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Sample records for cerium tellurides

  1. Mercury Telluride and Cadmium Telluride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    A semiconductor's usefulness is determined by how atoms are ordered within the crystal's underlying three-dimensional structure. While this mercury telluride and cadmium telluride alloy sample mixes completely in Earth -based laboratories, convective flows prevent them from mixing uniformly.

  2. Mercury Telluride and Cadmium Telluride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    A semiconductor's usefulness is determined by how atoms are ordered within the crystal's underlying three-dimensional structure. While this mercury telluride and cadmium telluride alloy sample mixes completely in Earth -based laboratories, convective flows prevent them from mixing uniformly. In space, the ingredients mix more homogenously, resulting in a superior product.

  3. Cerium Oxide and Cerium Compounds

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    EPA / 635 / R - 08 / 002F www.epa.gov / iris TOXICOLOGICAL REVIEW OF Cerium Oxide and Cerium Compounds ( CAS No . 1306 - 38 - 3 ) In Support of Summary Information on the Integrated Risk Information System ( IRIS ) September 2009 U.S . Environmental Protection Agency Washington , DC ii DISCLAIMER Th

  4. IRIS Toxicological Review of Cerium Oxide and Cerium ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA conducted a peer review of the scientific basis supporting the human health hazard and dose-response assessment of cerium oxide and cerium compounds that will appear on the Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS) database. The draft Toxicological Review of cerium oxide and cerium compounds provides scientific support and rationale for the hazard and dose-response assessment pertaining to chronic exposure to cerium oxide and cerium compounds.

  5. IRIS Toxicological Review of Cerium Oxide and Cerium ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    On September 29, 2009, the IRIS Summary and Toxicological Review of Cerium Oxide and Cerium Compounds was finalized and loaded onto the IRIS database. The Toxicological Review of Cerium Oxide and Cerium Compounds was reviewed internally by EPA, by other federal agencies and White House Offices, by expert external peer reviewers, and by the public. In the new IRIS process, introduced by the EPA Administrator, all written comments on IRIS assessments submitted by other federal agencies and White House Offices will be made publicly available. Accordingly, interagency comments and the interagency draft of the Cerium Oxide and Cerium Compounds IRIS assessment are posted on this site. The draft Toxicological Review of Cerium Oxide and Cerium Compounds provides scientific support and rationale for the hazard identification and dose-response assessment pertaining to chronic exposure to cerium oxide and cerium compounds.

  6. PLUTONIUM-CERIUM ALLOY

    DOEpatents

    Coffinberry, A.S.

    1959-01-01

    An alloy is presented for use as a reactor fuel. The binary alloy consists essentially of from about 5 to 90 atomic per cent cerium and the balance being plutonium. A complete phase diagram for the cerium--plutonium system is given.

  7. Reaction chemistry of cerium

    SciTech Connect

    1997-01-01

    It is truly ironic that a synthetic organic chemist likely has far greater knowledge of the reaction chemistry of cerium(IV) than an inorganic colleague. Cerium(IV) reagents have long since been employed as oxidants in effecting a wide variety of organic transformations. Conversely, prior to the late 1980s, the number of well characterized cerium(IV) complexes did not extend past a handful of known species. Though in many other areas, interest in the molecular chemistry of the 4f-elements has undergone an explosive growth over the last twenty years, the chemistry of cerium(IV) has for the most part been overlooked. This report describes reactions of cerium complexes and structure.

  8. Hafnium germanium telluride

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Gyung-Joo; Yun, Hoseop

    2008-01-01

    The title hafnium germanium telluride, HfGeTe4, has been synthesized by the use of a halide flux and structurally characterized by X-ray diffraction. HfGeTe4 is isostructural with stoichiometric ZrGeTe4 and the Hf site in this compound is also fully occupied. The crystal structure of HfGeTe4 adopts a two-dimensional layered structure, each layer being composed of two unique one-dimensional chains of face-sharing Hf-centered bicapped trigonal prisms and corner-sharing Ge-centered tetra­hedra. These layers stack on top of each other to complete the three-dimensional structure with undulating van der Waals gaps. PMID:21202163

  9. Cerium oxalate precipitation

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, T.P.

    1987-02-01

    Cerium, a nonradioactive, common stand-in for plutonium in development work, has been used to simulate several plutonium precipitation processes at the Savannah River Laboratory. There are similarities between the plutonium trifluoride and the cerium oxalate precipitations in particle size and extent of plating, but not particle morphology. The equilibrium solubility, precipitation kinetics, particle size, extent of plating, and dissolution characteristics of cerium oxalate have been investigated. Interpretations of particle size and plating based on precipitation kinetics (i.e., nucleation and crystal growth) are presented. 16 refs., 7 figs., 6 tabs.

  10. Thermoelectric properties of cerium monopnictides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danielson, L. R.; Alexander, M. N.; Wood, C.; Lockwood, R. A.; Vandersande, J. W.

    1987-01-01

    Several cerium pnictides have been synthesized from the pure elements and hot pressed into test samples. Measurements of Seebeck coefficients and electrical resistivities were performed on these samples from room temperature to 1000 C. Cerium arsenide and cerium antimonide are n-type; cerium nitride changes from p-type to n-type conduction at 800 C. The materials are semimetals with resistivities below 1 mohm/cm. Cerium arsenide is the most favorable of the pnictides studied for high-temperature thermoelectric energy conversion, with an average power factor of 15 microW/cm K sq from 500 to 1000 C.

  11. Thermoelectric properties of cerium monopnictides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danielson, L. R.; Alexander, M. N.; Wood, C.; Lockwood, R. A.; Vandersande, J. W.

    1987-01-01

    Several cerium pnictides have been synthesized from the pure elements and hot pressed into test samples. Measurements of Seebeck coefficients and electrical resistivities were performed on these samples from room temperature to 1000 C. Cerium arsenide and cerium antimonide are n-type; cerium nitride changes from p-type to n-type conduction at 800 C. The materials are semimetals with resistivities below 1 mohm/cm. Cerium arsenide is the most favorable of the pnictides studied for high-temperature thermoelectric energy conversion, with an average power factor of 15 microW/cm K sq from 500 to 1000 C.

  12. Cadmium telluride photovoltaic radiation detector

    DOEpatents

    Agouridis, Dimitrios C.; Fox, Richard J.

    1981-01-01

    A dosimetry-type radiation detector is provided which employs a polycrystalline, chlorine-compensated cadmium telluride wafer fabricated to operate as a photovoltaic current generator used as the basic detecting element. A photovoltaic junction is formed in the wafer by painting one face of the cadmium telluride wafer with an n-type semiconductive material. The opposite face of the wafer is painted with an electrically conductive material to serve as a current collector. The detector is mounted in a hermetically sealed vacuum containment. The detector is operated in a photovoltaic mode (zero bias) while DC coupled to a symmetrical differential current amplifier having a very low input impedance. The amplifier converts the current signal generated by radiation impinging upon the barrier surface face of the wafer to a voltage which is supplied to a voltmeter calibrated to read quantitatively the level of radiation incident upon the detecting wafer.

  13. Cadmium telluride photovoltaic radiation detector

    DOEpatents

    Agouridis, D.C.; Fox, R.J.

    A dosimetry-type radiation detector is provided which employs a polycrystalline, chlorine-compensated cadmium telluride wafer fabricated to operate as a photovoltaic current generator used as the basic detecting element. A photovoltaic junction is formed in the wafer by painting one face of the cadmium telluride wafer with an n-type semi-conductive material. The opposite face of the wafer is painted with an electrically conductive material to serve as a current collector. The detector is mounted in a hermetically sealed vacuum containment. The detector is operated in a photovoltaic mode (zero bias) while DC coupled to a symmetrical differential current amplifier having a very low input impedance. The amplifier converts the current signal generated by radiation impinging upon the barrier surface face of the wafer to a voltage which is supplied to a voltmeter calibrated to read quantitatively the level of radiation incident upon the detecting wafer.

  14. Research on Mercury Cadmium Telluride.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-05-20

    12180-3590 (Received 25 September 1985; accepted for publication 16 December 1985) Growth of epitaxial mercury cadmium telluride (Hg, Cd, Te) on 100...one another. 2015 j Appi Phys .vol 57. No 6. 15 March � Oaccar etai 2015 • : -. ...... ., " .. .’. .- 6 We have carried out a full EER study of...strained materials. K C Hi,,. U Fhrf r Ailn.od H P , Re, " . : 21’󈧘 7 •Aog, >ys . ,o 57 5.o 6 𔃿 a’c" � : acca - ’i :,’" Growth of CdTe on GaAs by

  15. Phonon dynamics of americium telluride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arya, B. S.; Aynyas, Mahendra; Ahirwar, Ashok K.; Sanyal, S. P.

    2013-06-01

    We report for the first time the complete phonon dispersion curves for Americium telluride (AmTe) using a breathing shell models (BSM) to establish their predominant ionic nature. The results obtained in the present study show the general features of the phonon spectrum. We could not compare our results with the experimental measurements as they are not available so far. We emphasize the need of neutron scattering measurements to compare our results. We also report, for the first time specific heat for this compound.

  16. Thin film cadmium telluride, zinc telluride, and mercury zinc telluride solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, T.L. )

    1992-04-01

    This report describes research to demonstrate (1) thin film cadmium telluride solar cells with a quantum efficiency of 75% or higher at 0. 44 {mu}m and a photovoltaic efficiency of 11.5% or greater, and (2) thin film zinc telluride and mercury zinc telluride solar cells with a transparency to sub-band-gap radiation of 65% and a photovoltaic conversion efficiency of 5% and 8%, respectively. Work was directed at (1) depositing transparent conducting semiconductor films by solution growth and metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) technique, (2) depositing CdTe films by close-spaced sublimation (CSS) and MOCVD techniques, (3) preparing and evaluating thin film CdTe solar cells, and (4) preparing and characterizing thin film ZnTe, CD{sub 1-x}Zn{sub 1-x}Te, and Hg{sub 1-x}Zn{sub x}Te solar cells. The deposition of CdS films from aqueous solutions was investigated in detail, and their crystallographic, optical, and electrical properties were characterized. CdTe films were deposited from DMCd and DIPTe at 400{degrees}C using TEGa and AsH{sub 3} as dopants. CdTe films deposited by CSS had significantly better microstructures than those deposited by MOCVD. Deep energy states in CdTe films deposited by CSS and MOCVD were investigated. Thin films of ZnTe, Cd{sub 1- x}Zn{sub x}Te, and Hg{sub 1-x}Zn{sub x}Te were deposited by MOCVD, and their crystallographic, optical, and electrical properties were characterized. 67 refs.

  17. Process for producing large grain cadmium telluride

    DOEpatents

    Hasoon, F.S.; Nelson, A.J.

    1996-01-16

    A process is described for producing a cadmium telluride polycrystalline film having grain sizes greater than about 20 {micro}m. The process comprises providing a substrate upon which cadmium telluride can be deposited and placing that substrate within a vacuum chamber containing a cadmium telluride effusion cell. A polycrystalline film is then deposited on the substrate through the steps of evacuating the vacuum chamber to a pressure of at least 10{sup {minus}6} torr.; heating the effusion cell to a temperature whereat the cell releases stoichiometric amounts of cadmium telluride usable as a molecular beam source for growth of grains on the substrate; heating the substrate to a temperature whereat a stoichiometric film of cadmium telluride can be deposited; and releasing cadmium telluride from the effusion cell for deposition as a film on the substrate. The substrate then is placed in a furnace having an inert gas atmosphere and heated for a sufficient period of time at an annealing temperature whereat cadmium telluride grains on the substrate grow to sizes greater than about 20 {micro}m.

  18. Process for producing large grain cadmium telluride

    DOEpatents

    Hasoon, Falah S.; Nelson, Art J.

    1996-01-01

    A process for producing a cadmium telluride polycrystalline film having grain sizes greater than about 20 .mu.m. The process comprises providing a substrate upon which cadmium telluride can be deposited and placing that substrate within a vacuum chamber containing a cadmium telluride effusion cell. A polycrystalline film is then deposited on the substrate through the steps of evacuating the vacuum chamber to a pressure of at least 10.sup.-6 torr.; heating the effusion cell to a temperature whereat the cell releases stoichiometric amounts of cadmium telluride usable as a molecular beam source for growth of grains on the substrate; heating the substrate to a temperature whereat a stoichiometric film of cadmium telluride can be deposited; and releasing cadmium telluride from the effusion cell for deposition as a film on the substrate. The substrate then is placed in a furnace having an inert gas atmosphere and heated for a sufficient period of time at an annealing temperature whereat cadmium telluride grains on the substrate grow to sizes greater than about 20 .mu.m.

  19. Research support for cadmium telluride crystal growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenberger, Franz; Banish, Michael

    1993-01-01

    Work performed during the period 11 Feb. 1992 to 10 Aug. 1993 on research support for cadmium telluride crystal growth is reported. Work on chemical impurity characterization and mass spectroscopy is described.

  20. Mercury Cadmium Telluride Sputtered Target Research.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-06-29

    ShirnlU in 1967 to describe the altered layer formation in the binary alloy NiCr . This model assumes an infinitesimally thin layer being sputter ...AD-AL7 456 NEW JERSEY INST OF TECH NEWARK DEPT OP ELECTRICAL EN-ETC FIG 13/8 MERCURY CADMIUM TELLURIDE SPUTTERED TARGET RESEARCH( U) JUN 82 R H...MERCURY CADMIUM TELLURIDE SPUTTERED TARGET RESEARCH TYPE OF REPORT (TECHNICAL, FINAL, ETC.) FINAL TECHNICAL REPORT AUTHOR (S) ROY H. CORNELY DATE JUNE 29

  1. Process for producing cadmium sulfide on a cadmium telluride surface

    DOEpatents

    Levi, Dean H.; Nelson, Art J.; Ahrenkiel, Richard K.

    1996-01-01

    A process for producing a layer of cadmium sulfide on a cadmium telluride surface to be employed in a photovoltaic device. The process comprises providing a cadmium telluride surface which is exposed to a hydrogen sulfide plasma at an exposure flow rate, an exposure time and an exposure temperature sufficient to permit reaction between the hydrogen sulfide and cadmium telluride to thereby form a cadmium sulfide layer on the cadmium telluride surface and accomplish passivation. In addition to passivation, a heterojunction at the interface of the cadmium sulfide and the cadmium telluride can be formed when the layer of cadmium sulfide formed on the cadmium telluride is of sufficient thickness.

  2. Preparation of cerium halide solvate complexes

    DOEpatents

    Vasudevan, Kalyan V; Smith, Nickolaus A; Gordon, John C; McKigney, Edward A; Muenchaussen, Ross E

    2013-08-06

    Crystals of a solvated cerium(III) halide solvate complex resulted from a process of forming a paste of a cerium(III) halide in an ionic liquid, adding a solvent to the paste, removing any undissolved solid, and then cooling the liquid phase. Diffusing a solvent vapor into the liquid phase also resulted in crystals of a solvated cerium(III) halide complex.

  3. Floating zone melting of cadmium telluride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Wen-Ming; Regel, L. L.; Wilcox, W. R.

    1992-01-01

    To produce superior crystals of cadmium telluride, floating zone melting in space has been proposed. Techniques required for floating zone melting of cadmium telluride are being developed. We have successfully float-zoned cadmium telluride on earth using square rods. A resistance heater was constructed for forming the molten zone. Evaporation of the molten zone was controlled by adding excess cadmium to the growth ampoule combined with heating of the entire ampoule. An effective method to hold the feed rod was developed. Slow rotation of the growth ampoule was proven experimentally to be necessary to achieve a complete symmetric molten zone. Most of the resultant cylindrical rods were single crystals with twins. Still needed is a suitable automatic method to control the zone length. We tried a fiber optical technique to control the zone length, but experiments showed that application of this technique to automate zone length control is unlikely to be successful.

  4. Floating zone melting of cadmium telluride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Wen-Ming; Regel, L. L.; Wilcox, W. R.

    1992-01-01

    To produce superior crystals of cadmium telluride, floating zone melting in space has been proposed. Techniques required for floating zone melting of cadmium telluride are being developed. We have successfully float-zoned cadmium telluride on earth using square rods. A resistance heater was constructed for forming the molten zone. Evaporation of the molten zone was controlled by adding excess cadmium to the growth ampoule combined with heating of the entire ampoule. An effective method to hold the feed rod was developed. Slow rotation of the growth ampoule was proven experimentally to be necessary to achieve a complete symmetric molten zone. Most of the resultant cylindrical rods were single crystals with twins. Still needed is a suitable automatic method to control the zone length. We tried a fiber optical technique to control the zone length, but experiments showed that application of this technique to automate zone length control is unlikely to be successful.

  5. PLUTONIUM-CERIUM-COBALT AND PLUTONIUM-CERIUM-NICKEL ALLOYS

    DOEpatents

    Coffinberry, A.S.

    1959-08-25

    >New plutonium-base teroary alloys useful as liquid reactor fuels are described. The alloys consist of 10 to 20 atomic percent cobalt with the remainder plutonium and cerium in any desired proportion, with the plutonium not in excess of 88 atomic percent; or, of from 10 to 25 atomic percent nickel (or mixture of nickel and cobalt) with the remainder plutonium and cerium in any desired proportion, with the plutonium not in excess of 86 atomic percent. The stated advantages of these alloys over unalloyed plutonium for reactor fuel use are a lower melting point and a wide range of permissible plutonium dilution.

  6. Thermal pulse damage thresholds in cadmium telluride.

    PubMed

    Slattery, J E; Thompson, J S; Schroeder, J B

    1975-09-01

    A model is presented for predicting the temperature rise in an opaque material during the absorption of a moderately short pulse of energy. Experimental verification of the model employing a pulsed ruby laser and a cadmium telluride plate is described. Two distinct damage thresholds were noted: (1) at modest energy levels plastic deformation occurred, and (2) the higher energies resulted in surface melting.

  7. PLUTONIUM-CERIUM-COPPER ALLOYS

    DOEpatents

    Coffinberry, A.S.

    1959-05-12

    A low melting point plutonium alloy useful as fuel is a homogeneous liquid metal fueled nuclear reactor is described. Vessels of tungsten or tantalum are useful to contain the alloy which consists essentially of from 10 to 30 atomic per cent copper and the balance plutonium and cerium. with the plutontum not in excess of 50 atomic per cent.

  8. IRIS Toxicological Review of Cerium Oxide and Cerium Compounds (External Review Draft)

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA conducted a peer review of the scientific basis supporting the human health hazard and dose-response assessment of cerium oxide and cerium compounds that will appear on the Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS) database.

  9. IRIS Toxicological Review of Cerium Oxide and Cerium Compounds (External Review Draft)

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA conducted a peer review of the scientific basis supporting the human health hazard and dose-response assessment of cerium oxide and cerium compounds that will appear on the Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS) database.

  10. Process for producing cadmium sulfide on a cadmium telluride surface

    DOEpatents

    Levi, D.H.; Nelson, A.J.; Ahrenkiel, R.K.

    1996-07-30

    A process is described for producing a layer of cadmium sulfide on a cadmium telluride surface to be employed in a photovoltaic device. The process comprises providing a cadmium telluride surface which is exposed to a hydrogen sulfide plasma at an exposure flow rate, an exposure time and an exposure temperature sufficient to permit reaction between the hydrogen sulfide and cadmium telluride to thereby form a cadmium sulfide layer on the cadmium telluride surface and accomplish passivation. In addition to passivation, a heterojunction at the interface of the cadmium sulfide and the cadmium telluride can be formed when the layer of cadmium sulfide formed on the cadmium telluride is of sufficient thickness. 12 figs.

  11. Nanoparticle cerium oxide and mixed cerium oxides for improved fuel cell lifetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, Stephen Michael

    While there is a rich body of literature concerning of properties of bulk cerium oxide and cerium cations in solution, the discussion has been inappropriately applied to nanoscale cerium oxide resulting in many unexpected or unexplained results. In particular, there is very limited understanding about the properties of cerium oxide and its potential use as a radical scavenger, and how the catalytic properties of cerium oxide change as the particle size approaches the nanoscale. For example, the involvement of Ce+4 and Ce+3 cations in reactions such as hydrogen peroxide decomposition have been investigated for both cerium cations and bulk cerium oxide. However, while both are assumed to decompose hydrogen peroxide through the same mechanism, whereby Ce+4 is involved in peroxide decomposition while Ce +3 is involved in radical scavenging, there has been very little done to address how the selectivity and activity of these reactions are affected by changing the majority cation population, as cerium cations in solution are predominantly in the +3 oxidation state while cerium cations are predominantly in the +4 oxidation state in cerium oxide. This matter is further complicated in cerium oxide nanoparticles where the surface concentration of Ce +3 cations is increased due to particle curvature effects. Due to the potential of controlling the surface cerium oxidation state using particle size and using this control to change the catalytic properties, this project investigated the effect of particle size and composition and the activity and selectivity of cerium oxide nanoparticles, and has served to expand the understanding of the properties of pure and mixed nanoparticle cerium oxide. This work explains the metric developed for measuring the catalytic properties of pure and mixed cerium oxide nanoparticles, which is also good at predicting the immediate and long-term behavior of nanoparticles in hydrogen fuel cells. This work also directly demonstrates praseodymium

  12. Photoionization of the cerium isonuclear sequence and cerium endohedral fullerene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habibi, Mustapha

    This dissertation presents an experimental photoionization study of the cerium isonuclear sequence ions in the energy range of the 4d inner-shell giant resonance. In addition, single and double photoionization and photofragmentation cross sections of the cerium endohedral ion Ce C+82 were also measured and studied in the 4d excitation-ionization energy range of cerium. Relative and absolute cross-section measurements were performed at undulator beamline 10.0.1 of the Advanced Light Source (ALS) for nine parent cerium ions: Ce+ - Ce9+. Double-to-single ionization cross-section ratios were measured for photoionization of the endohedral Ce C+82 and empty fullerene C C+82 molecular ions. The merged ion and photon beams technique was used to conduct the experiments. Multiconfiguration Hartree-Fock calculations were performed as an aid to interpret the experimental data. Four Rydberg series for 4d → nf (n ≥ 4) and 4d → np (n ≥ 6) autoionizing excitations were assigned using the quantum defect theory for the Ce3+ photoionization cross section. The experimental data show the collapse of the nf wavefunctions (n ≥ 4) with increasing ionization stage as outer-shell electrons are stripped from the parent ion. The nf orbital collapse occurs partially for Ce2+ and Ce3+ ion and completely for Ce4+, where these wavefunctions penetrate the core region of the ion. A strong contribution to the total oscillator strength was observed in the double and triple photoionization channels for low charge states (Ce +, Ce2+, and Ce3+), whereas most of the 4d excitations of the higher charge states decay by ejection of one electron.

  13. Diffusion and Defect Characterization Studies of Mercury Cadmium Telluride

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-08-01

    Mercury Cadmium Telluride" Principal Investigator: D. A. Stevenson Department of Materials Science and Engineering Stanford University Stanford, CA 94305...Include Security Classificatton, Difuson Defect Characterization Studies of Mercury Cadmium Telluride 12 PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) ProfessJL Ddvid A. Stevenson 13a...diffusion and defect chemistry of mercury cadmium telluride (MCT; Hg Cd Te). In this study, we have measured tracer self- diffusion and interdiffusion

  14. Growth of lead tin telluride crystals in gels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barber, Patrick G.

    1986-01-01

    Improved gels and several geometries were investigated for use in growing crystals. The use of lead sulfide test crystals proved workable, but it was impossible to obtain and maintain a sufficiently concentrated telluride ion solution to successfully grow lead telluride crystals. It appears that oxygen in the solution is capable of oxidizing the telluride ion up to tellurium metal. The method may still be successful, but only if precautions are taken to eliminate dissolved oxygen from the gels and aqueous solutions and to maintain a suitable concentration of telluride, Te(2)-(aq.).

  15. Grain Growth in Cerium Metal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooley, Jason; Katz, Martha; Mielke, Charles; Montalvo, Joel

    We report on grain growth in forged and rolled cerium plate for temperatures from 350 to 700 degrees C and times from 30 to 120 minutes. The cerium was made by arc-melting into a 25 mm deep by 80 mm diameter copper mold. The resulting disk was forged at room temperature to a 25% reduction of thickness four times with a 350 degree C strain relief heat treatment for 60 minutes between forging steps. The resulting 8 mm thick plate was clock rolled at room temperature to a 25% reduction of thickness three times with a 350 C strain relief heat treatment between steps resulting in a plate approximately 3 mm thick. 5 x 10 mm coupons were cut from the plate for the grain growth study.

  16. Cerium oxide for sunscreen cosmetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yabe, Shinryo; Sato, Tsugio

    2003-02-01

    Ultrafine particles of Mn+ -doped ceria ( Mn+ =Mg 2+, Ca 2+, Sr 2+, Ba 2+, Y 3+, La 3+, Nd 3+, Sm 3+, Eu 3+, Tb 3+) for UV filter were prepared via soft solution chemical routes at 40°C. X-ray diffraction revealed that the prepared doped particles had the cubic fluorite structures although peak positions changed depending on the kind and amount of doped metal ion. Doping with 20 mol% Ca 2+ and 20 mol% Zn 2+ resulted in extremely decreasing the particle size (2-4 nm) and the catalytic activity of ceria for oxidation of castor oil. Ca 2+-doped cerium dioxide showed excellent UV absorbing effect and transparency in the visible ray region compared with undoped cerium dioxide.

  17. Electron mobility in mercury cadmium telluride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, James D.

    1988-01-01

    A previously developed program, which includes all electronic interactions thought to be important, does not correctly predict the value of electron mobility in mercury cadmium telluride particularly near room temperature. Part of the reason for this discrepancy is thought to be the way screening is handled. It seems likely that there are a number of contributors to errors in the calculation. The objective is to survey the calculation, locate reasons for differences between experiment and calculation, and suggest improvements.

  18. Cadmium zinc telluride charged particle nuclear detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Toney, J.E. |; James, R.B.; Antolak, A.

    1997-02-01

    This report describes the improvements in understanding of transport phenomena in cadmium zinc telluride radiation sensors achieved through studies of alpha particle response and spatially resolved photoconductivity mapping. Alpha particle response waveforms and photocurrent profiles both indicate non-uniformities in the electric field which may have detrimental effects on detector performance. Identifying and eliminating the sources of these nonuniformities will ultimately lead to improved detector performance.

  19. Molecular modelling of some para-substituted aryl methyl telluride and diaryl telluride antioxidants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frisell, H.; Engman, L.

    2000-08-01

    Quantum mechanical calculations using the 3-21G(d) basis-set were performed on some p-substituted diaryl tellurides and aryl methyl tellurides, and the corresponding cationic radicals of these compounds. Calculated relative radical stabilization energies (RSE:s) were shown to correlate with experimentally determined peak oxidation potentials ( R=0.93) and 125Te-NMR chemical shifts ( R=0.91). A good correlation was also observed between the RSE:s and the Mulliken charge at the tellurium atoms ( R=0.97). The results showed that Hartree-Fock calculations using the 3-21G(d) basis set was sufficiently accurate for estimating the impact of p-substituents in aryl tellurides on experimentally determined properties such as peak oxidation potentials and 125Te-NMR chemical shifts.

  20. ADSORPTION OF CERIUM VALUES FROM AQUEOUS SOLUTIONS

    DOEpatents

    Roberts, F.P.

    1963-08-13

    Cerium can be removed from aqueous nitric acid (2 to 13 M) solutions by passing the latter over a PbO/sub 2/-containing anion exchange resin. The cerium is taken up by the resin, while any lanthanides, yttrium, and strontium present remain in the solution. (AEC)

  1. Formulation and method for preparing gels comprising hydrous cerium oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, Jack L; Chi, Anthony

    2013-05-07

    Formulations useful for preparing hydrous cerium oxide gels contain a metal salt including cerium, an organic base, and a complexing agent. Methods for preparing gels containing hydrous cerium oxide include heating a formulation to a temperature sufficient to induce gel formation, where the formulation contains a metal salt including cerium, an organic base, and a complexing agent.

  2. Thermal conductivity of bulk nanostructured lead telluride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hori, Takuma; Chen, Gang; Shiomi, Junichiro

    2014-01-01

    Thermal conductivity of lead telluride with embedded nanoinclusions was studied using Monte Carlo simulations with intrinsic phonon transport properties obtained from first-principles-based lattice dynamics. The nanoinclusion/matrix interfaces were set to completely reflect phonons to model the maximum interface-phonon-scattering scenario. The simulations with the geometrical cross section and volume fraction of the nanoinclusions matched to those of the experiment show that the experiment has already reached the theoretical limit of thermal conductivity. The frequency-dependent analysis further identifies that the thermal conductivity reduction is dominantly attributed to scattering of low frequency phonons and demonstrates mutual adaptability of nanostructuring and local disordering.

  3. Reaction of divinyl telluride with thiourea

    SciTech Connect

    Amosova, S.V.; Gavrilova, G.M.; Tatarinova, A.A.; Gostevskaya, V.I.; Sinegovskaya, L.M.; Gusarova, N.K.; Trofimov, B.A.

    1986-07-20

    Earlier it was shown that with thiourea in the presence of equimolar amounts of acids divinyl sulfide forms 2H,6H-2,6-dimethyl-4-amino-1,3,5-dithiazines in the salt form with yields of 70-90%. In the case of other divinyl chalcogenides the formation of similar reaction products could be expected. However, cycloaddition of the isothiuronium salts (in this example with hydrochloric acid) is not observed in the case of divinyl telluride, but the Te-C bond is cleaved with the formation of an aldehyde and of complexes of tellurium with thiourea.

  4. Conventional X-ray fluorescence camera with a cadmium-telluride detector and its application to cancer diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enomoto, Toshiyuki; Sato, Eiichi; Abderyim, Purkhet; Abudurexiti, Abulajiang; Hagiwara, Osahiko; Matsukiyo, Hiroshi; Osawa, Akihiro; Watanabe, Manabu; Nagao, Jiro; Sato, Shigehiro; Ogawa, Akira; Onagawa, Jun

    2011-04-01

    X-ray fluorescence (XRF) analysis is useful for mapping various molecules in objects. Bremsstrahlung X-rays are selected using a 3.0-mm-thick aluminum filter, and these rays are absorbed by iodine, cerium, and gadolinium molecules in objects. Next, XRF is produced from the objects, and photons are detected by a cadmium-telluride detector. The Kα photons are discriminated using a multichannel analyzer, and the number of photons is counted by a counter card. The objects are moved and scanned by an x- y stage in conjunction with a two-stage controller, and X-ray images obtained by molecular mapping are shown on a personal computer monitor. The scan steps of x and y axes were both 2.5 mm, and the photon-counting time per mapping point was 0.5 s. We carried out molecular mapping using the X-ray camera, and Kα photons from cerium and gadolinium molecules were produced from cancerous regions in nude mice.

  5. Lung retention of cerium in humans.

    PubMed Central

    Pairon, J C; Roos, F; Iwatsubo, Y; Janson, X; Billon-Galland, M A; Bignon, J; Brochard, P

    1994-01-01

    A retrospective study was conducted to evaluate lung retention of particles containing cerium in subjects with and without previous occupational exposure to mineral dusts. Analytical transmission electron microscopy was performed on 459 samples of bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid and 75 samples of lung tissue. Study of the distribution of mineralogical species in human samples showed that particles containing cerium were encountered in less than 10% of subjects. The proportion of subjects with particles containing cerium in their biological samples was not different between controls and subjects with previous occupational exposure to fibrous or nonfibrous mineral dusts. This was considered as the background level of lung retention of cerium in the general population. By contrast, determination of the absolute concentration of particles containing cerium in BAL fluid and lung tissue samples showed that 1.2% (from BAL fluid) and 1.5% (from lung tissue) of subjects with previous exposure to mineral particles had high lung retention of particles containing cerium. This study is believed to be the first one in which lung retention of cerium was estimated in the general population. PMID:8130849

  6. Virus Removal by Biogenic Cerium

    SciTech Connect

    De Gusseme, B.; Du Laing, G; Hennebel, T; Renard, P; Chidambaram, D; Fitts, J; Bruneel, E; Van Driessche, I; Verbeken, K; et. al.

    2010-01-01

    The rare earth element cerium has been known to exert antifungal and antibacterial properties in the oxidation states +III and +IV. This study reports on an innovative strategy for virus removal in drinking water by the combination of Ce(III) on a bacterial carrier matrix. The biogenic cerium (bio-Ce) was produced by addition of aqueous Ce(III) to actively growing cultures of either freshwater manganese-oxidizing bacteria (MOB) Leptothrix discophora or Pseudomonas putida MnB29. X-ray absorption spectroscopy results indicated that Ce remained in its trivalent state on the bacterial surface. The spectra were consistent with Ce(III) ions associated with the phosphoryl groups of the bacterial cell wall. In disinfection assays using a bacteriophage as model, it was demonstrated that bio-Ce exhibited antiviral properties. A 4.4 log decrease of the phage was observed after 2 h of contact with 50 mg L{sup -1} bio-Ce. Given the fact that virus removal with 50 mg L{sup -1} Ce(III) as CeNO{sub 3} was lower, the presence of the bacterial carrier matrix in bio-Ce significantly enhanced virus removal.

  7. Optical properties of cerium doped oxyfluoroborate glass.

    PubMed

    Bahadur, A; Dwivedi, Y; Rai, S B

    2013-06-01

    Cerium doped oxyfluoroborate glasses have been prepared and its spectroscopic properties have been discussed. It is found that the absorption edge shifts towards the lower energy side for the higher concentration of cerium dopant. Optical band gap for these glasses have been calculated and it is found that the number of non-bridging oxygen increases with cerium content. The emission spectra of these glasses have been recorded using UV laser radiations (266 and 355 nm) and it is observed that these glasses show bright blue emission. On the basis of excitation and emission spectra we have reported the existence of at least two different emission centers of Ce(3+)ions.

  8. Pharmacological potential of cerium oxidenanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celardo, Ivana; Pedersen, Jens Z.; Traversa, Enrico; Ghibelli, Lina

    2011-04-01

    Nanotechnology promises a revolution in pharmacology to improve or create ex novo therapies. Cerium oxidenanoparticles (nanoceria), well-known as catalysts, possess an astonishing pharmacological potential due to their antioxidant properties, deriving from a fraction of Ce3+ ions present in CeO2. These defects, compensated by oxygen vacancies, are enriched at the surface and therefore in nanosized particles. Reactions involving redox cycles between the Ce3+ and Ce4+oxidation states allow nanoceria to react catalytically with superoxide and hydrogen peroxide, mimicking the behavior of two key antioxidant enzymes, superoxide dismutase and catalase, potentially abating all noxious intracellularreactive oxygen species (ROS) via a self-regenerating mechanism. Hence nanoceria, apparently well tolerated by the organism, might fight chronic inflammation and the pathologies associated with oxidative stress, which include cancer and neurodegeneration. Here we review the biological effects of nanoceria as they emerge from in vitro and in vivo studies, considering biocompatibility and the peculiar antioxidant mechanisms.

  9. Polycrystalline Thin-Film Research: Cadmium Telluride (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2013-06-01

    This National Center for Photovoltaics sheet describes the capabilities of its polycrystalline thin-film research in the area of cadmium telluride. The scope and core competencies and capabilities are discussed.

  10. Polycrystalline Thin-Film Research: Cadmium Telluride (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-06-01

    Capabilities fact sheet that includes scope, core competencies and capabilities, and contact/web information for Polycrystalline Thin-Film Research: Cadmium Telluride at the National Center for Photovoltaics.

  11. A new occurrence of telluride minerals in South Carolina.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bell, H.; Larson, R.R.

    1984-01-01

    A study of drill cores from the Haile gold mine, Lancaster County, South Carolina, has revealed grains containing large amounts of Te with various combinations of Pb, Ag and Au in pyrite. These telluride minerals have so far not been identified. The nearby Brewer mine, on the basis of chemical evidence, also contains tellurides. The probable telluride localities in South Carolina are now expanded to three, significantly increasing the few reports of Te minerals from the Au deposits of the southeastern Piedmont, many of which are now considered to be volcanogenic. The occurrence of telluride minerals in gold ore from the Haile-Brewer area may help to explain the divergence in Au/Ag ratios reported in chemical analyses of drill core, ore samples and production records. Te, in addition, may be useful in geochemical exploration programmes in the SE Piedmont, including programmes using heavy mineral concentrates derived from stream alluvium. -R.S.M.

  12. The formation of light emitting cerium silicates in cerium-doped silicon oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Li Jing; Zalloum, Othman; Roschuk, Tyler; Heng Chenglin; Wojcik, Jacek; Mascher, Peter

    2009-01-05

    Cerium-doped silicon oxides with cerium concentrations of up to 0.9 at. % were deposited by electron cyclotron resonance plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition. Bright cerium related photoluminescence, easily seen even under room lighting conditions, was observed from the films and found to be sensitive to film composition and annealing temperature. The film containing 0.9 at. % Ce subjected to anneal in N{sub 2} at 1200 deg. C for 3 h showed the most intense cerium-related emission, easily visible under bright room lighting conditions. This is attributed to the formation of cerium silicate [Ce{sub 2}Si{sub 2}O{sub 7} or Ce{sub 4.667} (SiO{sub 4}){sub 3}O], the presence of which was confirmed by high resolution transmission electron microscopy.

  13. Cerium anomaly at microscale in fossils.

    PubMed

    Gueriau, Pierre; Mocuta, Cristian; Bertrand, Loïc

    2015-09-01

    Patterns in rare earth element (REE) concentrations are essential instruments to assess geochemical processes in Earth and environmental sciences. Excursions in the "cerium anomaly" are widely used to inform on past redox conditions in sediments. This proxy resources to the specificity of cerium to adopt both the +III and +IV oxidation states, while most rare earths are purely trivalent and share very similar reactivity and transport properties. In practical terms, the level of cerium anomaly is established through elemental point quantification and profiling. All these models rely on a supposed homogeneity of the cerium oxidation state within the samples. However, this has never been demonstrated, whereas the cerium concentration can significantly vary within a sample, as shown for fossils, which would vastly complicate interpretation of REE patterns. Here, we report direct micrometric mapping of Ce speciation through synchrotron X-ray absorption spectroscopy and production of local rare earth patterns in paleontological fossil tissues through X-ray fluorescence mapping. The sensitivity of the approach is demonstrated on well-preserved fishes and crustaceans from the Late Cretaceous (ca. 95 million years (Myr) old). The presence of Ce under the +IV form within the fossil tissues is attributed to slightly oxidative local conditions of burial and agrees well with the limited negative cerium anomaly observed in REE patterns. The [Ce(IV)]/[Ce(tot)] ratio appears remarkably stable at the microscale within each fossil and is similar between fossils from the locality. Speciation maps were obtained from an original combination of synchrotron microbeam X-ray fluorescence, absorption spectroscopy, and diffraction, together with light and electron microscopy. This work also highlights the need for more systematic studies of cerium geochemistry at the microscale in paleontological contexts, in particular across fossil histologies.

  14. Kinetics of thermal synthesis of cerium sulfides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibbard, Kevin B.; Allahar, Kerry N.; Kolman, David; Butt, Darryl P.

    2008-09-01

    One of the most promising applications for cerium sulfide is as a refractory for molten metal processing, particularly for reactive actinides. Separate processes were used to synthesize cerium monosulfide, cerium sesquisulfide (Ce 2S 3) and cerium hydride (CeH 2). High purity Ce 2S 3 was produced by reacting ceria (CeO 2) and hydrogen sulfide (H 2S) in an induction furnace using a carbon catalyst at temperatures above 2000 °C. CeH 2 was synthesized from cerium metal and hydrogen gas at 100 °C. Ce 2S 3 and CeH 2 were subsequently reacted together in an induction furnace at temperatures above 1700 °C to produce CeS. X-ray diffraction was used to analyze synthesized samples and the kinetics of the CeS synthesis reaction was modeled using a diffusion-limited reaction model. The activation energy for the process was estimated to be 190 kJ/mol.

  15. α-Radioactivity of cerium-142

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Senftle, F.E.; Stern, T.W.; Alekna, V.P.

    1959-01-01

    JOHNSON AND NIER1 have measured the atomic masses of some of the rare-earth isotopes and have shown that the mass difference cerium-142—(barium-138 + helium-4) is equivalent to 1.68 ± 0.10 MeV. Similar results for the naturally occurring samarium and neodymium isotopes show that the α-active isotope of each element is the one having the largest possible decay energy. Rasmussen and others2 suggest that the two or three neutrons just beyond the closed shell of 82 neutrons have decreased binding energies and hence the α-energy has a maximum about 84 neutrons. Johnson and Nier suggest that the α-decay of cerium-142 may take place with enough energy to be experimentally observable. Porschen and Riezler3 examined a sample of un-enriched cerium ammonium citrate using nuclear track plates sensitive to α-particles. No α-activity was observed after a 30-day exposure of 1.2 mgm. of the cerium salt. In 1957 Riezler and Kauw4 reported an alpha activity for an enriched sample of cerium-142. From their results they calculated a half-life of 5.1 × 1015 years with an uncertainty factor of 2.

  16. A Comparison of Bulk Precipitated Cerium Oxide Powders and Cerium Conversion Coatings and the Influence of Hydrogen Peroxide on Their Formation (Preprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-03-01

    AFRL-ML-WP-TP-2006-422 A COMPARISON OF BULK PRECIPITATED CERIUM OXIDE POWDERS AND CERIUM CONVERSION COATINGS AND THE INFLUENCE OF HYDROGEN...TITLE AND SUBTITLE A COMPARISON OF BULK PRECIPITATED CERIUM OXIDE POWDERS AND CERIUM CONVERSION COATINGS AND THE INFLUENCE OF HYDROGEN PEROXIDE ON...ABSTRACT To better understand the role of hydrogen peroxide in the formation of cerium conversion coatings and precipitates , hydrated cerium oxide

  17. Nanocrystalline cerium oxide materials for solid fuel cell systems

    DOEpatents

    Brinkman, Kyle S

    2015-05-05

    Disclosed are solid fuel cells, including solid oxide fuel cells and PEM fuel cells that include nanocrystalline cerium oxide materials as a component of the fuel cells. A solid oxide fuel cell can include nanocrystalline cerium oxide as a cathode component and microcrystalline cerium oxide as an electrolyte component, which can prevent mechanical failure and interdiffusion common in other fuel cells. A solid oxide fuel cell can also include nanocrystalline cerium oxide in the anode. A PEM fuel cell can include cerium oxide as a catalyst support in the cathode and optionally also in the anode.

  18. General solvothermal approach to synthesize telluride nanotubes for thermoelectric applications.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shuai; Peng, Nan; Bai, Yu; Xu, Huiyan; Ma, D Y; Ma, Fei; Xu, Kewei

    2017-03-27

    One-dimensional tellurides are good candidates for thermoelectric applications, but the fabrication of telluride nanotubes is still challenging. To this end, the solvothermal approach is proposed to synthesize Bi2Te3, PbTe, CuxTe and Ag2Te nanotubes. In this scheme, single-crystal Te nanotubes are produced first and then used as the sacrificed template for epitaxial growth of metal telluride. It was demonstrated that polycrystalline telluride nanotubes are produced. Considering Bi2Te3 nanotubes as an example, the pellets are prepared by spark plasma sintering, and the thermoelectric properties are measured. Compared to the nanowire counterpart, the higher-energy barrier to electrons at the grain boundaries (GBs) leads to an optimized power factor of 1.04 mW m(-1) K(-2) at 373 K in the nanotube samples. Furthermore, the thermal conductivity of nanotubes is in the range of 0.503-0.617 W m(-1) K(-1), which is much smaller than that of the nanowires. The ultralow thermal conductivity could be attributed to both the higher potential barrier of GBs and the additional scattering of phonons at the side walls of the nanotubes. In all, a ZT value of 0.74 was obtained at 373 K, which is much higher than that of nanowires. This synthesis route is ready to be extended to other telluride nanotubes.

  19. Cerium migration during PEM fuel cell accelerated stress testing

    DOE PAGES

    Baker, Andrew M.; Mukundan, Rangachary; Borup, Rodney L.; ...

    2016-01-01

    Cerium is a radical scavenger which improves polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell durability. During operation, however, cerium rapidly migrates in the PEM and into the catalyst layers (CLs). In this work, membrane electrode assemblies (MEAs) were subjected to accelerated stress tests (ASTs) under different humidity conditions. Cerium migration was characterized in the MEAs after ASTs using X-ray fluorescence. During fully humidified operation, water flux from cell inlet to outlet generated in-plane cerium gradients. Conversely, cerium profiles were flat during low humidity operation, where in-plane water flux was negligible, however, migration from the PEM into the CLs was enhanced. Humiditymore » cycling resulted in both in-plane cerium gradients due to water flux during the hydration component of the cycle, and significant migration into the CLs. Fluoride and cerium emissions into effluent cell waters were measured during ASTs and correlated, which signifies that ionomer degradation products serve as possible counter-ions for cerium emissions. Fluoride emission rates were also correlated to final PEM cerium contents, which indicates that PEM degradation and cerium migration are coupled. Lastly, it is proposed that cerium migrates from the PEM due to humidification conditions and degradation, and is subsequently stabilized in the CLs by carbon catalyst supports.« less

  20. Cerium migration during PEM fuel cell accelerated stress testing

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, Andrew M.; Mukundan, Rangachary; Borup, Rodney L.; Spernjak, Dusan; Judge, Elizabeth J.; Advani, Suresh G.; Prasad, Ajay K.

    2016-01-01

    Cerium is a radical scavenger which improves polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell durability. During operation, however, cerium rapidly migrates in the PEM and into the catalyst layers (CLs). In this work, membrane electrode assemblies (MEAs) were subjected to accelerated stress tests (ASTs) under different humidity conditions. Cerium migration was characterized in the MEAs after ASTs using X-ray fluorescence. During fully humidified operation, water flux from cell inlet to outlet generated in-plane cerium gradients. Conversely, cerium profiles were flat during low humidity operation, where in-plane water flux was negligible, however, migration from the PEM into the CLs was enhanced. Humidity cycling resulted in both in-plane cerium gradients due to water flux during the hydration component of the cycle, and significant migration into the CLs. Fluoride and cerium emissions into effluent cell waters were measured during ASTs and correlated, which signifies that ionomer degradation products serve as possible counter-ions for cerium emissions. Fluoride emission rates were also correlated to final PEM cerium contents, which indicates that PEM degradation and cerium migration are coupled. Lastly, it is proposed that cerium migrates from the PEM due to humidification conditions and degradation, and is subsequently stabilized in the CLs by carbon catalyst supports.

  1. Divalent fluoride doped cerium fluoride scintillator

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, David F.; Sparrow, Robert W.

    1991-01-01

    The use of divalent fluoride dopants in scintillator materials comprising cerium fluoride is disclosed. The preferred divalent fluoride dopants are calcium fluoride, strontium fluoride, and barium fluoride. The preferred amount of divalent fluoride dopant is less than about two percent by weight of the total scintillator. Cerium fluoride scintillator crystals grown with the addition of a divalent fluoride have exhibited better transmissions and higher light outputs than crystals grown without the addition of such dopants. These scintillators are useful in radiation detection and monitoring applications, and are particularly well suited for high-rate applications such as positron emission tomography (PET).

  2. Ion beam sputter deposited zinc telluride films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gulino, D. A.

    1985-01-01

    Zinc telluride is of interest as a potential electronic device material, particularly as one component in an amorphous superlattice, which is a new class of interesting and potentially useful materials. Some structural and electronic properties of ZnTe films deposited by argon ion beam sputter depoairion are described. Films (up to 3000 angstroms thick) were deposited from a ZnTe target. A beam energy of 1000 eV and a current density of 4 mA/sq. cm. resulted in deposition rates of approximately 70 angstroms/min. The optical band gap was found to be approximately 1.1 eV, indicating an amorphous structure, as compared to a literature value of 2.26 eV for crystalline material. Intrinsic stress measurements showed a thickness dependence, varying from tensile for thicknesses below 850 angstroms to compressive for larger thicknesses. Room temperature conductivity measurement also showed a thickness dependence, with values ranging from 1.86 x to to the -6/ohm. cm. for 300 angstrom film to 2.56 x 10 to the -1/ohm. cm. for a 2600 angstrom film. Measurement of the temperature dependence of the conductivity for these films showed complicated behavior which was thickness dependent. Thinner films showed at least two distinct temperature dependent conductivity mechanisms, as described by a Mott-type model. Thicker films showed only one principal conductivity mechanism, similar to what might be expected for a material with more crystalline character.

  3. Ion beam sputter deposited zinc telluride films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gulino, D. A.

    1986-01-01

    Zinc telluride is of interest as a potential electronic device material, particularly as one component in an amorphous superlattice, which is a new class of interesting and potentially useful materials. Some structural and electronic properties of ZnTe films deposited by argon ion beam sputter deposition are described. Films (up to 3000 angstroms thick) were deposited from a ZnTe target. A beam energy of 1000 eV and a current density of 4 mA/sq cm resulted in deposition rates of approximately 70 angstroms/min. The optical band gap was found to be approximately 1.1 eV, indicating an amorphous structure, as compared to a literature value of 2.26 eV for crystalline material. Intrinsic stress measurements showed a thickness dependence, varying from tensile for thicknesses below 850 angstroms to compressive for larger thicknesses. Room temperature conductivity measurement also showed a thickness dependence, with values ranging from 1.86 x 10 to the -6th/ohm cm for 300 angstrom film to 2.56 x 10 to the -1/ohm cm for a 2600 angstrom film. Measurement of the temperature dependence of the conductivity for these films showed complicated behavior which was thickness dependent. Thinner films showed at least two distinct temperature dependent conductivity mechanisms, as described by a Mott-type model. Thicker films showed only one principal conductivity mechanism, similar to what might be expected for a material with more crystalline character.

  4. Properties of Nitrogen-Doped Zinc Telluride Films for Back Contact to Cadmium Telluride Photovoltaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimpi, Tushar M.; Drayton, Jennifer; Swanson, Drew E.; Sampath, Walajabad S.

    2017-08-01

    Zinc telluride (ZnTe) films have been deposited onto uncoated glass superstrates by reactive radiofrequency (RF) sputtering with different amounts of nitrogen introduced into the process gas, and the structural and electronic transport properties of the resulting nitrogen-doped ZnTe (ZnTe:N) films characterized. Based on transmission and x-ray diffraction measurements, it was observed that the crystalline quality of the ZnTe:N films decreased with increasing nitrogen in the deposition process. The bulk carrier concentration of the ZnTe:N films determined from Hall-effect measurements showed a slight decrease at 4% nitrogen flow rate. The effect of ZnTe:N films as back contact to cadmium telluride (CdTe) solar cells was also investigated. ZnTe:N films were deposited before or after CdCl2 passivation on CdTe/CdS samples. Small-area devices were characterized for their electronic properties. Glancing-angle x-ray diffraction measurements and energy-dispersive spectroscopy analysis confirmed substantial loss of zinc from the samples where CdCl2 passivation was carried out after ZnTe:N film deposition.

  5. Molecular and electronic structures of cerium and cerium suboxide clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kafader, Jared O.; Topolski, Josey E.; Jarrold, Caroline Chick

    2016-10-01

    The anion photoelectron (PE) spectra of Ce2Oy- (y = 1, 2), Ce3Oy- (y = 0-4), Ce4Oy- (y = 0-2), and Ce5Oy- (y = 1, 2) are reported and analyzed with supporting results from density functional theory calculations. The PE spectra all exhibit an intense electronic transition to the neutral ground state, all falling in the range of 0.7 to 1.1 eV electron binding energy, with polarization dependence consistent with detachment from diffuse Ce 6s-based molecular orbitals. There is no monotonic increase in electron affinity with increasing oxidation. A qualitative picture of how electronic structure evolves with an oxidation state emerges from comparison between the spectra and the computational results. The electronic structure of the smallest metallic cluster observed in this study, Ce3, is similar to the bulk structure in terms of atomic orbital occupancy (4f 5d2 6s). Initial cerium cluster oxidation involves largely ionic bond formation via Ce 5d and O 2p orbital overlap (i.e., larger O 2p contribution), with Ce—O—Ce bridge bonding favored over Ce=O terminal bond formation. With subsequent oxidation, the Ce 5d-based molecular orbitals are depleted of electrons, with the highest occupied orbitals described as diffuse Ce 6s based molecular orbitals. In the y ≤ (x + 1) range of oxidation states, each Ce center has a singly occupied non-bonding 4f orbital. The PE spectrum of Ce3O4- is unique in that it exhibits a single nearly vertical transition. The highly symmetric structure predicted computationally is the same structure determined from Ce3O4+ IR predissociation spectra [A. M. Burow et al., Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 13, 19393 (2011)], indicating that this structure is stable in -1, 0, and +1 charge states. Spectra of clusters with x ≥ 3 exhibit considerable continuum signal above the ground state transition; the intensity of the continuum signal decreases with increasing oxidation. This feature is likely the result of numerous quasi-bound anion states or two

  6. Electrical Characterization of Thin Film Cadmium Telluride Electrodeposited from Tri-N Telluride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Windheim, Jesko A.

    The electrical transport properties of CdTe electrodeposited from tri-n-butylphosphine telluride have been studied by resistivity and Hall effect measurements. Methods have been developed to reproducibly remove large area samples from their conducting substrates, and these samples were prepared for temperature dependent Hall measurements and resistivity measurements. Apparatus was designed and built to routinely measure Hall voltages as low as 250 muV for source impedances up to 10 ^{12} Omega. The central aspect of the measurement system was a low cost, differential electrometer amplifier designed around the AD549L monolithic electrometer operational amplifier. Temperature control was achieved via a Eurotherm 808 temperature controller, and a cooled stream of nitrogen gas. With this system, temperature could be maintained within +/- 0.5^circC at set points between -40^circC and +40^circC. Data collection, temperature ramping, and power to the magnet were all computer controlled, and resistivity measurements were fully automated. As-annealed electrodeposited CdTe was found to be consistently p-type, with resistivity values typically 10^6- 10^{7 } Omega-cm. Various donor and acceptor dopants have been incorporated into polycrystalline CdTe films by three methods: electrochemical codeposition, electromigration and vapour techniques. The dopants were Cd, Te, Cu, Ag, In, and O_2. The activity of the dopant was dependent on the method that was used for incorporation. Oxygen was found to only have a significant effect when it was incorporated in situ, during deposition. For Cd and Te, on the other hand, little effect was seen when their concentration was varied in situ. However, hole concentration increased substantially when Te was incorporated by diffusion, and a p to n conversion was observed when Cd was incorporated by diffusion. The carrier concentration of p-type CdTe could be systematically increased by increasing the current density for the electromigration of

  7. Preparation of Sm doped cerium dioxide film by anodization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LIU, Xiaozhen; Yang, Junhua; Liu, Xiaozhou; Xia, Letian; Chen, Jie; Zhu, Ying

    2017-04-01

    The Sm doped cerium dioxide films were prepared with cerium foils as raw materials by anodization in Sm(NO3)3-Na2C2O4-NH3·H2O-H2O-(CH2OH)2 electrolyte. The anodic Sm doped cerium oxide film was heat treated at 550°C. The Sm doped cerium dioxide films were characterized with X-ray diffraction (XRD), energy-dispersive analyses of X-ray (EDAX), Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) techniques and scanning electron microcopy (SEM), respectively. The anodic Sm doped cerium oxide film is semi crystalline film. The heat treated anodic Sm doped cerium oxide film at 550°C has a structure of cubic fluorite. The doping of Sm is replacement doping or caulking doping. The Sm doped cerium dioxide film is porous film. The water, ethylene glycol and CO2 are adsorbed in the anodic Sm doped cerium oxide film. The adsorbing water, ethylene glycol and CO2 in the anodic Sm doped cerium oxide film are removed at 550°C. The Sm doped cerium dioxide film has strong absorption in the range of 1200 ~ 4000cm-1.

  8. Uptake and accumulation of bulk and nanosized cerium oxide particles and ionic cerium by radish (Raphanus sativus L.).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Weilan; Ebbs, Stephen D; Musante, Craig; White, Jason C; Gao, Cunmei; Ma, Xingmao

    2015-01-21

    The potential toxicity and accumulation of engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) in agricultural crops has become an area of great concern and intense investigation. Interestingly, although below-ground vegetables are most likely to accumulate the highest concentrations of ENMs, little work has been done investigating the potential uptake and accumulation of ENMs for this plant group. The overall objective of this study was to evaluate how different forms of cerium (bulk cerium oxide, cerium oxide nanoparticles, and the cerium ion) affected the growth of radish (Raphanus sativus L.) and accumulation of cerium in radish tissues. Ionic cerium (Ce(3+)) had a negative effect on radish growth at 10 mg CeCl3/L, whereas bulk cerium oxide (CeO2) enhanced plant biomass at the same concentration. Treatment with 10 mg/L cerium oxide nanoparticles (CeO2 NPs) had no significant effect on radish growth. Exposure to all forms of cerium resulted in the accumulation of this element in radish tissues, including the edible storage root. However, the accumulation patterns and their effect on plant growth and physiological processes varied with the characteristics of cerium. This study provides a critical frame of reference on the effects of CeO2 NPs versus their bulk and ionic counterparts on radish growth.

  9. Study of cerium phase transitions in shock wave experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhernokletov, M. V.; Kovalev, A. E.; Komissarov, V. V.; Novikov, M. G.; Zocher, M. A.; Cherne, F. J.

    2011-02-01

    Cerium has a complex phase diagram that is explained by the presence of structural phase transitions. Experiments to measure the sound velocities in cerium by two methods were carried out to determine the onset of cerium melting on the Hugoniot. In the pressure range 4-37 GPa, the sound velocity in cerium samples was measured by the counter release method using manganin-based piezoresistive gauges. In the pressure range 35-140 GPa, the sound velocity in cerium was measured by the overtaking release method using carbogal and tetrachloromethane indicator liquids. The samples were loaded with plane shock wave generators using powerful explosive charges. The onset of cerium melting on the Hugoniot at a pressure of about 13 GPa has been ascertained from the measured elastic longitudinal and bulk sound velocities.

  10. Study of cerium phase transitions in shock wave experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Zhernokletov, M. V. Kovalev, A. E.; Komissarov, V. V.; Novikov, M. G.; Zocher, M. A. Cherne, F. J.

    2011-02-15

    Cerium has a complex phase diagram that is explained by the presence of structural phase transitions. Experiments to measure the sound velocities in cerium by two methods were carried out to determine the onset of cerium melting on the Hugoniot. In the pressure range 4-37 GPa, the sound velocity in cerium samples was measured by the counter release method using manganin-based piezoresistive gauges. In the pressure range 35-140 GPa, the sound velocity in cerium was measured by the overtaking release method using carbogal and tetrachloromethane indicator liquids. The samples were loaded with plane shock wave generators using powerful explosive charges. The onset of cerium melting on the Hugoniot at a pressure of about 13 GPa has been ascertained from the measured elastic longitudinal and bulk sound velocities.

  11. Region 8: Colorado Telluride Adequate Letter (8/17/2011)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This March 4, 2011 letter from EPA to Chistopher E. Urbina M.D., MPH, Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment states that EPA has found that the Telluride, CO PM10 maintenance plan and the 2021 motor vehicle emisssions budget (MVEB) adequate

  12. Ultrasonication of Bismuth Telluride Nanocrystals Fabricated by Solvothermal Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, Sang-Hyon; Choi, Sang H.; Kim, Jae-Woo; King, Glen C.; Elliott, James R.

    2006-01-01

    The objective of this study is to evaluate the effect of ultrasonication on bismuth telluride nanocrystals prepared by solvothermal method. In this study, a low dimensional nanocrystal of bismuth telluride (Bi2Te3) was synthesized by a solvothermal process in an autoclave at 180 C and 200 psi. During the solvothermal reaction, organic surfactants effectively prevented unwanted aggregation of nanocrystals in a selected solvent while controlling the shape of the nanocrystal. The atomic ratio of bismuth and tellurium was determined by energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). The cavitational energy created by the ultrasonic probe was varied by the ultrasonication process time, while power amplitude remained constant. The nanocrystal size and its size distribution were measured by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and a dynamic light scattering system. When the ultrasonication time increased, the average size of bismuth telluride nanocrystal gradually increased due to the direct collision of nanocrystals. The polydispersity of the nanocrystals showed a minimum when the ultrasonication was applied for 5 min. Keywords: bismuth telluride, nanocrystal, low-dimensional, ultrasonication, solvothermal

  13. Living with wildfire in Telluride Fire Protection District, Colorado

    Treesearch

    James R. Meldrum; Lilia C. Falk; Jamie Gomez; Christopher M. Barth; Hannah Brenkert-Smith; Travis Warziniack; Patricia A. Champ

    2017-01-01

    Residents in the wildland-urban interface can play an important role in reducing wildfires’ negative effects by performing wildfire risk mitigation on their properties. This report offers insight into the wildfire risk mitigation activities and related considerations such as attitudes, experiences, and concern about wildfire, for residents of the Telluride Fire...

