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Sample records for cerevisiae diploid strain

  1. Direct mating between diploid sake strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Shinji; Aritomi, Kazuo; Minohara, Takafumi; Nishizawa, Yoshinori; Hoshida, Hisashi; Kashiwagi, Susumu; Akada, Rinji

    2006-02-01

    Various auxotrophic mutants of diploid heterothallic Japanese sake strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae were utilized for selecting mating-competent diploid isolates. The auxotrophic mutants were exposed to ultraviolet (UV) irradiation and crossed with laboratory haploid tester strains carrying complementary auxotrophic markers. Zygotes were then selected on minimal medium. Sake strains exhibiting a MATa or MATalpha mating type were easily obtained at high frequency without prior sporulation, suggesting that the UV irradiation induced homozygosity at the MAT locus. Flow cytometric analysis of a hybrid showed a twofold higher DNA content than the sake diploid parent, consistent with tetraploidy. By crossing strains of opposite mating type in all possible combinations, a number of hybrids were constructed. Hybrids formed in crosses between traditional sake strains and between a natural nonhaploid isolate and traditional sake strains displayed equivalent fermentation ability without any apparent defects and produced comparable or improved sake. Isolation of mating-competent auxotrophic mutants directly from industrial yeast strains allows crossbreeding to construct polyploids suitable for industrial use without dependence on sporulation.

  2. Homozygous diploid deletion strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae that determine lag phase and dehydration tolerance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    D'Elia, Riccardo; Allen, Patricia L.; Johanson, Kelly; Nickerson, Cheryl A.; Hammond, Timothy G.

    2005-01-01

    This study identifies genes that determine length of lag phase, using the model eukaryotic organism, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We report growth of a yeast deletion series following variations in the lag phase induced by variable storage times after drying-down yeast on filters. Using a homozygous diploid deletion pool, lag times ranging from 0 h to 90 h were associated with increased drop-out of mitochondrial genes and increased survival of nuclear genes. Simple linear regression (R2 analysis) shows that there are over 500 genes for which > 70% of the variation can be explained by lag alone. In the genes with a positive correlation, such that the gene abundance increases with lag and hence the deletion strain is suitable for survival during prolonged storage, there is a strong predominance of nucleonic genes. In the genes with a negative correlation, such that the gene abundance decreases with lag and hence the strain may be critical for getting yeast out of the lag phase, there is a strong predominance of glycoproteins and transmembrane proteins. This study identifies yeast deletion strains with survival advantage on prolonged storage and amplifies our understanding of the genes critical for getting out of the lag phase.

  3. Extracellular expression of glucose inhibition-resistant Cellulomonas flavigena PN-120 β-glucosidase by a diploid strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Mendoza-Aguayo, David J; Poggi-Varaldo, Héctor M; García-Mena, Jaime; Ramos-Valdivia, Ana C; Salgado, Luis M; de la Torre-Martínez, Mayra; Ponce-Noyola, Teresa

    2014-01-01

    The catalytic fraction of the Cellulomonas flavigena PN-120 oligomeric β-glucosidase (BGLA) was expressed both intra- and extracellularly in a recombinant diploid of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, under limited nutrient conditions. The recombinant enzyme (BGLA¹⁵) expressed in the supernatant of a rich medium showed 582 IU/L and 99.4 IU/g dry cell, with p-nitrophenyl-β-D-glucopyranoside as substrate. BGLA¹⁵ displayed activity against cello-oligosaccharides with 2-5 glucose monomers, demonstrating that the protein is not specific for cellobiose and that the oligomeric structure is not essential for β-D-1,4-bond hydrolysis. Native β-glucosidase is inhibited almost completely at 160 mM glucose, thus limiting cellobiose hydrolysis. At 200 mM glucose concentration, BGLA¹⁵ retained more than 50 % of its maximal activity, and even at 500 mM glucose concentration, more than 30 % of its activity was preserved. Due to these characteristics of BGLA¹⁵ activity, recombinant S. cerevisiae is able to utilize cellulosic materials (cello-oligosaccharides) to produce bioethanol.

  4. ``alternative Self-Diploidization'' or ``asd'' Homothallism in Saccharomyces Cerevisiae: Isolation of a Mutant, Nuclear-Cytoplasmic Interaction and Endomitotic Diploidization

    PubMed Central

    Ono, B. I.; Ishino-Arao, Y.; Takasugi, K.; Taniguchi, M.; Fukuda, M.; Fukui, M.; Miyakawa, I.; Sando, N.

    1990-01-01

    A mutant of Saccharomyces cerevisiae representing a novel life cycle, named ``alternative self-diploidization'' or ``ASD'' homothallism, was obtained fortuitously. In this life cycle, MATα (or MATa) haplophase and MATα/MATα (or MATa/MATa) diplophase alternate. Germinated cells are haploid and mating. They soon become nonmating and sporogenous as they vegetatively grow. They sooner or later diploidize presumably via endomitosis. The diploid cells haploidize via normal meiosis. A single recessive nuclear mutation, named asd1-1, is responsible for ``ASD'' homothallism. In the ρ(0) cytoplasm, asd1-1 cells mate even if at a low efficiency and fail to diploidize. Since pet mutations do not have such effects, we conclude that a certain mitochondrial function other than respiration is required for manifestation of ``ASD'' homothallism. That is, ``ASD'' homothallism is the result of some sort of nuclear-cytoplasmic interaction. PMID:2204579

  5. Mobilomics in Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Mobile Genetic Elements (MGEs) are selfish DNA integrated in the genomes. Their detection is mainly based on consensus–like searches by scanning the investigated genome against the sequence of an already identified MGE. Mobilomics aims at discovering all the MGEs in a genome and understanding their dynamic behavior: The data for this kind of investigation can be provided by comparative genomics of closely related organisms. The amount of data thus involved requires a strong computational effort, which should be alleviated. Results Our approach proposes to exploit the high similarity among homologous chromosomes of different strains of the same species, following a progressive comparative genomics philosophy. We introduce a software tool based on our new fast algorithm, called regender, which is able to identify the conserved regions between chromosomes. Our case study is represented by a unique recently available dataset of 39 different strains of S.cerevisiae, which regender is able to compare in few minutes. By exploring the non–conserved regions, where MGEs are mainly retrotransposons called Tys, and marking the candidate Tys based on their length, we are able to locate a priori and automatically all the already known Tys and map all the putative Tys in all the strains. The remaining putative mobile elements (PMEs) emerging from this intra–specific comparison are sharp markers of inter–specific evolution: indeed, many events of non–conservation among different yeast strains correspond to PMEs. A clustering based on the presence/absence of the candidate Tys in the strains suggests an evolutionary interconnection that is very similar to classic phylogenetic trees based on SNPs analysis, even though it is computed without using phylogenetic information. Conclusions The case study indicates that the proposed methodology brings two major advantages: (a) it does not require any template sequence for the wanted MGEs and (b) it can be applied to

  6. Genome structure of a Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain widely used in bioethanol production

    PubMed Central

    Argueso, Juan Lucas; Carazzolle, Marcelo F.; Mieczkowski, Piotr A.; Duarte, Fabiana M.; Netto, Osmar V.C.; Missawa, Silvia K.; Galzerani, Felipe; Costa, Gustavo G.L.; Vidal, Ramon O.; Noronha, Melline F.; Dominska, Margaret; Andrietta, Maria G.S.; Andrietta, Sílvio R.; Cunha, Anderson F.; Gomes, Luiz H.; Tavares, Flavio C.A.; Alcarde, André R.; Dietrich, Fred S.; McCusker, John H.; Petes, Thomas D.; Pereira, Gonçalo A.G.

    2009-01-01

    Bioethanol is a biofuel produced mainly from the fermentation of carbohydrates derived from agricultural feedstocks by the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. One of the most widely adopted strains is PE-2, a heterothallic diploid naturally adapted to the sugar cane fermentation process used in Brazil. Here we report the molecular genetic analysis of a PE-2 derived diploid (JAY270), and the complete genome sequence of a haploid derivative (JAY291). The JAY270 genome is highly heterozygous (∼2 SNPs/kb) and has several structural polymorphisms between homologous chromosomes. These chromosomal rearrangements are confined to the peripheral regions of the chromosomes, with breakpoints within repetitive DNA sequences. Despite its complex karyotype, this diploid, when sporulated, had a high frequency of viable spores. Hybrid diploids formed by outcrossing with the laboratory strain S288c also displayed good spore viability. Thus, the rearrangements that exist near the ends of chromosomes do not impair meiosis, as they do not span regions that contain essential genes. This observation is consistent with a model in which the peripheral regions of chromosomes represent plastic domains of the genome that are free to recombine ectopically and experiment with alternative structures. We also explored features of the JAY270 and JAY291 genomes that help explain their high adaptation to industrial environments, exhibiting desirable phenotypes such as high ethanol and cell mass production and high temperature and oxidative stress tolerance. The genomic manipulation of such strains could enable the creation of a new generation of industrial organisms, ideally suited for use as delivery vehicles for future bioenergy technologies. PMID:19812109

  7. Genome structure of a Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain widely used in bioethanol production.

    PubMed

    Argueso, Juan Lucas; Carazzolle, Marcelo F; Mieczkowski, Piotr A; Duarte, Fabiana M; Netto, Osmar V C; Missawa, Silvia K; Galzerani, Felipe; Costa, Gustavo G L; Vidal, Ramon O; Noronha, Melline F; Dominska, Margaret; Andrietta, Maria G S; Andrietta, Sílvio R; Cunha, Anderson F; Gomes, Luiz H; Tavares, Flavio C A; Alcarde, André R; Dietrich, Fred S; McCusker, John H; Petes, Thomas D; Pereira, Gonçalo A G

    2009-12-01

    Bioethanol is a biofuel produced mainly from the fermentation of carbohydrates derived from agricultural feedstocks by the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. One of the most widely adopted strains is PE-2, a heterothallic diploid naturally adapted to the sugar cane fermentation process used in Brazil. Here we report the molecular genetic analysis of a PE-2 derived diploid (JAY270), and the complete genome sequence of a haploid derivative (JAY291). The JAY270 genome is highly heterozygous (approximately 2 SNPs/kb) and has several structural polymorphisms between homologous chromosomes. These chromosomal rearrangements are confined to the peripheral regions of the chromosomes, with breakpoints within repetitive DNA sequences. Despite its complex karyotype, this diploid, when sporulated, had a high frequency of viable spores. Hybrid diploids formed by outcrossing with the laboratory strain S288c also displayed good spore viability. Thus, the rearrangements that exist near the ends of chromosomes do not impair meiosis, as they do not span regions that contain essential genes. This observation is consistent with a model in which the peripheral regions of chromosomes represent plastic domains of the genome that are free to recombine ectopically and experiment with alternative structures. We also explored features of the JAY270 and JAY291 genomes that help explain their high adaptation to industrial environments, exhibiting desirable phenotypes such as high ethanol and cell mass production and high temperature and oxidative stress tolerance. The genomic manipulation of such strains could enable the creation of a new generation of industrial organisms, ideally suited for use as delivery vehicles for future bioenergy technologies.

  8. Understanding the Mechanism of Thermotolerance Distinct From Heat Shock Response Through Proteomic Analysis of Industrial Strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae*

    PubMed Central

    Shui, Wenqing; Xiong, Yun; Xiao, Weidi; Qi, Xianni; Zhang, Yong; Lin, Yuping; Guo, Yufeng; Zhang, Zhidan; Wang, Qinhong; Ma, Yanhe

    2015-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been intensively studied in responses to different environmental stresses such as heat shock through global omic analysis. However, the S. cerevisiae industrial strains with superior thermotolerance have not been explored in any proteomic studies for elucidating the tolerance mechanism. Recently a new diploid strain was obtained through evolutionary engineering of a parental industrial strain, and it exhibited even higher resistance to prolonged thermal stress. Herein, we performed iTRAQ-based quantitative proteomic analysis on both the parental and evolved industrial strains to further understand the mechanism of thermotolerant adaptation. Out of ∼2600 quantifiable proteins from biological quadruplicates, 193 and 204 proteins were differentially regulated in the parental and evolved strains respectively during heat-stressed growth. The proteomic response of the industrial strains cultivated under prolonged thermal stress turned out to be substantially different from that of the laboratory strain exposed to sudden heat shock. Further analysis of transcription factors underlying the proteomic perturbation also indicated the distinct regulatory mechanism of thermotolerance. Finally, a cochaperone Mdj1 and a metabolic enzyme Adh1 were selected to investigate their roles in mediating heat-stressed growth and ethanol production of yeasts. Our proteomic characterization of the industrial strain led to comprehensive understanding of the molecular basis of thermotolerance, which would facilitate future improvement in the industrially important trait of S. cerevisiae by rational engineering. PMID:25926660

  9. The Transient Inactivation of the Master Cell Cycle Phosphatase Cdc14 Causes Genomic Instability in Diploid Cells of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Quevedo, Oliver; Ramos-Pérez, Cristina; Petes, Thomas D.; Machín, Félix

    2015-01-01

    Genomic instability is a common feature found in cancer cells . Accordingly, many tumor suppressor genes identified in familiar cancer syndromes are involved in the maintenance of the stability of the genome during every cell division and are commonly referred to as caretakers. Inactivating mutations and epigenetic silencing of caretakers are thought to be the most important mechanisms that explain cancer-related genome instability. However, little is known of whether transient inactivation of caretaker proteins could trigger genome instability and, if so, what types of instability would occur. In this work, we show that a brief and reversible inactivation, during just one cell cycle, of the key phosphatase Cdc14 in the model organism Saccharomyces cerevisiae is enough to result in diploid cells with multiple gross chromosomal rearrangements and changes in ploidy. Interestingly, we observed that such transient loss yields a characteristic fingerprint whereby trisomies are often found in small-sized chromosomes, and gross chromosome rearrangements, often associated with concomitant loss of heterozygosity, are detected mainly on the ribosomal DNA-bearing chromosome XII. Taking into account the key role of Cdc14 in preventing anaphase bridges, resetting replication origins, and controlling spindle dynamics in a well-defined window within anaphase, we speculate that the transient loss of Cdc14 activity causes cells to go through a single mitotic catastrophe with irreversible consequences for the genome stability of the progeny. PMID:25971663

  10. Characterization of a Torulaspora delbrueckii diploid strain with optimized performance in sweet and frozen sweet dough.

    PubMed

    Hernández-López, Maria José; Pallotti, Claudia; Andreu, Pasqual; Aguilera, Jaime; Prieto, José Antonio; Randez-Gil, Francisca

    2007-05-01

    Torulaspora delbrueckii is a baker's yeast that is highly tolerant to freeze-thaw stress, making it suitable for frozen dough technology. The T. delbrueckii strain PYCC5321, isolated from traditional bread dough, combines this tolerance with a high degree of ionic and osmotic stress resistance. However, the industrial use of this strain for frozen and sweet frozen baking is hampered by its small cell size, which causes clogging problems at the filtering stage. Here, we report the construction of a stable diploid strain of T. delbrueckii PYCC5321, which we named Td21-2n. The new strain was more than 2.7-fold bigger than their haploid counterpart, whereas biomass yield, stress resistance and sweet dough leavening ability were found to be similar in both strains. Moreover, the gassing power of the diploid after dough freezing also remained unaltered. Thus, Td21-2n meets the requirements necessary for industrial production and is suitable for application in frozen sweet baking products.

  11. Characterization of a Torulaspora delbrueckii diploid strain with optimized performance in sweet and frozen sweet dough.

    PubMed

    Hernández-López, Maria José; Pallotti, Claudia; Andreu, Pasqual; Aguilera, Jaime; Prieto, José Antonio; Randez-Gil, Francisca

    2007-05-01

    Torulaspora delbrueckii is a baker's yeast that is highly tolerant to freeze-thaw stress, making it suitable for frozen dough technology. The T. delbrueckii strain PYCC5321, isolated from traditional bread dough, combines this tolerance with a high degree of ionic and osmotic stress resistance. However, the industrial use of this strain for frozen and sweet frozen baking is hampered by its small cell size, which causes clogging problems at the filtering stage. Here, we report the construction of a stable diploid strain of T. delbrueckii PYCC5321, which we named Td21-2n. The new strain was more than 2.7-fold bigger than their haploid counterpart, whereas biomass yield, stress resistance and sweet dough leavening ability were found to be similar in both strains. Moreover, the gassing power of the diploid after dough freezing also remained unaltered. Thus, Td21-2n meets the requirements necessary for industrial production and is suitable for application in frozen sweet baking products. PMID:17316858

  12. Strain engineering of Saccharomyces cerevisiae for enhanced xylose metabolism.

    PubMed

    Kim, Soo Rin; Park, Yong-Cheol; Jin, Yong-Su; Seo, Jin-Ho

    2013-11-01

    Efficient and rapid fermentation of all sugars present in cellulosic hydrolysates is essential for economic conversion of renewable biomass into fuels and chemicals. Xylose is one of the most abundant sugars in cellulosic biomass but it cannot be utilized by wild type Saccharomyces cerevisiae, which has been used for industrial ethanol production. Therefore, numerous technologies for strain development have been employed to engineer S. cerevisiae capable of fermenting xylose rapidly and efficiently. These include i) optimization of xylose-assimilating pathways, ii) perturbation of gene targets for reconfiguring yeast metabolism, and iii) simultaneous co-fermentation of xylose and cellobiose. In addition, the genetic and physiological background of host strains is an important determinant to construct efficient and rapid xylose-fermenting S. cerevisiae. Vibrant and persistent researches in this field for the last two decades not only led to the development of engineered S. cerevisiae strains ready for industrial fermentation of cellulosic hydrolysates, but also deepened our understanding of operational principles underlying yeast metabolism. PMID:23524005

  13. In vitro screening of probiotic properties of Saccharomyces cerevisiae var. boulardii and food-borne Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains.

    PubMed

    van der Aa Kühle, Alis; Skovgaard, Kerstin; Jespersen, Lene

    2005-05-01

    The probiotic potential of 18 Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains used for production of foods or beverages or isolated from such, and eight strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae var. boulardii, was investigated. All strains included were able to withstand pH 2.5 and 0.3% Oxgall. Adhesion to the nontumorigenic porcine jejunal epithelial cell line (IPEC-J2) was investigated by incorporation of 3H-methionine into the yeast cells and use of liquid scintillation counting. Only few of the food-borne S. cerevisiae strains exhibited noteworthy adhesiveness with the strongest levels of adhesion (13.6-16.8%) recorded for two isolates from blue veined cheeses. Merely 25% of the S. cerevisiae var. boulardii strains displayed good adhesive properties (16.2-28.0%). The expression of the proinflammatory cytokine IL-1alpha decreased strikingly in IPEC-J2 cells exposed to a Shiga-like toxin 2e producing Escherichia coli strain when the cells were pre- and coincubated with S. cerevisiae var. boulardii even though this yeast strain was low adhesive (5.4%), suggesting that adhesion is not a mandatory prerequisite for such a probiotic effect. A strain of S. cerevisiae isolated from West African sorghum beer exerted similar effects hence indicating that food-borne strains of S. cerevisiae may possess probiotic properties in spite of low adhesiveness. PMID:15878404

  14. Mead production: selection and characterization assays of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Ana Paula; Dias, Teresa; Andrade, João; Ramalhosa, Elsa; Estevinho, Letícia M

    2009-08-01

    Mead is a traditional drink, which results from the alcoholic fermentation of diluted honey carried out by yeasts. However, when it is produced in a homemade way, mead producers find several problems, namely, the lack of uniformity in the final product, delayed and arrested fermentations, and the production of "off-flavours" by the yeasts. These problems are usually associated with the inability of yeast strains to respond and adapt to unfavourable and stressful growth conditions. The main objectives of this work were to evaluate the capacity of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains, isolated from honey of the Trás-os-Montes (Northeast Portugal), to produce mead. Five strains from honey, as well as one laboratory strain and one commercial wine strain, were evaluated in terms of their fermentation performance under ethanol, sulphur dioxide and osmotic stress. All the strains showed similar behaviour in these conditions. Two yeasts strains isolated from honey and the commercial wine strain were further tested for mead production, using two different honey (a dark and a light honey), enriched with two supplements (one commercial and one developed by the research team), as fermentation media. The results obtained in this work show that S. cerevisiae strains isolated from honey, are appropriate for mead production. However it is of extreme importance to take into account the characteristics of the honey, and supplements used in the fermentation medium formulation, in order to achieve the best results in mead production.

  15. Whole-genome sequencing of the efficient industrial fuel-ethanol fermentative Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain CAT-1.

    PubMed

    Babrzadeh, Farbod; Jalili, Roxana; Wang, Chunlin; Shokralla, Shadi; Pierce, Sarah; Robinson-Mosher, Avi; Nyren, Pål; Shafer, Robert W; Basso, Luiz C; de Amorim, Henrique V; de Oliveira, Antonio J; Davis, Ronald W; Ronaghi, Mostafa; Gharizadeh, Baback; Stambuk, Boris U

    2012-06-01

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains widely used for industrial fuel-ethanol production have been developed by selection, but their underlying beneficial genetic polymorphisms remain unknown. Here, we report the draft whole-genome sequence of the S. cerevisiae strain CAT-1, which is a dominant fuel-ethanol fermentative strain from the sugarcane industry in Brazil. Our results indicate that strain CAT-1 is a highly heterozygous diploid yeast strain, and the ~12-Mb genome of CAT-1, when compared with the reference S228c genome, contains ~36,000 homozygous and ~30,000 heterozygous single nucleotide polymorphisms, exhibiting an uneven distribution among chromosomes due to large genomic regions of loss of heterozygosity (LOH). In total, 58 % of the 6,652 predicted protein-coding genes of the CAT-1 genome constitute different alleles when compared with the genes present in the reference S288c genome. The CAT-1 genome contains a reduced number of transposable elements, as well as several gene deletions and duplications, especially at telomeric regions, some correlated with several of the physiological characteristics of this industrial fuel-ethanol strain. Phylogenetic analyses revealed that some genes were likely associated with traits important for bioethanol production. Identifying and characterizing the allelic variations controlling traits relevant to industrial fermentation should provide the basis for a forward genetics approach for developing better fermenting yeast strains.

  16. Whole-genome sequencing of the efficient industrial fuel-ethanol fermentative Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain CAT-1.

    PubMed

    Babrzadeh, Farbod; Jalili, Roxana; Wang, Chunlin; Shokralla, Shadi; Pierce, Sarah; Robinson-Mosher, Avi; Nyren, Pål; Shafer, Robert W; Basso, Luiz C; de Amorim, Henrique V; de Oliveira, Antonio J; Davis, Ronald W; Ronaghi, Mostafa; Gharizadeh, Baback; Stambuk, Boris U

    2012-06-01

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains widely used for industrial fuel-ethanol production have been developed by selection, but their underlying beneficial genetic polymorphisms remain unknown. Here, we report the draft whole-genome sequence of the S. cerevisiae strain CAT-1, which is a dominant fuel-ethanol fermentative strain from the sugarcane industry in Brazil. Our results indicate that strain CAT-1 is a highly heterozygous diploid yeast strain, and the ~12-Mb genome of CAT-1, when compared with the reference S228c genome, contains ~36,000 homozygous and ~30,000 heterozygous single nucleotide polymorphisms, exhibiting an uneven distribution among chromosomes due to large genomic regions of loss of heterozygosity (LOH). In total, 58 % of the 6,652 predicted protein-coding genes of the CAT-1 genome constitute different alleles when compared with the genes present in the reference S288c genome. The CAT-1 genome contains a reduced number of transposable elements, as well as several gene deletions and duplications, especially at telomeric regions, some correlated with several of the physiological characteristics of this industrial fuel-ethanol strain. Phylogenetic analyses revealed that some genes were likely associated with traits important for bioethanol production. Identifying and characterizing the allelic variations controlling traits relevant to industrial fermentation should provide the basis for a forward genetics approach for developing better fermenting yeast strains. PMID:22562254

  17. Diversity of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains isolated from Borassus akeassii palm wines from Burkina Faso in comparison to other African beverages.

    PubMed

    Tapsoba, François; Legras, Jean-Luc; Savadogo, Aly; Dequin, Sylvie; Traore, Alfred Sababenedyo

    2015-10-15

    In South-West of Burkina Faso, palm wine is produced by spontaneous fermentation of the sap from a specific palm tree Borassus akeassii and plays an important role in people's lives. Saccharomyces cerevisiae is the main agent of this alcoholic fermentation but little is known about the diversity of the isolates from palm. In this work, 39 Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains were isolated from palm wine samples collected from 14 sites in Burkina Faso, as well as 7 isolates obtained from sorghum beer (Dolo) from 3 distant sites. Their diversity was analyzed at 12 microsatellite loci, and compared to the genotypes obtained for other African yeast populations isolated from Cocoa hulks from Ghana, sorghum beer from Ivory Coast, palm wine from Djibouti Republic, and to our database of strains from miscellaneous origins (bread, beer, wine, sake, oaks…). The ploidy of these strains has been assessed as well by flow cytometry. Our results show that B. akeassii palm wine contains a specific yeast population of diploid strains, different from Dolo produced in the same area and from other palm wine strains from Ivory Coast, Nigeria, or Djibouti Republic. In contrast, Dolo strains appeared as a group of related and mainly tetraploid strains despite being isolated from different countries. PMID:26202324

  18. Diversity of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains isolated from Borassus akeassii palm wines from Burkina Faso in comparison to other African beverages.

    PubMed

    Tapsoba, François; Legras, Jean-Luc; Savadogo, Aly; Dequin, Sylvie; Traore, Alfred Sababenedyo

    2015-10-15

    In South-West of Burkina Faso, palm wine is produced by spontaneous fermentation of the sap from a specific palm tree Borassus akeassii and plays an important role in people's lives. Saccharomyces cerevisiae is the main agent of this alcoholic fermentation but little is known about the diversity of the isolates from palm. In this work, 39 Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains were isolated from palm wine samples collected from 14 sites in Burkina Faso, as well as 7 isolates obtained from sorghum beer (Dolo) from 3 distant sites. Their diversity was analyzed at 12 microsatellite loci, and compared to the genotypes obtained for other African yeast populations isolated from Cocoa hulks from Ghana, sorghum beer from Ivory Coast, palm wine from Djibouti Republic, and to our database of strains from miscellaneous origins (bread, beer, wine, sake, oaks…). The ploidy of these strains has been assessed as well by flow cytometry. Our results show that B. akeassii palm wine contains a specific yeast population of diploid strains, different from Dolo produced in the same area and from other palm wine strains from Ivory Coast, Nigeria, or Djibouti Republic. In contrast, Dolo strains appeared as a group of related and mainly tetraploid strains despite being isolated from different countries.

  19. Exploring the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Volatile Metabolome: Indigenous versus Commercial Strains

    PubMed Central

    Alves, Zélia; Melo, André; Figueiredo, Ana Raquel; Coimbra, Manuel A.; Gomes, Ana C.; Rocha, Sílvia M.

    2015-01-01

    Winemaking is a highly industrialized process and a number of commercial Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains are used around the world, neglecting the diversity of native yeast strains that are responsible for the production of wines peculiar flavours. The aim of this study was to in-depth establish the S. cerevisiae volatile metabolome and to assess inter-strains variability. To fulfill this objective, two indigenous strains (BT2652 and BT2453 isolated from spontaneous fermentation of grapes collected in Bairrada Appellation, Portugal) and two commercial strains (CSc1 and CSc2) S. cerevisiae were analysed using a methodology based on advanced multidimensional gas chromatography (HS-SPME/GC×GC-ToFMS) tandem with multivariate analysis. A total of 257 volatile metabolites were identified, distributed over the chemical families of acetals, acids, alcohols, aldehydes, ketones, terpenic compounds, esters, ethers, furan-type compounds, hydrocarbons, pyrans, pyrazines and S-compounds. Some of these families are related with metabolic pathways of amino acid, carbohydrate and fatty acid metabolism as well as mono and sesquiterpenic biosynthesis. Principal Component Analysis (PCA) was used with a dataset comprising all variables (257 volatile components), and a distinction was observed between commercial and indigenous strains, which suggests inter-strains variability. In a second step, a subset containing esters and terpenic compounds (C10 and C15), metabolites of particular relevance to wine aroma, was also analysed using PCA. The terpenic and ester profiles express the strains variability and their potential contribution to the wine aromas, specially the BT2453, which produced the higher terpenic content. This research contributes to understand the metabolic diversity of indigenous wine microflora versus commercial strains and achieved knowledge that may be further exploited to produce wines with peculiar aroma properties. PMID:26600152

  20. Isolation of an osmotolerant ale strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Pironcheva, G

    1998-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae (ale strain) grown in batch culture to stationary phase was tested for its tolerance to heat (50 degrees C for 5 min), hydrogen peroxide (0.3 M) and salt (growth in 1.5 M sodium chloride/YPD medium). Yeast cells which have been exposed previously to heat shock are more tolerant to hydrogen peroxide and high salt concentrations (1.5 M NaCl) than the controls. Their fermentative activity as judged by glucose consumption and their viability, as judged by cell number and density have higher levels when compared with cells not previously exposed to heat shock. Experimental conditions facilitated the isolation of S. cerevisiae ale strain, which was tolerant to heat, and other agents such as hydrogen peroxide and sodium chloride.

  1. Ciclohexadespipeptide beauvericin degradation by different strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Meca, G; Zhou, T; Li, X Z; Ritieni, A; Mañes, J

    2013-09-01

    The interaction between the mycotoxin beauvericin (BEA) and 9 yeast strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae named LO9, YE-2, YE5, YE-6, YE-4, A34, A17, A42 and A08 was studied. The biological degradations were carried out under aerobic conditions in the liquid medium of Potato Dextrose Broth (PDB) at 25°C for 48 h and in a food/feed system composed of corn flour at 37°C for 3 days, respectively. BEA present in fermented medium and corn flour was determined using liquid chromatography coupled to the mass spectrometry detector in tandem (LC-MS/MS) and the BEA degradation products produced during the fermentations were determined using the technique of the liquid chromatography coupled to a linear ion trap (LIT). Results showed that the S. cerevisiae strains reduced meanly the concentration of the BEA present in PDB by 86.2% and in a food system by 71.1%. All the S. cerevisiae strains used in this study showed a significant BEA reduction during the fermentation process employed.

  2. Heterologous expression of cellulase genes in natural Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains.

    PubMed

    Davison, Steffi A; den Haan, Riaan; van Zyl, Willem Heber

    2016-09-01

    Enzyme cost is a major impediment to second-generation (2G) cellulosic ethanol production. One strategy to reduce enzyme cost is to engineer enzyme production capacity in a fermentative microorganism to enable consolidated bio-processing (CBP). Ideally, a strain with a high secretory phenotype, high fermentative capacity as well as an innate robustness to bioethanol-specific stressors, including tolerance to products formed during pre-treatment and fermentation of lignocellulosic substrates should be used. Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a robust fermentative yeast but has limitations as a potential CBP host, such as low heterologous protein secretion titers. In this study, we evaluated natural S. cerevisiae isolate strains for superior secretion activity and other industrially relevant characteristics needed during the process of lignocellulosic ethanol production. Individual cellulases namely Saccharomycopsis fibuligera Cel3A (β-glucosidase), Talaromyces emersonii Cel7A (cellobiohydrolase), and Trichoderma reesei Cel5A (endoglucanase) were utilized as reporter proteins. Natural strain YI13 was identified to have a high secretory phenotype, demonstrating a 3.7- and 3.5-fold higher Cel7A and Cel5A activity, respectively, compared to the reference strain S288c. YI13 also demonstrated other industrially relevant characteristics such as growth vigor, high ethanol titer, multi-tolerance to high temperatures (37 and 40 °C), ethanol (10 % w/v), and towards various concentrations of a cocktail of inhibitory compounds commonly found in lignocellulose hydrolysates. This study accentuates the value of natural S. cerevisiae isolate strains to serve as potential robust and highly productive chassis organisms for CBP strain development. PMID:27470141

  3. Anaerobic glycerol production by Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains under hyperosmotic stress.

    PubMed

    Modig, Tobias; Granath, Katarina; Adler, Lennart; Lidén, Gunnar

    2007-05-01

    Glycerol formation is vital for reoxidation of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (reduced form; NADH) under anaerobic conditions and for the hyperosmotic stress response in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. However, relatively few studies have been made on hyperosmotic stress under anaerobic conditions. To study the combined effect of salt stress and anaerobic conditions, industrial and laboratory strains of S. cerevisiae were grown anaerobically on glucose in batch-cultures containing 40 g/l NaCl. The time needed for complete glucose conversion increased considerably, and the specific growth rates decreased by 80-90% when the cells were subjected to the hyperosmotic conditions. This was accompanied by an increased yield of glycerol and other by-products and reduced biomass yield in all strains. The slowest fermenting strain doubled its glycerol yield (from 0.072 to 0.148 g/g glucose) and a nearly fivefold increase in acetate formation was seen. In more tolerant strains, a lower increase was seen in the glycerol and in the acetate, succinate and pyruvate yields. Additionally, the NADH-producing pathway from acetaldehyde to acetate was analysed by overexpressing the stress-induced gene ALD3. However, this had no or very marginal effect on the acetate and glycerol yields. In the control experiments, the production of NADH from known sources well matched the glycerol formation. This was not the case for the salt stress experiments in which the production of NADH from known sources was insufficient to explain the formed glycerol.

  4. A Genomic Screen Revealing the Importance of Vesicular Trafficking Pathways in Genome Maintenance and Protection against Genotoxic Stress in Diploid Saccharomyces cerevisiae Cells

    PubMed Central

    Krol, Kamil; Brozda, Izabela; Skoneczny, Marek; Bretne, Maria; Skoneczna, Adrianna

    2015-01-01

    The ability to survive stressful conditions is important for every living cell. Certain stresses not only affect the current well-being of cells but may also have far-reaching consequences. Uncurbed oxidative stress can cause DNA damage and decrease cell survival and/or increase mutation rates, and certain substances that generate oxidative damage in the cell mainly act on DNA. Radiomimetic zeocin causes oxidative damage in DNA, predominantly by inducing single- or double-strand breaks. Such lesions can lead to chromosomal rearrangements, especially in diploid cells, in which the two sets of chromosomes facilitate excessive and deleterious recombination. In a global screen for zeocin-oversensitive mutants, we selected 133 genes whose deletion reduces the survival of zeocin-treated diploid Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells. The screen revealed numerous genes associated with stress responses, DNA repair genes, cell cycle progression genes, and chromatin remodeling genes. Notably, the screen also demonstrated the involvement of the vesicular trafficking system in cellular protection against DNA damage. The analyses indicated the importance of vesicular system integrity in various pathways of cellular protection from zeocin-dependent damage, including detoxification and a direct or transitional role in genome maintenance processes that remains unclear. The data showed that deleting genes involved in vesicular trafficking may lead to Rad52 focus accumulation and changes in total DNA content or even cell ploidy alterations, and such deletions may preclude proper DNA repair after zeocin treatment. We postulate that functional vesicular transport is crucial for sustaining an integral genome. We believe that the identification of numerous new genes implicated in genome restoration after genotoxic oxidative stress combined with the detected link between vesicular trafficking and genome integrity will reveal novel molecular processes involved in genome stability in diploid cells

  5. Development of flocculent Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain GYK-10 for the selective fermentation of glucose/fructose in sugar mills.

    PubMed

    Kato, Taku; Ohara, Satoshi; Fukushima, Yasuhiro; Sugimoto, Akira; Masuda, Takayuki; Yasuhara, Takaomi; Yamagishi, Hiromi

    2016-07-01

    Advances in glucose/fructose-selective ethanol production have successfully enhanced raw sugar extraction from sugarcane juice by converting inhibitory substances (i.e., glucose/fructose) into ethanol, which is removed by subsequent operations in cane sugar mills. However, the commercial implementation of this breakthrough process in existing cane sugar mills requires a yeast strain that (i) can be used in food production processes, (ii) exhibits stable saccharometabolic selectivity, and (iii) can be easily separated from the saccharide solution. In this study, we developed a suitable saccharometabolism-selective and flocculent strain, Saccharomyces cerevisiae GYK-10. We obtained a suitable yeast strain for selective fermentation in cane sugar mills using a yeast mating system. First, we crossed a haploid strain defective in sucrose utilization with a flocculent haploid strain. Next, we performed tetrad dissection of the resultant hybrid diploid strain and selected GYK-10 from various segregants by investigating the sucrose assimilation and flocculation capacity phenotypes. Ten consecutive fermentation tests of the GYK-10 strain using a bench-scale fermentor confirmed its suitability for the implementation of practical selective fermentation in a commercial sugar mill. The strain exhibited complete saccharometabolic selectivity and sustained flocculation, where it maintained a high ethanol yield and conversion rate throughout the test.

  6. Development of flocculent Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain GYK-10 for the selective fermentation of glucose/fructose in sugar mills.

    PubMed

    Kato, Taku; Ohara, Satoshi; Fukushima, Yasuhiro; Sugimoto, Akira; Masuda, Takayuki; Yasuhara, Takaomi; Yamagishi, Hiromi

    2016-07-01

    Advances in glucose/fructose-selective ethanol production have successfully enhanced raw sugar extraction from sugarcane juice by converting inhibitory substances (i.e., glucose/fructose) into ethanol, which is removed by subsequent operations in cane sugar mills. However, the commercial implementation of this breakthrough process in existing cane sugar mills requires a yeast strain that (i) can be used in food production processes, (ii) exhibits stable saccharometabolic selectivity, and (iii) can be easily separated from the saccharide solution. In this study, we developed a suitable saccharometabolism-selective and flocculent strain, Saccharomyces cerevisiae GYK-10. We obtained a suitable yeast strain for selective fermentation in cane sugar mills using a yeast mating system. First, we crossed a haploid strain defective in sucrose utilization with a flocculent haploid strain. Next, we performed tetrad dissection of the resultant hybrid diploid strain and selected GYK-10 from various segregants by investigating the sucrose assimilation and flocculation capacity phenotypes. Ten consecutive fermentation tests of the GYK-10 strain using a bench-scale fermentor confirmed its suitability for the implementation of practical selective fermentation in a commercial sugar mill. The strain exhibited complete saccharometabolic selectivity and sustained flocculation, where it maintained a high ethanol yield and conversion rate throughout the test. PMID:26811219

  7. Draft Genome Sequence of the Beer Spoilage Bacterium Megasphaera cerevisiae Strain PAT 1T

    PubMed Central

    Kutumbaka, Kirthi K.; Pasmowitz, Joshua; Mategko, James; Reyes, Dindo; Friedrich, Alex; Han, Sukkyun; Martens-Habbena, Willm; Neal-McKinney, Jason; Janagama, Harish K.; Nadala, Cesar

    2015-01-01

    The genus Megasphaera harbors important spoilage organisms that cause beer spoilage by producing off flavors, undesirable aroma, and turbidity. Megasphaera cerevisiae is mainly found in nonpasteurized low-alcohol beer. In this study, we report the draft genome of the type strain of the genus, M. cerevisiae strain PAT 1T. PMID:26358606

  8. Draft Genome Sequence of the Beer Spoilage Bacterium Megasphaera cerevisiae Strain PAT 1T.

    PubMed

    Kutumbaka, Kirthi K; Pasmowitz, Joshua; Mategko, James; Reyes, Dindo; Friedrich, Alex; Han, Sukkyun; Martens-Habbena, Willm; Neal-McKinney, Jason; Janagama, Harish K; Nadala, Cesar; Samadpour, Mansour

    2015-01-01

    The genus Megasphaera harbors important spoilage organisms that cause beer spoilage by producing off flavors, undesirable aroma, and turbidity. Megasphaera cerevisiae is mainly found in nonpasteurized low-alcohol beer. In this study, we report the draft genome of the type strain of the genus, M. cerevisiae strain PAT 1(T). PMID:26358606

  9. [Invertase Overproduction May Provide for Inulin Fermentation by Selection Strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae].

    PubMed

    Naumov, G I; Naumova, E S

    2015-01-01

    In some recent publications, the ability of selection strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to ferment inulin was attributed to inulinase activity. The review summarizes the literature data indicating that overproduction of invertase, an enzyme common to S. cerevisiae, may be responsible for this phenomenon. PMID:26263621

  10. Stress Tolerance Variations in Saccharomyces cerevisiae Strains from Diverse Ecological Sources and Geographical Locations.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yan-Lin; Wang, Shi-An

    2015-01-01

    The budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a platform organism for bioethanol production from various feedstocks and robust strains are desirable for efficient fermentation because yeast cells inevitably encounter stressors during the process. Recently, diverse S. cerevisiae lineages were identified, which provided novel resources for understanding stress tolerance variations and related shaping factors in the yeast. This study characterized the tolerance of diverse S. cerevisiae strains to the stressors of high ethanol concentrations, temperature shocks, and osmotic stress. The results showed that the isolates from human-associated environments overall presented a higher level of stress tolerance compared with those from forests spared anthropogenic influences. Statistical analyses indicated that the variations of stress tolerance were significantly correlated with both ecological sources and geographical locations of the strains. This study provides guidelines for selection of robust S. cerevisiae strains for bioethanol production from nature. PMID:26244846

  11. Stress Tolerance Variations in Saccharomyces cerevisiae Strains from Diverse Ecological Sources and Geographical Locations

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Yan-Lin; Wang, Shi-An

    2015-01-01

    The budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a platform organism for bioethanol production from various feedstocks and robust strains are desirable for efficient fermentation because yeast cells inevitably encounter stressors during the process. Recently, diverse S. cerevisiae lineages were identified, which provided novel resources for understanding stress tolerance variations and related shaping factors in the yeast. This study characterized the tolerance of diverse S. cerevisiae strains to the stressors of high ethanol concentrations, temperature shocks, and osmotic stress. The results showed that the isolates from human-associated environments overall presented a higher level of stress tolerance compared with those from forests spared anthropogenic influences. Statistical analyses indicated that the variations of stress tolerance were significantly correlated with both ecological sources and geographical locations of the strains. This study provides guidelines for selection of robust S. cerevisiae strains for bioethanol production from nature. PMID:26244846

  12. Divergence in wine characteristics produced by wild and domesticated strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Hyma, Katie E; Saerens, Sofie M; Verstrepen, Kevin J; Fay, Justin C

    2011-01-01

    The budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is the primary species used by wine makers to convert sugar into alcohol during wine fermentation. Saccharomyces cerevisiae is found in vineyards, but is also found in association with oak trees and other natural sources. Although wild strains of S. cerevisiae as well as other Saccharomyces species are also capable of wine fermentation, a genetically distinct group of S. cerevisiae strains is primarily used to produce wine, consistent with the idea that wine making strains have been domesticated for wine production. In this study, we demonstrate that humans can distinguish between wines produced using wine strains and wild strains of S. cerevisiae as well as its sibling species, Saccharomyces paradoxus. Wine strains produced wine with fruity and floral characteristics, whereas wild strains produced wine with earthy and sulfurous characteristics. The differences that we observe between wine and wild strains provides further evidence that wine strains have evolved phenotypes that are distinct from their wild ancestors and relevant to their use in wine production. PMID:22093681

  13. A coniferyl aldehyde dehydrogenase gene from Pseudomonas sp. strain HR199 enhances the conversion of coniferyl aldehyde by Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Adeboye, Peter Temitope; Olsson, Lisbeth; Bettiga, Maurizio

    2016-07-01

    The conversion of coniferyl aldehyde to cinnamic acids by Saccharomyces cerevisiae under aerobic growth conditions was previously observed. Bacteria such as Pseudomonas have been shown to harbor specialized enzymes for converting coniferyl aldehyde but no comparable enzymes have been identified in S. cerevisiae. CALDH from Pseudomonas was expressed in S. cerevisiae. An acetaldehyde dehydrogenase (Ald5) was also hypothesized to be actively involved in the conversion of coniferyl aldehyde under aerobic growth conditions in S. cerevisiae. In a second S. cerevisiae strain, the acetaldehyde dehydrogenase (ALD5) was deleted. A prototrophic control strain was also engineered. The engineered S. cerevisiae strains were cultivated in the presence of 1.1mM coniferyl aldehyde under aerobic condition in bioreactors. The results confirmed that expression of CALDH increased endogenous conversion of coniferyl aldehyde in S. cerevisiae and ALD5 is actively involved with the conversion of coniferyl aldehyde in S. cerevisiae. PMID:27070284

  14. Diversity of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Strains Isolated from Two Italian Wine-Producing Regions.

    PubMed

    Capece, Angela; Granchi, Lisa; Guerrini, Simona; Mangani, Silvia; Romaniello, Rossana; Vincenzini, Massimo; Romano, Patrizia

    2016-01-01

    Numerous studies, based on different molecular techniques analyzing DNA polymorphism, have provided evidence that indigenous Saccharomyces cerevisiae populations display biogeographic patterns. Since the differentiated populations of S. cerevisiae seem to be responsible for the regional identity of wine, the aim of this work was to assess a possible relationship between the diversity and the geographical origin of indigenous S. cerevisiae isolates from two different Italian wine-producing regions (Tuscany and Basilicata). For this purpose, sixty-three isolates from Aglianico del Vulture grape must (main cultivar in the Basilicata region) and from Sangiovese grape must (main cultivar in the Tuscany region) were characterized genotypically, by mitochondrial DNA restriction analysis and MSP-PCR by using (GTG)5 primers, and phenotypically, by determining technological properties and metabolic compounds of oenological interest after alcoholic fermentation. All the S. cerevisiae isolates from each region were inoculated both in must obtained from Aglianico grape and in must obtained from Sangiovese grape to carry out fermentations at laboratory-scale. Numerical analysis of DNA patterns resulting from both molecular methods and principal component analysis of phenotypic data demonstrated a high diversity among the S. cerevisiae strains. Moreover, a correlation between genotypic and phenotypic groups and geographical origin of the strains was found, supporting the concept that there can be a microbial aspect to terroir. Therefore, exploring the diversity of indigenous S. cerevisiae strains can allow developing tailored strategies to select wine yeast strains better adapted to each viticultural area. PMID:27446054

  15. Diversity of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Strains Isolated from Two Italian Wine-Producing Regions

    PubMed Central

    Capece, Angela; Granchi, Lisa; Guerrini, Simona; Mangani, Silvia; Romaniello, Rossana; Vincenzini, Massimo; Romano, Patrizia

    2016-01-01

    Numerous studies, based on different molecular techniques analyzing DNA polymorphism, have provided evidence that indigenous Saccharomyces cerevisiae populations display biogeographic patterns. Since the differentiated populations of S. cerevisiae seem to be responsible for the regional identity of wine, the aim of this work was to assess a possible relationship between the diversity and the geographical origin of indigenous S. cerevisiae isolates from two different Italian wine-producing regions (Tuscany and Basilicata). For this purpose, sixty-three isolates from Aglianico del Vulture grape must (main cultivar in the Basilicata region) and from Sangiovese grape must (main cultivar in the Tuscany region) were characterized genotypically, by mitochondrial DNA restriction analysis and MSP-PCR by using (GTG)5 primers, and phenotypically, by determining technological properties and metabolic compounds of oenological interest after alcoholic fermentation. All the S. cerevisiae isolates from each region were inoculated both in must obtained from Aglianico grape and in must obtained from Sangiovese grape to carry out fermentations at laboratory-scale. Numerical analysis of DNA patterns resulting from both molecular methods and principal component analysis of phenotypic data demonstrated a high diversity among the S. cerevisiae strains. Moreover, a correlation between genotypic and phenotypic groups and geographical origin of the strains was found, supporting the concept that there can be a microbial aspect to terroir. Therefore, exploring the diversity of indigenous S. cerevisiae strains can allow developing tailored strategies to select wine yeast strains better adapted to each viticultural area. PMID:27446054

  16. Screening of Non- Saccharomyces cerevisiae Strains for Tolerance to Formic Acid in Bioethanol Fermentation.

    PubMed

    Oshoma, Cyprian E; Greetham, Darren; Louis, Edward J; Smart, Katherine A; Phister, Trevor G; Powell, Chris; Du, Chenyu

    2015-01-01

    Formic acid is one of the major inhibitory compounds present in hydrolysates derived from lignocellulosic materials, the presence of which can significantly hamper the efficiency of converting available sugars into bioethanol. This study investigated the potential for screening formic acid tolerance in non-Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast strains, which could be used for the development of advanced generation bioethanol processes. Spot plate and phenotypic microarray methods were used to screen the formic acid tolerance of 7 non-Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeasts. S. kudriavzeii IFO1802 and S. arboricolus 2.3319 displayed a higher formic acid tolerance when compared to other strains in the study. Strain S. arboricolus 2.3319 was selected for further investigation due to its genetic variability among the Saccharomyces species as related to Saccharomyces cerevisiae and availability of two sibling strains: S. arboricolus 2.3317 and 2.3318 in the lab. The tolerance of S. arboricolus strains (2.3317, 2.3318 and 2.3319) to formic acid was further investigated by lab-scale fermentation analysis, and compared with S. cerevisiae NCYC2592. S. arboricolus 2.3319 demonstrated improved formic acid tolerance and a similar bioethanol synthesis capacity to S. cerevisiae NCYC2592, while S. arboricolus 2.3317 and 2.3318 exhibited an overall inferior performance. Metabolite analysis indicated that S. arboricolus strain 2.3319 accumulated comparatively high concentrations of glycerol and glycogen, which may have contributed to its ability to tolerate high levels of formic acid.

  17. Screening of Non- Saccharomyces cerevisiae Strains for Tolerance to Formic Acid in Bioethanol Fermentation

    PubMed Central

    Oshoma, Cyprian E.; Greetham, Darren; Louis, Edward J.; Smart, Katherine A.; Phister, Trevor G.; Powell, Chris; Du, Chenyu

    2015-01-01

    Formic acid is one of the major inhibitory compounds present in hydrolysates derived from lignocellulosic materials, the presence of which can significantly hamper the efficiency of converting available sugars into bioethanol. This study investigated the potential for screening formic acid tolerance in non-Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast strains, which could be used for the development of advanced generation bioethanol processes. Spot plate and phenotypic microarray methods were used to screen the formic acid tolerance of 7 non-Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeasts. S. kudriavzeii IFO1802 and S. arboricolus 2.3319 displayed a higher formic acid tolerance when compared to other strains in the study. Strain S. arboricolus 2.3319 was selected for further investigation due to its genetic variability among the Saccharomyces species as related to Saccharomyces cerevisiae and availability of two sibling strains: S. arboricolus 2.3317 and 2.3318 in the lab. The tolerance of S. arboricolus strains (2.3317, 2.3318 and 2.3319) to formic acid was further investigated by lab-scale fermentation analysis, and compared with S. cerevisiae NCYC2592. S. arboricolus 2.3319 demonstrated improved formic acid tolerance and a similar bioethanol synthesis capacity to S. cerevisiae NCYC2592, while S. arboricolus 2.3317 and 2.3318 exhibited an overall inferior performance. Metabolite analysis indicated that S. arboricolus strain 2.3319 accumulated comparatively high concentrations of glycerol and glycogen, which may have contributed to its ability to tolerate high levels of formic acid. PMID:26284784

  18. New amylolytic yeast strains for starch and dextrin fermentation. [Schwanniomyces alluvius, Saccharomyces cerevisiae var. diastaticus

    SciTech Connect

    Laluce, C.; Bertolini, M.C.; Ernandes, J.R. ); Martini, A.V.; Martini, A. )

    1988-10-01

    Yeast strains capable of fermenting starch and dextrin to ethanol were isolated from samples collected from Brazilian factories in which cassava flour is produced. Considerable alcohol production was observed for all the strains selected. One strain (DI-10) fermented starch rapidly and secreted 5 times as much amylolytic enzyme than that observed for Schwanniomyces alluvius UCD 54-83. This strain and three other similar isolates were classified as Saccharomyces cerevisiae var. diastaticus by morphological and physiological characteristics and molecular taxonomy.

  19. Regulators of pseudohyphal differentiation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae identified through multicopy suppressor analysis in ammonium permease mutant strains.

    PubMed Central

    Lorenz, M C; Heitman, J

    1998-01-01

    Nitrogen-starved diploid cells of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae differentiate into a filamentous, pseudohyphal growth form. Recognition of nitrogen starvation is mediated, at least in part, by the ammonium permease Mep2p and the Galpha subunit Gpa2p. Genetic activation of the pheromone-responsive MAP kinase cascade, which is also required for filamentous growth, only weakly suppresses the filamentation defect of Deltamep2/Deltamep2 and Deltagpa2/Deltagpa2 strain. Surprisingly, deletion of Mep1p, an ammonium permease not previously thought to regulate differentiation, significantly enhances the potency of MAP kinase activation, such that the STE11-4 allele induces filamentation to near wild-type levels in Deltamep1/Deltamep1 Deltamep2/Deltamep2 and Deltamep1/Deltamep1 Deltagpa2/Deltagpa2 strains. To identify additional regulatory components, we isolated high-copy suppressors of the filamentation defect of the Deltamep1/Deltamep1 Deltamep2/Deltamep2 mutant. Multicopy expression of TEC1, PHD1, PHD2 (MSS10/MSN1/FUP4), MSN5, CDC6, MSS11, MGA1, SKN7, DOT6, HMS1, HMS2, or MEP2 each restored filamentation in a Deltamep1/Deltamep1 Deltamep2/Deltamep2 strain. Overexpression of SRK1 (SSD1), URE2, DAL80, MEP1, or MEP3 suppressed only the growth defect of the Deltamep1/Deltamep1 Deltamep2/Deltamep2 mutant strain. Characterization of these genes through deletion analysis and epistasis underscores the complexity of this developmental pathway and suggests that stress conditions other than nitrogen deprivation may also promote filamentous growth. PMID:9832522

  20. Opportunistic Strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae: A Potential Risk Sold in Food Products

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Torrado, Roberto; Querol, Amparo

    2016-01-01

    In recent decades, fungal infections have emerged as an important health problem associated with more people who present deficiencies in the immune system, such as HIV or transplanted patients. Saccharomyces cerevisiae is one of the emerging fungal pathogens with a unique characteristic: its presence in many food products. S. cerevisiae has an impeccably good food safety record compared to other microorganisms like virus, bacteria and some filamentous fungi. However, humans unknowingly and inadvertently ingest large viable populations of S. cerevisiae (home-brewed beer or dietary supplements that contain yeast). In the last few years, researchers have studied the nature of S. cerevisiae strains and the molecular mechanisms related to infections. Here we review the last advance made in this emerging pathogen and we discuss the implication of using this species in food products. PMID:26779173

  1. Increased copper bioremediation ability of new transgenic and adapted Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains.

    PubMed

    Geva, Polina; Kahta, Rotem; Nakonechny, Faina; Aronov, Stella; Nisnevitch, Marina

    2016-10-01

    Environmental pollution with heavy metals is a very serious ecological problem, which can be solved by bioremediation of metal ions by microorganisms. Yeast cells, especially Saccharomyces cerevisiae, are known to exhibit a good natural ability to remove heavy metal ions from an aqueous phase. In the present work, an attempt was made to increase the copper-binding properties of S. cerevisiae. For this purpose, new strains of S. cerevisiae were produced by construction and integration of recombinant human MT2 and GFP-hMT2 genes into yeast cells. The ySA4001 strain expressed GFP-hMT2p under the constitutive pADH1 promoter and the ySA4002 and ySA4003 strains expressed hMT2 and GFP-hMT2 under the inducible pCUP1 promoter. An additional yMNWTA01 strain was obtained by adaptation of the BY4743 wild type S. cerevisiae strain to high copper concentrations. The yMNWTA01, ySA4002, and ySA4003 strains exhibited an enhanced ability for copper ion bioremediation. PMID:27392627

  2. Increased copper bioremediation ability of new transgenic and adapted Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains.

    PubMed

    Geva, Polina; Kahta, Rotem; Nakonechny, Faina; Aronov, Stella; Nisnevitch, Marina

    2016-10-01

    Environmental pollution with heavy metals is a very serious ecological problem, which can be solved by bioremediation of metal ions by microorganisms. Yeast cells, especially Saccharomyces cerevisiae, are known to exhibit a good natural ability to remove heavy metal ions from an aqueous phase. In the present work, an attempt was made to increase the copper-binding properties of S. cerevisiae. For this purpose, new strains of S. cerevisiae were produced by construction and integration of recombinant human MT2 and GFP-hMT2 genes into yeast cells. The ySA4001 strain expressed GFP-hMT2p under the constitutive pADH1 promoter and the ySA4002 and ySA4003 strains expressed hMT2 and GFP-hMT2 under the inducible pCUP1 promoter. An additional yMNWTA01 strain was obtained by adaptation of the BY4743 wild type S. cerevisiae strain to high copper concentrations. The yMNWTA01, ySA4002, and ySA4003 strains exhibited an enhanced ability for copper ion bioremediation.

  3. Molecular Basis for Strain Variation in the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Adhesin Flo11p

    PubMed Central

    Li, Li; Lipke, Peter N.; Dranginis, Anne M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT FLO11 encodes a yeast cell wall flocculin that mediates a variety of adhesive phenotypes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Flo11p is implicated in many developmental processes, including flocculation, formation of pseudohyphae, agar invasion, and formation of microbial mats and biofilms. However, Flo11p mediates different processes in different yeast strains. To investigate the mechanisms by which FLO11 determines these differences in colony morphology, flocculation, and invasion, we studied gene structure, function, and expression levels. Nonflocculent Saccharomyces cerevisiae Σ1278b cells exhibited significantly higher FLO11 mRNA expression, especially in the stationary phase, than highly flocculent S. cerevisiae var. diastaticus. The two strains varied in cell surface hydrophobicity, and Flo11p contributed significantly to surface hydrophobicity in S. cerevisiae var. diastaticus but not in strain Σ1278b. Sequencing of the FLO11 gene in S. cerevisiae var. diastaticus revealed strain-specific differences, including a 15-amino-acid insertion in the adhesion domain. Flo11p adhesion domains from strain Σ1278b and S. cerevisiae var. diastaticus were expressed and used to coat magnetic beads. The adhesion domain from each strain bound preferentially to homologous cells, and the preferences were independent of the cells in which the adhesion domains were produced. These results are consistent with the idea that strain-specific variations in the amino acid sequences in the adhesion domains cause different Flo11p flocculation activities. The results also imply that strain-specific differences in expression levels, posttranslational modifications, and allelic differences outside the adhesion domains have little effect on flocculation. IMPORTANCE As a nonmotile organism, Saccharomyces cerevisiae employs the cell surface flocculin Flo11/Muc1 as an important means of adapting to environmental change. However, there is a great deal of strain variation in the

  4. Molecular Basis for Strain Variation in the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Adhesin Flo11p.

    PubMed

    Barua, Subit; Li, Li; Lipke, Peter N; Dranginis, Anne M

    2016-01-01

    FLO11 encodes a yeast cell wall flocculin that mediates a variety of adhesive phenotypes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Flo11p is implicated in many developmental processes, including flocculation, formation of pseudohyphae, agar invasion, and formation of microbial mats and biofilms. However, Flo11p mediates different processes in different yeast strains. To investigate the mechanisms by which FLO11 determines these differences in colony morphology, flocculation, and invasion, we studied gene structure, function, and expression levels. Nonflocculent Saccharomyces cerevisiae Σ1278b cells exhibited significantly higher FLO11 mRNA expression, especially in the stationary phase, than highly flocculent S. cerevisiae var. diastaticus. The two strains varied in cell surface hydrophobicity, and Flo11p contributed significantly to surface hydrophobicity in S. cerevisiae var. diastaticus but not in strain Σ1278b. Sequencing of the FLO11 gene in S. cerevisiae var. diastaticus revealed strain-specific differences, including a 15-amino-acid insertion in the adhesion domain. Flo11p adhesion domains from strain Σ1278b and S. cerevisiae var. diastaticus were expressed and used to coat magnetic beads. The adhesion domain from each strain bound preferentially to homologous cells, and the preferences were independent of the cells in which the adhesion domains were produced. These results are consistent with the idea that strain-specific variations in the amino acid sequences in the adhesion domains cause different Flo11p flocculation activities. The results also imply that strain-specific differences in expression levels, posttranslational modifications, and allelic differences outside the adhesion domains have little effect on flocculation. IMPORTANCE As a nonmotile organism, Saccharomyces cerevisiae employs the cell surface flocculin Flo11/Muc1 as an important means of adapting to environmental change. However, there is a great deal of strain variation in the expression of

  5. A Novel Saccharomyces cerevisiae Killer Strain Secreting the X Factor Related to Killer Activity and Inhibition of S. cerevisiae K1, K2 and K28 Killer Toxins.

    PubMed

    Melvydas, Vytautas; Bružauskaitė, Ieva; Gedminienė, Genovaitė; Šiekštelė, Rimantas

    2016-09-01

    It was determined that Kx strains secrete an X factor which can inhibit all known Saccharomyces cerevisiae killer toxins (K1, K2, K28) and some toxins of other yeast species-the phenomenon not yet described in the scientific literature. It was shown that Kx type yeast strains posess a killer phenotype producing small but clear lysis zones not only on the sensitive strain α'1 but also on the lawn of S. cerevisiae K1, K2 and K28 type killer strains at temperatures between 20 and 30 °C. The pH at which killer/antikiller effect of Kx strain reaches its maximum is about 5.0-5.2. The Kx yeast were identified as to belong to S. cerevisiae species. Another newly identified S. cerevisiae killer strain N1 has killer activity but shows no antikilller properties against standard K1, K2 and K28 killer toxins. The genetic basis for Kx killer/antikiller phenotype was associated with the presence of M-dsRNA which is bigger than M-dsRNA of standard S. cerevisiae K1, K2, K28 type killer strains. Killer and antikiller features should be encoded by dsRNA. The phenomenon of antikiller (inhibition) properties was observed against some killer toxins of other yeast species. The molecular weight of newly identified killer toxins which produces Kx type strains might be about 45 kDa.

  6. Investigation of the dominance behavior of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains during wine fermentation.

    PubMed

    Perrone, Benedetta; Giacosa, Simone; Rolle, Luca; Cocolin, Luca; Rantsiou, Kalliopi

    2013-07-15

    During wine fermentation, different strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae compete in the same fermenting must and dominance takes place when one strain overcomes all the others. The purpose of this study was to investigate this phenomenon by identifying S. cerevisiae strains endowed with this feature and to test them in laboratory fermentations. First, autochthonous S. cerevisiae from Nebbiolo fermentations were isolated, molecularly identified and characterized. Genetically diverse S. cerevisiae strains were subsequently subjected to physiological characterization and to micro-scale fermentation, the weight loss kinetics was measured and HPLC analysis was performed at the end of the fermentation. Then, the strains that presented good fermentation characteristics were chosen for further analysis and to determine the dominance feature. For this purpose, couples of strains were co-inoculated in Nebbiolo must and the fermentations were monitored by microbiological and chemical analysis. Two different inoculation approaches were used: co-fermentations in flasks with mixed cells and reactor co-fermentations, in which the cells from the two different strains were kept separate by means of a 0.45 μm filter membrane, which allowed the fermenting must to move freely between the two compartments. During the flask co-fermentations, a minisatellite PCR protocol was applied, in order to differentiate the two strains and determine which one was able to dominate. The protocol included a culture-dependent approach and an independent one. In the first case, DNA extraction was performed on all the colonies scraped off the plates after sampling. In the second case, DNA extraction was performed directly on the fermenting must. The strains that were able to dominate were tested against several S. cerevisiae in order to confirm this dominance behavior. Dominance was observed in the early stages of fermentation, as early as 3days. Combinations of dominant and not-dominant strains were

  7. The use of genetically modified Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains in the wine industry.

    PubMed

    Schuller, Dorit; Casal, Margarida

    2005-08-01

    In recent decades, science and food technology have contributed at an accelerated rate to the introduction of new products to satisfy nutritional, socio-economic and quality requirements. With the emergence of modern molecular genetics, the industrial importance of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, is continuously extended. The demand for suitable genetically modified (GM) S. cerevisiae strains for the biofuel, bakery and beverage industries or for the production of biotechnological products (e.g. enzymes, pharmaceutical products) will continuously grow in the future. Numerous specialised S. cerevisiae wine strains were obtained in recent years, possessing a wide range of optimised or novel oenological properties, capable of satisfying the demanding nature of modern winemaking practise. The unlocking of transcriptome, proteome and metabolome complexities will contribute decisively to the knowledge about the genetic make-up of commercial yeast strains and will influence wine strain improvement via genetic engineering. The most relevant advances regarding the importance and implications of the use of GM yeast strains in the wine industry are discussed in this mini-review. In this work, various aspects are considered including the strategies used for the construction of strains with respect to current legislation requirements, the environmental risk evaluations concerning the deliberate release of genetically modified yeast strains, the methods for detection of recombinant DNA and protein that are currently under evaluation, and the reasons behind the critical public perception towards the application of such strains.

  8. The Interaction between Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Non-Saccharomyces Yeast during Alcoholic Fermentation Is Species and Strain Specific.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chunxiao; Mas, Albert; Esteve-Zarzoso, Braulio

    2016-01-01

    The present study analyzes the lack of culturability of different non-Saccharomyces strains due to interaction with Saccharomyces cerevisiae during alcoholic fermentation. Interaction was followed in mixed fermentations with 1:1 inoculation of S. cerevisiae and ten non-Saccharomyces strains. Starmerella bacillaris, and Torulaspora delbrueckii indicated longer coexistence in mixed fermentations compared with Hanseniaspora uvarum and Metschnikowia pulcherrima. Strain differences in culturability and nutrient consumption (glucose, alanine, ammonium, arginine, or glutamine) were found within each species in mixed fermentation with S. cerevisiae. The interaction was further analyzed using cell-free supernatant from S. cerevisiae and synthetic media mimicking both single fermentations with S. cerevisiae and using mixed fermentations with the corresponding non-Saccharomyces species. Cell-free S. cerevisiae supernatants induced faster culturability loss than synthetic media corresponding to the same fermentation stage. This demonstrated that some metabolites produced by S. cerevisiae played the main role in the decreased culturability of the other non-Saccharomyces yeasts. However, changes in the concentrations of main metabolites had also an effect. Culturability differences were observed among species and strains in culture assays and thus showed distinct tolerance to S. cerevisiae metabolites and fermentation environment. Viability kit and recovery analyses on non-culturable cells verified the existence of viable but not-culturable status. These findings are discussed in the context of interaction between non-Saccharomyces and S. cerevisiae.

  9. The Interaction between Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Non-Saccharomyces Yeast during Alcoholic Fermentation Is Species and Strain Specific

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chunxiao; Mas, Albert; Esteve-Zarzoso, Braulio

    2016-01-01

    The present study analyzes the lack of culturability of different non-Saccharomyces strains due to interaction with Saccharomyces cerevisiae during alcoholic fermentation. Interaction was followed in mixed fermentations with 1:1 inoculation of S. cerevisiae and ten non-Saccharomyces strains. Starmerella bacillaris, and Torulaspora delbrueckii indicated longer coexistence in mixed fermentations compared with Hanseniaspora uvarum and Metschnikowia pulcherrima. Strain differences in culturability and nutrient consumption (glucose, alanine, ammonium, arginine, or glutamine) were found within each species in mixed fermentation with S. cerevisiae. The interaction was further analyzed using cell-free supernatant from S. cerevisiae and synthetic media mimicking both single fermentations with S. cerevisiae and using mixed fermentations with the corresponding non-Saccharomyces species. Cell-free S. cerevisiae supernatants induced faster culturability loss than synthetic media corresponding to the same fermentation stage. This demonstrated that some metabolites produced by S. cerevisiae played the main role in the decreased culturability of the other non-Saccharomyces yeasts. However, changes in the concentrations of main metabolites had also an effect. Culturability differences were observed among species and strains in culture assays and thus showed distinct tolerance to S. cerevisiae metabolites and fermentation environment. Viability kit and recovery analyses on non-culturable cells verified the existence of viable but not-culturable status. These findings are discussed in the context of interaction between non-Saccharomyces and S. cerevisiae. PMID:27148191

  10. Metabolic engineering of Saccharomyces cerevisiae ethanol strains PE-2 and CAT-1 for efficient lignocellulosic fermentation.

    PubMed

    Romaní, Aloia; Pereira, Filipa; Johansson, Björn; Domingues, Lucília

    2015-03-01

    In this work, Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains PE-2 and CAT-1, commonly used in the Brazilian fuel ethanol industry, were engineered for xylose fermentation, where the first fermented xylose faster than the latter, but also produced considerable amounts of xylitol. An engineered PE-2 strain (MEC1121) efficiently consumed xylose in presence of inhibitors both in synthetic and corn-cob hydrolysates. Interestingly, the S. cerevisiae MEC1121 consumed xylose and glucose simultaneously, while a CEN.PK based strain consumed glucose and xylose sequentially. Deletion of the aldose reductase GRE3 lowered xylitol production to undetectable levels and increased xylose consumption rate which led to higher final ethanol concentrations. Fermentation of corn-cob hydrolysate using this strain, MEC1133, resulted in an ethanol yield of 0.47 g/g of total sugars which is 92% of the theoretical yield.

  11. Metabolic engineering of Saccharomyces cerevisiae ethanol strains PE-2 and CAT-1 for efficient lignocellulosic fermentation.

    PubMed

    Romaní, Aloia; Pereira, Filipa; Johansson, Björn; Domingues, Lucília

    2015-03-01

    In this work, Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains PE-2 and CAT-1, commonly used in the Brazilian fuel ethanol industry, were engineered for xylose fermentation, where the first fermented xylose faster than the latter, but also produced considerable amounts of xylitol. An engineered PE-2 strain (MEC1121) efficiently consumed xylose in presence of inhibitors both in synthetic and corn-cob hydrolysates. Interestingly, the S. cerevisiae MEC1121 consumed xylose and glucose simultaneously, while a CEN.PK based strain consumed glucose and xylose sequentially. Deletion of the aldose reductase GRE3 lowered xylitol production to undetectable levels and increased xylose consumption rate which led to higher final ethanol concentrations. Fermentation of corn-cob hydrolysate using this strain, MEC1133, resulted in an ethanol yield of 0.47 g/g of total sugars which is 92% of the theoretical yield. PMID:25536512

  12. A set of haploid strains available for genetic studies of Saccharomyces cerevisiae flor yeasts.

    PubMed

    Coi, Anna Lisa; Legras, Jean-Luc; Zara, Giacomo; Dequin, Sylvie; Budroni, Marilena

    2016-09-01

    Flor yeasts of Saccharomyces cerevisiae have been extensively studied for biofilm formation, however the lack of specific haploid model strains has limited the application of genetic approaches such as gene knockout, allelic replacement and Quantitative Trait Locus mapping for the deciphering of the molecular basis of velum formation under biological ageing. The aim of this work was to construct a set of flor isogenic haploid strains easy to manipulate genetically. The analysis of the allelic variations at 12 minisatellite loci of 174 Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains allowed identifying three flor parental strains with different phylogenic positions. These strains were characterized for sporulation efficiency, growth on galactose, adherence to polystyrene, agar invasion, growth on wine and ability to develop a biofilm. Interestingly, the inability to grow on galactose was found associated with a frameshift in GAL4 gene that seems peculiar of flor strains. From these wild flor strains, isogenic haploid strains were constructed by deleting HO gene with a loxP-KanMX-loxP cassette followed by the removal of the kanamycin cassette. Haploid strains obtained were characterized for their phenotypic and genetic properties and compared with the parental strains. Preliminary results showed that the haploid strains represent new tools for genetic studies and breeding programs on biofilm formation. PMID:27527101

  13. Social wasp intestines host the local phenotypic variability of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains.

    PubMed

    Dapporto, Leonardo; Stefanini, Irene; Rivero, Damariz; Polsinelli, Mario; Capretti, Paolo; De Marchi, Paolo; Viola, Roberto; Turillazzi, Stefano; Cavalieri, Duccio

    2016-07-01

    Nowadays, the presence of Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been assessed in both wild and human-related environments. Social wasps have been shown to maintain and vector S. cerevisiae among different environments. The availability of strains isolated from wasp intestines represents a striking opportunity to assess whether the strains found in wasp intestines are characterized by peculiar traits. We analysed strains isolated from the intestines of social wasps and compared them with strains isolated from other sources, all collected in a restricted geographic area. We evaluated the production of volatile metabolites during grape must fermentation, the resistance to different stresses and the ability to exploit various carbon sources. Wasp strains, in addition to representing a wide range of S. cerevisiae genotypes, also represent large part of the phenotypes characterizing the sympatric set of yeast strains; their higher production of acetic acid and ethyl acetate could reflect improved ability to attract insects. Our findings suggest that the relationship between yeasts and wasps should be preserved, to safeguard not only the natural variance of this microorganism but also the interests of wine-makers, who could take advantage from the exploitation of their phenotypic variability. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27168222

  14. Extensive Recombination of a Yeast Diploid Hybrid through Meiotic Reversion

    PubMed Central

    Laureau, Raphaëlle; Loeillet, Sophie; Salinas, Francisco; Bergström, Anders; Legoix-Né, Patricia; Liti, Gianni; Nicolas, Alain

    2016-01-01

    In somatic cells, recombination between the homologous chromosomes followed by equational segregation leads to loss of heterozygosity events (LOH), allowing the expression of recessive alleles and the production of novel allele combinations that are potentially beneficial upon Darwinian selection. However, inter-homolog recombination in somatic cells is rare, thus reducing potential genetic variation. Here, we explored the property of S. cerevisiae to enter the meiotic developmental program, induce meiotic Spo11-dependent double-strand breaks genome-wide and return to mitotic growth, a process known as Return To Growth (RTG). Whole genome sequencing of 36 RTG strains derived from the hybrid S288c/SK1 diploid strain demonstrates that the RTGs are bona fide diploids with mosaic recombined genome, derived from either parental origin. Individual RTG genome-wide genotypes are comprised of 5 to 87 homozygous regions due to the loss of heterozygous (LOH) events of various lengths, varying between a few nucleotides up to several hundred kilobases. Furthermore, we show that reiteration of the RTG process shows incremental increases of homozygosity. Phenotype/genotype analysis of the RTG strains for the auxotrophic and arsenate resistance traits validates the potential of this procedure of genome diversification to rapidly map complex traits loci (QTLs) in diploid strains without undergoing sexual reproduction. PMID:26828862

  15. Relationship of trehalose accumulation with ethanol fermentation in industrial Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast strains.

    PubMed

    Wang, Pin-Mei; Zheng, Dao-Qiong; Chi, Xiao-Qin; Li, Ou; Qian, Chao-Dong; Liu, Tian-Zhe; Zhang, Xiao-Yang; Du, Feng-Guang; Sun, Pei-Yong; Qu, Ai-Min; Wu, Xue-Chang

    2014-01-01

    The protective effect and the mechanisms of trehalose accumulation in industrial Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains were investigated during ethanol fermentation. The engineered strains with more intercellular trehalose achieved significantly higher fermentation rates and ethanol yields than their wild strain ZS during very high gravity (VHG) fermentation, while their performances were not different during regular fermentation. The VHG fermentation performances of these strains were consistent with their growth capacity under osmotic stress and ethanol stress, the key stress factors during VHG fermentation. These results suggest that trehalose accumulation is more important for VHG fermentation of industrial yeast strains than regular one. The differences in membrane integrity and antioxidative capacity of these strains indicated the possible mechanisms of trehalose as a protectant under VHG condition. Therefore, trehalose metabolic engineering may be a useful strategy for improving the VHG fermentation performance of industrial yeast strains.

  16. Detection of maltose fermentation genes in the baking yeast strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Oda, Y; Tonomura, K

    1996-10-01

    The presence of any one of the five unlinked MAL loci (MAL1, MAL2, MAL3, MAL4 and MAL6) confers the ability to ferment maltose on the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Each locus is composed of three genes encoding maltose permease, alpha-glucosidase and MAL activator. Chromosomal DNA of seven representative baking strains has been separated by pulse-field gel electrophoresis and probed with three genes in MAL6 locus. The DNA bands to which all of the three MAL-derived probes simultaneously hybridized were chromosome VII carrying MAL1 in all of the strains tested, chromosome XI carrying MAL4 in six strains, chromosome III carrying MAL2 in three strains and chromosomes II and VIII carrying MAL3 and MAL6, respectively, in the one strain. The number of MAL loci in baking strains was comparable to those of brewing strains.

  17. Relationship of trehalose accumulation with ethanol fermentation in industrial Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast strains.

