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Sample records for cerevisiae microbial cell

  1. Sensitive determination of L-lysine with a new amperometric microbial biosensor based on Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast cells.

    PubMed

    Akyilmaz, Erol; Erdoğan, Ali; Oztürk, Ramazan; Yaşa, Ihsan

    2007-01-15

    A new amperometric microbial biosensor based on Saccharomyces cerevisiae NRRL-12632 cells, which had been induced for lysine oxidase enzyme and immobilized in gelatin by a cross-linking agent was developed for the sensitive determination of L-lysine amino acid. To construct the microbial biosensor S. cerevisiae cells were activated and cultured in a suitable culture medium. By using gelatine (8.43 mg cm(-2)) and glutaraldehyde (0.25%), cells obtained in the logarithmic phase of the growth curve at the end of a 14 h period were immobilized and fixed on a pretreated oxygen sensitive Teflon membrane of a dissolved oxygen probe. The assay procedure of the microbial biosensor is based on the determination of the differences of the respiration activity of the cells on the oxygenmeter in the absence and the presence of L-lysine. According to the end point measurement technique used in the experiments it was determined that the microbial biosensor response depended linearly on L-lysine concentrations between 1.0 and 10.0 microM with a 1 min response time. In optimization studies of the microbial biosensor, the most suitable microorganism quantities were found to be 0.97x10(5)CFU cm(-2). In addition phosphate buffer (pH 7.5; 50 mM) and 30 degrees C were obtained as the optimum working conditions. In characterization studies of the microbial biosensor some parameters such as substrate specificity, interference effects of some substances on the microbial biosensor responses, reproducibility of the biosensor and operational and storage stability were investigated.

  2. Outward electron transfer by Saccharomyces cerevisiae monitored with a bi-cathodic microbial fuel cell-type activity sensor.

    PubMed

    Ducommun, Raphaël; Favre, Marie-France; Carrard, Delphine; Fischer, Fabian

    2010-03-01

    A Janus head-like bi-cathodic microbial fuel cell was constructed to monitor the electron transfer from Saccharomyces cerevisiae to a woven carbon anode. The experiments were conducted during an ethanol cultivation of 170 g/l glucose in the presence and absence of yeast-peptone medium. First, using a basic fuel-cell type activity sensor, it was shown that yeast-peptone medium contains electroactive compounds. For this purpose, 1% solutions of soy peptone and yeast extract were subjected to oxidative conditions, using a microbial fuel cell set-up corresponding to a typical galvanic cell, consisting of culture medium in the anodic half-cell and 0.5 M K(3)Fe(CN)(6) in the cathodic half-cell. Second, using a bi-cathodic microbial fuel cell, it was shown that electrons were transferred from yeast cells to the carbon anode. The participation of electroactive compounds in the electron transport was separated as background current. This result was verified by applying medium-free conditions, where only glucose was fed, confirming that electrons are transferred from yeast cells to the woven carbon anode. Knowledge about the electron transfer through the cell membrane is of importance in amperometric online monitoring of yeast fermentations and for electricity production with microbial fuel cells.

  3. A closed concept of extractive whole cell microbial transformation of benzaldehyde into L-phenylacetylcarbinol by Saccharomyces cerevisiae in novel polyethylene-glycol-induced cloud-point system.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhilong; Liang, Rui; Xu, Jian-He; Liu, Yubo; Qi, Hanshi

    2010-03-01

    Extractive microbial transformation of benzaldehyde into L-phenylacetylcarbinol (L-PAC) by Saccharomyces cerevisiae (Baker's yeast) has been carried out in a novel polyethylene-glycol-induced cloud-point system (PEG-CPS). The extractive microbial transformation in the PEG-CPS and a downstream process for stripping of the product from the microbial transformation broth with microemulsion extraction are demonstrated. The results indicate that the PEG-CPS maintains the advantage of CPS for in situ extraction of polar product in the microbial transformation. At the same time, the utilization of hydrophilic nonionic surfactant in the PEG-CPS is favorable for stripping of product from the nonionic surfactant in the microbial transformation broth by Winsor I microemulsion extraction. Thus, a closed concept of in situ extraction of polar product in microbial transformation and its downstream process of product recovery are fulfilled at the same time.

  4. Dominance of Saccharomyces cerevisiae in alcoholic fermentation processes: role of physiological fitness and microbial interactions.

    PubMed

    Albergaria, Helena; Arneborg, Nils

    2016-03-01

    Winemaking, brewing and baking are some of the oldest biotechnological processes. In all of them, alcoholic fermentation is the main biotransformation and Saccharomyces cerevisiae the primary microorganism. Although a wide variety of microbial species may participate in alcoholic fermentation and contribute to the sensory properties of end-products, the yeast S. cerevisiae invariably dominates the final stages of fermentation. The ability of S. cerevisiae to outcompete other microbial species during alcoholic fermentation processes, such as winemaking, has traditionally been ascribed to its high fermentative power and capacity to withstand the harsh environmental conditions, i.e. high levels of ethanol and organic acids, low pH values, scarce oxygen availability and depletion of certain nutrients. However, in recent years, several studies have raised evidence that S. cerevisiae, beyond its remarkable fitness for alcoholic fermentation, also uses defensive strategies mediated by different mechanisms, such as cell-to-cell contact and secretion of antimicrobial peptides, to combat other microorganisms. In this paper, we review the main physiological features underlying the special aptitude of S. cerevisiae for alcoholic fermentation and discuss the role of microbial interactions in its dominance during alcoholic fermentation, as well as its relevance for winemaking.

  5. Microbial Cell Imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Doktycz, Mitchel John; Sullivan, Claretta; Mortensen, Ninell P; Allison, David P

    2011-01-01

    the maximum scan size (roughly 100 x 100 {mu}m) and the restricted movement of the cantilever in the Z (or height) direction. In most commercial AFMs, the Z range is restricted to roughly 10 {mu}m such that the height of cells to be imaged must be seriously considered. Nevertheless, AFM can provide structural-functional information at nanometer resolution and do so in physiologically relevant environments. Further, instrumentation for scanning probe microscopy continues to advance. Systems for high-speed imaging are becoming available, and techniques for looking inside the cells are being demonstrated. The ability to combine AFM with other imaging modalities is likely to have an even greater impact on microbiological studies. AFM studies of intact microbial cells started to appear in the literature in the 1990s. For example, AFM studies of Saccharomyces cerevisiae examined buddings cars after cell division and detailed changes related to cell growth processes. Also, the first AFM studies of bacterial biofilms appeared. In the late 1990s, AFM studies of intact fungal spores described clear changes in spore surfaces upon germination, and studies of individual bacterial cells were also described. These early bacterial imaging studies examined changes in bacterial morphology due to antimicrobial peptides exposure and bacterial adhesion properties. The majority of these early studies were carried out on dried samples and took advantage of the resolving power of AFM. The lack of cell mounting procedures presented an impediment for cell imaging studies. Subsequently, several approaches to mounting microbial cells have been developed, and these techniques are described later. Also highlighted are general considerations for microbial imaging and a description of some of the various applications of AFM to microbiology.

  6. Metabolic Differences in Microbial Cell Populations Revealed by Nanophotonic Ionization

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, Bennett; Antonakos, Cory; Retterer, Scott T; Vertes, Akos

    2013-01-01

    ellular differences are linked to cell differentiation, the proliferation of cancer and to the development of drug resistance in microbial infections. Due to sensitivity limitations, however, large- scale metabolic analysis at the single cell level is only available for cells significantly larger in volume than Saccharomyces cerevisiae (~30 fL). Here we demonstrate that by a nanophotonic ionization platform and mass spectrometry, over one hundred up to 108 metabolites, or up to 18% of the known S. cerevisiae metabolome, can be identified in very small cell populations (n < 100). Under ideal conditions, r Relative quantitation of up to 4% of the metabolites is achieved at the single cell level.

  7. Exploration and comparison of inborn capacity of aerobic and anaerobic metabolisms of Saccharomyces cerevisiae for microbial electrical current production.

    PubMed

    Mao, Longfei; Verwoerd, Wynand S

    2013-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae possesses numerous advantageous biological features, such as being robust, easily handled, mostly non-pathogenic and having high catabolic rates, etc., which can be considered as merits for being used as a promising biocatalyst in microbial fuel cells (MFCs) for electricity generation. Previous studies have developed efficient MFC configurations to convert metabolic electron shuttles, such as cytoplasmic NADH, into usable electric current. However, no studies have elucidated the maximum potential of S. cerevisiae for current output and the underlying metabolic pathways, resulting from the interaction of thousands of reactions inside the cell during MFC operation. To address these two key issues, this study used in silico metabolic engineering techniques, flux balance analysis (FBA), and flux variability analysis with target flux minimization (FATMIN), to model the metabolic perturbation of S. cerevisiae under the MFC-energy extraction. The FBA results showed that, in the cytoplasmic NADH-dependent mediated electron transfer (MET) mode, S. cerevisiae had a potential to produce currents at up to 5.781 A/gDW for the anaerobic and 6.193 A/gDW for the aerobic environments. The FATMIN results showed that the aerobic and anaerobic metabolisms are resilient, relying on six and five contributing reactions respectively for high current production. Two reactions, catalyzed by glutamate dehydrogenase (NAD) (EC 1.4.1.3) and methylene tetrahydrofolate dehydrogenase (NAD) (EC 1.5.1.5), were shared in both current-production modes and contributed to over 80% of the identified maximum current outputs. It is also shown that the NADH regeneration was much less energy costly than biomass production rate. Taken together, our finding suggests that S. cerevisiae should receive more research effort for MFC electricity production.

  8. Exploration and comparison of inborn capacity of aerobic and anaerobic metabolisms of Saccharomyces cerevisiae for microbial electrical current production

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Longfei; Verwoerd, Wynand S

    2013-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae possesses numerous advantageous biological features, such as being robust, easily handled, mostly non-pathogenic and having high catabolic rates, etc., which can be considered as merits for being used as a promising biocatalyst in microbial fuel cells (MFCs) for electricity generation. Previous studies have developed efficient MFC configurations to convert metabolic electron shuttles, such as cytoplasmic NADH, into usable electric current. However, no studies have elucidated the maximum potential of S. cerevisiae for current output and the underlying metabolic pathways, resulting from the interaction of thousands of reactions inside the cell during MFC operation. To address these two key issues, this study used in silico metabolic engineering techniques, flux balance analysis (FBA), and flux variability analysis with target flux minimization (FATMIN), to model the metabolic perturbation of S. cerevisiae under the MFC-energy extraction. The FBA results showed that, in the cytoplasmic NADH-dependent mediated electron transfer (MET) mode, S. cerevisiae had a potential to produce currents at up to 5.781 A/gDW for the anaerobic and 6.193 A/gDW for the aerobic environments. The FATMIN results showed that the aerobic and anaerobic metabolisms are resilient, relying on six and five contributing reactions respectively for high current production. Two reactions, catalyzed by glutamate dehydrogenase (NAD) (EC 1.4.1.3) and methylene tetrahydrofolate dehydrogenase (NAD) (EC 1.5.1.5), were shared in both current-production modes and contributed to over 80% of the identified maximum current outputs. It is also shown that the NADH regeneration was much less energy costly than biomass production rate. Taken together, our finding suggests that S. cerevisiae should receive more research effort for MFC electricity production. PMID:23969939

  9. Saccharomyces cerevisiae structural cell wall mannoprotein.

    PubMed

    Frevert, J; Ballou, C E

    1985-01-29

    A novel mannoprotein fraction with an average molecular weight of 180 000 has been isolated from Saccharomyces cerevisiae mnn9 mutant cell wall that was solubilized by beta-glucanase digestion. The same material could be extracted from purified wall fragments with 1% sodium dodecyl sulfate. The protein component, 12% by weight, is rich in proline, whereas the carbohydrate, mainly mannose, is about evenly distributed between asparagine and hydroxyamino acids. Endoglucosaminidase H digestion of the isolated mannoprotein reduced its average molecular weight to 150 000, but the mannoprotein, while still embedded in the cell wall, was inaccessible to the enzyme. Biosynthesis and translocation of the mannoprotein were investigated by following incorporation of [3H]proline into this fraction. In the presence of tunicamycin, both mnn9 and wild-type X2180 cells made a mannoprotein fraction with an average molecular weight of 140 000, whereas in the absence of the glycosylation inhibitor, the mnn9 mutant made material with a molecular weight of 180 000 and the mannoprotein made by wild-type cells was too large to penetrate the polyacrylamide gel. Although the cell wall mannoprotein was resistant to heat and proteolytic enzymes, attempts to isolate the carbohydrate-free component failed to yield any characteristic peptide material. PMID:3888262

  10. Glucose‐based microbial production of the hormone melatonin in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Germann, Susanne M.; Baallal Jacobsen, Simo A.; Schneider, Konstantin; Harrison, Scott J.; Jensen, Niels B.; Chen, Xiao; Stahlhut, Steen G.; Borodina, Irina; Luo, Hao; Zhu, Jiangfeng; Maury, Jérôme

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Melatonin is a natural mammalian hormone that plays an important role in regulating the circadian cycle in humans. It is a clinically effective drug exhibiting positive effects as a sleep aid and a powerful antioxidant used as a dietary supplement. Commercial melatonin production is predominantly performed by complex chemical synthesis. In this study, we demonstrate microbial production of melatonin and related compounds, such as serotonin and N‐acetylserotonin. We generated Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains that comprise heterologous genes encoding one or more variants of an L‐tryptophan hydroxylase, a 5‐hydroxy‐L‐tryptophan decarboxylase, a serotonin acetyltransferase, an acetylserotonin O‐methyltransferase, and means for providing the cofactor tetrahydrobiopterin via heterologous biosynthesis and recycling pathways. We thereby achieved de novo melatonin biosynthesis from glucose. We furthermore accomplished increased product titers by altering expression levels of selected pathway enzymes and boosting co‐factor supply. The final yeast strain produced melatonin at a titer of 14.50 ± 0.57 mg L−1 in a 76h fermentation using simulated fed‐batch medium with glucose as sole carbon source. Our study lays the basis for further developing a yeast cell factory for biological production of melatonin. PMID:26710256

  11. Glucose-based microbial production of the hormone melatonin in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Germann, Susanne M; Baallal Jacobsen, Simo A; Schneider, Konstantin; Harrison, Scott J; Jensen, Niels B; Chen, Xiao; Stahlhut, Steen G; Borodina, Irina; Luo, Hao; Zhu, Jiangfeng; Maury, Jérôme; Forster, Jochen

    2016-05-01

    Melatonin is a natural mammalian hormone that plays an important role in regulating the circadian cycle in humans. It is a clinically effective drug exhibiting positive effects as a sleep aid and a powerful antioxidant used as a dietary supplement. Commercial melatonin production is predominantly performed by complex chemical synthesis. In this study, we demonstrate microbial production of melatonin and related compounds, such as serotonin and N-acetylserotonin. We generated Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains that comprise heterologous genes encoding one or more variants of an L-tryptophan hydroxylase, a 5-hydroxy-L-tryptophan decarboxylase, a serotonin acetyltransferase, an acetylserotonin O-methyltransferase, and means for providing the cofactor tetrahydrobiopterin via heterologous biosynthesis and recycling pathways. We thereby achieved de novo melatonin biosynthesis from glucose. We furthermore accomplished increased product titers by altering expression levels of selected pathway enzymes and boosting co-factor supply. The final yeast strain produced melatonin at a titer of 14.50 ± 0.57 mg L(-1) in a 76h fermentation using simulated fed-batch medium with glucose as sole carbon source. Our study lays the basis for further developing a yeast cell factory for biological production of melatonin.

  12. Applications of Microbial Cell Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimomura-Shimizu, Mifumi; Karube, Isao

    Since the first microbial cell sensor was studied by Karube et al. in 1977, many types of microbial cell sensors have been developed as analytical tools. The microbial cell sensor utilizes microbes as a sensing element and a transducer. The characteristics of microbial cell sensors as sensing devices are a complete contrast to those of enzyme sensors or immunosensors, which are highly specific for the substrates of interest, although the specificity of the microbial cell sensor has been improved by genetic modification of the microbe used as the sensing element. Microbial cell sensors have the advantages of tolerance to measuring conditions, a long lifetime, and good cost performance, and have the disadvantage of a long response time. In this review, applications of microbial cell sensors are summarized.

  13. Metabolic engineering of Saccharomyces cerevisiae: a key cell factory platform for future biorefineries.

    PubMed

    Hong, Kuk-Ki; Nielsen, Jens

    2012-08-01

    Metabolic engineering is the enabling science of development of efficient cell factories for the production of fuels, chemicals, pharmaceuticals, and food ingredients through microbial fermentations. The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a key cell factory already used for the production of a wide range of industrial products, and here we review ongoing work, particularly in industry, on using this organism for the production of butanol, which can be used as biofuel, and isoprenoids, which can find a wide range of applications including as pharmaceuticals and as biodiesel. We also look into how engineering of yeast can lead to improved uptake of sugars that are present in biomass hydrolyzates, and hereby allow for utilization of biomass as feedstock in the production of fuels and chemicals employing S. cerevisiae. Finally, we discuss the perspectives of how technologies from systems biology and synthetic biology can be used to advance metabolic engineering of yeast. PMID:22388689

  14. Yeast surface display of dehydrogenases in microbial fuel-cells.

    PubMed

    Gal, Idan; Schlesinger, Orr; Amir, Liron; Alfonta, Lital

    2016-12-01

    Two dehydrogenases, cellobiose dehydrogenase from Corynascus thermophilus and pyranose dehydrogenase from Agaricus meleagris, were displayed for the first time on the surface of Saccharomyces cerevisiae using the yeast surface display system. Surface displayed dehydrogenases were used in a microbial fuel cell and generated high power outputs. Surface displayed cellobiose dehydrogenase has demonstrated a midpoint potential of -28mV (vs. Ag/AgCl) at pH=6.5 and was used in a mediator-less anode compartment of a microbial fuel cell producing a power output of 3.3μWcm(-2) using lactose as fuel. Surface-displayed pyranose dehydrogenase was used in a microbial fuel cell and generated high power outputs using different substrates, the highest power output that was achieved was 3.9μWcm(-2) using d-xylose. These results demonstrate that surface displayed cellobiose dehydrogenase and pyranose dehydrogenase may successfully be used in microbial bioelectrochemical systems.

  15. Yeast surface display of dehydrogenases in microbial fuel-cells.

    PubMed

    Gal, Idan; Schlesinger, Orr; Amir, Liron; Alfonta, Lital

    2016-12-01

    Two dehydrogenases, cellobiose dehydrogenase from Corynascus thermophilus and pyranose dehydrogenase from Agaricus meleagris, were displayed for the first time on the surface of Saccharomyces cerevisiae using the yeast surface display system. Surface displayed dehydrogenases were used in a microbial fuel cell and generated high power outputs. Surface displayed cellobiose dehydrogenase has demonstrated a midpoint potential of -28mV (vs. Ag/AgCl) at pH=6.5 and was used in a mediator-less anode compartment of a microbial fuel cell producing a power output of 3.3μWcm(-2) using lactose as fuel. Surface-displayed pyranose dehydrogenase was used in a microbial fuel cell and generated high power outputs using different substrates, the highest power output that was achieved was 3.9μWcm(-2) using d-xylose. These results demonstrate that surface displayed cellobiose dehydrogenase and pyranose dehydrogenase may successfully be used in microbial bioelectrochemical systems. PMID:27459246

  16. Microbial fuel cells

    SciTech Connect

    Nealson, Kenneth H; Pirbazari, Massoud; Hsu, Lewis

    2013-04-09

    A microbial fuel cell includes an anode compartment with an anode and an anode biocatalyst and a cathode compartment with a cathode and a cathode biocatalyst, with a membrane positioned between the anode compartment and the cathode compartment, and an electrical pathway between the anode and the cathode. The anode biocatalyst is capable of catalyzing oxidation of an organic substance, and the cathode biocatalyst is capable of catalyzing reduction of an inorganic substance. The reduced organic substance can form a precipitate, thereby removing the inorganic substance from solution. In some cases, the anode biocatalyst is capable of catalyzing oxidation of an inorganic substance, and the cathode biocatalyst is capable of catalyzing reduction of an organic or inorganic substance.

  17. Microbial Fuel Cells and Microbial Electrolyzers

    SciTech Connect

    Borole, Abhijeet P

    2015-01-01

    Microbial Fuel Cells and microbial electrolyzers represent an upcoming technology for production of electricity and hydrogen using a hybrid electrocatalytic-biocatalytic approach. The combined catalytic efficiency of these processes has potential to make this technology highly efficient among the various renewable energy production alternatives. This field has attracted electrochemists, biologists and many other disciplines due to its potential to contribute to the energy, water and environment sectors. A brief introduction to the technology is provided followed by current research needs from a bioelectrochemical perspective. Insights into the operation and limitations of these systems achieved via cyclic voltammetry and impedance spectroscopy are discussed along with the power management needs to develop the application aspects. Besides energy production, other potential applications in bioenergy, bioelectronics, chemical production and remediation are also highlighted.

  18. Evaluation of microbial qPCR workflows using engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Da Silva, S.M.; Vang, L.K.; Olson, N.D.; Lund, S.P.; Downey, A.S.; Kelman, Z.; Salit, M.L.; Lin, N.J.; Morrow, J.B.

    2016-01-01

    Aims We describe the development and interlaboratory study of modified Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a candidate material to evaluate a full detection workflow including DNA extraction and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). Methods and results S. cerevisiae NE095 was prepared by stable insertion of DNA sequence External RNA Control Consortium-00095 into S. cerevisiae BY4739 to convey selectivity. For the interlaboratory study, a binomial regression model was used to select three cell concentrations, high (4 × 107 cells ml−1), intermediate (4 × 105 cells ml−1) and low (4 × 103 cells ml−1), and the number of samples per concentration. Seven participants, including potential end users, had combined rates of positive qPCR detection (quantification cycle <37) of 100%, 40%, and 0% for high, intermediate, and low concentrations, respectively. Conclusions The NE095 strain was successfully detected by all participants, with the high concentration indicating a potential target concentration for a reference material. Significance and impact of the study The engineered yeast has potential to support measurement assurance for the analytical process of qPCR, encompassing the method, equipment, and operator, to increase confidence in results and better inform decision-making in areas of applied microbiology. This material can also support process assessment for other DNA-based detection technologies. PMID:27077050

  19. Cell density-dependent linoleic acid toxicity to Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Túlio César; de Moraes, Lídia Maria Pepe; Campos, Elida Geralda

    2011-08-01

    Since the discovery of the apoptotic pathway in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, several compounds have been shown to cause apoptosis in this organism. While the toxicity of polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) peroxides towards S. cerevisiae has been known for a long time, studies on the effect of nonoxidized PUFA are scarce. The present study deals specifically with linoleic acid (LA) in its nonoxidized form and investigates its toxicity to yeast. Saccharomyces cerevisiae is unable to synthesize PUFA, but can take up and incorporate them into its membranes. Reports from the literature indicate that LA is not toxic to yeast cells. However, we demonstrated that yeast cell growth decreased in cultures treated with 0.1 mM LA for 4 h, and 3-(4,5 dimethyl-2-thiazolyl)-2,5-diphenyl-2H-tetrazolium bromide reduction (a measure of respiratory activity) decreased by 47%. This toxicity was dependent on the number of cells used in the experiment. We show apoptosis induction by LA concomitant with increases in malondialdehyde, glutathione content, activities of catalase and cytochrome c peroxidase, and decreases in two metabolic enzyme activities. While the main purpose of this study was to show that LA causes cell death in yeast, our results indicate some of the molecular mechanisms of the cell toxicity of PUFA. PMID:21457450

  20. Micromachined microbial and photosynthetic fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiao, Mu; Lam, Kien B.; Lin, Liwei

    2006-12-01

    This paper presents two types of fuel cells: a miniature microbial fuel cell (µMFC) and a miniature photosynthetic electrochemical cell (µPEC). A bulk micromachining process is used to fabricate the fuel cells, and the prototype has an active proton exchange membrane area of 1 cm2. Two different micro-organisms are used as biocatalysts in the anode: (1) Saccharomyces cerevisiae (baker's yeast) is used to catalyze glucose and (2) Phylum Cyanophyta (blue-green algae) is used to produce electrons by a photosynthetic reaction under light. In the dark, the µPEC continues to generate power using the glucose produced under light. In the cathode, potassium ferricyanide is used to accept electrons and electric power is produced by the overall redox reactions. The bio-electrical responses of µMFCs and µPECs are characterized with the open-circuit potential measured at an average value of 300-500 mV. Under a 10 ohm load, the power density is measured as 2.3 nW cm-2 and 0.04 nW cm-2 for µMFCs and µPECs, respectively.

  1. Effects of Saccharomyces cerevisiae fermentation products on dairy calves: Ruminal fermentation, gastrointestinal morphology, and microbial community.

    PubMed

    Xiao, J X; Alugongo, G M; Chung, R; Dong, S Z; Li, S L; Yoon, I; Wu, Z H; Cao, Z J

    2016-07-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of Saccharomyces cerevisiae fermentation products (SCFP) in the calf starter and milk on ruminal fermentation, gastrointestinal morphology, and microbial community in the first 56 d of life. Thirty Holstein bull calves were randomly assigned to 1 of 3 groups: a texturized calf starter containing 0 (CON), 0.5, or 1% SCFP (XPC, Diamond V, Cedar Rapids, IA) of dry matter from d 4 to 56. In addition, the XPC-supplemented calves were fed with 1 g/d SCFP (SmartCare, Diamond V, Cedar Rapids, IA) in milk from d 2 to 30. All calves were fed 4 L of colostrum within 1 h of birth and were subsequently fed milk twice daily until weaned on d 56. Rumen fluid was collected by an esophageal tube 4 h after the morning feeding on d 28 and 56 to determine ruminal pH, ammonia-N, and volatile fatty acids concentrations. On d 56, 15 (5 per treatment) calves were harvested and slaughter weight, gastrointestinal morphology parameters, and bacteria community were recorded. Papilla length, width, and surface area were measured from 5 locations within the rumen. Villus height, width, surface area, crypt depth, and villus height-to-crypt depth ratio were measured in the duodenum, jejunum, and ileum. Next-generation sequencing technology was used to test the microbial community of the rumen and duodenum samples on d 28 and 56. Data were analyzed by MIXED procedure in SAS (SAS Institute Inc., Cary, NC) with contrast statements to declare CON versus all SCFP and 0.5 versus 1% SCFP in starter grains. Ruminal pH, ammonia-N, and total volatile fatty acids were not altered by SCFP. However, the supplemented groups exhibited higher ruminal butyrate concentrations coinciding with higher Butyrivibrio and lower Prevotella richness than CON group. Supplementation of SCFP increased papilla length in the rumen. In the small intestine, SCFP reduced crypt depth of jejunum, and increased villus height-to-crypt depth ratio in all segments of the small intestine

  2. Symmetric cell division in pseudohyphae of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Kron, S J; Styles, C A; Fink, G R

    1994-01-01

    Laboratory strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae are dimorphic; in response to nitrogen starvation they switch from a yeast form (YF) to a filamentous pseudohyphal (PH) form. Time-lapse video microscopy of dividing cells reveals that YF and PH cells differ in their cell cycles and budding polarity. The YF cell cycle is controlled at the G1/S transition by the cell-size checkpoint Start. YF cells divide asymmetrically, producing small daughters from full-sized mothers. As a result, mothers and daughters bud asynchronously. Mothers bud immediately but daughters grow in G1 until they achieve a critical cell size. By contrast, PH cells divide symmetrically, restricting mitosis until the bud grows to the size of the mother. Thus, mother and daughter bud synchronously in the next cycle, without a G1 delay before Start. YF and PH cells also exhibit distinct bud-site selection patterns. YF cells are bipolar, producing their second and subsequent buds at either pole. PH cells are unipolar, producing their second and subsequent buds only from the end opposite the junction with their mother. We propose that in PH cells a G2 cell-size checkpoint delays mitosis until bud size reaches that of the mother cell. We conclude that yeast and PH forms are distinct cell types each with a unique cell cycle, budding pattern, and cell shape. Images PMID:7841518

  3. Oral Vaccine Development by Molecular Display Methods Using Microbial Cells.

    PubMed

    Shibasaki, Seiji; Ueda, Mitsuyoshi

    2016-01-01

    Oral vaccines are easier to administer than injectable vaccines. To induce an adequate immune response using vaccines, antigenic proteins are usually combined with adjuvant materials. This chapter presents methodologies for the design of oral vaccines using molecular display technology. In molecular display technology, antigenic proteins are displayed on a microbial cell surface with adjuvant ability. This technology would provide a quite convenient process to produce oral vaccines when the DNA sequence of an efficient antigenic protein is available. As an example, oral vaccines against candidiasis were introduced using two different molecular display systems with Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Lactobacillus casei. PMID:27076318

  4. Local Nanomechanical Motion of the Cell Wall of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pelling, Andrew E.; Sehati, Sadaf; Gralla, Edith B.; Valentine, Joan S.; Gimzewski, James K.

    2004-08-01

    We demonstrate that the cell wall of living Saccharomyces cerevisiae (baker's yeast) exhibits local temperature-dependent nanomechanical motion at characteristic frequencies. The periodic motions in the range of 0.8 to 1.6 kHz with amplitudes of ~3 nm were measured using the cantilever of an atomic force microscope (AFM). Exposure of the cells to a metabolic inhibitor causes the periodic motion to cease. From the strong frequency dependence on temperature, we derive an activation energy of 58 kJ/mol, which is consistent with the cell's metabolism involving molecular motors such as kinesin, dynein, and myosin. The magnitude of the forces observed (~10 nN) suggests concerted nanomechanical activity is operative in the cell.

  5. Microbial transformations of ferulic acid by Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Pseudomonas fluorescens.

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Z; Dostal, L; Rosazza, J P

    1993-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae (dry baker's yeast) and Pseudomonas fluorescens were used to convert trans-ferulic acid into 4-hydroxy-3-methoxystyrene in 96 and 89% yields, respectively. The metabolites were isolated by solid-phase extraction and analyzed by thin-layer chromatography and high-performance liquid chromatography. The identities of the metabolites were determined by 1H- and 13C-nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and by mass spectrometry. The mechanism of the decarboxylation of ferulic acid was investigated by measuring the degree and position of deuterium incorporated into the styrene derivative from D2O by mass spectrometry and by both proton and deuterium nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopies. Resting cells of baker's yeast reduced ferulic acid to 4-hydroxy-3-methoxyphenylpropionic acid in 54% yield when incubations were under an argon atmosphere. PMID:8395165

  6. Microbial Cell Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elad, Tal; Lee, Jin Hyung; Gu, Man Bock; Belkin, Shimshon

    The coming of age of whole-cell biosensors, combined with the continuing advances in array technologies, has prepared the ground for the next step in the evolution of both disciplines - the whole cell array. In the present chapter, we highlight the state-of-the-art in the different disciplines essential for a functional bacterial array. These include the genetic engineering of the biological components, their immobilization in different polymers, technologies for live cell deposition and patterning on different types of solid surfaces, and cellular viability maintenance. Also reviewed are the types of signals emitted by the reporter cell arrays, some of the transduction methodologies for reading these signals, and the mathematical approaches proposed for their analysis. Finally, we review some of the potential applications for bacterial cell arrays, and list the future needs for their maturation: a richer arsenal of high-performance reporter strains, better methodologies for their incorporation into hardware platforms, design of appropriate detection circuits, the continuing development of dedicated algorithms for multiplex signal analysis, and - most importantly - enhanced long term maintenance of viability and activity on the fabricated biochips.

  7. Influence of cell surface characteristics on adhesion of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to the biomaterial hydroxylapatite.

    PubMed

    White, Jane S; Walker, Graeme M

    2011-02-01

    The influence of the physicochemical properties of biomaterials on microbial cell adhesion is well known, with the extent of adhesion depending on hydrophobicity, surface charge, specific functional groups and acid-base properties. Regarding yeasts, the effect of cell surfaces is often overlooked, despite the fact that generalisations may not be made between closely related strains. The current investigation compared adhesion of three industrially relevant strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae (M-type, NCYC 1681 and ALY, strains used in production of Scotch whisky, ale and lager, respectively) to the biomaterial hydroxylapatite (HAP). Adhesion of the whisky yeast was greatest, followed by the ale strain, while adhesion of the lager strain was approximately 10-times less. According to microbial adhesion to solvents (MATS) analysis, the ale strain was hydrophobic while the whisky and lager strains were moderately hydrophilic. This contrasted with analyses of water contact angles where all strains were characterised as hydrophilic. All yeast strains were electron donating, with low electron accepting potential, as indicated by both surface energy and MATS analysis. Overall, there was a linear correlation between adhesion to HAP and the overall surface free energy of the yeasts. This is the first time that the relationship between yeast cell surface energy and adherence to a biomaterial has been described.

  8. CRISPR-Cas9 Genome Engineering in Saccharomyces cerevisiae Cells.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Owen W; Poddar, Snigdha; Cate, Jamie H D

    2016-06-01

    This protocol describes a method for CRISPR-Cas9-mediated genome editing that results in scarless and marker-free integrations of DNA into Saccharomyces cerevisiae genomes. DNA integration results from cotransforming (1) a single plasmid (pCAS) that coexpresses the Cas9 endonuclease and a uniquely engineered single guide RNA (sgRNA) expression cassette and (2) a linear DNA molecule that is used to repair the chromosomal DNA damage by homology-directed repair. For target specificity, the pCAS plasmid requires only a single cloning modification: replacing the 20-bp guide RNA sequence within the sgRNA cassette. This CRISPR-Cas9 protocol includes methods for (1) cloning the unique target sequence into pCAS, (2) assembly of the double-stranded DNA repair oligonucleotides, and (3) cotransformation of pCAS and linear repair DNA into yeast cells. The protocol is technically facile and requires no special equipment. It can be used in any S. cerevisiae strain, including industrial polyploid isolates. Therefore, this CRISPR-Cas9-based DNA integration protocol is achievable by virtually any yeast genetics and molecular biology laboratory.

  9. Towards a Microbial Thermoelectric Cell

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Barreiro, Raúl; Abendroth, Christian; Vilanova, Cristina; Moya, Andrés; Porcar, Manuel

    2013-01-01

    Microbial growth is an exothermic process. Biotechnological industries produce large amounts of heat, usually considered an undesirable by-product. In this work, we report the construction and characterization of the first microbial thermoelectric cell (MTC), in which the metabolic heat produced by a thermally insulated microbial culture is partially converted into electricity through a thermoelectric device optimized for low ΔT values. A temperature of 41°C and net electric voltage of around 250–600 mV was achieved with 1.7 L baker’s yeast culture. This is the first time microbial metabolic energy has been converted into electricity with an ad hoc thermoelectric device. These results might contribute towards developing a novel strategy to harvest excess heat in the biotechnology industry, in processes such as ethanol fermentation, auto thermal aerobic digestion (ATAD) or bioremediation, which could be coupled with MTCs in a single unit to produce electricity as a valuable by-product of the primary biotechnological product. Additionally, we propose that small portable MTCs could be conceived and inoculated with suitable thermophilic of hyperthermophilic starter cultures and used for powering small electric devices. PMID:23468862

  10. Towards a microbial thermoelectric cell.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Barreiro, Raúl; Abendroth, Christian; Vilanova, Cristina; Moya, Andrés; Porcar, Manuel

    2013-01-01

    Microbial growth is an exothermic process. Biotechnological industries produce large amounts of heat, usually considered an undesirable by-product. In this work, we report the construction and characterization of the first microbial thermoelectric cell (MTC), in which the metabolic heat produced by a thermally insulated microbial culture is partially converted into electricity through a thermoelectric device optimized for low ΔT values. A temperature of 41°C and net electric voltage of around 250-600 mV was achieved with 1.7 L baker's yeast culture. This is the first time microbial metabolic energy has been converted into electricity with an ad hoc thermoelectric device. These results might contribute towards developing a novel strategy to harvest excess heat in the biotechnology industry, in processes such as ethanol fermentation, auto thermal aerobic digestion (ATAD) or bioremediation, which could be coupled with MTCs in a single unit to produce electricity as a valuable by-product of the primary biotechnological product. Additionally, we propose that small portable MTCs could be conceived and inoculated with suitable thermophilic of hyperthermophilic starter cultures and used for powering small electric devices.

  11. Microbial Analysis of Escherichia coli ATCC, Lactobacteria and Saccharomyces cerevisiae Using Capillary Electrophoresis Approach.

    PubMed

    Pomastowski, Paweł; Railean-Plugaru, Viorica; Buszewski, Bogusław

    2016-01-01

    Rapid detection and identification of microorganisms is a challenging and important aspect in many areas of our life, beginning with medicine, ending with industry. Unfortunately, classical methods of microorganisms identification are based on time-consuming and labor-intensive approaches. Screening techniques require rapid and cheap grouping of bacterial isolates; however, modern bioanalytics demands comprehensive bacterial studies on molecular level. The new approach to the rapid identification of bacteria is to use the electromigration techniques, especially capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE). CZE is an important technique used in the analysis of microorganisms. However, the analysis of microbial complexes using this technology still encounters several problems-uncontrolled aggregation and/or adhesion to the capillary surface. One way to resolve this issue is the CZE analysis of microbial cell with surface charge modification by bivalent metal ions (e.g., Ca(2+) aq, Zn aq). Under the above conditions, bacterial cells create compact aggregates, and fewer high-intensity signals are observed in electropherograms. The chapter presents the capillary electrophoresis of microbial aggregates approach with UV and one-dimensional intact cell matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (ICM MS) detection. PMID:27645746

  12. Physical Properties of Cell Water in Partially Dried Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Koga, Shozo; Echigo, Akira; Nunomura, Kazuko

    1966-01-01

    The equilibrium vapor pressure, the heat of vaporization, the dielectric increment, and the NMR spectra of partially dried cells were studied in Saccharomyces cerevisiae with water contents varying in the range from 25 to 0.8%. The comparative study of those physical properties suggests that physical states of the microbe can be classified into four regions in accordance with the states of the cell water: the solution region, the gel region, the mobile adsorption region, and the localized water region. Much difference in the physiological properties is found between the cells in the solution region and those in the gel region, whereas the pattern changes in physical properties take place when the cells in the gel region are dried to a further extent into the mobile or the localized region. The various modes in the molecular motion of the cell water reflected in those physical properties of the cell seem to give some insight into the biological functions of the molecule in the native as well as the dried states of the cell. PMID:5970569

  13. Architecture and Biosynthesis of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Cell Wall

    PubMed Central

    Orlean, Peter

    2012-01-01

    The wall gives a Saccharomyces cerevisiae cell its osmotic integrity; defines cell shape during budding growth, mating, sporulation, and pseudohypha formation; and presents adhesive glycoproteins to other yeast cells. The wall consists of β1,3- and β1,6-glucans, a small amount of chitin, and many different proteins that may bear N- and O-linked glycans and a glycolipid anchor. These components become cross-linked in various ways to form higher-order complexes. Wall composition and degree of cross-linking vary during growth and development and change in response to cell wall stress. This article reviews wall biogenesis in vegetative cells, covering the structure of wall components and how they are cross-linked; the biosynthesis of N- and O-linked glycans, glycosylphosphatidylinositol membrane anchors, β1,3- and β1,6-linked glucans, and chitin; the reactions that cross-link wall components; and the possible functions of enzymatic and nonenzymatic cell wall proteins. PMID:23135325

  14. Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutant displaying beta-glucans on cell surface.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Yumiko; Azuma, Masayuki; Takada, Yuki; Umeyama, Takashi; Kaneko, Aki; Fujita, Tsuyoshi; Igarashi, Koichi; Ooshima, Hiroshi

    2007-02-01

    The deletion of MCD4 leads to an increase in beta-1,6-glucan level and a decrease in glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored protein and mannan levels in the cell wall of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, suggesting that mcd4 deletion mutant (mcd4Delta) displays beta-glucans on the cell surface without a mannan cover. An observation of the cell surface of mcd4Delta cells and an examination of the effect of contact between mcd4Delta cells and mouse macrophages indicated that macrophages were activated by contact with mcd4Delta cells displaying beta-glucans on the cell surface. We further examined the effect of intraperitoneal ethanol-fixed mcd4Delta cells on the survival period of mice infected with Candida albicans. mcd4Delta cells prolonged the survival period, implying that mcd4Delta cells may enhance the immune function of mice via macrophage activation. Moreover, we examined the structures of beta-glucans (i.e., alkali- and acetic acid-insoluble beta-glucans) extracted from mcd4Delta with (13)C-NMR and the effect of extracted beta-glucans on TNF-alpha secretion from macrophages. The structures of the beta-glucans from mcd4Delta differed from those of wild type (WT); however, there was no difference in tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) secretion level between beta-glucans from mcd4Delta and those from WT. The yield of purified beta-glucans obtained from dry cells of mcd4Delta was higher than that obtained from dry cells of WT. mcd4Delta may be a superior strain for the preparation of beta-glucans. PMID:17368399

  15. Ethanol fermentation in an immobilized cell reactor using Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Najafpour, Ghasem; Younesi, Habibollah; Syahidah Ku Ismail, Ku

    2004-05-01

    Fermentation of sugar by Saccharomyces cerevisiae, for production of ethanol in an immobilized cell reactor (ICR) was successfully carried out to improve the performance of the fermentation process. The fermentation set-up was comprised of a column packed with beads of immobilized cells. The immobilization of S. cerevisiae was simply performed by the enriched cells cultured media harvested at exponential growth phase. The fixed cell loaded ICR was carried out at initial stage of operation and the cell was entrapped by calcium alginate. The production of ethanol was steady after 24 h of operation. The concentration of ethanol was affected by the media flow rates and residence time distribution from 2 to 7 h. In addition, batch fermentation was carried out with 50 g/l glucose concentration. Subsequently, the ethanol productions and the reactor productivities of batch fermentation and immobilized cells were compared. In batch fermentation, sugar consumption and ethanol production obtained were 99.6% and 12.5% v/v after 27 h while in the ICR, 88.2% and 16.7% v/v were obtained with 6 h retention time. Nearly 5% ethanol production was achieved with high glucose concentration (150 g/l) at 6 h retention time. A yield of 38% was obtained with 150 g/l glucose. The yield was improved approximately 27% on ICR and a 24 h fermentation time was reduced to 7 h. The cell growth rate was based on the Monod rate equation. The kinetic constants (K(s) and mu(m)) of batch fermentation were 2.3 g/l and 0.35 g/lh, respectively. The maximum yield of biomass on substrate (Y(X-S)) and the maximum yield of product on substrate (Y(P-S)) in batch fermentations were 50.8% and 31.2% respectively. Productivity of the ICR were 1.3, 2.3, and 2.8 g/lh for 25, 35, 50 g/l of glucose concentration, respectively. The productivity of ethanol in batch fermentation with 50 g/l glucose was calculated as 0.29 g/lh. Maximum production of ethanol in ICR when compared to batch reactor has shown to increase

  16. Molecular basis of cell integrity and morphogenesis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Cid, V J; Durán, A; del Rey, F; Snyder, M P; Nombela, C; Sánchez, M

    1995-01-01

    In fungi and many other organisms, a thick outer cell wall is responsible for determining the shape of the cell and for maintaining its integrity. The budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been a useful model organism for the study of cell wall synthesis, and over the past few decades, many aspects of the composition, structure, and enzymology of the cell wall have been elucidated. The cell wall of budding yeasts is a complex and dynamic structure; its arrangement alters as the cell grows, and its composition changes in response to different environmental conditions and at different times during the yeast life cycle. In the past few years, we have witnessed a profilic genetic and molecular characterization of some key aspects of cell wall polymer synthesis and hydrolysis in the budding yeast. Furthermore, this organism has been the target of numerous recent studies on the topic of morphogenesis, which have had an enormous impact on our understanding of the intracellular events that participate in directed cell wall synthesis. A number of components that direct polarized secretion, including those involved in assembly and organization of the actin cytoskeleton, secretory pathways, and a series of novel signal transduction systems and regulatory components have been identified. Analysis of these different components has suggested pathways by which polarized secretion is directed and controlled. Our aim is to offer an overall view of the current understanding of cell wall dynamics and of the complex network that controls polarized growth at particular stages of the budding yeast cell cycle and life cycle. PMID:7565410

  17. Interaction between lanthanide ions and Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells.

    PubMed

    Ene, Cristian D; Ruta, Lavinia L; Nicolau, Ioana; Popa, Claudia V; Iordache, Virgil; Neagoe, Aurora D; Farcasanu, Ileana C

    2015-10-01

    Lanthanides are a group of non-essential elements with important imaging and therapeutic applications. Although trivalent lanthanide ions (Ln³⁺) are used as potent blockers of Ca²⁺ channels, the systematic studies correlating Ln³⁺ accumulation and toxicity to Ca²⁺ channel blocking activity are scarce. In this study, we made use of the eukaryotic model Saccharomyces cerevisiae to investigate the correlation between Ln³⁺ accumulation, their toxicity and their capacity to block the exogenous stress-induced Ca²⁺ influx into the cytosol. It was found that the Ln³⁺ blocked the Ca²⁺ entry into the yeast cells only when present at concentration high enough to allow rapid binding to cell surface. At lower concentrations, Ln³⁺ were taken up by the cell, but Ca²⁺ blockage was no longer achieved. At 1 mM concentration, all ions from the Ln³⁺ series could block Ca²⁺ entry into cytosol with the exception of La³⁺, and to a lesser extent, Pr³⁺ and Nd³⁺. The plasma membrane Ca²⁺-channel Cch1/Mid1 contributed to La³⁺ and Gd³⁺ entry into the cells, with a significant preference for La³⁺. The results open the possibility to obtain cells loaded with controlled amounts and ratios of Ln³⁺.

  18. Establishment of cellulolytic bacteria and development of fermentative activities in the rumen of gnotobiotically-reared lambs receiving the microbial additive Saccharomyces cerevisiae CNCM I-1077.

    PubMed

    Chaucheyras-Durand, F; Fonty, G

    2001-01-01

    We studied the effects of a yeast additive used in ruminant nutrition on the establishment of cellulolytic bacteria, on plant cell wall degradation and on digestive functions in the rumen of gnotobiotically-reared lambs. Cellulolytic bacteria inoculated to the lambs tended to become established earlier in the presence of Saccharomyces cerevisiae CNCM I-1077 (SC). In addition, their population was maintained at a higher level, when the physico-chemical conditions of the biotope were altered. In these lambs, specific activities of fibrolytic enzymes were greater, and in sacco degradation of wheat straw tended to increase. In the presence of SC there was a decrease in ruminal ammonia concentration and a higher volatile fatty acid (VFA) concentration when lambs were 20 to 50 days old. These data suggest that this yeast strain may stimulate the development of cellulolytic microflora and enhance microbial activity in the rumen of young ruminants. Such activity could be beneficial in preventing microbial imbalance and a reduction of rumen function efficiency in the case of nutritional transitions. Further studies with conventional animals will soon be performed in order to verify these dings.

  19. Physiology of Saccharomyces cerevisiae during cell cycle oscillations.

    PubMed

    Duboc, P; Marison, I; von Stockar, U

    1996-10-18

    Synchronized populations of Saccharomyces cerevisiae CBS 426 are characterized by autonomous oscillations of process variables. CO2 evolution rate, O2 uptake rate and heat production rate varied by a factor of 2 for a continuous culture grown at a dilution rate of 0.10 h-1. Elemental analysis showed that the carbon mass fraction of biomass did not change. Since the reactor is not at steady state, the elemental and energy balances were calculated on cumulated quantities, i.e. the integral of the reaction rates. It was possible to show that carbon, degree of reduction and energy balances matched. Application of simple mass balance principles for non-steady state systems indicated that oscillations were basically characterized by changes in biomass production rate. In addition, the amount of intermediates, e.g. ethanol or acetate, produced or consumed was negligible. Growth rate was low during the S-phase (0.075 h-1) and high during the G2, M and G1 phases (0.125 h-1) for a constant dilution rate of 0.10 h-1. However, nitrogen, ash, sulfur and potassium content showed systematic increases during the S-phase (bud initiation). Cell component analyses showed that changes in cellular fractions during oscillations (storage carbohydrate content decreased during the S-phase) were due to changes in production rates, particularly for protein and carbohydrates. Nevertheless, using the data evaluation techniques for dynamic systems presented here, it was shown that storage carbohydrates are not consumed during the S-phase. Only the synthesis rate of the different cell components changed depending on position in cell cycle. The growth process may be divided into two phenomena: the formation of new cells during mitosis with a low yield, and size increase of new born cells with high yield. Both kinetic and stoichiometric coefficients varied with the position in the oscillation: the results showed that biomass structure changed and that specific growth rate, as well as biomass yield

  20. [Development and application of Saccharomyces cerevisiae cell-surface display for bioethanol production].

    PubMed

    Yang, Fei; Cao, Meng; Jin, Yi; Yang, Xiushan; Tian, Shen

    2012-08-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae is useful as a host for genetic engineering, since it allows the folding and glycosylation of expressed heterologous eukaryotic proteins and can be subjected to many genetic manipulations. Recent advancements in the yeast cell surface engineering developed strategies to genetically immobilize amylolytic, cellulolytic and xylanolytic enzymes on yeast cell surface for the production of fuel ethanol from biomass. We reviewed the basic principle and progress of S. cerevisiae cell-surface engineering and gave an insight into the recent technological developments in the production of bioethanol using surface engineered yeast. PMID:23185890

  1. Changes of Saccharomyces cerevisiae cell membrane components and promotion to ethanol tolerance during the bioethanol fermentation.

    PubMed

    Dong, Shi-Jun; Yi, Chen-Feng; Li, Hao

    2015-12-01

    During bioethanol fermentation process, Saccharomyces cerevisiae cell membrane might provide main protection to tolerate accumulated ethanol, and S. cerevisiae cells might also remodel their membrane compositions or structure to try to adapt to or tolerate the ethanol stress. However, the exact changes and roles of S. cerevisiae cell membrane components during bioethanol fermentation still remains poorly understood. This study was performed to clarify changes and roles of S. cerevisiae cell membrane components during bioethanol fermentation. Both cell diameter and membrane integrity decreased as fermentation time lasting. Moreover, compared with cells at lag phase, cells at exponential and stationary phases had higher contents of ergosterol and oleic acid (C18:1) but lower levels of hexadecanoic (C16:0) and palmitelaidic (C16:1) acids. Contents of most detected phospholipids presented an increase tendency during fermentation process. Increased contents of oleic acid and phospholipids containing unsaturated fatty acids might indicate enhanced cell membrane fluidity. Compared with cells at lag phase, cells at exponential and stationary phases had higher expressions of ACC1 and HFA1. However, OLE1 expression underwent an evident increase at exponential phase but a decrease at following stationary phase. These results indicated that during bioethanol fermentation process, yeast cells remodeled membrane and more changeable cell membrane contributed to acquiring higher ethanol tolerance of S. cerevisiae cells. These results highlighted our knowledge about relationship between the variation of cell membrane structure and compositions and ethanol tolerance, and would contribute to a better understanding of bioethanol fermentation process and construction of industrial ethanologenic strains with higher ethanol tolerance.

  2. Electrophysiology in the eukaryotic model cell Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Bertl, A; Bihler, H; Kettner, C; Slayman, C L

    1998-11-01

    Since the mid-1980s, use of the budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, for expression of heterologous (foreign) genes and proteins has burgeoned for several major purposes, including facile genetic manipulation, large-scale production of specific proteins, and preliminary functional analysis. Expression of heterologous membrane proteins in yeast has not kept pace with expression of cytoplasmic proteins for two principal reasons: (1) although plant and fungal proteins express and function easily in yeast membranes, animal proteins do not, at least yet; and (2) the yeast plasma membrane is generally regarded as a difficult system to which to apply the standard electrophysiological techniques for detailed functional analysis of membrane proteins. Especially now, since completion of the genome-sequencing project for Saccharomyces, yeast membranes themselves can be seen as an ample source of diverse membrane proteins - including ion channels, pumps, and cotransporters - which lend themselves to electrophysiological analysis, and specifically to patch-clamping. Using some of these native proteins for assay, we report systematic methods to prepare both the yeast plasma membrane and the yeast vacuolar membrane (tonoplast) for patch-clamp experiments. We also describe optimized ambient conditions - such as electrode preparation, buffer solutions, and time regimens - which facilitate efficient patch recording from Saccharomyces membranes. There are two main keys to successful patch-clamping with Saccharomyces. The first is patience; the second is scrupulous cleanliness. Large cells, such as provided by polyploid strains, are also useful in yeast patch recording, especially while the skill required for gigaseal formation is being learned. Cleanliness is aided by (1) osmotic extrusion of protoplasts, after minimal digestion of yeast walls; (2) use of a rather spare suspension of protoplasts in the recording chamber; (3) maintenance of continuous chamber perfusion prior to

  3. Electrophysiology in the eukaryotic model cell Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Bertl, A; Bihler, H; Kettner, C; Slayman, C L

    1998-11-01

    Since the mid-1980s, use of the budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, for expression of heterologous (foreign) genes and proteins has burgeoned for several major purposes, including facile genetic manipulation, large-scale production of specific proteins, and preliminary functional analysis. Expression of heterologous membrane proteins in yeast has not kept pace with expression of cytoplasmic proteins for two principal reasons: (1) although plant and fungal proteins express and function easily in yeast membranes, animal proteins do not, at least yet; and (2) the yeast plasma membrane is generally regarded as a difficult system to which to apply the standard electrophysiological techniques for detailed functional analysis of membrane proteins. Especially now, since completion of the genome-sequencing project for Saccharomyces, yeast membranes themselves can be seen as an ample source of diverse membrane proteins - including ion channels, pumps, and cotransporters - which lend themselves to electrophysiological analysis, and specifically to patch-clamping. Using some of these native proteins for assay, we report systematic methods to prepare both the yeast plasma membrane and the yeast vacuolar membrane (tonoplast) for patch-clamp experiments. We also describe optimized ambient conditions - such as electrode preparation, buffer solutions, and time regimens - which facilitate efficient patch recording from Saccharomyces membranes. There are two main keys to successful patch-clamping with Saccharomyces. The first is patience; the second is scrupulous cleanliness. Large cells, such as provided by polyploid strains, are also useful in yeast patch recording, especially while the skill required for gigaseal formation is being learned. Cleanliness is aided by (1) osmotic extrusion of protoplasts, after minimal digestion of yeast walls; (2) use of a rather spare suspension of protoplasts in the recording chamber; (3) maintenance of continuous chamber perfusion prior to

  4. Bioconversion of lactose/whey to fructose diphosphate with recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells

    SciTech Connect

    Compagno, C.; Tura, A.; Ranzi, B.M.; Martegani, E. )

    1993-07-01

    Genetically engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains that express Escherichia coli [beta]-galactosidase gene are able to bioconvert lactose or whey into fructose-1,6-diphosphate (FDP). High FDP yields from whey were obtained with an appropriate ratio between cell concentration and inorganic phosphate. The biomass of transformed cells can be obtained from different carbon sources, according to the expression vector bearing the lacZ gene. The authors showed that whey can be used as the carbon source for S. cerevisiae growth and as the substrate for bioconversion to fructose diphosphate.

  5. Lead sulfide nanoparticles increase cell wall chitin content and induce apoptosis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Sun, Meiqing; Yu, Qilin; Hu, Mengyuan; Hao, Zhenwei; Zhang, Chengdong; Li, Mingchun

    2014-05-30

    Although there have been numerous studies on bacterial toxicity, the cytotoxicity of nanoparticles toward fungi remains poorly understood. We investigated the toxicity of various sizes of lead sulfide particles against the important model fungus, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The smallest particle exerted the highest toxicity, inhibiting cell growth and decreasing cell viability, likely reflecting reduced sedimentation and persistent cell wall attack. In response to cell wall stress, S. cerevisiae showed an increase in the cell wall chitin content and the overexpression of FKS2 and PRM5, two genes of the cell wall integrity signaling pathway. Cell wall stress increased the concentration of intracellular reactive oxygen species, leading to mitochondrial dysfunction and cell apoptosis. The contribution of dissolved lead ions to the overall toxicity was negligible. These findings provide the first demonstration of the physiological protective response of a fungus toward nanoparticles, thereby contributing useful information to the assessment of the environmental impact of metal nanoparticles.

  6. Exploiting cell metabolism for biocatalytic whole-cell transamination by recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Weber, Nora; Gorwa-Grauslund, Marie; Carlquist, Magnus

    2014-05-01

    The potential of Saccharomyces cerevisiae for biocatalytic whole-cell transamination was investigated using the kinetic resolution of racemic 1-phenylethylamine (1-PEA) to (R)-1-PEA as a model reaction. As native yeast do not possess any ω-transaminase activity for the reaction, a recombinant yeast biocatalyst was constructed by overexpressing the gene coding for vanillin aminotransferase from Capsicum chinense. The yeast-based biocatalyst could use glucose as the sole co-substrate for the supply of amine acceptor via cell metabolism. In addition, the biocatalyst was functional without addition of the co-factor pyridoxal-5'-phosphate (PLP), which can be explained by a high inherent cellular capacity to sustain PLP-dependent reactions in living cells. In contrast, external PLP supplementation was required when cell viability was low, as it was the case when using pyruvate as a co-substrate. Overall, the results indicate a potential for engineered S. cerevisiae as a biocatalyst for whole-cell transamination and with glucose as the only co-substrate for the supply of amine acceptor and PLP.

  7. Analysis of rumen microbial populations in lactating dairy cattle fed diets varying in carbohydrate profiles and Saccharomyces cerevisiae fermentation product.

    PubMed

    Mullins, C R; Mamedova, L K; Carpenter, A J; Ying, Y; Allen, M S; Yoon, I; Bradford, B J

    2013-09-01

    The rumen microbial ecosystem is a critical factor that links diets to bovine physiology and productivity; however, information about dietary effects on microbial populations has generally been limited to small numbers of samples and qualitative assessment. To assess whether consistent shifts in microbial populations occur in response to common dietary manipulations in dairy cattle, samples of rumen contents were collected from 2 studies for analysis by quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR). In one study, lactating Holstein cows (n=8) were fed diets in which a nonforage fiber source replaced an increasing proportion of forages and concentrates in a 4×4 Latin square design, and samples of ruminal digesta were collected at 9-h intervals over 3 d at the end of each period. In the second study, lactating Holstein cows (n=15) were fed diets with or without the inclusion of a Saccharomyces cerevisiae fermentation product (SCFP) in a crossover design. In this study, rumen liquid and solid samples were collected during total rumen evacuations before and after feeding in a 42-h period. In total, 146 samples of ruminal digesta were used for microbial DNA isolation and analysis by qPCR. Validated primer sets were used to quantify total bacterial and anaerobic fungal populations as well as 12 well-studied bacterial taxa. The relative abundance of the target populations was similar to those previously reported. No significant treatment effects were observed for any target population. A significant interaction of treatment and dry matter intake was observed, however, for the abundance of Eubacterium ruminantium. Increasing dry matter intake was associated with a quadratic decrease in E. ruminantium populations in control animals but with a quadratic increase in E.ruminantium populations in cows fed SCFP. Analysis of sample time effects revealed that Fibrobacter succinogenes and fungal populations were more abundant postfeeding, whereas Ruminococcus albus tended to be more abundant

  8. Expression of a Dianthus flavonoid glucosyltransferase in Saccharomyces cerevisiae for whole-cell biocatalysis.

    PubMed

    Werner, Sean R; Morgan, John A

    2009-07-15

    Glycosyltransferases are promising biocatalysts for the synthesis of small molecule glycosides. In this study, Saccharomyces cerevisiae expressing a flavonoid glucosyltransferase (GT) from Dianthus caryophyllus (carnation) was investigated as a whole-cell biocatalyst. Two yeast expression systems were compared using the flavonoid naringenin as a model substrate. Under in vitro conditions, naringenin-7-O-glucoside was formed and a higher specific glucosyl transfer activity was found using a galactose inducible expression system compared to a constitutive expression system. However, S. cerevisiae expressing the GT constitutively was significantly more productive than the galactose inducible system under in vivo conditions. Interestingly, the glycosides were recovered directly from the culture broth and did not accumulate intracellularly. A previously uncharacterized naringenin glycoside formed using the D. caryophyllus GT was identified as naringenin-4'-O-glucoside. It was found that S. cerevisiae cells hydrolyze naringenin-7-O-glucoside during whole-cell biocatalysis, resulting in a low final glycoside titer. When phloretin was added as a substrate to the yeast strain expressing the GT constitutively, the natural product phlorizin was formed. This study demonstrates S. cerevisiae is a promising whole-cell biocatalyst host for the production of valuable glycosides.

  9. Biosorption of water-soluble dyes on magnetically modified Saccharomyces cerevisiae subsp. uvarum cells.

    PubMed

    Safaríková, M; Ptácková, L; Kibriková, I; Safarík, I

    2005-05-01

    Brewer's yeast (bottom yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae subsp. uvarum) cells were magnetically modified using water based magnetic fluid stabilized with perchloric acid. Magnetically modified yeast cells efficiently adsorbed various water soluble dyes. The dyes adsorption can be described by the Langmuir adsorption model. The maximum adsorption capacity of the magnetic cells differed substantially for individual dyes; the highest value was found for aniline blue (approx. 220 mg per g of dried magnetic adsorbent). PMID:15811411

  10. Why should cell biologists study microbial pathogens?

    PubMed Central

    Welch, Matthew D.

    2015-01-01

    One quarter of all deaths worldwide each year result from infectious diseases caused by microbial pathogens. Pathogens infect and cause disease by producing virulence factors that target host cell molecules. Studying how virulence factors target host cells has revealed fundamental principles of cell biology. These include important advances in our understanding of the cytoskeleton, organelles and membrane-trafficking intermediates, signal transduction pathways, cell cycle regulators, the organelle/protein recycling machinery, and cell-death pathways. Such studies have also revealed cellular pathways crucial for the immune response. Discoveries from basic research on the cell biology of pathogenesis are actively being translated into the development of host-targeted therapies to treat infectious diseases. Thus there are many reasons for cell biologists to incorporate the study of microbial pathogens into their research programs. PMID:26628749

  11. Electrochemical Performance and Microbial Characterization of Thermophilic Microbial Fuel Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wrighton, K. C.; Agbo, P.; Brodie, E. L.; Weber, K. A.; Desantis, T. Z.; Anderson, G. L.; Coates, J. D.

    2007-12-01

    Significant research effort is currently focused on microbial fuel cells (MFC) as a source of renewable energy. To date, most of these efforts have concentrated on MFCs operating at mesophilic temperatures. However, many previous studies have reported on the superiority of thermophilic conditions in anaerobic digestion and demonstrated a net gain in energy yield, in terms of methane, relative to the increased energy requirements of operation. Because of this, our recent studies on MFCs focused on investigating the operation and microbiology associated with thermophilic MFCs operating at 55°C. Over 100-day operation, these MFCs were highly stable and achieved a maximum power density of 24mW/m2 and a columbic efficiency of 89 percent with acetate as the sole electron donor. In order to characterize the microbial community involved in thermophilic electricity generation, DNA and RNA were isolated from the electrode and PhyloChip analyses performed. Exploring the changes in the microbial community over time in electricity producing MFC revealed an increase in relative abundance of populations belonging to the Firmicutes, Chloroflexi, and alpha Proteobacteria by at least one order of magnitude. In contrast, these populations decreased in the open circuit and no electron donor amended controls. In order to better characterize the active microbial populations, we enriched and isolated a novel organism, strain JR, from samples collected from an operating MFC. Based on 16S rRNA sequence analysis strain JR was a member of the family Peptococcaceae, within the Phylum Firmicutes, clustering with Thermincola ferriacetica (98 percent similarity). Phenotypic characterization revealed that strain JR was capable of thermophilic dissimilatory reduction of insoluble electron acceptors such as amorphous Fe(III); as well as reduction of the model quinone 2,6-anthraquinone disulfonate. Thermincola strain JR was also capable of producing current by coupling acetate oxidation to anodic

  12. Nanotechnology, bionanotechnology and microbial cell factories

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Nanotechnology is increasingly using both materials and nano-objects synthesized by living beings, most of them produced by microbial cells. Emerging technologies and highly integrative approaches (such as 'omics and systems biology), that have been largely proven successful for the production of proteins and secondary metabolites are now expected to become fully adapted for the improved biological production of nanostructured materials with tailored properties. The so far underestimated potential of microbial cell factories in nanotechnology and nanomedicine is expected to emerge, in the next years, in the context of novel needs envisaged in the nanoscience universe. This should prompt a careful revisiting of the microbial cell factories as the most versatile biological platforms to supply functional materials for nanotechnological applications. PMID:20602780

  13. Molecular mechanisms of Saccharomyces cerevisiae stress adaptation and programmed cell death in response to acetic acid

    PubMed Central

    Giannattasio, Sergio; Guaragnella, Nicoletta; Ždralević, Maša; Marra, Ersilia

    2013-01-01

    Beyond its classical biotechnological applications such as food and beverage production or as a cell factory, the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a valuable model organism to study fundamental mechanisms of cell response to stressful environmental changes. Acetic acid is a physiological product of yeast fermentation and it is a well-known food preservative due to its antimicrobial action. Acetic acid has recently been shown to cause yeast cell death and aging. Here we shall focus on the molecular mechanisms of S. cerevisiae stress adaptation and programmed cell death in response to acetic acid. We shall elaborate on the intracellular signaling pathways involved in the cross-talk of pro-survival and pro-death pathways underlying the importance of understanding fundamental aspects of yeast cell homeostasis to improve the performance of a given yeast strain in biotechnological applications. PMID:23430312

  14. Molecular mechanisms of Saccharomyces cerevisiae stress adaptation and programmed cell death in response to acetic acid.

    PubMed

    Giannattasio, Sergio; Guaragnella, Nicoletta; Zdralević, Maša; Marra, Ersilia

    2013-01-01

    Beyond its classical biotechnological applications such as food and beverage production or as a cell factory, the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a valuable model organism to study fundamental mechanisms of cell response to stressful environmental changes. Acetic acid is a physiological product of yeast fermentation and it is a well-known food preservative due to its antimicrobial action. Acetic acid has recently been shown to cause yeast cell death and aging. Here we shall focus on the molecular mechanisms of S. cerevisiae stress adaptation and programmed cell death in response to acetic acid. We shall elaborate on the intracellular signaling pathways involved in the cross-talk of pro-survival and pro-death pathways underlying the importance of understanding fundamental aspects of yeast cell homeostasis to improve the performance of a given yeast strain in biotechnological applications. PMID:23430312

  15. Ethanol production from nonsterilized carob pod extract by free and immobilized Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells using fed-batch culture

    SciTech Connect

    Roukas, T. . Dept. of Food Science and Technology)

    1994-02-05

    The production of ethanol from carob pod extract by free and immobilized Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells in batch and fed-batch culture was investigated. Fed-batch culture proved to be a better fermentation system for the production of ethanol than batch culture. In fed-batch culture, both free and immobilized S. cerevisiae cells gave the same maximum concentration of final ethanol at an initial sugar concentration of 300 g/L and F = 167 mL/h. The maximum ethanol productivity was obtained with both free and immobilized cells at a substrate concentration of 300 g/L and F = 334 mL/h. In repeated fed-batch culture, immobilized S. cerevisiae cells gave a higher overall ethanol concentration compared with the free cells. The immobilized S. cerevisiae cells in Ca-alginate beads retained their ability to produce ethanol for 10 days.

  16. Regulation of Cell Wall Biogenesis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae: The Cell Wall Integrity Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Levin, David E.

    2011-01-01

    The yeast cell wall is a strong, but elastic, structure that is essential not only for the maintenance of cell shape and integrity, but also for progression through the cell cycle. During growth and morphogenesis, and in response to environmental challenges, the cell wall is remodeled in a highly regulated and polarized manner, a process that is principally under the control of the cell wall integrity (CWI) signaling pathway. This pathway transmits wall stress signals from the cell surface to the Rho1 GTPase, which mobilizes a physiologic response through a variety of effectors. Activation of CWI signaling regulates the production of various carbohydrate polymers of the cell wall, as well as their polarized delivery to the site of cell wall remodeling. This review article centers on CWI signaling in Saccharomyces cerevisiae through the cell cycle and in response to cell wall stress. The interface of this signaling pathway with other pathways that contribute to the maintenance of cell wall integrity is also discussed. PMID:22174182

  17. Preparation of a Saccharomyces cerevisiae cell-free extract for in vitro translation.

    PubMed

    Wu, Cheng; Sachs, Matthew S

    2014-01-01

    Eukaryotic cell-free in vitro translation systems have been in use since the 1970s. These systems can faithfully synthesize polypeptides when programmed with mRNA, enabling the production of polypeptides for analysis as well as permitting analyses of the cis- and trans-acting factors that regulate translation. Here we describe the preparation and use of cell-free translation systems from the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

  18. Brazilian propolis protects Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells against oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    de Sá, Rafael A; de Castro, Frederico A V; Eleutherio, Elis C A; de Souza, Raquel M; da Silva, Joaquim F M; Pereira, Marcos D

    2013-01-01

    Propolis is a natural product widely used for humans. Due to its complex composition, a number of applications (antimicrobial, antiinflammatory, anesthetic, cytostatic and antioxidant) have been attributed to this substance. Using Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a eukaryotic model we investigated the mechanisms underlying the antioxidant effect of propolis from Guarapari against oxidative stress. Submitting a wild type (BY4741) and antioxidant deficient strains (ctt1Δ, sod1Δ, gsh1Δ, gtt1Δ and gtt2Δ) either to 15 mM menadione or to 2 mM hydrogen peroxide during 60 min, we observed that all strains, except the mutant sod1Δ, acquired tolerance when previously treated with 25 μg/mL of alcoholic propolis extract. Such a treatment reduced the levels of ROS generation and of lipid peroxidation, after oxidative stress. The increase in Cu/Zn-Sod activity by propolis suggests that the protection might be acting synergistically with Cu/Zn-Sod.

  19. [Advances in microbial solar cells--A review].

    PubMed

    Guo, Xiaoyun; Yu, Changping; Zheng, Tianling

    2015-08-01

    The energy crisis has become one of the major problems hindering the development of the world. The emergence of microbial fuel cells provides a new solution to the energy crisis. Microbial solar cells, integrating photosynthetic organisms such as plants and microalgae into microbial fuel cells, can convert solar energy into electrical energy. Microbial solar cell has steady electric energy, and broad application prospects in wastewater treatment, biodiesel processing and intermediate metabolites production. Here we reviewed recent progress of microbial solar cells from the perspective of the role of photosynthetic organisms in microbial fuel cells, based on a vast amount of literature, and discussed their advantages and deficiency. At last, brief analysis of the facing problems and research needs of microbial fuel cells are undertaken. This work was expected to be beneficial for the application of the microbial solar cells technology.

  20. Autonomous, Retrievable, Deep Sea Microbial Fuel Cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richter, K.

    2014-12-01

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) work by providing bacteria in anaerobic sediments with an electron acceptor (anode) that stimulates metabolism of organic matter. The buried anode is connected via control circuitry to a cathode exposed to oxygen in the overlying water. During metabolism, bacteria release hydrogen ions into the sediment and transfer electrons extra-cellularly to the anode, which eventually reduce dissolved oxygen at the cathode, forming water. The open circuit voltage is approximately 0.8 v. The voltage between electrodes is operationally kept at 0.4 v with a potentiastat. The current is chiefly limited by the rate of microbial metabolism at the anode. The Office of Naval Research has encouraged development of microbial fuel cells in the marine environment at a number of academic and naval institutions. Earlier work in shallow sediments of San Diego Bay showed that the most important environmental parameters that control fuel cell power output in San Diego Bay were total organic carbon in the sediment and seasonal water temperature. Current MFC work at SPAWAR includes extension of microbial fuel cell tests to the deep sea environment (>1000 m) and, in parallel, testing microbial fuel cells in the laboratory under deep sea conditions. One question we are asking is whether MFC power output from deep water sediments repressurized and chilled in the laboratory comparable to those measured in situ. If yes, mapping the power potential of deep sea sediments may be made much easier, requiring sediment grabs and lab tests rather than deployment and retrieval of fuel cells. Another question we are asking is whether in situ temperature and total organic carbon in the deep sea sediment can predict MFC power. If yes, then we can make use of the large collection of publicly available, deep sea oceanographic measurements to make these predictions, foregoing expensive work at sea. These regressions will be compared to those derived from shallow water measurements.

  1. Interval scanning photomicrography of microbial cell populations.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Casida, L. E., Jr.

    1972-01-01

    A single reproducible area of the preparation in a fixed focal plane is photographically scanned at intervals during incubation. The procedure can be used for evaluating the aerobic or anaerobic growth of many microbial cells simultaneously within a population. In addition, the microscope is not restricted to the viewing of any one microculture preparation, since the slide cultures are incubated separately from the microscope.

  2. Single-cell transcriptomics for microbial eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Kolisko, Martin; Boscaro, Vittorio; Burki, Fabien; Lynn, Denis H; Keeling, Patrick J

    2014-11-17

    One of the greatest hindrances to a comprehensive understanding of microbial genomics, cell biology, ecology, and evolution is that most microbial life is not in culture. Solutions to this problem have mainly focused on whole-community surveys like metagenomics, but these analyses inevitably loose information and present particular challenges for eukaryotes, which are relatively rare and possess large, gene-sparse genomes. Single-cell analyses present an alternative solution that allows for specific species to be targeted, while retaining information on cellular identity, morphology, and partitioning of activities within microbial communities. Single-cell transcriptomics, pioneered in medical research, offers particular potential advantages for uncultivated eukaryotes, but the efficiency and biases have not been tested. Here we describe a simple and reproducible method for single-cell transcriptomics using manually isolated cells from five model ciliate species; we examine impacts of amplification bias and contamination, and compare the efficacy of gene discovery to traditional culture-based transcriptomics. Gene discovery using single-cell transcriptomes was found to be comparable to mass-culture methods, suggesting single-cell transcriptomics is an efficient entry point into genomic data from the vast majority of eukaryotic biodiversity.

  3. Molecular characterization of propolis-induced cell death in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    de Castro, Patrícia Alves; Savoldi, Marcela; Bonatto, Diego; Barros, Mário Henrique; Goldman, Maria Helena S; Berretta, Andresa A; Goldman, Gustavo Henrique

    2011-03-01

    Propolis, a natural product of plant resins, is used by the bees to seal holes in their honeycombs and protect the hive entrance. However, propolis has also been used in folk medicine for centuries. Here, we apply the power of Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model organism for studies of genetics, cell biology, and genomics to determine how propolis affects fungi at the cellular level. Propolis is able to induce an apoptosis cell death response. However, increased exposure to propolis provides a corresponding increase in the necrosis response. We showed that cytochrome c but not endonuclease G (Nuc1p) is involved in propolis-mediated cell death in S. cerevisiae. We also observed that the metacaspase YCA1 gene is important for propolis-mediated cell death. To elucidate the gene functions that may be required for propolis sensitivity in eukaryotes, the full collection of about 4,800 haploid S. cerevisiae deletion strains was screened for propolis sensitivity. We were able to identify 138 deletion strains that have different degrees of propolis sensitivity compared to the corresponding wild-type strains. Systems biology revealed enrichment for genes involved in the mitochondrial electron transport chain, vacuolar acidification, negative regulation of transcription from RNA polymerase II promoter, regulation of macroautophagy associated with protein targeting to vacuoles, and cellular response to starvation. Validation studies indicated that propolis sensitivity is dependent on the mitochondrial function and that vacuolar acidification and autophagy are important for yeast cell death caused by propolis.