  14. VIEW, LOOKING SOUTHEAST, OF TELLURIDE IRON WORKS RETORT USED FOR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW, LOOKING SOUTHEAST, OF TELLURIDE IRON WORKS RETORT USED FOR FLASHING MERCURY OFF OF GOLD TO CREATE SOFT INGOTS CALLED "SPONGES." AT RIGHT ARE SAFES FOR STORING 22-POUND SPONGES WORTH OVER $60,000 EACH, CA. 1985. - Shenandoah-Dives Mill, 135 County Road 2, Silverton, San Juan County, CO

  15. Photoemission study of cerium silicate model systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skála, Tomáš; Matolín, Vladimír

    2013-01-01

    Interaction of silicon with cerium oxide was studied by photoelectron spectroscopy using two model systems CeOx/Si(1 1 1) and Si/CeO2(1 1 1)/Cu(1 1 1) which can be used for fundamental studies in the field of microelectronics and heterogeneous catalysis. The interaction was found to be strong and lead to a formation of cerium silicate films of the proposed stoichiometry Ce4.67Si3O13. Their maximum thickness was limited by diffusion of silicon. Beside silicate other compounds were growing on the surface - SiO2, Si2O, Si, and CeO2. The assignment of the formed species is based on the interpretation of photoemission spectra involving the measurements of various reference O/Si and Sisbnd O/Cu systems.

  16. Gamma-alpha Isostructural Transition in Cerium

    SciTech Connect

    Lanata, Nicola; Yao, Yong-Xin; Wang, Cai-Zhuang; Ho, Kai-Ming; Schmalian, Jorg; Haule, Kristjan; Kotliar, Gabriel

    2013-11-05

    We present zero-temperature first-principles calculations of elemental cerium and we compute its pressure-volume phase diagram within a theoretical framework able to describe simultaneously both the α and the γ phases. A surprising result revealed by our study is the presence of a clear signature of the transition at zero temperature and that this signature can be observed if and only if the spin-orbit coupling is taken into account. Our calculations indicate that the transition line in the pressure-temperature phase diagram of this material has a low-T critical point at negative pressures, placed very close to zero temperature. This suggests that cerium is very close to being “quantum critical,” in agreement with recent experiments.

  17. Phonons of the anomalous element cerium

    PubMed Central

    Krisch, Michael; Farber, D. L.; Xu, R.; Antonangeli, Daniele; Aracne, C. M.; Beraud, Alexandre; Chiang, Tai-Chang; Zarestky, J.; Kim, Duck Young; Isaev, Eyvaz I.; Ahuja, Rajeev; Johansson, Börje

    2011-01-01

    Many physical and chemical properties of the light rare-earths and actinides are governed by the active role of f electrons, and despite intensive efforts the details of the mechanisms of phase stability and transformation are not fully understood. A prominent example which has attracted a lot of interest, both experimentally and theoretically over the years is the isostructural γ - α transition in cerium. We have determined by inelastic X-ray scattering, the complete phonon dispersion scheme of elemental cerium across the γ → α transition, and compared it with theoretical results using ab initio lattice dynamics. Several phonon branches show strong changes in the dispersion shape, indicating large modifications in the interactions between phonons and conduction electrons. This is reflected as well by the lattice Grüneisen parameters, particularly around the X point. We derive a vibrational entropy change , illustrating the importance of the lattice contribution to the transition. Additionally, we compare first principles calculations with the experiments to shed light on the mechanism underlying the isostructural volume collapse in cerium under pressure. PMID:21597000

  18. Atomic Transition Probabilities for Neutral Cerium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawler, J. E.; den Hartog, E. A.; Wood, M. P.; Nitz, D. E.; Chisholm, J.; Sobeck, J.

    2009-10-01

    The spectra of neutral cerium (Ce I) and singly ionized cerium (Ce II) are more complex than spectra of other rare earth species. The resulting high density of lines in the visible makes Ce ideal for use in metal halide (MH) High Intensity Discharge (HID) lamps. Inclusion of cerium-iodide in a lamp dose can improve both the Color Rendering Index and luminous efficacy of a MH-HID lamp. Basic spectroscopic data including absolute atomic transition probabilities for Ce I and Ce II are needed for diagnosing and modeling these MH-HID lamps. Recent work on Ce II [1] is now being augmented with similar work on Ce I. Radiative lifetimes from laser induced fluorescence measurements [2] on neutral Ce are being combined with emission branching fractions from spectra recorded using a Fourier transform spectrometer. A total of 14 high resolution spectra are being analyzed to determine branching fractions for 2000 to 3000 lines from 153 upper levels in neutral Ce. Representative data samples and progress to date will be presented. [4pt] [1] J. E. Lawler, C. Sneden, J. J. Cowan, I. I. Ivans, and E. A. Den Hartog, Astrophys. J. Suppl. Ser. 182, 51-79 (2009). [0pt] [2] E. A. Den Hartog, K. P. Buettner, and J. E. Lawler, J. Phys. B: Atomic, Molecular & Optical Physics 42, 085006 (7pp) (2009).

  19. RECOVERY OF Pu FROM CERIUM TRIFLUORIDE BY FLUORINATION

    DOEpatents

    Brown, H.S.; Bohlmann, E.G.

    1959-02-10

    An improved process is prcsented for selectively recovering plutonium from a solution containing fission products comprising precipitating cerium trifluoride in the solution for effccting carrier precipitation of plutonium. The resulting carrier precipitate is dried and subjected to fluorination at about 600 C. The plutonium forms a volatile fiuoridc and is so separated from the nonvolatile cerium fluoride.

  20. Study of the cerium(IV)-picrate system in acetonitrile.

    PubMed

    Kratochvil, B; Tipler, M; McKay, B

    1966-07-01

    A potentiometric and spectrophotometric study has been made of the reaction between hexanitratocerate and picrate in dry acetonitrile. Several cerium(IV)-picrate complexes are formed; the formation constant for the first is estimated to be 4 from spectrophotometric measurements. The catalytic effect of picrate on hydroquinone oxidation by nitratocerate is postulated to be due to more rapid electron transfer by cerium picrate complexes.

  1. 40 CFR 721.8657 - Cerium, hydroxy oleate propionate complexes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Cerium, hydroxy oleate propionate... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.8657 Cerium, hydroxy oleate propionate complexes. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as...

  2. 40 CFR 721.8657 - Cerium, hydroxy oleate propionate complexes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Cerium, hydroxy oleate propionate... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.8657 Cerium, hydroxy oleate propionate complexes. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as...

  3. 40 CFR 721.8657 - Cerium, hydroxy oleate propionate complexes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Cerium, hydroxy oleate propionate... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.8657 Cerium, hydroxy oleate propionate complexes. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as...

  4. 40 CFR 721.8657 - Cerium, hydroxy oleate propionate complexes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Cerium, hydroxy oleate propionate... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.8657 Cerium, hydroxy oleate propionate complexes. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as...

  5. Local Structure of Cerium in Aluminophosphate and Silicophosphate Glasses

    SciTech Connect

    J Rygel; Y Chen; C Pantano; T Shibata; J Du; L Kokou; R Woodman; J Belcher

    2011-12-31

    The local structure of cerium in two systematic compositional series of glasses, nominally CeP{sub 3}O{sub 9}-AlP{sub 3}O{sub 9} and CeP{sub 3}O{sub 9}-SiP{sub 2}O{sub 7}, was interrogated using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectroscopy. XPS revealed that, for glasses melted in air, {>=}95% of cerium ions are Ce{sup 3+}. This was independently confirmed using X-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy (XANES). Ce K-edge extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) has been used to determine the local structure of Ce{sup 3+}. Near the metaphosphate composition, cerium was found to have an average cerium coordination number of {approx}7.0 and an average cerium-oxygen bond length of 2.41 {angstrom}. The average cerium coordination number and average cerium-oxygen bond distance were found to increase with decreasing cerium concentration in both compositional series. Rare-earth clustering is suggested based on numerical calculations for glasses containing {>=}14 and {>=}15 mol% Ce{sub 2}O{sub 3} for the aluminophosphate and silicophosphate series, respectively.

  6. Local Structure of Cerium in Aluminophosphate and Silicophosphate Glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Rygel, Jennifer L.; Chen, Yongsheng; Pantano, Carlo G.; Shibata, Tomohiro; Du, Jincheng; Kokou, Leopold; Woodman, Robert; Belcher, James

    2011-09-20

    The local structure of cerium in two systematic compositional series of glasses, nominally CeP{sub 3}O{sub 9}-AlP{sub 3}O{sub 9} and CeP{sub 3}O{sub 9}-SiP{sub 2}O{sub 7}, was interrogated using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectroscopy. XPS revealed that, for glasses melted in air, {>=}95% of cerium ions are Ce{sup 3+}. This was independently confirmed using X-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy (XANES). Ce K-edge extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) has been used to determine the local structure of Ce{sup 3+}. Near the metaphosphate composition, cerium was found to have an average cerium coordination number of {approx}7.0 and an average cerium-oxygen bond length of 2.41 {angstrom}. The average cerium coordination number and average cerium-oxygen bond distance were found to increase with decreasing cerium concentration in both compositional series. Rare-earth clustering is suggested based on numerical calculations for glasses containing {>=}14 and {>=}15 mol% Ce{sub 2}O{sub 3} for the aluminophosphate and silicophosphate series, respectively.

  7. The Cadmium Zinc Telluride Imager on AstroSat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhalerao, V.; Bhattacharya, D.; Vibhute, A.; Pawar, P.; Rao, A. R.; Hingar, M. K.; Khanna, Rakesh; Kutty, A. P. K.; Malkar, J. P.; Patil, M. H.; Arora, Y. K.; Sinha, S.; Priya, P.; Samuel, Essy; Sreekumar, S.; Vinod, P.; Mithun, N. P. S.; Vadawale, S. V.; Vagshette, N.; Navalgund, K. H.; Sarma, K. S.; Pandiyan, R.; Seetha, S.; Subbarao, K.

    2017-06-01

    The Cadmium Zinc Telluride Imager (CZTI) is a high energy, wide-field imaging instrument on AstroSat. CZTI's namesake Cadmium Zinc Telluride detectors cover an energy range from 20 keV to >200 keV, with 11% energy resolution at 60 keV. The coded aperture mask attains an angular resolution of 17^' over a 4.6° × 4.6° (FWHM) field-of-view. CZTI functions as an open detector above 100 keV, continuously sensitive to GRBs and other transients in about 30% of the sky. The pixellated detectors are sensitive to polarization above ˜ 100 keV, with exciting possibilities for polarization studies of transients and bright persistent sources. In this paper, we provide details of the complete CZTI instrument, detectors, coded aperture mask, mechanical and electronic configuration, as well as data and products.

  8. Cerium migration during PEM fuel cell assembly and operation

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, Andrew M.; Torraco, Dennis; Judge, Elizabeth J.; Spernjak, Dusan; Mukundan, Rangachary; Borup, Rod L.; Advani, Suresh G.; Prasad, Ajay K.

    2015-09-14

    Cerium migration between PEM fuel cell components is influenced by potential-driven mobility, ionic diffusion, and gradients in water content. These factors were investigated in ex situ experiments and in operating fuel cells. Potential-induced migration was measured ex situ in hydrated window cells. Cerium-containing MEAs were also fabricated and tested under ASTs. MEA disassembly and subsequent XRF analysis were used to observe rapid cerium migration during cell assembly and operation. During MEA hot pressing, humidification, and low RH operation at OCV, ionic diffusion causes uniform migration from the membrane into the catalyst layers. During high RH operation at OCV, in-plane cerium gradients arise due to variations in water content. These gradients may diminish the scavenging efficacy of cerium by reducing its proximity to generated radicals.

  9. Thin film cadmium telluride, zinc telluride, and mercury zinc telluride solar cells. Final subcontract report, 1 July 1988--31 December 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, T.L.

    1992-04-01

    This report describes research to demonstrate (1) thin film cadmium telluride solar cells with a quantum efficiency of 75% or higher at 0. 44 {mu}m and a photovoltaic efficiency of 11.5% or greater, and (2) thin film zinc telluride and mercury zinc telluride solar cells with a transparency to sub-band-gap radiation of 65% and a photovoltaic conversion efficiency of 5% and 8%, respectively. Work was directed at (1) depositing transparent conducting semiconductor films by solution growth and metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) technique, (2) depositing CdTe films by close-spaced sublimation (CSS) and MOCVD techniques, (3) preparing and evaluating thin film CdTe solar cells, and (4) preparing and characterizing thin film ZnTe, CD{sub 1-x}Zn{sub 1-x}Te, and Hg{sub 1-x}Zn{sub x}Te solar cells. The deposition of CdS films from aqueous solutions was investigated in detail, and their crystallographic, optical, and electrical properties were characterized. CdTe films were deposited from DMCd and DIPTe at 400{degrees}C using TEGa and AsH{sub 3} as dopants. CdTe films deposited by CSS had significantly better microstructures than those deposited by MOCVD. Deep energy states in CdTe films deposited by CSS and MOCVD were investigated. Thin films of ZnTe, Cd{sub 1- x}Zn{sub x}Te, and Hg{sub 1-x}Zn{sub x}Te were deposited by MOCVD, and their crystallographic, optical, and electrical properties were characterized. 67 refs.

  10. Transient Response of Cadmium Telluride Modules to Light Exposure: Preprint

    SciTech Connect

    Deline, C.; del Cueto, J.; Albin, D. S.; Petersen, C.; Tyler, L.; TamizhMani, G.

    2011-07-01

    Commercial cadmium telluride (CdTe) photovoltaic (PV) modules from three different manufacturers were monitored for performance changes during indoor and outdoor light-exposure. Short-term transients in Voc were recorded on some modules, with characteristic times of ~1.1 hours. Outdoor performance data shows a similar drop in Voc after early morning light exposure. Preliminary analysis of FF changes show light-induced changes on multiple time scales, including a long time scale.

  11. Thermoelectric Micro-Refrigerator Based on Bismuth/Antimony Telluride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dang, Linh Tuan; Dang, Tung Huu; Nguyen, Thao Thi Thu; Nguyen, Thuat Tran; Nguyen, Hue Minh; Nguyen, Tuyen Viet; Nguyen, Hung Quoc

    2017-03-01

    Thermoelectric micro-coolers based on bismuth telluride (Bi2Te3) and antimony telluride (Sb2Te3) are important in many practical applications thanks to their compactness and fluid-free circulation. In this paper, we studied thermoelectric properties of bismuth/antimony telluride (Bi/SbTe) thin films prepared by the thermal co-evaporation method, which yielded among the best thermoelectric quality. Different co-evaporation conditions such as deposition flux ratio of materials and substrate temperature during deposition were investigated to optimize the thermoelectric figure␣of merit of these materials. Micron-size refrigerators were designed and fabricated using standard lithography and etching technique. A three-layer structure was introduced, including a p-type layer, an n-type layer and an aluminum layer. Next to the main cooler, a pair of smaller Bi/SbTe junctions was used as a thermocouple to directly measure electron temperature of the main device. Etching properties of the thermoelectric materials were investigated and optimized to support the fabrication process of the micro-refrigerator. We discuss our results and address possible applications.

  12. Solvothermal synthesis and study of nonlinear optical properties of nanocrystalline thallium doped bismuth telluride

    SciTech Connect

    Molli, Muralikrishna; Parola, Sowmendran; Avinash Chunduri, L.A.; Aditha, Saikiran; Sai Muthukumar, V; Mimani Rattan, Tanu; Kamisetti, Venkataramaniah

    2012-05-15

    Nanocrystalline Bismuth telluride and thallium (4 mol %) doped Bismuth telluride were synthesized through hydrothermal method. The as-prepared products were characterized using Powder X-ray Diffraction, High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy, Energy Dispersive X-Ray Spectroscopy, UV-Visible spectroscopy and Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy. Powder XRD results revealed the crystalline nature of the obtained phases. HRTEM showed the particle-like morphology of the products. The decrease in the absorption coefficient due to thallium doping was observed in FTIR spectra. The intensity dependent nonlinear optical properties of nanocrystalline bismuth telluride and thallium doped bismuth telluride were studied using the Z-scan technique in open-aperture configuration. Bismuth telluride doped with thallium showed enhanced nonlinear optical response compared to pristine bismuth telluride and hence could be used as a potential candidate for optical power limiting applications. - Graphical Abstract: Nonlinear transmission (Z-scan) curves of nanocrystalline bismuth telluride ({Delta}) and thallium doped bismuth telluride ({open_square}). Thallium doped bismuth telluride showed enhanced nonlinear absorption compared to bismuth telluride. Inset: TEM micrograph of bismuth telluride nanocrystallites. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Synthesis of Nanocrystalline Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} and Thallium doped Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} through solvothermal method. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Reduced absorption coefficient due to thallium doping found from IR spectroscopy. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Open-aperture Z-scan technique for nonlinear optical studies. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Two photon absorption based model for theoretical fitting of Z-scan data. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Enhanced nonlinear absorption in Thallium doped Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} - potential candidate for optical power limiting applications.

  13. Ultrathin, epitaxial cerium dioxide on silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Flege, Jan Ingo Kaemena, Björn; Höcker, Jan; Schmidt, Thomas; Falta, Jens; Bertram, Florian; Wollschläger, Joachim

    2014-03-31

    It is shown that ultrathin, highly ordered, continuous films of cerium dioxide may be prepared on silicon following substrate prepassivation using an atomic layer of chlorine. The as-deposited, few-nanometer-thin Ce{sub 2}O{sub 3} film may very effectively be converted at room temperature to almost fully oxidized CeO{sub 2} by simple exposure to air, as demonstrated by hard X-ray photoemission spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. This post-oxidation process essentially results in a negligible loss in film crystallinity and interface abruptness.

  14. Cerium and yttrium oxide nanoparticles are neuroprotective.

    PubMed

    Schubert, David; Dargusch, Richard; Raitano, Joan; Chan, Siu-Wai

    2006-03-31

    The responses of cells exposed to nanoparticles have been studied with regard to toxicity, but very little attention has been paid to the possibility that some types of particles can protect cells from various forms of lethal stress. It is shown here that nanoparticles composed of cerium oxide or yttrium oxide protect nerve cells from oxidative stress and that the neuroprotection is independent of particle size. The ceria and yttria nanoparticles act as direct antioxidants to limit the amount of reactive oxygen species required to kill the cells. It follows that this group of nanoparticles could be used to modulate oxidative stress in biological systems.

  15. Selective cytotoxicity effect of cerium oxide nanoparticles under UV irradiation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li; Jiang, Hui; Selke, Matthias; Wang, Xuemei

    2014-02-01

    During photodynamic therapy (PDT) of cancers, there are numerous side effects, accompanied by damage to normal cells/tissues caused by the abnormal elevation of reactive oxygen species (ROS). In this paper, we aim to provide an effective method to reduce the relevant side effects of PDT by using cerium oxide nanoparticles. The well-dispersed poly(vinyl pyrrolidone) stabilized cerium oxide nanoparticles were successfully synthesized by using a one-pot method at 60 degrees C in slightly alkaline environment. The morphological and structural characterizations clearly illustrate the excellent lattice structures of cerium oxide, nanoparticles. The MTT assay indicates that these cerium oxide nanoparticles show no intrinsic cytotoxicity even at a concentration up to 300 micro g/mL. More importantly, the results demonstrate that these nanoparticles can selectively protect human normal cells but not the cancer cells from ROS damage after exposure to UV-radiation, suggesting their potential applications for PDT treatment. The rationale behind the selective protection effect can be attributed to the hindrance of the Ce (III)/Ce (IV) redox reaction cycle on the surface of cerium oxide nanoparticles due to the abnormal intracellular pH in cancer cells. Furthermore, these cerium oxide nanoparticles can be used as effective drug carriers for enhancing drug delivery efficiency to target cancer cells like hepatoma HepG2 cells. This raises the possibility of applying cerium oxide nanoparticles for multifunctional therapeutic applications, i.e., combination of efficient PDT and chemotherapy.

  16. Method of Creating Micro-scale Silver Telluride Grains Covered with Bismuth Nanoparticles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Hyun-Jung (Inventor); Choi, Sang Hyouk (Inventor); King, Glen C. (Inventor); Park, Yeonjoon (Inventor); Lee, Kunik (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Provided is a method of enhancing thermoelectric performance by surrounding crystalline semiconductors with nanoparticles by contacting a bismuth telluride material with a silver salt under a substantially inert atmosphere and a temperature approximately near the silver salt decomposition temperature; and recovering a metallic bismuth decorated material comprising silver telluride crystal grains.

  17. Photodissociation of Cerium Oxide Nanocluster Cations.

    PubMed

    Akin, S T; Ard, S G; Dye, B E; Schaefer, H F; Duncan, M A

    2016-04-21

    Cerium oxide cluster cations, CexOy(+), are produced via laser vaporization in a pulsed nozzle source and detected with time-of-flight mass spectrometry. The mass spectrum displays a strongly preferred oxide stoichiometry for each cluster with a specific number of metal atoms x, with x ≤ y. Specifically, the most prominent clusters correspond to the formula CeO(CeO2)n(+). The cluster cations are mass selected and photodissociated with a Nd:YAG laser at either 532 or 355 nm. The prominent clusters dissociate to produce smaller species also having a similar CeO(CeO2)n(+) formula, always with apparent leaving groups of (CeO2). The production of CeO(CeO2)n(+) from the dissociation of many cluster sizes establishes the relative stability of these clusters. Furthermore, the consistent loss of neutral CeO2 shows that the smallest neutral clusters adopt the same oxidation state (IV) as the most common form of bulk cerium oxide. Clusters with higher oxygen content than the CeO(CeO2)n(+) masses are present with much lower abundance. These species dissociate by the loss of O2, leaving surviving clusters with the CeO(CeO2)n(+) formula. Density functional theory calculations on these clusters suggest structures composed of stable CeO(CeO2)n(+) cores with excess oxygen bound to the surface as a superoxide unit (O2(-)).

  18. The surface chemistry of cerium oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mullins, David R.

    2015-03-01

    This review covers the structure of, and chemical reactions on, well-defined cerium oxide surfaces. Ceria, or mixed oxides containing ceria, are critical components in automotive three-way catalysts due to their well-known oxygen storage capacity. Ceria is also emerging as an important material in a number of other catalytic processes, particularly those involving organic oxygenates and the water-gas shift reaction. Ceria's acid-base properties, and thus its catalytic behavior, are closely related to its surface structure where different oxygen anion and cerium cation environments are present on the low-index structural faces. The actual structure of these various faces has been the focus of a number of theoretical and experimental investigations. Ceria is also easily reducible from CeO2 to CeO2-X. The presence of oxygen vacancies on the surface often dramatically alters the adsorption and subsequent reactions of various adsorbates, either on a clean surface or on metal particles supported on the surface. Most surface science studies have been conducted on the surfaces of thin-films rather than on the surfaces of bulk single crystal oxides. The growth, characterization and properties of these thin-films are also examined.

  19. The surface chemistry of cerium oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Mullins, David R.

    2015-01-29

    Our review covers the structure of, and chemical reactions on, well-defined cerium oxide surfaces. Ceria, or mixed oxides containing ceria, are critical components in automotive three-way catalysts due to their well-known oxygen storage capacity. Ceria is also emerging as an important material in a number of other catalytic processes, particularly those involving organic oxygenates and the water–gas shift reaction. Ceria's acid–base properties, and thus its catalytic behavior, are closely related to its surface structure where different oxygen anion and cerium cation environments are present on the low-index structural faces. The actual structure of these various faces has been the focus of a number of theoretical and experimental investigations. Ceria is also easily reducible from CeO2 to CeO2-X. The presence of oxygen vacancies on the surface often dramatically alters the adsorption and subsequent reactions of various adsorbates, either on a clean surface or on metal particles supported on the surface. We conducted surface science studies on the surfaces of thin-films rather than on the surfaces of bulk single crystal oxides. The growth, characterization and properties of these thin-films are also examined.

  20. Atomic Transition Probabilities for Neutral Cerium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chisholm, John; Nitz, D.; Sobeck, J.; Den Hartog, E. A.; Wood, M. P.; Lawler, J. E.

    2010-01-01

    Among the rare earth species, the spectra of neutral cerium (Ce I) and singly ionized cerium (Ce II) are some of the most complex. Like other rare earth species, Ce has many lines in the visible which are suitable for elemental abundance studies. Recent work on Ce II transition probabilities [1] is now being augmented with similar work on Ce I for future studies using such lines from astrophysical sources. Radiative lifetimes from laser induced fluorescence measurements [2] on neutral Ce are being combined with emission branching fractions from spectra recorded using a Fourier transform spectrometer. A total of 14 high resolution spectra are being analyzed to determine branching fractions for 2500 to 3000 lines from 153 upper levels in neutral Ce. Representative data samples and progress to date will be presented. This work was supported by the National Science Foundation's REU program and the Department of Defense's ASSURE program through NSF Award AST-0453442 and NSF Grant CTS0613277. [1] J. E. Lawler, C. Sneden, J. J. Cowan, I. I. Ivans, and E. A. Den Hartog, Astrophys. J. Suppl. Ser. 182, 51-79 (2009). [2] E. A. Den Hartog, K. P. Buettner, and J. E. Lawler, J. Phys. B: Atomic, Molecular & Optical Physics 42, 085006 (7pp) (2009).

  1. Microstructure of surface cerium hydride growth sites

    SciTech Connect

    Brierley, Martin; Knowles, John; Montgomery, Neil; Preuss, Michael

    2014-05-15

    Samples of cerium were exposed to hydrogen under controlled conditions causing cerium hydride sites to nucleate and grow on the surface. The hydriding rate was measured in situ, and the hydrides were characterised using secondary ion mass spectrometry, scanning electron microscopy, and optical microscopy. The results show that the hydriding rate proceeded more quickly than earlier studies. Characterisation confirmed that the hydrogen is confined to the sites. The morphology of the hydrides was confirmed to be oblate, and stressed material was observed surrounding the hydride, in a number of cases lathlike features were observed surrounding the hydride sites laterally with cracking in the surface oxide above them. It is proposed that during growth the increased lattice parameter of the CeH{sub 2} induces a lateral compressive stress around the hydride, which relieves by the ca. 16% volume collapse of the γ-Ce to α-Ce pressure induced phase transition. Cracking of the surface oxide above the laths reduces the diffusion barrier to hydrogen reaching the metal/oxide interface surrounding the hydride site and contributes to the anisotropic growth of the hydrides.

  2. The surface chemistry of cerium oxide

    DOE PAGES

    Mullins, David R.

    2015-01-29

    Our review covers the structure of, and chemical reactions on, well-defined cerium oxide surfaces. Ceria, or mixed oxides containing ceria, are critical components in automotive three-way catalysts due to their well-known oxygen storage capacity. Ceria is also emerging as an important material in a number of other catalytic processes, particularly those involving organic oxygenates and the water–gas shift reaction. Ceria's acid–base properties, and thus its catalytic behavior, are closely related to its surface structure where different oxygen anion and cerium cation environments are present on the low-index structural faces. The actual structure of these various faces has been the focusmore » of a number of theoretical and experimental investigations. Ceria is also easily reducible from CeO2 to CeO2-X. The presence of oxygen vacancies on the surface often dramatically alters the adsorption and subsequent reactions of various adsorbates, either on a clean surface or on metal particles supported on the surface. We conducted surface science studies on the surfaces of thin-films rather than on the surfaces of bulk single crystal oxides. The growth, characterization and properties of these thin-films are also examined.« less

  3. Electrorefining of cerium: Part 2, Cerium as a surrogate for plutonium electrorefining studies

    SciTech Connect

    Raraz, A.G.; Mishra, B.; Olson, D.L.; Moore, J.J.

    1992-01-01

    The plutonium metal produced by the Direct Oxide Reduction Process is associated with other metallic impurities that have to be removed. The purification of plutonium is achieved using electrorefining process through a molten salt medium. The optimization of process parameters involved in electrorefining is required to make the process effective, in terms of the metal purity, cell efficiency and overall process reliability. Since the study of strategic and radioactive metals requires the use of a surrogate, it is important to choose surrogates that simulate the process as closely as possible. Cerium has been chosen to study the electrorefining behavior of plutonium. The differences that exist in the physico-chemical properties between the two metals have been critically examined and appropriate models have been developed to study the behavior. Cerium is a justified choice for the investigation.

  4. Lead telluride as a thermoelectric material for thermoelectric power generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dughaish, Z. H.

    2002-09-01

    The specialized applications of thermoelectric generators are very successful and have motivated a search for materials with an improved figure of merit Z, and also for materials which operate at elevated temperatures. Lead telluride, PbTe, is an intermediate thermoelectric power generator. Its maximum operating temperature is 900 K. PbTe has a high melting point, good chemical stability, low vapor pressure and good chemical strength in addition to high figure of merit Z. Recently, research in thermoelectricity aims to obtain new improved materials for autonomous sources of electrical power in specialized medical, terrestial and space applications and to obtain an unconventional energy source after the oil crises of 1974. Although the efficiency of thermoelectric generators is rather low, typically ∼5%, the other advantages, such as compactness, silent, reliability, long life, and long period of operation without attention, led to a wide range of applications. PbTe thermoelectric generators have been widely used by the US army, in space crafts to provide onboard power, and in pacemakers batteries. The general physical properties of lead telluride and factors affecting the figure of merit have been reviewed. Various possibilities of improving the figure of merit of the material have been given, including effect of grain size on reducing the lattice thermal conductivity λL. Comparison of some transport properties of lead telluride with other thermoelectric materials and procedures of preparing compacts with transport properties very close to the single crystal values from PbTe powder by cold and hot-pressing techniques are discussed.

  5. Photoreflectance Study of Boron Ion-Implanted (100) Cadmium Telluride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amirtharaj, P. M.; Odell, M. S.; Bowman, R. C., Jr.; Alt, R. L.

    1988-01-01

    Ion implanted (100) cadmium telluride was studied using the contactless technique of photoreflectance. The implantations were performed using 50- to 400-keV boron ions to a maximum dosage of 1.5 x 10(16)/sq cm, and the annealing was accomplished at 500 C under vacuum. The spectral measurements were made at 77 K near the E(0) and E(1) critical points; all the spectra were computer-fitted to Aspnes' theory. The spectral line shapes from the ion damaged, partially recovered and undamaged, or fully recovered regions could be identified, and the respective volume fraction of each phase was estimated.

  6. Photoreflectance Study of Boron Ion-Implanted (100) Cadmium Telluride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amirtharaj, P. M.; Odell, M. S.; Bowman, R. C., Jr.; Alt, R. L.

    1988-01-01

    Ion implanted (100) cadmium telluride was studied using the contactless technique of photoreflectance. The implantations were performed using 50- to 400-keV boron ions to a maximum dosage of 1.5 x 10(16)/sq cm, and the annealing was accomplished at 500 C under vacuum. The spectral measurements were made at 77 K near the E(0) and E(1) critical points; all the spectra were computer-fitted to Aspnes' theory. The spectral line shapes from the ion damaged, partially recovered and undamaged, or fully recovered regions could be identified, and the respective volume fraction of each phase was estimated.

  7. Ohmic contacts to zinc telluride and their high temperature behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luqman, M. M.; Brown, W. D.; Hajghassem, H. S.

    1987-03-01

    Ohmic contacts to zinc telluride (ZnTe) have been studied as a function of operating temperature and at room temperature following annealing at 150° C for extended periods of time. Contacts investigated included Ag-diffused, electroless Au, Ag paste, Cu-graphite and electroless Cu-Au. Of these, the Cu-Au contacts improved with annealing and stabilized after 2 hr at 150° C. A copper/gold ratio of 98%/2% yielded a contact resistivity of 0.28 ohm-cm2 after stabilizing. Although the other contacts were ohmic, contact resistivity and/or stability was unacceptable.

  8. High pressure phase transition and elastic properties of americium telluride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aynyas, Mahendra; Rukmangad, Aditi; Arya, B. S.; Sanyal, S. P.

    2013-06-01

    The structural and elastic properties of Americium Telluride (AmTe) have been investigated by using a modified inter-ionic potential theory (MIPT). This theory is capable of explaining first order phase transition with a crystallographic change NaCl to CsCl structure for this compound. The values of optimized lattice constant, phase transition pressure, zero pressure bulk modulus and second order elastic constants (C11, C44) agree well with their corresponding experimental data. Debye temperature (θD) is also calculated for this compound for the first time.

  9. Ultrafast carrier dynamics in polycrystalline bismuth telluride nanofilm

    SciTech Connect

    Jia, Lin; Ma, Weigang; Zhang, Xing

    2014-06-16

    In this study, the dynamics of energy carriers in polycrystalline bismuth telluride nanofilm are investigated by the ultrafast pump-probe method. The energy relaxation processes are quantitatively analyzed by using the numerical fitting models. The extracted hot carrier relaxation times of photon excitation, thermalization, and diffusion are around sub-picosecond. The initial reflectivity recovery is found to be dominantly determined by the carrier diffusion, electron-phonon coupling, and photo-generated carriers trapping processes. High-frequency and low-frequency oscillations are both observed and attributed to coherent optical phonons and coherent acoustic phonons, respectively.

  10. Diffuse vacuum arc with cerium oxide hot cathode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amirov, R. Kh; Vorona, N. A.; Gavrikov, A. V.; Liziakin, G. D.; Polistchook, V. P.; Samoylov, I. S.; Smirnov, V. P.; Usmanov, R. A.; Yartsev, I. M.; Ivanov, A. S.

    2016-11-01

    Diffuse vacuum arc with hot cathode is one of the perspective plasma sources for the development of spent nuclear fuel plasma reprocessing technology. Experimental data is known for such type of discharges on metal cathodes. In this work discharge with cerium dioxide hot cathode was studied. Cerium dioxide properties are similar to uranium dioxide. Its feature as dielectric is that it becomes conductive in oxygen-free atmosphere. Vacuum arc was studied at following parameters: cathode temperatures were between 2.0 and 2.2 kK, discharge currents was between 30 and 65 A and voltages was in range from 15 to 25 V. Power flows from plasma to cathode were estimated in achieved regimes. Analysis of generated plasma component composition was made by radiation spectrum diagnostics. These results were compared with calculations of equilibrium gaseous phase above solid sample of cerium dioxide in close to experimental conditions. Cerium dioxide vacuum evaporation rate and evaporation rate in arc were measured.

  11. Cerium migration during PEM fuel cell assembly and operation

    DOE PAGES

    Baker, Andrew M.; Torraco, Dennis; Judge, Elizabeth J.; ...

    2015-09-14

    Cerium migration between PEM fuel cell components is influenced by potential-driven mobility, ionic diffusion, and gradients in water content. These factors were investigated in ex situ experiments and in operating fuel cells. Potential-induced migration was measured ex situ in hydrated window cells. Cerium-containing MEAs were also fabricated and tested under ASTs. MEA disassembly and subsequent XRF analysis were used to observe rapid cerium migration during cell assembly and operation. During MEA hot pressing, humidification, and low RH operation at OCV, ionic diffusion causes uniform migration from the membrane into the catalyst layers. During high RH operation at OCV, in-plane ceriummore » gradients arise due to variations in water content. These gradients may diminish the scavenging efficacy of cerium by reducing its proximity to generated radicals.« less

  12. Heteroaggregation of cerium oxide nanoparticles and nanoparticles of pyrolyzed biomass

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Heteroaggregation with indigenous particles is an important process controlling the mobility of engineered nanomaterials in the environment. We studied heteroaggregation of cerium oxide nanoparticles (n-CeO2), which are widely used commercially, with nanoparticles of pyrogenic carbonaceous material ...

  13. An efficient method for dephosphorylation of phosphopeptides by cerium oxide.

    PubMed

    Tan, Feng; Zhang, Yangjun; Wang, Jinglan; Wei, Junying; Cai, Yun; Qian, Xiaohong

    2008-05-01

    In this article, an effective method for dephosphorylation of phosphopeptides by cerium oxide is described. The dephosphorylation activity of cerium oxide was evaluated by two standard phosphopeptides and the phosphopeptides in digests of phosphoprotein alpha-casein and beta-casein. Results showed that the dephosphorylation of all the phosphopeptides was completed in 10 min, and temperature had little effect on the dephosphorylation, the dephosphorylation could be carried out at 0 degrees C, room temperature and 37 degrees C. The dephosphorylation mediated by cerium oxide can be attributed to Lewis acid and nucleophile activations. Advantages of using cerium oxide as catalyst for the dephosphorylation include: safe, simple, high catalytic activity, and no precise control of the treatment temperature. The method is valid for the phosphorylation of Ser, Thr and Tyr, and can be used for phosphoprotein analysis.

  14. Method of applying a cerium diffusion coating to a metallic alloy

    DOEpatents

    Jablonski, Paul D [Salem, OR; Alman, David E [Benton, OR

    2009-06-30

    A method of applying a cerium diffusion coating to a preferred nickel base alloy substrate has been discovered. A cerium oxide paste containing a halide activator is applied to the polished substrate and then dried. The workpiece is heated in a non-oxidizing atmosphere to diffuse cerium into the substrate. After cooling, any remaining cerium oxide is removed. The resulting cerium diffusion coating on the nickel base substrate demonstrates improved resistance to oxidation. Cerium coated alloys are particularly useful as components in a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC).

  15. Control of cerium oxidation state through metal complex secondary structures

    SciTech Connect

    Levin, Jessica R.; Dorfner, Walter L.; Carroll, Patrick J.; Schelter, Eric J.

    2015-08-11

    A series of alkali metal cerium diphenylhydrazido complexes, Mx(py)y[Ce(PhNNPh)4], M = Li, Na, and K, x = 4 (Li and Na) or 5 (K), and y = 4 (Li), 8 (Na), or 7 (K), were synthesized to probe how a secondary coordination sphere would modulate electronic structures at a cerium cation. The resulting electronic structures of the heterobimetallic cerium diphenylhydrazido complexes were found to be strongly dependent on the identity of the alkali metal cations. When M = Li+ or Na+, the cerium(III) starting material was oxidized with concomitant reduction of 1,2-diphenylhydrazine to aniline. Reduction of 1,2-diphenylhydrazine was not observed when M = K+, and the complex remained in the cerium(III) oxidation state. Oxidation of the cerium(III) diphenylhydrazido complex to the Ce(IV) diphenylhydrazido one was achieved through a simple cation exchange reaction of the alkali metals. As a result, UV-Vis spectroscopy, FTIR spectroscopy, electrochemistry, magnetic susceptibility, and DFT studies were used to probe the oxidation state and the electronic changes that occurred at the metal centre.

  16. Control of cerium oxidation state through metal complex secondary structures

    DOE PAGES

    Levin, Jessica R.; Dorfner, Walter L.; Carroll, Patrick J.; ...

    2015-08-11

    A series of alkali metal cerium diphenylhydrazido complexes, Mx(py)y[Ce(PhNNPh)4], M = Li, Na, and K, x = 4 (Li and Na) or 5 (K), and y = 4 (Li), 8 (Na), or 7 (K), were synthesized to probe how a secondary coordination sphere would modulate electronic structures at a cerium cation. The resulting electronic structures of the heterobimetallic cerium diphenylhydrazido complexes were found to be strongly dependent on the identity of the alkali metal cations. When M = Li+ or Na+, the cerium(III) starting material was oxidized with concomitant reduction of 1,2-diphenylhydrazine to aniline. Reduction of 1,2-diphenylhydrazine was not observedmore » when M = K+, and the complex remained in the cerium(III) oxidation state. Oxidation of the cerium(III) diphenylhydrazido complex to the Ce(IV) diphenylhydrazido one was achieved through a simple cation exchange reaction of the alkali metals. As a result, UV-Vis spectroscopy, FTIR spectroscopy, electrochemistry, magnetic susceptibility, and DFT studies were used to probe the oxidation state and the electronic changes that occurred at the metal centre.« less

  17. Determination of chemical speciations of cerium in nuclear waste glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Gong, Meiling; Li, Hong

    1996-12-31

    Cerium oxides have been widely used as a surrogate for plutonium in the investigation of the melt and durability behavior of simulated nuclear waste glasses. It is well known that there is a cerous-ceric equilibrium in silicate glasses under normal melting conditions. The position of this equilibrium depends on glass composition, melting temperature, furnace atmosphere, and possibly the total amounts of cerium in glass. The oxidation state of cerium affects total solubility of cerium in glass, solubilities of other components in glass, viscosities and liquidus temperatures of the melts, and the chemical durability of the glasses. A procedure was developed for the determination of the ceric and cerous distribution. The glass was ground to small particles of less than 300 meshes and was dissolved in mixture of HF and H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}. The ceric oxide was graduately reduced to cerous species in the presence of HF acid during the dissolution. To compensate the change of the equilibrium during the dissolution, a calibration curve is made with a mixture of standard solution of ceric sulphate and one gram of glass of the same composition containing no cerium. Boric acid was added to complex the fluoride ions, and the resultant solution was titrated potentiometrically with 0.01 N ferrous ammonium sulphate solution. The corrected ceric concentration was obtained on the calibration curve. The total cerium content in the above solution was analyzed using ICP-AES and the cerous content was the difference between the total Ce and Ce(+4).

  18. Characterization of cerium oxide nanoparticles-part 2: nonsize measurements.

    PubMed

    Baalousha, Mohammed; Ju-Nam, Yon; Cole, Paula A; Hriljac, Joseph A; Jones, Ian P; Tyler, Charles R; Stone, Vicki; Fernandes, Teresa F; Jepson, Mark A; Lead, Jamie R

    2012-05-01

    Part 1 (see companion paper) of the present study discussed the application of a multimethod approach in characterizing the size of cerium oxide nanoparticles (NPs). However, other properties less routinely investigated, such as shape and morphology, structure, chemical composition, and surface properties, are likely to play an important role in determining the behavior, reactivity, and potential toxicity of these NPs. The present study describes the measurement of the aforementioned physicochemical properties of NPs (applied also to nanomaterials [NMs]) compared with micrometer particles (MPs). The authors use a wide range of techniques, including high resolution-transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, X-ray diffraction, X-ray energy dispersive spectroscopy, electron energy loss spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and electrophoresis, and compare these techniques, their advantages, and their limitations, along with recommendations about how best to approach NM characterization, using an application to commercial cerium oxide NPs and MPs. Results show that both cerium oxide NPs and MPs are formed of single polyhedron or truncated polyhedron crystals. Cerium oxide NPs contain a mixture of Ce(3+) and Ce(4+) cations, whereas the MPs contain mainly Ce(4+) , which is potentially important in understanding the toxicity of cerium oxide NPs. The isoelectric point of cerium oxide NPs was approximately pH 8, which explains their propensity to aggregate in aqueous media (see companion paper).

  19. The potential toxic effects of cerium on organism: cerium prolonged the developmental time and induced the expression of Hsp70 and apoptosis in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Wu, Bin; Zhang, Di; Wang, Dan; Qi, Chunyan; Li, Zongyun

    2012-10-01

    Due to the widespread application of cerium, a rare earth element, the risk of exposure to cerium has increased. Therefore, understanding the physiological effects of cerium is of great importance. Our previous work showed that cerium caused significant lifespan shortening accompanied by oxidative damage in Drosophila melanogaster, however, little is known about the detailed mechanism of cerium-induced cytotoxicity. Thus, we examined the developmental time during metamorphosis, and assessed the toxic effects of cerium by evaluating heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70), DNA damage markers and apoptosis in D. melanogaster. We found that cerium extended the developmental time of D. melanogaster and up-regulated the expression of Hsp70 when the concentration of cerium was increased (especially concentrations over 26.3 μg/g). Up-regulation of the cell cycle checkpoint p53 and cell signaling protein p38 were also observed when the concentration of cerium was over 104 μg/g. In addition, the activities of caspase-3 and caspase-9, markers of apoptosis, were significantly higher when the larvae were exposed to ceric sulfate. These results suggest that high concentrations of cerium may result in DNA damage and ultimately apoptosis in D. melanogaster, and strongly indicate that cerium should be applied with caution and the potential toxic effects in humans should also be taken into consideration.

  20. Ore petrology and geochemistry of Tertiary gold telluride deposits of the Colorado mineral belt

    SciTech Connect

    Saunders, J.A.; Romberger, S.B.

    1985-01-01

    Epithermal gold telluride deposits from the Colorado mineral belt share a number of similarities: relationship to alkalic stocks; high fluorine and CO/sub 2/ content; and similar paragenesis. Petrography of deposits in the Jamestown, Cripple Creek, and La Plata districts has resulted in a composite paragenesis: early Fe-Cu-Pb-Zn sulfides + hematite; tetrahedrite; high Te tellurides; low Te tellurides; late native gold. Fluid inclusion studies suggest telluride deposition occurred below 200/sup 0/C from low salinity. Gangue and alteration mineralogy indicates the ore fluids were near neutral pH during telluride deposition. The presence of hematite and locally barite suggest relatively oxidizing conditions. Evaluation of thermodynamic stabilities of tellurides and aqueous tellurium species indicates that progressive oxidation is consistent with the observed ore mineral paragenesis. Available data on gold bisulfide and chloride complexes suggest neither were important in the transport of gold in these systems. Thermodynamic data suggest the ditelluride ion (Te/sub 2//sup 2 -/) predominates in the range of inferred physiochemical conditions for the transport and deposition of gold in these systems. Inferred complexes such as AuTe/sub 2//sup -/ could account for the gold transport, and oxidation would be the most effective mechanism of precipitation of gold telluride or native gold. Published data suggest the associated alkalic stocks may be the ultimate source of the metals, since they are enriched in Au, Ag, Te, As, and Bi.

  1. TOP as ligand and solvent to synthesize silver telluride nanosheets

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Shutang; Lee, Soonil

    2015-11-15

    Highlights: • Silver telluride nanosheets were prepared through one-pot synthetic strategy. • TOP as both ligand and solvent favors silver telluride nanosheets growth. • The I–V curve of an Ag{sub 2}Te-nanosheet film indicates that as-prepared Ag{sub 2}Te nanosheets have good electric conductivity. - Abstract: Ag{sub 2}Te nanosheets are synthesized by a simple one-pot route using trioctylphosphine (TOP) as both solvent and stabilizer. Various controlling parameters were examined, such as molar ratios of AgNO{sub 3} to tellurium powder, reaction temperature and time, and precursor concentration. The morphology and composition of the products were characterized by X-ray diffraction, field-emission scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. On the basis of a series of synthesis and characterizations, the formation mechanism of the Ag{sub 2}Te nanosheets are discussed. The I–V curve of an Ag{sub 2}Te-nan osheet film indicates that as-prepared Ag{sub 2}Te nanosheets have good electric conductivity.

  2. Suzuki-Miyaura cross-coupling reactions of aryl tellurides with potassium aryltrifluoroborate salts.

    PubMed

    Cella, Rodrigo; Cunha, Rodrigo L O R; Reis, Ana E S; Pimenta, Daniel C; Klitzke, Clécio F; Stefani, Hélio A

    2006-01-06

    [reaction: see text] Palladium(0)-catalyzed cross-coupling between potassium aryltrifluoroborate salts and aryl tellurides proceeds readily to afford the desired biaryls in good to excellent yield. The reaction seems to be unaffected by the presence of electron-withdrawing or electron-donating substituents in both the potassium aryltrifluoroborate salts and aryl tellurides partners. Biaryls containing a variety of functional groups can be prepared. A chemoselectivity study was also carried out using aryl tellurides bearing halogen atoms in the same compound. In addition, this new version of the Suzuki-Miyaura cross-coupling reaction was monitored by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry where some reaction intermediates were detected and analyzed.

  3. Molecular and physiological responses to titanium dioxide and cerium oxide nanoparticles in arabidopsis

    EPA Science Inventory

    - Changes in tissue transcriptomes and productivity of Arabidopsis thaliana were investigated during exposure of plants to two widely-used engineered metal oxide nanoparticles, titanium dioxide (nano-titanium) and cerium dioxide (nano-cerium). Microarray analyses confirmed that e...

  4. Molecular and physiological responses to titanium dioxide and cerium oxide nanoparticles in arabidopsis

    EPA Science Inventory

    - Changes in tissue transcriptomes and productivity of Arabidopsis thaliana were investigated during exposure of plants to two widely-used engineered metal oxide nanoparticles, titanium dioxide (nano-titanium) and cerium dioxide (nano-cerium). Microarray analyses confirmed that e...

  5. Cerium oxide nanoparticles are more toxic than equimolar bulk cerium oxide in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Arnold, M C; Badireddy, A R; Wiesner, M R; Di Giulio, R T; Meyer, J N

    2013-08-01

    Engineered cerium oxide nanoparticles (CeO2 NPs) are widely used in biomedical and engineering manufacturing industries. Previous research has shown the ability of CeO2 NPs to act as a redox catalyst, suggesting potential to both induce and alleviate oxidative stress in organisms. In this study, Caenorhabditis elegans and zebrafish (Danio rerio) were dosed with commercially available CeO2 NPs. Non-nano cerium oxide powder (CeO2) was used as a positive control for cerium toxicity. CeO2 NPs suspended in standard United States Environmental Protection Agency reconstituted moderately hard water, used to culture the C. elegans, quickly formed large polydisperse aggregates. Dosing solutions were renewed daily for 3 days. Exposure of wild-type nematodes resulted in dose-dependent growth inhibition detected for all 3 days (p < 0.0001). Non-nano CeO2 also caused significant growth inhibition (p < 0.0001), but the scale of inhibition was less at equivalent mass exposures compared with CeO2 NP exposure. Some metal and oxidative stress-sensitive mutant nematode strains showed mildly altered growth relative to the wild-type when dosed with 5 mg/L CeO2 NPs on days 2 and 3, thus providing weak evidence for a role for oxidative stress or metal sensitivity in CeO2 NP toxicity. Zebrafish microinjected with CeO2 NPs or CeO2 did not exhibit increased gross developmental defects compared with controls. Hyperspectral imaging showed that CeO2 NPs were ingested but not detectable inside the cells of C. elegans. Growth inhibition observed in C. elegans may be explained at least in part by a non-specific inhibition of feeding caused by CeO2 NPs aggregating around bacterial food and/or inside the gut tract.

  6. On the system cerium-platinum-silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Gribanov, Alexander Grytsiv, Andriy; Royanian, Esmaeil; Rogl, Peter; Bauer, Ernst; Giester, Gerald; Seropegin, Yurii

    2008-11-15

    Phase relations in the ternary system Ce-Pt-Si have been established for the isothermal section at 800 deg. C based on X-ray powder diffraction, metallography, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and electron probe microanalysis (EPMA) techniques on about 120 alloys, which were prepared by various methods employing arc-melting under argon or powder reaction sintering. Nineteen ternary compounds were observed. Atom order in the crystal structures of {tau}{sub 18}-Ce{sub 5}(Pt,Si){sub 4} (Pnma; a=0.77223(3) nm, b=1.53279(8) nm c=0.80054(5) nm), {tau}{sub 3}-Ce{sub 2}Pt{sub 7}Si{sub 4} (Pnma; a=1.96335(8) nm, b=0.40361(4) nm, c=1.12240(6) nm) and {tau}{sub 10}-CePtSi{sub 2} (Cmcm; a=0.42943(2) nm, b=1.67357(5) nm, c=0.42372(2) nm) was determined by direct methods from X-ray single-crystal CCD data and found to be isotypic with the Sm{sub 5}Ge{sub 4}-type, the Ce{sub 2}Pt{sub 7}Ge{sub 4}-type and the CeNiSi{sub 2}-type, respectively. Rietveld refinements established the atom arrangement in the structures of Pt{sub 3}Si (Pt{sub 3}Ge-type, C2/m, a=0.7724(2) nm, b=0.7767(2) nm, c=0.5390(2) nm, {beta}=133.86(2){sup o}), {tau}{sub 16}-Ce{sub 3}Pt{sub 5}Si (Ce{sub 3}Pd{sub 5}Si-type, Imma, a=0.74025(8) nm, b=1.2951(2) nm, c=0.7508(1) nm) and {tau}{sub 17}-Ce{sub 3}PtSi{sub 3} (Ba{sub 3}Al{sub 2}Ge{sub 2}-type, Immm, a=0.41065(5) nm, b=0.43221(5) nm, c=1.8375(3) nm). Phase equilibria in Ce-Pt-Si are characterised by the absence of cerium solubility in platinum silicides. Cerium silicides and cerium platinides, however, dissolve significant amounts of the third component, whereby random substitution of the almost equally sized atom species platinum and silicon is reflected in extended homogeneous regions at constant Ce content such as for {tau}{sub 13}-Ce(Pt{sub x}Si{sub 1-x}){sub 2}, {tau}{sub 6}-Ce{sub 2}Pt{sub 3+x}Si{sub 5-x} or {tau}{sub 7}-CePt{sub 2-x}Si{sub 2+x}. - Graphical abstract: Phase relations in the ternary system Ce-Pt-Si have been established for the isothermal

  7. IRIS TOXICOLOGICAL REVIEW AND SUMMARY DOCUMENTS FOR CERIUM OXIDE (STABLE) AND COMPOUNDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cerium is a member of the lanthanoid series of rare earth metals. It is also the most abundant and most reactive of the rare earth metals. Cerium oxidizes at room temperature and forms a variety of salt compounds including oxides, hydroxides, sulfates and chlorides. Cerium is ...

  8. IRIS TOXICOLOGICAL REVIEW AND SUMMARY DOCUMENTS FOR CERIUM OXIDE (STABLE) AND COMPOUNDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cerium is a member of the lanthanoid series of rare earth metals. It is also the most abundant and most reactive of the rare earth metals. Cerium oxidizes at room temperature and forms a variety of salt compounds including oxides, hydroxides, sulfates and chlorides. Cerium is ...

  9. Region 8: Colorado Denver, Pagosa Springs and Telluride Adequate Letter (8/18/2000)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This letter from EPA to Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment determined Denvers' Carbon Monoxide (CO) maintenance plan, Pagosa Springs and Tellurides' Particulate Matter (PM10) maintenance plans for Motor Vehicle Emissions Budgets adequate

  10. A preliminary study on the use of cadmium telluride detectors in the scintigraphy of thyroid gland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mancini, A. M.; Quirini, A.; Vasanelli, L.; Bacci, C.; Bernabei, R.; Pani, R.; Rispoli, B.; Ballesio, P. L.; Furetta, C.

    1981-10-01

    A cadmium telluride gamma detector has been used for monitoring the activity of a radioactive tracer in a thyroid gland. Preliminary measurements are reported in comparison with those obtained with a standard NaI(Tl) scintillator.

  11. Potential for recovery of cerium contained in automotive catalytic converters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bleiwas, Donald I.

    2013-01-01

    Catalytic converters (CATCONs) are required by Federal law to be installed in nearly all gasoline- and diesel-fueled onroad vehicles used in the United States. About 85 percent of the light-duty vehicles and trucks manufactured worldwide are equipped with CATCONs. Portions of the CATCONs (called monoliths) are recycled for their platinum-group metal (PGM) content and for the value of the stainless steel they contain. The cerium contained in the monoliths, however, is disposed of along with the slag produced from the recycling process. Although there is some smelter capacity in the United States to treat the monoliths in order to recover the PGMs, a great percentage of monoliths is exported to Europe and South Africa for recycling, and a lesser amount is exported to Japan. There is presently no commercial-scale capacity in place domestically to recover cerium from the monoliths. Recycling of cerium or cerium compounds from the monoliths could help ensure against possible global supply shortages by increasing the amount that is available in the supply chain as well as the number and geographic distribution of the suppliers. It could also reduce the amount of material that goes into landfills. Also, the additional supply could lower the price of the commodity. This report analyzes how much cerium oxide is contained in CATCONs and how much could be recovered from used CATCONs.

  12. Towards understanding junction degradation in cadmium telluride solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Nardone, Marco

    2014-06-21

    A degradation mechanism in cadmium telluride (CdTe/CdS) solar cells is investigated using time-dependent numerical modeling to simulate various temperature, bias, and illumination stress conditions. The physical mechanism is based on defect generation rates that are proportional to nonequilibrium charge carrier concentrations. It is found that a commonly observed degradation mode for CdTe/CdS solar cells can be reproduced only if defects are allowed to form in a narrow region of the absorber layer close to the CdTe/CdS junction. A key aspect of this junction degradation is that both mid-gap donor and shallow acceptor-type defects must be generated simultaneously in response to photo-excitation or applied bias. The numerical approach employed here can be extended to study other mechanisms for any photovoltaic technology.

  13. Shock-Wave Consolidation of Nanostructured Bismuth Telluride Powders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, Jan; Alvarado, Manuel; Nemir, David; Nowell, Mathew; Murr, Lawrence; Prasad, Narasimha

    2012-06-01

    Nanostructured thermoelectric powders can be produced using a variety of techniques. However, it is very challenging to build a bulk material from these nanopowders without losing the nanostructure. In the present work, nanostructured powders of the bismuth telluride alloy system are obtained in kilogram quantities via a gas atomization process. These powders are characterized using a variety of methods including scanning electron microscopy, transition electron microscopy, and x-ray diffraction analysis. Then the powders are consolidated into a dense bulk material using a shock-wave consolidation technique whereby a nanopowder-containing tube is surrounded by explosives and then detonated. The resulting shock wave causes rapid fusing of the powders without the melt and subsequent grain growth of other techniques. We describe the test setup and consolidation results.

  14. Comparison of Germanium Telluride (GeTe) Crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Comparison of Germanium Telluride (GeTe) Crystals grown on Earth (left) and in space (right) during the Skylab SL-3 mission. These crystals were grown using a vapor transport crystal growth method in the Multipurpose Electric Furnace System (MEFS). Crystals grown on earth are needles and platelettes with distorted surfaces and hollow growth habits. The length of the ground-based needle is approximately 2 mm and the average lenth of the platelets is 1 mm. The dull appearance of the Skylab crystals resulted from condensation of the transport agent during the long cooling period dictated by the Skylab furnace. In a dedicated process, this would be prevented by removing the ampoule from the furnace and quenching the vapor source.

  15. Growth of lead-tin telluride crystals under high gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regel, L. L.; Turchaninov, A. M.; Shumaev, O. V.; Bandeira, I. N.; An, C. Y.; Rappl, P. H. O.

    1992-04-01

    The influence of high gravity environment on several growth habits of lead-tin telluride crystals began to be investigated. Preliminary experiments with Pb 0.8Sn 0.2te grown by the Bridgman technique had been made at the centrifuge facilities of the Y.A. Gagarin Cosmonauts Center in the USSR, using accelerations of 5 g, 5.2 g and 8 g. The Sn distribution for these crystals was compared with that obtained for growth at normal gravity and the results show the existence of significant compositional inhomogeneities along the axial direction. Convection currents at high gravity seem to help multiple nucleation and subsequent random orientation of growth. Analyses of carrier concentrations as well as morphological characteristics were also made.

  16. Process dependent thermoelectric properties of EDTA assisted bismuth telluride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulsi, Chiranjit; Kargupta, Kajari; Banerjee, Dipali

    2016-04-01

    Comparison between the structure and thermoelectric properties of EDTA (Ethylene-diamine-tetra-acetic acid) assisted bismuth telluride prepared by electrochemical deposition and hydrothermal route is reported in the present work. The prepared samples have been structurally characterized by high resolution X-ray diffraction spectra (HRXRD), field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and high resolution transmission electron microscopic images (HRTEM). Crystallite size and strain have been determined from Williamson-Hall plot of XRD which is in conformity with TEM images. Measurement of transport properties show sample in the pellet form (S1) prepared via hydrothermal route has higher value of thermoelectric power (S) than the electrodeposited film (S2). But due to a substantial increase in the electrical conductivity (σ) of the film (S2) over the pellet (S1), the power factor and the figure of merit is higher for sample S2 than the sample S1 at room temperature.

  17. Comparison of Germanium Telluride (GeTe) Crystals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Comparison of Germanium Telluride (GeTe) Crystals grown on Earth (left) and in space (right) during the Skylab SL-3 mission. These crystals were grown using a vapor transport crystal growth method in the Multipurpose Electric Furnace System (MEFS). Crystals grown on earth are needles and platelettes with distorted surfaces and hollow growth habits. The length of the ground-based needle is approximately 2 mm and the average lenth of the platelets is 1 mm. The dull appearance of the Skylab crystals resulted from condensation of the transport agent during the long cooling period dictated by the Skylab furnace. In a dedicated process, this would be prevented by removing the ampoule from the furnace and quenching the vapor source.

  18. Thermochemistry of transition metal tellurides of interest in nuclear technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathews, C. K.

    The binary systems of tellurium with the alloying constituents of stainless steel, viz. Fe, Cr, Ni, Mo and Mn, were investigated by using high temperature mass spectrometry. The partial pressures of Te 2 and Te, which were the only species detected in the vapour phase in all the cases except MnTe, were obtained as a function of temperature and composition. All the telluride phases were found to be nonstoichiometric and their homogeneity ranges broader than hitherto recognised. Thermodynamic parameters such as enthalpy of vaporisation, enthalpy of formation and Gibbs free energy of formation were deduced for various compositions. The threshold tellurium potential necessary for the corrosion of the clad was calculated for each alloying constituent, and this data was compared with the estimated tellurium potential in the fuel-clad gap of the fuel pins in fast breeder reactors. The role of fission product tellurium in the internal corrosion of the clad is discussed in the light of the above data.

  19. Ion implantation of erbium into polycrystalline cadmium telluride

    SciTech Connect

    Ushakov, V. V. Klevkov, Yu. V.; Dravin, V. A.