    PubMed

    Wang, Pin-Mei; Zheng, Dao-Qiong; Chi, Xiao-Qin; Li, Ou; Qian, Chao-Dong; Liu, Tian-Zhe; Zhang, Xiao-Yang; Du, Feng-Guang; Sun, Pei-Yong; Qu, Ai-Min; Wu, Xue-Chang

    2014-01-01

    The protective effect and the mechanisms of trehalose accumulation in industrial Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains were investigated during ethanol fermentation. The engineered strains with more intercellular trehalose achieved significantly higher fermentation rates and ethanol yields than their wild strain ZS during very high gravity (VHG) fermentation, while their performances were not different during regular fermentation. The VHG fermentation performances of these strains were consistent with their growth capacity under osmotic stress and ethanol stress, the key stress factors during VHG fermentation. These results suggest that trehalose accumulation is more important for VHG fermentation of industrial yeast strains than regular one. The differences in membrane integrity and antioxidative capacity of these strains indicated the possible mechanisms of trehalose as a protectant under VHG condition. Therefore, trehalose metabolic engineering may be a useful strategy for improving the VHG fermentation performance of industrial yeast strains. PMID:24316480

  18. Proteomic response to physiological fermentation stresses in a wild-type wine strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Trabalzini, Lorenza; Paffetti, Alessandro; Scaloni, Andrea; Talamo, Fabio; Ferro, Elisa; Coratza, Grazietta; Bovalini, Lucia; Lusini, Paola; Martelli, Paola; Santucci, Annalisa

    2003-01-01

    We report a study on the adaptive response of a wild-type wine Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain, isolated from natural spontaneous grape must, to mild and progressive physiological stresses due to fermentation. We observed by two-dimensional electrophoresis how the yeast proteome changes during glucose exhaustion, before the cell enters its complete stationary phase. On the basis of their identification, the proteins representing the S. cerevisiae proteomic response to fermentation stresses were divided into three classes: repressed proteins, induced proteins and autoproteolysed proteins. In an overall view, the proteome adaptation of S. cerevisiae at the time of glucose exhaustion seems to be directed mainly against the effects of ethanol, causing both hyperosmolarity and oxidative responses. Stress-induced autoproteolysis is directed mainly towards specific isoforms of glycolytic enzymes. Through the use of a wild-type S. cerevisiae strain and PMSF, a specific inhibitor of vacuolar proteinase B, we could also distinguish the specific contributions of the vacuole and the proteasome to the autoproteolytic process. PMID:12401115

  19. Improved xylose and arabinose utilization by an industrial recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain using evolutionary engineering

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Cost-effective fermentation of lignocellulosic hydrolysate to ethanol by Saccharomyces cerevisiae requires efficient mixed sugar utilization. Notably, the rate and yield of xylose and arabinose co-fermentation to ethanol must be enhanced. Results Evolutionary engineering was used to improve the simultaneous conversion of xylose and arabinose to ethanol in a recombinant industrial Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain carrying the heterologous genes for xylose and arabinose utilization pathways integrated in the genome. The evolved strain TMB3130 displayed an increased consumption rate of xylose and arabinose under aerobic and anaerobic conditions. Improved anaerobic ethanol production was achieved at the expense of xylitol and glycerol but arabinose was almost stoichiometrically converted to arabitol. Further characterization of the strain indicated that the selection pressure during prolonged continuous culture in xylose and arabinose medium resulted in the improved transport of xylose and arabinose as well as increased levels of the enzymes from the introduced fungal xylose pathway. No mutation was found in any of the genes from the pentose converting pathways. Conclusion To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report that characterizes the molecular mechanisms for improved mixed-pentose utilization obtained by evolutionary engineering of a recombinant S. cerevisiae strain. Increased transport of pentoses and increased activities of xylose converting enzymes contributed to the improved phenotype. PMID:20550651

  20. Production of Volatile and Sulfur Compounds by 10 Saccharomyces cerevisiae Strains Inoculated in Trebbiano Must

    PubMed Central

    Patrignani, Francesca; Chinnici, Fabio; Serrazanetti, Diana I.; Vernocchi, Pamela; Ndagijimana, Maurice; Riponi, Claudio; Lanciotti, Rosalba

    2016-01-01

    In wines, the presence of sulfur compounds is the resulting of several contributions among which yeast metabolism. The characterization of the starter Saccharomyces cerevisiae needs to be performed also taking into account this ability even if evaluated together with the overall metabolic profile. In this perspective, principal aim of this experimental research was the evaluation of the volatile profiles, throughout GC/MS technique coupled with solid phase micro extraction, of wines obtained throughout the fermentation of 10 strains of S. cerevisiae. In addition, the production of sulfur compounds was further evaluated by using a gas-chromatograph coupled with a Flame Photometric Detector. Specifically, the 10 strains were inoculated in Trebbiano musts and the fermentations were monitored for 19 days. In the produced wines, volatile and sulfur compounds as well as amino acid concentrations were investigated. Also the physico-chemical characteristics of the wines and their electronic nose profiles were evaluated. PMID:26973621

  1. Production of Volatile and Sulfur Compounds by 10 Saccharomyces cerevisiae Strains Inoculated in Trebbiano Must.

    PubMed

    Patrignani, Francesca; Chinnici, Fabio; Serrazanetti, Diana I; Vernocchi, Pamela; Ndagijimana, Maurice; Riponi, Claudio; Lanciotti, Rosalba

    2016-01-01

    In wines, the presence of sulfur compounds is the resulting of several contributions among which yeast metabolism. The characterization of the starter Saccharomyces cerevisiae needs to be performed also taking into account this ability even if evaluated together with the overall metabolic profile. In this perspective, principal aim of this experimental research was the evaluation of the volatile profiles, throughout GC/MS technique coupled with solid phase micro extraction, of wines obtained throughout the fermentation of 10 strains of S. cerevisiae. In addition, the production of sulfur compounds was further evaluated by using a gas-chromatograph coupled with a Flame Photometric Detector. Specifically, the 10 strains were inoculated in Trebbiano musts and the fermentations were monitored for 19 days. In the produced wines, volatile and sulfur compounds as well as amino acid concentrations were investigated. Also the physico-chemical characteristics of the wines and their electronic nose profiles were evaluated. PMID:26973621

  2. Use of interdelta polymorphisms of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains to monitor population evolution during wine fermentation.

    PubMed

    Xufre, Angela; Albergaria, Helena; Gírio, Francisco; Spencer-Martins, Isabel

    2011-01-01

    The industrial use of starter cultures containing a consortium of different strains from the same species is nowadays seen as a possible strategy to enhance the organoleptic complexity of wines. To assess the relative contribution of each strain to the final product it is essential to quantify population evolution during the wine fermentation process, which requires strain-specific methods to identify and differentiate each strain. In the present study, a molecular method based on analysis of the polymorphisms exhibited by the PCR-amplification of the delta regions of three Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains was developed. A set of three pairs of primers (delta1-delta2, delta12-delta2, delta12-delta21) was used for each strain, and analysis of the resulting polymorphism patterns showed that the delta12-delta2 primer pair exhibited the highest resolution and discriminatory power. Thus, this pair of primers was selected to monitor the population evolution of a laboratory-scale wine fermentation performed in synthetic grape juice that was inoculated with similar amounts of each strain. The results showed that all strains grew together during the exponential growth phase (2-3 days) and maintained high cell density values (10(6)-10(7) cfu ml(-1)) throughout the stationary growth phase without significantly changing their relative population proportion, thus indicating that each strain can influence the chemical composition and final flavor of wine, albeit at different levels. This study also showed that PCR-amplification of DNA delta sequences of S. cerevisiae strains is a reproducible, strain-specific and simple method that can be used successfully to monitor yeast strain population dynamics during wine fermentations.

  3. Genome Sequencing and Comparative Analysis of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Strains of the Peterhof Genetic Collection

    PubMed Central

    Drozdova, Polina B.; Tarasov, Oleg V.; Matveenko, Andrew G.; Radchenko, Elina A.; Sopova, Julia V.; Polev, Dmitrii E.; Inge-Vechtomov, Sergey G.; Dobrynin, Pavel V.

    2016-01-01

    The Peterhof genetic collection of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains (PGC) is a large laboratory stock that has accumulated several thousands of strains for over than half a century. It originated independently of other common laboratory stocks from a distillery lineage (race XII). Several PGC strains have been extensively used in certain fields of yeast research but their genomes have not been thoroughly explored yet. Here we employed whole genome sequencing to characterize five selected PGC strains including one of the closest to the progenitor, 15V-P4, and several strains that have been used to study translation termination and prions in yeast (25-25-2V-P3982, 1B-D1606, 74-D694, and 6P-33G-D373). The genetic distance between the PGC progenitor and S288C is comparable to that between two geographically isolated populations. The PGC seems to be closer to two bakery strains than to S288C-related laboratory stocks or European wine strains. In genomes of the PGC strains, we found several loci which are absent from the S288C genome; 15V-P4 harbors a rare combination of the gene cluster characteristic for wine strains and the RTM1 cluster. We closely examined known and previously uncharacterized gene variants of particular strains and were able to establish the molecular basis for known phenotypes including phenylalanine auxotrophy, clumping behavior and galactose utilization. Finally, we made sequencing data and results of the analysis available for the yeast community. Our data widen the knowledge about genetic variation between Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains and can form the basis for planning future work in PGC-related strains and with PGC-derived alleles. PMID:27152522

  4. Feasibility of Protein Turnover Studies in Prototroph Saccharomyces cerevisiae Strains

    PubMed Central

    Martin-Perez, Miguel; Villén, Judit

    2015-01-01

    Quantitative proteomics studies of yeast that use metabolic labeling with amino acids rely on auxotrophic mutations of one or more genes on the amino acid biosynthesis pathways. These mutations affect yeast metabolism and preclude the study of some biological processes. Overcoming this limitation, it has recently been described that proteins in a yeast prototrophic strain can also be metabolically labeled with heavy amino acids. However, the temporal profiles of label incorporation under the different phases of the prototroph’s growth have not been examined. Labeling trajectories are important in the study of protein turnover and dynamics, in which label incorporation into proteins is monitored across many time points. Here we monitored protein labeling trajectories for 48 h after a pulse with heavy lysine in a yeast prototrophic strain and compared them with those of a lysine auxotrophic yeast. Labeling was successful in prototroph yeast during exponential growth phase but not in stationary phase. Furthermore, we were able to determine the half-lives of more than 1700 proteins during exponential phase of growth with high accuracy and reproducibility. We found a median half-life of 2 h in both strains, which corresponds with the cellular doubling time. Nucleolar and ribosomal proteins showed short half-lives, whereas mitochondrial proteins and other energy production enzymes presented longer half-lives. Except for some proteins involved in lysine biosynthesis, we observed a high correlation in protein half-lives between prototroph and auxotroph strains. Overall, our results demonstrate the feasibility of using prototrophs for proteomic turnover studies and provide a reliable data set of protein half-lives in exponentially growing yeast. PMID:25767917

  5. Nutritional requirements of the BY series of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains for optimum growth.

    PubMed

    Hanscho, Michael; Ruckerbauer, David E; Chauhan, Neha; Hofbauer, Harald F; Krahulec, Stefan; Nidetzky, Bernd; Kohlwein, Sepp D; Zanghellini, Juergen; Natter, Klaus

    2012-11-01

    Among the vast variety of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains, the BY family is particularly important because the widely used deletion collections are based on this background. Here we demonstrate that some standard growth media recipes require substantial modifications to provide optimum growth conditions for auxotrophic BY strains and to avoid growth arrest before glucose is depleted. In addition to the essential supplements that are required to satisfy auxotrophic requirements, we found the four amino acids phenylalanine, glutamic acid, serine, and threonine to be indispensable for optimum growth, despite the fact that BY is 'prototrophic' for these amino acids. Interestingly, other widely used S. cerevisiae strains, such as strains of the CEN.PK family, are less sensitive to lack of the described supplements. Furthermore, we found that the concentration of inositol in yeast nitrogen base is too low to support fast proliferation of yeast cultures until glucose is exhausted. Depletion of inositol during exponential growth induces characteristic changes, namely a decrease in glucose uptake and maximum specific growth rate, increased cell size, reduced viability, and accumulation of lipid storage pools. Thus, several of the existing growth media recipes need to be revised to achieve optimum growth conditions for BY-derived strains.

  6. Whole-Genome Comparison Reveals Novel Genetic Elements That Characterize the Genome of Industrial Strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Borneman, Anthony R.; Desany, Brian A.; Riches, David; Affourtit, Jason P.; Forgan, Angus H.; Pretorius, Isak S.; Egholm, Michael; Chambers, Paul J.

    2011-01-01

    Human intervention has subjected the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae to multiple rounds of independent domestication and thousands of generations of artificial selection. As a result, this species comprises a genetically diverse collection of natural isolates as well as domesticated strains that are used in specific industrial applications. However the scope of genetic diversity that was captured during the domesticated evolution of the industrial representatives of this important organism remains to be determined. To begin to address this, we have produced whole-genome assemblies of six commercial strains of S. cerevisiae (four wine and two brewing strains). These represent the first genome assemblies produced from S. cerevisiae strains in their industrially-used forms and the first high-quality assemblies for S. cerevisiae strains used in brewing. By comparing these sequences to six existing high-coverage S. cerevisiae genome assemblies, clear signatures were found that defined each industrial class of yeast. This genetic variation was comprised of both single nucleotide polymorphisms and large-scale insertions and deletions, with the latter often being associated with ORF heterogeneity between strains. This included the discovery of more than twenty probable genes that had not been identified previously in the S. cerevisiae genome. Comparison of this large number of S. cerevisiae strains also enabled the characterization of a cluster of five ORFs that have integrated into the genomes of the wine and bioethanol strains on multiple occasions and at diverse genomic locations via what appears to involve the resolution of a circular DNA intermediate. This work suggests that, despite the scrutiny that has been directed at the yeast genome, there remains a significant reservoir of ORFs and novel modes of genetic transmission that may have significant phenotypic impact in this important model and industrial species. PMID:21304888

  7. Genetic improvement of Saccharomyces cerevisiae wine strains for enhancing cell viability after desiccation stress.

    PubMed

    López-Martínez, Gema; Pietrafesa, Rocchina; Romano, Patrizia; Cordero-Otero, Ricardo; Capece, Angela

    2013-08-01

    In the last few decades spontaneous grape must fermentations have been replaced by inoculated fermentation with Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains as active dry yeast (ADY). Among the essential genes previously characterized to overcome the cell-drying/rehydration process, six belong to the group of very hydrophilic proteins known as hydrophilins. Among them, only SIP18 has shown early transcriptional response during dehydration stress. In fact, the overexpression in S. cerevisiae of gene SIP18 increases cell viability after the dehydration process. The purpose of this study was to characterize dehydration stress tolerance of three wild and one commercial S. cerevisiae strains of wine origin. The four strains were submitted to transformation by insertion of the gene SIP18. Selected transformants were submitted to the cell-drying-rehydration process and yeast viability was evaluated by both viable cell count and flow cytometry. The antioxidant capacity of SIP18p was illustrated by ROS accumulation reduction after H2 O2 attack. Growth data as cellular duplication times and lag times were calculated to estimate cell vitality after the cell rehydration process. The overexpressing SIP18 strains showed significantly longer time of lag phase despite less time needed to stop the leakage of intracellular compounds during the rehydration process. Subsequently, the transformants were tested in inoculated grape must fermentation at laboratory scale in comparison to untransformed strains. Chemical analyses of the resultant wines indicated that no significant change for the content of secondary compounds was detected. The obtained data showed that the transformation enhances the viability of ADY without affecting fermentation efficiency and metabolic behaviour.

  8. Optimized fermentation of grape juice by laboratory strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Harsch, Michael J; Lee, Soon A; Goddard, Matthew R; Gardner, Richard C

    2010-02-01

    Laboratory strains of yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) based on S288C ferment grape juice relatively poorly. We show that slow fermentation appears to be inherent to this strain, because the original S288C isolate shows fermentation similar to current laboratory isolates. We demonstrate further that some auxotrophic mutations in the laboratory strain show reduced rates of fermentation in grape juice, with lysine auxotrophs particularly impaired compared with isogenic Lys(+) strains. Supplementing lysine at a 10-fold higher concentration than recommended allowed yeast cultures to reach higher final cell densities and restored the fermentation rate of auxotrophic strains to those of the corresponding wild-type strains. However, even with the additional supplementation, the fermentation rates of S288C strains were still slower than those of a commercial wine yeast strain. Conditions were developed that enable auxotrophic laboratory strains derived from S288C to ferment grape juice to completion with high efficiency on a laboratory scale. Fermentation in media based on grape juice will allow the suite of molecular genetic tools developed for these laboratory strains to be used in investigations of complex ferment characteristics and products.

  9. A fast method to diagnose chromosome and plasmid loss in Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains.

    PubMed

    Hegemann, J H; Klein, S; Heck, S; Güldener, U; Niedenthal, R K; Fleig, U

    1999-07-01

    We have developed a simple, fast and reliable method for the analysis of genetic stability in budding yeast strains. The assay relies on our previous finding that cells expressing the green fluorescent protein (GFP) can be detected and counted by flow cytometric analysis (FACS) (Niedenthal et al., 1996). Expression of a gfp-carrying CEN-plasmid in a wild-type strain resulted in the emission of strong fluorescence from 80% of the cell population. Strong fluorescence and presence of the plasmid, determined by the presence of the URA3 genetic marker, was strictly correlated. Expression of this plasmid in 266 yeast strains, each carrying a complete deletion of a novel, non-essential gene identified in the S. cerevisiae sequencing project, pinpointed 12 strains with an increased level of mitotic plasmid loss. Finally we have shown that measurement of mitotic loss of artificial chromosome fragments equipped with the gfp expression cassette can be performed quantitatively using FACS.

  10. Responses of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Strains from Different Origins to Elevated Iron Concentrations

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Garay, Carlos Andrés; de Llanos, Rosa; Romero, Antonia María; Martínez-Pastor, María Teresa

    2016-01-01

    Iron is an essential micronutrient for all eukaryotic organisms. However, the low solubility of ferric iron has tremendously increased the prevalence of iron deficiency anemia, especially in women and children, with dramatic consequences. Baker's yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is used as a model eukaryotic organism, a fermentative microorganism, and a feed supplement. In this report, we explore the genetic diversity of 123 wild and domestic strains of S. cerevisiae isolated from different geographical origins and sources to characterize how yeast cells respond to elevated iron concentrations in the environment. By using two different forms of iron, we selected and characterized both iron-sensitive and iron-resistant yeast strains. We observed that when the iron concentration in the medium increases, iron-sensitive strains accumulate iron more rapidly than iron-resistant isolates. We observed that, consistent with excess iron leading to oxidative stress, the redox state of iron-sensitive strains was more oxidized than that of iron-resistant strains. Growth assays in the presence of different oxidative reagents ruled out that this phenotype was due to alterations in the general oxidative stress protection machinery. It was noteworthy that iron-resistant strains were more sensitive to iron deficiency conditions than iron-sensitive strains, which suggests that adaptation to either high or low iron is detrimental for the opposite condition. An initial gene expression analysis suggested that alterations in iron homeostasis genes could contribute to the different responses of distant iron-sensitive and iron-resistant yeast strains to elevated environmental iron levels. PMID:26773083

  11. Responses of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Strains from Different Origins to Elevated Iron Concentrations.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Garay, Carlos Andrés; de Llanos, Rosa; Romero, Antonia María; Martínez-Pastor, María Teresa; Puig, Sergi

    2016-01-15

    Iron is an essential micronutrient for all eukaryotic organisms. However, the low solubility of ferric iron has tremendously increased the prevalence of iron deficiency anemia, especially in women and children, with dramatic consequences. Baker's yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is used as a model eukaryotic organism, a fermentative microorganism, and a feed supplement. In this report, we explore the genetic diversity of 123 wild and domestic strains of S. cerevisiae isolated from different geographical origins and sources to characterize how yeast cells respond to elevated iron concentrations in the environment. By using two different forms of iron, we selected and characterized both iron-sensitive and iron-resistant yeast strains. We observed that when the iron concentration in the medium increases, iron-sensitive strains accumulate iron more rapidly than iron-resistant isolates. We observed that, consistent with excess iron leading to oxidative stress, the redox state of iron-sensitive strains was more oxidized than that of iron-resistant strains. Growth assays in the presence of different oxidative reagents ruled out that this phenotype was due to alterations in the general oxidative stress protection machinery. It was noteworthy that iron-resistant strains were more sensitive to iron deficiency conditions than iron-sensitive strains, which suggests that adaptation to either high or low iron is detrimental for the opposite condition. An initial gene expression analysis suggested that alterations in iron homeostasis genes could contribute to the different responses of distant iron-sensitive and iron-resistant yeast strains to elevated environmental iron levels.

  12. Responses of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Strains from Different Origins to Elevated Iron Concentrations.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Garay, Carlos Andrés; de Llanos, Rosa; Romero, Antonia María; Martínez-Pastor, María Teresa; Puig, Sergi

    2016-03-01

    Iron is an essential micronutrient for all eukaryotic organisms. However, the low solubility of ferric iron has tremendously increased the prevalence of iron deficiency anemia, especially in women and children, with dramatic consequences. Baker's yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is used as a model eukaryotic organism, a fermentative microorganism, and a feed supplement. In this report, we explore the genetic diversity of 123 wild and domestic strains of S. cerevisiae isolated from different geographical origins and sources to characterize how yeast cells respond to elevated iron concentrations in the environment. By using two different forms of iron, we selected and characterized both iron-sensitive and iron-resistant yeast strains. We observed that when the iron concentration in the medium increases, iron-sensitive strains accumulate iron more rapidly than iron-resistant isolates. We observed that, consistent with excess iron leading to oxidative stress, the redox state of iron-sensitive strains was more oxidized than that of iron-resistant strains. Growth assays in the presence of different oxidative reagents ruled out that this phenotype was due to alterations in the general oxidative stress protection machinery. It was noteworthy that iron-resistant strains were more sensitive to iron deficiency conditions than iron-sensitive strains, which suggests that adaptation to either high or low iron is detrimental for the opposite condition. An initial gene expression analysis suggested that alterations in iron homeostasis genes could contribute to the different responses of distant iron-sensitive and iron-resistant yeast strains to elevated environmental iron levels. PMID:26773083

  13. Consolidated bioprocessing of starchy substrates into ethanol by industrial Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains secreting fungal amylases.

    PubMed

    Favaro, Lorenzo; Viktor, Marko J; Rose, Shaunita H; Viljoen-Bloom, Marinda; van Zyl, Willem H; Basaglia, Marina; Cagnin, Lorenzo; Casella, Sergio

    2015-09-01

    The development of a yeast strain that converts raw starch to ethanol in one step (called Consolidated Bioprocessing, CBP) could significantly reduce the commercial costs of starch-based bioethanol. An efficient amylolytic Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain suitable for industrial bioethanol production was developed in this study. Codon-optimized variants of the Thermomyces lanuginosus glucoamylase (TLG1) and Saccharomycopsis fibuligera α-amylase (SFA1) genes were δ-integrated into two S. cerevisiae yeast with promising industrial traits, i.e., strains M2n and MEL2. The recombinant M2n[TLG1-SFA1] and MEL2[TLG1-SFA1] yeast displayed high enzyme activities on soluble and raw starch (up to 8118 and 4461 nkat/g dry cell weight, respectively) and produced about 64 g/L ethanol from 200 g/L raw corn starch in a bioreactor, corresponding to 55% of the theoretical maximum ethanol yield (g of ethanol/g of available glucose equivalent). Their starch-to-ethanol conversion efficiencies were even higher on natural sorghum and triticale substrates (62 and 73% of the theoretical yield, respectively). This is the first report of direct ethanol production from natural starchy substrates (without any pre-treatment or commercial enzyme addition) using industrial yeast strains co-secreting both a glucoamylase and α-amylase.

  14. Engineering and Analysis of a Saccharomyces cerevisiae Strain That Uses Formaldehyde as an Auxiliary Substrate▿

    PubMed Central

    Baerends, Richard J. S.; de Hulster, Erik; Geertman, Jan-Maarten A.; Daran, Jean-Marc; van Maris, Antonius J. A.; Veenhuis, Marten; van der Klei, Ida J.; Pronk, Jack T.

    2008-01-01

    We demonstrated that formaldehyde can be efficiently coutilized by an engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain that expresses Hansenula polymorpha genes encoding formaldehyde dehydrogenase (FLD1) and formate dehydrogenase (FMD), in contrast to wild-type strains. Initial chemostat experiments showed that the engineered strain coutilized formaldehyde with glucose, but these mixed-substrate cultures failed to reach steady-state conditions and did not exhibit an increased biomass yield on glucose. Subsequent transcriptome analyses of chemostat cultures of the engineered strain, grown on glucose-formaldehyde mixtures, indicated that the presence of formaldehyde in the feed caused biotin limitations. Further transcriptome analysis demonstrated that this biotin inactivation was prevented by using separate formaldehyde and vitamin feeds. Using this approach, steady-state glucose-limited chemostat cultures were obtained that coutilized glucose and formaldehyde. Coutilization of formaldehyde under these conditions resulted in an enhanced biomass yield of the glucose-limited cultures. The biomass yield was quantitatively consistent with the use of formaldehyde as an auxiliary substrate that generates NADH and subsequently, via oxidative phosphorylation, ATP. On an electron pair basis, the biomass yield increase observed with formaldehyde was larger than that observed previously for formate, which is tentatively explained by different modes of formate and formaldehyde transport in S. cerevisiae. PMID:18378663

  15. Consolidated bioprocessing of starchy substrates into ethanol by industrial Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains secreting fungal amylases.

    PubMed

    Favaro, Lorenzo; Viktor, Marko J; Rose, Shaunita H; Viljoen-Bloom, Marinda; van Zyl, Willem H; Basaglia, Marina; Cagnin, Lorenzo; Casella, Sergio

    2015-09-01

    The development of a yeast strain that converts raw starch to ethanol in one step (called Consolidated Bioprocessing, CBP) could significantly reduce the commercial costs of starch-based bioethanol. An efficient amylolytic Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain suitable for industrial bioethanol production was developed in this study. Codon-optimized variants of the Thermomyces lanuginosus glucoamylase (TLG1) and Saccharomycopsis fibuligera α-amylase (SFA1) genes were δ-integrated into two S. cerevisiae yeast with promising industrial traits, i.e., strains M2n and MEL2. The recombinant M2n[TLG1-SFA1] and MEL2[TLG1-SFA1] yeast displayed high enzyme activities on soluble and raw starch (up to 8118 and 4461 nkat/g dry cell weight, respectively) and produced about 64 g/L ethanol from 200 g/L raw corn starch in a bioreactor, corresponding to 55% of the theoretical maximum ethanol yield (g of ethanol/g of available glucose equivalent). Their starch-to-ethanol conversion efficiencies were even higher on natural sorghum and triticale substrates (62 and 73% of the theoretical yield, respectively). This is the first report of direct ethanol production from natural starchy substrates (without any pre-treatment or commercial enzyme addition) using industrial yeast strains co-secreting both a glucoamylase and α-amylase. PMID:25786804

  16. Generation of a novel Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain that exhibits strong maltose utilization and hyperosmotic resistance using nonrecombinant techniques.

    PubMed

    Higgins, V J; Bell, P J; Dawes, I W; Attfield, P V

    2001-09-01

    A yeast strain capable of leavening both unsugared and sweet bread dough efficiently would reduce the necessity of carrying out the expensive procedure of producing multiple baker's yeast strains. But issues involving the use of genetically modified foods have rendered the use of recombinant techniques for developing yeast strains controversial. Therefore, we used strong selection and screening systems in conjunction with traditional mass mating techniques to develop a strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae that efficiently leavens both types of dough.

  17. Isolation and characterization of a freeze-tolerant diploid derivative of an industrial baker's yeast strain and its use in frozen doughs.

    PubMed

    Teunissen, Aloys; Dumortier, Françoise; Gorwa, Marie-Françoise; Bauer, Jürgen; Tanghe, An; Loïez, Annie; Smet, Peter; Van Dijck, Patrick; Thevelein, Johan M

    2002-10-01

    The routine production and storage of frozen doughs are still problematic. Although commercial baker's yeast is highly resistant to environmental stress conditions, it rapidly loses stress resistance during dough preparation due to the initiation of fermentation. As a result, the yeast loses gassing power significantly during storage of frozen doughs. We obtained freeze-tolerant mutants of polyploid industrial strains following screening for survival in doughs prepared with UV-mutagenized yeast and subjected to 200 freeze-thaw cycles. Two strains in the S47 background with a normal growth rate and the best freeze tolerance under laboratory conditions were selected for production in a 20-liter pilot fermentor. Before frozen storage, the AT25 mutant produced on the 20-liter pilot scale had a 10% higher gassing power capacity than the S47 strain, while the opposite was observed for cells produced under laboratory conditions. AT25 also retained more freeze tolerance during the initiation of fermentation in liquid cultures and more gassing power during storage of frozen doughs. Other industrially important properties (yield, growth rate, nitrogen assimilation, and phosphorus content) were very similar. AT25 had only half of the DNA content of S47, and its cell size was much smaller. Several diploid segregants of S47 had freeze tolerances similar to that of AT25 but inferior performance for other properties, while an AT25-derived tetraploid, TAT25, showed only slightly improved freeze tolerance compared to S47. When AT25 was cultured in a 20,000-liter fermentor under industrial conditions, it retained its superior performance and thus appears to be promising for use in frozen dough production. Our results also show that a diploid strain can perform at least as well as a tetraploid strain for commercial baker's yeast production and usage. PMID:12324320

  18. Raspberry wine fermentation with suspended and immobilized yeast cells of two strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Djordjević, Radovan; Gibson, Brian; Sandell, Mari; de Billerbeck, Gustavo M; Bugarski, Branko; Leskošek-Čukalović, Ida; Vunduk, Jovana; Nikićević, Ninoslav; Nedović, Viktor

    2015-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to assess the differences in fermentative behaviour of two different strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae (EC1118 and RC212) and to determine the differences in composition and sensory properties of raspberry wines fermented with immobilized and suspended yeast cells of both strains at 15 °C. Analyses of aroma compounds, glycerol, acetic acid and ethanol, as well as the kinetics of fermentation and a sensory evaluation of the wines, were performed. All fermentations with immobilized yeast cells had a shorter lag phase and faster utilization of sugars and ethanol production than those fermented with suspended cells. Slower fermentation kinetics were observed in all the samples that were fermented with strain RC212 (suspended and immobilized) than in samples fermented with strain EC1118. Significantly higher amounts of acetic acid were detected in all samples fermented with strain RC212 than in those fermented with strain EC1118 (0.282 and 0.602 g/l, respectively). Slightly higher amounts of glycerol were observed in samples fermented with strain EC1118 than in those fermented with strain RC212.

  19. Evaluation of industrial Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains as the chassis cell for second-generation bioethanol production.

    PubMed

    Li, Hongxing; Wu, Meiling; Xu, Lili; Hou, Jin; Guo, Ting; Bao, Xiaoming; Shen, Yu

    2015-03-01

    To develop a suitable Saccharomyces cerevisiae industrial strain as a chassis cell for ethanol production using lignocellulosic materials, 32 wild-type strains were evaluated for their glucose fermenting ability, their tolerance to the stresses they might encounter in lignocellulosic hydrolysate fermentation and their genetic background for pentose metabolism. The strain BSIF, isolated from tropical fruit in Thailand, was selected out of the distinctly different strains studied for its promising characteristics. The maximal specific growth rate of BSIF was as high as 0.65 h(-1) in yeast extract peptone dextrose medium, and the ethanol yield was 0.45 g g(-1) consumed glucose. Furthermore, compared with other strains, this strain exhibited superior tolerance to high temperature, hyperosmotic stress and oxidative stress; better growth performance in lignocellulosic hydrolysate; and better xylose utilization capacity when an initial xylose metabolic pathway was introduced. All of these results indicate that this strain is an excellent chassis strain for lignocellulosic ethanol production.

  20. Raspberry wine fermentation with suspended and immobilized yeast cells of two strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Djordjević, Radovan; Gibson, Brian; Sandell, Mari; de Billerbeck, Gustavo M; Bugarski, Branko; Leskošek-Čukalović, Ida; Vunduk, Jovana; Nikićević, Ninoslav; Nedović, Viktor

    2015-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to assess the differences in fermentative behaviour of two different strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae (EC1118 and RC212) and to determine the differences in composition and sensory properties of raspberry wines fermented with immobilized and suspended yeast cells of both strains at 15 °C. Analyses of aroma compounds, glycerol, acetic acid and ethanol, as well as the kinetics of fermentation and a sensory evaluation of the wines, were performed. All fermentations with immobilized yeast cells had a shorter lag phase and faster utilization of sugars and ethanol production than those fermented with suspended cells. Slower fermentation kinetics were observed in all the samples that were fermented with strain RC212 (suspended and immobilized) than in samples fermented with strain EC1118. Significantly higher amounts of acetic acid were detected in all samples fermented with strain RC212 than in those fermented with strain EC1118 (0.282 and 0.602 g/l, respectively). Slightly higher amounts of glycerol were observed in samples fermented with strain EC1118 than in those fermented with strain RC212. PMID:25418076

  1. Rim15p-mediated regulation of sucrose utilization during molasses fermentation using Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain PE-2.

    PubMed

    Inai, Tomomi; Watanabe, Daisuke; Zhou, Yan; Fukada, Rie; Akao, Takeshi; Shima, Jun; Takagi, Hiroshi; Shimoi, Hitoshi

    2013-11-01

    Inherited loss-of-function mutations in the Rim15p-mediated stress-response pathway contribute to the high fermentation rate of sake yeast strains. In the present study, we found that disruption of the RIM15 gene in ethanol-producing Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain PE-2 accelerated molasses fermentation through enhanced sucrose utilization following glucose starvation.

  2. A novel strategy to construct yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains for very high gravity fermentation.

    PubMed

    Tao, Xianglin; Zheng, Daoqiong; Liu, Tianzhe; Wang, Pinmei; Zhao, Wenpeng; Zhu, Muyuan; Jiang, Xinhang; Zhao, Yuhua; Wu, Xuechang

    2012-01-01

    Very high gravity (VHG) fermentation is aimed to considerably increase both the fermentation rate and the ethanol concentration, thereby reducing capital costs and the risk of bacterial contamination. This process results in critical issues, such as adverse stress factors (ie., osmotic pressure and ethanol inhibition) and high concentrations of metabolic byproducts which are difficult to overcome by a single breeding method. In the present paper, a novel strategy that combines metabolic engineering and genome shuffling to circumvent these limitations and improve the bioethanol production performance of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains under VHG conditions was developed. First, in strain Z5, which performed better than other widely used industrial strains, the gene GPD2 encoding glycerol 3-phosphate dehydrogenase was deleted, resulting in a mutant (Z5ΔGPD2) with a lower glycerol yield and poor ethanol productivity. Second, strain Z5ΔGPD2 was subjected to three rounds of genome shuffling to improve its VHG fermentation performance, and the best performing strain SZ3-1 was obtained. Results showed that strain SZ3-1 not only produced less glycerol, but also increased the ethanol yield by up to 8% compared with the parent strain Z5. Further analysis suggested that the improved ethanol yield in strain SZ3-1 was mainly contributed by the enhanced ethanol tolerance of the strain. The differences in ethanol tolerance between strains Z5 and SZ3-1 were closely associated with the cell membrane fatty acid compositions and intracellular trehalose concentrations. Finally, genome rearrangements in the optimized strain were confirmed by karyotype analysis. Hence, a combination of genome shuffling and metabolic engineering is an efficient approach for the rapid improvement of yeast strains for desirable industrial phenotypes.

  3. Impact of Commercial Strain Use on Saccharomyces cerevisiae Population Structure and Dynamics in Pinot Noir Vineyards and Spontaneous Fermentations of a Canadian Winery

    PubMed Central

    Martiniuk, Jonathan T.; Pacheco, Braydon; Russell, Gordon; Tong, Stephanie; Backstrom, Ian; Measday, Vivien

    2016-01-01

    Wine is produced by one of two methods: inoculated fermentation, where a commercially-produced, single Saccharomyces cerevisiae (S. cerevisiae) yeast strain is used; or the traditional spontaneous fermentation, where yeast present on grape and winery surfaces carry out the fermentative process. Spontaneous fermentations are characterized by a diverse succession of yeast, ending with one or multiple strains of S. cerevisiae dominating the fermentation. In wineries using both fermentation methods, commercial strains may dominate spontaneous fermentations. We elucidate the impact of the winery environment and commercial strain use on S. cerevisiae population structure in spontaneous fermentations over two vintages by comparing S. cerevisiae populations in aseptically fermented grapes from a Canadian Pinot Noir vineyard to S. cerevisiae populations in winery-conducted fermentations of grapes from the same vineyard. We also characterize the vineyard-associated S. cerevisiae populations in two other geographically separate Pinot Noir vineyards farmed by the same winery. Winery fermentations were not dominated by commercial strains, but by a diverse number of strains with genotypes similar to commercial strains, suggesting that a population of S. cerevisiae derived from commercial strains is resident in the winery. Commercial and commercial-related yeast were also identified in the three vineyards examined, although at a lower frequency. There is low genetic differentiation and S. cerevisiae population structure between vineyards and between the vineyard and winery that persisted over both vintages, indicating commercial yeast are a driver of S. cerevisiae population structure. We also have evidence of distinct and persistent populations of winery and vineyard-associated S. cerevisiae populations unrelated to commercial strains. This study is the first to characterize S. cerevisiae populations in Canadian vineyards. PMID:27551920

  4. Impact of Commercial Strain Use on Saccharomyces cerevisiae Population Structure and Dynamics in Pinot Noir Vineyards and Spontaneous Fermentations of a Canadian Winery.

    PubMed

    Martiniuk, Jonathan T; Pacheco, Braydon; Russell, Gordon; Tong, Stephanie; Backstrom, Ian; Measday, Vivien

    2016-01-01

    Wine is produced by one of two methods: inoculated fermentation, where a commercially-produced, single Saccharomyces cerevisiae (S. cerevisiae) yeast strain is used; or the traditional spontaneous fermentation, where yeast present on grape and winery surfaces carry out the fermentative process. Spontaneous fermentations are characterized by a diverse succession of yeast, ending with one or multiple strains of S. cerevisiae dominating the fermentation. In wineries using both fermentation methods, commercial strains may dominate spontaneous fermentations. We elucidate the impact of the winery environment and commercial strain use on S. cerevisiae population structure in spontaneous fermentations over two vintages by comparing S. cerevisiae populations in aseptically fermented grapes from a Canadian Pinot Noir vineyard to S. cerevisiae populations in winery-conducted fermentations of grapes from the same vineyard. We also characterize the vineyard-associated S. cerevisiae populations in two other geographically separate Pinot Noir vineyards farmed by the same winery. Winery fermentations were not dominated by commercial strains, but by a diverse number of strains with genotypes similar to commercial strains, suggesting that a population of S. cerevisiae derived from commercial strains is resident in the winery. Commercial and commercial-related yeast were also identified in the three vineyards examined, although at a lower frequency. There is low genetic differentiation and S. cerevisiae population structure between vineyards and between the vineyard and winery that persisted over both vintages, indicating commercial yeast are a driver of S. cerevisiae population structure. We also have evidence of distinct and persistent populations of winery and vineyard-associated S. cerevisiae populations unrelated to commercial strains. This study is the first to characterize S. cerevisiae populations in Canadian vineyards. PMID:27551920

  5. Impact of Commercial Strain Use on Saccharomyces cerevisiae Population Structure and Dynamics in Pinot Noir Vineyards and Spontaneous Fermentations of a Canadian Winery.

    PubMed

    Martiniuk, Jonathan T; Pacheco, Braydon; Russell, Gordon; Tong, Stephanie; Backstrom, Ian; Measday, Vivien

    2016-01-01

    Wine is produced by one of two methods: inoculated fermentation, where a commercially-produced, single Saccharomyces cerevisiae (S. cerevisiae) yeast strain is used; or the traditional spontaneous fermentation, where yeast present on grape and winery surfaces carry out the fermentative process. Spontaneous fermentations are characterized by a diverse succession of yeast, ending with one or multiple strains of S. cerevisiae dominating the fermentation. In wineries using both fermentation methods, commercial strains may dominate spontaneous fermentations. We elucidate the impact of the winery environment and commercial strain use on S. cerevisiae population structure in spontaneous fermentations over two vintages by comparing S. cerevisiae populations in aseptically fermented grapes from a Canadian Pinot Noir vineyard to S. cerevisiae populations in winery-conducted fermentations of grapes from the same vineyard. We also characterize the vineyard-associated S. cerevisiae populations in two other geographically separate Pinot Noir vineyards farmed by the same winery. Winery fermentations were not dominated by commercial strains, but by a diverse number of strains with genotypes similar to commercial strains, suggesting that a population of S. cerevisiae derived from commercial strains is resident in the winery. Commercial and commercial-related yeast were also identified in the three vineyards examined, although at a lower frequency. There is low genetic differentiation and S. cerevisiae population structure between vineyards and between the vineyard and winery that persisted over both vintages, indicating commercial yeast are a driver of S. cerevisiae population structure. We also have evidence of distinct and persistent populations of winery and vineyard-associated S. cerevisiae populations unrelated to commercial strains. This study is the first to characterize S. cerevisiae populations in Canadian vineyards.

  6. Breeding of a xylose-fermenting hybrid strain by mating genetically engineered haploid strains derived from industrial Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Hiroyuki; Hashimoto, Seitaro; Matsushika, Akinori; Watanabe, Seiya; Sawayama, Shigeki

    2014-12-01

    The industrial Saccharomyces cerevisiae IR-2 is a promising host strain to genetically engineer xylose-utilizing yeasts for ethanol fermentation from lignocellulosic hydrolysates. Two IR-2-based haploid strains were selected based upon the rate of xylulose fermentation, and hybrids were obtained by mating recombinant haploid strains harboring heterogeneous xylose dehydrogenase (XDH) (wild-type NAD(+)-dependent XDH or engineered NADP(+)-dependent XDH, ARSdR), xylose reductase (XR) and xylulose kinase (XK) genes. ARSdR in the hybrids selected for growth rates on yeast extract-peptone-dextrose (YPD) agar and YP-xylose agar plates typically had a higher activity than NAD(+)-dependent XDH. Furthermore, the xylose-fermenting performance of the hybrid strain SE12 with the same level of heterogeneous XDH activity was similar to that of a recombinant strain of IR-2 harboring a single set of genes, XR/ARSdR/XK. These results suggest not only that the recombinant haploid strains retain the appropriate genetic background of IR-2 for ethanol production from xylose but also that ARSdR is preferable for xylose fermentation.

  7. Study of Saccharomyces cerevisiae wine strains for breeding through fermentation efficiency and tetrad analysis.

    PubMed

    Fernández-González, Mónica; Úbeda, Juan F; Briones, Ana I

    2015-03-01

    One of the issues that most concerns to both winemakers and producers of active dry yeasts is the stuck and sluggish fermentations of grape musts with high levels of sugar, reflecting the inability of inoculated yeast strain to complete the fermentation process. It is difficult to obtain a wine strain that possesses both adequate oenological and technological properties; thus, the correct approach to solving these problems is the application of breeding programs primarily focused on both properties. The first step toward this process is to characterize the phenotypic diversity between potential parental strains. In the present study, we have analyzed the fermentative behavior of 26 Saccharomyces cerevisiae wine strains in high-sugar conditions at 20 °C, using a range of tests, such as sporulation ability, spore viability, and tetrad analysis to determine the tolerance of these yeasts to several stress conditions. Most tested strains were homothallic and heterozygous for more than one character. Two auxotrophic derivatives with defects in amino acid or nucleic acid metabolism were obtained, and these strains could potentially be used for the development of hybridization techniques without using laboratory strains. PMID:25447272

  8. Impact of different spray-drying conditions on the viability of wine Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains.

    PubMed

    Aponte, Maria; Troianiello, Gabriele Danilo; Di Capua, Marika; Romano, Raffaele; Blaiotta, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Spray-drying (SD) is widely considered a suitable method to preserve microorganisms, but data regarding yeasts are still scanty. In this study, the effect of growing media, process variables and carriers over viability of a wild wine Saccharomyces (S.) cerevisiae LM52 was evaluated. For biomass production, the strain was grown (batch and fed-batch fermentation) in a synthetic, as well as in a beet sugar molasses based-medium. Drying of cells resuspended in several combinations of soluble starch and maltose was performed at different inlet and outlet temperatures. Under the best conditions-suspension in soluble starch plus maltose couplet to inlet and outlet temperatures of 110 and 55 °C, respectively-the loss of viability of S. cerevisiae LM52 was 0.8 ± 0.1 and 0.5 ± 0.2 Log c.f.u. g(-1) for synthetic and molasses-based medium, respectively. Similar results were obtained when S. cerevisiae strains Zymoflore F15 and EC1118, isolated from commercial active dry yeast (ADY), were tested. Moreover, powders retained a high vitality and showed good fermentation performances up to 6 month of storage, at both 4 and -20 °C. Finally, fermentation performances of different kinds of dried formulates (SD and ADY) compared with fresh cultures did not show significant differences. The procedure proposed allowed a small-scale production of yeast in continuous operation with relatively simple equipment, and may thus represent a rapid response-on-demand for the production of autochthonous yeasts for local wine-making.

  9. Impact of different spray-drying conditions on the viability of wine Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains.

    PubMed

    Aponte, Maria; Troianiello, Gabriele Danilo; Di Capua, Marika; Romano, Raffaele; Blaiotta, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Spray-drying (SD) is widely considered a suitable method to preserve microorganisms, but data regarding yeasts are still scanty. In this study, the effect of growing media, process variables and carriers over viability of a wild wine Saccharomyces (S.) cerevisiae LM52 was evaluated. For biomass production, the strain was grown (batch and fed-batch fermentation) in a synthetic, as well as in a beet sugar molasses based-medium. Drying of cells resuspended in several combinations of soluble starch and maltose was performed at different inlet and outlet temperatures. Under the best conditions-suspension in soluble starch plus maltose couplet to inlet and outlet temperatures of 110 and 55 °C, respectively-the loss of viability of S. cerevisiae LM52 was 0.8 ± 0.1 and 0.5 ± 0.2 Log c.f.u. g(-1) for synthetic and molasses-based medium, respectively. Similar results were obtained when S. cerevisiae strains Zymoflore F15 and EC1118, isolated from commercial active dry yeast (ADY), were tested. Moreover, powders retained a high vitality and showed good fermentation performances up to 6 month of storage, at both 4 and -20 °C. Finally, fermentation performances of different kinds of dried formulates (SD and ADY) compared with fresh cultures did not show significant differences. The procedure proposed allowed a small-scale production of yeast in continuous operation with relatively simple equipment, and may thus represent a rapid response-on-demand for the production of autochthonous yeasts for local wine-making. PMID:26712628

  10. EasyClone 2.0: expanded toolkit of integrative vectors for stable gene expression in industrial Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains.

    PubMed

    Stovicek, Vratislav; Borja, Gheorghe M; Forster, Jochen; Borodina, Irina

    2015-11-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae is one of the key cell factories for production of chemicals and active pharmaceuticals. For large-scale fermentations, particularly in biorefinery applications, it is desirable to use stress-tolerant industrial strains. However, such strains are less amenable for metabolic engineering than the standard laboratory strains. To enable easy delivery and overexpression of genes in a wide range of industrial S. cerevisiae strains, we constructed a set of integrative vectors with long homology arms and dominant selection markers. The vectors integrate into previously validated chromosomal locations via double cross-over and result in homogenous stable expression of the integrated genes, as shown for several unrelated industrial strains. Cre-mediated marker rescue is possible for removing markers positioned on different chromosomes. To demonstrate the applicability of the presented vector set for metabolic engineering of industrial yeast, we constructed xylose-utilizing strains overexpressing xylose isomerase, xylose transporter and five genes of the pentose phosphate pathway.

  11. High vanillin tolerance of an evolved Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain owing to its enhanced vanillin reduction and antioxidative capacity.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yu; Li, Hongxing; Wang, Xinning; Zhang, Xiaoran; Hou, Jin; Wang, Linfeng; Gao, Nan; Bao, Xiaoming

    2014-11-01

    The phenolic compounds present in hydrolysates pose significant challenges for the sustainable lignocellulosic materials refining industry. Three Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains with high tolerance to lignocellulose hydrolysate were obtained through ethyl methanesulfonate mutation and adaptive evolution. Among them, strain EMV-8 exhibits specific tolerance to vanillin, a phenolic compound common in lignocellulose hydrolysate. The EMV-8 maintains a specific growth rate of 0.104 h(-1) in 2 g L(-1) vanillin, whereas the reference strain cannot grow. Physiological studies revealed that the vanillin reduction rate of EMV-8 is 1.92-fold higher than its parent strain, and the Trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity of EMV-8 is 15 % higher than its parent strain. Transcriptional analysis results confirmed an up-regulated oxidoreductase activity and antioxidant activity in this strain. Our results suggest that enhancing the antioxidant capacity and oxidoreductase activity could be a strategy to engineer S. cerevisiae for improved vanillin tolerance.

  12. Evolved Saccharomyces cerevisiae wine strains with enhanced glutathione production obtained by an evolution-based strategy.

    PubMed

    Mezzetti, Francesco; De Vero, Luciana; Giudici, Paolo

    2014-09-01

    In winemaking, the application of glutathione (GSH) has been the subject of ever-growing interest because of its important role in limiting must and wine oxidation and in protecting various aromatic compounds. Glutathione concentration in wine is highly variable, involving as it does several factors from must, through alcoholic fermentation, to yeast strain activity. Consequently, the development of new wine yeast strains able to improve flavor stability is in great demand. To generate evolved Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains with enhanced GSH production, we have applied an evolution-based strategy that combines the sexual recombination of spores with the application of molybdate, which is toxic for the cells at high concentration, as specific selective pressure. Eight molybdate-resistant strains were selected and further screened for GSH production in synthetic grape must and in microvinification assay. By this nongenetically modified strategy, we obtained two evolved strains, Mo21T2-5 and Mo21T2-12, both able to enhance GSH content in wine with an increase of 100% and 36%, respectively, compared with the parental strain 21T2, and 120% and 50% compared with initial GSH content in the must. PMID:25041878

  13. Near-freezing effects on the proteome of industrial yeast strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Ballester-Tomás, Lidia; Pérez-Torrado, Roberto; Rodríguez-Vargas, Sonia; Prieto, Jose A; Randez-Gil, Francisca

    2016-03-10

    At near-freezing temperatures (0-4°C), the growth of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae stops or is severely limited, and viability decreases. Under these conditions, yeast cells trigger a biochemical response, in which trehalose and glycerol accumulate and protect them against severe cold and freeze injury. However, the mechanisms that allow yeast cells to sustain this response have been not clarified. The effects of severe cold on the proteome of S. cerevisiae have been not investigated and its importance in providing cell survival at near-freezing temperatures and upon freezing remains unknown. Here, we have compared the protein profile of two industrial baker's yeast strains at 30°C and 4°C. Overall, a total of 16 proteins involved in energy-metabolism, translation and redox homeostasis were identified as showing increased abundance at 4°C. The predominant presence of glycolytic proteins among those upregulated at 4°C, likely represents a mechanism to maintain a constant supply of ATP for the synthesis of glycerol and other protective molecules. Accumulation of these molecules is by far the most important component in enhancing viability of baker's yeast strains upon freezing. Overexpression of genes encoding certain proteins associated with translation or redox homeostasis provided specifically protection against extreme cold damage, underlying the importance of these functions in the near-freezing response. PMID:26812658

  14. Identification and classification of genes required for tolerance to freeze-thaw stress revealed by genome-wide screening of Saccharomyces cerevisiae deletion strains.

    PubMed

    Ando, Akira; Nakamura, Toshihide; Murata, Yoshinori; Takagi, Hiroshi; Shima, Jun

    2007-03-01

    Yeasts used in bread making are exposed to freeze-thaw stress during frozen-dough baking. To clarify the genes required for freeze-thaw tolerance, genome-wide screening was performed using the complete deletion strain collection of diploid Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The screening identified 58 gene deletions that conferred freeze-thaw sensitivity. These genes were then classified based on their cellular function and on the localization of their products. The results showed that the genes required for freeze-thaw tolerance were frequently involved in vacuole functions and cell wall biogenesis. The highest numbers of gene products were components of vacuolar H(+)-ATPase. Next, the cross-sensitivity of the freeze-thaw-sensitive mutants to oxidative stress and to cell wall stress was studied; both of these are environmental stresses closely related to freeze-thaw stress. The results showed that defects in the functions of vacuolar H(+)-ATPase conferred sensitivity to oxidative stress and to cell wall stress. In contrast, defects in gene products involved in cell wall assembly conferred sensitivity to cell wall stress but not to oxidative stress. Our results suggest the presence of at least two different mechanisms of freeze-thaw injury: oxidative stress generated during the freeze-thaw process, and defects in cell wall assembly. PMID:16989656

  15. Increased inactivation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae by protraction of UV irradiation.

    PubMed Central

    Sommer, R; Haider, T; Cabaj, A; Heidenreich, E; Kundi, M

    1996-01-01

    The principle of equi-effectivity of the product of intensity and exposure time (principle of Bunsen-Roscoe) of UV irradiation has been assumed to be valid for the inactivation of microorganisms in general. Earlier studies claimed higher survival of Escherichia coli B/r with fractionated irradiation compared with single-exposure survival. However, data on the inactivation effect of protraction of UV irradiation are not available. By means of a specially designed UV irradiation apparatus which secured absolute UV dose measurements throughout the experiments, the effects of variation of UV irradiation intensities (253.7 nm) and exposure times were tested on the inactivation of a bacterial virus (Staphylococcus aureus phage A994), a vegetative bacterial strain (E. coli ATCC 25922), and bacterial spores (Bacillus subtilis ATCC 6633) as well as three haploid laboratory strains (RC43a, YNN281, and YNN282) and two diploid strains (commercial bakery yeast strain and laboratory strain YNN281 x YNN282) or yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) and spores of the latter diploid yeast strain. Each test organism was exposed to three UV intensities (0.02, 0.2, and 2 W/m2), with corresponding exposure times resulting in three dose levels for each intensity. Differences in inactivation rates were tested by analyses of variance and Newman-Keuls tests. Virus and bacteria showed no differences in inactivation rates by variation of intensities and exposure times within selected UV doses; hence, the principle of Bunsen-Roscoe could not be rejected for these strains. However, in the eukaryotic test strains of S. cerevisiae longer exposure times with lower intensities led to enhanced inactivation in both haploid and diploid strains, with a more pronounced effect in the diploid yeast strains, whereas in yeast spores in this dose rate effect could not be observed. PMID:8787396

  16. Haploid deletion strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae that determine survival during space flight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johanson, Kelly; Allen, Patricia L.; Gonzalez-Villalobos, Romer A.; Nesbit, Jacqueline; Nickerson, Cheryl A.; Höner zu Bentrup, Kerstin; Wilson, James W.; Ramamurthy, Rajee; D'Elia, Riccardo; Muse, Kenneth E.; Hammond, Jeffrey; Freeman, Jake; Stodieck, Louis S.; Hammond, Timothy G.

    2007-02-01

    This study identifies genes that determine survival during a space flight, using the model eukaryotic organism, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Select strains of a haploid yeast deletion series grew during storage in distilled water in space, but not in ground based static or clinorotation controls. The survival advantages in space in distilled water include a 133-fold advantage for the deletion of PEX19, a chaperone and import receptor for newly- synthesized class I peroxisomal membrane proteins, to 77-40 fold for deletion strains lacking elements of aerobic respiration, isocitrate metabolism, and mitochondrial electron transport. Following automated addition of rich growth media, the space flight was associated with a marked survival advantage of strains with deletions in catalytically active genes including hydrolases, oxidoreductases and transferases. When compared to static controls, space flight was associated with a marked survival disadvantage of deletion strains lacking transporter, antioxidant and catalytic activity. This study identifies yeast deletion strains with a survival advantage during storage in distilled water and space flight, and amplifies our understanding of the genes critical for survival in space.

  17. Absolute quantitation of glycolytic intermediates reveals thermodynamic shifts in Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains lacking PFK1 or ZWF1 genes.

    PubMed

    Nishino, Shunsuke; Okahashi, Nobuyuki; Matsuda, Fumio; Shimizu, Hiroshi

    2015-09-01

    Internal standard based absolute quantitation of glycolytic intermediates was performed to characterize the thermodynamic states of Saccharomyces cerevisiae metabolism. A mixture of (13)C-labeled glycolytic intermediates was prepared via extraction from S. cerevisiae cells cultivated using a synthetic medium containing [U-(13)C] glucose as the sole carbon source. The (13)C-labeled metabolite mixture was used as an internal standard for the analysis of S. cerevisiae cultivated in a medium containing natural glucose. The methodology was employed for the absolute quantitation of glycolytic intermediates of BY4742, pfk1Δ, and zwf1Δ strains of S. cerevisiae. Fructose-1,6-bisphosphate was the most abundant intermediate in the BY4742 strains in the log phase of growth. Estimation of the Gibbs free energy change (ΔG) from the absolute concentration revealed that several reactions, such as those catalyzed by ribose-5-phosphate keto-isomerase and phosphoglucose isomerase, were commonly at near-equilibrium in all three strains. A significant shift in thermodynamic state was also observed for the transketolase-transaldolase reaction, for which ΔG was -6.6 ± 0.5 kJ mol(-1) in the BY4742 strain and 5.4 ± 0.3 kJ mol(-1) in the zwf1Δ strain.

  18. Loss of lager specific genes and subtelomeric regions define two different Saccharomyces cerevisiae lineages for Saccharomyces pastorianus Group I and II strains.

    PubMed

    Monerawela, Chandre; James, Tharappel C; Wolfe, Kenneth H; Bond, Ursula

    2015-03-01

    Lager yeasts, Saccharomyces pastorianus, are interspecies hybrids between S. cerevisiae and S. eubayanus and are classified into Group I and Group II clades. The genome of the Group II strain, Weihenstephan 34/70, contains eight so-called 'lager-specific' genes that are located in subtelomeric regions. We evaluated the origins of these genes through bioinformatic and PCR analyses of Saccharomyces genomes. We determined that four are of cerevisiae origin while four originate from S. eubayanus. The Group I yeasts contain all four S. eubayanus genes but individual strains contain only a subset of the cerevisiae genes. We identified S. cerevisiae strains that contain all four cerevisiae 'lager-specific' genes, and distinct patterns of loss of these genes in other strains. Analysis of the subtelomeric regions uncovered patterns of loss in different S. cerevisiae strains. We identify two classes of S. cerevisiae strains: ale yeasts (Foster O) and stout yeasts with patterns of 'lager-specific' genes and subtelomeric regions identical to Group I and II S. pastorianus yeasts, respectively. These findings lead us to propose that Group I and II S. pastorianus strains originate from separate hybridization events involving different S. cerevisiae lineages. Using the combined bioinformatic and PCR data, we describe a potential classification map for industrial yeasts.

  19. A reference model systesm of industrial yeasts Saccharomyces cerevisiae is needed for development of the next-generation biocatalyst toward advanced biofuels production

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Diploid industrial yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has demonstrated distinct characteristics that differ from haploid laboratory model strains. However, as a workhorse for a broad range of fermentation-based industrial applications, it was poorly characterized at the genome level. Observations on the...

  20. Production of fructanase by a wild strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae on tequila agave fructan.

    PubMed

    Corona-González, R I; Pelayo-Ortiz, C; Jacques, G; Guatemala, G; Arriola, E; Arias, J A; Toriz, G

    2015-01-01

    A new wild strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae (CF3) isolated from tequila must was evaluated for production of fructanase on Agave tequilana Weber fructan (FT). Fructanase activity (F) was assessed by a 3(3) factorial design (substrate, temperature and pH). High enzymatic activity (31.1 U/ml) was found at 30 °C, pH 5, using FT (10 g/l) as substrate. The effect of initial substrate concentration on F (FT0, 5.7-66 g/l) was studied and it was found that F was highest (44.8 U/ml) at FT0 25 g/l. A 2(2) factorial experimental design with five central points was utilized to study the effect of stirring and aeration on fructanase activity; stirring exhibited a stronger effect on F. The ratio fructanase to invertase (F/S) was 0.57, which confirms that the enzymes are fructanase. Crude fructanase reached high substrate hydrolysis (48 wt%) in 10 h. It is shown that S. cerevisiae CF3 was able to produce large amounts of fructanase by growing it on fructan from A. tequilana.

  1. Production of fructanase by a wild strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae on tequila agave fructan.

    PubMed

    Corona-González, R I; Pelayo-Ortiz, C; Jacques, G; Guatemala, G; Arriola, E; Arias, J A; Toriz, G

    2015-01-01

    A new wild strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae (CF3) isolated from tequila must was evaluated for production of fructanase on Agave tequilana Weber fructan (FT). Fructanase activity (F) was assessed by a 3(3) factorial design (substrate, temperature and pH). High enzymatic activity (31.1 U/ml) was found at 30 °C, pH 5, using FT (10 g/l) as substrate. The effect of initial substrate concentration on F (FT0, 5.7-66 g/l) was studied and it was found that F was highest (44.8 U/ml) at FT0 25 g/l. A 2(2) factorial experimental design with five central points was utilized to study the effect of stirring and aeration on fructanase activity; stirring exhibited a stronger effect on F. The ratio fructanase to invertase (F/S) was 0.57, which confirms that the enzymes are fructanase. Crude fructanase reached high substrate hydrolysis (48 wt%) in 10 h. It is shown that S. cerevisiae CF3 was able to produce large amounts of fructanase by growing it on fructan from A. tequilana. PMID:25432071

  2. Different strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae differ in their effects on ruminal bacterial numbers in vitro and in sheep.

    PubMed

    Newbold, C J; Wallace, R J; Chen, X B; McIntosh, F M

    1995-06-01

    A ruminal simulation device (Rusitec) was used to compare the effects of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains NCYC 240, NCYC 694, NCYC 1026, NCYC 1088, and Yea-Sacc (a commercial product containing S. cerevisiae) on ruminal fermentation. S. cerevisiae NCYC 240, NCYC 1088, NCYC 1026, and NCYC 694 were grown on malt extract at 30 degrees C in aerated fed-batch culture and harvested along with spent growth medium by freeze-drying. Each vessel received daily 20 g of a basal diet consisting of hay, barley, molasses, fishmeal, and a minerals/vitamins mixture at 500, 299.5, 100, 91, and 9.5 g/kg of DM, respectively. Yeast preparations (500 mg/d) were added along with the feed. S. cerevisiae NCYC 240, NCYC 1026, and Yea-Sacc stimulated total and cellulolytic bacterial numbers, whereas S. cerevisiae NCYC 694 and NCYC 1088 had no effect on the numbers of bacteria. The effects of S. cerevisiae NCYC 240, NCYC 1026, and Yea-Sacc on ruminal fermentation were further investigated in vivo using ruminally cannulated sheep fed 1.5 kg/d of the diet used in Rusitec, supplemented with 2 g/d of yeast culture. All treatments tended to stimulate total and cellulolytic bacterial numbers. However, the stimulation was only statistically significant for S. cerevisiae NCYC 1026 with total bacterial numbers and S. cerevisiae NCYC 240 with cellulolytic bacteria (P < .05). Increased bacterial numbers were associated with an increase in the rate of straw degradation in the rumen and a nonsignificant (P > .05) increase in the excretion of purine derivatives in the urine, measured as an index of microbial nitrogen leaving the rumen.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7673076

  3. Different strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae differ in their effects on ruminal bacterial numbers in vitro and in sheep.

    PubMed

    Newbold, C J; Wallace, R J; Chen, X B; McIntosh, F M

    1995-06-01

    A ruminal simulation device (Rusitec) was used to compare the effects of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains NCYC 240, NCYC 694, NCYC 1026, NCYC 1088, and Yea-Sacc (a commercial product containing S. cerevisiae) on ruminal fermentation. S. cerevisiae NCYC 240, NCYC 1088, NCYC 1026, and NCYC 694 were grown on malt extract at 30 degrees C in aerated fed-batch culture and harvested along with spent growth medium by freeze-drying. Each vessel received daily 20 g of a basal diet consisting of hay, barley, molasses, fishmeal, and a minerals/vitamins mixture at 500, 299.5, 100, 91, and 9.5 g/kg of DM, respectively. Yeast preparations (500 mg/d) were added along with the feed. S. cerevisiae NCYC 240, NCYC 1026, and Yea-Sacc stimulated total and cellulolytic bacterial numbers, whereas S. cerevisiae NCYC 694 and NCYC 1088 had no effect on the numbers of bacteria. The effects of S. cerevisiae NCYC 240, NCYC 1026, and Yea-Sacc on ruminal fermentation were further investigated in vivo using ruminally cannulated sheep fed 1.5 kg/d of the diet used in Rusitec, supplemented with 2 g/d of yeast culture. All treatments tended to stimulate total and cellulolytic bacterial numbers. However, the stimulation was only statistically significant for S. cerevisiae NCYC 1026 with total bacterial numbers and S. cerevisiae NCYC 240 with cellulolytic bacteria (P < .05). Increased bacterial numbers were associated with an increase in the rate of straw degradation in the rumen and a nonsignificant (P > .05) increase in the excretion of purine derivatives in the urine, measured as an index of microbial nitrogen leaving the rumen.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  4. Regulation of allantoate transport in wild-type and mutant strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Chisholm, V T; Lea, H Z; Rai, R; Cooper, T G

    1987-01-01

    Accumulation of intracellular allantoin and allantoate is mediated by two distinct active transport systems in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Allantoin transport (DAL4 gene) is inducible, while allantoate uptake is constitutive (it occurs at full levels in the absence of any allantoate-related compounds from the culture medium). Both systems appear to be sensitive to nitrogen catabolite repression, feedback inhibition, and trans-inhibition. Mutants (dal5) that lack allantoate transport have been isolated. These strains also exhibit a 60% loss of allantoin transport capability. Conversely, dal4 mutants previously described are unable to transport allantoin and exhibit a 50% loss of allantoate transport. We interpret the pleiotropic behavior of the dal4 and dal5 mutations as deriving from a functional interaction between elements of the two transport systems. PMID:3549700

  5. Efficient fermentation of an improved synthetic grape must by enological and laboratory strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Grape must or freshly pressed grape juice is a complex chemical matrix that impacts the efficiency of yeast fermentation. The composition of natural grape must (NGM) can be variable; thus, to ensure reproducibility, a synthetic grape must (SGM) with defined composition is commonly used. The aim of this work was to create conditions to advance the use of Saccharomyces cerevisiae laboratory strains for wine fermentation studies, considering previous results obtained for enological strains fermenting NGM under simulated winery conditions. We designed a new SGM formulation, ISA-SGM, by introducing specific modifications to a commonly used formulation, putting together previous reports. We added glucose and fructose in equal amounts (125 g/l) and 50 parts per million (ppm) sulfur dioxide (SO2, corresponding to standard enological treatment), and we optimized the concentrations of malic acid (3 g/l), citric acid (0.3 g/l), and tartaric acid (3 g/l). Using ISA-SGM, we obtained similar fermentative profiles for the wine strain ISA1000, the prototrophic strain S288C, and its auxotrophic derivative BY4741. In this case, the concentrations of supplements were optimized to 120 mg/l L-uracil, 80 mg/l L-methionine, 400 mg/l L-leucine, and 100 mg/l L-histidine. All these strains tested in ISA-SGM presented a similar fermentative performance as ISA1000 in NGM. ISA-SGM formulation is a promising new tool to allow the use of the auxotrophic BY strains in the detailed assessment of the alcoholic fermentation process under simulated winery conditions, and it provides a foundation to extract relevant physiological conclusions in future research on enological yeast traits. PMID:24949253

  6. Genome sequencing and comparative analysis of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain YJM789.

    PubMed

    Wei, Wu; McCusker, John H; Hyman, Richard W; Jones, Ted; Ning, Ye; Cao, Zhiwei; Gu, Zhenglong; Bruno, Dan; Miranda, Molly; Nguyen, Michelle; Wilhelmy, Julie; Komp, Caridad; Tamse, Raquel; Wang, Xiaojing; Jia, Peilin; Luedi, Philippe; Oefner, Peter J; David, Lior; Dietrich, Fred S; Li, Yixue; Davis, Ronald W; Steinmetz, Lars M

    2007-07-31

    We sequenced the genome of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain YJM789, which was derived from a yeast isolated from the lung of an AIDS patient with pneumonia. The strain is used for studies of fungal infections and quantitative genetics because of its extensive phenotypic differences to the laboratory reference strain, including growth at high temperature and deadly virulence in mouse models. Here we show that the approximately 12-Mb genome of YJM789 contains approximately 60,000 SNPs and approximately 6,000 indels with respect to the reference S288c genome, leading to protein polymorphisms with a few known cases of phenotypic changes. Several ORFs are found to be unique to YJM789, some of which might have been acquired through horizontal transfer. Localized regions of high polymorphism density are scattered over the genome, in some cases spanning multiple ORFs and in others concentrated within single genes. The sequence of YJM789 contains clues to pathogenicity and spurs the development of more powerful approaches to dissecting the genetic basis of complex hereditary traits.

  7. Genome sequencing and comparative analysis of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain YJM789

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Wu; McCusker, John H.; Hyman, Richard W.; Jones, Ted; Ning, Ye; Cao, Zhiwei; Gu, Zhenglong; Bruno, Dan; Miranda, Molly; Nguyen, Michelle; Wilhelmy, Julie; Komp, Caridad; Tamse, Raquel; Wang, Xiaojing; Jia, Peilin; Luedi, Philippe; Oefner, Peter J.; David, Lior; Dietrich, Fred S.; Li, Yixue; Davis, Ronald W.; Steinmetz, Lars M.

    2007-01-01

    We sequenced the genome of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain YJM789, which was derived from a yeast isolated from the lung of an AIDS patient with pneumonia. The strain is used for studies of fungal infections and quantitative genetics because of its extensive phenotypic differences to the laboratory reference strain, including growth at high temperature and deadly virulence in mouse models. Here we show that the ≈12-Mb genome of YJM789 contains ≈60,000 SNPs and ≈6,000 indels with respect to the reference S288c genome, leading to protein polymorphisms with a few known cases of phenotypic changes. Several ORFs are found to be unique to YJM789, some of which might have been acquired through horizontal transfer. Localized regions of high polymorphism density are scattered over the genome, in some cases spanning multiple ORFs and in others concentrated within single genes. The sequence of YJM789 contains clues to pathogenicity and spurs the development of more powerful approaches to dissecting the genetic basis of complex hereditary traits. PMID:17652520

  8. Expression variability of co-regulated genes differentiates Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Saccharomyces cerevisiae (Baker's yeast) is found in diverse ecological niches and is characterized by high adaptive potential under challenging environments. In spite of recent advances on the study of yeast genome diversity, little is known about the underlying gene expression plasticity. In order to shed new light onto this biological question, we have compared transcriptome profiles of five environmental isolates, clinical and laboratorial strains at different time points of fermentation in synthetic must medium, during exponential and stationary growth phases. Results Our data unveiled diversity in both intensity and timing of gene expression. Genes involved in glucose metabolism and in the stress response elicited during fermentation were among the most variable. This gene expression diversity increased at the onset of stationary phase (diauxic shift). Environmental isolates showed lower average transcript abundance of genes involved in the stress response, assimilation of nitrogen and vitamins, and sulphur metabolism, than other strains. Nitrogen metabolism genes showed significant variation in expression among the environmental isolates. Conclusions Wild type yeast strains respond differentially to the stress imposed by nutrient depletion, ethanol accumulation and cell density increase, during fermentation of glucose in synthetic must medium. Our results support previous data showing that gene expression variability is a source of phenotypic diversity among closely related organisms. PMID:21507216

  9. Transcriptional regulation of fermentative and respiratory metabolism in Saccharomyces cerevisiae industrial bakers' strains.

    PubMed

    Dueñas-Sánchez, Rafael; Gutiérrez, Gabriel; Rincón, Ana M; Codón, Antonio C; Benítez, Tahía

    2012-09-01

    Bakers' yeast-producing companies grow cells under respiratory conditions, at a very high growth rate. Some desirable properties of bakers' yeast may be altered if fermentation rather than respiration occurs during biomass production. That is why differences in gene expression patterns that take place when industrial bakers' yeasts are grown under fermentative, rather than respiratory conditions, were examined. Macroarray analysis of V1 strain indicated changes in gene expression similar to those already described in laboratory Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains: repression of most genes related to respiration and oxidative metabolism and derepression of genes related to ribosome biogenesis and stress resistance in fermentation. Under respiratory conditions, genes related to the glyoxylate and Krebs cycles, respiration, gluconeogenesis, and energy production are activated. DOG21 strain, a partly catabolite-derepressed mutant derived from V1, displayed gene expression patterns quite similar to those of V1, although lower levels of gene expression and changes in fewer number of genes as compared to V1 were both detected in all cases. However, under fermentative conditions, DOG21 mutant significantly increased the expression of SNF1 -controlled genes and other genes involved in stress resistance, whereas the expression of the HXK2 gene, involved in catabolite repression, was considerably reduced, according to the pleiotropic stress-resistant phenotype of this mutant. These results also seemed to suggest that stress-resistant genes control desirable bakers' yeast qualities.

  10. Paradigm for industrial strain improvement identifies sodium acetate tolerance loci in Zymomonas mobilis and Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Shihui; Land, Miriam L; Klingeman, Dawn Marie; Pelletier, Dale A; Lu, Tse-Yuan; Martin, S L.; Guo, Hao-Bo; Smith, Jeremy C; Brown, Steven D

    2010-01-01

    The application of systems biology tools holds promise for rational industrial microbial strain development. Here, we characterize a Zymomonas mobilis mutant (AcR) demonstrating sodium acetate tolerance that has potential importance in biofuel development. The genome changes associated with AcR are determined using microarray comparative genome sequencing (CGS) and 454-pyrosequencing. Sanger sequencing analysis is employed to validate genomic differences and to investigate CGS and 454-pyrosequencing limitations. Transcriptomics, genetic data and growth studies indicate that over-expression of the sodium-proton antiporter gene nhaA confers the elevated AcR sodium acetate tolerance phenotype. nhaA over-expression mostly confers enhanced sodium (Na{sup +}) tolerance and not acetate (Ac{sup -}) tolerance, unless both ions are present in sufficient quantities. NaAc is more inhibitory than potassium and ammonium acetate for Z. mobilis and the combination of elevated Na{sup +} and Ac{sup -} ions exerts a synergistic inhibitory effect for strain ZM4. A structural model for the NhaA sodium-proton antiporter is constructed to provide mechanistic insights. We demonstrate that Saccharomyces cerevisiae sodium-proton antiporter genes also contribute to sodium acetate, potassium acetate, and ammonium acetate tolerances. The present combination of classical and systems biology tools is a paradigm for accelerated industrial strain improvement and combines benefits of few a priori assumptions with detailed, rapid, mechanistic studies.

  11. A paradigm for strain improvement identifies sodium acetate tolerance loci in Zymomonas mobilis and Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Shihui; Land, Miriam L; Klingeman, Dawn Marie; Pelletier, Dale A; Lu, Tse-Yuan; Martin, S L.; Guo, Hao-Bo; Smith, Jeremy C; Brown, Steven D

    2010-04-01

    The application of systems biology tools holds promise for rational industrial microbial strain development. Here, we characterize a Zymomonas mobilis mutant (AcR) demonstrating sodium acetate tolerance that has potential importance in biofuel development. The genome changes associated with AcR are determined using microarray comparative genome sequencing (CGS) and 454-pyrosequencing. Sanger sequencing analysis is employed to validate genomic differences and to investigate CGS and 454-pyrosequencing limitations. Transcriptomics, genetic data and growth studies indicate that over-expression of the sodium-proton antiporter gene nhaA confers the elevated AcR sodium acetate tolerance phenotype. nhaA over-expression mostly confers enhanced sodium (Na+) tolerance and not acetate (Ac-) tolerance, unless both ions are present in sufficient quantities. NaAc is more inhibitory than potassium and ammonium acetate for Z. mobilis and the combination of elevated Na+ and Ac- ions exerts a synergistic inhibitory effect for strain ZM4. A structural model for the NhaA sodium-proton antiporter is constructed to provide mechanistic insights. We demonstrate that Saccharomyces cerevisiae sodium-proton antiporter genes also contribute to sodium acetate, potassium acetate, and ammonium acetate tolerances. The present combination of classical and systems biology tools is a paradigm for accelerated industrial strain improvement and combines benefits of few a priori assumptions with detailed, rapid, mechanistic studies.

  12. Biodiversity of autolytic ability in flocculent Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains suitable for traditional sparkling wine fermentation.

    PubMed

    Perpetuini, Giorgia; Di Gianvito, Paola; Arfelli, Giuseppe; Schirone, Maria; Corsetti, Aldo; Tofalo, Rosanna; Suzzi, Giovanna

    2016-07-01

    Yeasts involved in secondary fermentation of traditional sparkling wines should show specific characteristics, such as flocculation capacity and autolysis. Recently it has been postulated that autophagy may contribute to the outcome of autolysis. In this study, 28 flocculent wine Saccahromyces cerevisiae strains characterized by different flocculation degrees were studied for their autolytic and autophagic activities. Autolysis was monitored in synthetic medium through the determination of amino acid nitrogen and total proteins released. At the same time, novel primer sets were developed to determine the expression of the genes ATG1, ATG17 and ATG29. Twelve strains were selected on the basis of their autolytic rate and ATG gene expressions in synthetic medium and were inoculated in a base wine. After 30, 60 and 180 days the autolytic process and ATG gene expressions were evaluated. The obtained data showed that autolysis and ATG gene expressions differed among strains and were independent of the degree of flocculation. This biodiversity could be exploited to select new starter stains to improve sparkling wine production. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26804203

  13. Xylose fermentation efficiency and inhibitor tolerance of the recombinant industrial Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain NAPX37.

    PubMed

    Li, Yun-Cheng; Mitsumasu, Kanako; Gou, Zi-Xi; Gou, Min; Tang, Yue-Qin; Li, Guo-Ying; Wu, Xiao-Lei; Akamatsu, Takashi; Taguchi, Hisataka; Kida, Kenji

    2016-02-01

    Industrial yeast strains with good xylose fermentation ability and inhibitor tolerance are important for economical lignocellulosic bioethanol production. The flocculating industrial Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain NAPX37, harboring the xylose reductase-xylitol dehydrogenase (XR-XDH)-based xylose metabolic pathway, displayed efficient xylose fermentation during batch and continuous fermentation. During batch fermentation, the xylose consumption rates at the first 36 h were similar (1.37 g/L/h) when the initial xylose concentrations were 50 and 75 g/L, indicating that xylose fermentation was not inhibited even when the xylose concentration was as high as 75 g/L. The presence of glucose, at concentrations of up to 25 g/L, did not affect xylose consumption rate at the first 36 h. Strain NAPX37 showed stable xylose fermentation capacity during continuous ethanol fermentation using xylose as the sole sugar, for almost 1 year. Fermentation remained stable at a dilution rate of 0.05/h, even though the xylose concentration in the feed was as high as 100 g/L. Aeration rate, xylose concentration, and MgSO4 concentration were found to affect xylose consumption and ethanol yield. When the xylose concentration in the feed was 75 g/L, a high xylose consumption rate of 6.62 g/L/h and an ethanol yield of 0.394 were achieved under an aeration rate of 0.1 vvm, dilution rate of 0.1/h, and 5 mM MgSO4. In addition, strain NAPX37 exhibited good tolerance to inhibitors such as weak acids, furans, and phenolics during xylose fermentation. These findings indicate that strain NAPX37 is a promising candidate for application in the industrial production of lignocellulosic bioethanol.

  14. Adjustment of Trehalose Metabolism in Wine Saccharomyces cerevisiae Strains To Modify Ethanol Yields

    PubMed Central

    Rossouw, D.; Heyns, E. H.; Setati, M. E.; Bosch, S.