  4. Microbial fuel cells for biosensor applications.

    PubMed

    Yang, Huijia; Zhou, Minghua; Liu, Mengmeng; Yang, Weilu; Gu, Tingyue

    2015-12-01

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) face major hurdles for real-world applications as power generators with the exception of powering small sensor devices. Despite tremendous improvements made in the last two decades, MFCs are still too expensive to build and operate and their power output is still too small. In view of this, in recently years, intensive researches have been carried out to expand the applications into other areas such as acid and alkali production, bioremediation of aquatic sediments, desalination and biosensors. Unlike power applications, MFC sensors have the immediate prospect to be practical. This review covers the latest developments in various proposed biosensor applications using MFCs including monitoring microbial activity, testing biochemical oxygen demand, detection of toxicants and detection of microbial biofilms that cause biocorrosion.

  5. From microbial communities to cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Margulis, L.

    1985-01-01

    The eukraotic cell, the unit of structure of protoctists, plants, fungi, and animals, is not at all homologous to prokaryotic cells. Instead the eukaryotic cell is homologous to communities of microorganisms such as those of the sulfuretum. This research is based on the hypothesis that at least four different interacting community members entered the original associations that, when stabilized, led to the emergence of eukaryotic cells. These are: (1) host nucleocytoplasm (thermoplasma like archaebacteria); (2) mitochrondria (paracoccus or bdellovibryo like respiring bacteria; and (3) plastids (cyanobacteria) and undulipodia. Tubulin like protein was found in the free living spirochete Spirochaeta bajacaliforniensis and in several other spirochetes. The amino acid sequence was to see if the spirochete protein is homologous to the tubulin of undulipodial and mitotic spindle microtubules.

  6. Wireless sensors powered by microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Shantaram, Avinash; Beyenal, Haluk; Raajan, Raaja; Veluchamy, Angathevar; Lewandowski, Zbigniew

    2005-07-01

    Monitoring parameters characterizing water quality, such as temperature, pH, and concentrations of heavy metals in natural waters, is often followed by transmitting the data to remote receivers using telemetry systems. Such systems are commonly powered by batteries, which can be inconvenient at times because batteries have a limited lifetime and must be recharged or replaced periodically to ensure that sufficient energy is available to power the electronics. To avoid these inconveniences, a microbial fuel cell was designed to power electrochemical sensors and small telemetry systems to transmit the data acquired by the sensors to remote receivers. The microbial fuel cell was combined with low-power, high-efficiency electronic circuitry providing a stable power source for wireless data transmission. To generate enough power for the telemetry system, energy produced by the microbial fuel cell was stored in a capacitor and used in short bursts when needed. Since commercial electronic circuits require a minimum 3.3 V input and our cell was able to deliver a maximum of 2.1 V, a DC-DC converter was used to boost the potential. The DC-DC converter powered a transmitter, which gathered the data from the sensor and transmitted it wirelessly to a remote receiver. To demonstrate the utility of the system, temporal variations in temperature were measured, and the data were wirelessly transmitted to a remote receiver.

  7. Wireless sensors powered by microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Shantaram, Avinash; Beyenal, Haluk; Raajan, Raaja; Veluchamy, Angathevar; Lewandowski, Zbigniew

    2005-07-01

    Monitoring parameters characterizing water quality, such as temperature, pH, and concentrations of heavy metals in natural waters, is often followed by transmitting the data to remote receivers using telemetry systems. Such systems are commonly powered by batteries, which can be inconvenient at times because batteries have a limited lifetime and must be recharged or replaced periodically to ensure that sufficient energy is available to power the electronics. To avoid these inconveniences, a microbial fuel cell was designed to power electrochemical sensors and small telemetry systems to transmit the data acquired by the sensors to remote receivers. The microbial fuel cell was combined with low-power, high-efficiency electronic circuitry providing a stable power source for wireless data transmission. To generate enough power for the telemetry system, energy produced by the microbial fuel cell was stored in a capacitor and used in short bursts when needed. Since commercial electronic circuits require a minimum 3.3 V input and our cell was able to deliver a maximum of 2.1 V, a DC-DC converter was used to boost the potential. The DC-DC converter powered a transmitter, which gathered the data from the sensor and transmitted it wirelessly to a remote receiver. To demonstrate the utility of the system, temporal variations in temperature were measured, and the data were wirelessly transmitted to a remote receiver. PMID:16053108

  8. Life cycle assessment of high-rate anaerobic treatment, microbial fuel cells, and microbial electrolysis cells.

    PubMed

    Foley, Jeffrey M; Rozendal, René A; Hertle, Christopher K; Lant, Paul A; Rabaey, Korneel

    2010-05-01

    Existing wastewater treatment options are generally perceived as energy intensive and environmentally unfriendly. Much attention has been focused on two new approaches in the past years, (i) microbial fuel cells and (ii) microbial electrolysis cells, which directly generate electrical current or chemical products, respectively, during wastewater treatment. These systems are commonly denominated as bioelectrochemical systems, and a multitude of claims have been made in the past regarding the environmental impact of these treatment options. However, an in-depth study backing these claims has not been performed. Here, we have conducted a life cycle assessment (LCA) to compare the environmental impact of three industrial wastewater treatment options, (i) anaerobic treatment with biogas generation, (ii) a microbial fuel cell treatment, with direct electricity generation, and (iii) a microbial electrolysis cell, with hydrogen peroxide production. Our analysis showed that a microbial fuel cell does not provide a significant environmental benefit relative to the "conventional" anaerobic treatment option. However, a microbial electrolysis cell provides significant environmental benefits through the displacement of chemical production by conventional means. Provided that the target conversion level of 1000 A.m(-3) can be met, the decrease in greenhouse gas emissions and other environmentally harmful emissions (e.g., aromatic hydrocarbons) of the microbial electrolysis cell will be a key driver for the development of an industrial standard for this technology. Evidently, this assessment is highly dependent on the underlying assumptions, such as the used reactor materials and target performance. This provides a challenge and an opportunity for researchers in the field to select and develop appropriate and environmentally benign materials of construction, as well as demonstrate the required 1000 A.m(-3) performance at pilot and full scale.

  9. Increased sensitivity of heat-stressed Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells to food-grade antioxidants.

    PubMed Central

    Eubanks, V L; Beuchat, L R

    1982-01-01

    Unheated and heat-stressed Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells were examined for their relative sensitivities to butylated hydroxyanisole (BHA), tertiary butylhydroquinone (TBHQ), and propyl gallate. Heated cells had significant (P less than or equal to 0.05) increases in sensitivity to 50 micrograms of BHA, 100 micrograms of TBHQ, and 1,000 micrograms of propyl gallate per ml as compared with unheated cells when surface plated on antioxidant-supplemented recovery agar. The rate of increase in size of colonies developed by heated cells was slower than that of unheated cells, and the presence of antioxidants in recovery agar enhanced this effect. Heat-stressed cells also had increased sensitivity to ethanol. Incubation temperatures of 15, 21, 30, and 37 degrees C for enumerating unheated cells had no significant effect on the numbers of colonies formed on unsupplemented recovery agar; however, incorporation of 100 micrograms of BHA, 200 micrograms of TBHQ, or 1,000 micrograms of propyl gallate per ml into agar resulted in significant decreases in the number of colonies formed by heated cells at various incubation temperatures. The detrimental effects of TBHQ and propyl gallate on repair of heat-injured cells are apparently expressed at a temperature higher than that observed for BHA. It is suggested that the adverse effects of antioxidants on repair of heat-injured S. cerevisiae cells may be associated with oxygen availability. PMID:6753745

  10. Microbial fuel cell with improved anode

    DOEpatents

    Borole, Abhijeet P.

    2010-04-13

    The present invention relates to a method for preparing a microbial fuel cell, wherein the method includes: (i) inoculating an anodic liquid medium in contact with an anode of the microbial fuel cell with one or more types of microorganisms capable of functioning by an exoelectrogenic mechanism; (ii) establishing a biofilm of the microorganisms on and/or within the anode along with a substantial absence of planktonic forms of the microorganisms by substantial removal of the planktonic microorganisms during forced flow and recirculation conditions of the anodic liquid medium; and (iii) subjecting the microorganisms of the biofilm to a growth stage by incorporating one or more carbon-containing nutritive compounds in the anodic liquid medium during biofilm formation or after biofilm formation on the anode has been established.

  11. Impact of photocatalysis on fungal cells: depiction of cellular and molecular effects on Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Thabet, Sana; Simonet, France; Lemaire, Marc; Guillard, Chantal; Cotton, Pascale

    2014-12-01

    We have investigated the antimicrobial effects of photocatalysis on the yeast model Saccharomyces cerevisiae. To accurately study the antimicrobial mechanisms of the photocatalytic process, we focused our investigations on two questions: the entry of the nanoparticles in treated cells and the fate of the intracellular environment. Transmission electronic microscopy did not reveal any entry of nanoparticles within the cells, even for long exposure times, despite degradation of the cell wall space and deconstruction of cellular compartments. In contrast to proteins located at the periphery of the cells, intracellular proteins did not disappear uniformly. Disappearance or persistence of proteins from the pool of oxidized intracellular isoforms was not correlated to their functions. Altogether, our data suggested that photocatalysis induces the establishment of an intracellular oxidative environment. This hypothesis was sustained by the detection of an increased level of superoxide ions (O2°(-)) in treated cells and by greater cell cultivability for cells expressing oxidant stress response genes during photocatalytic exposure. The increase in intracellular ROS, which was not connected to the entry of nanoparticles within the cells or to a direct contact with the plasma membrane, could be the result of an imbalance in redox status amplified by chain reactions. Moreover, we expanded our study to other yeast and filamentous fungi and pointed out that, in contrast to the laboratory model S. cerevisiae, some environmental strains are very resistant to photocatalysis. This could be related to the cell wall composition and structure.

  12. Impact of Photocatalysis on Fungal Cells: Depiction of Cellular and Molecular Effects on Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Thabet, Sana; Simonet, France; Lemaire, Marc; Guillard, Chantal

    2014-01-01

    We have investigated the antimicrobial effects of photocatalysis on the yeast model Saccharomyces cerevisiae. To accurately study the antimicrobial mechanisms of the photocatalytic process, we focused our investigations on two questions: the entry of the nanoparticles in treated cells and the fate of the intracellular environment. Transmission electronic microscopy did not reveal any entry of nanoparticles within the cells, even for long exposure times, despite degradation of the cell wall space and deconstruction of cellular compartments. In contrast to proteins located at the periphery of the cells, intracellular proteins did not disappear uniformly. Disappearance or persistence of proteins from the pool of oxidized intracellular isoforms was not correlated to their functions. Altogether, our data suggested that photocatalysis induces the establishment of an intracellular oxidative environment. This hypothesis was sustained by the detection of an increased level of superoxide ions (O2°−) in treated cells and by greater cell cultivability for cells expressing oxidant stress response genes during photocatalytic exposure. The increase in intracellular ROS, which was not connected to the entry of nanoparticles within the cells or to a direct contact with the plasma membrane, could be the result of an imbalance in redox status amplified by chain reactions. Moreover, we expanded our study to other yeast and filamentous fungi and pointed out that, in contrast to the laboratory model S. cerevisiae, some environmental strains are very resistant to photocatalysis. This could be related to the cell wall composition and structure. PMID:25261515

  13. Growth performance and gastrointestinal microbial ecology responses of piglets receiving Saccharomyces cerevisiae fermentation products after an oral challenge with Escherichia coli (K88).

    PubMed

    Kiarie, E; Bhandari, S; Scott, M; Krause, D O; Nyachoti, C M

    2011-04-01

    The effects of Saccharomyces cerevisiae fermentation products (YFP) on growth performance and gastrointestinal (GIT) microbial ecology in 90 weanling pigs orally challenged with Escherichia coli K88(+) (ETEC) were investigated. The YFP were an original YFP product (XPC) and a water-suspendable yeast fermentation prototype (WSYFP) from a commercial company. Treatments consisted of a negative control (NC, no in-feed or in-water additive), carbadox (AB, 55 mg of carbadox/kg of feed), XPC (in feed, 0.2%), and WSYFP (in water, 0.5, 1, or 2 g/pig per day), and each was allotted to 5 pens (3 pigs/pen). The diets met the 1998 NRC specifications. Pigs were acclimated to treatments for a 7-d period before an ETEC challenge. On d 8, blood was collected from pigs to determine the baseline packed cell volume (PCV) measurement, and pigs were orally challenged with ETEC. At various time points postchallenge, blood samples were taken, performance measures and fecal consistency scores were recorded, and gut digesta and tissue samples were taken to evaluate GIT morphology, microbial ecology, and metabolites. Preplanned contrasts were used for comparison. Pigs receiving YFP had greater ADFI than NC pigs on d 3 (424 vs. 378 g/d; P = 0.01) and d 7 (506 vs. 458 g/d; P = 0.03) postchallenge. This effect of YFP on ADFI was similar to that of AB on d 3, but pigs receiving AB ate more (576 vs. 506 g/d; P = 0.03) at d 7 than pigs receiving YFP. Pigs exhibited reduced (P < 0.001) PCV upon ETEC challenge; however, pigs receiving additives sustained a greater (P < 0.05) PCV at 72 h compared with the NC group. Compared with the NC pigs, pigs receiving YFP showed a smaller (P < 0.05) number of ileal mucosa adherent ETEC and prevalence of the order Enterobacteriales in the ileal digesta, which corresponded to less (5.09 vs. 6.97 mg/dL; P = 0.03) colonic ammonia on d 7 postchallenge. Most of the indices for ileal digesta bacterial richness and diversity were greater (P < 0.01) for YFP pigs compared

  14. Effect of Saccharomyces cerevisiae on alfalfa nutrient degradation characteristics and rumen microbial populations of steers fed diets with different concentrate-to-forage ratios

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Live yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) constitutes an effective additive for animal production; its probiotic effect may be related to the concentrate-to-forage ratio (CTFR). The objective of this study was to assess the effects of S. cerevisiae (SC) on fiber degradation and rumen microbial populations in steers fed diets with different levels of dietary concentrate. Ten Simmental × Local crossbred steers (450 ± 50 kg BW) were assigned to a control group or an SC group. Both groups were fed the same basal diet but the SC group received SC supplementation (8 × 109 cfu/h/d through the ruminal fistula) following a two-period crossover design. Each period consisted of four phases, each of which lasted 17 d: 10 d for dietary adaptation, 6 d for degradation study, and 1 d for rumen sample collection. From the 1st to the 4th phase, steers were fed in a stepwise fashion with increasing CTFRs, i.e., 30:70, 50:50, 70:30, and 90:10. The kinetics of dry matter and fiber degradation of alfalfa pellets were evaluated; the rumen microbial populations were detected using real-time PCR. The results revealed no significant (P > 0.05) interactions between dietary CTFR and SC for most parameters. Dietary CTFR had a significant effect (P < 0.01) on degradation characteristics of alfalfa pellets and the copies of rumen microorganism; the increasing concentrate level resulted in linear, quadratic or cubic variation trend for these parameters. SC supplementation significantly (P < 0.05) affected dry matter (DM) and neutral detergent fiber (NDF) degradation rates (cDM, cNDF) and NDF effective degradability (EDNDF). Compared with the control group, there was an increasing trend of rumen fungi and protozoa in SC group (P < 0.1); copies of total bacteria in SC group were significantly higher (P < 0.05). Additionally, percentage of Ruminobacter amylophilus was significantly lower (P < 0.05) but percentage of Selenomonas ruminantium was significantly

  15. Bioethanol production from rice straw by a sequential use of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Pichia stipitis with heat inactivation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells prior to xylose fermentation.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuan; Park, Jeung-yil; Shiroma, Riki; Tokuyasu, Ken

    2011-06-01

    In order to establish an efficient bioethanol production system from rice straw, a new strategy to ferment the mixture of glucose and xylose by a sequential application of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Pichia stipitis was developed, in which heat inactivation of S. cerevisiae cells before addition of P. stipitis was employed. The results showed that heating at 50°C for 6h was sufficient to give high xylose fermentation efficiency. By application of the inactivation process, 85% of the theoretical yield was achieved in the fermentation of the synthetic medium. At the same time, the xylitol production was reduced by 42.4% of the control process. In the simultaneous saccharification and fermentation of the lime-pretreated and CO(2)-neutralized rice straw, the inactivation of S. cerevisiae cells enabled the full conversion of glucose and xylose within 80 h. Finally, 21.1g/l of ethanol was produced from 10% (w/w) of pretreated rice straw and the ethanol yield of rice straw reached 72.5% of the theoretical yield. This process is expected to be useful for the ethanol production from lignocellulosic materials in the regions where large-scale application of recombinant microorganisms was restricted.

  16. Microbial fuel cells: Their application and microbiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Zhen

    The energy crisis is an urgent global issue due to the increased consumption of the finite amount of fossil fuel. As a result, looking for alternative energy sources is of critical importance. Microbial fuel cell (MFC) technology can extract electric energy from wastewater, and thus is a sustainable approach to supply energy to our electricity-based society. My research focuses on the development of a suitable MFC reactor for wastewater treatment and the understanding of the microbial function in the MFC process. First, together with colleagues, I have developed a novel MFC reactor, named upflow microbial fuel cell (UMFC), by combining upflow and MFC technologies. The power output from the UMFC was improved by 10-fold after it was modified with a U-shape cathode. The UMFC appears to be a practical reactor for continuous operation, though the output of electric power requires further improvement. In addition, a sediment MFC with a rotating cathode was also developed and its performance was examined. Second, I have adopted a human distal gut anaerobe, Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron, as the model organism to study the role of fermentative bacterium in electricity generation. When B. thetaiotaomicron grew under an applied electric potential, an electric current was generated. GeneChip data indicated that this bacterium did not alter its metabolism during this process. Although B. thetaiotaomicron may not be capable of respiration with an electrode as the electron acceptor, the experiment has demonstrated that fermentative bacteria may play an important role in electricity generation.

  17. Genetic improvement of Saccharomyces cerevisiae wine strains for enhancing cell viability after desiccation stress.

    PubMed

    López-Martínez, Gema; Pietrafesa, Rocchina; Romano, Patrizia; Cordero-Otero, Ricardo; Capece, Angela

    2013-08-01

    In the last few decades spontaneous grape must fermentations have been replaced by inoculated fermentation with Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains as active dry yeast (ADY). Among the essential genes previously characterized to overcome the cell-drying/rehydration process, six belong to the group of very hydrophilic proteins known as hydrophilins. Among them, only SIP18 has shown early transcriptional response during dehydration stress. In fact, the overexpression in S. cerevisiae of gene SIP18 increases cell viability after the dehydration process. The purpose of this study was to characterize dehydration stress tolerance of three wild and one commercial S. cerevisiae strains of wine origin. The four strains were submitted to transformation by insertion of the gene SIP18. Selected transformants were submitted to the cell-drying-rehydration process and yeast viability was evaluated by both viable cell count and flow cytometry. The antioxidant capacity of SIP18p was illustrated by ROS accumulation reduction after H2 O2 attack. Growth data as cellular duplication times and lag times were calculated to estimate cell vitality after the cell rehydration process. The overexpressing SIP18 strains showed significantly longer time of lag phase despite less time needed to stop the leakage of intracellular compounds during the rehydration process. Subsequently, the transformants were tested in inoculated grape must fermentation at laboratory scale in comparison to untransformed strains. Chemical analyses of the resultant wines indicated that no significant change for the content of secondary compounds was detected. The obtained data showed that the transformation enhances the viability of ADY without affecting fermentation efficiency and metabolic behaviour.

  18. Invert sugar formation with Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells encapsulated in magnetically responsive alginate microparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safarik, Ivo; Sabatkova, Zdenka; Safarikova, Mirka

    2009-05-01

    Invert sugar (an equimolar mixture of glucose and fructose prepared by sucrose hydrolysis) is a very important food component. We have prepared magnetically responsive alginate microbeads containing entrapped Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells and magnetite microparticles which can be easily separated in an appropriate magnetic separator. The microbeads (typical diameter between 50 and 100 μm) were prepared using the water-in-oil emulsification process. The prepared microbeads containing yeast cells with invertase activity enabled efficient sucrose conversion. The biocatalyst was quite stable; the same catalytic activity was observed after one month storage at 4 °C and the microbeads could be used at least six times.

  19. Decreased fluidity of cell membranes causes a metal ion deficiency in recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae producing carotenoids.

    PubMed

    Liu, Peitong; Sun, Liang; Sun, Yuxia; Shang, Fei; Yan, Guoliang

    2016-04-01

    The genome-wide transcriptional responses of S. cerevisiae to heterologous carotenoid biosynthesis were investigated using DNA microarray analysis. The results show that the genes involved in metal ion transport were specifically up-regulated in the recombinant strain, and metal ions, including Cu(2+), Fe(2+), Mn(2+), and Mg(2+), were deficient in the recombinant strain compared to the ion content of the parent strain. The decrease in metal ions was ascribed to a decrease in cell membrane (CM) fluidity caused by lower levels of unsaturated fatty acids and ergosterol. This was confirmed by the observation that metal ion levels were restored when CM fluidity was increased by supplying linoleic acid. In addition, a 24.3 % increase in the β-carotene concentration was observed. Collectively, our results suggest that heterologous production of carotenoids in S. cerevisiae can induce cellular stress by rigidifying the CM, which can lead to a deficiency in metal ions. Due to the importance of CM fluidity in cellular physiology, maintaining normal CM fluidity might be a potential approach to improving carotenoid production in genetically engineered S. cerevisiae. PMID:26749524

  20. Cell death caused by excision of centromeric DNA from a chromosome in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, Akihiro; Yanamoto, Toshiaki; Matsumoto, Takehiro; Hatano, Takushi; Matsuzaki, Hiroaki

    2013-01-01

    If genetically modified organisms (GMOs) are spread through the natural environment, it might affect the natural environment. To help prevent the spread of GMOs, we examined whether it is possible to introduce conditional lethality by excising centromeric DNA from a chromosome by site-specific recombination in Saccharomyces cerevisiae as model organism. First, we constructed haploid cells in which excision of the centromeric DNA from chromosome IV can occur due to recombinase induced by galactose. By this excision, cell death can occur. In diploid cells, cell death can also occur by excision from both homologous chromosomes IV. Furthermore, cell death can occur in the case of chromosome V. A small number of surviving cells appeared with excision of centromeric DNA, and the diploid showed greater viability than the haploid in both chromosomes IV and V. The surviving cells appeared mainly due to deletion of a recombination target site (RS) from the chromosome. PMID:24018677

  1. Electrochemical detection of intracellular and cell membrane redox systems in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Rawson, Frankie J.; Downard, Alison J.; Baronian, Keith H.

    2014-01-01

    Redox mediators can interact with eukaryote cells at a number of different cell locations. While cell membrane redox centres are easily accessible, the redox centres of catabolism are situated within the cytoplasm and mitochondria and can be difficult to access. We have systematically investigated the interaction of thirteen commonly used lipophilic and hydrophilic mediators with the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. A double mediator system is used in which ferricyanide is the final electron acceptor (the reporter mediator). After incubation of cells with mediators, steady state voltammetry of the ferri/ferrocyanide redox couple allows quantitation of the amount of mediator reduced by the cells. The plateau current at 425 mV vs Ag/AgCl gives the analytical signal. The results show that five of the mediators interact with at least three different trans Plasma Membrane Electron Transport systems (tPMETs), and that four mediators cross the plasma membrane to interact with cytoplasmic and mitochondrial redox molecules. Four of the mediators inhibit electron transfer from S. cerevisiae. Catabolic inhibitors were used to locate the cellular source of electrons for three of the mediators. PMID:24910017

  2. Electrochemical detection of intracellular and cell membrane redox systems in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rawson, Frankie J.; Downard, Alison J.; Baronian, Keith H.

    2014-06-01

    Redox mediators can interact with eukaryote cells at a number of different cell locations. While cell membrane redox centres are easily accessible, the redox centres of catabolism are situated within the cytoplasm and mitochondria and can be difficult to access. We have systematically investigated the interaction of thirteen commonly used lipophilic and hydrophilic mediators with the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. A double mediator system is used in which ferricyanide is the final electron acceptor (the reporter mediator). After incubation of cells with mediators, steady state voltammetry of the ferri/ferrocyanide redox couple allows quantitation of the amount of mediator reduced by the cells. The plateau current at 425 mV vs Ag/AgCl gives the analytical signal. The results show that five of the mediators interact with at least three different trans Plasma Membrane Electron Transport systems (tPMETs), and that four mediators cross the plasma membrane to interact with cytoplasmic and mitochondrial redox molecules. Four of the mediators inhibit electron transfer from S. cerevisiae. Catabolic inhibitors were used to locate the cellular source of electrons for three of the mediators.

  3. Flocculence of Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells is induced by nutrient limitation, with cell surface hydrophobicity as a major determinant.

    PubMed Central

    Smit, G; Straver, M H; Lugtenberg, B J; Kijne, J W

    1992-01-01

    Initiation of flocculation ability of Saccharomyces cerevisiae MPY1 cells was observed at the moment the cells stop dividing because of nitrogen limitation. A shift in concentration of the limiting nutrient resulted in a corresponding shift in cell division and initiation of flocculence. Other limitations also led to initiation of flocculence, with magnesium limitation as the exception. Magnesium-limited S. cerevisiae cells did not flocculate at any stage of growth. Cell surface hydrophobicity was found to be strongly correlated with the ability of the yeast cells to flocculate. Hydrophobicity sharply increased at the end of the logarithmic growth phase, shortly before initiation of flocculation ability. Treatments of cells which resulted in a decrease in hydrophobicity also yielded a decrease in flocculation ability. Similarly, the presence of polycations increased both hydrophobicity and the ability to flocculate. Magnesium-limited cells were found to be strongly affected in cell surface hydrophobicity. A proteinaceous cell surface factor(s) was identified as a flocculin. This heat-stable component had a strong emulsifying activity, and appears to be involved in both cell surface hydrophobicity and in flocculation ability of the yeast cells. PMID:1482191

  4. Ultracytochemical evidence of Golgi functions in microvesicles at all phases of cell cycle in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Vorísek, J

    1995-01-01

    The topical question of Golgi compartment identity in the ascomycetous yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is illustrated by a multiple ultracytochemical approach. For this eucaryotic single-cell organism the established scheme of secretory transport via a cascade of cisternae housing different functions of Golgi apparatus has been deduced principally of genetic and molecular analyses ex situ and confirms the mammalian secretion scheme. Nevertheless, ultracytochemical in situ localizations of enzyme activities engaged in secretion represented evidence for localization of important steps of secretory glycoprotein maturation in two morphologically distinct populations of transport microvesicles formed from endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi cisternae. Both types of microvesicles function in exocytosis or transport into lysosomal vacuoles and have identical charge. However, their presence differs in interphase and in budding cells of S. cerevisiae. Smooth, larger membrane bound microvesicles are conspicuous at the onset of budding and at construction of scars, while the coated, smaller microvesicles of globular ultrastructure are present constitutively, throughout the cell cycle. Because the established model of the yeast secretory path considers only the part of the budding phase preceding the onset of mitosis, an alternative scheme for the cellular mechanism of glycoprotein secretion in S. cerevisiae that distinguishes interphase and budding yeast, has been established. The lumen of microvesicles contains proteases catalysing maturation of the mating pheromone alpha-factor (yscIV, yscF), vacuolar protease yscY, alkaline phosphohydrolase, polyphosphorylated components of the bud scar and glycoproteins. The in situ approach also reveals a minimum level of alpha-factor precursor processing proteolytic activity at the budding phase of cells, a transient presence of polyphosphorylated compounds in the bud scars and their transport by microvesicles. Ultracytochemical reactions

  5. Stimulation of Carotenogenesis by Microbial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ciegler, A.; Pazola, Z.; Hall, H. H.

    1964-01-01

    Spent mycelia of Blakeslea trispora recovered from a previous fermentation enhanced carotene production by mated cultures of the same organism. Peak yields of 107 to 142 mg of carotene per 100 ml of medium were achieved in 6 days. β-Carotene constituted 92% of the total carotenoids produced. The enhancing substance was found present in an aqueous extract of the mycelium. Part of its activity was due to an organic acid fraction. Other microbial cells, molds, yeasts, and bacteria were also capable of enhancing carotene production. PMID:14131364

  6. Amyloid-like properties of Saccharomyces cerevisiae cell wall glucantransferase Bgl2p

    PubMed Central

    Plotnikova, Tatyana A; Gorkovskii, Anton A; Selyakh, Irina O; Galzitskaya, Oxana V; Bezsonov, Evgeniy E; Gellissen, Gerd; Kulaev, Igor S

    2008-01-01

    Glucantransferase Bgl2p is a major conserved cell wall constituent described for a wide range of yeast species. In the baker's yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae it is the only non-covalently bound cell wall protein that cannot be released from cell walls by sequential SDS and trypsin treatment. It contains seven amyloidogenic determinants. Circular dichroism analysis and fluorescence spectroscopy with thioflavin T indicate the presence of β-sheet structures in Bgl2p isolates. Bgl2p forms fibrils, a process that is enforced in the presence of other cell wall components. Thus the data obtained is the first evidence for amyloid-like properties of yeast cell wall protein—glucantransferase Bgl2p. PMID:19098439

  7. New separation methodologies for the distinction of the growth phases of Saccharomyces cerevisiae cell cycle.

    PubMed

    Lainioti, G Ch; Kapolos, J; Koliadima, A; Karaiskakis, G

    2010-03-12

    In the present work two separation techniques, namely the gravitational field-flow fractionation (GrFFF) and the reversed-flow gas chromatography (RFGC), are proposed for the distinction of the growth phases of Saccharomyces cerevisiae (AXAZ-1) yeast cycle at different temperatures (30 degrees C, 25 degrees C, 20 degrees C, and 15 degrees C) and pH (2.0, 3.0, 4.0 and 5.0) values. During the fermentation processes, differences observed in the peak profiles, obtained by GrFFF, can be related with the unlike cell growth. The distinction of the phases of AXAZ-1 cell cycle with the GrFFF, was also confirmed with the RFGC technique, which presented similar fermentation time periods for the alcoholic fermentation phases. Simultaneously, the reaction rate constant for each phase of the fermentation process and the activation energies were determined with the aid of the RFGC technique. Finally, the application of both the GrFFF and the RFGC techniques, in combination with high-performance liquid chromatography, allowed us to find the ideal experimental conditions (temperature and pH) for the alcoholic fermentation by AXAZ-1. The results indicate that S. cerevisiae cells performed better at 30 degrees C, whereas at lower temperatures decreases in the fermentation rate and in the number of viable cells were observed. Moreover, the pH of the medium (pH 5.0) resulted in higher fermentation rates and ethanol productivities.

  8. HOCl-mediated cell death and metabolic dysfunction in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    King, David A; Hannum, Diane M; Qi, Jian-Shen; Hurst, James K

    2004-03-01

    The nature of oxidative damage to Saccharomyces cerevisiae caused by levels of HOCl that inhibit cell replication was explored with the intent of identifying the loci of lethal lesions. Functions of cytosolic enzymes and organelles that are highly sensitive to inactivation by HOCl, including aldolase, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), and the mitochondrion, were only marginally affected by exposure of the yeast to levels of HOCl that completely inhibited colony formation. Loss of function in membrane-localized proteins, including the hexose transporters and PMA1 H(+)-ATPase, which is the primary proton pump located within the S. cerevisiae plasma membrane, was also marginal and K(+) leak rates to the extracellular medium increased only slowly with exposure to increasing amounts of HOCl, indicating that the plasma membrane retained its intrinsic impermeability to ions and metabolites. Adenylate phosphorylation levels in fermenting yeast declined in parallel with viability; however, yeast grown on respiratory substrates maintained near-normal phosphorylation levels at HOCl doses several-fold greater than that required for killing. This overall pattern of cellular response to HOCl differs markedly from that previously reported for bacteria, which appear to be killed by inhibition of plasma membrane proteins involved in energy transduction. The absence of significant loss of function in critical oxidant-sensitive cellular components and retention of ATP-synthesizing capabilities in respiring yeast cells exposed to lethal levels of HOCl suggests that toxicity in this case may arise by programmed cell death.

  9. Improved microbial fuel cell performance by encapsulating microbial cells with a nickel-coated sponge.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xueying; Du, Xiaoyu; Wang, Xia; Li, Naiqiang; Xu, Ping; Ding, Yi

    2013-03-15

    Development of novel anodic materials that could facilitate microbial biofilm formation, substrate transfer, and electron transfer is vital to enhance the performance of microbial fuel cells (MFCs). In this work, nickel-coated sponge, as a novel and inexpensive material with an open three-dimensional macro-porous structure, was employed as an anode to encapsulate microbial cells. Compared with planar carbon paper, the nickel-coated sponge did not only offer a high surface area to facilitate microbial cells attachment and colonization but also supported sufficient substrate transfer and electron transfer due to multiplexed and highly conductive pathways. As expected, the resulting nickel-coated sponge biofilm demonstrated excellent electrochemical activity and power output stability during electricity generation processes. A higher maximum power density of 996 mW m(-2) and a longer, more stable electricity generation period were achieved with the nickel-coated sponge biofilm than previously reported results. Notably, chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal reached 90.3% in the anode chamber, suggesting that the nickel-coated sponge is a highly promising anodic material and an efficient immobilization method for the fabrication of MFCs. PMID:22939511

  10. Fermentation temperature modulates phosphatidylethanolamine and phosphatidylinositol levels in the cell membrane of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Henderson, Clark M; Zeno, Wade F; Lerno, Larry A; Longo, Marjorie L; Block, David E

    2013-09-01

    During alcoholic fermentation, Saccharomyces cerevisiae is exposed to a host of environmental and physiological stresses. Extremes of fermentation temperature have previously been demonstrated to induce fermentation arrest under growth conditions that would otherwise result in complete sugar utilization at "normal" temperatures and nutrient levels. Fermentations were carried out at 15°C, 25°C, and 35°C in a defined high-sugar medium using three Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains with diverse fermentation characteristics. The lipid composition of these strains was analyzed at two fermentation stages, when ethanol levels were low early in stationary phase and in late stationary phase at high ethanol concentrations. Several lipids exhibited dramatic differences in membrane concentration in a temperature-dependent manner. Principal component analysis (PCA) was used as a tool to elucidate correlations between specific lipid species and fermentation temperature for each yeast strain. Fermentations carried out at 35°C exhibited very high concentrations of several phosphatidylinositol species, whereas at 15°C these yeast strains exhibited higher levels of phosphatidylethanolamine and phosphatidylcholine species with medium-chain fatty acids. Furthermore, membrane concentrations of ergosterol were highest in the yeast strain that experienced stuck fermentations at all three temperatures. Fluorescence anisotropy measurements of yeast cell membrane fluidity during fermentation were carried out using the lipophilic fluorophore diphenylhexatriene. These measurements demonstrate that the changes in the lipid composition of these yeast strains across the range of fermentation temperatures used in this study did not significantly affect cell membrane fluidity. However, the results from this study indicate that fermenting S. cerevisiae modulates its membrane lipid composition in a temperature-dependent manner.

  11. Fermentation Temperature Modulates Phosphatidylethanolamine and Phosphatidylinositol Levels in the Cell Membrane of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Henderson, Clark M.; Zeno, Wade F.; Lerno, Larry A.; Longo, Marjorie L.

    2013-01-01

    During alcoholic fermentation, Saccharomyces cerevisiae is exposed to a host of environmental and physiological stresses. Extremes of fermentation temperature have previously been demonstrated to induce fermentation arrest under growth conditions that would otherwise result in complete sugar utilization at “normal” temperatures and nutrient levels. Fermentations were carried out at 15°C, 25°C, and 35°C in a defined high-sugar medium using three Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains with diverse fermentation characteristics. The lipid composition of these strains was analyzed at two fermentation stages, when ethanol levels were low early in stationary phase and in late stationary phase at high ethanol concentrations. Several lipids exhibited dramatic differences in membrane concentration in a temperature-dependent manner. Principal component analysis (PCA) was used as a tool to elucidate correlations between specific lipid species and fermentation temperature for each yeast strain. Fermentations carried out at 35°C exhibited very high concentrations of several phosphatidylinositol species, whereas at 15°C these yeast strains exhibited higher levels of phosphatidylethanolamine and phosphatidylcholine species with medium-chain fatty acids. Furthermore, membrane concentrations of ergosterol were highest in the yeast strain that experienced stuck fermentations at all three temperatures. Fluorescence anisotropy measurements of yeast cell membrane fluidity during fermentation were carried out using the lipophilic fluorophore diphenylhexatriene. These measurements demonstrate that the changes in the lipid composition of these yeast strains across the range of fermentation temperatures used in this study did not significantly affect cell membrane fluidity. However, the results from this study indicate that fermenting S. cerevisiae modulates its membrane lipid composition in a temperature-dependent manner. PMID:23811519

  12. [Water activity and food stability. I. Effects on viability of Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Guerzoni, M E; Suzzi, G; Lerici, C R; Bartolini, R; Testa, G

    1976-01-01

    Biological activity of microorganism is related to water activity (aw). In this paper the effect of glicerol as humectant on Saccharomyces cerevisiae viability was considered. The irreversible loss of viability was observed only for values inferior than 0,75. The K+ presence promoted an increasing of cell viability and growth. We have evaluated the changes of the most important components of cell poll; the increasing of glicerol amount of the system induced a drastic fall of aminoacids, purines and K ions content, but it increased the Na ions content. The exposure of cells to increasing glicerol concentrations, caused an aminoacids and purines excretion related to contact time; after a few hours this material was readsorbed by cells. PMID:799835

  13. Adsorption of Zearalenone by beta-D-glucans in the Saccharomyces cerevisiae cell wall.

    PubMed

    Yiannikouris, A; François, J; Poughon, L; Dussap, C G; Bertin, G; Jeminet, G; Jouany, J P

    2004-06-01

    Cell walls of yeasts and bacteria are able to complex with mycotoxins and limit their bioavailability in the digestive tract when these yeasts and bacteria are given as feed additives to animals. To identify the component(s) of the yeast cell wall and the chemical interaction(s) involved in complex formation with zearalenone, four strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae differing in their cell wall glucan and mannan content were tested. Laboratory strains wt292, fks1, and mnn9 were compared with industrial S. cerevisiae strain sc1026. The complex-forming capacity of the yeast cell walls was determined in vitro by modelling the plots of amount of toxin bound versus amount of toxin added using Hill's model. A cooperative relationship between toxin and adsorbent was shown, and a correlation between the amount of beta-D-glucans in cell walls and complex-forming efficacy was revealed (R2 = 0.889). Cell walls of strains wt292 and mnn9, which have higher levels of beta-D-glucans, were able to complex larger amounts of zearalenone, with higher association constants and higher affinity rates than those of the fks1 and sc1026 strains. The high chitin content in strains mnn9 and fks1 increased the alkali insolubility of beta-D-glucans from isolated cell walls and decreased the flexibility of these cell walls, which restricted access of zearalenone to the chemical sites of the beta-D-glucans involved in complex formation. The strains with high chitin content thus had a lower complex-forming capacity than expected based on their beta-D-glucans content. Cooperativity and the three-dimensional structure of beta-D-glucans indicate that weak noncovalent bonds are involved in the complex-forming mechanisms associated with zearalenone. The chemical interactions between beta-D-glucans and zearalenone are therefore more of an adsorption type than a binding type.

  14. Adsorption of Zearalenone by beta-D-glucans in the Saccharomyces cerevisiae cell wall.

    PubMed

    Yiannikouris, A; François, J; Poughon, L; Dussap, C G; Bertin, G; Jeminet, G; Jouany, J P

    2004-06-01

    Cell walls of yeasts and bacteria are able to complex with mycotoxins and limit their bioavailability in the digestive tract when these yeasts and bacteria are given as feed additives to animals. To identify the component(s) of the yeast cell wall and the chemical interaction(s) involved in complex formation with zearalenone, four strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae differing in their cell wall glucan and mannan content were tested. Laboratory strains wt292, fks1, and mnn9 were compared with industrial S. cerevisiae strain sc1026. The complex-forming capacity of the yeast cell walls was determined in vitro by modelling the plots of amount of toxin bound versus amount of toxin added using Hill's model. A cooperative relationship between toxin and adsorbent was shown, and a correlation between the amount of beta-D-glucans in cell walls and complex-forming efficacy was revealed (R2 = 0.889). Cell walls of strains wt292 and mnn9, which have higher levels of beta-D-glucans, were able to complex larger amounts of zearalenone, with higher association constants and higher affinity rates than those of the fks1 and sc1026 strains. The high chitin content in strains mnn9 and fks1 increased the alkali insolubility of beta-D-glucans from isolated cell walls and decreased the flexibility of these cell walls, which restricted access of zearalenone to the chemical sites of the beta-D-glucans involved in complex formation. The strains with high chitin content thus had a lower complex-forming capacity than expected based on their beta-D-glucans content. Cooperativity and the three-dimensional structure of beta-D-glucans indicate that weak noncovalent bonds are involved in the complex-forming mechanisms associated with zearalenone. The chemical interactions between beta-D-glucans and zearalenone are therefore more of an adsorption type than a binding type. PMID:15222549

  15. Display of wasp venom allergens on the cell surface of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Yeast surface display is a technique, where the proteins of interest are expressed as fusions with yeast surface proteins and thus remain attached to the yeast cell wall after expression. Our purpose was to study whether allergens expressed on the cell surface of baker's yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae preserve their native allergenic properties and whether the yeast native surface glycoproteins interfere with IgE binding. We chose to use the major allergens from the common wasp Vespula vulgaris venom: phospholipase A1, hyaluronidase and antigen 5 as the model. Results The proteins were expressed on the surface as fusions with a-agglutinin complex protein AGA2. The expression was confirmed by fluorescent cytometry (FACS) after staining the cells with antibody against a C-tag attached to the C-terminal end of the allergens. Phospholipase A1 and hyaluronidase retained their enzymatic activities. Phospholipase A1 severely inhibited the growth of the yeast cells. Antigen 5 - expressing yeast cells bound IgE antibodies from wasp venom allergic patient sera but not from control sera as demonstrated by FACS. Moreover, antigen 5 - expressing yeast cells were capable of mediating allergen-specific histamine release from human basophils. Conclusions All the three major wasp venom allergens were expressed on the yeast surface. A high-level expression, which was observed only for antigen 5, was needed for detection of IgE binding by FACS and for induction of histamine release. The non-modified S. cerevisiae cells did not cause any unspecific reaction in FACS or histamine release assay despite the expression of high-mannose oligosaccharides. In perspective the yeast surface display may be used for allergen discovery from cDNA libraries and possibly for sublingual immunotherapy as the cells can serve as good adjuvant and can be produced in large amounts at a low price. PMID:20868475

  16. [Cloning and expression of bacteriophage FMV lysocyme gene in cells of yeasts Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Pichia pastoris].

    PubMed

    Kozlov, D G; Cheperigin, S E; Chestkov, A V; Krylov, V N; Tsygankov, Iu D

    2010-03-01

    Cloning, sequencing, and expression of the gene for soluble lysozyme of bacteriophage FMV from Gram-negative Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteria were conducted in yeast cells. Comparable efficiency of two lysozyme expression variants (as intracellular or secreted proteins) was estimated in cells of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Pichia pastoris. Under laboratory conditions, yeast S. cerevisiae proved to be more effective producer of phage lysozyme than P. pastoris, the yield of the enzyme in the secreted form being significantly higher than that produced in the intracellular form. PMID:20391778

  17. Saccharomyces Cerevisiae Cell Wall Components as Tools for Ochratoxin A Decontamination

    PubMed Central

    Piotrowska, Małgorzata; Masek, Anna

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of Saccharomyces cerevisiae cell wall preparations in the adsorption of ochratoxin A (OTA). The study involved the use of a brewer’s yeast cell wall devoid of protein substances, glucans obtained by water and alkaline extraction, a glucan commercially available as a dietary supplement for animals and, additionally, dried brewer’s yeast for comparison. Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) analysis of the obtained preparations showed bands characteristic for glucans in the resulting spectra. The yeast cell wall preparation, water-extracted glucan and the commercial glucan bound the highest amount of ochratoxin A, above 55% of the initial concentration, and the alkaline-extracted glucan adsorbed the lowest amount of this toxin. It has been shown that adsorption is most effective at a close-to-neutral pH, while being considerably limited in alkaline conditions. PMID:25848694

  18. Enzymatic process for the fractionation of baker's yeast cell wall (Saccharomyces cerevisiae).

    PubMed

    Borchani, Chema; Fonteyn, Fabienne; Jamin, Guilhem; Paquot, Michel; Blecker, Christophe; Thonart, Philippe

    2014-11-15

    β-Glucans, homopolymers of glucose, are widespread in many microorganisms, mushrooms and plants. They have attracted attention because of their bioactive and medicinal functions. One important source of β-glucans is the cell wall of yeasts, especially that of baker's yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Several processes for the isolation of β-glucans, using alkali, acid or a combination of both, result in degradation of the polymeric chains. In this paper, we have an enzymatic process for the isolation of glucans from yeast cell walls. As a result, β-glucans were obtained in a yield of 18.0% of the original ratio in the yeast cell walls. Therefore, this isolation process gave a better yield and higher β-glucan content than did traditional isolation methods. Furthermore, results showed that each extraction step of β-glucan had a significant effects on its chemical properties.

  19. A thermophilic microbial fuel cell design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carver, Sarah M.; Vuoriranta, Pertti; Tuovinen, Olli H.

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) are reactors able to generate electricity by capturing electrons from the anaerobic respiratory processes of microorganisms. While the majority of MFCs have been tested at ambient or mesophilic temperatures, thermophilic systems warrant evaluation because of the potential for increased microbial activity rates on the anode. MFC studies at elevated temperatures have been scattered, using designs that are already established, specifically air-cathode single chambers and two-chamber designs. This study was prompted by our previous attempts that showed an increased amount of evaporation in thermophilic MFCs, adding unnecessary technical difficulties and causing excessive maintenance. In this paper, we describe a thermophilic MFC design that prevents evaporation. The design was tested at 57 °C with an anaerobic, thermophilic consortium that respired with glucose to generate a power density of 375 mW m -2 after 590 h. Polarization and voltage data showed that the design works in the batch mode but the design allows for adoption to continuous operation.

  20. Physiological responses to acid stress by Saccharomyces cerevisiae when applying high initial cell density

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Zhong-peng; Olsson, Lisbeth

    2016-01-01

    High initial cell density is used to increase volumetric productivity and shorten production time in lignocellulosic hydrolysate fermentation. Comparison of physiological parameters in high initial cell density cultivation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae in the presence of acetic, formic, levulinic and cinnamic acids demonstrated general and acid-specific responses of cells. All the acids studied impaired growth and inhibited glycolytic flux, and caused oxidative stress and accumulation of trehalose. However, trehalose may play a role other than protecting yeast cells from acid-induced oxidative stress. Unlike the other acids, cinnamic acid did not cause depletion of cellular ATP, but abolished the growth of yeast on ethanol. Compared with low initial cell density, increasing initial cell density reduced the lag phase and improved the bioconversion yield of cinnamic acid during acid adaptation. In addition, yeast cells were able to grow at elevated concentrations of acid, probable due to the increase in phenotypic cell-to-cell heterogeneity in large inoculum size. Furthermore, the specific growth rate and the specific rates of glucose consumption and metabolite production were significantly lower than at low initial cell density, which was a result of the accumulation of a large fraction of cells that persisted in a viable but non-proliferating state. PMID:27620460

  1. Human lactoferrin triggers a mitochondrial- and caspase-dependent regulated cell death in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Acosta-Zaldívar, M; Andrés, M T; Rego, A; Pereira, C S; Fierro, J F; Côrte-Real, M

    2016-02-01

    We have previously shown that the antifungal activity of human lactoferrin (hLf) against Candida albicans relies on its ability to induce cell death associated with apoptotic markers. To gain a deeper understanding of the mechanisms underlying hLf-induced apoptosis, we characterized this cell death process in the well-established Saccharomyces cerevisiae model. Our results indicate that hLf induces cell death in S. cerevisiae in a manner that requires energy and de novo protein synthesis. Cell death is associated with nuclear chromatin condensation, preservation of plasma membrane integrity, and is Yca1p metacaspase-dependent. Lactoferrin also caused mitochondrial dysfunction associated with ROS accumulation and release of cytochrome c. Pre-incubation with oligomycin, an oxidative phosphorylation inhibitor, increased resistance to hLf and, accordingly, mutants deficient in the F1F0-ATP synthase complex were more resistant to death induced by hLf. This indicates that mitochondrial energetic metabolism plays a key role in the killing effect of hLf, though a direct role of F1F0-ATP synthase cannot be precluded. Overexpression of the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-xL or pre-incubation with N-acetyl cysteine reduced the intracellular level of ROS and increased resistance to hLf, confirming a ROS-mediated mitochondrial cell death process. Mitochondrial involvement was further reinforced by the higher resistance of cells lacking mitochondrial DNA, or other known yeast mitochondrial apoptosis regulators, such as, Aif1p, Cyc3p and Aac1/2/3p. This study provides new insights into a detailed understanding at the molecular level of hLf-induced apoptosis, which may allow the design of new strategies to overcome the emergence of resistance of clinically relevant fungi to conventional antifungals.

  2. Combining microbial cultures for efficient production of electricity from butyrate in a microbial electrochemical cell.

    PubMed

    Miceli, Joseph F; Garcia-Peña, Ines; Parameswaran, Prathap; Torres, César I; Krajmalnik-Brown, Rosa

    2014-10-01

    Butyrate is an important product of anaerobic fermentation; however, it is not directly used by characterized strains of the highly efficient anode respiring bacteria (ARB) Geobacter sulfurreducens in microbial electrochemical cells. By combining a butyrate-oxidizing community with a Geobacter rich culture, we generated a microbial community which outperformed many naturally derived communities found in the literature for current production from butyrate and rivaled the highest performing natural cultures in terms of current density (∼ 11A/m(2)) and Coulombic efficiency (∼ 70%). Microbial community analyses support the shift in the microbial community from one lacking efficient ARB in the marine hydrothermal vent community to a community consisting of ∼ 80% Geobacter in the anode biofilm. This demonstrates the successful production and adaptation of a novel microbial culture for generating electrical current from butyrate with high current density and high Coulombic efficiency, by combining two mixed microbial cultures containing complementing biochemical pathways.

  3. Enhanced cell-surface display and secretory production of cellulolytic enzymes with Saccharomyces cerevisiae Sed1 signal peptide.

    PubMed

    Inokuma, Kentaro; Bamba, Takahiro; Ishii, Jun; Ito, Yoichiro; Hasunuma, Tomohisa; Kondo, Akihiko

    2016-11-01

    Recombinant yeast strains displaying aheterologous cellulolytic enzymes on their cell surfaces using a glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchoring system are a promising strategy for bioethanol production from lignocellulosic materials. A crucial step for cell wall localization of the enzymes is the intracellular transport of proteins in yeast cells. Therefore, the addition of a highly efficient secretion signal sequence is important to increase the amount of the enzymes on the yeast cell surface. In this study, we demonstrated the effectiveness of a novel signal peptide (SP) sequence derived from the Saccharomyces cerevisiae SED1 gene for cell-surface display and secretory production of cellulolytic enzymes. Gene cassettes with SP sequences derived from S. cerevisiae SED1 (SED1SP), Rhizopus oryzae glucoamylase (GLUASP), and S. cerevisiae α-mating pheromone (MFα1SP) were constructed for cell-surface display of Aspergillus aculeatus β-glucosidase (BGL1) and Trichoderma reesei endoglucanase II (EGII). These gene cassettes were integrated into the S. cerevisiae genome. The recombinant strains with the SED1SP showed higher cell-surface BGL and EG activities than those with the conventional SP sequences (GLUASP and MFα1SP). The novel SP sequence also improved the secretory production of BGL and EG in S. cerevisiae. The extracellular BGL activity of the recombinant strains with the SED1SP was 1.3- and 1.9-fold higher than the GLUASP and MFα1SP strains, respectively. Moreover, the utilization of SED1SP successfully enhanced the secretory production of BGL in Pichia pastoris. The utilization of the novel SP sequence is a promising option for highly efficient cell-surface display and secretory production of heterologous proteins in various yeast species. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2016;113: 2358-2366. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27183011

  4. Biosensoric potential of microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Schneider, György; Kovács, Tamás; Rákhely, Gábor; Czeller, Miklós

    2016-08-01

    Recent progress in microbial fuel cell (MFC) technology has highlighted the potential of these devices to be used as biosensors. The advantages of MFC-based biosensors are that they are phenotypic and can function in either assay- or flow-through formats. These features make them appropriate for contiguous on-line monitoring in laboratories and for in-field applications. The selectivity of an MFC biosensor depends on the applied microorganisms in the anodic compartment where electron transfer (ET) between the artificial surface (anode) and bacterium occurs. This process strongly determines the internal resistance of the sensoric system and thus influences signal outcome and response time. Despite their beneficial characteristics, the number of MFC-based biosensoric applications has been limited until now. The aim of this mini-review is to turn attention to the biosensoric potential of MFCs by summarizing ET mechanisms on which recently established and future sensoric devices are based.

  5. Microbial fuel cells and microbial electrolysis cells for the production of bioelectricity and biomaterials.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Minghua; Yang, Jie; Wang, Hongyu; Jin, Tao; Xu, Dake; Gu, Tingyue

    2013-01-01

    Today's global energy crisis requires a multifaceted solution. Bioenergy is an important part of the solution. The microbial fuel cell (MFC) technology stands out as an attractive potential technology in bioenergy. MFCs can convert energy stored in organic matter directly into bioelectricity. MFCs can also be operated in the electrolysis mode as microbial electrolysis cells to produce bioproducts such as hydrogen and ethanol. Various wastewaters containing low-grade organic carbons that are otherwise unutilized can be used as feed streams for MFCs. Despite major advances in the past decade, further improvements in MFC power output and cost reduction are needed for MFCs to be practical. This paper analysed MFC operating principles using bioenergetics and bioelectrochemistry. Several major issues were explored to improve the MFC performance. An emphasis was placed on the use of catalytic materials for MFC electrodes. Recent advances in the production of various biomaterials using MFCs were also investigated.

  6. Relation between cell death progression, reactive oxygen species production and mitochondrial membrane potential in fermenting Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells under heat-shock conditions.

    PubMed

    Pyatrikas, Darya V; Fedoseeva, Irina V; Varakina, Nina N; Rusaleva, Tatyana M; Stepanov, Alexei V; Fedyaeva, Anna V; Borovskii, Gennadii B; Rikhvanov, Eugene G

    2015-06-01

    Moderate heat shock increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) production that led to cell death in glucose-grown Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells. Conditions that disturb mitochondrial functions such as treatment by uncouplers and petite mutation were shown to inhibit ROS production and protects cell from thermal death. Hence, mitochondria are responsible for ROS production and play an active role in cell death. An increase in ROS production was accompanied by hyperpolarization of inner mitochondrial membrane. All agents suppressing hyperpolarization also suppressed heat-induced ROS production. It was supposed that generation of ROS under moderate heat shock in glucose-grown S. cerevisiae cells is driven by the mitochondrial membrane potential.

  7. Visualization of calcium and zinc ions in Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells treated with PEFs (pulse electric fields) by laser confocal microscopy.

    PubMed

    Urszula, Pankiewicz; Jerzy, Jamroz; Sujka, Monika; Kowalski, Radosław

    2015-12-01

    The aim of the present work was to visualize the areas of increased concentration of calcium and zinc ions inside Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells with the use of confocal microscopy and to make an attempt to asses semi-quantitatively their concentration within the limits of the cells. Semi-quantitative analysis revealed that fluorescence inside cells from control samples was three-times lower than that observed for cells from the sample enriched with calcium. Differences in distribution of fluorescence intensity between cells originated from the samples enriched with zinc and control samples were also observed. On the basis of the optical sections, the 3D reconstructions of ion-rich areas distribution in the cell were made. The obtained results showed that confocal microscopy is a useful technique for visualization of the areas in S. cerevisiae cells which contain higher amount of calcium and zinc and it may be also used for semi-quantitative analysis.

  8. Discovery of Recurrent Sequence Motifs in Saccharomyces cerevisiae Cell Wall Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Coronado, Juan E.; Epstein, Susan L.; Qiu, Wei-Gang; Lipke, Peter N.

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes a procedure for the discovery of recurrent substrings in amino acid sequences of proteins, and its application to fungal cell walls. The evolutionary origins of fungal cell walls are an open biological question. This question can be approached by studies of similarity among the sequences and sub-sequences of fungal wall proteins and by comparison to proteins in animals. We describe here how we have discovered building blocks, represented as recurrent sequence motifs (sub-sequences), within fungal cell wall proteins. These motifs have not been systematically identified before, because the low Shannon entropy of the cell wall sequences has hindered searches for local sequence similarities by sequence alignments. Nonetheless, our new, composition-based scoring matrices for local alignment searches now support statistically valid alignments for such low entropy sequences (Coronado et al. 2006. Euk. Cell 5: 628–637). We have now searched for similarities in a set of 171 known and putative cell wall proteins from baker’s yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The aligned segments were repeatedly subdivided and catalogued to identify 217 recurrent sequence motifs of length 8 amino acids or greater. 95% of these motifs occur in more than one cell wall protein. The median length of the motifs is 22 amino acid residues, considerably shorter than protein domains. For many cell wall proteins, these motifs collectively account for more than half of their amino acids. The prevalence of these motifs supports the idea of fungal cell wall proteins as assemblies of recurrent building blocks. PMID:19430580

  9. Physical, functional and structural characterization of the cell wall fractions from baker's yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Borchani, Chema; Fonteyn, Fabienne; Jamin, Guilhem; Paquot, Michel; Thonart, Philippe; Blecker, Christophe

    2016-03-01

    The yeast cell wall of Saccharomyces cerevisiae is an important source of β-d-glucan, a glucose homopolymer with many functional, nutritional and human health benefits. In the present study, the yeast cell wall fractionation process involving enzymatic treatments (savinase and lipolase enzymes) affected most of the physical and functional characteristics of extracted fractions. Thus, the fractionation process showed that β-d-glucan fraction F4 had significantly higher swelling power and fat binding capacity compared to other fractions (F1, F2 and F3). It also exhibited a viscosity of 652.12mPas and a high degree of brightness of extracted β-d-glucan fraction. Moreover, the fractionation process seemed to have an effect on structural and thermal properties of extracted fractions. Overall, results showed that yeast β-d-glucan had good potential for use as a prebiotic ingredient in food, as well as medicinal and pharmaceutical products.

  10. Differential repair of UV damage in Saccharomyces cerevisiae is cell cycle dependent.

    PubMed

    Terleth, C; Waters, R; Brouwer, J; van de Putte, P

    1990-09-01

    In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae the transcriptionally active MAT alpha locus is repaired preferentially to the inactive HML alpha locus after UV irradiation. Here we analysed the repair of both loci after irradiating yeast cells at different stages of the mitotic cell cycle. In all stages repair of the active MAT alpha locus occurs at a rate of 30% removal of dimers per hour after a UV dose of 60 J/m2. The inactive HML alpha is repaired as efficiently as MAT alpha following irradiation in G2 whereas repair of HML alpha is less efficient in the other stages. Thus differential repair is observed in G1 and S but not in G2. Apparently, in G2 a chromatin structure exists in which repair does not discriminate between transcriptionally active and inactive DNA or, alternatively, an additional repair mechanism might exist which is only operational during G2.

  11. Physical, functional and structural characterization of the cell wall fractions from baker's yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Borchani, Chema; Fonteyn, Fabienne; Jamin, Guilhem; Paquot, Michel; Thonart, Philippe; Blecker, Christophe

    2016-03-01

    The yeast cell wall of Saccharomyces cerevisiae is an important source of β-d-glucan, a glucose homopolymer with many functional, nutritional and human health benefits. In the present study, the yeast cell wall fractionation process involving enzymatic treatments (savinase and lipolase enzymes) affected most of the physical and functional characteristics of extracted fractions. Thus, the fractionation process showed that β-d-glucan fraction F4 had significantly higher swelling power and fat binding capacity compared to other fractions (F1, F2 and F3). It also exhibited a viscosity of 652.12mPas and a high degree of brightness of extracted β-d-glucan fraction. Moreover, the fractionation process seemed to have an effect on structural and thermal properties of extracted fractions. Overall, results showed that yeast β-d-glucan had good potential for use as a prebiotic ingredient in food, as well as medicinal and pharmaceutical products. PMID:26471666

  12. Combining magnetic sorting of mother cells and fluctuation tests to analyze genome instability during mitotic cell aging in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Patterson, Melissa N; Maxwell, Patrick H

    2014-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been an excellent model system for examining mechanisms and consequences of genome instability. Information gained from this yeast model is relevant to many organisms, including humans, since DNA repair and DNA damage response factors are well conserved across diverse species. However, S. cerevisiae has not yet been used to fully address whether the rate of accumulating mutations changes with increasing replicative (mitotic) age due to technical constraints. For instance, measurements of yeast replicative lifespan through micromanipulation involve very small populations of cells, which prohibit detection of rare mutations. Genetic methods to enrich for mother cells in populations by inducing death of daughter cells have been developed, but population sizes are still limited by the frequency with which random mutations that compromise the selection systems occur. The current protocol takes advantage of magnetic sorting of surface-labeled yeast mother cells to obtain large enough populations of aging mother cells to quantify rare mutations through phenotypic selections. Mutation rates, measured through fluctuation tests, and mutation frequencies are first established for young cells and used to predict the frequency of mutations in mother cells of various replicative ages. Mutation frequencies are then determined for sorted mother cells, and the age of the mother cells is determined using flow cytometry by staining with a fluorescent reagent that detects bud scars formed on their cell surfaces during cell division. Comparison of predicted mutation frequencies based on the number of cell divisions to the frequencies experimentally observed for mother cells of a given replicative age can then identify whether there are age-related changes in the rate of accumulating mutations. Variations of this basic protocol provide the means to investigate the influence of alterations in specific gene functions or specific environmental conditions on

  13. Combining Magnetic Sorting of Mother Cells and Fluctuation Tests to Analyze Genome Instability During Mitotic Cell Aging in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Patterson, Melissa N.; Maxwell, Patrick H.

    2014-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been an excellent model system for examining mechanisms and consequences of genome instability. Information gained from this yeast model is relevant to many organisms, including humans, since DNA repair and DNA damage response factors are well conserved across diverse species. However, S. cerevisiae has not yet been used to fully address whether the rate of accumulating mutations changes with increasing replicative (mitotic) age due to technical constraints. For instance, measurements of yeast replicative lifespan through micromanipulation involve very small populations of cells, which prohibit detection of rare mutations. Genetic methods to enrich for mother cells in populations by inducing death of daughter cells have been developed, but population sizes are still limited by the frequency with which random mutations that compromise the selection systems occur. The current protocol takes advantage of magnetic sorting of surface-labeled yeast mother cells to obtain large enough populations of aging mother cells to quantify rare mutations through phenotypic selections. Mutation rates, measured through fluctuation tests, and mutation frequencies are first established for young cells and used to predict the frequency of mutations in mother cells of various replicative ages. Mutation frequencies are then determined for sorted mother cells, and the age of the mother cells is determined using flow cytometry by staining with a fluorescent reagent that detects bud scars formed on their cell surfaces during cell division. Comparison of predicted mutation frequencies based on the number of cell divisions to the frequencies experimentally observed for mother cells of a given replicative age can then identify whether there are age-related changes in the rate of accumulating mutations. Variations of this basic protocol provide the means to investigate the influence of alterations in specific gene functions or specific environmental conditions on

  14. Biological denitrification in microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Clauwaert, Peter; Rabaey, Korneel; Aelterman, Peter; de Schamphelaire, Liesje; Pham, The Hai; Boeckx, Pascal; Boon, Nico; Verstraete, Willy

    2007-05-01

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) that remove carbon as well as nitrogen compounds out of wastewater are of special interest for practice. We developed a MFC in which microorganisms in the cathode performed a complete denitrification by using electrons supplied by microorganisms oxidizing acetate in the anode. The MFC with a cation exchange membrane was designed as a tubular reactor with an internal cathode and was able to remove up to 0.146 kg NO(3-)-N m(-3) net cathodic compartment (NCC) d(-1) (0.080 kg NO(3-)-N m(-3) total cathodic compartment d(-1) (TCC)) at a current of 58 A m(-3) NCC (32 A m(-3) TCC) and a cell voltage of 0.075 V. The highest power output in the denitrification system was 8 W m(-3) NCC (4 W m(-3) TCC) with a cell voltage of 0.214 V and a current of 35 A m(-3) NCC. The denitrification rate and the power production was limited bythe cathodic microorganisms, which only denitrified significantly at a cathodic electrode potential below 0 V versus standard hydrogen electrode (SHE). This is, to our knowledge, the first study in which a MFC has both a biological anode and cathode performing simultaneous removal of an organic substrate, power production, and complete denitrification without relying on H2-formation or external added power.

  15. Microbial fuel cells and microbial ecology: applications in ruminant health and production research.

    PubMed

    Bretschger, Orianna; Osterstock, Jason B; Pinchak, William E; Ishii, Shun'ichi; Nelson, Karen E

    2010-04-01

    Microbial fuel cell (MFC) systems employ the catalytic activity of microbes to produce electricity from the oxidation of organic, and in some cases inorganic, substrates. MFC systems have been primarily explored for their use in bioremediation and bioenergy applications; however, these systems also offer a unique strategy for the cultivation of synergistic microbial communities. It has been hypothesized that the mechanism(s) of microbial electron transfer that enable electricity production in MFCs may be a cooperative strategy within mixed microbial consortia that is associated with, or is an alternative to, interspecies hydrogen (H(2)) transfer. Microbial fermentation processes and methanogenesis in ruminant animals are highly dependent on the consumption and production of H(2)in the rumen. Given the crucial role that H(2) plays in ruminant digestion, it is desirable to understand the microbial relationships that control H(2) partial pressures within the rumen; MFCs may serve as unique tools for studying this complex ecological system. Further, MFC systems offer a novel approach to studying biofilms that form under different redox conditions and may be applied to achieve a greater understanding of how microbial biofilms impact animal health. Here, we present a brief summary of the efforts made towards understanding rumen microbial ecology, microbial biofilms related to animal health, and how MFCs may be further applied in ruminant research.

  16. Microbial Fuel Cells and Microbial Ecology: Applications in Ruminant Health and Production Research

    PubMed Central

    Osterstock, Jason B.; Pinchak, William E.; Ishii, Shun’ichi; Nelson, Karen E.

    2009-01-01

    Microbial fuel cell (MFC) systems employ the catalytic activity of microbes to produce electricity from the oxidation of organic, and in some cases inorganic, substrates. MFC systems have been primarily explored for their use in bioremediation and bioenergy applications; however, these systems also offer a unique strategy for the cultivation of synergistic microbial communities. It has been hypothesized that the mechanism(s) of microbial electron transfer that enable electricity production in MFCs may be a cooperative strategy within mixed microbial consortia that is associated with, or is an alternative to, interspecies hydrogen (H2) transfer. Microbial fermentation processes and methanogenesis in ruminant animals are highly dependent on the consumption and production of H2in the rumen. Given the crucial role that H2 plays in ruminant digestion, it is desirable to understand the microbial relationships that control H2 partial pressures within the rumen; MFCs may serve as unique tools for studying this complex ecological system. Further, MFC systems offer a novel approach to studying biofilms that form under different redox conditions and may be applied to achieve a greater understanding of how microbial biofilms impact animal health. Here, we present a brief summary of the efforts made towards understanding rumen microbial ecology, microbial biofilms related to animal health, and how MFCs may be further applied in ruminant research. PMID:20024685

  17. Cell wall-related bionumbers and bioestimates of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Klis, Frans M; de Koster, Chris G; Brul, Stanley

    2014-01-01

    Bionumbers and bioestimates are valuable tools in biological research. Here we focus on cell wall-related bionumbers and bioestimates of the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and the polymorphic, pathogenic fungus Candida albicans. We discuss the linear relationship between cell size and cell ploidy, the correlation between cell size and specific growth rate, the effect of turgor pressure on cell size, and the reason why using fixed cells for measuring cellular dimensions can result in serious underestimation of in vivo values. We further consider the evidence that individual buds and hyphae grow linearly and that exponential growth of the population results from regular formation of new daughter cells and regular hyphal branching. Our calculations show that hyphal growth allows C. albicans to cover much larger distances per unit of time than the yeast mode of growth and that this is accompanied by strongly increased surface expansion rates. We therefore predict that the transcript levels of genes involved in wall formation increase during hyphal growth. Interestingly, wall proteins and polysaccharides seem barely, if at all, subject to turnover and replacement. A general lesson is how strongly most bionumbers and bioestimates depend on environmental conditions and genetic background, thus reemphasizing the importance of well-defined and carefully chosen culture conditions and experimental approaches. Finally, we propose that the numbers and estimates described here offer a solid starting point for similar studies of other cell compartments and other yeast species.

  18. Identification of Genes Required for Normal Pheromone-Induced Cell Polarization in Saccharomyces Cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Chenevert, J.; Valtz, N.; Herskowitz, I.

    1994-01-01

    In response to mating pheromones, cells of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae adopt a polarized ``shmoo'' morphology, in which the cytoskeleton and proteins involved in mating are localized to a cell-surface projection. This polarization is presumed to reflect the oriented morphogenesis that occurs between mating partners to facilitate cell and nuclear fusion. To identify genes involved in pheromone-induced cell polarization, we have isolated mutants defective in mating to an enfeebled partner and studied a subset of these mutants. The 34 mutants of interest are proficient for pheromone production, arrest in response to pheromone, mate to wild-type strains, and exhibit normal cell polarity during vegetative growth. The mutants were divided into classes based on their morphological responses to mating pheromone. One class is unable to localize cell-surface growth in response to mating factor and instead enlarges in a uniform manner. These mutants harbor special alleles of genes required for cell polarization during vegetative growth, BEM1 and CDC24. Another class of mutants forms bilobed, peanut-like shapes when treated with pheromone and defines two genes, PEA1 and PEA2. PEA1 is identical to SPA2. A third class forms normally shaped but tiny shmoos and defines the gene TNY1. A final group of mutants exhibits apparently normal shmoo morphology. The nature of their mating defect is yet to be determined. We discuss the possible roles of these gene products in establishing cell polarity during mating. PMID:8013906

  19. Synthesis of mannosylinositol phosphorylceramides is involved in maintenance of cell integrity of yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Morimoto, Yuji; Tani, Motohiro

    2015-02-01

    Complex sphingolipids play important roles in many physiologically important events in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In this study, we screened yeast mutant strains showing a synthetic lethal interaction with loss of mannosylinositol phosphorylceramide (MIPC) synthesis and found that a specific group of glycosyltransferases involved in the synthesis of mannan-type N-glycans is essential for the growth of cells lacking MIPC synthases (Sur1 and Csh1). The genetic interaction was also confirmed by repression of MNN2, which encodes alpha-1,2-mannosyltransferase that synthesizes mannan-type N-glycans, by a tetracycline-regulatable system. MNN2-repressed sur1Δ csh1Δ cells exhibited high sensitivity to zymolyase treatment, and caffeine and sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) strongly inhibited the growth of sur1Δ csh1Δ cells, suggesting impairment of cell integrity due to the loss of MIPC synthesis. The phosphorylated form of Slt2, a mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase activated by impaired cell integrity, increased in sur1Δ csh1Δ cells, and this increase was dramatically enhanced by the repression of Mnn2. Moreover, the growth defect of MNN2-repressed sur1Δ csh1Δ cells was enhanced by the deletion of SLT2 or RLM1 encoding a downstream target of Slt2. These results indicated that loss of MIPC synthesis causes impairment of cell integrity, and this effect is enhanced by impaired synthesis of mannan-type N-glycans.

  20. Effects of X-ray and carbon ion beam irradiation on membrane permeability and integrity in Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells.

    PubMed

    Cao, Guozhen; Zhang, Miaomiao; Miao, Jianshun; Li, Wenjian; Wang, Jufang; Lu, Dong; Xia, Jiefang

    2015-03-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae has served as a eukaryotic model in radiation biology studies of cellular responses to ionizing radiation (IR). Research in this field has thus far mainly been focused on DNA strand breaks, DNA base damage, or inhibition of protein activity. However, the effects of IR on S. cerevisiae cell membranes have barely been studied. Here, we investigated the changes in the permeability and integrity of S. cerevisiae cell membranes induced by high-linear energy transfer carbon ion (CI) beam or low-linear energy transfer X-ray. After CI exposure, protein elution and nucleotide diffusion were more pronounced than after X-ray treatment at the same doses, although these features were most prevalent following irradiation doses of 25-175 Gy. Flow cytometry of forward scatter light versus side scatter light and double-staining with fluorescein diacetate and propidium iodide showed that CI and X-ray irradiation significantly affected S. cerevisiae cell membrane integrity and cellular enzyme activity compared with untreated control cells. The extent of lesions in CI-irradiated cells, which exhibited markedly altered morphology and size, was greater than that in X-ray-irradiated cells. The relationships between permeabilized cells, esterase activity, and non-viable cell numbers furthermore indicated that irradiation-induced increases in cell permeabilization and decreases in esterase activity are dependent on the type of radiation and that these parameters correspond well with cell viability. These results also indicate that the patterns of cell inactivity due to X-ray or CI irradiation may be similar in terms of cell membrane damage.