    2015-05-15

    The specific features of the ion implantation of polycrystalline cadmium telluride with grains 20–1000 μm in dimensions are studied. The choice of erbium is motivated by the possibility of using rare-earth elements as luminescent “probes” in studies of the defect and impurity composition of materials and modification of the composition by various technological treatments. From the microphotoluminescence data, it is found that, with decreasing crystal-grain dimensions, the degree of radiation stability of the material is increased. Microphotoluminescence topography of the samples shows the efficiency of the rare-earth probe in detecting regions with higher impurity and defect concentrations, including regions of intergrain boundaries.

  20. Local Stoichiometry and Atomic Interdiffusion during Reactive Metal/Mercury-Cadmium-Telluride Junction Formation.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-10-23

    CHART NATIONAL BUREAU OF STANDARDS- 1963-A IfP LOCAL STOICHIOMETRY AND ATOMIC INTERDIFFUSION DURING REACTIVE METAL/ MERCURY- CADMIUM -TELLURIDE...TITLE rand Subtitle) S. TYPE OF REPORT PERIOED LOCAL STOICHIOMETRY AND ATOMIC INTERDIFFUSION Interim, 1/8 DURING REACTIVE METAL/MERCURY- CADMIUM ...identliy by block nuembw) Ag, Ge and Sm overlayers on Mercury- Cadmium -Telluride surfaces exhibit widely different interface reactivity and yield a

  1. Polycrystalline thin film cadmium telluride solar cells fabricated by electrodeposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trefny, J. U.; Furtak, T. E.; Williamson, D. L.; Kim, D.

    1994-07-01

    This report describes the principal results of work performed during the second year of a 3-year program at the Colorado School of Mines (CSM). The work on transparent conducting oxides was carried out primarily by CSM students at NREL and is described in three publications listed in Appendix C. The high-quality ZnO produced from the work was incorporated into a copper indium diselenide cell that exhibited a world-record efficiency of 16.4%. Much of the time was devoted to the improvement of cadmium sulfide films deposited by chemical bath deposition methods and annealed with or without a cadmium chloride treatment. Progress was also made in the electrochemical deposition of cadmium telluride. High-quality films yielding CdS/CdTe/Au cells of greater than 10% efficiency are now being produced on a regular basis. We explored the use of zinc telluride back contacts to form an n-i-p cell structure as previously used by Ametek. We began small-angle x-ray scattering (SAXS) studies to characterize crystal structures, residual stresses, and microstructures of both CdTe and CdS. Large SAXS signals were observed in CdS, most likely because of scattering from gain boundaries. The signals observed to date from CdTe are much weaker, indicating a more homogeneous microstructure. We began to use the ADEPT modeling program, developed at Purdue University, to guide our understanding of the CdS/CdTe cell physics and the improvements that will most likely lead to significantly enhanced efficiencies.

  2. Cadmium Telluride Solar Cells with PEDOT:PSS Back Contact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mount, Michael; Duarte, Fernanda; Paudel, Naba; Yan, Yanfa; Wang, Weining

    Cadmium Telluride (CdTe) solar cell is one of the most promising thin film solar cells and its highest efficiency has reached 21%. To keep improving the efficiency of CdTe solar cells, a few issues need to be addressed, one of which is the back contact. The back contact of CdTe solar cells are mostly Cu-base, and the problem with Cu-based back contact is that Cu diffuses into the grain boundary and into the CdS/CdTe junction, causing degradation problem at high temperature and under illumination. To continue improving the efficiency of CdTe/CdS solar cells, a good ohmic back contact with high work function and long term stability is needed. In this work, we report our studies on the potential of conducting polymer being used as the back contact of CdTe/CdS solar cells. Conducting polymers are good candidates because they have high work functions and high conductivities, are easy to process, and cost less, meeting all the requirements of a good ohmic back contact for CdTe. In our studies, we used poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) polystyrene sulfonate (PEDOT:PSS) with different conductivities and compared them with traditional Cu-based back contact. It was observed that the CdTe solar cell performance improves as the conductivity of the PEDOT:PSS increase, and the efficiency (9.1%) is approaching those with traditional Cu/Au back contact (12.5%). Cadmium Telluride Solar Cells with PEDOT:PSS Back Contact.

  3. Environmental Geochemistry of Cerium: Applications and Toxicology of Cerium Oxide Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Dahle, Jessica T.; Arai, Yuji

    2015-01-01

    Cerium is the most abundant of rare-earth metals found in the Earth’s crust. Several Ce-carbonate, -phosphate, -silicate, and -(hydr)oxide minerals have been historically mined and processed for pharmaceutical uses and industrial applications. Of all Ce minerals, cerium dioxide has received much attention in the global nanotechnology market due to their useful applications for catalysts, fuel cells, and fuel additives. A recent mass flow modeling study predicted that a major source of CeO2 nanoparticles from industrial processing plants (e.g., electronics and optics manufactures) is likely to reach the terrestrial environment such as landfills and soils. The environmental fate of CeO2 nanoparticles is highly dependent on its physcochemical properties in low temperature geochemical environment. Though there are needs in improving the analytical method in detecting/quantifying CeO2 nanoparticles in different environmental media, it is clear that aquatic and terrestrial organisms have been exposed to CeO2 NPs, potentially yielding in negative impact on human and ecosystem health. Interestingly, there has been contradicting reports about the toxicological effects of CeO2 nanoparticles, acting as either an antioxidant or reactive oxygen species production-inducing agent). This poses a challenge in future regulations for the CeO2 nanoparticle application and the risk assessment in the environment. PMID:25625406

  4. Environmental geochemistry of cerium: applications and toxicology of cerium oxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Dahle, Jessica T; Arai, Yuji

    2015-01-23

    Cerium is the most abundant of rare-earth metals found in the Earth's crust. Several Ce-carbonate, -phosphate, -silicate, and -(hydr)oxide minerals have been historically mined and processed for pharmaceutical uses and industrial applications. Of all Ce minerals, cerium dioxide has received much attention in the global nanotechnology market due to their useful applications for catalysts, fuel cells, and fuel additives. A recent mass flow modeling study predicted that a major source of CeO2 nanoparticles from industrial processing plants (e.g., electronics and optics manufactures) is likely to reach the terrestrial environment such as landfills and soils. The environmental fate of CeO2 nanoparticles is highly dependent on its physcochemical properties in low temperature geochemical environment. Though there are needs in improving the analytical method in detecting/quantifying CeO2 nanoparticles in different environmental media, it is clear that aquatic and terrestrial organisms have been exposed to CeO2 NPs, potentially yielding in negative impact on human and ecosystem health. Interestingly, there has been contradicting reports about the toxicological effects of CeO2 nanoparticles, acting as either an antioxidant or reactive oxygen species production-inducing agent). This poses a challenge in future regulations for the CeO2 nanoparticle application and the risk assessment in the environment.

  5. Cerium fluoride, a new fast, heavy scintillator

    SciTech Connect

    Moses, W.W.; Derenzo, S.E.

    1988-11-01

    We describe the scintillation properties of Cerium Fluoride (CeF/sub 3/), a newly discovered, heavy (6.16 g/cm/sup 3/), inorganic scintillator. Its fluorescence decay lifetime, measured with the delayed coincidence method, is described by a single exponential with a 27 /+-/ ns time constant. The emission spectrum peaks at a wavelength of 340 nm, and drops to less than 10% of its peak value at 315 nm and 460 nm. When a 1 cm optical quality cube of CeF/sub 3/ is excited with 511 keV photons, a photopeak with a 20% full width at half maximum is observed at approximately half the light output of a Bismuth Germanate (BGO) crystal with similar geometry. We also present measurements of the decay time and light output of CeF/sub 3/ doped with three rare-earth elements (Dy, Er, and Pr). The short fluorescence lifetime, high density, and reasonable light output of this new scintillator suggest that it would be useful for applications where high counting rates, good stopping power, and nanosecond timing are important, such as medical imaging and nuclear science. 5 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Cerium-iron-based magnetic compounds

    DOEpatents

    Zhou, Chen; Pinkerton, Frederick E.; Herbst, Jan F.

    2017-01-17

    New magnetic materials containing cerium, iron, and small additions of a third element are disclosed. These materials comprise compounds Ce(Fe.sub.12-xM.sub.x) where x=1-4, having the ThMn.sub.12 tetragonal crystal structure (space group I4/mmm, #139). Compounds with M=B, Al, Si, P, S, Sc, Co, Ni, Zn, Ga, Ge, Zr, Nb, Hf, Ta, and W are identified theoretically, and one class of compounds based on M=Si has been synthesized. The Si cognates are characterized by large magnetic moments (4.pi.M.sub.s greater than 1.27 Tesla) and high Curie temperatures (264.ltoreq.T.sub.c.ltoreq.305.degree. C.). The Ce(Fe.sub.12-xM.sub.x) compound may contain one or more of Ti, V, Cr, and Mo in combination with an M element. Further enhancement in T.sub.c is obtained by nitriding the Ce compounds through heat treatment in N.sub.2 gas while retaining the ThMn.sub.12 tetragonal crystal structure; for example CeFe.sub.10Si.sub.2N.sub.1.29 has T.sub.c=426.degree. C.

  7. Characterization of cerium fluoride nanocomposite scintillators

    SciTech Connect

    Stange, Sy; Esch, Ernst I; Brown, Leif O; Couture, Aaron J; Mckigney, Edward A; Muenchausen, Ross E; Del Sesto, Rico E; Gilbertson, Robert D; Mccleskey, T Mark; Reifarth, Rene

    2009-01-01

    Measurement of the neutron capture cross-sections of a number of short-lived isotopes would advance both pure and applied scientific research. These cross-sections are needed for calculation of criticality and waste production estimates for the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative, for analysis of data from nuclear weapons tests, and to improve understanding of nucleosynthesis. However, measurement of these cross-sections would require a detector with a faster signal decay time than those used in existing neutron capture experiments. Crystals of faster detector materials are not available in sufficient sizes and quantities to supply these large-scale experiments. Instead, we propose to use nanocomposite detectors, consisting of nanoscale particles of a scintillating material dispersed in a matrix material. We have successfully fabricated cerium fluoride (CeF{sub 3}) nanoparticles and dispersed them in a liquid matrix. We have characterized this scintillator and have measured its response to neutron capture. Results of the optical, structural, and radiation characterization will be presented.

  8. Thermodynamic Calculation among Cerium, Oxygen, and Sulfur in Liquid Iron

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Fei; Zhang, Jian; Chen, Hao-Long; Su, Yen-Hsun; Su, Yen-Hao; Hwang, Weng-Sing

    2016-01-01

    Thermodynamic calculation has been applied to predict the inclusion formation in molten SS400 steel. When the Cerium addition in liquid iron is 70 ppm and the initial Oxygen and Sulphur are both 110 ppm, the formation of oxides containing Cerium would experience the transformation from Ce2O3 to CeO2 and also the formation of sulfides containing Cerium would experience the transformation from CeS to Ce2S3 and then to Ce3S4. Below 2000 K the most thermodynamic stable matter is CeO2 and the less thermodynamic stable inclusion is CeS. Only when the amount of [O] is extremely low and the amount of [S] and [Ce] is relatively high, Ce2S3 has the possibility to form. PMID:27767092

  9. Thermodynamic Calculation among Cerium, Oxygen, and Sulfur in Liquid Iron

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Fei; Zhang, Jian; Chen, Hao-Long; Su, Yen-Hsun; Su, Yen-Hao; Hwang, Weng-Sing

    2016-10-01

    Thermodynamic calculation has been applied to predict the inclusion formation in molten SS400 steel. When the Cerium addition in liquid iron is 70 ppm and the initial Oxygen and Sulphur are both 110 ppm, the formation of oxides containing Cerium would experience the transformation from Ce2O3 to CeO2 and also the formation of sulfides containing Cerium would experience the transformation from CeS to Ce2S3 and then to Ce3S4. Below 2000 K the most thermodynamic stable matter is CeO2 and the less thermodynamic stable inclusion is CeS. Only when the amount of [O] is extremely low and the amount of [S] and [Ce] is relatively high, Ce2S3 has the possibility to form.

  10. Two-phase titration of cerium(III) by permanganate

    SciTech Connect

    Lazarev, A.I.; Lazareva, V.I.; Gerko, V.V.

    1987-02-01

    This paper presents a method for the two-phase titrimetric determination of cerium(III) with permanganate which does not require an expenditure of sugar and preliminary removal of chlorides and nitrates. The interaction of cerium(III) with permanganate at room temperature was studied as a function of the pH, the concentration of pyrophosphate, tetraphenylphosphonium (TPP), permanganate, and extraneous compounds, the rate of titration, and the time of stay of the solution in air before titration. The investigations were conducted according to the following methodology: water, solution of cerium(III) pyrophosphate, and TPP were introduced into an Erlenmeyer flask with a side branch near the bottom for clearer observation of the color of the chloroform phase. The authors established the given pH value, poured the water into a volume of 50 ml, and added chloroform. The result was titrated with permanganate solutions of various concentrations until a violet color appeared in the chloroform phase.

  11. Synthesis and characterization of magnesium doped cerium oxide for the fuel cell application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Amit; Kumari, Monika; Kumar, Mintu; Kumar, Sacheen; Kumar, Dinesh

    2016-05-01

    Cerium oxide has attained much attentions in global nanotechnology market due to valuable application for catalytic, fuel additive, and widely as electrolyte in solid oxide fuel cell. Doped cerium oxide has large oxygen vacancies that allow for greater reactivity and faster ion transport. These properties make cerium oxide suitable material for SOFCs application. Cerium oxide electrolyte requires lower operation temperature which shows improvement in processing and the fabrication technique. In our work, we synthesized magnesium doped cerium oxide by the co-precipitation method. With the magnesium doping catalytic reactivity of CeO2 was increased. Synthesized nanoparticle were characterized by the XRD and UV absorption techniques.

  12. Synthesis and characterization of magnesium doped cerium oxide for the fuel cell application

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Amit; Kumari, Monika; Kumar, Mintu; Kumar, Sacheen Kumar, Dinesh

    2016-05-06

    Cerium oxide has attained much attentions in global nanotechnology market due to valuable application for catalytic, fuel additive, and widely as electrolyte in solid oxide fuel cell. Doped cerium oxide has large oxygen vacancies that allow for greater reactivity and faster ion transport. These properties make cerium oxide suitable material for SOFCs application. Cerium oxide electrolyte requires lower operation temperature which shows improvement in processing and the fabrication technique. In our work, we synthesized magnesium doped cerium oxide by the co-precipitation method. With the magnesium doping catalytic reactivity of CeO{sub 2} was increased. Synthesized nanoparticle were characterized by the XRD and UV absorption techniques.

  13. Lanthanum Cerium Manganese Hexaaluminate Combustion Catalysts for Compact Steam Reformers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-12-07

    monoxide, and ethylene as partial oxidation products. Of the metals tested, iron is best, followed by cobalt and cerium. Our results concur with Wang et...that of Groppi et al., which marginally outperformed LaMnAl11O19 [15]. Our bimetallic manganese- cobalt catalyst was similarly lacking and did not...LaCo0.5Mn0.5Al11O19 are nearly identical and that in the absence of manganese, cobalt - and cerium-substituted hexaaluminates are equivalent catalysts. It

  14. Optical and electrical studies of cerium mixed oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Sherly, T. R.; Raveendran, R.

    2014-10-15

    The fast development in nanotechnology makes enthusiastic interest in developing nanomaterials having tailor made properties. Cerium mixed oxide materials have received great attention due to their UV absorption property, high reactivity, stability at high temperature, good electrical property etc and these materials find wide applications in solid oxide fuel cells, solar control films, cosmetics, display units, gas sensors etc. In this study cerium mixed oxide compounds were prepared by co-precipitation method. All the samples were doped with Zn (II) and Fe (II). Preliminary characterizations such as XRD, SEM / EDS, TEM were done. UV - Vis, Diffuse reflectance, PL, FT-IR, Raman and ac conductivity studies of the samples were performed.

  15. Optical and electrical studies of cerium mixed oxides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherly, T. R.; Raveendran, R.

    2014-10-01

    The fast development in nanotechnology makes enthusiastic interest in developing nanomaterials having tailor made properties. Cerium mixed oxide materials have received great attention due to their UV absorption property, high reactivity, stability at high temperature, good electrical property etc and these materials find wide applications in solid oxide fuel cells, solar control films, cosmetics, display units, gas sensors etc. In this study cerium mixed oxide compounds were prepared by co-precipitation method. All the samples were doped with Zn (II) and Fe (II). Preliminary characterizations such as XRD, SEM / EDS, TEM were done. UV - Vis, Diffuse reflectance, PL, FT-IR, Raman and ac conductivity studies of the samples were performed.

  16. The effective thermal conductivity of an adsorbent - Praseodymium cerium oxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Secary, J. J.; Tong, T. W.

    1992-01-01

    The results of an experimental study to determine the effective thermal conductivity of praseodymium cerium oxide are reported. Praseodymium cerium oxide is an adsorbent used in the development of adsorption compressors for spaceborne refrigeration systems. A guarded-hot-plate apparatus was built for this study. Measurements were carried out for mean temperatures ranging from 300 to 600 C under a vacuum of 10 exp -5 torr. For the temperature range studied, the effective thermal conductivity increased from 0.14 to 0.76 W/m per C with increasing temperature, while displaying a cubic temperature dependency.

  17. Cerium fluoride nanoparticles protect cells against oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Shcherbakov, Alexander B; Zholobak, Nadezhda M; Baranchikov, Alexander E; Ryabova, Anastasia V; Ivanov, Vladimir K

    2015-05-01

    A novel facile method of non-doped and fluorescent terbium-doped cerium fluoride stable aqueous sols synthesis is proposed. Intense green luminescence of CeF3:Tb nanoparticles can be used to visualize these nanoparticles' accumulation in cells using confocal laser scanning microscopy. Cerium fluoride nanoparticles are shown for the first time to protect both organic molecules and living cells from the oxidative action of hydrogen peroxide. Both non-doped and terbium-doped CeF3 nanoparticles are shown to provide noteworthy protection to cells against the vesicular stomatitis virus. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. The ternary system cerium-palladium-silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Lipatov, Alexey; Gribanov, Alexander; Grytsiv, Andriy; Rogl, Peter; Murashova, Elena; Seropegin, Yurii; Giester, Gerald; Kalmykov, Konstantin

    2009-09-15

    Phase relations in the ternary system Ce-Pd-Si have been established for the isothermal section at 800 deg. C based on X-ray powder diffraction and EMPA techniques on about 130 alloys, which were prepared by arc-melting under argon or powder reaction sintering. Eighteen ternary compounds have been observed to participate in the phase equilibria at 800 deg. C. Atom order was determined by direct methods from X-ray single-crystal counter data for the crystal structures of tau{sub 8}-Ce{sub 3}Pd{sub 4}Si{sub 4} (U{sub 3}Ni{sub 4}Si{sub 4}-type, Immm; a=0.41618(1), b=0.42640(1), c=2.45744(7) nm), tau{sub 16}-Ce{sub 2}Pd{sub 14}Si (own structure type, P4/nmm; a=0.88832(2), c=0.69600(2) nm) and also for tau{sub 18}-CePd{sub 1-x}Si{sub x} (x=0.07; FeB-type, Pnma; a=0.74422(5), b=0.45548(3), c=0.58569(4) nm). Rietveld refinements established the atom arrangement in the structures of tau{sub 5}-Ce{sub 3}PdSi{sub 3} (Ba{sub 3}Al{sub 2}Ge{sub 2}-type, Immm; a=0.41207(1), b=0.43026(1), c=1.84069(4) nm) and tau{sub 13}-Ce{sub 3-x}Pd{sub 20+x}Si{sub 6} (0<=x<=1, Co{sub 20}Al{sub 3}B{sub 6}-type, Fm3-barm; a=1.21527(2) nm). The ternary compound Ce{sub 2}Pd{sub 3}Si{sub 3} (structure-type Ce{sub 2}Rh{sub 1.35}Ge{sub 4.65}, Pmmn; a=0.42040(1), b=0.42247(1), c=1.72444(3) nm) was detected as a high-temperature compound, however, does not participate in the equilibria at 800 deg. C. Phase equilibria in Ce-Pd-Si are characterized by the absence of cerium solubility in palladium silicides. Mutual solubility among cerium silicides and cerium-palladium compounds are significant whereby random substitution of the almost equally sized atom species palladium and silicon is reflected in extended homogeneous regions at constant Ce-content such as for tau{sub 2}-Ce(Pd{sub x}Si{sub 1-x}){sub 2} (AlB{sub 2}-derivative type), tau{sub 6}-Ce(Pd{sub x}Si{sub 1-x}){sub 2} (ThSi{sub 2}-type) and tau{sub 7}-CePd{sub 2-x}Si{sub 2+x}. The crystal structures of compounds tau{sub 4}-Ce{sub a}pprox{sub 8}Pd

  19. Electrode electrolyte interlayers containing cerium oxide for electrochemical fuel cells

    DOEpatents

    Borglum, Brian P.; Bessette, Norman F.

    2000-01-01

    An electrochemical cell is made having a porous fuel electrode (16) and a porous air electrode (13), with solid oxide electrolyte (15) therebetween, where the air electrode surface opposing the electrolyte has a separate, attached, dense, continuous layer (14) of a material containing cerium oxide, and where electrolyte (16) contacts the continuous oxide layer (14), without contacting the air electrode (13).

  20. Progress on Radiative Transition Probabilities in Neutral Cerium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Curry, J. J.

    2009-10-01

    Cerium is a rare-earth atom that is currently used in energy-efficient metal-halide lamps because of its rich visible emission spectrum. More than 20,000 lines have been observed and classified for neutral cerium in the wavelength range of 340 nm to 1 μm (Bill Martin, unpublished). We recently derived more than 500 absolute transition probabilities from existing experimental data (J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys. 2009). Lawler and Den Hartog at the University of Wisconsin have made measurements that are expected to produce a few thousand transition probabilities. These advances, however, leave the data situation far short of what is needed to simulate an accurate global emission spectrum in numerical models of metal-halide lamps containing cerium. One possibility for closing this gap is through atomic structure calculations. Although it may be difficult for calculations to match the accuracy of measurements for any given transition, the global spectral distribution produced with calculated transition probabilities may still be satisfactory. For such a large number of lines, calculations may be the only realistic way to produce a reasonably complete set of data. We will discuss our recent atomic structure calculations of neutral cerium with the Cowan code based on a parametric fit of calculated energy level values to experimental values.

  1. Structural, optical and photocatalytic activity of cerium doped zinc aluminate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sumathi, Shanmugam; Kavipriya, A.

    2017-03-01

    Zinc aluminate and cerium-doped zinc aluminate nanoparticles are synthesised by co-precipitation method. Ammonium hydroxide is used as a precipitating agent. The synthesised compounds are characterised by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform Infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), Ultraviolet diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (UV-DRS), Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Surface area measurements. The photocatalytic activity of zinc aluminate and cerium doped zinc aluminate nanoparticles are studied under the UV light and visible light taking methylene blue as a model pollutant. The amount of catalyst, concentration of dye solution and time are optimised under UV-light. Degradation of methylene blue under the UV-light is found to be 99% in 20 min with 10 mg of cerium doped catalyst. Compared to visible light degradation, the degradation of dye under UV-light is higher. Cerium doping in zinc aluminate (ZnAl2O4:Ce3+) increased the photocatalytic activity of zinc aluminate.

  2. Cerium; crystal structure and position in the periodic table.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Börje; Luo, Wei; Li, Sa; Ahuja, Rajeev

    2014-09-17

    The properties of the cerium metal have intrigued physicists and chemists for many decades. In particular a lot of attention has been directed towards its high pressure behavior, where an isostructural volume collapse (γ phase → α phase) has been observed. Two main models of the electronic aspect of this transformation have been proposed; one where the 4f electron undergoes a change from being localized into an itinerant metallic state, and one where the focus is on the interaction between the 4f electron and the conduction electrons, often referred to as the Kondo volume collapse model. However, over the years it has been repeatedly questioned whether the cerium collapse really is isostructural. Most recently, detailed experiments have been able to remove this worrisome uncertainty. Therefore the isostructural aspect of the α-γ transition has now to be seriously addressed in the theoretical modeling, something which has been very much neglected. A study of this fundamental characteristic of the cerium volume collapse is made in present paper and we show that the localized [rlhar2 ] delocalized 4f electron picture provides an adequate description of this unique behavior. This agreement makes it possible to suggest that an appropriate crossroad position for cerium in The Periodic Table.

  3. 40 CFR 721.8657 - Cerium, hydroxy oleate propionate complexes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... complexes. 721.8657 Section 721.8657 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.8657 Cerium, hydroxy oleate propionate complexes. (a) Chemical substance..., hydroxy oleate propionate complexes (PMN P-99-0026) is subject to reporting under this section for the...

  4. Purification of cerium, neodymium and gadolinium for low background experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boiko, R. S.; Barabash, A. S.; Belli, P.; Bernabei, R.; Cappella, F.; Cerulli, R.; Danevich, F. A.; Incicchitti, A.; Laubenstein, M.; Mokina, V. M.; Nisi, S.; Poda, D. V.; Polischuk, O. G.; Tretyak, V. I.

    2014-01-01

    Cerium, neodymium and gadolinium contain double beta active isotopes. The most interesting are 150Nd and 160Gd (promising for 0ν2β search), 136Ce (2β+ candidate with one of the highest Q2β). The main problem of compounds containing lanthanide elements is their high radioactive contamination by uranium, radium, actinium and thorium. The new generation 2β experiments require development of methods for a deep purification of lanthanides from the radioactive elements. A combination of physical and chemical methods was applied to purify cerium, neodymium and gadolinium. Liquid-liquid extraction technique was used to remove traces of Th and U from neodymium, gadolinium and for purification of cerium from Th, U, Ra and K. Co-precipitation and recrystallization methods were utilized for further reduction of the impurities. The radioactive contamination of the samples before and after the purification was tested by using ultra-low-background HPGe gamma spectrometry. As a result of the purification procedure the radioactive contamination of gadolinium oxide (a similar purification efficiency was reached also with cerium and neodymium oxides) was decreased from 0.12 Bq/kg to 0.007 Bq/kg in 228Th, from 0.04 Bq/kg to <0.006 Bq/kg in 226Ra, and from 0.9 Bq/kg to 0.04 Bq/kg in 40K. The purification methods are much less efficient for chemically very similar radioactive elements like actinium, lanthanum and lutetium.

  5. Cerium; Crystal Structure and Position in The Periodic Table

    PubMed Central

    Johansson, Börje; Luo, Wei; Li, Sa; Ahuja, Rajeev

    2014-01-01

    The properties of the cerium metal have intrigued physicists and chemists for many decades. In particular a lot of attention has been directed towards its high pressure behavior, where an isostructural volume collapse (γ phase → α phase) has been observed. Two main models of the electronic aspect of this transformation have been proposed; one where the 4f electron undergoes a change from being localized into an itinerant metallic state, and one where the focus is on the interaction between the 4f electron and the conduction electrons, often referred to as the Kondo volume collapse model. However, over the years it has been repeatedly questioned whether the cerium collapse really is isostructural. Most recently, detailed experiments have been able to remove this worrisome uncertainty. Therefore the isostructural aspect of the α-γ transition has now to be seriously addressed in the theoretical modeling, something which has been very much neglected. A study of this fundamental characteristic of the cerium volume collapse is made in present paper and we show that the localized ⇌ delocalized 4f electron picture provides an adequate description of this unique behavior. This agreement makes it possible to suggest that an appropriate crossroad position for cerium in The Periodic Table. PMID:25227991

  6. Processing and Characterization of Sol-Gel Cerium Oxide Microspheres

    SciTech Connect

    McClure, Zachary D.; Padilla Cintron, Cristina

    2016-09-27

    Of interest to space exploration and power generation, Radioisotope Thermoelectric Generators (RTGs) can provide long-term power to remote electronic systems without the need for refueling or replacement. Plutonium-238 (Pu-238) remains one of the more promising materials for thermoelectric power generation due to its high power density, long half-life, and low gamma emissions. Traditional methods for processing Pu-238 include ball milling irregular precipitated powders before pressing and sintering into a dense pellet. The resulting submicron particulates of Pu-238 quickly accumulate and contaminate glove boxes. An alternative and dust-free method for Pu-238 processing is internal gelation via sol-gel techniques. Sol-gel methodology creates monodisperse and uniform microspheres that can be packed and pressed into a pellet. For this study cerium oxide microspheres were produced as a surrogate to Pu-238. The similar electronic orbitals between cerium and plutonium make cerium an ideal choice for non-radioactive work. Before the microspheres can be sintered and pressed they must be washed to remove the processing oil and any unreacted substituents. An investigation was performed on the washing step to find an appropriate wash solution that reduced waste and flammable risk. Cerium oxide microspheres were processed, washed, and characterized to determine the effectiveness of the new wash solution.

  7. A cadmium-zinc-telluride crystal array spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    H. R. McHugh; W. Quam; T. DeVore; R. Vogle; J. Weslowski

    2003-09-01

    This paper describes a gamma detector employing an array of eight cadmium-zinc-telluride (CZT) crystals configured as a high resolution gamma ray spectrometer. This detector is part of a more complex instrument that identifies the isotope,displays this information, and records the gamma spectrum. Various alarms and other operator features are incorporated in this battery operated rugged instrument. The CZT detector is the key component of this instrument and will be described in detail in this paper. We have made extensive spectral measurements of the usual laboratory gamma sources, common medical isotopes, and various Special Nuclear Materials (SNM) with this detector. Some of these data will be presented as spectra. We will also present energy resolution and detection efficiency for the basic 8-crystal array. Additional data will also be presented for a 32-crystal array. The basic 8-crystal array development was completed two years ago, and the system electronic design has been imp roved recently. This has resulted in significantly improved noise performance. We expect to have a much smaller detector package, using 8 crystals, in a few months. This package will use flip-chip packaging to reduce the electronics physical size by a factor of 5.

  8. Mechanical properties of thermoelectric lanthanum telluride from quantum mechanics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Guodong; Aydemir, Umut; Wood, Max; Goddard, William A., III; Zhai, Pengcheng; Zhang, Qingjie; Snyder, G. Jeffrey

    2017-07-01

    Lanthanum telluride (La3Te4) is an n-type high-performance thermoelectric material in the high temperature range, but its mechanical properties remain unknown. Since we want robust mechanical properties for their integration into industrial applications, we report here quantum mechanics (QM) simulations to determine the ideal strength and deformation mechanisms of La3Te4 under pure shear deformations. Among all plausible shear deformation paths, we find that shearing along the (0 0 1)/< \\text{1} 0 0> slip system has the lowest ideal shear strength of 0.99 GPa, making it the most likely slip system to be activated under pressure. We find that the long range La-Te ionic interactions play the predominant role in resisting shear deformation. To enhance the mechanical strength, we suggest improving the long ionic La-Te bond stiffness to strengthen the ionic La-Te framework in La3Te4 by a defect-engineering strategy, such as partial substitution of La by Ce or Pr having isotypic crystal structures. This work provides the fundamental information to understand the intrinsic mechanics of La3Te4.

  9. Ambient temperature cadmium zinc telluride radiation detector and amplifier circuit

    DOEpatents

    McQuaid, James H.; Lavietes, Anthony D.

    1998-05-29

    A low noise, low power consumption, compact, ambient temperature signal amplifier for a Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT) radiation detector. The amplifier can be used within a larger system (e.g., including a multi-channel analyzer) to allow isotopic analysis of radionuclides in the field. In one embodiment, the circuit stages of the low power, low noise amplifier are constructed using integrated circuit (IC) amplifiers , rather than discrete components, and include a very low noise, high gain, high bandwidth dual part preamplification stage, an amplification stage, and an filter stage. The low noise, low power consumption, compact, ambient temperature amplifier enables the CZT detector to achieve both the efficiency required to determine the presence of radio nuclides and the resolution necessary to perform isotopic analysis to perform nuclear material identification. The present low noise, low power, compact, ambient temperature amplifier enables a CZT detector to achieve resolution of less than 3% full width at half maximum at 122 keV for a Cobalt-57 isotope source. By using IC circuits and using only a single 12 volt supply and ground, the novel amplifier provides significant power savings and is well suited for prolonged portable in-field use and does not require heavy, bulky power supply components.

  10. Ambient temperature cadmium zinc telluride radiation detector and amplifier circuit

    DOEpatents

    McQuaid, J.H.; Lavietes, A.D.

    1998-05-26

    A low noise, low power consumption, compact, ambient temperature signal amplifier for a Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT) radiation detector is disclosed. The amplifier can be used within a larger system (e.g., including a multi-channel analyzer) to allow isotopic analysis of radionuclides in the field. In one embodiment, the circuit stages of the low power, low noise amplifier are constructed using integrated circuit (IC) amplifiers , rather than discrete components, and include a very low noise, high gain, high bandwidth dual part preamplification stage, an amplification stage, and an filter stage. The low noise, low power consumption, compact, ambient temperature amplifier enables the CZT detector to achieve both the efficiency required to determine the presence of radionuclides and the resolution necessary to perform isotopic analysis to perform nuclear material identification. The present low noise, low power, compact, ambient temperature amplifier enables a CZT detector to achieve resolution of less than 3% full width at half maximum at 122 keV for a Cobalt-57 isotope source. By using IC circuits and using only a single 12 volt supply and ground, the novel amplifier provides significant power savings and is well suited for prolonged portable in-field use and does not require heavy, bulky power supply components. 9 figs.

  11. Precision timing detectors with cadmium-telluride sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bornheim, A.; Pena, C.; Spiropulu, M.; Xie, S.; Zhang, Z.

    2017-09-01

    Precision timing detectors for high energy physics experiments with temporal resolutions of a few 10 ps are of pivotal importance to master the challenges posed by the highest energy particle accelerators such as the LHC. Calorimetric timing measurements have been a focus of recent research, enabled by exploiting the temporal coherence of electromagnetic showers. Scintillating crystals with high light yield as well as silicon sensors are viable sensitive materials for sampling calorimeters. Silicon sensors have very high efficiency for charged particles. However, their sensitivity to photons, which comprise a large fraction of the electromagnetic shower, is limited. To enhance the efficiency of detecting photons, materials with higher atomic numbers than silicon are preferable. In this paper we present test beam measurements with a Cadmium-Telluride (CdTe) sensor as the active element of a secondary emission calorimeter with focus on the timing performance of the detector. A Schottky type CdTe sensor with an active area of 1cm2 and a thickness of 1 mm is used in an arrangement with tungsten and lead absorbers. Measurements are performed with electron beams in the energy range from 2 GeV to 200 GeV. A timing resolution of 20 ps is achieved under the best conditions.

  12. Vapor crystal growth technology development: Application to cadmium telluride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenberger, Franz; Banish, Michael; Duval, Walter M. B.

    1991-01-01

    Growth of bulk crystals by physical vapor transport was developed and applied to cadmium telluride. The technology makes use of effusive ampoules, in which part of the vapor contents escapes to a vacuum shroud through defined leaks during the growth process. This approach has the advantage over traditional sealed ampoule techniques that impurity vapors and excess vapor constituents are continuously removed from the vicinity of the growing crystal. Thus, growth rates are obtained routinely at magnitudes that are rather difficult to achieve in closed ampoules. Other advantages of this effusive ampoule physical vapor transport (EAPVT) technique include the predetermination of transport rates based on simple fluid dynamics and engineering considerations, and the growth of the crystal from close to congruent vapors, which largely alleviates the compositional nonuniformities resulting from buoyancy driven convective transport. After concisely reviewing earlier work on improving transport rates, nucleation control, and minimization of crystal wall interactions in vapor crystal growth, a detail account is given of the largely computer controlled EAPVT experimentation.

  13. Inverting polar domains via electrical pulsing in metallic germanium telluride.

    PubMed

    Nukala, Pavan; Ren, Mingliang; Agarwal, Rahul; Berger, Jacob; Liu, Gerui; Johnson, A T Charlie; Agarwal, Ritesh

    2017-04-12

    Germanium telluride (GeTe) is both polar and metallic, an unusual combination of properties in any material system. The large concentration of free-carriers in GeTe precludes the coupling of external electric field with internal polarization, rendering it ineffective for conventional ferroelectric applications and polarization switching. Here we investigate alternate ways of coupling the polar domains in GeTe to external electrical stimuli through optical second harmonic generation polarimetry and in situ TEM electrical testing on single-crystalline GeTe nanowires. We show that anti-phase boundaries, created from current pulses (heat shocks), invert the polarization of selective domains resulting in reorganization of certain 71(o) domain boundaries into 109(o) boundaries. These boundaries subsequently interact and evolve with the partial dislocations, which migrate from domain to domain with the carrier-wind force (electrical current). This work suggests that current pulses and carrier-wind force could be external stimuli for domain engineering in ferroelectrics with significant current leakage.

  14. Bioinspired inimitable cadmium telluride quantum dots for bioimaging purposes.

    PubMed

    Pawar, Vinay; Kumar, Ameeta Ravi; Zinjarde, Smita; Gosavi, Suresh

    2013-06-01

    Synthesis of quantum nanoparticles of specific size, shape and composition are an aspect important in nanotechnology research. Although these nanostructures are routinely synthesized by chemical routes, the use of microorganisms has emerged as a promising option. The synthesis of cadmium telluride (CdTe) quantum dots by two hitherto unreported marine bacteria (Bacillus pumilus and Serratia marcescens) is reported here. Ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis) spectroscopy indicated the synthesis of CdTe nanoparticles and X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns implicated their crystalline face-centered cubic nature. The size of the synthesized CdTe nanostructures estimated by XRD and dynamic light scattering (DLS) analysis was found to be approximately 10 nm. Photoluminescence (PL) studies were used to confirm the fluorescence properties of these semi-conducting nanoparticles. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) analysis showed the presence of well-defined nanostructures and energy dispersive spectra (EDS) confirmed the microbial synthesis of these nanoparticles. These bio-inspired CdTe nanostructures could be effectively used in imaging of yeast and animal cells. This work thus describes a cost-effective green method for synthesizing highly fluorescent biocompatible CdTe nanoparticles suitable for bio-labeling purposes.

  15. Preliminary uranium enrichment analysis results using cadmium zinc telluride detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavietes, Anthony D.; McQuaid, James H.; Paulus, T. J.

    1996-10-01

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and EG and G ORTEC have jointly developed a portable ambient-temperature detection system that can be used in a number of application scenarios. The detection system uses a planar cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) detector with custom-designed detector support electronics developed at LLNL and is based on the recently released MicroNOMAD multichannel analyzer (MCA) produced by ORTEC. Spectral analysis is performed using software developed at LLNL that was originally designed for use with high-purity germanium (HPGe) detector systems. In one application, the CZT detection system determines uranium enrichments ranging from less than 3% to over 75% to within accuracies of 20%. The analysis was performed using sample sizes of 200 g or larger and acquisition times of 30 min. We have demonstrated the capabilities of this system by analyzing the spectra gathered by the CZT detection system from uranium sources of several enrichments. These experiments demonstrate that current CZT detectors can, in some cases, approach performance criteria that were previously the exclusive domain of larger HPGe detector systems.

  16. Selective and low temperature transition metal intercalation in layered tellurides

    PubMed Central

    Yajima, Takeshi; Koshiko, Masaki; Zhang, Yaoqing; Oguchi, Tamio; Yu, Wen; Kato, Daichi; Kobayashi, Yoji; Orikasa, Yuki; Yamamoto, Takafumi; Uchimoto, Yoshiharu; Green, Mark A.; Kageyama, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Layered materials embrace rich intercalation reactions to accommodate high concentrations of foreign species within their structures, and find many applications spanning from energy storage, ion exchange to secondary batteries. Light alkali metals are generally most easily intercalated due to their light mass, high charge/volume ratio and in many cases strong reducing properties. An evolving area of materials chemistry, however, is to capture metals selectively, which is of technological and environmental significance but rather unexplored. Here we show that the layered telluride T2PTe2 (T=Ti, Zr) displays exclusive insertion of transition metals (for example, Cd, Zn) as opposed to alkali cations, with tetrahedral coordination preference to tellurium. Interestingly, the intercalation reactions proceed in solid state and at surprisingly low temperatures (for example, 80 °C for cadmium in Ti2PTe2). The current method of controlling selectivity provides opportunities in the search for new materials for various applications that used to be possible only in a liquid. PMID:27966540

  17. Induced Positron Annihiliation Investigation of Cadmium Zinc Telluride Crystal Microstructures

    SciTech Connect

    D. W. Akers

    2005-06-01

    Cadmium-Zinc-Telluride (CZT) crystals are used in semiconductor radiation detectors for the detection of x-ray and gamma radiation. However, production of detector grade crystals is difficult as small variations in compositional uniformity and primarily the zinc content can significantly affect the ability of the CZT crystal to function as a radiation detector. Currently there are no known nondestructive methods that can be used to identify detector grade crystals. The current test method is to fabricate and test the detector to determine if the crystal is sufficiently uniform and of the correct composition to be considered a detector grade crystal. Consequently, nondestructive detection methods are needed to identify detector grade crystals prior to the fabrication process. The purpose of this feasibility study was to perform a preliminary assessment of the ability of several new, nondestructive technologies based on Induced Positron Annihilation (IPA) to determine if detector grade CZT crystals can be identified. Results of measurements performed on specimens from Fisk University and EV Products, Inc. indicate that both the near surface Distributed Source Positron Annihilation (up to 3 mm penetration) and the volumetric Photon Induced Positron Annihilation methods may be suitable for determining CZT crystal quality. Further work on CZT crystals with a broader range of compositions and detector characteristics is needed to provide a well defined, calibrated, method for assessing CZT crystal quality.

  18. Compensation mechanism of bromine dopants in cadmium telluride single crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Bolotnikov, A. E.; Fochuk, P. M.; Verzhak, Ye. V.; Parashchuk, T. O.; Freik, D. M.; Panchuk, O. E.; James, R. B.; Gorichok, I. V.

    2015-01-02

    We grew single crystals of cadmium telluride, doped with bromine by the Bridgman method, annealed them under a cadmium overpressure (PCd = 10² - 10⁵ Pa) at 800-1100 K, and investigated their electrical properties at high- and low-temperature. The influence of impurities on the crystals' electrical properties were analyzed using the defect subsystem model; the model includes the possibility of the formation of point intrinsic defects (V²⁻Cd, Cd²⁺i, V²⁺Te, Te²⁻i), and substitutional ones (Br⁰Te, Br⁺Te), as well as complexes of point defects, i.e., (Br⁺Te V²⁻Cd)⁻ and (2Br⁺Te V²⁻Cd)⁰. We established the concentration dependence between free charge carriers and the parameters of the annealing process. Here, n(T) and n(PCd) are determined by two dominant defects – Br⁺Te and (2Br⁺Te V²⁻Cd)⁰. Their content varies with the annealing temperature and the vapor pressure of the component; the concentration of other defects is much smaller and almost does not affect the electron density.

  19. Compensation mechanism of bromine dopants in cadmium telluride single crystals

    DOE PAGES

    Bolotnikov, A. E.; Fochuk, P. M.; Verzhak, Ye. V.; ...

    2015-01-02

    We grew single crystals of cadmium telluride, doped with bromine by the Bridgman method, annealed them under a cadmium overpressure (PCd = 10² - 10⁵ Pa) at 800-1100 K, and investigated their electrical properties at high- and low-temperature. The influence of impurities on the crystals' electrical properties were analyzed using the defect subsystem model; the model includes the possibility of the formation of point intrinsic defects (V²⁻Cd, Cd²⁺i, V²⁺Te, Te²⁻i), and substitutional ones (Br⁰Te, Br⁺Te), as well as complexes of point defects, i.e., (Br⁺Te V²⁻Cd)⁻ and (2Br⁺Te V²⁻Cd)⁰. We established the concentration dependence between free charge carriers and themore » parameters of the annealing process. Here, n(T) and n(PCd) are determined by two dominant defects – Br⁺Te and (2Br⁺Te V²⁻Cd)⁰. Their content varies with the annealing temperature and the vapor pressure of the component; the concentration of other defects is much smaller and almost does not affect the electron density.« less

  20. Chemical synthesis and supercapacitive properties of lanthanum telluride thin film.

    PubMed

    Patil, S J; Lokhande, A C; Lee, D-W; Kim, J H; Lokhande, C D

    2017-03-15

    Lanthanum telluride (La2Te3) thin films are synthesized via a successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction (SILAR) method. The crystal structure, surface morphology and surface wettability properties are investigated using X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) and contact angle goniometer techniques, respectively. The La2Te3 material exhibits a specific surface area of 51m(2)g(-1) determined by Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) method. La2Te3 thin film electrode has a hydrophilic surface which consists of interconnected pine leaf-like flaky arrays that affect the performance of the supercapacitor. The supercapacitive performance of La2Te3 film electrode is evaluated in 1M LiClO4/PC electrolyte using cyclic voltammetry, galvanostatic charge-discharge, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy techniques. La2Te3 film electrode exhibits a specific capacitance of 194Fg(-1) at a scan rate of 5mVs(-1) and stored energy density of 60Whkg(-1) with delivering power density of 7.22kWkg(-1). La2Te3 film electrode showed capacitive retention of 82% over 1000cycles at a scan rate of 100mVs(-1). Further, flexible La2Te3|LiClO4-PVA|La2Te3 supercapacitor cell is fabricated.

  1. Frustrated square lattice Heisenberg model and magnetism in Iron Telluride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaliznyak, Igor; Xu, Zhijun; Gu, Genda; Tranquada, John; Stone, Matthew

    2011-03-01

    We have measured spin excitations in iron telluride Fe1.1Te, the parent material of (1,1) family of iron-based superconductors. It has been recognized that J1-J2-J3 frustrated Heisenberg model on a square lattice might be relevant for the unusual magnetism and, perhaps, the superconductivity in cuprates [1,2]. Recent neutron scattering measurements show that similar frustrated model might also provide reasonable account for magnetic excitations in iron pnictide materials. We find that it also describes general features of spin excitations in FeTe parent compound observed in our recent neutron measurements, as well as in those by other groups. Results imply proximity of magnetic system to the limit of extreme frustration. Selection of spin ground state under such conditions could be driven by weak extrinsic interactions, such as lattice distortion, or strain. Consequently, different nonuniversal types of magnetic order could arise, both commensurate and incommensurate. These are not necessarily intrinsic to an ideal J1-J2-J3 model, but might result from lifting of its near degeneracy by weak extrinsic perturbations.

  2. Inverting polar domains via electrical pulsing in metallic germanium telluride

    PubMed Central

    Nukala, Pavan; Ren, Mingliang; Agarwal, Rahul; Berger, Jacob; Liu, Gerui; Johnson, A. T. Charlie; Agarwal, Ritesh

    2017-01-01

    Germanium telluride (GeTe) is both polar and metallic, an unusual combination of properties in any material system. The large concentration of free-carriers in GeTe precludes the coupling of external electric field with internal polarization, rendering it ineffective for conventional ferroelectric applications and polarization switching. Here we investigate alternate ways of coupling the polar domains in GeTe to external electrical stimuli through optical second harmonic generation polarimetry and in situ TEM electrical testing on single-crystalline GeTe nanowires. We show that anti-phase boundaries, created from current pulses (heat shocks), invert the polarization of selective domains resulting in reorganization of certain 71o domain boundaries into 109o boundaries. These boundaries subsequently interact and evolve with the partial dislocations, which migrate from domain to domain with the carrier-wind force (electrical current). This work suggests that current pulses and carrier-wind force could be external stimuli for domain engineering in ferroelectrics with significant current leakage. PMID:28401949

  3. Brief review of cadmium telluride-based photovoltaic technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Başol, Bülent M.; McCandless, Brian

    2014-01-01

    Cadmium telluride (CdTe) is the most commercially successful thin-film photovoltaic technology. Development of CdTe as a solar cell material dates back to the early 1980s when ˜10% efficient devices were demonstrated. Implementation of better quality glass, more transparent conductive oxides, introduction of a high-resistivity transparent film under the CdS junction-partner, higher deposition temperatures, and improved Cl-treatment, doping, and contacting approaches yielded >16% efficient cells in the early 2000s. Around the same time period, use of a photoresist plug monolithic integration process facilitated the demonstration of the first 11% efficient module. The most dramatic advancements in CdTe device efficiencies were made during the 2013 to 2014 time frame when small-area cell conversion efficiency was raised to 20% range and a champion module efficiency of 17% was reported. CdTe technology is attractive in terms of its limited life-cycle greenhouse gas and heavy metal emissions, small carbon footprint, and short energy payback times. Limited Te availability is a challenge for the growth of this technology unless Te utilization rates are greatly enhanced along with device efficiencies.

  4. Studies on Seebeck Coefficient of Individual Bismuth Telluride Nanotube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Duksoo; Du, Renzhong; Yin, Yuewei; Dong, Sining; Li, Xiaoguang; Li, Qi; Tadigadapa, Srinivas

    2013-03-01

    We have studied on Seebeck coefficient (S) of freestanding individual Bismuth Telluride nanotubes using micro-fabricated thermoelectric workbench at the temperatures from 300 K to 25 K. The thermoelectric workbench is composed of three main elements: heater, thermocouple, and platinum pad. A polysilicon-gold thermocouple accurately measures the temperature, arising from the heat generated at the tips of the test sites from the polysilicon heater located 2 μm apart from the thermocouple. Platinum pads placed on top of the heater and thermocouple structures and electrically isolated from these constitute S measurement circuit. IPA solution containing Bi2Te3 nanotubes was drop-cast on the workbench and the Ebeam Induced Deposition of platinum was used to improve the electrical and thermal contacts between nanotube and platinum pads. The inner and outer diameter of nanotube is 50 nm and 70 nm, respectively. The sign of obtained S was positive which is indicating the nanotube is p-type. And the magnitude was increased compared to the bulk and nanowire types. The measured S (364 μV/K) of nanotube at T = 300 K is 1.65 times larger than that (220 μV/K) of bulk and 1.4 times larger than the previously reported value (260 μV/K) of nanowire. This work is supported by NSF MRSEC (Grant No. DMR-0820404)

  5. Inverting polar domains via electrical pulsing in metallic germanium telluride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nukala, Pavan; Ren, Mingliang; Agarwal, Rahul; Berger, Jacob; Liu, Gerui; Johnson, A. T. Charlie; Agarwal, Ritesh

    2017-04-01

    Germanium telluride (GeTe) is both polar and metallic, an unusual combination of properties in any material system. The large concentration of free-carriers in GeTe precludes the coupling of external electric field with internal polarization, rendering it ineffective for conventional ferroelectric applications and polarization switching. Here we investigate alternate ways of coupling the polar domains in GeTe to external electrical stimuli through optical second harmonic generation polarimetry and in situ TEM electrical testing on single-crystalline GeTe nanowires. We show that anti-phase boundaries, created from current pulses (heat shocks), invert the polarization of selective domains resulting in reorganization of certain 71o domain boundaries into 109o boundaries. These boundaries subsequently interact and evolve with the partial dislocations, which migrate from domain to domain with the carrier-wind force (electrical current). This work suggests that current pulses and carrier-wind force could be external stimuli for domain engineering in ferroelectrics with significant current leakage.

  6. Selective and low temperature transition metal intercalation in layered tellurides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yajima, Takeshi; Koshiko, Masaki; Zhang, Yaoqing; Oguchi, Tamio; Yu, Wen; Kato, Daichi; Kobayashi, Yoji; Orikasa, Yuki; Yamamoto, Takafumi; Uchimoto, Yoshiharu; Green, Mark A.; Kageyama, Hiroshi

    2016-12-01

    Layered materials embrace rich intercalation reactions to accommodate high concentrations of foreign species within their structures, and find many applications spanning from energy storage, ion exchange to secondary batteries. Light alkali metals are generally most easily intercalated due to their light mass, high charge/volume ratio and in many cases strong reducing properties. An evolving area of materials chemistry, however, is to capture metals selectively, which is of technological and environmental significance but rather unexplored. Here we show that the layered telluride T2PTe2 (T=Ti, Zr) displays exclusive insertion of transition metals (for example, Cd, Zn) as opposed to alkali cations, with tetrahedral coordination preference to tellurium. Interestingly, the intercalation reactions proceed in solid state and at surprisingly low temperatures (for example, 80 °C for cadmium in Ti2PTe2). The current method of controlling selectivity provides opportunities in the search for new materials for various applications that used to be possible only in a liquid.

  7. In-Plane Optical Anisotropy of Layered Gallium Telluride.

    PubMed

    Huang, Shengxi; Tatsumi, Yuki; Ling, Xi; Guo, Huaihong; Wang, Ziqiang; Watson, Garrett; Puretzky, Alexander A; Geohegan, David B; Kong, Jing; Li, Ju; Yang, Teng; Saito, Riichiro; Dresselhaus, Mildred S

    2016-09-27

    Layered gallium telluride (GaTe) has attracted much attention recently, due to its extremely high photoresponsivity, short response time, and promising thermoelectric performance. Different from most commonly studied two-dimensional (2D) materials, GaTe has in-plane anisotropy and a low symmetry with the C2h(3) space group. Investigating the in-plane optical anisotropy, including the electron-photon and electron-phonon interactions of GaTe is essential in realizing its applications in optoelectronics and thermoelectrics. In this work, the anisotropic light-matter interactions in the low-symmetry material GaTe are studied using anisotropic optical extinction and Raman spectroscopies as probes. Our polarized optical extinction spectroscopy reveals the weak anisotropy in optical extinction spectra for visible light of multilayer GaTe. Polarized Raman spectroscopy proves to be sensitive to the crystalline orientation of GaTe, and shows the intricate dependences of Raman anisotropy on flake thickness, photon and phonon energies. Such intricate dependences can be explained by theoretical analyses employing first-principles calculations and group theory. These studies are a crucial step toward the applications of GaTe especially in optoelectronics and thermoelectrics, and provide a general methodology for the study of the anisotropy of light-matter interactions in 2D layered materials with in-plane anisotropy.

  8. In-plane optical anisotropy of layered gallium telluride

    DOE PAGES

    Huang, Shengxi; Tatsumi, Yuki; Ling, Xi; ...

    2016-08-16

    Layered gallium telluride (GaTe) has attracted much attention recently, due to its extremely high photoresponsivity, short response time, and promising thermoelectric performance. Different from most commonly studied two-dimensional (2D) materials, GaTe has in-plane anisotropy and a low symmetry with the C2h3 space group. Investigating the in-plane optical anisotropy, including the electron–photon and electron–phonon interactions of GaTe is essential in realizing its applications in optoelectronics and thermoelectrics. In this work, the anisotropic light-matter interactions in the low-symmetry material GaTe are studied using anisotropic optical extinction and Raman spectroscopies as probes. Our polarized optical extinction spectroscopy reveals the weak anisotropy in opticalmore » extinction spectra for visible light of multilayer GaTe. Polarized Raman spectroscopy proves to be sensitive to the crystalline orientation of GaTe, and shows the intricate dependences of Raman anisotropy on flake thickness, photon and phonon energies. Such intricate dependences can be explained by theoretical analyses employing first-principles calculations and group theory. Furthermore, these studies are a crucial step toward the applications of GaTe especially in optoelectronics and thermoelectrics, and provide a general methodology for the study of the anisotropy of light-matter interactions in 2D layered materials with in-plane anisotropy.« less

  9. In-plane optical anisotropy of layered gallium telluride

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Shengxi; Tatsumi, Yuki; Ling, Xi; Guo, Huaihong; Wang, Ziqiang; Watson, Garrett; Puretzky, Alexander A.; Geohegan, David B.; Kong, Jing; Li, Ju; Yang, Teng; Saito, Riichiro; Dresselhaus, Mildred S.

    2016-08-16

    Layered gallium telluride (GaTe) has attracted much attention recently, due to its extremely high photoresponsivity, short response time, and promising thermoelectric performance. Different from most commonly studied two-dimensional (2D) materials, GaTe has in-plane anisotropy and a low symmetry with the C2h3 space group. Investigating the in-plane optical anisotropy, including the electron–photon and electron–phonon interactions of GaTe is essential in realizing its applications in optoelectronics and thermoelectrics. In this work, the anisotropic light-matter interactions in the low-symmetry material GaTe are studied using anisotropic optical extinction and Raman spectroscopies as probes. Our polarized optical extinction spectroscopy reveals the weak anisotropy in optical extinction spectra for visible light of multilayer GaTe. Polarized Raman spectroscopy proves to be sensitive to the crystalline orientation of GaTe, and shows the intricate dependences of Raman anisotropy on flake thickness, photon and phonon energies. Such intricate dependences can be explained by theoretical analyses employing first-principles calculations and group theory. Furthermore, these studies are a crucial step toward the applications of GaTe especially in optoelectronics and thermoelectrics, and provide a general methodology for the study of the anisotropy of light-matter interactions in 2D layered materials with in-plane anisotropy.

  10. In-plane optical anisotropy of layered gallium telluride

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Shengxi; Tatsumi, Yuki; Ling, Xi; Guo, Huaihong; Wang, Ziqiang; Watson, Garrett; Puretzky, Alexander A.; Geohegan, David B.; Kong, Jing; Li, Ju; Yang, Teng; Saito, Riichiro; Dresselhaus, Mildred S.

    2016-08-16

    Layered gallium telluride (GaTe) has attracted much attention recently, due to its extremely high photoresponsivity, short response time, and promising thermoelectric performance. Different from most commonly studied two-dimensional (2D) materials, GaTe has in-plane anisotropy and a low symmetry with the C2h3 space group. Investigating the in-plane optical anisotropy, including the electron–photon and electron–phonon interactions of GaTe is essential in realizing its applications in optoelectronics and thermoelectrics. In this work, the anisotropic light-matter interactions in the low-symmetry material GaTe are studied using anisotropic optical extinction and Raman spectroscopies as probes. Our polarized optical extinction spectroscopy reveals the weak anisotropy in optical extinction spectra for visible light of multilayer GaTe. Polarized Raman spectroscopy proves to be sensitive to the crystalline orientation of GaTe, and shows the intricate dependences of Raman anisotropy on flake thickness, photon and phonon energies. Such intricate dependences can be explained by theoretical analyses employing first-principles calculations and group theory. Furthermore, these studies are a crucial step toward the applications of GaTe especially in optoelectronics and thermoelectrics, and provide a general methodology for the study of the anisotropy of light-matter interactions in 2D layered materials with in-plane anisotropy.

  11. Fundamental aspects of regenerative cerium oxide nanoparticles and their applications in nanobiotechnology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patil, Swanand D.

    Cerium oxide has been used extensively for various applications over the past two decades. The use of cerium oxide nanoparticles is beneficial in present applications and can open avenues for future applications. The present study utilizes the microemulsion technique to synthesize uniformly distributed cerium oxide nanoparticles. The same technique was also used to synthesize cerium oxide nanoparticles doped with trivalent elements (La and Nd). The fundamental study of cerium oxide nanoparticles identified variations in properties as a function of particle size and also due to doping with trivalent elements (La and Nd). It was found that the lattice parameter of cerium oxide nanoparticles increases with decrease in particle size. Also Raman allowed mode shift to lower energies and the peak at 464 cm-1 becomes broader and asymmetric. The size dependent changes in cerium oxide were correlated to increase in oxygen vacancy concentration in the cerium oxide lattice. The doping of cerium oxide nanoparticles with trivalent elements introduces more oxygen vacancies and expands the cerium oxide lattice further (in addition to the lattice expansion due to the size effect). The lattice expansion is greater for La-doped cerium oxide nanoparticles compared to Nd-doping due to the larger ionic radius of La compared to Nd, the lattice expansion is directly proportional to the dopant concentration. The synthesized cerium oxide nanoparticles were used to develop an electrochemical biosensor of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). The sensor was useful to detect H2O2 concentrations as low as 1muM in water. Also the preliminary testing of the sensor on tomato stem and leaf extracts indicated that the sensor can be used in practical applications such as plant physiological studies etc. The nanomolar concentrations of cerium oxide nanoparticles were also found to be useful in decreasing ROS (reactive oxygen species) mediated cellular damages in various in vitro cell cultures. Cerium oxide

  12. Near Infrared Quantum Cutting Luminescence of Er(3+)/Tm(3+) Ion Pairs in a Telluride Glass.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaobo; Li, Song; Hu, Lili; Wang, Kezhi; Zhao, Guoying; He, Lizhu; Liu, Jinying; Yu, Chunlei; Tao, Jingfu; Lin, Wei; Yang, Guojian; Salamo, Gregory J

    2017-05-16

    The multiphoton near-infrared, quantum cutting luminescence in Er(3+)/Tm(3+) co-doped telluride glass was studied. We found that the near-infrared 1800-nm luminescence intensity of (A) Er(3+)(8%)Tm(3+)(0.5%):telluride glass was approximately 4.4 to 19.5 times larger than that of (B) Tm(3+)(0.5%):telluride glass, and approximately 5.0 times larger than that of (C) Er(3+)(0.5%):telluride glass. Additionally, the infrared excitation spectra of the 1800 nm luminescence, as well as the visible excitation spectra of the 522 nm and 652 nm luminescence, of (A) Er(3+)(8%)Tm(3+)(0.5%):telluride glass are very similar to those of Er(3+) ions in (C) Er(3+)(0.5%):telluride glass, with respect to the shapes of their excitation spectral waveforms and peak wavelengths. Moreover, we found that there is a strong spectral overlap and energy transfer between the infrared luminescence of Er(3+) donor ions and the infrared absorption of Tm(3+) acceptor ions. The efficiency of this energy transfer {(4)I13/2(Er(3+)) → (4)I15/2(Er(3+)), (3)H6(Tm(3+)) → (3)F4(Tm(3+))} between the Er(3+) and Tm(3+) ions is approximately 69.8%. Therefore, we can conclude that the observed behaviour is an interesting multiphoton, near-infrared, quantum cutting luminescence phenomenon that occurs in novel Er(3+)-Tm(3+) ion pairs. These findings are significant for the development of next-generation environmentally friendly germanium solar cells, and near-to-mid infrared (1.8-2.0 μm) lasers pumped by GaN light emitting diodes.