    2013-01-01

    The ability of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to efficiently produce high levels of ethanol through glycolysis has been the focus of much scientific and industrial activity. Despite the accumulated knowledge regarding glycolysis, the modification of flux through this pathway to modify ethanol yields has proved difficult. Here, we report on the systematic screening of 66 strains with deletion mutations of genes encoding enzymes involved in central carbohydrate metabolism for altered ethanol yields. Five of these strains showing the most prominent changes in carbon flux were selected for further investigation. The genes were representative of trehalose biosynthesis (TPS1, encoding trehalose-6-phosphate synthase), central glycolysis (TDH3, encoding glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase), the oxidative pentose phosphate pathway (ZWF1, encoding glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase), and the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle (ACO1 and ACO2, encoding aconitase isoforms 1 and 2). Two strains exhibited lower ethanol yields than the wild type (tps1Δ and tdh3Δ), while the remaining three showed higher ethanol yields. To validate these findings in an industrial yeast strain, the TPS1 gene was selected as a good candidate for genetic modification to alter flux to ethanol during alcoholic fermentation in wine. Using low-strength promoters active at different stages of fermentation, the expression of the TPS1 gene was slightly upregulated, resulting in a decrease in ethanol production and an increase in trehalose biosynthesis during fermentation. Thus, the mutant screening approach was successful in terms of identifying target genes for genetic modification in commercial yeast strains with the aim of producing lower-ethanol wines. PMID:23793638

  15. Stress co-tolerance and trehalose content in baking strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Lewis, J G; Learmonth, R P; Attfield, P V; Watson, K

    1997-01-01

    Fourteen wild-type baking strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae were grown in batch culture to true stationary phase (exogenous carbon source exhausted) and tested for their trehalose content and their tolerance to heat (52 degrees C for 4.5 min), ethanol (20% v/v for 30 min), H2O2 (0.3 M for 60 min), rapid freezing (-196 degrees C for 20 min, cooling rate 200 degrees C min-1), slow freezing (-20 degrees C for 24 h, cooling rate 3 degrees C min(-1)), salt (growth in 1.5 M NaCl agar) or acetic acid (growth in 0.4% w/v acetic acid agar) stresses. Stress tolerance among the strains was highly variable and up to 1000-fold differences existed between strains for some types of stress. Compared with previously published reports, all strains were tolerant to H2O2 stress. Correlation analysis of stress tolerance results demonstrated relationships between tolerance to H2O2 and tolerance to all stresses except ethanol. This may imply that oxidative processes are associated with a wide variety of cellular stresses and also indicate that the general robustness associated with industrial yeast may be a result of their oxidative stress tolerance. In addition, H2O2 tolerance might be a suitable marker for the general assessment of stress tolerance in yeast strains. Trehalose content failed to correlate with tolerance to any stress except acetic acid. This may indicate that the contribution of trehalose to tolerance to other stresses is either small or inconsistent and that trehalose may not be used as a general predictor of stress tolerance in true stationary phase yeast. PMID:9079286

  16. Saccharomyces Cerevisiae S288c Has a Mutation in Flo8, a Gene Required for Filamentous Growth

    PubMed Central

    Liu, H.; Styles, C. A.; Fink, G. R.

    1996-01-01

    Diploid strains of baker's yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae can grow in a cellular yeast form or in filaments called pseudohyphae. This dimorphic transition from yeast to pseudohyphae is induced by starvation for nitrogen. Not all laboratory strains are capable of this dimorphic switch; many grow only in the yeast form and fail to form pseudohyphae when starved for nitrogen. Analysis of the standard laboratory strain S288C shows that this defect in dimorphism results from a nonsense mutation in the FLO8 gene. This defect in FLO8 blocks pseudohyphal growth in diploids, haploid invasive growth, and flocculation. Since feral strains of S. cerevisiae are dimorphic and have a functional FLO8 gene, we suggest that the flo8 mutation was selected during laboratory cultivation. PMID:8913742

  17. High ethanol fermentation performance of the dry dilute acid pretreated corn stover by an evolutionarily adapted Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain.

    PubMed

    Qureshi, Abdul Sattar; Zhang, Jian; Bao, Jie

    2015-01-01

    Ethanol fermentation was investigated at the high solids content of the dry dilute sulfuric acid pretreated corn stover feedstock using an evolutionary adapted Saccharomyces cerevisiae DQ1 strain. The evolutionary adaptation was conducted by successively transferring the S. cerevisiae DQ1 cells into the inhibitors containing corn stover hydrolysate every 12h and finally a stable yeast strain was obtained after 65 days' continuous adaptation. The ethanol fermentation performance using the adapted strain was significantly improved with the high ethanol titer of 71.40 g/L and the high yield of 80.34% in the simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) at 30% solids content. No wastewater was generated from pretreatment to fermentation steps. The results were compared with the published cellulosic ethanol fermentation cases, and the obvious advantages of the present work were demonstrated not only at the high ethanol titer and yield, but also the significant reduction of wastewater generation and potential cost reduction.

  18. High ethanol fermentation performance of the dry dilute acid pretreated corn stover by an evolutionarily adapted Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain.

    PubMed

    Qureshi, Abdul Sattar; Zhang, Jian; Bao, Jie

    2015-01-01

    Ethanol fermentation was investigated at the high solids content of the dry dilute sulfuric acid pretreated corn stover feedstock using an evolutionary adapted Saccharomyces cerevisiae DQ1 strain. The evolutionary adaptation was conducted by successively transferring the S. cerevisiae DQ1 cells into the inhibitors containing corn stover hydrolysate every 12h and finally a stable yeast strain was obtained after 65 days' continuous adaptation. The ethanol fermentation performance using the adapted strain was significantly improved with the high ethanol titer of 71.40 g/L and the high yield of 80.34% in the simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) at 30% solids content. No wastewater was generated from pretreatment to fermentation steps. The results were compared with the published cellulosic ethanol fermentation cases, and the obvious advantages of the present work were demonstrated not only at the high ethanol titer and yield, but also the significant reduction of wastewater generation and potential cost reduction. PMID:25930238

  19. Isolation and characterization of a resident tolerant Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain from a spent sulfite liquor fermentation plant

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Spent Sulfite Liquor (SSL) from wood pulping facilities is a sugar rich effluent that can be used as feedstock for ethanol production. However, depending on the pulping process conditions, the release of monosaccharides also generates a range of compounds that negatively affect microbial fermentation. In the present study, we investigated whether endogenous yeasts in SSL-based ethanol plant could represent a source of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains with a naturally acquired tolerance towards this inhibitory environment. Two isolation processes were performed, before and after the re-inoculation of the plant with a commercial baker’s yeast strain. The isolates were clustered by DNA fingerprinting and a recurrent Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain, different from the inoculated commercial baker’s yeast strain, was isolated. The strain, named TMB3720, flocculated heavily and presented high furaldehyde reductase activity. During fermentation of undiluted SSL, TMB3720 displayed a 4-fold higher ethanol production rate and 1.8-fold higher ethanol yield as compared to the commercial baker’s yeast. Another non-Saccharomyces cerevisiae species, identified as the pentose utilizing Pichia galeiformis, was also recovered in the last tanks of the process where the hexose to pentose sugar ratio and the inhibitory pressure are expected to be the lowest. PMID:23237549

  20. A repressor activator protein1 homologue from an oleaginous strain of Candida tropicalis increases storage lipid production in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Chattopadhyay, Atrayee; Dey, Prabuddha; Barik, Amita; Bahadur, Ranjit P; Maiti, Mrinal K

    2015-06-01

    The repressor activator protein1 (Rap1) has been studied over the years as a multifunctional regulator in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. However, its role in storage lipid accumulation has not been investigated. This report documents the identification and isolation of a putative transcription factor CtRap1 gene from an oleaginous strain of Candida tropicalis, and establishes the direct effect of its expression on the storage lipid accumulation in S. cerevisiae, usually a non-oleaginous yeast. In silico analysis revealed that the CtRap1 polypeptide binds relatively more strongly to the promoter of fatty acid synthase1 (FAS1) gene of S. cerevisiae than ScRap1. The expression level of CtRap1 transcript in vivo was found to correlate directly with the amount of lipid produced in oleaginous native host C. tropicalis. Heterologous expression of the CtRap1 gene resulted in ∼ 4-fold enhancement of storage lipid content (57.3%) in S. cerevisiae. We also showed that the functionally active CtRap1 upregulates the endogenous ScFAS1 and ScDGAT genes of S. cerevisiae, and this, in turn, might be responsible for the increased lipid production in the transformed yeast. Our findings pave the way for the possible utility of the CtRap1 gene in suitable microorganisms to increase their storage lipid content through transcription factor engineering.

  1. Chromosomal Assignment of Mutations by Specific Chromosome Loss in the Yeast Saccharomyces Cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Wakem, L. P.; Sherman, F.

    1990-01-01

    Yeast 2-μm plasmids were integrated near the centromere of a different chromosome in each of 16 cir(0) mapping strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The specific chromosomes containing the integrated 2-μm plasmid DNA were lost at a high frequency after crossing the cir(0) strains to cir(+) strains. A recessive mutation in a cir(+) strain can then be easily assigned to its chromosome using this set of mapping strains, since the phenotype of the recessive mutation will be manifested only in diploids having the integrated 2-μm plasmid and the unmapped mutation on homologous chromosomes. PMID:2199315

  2. Development of minimal fermentation media supplementation for ethanol production using two Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains.

    PubMed

    Tropea, Alessia; Wilson, David; Cicero, Nicola; Potortì, Angela G; La Torre, Giovanna L; Dugo, Giacomo; Richardson, David; Waldron, Keith W

    2016-01-01

    Ethanol production by fermentation is strongly dependent on media composition. Specific nutrients, such as trace elements, vitamins and nitrogen will affect the physiological state and, consequently, the fermentation performance of the micro-organism employed. The purpose of this study has been to assess the highest ethanol production by a minimal medium, instead of the more complex nutrients supplementation used during alcoholic fermentation. All fermentation tests were carried out using a microwell plate reader to monitor the processes. Two Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains (NCYC 2826 and NCYC 3445) were tested using three nitrogen sources, supplied with different vitamin and salts. The results show that solutions made of urea phosphate, KCl, MgSO4·7H2O, Ca-panthothenate, biotin allowed an ethanol yield of 22.9 and 23.4 g/L for strain NCYC 2826 and NCYC 3445, respectively, representing 90 and 92% of the theoretical yield. All tests were carried out using glucose as common reference carbon source.

  3. Mechanisms of strontium uptake by laboratory and brewing strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    SciTech Connect

    Avery, S.V.; Tobin, J.M. )

    1992-12-01

    Concern over transfer of toxic metals from microorgansims to higher organisms and interest in the biotechnological potential of microorganisms for metal removal and/or recovery has increased interest in the processes involved in heavy metal uptake. Strontium is a trace element with no know essential biological role, but a long half-live and discharge as a constituent of radioactive wastewaters from nuclear reactors and in fall-out make its fate in the environment a concern. In this study, strontium uptake in biomass obtained from laboratory and industrial sources was examined. The mechanisms of Sr[sup 2+] uptake were examined and uptake capacities for Sr[sup 2+] were compared in both live and denatured forms of laboratory and brewery-derived strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Release of cellular Ca[sup 2+], Mg[sup 2+], and H[sup +] in response to metabolism-independent and -dependent Sr[sup 2+] uptake processes, was determined for all biomass types. The results indicate clear differences in the mechanisms of both Sr[sup 2+] adsorption and intracellular Sr[sup 2+] accumulation between the yeasts examined. They point out the strong influence that the differential ecophysiology of strains from a single genus may exert on metal uptake characteristics and on external binding and intracellular distribution of essential ions.

  4. Development of minimal fermentation media supplementation for ethanol production using two Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains.

    PubMed

    Tropea, Alessia; Wilson, David; Cicero, Nicola; Potortì, Angela G; La Torre, Giovanna L; Dugo, Giacomo; Richardson, David; Waldron, Keith W

    2016-01-01

    Ethanol production by fermentation is strongly dependent on media composition. Specific nutrients, such as trace elements, vitamins and nitrogen will affect the physiological state and, consequently, the fermentation performance of the micro-organism employed. The purpose of this study has been to assess the highest ethanol production by a minimal medium, instead of the more complex nutrients supplementation used during alcoholic fermentation. All fermentation tests were carried out using a microwell plate reader to monitor the processes. Two Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains (NCYC 2826 and NCYC 3445) were tested using three nitrogen sources, supplied with different vitamin and salts. The results show that solutions made of urea phosphate, KCl, MgSO4·7H2O, Ca-panthothenate, biotin allowed an ethanol yield of 22.9 and 23.4 g/L for strain NCYC 2826 and NCYC 3445, respectively, representing 90 and 92% of the theoretical yield. All tests were carried out using glucose as common reference carbon source. PMID:26469871

  5. Saccharomyces cerevisiae BY4741 and W303-1A laboratory strains differ in salt tolerance.

    PubMed

    Petrezselyova, Silvia; Zahradka, Jaromir; Sychrova, Hana

    2010-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast cells serve as a model to elucidate the bases of salt tolerance and potassium homeostasis regulation in eukaryotic cells. In this study, we show that two widely used laboratory strains, BY4741 and W303-1A, differ not only in cell size and volume but also in their relative plasma-membrane potential (estimated with a potentiometric fluorescent dye diS-C3(3) and as Hygromycin B sensitivity) and tolerance to alkali-metal cations. W303-1A cells and their mutant derivatives lacking either uptake (trk1 trk2) or efflux (nha1) systems for alkali-metal cations are more tolerant to toxic sodium and lithium cations but also more sensitive to higher external concentrations of potassium than BY4741 cells and their mutants. Moreover, our results suggest that though the two strains do not differ in the total potassium content, the regulation of intracellular potassium homeostasis is probably not the same in BY4741 and W303-1A cells.

  6. Saccharomyces cerevisiae CCMI 885 secretes peptides that inhibit the growth of some non-Saccharomyces wine-related strains.

    PubMed

    Albergaria, Helena; Francisco, Diana; Gori, Klaus; Arneborg, Nils; Gírio, Francisco

    2010-04-01

    The nature of the toxic compounds produced by Saccharomyces cerevisiae CCMI 885 that induce the early death of Hanseniaspora guilliermondii during mixed fermentations, as well as their ability to inhibit the growth of other non-Saccharomyces wine-related strains, was investigated. The killing effect of mixed supernatants towards H. guilliermondii was inactivated by protease treatments, thus revealing the proteinaceous nature of the toxic compounds. Analysis of the protein pattern of mixed supernatants on Tricine SDS-PAGE showed that this S. cerevisiae strain secretes peptides (<10 kDa), which were detected only when death of H. guilliermondii was already established. Death-inducing supernatants were ultrafiltrated by 10 and 2 kDa membranes, respectively, and the inhibitory effect of those permeates were tested in H. guilliermondii cultures. Results indicated that the (2-10) kDa protein fraction of those supernatants seemed to contain antimicrobial peptides active against H. guilliermondii. Thus, the (2-10) kDa protein fraction was concentrated and its inhibitory effect tested against strains of Kluyveromyces marxianus, Kluyveromyces thermotolerans, Torulaspora delbrueckii and H. guilliermondii. Under the growth conditions used for these tests, the (2-10) kDa protein fraction of S. cerevisiae CCMI 885 supernatants exhibited a fungistatic effect against all the strains and a fungicidal effect against K. marxianus.

  7. Genome sequence and analysis of a stress-tolerant, wild-derived strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae used in biofuels research

    DOE PAGES

    McIlwain, Sean J.; Peris, Davis; Sardi, Maria; Moskvin, Oleg V.; Zhan, Fujie; Myers, Kevin S.; Riley, Nicholas M.; Buzzell, Alyssa; Parreiras, Lucas S.; Ong, Irene M.; et al

    2016-04-20

    The genome sequences of more than 100 strains of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae have been published. Unfortunately, most of these genome assemblies contain dozens to hundreds of gaps at repetitive sequences, including transposable elements, tRNAs, and subtelomeric regions, which is where novel genes generally reside. Relatively few strains have been chosen for genome sequencing based on their biofuel production potential, leaving an additional knowledge gap. Here, we describe the nearly complete genome sequence of GLBRCY22-3 (Y22-3), a strain of S. cerevisiae derived from the stress-tolerant wild strain NRRL YB-210 and subsequently engineered for xylose metabolism. After benchmarking several genome assemblymore » approaches, we developed a pipeline to integrate Pacific Biosciences (PacBio) and Illumina sequencing data and achieved one of the highest quality genome assemblies for any S. cerevisiae strain. Specifically, the contig N50 is 693 kbp, and the sequences of most chromosomes, the mitochondrial genome, and the 2-micron plasmid are complete. Our annotation predicts 92 genes that are not present in the reference genome of the laboratory strain S288c, over 70% of which were expressed. We predicted functions for 43 of these genes, 28 of which were previously uncharacterized and unnamed. Remarkably, many of these genes are predicted to be involved in stress tolerance and carbon metabolism and are shared with a Brazilian bioethanol production strain, even though the strains differ dramatically at most genetic loci. Lastly, the Y22-3 genome sequence provides an exceptionally high-quality resource for basic and applied research in bioenergy and genetics.« less

  8. Genome Sequence and Analysis of a Stress-Tolerant, Wild-Derived Strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Used in Biofuels Research.

    PubMed

    McIlwain, Sean J; Peris, David; Sardi, Maria; Moskvin, Oleg V; Zhan, Fujie; Myers, Kevin S; Riley, Nicholas M; Buzzell, Alyssa; Parreiras, Lucas S; Ong, Irene M; Landick, Robert; Coon, Joshua J; Gasch, Audrey P; Sato, Trey K; Hittinger, Chris Todd

    2016-01-01

    The genome sequences of more than 100 strains of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae have been published. Unfortunately, most of these genome assemblies contain dozens to hundreds of gaps at repetitive sequences, including transposable elements, tRNAs, and subtelomeric regions, which is where novel genes generally reside. Relatively few strains have been chosen for genome sequencing based on their biofuel production potential, leaving an additional knowledge gap. Here, we describe the nearly complete genome sequence of GLBRCY22-3 (Y22-3), a strain of S. cerevisiae derived from the stress-tolerant wild strain NRRL YB-210 and subsequently engineered for xylose metabolism. After benchmarking several genome assembly approaches, we developed a pipeline to integrate Pacific Biosciences (PacBio) and Illumina sequencing data and achieved one of the highest quality genome assemblies for any S. cerevisiae strain. Specifically, the contig N50 is 693 kbp, and the sequences of most chromosomes, the mitochondrial genome, and the 2-micron plasmid are complete. Our annotation predicts 92 genes that are not present in the reference genome of the laboratory strain S288c, over 70% of which were expressed. We predicted functions for 43 of these genes, 28 of which were previously uncharacterized and unnamed. Remarkably, many of these genes are predicted to be involved in stress tolerance and carbon metabolism and are shared with a Brazilian bioethanol production strain, even though the strains differ dramatically at most genetic loci. The Y22-3 genome sequence provides an exceptionally high-quality resource for basic and applied research in bioenergy and genetics. PMID:27172212

  9. Genome Sequence and Analysis of a Stress-Tolerant, Wild-Derived Strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Used in Biofuels Research

    PubMed Central

    McIlwain, Sean J.; Peris, David; Sardi, Maria; Moskvin, Oleg V.; Zhan, Fujie; Myers, Kevin S.; Riley, Nicholas M.; Buzzell, Alyssa; Parreiras, Lucas S.; Ong, Irene M.; Landick, Robert; Coon, Joshua J.; Gasch, Audrey P.; Sato, Trey K.; Hittinger, Chris Todd

    2016-01-01

    The genome sequences of more than 100 strains of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae have been published. Unfortunately, most of these genome assemblies contain dozens to hundreds of gaps at repetitive sequences, including transposable elements, tRNAs, and subtelomeric regions, which is where novel genes generally reside. Relatively few strains have been chosen for genome sequencing based on their biofuel production potential, leaving an additional knowledge gap. Here, we describe the nearly complete genome sequence of GLBRCY22-3 (Y22-3), a strain of S. cerevisiae derived from the stress-tolerant wild strain NRRL YB-210 and subsequently engineered for xylose metabolism. After benchmarking several genome assembly approaches, we developed a pipeline to integrate Pacific Biosciences (PacBio) and Illumina sequencing data and achieved one of the highest quality genome assemblies for any S. cerevisiae strain. Specifically, the contig N50 is 693 kbp, and the sequences of most chromosomes, the mitochondrial genome, and the 2-micron plasmid are complete. Our annotation predicts 92 genes that are not present in the reference genome of the laboratory strain S288c, over 70% of which were expressed. We predicted functions for 43 of these genes, 28 of which were previously uncharacterized and unnamed. Remarkably, many of these genes are predicted to be involved in stress tolerance and carbon metabolism and are shared with a Brazilian bioethanol production strain, even though the strains differ dramatically at most genetic loci. The Y22-3 genome sequence provides an exceptionally high-quality resource for basic and applied research in bioenergy and genetics. PMID:27172212

  10. Biotechnological process for obtaining new fermented products from cashew apple fruit by Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains.

    PubMed

    Araújo, Suzane Macêdo; Silva, Cristina Ferraz; Moreira, Jane Jesus Silveira; Narain, Narendra; Souza, Roberto Rodrigues

    2011-09-01

    In Brazil, the use of cashew apple (Anacardium occidentale L.) to obtain new products by biotechnological process represents an important alternative to avoid wastage of a large quantity of this fruit, which reaches about 85% of the annual production of 1 million tons. This work focuses on the development of an alcoholic product obtained by the fermentation of cashew apple juice. The inoculation with two different strains of yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae viz. SCP and SCT, were standardized to a concentration of 10(7 )cells ml(-1). Each inoculum was added to 1,500 ml of cashew must. Fermentation was performed at 28 ± 3°C and aliquots were withdrawn every 24 h to monitor soluble sugar concentrations, pH, and dry matter contents. The volatile compounds in fermented products were analyzed using the gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) system. After 6 days, the fermentation process was completed, cells removed by filtration and centrifugation, and the products were stabilized under refrigeration for a period of 20 days. The stabilized products were stored in glass bottles and pasteurized at 60 ± 5°C/30 min. Both fermented products contained ethanol concentration above 6% (v v(-1)) while methanol was not detected and total acidity was below 90 mEq l(-1), representing a pH of 3.8-3.9. The volatile compounds were characterized by the presence of aldehyde (butyl aldehyde diethyl acetal, 2,4-dimethyl-hepta-2,4-dienal, and 2-methyl-2-pentenal) and ester (ethyl α-methylbutyrate) representing fruity aroma. The strain SCT was found to be better and efficient and this produced 10% more alcohol over that of strain SCP.

  11. Selection of autochthonous Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains as wine starters using a polyphasic approach and ochratoxin A removal.

    PubMed

    Petruzzi, Leonardo; Bevilacqua, Antonio; Corbo, Maria Rosaria; Garofalo, Carmela; Baiano, Antonietta; Sinigaglia, Milena

    2014-07-01

    Over the last few years, the selection of autochthonous strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae as wine starters has been studied; however, researchers have not focused on the ability to remove ochratoxin A (OTA) as a possible trait to use in oenological characterization. In this article, a polyphasic approach, including yeast genotyping, evaluation of phenotypic traits, and fermentative performance in a model system (temperature, 25 and 30°C; sugar level, 200 and 250 g liter(-1)), was proposed as a suitable approach to select wine starters of S. cerevisiae from 30 autochthonous isolates from Uva di Troia cv., a red wine grape variety grown in the Apulian region (Southern Italy). The ability to remove OTA, a desirable trait to improve the safety of wine, was also assessed using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The isolates, identified by PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis of the internal transcribed spacer region and DNA sequencing, were differentiated at strain level through the amplification of the interdelta region; 11 biotypes (I to XI) were identified and further studied. Four biotypes (II, III, V, VIII) were able to reduce OTA, with the rate of toxin removal from the medium (0.6 to 42.8%, wt/vol) dependent upon the strain and the temperature, and biotypes II and VIII were promising in terms of ethanol, glycerol, and volatile acidity production, as well as for their enzymatic and stress resistance characteristics. For the first time, the ability of S. cerevisiae to remove OTA during alcoholic fermentation was used as an additional trait in the yeast-selection program; the results could have application for evaluating the potential of autochthonous S. cerevisiae strains as starter cultures for the production of typical wines with improved quality and safety. PMID:24988024

  12. Physicochemical characterization of pomegranate wines fermented with three different Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast strains.

    PubMed

    Berenguer, María; Vegara, Salud; Barrajón, Enrique; Saura, Domingo; Valero, Manuel; Martí, Nuria

    2016-01-01

    Three commercial Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast strains: Viniferm Revelación, Viniferm SV and Viniferm PDM were evaluated for the production of pomegranate wine from a juice coupage of the two well-known varieties Mollar and Wonderfull. Further malolactic fermentation was carried out spontaneously. The same fermentation patterns were observed for pH, titratable acidity, density, sugar consumption, and ethanol and glycerol production. Glucose was exhausted while fructose residues remained at the end of alcoholic fermentation. A high ethanol concentration (10.91 ± 0.27% v/v) in combination with 1.49 g/L glycerol was achieved. Citric acid concentration increased rapidly a 31.7%, malic acid disappeared as result of malolactic fermentation and the lactic acid levels reached values between 0.40 and 0.96 g/L. The analysis of CIEa parameter and total anthocyanin content highlights a lower degradation of monomeric anthocyanins during winemaking with Viniferm PDM yeast. The resulting wine retains a 34.5% of total anthocyanin content of pomegranate juice blend.

  13. Molecular response of Saccharomyces cerevisiae wine and laboratory strains to high sugar stress conditions.

    PubMed

    Jiménez-Martí, E; Zuzuarregui, A; Gomar-Alba, M; Gutiérrez, D; Gil, C; del Olmo, M

    2011-01-31

    One of the stress conditions that can affect Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells during their growth is osmotic stress. Under particular environments (for instance, during the production of alcoholic beverages) yeasts have to cope with osmotic stress caused by high sugar concentrations. Although the molecular changes and pathways involved in the response to saline or sorbitol stress are widely understood, less is known about how cells respond to high sugar concentrations. In this work we present a comprehensive study of the response to this form of stress which indicates important transcriptomic changes, especially in terms of the genes involved in both stress response and respiration, and the implication of the HOG pathway. We also describe several genes of an unknown function which are more highly expressed under 20% (w/v) glucose than under 2% (w/v) glucose. In this work we focus on the YHR087w (RTC3) gene and its encoded protein. Proteomic analysis of the mutant deletion strain reveals lower levels of several yeast Hsp proteins, which establishes a link between this protein and the response to several forms of stress. The relevance of YHR087W for the response to high sugar and other stress conditions and the relationship of the encoded protein with several Hsp proteins suggest applications of this gene in biotechnological processes in which response to stress is important.

  14. Intersexual partial diploids of phycomyces.

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, B J; Cerdá-Olmedo, E

    2001-01-01

    Sexual interaction between strains of opposite sex in many fungi of the order Mucorales modifies hyphal morphology and increases the carotene content. The progeny of crosses of Phycomyces blakesleeanus usually include a small proportion of anomalous segregants that show these signs of sexual stimulation without a partner. We have analyzed the genetic constitution of such segregants from crosses that involved a carF mutation for overaccumulation of beta-carotene and other markers. The new strains were diploids or partial diploids heterozygous for the sex markers. Diploidy was unknown in this fungus and in the Zygomycetes. Random chromosome losses during the vegetative growth of the diploid led to heterokaryosis in the coenocytic mycelia and eventually to sectors of various tints and mating behavior. The changes in the nuclear composition of the mycelia could be followed by selecting for individual nuclei. The results impose a reinterpretation of the sexual cycle of Phycomyces. Some of the intersexual strains that carried the carF mutation contained 25 mg beta-carotene per gram of dry mass and were sufficiently stable for practical use in carotene production. PMID:11404328

  15. Whole Genome Comparison Reveals High Levels of Inbreeding and Strain Redundancy Across the Spectrum of Commercial Wine Strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Borneman, Anthony R; Forgan, Angus H; Kolouchova, Radka; Fraser, James A; Schmidt, Simon A

    2016-01-01

    Humans have been consuming wines for more than 7000 yr . For most of this time, fermentations were presumably performed by strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae that naturally found their way into the fermenting must . In contrast, most commercial wines are now produced by inoculation with pure yeast monocultures, ensuring consistent, reliable and reproducible fermentations, and there are now hundreds of these yeast starter cultures commercially available. In order to thoroughly investigate the genetic diversity that has been captured by over 50 yr of commercial wine yeast development and domestication, whole genome sequencing has been performed on 212 strains of S. cerevisiae, including 119 commercial wine and brewing starter strains, and wine isolates from across seven decades. Comparative genomic analysis indicates that, despite their large numbers, commercial strains, and wine strains in general, are extremely similar genetically, possessing all of the hallmarks of a population bottle-neck, and high levels of inbreeding. In addition, many commercial strains from multiple suppliers are nearly genetically identical, suggesting that the limits of effective genetic variation within this genetically narrow group may be approaching saturation. PMID:26869621

  16. Whole Genome Comparison Reveals High Levels of Inbreeding and Strain Redundancy Across the Spectrum of Commercial Wine Strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Borneman, Anthony R.; Forgan, Angus H.; Kolouchova, Radka; Fraser, James A.; Schmidt, Simon A.

    2016-01-01

    Humans have been consuming wines for more than 7000 yr . For most of this time, fermentations were presumably performed by strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae that naturally found their way into the fermenting must . In contrast, most commercial wines are now produced by inoculation with pure yeast monocultures, ensuring consistent, reliable and reproducible fermentations, and there are now hundreds of these yeast starter cultures commercially available. In order to thoroughly investigate the genetic diversity that has been captured by over 50 yr of commercial wine yeast development and domestication, whole genome sequencing has been performed on 212 strains of S. cerevisiae, including 119 commercial wine and brewing starter strains, and wine isolates from across seven decades. Comparative genomic analysis indicates that, despite their large numbers, commercial strains, and wine strains in general, are extremely similar genetically, possessing all of the hallmarks of a population bottle-neck, and high levels of inbreeding. In addition, many commercial strains from multiple suppliers are nearly genetically identical, suggesting that the limits of effective genetic variation within this genetically narrow group may be approaching saturation. PMID:26869621

  17. Increased resveratrol production in wines using engineered wine strains Saccharomyces cerevisiae EC1118 and relaxed antibiotic or auxotrophic selection.

    PubMed

    Sun, Ping; Liang, Jing-Long; Kang, Lin-Zhi; Huang, Xiao-Yan; Huang, Jia-Jun; Ye, Zhi-Wei; Guo, Li-Qiong; Lin, Jun-Fang

    2015-01-01

    Resveratrol is a polyphenolic compound with diverse beneficial effects on human health. Red wine is the major dietary source of resveratrol but the amount that people can obtain from wines is limited. To increase the resveratrol production in wines, two expression vectors carrying 4-coumarate: coenzyme A ligase gene (4CL) from Arabidopsis thaliana and resveratrol synthase gene (RS) from Vitis vinifera were transformed into industrial wine strain Saccharomyces cerevisiae EC1118. When cultured with 1 mM p-coumaric acid, the engineered strains grown with and without the addition of antibiotics produced 8.249 and 3.317 mg/L of trans-resveratrol in the culture broth, respectively. Resveratrol content of the wine fermented with engineered strains was twice higher than that of the control, indicating that our engineered strains could increase the production of resveratrol during wine fermentation.

  18. Improvement of the multiple-stress tolerance of an ethanologenic Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain by freeze-thaw treatment.

    PubMed

    Wei, Pingying; Li, Zilong; Lin, Yuping; He, Peng; Jiang, Ning

    2007-10-01

    An effective, simple, and convenient method to improve yeast's multiple-stress tolerance, and ethanol production was developed. After an ethanologenic Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain SC521 was treated by nine cycles of freeze-thaw, a mutant FT9-11 strain with higher multiple-stress tolerance was isolated, whose viabilities under acetic acid, ethanol, freeze-thaw, H(2)O(2), and heat-shock stresses were, respectively, 23-, 26-, 10- and 7-fold more than the parent strain at an initial value 2 x 10(7) c.f.u. per ml. Ethanol production of FT9-11 was similar (91.5 g ethanol l(-1)) to SC521 at 30 degrees C with 200 g glucose l(-1), and was better than the parent strain at 37 degrees C (72.5 g ethanol l(-1)), with 300 (111 g ethanol l(-1)) or with 400 (85 g ethanol l(-1)) g glucose l(-1).

  19. In situ near infrared spectroscopy monitoring of cyprosin production by recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains.

    PubMed

    Sampaio, Pedro N; Sales, Kevin C; Rosa, Filipa O; Lopes, Marta B; Calado, Cecília R

    2014-10-20

    Near infrared (NIR) spectroscopy was used to in situ monitoring the cultivation of two recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains producing heterologous cyprosin B. NIR spectroscopy is a fast and non-destructive technique, that by being based on overtones and combinations of molecular vibrations requires chemometrics tools, such as partial least squares (PLS) regression models, to extract quantitative information concerning the variables of interest from the spectral data. In the present work, good PLS calibration models based on specific regions of the NIR spectral data were built for estimating the critical variables of the cyprosin production process: biomass concentration, cyprosin activity, cyprosin specific activity, the carbon sources glucose and galactose concentration and the by-products acetic acid and ethanol concentration. The PLS models developed are valid for both recombinant S. cerevisiae strains, presenting distinct cyprosin production capacities, and therefore can be used, not only for the real-time control of both processes, but also in optimization protocols. The PLS model for biomass yielded a R(2)=0.98 and a RMSEP=0.46 g dcw l(-1), representing an error of 4% for a calibration range between 0.44 and 13.75 g dcw l(-1). A R(2)=0.94 and a RMSEP=167 Um l(-1) were obtained for the cyprosin activity, corresponding to an error of 6.7% of the experimental data range (0-2509 Um l(-1)), whereas a R(2)=0.93 and RMSEP=672 U mg(-1) were obtained for the cyprosin specific activity, corresponding to an error of 7% of the experimental data range (0-11,690 Um g(-1)). For the carbon sources glucose and galactose, a R(2)=0.96 and a RMSECV of 1.26 and 0.55 g l(-1), respectively, were obtained, showing high predictive capabilities within the range of 0-20 g l(-1). For the metabolites resulting from the cell growth, the PLS model for acetate was characterized by a R(2)=0.92 and a RMSEP=0.06 g l (-1), which corresponds to a 6.1% error within the range of 0

  20. Killer activity of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains: partial characterization and strategies to improve the biocontrol efficacy in winemaking.

    PubMed

    de Ullivarri, Miguel Fernández; Mendoza, Lucía M; Raya, Raúl R

    2014-11-01

    Killer yeasts are considered potential biocontrol agents to avoid or reduce wine spoilage by undesirable species. In this study two Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains (Cf8 and M12) producing killer toxin were partially characterized and new strategies to improve their activity in winemaking were evaluated. Killer toxins were characterized by biochemical tests and growth inhibition of sensitive yeasts. Also genes encoding killer toxin were detected in the chromosomes of both strains by PCR. Both toxins showed optimal activity and production at conditions used during the wine-making process (pH 3.5 and temperatures of 15-25 °C). In addition, production of both toxins was higher when a nitrogen source was added. To improve killer activity different strategies of inoculation were studied, with the sequential inoculation of killer strains the best combination to control the growth of undesired yeasts. Sequential inoculation of Cf8-M12 showed a 45 % increase of killer activity on sensitive S. cerevisiae and spoilage yeasts. In the presence of ethanol (5-12 %) and SO2 (50 mg/L) the killer activity of both toxins was increased, especially for toxin Cf8. Characteristics of both killer strains support their future application as starter cultures and biocontrol agents to produce wines of controlled quality.

  1. Construction of the industrial ethanol-producing strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae able to ferment cellobiose and melibiose.

    PubMed

    Zhang, L; Guo, Z P; Ding, Z Y; Wang, Z X; Shi, G Y

    2012-01-01

    The gene mel1, encoding alpha-galactosidase in Schizosaccharomyces pombe, and the gene bgl2, encoding and beta-glucosidase in Trichoderma reesei, were isolated and co-expressed in the industrial ethanol-producing strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The resulting strains were able to grow on cellobiose and melibiose through simultaneous production of sufficient extracellular alpha-galactosidase and beta-glucosidase activity. Under aerobic conditions, the growth rate of the recombinant strain GC 1 co-expressing 2 genes could achieve 0.29 OD600 h(-1) and a biomass yield up to 7.8 g l(-1) dry cell weight on medium containing 10.0 g l(-1) cellobiose and 10.0 g l(-1) melibiose as sole carbohydrate source. Meanwhile, the new strain of S. cerevisiae CG 1 demonstrated the ability to directly produce ethanol from microcrystalline cellulose during simultaneous saccharification and fermentation process. Approximately 36.5 g l(-1) ethanol was produced from 100 g of cellulose supplied with 5 g l(-1) melibose within 60 h. The yield (g of ethanol produced/g of carbohydrate consumed) was 0.44 g/g, which corresponds to 88.0% of the theoretical yield.

  2. Engineering and Two-Stage Evolution of a Lignocellulosic Hydrolysate-Tolerant Saccharomyces cerevisiae Strain for Anaerobic Fermentation of Xylose from AFEX Pretreated Corn Stover

    PubMed Central

    Parreiras, Lucas S.; Breuer, Rebecca J.; Avanasi Narasimhan, Ragothaman; Higbee, Alan J.; La Reau, Alex; Tremaine, Mary; Qin, Li; Willis, Laura B.; Bice, Benjamin D.; Bonfert, Brandi L.; Pinhancos, Rebeca C.; Balloon, Allison J.; Uppugundla, Nirmal; Liu, Tongjun; Li, Chenlin; Tanjore, Deepti; Ong, Irene M.; Li, Haibo; Pohlmann, Edward L.; Serate, Jose; Withers, Sydnor T.; Simmons, Blake A.; Hodge, David B.; Westphall, Michael S.; Coon, Joshua J.; Dale, Bruce E.; Balan, Venkatesh; Keating, David H.; Zhang, Yaoping; Landick, Robert; Gasch, Audrey P.; Sato, Trey K.

    2014-01-01

    The inability of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae to ferment xylose effectively under anaerobic conditions is a major barrier to economical production of lignocellulosic biofuels. Although genetic approaches have enabled engineering of S. cerevisiae to convert xylose efficiently into ethanol in defined lab medium, few strains are able to ferment xylose from lignocellulosic hydrolysates in the absence of oxygen. This limited xylose conversion is believed to result from small molecules generated during biomass pretreatment and hydrolysis, which induce cellular stress and impair metabolism. Here, we describe the development of a xylose-fermenting S. cerevisiae strain with tolerance to a range of pretreated and hydrolyzed lignocellulose, including Ammonia Fiber Expansion (AFEX)-pretreated corn stover hydrolysate (ACSH). We genetically engineered a hydrolysate-resistant yeast strain with bacterial xylose isomerase and then applied two separate stages of aerobic and anaerobic directed evolution. The emergent S. cerevisiae strain rapidly converted xylose from lab medium and ACSH to ethanol under strict anaerobic conditions. Metabolomic, genetic and biochemical analyses suggested that a missense mutation in GRE3, which was acquired during the anaerobic evolution, contributed toward improved xylose conversion by reducing intracellular production of xylitol, an inhibitor of xylose isomerase. These results validate our combinatorial approach, which utilized phenotypic strain selection, rational engineering and directed evolution for the generation of a robust S. cerevisiae strain with the ability to ferment xylose anaerobically from ACSH. PMID:25222864

  3. Diploid versus Haploid Organisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ticona, Armando; de Oliveira, Paulo Murilo C.

    Using a bit string model, we show that asexual reproduction for diploids is more efficient than for haploids: it improves genetic material producing new individuals with less deleterious mutations. We also see that in a system where competition is present, diploids dominate, even though we consider some dominant loci.

  4. Genome Sequences of Industrially Relevant Saccharomyces cerevisiae Strain M3707, Isolated from a Sample of Distillers Yeast and Four Haploid Derivatives

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Steven D.; Klingeman, Dawn M.; Johnson, Courtney M.; Clum, Alicia; Aerts, Andrea; Salamov, Asaf; Sharma, Aditi; Zane, Matthew; Barry, Kerrie; Grigoriev, Igor V.; Davison, Brian H.; Lynd, Lee R.; Gilna, Paul; Hau, Heidi; Hogsett, David A.; Froehlich, Allan C.

    2013-04-19

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain M3707 was isolated from a sample of commercial distillers yeast, and its genome sequence together with the genome sequences for the four derived haploid strains M3836, M3837, M3838, and M3839 has been determined. Yeasts have potential for consolidated bioprocessing (CBP) for biofuel production, and access to these genome sequences will facilitate their development.

  5. Expression of a Heterologous Xylose Transporter in a Saccharomyces cerevisiae Strain Engineered to Utilize Xylose Improves Aerobic Xylose Co-consumption

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae have been engineered to utilize xylose by expression of the genes for xylose reductase and xylitol dehydrogenase, or xylose isomerase. These strains are still limited in their ability to efficiently use xylose. Unlike native xylose assimilating yeasts such as Pi...

  6. Expression of a heterologous xylose transporter in a Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain engineered to utilize xylose increases xylose uptake and improves xylose/glucose co-consumption

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae have been engineered to utilize xylose by expressing either the genes for xylose reductase and xylitol dehydrogenase, or for xylose isomerase. These strains still use xylose at sub-optimal rates for industrial fermentation. Unlike natural xylose fermenting yeast...

  7. Obtaining and selection of hexokinases-less strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae for production of ethanol and fructose from sucrose.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Rodrigo Setem; Gomes, Luiz Humberto; Gonzaga do P Filho, Luiz; Tavares, Flávio C A

    2008-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae hexokinase-less strains were produced to study the production of ethanol and fructose from sucrose. These strains do not have the hexokinases A and B. Twenty-three double-mutant strains were produced, and then, three were selected for presenting a smaller growth in yeast extract-peptone-fructose. In fermentations with a medium containing sucrose (180.3 g L(-1)) and with cell recycles, simulating industrial conditions, the capacity of these mutant yeasts in inverting sucrose and fermenting only glucose was well characterized. Besides that, we could also see their great tolerance to the stresses of fermentative recycles, where fructose production (until 90 g L(-1)) and ethanol production (until 42.3 g L(-1)) occurred in cycles of 12 h, in which hexokinase-less yeasts performed high growth (51.2% of wet biomass) and viability rates (77% of viable cells) after nine consecutive cycles.

  8. Mechanism of imidazolium ionic liquids toxicity in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and rational engineering of a tolerant, xylose-fermenting strain

    DOE PAGES

    Dickinson, Quinn; Bottoms, Scott; Hinchman, Li; McIlwain, Sean; Li, Sheena; Myers, Chad L.; Boone, Charles; Coon, Joshua J.; Hebert, Alexander; Sato, Trey K.; et al

    2016-01-20

    In this study, imidazolium ionic liquids (IILs) underpin promising technologies that generate fermentable sugars from lignocellulose for future biorefineries. However, residual IILs are toxic to fermentative microbes such as Saccharomyces cerevisiae, making IIL-tolerance a key property for strain engineering. To enable rational engineering, we used chemical genomic profiling to understand the effects of IILs on S. cerevisiae. As a result, we found that IILs likely target mitochondria as their chemical genomic profiles closely resembled that of the mitochondrial membrane disrupting agent valinomycin. Further, several deletions of genes encoding mitochondrial proteins exhibited increased sensitivity to IIL. High-throughput chemical proteomics confirmed effectsmore » of IILs on mitochondrial protein levels. IILs induced abnormal mitochondrial morphology, as well as altered polarization of mitochondrial membrane potential similar to valinomycin. Deletion of the putative serine/threonine kinase PTK2 thought to activate the plasma-membrane proton efflux pump Pma1p conferred a significant IIL-fitness advantage. Conversely, overexpression of PMA1 conferred sensitivity to IILs, suggesting that hydrogen ion efflux may be coupled to influx of the toxic imidazolium cation. PTK2 deletion conferred resistance to multiple IILs, including [EMIM]Cl, [BMIM]Cl, and [EMIM]Ac. An engineered, xylose-converting ptk2Δ S. cerevisiae (Y133-IIL) strain consumed glucose and xylose faster and produced more ethanol in the presence of 1 % [BMIM]Cl than the wild-type PTK2 strain. We propose a model of IIL toxicity and resistance. In conclusion, this work demonstrates the utility of chemical genomics-guided biodesign for development of superior microbial biocatalysts for the ever-changing landscape of fermentation inhibitors.« less

  9. Metabolomic and (13)C-metabolic flux analysis of a xylose-consuming Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain expressing xylose isomerase.

    PubMed

    Wasylenko, Thomas M; Stephanopoulos, Gregory

    2015-03-01

    Over the past two decades, significant progress has been made in the engineering of xylose-consuming Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains for production of lignocellulosic biofuels. However, the ethanol productivities achieved on xylose are still significantly lower than those observed on glucose for reasons that are not well understood. We have undertaken an analysis of central carbon metabolite pool sizes and metabolic fluxes on glucose and on xylose under aerobic and anaerobic conditions in a strain capable of rapid xylose assimilation via xylose isomerase in order to investigate factors that may limit the rate of xylose fermentation. We find that during xylose utilization the flux through the non-oxidative Pentose Phosphate Pathway (PPP) is high but the flux through the oxidative PPP is low, highlighting an advantage of the strain employed in this study. Furthermore, xylose fails to elicit the full carbon catabolite repression response that is characteristic of glucose fermentation in S. cerevisiae. We present indirect evidence that the incomplete activation of the fermentation program on xylose results in a bottleneck in lower glycolysis, leading to inefficient re-oxidation of NADH produced in glycolysis. PMID:25311863

  10. Metabolomic and 13C-Metabolic Flux Analysis of a Xylose-Consuming Saccharomyces cerevisiae Strain Expressing Xylose Isomerase

    PubMed Central

    Wasylenko, Thomas M.; Stephanopoulos, Gregory

    2016-01-01

    Over the past two decades significant progress has been made in the engineering of xylose-consuming Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains for production of lignocellulosic biofuels. However, the ethanol productivities achieved on xylose are still significantly lower than those observed on glucose for reasons that are not well understood. We have undertaken an analysis of central carbon metabolite pool sizes and metabolic fluxes on glucose and on xylose under aerobic and anaerobic conditions in a strain capable of rapid xylose assimilation via xylose isomerase in order to investigate factors that may limit the rate of xylose fermentation. We find that during xylose utilization the flux through the non-oxidative PPP is high but the flux through the oxidative PPP is low, highlighting an advantage of the strain employed in this study. Furthermore, xylose fails to elicit the full carbon catabolite repression response that is characteristic of glucose fermentation in S. cerevisiae. We present indirect evidence that the incomplete activation of the fermentation program on xylose results in a bottleneck in lower glycolysis, leading to inefficient re-oxidation of NADH produced in glycolysis. PMID:25311863

  11. Diploid yeast cells yield homozygous spontaneous mutations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Esposito, M. S.; Bruschi, C. V.; Brushi, C. V. (Principal Investigator)

    1993-01-01

    A leucine-requiring hybrid of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, homoallelic at the LEU1 locus (leu1-12/leu1-12) and heterozygous for three chromosome-VII genetic markers distal to the LEU1 locus, was employed to inquire: (1) whether spontaneous gene mutation and mitotic segregation of heterozygous markers occur in positive nonrandom association and (2) whether homozygous LEU1/LEU1 mutant diploids are generated. The results demonstrate that gene mutation of leu1-12 to LEU1 and mitotic segregation of heterozygous chromosome-VII markers occur in strong positive nonrandom association, suggesting that the stimulatory DNA lesion is both mutagenic and recombinogenic. In addition, genetic analysis of diploid Leu+ revertants revealed that approximately 3% of mutations of leu1-12 to LEU1 result in LEU1/LEU1 homozygotes. Red-white sectored Leu+ colonies exhibit genotypes that implicate post-replicational chromatid breakage and exchange near the site of leu1-12 reversion, chromosome loss, and subsequent restitution of diploidy, in the sequence of events leading to mutational homozygosis. By analogy, diploid cell populations can yield variants homozygous for novel recessive gene mutations at biologically significant rates. Mutational homozygosis may be relevant to both carcinogenesis and the evolution of asexual diploid organisms.

  12. Analysis of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae pan-genome reveals a pool of copy number variants distributed in diverse yeast strains from differing industrial environments.

    PubMed

    Dunn, Barbara; Richter, Chandra; Kvitek, Daniel J; Pugh, Tom; Sherlock, Gavin

    2012-05-01

    Although the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is arguably one of the most well-studied organisms on earth, the genome-wide variation within this species--i.e., its "pan-genome"--has been less explored. We created a multispecies microarray platform containing probes covering the genomes of several Saccharomyces species: S. cerevisiae, including regions not found in the standard laboratory S288c strain, as well as the mitochondrial and 2-μm circle genomes-plus S. paradoxus, S. mikatae, S. kudriavzevii, S. uvarum, S. kluyveri, and S. castellii. We performed array-Comparative Genomic Hybridization (aCGH) on 83 different S. cerevisiae strains collected across a wide range of habitats; of these, 69 were commercial wine strains, while the remaining 14 were from a diverse set of other industrial and natural environments. We observed interspecific hybridization events, introgression events, and pervasive copy number variation (CNV) in all but a few of the strains. These CNVs were distributed throughout the strains such that they did not produce any clear phylogeny, suggesting extensive mating in both industrial and wild strains. To validate our results and to determine whether apparently similar introgressions and CNVs were identical by descent or recurrent, we also performed whole-genome sequencing on nine of these strains. These data may help pinpoint genomic regions involved in adaptation to different industrial milieus, as well as shed light on the course of domestication of S. cerevisiae.

  13. Analysis of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae pan-genome reveals a pool of copy number variants distributed in diverse yeast strains from differing industrial environments

    PubMed Central

    Dunn, Barbara; Richter, Chandra; Kvitek, Daniel J.; Pugh, Tom; Sherlock, Gavin

    2012-01-01

    Although the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is arguably one of the most well-studied organisms on earth, the genome-wide variation within this species—i.e., its “pan-genome”—has been less explored. We created a multispecies microarray platform containing probes covering the genomes of several Saccharomyces species: S. cerevisiae, including regions not found in the standard laboratory S288c strain, as well as the mitochondrial and 2-μm circle genomes–plus S. paradoxus, S. mikatae, S. kudriavzevii, S. uvarum, S. kluyveri, and S. castellii. We performed array-Comparative Genomic Hybridization (aCGH) on 83 different S. cerevisiae strains collected across a wide range of habitats; of these, 69 were commercial wine strains, while the remaining 14 were from a diverse set of other industrial and natural environments. We observed interspecific hybridization events, introgression events, and pervasive copy number variation (CNV) in all but a few of the strains. These CNVs were distributed throughout the strains such that they did not produce any clear phylogeny, suggesting extensive mating in both industrial and wild strains. To validate our results and to determine whether apparently similar introgressions and CNVs were identical by descent or recurrent, we also performed whole-genome sequencing on nine of these strains. These data may help pinpoint genomic regions involved in adaptation to different industrial milieus, as well as shed light on the course of domestication of S. cerevisiae. PMID:22369888

  14. The effect of hexose ratios on metabolite production in Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains obtained from the spontaneous fermentation of mezcal.

    PubMed

    Oliva Hernández, Amanda A; Taillandier, Patricia; Reséndez Pérez, Diana; Narváez Zapata, José A; Larralde Corona, Claudia Patricia

    2013-04-01

    Mezcal from Tamaulipas (México) is produced by spontaneous alcoholic fermentation using Agave spp. musts, which are rich in fructose. In this study eight Saccharomyces cerevisiae isolates obtained at the final stage of fermentation from a traditional mezcal winery were analysed in three semi-synthetic media. Medium M1 had a sugar content of 100 g l(-1) and a glucose/fructose (G/F) of 9:1. Medium M2 had a sugar content of 100 g l(-1) and a G/F of 1:9. Medium M3 had a sugar content of 200 g l(-1) and a G/F of 1:1. In the three types of media tested, the highest ethanol yield was obtained from the glucophilic strain LCBG-3Y5, while strain LCBG-3Y8 was highly resistant to ethanol and the most fructophilic of the mezcal strains. Strain LCBG-3Y5 produced more glycerol (4.4 g l(-1)) and acetic acid (1 g l(-1)) in M2 than in M1 (1.7 and 0.5 g l(-1), respectively), and the ethanol yields were higher for all strains in M1 except for LCBG-3Y5, -3Y8 and the Fermichamp strain. In medium M3, only the Fermichamp strain was able to fully consume the 100 g of fructose l(-1) but left a residual 32 g of glucose l(-1). Regarding the hexose transporters, a high number of amino acid polymorphisms were found in the Hxt1p sequences. Strain LCBG-3Y8 exhibited eight unique amino acid changes, followed by the Fermichamp strain with three changes. In Hxt3p, we observed nine amino acid polymorphisms unique for the Fermichamp strain and five unique changes for the mezcal strains. PMID:23271642

  15. The effect of hexose ratios on metabolite production in Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains obtained from the spontaneous fermentation of mezcal.

    PubMed

    Oliva Hernández, Amanda A; Taillandier, Patricia; Reséndez Pérez, Diana; Narváez Zapata, José A; Larralde Corona, Claudia Patricia

    2013-04-01

    Mezcal from Tamaulipas (México) is produced by spontaneous alcoholic fermentation using Agave spp. musts, which are rich in fructose. In this study eight Saccharomyces cerevisiae isolates obtained at the final stage of fermentation from a traditional mezcal winery were analysed in three semi-synthetic media. Medium M1 had a sugar content of 100 g l(-1) and a glucose/fructose (G/F) of 9:1. Medium M2 had a sugar content of 100 g l(-1) and a G/F of 1:9. Medium M3 had a sugar content of 200 g l(-1) and a G/F of 1:1. In the three types of media tested, the highest ethanol yield was obtained from the glucophilic strain LCBG-3Y5, while strain LCBG-3Y8 was highly resistant to ethanol and the most fructophilic of the mezcal strains. Strain LCBG-3Y5 produced more glycerol (4.4 g l(-1)) and acetic acid (1 g l(-1)) in M2 than in M1 (1.7 and 0.5 g l(-1), respectively), and the ethanol yields were higher for all strains in M1 except for LCBG-3Y5, -3Y8 and the Fermichamp strain. In medium M3, only the Fermichamp strain was able to fully consume the 100 g of fructose l(-1) but left a residual 32 g of glucose l(-1). Regarding the hexose transporters, a high number of amino acid polymorphisms were found in the Hxt1p sequences. Strain LCBG-3Y8 exhibited eight unique amino acid changes, followed by the Fermichamp strain with three changes. In Hxt3p, we observed nine amino acid polymorphisms unique for the Fermichamp strain and five unique changes for the mezcal strains.

  16. Construction of recombinant industrial Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain with bglS gene insertion into PEP4 locus by homologous recombination*

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qiang; Chen, Qi-he; Fu, Ming-liang; Wang, Jin-ling; Zhang, Hong-bo; He, Guo-qing

    2008-01-01

    The bglS gene encoding endo-l,3-1,4-β-glucanase from Bacillus subtilis was cloned and sequenced in this study. The bglS expression cassette, including PGK1 promoter, bglS gene fused to the signal sequence of the yeast mating pheromone α-factor (MFα1S), and ADH1 terminator with G418-resistance as the selected marker, was constructed. Then one of the PEP4 allele of Saccharomyces cerevisiae WZ65 strain was replaced by bglS expression cassette using chromosomal integration of polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-mediated homologous recombination, and the bglS gene was expressed simultaneously. The recombinant strain S. cerevisiae (SC-βG) was preliminarily screened by the clearing hydrolysis zone formed after the barley β-glucan was hydrolyzed in the plate and no proteinase A (PrA) activity was measured in fermenting liquor. The results of PCR analysis of genome DNA showed that one of the PEP4 allele had been replaced and bglS gene had been inserted into the locus of PEP4 gene in recombinant strains. Different endo-l,3-1,4-β-glucanase assay methods showed that the recombinant strain SC-βG had high endo-l,3-1,4-β-glucanase expression level with the maximum of 69.3 U/(h·ml) after 60 h of incubation. Meanwhile, the Congo Red method was suitable for the determination of endo-l,3-1,4-β-glucanase activity during the actual brewing process. The current research implies that the constructed yeast strain could be utilized to improve the industrial brewing property of beer. PMID:18600782

  17. Ethanol production through simultaneous saccharification and fermentation of switchgrass using Saccharomyces cerevisiae D(5)A and thermotolerant Kluyveromyces marxianus IMB strains.

    PubMed

    Faga, Brian A; Wilkins, Mark R; Banat, Ibrahim M

    2010-04-01

    Hydrothermolysis pretreated switchgrass at 200 degrees C for 10min was used in a simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) process using five thermotolerant yeast strains Kluyveromyces marxianus IMB 1, IMB 2, IMB 3, IMB 4, and IMB 5 at 45 degrees C and Saccharomyces cerevisiae D(5)A at 37 degrees C. SSF was carried out for 7d using 5, 10, and 15FPU/g glucan to determine the effect of decreasing cellulase loading on ethanol yield. The effect of initial pH on SSF by S. cerevisiae D(5)A was also investigated. Fermentation by K. marxianus IMB 1, IMB 2, IMB 4, and IMB 5 ceased by 72 h and fermentation by K. marxianus IMB 3 ceased by 96 h, while fermentation S. cerevisiae D(5)A continued for 7d. At 96 and 120 h, IMB 3 and S. cerevisiae D(5)A had similar ethanol yields while the other K. marxianus strains were lower at a 95% confidence level. Final ethanol yields for IMB 3, IMB 1, IMB 5 strains were similar to one another, however, ethanol yield for S. cerevisiae D(5)A (92% maximum theoretical) was greater than all of the IMB strains except IMB 3 at a 95% confidence level. Reducing enzyme loading reduced ethanol yields for both K. marxianus IMB 3 and S. cerevisiae D(5)A. Reducing buffer pH from 5.5 to 4.8 reduced ethanol yields for S. cerevisiae D(5)A. This study shows that K. marxianus IMB 3 has potential for commercial use for ethanol production from cellulose in SSF processes with further improvement of its thermotolerance.

  18. Comparative study of Saccharomyces cerevisiae wine strains to identify potential marker genes correlated to desiccation stress tolerance.

    PubMed

    Capece, Angela; Votta, Sonia; Guaragnella, Nicoletta; Zambuto, Marianna; Romaniello, Rossana; Romano, Patrizia

    2016-05-01

    The most diffused formulation of starter for winemaking is active dry yeast (ADY). ADYs production process is essentially characterized by air-drying stress, a combination of several stresses, including thermal, hyperosmotic and oxidative and cell capacity to counteract such multiple stresses will determine its survival. The molecular mechanisms underlying cell stress response to desiccation have been mostly studied in laboratory and commercial yeast strains, but a growing interest is currently developing for indigenous yeast strains which represent a valuable and alternative source of genetic and molecular biodiversity to be exploited. In this work, a comparative study of different Saccharomyces cerevisiae indigenous wine strains, previously selected for their technological traits, has been carried out to identify potentially relevant genes involved in desiccation stress tolerance. Cell viability was evaluated along desiccation treatment and gene expression was analyzed by real-time PCR before and during the stress. Our data show that the observed differences in individual strain sensitivity to desiccation stress could be associated to specific gene expression over time. In particular, either the basal or the stress-induced mRNA levels of certain genes, such as HSP12, SSA3, TPS1, TPS2, CTT1 and SOD1, result tightly correlated to the strain survival advantage. This study provides a reliable and sensitive method to predict desiccation stress tolerance of indigenous wine yeast strains which could be preliminary to biotechnological applications.

  19. Comparative study of Saccharomyces cerevisiae wine strains to identify potential marker genes correlated to desiccation stress tolerance.

    PubMed

    Capece, Angela; Votta, Sonia; Guaragnella, Nicoletta; Zambuto, Marianna; Romaniello, Rossana; Romano, Patrizia

    2016-05-01

    The most diffused formulation of starter for winemaking is active dry yeast (ADY). ADYs production process is essentially characterized by air-drying stress, a combination of several stresses, including thermal, hyperosmotic and oxidative and cell capacity to counteract such multiple stresses will determine its survival. The molecular mechanisms underlying cell stress response to desiccation have been mostly studied in laboratory and commercial yeast strains, but a growing interest is currently developing for indigenous yeast strains which represent a valuable and alternative source of genetic and molecular biodiversity to be exploited. In this work, a comparative study of different Saccharomyces cerevisiae indigenous wine strains, previously selected for their technological traits, has been carried out to identify potentially relevant genes involved in desiccation stress tolerance. Cell viability was evaluated along desiccation treatment and gene expression was analyzed by real-time PCR before and during the stress. Our data show that the observed differences in individual strain sensitivity to desiccation stress could be associated to specific gene expression over time. In particular, either the basal or the stress-induced mRNA levels of certain genes, such as HSP12, SSA3, TPS1, TPS2, CTT1 and SOD1, result tightly correlated to the strain survival advantage. This study provides a reliable and sensitive method to predict desiccation stress tolerance of indigenous wine yeast strains which could be preliminary to biotechnological applications. PMID:26882930

  20. High Level Ethanol from Sugar Cane Molasses by a New Thermotolerant Saccharomyces cerevisiae Strain in Industrial Scale.

    PubMed

    Fadel, M; Keera, Abeer A; Mouafi, Foukia E; Kahil, Tarek

    2013-01-01

    A new local strain of S. cerevisiae F-514, for ethanol production during hot summer season, using Egyptian sugar cane molasses was applied in Egyptian distillery factory. The inouluum was propagated through 300 L, 3 m(3), and 12 m(3) fermenters charged with diluted sugar cane molasses containing 4%-5% sugars. The yeast was applied in fermentation vessels 65 m(3) working volume to study the varying concentrations of urea, DAP, orthophosphoric acid (OPA), and its combinations as well as magnesium sulfate and inoculum size. The fermenter was allowed to stay for a period of 20 hours to give time for maximum conversion of sugars into ethanol. S. cerevisiae F-514 at molasses sugar level of 18% (w/v), inoculum size of 20% (v/v) cell concentration of 3.0 × 10(8)/mL, and combinations of urea, diammonium phosphate (DAP), orthophosphoric acid (OPA), and magnesium sulfate at amounts of 20, 10, 5, and 10 kg/65 m(3) working volume fermenters, respectively, supported maximum ethanol production (9.8%, v/v), fermentation efficiency (FE) 88.1%, and remaining sugars (RS) 1.22%. The fermentation resulted 13.4 g dry yeast/L contained 34.6% crude protein and 8.2% ash. By selecting higher ethanol yielding yeast strain and optimizing, the fermentation parameters both yield and economics of the fermentation process can be improved.

  1. High Level Ethanol from Sugar Cane Molasses by a New Thermotolerant Saccharomyces cerevisiae Strain in Industrial Scale

    PubMed Central

    Fadel, M.; Keera, Abeer A.; Mouafi, Foukia E.; Kahil, Tarek

    2013-01-01

    A new local strain of S. cerevisiae F-514, for ethanol production during hot summer season, using Egyptian sugar cane molasses was applied in Egyptian distillery factory. The inouluum was propagated through 300 L, 3 m3, and 12 m3 fermenters charged with diluted sugar cane molasses containing 4%-5% sugars. The yeast was applied in fermentation vessels 65 m3 working volume to study the varying concentrations of urea, DAP, orthophosphoric acid (OPA), and its combinations as well as magnesium sulfate and inoculum size. The fermenter was allowed to stay for a period of 20 hours to give time for maximum conversion of sugars into ethanol. S. cerevisiae F-514 at molasses sugar level of 18% (w/v), inoculum size of 20% (v/v) cell concentration of 3.0 × 108/mL, and combinations of urea, diammonium phosphate (DAP), orthophosphoric acid (OPA), and magnesium sulfate at amounts of 20, 10, 5, and 10 kg/65 m3 working volume fermenters, respectively, supported maximum ethanol production (9.8%, v/v), fermentation efficiency (FE) 88.1%, and remaining sugars (RS) 1.22%. The fermentation resulted 13.4 g dry yeast/L contained 34.6% crude protein and 8.2% ash. By selecting higher ethanol yielding yeast strain and optimizing, the fermentation parameters both yield and economics of the fermentation process can be improved. PMID:24363937

  2. High hydrostatic pressure activates gene expression that leads to ethanol production enhancement in a Saccharomyces cerevisiae distillery strain

    PubMed Central

    Bravim, Fernanda; Lippman, Soyeon I.; da Silva, Lucas F.; Souza, Diego T.; Fernandes, A. Alberto R.; Masuda, Claudio A.; Broach, James R.

    2016-01-01

    High hydrostatic pressure (HHP) is a stress that exerts broad effects on microorganisms with characteristics similar to those of common environmental stresses. In this study, we aimed to identify genetic mechanisms that can enhance alcoholic fermentation of wild Saccharomyces cerevisiae isolated from Brazilian spirit fermentation vats. Accordingly, we performed a time course microarray analysis on a S. cerevisiae strain submitted to mild sublethal pressure treatment of 50 MPa for 30 min at room temperature, followed by incubation for 5, 10 and 15 min without pressure treatment. The obtained transcriptional profiles demonstrate the importance of post-pressurisation period on the activation of several genes related to cell recovery and stress tolerance. Based on these results, we over-expressed genes strongly induced by HHP in the same wild yeast strain and identified genes, particularly SYM1, whose over-expression results in enhanced ethanol production and stress tolerance upon fermentation. The present study validates the use of HHP as a biotechnological tool for the fermentative industries. PMID:22915193

  3. Nuclear and mitochondrial genome instability induced by senna (Cassia angustifolia Vahl.) aqueous extract in Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains.

    PubMed

    Silva, C R; Caldeira-de-Araújo, A; Leitão, A C; Pádula, M

    2014-01-01

    Cassia angustifolia Vahl. (senna) is commonly used in self-medication and is frequently used to treat intestine constipation. A previous study involving bacteria and plasmid DNA suggested the possible toxicity of the aqueous extract of senna (SAE). The aim of this study was to extend the knowledge concerning SAE genotoxicity mechanisms because of its widespread use and its risks to human health. We investigated the impact of SAE on nuclear DNA and on the stability of mitochondrial DNA in Saccharomyces cerevisiae (wt, ogg1, msh6, and ogg1msh6) strains, monitoring the formation of petite mutants. Our results demonstrated that SAE specifically increased Can(R) mutagenesis only in the msh6 mutant, supporting the view that SAE can induce misincorporation errors in DNA. We observed a significant increase in the frequency of petite colonies in all studied strains. Our data indicate that SAE has genotoxic activity towards both mitochondrial and nuclear DNA. PMID:25501195

  4. Nuclear and mitochondrial genome instability induced by senna (Cassia angustifolia Vahl.) aqueous extract in Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains.

    PubMed

    Silva, C R; Caldeira-de-Araújo, A; Leitão, A C; Pádula, M

    2014-11-27

    Cassia angustifolia Vahl. (senna) is commonly used in self-medication and is frequently used to treat intestine constipation. A previous study involving bacteria and plasmid DNA suggested the possible toxicity of the aqueous extract of senna (SAE). The aim of this study was to extend the knowledge concerning SAE genotoxicity mechanisms because of its widespread use and its risks to human health. We investigated the impact of SAE on nuclear DNA and on the stability of mitochondrial DNA in Saccharomyces cerevisiae (wt, ogg1, msh6, and ogg1msh6) strains, monitoring the formation of petite mutants. Our results demonstrated that SAE specifically increased Can(R) mutagenesis only in the msh6 mutant, supporting the view that SAE can induce misincorporation errors in DNA. We observed a significant increase in the frequency of petite colonies in all studied strains. Our data indicate that SAE has genotoxic activity towards both mitochondrial and nuclear DNA.

  5. Zearalenone and Its Derivatives α-Zearalenol and β-Zearalenol Decontamination by Saccharomyces cerevisiae Strains Isolated from Bovine Forage

    PubMed Central

    Keller, Luiz; Abrunhosa, Luís; Keller, Kelly; Rosa, Carlos Alberto; Cavaglieri, Lilia; Venâncio, Armando

    2015-01-01

    Zearalenone (ZEA) and its derivatives are mycotoxins with estrogenic effects on mammals. The biotransformation for ZEA in animals involves the formation of two major metabolites, α- and β-zearalenol (α-ZOL and β-ZOL), which are subsequently conjugated with glucuronic acid. The capability of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains isolated from silage to eliminate ZEA and its derivatives α-ZOL and β-ZOL was investigated as, also, the mechanisms involved. Strains were grown on Yeast Extract-Peptone-Dextrose medium supplemented with the mycotoxins and their elimination from medium was quantified over time by HPLC-FL. A significant effect on the concentration of ZEA was observed, as all the tested strains were able to eliminate more than 90% of the mycotoxin from the culture medium in two days. The observed elimination was mainly due to ZEA biotransformation into β-ZOL (53%) and α-ZOL (8%) rather than to its adsorption to yeast cells walls. Further, the biotransformation of α-ZOL was not observed but a small amount of β-ZOL (6%) disappeared from culture medium. ZEA biotransformation by yeasts may not be regarded as a full detoxification process because both main end-products are still estrogenic. Nonetheless, it was observed that the biotransformation favors the formation of β-ZOL which is less estrogenic than ZEA and α-ZOL. This metabolic effect is only possible if active strains are used as feed additives and may play a role in the detoxification performance of products with viable S. cerevisiae cells. PMID:26308051

  6. Disruption of seven hypothetical aryl alcohol dehydrogenase genes from Saccharomyces cerevisiae and construction of a multiple knock-out strain.

    PubMed

    Delneri, D; Gardner, D C; Bruschi, C V; Oliver, S G

    1999-11-01

    By in silicio analysis, we have discovered that there are seven open reading frames (ORFs) in Saccharomyces cerevisiae whose protein products show a high degree of amino acid sequence similarity to the aryl alcohol dehydrogenase (AAD) of the lignin-degrading fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium. Yeast cultures grown to stationary phase display a significant aryl alcohol dehydrogenase activity by degrading aromatic aldehydes to the corresponding alcohols. To study the biochemical and the biological role of each of the AAD genes, a series of mutant strains carrying deletion of one or more of the AAD-coding sequences was constructed by PCR-mediated gene replacement, using the readily selectable marker kanMX. The correct targeting of the PCR-generated disruption cassette into the genomic locus was verified by analytical PCR and by pulse-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) followed by Southern blot analysis. Double, triple and quadruple mutant strains were obtained by classical genetic methods, while the construction of the quintuple, sextuple and septuple mutants was achieved by using the marker URA3 from Kluyveromyces lactis, HIS3 from Schizosaccharomyces pombe and TRP1 from S. cerevisiae. None of the knock-out strains revealed any mutant phenotype when tested for the degradation of aromatic aldehydes using both spectrophotometry and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Specific tests for changes in the ergosterol and phospholipids profiles did not reveal any mutant phenotype and mating and sporulation efficiencies were not affected in the septuple deletant. Compared to the wild-type strain, the septuple deletant showed an increased resistance to the anisaldehyde, but there is a possibility that the nutritional markers used for gene replacement are causing this effect.

  7. Zearalenone and Its Derivatives α-Zearalenol and β-Zearalenol Decontamination by Saccharomyces cerevisiae Strains Isolated from Bovine Forage.

    PubMed

    Keller, Luiz; Abrunhosa, Luís; Keller, Kelly; Rosa, Carlos Alberto; Cavaglieri, Lilia; Venâncio, Armando

    2015-08-01

    Zearalenone (ZEA) and its derivatives are mycotoxins with estrogenic effects on mammals. The biotransformation for ZEA in animals involves the formation of two major metabolites, α- and β-zearalenol (α-ZOL and β-ZOL), which are subsequently conjugated with glucuronic acid. The capability of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains isolated from silage to eliminate ZEA and its derivatives α-ZOL and β-ZOL was investigated as, also, the mechanisms involved. Strains were grown on Yeast Extract-Peptone-Dextrose medium supplemented with the mycotoxins and their elimination from medium was quantified over time by HPLC-FL. A significant effect on the concentration of ZEA was observed, as all the tested strains were able to eliminate more than 90% of the mycotoxin from the culture medium in two days. The observed elimination was mainly due to ZEA biotransformation into β-ZOL (53%) and α-ZOL (8%) rather than to its adsorption to yeast cells walls. Further, the biotransformation of α-ZOL was not observed but a small amount of β-ZOL (6%) disappeared from culture medium. ZEA biotransformation by yeasts may not be regarded as a full detoxification process because both main end-products are still estrogenic. Nonetheless, it was observed that the biotransformation favors the formation of β-ZOL which is less estrogenic than ZEA and α-ZOL. This metabolic effect is only possible if active strains are used as feed additives and may play a role in the detoxification performance of products with viable S. cerevisiae cells.

  8. Hardness does not affect the physiological responses of wild and domestic strains of diploid and triploid rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss to short-term exposure to pH 9.5.

    PubMed

    Thompson, W A; Rodela, T M; Richards, J G

    2016-08-01

    This study examined the effects of water hardness on the physiological responses associated with high pH exposure in multiple strains of diploid and triploid rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss. To accomplish this, three wild strains and one domesticated strain of diploid and triploid O. mykiss were abruptly transferred from control soft water (City of Vancouver dechlorinated tap water; pH 6·7; [CaCO3 ] < 17·9 mg l(-1) ) to control soft water (handling control), high pH soft water (pH 9·5; [CaCO3 ] < 17·9 mg l(-1) ), or high pH hard water (pH 9·5; [CaCO3 ] = 320 mg l(-1) ) followed by sampling at 24 h for physiological measurements. There was a significant effect of ploidy on loss of equilibrium (LOE) over the 24 h exposure, with only triploid O. mykiss losing equilibrium at high pH in both soft and hard water. Furthermore, exposure to pH 9·5 resulted in significant decreases in plasma sodium and chloride, and increases in plasma and brain ammonia with no differences between soft and hard water. There was no significant effect of strain on LOE, but there were significant differences between strains in brain ammonia and plasma cortisol. Overall, there were no clear protective effects of hardness on high pH exposure in these strains of O. mykiss. PMID:27325291

  9. Hardness does not affect the physiological responses of wild and domestic strains of diploid and triploid rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss to short-term exposure to pH 9.5.

    PubMed

    Thompson, W A; Rodela, T M; Richards, J G

    2016-08-01

    This study examined the effects of water hardness on the physiological responses associated with high pH exposure in multiple strains of diploid and triploid rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss. To accomplish this, three wild strains and one domesticated strain of diploid and triploid O. mykiss were abruptly transferred from control soft water (City of Vancouver dechlorinated tap water; pH 6·7; [CaCO3 ] < 17·9 mg l(-1) ) to control soft water (handling control), high pH soft water (pH 9·5; [CaCO3 ] < 17·9 mg l(-1) ), or high pH hard water (pH 9·5; [CaCO3 ] = 320 mg l(-1) ) followed by sampling at 24 h for physiological measurements. There was a significant effect of ploidy on loss of equilibrium (LOE) over the 24 h exposure, with only triploid O. mykiss losing equilibrium at high pH in both soft and hard water. Furthermore, exposure to pH 9·5 resulted in significant decreases in plasma sodium and chloride, and increases in plasma and brain ammonia with no differences between soft and hard water. There was no significant effect of strain on LOE, but there were significant differences between strains in brain ammonia and plasma cortisol. Overall, there were no clear protective effects of hardness on high pH exposure in these strains of O. mykiss.

  10. Differing effects of 2 active dried yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) strains on ruminal acidosis and methane production in nonlactating dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Chung, Y-H; Walker, N D; McGinn, S M; Beauchemin, K A

    2011-05-01

    Fifteen ruminally cannulated, nonlactating Holstein cows were used to measure the effects of 2 strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, fed as active dried yeasts, on ruminal pH and fermentation and enteric methane (CH(4)) emissions. Nonlactating cows were blocked by total duration (h) that their ruminal pH was below 5.8 during a 6-d pre-experimental period. Within each block, cows were randomly assigned to control (no yeast), yeast strain 1 (Levucell SC), or yeast strain 2 (a novel strain selected for enhanced in vitro fiber degradation), with both strains (Lallemand Animal Nutrition, Montréal, QC, Canada) providing 1 × 10(10) cfu/head per day. Cows were fed once daily a total mixed ration consisting of a 50:50 forage to concentrate ratio (dry matter basis). The yeast strains were dosed via the rumen cannula daily at the time of feeding. During the 35-d experiment, ruminal pH was measured continuously for 7 d (d 22 to 28) by using an indwelling system, and CH(4) gas was measured for 4 d (d 32 to 35) using the sulfur hexafluoride tracer gas technique (with halters and yokes). Rumen contents were sampled on 2 d (d 22 and 26) at 0, 3, and 6h after feeding. Dry matter intake, body weight, and apparent total-tract digestibility of nutrients were not affected by yeast feeding. Strain 2 decreased the average daily minimum (5.35 vs. 5.65 or 5.66), mean (5.98 vs. 6.24 or 6.34), and maximum ruminal pH (6.71 vs. 6.86 or 6.86), and prolonged the time that ruminal pH was below 5.8 (7.5 vs. 3.3 or 1.0 h/d) compared with the control or strain 1, respectively. The molar percentage of acetate was lower and that of propionate was greater in the ruminal fluid of cows receiving strain 2 compared with cows receiving no yeast or strain 1. Enteric CH(4) production adjusted for intake of dry matter or gross energy, however, did not differ between either yeast strain compared with the control but it tended to be reduced by 10% when strain 2 was compared with strain 1. The study shows that

  11. Truncation of Gal4p explains the inactivation of the GAL/MEL regulon in both Saccharomyces bayanus and some Saccharomyces cerevisiae wine strains.

    PubMed

    Dulermo, Rémi; Legras, Jean-Luc; Brunel, François; Devillers, Hugo; Sarilar, Véronique; Neuvéglise, Cécile; Nguyen, Huu-Vang

    2016-09-01

    In the past, the galactose-negative (Gal(-)) phenotype was a key physiological character used to distinguish Saccharomyces bayanus from S. cerevisiae In this work, we investigated the inactivation of GAL gene networks in S. bayanus, which is an S. uvarum/S. eubayanus hybrid, and in S. cerevisiae wine strains erroneously labelled 'S. bayanus'. We made an inventory of their GAL genes using genomes that were either available publicly, re-sequenced by us, or assembled from public data and completed with targeted sequencing. In the S. eubayanus/S. uvarum CBS 380(T) hybrid, the GAL/MEL network is composed of genes from both parents: from S. uvarum, an otherwise complete set that lacks GAL4, and from S. eubayanus, a truncated version of GAL4 and an additional copy of GAL3 and GAL80 Similarly, two different truncated GAL4 alleles were found in S. cerevisiae wine strains EC1118 and LalvinQA23. The lack of GAL4 activity in these strains was corrected by introducing a full-length copy of S. cerevisiae GAL4 on a CEN4/ARS plasmid. Transformation with this plasmid restored galactose utilisation in Gal(-) strains, and melibiose fermentation in strain CBS 380(T) The melibiose fermentation phenotype, formerly regarded as characteristic of S. uvarum, turned out to be widespread among Saccharomyces species. PMID:27589939

  12. An atypical PMR2 locus is responsible for hypersensitivity to sodium and lithium cations in the laboratory strain Saccharomyces cerevisiae CEN.PK113-7D.