  1. Protein phosphatase 2A in Saccharomyces cerevisiae: effects on cell growth and bud morphogenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Ronne, H; Carlberg, M; Hu, G Z; Nehlin, J O

    1991-01-01

    We have cloned three genes for protein phosphatases in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Two of the genes, PPH21 and PPH22, encode highly similar proteins that are homologs of the mammalian protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A), while the third gene, PPH3, encodes a new PP2A-related protein. Disruptions of either PPH21 or PPH22 had no effects, but spores disrupted for both genes produced very small colonies with few surviving cells. We conclude that PP2A performs an important function in yeast cells. A disruption of the third gene, PPH3, did not in itself affect growth, but it completely prevented growth of spores disrupted for both PPH21 and PPH22. Thus, PPH3 provides some PP2A-complementing activity which allows for a limited growth of PP2A-deficient cells. Strains were constructed in which we could study the phenotypes caused by either excess PP2A or total PP2A depletion. We found that the level of PP2A activity has dramatic effects on cell shape. PP2A-depleted cells develop an abnormal pear-shaped morphology which is particularly pronounced in the growing bud. In contrast, overexpression of PP2A produces more elongated cells, and high-level overexpression causes a balloonlike phenotype with huge swollen cells filled by large vacuoles. Images PMID:1656215

  2. A pathway for cell wall anchorage of Saccharomyces cerevisiae alpha-agglutinin.

    PubMed Central

    Lu, C F; Kurjan, J; Lipke, P N

    1994-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae alpha-agglutinin is a cell wall-anchored adhesion glycoprotein. The previously identified 140-kDa form, which contains a glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchor (D. Wojciechowicz, C.-F. Lu, J. Kurjan, and P. N. Lipke, Mol. Cell. Biol. 13:2554-2563, 1993), and additional forms of 80, 150, 250 to 300, and > 300 kDa had the properties of intermediates in a transport and cell wall anchorage pathway. N glycosylation and additional modifications resulted in successive increases in size during transport. The 150- and 250- to 300-kDa forms were membrane associated and are likely to be intermediates between the 140-kDa form and a cell surface GPI-anchored form of > 300 kDa. A soluble form of > 300 kDa that lacked the GPI anchor had properties of a periplasmic intermediate between the plasma membrane form and the > 300-kDa cell wall-anchored form. These results constitute experimental support for the hypothesis that GPI anchors act to localize alpha-agglutinin to the plasma membrane and that cell wall anchorage involves release from the GPI anchor to produce a periplasmic intermediate followed by linkage to the cell wall. Images PMID:8007981

  3. Predictive Potential of Flux Balance Analysis of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Using as Optimization Function Combinations of Cell Compartmental Objectives

    PubMed Central

    García Sánchez, Carlos Eduardo; Vargas García, César Augusto; Torres Sáez, Rodrigo Gonzalo

    2012-01-01

    Background The main objective of flux balance analysis (FBA) is to obtain quantitative predictions of metabolic fluxes of an organism, and it is necessary to use an appropriate objective function to guarantee a good estimation of those fluxes. Methodology In this study, the predictive performance of FBA was evaluated, using objective functions arising from the linear combination of different cellular objectives. This approach is most suitable for eukaryotic cells, owing to their multiplicity of cellular compartments. For this reason, Saccharomyces cerevisiae was used as model organism, and its metabolic network was represented using the genome-scale metabolic model iMM904. As the objective was to evaluate the predictive performance from the FBA using the kind of objective function previously described, substrate uptake and oxygen consumption were the only input data used for the FBA. Experimental information about microbial growth and exchange of metabolites with the environment was used to assess the quality of the predictions. Conclusions The quality of the predictions obtained with the FBA depends greatly on the knowledge of the oxygen uptake rate. For the most of studied classifications, the best predictions were obtained with “maximization of growth”, and with some combinations that include this objective. However, in the case of exponential growth with unknown oxygen exchange flux, the objective function “maximization of growth, plus minimization of NADH production in cytosol, plus minimization of NAD(P)H consumption in mitochondrion” gave much more accurate estimations of fluxes than the obtained with any other objective function explored in this study. PMID:22912775

  4. Combining microbial cultures for efficient production of electricity from butyrate in a microbial electrochemical cell

    PubMed Central

    Miceli, Joseph F.; Garcia-Peña, Ines; Parameswaran, Prathap; Torres, César I.; Krajmalnik-Brown, Rosa

    2014-01-01

    Butyrate is an important product of anaerobic fermentation; however, it is not directly used by characterized strains of the highly efficient anode respiring bacteria (ARB) Geobacter sulfurreducens in microbial electrochemical cells. By combining a butyrate-oxidizing community with a Geobacter rich culture, we generated a microbial community which outperformed many naturally derived communities found in the literature for current production from butyrate and rivaled the highest performing natural cultures in terms of current density (~11 A/m2) and Coulombic efficiency (~70%). Microbial community analyses support the shift in the microbial community from one lacking efficient ARB in the marine hydrothermal vent community to a community consisting of ~80% Geobacter in the anode biofilm. This demonstrates the successful production and adaptation of a novel microbial culture for generating electrical current from butyrate with high current density and high Coulombic efficiency, by combining two mixed micro bial cultures containing complementing biochemical pathways. PMID:25048958

  5. Microbial Community Analysis of a Single Chamber Microbial Fuel Cell Using Potato Wastewater

    SciTech Connect

    Zhen Li; Rishika Haynes; Eugene Sato; Malcolm Shields; Yoshiko Fujita; Chikashi Sato

    2014-04-01

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) convert chemical energy to electrical energy via bioelectrochemical reactions mediated by microorganisms. We investigated the diversity of the microbial community in an air cathode single chamber MFC that utilized potato-process wastewater as substrate. Terminal Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (T-RFLP) results indicated that the bacterial communities on the anode, cathode, control electrode, and MFC bulk fluid were similar, but differed dramatically from that of the anaerobic domestic sludge and potato wastewater inoculum. The 16S rDNA sequencing results showed that microbial species detected on the anode were predominantly within the phyla of Proteobacteria, Firmicutes, and Bacteroidetes. Fluorescent microscopy results indicated that there was a clear enhancement of biofilm formation on the anode. Results of this study could help improve understanding of the complexity of microbial communities and optimize the microbial composition for generating electricity by MFCs that utilize potato wastewater.

  6. Over-pressurized bioreactors: application to microbial cell cultures.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Marlene; Belo, Isabel; Mota, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    In industrial biotechnology, microbial cultures are exposed to different local pressures inside bioreactors. Depending on the microbial species and strains, the increased pressure may have detrimental or beneficial effects on cellular growth and product formation. In this review, the effects of increased air pressure on various microbial cultures growing in bioreactors under moderate total pressure conditions (maximum, 15 bar) will be discussed. Recent data illustrating the diversity of increased air pressure effects at different levels in microbial cells cultivation will be presented, with particular attention to the effects of oxygen and carbon dioxide partial pressures on cellular growth and product formation, and the concomitant effect of oxygen pressure on antioxidant cellular defense mechanisms.

  7. Cellular and molecular engineering of yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae for advanced biobutanol production.

    PubMed

    Kuroda, Kouichi; Ueda, Mitsuyoshi

    2016-02-01

    Butanol is an attractive alternative energy fuel owing to several advantages over ethanol. Among the microbial hosts for biobutanol production, yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has a great potential as a microbial host due to its powerful genetic tools, a history of successful industrial use, and its inherent tolerance to higher alcohols. Butanol production by S. cerevisiae was first attempted by transferring the 1-butanol-producing metabolic pathway from native microorganisms or using the endogenous Ehrlich pathway for isobutanol synthesis. Utilizing alternative enzymes with higher activity, eliminating competitive pathways, and maintaining cofactor balance achieved significant improvements in butanol production. Meeting future challenges, such as enhancing butanol tolerance and implementing a comprehensive strategy by high-throughput screening, would further elevate the biobutanol-producing ability of S. cerevisiae toward an ideal microbial cell factory exhibiting high productivity of biobutanol. PMID:26712533

  8. Cellular and molecular engineering of yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae for advanced biobutanol production.

    PubMed

    Kuroda, Kouichi; Ueda, Mitsuyoshi

    2016-02-01

    Butanol is an attractive alternative energy fuel owing to several advantages over ethanol. Among the microbial hosts for biobutanol production, yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has a great potential as a microbial host due to its powerful genetic tools, a history of successful industrial use, and its inherent tolerance to higher alcohols. Butanol production by S. cerevisiae was first attempted by transferring the 1-butanol-producing metabolic pathway from native microorganisms or using the endogenous Ehrlich pathway for isobutanol synthesis. Utilizing alternative enzymes with higher activity, eliminating competitive pathways, and maintaining cofactor balance achieved significant improvements in butanol production. Meeting future challenges, such as enhancing butanol tolerance and implementing a comprehensive strategy by high-throughput screening, would further elevate the biobutanol-producing ability of S. cerevisiae toward an ideal microbial cell factory exhibiting high productivity of biobutanol.

  9. Calcium signaling mediates the response to cadmium toxicity in Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells.

    PubMed

    Ruta, Lavinia L; Popa, Valentina C; Nicolau, Ioana; Danet, Andrei F; Iordache, Virgil; Neagoe, Aurora D; Farcasanu, Ileana C

    2014-08-25

    The involvement of Ca(2+) in the response to high Mn(2+), Co(2+), Ni(2+), Cu(2+), Zn(2+), Cd(2+), and Hg(2+) was investigated in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The yeast cells responded through a sharp increase in cytosolic Ca(2+) when exposed to Cd(2+), and to a lesser extent to Cu(2+), but not to Mn(2+), Co(2+), Ni(2+), Zn(2+), or Hg(2+). The response to high Cd(2+) depended mainly on external Ca(2+) (transported through the Cch1p/Mid1p channel) but also on vacuolar Ca(2+) (released into the cytosol through the Yvc1p channel). The adaptation to high Cd(2+) was influenced by perturbations in Ca(2+) homeostasis. Thus, the tolerance to Cd(2+) often correlated with sharp Cd(2+)-induced cytosolic Ca(2+) pulses, while the Cd(2+) sensitivity was accompanied by the incapacity to rapidly restore the low cytosolic Ca(2+).

  10. Vaccinium corymbosum L. (blueberry) extracts exhibit protective action against cadmium toxicity in Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells.

    PubMed

    Oprea, Eliza; Ruta, Lavinia L; Nicolau, Ioana; Popa, Claudia V; Neagoe, Aurora D; Farcasanu, Ileana C

    2014-01-01

    Blueberries (Vaccinium corymbosum L.) are a rich source of antioxidants and their consumption is believed to contribute to food-related protection against oxidative stress. In the present study, the chemoprotective action of blueberry extracts against cadmium toxicity was investigated using a cadmium-hypersensitive strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Four varieties of blueberries were used in the study, and it was found that the extracts with high content of total anthocyanidins exhibited significant protective effect against the toxicity of cadmium and H2O2. Both the blueberry extracts and pure cyanidin exhibited protective effects against cadmium in a dose-dependent manner, but without significantly interfering with the cadmium accumulation by the yeast cells. The results imply that the blueberry extracts might be a potentially valuable food supplement for individuals exposed to high cadmium.

  11. Production of cytidine 5'-diphosphorylcholine with high utilization of ATP by whole cells of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Tang, Jiapeng; Chen, Yong; Chen, Xiaochun; Yao, Yuelan; Ying, Hanjie; Xiong, Jian; Bai, Jianxin

    2010-11-01

    Cytidine 5'-diphosphorylcholine (CDP-choline) was produced using a high efficiency ATP regeneration system and the Kennedy pathway in whole cells of Saccharomyces cerevisiae As 2.398. Out of eight variables, KH(2)PO(4), glycerol and (NH(4))(2)SO(4) were considered to be the most significant factors by response surface methodology including a Plackett-Burman design, path of steepest accent and central composite design. The optimum levels of the three variables were 20.13g/L KH(2)PO(4), 12.35g/L glycerol and 0.49g/L (NH(4))(2)SO(4), respectively. Energy utilization efficiency increased from 10.59% to 16.72% and choline chloride conversion yields increased from 12.35% to 42.78%. A high efficiency ATP regeneration system improves CDP-choline production.

  12. N-hypermannose glycosylation disruption enhances recombinant protein production by regulating secretory pathway and cell wall integrity in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Tang, Hongting; Wang, Shenghuan; Wang, Jiajing; Song, Meihui; Xu, Mengyang; Zhang, Mengying; Shen, Yu; Hou, Jin; Bao, Xiaoming

    2016-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a robust host for heterologous protein expression. The efficient expression of cellulases in S. cerevisiae is important for the consolidated bioprocess that directly converts lignocellulose into valuable products. However, heterologous proteins are often N-hyperglycosylated in S. cerevisiae, which may affect protein activity. In this study, the expression of three heterologous proteins, β-glucosidase, endoglucanase and cellobiohydrolase, was found to be N-hyperglycosylated in S. cerevisiae. To block the formation of hypermannose glycan, these proteins were expressed in strains with deletions in key Golgi mannosyltransferases (Och1p, Mnn9p and Mnn1p), respectively. Their extracellular activities improved markedly in the OCH1 and MNN9 deletion strains. Interestingly, truncation of the N-hypermannose glycan did not increase the specific activity of these proteins, but improved the secretion yield. Further analysis showed OCH1 and MNN9 deletion up-regulated genes in the secretory pathway, such as protein folding and vesicular trafficking, but did not induce the unfolded protein response. The cell wall integrity was also affected by OCH1 and MNN9 deletion, which contributed to the release of secretory protein extracellularly. This study demonstrated that mannosyltransferases disruption improved protein secretion through up-regulating secretory pathway and affecting cell wall integrity and provided new insights into glycosylation engineering for protein secretion. PMID:27156860

  13. N-hypermannose glycosylation disruption enhances recombinant protein production by regulating secretory pathway and cell wall integrity in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Hongting; Wang, Shenghuan; Wang, Jiajing; Song, Meihui; Xu, Mengyang; Zhang, Mengying; Shen, Yu; Hou, Jin; Bao, Xiaoming

    2016-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a robust host for heterologous protein expression. The efficient expression of cellulases in S. cerevisiae is important for the consolidated bioprocess that directly converts lignocellulose into valuable products. However, heterologous proteins are often N-hyperglycosylated in S. cerevisiae, which may affect protein activity. In this study, the expression of three heterologous proteins, β-glucosidase, endoglucanase and cellobiohydrolase, was found to be N-hyperglycosylated in S. cerevisiae. To block the formation of hypermannose glycan, these proteins were expressed in strains with deletions in key Golgi mannosyltransferases (Och1p, Mnn9p and Mnn1p), respectively. Their extracellular activities improved markedly in the OCH1 and MNN9 deletion strains. Interestingly, truncation of the N-hypermannose glycan did not increase the specific activity of these proteins, but improved the secretion yield. Further analysis showed OCH1 and MNN9 deletion up-regulated genes in the secretory pathway, such as protein folding and vesicular trafficking, but did not induce the unfolded protein response. The cell wall integrity was also affected by OCH1 and MNN9 deletion, which contributed to the release of secretory protein extracellularly. This study demonstrated that mannosyltransferases disruption improved protein secretion through up-regulating secretory pathway and affecting cell wall integrity and provided new insights into glycosylation engineering for protein secretion. PMID:27156860

  14. Valproate inhibits MAP kinase signalling and cell cycle progression in S. cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Desfossés-Baron, Kristelle; Hammond-Martel, Ian; Simoneau, Antoine; Sellam, Adnane; Roberts, Stephen; Wurtele, Hugo

    2016-01-01

    The mechanism of action of valproate (VPA), a widely prescribed short chain fatty acid with anticonvulsant and anticancer properties, remains poorly understood. Here, the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae was used as model to investigate the biological consequences of VPA exposure. We found that low pH strongly potentiates VPA-induced growth inhibition. Transcriptional profiling revealed that under these conditions, VPA modulates the expression of genes involved in diverse cellular processes including protein folding, cell wall organisation, sexual reproduction, and cell cycle progression. We further investigated the impact of VPA on selected processes and found that this drug: i) activates markers of the unfolded protein stress response such as Hac1 mRNA splicing; ii) modulates the cell wall integrity pathway by inhibiting the activation of the Slt2 MAP kinase, and synergizes with cell wall stressors such as micafungin and calcofluor white in preventing yeast growth; iii) prevents activation of the Kss1 and Fus3 MAP kinases of the mating pheromone pathway, which in turn abolishes cellular responses to alpha factor; and iv) blocks cell cycle progression and DNA replication. Overall, our data identify heretofore unknown biological responses to VPA in budding yeast, and highlight the broad spectrum of cellular pathways influenced by this chemical in eukaryotes. PMID:27782169

  15. Activation of chitin synthetase in permeabilized cells of a Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutant lacking proteinase B.

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez, M P; Correa, J U; Cabib, E

    1982-01-01

    Digitonin treatment at 30 degrees C of a Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutant lacking proteinase B permeabilized the cells and caused rapid and extensive activation of chitin synthetase in situ. The same result was obtained with a mutant generally defective in vacuolar proteases. By lowering the temperature and using different permeabilization procedures, we showed that increases in permeability and activation are distinct processes. Activation was inhibited by the protease inhibitors antipain and leupeptin, but by pepstatin or chymostatin. Metal chelators were also inhibitory, and their effect was reversed by the addition of Ca2+ but not by Mg2+. Antipain added together with Ca2+ after incubation of the cells in the presence of a chelating agent prevented reversal of inhibition, a result that was interpreted as indicating that antipain acts either on the same step affected by Ca2+ or on a subsequent step. Efforts to obtain activation in cell-free extracts were unsuccessful, but it was possible to extract the synthetase, once activated, by breaking permeabilized cells with glass beads. Treatment of the cell-free extracts with trypsin led not only to increased activity of chitin synthetase, but also to a change in the pH-activity curve and a diminished requirement by the enzyme for free N-acetylglucosamine. These observations suggest that the modification undergone by the synthetase during endogenous activation is different from that brought about by trypsin treatment. Images PMID:6216245

  16. Anodic and cathodic microbial communities in single chamber microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Daghio, Matteo; Gandolfi, Isabella; Bestetti, Giuseppina; Franzetti, Andrea; Guerrini, Edoardo; Cristiani, Pierangela

    2015-01-25

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) are a rapidly growing technology for energy production from wastewater and biomasses. In a MFC, a microbial biofilm oxidizes organic matter and transfers electrons from reduced compounds to an anode as the electron acceptor by extracellular electron transfer (EET). The aim of this work was to characterize the microbial communities operating in a Single Chamber Microbial Fuel Cell (SCMFC) fed with acetate and inoculated with a biogas digestate in order to gain more insight into anodic and cathodic EET. Taxonomic characterization of the communities was carried out by Illumina sequencing of a fragment of the 16S rRNA gene. Microorganisms belonging to Geovibrio genus and purple non-sulfur (PNS) bacteria were found to be dominant in the anodic biofilm. The alkaliphilic genus Nitrincola and anaerobic microorganisms belonging to Porphyromonadaceae family were the most abundant bacteria in the cathodic biofilm.

  17. AC power generation from microbial fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lobo, Fernanda Leite; Wang, Heming; Forrestal, Casey; Ren, Zhiyong Jason

    2015-11-01

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) directly convert biodegradable substrates to electricity and carry good potential for energy-positive wastewater treatment. However, the low and direct current (DC) output from MFC is not usable for general electronics except small sensors, yet commercial DC-AC converters or inverters used in solar systems cannot be directly applied to MFCs. This study presents a new DC-AC converter system for MFCs that can generate alternating voltage in any desired frequency. Results show that AC power can be easily achieved in three different frequencies tested (1, 10, 60 Hz), and no energy storage layer such as capacitors was needed. The DC-AC converter efficiency was higher than 95% when powered by either individual MFCs or simple MFC stacks. Total harmonic distortion (THD) was used to investigate the quality of the energy, and it showed that the energy could be directly usable for linear electronic loads. This study shows that through electrical conversion MFCs can be potentially used in household electronics for decentralized off-grid communities.

  18. Microscale microbial fuel cells: Advances and challenges.

    PubMed

    Choi, Seokheun

    2015-07-15

    The next generation of sustainable energy could come from microorganisms; evidence that it can be seen with the given rise of Electromicrobiology, the study of microorganisms' electrical properties. Many recent advances in electromicrobiology stem from studying microbial fuel cells (MFCs), which are gaining acceptance as a future alternative "green" energy technology and energy-efficient wastewater treatment method. MFCs are powered by living microorganisms with clean and sustainable features; they efficiently catalyse the degradation of a broad range of organic substrates under natural conditions. There is also increasing interest in photosynthetic MFCs designed to harness Earth's most abundant and promising energy source (solar irradiation). Despite their vast potential and promise, however, MFCs and photosynthetic MFCs have not yet successfully translated into commercial applications because they demonstrate persistent performance limitations and bottlenecks associated with scaling up. Instead, microscale MFCs have received increasing attention as a unique platform for various applications such as powering small portable electronic elements in remote locations, performing fundamental studies of microorganisms, screening bacterial strains, and toxicity detection in water. Furthermore, the stacking of miniaturized MFCs has been demonstrated to offer larger power densities than a single macroscale MFC in terms of scaling up. In this overview, we discuss recent achievements in microscale MFCs as well as their potential applications. Further scientific and technological challenges are also reviewed.

  19. Identification of a mannoprotein present in the inner layer of the cell wall of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Moukadiri, I; Armero, J; Abad, A; Sentandreu, R; Zueco, J

    1997-01-01

    Cell wall extracts from the double-mutant mnn1 mnn9 strain were used as the immunogen to obtain a monoclonal antibody (MAb), SAC A6, that recognizes a specific mannoprotein--which we have named Icwp--in the walls of cells of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Icwp runs as a polydisperse band of over 180 kDa in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis analysis of Zymolyase extracts of cell walls, although an analysis of the secretory pattern of the mannoprotein shows that at the level of secretory vesicles, it behaves like a discrete band of 140 kDa. Immunofluorescence analysis with the MAb showed that Icwp lies at the inner layer of the cell wall, being accessible to the antibody only after the outer layer of mannoproteins is disturbed by treatment with tunicamycin. The screening of a lambda gt11 expression library enabled us to identify the open reading frame (ORF) coding for Icwp. ICWP (EMBL accession number YLR391w, frame +3) codes for 238 amino acids, of which over 40% are serine or threonine, and contains a putative N-glycosylation site and a putative glycosylphosphatidylinositol attachment signal. Both disruption and overexpression of the ORF caused increased sensitivities to calcofluor white and Congo red, while the disruption caused an increased sensitivity to Zymolyase digestion, suggesting for Icwp a structural role in association with glucan. PMID:9079899

  20. POROSITY OF ISOLATED CELL WALLS OF SACCHAROMYCES CEREVISIAE AND BACILLUS MEGATERIUM

    PubMed Central

    Gerhardt, Philipp; Judge, Jean A.

    1964-01-01

    Gerhardt, Philipp (The University of Michigan, Ann Arbor), and Jean A. Judge. Porosity of isolated cell walls of a yeast and a bacillus. J. Bacteriol. 87:945–951. 1964.—Decagram masses of cell walls were isolated from Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Bacillus megaterium; their porosity was examined by measuring the extent of uptake with polyethylene glycols and dextrans varying in molecular weight from 62 to 2,000,000. The results indicated that both walls are heteroporous. The near equality of extrapolated water-uptake values and determined moisture contents suggested that water in the cell walls is mainly free for distribution of solutes. Polymers with molecular weights of 4,500 and above were excluded by the yeast walls, and those with molecular weights of 57,000 were excluded by the bacillus walls; from these results, maximal openings of 36 and 107 A, respectively, were calculated. Electron micrographs of shadowed, stained, and sectioned walls revealed fine structure not inconsistent with heteroporosity, but the predicted openings were not seen. Altogether, in structure and permeability behavior, the cell walls were like a random meshwork of cross-linked macromolecular strands. Images PMID:14137635

  1. An atypical active cell death process underlies the fungicidal activity of ciclopirox olamine against the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Bruno; Sampaio-Marques, Belém; Carvalho, Joana; Silva, Manuel T; Leão, Cecília; Rodrigues, Fernando; Ludovico, Paula

    2007-05-01

    Ciclopirox olamine (CPO), a fungicidal agent widely used in clinical practice, induced in Saccharomyces cerevisiae an active cell death (ACD) process characterized by changes in nuclear morphology and chromatin condensation associated with the appearance of a population in the sub-G(0)/G(1) cell cycle phase and an arrest delay in the G(2)/M phases. This ACD was associated neither with intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) signaling, as revealed by the use of different classes of ROS scavengers, nor with a terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL)-positive phenotype. Furthermore, CPO-induced cell death seems to be dependent on unknown protease activity but independent of the apoptotic regulators Aif1p and Yca1p and of autophagic pathways involving Apg5p, Apg8p and Uth1p. Our results show that CPO triggers in S. cerevisiae an atypical nonapoptotic, nonautophagic ACD with as yet unknown regulators. PMID:17233764

  2. Implementation of microbial fuel cell in harvesting energy using wastewater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramli, N. L.; Wahab, M. S. Abdul; Sharif, S. A. Md; Ramly, N. H.

    2016-02-01

    In this century, most of the companies use the electricity from the fossils fuels such as oil, gas and coal. This method will give negative impact to the environment and the fossils fuel will be run out. This project is to develop a microbial fuels cell that can produce electricity. There are several types of the microbial fuel cell, which are a single chamber, double chamber and continuous. In this paper, the double chamber microbial fuel cell was selected to investigate the effect of suspended sludge into the double chamber microbial fuels cell. The salt bridge will construct between both chambers of the double chamber microbial fuels cell. Carbon graphite rod is selected as an electrode at the cathode and anode to transfer the electron from the anode to the cathode. Electricity is generated from the anaerobic oxidation of organic matter by bacteria. At the end of this project, the microbial fuels cell was successful in generating electricity that can be used for a specific application.

  3. Heterogeneity of stress gene expression and stress resistance among individual cells of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Attfield, P V; Choi, H Y; Veal, D A; Bell, P J

    2001-05-01

    Knowledge of gene expression and cellular responses in microorganisms is derived from analyses of populations consisting of millions of cells. Analytical techniques that provide data as population averages fail to inform of culture heterogeneity. Flow cytometry and fluorescence techniques were used to provide information on the heterogeneity of stress-responsive gene expression and stress tolerance in individual cells within populations. A sequence of DNA encoding the heat shock and stress response elements of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae HSP104 gene was used to express enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP). When integrated into the genome of yeast strain W303-1A, intrinsic expression of EGFP increased about twofold as cells progressed from growth on glucose to ethanol utilization in aerobic batch cultures. Staining of cells with orange/red fluorescent propidium iodide (PI), which only enters cells that have compromised membrane integrity, revealed that the population became more tolerant to 52 degrees C heat stress as it progressed from growth on glucose and through the ethanol utilization phase of aerobic batch culture. Exposure of cultures growing on glucose to a mild heat shock (shift from 25 degrees C to 37 degrees C) resulted in significantly increased expression of EGFP in the population. However, there was heterogeneity in the intensity of fluorescence of individual cells from heat-shocked cultures, indicating variability in the strength of stress response in the clonal population. Detailed analysis of the heterogeneity showed a clear positive trend between intensity of stress response and individual cell resistance, measured in terms of PI exclusion, to heat stress at 52 degrees C. Further experiments indicated that, although the mean gene expression by a population is influenced by the genetic background, the heterogeneity among individual cells in clonal populations is largely physiologically based.

  4. Adenovirus transcriptional regulatory regions are conserved in mammalian cells and Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Kornuc, M; Altman, R; Harrich, D; Garcia, J; Chao, J; Kayne, P; Gaynor, R

    1988-01-01

    The adenovirus early region 3 (E3) promoter is an early viral promoter which is strongly induced by the adenovirus transactivator protein E1A. DNase I footprinting with HeLa cell extracts has identified four factor-binding domains which appear to be involved in basal and E1A-induced transcriptional regulation. These binding domains may bind TATA region-binding factors (site I), the CREB/ATF protein (site II), the AP-1 protein (site III), and nuclear factor I/CTF (site IV). Recently, it has been shown that the DNA-binding domain of transcription factor AP-1 has homology with the yeast transcription factor GCN4 and that the yeast transactivator protein GAL4 is able to stimulate transcription in HeLa cells from promoters containing GAL4-binding sites. These results suggest an evolutionary conservation of both transcription factors and the mechanisms responsible for transcriptional activation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and higher eucaryotic organisms. To determine whether similar patterns of transcriptional regulation were seen with the E3 promoter in HeLa and yeast cells, the E3 promoter fused to the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (cat) gene was cloned into a high-copy-number plasmid and stably introduced into yeast cells. S1 analysis revealed that similar E3 promoter mRNA start sites were found in yeast and HeLa cells. DNase I footprinting with partially purified yeast extracts revealed that four regions of the E3 promoter were protected. Several of these regions were similar to binding sites determined by using HeLa cell extracts. Oligonucleotide mutagenesis of these binding domains indicated their importance in the transcriptional regulation of the E3 promoter in yeast cells. These results suggest that similar cellular transcription factor-binding sites may be involved in the regulation of promoters in both yeast and mammalian cells. Images PMID:2975753

  5. The function of chitin synthases 2 and 3 in the Saccharomyces cerevisiae cell cycle

    PubMed Central

    1991-01-01

    The morphology of three Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains, all lacking chitin synthase 1 (Chs1) and two of them deficient in either Chs3 (calR1 mutation) or Chs2 was observed by light and electron microscopy. Cells deficient in Chs2 showed clumpy growth and aberrant shape and size. Their septa were very thick; the primary septum was absent. Staining with WGA-gold complexes revealed a diffuse distribution of chitin in the septum, whereas chitin was normally located at the neck between mother cell and bud and in the wall of mother cells. Strains deficient in Chs3 exhibited minor abnormalities in budding pattern and shape. Their septa were thin and trilaminar. Staining for chitin revealed a thin line of the polysaccharide along the primary septum; no chitin was present elsewhere in the wall. Therefore, Chs2 is specific for primary septum formation, whereas Chs3 is responsible for chitin in the ring at bud emergence and in the cell wall. Chs3 is also required for chitin synthesized in the presence of alpha-pheromone or deposited in the cell wall of cdc mutants at nonpermissive temperature, and for chitosan in spore walls. Genetic evidence indicated that a mutant lacking all three chitin synthases was inviable; this was confirmed by constructing a triple mutant rescued by a plasmid carrying a CHS2 gene under control of a GAL1 promoter. Transfer of the mutant from galactose to glucose resulted in cell division arrest followed by cell death. We conclude that some chitin synthesis is essential for viability of yeast cells. PMID:2050738

  6. Adenovirus transcriptional regulatory regions are conserved in mammalian cells and Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Kornuc, M; Altman, R; Harrich, D; Garcia, J; Chao, J; Kayne, P; Gaynor, R

    1988-09-01

    The adenovirus early region 3 (E3) promoter is an early viral promoter which is strongly induced by the adenovirus transactivator protein E1A. DNase I footprinting with HeLa cell extracts has identified four factor-binding domains which appear to be involved in basal and E1A-induced transcriptional regulation. These binding domains may bind TATA region-binding factors (site I), the CREB/ATF protein (site II), the AP-1 protein (site III), and nuclear factor I/CTF (site IV). Recently, it has been shown that the DNA-binding domain of transcription factor AP-1 has homology with the yeast transcription factor GCN4 and that the yeast transactivator protein GAL4 is able to stimulate transcription in HeLa cells from promoters containing GAL4-binding sites. These results suggest an evolutionary conservation of both transcription factors and the mechanisms responsible for transcriptional activation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and higher eucaryotic organisms. To determine whether similar patterns of transcriptional regulation were seen with the E3 promoter in HeLa and yeast cells, the E3 promoter fused to the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (cat) gene was cloned into a high-copy-number plasmid and stably introduced into yeast cells. S1 analysis revealed that similar E3 promoter mRNA start sites were found in yeast and HeLa cells. DNase I footprinting with partially purified yeast extracts revealed that four regions of the E3 promoter were protected. Several of these regions were similar to binding sites determined by using HeLa cell extracts. Oligonucleotide mutagenesis of these binding domains indicated their importance in the transcriptional regulation of the E3 promoter in yeast cells. These results suggest that similar cellular transcription factor-binding sites may be involved in the regulation of promoters in both yeast and mammalian cells.

  7. Aspergillus oryzae–Saccharomyces cerevisiae Consortium Allows Bio-Hybrid Fuel Cell to Run on Complex Carbohydrates

    PubMed Central

    Jahnke, Justin P.; Hoyt, Thomas; LeFors, Hannah M.; Sumner, James J.; Mackie, David M.

    2016-01-01

    Consortia of Aspergillus oryzae and Saccharomyces cerevisiae are examined for their abilities to turn complex carbohydrates into ethanol. To understand the interactions between microorganisms in consortia, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy is used to follow the concentrations of various metabolites such as sugars (e.g., glucose, maltose), longer chain carbohydrates, and ethanol to optimize consortia conditions for the production of ethanol. It is shown that with proper design A. oryzae can digest food waste simulants into soluble sugars that S. cerevisiae can ferment into ethanol. Depending on the substrate and conditions used, concentrations of 13% ethanol were achieved in 10 days. It is further shown that a direct alcohol fuel cell (FC) can be coupled with these A. oryzae-enabled S. cerevisiae fermentations using a reverse osmosis membrane. This “bio-hybrid FC” continually extracted ethanol from an ongoing consortium, enhancing ethanol production and allowing the bio-hybrid FC to run for at least one week. Obtained bio-hybrid FC currents were comparable to those from pure ethanol—water mixtures, using the same FC. The A. oryzae–S. cerevisiae consortium, coupled to a bio-hybrid FC, converted food waste simulants into electricity without any pre- or post-processing. PMID:27681904

  8. Aspergillus oryzae-Saccharomyces cerevisiae Consortium Allows Bio-Hybrid Fuel Cell to Run on Complex Carbohydrates.

    PubMed

    Jahnke, Justin P; Hoyt, Thomas; LeFors, Hannah M; Sumner, James J; Mackie, David M

    2016-01-01

    Consortia of Aspergillus oryzae and Saccharomyces cerevisiae are examined for their abilities to turn complex carbohydrates into ethanol. To understand the interactions between microorganisms in consortia, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy is used to follow the concentrations of various metabolites such as sugars (e.g., glucose, maltose), longer chain carbohydrates, and ethanol to optimize consortia conditions for the production of ethanol. It is shown that with proper design A. oryzae can digest food waste simulants into soluble sugars that S. cerevisiae can ferment into ethanol. Depending on the substrate and conditions used, concentrations of 13% ethanol were achieved in 10 days. It is further shown that a direct alcohol fuel cell (FC) can be coupled with these A. oryzae-enabled S. cerevisiae fermentations using a reverse osmosis membrane. This "bio-hybrid FC" continually extracted ethanol from an ongoing consortium, enhancing ethanol production and allowing the bio-hybrid FC to run for at least one week. Obtained bio-hybrid FC currents were comparable to those from pure ethanol-water mixtures, using the same FC. The A. oryzae-S. cerevisiae consortium, coupled to a bio-hybrid FC, converted food waste simulants into electricity without any pre- or post-processing. PMID:27681904

  9. Aspergillus oryzae-Saccharomyces cerevisiae Consortium Allows Bio-Hybrid Fuel Cell to Run on Complex Carbohydrates.

    PubMed

    Jahnke, Justin P; Hoyt, Thomas; LeFors, Hannah M; Sumner, James J; Mackie, David M

    2016-02-04

    Consortia of Aspergillus oryzae and Saccharomyces cerevisiae are examined for their abilities to turn complex carbohydrates into ethanol. To understand the interactions between microorganisms in consortia, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy is used to follow the concentrations of various metabolites such as sugars (e.g., glucose, maltose), longer chain carbohydrates, and ethanol to optimize consortia conditions for the production of ethanol. It is shown that with proper design A. oryzae can digest food waste simulants into soluble sugars that S. cerevisiae can ferment into ethanol. Depending on the substrate and conditions used, concentrations of 13% ethanol were achieved in 10 days. It is further shown that a direct alcohol fuel cell (FC) can be coupled with these A. oryzae-enabled S. cerevisiae fermentations using a reverse osmosis membrane. This "bio-hybrid FC" continually extracted ethanol from an ongoing consortium, enhancing ethanol production and allowing the bio-hybrid FC to run for at least one week. Obtained bio-hybrid FC currents were comparable to those from pure ethanol-water mixtures, using the same FC. The A. oryzae-S. cerevisiae consortium, coupled to a bio-hybrid FC, converted food waste simulants into electricity without any pre- or post-processing.

  10. Aspergillus oryzae–Saccharomyces cerevisiae Consortium Allows Bio-Hybrid Fuel Cell to Run on Complex Carbohydrates

    PubMed Central

    Jahnke, Justin P.; Hoyt, Thomas; LeFors, Hannah M.; Sumner, James J.; Mackie, David M.

    2016-01-01

    Consortia of Aspergillus oryzae and Saccharomyces cerevisiae are examined for their abilities to turn complex carbohydrates into ethanol. To understand the interactions between microorganisms in consortia, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy is used to follow the concentrations of various metabolites such as sugars (e.g., glucose, maltose), longer chain carbohydrates, and ethanol to optimize consortia conditions for the production of ethanol. It is shown that with proper design A. oryzae can digest food waste simulants into soluble sugars that S. cerevisiae can ferment into ethanol. Depending on the substrate and conditions used, concentrations of 13% ethanol were achieved in 10 days. It is further shown that a direct alcohol fuel cell (FC) can be coupled with these A. oryzae-enabled S. cerevisiae fermentations using a reverse osmosis membrane. This “bio-hybrid FC” continually extracted ethanol from an ongoing consortium, enhancing ethanol production and allowing the bio-hybrid FC to run for at least one week. Obtained bio-hybrid FC currents were comparable to those from pure ethanol—water mixtures, using the same FC. The A. oryzae–S. cerevisiae consortium, coupled to a bio-hybrid FC, converted food waste simulants into electricity without any pre- or post-processing.

  11. Raspberry wine fermentation with suspended and immobilized yeast cells of two strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Djordjević, Radovan; Gibson, Brian; Sandell, Mari; de Billerbeck, Gustavo M; Bugarski, Branko; Leskošek-Čukalović, Ida; Vunduk, Jovana; Nikićević, Ninoslav; Nedović, Viktor

    2015-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to assess the differences in fermentative behaviour of two different strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae (EC1118 and RC212) and to determine the differences in composition and sensory properties of raspberry wines fermented with immobilized and suspended yeast cells of both strains at 15 °C. Analyses of aroma compounds, glycerol, acetic acid and ethanol, as well as the kinetics of fermentation and a sensory evaluation of the wines, were performed. All fermentations with immobilized yeast cells had a shorter lag phase and faster utilization of sugars and ethanol production than those fermented with suspended cells. Slower fermentation kinetics were observed in all the samples that were fermented with strain RC212 (suspended and immobilized) than in samples fermented with strain EC1118. Significantly higher amounts of acetic acid were detected in all samples fermented with strain RC212 than in those fermented with strain EC1118 (0.282 and 0.602 g/l, respectively). Slightly higher amounts of glycerol were observed in samples fermented with strain EC1118 than in those fermented with strain RC212.

  12. Differential importance of trehalose in stress resistance in fermenting and nonfermenting Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells.

    PubMed

    Van Dijck, P; Colavizza, D; Smet, P; Thevelein, J M

    1995-01-01

    The trehalose content in laboratory and industrial baker's yeast is widely believed to be a major determinant of stress resistance. Fresh and dried baker's yeast is cultured to obtain a trehalose content of more than 10% of the dry weight. Initiation of fermentation, e.g., during dough preparation, is associated with a rapid loss of stress resistance and a rapid mobilization of trehalose. Using specific Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutants affected in trehalose metabolism, we confirm the correlation between trehalose content and stress resistance but only in the absence of fermentation. We demonstrate that both phenomena can be dissociated clearly once the cells initiate fermentation. This was accomplished both for cells with moderate trehalose levels grown under laboratory conditions and for cells with trehalose contents higher than 10% obtained under pilot-scale conditions. Retention of a high trehalose level during fermentation also does not prevent the loss of fermentation capacity during preparation of frozen doughs. Although higher trehalose levels are always correlated with higher stress resistance before the addition of fermentable sugar, our results show that the initiation of fermentation causes the disappearance of any other factor(s) required for the maintenance of stress resistance, even in the presence of a high trehalose content. PMID:7887593

  13. Polyphosphate is involved in cell cycle progression and genomic stability in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Bru, Samuel; Martínez-Laínez, Joan Marc; Hernández-Ortega, Sara; Quandt, Eva; Torres-Torronteras, Javier; Martí, Ramón; Canadell, David; Ariño, Joaquin; Sharma, Sushma; Jiménez, Javier; Clotet, Josep

    2016-08-01

    Polyphosphate (polyP) is a linear chain of up to hundreds of inorganic phosphate residues that is necessary for many physiological functions in all living organisms. In some bacteria, polyP supplies material to molecules such as DNA, thus playing an important role in biosynthetic processes in prokaryotes. In the present study, we set out to gain further insight into the role of polyP in eukaryotic cells. We observed that polyP amounts are cyclically regulated in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and those mutants that cannot synthesise (vtc4Δ) or hydrolyse polyP (ppn1Δ, ppx1Δ) present impaired cell cycle progression. Further analysis revealed that polyP mutants show delayed nucleotide production and increased genomic instability. Based on these findings, we concluded that polyP not only maintains intracellular phosphate concentrations in response to fluctuations in extracellular phosphate levels, but also muffles internal cyclic phosphate fluctuations, such as those produced by the sudden demand of phosphate to synthetize deoxynucleotides just before and during DNA duplication. We propose that the presence of polyP in eukaryotic cells is required for the timely and accurate duplication of DNA. PMID:27072996

  14. Raspberry wine fermentation with suspended and immobilized yeast cells of two strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Djordjević, Radovan; Gibson, Brian; Sandell, Mari; de Billerbeck, Gustavo M; Bugarski, Branko; Leskošek-Čukalović, Ida; Vunduk, Jovana; Nikićević, Ninoslav; Nedović, Viktor

    2015-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to assess the differences in fermentative behaviour of two different strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae (EC1118 and RC212) and to determine the differences in composition and sensory properties of raspberry wines fermented with immobilized and suspended yeast cells of both strains at 15 °C. Analyses of aroma compounds, glycerol, acetic acid and ethanol, as well as the kinetics of fermentation and a sensory evaluation of the wines, were performed. All fermentations with immobilized yeast cells had a shorter lag phase and faster utilization of sugars and ethanol production than those fermented with suspended cells. Slower fermentation kinetics were observed in all the samples that were fermented with strain RC212 (suspended and immobilized) than in samples fermented with strain EC1118. Significantly higher amounts of acetic acid were detected in all samples fermented with strain RC212 than in those fermented with strain EC1118 (0.282 and 0.602 g/l, respectively). Slightly higher amounts of glycerol were observed in samples fermented with strain EC1118 than in those fermented with strain RC212. PMID:25418076

  15. Rapid detection of microbial cell abundance in aquatic systems.

    PubMed

    Rocha, Andrea M; Yuan, Quan; Close, Dan M; O'Dell, Kaela B; Fortney, Julian L; Wu, Jayne; Hazen, Terry C

    2016-11-15

    The detection and quantification of naturally occurring microbial cellular densities is an essential component of environmental systems monitoring. While there are a number of commonly utilized approaches for monitoring microbial abundance, capacitance-based biosensors represent a promising approach because of their low-cost and label-free detection of microbial cells, but are not as well characterized as more traditional methods. Here, we investigate the applicability of enhanced alternating current electrokinetics (ACEK) capacitive sensing as a new application for rapidly detecting and quantifying microbial cellular densities in cultured and environmentally sourced aquatic samples. ACEK capacitive sensor performance was evaluated using two distinct and dynamic systems - the Great Australian Bight and groundwater from the Oak Ridge Reservation in Oak Ridge, TN. Results demonstrate that ACEK capacitance-based sensing can accurately determine microbial cell counts throughout cellular concentrations typically encountered in naturally occurring microbial communities (10(3)-10(6) cells/mL). A linear relationship was observed between cellular density and capacitance change correlations, allowing a simple linear curve fitting equation to be used for determining microbial abundances in unknown samples. This work provides a foundation for understanding the limits of capacitance-based sensing in natural environmental samples and supports future efforts focusing on evaluating the robustness ACEK capacitance-based within aquatic environments. PMID:27315516

  16. An efficient magnetically modified microbial cell biocomposite for carbazole biodegradation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Magnetic modification of microbial cells enables to prepare smart biocomposites in bioremediation. In this study, we constructed an efficient biocomposite by assembling Fe3O4 nanoparticles onto the surface of Sphingomonas sp. XLDN2-5 cells. The average particle size of Fe3O4 nanoparticles was about 20 nm with 45.5 emu g-1 saturation magnetization. The morphology of Sphingomonas sp. XLDN2-5 cells before and after Fe3O4 nanoparticle loading was verified by scanning electron microscopy and transmission electronic microscopy. Compared with free cells, the microbial cell/Fe3O4 biocomposite had the same biodegradation activity but exhibited remarkable reusability. The degradation activity of the microbial cell/Fe3O4 biocomposite increased gradually during recycling processes. Additionally, the microbial cell/Fe3O4 biocomposite could be easily separated and recycled by an external magnetic field due to the super-paramagnetic properties of Fe3O4 nanoparticle coating. These results indicated that magnetically modified microbial cells provide a promising technique for improving biocatalysts used in the biodegradation of hazardous compounds. PMID:24330511

  17. Enrichment of microbial electrolysis cell biocathodes from sediment microbial fuel cell bioanodes.

    PubMed

    Pisciotta, John M; Zaybak, Zehra; Call, Douglas F; Nam, Joo-Youn; Logan, Bruce E

    2012-08-01

    Electron-accepting (electrotrophic) biocathodes were produced by first enriching graphite fiber brush electrodes as the anodes in sediment-type microbial fuel cells (sMFCs) using two different marine sediments and then electrically inverting the anodes to function as cathodes in two-chamber bioelectrochemical systems (BESs). Electron consumption occurred at set potentials of -439 mV and -539 mV (versus the potential of a standard hydrogen electrode) but not at -339 mV in minimal media lacking organic sources of energy. Results at these different potentials were consistent with separate linear sweep voltammetry (LSV) scans that indicated enhanced activity (current consumption) below only ca. -400 mV. MFC bioanodes not originally acclimated at a set potential produced electron-accepting (electrotrophic) biocathodes, but bioanodes operated at a set potential (+11 mV) did not. CO(2) was removed from cathode headspace, indicating that the electrotrophic biocathodes were autotrophic. Hydrogen gas generation, followed by loss of hydrogen gas and methane production in one sample, suggested hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis. There was abundant microbial growth in the biocathode chamber, as evidenced by an increase in turbidity and the presence of microorganisms on the cathode surface. Clone library analysis of 16S rRNA genes indicated prominent sequences most similar to those of Eubacterium limosum (Butyribacterium methylotrophicum), Desulfovibrio sp. A2, Rhodococcus opacus, and Gemmata obscuriglobus. Transfer of the suspension to sterile cathodes made of graphite plates, carbon rods, or carbon brushes in new BESs resulted in enhanced current after 4 days, demonstrating growth by these microbial communities on a variety of cathode substrates. This report provides a simple and effective method for enriching autotrophic electrotrophs by the use of sMFCs without the need for set potentials, followed by the use of potentials more negative than -400 mV. PMID:22610438

  18. Enrichment of Microbial Electrolysis Cell Biocathodes from Sediment Microbial Fuel Cell Bioanodes

    SciTech Connect

    Pisciotta, JM; Zaybak, Z; Call, DF; Nam, JY; Logan, BE

    2012-07-18

    Electron-accepting (electrotrophic) biocathodes were produced by first enriching graphite fiber brush electrodes as the anodes in sediment-type microbial fuel cells (sMFCs) using two different marine sediments and then electrically inverting the anodes to function as cathodes in two-chamber bioelectrochemical systems (BESs). Electron consumption occurred at set potentials of -439 mV and -539 mV (versus the potential of a standard hydrogen electrode) but not at -339 mV in minimal media lacking organic sources of energy. Results at these different potentials were consistent with separate linear sweep voltammetry (LSV) scans that indicated enhanced activity (current consumption) below only ca. -400 mV. MFC bioanodes not originally acclimated at a set potential produced electron-accepting (electrotrophic) biocathodes, but bioanodes operated at a set potential (+11 mV) did not. CO, was removed from cathode headspace, indicating that the electrotrophic biocathodes were autotrophic. Hydrogen gas generation, followed by loss of hydrogen gas and methane production in one sample, suggested hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis. There was abundant microbial growth in the biocathode chamber, as evidenced by an increase in turbidity and the presence of microorganisms on the cathode surface. Clone library analysis of 16S rRNA genes indicated prominent sequences most similar to those of Eubacterium limosum (Butyribacterium methylotrophicum), Desulfovibrio sp. A2, Rhodococcus opacus, and Gemmata obscuriglobus. Transfer of the suspension to sterile cathodes made of graphite plates, carbon rods, or carbon brushes in new BESs resulted in enhanced current after 4 days, demonstrating growth by these microbial communities on a variety of cathode substrates. This report provides a simple and effective method for enriching autotrophic electrotrophs by the use of sMFCs without the need for set potentials, followed by the use of potentials more negative than -400 mV.

  19. Enrichment of Microbial Electrolysis Cell Biocathodes from Sediment Microbial Fuel Cell Bioanodes

    PubMed Central

    Pisciotta, John M.; Zaybak, Zehra; Call, Douglas F.; Nam, Joo-Youn

    2012-01-01

    Electron-accepting (electrotrophic) biocathodes were produced by first enriching graphite fiber brush electrodes as the anodes in sediment-type microbial fuel cells (sMFCs) using two different marine sediments and then electrically inverting the anodes to function as cathodes in two-chamber bioelectrochemical systems (BESs). Electron consumption occurred at set potentials of −439 mV and −539 mV (versus the potential of a standard hydrogen electrode) but not at −339 mV in minimal media lacking organic sources of energy. Results at these different potentials were consistent with separate linear sweep voltammetry (LSV) scans that indicated enhanced activity (current consumption) below only ca. −400 mV. MFC bioanodes not originally acclimated at a set potential produced electron-accepting (electrotrophic) biocathodes, but bioanodes operated at a set potential (+11 mV) did not. CO2 was removed from cathode headspace, indicating that the electrotrophic biocathodes were autotrophic. Hydrogen gas generation, followed by loss of hydrogen gas and methane production in one sample, suggested hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis. There was abundant microbial growth in the biocathode chamber, as evidenced by an increase in turbidity and the presence of microorganisms on the cathode surface. Clone library analysis of 16S rRNA genes indicated prominent sequences most similar to those of Eubacterium limosum (Butyribacterium methylotrophicum), Desulfovibrio sp. A2, Rhodococcus opacus, and Gemmata obscuriglobus. Transfer of the suspension to sterile cathodes made of graphite plates, carbon rods, or carbon brushes in new BESs resulted in enhanced current after 4 days, demonstrating growth by these microbial communities on a variety of cathode substrates. This report provides a simple and effective method for enriching autotrophic electrotrophs by the use of sMFCs without the need for set potentials, followed by the use of potentials more negative than −400 mV. PMID:22610438

  20. Ethanol production by fermentation using immobilized cells of Saccharomyces cerevisiae in cashew apple bagasse.

    PubMed

    Pacheco, Alexandre Monteiro; Gondim, Diego Romão; Gonçalves, Luciana Rocha Barros

    2010-05-01

    In this work, cashew apple bagasse (CAB) was used for Saccharomyces cerevisiae immobilization. The support was prepared through a treatment with a solution of 3% HCl, and delignification with 2% NaOH was also conducted. Optical micrographs showed that high populations of yeast cells adhered to pre-treated CAB surface. Ten consecutive fermentations of cashew apple juice for ethanol production were carried out using immobilized yeasts. High ethanol productivity was observed from the third fermentation assay until the tenth fermentation. Ethanol concentrations (about 19.82-37.83 g L(-1) in average value) and ethanol productivities (about 3.30-6.31 g L(-1) h(-1)) were high and stable, and residual sugar concentrations were low in almost all fermentations (around 3.00 g L(-1)) with conversions ranging from 44.80% to 96.50%, showing efficiency (85.30-98.52%) and operational stability of the biocatalyst for ethanol fermentation. Results showed that cashew apple bagasse is an efficient support for cell immobilization aiming at ethanol production.

  1. Defects in Base Excision Repair Sensitize Cells to Manganese in S. cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Stephenson, Adrienne P.; Mazu, Tryphon K.; Miles, Jana S.; Freeman, Miles D.; Reams, R. Renee; Flores-Rozas, Hernan

    2013-01-01

    Manganese (Mn) is essential for normal physiologic functioning; therefore, deficiencies and excess intake of manganese can result in disease. In humans, prolonged exposure to manganese causes neurotoxicity characterized by Parkinson-like symptoms. Mn2+ has been shown to mediate DNA damage possibly through the generation of reactive oxygen species. In a recent publication, we showed that Mn induced oxidative DNA damage and caused lesions in thymines. This study further investigates the mechanisms by which cells process Mn2+-mediated DNA damage using the yeast S. cerevisiae. The strains most sensitive to Mn2+ were those defective in base excision repair, glutathione synthesis, and superoxide dismutase mutants. Mn2+ caused a dose-dependent increase in the accumulation of mutations using the CAN1 and lys2-10A mutator assays. The spectrum of CAN1 mutants indicates that exposure to Mn results in accumulation of base substitutions and frameshift mutations. The sensitivity of cells to Mn2+ as well as its mutagenic effect was reduced by N-acetylcysteine, glutathione, and Mg2+. These data suggest that Mn2+ causes oxidative DNA damage that requires base excision repair for processing and that Mn interferes with polymerase fidelity. The status of base excision repair may provide a biomarker for the sensitivity of individuals to manganese. PMID:24282812

  2. Bcl-2 family members inhibit oxidative stress-induced programmed cell death in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shao-Rong; Dunigan, David D; Dickman, Martin B

    2003-05-15

    Selected antiapoptotic genes were expressed in baker's yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) to evaluate cytoprotective effects during oxidative stress. When exposed to treatments resulting in the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), including H(2)O(2), menadione, or heat shock, wild-type yeast died and exhibited apoptotic-like characteristics, consistent with previous studies. Yeast strains were generated expressing nematode ced-9, human bcl-2, or chicken bcl-xl genes. These transformants tolerated a range of oxidative stresses, did not display features associated with apoptosis, and remained viable under conditions that were lethal to wild-type yeast. Yeast strains expressing a mutant antiapoptotic gene (bcl-2 deltaalpha 5-6), known to be nonfunctional in mammalian cells, were unable to tolerate any of the ROS-generating insults. These data are the first report showing CED-9 has cytoprotective effects against oxidative stress, and add CED-9 to the list of Bcl-2 protein family members that modulate ROS-mediated programmed cell death. In addition, these data indicate that Bcl-2 family members protect wild-type yeast from physiological stresses. Taken together, these data support the concept of the broad evolutionary conservation and functional similarity of the apoptotic processes in eukaryotic organisms.

  3. Removing heavy metals from synthetic effluents using "kamikaze" Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells.

    PubMed

    Ruta, Lavinia; Paraschivescu, Codruta; Matache, Mihaela; Avramescu, Sorin; Farcasanu, Ileana Cornelia

    2010-01-01

    One key step of the bioremediation processes designed to clean up heavy metal contaminated environments is growing resistant cells that accumulate the heavy metals to ensure better removal through a combination of biosorption and continuous metabolic uptake after physical adsorption. Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells can easily act as cation biosorbents, but isolation of mutants that are both hyperaccumulating and tolerant to heavy metals proved extremely difficult. Instead, mutants that are hypersensitive to heavy metals due to increased and continuous uptake from the environment were considered, aiming to use such mutants to reduce the heavy metal content of contaminated waters. In this study, the heavy metal hypersensitive yeast strain pmr1Delta was investigated for the ability to remove Mn2+, Cu2+, Co2+, or Cd2+ from synthetic effluents. Due to increased metal accumulation, the mutant strain was more efficient than the wild-type in removing Mn2+, Cu2+, or Co2+ from synthetic effluents containing 1-2 mM cations, with a selectivity and also in removing Mn2+ and Cd2+ from synthetic effluents containing 20-50 microM cations, with a selectivity Mn2+ > Cd2+. PMID:19795117

  4. Continuous bioethanol production from oilseed rape straw hydrosylate using immobilised Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells.

    PubMed

    Mathew, Anil Kuruvilla; Crook, Mitch; Chaney, Keith; Humphries, Andrea Clare

    2014-02-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate continuous bioethanol production from oilseed rape (OSR) straw hydrolysate using Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells immobilised in Lentikat® discs. The study evaluated the effect of dilution rate (0.25, 0.50, 0.75 and 1.00 h(-1)), substrate concentration (15, 22, 40 and 60 g L(-1)) and cell loading (0.03, 0.16 and 0.24 g d.c.w.mL(-1) Lentikat®) on bioethanol production. Volumetric productivity was found to increase with increasing substrate concentration from 15 g L(-1) to 60 g L(-1). A maximum volumetric productivity of 12.88 g L(-1)h(-1) was achieved at a substrate concentration of 60 g L(-1) and at a dilution rate of 0.5h(-1). An overall mass balance for bioethanol production was created to determine the energy recovery from bioethanol and concluded that a biorefinery approach might be the most appropriate option for maximising the energy recovery from OSR straw.

  5. Electricity production from municipal solid waste using microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Chiu, H Y; Pai, T Y; Liu, M H; Chang, C A; Lo, F C; Chang, T C; Lo, H M; Chiang, C F; Chao, K P; Lo, W Y; Lo, S W; Chu, Y L

    2016-07-01

    The organic content of municipal solid waste has long been an attractive source of renewable energy, mainly as a solid fuel in waste-to-energy plants. This study focuses on the potential to use microbial fuel cells to convert municipal solid waste organics into energy using various operational conditions. The results showed that two-chamber microbial fuel cells with carbon felt and carbon felt allocation had a higher maximal power density (20.12 and 30.47 mW m(-2) for 1.5 and 4 L, respectively) than those of other electrode plate allocations. Most two-chamber microbial fuel cells (1.5 and 4 L) had a higher maximal power density than single-chamber ones with corresponding electrode plate allocations. Municipal solid waste with alkali hydrolysis pre-treatment and K3Fe(CN)6 as an electron acceptor improved the maximal power density to 1817.88 mW m(-2) (~0.49% coulomb efficiency, from 0.05-0.49%). The maximal power density from experiments using individual 1.5 and 4 L two-chamber microbial fuel cells, and serial and parallel connections of 1.5 and 4 L two-chamber microbial fuel cells, was found to be in the order of individual 4 L (30.47 mW m(-2)) > serial connection of 1.5 and 4 L (27.75) > individual 1.5 L (20.12) > parallel connection of 1.5 and 4 L (17.04) two-chamber microbial fuel cells . The power density using municipal solid waste microbial fuel cells was compared with information in the literature and discussed.

  6. Comparing regions of the Epstein-Barr virus ZEBRA protein which function as transcriptional activating sequences in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and in B cells.

    PubMed Central

    Miller, G; Himmelfarb, H; Heston, L; Countryman, J; Gradoville, L; Baumann, R; Chi, T; Carey, M

    1993-01-01

    The ZEBRA protein activates expression of Epstein-Barr virus early-lytic-cycle genes in human B lymphocytes. Here it is shown that ZEBRA also behaves as a sequence-specific transcriptional activator in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Deletional mutagenesis defined three regions of ZEBRA that participate in activation in S. cerevisiae. These regions are designated YI (amino acids [aa] 1 to 25), YII (aa 51 to 102), and YIII (aa 228 to 245). Two of the three regions of the native ZEBRA protein act together to mediate activation when assayed on ZEBRA binding sites. However, when fused to the DNA binding domain of GAL4 and assayed on GAL4 binding sites, regions YII and YIII were each sufficient to confer activation in S. cerevisiae. Regions of ZEBRA which affected activation in S. cerevisiae were also required in human B lymphocytes. The amino-terminal region of ZEBRA (aa 1 to 98) was required for activation both in S. cerevisiae and in human B cells; deletion of the carboxy-terminal 18 aa also significantly reduced activation in both cell types. Thus, the behavior of ZEBRA in human B cells and S. cerevisiae suggests that the protein contains universal activation motifs that interact with conserved components of the transcription machinery. However, certain deletion mutants of ZEBRA containing mutations in the N-terminal region exhibited discordant behaviors in S. cerevisiae and in B cells. For example, deletion of ZEBRA aa 26 to 51 impaired activation to a great extent in B cells but had little or no effect in S. cerevisiae. The discordant mutants may reflect interactions with a variable domain of a conserved component or unique interactions with specialized components of the basal transcription apparatus in different cells. PMID:8230468

  7. Modeling of Sustainable Base Production by Microbial Electrolysis Cell.

    PubMed

    Blatter, Maxime; Sugnaux, Marc; Comninellis, Christos; Nealson, Kenneth; Fischer, Fabian

    2016-07-01

    A predictive model for the microbial/electrochemical base formation from wastewater was established and compared to experimental conditions within a microbial electrolysis cell. A Na2 SO4 /K2 SO4 anolyte showed that model prediction matched experimental results. Using Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, a strong base (pH≈13) was generated using applied voltages between 0.3 and 1.1 V. Due to the use of bicarbonate, the pH value in the anolyte remained unchanged, which is required to maintain microbial activity.

  8. Microbial communities involved in electricity generation from sulfide oxidation in a microbial fuel cell.

    PubMed

    Sun, Min; Tong, Zhong-Hua; Sheng, Guo-Ping; Chen, Yong-Zhen; Zhang, Feng; Mu, Zhe-Xuan; Wang, Hua-Lin; Zeng, Raymond J; Liu, Xian-Wei; Yu, Han-Qing; Wei, Li; Ma, Fang

    2010-10-15

    Simultaneous electricity generation and sulfide removal can be achieved in a microbial fuel cell (MFC). In electricity harvesting from sulfide oxidation in such an MFC, various microbial communities are involved. It is essential to elucidate the microbial communities and their roles in the sulfide conversion and electricity generation. In this work, an MFC was constructed to enrich a microbial consortium, which could harvest electricity from sulfide oxidation. Electrochemical analysis demonstrated that microbial catalysis was involved in electricity output in the sulfide-fed MFC. The anode-attached and planktonic communities could perform catalysis independently, and synergistic interactions occurred when the two communities worked together. A 16S rRNA clone library analysis was employed to characterize the microbial communities in the MFC. The anode-attached and planktonic communities shared similar richness and diversity, while the LIBSHUFF analysis revealed that the two community structures were significantly different. The exoelectrogenic, sulfur-oxidizing and sulfate-reducing bacteria were found in the MFC anodic chamber. The discovery of these bacteria was consistent with the community characteristics for electricity generation from sulfide oxidation. The exoelectrogenic bacteria were found both on the anode and in the solution. The sulfur-oxidizing bacteria were present in greater abundance on the anode than in the solution, while the sulfate-reducing bacteria preferably lived in the solution.

  9. Permeability of the cell envelope and osmotic behavior in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Arnold, W N; Lacy, J S

    1977-08-01

    Bakers' yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) was equilibrated with distilled water and then packed into standardized pellets by centrifugation. The fractional space (S value) that was accessible to passive permeation was probed with a variety of mono- and divalent salts, mono- and disaccharides, polyols, substrates and products of beta-fructofuranosidase (EC 3.2.1.26) and acid phosphatase (EC 3.1.3.2), and a cross-linked polymer of sucrose (Ficoll 400). A simple but very reproducible method was developed to measure pellet volume. At the limit of zero osmolality for bathing medium, the interstitial space was 0.223 ml/ml of pellet, and the aqueous volume of cell envelopes was 0.117 ml/ml of pellet. Thus the cell envelope for this yeast, under these conditions, was approximately 15% of the total cell volume. At a finite osmolality, the space in a yeast pellet that was accessible to salt was accounted for by the sum of initial interstitial space, the volume of the cell envelopes, and the volume of water abstracted from the cells by osmosis. Plots of S value versus osmolality were linear for uncharged probes and curvilinear for all salts. When Ficoll and potassium thiocyanate were presented to the yeast in admixture, the S values for the salt increased continuously over the range of osmolality studied. However, the S values for Ficoll 400 (which did not penetrate the cell wall) were lower by an amount equilivalent to the cell envelopes; they increased in parallel with the S curve for salt up to 1.15 osmol/kg and then plateaued. The results support the concept of incipient plasmolysis at 1.15 osmol/kg, and the separation of protoplasm from the cell wall is indicated with more concentrated solutions. Such cells were still viable if slowly diluted in distilled water, but they were injured by the shock of rapid dilution. However, shocking the cells did not release beta-fructofuranosidase into the medium. The complete accessibility of salts toward killed cells was demonstrated

  10. Actin and myosin function in directed vacuole movement during cell division in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    During cell division, cytoplasmic organelles are not synthesized de novo, rather they are replicated and partitioned between daughter cells. Partitioning of the vacuole in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is coordinated with the cell cycle and involves a dramatic translocation of a portion of the parental organelle from the mother cell into the bud. While the molecular mechanisms that mediate this event are unknown, the vacuole's rapid and directed movements suggest cytoskeleton involvement. To identify cytoskeletal components that function in this process, vacuole inheritance was examined in a collection of actin mutants. Six strains were identified as being defective in vacuole inheritance. Tetrad analysis verified that the defect cosegregates with the mutant actin gene. One strain with a deletion in a myosin-binding region was analyzed further. The vacuole inheritance defect in this strain appears to result from the loss of a specific actin function; the actin cytoskeleton is intact and protein targeting to the vacuole is normal. Consistent with these findings, a mutation in the actin-binding domain of Myo2p, a class V unconventional myosin, abolishes vacuole inheritance. This suggests that Myo2p serves as a molecular motor for vacuole transport along actin filaments. The location of actin and Myo2p relative to the vacuole membrane is consistent with this model. Additional studies suggest that the actin filaments used for vacuole transport are dynamic, and that profilin plays a critical role in regulating their assembly. These results present the first demonstration that specific cytoskeletal proteins function in vacuole inheritance. PMID:8978821

  11. Fast “Feast/Famine” Cycles for Studying Microbial Physiology Under Dynamic Conditions: A Case Study with Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Suarez-Mendez, Camilo A.; Sousa, Andre; Heijnen, Joseph J.; Wahl, Aljoscha

    2014-01-01

    Microorganisms are constantly exposed to rapidly changing conditions, under natural as well as industrial production scale environments, especially due to large-scale substrate mixing limitations. In this work, we present an experimental approach based on a dynamic feast/famine regime (400 s) that leads to repetitive cycles with moderate changes in substrate availability in an aerobic glucose cultivation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. After a few cycles, the feast/famine produced a stable and repetitive pattern with a reproducible metabolic response in time, thus providing a robust platform for studying the microorganism’s physiology under dynamic conditions. We found that the biomass yield was slightly reduced (−5%) under the feast/famine regime, while the averaged substrate and oxygen consumption as well as the carbon dioxide production rates were comparable. The dynamic response of the intracellular metabolites showed specific differences in comparison to other dynamic experiments (especially stimulus-response experiments, SRE). Remarkably, the frequently reported ATP paradox observed in single pulse experiments was not present during the repetitive perturbations applied here. We found that intracellular dynamic accumulations led to an uncoupling of the substrate uptake rate (up to 9-fold change at 20 s.) Moreover, the dynamic profiles of the intracellular metabolites obtained with the feast/famine suggest the presence of regulatory mechanisms that resulted in a delayed response. With the feast famine setup many cellular states can be measured at high frequency given the feature of reproducible cycles. The feast/famine regime is thus a versatile platform for systems biology approaches, which can help us to identify and investigate metabolite regulations under realistic conditions (e.g., large-scale bioreactors or natural environments). PMID:24957030

  12. Evaluation of industrial Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains as the chassis cell for second-generation bioethanol production.

    PubMed

    Li, Hongxing; Wu, Meiling; Xu, Lili; Hou, Jin; Guo, Ting; Bao, Xiaoming; Shen, Yu

    2015-03-01

    To develop a suitable Saccharomyces cerevisiae industrial strain as a chassis cell for ethanol production using lignocellulosic materials, 32 wild-type strains were evaluated for their glucose fermenting ability, their tolerance to the stresses they might encounter in lignocellulosic hydrolysate fermentation and their genetic background for pentose metabolism. The strain BSIF, isolated from tropical fruit in Thailand, was selected out of the distinctly different strains studied for its promising characteristics. The maximal specific growth rate of BSIF was as high as 0.65 h(-1) in yeast extract peptone dextrose medium, and the ethanol yield was 0.45 g g(-1) consumed glucose. Furthermore, compared with other strains, this strain exhibited superior tolerance to high temperature, hyperosmotic stress and oxidative stress; better growth performance in lignocellulosic hydrolysate; and better xylose utilization capacity when an initial xylose metabolic pathway was introduced. All of these results indicate that this strain is an excellent chassis strain for lignocellulosic ethanol production.

  13. Improving flavor metabolism of Saccharomyces cerevisiae by mixed culture with Bacillus licheniformis for Chinese Maotai-flavor liquor making.

    PubMed

    Meng, Xing; Wu, Qun; Wang, Li; Wang, Diqiang; Chen, Liangqiang; Xu, Yan

    2015-12-01

    Microbial interactions could impact the metabolic behavior of microbes involved in food fermentation, and therefore they are important for improving food quality. This study investigated the effect of Bacillus licheniformis, the dominant bacteria in the fermentation process of Chinese Maotai-flavor liquor, on the metabolic activity of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Results indicated that S. cerevisiae inhibited the growth of B. licheniformis in all mixed culture systems and final viable cell count was lower than 20 cfu/mL. Although growth of S. cerevisiae was barely influenced by B. licheniformis, its metabolism was changed as initial inoculation ratio varied. The maximum ethanol productions were observed in S. cerevisiae and B. licheniformis at 10(6):10(7) and 10(6):10(8) ratios and have increased by 16.8 % compared with single culture of S. cerevisiae. According to flavor compounds, the culture ratio 10(6):10(6) showed the highest level of total concentrations of all different kinds of flavor compounds. Correlation analyses showed that 12 flavor compounds, including 4 fatty acids and their 2 corresponding esters, 1 terpene, and 5 aromatic compounds, that could only be produced by S. cerevisiae were significantly correlated with the initial inoculation amount of B. licheniformis. These metabolic changes in S. cerevisiae were not only a benefit for liquor aroma, but may also be related to its inhibition effect in mixed culture. This study could help to reveal the microbial interactions in Chinese liquor fermentation and provide guidance for optimal arrangement of mixed culture fermentation systems.

  14. The Transient Inactivation of the Master Cell Cycle Phosphatase Cdc14 Causes Genomic Instability in Diploid Cells of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Quevedo, Oliver; Ramos-Pérez, Cristina; Petes, Thomas D.; Machín, Félix

    2015-01-01

    Genomic instability is a common feature found in cancer cells . Accordingly, many tumor suppressor genes identified in familiar cancer syndromes are involved in the maintenance of the stability of the genome during every cell division and are commonly referred to as caretakers. Inactivating mutations and epigenetic silencing of caretakers are thought to be the most important mechanisms that explain cancer-related genome instability. However, little is known of whether transient inactivation of caretaker proteins could trigger genome instability and, if so, what types of instability would occur. In this work, we show that a brief and reversible inactivation, during just one cell cycle, of the key phosphatase Cdc14 in the model organism Saccharomyces cerevisiae is enough to result in diploid cells with multiple gross chromosomal rearrangements and changes in ploidy. Interestingly, we observed that such transient loss yields a characteristic fingerprint whereby trisomies are often found in small-sized chromosomes, and gross chromosome rearrangements, often associated with concomitant loss of heterozygosity, are detected mainly on the ribosomal DNA-bearing chromosome XII. Taking into account the key role of Cdc14 in preventing anaphase bridges, resetting replication origins, and controlling spindle dynamics in a well-defined window within anaphase, we speculate that the transient loss of Cdc14 activity causes cells to go through a single mitotic catastrophe with irreversible consequences for the genome stability of the progeny. PMID:25971663

  15. Batteryless, wireless sensor powered by a sediment microbial fuel cell.

    PubMed

    Donovan, Conrad; Dewan, Alim; Heo, Deukhyoun; Beyenal, Haluk

    2008-11-15

    Sediment microbial fuel cells (SMFCs) are considered to be an alternative renewable power source for remote monitoring. There are two main challenges to using SMFCs as power sources: 1) a SMFC produces a low potential at which most sensor electronics do not operate, and 2) a SMFC cannot provide continuous power, so energy from the SMFC must be stored and then used to repower sensor electronics intermittently. In this study, we developed a SMFC and a power management system (PMS) to power a batteryless, wireless sensor. A SMFC operating with a microbial anode and cathode, located in the Palouse River, Pullman, Washington, U.S.A., was used to demonstrate the utility of the developed system. The designed PMS stored microbial energy and then started powering the wireless sensor when the SMFC potential reached 320 mV. It continued powering until the SMFC potential dropped below 52 mV. The system was repowered when the SMFC potential increased to 320 mV, and this repowering continued as long as microbial reactions continued. We demonstrated that a microbial fuel cell with a microbial anode and cathode can be used as an effective renewable power source for remote monitoring using custom-designed electronics.

  16. Protozoan grazing reduces the current output of microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Holmes, Dawn E; Nevin, Kelly P; Snoeyenbos-West, Oona L; Woodard, Trevor L; Strickland, Justin N; Lovley, Derek R

    2015-10-01

    Several experiments were conducted to determine whether protozoan grazing can reduce current output from sediment microbial fuel cells. When marine sediments were amended with eukaryotic inhibitors, the power output from the fuel cells increased 2-5-fold. Quantitative PCR showed that Geobacteraceae sequences were 120 times more abundant on anodes from treated fuel cells compared to untreated fuel cells, and that Spirotrichea sequences in untreated fuel cells were 200 times more abundant on anode surfaces than in the surrounding sediments. Defined studies with current-producing biofilms of Geobacter sulfurreducens and pure cultures of protozoa demonstrated that protozoa that were effective in consuming G. sulfurreducens reduced current production up to 91% when added to G. sulfurreducens fuel cells. These results suggest that anode biofilms are an attractive food source for protozoa and that protozoan grazing can be an important factor limiting the current output of sediment microbial fuel cells.

  17. Functionally Stable and Phylogenetically Diverse Microbial Enrichments from Microbial Fuel Cells during Wastewater Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Ishii, Shun'ichi; Suzuki, Shino; Norden-Krichmar, Trina M.; Nealson, Kenneth H.; Sekiguchi, Yuji; Gorby, Yuri A.; Bretschger, Orianna

    2012-01-01

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) are devices that exploit microorganisms as biocatalysts to recover energy from organic matter in the form of electricity. One of the goals of MFC research is to develop the technology for cost-effective wastewater treatment. However, before practical MFC applications are implemented it is important to gain fundamental knowledge about long-term system performance, reproducibility, and the formation and maintenance of functionally-stable microbial communities. Here we report findings from a MFC operated for over 300 days using only primary clarifier effluent collected from a municipal wastewater treatment plant as the microbial resource and substrate. The system was operated in a repeat-batch mode, where the reactor solution was replaced once every two weeks with new primary effluent that consisted of different microbial and chemical compositions with every batch exchange. The turbidity of the primary clarifier effluent solution notably decreased, and 97% of biological oxygen demand (BOD) was removed after an 8–13 day residence time for each batch cycle. On average, the limiting current density was 1000 mA/m2, the maximum power density was 13 mW/m2, and coulombic efficiency was 25%. Interestingly, the electrochemical performance and BOD removal rates were very reproducible throughout MFC operation regardless of the sample variability associated with each wastewater exchange. While MFC performance was very reproducible, the phylogenetic analyses of anode-associated electricity-generating biofilms showed that the microbial populations temporally fluctuated and maintained a high biodiversity throughout the year-long experiment. These results suggest that MFC communities are both self-selecting and self-optimizing, thereby able to develop and maintain functional stability regardless of fluctuations in carbon source(s) and regular introduction of microbial competitors. These results contribute significantly toward the practical application of

  18. Evolutionary engineering of Saccharomyces cerevisiae for efficient aerobic xylose consumption.

    PubMed

    Scalcinati, Gionata; Otero, José Manuel; Van Vleet, Jennifer R H; Jeffries, Thomas W; Olsson, Lisbeth; Nielsen, Jens

    2012-08-01

    Industrial biotechnology aims to develop robust microbial cell factories, such as Saccharomyces cerevisiae, to produce an array of added value chemicals presently dominated by petrochemical processes. Xylose is the second most abundant monosaccharide after glucose and the most prevalent pentose sugar found in lignocelluloses. Significant research efforts have focused on the metabolic engineering of S. cerevisiae for fast and efficient xylose utilization. This study aims to metabolically engineer S. cerevisiae, such that it can consume xylose as the exclusive substrate while maximizing carbon flux to biomass production. Such a platform may then be enhanced with complementary metabolic engineering strategies that couple biomass production with high value-added chemical. Saccharomyces cerevisiae, expressing xylose reductase, xylitol dehydrogenase and xylulose kinase, from the native xylose-metabolizing yeast Pichia stipitis, was constructed, followed by a directed evolution strategy to improve xylose utilization rates. The resulting S. cerevisiae strain was capable of rapid growth and fast xylose consumption producing only biomass and negligible amount of byproducts. Transcriptional profiling of this strain was employed to further elucidate the observed physiology confirms a strongly up-regulated glyoxylate pathway enabling respiratory metabolism. The resulting strain is a desirable platform for the industrial production of biomass-related products using xylose as a sole carbon source. PMID:22487265

  19. Methods for understanding microbial community structures and functions in microbial fuel cells: a review.

    PubMed

    Zhi, Wei; Ge, Zheng; He, Zhen; Zhang, Husen

    2014-11-01

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) employ microorganisms to recover electric energy from organic matter. However, fundamental knowledge of electrochemically active bacteria is still required to maximize MFCs power output for practical applications. This review presents microbiological and electrochemical techniques to help researchers choose the appropriate methods for the MFCs study. Pre-genomic and genomic techniques such as 16S rRNA based phylogeny and metagenomics have provided important information in the structure and genetic potential of electrode-colonizing microbial communities. Post-genomic techniques such as metatranscriptomics allow functional characterizations of electrode biofilm communities by quantifying gene expression levels. Isotope-assisted phylogenetic analysis can further link taxonomic information to microbial metabolisms. A combination of electrochemical, phylogenetic, metagenomic, and post-metagenomic techniques offers opportunities to a better understanding of the extracellular electron transfer process, which in turn can lead to process optimization for power output.