  13. Fabrication of Nanovoid-Imbedded Bismuth Telluride with Low Dimensional System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chu, Sang-Hyon (Inventor); Choi, Sang H. (Inventor); Kim, Jae-Woo (Inventor); Park, Yeonjoon (Inventor); Elliott, James R. (Inventor); King, Glen C. (Inventor); Stoakley, Diane M. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A new fabrication method for nanovoids-imbedded bismuth telluride (Bi--Te) material with low dimensional (quantum-dots, quantum-wires, or quantum-wells) structure was conceived during the development of advanced thermoelectric (TE) materials. Bismuth telluride is currently the best-known candidate material for solid-state TE cooling devices because it possesses the highest TE figure of merit at room temperature. The innovative process described here allows nanometer-scale voids to be incorporated in Bi--Te material. The final nanovoid structure such as void size, size distribution, void location, etc. can be also controlled under various process conditions.

  14. Telluride glasses with far-infrared transmission up to 35 μm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Coq, David; Cui, Shuo; Boussard-Plédel, Catherine; Masselin, Pascal; Bychkov, Eugène; Bureau, Bruno

    2017-10-01

    Telluride glasses are very attractive due to their unique infrared transparency window compared to other chalcogenide glasses. The extension of their infrared transmission by changing the composition appears to be very challenging. Glasses in the (GeTe4)100-x(AgI)x system, with 5 ≤ x ≤ 30 have been synthesized using the melt-quenching method. The effect of the addition of silver iodide is a widening of the infrared transparency range up to 35 μm that is much larger than for any other chalcogenide glass families. Moreover, the moulding of these telluride glasses is also achievable without affecting the optical properties.

  15. Effect of Indium on the Superconducting Transition Temperature of Tin Telluride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, Ruidan; Schneeloch, John; Shi, Xiaoya; Li, Qiang; Tranquada, John; Gu, Genda

    2013-03-01

    Indium-doped tin telluride is one of the most appealing topological superconductors. We have grown a series of Sn1-xInxTe crystals with different indium concentrations (0.1 <=x <=1.0). The results show indium doping improves the superconducting transition temperature significantly and is highly related to the indium concentration. The maximum Tc of indium-doped tin telluride polycrystalline is 4.5K for x =0.4. Single crystals of Sn1-xInxTe were also grown by the floating zone method, and their magnetic properties were characterized.

  16. Correlation of tellurium inclusions and carrier lifetime in detector grade cadmium zinc telluride

    SciTech Connect

    Elshazly, Ezzat S.; Tepper, Gary

    2008-07-28

    Carrier lifetimes and tellurium inclusion densities in detector grade cadmium zinc telluride crystals grown by the high pressure Bridgman method were optically measured using pulsed laser microwave cavity perturbation and infrared microscopy. Excess carriers were produced in the material using a pulsed laser with a wavelength of 1064 nm and pulse width of 7 ns, and the electronic decay was measured at room temperature. Spatial mapping of lifetimes and defect densities in cadmium zinc telluride was performed to determine the relationship between tellurium defect density and trapping. A strong correlation was found between the volume fraction of tellurium inclusions and the carrier trapping time.

  17. Directional Solidification of Mercury Cadmium Telluride in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lechoczhy, Sandor L.; Gillies, Donald C.; Szofran, Frank R.; Watring, Dale A.

    1998-01-01

    Mercury cadmium telluride (MCT) has been directionally solidified for ten days in the Advanced Automated Directional Solidification Furnace (AADSF) on the second United States Microgravity Payload Mission (USMP-2). A second growth experiment is planned for the USMP-4 mission in November 1997. Results from USMP-2 demonstrated significant changes between microgravity and ground-based experiments, particularly in the compositional homogeneity. Changes were also observed during the microgravity mission which were dependent on the attitude of the space shuttle and the relative magnitudes of axial and transverse residual accelerations with respect to the growth axis of the crystal. Issues of shuttle operation, especially those concerned with safety and navigation, and the science needs of other payloads dictated the need for changes in attitude. One consequence for solidification of MCT in the USMP4 mission is the desire for a shorter growth time to complete the experiment without subjecting the sample to shuttle maneuvers. By using a seeded technique and a pre-processed boule of MCT with an established diffusion layer quenched into the solid, equilibrium steady state growth can be established within 24 hours, rather than the three days needed in USMP-2. The growth of MCT in AADSF during the USMP-4 mission has been planned to take less than 72 hours with 48 hours of actual growth time. A review of the USMP-2 results will be presented, and the rationale for the USMP-4 explained. Pre-mission ground based tests for the USN4P-4 mission will be presented, as will any available preliminary flight results from the mission.

  18. Current transport mechanisms in mercury cadmium telluride diode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gopal, Vishnu; Li, Qing; He, Jiale; He, Kai; Lin, Chun; Hu, Weida

    2016-08-01

    This paper reports the results of modelling of the current-voltage characteristics (I-V) of a planar mid-wave Mercury Cadmium Telluride photodiode in a gate controlled diode experiment. It is reported that the diode exhibits nearly ideal I-V characteristics under the optimum surface potential leading to the minimal surface leakage current. Deviations from the optimum surface potential lead to non ideal I-V characteristics, indicating a strong relationship between the ideality factor of the diode with its surface leakage current. Diode's I-V characteristics have been modelled over a range of gate voltages from -9 V to -2 V. This range of gate voltages includes accumulation, flat band, and depletion and inversion conditions below the gate structure of the diode. It is shown that the I-V characteristics of the diode can be very well described by (i) thermal diffusion current, (ii) ohmic shunt current, (iii) photo-current due to background illumination, and (iv) excess current that grows by the process of avalanche multiplication in the gate voltage range from -3 V to -5 V that corresponds to the optimum surface potential. Outside the optimum gate voltage range, the origin of the excess current of the diode is associated with its high surface leakage currents. It is reported that the ohmic shunt current model applies to small surface leakage currents. The higher surface leakage currents exhibit a nonlinear shunt behaviour. It is also shown that the observed zero-bias dynamic resistance of the diode over the entire gate voltage range is the sum of ohmic shunt resistance and estimated zero-bias dynamic resistance of the diode from its thermal saturation current.

  19. Current transport mechanisms in mercury cadmium telluride diode

    SciTech Connect

    Gopal, Vishnu E-mail: wdhu@mail.sitp.ac.cn; Li, Qing; He, Jiale; Hu, Weida E-mail: wdhu@mail.sitp.ac.cn; He, Kai; Lin, Chun

    2016-08-28

    This paper reports the results of modelling of the current-voltage characteristics (I-V) of a planar mid-wave Mercury Cadmium Telluride photodiode in a gate controlled diode experiment. It is reported that the diode exhibits nearly ideal I-V characteristics under the optimum surface potential leading to the minimal surface leakage current. Deviations from the optimum surface potential lead to non ideal I–V characteristics, indicating a strong relationship between the ideality factor of the diode with its surface leakage current. Diode's I–V characteristics have been modelled over a range of gate voltages from −9 V to −2 V. This range of gate voltages includes accumulation, flat band, and depletion and inversion conditions below the gate structure of the diode. It is shown that the I–V characteristics of the diode can be very well described by (i) thermal diffusion current, (ii) ohmic shunt current, (iii) photo-current due to background illumination, and (iv) excess current that grows by the process of avalanche multiplication in the gate voltage range from −3 V to −5 V that corresponds to the optimum surface potential. Outside the optimum gate voltage range, the origin of the excess current of the diode is associated with its high surface leakage currents. It is reported that the ohmic shunt current model applies to small surface leakage currents. The higher surface leakage currents exhibit a nonlinear shunt behaviour. It is also shown that the observed zero-bias dynamic resistance of the diode over the entire gate voltage range is the sum of ohmic shunt resistance and estimated zero-bias dynamic resistance of the diode from its thermal saturation current.

  20. Effectiveness of ethylene glycol bis (2-aminoethyl ether) tetraacetic acid (EGTA) against cerium toxicity.

    PubMed

    Shrivastava, Sadhana; Mathur, R

    2004-09-01

    Therapeutic efficacy of EGTA (ethylene glycol bis (2-aminoethyl ether) tetraacetic acid) against cerium intoxicated mice was studied. Administration of cerium showed significant decrease in haemoglobin percentage, RBC counts and blood glucose level with an increase in the activity of serum transaminases and WBC counts. Decrease in the activity of alkaline phosphatase and glycogen content was noted in liver and kidney after cerium exposure. Light and electron microscopical investigations showed that these changes were recouped considerably with the administration of EGTA suggesting its therapeutic efficacy against cerium toxicity.

  1. Ab initio electronic and lattice dynamical properties of cerium dihydride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurel, Tanju; Eryigit, Resul

    2007-03-01

    The rare-earth metal hydrides are interesting systems because of the dramatic structural and electronic changes due to the hydrogen absorption and desorption. Among them, cerium dihydride (CeH2) is one of the less studied rare-earth metal-hydride. To have a better understanding, we have performed an ab initio study of electronic and lattice dynamical properties of CeH2 by using pseudopotential density functional theory within local density approximation (LDA) and a plane-wave basis. Electronic band structure of CeH2 have been obtained within LDA and as well as GW approximation. Lattice dynamical properties are calculated using density functional perturbation theory. The phonon spectrum is found to contain a set of high-frequency (˜ 850-1000 cm-1) optical bands, mostly hydrogen related, and low frequency cerium related acoustic modes climbing to 160 cm^ -1 at the zone boundary.

  2. Liquid-phase oxidation of cyclohexanone over cerium oxide catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, H.C. ); Weng, H.S. )

    1990-05-01

    Catalytic oxidation of cyclohexanone in the liquid phase with glacial acetic acid as the solvent over cerium oxide was studied between 5 and 15 atm and 98 and 118 {degrees} C in a batch reactor. The products were adipic acid, glutaric acid, succinic acid, caprolactone, carbon oxides, etc. The reaction undergoes a short induction period prior to a rapid reaction regime. In both regimes, the reaction is independent of oxygen pressure when the system pressure is above 10 atm. The induction period is inversely proportional to both of the catalyst weight and cyclohexanone concentration.During the rapid reaction regime, the reaction rate was found to be proportional to the 0.5 power of the catalyst weight and to the 1.5 power of the cyclohexanone concentration. Reaction mechanisms and rate expressions are proposed. The carbon oxides produced in this study were much lower than those previously reported. The cerium oxide catalyst is stable during the reaction.

  3. Isomorphic phase transformation in shocked cerium using molecular dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Dupont, Virginie; Germann, Timothy C; Chen, Shao - Ping

    2010-08-12

    Cerium (Ce) undergoes a significant ({approx}16%) volume collapse associated with an isomorphic fcc-fcc phase transformation when subject to compressive loading. We present here a new Embedded Atom Method (EAM) potential for Cerium that models two minima for the two fcc phases. We show results from its use in Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations of Ce samples subjected to shocks with pressures ranging from 0.5 to 25 GPa. A split wave structure is observed, with an elastic precursor followed by a plastic wave. The plastic wave causes the expected fcc-fcc phase transformation. Comparisons to experiments and MD simulations on Cesium (Cs) indicate that three waves could be observed. The construction of the EAM potential may be the source of the difference.

  4. Shock wave experiments to examine the multiphase properties of cerium

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, Brian James

    2009-01-01

    There is a scientific need to obtain new data to constrain and refine next generation multi-phase equation-of-state (EOS) for metals. Experiments are needed to locate phase boundaries, determine transition kinetic times, and to obtain EOS and Hugoniot data for relevant phases. The objectives of the current work was to examine the multiphase properties for cerium including the dynamic melt boundary and the low-pressure solid-solid phase transition through the critical point. These objectives were addressed by performing plate impact experiment that used multiple experimental configuration including front-surface impact experiments to directly measure transition kinetics, multislug experiments that used the overtake method to measure sound speeds at pressure, and preheat experiments to map out phase boundaries. Preliminary data and analysis obtained for cerium will be presented.

  5. Toxicity study of cerium oxide nanoparticles in human neuroblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Kumari, Monika; Singh, Shailendra Pratap; Chinde, Srinivas; Rahman, Mohammed Fazlur; Mahboob, Mohammed; Grover, Paramjit

    2014-01-01

    The present study consisted of cytotoxic, genotoxic, and oxidative stress responses of human neuroblastoma cell line (IMR32) following exposure to different doses of cerium oxide nanoparticles (CeO2 NPs; nanoceria) and its microparticles (MPs) for 24 hours. Cytotoxicity was evaluated by 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide and lactate dehydrogenase assays whereas genotoxicity was assessed using the cytokinesis-block micronucleus and comet assays. A battery of assays including lipid peroxidation, reactive oxygen species (ROS), hydrogen peroxide, reduced glutathione, nitric oxide, glutathione reductase, glutathione peroxidase, superoxide dismutase, catalase, and glutathione S-transferase were performed to test the hypothesis that ROS was responsible for the toxicity of nanoceria. The results showed that nanosized CeO2 was more toxic than cerium oxide MPs. Hence, further study on safety evaluation of CeO2 NPs on other models is recommended.

  6. Dissociation of cerium(III) and neodymium(III) phthalocyanines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lomova, T. N.

    2015-07-01

    The kinetics of dissociation of phthalocyanine complexes with cerium(III) and neodymium(III) (X)LnPc (X = Cl-, Br-, AcO-) under the action of acetic acid in ethanol with isolation of the macrocyclic ligand depending on the temperature was studied. The kinetic equations with the numerical values of rate constants, activation parameters, and the stoichiometric mechanisms with the limiting simple reaction between the nonionized AcOH molecule and (phthalocyaninato)lanthanide(III) in the axially coordinated ((X)LnPc, cerium complexes) or axially ionized ([(AcOH)LnPc]+X-, neodymium complexes) state were derived by solving the direct and inverse problems. As shown by a comparative analysis of quantitative kinetic data, the state is determined by the electronic structure of the metal cation and the mutual effect of the axial and equatorial ligands in the first coordination sphere.

  7. Crystal structures of the alpha''-cerium phases.

    PubMed

    Zachariasen, W H

    1978-03-01

    Endo et al. [Endo, S., Sasaki, H. & Mitsui, T. (1972) J. Phys. Soc. Jpn. 42, 882-885] have reported x-ray diffraction data for an unidentified phase of cerium metal observed in the 50- to 100-kbar range. It is shown that the unknown phase is a variant of the metastable monoclinic phase, alpha''-Ce, previously observed. The complete structure of the new form of alpha''-Ce is deduced.

  8. Crystal structures of the α″-cerium phases

    PubMed Central

    Zachariasen, W. H.

    1978-01-01

    Endo et al. [Endo, S., Sasaki, H. & Mitsui, T. (1972) J. Phys. Soc. Jpn. 42, 882-885] have reported x-ray diffraction data for an unidentified phase of cerium metal observed in the 50- to 100-kbar range. It is shown that the unknown phase is a variant of the metastable monoclinic phase, α″-Ce, previously observed. The complete structure of the new form of α″-Ce is deduced. PMID:16592508

  9. Engineered cerium oxide nanoparticles: Effects on bacterial growth and viability

    SciTech Connect

    Pelletier, Dale A; Suresh, Anil K; Holton, Gregory A; McKeown, Catherine K; Wang, Wei; Gu, Baohua; Mortensen, Ninell P; Allison, David P; Joy, David Charles; Allison, Martin R; Brown, Steven D; Phelps, Tommy Joe; Doktycz, Mitchel John

    2010-01-01

    Interest in engineered nanostructures has risen in recent years due to their use in energy conservation strategies and biomedicine. To ensure prudent development and use of nanomaterials, the fate and effects of such engineered structures on the environment should be understood. Interactions of nanomaterials with environmental microorganisms are inevitable, but the general consequences of such interactions remain unclear. Further, standardized methods for assessing such interactions are lacking. Therefore, we have initiated a multianalytical approach to understand the interactions of synthesized nanoparticles with bacterial systems. These efforts are focused initially on cerium oxide nanoparticles and model bacteria in order to evaluate characterization procedures and the possible fate of such materials in the environment. In this study the effects of cerium oxide nanoparticles on the growth and viability of Gram-negative Escherichia coli and Shewanella oneidensis, a metal-reducing bacteria, and Gram-positive Bacillus subtilis were examined relative to particle size, growth media, pH, and dosage. A hydrothermal based synthesis procedure was used to prepare cerium oxide nanoparticles of defined sizes in order to eliminate complications originating from the use of organic solvents and surfactants. Bactericidal effects were determined by minimum inhibitory concentration, colony forming units, disc diffusion tests and Live/Dead assays. In growth inhibition experiments involving E. coli and B. subtilis, a clear strain and size-dependent inhibition was observed. S. oneidensis appeared to be unaffected by the cerium oxide nanoparticles. Transmission electron microscopy along with microarray-based transcriptional profiling have been used to understand the response mechanism of the bacteria. The use of multiple analytical approaches adds confidence to toxicity assessments while the use of different bacterial systems highlights the potential wide-ranging effects of

  10. Optical Response of Shocked Cerium-Doped Lutetium Oxyorthosilicate

    SciTech Connect

    G. D. Stevens

    2003-03-01

    Shock experiments were performed in order to characterize the triboluminescent signature of cerium-doped lutetium oxyorthosilicate (LSO:Ce). This material shows prompt, nano-second timescale light emission when driven by explosive detonation. When properly applied to a surface, it may be used as a shock arrival sensor, and also for imaging the propagation of a shock front. Triboluminescent rise times, spectral content, and spatial resolution measurements are presented.

  11. Fungus mediated synthesis of biomedically important cerium oxide nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Khan, Shadab Ali; Ahmad, Absar

    2013-10-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • First time biological synthesis of cerium oxide oxide nanoparticles using fungus Humicola sp. • Complete characterization of cerium oxide nanoparticles. • Biosynthesis of naturally protein capped, luminescent and water dispersible CeO{sub 2} nanoparticles. • Biosynthesized CeO{sub 2} nanoparticles can be used for many biomedical applications. - Abstract: Nanomaterials can be synthesized by chemical, physical and the more recently discovered biological routes. The biological routes are advantageous over the chemical and physical ones as unlike these, the biological synthesis protocols occur at ambient conditions, are cheap, non-toxic and eco-friendly. Although purely biological and bioinspired methods for the synthesis of nanomaterials are environmentally benign and energy conserving processes, their true potential has not been explored yet and attempts are being made to extend the formation of technologically important nanoparticles using microorganisms like fungi. Though there have been reports on the biosynthesis of oxide nanoparticles by our group in the past, no attempts have been made to employ fungi for the synthesis of nanoparticles of rare earth metals or lanthanides. Here we report for the first time, the bio-inspired synthesis of biomedically important cerium oxide (CeO{sub 2}) nanoparticles using the thermophilic fungus Humicola sp. The fungus Humicola sp. when exposed to aqueous solutions of oxide precursor cerium (III) nitrate hexahydrate (CeN{sub 3}O{sub 9}·6H{sub 2}O) results in the extracellular formation of CeO{sub 2} nanoparticles containing Ce (III) and Ce (IV) mixed oxidation states, confirmed by X-ray Photoemission Spectroscopy (XPS). The formed nanoparticles are naturally capped by proteins secreted by the fungus and thus do not agglomerate, are highly stable, water dispersible and are highly fluorescent as well. The biosynthesized nanoparticles were characterized by UV–vis spectroscopy

  12. Cerium chloride reduces enamel lesion initiation and progression in vitro.

    PubMed

    Wegehaupt, F J; Buchalla, W; Sener, B; Attin, T; Schmidlin, P R

    2014-01-01

    Determination of the potential of cerium chloride to reduce artificial carious mineral loss and lesion depth progression. A total of 160 enamel samples were prepared from 40 bovine lower central incisors. Crowns were sectioned into four pieces, embedded in acrylic resin, ground flat and allocated to eight groups (S1-S4 and D1-D4; n = 20). Specimens of groups D1-D4 were stored (for 7 days) in a demineralizing buffer solution to induce caries-like lesions. Afterwards, samples were treated for 30 s with one of the following solutions: placebo (S1 and D1), amine fluoride (S2 and D2), cerium chloride (S3 and D3) and a combination of fluoride and cerium chloride (S4 and D4). After another 7 (D1-D4) or 14 (S1-S4) days in demineralizing buffer solution, integrated mineral loss and lesion depth were determined by transversal microradiography and compared by Scheffé's post hoc tests. In groups S1-S4, the highest values for integrated mineral loss and lesion depth were observed for group S1 (placebo), the lowest values for group S4. The results in groups S2-S4 were not significantly different. In groups D1-D4, the highest values for integrated mineral loss and lesion depth were observed for group D1 (placebo), the lowest values in groups D3 and D4. In group D2, integrated mineral loss and lesion depth were significantly lower as compared to D1, but significantly higher compared to groups D3 and D4. Cerium chloride and its combination with fluoride are able to significantly reduce carious mineral loss and the progression of lesion depth.

  13. Jet formation in cerium metal to examine material strength

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, B. J. Cherne, F. J.; Prime, M. B.; Yeager, J. D.; Ramos, K. J.; Hooks, D. E.; Cooley, J. C.; Dimonte, G.; Fezzaa, K.; Iverson, A. J.; Carlson, C. A.

    2015-11-21

    Examining the evolution of material properties at extreme conditions advances our understanding of numerous high-pressure phenomena from natural events like meteorite impacts to general solid mechanics and fluid flow behavior. Recent advances in synchrotron diagnostics coupled with dynamic compression platforms have introduced new possibilities for examining in-situ, spatially resolved material response with nanosecond time resolution. In this work, we examined jet formation from a Richtmyer-Meshkov instability in cerium initially shocked into a transient, high-pressure phase, and then released to a low-pressure, higher-temperature state. Cerium's rich phase diagram allows us to study the yield stress following a shock induced solid-solid phase transition. X-ray imaging was used to obtain images of jet formation and evolution with 2–3 μm spatial resolution. From these images, an analytic method was used to estimate the post-shock yield stress, and these results were compared to continuum calculations that incorporated an experimentally validated equation-of-state (EOS) for cerium coupled with a deviatoric strength model. Reasonable agreement was observed between the calculations and the data illustrating the sensitivity of jet formation on the yield stress values. The data and analysis shown here provide insight into material strength during dynamic loading which is expected to aid in the development of strength aware multi-phase EOS required to predict the response of matter at extreme conditions.

  14. Antibacterial Activity of Polymer Coated Cerium Oxide Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Vishal; Shah, Shreya; Shah, Hirsh; Rispoli, Fred J.; McDonnell, Kevin T.; Workeneh, Selam; Karakoti, Ajay; Kumar, Amit; Seal, Sudipta

    2012-01-01

    Cerium oxide nanoparticles have found numerous applications in the biomedical industry due to their strong antioxidant properties. In the current study, we report the influence of nine different physical and chemical parameters: pH, aeration and, concentrations of MgSO4, CaCl2, KCl, natural organic matter, fructose, nanoparticles and Escherichia coli, on the antibacterial activity of dextran coated cerium oxide nanoparticles. A least-squares quadratic regression model was developed to understand the collective influence of the tested parameters on the anti-bacterial activity and subsequently a computer-based, interactive visualization tool was developed. The visualization allows us to elucidate the effect of each of the parameters in combination with other parameters, on the antibacterial activity of nanoparticles. The results indicate that the toxicity of CeO2 NPs depend on the physical and chemical environment; and in a majority of the possible combinations of the nine parameters, non-lethal to the bacteria. In fact, the cerium oxide nanoparticles can decrease the anti-bacterial activity exerted by magnesium and potassium salts. PMID:23110109

  15. XANES (X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure) investigation of cerium as an inhibitor for Al alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Davenport, A.J.; Isaacs, H.S. ); Kendig, M.W. . Science Center)

    1991-01-01

    Cerium ions are under investigation as possible replacements for toxic chromates. The use of cerium ions as corrosion inhibitors for aluminum alloys is investigated using XANES (x-ray absorption near edge structure). On immersion in a dilute solution of cerium ions, cerium is incorporated into the oxide films on aluminum alloys in either the 3- or 4-valent state depending upon the alloy and on the surface preparation. 7 refs., 2 figs.

  16. The effect of annealing on vacuum-evaporated copper selenide and indium telluride thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Peranantham, P.; Jeyachandran, Y.L.; Viswanathan, C.; Praveena, N.N.; Chitra, P.C.; Mangalaraj, D. . E-mail: dmraj800@yahoo.com; Narayandass, Sa. K.

    2007-08-15

    Copper selenide and indium telluride thin films were prepared by a vacuum evaporation technique. The as-deposited films were annealed in a vacuum at different temperatures and the influence on composition, structure and optical properties of copper selenide and indium telluride films was investigated using energy dispersive X-ray analysis, X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and optical transmission measurements. From the compositional analysis, the as-deposited copper selenide and indium telluride films which were annealed at 473 and 523 K, respectively, were found to possess the nearly stoichiometric composition of CuSe and InTe phases. However, the films annealed at 673 K showed the composition of Cu{sub 2}Se and In{sub 4}Te{sub 3} phases. The structural parameters such as, particle size and strain were determined using X-ray diffractograms of the films. Optical transmittance measurements indicated the existence of direct and indirect transitions in copper selenide films and an indirect allowed transition in indium telluride films.

  17. INSTRUMENTS AND METHODS OF INVESTIGATION: Cadmium mercury telluride and the new generation of photoelectronic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponomarenko, Vladimir P.

    2003-06-01

    This paper is a 1969-2002 progress report on the development of solid semiconductor solutions of cadmium-mercury tellurides (single crystals and epitaxial layers) as well as of infrared photodetectors based on them (photoresistors and photodiodes, including the array variety).

  18. 121. FRONT ELEVATION OF TELLURIDE IRON WORKS 2.5 BY 4FOOT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    121. FRONT ELEVATION OF TELLURIDE IRON WORKS 2.5 BY 4-FOOT RETORT, USED TO FLASH MERCURY FROM GOLD. MERCURY VAPOR THEN CONDENSED ON INSIDE OF HOOD AND WAS COLLECTED FOR REUSE. - Shenandoah-Dives Mill, 135 County Road 2, Silverton, San Juan County, CO

  19. Method and making group IIB metal - telluride films and solar cells

    DOEpatents

    Basol, Bulent M.; Kapur, Vijay K.

    1990-08-21

    A technique is disclosed forming thin films (13) of group IIB metal-telluride, such as Cd.sub.x Zn.sub.1-x Te (0.ltoreq.x.ltoreq.1), on a substrate (10) which comprises depositing Te (18) and at least one of the elements (19) of Cd, Zn, and Hg onto a substrate and then heating the elements to form the telluride. A technique is also provided for doping this material by chemically forming a thin layer of a dopant on the surface of the unreacted elements and then heating the elements along with the layer of dopant. A method is disclosed of fabricating a thin film photovoltaic cell which comprises depositing Te and at least one of the elements of Cd, Zn, and Hg onto a substrate which contains on its surface a semiconductor film (12) and then heating the elements in the presence of a halide of the Group IIB metals, causing the formation of solar cell grade Group IIB metal-telluride film and also causing the formation of a rectifying junction, in situ, between the semiconductor film on the substrate and the Group IIB metal-telluride layer which has been formed.

  20. Growth of Cadmium-Zinc Telluride Crystals by Controlled Seeding Contactless Physical Vapor Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palosz, W.; Grasza, K.; Gillies, D.; Jerman, G.

    1996-01-01

    Bulk crystals of cadmium-zinc telluride, 23 mm in diameter and up to 45 grams in weight were grown. Controlled seed formation procedure was used to limit the number of grains in the crystal. Most uniform distribution of ZnTe in the crystals was obtained using excess (Cd + Zn) pressure in the ampoule.

  1. Cadmium telluride in tellurium—cadmium films consisting of ultradispersed particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuleushev, Yu. Zh.; Volodin, V. N.; Migunova, A. A.; Lisitsyn, V. N.

    2015-08-01

    Solid solutions of tellurium in cadmium, cadmium in tellurium, and cadmium in cadmium telluride synthesized during sputtering are formed for the first time by ion-plasma sputtering and the codeposition of ultradispersed Te and Cd particle fluxes onto substrates moving with respect to the fluxes. This fact supports thermofluctuation melting and coalescence of small particles. The lattice parameter of cadmium telluride, which coexists with an amorphous solid solution of tellurium in cadmium in a coating, is smaller than the tabulated value and reaches it when the cadmium concentration in a coating increases to 70 at %. The lattice parameter of the fcc lattice of cadmium telluride increases with the cadmium concentration in a coating according to the linear relation a = 0.0002CCd + 0.6346 nm (where CCd is the cadmium concentration in the coating, at %), which is likely to indicate a certain broadening of the homogeneity area. The estimation of the particle size shows that the cadmium telluride grain size is 10-15 nm, which implies that the coatings are nanocrystalline. The absorption and transmission spectra of the tellurium—cadmium films at the fundamental absorption edge demonstrate that their energy gaps are larger than that of stoichiometric CdTe, which can be explained by the experimental conditions of crystal structure formation.

  2. Study of Photo-Conductivity in Nano-Crystalline Cadmium Telluride Thin Films

    SciTech Connect

    Mahesha, M. G.; Bangera, Kasturi V.; Shivakumar, G. K.

    2011-07-15

    Nano crystallite thin films of Cadmium Telluride have been grown on glass substrates by thermal evaporation under vacuum. The growth conditions to get stoichiometric films of the compound have been optimized. The effect of substrate temperature and annealing on photosensitivity has been investigated. Also the effect of deposition parameters and post deposition annealing on rise time and decay time have been studied in detail.

  3. Terrestrial growth of lead-tin-telluride by techniques related to low G growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jesser, W. A.

    1982-01-01

    A modified Bridgman-Stockbarger furnace was constructed for a study of the solidification of silver, germanium and lead-tin-telluride. The melt-solid interface position with respect to the furnace and its temperature profile was determined by measuring the discontinuity in the slope of temperature as a function of position in the melt and in the solid. The results show that the interface position of the semiconductors germanium and lead-tin-telluride was essentially constant with respect to the furnace and hence the growth rate was constant and equal to the sample translation rate of 0.046 cm/min and 0.178 cm/min in each case. The metal, silver, on the other hand showed a continuous interface migration toward the hot zone of the furnace and always exhibited a growth rate which was higher than the ampoule translation rate. The K sub L/K sub S ratio of lead-tin-telluride was determined to be 2.33 + or - 0.06 where K sub L,S denotes the thermal conductivity of the liquid, solid respectively. The value of K sub L was calculated to be about 0.054 Watt 0.1 cm 0.1 K. The diffusion boundary layer thickness was calculated for lead-tin-telluride to be about 0.05 cm using a liquid diffusivity of .00007 sq cm/sec.

  4. Induction of pulmonary fibrosis by cerium oxide nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Jane Y.; Mercer, Robert R.; Barger, Mark; Schwegler-Berry, Diane; Scabilloni, James; Ma, Joseph K.; Castranova, Vincent

    2012-08-01

    Cerium compounds have been used as a diesel engine catalyst to lower the mass of diesel exhaust particles, but are emitted as cerium oxide (CeO{sub 2}) nanoparticles in the diesel exhaust. In a previous study, we have demonstrated a wide range of CeO{sub 2}-induced lung responses including sustained pulmonary inflammation and cellular signaling that could lead to pulmonary fibrosis. In this study, we investigated the fibrogenic responses induced by CeO{sub 2} in a rat model at various time points up to 84 days post-exposure. Male Sprague Dawley rats were exposed to CeO{sub 2} by a single intratracheal instillation. Alveolar macrophages (AM) were isolated by bronchial alveolar lavage (BAL). AM-mediated cellular responses, osteopontin (OPN) and transform growth factor (TGF)-β1 in the fibrotic process were investigated. The results showed that CeO{sub 2} exposure significantly increased fibrotic cytokine TGF-β1 and OPN production by AM above controls. The collagen degradation enzymes, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and -9 and the tissue inhibitor of MMP were markedly increased in the BAL fluid at 1 day- and subsequently declined at 28 days after exposure, but remained much higher than the controls. CeO{sub 2} induced elevated phospholipids in BAL fluid and increased hydroxyproline content in lung tissue in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Immunohistochemical analysis showed MMP-2, MMP-9 and MMP-10 expressions in fibrotic regions. Morphological analysis noted increased collagen fibers in the lungs exposed to a single dose of 3.5 mg/kg CeO{sub 2} and euthanized at 28 days post-exposure. Collectively, our studies show that CeO{sub 2} induced fibrotic lung injury in rats, suggesting it may cause potential health effects. -- Highlights: ► Cerium oxide exposure significantly affected the following parameters in the lung. ► Induced fibrotic cytokine OPN and TGF-β1 production and phospholipidosis. ► Caused imbalance of the MMP-9/ TIMP-1 ratio that favors fibrosis

  5. The Electrodeposition of Lead Telluride Nanowires for Thermoelectric Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillman, Peter

    The electrodeposition of PbTe nanowires for thermoelectric applications is presented in this thesis. The Pb-Te electrochemical system was investigated to determine the optimal conditions for deposition. It was found that citric acid complexed tellurium in solution shifting its reduction potential cathodically. The shift in reduction potential led to the deposition of pure PbTe without any observable excess tellurium. Nanowires of PbTe were doped p-type and n-type through the addition of thallium and indium to the plating solution. Indium-doped nanowire arrays showed a linear relation between lattice parameter and atomic percent indium confirming successful incorporation. The lattice parameter trend in thallium-doped nanowire arrays was linear only after annealing. In the case of thallium doping, thallium tellurides were formed, which upon annealing formed a solid solution with PbTe. The results of the thallium doping study led to the investigation of the Tl-Te electrochemical system. Cyclic voltammagrams were used to determine the deposition mechanism of TlTe and Tl5Te3. Thin films and nanowire arrays of these compounds were deposited. This was the first study of the electrochemical Tl-Te system and the first report of the electrodeposition of TlTe and Tl5Te3. Thermoelectric measurements were conducted on thin films and nanowire arrays of PbTe. The Seebeck coefficient and resistivity of PbTe thin film were measured. Results from thin films were complicated by the Pt substrate on which PbTe was deposited. Subtracting the effects of the Pt layer suggested PbTe thin films could have a large zT, however further work is needed to confirm this result. Resistivity measurements on nanowire arrays were also conducted. Despite efforts to minimize the oxidation of PbTe nanowires, good electrical contacts could not be created. The resistivity of nanowire arrays were orders of magnitude higher than expected. As a result of their low conductivity, the thermoelectric efficiency

  6. Cerium valence in cerium-exchanged Preyssler`s heteropolyanion through x-ray absorption near-edge structure

    SciTech Connect

    Antonio, M.R.; Soderholm, L.

    1994-12-21

    The sodium ion in the heteropolytungstate known as the Preyssler anion, [NaP{sub 5}W{sub 30}O{sub 110}]{sup 14{minus}}, was exchanged with cerium from aqueous solutions of ammonium ceric nitrate, [NH{sub 4}]{sub 2}Ce{sup IV}(NO{sub 3}){sub 6}, as described by Creaser et al. The valence of cerium in this heteropolyanion was determined through Ce L-edge XANES, X-ray absorption near-edge structure. The XANES results demonstrate that cerium is trivalent in the Ce-exchanged Preyssler heteropolyanion in the solid state and in aqueous solution (1 M H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}) at rest potential and after constant-potential, bulk electrolysis at-0.55 V vs SCE. The encapsulated sodium ion of the Preyssler anion was shown to be directly exchangeable with Ce{sup III} by prolonged (48 h), high temperature (165 {degrees}C) aqueous treatments with either Ce(NO{sub 3}){sub 3}{lg_bullet}6H{sub 2}O or CeCl{sub 3}{lg_bullet}7H{sub 2}O in Teflon-lined pressure vessels.

  7. Investigation of cerium and yttrium ions effects on microbial nitrogen fixation and determination of inhibition.

    PubMed

    Bahadur, K; Tripathi, P

    1978-01-01

    Critical investigation of the effect of yttrium and cerium ions in culture media for nitrogen-fixing bacteria showed strong inhibition. There was a decrease in the amount of nitrogen fixed; simultaneously, in the samples containing cerium ions, carbon consumption values increased as the molarity of metal ion was enhanced. Inhibition rate was invariably maximum at the highest concentration of metal ions.

  8. Cerium doped red mud catalytic ozonation for bezafibrate degradation in wastewater: Efficiency, intermediates, and toxicity.

    PubMed

    Xu, Bingbing; Qi, Fei; Sun, Dezhi; Chen, Zhonglin; Robert, Didier

    2016-03-01

    In this study, the performance of bezafibrate (BZF) degradation and detoxification in the aqueous phase using cerium-modified red mud (RM) catalysts prepared using different cerium sources and synthesis methods were evaluated. Experimental results showed that the surface cerium modification was responsible for the development of the catalytic activity of RM and this was influenced by the cerium source and the synthesis method. Catalyst prepared from cerium (IV) by precipitation was found to show the best catalytic activity in BZF degradation and detoxification. Reactive oxygen species including peroxides, hydroxyl radicals, and super oxide ions were identified in all reactions and we proposed the corresponding catalytic reaction mechanism for each catalyst that prepared from different cerium source and method. This was supported by the intermediates profiles that were generated upon BZF degradation. The surface and the structural properties of cerium-modified RM were characterized in detail by several analytical methods. Two interesting findings were made: (1) the surface texture (specific surface area and mesoporous volume) influenced the catalytic reaction pathway; and (2) Ce(III) species and oxygen vacancies were generated on the surface of the catalyst after cerium modification. This plays an important role in the development of the catalytic activity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Fenton-Like Reaction Catalyzed by the Rare Earth Inner Transition Metal Cerium

    PubMed Central

    HECKERT, ERIC G.; SEAL, SUDIPTA; SELF, WILLIAM T.

    2011-01-01

    Cerium (Ce) is a rare earth metal that is not known to have any biological role. Cerium oxide materials of several sizes and shapes have been developed in recent years as a scaffold for catalysts. Indeed even cerium oxide nanoparticles themselves have displayed catalytic activities and antioxidant properties in tissue culture and animal models. Because of ceria's ability to cycle between the +3 and +4 states at oxygen vacancy sites, we investigated whether cerium metal would catalyze a Fenton-like reaction with hydrogen peroxide. Indeed, cerium chloride did exhibit radical production in the presence of hydrogen peroxide, as assessed by relaxation of supercoiled plasmid DNA. Radical production in this reaction was also followed by production of radical cation of 2,2′-azinobis-(3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) (ABTS). Radical scavengers and spin traps were capable of competing with ABTS for radicals produced in this cerium dependent Fenton-like reaction. Electron paramagnetic resonance experiments reveal both hydroxyl radical and superoxide anion in a reaction containing cerium and hydrogen peroxide. Based on these results we propose that cerium is capable of redox-cycling with peroxide to generate damaging oxygen radicals. PMID:18678042

  10. Fenton-like reaction catalyzed by the rare earth inner transition metal cerium.

    PubMed

    Heckert, Eric G; Seal, Sudipta; Self, William T

    2008-07-01

    Cerium (Ce) is a rare earth metal that is not known to have any biological role. Cerium oxide materials of several sizes and shapes have been developed in recent years as a scaffold for catalysts. Indeed even cerium oxide nanoparticles themselves have displayed catalytic activities and antioxidant properties in tissue culture and animal models. Because of ceria's ability to cycle between the +3 and +4 states at oxygen vacancy sites, we investigated whether cerium metal would catalyze a Fenton-like reaction with hydrogen peroxide. Indeed, cerium chloride did exhibit radical production in the presence of hydrogen peroxide, as assessed by relaxation of supercoiled plasmid DNA. Radical production in this reaction was also followed by production of radical cation of 2,2'-azinobis-(3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) (ABTS). Radical scavengers and spin traps were capable of competing with ABTS for radicals produced in this cerium dependent Fenton-like reaction. Electron paramagnetic resonance experiments reveal both hydroxyl radical and superoxide anion in a reaction containing cerium and hydrogen peroxide. Based on these results we propose that cerium is capable of redox-cycling with peroxide to generate damaging oxygen radicals.

  11. Tuning reactivity and electronic properties through ligand reorganization within a cerium heterobimetallic framework.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Jerome R; Gordon, Zachary; Booth, Corwin H; Carroll, Patrick J; Walsh, Patrick J; Schelter, Eric J

    2013-12-18

    Cerium compounds have played vital roles in organic, inorganic, and materials chemistry due to their reversible redox chemistry between trivalent and tetravalent oxidation states. However, attempts to rationally access molecular cerium complexes in both oxidation states have been frustrated by unpredictable reactivity in cerium(III) oxidation chemistry. Such oxidation reactions are limited by steric saturation at the metal ion, which can result in high energy activation barriers for electron transfer. An alternative approach has been realized using a rare earth/alkali metal/1,1'-BINOLate (REMB) heterobimetallic framework, which uses redox-inactive metals within the secondary coordination sphere to control ligand reorganization. The rational syntheses of functionalized cerium(IV) products and a mechanistic examination of the role of ligand reorganization in cerium(III) oxidation are presented.

  12. Hydrocarbon-based polymer electrolyte cerium composite membranes for improved proton exchange membrane fuel cell durability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hyejin; Han, Myungseong; Choi, Young-Woo; Bae, Byungchan

    2015-11-01

    Hydrocarbon-based cerium composite membranes were prepared for proton exchange membrane fuel cell applications to increase oxidative stability. Different amounts of cerium ions were impregnated in sulfonated poly(arylene ether sulfone) (SPES) membranes and their physicochemical properties were investigated according to the cerium content. Field-emission scanning electron microscopy and inductively coupled plasma analyses confirmed the presence of cerium ions in the composite membranes and 1H NMR indicated the successful coordination of sulfonic acid groups with the metal ions. Increasing amounts of cerium ions resulted in decreases in the proton conductivity and water uptake, but enhanced oxidative stability. The oxidative stability of the composite membranes was proven via a hydrogen peroxide exposure experiment which mimicked fuel cell operating conditions. In addition, more than 2200 h was achieved with the composite membrane under in situ accelerated open circuit voltage (OCV) durability testing (DOE protocol), whereas the corresponding pristine SPES membrane attained only 670 h.

  13. Spectrofluorometric trace determination of cerium(III) in sodium hexametaphosphate solutions.

    PubMed

    Akseli, A; Rakicioğlu, Y

    1996-02-01

    The use of sodium hexametaphosphate in the spectrofluorometric determination of trace amounts of cerium(III) ions is described. Sodium hexametaphosphate acts as a specific reagent for enhancing the fluorescence intensity of cerium(III) in aqueous solutions. The apparent excitation and fluorescence wavelength used are 304 and 344 nm, respectively. Maximum fluorescence intensity is obtained by irradiating Ce(III) dissolved in 5.346 g/l sodium hexametaphosphate solution at room temperature. The fluorescence varies linearly with the concentration of cerium(III) in the range of 0.001-60 microg/ml. The coefficient of variation for 45 microg/ml Ce(III) in 5.346 g/l sodium hexametaphosphate solution is 1. The quenching effects of other lanthanides and some inorganic anions are given. This technique permits a direct and rapid determination of cerium(III) in rare earth mixtures and cerium concentrates.

  14. Tuning Reactivity and Electronic Properties through Ligand Reorganization within a Cerium Heterobimetallic Framework

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, Jerome R.; Gordon, Zachary; Booth, Corwin H.; Carroll, Patrick J.; Walsh, Patrick J.; Schelter, Eric J.

    2014-06-24

    Cerium compounds have played vital roles in organic, inorganic, and materials chemistry due to their reversible redox chemistry between trivalent and tetravalent oxidation states. However, attempts to rationally access molecular cerium complexes in both oxidation states have been frustrated by unpredictable reactivity in cerium(III) oxidation chemistry. Such oxidation reactions are limited by steric saturation at the metal ion, which can result in high energy activation barriers for electron transfer. An alternative approach has been realized using a rare earth/alkali metal/1,1'-BINOLate (REMB) heterobimetallic framework, which uses redox-inactive metals within the secondary coordination sphere to control ligand reorganization. The rational syntheses of functionalized cerium(IV) products and a mechanistic examination of the role of ligand reorganization in cerium(III) oxidation are presented.

  15. Indium telluride nanotubes: Solvothermal synthesis, growth mechanism, and properties

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Liyan; Yan, Shancheng; Lu, Tao; Shi, Yi; Wang, Jianyu; Yang, Fan

    2014-03-15

    hydrogen storage, compared with the nanowires. The nanotube device also has a broad light detection range from 300 nm to 1100 nm, covering the UV–visible–NIR region. This good performance of In{sub 2}Te{sub 3} nanotubes may enable significant advancements of new photodetection and photosensing applications. Highlights: • The In{sub 2}Te{sub 3} nanotube device also has a broad light detection range from 300 nm to 1100 nm. • The nanotube is 137.85 m{sup 2} g{sup −1}, which makes it suitable for gas sensing and hydrogen storage. • A possible growth mechanism of the indium telluride nanotubes was proposed. • In addition, no In{sub 2}Te{sub 3} nanotubes have been reported until now.

  16. Effects of uncoated and citric acid coated cerium oxide nanoparticles, bulk cerium oxide, cerium acetate, and citric acid on tomato plants.

    PubMed

    Barrios, Ana Cecilia; Rico, Cyren M; Trujillo-Reyes, Jesica; Medina-Velo, Illya A; Peralta-Videa, Jose R; Gardea-Torresdey, Jorge L

    2016-09-01

    Little is known about the physiological and biochemical responses of plants exposed to surface modified nanomaterials. In this study, tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) plants were cultivated for 210days in potting soil amended with uncoated and citric acid coated cerium oxide nanoparticles (nCeO2, CA+nCeO2) bulk cerium oxide (bCeO2), and cerium acetate (CeAc). Millipore water (MPW), and citric acid (CA) were used as controls. Physiological and biochemical parameters were measured. At 500mg/kg, both the uncoated and CA+nCeO2 increased shoot length by ~9 and ~13%, respectively, while bCeO2 and CeAc decreased shoot length by ~48 and ~26%, respectively, compared with MPW (p≤0.05). Total chlorophyll, chlo-a, and chlo-b were significantly increased by CA+nCeO2 at 250mg/kg, but reduced by bCeO2 at 62.5mg/kg, compared with MPW. At 250 and 500mg/kg, nCeO2 increased Ce in roots by 10 and 7 times, compared to CA+nCeO2, but none of the treatments affected the Ce concentration in above ground tissues. Neither nCeO2 nor CA+nCeO2 affected the homeostasis of nutrient elements in roots, stems, and leaves or catalase and ascorbate peroxidase in leaves. CeAc at 62.5 and 125mg/kg increased B (81%) and Fe (174%) in roots, while at 250 and 500mg/kg, increased Ca in stems (84% and 86%, respectively). On the other hand, bCeO2 at 62.5 increased Zn (152%) but reduced P (80%) in stems. Only nCeO2 at 62.5mg/kg produced higher total number of tomatoes, compared with control and the rest of the treatments. The surface coating reduced Ce uptake by roots but did not affect its translocation to the aboveground organs. In addition, there was no clear effect of surface coating on fruit production. To our knowledge, this is the first study comparing the effects of coated and uncoated nCeO2 on tomato plants. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Effects of cerium oxide nanoparticles on the proliferation, differentiation, and mineralization function of primary osteoblasts in vitro.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Guoqiang; Gu, Guangqi; Li, Yang; Zhang, Qun; Wang, Wenying; Wang, Shuxiang; Zhang, Jinchao

    2013-06-01

    The effects of cerium oxide nanoparticles on the proliferation, differentiation, and mineralization function of primary osteoblasts in vitro were evaluated. The results showed that the cell biological effects of cerium oxide nanoparticles varied with different diameters. The cytotoxicity of cerium oxide nanoparticles on primary osteoblasts varies with the size and incubation time. Sixty-nanometer cerium oxide nanoparticles show significant cytotoxicity on primary osteoblasts at 48 h exposure. Cerium oxide nanoparticles with diameters of 40 nm promoted the differentiation of osteoblasts and the promotion rate was enhanced with increasing concentration. Cerium oxide nanoparticles with diameters of 60 nm promoted the differentiation of osteoblasts at lower concentrations, but turned to inhibit the differentiation at higher concentrations. Cerium oxide nanoparticles promoted the adipogenic transdifferentiation of osteoblasts at all tested concentrations. Moreover, the effects of 60-nm cerium oxide nanoparticles were stronger than that of 40-nm cerium oxide nanoparticles. Cerium oxide nanoparticles promoted the formation of mineralized matrix nodules of osteoblasts at all tested concentrations in a dose-dependent manner and the promotion rate increased with decreasing size. The results showed that cerium oxide nanoparticles had no acute cytotoxic effects on osteoblasts and could promote the osteogenic differentiation and mineralization of osteoblasts. Moreover, the size, concentration, and culture time of nanoparticles have significant influence on the proliferation, differentiation, and mineralization of osteoblasts.

  18. Modelling the structure of disordered cerium oxide thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peña Leal, José Juan; Barrio, Rafael A.

    2017-10-01

    Cerium oxide is an interesting mixed valence compound of great technological importance. We model the growth of thin films of this substance by describing the statistical nucleation of atomic units containing Ce3+ and Ce4+. The theoretical results are compared with available experimental values of the magnetic susceptibility of the material, which is related to the proportion of magnetic atoms in the solid. The model is able to predict the composition of the final solid under different preparation conditions, namely the oxygen content of the precursor and the temperature of the substrate.

  19. Test beam results of a cerium fluoride crystal matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auffray, E.; Bourotte, J.; Beckers, T.; Chipaux, M.; Commichau, V.; Dafinei, I.; Depasse, P.; Djambazov, L.; Dydak, U.; El Mamouni, H.; Fay, J.; Felcini, M.; Goyot, M.; Haguenauer, M.; Hillemans, H.; Hofer, H.; Ille, B.; Kirn, T.; Kryn, D.; Lebrun, P.; Lecomte, P.; Lecoq, P.; Martin, J. P.; Maurelli, G.; Mattioli, M.; Melnikov, I.; Nessi-Tedaldi, F.; Pacciani, L.; Pirro, S.; Raghavan, R.; Ren, D.; Reynaud, M.; Röser, U.; Sahuc, P.; Schmitz, D.; Schneegans, M.; Schwenke, J.; Soric, I.; Viertel, G.; von Gunten, H. P.; Walder, J. P.; Waldmeier-Wicki, S.

    1995-11-01

    A Cerium Fluoride matrix of 3 × 3 towers with Silicon photodiode readout has been tested in electron and pion beams from 10 to 150 GeV energy. The matrix was assembled with a selection of crystals out of a total of over 40 large crystals (up to 20 cm long and 3 cm × 3 cm in cross section) from various producers. Despite less than optimal geometry and crystal quality, an energy resolution of 0.5% for energies ≥ 50 GeV has been obtained. Fast shaping amplifier prototypes were tested and their performance was found to be appropriate for operation in an LHC-like environment.

  20. Identification of the Charge Carriers in Cerium Phosphate Ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Ray, Hannah L.; Jonghe, Lutgard C. De

    2010-06-02

    The total conductivity of Sr-doped cerium orthophosphate changes by nearly two orders of magnitude depending on the oxygen and hydrogen content of the atmosphere. The defect model for the system suggests that this is because the identity of the dominant charge carrier can change from electron holes to protons when the sample is in equilibrium with air vs. humidified hydrogen. In this work are presented some preliminary measurements that can help to clarify this exchange between carriers. The conduction behavior of a 2percent Sr-doped CePO4 sample under symmetric atmospheric conditions is investigated using several techniques, including AC impedance, H/D isotope effects, and chronoamperometry.

  1. Soil organic matter influences cerium translocation and physiological processes in kidney bean plants exposed to cerium oxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Majumdar, Sanghamitra; Peralta-Videa, Jose R; Trujillo-Reyes, Jesica; Sun, Youping; Barrios, Ana C; Niu, Genhua; Margez, Juan P Flores-; Gardea-Torresdey, Jorge L

    2016-11-01

    Soil organic matter plays a major role in determining the fate of the engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) in the soil matrix and effects on the residing plants. In this study, kidney bean plants were grown in soils varying in organic matter content and amended with 0-500mg/kg cerium oxide nanoparticles (nano-CeO2) under greenhouse condition. After 52days of exposure, cerium accumulation in tissues, plant growth and physiological parameters including photosynthetic pigments (chlorophylls and carotenoids), net photosynthesis rate, transpiration rate, and stomatal conductance were recorded. Additionally, catalase and ascorbate peroxidase activities were measured to evaluate oxidative stress in the tissues. The translocation factor of cerium in the nano-CeO2 exposed plants grown in organic matter enriched soil (OMES) was twice as the plants grown in low organic matter soil (LOMS). Although the leaf cover area increased by 65-111% with increasing nano-CeO2 concentration in LOMS, the effect on the physiological processes were inconsequential. In OMES leaves, exposure to 62.5-250mg/kg nano-CeO2 led to an enhancement in the transpiration rate and stomatal conductance, but to a simultaneous decrease in carotenoid contents by 25-28%. Chlorophyll a in the OMES leaves also decreased by 27 and 18% on exposure to 125 and 250mg/kg nano-CeO2. In addition, catalase activity increased in LOMS stems, and ascorbate peroxidase increased in OMES leaves of nano-CeO2 exposed plants, with respect to control. Thus, this study provides clear evidence that the properties of the complex soil matrix play decisive roles in determining the fate, bioavailability, and biological transport of ENMs in the environment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Novel borothermal route for the synthesis of lanthanum cerium hexaborides and their field emission properties

    SciTech Connect

    Menaka; Patra, Rajkumar; Ghosh, Santanu; Ganguli, Ashok K.

    2012-10-15

    The present study describes the development of a simple approach to stabilize polycrystalline lanthanum cerium hexaborides without using any flux and at ambient pressure. The nanostructured lanthanum-cerium borides were synthesized using hydroxide precursors. These precursors (La{sub 1-x}Ce{sub x}(OH){sub 3}, x=0.1, 0.2, 0.3 and 0.5) were synthesized via hydrothermal route in the presence of Tergitol (surfactant, nonylphenol ethoxylate) as a capping agent. The precursors on heating with boron at 1300 Degree-Sign C lead to the formation of nanostructures (cubes, rods and pyramids) of lanthanum cerium hexaboride. We have investigated the field emission behaviour of the hexaboride films fabricated by spin coating. It was observed that the pyramidal shaped nanostructures of La{sub 0.5}Ce{sub 0.5}B{sub 6} shows excellent field emission characteristics with high field enhancement factor of 4502. - Graphical abstract: Nanostructured lanthanum cerium hexaboride with efficient field emission have fabricated by low temperature hydroxide precursor mediated route. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer New methodology to prepare lanthanum cerium hexaboride at 1300 Degree-Sign C via borothermal route. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nanostructured lanthanum cerium hexaboride film by spin coating process. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nanopyramids based lanthanum cerium hexaboride shows excellent field emission.

  3. Hydrothermal synthesis of cerium titanate nanorods and its application in visible light photocatalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Pei, L.Z. Liu, H.D.; Lin, N.; Yu, H.Y.

    2015-01-15

    Highlights: • Cerium titanate nanorods have been synthesized by a simple hydrothermal process. • The size of the cerium titanate nanorods can be controlled by growth conditions. • Cerium titanate nanorods exhibit good photocatalytic activities for methyl blue. - Abstract: Cerium titanate nanorods have been prepared via a hydrothermal process using sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) as the surfactant. The cerium titanate nanorods have been analyzed by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), high-resolution TEM (HRTEM), and ultraviolet–visible (UV–vis) diffuse reflectance spectrum. XRD shows that the nanorods are composed of CeTi{sub 21}O{sub 38} phase. Electron microscopy observations indicate that the nanorods have good single crystalline nature. The diameter and length of the nanorods are about 50–200 nm and 1–2 μm, respectively. Cerium titanate nanorods have a band gap of 2.65 eV. The photocatalytic activities of the nanorods have been investigated by degrading methylene blue (MB) under visible light irradiation. MB solution with the concentration of 10 mg L{sup −1} can be degraded totally with the irradiation time increasing to 240 min. Cerium titanate nanorods exhibit great potential in photocatalytic degradation of MB under visible light irradiation.

  4. Cadmium Telluride Quantum Dots as a Fluorescence Marker for Adipose Tissue Grafts.

    PubMed

    Deglmann, Claus J; Błażków-Schmalzbauer, Katarzyna; Moorkamp, Sarah; Susha, Andrei S; Herrler, Tanja; Giunta, Riccardo E; Wagner, Ernst; Rogach, Andrey L; Baumeister, Ruediger G; Ogris, Manfred

    2017-02-01

    Plastic and reconstructive surgeons increasingly apply adipose tissue grafting in a clinical setting, although the anticipation of graft survival is insecure. There are only few tools for tracking transplanted fat grafts in vivo.Murine adipose tissue clusters were incubated with negatively charged, mercaptoproprionic acid-coated cadmium telluride quantum dots (QDs) emitting in the dark red or near infrared. The intracellular localization of QDs was studied by confocal laser scanning microscopy.As a result, the adipose tissue clusters showed a proportional increase in fluorescence with increasing concentrations (1, 10, 16, 30, 50 nM) of cadmium telluride QDs. Laser scanning microscopy demonstrated a membrane bound localization of QDs. Vacuoles and cell nuclei of adipocytes were spared by QDs. We conclude that QDs were for the first time proven intracellular in adult adipocytes and demonstrate a strong fluorescence signal. Therefore, they may play an essential role for in vivo tracking of fat grafts.

  5. Development and evaluation of germanium telluride phase change material based ohmic switches for RF applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Muzhi; Rais-Zadeh, Mina

    2017-01-01

    We report on the device structure and performance of germanium telluride phase change material based ohmic RF switches. Two main types of the phase change switches using direct and indirect heating methods have been designed, fabricated and measured to analyze and compare the performance of germanium telluride in RF switch applications. Both types of switches are proven to have an insertion loss of less than 0.6 dB and an isolation of more than 13 dB for up to 20 GHz. Good linearity and power handling capability results are also measured. A reconfigurable bandpass filter using the indirectly heated phase change switch has also been developed, and shows promising performance. Efforts have been made to further analyze the issues with switching reliability, and explore possible ways of improving the performance of phase change RF switches.

  6. Development of Cadmium Telluride Detectors for Hard X-ray Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pike, Sean; Harrison, Fiona; Burnham, Jill; Cook, Rick; Grefenstette, Brian; Madsen, Kristin; Miyasaka, Hiromasa; Rana, Vikram

    2017-08-01

    We present findings on the development of hybrid Cadmium Telluride (CdTe) detectors for applications in space-based X-ray astronomy. In addition to presenting the components and design of the detectors, which consist of 2cm × 2cm × 2mm CdTe crystals mounted on a custom ASIC, we also determine their viability for scientific applications. We present results of spectral calibration using 57Co, 155Eu, and 241Am sources, noise calibration, as well as optimal operating conditions including temperature, guard ring voltage, and bias voltage. By comparing these CdTe detectors to previous generations of detectors, in particular the Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT) detectors launched onboard NuSTAR in 2012, we hope to show that hybrid CdTe detectors are uniquely suited to high-resolution X-ray astronomy above the energy ranges of current comparable observatories.

  7. Ab initio lattice dynamics and thermochemistry of layered bismuth telluride (Bi2Te3).

    PubMed

    Zurhelle, Alexander F; Deringer, Volker L; Stoffel, Ralf P; Dronskowski, Richard

    2016-03-23

    We present density-functional theory calculations of the lattice dynamics of bismuth telluride, yielding force constants, mean-square displacements and partial densities of phonon states which corroborate and complement previous nuclear inelastic scattering experiments. From these data, we derive an element- and energy-resolved view of the vibrational anharmonicity, quantified by the macroscopic Grüneisen parameter γ which results in 1.56. Finally, we calculate thermochemical properties in the quasiharmonic approximation, especially the heat capacity at constant pressure and the enthalpy of formation for bismuth telluride; the latter arrives at ΔHf (Bi2Te3)  =  -102 kJ mol(-1) at 298 K.

  8. Method for improving the growth of cadmium telluride on a gallium arsenide substrate

    SciTech Connect

    Reno, J.L.