    PubMed

    Daran-Lapujade, Pascale; Daran, Jean-Marc; Luttik, Marijke A H; Almering, Marinka J H; Pronk, Jack T; Kötter, Peter

    2009-08-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains belonging to the CEN.PK family are widely used in fundamental and applied yeast research. These strains have been reported to be hypersensitive to sodium ions and a previous microarray-based genotyping study indicated an atypical organization of the PMR2 locus. In other S. cerevisiae strains, this locus harbours one to five ENA genes that encode plasma membrane sodium-pumping ATPases. Sequence analysis of the PMR2 locus in S. cerevisiae CEN.PK113-7D revealed the presence of a new ENA gene that showed substantial sequence differences, both at the nucleotide level and at the predicted amino acid sequence level, with previously described ENA genes. The presence of this single and atypical ENA gene correlated with hypersensitivity to sodium and, in particular, to lithium ions. The native ENA6 gene was transcriptionally induced by sodium and lithium ions, but, apparently, the capacity for sodium export upon full induction was insufficient to achieve the levels of sodium and lithium ion tolerance observed in other S. cerevisiae strains. The sodium and lithium hypersensitivity of CEN.PK strains, which is potentially detrimental during cultivation in sodium-rich media, could, however, be suppressed by overexpression of ENA6.

  13. Vanadium pentoxide effects on stress responses in wine Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain UE-ME3.

    PubMed

    Rosado, Tânia; Conim, Ana; Alves-Pereira, Isabel; Ferreira, Rui

    2009-11-01

    Vanadium pentoxide mainly used as catalyst in sulphuric acid, maleic anhydride and ceramics industry, is a pollutant watering redistributed around the environment. Research on biological influence of vanadium pentoxide has gained major importance because it exerts toxic effects on a wide variety of biological systems. In this work we intent to evaluate the effects of vanadium pentoxide ranging from 0 to 2 mM in culture media on a wine wild-type Saccharomyces cerevisiae from Alentejo region of Portugal. Our results show that 2.0 mM vanadium pentoxide in culture medium induced a significant increase of malonaldehyde level and Glutathione peroxidase activity, a slightly increase of Catalase A activity as well as a decrease of wet weight and mitochondrial NADH cit c reductase of S. cerevisiae UE-ME(3). Also our results show that cycloheximide prevent cell death when cells grows 30 min in presence of 1.5 mM of vanadium pentoxide.

  14. Alcoholic fermentation by wild-type Hansenula polymorpha and Saccharomyces cerevisiae versus recombinant strains with an elevated level of intracellular glutathione.

    PubMed

    Grabek-Lejko, Dorota; Kurylenko, Olena O; Sibirny, Vladimir A; Ubiyvovk, Vira M; Penninckx, Michel; Sibirny, Andriy A

    2011-11-01

    The ability of baker's yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and of the thermotolerant methylotrophic yeast Hansenula polymorpha to produce ethanol during alcoholic fermentation of glucose was compared between wild-type strains and recombinant strains possessing an elevated level of intracellular glutathione (GSH) due to overexpression of the first gene of GSH biosynthesis, gamma-glutamylcysteine synthetase, or of the central regulatory gene of sulfur metabolism, MET4. The analyzed strains of H. polymorpha with an elevated pool of intracellular GSH were found to accumulate almost twice as much ethanol as the wild-type strain during glucose fermentation, in contrast to GSH1-overexpressing S. cerevisiae strains, which also possessed an elevated pool of GSH. The ethanol tolerance of the GSH-overproducing strains was also determined. For this, the wild-type strain and transformants with an elevated GSH pool were compared for their viability upon exposure to exogenous ethanol. Unexpectedly, both S. cerevisiae and H. polymorpha transformants with a high GSH pool proved more sensitive to exogenous ethanol than the corresponding wild-type strains.

  15. Genomic structural variation contributes to phenotypic change of industrial bioethanol yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ke; Zhang, Li-Jie; Fang, Ya-Hong; Jin, Xin-Na; Qi, Lei; Wu, Xue-Chang; Zheng, Dao-Qiong

    2016-03-01

    Genomic structural variation (GSV) is a ubiquitous phenomenon observed in the genomes of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains with different genetic backgrounds; however, the physiological and phenotypic effects of GSV are not well understood. Here, we first revealed the genetic characteristics of a widely used industrial S. cerevisiae strain, ZTW1, by whole genome sequencing. ZTW1 was identified as an aneuploidy strain and a large-scale GSV was observed in the ZTW1 genome compared with the genome of a diploid strain YJS329. These GSV events led to copy number variations (CNVs) in many chromosomal segments as well as one whole chromosome in the ZTW1 genome. Changes in the DNA dosage of certain functional genes directly affected their expression levels and the resultant ZTW1 phenotypes. Moreover, CNVs of large chromosomal regions triggered an aneuploidy stress in ZTW1. This stress decreased the proliferation ability and tolerance of ZTW1 to various stresses, while aneuploidy response stress may also provide some benefits to the fermentation performance of the yeast, including increased fermentation rates and decreased byproduct generation. This work reveals genomic characters of the bioethanol S. cerevisiae strain ZTW1 and suggests that GSV is an important kind of mutation that changes the traits of industrial S. cerevisiae strains.

  16. Highly efficient bioethanol production by a Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain with multiple stress tolerance to high temperature, acid and ethanol.

    PubMed

    Benjaphokee, Suthee; Hasegawa, Daisuke; Yokota, Daiki; Asvarak, Thipa; Auesukaree, Choowong; Sugiyama, Minetaka; Kaneko, Yoshinobu; Boonchird, Chuenchit; Harashima, Satoshi

    2012-02-15

    Use of super strains exhibiting tolerance to high temperature, acidity and ethanol is a promising way to make ethanol production economically feasible. We describe here the breeding and performance of such a multiple-tolerant strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae generated by a spore-to-cell hybridization technique without recombinant DNA technology. A heterothallic strain showing a high-temperature (41°C) tolerant (Htg(+)) phenotype, a derivative from a strain isolated from nature, was crossed with a homothallic strain displaying high-ethanol productivity (Hep(+)), a stock culture at the Thailand Institute of Scientific and Technological Research. The resultant hybrid TJ14 displayed ability to rapidly utilize glucose, and produced ethanol (46.6g/l) from 10% glucose fermentation medium at high temperature (41°C). Not only ethanol productivity at 41°C but also acid tolerance (Acd(+)) was improved in TJ14 as compared with its parental strains, enabling TJ14 to grow in liquid medium even at pH 3. TJ14 maintained high ethanol productivity (46.0g/l) from 10% glucose when fermentation was done under multiple-stress conditions (41°C and pH 3.5). Furthermore, when TJ14 was subjected to a repeated-batch fermentation scheme, the growth and ethanol production of TJ14 were maintained at excellent levels over ten cycles of fermentation. Thus, the multiple-stress (Htg(+) Hep(+) Acd(+)) resistant strain TJ14 should be useful for cost-effective bioethanol production under high-temperature and acidic conditions.

  17. Transcriptomes of a xylose-utilizing industrial flocculating Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain cultured in media containing different sugar sources.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Wei-Yi; Tang, Yue-Qin; Gou, Min; Xia, Zi-Yuan; Kida, Kenji

    2016-12-01

    Lignocellulosic hydrolysates used for bioethanol production contain a mixture of sugars, with xylose being the second most abundant after glucose. Since xylose is not a natural substrate for Saccharomyces cerevisiae, recombinant S. cerevisiae strongly prefers glucose over xylose, and the fermentation rate and ethanol yield with xylose are both lower than those with glucose. To determine the molecular basis for glucose and xylose fermentation, we used microarrays to investigate the transcriptional difference of a xylose-utilizing industrial strain cultured in both single sugar media and a mixed sugar medium of glucose and xylose. The transcriptomes were nearly identical between glucose metabolizing cells in the glucose alone medium and those in the glucose fermentation phase in the mixed-sugar medium. Whereas the transcriptomes highly differed between the xylose metabolizing cells in the xylose alone medium and those in the xylose fermentation phase in the mixed sugar medium, and the differences mainly involved sulfur metabolism. When the transcriptional profiles were compared between glucose fermentation state and xylose fermentation state, we found the expression patterns of hexose transporters and glucose signaling pathway differed in response to different sugar sources, and the expression levels of the genes involved in gluconeogenesis, the glyoxylate and tricarboxylic acid cycles and respiration increased with xylose, indicating that the xylose-metabolizing cells had high requirements for maintenance energy and lacked the carbon catabolite repression capability. The effect of carbon catabolite repression by glucose lasted after glucose depletion for specific genes to different extents. PMID:27485516

  18. Transcriptomes of a xylose-utilizing industrial flocculating Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain cultured in media containing different sugar sources.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Wei-Yi; Tang, Yue-Qin; Gou, Min; Xia, Zi-Yuan; Kida, Kenji

    2016-12-01

    Lignocellulosic hydrolysates used for bioethanol production contain a mixture of sugars, with xylose being the second most abundant after glucose. Since xylose is not a natural substrate for Saccharomyces cerevisiae, recombinant S. cerevisiae strongly prefers glucose over xylose, and the fermentation rate and ethanol yield with xylose are both lower than those with glucose. To determine the molecular basis for glucose and xylose fermentation, we used microarrays to investigate the transcriptional difference of a xylose-utilizing industrial strain cultured in both single sugar media and a mixed sugar medium of glucose and xylose. The transcriptomes were nearly identical between glucose metabolizing cells in the glucose alone medium and those in the glucose fermentation phase in the mixed-sugar medium. Whereas the transcriptomes highly differed between the xylose metabolizing cells in the xylose alone medium and those in the xylose fermentation phase in the mixed sugar medium, and the differences mainly involved sulfur metabolism. When the transcriptional profiles were compared between glucose fermentation state and xylose fermentation state, we found the expression patterns of hexose transporters and glucose signaling pathway differed in response to different sugar sources, and the expression levels of the genes involved in gluconeogenesis, the glyoxylate and tricarboxylic acid cycles and respiration increased with xylose, indicating that the xylose-metabolizing cells had high requirements for maintenance energy and lacked the carbon catabolite repression capability. The effect of carbon catabolite repression by glucose lasted after glucose depletion for specific genes to different extents.

  19. Improving the productivity of S-adenosyl-l-methionine by metabolic engineering in an industrial Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Weijun; Hang, Baojian; Zhu, Xiangcheng; Wang, Ri; Shen, Minjie; Huang, Lei; Xu, Zhinan

    2016-10-20

    S-Adenosyl-l-methionine (SAM) is an important metabolite having prominent roles in treating various diseases. In order to improve the production of SAM, the regulation of three metabolic pathways involved in SAM biosynthesis were investigated in an industrial yeast strain ZJU001. GLC3 encoded glycogen-branching enzyme (GBE), SPE2 encoded SAM decarboxylase, as well as ERG4 and ERG6 encoded key enzymes in ergosterol biosynthesis, were knocked out in ZJU001 accordingly. The results indicated that blocking of either glycogen pathway or SAM decarboxylation pathway could improve the SAM accumulation significantly in ZJU001, while single disruption of either ERG4 or ERG6 gene had no obvious effect on SAM production. Moreover, the double mutant ZJU001-GS with deletion of both GLC3 and SPE2 genes was also constructed, which showed further improvement of SAM accumulation. Finally, SAM2 was overexpressed in ZJU001-GS to give the best SAM-producing recombinant strain ZJU001-GS-SAM2, in which 12.47g/L SAM was produced by following our developed pseudo-exponential fed-batch cultivation strategy, about 81.0% increase comparing to its parent strain ZJU001. The present work laid a solid base for large-scale SAM production with the industrial Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain.

  20. Improving the productivity of S-adenosyl-l-methionine by metabolic engineering in an industrial Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Weijun; Hang, Baojian; Zhu, Xiangcheng; Wang, Ri; Shen, Minjie; Huang, Lei; Xu, Zhinan

    2016-10-20

    S-Adenosyl-l-methionine (SAM) is an important metabolite having prominent roles in treating various diseases. In order to improve the production of SAM, the regulation of three metabolic pathways involved in SAM biosynthesis were investigated in an industrial yeast strain ZJU001. GLC3 encoded glycogen-branching enzyme (GBE), SPE2 encoded SAM decarboxylase, as well as ERG4 and ERG6 encoded key enzymes in ergosterol biosynthesis, were knocked out in ZJU001 accordingly. The results indicated that blocking of either glycogen pathway or SAM decarboxylation pathway could improve the SAM accumulation significantly in ZJU001, while single disruption of either ERG4 or ERG6 gene had no obvious effect on SAM production. Moreover, the double mutant ZJU001-GS with deletion of both GLC3 and SPE2 genes was also constructed, which showed further improvement of SAM accumulation. Finally, SAM2 was overexpressed in ZJU001-GS to give the best SAM-producing recombinant strain ZJU001-GS-SAM2, in which 12.47g/L SAM was produced by following our developed pseudo-exponential fed-batch cultivation strategy, about 81.0% increase comparing to its parent strain ZJU001. The present work laid a solid base for large-scale SAM production with the industrial Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain. PMID:27510807

  1. Genetic engineering of industrial Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains using a selection/counter-selection approach.

    PubMed

    Kutyna, Dariusz R; Cordente, Antonio G; Varela, Cristian

    2014-01-01

    Gene modification of laboratory yeast strains is currently a very straightforward task thanks to the availability of the entire yeast genome sequence and the high frequency with which yeast can incorporate exogenous DNA into its genome. Unfortunately, laboratory strains do not perform well in industrial settings, indicating the need for strategies to modify industrial strains to enable strain development for industrial applications. Here we describe approaches we have used to genetically modify industrial strains used in winemaking.

  2. Evolutionary engineering of a glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase-negative, acetate-reducing Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain enables anaerobic growth at high glucose concentrations

    PubMed Central

    Guadalupe-Medina, Víctor; Metz, Benjamin; Oud, Bart; van Der Graaf, Charlotte M; Mans, Robert; Pronk, Jack T; van Maris, Antonius J A

    2014-01-01

    Glycerol production by Saccharomyces cerevisiae, which is required for redox-cofactor balancing in anaerobic cultures, causes yield reduction in industrial bioethanol production. Recently, glycerol formation in anaerobic S. cerevisiae cultures was eliminated by expressing Escherichia coli (acetylating) acetaldehyde dehydrogenase (encoded by mhpF) and simultaneously deleting the GPD1 and GPD2 genes encoding glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, thus coupling NADH reoxidation to reduction of acetate to ethanol. Gpd– strains are, however, sensitive to high sugar concentrations, which complicates industrial implementation of this metabolic engineering concept. In this study, laboratory evolution was used to improve osmotolerance of a Gpd– mhpF-expressing S. cerevisiae strain. Serial batch cultivation at increasing osmotic pressure enabled isolation of an evolved strain that grew anaerobically at 1 M glucose, at a specific growth rate of 0.12 h−1. The evolved strain produced glycerol at low concentrations (0.64 ± 0.33 g l−1). However, these glycerol concentrations were below 10% of those observed with a Gpd+ reference strain. Consequently, the ethanol yield on sugar increased from 79% of the theoretical maximum in the reference strain to 92% for the evolved strains. Genetic analysis indicated that osmotolerance under aerobic conditions required a single dominant chromosomal mutation, and one further mutation in the plasmid-borne mhpF gene for anaerobic growth. PMID:24004455

  3. a/alpha-specific effect on the mms3 mutation on ultraviolet mutagenesis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Martin, P; Prakash, L; Prakash, S

    1981-05-01

    A new gene involved in error-prone repair of ultraviolet (UV) damage has been identified in Saccharomyces cerevisiae by the mms3-1 mutation. UV-induced reversion is reduced in diploids that are homozygous for mms3-1, only if they are also heterozygous (MATa/MAT alpha) at the mating type locus. The mms3-1 mutation has no effect on UV-induced reversion either in haploids or MATa/MATa or MAT alpha/MAT alpha diploids. The mutation confers sensitivity to UV and methyl methane sulfonate in both haploids and diploids. Even though mutation induction by UV is restored to wild-type levels in MATa/MATa mms3-1/mms3-1 or MAT alpha/MAT alpha mms3-1/mms3-1 diploids, such strains still retain sensitivity to the lethal effects of UV. Survival after UV irradiation in mms3-1 rad double mutant combinations indicates that mms3-1 is epistatic to rad6-1 whereas non-epistatic interactions are observed with rad3 and rad52 mutants. When present in the homozygous state in MATa/MAT alpha his1-1/his1-315 heteroallelic diploids, mms3-1 was found to lower UV-induced mitotic recombination.

  4. [Isolation, purification and identification of metallthionein from strain BD 101 of Saccharomyces cerevisiae].

    PubMed

    Lin, Z; Chang, L

    1998-08-01

    Selection of Saccharomyces cerevisiae BD101 having resistance to metal ions and producing metallothionein by inducer from Saccharomyces. These proteins were isolated and purified by Sephadex G-50 and subsequent DEAE Sepharose CL-4B, then Sephadex G-25 for desalination. There were two iso-MTs for Cu-induced. The, molecular weights were 7 kD and had 60 amino acids. Both Cu-MTs were rich in Cysteine (10%). 4 atom Cu/6 mole Cys/mole Cu-MTs.

  5. Acetic acid inhibits nutrient uptake in Saccharomyces cerevisiae: auxotrophy confounds the use of yeast deletion libraries for strain improvement.

    PubMed

    Ding, Jun; Bierma, Jan; Smith, Mark R; Poliner, Eric; Wolfe, Carole; Hadduck, Alex N; Zara, Severino; Jirikovic, Mallori; van Zee, Kari; Penner, Michael H; Patton-Vogt, Jana; Bakalinsky, Alan T

    2013-08-01

    Acetic acid inhibition of yeast fermentation has a negative impact in several industrial processes. As an initial step in the construction of a Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain with increased tolerance for acetic acid, mutations conferring resistance were identified by screening a library of deletion mutants in a multiply auxotrophic genetic background. Of the 23 identified mutations, 11 were then introduced into a prototrophic laboratory strain for further evaluation. Because none of the 11 mutations was found to increase resistance in the prototrophic strain, potential interference by the auxotrophic mutations themselves was investigated. Mutants carrying single auxotrophic mutations were constructed and found to be more sensitive to growth inhibition by acetic acid than an otherwise isogenic prototrophic strain. At a concentration of 80 mM acetic acid at pH 4.8, the initial uptake of uracil, leucine, lysine, histidine, tryptophan, phosphate, and glucose was lower in the prototrophic strain than in a non-acetic acid-treated control. These findings are consistent with two mechanisms by which nutrient uptake may be inhibited. Intracellular adenosine triphosphate (ATP) levels were severely decreased upon acetic acid treatment, which likely slowed ATP-dependent proton symport, the major form of transport in yeast for nutrients other than glucose. In addition, the expression of genes encoding some nutrient transporters was repressed by acetic acid, including HXT1 and HXT3 that encode glucose transporters that operate by facilitated diffusion. These results illustrate how commonly used genetic markers in yeast deletion libraries complicate the effort to isolate strains with increased acetic acid resistance.

  6. Xylose and xylose/glucose co-fermentation by recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains expressing individual hexose transporters.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Davi L; Matsushika, Akinori; de Sales, Belisa B; Goshima, Tetsuya; Bon, Elba P S; Stambuk, Boris U

    2014-09-01

    Since the uptake of xylose is believed to be one of the rate-limiting steps for xylose ethanol fermentation by recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains, we transformed a hxt-null strain lacking the major hexose transporters (hxt1Δ-hxt7Δ and gal2Δ) with an integrative plasmid to overexpress the genes for xylose reductase (XYL1), xylitol dehydrogenase (XYL2) and xylulokinase (XKS1), and analyzed the impact that overexpression of the HXT1, HXT2, HXT5 or HXT7 permeases have in anaerobic batch fermentations using xylose, glucose, or xylose plus glucose as carbon sources. Our results revealed that the low-affinity HXT1 permease allowed the maximal consumption of sugars and ethanol production rates during xylose/glucose co-fermentations, but was incapable to allow xylose uptake when this sugar was the only carbon source. The moderately high-affinity HXT5 permease was a poor glucose transporter, and it also did not allow significant xylose uptake by the cells. The moderately high-affinity HXT2 permease allowed xylose uptake with the same rates as those observed during glucose consumption, even under co-fermentation conditions, but had the drawback of producing incomplete fermentations. Finally, the high-affinity HXT7 permease allowed efficient xylose fermentation, but during xylose/glucose co-fermentations this permease showed a clear preference for glucose. Thus, our results indicate that approaches to engineer S. cerevisiae HXT transporters to improve second generation bioethanol production need to consider the composition of the biomass sugar syrup, whereby the HXT1 transporter seems more suitable for hydrolysates containing xylose/glucose blends, whereas the HXT7 permease would be a better choice for xylose-enriched sugar streams. PMID:25039054

  7. High Level Ethanol from Sugar Cane Molasses by a New Thermotolerant Saccharomyces cerevisiae Strain in Industrial Scale.

    PubMed

    Fadel, M; Keera, Abeer A; Mouafi, Foukia E; Kahil, Tarek

    2013-01-01

    A new local strain of S. cerevisiae F-514, for ethanol production during hot summer season, using Egyptian sugar cane molasses was applied in Egyptian distillery factory. The inouluum was propagated through 300 L, 3 m(3), and 12 m(3) fermenters charged with diluted sugar cane molasses containing 4%-5% sugars. The yeast was applied in fermentation vessels 65 m(3) working volume to study the varying concentrations of urea, DAP, orthophosphoric acid (OPA), and its combinations as well as magnesium sulfate and inoculum size. The fermenter was allowed to stay for a period of 20 hours to give time for maximum conversion of sugars into ethanol. S. cerevisiae F-514 at molasses sugar level of 18% (w/v), inoculum size of 20% (v/v) cell concentration of 3.0 × 10(8)/mL, and combinations of urea, diammonium phosphate (DAP), orthophosphoric acid (OPA), and magnesium sulfate at amounts of 20, 10, 5, and 10 kg/65 m(3) working volume fermenters, respectively, supported maximum ethanol production (9.8%, v/v), fermentation efficiency (FE) 88.1%, and remaining sugars (RS) 1.22%. The fermentation resulted 13.4 g dry yeast/L contained 34.6% crude protein and 8.2% ash. By selecting higher ethanol yielding yeast strain and optimizing, the fermentation parameters both yield and economics of the fermentation process can be improved. PMID:24363937

  8. Xylose and xylose/glucose co-fermentation by recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains expressing individual hexose transporters.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Davi L; Matsushika, Akinori; de Sales, Belisa B; Goshima, Tetsuya; Bon, Elba P S; Stambuk, Boris U

    2014-09-01

    Since the uptake of xylose is believed to be one of the rate-limiting steps for xylose ethanol fermentation by recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains, we transformed a hxt-null strain lacking the major hexose transporters (hxt1Δ-hxt7Δ and gal2Δ) with an integrative plasmid to overexpress the genes for xylose reductase (XYL1), xylitol dehydrogenase (XYL2) and xylulokinase (XKS1), and analyzed the impact that overexpression of the HXT1, HXT2, HXT5 or HXT7 permeases have in anaerobic batch fermentations using xylose, glucose, or xylose plus glucose as carbon sources. Our results revealed that the low-affinity HXT1 permease allowed the maximal consumption of sugars and ethanol production rates during xylose/glucose co-fermentations, but was incapable to allow xylose uptake when this sugar was the only carbon source. The moderately high-affinity HXT5 permease was a poor glucose transporter, and it also did not allow significant xylose uptake by the cells. The moderately high-affinity HXT2 permease allowed xylose uptake with the same rates as those observed during glucose consumption, even under co-fermentation conditions, but had the drawback of producing incomplete fermentations. Finally, the high-affinity HXT7 permease allowed efficient xylose fermentation, but during xylose/glucose co-fermentations this permease showed a clear preference for glucose. Thus, our results indicate that approaches to engineer S. cerevisiae HXT transporters to improve second generation bioethanol production need to consider the composition of the biomass sugar syrup, whereby the HXT1 transporter seems more suitable for hydrolysates containing xylose/glucose blends, whereas the HXT7 permease would be a better choice for xylose-enriched sugar streams.

  9. Molecular-genetic biodiversity in a natural population of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae from "Evolution Canyon": microsatellite polymorphism, ploidy and controversial sexual status.

    PubMed

    Ezov, T Katz; Boger-Nadjar, E; Frenkel, Z; Katsperovski, I; Kemeny, S; Nevo, E; Korol, A; Kashi, Y

    2006-11-01

    The yeast S. cerevisiae is a central model organism in eukaryotic cell studies and a major component in many food and biotechnological industrial processes. However, the wide knowledge regarding genetics and molecular biology of S. cerevisiae is based on an extremely narrow range of strains. Studies of natural populations of S. cerevisiae, not associated with human activities or industrial fermentation environments, are very few. We isolated a panel of S. cerevisiae strains from a natural microsite, "Evolution Canyon" at Mount Carmel, Israel, and studied their genomic biodiversity. Analysis of 19 microsatellite loci revealed high allelic diversity and variation in ploidy level across the panel, from diploids to tetraploids, confirmed by flow cytometry. No significant differences were found in the level of microsatellite variation between strains derived from the major localities or microniches, whereas strains of different ploidy showed low similarity in allele content. Maximum genetic diversity was observed among diploids and minimum among triploids. Phylogenetic analysis revealed clonal, rather than sexual, structure of the triploid and tetraploid subpopulations. Viability tests in tetrad analysis also suggest that clonal reproduction may predominate in the polyploid subpopulations. PMID:16980391

  10. A Simple and Reliable Method for Hybridization of Homothallic Wine Strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Ramírez, Manuel; Peréz, Francisco; Regodón, José A.

    1998-01-01

    A procedure was developed for the hybridization and improvement of homothallic industrial wine yeasts. Killer cycloheximide-sensitive strains were crossed with killer-sensitive cycloheximide-resistant strains to get killer cycloheximide-resistant hybrids, thereby enabling hybrid selection and identification. This procedure also allows backcrossing of spore colonies from the hybrids with parental strains. PMID:9835605

  11. Identification and characterization of a drug-sensitive strain enables puromycin-based translational assays in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Cary, Gregory A; Yoon, Sung Hwan; Torres, Cecilia Garmendia; Wang, Kathie; Hays, Michelle; Ludlow, Catherine; Goodlett, David R; Dudley, Aimée M

    2014-05-01

    Puromycin is an aminonucleoside antibiotic with structural similarity to aminoacyl tRNA. This structure allows the drug to bind the ribosomal A site and incorporate into nascent polypeptides, causing chain termination, ribosomal subunit dissociation and widespread translational arrest at high concentrations. In contrast, at sufficiently low concentrations, puromycin incorporates primarily at the C-terminus of proteins. While a number of techniques utilize puromycin incorporation as a tool for probing translational activity in vivo, these methods cannot be applied in yeasts that are insensitive to puromycin. Here, we describe a mutant strain of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae that is sensitive to puromycin and characterize the cellular response to the drug. Puromycin inhibits the growth of yeast cells mutant for erg6∆, pdr1∆ and pdr3∆ (EPP) on both solid and liquid media. Puromycin also induces the aggregation of the cytoplasmic processing body component Edc3 in the mutant strain. We establish that puromycin is rapidly incorporated into yeast proteins and test the effects of puromycin on translation in vivo. This study establishes the EPP strain as a valuable tool for implementing puromycin-based assays in yeast, which will enable new avenues of inquiry into protein production and maturation.

  12. Characteristics of the high malic acid production mechanism in Saccharomyces cerevisiae sake yeast strain No. 28.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Shunichi; Tabata, Ken; Oba, Takahiro; Kusumoto, Kenichi; Mitsuiki, Shinji; Kadokura, Toshimori; Nakazato, Atsumi

    2012-09-01

    We characterized a high malic acid production mechanism in sake yeast strain No. 28. No considerable differences in the activity of the enzymes that were involved in malic acid synthesis were observed between strain No. 28 and its parent strain, K1001. However, compared with strain K1001, which actively took up rhodamine 123 during staining, the cells of strain No. 28 were only lightly stained, even when cultured in high glucose concentrations. In addition, malic acid production by the respiratory-deficient strain of K1001 was 2.5-fold higher than that of the wild-type K1001 and wild-type No. 28. The findings of this study demonstrated that the high malic acid production by strain No. 28 is attributed to the suppression of mitochondrial activity.

  13. Exploring the use of Saccharomyces cerevisiae commercial strain and Saccharomycodes ludwigii natural isolate for grape marc fermentation to improve sensory properties of spirits.

    PubMed

    Bovo, Barbara; Carlot, Milena; Lombardi, Angiolella; Lomolino, Giovanna; Lante, Anna; Giacomini, Alessio; Corich, Viviana

    2014-08-01

    In Mediterranean countries the most diffuse practice to obtain the valorization of grape marc, the main by-product from winemaking, is the production of spirits. During this process, marc storage for sugar fermentation represents a crucial step, since side-fermentations leading to off-flavours production can very easily occur. In this study we evaluated the effect of the addition of two yeast strains, inoculated separately at the beginning of the storage period, into marcs from two Italian grape varieties with the aim to control the development of autochthonous microbiota and to improve spirit quality. The presence of the inoculated strains was monitored by means of PCR-based approaches. A commercial Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain, chosen as this species is notably the best ethanol producer, showed excellent ability to dominate the autochthonous microflora and to reduce off-flavours as demonstrated by chemical analysis and sensory evaluation. A Saccharomycodes ludwigii strain, chosen for increasing varietal compounds thus enhancing spirit aroma, showed a level of implantation not sufficient to assure a clear beneficial effect on quality. The implantation level of this strain was affected by S. cerevisiae competition since the highest level was found in grape marc with lower sugar content, where indigenous S. cerevisiae were less persistent. PMID:24750811

  14. Novel starters for old processes: use of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains isolated from artisanal sourdough for craft beer production at a brewery scale.

    PubMed

    Marongiu, Antonella; Zara, Giacomo; Legras, Jean-Luc; Del Caro, Alessandra; Mascia, Ilaria; Fadda, Costantino; Budroni, Marilena

    2015-01-01

    The deliberate inoculation of yeast strains isolated from food matrices such as wine or bread, could allow the transfer of novel properties to beer. In this work, the feasibility of the use of baker's yeast strains as starters for craft beer production has been evaluated at laboratory and brewery scale. Nine out of 12 Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains isolated from artisanal sourdoughs metabolized 2 % maltose, glucose and trehalose and showed growth rates and cell populations higher than those of the brewer's strain Safbrew-S33. Analysis of allelic variation at 12 microsatellite loci clustered seven baker's strains and Safbrew-S33 in the main group of bread isolates. Chemical analyses of beers produced at a brewery scale showed significant differences among the beers produced with the baker's strain S38 or Safbrew-S33, while no significant differences were observed when S38 or the brewer's strain Safbrew-F2 was used for re-fermentation. The sensory profile of beers obtained with S38 or the brewer's yeasts did not show significant differences, thus suggesting that baker's strains of S. cerevisiae could represent a reservoir of biodiversity for the selection of starter strains for craft beer production. PMID:25387611

  15. Novel starters for old processes: use of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains isolated from artisanal sourdough for craft beer production at a brewery scale.

    PubMed

    Marongiu, Antonella; Zara, Giacomo; Legras, Jean-Luc; Del Caro, Alessandra; Mascia, Ilaria; Fadda, Costantino; Budroni, Marilena

    2015-01-01

    The deliberate inoculation of yeast strains isolated from food matrices such as wine or bread, could allow the transfer of novel properties to beer. In this work, the feasibility of the use of baker's yeast strains as starters for craft beer production has been evaluated at laboratory and brewery scale. Nine out of 12 Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains isolated from artisanal sourdoughs metabolized 2 % maltose, glucose and trehalose and showed growth rates and cell populations higher than those of the brewer's strain Safbrew-S33. Analysis of allelic variation at 12 microsatellite loci clustered seven baker's strains and Safbrew-S33 in the main group of bread isolates. Chemical analyses of beers produced at a brewery scale showed significant differences among the beers produced with the baker's strain S38 or Safbrew-S33, while no significant differences were observed when S38 or the brewer's strain Safbrew-F2 was used for re-fermentation. The sensory profile of beers obtained with S38 or the brewer's yeasts did not show significant differences, thus suggesting that baker's strains of S. cerevisiae could represent a reservoir of biodiversity for the selection of starter strains for craft beer production.

  16. Association of constitutive hyperphosphorylation of Hsf1p with a defective ethanol stress response in Saccharomyces cerevisiae sake yeast strains.

    PubMed

    Noguchi, Chiemi; Watanabe, Daisuke; Zhou, Yan; Akao, Takeshi; Shimoi, Hitoshi

    2012-01-01

    Modern sake yeast strains, which produce high concentrations of ethanol, are unexpectedly sensitive to environmental stress during sake brewing. To reveal the underlying mechanism, we investigated a well-characterized yeast stress response mediated by a heat shock element (HSE) and heat shock transcription factor Hsf1p in Saccharomyces cerevisiae sake yeast. The HSE-lacZ activity of sake yeast during sake fermentation and under acute ethanol stress was severely impaired compared to that of laboratory yeast. Moreover, the Hsf1p of modern sake yeast was highly and constitutively hyperphosphorylated, irrespective of the extracellular stress. Since HSF1 allele replacement did not significantly affect the HSE-mediated ethanol stress response or Hsf1p phosphorylation patterns in either sake or laboratory yeast, the regulatory machinery of Hsf1p is presumed to function differently between these types of yeast. To identify phosphatases whose loss affected the control of Hsf1p, we screened a series of phosphatase gene deletion mutants in a laboratory strain background. Among the 29 mutants, a Δppt1 mutant exhibited constitutive hyperphosphorylation of Hsf1p, similarly to the modern sake yeast strains, which lack the entire PPT1 gene locus. We confirmed that the expression of laboratory yeast-derived functional PPT1 recovered the HSE-mediated stress response of sake yeast. In addition, deletion of PPT1 in laboratory yeast resulted in enhanced fermentation ability. Taken together, these data demonstrate that hyperphosphorylation of Hsf1p caused by loss of the PPT1 gene at least partly accounts for the defective stress response and high ethanol productivity of modern sake yeast strains.

  17. Exploring grape marc as trove for new thermotolerant and inhibitor-tolerant Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains for second-generation bioethanol production

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Robust yeasts with high inhibitor, temperature, and osmotic tolerance remain a crucial requirement for the sustainable production of lignocellulosic bioethanol. These stress factors are known to severely hinder culture growth and fermentation performance. Results Grape marc was selected as an extreme environment to search for innately robust yeasts because of its limited nutrients, exposure to solar radiation, temperature fluctuations, weak acid and ethanol content. Forty newly isolated Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains gave high ethanol yields at 40°C when inoculated in minimal media at high sugar concentrations of up to 200 g/l glucose. In addition, the isolates displayed distinct inhibitor tolerance in defined broth supplemented with increasing levels of single inhibitors or with a cocktail containing several inhibitory compounds. Both the fermentation ability and inhibitor resistance of these strains were greater than those of established industrial and commercial S. cerevisiae yeasts used as control strains in this study. Liquor from steam-pretreated sugarcane bagasse was used as a key selective condition during the isolation of robust yeasts for industrial ethanol production, thus simulating the industrial environment. The isolate Fm17 produced the highest ethanol concentration (43.4 g/l) from the hydrolysate, despite relatively high concentrations of weak acids, furans, and phenolics. This strain also exhibited a significantly greater conversion rate of inhibitory furaldehydes compared with the reference strain S. cerevisiae 27P. To our knowledge, this is the first report describing a strain of S. cerevisiae able to produce an ethanol yield equal to 89% of theoretical maximum yield in the presence of high concentrations of inhibitors from sugarcane bagasse. Conclusions This study showed that yeasts with high tolerance to multiple stress factors can be obtained from unconventional ecological niches. Grape marc appeared to be an unexplored and

  18. Engineering industrial Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains for xylose fermentation and comparison for switchgrass conversion

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Saccharomyces physiology and fermentation related properties vary broadly among industrial strains. In this study, six industrial strains of varied genetic background were engineered to ferment xylose. Aerobic growth rates on xylose were 0.040 h**-1 to 0.167 h**-1. Fermentation of xylose, glucose/xy...

  19. Whole Genome Analysis of 132 Clinical Saccharomyces cerevisiae Strains Reveals Extensive Ploidy Variation

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yuan O.; Sherlock, Gavin; Petrov, Dmitri A.

    2016-01-01

    Budding yeast has undergone several independent transitions from commercial to clinical lifestyles. The frequency of such transitions suggests that clinical yeast strains are derived from environmentally available yeast populations, including commercial sources. However, despite their important role in adaptive evolution, the prevalence of polyploidy and aneuploidy has not been extensively analyzed in clinical strains. In this study, we have looked for patterns governing the transition to clinical invasion in the largest screen of clinical yeast isolates to date. In particular, we have focused on the hypothesis that ploidy changes have influenced adaptive processes. We sequenced 144 yeast strains, 132 of which are clinical isolates. We found pervasive large-scale genomic variation in both overall ploidy (34% of strains identified as 3n/4n) and individual chromosomal copy numbers (36% of strains identified as aneuploid). We also found evidence for the highly dynamic nature of yeast genomes, with 35 strains showing partial chromosomal copy number changes and eight strains showing multiple independent chromosomal events. Intriguingly, a lineage identified to be baker’s/commercial derived with a unique damaging mutation in NDC80 was particularly prone to polyploidy, with 83% of its members being triploid or tetraploid. Polyploidy was in turn associated with a >2× increase in aneuploidy rates as compared to other lineages. This dataset provides a rich source of information on the genomics of clinical yeast strains and highlights the potential importance of large-scale genomic copy variation in yeast adaptation. PMID:27317778

  20. Whole Genome Analysis of 132 Clinical Saccharomyces cerevisiae Strains Reveals Extensive Ploidy Variation.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yuan O; Sherlock, Gavin; Petrov, Dmitri A

    2016-01-01

    Budding yeast has undergone several independent transitions from commercial to clinical lifestyles. The frequency of such transitions suggests that clinical yeast strains are derived from environmentally available yeast populations, including commercial sources. However, despite their important role in adaptive evolution, the prevalence of polyploidy and aneuploidy has not been extensively analyzed in clinical strains. In this study, we have looked for patterns governing the transition to clinical invasion in the largest screen of clinical yeast isolates to date. In particular, we have focused on the hypothesis that ploidy changes have influenced adaptive processes. We sequenced 144 yeast strains, 132 of which are clinical isolates. We found pervasive large-scale genomic variation in both overall ploidy (34% of strains identified as 3n/4n) and individual chromosomal copy numbers (36% of strains identified as aneuploid). We also found evidence for the highly dynamic nature of yeast genomes, with 35 strains showing partial chromosomal copy number changes and eight strains showing multiple independent chromosomal events. Intriguingly, a lineage identified to be baker's/commercial derived with a unique damaging mutation in NDC80 was particularly prone to polyploidy, with 83% of its members being triploid or tetraploid. Polyploidy was in turn associated with a >2× increase in aneuploidy rates as compared to other lineages. This dataset provides a rich source of information on the genomics of clinical yeast strains and highlights the potential importance of large-scale genomic copy variation in yeast adaptation. PMID:27317778

  1. Evaluation of different Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains on the profile of volatile compounds and polyphenols in cherry wines.

    PubMed

    Sun, Shu Yang; Jiang, Wen Guang; Zhao, Yu Ping

    2011-07-15

    Tart cherries of 'Early Richmond', widely grown in Shandong (China), were fermented with six different Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains (BM4×4, RA17, RC212, D254, D21 and GRE) to elucidate their influence on the production of volatiles and polyphenols. Acetic acid and 3-methylbutanol were found in the highest concentrations among all identified volatiles with all six yeast strains, followed by 2-methylpropanol and ethyl lactate. RA17 and GRE cherry wines were characterised by a higher amount of esters and acids. D254 wine contained a higher concentration of alcohols. With respect to polyphenols, five phenolic acids and four anthocyanins were identified among all tested samples, with chlorogenic and neochlorogenic acids, cyanidin 3-glucosylrutinoside and cyanidin 3-rutinoside being the major compounds. When using principal component analysis to classify the cherry wines according to the volatiles and polyphenols, they were divided into three groups: (1) RA17 and GRE, (2) RC212 and D254 and (3) BM4×4 and D21. PMID:23140699

  2. Rumen fermentation and acetogen population changes in response to an exogenous acetogen TWA4 strain and Saccharomyces cerevisiae fermentation product.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chun-lei; Guan, Le-luo; Liu, Jian-xin; Wang, Jia-kun

    2015-08-01

    The presence of yeast cells could stimulate hydrogen utilization of acetogens and enhance acetogenesis. To understand the roles of acetogens in rumen fermentation, an in vitro rumen fermentation experiment was conducted with addition of acetogen strain (TWA4) and/or Saccharomyces cerevisiae fermentation product (XP). A 2×2 factorial design with two levels of TWA4 (0 or 2×10(7) cells/ml) and XP (0 or 2 g/L) was performed. Volatile fatty acids (VFAs) were increased (P<0.05) in XP and TWA4XP, while methane was increased only in TWA4XP (P<0.05). The increase rate of microorganisms with formyltetrahydrofolate synthetase, especially acetogens, was higher than that of methanogens under all treatments. Lachnospiraceae was predominant in all acetogen communities, but without close acetyl-CoA synthase (ACS) amino acid sequences from cultured isolates. Low-Acetitomaculum ruminis-like ACS was predominant in all acetogen communities, while four unique phylotypes in XP treatment were all amino acid identified low-Eubacterium limosum-like acetogens. It differs to XP treatment that more low-A. ruminis-like and less low-E. limosum-like sequences were identified in TWA4 and TWA4XP treatments. Enhancing acetogenesis by supplementation with an acetogen strain and/or yeast cells may be an approach to mitigate methane, by targeting proper acetogens such as uncultured low-E. limosum-like acetogens.

  3. Rumen fermentation and acetogen population changes in response to an exogenous acetogen TWA4 strain and Saccharomyces cerevisiae fermentation product*

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Chun-lei; Guan, Le-luo; Liu, Jian-xin; Wang, Jia-kun

    2015-01-01

    The presence of yeast cells could stimulate hydrogen utilization of acetogens and enhance acetogenesis. To understand the roles of acetogens in rumen fermentation, an in vitro rumen fermentation experiment was conducted with addition of acetogen strain (TWA4) and/or Saccharomyces cerevisiae fermentation product (XP). A 2×2 factorial design with two levels of TWA4 (0 or 2×107 cells/ml) and XP (0 or 2 g/L) was performed. Volatile fatty acids (VFAs) were increased (P<0.05) in XP and TWA4XP, while methane was increased only in TWA4XP (P<0.05). The increase rate of microorganisms with formyltetrahydrofolate synthetase, especially acetogens, was higher than that of methanogens under all treatments. Lachnospiraceae was predominant in all acetogen communities, but without close acetyl-CoA synthase (ACS) amino acid sequences from cultured isolates. Low-Acetitomaculum ruminis-like ACS was predominant in all acetogen communities, while four unique phylotypes in XP treatment were all amino acid identified low-Eubacterium limosum-like acetogens. It differs to XP treatment that more low-A. ruminis-like and less low-E. limosum-like sequences were identified in TWA4 and TWA4XP treatments. Enhancing acetogenesis by supplementation with an acetogen strain and/or yeast cells may be an approach to mitigate methane, by targeting proper acetogens such as uncultured low-E. limosum-like acetogens. PMID:26238546

  4. Using mixed inocula of Saccharomyces cerevisiae killer strains to improve the quality of traditional sparkling-wine.

    PubMed

    Velázquez, Rocío; Zamora, Emiliano; Álvarez, Manuel; Álvarez, María L; Ramírez, Manuel

    2016-10-01

    The quality of traditional sparkling-wine depends on the aging process in the presence of dead yeast cells. These cells undergo a slow autolysis process thereby releasing some compounds, mostly colloidal polymers such as polysaccharides and mannoproteins, which influence the wine's foam properties and mouthfeel. Saccharomyces cerevisiae killer yeasts were tested to increase cell death and autolysis during mixed-yeast-inoculated second fermentation and aging. These yeasts killed sensitive strains in killer plate assays done under conditions of low pH and temperature similar to those used in sparkling-wine making, although some strains showed a different killer behaviour during the second fermentation. The fast killer effect improved the foam quality and mouthfeel of the mixed-inoculated wines, while the slow killer effect gave small improvements over single-inoculated wines. The effect was faster under high-pressure than under low-pressure conditions. Wine quality improvement did not correlate with the polysaccharide, protein, mannan, or aromatic compound concentrations, suggesting that the mouthfeel and foaming quality of sparkling wine are very complex properties influenced by other wine compounds and their interactions, as well as probably by the specific chemical composition of a given wine. PMID:27375256

  5. Using mixed inocula of Saccharomyces cerevisiae killer strains to improve the quality of traditional sparkling-wine.

    PubMed

    Velázquez, Rocío; Zamora, Emiliano; Álvarez, Manuel; Álvarez, María L; Ramírez, Manuel

    2016-10-01

    The quality of traditional sparkling-wine depends on the aging process in the presence of dead yeast cells. These cells undergo a slow autolysis process thereby releasing some compounds, mostly colloidal polymers such as polysaccharides and mannoproteins, which influence the wine's foam properties and mouthfeel. Saccharomyces cerevisiae killer yeasts were tested to increase cell death and autolysis during mixed-yeast-inoculated second fermentation and aging. These yeasts killed sensitive strains in killer plate assays done under conditions of low pH and temperature similar to those used in sparkling-wine making, although some strains showed a different killer behaviour during the second fermentation. The fast killer effect improved the foam quality and mouthfeel of the mixed-inoculated wines, while the slow killer effect gave small improvements over single-inoculated wines. The effect was faster under high-pressure than under low-pressure conditions. Wine quality improvement did not correlate with the polysaccharide, protein, mannan, or aromatic compound concentrations, suggesting that the mouthfeel and foaming quality of sparkling wine are very complex properties influenced by other wine compounds and their interactions, as well as probably by the specific chemical composition of a given wine.

  6. Rumen fermentation and acetogen population changes in response to an exogenous acetogen TWA4 strain and Saccharomyces cerevisiae fermentation product.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chun-lei; Guan, Le-luo; Liu, Jian-xin; Wang, Jia-kun

    2015-08-01

    The presence of yeast cells could stimulate hydrogen utilization of acetogens and enhance acetogenesis. To understand the roles of acetogens in rumen fermentation, an in vitro rumen fermentation experiment was conducted with addition of acetogen strain (TWA4) and/or Saccharomyces cerevisiae fermentation product (XP). A 2×2 factorial design with two levels of TWA4 (0 or 2×10(7) cells/ml) and XP (0 or 2 g/L) was performed. Volatile fatty acids (VFAs) were increased (P<0.05) in XP and TWA4XP, while methane was increased only in TWA4XP (P<0.05). The increase rate of microorganisms with formyltetrahydrofolate synthetase, especially acetogens, was higher than that of methanogens under all treatments. Lachnospiraceae was predominant in all acetogen communities, but without close acetyl-CoA synthase (ACS) amino acid sequences from cultured isolates. Low-Acetitomaculum ruminis-like ACS was predominant in all acetogen communities, while four unique phylotypes in XP treatment were all amino acid identified low-Eubacterium limosum-like acetogens. It differs to XP treatment that more low-A. ruminis-like and less low-E. limosum-like sequences were identified in TWA4 and TWA4XP treatments. Enhancing acetogenesis by supplementation with an acetogen strain and/or yeast cells may be an approach to mitigate methane, by targeting proper acetogens such as uncultured low-E. limosum-like acetogens. PMID:26238546

  7. Outlining a future for non-Saccharomyces yeasts: selection of putative spoilage wine strains to be used in association with Saccharomyces cerevisiae for grape juice fermentation.

    PubMed

    Domizio, Paola; Romani, Cristina; Lencioni, Livio; Comitini, Francesca; Gobbi, Mirko; Mannazzu, Ilaria; Ciani, Maurizio

    2011-06-30

    The use of non-Saccharomyces yeasts that are generally considered as spoilage yeasts, in association with Saccharomyces cerevisiae for grape must fermentation was here evaluated. Analysis of the main oenological characteristics of pure cultures of 55 yeasts belonging to the genera Hanseniaspora, Pichia, Saccharomycodes and Zygosaccharomyces revealed wide biodiversity within each genus. Moreover, many of these non-Saccharomyces strains had interesting oenological properties in terms of fermentation purity, and ethanol and secondary metabolite production. The use of four non-Saccharomyces yeasts (one per genus) in mixed cultures with a commercial S. cerevisiae strain at different S. cerevisiae/non-Saccharomyces inoculum ratios was investigated. This revealed that most of the compounds normally produced at high concentrations by pure cultures of non-Saccharomyces, and which are considered detrimental to wine quality, do not reach threshold taste levels in these mixed fermentations. On the other hand, the analytical profiles of the wines produced by these mixed cultures indicated that depending on the yeast species and the S. cerevisiae/non-Saccharomyces inoculum ratio, these non-Saccharomyces yeasts can be used to increase production of polysaccharides and to modulate the final concentrations of acetic acid and volatile compounds, such as ethyl acetate, phenyl-ethyl acetate, 2-phenyl ethanol, and 2-methyl 1-butanol.

  8. Isolation and characterization of acetic acid-tolerant galactose-fermenting strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae from a spent sulfite liquor fermentation plant.

    PubMed Central

    Lindén, T; Peetre, J; Hahn-Hägerdal, B

    1992-01-01

    From a continuous spent sulfite liquor fermentation plant, two species of yeast were isolated, Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Pichia membranaefaciens. One of the isolates of S. cerevisiae, no. 3, was heavily flocculating and produced a higher ethanol yield from spent sulfite liquor than did commercial baker's yeast. The greatest difference between isolate 3 and baker's yeast was that of galactose fermentation, even when galactose utilization was induced, i.e., when they were grown in the presence of galactose, prior to fermentation. Without acetic acid present, both baker's yeast and isolate 3 fermented glucose and galactose sequentially. Galactose fermentation with baker's yeast was strongly inhibited by acetic acid at pH values below 6. Isolate 3 fermented galactose, glucose, and mannose without catabolite repression in the presence of acetic acid, even at pH 4.5. The xylose reductase (EC 1.1.1.21) and xylitol dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.1.9) activities were determined in some of the isolates as well as in two strains of S. cerevisiae (ATCC 24860 and baker's yeast) and Pichia stipitis CBS 6054. The S. cerevisiae strains manifested xylose reductase activity that was 2 orders of magnitude less than the corresponding P. stipitis value of 890 nmol/min/mg of protein. The xylose dehydrogenase activity was 1 order of magnitude less than the corresponding activity of P. stipitis (330 nmol/min/mg of protein). Images PMID:1622236

  9. Comparative Transcriptomic Analysis Reveals Similarities and Dissimilarities in Saccharomyces cerevisiae Wine Strains Response to Nitrogen Availability

    PubMed Central

    Barbosa, Catarina; García-Martínez, José; Pérez-Ortín, José E.; Mendes-Ferreira, Ana

    2015-01-01

    Nitrogen levels in grape-juices are of major importance in winemaking ensuring adequate yeast growth and fermentation performance. Here we used a comparative transcriptome analysis to uncover wine yeasts responses to nitrogen availability during fermentation. Gene expression was assessed in three genetically and phenotypically divergent commercial wine strains (CEG, VL1 and QA23), under low (67 mg/L) and high nitrogen (670 mg/L) regimes, at three time points during fermentation (12h, 24h and 96h). Two-way ANOVA analysis of each fermentation condition led to the identification of genes whose expression was dependent on strain, fermentation stage and on the interaction of both factors. The high fermenter yeast strain QA23 was more clearly distinct from the other two strains, by differential expression of genes involved in flocculation, mitochondrial functions, energy generation and protein folding and stabilization. For all strains, higher transcriptional variability due to fermentation stage was seen in the high nitrogen fermentations. A positive correlation between maximum fermentation rate and the expression of genes involved in stress response was observed. The finding of common genes correlated with both fermentation activity and nitrogen up-take underlies the role of nitrogen on yeast fermentative fitness. The comparative analysis of genes differentially expressed between both fermentation conditions at 12h, where the main difference was the level of nitrogen available, showed the highest variability amongst strains revealing strain-specific responses. Nevertheless, we were able to identify a small set of genes whose expression profiles can quantitatively assess the common response of the yeast strains to varying nitrogen conditions. The use of three contrasting yeast strains in gene expression analysis prompts the identification of more reliable, accurate and reproducible biomarkers that will facilitate the diagnosis of deficiency of this nutrient in the grape

  10. Functional genomic analysis of a commercial wine strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae under differing nitrogen conditions.

    PubMed

    Backhus, L E; DeRisi, J; Bisson, L F

    2001-07-01

    DNA microarray analysis was used to profile gene expression in a commercial isolate of Saccharomyces cerevisiae grown in a synthetic grape juice medium under conditions mimicking a natural environment for yeast: High-sugar and variable nitrogen conditions. The high nitrogen condition displayed elevated levels of expression of genes involved in biosynthesis of macromolecular precursors across the time course as compared to low-nitrogen. In contrast, expression of genes involved in translation and oxidative carbon metabolism were increased in the low-nitrogen condition, suggesting that respiration is more nitrogen-conserving than fermentation. Several genes under glucose repression control were induced in low-nitrogen in spite of very high (17%) external glucose concentrations, but there was no general relief of glucose repression. Expression of many stress response genes was elevated in stationary phase. Some of these genes were expressed regardless of the nitrogen concentration while others were found at higher levels only under high nitrogen conditions. A few genes, FSP2, RGS2, AQY1, YFL030W, were expressed more strongly with nitrogen limitation as compared to other conditions.

  11. Enological characterization of Spanish Saccharomyces kudriavzevii strains, one of the closest relatives to parental strains of winemaking and brewing Saccharomyces cerevisiae × S. kudriavzevii hybrids.

    PubMed

    Peris, D; Pérez-Través, L; Belloch, C; Querol, A

    2016-02-01

    Wine fermentation and innovation have focused mostly on Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains. However, recent studies have shown that other Saccharomyces species can also be involved in wine fermentation or are useful for wine bouquet, such as Saccharomyces uvarum and Saccharomyces paradoxus. Many interspecies hybrids have also been isolated from wine fermentation, such as S. cerevisiae × Saccharomyces kudriavzevii hybrids. In this study, we explored the genetic diversity and fermentation performance of Spanish S. kudriavzevii strains, which we compared to other S. kudriavzevii strains. Fermentations of red and white grape musts were performed, and the phenotypic differences between Spanish S. kudriavzevii strains under different temperature conditions were examined. An ANOVA analysis suggested striking similarity between strains for glycerol and ethanol production, although a high diversity of aromatic profiles among fermentations was found. The sources of these phenotypic differences are not well understood and require further investigation. Although the Spanish S. kudriavzevii strains showed desirable properties, particularly must fermentations, the quality of their wines was no better than those produced with a commercial S. cerevisiae. We suggest hybridization or directed evolution as methods to improve and innovate wine. PMID:26678127

  12. Enological characterization of Spanish Saccharomyces kudriavzevii strains, one of the closest relatives to parental strains of winemaking and brewing Saccharomyces cerevisiae × S. kudriavzevii hybrids.

    PubMed

    Peris, D; Pérez-Través, L; Belloch, C; Querol, A

    2016-02-01

    Wine fermentation and innovation have focused mostly on Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains. However, recent studies have shown that other Saccharomyces species can also be involved in wine fermentation or are useful for wine bouquet, such as Saccharomyces uvarum and Saccharomyces paradoxus. Many interspecies hybrids have also been isolated from wine fermentation, such as S. cerevisiae × Saccharomyces kudriavzevii hybrids. In this study, we explored the genetic diversity and fermentation performance of Spanish S. kudriavzevii strains, which we compared to other S. kudriavzevii strains. Fermentations of red and white grape musts were performed, and the phenotypic differences between Spanish S. kudriavzevii strains under different temperature conditions were examined. An ANOVA analysis suggested striking similarity between strains for glycerol and ethanol production, although a high diversity of aromatic profiles among fermentations was found. The sources of these phenotypic differences are not well understood and require further investigation. Although the Spanish S. kudriavzevii strains showed desirable properties, particularly must fermentations, the quality of their wines was no better than those produced with a commercial S. cerevisiae. We suggest hybridization or directed evolution as methods to improve and innovate wine.

  13. Strain-dependent occurrence of functional GTP:AMP phosphotransferase (AK3) in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Schricker, R; Magdolen, V; Strobel, G; Bogengruber, E; Breitenbach, M; Bandlow, W

    1995-12-29

    The gene for yeast GTP:AMP phosphotransferase (PAK3) was found to encode a nonfunctional protein in 10 laboratory strains and one brewers' strain. The protein product showed high similarity to vertebrate AK3 and was located exclusively in the mitochondrial matrix. The deduced amino acid sequence revealed a protein that was shorter at the carboxyl terminus than all other known adenylate kinases. Introduction of a +1 frameshift into the 3'-terminal region of the gene extended homology of the deduced amino acid sequence to other members of the adenylate kinase family including vertebrate AK3. Frameshift mutations obtained after in vitro and in vivo mutagenesis were capable of complementing the adk1 temperature-conditional deficiency in Escherichia coli, indicating that the frameshift led to the expression of a protein that could phosphorylate AMP. Some yeasts, however, including strain D273-10B, two wine yeasts, and two more distantly related yeast genera, harbored an active allele, named AKY3, which contained a +1 frameshift close to the carboxyl terminus as compared with the laboratory strains. The encoded protein exhibited GTP:AMP and ITP:AMP phosphotransferase activities but did not accept ATP as phosphate donor. Although single copy in the haploid genome, disruption of the AKY3 allele displayed no phenotype, excluding the possibility that laboratory and brewers' strains had collected second site suppressors. It must be concluded that yeast mitochondria can completely dispense with GTP:AMP phosphotransferase activity.

  14. Mating type regulates the radiation-associated stimulation of reciprocal translocation events in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Fasullo, M; Dave, P

    1994-04-01

    Both ultraviolet (UV) and ionizing radiation were observed to stimulate mitotic, ectopic recombination between his3 recombinational substrates, generating reciprocal translocations in Saccharomyces cerevisiae (yeast). The stimulation was greatest in diploid strains competent for sporulation and depends upon both the ploidy of the strain and heterozygosity at the MATlocus. The difference in levels of stimulation between MATa/MAT alpha diploid and MAT alpha haploid strains increases when cells are exposed to higher levels of UV radiation (sevenfold at 150 J/m2), whereas when cells are exposed to higher levels of ionizing radiation (23.4 krad), only a twofold difference is observed. When the MAT alpha gene was introduced by DNA transformation into a MATa/mat alpha::LEU2+ diploid, the levels of radiation-induced ectopic recombination approach those obtained in a strain that is heterozygous at MAT. Conversely, when the MATa gene was introduced by DNA transformation into a MAT alpha haploid, no enhanced stimulation of ectopic recombination was observed when cells were irradiated with ionizing radiation but a threefold enhancement was observed when cells were irradiated with UV. The increase in radiation-stimulated ectopic recombination resulting from heterozygosity at MAT correlated with greater spontaneous ectopic recombination and higher levels of viability after irradiation. We suggest that MAT functions that have been previously shown to control the level of mitotic, allelic recombination (homolog recombination) also control the level of mitotic, radiation-stimulated ectopic recombination between short dispersed repetitive sequences on non-homologous chromosomes.

  15. Comparisons of five Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains for ethanol production from SPORL-pretreated lodgepole pine.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Haifeng; Lan, Tianqing; Dien, Bruce S; Hector, Ronald E; Zhu, J Y

    2014-01-01

    The performances of five yeast strains under three levels of toxicity were evaluated using hydrolysates from lodgepole pine pretreated by Sulfite Pretreatment to Overcome the Recalcitrance of Lignocelluloses (SPORL). The highest level of toxicity was represented by the whole pretreated biomass slurry, while intermediate toxicity was represented by the hydrolysate with partial loading of pretreatment spent liquor. The zero toxicity was represented using the enzymatic hydrolysate produced from thoroughly washed SPORL lodgepole pine solids. The results indicate that strains D5A and YRH400 can tolerate the whole pretreated biomass slurry to produce 90.1 and 73.5% theoretical ethanol yield. Strains Y1528, YRH403, and FPL450 did not grow in whole hydrolysate cultures and were observed to have lower ethanol productivities than D5A and YRH400 on the hydrolysate with intermediate toxicity. Both YRH400 and YRH403 were genetically engineered for xylose fermentation but were not able to consume xylose efficiently in hydrolysate.

  16. The new modern era of yeast genomics: community sequencing and the resulting annotation of multiple Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains at the Saccharomyces Genome Database

    PubMed Central

    Engel, Stacia R.; Cherry, J. Michael

    2013-01-01

    The first completed eukaryotic genome sequence was that of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and the Saccharomyces Genome Database (SGD; http://www.yeastgenome.org/) is the original model organism database. SGD remains the authoritative community resource for the S. cerevisiae reference genome sequence and its annotation, and continues to provide comprehensive biological information correlated with S. cerevisiae genes and their products. A diverse set of yeast strains have been sequenced to explore commercial and laboratory applications, and a brief history of those strains is provided. The publication of these new genomes has motivated the creation of new tools, and SGD will annotate and provide comparative analyses of these sequences, correlating changes with variations in strain phenotypes and protein function. We are entering a new era at SGD, as we incorporate these new sequences and make them accessible to the scientific community, all in an effort to continue in our mission of educating researchers and facilitating discovery. Database URL: http://www.yeastgenome.org/ PMID:23487186

  17. Comparisons of five Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains for ethanol production from SPORL pretreated lodgepole pine

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The performances of 5 yeast strains under three levels of toxicity were evaluated using hydrolysates from lodgepole pine pretreated by Sulfite Pretreatment to Overcome the Recalcitrance of Lignocelluloses (SPORL). The highest level of toxicity was represented by the whole pretreated biomass slurry, ...

  18. The fraction of cells that resume growth after acetic acid addition is a strain-dependent parameter of acetic acid tolerance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Swinnen, Steve; Fernández-Niño, Miguel; González-Ramos, Daniel; van Maris, Antonius J A; Nevoigt, Elke

    2014-06-01

    High acetic acid tolerance of Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a relevant phenotype in industrial biotechnology when using lignocellulosic hydrolysates as feedstock. A screening of 38 S. cerevisiae strains for tolerance to acetic acid revealed considerable differences, particularly with regard to the duration of the latency phase. To understand how this phenotype is quantitatively manifested, four strains exhibiting significant differences were studied in more detail. Our data show that the duration of the latency phase is primarily determined by the fraction of cells within the population that resume growth. Only this fraction contributed to the exponential growth observed after the latency phase, while all other cells persisted in a viable but non-proliferating state. A remarkable variation in the size of the fraction was observed among the tested strains differing by several orders of magnitude. In fact, only 11 out of 10(7)  cells of the industrial bioethanol production strain Ethanol Red resumed growth after exposure to 157 mM acetic acid at pH 4.5, while this fraction was 3.6 × 10(6) (out of 10(7)  cells) in the highly acetic acid tolerant isolate ATCC 96581. These strain-specific differences are genetically determined and represent a valuable starting point to identify genetic targets for future strain improvement.

  19. Short-term response of different Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains to hyperosmotic stress caused by inoculation in grape must: RT-qPCR study and metabolite analysis.

    PubMed

    Noti, Olta; Vaudano, Enrico; Pessione, Enrica; Garcia-Moruno, Emilia

    2015-12-01

    During the winemaking process, glycerol synthesis represents the first adaption response of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to osmotic stress after inoculation in grape must. We have implemented an RT-qPCR (Reverse Transcription-quantitative PCR) methodology with a preventive evaluation of candidate reference genes, to study six target genes related to glycerol synthesis (GPD1, GPD2, GPP2 and GPP1) and flux (STL1 and FPS1), and three ALD genes coding for aldehyde dehydrogenase involved in redox equilibrium via acetate production. The mRNA level in three strains, characterized by different metabolite production, was monitored in the first 120 min from inoculation into natural grape must. Expression analysis shows a transient response of genes GPD1, GPD2, GPP2, GPP1 and STL1 with differences among strains in term of mRNA abundance, while FPS1 was expressed constitutively. The transient response and different expression intensity among strains, in relation to the intracellular glycerol accumulation pattern, prove the negative feedback control via the HOG (High Osmolarity Glycerol) signalling pathway in S. cerevisiae wine strains under winery conditions. Among the ALD genes, only ALD6 was moderately induced in the hyperosmotic environment but not in all strains tested, while ALD3 and ALD4 were drastically glucose repressed. The intensity of transcription of ALD6 and ALD3 seems to be related to different acetate production found among the strains.

  20. Short-term response of different Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains to hyperosmotic stress caused by inoculation in grape must: RT-qPCR study and metabolite analysis.

    PubMed

    Noti, Olta; Vaudano, Enrico; Pessione, Enrica; Garcia-Moruno, Emilia

    2015-12-01

    During the winemaking process, glycerol synthesis represents the first adaption response of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to osmotic stress after inoculation in grape must. We have implemented an RT-qPCR (Reverse Transcription-quantitative PCR) methodology with a preventive evaluation of candidate reference genes, to study six target genes related to glycerol synthesis (GPD1, GPD2, GPP2 and GPP1) and flux (STL1 and FPS1), and three ALD genes coding for aldehyde dehydrogenase involved in redox equilibrium via acetate production. The mRNA level in three strains, characterized by different metabolite production, was monitored in the first 120 min from inoculation into natural grape must. Expression analysis shows a transient response of genes GPD1, GPD2, GPP2, GPP1 and STL1 with differences among strains in term of mRNA abundance, while FPS1 was expressed constitutively. The transient response and different expression intensity among strains, in relation to the intracellular glycerol accumulation pattern, prove the negative feedback control via the HOG (High Osmolarity Glycerol) signalling pathway in S. cerevisiae wine strains under winery conditions. Among the ALD genes, only ALD6 was moderately induced in the hyperosmotic environment but not in all strains tested, while ALD3 and ALD4 were drastically glucose repressed. The intensity of transcription of ALD6 and ALD3 seems to be related to different acetate production found among the strains. PMID:26338116

  1. Population Structure and Comparative Genome Hybridization of European Flor Yeast Reveal a Unique Group of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Strains with Few Gene Duplications in Their Genome

    PubMed Central

    Legras, Jean-Luc; Erny, Claude; Charpentier, Claudine

    2014-01-01

    Wine biological aging is a wine making process used to produce specific beverages in several countries in Europe, including Spain, Italy, France, and Hungary. This process involves the formation of a velum at the surface of the wine. Here, we present the first large scale comparison of all European flor strains involved in this process. We inferred the population structure of these European flor strains from their microsatellite genotype diversity and analyzed their ploidy. We show that almost all of these flor strains belong to the same cluster and are diploid, except for a few Spanish strains. Comparison of the array hybridization profile of six flor strains originating from these four countries, with that of three wine strains did not reveal any large segmental amplification. Nonetheless, some genes, including YKL221W/MCH2 and YKL222C, were amplified in the genome of four out of six flor strains. Finally, we correlated ICR1 ncRNA and FLO11 polymorphisms with flor yeast population structure, and associate the presence of wild type ICR1 and a long Flo11p with thin velum formation in a cluster of Jura strains. These results provide new insight into the diversity of flor yeast and show that combinations of different adaptive changes can lead to an increase of hydrophobicity and affect velum formation. PMID:25272156

  2. Engineering of a Nepetalactol-Producing Platform Strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae for the Production of Plant Seco-Iridoids.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Alex; Bauchart, Philippe; Gold, Nicholas D; Zhu, Yun; De Luca, Vincenzo; Martin, Vincent J J

    2016-05-20

    The monoterpene indole alkaloids (MIAs) are a valuable family of chemicals that include the anticancer drugs vinblastine and vincristine. These compounds are of global significance-appearing on the World Health Organization's list of model essential medicines-but remain exorbitantly priced due to low in planta levels. Chemical synthesis and genetic manipulation of MIA producing plants such as Catharanthus roseus have so far failed to find a solution to this problem. Synthetic biology holds a potential answer, by building the pathway into more tractable organisms such as Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Recent work has taken the first steps in this direction by producing small amounts of the intermediate strictosidine in yeast. In order to help improve on these titers, we aimed to optimize the early biosynthetic steps of the MIA pathway to the metabolite nepetalactol. We combined a number of strategies to create a base strain producing 11.4 mg/L of the precursor geraniol. We also show production of the critical intermediate 10-hydroxygeraniol and demonstrate nepetalactol production in vitro. Lastly we demonstrate that activity of the iridoid synthase toward the intermediates geraniol and 10-hydroxygeraniol results in the synthesis of the nonproductive intermediates citronellol and 10-hydroxycitronellol. This discovery has serious implications for the reconstruction of the MIA in heterologous organisms.

  3. Proteins involved in wine aroma compounds metabolism by a Saccharomyces cerevisiae flor-velum yeast strain grown in two conditions.

    PubMed

    Moreno-García, Jaime; García-Martínez, Teresa; Millán, M Carmen; Mauricio, Juan Carlos; Moreno, Juan

    2015-10-01

    A proteomic and exometabolomic study was conducted on Saccharomyces cerevisiae flor yeast strain growing under biofilm formation condition (BFC) with ethanol and glycerol as carbon sources and results were compared with those obtained under no biofilm formation condition (NBFC) containing glucose as carbon source. By using modern techniques, OFFGEL fractionator and LTQ-Orbitrap for proteome and SBSE-TD-GC-MS for metabolite analysis, we quantified 84 proteins including 33 directly involved in the metabolism of glycerol, ethanol and 17 aroma compounds. Contents in acetaldehyde, acetic acid, decanoic acid, 1,1-diethoxyethane, benzaldehyde and 2-phenethyl acetate, changed above their odor thresholds under BFC, and those of decanoic acid, ethyl octanoate, ethyl decanoate and isoamyl acetate under NBFC. Of the twenty proteins involved in the metabolism of ethanol, acetaldehyde, acetoin, 2,3-butanediol, 1,1-diethoxyethane, benzaldehyde, organic acids and ethyl esters, only Adh2p, Ald4p, Cys4p, Fas3p, Met2p and Plb1p were detected under BFC and as many Acs2p, Ald3p, Cem1p, Ilv2p, Ilv6p and Pox1p, only under NBFC. Of the eight proteins involved in glycerol metabolism, Gut2p was detected only under BFC while Pgs1p and Rhr2p were under NBFC. Finally, of the five proteins involved in the metabolism of higher alcohols, Thi3p was present under BFC, and Aro8p and Bat2p were under NBFC.

  4. Direct and efficient ethanol production from high-yielding rice using a Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain that express amylases.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Ryosuke; Yamakawa, Syun-Ichi; Tanaka, Tsutomu; Ogino, Chiaki; Fukuda, Hideki; Kondo, Akihiko

    2011-04-01

    Efficient ethanol producing yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae cannot produce ethanol from raw starch directly. Thus the conventional ethanol production required expensive and complex process. In this study, we developed a direct and efficient ethanol production process from high-yielding rice harvested in Japan by using amylase expressing yeast without any pretreatment or addition of enzymes or nutrients. Ethanol productivity from high-yielding brown rice (1.1g/L/h) was about 5-fold higher than that obtained from purified raw corn starch (0.2g/L/h) when nutrients were added. Using an inoculum volume equivalent to 10% of the fermentation volume without any nutrient supplementation resulted in ethanol productivity and yield reaching 1.2g/L/h and 101%, respectively, in a 24-h period. High-yielding rice was demonstrated to be a suitable feedstock for bioethanol production. In addition, our polyploid amylase-expressing yeast was sufficiently robust to produce ethanol efficiently from real biomass. This is first report of direct ethanol production on real biomass using an amylase-expressing yeast strain without any pretreatment or commercial enzyme addition.

  5. Proteins involved in wine aroma compounds metabolism by a Saccharomyces cerevisiae flor-velum yeast strain grown in two conditions.

    PubMed

    Moreno-García, Jaime; García-Martínez, Teresa; Millán, M Carmen; Mauricio, Juan Carlos; Moreno, Juan

    2015-10-01

    A proteomic and exometabolomic study was conducted on Saccharomyces cerevisiae flor yeast strain growing under biofilm formation condition (BFC) with ethanol and glycerol as carbon sources and results were compared with those obtained under no biofilm formation condition (NBFC) containing glucose as carbon source. By using modern techniques, OFFGEL fractionator and LTQ-Orbitrap for proteome and SBSE-TD-GC-MS for metabolite analysis, we quantified 84 proteins including 33 directly involved in the metabolism of glycerol, ethanol and 17 aroma compounds. Contents in acetaldehyde, acetic acid, decanoic acid, 1,1-diethoxyethane, benzaldehyde and 2-phenethyl acetate, changed above their odor thresholds under BFC, and those of decanoic acid, ethyl octanoate, ethyl decanoate and isoamyl acetate under NBFC. Of the twenty proteins involved in the metabolism of ethanol, acetaldehyde, acetoin, 2,3-butanediol, 1,1-diethoxyethane, benzaldehyde, organic acids and ethyl esters, only Adh2p, Ald4p, Cys4p, Fas3p, Met2p and Plb1p were detected under BFC and as many Acs2p, Ald3p, Cem1p, Ilv2p, Ilv6p and Pox1p, only under NBFC. Of the eight proteins involved in glycerol metabolism, Gut2p was detected only under BFC while Pgs1p and Rhr2p were under NBFC. Finally, of the five proteins involved in the metabolism of higher alcohols, Thi3p was present under BFC, and Aro8p and Bat2p were under NBFC. PMID:26187821

  6. [Ethanol fermentation from Jerusalem artichoke tubers by a genetically-modified Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain capable of secreting inulinase].

    PubMed

    Li, Nannan; Yuan, Wenjie; Wang, Na; Xin, Chengxun; Ge, Xumeng; Bai, Fengwu

    2011-07-01

    Ethanol fermentation from Jerusalem artichoke tubers by recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains expressing the inulinase gene (inu) from Kluyveromyces marxianus was investigated. The inu native and pgk promoters were used to drive the expression of the inu gene, and the inulinase was expressed as an extracellular enzyme. All positive clones (confirmed by PCR) were able to express inulinase as measured by enzyme activity in the culture supernatant, among which two clones HI6/6 and HPI6/3 were selected, and their inulinase activity and ethanol fermentation performance were compared with their wild type. The inulinase activities of 86 and 23.8 U/mL were achieved, which were 4.6-fold and 1.5-fold higher than that of the wild type. Furthermore, ethanol fermentation was carried out with the recombinants and medium containing 200 g/L raw Jerusalem artichoke meal, and ethanol concentrations of 55 g/L and 52 g/L were obtained, with ethanol yields of 0.495 and 0.453, respectively, equivalent to 96.9% and 88.6% of the theoretical value. PMID:22016987

  7. Metabolite Profiling during Fermentation of Makgeolli by the Wild Yeast Strain Saccharomyces cerevisiae Y98-5

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jae-Ho; Ahn, Byung Hak; Bai, Dong-Hoon

    2014-01-01

    Makgeolli is a traditional Korean alcoholic beverage. The flavor of makgeolli is primarily determined by metabolic products such as free sugars, amino acids, organic acids, and aromatic compounds, which are produced during the fermentation of raw materials by molds and yeasts present in nuruk, a Korean fermentation starter. In this study, makgeolli was brewed using the wild yeast strain Saccharomyces cerevisiae Y98-5, and temporal changes in the metabolites during fermentation were analyzed by ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography-quadrupole-time-of-flight mass spectrometry. The resultant data were analyzed by partial least squares-discriminant analysis (PLS-DA). Various metabolites, including amino acids, organic acids, sugar alcohols, small peptides, and nucleosides, were obviously altered by increasing the fermentation period. Changes in these metabolites allowed us to distinguish among makgeolli samples with different fermentation periods (1, 2, 3, 6, 7, and 8 days) on a PLS-DA score plot. In the makgeolli brewed in this study, the amounts of tyrosine (463.13 µg/mL) and leucine (362.77 µg/mL) were high. Therefore, our results indicate that monitoring the changes in metabolites during makgeolli fermentation might be important for brewing makgeolli with good nutritional quality. PMID:25606007

  8. Promotion of maltose fermentation at extremely low temperatures using a cryotolerant Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain immobilized on porous cellulosic material.

    PubMed

    Ganatsios, Vassilios; Koutinas, Athanasios A; Bekatorou, Argyro; Kanellaki, Maria; Nigam, Poonam

    2014-11-01

    Advantages in maltose fermentation at extremely low temperatures (5-10°C) using an alcohol resistant and cryotolerant yeast strain (Saccharomyces cerevisiae AXAZ-1) immobilized on porous cellulosic material (or tubular cellulose, TC), produced by delignification of wood sawdust, are reported. Pure maltose and glucose media (80, 100 and 140 g/l) were examined as model substrates to evaluate the potential effect of TC on the rate of fermentation of maltose containing substrates. The use of TC sharply accelerated the rate of maltose fermentation compared to free cells (FC) in suspension. Fermentation at 5°C by immobilized cells was complete, while FC were unable to ferment maltose at this temperature, in contrast to glucose, which was completely fermented. From the results of maltose and glucose fermentations at 5 and 10°C, it was concluded that the effect of TC was higher at lower fermentation temperature and that its promotional effect on fermentation rate had to be at the step of maltose uptake. Specifically, it is suggested that the presence of TC increased maltose uptake rate by the immobilized cells due to attraction by hydrogen bonding on the TC surface and continuous pumping of maltose towards the cells. Calculation of the activation energy of maltose fermentations at 5, 10 and 15°C showed that it was reduced by an average 42% when cells immobilized on TC were used.