  20. Microbially-reduced graphene scaffolds to facilitate extracellular electron transfer in microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Yong; Zhou, Shungui; Zhao, Bo; Zhuang, Li; Wang, Yueqiang

    2012-07-01

    A one-pot method is exploited by adding graphene oxide (GO) and acetate into an microbial fuel cell (MFC) in which GO is microbially reduced, leading to in situ construction of a bacteria/graphene network in the anode. The obtained microbially reduced graphene (MRG) exhibits comparable conductivity and physical characteristics to the chemically reduced graphene. Electrochemical measurements reveal that the number of exoelectrogens involved in extracellular electron transfer (EET) to the solid electrode, increases due to the presence of graphene scaffolds, and the EET is facilitated in terms of electron transfer kinetics. As a result, the maximum power density of the MFC is enhanced by 32% (from 1440 to 1905 mW m(-2)) and the coulombic efficiency is improved by 80% (from 30 to 54%). The results demonstrate that the construction of the bacteria/graphene network is an effective alternative to improve the MFC performance.

  1. Simultaneous microbial and electrochemical reductions of vanadium (V) with bioelectricity generation in microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Baogang; Tian, Caixing; Liu, Ying; Hao, Liting; Liu, Ye; Feng, Chuanping; Liu, Yuqian; Wang, Zhongli

    2015-03-01

    Simultaneous microbial and electrochemical reductions of vanadium (V) with bioelectricity generation were realized in microbial fuel cells (MFCs). With initial V(V) concentrations of 75 mg/l and 150 mg/l in anolyte and catholyte, respectively, stable power output of 419±11 mW/m(2) was achieved. After 12h operation, V(V) concentration in the catholyte decreased to the value similar to that of the initial one in the anolyte, meanwhile it was nearly reduced completely in the anolyte. V(IV) was the main reduction product, which subsequently precipitated, acquiring total vanadium removal efficiencies of 76.8±2.9%. Microbial community analysis revealed the emergence of the new species of Deltaproteobacteria and Bacteroidetes as well as the enhanced Spirochaetes mainly functioned in the anode. This study opens new pathways to successful remediation of vanadium contamination.

  2. Recognition of Microbial Glycolipids by Natural Killer T Cells.

    PubMed

    Zajonc, Dirk M; Girardi, Enrico

    2015-01-01

    T cells can recognize microbial antigens when presented by dedicated antigen-presenting molecules. While peptides are presented by classical members of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) family (MHC I and II), lipids, glycolipids, and lipopeptides can be presented by the non-classical MHC member, CD1. The best studied subset of lipid-reactive T cells are type I natural killer T (iNKT) cells that recognize a variety of different antigens when presented by the non-classical MHCI homolog CD1d. iNKT cells have been shown to be important for the protection against various microbial pathogens, including B. burgdorferi, the causative agents of Lyme disease, and S. pneumoniae, which causes pneumococcal meningitis and community-acquired pneumonia. Both pathogens carry microbial glycolipids that can trigger the T cell antigen receptor (TCR), leading to iNKT cell activation. iNKT cells have an evolutionary conserved TCR alpha chain, yet retain the ability to recognize structurally diverse glycolipids. They do so using a conserved recognition mode, in which the TCR enforces a conserved binding orientation on CD1d. TCR binding is accompanied by structural changes within the TCR binding site of CD1d, as well as the glycolipid antigen itself. In addition to direct recognition of microbial antigens, iNKT cells can also be activated by a combination of cytokines (IL-12/IL-18) and TCR stimulation. Many microbes carry TLR antigens, and microbial infections can lead to TLR activation. The subsequent cytokine response in turn lower the threshold of TCR-mediated iNKT cell activation, especially when weak microbial or even self-antigens are presented during the cause of the infection. In summary, iNKT cells can be directly activated through TCR triggering of strong antigens, while cytokines produced by the innate immune response may be necessary for TCR triggering and iNKT cell activation in the presence of weak antigens. Here, we will review the molecular basis of iNKT cell

  3. Recognition of Microbial Glycolipids by Natural Killer T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zajonc, Dirk M.; Girardi, Enrico

    2015-01-01

    T cells can recognize microbial antigens when presented by dedicated antigen-presenting molecules. While peptides are presented by classical members of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) family (MHC I and II), lipids, glycolipids, and lipopeptides can be presented by the non-classical MHC member, CD1. The best studied subset of lipid-reactive T cells are type I natural killer T (iNKT) cells that recognize a variety of different antigens when presented by the non-classical MHCI homolog CD1d. iNKT cells have been shown to be important for the protection against various microbial pathogens, including B. burgdorferi, the causative agents of Lyme disease, and S. pneumoniae, which causes pneumococcal meningitis and community-acquired pneumonia. Both pathogens carry microbial glycolipids that can trigger the T cell antigen receptor (TCR), leading to iNKT cell activation. iNKT cells have an evolutionary conserved TCR alpha chain, yet retain the ability to recognize structurally diverse glycolipids. They do so using a conserved recognition mode, in which the TCR enforces a conserved binding orientation on CD1d. TCR binding is accompanied by structural changes within the TCR binding site of CD1d, as well as the glycolipid antigen itself. In addition to direct recognition of microbial antigens, iNKT cells can also be activated by a combination of cytokines (IL-12/IL-18) and TCR stimulation. Many microbes carry TLR antigens, and microbial infections can lead to TLR activation. The subsequent cytokine response in turn lower the threshold of TCR-mediated iNKT cell activation, especially when weak microbial or even self-antigens are presented during the cause of the infection. In summary, iNKT cells can be directly activated through TCR triggering of strong antigens, while cytokines produced by the innate immune response may be necessary for TCR triggering and iNKT cell activation in the presence of weak antigens. Here, we will review the molecular basis of iNKT cell

  4. Bioethanol production from mixed sugars by Scheffersomyces stipitis free and immobilized cells, and co-cultures with Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    De Bari, Isabella; De Canio, Paola; Cuna, Daniela; Liuzzi, Federico; Capece, Angela; Romano, Patrizia

    2013-09-25

    Bioethanol can be produced from several biomasses including lignocellulosic materials. Besides 6-carbon sugars that represent the prevalent carbohydrates, some of these feedstocks contain significant amounts of 5-carbon sugars. One common limit of the major part of the xylose-fermenting yeasts is the diauxic shift between the uptake of glucose and xylose during the fermentation of mixed syrups. Thus, optimized fermentation strategies are required. In this paper the ability of Scheffersomyces stipitis strain NRRLY-11544 to ferment mixed syrups with a total sugar concentration in the range 40-80 g/L was investigated by using mono cultures, co-cultures with Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain Bakers Yeast Type II and single cultures immobilized in silica-hydrogel films. The experimental design for the fermentations with immobilized cells included the process analysis in function of two parameters: the fraction of the gel in the broth and the concentration of the cells loaded in the gel. Furthermore, for each total sugars level, the fermentative course of S. stipitis was analyzed at several glucose-to xylose ratios. The results indicated that the use of S. stipitis and S. cerevisiae in free co-cultures ensured faster processes than single cultures of S. stipitis either free or immobilized. However, the rapid production of ethanol by S. cerevisiae inhibited S. stipitis and caused a stuck of the process. Immobilization of S. stipitis in silica-hydrogel increased the relative consumption rate of xylose-to-glucose by 2-6 times depending on the composition of the fermentation medium. Furthermore the films performances appeared stable over three weeks of continuous operations. However, on the whole, the final process yields obtained with the immobilized cells were not meaningfully different from that of the free cells. This was probably due to concurrent fermentations operated by the cells released in the broth. Optimization of the carrier characteristics could improve the

  5. Differential Flo8p-dependent regulation of FLO1 and FLO11 for cell-cell and cell-substrate adherence of S. cerevisiae S288c.

    PubMed

    Fichtner, Lars; Schulze, Florian; Braus, Gerhard H

    2007-12-01

    Cell-cell and cell-surface adherence represents initial steps in forming multicellular aggregates or in establishing cell-surface interactions. The commonly used Saccharomyces cerevisiae laboratory strain S288c carries a flo8 mutation, and is only able to express the flocculin-encoding genes FLO1 and FLO11, when FLO8 is restored. We show here that the two flocculin genes exhibit differences in regulation to execute distinct functions under various environmental conditions. In contrast to the laboratory strain Sigma1278b, haploids of the S288c genetic background require FLO1 for cell-cell and cell-substrate adhesion, whereas FLO11 is required for pseudohyphae formation of diploids. In contrast to FLO11, FLO1 repression requires the Sin4p mediator tail component, but is independent of the repressor Sfl1p. FLO1 regulation also differs from FLO11, because it requires neither the KSS1 MAP kinase cascade nor the pathways which lead to the transcription factors Gcn4p or Msn1p. The protein kinase A pathway and the transcription factors Flo8p and Mss11p are the major regulators for FLO1 expression. Therefore, S. cerevisiae is prepared to simultaneously express two genes of its otherwise silenced FLO reservoir resulting in an appropriate cellular surface for different environments. PMID:18001350

  6. Trehalose reserve in Saccharomyces cerevisiae: phenomenon of transport, accumulation and role in cell viability.

    PubMed

    Plourde-Owobi, L; Durner, S; Goma, G; François, J

    2000-04-10

    Strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae deleted for TPS1 encoding trehalose-6-phosphate synthase still accumulate trehalose when harbouring a functional MAL locus. We demonstrate that this accumulation results from an active uptake of trehalose present in the 'yeast extract' used to make the enriched culture media and that no accumulation is observed in mineral media. The uptake of trehalose was shown to be mediated by the alpha-glucoside transporter encoded by AGT1, the expression of which is linked to the presence of a functional MAL locus. Deletion of this gene in a MAL+ tps1 mutant abolished trehalose accumulation on a maltose or galactose mineral medium. However, small amounts of disaccharide were still detected in a agt1 tps1 double mutant when the medium was supplemented with 10 g trehalose l(-1), indicating the existence of a non-concentrative low-affinity sugar transporter. The presence of the high-affinity trehalose permease allowed us to investigate the effect of increasing exogenous trehalose from 0 to 10 g(-1) on intracellular accumulation. A maximum of ca. 10% (wt/wt dry cells) trehalose was attained in the presence of only 1 g l(-1) of disaccharide in the medium. The capability to monitor the intracellular content of trehalose by varying its extracellular concentration, independent of genetic alterations of the trehalose metabolic machinery, allowed the remarkable contribution of this molecule in stress tolerance to be demonstrated, as the higher the trehalose content, the longer the cell survival to a severe heat shock and to glucose starvation.

  7. Proximity effect among cellulose-degrading enzymes displayed on the Saccharomyces cerevisiae cell surface.

    PubMed

    Bae, Jungu; Kuroda, Kouichi; Ueda, Mitsuyoshi

    2015-01-01

    Proximity effect is a form of synergistic effect exhibited when cellulases work within a short distance from each other, and this effect can be a key factor in enhancing saccharification efficiency. In this study, we evaluated the proximity effect between 3 cellulose-degrading enzymes displayed on the Saccharomyces cerevisiae cell surface, that is, endoglucanase, cellobiohydrolase, and β-glucosidase. We constructed 2 kinds of arming yeasts through genome integration: ALL-yeast, which simultaneously displayed the 3 cellulases (thus, the different cellulases were near each other), and MIX-yeast, a mixture of 3 kinds of single-cellulase-displaying yeasts (the cellulases were far apart). The cellulases were tagged with a fluorescence protein or polypeptide to visualize and quantify their display. To evaluate the proximity effect, we compared the activities of ALL-yeast and MIX-yeast with respect to degrading phosphoric acid-swollen cellulose after adjusting for the cellulase amounts. ALL-yeast exhibited 1.25-fold or 2.22-fold higher activity than MIX-yeast did at a yeast concentration equal to the yeast cell number in 1 ml of yeast suspension with an optical density (OD) at 600 nm of 10 (OD10) or OD0.1. At OD0.1, the distance between the 3 cellulases was greater than that at OD10 in MIX-yeast, but the distance remained the same in ALL-yeast; thus, the difference between the cellulose-degrading activities of ALL-yeast and MIX-yeast increased (to 2.22-fold) at OD0.1, which strongly supports the proximity effect between the displayed cellulases. A proximity effect was also observed for crystalline cellulose (Avicel). We expect the proximity effect to further increase when enzyme display efficiency is enhanced, which would further increase cellulose-degrading activity. This arming yeast technology can also be applied to examine proximity effects in other diverse fields.

  8. CD1-Restricted T Cell Recognition of Microbial Lipoglycan Antigens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sieling, P. A.; Chatterjee, D.; Porcelli, S. A.; Prigozy, T. I.; Mazzaccaro, R. J.; Soriano, T.; Bloom, B. R.; Brenner, M. B.; Kronenberg, M.; Brennan, P. J.; Modlin, R. L.

    1995-07-01

    It has long been the paradigm that T cells recognize peptide antigens presented by major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules. However, nonpeptide antigens can be presented to T cells by human CD1b molecules, which are not encoded by the MHC. A major class of microbial antigens associated with pathogenicity are lipoglycans. It is shown here that human CD1b presents the defined mycobacterial lipoglycan lipoarabinomannan (LAM) to αβ T cell receptor-bearing lymphocytes. Presentation of these lipoglycan antigens required internalization and endosomal acidification. The T cell recognition required mannosides with α(1-->2) linkages and a phosphatidylinositol unit. T cells activated by LAM produced interferon γ and were cytolytic. Thus, an important class of microbial molecules, the lipoglycans, is a part of the universe of foreign antigens recognized by human T cells.

  9. Tomato QM-Like Protein Protects Saccharomyces cerevisiae Cells against Oxidative Stress by Regulating Intracellular Proline Levels

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Changbin; Wanduragala, Srimevan; Becker, Donald F.; Dickman, Martin B.

    2006-01-01

    Exogenous proline can protect cells of Saccharomyces cerevisiae from oxidative stress. We altered intracellular proline levels by overexpressing the proline dehydrogenase gene (PUT1) of S. cerevisiae. Put1p performs the first enzymatic step of proline degradation in S. cerevisiae. Overexpression of Put1p results in low proline levels and hypersensitivity to oxidants, such as hydrogen peroxide and paraquat. A put1-disrupted yeast mutant deficient in Put1p activity has increased protection from oxidative stress and increased proline levels. Following a conditional life/death screen in yeast, we identified a tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum) gene encoding a QM-like protein (tQM) and found that stable expression of tQM in the Put1p-overexpressing strain conferred protection against oxidative damage from H2O2, paraquat, and heat. This protection was correlated with reactive oxygen species (ROS) reduction and increased proline accumulation. A yeast two-hybrid system assay was used to show that tQM physically interacts with Put1p in yeast, suggesting that tQM is directly involved in modulating proline levels. tQM also can rescue yeast from the lethality mediated by the mammalian proapoptotic protein Bax, through the inhibition of ROS generation. Our results suggest that tQM is a component of various stress response pathways and may function in proline-mediated stress tolerance in plants. PMID:16751508

  10. Cell Surface Display of Four Types of Solanum nigrum Metallothionein on Saccharomyces cerevisiae for Biosorption of Cadmium.

    PubMed

    Wei, Qinguo; Zhang, Honghai; Guo, Dongge; Ma, Shisheng

    2016-05-28

    We displayed four types of Solanum nigrum metallothionein (SMT) for the first time on the surface of Saccharomyces cerevisiae using an α-agglutinin-based display system. The SMT genes were amplified by RT-PCR. The plasmid pYES2 was used to construct the expression vector. Transformed yeast strains were confirmed by PCR amplification and custom sequencing. Surface-expressed metallothioneins were indirectly indicated by the enhanced cadmium sorption capacity. Flame atomic absorption spectrophotometry was used to examine the concentration of Cd(2+) in this study. The transformed yeast strains showed much higher resistance ability to Cd(2+) compared with the control. Strikingly, their Cd(2+) accumulation was almost twice as much as that of the wild-type yeast cells. Furthermore, surface-engineered yeast strains could effectively adsorb ultra-trace cadmium and accumulate Cd(2+) under a wide range of pH levels, from 3 to 7, without disturbing the Cu(2+) and Hg(2+). Four types of surfaceengineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains were constructed and they could be used to purify Cd(2+)-contaminated water and adsorb ultra-trace cadmium effectively. The surface-engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains would be useful tools for the bioremediation and biosorption of environmental cadmium contaminants. PMID:26838339

  11. Production Strategies and Applications of Microbial Single Cell Oils

    PubMed Central

    Ochsenreither, Katrin; Glück, Claudia; Stressler, Timo; Fischer, Lutz; Syldatk, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) of the ω-3 and ω-6 class (e.g., α-linolenic acid, linoleic acid) are essential for maintaining biofunctions in mammalians like humans. Due to the fact that humans cannot synthesize these essential fatty acids, they must be taken up from different food sources. Classical sources for these fatty acids are porcine liver and fish oil. However, microbial lipids or single cell oils, produced by oleaginous microorganisms such as algae, fungi and bacteria, are a promising source as well. These single cell oils can be used for many valuable chemicals with applications not only for nutrition but also for fuels and are therefore an ideal basis for a bio-based economy. A crucial point for the establishment of microbial lipids utilization is the cost-effective production and purification of fuels or products of higher value. The fermentative production can be realized by submerged (SmF) or solid state fermentation (SSF). The yield and the composition of the obtained microbial lipids depend on the type of fermentation and the particular conditions (e.g., medium, pH-value, temperature, aeration, nitrogen source). From an economical point of view, waste or by-product streams can be used as cheap and renewable carbon and nitrogen sources. In general, downstream processing costs are one of the major obstacles to be solved for full economic efficiency of microbial lipids. For the extraction of lipids from microbial biomass cell disruption is most important, because efficiency of cell disruption directly influences subsequent downstream operations and overall extraction efficiencies. A multitude of cell disruption and lipid extraction methods are available, conventional as well as newly emerging methods, which will be described and discussed in terms of large scale applicability, their potential in a modern biorefinery and their influence on product quality. Furthermore, an overview is given about applications of microbial lipids or derived fatty

  12. Enhanced product formation in continuous fermentations with microbial cell recycle

    SciTech Connect

    Bull, D.N.; Young, M.D.

    1981-02-01

    The effect of partial recycle of microbial cells on the operation of a chemostat has been investigated for two fermentations. Stable steady states with and without partial cell recycle were obtained for the conversion of d-sorbitol to L-sorbose by Gluconobacter oxydans subsp. suboxydans 1916B and for the conversion of glucose to 2-ketogluconic acid by Serratia marcescens NRRl B-486. The employment of partial cell recycle dramatically increased product formation rates for both fermentations.

  13. Recent advances in microbial single cell genomics technology and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepanauskas, R.

    2015-12-01

    Single cell genomics is increasingly utilized as a powerful tool to decipher the metabolic potential, evolutionary histories and in situ interactions of environmental microorganisms. I will present several new developments of this exciting technology, which improve genomic data recovery from individual cells and allow its integration with cell's phenotypic properties. I will also demonstrate how these new technical capabilities help understanding the biology of the "microbial dark matter" inhabiting marine and terrestrial subsurface environments.

  14. Anodic microbial community diversity as a predictor of the power output of microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Stratford, James P; Beecroft, Nelli J; Slade, Robert C T; Grüning, André; Avignone-Rossa, Claudio

    2014-03-01

    The relationship between the diversity of mixed-species microbial consortia and their electrogenic potential in the anodes of microbial fuel cells was examined using different diversity measures as predictors. Identical microbial fuel cells were sampled at multiple time-points. Biofilm and suspension communities were analysed by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis to calculate the number and relative abundance of species. Shannon and Simpson indices and richness were examined for association with power using bivariate and multiple linear regression, with biofilm DNA as an additional variable. In simple bivariate regressions, the correlation of Shannon diversity of the biofilm and power is stronger (r=0.65, p=0.001) than between power and richness (r=0.39, p=0.076), or between power and the Simpson index (r=0.5, p=0.018). Using Shannon diversity and biofilm DNA as predictors of power, a regression model can be constructed (r=0.73, p<0.001). Ecological parameters such as the Shannon index are predictive of the electrogenic potential of microbial communities.

  15. Identification of the essential EPE1 gene involved in retention of secreted proteins on the cell surface of Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells.

    PubMed

    Alexieva, K I; Klis, F; Wedler, H; Wambutt, R; Venkov, P

    1999-09-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast cells secrete extracellularly low amounts of a few proteins. The reasons for retardation of secreted proteins on the cell surface remain obscure. We describe here a mutant able to export enhanced amount of proteins. Classical genetic methods, nucleic acids manipulations and cloning procedures were used to isolate and characterize the mutant and to clone and sequence the corresponding wild type gene. The isolated Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutant MW11, is temperature sensitive and exports on average twenty-fold more proteins at 37 degrees C than parental wild type strain (80 micrograms of proteins/1 x 10(8) mutant cells, SEM +/- 5, n22; versus 3 micrograms of proteins/1 x 10(8) parental cells, SEM +/- 1, n22). Protein overexport in the mutant requires a functional SEC1 pathway and is independent of cell lysis. Cloning and sequencing of the corresponding wild type gene identified an open reading frame of 786 bp coding for a hydrophilic protein with predicted molecular mass of 30 kDa and cytosolic localization. The newly identified gene, designated EPE1, is an essential gene. Its DNA and amino acids sequence showed no homology with other yeast genes and proteins. It is concluded that the function of unknown yet genes, such as EPE1 is needed for retention of secreted proteins on the surface of Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells.

  16. Segregation of the Anodic Microbial Communities in a Microbial Fuel Cell Cascade.

    PubMed

    Hodgson, Douglas M; Smith, Ann; Dahale, Sonal; Stratford, James P; Li, Jia V; Grüning, André; Bushell, Michael E; Marchesi, Julian R; Avignone Rossa, C

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic interactions within microbial communities are essential for the efficient degradation of complex organic compounds, and underpin natural phenomena driven by microorganisms, such as the recycling of carbon-, nitrogen-, and sulfur-containing molecules. These metabolic interactions ultimately determine the function, activity and stability of the community, and therefore their understanding would be essential to steer processes where microbial communities are involved. This is exploited in the design of microbial fuel cells (MFCs), bioelectrochemical devices that convert the chemical energy present in substrates into electrical energy through the metabolic activity of microorganisms, either single species or communities. In this work, we analyzed the evolution of the microbial community structure in a cascade of MFCs inoculated with an anaerobic microbial community and continuously fed with a complex medium. The analysis of the composition of the anodic communities revealed the establishment of different communities in the anodes of the hydraulically connected MFCs, with a decrease in the abundance of fermentative taxa and a concurrent increase in respiratory taxa along the cascade. The analysis of the metabolites in the anodic suspension showed a metabolic shift between the first and last MFC, confirming the segregation of the anodic communities. Those results suggest a metabolic interaction mechanism between the predominant fermentative bacteria at the first stages of the cascade and the anaerobic respiratory electrogenic population in the latter stages, which is reflected in the observed increase in power output. We show that our experimental system represents an ideal platform for optimization of processes where the degradation of complex substrates is involved, as well as a potential tool for the study of metabolic interactions in complex microbial communities.

  17. Segregation of the Anodic Microbial Communities in a Microbial Fuel Cell Cascade

    PubMed Central

    Hodgson, Douglas M.; Smith, Ann; Dahale, Sonal; Stratford, James P.; Li, Jia V.; Grüning, André; Bushell, Michael E.; Marchesi, Julian R.; Avignone Rossa, C.

    2016-01-01

    Metabolic interactions within microbial communities are essential for the efficient degradation of complex organic compounds, and underpin natural phenomena driven by microorganisms, such as the recycling of carbon-, nitrogen-, and sulfur-containing molecules. These metabolic interactions ultimately determine the function, activity and stability of the community, and therefore their understanding would be essential to steer processes where microbial communities are involved. This is exploited in the design of microbial fuel cells (MFCs), bioelectrochemical devices that convert the chemical energy present in substrates into electrical energy through the metabolic activity of microorganisms, either single species or communities. In this work, we analyzed the evolution of the microbial community structure in a cascade of MFCs inoculated with an anaerobic microbial community and continuously fed with a complex medium. The analysis of the composition of the anodic communities revealed the establishment of different communities in the anodes of the hydraulically connected MFCs, with a decrease in the abundance of fermentative taxa and a concurrent increase in respiratory taxa along the cascade. The analysis of the metabolites in the anodic suspension showed a metabolic shift between the first and last MFC, confirming the segregation of the anodic communities. Those results suggest a metabolic interaction mechanism between the predominant fermentative bacteria at the first stages of the cascade and the anaerobic respiratory electrogenic population in the latter stages, which is reflected in the observed increase in power output. We show that our experimental system represents an ideal platform for optimization of processes where the degradation of complex substrates is involved, as well as a potential tool for the study of metabolic interactions in complex microbial communities. PMID:27242723

  18. Specific features of changes in levels of endogenous respiration substrates in Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells at low temperature.

    PubMed

    Aliverdieva, D A; Mamaev, D V; Lagutina, L S; Sholtz, K F

    2006-01-01

    The rate of endogenous respiration of Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells incubated at 0 degrees C under aerobic conditions in the absence of exogenous substrates decreased exponentially with a half-period of about 5 h when measured at 30 degrees C. This was associated with an indirectly shown decrease in the level of oxaloacetate in the mitochondria in situ. The initial concentration of oxaloacetate significantly decreased the activity of succinate dehydrogenase. The rate of cell respiration in the presence of acetate and other exogenous substrates producing acetyl-CoA in mitochondria also decreased, whereas the respiration rate on succinate increased. These changes were accompanied by an at least threefold increase in the L-malate concentration in the cells within 24 h. It is suggested that the increase in the L-malate level in the cells and the concurrent decrease in the oxaloacetate level in the mitochondria should be associated with a deceleration at 0 degrees C of the transport of endogenous respiration substrates from the cytosol into the mitochondria. This deceleration is likely to be caused by a high Arrhenius activation energy specific for transporters. The physiological significance of L-malate in regulation of the S. cerevisiae cell respiration is discussed.

  19. The Microbial Fuel Cell as an Education Tool

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dewan, Alim; Van Wie, Bernard; Beyenal, Haluk; Lewandowski, Zbigniew

    2010-01-01

    Many chemical engineering programs offer courses from a variety of disciplines to teach their students multidisciplinary concepts, but often these courses lack appropriate tools for linking newly learned concepts to principles learned in the core courses. This paper describes our experience of incorporating a microbial fuel cell education module…

  20. Oxygen - Enemy or Friend for Microbial Fuel Cell Anode Performance?

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Until recently, scientists and engineers have held a strong belief that oxygen intrusion into the anode chamber of a bioelectrochemical system (BES) is detrimental to microbial fuel cell (MFC) performance because oxygen acts as an alternate electron acceptor. This would, according to recent beliefs...

  1. Microbial Fuel Cell Performance with a Pressurized Cathode Chamber

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Microbial fuel cell (MFC) power densities are often constrained by the oxygen reduction reaction rate on the cathode electrode. One important factor for this is the normally low solubility of oxygen in the aqueous cathode solution creating mass transport limitations, which hinder oxygen reduction a...

  2. Multi-omics data driven analysis establishes reference codon biases for synthetic gene design in microbial and mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Ang, Kok Siong; Kyriakopoulos, Sarantos; Li, Wei; Lee, Dong-Yup

    2016-06-01

    In this study, we analyzed multi-omics data and subsets thereof to establish reference codon usage biases for codon optimization in synthetic gene design. Specifically, publicly available genomic, transcriptomic, proteomic and translatomic data for microbial and mammalian expression hosts, Escherichia coli, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Pichia pastoris and Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells, were compiled to derive their individual codon and codon pair frequencies. Then, host dependent and -omics specific codon biases were generated and compared by principal component analysis and hierarchical clustering. Interestingly, our results indicated the similar codon bias patterns of the highly expressed transcripts, highly abundant proteins, and efficiently translated mRNA in microbial cells, despite the general lack of correlation between mRNA and protein expression levels. However, for CHO cells, the codon bias patterns among various -omics subsets are not distinguishable, forming one cluster. Thus, we further investigated the effect of different input codon biases on codon optimized sequences using the codon context (CC) and individual codon usage (ICU) design parameters, via in silico case study on the expression of human IFNγ sequence in CHO cells. The results supported that CC is more robust design parameter than ICU for improved heterologous gene design. PMID:26850284

  3. High shear enrichment improves the performance of the anodophilic microbial consortium in a microbial fuel cell

    PubMed Central

    Pham, Hai The; Boon, Nico; Aelterman, Peter; Clauwaert, Peter; De Schamphelaire, Liesje; Van Oostveldt, Patrick; Verbeken, Kim; Rabaey, Korneel; Verstraete, Willy

    2008-01-01

    Summary In many microbial bioreactors, high shear rates result in strong attachment of microbes and dense biofilms. In this study, high shear rates were applied to enrich an anodophilic microbial consortium in a microbial fuel cell (MFC). Enrichment at a shear rate of about 120 s−1 resulted in the production of a current and power output two to three times higher than those in the case of low shear rates (around 0.3 s−1). Biomass and biofilm analyses showed that the anodic biofilm from the MFC enriched under high shear rate conditions, in comparison with that under low shear rate conditions, had a doubled average thickness and the biomass density increased with a factor 5. The microbial community of the former, as analysed by DGGE, was significantly different from that of the latter. The results showed that enrichment by applying high shear rates in an MFC can result in a specific electrochemically active biofilm that is thicker and denser and attaches better, and hence has a better performance. PMID:21261869

  4. Microbial community dynamics in continuous microbial fuel cells fed with synthetic wastewater and pig slurry.

    PubMed

    Sotres, Ana; Tey, Laura; Bonmatí, August; Viñas, Marc

    2016-10-01

    Two-chambered microbial fuel cells (MFCs) operating with synthetic wastewater and pig slurry were assessed. Additionally, the use of 2-bromoethanesulfonate (BES-Inh) was studied. The synthetic wastewater-fed MFC (MFCSW) showed a maximum power density (PDmax) of 2138mWm(-3), and the addition of BES-Inh (10mM) did not show any improvement in its performance (PDmax=2078mWm(-3)). When pig slurry was used as feed (MFCPS), PDmax increased up to 5623mWm(-3). The microbial community composition was affected by the type of substrate used. While, Pseudomonadaceae and Clostridiaceae were the most representative families within the acetate-based medium, Flavobacteriaceae, Chitinophagaceae, Comamonadaceae and Nitrosomonadaceae were predominant when pig slurry was used as feed. Otherwise, only the Eubacterial microbial community composition was strongly modified when adding BES-Inh, thus leading to an enrichment of the Bacteroidetes phylum. Oppositely, the Archaeal community was less affected by the addition of BES-Inh, and Methanosarcina sp., arose as the predominant family in both situations. Despite all the differences in microbial communities, 6 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) belonging to Bacteroidetes (Porphyromonadaceae and Marinilabiaceae) and Firmicutes (Clostridiales) were found to be common to both MFCs, also for different contents of COD and N-NH4(+), and therefore could be considered as the bioanode core microbiome.

  5. Microbial fuel cell treatment of fuel process wastewater

    DOEpatents

    Borole, Abhijeet P; Tsouris, Constantino

    2013-12-03

    The present invention is directed to a method for cleansing fuel processing effluent containing carbonaceous compounds and inorganic salts, the method comprising contacting the fuel processing effluent with an anode of a microbial fuel ell, the anode containing microbes thereon which oxidatively degrade one or more of the carbonaceous compounds while producing electrical energy from the oxidative degradation, and directing the produced electrical energy to drive an electrosorption mechanism that operates to reduce the concentration of one or more inorganic salts in the fuel processing effluent, wherein the anode is in electrical communication with a cathode of the microbial fuel cell. The invention is also directed to an apparatus for practicing the method.

  6. Coastal microbial fuel cell: scaling laws and systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandyopadhyay, Promode R.; McNeilly, Frank J.; Thivierge, Daniel P.; Fredette, Albert R.

    2006-05-01

    Microbes, like Geobacters, have inhabited the seafloors around the world since the early days of earth. Such regions are anaerobic and they gain energy by using the widely prevalent iron oxides and organic matters. Because they appear to colonize conducting surfaces that act as sinks of electrons, microbial fuel cells have been shown to convert organic matter to electricity. A microbial fuel cell system has been deployed in Narragansett Bay in Newport, Rhode Island for a year. Currently, the cathode and anode areas are of the order of that of a small wind mill. Measurements have been carried out to determine the marine scaling laws of power harvesting in passive benthic microbial fuel cells. The focus has been on the ocean engineering aspects such as marine scaling laws and the integration of the biochemical and the electronic systems. The characteristics examined are: the relationship of electrode surface area and power produced, the stabilization rates of ionic paths, that is, the effects of location depth of cathodes on stabilization after deployment, the effects of solar and lunar cycles in the Narragansett Bay on the dynamic components of power produced, and the hysteresis effects between periods of active power harvesting and dormancy; the effects of 'on sediment surface' versus 'in sediment' anode deployment have been examined for smaller electrode areas so far. A capacitance model of power consumption and harvesting has been proposed for the marine environment. It is assumed that the primordial benthic microbe laden layer of the earth acts like a giant capacitor. In the microbial fuel cell, this charged benthic layer acts in series with a smaller constant voltage DC power source. This giant benthic capacitance is a result of untapped accumulated charge from the microbes while the DC source originates from the real-time production due to the microbes. Finally, the microbial fuel cell is integrated with a power conversion system to intermittently energize a

  7. Electricity production and microbial biofilm characterization in cellulose-fed microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Ren, Z; Steinberg, L M; Regan, J M

    2008-01-01

    Converting biodegradable materials into electricity, microbial fuel cells (MFCs) present a promising technology for renewable energy production in specific applications. Unlike typical soluble substrates that have been used as electron donors in MFC studies, cellulose is unique because it requires a microbial consortium that can metabolize both an insoluble electron donor (cellulose) and electron acceptor (electrode). In this study, electricity generation and the microbial ecology of cellulose-fed MFCs were analyzed using a defined co-culture of Clostridium cellulolyticum and Geobacter sulfurreducens. Fluorescent in situ hybridization and quantitative PCR showed that when particulate MN301 cellulose was used as sole substrate, most Clostridium cells were found adhered to cellulose particles in suspension, while most Geobacter cells were attached to the electrode. By comparison, both bacteria resided in suspension and biofilm samples when soluble carboxymethyl cellulose was used. This distinct function-related distribution of the bacteria suggests an opportunity to optimize reactor operation by settling cellulose and decanting supernatant to extend cellulose hydrolysis and improve cellulose-electricity conversion.

  8. Design of acoustic cell settler for filtering and recycling microbial cells.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Sung-Ho; Koo, Yoon-Mo

    2003-02-01

    An acoustic cell settler (ACS) using ultrasound at cells of 3 MHz was used to recycle Saccharomyces cerevisiae in a fermenter. The locations of both the inlet and outlet in the acoustic cell settler, which have a relatively long distance between the transducer and reflector, were optimized. A tilted settler was designed to make up for the defect in the horizontal ACS, which has a low recovery ratio. The tilted ACS gave a recovery ratio of yeast cells of about 5 during the most period of operation, which was twice that of the horizontal ACS. PMID:12882550

  9. Simultaneous Alcoholic and Malolactic Fermentations by Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Oenococcus oeni Cells Co-immobilized in Alginate Beads

    PubMed Central

    Bleve, Gianluca; Tufariello, Maria; Vetrano, Cosimo; Mita, Giovanni; Grieco, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Malolactic fermentation (MLF) usually takes place after the end of alcoholic fermentation (AF). However, the inoculation of lactic acid bacteria together with yeast starter cultures is a promising system to enhance the quality and safety of wine. In recent years, the use of immobilized cell systems has been investigated, with interesting results, for the production of different fermented foods and beverages. In this study we have carried out the simultaneous immobilization of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Oenococcus oeni in alginate beads and used them in microvinifications tests to produce Negroamaro wine. The process was monitored by chemical and sensorial analyses and dominance of starters and cell leaking from beads were also checked. Co-immobilization of S. cerevisiae and O. oeni allowed to perform an efficient fermentation process, producing low volatile acidity levels and ethanol and glycerol concentrations comparable with those obtained by cell sequential inoculum and co-inoculum of yeast and bacteria cells in free form. More importantly, co-immobilization strategy produced a significant decrease of the time requested to complete AF and MLF. The immobilized cells could be efficiently reused for the wine fermentation at least three times without any apparent loss of cell metabolic activities. This integrated biocatalytic system is able to perform simultaneously AF and MLF, producing wines similar in organoleptic traits in comparison with wines fermented following traditional sequential AF and MLF with free cell starters. The immobilized-cell system, that we here describe for the first time in our knowledge, offers many advantages over conventional free cell fermentations, including: (i) elimination of non-productive cell growth phases; (ii) feasibility of continuous processing; (iii) re-use of the biocatalyst. PMID:27379072

  10. Simultaneous Alcoholic and Malolactic Fermentations by Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Oenococcus oeni Cells Co-immobilized in Alginate Beads.

    PubMed

    Bleve, Gianluca; Tufariello, Maria; Vetrano, Cosimo; Mita, Giovanni; Grieco, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Malolactic fermentation (MLF) usually takes place after the end of alcoholic fermentation (AF). However, the inoculation of lactic acid bacteria together with yeast starter cultures is a promising system to enhance the quality and safety of wine. In recent years, the use of immobilized cell systems has been investigated, with interesting results, for the production of different fermented foods and beverages. In this study we have carried out the simultaneous immobilization of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Oenococcus oeni in alginate beads and used them in microvinifications tests to produce Negroamaro wine. The process was monitored by chemical and sensorial analyses and dominance of starters and cell leaking from beads were also checked. Co-immobilization of S. cerevisiae and O. oeni allowed to perform an efficient fermentation process, producing low volatile acidity levels and ethanol and glycerol concentrations comparable with those obtained by cell sequential inoculum and co-inoculum of yeast and bacteria cells in free form. More importantly, co-immobilization strategy produced a significant decrease of the time requested to complete AF and MLF. The immobilized cells could be efficiently reused for the wine fermentation at least three times without any apparent loss of cell metabolic activities. This integrated biocatalytic system is able to perform simultaneously AF and MLF, producing wines similar in organoleptic traits in comparison with wines fermented following traditional sequential AF and MLF with free cell starters. The immobilized-cell system, that we here describe for the first time in our knowledge, offers many advantages over conventional free cell fermentations, including: (i) elimination of non-productive cell growth phases; (ii) feasibility of continuous processing; (iii) re-use of the biocatalyst. PMID:27379072

  11. [Application of microbial fuel cell (MFC) in solid waste composting].

    PubMed

    Cui, Jinxin; Wang, Xin; Tang, Jingchun

    2012-03-01

    Microbial fuel cell (MFC) is a new technology that can recover energy from biomass with simultaneous waste treatment. This technique has been developed fast in recent years in combining with environmental techniques such as wastewater treatment, degradation of toxic pollutants and desalination. With the increase of solid waste, applying MFC in composting is promising due to its property of waste disposal with simultaneous energy generation. In this paper, the microbial community of MFCs during composting was summarized. Four major influencing factors including electrodes, separators, oxygen supplement and configurations on the performance of composting MFCs were discussed. The characteristics of composting MFC as a new technique for reducing solid waste were as follows: high microbial biomass resulted in the high current density; adaptable to different environmental conditions; self-adjustable temperature with high energy efficiency; the transportation of proton from anode to cathode were limited by different solid substrates.

  12. [Microbial fuel cells as an alternative power supply].

    PubMed

    Il'in, V K; Smirnov, I A; Soldatov, P É; Korshunov, D V; Tiurin-Kuz'min, A Iu; Starkova, L V; Chumakov, P E; Emel'ianova, L K; Novikova, L M; Debabov, V G; Voeĭkova, T A

    2012-01-01

    Purpose of the work was designing and prototyping of microbial fuel cells (MFC) and comparative evaluation of the electrogenic activity of wastewater autochthonous microorganisms as well as bacterial monocultures. Objects were model electrogenic strain Shewanella oneidensis MR-1, and an Ochrobactrum sp. strain isolated from the active anode biofilm of MFC composed as an electricity generating system. The study employed the methods typically used for aerobic and anaerobic strains, current measurement, identification of new electrogenic strains in microbial association of wastewater sludge and species definition by rRNA 16-S. As a result, two MFCs prototypes were tried out. Besides, it was shown that electrogenic activity of S. oneidensis MR-1 and Ochrobactrum sp. monocultures is similar but differs from that of the microbial association of the anode biofilm.

  13. Programmed Cell Death and Complexity in Microbial Systems.

    PubMed

    Durand, Pierre M; Sym, Stuart; Michod, Richard E

    2016-07-11

    Programmed cell death (PCD) is central to organism development and for a long time was considered a hallmark of multicellularity. Its discovery, therefore, in unicellular organisms presents compelling questions. Why did PCD evolve? What is its ecological effect on communities? To answer these questions, one is compelled to consider the impacts of PCD beyond the cell, for death obviously lowers the fitness of the cell. Here, we examine the ecological effects of PCD in different microbial scenarios and conclude that PCD can increase biological complexity. In mixed microbial communities, the mode of death affects the microenvironment, impacting the interactions between taxa. Where the population comprises groups of relatives, death has a more explicit effect. Death by lysis or other means can be harmful, while PCD can evolve by providing advantages to relatives. The synchronization of death between individuals suggests a group level property is being maintained and the mode of death also appears to have had an impact during the origin of multicellularity. PCD can result in the export of fitness from the cell to the group level via re-usable resources and PCD may also provide a mechanism for how groups beget new groups comprising kin. Furthermore, PCD is a means for solving a central problem of group living - the toxic effects of death - by making resources in dying cells beneficial to others. What emerges from the data reviewed here is that while PCD carries an obvious cost to the cell, it can be a driver of complexity in microbial communities. PMID:27404254

  14. Interactions of Condensed Tannins with Saccharomyces cerevisiae Yeast Cells and Cell Walls: Tannin Location by Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Mekoue Nguela, Julie; Vernhet, Aude; Sieczkowski, Nathalie; Brillouet, Jean-Marc

    2015-09-01

    Interactions between grape tannins/red wine polyphenols and yeast cells/cell walls was previously studied within the framework of red wine aging and the use of yeast-derived products as an alternative to aging on lees. Results evidenced a quite different behavior between whole cells (biomass grown to elaborate yeast-derived products, inactivated yeast, and yeast inactivated after autolysis) and yeast cell walls (obtained from mechanical disruption of the biomass). Briefly, whole cells exhibited a high capacity to irreversibly adsorb grape and wine tannins, whereas only weak interactions were observed for cell walls. This last point was quite unexpected considering the literature and called into question the real role of cell walls in yeasts' ability to fix tannins. In the present work, tannin location after interactions between grape and wine tannins and yeast cells and cell walls was studied by means of transmission electron microscopy, light epifluorescence, and confocal microscopy. Microscopy observations evidenced that if tannins interact with cell walls, and especially cell wall mannoproteins, they also diffuse freely through the walls of dead cells to interact with their plasma membrane and cytoplasmic components.

  15. Interactions of Condensed Tannins with Saccharomyces cerevisiae Yeast Cells and Cell Walls: Tannin Location by Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Mekoue Nguela, Julie; Vernhet, Aude; Sieczkowski, Nathalie; Brillouet, Jean-Marc

    2015-09-01

    Interactions between grape tannins/red wine polyphenols and yeast cells/cell walls was previously studied within the framework of red wine aging and the use of yeast-derived products as an alternative to aging on lees. Results evidenced a quite different behavior between whole cells (biomass grown to elaborate yeast-derived products, inactivated yeast, and yeast inactivated after autolysis) and yeast cell walls (obtained from mechanical disruption of the biomass). Briefly, whole cells exhibited a high capacity to irreversibly adsorb grape and wine tannins, whereas only weak interactions were observed for cell walls. This last point was quite unexpected considering the literature and called into question the real role of cell walls in yeasts' ability to fix tannins. In the present work, tannin location after interactions between grape and wine tannins and yeast cells and cell walls was studied by means of transmission electron microscopy, light epifluorescence, and confocal microscopy. Microscopy observations evidenced that if tannins interact with cell walls, and especially cell wall mannoproteins, they also diffuse freely through the walls of dead cells to interact with their plasma membrane and cytoplasmic components. PMID:26223789

  16. Efficacy of beer fermentation residue containing Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells for ameliorating aflatoxicosis in broilers.

    PubMed

    Bovo, F; Franco, L T; Kobashigawa, E; Rottinghaus, G E; Ledoux, D R; Oliveira, C A F

    2015-05-01

    This study aimed to determine the aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) binding capacity of a beer fermentation residue (BFR) containing Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells, and the efficacy of BFR to ameliorate the toxic effects of AFB1 on performance, serum biochemistry, and histology of broilers. The BFR was collected from a microbrewery, and the yeast cells were counted, dried, and milled before it was used in the study. In vitro evaluation of the BFR was conducted using different concentrations of AFB1 (2.0, 4.0, 8.0, 16.0, and 32.0 μg AFB1/mL) and 100 mg/10 mL of BFR at pH 3.0 or 6.0. Two hundred 1-day-old male broilers (Ross 308) were assigned to chick batteries and allowed ad libitum access to feed and water. A completely randomized design was used with 5 replicate pens of 5 chicks assigned to each of 4 dietary treatments from hatch to 21 d, which included: 1) basal diet (BD), with no BFR or AFB1; 2) BD supplemented with 1% BFR; 3) BD supplemented with 2 mg AFB1/kg of feed; and 4) BD supplemented with 2 mg AFB1/kg feed and 1% BFR. Performance variables were determined weekly, while serum analyses were performed on d 14 and 21. At the end of the study, chicks were anesthetized with carbon dioxide, euthanized by cervical dislocation, and the kidney, liver, and bursa of Fabricius were removed for determination of relative weights, and for histological evaluation. In vitro assays showed that the higher the initial AFB1 concentration in solution, the greater the AFB1 amount adsorbed by BFR at both pHs tested. Feed intake, BW gain, and concentrations of albumin, total protein, and globulin increased (P < 0.05) in broilers fed BFR+AFB1 (Diet 4), when compared to the birds receiving only AFB1 (Diet 2). Although BFR was not able to reduce or prevent the effects of AFB1 on relative weights of kidneys and liver, it reduced the severity of histological changes in the liver and kidney caused by AFB1.

  17. Autologous transplant: microbial contamination of hematopoietic stem cell products.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Igor Dullius; Schmalfuss, Tissiana; Röhsig, Liane Marise; Goldani, Luciano Zubaran

    2012-01-01

    Hematopoietic progenitor cells from peripheral blood (HPCPB) are commonly used for autologous and allogenic transplants in patients with most various onco-hematological diseases, and despite the utilization of sterile techniques during collection and processing of these products, bacterial contamination can occur. This study aimed to investigate the microbial contamination of HPCPB products. Microbial cultures of 837 HPCPB products between the year 2000 and 2009 were retrospectively analyzed to determine the incidence of culture positivity and identify the main organisms that cause contamination. The microbiological studies were performed with an automated system (BacT/Alert(®) bioMérieux Corporate). Thirty-six (4.3%) of 837 microbial cultures were contaminated. Coagulase-negative Staphylococcus was the most frequent bacteria isolated from HPCPB products (20 [56%] of the 36 positive microbial cultures). Considering the 36 contaminated samples, 22 HPCPB products were infused and 14 discarded. Pre- and post-infusion antibiotic therapy of the patients transfused with contaminated products was established based on the isolated microorganism and its antibiogram. Microbial contamination rate of HPCPB products was low. Clinically significant outcomes after infusion of contaminated HPCPB products were not observed. PMID:22846122

  18. Display of phytase on the cell surface of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to degrade phytate phosphorus and improve bioethanol production.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xianzhong; Xiao, Yan; Shen, Wei; Govender, Algasan; Zhang, Liang; Fan, You; Wang, Zhengxiang

    2016-03-01

    Currently, development of biofuels as an alternative fuel has gained much attention due to resource and environmental challenges. Bioethanol is one of most important and dominant biofuels, and production using corn or cassava as raw materials has become a prominent technology. However, phytate contained in the raw material not only decreases the efficiency of ethanol production, but also leads to an increase in the discharge of phosphorus, thus impacting on the environment. In this study, to decrease phytate and its phosphorus content in an ethanol fermentation process, Saccharomyces cerevisiae was engineered through a surface-displaying system utilizing the C-terminal half of the yeast α-agglutinin protein. The recombinant yeast strain, PHY, was constructed by successfully displaying phytase on the surface of cells, and enzyme activity reached 6.4 U/g wet biomass weight. Ethanol productions using various strains were compared, and the results demonstrated that the specific growth rate and average fermentation rate of the PHY strain were higher 20 and 18 %, respectively, compared to the control strain S. cerevisiae CICIMY0086, in a 5-L bioreactor process by simultaneous saccharification and fermentation. More importantly, the phytate phosphorus concentration decreased by 89.8 % and free phosphorus concentration increased by 142.9 % in dry vinasse compared to the control in a 5-L bioreactor. In summary, we constructed a recombinant S. cerevisiae strain displaying phytase on the cell surface, which could improve ethanol production performance and effectively reduce the discharge of phosphorus. The strain reported here represents a useful novel engineering platform for developing an environment-friendly system for bioethanol production from a corn substrate. PMID:26610799

  19. Decreased cellular permeability to H2O2 protects Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells in stationary phase against oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Sousa-Lopes, A; Antunes, F; Cyrne, L; Marinho, H S

    2004-12-01

    The higher resistance of stationary-phase Saccharomyces cerevisiae to H2O2 when compared with exponential phase is well characterized, but the molecular mechanisms underlying it remain mostly unknown. By applying the steady-state H2O2-delivery model, we show that (a) cellular permeability to H2O2 is five times lower in stationary--than in exponential phase; (b) cell survival to H2O2 correlates with H2O2 cellular gradients for a variety of cells; and, (c) cells in stationary phase are predicted to be more susceptible to intracellular H2O2 than in exponential phase. In conclusion, limiting H2O2 diffusion into cells is a key protective mechanism against extracellular H2O2.

  20. Innate and cytokine-driven signals, rather than microbial antigens, dominate in natural killer T cell activation during microbial infection

    PubMed Central

    Tatituri, Raju V.V.; Watts, Gerald F.M.; Bhowruth, Veemal; Leadbetter, Elizabeth A.; Barton, Nathaniel; Cohen, Nadia R.; Hsu, Fong-Fu; Besra, Gurdyal S.

    2011-01-01

    Invariant natural killer T cells (iNKT cells) are critical for host defense against a variety of microbial pathogens. However, the central question of how iNKT cells are activated by microbes has not been fully explained. The example of adaptive MHC-restricted T cells, studies using synthetic pharmacological α-galactosylceramides, and the recent discovery of microbial iNKT cell ligands have all suggested that recognition of foreign lipid antigens is the main driver for iNKT cell activation during infection. However, when we compared the role of microbial antigens versus innate cytokine-driven mechanisms, we found that iNKT cell interferon-γ production after in vitro stimulation or infection with diverse bacteria overwhelmingly depended on toll-like receptor–driven IL-12. Importantly, activation of iNKT cells in vivo during infection with Sphingomonas yanoikuyae or Streptococcus pneumoniae, pathogens which are known to express iNKT cell antigens and which require iNKT cells for effective protection, also predominantly depended on IL-12. Constitutive expression of high levels of IL-12 receptor by iNKT cells enabled instant IL-12–induced STAT4 activation, demonstrating that among T cells, iNKT cells are uniquely equipped for immediate, cytokine-driven activation. These findings reveal that innate and cytokine-driven signals, rather than cognate microbial antigen, dominate in iNKT cell activation during microbial infections. PMID:21555485

  1. Development of microbial cell factories for bio-refinery through synthetic bioengineering.

    PubMed

    Kondo, Akihiko; Ishii, Jun; Hara, Kiyotaka Y; Hasunuma, Tomohisa; Matsuda, Fumio

    2013-01-20

    Synthetic bioengineering is a strategy for developing useful microbial strains with innovative biological functions. Novel functions are designed and synthesized in host microbes with the aid of advanced technologies for computer simulations of cellular processes and the system-wide manipulation of host genomes. Here, we review the current status and future prospects of synthetic bioengineering in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae for bio-refinery processes to produce various commodity chemicals from lignocellulosic biomass. Previous studies to improve assimilation of xylose and production of glutathione and butanol suggest a fixed pattern of problems that need to be solved, and as a crucial step, we now need to identify promising targets for further engineering of yeast metabolism. Metabolic simulation, transcriptomics, and metabolomics are useful emerging technologies for achieving this goal, making it possible to optimize metabolic pathways. Furthermore, novel genes responsible for target production can be found by analyzing large-scale data. Fine-tuning of enzyme activities is essential in the latter stage of strain development, but it requires detailed modeling of yeast metabolic functions. Recombinant technologies and genetic engineering are crucial for implementing metabolic designs into microbes. In addition to conventional gene manipulation techniques, advanced methods, such as multicistronic expression systems, marker-recycle gene deletion, protein engineering, cell surface display, genome editing, and synthesis of very long DNA fragments, will facilitate advances in synthetic bioengineering. PMID:22728424

  2. Microbial fuel cell (MFC) for bioelectricity generation from organic wastes.

    PubMed

    Moqsud, M Azizul; Omine, Kiyoshi; Yasufuku, Noriyuki; Hyodo, Masayuki; Nakata, Yukio

    2013-11-01

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) have gained a lot of attention recently as a mode of converting organic matter into electricity. In this study, a compost-based microbial fuel cell that generates bioelectricity by biodegradation of organic matter is developed. Grass cuttings, along with leaf mold, rice bran, oil cake (from mustard plants) and chicken droppings (waste from chickens) were used as organic waste. The electric properties of the MFC under anaerobic fermentation condition were investigated along with the influence of different types of membranes, the mixing of fly ash, and different types of electrode materials. It is observed that the maximum voltage was increased by mixing fly ash. Cellophane showed the highest value of voltage (around 350mV). Bamboo charcoal is good for anode material; however carbon fiber is better for the cathode material in terms of optimization of power generated. This developed MFC is a simple cell to generate electricity from organic waste.

  3. Microbial fuel cell (MFC) for bioelectricity generation from organic wastes.

    PubMed

    Moqsud, M Azizul; Omine, Kiyoshi; Yasufuku, Noriyuki; Hyodo, Masayuki; Nakata, Yukio

    2013-11-01

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) have gained a lot of attention recently as a mode of converting organic matter into electricity. In this study, a compost-based microbial fuel cell that generates bioelectricity by biodegradation of organic matter is developed. Grass cuttings, along with leaf mold, rice bran, oil cake (from mustard plants) and chicken droppings (waste from chickens) were used as organic waste. The electric properties of the MFC under anaerobic fermentation condition were investigated along with the influence of different types of membranes, the mixing of fly ash, and different types of electrode materials. It is observed that the maximum voltage was increased by mixing fly ash. Cellophane showed the highest value of voltage (around 350mV). Bamboo charcoal is good for anode material; however carbon fiber is better for the cathode material in terms of optimization of power generated. This developed MFC is a simple cell to generate electricity from organic waste. PMID:23962448

  4. Electricity generation from food wastes and microbial community structure in microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Jia, Jianna; Tang, Yu; Liu, Bingfeng; Wu, Di; Ren, Nanqi; Xing, Defeng

    2013-09-01

    Microbial fuel cell (MFC) was studied as an alternate and a novel way to dispose food wastes (FWs) in a waste-to-energy form. Different organic loading rate obviously affected the performance of MFCs fed with FWs. The maximum power density of ~18 W/m(3) (~556 mW/m(2)) was obtained at COD of 3200±400 mg/L and the maximum coulombic efficiency (CE) was ~27.0% at COD of 4900±350 mg/L. The maximum removals of COD, total carbohydrate (TC) and total nitrogen (TN) were ~86.4%, ~95.9% and ~16.1%, respectively. Microbial community analysis using 454 pyrosequencing of 16S rRNA gene demonstrated the combination of the dominant genera of the exoelectrogenic Geobacter and fermentative Bacteroides effectively drove highly efficient and reliable MFC systems with functions of organic matters degradation and electricity generation.

  5. Microbial community structure accompanied with electricity production in a constructed wetland plant microbial fuel cell.

    PubMed

    Lu, Lu; Xing, Defeng; Ren, Zhiyong Jason

    2015-11-01

    This study reveals the complex structure of bacterial and archaeal communities associated with a Canna indica plant microbial fuel cell (PMFC) and its electricity production. The PMFC produced a maximum current of 105 mA/m(2) by utilizing rhizodeposits as the sole electron donor without any external nutrient or buffer supplements, which demonstrates the feasibility of PMFCs in practical oligotrophic conditions with low solution conductivity. The microbial diversity was significantly higher in the PMFC than non-plant controls or sediment-only controls, and pyrosequencing and clone library reveal that rhizodeposits conversion to current were carried out by syntrophic interactions between fermentative bacteria (e.g., Anaerolineaceae) and electrochemically active bacteria (e.g., Geobacter). Denitrifying bacteria and acetotrophic methanogens play a minor role in organics degradation, but abundant hydrogenotrophic methanogens and thermophilic archaea are likely main electron donor competitors.

  6. HKR1 encodes a cell surface protein that regulates both cell wall beta-glucan synthesis and budding pattern in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Yabe, T; Yamada-Okabe, T; Kasahara, S; Furuichi, Y; Nakajima, T; Ichishima, E; Arisawa, M; Yamada-Okabe, H

    1996-01-01

    We previously isolated the Saccharomyces cerevisiae HKR1 gene that confers on S. cerevisiae cells resistance to HM-1 killer toxin secreted by Hansenula mrakii (S. Kasahara, H. Yamada, T. Mio, Y. Shiratori, C. Miyamoto, T. Yabe, T. Nakajima, E. Ichishima, and Y. Furuichi, J. Bacteriol. 176:1488-1499, 1994). HKR1 encodes a type 1 membrane protein that contains a calcium-binding consensus sequence (EF hand motif) in the cytoplasmic domain. Although the null mutation of HKR1 is lethal, disruption of the 3' part of the coding region, which would result in deletion of the cytoplasmic domain of Hkr1p, did not affect the viability of yeast cells. This partial disruption of HKR1 significantly reduced beta-1,3-glucan synthase activity and the amount of beta-1,3-glucan in the cell wall and altered the axial budding pattern of haploid cells. Neither chitin synthase activity nor chitin content was significantly affected in the cells harboring the partially disrupted HKR1 allele. Immunofluorescence microscopy with an antibody raised against Hkr1p expressed in Escherichia coli revealed that Hkr1p was predominantly localized on the cell surface. The cell surface localization of Hkr1p required the N-terminal signal sequence because the C-terminal half of Hkr1p was detected uniformly in the cells. These results demonstrate that HKR1 encodes a cell surface protein that regulates both cell wall beta-glucan synthesis and budding pattern and suggest that bud site assembly is somehow related to beta-glucan synthesis in S. cerevisiae. PMID:8550469

  7. Protein overexport in a Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutant is not due to facilitated release of cell-surface proteins.

    PubMed

    Alexieva, K I; Venkov, P V

    2000-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain MW11 is a temperature-sensitive mutant which exports twenty times more proteins at 37 degrees C than parental or wild-type strains do. To understand the mechanism underlying the protein overexport in the mutant the possibility of an altered cell-wall structure leading to facilitated release of cell-surface proteins was studied. Data on calcofluor white and zymolyase sensitivities, resistance to killer 1 toxin and determination of exported acid phosphatase and invertase did not provide evidence for alterations in the cell-wall structure that could explain the protein overexport phenotype. The results were obtained in experiments when transcription of mutated gene was discontinued which permits the full expression of the protein overexport phenotype.

  8. The linkage of (1-3)-beta-glucan to chitin during cell wall assembly in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Hartland, R P; Vermeulen, C A; Klis, F M; Sietsma, J H; Wessels, J G

    1994-12-01

    Pulse-chase experiments with [14C]glucose demonstrated that in the cell wall of wild-type Saccharomyces cerevisiae alkali-soluble (1-3)-beta-glucan serves as a precursor for alkali-insoluble (1-3)-beta-glucan. The following observations support the notion that the insolubilization of the glucan is caused by linkage to chitin: (i) degradation of chitin by chitinase completely dissolved the glucan, and (ii) disruption of the gene for chitin synthase 3 prevented the formation of alkali-insoluble glucan. These cells, unable to form a glucan-chitin complex, were highly vulnerable to hypo-osmotic shock indicating that the linkage of the two polymers significantly contributes to the mechanical strength of the cell wall. Conversion of alkali-soluble glucan into alkali-insoluble glucan occurred both early and late during budding and also in the ts-mutant cdc24-1 in the absence of bud formation.

  9. Microbial cell retention in a melting High Arctic snowpack, Svalbard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zarsky, Jakub; Björkman, Mats; Kühnel, Rafael; Hell, Katherina; Hodson, Andy; Sattler, Birgit; Psenner, Roland

    2014-05-01

    Introduction The melting snow pack represents a highly dynamic system not only for chemical compounds but also for bacterial cells. Microbial activity was found at subzero temperatures in ice veins when liquid water persists due to high concentration of ions on the surface of snow crystals and brine channels between large ice crystals in ice. Several observations also suggest microbial activity under subzero temperatures in seasonal snow. Even with regard to the spatial and temporal relevance of snow ecosystems, microbial activity in such an extreme habitat represents a relatively small proportion in the carbon flux of the global ecosystem and even of the glacial ecosystems specifically. On the other hand, it represents a remarkable piece of mosaic of the microbial activity in glacial ecosystems because the snow pack represents the first contact between the atmosphere and cryosphere. This topic also embodies vital crossovers to biogeochemistry and ecotoxicology, offering a quantitative view of utilization of various substrates relevant for downstream ecosystems. Here we present our study of the dynamics of both solvents and cells suspended in meltwater of the melting snowpack on a high arctic glacier to demonstrate the spatio-temporal constraint of interaction between solvent and bacterial cells in this environment. Method We used 6 lysimeters inserted into the bottom of the snowpack to collect replicated samples of melt water before it comes into contact with basal ice or slush layer at the base of the snow pack. The sampling site was chosen at Midre Lovénbreen (Svalbard, Kongsfjorden, MLB stake 6) where the snow pack showed melting on the surface but the basal ice was still dry. Sampling was conducted in June 2010 for a period of 10 days once per day and the snow profile was sampled according to distinguished layers in the profile at the beginning of the field mission and as bulk at its end. The height of snow above the lysimeters dropped from the initial 74 cm

  10. An innovative miniature microbial fuel cell fabricated using photolithography.

    PubMed

    Chen, You-Peng; Zhao, Yue; Qiu, Ke-Qiang; Chu, Jian; Lu, Rui; Sun, Min; Liu, Xian-Wei; Sheng, Guo-Ping; Yu, Han-Qing; Chen, Jie; Li, Wen-Jie; Liu, Gang; Tian, Yang-Chao; Xiong, Ying

    2011-02-15

    Recently microbial fuel cells (MFCs) have attracted increasing interests in both environmental and energy fields. Among the various MFC configurations, miniature microbial fuel cell (mini-MFC) has a great potential for the application in medical, communication and other areas because of its miniature volume and high output power density. In this work, a 25-μL single-chamber mini-MFC was fabricated using the photolithography technique. The plate-shaped gold anodic electrode in the mini-MFC showed a higher electrochemical activity than the stripe-shaped one. A biofilm of Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 was formed on the surface of gold electrode in this micro-liter-scale MFCs. As a result, a maximum power density of 29 mW/m(2) and a maximum current density of 2148 mA/m(2) were achieved by this single-chamber mini-MFC.

  11. Produced Water Treatment Using Microbial Fuel Cell Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Borole, A. P.; Campbell, R.

    2011-05-20

    ORNL has developed a treatment for produced water using a combination of microbial fuel cells and electrosorption. A collaboration between Campbell Applied Physics and ORNL was initiated to further investigate development of the technology and apply it to treatment of field produced water. The project successfully demonstrated the potential of microbial fuel cells to generate electricity from organics in produced water. A steady voltage was continuously generated for several days using the system developed in this study. In addition to the extraction of electrical energy from the organic contaminants, use of the energy at the representative voltage was demonstrated for salts removal or desalination of the produced water. Thus, the technology has potential to remove organic as well as ionic contaminants with minimal energy input using this technology. This is a novel energy-efficient method to treat produced water. Funding to test the technology at larger scale is being pursued to enable application development.

  12. Recent developments in microbial fuel cell technologies for sustainable bioenergy.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Kazuya

    2008-12-01

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) are devices that exploit microbial catabolic activities to generate electricity from a variety of materials, including complex organic waste and renewable biomass. These sources provide MFCs with a great advantage over chemical fuel cells that can utilize only purified reactive fuels (e.g., hydrogen). A developing primary application of MFCs is its use in the production of sustainable bioenergy, e.g., organic waste treatment coupled with electricity generation, although further technical developments are necessary for its practical use. In this article, recent advances in MFC technologies that can become fundamentals for future practical MFC developments are summarized. Results of recent studies suggest that MFCs will be of practical use in the near future and will become a preferred option among sustainable bioenergy processes.

  13. Composite materials for polymer electrolyte membrane microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Antolini, Ermete

    2015-07-15

    Recently, the feasibility of using composite metal-carbon, metal-polymer, polymer-carbon, polymer-polymer and carbon-carbon materials in microbial fuel cells (MFCs) has been investigated. These materials have been tested as MFC anode catalyst (microorganism) supports, cathode catalysts and membranes. These hybrid materials, possessing the properties of each component, or even with a synergistic effect, would present improved characteristics with respect to the bare components. In this paper we present an overview of the use of these composite materials in microbial fuel cells. The characteristics of the composite materials as well as their effect on MFC performance were compared with those of the individual component and/or the conventionally used materials.

  14. Enhanced microbial reduction of vanadium (V) in groundwater with bioelectricity from microbial fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Liting; Zhang, Baogang; Tian, Caixing; Liu, Ye; Shi, Chunhong; Cheng, Ming; Feng, Chuanping

    2015-08-01

    Bioelectricity generated from the microbial fuel cell (MFC) is applied to the bioelectrical reactor (BER) directly to enhance microbial reduction of vanadium (V) (V(V)) in groundwater. With the maximum power density of 543.4 mW m-2 from the MFC, V(V) removal is accelerated with efficiency of 93.6% during 12 h operation. Higher applied voltage can facilitate this process. V(V) removals decrease with the increase of initial V(V) concentration, while extra addition of chemical oxygen demand (COD) has little effect on performance improvement. Microbial V(V) reduction is enhanced and then suppressed with the increase of conductivity. High-throughput 16S rRNA gene pyrosequencing analysis implies the accumulated Enterobacter and Lactococcus reduce V(V) with products from fermentative microorganisms such as Macellibacteroides. The presentation of electrochemically active bacteria as Enterobacter promotes electron transfers. This study indicates that application of bioelectricity from MFCs is a promising strategy to improve the efficiency of in-situ bioremediation of V(V) polluted groundwater.

  15. Effect of electricity on microbial community of microbial fuel cell simultaneously treating sulfide and nitrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Jing; Zheng, Ping; Xing, Yajuan; Qaisar, Mahmood

    2015-05-01

    The effect of electric current on microbial community is explored in Microbial Fuel Cells (MFCs) simultaneously treating sulfide and nitrate. The MFCs are operated under four different conditions which exhibited different characteristics of electricity generation. In batch mode, MFCs generate intermittently high current pulses in the beginning, and the current density is instable subsequently, while the current density of MFCs in continuous mode is relatively stable. All operational parameters show good capacity for substrate removal, and nitrogen and sulfate were the main reaction products. Polymerase Chain Reaction-Denaturing Gradient Gel Electrophoresis (PCR-DGGE) analysis is employed to obtain profiles of the bacterial communities present in inoculum and suspension of four MFCs. Based on the community diversity indices and Spearman correlation analyses, significant correlation exists between Richness of the community of anode chamber and the electricity generated, while no strong correlation is evident between other indexes (Shannon index, Simpson index and Equitability index) and the electricity. Additionally, the results of Principal Component Analysis (PCA) suggest that MFCs suffering from current shock have similar suspension communities, while the others have diverse microbial communities.

  16. Ohmic resistance affects microbial community and electrochemical kinetics in a multi-anode microbial electrochemical cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhar, Bipro Ranjan; Ryu, Hodon; Santo Domingo, Jorge W.; Lee, Hyung-Sool

    2016-11-01

    Multi-anode microbial electrochemical cells (MxCs) are considered as one of the most promising configurations for scale-up of MxCs, but understanding of anode kinetics in multiple anodes is limited in the MxCs. In this study we assessed microbial community and electrochemical kinetic parameters for biofilms on individual anodes in a multi-anode MxC to better comprehend anode fundamentals. Microbial community analysis targeting 16S rRNA Illumina sequencing showed that Geobacter genus was abundant (87%) only on the biofilm anode closest to a reference electrode (low ohmic energy loss) in which current density was the highest among three anodes. In comparison, Geobacter populations were less than 1% for biofilms on other two anodes distant from the reference electrode (high ohmic energy loss), generating small current density. Half-saturation anode potential (EKA) was the lowest at -0.251 to -0.242 V (vs. standard hydrogen electrode) for the closest biofilm anode to the reference electrode, while EKA was as high as -0.134 V for the farthest anode. Our study proves that electric potential of individual anodes changed by ohmic energy loss shifts biofilm communities on individual anodes and consequently influences electron transfer kinetics on each anode in the multi-anode MxC.

  17. Microbial community structures differentiated in a single-chamber air-cathode microbial fuel cell fueled with rice straw hydrolysate

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The microbial fuel cell represents a novel technology to simultaneously generate electric power and treat wastewater. Both pure organic matter and real wastewater can be used as fuel to generate electric power and the substrate type can influence the microbial community structure. In the present study, rice straw, an important feedstock source in the world, was used as fuel after pretreatment with diluted acid method for a microbial fuel cell to obtain electric power. Moreover, the microbial community structures of anodic and cathodic biofilm and planktonic culturewere analyzed and compared to reveal the effect of niche on microbial community structure. Results The microbial fuel cell produced a maximum power density of 137.6 ± 15.5 mW/m2 at a COD concentration of 400 mg/L, which was further increased to 293.33 ± 7.89 mW/m2 through adjusting the electrolyte conductivity from 5.6 mS/cm to 17 mS/cm. Microbial community analysis showed reduction of the microbial diversities of the anodic biofilm and planktonic culture, whereas diversity of the cathodic biofilm was increased. Planktonic microbial communities were clustered closer to the anodic microbial communities compared to the cathodic biofilm. The differentiation in microbial community structure of the samples was caused by minor portion of the genus. The three samples shared the same predominant phylum of Proteobacteria. The abundance of exoelectrogenic genus was increased with Desulfobulbus as the shared most abundant genus; while the most abundant exoelectrogenic genus of Clostridium in the inoculum was reduced. Sulfate reducing bacteria accounted for large relative abundance in all the samples, whereas the relative abundance varied in different samples. Conclusion The results demonstrated that rice straw hydrolysate can be used as fuel for microbial fuel cells; microbial community structure differentiated depending on niches after microbial fuel cell operation; exoelectrogens were

  18. Enzyme Amplified Detection of Microbial Cell Wall Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wainwright, Norman R.

    2004-01-01

    This proposal is MBL's portion of NASA's Johnson Space Center's Astrobiology Center led by Principal Investigator, Dr. David McKay, entitled: 'Institute for the Study of Biomarkers in Astromaterials.' Dr. Norman Wainwright is the principal investigator at MBL and is responsible for developing methods to detect trace quantities of microbial cell wall chemicals using the enzyme amplification system of Limulus polyphemus and other related methods.

  19. New insights in Microbial Fuel Cells: novel solid phase anolyte.

    PubMed

    Tommasi, Tonia; Salvador, Gian Paolo; Quaglio, Marzia

    2016-01-01

    For the development of long lasting portable microbial fuel cells (MFCs) new strategies are necessary to overcome critical issues such as hydraulic pump system and the biochemical substrate retrieval overtime to sustain bacteria metabolism. The present work proposes the use of a synthetic solid anolyte (SSA), constituted by agar, carbonaceous and nitrogen sources dissolved into diluted seawater. Results of a month-test showed the potential of the new SSA-MFC as a long lasting low energy consuming system. PMID:27375205

  20. New insights in Microbial Fuel Cells: novel solid phase anolyte

    PubMed Central

    Tommasi, Tonia; Salvador, Gian Paolo; Quaglio, Marzia

    2016-01-01

    For the development of long lasting portable microbial fuel cells (MFCs) new strategies are necessary to overcome critical issues such as hydraulic pump system and the biochemical substrate retrieval overtime to sustain bacteria metabolism. The present work proposes the use of a synthetic solid anolyte (SSA), constituted by agar, carbonaceous and nitrogen sources dissolved into diluted seawater. Results of a month-test showed the potential of the new SSA-MFC as a long lasting low energy consuming system. PMID:27375205

  1. New insights in Microbial Fuel Cells: novel solid phase anolyte.

    PubMed

    Tommasi, Tonia; Salvador, Gian Paolo; Quaglio, Marzia

    2016-07-04

    For the development of long lasting portable microbial fuel cells (MFCs) new strategies are necessary to overcome critical issues such as hydraulic pump system and the biochemical substrate retrieval overtime to sustain bacteria metabolism. The present work proposes the use of a synthetic solid anolyte (SSA), constituted by agar, carbonaceous and nitrogen sources dissolved into diluted seawater. Results of a month-test showed the potential of the new SSA-MFC as a long lasting low energy consuming system.

  2. New insights in Microbial Fuel Cells: novel solid phase anolyte

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tommasi, Tonia; Salvador, Gian Paolo; Quaglio, Marzia

    2016-07-01

    For the development of long lasting portable microbial fuel cells (MFCs) new strategies are necessary to overcome critical issues such as hydraulic pump system and the biochemical substrate retrieval overtime to sustain bacteria metabolism. The present work proposes the use of a synthetic solid anolyte (SSA), constituted by agar, carbonaceous and nitrogen sources dissolved into diluted seawater. Results of a month-test showed the potential of the new SSA-MFC as a long lasting low energy consuming system.

  3. [Electricity production from surplus sludge using microbial fuel cells].

    PubMed

    Jia, Bin; Liu, Zhi-Hua; Li, Xiao-Ming; Yang, Yong-Lin; Yang, Qi; Zeng, Guang-Ming; Liu, Yi-Lin; Liu, Qian-Qian; Zheng, Shi-Wen

    2009-04-15

    A single-chamber and membrane-less microbial fuel cells were successfully started up using anaerobic sludge as inoculums without any chemical substance for 20 d. The electricity generation of the microbial fuel cell using surplus sludge as fuel and the change of substrate were investigated. The results showed that the obtained maximum voltage and power density were 495 mV and 44 mW x m(-2) (fixed 1,000 Omega), and the internal resistance was about 300 Omega during steady state. In a cycle, the removal efficiency of SS and VSS were 27.3% and 28.7%, pH was 6.5-8.0. In addition, the COD increased from 617 mg x L(-1) to 1,150 mg x L(-1) and decreased afterwards with time. The change of glucose was similar to that of COD, glucose increased from 47 mg x L(-1) to 60 mg x L(-1) and decreased afterwards with time. Consequently, the microbial fuel cell can transform chemical energy of surplus sludge into the cleanest electrical energy, and it provides a new way of sludge recycling.

  4. Proline accumulation protects Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells in stationary phase from ethanol stress by reducing reactive oxygen species levels.