    1990-12-31

    A method for preparing a gallium arsenide substrate, prior to growing a layer of cadmium telluride on a support surface thereof. The preparation includes the steps of cleaning the gallium arsenide substrate and thereafter forming prepatterned shapes on the support surface of the gallium arsenide substrate. The layer of cadmium telluride then grown on the prepared substrate results in dislocation densities of approximately 1{times}10{sup 6}/cm{sup 2} or less. The prepatterned shapes on the support surface of the gallium arsenide substrate are formed by reactive ion etching an original outer surface of the gallium arsenide substrate and into the body of the gallium arsenide substrate to a depth of at least two microns. The prepatterned shapes have the appearance of cylindrical mesas each having a diameter of at lease twelve microns. After the mesas are formed on the support surface of the gallium arsenide substrate, the substrate is again cleaned.

  9. Epitaxial growth of cadmium telluride films on silicon with a buffer silicon carbide layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antipov, V. V.; Kukushkin, S. A.; Osipov, A. V.

    2017-02-01

    An epitaxial 1-3-μm-thick cadmium telluride film has been grown on silicon with a buffer silicon carbide layer using the method of open thermal evaporation and condensation in vacuum for the first time. The optimum substrate temperature was 500°C at an evaporator temperature of 580°C, and the growth time was 4 s. In order to provide more qualitative growth of cadmium telluride, a high-quality 100-nm-thick buffer silicon carbide layer was previously synthesized on the silicon surface using the method of topochemical substitution of atoms. The ellipsometric, Raman, X-ray diffraction, and electron-diffraction analyses showed a high structural perfection of the CdTe layer in the absence of a polycrystalline phase.

  10. Spectral properties of powder preparations of cadmium telluride and cadmium selenide with controlled nonstoichiometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khomyakov, A. V.; Mozhevitina, E. N.; Kuz'min, V. V.; Kon'kova, N. A.; Avetissov, I. Ch.

    2015-03-01

    The reflection spectra of powder preparations of cadmium telluride and cadmium selenide with different contents of overstoichiometric components have been investigated in the range of 800-1700 nm. The reflectance is found to be maximum for samples with compositions close to stoichiometric. An increase in the concentration of overstoichiometric cadmium more radically reduces the reflectance in comparison with preparations containing excess chalcogen. It is shown that halftone images in the near-IR range can be formed by using of these materials.

  11. Structure and dynamics of cadmium telluride studied by x-ray and inelastic neutron scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Niedziela, Jennifer L; Stone, Matthew B

    2014-01-01

    We present a combined study of density functional theory, x-ray diffraction, and inelastic neutron scattering examining the temperature dependent structure and lattice dynamics of commercially available cadmium telluride. A subtle change in the structure is evinced near 80~K, which manifests also in the measured phonon density of states. There is no change to the long-range ordered structure. The implications of the change in relation to structural defects are discussed.

  12. The heat capacity of solid antimony telluride Sb2Te3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pashinkin, A. S.; Malkova, A. S.; Mikhailova, M. S.

    2008-05-01

    The literature data on the heat capacity of solid antimony telluride over the range 53 895 K were analyzed. The heat capacity of Sb2Te3 was measured over the range 350 700 K on a DSM-2M calorimeter. The equation for the temperature dependence was suggested. The thermodynamic functions of Sb2Te3 were calculated over the range 298.15 700 K.

  13. Large-Area and High-Quality 2D Transition Metal Telluride

    DOE PAGES

    Zhou, Jiadong; Liu, Fucai; Lin, Junhao; ...

    2016-11-17

    Large-area and high-quality 2D transition metal tellurides are synthesized in this paper by the chemical vapor deposition method. The as-grown WTe2 maintains two different stacking sequences in the bilayer, where the atomic structure of the stacking boundary is revealed by scanning transmission electron microscopy. Finally, the low-temperature transport measurements reveal a novel semimetal-to-insulator transition in WTe2 layers and an enhanced superconductivity in few-layer MoTe2.

  14. Structure and dynamics of cadmium telluride studied by x-ray and inelastic neutron scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Niedziela, J. L.; Stone, M. B.

    2014-09-08

    We present a combined study of density functional theory, x-ray diffraction, and inelastic neutron scattering examining the temperature dependent structure and lattice dynamics of commercially available cadmium telluride. A subtle change in the structure is evinced near 80 K, which manifests also in the measured phonon density of states. There is no change to the long-range ordered structure. The implications of the change in relation to structural defects are discussed.

  15. Interactional effect of cerium and manganese on NO catalytic oxidation.

    PubMed

    Liang, Yanli; Huang, Yufen; Zhang, Hailong; Lan, Li; Zhao, Ming; Gong, Maochu; Chen, Yaoqiang; Wang, Jianli

    2017-04-01

    To preferably catalyze the oxidation of NO to NO2 in diesel after-treatment system, a series of CeO2-MnO x composite oxides was supported on silica-alumina material by the co-impregnation method. The maximum conversion of NO of the catalyst with a Ce/Mn weight ratio of 5:5 was improved by around 40%, compared to the supported manganese-only or cerium-only sample. And its maximum reaction rate was 0.056 μmol g(-1) s(-1) at 250 °C at the gas hourly space velocity of 30,000 h(-1). The experimental results suggested that Ce-Mn solid solution was formed, which could modulate the valence state of cerium and manganese and exhibit great redox properties. Moreover, the strong interaction between ceria and manganese resulted in the largest desorption amount of strong chemical oxygen and oxygen vacancies, leading to the maximum O α area ratio of 62.26% from the O 1s result. These effective oxygen species could be continually transferred to the surface, leading to the best NO catalytic activity of 5Ce5Mn/SA catalyst. Graphical abstract.

  16. Threshold Ionization and Spin-Orbit Coupling of Cerium Monoxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Wenjin; Zhang, Yuchen; Wu, Lu; Yang, Dong-Sheng

    2017-06-01

    Cerium oxides are widely used in heterogeneous catalysis due to their ability to switch between different oxidation states. We report here the mass-analyzed threshold ionization (MATI) spectroscopy of cerium monoxide (CeO) produced by laser ablating a Ce rod in a molecular beam source. The MATI spectrum in the range of 40000-45000 \\wn exhibits several band systems with similar vibrational progressions. The strongest band is at 43015 (5) \\wn, which can be assigned as the adiabatic ionization energy of the neutral species. The spectrum also shows Ce-O stretching frequencies of 817 and 890 \\wn in the neutral and ion states, respectively. By comparing with spin-orbit coupled multireference quasi-degenerate perturbation theory (SO-MCQDPT) calculations, the observed band systems are assigned to transitions from various low-energy spin-orbit levels of the neutral oxide to the two lowest spin-orbit levels of the corresponding ion. The current work will also be compared with previous experimental and computational studies on the neutral species.

  17. Functionalization of nanostructured cerium oxide films with histidine.

    PubMed

    Tsud, Nataliya; Bercha, Sofiia; Acres, Robert G; Vorokhta, Mykhailo; Khalakhan, Ivan; Prince, Kevin C; Matolín, Vladimír

    2015-01-28

    The surfaces of polycrystalline cerium oxide films were modified by histidine adsorption under vacuum and characterized by the synchrotron based techniques of core and valence level photoemission, resonant photoemission and near edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy, as well as atomic force microscopy. Histidine is strongly bound to the oxide surface in the anionic form through the deprotonated carboxylate group, and forms a disordered molecular adlayer. The imidazole ring and the amino side group do not form bonds with the substrate but are involved in the intermolecular hydrogen bonding which stabilizes the molecular adlayer. The surface reaction with histidine results in water desorption accompanied by oxide reduction, which is propagated into the bulk of the film. Previously studied, well-characterized surfaces are a guide to the chemistry of the present polycrystalline surface and histidine bonds via the carboxylate group in both cases. In contrast, bonding via the imidazole group occurs on the well-ordered surface but not in the present case. The morphology and structure of the cerium oxide are decisive factors which define the adsorption geometry of the histidine adlayer.

  18. Pulmonary toxicity in mice following exposure to cerium chloride.

    PubMed

    Hong, Jie; Yu, Xiaohong; Pan, Xiaoyu; Zhao, Xiaoyang; Sheng, Lei; Sang, Xuezi; Lin, Anan; Zhang, Chi; Zhao, Yue; Gui, Suxin; Sun, Qingqing; Wang, Ling; Hong, Fashui

    2014-06-01

    The widespread application of lanthanoids (Lns) in manufacturing industries has raised occupational and environmental health concerns about the possible increased health risks to humans exposed to Lns in their working and living environments. Numerous studies have shown that exposures to Ln cause pulmonary injury in animals, but very little is known about the molecular mechanisms of the pulmonary inflammation caused by cerium chloride (CeCl3) exposure. In this study, we evaluated the oxidative stress and molecular mechanism underlying with the pulmonary inflammation associated with chronic lung toxicity in mice treated with nasally instilled CeCl3 for 90 consecutive days. Our findings suggest that significant cerium accumulated in the lung, leading the obvious increase of the lung indices, significant increases in inflammatory cells and levels of lactate dehydrogenase, alkaline phosphate, and total protein, overproduction of reactive oxygen species and peroxidation of lipids, reduced antioxidant capacity, and pulmonary inflammation. CeCl3 exposure also activated nuclear factor κB, increased the expression of tumor necrosis factor α, cyclooxygenase-2, heme oxygenase 1, interleukin 2, interleukin 4, interleukin 6, interleukin 8, interleukin 10, interleukin 18, interleukin 1β, and CYP1A1. However, CeCl3 reduced the expression of nuclear factor κB (NF-κB)-inhibiting factor and heat shock protein 70. These findings suggest that the pulmonary inflammation caused by CeCl3 in mice is closely associated with oxidative stress and inflammatory cytokine expression.

  19. Fast synthesis of cerium oxide nanoparticles and nanorods.

    PubMed

    Gao, Feng; Lu, Qingyi; Komarneni, Sridhar

    2006-12-01

    The microwave-hydrothermal method has been investigated for the fast synthesis of rare earth cerium oxide (CeO2) nanoparticles and nanorods. This approach combines the advantages of both hydrothermal and microwave heating techniques. It is facile, rapid, energy-saving, and environmentally-benign and leads to high-yields. The average sizes of the obtained CeO2 nanoparticles could be adjusted from approximatrly 1.6 nm to approximately 20 nm. Moreover, by changing cerium source and adjusting the amount of the added ammonia water, CeO2 nanorods could be synthesized under microwave-assisted conditions for the first time. No calcination process or surfactant is required in our experiments for both CeO2 nanoparticles and nanorods. The ultraviolet and visible (UV-vis) spectra show the obvious size-dependence of the position of the absorbance peak. The Brunaur Emmett Teller (BET) nitrogen adsorption indicates that these nanoparticles and nanorods have high specific surface areas, which are needed for potential applications in many fields. Compared with conventional hydrothermal method, microwave-assisted hydrothermal method shows its advantages of rapidity, convenience and perhaps cost-effectiveness and could be extended to the synthesis of other nanoparticles and nanorods.

  20. Toxicity of cerium and thorium on Daphnia magna.

    PubMed

    Ma, Yuhui; Wang, Jingkun; Peng, Can; Ding, Yayun; He, Xiao; Zhang, Peng; Li, Na; Lan, Tu; Wang, Dongqi; Zhang, Zhaohui; Sun, Fuhong; Liao, Haiqing; Zhang, Zhiyong

    2016-12-01

    Cerium (Ce) and thorium (Th) are always thought to be chemically similar and have comparable toxic properties on living organisms. In the present study, the acute and chronic toxicity of these two elements to freshwater crustacean Daphnia magna were investigated in the modified reconstituted water (6mg/L KCl, 123mg/L MgSO4·7H2O, and 294mg/L CaCl2·2H2O in Milli-Q water, pH 7.8). It seemed that Ce and Th had comparable acute toxicity on Daphnia: 24/48h EC50 for Th and Ce were 7.3/4.7μM and 16.4/10.7μM, respectively. However, Ce was present as soluble ions while all of Th was present as particulate ThO2 in the exposure medium. Considering their different chemical forms and bioavailability, the toxic mechanisms of Ce(3+) and ThO2 on Daphnia would be totally different. To our knowledge, this is the first time to investigate the aquatic toxicity of thorium and cerium based on their actual chemical speciation in the exposure medium. The results also suggest that more attention should be paid on the detrimental effect of Th in the form of particulate ThO2.

  1. Cerium Tetrafluoride: Sublimation, Thermolysis, and Atomic Fluorine Migration.

    PubMed

    Chilingarov, N S; Knot'ko, A V; Shlyapnikov, I M; Mazej, Z; Kristl, M; Sidorov, L N

    2015-08-06

    Saturated vapor pressure p° and enthalpy of sublimation (ΔsH°) of cerium tetrafluoride CeF4 were determined by means of Knudsen effusion mass spectrometry in the range of 750-920 K. It was discovered that sublimation of cerium tetrafluoride from a platinum effusion cell competes with thermal decomposition to CeF3 in the solid phase, but no accompanying release of fluorine to the gas phase occurs. Thus, fluorine atoms migrate within the surface layer of CeF4(s) to the regions of their irreversible drain. We used scanning electron microscopy to study the distribution of the residual CeF3(s) across the inner surface of the effusion cell after complete evaporation of CeF4(s). It was observed that CeF3 accumulates near the edge of the effusion orifice and near the junction of the lid and the body of the cell, that is, in those regions where the fluorine atoms can migrate to a free platinum surface and thus be depleted from the system. Distribution of CeF3(s) solid particles indicates the ways of fluorine atoms migration providing CeF3(s) formation inside the CeF4(s) surface layer.

  2. Incorporation of cerium and neodymium in uranyl phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Cheol-Woon; Wronkiewicz, David J.; Finch, Robert J.; Buck, Edgar C.

    2006-07-01

    The potential for incorporating rare earth elements (REE) into/onto crystalline compounds has been evaluated by precipitating uranyl phases from aqueous solutions containing either cerium or neodymium. These REEs serve both as monitors for evaluating the potential repository behavior of REE radionuclides, and as surrogate elements for actinides (e.g., Ce 4+ and Nd 3+ for Pu 4+ and Am 3+, respectively). The present experiments examined the behavior of REE in the presence of ianthinite ([U24+(UO2)4O6(OH)4(H2O)4](H2O)5), becquerelite (Ca(UO 2) 6O 4(OH) 6(H 2O) 8), and other uranyl hydroxide compounds commonly noted as alteration products during the corrosion of UO 2, spent nuclear fuel, and naturally occurring uraninite. The results of these experiments demonstrate that significant quantities of both cerium ( Kd = 1020) and neodymium ( Kd = 840) are incorporated within the uranium alteration phases and suggest that ionic substitution and/or adsorption to the uranyl phases can play a key role in the limiting the mobility of REE (and by analogy, actinide elements) in a nuclear waste repository.

  3. Altering properties of cerium oxide thin films by Rh doping

    SciTech Connect

    Ševčíková, Klára; Nehasil, Václav; Vorokhta, Mykhailo; Haviar, Stanislav; Matolín, Vladimír; and others

    2015-07-15

    Highlights: • Thin films of ceria doped by rhodium deposited by RF magnetron sputtering. • Concentration of rhodium has great impact on properties of Rh–CeO{sub x} thin films. • Intensive oxygen migration in films with low concentration of rhodium. • Oxygen migration suppressed in films with high amount of Rh dopants. - Abstract: Ceria containing highly dispersed ions of rhodium is a promising material for catalytic applications. The Rh–CeO{sub x} thin films with different concentrations of rhodium were deposited by RF magnetron sputtering and were studied by soft and hard X-ray photoelectron spectroscopies, Temperature programmed reaction and X-ray powder diffraction techniques. The sputtered films consist of rhodium–cerium mixed oxide where cerium exhibits a mixed valency of Ce{sup 4+} and Ce{sup 3+} and rhodium occurs in two oxidation states, Rh{sup 3+} and Rh{sup n+}. We show that the concentration of rhodium has a great influence on the chemical composition, structure and reducibility of the Rh–CeO{sub x} thin films. The films with low concentrations of rhodium are polycrystalline, while the films with higher amount of Rh dopants are amorphous. The morphology of the films strongly influences the mobility of oxygen in the material. Therefore, varying the concentration of rhodium in Rh–CeO{sub x} thin films leads to preparing materials with different properties.

  4. Effect of cerium on temper embrittlement of P-doped Mn structural steels

    SciTech Connect

    Zhexi, Yuan; Shenhua, Song; Faulkner, R.G.; Tingdong, Xu

    1994-01-01

    The effect of cerium on temper embrittlement of P-doped Mn structural steels has been investigated by measurements of the ductile-brittle transition temperature and observations by AES, SIMS and SEM of the fracture surfaces of isothermally embrittled steels. It is shown that P can bring about the temper embrittlement of Mn structural steels; cerium may reduce the temper embrittlement of the steels and the segregation of cerium to grain boundaries may play an important part in reducing the temper embrittlement of the steels.

  5. Magnetophotonic crystal with cerium substituted yttrium iron garnet and enhanced Faraday rotation angle.

    PubMed

    Yoshimoto, Takuya; Goto, Taichi; Isogai, Ryosuke; Nakamura, Yuichi; Takagi, Hiroyuki; Ross, C A; Inoue, M

    2016-04-18

    Magnetophotonic crystals (MPCs) comprising cerium-substituted yttrium iron garnet (CeYIG) sandwiched by two Bragg mirrors were fabricated by vacuum annealing. CeYIG was deposited on Bragg mirrors at room temperature and annealed in 5 Pa of residual air. No ceria or other non-garnet phases were detected. Cerium 3 + ions substituted on the yttrium sites and no cerium 4 + ions were found. The Faraday rotation angle of the MPC was -2.92° at a wavelength of λ = 1570 nm was 30 times larger than that of the CeYIG film. These results showed good agreement with calculated values derived using a matrix approach.

  6. Structural, topographical and electrical properties of cerium doped strontium barium niobate (Ce:SBN60) ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Raj, S. Gokul; Mathivanan, V.; Mohan, R.; Kumar, G. Ramesh Yathavan, S.

    2016-05-06

    Tungsten bronze type cerium doped strontium barium niobate (Ce:SBN - Sr{sub 0.6}B{sub 0.4}Nb{sub 2}O{sub 6}) ceramics were synthesized by solid state process. Cerium was used as dopant to improve its electrical properties. Influence of Ce{sup +} ions on the photoluminescence properties was investigated in detail. The grain size topographical behavior of SBN powders and their associated abnormal grain growth (AGG) were completely analyzed through SEM studies. Finally dielectric, measurement discusses about the broad phase transition observed due to cerium dopant The results were discussed in detail.

  7. Structural, topographical and electrical properties of cerium doped strontium barium niobate (Ce:SBN60) ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raj, S. Gokul; Mathivanan, V.; Kumar, G. Ramesh; Yathavan, S.; Mohan, R.

    2016-05-01

    Tungsten bronze type cerium doped strontium barium niobate (Ce:SBN - Sr0.6B0.4Nb2O6) ceramics were synthesized by solid state process. Cerium was used as dopant to improve its electrical properties. Influence of Ce+ ions on the photoluminescence properties was investigated in detail. The grain size topographical behavior of SBN powders and their associated abnormal grain growth (AGG) were completely analyzed through SEM studies. Finally dielectric, measurement discusses about the broad phase transition observed due to cerium dopant The results were discussed in detail.

  8. Cerium-Based Magnets: Novel High Energy Permanent Magnet Without Critical Elements

    SciTech Connect

    2012-01-01

    REACT Project: Ames Laboratory will develop a new class of permanent magnets based on the more commonly available element cerium for use in both EVs and renewable power generators. Cerium is 4 times more abundant and significantly less expensive than the rare earth element neodymium, which is frequently used in today’s most powerful magnets. Ames Laboratory will combine other metal elements with cerium to create a new magnet that can remain stable at the high temperatures typically found in electric motors. This new magnetic material will ultimately be demonstrated in a prototype electric motor, representing a cost-effective and efficient alternative to neodymium-based motors.

  9. Use of a Soluble Anode in Electrodeposition of Thick Bismuth Telluride Layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maas, M.; Diliberto, S.; de Vaulx, C.; Azzouz, K.; Boulanger, C.

    2014-10-01

    Integration of thermoelectric devices within an automotive heat exchanger could enable conversion of lost heat into electrical energy, contributing to improved total output from the engine. For this purpose, synthesis of thick bismuth telluride (Bi2Te3) films is required. Bismuth telluride has been produced by an electrochemical method in nitric acid with a sacrificial bismuth telluride anode as the source of cations. The binary layer grows on the working electrode while the counter-electrode, a Bi2Te3 disk obtained by high frequency melting, is oxidized to BiIII and TeIV. This process leads to auto-regeneration of the solution without modification of its composition. The thickness of films deposited by use of the Bi2Te3 anode was approximately 10 times that without. To demonstrate the utility of a soluble anode in electrochemical deposition, we report characterization of the composition and morphology of the films obtained under different experimental conditions. Perfectly dense and regular Bi2Te3 films (˜400 μm) with low internal stress and uniform composition across the cross-section were prepared. Their thermoelectric properties were assessed.

  10. Exfoliation and characterization of bismuth telluride atomic quintuples and quasi-two-dimensional crystals.

    PubMed

    Teweldebrhan, Desalegne; Goyal, Vivek; Balandin, Alexander A

    2010-04-14

    Bismuth telluride (Bi(2)Te(3)) and its alloys are the best bulk thermoelectric materials known today. In addition, stacked quasi-two-dimensional (2D) layers of Bi(2)Te(3) were recently identified as promising topological insulators. In this Letter we describe a method for "graphene-inspired" exfoliation of crystalline bismuth telluride films with a thickness of a few atoms. The atomically thin films were suspended across trenches in Si/SiO(2) substrates, and subjected to detail material characterization, which included atomic force microscopy and micro-Raman spectroscopy. The presence of the van der Waals gaps allowed us to disassemble Bi(2)Te(3) crystal into its quintuple building blocks-five monatomic sheets-consisting of Te((1))-Bi-Te((2))-Bi-Te((1)). By altering the thickness and sequence of atomic planes, we were able to create "designer" nonstoichiometric quasi-2D crystalline films, change their composition and doping, the type of charge carriers as well as other properties. The exfoliated quintuples and ultrathin films have low thermal conductivity, high electrical conductivity, and enhanced thermoelectric properties. The obtained results pave the way for producing stacks of crystalline bismuth telluride quantum wells with the strong spatial confinement of charge carriers and acoustic phonons, beneficial for thermoelectric devices. The developed technology for producing free-standing quasi-2D layers of Te((1))-Bi-Te((2))-Bi-Te((1)) creates an impetus for investigation of the topological insulators and their possible practical applications.

  11. Synthesis of cerium rich intermetallics using molten metal eutectics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tucker, Patricia Christine

    Metal eutectic fluxes are useful for exploratory synthesis of new intermetallic phases. In this work the use of cerium/transition metal eutectics such as: Ce/Co, Ce/Ni, and Ce/Fe have yielded many new synthetically and magnetically complex phases. Structural units that were previously observed in phases grown in La/Ni eutectic reactions have also been observed in new structures and analogs grown from cerium/transition metal eutectics. These structural units include a main group element coordinated by 9 rare-earth atoms (such as the Al Ce9 clusters seen in Ce31.0(2)Fe11.8(5)Al6.5(6) B13C4), trigonal planar FeC3 units (also seen in Ce31.0(2)Fe11.8(5)Al6.5(6)B 13C4), iron clusters capped by light elements (Fe4C 6 frustrated tetrahedral in Ce21Fe8M7C 14, and larger Fe clusters in Ce33Fe14B25 C34). Variants of these building blocks were observed in Ce10Co2B7C16 with square Co units and chains of B and C connected to them, Fe2C8 units observed in Ce7Fe2C9, and FeC4 observed in Ce4FeGa0.85Al0.15C4 and Ce4FeAlC4. Two new phases were grown from Ce/Fe eutectic, Ce33Fe 14B25C34 and Ce33Fe13B 18C34 which exhibits very similar structures, but significantly different magnetic behavior. Structurally these two phases are similar. Both crystallize in the Im-3m space group, but differ by the centering of the Fe clusters. Ce33Fe14B25C34 contains Fe clusters centered by B atoms and Al doped on the Fe2 site. In Ce33Fe13B18C34, the Fe cluster is a perfect cuboctahedron. Ce33Fe14B25 C34 exhibits mixed valent behavior of cerium at 75K and no magnetic moment on iron, where-as Ce33Fe13B18C 34 exhibits tetravalent cerium and its iron clusters undergo a ferromagnetic transition at 180K. Another borocarbide, Ce10Co2B7C 16 was synthesized from Ce/Co eutectic flux. This structure features squares of Co surrounded by chains of C and B and a sea of cerium atoms. Temperature dependent magnetic susceptibility measurements at 1 Tesla were fit to a modified Curie-Weiss law and a moment per Ce was

  12. Electronic characterization of defects in narrow gap semiconductors: Comparison of electronic energy levels and formation energies in mercury cadmium telluride, mercury zinc telluride, and mercury zinc selenide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, James D.; Li, Wei-Gang

    1995-01-01

    The project has evolved to that of using Green's functions to predict properties of deep defects in narrow gap materials. Deep defects are now defined as originating from short range potentials and are often located near the middle of the energy gap. They are important because they affect the lifetime of charge carriers and hence the switching time of transistors. We are now moving into the arena of predicting formation energies of deep defects. This will also allow us to make predictions about the relative concentrations of the defects that could be expected at a given temperature. The narrow gap materials mercury cadmium telluride (MCT), mercury zinc telluride (MZT), and mercury zinc selenide (MZS) are of interest to NASA because they have commercial value for infrared detecting materials, and because there is a good possibility that they can be grown better in a microgravity environment. The uniform growth of these crystals on earth is difficult because of convection (caused by solute depletion just ahead of the growing interface, and also due to thermal gradients). In general it is very difficult to grow crystals with both radial and axial homogeneity.

  13. Electronic characterization of defects in narrow gap semiconductors: Comparison of electronic energy levels and formation energies in mercury cadmium telluride, mercury zinc telluride, and mercury zinc selenide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patterson, James D.; Li, Wei-Gang

    1995-03-01

    The project has evolved to that of using Green's functions to predict properties of deep defects in narrow gap materials. Deep defects are now defined as originating from short range potentials and are often located near the middle of the energy gap. They are important because they affect the lifetime of charge carriers and hence the switching time of transistors. We are now moving into the arena of predicting formation energies of deep defects. This will also allow us to make predictions about the relative concentrations of the defects that could be expected at a given temperature. The narrow gap materials mercury cadmium telluride (MCT), mercury zinc telluride (MZT), and mercury zinc selenide (MZS) are of interest to NASA because they have commercial value for infrared detecting materials, and because there is a good possibility that they can be grown better in a microgravity environment. The uniform growth of these crystals on earth is difficult because of convection (caused by solute depletion just ahead of the growing interface, and also due to thermal gradients). In general it is very difficult to grow crystals with both radial and axial homogeneity.

  14. Effect of heat treatment on the crystal structure and FTIR spectra of Sm doped cerium dioxide film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiaozhou; Liu, Xiaozhou; Xia, Letian; Chen, Jie; Wang, Xiaoyu

    2017-04-01

    The Sm doped cerium dioxide films were prepared with cerium foils as raw materials by anodization in Sm(NO3)3-Na2C2O4-NH3·H2O-H2O-(CH2OH)2 electrolyte. The anodic Sm doped cerium oxide films were heat treated in 100°C ~ 400°C. The heat treated anodic Sm doped cerium oxide films were characterized with X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) techniques respectively. The heat treated anodic Sm doped cerium oxide film at 100°C is the semi crystalline film. As heat treatment temperatures being in 200°C ~ 400°C, the heat treated anodic Sm doped cerium oxide films have a structure of cubic fluorite respectively. The doping of Sm can be achieved well by anodization method and be recognized as replacement doping or caulking doping. The crystal structure of Sm doped cerium dioxide films become more complete with the increase of heat treatment temperature in 200 ~ 400 °C. The doping of Sm can improve the crystallinity of the cerium dioxide film. The presence of adsorbing water, ethylene glycol and CO2 in the heat treated anodic Sm doped cerium oxide film at 100°C. The adsorbing ethylene glycols and water, CO2 in the anodic Sm doped cerium oxide film are removed at 200°C and 300°C respectively.

  15. The effect of different annealing temperatures on tin and cadmium telluride phases obtained by a modified chemical route

    SciTech Connect

    Mesquita, Anderson Fuzer; Porto, Arilza de Oliveira; Magela de Lima, Geraldo; Paniago, Roberto; Ardisson, José Domingos

    2012-11-15

    Graphical abstract: Display Omitted Highlights: ► Synthesis of cadmium and tin telluride. ► Chemical route to obtain pure crystalline cadmium and tin telluride. ► Effect of the annealing temperature on the crystalline phases. ► Removal of tin oxide as side product through thermal treatment. -- Abstract: In this work tin and cadmium telluride were prepared by a modification of a chemical route reported in the literature to obtain metallacycles formed by oxidative addition of tin-tellurium bonds to platinum (II). Through this procedure it was possible to obtain tin and cadmium telluride. X-ray diffraction and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy were used to identify the crystalline phases obtained as well as the presence of side products. In the case of tin telluride it was identified potassium chloride, metallic tellurium and tin oxide as contaminants. The tin oxidation states were also monitored by {sup 119}Sn Mössbauer spectroscopy. The annealing in hydrogen atmosphere was chosen as a strategy to reduce the tin oxide and promote its reaction with the excess of tellurium present in the medium. The evolution of this tin oxide phase was studied through the annealing of the sample at different temperatures. Cadmium telluride was obtained with high degree of purity (98.5% relative weight fraction) according to the Rietveld refinement of X-ray diffraction data. The modified procedure showed to be very effective to obtain amorphous tin and cadmium telluride and the annealing at 450 °C has proven to be useful to reduce the amount of oxide produced as side product.

  16. Direct growth of cerium oxide nanorods on diverse substrates for superhydrophobicity and corrosion resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Young Jun; Jang, Hanmin; Lee, Kwan-Soo; Kim, Dong Rip

    2015-06-01

    Superhydrophobic surfaces with anti-corrosion properties have attracted great interest in many industrial fields, particularly to enhance the thermal performance of offshore applications such as heat exchangers, pipelines, power plants, and platform structures. Nanostructures with hydrophobic materials have been widely utilized to realize superhydrophobicity of surfaces, and cerium oxide has been highlighted due to its good corrosion resistive and intrinsically hydrophobic properties. However, few studies of direct growth of cerium oxide nanostructures on diverse substrates have been reported. Herein we report a facile hydrothermal method to directly grow cerium oxide nanorods on diverse substrates, such as aluminum alloy, stainless steel, titanium, and silicon. Diverse substrates with cerium oxide nanorods exhibited superhydrophobicity with no hydrophobic modifiers on their surfaces, and showed good corrosion resistive properties in corrosive medium. We believe our method could pave the way for realization of scalable and sustainable corrosion resistive superhydrophobic surfaces in many industrial fields.

  17. Inhaled Diesel Emissions Generated with Cerium Oxide Nanoparticle Fuel Additive Induce Adverse Pulmonary and Systemic Effects

    EPA Science Inventory

    Diesel exhaust (DE) exposure induces adverse cardiopulmonary effects. Cerium oxide nanoparticles added to diesel fuel (DECe) increases fuel burning efficiency but leads to altered emission characteristics and potentially altered health effects. Here, we evaluated whether DECe res...

  18. Recent advances (2010-2015) in studies of cerium oxide nanoparticles' health effects.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Li, Peng; Yu, Hua; Bian, Ying

    2016-06-01

    Cerium oxide nanoparticles, widespread applied in our life, have attracted much concern for their human health effects. However, most of the works addressing cerium oxide nanoparticles toxicity have only used in vitro models or in vivo intratracheal instillation methods. The toxicity studies have varied results and not all are conclusive. The information about risk assessments derived from epidemiology studies is severely lacking. The knowledge of occupational safety and health (OSH) for exposed workers is very little. Thus this review focuses on recent advances in studies of toxicokinetics, antioxidant activity and toxicity. Additionally, aim to extend previous health effects assessments of cerium oxide nanoparticles, we summarize the epidemiology studies of engineered cerium oxide nanoparticles used as automotive diesel fuel additive, aerosol particulate matter in air pollution, other industrial ultrafine and nanoparticles (e.g., fumes particles generated in welding and flame cutting processes).

  19. Inhaled Diesel Emissions Generated with Cerium Oxide Nanoparticle Fuel Additive Induce Adverse Pulmonary and Systemic Effects

    EPA Science Inventory

    Diesel exhaust (DE) exposure induces adverse cardiopulmonary effects. Cerium oxide nanoparticles added to diesel fuel (DECe) increases fuel burning efficiency but leads to altered emission characteristics and potentially altered health effects. Here, we evaluated whether DECe res...

  20. Nutritional quality assessment of tomato fruits after exposure to uncoated and citric acid coated cerium oxide nanoparticles, bulk cerium oxide, cerium acetate and citric acid.

    PubMed

    Barrios, Ana Cecilia; Medina-Velo, Illya A; Zuverza-Mena, Nubia; Dominguez, Osvaldo E; Peralta-Videa, Jose R; Gardea-Torresdey, Jorge L

    2017-01-01

    Little is known about the effects of surface modification on the interaction of nanoparticles (NPs) with plants. Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) plants were cultivated in potting soil amended with bare and citric acid coated nanoceria (nCeO2, nCeO2+CA), cerium acetate (CeAc), bulk cerium oxide (bCeO2) and citric acid (CA) at 0-500 mg kg(-1). Fruits were collected year-round until the harvesting time (210 days). Results showed that nCeO2+CA at 62.5, 250 and 500 mg kg(-1) reduced dry weight by 54, 57, and 64% and total sugar by 84, 78, and 81%. At 62.5, 125, and 500 mg kg(-1) nCeO2+CA decreased reducing sugar by 63, 75, and 52%, respectively and at 125 mg kg(-1) reduced starch by 78%, compared to control. The bCeO2 at 250 and 500 mg kg(-1), increased reducing sugar by 67 and 58%. In addition, when compared to controls, nCeO2 at 500 mg kg(-1) reduced B (28%), Fe (78%), Mn (33%), and Ca (59%). At 125 mg kg(-1) decreased Al by 24%; while nCeO2+CA at 125 and 500 mg kg(-1) increased B by 33%. On the other hand, bCeO2 at 62.5 mg kg(-1) increased Ca (267%), but at 250 mg kg(-1) reduced Cu (52%), Mn (33%), and Mg (58%). Fruit macromolecules were mainly affected by nCeO2+CA, while nutritional elements by nCeO2; however, all Ce treatments altered, in some way, the nutritional quality of tomato fruit. To our knowledge, this is the first study comparing effects of uncoated and coated nanoceria on tomato fruit quality. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. The influence of a cerium additive on ultrafine diesel particle emissions and kinetics of oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Jung, Heejung; Kittelson, David B.; Zachariah, Michael R.

    2005-08-01

    The influence of a cerium additive on the kinetics of oxidation and size distribution of ultrafine diesel particles was studied using a high-temperature oxidation-tandem differential mobility analysis method over the temperature range 300-700|{sup o}C. The addition of cerium to the diesel fuel was observed to cause significant changes in number-weighted size distributions, light-off temperature, and kinetics of oxidation. The peak number concentration in the accumulation mode decreased 50 and 65%, respectively, for 25 and 100 ppm dosing levels under 1400 rpm and 75% engine load. The light-off temperature was reduced by 250 and 300|{sup o}C, respectively, for 25 and 100 ppm dosing levels. The oxidation rate increased significantly (x20) with the addition of cerium to the fuel; however, the rate was relatively insensitive to dosing level. The activation energy for cerium-dosed oxidation was, within experimental error, equivalent to that for undosed fuel (E{sub a}=100-110 kJmol{sup -1}). From a phenomenological kinetic rate perspective, the increase in oxidation rate was attributed solely to an increase in the preexponential factor. These results suggested that diesel particles using regular, undosed diesel fuels were already metal-catalyzed to some extent, most likely from metals in the lube oil. The addition of cerium likely increased the number of catalytic sites but had no effect on the overall activation energy due to the presence of other metals in the diesel particulate matter coming from lube oil. The characteristics of cerium-laden diesel particles were also investigated. Two principal types of aggregates were found using transmission electron microscopy and energy-dispersive spectrometry analysis. The first was composed mainly of agglomerates of carbonaceous spherules and a few, considerably smaller cerium oxide nanoparticles. The second consisted of metallic aggregates composed mainly of cerium oxide nanoparticles and some carbon.

  2. Transformation of Cerium Oxide Nanoparticles from a Diesel Fuel Additive during Combustion in a Diesel Engine.

    PubMed

    Dale, James G; Cox, Steven S; Vance, Marina E; Marr, Linsey C; Hochella, Michael F

    2017-02-21

    Nanoscale cerium oxide is used as a diesel fuel additive to reduce particulate matter emissions and increase fuel economy, but its fate in the environment has not been established. Cerium oxide released as a result of the combustion of diesel fuel containing the additive Envirox, which utilizes suspended nanoscale cerium oxide to reduce particulate matter emissions and increase fuel economy, was captured from the exhaust stream of a diesel engine and was characterized using a combination of bulk analytical techniques and high resolution transmission electron microscopy. The combustion process induced significant changes in the size and morphology of the particles; ∼15 nm aggregates consisting of 5-7 nm faceted crystals in the fuel additive became 50-300 nm, near-spherical, single crystals in the exhaust. Electron diffraction identified the original cerium oxide particles as cerium(IV) oxide (CeO2, standard FCC structure) with no detectable quantities of Ce(III), whereas in the exhaust the ceria particles had additional electron diffraction reflections indicative of a CeO2 superstructure containing ordered oxygen vacancies. The surfactant coating present on the cerium oxide particles in the additive was lost during combustion, but in roughly 30% of the observed particles in the exhaust, a new surface coating formed, approximately 2-5 nm thick. The results of this study suggest that pristine, laboratory-produced, nanoscale cerium oxide is not a good substitute for the cerium oxide released from fuel-borne catalyst applications and that future toxicity experiments and modeling will require the use/consideration of more realistic materials.

  3. Antioxidant properties of cerium oxide nanocrystals as a function of nanocrystal diameter and surface coating.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seung Soo; Song, Wensi; Cho, Minjung; Puppala, Hema L; Nguyen, Phuc; Zhu, Huiguang; Segatori, Laura; Colvin, Vicki L

    2013-11-26

    This work examines the effect of nanocrystal diameter and surface coating on the reactivity of cerium oxide nanocrystals with H2O2 both in chemical solutions and in cells. Monodisperse nanocrystals were formed in organic solvents from the decomposition of cerium precursors, and subsequently phase transferred into water using amphiphiles as nanoparticle coatings. Quantitative analysis of the antioxidant capacity of CeO2-x using gas chromatography and a luminol test revealed that 2 mol of H2O2 reacted with every mole of cerium(III), suggesting that the reaction proceeds via a Fenton-type mechanism. Smaller diameter nanocrystals containing more cerium(III) were found to be more reactive toward H2O2. Additionally, the presence of a surface coating did not preclude the reaction between the nanocrystal surface cerium(III) and hydrogen peroxide. Taken together, the most reactive nanoparticles were the smallest (e.g., 3.8 nm diameter) with the thinnest surface coating (e.g., oleic acid). Moreover, a benchmark test of their antioxidant capacity revealed these materials were 9 times more reactive than commercial antioxidants such as Trolox. A unique feature of these antioxidant nanocrystals is that they can be applied multiple times: over weeks, cerium(IV) rich particles slowly return to their starting cerium(III) content. In nearly all cases, the particles remain colloidally stable (e.g., nonaggregated) and could be applied multiple times as antioxidants. These chemical properties were also observed in cell culture, where the materials were able to reduce oxidative stress in human dermal fibroblasts exposed to H2O2 with efficiency comparable to their solution phase reactivity. These data suggest that organic coatings on cerium oxide nanocrystals do not limit the antioxidant behavior of the nanocrystals, and that their redox cycling behavior can be preserved even when stabilized.

  4. Thin film cadmium telluride solar cells. Final technical report for period July 1, 1979-August 31, 1980

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, T.L.

    1980-08-01

    The objectives of this contract are to investigate thin films of cadmium telluride on low cost substrates and to determine the feasibility of using these films for high efficiency solar cells. Efforts during this program have been directed to the construction of apparatus for the chemical vapor deposition of cadmium telluride films, the selection and preparation of substrates, the deposition and characterization of cadmium telluride films, and the fabrication and characterization of solar cells. Cadmium telluride films have been deposited on a number of substrates by the direct combination of cadmium and tellurium on the substrate surface at 500/sup 0/C or higher at rates of up to 0.6 ..mu..m/min. The structural, crystallographic, and electrical properties of cadmium telluride films deposited over a wide range of conditions have been evaluated. A series of doping experiments have been carried out using iodine and indium as the n-type dopant, and phosphorus, arsenic, and antimony as the p-type dopant. Low resistivity films have not been produced thus far. In/W/graphite substrates have been used for the deposition of n-type films with an ohmic interface. However, no suitable substrates have been found to form an ohmic interface with p-type films. Solar cells prepared from these films exhibit relatively good short-circuit current density, up to 15 mA/cm/sup 2/, but their conversion efficiencies are severely limited by the high series resistance of the devices.

  5. The Corrosion Behaviors of the Cerium Conversion Coatings on the Zinc Coating in a 5 % NaCl Solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jianghong; Meng, Binfang; Wang, Xinying; Li, Wei

    2017-01-01

    The present paper investigated the impact of cerium on the corrosion resistance of zinc coating in a 5 % NaCl solution. Electrochemistry was used to measure the electrochemical parameters to compare the corrosion resistance of the zinc coating with that of the cerium conversion coating on the galvanized layer. SEM/EDS and XRD were adopted to analyze the appearance and phases of corrosion products of the cerium conversion coating and to probe the impact of cerium on the corrosion behavior of zinc coating in the Cl- media. The results showed that the cerium conversion coating formed on the zinc coating increased the zinc's corrosion resistance effectively, conversion coating with lower cerium content protected the substrate poorly, resulting in easy erosion of the zinc coating in the Cl- media. The corrosion products mainly consist of complexes, such as Zn(OH)xCly and Ce(OH)xCly.

  6. Effects of manganese deficiency and added cerium on nitrogen metabolism of maize.

    PubMed

    Gong, Xiaolan; Qu, Chunxiang; Liu, Chao; Hong, Mengmeng; Wang, Ling; Hong, Fashui

    2011-12-01

    Manganese is one of the essential microelements for plant growth, and cerium is a beneficial element for plant growth. However, whether manganese deficiency affects nitrogen metabolism of plants and cerium improves the nitrogen metabolism of plants by exposure to manganese-deficient media are still unclear. The main aim of the study was to determine the effects of manganese deficiency in nitrogen metabolism and the roles of cerium in the improvement of manganese-deficient effects in maize seedlings. Maize seedlings were cultivated in manganese present Meider's nutrient solution. They were subjected to manganese deficiency and to cerium chloride administered in the manganese-present and manganese-deficient media. Maize seedlings grown in the various media were measured for key enzyme activities involved in nitrogen metabolism, such as nitrate reductase, glutamate dehydrogenase, glutamine synthetase, and glutamic-oxaloace transaminase. We found that manganese deficiency restricted uptake and transport of NO(3)(-), inhibited activities of nitrogen-metabolism-related enzymes, such as nitrate reductase, glutamine synthetase, and glutamic-oxaloace transaminase, thus decreasing the synthesis of chlorophyll and soluble protein, and inhibited the growth of maize seedlings. Manganese deficiency promoted the activity of glutamate dehydrogenase and reduced the toxicity of excess ammonia to the plant, while added cerium relieved the damage to nitrogen metabolism caused by manganese deficiency in maize seedlings. However, cerium addition exerted positively to relieve the damage of nitrogen metabolism process in maize seedlings caused by exposure to manganese-deficient media.

  7. Synthesis and catalytic properties of microemulsion-derived cerium oxide nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Kockrick, Emanuel; Schrage, Christian; Grigas, Anett; Geiger, Dorin; Kaskel, Stefan

    2008-07-15

    The synthesis of cerium dioxide nanoparticles using an inverse microemulsion technique and precipitation method was investigated. Cerium hydroxide nanoparticles were synthesized by adding diluted ammonia to n-heptane-surfactant-cerium nitrate system. The micelle and particle size in the range of 5-12 nm were controlled by varying the molar water to surfactant ratio and analyzed by dynamic light scattering (DLS), small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). Cerium hydroxide nanoparticles were isolated and subsequently treated at 100-600 deg. C to obtain nanoscale ceria. Crystallite sizes of cerium dioxide in the range of 6-16 nm were estimated by Scherrer analysis by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and HRTEM. The catalytic activity of particles annealed at 400 and 600 deg. C in soot combustion reactions was characterized by temperature-programmed oxidation (TPO) indicating a size-dependant activity. Crystallite sizes and catalytic stability of elevated ceria systems were tested in second combustion cycles. - Graphical abstract: The synthesis of cerium dioxide nanoparticles using an inverse microemulsion technique and precipitation method was investigated using small angle X-ray scattering, dynamic light scattering and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. Catalytic activity of ceria nanoparticles was tested in soot combustion reaction indicating size-dependent reactivity.

  8. Growth and composition of nanostructured and nanoporous cerium oxide thin films on a graphite foil.

    PubMed

    Lavkova, Jaroslava; Khalakhan, Ivan; Chundak, Mykhailo; Vorokhta, Mykhailo; Potin, Valerie; Matolin, Vladimir; Matolinova, Iva

    2015-03-07

    The morphology and composition of CeOx films prepared by r.f. magnetron sputtering on a graphite foil have been investigated mainly by using microscopy methods. This study presents the formation of nanocrystalline layers with porous structure due to the modification of a carbon support and the formation of cerium carbide crystallites as a result of the deposition process. Chemical analyses of the layers with different thicknesses performed by energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, electron energy loss spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy have pointed to the reduction of the cerium oxide layers. In the deposited layers, cerium was present in mixed Ce(3+) and Ce(4+) valence. Ce(3+) species were located mainly at the graphite foil-CeOx interface and the chemical state of cerium was gradually changing to Ce(4+) going to the layer surface. It became more stoichiometric in the case of thicker layers except for the surface region, where the presence of Ce(3+) was associated with oxygen vacancies on the surface of cerium oxide grains. The degree of cerium oxide reduction is discussed in the context of particle size.

  9. Measuring technique for thermal ionisation mass spectrometry of human tracer kinetic study with stable cerium isotopes.

    PubMed

    Keiser, Teresa; Höllriegl, Vera; Giussani, Augusto; Oeh, Uwe

    2011-06-01

    Thermal ionisation mass spectrometry (TIMS) method has been developed for the simultaneous detection of different cerium isotopes in biological samples (i.e., blood and urine) at very low concentrations. The work has been done in the frame of a biokinetic study, where different stable cerium isotopes have been administered orally and intravenously as tracers to the human body. In order to develop an appropriate detection method for the tracers in the biological samples, an optimum sample preparation technique has been set and adapted to the specific requirements of the analysis technique used, i.e., TIMS. For sample evaporation and ionisation, the double tantalum filament technique showed the best results. The ions produced were simultaneously collected on a secondary electron multiplier so that the isotopic ratios of the cerium isotopes in the biological samples could be measured. The technique has been optimised for the determination of cerium down to 1 ng loaded on the evaporation filament corresponding to cerium concentrations of down to 1 ng ml(-1) in the blood or urine samples. It has been shown that the technique is reliable in application and enables studies on cerium metabolism and biokinetics in humans without employing radioactive tracers.

  10. Enhanced electrochromism in cerium doped molybdenum oxide thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Dhanasankar, M.; Purushothaman, K.K.; Muralidharan, G.

    2010-12-15

    Cerium (5-15% by weight) doped molybdenum oxide thin films have been prepared on FTO coated glass substrate at 250 {sup o}C using sol-gel dip coating method. The structural and morphological changes were observed with the help of XRD, SEM and EDS analysis. The amorphous structure of the Ce doped samples, favours easy intercalation and deintercalation processes. Mo oxide films with 10 wt.% of Ce exhibit maximum anodic diffusion coefficient of 24.99 x 10{sup -11} cm{sup 2}/s and the change in optical transmittance of ({Delta}T at 550 nm) of 79.28% between coloured and bleached state with the optical density of ({Delta}OD) 1.15.

  11. Structure and Electronic Properties of Cerium Orthophosphate: Theory and Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Adelstein, Nicole; Mun, B. Simon; Ray, Hannah; Ross Jr, Phillip; Neaton, Jeffrey; De Jonghe, Lutgard

    2010-07-27

    Structural and electronic properties of cerium orthophosphate (CePO{sub 4}) are calculated using density functional theory (DFT) with the local spin-density approximation (LSDA+U), with and without gradient corrections (GGA-(PBE)+U), and compared to X-ray diffraction and photoemission spectroscopy measurements. The density of states is found to change significantly as the Hubbard parameter U, which is applied to the Ce 4f states, is varied from 0 to 5 eV. The calculated structural properties are in good agreement with experiment and do not change significantly with U. Choosing U = 3 eV for LDSA provides the best agreement between the calculated density of states and the experimental photoemission spectra.

  12. Characterization of a zinc-cerium flow battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leung, P. K.; Ponce-de-León, C.; Low, C. T. J.; Shah, A. A.; Walsh, F. C.

    The performance of a divided, parallel-plate zinc-cerium redox flow battery using methanesulfonic acid electrolytes was studied. Eight two and three-dimensional electrodes were tested under both constant current density and constant cell voltage discharge. Carbon felt and the three-dimensional platinised titanium mesh electrodes exhibited superior performance over the 2-dimensional electrodes. The charge and discharge characteristics of the redox flow battery were studied under different operating conditions and Zn/Ce reactant, as well as methansulfonic acid concentration. The cell performance improved at higher operating temperatures and faster electrolyte flow velocities. The number of possible cycles increased at reduced states of charge. During 15 min charge/discharge per cycle experiment, 57 cycles were obtained and the zinc reaction was found to be the limiting process during long term operation.

  13. Geometry of electromechanically active structures in Gadolinium - doped Cerium oxides

    DOE PAGES

    Li, Yuanyuan; Kraynis, Olga; Kas, Joshua; ...

    2016-05-20

    Local distortions from average structure are important in many functional materials, such as electrostrictors or piezoelectrics, and contain clues about their mechanism of work. However, the geometric attributes of these distortions are exceedingly difficult to measure, leading to a gap in knowledge regarding their roles in electromechanical response. This task is particularly challenging in the case of recently reported non-classical electrostriction in Cerium-Gadolinium oxides (CGO), where only a small population of Ce-O bonds that are located near oxygen ion vacancies responds to external electric field. In this study, we used high-energy resolution fluorescence detection (HERFD) technique to collect X-ray absorptionmore » spectra in CGO in situ, with and without an external electric field, coupled with theoretical modeling to characterize three-dimensional geometry of electromechanically active units.« less

  14. The Spin Glass-Kondo Competition in Disordered Cerium Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magalhaes, S. G.; Zimmer, F.; Coqblin, B.

    2013-10-01

    We discuss the competition between the Kondo effect, the spin glass state and a magnetic order observed in disordered Cerium systems. We present firstly the experimental situation of disordered alloys such as CeNi1 - xCux and then the different theoretical approaches based on the Kondo lattice model, with different descriptions of the intersite exchange interaction for the spin glass. After the gaussian approach of the Sherrington-Kirkpatrick model, we discuss the Mattis and the van Hemmen models. Then, we present simple cluster calculations in order to describe the percolative evolution of the clusters from the cluster spin glass to the inhomogeneous ferromagnetic order recently observed in CeNi1 - xCux disordered alloys and finally we discuss the effect of random and transverse magnetic field.

  15. Geometry of electromechanically active structures in Gadolinium - doped Cerium oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yuanyuan; Zacharowicz, Renee; Frenkel, Anatoly I. E-mail: anatoly.frenkel@yu.edu; Kraynis, Olga; Lubomirsky, Igor E-mail: anatoly.frenkel@yu.edu; Kas, Joshua; Weng, Tsu-Chien; Sokaras, Dimosthenis

    2016-05-15

    Local distortions from average structure are important in many functional materials, such as electrostrictors or piezoelectrics, and contain clues about their mechanism of work. However, the geometric attributes of these distortions are exceedingly difficult to measure, leading to a gap in knowledge regarding their roles in electromechanical response. This task is particularly challenging in the case of recently reported non-classical electrostriction in Cerium-Gadolinium oxides (CGO), where only a small population of Ce-O bonds that are located near oxygen ion vacancies responds to external electric field. We used high-energy resolution fluorescence detection (HERFD) technique to collect X-ray absorption spectra in CGO in situ, with and without an external electric field, coupled with theoretical modeling to characterize three-dimensional geometry of electromechanically active units.

  16. Interplay of spin-orbit and entropic effects in cerium

    SciTech Connect

    Lanata, Nicola; Yao, Yong-Xin; Wang, Cai-Zhuang; Ho, Kai-Ming; Kotliar, Gabriel

    2014-10-01

    We perform first-principles calculations of elemental cerium and compute its pressure-temperature phase diagram, finding good quantitative agreement with the experiments. Our calculations indicate that, while a signature of the volume-collapse transition appears in the free energy already at low temperatures, at higher temperatures this signature is enhanced because of the entropic effects, and originates an actual thermodynamical instability. Furthermore, we find that the catalyst determining this feature is—in all temperature regimes—a pressure-induced effective reduction of the f-level degeneracy due to the spin-orbit coupling. Our analysis suggests also that the lattice vibrations might be crucial in order to capture the behavior of the pressure-temperature transition line at large temperatures.

  17. Cerium oxide nanoparticles: a 'radical' approach to neurodegenerative disease treatment.

    PubMed

    Naz, Shuguftha; Beach, James; Heckert, Blaze; Tummala, Tanuja; Pashchenko, Oleksandra; Banerjee, Tuhina; Santra, Santimukul

    2017-03-01

    Despite advances in understanding the factors that cause many neurodegenerative diseases (NDs), no current therapies have yielded significant results. Cerium oxide nanoparticles (CeONPs) have recently emerged as therapeutics for the treatment of NDs due to their antioxidant properties. This report summarizes the recent findings regarding CeONPs in treatment of various NDs, including Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease, multiple sclerosis, ischemic stroke and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Interest in CeONPs as a potential nanomedicine for NDs has increased due to: their ability to alter signaling pathways, small diameter allowing passage through the blood-brain barrier and scavenging of reactive oxygen species. Due to these properties, CeONPs could eventually revolutionize existing treatments for NDs.

  18. EPDM composite membranes modified with cerium doped lead zirconate titanate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaharescu, T.; Dumitru, A.; Lungulescu, M. E.; Velciu, G.

    2016-01-01

    This study was performed on γ-irradiated ethylene-propylene diene terpolymer (EPDM) loaded with lead zirconate titanate. The inorganic phase has a perovskite structure with general formula Pb(Zr0.65-xCexTi0.35)O3. The three composites with different Ce dopant concentrations revealed the stabilization activity of filler against oxidation proved by chemiluminescence investigation in respect to pristine polymer. The presence of cerium low concentrations in the solid lead zirconate titanate nanoparticles causes significant slowing of oxidation rate during radiation exposure. The improvement in the stabilization feature of filler is correlated with the existence of traps, whose interaction with free radicals assumes medium energy due to their convenient depth.

  19. Induction of pulmonary fibrosis by cerium oxide nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Jane Y.; Mercer, Robert R.; Barger, Mark; Schwegler-Berry, Diane; Scabilloni, James; Ma, Joseph K.; Castranova, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    Cerium compounds have been used as a diesel engine catalyst to lower the mass of diesel exhaust particles, but are emitted as cerium oxide (CeO2) nanoparticles in the diesel exhaust. In a previous study, we have demonstrated a wide range of CeO2-induced lung responses including sustained pulmonary inflammation and cellular signaling that could lead to pulmonary fibrosis. In this study, we investigated the fibrogenic responses induced by CeO2 in a rat model at various time points up to 84 days post-exposure. Male Sprague Dawley rats were exposed to CeO2 by a single intratracheal instillation. Alveolar macrophages (AM) were isolated by bronchial alveolar lavage (BAL). AM-mediated cellular responses, osteopontin (OPN) and transform growth factor (TGF)-β1 in the fibrotic process were investigated. The results showed that CeO2 exposure significantly increased fibrotic cytokine TGF-β1 and OPN production by AM above controls. The collagen degradation enzymes, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and -9 and the tissue inhibitor of MMP were markedly increased in the BAL fluid at 1 day- and subsequently declined at 28 days after exposure, but remained much higher than the controls. CeO2 induced elevated phospholipids in BAL fluid and increased hydroxyproline content in lung tissue in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Immunohistochemical analysis showed MMP-2, MMP-9 and MMP-10 expressions in fibrotic regions. Morphological analysis noted increased collagen fibers in the lungs exposed to a single dose of 3.5 mg/kg CeO2 and euthanized at 28 days post-exposure. Collectively, our studies show that CeO2 induced fibrotic lung injury in rats, suggesting it may cause potential health effects. PMID:22613087

  20. Cerium oxide nanoparticles accelerate the decay of peroxynitrite (ONOO(-)).

    PubMed

    Dowding, Janet M; Seal, Sudipta; Self, William T

    2013-08-01

    Cerium oxide nanoparticles (CeO2 NPs) have been shown to possess a substantial oxygen storage capacity via the interchangeable surface reduction and oxidation of cerium atoms, cycling between the Ce(4+) and Ce(3+) redox states. It has been well established in many studies that depending on their reactivity and surface chemistry, CeO2 NPs can effectively convert both reactive oxygen species (superoxide, O2 (•-), and hydrogen peroxide) into more inert species and scavenge reactive nitrogen species (RNS)(nitric oxide, •NO), both in vitro and in vivo. Since much of damage attributed to •NO and O2 (•-) is actually the result of oxidation or nitration by peroxynitrite or its breakdown products and due to the multiple species that these nanoparticles target in vivo, it was logical to test their interaction with the highly reactive molecule peroxynitrite (ONOO(-)). Here, we report that CeO2 NPs significantly accelerated the decay of ONOO(-) by three independent methods. Additionally, our data suggest the ability of CeO2 NPs to interact with ONOO(-) is independent of the Ce(3+)/Ce(4+) ratio on the surface of the CeO2 NPs. The accelerated decay was not observed when reactions were carried out in an inert gas (argon), suggesting strongly that the decay of peroxynitrite is being accelerated due to a reaction of CeNPs with the carbonate radical anion. These results suggest that one of the protective effects of CeO2 NPs during RNS is likely due to reduction in peroxynitrite or its reactive breakdown products.

  1. Role of nanocrystalline cerium oxide coatings on austenitic stainless steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Haiying

    Protective nanocrystalline cerium oxide coating has been applied to ASTM grade 304L and 304 austenitic stainless steels to improve its oxidation resistance at elevated temperatures. Experimentally, the selected alloy was exposed to 800°C/1000°C under dry air conditions. Weight changes (DeltaW/A) were monitored as a function of time and the results were compared with uncoated alloys tested under similar conditions. It was found that the oxidation resistances of 304L and 304 stainless steels were significantly improved. A comparison of the oxidation rates indicated that the nanocrystalline cerium oxide coating reduced the rate of oxidation by more than two orders of magnitude. Nevertheless, a comprehensive understanding of the mechanisms responsible for the reduction in the oxidation rate is not clear. Consequently, this work is aimed at investigating the mechanisms involved during scale growth in the presence or absence of nanocrystalline coatings. For this purpose, density functional theory was carried out in order to predict oxygen and iron diffusion microscopic activation energies and reveal the intrinsic characteristics of nanocrystalline coatings. A numerical simulation of corrosion process has also been conducted to predict the corrosion rates of alloys with and without coatings. Hence, the results from simulations are compared with the experimental outcome, and possible explanations are given to account for the reduction in the exhibited oxidation rates. The simulation results will provide a highly valuable tool for the realization of functional nanostructures and architectures "by design", particularly in the development of novel coatings, and a new approach of life assessment.

  2. Electronic Characterization of Defects in Narrow Gap Semiconductors-Comparison of Electronic Energy Levels and Formation Energies in Mercury Cadmium Telluride, Mercury Zinc Telluride, and Mercury Zinc Selenide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, James D.

    1996-01-01

    We have used a Green's function technique to calculate the energy levels and formation energy of deep defects in the narrow gap semiconductors mercury cadmium telluride (MCT), mercury zinc telluride (MZT) and mercury zinc selenide (MZS). The formation energy is calculated from the difference between the total energy with an impurity cluster and the total energy for the perfect crystal. Substitutional (including antisite), interstitial (self and foreign), and vacancy deep defects are considered. Relaxation effects are calculated (with molecular dynamics). By use of a pseudopotential, we generalize the ideal vacancy model so as to be able to consider relaxation for vacancies. Different charge states are considered and the charged state energy shift (as computed by a modified Haldane-Anderson model) can be twice that due to relaxation. Different charged states for vacancies were not calculated to have much effect on the formation energy. For all cases we find deep defects in the energy gap only for cation site s-like orbitals or anion site p-like orbitals, and for the substitutional case only the latter are appreciably effected by relaxation. For most cases for MCT, MZT, MZS, we consider x (the concentration of Cd or Zn) in the range appropriate for a band gap of 0.1 eV. For defect energy levels, the absolute accuracy of our results is limited, but the precision is good, and hence chemical trends are accurately predicted. For the same reason, defect formation energies are more accurately predicted than energy level position. We attempt, in Appendix B, to calculate vacancy formation energies using relatively simple chemical bonding ideas due to Harrison. However, these results are only marginally accurate for estimating vacancy binding energies. Appendix C lists all written reports and publications produced for the grant. We include abstracts and a complete paper that summarizes our work which is not yet available.