  9. A physical comparison of chromosome III in six strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Wicksteed, B L; Collins, I; Dershowitz, A; Stateva, L I; Green, R P; Oliver, S G; Brown, A J; Newlon, C S

    1994-01-01

    We have tested the clones used in the European Yeast Chromosome III Sequencing Programme for possible artefacts that might have been introduced during cloning or passage through Escherichia coli. Southern analysis was performed to compare the BamHI, EcoRI, HindIII and PstI restriction pattern for each clone with that of the corresponding locus on chromosome III in the parental yeast strain. In addition, further enzymes were used to compare the restriction maps of most clones with the map predicted by the nucleotide sequence (Oliver et al., 1992). Only four of 506 6-bp restriction sites predicted by the sequence were not observed experimentally. No significant cloning artefacts appear to disrupt the published sequence of chromosome III. The restriction patterns of six yeast strains have also been compared. In addition to two previously identified sites of Ty integration on chromosome III (Warmington et al., 1986; Stucka et al., 1989; Newlon et al., 1991), a new polymorphic site involving Ty retrotransposition (the Far Right-Arm transposition Hot-Spot, FRAHS) has been identified close to CRY1. On the basis of simple restriction polymorphisms, the strains S288C, AB972 and W303-1b are closely related, while XJ24-24a and J178 are more distant relatives of S288C. A polyploid distillery yeast is heterozygous for many polymorphisms, particularly on the right arm of the chromosome.

  10. Initiation of recombination in Saccharomyces cerevisiae haploid meiosis.

    PubMed Central

    De Massy, B; Baudat, F; Nicolas, A

    1994-01-01

    In most eukaryotes during prophase I of meiosis, homologous chromosomes pair and recombine by coordinated molecular and cellular processes. To directly test whether or not the early steps of the initiation of recombination depend on the presence of a homologous chromosome, we have examined the formation and processing of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs, the earliest physical landmark of recombination initiation) in various haploid Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains capable of entering meiosis. We find that DSBs occur in haploid meiosis, showing that the presence of a homolog is not required for DSB formation. DSBs occur at the same positions in haploid and diploid meioses. However, these two types of meiosis exhibit subtle differences with respect to the timing of formation and levels of DSBs. In haploid meiosis, a slower rate of DSB formation and a reduction in the frequency of DSB (at one of the three sites analyzed) were observed. These results might indicate that interactions between homologs play a role in the formation of meiotic DSBs. Furthermore, haploid strains exhibit a pronounced delay in the disappearance of meiotic DSBs compared to diploid strains, which suggests that sister chromatid interactions for DSB repair are inhibited in haploid meiosis. Images PMID:7991559

  11. Construction of a Quadruple Auxotrophic Mutant of an Industrial Polyploid Saccharomyces cerevisiae Strain by Using RNA-Guided Cas9 Nuclease

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Guo-Chang; Kong, In Iok; Kim, Heejin; Liu, Jing-Jing; Cate, Jamie H. D.

    2014-01-01

    Industrial polyploid yeast strains harbor numerous beneficial traits but suffer from a lack of available auxotrophic markers for genetic manipulation. Here we demonstrated a quick and efficient strategy to generate auxotrophic markers in industrial polyploid yeast strains with the RNA-guided Cas9 nuclease. We successfully constructed a quadruple auxotrophic mutant of a popular industrial polyploid yeast strain, Saccharomyces cerevisiae ATCC 4124, with ura3, trp1, leu2, and his3 auxotrophies through RNA-guided Cas9 nuclease. Even though multiple alleles of auxotrophic marker genes had to be disrupted simultaneously, we observed knockouts in up to 60% of the positive colonies after targeted gene disruption. In addition, growth-based spotting assays and fermentation experiments showed that the auxotrophic mutants inherited the beneficial traits of the parental strain, such as tolerance of major fermentation inhibitors and high temperature. Moreover, the auxotrophic mutants could be transformed with plasmids containing selection marker genes. These results indicate that precise gene disruptions based on the RNA-guided Cas9 nuclease now enable metabolic engineering of polyploid S. cerevisiae strains that have been widely used in the wine, beer, and fermentation industries. PMID:25281382

  12. An event-specific method for the detection and quantification of ML01, a genetically modified Saccharomyces cerevisiae wine strain, using quantitative PCR.

    PubMed

    Vaudano, Enrico; Costantini, Antonella; Garcia-Moruno, Emilia

    2016-10-01

    The availability of genetically modified (GM) yeasts for winemaking and, in particular, transgenic strains based on the integration of genetic constructs deriving from other organisms into the genome of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, has been a reality for several years. Despite this, their use is only authorized in a few countries and limited to two strains: ML01, able to convert malic acid into lactic acid during alcoholic fermentation, and ECMo01 suitable for reducing the risk of carbamate production. In this work we propose a quali-quantitative culture-independent method for the detection of GM yeast ML01 in commercial preparations of ADY (Active Dry Yeast) consisting of efficient extraction of DNA and qPCR (quantitative PCR) analysis based on event-specific assay targeting MLC (malolactic cassette), and a taxon-specific S. cerevisiae assay detecting the MRP2 gene. The ADY DNA extraction methodology has been shown to provide good purity DNA suitable for subsequent qPCR. The MLC and MRP2 qPCR assay showed characteristics of specificity, dynamic range, limit of quantification (LOQ) limit of detection (LOD), precision and trueness, which were fully compliant with international reference guidelines. The method has been shown to reliably detect 0.005% (mass/mass) of GM ML01 S. cerevisiae in commercial preparations of ADY.

  13. An event-specific method for the detection and quantification of ML01, a genetically modified Saccharomyces cerevisiae wine strain, using quantitative PCR.

    PubMed

    Vaudano, Enrico; Costantini, Antonella; Garcia-Moruno, Emilia

    2016-10-01

    The availability of genetically modified (GM) yeasts for winemaking and, in particular, transgenic strains based on the integration of genetic constructs deriving from other organisms into the genome of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, has been a reality for several years. Despite this, their use is only authorized in a few countries and limited to two strains: ML01, able to convert malic acid into lactic acid during alcoholic fermentation, and ECMo01 suitable for reducing the risk of carbamate production. In this work we propose a quali-quantitative culture-independent method for the detection of GM yeast ML01 in commercial preparations of ADY (Active Dry Yeast) consisting of efficient extraction of DNA and qPCR (quantitative PCR) analysis based on event-specific assay targeting MLC (malolactic cassette), and a taxon-specific S. cerevisiae assay detecting the MRP2 gene. The ADY DNA extraction methodology has been shown to provide good purity DNA suitable for subsequent qPCR. The MLC and MRP2 qPCR assay showed characteristics of specificity, dynamic range, limit of quantification (LOQ) limit of detection (LOD), precision and trueness, which were fully compliant with international reference guidelines. The method has been shown to reliably detect 0.005% (mass/mass) of GM ML01 S. cerevisiae in commercial preparations of ADY. PMID:27367966

  14. ROS accumulation and oxidative damage to cell structures in Saccharomyces cerevisiae wine strains during fermentation of high-sugar-containing medium.

    PubMed

    Landolfo, Sara; Politi, Huguette; Angelozzi, Daniele; Mannazzu, Ilaria

    2008-06-01

    To further elucidate the impact of fermentative stress on Saccharomyces cerevisiae wine strains, we have here evaluated markers of oxidative stress, oxidative damage and antioxidant response in four oenological strains of S. cerevisiae, relating these to membrane integrity, ethanol production and cell viability during fermentation in high-sugar-containing medium. The cells were sampled at different fermentation stages and analysed by flow cytometry to evaluate membrane integrity and accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). At the same time, catalase and superoxide dismutase activities, trehalose accumulation, and protein carbonylation and degradation were measured. The results indicate that the stress conditions occurring during hypoxic fermentation in high-sugar-containing medium result in the production of ROS and trigger an antioxidant response. This involves superoxide dismutase and trehalose for the protection of cell structures from oxidative damage, and protein catabolism for the removal of damaged proteins. Cell viability, membrane integrity and ethanol production depend on the extent of oxidative damage to cellular components. This is, in turn, related to the 'fitness' of each strain, which depends on the contribution of individual cells to ROS accumulation and scavenging. These findings highlight that the differences in individual cell resistances to ROS contribute to the persistence of wine strains during growth under unfavourable culture conditions, and they provide further insights into our understanding of yeast behaviour during industrial fermentation.

  15. Ethanol-tolerant Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains isolated under selective conditions by over-expression of a proofreading-deficient DNA polymerase delta.

    PubMed

    Abe, Hiroko; Fujita, Yasuko; Takaoka, Yuki; Kurita, Eri; Yano, Shuntaro; Tanaka, Naotaka; Nakayama, Ken-ichi

    2009-09-01

    Ethanol damages the cell membrane and functional proteins, gradually reducing cell viability, and leading to cell death during fermentation which impairs effective bioethanol production by budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. To obtain more suitable strains for bioethanol production and to gain a better understanding of ethanol tolerance, ethanol-tolerant mutants were isolated using the novel mutagenesis technique based on the disparity theory of evolution. According to this theory evolution can be accelerated by affecting the lagging-strand synthesis in which DNA polymerase delta is involved. Expression of the pol3-01 gene, a proofreading-deficient of DNA polymerase delta, in S. cerevisiae W303-1A grown under conditions of increasing ethanol concentration resulted in three ethanol-tolerant mutants (YFY1, YFY2 and YFY3), which could grow in medium containing 13% ethanol. Ethanol productivity also increased in YFY strains compared to the wild-type strain in medium containing 25% glucose. Cell morphology of YFY strain cells was normal even in the presence of 8% ethanol, whereas W303-1A cells were expanded by a big vacuole. Furthermore, two of these mutants were also resistant to high-temperature, Calcofluor white and NaCl. Expression levels of TPS1 and TSL1, which are responsible for trehalose biosynthesis, were higher in YFY strains relative to W303-1A, resulting in high levels of intracellular trehalose in YFY strains. This contributed to the multiple-stress tolerance that makes YFY strains suitable for the production of bioethanol.

  16. Physiology of the fuel ethanol strain Saccharomyces cerevisiae PE-2 at low pH indicates a context-dependent performance relevant for industrial applications.

    PubMed

    Della-Bianca, Bianca E; de Hulster, Erik; Pronk, Jack T; van Maris, Antonius J A; Gombert, Andreas K

    2014-12-01

    Selected Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains are used in Brazil to produce the hitherto most energetically efficient first-generation fuel ethanol. Although genome and some transcriptome data are available for some of these strains, quantitative physiological data are lacking. This study investigates the physiology of S. cerevisiae strain PE-2, widely used in the Brazilian fuel ethanol industry, in comparison with CEN.PK113-7D, a reference laboratory strain, focusing on tolerance to low pH and acetic acid stress. Both strains were grown in anaerobic bioreactors, operated as batch, chemostat or dynamic continuous cultures. Despite their different backgrounds, biomass and product formation by the two strains were similar under a range of conditions (pH 5 or pH < 3, with or without 105 mM acetic acid added). PE-2 displayed a remarkably higher fitness than CEN.PK113-7D during batch cultivation on complex Yeast extract - Peptone - Dextrose medium at low pH (2.7). Kinetics of viability loss of non-growing cells, incubated at pH 1.5, indicated a superior survival of glucose-depleted PE-2 cells, when compared with either CEN.PK113-7D or a commercial bakers' strain. These results indicate that the sulfuric acid washing step, used in the fuel ethanol industry to decrease bacterial contamination due to non-aseptic operation, might have exerted an important selective pressure on the microbial populations present in such environments.

  17. Advances and developments in strategies to improve strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and processes to obtain the lignocellulosic ethanol--a review.

    PubMed

    Laluce, C; Schenberg, A C G; Gallardo, J C M; Coradello, L F C; Pombeiro-Sponchiado, S R

    2012-04-01

    The conversion of biomass into ethanol using fast, cheap, and efficient methodologies to disintegrate and hydrolyse the lignocellulosic biomass is the major challenge of the production of the second-generation ethanol. This revision describes the most relevant advances on the conversion process of lignocellulose materials into ethanol, development of new xylose-fermenting strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae using classical and modern genetic tools and strategies, elucidation of the expression of some complex industrial phenotypes, tolerance mechanisms of S. cerevisiae to lignocellulosic inhibitors, monitoring and strategies to improve fermentation processes. In the last decade, numerous engineered pentose-fermenting yeasts have been developed using molecular biology tools. The increase in the tolerance of S. cerevisiae to inhibitors is still an important issue to be exploited. As the industrial systems of ethanol production operate under non-sterile conditions, microbial subpopulations are generated, depending on the operational conditions and the levels of contaminants. Among the most critical requirements for production of the second-generation ethanol is the reduction in the levels of toxic by-products of the lignocellulosic hydrolysates and the production of low-cost and efficient cellulosic enzymes. A number of procedures have been established for the conversion of lignocellulosic materials into ethanol, but none of them are completely satisfactory when process time, costs, and efficiency are considered.

  18. Process intensification through microbial strain evolution: mixed glucose-xylose fermentation in wheat straw hydrolyzates by three generations of recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Lignocellulose hydrolyzates present difficult substrates for ethanol production by the most commonly applied microorganism in the fermentation industries, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. High resistance towards inhibitors released during pretreatment and hydrolysis of the feedstock as well as efficient utilization of hexose and pentose sugars constitute major challenges in the development of S. cerevisiae strains for biomass-to-ethanol processes. Metabolic engineering and laboratory evolution are applied, alone and in combination, to adduce desired strain properties. However, physiological requirements for robust performance of S. cerevisiae in the conversion of lignocellulose hydrolyzates are not well understood. The herein presented S. cerevisiae strains IBB10A02 and IBB10B05 are descendants of strain BP10001, which was previously derived from the widely used strain CEN.PK 113-5D through introduction of a largely redox-neutral oxidoreductive xylose assimilation pathway. The IBB strains were obtained by a two-step laboratory evolution that selected for fast xylose fermentation in combination with anaerobic growth before (IBB10A02) and after adaption in repeated xylose fermentations (IBB10B05). Enzymatic hydrolyzates were prepared from up to 15% dry mass pretreated (steam explosion) wheat straw and contained glucose and xylose in a mass ratio of approximately 2. Results With all strains, yield coefficients based on total sugar consumed were high for ethanol (0.39 to 0.40 g/g) and notably low for fermentation by-products (glycerol: ≤0.10 g/g; xylitol: ≤0.08 g/g; acetate: 0.04 g/g). In contrast to the specific glucose utilization rate that was similar for all strains (qGlucose ≈ 2.9 g/gcell dry weight (CDW)/h), the xylose consumption rate was enhanced by a factor of 11.5 (IBB10A02; qXylose = 0.23 g/gCDW/h) and 17.5 (IBB10B05; qXylose = 0.35 g/gCDW/h) as compared to the qXylose of the non-evolved strain BP10001. In xylose-supplemented (50

  19. Evaluation of the formation of volatiles and sensory characteristics of persimmon (Diospyros kaki L.f.) fruit wines using different commercial yeast strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jian Cai; Niu, Yun Wei; Feng, Tao; Liu, Sheng Jiang; Cheng, He Xing; Xu, Na; Yu, Hai Yan; Xiao, Zuo Bing

    2014-01-01

    This study evaluated the effects of five strains (IFFI 1346, IFFI 1363, CICC 31482, D254 and CGMCC2.346) of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae on the aromatic profiles of fermented persimmon (Diospyros kaki L.f.) musts. A total of 50 and 60 compounds were identified in persimmon wine by stir bar sorptive extraction coupled with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. According to odour activity values (OAVs), 26 detected compounds showed an OAV above 1. Principal component analysis explained the distribution of these persimmon wines on the basis of volatile compounds with OAV>1. The volatile compounds with high OAV included ethyl hexanoate, ethyl octanoate, methyl decanoate, linalool and geraniol. Quantitative descriptive analysis was employed. The result showed that persimmon wines fermented with strains IFFI 1363 and D254 were strongly correlated with persimmon, aroma harmony, fruity, fusel and taste balanced, fullness, hedonic scale. Therefore, the two yeast strains could be used as starter culture for persimmon wine production.

  20. Expression of V-ATPase proteolipid subunit of Acetabularia acetabulum in a VMA3-deficient strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and its complementation study.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, M; Hinohara, M; Umami, K; Taguro, Y; Okada, Y; Wada, Y; Nakanishi, Y; Maeshima, M

    2001-12-01

    The function of the translation products of six different cDNAs for Acetabularia V-ATPase proteolipid subunit (AACEVAPD1 to AACEVAPD6) was examined using a Saccharomyces cerevisiae VMA3-deficient strain that lacked its own gene for one of the proteolipid subunits of V-ATPase. Expression of the cDNAs in the strain revealed that four cDNAs from the six complemented the proton transport activity into the vacuole, visualized by fluorescence microscopy. The vacuolar-membrane-enriched fractions from the four transformants showed cross-reactivity with antibodies against the subunits a and A of S. cerevisiae V-ATPase. Two translation products from the other two cDNAs were demonstrated not to be localized in vacuolar membranes, and thus could not complement the function of the VMA3-deficient strain. As the primary structures deduced from the former four cDNAs are similar but clearly different from those of the latter two, the latter two translation products may not be able to substitute for theVMA3 gene product.

  1. Saccharomyces cerevisiae-based system for studying clustered DNA damages

    SciTech Connect

    Moscariello, M.M.; Sutherland, B.

    2010-08-01

    DNA-damaging agents can induce clustered lesions or multiply damaged sites (MDSs) on the same or opposing DNA strands. In the latter, attempts to repair MDS can generate closely opposed single-strand break intermediates that may convert non-lethal or mutagenic base damage into double-strand breaks (DSBs). We constructed a diploid S. cerevisiae yeast strain with a chromosomal context targeted by integrative DNA fragments carrying different damages to determine whether closely opposed base damages are converted to DSBs following the outcomes of the homologous recombination repair pathway. As a model of MDS, we studied clustered uracil DNA damages with a known location and a defined distance separating the lesions. The system we describe might well be extended to assessing the repair of MDSs with different compositions, and to most of the complex DNA lesions induced by physical and chemical agents.

  2. Effects of pH and temperature on growth and glycerol production kinetics of two indigenous wine strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae from Turkey

    PubMed Central

    Yalcin, Seda Karasu; Yesim Ozbas, Z.

    2008-01-01

    The study was performed in a batch system in order to determine the effects of pH and temperature on growth and glycerol production kinetics of two indigenous wine yeast strains Saccharomyces cerevisiae Kalecik 1 and Narince 3. The highest values of dry mass and specific growth rate were obtained at pH 4.00 for both of the strains. Maximum specific glycerol production rates were obtained at pH 5.92 and 6.27 for the strains Kalecik 1 and Narince 3, respectively. Kalecik 1 strain produced maximum 8.8 gL−1 of glycerol at pH 6.46. Maximum glycerol concentration obtained by the strain Narince 3 was 9.1 gL−1 at pH 6.48. Both yeasts reached maximum specific growth rate at 30°C. Optimum temperature range for glycerol production was determined as 25-30°C for the strain Kalecik 1. The strain Narince 3 reached maximum specific glycerol production rate at 30°C. Maximum glycerol concentrations at 30°C were obtained as 8.5 and 7.6 gL−1 for Kalecik 1 and Narince 3, respectively. PMID:24031225

  3. The effect of temperature on the growth of strains of Kloeckera apiculata and Saccharomyces cerevisiae in apple juice fermentation.

    PubMed

    Bilbao, A; Irastorza, A; Dueñas, M; Fernandez, K

    1997-01-01

    The influence of temperature (10 degrees C and 25 degrees C) on the survival and growth of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Kloeckera apiculata was examined in mixed and pure cultures during fermentation in apple juice. The growth reached by S. cerevisiae did not seem to be affected by temperature and the presence of K. apiculata. However, the growth and survival of K. apiculata, both in single and mixed cultures, were substantially enhanced at 10 degrees C. The highest amount of ethyl acetate was produced by K. apiculata in pure culture at 10 degrees C. Nevertheless, this concentration was lowest when both yeasts were fermented together at 10 degrees C and 25 degrees C.

  4. Comparative genotyping of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae laboratory strains S288C and CEN.PK113-7D using oligonucleotide microarrays.

    PubMed

    Daran-Lapujade, Pascale; Daran, Jean Marc; Kötter, Peter; Petit, Thomas; Piper, Matthew D W; Pronk, Jack T

    2003-12-01

    To analyse the reliability and accuracy of genotype analysis with high-density oligonucleotide microarrays, this method and other experimental approaches were used to analyse genomic DNA of two popular Saccharomyces cerevisiae laboratory strains. S288C was used for systematic sequencing of 'the' S. cerevisiae genome; CEN.PK113-7D is a popular strain for physiological studies and functional genomics. Random amplified polymorphic DNA, electrophoretic karyotyping and microarray analysis all indicated a high level of sequence similarity between the two strains. In the microarray analysis, as few as 288 (4.5%) of the ca. 6300 represented yeast genes were identified that yielded significantly different hybridisation intensities between the two strains. These could be classified as amplified, absent, or with sequence polymorphism in CEN.PK113-7D compared to S288C. A detailed analysis focused on the subset of 25 genes called absent in CEN.PK113-7D. Among these absent genes, 17 were clustered together on five chromosomes, mainly in subtelomeric regions. Thorough analysis of these regions by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and restriction fragment length polymorphism confirmed the absence of these genes in CEN.PK113-7D. Surprisingly, three of these regions were not smaller in CEN.PK113-7D chromosomes, indicating that they may harbour unidentified and potentially new sequences. In addition, eight genes called absent by the microarrays were scattered over the chromosomes. Using diagnostic PCR most of these genes were actually found to be present in CEN.PK113-7D, but after sequencing were found to differ significantly at the DNA level from S288C, explaining the poor hybridisation to the arrays. Our results indicate that DNA microarrays are a powerful tool for determining genotypic similarity between different yeast strains. However, to obtain meaningful information at the individual gene level, this method should be backed up by additional techniques.

  5. FSY1, a horizontally transferred gene in the Saccharomyces cerevisiae EC1118 wine yeast strain, encodes a high-affinity fructose/H+ symporter.

    PubMed

    Galeote, Virginie; Novo, Maïté; Salema-Oom, Madalena; Brion, Christian; Valério, Elisabete; Gonçalves, Paula; Dequin, Sylvie

    2010-12-01

    Transport of glucose and fructose in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae plays a crucial role in controlling the rate of wine fermentation. In S. cerevisiae, hexoses are transported by facilitated diffusion via hexose carriers (Hxt), which prefer glucose to fructose. However, utilization of fructose by wine yeast is critically important at the end of fermentation. Here, we report the characterization of a fructose transporter recently identified by sequencing the genome of the commercial wine yeast strain EC1118 and found in many other wine yeasts. This transporter is designated Fsy1p because of its homology with the Saccharomyces pastorianus fructose/H(+) symporter Fsy1p. A strain obtained by transformation of the V5 hxt1-7Δ mutant with FSY1 grew well on fructose, but to a much lesser extent on glucose as the sole carbon source. Sugar uptake and symport experiments showed that FSY1 encodes a proton-coupled symporter with high affinity for fructose (K(m) 0.24±0.04mM). Using real-time RT-PCR, we also investigated the expression pattern of FSY1 in EC1118 growing on various carbon sources. FSY1 was repressed by high concentrations of glucose or fructose and was highly expressed on ethanol as the sole carbon source. The characteristics of this transporter indicate that its acquisition could confer a significant advantage to S. cerevisiae during the wine fermentation process. This transporter is a good example of acquisition of a new function in yeast by horizontal gene transfer.

  6. Anaerobic and sequential aerobic production of high-titer ethanol and single cell protein from NaOH-pretreated corn stover by a genome shuffling-modified Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain.

    PubMed

    Ren, Xueliang; Wang, Juncong; Yu, Hui; Peng, Chunlan; Hu, Jinlong; Ruan, Zhiyong; Zhao, Shumiao; Liang, Yunxiang; Peng, Nan

    2016-10-01

    In this study, a Saccharomyces cerevisiae recombinant strain 14 was constructed through genome shuffling method by transferring the whole genomic DNA of Candida intermedia strain 23 into a thermo-tolerant S. cerevisiae strain. The recombinant strain 14 combined the good natures of both parent strains that efficiently produced ethanol from glucose and single cell protein from xylose with 54.6% crude protein and all essential amino acids except cysteine at 35°C. Importantly, the recombinant strain 14 produced 64.07g/L ethanol from 25%(w/v) NaOH-pretreated and washed corn stover with the ethanol yield of 0.26g/g total stover by fed-batch simultaneous saccharification and fermentation and produced 66.50g/L dry cell mass subsequently from the residual hydrolysate and ethanol. Therefore, this study represents a feasible method to comprehensively utilize hexose and pentose in lignocellulosic materials. PMID:27416512

  7. Dynamic study of yeast species and Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains during the spontaneous fermentations of Muscat blanc in Jingyang, China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chunxiao; Liu, Yanlin

    2013-04-01

    The evolution of yeast species and Saccharomyces cerevisiae genotypes during spontaneous fermentations of Muscat blanc planted in 1957 in Jingyang region of China was followed in this study. Using a combination of colony morphology on Wallerstein Nutrient (WLN) medium, sequence analysis of the 26S rDNA D1/D2 domain and 5.8S-ITS-RFLP analysis, a total of 686 isolates were identified at the species level. The six species identified were S. cerevisiae, Hanseniaspora uvarum, Hanseniaspora opuntiae, Issatchenkia terricola, Pichia kudriavzevii (Issatchenkia orientalis) and Trichosporon coremiiforme. This is the first report of T. coremiiforme as an inhabitant of grape must. Three new colony morphologies on WLN medium and one new 5.8S-ITS-RFLP profile are described. Species of non-Saccharomyces, predominantly H. opuntiae, were found in early stages of fermentation. Subsequently, S. cerevisiae prevailed followed by large numbers of P. kudriavzevii that dominated at the end of fermentations. Six native genotypes of S. cerevisiae were determined by interdelta sequence analysis. Genotypes III and IV were predominant. As a first step in exploring untapped yeast resources of the region, this study is important for monitoring the yeast ecology in native fermentations and screening indigenous yeasts that will produce wines with regional characteristics.

  8. Dynamic study of yeast species and Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains during the spontaneous fermentations of Muscat blanc in Jingyang, China.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chunxiao; Liu, Yanlin

    2013-04-01

    The evolution of yeast species and Saccharomyces cerevisiae genotypes during spontaneous fermentations of Muscat blanc planted in 1957 in Jingyang region of China was followed in this study. Using a combination of colony morphology on Wallerstein Nutrient (WLN) medium, sequence analysis of the 26S rDNA D1/D2 domain and 5.8S-ITS-RFLP analysis, a total of 686 isolates were identified at the species level. The six species identified were S. cerevisiae, Hanseniaspora uvarum, Hanseniaspora opuntiae, Issatchenkia terricola, Pichia kudriavzevii (Issatchenkia orientalis) and Trichosporon coremiiforme. This is the first report of T. coremiiforme as an inhabitant of grape must. Three new colony morphologies on WLN medium and one new 5.8S-ITS-RFLP profile are described. Species of non-Saccharomyces, predominantly H. opuntiae, were found in early stages of fermentation. Subsequently, S. cerevisiae prevailed followed by large numbers of P. kudriavzevii that dominated at the end of fermentations. Six native genotypes of S. cerevisiae were determined by interdelta sequence analysis. Genotypes III and IV were predominant. As a first step in exploring untapped yeast resources of the region, this study is important for monitoring the yeast ecology in native fermentations and screening indigenous yeasts that will produce wines with regional characteristics. PMID:23200649

  9. Engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain for improved xylose utilization with a three-plasmid SUMO yeast expression system

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A three-plasmid yeast expression system utilizing the portable small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) vector set combined with the efficient endogenous yeast protease Ulp1 was developed for production of large amounts of soluble functional protein in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Each vector has a differ...

  10. Biochemical and molecular characterization of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains obtained from sugar-cane juice fermentations and their impact in cachaça production.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Valdinéia Aparecida; Vicente, Maristela Araújo; Fietto, Luciano Gomes; Castro, Ieso de Miranda; Coutrim, Maurício Xavier; Schüller, Dorit; Alves, Henrique; Casal, Margarida; Santos, Juliana de Oliveira; Araújo, Leandro Dias; da Silva, Paulo Henrique Alves; Brandão, Rogelio Lopes

    2008-02-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains from different regions of Minas Gerais, Brazil, were isolated and characterized aiming at the selection of starter yeasts to be used in the production of cachaça, the Brazilian sugar cane spirit. The methodology established took into account the screening for biochemical traits desirable in a yeast cachaça producer, such as no H2S production, high tolerance to ethanol and high temperatures, high fermentative capacity, and the abilities to flocculate and to produce mycocins. Furthermore, the yeasts were exposed to drugs such as 5,5',5"-trifluor-D,L-leucine and cerulenin to isolate those that potentially overproduce higher alcohols and esters. The utilization of a random amplified polymorphic DNA-PCR method with primers based on intron splicing sites flanking regions of the COX1 gene, as well as microsatellite analysis, was not sufficient to achieve good differentiation among selected strains. In contrast, karyotype analysis allowed a clear distinction among all strains. Two selected strains were experimentally evaluated as cachaça producers. The results suggest that the selection of strains as fermentation starters requires the combined use of biochemical and molecular criteria to ensure the isolation and identification of strains with potential characteristics to produce cachaça with a higher quality standard.

  11. Construction of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains with enhanced ethanol tolerance by mutagenesis of the TATA-binding protein gene and identification of novel genes associated with ethanol tolerance.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jungwoo; Bae, Ju Yun; Lee, Young Mi; Kwon, Hyeji; Moon, Hye-Yun; Kang, Hyun Ah; Yee, Su-Bog; Kim, Wankee; Choi, Wonja

    2011-08-01

    Since elevated ethanol is a major stress during ethanol fermentation, yeast strains tolerant to ethanol are highly desirable for the industrial scale ethanol production. A technology called global transcriptional machinery engineering (gTME), which exploits a mutant library of SPT15 encoding the TATA-binding protein of Saccharomyces cerevisiae (Alper et al., 2006; Science 314: 1565-1568), seems to a powerful tool for creating ethanol-tolerant strains. However, the ability of created strains to tolerate high ethanol on rich media remains unproven. In this study, a similar strategy was used to obtain five strains with enhanced ethanol tolerance (ETS1-5) of S. cerevisiae. Comparing global transcriptional profiles of two selected strains ETS2 and ETS3 with that of the control identified 42 genes that were commonly regulated with twofold change. Out of 34 deletion mutants available from a gene knockout library, 18 were ethanol sensitive, suggesting that these genes were closely associated with ethanol tolerance. Eight of them were novel with most being functionally unknown. To establish a basis for future industrial applications, strains iETS2 and iETS3 were created by integrating the SPT15 mutant alleles of ETS2 and ETS3 into the chromosomes, which also exhibited enhanced ethanol tolerance and survival upon ethanol shock on a rich medium. Fermentation with 20% glucose for 24 h in a bioreactor revealed that iETS2 and iETS3 grew better and produced approximately 25% more ethanol than a control strain. The ethanol yield and productivity were also substantially enhanced: 0.31 g/g and 2.6 g/L/h, respectively, for control and 0.39 g/g and 3.2 g/L/h, respectively, for iETS2 and iETS3. Thus, our study demonstrates the utility of gTME in generating strains with enhanced ethanol tolerance that resulted in increase of ethanol production. Strains with enhanced tolerance to other stresses such as heat, fermentation inhibitors, osmotic pressure, and so on, may be further created by

  12. Contribution of PRS3, RPB4 and ZWF1 to the resistance of industrial Saccharomyces cerevisiae CCUG53310 and PE-2 strains to lignocellulosic hydrolysate-derived inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Cunha, Joana T; Aguiar, Tatiana Q; Romaní, Aloia; Oliveira, Carla; Domingues, Lucília

    2015-09-01

    PRS3, RPB4 and ZWF1 were previously identified as key genes for yeast tolerance to lignocellulose-derived inhibitors. To better understand their contribution to yeast resistance to the multiple stresses occurring during lignocellulosic hydrolysate fermentations, we overexpressed these genes in two industrial Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains, CCUG53310 and PE-2, and evaluated their impact on the fermentation of Eucalyptus globulus wood and corn cob hydrolysates. PRS3 overexpression improved the fermentation rate (up to 32%) and productivity (up to 48%) in different hydrolysates. ZWF1 and RPB4 overexpression did not improve the fermentation performance, but their increased expression in the presence of acetic acid, furfural and hydroxymethylfurfural was found to contribute to yeast adaptation to these inhibitors. This study expands our understanding about the molecular mechanisms involved in industrial yeast tolerance to the stresses occurring during lignocellulosic bioethanol production and highlights the importance of selecting appropriate strain backgrounds/hydrolysates combinations when addressing further improvement of these processes.

  13. Isolation of a novel mutant strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae by an ethyl methane sulfonate-induced mutagenesis approach as a high producer of bioethanol.

    PubMed

    Mobini-Dehkordi, Mohsen; Nahvi, Iraj; Zarkesh-Esfahani, Hamid; Ghaedi, Kamran; Tavassoli, Manoochehr; Akada, Rinji

    2008-04-01

    In order to obtain mutant strains showing higher bioethanol production than wild-type strains, a commercial Saccharomyces cerevisiae type was subjected to mutagenesis using ethyl methane sulfonate (EMS). After adding EMS to a shaken yeast suspension, the viability of yeast cells was assessed by diluted sample inoculation to solid yeast-extract peptone glucose (YEPG) medium at 15-min intervals. At 45 min, the viability of yeast cells was estimated to be about 40%. Mutagenized cells were recovered from YEPG broth after incubation at 30 degrees C for 18 h. After this period, EMS-treated yeast cells were grown on solid aerobic low-peptone (ALP) medium containing 2-12% (v/v) ethanol. All plates were incubated at 30 degrees C for 2-6 d in order to form colonies. The mutant strains that tolerated high concentrations of ethanol were selected for bioethanol production in microfuge tubes containing fermentation medium. Formation of bioethanol in small tubes was detected by the distillation-colorimetric method. In addition, trehalose content and invertase activity were determined in each mutant strain. Among many isolated mutant strains, there were six isolated colonies that grew on ALP medium supplemented with 10% (v/v) ethanol and one of them produced bioethanol 17.3% more than the wild type.

  14. Allelic variants of hexose transporter Hxt3p and hexokinases Hxk1p/Hxk2p in strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and interspecies hybrids.

    PubMed

    Zuchowska, Magdalena; Jaenicke, Elmar; König, Helmut; Claus, Harald

    2015-11-01

    The transport of sugars across the plasma membrane is a critical step in the utilization of glucose and fructose by Saccharomyces cerevisiae during must fermentations. Variations in the molecular structure of hexose transporters and kinases may affect the ability of wine yeast strains to finish sugar fermentation, even under stressful wine conditions. In this context, we sequenced and compared genes encoding the hexose transporter Hxt3p and the kinases Hxk1p/Hxk2p of Saccharomyces strains and interspecies hybrids with different industrial usages and regional backgrounds. The Hxt3p primary structure varied in a small set of amino acids, which characterized robust yeast strains used for the production of sparkling wine or to restart stuck fermentations. In addition, interspecies hybrid strains, previously isolated at the end of spontaneous fermentations, revealed a common amino acid signature. The location and potential influence of the amino acids exchanges is discussed by means of a first modelled Hxt3p structure. In comparison, hexokinase genes were more conserved in different Saccharomyces strains and hybrids. Thus, molecular variants of the hexose carrier Hxt3p, but not of kinases, correlate with different fermentation performances of yeast.

  15. Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain 905 reduces the translocation of Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium and stimulates the immune system in gnotobiotic and conventional mice.

    PubMed

    Martins, Flaviano S; Rodrigues, Ana Cristina P; Tiago, Fabiana C P; Penna, Francisco J; Rosa, Carlos A; Arantes, Rosa M E; Nardi, Regina M D; Neves, Maria J; Nicoli, Jacques R

    2007-03-01

    Previous results in the laboratory of the authors showed that Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain 905, isolated during 'cachaça' production, was able to colonize and survive in the gastrointestinal tract of germ-free and conventional mice, and to protect these animals against oral challenge with Salmonella enterica serotype Typhimurium or Clostridium difficile. In the present work, the effects of S. cerevisiae 905 on the translocation of Salm. Typhimurium (mesenteric lymph nodes, Peyer's patches, spleen, liver) as well as on the immune system (number of Küpffer cells, immunoglobulin production, clearance of Escherichia coli B41) were evaluated in gnotobiotic and/or conventional mice. The treatment with the yeast reduced significantly the translocation of Salm. Typhimurium to liver in gnotobiotic animals and to all the organs tested in conventional mice. The number of Küpffer cells per 100 hepatocytes in liver was significantly higher (P<0.05) in yeast mono-associated mice (52.9+/-15.7) than in germ-free controls (38.1+/-9.0). Probably as a consequence, clearance of E. coli B41 from the bloodstream was more efficient in yeast mono-associated animals when compared to germ-free mice. Higher levels (P<0.05) of secretory IgA in intestinal content and of IgA and IgM in serum were observed in yeast mono-associated mice when compared to germ-free group. Concluding, the protection against pathogenic bacteria observed in a previous study was probably due to a modulation of both local and systemic immunity of mice treated with S. cerevisiae 905.

  16. Identification of yeasts isolated from raffia wine (Raphia hookeri) produced in Côte d'Ivoire and genotyping of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains by PCR inter-delta.

    PubMed

    Tra Bi, Charles Y; N'guessan, Florent K; Kouakou, Clémentine A; Jacques, Noemie; Casaregola, Serge; Djè, Marcellin K

    2016-08-01

    Raffia wine is a traditional alcoholic beverage produced in several African countries where it plays a significant role in traditional customs and population diet. Alcoholic fermentation of this beverage is ensured by a complex natural yeast flora which plays a decisive role in the quality of the final product. This present study aims to evaluate the distribution and the diversity of the yeast strains isolated in raffia wine from four sampling areas (Abengourou, Alépé, Grand-Lahou and Adzopé) in Côte d'Ivoire. Based on the D1/D2 domain of the LSU rDNA sequence analysis, nine species belonging to six genera were distinguished. With a percentage of 69.5 % out of 171 yeast isolates, Saccharomyces cerevisiae was the predominant species in the raffia wine, followed by Kodamaea ohmeri (20.4 %). The other species isolated were Candida haemulonii (4.1 %), Candida phangngensis (1.8 %), Pichia kudriavzevii (1.2 %), Hanseniaspora jakobsenii (1.2 %), Candida silvae (0.6 %), Hanseniaspora guilliermondii (0.6 %) and Meyerozyma caribbica (0.6 %). The molecular characterization of S. cerevisiae isolates at the strain level using the PCR-interdelta method revealed the presence of 21 profiles (named I to XXI) within 115 isolates. Only four profiles (I, III, V and XI) were shared by the four areas under study. Phenotypic characterization of K. ohmeri strains showed two subgroups for sugar fermentation and no diversity for the nitrogen compound assimilations and the growth at different temperatures. PMID:27339306

  17. Identification of yeasts isolated from raffia wine (Raphia hookeri) produced in Côte d'Ivoire and genotyping of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains by PCR inter-delta.

    PubMed

    Tra Bi, Charles Y; N'guessan, Florent K; Kouakou, Clémentine A; Jacques, Noemie; Casaregola, Serge; Djè, Marcellin K

    2016-08-01

    Raffia wine is a traditional alcoholic beverage produced in several African countries where it plays a significant role in traditional customs and population diet. Alcoholic fermentation of this beverage is ensured by a complex natural yeast flora which plays a decisive role in the quality of the final product. This present study aims to evaluate the distribution and the diversity of the yeast strains isolated in raffia wine from four sampling areas (Abengourou, Alépé, Grand-Lahou and Adzopé) in Côte d'Ivoire. Based on the D1/D2 domain of the LSU rDNA sequence analysis, nine species belonging to six genera were distinguished. With a percentage of 69.5 % out of 171 yeast isolates, Saccharomyces cerevisiae was the predominant species in the raffia wine, followed by Kodamaea ohmeri (20.4 %). The other species isolated were Candida haemulonii (4.1 %), Candida phangngensis (1.8 %), Pichia kudriavzevii (1.2 %), Hanseniaspora jakobsenii (1.2 %), Candida silvae (0.6 %), Hanseniaspora guilliermondii (0.6 %) and Meyerozyma caribbica (0.6 %). The molecular characterization of S. cerevisiae isolates at the strain level using the PCR-interdelta method revealed the presence of 21 profiles (named I to XXI) within 115 isolates. Only four profiles (I, III, V and XI) were shared by the four areas under study. Phenotypic characterization of K. ohmeri strains showed two subgroups for sugar fermentation and no diversity for the nitrogen compound assimilations and the growth at different temperatures.

  18. Metabolic and transcriptomic response of the wine yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain EC1118 after an oxygen impulse under carbon-sufficient, nitrogen-limited fermentative conditions.

    PubMed

    Orellana, Marcelo; Aceituno, Felipe F; Slater, Alex W; Almonacid, Leonardo I; Melo, Francisco; Agosin, Eduardo

    2014-05-01

    During alcoholic fermentation, Saccharomyces cerevisiae is exposed to continuously changing environmental conditions, such as decreasing sugar and increasing ethanol concentrations. Oxygen, a critical nutrient to avoid stuck and sluggish fermentations, is only discretely available throughout the process after pump-over operation. In this work, we studied the physiological response of the wine yeast S. cerevisiae strain EC1118 to a sudden increase in dissolved oxygen, simulating pump-over operation. With this aim, an impulse of dissolved oxygen was added to carbon-sufficient, nitrogen-limited anaerobic continuous cultures. Results showed that genes related to mitochondrial respiration, ergosterol biosynthesis, and oxidative stress, among other metabolic pathways, were induced after the oxygen impulse. On the other hand, mannoprotein coding genes were repressed. The changes in the expression of these genes are coordinated responses that share common elements at the level of transcriptional regulation. Beneficial and detrimental effects of these physiological processes on wine quality highlight the dual role of oxygen in 'making or breaking wines'. These findings will facilitate the development of oxygen addition strategies to optimize yeast performance in industrial fermentations.

  19. Conversion of starch to ethanol in a recombinant saccharomyces cerevisiae strain expressing rice [alpha]-amylase from a novel Pichia pastoris alcohol oxidase promoter

    SciTech Connect

    Kumagai, M.H.; Sverlow, G.G.; della-Cioppa, G.; Grill, L.K. )

    1993-05-01

    A recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae, expressing and secreting rice [alpha]-amylase, converts starch to ethanol. The rice [alpha]-amylase gene (OS103) was placed under the transcriptional control of the promoter from a newly described Pichia pastoris alcohol oxidase genomic clone. The nucleotide sequences of ZZA1 and other methanol-regulated promoters were analyzed. A highly conserved sequence (TTG-N[sub 3]-GCTTCCAA-N[sub 5]-TGGT) was found in the 5' flanking regions of alcohol oxidase, methanol oxidase, and dihydroxyacetone synthase genes in Pichia pastoris, Hansenula polymorpha, and Candida biodinii S2. The yeast strain containing the ZZA1-OS103 fusion secreted biologically active enzyme into the culture media while fermenting soluble starch. 45 refs., 8 figs.

  20. Triploid-diploid mosaic chicken embryo.

    PubMed

    Bloom, S E; Buss, E G

    1966-08-12

    Cytological analysis of an underdeveloped chicken embryo at 6 days of incubation revealed a triploid-diploid mosaic condition. Of the 30 metaphases observed, 19 were triploid and 11 diploid. The triploid cells were 3A-ZZZ and diploid cells 2A-ZZ, as determined for the six largest pairs of chromnosomes. PMID:5328678

  1. Osmotolerance and leavening ability in sweet and frozen sweet dough. Comparative analysis between Torulaspora delbrueckii and Saccharomyces cerevisiae baker's yeast strains.

    PubMed

    Hernandez-Lopez, M J; Prieto, J A; Randez-Gil, F

    2003-01-01

    The response of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and freeze-tolerant Torulaspora delbrueckii strains to osmotic stress and their CO2 production capacity in sweet and frozen-sweet dough has been examined. T. delbrueckii strains, IGC5321 and IGC5323 showed higher leavening ability than Saccharomyces, specially after exposure to hyperosmotic stress of bread dough containing 20% sucrose and 2% salt added. In addition, Torulaspora and especially T. delbrueckii IGC5321 exhibited no loss of CO2 production capacity during freeze-thaw stress. Overall, these results appeared to indicate that Torulaspora cells are more tolerant than Saccharomyces to osmotic stress of bread dough. This trait correlated with a low invertase activity, a slow rate of trehalose mobilisation and the ability to respond rapidly to osmotic stress. Growth behaviour on high osmotic synthetic media was also examined. Cells of the IGC5321 strain showed intrinsic osmotolerance and ion toxicity resistance. However, T. delbrueckii IGC5323 exhibited a clear phenotype of osmosensitivity. Hence, this characteristic may not be essential or the only determinant for leavening ability in salted high-sugar dough.

  2. Yeast ecology of vineyards within Marsala wine area (western Sicily) in two consecutive vintages and selection of autochthonous Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains.

    PubMed

    Settanni, Luca; Sannino, Ciro; Francesca, Nicola; Guarcello, Rosa; Moschetti, Giancarlo

    2012-12-01

    In this work, the yeast ecology associated with the spontaneous fermentation of Grillo cultivar grapes from 10 vineyards was analyzed from grape harvest till complete consumption of must sugars. The microbiological investigation started with the plate count onto two culture media to distinguish total yeasts (TY) and presumptive Saccharomyces (PS). Yeasts were randomly isolated and identified by a combined genotypic approach consisting of restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) of 5.8S rRNA gene and 26S rRNA and sequencing of D1/D2 domain of the 26S rRNA gene, which resulted in the recognition of 14 species belonging to 10 genera. The distribution of the yeasts within the vineyards showed some differences in species composition and concentration levels among 2008 and 2009 vintages. Due to the enological relevance, all Saccharomyces cerevisiae isolates were differentiated applying two genotypic tools (interdelta analysis and microsatellite multiplex PCR of polymorphic microsatellite loci) that recognized 51 strains. Based on the low production of H(2)S, acetic acid and foam, ethanol resistance, growth in presence of high concentrations of potassium metabisulphite (KMBS) and CuSO(4) and at low temperatures, 14 strains were selected and used as starter to ferment grape must at 13 °C and 17 °C in presence of 100 mg/L of KMBS. Three strains (CS160, CS165 and CS182) showed optimal technological aptitudes.

  3. Osmotolerance and leavening ability in sweet and frozen sweet dough. Comparative analysis between Torulaspora delbrueckii and Saccharomyces cerevisiae baker's yeast strains.

    PubMed

    Hernandez-Lopez, M J; Prieto, J A; Randez-Gil, F

    2003-01-01

    The response of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and freeze-tolerant Torulaspora delbrueckii strains to osmotic stress and their CO2 production capacity in sweet and frozen-sweet dough has been examined. T. delbrueckii strains, IGC5321 and IGC5323 showed higher leavening ability than Saccharomyces, specially after exposure to hyperosmotic stress of bread dough containing 20% sucrose and 2% salt added. In addition, Torulaspora and especially T. delbrueckii IGC5321 exhibited no loss of CO2 production capacity during freeze-thaw stress. Overall, these results appeared to indicate that Torulaspora cells are more tolerant than Saccharomyces to osmotic stress of bread dough. This trait correlated with a low invertase activity, a slow rate of trehalose mobilisation and the ability to respond rapidly to osmotic stress. Growth behaviour on high osmotic synthetic media was also examined. Cells of the IGC5321 strain showed intrinsic osmotolerance and ion toxicity resistance. However, T. delbrueckii IGC5323 exhibited a clear phenotype of osmosensitivity. Hence, this characteristic may not be essential or the only determinant for leavening ability in salted high-sugar dough. PMID:14533716

  4. AUT1, a gene essential for autophagocytosis in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Schlumpberger, M; Schaeffeler, E; Straub, M; Bredschneider, M; Wolf, D H; Thumm, M

    1997-01-01

    Autophagocytosis is a starvation-induced process responsible for transport of cytoplasmic proteins to the vacuole. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, autophagy is characterized by the phenotypic appearance of autophagic vesicles inside the vacuole of strains deficient in proteinase yscB. The AUT1 gene, essential for autophagy, was isolated by complementation of the sporulation deficiency of a diploid aut1-1 mutant strain by a yeast genomic library and characterized. AUT1 is located on the right arm of chromosome XIV, 10 kb from the centromere, and encodes a protein of 310 amino acids, with an estimated molecular weight of 36 kDa. Cells carrying a chromosomal deletion of AUT1 are defective in the starvation-induced bulk flow transport of cytoplasmic proteins to the vacuole. aut1 null mutant strains are completely viable but show decreased survival rates during starvation. Homozygous delta aut1 diploid cells fail to sporulate. The selective cytoplasm-to-vacuole transport of aminopeptidase I is blocked in logarithmically growing and in starved delta autl cells. Deletion of the AUT1 gene had no obvious influence on secretion, fluid phase endocytosis, or vacuolar protein sorting. This supports the idea of autophagocytosis as being a novel route transporting proteins from the cytoplasm to the vacuole. PMID:9023185

  5. Genetics of CHLAMYDOMONAS REINHARDTII Diploids I. Isolation and Characterization and Meiotic Segregation Pattern of a Homozygous Diploid

    PubMed Central

    Eves, Eva M.; Chiang, Kwen-Sheng

    1982-01-01

    A strain of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii has been investigated which, when mated with known wild-types, produces very few viable germination products and transmits its Mendelian markers to more than half of those products. Cytogenetic observations, fluorometric measurements of DNA and genetic data all suggest that the strain, d mt-ery-M3a sr-u-1 is a stable homozygous diploid. This strain has twice as many nuclear chromatin bodies at metaphase and twice as much DNA as its haploid progenitor, and the phenotypes of its meiotic progeny are consistent with predictions based on triploid meiosis. Data from crosses involving d mt-ery-M3a sr-u-1 and from crosses involving hybrid diploids indicate that the frequency of second division segregation increases in triploid zygotes and that mitotic segregation following triploid meiosis is a frequent event which may more often result from mitotic recombination than from chromosome loss. PMID:7095421

  6. Induction of pseudohyphal growth by overexpression of PHD1, a Saccharomyces cerevisiae gene related to transcriptional regulators of fungal development.

    PubMed Central

    Gimeno, C J; Fink, G R

    1994-01-01

    When starved for nitrogen, MATa/MAT alpha cells of the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae undergo a dimorphic transition to pseudohyphal growth. A visual genetic screen, called PHD (pseudohyphal determinant), for S. cerevisiae pseudohyphal growth mutants was developed. The PHD screen was used to identify seven S. cerevisiae genes that when overexpressed in MATa/MAT alpha cells growing on nitrogen starvation medium cause precocious and unusually vigorous pseudohyphal growth. PHD1, a gene whose overexpression induced invasive pseudohyphal growth on a nutritionally rich medium, was characterized. PHD1 maps to chromosome XI and is predicted to encode a 366-amino-acid protein. PHD1 has a SWI4- and MBP1-like DNA binding motif that is 73% identical over 100 amino acids to a region of Aspergillus nidulans StuA. StuA regulates two pseudohyphal growth-like cell divisions during conidiophore morphogenesis. Epitope-tagged PHD1 was localized to the nucleus by indirect immunofluorescence. These facts suggest that PHD1 may function as a transcriptional regulatory protein. Overexpression of PHD1 in wild-type haploid strains does not induce pseudohyphal growth. Interestingly, PHD1 overexpression enhances pseudohyphal growth in a haploid strain that has the diploid polar budding pattern because of a mutation in the BUD4 gene. In addition, wild-type diploid strains lacking PHD1 undergo pseudohyphal growth when starved for nitrogen. The possible functions of PHD1 in pseudohyphal growth and the uses of the PHD screen to identify morphogenetic regulatory genes from heterologous organisms are discussed. Images PMID:8114741

  7. Ethanol production and maximum cell growth are highly correlated with membrane lipid composition during fermentation as determined by lipidomic analysis of 22 Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains.

    PubMed

    Henderson, Clark M; Lozada-Contreras, Michelle; Jiranek, Vladimir; Longo, Marjorie L; Block, David E

    2013-01-01

    Optimizing ethanol yield during fermentation is important for efficient production of fuel alcohol, as well as wine and other alcoholic beverages. However, increasing ethanol concentrations during fermentation can create problems that result in arrested or sluggish sugar-to-ethanol conversion. The fundamental cellular basis for these problem fermentations, however, is not well understood. Small-scale fermentations were performed in a synthetic grape must using 22 industrial Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains (primarily wine strains) with various degrees of ethanol tolerance to assess the correlation between lipid composition and fermentation kinetic parameters. Lipids were extracted at several fermentation time points representing different growth phases of the yeast to quantitatively analyze phospholipids and ergosterol utilizing atmospheric pressure ionization-mass spectrometry methods. Lipid profiling of individual fermentations indicated that yeast lipid class profiles do not shift dramatically in composition over the course of fermentation. Multivariate statistical analysis of the data was performed using partial least-squares linear regression modeling to correlate lipid composition data with fermentation kinetic data. The results indicate a strong correlation (R(2) = 0.91) between the overall lipid composition and the final ethanol concentration (wt/wt), an indicator of strain ethanol tolerance. One potential component of ethanol tolerance, the maximum yeast cell concentration, was also found to be a strong function of lipid composition (R(2) = 0.97). Specifically, strains unable to complete fermentation were associated with high phosphatidylinositol levels early in fermentation. Yeast strains that achieved the highest cell densities and ethanol concentrations were positively correlated with phosphatidylcholine species similar to those known to decrease the perturbing effects of ethanol in model membrane systems.

  8. Oral treatment with Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain UFMG 905 modulates immune responses and interferes with signal pathways involved in the activation of inflammation in a murine model of typhoid fever.

    PubMed

    Martins, Flaviano S; Elian, Samir D A; Vieira, Angélica T; Tiago, Fabiana C P; Martins, Ariane K S; Silva, Flávia C P; Souza, Ericka L S; Sousa, Lirlândia P; Araújo, Helena R C; Pimenta, Paulo F; Bonjardim, Cláudio A; Arantes, Rosa M E; Teixeira, Mauro M; Nicoli, Jacques R

    2011-04-01

    Salmonella spp. are Gram-negative, facultative, intracellular pathogens that cause several diarrheal diseases ranging from self-limiting gastroenteritis to typhoid fever. Previous results from our laboratory showed that Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain UFMG 905 isolated from 'cachaça' production presented probiotic properties due to its ability to protect against experimental infection with Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium. In this study, the effects of oral treatment with S. cerevisiae 905 were evaluated at the immunological level in a murine model of typhoid fever. Treatment with S. cerevisiae 905 inhibited weight loss and increased survival rate after Salmonella challenge. Immunological data demonstrated that S. cerevisiae 905 decreased levels of proinflammatory cytokines and modulated the activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (p38 and JNK, but not ERK1/2), NF-κB and AP-1, signaling pathways which are involved in the transcriptional activation of proinflammatory mediators. Experiments in germ-free mice revealed that probiotic effects were due, at least in part, to the binding of Salmonella to the yeast. In conclusion, S. cerevisiae 905 acts as a potential new biotherapy against S. Typhimurium infection due to its ability to bind bacteria and modulate signaling pathways involved in the activation of inflammation in a murine model of typhoid fever.

  9. Stress tolerance in doughs of Saccharomyces cerevisiae trehalase mutants derived from commercial Baker's yeast.

    PubMed

    Shima, J; Hino, A; Yamada-Iyo, C; Suzuki, Y; Nakajima, R; Watanabe, H; Mori, K; Takano, H

    1999-07-01

    Accumulation of trehalose is widely believed to be a critical determinant in improving the stress tolerance of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, which is commonly used in commercial bread dough. To retain the accumulation of trehalose in yeast cells, we constructed, for the first time, diploid homozygous neutral trehalase mutants (Deltanth1), acid trehalase mutants (Deltaath1), and double mutants (Deltanth1 ath1) by using commercial baker's yeast strains as the parent strains and the gene disruption method. During fermentation in a liquid fermentation medium, degradation of intracellular trehalose was inhibited with all of the trehalase mutants. The gassing power of frozen doughs made with these mutants was greater than the gassing power of doughs made with the parent strains. The Deltanth1 and Deltaath1 strains also exhibited higher levels of tolerance of dry conditions than the parent strains exhibited; however, the Deltanth1 ath1 strain exhibited lower tolerance of dry conditions than the parent strain exhibited. The improved freeze tolerance exhibited by all of the trehalase mutants may make these strains useful in frozen dough. PMID:10388673

  10. Visualization analysis of the vacuole-targeting fungicidal activity of amphotericin B against the parent strain and an ergosterol-less mutant of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Kang, Chang-Kyung; Yamada, Keiichi; Usuki, Yoshinosuke; Ogita, Akira; Fujita, Ken-ichi; Tanaka, Toshio

    2013-05-01

    Here, we sought to investigate the vacuole-targeting fungicidal activity of amphotericin B (AmB) in the parent strain and AmB-resistant mutant of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and elucidate the mechanisms involved in this process. Our data demonstrated that the vacuole-targeting fungicidal activity of AmB was markedly enhanced by N-methyl-N″-dodecylguanidine (MC12), a synthetic analogue of the alkyl side chain in niphimycin, as represented by the synergy in their antifungal activities against parent cells of S. cerevisiae. Indifference was observed only with Δerg3 cells, indicating that the replacement of ergosterol with episterol facilitated their resistance to the combined lethal actions of AmB and MC12. Dansyl-labelled amphotericin B (AmB-Ds) was concentrated into normal rounded vacuoles when parent cells were treated with AmB-Ds alone, even at a non-lethal concentration. The additional supplementation of MC12 resulted in a marked loss of cell viability and vacuole disruption, as judged by the fluorescence from AmB-Ds scattered throughout the cytoplasm. In Δerg3 cells, AmB-Ds was scarcely detected in the cytoplasm, even with the addition of MC12, reflecting its failure to normally incorporate across the plasma membrane into the vacuole. Thus, this study supported the hypothesis that ergosterol is involved in the mobilization of AmB into the vacuolar membrane so that AmB-dependent vacuole disruption can be fully enhanced by cotreatment with MC12.

  11. A novel wild-type Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain TSH1 in scaling-up of solid-state fermentation of ethanol from sweet sorghum stalks.

    PubMed

    Du, Ran; Yan, Jianbin; Feng, Quanzhou; Li, Peipei; Zhang, Lei; Chang, Sandra; Li, Shizhong

    2014-01-01

    The rising demand for bioethanol, the most common alternative to petroleum-derived fuel used worldwide, has encouraged a feedstock shift to non-food crops to reduce the competition for resources between food and energy production. Sweet sorghum has become one of the most promising non-food energy crops because of its high output and strong adaptive ability. However, the means by which sweet sorghum stalks can be cost-effectively utilized for ethanol fermentation in large-scale industrial production and commercialization remains unclear. In this study, we identified a novel Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain, TSH1, from the soil in which sweet sorghum stalks were stored. This strain exhibited excellent ethanol fermentative capacity and ability to withstand stressful solid-state fermentation conditions. Furthermore, we gradually scaled up from a 500-mL flask to a 127-m3 rotary-drum fermenter and eventually constructed a 550-m3 rotary-drum fermentation system to establish an efficient industrial fermentation platform based on TSH1. The batch fermentations were completed in less than 20 hours, with up to 96 tons of crushed sweet sorghum stalks in the 550-m3 fermenter reaching 88% of relative theoretical ethanol yield (RTEY). These results collectively demonstrate that ethanol solid-state fermentation technology can be a highly efficient and low-cost solution for utilizing sweet sorghum, providing a feasible and economical means of developing non-food bioethanol.

  12. A novel wild-type Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain TSH1 in scaling-up of solid-state fermentation of ethanol from sweet sorghum stalks.

    PubMed

    Du, Ran; Yan, Jianbin; Feng, Quanzhou; Li, Peipei; Zhang, Lei; Chang, Sandra; Li, Shizhong

    2014-01-01

    The rising demand for bioethanol, the most common alternative to petroleum-derived fuel used worldwide, has encouraged a feedstock shift to non-food crops to reduce the competition for resources between food and energy production. Sweet sorghum has become one of the most promising non-food energy crops because of its high output and strong adaptive ability. However, the means by which sweet sorghum stalks can be cost-effectively utilized for ethanol fermentation in large-scale industrial production and commercialization remains unclear. In this study, we identified a novel Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain, TSH1, from the soil in which sweet sorghum stalks were stored. This strain exhibited excellent ethanol fermentative capacity and ability to withstand stressful solid-state fermentation conditions. Furthermore, we gradually scaled up from a 500-mL flask to a 127-m3 rotary-drum fermenter and eventually constructed a 550-m3 rotary-drum fermentation system to establish an efficient industrial fermentation platform based on TSH1. The batch fermentations were completed in less than 20 hours, with up to 96 tons of crushed sweet sorghum stalks in the 550-m3 fermenter reaching 88% of relative theoretical ethanol yield (RTEY). These results collectively demonstrate that ethanol solid-state fermentation technology can be a highly efficient and low-cost solution for utilizing sweet sorghum, providing a feasible and economical means of developing non-food bioethanol. PMID:24736641

  13. A strategic study using mutant-strain entrapment in calcium alginate for the production of Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells with high invertase activity.

    PubMed

    Rossi-Alva, Juan Carlos; Rocha-Leão, Maria Helena Miguez

    2003-08-01

    Entrapped cells and entrapped cells grown inside of a calcium alginate matrix as well as free cells have been investigated using Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutant strains with regard to their pattern of growth and invertase activity. The repression of invertase by glucose and glucose-consumption ability were considered in the selection process of the mutants. Efficient sucrose bioconversion due to high invertase activity was obtained when entrapped mutant strain Q6R2 cells were grown within calcium alginate gel beads using sucrose plus glucose as the carbon source. Under these conditions, 1 mg (dry weight) of entrapped cells is able to produce 20 micromol of inverted sugar in 3 min (the maximum activity obtained was 20 units x mg(-1)). The experiments were carried out for 6 months without appreciable loss of either bead integrity or invertase activity. The biocatalyst was also stored at 4 degrees C for 6 months without appreciable loss of the invertase activity. This work shows that entrapped yeast cells with a weak ability to consume sugar may be used to produce inverted sugar.

  14. A Novel Wild-Type Saccharomyces cerevisiae Strain TSH1 in Scaling-Up of Solid-State Fermentation of Ethanol from Sweet Sorghum Stalks

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Quanzhou; Li, Peipei; Zhang, Lei; Chang, Sandra; Li, Shizhong

    2014-01-01

    The rising demand for bioethanol, the most common alternative to petroleum-derived fuel used worldwide, has encouraged a feedstock shift to non-food crops to reduce the competition for resources between food and energy production. Sweet sorghum has become one of the most promising non-food energy crops because of its high output and strong adaptive ability. However, the means by which sweet sorghum stalks can be cost-effectively utilized for ethanol fermentation in large-scale industrial production and commercialization remains unclear. In this study, we identified a novel Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain, TSH1, from the soil in which sweet sorghum stalks were stored. This strain exhibited excellent ethanol fermentative capacity and ability to withstand stressful solid-state fermentation conditions. Furthermore, we gradually scaled up from a 500-mL flask to a 127-m3 rotary-drum fermenter and eventually constructed a 550-m3 rotary-drum fermentation system to establish an efficient industrial fermentation platform based on TSH1. The batch fermentations were completed in less than 20 hours, with up to 96 tons of crushed sweet sorghum stalks in the 550-m3 fermenter reaching 88% of relative theoretical ethanol yield (RTEY). These results collectively demonstrate that ethanol solid-state fermentation technology can be a highly efficient and low-cost solution for utilizing sweet sorghum, providing a feasible and economical means of developing non-food bioethanol. PMID:24736641

  15. Contribution of PRS3, RPB4 and ZWF1 to the resistance of industrial Saccharomyces cerevisiae CCUG53310 and PE-2 strains to lignocellulosic hydrolysate-derived inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Cunha, Joana T; Aguiar, Tatiana Q; Romaní, Aloia; Oliveira, Carla; Domingues, Lucília

    2015-09-01

    PRS3, RPB4 and ZWF1 were previously identified as key genes for yeast tolerance to lignocellulose-derived inhibitors. To better understand their contribution to yeast resistance to the multiple stresses occurring during lignocellulosic hydrolysate fermentations, we overexpressed these genes in two industrial Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains, CCUG53310 and PE-2, and evaluated their impact on the fermentation of Eucalyptus globulus wood and corn cob hydrolysates. PRS3 overexpression improved the fermentation rate (up to 32%) and productivity (up to 48%) in different hydrolysates. ZWF1 and RPB4 overexpression did not improve the fermentation performance, but their increased expression in the presence of acetic acid, furfural and hydroxymethylfurfural was found to contribute to yeast adaptation to these inhibitors. This study expands our understanding about the molecular mechanisms involved in industrial yeast tolerance to the stresses occurring during lignocellulosic bioethanol production and highlights the importance of selecting appropriate strain backgrounds/hydrolysates combinations when addressing further improvement of these processes. PMID:25974617

  16. Genetic profiling of yeast industrial strains using in situ comparative genomic hybridization (CGH).

    PubMed

    Wnuk, Maciej; Panek, Anita; Golec, Ewelina; Magda, Michal; Deregowska, Anna; Adamczyk, Jagoda; Lewinska, Anna

    2015-09-20

    The genetic differences and changes in genomic stability may affect fermentation processes involving baker's, brewer's and wine yeast strains. Thus, it seems worthwhile to monitor the changes in genomic DNA copy number of industrial strains. In the present study, we developed an in situ comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) to investigate the ploidy and genetic differences between selected industrial yeast strains. The CGH-based system was validated using the laboratory Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast strains (haploid BY4741 and diploid BY4743). DNA isolated from BY4743 cells was considered a reference DNA. The ploidy and DNA gains and losses of baker's, brewer's and wine strains were revealed. Taken together, the in situ CGH was shown a helpful molecular tool to identify genomic differences between yeast industrial strains. Moreover, the in situ CGH-based system may be used at the single-cell level of analysis to supplement array-based techniques and high-throughput analyses at the population scale. PMID:26116136

  17. A strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae evolved for fermentation of lignocellulosic biomass displays improved growth and fermentative ability in high solids concentrations and in the presence of inhibitory compounds

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Softwoods are the dominant source of lignocellulosic biomass in the northern hemisphere, and have been investigated worldwide as a renewable substrate for cellulosic ethanol production. One challenge to using softwoods, which is particularly acute with pine, is that the pretreatment process produces inhibitory compounds detrimental to the growth and metabolic activity of fermenting organisms. To overcome the challenge of bioconversion in the presence of inhibitory compounds, especially at high solids loading, a strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae was subjected to evolutionary engineering and adaptation for fermentation of pretreated pine wood (Pinus taeda). Results An industrial strain of Saccharomyces, XR122N, was evolved using pretreated pine; the resulting daughter strain, AJP50, produced ethanol much more rapidly than its parent in fermentations of pretreated pine. Adaptation, by preculturing of the industrial yeast XR122N and the evolved strains in 7% dry weight per volume (w/v) pretreated pine solids prior to inoculation into higher solids concentrations, improved fermentation performance of all strains compared with direct inoculation into high solids. Growth comparisons between XR122N and AJP50 in model hydrolysate media containing inhibitory compounds found in pretreated biomass showed that AJP50 exited lag phase faster under all conditions tested. This was due, in part, to the ability of AJP50 to rapidly convert furfural and hydroxymethylfurfural to their less toxic alcohol derivatives, and to recover from reactive oxygen species damage more quickly than XR122N. Under industrially relevant conditions of 17.5% w/v pretreated pine solids loading, additional evolutionary engineering was required to decrease the pronounced lag phase. Using a combination of adaptation by inoculation first into a solids loading of 7% w/v for 24 hours, followed by a 10% v/v inoculum (approximately equivalent to 1 g/L dry cell weight) into 17.5% w/v solids, the final

  18. Production of fermentation aroma compounds by Saccharomyces cerevisiae wine yeasts: effects of yeast assimilable nitrogen on two model strains.

    PubMed

    Carrau, Francisco M; Medina, Karina; Farina, Laura; Boido, Eduardo; Henschke, Paul A; Dellacassa, Eduardo

    2008-11-01

    The contribution of yeast fermentation metabolites to the aromatic profile of wine is well documented; however, the biotechnological application of this knowledge, apart from strain selection, is still rather limited and often contradictory. Understanding and modeling the relationship between nutrient availability and the production of desirable aroma compounds by different strains must be one of the main objectives in the selection of industrial yeasts for the beverage and food industry. In order to overcome the variability in the composition of grape juices, we have used a chemically defined model medium for studying yeast physiological behavior and metabolite production in response to nitrogen supplementation so as to identify an appropriate yeast assimilable nitrogen level for strain differentiation. At low initial nitrogen concentrations, strain KU1 produced higher quantities of esters and fatty acids whereas M522 produced higher concentrations of isoacids, gamma-butyrolactone, higher alcohols and 3-methylthio-1-propanol. We propose that although strains KU1 and M522 have a similar nitrogen consumption profile, they represent useful models for the chemical characterization of wine strains in relation to wine quality. The differential production of aroma compounds by the two strains is discussed in relation to their capacity for nitrogen usage and their impact on winemaking. The results obtained here will help to develop targeted metabolic footprinting methods for the discrimination of industrial yeasts.

  19. Outcrossing, mitotic recombination, and life-history trade-offs shape genome evolution in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Magwene, Paul M.; Kayıkçı, Ömür; Granek, Joshua A.; Reininga, Jennifer M.; Scholl, Zackary; Murray, Debra

    2011-01-01

    We carried out a population genomic survey of Saccharomyces cerevisiae diploid isolates and find that many budding yeast strains have high levels of genomic heterozygosity, much of which is likely due to outcrossing. We demonstrate that variation in heterozygosity among strains is correlated with a life-history trade-off that involves how readily yeast switch from asexual to sexual reproduction under nutrient stress. This trade-off is reflected in a negative relationship between sporulation efficiency and pseudohyphal development and correlates with variation in the expression of RME1, a transcription factor with pleiotropic effects on meiosis and filamentous growth. Selection for alternate life-history strategies in natural versus human-associated environments likely contributes to differential maintenance of genomic heterozygosity through its effect on the frequency that yeast lineages experience sexual cycles and hence the opportunity for inbreeding. In addition to elevated levels of heterozygosity, many strains exhibit large genomic regions of loss-of-heterozygosity (LOH), suggesting that mitotic recombination has a significant impact on genetic variation in this species. This study provides new insights into the roles that both outcrossing and mitotic recombination play in shaping the genome architecture of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. This study also provides a unique case where stark differences in the genomic distribution of genetic variation among individuals of the same species can be largely explained by a life-history trade-off. PMID:21245305

  20. Ploidy-Regulated Variation in Biofilm-Related Phenotypes in Natural Isolates of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Hope, Elyse A.; Dunham, Maitreya J.

    2014-01-01

    The ability of yeast to form biofilms contributes to better survival under stressful conditions. We see the impact of yeast biofilms and “flocs” (clumps) in human health and industry, where forming clumps enables yeast to act as a natural filter in brewing and forming biofilms enables yeast to remain virulent in cases of fungal infection. Despite the importance of biofilms in yeast natural isolates, the majority of our knowledge about yeast biofilm genetics comes from work with a few tractable laboratory strains. A new collection of sequenced natural isolates from the Saccharomyces Genome Resequencing Project enabled us to examine the breadth of biofilm-related phenotypes in geographically, ecologically, and genetically diverse strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We present a panel of 31 haploid and 24 diploid strains for which we have characterized six biofilm-related phenotypes: complex colony morphology, complex mat formation, flocculation, agar invasion, polystyrene adhesion, and psuedohyphal growth. Our results show that there is extensive phenotypic variation between and within strains, and that these six phenotypes are primarily uncorrelated or weakly correlated, with the notable exception of complex colony and complex mat formation. We also show that the phenotypic strength of these strains varies significantly depending on ploidy, and the diploid strains demonstrate both decreased and increased phenotypic strength with respect to their haploid counterparts. This is a more complex view of the impact of ploidy on biofilm-related phenotypes than previous work with laboratory strains has suggested, demonstrating the importance and enormous potential of working with natural isolates of yeast. PMID:25060625

  1. Clonal diploid sperm of the diploid-triploid mosaic loach, Misgurnus anguillicaudatus (Teleostei:Cobitidae).

    PubMed

    Morishima, Kagayaki; Oshima, Kouzou; Horie, Shin; Fujimoto, Takafumi; Yamaha, Etsuro; Arai, Katsutoshi

    2004-06-01

    The loach Misgurnus anguillicaudatus comprises diploid, triploid and diploid-triploid mosaic individuals in a wild population of the Hokkaido island, Japan. Previous studies revealed the presence of a cryptic clonal lineage among diploid loaches, which is maintained by uniparental reproduction of genetically identical diploid eggs. In the present study, we analyzed distribution and genetic status of diploid and triploid cells in infrequent mosaic males. Flow cytometry, microsatellite genotyping and DNA fingerprinting verified that mosaic males consisted of diploid cells with genotypes identical to the natural clone and triploid cells with diploid genomes of the clonal lineage plus haploid genome from sperm nucleus of the father. Thus, the occurrence of diploid-triploid mosaicism might be caused by accidental fertilization of a diploid blastomere nucleus with haploid sperm after the initiation of clonal development of unreduced eggs. Such mosaic males produced fertile sperm with diploid DNA content. The experimental cross between normal diploid female and diploid-triploid mosaic male gave rise to the appearance of triploid progeny which exhibited two microsatellite alleles identical to the clonal genotype and one allele derived from the normal female. In DNA fingerprinting, such triploid progeny gave not only all the DNA fragments from the clone, but also other fragments from the normal female. Induced androgenesis using UV irradiated eggs and sperm of the mosaic male gave rise to the occurrence of diploid individuals with paternally derived microsatellite genotypes and DNA fingerprints, absolutely identical to the natural clonal lineage. These results conclude that the diploid-triploid mosaic male produced unreduced diploid sperm with genetically identical genotypes. The spermatogenesis in the clonal diploid cells under the mosaic condition suggests that triploid male somatic cells might transform genetically all-female germ cells to differentiate into functionally

  2. Eukaryote-to-eukaryote gene transfer events revealed by the genome sequence of the wine yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae EC1118

    PubMed Central

    Novo, Maite; Bigey, Frédéric; Beyne, Emmanuelle; Galeote, Virginie; Gavory, Frédérick; Mallet, Sandrine; Cambon, Brigitte; Legras, Jean-Luc; Wincker, Patrick; Casaregola, Serge; Dequin, Sylvie

    2009-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been used for millennia in winemaking, but little is known about the selective forces acting on the wine yeast genome. We sequenced the complete genome of the diploid commercial wine yeast EC1118, resulting in an assembly of 31 scaffolds covering 97% of the S288c reference genome. The wine yeast differed strikingly from the other S. cerevisiae isolates in possessing 3 unique large regions, 2 of which were subtelomeric, the other being inserted within an EC1118 chromosome. These regions encompass 34 genes involved in key wine fermentation functions. Phylogeny and synteny analyses showed that 1 of these regions originated from a species closely related to the Saccharomyces genus, whereas the 2 other regions were of non-Saccharomyces origin. We identified Zygosaccharomyces bailii, a major contaminant of wine fermentations, as the donor species for 1 of these 2 regions. Although natural hybridization between Saccharomyces strains has been described, this report provides evidence that gene transfer may occur between Saccharomyces and non-Saccharomyces species. We show that the regions identified are frequent and differentially distributed among S. cerevisiae clades, being found almost exclusively in wine strains, suggesting acquisition through recent transfer events. Overall, these data show that the wine yeast genome is subject to constant remodeling through the contribution of exogenous genes. Our results suggest that these processes are favored by ecologic proximity and are involved in the molecular adaptation of wine yeasts to conditions of high sugar, low nitrogen, and high ethanol concentrations. PMID:19805302

  3. Harnessing Genetic Diversity in Saccharomyces cerevisiae for Fermentation of Xylose in Hydrolysates of Alkaline Hydrogen Peroxide-Pretreated Biomass

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Tongjun; Parreiras, Lucas S.; Williams, Daniel L.; Wohlbach, Dana J.; Bice, Benjamin D.; Ong, Irene M.; Breuer, Rebecca J.; Qin, Li; Busalacchi, Donald; Deshpande, Shweta; Daum, Chris; Gasch, Audrey P.

    2014-01-01

    The fermentation of lignocellulose-derived sugars, particularly xylose, into ethanol by the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is known to be inhibited by compounds produced during feedstock pretreatment. We devised a strategy that combined chemical profiling of pretreated feedstocks, high-throughput phenotyping of genetically diverse S. cerevisiae strains isolated from a range of ecological niches, and directed engineering and evolution against identified inhibitors to produce strains with improved fermentation properties. We identified and quantified for the first time the major inhibitory compounds in alkaline hydrogen peroxide (AHP)-pretreated lignocellulosic hydrolysates, including Na+, acetate, and p-coumaric (pCA) and ferulic (FA) acids. By phenotyping these yeast strains for their abilities to grow in the presence of these AHP inhibitors, one heterozygous diploid strain tolerant to all four inhibitors was selected, engineered for xylose metabolism, and then allowed to evolve on xylose with increasing amounts of pCA and FA. After only 149 generations, one evolved isolate, GLBRCY87, exhibited faster xylose uptake rates in both laboratory media and AHP switchgrass hydrolysate than its ancestral GLBRCY73 strain and completely converted 115 g/liter of total sugars in undetoxified AHP hydrolysate into more than 40 g/liter ethanol. Strikingly, genome sequencing revealed that during the evolution from GLBRCY73, the GLBRCY87 strain acquired the conversion of heterozygous to homozygous alleles in chromosome VII and amplification of chromosome XIV. Our approach highlights that simultaneous selection on xylose and pCA or FA with a wild S. cerevisiae strain containing inherent tolerance to AHP pretreatment inhibitors has potential for rapid evolution of robust properties in lignocellulosic biofuel production. PMID:24212571

  4. Diploid males, diploid sperm production, and triploid females in the ant Tapinoma erraticum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cournault, Laurent; Aron, Serge

    2009-12-01

    Under complementary sex determination (CSD), females of Hymenoptera arise from diploid, fertilized eggs and males from haploid, unfertilized eggs. Incidentally, fertilized eggs that inherit two identical alleles at the CSD locus will develop into diploid males. Diploid males are usually unviable or sterile. In a few species, however, they produce diploid sperm and father a triploid female progeny. Diploid males have been reported in a number of social Hymenoptera, but the occurrence of triploid females has hardly ever been documented. Here, we report the presence of triploid females, diploid males, and diploid sperm (produced by diploid males and stored in queen spermathecae) in the ant Tapinoma erraticum. Moreover, we show variations in the frequency of triploids among female castes: Triploid females are more frequent among workers than virgin queens; they are absent among mated, reproductive queens. The frequency of triploid workers also varies between populations and between nests within populations.