    PubMed

    Takagi, Hiroshi; Taguchi, Junpei; Kaino, Tomohiro

    2016-08-01

    During fermentation processes, Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells are exposed to multiple stresses, including a high concentration of ethanol that represents toxicity through intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. We previously reported that proline protected yeast cells from damage caused by various stresses, such as freezing and ethanol. As an anti-oxidant, proline is suggested to scavenge intracellular ROS. In this study, we examined the role of intracellular proline during ethanol treatment in S. cerevisiae strains that accumulate different concentrations of proline. When cultured in YPD medium, there was a significant accumulation of proline in the put1 mutant strain, which is deficient in proline oxidase, in the stationary phase. Expression of the mutant PRO1 gene, which encodes the γ-glutamyl kinase variant (Asp154Asn or Ile150Thr) with desensitization to feedback inhibition by proline in the put1 mutant strain, showed a prominent increase in proline content as compared with that of the wild-type strain. The oxidation level was clearly increased in wild-type cells after exposure to ethanol, indicating that the generation of ROS occurred. Interestingly, proline accumulation significantly reduces the ROS level and increases the survival rate of yeast cells in the stationary phase under ethanol stress conditions. However, there was not a clear correlation between proline content and survival rate in yeast cells. An appropriate level of intracellular proline in yeast might be important for its stress-protective effect. Hence, the engineering of proline metabolism could be promising for breeding stress-tolerant industrial yeast strains. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26833688

  5. β-Galactomannan and Saccharomyces cerevisiae var. boulardii Modulate the Immune Response against Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium in Porcine Intestinal Epithelial and Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Brufau, M. Teresa; Guerrero-Zamora, Ana Maria; Lizardo, Rosil; Dobrescu, Irina; Martin-Venegas, Raquel; Ferrer, Ruth; Salmon, Henri; Martínez, Paz

    2012-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium is a facultative intracellular pathogen that causes inflammation, necrosis, and diarrhea in pigs, as well as being an important source of food-borne diseases in humans. Probiotics and prebiotics are promising alternatives to antibiotics to control and prevent intestinal infections. The present work investigated a recently developed β-galactomannan (βGM) prebiotic compared to the proven probiotic Saccharomyces cerevisiae var. boulardii on porcine ileum intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) of the IPI-2I line and monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DCs) cocultured in vitro with Salmonella. We observed that both S. cerevisiae var. boulardii and βGM inhibited the association of Salmonella with IECs in vitro. Our data indicated that βGM has a higher ability than S. cerevisiae var. boulardii to inhibit Salmonella-induced proinflammatory mRNA (cytokines tumor necrosis factor alpha [TNF-α], interleukin-1α [IL-1α], IL-6, and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor [GM-CSF] and chemokines CCL2, CCL20, and CXCL8) and at protein levels (IL-6 and CXCL8). Additionally, βGM and S. cerevisiae var. boulardii induced some effects on DCs that were not observed on IECs: βGM and S. cerevisiae var. boulardii showed slight upregulation of mRNA for TNF-α, GM-CSF, and CCR7 receptor on porcine monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DCs). Indeed, the addition of βGM or S. cerevisiae var. boulardii on DCs cocultured with Salmonella showed higher gene expression (mRNA) for TNF-α, GM-CSF, and CXCL8 compared to that of the control with Salmonella. In conclusion, the addition of βGM inhibits Salmonella-induced proinflammatory profiles in IECs but may promote DC activation, although associated molecular mechanisms remain to be elucidated. PMID:22301691

  6. Recent Advances in Genetic Technique of Microbial Report Cells and Their Applications in Cell Arrays.

    PubMed

    Kim, Do Hyun; Kim, Moon Il; Park, Hyun Gyu

    2015-01-01

    Microbial cell arrays have attracted consistent attention for their ability to provide unique global data on target analytes at low cost, their capacity for readily detectable and robust cell growth in diverse environments, their high degree of convenience, and their capacity for multiplexing via incorporation of molecularly tailored reporter cells. To highlight recent progress in the field of microbial cell arrays, this review discusses research on genetic engineering of reporter cells, technologies for patterning live cells on solid surfaces, cellular immobilization in different polymers, and studies on their application in environmental monitoring, disease diagnostics, and other related fields. On the basis of these results, we discuss current challenges and future prospects for novel microbial cell arrays, which show promise for use as potent tools for unraveling complex biological processes.

  7. Recent Advances in Genetic Technique of Microbial Report Cells and Their Applications in Cell Arrays

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Do Hyun; Kim, Moon Il; Park, Hyun Gyu

    2015-01-01

    Microbial cell arrays have attracted consistent attention for their ability to provide unique global data on target analytes at low cost, their capacity for readily detectable and robust cell growth in diverse environments, their high degree of convenience, and their capacity for multiplexing via incorporation of molecularly tailored reporter cells. To highlight recent progress in the field of microbial cell arrays, this review discusses research on genetic engineering of reporter cells, technologies for patterning live cells on solid surfaces, cellular immobilization in different polymers, and studies on their application in environmental monitoring, disease diagnostics, and other related fields. On the basis of these results, we discuss current challenges and future prospects for novel microbial cell arrays, which show promise for use as potent tools for unraveling complex biological processes. PMID:26436087

  8. Hanseniaspora opuntiae, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Lactobacillus fermentum, and Acetobacter pasteurianus predominate during well-performed Malaysian cocoa bean box fermentations, underlining the importance of these microbial species for a successful cocoa bean fermentation process.

    PubMed

    Papalexandratou, Zoi; Lefeber, Timothy; Bahrim, Bakhtiar; Lee, Ong Seng; Daniel, Heide-Marie; De Vuyst, Luc

    2013-09-01

    Two spontaneous Malaysian cocoa bean box fermentations (one farm, two plantation plots) were investigated. Physical parameters, microbial community dynamics, yeast and bacterial species diversity [mainly lactic acid bacteria (LAB) and acetic acid bacteria (AAB)], and metabolite kinetics were monitored, and chocolates were produced from the respective fermented dry cocoa beans. Similar microbial growth and metabolite profiles were obtained for the two fermentations. Low concentrations of citric acid were found in the fresh pulp, revealing low acidity of the raw material. The main end-products of the catabolism of the pulp substrates glucose, fructose, and citric acid by yeasts, LAB, and AAB were ethanol, lactic acid, acetic acid, and/or mannitol. Hanseniaspora opuntiae, Lactobacillus fermentum, and Acetobacter pasteurianus were the prevalent species of the two fermentations. Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Lactobacillus plantarum, Lactobacillus pentosus, and Acetobacter ghanensis were also found during the mid-phase of the fermentation processes. Leuconostoc pseudomesenteroides and Acetobacter senegalensis were among the prevailing species during the initial phase of the fermentations. Tatumella saanichensis and Enterobacter sp. were present in the beginning of the fermentations and they could be responsible for the degradation of citric acid and/or the production of gluconic acid and lactic acid, respectively. The presence of facultative heterofermentative LAB during the fermentations caused a high production of lactic acid. Finally, as these fermentations were carried out with high-quality raw material and were characterised by a restricted microbial species diversity, resulting in successfully fermented dry cocoa beans and good chocolates produced thereof, it is likely that the prevailing species H. opuntiae, S. cerevisiae, Lb. fermentum, and A. pasteurianus were responsible for it.

  9. Mitochondrial Function in Cell Wall Glycoprotein Synthesis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae NCYC 625 (Wild Type) and [rho0] Mutants

    PubMed Central

    Iung, Annie Rakotoarivony; Coulon, Joël; Kiss, Ferenc; Ekome, Jacques Ngondi; Vallner, Judit; Bonaly, Roger

    1999-01-01

    We studied phosphopeptidomannans (PPMs) of two Saccharomyces cerevisiae NCYC 625 strains (S. diastaticus): a wild type strain grown aerobically, anaerobically, and in the presence of antimycin and a [rho0] mutant grown aerobically and anaerobically. The aerobic wild-type cultures were highly flocculent, but all others were weakly flocculent. Ligands implicated in flocculation of mutants or antimycin-treated cells were not aggregated as much by concanavalin A as were those of the wild type. The [rho0] mutants and antimycin-treated cells differ from the wild type in PPM composition and invertase, acid phosphatase, and glucoamylase activities. PPMs extracted from different cells differ in the protein but not in the glycosidic moiety. The PPMs were less stable in mitochondrion-deficient cells than in wild-type cells grown aerobically, and this difference may be attributable to defective mitochondrial function during cell wall synthesis. The reduced flocculation of cells grown in the presence of antimycin, under anaerobiosis, or carrying a [rho0] mutation may be the consequence of alterations of PPM structures which are the ligands of lectins, both involved in this cell-cell recognition phenomenon. These respiratory chain alterations also affect peripheral, biologically active glycoproteins such as extracellular enzymes and peripheral PPMs. PMID:10583995

  10. Sensitivity of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to the cell-penetrating antifungal peptide PAF26 correlates with endogenous nitric oxide (NO) production.

    PubMed

    Carmona, Lourdes; Gandía, Mónica; López-García, Belén; Marcos, Jose F

    2012-01-01

    PAF26 is a synthetic fungicidal hexapeptide with cell-penetration properties and non-lytic mode of action. We demonstrate herein the endogenous accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and nitric oxide (NO) in the model fungus Saccharomyces cerevisiae treated with PAF26. However, the S. cerevisiae deletion mutant of YAP1 - the major inductor of defense to oxidative stress - did not show high sensitivity to PAF26 but rather increased resistance, and its ROS accumulation did not differ from that of the parental strain. Cross-protection experiments suggest that the oxidant H(2)O(2) and PAF26 kill yeast through different pathways. Overall, the data indicate that ROS are not the primary antifungal mechanism of the peptide. On the contrary, the PAF26-induced intracellular production of NO was blocked in two distinct resistant mutants: the above mentioned Δyap1, which had the induction of NO disrupted, and the previously reported Δarg1 from the biosynthetic pathway of arginine, which has reduced basal NO levels. The NO synthase inhibitor l-NAME partially restored yeast growth in the presence of PAF26. These findings correlate antifungal activity of PAF26 with NO production and provide a plausible explanation for the resistance phenotype of Δarg1 through its involvement in NO biosynthesis. PMID:22120633

  11. alpha-Factor-mediatd modification of a 32P-labeled protein by MATa cells of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Finkelstein, D B; McAlister, L

    1981-03-10

    Addition of the polypeptide mating pheromone alpha-factor to haploid MATa cells of Saccharomyces cerevisiae results in the modification of a 32P-labeled protein (P17) with an apparent Mr of 17,000 to a form having an apparent Mr of 17,500 (P17). 32P associated with both P17 and P17 exhibits an unusually rapid rate of turnover. The conversion of P17 to P17 precedes the appearance of morphologically abnormal cells and, in contrast to other responses elicited by this pheromone, this change in apparent molecular weight does not require protein synthesis. Upon removal of alpha-factor, the P17/P17 ratio returns to pretreatment levels. PMID:7007388

  12. Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells harboring the gene encoding sarcotoxin IA secrete a peptide that is toxic to plant pathogenic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Aly, R; Granot, D; Mahler-Slasky, Y; Halpern, N; Nir, D; Galun, E

    1999-06-01

    Sarcotoxin IA is a cecropin-type antibacterial protein produced by the flesh fly, Sarcophaga peregrina. Similar to other bactericidal small proteins produced by insects, sarcotoxin IA is released into the hemolymph of larvae and nymphs upon mechanical injury or bacterial infection. The gene (sarco) that encodes this toxin was introduced into Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast cells and was expressed under a constitutive yeast promoter. The transformed yeast cells were grown in a liquid medium, and a peptide with a similar molecular size to that of the mature sarcotoxin IA was detected in the medium by Western blot analysis. The secreted sarcotoxin-like peptide (SLP) had a potent cytotoxic effect against several bacteria, including plant pathogenic bacteria, similar to the toxic effects of the authentic sarcotoxin IA. Erwinia carotovora was more susceptible to the toxic medium than Pseudomonas solanacearum and Pseudomonas syringae pv. lachrymans. Thus, yeast may be used in the production of such proteins for employment against various bacterial pathogens.

  13. Flocculation protein structure and cell-cell adhesion mechanism in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Goossens, Katty; Willaert, Ronnie

    2010-11-01

    Cell-cell adhesion occurs in a broad spectrum of biological processes, of which yeast flocculation is an area of interest for evolutionary scientists to brewers and winemakers. The flocculation mechanism is based on a lectin-carbohydrate interaction but is not yet fully understood, although the first model dates back to the 1950s. This review will update the current understanding of the complex mechanism behind yeast flocculation. Moreover, modern technologies to measure the forces involved in single carbohydrate-lectin interactions, are discussed. The Flo1 protein has been extensively described as the protein responsible for strong flocculation. Recently, more research has been directed to the detailed analysis of this flocculin. Due to the advances in the field of bioinformatics, more information about Flo1p could be obtained via structurally or functionally related proteins. Here, we review the current knowledge of the Flo1 protein, with a strong emphasis towards its structure.

  14. Expression and characterization of an M cell-specific ligand-fused dengue virus tetravalent epitope using Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Ngoc-Luong; So, Kum-Kang; Kim, Jung-Mi; Kim, Sae-Hae; Jang, Yong-Suk; Yang, Moon-Sik; Kim, Dae-Hyuk

    2015-01-01

    A fusion construct (Tet-EDIII-Co1) consisting of an M cell-specific peptide ligand (Co1) at the C-terminus of a recombinant tetravalent gene encoding the amino acid sequences of dengue envelope domain III (Tet-EDIII) from four serotypes was expressed and tested for binding activity to the mucosal immune inductive site M cells for the development of an oral vaccine. The yeast episomal expression vector, pYEGPD-TER, which was designed to direct gene expression using the glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GPD) promoter, a functional signal peptide of the amylase 1A protein from rice, and the GAL7 terminator, was used to clone the Tet-EDIII-Co1 gene and resultant plasmids were then used to transform Saccharomyces cerevisiae. PCR and back-transformation into Escherichia coli confirmed the presence of the Tet-EDIII-Co1 gene-containing plasmid in transformants. Northern blot analysis of transformed S. cerevisiae identified the presence of the Tet-EDIII-Co1-specific transcript. Western blot analysis indicated that the produced Tet-EDIII-Co1 protein with the expected molecular weight was successfully secreted into the culture medium. Quantitative Western blot analysis and ELISA revealed that the recombinant Tet-EDIII-Co1 protein comprised approximately 0.1-0.2% of cell-free extracts (CFEs). In addition, 0.1-0.2 mg of Tet-EDIII-Co1 protein per liter of culture filtrate was detected on day 1, and this quantity peaked on day 3 after cultivation. In vivo binding assays showed that the Tet-EDIII-Co1 protein was delivered specifically to M cells in Peyer's patches (PPs) while the Tet-EDIII protein lacking the Co1 ligand did not, which demonstrated the efficient targeting of this antigenic protein through the mucosal-specific ligand.

  15. Multiple sequence signals determine the distribution of glycosylphosphatidylinositol proteins between the plasma membrane and cell wall in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Frieman, Matthew B; Cormack, Brendan P

    2004-10-01

    Glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored cell wall proteins (GPI-CWPs) play an important role in the structure and function of the cell wall in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and other fungi. While the majority of characterized fungal GPI-anchored proteins localize to the cell wall, a subset of GPI proteins are thought to reside at the plasma membrane and not to traffic significantly to the cell wall. The amino acids immediately upstream of the site of GPI anchor addition (the omega site) are the primary signal determining whether a GPI protein localizes to the cell wall or to the plasma membrane. Here, evidence was found that in addition to this omega-proximal signal, other sequences in the protein can impact the distribution of GPI proteins between cell wall and membrane. In particular, it was found that long regions rich in serine and threonine residues (a feature of many cell wall proteins) can override the omega-proximal signal and redirect a model GPI plasma membrane protein to the cell wall.

  16. Using S. cerevisiae as a Model System to Investigate V. cholerae VopX-Host Cell Protein Interactions and Phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Seward, Christopher H.; Manzella, Alexander; Alam, Ashfaqul; Butler, J. Scott; Dziejman, Michelle

    2015-01-01

    Most pathogenic, non-O1/non-O139 serogroup Vibrio cholerae strains cause diarrheal disease in the absence of cholera toxin. Instead, many use Type 3 Secretion System (T3SS) mediated mechanisms to disrupt host cell homeostasis. We identified a T3SS effector protein, VopX, which is translocated into mammalian cells during in vitro co-culture. In a S. cerevisiae model system, we found that expression of VopX resulted in a severe growth defect that was partially suppressed by a deletion of RLM1, encoding the terminal transcriptional regulator of the Cell Wall Integrity MAP kinase (CWI) regulated pathway. Growth of yeast cells in the presence of sorbitol also suppressed the defect, supporting a role for VopX in destabilizing the cell wall. Expression of VopX activated expression of β-galactosidase from an RLM1-reponsive element reporter fusion, but failed to do so in cells lacking MAP kinases upstream of Rlm1. The results suggest that VopX inhibits cell growth by stimulating the CWI pathway through Rlm1. Rlm1 is an ortholog of mammalian MEF2 transcription factors that are proposed to regulate cell differentiation, proliferation, and apoptosis. The collective findings suggest that VopX contributes to disease by activating MAP kinase cascades that elicit changes in cellular transcriptional programs. PMID:26473925

  17. Recent Progress of Nanostructure Modified Anodes in Microbial Fuel Cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Marie; Kim, Hyeon Woo; Nam, Joo-Youn; In, Su-Il

    2015-09-01

    Microbial fuel cell (MFC) is a bio-electrochemical system which converts chemical energy into electrical energy by catalytic activity of microorganisms. Electrons produced by microbial oxidation from substrates such as organic matter, complex or renewable biomass are transferred to the anode. Protons produced at the anode migrate to the cathode via the wire and combine with oxygen to form water. Therefore MFC technologies are promising approach for generating electricity or hydrogen gas and wastewater treatment. Electrode materials are one of the keys to increase the power output of MFCs. To improve the cost effective performance of MFCs, various electrodes materials, modifications and configurations have been developed. In this paper, among other recent advances of nanostructured electrodes, especially carbon based anodes, are highlighted. The properties of these electrodes, in terms of surface characteristics, conductivity, modifications, and options were reviewed. The applications, challenges and perspectives of the current MFCs electrode for future development in bio or medical field are briefly discussed. PMID:26716261

  18. Recent Progress of Nanostructure Modified Anodes in Microbial Fuel Cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, Marie; Kim, Hyeon Woo; Nam, Joo-Youn; In, Su-Il

    2015-09-01

    Microbial fuel cell (MFC) is a bio-electrochemical system which converts chemical energy into electrical energy by catalytic activity of microorganisms. Electrons produced by microbial oxidation from substrates such as organic matter, complex or renewable biomass are transferred to the anode. Protons produced at the anode migrate to the cathode via the wire and combine with oxygen to form water. Therefore MFC technologies are promising approach for generating electricity or hydrogen gas and wastewater treatment. Electrode materials are one of the keys to increase the power output of MFCs. To improve the cost effective performance of MFCs, various electrodes materials, modifications and configurations have been developed. In this paper, among other recent advances of nanostructured electrodes, especially carbon based anodes, are highlighted. The properties of these electrodes, in terms of surface characteristics, conductivity, modifications, and options were reviewed. The applications, challenges and perspectives of the current MFCs electrode for future development in bio or medical field are briefly discussed.

  19. Perchlorate reduction in microbial electrolysis cell with polyaniline modified cathode.

    PubMed

    Li, Jia-Jia; Gao, Ming-Ming; Zhang, Gang; Wang, Xin-Hua; Wang, Shu-Guang; Song, Chao; Xu, Yan-Yan

    2015-02-01

    Excellent perchlorate reduction was obtained under various initial concentrations in a non-membrane microbial electrolysis cell with polyaniline (PANI) modified graphite cathode as sole electron donor. PANI modification is conducive to the formation of biofilm due to its porous structure and good electrocatalytic performance. Compared with cathode without biofilm, over 12% higher reduction rates were acquired in the presence of biocathode. The study demonstrates that, instead of perchlorate reduction, the main contribution of biofilm is involved in facilitate electron transfer from cathode to electrolyte. Interestingly, hairlike structure, referred as to pili-like, was observed in the biofilm as well as in the electrolyte. Additionally, the results show that pili were prone to formation under the condition of external electron field as sole electron donor. Analysis of microbial community suggests that perchlorate reduction bacteria community was most consistent with Azospiraoryzae strain DSM 13638 in the subdivision of the class Proteobacteria. PMID:25479396

  20. Energy generation by fermentation of glucose in a batch flow microbial fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badea, Silviu-Laurentiu; Enache, Stanica; Tamaian, Radu; Buga, Mihaela-Ramona; Pirvu, Cristian; Varlam, Mihai

    2016-04-01

    In the last years, microbial fuel cells (MFCs) have emerged like a novel research technologies for production of sustainable and clean electricity energy through bioxidation of organic materials, representing a promising alternative to combustion energy sources. In this study, production of bioelectricity in MFC in batch system (dual chambered MFC) was investigated. A dual chambered MFC from glass was built for this purpose. Saccharomyces cerevisiae as an active biocatalyst was explored for power generation. Graphite plates were used as electrodes and glucose as substrate. Saccharomyces cerevisiae was initially grown on a period of 72h at 30 degree Celsius, on medium of modified Sabouraud liquid medium containing 30 g glucose/L. A volume of inoculated medium (80 mL) was transferred in the anode compartment of MFC together with 20 mL glucose 1M, while neutral red was used as mediator (electron shuttle) in concentration of 200 μM in anaerobic anode chamber. Potassium permanganate (KMnO4) was used as oxidizing agent in the cathode in wide concentration range (400 μM-40 000 μM). Cathodic compartment was loaded initially with 40 mM potassium permanganate, and afterwards was supplied two times more with KMnO4 of the same concentration, in order to maintain MFC functionality. The MFC was operated on a water bath heated by a combined hot-plate magnetic-stirrer device at 30 degree Celsius and mixed at 180 rpm. The maximum open circuit potential (OCV) recorded of about 0.6 V was reached after the 3rd loading with 40 milimolles of potassium permanganate. Using a potentiostat, the polarization curve was recorded by varying the potential between 0.5 V and 0.0 V, while the intensity of current increased from 0.0 to about 1.5 mA respectively, corresponding to an anodic current density of about 0.81 A/m2. In order to optimize the design and performance of the MFC, the goal of the further research is to use variously concentrations of potassium permanganate. Furthermore, a dual

  1. Effects of ice-seeding temperature and intracellular trehalose contents on survival of frozen Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Toshihide; Takagi, Hiroshi; Shima, Jun

    2009-04-01

    Freezing tolerance is an important characteristic for baker's yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, as it is used to make frozen dough. The ability of yeast cells to survive freezing is thought to depend on various factors. The purpose of this work was to study the viability of yeast cells during the freezing process. We examined factors potentially affecting their survival, including the growth phase, ice-seeding temperature, intracellular trehalose content, freezing period, and duration of supercooling. The results showed that the ice-seeding temperature significantly affected cell viability. In the stationary phase, trehalose accumulation did not affect the viability of yeast cells after brief freezing, although it did significantly affect the viability after prolonged freezing. In the log phase, the ice-seeding temperature was more important for cell survival than the presence of trehalose during prolonged freezing. The importance of increasing the extracellular ice-seeding temperature was verified by comparing frozen yeast survival rates in a freezing test with ice-seeding temperatures of -5 degrees C and -15 degrees C. We also found that the cell survival rates began to increase at 3h of supercooling. The yeast cells may adapt to subzero temperatures and/or acquire tolerance to freezing stress during the supercooling. PMID:19126409

  2. The influence of microbial synergistic and antagonistic effects on the performance of refinery wastewater microbial fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Xuan; Zhan, Yali; Chen, Chunmao; Zhao, Lijie; Guo, Shaohui

    2014-04-01

    This study provides a preliminary investigation of the synergistic and antagonistic effects of different microbial strains and their influence on electricity generation and wastewater treatment performances in microbial fuel cells (MFCs). Microbial metabolic characteristics of petroleum hydrocarbon pollutants are studied simultaneously to provide further insight into how microbial synergistic and antagonistic effects influence MFCs. We observed a synergistic effect between Paenibacillus sp. and Deinococcus sp. and an antagonistic effect between Microbacterium sp. and Paenibacillus sp. and Deinococcus sp. The microbial synergistic and antagonistic effects significantly influenced MFC performance directly. The best MFC performance was observed with Paenibacillus sp. + Deinococcus sp. due to their synergistic effect, where the power density output reached 102.93 mW m-3, and the oil removal rate was 85.56 ± 1.10%. However, the performances of MFCs inoculated with Microbacterium sp. were considerably poorer because of its antagonistic effect on the other microbial strains, where the lowest power density output was 24.93 mW m-3, and the oil removal rate was 65.88 ± 1.10%. The degradation characteristics of petroleum hydrocarbons differ between microbial strains; thus, the relative results can provide further insight into how microbial synergistic and antagonistic effects influence MFCs.

  3. Carbon and nitrogen assimilation in deep subseafloor microbial cells

    PubMed Central

    Morono, Yuki; Terada, Takeshi; Nishizawa, Manabu; Ito, Motoo; Hillion, François; Takahata, Naoto; Sano, Yuji; Inagaki, Fumio

    2011-01-01

    Remarkable numbers of microbial cells have been observed in global shallow to deep subseafloor sediments. Accumulating evidence indicates that deep and ancient sediments harbor living microbial life, where the flux of nutrients and energy are extremely low. However, their physiology and energy requirements remain largely unknown. We used stable isotope tracer incubation and nanometer-scale secondary ion MS to investigate the dynamics of carbon and nitrogen assimilation activities in individual microbial cells from 219-m-deep lower Pleistocene (460,000 y old) sediments from the northwestern Pacific off the Shimokita Peninsula of Japan. Sediment samples were incubated in vitro with 13C- and/or 15N-labeled glucose, pyruvate, acetate, bicarbonate, methane, ammonium, and amino acids. Significant incorporation of 13C and/or 15N and growth occurred in response to glucose, pyruvate, and amino acids (∼76% of total cells), whereas acetate and bicarbonate were incorporated without fostering growth. Among those substrates, a maximum substrate assimilation rate was observed at 67 × 10−18 mol/cell per d with bicarbonate. Neither carbon assimilation nor growth was evident in response to methane. The atomic ratios between nitrogen incorporated from ammonium and the total cellular nitrogen consistently exceeded the ratios of carbon, suggesting that subseafloor microbes preferentially require nitrogen assimilation for the recovery in vitro. Our results showed that the most deeply buried subseafloor sedimentary microbes maintain potentials for metabolic activities and that growth is generally limited by energy but not by the availability of C and N compounds. PMID:21987801

  4. Engineering microbial fuels cells: recent patents and new directions.

    PubMed

    Biffinger, Justin C; Ringeisen, Bradley R

    2008-01-01

    Fundamental research into how microbes generate electricity within microbial fuel cells (MFCs) has far outweighed the practical application and large scale development of microbial energy harvesting devices. MFCs are considered alternatives to standard commercial polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell technology because the fuel supply does not need to be purified, ambient operating temperatures are maintained with biologically compatible materials, and the biological catalyst is self-regenerating. The generation of electricity during wastewater treatment using MFCs may profoundly affect the approach to anaerobic treatment technologies used in wastewater treatment as a result of developing this energy harvesting technology. However, the materials and engineering designs for MFCs were identical to commercial fuel cells until 2003. Compared to commercial fuel cells, MFCs will remain underdeveloped as long as low power densities are generated from the best systems. The variety of designs for MFCs has expanded rapidly in the last five years in the literature, but the patent protection has lagged behind. This review will cover recent and important patents relating to MFC designs and progress. PMID:19075862

  5. Design and development of synthetic microbial platform cells for bioenergy

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang Jun; Lee, Sang-Jae; Lee, Dong-Woo

    2013-01-01

    The finite reservation of fossil fuels accelerates the necessity of development of renewable energy sources. Recent advances in synthetic biology encompassing systems biology and metabolic engineering enable us to engineer and/or create tailor made microorganisms to produce alternative biofuels for the future bio-era. For the efficient transformation of biomass to bioenergy, microbial cells need to be designed and engineered to maximize the performance of cellular metabolisms for the production of biofuels during energy flow. Toward this end, two different conceptual approaches have been applied for the development of platform cell factories: forward minimization and reverse engineering. From the context of naturally minimized genomes,non-essential energy-consuming pathways and/or related gene clusters could be progressively deleted to optimize cellular energy status for bioenergy production. Alternatively, incorporation of non-indigenous parts and/or modules including biomass-degrading enzymes, carbon uptake transporters, photosynthesis, CO2 fixation, and etc. into chassis microorganisms allows the platform cells to gain novel metabolic functions for bioenergy. This review focuses on the current progress in synthetic biology-aided pathway engineering in microbial cells and discusses its impact on the production of sustainable bioenergy. PMID:23626588

  6. Osteoprotegerin Regulates Pancreatic β-Cell Homeostasis upon Microbial Invasion

    PubMed Central

    Kuroda, Yukiko; Maruyama, Kenta; Fujii, Hideki; Sugawara, Isamu; Ko, Shigeru B. H.; Yasuda, Hisataka; Matsui, Hidenori; Matsuo, Koichi

    2016-01-01

    Osteoprotegerin (OPG), a decoy receptor for receptor activator of NF-κB ligand (RANKL), antagonizes RANKL’s osteoclastogenic function in bone. We previously demonstrated that systemic administration of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) to mice elevates OPG levels and reduces RANKL levels in peripheral blood. Here, we show that mice infected with Salmonella, Staphylococcus, Mycobacteria or influenza virus also show elevated serum OPG levels. We then asked whether OPG upregulation following microbial invasion had an effect outside of bone. To do so, we treated mice with LPS and observed OPG production in pancreas, especially in β-cells of pancreatic islets. Insulin release following LPS administration was enhanced in mice lacking OPG, suggesting that OPG inhibits insulin secretion under acute inflammatory conditions. Consistently, treatment of MIN6 pancreatic β-cells with OPG decreased their insulin secretion following glucose stimulation in the presence of LPS. Finally, our findings suggest that LPS-induced OPG upregulation is mediated in part by activator protein (AP)-1 family transcription factors, particularly Fos proteins. Overall, we report that acute microbial infection elevates serum OPG, which maintains β-cell homeostasis by restricting glucose-stimulated insulin secretion, possibly preventing microbe-induced exhaustion of β-cell secretory capacity. PMID:26751951

  7. Design and development of synthetic microbial platform cells for bioenergy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang Jun; Lee, Sang-Jae; Lee, Dong-Woo

    2013-01-01

    The finite reservation of fossil fuels accelerates the necessity of development of renewable energy sources. Recent advances in synthetic biology encompassing systems biology and metabolic engineering enable us to engineer and/or create tailor made microorganisms to produce alternative biofuels for the future bio-era. For the efficient transformation of biomass to bioenergy, microbial cells need to be designed and engineered to maximize the performance of cellular metabolisms for the production of biofuels during energy flow. Toward this end, two different conceptual approaches have been applied for the development of platform cell factories: forward minimization and reverse engineering. From the context of naturally minimized genomes,non-essential energy-consuming pathways and/or related gene clusters could be progressively deleted to optimize cellular energy status for bioenergy production. Alternatively, incorporation of non-indigenous parts and/or modules including biomass-degrading enzymes, carbon uptake transporters, photosynthesis, CO2 fixation, and etc. into chassis microorganisms allows the platform cells to gain novel metabolic functions for bioenergy. This review focuses on the current progress in synthetic biology-aided pathway engineering in microbial cells and discusses its impact on the production of sustainable bioenergy.

  8. Chemical modulation of the ultra-weak photon emission from Saccharomyces cerevisiae and differentiated HL-60 cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Červinková, Kateřina; Nerudová, Michaela; Hašek, Jiří; Cifra, Michal

    2015-01-01

    The ultra-weak photon emission (UPE) is a universal phenomenon common to all cells with active oxidative metabolism. Generally accepted mechanism of the origin of the ultra-weak photon emission considers reactions of radical or nonradical reactive oxygen species (ROS) with biomolecules such as lipids and proteins which lead to the formation of electron excited species. During the transition to the ground state the excess energy is released as a photon with a wavelength in the visible range of the electromagnetic spectrum. Since the intensity of the light is very low it is possible to be measured only by highly sensitive devices. We used Hamamatsu Photonics PMT module H7360-01 mounted into a light-tight chamber for the purposes of this work. The goal of our research is to delineate an origin of UPE from two model organisms; differentiated HL-60 cells (human promyelocytic leukemia) and yeast cells Saccharomyces cerevisiae. While the UPE from the yeast cells arises spontaneously during the growth without any external stimuli, UPE from HL-60 is induced by phorbol 12-myristate, 13-acetate (PMA). It is possible to modulate the UPE production by certain antioxidants which scavenge ROS formed during the metabolism (yeast cells) or respiratory burst (HL-60 cells). The experiments are focused on the description of effects caused by antioxidants. Several kinds of antioxidants (ascorbic acid, mannitol, glutathione) with different concentration were used and we studied the changes in the UPE intensities of and the temporal developments of the optical signal.

  9. In silicio identification of glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol-anchored plasma-membrane and cell wall proteins of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Caro, L H; Tettelin, H; Vossen, J H; Ram, A F; van den Ende, H; Klis, F M

    1997-12-01

    Use of the Von Heijne algorithm allowed the identification of 686 open reading frames (ORFs) in the genome of Saccharomyces cerevisiae that encode proteins with a potential N-terminal signal sequence for entering the secretory pathway. On further analysis, 51 of these proteins contain a potential glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol (GPI)-attachment signal. Seven additional ORFs were found to belong to this group. Upon examination of the possible GPI-attachment sites, it was found that in yeast the most probable amino acids for GPI-attachment as asparagine and glycine. In yeast, GPI-proteins are found at the cell surface, either attached to the plasma-membrane or as an intrinsic part of the cell wall. It was noted that plasma-membrane GPI-proteins possess a dibasic residue motif just before their predicted GPI-attachment site. Based on this, and on homologies between proteins, families of plasma-membrane and cell wall proteins were assigned, revealing 20 potential plasma-membrane and 38 potential cell wall proteins. For members of three plasma-membrane protein families, a function has been described. On the other hand, most of the cell wall proteins seem to be structural components of the wall, responsive to different growth conditions. The GPI-attachment site of yeast slightly differs from mammalian cells. This might be of use in the development of anti-fungal drugs.

  10. The Cytosolic pH of Individual Saccharomyces cerevisiae Cells Is a Key Factor in Acetic Acid Tolerance.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Niño, Miguel; Marquina, Maribel; Swinnen, Steve; Rodríguez-Porrata, Boris; Nevoigt, Elke; Ariño, Joaquín

    2015-11-01

    It was shown recently that individual cells of an isogenic Saccharomyces cerevisiae population show variability in acetic acid tolerance, and this variability affects the quantitative manifestation of the trait at the population level. In the current study, we investigated whether cell-to-cell variability in acetic acid tolerance could be explained by the observed differences in the cytosolic pHs of individual cells immediately before exposure to the acid. Results obtained with cells of the strain CEN.PK113-7D in synthetic medium containing 96 mM acetic acid (pH 4.5) showed a direct correlation between the initial cytosolic pH and the cytosolic pH drop after exposure to the acid. Moreover, only cells with a low initial cytosolic pH, which experienced a less severe drop in cytosolic pH, were able to proliferate. A similar correlation between initial cytosolic pH and cytosolic pH drop was also observed in the more acid-tolerant strain MUCL 11987-9. Interestingly, a fraction of cells in the MUCL 11987-9 population showed initial cytosolic pH values below the minimal cytosolic pH detected in cells of the strain CEN.PK113-7D; consequently, these cells experienced less severe drops in cytosolic pH. Although this might explain in part the difference between the two strains with regard to the number of cells that resumed proliferation, it was observed that all cells from strain MUCL 11987-9 were able to proliferate, independently of their initial cytosolic pH. Therefore, other factors must also be involved in the greater ability of MUCL 11987-9 cells to endure strong drops in cytosolic pH.

  11. Size and Carbon Content of Sub-seafloor Microbial Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braun, S.; Morono, Y.; Littmann, S.; Jørgensen, B. B.; Lomstein, B. A.

    2015-12-01

    Into the seafloor, a radical decline in nutrient and energy availability poses strong metabolic demands to any residing life. However, a sedimentary microbial ecosystem seems to maintain itself close to what we understand to be the energetic limit of life. Since a complex sediment matrix is interfering with the analysis of whole cells and sub-cellular compounds such as cell wall and membrane molecules, little is known about the physiological properties of cells in the deep biosphere. Here we focus on the size and carbon content of cells from a 90-m sediment drill core retrieved in October 2013 at Landsort Deep, Baltic Sea, in 437 meters water depth. To determine their shape and volume, cells were separated from the sediment matrix by multi-layer density centrifugation and visualized via fluorescence microscopy (FM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and stimulated emission depletion microscopy (STED). Total cell-carbon was calculated from amino acid-carbon, which was analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography after cells had additionally been purified by fluorescence activated cell sorting (FACS). Cell-carbon turnover times were estimated using an amino acid racemization model that is based on the built-in molecular clock of aspartic acid, which due to racemization alternates between the D- and L-isomeric configurations over timescales of thousands of years at low in-situ temperatures (≈4˚C). We find that the majority of microbial cells in the sediment have coccoid or rod-shaped morphology, and that absolute values for cell volume are strongly dependent on the method used, spanning three orders of magnitude from approximately 0.001 to 1 µm3 for both coccoid and rod-shaped cells. From the surface to the deepest sample measured (≈60 mbsf), cell volume decreases by an order of magnitude, and carbon content is in the lower range (<20 fg C cell-1) of what has been reported in the literature as conversion factors. Cell-carbon is turned over approximately

  12. Self-Assembled Amyloid-Like Oligomeric-Cohesin Scaffoldin for Augmented Protein Display on the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Cell Surface

    PubMed Central

    Han, Zhenlin; Zhang, Bei; Wang, Yi E.; Zuo, Yi Y.

    2012-01-01

    In this study, a molecular self-assembly strategy to develop a novel protein scaffold for amplifying the extent and variety of proteins displayed on the surface of Saccharomyces cerevisiae is presented. The cellulosomal scaffolding protein cohesin and its upstream hydrophilic domain (HD) were genetically fused with the yeast Ure2p N-terminal fibrillogenic domain consisting of residues 1 to 80 (Ure2p1-80). The resulting Ure2p1-80-HD-cohesin fusion protein was successfully expressed in Escherichia coli to produce self-assembled supramolecular nanofibrils that serve as a novel protein scaffold displaying multiple copies of functional cohesin domains. The amyloid-like property of the nanofibrils was confirmed via thioflavin T staining and atomic force microscopy. These cohesin nanofibrils attached themselves, via a green fluorescent protein (GFP)-dockerin fusion protein, to the cell surface of S. cerevisiae engineered to display a GFP-nanobody. The excess cohesin units on the nanofibrils provide ample sites for binding to dockerin fusion proteins, as exemplified using an mCherry-dockerin fusion protein as well as the Clostridium cellulolyticum CelA endoglucanase. More than a 24-fold increase in mCherry fluorescence and an 8-fold increase in CelA activity were noted when the cohesin nanofibril scaffold-mediated yeast display was used, compared to using yeast display with GFP-cohesin that contains only a single copy of cohesin. Self-assembled supramolecular cohesin nanofibrils created by fusion with the yeast Ure2p fibrillogenic domain provide a versatile protein scaffold that expands the utility of yeast cell surface display. PMID:22344635

  13. High power density yeast catalyzed microbial fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganguli, Rahul

    Microbial fuel cells leverage whole cell biocatalysis to convert the energy stored in energy-rich renewable biomolecules such as sugar, directly to electrical energy at high efficiencies. Advantages of the process include ambient temperature operation, operation in natural streams such as wastewater without the need to clean electrodes, minimal balance-of-plant requirements compared to conventional fuel cells, and environmentally friendly operation. These make the technology very attractive as portable power sources and waste-to-energy converters. The principal problem facing the technology is the low power densities compared to other conventional portable power sources such as batteries and traditional fuel cells. In this work we examined the yeast catalyzed microbial fuel cell and developed methods to increase the power density from such fuel cells. A combination of cyclic voltammetry and optical absorption measurements were used to establish significant adsorption of electron mediators by the microbes. Mediator adsorption was demonstrated to be an important limitation in achieving high power densities in yeast-catalyzed microbial fuel cells. Specifically, the power densities are low for the length of time mediator adsorption continues to occur. Once the mediator adsorption stops, the power densities increase. Rotating disk chronoamperometry was used to extract reaction rate information, and a simple kinetic expression was developed for the current observed in the anodic half-cell. Since the rate expression showed that the current was directly related to microbe concentration close to the electrode, methods to increase cell mass attached to the anode was investigated. Electrically biased electrodes were demonstrated to develop biofilm-like layers of the Baker's yeast with a high concentration of cells directly connected to the electrode. The increased cell mass did increase the power density 2 times compared to a non biofilm fuel cell, but the power density

  14. Low Toxicity of Deoxynivalenol-3-Glucoside in Microbial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Tadahiro; Iwahashi, Yumiko

    2015-01-01

    Host plants excrete a glucosylation enzyme onto the plant surface that changes mycotoxins derived from fungal secondary metabolites to glucosylated products. Deoxynivalenol-3-glucoside (DON3G) is synthesized by grain uridine diphosphate-glucosyltransferase, and is found worldwide, although information on its toxicity is lacking. Here, we conducted growth tests and DNA microarray analysis to elucidate the characteristics of DON3G. The Saccharomyces cerevisiae PDR5 mutant strain exposed to DON3G demonstrated similar growth to the dimethyl sulfoxide control, and DNA microarray analysis revealed limited differences. Only 10 genes were extracted, and the expression profile of stress response genes was similar to that of DON, in contrast to metabolism genes like SER3, which encodes 3-phosphoglycerate dehydrogenase. Growth tests with Chlamydomonas reinhardtii also showed a similar growth rate to the control sample. These results suggest that DON3G has extremely low toxicity to these cells, and the glucosylation of mycotoxins is a useful protective mechanism not only for host plants, but also for other species. PMID:25609182

  15. Microbial electricity generation in rice paddy fields: recent advances and perspectives in rhizosphere microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Kouzuma, Atsushi; Kaku, Nobuo; Watanabe, Kazuya

    2014-12-01

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) are devices that use living microbes for the conversion of organic matter into electricity. MFC systems can be applied to the generation of electricity at water/sediment interfaces in the environment, such as bay areas, wetlands, and rice paddy fields. Using these systems, electricity generation in paddy fields as high as ∼80 mW m(-2) (based on the projected anode area) has been demonstrated, and evidence suggests that rhizosphere microbes preferentially utilize organic exudates from rice roots for generating electricity. Phylogenetic and metagenomic analyses have been conducted to identify the microbial species and catabolic pathways that are involved in the conversion of root exudates into electricity, suggesting the importance of syntrophic interactions. In parallel, pot cultures of rice and other aquatic plants have been used for rhizosphere MFC experiments under controlled laboratory conditions. The findings from these studies have demonstrated the potential of electricity generation for mitigating methane emission from the rhizosphere. Notably, however, the presence of large amounts of organics in the rhizosphere drastically reduces the effect of electricity generation on methane production. Further studies are necessary to evaluate the potential of these systems for mitigating methane emission from rice paddy fields. We suggest that paddy-field MFCs represent a promising approach for harvesting latent energy of the natural world.

  16. Cell-to-cell contact and antimicrobial peptides play a combined role in the death of Lachanchea thermotolerans during mixed-culture alcoholic fermentation with Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Kemsawasd, Varongsiri; Branco, Patrícia; Almeida, Maria Gabriela; Caldeira, Jorge; Albergaria, Helena; Arneborg, Nils

    2015-07-01

    The roles of cell-to-cell contact and antimicrobial peptides in the early death of Lachanchea thermotolerans CBS2803 during anaerobic, mixed-culture fermentations with Saccharomyces cerevisiae S101 were investigated using a commercially available, double-compartment fermentation system separated by cellulose membranes with different pore sizes, i.e. 1000 kDa for mixed- and single-culture fermentations, and 1000 and 3.5-5 kDa for compartmentalized-culture fermentations. SDS-PAGE and gel filtration chromatography were used to determine an antimicrobial peptidic fraction in the fermentations. Our results showed comparable amounts of the antimicrobial peptidic fraction in the inner compartments of the mixed-culture and 1000 kDa compartmentalized-culture fermentations containing L. thermotolerans after 4 days of fermentation, but a lower death rate of L. thermotolerans in the 1000 kDa compartmentalized-culture fermentation than in the mixed-culture fermentation. Furthermore, L. thermotolerans died off even more slowly in the 3.5-5 kDa than in the 1000 kDa compartmentalized-culture fermentation, which coincided with the presence of less of the antimicrobial peptidic fraction in the inner compartment of that fermentation than of the 1000 kDa compartmentalized-culture fermentation. Taken together, these results indicate that the death of L. thermotolerans in mixed cultures with S. cerevisiae is caused by a combination of cell-to-cell contact and antimicrobial peptides.

  17. a-Factor from Saccharomyces cerevisiae: partial characterization of a mating hormone produced by cells of mating type a.

    PubMed Central

    Betz, R; MacKay, V L; Duntze, W

    1977-01-01

    Conjugation between haploid cells of Saccharomyces cerevisiae is mediated through the action of diffusible mating hormones, two of which have been designated as a-factor and alpha-factor. Partially purified fractions exhibiting a-factor activity have been obtained from culture filtrates of a cells by ultrafiltration, ion-exchange chromatography, and gel filtration. The a-factor preparations specifically caused both G1 arrest and morphological alterations in cells of alpha-mating type, whereas a cells, a/alpha diploids, and nonmating alpha mutants were not affected. The a-factor activity was found in the culture filtrates of all a strains tested, but not in filtrates of alpha or a/alpha cell cultures. The hormone is sensitive to various proteases, showing that it is associated with a peptide or protein. Gel filtration studies suggest an apparent molecular weight greater than 600,000; however, this result may be due to aggregation with carbohydrate present in the preparations. Although the biological activities of a-factor are analogous to those described previously for alpha-factor, the chemical properties of these two hormones appear to be quite different. Images PMID:334743

  18. The PXL1 Gene of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Encodes a Paxillin-like Protein Functioning in Polarized Cell Growth

    PubMed Central

    Mackin, Nancy A.; Sousou, Tarek J.; Erdman, Scott E.

    2004-01-01

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae open reading frame YKR090w encodes a predicted protein displaying similarity in organization to paxillin, a scaffolding protein that organizes signaling and actin cytoskeletal regulating activities in many higher eucaryotic cell types. We found that YKR090w functions in a manner analogous to paxillin as a mediator of polarized cell growth; thus, we have named this gene PXL1 (Paxillin-like protein 1). Analyses of pxl1Δ strains show that PXL1 is required for the selection and maintenance of polarized growth sites during vegetative growth and mating. Genetic analyses of strains lacking both PXL1 and the Rho GAP BEM2 demonstrate that such cells display pronounced growth defects in response to different conditions causing Rho1 pathway activation. PXL1 also displays genetic interactions with the Rho1 effector FKS1. Pxl1p may therefore function as a modulator of Rho-GTPase signaling. A GFP::Pxl1 fusion protein localizes to sites of polarized cell growth. Experiments mapping the localization determinants of Pxl1p demonstrate the existence of localization mechanisms conserved between paxillin and Pxl1p and indicate an evolutionarily ancient and conserved role for LIM domain proteins in acting to modulate cell signaling and cytoskeletal organization during polarized growth. PMID:14767053

  19. Design of a microbial fuel cell and its transition to microbial electrolytic cell for hydrogen production by electrohydrogenesis.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Pratima; Parkhey, Piyush; Joshi, Komal; Mahilkar, Anjali

    2013-10-01

    Anaerobic bacteria were isolated from industrial wastewater and soil samples and tested for exoelectrogenic activity by current production in double chambered microbial fuel cell (MFC), which was further transitioned into a single chambered microbial electrolytic cell to test hydrogen production by electrohydrogenesis. Of all the cultures, the isolate from industrial water sample showed the maximum values for current = 0.161 mA, current density = 108.57 mA/m2 and power density = 48.85 mW/m2 with graphite electrode. Maximum voltage across the cell, however, was reported by the isolate from sewage water sample (506 mv) with copper as electrode. Tap water with KMnO4 was the best cathodic electrolyte as the highest values for all the measured MFC parameters were reported with it. Once the exoelectrogenic activity of the isolates was confirmed by current production, these were tested for hydrogen production in a single chambered microbial electrolytic cell (MEC) modified from the MFC. Hydrogen production was reported positive from co-culture of isolates of both the water samples and co-culture of one soil and one water sample. The maximum rate and yield of hydrogen production was 0.18 m3H2/m3/d and 3.2 mol H2/mol glucose respectively with total hydrogen production of 42.4 mL and energy recovery of 57.4%. Cumulative hydrogen production for a five day cycle of MEC operation was 0.16 m3H2/m3/d.

  20. Microbial fuel cells as pollutant treatment units: Research updates.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Quanguo; Hu, Jianjun; Lee, Duu-Jong

    2016-10-01

    Microbial fuel cells (MFC) are a device that can convert chemical energy in influent substances to electricity via biological pathways. Based on the consent that MFC technology should be applied as a waste/wastewater treatment unit rather than a renewable energy source, this mini-review discussed recent R&D efforts on MFC technologies for pollutant treatments and highlighted the challenges and research and development needs. Owing to the low power density levels achievable by larger-scale MFC, the MFC should be used as a device other than energy source such as being a pollutant treatment unit.

  1. Stacked microbial desalination cells to enhance water desalination efficiency.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xi; Xia, Xue; Liang, Peng; Cao, Xiaoxin; Sun, Haotian; Huang, Xia

    2011-03-15

    Microbial desalination cell (MDC) is a new method to obtain clean water from brackish water using electricity generated from organic matters by exoelectrogenic bacteria. Anions and cations, derived from salt solution filled in the desalination chamber between the anode and cathode, move to the anode and cathode chambers under the force of electrical field, respectively. On the basis of the primitive single-desalination-chambered MDC, stacked microbial desalination cells (SMDCs) were developed in order to promote the desalination rate in the present study. The effects of desalination chamber number and external resistance were investigated. Results showed that a remarkable increase in the total desalination rate (TDR) could be obtained by means of increasing the desalination cell number and reducing the external resistance, which caused the charge transfer efficiency increased since the SMDCs enabled more pairs of ions separated while one electron passed through the external circuit. The maximum TDR of 0.0252 g/h was obtained using a two-desalination-chambered SMDC with an external resistance of 10 Ω, which was 1.4 times that of single-desalination-chambered MDC. SMDCs proved to be an effective approach to increase the total water desalination rate if provided a proper desalination chamber number and external resistance.

  2. Environmental sensing of heavy metals through whole cell microbial biosensors: a synthetic biology approach.

    PubMed

    Bereza-Malcolm, Lara Tess; Mann, Gülay; Franks, Ashley Edwin

    2015-05-15

    Whole cell microbial biosensors are offering an alternative means for rapid, on-site heavy metal detection. Based in microorganisms, biosensing constructs are designed and constructed to produce both qualitative and quantitative outputs in response to heavy metal ions. Previous microbial biosensors designs are focused on single-input constructs; however, development of multiplexed systems is resulting in more flexible designs. The movement of microbial biosensors from laboratory based designs toward on-site, functioning heavy metal detectors has been hindered by the toxic nature of heavy metals, along with the lack of specificity of heavy metals promoter elements. Applying a synthetic biology approach with alternative microbial chassis may increase the robustness of microbial biosensors and mitigate these issues. Before full applications are achieved, further consideration has to be made regarding the risk and regulations of whole cell microbial biosensor use in the environment. To this end, a standard framework for future whole cell microbial biosensor design and use is proposed.

  3. Characterization of the Cell Surface Properties of Drinking Water Pathogens by Microbial Adhesion to Hydrocarbon and Electrophoretic Mobility Measurements

    EPA Science Inventory

    The surface characteristics of microbial cells directly influence their mobility and behavior within aqueous environments. The cell surface hydrophobicity (CSH) and electrophoretic mobility (EPM) of microbial cells impact a number of interactions and processes including aggregati...

  4. DNA Damage Response Checkpoint Activation Drives KP1019 Dependent Pre-Anaphase Cell Cycle Delay in S. cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Bierle, Lindsey A.; Reich, Kira L.; Taylor, Braden E.; Blatt, Eliot B.; Middleton, Sydney M.; Burke, Shawnecca D.; Stultz, Laura K.; Hanson, Pamela K.; Partridge, Janet F.; Miller, Mary E.

    2015-01-01

    Careful regulation of the cell cycle is required for proper replication, cell division, and DNA repair. DNA damage–including that induced by many anticancer drugs–results in cell cycle delay or arrest, which can allow time for repair of DNA lesions. Although its molecular mechanism of action remains a matter of debate, the anticancer ruthenium complex KP1019 has been shown to bind DNA in biophysical assays and to damage DNA of colorectal and ovarian cancer cells in vitro. KP1019 has also been shown to induce mutations and induce cell cycle arrest in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, suggesting that budding yeast can serve as an appropriate model for characterizing the cellular response to the drug. Here we use a transcriptomic approach to verify that KP1019 induces the DNA damage response (DDR) and find that KP1019 dependent expression of HUG1 requires the Dun1 checkpoint; both consistent with KP1019 DDR in budding yeast. We observe a robust KP1019 dependent delay in cell cycle progression as measured by increase in large budded cells, 2C DNA content, and accumulation of Pds1 which functions to inhibit anaphase. Importantly, we also find that deletion of RAD9, a gene required for the DDR, blocks drug-dependent changes in cell cycle progression, thereby establishing a causal link between the DDR and phenotypes induced by KP1019. Interestingly, yeast treated with KP1019 not only delay in G2/M, but also exhibit abnormal nuclear position, wherein the nucleus spans the bud neck. This morphology correlates with short, misaligned spindles and is dependent on the dynein heavy chain gene DYN1. We find that KP1019 creates an environment where cells respond to DNA damage through nuclear (transcriptional changes) and cytoplasmic (motor protein activity) events. PMID:26375390

  5. The conserved carboxy-terminal domain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae TFIID is sufficient to support normal cell growth.

    PubMed Central

    Poon, D; Schroeder, S; Wang, C K; Yamamoto, T; Horikoshi, M; Roeder, R G; Weil, P A

    1991-01-01

    We have examined the structure-function relationships of TFIID through in vivo complementation tests. A yeast strain was constructed which lacked the chromosomal copy of SPT15, the gene encoding TFIID, and was therefore dependent on a functional plasmid-borne wild-type copy of this gene for viability. By using the plasmid shuffle technique, the plasmid-borne wild-type TFIID gene was replaced with a family of plasmids containing a series of systematically mutated TFIID genes. These various forms of TFIID were expressed from three different promoter contexts of different strengths, and the ability of each mutant form of TFIID to complement our chromosomal TFIID null allele was assessed. We found that the first 61 amino acid residues of TFIID are totally dispensable for vegetative cell growth, since yeast strains containing this deleted form of TFIID grow at wild-type rates. Amino-terminally deleted TFIID was further shown to be able to function normally in vivo by virtue of its ability both to promote accurate transcription initiation from a large number of different genes and to interact efficiently with the Gal4 protein to activate transcription of GAL1 with essentially wild-type kinetics. Any deletion removing sequences from within the conserved carboxy-terminal region of S. cerevisiae TFIID was lethal. Further, the exact sequence of the conserved carboxy-terminal portion of the molecule is critical for function, since of several heterologous TFIID homologs tested, only the highly related Schizosaccharomyces pombe gene could complement our S. cerevisiae TFIID null mutant. Taken together, these data indicate that all important functional domains of TFIID appear to lie in its carboxy-terminal 179 amino acid residues. The significance of these findings regarding TFIID function are discussed. Images PMID:1922021

  6. Respiratory inhibitors affect incorporation of glucose into Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells, but not the activity of glucose transport.

    PubMed

    Walsh, M C; Smits, H P; van Dam, K

    1994-12-01

    Incubation of starved galactose-grown S. cerevisiae cells with cyanide reduced glucose uptake as measured over a 5-s period. The Vmax for glucose uptake was decreased by over a factor of two but the apparent affinity for glucose doubled. When measured in the sub-second time scale, however, there was no significant inhibition of glucose uptake, by cyanide, up to 200-ms, clearly demonstrating that, in cyanide treated cells, glucose uptake was not linear for the first 5-s. After a 200-ms exposure of untreated cells to radio-labelled glucose, less than 10% of the intracellular label resided in soluble uncharged compounds. In cyanide-treated cells up to 43% of the labelled compounds were uncharged, with a concurrent reduction of intracellular label residing in anionic compounds. The results suggest that, in the presence of 10 mM cyanide when respiration is inhibited, a reduction in the cellular ATP concentration causes a reduction in hexose-kinase activity which results in an accumulation of internal free glucose, which in turn causes a reduction in net glucose transport.

  7. Optimization of ethanol production from carob pod extract using immobilized Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells in a stirred tank bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Ercan, Yatmaz; Irfan, Turhan; Mustafa, Karhan

    2013-05-01

    In this study, optimization of ethanol production from carob pod extract was carried out by immobilized Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Results showed that Ca-alginate concentration and the amount of immobilized cells had significant effects on yield. Optimum conditions for ethanol fermentation were determined to be 2% Ca-alginate concentration, 150 rpm agitation rate, 5% yeast cells entrapped in beads and pH 5.5. After validation experiments; ethanol concentration, yield, production rate and sugar utilization rate were respectively 40.10 g/L, 46.32%, 3.19 g/L/h and 90.66%; and the fermentation time was decreased to 24 h. In addition, the immobilized cells were shown to be reusable for five cycles, though a decrease in yield was observed. Finally, carob pod extract was used for ethanol fermentation by controlled and uncontrolled pH without any enrichment, and the results suggest that carob extract can be utilized effectively by immobilized-cell fermentation without the use of enrichments to facilitate yeast growth.

  8. Symmetry, asymmetry, and kinetics of silencing establishment in Saccharomyces cerevisiae revealed by single-cell optical assays.

    PubMed

    Osborne, Erin A; Hiraoka, Yasushi; Rine, Jasper

    2011-01-25

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, silent chromatin inhibits the expression of genes at the HML, HMR, and telomeric loci. When silent chromatin forms de novo, the rate of its establishment is influenced by different chromatin states. In particular, loss of the enzyme Dot1, an H3 K79 methyltransferase, leads to rapid silencing establishment. We tested whether silencing establishment was antagonized by H3 K79 methylation or by the Dot1 protein itself competing with Sir3 for binding sites on nucleosomes. To do so, we monitored fluorescence activity in cells containing a GFP gene within the HML locus during silencing establishment in a series of dot1 and histone mutant backgrounds. Silencing establishment rate was correlated with Dot1's enzymatic function rather than with the Dot1 protein itself. In addition, histone mutants that mimicked the conformation of unmethylated H3 K79 increased the rate of silencing establishment, indicating that the H3 K79 residue affected silencing independently of Dot1 abundance. Using fluorophore-based reporters, we confirmed that mother and daughter cells often silence in concert, but in instances where asymmetric silencing occurs, daughter cells established silencing earlier than their mothers. This noninvasive technique enabled us to demonstrate an asymmetry in silencing establishment of a key regulatory locus controlling cell fate. PMID:21262833

  9. Superoxide triggers an acid burst in Saccharomyces cerevisiae to condition the environment of glucose-starved cells.

    PubMed

    Baron, J Allen; Laws, Kaitlin M; Chen, Janice S; Culotta, Valeria C

    2013-02-15

    Although yeast cells grown in abundant glucose tend to acidify their extracellular environment, they raise the pH of the environment when starved for glucose or when grown strictly with non-fermentable carbon sources. Following prolonged periods in this alkaline phase, Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells will switch to producing acid. The mechanisms and rationale for this "acid burst" were unknown. Herein we provide strong evidence for the role of mitochondrial superoxide in initiating the acid burst. Yeast mutants lacking the mitochondrial matrix superoxide dismutase (SOD2) enzyme, but not the cytosolic Cu,Zn-SOD1 enzyme, exhibited marked acceleration in production of acid on non-fermentable carbon sources. Acid production is also dramatically enhanced by the superoxide-producing agent, paraquat. Conversely, the acid burst is eliminated by boosting cellular levels of Mn-antioxidant mimics of SOD. We demonstrate that the acid burst is dependent on the mitochondrial aldehyde dehydrogenase Ald4p. Our data are consistent with a model in which mitochondrial superoxide damage to Fe-S enzymes in the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle leads to acetate buildup by Ald4p. The resultant expulsion of acetate into the extracellular environment can provide a new carbon source to glucose-starved cells and enhance growth of yeast. By triggering production of organic acids, mitochondrial superoxide has the potential to promote cell population growth under nutrient depravation stress.

  10. Maltose/proton co-transport in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Comparative study with cells and plasma membrane vesicles.

    PubMed Central

    Van Leeuwen, C C; Weusthuis, R A; Postma, E; Van den Broek, P J; Van Dijken, J P

    1992-01-01

    Maltose/proton co-transport was studied in intact cells and in plasma membrane vesicles of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In order to determine uphill transport in vesicles, plasma membranes were fused with proteoliposomes containing cytochrome c oxidase as a proton-motive force-generating system. Maltose accumulation, dependent on the electrical and pH gradients, was observed. The initial uptake velocity and accumulation ratio in vesicles proved to be dependent on the external pH. Moreover, kinetic analysis of maltose transport showed that Vmax. values greatly decreased with increasing pH, whereas the Km remained virtually constant. These observations were in good agreement with results obtained with intact cells, and suggest that proton binding to the carrier proceeds with an apparent pK of 5.7. The observation with intact cells that maltose is co-transported with protons in a one-to-one stoichiometry was ascertained in the vesicle system by measuring the balance between proton-motive force and the chemical maltose gradient. These results show that maltose transport in vesicles prepared by fusion of plasma membranes with cytochrome c oxidase proteoliposomes behaves in a similar way as in intact cells. It is therefore concluded that this vesicle model system offers a wide range of new possibilities for the study of maltose/proton co-transport in more detail. PMID:1318030

  11. Nanoparticle facilitated extracellular electron transfer in microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xiaocheng; Hu, Jinsong; Lieber, Alexander M; Jackan, Charles S; Biffinger, Justin C; Fitzgerald, Lisa A; Ringeisen, Bradley R; Lieber, Charles M

    2014-11-12

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) have been the focus of substantial research interest due to their potential for long-term, renewable electrical power generation via the metabolism of a broad spectrum of organic substrates, although the low power densities have limited their applications to date. Here, we demonstrate the potential to improve the power extraction by exploiting biogenic inorganic nanoparticles to facilitate extracellular electron transfer in MFCs. Simultaneous short-circuit current recording and optical imaging on a nanotechnology-enabled platform showed substantial current increase from Shewanella PV-4 after the formation of cell/iron sulfide nanoparticle aggregates. Detailed characterization of the structure and composition of the cell/nanoparticle interface revealed crystalline iron sulfide nanoparticles in intimate contact with and uniformly coating the cell membrane. In addition, studies designed to address the fundamental mechanisms of charge transport in this hybrid system showed that charge transport only occurred in the presence of live Shewanella, and moreover demonstrated that the enhanced current output can be attributed to improved electron transfer at cell/electrode interface and through the cellular-networks. Our approach of interconnecting and electrically contacting bacterial cells through biogenic nanoparticles represents a unique and promising direction in MFC research and has the potential to not only advance our fundamental knowledge about electron transfer processes in these biological systems but also overcome a key limitation in MFCs by constructing an electrically connected, three-dimensional cell network from the bottom-up.

  12. The Role of Soil Organic Matter, Nutrients, and Microbial Community Structure on the Performance of Microbial Fuel Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rooney-Varga, J. N.; Dunaj, S. J.; Vallino, J. J.; Hines, M. E.; Gay, M.; Kobyljanec, C.

    2011-12-01

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) offer the potential for generating electricity, mitigating greenhouse gas emissions, and bioremediating pollutants through utilization of a plentiful, natural, and renewable resource: soil organic carbon. In the current study, we analyzed microbial community structure, MFC performance, and soil characteristics in different microhabitats (bulk soil, anode, and cathode) within MFCs constructed from agricultural or forest soils in order to determine how soil type and microbial dynamics influence MFC performance. MFCs were constructed with soils from agricultural and hardwood forest sites at Harvard Forest (Petersham, MA). The bulk soil characteristics were analyzed, including polyphenols, short chain fatty acids, total organic C and N, abiotic macronutrients, N and P mineralization rates, CO2 respiration rates, and MFC power output. Microbial community structure of the anodes, cathodes, and bulk soils was determined with molecular fingerprinting methods, which included terminal restriction length polymorphism (T-RFLP) analysis and 16S rRNA gene sequencing analysis. Our results indicated that MFCs constructed from agricultural soil had power output about 17 times that of forest soil-based MFCs and respiration rates about 10 times higher than forest soil MFCs. Agricultural soil MFCs had lower C:N ratios, polyphenol content, and acetate concentrations than forest soil MFCs, suggesting that active agricultural MFC microbial communities were supported by higher quality organic carbon. Microbial community profile data indicate that the microbial communities at the anode of the high power MFCs were less diverse than in low power MFCs and were dominated by Deltaproteobacteria, Geobacter, and, to a lesser extent, Clostridia, while low-power MFC anode communities were dominated by Clostridia. These data suggest that the presence of organic carbon substrate (acetate) was not the major limiting factor in selecting for highly electrogenic microbial

  13. The a-factor transporter (STE6 gene product) and cell polarity in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    STE6 gene product is required for secretion of the lipopeptide mating pheromone a-factor by Saccharomyces cerevisiae MATa cells. Radiolabeling and immunoprecipitation, either with specific polyclonal antibodies raised against a TrpE-Ste6 fusion protein or with mAbs that recognize c-myc epitopes in fully functional epitope-tagged Ste6 derivatives, demonstrated that Ste6 is a 145-kD phosphoprotein. Subcellular fractionation, various extraction procedures, and immunoblotting showed that Ste6 is an intrinsic plasma membrane- associated protein. The apparent molecular weight of Ste6 was unaffected by tunicamycin treatment, and the radiolabeled protein did not bind to concanavalin A, indicating that Ste6 is not glycosylated and that glycosylation is not required either for its membrane delivery or its function. The amino acid sequence of Ste6 predicts two ATP- binding folds; correspondingly, Ste6 was photoaffinity-labeled specifically with 8-azido-[alpha-32P]ATP. Indirect immunofluorescence revealed that in exponentially growing MATa cells, the majority of Ste6 showed a patchy distribution within the plasma membrane, but a significant fraction was found concentrated in a number of vesicle-like bodies subtending the plasma membrane. In contrast, in MATa cells exposed to the mating pheromone alpha-factor, which markedly induced Ste6 production, the majority of Ste6 was incorporated into the plasma membrane within the growing tip of the elongating cells. The highly localized insertion of this transporter may establish pronounced anisotropy in a-factor secretion from the MATa cell, and thereby may contribute to the establishment of the cell polarity which restricts partner selection and cell fusion during mating to one MAT alpha cell. PMID:7679674

  14. Fermentative and growth performances of Dekkera bruxellensis in different batch systems and the effect of initial low cell counts in co-cultures with Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Meneghin, Maria Cristina; Bassi, Ana Paula Guarnieri; Codato, Carolina Brito; Reis, Vanda Renata; Ceccato-Antonini, Sandra Regina

    2013-08-01

    Dekkera bruxellensis is a multifaceted yeast present in the fermentative processes used for alcoholic beverage and fuel alcohol production - in the latter, normally regarded as a contaminant. We evaluated the fermentation and growth performance of a strain isolated from water in an alcohol-producing unit, in batch systems with/without cell recycling in pure and co-cultures with Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The ethanol resistance and aeration dependence for ethanol/acid production were verified. Ethanol had an effect on the growth of D. bruxellensis in that it lowered or inhibited growth depending on the concentration. Acid production was verified in agitated cultures either with glucose or sucrose, but more ethanol was produced with glucose in agitated cultures. Regardless of the batch system, low sugar consumption and alcohol production and expressive growth were found with D. bruxellensis. Despite a similar ethanol yield compared to S. cerevisiae in the batch system without cell recycling, ethanol productivity was approximately four times lower. However, with cell recycling, ethanol yield was almost half that of S. cerevisiae. At initial low cell counts of D. bruxellensis (10 and 1000 cells/ml) in co-cultures with S. cerevisiae, a decrease in fermentative efficiency and a substantial growth throughout the fermentative cycles were displayed by D. bruxellensis. Due to the peculiarity of cell repitching in Brazilian fermentation processes, D. bruxellensis is able to establish itself in the process, even when present in low numbers initially, substantially impairing bioethanol production due to the low ethanol productivity, in spite of comparable ethanol yields. PMID:23658026

  15. Nitrite as a candidate substrate in microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Faraghi, Neda; Ebrahimi, Sirous

    2012-08-01

    Current generation using nitrite as substrate (pH 6.9, 40 mgN l(-1)) in a nitrite-fed microbial fuel cell was investigated under anaerobic and aerobic anodic conditions as an alternative to the biological nitrite oxidation process. Cell current, coulombic efficiency (CE) and power generation of 0.04 mA, 30 ± 2 % and 19.3 ± 3.3 μW m(-2), respectively, were observed under anaerobic conditions while complete nitrite degradation (no current) was obtained under aerobic conditions. Switching from aerobic to anaerobic anode enhanced the CE and power generation (39 ± 1 % and 29 ± 4.3 μW m(-2)).

  16. The Saccharomyces cerevisiae RNase mitochondrial RNA processing is critical for cell cycle progression at the end of mitosis.

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Ti; Aulds, Jason; Gill, Tina; Cerio, Michael; Schmitt, Mark E

    2002-01-01

    We have identified a cell cycle delay in Saccharomyces cerevisiae RNase MRP mutants. Mutants delay with large budded cells, dumbbell-shaped nuclei, and extended spindles characteristic of "exit from mitosis" mutants. In accord with this, a RNase MRP mutation can be suppressed by overexpressing the polo-like kinase CDC5 or by deleting the B-type cyclin CLB1, without restoring the MRP-dependent rRNA-processing step. In addition, we identified a series of genetic interactions between RNase MRP mutations and mutations in CDC5, CDC14, CDC15, CLB2, and CLB5. As in most "exit from mitosis" mutants, levels of the Clb2 cyclin were increased. The buildup of Clb2 protein is not the result of a defect in the release of the Cdc14 phosphatase from the nucleolus, but rather the result of an increase in CLB2 mRNA levels. These results indicate a clear role of RNase MRP in cell cycle progression at the end of mitosis. Conservation of this function in humans may explain many of the pleiotropic phenotypes of cartilage hair hypoplasia. PMID:12136008

  17. The ATX1 gene of Saccharomyces cerevisiae encodes a small metal homeostasis factor that protects cells against reactive oxygen toxicity.

    PubMed Central

    Lin, S J; Culotta, V C

    1995-01-01

    In aerobic organisms, protection against oxidative damage involves the combined action of highly specialized antioxidant enzymes, such as superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase. Here we describe the isolation and characterization of another gene in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae that plays a critical role in detoxification of reactive oxygen species. This gene, named ATX1, was originally isolated by its ability to suppress oxygen toxicity in yeast lacking SOD. ATX1 encodes a 8.2-kDa polypeptide exhibiting significant similarity and identity to various bacterial metal transporters. Potential ATX1 homologues were also identified in multicellular eukaryotes, including the plants Arabidopsis thaliana and Oryza sativa and the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. In yeast cells, ATX1 evidently acts in the transport and/or partitioning of copper, and this role in copper homeostasis appears to be directly relevant to the ATX1 suppression of oxygen toxicity: ATX1 was incapable of compensating for SOD when cells were depleted of exogenous copper. Strains containing a deletion in the chromosomal ATX1 locus were generated. Loss of ATX1 function rendered both mutant and wild-type SOD strains hypersensitive toward paraquat (a generator of superoxide anion) and was also associated with an increased sensitivity toward hydrogen peroxide. Hence, ATX1 protects cells against the toxicity of both superoxide anion and hydrogen peroxide. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:7731983

  18. Regulation of Cdc28 Cyclin-Dependent Protein Kinase Activity during the Cell Cycle of the Yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Mendenhall, Michael D.; Hodge, Amy E.

    1998-01-01

    The cyclin-dependent protein kinase (CDK) encoded by CDC28 is the master regulator of cell division in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. By mechanisms that, for the most part, remain to be delineated, Cdc28 activity controls the timing of mitotic commitment, bud initiation, DNA replication, spindle formation, and chromosome separation. Environmental stimuli and progress through the cell cycle are monitored through checkpoint mechanisms that influence Cdc28 activity at key cell cycle stages. A vast body of information concerning how Cdc28 activity is timed and coordinated with various mitotic events has accrued. This article reviews that literature. Following an introduction to the properties of CDKs common to many eukaryotic species, the key influences on Cdc28 activity—cyclin-CKI binding and phosphorylation-dephosphorylation events—are examined. The processes controlling the abundance and activity of key Cdc28 regulators, especially transcriptional and proteolytic mechanisms, are then discussed in detail. Finally, the mechanisms by which environmental stimuli influence Cdc28 activity are summarized. PMID:9841670

  19. Enhancement of electricity production by graphene oxide in soil microbial fuel cells and plant microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Goto, Yuko; Yoshida, Naoko; Umeyama, Yuto; Yamada, Takeshi; Tero, Ryugo; Hiraishi, Akira

    2015-01-01

    The effects of graphene oxide (GO) on electricity generation in soil microbial fuel cells (SMFCs) and plant microbial fuel cell (PMFCs) were investigated. GO at concentrations ranging from 0 to 1.9 g⋅kg(-1) was added to soil and reduced for 10 days under anaerobic incubation. All SMFCs (GO-SMFCs) utilizing the soils incubated with GO produced electricity at a greater rate and in higher quantities than the SMFCs which did not contain GO. In fed-batch operations, the overall average electricity generation in GO-SMFCs containing 1.0 g⋅kg(-1) of GO was 40 ± 19 mW⋅m(-2), which was significantly higher than the value of 6.6 ± 8.9 mW⋅m(-2) generated from GO-free SMFCs (p < 0.05). The increase in catalytic current at the oxidative potential was observed by cyclic voltammetry (CV) for GO-SMFC, with the CV curve suggesting the enhancement of electron transfer from oxidation of organic substances in the soil by the reduced form of GO. The GO-containing PMFC also displayed a greater generation of electricity compared to the PMFC with no added GO, with GO-PMFC producing 49 mW⋅m(-2) of electricity after 27 days of operation. Collectively, this study demonstrates that GO added to soil can be microbially reduced in soil, and facilitates electron transfer to the anode in both SMFCs and PMFCs.

  20. Enhancement of Electricity Production by Graphene Oxide in Soil Microbial Fuel Cells and Plant Microbial Fuel Cells

    PubMed Central

    Goto, Yuko; Yoshida, Naoko; Umeyama, Yuto; Yamada, Takeshi; Tero, Ryugo; Hiraishi, Akira

    2015-01-01

    The effects of graphene oxide (GO) on electricity generation in soil microbial fuel cells (SMFCs) and plant microbial fuel cell (PMFCs) were investigated. GO at concentrations ranging from 0 to 1.9 g⋅kg−1 was added to soil and reduced for 10 days under anaerobic incubation. All SMFCs (GO-SMFCs) utilizing the soils incubated with GO produced electricity at a greater rate and in higher quantities than the SMFCs which did not contain GO. In fed-batch operations, the overall average electricity generation in GO-SMFCs containing 1.0 g⋅kg−1 of GO was 40 ± 19 mW⋅m−2, which was significantly higher than the value of 6.6 ± 8.9 mW⋅m−2 generated from GO-free SMFCs (p < 0.05). The increase in catalytic current at the oxidative potential was observed by cyclic voltammetry (CV) for GO-SMFC, with the CV curve suggesting the enhancement of electron transfer from oxidation of organic substances in the soil by the reduced form of GO. The GO-containing PMFC also displayed a greater generation of electricity compared to the PMFC with no added GO, with GO-PMFC producing 49 mW⋅m−2 of electricity after 27 days of operation. Collectively, this study demonstrates that GO added to soil can be microbially reduced in soil, and facilitates electron transfer to the anode in both SMFCs and PMFCs. PMID:25883931

  1. [Production of β-carotene by metabolically engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae].