  3. Formation of Semimetallic Cobalt Telluride Nanotube Film via Anion Exchange Tellurization Strategy in Aqueous Solution for Electrocatalytic Applications.

    PubMed

    Patil, Supriya A; Kim, Eun-Kyung; Shrestha, Nabeen K; Chang, Jinho; Lee, Joong Kee; Han, Sung-Hwan

    2015-11-25

    Metal telluride nanostructures have demonstrated several potential applications particularly in harvesting and storing green energy. Metal tellurides are synthesized by tellurization process performed basically at high temperature in reducing gas atmosphere, which makes the process expensive and complicated. The development of a facile and economical process for desirable metal telluride nanostructures without complicated manipulation is still a challenge. In an effort to develop an alternative strategy of tellurization, herein we report a thin film formation of self-standing cobalt telluride nanotubes on various conducting and nonconducting substrates using a simple binder-free synthetic strategy based on anion exchange transformation from a thin film of cobalt hydroxycarbonate nanostructures in aqueous solution at room temperature. The nanostructured films before and after ion exchange transformation reaction are characterized using field emission scanning electron microscope, energy dispersive X-ray analyzer, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, thin film X-ray diffraction technique, high resolution transmission electron microscope, and selected area electron diffraction analysis technique. After the ion exchange transformation of nanostructures, the film shows conversion from insulator to highly electrical conductive semimetallic characteristic. When used as a counter electrode in I3(-)/I(-) redox electrolyte based dye-sensitized solar cells, the telluride film exhibits an electrocatalytic reduction activity for I3(-) with a demonstration of solar-light to electrical power conversion efficiency of 8.10%, which is highly competitive to the efficiency of 8.20% exhibited by a benchmarked Pt-film counter electrode. On the other hand, the telluride film electrode also demonstrates electrocatalytic activity for oxygen evolution reaction from oxidation of water.

  4. Feasibility of preparing patterned molybdenum coatings on bismuth telluride thermoelectric modules.

    SciTech Connect

    Sarobol, Pylin; Hall, Aaron Christopher; Miller, Stephen Samuel; Knight, Marlene E.; LePage, William S.; Sobczak, Catherine Elizabeth.; Wesolowski, Daniel Edward

    2013-09-01

    Molybdenum electrical interconnects for thermoelectric modules were produced by air plasma spraying a 30%CE%BCm size molybdenum powder through a laser-cut Kapton tape mask. Initial feasibility demonstrations showed that the molybdenum coating exhibited excellent feature and spacing retention (~170%CE%BCm), adhered to bismuth-telluride, and exhibited electrical conductivity appropriate for use as a thermoelectric module interconnect. A design of experiments approach was used to optimize air plasma spray process conditions to produce a molybdenum coating with low electrical resistivity. Finally, a molybdenum coating was successfully produced on a fullscale thermoelectric module. After the addition of a final titanium/gold layer deposited on top of the molybdenum coating, the full scale module exhibited an electrical resistivity of 128%CE%A9, approaching the theoretical resistivity value for the 6mm module leg of 112%CE%A9. Importantly, air plasma sprayed molybdenum did not show significant chemical reaction with bismuth-telluride substrate at the coating/substrate interface. The molybdenum coating microstructure consisted of lamellar splats containing columnar grains. Air plasma sprayed molybdenum embedded deeply (several microns) into the bismuth-telluride substrate, leading to good adhesion between the coating and the substrate. Clusters of round pores (and cracks radiating from the pores) were found immediately beneath the molybdenum coating. These pores are believed to result from tellurium vaporization during the spray process where the molten molybdenum droplets (2623%C2%B0C) transferred their heat of solidification to the substrate at the moment of impact. Substrate cooling during the molybdenum deposition process was recommended to mitigate tellurium vaporization in future studies.

  5. Investigation of the electrophysical characteristics of SIS structures based on polycrystalline cadmium telluride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirsagatov, Sh. A.; Muzafarova, S. A.; Pak, V.

    Results are presented on the electrophysical characteristics of SIS structures based on polycrystalline cadmium telluride (structures used for solar cells). The volt-farad characteristics, the distribution of the concentration of surface states, impurity-distribution profiles in CdTe, and the dependence of the time of capture of electrons and holes by surface states on surface potential are examined for SnO2/pCdTe, ITO/pCdTe, and In2O3/pCdTe.

  6. Terahertz-field-induced second harmonic generation through Pockels effect in zinc telluride crystal.

    PubMed

    Cornet, Marion; Degert, Jérôme; Abraham, Emmanuel; Freysz, Eric

    2014-10-15

    We report on the second harmonic generation (SHG) of a near-infrared pulse in a zinc telluride crystal through the Pockels effect induced by an intense terahertz pulse. The temporal and angular behaviors of the SHG have been measured and agree well with theoretical predictions. This phenomenon, so far overlooked, makes it possible to generate second harmonic through cascading of two second-order nonlinear phenomena in the near-infrared and terahertz ranges. We also show how this cascading process can be used to sample terahertz pulses.

  7. Large-Area and High-Quality 2D Transition Metal Telluride

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Jiadong; Liu, Fucai; Lin, Junhao; Huang, Xiangwei; Xia, Juan; Zhang, Bowei; Zeng, Qingsheng; Wang, Hong; Zhu, Chao; Niu, Lin; Wang, Xuewen; Fu, Wei; Yu, Peng; Chang, Tay-Rong; Hsu, Chuang-Han; Wu, Di; Jeng, Horng-Tay; Huang, Yizhong; Lin, Hsin; Shen, Zexiang; Yang, Changli; Lu, Li; Suenaga, Kazu; Zhou, Wu; Pantelides, Sokrates T.; Liu, Guangtong; Liu, Zheng

    2016-11-17

    Large-area and high-quality 2D transition metal tellurides are synthesized in this paper by the chemical vapor deposition method. The as-grown WTe2 maintains two different stacking sequences in the bilayer, where the atomic structure of the stacking boundary is revealed by scanning transmission electron microscopy. Finally, the low-temperature transport measurements reveal a novel semimetal-to-insulator transition in WTe2 layers and an enhanced superconductivity in few-layer MoTe2.

  8. Evaluation of the efficiency curve of a Cadmiun Telluride detector for low-energy photon spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Correia, Amanda Ribeiro; Iwahara, Akira; da Cruz, Paulo Alberto Lima; da Silva, Carlos José; Tauhata, Luiz; Poledna, Roberto; da Silva, Ronaldo Lins; de Queiroz Filho, Pedro Pacheco; Lopes, Ricardo Tadeu

    2016-10-01

    The performance of a Cadmiun Telluride (CdTe) detector for low energy photon spectrometry was evaluated. Collected data were analyzed using the basic software package available with the CdTe detector system and the COLEGRAM code developed for photopeak deconvolution at LNHB/France. Several calibrated point sources were used to determine the energy versus efficiency curve. The efficiency curve was used in the determination of main X-ray intensities of (153)Sm and (177)Lu. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Fabrication of Lanthanum Telluride 14-1-11 Zintl High-Temperature Thermoelectric Couple

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ravi, Vilupanur A.; Li, Billy Chun-Yip; Fleurial, Pierre; Star, Kurt

    2010-01-01

    The development of more efficient thermoelectric couple technology capable of operating with high-grade heat sources up to 1,275 K is key to improving the performance of radioisotope thermoelectric generators. Lanthanum telluride La3-xTe4 and 14-1-11 Zintls (Yb14MnSb11) have been identified as very promising materials. The fabrication of advanced high-temperature thermoelectric couples requires the joining of several dissimilar materials, typically including a number of diffusion bonding and brazing steps, to achieve a device capable of operating at elevated temperatures across a large temperature differential (up to 900 K). A thermoelectric couple typically comprises a heat collector/ exchanger, metallic interconnects on both hot and cold sides, n-type and ptype conductivity thermoelectric elements, and cold-side hardware to connect to the cold-side heat rejection and provide electrical connections. Differences in the physical, mechanical, and chemical properties of the materials that make up the thermoelectric couple, especially differences in the coefficients of thermal expansion (CTE), result in undesirable interfacial stresses that can lead to mechanical failure of the device. The problem is further complicated by the fact that the thermoelectric materials under consideration have large CTE values, are brittle, and cracks can propagate through them with minimal resistance. The inherent challenge of bonding brittle, high-thermal-expansion thermoelectric materials to a hot shoe material that is thick enough to carry the requisite electrical current was overcome. A critical advantage over prior art is that this device was constructed using all diffusion bonds and a minimum number of assembly steps. The fabrication process and the materials used are described in the following steps: (1) Applying a thin refractory metal foil to both sides of lanthanum telluride. To fabricate the n-type leg of the advanced thermoelectric couple, the pre-synthesized lanthanum

  10. Advanced methods for preparation and characterization of infrared detector materials. [mercury cadmium telluride alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lehoczky, S. L.; Szofran, F. R.

    1981-01-01

    Differential thermal analysis data were obtained on mercury cadmium telluride alloys in order to establish the liquidus temperatures for the various alloy compositions. Preliminary theoretical analyses was performed to establish the ternary phase equilibrium parameters for the metal rich region of the phase diagram. Liquid-solid equilibrium parameters were determined for the pseudobinary alloy system. Phase equilibrium was calculated and Hg(l-x) Cd(x) Te alloys were directionally solidified from pseudobinary melts. Electrical resistivity and Hall coefficient measurements were obtained.

  11. Metal-insulator-semi-conductor studies of lead telluride. [capacitance and conductance-voltage characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lilly, D. A.; Joslin, D. E.; Kan, H. K. A.

    1976-01-01

    The capacitance and conductance-voltage characteristics were measured on metal-insulator-semiconductor capacitors fabricated with zirconium dioxide films on single-crystal lead telluride. At 77 K, on both n- and p-type substrates, evidence of surface potential control was obtained. Comparison of the measured capacitance-voltage characteristics with those calculated from the equilibrium solution of the one-dimensional Poisson equation indicated qualitative agreement, although the slope of the measured capacitance in the region near the capacitance minimum was less steep than calculated.

  12. Seeded Physical Vapor Transport of Cadmium-Zinc Telluride Crystals: Growth and Characterization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palosz, W.; George, M. A.; Collins, E. E.; Chen, K.-T.; Zhang, Y.; Burger, A.

    1997-01-01

    Crystals of Cd(1-x)Zn(x)Te with x = 0.2 and 40 g in weight were grown on monocrystalline cadmium-zinc telluride seeds by closed-ampoule physical vapor transport with or without excess (Cd + Zn) in the vapor phase. Two post-growth cool-down rates were used. The crystals were characterized using low temperature photoluminescence, atomic force microscopy, chemical etching, X-ray diffraction and electrical measurements. No formation of a second, ZnTe-rich phase was observed.

  13. Specific features of the photoconductivity of semi-insulating cadmium telluride

    SciTech Connect

    Golubyatnikov, V. A.; Grigor’ev, F. I.; Lysenko, A. P. Strogankova, N. I.; Shadov, M. B.; Belov, A. G.

    2014-12-15

    The effect of local illumination providing a high level of free-carrier injection on the conductivity of a sample of semi-insulating cadmium telluride and on the properties of ohmic contacts to the sample is studied. It is found that, irrespective of the illumination region, the contact resistance of ohmic contacts decreases and the concentration of majority carriers in the sample grows in proportion to the illumination intensity. It is shown that inherent heterogeneities in crystals of semi-insulating semiconductors can be studied by scanning with a light probe.

  14. Metal-insulator-semi-conductor studies of lead telluride. [capacitance and conductance-voltage characteristics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lilly, D. A.; Joslin, D. E.; Kan, H. K. A.

    1976-01-01

    The capacitance and conductance-voltage characteristics were measured on metal-insulator-semiconductor capacitors fabricated with zirconium dioxide films on single-crystal lead telluride. At 77 K, on both n- and p-type substrates, evidence of surface potential control was obtained. Comparison of the measured capacitance-voltage characteristics with those calculated from the equilibrium solution of the one-dimensional Poisson equation indicated qualitative agreement, although the slope of the measured capacitance in the region near the capacitance minimum was less steep than calculated.

  15. Charge Carrier Processes in Photovoltaic Materials and Devices: Lead Sulfide Quantum Dots and Cadmium Telluride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roland, Paul

    Charge separation, transport, and recombination represent fundamental processes for electrons and holes in semiconductor photovoltaic devices. Here, two distinct materials systems, based on lead sulfide quantum dots and on polycrystalline cadmium telluride, are investigated to advance the understanding of their fundamental nature for insights into the material science necessary to improve the technologies. Lead sulfide quantum dots QDs have been of growing interest in photovoltaics, having recently produced devices exceeding 10% conversion efficiency. Carrier transport via hopping through the quantum dot thin films is not only a function of inter-QD distance, but of the QD size and dielectric media of the surrounding materials. By conducting temperature dependent transmission, photoluminescence, and time resolved photoluminescence measurements, we gain insight into photoluminescence quenching and size-dependent carrier transport through QD ensembles. Turning to commercially relevant cadmium telluride (CdTe), we explore the high concentrations of self-compensating defects (donors and acceptors) in polycrystalline thin films via photoluminescence from recombination at defect sites. Low temperature (25 K) photoluminescence measurements of CdTe reveal numerous radiative transitions due to exciton, trap assisted, and donor-acceptor pair recombination events linked with various defect states. Here we explore the difference between films deposited via close space sublimation (CSS) and radio frequency magnetron sputtering, both as-grown and following a cadmium chloride treatment. The as-grown CSS films exhibited a strong donor-acceptor pair transition associated with deep defect states. Constructing photoluminescence spectra as a function of time from time-resolved photoluminescence data, we report on the temporal evolution of this donor-acceptor transition. Having gained insight into the cadmium telluride film quality from low temperature photoluminescence measurements

  16. Cadmium Telluride Semiconductor Detector for Improved Spatial and Energy Resolution Radioisotopic Imaging.

    PubMed

    Abbaspour, Samira; Mahmoudian, Babak; Islamian, Jalil Pirayesh

    2017-01-01

    The detector in single-photon emission computed tomography has played a key role in the quality of the images. Over the past few decades, developments in semiconductor detector technology provided an appropriate substitution for scintillation detectors in terms of high sensitivity, better energy resolution, and also high spatial resolution. One of the considered detectors is cadmium telluride (CdTe). The purpose of this paper is to review the CdTe semiconductor detector used in preclinical studies, small organ and small animal imaging, also research in nuclear medicine and other medical imaging modalities by a complete inspect on the material characteristics, irradiation principles, applications, and epitaxial growth method.

  17. Cadmium Telluride Semiconductor Detector for Improved Spatial and Energy Resolution Radioisotopic Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Abbaspour, Samira; Mahmoudian, Babak; Islamian, Jalil Pirayesh

    2017-01-01

    The detector in single-photon emission computed tomography has played a key role in the quality of the images. Over the past few decades, developments in semiconductor detector technology provided an appropriate substitution for scintillation detectors in terms of high sensitivity, better energy resolution, and also high spatial resolution. One of the considered detectors is cadmium telluride (CdTe). The purpose of this paper is to review the CdTe semiconductor detector used in preclinical studies, small organ and small animal imaging, also research in nuclear medicine and other medical imaging modalities by a complete inspect on the material characteristics, irradiation principles, applications, and epitaxial growth method. PMID:28553175

  18. High resolution X-ray diffraction imaging of lead tin telluride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steiner, Bruce; Dobbyn, Ronald C.; Black, David; Burdette, Harold; Kuriyama, Masao; Spal, Richard; Simchick, Richard; Fripp, Archibald

    1991-01-01

    High resolution X-ray diffraction images of two directly comparable crystals of lead tin telluride, one Bridgman-grown on Space Shuttle STS 61A and the other terrestrially Bridgman-grown under similar conditions from identical material, present different subgrain structure. In the terrestrial, sample 1 the appearance of an elaborate array of subgrains is closely associated with the intrusion of regions that are out of diffraction in all of the various images. The formation of this elaborate subgrain structure is inhibited by growth in microgravity.

  19. Hexavalent chromium in the ground and surface waters near Telluride, Colorado; preliminary data report

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grove, David B.; Miller, R.L.; Konikow, L.F.; O'Boyle, P. S.

    1979-01-01

    Data showing results of 38 groundwater and 25 surface-water samples analyzed for hexavalent chromium are presented. Most samples were taken within the Telluride, Colo., city limits during October 1978. Twenty-four of the 38 groundwater samples (63%) contained more than 50 micrograms per liter of hexavalent chromium. Excluding the mill tailings pond 6 of the 23 surface-water samples (26%) contained more than 50 micrograms per liter of hexavalent chromium. Hexavalent chromium concentrations in groundwaters ranged from 0 to 2700 micrograms per liter and in surface waters from 0 to 160 micrograms per liter. (USGS)

  20. Fundamental and Practical Studies of Metal Contacts on Mercury Zinc Telluride

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-12-31

    8217UTW FfR F rnpv_ - Fundamental and Practical Studies of Metal Contacts on Mercury Zinc Telluride 00 Lf Sponsored by M0 The Defense Advanced...three models of Schottky barrier pinning on semiconductors (e.g. see Flores and Tejedor [7]) to extrapolate from CdTe to Hgl.xCdxTe. Two of the models of...the CBM, which is at the F point in the Brillouin zone, decreases faster than other parts of the conduction band and the valence band is only slightly

  1. Operational Studies of Cadmium Zinc Telluride Microstrip Detectors using SVX ASIC Electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krizmanic, John; Barbier, L. M.; Barthelmy, S.; Bartlett, L.; Birsa, F.; Gehrels, N.; Hanchak, C.; Kurczynski, P.; Odom, J.; Parsons, A.; Palmer, D.; Sheppard, D.; Snodgrass, S.; Stahle, C. M.; Teegarden, B.; Tueller, J.

    1997-04-01

    We have been investigating the operational properties of cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) microstrip detectors by using SVX ASIC readout electronics. This research is in conjunction with the development of a CZT-based, next generation gamma-ray telescope for use in the gamma-ray Burst ArcSecond Imaging and Spectroscopy (BASIS) experiment. CZT microstrip detectors with 128 channels and 100 micron strip pitch have been fabricated and were interfaced to SVX electronics at Goddard Space Flight Center. Experimental results involving position sensing, spectroscopy, and CZT operational properties will be presented.

  2. Angular dependence of magnetization reversal in epitaxial chromium telluride thin films with perpendicular magnetic anisotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pramanik, Tanmoy; Roy, Anupam; Dey, Rik; Rai, Amritesh; Guchhait, Samaresh; Movva, Hema C. P.; Hsieh, Cheng-Chih; Banerjee, Sanjay K.

    2017-09-01

    We investigate magnetic anisotropy and magnetization reversal mechanism in chromium telluride thin films grown by molecular beam epitaxy. We report existence of strong perpendicular magnetic anisotropy in these thin films, along with a relatively strong second order anisotropy contribution. The angular variation of the switching field observed from the magnetoresistance measurement is explained quantitatively using a one-dimensional defect model. The model reveals the relative roles of nucleation and pinning in the magnetization reversal, depending on the applied field orientation. Micromagnetic simulations are performed to visualize the domain structure and switching process.

  3. Copper, Boron, and Cerium Additions in Type 347 Austenitic Steel to Improve Creep Rupture Strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laha, Kinkar; Kyono, J.; Shinya, Norio

    2012-04-01

    Type 347 austenitic stainless steel (18Cr-12Ni-Nb) was alloyed with copper (3 wt pct), boron (0.01 to 0.06 wt pct), and cerium (0.01 wt pct) with an aim to increase the creep rupture strength of the steel through the improved deformation and cavitation resistance. Short-term creep rupture strength was found to increase with the addition of copper in the 347 steel, but the long-term strength was inferior. Extensive creep cavitation deprived the steel of the beneficial effect of creep deformation resistance induced by nano-size copper particles. Boron and cerium additions in the copper-containing steel increased its creep rupture strength and ductility, which were more for higher boron content. Creep deformation, grain boundary sliding, and creep cavity nucleation and growth in the steel were found to be suppressed by microalloying the copper-containing steel with boron and cerium, and the suppression was more for higher boron content. An auger electron spectroscopic study revealed the segregation of boron instead of sulfur on the cavity surface of the boron- and cerium-microalloyed steel. Cerium acted as a scavenger for soluble sulfur in the steels through the precipitation of cerium sulfide (CeS). This inhibited the segregation of sulfur and facilitated the segregation of boron on cavity surface. Boron segregation on the nucleated cavity surface reduced its growth rate. Microalloying the copper-containing 347 steel with boron and cerium thus enabled to use the full extent of creep deformation resistance rendered by copper nano-size particle by increase in creep rupture strength and ductility.

  4. Exposure and Health Effects Review of Engineered Nanoscale Cerium and Cerium Dioxide Associated with its Use as a Fuel Additive - NOW IN PRINT IN THE JOURNAL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Advances of nanoscale science have produced nanomaterials with unique physical and chemical properties at commercial levels that are now incorporated into over 1000 products. Nanoscale cerium (di) oxide (Ce02) has recently gained a wide range of applications which includes coatin...

  5. Exposure, Health and Ecological Effects Review of Engineered Nanoscale Cerium and Cerium Oxide Associated with its Use as a Fuel Additive

    EPA Science Inventory

    Advances of nanoscale science have produced nanomaterials with unique physical and chemical properties at commercial levels which are now incorporated into over 1000 products. Nanoscale cerium (di) oxide (CeO(2)) has recently gained a wide range of applications which includes coa...

  6. Exposure, Health and Ecological Effects Review of Engineered Nanoscale Cerium and Cerium Oxide Associated with its Use as a Fuel Additive

    EPA Science Inventory

    Advances of nanoscale science have produced nanomaterials with unique physical and chemical properties at commercial levels which are now incorporated into over 1000 products. Nanoscale cerium (di) oxide (CeO(2)) has recently gained a wide range of applications which includes coa...

  7. Exposure and Health Effects Review of Engineered Nanoscale Cerium and Cerium Dioxide Associated with its Use as a Fuel Additive - NOW IN PRINT IN THE JOURNAL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Advances of nanoscale science have produced nanomaterials with unique physical and chemical properties at commercial levels that are now incorporated into over 1000 products. Nanoscale cerium (di) oxide (Ce02) has recently gained a wide range of applications which includes coatin...

  8. Thermochemical Modeling of the Uranium-Cerium-Oxygen System

    SciTech Connect

    Voit, Stewart L; Besmann, Theodore M

    2010-10-01

    with actinide materials, fundamental studies with uranium are performed using surrogate materials as stand-ins for transuranic elements. In most cases, cerium can be used as a suitable substitute for plutonium when performing O:M and sintering kinetics studies because of identical valence states. Differences exist between the magnitude of reported thermodynamic data of (U,Pu)O{sub x} and (U,Ce)O{sub x}, however the change in oxygen potential versus O:M follows the same trend for both systems. Cerium is also a major fission product element, and thus understanding its behavior in fuel is an important issue as well.

  9. The Effect of Microgravity on the Growth of Lead Tin Telluride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Narayanan, R.

    2000-01-01

    The main objective of this research was to present a model for the prediction of the effect of the microgravity environment on the growth of Lead Tin Telluride. The attitude change and its relation to the experimental objectives: The main objective for the AADSF experiment on USMP 3 involving LTT growth was to estimate the effect of ampoule orientation on the axial and radial segregation of tin telluride. As the furnace was not situated on a gimbal there was no possibility to reorient the ampoule during the flight. Instead the only way to change the growth orientation was to change the attitude of the orbiter. This was accomplished by vernier rocket firings. In what follows it must be noted that the orbiter body coordinates are such that the positive z axis points outward from the 'belly', the positive 'x' axis points outwards from the nose and the positive 'y' axis points outwards from the starboard side. The furnace which was in the pay load had its axis aligned with the orbiter's 'z' axis with the hot end closest to the shuttle body. There were basically three orientations that were desired. These corresponded to the ampoule being seen as a heated from above (thermally stable-solutally unstable) configuration, the heated from below (where the instabilities were reversed from the first orientation) configuration and an 'in between' case where the ampoule axis was misaligned with respect to the orbiters 'g(sub z)' axis.

  10. A density-functional study on the electronic and vibrational properties of layered antimony telluride.

    PubMed

    Stoffel, Ralf P; Deringer, Volker L; Simon, Ronnie E; Hermann, Raphaël P; Dronskowski, Richard

    2015-03-04

    We present a comprehensive survey of electronic and lattice-dynamical properties of crystalline antimony telluride (Sb2Te3). In a first step, the electronic structure and chemical bonding have been investigated, followed by calculations of the atomic force constants, phonon dispersion relationships and densities of states. Then, (macroscopic) physical properties of Sb2Te3 have been computed, namely, the atomic thermal displacement parameters, the Grüneisen parameter γ, the volume expansion of the lattice, and finally the bulk modulus B. We compare theoretical results from three popular and economic density-functional theory (DFT) approaches: the local density approximation (LDA), the generalized gradient approximation (GGA), and a posteriori dispersion corrections to the latter. Despite its simplicity, the LDA shows excellent performance for all properties investigated-including the Grüneisen parameter, which only the LDA is able to recover with confidence. In the absence of computationally more demanding hybrid DFT methods, the LDA seems to be a good choice for further lattice dynamical studies of Sb2Te3 and related layered telluride materials.

  11. Examination of microstructural liquid phase behavior during heat treatment of doped -- lead telluride thermoelectric materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langan, Sean McCoy

    Thermoelectric materials offer a potentially valuable source of energy by converting a temperature gradient to electricity. Recent progress in alloying, doping, and nanostructuring these materials has increased their figure of merit, bringing this technology closer to widespread use. However, the costs associated with processing and questions about fatigue reliability during long-term use could slow the development process. Liquid phase microstructure shapes are critical for sintering; further understanding of these shapes could potentially be used to improve mechanical response and lower overall processing costs. Here we review our progress with respect to the microstructure development of the material depending on heat treatment and composition. Thermoelectric materials made up of a PbTe/Ag2Te system were produced by heat treatments aimed at producing a liquid phase in the material. These samples were then examined through scanning electron microscopy, in an attempt to better understand the microstructure and track the liquid phase. This study was met with mixed results. While the process outlined does seem to produce faster sintering than undoped samples, full densification was not achieved. Furthermore, though the silver telluride was identified in the sample through the use of backscattering detection and EDS, the desired accuracy in finding the liquid phase was not achieved. However, the silver telluride was found to penetrate the grain boundaries, create secondary phases and form nano-precipitates, a development that is extremely promising as these features could all scatter phonons and raise the figure of merit of the material.

  12. Anomalous segregation during electrodynamic gradient freeze growth of cadmium zinc telluride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Nan; Yeckel, Andrew; Burger, Arnold; Cui, Yunlong; Lynn, Kelvin G.; Derby, Jeffrey J.

    2011-06-01

    A transient, coupled model has been developed to analyze the segregation of zinc in cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) grown in an electrodynamic gradient freeze (EDG) furnace. The coupled model consists of a local model that solves for time-dependent melt flow, heat transfer, melt-crystal interface position, and zinc distribution in both melt and solid phases and a quasi-steady-state global model that features realistic furnace heat transfer. After verification and validation tests, the model is applied to predict composition patterns in a large-scale CZT EDG growth system previously analyzed by Gasperino et al. [On crucible effects during the growth of cadmium zinc telluride in an electrodynamic gradient freeze furnace, J. Crys. Growth 311 (2009) 2327-2335]. Surprisingly, anomalous zinc segregation is predicted, featuring a non-monotonic axial concentration profile and several local minima and maxima across the boule. A mechanistic explanation is put forth based on the cumulative effect of changes in multi-cellular melt flow structures, a particularly susceptible occurrence for CZT systems. Additional effects of furnace translation rate and solid state diffusion are probed.

  13. Synthesis and catalytic properties of microemulsion-derived cerium oxide nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kockrick, Emanuel; Schrage, Christian; Grigas, Anett; Geiger, Dorin; Kaskel, Stefan

    2008-07-01

    The synthesis of cerium dioxide nanoparticles using an inverse microemulsion technique and precipitation method was investigated. Cerium hydroxide nanoparticles were synthesized by adding diluted ammonia to n-heptane-surfactant-cerium nitrate system. The micelle and particle size in the range of 5-12 nm were controlled by varying the molar water to surfactant ratio and analyzed by dynamic light scattering (DLS), small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). Cerium hydroxide nanoparticles were isolated and subsequently treated at 100-600 °C to obtain nanoscale ceria. Crystallite sizes of cerium dioxide in the range of 6-16 nm were estimated by Scherrer analysis by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and HRTEM. The catalytic activity of particles annealed at 400 and 600 °C in soot combustion reactions was characterized by temperature-programmed oxidation (TPO) indicating a size-dependant activity. Crystallite sizes and catalytic stability of elevated ceria systems were tested in second combustion cycles.

  14. Structural and luminescent studies on nanosized cerium doped strontium barium niobate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    John, Nuja; Nandakumar, K.

    2017-06-01

    The nanosized cerium doped Strontium Barium Niobate ceramic powder system have been synthesized by sol-gel technique. The X-ray diffraction measurement confirmed the structure of cerium doped Strontium Barium Niobate ceramic powder system. The absorption peaks were analysed by FTIR spectroscopy. Particle morphology and size of the powder were examined using SEM and TEM. Crystal quality and structure were also examined by micro raman spectra. The transmission electron microscopy image of cerium doped Strontium Barium Niobate nano powder system consist of particles with average size of 20 nm. A band gap of the system was measured by optical absorption spectra. Photoluminescence data were recorded at room temperature. The emission peaks were detected under excitation at 305 nm wavelength. The peaks are assigned to the cerium electron transition from lowest 5d level to 2F5/2 and 2F7/2 of 4f, respectively. The decay time were also measured for cerium doped Strontium Barium Niobate powder system.

  15. Synthesis, electrochemistry, and reactivity of cerium(III/IV) methylene-bis-phenolate complexes.

    PubMed

    Mahoney, Brian D; Piro, Nicholas A; Carroll, Patrick J; Schelter, Eric J

    2013-05-20

    A series of cerium complexes containing a 2,2'-methylenebis(6-tert-butyl-4-methylphenolate) (MBP(2-)) ligand framework is described. Electrochemical studies of the compound [Li(THF)2Ce(MBP)2(THF)2] (1) reveal that the metal based oxidation wave occurs at -0.93 V vs Fc/Fc(+). This potential demonstrates significant stabilization of the cerium(IV) ion in the MBP(2-) framework with a shift of ∼2.25 V from the typically reported value for the cerium(III/IV) couple of E°' = +1.30 V vs Fc/Fc(+) for Ce(ClO4)3 in HClO4 solutions. Compound 1 undergoes oxidation to form stable cerium(IV) species in the presence of a variety of common oxidants. The coordination of the redox-active ligands 2,2'-bipyridine and benzophenone to 1 result in complexes in which no apparent metal-to-ligand charge transfer occurs and the cerium ion remains in the +3 oxidation state.

  16. Exposure of cerium oxide nanoparticles to kidney bean shows disturbance in the plant defense mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Majumdar, Sanghamitra; Peralta-Videa, Jose R; Bandyopadhyay, Susmita; Castillo-Michel, Hiram; Hernandez-Viezcas, Jose-Angel; Sahi, Shivendra; Gardea-Torresdey, Jorge L

    2014-08-15

    Overwhelming use of engineered nanoparticles demands rapid assessment of their environmental impacts. The transport of cerium oxide nanoparticles (nCeO2) in plants and their impact on cellular homeostasis as a function of exposure duration is not well understood. In this study, kidney bean plants were exposed to suspensions of ∼ 8 ± 1 nm nCeO2 (62.5 to 500 mg/L) for 15 days in hydroponic conditions. Plant parts were analyzed for cerium accumulation after one, seven, and 15 days of nCeO2 exposure. The primary indicators of stress like lipid peroxidation, antioxidant enzyme activities, total soluble protein and chlorophyll contents were studied. Cerium in tissues was localized using scanning electron microscopy and synchrotron μ-XRF mapping, and the chemical forms were identified using μ-XANES. In the root epidermis, cerium was primarily shown to exist as nCeO2, although a small fraction (12%) was biotransformed to Ce(III) compound. Cerium was found to reach the root vascular tissues and translocate to aerial parts with time. Upon prolonged exposure to 500 mg nCeO2/L, the root antioxidant enzyme activities were significantly reduced, simultaneously increasing the root soluble protein by 204%. In addition, leaf's guaiacol peroxidase activity was enhanced with nCeO2 exposure in order to maintain cellular homeostasis.

  17. Catalysts with Cerium in a Membrane Reactor for the Removal of Formaldehyde Pollutant from Water Effluents.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez-Arzaluz, Mirella; Noreña-Franco, Luis; Ángel-Cuevas, Saúl; Mugica-Álvarez, Violeta; Torres-Rodríguez, Miguel

    2016-05-24

    We report the synthesis of cerium oxide, cobalt oxide, mixed cerium, and cobalt oxides and a Ce-Co/Al₂O₃ membrane, which are employed as catalysts for the catalytic wet oxidation (CWO) reaction process and the removal of formaldehyde from industrial effluents. Formaldehyde is present in numerous waste streams from the chemical industry in a concentration low enough to make its recovery not economically justified but high enough to create an environmental hazard. Common biological degradation methods do not work for formaldehyde, a highly toxic but refractory, low biodegradability substance. The CWO reaction is a recent, promising alternative that also permits much lower temperature and pressure conditions than other oxidation processes, resulting in economic benefits. The CWO reaction employing Ce- and Co-containing catalysts was carried out inside a slurry batch reactor and a membrane reactor. Experimental results are reported. Next, a mixed Ce-Co oxide film was supported on an γ-alumina membrane used in a catalytic membrane reactor to compare formaldehyde removal between both types of systems. Catalytic materials with cerium and with a relatively large amount of cerium favored the transformation of formaldehyde. Cerium was present as cerianite in the catalytic materials, as indicated by X-ray diffraction patterns.

  18. Cerium relieves the inhibition of nitrogen metabolism of spinach caused by magnesium deficiency.

    PubMed

    Yin, Sitao; Ze, Yuguan; Liu, Chao; Li, Na; Zhou, Min; Duan, Yanmei; Hong, Fashui

    2009-12-01

    Magnesium is one of the essential elements for plant growth and cerium is a beneficial element for plant growth. However, the effects of the fact that cerium improves the nitrogen metabolism of plants under magnesium deficiency is poorly understood. The main aim of the study was to determine the role of cerium in the amelioration of magnesium-deficiency effects in spinach plants. Spinach plants were cultivated in Hoagland's solution. They were subjected to magnesium deficiency and to cerium chloride administered in the magnesium-present media and magnesium-deficient media. Spinach plants grown in the magnesium-present media and magnesium-deficient media were measured for key enzyme activities involved in nitrogen metabolism such as nitrate reductase, nitrite reductase, glutamate dehydrogenase, glutamate synthase, urease, glutamic–pyruvic transaminase, and glutamic–oxaloace protease transaminase. As the nitrogen metabolism in spinach was significantly inhibited by magnesium deficiency, it caused a significant reduction of spinach plant weight, leaf turning chlorosis. However, cerium treatment grown in magnesium-deficiency media significantly promoted the activities of the key enzymes as well as the contents of the free amino acids, chlorophyll, soluble protein, and spinach growth. It implied that Ce3+ could partly substitute for magnesium to facilitate the transformation from inorganic nitrogen to organic nitrogen, leading to the improvement of spinach growth, although the metabolism needs to be investigated further.

  19. Influences of calcium deficiency and cerium on growth of spinach plants.

    PubMed

    Chao, Liu; Bofu, Pan; Weiqian, Cao; Yun, Lu; Hao, Huang; Liang, Chen; Xiaoqing, Liu; Xiao, Wu; Fashui, Hong

    2008-03-01

    The main aim of the study was to determine the role of cerium in the amelioration of calcium-deficiency effects in spinach plants. Spinach plants were cultivated in Hoagland's solution. They were subjected to calcium-deficiency and to cerium chloride administered in the calcium-present Hoagland's media and calcium-deficient Hoagland's media. Within 3 weeks, young leaves developed distinct calcium-deficient symptoms, and plant growth significantly inhibited to calcium deprivation as would be expected; cerium-treated groups grown in the same conditions did not develop calcium-deficient symptoms; fresh weight, dry weight and chlorophyll content of spinach plants were increased by 35.9, 45 and 64.05% compared to those of plants cultivated in calcium-deficient media. In addition, calcium deprivation in spinach plants caused the reduction of photosynthetic rate, oxygen evolution rate and ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase activity. The reduction of activities of nitrate reductase, glutamate dehydrogenase, glutamate synthase and glutamic-pyruvic transaminase was observed under calcium-deficient media. However, cerium treatment under calcium-deficient media could significantly improve photosynthesis and nitrogen metabolism of spinach plants. This is viewed as evidence that cerium added to calcium-deficient media in the spinach plants could substitute for calcium and improve spinach growth.

  20. Application of cerium chloride to improve the acid resistance of dentine.

    PubMed

    Wegehaupt, Florian J; Sener, Beatrice; Attin, Thomas; Schmidlin, Patrick R

    2010-06-01

    To investigate the effect of cerium chloride, cerium chloride/fluoride and fluoride application on calcium release during erosion of treated dentine. Forty dentine samples were prepared from human premolars and randomly assigned to four groups (1-4). Samples were treated twice a day for 5 days, 30s each, with the following solutions: group 1 placebo, group 2 fluoride (Elmex fluid), group 3 cerium chloride and group 4 combined fluoride and cerium chloride. For the determination of acid resistance, the samples were consecutively eroded six times for 5 min with lactic acid (pH 3.0) and the calcium release in the acid was determined. Furthermore, six additional samples per group were prepared and used for EDS analysis. SEM pictures of these samples of each group were also captured. Samples of group 1 presented the highest calcium release when compared with the samples of groups 2-4. The highest acid resistance was observed for group 2. Calcium release in group 3 was similar to that of group 4 for the first two erosive attacks, after which calcium release in group 4 was lower than that of group 3. Generally, the SEM pictures showed a surface coating for groups 2-4. No deposits were observed in group 1. Although fluoride showed the best protective effect, cerium chloride was also able to reduce the acid susceptibility of dentine significantly, which merits further investigation. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Coupled redox transformations of catechol and cerium at the surface of a cerium(III) phosphate mineral

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cervini-Silva, Javiera; Gilbert, Benjamin; Fakra, Sirine; Friedlich, Stephan; Banfield, Jillian

    2008-05-01

    Highly insoluble Ce-bearing phosphate minerals form by weathering of apatite [Ca5(PO4)3.(OH,F,Cl)], and are important phosphorous repositories in soils. Although these phases can be dissolved via biologically-mediated pathways, the dissolution mechanisms are poorly understood. In this paper we report spectroscopic evidence to support coupling of redox transformations of organic carbon and cerium during the reaction of rhabdophane (CePO4·H2O) and catechol, a ubiquitous biogenic compound, at pH 5. Results show that the oxic-anoxic conditions influence the mineral dissolution behavior. Under anoxic conditions, the release of P and Ce occurs stoichiometrically. In contrast, under oxic conditions, the mineral dissolution behavior is incongruent, with dissolving Ce3+ ions oxidizing to CeO2. Reaction product analysis shows the formation of CO2, polymeric C, and oxalate and malate. The presence of more complex forms of organic carbon was also confirmed. Near edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy measurements at Ce-M4,5 and C-K absorption edges on reacted CePO4·H2O samples in the absence or presence of catechol and dissolved oxygen confirm that (1) the mineral surface converts to the oxide during this reaction, while full oxidation is limited to the near-surface region only; (2) the Ce valence remains unchanged when the reaction between CePO4·H2O and O2 but in the absence of catechol. Carbon K-edge spectra acquired from rhabdophane reacted with catechol under oxic conditions show spectral features before and after reaction that are considerably different from catechol, indicating the formation of more complex organic molecules. Decreases in intensity of characteristic catechol peaks are accompanied by the appearance of new π∗ resonances due to carbon in carboxyl (ca. 288.5 eV) and carbonyl (ca. 289.3 eV) groups, and the development of broad structure in the σ∗ region characteristic of aliphatic carbon. Evolution of the C K-edge spectra is consistent

  2. Facile preparation of carbon wrapped copper telluride nanowires as high performance anodes for sodium and lithium ion batteries.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hong; Yang, Jun; Geng, Hongbo; Li, Cheng Chao

    2017-04-07

    Uniform carbon wrapped copper telluride nanowires were successfully prepared by using an in situ conversion reaction. The length of these nanowires is up to several micrometers and the width is around 30-40 nm. The unique one dimensional structure and the presence of conformal carbon coating of copper telluride greatly accommodate the large volumetric changes during cycling, significantly increase the electrical conductivity and reduce charge transfer resistance. The copper telluride nanowires show promising performance in a lithium ion battery with a discharge capacity of 130.2 mA h g(-1) at a high current density of 6.0 A g(-1) (26.74 C) and a stable cycling performance of 673.3 mA h g(-1) during the 60th cycle at 100 mA g(-1). When evaluated as anode material for a sodium ion battery, the copper telluride nanowires deliver a reversible capacity of 68.1 mA h g(-1) at 1.0 A g(-1) (∼4.46 C) and have a high capacity retention of 177.5 mA h g(-1) during the 500th cycle at 100 mA g(-1).

  3. Dual-functional aniline-assisted wet-chemical synthesis of bismuth telluride nanoplatelets and their thermoelectric performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Changcun; Kong, Fangfang; Liu, Congcong; Liu, Huixuan; Hu, Yongjing; Wang, Tongzhou; Xu, Jingkun; Jiang, Fengxing

    2017-06-01

    The wet-chemical approach is of great significance for the synthesis of two-dimensional (2D) bismuth telluride nanoplatelets as a potential thermoelectric (TE) material. Herein, we proposed a simple and effective solution method with the assistance of aniline for the fabrication of bismuth telluride nanoplatelets at a low temperature of 100 °C. The choice of aniline with its dual function avoided the simultaneous use of a capping regent and a toxic reductant. The as-synthesized nanoplatelets have a large size of more than 900 × 500 nm2 and a small thickness of 15.4 nm. The growth of bismuth telluride nanoplatelets are related to the Bi/Te ratio of precursors indicating that a larger content of the Bi precursor is more conducive to the formation of 2D nanoplatelets. The bismuth telluride nanoplatelets pressed into a pellet show a smaller electrical resistivity (˜6.5 × 10-3 Ω · m) and a larger Seebeck coefficient (-135 μV K-1), as well as a lower thermal conductivity (0.27 W m-1 K-1) than those of nanoparticles. The next goal is to further reduce the electrical resistivity and optimize the TE performance by disposing of the residual reactant of aniline adsorbed on the surface of the nanoplatelets.

  4. Facile preparation of carbon wrapped copper telluride nanowires as high performance anodes for sodium and lithium ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Hong; Yang, Jun; Geng, Hongbo; Chao Li, Cheng

    2017-04-01

    Uniform carbon wrapped copper telluride nanowires were successfully prepared by using an in situ conversion reaction. The length of these nanowires is up to several micrometers and the width is around 30–40 nm. The unique one dimensional structure and the presence of conformal carbon coating of copper telluride greatly accommodate the large volumetric changes during cycling, significantly increase the electrical conductivity and reduce charge transfer resistance. The copper telluride nanowires show promising performance in a lithium ion battery with a discharge capacity of 130.2 mA h g‑1 at a high current density of 6.0 A g‑1 (26.74 C) and a stable cycling performance of 673.3 mA h g‑1 during the 60th cycle at 100 mA g‑1. When evaluated as anode material for a sodium ion battery, the copper telluride nanowires deliver a reversible capacity of 68.1 mA h g‑1 at 1.0 A g‑1 (∼4.46 C) and have a high capacity retention of 177.5 mA h g‑1 during the 500th cycle at 100 mA g‑1.

  5. [Characterization and analysis of direction extraction and precipitation of cerium loading organic phase by oxalic acid solution].

    PubMed

    Mei, Yan; Xia, Chuan; Chen, Xiao-Li; Sun, He; Nie, Zuo-Ren

    2011-11-01

    In the condition of sodium hydroxide saponification, the test results using direction extraction and precipitation of cerium from P507 loading organic phase by oxalic acid solution were studied. Infared (IR) spectrum, X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscope (TEM) and thermogravimetry (TG-DSC) were used to study and characterize organic cerium precipitates and the final calcined products. The results showed that organic cerium precipitates and final calcined products were spheric organic cerium coordination and spheric cube CeO2 crystal, respectively, showing their morphologies were successive. IR made out that the structures of organic cerium precipitates and final calcined products were different. TG-DSC indicated that the final calcined products weightlessness was 3.5% and chemical composing was CeO2 x 1/3H2O.

  6. Antioxidant Cerium Oxide Nanoparticles in Biology and Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Bryant C.; Johnson, Monique E.; Walker, Marlon L.; Riley, Kathryn R.; Sims, Christopher M.

    2016-01-01

    Previously, catalytic cerium oxide nanoparticles (CNPs, nanoceria, CeO2-x NPs) have been widely utilized for chemical mechanical planarization in the semiconductor industry and for reducing harmful emissions and improving fuel combustion efficiency in the automobile industry. Researchers are now harnessing the catalytic repertoire of CNPs to develop potential new treatment modalities for both oxidative- and nitrosative-stress induced disorders and diseases. In order to reach the point where our experimental understanding of the antioxidant activity of CNPs can be translated into useful therapeutics in the clinic, it is necessary to evaluate the most current evidence that supports CNP antioxidant activity in biological systems. Accordingly, the aims of this review are three-fold: (1) To describe the putative reaction mechanisms and physicochemical surface properties that enable CNPs to both scavenge reactive oxygen species (ROS) and to act as antioxidant enzyme-like mimetics in solution; (2) To provide an overview, with commentary, regarding the most robust design and synthesis pathways for preparing CNPs with catalytic antioxidant activity; (3) To provide the reader with the most up-to-date in vitro and in vivo experimental evidence supporting the ROS-scavenging potential of CNPs in biology and medicine. PMID:27196936

  7. Cerium oxide nanoparticles inhibit differentiation of neural stem cells.

    PubMed

    Gliga, Anda R; Edoff, Karin; Caputo, Fanny; Källman, Thomas; Blom, Hans; Karlsson, Hanna L; Ghibelli, Lina; Traversa, Enrico; Ceccatelli, Sandra; Fadeel, Bengt

    2017-08-24

    Cerium oxide nanoparticles (nanoceria) display antioxidant properties and have shown cytoprotective effects both in vitro and in vivo. Here, we explored the effects of nanoceria on neural progenitor cells using the C17.2 murine cell line as a model. First, we assessed the effects of nanoceria versus samarium (Sm) doped nanoceria on cell viability in the presence of the prooxidant, DMNQ. Both particles were taken up by cells and nanoceria, but not Sm-doped nanoceria, elicited a temporary cytoprotective effect upon exposure to DMNQ. Next, we employed RNA sequencing to explore the transcriptional responses induced by nanoceria or Sm-doped nanoceria during neuronal differentiation. Detailed computational analyses showed that nanoceria altered pathways and networks relevant for neuronal development, leading us to hypothesize that nanoceria inhibits neuronal differentiation, and that nanoceria and Sm-doped nanoceria both interfere with cytoskeletal organization. We confirmed that nanoceria reduced neuron specific β3-tubulin expression, a marker of neuronal differentiation, and GFAP, a neuroglial marker. Furthermore, using super-resolution microscopy approaches, we could show that both particles interfered with cytoskeletal organization and altered the structure of neural growth cones. Taken together, these results reveal that nanoceria may impact on neuronal differentiation, suggesting that nanoceria could pose a developmental neurotoxicity hazard.

  8. Solar hydrogen production with cerium oxides thermochemical cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binotti, Marco; Di Marcoberardino, Gioele; Biassoni, Mauro; Manzolini, Giampaolo

    2017-06-01

    This paper discusses the hydrogen production using a solar driven thermochemical cycle. The thermochemical cycle is based on nonstoichiometric cerium oxides redox and the solar concentration system is a solar dish. Detailed optical and redox models were developed to optimize the hydrogen production performance as function of several design parameters (i.e. concentration ratio, reactor pressures and temperatures) The efficiency of the considered technology is compared against two commercially available technologies namely PV + electrolyzer and Dish Stirling + electrolyzer. Results show that solar-to-fuel efficiency of 21.2% can be achieved at design condition assuming a concentration ratio around 5000, reduction and oxidation temperatures of 1500°C and 1275 °C. When moving to annual performance, the annual yield of the considered approach can be as high as 16.7% which is about 43% higher than the best competitive technology. The higher performance implies that higher installation costs around 40% can be accepted for the innovative concept to achieve the same cost of hydrogen.

  9. Toxicity of Cerium Oxide Nanoparticles in Human Lung Cancer Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Weisheng, Lin; Huang, Yue-wern; Zhou, Xiao Dong; Ma, Yinfa

    2006-12-31

    With the fast development of nanotechnology, the nanomaterials start to cause people's attention for potential toxic effect. In this paper, the cytotoxicity and oxidative stress caused by 20-nm cerium oxide (CeO2) nanoparticles in cultured human lung cancer cells was investigated. The sulforhodamine B method was employed to assess cell viability after exposure to 3.5, 10.5, and 23.3 μg/ml of CeO2 nanoparticles for 24, 48, and 72 h. Cell viability decreased significantly as a function of nanoparticle dose and exposure time. Indicators of oxidative stress and cytotoxicity, including total reactive oxygen species, glutathione, malondialdehyde, α-tocopherol, and lactate dehydrogenase, were quantitatively assessed. It is concluded from the results that free radicals generated by exposure to 3.5 to 23.3 μg/ml CeO2 nanoparticles produce significant oxidative stress in the cells, as reflected by reduced glutathione and α-tocopherol levels; the toxic effects of CeO2 nanoparticles are dose dependent and time dependent; elevated oxidative stress increases the production of malondialdehyde and lactate dehydrogenase, which are indicators of lipid peroxidation and cell membrane damage, respectively.

  10. Cerium negatively impacts the nutritional status in rapeseed.

    PubMed

    Pošćić, Filip; Schat, Henk; Marchiol, Luca

    2017-03-29

    Cerium (Ce) has been reported to be both beneficial and harmful to plants. This contradiction deserves explanation in the light of increased anthropogenic release of Ce in the environment. Ce tolerance and accumulation were evaluated in hydroponically cultivated Brassica napus L. (rapeseed). Ce and other nutrient concentrations were measured with increasing Ce concentration in the nutrient solution. Moreover, Ce and calcium (Ca) accumulation were evaluated at different Ca and Ce concentrations in nutrient solution and a Michaelis-Menten type inhibition model considering Ce and Ca competition was tested. Plants were also sprayed with Ce solution in Ca-deficient media. Ce decreased the growth and root function, which affected shoot nutritional status. Calcium was the most severely inhibited nutrient in both roots and shoots. High Ca concentrations in the nutrient solution inhibited Ce accumulation in a non-competitive way. Moreover, phosphorus (P) precipitated Ce inside root cells. Ce spraying did not alleviate Ca deficiency symptoms and the results were critically compared to the available literature.

  11. Correlation of cerium anomalies with indicators of paleoenvironment

    SciTech Connect

    MacLeod, K.G.; Irving, A.J.

    1996-09-01

    Among 21 whole-rock samples of the Upper Cretaceous Niobrara Formation from Colorado, the abundance of cerium relative to other rate earth elements (Ce anomaly), the weight percent organic carbon (%C{sub org}), and the intensity of bioturbation all covary. This covariation is provocative because %C{sub org} and intensity of bioturbation track changes in the concentration of oxygen in the local water column at the time of deposition (Savrda and Bottjer 1989). Ce anomalies in apatite-rich fractions of the Maastrichtian Zumaya-Algorta Formation from France and Spain and the Miocene Monterey Formation from California show changes that also may coincide with changes in ancient oxygen levels. Results for the Niobrara samples are the closest correspondence demonstrated between paleo-redox conditions and Ce anomalies, but the authors cannot yet determine whether the correspondence reflects a cause-and-effect relationship. Variation in Ce anomalies is influenced by a number of factors, including terrigenous input, depositional environment, and diagenetic conditions. Potential interplay of these factors prevents a unique interpretation of the whole-rock data; dissecting whole-rock Ce anomalies through analysis of isolated sedimentary components, though, is a promising avenue of research.

  12. Antioxidant Cerium Oxide Nanoparticles in Biology and Medicine.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Bryant C; Johnson, Monique E; Walker, Marlon L; Riley, Kathryn R; Sims, Christopher M

    2016-05-17

    Previously, catalytic cerium oxide nanoparticles (CNPs, nanoceria, CeO2-x NPs) have been widely utilized for chemical mechanical planarization in the semiconductor industry and for reducing harmful emissions and improving fuel combustion efficiency in the automobile industry. Researchers are now harnessing the catalytic repertoire of CNPs to develop potential new treatment modalities for both oxidative- and nitrosative-stress induced disorders and diseases. In order to reach the point where our experimental understanding of the antioxidant activity of CNPs can be translated into useful therapeutics in the clinic, it is necessary to evaluate the most current evidence that supports CNP antioxidant activity in biological systems. Accordingly, the aims of this review are three-fold: (1) To describe the putative reaction mechanisms and physicochemical surface properties that enable CNPs to both scavenge reactive oxygen species (ROS) and to act as antioxidant enzyme-like mimetics in solution; (2) To provide an overview, with commentary, regarding the most robust design and synthesis pathways for preparing CNPs with catalytic antioxidant activity; (3) To provide the reader with the most up-to-date in vitro and in vivo experimental evidence supporting the ROS-scavenging potential of CNPs in biology and medicine.

  13. Catalytic Properties and Biomedical Applications of Cerium Oxide Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Walkey, Carl; Das, Soumen; Seal, Sudipta; Erlichman, Joseph; Heckman, Karin; Ghibelli, Lina; Traversa, Enrico; McGinnis, James F.; Self, William T.

    2014-01-01

    Cerium oxide nanoparticles (Nanoceria) have shown promise as catalytic antioxidants in the test tube, cell culture models and animal models of disease. However given the reactivity that is well established at the surface of these nanoparticles, the biological utilization of Nanoceria as a therapeutic still poses many challenges. Moreover the form that these particles take in a biological environment, such as the changes that can occur due to a protein corona, are not well established. This review aims to summarize the existing literature on biological use of Nanoceria, and to raise questions about what further study is needed to apply this interesting catalytic material to biomedical applications. These questions include: 1) How does preparation, exposure dose, route and experimental model influence the reported effects of Nanoceria in animal studies? 2) What are the considerations to develop Nanoceria as a therapeutic agent in regards to these parameters? 3) What biological targets of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) are relevant to this targeting, and how do these properties also influence the safety of these nanomaterials? PMID:26207185

  14. Cerium dioxide nanoparticles increase immunogenicity of the influenza vaccine.

    PubMed

    Zholobak, Nadezhda M; Mironenko, Alla P; Shcherbakov, Alexander B; Shydlovska, Olga A; Spivak, Mykola Ya; Radchenko, Larysa V; Marinin, Andrey I; Ivanova, Olga S; Baranchikov, Alexander E; Ivanov, Vladimir K

    2016-03-01

    We have demonstrated the influence of cerium dioxide nanoparticles on the immunogenicity of the influenza vaccine on an example of liquid split inactivated Vaxigrip vaccine. Antibody titers were analyzed using the hemagglutination inhibition (HI) assay. Seroprotection, seroconversion, the geometric mean titers (GMTs) and the factor increase (FI) in the GMTs were calculated. The effect of nano-ceria surface stabilizer on the enhancement of immunogenicity was shown. The vaccine modified by citrate-stabilized nano-ceria, in contrast to a non-modified Vaxigrip vaccine, did not provide an adequate level of seroprotection, and seroconversion after vaccination was 66.7% on days 49-63 for virus strain А(H1N1) and 100% on day 49 for virus strain B/Yamagata. For the low immunogenic influenza B virus, the rise in antibody titers (GMT/IF) was 24.38/3.28 after the first injection and 50.40/6.79 on day 49. For the vaccine modified by non-stabilized nano-ceria, for all virus strains under study, on day 63, upon immunization notable levels of seroprotection, seroconversion and GMT/IF were registered (higher than for the non-modified Vaxigrip vaccine). The successful attempt to modify the influenza vaccine demonstrates the possible ways of increasing the specific activity of vaccines using nano-ceria.

  15. Denaturation of Human Serum Albumin by Cerium (iii) Chloride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behbahani, G. Rezaei; Shalbafan, M.; Gheibi, N.; Barzegar, L.; Behbahani, H. Rezaei; Yaghdavaei, N.; Behbahani, Z. Rezaei

    2013-08-01

    Cerium (III) Chloride-induced conformational changes of human serum albumin, HSA, in phosphate buffer, 10 mM at pH 7.4 was investigated, using isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), UV and fluorescence emission spectroscopic methods. The results indicate that CeCl3, Ce3+, induces irreversible denaturation of the HSA structure. The UV absorption intensity of HSA + Ce3+ shows a slight blueshift in the absorbance wavelength with increasing Ce3+ concentration. The fluorescence intensity was increased regularly and a slight redshift was observed in the emission wavelength. The HSA + Ce3+ complex quenches the fluorescence of HSA and changes the microenvironment of tryptophan residue. The emission intensity increases suggesting the loss of the tertiary structure of HSA. The results obtained from the ITC data are in agreement with the spectroscopic methods. The strong negative cooperativity of Ce3+ binding with HSA (Table 1) recovered from the extended solvation model, indicates that HSA has been denatured as a result of its interaction with Ce3+ ions.

  16. Anti-angiogenic activity of heparin functionalised cerium oxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Lord, Megan S; Tsoi, Bonny; Gunawan, Cindy; Teoh, Wey Yang; Amal, Rose; Whitelock, John M

    2013-11-01

    Cerium oxide nanoparticles (nanoceria) are widely reported to be non-cytotoxic and modulate intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS). In this study, nanoceria (dxRD = 12 nm) were functionalised with either 130 or 880 molecules of unfractionated heparin using the organosilane linker, 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane. Nanoceria with a low level of heparin functionalisation were found to scavenge intracellular ROS to the same extent as unfunctionalised nanoceria and significantly more than cells exposed to medium only. In contrast, nanoceria with the highest level of heparin functionalisation were not as effective at scavenging intracellular ROS. Nanoceria were localised predominantly in the cytoplasm, while heparin-nanoceria were localised in both the cytoplasm and lysosomes. Together these data demonstrated that the level of nanoceria surface functionalisation with heparin determined the intracellular localisation and ROS scavenging ability of these particles. Additionally, heparin-nanoceria were effective in reducing endothelial cell proliferation indicating that they may find application in the control of angiogenesis in cancer in the future.

  17. Synthesis and photocatalytic activity of mesoporous cerium doped TiO{sub 2} as visible light sensitive photocatalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Aman, Noor; Satapathy, P.K.; Mishra, T.; Mahato, M.; Das, N.N.

    2012-02-15

    Graphical abstract: Cerium doped titania having optimum 5 wt% of cerium can decompose methylene blue and reduce selenium (IV) efficiently under visible light. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Effect of cerium doping on the surface properties and visible light mediated photocatalytic reaction is studied. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cerium doping increases the anatase phase stability, surface area (up to 137 m{sup 2}/g) and visible light absorption. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Importance of Ce{sup 3+}/Ce{sup 4+}, oxygen vacancy, surface area and crystallinity is correlated with improved catalytic activity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Material with 5 wt% Ce is found to be most active photocatalyst for methylene blue decomposition and Se (IV) reduction. -- Abstract: Cerium doped titania materials were synthesized varying the cerium concentration from 0 to 10 wt%. Materials are characterised by XRD, TEM, XPS and N{sub 2} adsorption desorption method. Surface area and visible light absorption substantially increases and crystallite size decreases with the increasing cerium content. Cerium doping stabilizes the anatase phase and surface area even at 600 Degree-Sign C calcination. Photocatalytic activity towards methylene blue decomposition and selenium (IV) reduction is found to increase with the cerium content up to 5 wt% and then decreases. Materials calcined at 600 Degree-Sign C shows better activity than that calcined at 400 Degree-Sign C, even though surface area decreases. Anatase crystallinity mostly decides the photocatalytic activity rather than only surface area. It can be concluded that the optimum visible light absorption and oxygen vacancy with 5% cerium doping enhances the photocatalytic activity. In addition photocatalytic performance is found to depend on the presence of Ce{sup 4+}/Ce{sup 3+} rather than only visible light absorption.