  5. Dynamics and quantitative analysis of the synthesis of fermentative aromas by an evolved wine strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Mouret, J R; Cadiere, A; Aguera, E; Rollero, S; Ortiz-Julien, A; Sablayrolles, J M; Dequin, S

    2015-01-01

    We performed a dynamic and quantitative analysis of the synthesis of fermentative aromas by an aromatic wine yeast, ECA5, obtained by adaptive evolution. During fermentation at pilot scale on synthetic and natural musts, ECA5 produced volatile compounds (higher alcohols and their acetates, ethyl esters) at higher rates than the ancestral strain, with the exception of propanol. Marked differences in the chronology of synthesis of several compounds were observed between the two strains. Overproduction of phenyl ethanol occurred mainly during the growth phase for ECA5, consistent with its higher flux through the pentose phosphate pathway, which plays a key role in biosynthetic processes. The kinetics of production of isobutanol and isoamyl alcohol were differently affected by different media (synthetic or natural must) and, in particular, according to the nature of the sterols in the media (ergosterol or phytosterols). We also observed differences in the chronology of synthesis of ethyl acetate and isoamyl acetate or ethyl esters, suggesting that the regulation of the synthesis of these compounds in the evolved strain differs from that in the ancestral strain. This study shows that a dynamic analysis of volatile compounds, using high acquisition frequency online gas chromatography, can provide novel insights into the synthesis and regulation of aromas and is thus a potentially powerful tool for strain characterization. PMID:24989462

  6. Isolation of a high malic and low acetic acid-producing sake yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain screened from respiratory inhibitor 2,4-dinitrophenol (DNP)-resistant strains.

    PubMed

    Kosugi, Shingo; Kiyoshi, Keiji; Oba, Takahiro; Kusumoto, Kenichi; Kadokura, Toshimori; Nakazato, Atsumi; Nakayama, Shunichi

    2014-01-01

    We isolated 2,4-dinitrophenol (DNP)-resistant sake yeast strains by UV mutagenesis. Among the DNP-resistant mutants, we focused on strains exhibiting high malic acid and low acetic acid production. The improved organic acid composition is unlikely to be under the control of enzyme activities related to malic and acetic acid synthesis pathways. Instead, low mitochondrial activity was observed in DNP-resistant mutants, indicating that the excess pyruvic acid generated during glycolysis is not metabolized in the mitochondria but converted to malic acid in the cytosol. In addition, the NADH/NAD(+) ratio of the DNP-resistant strains was higher than that of the parental strain K901. These results suggest that the increased NADH/NAD(+) ratio together with the low mitochondrial activity alter the organic acid composition because malic acid synthesis requires NADH, while acetic acid uses NAD(+).

  7. Effect of UV radiation on thermotolerance, ethanol tolerance and osmotolerance of Saccharomyces cerevisiae VS1 and VS3 strains.

    PubMed

    Sridhar, M; Sree, N Kiran; Rao, L Venkateswar

    2002-07-01

    After a previous mass screening and enrichment programme for the isolation of thermotolerant yeasts, VS1, VS2, VS3 and VS4 strains isolated from soil samples, collected within the hot regions of Kothagudem Thermal Power Plant, AP, India, had a better thermotolerance, osmotolerance and ethanol tolerance than the other isolates. Among these isolates VS1 and VS3 were best performers. Efforts were made to further improve their osmotolerance, thermotolerance and ethanol tolerance by treating them with UV radiation. Mutants of VS1 and VS3 produced more biomass and ethanol than the parent strains at high temperature and glucose concentrations. The amount of biomass produced by VS1 and VS3 mutants was 0.25 and 0.20 g l(-1) more than the parent strains at 42 degrees C using 2% glucose. At high glucose concentrations VS1 and VS3 mutants produced biomass which was 0.70 and 0.30 g l(-1) at 30 degrees C and 0.10 and 0.20 g l(-1) at 40 degrees C more than the parent strains. The amount of ethanol produced by the mutants (VS1 and VS3) was 8.20 and 1.20 g l(-1) more than the parent strains at 42 degrees C using 150 g l(-1) glucose. More ethanol was produced by mutants (VS1 and VS3) than the parents at high glucose concentrations of 5.0 and 6.0 g l(-1) at 30 degrees C and 13.0 and 3.0 g l(-1) at 42 degrees C, respectively. These results indicated that UV mutagenesis can be used for improving thermotolerance, ethanol tolerance and osmotolerance in VS1 and VS3 yeast strains.

  8. Industrial Saccharomyces cerevisiae Yeast Strain Engineered to Convert Glucose, Mannose, Arabinose, and Xylose (GMAX) to Ethanol Anaerobically

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Technology for engineering an industrial yeast strain for production of ethanol from glucose, mannose, arabinose, and xylose (GMAX-yeast) using both corn starch and cellulosic feedstocks with simultaneous production of valuable coproducts, including biodiesel, will be discussed. A stable industrial...

  9. Different response to acetic acid stress in Saccharomyces cerevisiae wild-type and l-ascorbic acid-producing strains.

    PubMed

    Martani, Francesca; Fossati, Tiziana; Posteri, Riccardo; Signori, Lorenzo; Porro, Danilo; Branduardi, Paola

    2013-09-01

    Biotechnological processes are of increasing significance for industrial production of fine and bulk chemicals, including biofuels. Unfortunately, under operative conditions microorganisms meet multiple stresses, such as non-optimal pH, temperature, oxygenation and osmotic stress. Moreover, they have to face inhibitory compounds released during the pretreatment of lignocellulosic biomasses, which constitute the preferential substrate for second-generation processes. Inhibitors include furan derivatives, phenolic compounds and weak organic acids, among which acetic acid is one of the most abundant and detrimental for cells. They impair cellular metabolism and growth, reducing the productivity of the process: therefore, the development of robust cell factories with improved production rates and resistance is of crucial importance. Here we show that a yeast strain engineered to endogenously produce vitamin C exhibits an increased tolerance compared to the parental strain when exposed to acetic acid at moderately toxic concentrations, measured as viability on plates. Starting from this evidence, we investigated more deeply: (a) the nature and levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS); (b) the activation of enzymes that act directly as detoxifiers of reactive oxygen species, such as superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase, in parental and engineered strains during acetic acid stress. The data indicate that the engineered strain can better recover from stress by limiting ROS accumulation, independently from SOD activation. The engineered yeast can be proposed as a model for further investigating direct and indirect mechanism(s) by which an antioxidant can rescue cells from organic acid damage; moreover, these studies will possibly provide additional targets for further strain improvements.

  10. Different response to acetic acid stress in Saccharomyces cerevisiae wild-type and l-ascorbic acid-producing strains.

    PubMed

    Martani, Francesca; Fossati, Tiziana; Posteri, Riccardo; Signori, Lorenzo; Porro, Danilo; Branduardi, Paola

    2013-09-01

    Biotechnological processes are of increasing significance for industrial production of fine and bulk chemicals, including biofuels. Unfortunately, under operative conditions microorganisms meet multiple stresses, such as non-optimal pH, temperature, oxygenation and osmotic stress. Moreover, they have to face inhibitory compounds released during the pretreatment of lignocellulosic biomasses, which constitute the preferential substrate for second-generation processes. Inhibitors include furan derivatives, phenolic compounds and weak organic acids, among which acetic acid is one of the most abundant and detrimental for cells. They impair cellular metabolism and growth, reducing the productivity of the process: therefore, the development of robust cell factories with improved production rates and resistance is of crucial importance. Here we show that a yeast strain engineered to endogenously produce vitamin C exhibits an increased tolerance compared to the parental strain when exposed to acetic acid at moderately toxic concentrations, measured as viability on plates. Starting from this evidence, we investigated more deeply: (a) the nature and levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS); (b) the activation of enzymes that act directly as detoxifiers of reactive oxygen species, such as superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase, in parental and engineered strains during acetic acid stress. The data indicate that the engineered strain can better recover from stress by limiting ROS accumulation, independently from SOD activation. The engineered yeast can be proposed as a model for further investigating direct and indirect mechanism(s) by which an antioxidant can rescue cells from organic acid damage; moreover, these studies will possibly provide additional targets for further strain improvements. PMID:23847041

  11. Characterization of a recombinant flocculent Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain that co-ferments glucose and xylose: II. influence of pH and acetic acid on ethanol production.

    PubMed

    Matsushika, Akinori; Sawayama, Shigeki

    2012-12-01

    The inhibitory effects of pH and acetic acid on the co-fermentation of glucose and xylose in complex medium by recombinant flocculent Saccharomyces cerevisiae MA-R4 were evaluated. In the absence of acetic acid, the fermentation performance of strain MA-R4 was similar between pH 4.0-6.0, but was negatively affected at pH 2.5. The addition of acetic acid to batch cultures resulted in negligible inhibition of several fermentation parameters at pH 6.0, whereas the interactive inhibition of pH and acetic acid on the maximum cell and ethanol concentrations, and rates of sugar consumption and ethanol production were observed at pH levels below 5.4. The inhibitory effect of acetic acid was particularly marked for the consumption rate of xylose, as compared with that of glucose. With increasing initial acetic acid concentration, the ethanol yield slightly increased at pH 5.4 and 6.0, but decreased at pH values lower than 4.7. Notably, ethanol production was nearly completely inhibited under low pH (4.0) and high acetic acid (150-200 mM) conditions. Together, these results indicate that the inhibitory effects of acetic acid and pH on ethanol fermentation by MA-R4 are highly synergistic, although the inhibition can be reduced by increasing the medium pH. PMID:23076570

  12. Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain UFMG 905 protects against bacterial translocation, preserves gut barrier integrity and stimulates the immune system in a murine intestinal obstruction model.

    PubMed

    Generoso, Simone V; Viana, Mirelle; Santos, Rosana; Martins, Flaviano S; Machado, José A N; Arantes, Rosa M E; Nicoli, Jacques R; Correia, Maria I T D; Cardoso, Valbert N

    2010-06-01

    Probiotic is a preparation containing microorganisms that confers beneficial effect to the host. This work assessed whether oral treatment with viable or heat-killed yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain UFMG 905 prevents bacterial translocation (BT), intestinal barrier integrity, and stimulates the immunity, in a murine intestinal obstruction (IO) model. Four groups of mice were used: mice undergoing only laparotomy (CTL), undergoing intestinal obstruction (IO) and undergoing intestinal obstruction after previous treatment with viable or heat-killed yeast. BT, determined as uptake of (99m)Tc-E. coli in blood, mesenteric lymph nodes, liver, spleen and lungs, was significantly higher in IO group than in CTL group. Treatments with both yeasts reduced BT in blood and all organs investigated. The treatment with both yeasts also reduced intestinal permeability as determined by blood uptake of (99m)Tc-DTPA. Immunological data demonstrated that both treatments were able to significantly increase IL-10 levels, but only viable yeast had the same effect on sIgA levels. Intestinal lesions were more severe in IO group when compared to CTL and yeasts groups. Concluding, both viable and heat-killed cells of yeast prevent BT, probably by immunomodulation and by maintaining gut barrier integrity. Only the stimulation of IgA production seems to depend on the yeast viability.

  13. Variation in Indole-3-Acetic Acid Production by Wild Saccharomyces cerevisiae and S. paradoxus Strains from Diverse Ecological Sources and Its Effect on Growth

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yen-Yu; Chen, Hung-Wei; Chou, Jui-Yu

    2016-01-01

    Phytohormone indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) is the most common naturally occurring and most thoroughly studied plant growth regulator. Microbial synthesis of IAA has long been known. Microbial IAA biosynthesis has been proposed as possibly occurring through multiple pathways, as has been proven in plants. However, the biosynthetic pathways of IAA and the ecological roles of IAA in yeast have not been widely studied. In this study, we investigated the variation in IAA production and its effect on the growth of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and its closest relative Saccharomyces paradoxus yeasts from diverse ecological sources. We found that almost all Saccharomyces yeasts produced IAA when cultured in medium supplemented with the primary precursor of IAA, L-tryptophan (L-Trp). However, when cultured in medium without L-Trp, IAA production was only detected in three strains. Furthermore, exogenous added IAA exerted stimulatory and inhibitory effects on yeast growth. Interestingly, a negative correlation was observed between the amount of IAA production in the yeast cultures and the IAA inhibition ratio of their growth. PMID:27483373

  14. Variation in Indole-3-Acetic Acid Production by Wild Saccharomyces cerevisiae and S. paradoxus Strains from Diverse Ecological Sources and Its Effect on Growth.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yen-Yu; Chen, Hung-Wei; Chou, Jui-Yu

    2016-01-01

    Phytohormone indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) is the most common naturally occurring and most thoroughly studied plant growth regulator. Microbial synthesis of IAA has long been known. Microbial IAA biosynthesis has been proposed as possibly occurring through multiple pathways, as has been proven in plants. However, the biosynthetic pathways of IAA and the ecological roles of IAA in yeast have not been widely studied. In this study, we investigated the variation in IAA production and its effect on the growth of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and its closest relative Saccharomyces paradoxus yeasts from diverse ecological sources. We found that almost all Saccharomyces yeasts produced IAA when cultured in medium supplemented with the primary precursor of IAA, L-tryptophan (L-Trp). However, when cultured in medium without L-Trp, IAA production was only detected in three strains. Furthermore, exogenous added IAA exerted stimulatory and inhibitory effects on yeast growth. Interestingly, a negative correlation was observed between the amount of IAA production in the yeast cultures and the IAA inhibition ratio of their growth. PMID:27483373

  15. On the Evolution of New Metabolic Functions in Diploid Organisms

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Barry G.

    1980-01-01

    Evolution of lactose utilization via the ebg system of Escherichia coli requires both structural gene (ebgA) and regulatory gene (ebgR) mutations. Because evolution of new metabolic functions in diploids might be subject to constraints not present in haploid organisms, merodiploid strains carrying a wild-type and an evolved ebgA allele, or a wild-type and an evolved ebgR allele were constructed. I show that heterozygosity at ebgA does not significantly affect the selective advantage of the evolved ebgA allele; whereas heterozygosity at ebgR eliminates the selective advantage of the evolved ebgR allele. It is suggested that, in diploid organisms, evolution of new functions for systems under negative control would be very difficult. PMID:6790336

  16. Multicopy suppression screen in a Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain lacking the Rab GTPase-activating protein Msb3p.

    PubMed

    Biver, Sophie; Portetelle, Daniel; Vandenbol, Micheline

    2011-01-01

    The yeast proteins, Msb3p and Msb4p, are two Ypt/Rab-specific GTPase-activating proteins sharing redundant functions in exocytosis, organization of the actin cytoskeleton, and budding site selection. To see if Msb3p might play an additional, specific role, we first tested the sensitivities of msb3 and msb4 mutant strains to different drugs and then screened a genomic library for multicopy suppressors of msb3 sensitivity to CdCl(2) or to the calcium channel blocker diltiazem hydrochloride. Three genes (ADH1, RNT1, and SUI1) were found to suppress the CdCl(2) sensitivity of the msb3 strain and three others (YAP6, ZEO1, and SLM1) its diltiazem-HCl sensitivity. The results suggest a possible involvement of Msb3p in calcineurin-mediated signalling.

  17. Effect of Agave tequilana juice on cell wall polysaccharides of three Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains from different origins.

    PubMed

    Aguilar-Uscanga, Blanca; Arrizon, Javier; Ramirez, Jesús; Solis-Pacheco, Josué

    2007-02-01

    In this study, a characterization of cell wall polysaccharide composition of three yeasts involved in the production of agave distilled beverages was performed. The three yeast strains were isolated from different media (tequila, mezcal and bakery) and were evaluated for the beta(1,3)-glucanase lytic activity and the beta-glucan/ mannan ratio during the fermentation of Agave tequilana juice and in YPD media (control). Fermentations were performed in shake flasks with 30 g l(-1) sugar concentration of A. tequilana juice and with the control YPD using 30 g l(-1) of glucose. The three yeasts strains showed different levels of beta-glucan and mannan when they were grown in A. tequilana juice in comparison to the YPD media. The maximum rate of cell wall lyses was 50% lower in fermentations with A. tequilana juice for yeasts isolated from tequila and mezcal than compared to the bakery yeast.

  18. Effect of Agave tequilana juice on cell wall polysaccharides of three Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains from different origins.

    PubMed

    Aguilar-Uscanga, Blanca; Arrizon, Javier; Ramirez, Jesús; Solis-Pacheco, Josué

    2007-02-01

    In this study, a characterization of cell wall polysaccharide composition of three yeasts involved in the production of agave distilled beverages was performed. The three yeast strains were isolated from different media (tequila, mezcal and bakery) and were evaluated for the beta(1,3)-glucanase lytic activity and the beta-glucan/ mannan ratio during the fermentation of Agave tequilana juice and in YPD media (control). Fermentations were performed in shake flasks with 30 g l(-1) sugar concentration of A. tequilana juice and with the control YPD using 30 g l(-1) of glucose. The three yeasts strains showed different levels of beta-glucan and mannan when they were grown in A. tequilana juice in comparison to the YPD media. The maximum rate of cell wall lyses was 50% lower in fermentations with A. tequilana juice for yeasts isolated from tequila and mezcal than compared to the bakery yeast. PMID:17120082

  19. Reinventing potato at the diploid level

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The outcrossing polyploidy nature of cultivated potato has hindered the use of genomics resources to dissect the genetic basis of agronomically important traits. Reversion to the diploid level allows us to apply powerful tools toward this effort. Parthenogenesis generates diploid cultivated potato, ...

  20. The glucose/xylose facilitator Gxf1 from Candida intermedia expressed in a xylose-fermenting industrial strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae increases xylose uptake in SSCF of wheat straw.

    PubMed

    Fonseca, César; Olofsson, Kim; Ferreira, Carla; Runquist, David; Fonseca, Luís L; Hahn-Hägerdal, Bärbel; Lidén, Gunnar

    2011-05-01

    Ethanolic fermentation of lignocellulose raw materials requires industrial xylose-fermenting strains capable of complete and efficient D-xylose consumption. A central question in xylose fermentation by Saccharomyces cerevisiae engineered for xylose fermentation is to improve the xylose uptake. In the current study, the glucose/xylose facilitator Gxf1 from Candida intermedia, was expressed in three different xylose-fermenting S. cerevisiae strains of industrial origin. The in vivo effect on aerobic xylose growth and the initial xylose uptake rate were assessed. The expression of Gxf1 resulted in enhanced aerobic xylose growth only for the TMB3400 based strain. It displayed more than a 2-fold higher affinity for D-xylose than the parental strain and approximately 2-fold higher initial specific growth rate at 4 g/L D-xylose. Enhanced xylose consumption was furthermore observed when the GXF1-strain was assessed in simultaneous saccharification and co-fermentation (SSCF) of pretreated wheat straw. However, the ethanol yield remained unchanged due to increased by-product formation. Metabolic flux analysis suggested that the expression of the Gxf1 transporter had shifted the control of xylose catabolism from transport to the NAD(+) dependent oxidation of xylitol to xylulose. PMID:22113025

  1. Adenine auxotrophy--be aware: some effects of adenine auxotrophy in Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain W303-1A.

    PubMed

    Kokina, Agnese; Kibilds, Juris; Liepins, Janis

    2014-08-01

    Adenine auxotrophy is a commonly used genetic marker in haploid yeast strains. Strain W303-1A, which carries the ade2-1 mutation, is widely used in physiological and genetic research. Yeast extract-based rich medium contains a low level of adenine, so that adenine is often depleted before glucose. This could affect the cell physiology of adenine auxotrophs grown in rich medium. The aim of our study was to assess the effects of adenine auxotrophy on cell morphology and stress physiology. Our results show that adenine depletion halts cell division, but that culture optical density continues to increase due to cell swelling. Accumulation of trehalose and a coincident 10-fold increase in desiccation stress tolerance is observed in adenine auxotrophs after adenine depletion, when compared to prototrophs. Under adenine starvation, long-term survival of W303-1A is lower than during carbon starvation, but higher than during leucine starvation. We observed drastic adenine-dependent changes in cell stress physiology, suggesting that results may be biased when adenine auxotrophs are grown in rich media without adenine supplementation.

  2. Synthetic lethal interaction between the pel1 and op1 mutations in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Dzugasová, V; Subík, J

    2005-01-01

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutant strain containing the op1 mutation affecting the function of a mitochondrial ATP/ADP translocator has been crossed to the pel1 and crd1 mutants deficient in the biosynthesis of mitochondrial phosphatidylglycerol (PG) and cardiolipin (CL). Using tetrad analysis of diploids issued from corresponding crosses a synthetic lethal interaction has been observed between the op1 and pel1 mutations resulting in the lack of growth of a corresponding double mutant on minimal medium containing glucose. The op1 pel1 double mutant also displayed a decreased susceptibility to fluconazole and a compromised growth even in complex medium containing glucose. The viability of mutant cells was strongly reduced, corresponding to <30 % and 10 % of colony-forming units observed after growth in complex and minimal medium, respectively. A lower viability of the double mutant in minimal medium was accompanied by an increased formation of mitochondrial petite mutants (as determined by mtDNA rescue into diploid cells). The results indicate that in the simultaneous absence of mitochondrial anionic phospholipids (PG plus CL) and ATP/ADP exchange across the inner mitochondrial membrane the yeast mitochondrial functions are severely limited, leading to a strongly compromised cell multiplication. Since under similar conditions the op1 crd1 double mutant was able to grow on minimal medium this deleterious effect of anionic phospholipid deficiency could be at least partially substituted by PG accumulated in the cardiolipin deficient delta crd1 mutant cells.

  3. Regulated expression of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae DNA repair gene RAD7 in response to DNA damage and during sporulation.

    PubMed

    Jones, J S; Prakash, L; Prakash, S

    1990-06-11

    The RAD7 gene of Saccharomyces cerevisiae affects the proficiency of excision repair of DNA damaged by UV light. Here, we report our studies on the regulation of the RAD7 gene in response to UV irradiation and during sporulation. RAD7 transcript levels increased 6-fold within 40 min of exposure of cells to 37 J/m2 of UV light. Higher UV doses also elicited rapid increases in the level of RAD7 mRNA. RAD7 mRNA levels increased in sporulating MATa/MAT alpha diploid cells, but not in the asporogenous MATa/MATa strain exposed to sporulation conditions. The increase in RAD7 mRNA level in MATa/MAT alpha cells was 15-fold after 6 h and 9-fold after 7 h in sporulation medium; thereafter, RAD7 mRNA levels declined. Periodic transcription of RAD7 during sporulation suggests a role for RAD7 in this process.

  4. Genome-wide identification of genes involved in growth and fermentation activity at low temperature in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Salvadó, Zoel; Ramos-Alonso, Lucía; Tronchoni, Jordi; Penacho, Vanessa; García-Ríos, Estéfani; Morales, Pilar; Gonzalez, Ramon; Guillamón, José Manuel

    2016-11-01

    Fermentation at low temperatures is one of the most popular current winemaking practices because of its reported positive impact on the aromatic profile of wines. However, low temperature is an additional hurdle to develop Saccharomyces cerevisiae wine yeasts, which are already stressed by high osmotic pressure, low pH and poor availability of nitrogen sources in grape must. Understanding the mechanisms of adaptation of S. cerevisiae to fermentation at low temperature would help to design strategies for process management, and to select and improve wine yeast strains specifically adapted to this winemaking practice. The problem has been addressed by several approaches in recent years, including transcriptomic and other high-throughput strategies. In this work we used a genome-wide screening of S. cerevisiae diploid mutant strain collections to identify genes that potentially contribute to adaptation to low temperature fermentation conditions. Candidate genes, impaired for growth at low temperatures (12°C and 18°C), but not at a permissive temperature (28°C), were deleted in an industrial homozygous genetic background, wine yeast strain FX10, in both heterozygosis and homozygosis. Some candidate genes were required for growth at low temperatures only in the laboratory yeast genetic background, but not in FX10 (namely the genes involved in aromatic amino acid biosynthesis). Other genes related to ribosome biosynthesis (SNU66 and PAP2) were required for low-temperature fermentation of synthetic must (SM) in the industrial genetic background. This result coincides with our previous findings about translation efficiency with the fitness of different wine yeast strains at low temperature.

  5. Construction of lycopene-overproducing Saccharomyces cerevisiae by combining directed evolution and metabolic engineering.

    PubMed

    Xie, Wenping; Lv, Xiaomei; Ye, Lidan; Zhou, Pingping; Yu, Hongwei

    2015-07-01

    Improved supply of farnesyl diphosphate (FPP) is often considered as a typical strategy for engineering Saccharomyces cerevisiae towards efficient terpenoid production. However, in the engineered strains with enhanced precursor supply, the production of the target metabolite is often impeded by insufficient capacity of the heterologous terpenoid pathways, which limits further conversion of FPP. Here, we tried to assemble an unimpeded biosynthesis pathway by combining directed evolution and metabolic engineering in S. cerevisiae for lycopene-overproduction. First, the catalytic ability of phytoene syntheses from different sources was investigated based on lycopene accumulation. Particularly, the lycopene cyclase function of the bifunctional enzyme CrtYB from Xanthophyllomyces dendrorhous was inactivated by deletion of functional domain and directed evolution to obtain mutants with solely phytoene synthase function. Coexpression of the resulting CrtYB11M mutant along with the CrtE and CrtI genes from X. dendrorhous, and the tHMG1 gene from S. cerevisiae led to production of 4.47 mg/g DCW (Dry cell weight) of lycopene and 25.66 mg/g DCW of the by-product squalene. To further increase the FPP competitiveness of the lycopene synthesis pathway, we tried to enhance the catalytic performance of CrtE by directed evolution and created a series of pathway variants by varying the copy number of Crt genes. Finally, fed-batch fermentation was conducted for the diploid strain YXWPD-14 resulting in accumulation of 1.61 g/L (24.41 mg/g DCW) of lycopene, meanwhile, the by-production of squalene was reduced to below 1 mg/g DCW. PMID:25959020

  6. Parasexual recombination in Dictyostelium discoideum: selection of stable diploid heterozygotes and stable haploid segregants (clones-temperature sensitive-ploidy-fruiting bodies-spore-slime mold).

    PubMed

    Katz, E R; Sussman, M

    1972-02-01

    Haploid strains of Dictyostelium discoideum bearing temperature-sensitive mutations have been used to select stable diploid, heterozygotic clones, which arise at low frequency (about 10(-5)). Segregants arise from such diploids at low frequency (about 10(-3)). The diploids were heterozygous for resistance to cycloheximide and were phenotypically sensitive to the drug. Growth of the diploid cells in the presence of cycloheximide automatically selected those segregants bearing the resistant allele, and facilitated examination of the assortment of unselected markers. The combination of the two selective methods provides a workable system of genetic analysis in this species. We have used this method to locate six markers on three different linkage groups.

  7. Analysis and Dynamics of the Chromosomal Complements of Wild Sparkling-Wine Yeast Strains

    PubMed Central

    Nadal, Dolors; Carro, David; Fernández-Larrea, Juan; Piña, Benjamin

    1999-01-01

    We isolated Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast strains that are able to carry out the second fermentation of sparkling wine from spontaneously fermenting musts in El Penedès (Spain) by specifically designed selection protocols. All of them (26 strains) showed one of two very similar mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) restriction patterns, whereas their karyotypes differed. These strains showed high rates of karyotype instability, which were dependent on both the medium and the strain, during vegetative growth. In all cases, the mtDNA restriction pattern was conserved in strains kept under the same conditions. Analysis of different repetitive sequences in their genomes suggested that ribosomal DNA repeats play an important role in the changes in size observed in chromosome XII, whereas SUC genes or Ty elements did not show amplification or transposition processes that could be related to rearrangements of the chromosomes showing these sequences. Karyotype changes also occurred in monosporidic diploid derivatives. We propose that these changes originated mainly from ectopic recombination between repeated sequences interspersed in the genome. None of the rearranged karyotypes provided a selective advantage strong enough to allow the strains to displace the parental strains. The nature and frequency of these changes suggest that they may play an important role in the establishment and maintenance of the genetic diversity observed in S. cerevisiae wild populations. PMID:10103269

  8. Repair of endonuclease-induced double-strand breaks in Saccharomyces cerevisiae: essential role for genes associated with nonhomologous end-joining.

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, L K; Westmoreland, J W; Resnick, M A

    1999-01-01

    Repair of double-strand breaks (DSBs) in chromosomal DNA by nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ) is not well characterized in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Here we demonstrate that several genes associated with NHEJ perform essential functions in the repair of endonuclease-induced DSBs in vivo. Galactose-induced expression of EcoRI endonuclease in rad50, mre11, or xrs2 mutants, which are deficient in plasmid DSB end-joining and some forms of recombination, resulted in G2 arrest and rapid cell killing. Endonuclease synthesis also produced moderate cell killing in sir4 strains. In contrast, EcoRI caused prolonged cell-cycle arrest of recombination-defective rad51, rad52, rad54, rad55, and rad57 mutants, but cells remained viable. Cell-cycle progression was inhibited in excision repair-defective rad1 mutants, but not in rad2 cells, indicating a role for Rad1 processing of the DSB ends. Phenotypic responses of additional mutants, including exo1, srs2, rad5, and rdh54 strains, suggest roles in recombinational repair, but not in NHEJ. Interestingly, the rapid cell killing in haploid rad50 and mre11 strains was largely eliminated in diploids, suggesting that the cohesive-ended DSBs could be efficiently repaired by homologous recombination throughout the cell cycle in the diploid mutants. These results demonstrate essential but separable roles for NHEJ pathway genes in the repair of chromosomal DSBs that are structurally similar to those occurring during cellular development. PMID:10430580

  9. Population Studies in Microorganisms I. Evolution of Diploidy in SACCHAROMYCES CEREVISIAE

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Julian; Hansche, Paul E.

    1974-01-01

    The relative adaptation of isogenic haploid and diploid strains of yeast was investigated in different sets of physiological conditions. When all nutrients were present in excess, no difference in the reproductive rates of isogenic haploid and diploid strains of yeast was detected in both optimal and non-optimal growth conditions. Competition between haploid and diploid strains of yeast was observed when growth was limited by the concentration of a single nutrilite. Under certain conditions when fitness (reproductive rate) is determined by transport of an essential nutrilite that exists in very low concentrations, diploid cells were selected against. These environmental conditions are similar to those found in offshore marine environments where nutrients are often present in extremely low concentrations. The fitness of diploid cells was estimated to be.93 ±.02 (haploid fitness = 1). The reduced fitness of diploid cells in this environment can be explained by the reduced surface area/volume ratio possessed by diploid cells in comparison to haploid cells. The fitnesses of haploid and diploid cells in these environments are closely correlated with geometric variations in these strains. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that diploid cells are simply double haploids, and diploidy per se does not confer any direct adaptive advantage. The mechanism of the evolution of diploidy as a dominant phase in the life cycle of higher plants and animals remains obscure. PMID:4595645

  10. Production of androgenetic diploid loach by cold-shock of eggs fertilized with diploid sperm.

    PubMed

    Hou, Jilun; Fujimoto, Takafumi; Yamaha, Etsuro; Arai, Katsutoshi

    2013-07-15

    Diploid androgenotes were produced without egg irradiation in the loach, Misgurnus anguillicaudatus. Eggs of wild-type diploid females were fertilized with diploid sperm of a neo-tetraploid male and then cold-shock treated at 3 °C (range, ±0.5 °C) for 30 minutes just after fertilization to eliminate the female nucleus. After hatching, ploidy status of the hatched larvae was analyzed by flow cytometry, which revealed putative diploid androgenotes as well as larvae possessing other ploidies. Five independent microsatellite DNA markers were genotyped to confirm all-male inheritance of the resultant diploid larvae. The mean ± SD yield rate of diploid androgenetic larvae to total eggs used was 12.29 ± 3.25% in the cold-shock group and 22.23 ± 13.42% in the UV-irradiated group (P > 0.05). No diploid androgenetic larvae were detected in the intact control group. To our knowledge, this is the first report demonstrating successful induction of diploid androgenotes without egg irradiation in fish. PMID:23602217

  11. Manufacture of diploid/tetraploid chimeric mice.

    PubMed Central

    Lu, T Y; Markert, C L

    1980-01-01

    Tetraploid mouse embryos were produced by cytochalasin B treatment. These embryos usually die before completion of embryonic development and are abnormal morphologically and physiologically. The tetraploid embryos can be rescued to develop to maturity by aggregating them with normal diploid embryos to produce diploid/tetraploid chimeric mice. The diploid/tetraploid chimeric embryos are frequently abnormal: the larger the proportion of tetraploid cells, the greater the abnormality. By karyotype analysis and by the use of appropriate pigment cell markers, we have demonstrated that two of our surviving chimeras are in fact diploid/tetraploid chimeras. One surviving chimera is retarded in growth and displays neurological abnormalities. The coat color chimerism suggests that this chimera is about 50% tetraploid. Another chimera with about 10% tetraploid pigment cells in the coat is only slightly retarded in growth and is a fertile male. Tetraploid cells are distributed in many, if not all, tissues of embryos but evidently are physiologically inadequate to support completely normal development and function in the absence of substantial numbers of normal diploid cells. Images PMID:6934528

  12. A Stable Hybrid Containing Haploid Genomes of Two Obligate Diploid Candida Species

    PubMed Central

    Chakraborty, Uttara; Mohamed, Aiyaz; Kakade, Pallavi; Mugasimangalam, Raja C.; Sadhale, Parag P.

    2013-01-01

    Candida albicans and Candida dubliniensis are diploid, predominantly asexual human-pathogenic yeasts. In this study, we constructed tetraploid (4n) strains of C. albicans of the same or different lineages by spheroplast fusion. Induction of chromosome loss in the tetraploid C. albicans generated diploid or near-diploid progeny strains but did not produce any haploid progeny. We also constructed stable heterotetraploid somatic hybrid strains (2n + 2n) of C. albicans and C. dubliniensis by spheroplast fusion. Heterodiploid (n + n) progeny hybrids were obtained after inducing chromosome loss in a stable heterotetraploid hybrid. To identify a subset of hybrid heterodiploid progeny strains carrying at least one copy of all chromosomes of both species, unique centromere sequences of various chromosomes of each species were used as markers in PCR analysis. The reduction of chromosome content was confirmed by a comparative genome hybridization (CGH) assay. The hybrid strains were found to be stably propagated. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays with antibodies against centromere-specific histones (C. albicans Cse4/C. dubliniensis Cse4) revealed that the centromere identity of chromosomes of each species is maintained in the hybrid genomes of the heterotetraploid and heterodiploid strains. Thus, our results suggest that the diploid genome content is not obligatory for the survival of either C. albicans or C. dubliniensis. In keeping with the recent discovery of the existence of haploid C. albicans strains, the heterodiploid strains of our study can be excellent tools for further species-specific genome elimination, yielding true haploid progeny of C. albicans or C. dubliniensis in future. PMID:23709179

  13. A loss-of-function mutation in the PAS kinase Rim15p is related to defective quiescence entry and high fermentation rates of Saccharomyces cerevisiae sake yeast strains.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Daisuke; Araki, Yuya; Zhou, Yan; Maeya, Naoki; Akao, Takeshi; Shimoi, Hitoshi

    2012-06-01

    Sake yeast cells have defective entry into the quiescent state, allowing them to sustain high fermentation rates. To reveal the underlying mechanism, we investigated the PAS kinase Rim15p, which orchestrates initiation of the quiescence program in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We found that Rim15p is truncated at the carboxyl terminus in modern sake yeast strains as a result of a frameshift mutation. Introduction of this mutation or deletion of the full-length RIM15 gene in a laboratory strain led to a defective stress response, decreased synthesis of the storage carbohydrates trehalose and glycogen, and impaired G(1) arrest, which together closely resemble the characteristic phenotypes of sake yeast. Notably, expression of a functional RIM15 gene in a modern sake strain suppressed all of these phenotypes, demonstrating that dysfunction of Rim15p prevents sake yeast cells from entering quiescence. Moreover, loss of Rim15p or its downstream targets Igo1p and Igo2p remarkably improved the fermentation rate in a laboratory strain. This finding verified that Rim15p-mediated entry into quiescence plays pivotal roles in the inhibition of ethanol fermentation. Taken together, our results suggest that the loss-of-function mutation in the RIM15 gene may be the key genetic determinant of the increased ethanol production rates in modern sake yeast strains.

  14. On the Genealogy of Asexual Diploids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lam, Fumei; Langley, Charles H.; Song, Yun S.

    Given molecular genetic data from diploid individuals that, at present, reproduce mostly or exclusively asexually without recombination, an important problem in evolutionary biology is detecting evidence of past sexual reproduction (i.e., meiosis and mating) and recombination (both meiotic and mitotic). However, currently there is a lack of computational tools for carrying out such a study. In this paper, we formulate a new problem of reconstructing diploid genealogies under the assumption of no sexual reproduction or recombination, with the ultimate goal being to devise genealogy-based tools for testing deviation from these assumptions. We first consider the infinite-sites model of mutation and develop linear-time algorithms to test the existence of an asexual diploid genealogy compatible with the infinite-sites model of mutation, and to construct one if it exists. Then, we relax the infinite-sites assumption and develop an integer linear programming formulation to reconstruct asexual diploid genealogies with the minimum number of homoplasy (back or recurrent mutation) events. We apply our algorithms on simulated data sets with sizes of biological interest.

  15. Biodiversity study of wine yeasts belonging to the "terroir" of Montepulciano d'Abruzzo "Colline Teramane" revealed Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains exhibiting atypical and unique 5.8S-ITS restriction patterns.

    PubMed

    Tofalo, Rosanna; Perpetuini, Giorgia; Fasoli, Giuseppe; Schirone, Maria; Corsetti, Aldo; Suzzi, Giovanna

    2014-05-01

    The Montepulciano d'Abruzzo "Colline Teramane" premium wine DOCG is produced in the Teramo province (Abruzzo, Italy). This region has a great tradition in winemaking and the wine is produced by a spontaneous fermentation so it could represent a reservoir of wine natural yeasts with important oenological features. The aim of this study was to characterize the yeast community of this wine grape growing region in order to create a Saccharomyces cerevisiae bank, providing data on oenological properties for potential industrial applications. A total of 430 yeasts were isolated at the end of spontaneous fermentation. PCR-RFLP was applied for the identification at the species level and underlined that 14 strains exhibited unusual and characteristic restriction patterns different from those typical of the species S. cerevisiae. This difference was due to the insertion of base C at a position 138 in the ITS1 region that determined an additional cleavage site for the enzyme HaeIII. This insertion could be associated to the fermentative performance and associated to the relationship existing between yeasts and a viticulture region or 'terroir'.

  16. Functional anatomy of haploid and diploid rabbit spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Mortimer, D

    1979-01-01

    Ultrastructural studies of surface replicas of haploid and diploid rabbit spermatozoa after treatment with various chemical media have shown that the various structural components of the diploid sperm head possess the same stabilities and labilities as those of the haploid. Therefore, at least in terms of functional anatomy, diploid rabbit spermatozoa should be capable of penetrating the egg investments and undergoing syngamy. PMID:443919

  17. Intracellular distribution of amino acids in an slp1 vacuole-deficient mutant of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Gent, D P; Slaughter, J C

    1998-05-01

    Amino acid pools were compared in a constructed diploid strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, SKD1, and a closely related strain, SKD2, carrying the slp1 mutation characterized by low pools of lysine and lacking a central vacuole. Cells of SKD2 grew more poorly than SKD1 but took up the same total amount of amino acids from the medium per cell although the profile differed between the two strains. Initially, the total pool was much higher in SKD1 than in SKD2 but the overall relative distribution between cytosol and vacuole was identical and mainly cytosolic even though the composition differed between the two strains. At the end of growth the amino acid concentration had increased and become predominantly vacuolar. Two days later the total pool in SKD1 had declined to the starting level but the intracellular distribution remained identical to that at the end of fermentation. The total concentration of amino acids in SKD2 continued to increase, particularly in the cytosol. PMID:9674128

  18. Under-dominance constrains the evolution of negative autoregulation in diploids.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Alexander J; Seymour, Robert M; Pomiankowski, Andrew; Reuter, Max

    2013-01-01

    Regulatory networks have evolved to allow gene expression to rapidly track changes in the environment as well as to buffer perturbations and maintain cellular homeostasis in the absence of change. Theoretical work and empirical investigation in Escherichia coli have shown that negative autoregulation confers both rapid response times and reduced intrinsic noise, which is reflected in the fact that almost half of Escherichia coli transcription factors are negatively autoregulated. However, negative autoregulation is rare amongst the transcription factors of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. This difference is surprising because E. coli and S. cerevisiae otherwise have similar profiles of network motifs. In this study we investigate regulatory interactions amongst the transcription factors of Drosophila melanogaster and humans, and show that they have a similar dearth of negative autoregulation to that seen in S. cerevisiae. We then present a model demonstrating that this striking difference in the noise reduction strategies used amongst species can be explained by constraints on the evolution of negative autoregulation in diploids. We show that regulatory interactions between pairs of homologous genes within the same cell can lead to under-dominance--mutations which result in stronger autoregulation, and decrease noise in homozygotes, paradoxically can cause increased noise in heterozygotes. This severely limits a diploid's ability to evolve negative autoregulation as a noise reduction mechanism. Our work offers a simple and general explanation for a previously unexplained difference between the regulatory architectures of E. coli and yeast, Drosophila and humans. It also demonstrates that the effects of diploidy in gene networks can have counter-intuitive consequences that may profoundly influence the course of evolution.

  19. Pleiotropic Mutations at the TUP1 Locus That Affect the Expression of Mating-Type-Dependent Functions in SACCHAROMYCES CEREVISIAE.

    PubMed

    Lemontt, J F; Fugit, D R; Mackay, V L

    1980-04-01

    The umr7-1 mutation, previously identified in a set of mutants that had been selected for defective UV-induced mutagenesis at CAN1, affects other cellular functions, including many of those regulated by the mating-type locus (MAT) in heterothallic Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The recessive umr7-1 allele, mapping approximately 20 cM distal to thr4 on chromosome III, causes clumpy growth in both a and alpha cells and has no apparent effect on a mating functions. However, alpha umr7 meiotic segregants fail to express several alpha-specific functions (e.g., high-frequency conjugation with a strains, secretion of the hormone alpha-factor and response to the hormone a-factor). In addition, alpha umr7 cells exhibit some a-specific characteristics, such as the barrier phenotype (Bar(+)) that prevents diffusion of alpha-factor and an increased mating frequency with alpha strains. The most striking property of alpha umr7 strains is their altered morphology, in which mitotic cells develop an asymmetric pear shape, like that of normal a cells induced to form "shmoos" by interaction with alpha-factor. Some a/alpha-specific diploid functions are also affected by umr7; instead of polar budding patterns, a/alpha umr7/umr7 diploids have medial budding like a/a, alpha/alpha and haploid strains. Moreover, a/alpha umr7/umr7 diploids have lost the ability to sporulate and are Bar(+) like a or a/a strains. Revertant studies indicate that umr7-1 is a single point mutation. The umr7 mutant fails to complement mutants of both tup1 (selected for deoxythymidine monophosphate utilization) and cyc9 (selected for high iso-2-cytochrome c levels), and all three isolates have similar genetic and phenotypic properties. It is suggested that the product of this gene plays some common central role in the complex regulation of the expression of both MAT-dependent and MAT-independent functions.

  20. Automated Yeast Transformation Protocol to Engineer S. cerevisiae Strains for Cellulosic Ethanol Production with Open Reading Frames that Express Proteins Binding to Xylose Isomerase Identified using Robotic Two-hybrid Screen

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Commercialization of fuel ethanol production from lignocellulosic biomass has focused on engineering the glucose-fermenting industrial yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae to utilize pentose sugars. Since S. cerevisiae naturally metabolizes xylulose, one approach involves introducing xylose isomerase (XI...

  1. Effect of dilution rate and nutrients addition on the fermentative capability and synthesis of aromatic compounds of two indigenous strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae in continuous cultures fed with Agave tequilana juice.

    PubMed

    Morán-Marroquín, G A; Córdova, J; Valle-Rodríguez, J O; Estarrón-Espinosa, M; Díaz-Montaño, D M

    2011-11-15

    Knowledge of physiological behavior of indigenous tequila yeast used in fermentation process is still limited. Yeasts have significant impact on the productivity fermentation process as well as the sensorial characteristics of the alcoholic beverage. For these reasons a better knowledge of the physiological and metabolic features of these yeasts is required. The effects of dilution rate, nitrogen and phosphorus source addition and micro-aeration on growth, fermentation and synthesis of volatile compounds of two native Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains, cultured in continuous fed with Agave tequilana juice were studied. For S1 and S2 strains, maximal concentrations of biomass, ethanol, consumed sugars, alcohols and esters were obtained at 0.04 h⁻¹. Those concentrations quickly decreased as D increased. For S. cerevisiae S1 cultures (at D=0.08 h⁻¹) supplemented with ammonium phosphate (AP) from 1 to 4 g/L, concentrations of residual sugars decreased from 29.42 to 17.60 g/L and ethanol increased from 29.63 to 40.08 g/L, respectively. The S1 culture supplemented with AP was then micro-aerated from 0 to 0.02 vvm, improving all the kinetics parameters: biomass, ethanol and glycerol concentrations increased from 5.66, 40.08 and 3.11 g/L to 8.04, 45.91 and 4.88 g/L; residual sugars decreased from 17.67 g/L to 4.48 g/L; and rates of productions of biomass and ethanol, and consumption of sugars increased from 0.45, 3.21 and 7.33 g/L·h to 0.64, 3.67 and 8.38 g/L·h, respectively. Concentrations of volatile compounds were also influenced by the micro-aeration rate. Ester and alcohol concentrations were higher, in none aerated and in aerated cultures respectively. PMID:21903290

  2. Frequencies of mutagen-induced coincident mitotic recombination at unlinked loci in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Kathryn M; Hoffmann, George R

    2007-03-01

    Frequencies of coincident genetic events were measured in strain D7 of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. This diploid strain permits the detection of mitotic gene conversion involving the trp5-12 and trp5-27 alleles, mitotic crossing-over and gene conversion leading to the expression of the ade2-40 and ade2-119 alleles as red and pink colonies, and reversion of the ilv1-92 allele. The three genes are on different chromosomes, and one might expect that coincident (simultaneous) genetic alterations at two loci would occur at frequencies predicted by those of the single alterations acting as independent events. Contrary to this expectation, we observed that ade2 recombinants induced by bleomycin, beta-propiolactone, and ultraviolet radiation occur more frequently among trp5 convertants than among total colonies. This excess among trp5 recombinants indicates that double recombinants are more common than expected for independent events. No similar enrichment was found among Ilv(+) revertants. The possibility of an artifact in which haploid yeasts that mimic mitotic recombinants are generated by a low frequency of cryptic meiosis has been excluded. Several hypotheses that can explain the elevated incidence of coincident mitotic recombination have been evaluated, but the cause remains uncertain. Most evidence suggests that the excess is ascribable to a subset of the population being in a recombination-prone state. PMID:17156798

  3. EasyClone-MarkerFree: A vector toolkit for marker-less integration of genes into Saccharomyces cerevisiae via CRISPR-Cas9.

    PubMed

    Jessop-Fabre, Mathew M; Jakočiūnas, Tadas; Stovicek, Vratislav; Dai, Zongjie; Jensen, Michael K; Keasling, Jay D; Borodina, Irina

    2016-08-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae is an established industrial host for production of recombinant proteins, fuels and chemicals. To enable stable integration of multiple marker-free overexpression cassettes in the genome of S. cerevisiae, we have developed a vector toolkit EasyClone-MarkerFree. The integration of linearized expression cassettes into defined genomic loci is facilitated by CRISPR/Cas9. Cas9 is recruited to the chromosomal location by specific guide RNAs (gRNAs) expressed from a set of gRNA helper vectors. Using our genome engineering vector suite, single and triple insertions are obtained with 90-100% and 60-70% targeting efficiency, respectively. We demonstrate application of the vector toolkit by constructing a haploid laboratory strain (CEN.PK113-7D) and a diploid industrial strain (Ethanol Red) for production of 3-hydroxypropionic acid, where we tested three different acetyl-CoA supply strategies, requiring overexpression of three to six genes each. Among the tested strategies was a bacterial cytosolic pyruvate dehydrogenase complex, which was integrated into the genome in a single transformation. The publicly available EasyClone-MarkerFree vector suite allows for facile and highly standardized genome engineering, and should be of particular interest to researchers working on yeast chassis with limited markers available.

  4. Differential Flo8p-dependent regulation of FLO1 and FLO11 for cell-cell and cell-substrate adherence of S. cerevisiae S288c.

    PubMed

    Fichtner, Lars; Schulze, Florian; Braus, Gerhard H

    2007-12-01

    Cell-cell and cell-surface adherence represents initial steps in forming multicellular aggregates or in establishing cell-surface interactions. The commonly used Saccharomyces cerevisiae laboratory strain S288c carries a flo8 mutation, and is only able to express the flocculin-encoding genes FLO1 and FLO11, when FLO8 is restored. We show here that the two flocculin genes exhibit differences in regulation to execute distinct functions under various environmental conditions. In contrast to the laboratory strain Sigma1278b, haploids of the S288c genetic background require FLO1 for cell-cell and cell-substrate adhesion, whereas FLO11 is required for pseudohyphae formation of diploids. In contrast to FLO11, FLO1 repression requires the Sin4p mediator tail component, but is independent of the repressor Sfl1p. FLO1 regulation also differs from FLO11, because it requires neither the KSS1 MAP kinase cascade nor the pathways which lead to the transcription factors Gcn4p or Msn1p. The protein kinase A pathway and the transcription factors Flo8p and Mss11p are the major regulators for FLO1 expression. Therefore, S. cerevisiae is prepared to simultaneously express two genes of its otherwise silenced FLO reservoir resulting in an appropriate cellular surface for different environments. PMID:18001350

  5. Expression, processing and secretion of a proteolytically-sensitive insect diuretic hormone by Saccharomyces cerevisiae requires the use of a yeast strain lacking genes encoding the Yap3 and Mkc7 endoproteases found in the secretory pathway.

    PubMed Central

    Copley, K S; Alm, S M; Schooley, D A; Courchesne, W E

    1998-01-01

    A system is described for the heterologous expression of peptides in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. A synthetic gene encoding a precursor of the 41 amino acid Manduca sexta diuretic hormone (Mas-DH) was expressed at 0.8 mg/l purified peptide. A precursor of a mutant peptide of Mas-DH, Mas-DH[K22Q] was also expressed. The peptides were purified, then treated with peptidylglycine alpha-amidating enzyme to generate the alpha-amidated, mature, form of Mas-DH or Mas-DH[K22Q], which were biologically active. Successful expression of full-length Mas-DH+Gly depended upon the use of a protease-deficient yeast strain. In wild-type strains, Mas-DH+Gly was recovered only as proteolytic fragments, even in the presence of various protease inhibitors. Expression of Mas-DH+Gly in strains deficient in either the Mkc7 or the Yap3 protease reduced proteolysis, while no proteolysis of Mas-DH+Gly was detectable in a strain lacking both proteases. This protease-deficient strain may prove of general utility for expression of peptides. Analysis of recovered proteolytic fragments revealed a complex pattern of cleavage sites. Both the Yap3 and Mkc7 proteases preferred to cleave at a single Glu-Lys downward arrow-Glu-Arg site. Analysis of secondary cleavage sites showed that Yap3 preferred to cleave after either Lys or Arg and Mkc7 after Lys. This paper is the first report on the in vivo activity and specificity of Yap3 and Mkc7 expressed at physiological levels. PMID:9494104

  6. Molecular and genetic analysis of the gene encoding the Saccharomyces cerevisiae strand exchange protein Sep1.

    PubMed

    Tishkoff, D X; Johnson, A W; Kolodner, R D

    1991-05-01

    Vegetatively grown Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells contain an activity that promotes a number of homologous pairing reactions. A major portion of this activity is due to strand exchange protein 1 (Sep1), which was originally purified as a 132,000-Mr species (R. Kolodner, D. H. Evans, and P. T. Morrison, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 84:5560-5564, 1987). The gene encoding Sep1 was cloned, and analysis of the cloned gene revealed a 4,587-bp open reading frame capable of encoding a 175,000-Mr protein. The protein encoded by this open reading frame was overproduced and purified and had a relative molecular weight of approximately 160,000. The 160,000-Mr protein was at least as active in promoting homologous pairing as the original 132,000-Mr species, which has been shown to be a fragment of the intact 160,000-Mr Sep1 protein. The SEP1 gene mapped to chromosome VII within 20 kbp of RAD54. Three Tn10LUK insertion mutations in the SEP1 gene were characterized. sep1 mutants grew more slowly than wild-type cells, showed a two- to fivefold decrease in the rate of spontaneous mitotic recombination between his4 heteroalleles, and were delayed in their ability to return to growth after UV or gamma irradiation. Sporulation of sep1/sep1 diploids was defective, as indicated by both a 10- to 40-fold reduction in spore formation and reduced spore viability of approximately 50%. The majority of sep1/sep1 diploid cells arrested in meiosis after commitment to recombination but prior to the meiosis I cell division. Return-to-growth experiments showed that sep1/sep1 his4X/his4B diploids exhibited a five- to sixfold greater meiotic induction of His+ recombinants than did isogenic SEP1/SEP1 strains. sep1/sep1 mutants also showed an increased frequency of exchange between HIS4, LEU2, and MAT and a lack of positive interference between these markers compared with wild-type controls. The interaction between sep1, rad50, and spo13 mutations suggested that SEP1 acts in meiosis in a pathway that is

  7. The evolution of haploid, diploid and polymorphic haploid-diploid life cycles: the role of meiotic mutation.

    PubMed

    Hall, D W

    2000-10-01

    Here I present a simple population genetic model to investigate the evolution of polymorphic haploid-diploid life cycles. The key feature of the model is the assumption of mutation occurring during meiosis. I show that, in addition to regions favoring haploid or diploid life cycles, there are substantial regions of the parameter space under which polymorphic haploid-diploid life cycles are expected to evolve.

  8. Biodiversity of Saccharomyces cerevisiae populations in Malbec vineyards from the "Zona Alta del Río Mendoza" region in Argentina.

    PubMed

    Mercado, Laura; Sturm, María Elena; Rojo, María Cecilia; Ciklic, Iván; Martínez, Claudio; Combina, Mariana

    2011-12-15

    The "Zona Alta del Río Mendoza" (ZARM) is the major Malbec grape viticulture region of Argentina. The aim of the present study was to explore Saccharomyces cerevisiae biodiversity in ZARM vineyards. Interdelta PCR and RFLP mtDNA molecular markers were applied to differentiate S. cerevisiae strains. The presence of commercial strains on ZARM vineyards was also assessed. Our results reveal a highly diverse, but genetically closely related, S. cerevisiae population (containing more than 190 molecular patterns among 590 S. cerevisiae isolates). According to the S. cerevisiae strain diversity found in vineyards, they were classified as vineyards with high and low polymorphic S. cerevisiae populations. Six vineyards showed a high polymorphic population, with more than 20 different S. cerevisiae molecular patterns. S. cerevisiae populations in these vineyards were diverse and irregularly distributed, with different strains in each vineyard site. Low polymorphic S. cerevisiae population vineyards displayed very low yeast diversity, with only 9 to 10 different S. cerevisiae strains and presence of two commercial strains widely distributed. Population diversity estimators were calculated to determine the population structure of S. cerevisiae in the ZARM vineyards. The obtained values support the hypothesis that the eight sampled subpopulations come indeed from a larger population.

  9. Characterization of global yeast quantitative proteome data generated from the wild-type and glucose repression Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains: the comparison of two quantitative methods

    PubMed Central

    Usaite, Renata; Wohlschlegel, James; Venable, John D.; Park, Sung K.; Nielsen, Jens; Olsson, Lisbeth; Yates, John R.

    2008-01-01

    The quantitative proteomic analysis of complex protein mixtures is emerging as a technically challenging but viable systems-level approach for studying cellular function. This study presents a large-scale comparative analysis of protein abundances from yeast protein lysates derived from both wild-type yeast and yeast strains lacking key components of the Snf1 kinase complex. Four different strains were grown under well-controlled chemostat conditions. Multidimensional protein identification technology followed by quantitation using either spectral counting or stable isotope labeling approaches was used to identify relative changes in the protein expression levels between the strains. A total of 2388 proteins were relatively quantified and more than 350 proteins were found to have significantly different expression levels between the two strains of comparison when using the stable isotope labeling strategy. The stable isotope labeling based quantitative approach was found to be highly reproducible among biological replicates when complex protein mixtures containing small expression changes were analyzed. Where poor correlation between stable isotope labeling and spectral counting was found, the major reason behind the discrepancy was the lack of reproducible sampling for proteins with low spectral counts. The functional categorization of the relative protein expression differences that occur in Snf1-deficient strains uncovers a wide range of biological processes regulated by this important cellular kinase. PMID:18173223

  10. Application of the reuseable, KanMX selectable marker to industrial yeast: construction and evaluation of heterothallic wine strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, possessing minimal foreign DNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Walker, Michelle E; Gardner, Jennie M; Vystavelova, Andrea; McBryde, Colin; de Barros Lopes, Miguel; Jiranek, Vladimir

    2003-12-01

    The characterisation of wine yeasts and the complex metabolic processes influencing wine fermentation and the quality of wine might best be achieved by exploiting the standard classical and recombinant genetic techniques which have been successfully used with laboratory strains. However, application of these techniques to industrial strains has been restricted because such strains are typically prototrophic and often polyploid. To overcome this problem, we have identified commercial wine strains with good mating and sporulation properties from which heterothallic derivatives were constructed by disruption of the HO gene. Consequently, these haploids are amenable to genetic analysis, whilst retaining desirable wine-making properties. The approach used was an adaptation of a previously published gene disruption procedure for laboratory yeast and is based on the acquisition of geneticin resistance from a removable KanMX marker. The present work is the first report of the application of a construct of this type to the disruption of the HO gene in wine yeasts that are in common commercial use. Most of the 4.9-kb disruption construct was successfully removed from the genome of the haploid derivative strains by loop-out of the KanMX marker through meiotic recombination. Sequencing of the HO region confirmed the reduction of foreign sequences to a 582-bp fragment comprised largely of a single direct repeat at the target gene. The removal of the active foreign gene (conferring antibiotic resistance) allows the application of other constructs based on the KanMX module without the need to resort to other selectable marker systems. Laboratory-scale fermentation trials typically showed minimal differences between the HO disruptants and the parental wine strains in terms of fermentation kinetics and formation of key metabolites.

  11. [Tolerance of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to monoterpenes--a review].

    PubMed

    Liu, Jidong; Zhou, Jingwen; Chen, Jian

    2013-06-01

    Tolerance of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to monoterpenes is important in both metabolic engineering of the yeast to produce these chemicals de novo and efficient use of biomass containing these chemicals. Understanding the mechanisms in the tolerance of S. cerevisiae to monoterpenes could facilitate the construction of yeast strains with enhanced monoterpenes resistance, and therefore improve related bioprocesses. Monoterpenes could disturb the redox balance in S. cerevisiae, therefore increase the accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and result in cell death. S. cerevisiae has to systematically improve its antioxidative ability to deal with the ROS induced damage. The current review summarized the recent developments in demonstration of the tolerance of S. cerevisiae to different typical monoterpenes mainly from the aspect of the antioxidative mechanisms. Based on the analysis of the previous works, further attempts to demonstrate the mechanisms were proposed. PMID:24028054

  12. Comparison of process configurations for ethanol production from acid- and alkali-pretreated corncob by Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains with and without β-glucosidase expression.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guoqiang; Liu, Cheng; Hong, Jiefang; Ma, Yuanyuan; Zhang, Kun; Huang, Xinyu; Zou, Shaolan; Zhang, Minhua

    2013-08-01

    β-Glucosidase was shown to have synergistic effects with commercial cellulase in the hydrolysis of acid- and alkali-pretreated corncob, especially at the dose of 5 U/g biomass and 5 or 10 FPU/g biomass. An integrating yeast strain 45# expressing β-glucosidase was constructed that utilized cellobiose quickly and efficiently. Process configurations were compared under conditions of 10% solid content, 10 FPU cellulase/g biomass, 5 U β-glucosidase/g biomass (only used for parental strain W303-1A), 1g/kg yeast loading and 3.3g/kg urea supplementation. While separate hydrolysis and fermentation was optimal for W303-1A and the ethanol titer and yield reached 3.22 g/100g and 75.6% (expressed as a percentage of the theoretical yield), respectively, simultaneous saccharification and fermentation was optimal for strain 45# and the ethanol titer and yield reached 3.31 g/100g and 77.7%, respectively. These results are valuable in optimization of the process configuration and improving the yeast strain selected for cellulosic ethanol production.

  13. GMAX Yeast Background Strain Made from Industrial Tolerant Saccharomyces Cerevisiae Engineered to Convert Pretreated Lignocellulosic Starch and Cellulosic Sugars Universally to Ethanol Anaerobically

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tailored GMAX yeast background strain technology for universal ethanol production industrially: Production of the stable baseline glucose, mannose, arabinose, xylose-utilizing (GMAX) yeast will be evaluated by taking the genes identified in high-throughput screening for a plasmid-based yeast to util...

  14. GMAX Yeast Background Strain Made from Industrial Tolerant Saccharomyces cerevisiae Engineered to Convert Sucrose, Starch and Cellulosic Sugars Universally to Ethanol Anaerobically with Concurrent Coproduct Expression

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Tailored GMAX yeast background strain technology for universal ethanol production industrially. Production of the stable baseline glucose, mannose, arabinose, xylose-utilizing (GMAX) yeast will be evaluated by taking the genes identified in high-throughput screening for a plasmid-based yeast to uti...

  15. Construction of lactose-consuming Saccharomyces cerevisiae for lactose fermentation into ethanol fuel.

    PubMed

    Zou, Jing; Guo, Xuewu; Shen, Tong; Dong, Jian; Zhang, Cuiying; Xiao, Dongguang

    2013-04-01

    Two lactose-consuming diploid Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains, AY-51024A and AY-51024M, were constructed by expressing the LAC4 and LAC12 genes of Kluyveromyces marxianus in the host strain AY-5. In AY-51024A, both genes were targeted to the ATH1 and NTH1 gene-encoding regions to abolish the activity of acid/neutral trehalase. In AY-51024M, both genes were respectively integrated into the MIG1 and NTH1 gene-encoding regions to relieve glucose repression. Physiologic studies of the two transformants under anaerobic cultivations in glucose and galactose media indicated that the expression of both LAC genes did not physiologically burden the cells, except for AY-51024A in glucose medium. Galactose consumption was initiated at higher glucose concentrations in the MIG1 deletion strain AY-51024M than in the corresponding wild-type strain and AY-51024A, wherein galactose was consumed until glucose was completely depleted in the mixture. In lactose medium, the Sp. growth rates of AY-51024A and AY-51024M under anaerobic shake-flasks were 0.025 and 0.067 h(-1), respectively. The specific lactose uptake rate and ethanol production of AY-51024M were 2.50 g lactose g CDW(-1) h(-1) and 23.4 g l(-1), respectively, whereas those of AY-51024A were 0.98 g lactose g CDW(-1) h(-1) and 24.3 g lactose g CDW(-1) h(-1), respectively. In concentrated cheese whey powder solutions, AY-51024M produced 63.3 g l(-1) ethanol from approximately 150 g l(-1) initial lactose in 120 h, conversely, AY-51024A consumed 63.7 % of the initial lactose and produced 35.9 g l(-1) ethanol. Therefore, relieving glucose repression is an effective strategy for constructing lactose-consuming S. cerevisiae.

  16. Comparison of aroma-active compounds and sensory characteristics of durian (Durio zibethinus L.) wines using strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae with odor activity values and partial least-squares regression.

    PubMed

    Zhu, JianCai; Chen, Feng; Wang, LingYing; Niu, YunWei; Shu, Chang; Chen, HeXing; Xiao, ZuoBing

    2015-02-25

    The study evaluated the effects of five different strains (GRE, RC212, Lalvin D254, CGMCC2.4, and CGMCC2.23) of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae on the aromatic characteristics of fermented durian musts. In this work, 38 and 43 compounds in durian juices and wines were analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and GC-pulsed flame photometric detection (GC-PFPD) with the aid of stir bar sorptive extraction (SBSE), respectively. According to the measured odor activity values (OAV), only 11 and 15 aroma compounds had OAVs >1 in durian juices or wines, among which 2,3-butanedione, 3-methylbutanol, dimethyl sulfide, dimethyl disulfide, methyl ethyl disulfide, ethyl 2-methylbutanoate, ethyl butanoate, and ethyl octanoate were major contributors to the aroma of juices and wines. Partial least-squares regression (PLSR) was used to detect positive correlations between sensory analysis and aroma compounds. The results showed that the attributes were closely related to aroma compounds.

  17. Comparison of aroma-active compounds and sensory characteristics of durian (Durio zibethinus L.) wines using strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae with odor activity values and partial least-squares regression.

    PubMed

    Zhu, JianCai; Chen, Feng; Wang, LingYing; Niu, YunWei; Shu, Chang; Chen, HeXing; Xiao, ZuoBing

    2015-02-25

    The study evaluated the effects of five different strains (GRE, RC212, Lalvin D254, CGMCC2.4, and CGMCC2.23) of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae on the aromatic characteristics of fermented durian musts. In this work, 38 and 43 compounds in durian juices and wines were analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and GC-pulsed flame photometric detection (GC-PFPD) with the aid of stir bar sorptive extraction (SBSE), respectively. According to the measured odor activity values (OAV), only 11 and 15 aroma compounds had OAVs >1 in durian juices or wines, among which 2,3-butanedione, 3-methylbutanol, dimethyl sulfide, dimethyl disulfide, methyl ethyl disulfide, ethyl 2-methylbutanoate, ethyl butanoate, and ethyl octanoate were major contributors to the aroma of juices and wines. Partial least-squares regression (PLSR) was used to detect positive correlations between sensory analysis and aroma compounds. The results showed that the attributes were closely related to aroma compounds. PMID:25620380

  18. Production of androgenetic diploid rainbow trout.

    PubMed

    Parsons, J E; Thorgaard, G H

    1985-01-01

    Haploid androgenesis was induced in rainbow trout (Salmo gairdneri) when eggs were irradiated with 60Co gamma radiation prior to fertilization. Diploidy was restored to the androgenetic haploid zygotes by suppression of first cleavage division using hydrostatic pressure. Peak survival in the androgenetic diploid lots (32.5-38.9 percent of control) occurred when a pressure shock of 9000 pounds per square inch lasting from one to three minutes was applied to the eggs 345 minutes post-fertilization. Chromosomal analysis confirmed diploidy in the androgenetic individuals and suggested that YY rainbow trout are viable to at least the "eyed stage" of development. Inheritance patterns at two loci confirmed all-paternal inheritance. The relatively high yields of completely homozygous androgenetic rainbow trout and the potential for the use of androgenesis in the production of inbred lines and in genetic studies indicate that androgenesis may become a valuable tool in fish research and breeding.

  19. Response to acetaldehyde stress in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae involves a strain-dependent regulation of several ALD genes and is mediated by the general stress response pathway.

    PubMed

    Aranda, Agustín; del Olmo Ml, Marcel lí

    2003-06-01

    One of the stress conditions that yeast may encounter is the presence of acetaldehyde. In a previous study we identified that, in response to this stress, several HSP genes are induced that are also involved in the response to other forms of stress. Aldehyde dehydrogenases (ALDH) play an important role in yeast acetaldehyde metabolism (e.g. when cells are growing in ethanol). In this work we analyse the expression of the genes encoding these enzymes (ALD) and also the corresponding enzymatic activities under several growth conditions. We investigate three kinds of yeast strains: laboratory strains, strains involved in the alcoholic fermentation stage of wine production and flor yeasts (responsible for the biological ageing of sherry wines). The latter are very important to consider because they grow in media containing high ethanol concentrations, and produce important amounts of acetaldehyde. Under several growth conditions, further addition of acetaldehyde or ethanol in flor yeasts induced the expression of some ALD genes and led to an increase in ALDH activity. This result is consistent with their need to obtain energy from ethanol during biological ageing processes. Our data also suggest that post-transcriptional and/or post-translational mechanisms are involved in regulating the activity of these enzymes. Finally, analyses indicate that the Msn2/4p and Hsf1p transcription factors are necessary for HSP26, ALD2/3 and ALD4 gene expression under acetaldehyde stress, while PKA represses the expression of these genes.

  20. Intracellular Population Genetics: Evidence for Random Drift of Mitochondrial Allele Frequencies in SACCHAROMYCES CEREVISIAE and SCHIZOSACCHAROMYCES POMBE

    PubMed Central

    Thrailkill, Kathryn M.; Birky, C. William; Lückemann, Gudrun; Wolf, Klaus

    1980-01-01

    We report evidence for random drift of mitochondrial allele frequencies in zygote clones of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Monofactorial and bifactorial crosses were done, using strains resistant or sensitive to erythromycin (alleles ER, ES), oligomycin (OR, OS), or diuron (DR, DS). The frequencies of resistant and sensitive cells (and thus the frequencies of the resistant and sensitive alleles) were determined for each of a number of clones of diploid cells arising from individual zygotes. Allele frequencies were extremely variable among these zygote clones; some clones were "uniparental," with mitochondrial alleles from only one parent present. These observations suggest random drift of the allele frequencies in the population of mitochondrial genes within an individual zygote and its diploid progeny. Drift would cease when all the cells in a clone become homoplasmic, due to segregation of the mitochondrial genomes during vegetative cell divisions. To test this, we delayed cell division (and hence segregation) for varying times by starving zygotes in order to give drift more time to operate. As predicted, delaying cell division resulted in an increase in the variance of allele frequencies among the zygote clones and an increase in the proportion of uniparental zygote clones. The changes in form of the allele frequency distributions resembled those seen during random drift in finite Mendelian populations. In bifactorial crosses, genotypes as well as individual alleles were fixed or lost in some zygote clones. However, the mean recombination frequency for a large number of clones did not increase when cell division was delayed. Several possible molecular mechanisms for intracellular random drift are discussed. PMID:7009322

  1. Evolution of haploid selection in predominantly diploid organisms

    PubMed Central

    Otto, Sarah P.; Scott, Michael F.; Immler, Simone

    2015-01-01

    Diploid organisms manipulate the extent to which their haploid gametes experience selection. Animals typically produce sperm with a diploid complement of most proteins and RNA, limiting selection on the haploid genotype. Plants, however, exhibit extensive expression in pollen, with actively transcribed haploid genomes. Here we analyze models that track the evolution of genes that modify the strength of haploid selection to predict when evolution intensifies and when it dampens the “selective arena” within which male gametes compete for fertilization. Considering deleterious mutations, evolution leads diploid mothers to strengthen selection among haploid sperm/pollen, because this reduces the mutation load inherited by their diploid offspring. If, however, selection acts in opposite directions in haploids and diploids (“ploidally antagonistic selection”), mothers evolve to reduce haploid selection to avoid selectively amplifying alleles harmful to their offspring. Consequently, with maternal control, selection in the haploid phase either is maximized or reaches an intermediate state, depending on the deleterious mutation rate relative to the extent of ploidally antagonistic selection. By contrast, evolution generally leads diploid fathers to mask mutations in their gametes to the maximum extent possible, whenever masking (e.g., through transcript sharing) increases the average fitness of a father’s gametes. We discuss the implications of this maternal–paternal conflict over the extent of haploid selection and describe empirical studies needed to refine our understanding of haploid selection among seemingly diploid organisms. PMID:26669442

  2. Deletion of BCY1 from the Saccharomyces cerevisiae genome is semidominant and induces autolytic phenotypes suitable for improvement of sparkling wines.

    PubMed

    Tabera, Laura; Muñoz, Rosario; Gonzalez, Ramon

    2006-04-01

    Autolysis of Saccharomyces cerevisiae is the main source of molecules that contribute to the quality of sparkling wines made by the traditional method. In this work the possibility of accelerating this slow process in order to improve the quality of sparkling wines by using genetically engineered wine yeast strains was explored. The effect of partial or total deletion of BCY1 (which encodes a regulatory subunit of cAMP-dependent protein kinase A) in haploid and diploid (heterozygous and homozygous) yeast strains was studied. We proved that heterozygous strains having partial or complete BCY1 deletions have a semidominant phenotype for several of the properties studied, including autolysis under simulated second-fermentation conditions, in contrast to previously published reports describing mutations in BCY1 as recessive. Considering the degree of autolysis, ethanol tolerance, and technical feasibility, we propose that deletion of the 3' end of the open reading frame of a single copy of BCY1 is a way to improve the quality of sparkling wines.

  3. Tetraploid Artemisia annua hairy roots produce more artemisinin than diploids.

    PubMed

    De Jesus-Gonzalez, L; Weathers, P J

    2003-04-01

    Hairy root cultures of diploid Artemisia annua L. (clone YUT16) grow rapidly and produce the antimalarial sesquiterpene artemisinin. Little is known about how polyploidy affects the growth of transformed hairy roots and the production of secondary metabolites. Using colchicine, we produced four stable tetraploid clones of A. annua L. from the YUT16 hairy root clone. Analysis showed major differences in growth and artemisinin production compared to the diploid clone. Tetraploid clones produced up to six times more artemisinin than the diploid parent. This study provides an initial step in increasing our understanding of the role of polyploidy in secondary metabolite production, especially in hairy roots. PMID:12789527

  4. Lycotoxin-1 insecticidal peptide optimized by amino acid scanning mutagenesis and expressed as a coproduct in an ethanologenic Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Stephen R; Dowd, Patrick F; Hector, Ronald E; Panavas, Tadas; Sterner, David E; Qureshi, Nasib; Bischoff, Kenneth M; Bang, Sookie S; Mertens, Jeffrey A; Johnson, Eric T; Li, Xin-Liang; Jackson, John S; Caughey, Robert J; Riedmuller, Steven B; Bartolett, Scott; Liu, Siqing; Rich, Joseph O; Farrelly, Philip J; Butt, Tauseef R; Labaer, Joshua; Cotta, Michael A

    2008-09-01

    New methods of safe biological pest control are required as a result of evolution of insect resistance to current biopesticides. Yeast strains being developed for conversion of cellulosic biomass to ethanol are potential host systems for expression of commercially valuable peptides, such as bioinsecticides, to increase the cost-effectiveness of the process. Spider venom is one of many potential sources of novel insect-specific peptide toxins. Libraries of mutants of the small amphipathic peptide lycotoxin-1 from the wolf spider were produced in high throughput using an automated integrated plasmid-based functional proteomic platform and screened for ability to kill fall armyworms, a significant cause of damage to corn (maize) and other crops in the United States. Using amino acid scanning mutagenesis (AASM) we generated a library of mutagenized lycotoxin-1 open reading frames (ORF) in a novel small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) yeast expression system. The SUMO technology enhanced expression and improved generation of active lycotoxins. The mutants were engineered to be expressed at high level inside the yeast and ingested by the insect before being cleaved to the active form (so-called Trojan horse strategy). These yeast strains expressing mutant toxin ORFs were also carrying the xylose isomerase (XI) gene and were capable of aerobic growth on xylose. Yeast cultures expressing the peptide toxins were prepared and fed to armyworm larvae to identify the mutant toxins with greatest lethality. The most lethal mutations appeared to increase the ability of the toxin alpha-helix to interact with insect cell membranes or to increase its pore-forming ability, leading to cell lysis. The toxin peptides have potential as value-added coproducts to increase the cost-effectiveness of fuel ethanol bioproduction.

  5. Potent L-lactic acid assimilation of the fermentative and heterothallic haploid yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae NAM34-4C.

    PubMed

    Tomitaka, Masataka; Taguchi, Hisataka; Matsuoka, Masayoshi; Morimura, Shigeru; Kida, Kenji; Akamatsu, Takashi

    2014-01-01

    We screened an industrial thermotolerant Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain, KF7, as a potent lactic-acid-assimilating yeast. Heterothallic haploid strains KF7-5C and KF7-4B were obtained from the tetrads of the homothallic yeast strain KF7. The inefficient sporulation and poor spore viability of the haploid strains were improved by two strategies. The first strategy was as follows: (i) the KF7-5C was crossed with the laboratory strain SH6710; (ii) the progenies were backcrossed with KF7-5C three times; and (iii) the progenies were inbred three times to maintain a genetic background close to that of KF7. The NAM12 diploid between the cross of the resultant two strains, NAM11-9C and NAM11-13A, showed efficient sporulation and exhibited excellent growth in YPD medium (pH 3.5) at 35°C with 1.4-h generation time, indicating thermotolerance and acid tolerance. The second strategy was successive intrastrain crosses. The resultant two strains, KFG4-6B and KFG4-4B, showed excellent mating capacity. A spontaneous mutant of KFG4-6B, KFG4-6BD, showed a high growth rate with a generation time of 1.1 h in YPD medium (pH 3.0) at 35°C. The KFG4-6BD strain produced ascospores, which were crossed with NAM11-2C and its progeny to produce tetrads. These tetrads were crossed with KFG4-4B to produce NAM26-14A and NAM26-15A. The latter strain had a generation time of 1.6 h at 35°C in pH 2.5, thus exhibiting further thermotolerance and acid tolerance. A progeny from a cross of NAM26-14A and NAM26-15A yielded the strain NAM34-4C, which showed potent lactic acid assimilation and high transformation efficiency, better than those of a standard laboratory strain.