    PubMed

    Wang, Beibei; Shi, Mingyu; Wang, Dong; Xu, Jiaoyang; Liu, Yi; Yang, Hongjiang; Dai, Zhubo; Zhang, Xueli

    2014-08-01

    β-carotene has a wide range of application in food, pharmaceutical and cosmetic industries. For microbial production of β-carotene in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the supply of geranylgeranyl diphosphate (GGPP) was firstly increased in S. cerevisiae BY4742 to obtain strain BY4742-T2 through over-expressing truncated 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase (tHMGR), which is the major rate-limiting enzyme in the mevalonate (MVA) pathway, and GGPP synthase (GGPS), which is a key enzyme in the diterpenoid synthetic pathway. The β-carotene synthetic genes of Pantoea agglomerans and Xanthophyllomyces dendrorhous were further integrated into strain BY4742-T2 for comparing β-carotene production. Over-expression of tHMGR and GGPS genes led to 26.0-fold increase of β-carotene production. In addition, genes from X. dendrorhous was more efficient than those from P. agglomerans for β-carotene production in S. cerevisiae. Strain BW02 was obtained which produced 1.56 mg/g (dry cell weight) β-carotene, which could be used further for constructing cell factories for β-carotene production. PMID:25507473

  2. [Production of β-carotene by metabolically engineered Saccharomyces cerevisiae].

    PubMed

    Wang, Beibei; Shi, Mingyu; Wang, Dong; Xu, Jiaoyang; Liu, Yi; Yang, Hongjiang; Dai, Zhubo; Zhang, Xueli

    2014-08-01

    β-carotene has a wide range of application in food, pharmaceutical and cosmetic industries. For microbial production of β-carotene in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the supply of geranylgeranyl diphosphate (GGPP) was firstly increased in S. cerevisiae BY4742 to obtain strain BY4742-T2 through over-expressing truncated 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase (tHMGR), which is the major rate-limiting enzyme in the mevalonate (MVA) pathway, and GGPP synthase (GGPS), which is a key enzyme in the diterpenoid synthetic pathway. The β-carotene synthetic genes of Pantoea agglomerans and Xanthophyllomyces dendrorhous were further integrated into strain BY4742-T2 for comparing β-carotene production. Over-expression of tHMGR and GGPS genes led to 26.0-fold increase of β-carotene production. In addition, genes from X. dendrorhous was more efficient than those from P. agglomerans for β-carotene production in S. cerevisiae. Strain BW02 was obtained which produced 1.56 mg/g (dry cell weight) β-carotene, which could be used further for constructing cell factories for β-carotene production. PMID:25423750

  3. Genomic Sequencing of Single Microbial Cells from Environmental Samples

    SciTech Connect

    Ishoey, Thomas; Woyke, Tanja; Stepanauskas, Ramunas; Novotny, Mark; Lasken, Roger S.

    2008-02-01

    Recently developed techniques allow genomic DNA sequencing from single microbial cells [Lasken RS: Single-cell genomic sequencing using multiple displacement amplification, Curr Opin Microbiol 2007, 10:510-516]. Here, we focus on research strategies for putting these methods into practice in the laboratory setting. An immediate consequence of single-cell sequencing is that it provides an alternative to culturing organisms as a prerequisite for genomic sequencing. The microgram amounts of DNA required as template are amplified from a single bacterium by a method called multiple displacement amplification (MDA) avoiding the need to grow cells. The ability to sequence DNA from individual cells will likely have an immense impact on microbiology considering the vast numbers of novel organisms, which have been inaccessible unless culture-independent methods could be used. However, special approaches have been necessary to work with amplified DNA. MDA may not recover the entire genome from the single copy present in most bacteria. Also, some sequence rearrangements can occur during the DNA amplification reaction. Over the past two years many research groups have begun to use MDA, and some practical approaches to single-cell sequencing have been developed. We review the consensus that is emerging on optimum methods, reliability of amplified template, and the proper interpretation of 'composite' genomes which result from the necessity of combining data from several single-cell MDA reactions in order to complete the assembly. Preferred laboratory methods are considered on the basis of experience at several large sequencing centers where >70% of genomes are now often recovered from single cells. Methods are reviewed for preparation of bacterial fractions from environmental samples, single-cell isolation, DNA amplification by MDA, and DNA sequencing.

  4. Integrated hydrogen production process from cellulose by combining dark fermentation, microbial fuel cells, and a microbial electrolysis cell.

    PubMed

    Wang, Aijie; Sun, Dan; Cao, Guangli; Wang, Haoyu; Ren, Nanqi; Wu, Wei-Min; Logan, Bruce E

    2011-03-01

    Hydrogen gas production from cellulose was investigated using an integrated hydrogen production process consisting of a dark fermentation reactor and microbial fuel cells (MFCs) as power sources for a microbial electrolysis cell (MEC). Two MFCs (each 25 mL) connected in series to an MEC (72 mL) produced a maximum of 0.43 V using fermentation effluent as a feed, achieving a hydrogen production rate from the MEC of 0.48 m(3) H(2)/m(3)/d (based on the MEC volume), and a yield of 33.2 mmol H(2)/g COD removed in the MEC. The overall hydrogen production for the integrated system (fermentation, MFC and MEC) was increased by 41% compared with fermentation alone to 14.3 mmol H(2)/g cellulose, with a total hydrogen production rate of 0.24 m(3) H(2)/m(3)/d and an overall energy recovery efficiency of 23% (based on cellulose removed) without the need for any external electrical energy input.

  5. Atomic Force Microscopy in Microbiology: New Structural and Functional Insights into the Microbial Cell Surface

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Microbial cells sense and respond to their environment using their surface constituents. Therefore, understanding the assembly and biophysical properties of cell surface molecules is an important research topic. With its ability to observe living microbial cells at nanometer resolution and to manipulate single-cell surface molecules, atomic force microscopy (AFM) has emerged as a powerful tool in microbiology. Here, we survey major breakthroughs made in cell surface microbiology using AFM techniques, emphasizing the most recent structural and functional insights. PMID:25053785

  6. Towards an engineering-oriented strategy for building microbial anodes for microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Pocaznoi, Diana; Erable, Benjamin; Etcheverry, Luc; Delia, Marie-Line; Bergel, Alain

    2012-10-14

    The objective of the work was to give some first insight into an engineering-oriented approach to MFC design by focusing on anode optimisation. The effect of various parameters was firstly investigated in half cell set-ups under well-controlled conditions. Microbial anodes were formed from soil leachate under polarisation at -0.2 V vs. SCE with different concentrations of substrate, salt and buffer. It was shown that non-turnover CV could be used to assess the electroactive maturity of the anodes during polarisation. This first phase resulted in the definition of a set of optimal parameter values. In the second phase, an optimal anode was formed in a half-cell under the defined optimal conditions. A numerical approach was then developed to calculate the theoretical maximum power that the anode could provide in an ideal MFC. The concept of "ideal MFC" introduced here allowed the theoretical maximum power to be calculated on the sole basis of the kinetic characteristics of the anode. Finally, a MFC designed in the aim of approaching such ideal conditions generated stable power densities of 6.0 W m(-2), which were among the highest values reported so far. The discrepancy between the theoretical maximum (8.9 W m(-2)) and the experimental results pointed out some limit due to the source of inoculum and suggested possible paths to improvement.

  7. Molecular Basis for Strain Variation in the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Adhesin Flo11p

    PubMed Central

    Li, Li; Lipke, Peter N.; Dranginis, Anne M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT FLO11 encodes a yeast cell wall flocculin that mediates a variety of adhesive phenotypes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Flo11p is implicated in many developmental processes, including flocculation, formation of pseudohyphae, agar invasion, and formation of microbial mats and biofilms. However, Flo11p mediates different processes in different yeast strains. To investigate the mechanisms by which FLO11 determines these differences in colony morphology, flocculation, and invasion, we studied gene structure, function, and expression levels. Nonflocculent Saccharomyces cerevisiae Σ1278b cells exhibited significantly higher FLO11 mRNA expression, especially in the stationary phase, than highly flocculent S. cerevisiae var. diastaticus. The two strains varied in cell surface hydrophobicity, and Flo11p contributed significantly to surface hydrophobicity in S. cerevisiae var. diastaticus but not in strain Σ1278b. Sequencing of the FLO11 gene in S. cerevisiae var. diastaticus revealed strain-specific differences, including a 15-amino-acid insertion in the adhesion domain. Flo11p adhesion domains from strain Σ1278b and S. cerevisiae var. diastaticus were expressed and used to coat magnetic beads. The adhesion domain from each strain bound preferentially to homologous cells, and the preferences were independent of the cells in which the adhesion domains were produced. These results are consistent with the idea that strain-specific variations in the amino acid sequences in the adhesion domains cause different Flo11p flocculation activities. The results also imply that strain-specific differences in expression levels, posttranslational modifications, and allelic differences outside the adhesion domains have little effect on flocculation. IMPORTANCE As a nonmotile organism, Saccharomyces cerevisiae employs the cell surface flocculin Flo11/Muc1 as an important means of adapting to environmental change. However, there is a great deal of strain variation in the

  8. Molecular Basis for Strain Variation in the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Adhesin Flo11p.

    PubMed

    Barua, Subit; Li, Li; Lipke, Peter N; Dranginis, Anne M

    2016-01-01

    FLO11 encodes a yeast cell wall flocculin that mediates a variety of adhesive phenotypes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Flo11p is implicated in many developmental processes, including flocculation, formation of pseudohyphae, agar invasion, and formation of microbial mats and biofilms. However, Flo11p mediates different processes in different yeast strains. To investigate the mechanisms by which FLO11 determines these differences in colony morphology, flocculation, and invasion, we studied gene structure, function, and expression levels. Nonflocculent Saccharomyces cerevisiae Σ1278b cells exhibited significantly higher FLO11 mRNA expression, especially in the stationary phase, than highly flocculent S. cerevisiae var. diastaticus. The two strains varied in cell surface hydrophobicity, and Flo11p contributed significantly to surface hydrophobicity in S. cerevisiae var. diastaticus but not in strain Σ1278b. Sequencing of the FLO11 gene in S. cerevisiae var. diastaticus revealed strain-specific differences, including a 15-amino-acid insertion in the adhesion domain. Flo11p adhesion domains from strain Σ1278b and S. cerevisiae var. diastaticus were expressed and used to coat magnetic beads. The adhesion domain from each strain bound preferentially to homologous cells, and the preferences were independent of the cells in which the adhesion domains were produced. These results are consistent with the idea that strain-specific variations in the amino acid sequences in the adhesion domains cause different Flo11p flocculation activities. The results also imply that strain-specific differences in expression levels, posttranslational modifications, and allelic differences outside the adhesion domains have little effect on flocculation. IMPORTANCE As a nonmotile organism, Saccharomyces cerevisiae employs the cell surface flocculin Flo11/Muc1 as an important means of adapting to environmental change. However, there is a great deal of strain variation in the expression of

  9. Sorption of trivalent cerium by a mixture of microbial cells and manganese oxides: Effect of microbial cells on the oxidation of trivalent cerium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohnuki, Toshihiko; Jiang, Mingyu; Sakamoto, Fuminori; Kozai, Naofumi; Yamasaki, Shinya; Yu, Qianqian; Tanaka, Kazuya; Utsunomiya, Satoshi; Xia, Xiaobin; Yang, Ke; He, Jianhua

    2015-08-01

    Sorption of Ce by mixtures of synthetic Mn oxides and microbial cells of Pseudomonas fluorescens was investigated to elucidate the role of microorganisms on Ce(III) oxidative migration in the environment. The mixtures, upon which Ce was sorbed following exposure to solutions containing 1.0 × 10-4 or 1.0 × 10-5 mol L-1 Ce(III), were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM-EDS) and micro-X-ray fluorescence (micro-XRF) at synchrotron facilities. A Ce LIII-edge micro XANES spectra analysis was also performed to determine the oxidation states of Ce adsorbed to the Mn oxides and microbial cells in the mixtures. The distribution ratios (Kd) of Ce between the individual solids and solution increased with increasing pH of the solution, and was nearly the same in mixtures containing varying amounts of microbial cells. SEM-EDS and micro-XRF analyses showed that Ce was sorbed by both MnO2 and microbial cells (1.7 × 10-1 or 3.3 × 10-1 g L-1). In addition, nano-particles containing Ce and P developed on the surface of the microbial cells. XANES analysis showed that lower fractions of Ce(III) were oxidized to Ce(IV) in the mixtures containing greater amounts of microbial cells. Micro-XANES analysis revealed that Ce was present as Ce(III) on the microbial cells and as Ce(IV) on Mn oxides. These results strongly suggest that the association of Ce(III) with the microbial cell surface and the formation of Ce phosphate nano-particles are responsible for suppressing the oxidation of Ce(III) to Ce(IV) in the mixtures.

  10. Flow cytometry and cell sorting of heterogeneous microbial populations: the importance of single-cell analyses.

    PubMed Central

    Davey, H M; Kell, D B

    1996-01-01

    The most fundamental questions such as whether a cell is alive, in the sense of being able to divide or to form a colony, may sometimes be very hard to answer, since even axenic microbial cultures are extremely heterogeneous. Analyses that seek to correlate such things as viability, which is a property of an individual cell, with macroscopic measurements of culture variables such as ATP content, respiratory activity, and so on, must inevitably fail. It is therefore necessary to make physiological measurements on individual cells. Flow cytometry is such a technique, which allows one to analyze cells rapidly and individually and permits the quantitative analysis of microbial heterogeneity. It therefore offers many advantages over conventional measurements for both routine and more exploratory analyses of microbial properties. While the technique has been widely applied to the study of mammalian cells, is use in microbiology has until recently been much more limited, largely because of the smaller size of microbes and the consequently smaller optical signals obtainable from them. Since these technical barriers no longer hold, flow cytometry with appropriate stains has been used for the rapid discrimination and identification of microbial cells, for the rapid assessment of viability and of the heterogeneous distributions of a wealth of other more detailed physiological properties, for the analysis of antimicrobial drug-cell interactions, and for the isolation of high-yielding strains of biotechnological interest. Flow cytometric analyses provide an abundance of multivariate data, and special methods have been devised to exploit these. Ongoing advances mean that modern flow cytometers may now be used by nonspecialists to effect a renaissance in our understanding of microbial heterogeneity. PMID:8987359

  11. Stimulating sediment bioremediation with benthic microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Wen-Wei; Yu, Han-Qing

    2015-01-01

    Efficient and sustainable technologies for cleaning up of contaminated sediments are under urgent demand. Bioremediation by utilizing the natural metabolic activities of sediment-inhabited microorganisms has been widely accepted as a viable option, but the relatively low efficiency and poor controllability severely limite its application. Here, we bring out the concept that electrochemical approaches may be used as an efficient means to stimulate sediment bioremediation. Although still at the very beginning, benthic microbial fuel cells (BMFC) as a remediation technology show many potential benefits, such as accelerated decontamination, self-sustained operation, relatively easy deployment and control, and environmental benignity. The unique features of BMFC setup and operation also give rise to substantially different challenges compared to conventional MFCs. In this review, we present a critical overview on the characteristics, possible application niches, and state-of-the-art progress of this technology. Especially, the current limitations in respect of system design, electrode selection, microbial control and selection of deployment environment are discussed in details, and the needed future research endeavors to promote its practical application are highlighted.

  12. Electricity generation from tetrathionate in microbial fuel cells by acidophiles.

    PubMed

    Sulonen, Mira L K; Kokko, Marika E; Lakaniemi, Aino-Maija; Puhakka, Jaakko A

    2015-03-01

    Inorganic sulfur compounds, such as tetrathionate, are often present in mining process and waste waters. The biodegradation of tetrathionate was studied under acidic conditions in aerobic batch cultivations and in anaerobic anodes of two-chamber flow-through microbial fuel cells (MFCs). All four cultures originating from biohydrometallurgical process waters from multimetal ore heap bioleaching oxidized tetrathionate aerobically at pH below 3 with sulfate as the main soluble metabolite. In addition, all cultures generated electricity from tetrathionate in MFCs at pH below 2.5 with ferric iron as the terminal cathodic electron acceptor. The maximum current and power densities during MFC operation and in the performance analysis were 79.6 mA m(-2) and 13.9 mW m(-2) and 433 mA m(-2) and 17.6 mW m(-2), respectively. However, the low coulombic efficiency (below 5%) indicates that most of the electrons were directed to other processes, such as aerobic oxidation of tetrathionate and unmeasured intermediates. The microbial community analysis revealed that the dominant species both in the anolyte and on the anode electrode surface of the MFCs were Acidithiobacillus spp. and Ferroplasma spp. This study provides a proof of concept that tetrathionate serves as electron donor for biological electricity production in the pH range of 1.2-2.5.

  13. Optical manipulation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells reveals that green light protection against UV irradiation is favored by low Ca2+ and requires intact UPR pathway.

    PubMed

    Farcasanu, Ileana C; Mitrica, Radu; Cristache, Ligia; Nicolau, Ioana; Ruta, Lavinia L; Paslaru, Liliana; Comorosan, Sorin

    2013-11-01

    Optical manipulation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells with high density green photons conferred protection against the deleterious effects of UV radiation. Combining chemical screening with UV irradiation of yeast cells, it was noted that the high density green photons relied on the presence of intact unfolded protein response (UPR) pathway to exert their protective effect and that the low Ca(2+) conditions boosted the effect. UPR chemical inducers tunicamycin, dithiotreitol and calcium chelators augmented the green light effect in a synergic action against UV-induced damage. Photo-manipulation of cells was a critical factor since the maximum protection was achieved only when cells were pre-exposed to green light. PMID:24056073

  14. Optical manipulation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells reveals that green light protection against UV irradiation is favored by low Ca2+ and requires intact UPR pathway.

    PubMed

    Farcasanu, Ileana C; Mitrica, Radu; Cristache, Ligia; Nicolau, Ioana; Ruta, Lavinia L; Paslaru, Liliana; Comorosan, Sorin

    2013-11-01

    Optical manipulation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells with high density green photons conferred protection against the deleterious effects of UV radiation. Combining chemical screening with UV irradiation of yeast cells, it was noted that the high density green photons relied on the presence of intact unfolded protein response (UPR) pathway to exert their protective effect and that the low Ca(2+) conditions boosted the effect. UPR chemical inducers tunicamycin, dithiotreitol and calcium chelators augmented the green light effect in a synergic action against UV-induced damage. Photo-manipulation of cells was a critical factor since the maximum protection was achieved only when cells were pre-exposed to green light.

  15. Synthesis of FUDP-N-acetylglucosamine and FUDP-glucose in Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells treated with 5-fluorouracil.

    PubMed

    Günther Sillero, María A; Pérez-Zúñiga, Francisco; Gomes, Joana; de Carvalho, Ana Isabel; Martins, Susana; Silles, Eduardo; Sillero, Antonio

    2008-03-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells (strain W303-1A) treated with 5-fluorouracil and grown in 2% (fermentative conditions) or in 0.1% glucose (oxidative conditions) accumulated two types of 5-fluoro-UDP-sugars (FUDP-sugars): FUDP-N-acetylglucosamine and FUDP-glucose. No difference was observed in both conditions of culture. The viability of yeast cells on treatment with 5-fluorouracil was also followed. Both FUDP-sugars were partially purified by column chromatography (on Hypersil ODS and Mono Q columns) and characterized by: (i) treatment with alkaline phosphatase (EC 3.1.3.1), snake venom phosphodiesterase (EC 3.1.4.1) and UDP-glucose dehydrogenase (EC 1.1.1.22); (ii) UV spectra; and (iii) matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight mass analysis and 1H-nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometry. The syntheses of both FUDP-sugars were inversely related to the concentration of uracil and directly related to the concentration of 5-fluorouracil in the culture medium. The strain W303-1A, requiring uracil for growth, was useful as a tool to analyze the effect of 5-fluorouracil on nucleotide metabolism.

  16. Whole-cell imaging of the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae by high-voltage scanning transmission electron tomography.

    PubMed

    Murata, Kazuyoshi; Esaki, Masatoshi; Ogura, Teru; Arai, Shigeo; Yamamoto, Yuta; Tanaka, Nobuo

    2014-11-01

    Electron tomography using a high-voltage electron microscope (HVEM) provides three-dimensional information about cellular components in sections thicker than 1 μm, although in bright-field mode image degradation caused by multiple inelastic scattering of transmitted electrons limit the attainable resolution. Scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) is believed to give enhanced contrast and resolution compared to conventional transmission electron microscopy (CTEM). Samples up to 1 μm in thickness have been analyzed with an intermediate-voltage electron microscope because inelastic scattering is not a critical limitation, and probe broadening can be minimized. Here, we employed STEM at 1 MeV high-voltage to extend the useful specimen thickness for electron tomography, which we demonstrate by a seamless tomographic reconstruction of a whole, budding Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast cell, which is ~3 μm in thickness. High-voltage STEM tomography, especially in the bright-field mode, demonstrated sufficiently enhanced contrast and intensity, compared to CTEM tomography, to permit segmentation of major organelles in the whole cell. STEM imaging also reduced specimen shrinkage during tilt-series acquisition. The fidelity of structural preservation was limited by cytoplasmic extraction, and the spatial resolution was limited by the relatively large convergence angle of the scanning probe. However, the new technique has potential to solve longstanding problems of image blurring in biological specimens beyond 1 μm in thickness, and may facilitate new research in cellular structural biology.

  17. Cell surface engineering of Saccharomyces cerevisiae combined with membrane separation technology for xylitol production from rice straw hydrolysate.

    PubMed

    Guirimand, Gregory; Sasaki, Kengo; Inokuma, Kentaro; Bamba, Takahiro; Hasunuma, Tomohisa; Kondo, Akihiko

    2016-04-01

    Xylitol, a value-added polyol deriving from D-xylose, is widely used in both the food and pharmaceutical industries. Despite extensive studies aiming to streamline the production of xylitol, the manufacturing cost of this product remains high while demand is constantly growing worldwide. Biotechnological production of xylitol from lignocellulosic waste may constitute an advantageous and sustainable option to address this issue. However, to date, there have been few reports of biomass conversion to xylitol. In the present study, xylitol was directly produced from rice straw hydrolysate using a recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae YPH499 strain expressing cytosolic xylose reductase (XR), along with β-glucosidase (BGL), xylosidase (XYL), and xylanase (XYN) enzymes (co-)displayed on the cell surface; xylitol production by this strain did not require addition of any commercial enzymes. All of these enzymes contributed to the consolidated bioprocessing (CBP) of the lignocellulosic hydrolysate to xylitol to produce 5.8 g/L xylitol with 79.5 % of theoretical yield from xylose contained in the biomass. Furthermore, nanofiltration of the rice straw hydrolysate provided removal of fermentation inhibitors while simultaneously increasing sugar concentrations, facilitating high concentration xylitol production (37.9 g/L) in the CBP. This study is the first report (to our knowledge) of the combination of cell surface engineering approach and membrane separation technology for xylitol production, which could be extended to further industrial applications. PMID:26631184

  18. A comparative evaluation of different types of microbial electrolysis desalination cells for malic acid production.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guangli; Zhou, Ying; Luo, Haiping; Cheng, Xing; Zhang, Renduo; Teng, Wenkai

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate different microbial electrolysis desalination cells for malic acid production. The systems included microbial electrolysis desalination and chemical-production cell (MEDCC), microbial electrolysis desalination cell (MEDC) with bipolar membrane and anion exchange membrane (BP-A MEDC), MEDC with bipolar membrane and cation exchange membrane (BP-C MEDC), and modified microbial desalination cell (M-MDC). The microbial electrolysis desalination cells performed differently in terms of malic acid production and energy consumption. The MEDCC performed best with the highest malic acid production rate (18.4 ± 0.6 mmol/Lh) and the lowest energy consumption (0.35 ± 0.14 kWh/kg). The best performance of MEDCC was attributable to the neutral pH condition in the anode chamber, the lowest internal resistance, and the highest Geobacter percentage of the anode biofilm population among all the reactors.

  19. A comparative evaluation of different types of microbial electrolysis desalination cells for malic acid production.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guangli; Zhou, Ying; Luo, Haiping; Cheng, Xing; Zhang, Renduo; Teng, Wenkai

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate different microbial electrolysis desalination cells for malic acid production. The systems included microbial electrolysis desalination and chemical-production cell (MEDCC), microbial electrolysis desalination cell (MEDC) with bipolar membrane and anion exchange membrane (BP-A MEDC), MEDC with bipolar membrane and cation exchange membrane (BP-C MEDC), and modified microbial desalination cell (M-MDC). The microbial electrolysis desalination cells performed differently in terms of malic acid production and energy consumption. The MEDCC performed best with the highest malic acid production rate (18.4 ± 0.6 mmol/Lh) and the lowest energy consumption (0.35 ± 0.14 kWh/kg). The best performance of MEDCC was attributable to the neutral pH condition in the anode chamber, the lowest internal resistance, and the highest Geobacter percentage of the anode biofilm population among all the reactors. PMID:26367771

  20. Genetic analysis reveals that FLO11 upregulation and cell polarization independently regulate invasive growth in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Palecek, S P; Parikh, A S; Kron, S J

    2000-01-01

    Under inducing conditions, haploid Saccharomyces cerevisiae perform a dimorphic transition from yeast-form growth on the agar surface to invasive growth, where chains of cells dig into the solid growth medium. Previous work on signaling cascades that promote agar invasion has demonstrated upregulation of FLO11, a cell-surface flocculin involved in cell-cell adhesion. We find that increasing FLO11 transcription is sufficient to induce both invasive and filamentous growth. A genetic screen for repressors of FLO11 isolated mutant strains that dig into agar (dia) and identified mutations in 35 different genes: ELM1, HSL1, HSL7, BUD3, BUD4, BUD10, AXL1, SIR2, SIR4, BEM2, PGI1, GND1, YDJ1, ARO7, GRR1, CDC53, HSC82, ZUO1, ADH1, CSE2, GCR1, IRA1, MSN5, SRB8, SSN3, SSN8, BPL1, GTR1, MED1, SKN7, TAF25, DIA1, DIA2, DIA3, and DIA4. Indeed, agar invasion in 20 dia mutants requires upregulation of the endogenous FLO11 promoter. However, 13 mutants promote agar invasion even with FLO11 clamped at a constitutive low-expression level. These FLO11 promoter-independent dia mutants establish distinct invasive growth pathways due to polarized bud site selection and/or cell elongation. Epistasis with the STE MAP kinase cascade and cytokinesis/budding checkpoint shows these pathways are targets of DIA genes that repress agar invasion by FLO11 promoter-dependent and -independent mechanisms, respectively. PMID:11063681

  1. Microbial linguistics: perspectives and applications of microbial cell-to-cell communication.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Robert J; Lee, Sung Kuk; Kim, Taesung; Ghim, Cheol-Min

    2011-01-01

    Inter-cellular communication via diffusible small molecules is a defining character not only of multicellular forms of life but also of single-celled organisms. A large number of bacterial genes are regulated by the change of chemical milieu mediated by the local population density of its own species or others. The cell density-dependent "autoinducer" molecules regulate the expression of those genes involved in genetic competence, biofilm formation and persistence, virulence, sporulation, bioluminescence, antibiotic production, and many others. Recent innovations in recombinant DNA technology and micro-/nano-fluidics systems render the genetic circuitry responsible for cell-to-cell communication feasible to and malleable via synthetic biological approaches. Here we review the current understanding of the molecular biology of bacterial intercellular communication and the novel experimental protocols and platforms used to investigate this phenomenon. A particular emphasis is given to the genetic regulatory circuits that provide the standard building blocks which constitute the syntax of the biochemical communication network. Thus, this review gives focus to the engineering principles necessary for rewiring bacterial chemo-communication for various applications, ranging from population-level gene expression control to the study of host-pathogen interactions.

  2. COD removal characteristics in air-cathode microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaoyuan; He, Weihua; Ren, Lijiao; Stager, Jennifer; Evans, Patrick J; Logan, Bruce E

    2015-01-01

    Exoelectrogenic microorganisms in microbial fuel cells (MFCs) compete with other microorganisms for substrate. In order to understand how this affects removal rates, current generation, and coulombic efficiencies (CEs), substrate removal rates were compared in MFCs fed a single, readily biodegradable compound (acetate) or domestic wastewater (WW). Removal rates based on initial test conditions fit first-order kinetics, but rate constants varied with circuit resistance. With filtered WW (100Ω), the rate constant was 0.18h(-)(1), which was higher than acetate or filtered WW with an open circuit (0.10h(-)(1)), but CEs were much lower (15-24%) than acetate. With raw WW (100Ω), COD removal proceeded in two stages: a fast removal stage with high current production, followed by a slower removal with little current. While using MFCs increased COD removal rate due to current generation, secondary processes will be needed to reduce COD to levels suitable for discharge.

  3. Fade to Green: A Biodegradable Stack of Microbial Fuel Cells.

    PubMed

    Winfield, Jonathan; Chambers, Lily D; Rossiter, Jonathan; Stinchcombe, Andrew; Walter, X Alexis; Greenman, John; Ieropoulos, Ioannis

    2015-08-24

    The focus of this study is the development of biodegradable microbial fuel cells (MFCs) able to produce useful power. Reactors with an 8 mL chamber volume were designed using all biodegradable products: polylactic acid for the frames, natural rubber as the cation-exchange membrane and egg-based, open-to-air cathodes coated with a lanolin gas diffusion layer. Forty MFCs were operated in various configurations. When fed with urine, the biodegradable stack was able to power appliances and was still operational after six months. One useful application for this truly sustainable MFC technology includes onboard power supplies for biodegradable robotic systems. After operation in remote ecological locations, these could degrade harmlessly into the surroundings to leave no trace when the mission is complete.

  4. Percarbonate as a naturally buffering catholyte for microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Forrestal, Casey; Huang, Zhe; Ren, Zhiyong Jason

    2014-11-01

    Sustainable cathode development has been a challenge for the emerging microbial fuel cell (MFC) technology. This study presents a simple catholyte called sodium percarbonate to serve as a new type of electron acceptor for MFCs. Lab scale comparisons showed sodium percarbonate cathode obtained comparable power density (9.6W/m(3)) with traditional air-cathode and potassium ferricyanide, but percarbonate showed multiple additional benefits that no other catholyte had demonstrated. Percarbonate has a sustaining natural buffering capacity that can counter pH fluctuations seen in many other systems, and the peroxide produced prevents bio-fouling problems associated with air-cathodes. It is also safer to use and has the lowest cost among popular cathode options based on per mole of electron transferred, which makes it a good candidate for modular system scale up.

  5. Performance of Denitrifying Microbial Fuel Cell with Biocathode over Nitrite

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Huimin; Zhao, Jianqiang; Li, Fenghai; Li, Xiaoling

    2016-01-01

    Microbial fuel cell (MFC) with nitrite as an electron acceptor in cathode provided a new technology for nitrogen removal and electricity production simultaneously. The influences of influent nitrite concentration and external resistance on the performance of denitrifying MFC were investigated. The optimal effectiveness were obtained with the maximum total nitrogen (TN) removal rate of 54.80 ± 0.01 g m−3 d−1. It would be rather desirable for the TN removal than electricity generation at lower external resistance. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis suggested that Proteobacteria was the predominant phylum, accounting for 35.72%. Thiobacillus and Afipia might benefit to nitrite removal. The presence of nitrifying Devosia indicated that nitrite was oxidized to nitrate via a biochemical mechanism in the cathode. Ignavibacterium and Anaerolineaceae was found in the cathode as a heterotrophic bacterium with sodium acetate as substrate, which illustrated that sodium acetate in anode was likely permeated through proton exchange membrane to the cathode. PMID:27047462

  6. Microbial fuel cell treatment of ethanol fermentation process water

    SciTech Connect

    Borole, Abhijeet P.

    2012-06-05

    The present invention relates to a method for removing inhibitor compounds from a cellulosic biomass-to-ethanol process which includes a pretreatment step of raw cellulosic biomass material and the production of fermentation process water after production and removal of ethanol from a fermentation step, the method comprising contacting said fermentation process water with an anode of a microbial fuel cell, said anode containing microbes thereon which oxidatively degrade one or more of said inhibitor compounds while producing electrical energy or hydrogen from said oxidative degradation, and wherein said anode is in electrical communication with a cathode, and a porous material (such as a porous or cation-permeable membrane) separates said anode and cathode.

  7. Scaling up microbial fuel cells and other bioelectrochemical systems.

    PubMed

    Logan, Bruce E

    2010-02-01

    Scientific research has advanced on different microbial fuel cell (MFC) technologies in the laboratory at an amazing pace, with power densities having reached over 1 kW/m(3) (reactor volume) and to 6.9 W/m(2) (anode area) under optimal conditions. The main challenge is to bring these technologies out of the laboratory and engineer practical systems for bioenergy production at larger scales. Recent advances in new types of electrodes, a better understanding of the impact of membranes and separators on performance of these systems, and results from several new pilot-scale tests are all good indicators that commercialization of the technology could be possible within a few years. Some of the newest advances and future challenges are reviewed here with respect to practical applications of these MFCs for renewable energy production and other applications.

  8. Long-term operation of manure-microbial fuel cell.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guodong; Zhao, Qingliang; Jiao, Yan; Lee, Duu-Jong

    2015-03-01

    Microbial fuel cell (MFC) is applied to produce electricity using dairy manure as a fuel. Since the way MFC utilizes manure as a fuel and the long-term operation stability of manure-MFC remains unclear, this study examined the evolution of dissolved organic matter (DOM) in anodic chamber and power generation by MFC in a 171days test. The tested MFC can produce electricity over the entire testing period by single feed of manure, with stable power output and total chemical oxygen demand (TCOD) removal rate in the period of day 30-140. The hydrophobic acid (HPO-A) and hydrophilic (HPI) fractions of manure were the principal components of anolyte DOM, with the concentrations of both being reduced over MFC operation. The degradable organic matters were converted to compounds with high aromaticity.

  9. Experimental study of the microbial fuel cell internal resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Pei-Yuan; Liu, Zhong-Liang

    The internal resistance, including activation loss internal resistance (AIR), ohmic loss internal resistance (OIR) and concentration loss internal resistance (CIR), is an important parameter that determines the performance of microbial fuel cells (MFCs). The experimental investigations were completed to estimate the contributions of these three components to the internal resistance. The internal resistance is found to vary with electric current, although it is almost a constant for the current is within a certain region. The largest component of the internal resistance is CIR except for small currents. The AIR decreases quickly for small current and reduces its decreasing rate as the current increases and approaches to a constant. The OIR is constant over the whole current range. The experiments also disclose that increasing the limiting current and reducing the concentration loss are both important for improving the MFC performance.

  10. Microbial desalination cell with capacitive adsorption for ion migration control.

    PubMed

    Forrestal, Casey; Xu, Pei; Jenkins, Peter E; Ren, Zhiyong

    2012-09-01

    A new microbial desalination cell with capacitive adsorption capability (cMDC) was developed to solve the ion migration problem facing current MDC systems. Traditional MDCs remove salts by transferring ions to the anode and cathode chambers, which may prohibit wastewater beneficial reuse due to increased salinity. The cMDC uses adsorptive activated carbon cloth (ACC) as the electrodes and utilizes the formed capacitive double layers for electrochemical ion adsorption. The cMDC removed an average of 69.4% of the salt from the desalination chamber through electrode adsorption during one batch cycle, and it did not add salts to the anode or cathode chamber. It was estimated that 61-82.2mg of total dissolved solids (TDS) was adsorbed to 1g of ACC electrode. The cMDC provides a new approach for salt management, organic removal, and energy production. Further studies will be conducted to optimize reactor configuration and achieve in situ electrode regeneration.

  11. Microfluidic microbial fuel cells: from membrane to membrane free

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yang; Ye, Dingding; Li, Jun; Zhu, Xun; Liao, Qiang; Zhang, Biao

    2016-08-01

    Microfluidic microbial fuel cells (MMFCs) are small carbon-neutral devices that use self-organized bacteria to degrade organic substrates and harness energy from the waste water. Conventional MMFCs have made great strides in the past decade and have overcome some limitations, such as high capital costs and low energy output. A co-laminar flow MFC has been first proposed in 2011 with the potential to be an attractively power source to niche applications. Co-laminar MFCs typically operate without any physical membranes separating the reactants, and bacterial ecosystems can be easily manipulated by regulating the inlet conditions. This paper highlights recent accomplishments in the development of co-laminar MFCs, emphasizing basic principles, mass transport and fluid dynamics including boundary layer theory, entrance conditions and mixing zone issues. Furthermore, the development of current techniques, major challenges and the potential research directions are discussed.

  12. Practical energy harvesting for microbial fuel cells: a review.

    PubMed

    Wang, Heming; Park, Jae-Do; Ren, Zhiyong Jason

    2015-03-17

    The microbial fuel cell (MFC) technology offers sustainable solutions for distributed power systems and energy positive wastewater treatment, but the generation of practically usable power from MFCs remains a major challenge for system scale up and application. Commonly used external resistors will not harvest any usable energy, so energy-harvesting circuits are needed for real world applications. This review summarizes, explains, and discusses the different energy harvesting methods, components, and systems that can extract and condition the MFC energy for direct utilization. This study aims to assist environmental scientists and engineers to gain fundamental understandings of these electronic systems and algorithms, and it also offers research directions and insights on how to overcome the barriers, so the technology can be further advanced and applied in larger scale.

  13. Carbon nanotube modification of microbial fuel cell electrodes.

    PubMed

    Yazdi, Alireza Ahmadian; D'Angelo, Lorenzo; Omer, Nada; Windiasti, Gracia; Lu, Xiaonan; Xu, Jie

    2016-11-15

    The use of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) for energy harvesting devices is preferable due to their unique mechanical, thermal, and electrical properties. On the other hand, microbial fuel cells (MFCs) are promising devices to recover carbon-neutral energy from the organic matters, and have been hindered with major setbacks towards commercialization. Nanoengineered CNT-based materials show remarkable electrochemical properties, and therefore have provided routes towards highly effective modification of MFC compartments to ultimately reach the theoretical limits of biomass energy recovery, low-cost power production, and thus the commercialization of MFCs. Moreover, these CNT-based composites offer significant flexibility in the design of MFCs that enable their use for a broad spectrum of applications ranging from scaled-up power generation to medically related devices. This article reviews the recent advances in the modification of MFCs using CNTs and CNT-based composites, and the extent to which each modification route impacts MFC power and current generation. PMID:27213269

  14. Fade to Green: A Biodegradable Stack of Microbial Fuel Cells.

    PubMed

    Winfield, Jonathan; Chambers, Lily D; Rossiter, Jonathan; Stinchcombe, Andrew; Walter, X Alexis; Greenman, John; Ieropoulos, Ioannis

    2015-08-24

    The focus of this study is the development of biodegradable microbial fuel cells (MFCs) able to produce useful power. Reactors with an 8 mL chamber volume were designed using all biodegradable products: polylactic acid for the frames, natural rubber as the cation-exchange membrane and egg-based, open-to-air cathodes coated with a lanolin gas diffusion layer. Forty MFCs were operated in various configurations. When fed with urine, the biodegradable stack was able to power appliances and was still operational after six months. One useful application for this truly sustainable MFC technology includes onboard power supplies for biodegradable robotic systems. After operation in remote ecological locations, these could degrade harmlessly into the surroundings to leave no trace when the mission is complete. PMID:26212495

  15. Adhesion-dependent rupturing of Saccharomyces cerevisiae on biological antimicrobial nanostructured surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Nowlin, Kyle; Boseman, Adam; Covell, Alan; LaJeunesse, Dennis

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that some nanostructured surfaces (NSS), many of which are derived from surfaces found on insect cuticles, rupture and kill adhered prokaryotic microbes. Most important, the nanoscale topography is directly responsible for this effect. Although parameters such as cell adhesion and cell wall rigidity have been suggested to play significant roles in this process, there is little experimental evidence regarding the underlying mechanisms involving NSS-induced microbial rupture. In this work, we report the NSS-induced rupturing of a eukaryotic microorganism, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We show that the amount of NSS-induced rupture of S. cerevisiae is dependent on both the adhesive qualities of the yeast cell and the nanostructure geometry of the NSS. Thus, we are providing the first empirical evidence that these parameters play a direct role in the rupturing of microbes on NSS. Our observations of this phenomenon with S. cerevisiae, particularly the morphological changes, are strikingly similar to that reported for bacteria despite the differences in the yeast cell wall structure. Consequently, NSS provide a novel approach for the control of microbial growth and development of broad-spectrum microbicidal surfaces. PMID:25551144

  16. A new method for water desalination using microbial desalination cells.

    PubMed

    Cao, Xiaoxin; Huang, Xia; Liang, Peng; Xiao, Kang; Zhou, Yingjun; Zhang, Xiaoyuan; Logan, Bruce E

    2009-09-15

    Current water desalination techniques are energy intensive and some use membranes operated at high pressures. It is shown here that water desalination can be accomplished without electrical energy input or high water pressure by using a source of organic matter as the fuel to desalinate water. A microbial fuel cell was modified by placing two membranes between the anode and cathode, creating a middle chamber for water desalination between the membranes. An anion exchange membrane was placed adjacent to the anode, and a cation exchange membrane was positioned next to the cathode. When current was produced by bacteria on the anode, ionic species in the middle chamber were transferred into the two electrode chambers, desalinating the water in the middle chamber. Proof-of-concept experiments for this approach, using what we call a microbial desalination cell (MDC), was demonstrated using water at different initial salt concentrations (5, 20, and 35 g/L) with acetate used as the substrate for the bacteria. The MDC produced a maximum of 2 W/m2 (31 W/m3) while at the same time removing about 90% of the salt in a single desalination cycle. As the salt was removed from the middle chamber the ohmic resistance of the MDC (measured using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy) increased from 25 Omega to 970 Omega at the end of the cycle. This increased resistance was reflected by a continuous decrease in the voltage produced over the cycle. These results demonstrate for the first time the possibility for a new method for water desalination and power production that uses only a source of biodegradable organic matter and bacteria.

  17. Microbial fuel cells for clogging assessment in constructed wetlands.

    PubMed

    Corbella, Clara; García, Joan; Puigagut, Jaume

    2016-11-01

    Clogging in HSSF CW may result in a reduction of system's life-span or treatment efficiency. Current available techniques to assess the degree of clogging in HSSF CW are time consuming and cannot be applied on a continuous basis. Main objective of this work was to assess the potential applicability of microbial fuel cells for continuous clogging assessment in HSSF CW. To this aim, two replicates of a membrane-less microbial fuel cell (MFC) were built up and operated under laboratory conditions for five weeks. The MFC anode was gravel-based to simulate the filter media of HSSF CW. MFC were weekly loaded with sludge that had been accumulating for several years in a pilot HSSF CW treating domestic wastewater. Sludge loading ranged from ca. 20kgTS·m(-3)CW·year(-1) at the beginning of the study period up to ca. 250kgTS·m(-3)CW·year(-1) at the end of the study period. Sludge loading applied resulted in sludge accumulated within the MFC equivalent to a clogging degree ranging from 0.2years (ca. 0.5kgTS·m(-3)CW) to ca. 5years (ca. 10kgTS·m(-3)CW). Results showed that the electric charge was negatively correlated to the amount of sludge accumulated (degree of clogging). Electron transference (expressed as electric charge) almost ceased when accumulated sludge within the MFC was equivalent to ca. 5years of clogging (ca. 10kgTS·m(-3)CW). This result suggests that, although longer study periods under more realistic conditions shall be further performed, HSSF CW operated as a MFC has great potential for clogging assessment. PMID:27392579

  18. Microbial fuel cells for clogging assessment in constructed wetlands.

    PubMed

    Corbella, Clara; García, Joan; Puigagut, Jaume

    2016-11-01

    Clogging in HSSF CW may result in a reduction of system's life-span or treatment efficiency. Current available techniques to assess the degree of clogging in HSSF CW are time consuming and cannot be applied on a continuous basis. Main objective of this work was to assess the potential applicability of microbial fuel cells for continuous clogging assessment in HSSF CW. To this aim, two replicates of a membrane-less microbial fuel cell (MFC) were built up and operated under laboratory conditions for five weeks. The MFC anode was gravel-based to simulate the filter media of HSSF CW. MFC were weekly loaded with sludge that had been accumulating for several years in a pilot HSSF CW treating domestic wastewater. Sludge loading ranged from ca. 20kgTS·m(-3)CW·year(-1) at the beginning of the study period up to ca. 250kgTS·m(-3)CW·year(-1) at the end of the study period. Sludge loading applied resulted in sludge accumulated within the MFC equivalent to a clogging degree ranging from 0.2years (ca. 0.5kgTS·m(-3)CW) to ca. 5years (ca. 10kgTS·m(-3)CW). Results showed that the electric charge was negatively correlated to the amount of sludge accumulated (degree of clogging). Electron transference (expressed as electric charge) almost ceased when accumulated sludge within the MFC was equivalent to ca. 5years of clogging (ca. 10kgTS·m(-3)CW). This result suggests that, although longer study periods under more realistic conditions shall be further performed, HSSF CW operated as a MFC has great potential for clogging assessment.

  19. Induction of a Mitosis Delay and Cell Lysis by High-Level Secretion of Mouse α-Amylase from Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Bi-Dar; Kuo, Tsong-Teh

    2001-01-01

    Some foreign proteins are produced in yeast in a cell cycle-dependent manner, but the cause of the cell cycle dependency is unknown. In this study, we found that Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells secreting high levels of mouse α-amylase have elongated buds and are delayed in cell cycle completion in mitosis. The delayed cell mitosis suggests that critical events during exit from mitosis might be disturbed. We found that the activities of PP2A (protein phosphatase 2A) and MPF (maturation-promoting factor) were reduced in α-amylase-oversecreting cells and that these cells showed a reduced level of assembly checkpoint protein Cdc55, compared to the accumulation in wild-type cells. MPF inactivation is due to inhibitory phosphorylation on Cdc28, as a cdc28 mutant which lacks an inhibitory phosphorylation site on Cdc28 prevents MPF inactivation and prevents the defective bud morphology induced by overproduction of α-amylase. Our data also suggest that high levels of α-amylase may downregulate PPH22, leading to cell lysis. In conclusion, overproduction of heterologous α-amylase in S. cerevisiae results in a negative regulation of PP2A, which causes mitotic delay and leads to cell lysis. PMID:11472949

  20. High-cell-density fermentation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae for the optimisation of mead production.

    PubMed

    Pereira, A P; Mendes-Ferreira, A; Oliveira, J M; Estevinho, L M; Mendes-Faia, A

    2013-02-01

    Mead is a traditional drink that contains 8%-18% (v/v) of ethanol, resulting from the alcoholic fermentation of diluted honey by yeasts. Mead fermentation is a time-consuming process and the quality of the final product is highly variable. Therefore, the present investigation had two main objectives: first, to determine the adequate inoculum size of two commercial wine-making strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae for the optimisation of mead fermentation; and second, to determine if an increase in yeast pitching rates in batch fermentations altered the resulting aroma profiles. Minor differences were detected in the growth kinetics between the two strains at the lowest pitching rate. With increasing pitching rates net growth of the strain ICV D47 progressively decreased, whereas for the QA23 the increasing inoculum size had no influence on its net growth. The time required to reach the same stage of fermentation ranged from 24 to 96 h depending on the inoculum size. The final aroma composition was dependent on the yeast strain and inoculum size. Fourteen of the twenty-seven volatile compounds quantified could contribute to mead aroma and flavour because their concentrations rose above their respective thresholds. The formation of these compounds was particularly pronounced at low pitching rates, except in mead fermented by strain ICV D47, at 10(6) CFUs/mL. The esters isoamyl acetate, ethyl octanoate and ethyl hexanoate were the major powerful odourants found in the meads. The results obtained in this study demonstrate that yeast strain and inoculum size can favourably impact mead's flavour and aroma profiles. PMID:23122509

  1. High-cell-density fermentation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae for the optimisation of mead production.

    PubMed

    Pereira, A P; Mendes-Ferreira, A; Oliveira, J M; Estevinho, L M; Mendes-Faia, A

    2013-02-01

    Mead is a traditional drink that contains 8%-18% (v/v) of ethanol, resulting from the alcoholic fermentation of diluted honey by yeasts. Mead fermentation is a time-consuming process and the quality of the final product is highly variable. Therefore, the present investigation had two main objectives: first, to determine the adequate inoculum size of two commercial wine-making strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae for the optimisation of mead fermentation; and second, to determine if an increase in yeast pitching rates in batch fermentations altered the resulting aroma profiles. Minor differences were detected in the growth kinetics between the two strains at the lowest pitching rate. With increasing pitching rates net growth of the strain ICV D47 progressively decreased, whereas for the QA23 the increasing inoculum size had no influence on its net growth. The time required to reach the same stage of fermentation ranged from 24 to 96 h depending on the inoculum size. The final aroma composition was dependent on the yeast strain and inoculum size. Fourteen of the twenty-seven volatile compounds quantified could contribute to mead aroma and flavour because their concentrations rose above their respective thresholds. The formation of these compounds was particularly pronounced at low pitching rates, except in mead fermented by strain ICV D47, at 10(6) CFUs/mL. The esters isoamyl acetate, ethyl octanoate and ethyl hexanoate were the major powerful odourants found in the meads. The results obtained in this study demonstrate that yeast strain and inoculum size can favourably impact mead's flavour and aroma profiles.

  2. Application of conductive polymers in biocathode of microbial fuel cells and microbial community.

    PubMed

    Li, Chao; Ding, Lili; Cui, Hao; Zhang, Libin; Xu, Ke; Ren, Hongqiang

    2012-07-01

    Four kinds of conductive polymers, polyaniline (PANI) and its co-polymers poly (aniline-co-o-aminophenol) (PANOA), poly (aniline-co-2, 4-diaminophenol) (PANDAP) and poly (aniline-1, 8-diaminonaphthalene) (PANDAN) were applied to modify carbon felts as the aerobic abiotic cathodes and biocathodes in microbial fuel cells (MFC). Compare to unmodified, all the four polymers can significantly improve the power densities for both abiotic cathodes (increased by 300%) and biocathodes (increased by 180%). The co-polymers with different functional groups introduction had further special advantages in MFC performance: PANOA and PANDAP with -OH showed less sensitivity to DO and pH change in cathode; PANDAP and PANDAN with -NH(3) provided better attachment condition for biofilm which endowed them higher power output. With the help of conductive polymer coats, the cathode biofilm became thicker, and according to biodiversity analysis, the predominated phyla changed from β-Proteobacteria (unmodified) to α, γ-Proteobacteria (modified), which may be responsible for the superiority of the modified MFCs.

  3. Type 2C protein phosphatase Ptc6 participates in activation of the Slt2-mediated cell wall integrity pathway in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Sharmin, Dilruba; Sasano, Yu; Sugiyama, Minetaka; Harashima, Satoshi

    2015-04-01

    The phosphorylation status of cellular proteins results from an equilibrium between the activities of protein kinases and protein phosphatases (PPases). Reversible protein phosphorylation is an important aspect of signal transduction that regulate many biological processes in eukaryotic cells. The Saccharomyces cerevisiae genome encodes 40 PPases, including seven members of the protein phosphatase 2C subfamily (PTC1 to PTC7). In contrast to other PPases, the cellular roles of PTCs have not been investigated in detail. Here, we sought to determine the cellular role of PTC6 in S. cerevisiae with disruption of PTC genes. We found that cells with Δptc6 disruption were tolerant to the cell wall-damaging agents Congo red (CR) and calcofluor white (CFW); however, cells with simultaneous disruption of PTC1 and PTC6 were very sensitive to these agents. Thus, simultaneous disruption of PTC1 and PTC6 gave a synergistic response to cell wall damaging agents. The level of phosphorylated Slt2 increased significantly after CR treatment in Δptc1 cells and more so in Δptc1Δptc6 cells; therefore, deletion of PTC6 enhanced Slt2 phosphorylation in the Δptc1 disruptant. The level of transcription of KDX1 upon exposure to CR increased to a greater extent in the Δptc1Δptc6 double disruptant than the Δptc1 single disruptant. The Δptc1Δptc6 double disruptant cells showed normal vacuole formation under standard growth conditions, but fragmented vacuoles were present in the presence of CR or CFW. Our analyses indicate that S. cerevisiae PTC6 participates in the negative regulation of Slt2 phosphorylation and vacuole morphogenesis under cell wall stress conditions.

  4. Effect of biocides on S. cerevisiae: relationship between short-term membrane affliction and long-term cell killing.

    PubMed

    Chládková, K; Hendrych, T; Gásková, D; Goroncy-Bermes, P; Sigler, K

    2004-01-01

    The long-term action of recommended (RC) and near-recommended concentrations of several commercial biocides (Lonzabac 12.100, Genamin CS302D, benzalkonium chloride and 2-phenoxyethanol) on cells of S. cerevisiae wild-type strain DTXII was described using plating tests while short-term effects were determined using the potentiometric fluorescent probe diS-C3(3) that detects both changes in membrane potential and impairment of membrane integrity. A 2-d plating of cells exposed to 0.5xRC of benzalkonium chloride and Genamin CS302D for 15 min showed a complete long-term cell killing, with 2-phenoxyethanol the killing was complete only at 2xRC and Lonzabac caused complete killing at RC but not at 0.5xRC. The diS-C3(3) fluorescence assay performed immediately after a 10-min biocide exposure revealed several concentration-dependent modes of action: Lonzabac at 0.5xRC caused a mere depolarization, higher concentrations causing gradually increasing cell damage; benzalkonium chloride and Genamin CS302D rapidly damaged the membrane of some cells and depolarized the rest whereas 2-phenoxyethanol, which had the lowest effect in the plating test, produced a concentration-dependent fraction of cells with impaired membranes. Cell staining slightly increased during the diS-C3(3) assay; addition of a protonophore showed that part of the remaining undamaged cells retained their membrane potential. Comparison of short-term and long-term data implies that membrane depolarization alone is not sufficient for complete long-term killing of yeast cells under the action of a biocide unless it is accompanied by perceptible impairment of membrane integrity. The results show that the diS-C3(3) fluorescence assay, which reflects the short-term effects of a biocide on cell membranes, can be successfully used to assess the microbicidal efficiency of biocides.

  5. Energy accumulation and improved performance in microbial fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ieropoulos, Ioannis; Greenman, John; Melhuish, Chris; Hart, John

    The mechanisms for electron transfer from the microorganisms found in anaerobic sludge to the anode electrode in microbial fuel cells (MFCs) have been investigated. In doing so, both the energy accumulation and improved performance were observed as a result of the addition of exogenous Na 2SO 4. Treatment of anaerobic sludge by centrifugation and washing can provide samples devoid of sulphide/sulphate. Addition of exogenous sulphate can give matched samples of S-deplete and S-replete suspensions. When these are compared in an experimental MFC, the power output of the S-deplete is only 20% that of the S-replete system. Moreover, repeat washing of the anodic chamber to remove suspended cells (leaving only cells attached to the electrode) and addition of buffer substrate gives MFC that produce an output between 10 and 20% that of control. We conclude that anaerobic sludge MFCs are a hybrid incorporating both natural mediator and anodophillic properties. We have also shown that disconnected MFC (open circuit) continue to produce sulphide and when reconnected gives an initial burst of power output demonstrating accumulator-type activity.

  6. High cell density culture with S. cerevisiae CEN.PK113-5D for IL-1β production: optimization, modeling, and physiological aspects.

    PubMed

    Landi, Carmine; Paciello, Lucia; de Alteriis, Elisabetta; Brambilla, Luca; Parascandola, Palma

    2015-02-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae CEN.PK113-5D, a strain auxotrophic for uracil belonging to the CEN.PK family of the yeast S. cerevisiae, was cultured in aerated fed-batch reactor as such and once transformed to express human interleukin-1β (IL-1β), aiming at obtaining high cell densities and optimizing IL-1β production. Three different exponentially increasing glucose feeding profiles were tested, all of them "in theory" promoting respiratory metabolism to obtain high biomass/product yield. A non-structured non-segregated model was developed to describe the performance of S. cerevisiae CEN.PK113-5D during the fed-batch process and, in particular, its capability to metabolize simultaneously glucose and ethanol which derived from the precedent batch growth. Our study showed that the proliferative capacity of the yeast population declined along the fed-batch run, as shown by the exponentially decreasing specific growth rates on glucose. Further, a shift towards fermentative metabolism occurred. This shift took place earlier the higher was the feed rate and was more pronounced in the case of the recombinant strain. Determination of some physiological markers (acetate production, intracellular ROS accumulation, catalase activity and cell viability) showed that neither poor oxygenation nor oxidative stress was responsible for the decreased specific growth rate, nor for the shift to fermentative metabolism.

  7. High cell density culture with S. cerevisiae CEN.PK113-5D for IL-1β production: optimization, modeling, and physiological aspects.

    PubMed

    Landi, Carmine; Paciello, Lucia; de Alteriis, Elisabetta; Brambilla, Luca; Parascandola, Palma

    2015-02-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae CEN.PK113-5D, a strain auxotrophic for uracil belonging to the CEN.PK family of the yeast S. cerevisiae, was cultured in aerated fed-batch reactor as such and once transformed to express human interleukin-1β (IL-1β), aiming at obtaining high cell densities and optimizing IL-1β production. Three different exponentially increasing glucose feeding profiles were tested, all of them "in theory" promoting respiratory metabolism to obtain high biomass/product yield. A non-structured non-segregated model was developed to describe the performance of S. cerevisiae CEN.PK113-5D during the fed-batch process and, in particular, its capability to metabolize simultaneously glucose and ethanol which derived from the precedent batch growth. Our study showed that the proliferative capacity of the yeast population declined along the fed-batch run, as shown by the exponentially decreasing specific growth rates on glucose. Further, a shift towards fermentative metabolism occurred. This shift took place earlier the higher was the feed rate and was more pronounced in the case of the recombinant strain. Determination of some physiological markers (acetate production, intracellular ROS accumulation, catalase activity and cell viability) showed that neither poor oxygenation nor oxidative stress was responsible for the decreased specific growth rate, nor for the shift to fermentative metabolism. PMID:25106469

  8. Identification of two hydrophilins that contribute to the desiccation and freezing tolerance of yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) cells.

    PubMed

    Dang, Nghiem X; Hincha, Dirk K

    2011-06-01

    Hydrophilins are a group of proteins that are present in all organisms and that have been defined as being highly hydrophilic and rich in glycine. They are assumed to play important roles in cellular dehydration tolerance. There are 12 genes in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae that encode hydrophilins and most of these genes are stress responsive. However, the functional role of yeast hydrophilins, especially in desiccation and freezing tolerance, is largely unknown. Here, we selected six candidate hydrophilins for further analysis. All six proteins were predicted to be intrinsically disordered, i.e. to have no stable structure in solution. The contribution of these proteins to the desiccation and freezing tolerance of yeast was investigated in the respective knock-out strains. Only the disruption of the genes YJL144W and YMR175W (SIP18) resulted in significantly reduced desiccation tolerance, while none of the strains was affected in its freezing tolerance under our experimental conditions. Complementation experiments showed that yeast cells overexpressing these two genes were both more desiccation and freezing tolerant, confirming the role of these two hydrophilins in yeast dehydration stress tolerance.

  9. Single Cell Synchrotron FT-IR Microspectroscopy Reveals a Link between Neutral Lipid and Storage Carbohydrate Fluxes in S. cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Jamme, Frédéric; Vindigni, Jean-David; Méchin, Valérie; Cherifi, Tamazight; Chardot, Thierry; Froissard, Marine

    2013-01-01

    In most organisms, storage lipids are packaged into specialized structures called lipid droplets. These contain a core of neutral lipids surrounded by a monolayer of phospholipids, and various proteins which vary depending on the species. Hydrophobic structural proteins stabilize the interface between the lipid core and aqueous cellular environment (perilipin family of proteins, apolipoproteins, oleosins). We developed a genetic approach using heterologous expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae of the Arabidopsis thaliana lipid droplet oleosin and caleosin proteins AtOle1 and AtClo1. These transformed yeasts overaccumulate lipid droplets, leading to a specific increase in storage lipids. The phenotype of these cells was explored using synchrotron FT-IR microspectroscopy to investigate the dynamics of lipid storage and cellular carbon fluxes reflected as changes in spectral fingerprints. Multivariate statistical analysis of the data showed a clear effect on storage carbohydrates and more specifically, a decrease in glycogen in our modified strains. These observations were confirmed by biochemical quantification of the storage carbohydrates glycogen and trehalose. Our results demonstrate that neutral lipid and storage carbohydrate fluxes are tightly connected and co-regulated. PMID:24040242

  10. From microbial fuel cell (MFC) to microbial electrochemical snorkel (MES): maximizing chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal from wastewater.

    PubMed

    Erable, Benjamin; Etcheverry, Luc; Bergel, Alain

    2011-03-01

    The paper introduces the concept of the microbial electrochemical snorkel (MES), a simplified design of a "short-circuited" microbial fuel cell (MFC). The MES cannot provide current but it is optimized for wastewater treatment. An electrochemically active biofilm (EAB) was grown on graphite felt under constant polarization in an urban wastewater. Controlling the electrode potential and inoculating the bioreactor with a suspension of an established EAB improved the performance and the reproducibility of the anodes. Anodes, colonized by an EAB were tested for the chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal from urban wastewater using a variety of bio-electrochemical processes (microbial electrolysis, MFC, MES). The MES technology, as well as a short-circuited MFC, led to a COD removal 57% higher than a 1000 Ω-connected MFC, confirming the potential for wastewater treatment.

  11. Process intensification through microbial strain evolution: mixed glucose-xylose fermentation in wheat straw hydrolyzates by three generations of recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Lignocellulose hydrolyzates present difficult substrates for ethanol production by the most commonly applied microorganism in the fermentation industries, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. High resistance towards inhibitors released during pretreatment and hydrolysis of the feedstock as well as efficient utilization of hexose and pentose sugars constitute major challenges in the development of S. cerevisiae strains for biomass-to-ethanol processes. Metabolic engineering and laboratory evolution are applied, alone and in combination, to adduce desired strain properties. However, physiological requirements for robust performance of S. cerevisiae in the conversion of lignocellulose hydrolyzates are not well understood. The herein presented S. cerevisiae strains IBB10A02 and IBB10B05 are descendants of strain BP10001, which was previously derived from the widely used strain CEN.PK 113-5D through introduction of a largely redox-neutral oxidoreductive xylose assimilation pathway. The IBB strains were obtained by a two-step laboratory evolution that selected for fast xylose fermentation in combination with anaerobic growth before (IBB10A02) and after adaption in repeated xylose fermentations (IBB10B05). Enzymatic hydrolyzates were prepared from up to 15% dry mass pretreated (steam explosion) wheat straw and contained glucose and xylose in a mass ratio of approximately 2. Results With all strains, yield coefficients based on total sugar consumed were high for ethanol (0.39 to 0.40 g/g) and notably low for fermentation by-products (glycerol: ≤0.10 g/g; xylitol: ≤0.08 g/g; acetate: 0.04 g/g). In contrast to the specific glucose utilization rate that was similar for all strains (qGlucose ≈ 2.9 g/gcell dry weight (CDW)/h), the xylose consumption rate was enhanced by a factor of 11.5 (IBB10A02; qXylose = 0.23 g/gCDW/h) and 17.5 (IBB10B05; qXylose = 0.35 g/gCDW/h) as compared to the qXylose of the non-evolved strain BP10001. In xylose-supplemented (50

  12. Inhibition of microbial growth on air cathodes of single chamber microbial fuel cells by incorporating enrofloxacin into the catalyst layer.

    PubMed

    Liu, Weifeng; Cheng, Shaoan; Sun, Dan; Huang, Haobin; Chen, Jie; Cen, Kefa

    2015-10-15

    The inevitable growth of aerobic bacteria on the surface of air cathodes is an important factor reducing the performance stability of air cathode single-chamber membrane-free microbial fuel cells (MFCs). Thus searching for effective methods to inhibit the cathodic microbial growth is critical for the practical application of MFCs. In this study, enrofloxacin (ENR), a broad spectrum fluoroquinolone antibiotic, was incorporated into the catalyst layer of activated carbon air cathodes (ACACs) to inhibit the cathodic microbial growth. The biomass content on ACACs was substantially reduced by 60.2% with ENR treatment after 91 days of MFCs operation. As a result of the inhibited microbial growth, the oxygen reduction catalytic performance of the ENR treated ACACs was much stable compared to the fast performance decline of the untreated control. Consequently, a quite stable electricity production was obtained for the MFCs with the ENR treated ACACs, in contrast with a 22.5% decrease in maximum power density of the MFCs with the untreated cathode. ENR treatment of ACACs showed minimal effects on the anode performance. These results indicate that incorporating antibiotics into ACACs should be a simple and effective strategy to inhibit the microbial growth and improve the long-term stability of the performance of air cathode and the electricity production of MFCs.

  13. Convergent development of anodic bacterial communities in microbial fuel cells

    PubMed Central

    Yates, Matthew D; Kiely, Patrick D; Call, Douglas F; Rismani-Yazdi, Hamid; Bibby, Kyle; Peccia, Jordan; Regan, John M; Logan, Bruce E

    2012-01-01

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) are often inoculated from a single wastewater source. The extent that the inoculum affects community development or power production is unknown. The stable anodic microbial communities in MFCs were examined using three inocula: a wastewater treatment plant sample known to produce consistent power densities, a second wastewater treatment plant sample, and an anaerobic bog sediment. The bog-inoculated MFCs initially produced higher power densities than the wastewater-inoculated MFCs, but after 20 cycles all MFCs on average converged to similar voltages (470±20 mV) and maximum power densities (590±170 mW m−2). The power output from replicate bog-inoculated MFCs was not significantly different, but one wastewater-inoculated MFC (UAJA3 (UAJA, University Area Joint Authority Wastewater Treatment Plant)) produced substantially less power. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis profiling showed a stable exoelectrogenic biofilm community in all samples after 11 cycles. After 16 cycles the predominance of Geobacter spp. in anode communities was identified using 16S rRNA gene clone libraries (58±10%), fluorescent in-situ hybridization (FISH) (63±6%) and pyrosequencing (81±4%). While the clone library analysis for the underperforming UAJA3 had a significantly lower percentage of Geobacter spp. sequences (36%), suggesting that a predominance of this microbe was needed for convergent power densities, the lower percentage of this species was not verified by FISH or pyrosequencing analyses. These results show that the predominance of Geobacter spp. in acetate-fed systems was consistent with good MFC performance and independent of the inoculum source. PMID:22572637

  14. Cathodic oxygen reduction catalyzed by bacteria in microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Rabaey, Korneel; Read, Suzanne T; Clauwaert, Peter; Freguia, Stefano; Bond, Philip L; Blackall, Linda L; Keller, Jurg

    2008-05-01

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) have the potential to combine wastewater treatment efficiency with energetic efficiency. One of the major impediments to MFC implementation is the operation of the cathode compartment, as it employs environmentally unfriendly catalysts such as platinum. As recently shown, bacteria can facilitate sustainable and cost-effective cathode catalysis for nitrate and also oxygen. Here we describe a carbon cathode open to the air, on which attached bacteria catalyzed oxygen reduction. The bacteria present were able to reduce oxygen as the ultimate electron acceptor using electrons provided by the solid-phase cathode. Current densities of up to 2.2 A m(-2) cathode projected surface were obtained (0.303+/-0.017 W m(-2), 15 W m(-3) total reactor volume). The cathodic microbial community was dominated by Sphingobacterium, Acinetobacter and Acidovorax sp., according to 16S rRNA gene clone library analysis. Isolates of Sphingobacterium sp. and Acinetobacter sp. were obtained using H(2)/O(2) mixtures. Some of the pure culture isolates obtained from the cathode showed an increase in the power output of up to three-fold compared to a non-inoculated control, that is, from 0.015+/-0.001 to 0.049+/-0.025 W m(-2) cathode projected surface. The strong decrease in activation losses indicates that bacteria function as true catalysts for oxygen reduction. Owing to the high overpotential for non-catalyzed reduction, oxygen is only to a limited extent competitive toward the electron donor, that is, the cathode. Further research to refine the operational parameters and increase the current density by modifying the electrode surface and elucidating the bacterial metabolism is warranted. PMID:18288216

  15. Microbial Translocation and B Cell Dysfunction in Human Immunodeficiency Virus Disease

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Wei

    2013-01-01

    The gut mucosal barrier disrupted in HIV disease, resulting in increased systemic exposure to microbial products such as Lipo Polys Accharide (LPS). The association of enhanced microbial translocation and B cell dysfunction in HIV disease is not fully understood. High dose and short term exposure of microbial Toll-Like Receptor (TLR) agonists were used as vaccine adjuvants, however, low dose and long term exposure of TLR agonists could be harmful. The characteristics of B cell dysfunction in HIV disease included B cell, especially memory B cell depletion, enhanced levels of autoimmune antibodies and impaired vaccine or antigen responsiveness. This review discusses and explores the possibility of the effect of microbial translocation on memory B cell depletion and impaired vaccine responses in HIV infection. By determining the mechanisms of B cell depletion and perturbations in HIV disease, it may be possible to design interventions that can improve immune responses to vaccines, reduce selected opportunistic infections and perhaps slow disease progression. PMID:23869197

  16. In silico model-driven cofactor engineering strategies for improving the overall NADP(H) turnover in microbial cell factories.

    PubMed

    Lakshmanan, Meiyappan; Yu, Kai; Koduru, Lokanand; Lee, Dong-Yup

    2015-10-01

    Optimizing the overall NADPH turnover is one of the key challenges in various value-added biochemical syntheses. In this work, we first analyzed the NADPH regeneration potentials of common cell factories, including Escherichia coli, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Bacillus subtilis, and Pichia pastoris across multiple environmental conditions and determined E. coli and glycerol as the best microbial chassis and most suitable carbon source, respectively. In addition, we identified optimal cofactor specificity engineering (CSE) enzyme targets, whose cofactors when switched from NAD(H) to NADP(H) improve the overall NADP(H) turnover. Among several enzyme targets, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase was recognized as a global candidate since its CSE improved the NADP(H) regeneration under most of the conditions examined. Finally, by analyzing the protein structures of all CSE enzyme targets via homology modeling, we established that the replacement of conserved glutamate or aspartate with serine in the loop region could change the cofactor dependence from NAD(H) to NADP(H).

  17. Detection of Active Yeast Cells (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) in Frozen Dough Sections.

    PubMed

    Autio, K; Mattila-Sandholm, T

    1992-07-01

    A new method based on fluorescence microscopy was developed to detect active yeast cells in cryosections of wheat dough. The sections were stained with 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) and counterstained with Evans blue. The active yeast cells in the sections appeared brilliant yellow and were readily distinguished from the red dough matrix. The dead cells allowed penetration of the Evans blue through the cell membrane, which interfered with the DAPI staining and caused the dead cells to blend into the red environment. The number of active yeast cells in fermenting dough sections containing different proportions of living and dead yeast cells correlated well with the gas-forming capability of the yeast in the dough but not with the results of the conventional plate count method. The new method allows the study of yeast activity not only during the different stages of frozen dough processing but also during the fermentation of doughs. PMID:16348731

  18. Determination of Microbial Growth by Protein Assay in an Air-Cathode Single Chamber Microbial Fuel Cell.

    PubMed

    Li, Na; Kakarla, Ramesh; Moon, Jung Mi; Min, Booki

    2015-07-01

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) have gathered attention as a novel bioenergy technology to simultaneously treat wastewater with less sludge production than the conventional activated sludge system. In two different operations of the MFC and aerobic process, microbial growth was determined by the protein assay method and their biomass yields using real wastewater were compared. The biomass yield on the anode electrode of the MFC was 0.02 g-COD-cell/g- COD-substrate and the anolyte planktonic biomass was 0.14 g-COD-cell/g-COD-substrate. An MFC without anode electrode resulted in the biomass yield of 0.07 ± 0.03 g-COD-cell/g-COD-substrate, suggesting that oxygen diffusion from the cathode possibly supported the microbial growth. In a comparative test, the biomass yield under aerobic environment was 0.46 ± 0.07 g-COD-cell/g-COD-substrate, which was about 3 times higher than the total biomass value in the MFC operation.

  19. Microbial Cryptotopes are Prominent Targets of B-cell Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Rieder, Franz J. J.; Biebl, Julia; Kastner, Marie-Theres; Schneider, Martina; Jungbauer, Christof; Redlberger-Fritz, Monika; Britt, William J.; Kundi, Michael; Steininger, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    B-cell recognition of microbial antigens may be limited by masking of epitopes within three-dimensional structures (cryptotopes). Here we report that unmasking of cryptotopes by unfolding whole cytomegalovirus (CMV) antigen preparations with the chaotropic reagent Urea and probing with immune sera from healthy individuals (n = 109) increased ELISA signals by 36% in comparison to folded CMV antigens (P < 0.001). ELISA signals increased also significantly upon unfolding of S. aureus or E. coli antigens, whereas unfolded influenza H1N1 or respiratory syncitial virus antigens yielded reduced or unchanged reactivity in comparison to folded ones, respectively. Blocking of CMV cryptotope-specific Abs by incubation of an immunoglobuline preparation and three sera with unfolded CMV antigens enhanced clearly the neutralizing capacity of this immunoglobuline preparation against CMV infection. Thus, B-cell immunity frequently targets cryptotopes on CMV but these Abs are non-neutralizing, may reduce the neutralizing effectiveness of pathogen-specific Abs, and increase during immune maturation following primary CMV infection. The observation of functional consequences of Abs specific for cryptotopes may open whole new avenues to a better understanding of the humoral immune response to CMV and development of more effective vaccines and immunoglobuline preparations. PMID:27539094

  20. Compost in plant microbial fuel cell for bioelectricity generation.

    PubMed

    Moqsud, M A; Yoshitake, J; Bushra, Q S; Hyodo, M; Omine, K; Strik, David

    2015-02-01

    Recycling of organic waste is an important topic in developing countries as well as developed countries. Compost from organic waste has been used for soil conditioner. In this study, an experiment has been carried out to produce green energy (bioelectricity) by using paddy plant microbial fuel cells (PMFCs) in soil mixed with compost. A total of six buckets filled with the same soil were used with carbon fiber as the electrodes for the test. Rice plants were planted in five of the buckets, with the sixth bucket containing only soil and an external resistance of 100 ohm was used for all cases. It was observed that the cells with rice plants and compost showed higher values of voltage and power density with time. The highest value of voltage showed around 700 mV when a rice plant with 1% compost mixed soil was used, however it was more than 95% less in the case of no rice plant and without compost. Comparing cases with and without compost but with the same number of rice plants, cases with compost depicted higher voltage to as much as 2 times. The power density was also 3 times higher when the compost was used in the paddy PMFCs which indicated the influence of compost on bio-electricity generation.

  1. Microbial fuel cells with highly active aerobic biocathodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milner, Edward M.; Popescu, Dorin; Curtis, Tom; Head, Ian M.; Scott, Keith; Yu, Eileen H.