  18. Fabrication of Cerium Oxide and Uranium Oxide Microspheres for Space Nuclear Power Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Jeffrey A. Katalenich; Michael R. Hartman; Robert C. O'Brien

    2013-02-01

    Cerium oxide and uranium oxide microspheres are being produced via an internal gelation sol-gel method to investigate alternative fabrication routes for space nuclear fuels. Depleted uranium and non-radioactive cerium are being utilized as surrogates for plutonium-238 (Pu-238) used in radioisotope thermoelectric generators and for enriched uranium required by nuclear thermal rockets. While current methods used to produce Pu-238 fuels at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) involve the generation of fine powders that pose a respiratory hazard and have a propensity to contaminate glove boxes, the sol-gel route allows for the generation of oxide microsphere fuels through an aqueous route. The sol-gel method does not generate fine powders and may require fewer processing steps than the LANL method with less operator handling. High-quality cerium dioxide microspheres have been fabricated in the desired size range and equipment is being prepared to establish a uranium dioxide microsphere production capability.

  19. Mesoporous cerium oxide nanospheres for the visible-light driven photocatalytic degradation of dyes

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Shi; Ng, Chin Fan; Huan, Cheng Hon Alfred

    2014-01-01

    Summary A facile, solvothermal synthesis of mesoporous cerium oxide nanospheres is reported for the purpose of the photocatalytic degradation of organic dyes and future applications in sustainable energy research. The earth-abundant, relatively affordable, mixed valence cerium oxide sample, which consists of predominantly Ce7O12, has been characterized by powder X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron and UV–vis spectroscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. Together with N2 sorption experiments, the data confirms that the new cerium oxide material is mesoporous and absorbs visible light. The photocatalytic degradation of rhodamin B is investigated with a series of radical scavengers, suggesting that the mechanism of photocatalytic activity under visible-light irradiation involves predominantly hydroxyl radicals as the active species. PMID:24991486

  20. Excitation induced spectroscopic study and quenching effect in cerium samarium codoped lithium aluminoborate glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Parvinder; Kaur, Simranpreet; Singh, Gurinder Pal; Arora, Deepawali; Kumar, Sunil; Singh, D. P.

    2016-08-01

    Lithium aluminium borate host has been codoped with cerium and samarium to prepare glass by conventional melt quench technique. Their structural and spectroscopic investigation has been carried out using XRD, FTIR and density measurements. The UV-Vis absorption spectra and fluorescence spectra (λexc.=380 nm and 400 nm) have been studied for spectroscopic analysis. The amorphous nature of the prepared samples is shown by XRD. The density is increasing with addition of cerium at the expense of aluminium, keeping other components constant. FTIR study also shows the presence of compact and stable tetrahedral BO4 units thus supporting the density results. The UV- Vis absorption spectra show a shift of optical absorption edge towards longer wavelength along with an increase in intensity of peaks with rising samarium concentration. The fluorescence spectra show a blue shift and subsequent suppression of cerium peaks with addition of samarium.

  1. Samarium Doped Cerium Oxide Clusters: a Study on the Modulation of Electronic Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Topolski, Josey E.; Kafader, Jared O.; Marrero-Colon, Vicmarie; Chick Jarrold, Caroline

    2017-06-01

    Cerium oxide is known for its use in solid oxide fuel cells due to its high ionic conductivity. The doping of trivalent samarium atoms into cerium oxide is known to enhance the ionic conductivity through the generation of additional oxygen vacancies. This study probes the electronic structure of Sm_{x}Ce_{y}O_{z} (x+y=3, z=2-4) anion and neutral clusters. Anion photoelectron spectra of these mixed metal clusters exhibit additional spectral features not present in the previously studied cerium oxide clusters. Density functional theory calculations have been used to aid interpretation of collected spectra. The results of this work can be used to inform the design of materials used for solid oxide fuel cells.

  2. Study of phase transitions in cerium in shock-wave experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhernokletov, M. V.; Borisenok, V. A.; Simakov, V. G.; Bragunets, V. A.; Shestakov, E. E.; Podurets, A. M.; Tkachenko, M. I.

    2015-09-01

    Cerium has a complex phase diagram that is explained by the presence of structure phase transitions. Planar gauges were used in various combinations in experiments for determination of sound velocity dependence on pressure in cerium by the technique of PVDF gauge. The data of time dependence on pressure profiles with use of x(t) diagrams and the D(u) relation for cerium allowed the definition of the Lagrangian velocity of the unloading wave CLagr and the Eulerian velocity CEul by taking into account the compression σ. These results accords with data obtained by using the technique of VISAR and a manganin-based gauge, and calculated pressure dependence of isentropic sound velocity according to the VNIITF EOS. Metallography analysis of post-experimental samples did not find any changes in a phase composition.

  3. Decomposition kinetics of ammonia in gaseous stream by a nanoscale copper-cerium bimetallic catalyst.

    PubMed

    Hung, Chang-Mao

    2008-01-15

    This study performance is to examine the kinetics over nanoscale copper-cerium bimetallic catalyst under selective catalytic oxidation (SCO) of ammonia to N(2) in a tubular fixed-bed reactor (TFBR) at temperatures from 150 to 400 degrees C in the presence of oxygen. The nanoscale copper-cerium bimetallic catalyst was prepared by co-precipitation with Cu(NO(3))(2) and Ce(NO(3))(3) at molar ratio of 6:4. Experimental results showed that the catalyst with transmission electron microscopy (TEM) revealed that copper and cerium are well dispersed and catalyst in the form of nanometer-sized particles. Moreover, the kinetic behavior of NH(3) oxidation with catalysis can be accounted by using the rate expression of the Langmuir-Hinshelwood type kinetic model. Kinetic parameters are also developed on the basis of the differential reactor data. Also, experimental results are compared with those of the model predicted.

  4. Enhanced chemiluminescence of cerium(IV)-Tween 85 system and the analytical application.

    PubMed

    Li, Shifeng; Qian, Li; Zhu, Yan; Liu, Manman; Gao, Yinping; Ni, Yonghong

    2013-01-01

    The oxidation reaction between cerium(IV) and Tween 85 in sulfuric acid medium produced weak chemiluminescence (CL). In this paper, it was found that citrate could strongly enhance the CL of cerium(IV)-Tween 85-polyphenol system. Based on studies of ultraviolet-visible spectra and CL spectra, the CL enhancement mechanism had been proposed. It was surmised that the light emission was from an excited oxygen molecular pair O2((1)Δg)O2((1)∑g(-)). The maximum emission wavelength was about 478 nm. The effects of 17 amino acids and 29 organic compounds on cerium(IV)-Tween 85-citrate CL were investigated by a flow injection procedure. This study showed the present system had a wide application for the determination of these compounds.

  5. Green synthesized cerium oxide nanoparticle: A prospective drug against oxidative harm.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Debanjan; Mukherjee, Riya; Patra, Mousumi; Banik, Milon; Dasgupta, Rakhi; Mukherjee, Manabendra; Basu, Tarakdas

    2016-11-01

    Cerium oxide nanoparticle (CeONP) of size 2-3nm was synthesized by a new, simple and green method at ambient temperature, using cerium nitrate as prime precursor and Aloe vera leaf extract as stabilizing agent. Of the two oxidation states (+3) and (+4) of cerium, it was dominantly present in (+3) state in CeONP and cyclic conversion of Ce(III)O→Ce(IV)O→Ce(III)O by reaction with H2O2 implied uninterrupted antioxidant property of CeONP. Moreover, the higher oxygen defect in the crystal lattice produced particles with higher antioxidant activity. CeONP was found to neutralize the deleterious effects of H2O2 viz., cell death, generation of intracellular reactive oxygen species and loss of connectivity in mouse neural cells. Therefore, CeONP might have potential use in future as an anti-oxidant drug.

  6. THERMAL EFFECTS ON MASS AND SPATIAL RESOLUTION DURING LASER PULSE ATOM PROBE TOMOGRAPHY OF CERIUM OXIDE

    SciTech Connect

    Rita Kirchhofer; Melissa C. Teague; Brian P. Gorman

    2013-05-01

    Cerium oxide (CeO2) is an ideal surrogate material for trans-uranic elements and fission products found in nuclear fuels due to similarities in their thermal properties; therefore, cerium oxide was used to determine the best run condition for atom probe tomography (APT). Laser pulse APT is a technique that allows for spatial resolution in the nm scale and isotopic/elemental chemical identification. A systematic study of the impact of laser pulse energy and specimen base temperature on the mass resolution, measurement of stoichiometry, multiples, and evaporation mechanisms are reported in this paper. It was demonstrated that using laser pulse APT stoichiometric field evaporation of cerium oxide was achieved at 1 pJ laser pulse energy and 20 K specimen base temperature.

  7. Synthesis and characterization of cerium and yttrium alkoxide complexes supported by ferrocene-based chelating ligands.

    PubMed

    Broderick, Erin M; Thuy-Boun, Peter S; Guo, Neng; Vogel, Carola S; Sutter, Jörg; Miller, Jeffrey T; Meyer, Karsten; Diaconescu, Paula L

    2011-04-04

    Two series of Schiff base metal complexes were investigated, where each series was supported by an ancillary ligand incorporating a ferrocene backbone and different N=X functionalities. One ligand is based on an imine, while the other is based on an iminophosphorane group. Cerium(IV), cerium(III), and yttrium(III) alkoxide complexes supported by the two ligands were synthesized. All metal complexes were characterized by cyclic voltammetry. Additionally, NMR, Mössbauer, X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES), and absorption spectroscopies were used. The experimental data indicate that iron remains in the +2 oxidation state and that cerium(IV) does not engage in a redox behavior with the ancillary ligand.

  8. The role of chemical interactions between thorium, cerium, and lanthanum in lymphocyte toxicity.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Monica S; Duarte, Isabelle M; Paiva, Amanda V; Yunes, Samira N; Almeida, Carlos E; Mattos, Rita C; Sarcinelli, Paula N

    2014-01-01

    Thorium, cerium, and lanthanum are metals present in several types of minerals, the most common of which is monazite. Cerium and lanthanum are elements in the lanthanides series. Thorium, an actinide metal, is a hazardous element due to its radioactive characteristics. There is a lack of information describing the possible chemical interactions among these elements and the effects they may have on humans. Toxicological analyses were performed using cell viability, cell death, and DNA damage assays. Chemical interactions were evaluated based on the Loewe additivity model. The results indicate that thorium and cerium individually have no toxic effects on lymphocytes. However, thorium associated with lanthanum increases the toxicity of this element, thereby reducing the viability of lymphocytes at low concentrations of metals in the mixture.

  9. Cytotoxic activity of new cerium (III) complexes of bis-coumarins.

    PubMed

    Kostova, Irena; Manolov, Ilia; Momekov, Georgi; Tzanova, Tzvetomira; Konstantinov, Spiro; Karaivanova, Margarita

    2005-12-01

    Complexes of cerium (III) with bis-coumarins: 3,3'-benzylidene-bis(4-hydroxy-2H-1-benzopyran-2-one) and bis(4-hydroxy-2-oxo-2H-chromen-3-yl)-(1H-pyrazol-3-yl)-methane were synthesized by reaction of cerium (III) salt and the ligands, in amounts equal to metal/ligand molar ratio of 1:2. The complexes were prepared by adding an aqueous solution of cerium (III) salt to an aqueous solution of the ligand subsequently raising the pH of the mixture gradually to ca. 5.0 by adding dilute solution of sodium hydroxide. The cerium (III) complexes with bis-coumarins were characterized by different physicochemical methods--elemental analysis, IR-, 1H- and 13C-NMR-spectroscopies and mass-spectral data. The spectral data of cerium (III) complexes were interpreted on the basis of comparison with the spectra of the free ligands. This analysis showed that in the Ce (III) complexes the ligands coordinated to the metal ion through both deprotonated hydroxyl groups. On the basis of the nu(C=O) red shift observed, participation of the carbonyl groups in the coordination to the metal ion was also suggested. Cytotoxic screening by MTT assay was carried out. In the present study we performed comparative evaluation of the cytotoxic effects of the two newly synthesized cerium complexes against the acute myeloid leukemia derived HL-60 and the chronic myeloid leukemia (CML)-derived BV-173. In addition the cytotoxic effects of Ce (III) complex with 3,3'-benzylidene-bis(4-hydroxy-2H-1-benzopyran-2-one) were evaluated on the CML-derived K-562 and LAMA-84 cells, characterized by relative low responsiveness to chemotherapy. The DNA isolated from the cytosolic fraction of BV-173 cells after 24 h treatment with the same complex (at 100 and 200 microM) demonstrated a laddering phenomenon that is indicative for apoptotic cell death.

  10. Crystallization kinetics of cerium oxide nanoparticles formed by spontaneous, room-temperature hydrolysis of cerium(iv) ammonium nitrate in light and heavy water.

    PubMed

    Pettinger, Natasha W; Williams, Robert E A; Chen, Jinquan; Kohler, Bern

    2017-02-01

    A stable sol of cerium oxide nanoparticles forms spontaneously when cerium(iv) ammonium nitrate (CAN) is dissolved in room-temperature water at mM concentrations. Electron microscopy experiments reveal the formation of highly crystalline cerium oxide particles several nm in diameter and suggest that they are formed from amorphous particles that are similar in size. Under the low pH conditions of the experiments, the nanoparticles form a stable dispersion and show no evidence of aggregation, even many months after synthesis. The absence of particles large enough to scatter light significantly makes it possible to observe the crystallization kinetics through dramatic changes in the UV-visible absorption spectra that occur during solution aging. Measurements show that the cerium oxide nanocrystals are formed roughly an order of magnitude more slowly in D2O than in H2O solution. This large solvent kinetic isotope effect (kH/kD ∼ 10), which is reported here for the first time for the crystallization of a solid metal oxide phase, indicates a rate-determining proton transfer reaction, which is assigned to the conversion of hydroxy to oxo bridges. In D2O solution, the absorption per mole of cerium ions increases by over 400% at 290 nm as the weakly absorbing precursor phase is transformed into nanocrystalline cerium oxide. An isosbestic point is detected at 368 nm, and the absorption spectra can be modeled throughout aging by the sum of spectra of just two interconverting species. Preliminary ultrafast transient absorption experiments confirm that the optical properties of the amorphous precursors differ greatly from those of the final, nanocrystalline phase. Crystallization of CeO2 from CAN in water has much in common with the crystallization of iron oxides from iron(iii) salts, including the importance of non-classical nucleation and growth pathways. It is an outstanding system for studying the poorly understood events that cause molecularly solvated ions to self

  11. Synthesis and characterization of two dimensional metal organic framework of cerium with tetraaza macrocyclic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bt Safiin, Nurul Atikah; Yarmo, Ambar; Yamin, Bohari M.

    2013-11-01

    A two dimensional metal organic framework containing cerium sufate layers and ethylenediaminium between layers was obtained by refluxing the mixture of cerium sulphate and 5,5,7,12,12,14-hexamethyl-1,4,8,11-tetraazacyclotetradeca-7, 14-diene bromide. The complex was characterized by infrared spectroscopy and microelemental analysis. X-ray study showed that the complex adopts eleven coordination environments about the central atom. Thermogravimetric study showed the removal of water molecules at about 70°C followed by a gradual mass loss until the whole structure collapsed at about 400°C.

  12. Cerium clustering and radiation damage resistance in aluminophosphate and silicophosphate glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rygel, Jennifer Lynn

    Cerium oxide is a well-known additive for increasing resistance to radiation damage in glass by preventing electrons and holes freed by irradiation from becoming trapped at defect sites and inducing optical absorption bands which can severely darken the glass. Phosphate glasses provide a unique opportunity for studying radiation damage resistance due to their high rare-earth solubility, ˜25 mol%. Two series of glasses, nominally AlP3O9-CeP 3O9 and CeP3O9-SiP2O 7, were synthesized to investigate structure-property relationships in a range of compositions near the metaphosphate. The presence of cerium clustering, or sharing of oxygen between cerium cations, was predicted using the chain fragment cluster model, an extension of earlier models for rare-earth phosphate glasses. Using the atom% composition determined by XPS from vacuum fracture surfaces, and cation coordination measured by Ce K-edge EXAFS, 29Si CPMG NMR, and 27Al MAS NMR, it was determined that clustering occurs for glasses containing ≥ 14 mol% Ce2O3 in the aluminophosphate glass series and ≥ 18 mol% Ce2O3 in the silicophosphate glass series. Many measured properties have been observed to correlate with the presence or absence of cerium clustering, cluster size, or other concomitant structural changes, including: visible coloration, density, refractive index, Ce3+ photoluminescence, and Ce3+ paramagnetic resonance. Additionally, radiation damage resistance was identified in the aluminophosphate and silicophosphate glasses which were predicted to have clustered cerium cations through the absence of radiation-induced phosphorus-related paramagnetic defects. This resistance is attributed to a structural implication of clustering. Specifically, cerium cations will be in close proximity to defect precursor sites at the concentrations required for clustering and are thus able to prevent localization of electrons and holes on those sites. Finally, irradiation-induced optical absorption was measured in all

  13. Systematic variation of rare-earth elements in cerium-earth minerals

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Murata, K.J.; Rose, H.J.; Carron, M.K.; Glass, J.J.

    1957-01-01

    In a continuation of a study reported previously, rare-earth elements and thorium have been determined in monazite, allanite, cerite, bastnaesite, and a number of miscellaneous cerium-earth minerals. A quantity called sigma (???), which is the sum of the atomic percentages of La, Ce, and Pr, is proposed as an index of composition of all cerium-earth minerals with respect to the rare-earth elements. The value of ??? for all of the minerals analysed falls between 58 and 92 atomic per cent. Monazites, allanites, and cerites cover the entire observed range, whereas bastnaesites are sharply restricted to the range between 80 and 92 atomic per cent. The minimum value of ??? for a cerium-earth mineral corresponds to the smallest possible unit-cell size of the mineral. In monazite, this structurally controlled minimum value of ??? is estimated to be around 30 atomic per cent. Neodymium, because of its abundance, and yttrium, because of its small size, have dominant roles in contraction of the structure. In the other direction, the limit of variation in composition will be reached when lanthanum becomes the sole rare-earth element in a cerium-earth mineral. Cerium-earth minerals from alkalic rocks are all characterized by values of ??? greater than 80 atomic per cent, indicating that the processes that formed these rocks were unusually efficient in fractionating the rare-earth elements-efficient in the sense that a highly selected assemblage is produced without eliminating the bulk of these elements. Analyses of inner and outer parts of two large crystals of monazite from different deposits show no difference in ??? in one crystal and a slightly smaller value of ??? in the outer part of the other crystal compared to the inner part. The ??? of monazites from pegmatites that intrude genetically related granitic rocks in North Carolina is found to be either higher or lower than the ??? of monazites in the intruded host rock. These results indicate that the fractionation of the

  14. METHOD OF SEPARATING TETRAVALENT PLUTONIUM VALUES FROM CERIUM SUB-GROUP RARE EARTH VALUES

    DOEpatents

    Duffield, R.B.; Stoughton, R.W.

    1959-02-01

    A method is presented for separating plutonium from the cerium sub-group of rare earths when both are present in an aqueous solution. The method consists in adding an excess of alkali metal carbonate to the solution, which causes the formation of a soluble plutonium carbonate precipitate and at the same time forms an insoluble cerium-group rare earth carbonate. The pH value must be adjusted to bctween 5.5 and 7.5, and prior to the precipitation step the plutonium must be reduced to the tetravalent state since only tetravalent plutonium will form the soluble carbonate complex.

  15. Behavior of cerium in boundary segregation and temper embrittlement of steels

    SciTech Connect

    Yuan, Z.; Li, J.; Feng, S.

    1986-01-01

    The co-segregation of manganese and phosphorus causes temper embrittlement. As the tempering is prolonged, the concentration of manganese in (Fe,Mn)/sub 3/C increases. It upsets the equilibrium of co-segregation and, in turn, reduces the degree of co-segregation of manganese and phosphorus, thus lessening the increase in FATT 50%. Cerium reduces the amounts of phosphorus and manganese segregated to the grain boundaries. As the grain-boundary concentration of cerium increases unceasingly, the resistance against co-segregation increases and the rate of embrittling decreases.

  16. Photocatalytic action of cerium molybdate and iron-titanium oxide hollow nanospheres on Escherichia coli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kartsonakis, I. A.; Kontogiani, P.; Pappas, G. S.; Kordas, G.

    2013-06-01

    This study is focused on the production of hollow nanospheres that reveal antibacterial action. Cerium molybdate and iron-titanium oxide hollow nanospheres with a diameter of 175 ± 15 and 221 ± 10 nm, respectively, were synthesized using emulsion polymerization and the sol-gel process. Their morphology characterization was accomplished using scanning electron microscopy. Their antibacterial action was examined on pure culture of Escherichia coli considering the loss of their viability. Both hollow nanospheres presented photocatalytic action after illumination with blue-black light, but those of cerium molybdate also demonstrated photocatalytic action in the dark. Therefore, the produced nanospheres can be used for antibacterial applications.

  17. Synthesis and characterization of two dimensional metal organic framework of cerium with tetraaza macrocyclic

    SciTech Connect

    Bt Safiin, Nurul Atikah; Yarmo, Ambar; Yamin, Bohari M.

    2013-11-27

    A two dimensional metal organic framework containing cerium sufate layers and ethylenediaminium between layers was obtained by refluxing the mixture of cerium sulphate and 5,5,7,12,12,14-hexamethyl-1,4,8,11-tetraazacyclotetradeca-7, 14-diene bromide. The complex was characterized by infrared spectroscopy and microelemental analysis. X-ray study showed that the complex adopts eleven coordination environments about the central atom. Thermogravimetric study showed the removal of water molecules at about 70°C followed by a gradual mass loss until the whole structure collapsed at about 400°C.

  18. Preparation of yttrium, lanthanum, cerium, and neodymium basic carbonate particles by homogeneous precipitation

    SciTech Connect

    Akinc, M.; Sordelet, D. )

    1987-07-01

    Uniform yttrium, lanthanum, cerium, and neodymium basic carbonate particles were prepared by homogeneous precipitation. Powders were characterized with respect to size, shape, crystal structure, and thermal decomposition behavior. Yttria precursor particles were spherical, monosized (0.4 {mu}m), and amorphous; whereas lanthana, neodymia, and ceria precursors were prismatic (ranging from 1 to 6 {mu}m in size) and crystalline. Crystal structure was found to be ancylite-type orthorhombic symmetry in all three cases. Upon heating in air, yttrium, lanthanum, and neodymium precursors underwent two-step decomposition to first form oxycarbonate and then oxide. Cerium hydroxycarbonate decomposed in a single step to form the oxide.

  19. a Photoemission Study of the Electronic Structure and Oxidation Properties of Mercury-Cadmium Telluride.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silberman, Joel Abraham

    The study of electronic structure and oxidation properties of the random substitutional alloy Mercury Cadmium Telluride is of general interest in relating the electronic structure and surface properties of a semiconductor alloy with a strongly aperiodic potential to these aspects of the binary compounds that represent the composition extremes. It is also of practical value, as study of the electronic structure and oxidation properties provides an underpinning of fundamental knowledge for further technological development. Angle-integrated and polarization dependent angle -resolved photoemission spectroscopy (along the normal) from the (110) cleavage face of the alloy and the binaries Cadmium Telluride and Mercury Telluride were performed to examine the composition dependence of the electronic structure and bonding. Emission from the valence states documents the breakdown of the virtual crystal approximation and the success of the coherent potential approximation in treating the alloy potential. The consequences of this finding for the bonding and materials properties are described. Detailed dispersion relations as a function of composition have been deduced from the angle-resolved data for a portion of the band structure along (110) and are compared to theory. To augment the discussion of the photoemission final states and the polarization dependence of the data, a nonlocal pseudopotential calculation extending to 30 eV above the valence band maximum was executed. In the oxidation studies, core level photoemission spectroscopy was used to characterize the clean surface and monitor the growth of native oxide films a few monolayers thick formed on the semi- conductor at room temperature by exposure to oxygen in the gas phase activated by contact with a hot filament. The cleaved (110) surface of p-type solid state recrystallized alloy samples was found to be stoichiometric, stable against Hg loss over time in vacuum at room temperature, but converted to n

  20. Synthesis of cadmium telluride quantum wires and the similarity of their band gaps to those of equidiameter cadmium telluride quantum dots

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Lin-Wang; Sun, Jianwei; Wang, Lin-Wang; Buhro, William E.

    2008-07-11

    High-quality colloidal CdTe quantum wires having purposefully controlled diameters in the range of 5-11 nm are grown by the solution-liquid-solid (SLS) method, using Bi-nanoparticle catalysts, cadmium octadecylphosphonate and trioctylphosphine telluride as precursors, and a TOPO solvent. The wires adopt the wurtzite structure, and grow along the [002] direction (parallel to the c axis). The size dependence of the band gaps in the wires are determined from the absorption spectra, and compared to the experimental results for high-quality CdTe quantum dots. In contrast to the predictions of an effective-mass approximation, particle-in-a-box model, and previous experimental results from CdSe and InP dot-wire comparisons, the band gaps of CdTe dots and wires of like diameter are found to be experimentally indistinguishable. The present results are analyzed using density functional theory under the local-density approximation by implementing a charge-patching method. The higher-level theoretical analysis finds the general existence of a threshold diameter, above which dot and wire band gaps converge. The origin and magnitude of this threshold diameter is discussed.

  1. Synthesis of cadmium telluride quantum wires and the similarity of their effective band gaps to those of equidiameter cadmium telluride quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jianwei; Wang, Lin-Wang; Buhro, William E

    2008-06-25

    High-quality colloidal CdTe quantum wires having purposefully controlled diameters in the range 5-11 nm are grown by the solution-liquid-solid (SLS) method, using Bi nanoparticle catalysts, cadmium octadecylphosphonate and trioctylphosphine telluride as precursors, and a TOPO solvent. The wires adopt the wurtzite structure and grow along the [002] direction (parallel to the c axis). The size dependence of the effective band gaps in the wires is determined from the absorption spectra and compared to the experimental results for high-quality CdTe quantum dots. In contrast to the predictions of an effective-mass approximation, particle-in-a-box model, and previous experimental results from CdSe and InP dot-wire comparisons, the effective band gaps of CdTe dots and wires of like diameter are found to be experimentally indistinguishable. The present results are analyzed using density functional theory under the local-density approximation by implementing a charge-patching method. The higher-level theoretical analysis finds the general existence of a threshold diameter, above which dot and wire effective band gaps converge. The origin and magnitude of this threshold diameter are discussed.

  2. Fate of cerium dioxide nanoparticles in endothelial cells: exocytosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strobel, Claudia; Oehring, Hartmut; Herrmann, Rudolf; Förster, Martin; Reller, Armin; Hilger, Ingrid

    2015-05-01

    Although cytotoxicity and endocytosis of nanoparticles have been the subject of numerous studies, investigations regarding exocytosis as an important mechanism to reduce intracellular nanoparticle accumulation are rather rare and there is a distinct lack of knowledge. The current study investigated the behavior of human microvascular endothelial cells to exocytose cerium dioxide (CeO2) nanoparticles (18.8 nm) by utilization of specific inhibitors [brefeldin A; nocodazole; methyl-β-cyclodextrin (MβcD)] and different analytical methods (flow cytometry, transmission electron microscopy, inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry). Overall, it was found that endothelial cells were able to release CeO2 nanoparticles via exocytosis after the migration of nanoparticle containing endosomes toward the plasma membrane. The exocytosis process occurred mainly by fusion of vesicular membranes with plasma membrane resulting in the discharge of vesicular content to extracellular environment. Nevertheless, it seems to be likely that nanoparticles present in the cytosol could leave the cells in a direct manner. MβcD treatment led to the strongest inhibition of the nanoparticle exocytosis indicating a significant role of the plasma membrane cholesterol content in the exocytosis process. Brefeldin A (inhibitor of Golgi-to-cell-surface-transport) caused a higher inhibitory effect on exocytosis than nocodazole (inhibitor of microtubules). Thus, the transfer from distal Golgi compartments to the cell surface influenced the exocytosis process of the CeO2 nanoparticles more than the microtubule-associated transport. In conclusion, endothelial cells, which came in contact with nanoparticles, e.g., after intravenously applied nano-based drugs, can regulate their intracellular nanoparticle amount, which is necessary to avoid adverse nanoparticle effects on cells.

  3. Cerium-based conversion coatings on magnesium alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castano Londono, Carlos Eduardo

    This research is primarily focused on gaining a better understanding of the deposition and corrosion behavior of cerium-based conversion coatings (CeCCs) on AZ31B and AZ91D Mg alloys. Deposition of homogenous and protective CeCCs was highly dependent on the surface preparation steps. The best results were obtained when Mg samples underwent grinding, acid cleaning, and alkaline cleaning processes. This reduced the number of active cathodic sites and promoted the formation of a protective Al-rich Mg oxide/hydroxide layer. Electrochemical properties of the CeCCs were also strongly correlated with morphological, microstructural, and chemical characteristics. Protective CeCCs were deposited on both AZ31 and AZ91 Mg alloys using a range of deposition times (5 to 180 s) and temperatures (10 to 80 °C). However, shorter deposition times (5 s) and lower deposition temperatures (~10 °C) showed higher impedance and longer bath stability than other deposition conditions. The increase in impedance was related with fewer cracks and smaller nodule sizes. Additional investigations of post-treated CeCCs exposed to NaCl environments showed an increased in the total impedance. The increase in corrosion protection of the CeCCs was associated with an overall increase in coating thickness from 400 to 800 nm. A microstructural evolution from ~3 nm nodular nanocrystals of CeO2/CePO4*H2O embedded in an amorphous matrix to >50 nm CePO4*H2O nanocrystals was responsible for the electrochemically active corrosion protection. Exposure of CeCCs to sunlight in humid environments promoted the reduction of Ce(IV) into Ce(III) species compared to unexposed coatings. This reduction process was related with photocatalytic water oxidation reaction.

  4. Effects of Cerium Oxide Nanoparticles on Sorghum Plant Traits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mu, L.; Chen, Y.; Darnault, C. J. G.; Rauh, B.; Kresovich, S.; Korte, C.

    2015-12-01

    Nanotechnology and nanomaterials are considered as the development of the modern science. However, besides with that wide application, nanoparticles arouse to the side effects on the environment and human health. As the catalyst of ceramics and fuel industry, Cerium (IV) oxide nanoparticles (CeO2 NPs) can be found in the environment following their use and life-cycle. Therefore, it is critical to assess the potential effects that CeO2 NPs found in soils may have on plants. In this study, CeO2 NPs were analyzed for the potential influence on the sorghum [Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench] (Reg. no. 126) (PI 154844) growth and traits. The objectives of this research were to determine whether CeO2 NPs impact the sorghum germination and growth characteristics. The sorghum was grown in the greenhouse located at Biosystems Research Complex, Clemson University under different CeO2 NPs treatments (0mg; 100mg; 500mg; 1000mg CeO2 NPs/Kg soil) and harvested around each month. At the end of the each growing period, above ground vegetative tissue was air-dried, ground to 2mm particle size and compositional traits estimated using near-infrared spectroscopy. Also, the NPK value of the sorghum tissue was tested by Clemson Agriculture Center. After the first harvest, the result showed that the height of above ground biomass under the nanoparticles stress was higher than that of control group. This difference between the control and the nanoparticles treatments was significant (F>F0.05; LSD). Our results also indicated that some of the compositional traits were impacted by the different treatments, including the presence and/or concentrations of the nanoparticles.

  5. Variations in Reactivity on Different Crystallographic Orientations of Cerium Oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Mullins, David R; Albrecht, Peter M; Calaza, Florencia C

    2013-01-01

    Cerium oxide is a principal component in many heterogeneous catalytic processes. One of its key characteristics is the ability to provide or remove oxygen in chemical reactions. The different crystallographic faces of ceria present significantly different surface structures and compositions that may alter the catalytic reactivity. The structure and composition determine the number of coordination vacancies surrounding surface atoms, the availability of adsorption sites, the spacing between adsorption sites and the ability to remove O from the surface. To investigate the role of surface orientation on reactivity, CeO2 films were grown with two different orientations. CeO2(100) films were grown ex situ by pulsed laser deposition on Nb-doped SrTiO3(100). CeO2(111) films were grown in situ by thermal deposition of Ce metal onto Ru(0001) in an oxygen atmosphere. The chemical reactivity was characterized by the adsorption and decomposition of various molecules such as alcohols, aldehydes and organic acids. In general the CeO2(100) surface was found to be more active, i.e. molecules adsorbed more readily and reacted to form new products, especially on a fully oxidized substrate. However the CeO2(100) surface was less selective with a greater propensity to produce CO, CO2 and water as products. The differences in chemical reactivity are discussed in light of possible structural terminations of the two surfaces. Recently nanocubes and nano-octahedra have been synthesized that display CeO2(100) and CeO2(111) faces, respectively. These nanoparticles enable us to correlate reactions on high surface area model catalysts at atmospheric pressure with model single crystal films in a UHV environment.

  6. Cerium oxide nanoparticle treatment ameliorates peritonitis-induced diaphragm dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Asano, Shinichi; Arvapalli, Ravikumar; Manne, Nandini D P K; Maheshwari, Mani; Ma, Bing; Rice, Kevin M; Selvaraj, Vellaisamy; Blough, Eric R

    2015-01-01

    The severe inflammation observed during sepsis is thought to cause diaphragm dysfunction, which is associated with poor patient prognosis. Cerium oxide (CeO2) nanoparticles have been posited to exhibit anti-inflammatory and antioxidative activities suggesting that these particles may be of potential use for the treatment of inflammatory disorders. To investigate this possibility, Sprague Dawley rats were randomly assigned to the following groups: sham control, CeO2 nanoparticle treatment only (0.5 mg/kg iv), sepsis, and sepsis+CeO2 nanoparticles. Sepsis was induced by the introduction of cecal material (600 mg/kg) directly into the peritoneal cavity. Nanoparticle treatment decreased sepsis-associated impairments in diaphragmatic contractile (P(o)) function (sham: 25.6±1.6 N/cm(2) vs CeO2: 23.4±0.8 N/cm(2) vs Sep: 15.9±1.0 N/cm(2) vs Sep+CeO2: 20.0±1.0 N/cm(2), P<0.05). These improvements in diaphragm contractile function were accompanied by a normalization of protein translation signaling (Akt, FOXO-1, and 4EBP1), diminished proteolysis (caspase 8 and ubiquitin levels), and decreased inflammatory signaling (Stat3 and iNOS). Histological analysis suggested that nanoparticle treatment was associated with diminished sarcolemma damage and diminished inflammatory cell infiltration. These data indicate CeO2 nanoparticles may improve diaphragmatic function in the septic laboratory rat.

  7. Charge Sharing and Charge Loss in a Cadmium-Zinc-Telluride Fine-Pixel Detector Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaskin, J. A.; Sharma, D. P.; Ramsey, B. D.; Six, N. Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Because of its high atomic number, room temperature operation, low noise, and high spatial resolution a Cadmium-Zinc-Telluride (CZT) multi-pixel detector is ideal for hard x-ray astrophysical observation. As part of on-going research at MSFC (Marshall Space Flight Center) to develop multi-pixel CdZnTe detectors for this purpose, we have measured charge sharing and charge loss for a 4x4 (750micron pitch), lmm thick pixel array and modeled these results using a Monte-Carlo simulation. This model was then used to predict the amount of charge sharing for a much finer pixel array (with a 300micron pitch). Future work will enable us to compare the simulated results for the finer array to measured values.

  8. Towards Optimization of ACRT Schedules Applied to the Gradient Freeze Growth of Cadmium Zinc Telluride

    DOE PAGES

    Divecha, Mia S.; Derby, Jeffrey J.

    2017-10-03

    Historically, the melt growth of II-VI crystals has benefitted by the application of the accelerated crucible rotation technique (ACRT). Here, we employ a comprehensive numerical model to assess the impact of two ACRT schedules designed for a cadmium zinc telluride growth system per the classical recommendations of Capper and co-workers. The “flow maximizing” ACRT schedule, with higher rotation, effectively mixes the solutal field in the melt but does not reduce supercooling adjacent to the growth interface. The ACRT schedule derived for stable Ekman flow, with lower rotation, proves more effective in reducing supercooling and promoting stable growth. Furthermore, these counterintuitivemore » results highlight the need for more comprehensive studies on the optimization of ACRT schedules for specific growth systems and for desired growth outcomes.« less

  9. Solvothermal synthesis and thermoelectric properties of indium telluride nanostring-cluster hierarchical structures.

    PubMed

    Tai, Guo'an; Miao, Chunyang; Wang, Yubo; Bai, Yunrui; Zhang, Haiqian; Guo, Wanlin

    2011-04-13

    A simple solvothermal approach has been developed to successfully synthesize n-type α-In2Te3 thermoelectric nanomaterials. The nanostring-cluster hierarchical structures were prepared using In(NO3)3 and Na2TeO3 as the reactants in a mixed solvent of ethylenediamine and ethylene glycol at 200°C for 24 h. A diffusion-limited reaction mechanism was proposed to explain the formation of the hierarchical structures. The Seebeck coefficient of the bulk pellet pressed by the obtained samples exhibits 43% enhancement over that of the corresponding thin film at room temperature. The electrical conductivity of the bulk pellet is one to four orders of magnitude higher than that of the corresponding thin film or p-type bulk sample. The synthetic route can be applied to obtain other low-dimensional semiconducting telluride nanostructures.PACS: 65.80.-g, 68.35.bg, 68.35.bt.

  10. Flexible cadmium telluride thin films grown on electron-beam-irradiated graphene/thin glass substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Seo, Won-Oh; Kim, Jihyun; Koo, Yong Hwan; Kim, Byungnam; Lee, Byung Cheol; Kim, Donghwan

    2014-08-25

    We demonstrate the close-spaced sublimation growth of polycrystalline cadmium telluride (CdTe) thin films on a flexible graphene electrode/thin glass substrate structure. Prior to the growth of CdTe films, chemical-vapor-deposited graphene was transferred onto a flexible glass substrate and subjected to electron-beam irradiation at an energy of 0.2 MeV in order to intentionally introduce the defects into it in a controlled manner. Micro-Raman spectroscopy and sheet resistance measurements were employed to monitor the damage and disorder in the electron-beam irradiated graphene layers. The morphology and optical properties of the CdTe thin films deposited on a graphene/flexible glass substrate were systematically characterized. The integration of the defective graphene layers with a flexible glass substrate can be a useful platform to grow various thin-film structures for flexible electronic and optoelectronic devices.

  11. A passively mode locked thulium doped fiber laser using bismuth telluride deposited multimode interference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, M.; Lee, J.; Song, W.; Lee, Y. L.; Lee, J. H.; Shin, W.

    2016-05-01

    We proposed a multimode interference (MMI) fiber based saturable absorber using bismuth telluride at  ∼2 μm region. Our MMI based saturable absorber was fabricated by fusion splicing with single mode fiber and null core fiber. The MMI functioned as both wavelength fixed filter and saturable absorber. The 3 dB bandwidth and insertion loss of MMI were 42 nm and 3.4 dB at wavelength of 1958 nm, respectively. We have also reported a passively mode locked thulium doped fiber laser operating at a wavelength of 1958 nm using a multimode interference. A temporal bandwidth of  ∼46 ps was experimentally obtained at a repetition rate of 8.58 MHz.

  12. An additive approach to low temperature zero pressure sintering of bismuth antimony telluride thermoelectric materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catlin, Glenn C.; Tripathi, Rajesh; Nunes, Geoffrey; Lynch, Philip B.; Jones, Howard D.; Schmitt, Devin C.

    2017-03-01

    This paper presents an additive-based approach to the formulation of thermoelectric materials suitable for screen printing. Such printing processes are a likely route to such thermoelectric applications as micro-generators for wireless sensor networks and medical devices, but require the development of materials that can be sintered at ambient pressure and low temperatures. Using a rapid screening process, we identify the eutectic combination of antimony and tellurium as an additive for bismuth-antimony-telluride that enables good thermoelectric performance without a high pressure step. An optimized composite of 15 weight percent Sb7.5Te92.5 in Bi0.5Sb1.5Te3 is scaled up and formulated into a screen-printable paste. Samples fabricated from this paste achieve a thermoelectric figure of merit (ZT) of 0.74 using a maximum processing temperature of 748 K and a total thermal processing budget of 12 K-hours.

  13. Preparation and Characterization of Niobium Doped Lead-Telluride Glass Ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Sathish, M.; Eraiah, B.; Anavekar, R. V.

    2011-07-15

    Niobium-lead-telluride glass ceramics of composition xNb{sub 2}O{sub 5}-(20-x) pbO-80TeO{sub 2}(where x = 0.1 mol% to 0.5 mol%) were prepared by using conventional melt quenching method. The prepared glass samples were initially amorphous in nature after annealed at 400 deg. c all samples were crystallized. This was confined by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. The particle size of these glass ceramics have been calculated by using Debye-Scherer formula and the particle size is in the order of 15 nm to 60 nm. The scanning electron microscopy (SEM) photograph shows the presence of needle-like crystals in these samples.

  14. Time resolved photo-luminescent decay characterization of mercury cadmium telluride focal plane arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Soehnel, Grant

    2015-01-20

    The minority carrier lifetime is a measurable material property that is an indication of infrared detector device performance. To study the utility of measuring the carrier lifetime, an experiment has been constructed that can time resolve the photo-luminescent decay of a detector or wafer sample housed inside a liquid nitrogen cooled Dewar. Motorized stages allow the measurement to be scanned over the sample surface, and spatial resolutions as low as 50µm have been demonstrated. A carrier recombination simulation was developed to analyze the experimental data. Results from measurements performed on 4 mercury cadmium telluride focal plane arrays show strong correlation between spatial maps of the lifetime, dark current, and relative response.

  15. Characterization of a 2-mm thick, 16x16 Cadmium-Zinc-Telluride Pixel Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaskin, Jessica; Richardson, Georgia; Mitchell, Shannon; Ramsey, Brian; Seller, Paul; Sharma, Dharma

    2003-01-01

    The detector under study is a 2-mm-thick, 16x16 Cadmium-Zinc-Telluride pixel array with a pixel pitch of 300 microns and inter-pixel gap of 50 microns. This detector is a precursor to that which will be used at the focal plane of the High Energy Replicated Optics (HERO) telescope currently being developed at Marshall Space Flight Center. With a telescope focal length of 6 meters, the detector needs to have a spatial resolution of around 200 microns in order to take full advantage of the HERO angular resolution. We discuss to what degree charge sharing will degrade energy resolution but will improve our spatial resolution through position interpolation. In addition, we discuss electric field modeling for this specific detector geometry and the role this mapping will play in terms of charge sharing and charge loss in the detector.

  16. Time resolved photo-luminescent decay characterization of mercury cadmium telluride focal plane arrays

    DOE PAGES

    Soehnel, Grant

    2015-01-20

    The minority carrier lifetime is a measurable material property that is an indication of infrared detector device performance. To study the utility of measuring the carrier lifetime, an experiment has been constructed that can time resolve the photo-luminescent decay of a detector or wafer sample housed inside a liquid nitrogen cooled Dewar. Motorized stages allow the measurement to be scanned over the sample surface, and spatial resolutions as low as 50µm have been demonstrated. A carrier recombination simulation was developed to analyze the experimental data. Results from measurements performed on 4 mercury cadmium telluride focal plane arrays show strong correlationmore » between spatial maps of the lifetime, dark current, and relative response.« less

  17. Deposition of heteroepitaxial layer of cadmium selenide and telluride on indium arsenide

    SciTech Connect

    Buttaev, M.S.; Gasanov, N.G.; Gasanova, R.N.; Magomedov, K.A.

    1986-04-01

    The authors have investigated how the technological deposition regimes influence the surface morphology, growth rate, and structural perfection of heteroepitaxial layers of cadmium selenide and telluride grown on the polar faces of indium arsenide. Investigation of the process of obtaining layers of CdSe on InAs revealed that the orientation of the polar faces of the substrate influences both the morphology of the surface layer and the rate of growth. Photomicrographs are shown of the surfaces of layers with different growth figures. A phenomenum is explained that does not enable one to grow CdTe layers on InAs at high temperatures; this complicates the choice of particular parameters for the deposition process and rules out the use of indium arsenide as a substrate.

  18. Multifold Electrical Conductance Enhancements at Metal-Bismuth Telluride Interfaces Modified Using an Organosilane Monolayer.

    PubMed

    Cardinal, Thomas; Kwan, Matthew; Borca-Tasciuc, Theodorian; Ramanath, Ganpati

    2017-01-25

    Controlling electrical transport across metal-thermoelectric interfaces is key to realizing high efficiency devices for solid state refrigeration and waste-heat harvesting. We obtain up to 17-fold increases in electrical contact conductivity Σc by inserting a mercaptan-terminated organosilane monolayer at Cu-Bi2Te3 and Ni-Bi2Te3 interfaces, yielding similar Σc for both metals by offsetting an otherwise 7-fold difference. The Σc improvements are underpinned by silane-moiety-induced inhibition of Cu diffusion, promotion of high-conductivity interfacial nickel telluride formation, and mercaptan-induced reduction of Bi2Te3 surface oxides. Our findings should enable incorporating nanomolecular layers with appropriately chosen terminal moieties in thermoelectric device metallization schemes without metal diffusion barriers.

  19. Internal Electric Field Behavior of Cadmium Zinc Telluride Radiation Detectors Under High Carrier Injection

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, G.; Bolotnikov, A.E.; Camarda, G.S.; Cui, Y.; Hossain, A.; Kim, K.H.; Gul, R.; and James, R.B.

    2010-10-26

    The behavior of the internal electric-field of nuclear-radiation detectors substantially affects the detector's performance. We investigated the distribution of the internal field in cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) detectors under high carrier injection. We noted the build-up of a space charge region near the cathode that produces a built-in field opposing the applied field. Its presence entails the collapse of the electric field in the rest of detector, other than the portion near the cathode. Such a space-charge region originates from serious hole-trapping in CZT. The device's operating temperature greatly affects the width of the space-charge region. With increasing temperature from 5 C to 35 C, its width expanded from about 1/6 to 1/2 of the total depth of the detector.

  20. Characterization of a 2-mm thick, 16x16 Cadmium-Zinc-Telluride Pixel Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaskin, Jessica; Richardson, Georgia; Mitchell, Shannon; Ramsey, Brian; Seller, Paul; Sharma, Dharma

    2003-01-01

    The detector under study is a 2-mm-thick, 16x16 Cadmium-Zinc-Telluride pixel array with a pixel pitch of 300 microns and inter-pixel gap of 50 microns. This detector is a precursor to that which will be used at the focal plane of the High Energy Replicated Optics (HERO) telescope currently being developed at Marshall Space Flight Center. With a telescope focal length of 6 meters, the detector needs to have a spatial resolution of around 200 microns in order to take full advantage of the HERO angular resolution. We discuss to what degree charge sharing will degrade energy resolution but will improve our spatial resolution through position interpolation. In addition, we discuss electric field modeling for this specific detector geometry and the role this mapping will play in terms of charge sharing and charge loss in the detector.

  1. Nanoscale arrays of antimony telluride single crystals by selective chemical vapor deposition

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Ruomeng; Benjamin, Sophie L.; Gurnani, Chitra; Wang, Yudong; Hector, Andrew L.; Levason, William; Reid, Gillian; De Groot, C. H. (Kees)

    2016-01-01

    Arrays of individual single nanocrystals of Sb2Te3 have been formed using selective chemical vapor deposition (CVD) from a single source precursor. Crystals are self-assembled reproducibly in confined spaces of 100 nm diameter with pitch down to 500 nm. The distribution of crystallite sizes across the arrays is very narrow (standard deviation of 15%) and is affected by both the hole diameter and the array pitch. The preferred growth of the crystals in the <1 1 0> orientation along the diagonal of the square holes strongly indicates that the diffusion of adatoms results in a near thermodynamic equilibrium growth mechanism of the nuclei. A clear relationship between electrical resistivity and selectivity is established across a range of metal selenides and tellurides, showing that conductive materials result in more selective growth and suggesting that electron donation is of critical importance for selective deposition. PMID:27283116

  2. Phase transition and thermodynamic properties of beryllium telluride under high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Zhi-Cheng; Luo, Fen; Zhang, Xiu-Lu; Liu, Cheng-An; Cai, Ling-Cang

    2015-04-01

    A theoretical investigation on structural, dynamical, phase diagram and thermodynamic properties of beryllium telluride (BeTe) under high pressure and temperature is presented in the framework of density functional theory. The calculated structural parameters of BeTe in both zinc blende (ZB) and nickel arsenide (NiAs) structures are in reasonable agreement with available experimental data and previous theoretical work. The phonon dispersion relations, dielectric tensor and Born effective charge are investigated within the density functional perturbation theory (DFPT). The investigation of the phase diagram indicated that the NiAs structure BeTe becomes stable at high pressure and temperature. Based on the quasiharmonic Debye model, the pressure and temperature dependences of bulk modulus, Grüneisen parameter, Debye temperature, specific heat and thermal expansion coefficient are all successfully obtained. We hope that the theoretical results reported here can give more insight into the structural and thermodynamic properties of other semiconductors at high temperature and pressure.

  3. Correlation Between Bulk Material Defects and Spectroscopic Response in Cadmium Zinc Telluride Detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, Bradford H.; Stahle, C. M.; Barthelmy, S. D.; Parsons, A. M.; Tueller, J.; VanSant, J. T.; Munoz, B. F.; Snodgrass, S. J.; Mullinix, R. E.

    1999-01-01

    One of the critical challenges for large area cadmium zinc telluride (CdZnTe) detector arrays is obtaining material capable of uniform imaging and spectroscopic response. Two complementary nondestructive techniques for characterizing bulk CdZnTe have been developed to identify material with a uniform response. The first technique, infrared transmission imaging, allows for rapid visualization of bulk defects. The second technique, x-ray spectral mapping, provides a map of the material spectroscopic response when it is configured as a planar detector. The two techniques have been used to develop a correlation between bulk defect type and detector performance. The correlation allows for the use of infrared imaging to rapidly develop wafer mining maps. The mining of material free of detrimental defects has the potential to dramatically increase the yield and quality of large area CdZnTe detector arrays.

  4. Cd-rich and Te-rich low-temperature photoluminescence in cadmium telluride

    SciTech Connect

    Albin, D. S. Kuciauskas, D.; Ma, J.; Metzger, W. K.; Burst, J. M.; Moutinho, H. R.; Dippo, P. C.

    2014-03-03

    Low-temperature photoluminescence emission spectra were measured in cadmium telluride (CdTe) samples in which composition was varied to promote either Cd or Te-rich stoichiometry. The ability to monitor stoichiometry is important, since it has been shown to impact carrier recombination. Te-rich samples show transitions corresponding to acceptor-bound excitons (∼1.58 eV) and free-electron to acceptor transitions (∼1.547 eV). In addition to acceptor-bound excitons, Cd-rich samples show transitions assigned to donor-bound excitons (1.591 eV) and Te vacancies at 1.552 eV. Photoluminescence is a noninvasive way to monitor stoichiometric shifts induced by post-deposition anneals in polycrystalline CdTe thin films deposited by close-spaced sublimation.

  5. Imaging characteristics of zinc sulfide shell, cadmium telluride core quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Daneshvar, Hamid; Nelms, Jennifer; Muhammad, Osman; Jackson, Heather; Tkach, Jean; Davros, William; Peterson, Todd; Vogelbaum, Michael A; Bruchez, Marcel P; Toms, Steven A

    2008-02-01

    Quantum dots are optical nanocrystals whose in vitro and in vivo use in molecular imaging is expanding rapidly. In comparison with organic fluorophores, quantum dots exhibit desirable properties, such as multiwavelength fluorescence emission, excellent brightness and resistance to photobleaching. Their electron-dense, metallic cores suggest utility in other clinical imaging modalities. Core-shell zinc sulfide-cadmium telluride quantum dots were studied by magnetic resonance and computed tomography phantoms. Quantum dots were also injected into rat brain, as well as intravenously, using convection-enhanced delivery, prior to animal imaging. Computed tomography studies suggest that current formulations of quantum dots might be imaged in vivo in animals. Used in conjunction with optical imaging techniques, quantum dots have the potential to function as multimodal imaging platforms in vivo. The ability to detect an optical nanoparticle preoperatively with clinical imaging modality offers a distinct advantage to clinicians engaged in image-guided surgical applications.

  6. Solvothermal synthesis and thermoelectric properties of indium telluride nanostring-cluster hierarchical structures

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    A simple solvothermal approach has been developed to successfully synthesize n-type α-In2Te3 thermoelectric nanomaterials. The nanostring-cluster hierarchical structures were prepared using In(NO3)3 and Na2TeO3 as the reactants in a mixed solvent of ethylenediamine and ethylene glycol at 200°C for 24 h. A diffusion-limited reaction mechanism was proposed to explain the formation of the hierarchical structures. The Seebeck coefficient of the bulk pellet pressed by the obtained samples exhibits 43% enhancement over that of the corresponding thin film at room temperature. The electrical conductivity of the bulk pellet is one to four orders of magnitude higher than that of the corresponding thin film or p-type bulk sample. The synthetic route can be applied to obtain other low-dimensional semiconducting telluride nanostructures. PACS: 65.80.-g, 68.35.bg, 68.35.bt PMID:21711853

  7. Evaluation of DAST and zinc telluride nonlinear crystals for efficient terahertz generation

    SciTech Connect

    Venkatesh, M.; Chaudhary, A. K.; Rao, K. S.

    2015-07-31

    Terahertz (THz) signal is generated from 4-N, N-dimethylamino-4’-N’-methyl-stilbazolium tosylate (i.e. DAST Crystal) and Zinc telluride (ZnTe) nonlinear crystals by employing 140 fs laser pulses at 800 nm with 80 MHz repetition rate. The semi insulating gallium arsenide photoconductive stripline antennas (gap =5 µm, length = 20 µm) is used as a Terahertz detector. The detected temporal profile of Terahertz radiation generated from DAST crystal is high as compared to ZnTe crystal in terms of amplitude. THz effective bandwidths of these crystals are extended up to 1.1 THz range. The potential of THz generation of DAST and ZnTe crystals are evaluated with respect to incident laser power.

  8. New Insights into High-Performance Thermoelectric Tellurides from ^125Te NMR Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levin, E. M.; Hu, Y.-Y.; Cook, B. A.; Harringa, J. L.; Schmidt-Rohr, K.; Kanatzidis, M. G.

    2009-11-01

    Thermoelectric materials are widely used for direct transformation of heat to electricity (Seebeck effect) and for solid state refrigeration (Peltier effect). Efforts to increase the efficiency of high-performance thermoelectrics, which include narrow-gap, doped tellurium-based semiconductors, require detailed knowledge of their local structure and bonding. We have used ^125Te nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) as a local probe for obtaining better understanding of these high-performance thermoelectric tellurides, specifically PbTe doped with Ag and Sb (LAST materials) and GeTe doped with Ag and Sb (TAGS materials). The resonance frequencies and line shapes of the NMR spectra, as well as spin-lattice relaxation times and chemical shift anisotropies are highly sensitive to the composition and synthesis conditions of LAST and TAGS materials, enabling studies of the local composition, distortion, bonding, and carrier concentration. Several intriguing phenomena including electronic inhomogeneity and local distortions of the crystal lattice have been observed by NMR.

  9. An optically-interrogated microwave-Poynting-vector sensor using cadmium manganese telluride.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chia-Chu; Whitaker, John F

    2010-06-07

    A single <110> cadmium-manganese-telluride crystal that exhibits both the Pockels and Faraday effects is used to produce a Poynting-vector sensor for signals in the microwave regime. This multi-birefringent crystal can independently measure either electric or magnetic fields through control of the polarization of the optical probe beam. After obtaining all the relevant electric and magnetic field components, a map of the Poynting vector along a 50-Omega microstrip was experimentally determined without the need for any further transformational calculations. The results demonstrate that this sensor can be used for near-field mapping of the Poynting vector. Utilizing both amplitude and phase information from the fields in the microwave signal, it was confirmed for the case of an open-terminated microstrip that no energy flowed to the load, while for a microstrip with a matched termination, the energy flowed consistently along the transmission line.

  10. Transport properties of lithium- lead-vanadium-telluride glass and glass ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Sathish, M.; Eraiah, B.

    2014-04-24

    Glasses with the chemical composition 35Li{sub 2}O-(45-x)V{sub 2}O{sub 5−}20PbO-xTeO{sub 2} (where x = 2.5, 5, 7.5, 10, 15 mol %) have prepared by conventional melt quenching method. The electrical conductivity of Li{sup +} ion conducting lead vanadium telluride glass samples has been carried out both as a function of temperature and frequency in the temperature range 503K-563K and over frequencies 40 Hz to 10 MHz. The electronic conduction has been observed in the present systems. When these samples annealed around 400°C for 2hour become the glass ceramic, which also shows increase tendency of conductivity. SEM confines glass and glass ceramic nature of the prepared samples.

  11. Solvothermal synthesis and thermoelectric properties of indium telluride nanostring-cluster hierarchical structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tai, Guo'an; Miao, Chunyang; Wang, Yubo; Bai, Yunrui; Zhang, Haiqian; Guo, Wanlin

    2011-12-01

    A simple solvothermal approach has been developed to successfully synthesize n-type α-In2Te3 thermoelectric nanomaterials. The nanostring-cluster hierarchical structures were prepared using In(NO3)3 and Na2TeO3 as the reactants in a mixed solvent of ethylenediamine and ethylene glycol at 200°C for 24 h. A diffusion-limited reaction mechanism was proposed to explain the formation of the hierarchical structures. The Seebeck coefficient of the bulk pellet pressed by the obtained samples exhibits 43% enhancement over that of the corresponding thin film at room temperature. The electrical conductivity of the bulk pellet is one to four orders of magnitude higher than that of the corresponding thin film or p-type bulk sample. The synthetic route can be applied to obtain other low-dimensional semiconducting telluride nanostructures. PACS: 65.80.-g, 68.35.bg, 68.35.bt

  12. Infrared spectrum of divinyl telluride and theoretical analysis of divinyl group VI compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sohlberg, Karl; Baker, Brian L.; Leary, Scott P.; Owen, Noel L.; Facelli, Julio C.; Trofimov, Boris A.

    1995-07-01

    The infrared spectrum of divinyl telluride (DVT) has been studied for the gaseous, liquid and solid phases as well as in inert matrices at low temperatures. HF-SCF calculations (using triple-zeta quality basis sets) have been carried out on DVT and on the oxygen, sulfur and selenium analogs. In each instance the calculations predict two relatively stable conformations, with the cis/trans form being the more stable for divinyl ether and a near-planar trans/trans form being the more stable for the other three compounds. The infrared spectrum of DVT is consistent with the presence of two rotameric forms of the molecule, and assignments of many of the absorptions are made to normal modes.

  13. Nanoscale arrays of antimony telluride single crystals by selective chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Ruomeng; Benjamin, Sophie L.; Gurnani, Chitra; Wang, Yudong; Hector, Andrew L.; Levason, William; Reid, Gillian; de Groot, C. H. (Kees)

    2016-06-01

    Arrays of individual single nanocrystals of Sb2Te3 have been formed using selective chemical vapor deposition (CVD) from a single source precursor. Crystals are self-assembled reproducibly in confined spaces of 100 nm diameter with pitch down to 500 nm. The distribution of crystallite sizes across the arrays is very narrow (standard deviation of 15%) and is affected by both the hole diameter and the array pitch. The preferred growth of the crystals in the <1 1 0> orientation along the diagonal of the square holes strongly indicates that the diffusion of adatoms results in a near thermodynamic equilibrium growth mechanism of the nuclei. A clear relationship between electrical resistivity and selectivity is established across a range of metal selenides and tellurides, showing that conductive materials result in more selective growth and suggesting that electron donation is of critical importance for selective deposition.

  14. Role of Van der Waals interactions in determining the structure of liquid tellurides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Micoulaut, Matthieu; Flores-Ruiz, Hugo; Coulet, Vanessa; Piarristeguy, Andrea; Johnson, Mark; Cuello, Gabriel; Pradel, Annie

    The simulation of tellurides using standard density functional (DFT) theory based molecular dynamics usually leads to an overestimation of the bond distances and a noticeable mismatch between theory and experiments when e.g. structure functions are being directly compared. Here, the structural properties of several compositions of Ge-Te and Ge-Sb-Te liquids are studied from a combination of neutron diffraction and DFT-based molecular dynamics. Importantly, we find an excellent agreement in the reproduction of the structure in real and reciprocal spaces, resulting from the incorporation of dispersion forces in the simulation. We then investigate structural properties including structure factors, pair distribution functions, angular distributions, coordination numbers, neighbor distributions, and compare our results with experimental findings. References:Physical Review B 92, 134205 (2015)Physical Review B 89, 174205 (2014)Physical Review B 90, 094207 (2014) Support from Agence Nationale de la Recherche (ANR) (Grant No. ANR-11-BS08-0012) is gratefully acknowledged.

  15. Suppression of Grain Growth by Additive in Nanostructured P-type Bismuth Antimony Tellurides

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Qian; Zhang, Qinyong; Chen, S.; Liu, W S; Lukas, K; Yan, X; Wang, H; Wang, D.; Opeil, C; Chen, Gang; Ren, Z. F.