  6. Quantifying the mutational meltdown in diploid populations.

    PubMed

    Coron, Camille; Méléard, Sylvie; Porcher, Emmanuelle; Robert, Alexandre

    2013-05-01

    Mutational meltdown, in which demographic and genetic processes mutually reinforce one another to accelerate the extinction of small populations, has been poorly quantified despite its potential importance in conservation biology. Here we present a model-based framework to study and quantify the mutational meltdown in a finite diploid population that is evolving continuously in time and subject to resource competition. We model slightly deleterious mutations affecting the population demographic parameters and study how the rate of mutation fixation increases as the genetic load increases, a process that we investigate at two timescales: an ecological scale and a mutational scale. Unlike most previous studies, we treat population size as a random process in continuous time. We show that as deleterious mutations accumulate, the decrease in mean population size accelerates with time relative to a null model with a constant mean fixation time. We quantify this mutational meltdown via the change in the mean fixation time after each new mutation fixation, and we show that the meltdown appears less severe than predicted by earlier theoretical work. We also emphasize that mean population size alone can be a misleading index of the risk of population extinction, which could be better evaluated with additional information on demographic parameters.

  7. Carboxypeptidase S- and carboxypeptidase Y-deficient mutants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Wolf, D H; Ehmann, C

    1981-08-01

    A new carboxypeptidase (carboxypeptidase S) was found in a Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain lacking carboxypeptidase Y (D. H. Wolf and U. Weiser, Eur. J. Biochem. 73:553-556, 1977). Mutants devoid of carboxypeptidase S activity were isolated from a mutant strain that was also deficient in carboxypeptidase Y. Four mutants were analyzed in detail and fell into one complementation group. The defect segregated 2:2 in meiotic tetrads. Gene dosage experiments indicated that the mutation might reside in the structural gene of carboxypeptidase S. The absence of both enzymes, carboxypeptidases Y and S, did not affect mitotic growth. Ascopore formation was only slightly affected by the absence of both carboxypeptidases. Protein degradation under conditions of nutrient deprivation and under sporulation conditions showed no obvious alteration in the absence of carboxypeptidases Y and S. When a proteinase B mutation, which led to the absence of proteinase B activity and resulted in the partial reduction of sporulation, was introduced into a mutant lacking both carboxypeptidases, the ability of diploid cells to sporulate was nearly completely lost. Mutants lacking both carboxypeptidases were unable to grow on the dipeptide benzyloxycarbonylglycyl-l-leucine as a sole nitrogen source, which indicates an additional function for carboxypeptidases Y and S in supplying nutrients from exogenous peptides. Catabolite inactivation of fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase, cytoplasmic malate dehydrogenase, and phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase and inactivation of nicotin-amide adenine dinucleotide phosphate-dependent, glutamate dehydrogenase, events which have been proposed to involve proteolysis in vivo, were not dependent on the presence of carboxypeptidase Y and S. In a mutant lacking both carboxypeptidases, four new proteolytic enzymes with carboxypeptidase activity were detected. PMID:7021530

  8. Selection at the Haploid and Diploid Phases: Cyclical Variation

    PubMed Central

    Ewing, Evelyn P.

    1977-01-01

    This paper considers a deterministic model, where selection acts at both the diploid and haploid phases of development. The stability criteria for the maintenance of a protected polymorphism are derived. The implications of the model are examined through several examples, with emphasis on the comparison of these conditions to those of models that view selection as acting only at the diploid or haploid phases. It is found that the consideration of both phases broadens the conditions over such models. PMID:17248758

  9. Niche differentiation between diploid and hexaploid Aster amellus.

    PubMed

    Raabová, Jana; Fischer, Markus; Münzbergová, Zuzana

    2008-12-01

    The maintenance of separated diploid and polyploid populations within a contact zone is possible due to both prezygotic and postzygotic isolation mechanisms. Niche differentiation between two cytotypes may be an important prezygotic isolating mechanism and can be studied using reciprocal transplant experiments. We investigated niche differentiation between diploid and hexaploid Aster amellus in their contact zone in the Czech Republic. Diploid populations are confined to habitats with low productivity, whereas hexaploid populations occur in habitats with both low and high productivity. Thus, we chose three diploid populations and six hexaploid populations, three in each of the two different habitat types. We analyzed habitat characteristics and carried out reciprocal transplant experiments in the field using both seeds and adult plants. Sites of diploid and hexaploid populations differed significantly in vegetation and soil properties. The mean number of juveniles was higher at sites of home ploidy level than at sites of foreign ploidy level, suggesting niche differentiation between the two cytotypes. On the other hand, transplanted adult plants survived at all sites and juvenile plants were able to establish at some sites of the foreign cytotype. Furthermore, the mean number of juveniles, survival, and flowering percentages were higher at home sites than at foreign sites, indicating local adaptation. We conclude that niche differentiation between the two cytotypes and local adaptation within each cytotype may contribute to the maintenance of diploid and hexaploid populations of A. amellus in their contact zone. Moreover, further factors, such as differences in flowering phenology and exclusion of minority cytotypes, should also be considered.

  10. a-Factor from Saccharomyces cerevisiae: partial characterization of a mating hormone produced by cells of mating type a.

    PubMed Central

    Betz, R; MacKay, V L; Duntze, W

    1977-01-01

    Conjugation between haploid cells of Saccharomyces cerevisiae is mediated through the action of diffusible mating hormones, two of which have been designated as a-factor and alpha-factor. Partially purified fractions exhibiting a-factor activity have been obtained from culture filtrates of a cells by ultrafiltration, ion-exchange chromatography, and gel filtration. The a-factor preparations specifically caused both G1 arrest and morphological alterations in cells of alpha-mating type, whereas a cells, a/alpha diploids, and nonmating alpha mutants were not affected. The a-factor activity was found in the culture filtrates of all a strains tested, but not in filtrates of alpha or a/alpha cell cultures. The hormone is sensitive to various proteases, showing that it is associated with a peptide or protein. Gel filtration studies suggest an apparent molecular weight greater than 600,000; however, this result may be due to aggregation with carbohydrate present in the preparations. Although the biological activities of a-factor are analogous to those described previously for alpha-factor, the chemical properties of these two hormones appear to be quite different. Images PMID:334743

  11. Regulated expression of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae DNA repair gene RAD7 in response to DNA damage and during sporulation.

    PubMed Central

    Jones, J S; Prakash, L; Prakash, S

    1990-01-01

    The RAD7 gene of Saccharomyces cerevisiae affects the proficiency of excision repair of DNA damaged by UV light. Here, we report our studies on the regulation of the RAD7 gene in response to UV irradiation and during sporulation. RAD7 transcript levels increased 6-fold within 40 min of exposure of cells to 37 J/m2 of UV light. Higher UV doses also elicited rapid increases in the level of RAD7 mRNA. RAD7 mRNA levels increased in sporulating MATa/MAT alpha diploid cells, but not in the asporogenous MATa/MATa strain exposed to sporulation conditions. The increase in RAD7 mRNA level in MATa/MAT alpha cells was 15-fold after 6 h and 9-fold after 7 h in sporulation medium; thereafter, RAD7 mRNA levels declined. Periodic transcription of RAD7 during sporulation suggests a role for RAD7 in this process. Images PMID:2192359

  12. Isolation of diploid baker's yeast capable of strongly activating immune cells and analyses of the cell wall structure.

    PubMed

    Takada, Yuki; Mizobuchi, Ayano; Kato, Takayuki; Kasahara, Emiko; Ito, Chinatsu; Watanabe, Hajime; Kanzaki, Ken; Kitagawa, Seiichi; Tachibana, Taro; Azuma, Masayuki

    2014-01-01

    Diploid baker's yeast capable of strongly activating a mouse macrophage was constructed based on haploid mutant AQ-37 obtained previously. The obtained strain BQ-55 activated also human immune cells. To clarify a factor for the activation, the cell wall structure, especially the β-glucan structure, was analyzed, suggesting that the length of branching, β-1,6-glucan, may be one of the factors.

  13. Ancestries of a recombining diploid population.

    PubMed

    Sainudiin, R; Thatte, B; Véber, A

    2016-01-01

    We derive the exact one-step transition probabilities of the number of lineages that are ancestral to a random sample from the current generation of a bi-parental population that is evolving under the discrete Wright-Fisher model with n diploid individuals. Our model allows for a per-generation recombination probability of r . When r = 1, our model is equivalent to Chang's (Adv Appl Probab 31:1002-1038, 1999) model for the karyotic pedigree. When r = 0, our model is equivalent to Kingman's (Stoch Process Appl 13:235-248, 1982) discrete coalescent model for the cytoplasmic tree or sub-karyotic tree containing a DNA locus that is free of intra-locus recombination. When 0 < r < 1 our model can be thought to track a sub-karyotic ancestral graph containing a DNA sequence from an autosomal chromosome that has an intra-locus recombination probability r . Thus, our family of models indexed by r ∈ [0, 1] connects Kingman's discrete coalescent to Chang's pedigree in a continuous way as r goes from 0 to 1. For large populations, we also study three properties of the ancestral process corresponding to a given r ∈ (0, 1): the time Tn to a most recent common ancestor (MRCA) of the population, the time Un at which all individuals are either common ancestors of all present day individuals or ancestral to none of them, and the fraction of individuals that are common ancestors at time Un. These results generalize the three main results of Chang's (Adv Appl Probab 31:1002-1038, 1999). When we appropriately rescale time and recombination probability by the population size, our model leads to the continuous time Markov chain called the ancestral recombination graph of Hudson (Theor Popul Biol 23:183-201, 1983) and Griffiths (The two-locus ancestral graph, Institute of Mathematical Statistics 100-117, 1991). PMID:25925241

  14. Interactions between Torulaspora delbrueckii and Saccharomyces cerevisiae in wine fermentation: influence of inoculation and nitrogen content.

    PubMed

    Taillandier, Patricia; Lai, Quoc Phong; Julien-Ortiz, Anne; Brandam, Cédric

    2014-07-01

    Alcoholic fermentation by an oenological strain of Torulaspora delbrueckii in association with an oenological strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae was studied in mixed and sequential cultures. Experiments were performed in a synthetic grape must medium in a membrane bioreactor, a special tool designed to study indirect interactions between microorganisms. Results showed that the S. cerevisiae strain had a negative impact on the T. delbrueckii strain, leading to a viability decrease as soon as S. cerevisiae was inoculated. Even for high inoculation of T. delbrueckii (more than 20× S. cerevisiae) in mixed cultures, T. delbrueckii growth was inhibited. Substrate competition and cell-to-cell contact mechanism could be eliminated as explanations of the observed interaction, which was probably an inhibition by a metabolite produced by S. cerevisiae. S. cerevisiae should be inoculated 48 h after T. delbrueckii in order to ensure the growth of T. delbrueckii and consequently a decrease of volatile acidity and a higher isoamyl acetate production. In this case, in a medium with a high concentration of assimilable nitrogen (324 mg L(-1)), S. cerevisiae growth was not affected by T. delbrueckii. But in a sequential fermentation in a medium containing 176 mg L(-1) initial assimilable nitrogen, S. cerevisiae was not able to develop because of nitrogen exhaustion by T. delbrueckii growth during the first 48 h, leading to sluggish fermentation. PMID:24500666

  15. Creation of a synthetic xylose-inducible promoter for Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae is currently used to produce ethanol from glucose, but it cannot utilize five-carbon sugars contained in the hemicellulose component of biomass feedstocks. S. cerevisiae strains engineered for xylose fermentation have been made using constitutive promoters to express the req...

  16. 2μ plasmid in Saccharomyces species and in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Strope, Pooja K; Kozmin, Stanislav G; Skelly, Daniel A; Magwene, Paul M; Dietrich, Fred S; McCusker, John H

    2015-12-01

    We determined that extrachromosomal 2μ plasmid was present in 67 of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae 100-genome strains; in addition to variation in the size and copy number of 2μ, we identified three distinct classes of 2μ. We identified 2μ presence/absence and class associations with populations, clinical origin and nuclear genotypes. We also screened genome sequences of S. paradoxus, S. kudriavzevii, S. uvarum, S. eubayanus, S. mikatae, S. arboricolus and S. bayanus strains for both integrated and extrachromosomal 2μ. Similar to S. cerevisiae, we found no integrated 2μ sequences in any S. paradoxus strains. However, we identified part of 2μ integrated into the genomes of some S. uvarum, S. kudriavzevii, S. mikatae and S. bayanus strains, which were distinct from each other and from all extrachromosomal 2μ. We identified extrachromosomal 2μ in one S. paradoxus, one S. eubayanus, two S. bayanus and 13 S. uvarum strains. The extrachromosomal 2μ in S. paradoxus, S. eubayanus and S. cerevisiae were distinct from each other. In contrast, the extrachromosomal 2μ in S. bayanus and S. uvarum strains were identical with each other and with one of the three classes of S. cerevisiae 2μ, consistent with interspecific transfer.

  17. Evolutionary engineering of Saccharomyces cerevisiae for efficient aerobic xylose consumption.

    PubMed

    Scalcinati, Gionata; Otero, José Manuel; Van Vleet, Jennifer R H; Jeffries, Thomas W; Olsson, Lisbeth; Nielsen, Jens

    2012-08-01

    Industrial biotechnology aims to develop robust microbial cell factories, such as Saccharomyces cerevisiae, to produce an array of added value chemicals presently dominated by petrochemical processes. Xylose is the second most abundant monosaccharide after glucose and the most prevalent pentose sugar found in lignocelluloses. Significant research efforts have focused on the metabolic engineering of S. cerevisiae for fast and efficient xylose utilization. This study aims to metabolically engineer S. cerevisiae, such that it can consume xylose as the exclusive substrate while maximizing carbon flux to biomass production. Such a platform may then be enhanced with complementary metabolic engineering strategies that couple biomass production with high value-added chemical. Saccharomyces cerevisiae, expressing xylose reductase, xylitol dehydrogenase and xylulose kinase, from the native xylose-metabolizing yeast Pichia stipitis, was constructed, followed by a directed evolution strategy to improve xylose utilization rates. The resulting S. cerevisiae strain was capable of rapid growth and fast xylose consumption producing only biomass and negligible amount of byproducts. Transcriptional profiling of this strain was employed to further elucidate the observed physiology confirms a strongly up-regulated glyoxylate pathway enabling respiratory metabolism. The resulting strain is a desirable platform for the industrial production of biomass-related products using xylose as a sole carbon source. PMID:22487265

  18. Saccharomyces cerevisiae metabolism in ecological context

    PubMed Central

    Jouhten, Paula; Ponomarova, Olga; Gonzalez, Ramon; Patil, Kiran R.

    2016-01-01

    The architecture and regulation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae metabolic network are among the best studied owing to its widespread use in both basic research and industry. Yet, several recent studies have revealed notable limitations in explaining genotype–metabolic phenotype relations in this yeast, especially when concerning multiple genetic/environmental perturbations. Apparently unexpected genotype–phenotype relations may originate in the evolutionarily shaped cellular operating principles being hidden in common laboratory conditions. Predecessors of laboratory S. cerevisiae strains, the wild and the domesticated yeasts, have been evolutionarily shaped by highly variable environments, very distinct from laboratory conditions, and most interestingly by social life within microbial communities. Here we present a brief review of the genotypic and phenotypic peculiarities of S. cerevisiae in the context of its social lifestyle beyond laboratory environments. Accounting for this ecological context and the origin of the laboratory strains in experimental design and data analysis would be essential in improving the understanding of genotype–environment–phenotype relationships. PMID:27634775

  19. Development of rapidly fermenting strains of Saccharomyces diastaticus for direct conversion of starch and dextrins to ethanol

    SciTech Connect

    Laluce, C.; Mattoon, J.R.

    1984-07-01

    Alcoholic fermentation, growth, and glucoamylase production by 12 strains of Saccharomyces diastaticus were compared by using starch and dextrins as substrates. Haploid progeny produced from a rapidly fermenting strain, SD2, were used for hybridization with other S. diastaticus and Saccharomyces cerevisiae haploids. Alcoholic fermentation and enzyme production by hybrid diploids and their haploid parents were evaluated. Although the dosage of the STA or DEX (starch or dextrin fermentation) genes may enhance ethanol production, epistatic effects in certain strain combinations caused decreases in starch-fermenting activity. Both the nature of the starch or dextrin used and the fermentation medium pH had substantial effects on alcohol production. Commercial dextrin was not as good a substrate as dextrins prepared by digesting starch with ..cap alpha..-amylase. Crude manioc starch digested by ..cap alpha..-amylase was fermented directly by selected hybrids with almost 100% conversion efficiency. The manioc preparation contained adequate minerals and growth factors. This procedure should be suitable for direct commercial application in manioc-producing regions in Brazil and elsewhere. A rapidly fermenting haploid strain, SD2-A8, descended from strain SD2, contains two unlinked genes controlling formation of extracellular amylase. A convenient method for detecting these genes (STA genes) in replica plates containing large numbers of meiotic progeny was developed.

  20. Isolation and genetic analysis of Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutants supersensitive to G1 arrest by a factor and. cap alpha. factor pheromones

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, R.K.; Otte, C.A.

    1982-01-01

    Eight independently isolated mutants which are supersensitive (Sst/sup -/) to the G1 arrest induced by the tridecapeptide pheromone ..cap alpha.. factor were identified by screening mutagenized Saccharomyces cerevisiae MATa cells on solid medium for increased growth inhibition by ..cap alpha.. factor. These mutants carries lesions in two complementation groups, sst1 and sst2. Mutations at the sst1 locus were mating type specific: MATa sst1 cells were supersensitive to ..cap alpha.. factor, but MAT..cap alpha.. sst1 cells were not supersensitive to a factor. In contrast, mutations at the sst2 locus conferred supersensitivity to the pheromones of the opposite mating type on both MATa and MAT..cap alpha.. cells. Even in the absence of added ..cap alpha.. pheromone, about 10% of the cells in exponentially growing cultures of MATa strains carrying any of three different alleles of sst2 (including the ochre mutation sst2-4) had the aberrant morphology (''shmoo'' shape) that normally develops only after MATa cells are exposed to ..cap alpha.. factor. This ''self-shmooing'' phenotype was genetically linked to the sst2 mutations, although the leakiest allele isolated (sst2-3) did not display this characteristic. Normal MATa/MAT..cap alpha.. diploids do not respond to pheromones; diploids homozygous for an sst2 mutation (MATa/MAT..cap alpha.. sst2-1/sst2-1) were still insensitive to ..cap alpha.. factor. The sst1 gene was mapped to within 6.9 centimorgans of his6 on chromosome IX. The sst2 gene was unlinked to sst1, was not centromere linked, and was shown to be neither linked nor centromere distal to MAT on the right arm of chromosome III.

  1. Escape from Het-6 Incompatibility in Neurospora Crassa Partial Diploids Involves Preferential Deletion within the Ectopic Segment

    PubMed Central

    Smith, M. L.; Yang, C. J.; Metzenberg, R. L.; Glass, N. L.

    1996-01-01

    Self-incompatible het-6(OR)/het-6(PA) partial diploids of Neurospora crassa were selected from a cross involving the translocation strain, T(IIL -> IIIR)AR18, and a normal sequence strain. About 25% of the partial diploids exhibited a marked increase in growth rate after 2 weeks, indicating that ``escape'' from het-6 incompatibility had occurred. Near isogenic tester strains with different alleles (het-6(OR) and het-6(PA)) were constructed and used to determine that 80 of 96 escape strains tested were het-6(PA), retaining the het-6 allele found in the normal-sequence LGII position; 16 were het-6(OR), retaining the allele in the translocated position. Restriction fragment length polymorphisms in 45 escape strains were examined with probes made from cosmids that spanned the translocated region. Along with electrophoretic analysis of chromosomes from three escape strains, RFLPs showed that escape is associated with deletion of part of one or the other of the duplicated DNA segments. Deletions ranged in size from ~70 kbp up to putatively the entire 270-kbp translocated region but always included a 35-kbp region wherein we hypothesize het-6 is located. The deletion spectrum at het-6 thus resembles other cases where mitotic deletions occur such as of tumor suppressor genes and of the hprt gene (coding for hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl-transferase) in humans. PMID:8889517

  2. Construction of Killer Industrial Yeast Saccharomyces Cerevisiae Hau-1 and its Fermentation Performance

    PubMed Central

    Bajaj, Bijender K.; Sharma, S.

    2010-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae HAU-1, a time tested industrial yeast possesses most of the desirable fermentation characteristics like fast growth and fermentation rate, osmotolerance, high ethanol tolerance, ability to ferment molasses, and to ferment at elevated temperatures etc. However, this yeast was found to be sensitive against the killer strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In the present study, killer trait was introduced into Saccharomyces cerevisiae HAU-1 by protoplast fusion with Saccharomyces cerevisiae MTCC 475, a killer strain. The resultant fusants were characterized for desirable fermentation characteristics. All the technologically important characteristics of distillery yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae HAU-1 were retained in the fusants, and in addition the killer trait was also introduced into them. Further, the killer activity was found to be stably maintained during hostile conditions of ethanol fermentations in dextrose or molasses, and even during biomass recycling. PMID:24031519

  3. 21 CFR 866.5785 - Anti-Saccharomyces cerevisiae (S. cerevisiae) antibody (ASCA) test systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Anti-Saccharomyces cerevisiae (S. cerevisiae... Immunological Test Systems § 866.5785 Anti-Saccharomyces cerevisiae (S. cerevisiae) antibody (ASCA) test systems. (a) Identification. The Anti-Saccharomyces cerevisiae (S. cerevisiae) antibody (ASCA) test system...

  4. 21 CFR 866.5785 - Anti-Saccharomyces cerevisiae (S. cerevisiae) antibody (ASCA) test systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Anti-Saccharomyces cerevisiae (S. cerevisiae... Immunological Test Systems § 866.5785 Anti-Saccharomyces cerevisiae (S. cerevisiae) antibody (ASCA) test systems. (a) Identification. The Anti-Saccharomyces cerevisiae (S. cerevisiae) antibody (ASCA) test system...

  5. 21 CFR 866.5785 - Anti-Saccharomyces cerevisiae (S. cerevisiae) antibody (ASCA) test systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Anti-Saccharomyces cerevisiae (S. cerevisiae... Immunological Test Systems § 866.5785 Anti-Saccharomyces cerevisiae (S. cerevisiae) antibody (ASCA) test systems. (a) Identification. The Anti-Saccharomyces cerevisiae (S. cerevisiae) antibody (ASCA) test system...

  6. 21 CFR 866.5785 - Anti-Saccharomyces cerevisiae (S. cerevisiae) antibody (ASCA) test systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Anti-Saccharomyces cerevisiae (S. cerevisiae... Immunological Test Systems § 866.5785 Anti-Saccharomyces cerevisiae (S. cerevisiae) antibody (ASCA) test systems. (a) Identification. The Anti-Saccharomyces cerevisiae (S. cerevisiae) antibody (ASCA) test system...

  7. 21 CFR 866.5785 - Anti-Saccharomyces cerevisiae (S. cerevisiae) antibody (ASCA) test systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Anti-Saccharomyces cerevisiae (S. cerevisiae... Immunological Test Systems § 866.5785 Anti-Saccharomyces cerevisiae (S. cerevisiae) antibody (ASCA) test systems. (a) Identification. The Anti-Saccharomyces cerevisiae (S. cerevisiae) antibody (ASCA) test system...

  8. Cell death caused by excision of centromeric DNA from a chromosome in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, Akihiro; Yanamoto, Toshiaki; Matsumoto, Takehiro; Hatano, Takushi; Matsuzaki, Hiroaki

    2013-01-01

    If genetically modified organisms (GMOs) are spread through the natural environment, it might affect the natural environment. To help prevent the spread of GMOs, we examined whether it is possible to introduce conditional lethality by excising centromeric DNA from a chromosome by site-specific recombination in Saccharomyces cerevisiae as model organism. First, we constructed haploid cells in which excision of the centromeric DNA from chromosome IV can occur due to recombinase induced by galactose. By this excision, cell death can occur. In diploid cells, cell death can also occur by excision from both homologous chromosomes IV. Furthermore, cell death can occur in the case of chromosome V. A small number of surviving cells appeared with excision of centromeric DNA, and the diploid showed greater viability than the haploid in both chromosomes IV and V. The surviving cells appeared mainly due to deletion of a recombination target site (RS) from the chromosome. PMID:24018677

  9. Production of geranylgeraniol on overexpression of a prenyl diphosphate synthase fusion gene in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Ohto, Chikara; Muramatsu, Masayoshi; Obata, Shusei; Sakuradani, Eiji; Shimizu, Sakayu

    2010-07-01

    An acyclic diterpene alcohol, (E,E,E)-geranylgeraniol (GGOH), is one of the important compounds used as perfume and pharmacological agents. A deficiency of squalene (SQ) synthase activity allows yeasts to accumulate an acyclic sesquiterpene alcohol, (E,E)-farnesol, in their cells. Since sterols are essential for the growth of yeasts, a deficiency of SQ synthase activity makes the addition of supplemental sterols to the culture media necessary. To develop a GGOH production method not requiring any supplemental sterols, we overexpressed HMG1 encoding hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA reductase and the genes of two prenyl diphosphate synthases, ERG20 and BTS1, in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. A prototrophic diploid coexpressing HMG1 and the ERG20-BTS1 fusion accumulated GGOH with neither disruption of the SQ synthase gene nor the addition of any supplemental sterols. The GGOH content on the diploid cultivation in a 5-l jar fermenter reached 138.8 mg/l under optimal conditions.

  10. Apparent Epigenetic Meiotic Double-Strand-Break Disparity in Saccharomyces cerevisiae: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Stahl, Franklin W.; Rehan, Maryam Binti Mohamed; Foss, Henriette M.; Borts, Rhona H.

    2016-01-01

    Previously published, and some unpublished, tetrad data from budding yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) are analyzed for disparity in gene conversion, in which one allele is more often favored than the other (conversion disparity). One such disparity, characteristic of a bias in the frequencies of meiotic double-strand DNA breaks at the hotspot near the His4 locus, is found in diploids that undergo meiosis soon after their formation, but not in diploids that have been cloned and frozen. Altered meiotic DNA breakability associated with altered metabolism-related chromatin states has been previously reported. However, the above observations imply that such differing parental chromatin states can persist through at least one chromosome replication, and probably more, in a common environment. This conclusion may have implications for interpreting changes in allele frequencies in populations. PMID:27356614

  11. No current evidence for widespread dosage compensation in S. cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Torres, Eduardo M; Springer, Michael; Amon, Angelika

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies of laboratory strains of budding yeast had shown that when gene copy number is altered experimentally, RNA levels generally scale accordingly. This is true when the copy number of individual genes or entire chromosomes is altered. In a recent study, Hose et al. (2015) reported that this tight correlation between gene copy number and RNA levels is not observed in recently isolated wild Saccharomyces cerevisiae variants. To understand the origins of this proposed difference in gene expression regulation between natural variants and laboratory strains of S. cerevisiae, we evaluated the karyotype and gene expression studies performed by Hose et al. on wild S. cerevisiae strains. In contrast to the results of Hose et al., our reexamination of their data revealed a tight correlation between gene copy number and gene expression. We conclude that widespread dosage compensation occurs neither in laboratory strains nor in natural variants of S. cerevisiae. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.10996.001 PMID:26949255

  12. Effects of probiotics Pediococcus acidilactici strain MA18/5M and Saccharomyces cerevisiae subsp. boulardii strain SB-CNCM I-1079 on fecal and intestinal microbiota of nursing and weanling piglets.

    PubMed

    Brousseau, J-P; Talbot, G; Beaudoin, F; Lauzon, K; Roy, D; Lessard, M

    2015-11-01

    Ruminococcaceae bacterial families in the colon. Moreover, pairwise MRPP analysis indicated that ileum bacterial communities of pigs treated with PA or ATB differed from those of CTRL pigs ( < 0.05). In conclusion, PA and SCB supplements, respectively, influenced, in a strain-dependent manner, the ileum and colon microbiota of weaned piglets. Results also suggest that PA and SCB have the potential as feed additives to modulate bacterial populations associated with gut health. PMID:26641051

  13. Biosynthesis of glyoxylate from glycine in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Villas-Bôas, Silas Granato; Kesson, Mats; Nielsen, Jens

    2005-05-01

    Glyoxylate biosynthesis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae is traditionally mainly ascribed to the reaction catalyzed by isocitrate lyase (Icl), which converts isocitrate to glyoxylate and succinate. However, Icl is generally reported to be repressed by glucose and yet glyoxylate is detected at high levels in S. cerevisiae extracts during cultivation on glucose. In bacteria there is an alternative pathway for glyoxylate biosynthesis that involves a direct oxidation of glycine. Therefore, we investigated the glycine metabolism in S. cerevisiae coupling metabolomics data and (13)C-isotope-labeling analysis of two reference strains and a mutant with a deletion in a gene encoding an alanine:glyoxylate aminotransferase. The strains were cultivated on minimal medium containing glucose or galactose, and (13)C-glycine as sole nitrogen source. Glyoxylate presented (13)C-labeling in all cultivation conditions. Furthermore, glyoxylate seemed to be converted to 2-oxovalerate, an unusual metabolite in S. cerevisiae. 2-Oxovalerate can possibly be converted to 2-oxoisovalerate, a key precursor in the biosynthesis of branched-chain amino acids. Hence, we propose a new pathway for glycine catabolism and glyoxylate biosynthesis in S. cerevisiae that seems not to be repressed by glucose and is active under both aerobic and anaerobic conditions. This work demonstrates the great potential of coupling metabolomics data and isotope-labeling analysis for pathway reconstructions.

  14. Changes and roles of membrane compositions in the adaptation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to ethanol.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yanfeng; Zhang, Shuxian; Liu, Huaqing; Zhang, Lei; Yi, Chenfeng; Li, Hao

    2015-12-01

    Bioethanol fermentation by Saccharomyces cerevisiae is often stressed by the accumulation of ethanol. Cell membrane is the first assaulting target of ethanol. Ethanol-adapted S. cerevisiae strains provide opportunity to shed light on membrane functions in the ethanol tolerance. This study aimed at clarifying the roles of cell membrane in the ethanol tolerance of S. cerevisiae through comparing membrane components between S. cerevisiae parental strain and ethanol-adapted strains. A directed evolutionary engineering was performed to obtain the ethanol-adapted S. cerevisiae strains. The parental, ethanol-adapted M5 and M10 strains were selected to be compared the percentage of viable cells after exposing to ethanol stress and cell membrane compositions (i.e., ergosterol, trehalose, and fatty acids). Compared with the parental strain, M5 or M10 strain had higher survival rate in the presence of 10% v/v ethanol. Compared with that in the parental strain, contents of trehalose, ergosterol, and fatty acids increased about 15.7, 12.1, and 29.3%, respectively, in M5 strain, and about 47.5, 107.8, and 61.5%, respectively, in M10 strain. Moreover, expression differences of genes involved in fatty acids metabolisms among the parental, M5 and M10 strains were analyzed by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR), and results demonstrated that M5 or M10 strain had higher expression of ACC1 and OLE1 than the parental strain. These results indicated that although being exposed to step-wise increased ethanol, S. cerevisiae cells might remodel membrane components or structure to adapt to the ethanol stress.

  15. Selection on Meiosis Genes in Diploid and Tetraploid Arabidopsis arenosa

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Kevin M.; Arnold, Brian; Xue, Katherine; Šurinová, Maria; O’Connell, Jeremy; Bomblies, Kirsten

    2015-01-01

    Meiotic chromosome segregation is critical for fertility across eukaryotes, and core meiotic processes are well conserved even between kingdoms. Nevertheless, recent work in animals has shown that at least some meiosis genes are highly diverse or strongly differentiated among populations. What drives this remains largely unknown. We previously showed that autotetraploid Arabidopsis arenosa evolved stable meiosis, likely through reduced crossover rates, and that associated with this there is strong evidence for selection in a subset of meiosis genes known to affect axis formation, synapsis, and crossover frequency. Here, we use genome-wide data to study the molecular evolution of 70 meiosis genes in a much wider sample of A. arenosa. We sample the polyploid lineage, a diploid lineage from the Carpathian Mountains, and a more distantly related diploid lineage from the adjacent, but biogeographically distinct Pannonian Basin. We find that not only did selection act on meiosis genes in the polyploid lineage but also independently on a smaller subset of meiosis genes in Pannonian diploids. Functionally related genes are targeted by selection in these distinct contexts, and in two cases, independent sweeps occurred in the same loci. The tetraploid lineage has sustained selection on more genes, has more amino acid changes in each, and these more often affect conserved or potentially functional sites. We hypothesize that Pannonian diploid and tetraploid A. arenosa experienced selection on structural proteins that mediate sister chromatid cohesion, the formation of meiotic chromosome axes, and synapsis, likely for different underlying reasons. PMID:25543117

  16. Assay for mutagenesis in heterozygous diploid human lymphoblasts

    DOEpatents

    Skopek, Thomas R.; Liber, Howard L.; Penman, Bruce W.; Thilly, William G.; Hoppe, IV, Henry

    1981-01-01

    An assay is disclosed for determining mutagenic damage caused by the administration of a known or suspected mutagen to diploid human lymphoblastoid cell lines. The gene locus employed for this assay is the gene for thymidine kinase, uridine kinase, or cytidine deaminase. Since human lymphoblastoid cells contain two genes for these enzymes, heterozygotes of human lymphoblastoid cells are used in this assay.

  17. Fertile diploid drones in africanized honeybees, Apis mellifera adansonii.

    PubMed

    Chaud-Netto, J

    1977-02-15

    59 diploid drones of Apis mellifera adansonii, 12-37 days old, were tested for the presence of semen after provoked ejaculation; 13 drones ejaculated semen enough to be used in an instrumental insemination, but only three on them (5%) furnished 1 mm3 of semen. The problems referring to the attainment of descendants from the 2n drones are briefly discussed.

  18. Does hybridization drive the transition to asexuality in diploid Boechera?

    PubMed

    Beck, James B; Alexander, Patrick J; Allphin, Loreen; Al-Shehbaz, Ihsan A; Rushworth, Catherine; Bailey, C Donovan; Windham, Michael D

    2012-04-01

    Gametophytic apomixis is a common form of asexual reproduction in plants. Virtually all gametophytic apomicts are polyploids, and some view polyploidy as a prerequisite for the transition to apomixis. However, any causal link between apomixis and polyploidy is complicated by the fact that most apomictic polyploids are allopolyploids, leading some to speculate that hybridization, rather than polyploidy, enables apomixis. Diploid apomixis presents a rare opportunity to isolate the role of hybridization, and a number of diploid apomicts have been documented in the genus Boechera (Brassicaceae). Here, we present the results of a microsatellite study of 1393 morphologically and geographically diverse diploid individuals, evaluating the hypothesis that diploid Boechera apomicts are hybrids. This genus-wide dataset was made possible by the applicability of a core set of microsatellite loci in 69 of the 70 diploid Boechera species and by our ability to successfully genotype herbarium specimens of widely varying ages. With few exceptions, diploid apomicts exhibited markedly high levels of heterozygosity resulting from the combination of disparate genomes. This strongly suggests that most apomictic diploid Boechera lineages are of hybrid origin, and that the genomic consequences of hybridization allow for the transition to gametophytic apomixis in this genus.

  19. Selection on meiosis genes in diploid and tetraploid Arabidopsis arenosa.

    PubMed

    Wright, Kevin M; Arnold, Brian; Xue, Katherine; Šurinová, Maria; O'Connell, Jeremy; Bomblies, Kirsten

    2015-04-01

    Meiotic chromosome segregation is critical for fertility across eukaryotes, and core meiotic processes are well conserved even between kingdoms. Nevertheless, recent work in animals has shown that at least some meiosis genes are highly diverse or strongly differentiated among populations. What drives this remains largely unknown. We previously showed that autotetraploid Arabidopsis arenosa evolved stable meiosis, likely through reduced crossover rates, and that associated with this there is strong evidence for selection in a subset of meiosis genes known to affect axis formation, synapsis, and crossover frequency. Here, we use genome-wide data to study the molecular evolution of 70 meiosis genes in a much wider sample of A. arenosa. We sample the polyploid lineage, a diploid lineage from the Carpathian Mountains, and a more distantly related diploid lineage from the adjacent, but biogeographically distinct Pannonian Basin. We find that not only did selection act on meiosis genes in the polyploid lineage but also independently on a smaller subset of meiosis genes in Pannonian diploids. Functionally related genes are targeted by selection in these distinct contexts, and in two cases, independent sweeps occurred in the same loci. The tetraploid lineage has sustained selection on more genes, has more amino acid changes in each, and these more often affect conserved or potentially functional sites. We hypothesize that Pannonian diploid and tetraploid A. arenosa experienced selection on structural proteins that mediate sister chromatid cohesion, the formation of meiotic chromosome axes, and synapsis, likely for different underlying reasons.

  20. Heterozygote advantage as a natural consequence of adaptation in diploids

    PubMed Central

    Sellis, Diamantis; Callahan, Benjamin J.; Petrov, Dmitri A.; Messer, Philipp W.

    2011-01-01

    Molecular adaptation is typically assumed to proceed by sequential fixation of beneficial mutations. In diploids, this picture presupposes that for most adaptive mutations, the homozygotes have a higher fitness than the heterozygotes. Here, we show that contrary to this expectation, a substantial proportion of adaptive mutations should display heterozygote advantage. This feature of adaptation in diploids emerges naturally from the primary importance of the fitness of heterozygotes for the invasion of new adaptive mutations. We formalize this result in the framework of Fisher's influential geometric model of adaptation. We find that in diploids, adaptation should often proceed through a succession of short-lived balanced states that maintain substantially higher levels of phenotypic and fitness variation in the population compared with classic adaptive walks. In fast-changing environments, this variation produces a diversity advantage that allows diploids to remain better adapted compared with haploids despite the disadvantage associated with the presence of unfit homozygotes. The short-lived balanced states arising during adaptive walks should be mostly invisible to current scans for long-term balancing selection. Instead, they should leave signatures of incomplete selective sweeps, which do appear to be common in many species. Our results also raise the possibility that balancing selection, as a natural consequence of frequent adaptation, might play a more prominent role among the forces maintaining genetic variation than is commonly recognized. PMID:22143780

  1. Progress in Metabolic Engineering of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Nevoigt, Elke

    2008-01-01

    Summary: The traditional use of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae in alcoholic fermentation has, over time, resulted in substantial accumulated knowledge concerning genetics, physiology, and biochemistry as well as genetic engineering and fermentation technologies. S. cerevisiae has become a platform organism for developing metabolic engineering strategies, methods, and tools. The current review discusses the relevance of several engineering strategies, such as rational and inverse metabolic engineering, evolutionary engineering, and global transcription machinery engineering, in yeast strain improvement. It also summarizes existing tools for fine-tuning and regulating enzyme activities and thus metabolic pathways. Recent examples of yeast metabolic engineering for food, beverage, and industrial biotechnology (bioethanol and bulk and fine chemicals) follow. S. cerevisiae currently enjoys increasing popularity as a production organism in industrial (“white”) biotechnology due to its inherent tolerance of low pH values and high ethanol and inhibitor concentrations and its ability to grow anaerobically. Attention is paid to utilizing lignocellulosic biomass as a potential substrate. PMID:18772282

  2. Killer systems of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    SciTech Connect

    Nesterova, G.F.

    1989-01-01

    The killer systems of Saccharomyces cerevisiae are an unusual class of cytoplasmic symbionts of primitive eukaryotes. The genetic material of these symbionts is double-stranded RNA. They are characterized by the linearity of the genome, its fragmentation into a major and a minor fraction, which replicate separately, and their ability to control the synthesis of secretory mycocin proteins possessing a toxic action on closely related strains. The secretion of mycocins at the same time ensures acquiring of resistance to them. Strains containing killer symbionts are toxigenic and resistant to the action of their own toxin, but strains that are free of killer double-stranded RNAs are sensitive to the action of mycocins. The killer systems of S. cerevisiae have retained features relating them to viruses and are apparently the result of evolution of infectious viruses. The occurrences of such systems among monocellular eukaryotic organisms is an example of complication of the genome by means of its assembly from virus-like components. We discuss the unusual features of replication and the expression of killer systems and their utilization in the construction of vector molecules.

  3. Growth of non-Saccharomyces yeasts affects nutrient availability for Saccharomyces cerevisiae during wine fermentation.

    PubMed

    Medina, Karina; Boido, Eduardo; Dellacassa, Eduardo; Carrau, Francisco

    2012-07-01

    Yeast produces numerous secondary metabolites during fermentation that impact final wine quality. Although it is widely recognized that growth of diverse non-Saccharomyces (NS) yeast can positively affect flavor complexity during Saccharomyces cerevisiae wine fermentation, the inability to control spontaneous or co-fermentation processes by NS yeast has restricted their use in winemaking. We selected two NS yeasts from our Uruguayan native collection to study NS-S. cerevisiae interactions during wine fermentation. The selected strains of Hanseniaspora vineae and Metschnikowia pulcherrima had different yeast assimilable nitrogen consumption profiles and had different effects on S. cerevisiae fermentation and growth kinetics. Studies in which we varied inoculum size and using either simultaneous or sequential inoculation of NS yeast and S. cerevisiae suggested that competition for nutrients had a significant effect on fermentation kinetics. Sluggish fermentations were more pronounced when S. cerevisiae was inoculated 24h after the initial stage of fermentation with a NS strain compared to co-inoculation. Monitoring strain populations using differential WL nutrient agar medium and fermentation kinetics of mixed cultures allowed for a better understanding of strain interactions and nutrient addition effects. Limitation of nutrient availability for S. cerevisiae was shown to result in stuck fermentations as well as to reduce sensory desirability of the resulting wine. Addition of diammonium phosphate (DAP) and a vitamin mix to a defined medium allowed for a comparison of nutrient competition between strains. Addition of DAP and the vitamin mix was most effective in preventing stuck fermentations. PMID:22687186

  4. Growth of non-Saccharomyces yeasts affects nutrient availability for Saccharomyces cerevisiae during wine fermentation.

    PubMed

    Medina, Karina; Boido, Eduardo; Dellacassa, Eduardo; Carrau, Francisco

    2012-07-01

    Yeast produces numerous secondary metabolites during fermentation that impact final wine quality. Although it is widely recognized that growth of diverse non-Saccharomyces (NS) yeast can positively affect flavor complexity during Saccharomyces cerevisiae wine fermentation, the inability to control spontaneous or co-fermentation processes by NS yeast has restricted their use in winemaking. We selected two NS yeasts from our Uruguayan native collection to study NS-S. cerevisiae interactions during wine fermentation. The selected strains of Hanseniaspora vineae and Metschnikowia pulcherrima had different yeast assimilable nitrogen consumption profiles and had different effects on S. cerevisiae fermentation and growth kinetics. Studies in which we varied inoculum size and using either simultaneous or sequential inoculation of NS yeast and S. cerevisiae suggested that competition for nutrients had a significant effect on fermentation kinetics. Sluggish fermentations were more pronounced when S. cerevisiae was inoculated 24h after the initial stage of fermentation with a NS strain compared to co-inoculation. Monitoring strain populations using differential WL nutrient agar medium and fermentation kinetics of mixed cultures allowed for a better understanding of strain interactions and nutrient addition effects. Limitation of nutrient availability for S. cerevisiae was shown to result in stuck fermentations as well as to reduce sensory desirability of the resulting wine. Addition of diammonium phosphate (DAP) and a vitamin mix to a defined medium allowed for a comparison of nutrient competition between strains. Addition of DAP and the vitamin mix was most effective in preventing stuck fermentations.

  5. Fumaric Acid Production in Saccharomyces cerevisiae by In Silico Aided Metabolic Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Guoqiang; Zou, Wei; Chen, Xiulai; Xu, Nan; Liu, Liming; Chen, Jian

    2012-01-01

    Fumaric acid (FA) is a promising biomass-derived building-block chemical. Bio-based FA production from renewable feedstock is a promising and sustainable alternative to petroleum-based chemical synthesis. Here we report on FA production by direct fermentation using metabolically engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae with the aid of in silico analysis of a genome-scale metabolic model. First, FUM1 was selected as the target gene on the basis of extensive literature mining. Flux balance analysis (FBA) revealed that FUM1 deletion can lead to FA production and slightly lower growth of S. cerevisiae. The engineered S. cerevisiae strain obtained by deleting FUM1 can produce FA up to a concentration of 610±31 mg L–1 without any apparent change in growth in fed-batch culture. FT-IR and 1H and 13C NMR spectra confirmed that FA was synthesized by the engineered S. cerevisiae strain. FBA identified pyruvate carboxylase as one of the factors limiting higher FA production. When the RoPYC gene was introduced, S. cerevisiae produced 1134±48 mg L–1 FA. Furthermore, the final engineered S. cerevisiae strain was able to produce 1675±52 mg L–1 FA in batch culture when the SFC1 gene encoding a succinate–fumarate transporter was introduced. These results demonstrate that the model shows great predictive capability for metabolic engineering. Moreover, FA production in S. cerevisiae can be efficiently developed with the aid of in silico metabolic engineering. PMID:23300594

  6. Genomic evolution of Saccharomyces cerevisiae under Chinese rice wine fermentation.

    PubMed

    Li, Yudong; Zhang, Weiping; Zheng, Daoqiong; Zhou, Zhan; Yu, Wenwen; Zhang, Lei; Feng, Lifang; Liang, Xinle; Guan, Wenjun; Zhou, Jingwen; Chen, Jian; Lin, Zhenguo

    2014-09-10

    Rice wine fermentation represents a unique environment for the evolution of the budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. To understand how the selection pressure shaped the yeast genome and gene regulation, we determined the genome sequence and transcriptome of a S. cerevisiae strain YHJ7 isolated from Chinese rice wine (Huangjiu), a popular traditional alcoholic beverage in China. By comparing the genome of YHJ7 to the lab strain S288c, a Japanese sake strain K7, and a Chinese industrial bioethanol strain YJSH1, we identified many genomic sequence and structural variations in YHJ7, which are mainly located in subtelomeric regions, suggesting that these regions play an important role in genomic evolution between strains. In addition, our comparative transcriptome analysis between YHJ7 and S288c revealed a set of differentially expressed genes, including those involved in glucose transport (e.g., HXT2, HXT7) and oxidoredutase activity (e.g., AAD10, ADH7). Interestingly, many of these genomic and transcriptional variations are directly or indirectly associated with the adaptation of YHJ7 strain to its specific niches. Our molecular evolution analysis suggested that Japanese sake strains (K7/UC5) were derived from Chinese rice wine strains (YHJ7) at least approximately 2,300 years ago, providing the first molecular evidence elucidating the origin of Japanese sake strains. Our results depict interesting insights regarding the evolution of yeast during rice wine fermentation, and provided a valuable resource for genetic engineering to improve industrial wine-making strains.

  7. Human acylphosphatase cannot replace phosphoglycerate kinase in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Van Hoek, P; Modesti, A; Ramponi, G; Kötter, P; van Dijken, J P; Pron, J T

    2001-10-01

    Human acylphosphatase (h-AP, EC 3.6.1.7) has been reported to catalyse the hydrolysis of the 1-phosphate group of 1,3-diphosphoglycerate. In vivo operation of this reaction in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae would bypass phosphoglycerate kinase and thus reduce the ATP yield from glycolysis. To investigate whether h-AP can indeed replace the S. cerevisiae phosphoglycerate kinase, a multi-copy plasmid carrying the h-AP gene under control of the yeast TDH3 promoter was introduced into a pgk1 delta mutant of S. cerevisiae. A strain carrying the expression vector without the h-AP cassette was used as a reference. For both strains, steady-state carbon- and energy-limited chemostat cultures were obtained at a dilution rate of 0.10 h(-1) on a medium containing a mixture of glucose and ethanol (15% and 85% on a carbon basis, respectively). Although the h-AP strain exhibited a high acylphosphatase activity in cell extracts, switching to glucose as sole carbon and energy source resulted in a complete arrest of glucose consumption and growth. The lack of a functional glycolytic pathway was further evident from the absence of ethanol formation in the presence of excess glucose in the culture. As h-AP cannot replace yeast phosphoglycerate kinase in vivo, the enzyme is not a useful tool to modify the ATP yield of glycolysis in S. cerevisiae.

  8. SPME-GC method as a tool to differentiate VOC profiles in Saccharomyces cerevisiae wine yeasts.

    PubMed

    Mauriello, Giacomo; Capece, Angela; D'Auria, Maurizio; Garde-Cerdán, Teresa; Romano, Patrizia

    2009-05-01

    The aim of this work was to study the variability of 36 Saccharomyces cerevisiae wild strains isolated from different grape varieties and from two very distant zones, located in Northern and Southern Italy. The strains were differentiated on the basis of parameters of technological interest, such as resistance to antimicrobial compounds frequently present in wine, and the production of volatile aromatic compounds (VOC), determined by SPME procedure in the experimental wines obtained by inoculated fermentations. The VOC profile allowed to differentiate the yeasts in function of isolation area: S. cerevisiae isolated from Southern Italy grapes were able to produce more volatile compounds than those from Northern Italy. The compounds synthesized by all the yeasts, besides the ethanol, were 3-methyl-1-butanol and ethyl acetate. The production of acids during the alcoholic fermentation was a characteristic of Southern yeast strains. The screening of S. cerevisiae strains for technological parameters, such as sulphur dioxide, copper and ethanol resistance or hydrogen sulphide production, revealed similar behaviour for sulphur dioxide resistance among Northern and Southern S. cerevisiae strains. Copper resistance and sulphur dioxide production were correlated to isolation area: S. cerevisiae "Northern" strains showed higher copper resistance and lowest hydrogen sulphide production than that exhibited from "Southern" strains. PMID:19269564

  9. Gene Duplication in SACCHAROMYCES CEREVISIAE

    PubMed Central

    Hansche, P. E.; Beres, V.; Lange, P.

    1978-01-01

    Five indepdendent duplications of the acid-phosphatase (aphtase) structural gene (acp1) were recovered from chemostat populations of S. cerevisiae that were subject to selection for in vivo hyper-aphtase activity. Two of the duplications arose spontaneously. Three of them were induced by UV. All five of the duplication events involved the transpositioning of the aphtase structural gene, acp1, and all known genes distal to acp1 on the right arm of chromosome II, to the terminus of an arm of other unknown chromosomes. One of the five duplicated regions of the right arm of chromosome II was found to be transmitted mitotically and meiotically with very high fidelity. The other four duplicated regions of the right arm of chromosome II were found to be unstable, being lost at a rate of about 2% per mitosis. However, selection for increased fidelity of mitotic transmission was effective in one of these strains. No tandem duplications of the aphtase structural gene were found. PMID:348562

  10. Growth and fermentation characteristics of Saccharomyces cerevisiae NK28 isolated from kiwi fruit.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jong-Sub; Park, Eun-Hee; Kim, Jung-Wan; Yeo, Soo-Hwan; Kim, Myoung-Dong

    2013-09-28

    The influences of glucose concentration, initial medium acidity (pH), and temperature on the growth and ethanol production of Saccharomyces cerevisiae NK28, which was isolated from kiwi fruit, were examined in shake flask cultures. The optimal glucose concentration, initial medium pH, and temperature for ethanol production were 200 g/l, pH 6.0, and 35oC, respectively. Under this growth condition, S. cerevisiae NK28 produced 98.9 ± 5.67 g/l ethanol in 24 h with a volumetric ethanol production rate of 4.12 ± 0.24 g/l·h. S. cerevisiae NK28 was more tolerant to heat and ethanol than laboratory strain S. cerevisiae BY4742, and its tolerance to ethanol and fermentation inhibitors was comparable to that of an ethanologen, S. cerevisiae D5A.

  11. Role of social wasps in Saccharomyces cerevisiae ecology and evolution.

    PubMed

    Stefanini, Irene; Dapporto, Leonardo; Legras, Jean-Luc; Calabretta, Antonio; Di Paola, Monica; De Filippo, Carlotta; Viola, Roberto; Capretti, Paolo; Polsinelli, Mario; Turillazzi, Stefano; Cavalieri, Duccio

    2012-08-14

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae is one of the most important model organisms and has been a valuable asset to human civilization. However, despite its extensive use in the last 9,000 y, the existence of a seasonal cycle outside human-made environments has not yet been described. We demonstrate the role of social wasps as vector and natural reservoir of S. cerevisiae during all seasons. We provide experimental evidence that queens of social wasps overwintering as adults (Vespa crabro and Polistes spp.) can harbor yeast cells from autumn to spring and transmit them to their progeny. This result is mirrored by field surveys of the genetic variability of natural strains of yeast. Microsatellites and sequences of a selected set of loci able to recapitulate the yeast strain's evolutionary history were used to compare 17 environmental wasp isolates with a collection of strains from grapes from the same region and more than 230 strains representing worldwide yeast variation. The wasp isolates fall into subclusters representing the overall ecological and industrial yeast diversity of their geographic origin. Our findings indicate that wasps are a key environmental niche for the evolution of natural S. cerevisiae populations, the dispersion of yeast cells in the environment, and the maintenance of their diversity. The close relatedness of several wasp isolates with grape and wine isolates reflects the crucial role of human activities on yeast population structure, through clonal expansion and selection of specific strains during the biotransformation of fermented foods, followed by dispersal mediated by insects and other animals.

  12. Genomic relationships among diploid and hexaploid species of Andropogon (Poaceae).

    PubMed

    Norrmann, G; Hanson, L; Renvoize, S; Leitch, I J

    2004-12-01

    Andropogon is a pantropical grass genus comprising 100-120 species and found mainly in the grasslands of Africa and the Americas. While the genomic relationships between many Andropogon species have been resolved by studying chromosome behavior in interspecific hybrids, relationships between the North and South American diploids have remained elusive. Further, the genome composition of two hexaploid species (including the important forage grass Andropogon lateralis Nees) has been unclear because of the strong hybridization barriers that exist between species. Consequently, genomic in situ hybridization was applied to shed light on these issues. The results confirmed that (i) both the South American (Andropogon selloanus (Hack.) Hack., Andropogon macrothrix Trin.) and North American (Andropogon gyrans Michx.) diploid species shared a common S genome and (ii) the S genome comprises just one of the three genomes in the hexaploids A. lateralis Nees and Andropogon bicornis L. The evolutionary and taxonomic implications of these findings are discussed.

  13. [Diploid/triploid mosaicism: a variable but characteristic phenotype].

    PubMed

    Natera-De Benito, Daniel; Poo, Pilar; Gean, Esther; Vicente-Villa, Asunción; García-Cazorla, Angels; Fons-Estupiña, M Carmen

    2014-08-16

    Introduccion. El mosaicismo diploide/triploide es una alteracion cromosomica poco frecuente. La produce un fallo en la division poscigotica durante el desarrollo embrionario. Da lugar a la coexistencia de dos lineas celulares con diferente constitucion cromosomica (46,XX y 69,XXX) en un mismo individuo. Su fenotipo clinico es caracteristico. Las alteraciones pigmentarias con un patron de distribucion que sigue las lineas de Blaschko son el principal signo guia, asi como las alteraciones de otros tejidos derivados del ectodermo. Casos clinicos. Describimos las caracteristicas clinicas de tres pacientes afectos de mosaicismo diploide/triploide y realizamos una comparacion de su fenotipo clinico con el de los casos publicados previamente en la bibliografia. Las alteraciones observadas con mayor frecuencia fueron alteraciones cutaneas, discapacidad intelectual, obesidad troncular, talla baja, hemihipertrofia, y manos pequeñas y estrechas con clino y camptodactilia. Las caracteristicas fenotipicas de nuestros pacientes fueron similares a las de los casos comunicados previamente. Aunque no existe un fenotipo unico y especifico asociado al mosaicismo diploide/triploide, existen malformaciones caracteristicas que conforman un sindrome malformativo bien definido. El cariotipo realizado en linfocitos de sangre periferica en las tres pacientes fue normal, y se logro el diagnostico mediante cariotipo en fibroblastos cultivados tras biopsia de piel hipopigmentada. Conclusiones. La presencia de discapacidad intelectual asociada a obesidad troncular, talla baja, hemihipertrofia o clino y camptodactilia, ademas de las alteraciones cutaneas, debe hacer pensar en la posible existencia de un mosaicismo diploide/triploide. En la mayoria de los casos, es necesario el estudio del cariotipo en los fibroblastos para llegar al diagnostico.

  14. The Diploid Genome Sequence of an Individual Human

    PubMed Central

    Levy, Samuel; Sutton, Granger; Ng, Pauline C; Feuk, Lars; Halpern, Aaron L; Walenz, Brian P; Axelrod, Nelson; Huang, Jiaqi; Kirkness, Ewen F; Denisov, Gennady; Lin, Yuan; MacDonald, Jeffrey R; Pang, Andy Wing Chun; Shago, Mary; Stockwell, Timothy B; Tsiamouri, Alexia; Bafna, Vineet; Bansal, Vikas; Kravitz, Saul A; Busam, Dana A; Beeson, Karen Y; McIntosh, Tina C; Remington, Karin A; Abril, Josep F; Gill, John; Borman, Jon; Rogers, Yu-Hui; Frazier, Marvin E; Scherer, Stephen W; Strausberg, Robert L; Venter, J. Craig

    2007-01-01

    Presented here is a genome sequence of an individual human. It was produced from ∼32 million random DNA fragments, sequenced by Sanger dideoxy technology and assembled into 4,528 scaffolds, comprising 2,810 million bases (Mb) of contiguous sequence with approximately 7.5-fold coverage for any given region. We developed a modified version of the Celera assembler to facilitate the identification and comparison of alternate alleles within this individual diploid genome. Comparison of this genome and the National Center for Biotechnology Information human reference assembly revealed more than 4.1 million DNA variants, encompassing 12.3 Mb. These variants (of which 1,288,319 were novel) included 3,213,401 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), 53,823 block substitutions (2–206 bp), 292,102 heterozygous insertion/deletion events (indels)(1–571 bp), 559,473 homozygous indels (1–82,711 bp), 90 inversions, as well as numerous segmental duplications and copy number variation regions. Non-SNP DNA variation accounts for 22% of all events identified in the donor, however they involve 74% of all variant bases. This suggests an important role for non-SNP genetic alterations in defining the diploid genome structure. Moreover, 44% of genes were heterozygous for one or more variants. Using a novel haplotype assembly strategy, we were able to span 1.5 Gb of genome sequence in segments >200 kb, providing further precision to the diploid nature of the genome. These data depict a definitive molecular portrait of a diploid human genome that provides a starting point for future genome comparisons and enables an era of individualized genomic information. PMID:17803354

  15. Coexistence analysis of diploid and triploid hybrid water frogs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Apri, M.; Suandi, D.; Soewono, E.

    2014-02-01

    A dynamical model for genotype distributions of all hybrid populations of Pelophylax esculentus in the absence of differential survival is studied here. Assuming that under natural condition the parental genotypes LL and RR do not survive into adult stage, the dynamic is then reduced into three-dimensional dynamical system of classes LR, LLR, LRR genotypes. Coexistence of diploid (LR) and triploid (LLR and LRR) genotypes is analyzed here.

  16. Genome size and genome evolution in diploid Triticeae species.

    PubMed

    Eilam, T; Anikster, Y; Millet, E; Manisterski, J; Sagi-Assif, O; Feldman, M

    2007-11-01

    One of the intriguing issues concerning the dynamics of plant genomes is the occurrence of intraspecific variation in nuclear DNA amount. The aim of this work was to assess the ranges of intraspecific, interspecific, and intergeneric variation in nuclear DNA content of diploid species of the tribe Triticeae (Poaceae) and to examine the relation between life form or habitat and genome size. Altogether, 438 plants representing 272 lines that belong to 22 species were analyzed. Nuclear DNA content was estimated by flow cytometry. Very small intraspecific variation in DNA amount was found between lines of Triticeae diploid species collected from different habitats or between different morphs. In contrast to the constancy in nuclear DNA amount at the intraspecific level, there are significant differences in genome size between the various diploid species. Within the genus Aegilops, the 1C DNA amount ranged from 4.84 pg in A. caudata to 7.52 pg in A. sharonensis; among genera, the 1C DNA amount ranged from 4.18 pg in Heteranthelium piliferum to 9.45 pg in Secale montanum. No evidence was found for a smaller genome size in annual, self-pollinating species relative to perennial, cross-pollinating ones. Diploids that grow in the southern part of the group's distribution have larger genomes than those growing in other parts of the distribution. The contrast between the low variation at the intraspecific level and the high variation at the interspecific one suggests that changes in genome size originated in close temporal proximity to the speciation event, i.e., before, during, or immediately after it. The possible effects of sudden changes in genome size on speciation processes are discussed.

  17. Filamentation of Metabolic Enzymes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Shen, Qing-Ji; Kassim, Hakimi; Huang, Yong; Li, Hui; Zhang, Jing; Li, Guang; Wang, Peng-Ye; Yan, Jun; Ye, Fangfu; Liu, Ji-Long

    2016-06-20

    Compartmentation via filamentation has recently emerged as a novel mechanism for metabolic regulation. In order to identify filament-forming metabolic enzymes systematically, we performed a genome-wide screening of all strains available from an open reading frame-GFP collection in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We discovered nine novel filament-forming proteins and also confirmed those identified previously. From the 4159 strains, we found 23 proteins, mostly metabolic enzymes, which are capable of forming filaments in vivo. In silico protein-protein interaction analysis suggests that these filament-forming proteins can be clustered into several groups, including translational initiation machinery and glucose and nitrogen metabolic pathways. Using glutamine-utilising enzymes as examples, we found that the culture conditions affect the occurrence and length of the metabolic filaments. Furthermore, we found that two CTP synthases (Ura7p and Ura8p) and two asparagine synthetases (Asn1p and Asn2p) form filaments both in the cytoplasm and in the nucleus. Live imaging analyses suggest that metabolic filaments undergo sub-diffusion. Taken together, our genome-wide screening identifies additional filament-forming proteins in S. cerevisiae and suggests that filamentation of metabolic enzymes is more general than currently appreciated. PMID:27312010

  18. Filamentation of Metabolic Enzymes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Shen, Qing-Ji; Kassim, Hakimi; Huang, Yong; Li, Hui; Zhang, Jing; Li, Guang; Wang, Peng-Ye; Yan, Jun; Ye, Fangfu; Liu, Ji-Long

    2016-06-20

    Compartmentation via filamentation has recently emerged as a novel mechanism for metabolic regulation. In order to identify filament-forming metabolic enzymes systematically, we performed a genome-wide screening of all strains available from an open reading frame-GFP collection in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We discovered nine novel filament-forming proteins and also confirmed those identified previously. From the 4159 strains, we found 23 proteins, mostly metabolic enzymes, which are capable of forming filaments in vivo. In silico protein-protein interaction analysis suggests that these filament-forming proteins can be clustered into several groups, including translational initiation machinery and glucose and nitrogen metabolic pathways. Using glutamine-utilising enzymes as examples, we found that the culture conditions affect the occurrence and length of the metabolic filaments. Furthermore, we found that two CTP synthases (Ura7p and Ura8p) and two asparagine synthetases (Asn1p and Asn2p) form filaments both in the cytoplasm and in the nucleus. Live imaging analyses suggest that metabolic filaments undergo sub-diffusion. Taken together, our genome-wide screening identifies additional filament-forming proteins in S. cerevisiae and suggests that filamentation of metabolic enzymes is more general than currently appreciated.

  19. Sexual conflict and the alternation of haploid and diploid generations

    PubMed Central

    Haig, David; Wilczek, Amity

    2006-01-01

    Land plants possess a multicellular diploid stage (sporophyte) that begins development while attached to a multicellular haploid progenitor (gametophyte). Although the closest algal relatives of land plants lack a multicellular sporophyte, they do produce a zygote that grows while attached to the maternal gametophyte. The diploid offspring shares one haploid set of genes with the haploid mother that supplies it with resources and a paternal haploid complement that is not shared with the mother. Sexual conflict can arise within the diploid offspring because the offspring's maternal genome will be transmitted in its entirety to all other sexual and asexual offspring that the mother may produce, but the offspring's paternally derived genes may be absent from these other offspring. Thus, the selective forces favouring the evolution of genomic imprinting may have been present from the origin of modern land plants. In bryophytes, where gametophytes are long-lived and capable of multiple bouts of asexual and sexual reproduction, we predict strong sexual conflict over allocation to sporophytes. Female gametophytes of pteridophytes produce a single sporophyte and often lack means of asexual reproduction. Therefore, sexual conflict is predicted to be attenuated. Finally, we explore similarities among models of mate choice, offspring choice and segregation distortion. PMID:16612891

  20. Analysis of variation for apomictic reproduction in diploid Paspalum rufum

    PubMed Central

    Delgado, Luciana; Galdeano, Florencia; Sartor, María E.; Quarin, Camilo L.; Espinoza, Francisco; Ortiz, Juan Pablo A.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims The diploid cytotype of Paspalum rufum (Poaceae) reproduces sexually and is self-sterile; however, recurrent autopolyploidization through 2n + n fertilization and the ability for reproduction via apomixis have been documented in one genotype of the species. The objectives of this work were to analyse the variation in the functionality of apomixis components in diploid genotypes of P. rufum and to identify individuals with contrasting reproductive behaviours. Methods Samples of five individuals from each of three natural populations of P. rufum (designated R2, R5 and R6) were used. Seeds were obtained after open pollination, selfing, conspecific interploidy crosses and interspecific interploidy self-pollination induction. The reproductive behaviour of each plant was determined by using the flow cytometric seed screen (FCSS) method. Embryo sacs were cleared using a series of ethanol and methyl salicylate solutions and observed microscopically. Key Results In open pollination, all genotypes formed seeds by sexual means and no evidence of apomeiotic reproduction was detected. However, in conspecific interploidy crosses and interspecific interploidy self-pollination induction, variations in the reproductive pathways were observed. While all plants from populations R2 and R6 formed seeds exclusively by sexual means, three genotypes from the R5 population developed seeds from both meiotic and aposporous embryo sacs, and one of them (R5#49) through the complete apomictic pathway (apospory + parthenogenesis + pseudogamy). Cytoembryological observations revealed the presence of both meiotic and aposporous embryo sacs in all the genotypes analysed, suggesting that parthenogenesis could be uncoupled from apospory in some genotypes. Conclusions The results presented demonstrate the existence of variation in the functionality of apomixis components in natural diploid genotypes of P. rufum and have identified individuals with contrasting reproductive

  1. Characters that differ between diploid and haploid honey bee (Apis mellifera) drones.

    PubMed

    Herrmann, Matthias; Trenzcek, Tina; Fahrenhorst, Hartmut; Engels, Wolf

    2005-12-30

    Diploid males have long been considered a curiosity contradictory to the haplo-diploid mode of sex determination in the Hymenoptera. In Apis mellifera, 'false' diploid male larvae are eliminated by worker cannibalism immediately after hatching. A 'cannibalism substance' produced by diploid drone larvae to induce worker-assisted suicide has been hypothesized, but it has never been detected. Diploid drones are only removed some hours after hatching. Older larvae are evidently not regarded as 'false males' and instead are regularly nursed by the brood-attending worker bees. As the pheromonal cues presumably are located on the surface of newly hatched bee larvae, we extracted the cuticular secretions and analyzed their chemical composition by gas chromatograph-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analyses. Larvae were sexed and then reared in vitro for up to three days. The GC-MS pattern that was obtained, with alkanes as the major compounds, was compared between diploid and haploid drone larvae. We also examined some physical parameters of adult drones. There was no difference between diploid and haploid males in their weight at the day of emergence. The diploid adult drones had fewer wing hooks and smaller testes. The sperm DNA content was 0.30 and 0.15 pg per nucleus, giving an exact 2:1 ratio for the gametocytes of diploid and haploid drones, respectively. Vitellogenin was found in the hemolymph of both types of imaginal drones at 5 to 6 days, with a significantly lower titer in the diploids.

  2. Changes in regulation of ribosomal protein synthesis during vegetative growth and sporulation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Pearson, N J; Haber, J E

    1980-01-01

    When diploid Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells logarithmically growing in acetate medium were placed in sporulation medium, the relative rates of synthesis of 40 or more individual ribosomal proteins (r-proteins) were coordinately depressed to approximately 20% of those of growing cells. These new depressed rates remained constant for at least 10 h into sporulation. If yeast nitrogen base was added 4 yh after the beginning of sporulation to shift the cells back to vegetative growth, the original relative rates of r-protein synthesis were rapidly reestablished. this upshift in the rates occurred even in diploids homozygous for the regulatory mutation rna2 at the restrictive temperature for this mutation (34 degrees C). However, once these mutant cells began to bud and grow at 34 degrees C, the phenotype of rna2 was expressed and the syntheses of r-proteins were again coordinately depressed. At least one protein whose rate of synthesis was not depressed by rna2 in vegetative cells did have a decreased rate of synthesis during sporulation. Another r-protein whose synthesis was depressed by rna2 maintained a high rate of synthesis at the beginning of sporulation. These data suggest that the mechanism responsible for coordinate control of r-protein synthesis during sporulation does not require the gene product of RNA2 and thus defines a separate mechanism by which r-proteins are coordinately controlled in S. cerevisiae. Images PMID:6997272

  3. Links between nucleolar activity, rDNA stability, aneuploidy and chronological aging in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Lewinska, Anna; Miedziak, Beata; Kulak, Klaudia; Molon, Mateusz; Wnuk, Maciej

    2014-06-01

    The nucleolus is speculated to be a regulator of cellular senescence in numerous biological systems (Guarente, Genes Dev 11(19):2449-2455, 1997; Johnson et al., Curr Opin Cell Biol 10(3):332-338, 1998). In the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, alterations in nucleolar architecture, the redistribution of nucleolar protein and the accumulation of extrachromosomal ribosomal DNA circles (ERCs) during replicative aging have been reported. However, little is known regarding rDNA stability and changes in nucleolar activity during chronological aging (CA), which is another yeast aging model used. In the present study, the impact of aberrant cell cycle checkpoint control (knock-out of BUB1, BUB2, MAD1 and TEL1 genes in haploid and diploid hemizygous states) on CA-mediated changes in the nucleolus was studied. Nucleolus fragmentation, changes in the nucleolus size and the nucleolus/nucleus ratio, ERC accumulation, expression pattern changes and the relocation of protein involved in transcriptional silencing during CA were revealed. All strains examined were affected by oxidative stress, aneuploidy (numerical rather than structural aberrations) and DNA damage. However, the bub1 cells were the most prone to aneuploidy events, which may contribute to observed decrease in chronological lifespan. We postulate that chronological aging may be affected by redox imbalance-mediated chromosome XII instability leading to both rDNA instability and whole chromosome aneuploidy. CA-mediated nucleolus fragmentation may be a consequence of nucleolus enlargement and/or Nop2p upregulation. Moreover, the rDNA content of chronologically aging cells may be a factor determining the subsequent replicative lifespan. Taken together, we demonstrated that the nucleolus state is also affected during CA in yeast.

  4. Switching the mode of sucrose utilization by Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Badotti, Fernanda; Dário, Marcelo G; Alves, Sergio L; Cordioli, Maria Luiza A; Miletti, Luiz C; de Araujo, Pedro S; Stambuk, Boris U

    2008-01-01

    Background Overflow metabolism is an undesirable characteristic of aerobic cultures of Saccharomyces cerevisiae during biomass-directed processes. It results from elevated sugar consumption rates that cause a high substrate conversion to ethanol and other bi-products, severely affecting cell physiology, bioprocess performance, and biomass yields. Fed-batch culture, where sucrose consumption rates are controlled by the external addition of sugar aiming at its low concentrations in the fermentor, is the classical bioprocessing alternative to prevent sugar fermentation by yeasts. However, fed-batch fermentations present drawbacks that could be overcome by simpler batch cultures at relatively high (e.g. 20 g/L) initial sugar concentrations. In this study, a S. cerevisiae strain lacking invertase activity was engineered to transport sucrose into the cells through a low-affinity and low-capacity sucrose-H+ symport activity, and the growth kinetics and biomass yields on sucrose analyzed using simple batch cultures. Results We have deleted from the genome of a S. cerevisiae strain lacking invertase the high-affinity sucrose-H+ symporter encoded by the AGT1 gene. This strain could still grow efficiently on sucrose due to a low-affinity and low-capacity sucrose-H+ symport activity mediated by the MALx1 maltose permeases, and its further intracellular hydrolysis by cytoplasmic maltases. Although sucrose consumption by this engineered yeast strain was slower than with the parental yeast strain, the cells grew efficiently on sucrose due to an increased respiration of the carbon source. Consequently, this engineered yeast strain produced less ethanol and 1.5 to 2 times more biomass when cultivated in simple batch mode using 20 g/L sucrose as the carbon source. Conclusion Higher cell densities during batch cultures on 20 g/L sucrose were achieved by using a S. cerevisiae strain engineered in the sucrose uptake system. Such result was accomplished by effectively reducing sucrose

  5. Continuous co-fermentation of cellobiose and xylose by engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Ha, Suk-Jin; Kim, Soo Rin; Kim, Heejin; Du, Jing; Cate, Jamie H D; Jin, Yong-Su

    2013-12-01

    Simultaneous fermentation of cellobiose and xylose by an engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been demonstrated in batch fermentation, suggesting the feasibility of continuous co-fermentation of cellulosic sugars. As industrial S. cerevisiae strains have known to possess higher ethanol productivity and robustness compared to laboratory S. cerevisiae strains, xylose and cellobiose metabolic pathways were introduced into a haploid strain derived from an industrial S. cerevisiae. The resulting strain (JX123-BTT) was able to ferment a mixture of cellobiose and xylose simultaneously in batch fermentation with a high ethanol yield (0.38 g/g) and productivity (2.00 g/L · h). Additionally, the JX123-BTT strain co-consumed glucose, cellobiose, and xylose under continuous culture conditions at a dilution rate of 0.05 h(-1) and produced ethanol resulting in 0.38 g/g of ethanol yield and 0.96 g/L · h of productivity. This is the first demonstration of co-fermentation of cellobiose and xylose by an engineered S. cerevisiae under continuous culture conditions. PMID:24140899

  6. Tetraploid citrus rootstocks are more tolerant to salt stress than diploid.

    PubMed

    Saleh, Basel; Allario, Thierry; Dambier, Dominique; Ollitrault, Patrick; Morillon, Raphaël

    2008-09-01

    Citrus trees are subject to several abiotic constraints such as salinity. Providing new rootstocks more tolerant is thus a requirement. In this article, we investigated salt stress tolerance of three tetraploid rootstock genotypes when compared to their respective diploid rootstocks (Poncirus trifoliata, Carrizo citrange, Cleopatra mandarin). Plant growth, leaf fall and ion contents were investigated. At the end of the experiment, leaf fall was observed only for diploid Poncirus trifoliata plants as well as chlorosis symptoms for Poncirus trifoliata and Carrizo citrange diploid plants. The diploid Cleopatra mandarin plants growth rate was not affected by salt stress and has even been increased for tetraploid Cleopatra mandarin. Ion contents investigation has shown lower accumulations of chloride ions in leaves of the tetraploid plants when compared to diploid plants. Our results suggest that citrus tetraploid rootstocks are more tolerant to salt stress than their corresponding diploid.

  7. Performance comparisons between diploid and triploid sunshine bass in fresh water ponds

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kerby, J.H.; Everson, J.M.; Harrell, R.M.; Geiger, J.G.; Starling, C.C.; Revels, H.

    2002-01-01

    Diploid and triploid sunshine bass (white bass ??? x striped bass ???) were produced in 1990 at Florida's Richloam Fish Hatchery. Triploidy was induced with hydrostatic pressure. Fry were cultured to phase I in earthen ponds in Webster and Gainesville, FL, and transported to Leetown, WV, where they were held in circular flow-through fiberglass tanks. Ploidy of treated fish was determined with a Coulter counter and triploids were segregated from diploids. In April 1991, control diploid and triploid populations were graded to remove the largest and smallest individuals, and four 0.2-ha hypalon-lined ponds were stocked with 600 fish each; two ponds contained triploids and two contained diploids. Triploids and diploids were not significantly different in average fork length (FL) or weight at stocking. Triploids averaged 231 mm and 181.2 g, compared to diploid averages of 233 mm and 188.9 g. Monthly samples indicated that diploids grew faster than triploids; mean weights and lengths were both significantly different after 3 months. When harvested in October, triploids averaged 358 mm and 867.9 g, whereas diploids averaged 381 mm and 1153.5 g. Survival of triploids and diploids was 97.0% and 95.9%, respectively. Mean standing crop was 2496.3 kg/ha for triploids and 3280.6 kg/ha for diploids. Male diploids and most female diploids were sexually mature at 2 years of age. Sterility of triploids was confirmed as gonads remained reduced and dysfunctional at 5 years of age. ?? 2002 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Diploid biological evolution models with general smooth fitness landscapes and recombination.

    PubMed

    Saakian, David B; Kirakosyan, Zara; Hu, Chin-Kun

    2008-06-01

    Using a Hamilton-Jacobi equation approach, we obtain analytic equations for steady-state population distributions and mean fitness functions for Crow-Kimura and Eigen-type diploid biological evolution models with general smooth hypergeometric fitness landscapes. Our numerical solutions of diploid biological evolution models confirm the analytic equations obtained. We also study the parallel diploid model for the simple case of recombination and calculate the variance of distribution, which is consistent with numerical results. PMID:18643300

  9. ROG1 encodes a monoacylglycerol lipase in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Vishnu Varthini, Lakshmanaperumal; Selvaraju, Kandasamy; Srinivasan, Malathi; Nachiappan, Vasanthi

    2015-01-01

    Lipid metabolism is extensively studied in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Here, we report that revertant of glycogen synthase kinase mutation-1 (Rog1p) possesses monoacylglycerol (MAG) lipase activity in S. cerevisiae. The lipase activity of Rog1p was confirmed in two ways: through analysis of a strain with a double deletion of ROG1 and monoglyceride lipase YJU3 (yju3Δrog1Δ) and by site-directed mutagenesis of the ROG1 lipase motif (GXSXG). Rog1p is localized in both the cytosol and the nucleus. Overexpression of ROG1 in a ROG1-deficient strain resulted in an accumulation of reactive oxygen species. These results suggest that Rog1p is a MAG lipase that regulates lipid homeostasis.