    2016-08-01

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs), which convert organic waste to electricity, could be used to make the wastewater infrastructure more energy efficient and sustainable. However, platinum and other non-platinum chemical catalysts used for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) at the cathode of MFCs are unsustainable due to their high cost and long-term degradation. Aerobic biocathodes, which use microorganisms as the biocatalysts for cathode ORR, are a good alternative to chemical catalysts. In the current work, high-performing aerobic biocathodes with an onset potential for the ORR of +0.4 V vs. Ag/AgCl were enriched from activated sludge in electrochemical half-cells poised at -0.1 and + 0.2 V vs. Ag/AgCl. Gammaproteobacteria, distantly related to any known cultivated gammaproteobacterial lineage, were identified as dominant in these working electrode biofilms (23.3-44.3% of reads in 16S rRNA gene Ion Torrent libraries), and were in very low abundance in non-polarised control working electrode biofilms (0.5-0.7%). These Gammaproteobacteria were therefore most likely responsible for the high activity of biologically catalysed ORR. In MFC tests, a high-performing aerobic biocathode increased peak power 9-fold from 7 to 62 μW cm-2 in comparison to an unmodified carbon cathode, which was similar to peak power with a platinum-doped cathode at 70 μW cm-2.

  2. Microbial fuel cells with highly active aerobic biocathodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milner, Edward M.; Popescu, Dorin; Curtis, Tom; Head, Ian M.; Scott, Keith; Yu, Eileen H.

    2016-08-01

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs), which convert organic waste to electricity, could be used to make the wastewater infrastructure more energy efficient and sustainable. However, platinum and other non-platinum chemical catalysts used for the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) at the cathode of MFCs are unsustainable due to their high cost and long-term degradation. Aerobic biocathodes, which use microorganisms as the biocatalysts for cathode ORR, are a good alternative to chemical catalysts. In the current work, high-performing aerobic biocathodes with an onset potential for the ORR of +0.4 V vs. Ag/AgCl were enriched from activated sludge in electrochemical half-cells poised at -0.1 and + 0.2 V vs. Ag/AgCl. Gammaproteobacteria, distantly related to any known cultivated gammaproteobacterial lineage, were identified as dominant in these working electrode biofilms (23.3-44.3% of reads in 16S rRNA gene Ion Torrent libraries), and were in very low abundance in non-polarised control working electrode biofilms (0.5-0.7%). These Gammaproteobacteria were therefore most likely responsible for the high activity of biologically catalysed ORR. In MFC tests, a high-performing aerobic biocathode increased peak power 9-fold from 7 to 62 μW cm-2 in comparison to an unmodified carbon cathode, which was similar to peak power with a platinum-doped cathode at 70 μW cm-2.

  3. Microbial Cryptotopes are Prominent Targets of B-cell Immunity.

    PubMed

    Rieder, Franz J J; Biebl, Julia; Kastner, Marie-Theres; Schneider, Martina; Jungbauer, Christof; Redlberger-Fritz, Monika; Britt, William J; Kundi, Michael; Steininger, Christoph

    2016-08-19

    B-cell recognition of microbial antigens may be limited by masking of epitopes within three-dimensional structures (cryptotopes). Here we report that unmasking of cryptotopes by unfolding whole cytomegalovirus (CMV) antigen preparations with the chaotropic reagent Urea and probing with immune sera from healthy individuals (n = 109) increased ELISA signals by 36% in comparison to folded CMV antigens (P < 0.001). ELISA signals increased also significantly upon unfolding of S. aureus or E. coli antigens, whereas unfolded influenza H1N1 or respiratory syncitial virus antigens yielded reduced or unchanged reactivity in comparison to folded ones, respectively. Blocking of CMV cryptotope-specific Abs by incubation of an immunoglobuline preparation and three sera with unfolded CMV antigens enhanced clearly the neutralizing capacity of this immunoglobuline preparation against CMV infection. Thus, B-cell immunity frequently targets cryptotopes on CMV but these Abs are non-neutralizing, may reduce the neutralizing effectiveness of pathogen-specific Abs, and increase during immune maturation following primary CMV infection. The observation of functional consequences of Abs specific for cryptotopes may open whole new avenues to a better understanding of the humoral immune response to CMV and development of more effective vaccines and immunoglobuline preparations.

  4. Microbial Cryptotopes are Prominent Targets of B-cell Immunity.

    PubMed

    Rieder, Franz J J; Biebl, Julia; Kastner, Marie-Theres; Schneider, Martina; Jungbauer, Christof; Redlberger-Fritz, Monika; Britt, William J; Kundi, Michael; Steininger, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    B-cell recognition of microbial antigens may be limited by masking of epitopes within three-dimensional structures (cryptotopes). Here we report that unmasking of cryptotopes by unfolding whole cytomegalovirus (CMV) antigen preparations with the chaotropic reagent Urea and probing with immune sera from healthy individuals (n = 109) increased ELISA signals by 36% in comparison to folded CMV antigens (P < 0.001). ELISA signals increased also significantly upon unfolding of S. aureus or E. coli antigens, whereas unfolded influenza H1N1 or respiratory syncitial virus antigens yielded reduced or unchanged reactivity in comparison to folded ones, respectively. Blocking of CMV cryptotope-specific Abs by incubation of an immunoglobuline preparation and three sera with unfolded CMV antigens enhanced clearly the neutralizing capacity of this immunoglobuline preparation against CMV infection. Thus, B-cell immunity frequently targets cryptotopes on CMV but these Abs are non-neutralizing, may reduce the neutralizing effectiveness of pathogen-specific Abs, and increase during immune maturation following primary CMV infection. The observation of functional consequences of Abs specific for cryptotopes may open whole new avenues to a better understanding of the humoral immune response to CMV and development of more effective vaccines and immunoglobuline preparations. PMID:27539094

  5. Anhydrobiosis in yeast: cell wall mannoproteins are important for yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae resistance to dehydration.

    PubMed

    Borovikova, Diana; Teparić, Renata; Mrša, Vladimir; Rapoport, Alexander

    2016-08-01

    The state of anhydrobiosis is linked with the reversible delay of metabolism as a result of strong dehydration of cells, and is widely distributed in nature. A number of factors responsible for the maintenance of organisms' viability in these conditions have been revealed. This study was directed to understanding how changes in cell wall structure may influence the resistance of yeasts to dehydration-rehydration. Mutants lacking various cell wall mannoproteins were tested to address this issue. It was revealed that mutants lacking proteins belonging to two structurally and functionally unrelated groups (proteins non-covalently attached to the cell wall, and Pir proteins) possessed significantly lower cell resistance to dehydration-rehydration than the mother wild-type strain. At the same time, the absence of the GPI-anchored cell wall protein Ccw12 unexpectedly resulted in an increase of cell resistance to this treatment; this phenomenon is explained by the compensatory synthesis of chitin. The results clearly indicate that the cell wall structure/composition relates to parameters strongly influencing yeast viability during the processes of dehydration-rehydration, and that damage to cell wall proteins during yeast desiccation can be an important factor leading to cell death. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Anhydrobiosis in yeast: cell wall mannoproteins are important for yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae resistance to dehydration.

    PubMed

    Borovikova, Diana; Teparić, Renata; Mrša, Vladimir; Rapoport, Alexander

    2016-08-01

    The state of anhydrobiosis is linked with the reversible delay of metabolism as a result of strong dehydration of cells, and is widely distributed in nature. A number of factors responsible for the maintenance of organisms' viability in these conditions have been revealed. This study was directed to understanding how changes in cell wall structure may influence the resistance of yeasts to dehydration-rehydration. Mutants lacking various cell wall mannoproteins were tested to address this issue. It was revealed that mutants lacking proteins belonging to two structurally and functionally unrelated groups (proteins non-covalently attached to the cell wall, and Pir proteins) possessed significantly lower cell resistance to dehydration-rehydration than the mother wild-type strain. At the same time, the absence of the GPI-anchored cell wall protein Ccw12 unexpectedly resulted in an increase of cell resistance to this treatment; this phenomenon is explained by the compensatory synthesis of chitin. The results clearly indicate that the cell wall structure/composition relates to parameters strongly influencing yeast viability during the processes of dehydration-rehydration, and that damage to cell wall proteins during yeast desiccation can be an important factor leading to cell death. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27510749

  7. Increased electrical output when a bacterial ABTS oxidizer is used in a microbial fuel cell

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) are a technology that provides electrical energy from the microbial oxidation of organic compounds. Most MFCs use oxygen as the oxidant in the cathode chamber. The present study examined the formation in culture of an unidentified bacterial oxidant and investigated the ...

  8. Cytoplasmic proteasomes are not indispensable for cell growth in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    SciTech Connect

    Tsuchiya, Hikaru; Arai, Naoko; Tanaka, Keiji Saeki, Yasushi

    2013-07-05

    Highlights: •We succeeded to control the proteasome localization by the anchor-away technique. •Nuclear proteasome-depleted cells showed a lethal phenotype. •Cytoplasmic proteasomes are not indispensable for cell growth in dividing cells. -- Abstract: The 26S proteasome is an essential protease complex responsible for the degradation of ubiquitinated proteins in eukaryotic cells. In rapidly proliferating yeast cells, proteasomes are mainly localized in the nucleus, but the biological significance of the proteasome localization is still unclear. In this study, we investigated the relationship between the proteasome localization and the functions by the anchor-away technique, a ligand-dependent sequestration of a target protein into specific compartment(s). Anchoring of the proteasome to the plasma membrane or the ribosome resulted in conditional depletion of the nuclear proteasomes, whereas anchoring to histone resulted in the proteasome sequestration into the nucleus. We observed that the accumulation of ubiquitinated proteins in all the proteasome-targeted cells, suggesting that both the nuclear and cytoplasmic proteasomes have proteolytic functions and that the ubiquitinated proteins are produced and degraded in each compartment. Consistent with previous studies, the nuclear proteasome-depleted cells exhibited a lethal phenotype. In contrast, the nuclear sequestration of the proteasome resulted only in a mild growth defect, suggesting that the cytoplasmic proteasomes are not basically indispensable for cell growth in rapidly growing yeast cells.

  9. Large Scale Identification of Genes Involved in Cell Surface Biosynthesis and Architecture in Saccharomyces Cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Lussier, M.; White, A. M.; Sheraton, J.; di-Paolo, T.; Treadwell, J.; Southard, S. B.; Horenstein, C. I.; Chen-Weiner, J.; Ram, AFJ.; Kapteyn, J. C.; Roemer, T. W.; Vo, D. H.; Bondoc, D. C.; Hall, J.; Wei Zhong, W.; Sdicu, A. M.; Davies, J.; Klis, F. M.; Robbins, P. W.; Bussey, H.

    1997-01-01

    The sequenced yeast genome offers a unique resource for the analysis of eukaryotic cell function and enables genome-wide screens for genes involved in cellular processes. We have identified genes involved in cell surface assembly by screening transposon-mutagenized cells for altered sensitivity to calcofluor white, followed by supplementary screens to further characterize mutant phenotypes. The mutated genes were directly retrieved from genomic DNA and then matched uniquely to a gene in the yeast genome database. Eighty-two genes with apparent perturbation of the cell surface were identified, with mutations in 65 of them displaying at least one further cell surface phenotype in addition to their modified sensitivity to calcofluor. Fifty of these genes were previously known, 17 encoded proteins whose function could be anticipated through sequence homology or previously recognized phenotypes and 15 genes had no previously known phenotype. PMID:9335584

  10. ROS accumulation and oxidative damage to cell structures in Saccharomyces cerevisiae wine strains during fermentation of high-sugar-containing medium.

    PubMed

    Landolfo, Sara; Politi, Huguette; Angelozzi, Daniele; Mannazzu, Ilaria

    2008-06-01

    To further elucidate the impact of fermentative stress on Saccharomyces cerevisiae wine strains, we have here evaluated markers of oxidative stress, oxidative damage and antioxidant response in four oenological strains of S. cerevisiae, relating these to membrane integrity, ethanol production and cell viability during fermentation in high-sugar-containing medium. The cells were sampled at different fermentation stages and analysed by flow cytometry to evaluate membrane integrity and accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). At the same time, catalase and superoxide dismutase activities, trehalose accumulation, and protein carbonylation and degradation were measured. The results indicate that the stress conditions occurring during hypoxic fermentation in high-sugar-containing medium result in the production of ROS and trigger an antioxidant response. This involves superoxide dismutase and trehalose for the protection of cell structures from oxidative damage, and protein catabolism for the removal of damaged proteins. Cell viability, membrane integrity and ethanol production depend on the extent of oxidative damage to cellular components. This is, in turn, related to the 'fitness' of each strain, which depends on the contribution of individual cells to ROS accumulation and scavenging. These findings highlight that the differences in individual cell resistances to ROS contribute to the persistence of wine strains during growth under unfavourable culture conditions, and they provide further insights into our understanding of yeast behaviour during industrial fermentation.

  11. Aquifer Microbial Diversity Represented by Whole Cell and Dissolved DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shields, M. S.; Briggs, B.

    2004-12-01

    Microbial diversity measurements of aquifers are faced with two major sources of bias. These are a reflection of molecular (caused by amplification, labeling and extraction dissimilarities) and sampling aspects. Sampling of aquifers represents a considerable and often insurmountable bias since almost all evaluations rely on water samples where free living bacteria will predominate. This highly problematic when one desires to know the metagenomic potential of zone of well influence. We present a method designed to avoid cellular collection biases imposed by the difficulty in collecting attached biomass. Dissolved DNA (d-DNA) and whole bacterial cells were concentrated from Snake River Plain aquifer water. 96% of dDNA was recovered from DNA spiked surrogates using an anion-exchange membrane method. Approximately 2,000 ng DNA was recovered per liter of water. Total DNA turnover rate was measured at 49.3 ng/ml/day, at DNA concentrations above 1 mg/l, indicating that aquifer dDNA represents a dynamic steady state balanced between dDNA release and native DNA degradation activities. 16s, dual labeled T-RFLP analysis was used analyze the genomic complexity of whole bacterial cells collected via filtration versus d-DNA sources of bacterial DNA from 16 l of water. Highly similar T-RFLP profiles (with two restriction endonucleases) were obtained for both dDNA (200 nm filtrate) and the whole cells harvested from the same filter. This demonstrates that dDNA was an accurate reflection of the total bacterial community found within the well volume. We present evaluations of the anion-exchange system with respect to DNA recovery parameters, and demonstrate the suitability of this DNA template for PCR amplification reactions.

  12. [The cloning and expression of the gene for beta-galactosidase from Candida pseudotropicalis yeasts in Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells].

    PubMed

    Tretiak, K A; Zakal'skiĭ, A E; Gudz', S P

    1998-01-01

    The gene of beta-galactosidase of lactose-assimilating yeast Candida pseudotropicalis was cloned in pG2 and pBG2-3 hybrid shuttle vectors and expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae laboratory strains under the control of own promoter. The plasmids were able to replicate autonomously with relative stability in transformants of baker's yeasts. The availability of glucose or lactose in the medium influenced the recombinant plasmid stability and the expression of the cloned gene. A number of experiments have shown that the LAC+ phenotype in pG2-transformed Saccharomyces cerevisiae was due to the expression of the Candida pseudotropicalis lactose permease gene that is probably located in SaIG1/XhoI DNA fragment about 4.3 kb long. Southern hybridization experiments showed that LAC(+)-transformants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae contained both autonomously-replicative, and integrative pG2 plasmid.

  13. Mass spectrometric quantitation of covalently bound cell wall proteins in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Qing Yuan; de Groot, Piet W J; de Jong, Luitzen; Klis, Frans M; De Koster, Chris G

    2007-01-01

    The cell wall of yeast consists of an internal skeletal layer and an external layer of glycoproteins covalently linked to the stress-bearing polysaccharides. The cell wall protein (CWP) population consists of over 20 different proteins, and may vary in composition. We present two complementary methods for quantifying CWPs, based on isobaric tagging and tandem MS: (1) absolute quantitation of individual CWPs, allowing estimation of surface densities; and (2) relative quantitation of CWPs, allowing monitoring of the dynamics of the CWP population. For absolute quantitation, we selected a representative group of five proteins (Cwp1p, Crh1p, Scw4p, Gas1p, and Ecm33p), which had 67 × 103, 44 × 103, 38 × 103, 11 × 103 and 6.5 × 103 of wall-bound copies per cell, respectively. As Cwp1p is predominantly incorporated in the birth scar, this corresponds to a protein density of c. 22 × 103 copies μm−2. For relative quantitation, we compared wild-type cells to gas1Δ cells, in which the cell wall integrity pathway is constitutively activated. The levels of Crh1p, Crh2p, Ecm33p, Gas5p, Pst1p and Pir3p increased about three- to fivefold, whereas the level of Scw4p was significantly decreased. We propose that our methods are widely applicable to other fungi. PMID:17617218

  14. Saccharomyces cerevisiae MPT5 and SSD1 function in parallel pathways to promote cell wall integrity.

    PubMed Central

    Kaeberlein, Matt; Guarente, Leonard

    2002-01-01

    Yeast MPT5 (UTH4) is a limiting component for longevity. We show here that MPT5 also functions to promote cell wall integrity. Loss of Mpt5p results in phenotypes associated with a weakened cell wall, including sorbitol-remedial temperature sensitivity and sensitivities to calcofluor white and sodium dodecyl sulfate. Additionally, we find that mutation of MPT5, in the absence of SSD1-V, is lethal in combination with loss of either Ccr4p or Swi4p. These synthetic lethal interactions are suppressed by the SSD1-V allele. Furthermore, we have provided evidence that the short life span caused by loss of Mpt5p is due to a weakened cell wall. This cell wall defect may be the result of abnormal chitin biosynthesis or accumulation. These analyses have defined three genetic pathways that function in parallel to promote cell integrity: an Mpt5p-containing pathway, an Ssd1p-containing pathway, and a Pkc1p-dependent pathway. This work also provides evidence that post-transcriptional regulation is likely to be important both for maintaining cell integrity and for promoting longevity. PMID:11805047

  15. Microbial desalination cells for improved performance in wastewater treatment, electricity production, and desalination.

    PubMed

    Luo, Haiping; Xu, Pei; Roane, Timberley M; Jenkins, Peter E; Ren, Zhiyong

    2012-02-01

    The low conductivity and alkalinity in municipal wastewater significantly limit power production from microbial fuel cells (MFCs). This study integrated desalination with wastewater treatment and electricity production in a microbial desalination cell (MDC) by utilizing the mutual benefits among the above functions. When using wastewater as the sole substrate, the power output from the MDC (8.01 W/m(3)) was four times higher than a control MFC without desalination function. In addition, the MDC removed 66% of the salts and improved COD removal by 52% and Coulombic efficiency by 131%. Desalination in MDCs improved wastewater characteristics by increasing the conductivity by 2.5 times and stabilizing anolyte pH, which therefore reduced system resistance and maintained microbial activity. Microbial community analysis revealed a more diverse anode microbial structure in the MDC than in the MFC. The results demonstrated that MDC can serve as a viable option for integrated wastewater treatment, energy production, and desalination.

  16. Is resistance futile? Changing external resistance does not improve microbial fuel cell performance.

    PubMed

    Lyon, Delina Y; Buret, Francois; Vogel, Timothy M; Monier, Jean-Michel

    2010-04-01

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) show promise as an alternative to conventional batteries for point source electricity generation. A better understanding of the relationship between the microbiological and electrical aspects of fuels cells is needed prior to successful MFC application. Here, we observed the effects of external resistance on power production and the anodic biofilm community structure. Large differences in the external resistance affected both power production and microbial community structure. After the establishment of the anodic microbial community, change in external resistance (from low to high and vice versa) changed the anodic microbial community structure, but the resulting community did not resemble the communities established at that same external resistance. Different microbial community structures, established under different external resistances, resulted in similar power production, demonstrating the flexibility of the MFC system.

  17. Bioelectricity production from soil using microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Wolińska, Agnieszka; Stępniewska, Zofia; Bielecka, Arletta; Ciepielski, Jakub

    2014-08-01

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) are a device using microorganisms as biocatalysts for transforming chemical energy into bioelectricity. As soil is an environment with the highest number of microorganisms and diversity, we hypothesized that it should have the potential for energy generation. The soil used for the study was Mollic Gleysol collected from the surface layer (0-20 cm). Four combinations of soil MFC differing from each other in humidity (full water holding capacity [WHC] and flooding) and the carbon source (glucose and straw) were constructed. Voltage (mV) and current intensity (μA) produced by the MFCs were recorded every day or at 2-day intervals. The fastest and the most effective MFCs in voltage generation (372.2 ± 5 mV) were those constructed on the basis of glucose (MFC-G). The efficiency of straw MFCs (MFC-S) was noticeable after 2 weeks (319.3 ± 4 mV). Maximal power density (P max = 32 mW m(-2)) was achieved by the MFC-G at current density (CD) of 100 mA m(-2). Much lower values of P max (10.6-10.8 mW m(-2)) were noted in the MFC-S at CD of ca. 60-80 mA m(-2). Consequently, soil has potential for production of renewable energy.

  18. Carbon Material Optimized Biocathode for Improving Microbial Fuel Cell Performance.

    PubMed

    Tursun, Hairti; Liu, Rui; Li, Jing; Abro, Rashid; Wang, Xiaohui; Gao, Yanmei; Li, Yuan

    2016-01-01

    To improve the performance of microbial fuel cells (MFCs), the biocathode electrode material of double-chamber was optimized. Alongside the basic carbon fiber brush, three carbon materials namely graphite granules, activated carbon granules (ACG) and activated carbon powder, were added to the cathode-chambers to improve power generation. The result shows that the addition of carbon materials increased the amount of available electroactive microbes on the electrode surface and thus promote oxygen reduction rate, which improved the generation performance of the MFCs. The Output current (external resistance = 1000 Ω) greatly increased after addition of the three carbon materials and maximum power densities in current stable phase increased by 47.4, 166.1, and 33.5%, respectively. Additionally, coulombic efficiencies of the MFC increased by 16.3, 64.3, and 20.1%, respectively. These results show that MFC when optimized with ACG show better power generation, higher chemical oxygen demands removal rate and coulombic efficiency. PMID:26858695

  19. Cathodic and anodic biofilms in Single Chamber Microbial Fuel Cells.

    PubMed

    Cristiani, P; Carvalho, M L; Guerrini, E; Daghio, M; Santoro, C; Li, B

    2013-08-01

    The oxygen reduction due to microaerophilic biofilms grown on graphite cathodes (biocathodes) in Single Chamber Microbial Fuel Cells (SCMFCs) is proved and analysed in this paper. Pt-free cathode performances are compared with those of different platinum-loaded cathodes, before and after the biofilm growth. Membraneless SCMFCs were operating in batch-mode, filled with wastewater. A substrate (fuel) of sodium acetate (0.03 M) was periodically added and the experiment lasted more than six months. A maximum of power densities, up to 0.5 W m(-2), were reached when biofilms developed on the electrodes and the cathodic potential decreased (open circuit potential of 50-200 mV vs. SHE). The power output was almost constant with an acetate concentration of 0.01-0.05 M and it fell down when the pH of the media exceeded 9.5, independently of the Pt-free/Pt-loading at the cathodes. Current densities varied in the range of 1-5 Am(-2) (cathode area of 5 cm(2)). Quasi-stationary polarization curves performed with a three-electrode configuration on cathodic and anodic electrodes showed that the anodic overpotential, more than the cathodic one, may limit the current density in the SCMFCs for a long-term operation. PMID:23474690

  20. Carbon fiber enhanced bioelectricity generation in soil microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaojing; Wang, Xin; Zhao, Qian; Wan, Lili; Li, Yongtao; Zhou, Qixing

    2016-11-15

    The soil microbial fuel cell (MFC) is a promising biotechnology for the bioelectricity recovery as well as the remediation of organics contaminated soil. However, the electricity production and the remediation efficiency of soil MFC are seriously limited by the tremendous internal resistance of soil. Conductive carbon fiber was mixed with petroleum hydrocarbons contaminated soil and significantly enhanced the performance of soil MFC. The maximum current density, the maximum power density and the accumulated charge output of MFC mixed carbon fiber (MC) were 10, 22 and 16 times as high as those of closed circuit control due to the carbon fiber productively assisted the anode to collect the electron. The internal resistance of MC reduced by 58%, 83% of which owed to the charge transfer resistance, resulting in a high efficiency of electron transfer from soil to anode. The degradation rates of total petroleum hydrocarbons enhanced by 100% and 329% compared to closed and opened circuit controls without the carbon fiber respectively. The effective range of remediation and the bioelectricity recovery was extended from 6 to 20cm with the same area of air-cathode. The mixed carbon fiber apparently enhanced the bioelectricity generation and the remediation efficiency of soil MFC by means of promoting the electron transfer rate from soil to anode. The use of conductively functional materials (e.g. carbon fiber) is very meaningful for the remediation and bioelectricity recovery in the bioelectrochemical remediation. PMID:27162144

  1. Capacitive bioanodes enable renewable energy storage in microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Deeke, Alexandra; Sleutels, Tom H J A; Hamelers, Hubertus V M; Buisman, Cees J N

    2012-03-20

    We developed an integrated system for storage of renewable electricity in a microbial fuel cell (MFC). The system contained a capacitive electrode that was inserted into the anodic compartment of an MFC to form a capacitive bioanode. This capacitive bioanode was compared with a noncapacitive bioanode on the basis of performance and storage capacity. The performance and storage capacity were investigated during polarization curves and charge-discharge experiments. During polarization curves the capacitive electrode reached a maximum current density of 1.02 ± 0.04 A/m(2), whereas the noncapacitive electrode reached a current density output of only 0.79 ± 0.03 A/m(2). During the charge-discharge experiment with 5 min of charging and 20 min of discharging, the capacitive electrode was able to store a total of 22,831 C/m(2), whereas the noncapacitive electrode was only able to store 12,195 C/m(2). Regarding the charge recovery of each electrode, the capacitive electrode was able to recover 52.9% more charge during each charge-discharge experiment compared with the noncapacitive electrode. The capacitive electrode outperformed the noncapacitive electrode throughout each charge-discharge experiment. With a capacitive electrode it is possible to use the MFC simultaneously for production and storage of renewable electricity.

  2. Tubular bamboo charcoal for anode in microbial fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jun; Li, Jun; Ye, Dingding; Zhu, Xun; Liao, Qiang; Zhang, Biao

    2014-12-01

    The anode material plays a significant role in determining the performance of microbial fuel cells (MFCs). In this study, the bamboo charcoal tube is proposed as a novel anode substrate by carbonizing the natural bamboo. Its surface functional groups, biocompatibility and internal resistance are thoroughly investigated. Performance of the MFCs with a conventional graphite tube anode and a bamboo charcoal tube anode is also compared. The results indicate that the tubular bamboo charcoal anode exhibits advantages over the graphite tube anode in terms of rougher surface, superior biocompatibility and smaller total internal resistance. Moreover, the X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis for the bamboo charcoal reveals that the introduced C-N bonds facilitate the electron transfer between the biofilm and electrodes. As a result, the MFC with a bamboo charcoal tube anode achieves a 50% improvement in the maximum power density over the graphite tube case. Furthermore, scale-up of the bamboo charcoal tube anode is demonstrated by employing a bundle of tubular bamboo charcoal to reach higher power output.

  3. Submersible microbial fuel cell for electricity production from sewage sludge.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yifeng; Olias, Lola Gonzalez; Kongjan, Prawit; Angelidaki, Irini

    2011-01-01

    A submersible microbial fuel cell (SMFC) was utilized to treat sewage sludge and simultaneously generate electricity. Stable power generation (145 +/- 5 mW/m2, 470 omega) was produced continuously from raw sewage sludge for 5.5 days. The maximum power density reached 190 +/- 5 mW/m2. The corresponding total chemical oxygen demand (TCOD) removal efficiency was 78.1 +/- 0.2% with initial TCOD of 49.7 g/L. The power generation of SMFC was depended on the sludge concentration, while dilution of the raw sludge resulted in higher power density. The maximum power density was saturated at sludge concentration of 17 g-TCOD/L, where 290 mw/m2 was achieved. When effluents from an anaerobic digester that was fed with raw sludge were used as substrate in the SMFC, a maximum power density of 318 mW/m2, and a final TCOD removal of 71.9 +/- 0.2% were achieved. These results have practical implications for development of an effective system to treat sewage sludge and simultaneously recover energy.

  4. Electricity generation from rapeseed straw hydrolysates using microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Jablonska, Milena A; Rybarczyk, Maria K; Lieder, Marek

    2016-05-01

    Rapeseed straw is an attractive fuel material for microbial fuel cells (MFCs) due to its high content of carbohydrates (more than 60% carbohydrates). This study has demonstrated that reducing sugars can be efficiently extracted from raw rapeseed straw by combination of hydrothermal pretreatment and enzymatic hydrolysis followed by utilization as a fuel in two-chamber MFCs for electrical power generation. The most efficient method of saccharification of this lignocellulosic biomass (17%) turned out hydrothermal pretreatment followed by enzymatic hydrolysis. Electricity was produced using hydrolysate concentrations up to 150 mg/dm(3). The power density reached 54 mW/m(2), while CEs ranged from 60% to 10%, corresponding to the initial reducing sugar concentrations of 10-150 mg/dm(3). The COD degradation rates based on charge calculation increased from 0.445 g COD/m(2)/d for the hydrolysate obtained with the microwave treatment to 0.602 g COD/m(2)/d for the most efficient combination of hydrothermal treatment followed by enzymatic hydrolysis.

  5. High performance spiral wound microbial fuel cell with hydraulic characterization.

    PubMed

    Haeger, Alexander; Forrestal, Casey; Xu, Pei; Ren, Zhiyong Jason

    2014-12-01

    The understanding and development of functioning systems are crucial steps for microbial fuel cell (MFC) technology advancement. In this study, a compact spiral wound MFC (swMFC) was developed and hydraulic residence time distribution (RTD) tests were conducted to investigate the flow characteristics in the systems. Results show that two-chamber swMFCs have high surface area to volume ratios of 350-700m(2)/m(3), and by using oxygen cathode without metal-catalysts, the maximum power densities were 42W/m(3) based on total volume and 170W/m(3) based on effective volume. The hydraulic step-input tracer study identified 20-67% of anodic flow dead space, which presents new opportunities for system improvement. Electrochemical tools revealed very low ohmic resistance but high charge transfer and diffusion resistance due to catalyst-free oxygen reduction. The spiral wound configuration combined with RTD tool offers a holistic approach for MFC development and optimization.

  6. Shift of voltage reversal in stacked microbial fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, Junyeong; Kim, Bongkyu; Chang, In Seop; Lee, Hyung-Sool

    2015-03-01

    We proved that sluggish kinetics on the cathode and the imbalance of cathode kinetics cause voltage reversal in a stacked microbial fuel cell (MFC) equipped with a non-Pt cathode. Catholyte aeration to a unit MFC against passive air diffusion to the cathode in the other unit MFC shifted voltage reversal between the two units, due to improved mass transport and O2 concentration effects in the aerated MFC. The shifted voltage reversal returned to an original status when catholyte aeration was stopped. A Pt-coated cathode increased the rate of oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) by a factor of ∼20, as compared to the non-Pt cathode. As a result, the anodic reaction rate that became slower than the rate on the Pt-cathode limited current density to overpotential in the stacked MFC equipped with the Pt-cathode. This work shows that dominant kinetic bottlenecks, which are the primary cause of voltage reversal, can be shifted between individual MFCs of stacked MFCs or electrodes depending on relative kinetics.

  7. Cadmium recovery by coupling double microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Choi, Chansoo; Hu, Naixu; Lim, Bongsu

    2014-10-01

    Cr(VI)-MFC of the double microbial fuel cell (d-MFC) arrangement could successfully complement the insufficient voltage and power needed to recover cadmium metal from Cd(II)-MFC, which operated as a redox-flow battery. It was also possible to drain electrical energy from the d-MFC by an additional passage. The highest maximum utilization power density (22.5Wm(-2)) of Cr(VI)-MFC, with the cathode optimized with sulfate buffer, was 11.3times higher than the highest power density directly supplied to Cd(II)-MFC (2.0Wm(-2)). Cr(VI)-MFC could generate 3times higher power with the additional passage than without it; and the current density for the former was 4.2times higher than the latter at the same maximum power point (38.0Am(-2) vs. 9.0Am(-2)). This boosting phenomenon could be explained by the Le Chatelier's principle, which addresses the rate of electron-hole pair formation that can be accelerated by quickly removing electrons generated by microorganisms. PMID:25151082

  8. Carbon Material Optimized Biocathode for Improving Microbial Fuel Cell Performance

    PubMed Central

    Tursun, Hairti; Liu, Rui; Li, Jing; Abro, Rashid; Wang, Xiaohui; Gao, Yanmei; Li, Yuan

    2016-01-01

    To improve the performance of microbial fuel cells (MFCs), the biocathode electrode material of double-chamber was optimized. Alongside the basic carbon fiber brush, three carbon materials namely graphite granules, activated carbon granules (ACG) and activated carbon powder, were added to the cathode-chambers to improve power generation. The result shows that the addition of carbon materials increased the amount of available electroactive microbes on the electrode surface and thus promote oxygen reduction rate, which improved the generation performance of the MFCs. The Output current (external resistance = 1000 Ω) greatly increased after addition of the three carbon materials and maximum power densities in current stable phase increased by 47.4, 166.1, and 33.5%, respectively. Additionally, coulombic efficiencies of the MFC increased by 16.3, 64.3, and 20.1%, respectively. These results show that MFC when optimized with ACG show better power generation, higher chemical oxygen demands removal rate and coulombic efficiency. PMID:26858695

  9. Polymer coatings as separator layers for microbial fuel cell cathodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watson, Valerie J.; Saito, Tomonori; Hickner, Michael A.; Logan, Bruce E.

    2011-03-01

    Membrane separators reduce oxygen flux from the cathode into the anolyte in microbial fuel cells (MFCs), but water accumulation and pH gradients between the separator and cathode reduces performance. Air cathodes were spray-coated (water-facing side) with anion exchange, cation exchange, and neutral polymer coatings of different thicknesses to incorporate the separator into the cathode. The anion exchange polymer coating resulted in greater power density (1167 ± 135 mW m-2) than a cation exchange coating (439 ± 2 mW m-2). This power output was similar to that produced by a Nafion-coated cathode (1114 ± 174 mW m-2), and slightly lower than the uncoated cathode (1384 ± 82 mW m-2). Thicker coatings reduced oxygen diffusion into the electrolyte and increased coulombic efficiency (CE = 56-64%) relative to an uncoated cathode (29 ± 8%), but decreased power production (255-574 mW m-2). Electrochemical characterization of the cathodes ex situ to the MFC showed that the cathodes with the lowest charge transfer resistance and the highest oxygen reduction activity produced the most power in MFC tests. The results on hydrophilic cathode separator layers revealed a trade off between power and CE. Cathodes coated with a thin coating of anion exchange polymer show promise for controlling oxygen transfer while minimally affecting power production.

  10. Carbon fiber enhanced bioelectricity generation in soil microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaojing; Wang, Xin; Zhao, Qian; Wan, Lili; Li, Yongtao; Zhou, Qixing

    2016-11-15

    The soil microbial fuel cell (MFC) is a promising biotechnology for the bioelectricity recovery as well as the remediation of organics contaminated soil. However, the electricity production and the remediation efficiency of soil MFC are seriously limited by the tremendous internal resistance of soil. Conductive carbon fiber was mixed with petroleum hydrocarbons contaminated soil and significantly enhanced the performance of soil MFC. The maximum current density, the maximum power density and the accumulated charge output of MFC mixed carbon fiber (MC) were 10, 22 and 16 times as high as those of closed circuit control due to the carbon fiber productively assisted the anode to collect the electron. The internal resistance of MC reduced by 58%, 83% of which owed to the charge transfer resistance, resulting in a high efficiency of electron transfer from soil to anode. The degradation rates of total petroleum hydrocarbons enhanced by 100% and 329% compared to closed and opened circuit controls without the carbon fiber respectively. The effective range of remediation and the bioelectricity recovery was extended from 6 to 20cm with the same area of air-cathode. The mixed carbon fiber apparently enhanced the bioelectricity generation and the remediation efficiency of soil MFC by means of promoting the electron transfer rate from soil to anode. The use of conductively functional materials (e.g. carbon fiber) is very meaningful for the remediation and bioelectricity recovery in the bioelectrochemical remediation.

  11. Microbial fuel cell energy harvesting using synchronous flyback converter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alaraj, Muhannad; Ren, Zhiyong Jason; Park, Jae-Do

    2014-02-01

    Microbial Fuel Cells (MFCs) use biodegradable substrates, such as wastewater and marine sediments to generate electrical energy. To harvest more energy from an MFC, power electronic converters have recently been used to replace resistors or charge pumps, because they have superior controllability on MFC's operating point and higher efficiency in energy storage for different applications. Conventional diode-based energy harvesters suffer from low efficiency because of the energy losses through the diode. Replacing the diode with a MOSFET can reduce the conduction loss, but it requires an isolated gate signal to control the floating secondary MOSFET, which makes the control circuitry complex. This study presents a new MFC energy harvesting regime using a synchronous flyback converter, which implements a transformer-based harvester with much simpler configuration and improves harvesting efficiency by 37.6% compared to a diode based boost converter, from 33.5% to 46.1%. The proposed harvester was able to store 2.27 J in the output capacitor out of 4.91 J generated energy from the MFC, while the boost converter can capture 1.67 J from 4.95 J.

  12. Microbial fuel cells for robotics: energy autonomy through artificial symbiosis.

    PubMed

    Ieropoulos, Ioannis A; Greenman, John; Melhuish, Chris; Horsfield, Ian

    2012-06-01

    The development of the microbial fuel cell (MFC) technology has seen an enormous growth over the last hundred years since its inception by Potter in 1911. The technology has reached a level of maturity that it is now considered to be a field in its own right with a growing scientific community. The highest level of activity has been recorded over the last decade and it is perhaps considered commonplace that MFCs are primarily suitable for stationary, passive wastewater treatment applications. Sceptics have certainly not considered MFCs as serious contenders in the race for developing renewable energy technologies. Yet this is the only type of alternative system that can convert organic waste-widely distributed around the globe-directly into electricity, and therefore, the only technology that will allow artificial agents to autonomously operate in a plethora of environments. This Minireview describes the history and current state-of-the-art regarding MFCs in robotics and their vital role in artificial symbiosis and autonomy. Furthermore, the article demonstrates how pursuing practical robotic applications can provide insights of the core MFC technology in general.

  13. High performance spiral wound microbial fuel cell with hydraulic characterization.

    PubMed

    Haeger, Alexander; Forrestal, Casey; Xu, Pei; Ren, Zhiyong Jason

    2014-12-01

    The understanding and development of functioning systems are crucial steps for microbial fuel cell (MFC) technology advancement. In this study, a compact spiral wound MFC (swMFC) was developed and hydraulic residence time distribution (RTD) tests were conducted to investigate the flow characteristics in the systems. Results show that two-chamber swMFCs have high surface area to volume ratios of 350-700m(2)/m(3), and by using oxygen cathode without metal-catalysts, the maximum power densities were 42W/m(3) based on total volume and 170W/m(3) based on effective volume. The hydraulic step-input tracer study identified 20-67% of anodic flow dead space, which presents new opportunities for system improvement. Electrochemical tools revealed very low ohmic resistance but high charge transfer and diffusion resistance due to catalyst-free oxygen reduction. The spiral wound configuration combined with RTD tool offers a holistic approach for MFC development and optimization. PMID:25463810

  14. Bioelectricity production from soil using microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Wolińska, Agnieszka; Stępniewska, Zofia; Bielecka, Arletta; Ciepielski, Jakub

    2014-08-01

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) are a device using microorganisms as biocatalysts for transforming chemical energy into bioelectricity. As soil is an environment with the highest number of microorganisms and diversity, we hypothesized that it should have the potential for energy generation. The soil used for the study was Mollic Gleysol collected from the surface layer (0-20 cm). Four combinations of soil MFC differing from each other in humidity (full water holding capacity [WHC] and flooding) and the carbon source (glucose and straw) were constructed. Voltage (mV) and current intensity (μA) produced by the MFCs were recorded every day or at 2-day intervals. The fastest and the most effective MFCs in voltage generation (372.2 ± 5 mV) were those constructed on the basis of glucose (MFC-G). The efficiency of straw MFCs (MFC-S) was noticeable after 2 weeks (319.3 ± 4 mV). Maximal power density (P max = 32 mW m(-2)) was achieved by the MFC-G at current density (CD) of 100 mA m(-2). Much lower values of P max (10.6-10.8 mW m(-2)) were noted in the MFC-S at CD of ca. 60-80 mA m(-2). Consequently, soil has potential for production of renewable energy. PMID:24980749

  15. Influence of anode surface chemistry on microbial fuel cell operation.

    PubMed

    Santoro, Carlo; Babanova, Sofia; Artyushkova, Kateryna; Cornejo, Jose A; Ista, Linnea; Bretschger, Orianna; Marsili, Enrico; Atanassov, Plamen; Schuler, Andrew J

    2015-12-01

    Self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) modified gold anodes are used in single chamber microbial fuel cells for organic removal and electricity generation. Hydrophilic (N(CH3)3(+), OH, COOH) and hydrophobic (CH3) SAMs are examined for their effect on bacterial attachment, current and power output. The different substratum chemistry affects the community composition of the electrochemically active biofilm formed and thus the current and power output. Of the four SAM-modified anodes tested, N(CH3)3(+) results in the shortest start up time (15 days), highest current achieved (225 μA cm(-2)) and highest MFC power density (40 μW cm(-2)), followed by COOH (150 μA cm(-2) and 37 μW cm(-2)) and OH (83 μA cm(-2) and 27 μW cm(-2)) SAMs. Hydrophobic SAM decreases electrochemically active bacteria attachment and anode performance in comparison to hydrophilic SAMs (CH3 modified anodes 7 μA cm(-2) anodic current and 1.2 μW cm(-2) MFC's power density). A consortium of Clostridia and δ-Proteobacteria is found on all the anode surfaces, suggesting a synergistic cooperation under anodic conditions.

  16. Submersible microbial fuel cell for electricity production from sewage sludge.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yifeng; Olias, Lola Gonzalez; Kongjan, Prawit; Angelidaki, Irini

    2011-01-01

    A submersible microbial fuel cell (SMFC) was utilized to treat sewage sludge and simultaneously generate electricity. Stable power generation (145 +/- 5 mW/m2, 470 omega) was produced continuously from raw sewage sludge for 5.5 days. The maximum power density reached 190 +/- 5 mW/m2. The corresponding total chemical oxygen demand (TCOD) removal efficiency was 78.1 +/- 0.2% with initial TCOD of 49.7 g/L. The power generation of SMFC was depended on the sludge concentration, while dilution of the raw sludge resulted in higher power density. The maximum power density was saturated at sludge concentration of 17 g-TCOD/L, where 290 mw/m2 was achieved. When effluents from an anaerobic digester that was fed with raw sludge were used as substrate in the SMFC, a maximum power density of 318 mW/m2, and a final TCOD removal of 71.9 +/- 0.2% were achieved. These results have practical implications for development of an effective system to treat sewage sludge and simultaneously recover energy. PMID:22053457

  17. Cadmium recovery by coupling double microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Choi, Chansoo; Hu, Naixu; Lim, Bongsu

    2014-10-01

    Cr(VI)-MFC of the double microbial fuel cell (d-MFC) arrangement could successfully complement the insufficient voltage and power needed to recover cadmium metal from Cd(II)-MFC, which operated as a redox-flow battery. It was also possible to drain electrical energy from the d-MFC by an additional passage. The highest maximum utilization power density (22.5Wm(-2)) of Cr(VI)-MFC, with the cathode optimized with sulfate buffer, was 11.3times higher than the highest power density directly supplied to Cd(II)-MFC (2.0Wm(-2)). Cr(VI)-MFC could generate 3times higher power with the additional passage than without it; and the current density for the former was 4.2times higher than the latter at the same maximum power point (38.0Am(-2) vs. 9.0Am(-2)). This boosting phenomenon could be explained by the Le Chatelier's principle, which addresses the rate of electron-hole pair formation that can be accelerated by quickly removing electrons generated by microorganisms.

  18. Voltage balancing strategies for serial connection of microbial fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khaled, Firas; Ondel, Olivier; Allard, Bruno; Buret, François

    2015-07-01

    The microbial fuel cell (MFC) converts electrochemically organic matter into electricity by means of metabolisms of bacteria. The MFC power output is limited by low voltage and low current characteristics in the range of microwatts or milliwatts per litre. In order to produce a sufficient voltage level (>1.5 V) and sufficient power to supply real applications such as autonomous sensors, it is necessary to either scale-up one single unit or to connect multiple units together. Many topologies of connection are possible as the serial association to improve the output voltage, or the parallel connection to improve the output current or the series/parallel connection to step-up both voltage and current. The association of MFCs in series is a solution to increase the voltage to an acceptable value and to mutualize the unit's output power. The serial association of a large number of MFCs presents several issues. The first one is the hydraulic coupling among MFCs when they share the same substrate. The second one is the dispersion between generators that lead to a non-optimal stack efficiency because the maximum power point (MPP) operation of all MFCs is not permitted. Voltage balancing is a solution to compensate non-uniformities towards MPP. This paper presents solutions to improve the efficiency of a stack of serially connected MFCs through a voltage-balancing circuit. Contribution to the topical issue "Electrical Engineering Symposium (SGE 2014)", edited by Adel Razek

  19. Enhanced power production from microbial fuel cells with high cell density culture.

    PubMed

    Zhai, Dan-Dan; Li, Bing; Sun, Jian-Zhong; Sun, De-Zhen; Si, Rong-Wei; Yong, Yang-Chun

    2016-01-01

    Improvement of power production in a microbial fuel cell (MFC) with a high cell density culture strategy was developed. By using high cell density culture, the voltage output and power density output of the MFC were enhanced about 0.6 and 1.6 times compared to the control, respectively. Further analysis showed that riboflavin concentration in the MFC was dramatically increased from 0.1 mg/L to 1.2 mg/L by high cell density culture. Moreover, the biofilm formation on the anode surface was significantly enhanced by this new strategy. The increased accumulation of electron shuttle (riboflavin) as well as enhanced biofilm formation contributed to the improvement in anodic electrochemical activity and these factors were the underlying mechanism for MFC performance improvement by high cell density culture. This work demonstrated that high cell density culture would be a simple and practical strategy for MFC manipulation.

  20. Scale-up of phosphate remobilization from sewage sludge in a microbial fuel cell.

    PubMed

    Happe, Manuel; Sugnaux, Marc; Cachelin, Christian Pierre; Stauffer, Marc; Zufferey, Géraldine; Kahoun, Thomas; Salamin, Paul-André; Egli, Thomas; Comninellis, Christos; Grogg, Alain-François; Fischer, Fabian

    2016-01-01

    Phosphate remobilization from digested sewage sludge containing iron phosphate was scaled-up in a microbial fuel cell (MFC). A 3litre triple chambered MFC was constructed. This reactor was operated as a microbial fuel cell and later as a microbial electrolysis cell to accelerate cathodic phosphate remobilization. Applying an additional voltage and exceeding native MFC power accelerated chemical base formation and the related phosphate remobilization rate. The electrolysis approach was extended using a platinum-RVC cathode. The pH rose to 12.6 and phosphate was recovered by 67% in 26h. This was significantly faster than using microbial fuel cell conditions. Shrinking core modelling particle fluid kinetics showed that the reaction resistance has to move inside the sewage sludge particle for considerable rate enhancement. Remobilized phosphate was subsequently precipitated as struvite and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry indicated low levels of cadmium, lead, and other metals as required by law for recycling fertilizers. PMID:26519694

  1. Scale-up of phosphate remobilization from sewage sludge in a microbial fuel cell.

    PubMed

    Happe, Manuel; Sugnaux, Marc; Cachelin, Christian Pierre; Stauffer, Marc; Zufferey, Géraldine; Kahoun, Thomas; Salamin, Paul-André; Egli, Thomas; Comninellis, Christos; Grogg, Alain-François; Fischer, Fabian

    2016-01-01

    Phosphate remobilization from digested sewage sludge containing iron phosphate was scaled-up in a microbial fuel cell (MFC). A 3litre triple chambered MFC was constructed. This reactor was operated as a microbial fuel cell and later as a microbial electrolysis cell to accelerate cathodic phosphate remobilization. Applying an additional voltage and exceeding native MFC power accelerated chemical base formation and the related phosphate remobilization rate. The electrolysis approach was extended using a platinum-RVC cathode. The pH rose to 12.6 and phosphate was recovered by 67% in 26h. This was significantly faster than using microbial fuel cell conditions. Shrinking core modelling particle fluid kinetics showed that the reaction resistance has to move inside the sewage sludge particle for considerable rate enhancement. Remobilized phosphate was subsequently precipitated as struvite and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry indicated low levels of cadmium, lead, and other metals as required by law for recycling fertilizers.

  2. Robustness and adaptation reveal plausible cell cycle controlling subnetwork in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jiun-Yan; Huang, Chi-Wei; Kao, Kuo-Ching; Lai, Pik-Yin

    2013-04-10

    Biological systems are often organized spatially and temporally by multi-scale functional subsystems (modules). A specific subcellular process often corresponds to a subsystem composed of some of these interconnected modules. Accurate identification of system-level modularity organization from the large scale networks can provide valuable information on subsystem models of subcellular processes or physiological phenomena. Computational identification of functional modules from the large scale network is the key approach to solve the complexity of modularity in the past decade, but the overlapping and multi-scale nature of modules often renders unsatisfactory results in these methods. Most current methods for modularity detection are optimization-based and suffered from the drawback of size resolution limit. It is difficult to trace the origin of the unsatisfactory results, which may be due to poor data, inappropriate objective function selection or simply resulted from natural evolution, and hence no system-level accurate modular models for subcellular processes can be offered. Motivated by the idea of evolution with robustness and adaption as guiding principles, we propose a novel approach that can identify significant multi-scale overlapping modules that are sufficiently accurate at the system and subsystem levels, giving biological insights for subcellular processes. The success of our evolution strategy method is demonstrated by applying to the yeast protein-protein interaction network. Functional subsystems of important physiological phenomena can be revealed. In particular, the cell cycle controlling network is selected for detailed discussion. The cell cycle subcellular processes in yeast can be successfully dissected into functional modules of cell cycle control, cell size check point, spindle assembly checkpoint, and DNA damage check point in G2/M and S phases. The interconnections between check points and cell cycle control modules provide clues on the

  3. Silicon-based microfabricated microbial fuel cell toxicity sensor.

    PubMed

    Dávila, D; Esquivel, J P; Sabaté, N; Mas, J

    2011-01-15

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) have been used for several years as biosensors for measuring environmental parameters such as biochemical oxygen demand and water toxicity. The present study is focused on the detection of toxic matter using a novel silicon-based MFC. Like other existing toxicity sensors based on MFCs, this device is capable of detecting the variation on the current produced by the cell when toxic compounds are present in the medium. The MFC approach presented in this work aims to obtain a simple, compact and planar device for its further application as a biosensor in the design and fabrication of equipment for toxicity monitoring. It consists on a proton exchange membrane placed between two microfabricated silicon plates that act as current collectors. An array of square 80 μm × 80 μm vertical channels, 300 μm deep, have been defined trough the plates over an area of 6 mm × 6 mm. The final testing assembly incorporates two perspex pieces positioned onto the plates as reservoirs with a working volume of 144 μL per compartment. The operation of the microdevice as a direct electron transfer MFC has been validated by comparing its performance against a larger scale MFC, run under the same conditions. The device has been tested as a toxicity sensor by setting it at a fixed current while monitoring changes in the output power. A drop in the power production is observed when a toxic compound is added to the anode compartment. The compact design of the device makes it suitable for its incorporation into measurement equipment either as an individual device or as an array of sensors for high throughput processing.

  4. Saccharomyces cerevisiae Mid2p Is a Potential Cell Wall Stress Sensor and Upstream Activator of the PKC1-MPK1 Cell Integrity Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Ketela, Troy; Green, Robin; Bussey, Howard

    1999-01-01

    The MID2 gene of Saccharomyces cerevisiae encodes a protein with structural features indicative of a plasma membrane-associated cell wall sensor. MID2 was isolated as a multicopy activator of the Skn7p transcription factor. Deletion of MID2 causes resistance to calcofluor white, diminished production of stress-induced cell wall chitin under a variety of conditions, and changes in growth rate and viability in a number of different cell wall biosynthesis mutants. Overexpression of MID2 causes hyperaccumulation of chitin and increased sensitivity to calcofluor white. α-Factor hypersensitivity of mid2Δ mutants can be suppressed by overexpression of upstream elements of the cell integrity pathway, including PKC1, RHO1, WSC1, and WSC2. Mid2p and Wsc1p appear to have overlapping roles in maintaining cell integrity since mid2Δ wsc1Δ mutants are inviable on medium that does not contain osmotic support. A role for MID2 in the cell integrity pathway is further supported by the finding that MID2 is required for induction of Mpk1p tyrosine phosphorylation during exposure to α-factor, calcofluor white, or high temperature. Our data are consistent with a role for Mid2p in sensing cell wall stress and in activation of a response that includes both increased chitin synthesis and the Mpk1p mitogen-activated protein kinase cell integrity pathway. In addition, we have identified an open reading frame, MTL1, which encodes a protein with both structural and functional similarity to Mid2p. PMID:10348843

  5. The fungicide Mancozeb induces metacaspase-dependent apoptotic cell death in Saccharomyces cerevisiae BY4741.

    PubMed

    Scariot, F J; Jahn, L M; Maianti, J P; Delamare, A P L; Echeverrigaray, S

    2016-07-01

    Mancozeb (MZ), a mixture of ethylene-bis-dithiocarbamate manganese and zinc salts, is one of the most widely used fungicides in agriculture. Toxicologic studies in mammals and mammalian cells indicate that this fungicide can cause neurological and cytological disorders, putatively associated with pro-oxidant and apoptotic effects. Yeast adaptation to sub-inhibitory concentrations of MZ has been correlated with oxidative response, proteins degradation, and energy metabolism, and its main effect on yeast has been attributed to its high reactivity with thiol groups in proteins. Herein, we show that acute MZ treatments on aerobic exponentially growing yeast of wild type (BY4741) and deletion mutant strains, coupled with multiplex flow cytometry analysis, conclusively demonstrated that MZ displays the typical features of pro-oxidant activity on Saccharomyces, elevating mitochondrial ROS, and causing hyper-polarization of mitochondrial membranes leading to apoptosis. A drastic reduction of cellular viability associated with the maintenance of cell membrane integrity, as well as phosphatidyl serine externalization on yeast cells exposed to MZ, also supports an apoptotic mode of action. Moreover, abrogation of the apoptotic response in yca1 deficient mutants indicates that metacaspase-1 is involved in the programmed cell death mechanism induced by MZ in yeast. PMID:27160815

  6. Water structure in vitro and within Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast cells under conditions of heat shock

    PubMed Central

    Dashnau, Jennifer L.; Conlin, Laura K.; Nelson, Hillary C. M.; Vanderkooi, Jane M.

    2008-01-01

    The OH stretch mode from water and organic hydroxyl groups have strong infrared absorption, the position of the band going to lower frequency with increased H-bonding. This band was used to study water in trehalose and glycerol solutions and in genetically modified yeast cells containing varying amounts of trehalose. Concentration-dependent changes in water structure induced by trehalose and glycerol in solution were detected, consistent with an increase of lower-energy H-bonds and interactions at the expense of higher-energy interactions. This result suggests that these molecules disrupt the water H-bond network in such a way as to strengthen molecule-water interactions while perturbing water-water interactions. The molecule-induced changes in the water H-bond network seen in solution do not translate to observable differences in yeast cells that are trehalose-deficient and trehalose-rich. Although comparison of yeast with low and high trehalose showed no observable effect on intracellular water structure, the structure of water in cells is different from that in bulk water. Cellular water exhibits a larger preference for lower-energy H-bonds or interactions over higher-energy interactions relative to that shown in bulk water. This effect is likely the result of the high concentration of biological molecules present in the cell. The ability of water to interact directly with polar groups on biological molecules may cause the preference seen for lower-energy interactions. PMID:17961925

  7. The fraction of cells that resume growth after acetic acid addition is a strain-dependent parameter of acetic acid tolerance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Swinnen, Steve; Fernández-Niño, Miguel; González-Ramos, Daniel; van Maris, Antonius J A; Nevoigt, Elke

    2014-06-01

    High acetic acid tolerance of Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a relevant phenotype in industrial biotechnology when using lignocellulosic hydrolysates as feedstock. A screening of 38 S. cerevisiae strains for tolerance to acetic acid revealed considerable differences, particularly with regard to the duration of the latency phase. To understand how this phenotype is quantitatively manifested, four strains exhibiting significant differences were studied in more detail. Our data show that the duration of the latency phase is primarily determined by the fraction of cells within the population that resume growth. Only this fraction contributed to the exponential growth observed after the latency phase, while all other cells persisted in a viable but non-proliferating state. A remarkable variation in the size of the fraction was observed among the tested strains differing by several orders of magnitude. In fact, only 11 out of 10(7)  cells of the industrial bioethanol production strain Ethanol Red resumed growth after exposure to 157 mM acetic acid at pH 4.5, while this fraction was 3.6 × 10(6) (out of 10(7)  cells) in the highly acetic acid tolerant isolate ATCC 96581. These strain-specific differences are genetically determined and represent a valuable starting point to identify genetic targets for future strain improvement.

  8. Re-examination of the relationship between marine virus and microbial cell abundances.

    PubMed

    Wigington, Charles H; Sonderegger, Derek; Brussaard, Corina P D; Buchan, Alison; Finke, Jan F; Fuhrman, Jed A; Lennon, Jay T; Middelboe, Mathias; Suttle, Curtis A; Stock, Charles; Wilson, William H; Wommack, K Eric; Wilhelm, Steven W; Weitz, Joshua S

    2016-01-25

    Marine viruses are critical drivers of ocean biogeochemistry, and their abundances vary spatiotemporally in the global oceans, with upper estimates exceeding 10(8) per ml. Over many years, a consensus has emerged that virus abundances are typically tenfold higher than microbial cell abundances. However, the true explanatory power of a linear relationship and its robustness across diverse ocean environments is unclear. Here, we compile 5,671 microbial cell and virus abundance estimates from 25 distinct marine surveys and find substantial variation in the virus-to-microbial cell ratio, in which a 10:1 model has either limited or no explanatory power. Instead, virus abundances are better described as nonlinear, power-law functions of microbial cell abundances. The fitted scaling exponents are typically less than 1, implying that the virus-to-microbial cell ratio decreases with microbial cell density, rather than remaining fixed. The observed scaling also implies that viral effect sizes derived from 'representative' abundances require substantial refinement to be extrapolated to regional or global scales.

  9. Re-examination of the relationship between marine virus and microbial cell abundances.

    PubMed

    Wigington, Charles H; Sonderegger, Derek; Brussaard, Corina P D; Buchan, Alison; Finke, Jan F; Fuhrman, Jed A; Lennon, Jay T; Middelboe, Mathias; Suttle, Curtis A; Stock, Charles; Wilson, William H; Wommack, K Eric; Wilhelm, Steven W; Weitz, Joshua S

    2016-01-01

    Marine viruses are critical drivers of ocean biogeochemistry, and their abundances vary spatiotemporally in the global oceans, with upper estimates exceeding 10(8) per ml. Over many years, a consensus has emerged that virus abundances are typically tenfold higher than microbial cell abundances. However, the true explanatory power of a linear relationship and its robustness across diverse ocean environments is unclear. Here, we compile 5,671 microbial cell and virus abundance estimates from 25 distinct marine surveys and find substantial variation in the virus-to-microbial cell ratio, in which a 10:1 model has either limited or no explanatory power. Instead, virus abundances are better described as nonlinear, power-law functions of microbial cell abundances. The fitted scaling exponents are typically less than 1, implying that the virus-to-microbial cell ratio decreases with microbial cell density, rather than remaining fixed. The observed scaling also implies that viral effect sizes derived from 'representative' abundances require substantial refinement to be extrapolated to regional or global scales. PMID:27572161

  10. Polymer separators for high-power, high-efficiency microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Guang; Wei, Bin; Luo, Yong; Logan, Bruce E; Hickner, Michael A

    2012-12-01

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) with hydrophilic poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) separators showed higher Coulombic efficiencies (94%) and power densities (1220 mW m(-2)) than cells with porous glass fiber separators or reactors without a separator after 32 days of operation. These remarkable increases in both the coublomic efficiency and the power production of the microbial fuel cells were made possible by the separator's unique characteristics of fouling mitigation of the air cathode without a large increase in ionic resistance in the cell. This new type of polymer gel-like separator design will be useful for improving MFC reactor performance by enabling compact cell designs.

  11. Tracking heavy water (D2O) incorporation for identifying and sorting active microbial cells.

    PubMed

    Berry, David; Mader, Esther; Lee, Tae Kwon; Woebken, Dagmar; Wang, Yun; Zhu, Di; Palatinszky, Marton; Schintlmeister, Arno; Schmid, Markus C; Hanson, Buck T; Shterzer, Naama; Mizrahi, Itzhak; Rauch, Isabella; Decker, Thomas; Bocklitz, Thomas; Popp, Jürgen; Gibson, Christopher M; Fowler, Patrick W; Huang, Wei E; Wagner, Michael

    2015-01-13

    Microbial communities are essential to the function of virtually all ecosystems and eukaryotes, including humans. However, it is still a major challenge to identify microbial cells active under natural conditions in complex systems. In this study, we developed a new method to identify and sort active microbes on the single-cell level in complex samples using stable isotope probing with heavy water (D2O) combined with Raman microspectroscopy. Incorporation of D2O-derived D into the biomass of autotrophic and heterotrophic bacteria and archaea could be unambiguously detected via C-D signature peaks in single-cell Raman spectra, and the obtained labeling pattern was confirmed by nanoscale-resolution secondary ion MS. In fast-growing Escherichia coli cells, label detection was already possible after 20 min. For functional analyses of microbial communities, the detection of D incorporation from D2O in individual microbial cells via Raman microspectroscopy can be directly combined with FISH for the identification of active microbes. Applying this approach to mouse cecal microbiota revealed that the host-compound foragers Akkermansia muciniphila and Bacteroides acidifaciens exhibited distinctive response patterns to amendments of mucin and sugars. By Raman-based cell sorting of active (deuterated) cells with optical tweezers and subsequent multiple displacement amplification and DNA sequencing, novel cecal microbes stimulated by mucin and/or glucosamine were identified, demonstrating the potential of the nondestructive D2O-Raman approach for targeted sorting of microbial cells with defined functional properties for single-cell genomics.

  12. Identification of novel Saccharomyces cerevisiae proteins with nuclear export activity: cell cycle-regulated transcription factor ace2p shows cell cycle-independent nucleocytoplasmic shuttling.

    PubMed

    Jensen, T H; Neville, M; Rain, J C; McCarthy, T; Legrain, P; Rosbash, M

    2000-11-01

    Nuclear export of proteins containing leucine-rich nuclear export signals (NESs) is mediated by the NES receptor CRM1/Crm1p. We have carried out a yeast two-hybrid screen with Crm1p as a bait. The Crm1p-interacting clones were subscreened for nuclear export activity in a visual assay utilizing the Crm1p-inhibitor leptomycin B (LMB). This approach identified three Saccharomyces cerevisiae proteins not previously known to have nuclear export activity. These proteins are the 5' RNA triphosphatase Ctl1p, the cell cycle-regulated transcription factor Ace2p, and a protein encoded by the previously uncharacterized open reading frame YDR499W. Mutagenesis analysis show that YDR499Wp contains an NES that conforms to the consensus sequence for leucine-rich NESs. Mutagenesis of Ctl1p and Ace2p were unable to identify specific NES residues. However, a 29-amino-acid region of Ace2p, rich in hydrophobic residues, contains nuclear export activity. Ace2p accumulates in the nucleus at the end of mitosis and activates early-G(1)-specific genes. We now provide evidence that Ace2p is nuclear not only in late M-early G(1) but also during other stages of the cell cycle. This feature of Ace2p localization explains its ability to activate genes such as CUP1, which are not expressed in a cell cycle-dependent manner.

  13. The product of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae cell cycle gene DBF2 has homology with protein kinases and is periodically expressed in the cell cycle.

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, L H; Eberly, S L; Chapman, J W; Araki, H; Sugino, A

    1990-01-01

    Several Saccharomyces cerevisiae dbf mutants defective in DNA synthesis have been described previously. In this paper, one of them, dbf2, is characterized in detail. The DBF2 gene has been cloned and mapped, and its nucleotide sequence has been determined. This process has identified an open reading frame capable of encoding a protein of molecular weight 64,883 (561 amino acids). The deduced amino acid sequence contains all 11 conserved domains found in various protein kinases. DBF2 was periodically expressed in the cell cycle at a time that clearly differed from the time of expression of either the histone H2A or DNA polymerase I gene. Its first function was completed very near to initiation of DNA synthesis. However, DNA synthesis in the mutant was only delayed at 37 degrees C, and the cells blocked in nuclear division. Consistent with this finding, the execution point occurred about 1 h after DNA synthesis, and the nuclear morphology of the mutant at the restrictive temperature was that of cells blocked in late nuclear division. DBF2 is therefore likely to encode a protein kinase that may function in initiation of DNA synthesis and also in late nuclear division. Images PMID:2181271

  14. Fructose and glucose differentially affect aging and carbonyl/oxidative stress parameters in Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells.

    PubMed

    Semchyshyn, Halyna M; Lozinska, Liudmyla M; Miedzobrodzki, Jacek; Lushchak, Volodymyr I

    2011-05-15

    Fructose is commonly used as an industrial sweetener and has been excessively consumed in human diets in the last decades. High fructose intake is causative in the development of metabolic disorders, but the mechanisms underlying fructose-induced disturbances are under debate. Fructose compared to glucose has been found to be a more potent initiator of the glycation reaction. Therefore, we supposed that glucose and fructose might have different vital effects. Here we compare the effects of glucose and fructose on yeast cell viability and markers of carbonyl/oxidative stress. Analysis of the parameters in cells growing on glucose and fructose clearly reveals that yeast growing on fructose has higher levels of carbonyl groups in proteins, α-dicarbonyl compounds and reactive oxygen species. This may explain the observation that fructose-supplemented growth as compared with growth on glucose resulted in more pronounced age-related decline in yeast reproductive ability and higher cell mortality. The results are discussed from the point of view that fructose rather than glucose is more extensively involved in glycation and ROS generation in vivo, yeast aging and development of carbonyl/oxidative stress. It should be noted that carbohydrate restriction used in this study does not reveal a significant difference between markers of aging and carbonyl/oxidative stress in yeasts cultivated on glucose and fructose.

  15. In situ extraction of polar product of whole cell microbial transformation with polyethylene glycol-induced cloud point system.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhilong; Xu, Jian-He; Zhang, Wenzhi; Zhuang, Baohua; Qi, Hanshi

    2008-01-01

    A novel polyethylene glycol-induced cloud point system (PEG-CPS) was developed for in situ extraction of moderate polar product by setting a microbial transformation of benzaldehyde into L-phenylacetylcarbinol (L-PAC) with Saccharomyces cerevisiae (baker's yeast) as a model reaction. The biocompatibility of the microorganism in PEG-CPS was comparatively studied with a series of water-organic solvent two-phase partitioning systems. The tolerance of microorganism to the toxic substrate benzaldehyde was increased and the moderate polar product L-PAC was extracted into the surfactant-rich phase in the PEG-CPS. The novel PEG-CPS fills the gap of in situ extraction of polar product in microbial transformation left by water-organic solvent two-phase partitioning system. At the same time, the application of PEG-CPS in a microbial transformation also avoids expensive solvent when compared with that of aqueous two-phase system or CPS.

  16. Analysis of long-term performance and microbial community structure in bio-cathode microbial desalination cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Huichao; Wen, Qinxue; An, Zhongyi; Chen, Zhiqiang; Nan, Jun

    2016-03-01

    A microbial desalination cell (MDC) could desalinate salt water without energy consumption and simultaneously generate bioenergy. Compared with an abiotic cathode MDC, an aerobic bio-cathode MDC is more sustainable and is less expensive to operate. In this study, the long-term operation (5500 h) performance of a bio-cathode MDC was investigated in which the power density, Coulombic efficiency, and salt removal rate were decreased by 71, 44, and 27 %, respectively. The primary reason for the system performance decrease was biofouling on the membranes, which increased internal resistance and reduced the ionic transfer and energy conversion efficiency. Changing membranes was an effective method to recover the MDC performance. The microbial community diversity in the MDC anode was low compared with that of the reported microbial fuel cell (MFC), while the abundance of Proteobacteria was 30 % higher. The content of Planctomycetes in the cathode biofilm sample was much higher than that in biofouling on the cation exchange membrane (CEM), indicating that Planctomycetes were relevant to cathode oxygen reduction.

  17. In vitro nonsense suppression in [psi+] and [psi-] cell-free lysates of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Tuite, M F; Cox, B S; McLaughlin, C S

    1983-01-01

    An homologous in vitro assay for yeast nonsense suppressors was used to examine the effect of the cytoplasmically inherited genetic determinant [psi] on the efficiency of in vitro nonsense suppression. The efficiency of all three types of yeast tRNA-mediated nonsense suppressor (ochre, amber, and UGA) is much greater in cell-free lysates prepared from a sup+ [psi+] strain than in lysates prepared from an isogeneic sup+ [psi-] strain. Lysates prepared from a [psi-] strain, into which the [psi+] determinant was reintroduced by kar1-mediated cytoduction, support efficient suppression. Evidence is also presented that [psi-] lysates contain an inhibitor of in vitro nonsense suppression. Images PMID:6344070

  18. Electron flux and microbial community in microbial fuel cells (open-circuit and closed-circuit modes) and fermentation.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jaecheul; Park, Youghyun; Lee, Taeho

    2015-07-01

    A closed-circuit microbial fuel cell (C-MFC) was operated to investigate the electron flux under fed-batch mode, and the results were compared to those of open-circuit MFC (O-MFC) and a fermentation reactor (F-reactor). The current was the largest electron sink (52.7% of influent SCOD) in C-MFC, whereas biomass and methane gas were the most significant electron sinks in O-MFC and F-reactor. Interestingly, some of the unknown sink may have accumulated in the electrode of O-MFC. Principal component analysis based on gradient gel electrophoresis profiles showed that the microbial communities were significantly affected by the growth conditions and the presence of electrode, regardless of the circuit connection. Therefore, the electrode and circuit mode might help to control the amount of biomass and enhance the MFC performance.

  19. Microbial community analysis in a long-term membrane-less microbial electrolysis cell with hydrogen and methane production.

    PubMed

    Rago, Laura; Ruiz, Yolanda; Baeza, Juan A; Guisasola, Albert; Cortés, Pilar

    2015-12-01

    A single-chamber microbial electrolysis cell (MEC) aiming at hydrogen production with acetate as sole carbon source failed due to methanogenesis build-up despite the significant amount of 2-bromoethanesulfonate (BES) dosage, 50 mM. Specific batch experiments and a thorough microbial community analysis, pyrosequencing and qPCR, of cathode, anode and medium were performed to understand these observations. The experimental data rebuts different hypothesis and shows that methanogenesis at high BES concentration was likely due to the capacity of some Archaea (hydrogen-oxidizing genus Methanobrevibacter) to resist high BES concentration up to 200 mM. Methanobrevibacter, of the Methanobacteriales order, represented almost the 98% of the total Archaea in the cathode whereas Geobacter was highly abundant in the anode (72% of bacteria). Moreover, at higher BES concentration (up to 200 mM), methanogenesis activity decreased resulting in an increase of homoacetogenic activity, which challenged the performance of the MEC for H2 production.

  20. Procedure for determining maximum sustainable power generated by microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Menicucci, Joseph; Beyenal, Haluk; Marsili, Enrico; Veluchamy, Raajaraajan Angathevar; Demir, Goksel; Lewandowski, Zbigniew

    2006-02-01

    Power generated by microbial fuel cells is computed as a product of current passing through an external resistor and voltage drop across this resistor. If the applied resistance is very low, then high instantaneous power generated by the cell is measured, which is not sustainable; the cell cannot deliver that much power for long periods of time. Since using small electrical resistors leads to erroneous assessment of the capabilities of microbial fuel cells, a question arises: what resistor should be used in such measurements? To address this question, we have defined the sustainable power as the steady state of power delivery by a microbial fuel cell under a given set of conditions and the maximum sustainable power as the highest sustainable power that a microbial fuel cell can deliver under a given set of conditions. Selecting the external resistance that is associated with the maximum sustainable power in a microbial fuel cell (MFC) is difficult because the operator has limited influence on the main factors that control power generation: the rate of charge transfer at the current-limiting electrode and the potential established across the fuel cell. The internal electrical resistance of microbial fuel cells varies, and it depends on the operational conditions of the fuel cell. We have designed an empirical procedure to predict the maximum sustainable power that can be generated by a microbial fuel cell operated under a given set of conditions. Following the procedure, we change the external resistors incrementally, in steps of 500 omega every 10, 60, or 180 s and measure the anode potential, the cathode potential, and the cell current. Power generated in the microbial fuel cell that we were using was limited by the anodic current. The anodic potential was used to determine the condition where the maximum sustainable power is obtained. The procedure is simple, microbial fuel cells can be characterized within an hour, and the results of the measurements can serve

  1. Ion exchange membrane cathodes for scalable microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Yi; Cheng, Shaoan; Logan, Bruce E

    2008-09-15

    One of the main challenges for using microbial fuel cells (MFCs) is developing materials and architectures that are economical and generate high power densities. The performance of two cathodes constructed from two low-cost anion (AEM) and cation (CEM) exchange membranes was compared to that achieved using an ultrafiltration (UF) cathode, when the membranes were made electrically conductive using graphite paint and a nonprecious metal catalyst (CoTMPP). The best performance in single-chamber MFCs using graphite fiber brush anodes was achieved using an AEM cathode with the conductive coating facing the solution, at a catalyst loading of 0.5 mg/cm2 CoTMPP. The maximum power densitywas 449 mW/ m2 (normalized to the projected cathode surface area) or 13.1 W/m3 (total reactor volume), with a Coulombic efficiency up to 70% in a 50 mM phosphate buffer solution (PBS) using acetate. Decreasing the CoTMPP loading by 40-80% reduced power by 28-56%, with only 16% of the power (72 mW/m2) generated using an AEM cathode lacking a catalyst. Using a current collector (a stainless steel mesh) pressed against the inside surface of the AEM cathode and 200 mM PBS, the maximum power produced was further increased to 728 mW/m2 (21.2 W/m3). The use of AEM cathodes and brush anodes provides comparable performance to similar systems that use materials costing nearly an order of magnitude more (carbon paper electrodes) and thus represent more useful materials for reducing the costs of MFCs for wastewater treatment applications. PMID:18853817

  2. Power generation from furfural using the microbial fuel cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Yong; Liu, Guangli; Zhang, Renduo; Zhang, Cuiping

    Furfural is a typical inhibitor in the ethanol fermentation process using lignocellulosic hydrolysates as raw materials. In the literature, no report has shown that furfural can be utilized as the fuel to produce electricity in the microbial fuel cell (MFC), a device that uses microbes to convert organic compounds to generate electricity. In this study, we demonstrated that electricity was successfully generated using furfural as the sole fuel in both the ferricyanide-cathode MFC and the air-cathode MFC. In the ferricyanide-cathode MFC, the maximum power densities reached 45.4, 81.4, and 103 W m -3, respectively, when 1000 mg L -1 glucose, a mixture of 200 mg L -1 glucose and 5 mM furfural, and 6.68 mM furfural were used as the fuels in the anode solution. The corresponding Coulombic efficiencies (CE) were 4.0, 7.1, and 10.2% for the three treatments, respectively. For pure furfural as the fuel, the removal efficiency of furfural reached up to 95% within 12 h. In the air-cathode MFC using 6.68 mM furfural as the fuel, the maximum values of power density and CE were 361 mW m -2 (18 W m -3) and 30.3%, respectively, and the COD removal was about 68% at the end of the experiment (about 30 h). Increase in furfural concentrations from 6.68 to 20 mM resulted in increase in the maximum power densities from 361 to 368 mW m -2, and decrease in CEs from 30.3 to 20.6%. These results indicated that some toxic and biorefractory organics such as furfural might still be suitable resources for electricity generation using the MFC technology.

  3. Stackable and submergible microbial fuel cell modules for wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Kim, Minsoo; Cha, Jaehwan; Yu, Jaecheul; Kim, Changwon

    2016-08-01

    The stackable and submergible microbial fuel cell (SS-MFC) system was fabricated consisting of three MFC modules (#1, #2 and #3) that were immersed in an anaerobic tank as a 30 L anode compartment. Each module consisted of the anion exchange membrane-membrane electrode assembly (A-MEA) and cation exchange membrane-MEA (C-MEA). Two MEAs shared a cathode compartment in the module and the three modules shared a anode compartment The SS-MFC system was operated with two phase. After batch feeding (phase I), the system was operated under continuous mode (phase II) with different organic concentrations (from 50 to 1000 mg/L) and different hydraulic retention times (HRT; from 3.4 to 7.2 h). The SS-MFC system successfully produced a stable voltage. A-MEA generated a lower power density than the C-MEA because of the former's high activation and resistance loss. C-MEA showed a higher average maximum power density (3.16 W/m(3)) than A-MEA (2.82 W/m(3)) at 70 mL/min (HRT of 7.2 h). The current density increased as the organic concentration was increased from 70 to 1000 mg/L in a manner consistent with Monod kinetics. When the HRT was increased from 3.4 to 7.2 h, the power densities of the C-MEAs increased from 34.3-40.9 to 40.7-45.7 mW/m(2), but those of the A-MEAs decreased from 25.3-48.0 to 27.7-40.9 mW/m(2). Although power generation was affected by HRT, organic concentrations, and separator types, the proposed SS-MFC modules can be applied to existing wastewater treatment plants. PMID:27033857

  4. Electricity production from twelve monosaccharides using microbial fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catal, Tunc; Li, Kaichang; Bermek, Hakan; Liu, Hong

    Direct generation of electricity from monosaccharides of lignocellulosic biomass was examined using air cathode microbial fuel cells (MFCs). Electricity was generated from all carbon sources tested, including six hexoses (D-glucose, D-galactose, D(-)-levulose (fructose), L-fucose, L-rhamnose, and D-mannose), three pentoses (D-xylose, D(-)-arabinose, and D(-)-ribose), two uronic acids (D-galacturonic acid and D-glucuronic acid) and one aldonic acid (D-gluconic acid). The mixed bacterial culture, which was enriched using acetate as a carbon source, adapted well to all carbon sources tested, although the adaptation times varied from 1 to 70 h. The maximum power density obtained from these carbon sources ranged from 1240 ± 10 to 2770 ± 30 mW m -2 at current density range of 0.76-1.18 mA cm -2. D-Mannose resulted in the lowest maximum power density, whereas D-glucuronic acid generated the highest one. Coulombic efficiency ranged from 21 to 37%. For all carbon sources tested, the relationship between the maximum voltage output and the substrate concentration appeared to follow saturation kinetics at 120 Ω external resistance. The estimated maximum voltage output ranged between 0.26 and 0.44 V and half-saturation kinetic constants ranged from 111 to 725 mg L -1. Chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal was over 80% for all carbon sources tested. Results from this study indicated that lignocellulosic biomass-derived monosaccharides might be a suitable resource for electricity generation using MFC technology.

  5. Ion exchange membrane cathodes for scalable microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Yi; Cheng, Shaoan; Logan, Bruce E

    2008-09-15

    One of the main challenges for using microbial fuel cells (MFCs) is developing materials and architectures that are economical and generate high power densities. The performance of two cathodes constructed from two low-cost anion (AEM) and cation (CEM) exchange membranes was compared to that achieved using an ultrafiltration (UF) cathode, when the membranes were made electrically conductive using graphite paint and a nonprecious metal catalyst (CoTMPP). The best performance in single-chamber MFCs using graphite fiber brush anodes was achieved using an AEM cathode with the conductive coating facing the solution, at a catalyst loading of 0.5 mg/cm2 CoTMPP. The maximum power densitywas 449 mW/ m2 (normalized to the projected cathode surface area) or 13.1 W/m3 (total reactor volume), with a Coulombic efficiency up to 70% in a 50 mM phosphate buffer solution (PBS) using acetate. Decreasing the CoTMPP loading by 40-80% reduced power by 28-56%, with only 16% of the power (72 mW/m2) generated using an AEM cathode lacking a catalyst. Using a current collector (a stainless steel mesh) pressed against the inside surface of the AEM cathode and 200 mM PBS, the maximum power produced was further increased to 728 mW/m2 (21.2 W/m3). The use of AEM cathodes and brush anodes provides comparable performance to similar systems that use materials costing nearly an order of magnitude more (carbon paper electrodes) and thus represent more useful materials for reducing the costs of MFCs for wastewater treatment applications.

  6. The Saccharomyces cerevisiae PRM1 homolog in Neurospora crassa is involved in vegetative and sexual cell fusion events but also has postfertilization functions.

    PubMed

    Fleissner, André; Diamond, Spencer; Glass, N Louise

    2009-02-01

    Cell-cell fusion is essential for a variety of developmental steps in many eukaryotic organisms, during both fertilization and vegetative cell growth. Although the molecular mechanisms associated with intracellular membrane fusion are well characterized, the molecular mechanisms of plasma membrane merger between cells are poorly understood. In the filamentous fungus Neurospora crassa, cell fusion events occur during both vegetative and sexual stages of its life cycle, thus making it an attractive model for studying the molecular basis of cell fusion during vegetative growth vs. sexual reproduction. In the unicellular yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, one of the few proteins implicated in plasma membrane merger during mating is Prm1p; prm1Delta mutants show an approximately 50% reduction in mating cell fusion. Here we report on the role of the PRM1 homolog in N. crassa. N. crassa strains with deletions of a Prm1-like gene (Prm1) showed an approximately 50% reduction in both vegetative and sexual cell fusion events, suggesting that PRM1 is part of the general cell fusion machinery. However, unlike S. cerevisiae, N. crassa strains carrying a Prm1 deletion exhibited complete sterility as either a male or female mating partner, a phenotype that was not complemented in a heterokaryon with wild type (WT). Crosses with DeltaPrm1 strains were blocked early in sexual development, well before development of ascogenous hyphae. The DeltaPrm1 sexual defect in N. crassa was not suppressed by mutations in Sad-1, which is required for meiotic silencing of unpaired DNA (MSUD). However, mutations in Sad-1 increased the number of progeny obtained in crosses with a DeltaPrm1 (Prm1-gfp) complemented strain. These data indicate multiple roles for PRM1 during sexual development.

  7. Bioconversion of cellulose into electrical energy in microbial fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rismani-Yazdi, Hamid

    In microbial fuel cells (MFCs), bacteria generate electricity by mediating the oxidation of organic compounds and transferring the resulting electrons to an anode electrode. The first objective of this study was to test the possibility of generating electricity with rumen microorganisms as biocatalysts and cellulose as the electron donor in two-compartment MFCs. Maximum power density reached 55 mW/m2 (1.5 mA, 313 mV) with cellulose as the electron donor. Cellulose hydrolysis and electrode reduction were shown to support the production of current. The electrical current was sustained for over two months with periodic cellulose addition. Clarified rumen fluid and a soluble carbohydrate mixture, serving as the electron donors, could also sustain power output. The second objective was to analyze the composition of the bacterial communities enriched in the cellulose-fed MFCs. Denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis of PCR amplified 16S rRNA genes revealed that the microbial communities differed when different substrates were used in the MFCs. The anode-attached and the suspended consortia were shown to be different within the same MFC. Cloning and analysis of 16S rRNA gene sequences indicated that the most predominant bacteria in the anode-attached consortia were related to Clostridium spp., while Comamonas spp. was abundant in the suspended consortia. The external resistance affects the characteristic outputs of MFCs by controlling the flow of electrons from the anode to the cathode. The third objective of this study was to determine the effect of various external resistances on power output and coulombic efficiency of cellulose-fed MFCs. Four external resistances (20, 249, 480, and 1000 ohms) were tested with a systematic approach of operating parallel MFCs independently at constant circuit loads for three months. A maximum power density of 66 mWm-2 was achieved by MFCs with 20 ohms circuit load, while MFCs with 249, 480 and1000 ohms external resistances produced 57

  8. The polyene antifungals, amphotericin B and nystatin, cause cell death in Saccharomyces cerevisiae by a distinct mechanism to amphibian-derived antimicrobial peptides

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background There is a pressing need to identify novel antifungal drug targets to aid in the therapy of life-threatening mycoses and overcome increasing drug resistance. Identifying specific mechanisms of action of membrane-interacting antimicrobial drugs on the model fungus Saccharomyces cerevisiae is one avenue towards addressing this issue. The S. cerevisiae deletion mutants Δizh2, Δizh3, Δaif1 and Δstm1 were demonstrated to be resistant to amphibian-derived antimicrobial peptides (AMPs). The purpose of this study was to examine whether AMPs and polyene antifungals have a similar mode of action; this was done by comparing the relative tolerance of the mutants listed above to both classes of antifungal. Findings In support of previous findings on solid media it was shown that Δizh2 and Δizh3 mutants had increased resistance to both amphotericin B (1–2 μg ml−1) and nystatin (2.5 – 5 μg ml−1) in liquid culture, after acute exposure. However, Δaif1 and Δstm1 had wild-type levels of susceptibility to these polyenes. The generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) after exposure to amphotericin B was also reduced in Δizh2 and Δizh3. These data indicated that polyene antifungal and AMPs may act via distinct mechanisms of inducing cell death in S. cerevisiae. Conclusions Further understanding of the mechanism(s) involved in causing cell death and the roles of IZH2 and IZH3 in drug susceptibility may help to inform improved drug design and treatment of fungal pathogens. PMID:24884795

  9. Transcript levels of the Saccharomyes cerevisiae DNA repair gene RAD23 increase in response to UV light and in meiosis but remain constant in the mitotic cell cycle.

    PubMed

    Madura, K; Prakash, S

    1990-08-25

    The RAD23 gene of Saccharomyces cerevisiae is required for excision-repair of UV damaged DNA. In this paper, we determine the location of the RAD23 gene in a cloned DNA fragment, identify the 1.6 kb RAD23 transcript, and examine RAD23 transcript levels in UV damaged cells, during the mitotic cell cycle, and in meiosis. The RAD23 mRNA levels are elevated 5-fold between 30 to 60 min after 37 J/m2 of UV light. RAD23 mRNA levels rise over 6-fold during meiosis at a stage coincident with high levels of genetic recombination. This response is specific to sporulation competent MATa/MAT alpha diploid cells, and is not observed in asporogenous MATa/MATa diploids. RAD23 mRNA levels, however, remain constant during the mitotic cell cycle.

  10. Novel Strategy for Tracking the Microbial Degradation of Azo Dyes with Different Polarities in Living Cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fei; Xu, Meiying; Chen, Xingjuan; Yang, Yonggang; Wang, Haiji; Sun, Guoping

    2015-10-01

    Direct visualization evidence is important for understanding the microbial degradation mechanisms. To track the microbial degradation pathways of azo dyes with different polar characterizations, sensors based on the fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) from 1,8-naphthalimide to azo dyes were synthesized, in which the quenched fluorescence will recover when the azo bond was cleaved. In living cells, the sensor-tracking experiment showed that the low polarity and hydrophobic azo dye can be taken up into the cells and reduced inside the cells, whereas the high polarity and hydrophilic azo dye can be reduced only outside the cells because of the selective permeability of the cell membranes. These results indicated that there were two different bacterial degradation pathways available for different polarity azo dyes. To our knowledge, no fluorescent sensor has yet been designed for illuminating the microbial degradation mechanisms of organic pollutants with different characteristics.

  11. The Schizosaccharomyces pombe rhp3+ gene required for DNA repair and cell viability is functionally interchangeable with the RAD3 gene of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, P R; Biggar, S; Prakash, L; Prakash, S

    1992-01-01

    The RAD3 gene of Saccharomyces cerevisiae is required for excision repair and is essential for cell viability. RAD3 encoded protein possesses a single stranded DNA-dependent ATPase and DNA and DNA.RNA helicase activities. Mutational studies have indicated a requirement for the RAD3 helicase activities in excision repair. To examine the extent of conservation of structure and function of RAD3 during eukaryotic evolution, we have cloned the RAD3 homolog, rhp3+, from the distantly related yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. RAD3 and rhp3+ encoded proteins are highly similar, sharing 67% identical amino acids. We show that like RAD3, rhp3+ is indispensable for excision repair and cell viability, and our studies indicate a requirement of the putative rhp3+ DNA helicase activity in DNA repair. We find that the RAD3 and rhp3+ genes can functionally substitute for one another. The level of complementation provided by the rhp3+ gene in S.cerevisiae rad3 mutants or by the RAD3 gene in S.pombe rhp3 mutants is remarkable in that both the excision repair and viability defects in both yeasts are restored to wild type levels. These observations suggest a parallel evolutionary conservation of other protein components with which RAD3 interacts in mediating its DNA repair and viability functions. Images PMID:1534406

  12. Series assembly of microbial desalination cells containing stacked electrodialysis cells for partial or complete seawater desalination.

    PubMed

    Kim, Younggy; Logan, Bruce E

    2011-07-01

    A microbial desalination cell (MDC) is a new approach for desalinating water based on using the electrical current generated by exoelectrogenic bacteria. Previously developed MDCs have used only one or two desalination chambers with substantial internal resistance, and used low salinity catholytes containing a buffered or acid solution. Here we show that substantially improved MDC performance can be obtained even with a nonbuffered, saline catholyte, by using an electrodialysis stack consisting of 5 pairs of desalting and concentrating cells. When 4 stacked MDCs were used in series (20 total pairs of desalination chambers), the salinity of 0.06 L of synthetic seawater (35 g/L NaCl) was reduced by 44% using 0.12 L of anode solution (2:1). The resistive loss in the electrodialysis stack was negligible due to minimization of the intermembrane distances, and therefore the power densities produced by the MDC were similar to those produced by single chamber microbial fuel cells (MFCs) lacking desalination chambers. The observed current efficiency was 86%, indicating separation of 4.3 pairs of sodium and chloride ions for every electron transferred through the circuit. With two additional stages (total of 3.8 L of anolyte), desalination was increased to 98% salt removal, producing 0.3 L of fresh water (12.6:1). These results demonstrate that stacked MDCs can be used for efficient desalination of seawater while at the same time achieving power densities comparable to those obtained in MFCs. PMID:21671676

  13. Series assembly of microbial desalination cells containing stacked electrodialysis cells for partial or complete seawater desalination.

    PubMed

    Kim, Younggy; Logan, Bruce E

    2011-07-01

    A microbial desalination cell (MDC) is a new approach for desalinating water based on using the electrical current generated by exoelectrogenic bacteria. Previously developed MDCs have used only one or two desalination chambers with substantial internal resistance, and used low salinity catholytes containing a buffered or acid solution. Here we show that substantially improved MDC performance can be obtained even with a nonbuffered, saline catholyte, by using an electrodialysis stack consisting of 5 pairs of desalting and concentrating cells. When 4 stacked MDCs were used in series (20 total pairs of desalination chambers), the salinity of 0.06 L of synthetic seawater (35 g/L NaCl) was reduced by 44% using 0.12 L of anode solution (2:1). The resistive loss in the electrodialysis stack was negligible due to minimization of the intermembrane distances, and therefore the power densities produced by the MDC were similar to those produced by single chamber microbial fuel cells (MFCs) lacking desalination chambers. The observed current efficiency was 86%, indicating separation of 4.3 pairs of sodium and chloride ions for every electron transferred through the circuit. With two additional stages (total of 3.8 L of anolyte), desalination was increased to 98% salt removal, producing 0.3 L of fresh water (12.6:1). These results demonstrate that stacked MDCs can be used for efficient desalination of seawater while at the same time achieving power densities comparable to those obtained in MFCs.

  14. Separator characteristics for increasing performance of microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaoyuan; Cheng, Shaoan; Wang, Xin; Huang, Xia; Logan, Bruce E

    2009-11-01

    Two challenges for improving the performance of air cathode, single-chamber microbial fuel cells (MFCs) include increasing Coulombic efficiency (CE) and decreasing internal resistance. Nonbiodegradable glass fiber separators between the two electrodes were shown to increase power and CE, compared to cloth separators (J-cloth) that were degraded over time. MFC tests were conducted using glass fiber mats with thicknesses of 1.0 mm (GF1) or 0.4 mm (GF0.4), a cation exchange membrane (CEM), and a J-cloth (JC), using reactors with different configurations. Higher power densities were obtained with either GF1 (46 +/- 4 W/m(3)) or JC (46 +/- 1 W/m(3)) in MFCs with a 2 cm electrode spacing, when the separator was placed against the cathode (S-configuration), rather than MFCs with GF0.4 (36 +/- 1 W/m(3)) or CEM (14 +/- 1 W/m(3)). Power was increased to 70 +/- 2 W/m(3) by placing the electrodes on either side of the GF1 separator (single separator electrode assembly, SSEA) and further to 150 +/- 6 W/m(3) using two sets of electrodes spaced 2 cm apart (double separator electrode assembly, DSEA). Reducing the DSEA electrode spacing to 0.3 cm increased power to 696 +/- 26 W/m(3) as a result of a decrease in the ohmic resistance from 5.9 to 2.2 Omega. The main advantages of a GF1 separator compared to JC were an improvement in the CE from 40% to 81% (S-configuration), compared to only 20-40% for JC under similar conditions, and the fact that GF1 was not biodegradable. The high CE for the GF1 separator was attributed to a low oxygen mass transfer coefficient (k(O) = 5.0 x 10(-5) cm/s). The GF1 and JC materials differed in the amount of biomass that accumulated on the separator and its biodegradability, which affected long-term power production and oxygen transport. These results show that materials and mass transfer properties of separators are important factors for improving power densities, CE, and long-term performance of MFCs.

  15. Modular spectral imaging system for discrimination of pigments in cells and microbial communities.

    PubMed

    Polerecky, Lubos; Bissett, Andrew; Al-Najjar, Mohammad; Faerber, Paul; Osmers, Harald; Suci, Peter A; Stoodley, Paul; de Beer, Dirk

    2009-02-01

    Here we describe a spectral imaging system for minimally invasive identification, localization, and relative quantification of pigments in cells and microbial communities. The modularity of the system allows pigment detection on spatial scales ranging from the single-cell level to regions whose areas are several tens of square centimeters. For pigment identification in vivo absorption and/or autofluorescence spectra are used as the analytical signals. Along with the hardware, which is easy to transport and simple to assemble and allows rapid measurement, we describe newly developed software that allows highly sensitive and pigment-specific analyses of the hyperspectral data. We also propose and describe a number of applications of the system for microbial ecology, including identification of pigments in living cells and high-spatial-resolution imaging of pigments and the associated phototrophic groups in complex microbial communities, such as photosynthetic endolithic biofilms, microbial mats, and intertidal sediments. This system provides new possibilities for studying the role of spatial organization of microorganisms in the ecological functioning of complex benthic microbial communities or for noninvasively monitoring changes in the spatial organization and/or composition of a microbial community in response to changing environmental factors. PMID:19074609

  16. Size and Carbon Content of Sub-seafloor Microbial Cells at Landsort Deep, Baltic Sea.

    PubMed

    Braun, Stefan; Morono, Yuki; Littmann, Sten; Kuypers, Marcel; Aslan, Hüsnü; Dong, Mingdong; Jørgensen, Bo B; Lomstein, Bente Aa

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of a microbial ecosystem in ocean sediments has evoked interest in life under extreme energy limitation and its role in global element cycling. However, fundamental parameters such as the size and the amount of biomass of sub-seafloor microbial cells are poorly constrained. Here we determined the volume and the carbon content of microbial cells from a marine sediment drill core retrieved by the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP), Expedition 347, at Landsort Deep, Baltic Sea. To determine their shape and volume, cells were separated from the sediment matrix by multi-layer density centrifugation and visualized via epifluorescence microscopy (FM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Total cell-carbon was calculated from amino acid-carbon, which was analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) after cells had been purified by fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS). The majority of microbial cells in the sediment have coccoid or slightly elongated morphology. From the sediment surface to the deepest investigated sample (~60 m below the seafloor), the cell volume of both coccoid and elongated cells decreased by an order of magnitude from ~0.05 to 0.005 μm(3). The cell-specific carbon content was 19-31 fg C cell(-1), which is at the lower end of previous estimates that were used for global estimates of microbial biomass. The cell-specific carbon density increased with sediment depth from about 200 to 1000 fg C μm(-3), suggesting that cells decrease their water content and grow small cell sizes as adaptation to the long-term subsistence at very low energy availability in the deep biosphere. We present for the first time depth-related data on the cell volume and carbon content of sedimentary microbial cells buried down to 60 m below the seafloor. Our data enable estimates of volume- and biomass-specific cellular rates of energy metabolism in the deep biosphere and will improve global estimates of microbial biomass. PMID:27630628

  17. Riboflavin-shuttled extracellular electron transfer from Enterococcus faecalis to electrodes in microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Enren; Cai, Yamin; Luo, Yue; Piao, Zhe

    2014-11-01

    Great attention has been focused on Gram-negative bacteria in the application of microbial fuel cells. In this study, the Gram-positive bacterium Enterococcus faecalis was employed in microbial fuel cells. Bacterial biofilms formed by E. faecalis ZER6 were investigated with respect to electricity production through the riboflavin-shuttled extracellular electron transfer. Trace riboflavin was shown to be essential for transferring electrons derived from the oxidation of glucose outside the peptidoglycan layer in the cell wall of E. faecalis biofilms formed on the surface of electrodes, in the absence of other potential electron mediators (e.g., yeast extract).

  18. [Advance in the bioavailability monitoring of heavy metal based on microbial whole-cell sensor].

    PubMed

    Hou, Qi-Hui; Ma, An-Shou; Zhuang, Xiu-Liang; Zhuang, Guo-Qiang

    2013-01-01

    Microbial whole-cell biosensor is an excellent tool to assess the bioavailability of heavy metal in soil and water. However, the traditional physicochemical instruments are applied to detect the total metal. Furthermore, microbial whole-cell biosensor is simple, rapid and economical in manipulating, and is thus a highly qualified candidate for emergency detection of pollution incidents. The biological component of microbial whole-cell biosensor mostly consists of metalloregulatory proteins and reporter genes. In detail, metalloregulatory proteins mainly include the MerR family, ArsR family and RS family, and reporter genes mainly include gfp, lux and luc. Metalloregulatory protein and reporter gene are related to the sensitivity, specificity and properties in monitoring. The bioavailability of heavy metals is alterable under different conditions, influenced by pH, chelate and detection methods and so on. Increasing the accumulation of intracellular heavy metal, modifying the metalloregulatory proteins and optimizing the detecting conditions are important for improving the sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of the microbial whole-cell biosensor. The future direction of microbial whole-cell biosensor is to realize the monitoring of pollutions in situ and on line.

  19. [Advance in the bioavailability monitoring of heavy metal based on microbial whole-cell sensor].

    PubMed

    Hou, Qi-Hui; Ma, An-Shou; Zhuang, Xiu-Liang; Zhuang, Guo-Qiang

    2013-01-01

    Microbial whole-cell biosensor is an excellent tool to assess the bioavailability of heavy metal in soil and water. However, the traditional physicochemical instruments are applied to detect the total metal. Furthermore, microbial whole-cell biosensor is simple, rapid and economical in manipulating, and is thus a highly qualified candidate for emergency detection of pollution incidents. The biological component of microbial whole-cell biosensor mostly consists of metalloregulatory proteins and reporter genes. In detail, metalloregulatory proteins mainly include the MerR family, ArsR family and RS family, and reporter genes mainly include gfp, lux and luc. Metalloregulatory protein and reporter gene are related to the sensitivity, specificity and properties in monitoring. The bioavailability of heavy metals is alterable under different conditions, influenced by pH, chelate and detection methods and so on. Increasing the accumulation of intracellular heavy metal, modifying the metalloregulatory proteins and optimizing the detecting conditions are important for improving the sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of the microbial whole-cell biosensor. The future direction of microbial whole-cell biosensor is to realize the monitoring of pollutions in situ and on line. PMID:23487961

  20. Size and Carbon Content of Sub-seafloor Microbial Cells at Landsort Deep, Baltic Sea

    PubMed Central

    Braun, Stefan; Morono, Yuki; Littmann, Sten; Kuypers, Marcel; Aslan, Hüsnü; Dong, Mingdong; Jørgensen, Bo B.; Lomstein, Bente Aa.

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of a microbial ecosystem in ocean sediments has evoked interest in life under extreme energy limitation and its role in global element cycling. However, fundamental parameters such as the size and the amount of biomass of sub-seafloor microbial cells are poorly constrained. Here we determined the volume and the carbon content of microbial cells from a marine sediment drill core retrieved by the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP), Expedition 347, at Landsort Deep, Baltic Sea. To determine their shape and volume, cells were separated from the sediment matrix by multi-layer density centrifugation and visualized via epifluorescence microscopy (FM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Total cell-carbon was calculated from amino acid-carbon, which was analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) after cells had been purified by fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS). The majority of microbial cells in the sediment have coccoid or slightly elongated morphology. From the sediment surface to the deepest investigated sample (~60 m below the seafloor), the cell volume of both coccoid and elongated cells decreased by an order of magnitude from ~0.05 to 0.005 μm3. The cell-specific carbon content was 19–31 fg C cell−1, which is at the lower end of previous estimates that were used for global estimates of microbial biomass. The cell-specific carbon density increased with sediment depth from about 200 to 1000 fg C μm−3, suggesting that cells decrease their water content and grow small cell sizes as adaptation to the long-term subsistence at very low energy availability in the deep biosphere. We present for the first time depth-related data on the cell volume and carbon content of sedimentary microbial cells buried down to 60 m below the seafloor. Our data enable estimates of volume- and biomass-specific cellular rates of energy metabolism in the deep biosphere and will improve global estimates of microbial biomass.

  1. Size and Carbon Content of Sub-seafloor Microbial Cells at Landsort Deep, Baltic Sea

    PubMed Central

    Braun, Stefan; Morono, Yuki; Littmann, Sten; Kuypers, Marcel; Aslan, Hüsnü; Dong, Mingdong; Jørgensen, Bo B.; Lomstein, Bente Aa.

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of a microbial ecosystem in ocean sediments has evoked interest in life under extreme energy limitation and its role in global element cycling. However, fundamental parameters such as the size and the amount of biomass of sub-seafloor microbial cells are poorly constrained. Here we determined the volume and the carbon content of microbial cells from a marine sediment drill core retrieved by the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP), Expedition 347, at Landsort Deep, Baltic Sea. To determine their shape and volume, cells were separated from the sediment matrix by multi-layer density centrifugation and visualized via epifluorescence microscopy (FM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Total cell-carbon was calculated from amino acid-carbon, which was analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) after cells had been purified by fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS). The majority of microbial cells in the sediment have coccoid or slightly elongated morphology. From the sediment surface to the deepest investigated sample (~60 m below the seafloor), the cell volume of both coccoid and elongated cells decreased by an order of magnitude from ~0.05 to 0.005 μm3. The cell-specific carbon content was 19–31 fg C cell−1, which is at the lower end of previous estimates that were used for global estimates of microbial biomass. The cell-specific carbon density increased with sediment depth from about 200 to 1000 fg C μm−3, suggesting that cells decrease their water content and grow small cell sizes as adaptation to the long-term subsistence at very low energy availability in the deep biosphere. We present for the first time depth-related data on the cell volume and carbon content of sedimentary microbial cells buried down to 60 m below the seafloor. Our data enable estimates of volume- and biomass-specific cellular rates of energy metabolism in the deep biosphere and will improve global estimates of microbial biomass. PMID:27630628

  2. Digestion of algal biomass for electricity generation in microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Nishio, Koichi; Hashimoto, Kazuhito; Watanabe, Kazuya

    2013-01-01

    Algal biomass serves as a fuel for electricity generation in microbial fuel cells. This study constructed a model consortium comprised of an alga-digesting Lactobacillus and an iron-reducing Geobacter for electricity generation from photo-grown Clamydomonas cells. Total power-conversion efficiency (from Light to electricity) was estimated to be 0.47%.

  3. Characterization and optimization of cathodic conditions for H2O2 synthesis in microbial electrochemical cells

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cathode potential and O2 supply methods were investigated to improve H2O2 synthesis in an electrochemical cell, and optimal cathode conditions were applied for microbial electrochemical cells (MECs). Using aqueous O2 for the cathode significantly improved current density, but H2...

  4. Immobilization of microbial cell and yeast cell and its application to biomass conversion using radiation techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaetsu, Isao; Kumakura, Minoru; Fujimura, Takashi; Kasai, Noboru; Tamada, Masao

    The recent results of immobilization of cellulase-producing cells and ethanol-fermentation yeast by radiation were reported. The enzyme of cellulase produced by immobilized cells was used for saccharification of lignocellulosic wastes and immobilized yeast cells were used for fermentation reaction from glucose to ethanol. The wastes such as chaff and bagasse were treated by γ-ray or electron-beam irradiation in the presence of alkali and subsequent mechanical crushing, to form a fine powder less than 50 μm in diameter. On the other hand, Trichoderma reesei as a cellulase-producing microbial cell was immobilized on a fibrous carrier having a specific porous structure and cultured to produce cellulase. The enzymatic saccharification of the pretreated waste was carried out using the produced cellulase. The enhanced fermentation process to produce ethanol from glucose with the immobilized yeast by radiation was also studied. The ethanol productivity of immobilized growing yeast cells thus obtained was thirteen times that of free yeast cells in a 1:1 volume of liquid medium to immobilized yeast cells.

  5. Biosynthesis of silver nanoparticles using Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Korbekandi, Hassan; Mohseni, Soudabeh; Mardani Jouneghani, Rasoul; Pourhossein, Meraj; Iravani, Siavash

    2016-01-01

    The objectives of this study were the biosynthesis of silver nanoparticles (NPs) by biotransformations using Saccharomyces cerevisiae and analysis of the sizes and shapes of the NPs produced. Dried and freshly cultured S. cerevisiae were used as the biocatalyst. Dried yeast synthesized few NPs, but freshly cultured yeast produced a large amount of them. Silver NPs were spherical, 2-20 nm in diameter, and the NPs with the size of 5.4 nm were the most frequent ones. NPs were seen inside the cells, within the cell membrane, attached to the cell membrane during the exocytosis, and outside of the cells.

  6. Graphite anode surface modification with controlled reduction of specific aryl diazonium salts for improved microbial fuel cells power output.

    PubMed

    Picot, Matthieu; Lapinsonnière, Laure; Rothballer, Michael; Barrière, Frédéric

    2011-10-15

    Graphite electrodes were modified with reduction of aryl diazonium salts and implemented as anodes in microbial fuel cells. First, reduction of 4-aminophenyl diazonium is considered using increased coulombic charge density from 16.5 to 200 mC/cm(2). This procedure introduced aryl amine functionalities at the surface which are neutral at neutral pH. These electrodes were implemented as anodes in "H" type microbial fuel cells inoculated with waste water, acetate as the substrate and using ferricyanide reduction at the cathode and a 1000 Ω external resistance. When the microbial anode had developed, the performances of the microbial fuel cells were measured under acetate saturation conditions and compared with those of control microbial fuel cells having an unmodified graphite anode. We found that the maximum power density of microbial fuel cell first increased as a function of the extent of modification, reaching an optimum after which it decreased for higher degree of surface modification, becoming even less performing than the control microbial fuel cell. Then, the effect of the introduction of charged groups at the surface was investigated at a low degree of surface modification. It was found that negatively charged groups at the surface (carboxylate) decreased microbial fuel cell power output while the introduction of positively charged groups doubled the power output. Scanning electron microscopy revealed that the microbial anode modified with positively charged groups was covered by a dense and homogeneous biofilm. Fluorescence in situ hybridization analyses showed that this biofilm consisted to a large extent of bacteria from the known electroactive Geobacter genus. In summary, the extent of modification of the anode was found to be critical for the microbial fuel cell performance. The nature of the chemical group introduced at the electrode surface was also found to significantly affect the performance of the microbial fuel cells. The method used for

  7. Mutations in the Saccharomyces Cerevisiae Type 2a Protein Phosphatase Catalytic Subunit Reveal Roles in Cell Wall Integrity, Actin Cytoskeleton Organization and Mitosis

    PubMed Central

    Evans, DRH.; Stark, MJR.

    1997-01-01

    Temperature-sensitive mutations were generated in the Saccharomyces cerevisiae PPH22 gene that, together with its homologue PPH21, encode the catalytic subunit of type 2A protein phosphatase (PP2A). At the restrictive temperature (37°), cells dependent solely on pph22(ts) alleles for PP2A function displayed a rapid arrest of proliferation. Ts(-) pph22 mutant cells underwent lysis at 37°, showing an accompanying viability loss that was suppressed by inclusion of 1 M sorbitol in the growth medium. Ts(-) pph22 mutant cells also displayed defects in bud morphogenesis and polarization of the cortical actin cytoskeleton at 37°. PP2A is therefore required for maintenance of cell integrity and polarized growth. On transfer from 24° to 37°, Ts(-) pph22 mutant cells accumulated a 2N DNA content indicating a cell cycle block before completion of mitosis. However, during prolonged incubation at 37°, many Ts(-) pph22 mutant cells progressed through an aberrant nuclear division and accumulated multiple nuclei. Ts(-) pph22 mutant cells also accumulated aberrant microtubule structures at 37°, while under semi-permissive conditions they were sensitive to the microtubule-destabilizing agent benomyl, suggesting that PP2A is required for normal microtubule function. Remarkably, the multiple defects of Ts(-) pph22 mutant cells were suppressed by a viable allele (SSD1-v1) of the polymorphic SSD1 gene. PMID:9071579

  8. Anode and cathode materials characterization for a microbial fuel cell in half cell configuration.

    PubMed

    Pant, Deepak; Van Bogaert, Gilbert; Porto-Carrero, Christof; Diels, Ludo; Vanbroekhoven, Karolien

    2011-01-01

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) are novel bioelectrochemical devices for spontaneous conversion of biomass into electricity through the metabolic activity of the bacteria. Microbial production of electricity may become an important source of bioenergy in future because MFCs offer the possibility of extracting electric current from a wide range of soluble or dissolved complex organic wastes and renewable biomass. However, the materials used in these devices are still not economic and researchers use different materials as cathode and anode in MFCs. This results in variable performance which is difficult to compare. We tested several commercially available materials for their suitability as anode in an acetate fed MFC. Besides, a novel non-platinized activated carbon (AC) based, gas porous air cathode was also tested. Both the anode and cathode were tested in a half cell configuration. Carbon cloth, graphite cloth and dynamically stable anode (DSA) served as ideal anode material with carbon cloth and graphite mesh reaching the open circuit voltage (OCV) of acetate oxidation (-500 mV vs. Ag/AgCl). The effect of increasing concentration of acetate on anode OCV was also investigated and results showed that on increasing the acetate concentration from 10 mM to 40 mM has no adverse impact on the anodic activity towards electrochemical oxidation of acetate. The AC cathode showed stable current (-1.2 mA/cm2) over a period of 100 days. PMID:21977673

  9. Enhanced biofilm distribution and cell performance of microfluidic microbial fuel cells with multiple anolyte inlets.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yang; Ye, Dingding; Liao, Qiang; Zhang, Pengqing; Zhu, Xun; Li, Jun; Fu, Qian

    2016-05-15

    A laminar-flow controlled microfluidic microbial fuel cell (MMFC) is considered as a promising approach to be a bio-electrochemical system (BES). But poor bacterial colonization and low power generation are two severe bottlenecks to restrict its development. In this study, we reported a MMFC with multiple anolyte inlets (MMFC-MI) to enhance the biofilm formation and promote the power density of MMFCs. Voltage profiles during the inoculation process demonstrated MMFC-MI had a faster start-up process than the conventional microfluidic microbial fuel cell with one inlet (MMFC-OI). Meanwhile, benefited from the periodical replenishment of boundary layer near the electrode, a more densely-packed bacterial aggregation was observed along the flow direction and also the substantially low internal resistance for MMFC-MI. Most importantly, the output power density of MMFC-MI was the highest value among the reported µl-scale MFCs to our best knowledge. The presented MMFC-MI appears promising for bio-chip technology and extends the scope of microfluidic energy.

  10. Saccharomyces cerevisiae SHSY detoxifies petroleum n-alkanes by an induced CYP52A58 and an enhanced order in cell surface hydrophobicity.

    PubMed

    Hanano, Abdulsamie; Shaban, Mouhnad; Almousally, Ibrahem; Al-Ktaifani, Mahmoud

    2015-09-01

    Environmental hydrocarbon contamination has a serious hazard to human health. Alkanes, the major component of hydrocarbons, can be consumed by various species of yeast. We previously identified a new strain SHSY of Saccharomyces cerevisiae with a remarkable ability to utilize the petroleum crude-oil (PCO) in aqueous solution. The current study demonstrated that the n-alkanes-assimilation activity of S. cerevisiae SHSY was related to an induced microsomal protein of 59 kDa approximately. The identified ORF encoded a protein of 517 amino acids and shared 93% sequence identity with an alkane-inducible hydroxylase CYP52A53 isolated from Scheffersomyces stipitis CBS. It was therefore referred as CYP52A58. The catalytic activity of the recombinant CYP52A58 was confirmed by the hydroxylation of n-alkanes, it showed an optimal mono-terminal hydroxylation activity toward n-hexadecane. Moreover, the ability of the yeast to use n-alkanes was accompanied with an increasing level in cell wall mannoproteins. Two differential protein bands were detected in the mannoproteins extracted from PCO-grown yeast. In parallel, a significant increase in the fatty acids content with a high degree of unsaturation was subsequently detected in the PCO-grown yeast. This study characterizes a safe and potential microorganism to remove n-alkanes from the aquatic environment.

  11. A simple and effective set of PCR-based molecular markers for the monitoring of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae cell population during bioethanol fermentation.

    PubMed

    Carvalho-Netto, Osmar V; Carazzolle, Marcelo F; Rodrigues, Aline; Bragança, Welbe O; Costa, Gustavo G L; Argueso, Juan Lucas; Pereira, Gonçalo A G

    2013-12-01

    One of the defining features of the fermentation process used in the production of bioethanol from sugarcane feedstock is the dynamic nature of the yeast population. Minisatellite molecular markers are particularly useful for monitoring yeast communities because they produce polymorphic PCR products that typically display wide size variations. We compared the coding sequences derived from the genome of the sugarcane bioethanol strain JAY270/PE-2 to those of the reference Saccharomyces cerevisiae laboratory strain S288c, and searched for genes containing insertion or deletion polymorphisms larger than 24 bp. We then designed oligonucleotide primers flanking nine of these sites, and used them to amplify differentially sized PCR products. We analyzed the banding patterns in the most widely adopted sugarcane bioethanol strains and in several indigenous yeast contaminants, and found that our marker set had very good discriminatory power. Subsequently, these markers were used to successfully monitor the yeast cell populations in six sugarcane bioethanol distilleries. Additionally, we showed that most of the markers described here are also polymorphic among strains unrelated to bioethanol production, suggesting that they may be applied universally in S. cerevisiae. Because the relatively large polymorphisms are detectable in conventional agarose gels, our method is well suited to modestly equipped on-site laboratories at bioethanol distilleries, therefore providing both cost and time savings.

  12. Intracellular glycerol influences resistance to freeze stress in Saccharomyces cerevisiae: analysis of a quadruple mutant in glycerol dehydrogenase genes and glycerol-enriched cells.

    PubMed

    Izawa, Shingo; Sato, Machiko; Yokoigawa, Kumio; Inoue, Yoshiharu

    2004-11-01

    Glycerol is well known as a cryoprotectant similar to trehalose. However, there is little information about the effects of intracellular glycerol on the freeze-thaw stress tolerance of yeast. Through analysis of a quadruple-knockout mutant of glycerol dehydrogenase genes (ara1 Delta gcy1 Delta gre3 Delta ypr1 Delta) in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, we revealed that the decrease in glycerol dehydrogenase activity led to increased levels of intracellular glycerol. We also found that this mutant showed higher tolerance to freeze stress than wild type strain W303-1A. Furthermore, we demonstrated that intracellular-glycerol-enriched cells cultured in glycerol medium acquire tolerance to freeze stress and retain high leavening ability in dough even after frozen storage for 7 days. These results suggest the possibility of using intracellular-glycerol-enriched cells to develop better frozen dough.

  13. Intracellular glycerol influences resistance to freeze stress in Saccharomyces cerevisiae: analysis of a quadruple mutant in glycerol dehydrogenase genes and glycerol-enriched cells.

    PubMed

    Izawa, Shingo; Sato, Machiko; Yokoigawa, Kumio; Inoue, Yoshiharu

    2004-11-01

    Glycerol is well known as a cryoprotectant similar to trehalose. However, there is little information about the effects of intracellular glycerol on the freeze-thaw stress tolerance of yeast. Through analysis of a quadruple-knockout mutant of glycerol dehydrogenase genes (ara1 Delta gcy1 Delta gre3 Delta ypr1 Delta) in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, we revealed that the decrease in glycerol dehydrogenase activity led to increased levels of intracellular glycerol. We also found that this mutant showed higher tolerance to freeze stress than wild type strain W303-1A. Furthermore, we demonstrated that intracellular-glycerol-enriched cells cultured in glycerol medium acquire tolerance to freeze stress and retain high leavening ability in dough even after frozen storage for 7 days. These results suggest the possibility of using intracellular-glycerol-enriched cells to develop better frozen dough. PMID:15127164

  14. Wiring microbial biofilms to the electrode by osmium redox polymer for the performance enhancement of microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Yong; Shin, Hyosul; Kang, Chan; Kim, Sunghyun

    2016-04-01

    An osmium redox polymer, PAA-PVI-[Os(4,4'-dimethyl-2,2'-bipyridine)2Cl]+/2+ that has been used in enzymatic fuel cells and microbial sensors, was applied for the first time to the anode of single-chamber microbial fuel cells with the mixed culture inoculum aiming at enhancing performance. Functioning as a molecular wire connecting the biofilm to the anode, power density increased from 1479 mW m(-2) without modification to 2355 mW m(-2) after modification of the anode. Evidence from cyclic voltammetry showed that the catalytic activity of an anodic biofilm was greatly enhanced in the presence of an osmium redox polymer, indicating that electrons were more efficiently transferred to the anode via co-immobilized osmium complex tethered to wiring polymer chains at the potential range of -0.3 V-+0.1 V (vs. SCE). The optimum amount of the redox polymer was determined to be 0.163 mg cm(-2).

  15. Wiring microbial biofilms to the electrode by osmium redox polymer for the performance enhancement of microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Yong; Shin, Hyosul; Kang, Chan; Kim, Sunghyun

    2016-04-01

    An osmium redox polymer, PAA-PVI-[Os(4,4'-dimethyl-2,2'-bipyridine)2Cl]+/2+ that has been used in enzymatic fuel cells and microbial sensors, was applied for the first time to the anode of single-chamber microbial fuel cells with the mixed culture inoculum aiming at enhancing performance. Functioning as a molecular wire connecting the biofilm to the anode, power density increased from 1479 mW m(-2) without modification to 2355 mW m(-2) after modification of the anode. Evidence from cyclic voltammetry showed that the catalytic activity of an anodic biofilm was greatly enhanced in the presence of an osmium redox polymer, indicating that electrons were more efficiently transferred to the anode via co-immobilized osmium complex tethered to wiring polymer chains at the potential range of -0.3 V-+0.1 V (vs. SCE). The optimum amount of the redox polymer was determined to be 0.163 mg cm(-2). PMID:26599210

  16. Variable Cell Morphology Approach for Individual-Based Modeling of Microbial Communities

    PubMed Central

    Storck, Tomas; Picioreanu, Cristian; Virdis, Bernardino; Batstone, Damien J.

    2014-01-01

    An individual-based, mass-spring modeling framework has been developed to investigate the effect of cell properties on the structure of biofilms and microbial aggregates through Lagrangian modeling. Key features that distinguish this model are variable cell morphology described by a collection of particles connected by springs and a mechanical representation of deformable intracellular, intercellular, and cell-substratum links. A first case study describes the colony formation of a rod-shaped species on a planar substratum. This case shows the importance of mechanical interactions in a community of growing and dividing rod-shaped cells (i.e., bacilli). Cell-substratum links promote formation of mounds as opposed to single-layer biofilms, whereas filial links affect the roundness of the biofilm. A second case study describes the formation of flocs and development of external filaments in a mixed-culture activated sludge community. It is shown by modeling that distinct cell-cell links, microbial morphology, and growth kinetics can lead to excessive filamentous proliferation and interfloc bridging, possible causes for detrimental sludge bulking. This methodology has been extended to more advanced microbial morphologies such as filament branching and proves to be a very powerful tool in determining how fundamental controlling mechanisms determine diverse microbial colony architectures. PMID:24806936

  17. Application of a weak magnetic field to improve microbial fuel cell performance.

    PubMed

    Tong, Zhong-Hua; Yu, Han-Qing; Li, Wen-Wei; Wang, Yun-Kun; Sun, Min; Liu, Xian-Wei; Sheng, Guo-Ping

    2015-12-01

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) have emerged as a promising technology for wastewater treatment with concomitant energy production but the performance is usually limited by low microbial activities. This has spurred intensive research interest for microbial enhancement. This study demonstrated an interesting stimulation effect of a static magnetic field (MF) on sludge-inoculated MFCs and explored into the mechanisms. The implementation of a 100-mT MF accelerated the reactor startup and led to increased electricity generation. Under the MF exposure, the activation loss of the MFC was decreased, but there was no increased secretion of redox mediators. Thus, the MF effect was mainly due to enhanced bioelectrochemical activities of anodic microorganisms, which are likely attributed to the oxidative stress and magnetohydrodynamic effects under an MF exposure. This work implies that weak MF may be applied as a simple and effective approach to stimulate microbial activities for various bioelectrochemical energy production and decontamination applications.

  18. Substrates and pathway of electricity generation in a nitrification-based microbial fuel cell.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hui; Zheng, Ping; Zhang, Jiqiang; Xie, Zuofu; Ji, Junyuan; Ghulam, Abbas

    2014-06-01

    Nitrification-based microbial fuel cell (N-MFC) is a novel inorganic microbial fuel cell based on nitrification in the anode compartment. So far, little information is available on the substrates and pathway of N-MFC. The results of this study indicated that apart from the primary nitrification substrate (ammonium), the intermediates (hydroxylamine and nitrite) could also serve as anodic fuel to generate current, and the end product nitrate showed an inhibitory effect on electricity generation. Based on the research, a pathway of electricity generation was proposed for N-MFC: ammonium was oxidized first to nitrite by ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB), then the nitrite in anolyte and the potassium permanganate in catholyte constituted a chemical cell to generate current. In other words, the electricity generation in N-MFC was not only supported by microbial reaction as we expected, but both biological and electrochemical reactions contributed.

  19. Electrochemical communication between microbial cells and electrodes via osmium redox systems.

    PubMed

    Hasan, Kamrul; Patil, Sunil A; Leech, Dónal; Hägerhäll, Cecilia; Gorton, Lo

    2012-12-01

    Electrochemical communication between micro-organisms and electrodes is the integral and fundamental part of BESs (bioelectrochemical systems). The immobilization of bacterial cells on the electrode and ensuring efficient electron transfer to the electrode via a mediator are decisive features of mediated electrochemical biosensors. Notably, mediator-based systems are essential to extract electrons from the non-exoelectrogens, a major group of microbes in Nature. The advantage of using polymeric mediators over diffusible mediators led to the design of osmium redox polymers. Their successful use in enzyme-based biosensors and BFCs (biofuel cells) paved the way for exploring their use in microbial BESs. The present mini-review focuses on osmium-bound redox systems used to date in microbial BESs and their role in shuttling electrons from viable microbial cells to electrodes.

  20. Engineering cellular redox balance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae for improved production of L-lactic acid.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ju Young; Kang, Chang Duk; Lee, Seung Hyun; Park, Young Kyoung; Cho, Kwang Myung

    2015-04-01

    Owing to the growing market for the biodegradable and renewable polymer, polylactic acid, world demand for lactic acid is rapidly increasing. However, the very high concentrations desired for industrial production of the free lactic acid create toxicity and low pH concerns for manufacturers. Saccharomyces cerevisiae is the most well characterized eukaryote, a preferred microbial cell factory for the largest industrial biotechnology product (bioethanol), and a robust, commercially compatible workhorse to be exploited for the production of diverse chemicals. S. cerevisiae has also been explored as a host for lactic acid production because of its high acid tolerance. Here, we constructed an L-lactic acid-overproducing S. cerevisiae by redirecting cellular metabolic fluxes to the production of L-lactic acid. To this end, we deleted the S. cerevisiae genes encoding pyruvate decarboxylase 1 (PDC1), L-lactate cytochrome-c oxidoreductase (CYB2), and glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GPD1), replacing them with a heterologous L-lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) gene. Two new target genes encoding isoenzymes of the external NADH dehydrogenase (NDE1 and NDE2), were also deleted from the genome to re-engineer the intracellular redox balance. The resulting strain was found to produce L-lactic acid more efficiently (32.6% increase in final L-lactic acid titer). When tested in a bioreactor in fed-batch mode, this engineered strain produced 117 g/L of L-lactic acid under low pH conditions. This result demonstrates that the redox balance engineering should be coupled with the metabolic engineering in the construction of L-lactic acid-overproducing S. cerevisiae.

  1. Plant cell walls: Protecting the barrier from degradation by microbial enzymes.

    PubMed

    Lagaert, Stijn; Beliën, Tim; Volckaert, Guido

    2009-12-01

    Plant cell walls are predominantly composed of polysaccharides, which are connected in a strong, yet resilient network. They determine the size and shape of plant cells and form the interface between the cell and its often hostile environment. To penetrate the cell wall and thus infect plants, most phytopathogens secrete numerous cell wall degrading enzymes. Conversely, as a first line of defense, plant cell walls contain an array of inhibitors of these enzymes. Scientific knowledge on these inhibitors significantly progressed in the past years and this review is meant to give a comprehensive overview of plant inhibitors against microbial cell wall degrading enzymes and their role in plant protection.

  2. Oral Microencapsulated Live Saccharomyces cerevisiae Cells for Use in Renal Failure Uremia: Preparation and In Vivo Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Coussa, Razek; Martoni, Christopher; Bhathena, Jasmine; Urbanska, Aleksandra Malgorzata; Prakash, Satya

    2010-01-01

    Orally administrable alginate-poly-L-lysine-alginate (APA) microcapsules containing live yeast cells was investigated for use in renal failure. At all times, yeast cells remain inside the microcapsules, which are then excreted in the stool. During their gastrointestinal passage, small molecules, like urea, diffuse into the yeast microcapsules where they are hydrolyzed. Orally administrating these microcapsules to uremic rats was found to decrease urea concentrations from 7.29 ± 0.89 mmol/L to 6.12 ± 0.90 mmol/L over a treatment period of eight weeks. After stopping the treatment, the urea concentrations increased back to uremic levels of 7.64 ± 0.77 mmol/L. The analysis of creatinine concentrations averaged 39.19 ± 4.33 μmol/L, 50.83 ± 5.55 μmol/L, and 50.28 ± 7.10 μmol/L for the normal-control, uremic-control and uremic-treatment groups, respectively. While creatinine concentrations for both uremic-control and uremic-treatment groups did not differ among each other (P > .05), they were, however, significantly higher than those of the normal control group (P < .05). Uric acid concentrations averaged 80.08 ± 26.49 μmol/L, 99.92 ± 26.55 μmol/L, and 86.49 ± 28.42 μmol/L for the normal-control, uremic-control and uremic-treatment groups, respectively. There were no significant differences in both calcium and phosphate concentrations among all three groups (P > .05). The microbial populations of five tested types of bacteria were not substantially altered by the presence of the yeast APA encapsulated yeast (P > .05). PMID:20798777

  3. Tracking heavy water (D2O) incorporation for identifying and sorting active microbial cells

    PubMed Central

    Berry, David; Mader, Esther; Lee, Tae Kwon; Woebken, Dagmar; Wang, Yun; Zhu, Di; Palatinszky, Marton; Schintlmeister, Arno; Schmid, Markus C.; Hanson, Buck T.; Shterzer, Naama; Mizrahi, Itzhak; Rauch, Isabella; Decker, Thomas; Bocklitz, Thomas; Popp, Jürgen; Gibson, Christopher M.; Fowler, Patrick W.; Huang, Wei E.; Wagner, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Microbial communities are essential to the function of virtually all ecosystems and eukaryotes, including humans. However, it is still a major challenge to identify microbial cells active under natural conditions in complex systems. In this study, we developed a new method to identify and sort active microbes on the single-cell level in complex samples using stable isotope probing with heavy water (D2O) combined with Raman microspectroscopy. Incorporation of D2O-derived D into the biomass of autotrophic and heterotrophic bacteria and archaea could be unambiguously detected via C-D signature peaks in single-cell Raman spectra, and the obtained labeling pattern was confirmed by nanoscale-resolution secondary ion MS. In fast-growing Escherichia coli cells, label detection was already possible after 20 min. For functional analyses of microbial communities, the detection of D incorporation from D2O in individual microbial cells via Raman microspectroscopy can be directly combined with FISH for the identification of active microbes. Applying this approach to mouse cecal microbiota revealed that the host-compound foragers Akkermansia muciniphila and Bacteroides acidifaciens exhibited distinctive response patterns to amendments of mucin and sugars. By Raman-based cell sorting of active (deuterated) cells with optical tweezers and subsequent multiple displacement amplification and DNA sequencing, novel cecal microbes stimulated by mucin and/or glucosamine were identified, demonstrating the potential of the nondestructive D2O-Raman approach for targeted sorting of microbial cells with defined functional properties for single-cell genomics. PMID:25550518

  4. Electricity generation from wastewaters with starch as carbon source using a mediatorless microbial fuel cell.

    PubMed

    Herrero-Hernandez, E; Smith, T J; Akid, R

    2013-01-15

    Microbial fuel cells represent a new method for producing electricity from the oxidation of organic matter. A mediatorless microbial fuel cell was developed using Escherichia coli as the active bacterial component with synthetic wastewater of potato extract as the energy source. The two-chamber fuel cell, with a relation of volume between anode and cathode chamber of 8:1, was operated in batch mode. The response was similar to that obtained when glucose was used as the carbon source. The performance characteristics of the fuel cell were evaluated with two different anode and cathode shapes, platinised titanium strip or mesh; the highest maximum power density (502mWm(-2)) was achieved in the microbial fuel cell with mesh electrodes. In addition to electricity generation, the MFC exhibited efficient treatment of wastewater so that significant reduction of initial oxygen demand of wastewater by 61% was observed. These results demonstrate that potato starch can be used for power generation in a mediatorless microbial fuel cell with high removal efficiency of chemical oxygen demand.

  5. Analytical applications of microbial fuel cells. Part II: Toxicity, microbial activity and quantification, single analyte detection and other uses.

    PubMed

    Abrevaya, Ximena C; Sacco, Natalia J; Bonetto, Maria C; Hilding-Ohlsson, Astrid; Cortón, Eduardo

    2015-01-15

    Microbial fuel cells were rediscovered twenty years ago and now are a very active research area. The reasons behind this new activity are the relatively recent discovery of electrogenic or electroactive bacteria and the vision of two important practical applications, as wastewater treatment coupled with clean energy production and power supply systems for isolated low-power sensor devices. Although some analytical applications of MFCs were proposed earlier (as biochemical oxygen demand sensing) only lately a myriad of new uses of this technology are being presented by research groups around the world, which combine both biological-microbiological and electroanalytical expertises. This is the second part of a review of MFC applications in the area of analytical sciences. In Part I a general introduction to biological-based analytical methods including bioassays, biosensors, MFCs design, operating principles, as well as, perhaps the main and earlier presented application, the use as a BOD sensor was reviewed. In Part II, other proposed uses are presented and discussed. As other microbially based analytical systems, MFCs are satisfactory systems to measure and integrate complex parameters that are difficult or impossible to measure otherwise, such as water toxicity (where the toxic effect to aquatic organisms needed to be integrated). We explore here the methods proposed to measure toxicity, microbial metabolism, and, being of special interest to space exploration, life sensors. Also, some methods with higher specificity, proposed to detect a single analyte, are presented. Different possibilities to increase selectivity and sensitivity, by using molecular biology or other modern techniques are also discussed here.

  6. The Response to Heat Shock and Oxidative Stress in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Morano, Kevin A.; Grant, Chris M.; Moye-Rowley, W. Scott

    2012-01-01

    A common need for microbial cells is the ability to respond to potentially toxic environmental insults. Here we review the progress in understanding the response of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae to two important environmental stresses: heat shock and oxidative stress. Both of these stresses are fundamental challenges that microbes of all types will experience. The study of these environmental stress responses in S. cerevisiae has illuminated many of the features now viewed as central to our understanding of eukaryotic cell biology. Transcriptional activation plays an important role in driving the multifaceted reaction to elevated temperature and levels of reactive oxygen species. Advances provided by the development of whole genome analyses have led to an appreciation of the global reorganization of gene expression and its integration between different stress regimens. While the precise nature of the signal eliciting the heat shock response remains elusive, recent progress in the understanding of induction of the oxidative stress response is summarized here. Although these stress conditions represent ancient challenges to S. cerevisiae and other microbes, much remains to be learned about the mechanisms dedicated to dealing with these environmental parameters. PMID:22209905

  7. [Advances in functional genomics studies underlying acetic acid tolerance of Saccharomyces cerevisiae].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xinqing; Zhang, Mingming; Xu, Guihong; Xu, Jianren; Bai, Fengwu

    2014-03-01

    Industrial microorganisms are subject to various stress conditions, including products and substrates inhibitions. Therefore, improvement of stress tolerance is of great importance for industrial microbial production. Acetic acid is one of the major inhibitors in the cellulosic hydrolysates, which affects seriously on cell growth and metabolism of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Studies on the molecular mechanisms underlying adaptive response and tolerance of acetic acid of S. cerevisiae benefit breeding of robust strains of industrial yeast for more efficient production. In recent years, more insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying acetic acid tolerance have been revealed through analysis of global gene expression and metabolomics analysis, as well as phenomics analysis by single gene deletion libraries. Novel genes related to response to acetic acid and improvement of acetic acid tolerance have been identified, and novel strains with improved acetic acid tolerance were constructed by modifying key genes. Metal ions including potassium and zinc play important roles in acetic acid tolerance in S. cerevisiae, and the effect of zinc was first discovered in our previous studies on flocculating yeast. Genes involved in cell wall remodeling, membrane transport, energy metabolism, amino acid biosynthesis and transport, as well as global transcription regulation were discussed. Exploration and modification of the molecular mechanisms of yeast acetic acid tolerance will be done further on levels such as post-translational modifications and synthetic biology and engineering; and the knowledge obtained will pave the way for breeding robust strains for more efficient bioconversion of cellulosic materials to produce biofuels and bio-based chemicals.

  8. Effect of separator and inoculum type on electricity generation and microbial community in single-chamber microbial fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jaecheul; Park, Younghyun; Lee, Taeho

    2014-04-01

    Single-chamber microbial fuel cell (SMFC)-I consisted of 4 separator-electrode assemblies (SEAs) with two types of cation exchange membrane (CEM: Nafion and CMI 7000) and an anion exchange membrane (AEM: AMI 7001). SMFC-II consisted of 4 SEAs with Nafion and three types of nonwoven fabric. SMFC-I and -II were inoculated with anaerobic digested and activated sludge, respectively, and operated under fed-batch mode. In SMFC I, AEM-SEA showed a maximum power density (PDmax). Nafion-SEA showed a PDmax in SMFC II, which was similar to that of Nafion-SEA of SMFC I. Although different bacteria were developed in SMFC-I (Deltaproteobacteria and Firmicutes) and SMFC-II (Gammaproteobacteria, Betaproteobacteria and Bacteroidetes), the inoculum type little affects electricity generation. Variations of pH and oxygen in biofilm have influenced microbial community structure and electricity generation according to the electrode and separator material. Although the electricity generation of non-woven fabric-SEA was less than that of Nafion-SEA, the use of non-woven fabrics is expected to reduce the construction and operating costs of MFCs.

  9. Identification of a potent microbial lipid antigen for diverse Natural Killer T cells1

    PubMed Central

    Wolf, Benjamin J.; Tatituri, Raju V. V.; Almeida, Catarina F.; Le Nours, Jérôme; Bhowruth, Veemal; Johnson, Darryl; Uldrich, Adam P.; Hsu, Fong-Fu; Brigl, Manfred; Besra, Gurdyal S.; Rossjohn, Jamie; Godfrey, Dale I.; Brenner, Michael B.

    2016-01-01

    Invariant Natural Killer T (iNKT) cells are a well-characterized CD1d-restricted T cell subset. The availability of potent antigens and tetramers for iNKT cells has allowed this population to be extensively studied and has revealed their central roles in infection, autoimmunity, and tumor immunity. In contrast, diverse Natural Killer T (dNKT) cells are poorly understood because the lipid antigens they recognize are largely unknown. We sought to identify dNKT cell lipid antigen(s) by interrogating a panel of dNKT mouse cell hybridomas with lipid extracts from the pathogen Listeria monocytogenes. We identified Listeria phosphatidylglycerol (PG) as a microbial antigen that was significantly more potent than a previously characterized dNKT cell antigen, mammalian PG. Further, while mammalian PG loaded CD1d tetramers did not stain dNKT cells, the Listeria-derived PG loaded tetramers did. The structure of Listeria PG was distinct from mammalian PG since it contained shorter, fully-saturated anteiso fatty acid lipid tails. CD1d binding lipid displacement studies revealed that the microbial PG antigen binds significantly better to CD1d than counterparts with the same headgroup. These data reveal a highly-potent microbial lipid antigen for a subset of dNKT cells and provide an explanation for its increased antigen potency compared to the mammalian counterpart. PMID:26254340

  10. Utilization of Cheese Whey Using Synergistic Immobilization of β-Galactosidase and Saccharomyces cerevisiae Cells in Dual Matrices.

    PubMed

    Kokkiligadda, Anusha; Beniwal, Arun; Saini, Priyanka; Vij, Shilpa

    2016-08-01

    Whey is a byproduct of the dairy industry, which has prospects of using as a source for production of various valuable compounds. The lactose present in whey is considered as an environmental pollutant and its utilization for enzyme and fuel production, may be effective for whey bioremediation. The dairy yeast Kluyveromyces marxianus have the ability to utilize lactose sharply as the major carbon source for the production of the enzyme. Five strains were tested for the production of the β-galactosidase using whey. The maximum β-galactosidase activity of 1.74 IU/mg dry weight was achieved in whey using K. marxianus MTCC 1389. The biocatalyst was further immobilized on chitosan macroparticles and exhibited excellent functional activity at 35 °C. Almost 89 % lactose hydrolysis was attained for concentrated whey (100 g/L) and retained 89 % catalytic activity after 15 cycles of reuse. Finally, β-galactosidase was immobilized on chitosan and Saccharomyces cerevisiae on calcium alginate, and both were used together for the production of ethanol from concentrated whey. Maximal ethanol titer of 28.9 g/L was achieved during fermentation at 35 °C. The conclusions generated by employing two different matrices will be beneficial for the future modeling using engineered S. cerevisiae in scale-up studies. PMID:27059625

  11. Utilization of Cheese Whey Using Synergistic Immobilization of β-Galactosidase and Saccharomyces cerevisiae Cells in Dual Matrices.

    PubMed

    Kokkiligadda, Anusha; Beniwal, Arun; Saini, Priyanka; Vij, Shilpa

    2016-08-01

    Whey is a byproduct of the dairy industry, which has prospects of using as a source for production of various valuable compounds. The lactose present in whey is considered as an environmental pollutant and its utilization for enzyme and fuel production, may be effective for whey bioremediation. The dairy yeast Kluyveromyces marxianus have the ability to utilize lactose sharply as the major carbon source for the production of the enzyme. Five strains were tested for the production of the β-galactosidase using whey. The maximum β-galactosidase activity of 1.74 IU/mg dry weight was achieved in whey using K. marxianus MTCC 1389. The biocatalyst was further immobilized on chitosan macroparticles and exhibited excellent functional activity at 35 °C. Almost 89 % lactose hydrolysis was attained for concentrated whey (100 g/L) and retained 89 % catalytic activity after 15 cycles of reuse. Finally, β-galactosidase was immobilized on chitosan and Saccharomyces cerevisiae on calcium alginate, and both were used together for the production of ethanol from concentrated whey. Maximal ethanol titer of 28.9 g/L was achieved during fermentation at 35 °C. The conclusions generated by employing two different matrices will be beneficial for the future modeling using engineered S. cerevisiae in scale-up studies.

  12. Microbial electrolysis cells for high yield hydrogen gas production from organic matter.

    PubMed

    Logan, Bruce E; Call, Douglas; Cheng, Shaoan; Hamelers, Hubertus V M; Sleutels, Tom H J A; Jeremiasse, Adriaan W; Rozendal, René A

    2008-12-01

    The use of electrochemically active bacteria to break down organic matter, combined with the addition of a small voltage (> 0.2 V in practice) in specially designed microbial electrolysis cells (MECs), can result in a high yield of hydrogen gas. While microbial electrolysis was invented only a few years ago, rapid developments have led to hydrogen yields approaching 100%, energy yields based on electrical energy input many times greater than that possible by water electrolysis, and increased gas production rates. MECs used to make hydrogen gas are similar in design to microbial fuel cells (MFCs) that produce electricity, but there are important differences in architecture and analytical methods used to evaluate performance. We review here the materials, architectures, performance, and energy efficiencies of these MEC systems that show promise as a method for renewable and sustainable energy production, and wastewater treatment.

  13. Three independent forms of regulation affect expression of HO, CLN1 and CLN2 during the cell cycle of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Breeden, L; Mikesell, G

    1994-12-01

    The G1 cyclins (CLNs) bind to and activate the CDC28 kinase during the G1 to S transition in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Two G1 cyclins are regulated at the RNA level so that their RNAs peak at the G1/S boundary. In this report we show that the cell cycle regulation of CLN1 and CLN2 is partially determined by the restricted expression of SW14, a known trans-activator of SCB elements. When SWI4 is constitutively expressed or deleted, cell cycle regulation of CLN1/2 is reduced but not eliminated. In the absence of SwI6, another known regulator of both SCB and MCB elements, cell cycle regulation of the CLNs is also reduced, and the Start-dependence of HO transcription is eliminated. This indicates that SwI6 also plays an important role in the normal cell cycle regulation of all three promoters. When both SwI6 activity and the transcriptional regulation of SW14 are eliminated, cell cycle regulation is further reduced, indicating that these are two independent pathways of regulation. However, a twofold fluctuation in transcript levels still persists under these conditions. This reveals a third source of cell cycle control, which could affect SwI4 activity post-transcriptionally, or reflect the existence of another unidentified regulator of these promoters.

  14. Real-time detection of cofactor availability in genetically modified living Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells--simultaneous probing of different geno- and phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Kostesha, Natalie; Heiskanen, Arto; Spégel, Christer; Hahn-Hägerdal, Barbel; Gorwa-Grauslund, Marie-Francoise; Emnéus, Jenny

    2009-09-01

    This work describes a mediated amperometric method for simultaneous real-time probing of the NAD(P)H availability in two different phenotypes, fermentative and respiratory, of the phosphoglucose isomerase deletion mutant strain of S. cerevisiae, EBY44 [ENY.WA-1A pgi1-1D::URA3], and its parental strain, ENY.WA-1A. The developed method is based on multichannel detection using microelectrode arrays. Its versatility was demonstrated by using four microelectrode arrays for simultaneously monitoring the NAD(P)H availability of both geno- and phenotypes under the influence of two different carbon sources, glucose and fructose, as well as the cytosolic and mitochondrial inhibitor and uncoupler, dicoumarol. The obtained results indicate that the method is capable of accurately and reproducibly (overall relative standard error of mean 3.2%) mapping the real-time responses of the cells with different genotype-phenotype combinations. The ENY.WA cells showed the same response to glucose and fructose when dicoumarol was used; fermentative cells indicated the presence of cytosolic inhibition and respiratory cells a net effect of mitochondrial uncoupling. EBY44 cells showed cytosolic inhibition with the exception of respiratory cells when fructose was used as carbon source.

  15. Three Independent Forms of Regulation Affect Expression of Ho, Cln1 and Cln2 during the Cell Cycle of Saccharomyces Cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Breeden, L.; Mikesell, G.

    1994-01-01

    The G(1) cyclins (CLNs) bind to and activate the CDC28 kinase during the G(1) to S transition in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Two G(1) cyclins are regulated at the RNA level so that their RNAs peak at the G(1)/S boundary. In this report we show that the cell cycle regulation of CLN1 and CLN2 is partially determined by the restricted expression of SWI4, a known trans-activator of SCB elements. When SWI4 is constitutively expressed or deleted, cell cycle regulation of CLN1/2 is reduced but not eliminated. In the absence of Swi6, another known regulator of both SCB and MCB elements, cell cycle regulation of the CLNs is also reduced, and the Start-dependence of HO transcription is eliminated. This indicates that Swi6 also plays an important role in the normal cell cycle regulation of all three promoters. When both Swi6 activity and the transcriptional regulation of SWI4 are eliminated, cell cycle regulation is further reduced, indicating that these are two independent pathways of regulation. However, a twofold fluctuation in transcript levels still persists under these conditions. This reveals a third source of cell cycle control, which could affect Swi4 activity post-transcriptionally, or reflect the existence of another unidentified regulator of these promoters. PMID:7896087

  16. A strategic study using mutant-strain entrapment in calcium alginate for the production of Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells with high invertase activity.

    PubMed

    Rossi-Alva, Juan Carlos; Rocha-Leão, Maria Helena Miguez

    2003-08-01

    Entrapped cells and entrapped cells grown inside of a calcium alginate matrix as well as free cells have been investigated using Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutant strains with regard to their pattern of growth and invertase activity. The repression of invertase by glucose and glucose-consumption ability were considered in the selection process of the mutants. Efficient sucrose bioconversion due to high invertase activity was obtained when entrapped mutant strain Q6R2 cells were grown within calcium alginate gel beads using sucrose plus glucose as the carbon source. Under these conditions, 1 mg (dry weight) of entrapped cells is able to produce 20 micromol of inverted sugar in 3 min (the maximum activity obtained was 20 units x mg(-1)). The experiments were carried out for 6 months without appreciable loss of either bead integrity or invertase activity. The biocatalyst was also stored at 4 degrees C for 6 months without appreciable loss of the invertase activity. This work shows that entrapped yeast cells with a weak ability to consume sugar may be used to produce inverted sugar.

  17. Single cell visualization of sulfur cycling in intertidal microbial mats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawson, K.; Green, A.; Orphan, V. J.

    2014-12-01

    Chemoautrophic microbial mats form in shallow intertidal pools adjacent to sulfidic hydrothermal vents in San Pedro, CA. Sulfide is primarily geologically derived. However, microscopy revealed deltaproteobacteria closely associated with Beggiatoa -like filaments, indicating an additional biogenic sulfide source, derived from sulfate reduction or sulfur disproportionation. At small scales the intercellular interaction of sulfide producing and sulfide consuming bacteria may play a important role in biogeochemical sulfur cycling. We explored the intracellular transfer of biologically derived sulfide in this system with triple and quadruple stable isotope labeling experiments: 13C, 15N, 33S, and 34S. Silicon wafers colonized by microbial mats in situ, were then incubated with 34SO42- or 34SO42- and 33S0 as well as 13C-acetate and 15NH4+and analyzed by fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) coupled to nanometer-scale secondary ion mass spectrometry (NanoSIMS). We observed enrichment of 34S and 33S in both deltaproteobacteria and sulfide oxidizing gammaproteobacteria. Greater enrichment relative to killed controls occurred in deltaproteobacteria than the sulfide oxidizers during both sulfate reducing (Δ34Sdelta-killed = 240‰, Δ34Sgamma-killed = 40‰) and sulfur disproportionating incubations (Δ33Sdelta-killed = 1730‰, Δ33Sgamma-killed = 1050‰). These results provide a direct visualization of interspecies sulfur transfer and indicate that biogenic sulfide derived from either sulfate or intermediate oxidation state sulfur species plays a role in sulfur cycling in this system.

  18. Small ubiquitin-related modifier ligase activity of Mms21 is required for maintenance of chromosome integrity during the unperturbed mitotic cell division cycle in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Rai, Ragini; Varma, Satya P M V; Shinde, Nikhil; Ghosh, Shilpa; Kumaran, Srikala P; Skariah, Geena; Laloraya, Shikha

    2011-04-22

    The SUMO ligase activity of Mms21/Nse2, a conserved member of the Smc5/6 complex, is required for resisting extrinsically induced genotoxic stress. We report that the Mms21 SUMO ligase activity is also required during the unchallenged mitotic cell cycle in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. SUMO ligase-defective cells were slow growing and spontaneously incurred DNA damage. These cells required caffeine-sensitive Mec1 kinase-dependent checkpoint signaling for survival even in the absence of extrinsically induced genotoxic stress. SUMO ligase-defective cells were sensitive to replication stress and displayed synthetic growth defects with DNA damage checkpoint-defective mutants such as mec1, rad9, and rad24. MMS21 SUMO ligase and mediator of replication checkpoint 1 gene (MRC1) were epistatic with respect to hydroxyurea-induced replication stress or methyl methanesulfonate-induced DNA damage sensitivity. Subjecting Mms21 SUMO ligase-deficient cells to transient replication stress resulted in enhancement of cell cycle progression defects such as mitotic delay and accumulation of hyperploid cells. Consistent with the spontaneous activation of the DNA damage checkpoint pathway observed in the Mms21-mediated sumoylation-deficient cells, enhanced frequency of chromosome breakage and loss was detected in these mutant cells. A mutation in the conserved cysteine 221 that is engaged in coordination of the zinc ion in Loop 2 of the Mms21 SPL-RING E3 ligase catalytic domain resulted in strong replication stress sensitivity and also conferred slow growth and Mec1 dependence to unchallenged mitotically dividing cells. Our findings establish Mms21-mediated sumoylation as a determinant of cell cycle progression and maintenance of chromosome integrity during the unperturbed mitotic cell division cycle in budding yeast. PMID:21324902

  19. ChemCell : a particle-based model of protein chemistry and diffusion in microbial cells.

    SciTech Connect

    Plimpton, Steven James; Slepoy, Alexander

    2003-12-01

    Prokaryotic single-cell microbes are the simplest of all self-sufficient living organisms. Yet microbes create and use much of the molecular machinery present in more complex organisms, and the macro-molecules in microbial cells interact in regulatory, metabolic, and signaling pathways that are prototypical of the reaction networks present in all cells. We have developed a simple simulation model of a prokaryotic cell that treats proteins, protein complexes, and other organic molecules as particles which diffuse via Brownian motion and react with nearby particles in accord with chemical rate equations. The code models protein motion and chemistry within an idealized cellular geometry. It has been used to simulate several simple reaction networks and compared to more idealized models which do not include spatial effects. In this report we describe an initial version of the simulation code that was developed with FY03 funding. We discuss the motivation for the model, highlight its underlying equations, and describe simulations of a 3-stage kinase cascade and a portion of the carbon fixation pathway in the Synechococcus microbe.