  10. The association between polyploidy and clonal reproduction in diploid and tetraploid Chamerion angustifolium.

    PubMed

    Baldwin, Sarah J; Husband, Brian C

    2013-04-01

    Clonal reproduction is associated with the incidence of polyploidy in flowering plants. This pattern may arise through selection for increased clonality in polyploids compared to diploids to reduce mixed-ploidy mating. Here, we test whether clonal reproduction is greater in tetraploid than diploid populations of the mixed-ploidy plant, Chamerion angustifolium, through an analysis of the size and spatial distribution of clones in natural populations using AFLP genotyping and a comparison of root bud production in a greenhouse study. Natural tetraploid populations (N = 5) had significantly more AFLP genotypes (x¯ = 10.8) than diploid populations (x¯ = 6.0). Tetraploid populations tended to have fewer ramets per genotype and fewer genotypes with >1 ramet. In a spatial autocorrelation analysis, ramets within genotypes were more spatially aggregated in diploid populations than in tetraploid populations. In the greenhouse, tetraploids allocated 90.4% more dry mass to root buds than diploids, but tetraploids produced no more root buds and 44% fewer root buds per unit root mass than diploids. Our results indicate that clonal reproduction is significant in most populations, but tetraploid populations are not more clonal than diploids, nor are their clones more spatially aggregated. As a result, tetraploids may be less sheltered from mixed-ploidy mating and diploids more exposed to inbreeding, the balance of which could influence the establishment of tetraploids in diploid populations. PMID:23432094

  11. Metapopulation inbreeding dynamics, effective size and subpopulation differentiation--A general analytical approach for diploid organisms.

    PubMed

    Hössjer, Ola; Olsson, Fredrik; Laikre, Linda; Ryman, Nils

    2015-06-01

    Motivated by problems in conservation biology we study genetic dynamics in structured populations of diploid organisms (monoecious or dioecious). Our analysis provides an analytical framework that unifies substantial parts of previous work in terms of exact identity by descent (IBD) and identity by state (IBS) recursions. We provide exact conditions under which two structured haploid and diploid populations are equivalent, and some sufficient conditions under which a dioecious diploid population can be treated as a monoecious diploid one. The IBD recursions are used for computing local and metapopulation inbreeding and coancestry effective population sizes and for predictions of several types of fixation indices over different time horizons. PMID:25875853

  12. Metapopulation inbreeding dynamics, effective size and subpopulation differentiation--A general analytical approach for diploid organisms.

    PubMed

    Hössjer, Ola; Olsson, Fredrik; Laikre, Linda; Ryman, Nils

    2015-06-01

    Motivated by problems in conservation biology we study genetic dynamics in structured populations of diploid organisms (monoecious or dioecious). Our analysis provides an analytical framework that unifies substantial parts of previous work in terms of exact identity by descent (IBD) and identity by state (IBS) recursions. We provide exact conditions under which two structured haploid and diploid populations are equivalent, and some sufficient conditions under which a dioecious diploid population can be treated as a monoecious diploid one. The IBD recursions are used for computing local and metapopulation inbreeding and coancestry effective population sizes and for predictions of several types of fixation indices over different time horizons.

  13. Saccharomyces cerevisiae engineered to produce D-xylonate.

    PubMed

    Toivari, Mervi H; Ruohonen, Laura; Richard, Peter; Penttilä, Merja; Wiebe, Marilyn G

    2010-10-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae was engineered to produce D-xylonate by introducing the Trichoderma reesei xyd1 gene, encoding a D-xylose dehydrogenase. D-xylonate was not toxic to S. cerevisiae, and the cells were able to export D-xylonate produced in the cytoplasm to the supernatant. Up to 3.8 g of D-xylonate per litre, at rates of 25-36 mg of D-xylonate per litre per hour, was produced. Up to 4.8 g of xylitol per litre was also produced. The yield of D-xylonate from D-xylose was approximately 0.4 g of D-xylonate per gramme of D-xylose consumed. Deletion of the aldose reductase encoding gene GRE3 in S. cerevisiae strains expressing xyd1 reduced xylitol production by 67%, increasing the yield of D-xylonate from D-xylose. However, D-xylose uptake was reduced compared to strains containing GRE3, and the total amount of D-xylonate produced was reduced. To determine whether the co-factor NADP+ was limiting for D-xylonate production the Escherichia coli transhydrogenase encoded by udhA, the Bacillus subtilis glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase encoded by gapB or the S. cerevisiae glutamate dehydrogenase encoded by GDH2 was co-expressed with xyd1 in the parent and GRE3 deficient strains. Although each of these enzymes enhanced NADPH consumption on D-glucose, they did not enhance D-xylonate production, suggesting that NADP+ was not the main limitation in the current D-xylonate producing strains.

  14. Phenotypic Landscape of Saccharomyces cerevisiae during Wine Fermentation: Evidence for Origin-Dependent Metabolic Traits

    PubMed Central

    Camarasa, Carole; Sanchez, Isabelle; Brial, Pascale; Bigey, Frédéric; Dequin, Sylvie

    2011-01-01

    The species Saccharomyces cerevisiae includes natural strains, clinical isolates, and a large number of strains used in human activities. The aim of this work was to investigate how the adaptation to a broad range of ecological niches may have selectively shaped the yeast metabolic network to generate specific phenotypes. Using 72 S. cerevisiae strains collected from various sources, we provide, for the first time, a population-scale picture of the fermentative metabolic traits found in the S. cerevisiae species under wine making conditions. Considerable phenotypic variation was found suggesting that this yeast employs diverse metabolic strategies to face environmental constraints. Several groups of strains can be distinguished from the entire population on the basis of specific traits. Strains accustomed to growing in the presence of high sugar concentrations, such as wine yeasts and strains obtained from fruits, were able to achieve fermentation, whereas natural yeasts isolated from “poor-sugar” environments, such as oak trees or plants, were not. Commercial wine yeasts clearly appeared as a subset of vineyard isolates, and were mainly differentiated by their fermentative performances as well as their low acetate production. Overall, the emergence of the origin-dependent properties of the strains provides evidence for a phenotypic evolution driven by environmental constraints and/or human selection within S. cerevisiae. PMID:21949874

  15. Biogeographical characterization of Saccharomyces cerevisiae wine yeast by molecular methods

    PubMed Central

    Tofalo, Rosanna; Perpetuini, Giorgia; Schirone, Maria; Fasoli, Giuseppe; Aguzzi, Irene; Corsetti, Aldo; Suzzi, Giovanna

    2013-01-01

    Biogeography is the descriptive and explanatory study of spatial patterns and processes involved in the distribution of biodiversity. Without biogeography, it would be difficult to study the diversity of microorganisms because there would be no way to visualize patterns in variation. Saccharomyces cerevisiae, “the wine yeast,” is the most important species involved in alcoholic fermentation, and in vineyard ecosystems, it follows the principle of “everything is everywhere.” Agricultural practices such as farming (organic versus conventional) and floor management systems have selected different populations within this species that are phylogenetically distinct. In fact, recent ecological and geographic studies highlighted that unique strains are associated with particular grape varieties in specific geographical locations. These studies also highlighted that significant diversity and regional character, or ‘terroir,’ have been introduced into the winemaking process via this association. This diversity of wild strains preserves typicity, the high quality, and the unique flavor of wines. Recently, different molecular methods were developed to study population dynamics of S. cerevisiae strains in both vineyards and wineries. In this review, we will provide an update on the current molecular methods used to reveal the geographical distribution of S. cerevisiae wine yeast. PMID:23805132

  16. [Production of β-carotene by metabolically engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae].

    PubMed

    Wang, Beibei; Shi, Mingyu; Wang, Dong; Xu, Jiaoyang; Liu, Yi; Yang, Hongjiang; Dai, Zhubo; Zhang, Xueli

    2014-08-01

    β-carotene has a wide range of application in food, pharmaceutical and cosmetic industries. For microbial production of β-carotene in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the supply of geranylgeranyl diphosphate (GGPP) was firstly increased in S. cerevisiae BY4742 to obtain strain BY4742-T2 through over-expressing truncated 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase (tHMGR), which is the major rate-limiting enzyme in the mevalonate (MVA) pathway, and GGPP synthase (GGPS), which is a key enzyme in the diterpenoid synthetic pathway. The β-carotene synthetic genes of Pantoea agglomerans and Xanthophyllomyces dendrorhous were further integrated into strain BY4742-T2 for comparing β-carotene production. Over-expression of tHMGR and GGPS genes led to 26.0-fold increase of β-carotene production. In addition, genes from X. dendrorhous was more efficient than those from P. agglomerans for β-carotene production in S. cerevisiae. Strain BW02 was obtained which produced 1.56 mg/g (dry cell weight) β-carotene, which could be used further for constructing cell factories for β-carotene production. PMID:25507473

  17. [Production of β-carotene by metabolically engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae].

    PubMed

    Wang, Beibei; Shi, Mingyu; Wang, Dong; Xu, Jiaoyang; Liu, Yi; Yang, Hongjiang; Dai, Zhubo; Zhang, Xueli

    2014-08-01

    β-carotene has a wide range of application in food, pharmaceutical and cosmetic industries. For microbial production of β-carotene in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the supply of geranylgeranyl diphosphate (GGPP) was firstly increased in S. cerevisiae BY4742 to obtain strain BY4742-T2 through over-expressing truncated 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase (tHMGR), which is the major rate-limiting enzyme in the mevalonate (MVA) pathway, and GGPP synthase (GGPS), which is a key enzyme in the diterpenoid synthetic pathway. The β-carotene synthetic genes of Pantoea agglomerans and Xanthophyllomyces dendrorhous were further integrated into strain BY4742-T2 for comparing β-carotene production. Over-expression of tHMGR and GGPS genes led to 26.0-fold increase of β-carotene production. In addition, genes from X. dendrorhous was more efficient than those from P. agglomerans for β-carotene production in S. cerevisiae. Strain BW02 was obtained which produced 1.56 mg/g (dry cell weight) β-carotene, which could be used further for constructing cell factories for β-carotene production. PMID:25423750

  18. Noncomplementing Diploids from Bacillus Subtilis Protoplast Fusion: Relationship between Maintenance of Chromosomal Inactivation and Segregation Capacity

    PubMed Central

    Grandjean, V.; Hauck, Y.; Le-Derout, J.; Hirschbein, L.

    1996-01-01

    Fusions of Bacillus subtilis protoplasts from two genetically marked strains produce noncomplementing heterodiploid bacteria. These noncomplementing diploids (Ncds) carry both parental chromosomes, but only one is expressed. Fusion products of strains polymorphic for NotI restriction sites provide new physical evidence to support the conclusion that Ncds are not an artifact of cross feeding or cell adhesion. We show that reversible chromosomal inactivation can only account for the biparental trait of unstable Ncds. Two types of cells were recovered from the late progeny of unstable Ncds: Ncds with irreversible chromosome silencing (stable Ncds) and secondary recombinants that displayed a genomic mosaic NotI profile. Segregants from an unstable Ncd population gave rise to two viable haploid cell types. By contrast, stable Ncds segregated into a population of viable and inviable haploid cells. We propose that the latter are derived from irreversible chromosome silencing. Our results indicate that clonal populations of stable Ncds are heterogenous and suggest that segregation and inactivation are independent parameters. PMID:8913734

  19. Engineering of Saccharomyces cerevisiae for efficient anaerobic alcoholic fermentation of L-arabinose.

    PubMed

    Wisselink, H Wouter; Toirkens, Maurice J; del Rosario Franco Berriel, M; Winkler, Aaron A; van Dijken, Johannes P; Pronk, Jack T; van Maris, Antonius J A

    2007-08-01

    For cost-effective and efficient ethanol production from lignocellulosic fractions of plant biomass, the conversion of not only major constituents, such as glucose and xylose, but also less predominant sugars, such as l-arabinose, is required. Wild-type strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the organism used in industrial ethanol production, cannot ferment xylose and arabinose. Although metabolic and evolutionary engineering has enabled the efficient alcoholic fermentation of xylose under anaerobic conditions, the conversion of l-arabinose into ethanol by engineered S. cerevisiae strains has previously been demonstrated only under oxygen-limited conditions. This study reports the first case of fast and efficient anaerobic alcoholic fermentation of l-arabinose by an engineered S. cerevisiae strain. This fermentation was achieved by combining the expression of the structural genes for the l-arabinose utilization pathway of Lactobacillus plantarum, the overexpression of the S. cerevisiae genes encoding the enzymes of the nonoxidative pentose phosphate pathway, and extensive evolutionary engineering. The resulting S. cerevisiae strain exhibited high rates of arabinose consumption (0.70 g h(-1) g [dry weight](-1)) and ethanol production (0.29 g h(-1) g [dry weight](-1)) and a high ethanol yield (0.43 g g(-1)) during anaerobic growth on l-arabinose as the sole carbon source. In addition, efficient ethanol production from sugar mixtures containing glucose and arabinose, which is crucial for application in industrial ethanol production, was achieved.

  20. Saccharomyces cerevisiae: Population Divergence and Resistance to Oxidative Stress in Clinical, Domesticated and Wild Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Diezmann, Stephanie; Dietrich, Fred S.

    2009-01-01

    Background Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been associated with human life for millennia in the brewery and bakery. Recently it has been recognized as an emerging opportunistic pathogen. To study the evolutionary history of S. cerevisiae, the origin of clinical isolates and the importance of a virulence-associated trait, population genetics and phenotypic assays have been applied to an ecologically diverse set of 103 strains isolated from clinics, breweries, vineyards, fruits, soil, commercial supplements and insect guts. Methodology/Principal Findings DNA sequence data from five nuclear DNA loci were analyzed for population structure and haplotype distribution. Additionally, all strains were tested for survival of oxidative stress, a trait associated with microbial pathogenicity. DNA sequence analyses identified three genetic subgroups within the recombining S. cerevisiae strains that are associated with ecology, geography and virulence. Shared alleles suggest that the clinical isolates contain genetic contribution from the fruit isolates. Clinical and fruit isolates exhibit high levels of recombination, unlike the genetically homogenous soil isolates in which no recombination was detected. However, clinical and soil isolates were more resistant to oxidative stress than any other population, suggesting a correlation between survival in oxidative stress and yeast pathogenicity. Conclusions/Significance Population genetic analyses of S. cerevisiae delineated three distinct groups, comprising primarily the (i) human-associated brewery and vineyard strains, (ii) clinical and fruit isolates (iii) and wild soil isolates from eastern U.S. The interactions between S. cerevisiae and humans potentiate yeast evolution and the development of genetically, ecologically and geographically divergent groups. PMID:19390633

  1. Lactose fermentation by engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae capable of fermenting cellobiose.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jing-Jing; Zhang, Guo-Chang; Oh, Eun Joong; Pathanibul, Panchalee; Turner, Timothy L; Jin, Yong-Su

    2016-09-20

    Lactose is an inevitable byproduct of the dairy industry. In addition to cheese manufacturing, the growing Greek yogurt industry generates excess acid whey, which contains lactose. Therefore, rapid and efficient conversion of lactose to fuels and chemicals would be useful for recycling the otherwise harmful acid whey. Saccharomyces cerevisiae, a popular metabolic engineering host, cannot natively utilize lactose. However, we discovered that an engineered S. cerevisiae strain (EJ2) capable of fermenting cellobiose can also ferment lactose. This finding suggests that a cellobiose transporter (CDT-1) can transport lactose and a β-glucosidase (GH1-1) can hydrolyze lactose by acting as a β-galactosidase. While the lactose fermentation by the EJ2 strain was much slower than the cellobiose fermentation, a faster lactose-fermenting strain (EJ2e8) was obtained through serial subcultures on lactose. The EJ2e8 strain fermented lactose with a consumption rate of 2.16g/Lh. The improved lactose fermentation by the EJ2e8 strain was due to the increased copy number of cdt-1 and gh1-1 genes. Looking ahead, the EJ2e8 strain could be exploited for the production of other non-ethanol fuels and chemicals from lactose through further metabolic engineering. PMID:27457698

  2. Depletion of H2A-H2B dimers in Saccharomyces cerevisiae triggers meiotic arrest by reducing IME1 expression and activating the BUB2-dependent branch of the spindle checkpoint.

    PubMed Central

    Hanlon, Sean E; Norris, David N; Vershon, Andrew K

    2003-01-01

    In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, diploid strains carrying homozygous hta1-htb1Delta mutations express histone H2A-H2B dimers at a lower level than do wild-type cells. Although this mutation has only minor effects on mitotic growth, it causes an arrest in sporulation prior to the first meiotic division. In this report, we show that the hta1-htb1Delta mutant exhibits reduced expression of early and middle-sporulation-specific genes and that the meiotic arrest of the hta1-htb1Delta mutant can be partially bypassed by overexpression of IME1. Additionally, deletions of BUB2 or BFA1, components of one branch of the spindle checkpoint pathway, bypass the meiotic arrest. Mutations in the other branch of the pathway or in the pachytene checkpoint are unable to suppress the meiotic block. These observations indicate that depletion of the H2A-H2B dimer blocks sporulation by at least two mechanisms: disruption of the expression of meiotic regulatory genes and activation of the spindle checkpoint. Our results show that the failure to progress through the meiotic pathway is not the result of global chromosomal alterations but that specific aspects of meiosis are sensitive to depletion of the H2A-H2B dimer. PMID:12930743

  3. A monoecious and diploid Moran model of random mating.

    PubMed

    Hössjer, Ola; Tyvand, Peder A

    2016-04-01

    An exact Markov chain is developed for a Moran model of random mating for monoecious diploid individuals with a given probability of self-fertilization. The model captures the dynamics of genetic variation at a biallelic locus. We compare the model with the corresponding diploid Wright-Fisher (WF) model. We also develop a novel diffusion approximation of both models, where the genotype frequency distribution dynamics is described by two partial differential equations, on different time scales. The first equation captures the more slowly varying allele frequencies, and it is the same for the Moran and WF models. The other equation captures departures of the fraction of heterozygous genotypes from a large population equilibrium curve that equals Hardy-Weinberg proportions in the absence of selfing. It is the distribution of a continuous time Ornstein-Uhlenbeck process for the Moran model and a discrete time autoregressive process for the WF model. One application of our results is to capture dynamics of the degree of non-random mating of both models, in terms of the fixation index fIS. Although fIS has a stable fixed point that only depends on the degree of selfing, the normally distributed oscillations around this fixed point are stochastically larger for the Moran than for the WF model. PMID:26807805

  4. Spatial heterogeneity and the evolution of sex in diploids.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Aneil F

    2009-07-01

    Much of the theoretical work on the evolution of sex has focused on the effects of recombination. In diploids, segregation also occurs during sexual reproduction. Segregation breaks down some types of genetic associations that are not affected by recombination and thus influences the evolution of sex in ways that are not apparent from studying the evolution of recombination as a surrogate for sex. Here I examine the evolution of sex in diploids experiencing spatially heterogeneous selection. If divergent selection causes genetic differentiation, then migration can be a powerful force generating genetic associations that may not be favored by selection. An advantage to sex can arise from breaking down these associations. By examining modifiers of both sex and recombination, the model allows for a direct comparison of the forces acting on these related but different processes, illuminating the role of segregation. The model also includes inbreeding, which has been shown to be important for both segregation and recombination. I find that inbreeding affects the evolution of sex through segregation, not recombination. Several suggestions for empirical experiments are given.

  5. Deleterious mutations and selection for sex in finite diploid populations.

    PubMed

    Roze, Denis; Michod, Richard E

    2010-04-01

    In diploid populations, indirect benefits of sex may stem from segregation and recombination. Although it has been recognized that finite population size is an important component of selection for recombination, its effects on selection for segregation have been somewhat less studied. In this article, we develop analytical two- and three-locus models to study the effect of recurrent deleterious mutations on a modifier gene increasing sex, in a finite diploid population. The model also incorporates effects of mitotic recombination, causing loss of heterozygosity (LOH). Predictions are tested using multilocus simulations representing deleterious mutations occurring at a large number of loci. The model and simulations show that excess of heterozygosity generated by finite population size is an important component of selection for sex, favoring segregation when deleterious alleles are nearly additive to dominant. Furthermore, sex tends to break correlations in homozygosity among selected loci, which disfavors sex when deleterious alleles are either recessive or dominant. As a result, we find that it is difficult to maintain costly sex when deleterious alleles are recessive. LOH tends to favor sex when deleterious mutations are recessive, but the effect is relatively weak for rates of LOH corresponding to current estimates (of the order 10(-4)-10(-5)).

  6. Deciphering the diploid ancestral genome of the Mesohexaploid Brassica rapa.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Feng; Mandáková, Terezie; Wu, Jian; Xie, Qi; Lysak, Martin A; Wang, Xiaowu

    2013-05-01

    The genus Brassica includes several important agricultural and horticultural crops. Their current genome structures were shaped by whole-genome triplication followed by extensive diploidization. The availability of several crucifer genome sequences, especially that of Chinese cabbage (Brassica rapa), enables study of the evolution of the mesohexaploid Brassica genomes from their diploid progenitors. We reconstructed three ancestral subgenomes of B. rapa (n = 10) by comparing its whole-genome sequence to ancestral and extant Brassicaceae genomes. All three B. rapa paleogenomes apparently consisted of seven chromosomes, similar to the ancestral translocation Proto-Calepineae Karyotype (tPCK; n = 7), which is the evolutionarily younger variant of the Proto-Calepineae Karyotype (n = 7). Based on comparative analysis of genome sequences or linkage maps of Brassica oleracea, Brassica nigra, radish (Raphanus sativus), and other closely related species, we propose a two-step merging of three tPCK-like genomes to form the hexaploid ancestor of the tribe Brassiceae with 42 chromosomes. Subsequent diversification of the Brassiceae was marked by extensive genome reshuffling and chromosome number reduction mediated by translocation events and followed by loss and/or inactivation of centromeres. Furthermore, via interspecies genome comparison, we refined intervals for seven of the genomic blocks of the Ancestral Crucifer Karyotype (n = 8), thus revising the key reference genome for evolutionary genomics of crucifers. PMID:23653472

  7. Deciphering the diploid ancestral genome of the Mesohexaploid Brassica rapa.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Feng; Mandáková, Terezie; Wu, Jian; Xie, Qi; Lysak, Martin A; Wang, Xiaowu

    2013-05-01

    The genus Brassica includes several important agricultural and horticultural crops. Their current genome structures were shaped by whole-genome triplication followed by extensive diploidization. The availability of several crucifer genome sequences, especially that of Chinese cabbage (Brassica rapa), enables study of the evolution of the mesohexaploid Brassica genomes from their diploid progenitors. We reconstructed three ancestral subgenomes of B. rapa (n = 10) by comparing its whole-genome sequence to ancestral and extant Brassicaceae genomes. All three B. rapa paleogenomes apparently consisted of seven chromosomes, similar to the ancestral translocation Proto-Calepineae Karyotype (tPCK; n = 7), which is the evolutionarily younger variant of the Proto-Calepineae Karyotype (n = 7). Based on comparative analysis of genome sequences or linkage maps of Brassica oleracea, Brassica nigra, radish (Raphanus sativus), and other closely related species, we propose a two-step merging of three tPCK-like genomes to form the hexaploid ancestor of the tribe Brassiceae with 42 chromosomes. Subsequent diversification of the Brassiceae was marked by extensive genome reshuffling and chromosome number reduction mediated by translocation events and followed by loss and/or inactivation of centromeres. Furthermore, via interspecies genome comparison, we refined intervals for seven of the genomic blocks of the Ancestral Crucifer Karyotype (n = 8), thus revising the key reference genome for evolutionary genomics of crucifers.

  8. An improved method of xylose utilization by recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Ma, Tien-Yang; Lin, Ting-Hsiang; Hsu, Teng-Chieh; Huang, Chiung-Fang; Guo, Gia-Luen; Hwang, Wen-Song

    2012-10-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a method to optimize expression levels of xylose-metabolizing enzymes to improve xylose utilization capacity of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. A xylose-utilizing recombinant S. cerevisiae strain YY2KL, able to express nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate, reduced (NADPH)-dependent xylose reductase (XR), nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+))-dependent xylitol dehydrogenase (XDH), and xylulokinase (XK), showed a low ethanol yield and sugar consumption rate. To optimize xylose utilization by YY2KL, a recombinant expression plasmid containing the XR gene was transformed and integrated into the aur1 site of YY2KL. Two recombinant expression plasmids containing an nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADP(+))-dependent XDH mutant and XK genes were dually transformed and integrated into the 5S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) sites of YY2KL. This procedure allowed systematic construction of an S. cerevisiae library with different ratios of genes for xylose-metabolizing enzymes, and well-grown colonies with different xylose fermentation capacities could be further selected in yeast protein extract (YPX) medium (1 % yeast extract, 2 % peptone, and 2 % xylose). We successfully isolated a recombinant strain with a superior xylose fermentation capacity and designated it as strain YY5A. The xylose consumption rate for strain YY5A was estimated to be 2.32 g/gDCW/h (g xylose/g dry cell weight/h), which was 2.34 times higher than that for the parent strain YY2KL (0.99 g/gDCW/h). The ethanol yield was also enhanced 1.83 times by this novel method. Optimal ratio and expression levels of xylose-metabolizing enzymes are important for efficient conversion of xylose to ethanol. This study provides a novel method that allows rapid and effective selection of ratio-optimized xylose-utilizing yeast strains. This method may be applicable to other multienzyme systems in yeast.

  9. The study of the influence of temperature and initial glucose concentration on the fermentation process in the presence of Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast strain immobilized on starch gels by reversed-flow gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Lainioti, G Ch; Kapolos, J; Koliadima, A; Karaiskakis, G

    2012-01-01

    The technique of reversed-flow gas chromatography (RFGC) was employed for the determination of the alcoholic fermentation phases and of kinetic parameters for free and immobilized cell systems, at different initial glucose concentrations and temperature values. In addition to this, due to its considerable advantages over other techniques, RFGC was used for the characterization of a new biocatalyst, yeast cells immobilized on starch gel, and especially wheat starch gel. Immobilization of wine yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae AXAZ-1 was accomplished on wheat and corn starch gels in order to prepare new biocatalysts with great interest for the fermentation industry. The RFGC led with great accuracy, resulting from a literature review, to the determination of reaction rate constants and activation energies at each phase of the fermentation processes. A maximum value of rate constants was observed at initial glucose concentration of 205 g/L, where a higher number of yeast cells was observed. The increase of glucose concentrations had a negative influence on the growth of AXAZ-1 cells and rate constants were decreased. The decrease of fermentation temperature caused a substantial reduction in the viability of immobilized cells as well as in rate constant values. Activation energies of corn starch gel presented lower values than those of wheat starch gel. However, the two supports showed higher catalytic efficiency than free cell systems, proving that starch gels may act as a promoter of the catalytic activity of the yeast cells involved in the fermentation process.

  10. Diploid males and their triploid offspring in the paper wasp Polistes dominulus

    PubMed Central

    Liebert, Aviva E; Sumana, Annagiri; Starks, Philip T

    2005-01-01

    Although the hymenopteran sex-determining mechanism generally results in haploid males and diploid females, diploid males can be produced via homozygosity at the sex-determining locus. Diploid males have low fitness because they are effectively sterile or produce presumably sterile triploid offspring. Previously, triploid females were observed in three species of North American Polistes paper wasps, and this was interpreted as indirect evidence of diploid males. Here we report what is, to our knowledge, the first direct evidence: four of five early male-producing Polistes dominulus nests from three populations contained diploid males. Because haploid males were also found, however, the adaptive value of early males cannot be ignored. Using genetic and morphological data from triploid females, we also present evidence that both diploid males and triploid females remain undetected throughout the colony cycle. Consequently, diploid male production may result in a delayed fitness cost for two generations. This phenomenon is particularly relevant for introduced populations with few alleles at the sex-determining locus, but cannot be ignored in native populations without supporting genetic data. Future research using paper wasp populations to test theories of social evolution should explicitly consider the potential impacts of diploid males. PMID:17148166

  11. Pollen competition as a unilateral reproductive barrier between sympatric diploid and tetraploid Chamerion angustifolium.

    PubMed

    Husband, Brian C; Schemske, Douglas W; Burton, Tracy L; Goodwillie, Carol

    2002-12-22

    Speciation requires the evolution of barriers to gene exchange between descendant and progenitor populations. Cryptic reproductive barriers in plants arise after pollination but before fertilization as a result of pollen competition and interactions between male gametophytes and female reproductive tissues. We tested for such gametic isolation between the polyploid Chamerion angustifolium and its diploid progenitor by conducting single (diploid or tetraploid) and mixed ploidy (1 : 1 diploid and tetraploid) pollinations on both cytotypes and inferring siring success from paternity analysis and pollen-tube counts. In mixed pollinations, polyploids sired most (79%) of their own seeds as well as those of diploids (61%) (correcting for triploid block, siring success was 70% and 83%, respectively). In single donor pollinations, pollen tubes from tetraploids were more numerous than those from diploids at four different positions in each style and for both diploid and tetraploid pollen recipients. The lack of a pollen donor x recipient interaction indicates that the tetraploid siring advantage is a result of pollen competition rather than pollen-pistil interactions. Such unilateral pollen precedence results in an asymmetrical pattern of isolation, with tetraploids experiencing less gene flow than diploids. It also enhances tetraploid establishment in sympatric populations, by maximizing tetraploid success and simultaneously diminishing that of diploids through the production of inviable triploid offspring. PMID:12573071

  12. Advances in metabolic engineering of yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae for production of chemicals.

    PubMed

    Borodina, Irina; Nielsen, Jens

    2014-05-01

    Yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is an important industrial host for production of enzymes, pharmaceutical and nutraceutical ingredients and recently also commodity chemicals and biofuels. Here, we review the advances in modeling and synthetic biology tools and how these tools can speed up the development of yeast cell factories. We also present an overview of metabolic engineering strategies for developing yeast strains for production of polymer monomers: lactic, succinic, and cis,cis-muconic acids. S. cerevisiae has already firmly established itself as a cell factory in industrial biotechnology and the advances in yeast strain engineering will stimulate development of novel yeast-based processes for chemicals production.

  13. Metabolic Engineering of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Ostergaard, Simon; Olsson, Lisbeth; Nielsen, Jens

    2000-01-01

    Comprehensive knowledge regarding Saccharomyces cerevisiae has accumulated over time, and today S. cerevisiae serves as a widley used biotechnological production organism as well as a eukaryotic model system. The high transformation efficiency, in addition to the availability of the complete yeast genome sequence, has facilitated genetic manipulation of this microorganism, and new approaches are constantly being taken to metabolicially engineer this organism in order to suit specific needs. In this paper, strategies and concepts for metabolic engineering are discussed and several examples based upon selected studies involving S. cerevisiae are reviewed. The many different studies of metabolic engineering using this organism illustrate all the categories of this multidisciplinary field: extension of substrate range, improvements of producitivity and yield, elimination of byproduct formation, improvement of process performance, improvements of cellular properties, and extension of product range including heterologous protein production. PMID:10704473

  14. Computational models reveal genotype-phenotype associations in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Franco-Duarte, Ricardo; Mendes, Inês; Umek, Lan; Drumonde-Neves, João; Zupan, Blaz; Schuller, Dorit

    2014-07-01

    Genome sequencing is essential to understand individual variation and to study the mechanisms that explain relations between genotype and phenotype. The accumulated knowledge from large-scale genome sequencing projects of Saccharomyces cerevisiae isolates is being used to study the mechanisms that explain such relations. Our objective was to undertake genetic characterization of 172 S. cerevisiae strains from different geographical origins and technological groups, using 11 polymorphic microsatellites, and computationally relate these data with the results of 30 phenotypic tests. Genetic characterization revealed 280 alleles, with the microsatellite ScAAT1 contributing most to intrastrain variability, together with alleles 20, 9 and 16 from the microsatellites ScAAT4, ScAAT5 and ScAAT6. These microsatellite allelic profiles are characteristic for both the phenotype and origin of yeast strains. We confirm the strength of these associations by construction and cross-validation of computational models that can predict the technological application and origin of a strain from the microsatellite allelic profile. Associations between microsatellites and specific phenotypes were scored using information gain ratios, and significant findings were confirmed by permutation tests and estimation of false discovery rates. The phenotypes associated with higher number of alleles were the capacity to resist to sulphur dioxide (tested by the capacity to grow in the presence of potassium bisulphite) and the presence of galactosidase activity. Our study demonstrates the utility of computational modelling to estimate a strain technological group and phenotype from microsatellite allelic combinations as tools for preliminary yeast strain selection.

  15. Establishment of the diploid gynogenetic hybrid clonal line of red crucian carp x common carp.

    PubMed

    Liu, ShaoJun; Duan, Wei; Tao, Min; Zhang, Chun; Sun, YuanDong; Shen, JiaMin; Wang, Jing; Luo, KaiKun; Liu, Yun

    2007-04-01

    This study investigated the gynogenetic cytobiological behavior of the third gynogenetic generation (G(3)), which was generated from the diploid eggs produced by the second gynogenetic generation (G(2)) of red crucian carp x common carp, and determined the chromosomal numbers of G(3), G(2)xscatter scale carp and G(2)xallotetraploid hybrids of red crucian carp x common carp. The results showed that the diploid eggs of G(2) with 100 chromosomes, activated by UV-irradiated sperm from scatter scale carp and without the treatment for doubling the chromosomes, could develop into G(3) with 100 chromosomes. Similar to the first and second gynogenetic generations (G(1) and G(2)), G(3) was also diploid (2n=100) and presented the hybrid traits. The triploids (3n=150) and tetraploids (4n=200) were produced by crossing G(2) with scatter scale carp, and crossing G(2) with allotetraploids, respectively. The extrusion of the second polar body in the eggs of G(2) ruled out the possibility that the retention of the second polar body led to the formation of the diploid eggs. In addition, we discussed the mechanism of the formation of the diploid eggs generated by G(2). The establishment of the diploid gynogenesis clonal line (G(1), G(2) and G(3)) provided the evidence that the diploid eggs were able to develop into a new diploid hybrid clonal line by gynogenesis. By producing the diploid eggs as a unique reproductive way, the diploid gynogenetic progeny of allotetraploid hybrids of red crucian carp x common carp had important significances in both biological evolution and production application. PMID:17447025

  16. Evolution of maternal care in diploid and haplodiploid populations.

    PubMed

    Gardner, A

    2012-08-01

    Maternal care has been suggested to evolve more readily in haplodiploid populations. Because maternal care appears to have been a prerequisite for the evolution of eusociality, this effect potentially explains the apparent preponderance of haplodiploidy among eusocial taxa. Here, I use a kin selection approach to model the evolution of maternal care in diploid and haplodiploid populations. In contrast to previous suggestions, I find that haplodiploidy may inhibit as well as promote the evolution of maternal care. Moreover, I find that the haplodiploidy effect vanishes in outbred populations if gene effects average rather than add together. I confirm these analytical results using numerical simulation of an explicit population genetics model. This analysis casts doubt upon the idea that haplodiploidy has promoted the evolution of maternal care and, consequently, the evolution of eusociality. PMID:22694128

  17. Characterization of a heteropolysaccharide isolated from diploid Gynostemma pentaphyllum Makino.

    PubMed

    Yan, Wei; Niu, Yuge; Lv, Junli; Xie, Zhuohong; Jin, Lei; Yao, Wenbing; Gao, Xiangdong; Yu, Liangli Lucy

    2013-02-15

    A novel water-soluble polysaccharide (GPP), with a molecular mass of 7.1×10(3) Da, was isolated from the defatted whole-plant of diploid Gynostemma pentaphyllum Makino. Monosaccharide composition analysis indicated that GPP was a heteropolysaccharide mainly containing mannose, glucose, galactose and arabinose, at a molar ratio of 1.00:77.33:4.81:1.83. The detailed structure analysis revealed that GPP consisted of a (1→4)-α-D-glucoside backbone with a 1→)-α-D-glucopyranosyl branch at the C-6 position of (1→4,6)-linked-α-D-glucopyranosyl on every 5 monosaccharide residues, with a few mannose, galactose and arabinose terminal residues. GPP exhibited scavenging capacities against hydroxyl, peroxyl and DPPH radicals in vitro, and had a greater bile acid-binding ability than psyllium on a per weight basis. These results suggested a potential application of GPP in functional foods and dietary supplements.

  18. Diploid chromosome set of kissing bug Triatoma baratai (Hemiptera, Triatominae).

    PubMed

    Alevi, K C C; Reis, Y V; Borgueti, A O; Mendonça, V J; Rosa, J A; Azeredo-Oliveira, M T V

    2015-02-06

    Triatomines are insects that are taxonomically included in the Hemiptera order and Triatominae subfamily. Based on phenotypic similarity, capacity hybridization, and genetic and ecological aspects, the triatomine species can be grouped into specific complexes and subcomplexes. However, these groupings have not been confirmed. Cytogenetic analyses are important cytotaxonomic tools for improving the taxonomic knowledge of triatomines. Thus, we examined the karyotype of Triatoma baratai and compared the results with those of other species in the Matogrossensis subcomplex in order increase the understanding of vector potential. We also examined the cytotaxonomic classification of this insect. Triatoma baratai, similarly to other species that currently compose the Matogrossensis subcomplex, contains 22 chromosomes (20A + XY). Here, we describe the diploid chromosome set of T. baratai. We confirmed their current classification in the Matogrossensis subcomplex and demonstrated that the species in this subcomplex present karyotype homogeneity.

  19. The YH database: the first Asian diploid genome database.

    PubMed

    Li, Guoqing; Ma, Lijia; Song, Chao; Yang, Zhentao; Wang, Xiulan; Huang, Hui; Li, Yingrui; Li, Ruiqiang; Zhang, Xiuqing; Yang, Huanming; Wang, Jian; Wang, Jun

    2009-01-01

    The YH database is a server that allows the user to easily browse and download data from the first Asian diploid genome. The aim of this platform is to facilitate the study of this Asian genome and to enable improved organization and presentation large-scale personal genome data. Powered by GBrowse, we illustrate here the genome sequences, SNPs, and sequencing reads in the MapView. The relationships between phenotype and genotype can be searched by location, dbSNP ID, HGMD ID, gene symbol and disease name. A BLAST web service is also provided for the purpose of aligning query sequence against YH genome consensus. The YH database is currently one of the three personal genome database, organizing the original data and analysis results in a user-friendly interface, which is an endeavor to achieve fundamental goals for establishing personal medicine. The database is available at http://yh.genomics.org.cn.

  20. Copper Tolerance and Biosorption of Saccharomyces cerevisiae during Alcoholic Fermentation.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiang-Yu; Zhao, Yu; Liu, Ling-Ling; Jia, Bo; Zhao, Fang; Huang, Wei-Dong; Zhan, Ji-Cheng

    2015-01-01

    At high levels, copper in grape mash can inhibit yeast activity and cause stuck fermentations. Wine yeast has limited tolerance of copper and can reduce copper levels in wine during fermentation. This study aimed to understand copper tolerance of wine yeast and establish the mechanism by which yeast decreases copper in the must during fermentation. Three strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae (lab selected strain BH8 and industrial strains AWRI R2 and Freddo) and a simple model fermentation system containing 0 to 1.50 mM Cu2+ were used. ICP-AES determined Cu ion concentration in the must decreasing differently by strains and initial copper levels during fermentation. Fermentation performance was heavily inhibited under copper stress, paralleled a decrease in viable cell numbers. Strain BH8 showed higher copper-tolerance than strain AWRI R2 and higher adsorption than Freddo. Yeast cell surface depression and intracellular structure deformation after copper treatment were observed by scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy; electronic differential system detected higher surface Cu and no intracellular Cu on 1.50 mM copper treated yeast cells. It is most probably that surface adsorption dominated the biosorption process of Cu2+ for strain BH8, with saturation being accomplished in 24 h. This study demonstrated that Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain BH8 has good tolerance and adsorption of Cu, and reduces Cu2+ concentrations during fermentation in simple model system mainly through surface adsorption. The results indicate that the strain selected from China's stress-tolerant wine grape is copper tolerant and can reduce copper in must when fermenting in a copper rich simple model system, and provided information for studies on mechanisms of heavy metal stress.

  1. Mixing of vineyard and oak-tree ecotypes of Saccharomyces cerevisiae in North American vineyards.

    PubMed

    Hyma, Katie E; Fay, Justin C

    2013-06-01

    Humans have had a significant impact on the distribution and abundance of Saccharomyces cerevisiae through its widespread use in beer, bread and wine production. Yet, similar to other Saccharomyces species, S. cerevisiae has also been isolated from habitats unrelated to fermentations. Strains of S. cerevisiae isolated from grapes, wine must and vineyards worldwide are genetically differentiated from strains isolated from oak-tree bark, exudate and associated soil in North America. However, the causes and consequences of this differentiation have not yet been resolved. Historical differentiation of these two groups may have been influenced by geographic, ecological or human-associated barriers to gene flow. Here, we make use of the relatively recent establishment of vineyards across North America to identify and characterize any active barriers to gene flow between these two groups. We examined S. cerevisiae strains isolated from grapes and oak trees within three North American vineyards and compared them to those isolated from oak trees outside of vineyards. Within vineyards, we found evidence of migration between grapes and oak trees and potential gene flow between the divergent oak-tree and vineyard groups. Yet, we found no vineyard genotypes on oak trees outside of vineyards. In contrast, Saccharomyces paradoxus isolated from the same sources showed population structure characterized by isolation by distance. The apparent absence of ecological or genetic barriers between sympatric vineyard and oak-tree populations of S. cerevisiae implies that vineyards play an important role in the mixing between these two groups.

  2. Overproduction of fatty acids in engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaowei; Guo, Daoyi; Cheng, Yongbo; Zhu, Fayin; Deng, Zixin; Liu, Tiangang

    2014-09-01

    The long hydrocarbon fatty acyl chain is energy rich, making it an ideal precursor for liquid transportation fuels and high-value oleo chemicals. As Saccharomyces cerevisiae has many advantages for industrial production compared to Escherichia coli. Here, we attempted to engineer Saccharomyces cerevisiae for overproduction of fatty acids. First, disruption of the beta-oxidation pathway, elimination of the acyl-CoA synthetases, overexpression of different thioesterases and acetyl-CoA carboxylase ACC1, and engineering the supply of precursor acetyl-CoA. The engineered strain XL122 produced more than 120 mg/L of fatty acids. In parallel, we inactivated ADH1, the dominant gene for ethanol production, to redirect the metabolic flux to fatty acids synthesis. The engineered strain DG005 produced about 140 mg/L fatty acids. Additionally, Acetyl-CoA carboxylase was identified as a critical bottleneck of fatty acids synthesis in S. cerevisiae with a cell-free system. However, overexpression of ACC1 has little effect on fatty acids biosynthesis. As it has been reported that phosphorylation of ACC1 may influent its activity, so phosphorylation sites of ACC1 were further identified. Although the regulatory mechanisms remain unclear, our results provide rationale for future studies to target this critical step. All these efforts, particularly the discovery of the limiting step are critical for developing a "cell factory" for the overproduction of fatty acids by using type I fatty acids synthase in yeast or other fungi. PMID:24752690

  3. PGM2 overexpression improves anaerobic galactose fermentation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background In Saccharomyces cerevisiae galactose is initially metabolized through the Leloir pathway after which glucose 6-phosphate enters glycolysis. Galactose is controlled both by glucose repression and by galactose induction. The gene PGM2 encodes the last enzyme of the Leloir pathway, phosphoglucomutase 2 (Pgm2p), which catalyses the reversible conversion of glucose 1-phosphate to glucose 6-phosphate. Overexpression of PGM2 has previously been shown to enhance aerobic growth of S. cerevisiae in galactose medium. Results In the present study we show that overexpression of PGM2 under control of the HXT7'promoter from an integrative plasmid increased the PGM activity 5 to 6 times, which significantly reduced the lag phase of glucose-pregrown cells in an anaerobic galactose culture. PGM2 overexpression also increased the anaerobic specific growth rate whereas ethanol production was less influenced. When PGM2 was overexpressed from a multicopy plasmid instead, the PGM activity increased almost 32 times. However, this increase of PGM activity did not further improve aerobic galactose fermentation as compared to the strain carrying PGM2 on the integrative plasmid. Conclusion PGM2 overexpression in S. cerevisiae from an integrative plasmid is sufficient to reduce the lag phase and to enhance the growth rate in anaerobic galactose fermentation, which results in an overall decrease in fermentation duration. This observation is of particular importance for the future development of stable industrial strains with enhanced PGM activity. PMID:20507616

  4. A fast and accurate algorithm for diploid individual haplotype reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jingli; Liang, Binbin

    2013-08-01

    Haplotypes can provide significant information in many research fields, including molecular biology and medical therapy. However, haplotyping is much more difficult than genotyping by using only biological techniques. With the development of sequencing technologies, it becomes possible to obtain haplotypes by combining sequence fragments. The haplotype reconstruction problem of diploid individual has received considerable attention in recent years. It assembles the two haplotypes for a chromosome given the collection of fragments coming from the two haplotypes. Fragment errors significantly increase the difficulty of the problem, and which has been shown to be NP-hard. In this paper, a fast and accurate algorithm, named FAHR, is proposed for haplotyping a single diploid individual. Algorithm FAHR reconstructs the SNP sites of a pair of haplotypes one after another. The SNP fragments that cover some SNP site are partitioned into two groups according to the alleles of the corresponding SNP site, and the SNP values of the pair of haplotypes are ascertained by using the fragments in the group that contains more SNP fragments. The experimental comparisons were conducted among the FAHR, the Fast Hare and the DGS algorithms by using the haplotypes on chromosome 1 of 60 individuals in CEPH samples, which were released by the International HapMap Project. Experimental results under different parameter settings indicate that the reconstruction rate of the FAHR algorithm is higher than those of the Fast Hare and the DGS algorithms, and the running time of the FAHR algorithm is shorter than those of the Fast Hare and the DGS algorithms. Moreover, the FAHR algorithm has high efficiency even for the reconstruction of long haplotypes and is very practical for realistic applications.

  5. [Surface display of phytase on Saccharomyces cerevisiae for efficient bioethanol production from corn starch].

    PubMed

    Xiao, Yan; Chen, Xianzhong; Shen, Wei; Yang, Haiquan; Fan, You

    2015-12-01

    Production of bioethanol using starch as raw material has become a very prominent technology. However, phytate in the raw material not only decreases ethanol production efficiency, but also increases phosphorus discharge. In this study, to decrease phytate content in an ethanol fermentationprocess, Saccharomyces cerevisiae was engineered forheterologous expression of phytase on the cell surface. The phy gene encoding phytase gene was fused with the C-terminal-half region of α-agglutinin and then inserted downstream of the secretion signal gene, to produce a yeast surface-display expression vector pMGK-AG-phy, which was then transformed into S. cerevisiae. The recombinant yeast strain, PHY, successfully displayed phytase on the surface of cells producing 6.4 U/g wet cells and its properties were further characterized. The growthrate and ethanol production of the PHY strain were faster than the parent S. cerevisiae strain in the fermentation medium by simultaneous saccharification and fermentation. Moreover, the phytate concentration decreased by 91% in dry vinasse compared to the control. In summary, we constructed recombinant S. cerevisiae strain displaying phytase on the cell surface, which could effectively reduce the content of phytate, improve the utilization value of vinasse and reduce the discharge of phosphorus. The strain reported here represents a useful novel engineering platform for developing an environment-friendly system for bioethanol production from a corn substrate. PMID:27093833

  6. Heterologous carotenoid production in Saccharomyces cerevisiae induces the pleiotropic drug resistance stress response.

    PubMed

    Verwaal, René; Jiang, Yang; Wang, Jing; Daran, Jean-Marc; Sandmann, Gerhard; van den Berg, Johan A; van Ooyen, Albert J J

    2010-12-01

    To obtain insight into the genome-wide transcriptional response of heterologous carotenoid production in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the transcriptome of two different S. cerevisiae strains overexpressing carotenogenic genes from the yeast Xanthophyllomyces dendrorhous grown in carbon-limited chemostat cultures was analysed. The strains exhibited different absolute carotenoid levels as well as different intermediate profiles. These discrepancies were further sustained by the difference of the transcriptional response exhibited by the two strains. Transcriptome analysis of the strain producing high carotenoid levels resulted in specific induction of genes involved in pleiotropic drug resistance (PDR). These genes encode ABC-type and major facilitator transporters which are reported to be involved in secretion of toxic compounds out of cells. β-Carotene was found to be secreted when sunflower oil was added to the medium of S. cerevisiae cells producing high levels of carotenoids, which was not observed when added to X. dendrorhous cells. Deletion of pdr10, one of the induced ABC transporters, decreased the transformation efficiency of a plasmid containing carotenogenic genes. The few transformants that were obtained had decreased growth rates and lower carotenoid production levels compared to a pdr5 deletion and a reference strain transformed with the same genes. Our results suggest that production of high amounts of carotenoids in S. cerevisiae leads to membrane stress, in which Pdr10 might play an important role, and a cellular response to secrete carotenoids out of the cell. PMID:20632327

  7. Engineering the robustness of Saccharomyces cerevisiae by introducing bifunctional glutathione synthase gene.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Zhiqi; Deng, Zujun; Tan, Hongming; Zhou, Shining; Cao, Lixiang

    2015-04-01

    Robust, high-yielding Saccharomyces cerevisiae is highly desirable for cost-effective cellulosic ethanol production. In this study, the bifunctional glutathione (GSH) synthetase genes GCSGS at high copy number was integrated into ribosomal DNA of S. cerevisiae by Cre-LoxP system. Threefold higher GSH contents (54.9 μmol/g dry weight) accumulated in the engineered strain BY-G compared to the reference strain. Tolerance of BY-G to H2O2 (3 mM), temperature (40 °C), furfural (10 mM), hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF, 10 mM) and 0.5 mM Cd(2+) increased compared to reference strain. Twofold higher ethanol concentration was obtained by BY-G in simultaneous saccharification and fermentation of corn stover compared to the reference strain. The results showed that intracellular GSH content of S. cerevisiae has an influence on robustness. The strategy is used to engineer S. cerevisiae strains adaptive to a combination of tolerance to inhibitors and raised temperature that may occur in high solid simultaneous saccharification and fermentation of lignocellulosic feedstocks. PMID:25561319

  8. The reference genome sequence of Saccharomyces cerevisiae: then and now.

    PubMed

    Engel, Stacia R; Dietrich, Fred S; Fisk, Dianna G; Binkley, Gail; Balakrishnan, Rama; Costanzo, Maria C; Dwight, Selina S; Hitz, Benjamin C; Karra, Kalpana; Nash, Robert S; Weng, Shuai; Wong, Edith D; Lloyd, Paul; Skrzypek, Marek S; Miyasato, Stuart R; Simison, Matt; Cherry, J Michael

    2014-03-01

    The genome of the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae was the first completely sequenced from a eukaryote. It was released in 1996 as the work of a worldwide effort of hundreds of researchers. In the time since, the yeast genome has been intensively studied by geneticists, molecular biologists, and computational scientists all over the world. Maintenance and annotation of the genome sequence have long been provided by the Saccharomyces Genome Database, one of the original model organism databases. To deepen our understanding of the eukaryotic genome, the S. cerevisiae strain S288C reference genome sequence was updated recently in its first major update since 1996. The new version, called "S288C 2010," was determined from a single yeast colony using modern sequencing technologies and serves as the anchor for further innovations in yeast genomic science. PMID:24374639

  9. Interorganelle signaling is a determinant of longevity in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Kirchman, P A; Kim, S; Lai, C Y; Jazwinski, S M

    1999-01-01

    Replicative capacity, which is the number of times an individual cell divides, is the measure of longevity in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In this study, a process that involves signaling from the mitochondrion to the nucleus, called retrograde regulation, is shown to determine yeast longevity, and its induction resulted in postponed senescence. Activation of retrograde regulation, by genetic and environmental means, correlated with increased replicative capacity in four different S. cerevisiae strains. Deletion of a gene required for the retrograde response, RTG2, eliminated the increased replicative capacity. RAS2, a gene previously shown to influence longevity in yeast, interacts with retrograde regulation in setting yeast longevity. The molecular mechanism of aging elucidated here parallels the results of genetic studies of aging in nematodes and fruit flies, as well as the caloric restriction paradigm in mammals, and it underscores the importance of metabolic regulation in aging, suggesting a general applicability. PMID:10224252

  10. Saccharomyces cerevisiae: a sexy yeast with a prion problem.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Amy C; Wickner, Reed B

    2013-01-01

    Yeast prions are infectious proteins that spread exclusively by mating. The frequency of prions in the wild therefore largely reflects the rate of spread by mating counterbalanced by prion growth slowing effects in the host. We recently showed that the frequency of outcross mating is about 1% of mitotic doublings with 23-46% of total matings being outcrosses. These findings imply that even the mildest forms of the [PSI+], [URE3] and [PIN+] prions impart > 1% growth/survival detriment on their hosts. Our estimate of outcrossing suggests that Saccharomyces cerevisiae is far more sexual than previously thought and would therefore be more responsive to the adaptive effects of natural selection compared with a strictly asexual yeast. Further, given its large effective population size, a growth/survival detriment of > 1% for yeast prions should strongly select against prion-infected strains in wild populations of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

  11. Saccharomyces cerevisiae: a sexy yeast with a prion problem.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Amy C; Wickner, Reed B

    2013-01-01

    Yeast prions are infectious proteins that spread exclusively by mating. The frequency of prions in the wild therefore largely reflects the rate of spread by mating counterbalanced by prion growth slowing effects in the host. We recently showed that the frequency of outcross mating is about 1% of mitotic doublings with 23-46% of total matings being outcrosses. These findings imply that even the mildest forms of the [PSI+], [URE3] and [PIN+] prions impart > 1% growth/survival detriment on their hosts. Our estimate of outcrossing suggests that Saccharomyces cerevisiae is far more sexual than previously thought and would therefore be more responsive to the adaptive effects of natural selection compared with a strictly asexual yeast. Further, given its large effective population size, a growth/survival detriment of > 1% for yeast prions should strongly select against prion-infected strains in wild populations of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. PMID:23764836

  12. The influence of microgravity on invasive growth in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Van Mulders, Sebastiaan E; Stassen, Catherine; Daenen, Luk; Devreese, Bart; Siewers, Verena; van Eijsden, Rudy G E; Nielsen, Jens; Delvaux, Freddy R; Willaert, Ronnie

    2011-01-01

    This study investigates the effects of microgravity on colony growth and the morphological transition from single cells to short invasive filaments in the model eukaryotic organism Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Two-dimensional spreading of the yeast colonies grown on semi-solid agar medium was reduced under microgravity in the Σ1278b laboratory strain but not in the CMBSESA1 industrial strain. This was supported by the Σ1278b proteome map under microgravity conditions, which revealed upregulation of proteins linked to anaerobic conditions. The Σ1278b strain showed a reduced invasive growth in the center of the yeast colony. Bud scar distribution was slightly affected, with a switch toward more random budding. Together, microgravity conditions disturb spatially programmed budding patterns and generate strain-dependent growth differences in yeast colonies on semi-solid medium.

  13. Construction of a flocculent Saccharomyces cerevisiae fermenting lactose.

    PubMed

    Domingues, L; Teixeira, J A; Lima, N

    1999-05-01

    A flocculent Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain with the ability to express both the LAC4 (coding for beta-galactosidase) and LAC12 (coding for lactose permease) genes of Kluyveromyces marxianus was constructed. This recombinant strain is not only able to grow on lactose, but it can also ferment this substrate. To our knowledge this is the first time that a recombinant S. cervisiae has been found to ferment lactose in a way comparable to that of the existing lactose-fermenting yeast strains. Moreover, the flocculating capacity of the strain used in this work gives the process several advantages. On the one hand, it allows for operation in a continuous mode at high cell concentration, thus increasing the system's overall productivity; on the other hand, the biomass concentration in the effluent is reduced, thus decreasing product separation/purification costs. PMID:10390820

  14. Breeding of lager yeast with Saccharomyces cerevisiae improves stress resistance and fermentation performance.

    PubMed

    Garcia Sanchez, Rosa; Solodovnikova, Natalia; Wendland, Jürgen

    2012-08-01

    Lager beer brewing relies on strains collectively known as Saccharomyces carlsbergensis, which are hybrids between S. cerevisiae and S. eubayanus-like strains. Lager yeasts are particularly adapted to low-temperature fermentations. Selection of new yeast strains for improved traits or fermentation performance is laborious, due to the allotetraploid nature of lager yeasts. Initially, we have generated new F1 hybrids by classical genetics, using spore clones of lager yeast and S. cerevisiae and complementation of auxotrophies of the single strains upon mating. These hybrids were improved on several parameters, including growth at elevated temperature and resistance against high osmolarity or high ethanol concentrations. Due to the uncertainty of chromosomal make-up of lager yeast spore clones, we introduced molecular markers to analyse mating-type composition by PCR. Based on these results, new hybrids between a lager and an ale yeast strain were isolated by micromanipulation. These hybrids were not subject to genetic modification. We generated and verified 13 hybrid strains. All of these hybrid strains showed improved stress resistance as seen in the ale parent, including improved survival at the end of fermentation. Importantly, some of the strains showed improved fermentation rates using 18° Plato at 18-25°C. Uniparental mitochondrial DNA inheritance was observed mostly from the S. cerevisiae parent.

  15. High-efficiency transformation of the diploid strawberry (Fragaria vesca) for functional genomics.

    PubMed

    Oosumi, Teruko; Gruszewski, Hope A; Blischak, Leslie A; Baxter, Aaron J; Wadl, Phillip A; Shuman, Joel L; Veilleux, Richard E; Shulaev, Vladimir

    2006-05-01

    Fragaria vesca L., a diploid (2n = 2x = 14) relative of the commercial octoploid strawberry, is an attractive model for functional genomics research in Rosaceae. Its small genome size, short reproductive cycle, and facile vegetative and seed propagation make F. vesca a promising candidate for forward and reverse genetics experiments. However, the lack of a high-efficiency transformation protocol required for systematic production of thousands of T-DNA insertional mutant lines and high-throughput gene validation is a major bottleneck. We describe a new transformation procedure that uses leaf explants from newly unfolded trifoliate leaves obtained from stock plants 6-7 weeks after seed germination, co-cultivation with Agrobacterium strain GV3101, and stringent selection on MS medium containing 4 mg l(-1) hygromycin. Using this protocol we achieved 100% transformation efficiency for 6 of 14 F. vesca accessions tested. Accession PI 551572 was determined to be the best candidate for a model in F. vesca functional genomics research, as it showed the greatest propensity for callus formation, transformation, shoot regeneration, ex vitro establishment, and plant growth, requiring only 14-15 weeks to complete its life cycle in different seasons in the greenhouse.

  16. Application of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Pichia stipitis karyoductants to the production of ethanol from xylose.

    PubMed

    Kordowska-Wiater, M; Targoński, Z

    2001-01-01

    Karyoductants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae V30 and Pichia stipitis CCY 39501 with the ability to ferment D-xylose to ethanol were isolated. The ability of these isolates to assimilate different sugars, ethanol tolerance and ethanol production from D-xylose was investigated. Karyoductants didn't grow on starch, lactose and cellobiose, like S. cerevisiae, but showed good growth on xylose and L-arabinose, like P. stipitis. All isolates fermented xylose to ethanol slower than P. stipitis and with lower yields, 0.09 - 0.16 g/g. They secreted also about 3.4 - 7.1 g/dm3 of xylitol to the culture medium (P. stipitis only 0.06 g/dm3). The karyoductants showed an average tolerance to ethanol when compared with the parent strains and fermented glucose in the presence of 6% alcohol whereas parent strain S. cerevisiae and P. stipitis showed exogenic ethanol tolerance of 9% and 3%, respectively.

  17. A novel selection system for chromosome translocations in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Tennyson, Rachel B; Ebran, Nathalie; Herrera, Anissa E; Lindsley, Janet E

    2002-01-01

    Chromosomal translocations are common genetic abnormalities found in both leukemias and solid tumors. While much has been learned about the effects of specific translocations on cell proliferation, much less is known about what causes these chromosome rearrangements. This article describes the development and use of a system that genetically selects for rare translocation events using the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. A translocation YAC was created that contains the breakpoint cluster region from the human MLL gene, a gene frequently involved in translocations in leukemia patients, flanked by positive and negative selection markers. A translocation between the YAC and a yeast chromosome, whose breakpoint falls within the MLL DNA, physically separates the markers and forms the basis for the selection. When RAD52 is deleted, essentially all of the selected and screened cells contain simple translocations. The detectable translocation rates are the same in haploids and diploids, although the mechanisms involved and true translocation rates may be distinct. A unique double-strand break induced within the MLL sequences increases the number of detectable translocation events 100- to 1000-fold. This novel system provides a tractable assay for answering basic mechanistic questions about the development of chromosomal translocations. PMID:11973293

  18. Regulation of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae DNA repair gene RAD16.

    PubMed Central

    Bang, D D; Timmermans, V; Verhage, R; Zeeman, A M; van de Putte, P; Brouwer, J

    1995-01-01

    The RAD16 gene product has been shown to be essential for the repair of the silenced mating type loci [Bang et al. (1992) Nucleic Acids Res. 20, 3925-3931]. More recently we demonstrated that the RAD16 and RAD7 proteins are also required for repair of non-transcribed strands of active genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae [Waters et al. (1993) Mol. Gen. Genet. 239, 28-32]. We have studied the regulation of the RAD16 gene and found that the RAD16 transcript levels increased up to 7-fold upon UV irradiation. Heat shock at 42 degrees C also results in elevated levels of RAD16 mRNA. In sporulating MAT alpha/MATa diploid cells RAD16 mRNA is also induced. The basal level of the RAD16 transcript is constant during the mitotic cell cycle. G1-arrested cells show normal induction of RAD16 mRNA upon UV irradiation demonstrating that the induction is not a secondary consequence of G2 cell cycle arrest following UV irradiation. However, in cells arrested in G1 the induction of RAD16 mRNA after UV irradiation is not followed by a rapid decline as occurs in normal growing cells suggesting that the down regulation of RAD16 transcription is dependent on progression into the cell cycle. Images PMID:7784171

  19. Efficient Sporulation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae in a 96 Multiwell Format.

    PubMed

    Paulissen, Scott M; Huang, Linda S

    2016-01-01

    During times of nutritional stress, Saccharomyces cerevisiae undergoes gametogenesis, known as sporulation. Diploid yeast cells that are starved for nitrogen and carbon will initiate the sporulation process. The process of sporulation includes meiosis followed by spore formation, where the haploid nuclei are packaged into environmentally resistant spores. We have developed methods for the efficient sporulation of budding yeast in 96 multiwell plates, to increase the throughput of screening yeast cells for sporulation phenotypes. These methods are compatible with screening with yeast containing plasmids requiring nutritional selection, when appropriate minimal media is used, or with screening yeast with genomic alterations, when a rich presporulation regimen is used. We find that for this method, aeration during sporulation is critical for spore formation, and have devised techniques to ensure sufficient aeration that are compatible with the 96 multiwell plate format. Although these methods do not achieve the typical ~80% level of sporulation that can be achieved in large-volume flask based experiments, these methods will reliably achieve about 50-60% level of sporulation in small-volume multiwell plates. PMID:27684273

  20. Mating-Type Genes and MAT Switching in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Haber, James E.

    2012-01-01

    Mating type in Saccharomyces cerevisiae is determined by two nonhomologous alleles, MATa and MATα. These sequences encode regulators of the two different haploid mating types and of the diploids formed by their conjugation. Analysis of the MATa1, MATα1, and MATα2 alleles provided one of the earliest models of cell-type specification by transcriptional activators and repressors. Remarkably, homothallic yeast cells can switch their mating type as often as every generation by a highly choreographed, site-specific homologous recombination event that replaces one MAT allele with different DNA sequences encoding the opposite MAT allele. This replacement process involves the participation of two intact but unexpressed copies of mating-type information at the heterochromatic loci, HMLα and HMRa, which are located at opposite ends of the same chromosome-encoding MAT. The study of MAT switching has yielded important insights into the control of cell lineage, the silencing of gene expression, the formation of heterochromatin, and the regulation of accessibility of the donor sequences. Real-time analysis of MAT switching has provided the most detailed description of the molecular events that occur during the homologous recombinational repair of a programmed double-strand chromosome break. PMID:22555442

  1. Mating-type genes and MAT switching in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Haber, James E

    2012-05-01

    Mating type in Saccharomyces cerevisiae is determined by two nonhomologous alleles, MATa and MATα. These sequences encode regulators of the two different haploid mating types and of the diploids formed by their conjugation. Analysis of the MATa1, MATα1, and MATα2 alleles provided one of the earliest models of cell-type specification by transcriptional activators and repressors. Remarkably, homothallic yeast cells can switch their mating type as often as every generation by a highly choreographed, site-specific homologous recombination event that replaces one MAT allele with different DNA sequences encoding the opposite MAT allele. This replacement process involves the participation of two intact but unexpressed copies of mating-type information at the heterochromatic loci, HMLα and HMRa, which are located at opposite ends of the same chromosome-encoding MAT. The study of MAT switching has yielded important insights into the control of cell lineage, the silencing of gene expression, the formation of heterochromatin, and the regulation of accessibility of the donor sequences. Real-time analysis of MAT switching has provided the most detailed description of the molecular events that occur during the homologous recombinational repair of a programmed double-strand chromosome break.

  2. Regulation of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae DNA repair gene RAD16.

    PubMed

    Bang, D D; Timmermans, V; Verhage, R; Zeeman, A M; van de Putte, P; Brouwer, J

    1995-05-25

    The RAD16 gene product has been shown to be essential for the repair of the silenced mating type loci [Bang et al. (1992) Nucleic Acids Res. 20, 3925-3931]. More recently we demonstrated that the RAD16 and RAD7 proteins are also required for repair of non-transcribed strands of active genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae [Waters et al. (1993) Mol. Gen. Genet. 239, 28-32]. We have studied the regulation of the RAD16 gene and found that the RAD16 transcript levels increased up to 7-fold upon UV irradiation. Heat shock at 42 degrees C also results in elevated levels of RAD16 mRNA. In sporulating MAT alpha/MATa diploid cells RAD16 mRNA is also induced. The basal level of the RAD16 transcript is constant during the mitotic cell cycle. G1-arrested cells show normal induction of RAD16 mRNA upon UV irradiation demonstrating that the induction is not a secondary consequence of G2 cell cycle arrest following UV irradiation. However, in cells arrested in G1 the induction of RAD16 mRNA after UV irradiation is not followed by a rapid decline as occurs in normal growing cells suggesting that the down regulation of RAD16 transcription is dependent on progression into the cell cycle.

  3. Adaptation of diploid and tetraploid chamerion angustifolium to elevation but not local environment.

    PubMed

    Martin, Sara L; Husband, Brian C

    2013-06-01

    Polyploid organisms often have different geographic ranges than their diploid relatives. However, it is unclear whether this divergence is maintained by adaptation or results from historical differences in colonization. Here, we conducted a reciprocal transplant experiment with diploid and autotetraploid Chamerion angustifolium to test for adaptation at the ploidy and population level. In the Rocky Mountains, pure diploid populations occur at high elevations and pure autotetraploid populations occur at low elevations with mixed ploidy populations between. We planted 3134 seedlings in 2004 and 3890 juveniles (bolting) in 2005 among nine plots, three in each of the diploid, mixed ploidy, and tetraploid zones, and monitored survival until 2008. For both seedlings and juvenile plants, elevation significantly influenced survival. The juvenile plants also showed a significant ploidy by elevation interaction, indicating that diploids and tetraploids survived best at their native elevations. In contrast, we found no evidence of local adaptation to plot within elevation. This suggests that the current distribution of diploids and tetraploids across elevations is the result of adaptation and that genome duplication may have facilitated the invasion of lower elevation habitats by limiting the movement of maladapted alleles from diploid populations at higher elevations. PMID:23730769

  4. Cytotype distribution at a diploid-tetraploid contact zone in Chamerion (Epilobium) angustifolium (Onagraceae).

    PubMed

    Husband, B C; Schemske, D W

    1998-12-01

    In North America, the geographic distributions of diploid and tetraploid Chamerion (formerly Epilobium) angustifolium overlap in a narrow zone along the southern border of the boreal forest and along the Rocky Mountains. We examined the frequency and distribution of diploid and tetraploid cytotypes in a narrow (5 km) zone of sympatry across an elevational gradient and in putatively uniform diploid and tetraploid reference populations on the Beartooth Pass, in the Rocky Mountains of southern Montana-northern Wyoming. All five reference populations sampled were dominated by a single cytotype, but only one was completely uniform. In the zone of sympatry, 27 transects were sampled every 2 m for a total of 238 plants. Reproductive status (vegetative, flower buds, open flowers) was recorded, and the ploidy of each plant was determined by flow cytometry. Diploid and tetraploid plants predominated (36 and 55%, respectively) but were heterogeneously distributed among the transects. Six of the 27 transects were fixed for a single cytotype (four transects, diploid; two transects, tetraploid), and in seven others either diploids or tetraploids predominated (frequency >75%). Triploids represented 9% of the total sample and occurred most frequently in transects containing both diploids and tetraploids (G = 3.4, df = 2, P = 0.07). Diploids were more often reproductive (in bud, flower, or fruit) than either triploids or tetraploids (G = 12.0, df = 2, P < 0.001) and were the only cytotype to have produced open flowers. These results suggest that the zone of sympatry is best characterized as a mosaic rather than a cline, with diploid and tetraploids in close proximity and that the distribution of polyploidy is regulated by ecological sorting in a heterogeneous physical environment. PMID:21719413

  5. Role of social wasps in Saccharomyces cerevisiae ecology and evolution

    PubMed Central

    Stefanini, Irene; Dapporto, Leonardo; Legras, Jean-Luc; Calabretta, Antonio; Di Paola, Monica; De Filippo, Carlotta; Viola, Roberto; Capretti, Paolo; Polsinelli, Mario; Turillazzi, Stefano; Cavalieri, Duccio

    2012-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae is one of the most important model organisms and has been a valuable asset to human civilization. However, despite its extensive use in the last 9,000 y, the existence of a seasonal cycle outside human-made environments has not yet been described. We demonstrate the role of social wasps as vector and natural reservoir of S. cerevisiae during all seasons. We provide experimental evidence that queens of social wasps overwintering as adults (Vespa crabro and Polistes spp.) can harbor yeast cells from autumn to spring and transmit them to their progeny. This result is mirrored by field surveys of the genetic variability of natural strains of yeast. Microsatellites and sequences of a selected set of loci able to recapitulate the yeast strain’s evolutionary history were used to compare 17 environmental wasp isolates with a collection of strains from grapes from the same region and more than 230 strains representing worldwide yeast variation. The wasp isolates fall into subclusters representing the overall ecological and industrial yeast diversity of their geographic origin. Our findings indicate that wasps are a key environmental niche for the evolution of natural S. cerevisiae populations, the dispersion of yeast cells in the environment, and the maintenance of their diversity. The close relatedness of several wasp isolates with grape and wine isolates reflects the crucial role of human activities on yeast population structure, through clonal expansion and selection of specific strains during the biotransformation of fermented foods, followed by dispersal mediated by insects and other animals. PMID:22847440

  6. Transcript levels of the Saccharomyes cerevisiae DNA repair gene RAD23 increase in response to UV light and in meiosis but remain constant in the mitotic cell cycle.

    PubMed

    Madura, K; Prakash, S

    1990-08-25

    The RAD23 gene of Saccharomyces cerevisiae is required for excision-repair of UV damaged DNA. In this paper, we determine the location of the RAD23 gene in a cloned DNA fragment, identify the 1.6 kb RAD23 transcript, and examine RAD23 transcript levels in UV damaged cells, during the mitotic cell cycle, and in meiosis. The RAD23 mRNA levels are elevated 5-fold between 30 to 60 min after 37 J/m2 of UV light. RAD23 mRNA levels rise over 6-fold during meiosis at a stage coincident with high levels of genetic recombination. This response is specific to sporulation competent MATa/MAT alpha diploid cells, and is not observed in asporogenous MATa/MATa diploids. RAD23 mRNA levels, however, remain constant during the mitotic cell cycle.

  7. Characterization of Insertion Mutations in the Saccharomyces Cerevisiae Msh1 and Msh2 Genes: Evidence for Separate Mitochondrial and Nuclear Functions

    PubMed Central

    Reenan, RAG.; Kolodner, R. D.

    1992-01-01

    The MSH1 and MSH2 genes of Saccharomyces cerevisiae are predicted to encode proteins that are homologous to the Escherichia coli MutS and Streptococcus pneumoniae HexA proteins and their homologs. Disruption of the MSH1 gene caused a petite phenotype which was established rapidly. A functional MSH1 gene present on a single-copy centromere plasmid was incapable of rescuing the established msh1 petite phenotype. Analysis of msh1 strains demonstrated that mutagenesis and large-scale rearrangement of mitochondrial DNA had occurred. 4',6-Diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) staining of msh1 yeast revealed an aberrant distribution of mtDNA. Haploid msh2 mutants displayed an increase of 85-fold in the rate of spontaneous mutation to canavanine resistance. Sporulation of homozygous msh2/msh2 diploids gave rise to a high level of lethality which was compounded during increased vegetative growth prior to sporulation. msh2 mutations also affected gene conversion of two HIS4 alleles. The his4x mutation, lying near the 5' end of the gene, was converted with equal frequency in both wild-type and msh2 strains. However, many of the events in the msh2 background were post-meiotic segregation (PMS) events (46.4%) while none (<0.25%) of the aberrant segregations in wild type were PMS events. The his4b allele, lying 1.6 kb downstream of his4x, was converted at a 10-fold higher frequency in the msh2 background than in the corresponding wild-type strain. Like the his4x allele, his4b showed a high level of PMS (30%) in the msh2 background compared to the corresponding wild-type strain where no (<0.26%) PMS events were observed. These results indicate that MSH1 plays a role in repair or stability of mtDNA and MSH2 plays a role in repair of 4-bp insertion/deletion mispairs in the nucleus. PMID:1334021

  8. PRIMARY STRUCTURE OF THE P450 LANOSTEROL DEMETHYLASE GENE FROM SACCHAROMYCES CEREVISIAE

    EPA Science Inventory

    We have sequenced the structural gene and flanking regions for lanosterol 14 alpha-demethylase (14DM) from Saccharomyces cerevisiae. An open reading frame of 530 codons encodes a 60.7-kDa protein. When this gene is disrupted by integrative transformation, the resulting strain req...

  9. A Minimal Set of Glycolytic Genes Reveals Strong Redundancies in Saccharomyces cerevisiae Central Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Solis-Escalante, Daniel; Kuijpers, Niels G A; Barrajon-Simancas, Nuria; van den Broek, Marcel; Pronk, Jack T; Daran, Jean-Marc; Daran-Lapujade, Pascale

    2015-08-01

    As a result of ancestral whole-genome and small-scale duplication events, the genomes of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and many eukaryotes still contain a substantial fraction of duplicated genes. In all investigated organisms, metabolic pathways, and more particularly glycolysis, are specifically enriched for functionally redundant paralogs. In ancestors of the Saccharomyces lineage, the duplication of glycolytic genes is purported to have played an important role leading to S. cerevisiae's current lifestyle favoring fermentative metabolism even in the presence of oxygen and characterized by a high glycolytic capacity. In modern S. cerevisiae strains, the 12 glycolytic reactions leading to the biochemical conversion from glucose to ethanol are encoded by 27 paralogs. In order to experimentally explore the physiological role of this genetic redundancy, a yeast strain with a minimal set of 14 paralogs was constructed (the "minimal glycolysis" [MG] strain). Remarkably, a combination of a quantitative systems approach and semiquantitative analysis in a wide array of growth environments revealed the absence of a phenotypic response to the cumulative deletion of 13 glycolytic paralogs. This observation indicates that duplication of glycolytic genes is not a prerequisite for achieving the high glycolytic fluxes and fermentative capacities that are characteristic of S. cerevisiae and essential for many of its industrial applications and argues against gene dosage effects as a means of fixing minor glycolytic paralogs in the yeast genome. The MG strain was carefully designed and constructed to provide a robust prototrophic platform for quantitative studies and has been made available to the scientific community.

  10. Genome Sequence of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Double-Stranded RNA Virus L-A-28

    PubMed Central

    Konovalovas, Aleksandras

    2016-01-01

    We cloned and sequenced the complete genome of the L-A-28 virus from the Saccharomyces cerevisiae K28 killer strain. This sequence completes the set of currently identified L-A helper viruses required for expression of double-stranded RNA-originated killer phenotypes in baking yeast. PMID:27313294

  11. Genome Sequence of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Double-Stranded RNA Virus L-A-28.

    PubMed

    Konovalovas, Aleksandras; Serviené, Elena; Serva, Saulius

    2016-01-01

    We cloned and sequenced the complete genome of the L-A-28 virus from the Saccharomyces cerevisiae K28 killer strain. This sequence completes the set of currently identified L-A helper viruses required for expression of double-stranded RNA-originated killer phenotypes in baking yeast. PMID:27313294

  12. The role of centromere alignment in meiosis I segregation of homologous chromosomes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Guerra, C E; Kaback, D B

    1999-01-01

    During meiosis, homologous chromosomes pair and then segregate from each other at the first meiotic division. Homologous centromeres appear to be aligned when chromosomes are paired. The role of centromere alignment in meiotic chromosome segregation was investigated in Saccharomyces cerevisiae diploids that contained one intact copy of chromosome I and one copy bisected into two functional centromere-containing fragments. The centromere on one fragment was aligned with the centromere on the intact chromosome while the centromere on the other fragment was either aligned or misaligned. Fragments containing aligned centromeres segregated efficiently from the intact chromosome, while fragments containing misaligned centromeres segregated much less efficiently from the intact chromosome. Less efficient segregation was correlated with crossing over in the region between the misaligned centromeres. Models that suggest that these crossovers impede proper segregation by preventing either a segregation-promoting chromosome alignment on the meiotic spindle or some physical interaction between homologous centromeres are proposed. PMID:10581265

  13. Gains and Losses of Transcription Factor Binding Sites in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Saccharomyces paradoxus

    PubMed Central

    Schaefke, Bernhard; Wang, Tzi-Yuan; Wang, Chuen-Yi; Li, Wen-Hsiung

    2015-01-01

    Gene expression evolution occurs through changes in cis- or trans-regulatory elements or both. Interactions between transcription factors (TFs) and their binding sites (TFBSs) constitute one of the most important points where these two regulatory components intersect. In this study, we investigated the evolution of TFBSs in the promoter regions of different Saccharomyces strains and species. We divided the promoter of a gene into the proximal region and the distal region, which are defined, respectively, as the 200-bp region upstream of the transcription starting site and as the 200-bp region upstream of the proximal region. We found that the predicted TFBSs in the proximal promoter regions tend to be evolutionarily more conserved than those in the distal promoter regions. Additionally, Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains used in the fermentation of alcoholic drinks have experienced more TFBS losses than gains compared with strains from other environments (wild strains, laboratory strains, and clinical strains). We also showed that differences in TFBSs correlate with the cis component of