    2011-01-01

    Grain growth is a major issue in the preparation of nanostructured bismuth-antimony-tellurides during hot pressing the nanopowders into dense bulk samples. To prevent grain agglomeration during ball milling and growth during hot pressing, organic agent (Oleic Acid, OA) as additive was added into the materials at the beginning of the ball milling process. With different concentrations of OA (0.5, 1.0, 1.5, 2.0, and 2.5 wt%), grains with different sizes are obtained. Structural analysis clearly shows that it is the particle size of the nanopowders that determines the final grain size in the densely compacted bulk samples. A combination of small grains ~200–500 nm and nanopores leads to effective phonon scattering, which results in the decrease of lattice thermal conductivity, and ZT of ~1.3 at 373 K for the sample with 2.0 wt% OA.

  16. One-step chemical synthesis of samarium telluride thin films and their supercapacitive properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumbhar, V. S.; Lokhande, A. C.; Gaikwad, N. S.; Lokhande, C. D.

    2016-02-01

    The letter reports synthesis of samarium telluride (Sm2Te3) thin films through a one-step chemical route. The formation of Sm2Te3 is confirmed by X-ray diffraction and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy studies. The surface morphological study is carried out using field emission scanning electron microscopy and contact angle measurement techniques. The film shows barley-like microstructure with an average length of barley of about 5 μm and diameter of about 300 nm. The Sm2Te3 film surface exhibits lyophilic nature with contact angle of 21.3° for propylene carbonate electrolyte. Cyclic voltammetry results revealed specific capacitance of 207 F g-1 with power density of 14.18 kW kg-1 in LiClO4-propylene carbonate electrolyte.

  17. Experiments and Monte Carlo modeling of a higher resolution Cadmium Zinc Telluride detector for safeguards applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borella, Alessandro

    2016-09-01

    The Belgian Nuclear Research Centre is engaged in R&D activity in the field of Non Destructive Analysis on nuclear materials, with focus on spent fuel characterization. A 500 mm3 Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT) with enhanced resolution was recently purchased. With a full width at half maximum of 1.3% at 662 keV, the detector is very promising in view of its use for applications such as determination of uranium enrichment and plutonium isotopic composition, as well as measurement on spent fuel. In this paper, I report about the work done with such a detector in terms of its characterization. The detector energy calibration, peak shape and efficiency were determined from experimental data. The data included measurements with calibrated sources, both in a bare and in a shielded environment. In addition, Monte Carlo calculations with the MCNPX code were carried out and benchmarked with experiments.

  18. Degradation of nitrobenzene using titania photocatalyst co-doped with nitrogen and cerium under visible light illumination.

    PubMed

    Shen, Xiang-Zhong; Liu, Zhi-Cheng; Xie, Shan-Mei; Guo, Jun

    2009-03-15

    A type of nitrogen and cerium co-doped titania photocatalyst, which could degrade nitrobenzene under visible light irradiation, was prepared by the sol-gel route. Titanium isopropoxide, ammonium nitrate, and cerium nitrate were used as the sources of titanium, nitrogen, and cerium, respectively. X-ray diffraction (XRD), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), UV-vis diffusive reflectance spectroscopy (DRS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and N(2) adsorption-desorption isotherm were employed to characterize the as-prepared photocatalyst. The degradation of nitrobenzene under visible light illumination was taken as probe reaction to evaluate the photoactivity of the co-doped photocatalyst. The commercial TiO(2) photocatalyst (Degussa P25), which was thought as a high active photocatalyst, was chosen as standard photocatalyst to contrast the photoactivity of the nitrogen and cerium co-doped titania photocatalyst. The results showed that the photocatalytic performance of the nitrogen and cerium co-doped titania was related with the calcination temperature and the component. The nitrogen atoms were incorporated into the crystal of titania and could narrow the band gap energy. The doping cerium atoms existed in the forms of Ce(2)O(3) and dispersed on the surface of TiO(2). The improvement of the photocatalytic activity was ascribed to the synergistic effects of the nitrogen and cerium co-doping.

  19. Fluorescent cadmium telluride quantum dots embedded chitosan nanoparticles: a stable, biocompatible preparation for bio-imaging.

    PubMed

    Ghormade, Vandana; Gholap, Haribhau; Kale, Sonia; Kulkarni, Vaishnavi; Bhat, Suresh; Paknikar, Kishore

    2015-01-01

    Fluorescent cadmium telluride quantum dots (CdTe QDs) are an optically attractive option for bioimaging, but are known to display high cytotoxicity. Nanoparticles synthesized from chitosan, a natural biopolymer of β 1-4 linked glucosamine, display good biocompatibility and cellular uptake. A facile, green synthetic strategy has been developed to embed green fluorescent cadmium telluride quantum dots (CdTe QDs) in biocompatible CNPs to obtain a safer preparation than 'as is' QDs. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy showed the crystal lattice corresponding to CdTe QDs embedded in CNPs while thermogravimetry confirmed their polymeric composition. Electrostatic interactions between thiol-capped QDs (4 nm, -57 mV) and CNPs (~300 nm, +38 mV) generated CdTe QDs-embedded CNPs that were stable up to three months. Further, viability of NIH3T3 mouse fibroblast cells in vitro increased in presence of QDs-embedded CNPs as compared to bare QDs. At the highest concentration (10 μg/ml), the former shows 34 and 39% increase in viability at 24 and 48 h, respectively, as compared to the latter. This shows that chitosan nanoparticles do not release the QDs up to 48 h and do not cause extended toxicity. Furthermore, hydrolytic enzymes such as lysozyme and chitinase did not degrade chitosan nanoparticles. Moreover, QDs-embedded CNPs show enhanced internalization in NIH3T3 cells as compared to bare QDs. This method offers ease of synthesis and handling of stable, luminescent, biocompatible CdTe QDs-embedded CNPs with a favorable toxicity profile and better cellular uptake with potential for bioimaging and targeted detection of cellular components.

  20. Novel aspects of application of cadmium telluride quantum dots nanostructures in radiation oncology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fazaeli, Yousef; Zare, Hakimeh; Karimi, Shokufeh; Rahighi, Reza; Feizi, Shahzad

    2017-08-01

    In the last two decades, quantum dots nanomaterials have garnered a great deal of scientific interest because of their unique properties. Quantum dots (QDs) are inorganic fluorescent nanocrystals in the size range between 1 and 20 nm. Due to their structural properties, they possess distinctive properties and behave in different way from crystals in macro scale, in many branches of human life. Cadmium telluride quantum dots (CdTe QDs) were labeled with 68Ga radio nuclide for fast in vivo targeting and coincidence imaging of tumors. Using instant paper chromatography, the physicochemical properties of the Cadmium telluride quantum dots labeled with 68Ga NPs (68Ga@ CdTe QDs) were found high enough stable in organic phases, e.g., a human serum, to be reliably used in bioapplications. In vivo biodistribution of the 68Ga@ CdTe QDs nanoconposite was investigated in rats bearing fibro sarcoma tumor after various post-injection periods of time. The 68Ga NPs exhibited a rapid as well as high tumor uptake in a very short period of time (less than 10 min), resulting in an efficient tumor targeting/imaging agent. Meantime, the low lipophilicity of the 68Ga NPs caused to their fast excretion throughout the body by kidneys (as also confirmed by the urinary tract). Because of the short half-life of 68Ga radionuclide, the 68Ga@ CdTe QDs with an excellent tumor targeting/imaging and fast washing out from the body can be suggested as one of the most effective and promising nanomaterials in nanotechnology-based cancer diagnosis and therapy.

  1. The origin of electronic band structure anomaly in topological crystalline insulator group-IV tellurides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Zhen-Yu; Deng, Hui-Xiong; Wu, Hui-Zhen; Li, Shu-Shen; Wei, Su-Huai; Luo, Jun-Wei

    2015-11-01

    Group-IV tellurides have exhibited exotic band structures. Specifically, despite the fact that Sn sits between Ge and Pb in the same column of the periodic table, cubic SnTe is a topological crystalline insulator with band inversion, but both isovalent GeTe and PbTe are trivial semiconductors with normal band order. By performing first-principles band structure calculations, we unravel the origin of this abnormal behaviour by using symmetry analysis and the atomic orbital energy levels and atomic sizes of these elements. In group-IV tellurides, the s lone pair band of the group-IV element is allowed by symmetry to couple with the anion valence p band at the L-point, and such s-p coupling leads to the occurrence of bandgap at the L-point. We find that such s-p coupling is so strong in SnTe that it inverts the band order near the bandgap; however, it is not strong enough in both GeTe and PbTe, so they remain normal semiconductors. The reason for this is the incomplete screening of the core of the relatively tight-binding Ge 4s orbital by its 3d orbitals and the large atomic size and strong relativistic effect in Pb, respectively. Interestingly, we also find that the rhombohedral distortion removes the inversion symmetry and the reduced s-p coupling transforms the α-SnTe back to a normal semiconductor. Our study demonstrates that, in addition to spin-orbital coupling, strain and interface dipole fields, inter-orbital coupling is another effective way to engineer the topological insulators.

  2. The effects of cerium doping on the size, morphology, and optical properties of α-hematite nanoparticles for ultraviolet filtration

    SciTech Connect

    Cardillo, Dean; Konstantinov, Konstantin; Devers, Thierry

    2013-11-15

    Highlights: • Possible application of cerium-doped α-hematite as ultraviolet filter. • Nanoparticles obtained through co-precipitation technique using various cerium doping levels followed by annealing. • Comprehensive materials characterisation utilizing XRD, DSC/TGA, STEM, UV–vis spectroscopy. • Increasing cerium content reduces particle sizing and alters morphology. • Solubility of cerium in hematite seen between 5 and 10% doping, 10% cerium doping greatly enhances attenuation in ultraviolet region and increases optical bandgap. - Abstract: Metal oxide nanoparticles have potential use in energy storage, electrode materials, as catalysts and in the emerging field of nanomedicine. Being able to accurately tailor the desirable properties of these nanoceramic materials, such as particle size, morphology and optical bandgap (E{sub g}) is integral in the feasibility of their use. In this study we investigate the altering of both the structure and physical properties through the doping of hematite (α-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}) nanocrystals with cerium at a range of concentrations, synthesised using a one-pot co-precipitation method. This extremely simple synthesis followed by thermal treatment results in stable Fe{sub 2−x}Ce{sub x}O{sub y} nanoceramics resulting from the burning of any unreacted precursors and transformation of goethite-cerium doped nanoparticle intermediate. The inclusion of Ce into the crystal lattice of these α-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles causes a significantly large reduction in mean crystalline size and alteration in particle morphology with increasing cerium content. Finally we report an increase optical semiconductor bandgap, along with a substantial increase in the ultraviolet attenuation found for a 10% Ce-doping concentration which shows the potential application of cerium-doped hematite nanocrystals to be used as a pigmented ultraviolet filter for cosmetic products.

  3. Cerium Oxide Nanoparticles and Bulk Cerium Oxide Leading to Different Physiological and Biochemical Responses in Brassica rapa.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xingmao; Wang, Qiang; Rossi, Lorenzo; Zhang, Weilan

    2016-07-05

    Cerium oxide nanoparticles (CeO2NPs) have been incorporated into many commercial products, and their potential release into the environment through the use and disposal of these products has caused serious concerns. Despite the previous efforts and rapid progress on elucidating the environmental impact of CeO2NPs, the long-term impact of CeO2NPs to plants, a key component of the ecosystem, is still not well understood. The potentially different impact of CeO2NPs and their bulk counterparts to plants is also unclear. The main objectives of this study were (1) to investigate whether continued irrigation with solutions containing different concentrations of CeO2NPs (0, 10, and 100 mg/L) would induce physiological and biochemical adjustments in Brassica rapa in soil growing conditions and (2) to determine whether CeO2NPs and bulk CeO2 particles exert different impacts on plants. The results indicated that bulk CeO2 at 10 and 100 mg/L enhanced plant biomass by 28% and 35%, respectively, while CeO2NPs at equivalent concentrations did not. While the bulk CeO2 treatment resulted in significantly higher concentrations of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in plant tissues at the vegetative stage, CeO2NPs led to significantly higher H2O2 levels in plant tissues at the floral stage. The activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD) in Brassica rapa also displayed a growth-stage dependent response to different sizes of CeO2 while catalase (CAT) activity was not affected by either size of CeO2 throughout the life cycle of Brassica rapa. Altogether, the results demonstrated that plant responses to CeO2 exposure varied with the particle sizes and the growth stages of plants.

  4. Resonant photoemission study of the 4f spectral function of cerium in Ce/Fe(100) interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Witkowski, N.; Bertran, F.; Gourieux, T.; Kierren, B.; Malterre, D.; Panaccione, G. |

    1997-11-01

    In this paper, we present a resonant photoemission study of the cerium 4f spectral function in Ce/Fe(100) interfaces. By covering cerium ultrathin films with lanthanum, we completely suppress the surface contribution of the spectra. Then we show that the cerium atoms at the interface are in an intermediate valent state, whereas the f{sup 1} configuration is stabilized in the top layer. This method allows us to obtain the genuine 4f spectral function of the interface, and could be extended to a study of Ce-based compounds. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  5. Phenotypic and genomic responses to titanium dioxide and cerium oxide nanoparticles in Arabidopsis germinants

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effects of exposure to two nanoparticles (NPs) -titanium dioxide (nano-titania) and cerium oxide (nano-ceria) at 500 mg NPs L-1 on gene expression and growth in Arabidopsis thaliana germinants were studied using microarrays and phenotype studies. After 12 days post treatment,...

  6. Phenotypic and genomic responses to titanium dioxide and cerium oxide nanoparticles in Arabidopsis germinants

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effects of exposure to two nanoparticles (NPs) -titanium dioxide (nano-titania) and cerium oxide (nano-ceria) at 500 mg NPs L-1 on gene expression and growth in Arabidopsis thaliana germinants were studied using microarrays and phenotype studies. After 12 days post treatment,...

  7. Pits confined in ultrathin cerium(IV) oxide for studying catalytic centers in carbon monoxide oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yongfu; Liu, Qinghua; Gao, Shan; Cheng, Hao; Lei, Fengcai; Sun, Zhihu; Jiang, Yong; Su, Haibin; Wei, Shiqiang; Xie, Yi

    2013-11-01

    Finding ideal material models for studying the role of catalytic active sites remains a great challenge. Here we propose pits confined in an atomically thin sheet as a platform to evaluate carbon monoxide catalytic oxidation at various sites. The artificial three-atomic-layer thin cerium(IV) oxide sheet with approximately 20% pits occupancy possesses abundant pit-surrounding cerium sites having average coordination numbers of 4.6 as revealed by X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Density-functional calculations disclose that the four- and five-fold coordinated pit-surrounding cerium sites assume their respective role in carbon monoxide adsorption and oxygen activation, which lowers the activation barrier and avoids catalytic poisoning. Moreover, the presence of coordination-unsaturated cerium sites increases the carrier density and facilitates carbon monoxide diffusion along the two-dimensional conducting channels of surface pits. The atomically thin sheet with surface-confined pits exhibits lower apparent activation energy than the bulk material (61.7 versus 122.9 kJ mol-1), leading to reduced conversion temperature and enhanced carbon monoxide catalytic ability.

  8. Effects of manganese deficiency and added cerium on photochemical efficiency of maize chloroplasts.

    PubMed

    Qu, Chunxiang; Gong, Xiaolan; Liu, Chao; Hong, Mengmeng; Wang, Ling; Hong, Fashui

    2012-04-01

    The mechanism of the fact that manganese deprivation and cerium addition affect the photochemical efficiency of plants is unclear. In this study, we investigated the improvement by cerium of the damage of the photochemical function of maize chloroplasts under manganese-deprived stress. Chlorophyll fluorescence induction measurements showed that the ratio of variable to maximum fluorescence (Fv/Fm) underwent great decreases under manganese deficiency, which was attributed to the reduction of intrinsic quantum efficiency of the photosystem II units. The electron flow between the two photosystems, activities of Mg(2+)-ATPase and Ca(2+)-ATPase, and rate of photophosphorylation on the thylakoid membrane of maize chloroplasts were reduced significantly by exposure to manganese deprivation. Furthermore, the inhibition of cyclic photophosphorylation was more severe than non-cyclic photophosphorylation under manganese deficiency. However, added cerium could relieve the inhibition of the photochemical reaction caused by manganese deprivation in maize chloroplasts. It implied that manganese deprivation could disturb photochemical reaction of chloroplasts strongly, which could be improved by cerium addition.

  9. Cyclic thermochemical process for producing hydrogen using cerium-titanium compounds

    DOEpatents

    Bamberger, Carlos E.

    1980-01-01

    A thermochemical cyclic process for producing hydrogen employs the reaction between ceric oxide and titanium dioxide to form cerium titanate and oxygen. The titanate is treated with an alkali metal hydroxide to give hydrogen, ceric oxide, an alkali metal titanate and water. Alkali metal titanate and water are boiled to give titanium dioxide which, along with ceric oxide, is recycled.

  10. Cyclic thermochemical process for producing hydrogen using cerium-titanium compounds

    DOEpatents

    Bamberger, C.E.

    A thermochemical cyclic process for producing hydrogen employs the reaction between ceric oxide and titanium dioxide to form cerium titanate and oxygen. The titanate is treated with an alkali metal hydroxide to give hydrogen, ceric oxide, an alkali metal titanate and water. Alkali metal titanate and water are boiled to give titanium dioxide which, along with ceric oxide, is recycled.

  11. Compact x-ray generator utilizing cerium-target tube for angiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Eiichi; Tanaka, Etsuro; Mori, Hidezo; Kawai, Toshiaki; Ito, Fumihito; Ichimaru, Toshio; Sato, Shigehiro; Takayama, Kazuyoshi; Ido, Hideaki

    2004-11-01

    The cerium-target x-ray tube is useful in order to perform cone beam K-edge angiography because K-series characteristic x rays from the cerium target are absorbed effectively by iodine-based contrast mediums. The x-ray generator consists of a main controller and a unit with a high-voltage circuit and a fixed anode x-ray tube. The tube is a glass-enclosed diode with a cerium target and a 0.5 mm-thick beryllium window. The maximum tube voltage and current were 65 kV and 0.4 mA, respectively, and the focal-spot sizes were 1.3×0.9 mm. Cerium K-series characteristic x rays were left using a 3.0 mm-thick aluminum filter, and the x-ray intensity was 0.59 μC/kg at 1.0 m from the source with a tube voltage of 60 kV, a current of 0.40 mA, and an exposure time of 1.0 s. Angiography was performed with a computed radiography system using iodine-based microspheres 15 μm in diameter. In angiography of non-living animals, we observed fine blood vessels of approximately 100 μm with high contrasts.

  12. Electrooxidation of nitrite on a silica-cerium mixed oxide carbon paste electrode.

    PubMed

    Silveira, Gustavo; de Morais, Andréia; Villis, Paulo César Mendes; Maroneze, Camila Marchetti; Gushikem, Yoshitaka; Lucho, Alzira Maria Serpa; Pissetti, Fábio Luiz

    2012-03-01

    A silica-cerium mixed oxide (SiCe) was prepared by the sol-gel process, using tetraethylorthosilicate and cerium nitrate as precursors and obtained as an amorphous solid possessing a specific surface area of 459 m(2) g(-1). Infrared spectroscopy of the SiCe material showed the formation of the Si-O-Ce linkage in the mixed oxide. Scanning electron microscopy/energy dispersive spectroscopy indicated that the cerium oxide particles were homogenously dispersed on the matrix surface. X-ray diffraction and (29)Si solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance implied non-crystalline silica matrices with chemical environments that are typical for silica-based mixed oxides. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy showed that Ce was present in approximately equal amounts of both the 3+ and 4+ oxidation states. Cyclic voltammetry data of electrode prepared from the silica-cerium mixed oxide showed a peak for oxidation of Ce(3+)/Ce(4+) at 0.76 V and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy equivalent circuit indicated a porous structure with low charge transfer resistance. In the presence of nitrite, the SiCe electrode shows an anodic oxidation peak at 0.76 V with a linear response as the concentration of the analyte increases from 3×10(-5) at 3.9×10(-3) mol L(-1).

  13. Intergenerational responses of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) to cerium oxide nanoparticles exposure

    EPA Science Inventory

    The intergenerational impact of engineered nanomaterials in plants is a key knowledge gap in the literature. A soil microcosm study was performed to assess the effects of multi-generational exposure of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) to cerium oxide nanoparticles (CeO2-NPs). Seeds f...

  14. Demonstration of enhanced K-edge angiography using a cerium target x-ray generator

    SciTech Connect

    Sato, Eiichi; Tanaka, Etsuro; Mori, Hidezo; Kawai, Toshiaki; Ichimaru, Toshio; Sato, Shigehiro; Takayama, Kazuyoshi; Ido, Hideaki

    2004-11-01

    The cerium target x-ray generator is useful in order to perform enhanced K-edge angiography using a cone beam because K-series characteristic x rays from the cerium target are absorbed effectively by iodine-based contrast mediums. The x-ray generator consists of a main controller, a unit with a Cockcroft-Walton circuit and a fixed anode x-ray tube, and a personal computer. The tube is a glass-enclosed diode with a cerium target and a 0.5-mm-thick beryllium window. The maximum tube voltage and current were 65 kV and 0.4 mA, respectively, and the focal-spot sizes were 1.0x1.3 mm. Cerium K{alpha} lines were left using a barium sulfate filter, and the x-ray intensity was 0.48 {mu}C/kg at 1.0 m from the source with a tube voltage of 60 kV, a current of 0.40 mA, and an exposure time of 1.0 s. Angiography was performed with a computed radiography system using iodine-based microspheres. In coronary angiography of nonliving animals, we observed fine blood vessels of approximately 100 {mu}m with high contrasts.

  15. Intergenerational responses of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) to cerium oxide nanoparticles exposure

    EPA Science Inventory

    The intergenerational impact of engineered nanomaterials in plants is a key knowledge gap in the literature. A soil microcosm study was performed to assess the effects of multi-generational exposure of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) to cerium oxide nanoparticles (CeO2-NPs). Seeds f...

  16. Cerium oxide nanoparticles inhibit lipopolysaccharide induced MAP kinase/NF-kB mediated severe sepsis.

    PubMed

    Selvaraj, Vellaisamy; Nepal, Niraj; Rogers, Steven; Manne, Nandini D P K; Arvapalli, Ravikumar; Rice, Kevin M; Asano, Shinichi; Fankenhanel, Erin; Ma, J Y; Shokuhfar, Tolou; Maheshwari, Mani; Blough, Eric R

    2015-09-01

    The life threatening disease of sepsis is associated with high mortality. Septic patient survivability with currently available treatments has failed to improve. The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induced sepsis mortality and associated hepatic dysfunction can be prevented by cerium oxide nanoparticles (CeO2NPs) treatment in male Sprague Dawley rats. Here we provide the information about the methods processing of raw data related to our study published in Biomaterials (Selvaraj et al., Biomaterials, 2015, In press) and Data in Brief (Selvaraj et al., Data in Brief, 2015, In Press). The data present here provides confirmation of cerium oxide nanoparticle treatments ability to prevent the LPS induced sepsis associated changes in physiological, blood cell count, inflammatory protein and growth factors in vivo. In vitro assays investigation the treated of macrophages cells with different concentrations of cerium oxide nanoparticle demonstrate that concentration of cerium oxide nanoparticles below 1 µg/ml did not significantly influence cell survival as determined by the MTT assay.

  17. Formation of Self-Assembled Monolayer on Cerium Conversion Coated AZ31 Mg Alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salman, S. A.; Akira, N.; Kuroda, K.; Okido, M.

    Magnesium alloys are recognized as alternatives to Al alloys and steel to reduce the weight of structural materials. However, a major obstacle to the widespread use of magnesium alloys is its poor corrosion resistance. Therefore, further surface treatment of magnesium and its alloy is important in meeting several industrial specifications. In a previous research, we investigated the surface treatment of AZ31 magnesium alloy using cerium conversion coating. The anticorrosion properties could be improved with the cerium treatment. In this present research, self-assembled monolayer (SAM) was adsorbed on the surface of cerium conversion coated AZ31 magnesium alloy. The SAM thin film was deposited using (Tridecafluoro-1, 1, 2, 2-tetrahydrooctyl) trimethoxysilane (FAS13) and Tetrakis(trimethylsiloxy)titanium (TTMS) as a catalyst. The corrosion resistance of cerium conversion coated AZ31 Mg alloy was improved with SAM post treatment. Furthermore, the contact angle increases from 13 deg. to 169 deg. indicating to production of super hydrophobic surface with SAM post treatment.

  18. Controlled Redox Chemistry at Cerium within a Tripodal Nitroxide Ligand Framework

    DOE PAGES

    Bogart, Justin A.; Lippincott, Connor A.; Carroll, Patrick J.; ...

    2015-10-27

    Ligand reorganization has been shown to have a profound effect on the outcome of cerium redox chemistry. Through the use of a tethered, tripodal, trianionic nitroxide ligand, [((2-tBuNOH)C 6 H 4 CH 2 ) 3 N] 3- (TriNO x 3- ), controlled redox chemistry at cerium was accomplished, and typically reactive complexes of tetravalent cerium were isolated. These included rare cationic complexes [Ce(TriNO x )thf][BAr F 4 ], in which Ar F =3,5-(CF 3 ) 2 -C 6 H 3 , and [Ce(TriNO x )py][OTf] . A rare complete Ce-halide series, Ce(TriNO x )X, in which X=F - , Clmore » - , Br - , I - , was also synthesized. We explored the solution chemistry of these complexes through detailed solution-phase electrochemistry and 1 H NMR experiments and showed a unique shift in the ratio of species with inner- and outer-sphere anions with size of the anionic X - group. DFT calculations on the series of calculations corroborated the experimental findings. Also, the use of a bulky and strongly donating tethered tripodal nitroxide ligand allowed the controlled redox chemistry at cerium. As a result, rare examples of cationic Ce IV complexes were synthesized and fully characterized. The full Ce-halide series supported by the tripodal ligand framework is also reported (see scheme).« less

  19. Long range ordered alloys modified by addition of niobium and cerium

    DOEpatents

    Liu, C.T.

    1984-08-22

    Long range ordered alloys are described having the nominal composition (Fe,Ni,Co)/sub 3/ (V,M) where M is a ductility enhancing metal selected from the group Ti, Zr, Hf with additions of small amounts of cerium and niobium to dramatically enhance the creep properties of the resulting alloys.

  20. Long range ordered alloys modified by addition of niobium and cerium

    DOEpatents

    Liu, Chain T.

    1987-01-01

    Long range ordered alloys are described having the nominal composition (Fe,Ni,Co).sub.3 (V,M) where M is a ductility enhancing metal selected from the group Ti, Zr, Hf with additions of small amounts of cerium and niobium to drammatically enhance the creep properties of the resulting alloys.

  1. Phosphate ester hydrolysis of biologically relevant molecules by cerium oxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Kuchma, Melissa Hirsch; Komanski, Christopher B; Colon, Jimmie; Teblum, Andrew; Masunov, Artëm E; Alvarado, Beatrice; Babu, Suresh; Seal, Sudipta; Summy, Justin; Baker, Cheryl H

    2010-12-01

    In an effort to characterize the interaction of cerium oxide nanoparticles (CNPs) in biological systems, we explored the reactivity of CNPs with the phosphate ester bonds of p-nitrophenylphosphate (pNPP), ATP, o-phospho-l-tyrosine, and DNA. The activity of the bond cleavage for pNPP at pH 7 is calculated to be 0.860 ± 0.010 nmol p-nitrophenol/min/μg CNPs. Interestingly, when CNPs bind to plasmid DNA, no cleavage products are detected. While cerium(IV) complexes generally exhibit the ability to break phosphorus-oxygen bonds, the reactions we report appear to be dependent on the availability of cerium(III) sites, not cerium(IV) sites. We investigated the dephosphorylation mechanism from the first principles and find the reaction proceeds through inversion of the phosphate group similar to an S(N)2 mechanism. The ability of CNPs to interact with phosphate ester bonds of biologically relevant molecules has important implications for their use as potential therapeutics.

  2. Titrimetric and Spectrophotometric Methods for the Assay of Ketotifen Using Cerium(IV) and Two Reagents

    PubMed Central

    Raghu, Madihalli Srinivas; Basavaiah, Kanakapura; Prashanth, Kudige Nagaraj; Vinay, Kanakapura Basavaiah

    2013-01-01

    One titrimetric and two spectrophotometric methods are described for the determination of ketotifen fumarate (KTF) in bulk drug and in tablets using cerium(IV) as the oxidimetric agent. In titrimetry (method A), the drug was treated with a measured excess of cerium(IV) in H2SO4 medium and after a standing time of 10 min, the surplus oxidant was determined by back titration with iron(II). The spectrophotometric procedures involve addition of a known excess of cerium(IV) to KTF in acid medium followed by the determination of unreacted oxidant by reacting with either p-dimethyl amino benzaldehyde and measuring the resulting colour at 460 nm (method B) or o-dianisidine and subsequent measurement of the absorbance of coloured product at 470 nm (method C). Titrimetric assay is based on a 1 : 2 reaction stoichiometry between KTF and cerium(IV) and the method is applicable over 2–18 mg range. In spectrophotometry, regression analysis of Beer's law plots showed a good correlation in 0.4–8.0 and 0.4–10.0 g mL−1 KTF ranges for method B and method C, respectively, and the corresponding molar absorptivity coefficients are calculated to be 4.0 × 104 and 3.7 × 104 L mol−1 cm−1. PMID:24324496

  3. Cerium oxide coated anodes for aluminum electrowinning: Topical report, October 1, 1986-June 30, 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, J. K.

    1987-12-01

    Because of the cost of building and maintaining a carbon anode plant and the energy penalties associated with the use of carbon anodes in the production of aluminum, the use of inert anodes has long been proposed. Various cermet anodes have been investigated. In this paper, tests on a material, cerium oxyfluoride (CEROX), deposited in situ as an anode, are reported. (JDH)

  4. Calculation of the volume effect at an electron phase transition in pure cerium and praseodymium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponomareva, S. A.; Koval', Yu. N.; Ponomarev, A. P.

    2014-03-01

    The experimental values of the volume effect at an electronic phase transition in several rare-earth metals are discussed. Specifically, volume changes at phase transitions in cerium and praseodymium are calculated using a semiphenomenological relationship derived in terms of the Falikov-Ramirez-Kimball model. A number of factors influencing the amount of the volume effect at electronic phase transitions are analyzed.

  5. Pre-eminence of the Indirect Channel in the Resonant Inverse Photoelectron Spectroscopy of Cerium Oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Tobin, J. G.; Yu, S. -W.; Chung, B. W.; Waddill, G. D.

    2012-04-01

    We recently reported a strong resonance in the inverse photoelectron spectroscopy (IPES) of cerium oxide. Here, we showed that dominance of the indirect channel of the resonant inverse photoelectron spectroscopy (RIPES) is so complete that the photon energy dependence can be explained in terms of emission associated with a single photon energy.

  6. Fabrication and characterization of cerium-doped barium titanate inverse opal by sol-gel method

    SciTech Connect

    Jin Yi; Zhu Yihua Yang Xiaoling; Li Chunzhong; Zhou Jinghong

    2007-01-15

    Cerium-doped barium titanate inverted opal was synthesized from barium acetate contained cerous acetate and tetrabutyl titanate in the interstitial spaces of a polystyrene (PS) opal. This procedure involves infiltration of precursors into the interstices of the PS opal template followed by hydrolytic polycondensation of the precursors to amorphous barium titanate and removal of the PS opal by calcination. The morphologies of opal and inverse opal were characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM). The pores were characterized by mercury intrusion porosimetry (MIP). X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) investigation showed the doping structure of cerium, barium and titanium. And powder X-ray diffraction allows one to observe the influence of doping degree on the grain size. The lattice parameters, crystal size and lattice strain were calculated by the Rietveld refinement method. The synthesis of cerium-doped barium titanate inverted opals provides an opportunity to electrically and optically engineer the photonic band structure and the possibility of developing tunable three-dimensional photonic crystal devices. - Graphical abstract: Cerium-doped barium titanate inverted opal was synthesized from barium acetate acid contained cerous acetate and tetrabutyl titanate in the interstitial spaces of a PS opal, which involves infiltration of precursors into the interstices of the PS opal template and removal of the PS opal by calcination.

  7. Influences of the main anodic electroplating parameters on cerium oxide films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yang; Yang, Yumeng; Du, Xiaoqing; Chen, Yu; Zhang, Zhao; Zhang, Jianqing

    2014-06-01

    Cerium oxide thin films were fabricated onto 316 L stainless steel via a potentiostatically anodic electrodeposition approach in the solutions containing cerium(III) nitrate (0.05 M), ammonia acetate (0.1 M) and ethanol (10% V/V). The electrochemical behaviors and deposition parameters (applied potential, bath temperature, dissolving O2 and bath pH) have been investigated. Results show that, the electrochemical oxidation of Ce3+ goes through one electrochemical step, which is under charge transfer control. The optimum applied potential for film deposition is 0.8 V. Bath temperature plays a significant effect on the deposition rate, composition (different colors of the film) and surface morphology of the deposits. Due to the hydrolysis of Ce3+, cerous hydroxide is facility to form when the bath temperature is higher than 60 °C. The electroplating bath pH is another key role for the anodic deposition of cerium oxide thin films, and the best bath pH is around 6.20. N2 or O2 purged into the bath will result in film porosities and O2 favors cerium oxide particles and film generation.

  8. Synthesis, electrical and dielectric characterization of cerium doped nano copper ferrites

    SciTech Connect

    Malana, Muhammad Aslam Qureshi, Raheela Beenish; Ashiq, Muhammad Naeem; Zafar, Zafar Iqbal

    2013-11-15

    Graphical abstract: Lattice constant (a) and activation energy (Ea) as a function of Ce (cerium) content. - Highlights: • The simple and economic method has been adopted for the synthesis of nanoferrites. • The electrical resistivity increases with cerium concentration. • DC electrical resistivity of these materials favours their use in microwave devices. • Dielectric measurements show semiconductor nature of the synthesized ferrites. - Abstract: The nanosized CuFe{sub 2−x}Ce{sub x}O{sub 4} (x = 0.0, 0.2, 0.4, 0.6, 0.8) ferrites doped with cerium are synthesized by chemical co-precipitation method. The synthesized materials are characterized by XRD, FTIR, TGA and SEM. XRD analysis of cerium substituted copper ferrites confirms the cubic spinel structure. The average crystallite size calculated by using Scherrer's formula ranges from 37 to 53 nm. The values of cell constant and cell volume vary with the dopant concentration. These variations can be explained in terms of their ionic radii. The DC electrical resistivity, measured by two point probe method, increases with increase in dopant concentration while it decreases with rise in temperature exhibiting semiconductor behaviour. Energy of activation of these ferrites is calculated by using Arrhenius type resistivity plots. Dielectric measurements of the synthesized compounds show exponential decrease in dielectric constant and dielectric loss factor with increase in frequency. This indicates the normal dielectric behaviour of ferrites.

  9. Effects of cerium on key enzymes of carbon assimilation of spinach under magnesium deficiency.

    PubMed

    Yuguan, Ze; Min, Zhou; Luyang, Luo; Zhe, Ji; Chao, Liu; Sitao, Yin; Yanmei, Duan; Na, Li; Fashui, Hong

    2009-11-01

    The mechanism of the fact that cerium improves the photosynthesis of plants under magnesium deficiency is poorly understood. The main aim of the study was to determine the role of cerium in the amelioration of magnesium deficiency effects in CO(2) assimilation of spinach. Spinach plants were cultivated in Hoagland's solution. They were subjected to magnesium deficiency and to cerium chloride administered in the magnesium-present Hoagland's media and magnesium-deficient Hoagland's media. The results showed that the chlorophyll synthesis and oxygen evolution was destroyed, and the activities of Rubisco carboxylasae and Rubisco activase and the expression of Rubisco large subunit (rbcL), Rubisco small subunit (rbcS), and Rubisco activase subunit (rca) were significantly inhibited, then plant growth was inhibited by magnesium deficiency. However, cerium promotes the chlorophyll synthesis, the activities of two key enzymes in CO(2) assimilation, and the expression of rbcL, rbcS, and rca, thus leading to the enhancement of spinach growth under magnesium-deficient conditions.

  10. Anti-erosive potential of amine fluoride, cerium chloride and laser irradiation application on dentine.

    PubMed

    Wegehaupt, Florian J; Sener, Beatrice; Attin, Thomas; Schmidlin, Patrick R

    2011-12-01

    Ninety-six dentine samples were prepared from human premolars and randomly assigned to eight groups (G1-G8). Samples were treated for 30s with the following solutions: placebo (G1/G2), amine fluoride (Elmex fluid; G3/G4), cerium chloride (G5/G6) and combined fluoride/cerium chloride application (G7/G8). Samples of groups G2, G4, G6 and G8 were additionally irradiated with a carbon dioxide laser through the solutions for 30s. Acid resistance was assessed in a six-time 5-min consecutive lactic acid (pH 3.0) erosion model and calcium release was determined by atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS). Furthermore, six additional samples per group were prepared and subjected to EDS-analysis. In the non-irradiated groups, specimens of G1 (placebo) showed the highest calcium release when compared to the other treatments (G3, G5 and G7). The highest acid resistance was observed for G7. In G3, calcium release was lower than in G5, but higher than in G7. In general (except for the placebo groups), calcium release in the laser-irradiated groups was higher compared with the respective non-irradiated groups. EDS showed a replacement of calcium by cerium and of phosphor by fluoride. The highest anti-erosive potential was found after combined cerium chloride and amine fluoride application. Laser irradiation had not adjunctive effect. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Multicolored redox active upconverter cerium oxide nanoparticle for bio-imaging and therapeutics†

    PubMed Central

    Babu, Suresh; Cho, Jung-Hyun; Dowding, Janet M.; Heckert, Eric; Komanski, Chris; Das, Soumen; Colon, Jimmie; Baker, Cheryl H.; Bass, Michael; Self, William T.; Seal, Sudipta

    2011-01-01

    Cytocompatible, co-doped cerium oxide nanoparticles exhibited strong upconversion properties that were found to kill lung cancer cells by inducing apoptosis thereby demonstrating the potential to be used as clinical contrast agents for imaging and as therapeutic agents for treatment of cancer. PMID:20683524

  12. 4d → 4f resonance in photoabsorption of cerium ion Ce3+ and endohedral cerium in fullerene complex {\\rm{Ce}}@{{{\\rm{C}}}_{82}}^{+}

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schrange-Kashenock, G.

    2016-09-01

    The theoretical investigation of the single-photoionization spectra in the 4d-resonance region (120-150 eV) for the ionic cerium Ce3+ and cerium in the endohedral complex {{Ce}}@{{{{C}}}82}+ (in practice, {{{Ce}}}3+@{{{{C}}}82}2-) is presented. The fullerene cage is modeled by ab initio spherical jellium shell with an accurate account for the real distribution of carbon electron density. The oscillator strengths are calculated within the multiconfiguration Dirac-Fock (MCDF) approach for phototransitions from the outermost shells of the ion Ce3+ with and without the influence of the potential generated by a fullerene cage. It is shown that the integrated oscillator strengths have the main contribution from the Ce3+ 4d → 4f (ten possible from the phototransitions {}2F{7/2,5/2}\\to {}2D{3/2,5/2},{}2F{5/2,7/2},{}2G{5/2,7/2}) resonance photoexcitations. The corresponding precise MCDF values for the oscillator strengths and the transition energies are presented for the first time. It is demonstrated that the resonance {f}4d\\to 4f oscillator strengths are slightly affected by the presence of the cage potential, despite the fact that the spectral levels structure is changed when the effect of this potential is included. The Auger 4d -1 decay from the cerium free ion Ce3+ and the encapsulated endohedral ion Ce3+@ are considered within the two-step model and the corresponding Lorentzian profiles are presented. This model clearly reveals the correspondence of the complex resonance profile in the Ce3+ photoabsorption to the fine structure of ion energy levels. The smoothing of the resonance profile in the photoabsorption of the endohedral system {{Ce}}@{{{{C}}}82}+ compared with the free ion Ce3+ is attributed to increasing the linewidths of the Auger transitions. This increase is estimated from the relevant experiment (Müller et al 2008 Phys. Rev. Lett. 101 133001) to be strong; as at least three times the value for an isolated ion. The presence of the confining fullerene

  13. Band structure, cohesive properties, and Compton profile of γ- and α-cerium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podloucky, R.; Glötzel, D.

    1983-03-01

    Recent Compton scattering experiments on the high-volume (γ) and low-volume (α) phases of fcc cerium and their interpretation in terms of the renormalized-free-atom model cast severe doubts on the promotional model of Pauling and Zachariasen for the γ-α transition. Stimulated by these results, we have extended a previous self-consistent local-density band-structure investigation to study the Compton profiles of γ- and α-cerium. For the band structure, Bloch functions, and their Fourier transforms we use the linear muffin-tin orbital method in the atomic-sphere approximation. We analyze the calculated Compton profiles in terms of band structure and local angular momentum character of the wave functions. The change in band structure and wave functions under compression (with approximately one electron per atom in the 4f band of both phases) accounts well for the observed change in the Compton profile. This provides further evidence against the promotional model in agreement with the analysis of Kornstädt et al. In addition, we study the cohesive energy of fcc cerium as a function of volume in the local-density approximation. For α-cerium in the 4f1(5d 6s)3 configuration we find a cohesive energy of 5.4 eV/atom in good agreement with experiment, whereas the "promotional" 4f0(5d 6s)4 state yields a binding energy of 0.6 eV/atom only. Therefore the fourth valence electron has to be a 4f electron, and α-cerium has to be regarded as an f-band metal.

  14. Infrared microspectroscopic imaging of biomineralized tissues using a mercury-cadmium-telluride focal-plane array detector.

    PubMed

    Marcott, C; Reeder, R C; Paschalis, E P; Tatakis, D N; Boskey, A L; Mendelsohn, R

    1998-02-01

    A 64 x 64 mercury-cadmium-telluride focal-plane array detector attached to a Fourier transform infrared microscope was used to spectroscopically image 5 microm sections of canine alveolar bone tissue in the fingerprint region of the infrared spectrum. By ratioing the relative intensities of specific bands across the images, it is possible to obtain spatial distributions of the mineral-to-matrix ratio and mineral maturity as a function of distance from an osteon.

  15. Optimization of the thermoelectric figure of merit of fine-grained semiconductor materials based upon lead telluride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rowe, D. M.

    1986-02-01

    Lead telluride type semiconductors are used in the fabrication of thermoelectric modules. This report covers the programme to produce materials based upon lead telluride with improved figures of merit and hence greater thermoelectric conversion efficiency. One way of improving the figure of merit is by reducing the lattice thermal conductivity of the material. This can be achieved by increasing phonon grain boundary scattering. A realistic theoretical model has been developed for lead telluride and used to investigate the lattice thermal conductivity as a function of grain size and level of doping. In optimally doped material with a grain size of 1 micrometer, the reduction in lattice thermal conductivity was predicted to be 4-6 percent compared with equivalent single crystal. Thermal diffusivity measurements on small grained compacts supported this prediction. Phonon grain boundary scattering is enhanced in semiconductor alloys because of the presence of disorder scattering and the theoretical model was extended to take this factor into account. PbSnTe and PbGeTe were identified as alloys whose lattice thermal conductivity could be significantly decreased by a reduction in grain size and in optimally doped compacted material with a grain size of 0.5 micrometer the reduction compared to equivalent single crystal material was estimated to be 11 and 14 percent respectively.

  16. Effects of chemical intermixing on electrical and thermal contact conductances at metallized bismuth and antimony telluride interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Devender,; Mehta, Rutvik J.; Ramanath, Ganpati; Lofgreen, Kelly; Mahajan, Ravi; Yamaguchi, Masashi; Borca-Tasciuc, Theodorian

    2015-03-15

    Tailoring electrical and thermal contact conductivities (Σ{sub c} and Γ{sub c}) across metallized pnictogen chalcogenide interfaces is key for realizing efficient thermoelectric devices. The authors report that Cu, Ni, Ti, and Ta diffusion and interfacial telluride formation with n-Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} and p-Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3} influence both Σ{sub c} and Γ{sub c}. Cu metallization yields the highest Γ{sub c} and the lowest Σ{sub c}, correlating with maximal metal diffusion and copper telluride formation. Ni diffuses less and yields the highest Σ{sub c} with Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3} due to p-type nickel telluride formation, which diminishes Σ{sub c} improvement with n-Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} interfaces. Ta and Ti contacts yield the lowest properties similar to that in Ni-metallized structures. These correlations between interfacial diffusion and phase formation on electronic and thermal transport properties will be important for devising suitable metallization for thermoelectric devices.

  17. Enhanced thermoelectric properties of phase-separating bismuth selenium telluride thin films via a two-step method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takashiri, Masayuki; Kurita, Kensuke; Hagino, Harutoshi; Tanaka, Saburo; Miyazaki, Koji

    2015-08-01

    A two-step method that combines homogeneous electron beam (EB) irradiation and thermal annealing has been developed to enhance the thermoelectric properties of nanocrystalline bismuth selenium telluride thin films. The thin films, prepared using a flash evaporation method, were treated with EB irradiation in a N2 atmosphere at room temperature and an acceleration voltage of 0.17 MeV. Thermal annealing was performed under Ar/H2 (5%) at 300 °C for 60 min. X-ray diffraction was used to determine that compositional phase separation between bismuth telluride and bismuth selenium telluride developed in the thin films exposed to higher EB doses and thermal annealing. We propose that the phase separation was induced by fluctuations in the distribution of selenium atoms after EB irradiation, followed by the migration of selenium atoms to more stable sites during thermal annealing. As a result, thin film crystallinity improved and mobility was significantly enhanced. This indicates that the phase separation resulting from the two-step method enhanced, rather than disturbed, the electron transport. Both the electrical conductivity and the Seebeck coefficient were improved following the two-step method. Consequently, the power factor of thin films that underwent the two-step method was enhanced to 20 times (from 0.96 to 21.0 μW/(cm K2) that of the thin films treated with EB irradiation alone.

  18. Enhanced thermoelectric properties of phase-separating bismuth selenium telluride thin films via a two-step method

    SciTech Connect

    Takashiri, Masayuki Kurita, Kensuke; Hagino, Harutoshi; Miyazaki, Koji; Tanaka, Saburo

    2015-08-14

    A two-step method that combines homogeneous electron beam (EB) irradiation and thermal annealing has been developed to enhance the thermoelectric properties of nanocrystalline bismuth selenium telluride thin films. The thin films, prepared using a flash evaporation method, were treated with EB irradiation in a N{sub 2} atmosphere at room temperature and an acceleration voltage of 0.17 MeV. Thermal annealing was performed under Ar/H{sub 2} (5%) at 300 °C for 60 min. X-ray diffraction was used to determine that compositional phase separation between bismuth telluride and bismuth selenium telluride developed in the thin films exposed to higher EB doses and thermal annealing. We propose that the phase separation was induced by fluctuations in the distribution of selenium atoms after EB irradiation, followed by the migration of selenium atoms to more stable sites during thermal annealing. As a result, thin film crystallinity improved and mobility was significantly enhanced. This indicates that the phase separation resulting from the two-step method enhanced, rather than disturbed, the electron transport. Both the electrical conductivity and the Seebeck coefficient were improved following the two-step method. Consequently, the power factor of thin films that underwent the two-step method was enhanced to 20 times (from 0.96 to 21.0 μW/(cm K{sup 2}) that of the thin films treated with EB irradiation alone.

  19. Bulk Dissolution Rates of Cadmium and Bismuth Tellurides As a Function of pH, Temperature and Dissolved Oxygen.

    PubMed

    Biver, Marc; Filella, Montserrat

    2016-05-03

    The toxicity of Cd being well established and that of Te suspected, the bulk, surface-normalized steady-state dissolution rates of two industrially important binary tellurides-polycrystalline cadmium and bismuth tellurides- were studied over the pH range 3-11, at various temperatures (25-70 °C) and dissolved oxygen concentrations (0-100% O2 in the gas phase). The behavior of both tellurides is strikingly different. The dissolution rates of CdTe monotonically decreased with increasing pH, the trend becoming more pronounced with increasing temperature. Activation energies were of the order of magnitude associated with surface controlled processes; they decreased with decreasing acidity. At pH 7, the CdTe dissolution rate increased linearly with dissolved oxygen. In anoxic solution, CdTe dissolved at a finite rate. In contrast, the dissolution rate of Bi2Te3 passed through a minimum at pH 5.3. The activation energy had a maximum in the rate minimum at pH 5.3 and fell below the threshold for diffusion control at pH 11. No oxygen dependence was detected. Bi2Te3 dissolves much more slowly than CdTe; from one to more than 3.5 orders of magnitude in the Bi2Te3 rate minimum. Both will readily dissolve under long-term landfill deposition conditions but comparatively slowly.

  20. Radioactive waste forms stabilized by ChemChar gasification: characterization and leaching behavior of cerium, thorium, protactinium, uranium, and neptunium.

    PubMed

    Marrero, T W; Morris, J S; Manahan, S E

    2004-02-01

    The uses of a thermally reductive gasification process in conjunction with vitrification and cementation for the long-term disposal of low level radioactive materials have been investigated. gamma-ray spectroscopy was used for analysis of carrier-free protactinium-233 and neptunium-239 and a stoichiometric amount of cerium (observed cerium-141) subsequent to gasification and leaching, up to 48 days. High resolution ICP-MS was used to analyze the cerium, thorium, and uranium from 46 to 438 days of leaching. Leaching procedures followed the guidance of ASTM Procedure C 1220-92, Standard Test Method for Static Leaching of Monolithic Waste Forms for Disposal of Radioactive Waste. The combination of the thermally reductive pretreatment, vitrification and cementation produced a highly non-leachable form suitable for long-term disposal of cerium, thorium, protactinium, uranium, and neptunium.

  1. A chemical-spectrochemical method for the determination of rare earth elements and thorium in cerium minerals

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rose, H.J.; Murata, K.J.; Carron, M.K.

    1954-01-01

    In a combined chemical-spectrochemical procedure for quantitatively determining rare earth elements in cerium minerals, cerium is determined volumetrically, a total rare earths plus thoria precipitate is separated chemically, the ceria content of the precipitate is raised to 80??0 percent by adding pure ceria, and the resulting mixture is analyzed for lanthanum, praseodymium, neodymium, samarium, gadolinium, yttrium, and thorium spectrochemically by means of the d.c. carbon arc. Spectral lines of singly ionized cerium are used as internal standard lines in the spectrochemical determination which is patterned after Fassel's procedure [1]. Results of testing the method with synthetic mixtures of rare earths and with samples of chemically analyzed cerium minerals show that the coefficient of variation for a quadruplicate determination of any element does not exceed 5??0 (excepting yttrium at concentrations less than 1 percent) and that the method is free of serious systematic error. ?? 1954.

  2. Synthesis and characterization of bismuth telluride based nanostructured thermoelectric composite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keshavarz Khorasgani, Mohsen

    Thermoelectric (TE) materials and devices are attractive in solid-state energy conversion applications such as waste heat recovery, air-conditioning, and refrigeration. Since the 1950's lots of unremitting efforts have been made to enhance the efficiency of energy conversion in TE materials (i. e. improving the figure of merit (ZT)), however, most of commercial bulk TE materials still suffer from low efficiency with ZTs around unity. To enhance the performance of bismuth telluride based TE alloys, we have developed composite TE materials, based on the idea that introducing more engineered interfaces in the bulk TE materials may lead to thermal conductivity reduction due to increased phonon scattering by these interfaces. In this approach it is expected that the electronic transport properties of the material are not effectively affected. Consequently, ZT enhancement can be achieved. In this dissertation we will discuss synthesis and characterization of two types of bismuth telluride based bulk composite TE materials. The first type is engineered to contain the presence of coherent interfaces between phases in the material resulting from different mixtures of totally miscible compounds with similar composition. The second type includes the nanocomposites with embedded foreign nano-particles in which the matrix and the particles are delimited by incoherent interfaces. The synthesis procedure, micro- and nano-structures as well as thermoelectric properties of these composites will be presented. In our study on the composites with coherent interfaces, we produced a series of different composites of p-type bismuth antimony telluride alloys and studied their microstructure and thermoelectric properties. Each composite consists of two phases that were obtained in powder form by mechanical alloying. Mixed powders in various proportions of the two different phases were consolidated by hot extrusion to obtain each bulk composite. The minimum grain size of bulk composites as

  3. Light microscopical localization of enzymes by means of cerium-based methods. I.V. Optimization procedures for acid phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Halbhuber, K J; Zimmermann, N; Feuerstein, H

    1986-01-01

    The earlier described cerium based histochemical reaction for acid phosphatase [Ce-Pb-reaction, Zimmermann and Halbhuber (1985)] was optimized. The target tissues (kidney, intestine) were fixed by perfusion with glutaraldehyde in cacodylate or piperazine buffer in anesthetized animals. Postfixation of prefixed sections is not advantageous because of the detectable repressing of the enzyme activity. Moreover, the employment of unfixed cryostat sections, which were postfixed, was always connected with a complete abolition of the acid phosphatase activity. The optimal concentration of the primary capture cerium III chloride in the incubation medium is about 1 mmol. Lower concentrations lead to an incomplete histochemical detection of phosphatase activity in lysosomes. The treatment of cryostat sections of perfusion fixed tissue with borohydride (diminution of aldehyde induced cross links) or with dimethylsulfoxide (extraction of lysosomal materials or the well known vehicle property) brought about an improvement of the penetration capacity for cerium-III-cations into the target structures. After conversion of the cerium phosphate (primary specific reaction product) into cerium perhydroxide, oxalate or fluoride, the Ce-Pb-reaction was negative. Therefore, these blocking reactions represent specific inhibition controls, which indicates the formation and presence of cerium phosphate. On the basis of these reactions it is possible to check the specificity of the histochemical Ce-Pb-reaction for phosphatase activity in sections.

  4. Rajkonkoski gold-telluride ore occurrence: A new high prospective type of complex noble metal mineralization in the Karelian Proterozoic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivashchenko, V. I.; Sundblad, K.; Toritsin, A. N.; Golubev, A. I.; Lavrov, O. B.

    2008-11-01

    The Rajkonkoski ore occurrence is located within the region of the Karelian craton (AR2) and the Svecofennian folded belt (PR1) conjugation. It is presented by quartz-carbonate veins in metadoleriles and a zone of brecciation, crumple, and silification of carbonaceous shales within the volcanites of the Soanlakhtinsky suite (PR1). Ore mineralization in black shales and quartz veins has features of genetic similarity presenting different levels of the ore system controlled by different range strike-slip fault dislocations. At the Rajkonkoski ore occurrence, 41 ore minerals have been identified: 12 tellurides (native tellurium, hedleyite, pilsenite, tsumoite, tellurobismuthite, hessite, stuetzite, radclidzhite, joseite-B, altaite, volynskite, petzite); 4 bismuth-tellurides of the following compositions Bi3Te, Bi3Te2, BiTe4, PbBiTe; 3 selenides (clausthalite, tellurolaitakarite, native selenium); and 12 native metals (gold, silver, electrum, copper, iron, lead, tin, bismuth, osmiridium). The contents of the main ore minerals in places exceed 10%, and the concentrations of elements reach as follows: Cu and Pb, 5%; Zn, Bi, 1%; Se, 219 ppm; Te, 171 ppm; Sb, 3 ppm; As, 5 ppm; Ag, >0.1%; Au, 35.28 ppm. Ore mineralization is formed during the temperature interval from 550°C up to <170oC in the conditions of high activity of Se and Te, and beginning from medium temperatures (>300°C) complete miscibilities galenite-clausthalite and galenite-altaite are observed. In aggregate with a wide temperature interval (>400°C) of ore process evolution and mineral specia variety of telluride and native metal mineralizations, the original “torsion” of different temperature mineralizations makes it possible to determine the affiliation of the Rajkonkoski ore occurrence to the xenothermal type deposits or epithermal “alkaline,” gold-telluride A-type characterized by a close connection with magmatism of increased alkalinity and the original geochemical (Te-V-F) and mineral

  5. Enhanced thermoelectric properties of bismuth telluride-organic hybrid films via graphene doping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, Airul Azha Abd; Umar, Akrajas Ali; Chen, Xiaomei; Salleh, Muhamad Mat; Oyama, Munetaka

    2016-02-01

    The thermoelectric properties of graphene-doped bismuth telluride-PEDOT:PSS-glycerol (hybrid) films were investigated. Prior to the study, p-type and n-type hybrid films were prepared by doping the PEDOT:PSS-glycerol with the p- and n-type bismuth telluride. Graphene-doped hybrid films were prepared by adding graphene particles of concentration ranging from 0.02 to 0.1 wt% into the hybrid films. Films of graphene-doped hybrid system were then prepared on a glass substrate using a spin-coating technique. It was found that the electrical conductivity of the hybrid films increases with the increasing of the graphene-dopant concentration and optimum at 0.08 wt% for both p- and n-type films, namely 400 and 195 S/cm, respectively. Further increasing in the concentration caused a decreasing in the electrical conductivity. Analysis of the thermoelectric properties of the films obtained that the p-type film exhibited significant improvement in its thermoelectric properties, where the thermoelectric properties increased with the increasing of the doping concentration. Meanwhile, for the case of n-type film, graphene doping showed a negative effect to the thermoelectrical properties, where the thermoelectric properties decreased with the increasing of doping concentration. Seebeck coefficient (and power factor) for optimum p-type and n-type hybrid thin films, i.e., doped with 0.08 wt% of graphene, is 20 μV/K (and 160 μW m-1 K-2) and 10 μV/K (and 19.5 μW m-1 K-2), respectively. The obtained electrical conductivity and thermoelectric properties of graphene-doped hybrid film are interestingly several orders higher than the pristine hybrid films. A thermocouple device fabricated utilizing the p- and n-type graphene-doped hybrid films can generate an electric voltage as high as 2.2 mV under a temperature difference between the hot-side and the cold-side terminal as only low as 55 K. This is equivalent to the output power as high as 24.2 nW (for output load as high as 50

  6. Transitions between two oscillatory states in a closed malonic acid Belousov-Zhabotinsky reaction simultaneously catalyzed by ferroin and cerium ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sjøgren, Carl E.; Kolboe, Stein; Ruoff, Peter

    1986-09-01

    At a certain temperature the malonic acid Belousov-Zhabotinsky reaction, which is simultaneously catalyzed by ferroin and cerium ions, can exhibit regular transitions between the ferroin oscillating and the cerium oscillating states. We believe that this is the first demonstration of transitions between two distinct oscillatory states in a closed system. The differences between ferroin and cerium catalysis are briefly discussed and the observed dynamic behaviour is qualitatively explained in terms of the Field-Körös-Noyes theory.

  7. Influence of cerium on the pulsed UV nanosecond laser processing of photostructurable glass ceramic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livingston, F. E.; Adams, P. M.; Helvajian, H.

    2005-07-01

    Photostructurable glass ceramic (PSGC) materials contain a sensitizer that is used to facilitate the optical exposure process. The primary role of the sensitizer is to absorb incident radiation and generate photoelectrons. With thermal treatment, these photoelectrons can then interact with nascent metal ions to induce the formation of metallic clusters and the precipitation of a soluble crystalline phase in the glass matrix. The photo-ionization efficiency of the sensitizer species is strongly dependent on its spectral absorption and oxidation state in the base glass. Stabilizing compounds are typically added to the glass matrix to maintain the photo-active oxidation state and promote efficient exposure. To investigate the effectiveness of the photo-initiator, we have conducted experiments in which sample coupons of a commercial PSGC material (Foturan™, Schott Corp., Germany) were carefully exposed to various photon doses by pulsed UV nanosecond lasers at λ = 266 nm and 355 nm. Foturan is a lithium aluminosilicate glass that contains trace amounts of cerium as the photosensitive agent (0.01-0.04 wt.% admixture Ce 2O 3). The photo-initiator efficiency was investigated by using samples with cerium and without cerium. The irradiation wavelengths were selected because they lie above and below the primary absorption band of the cerium photo-initiator. Optical transmission spectroscopy (OTS) was employed to identify and monitor the population density of the photo-induced trapped electron state as a function of incident laser irradiance. The irradiated samples were thermally processed and then analyzed again with OTS to measure the quenching of the trapped electron state and the concurrent growth of a spectral band associated with the formation of nanometer-scale metallic clusters. The growth of metallic clusters signifies the "fixing" of the exposure and permanent image formation in the glass. The OTS results reveal that for λ = 266 nm laser irradiation, at least two

  8. Multi-stage uplift of the Rocky Mountains: new age constraints on the Telluride Conglomerate and regional compilation of apatite fission track ages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donahue, M. S.; Karlstrom, K. E.; Gonzales, D. A.; Pecha, M.; McKeon, R. E.

    2011-12-01

    The Telluride Conglomerate, exposed on the western flanks of Oligocene caldera complexes of the San Juan Mountains of Colorado, has historically been considered an Eocene alluvial deposit overlying the "Rocky Mountain erosion surface" and pre-dating Oligocene volcanism. Measured sections show that the Telluride preserves an unroofing sequence with basal units dominated by Paleozoic sedimentary clasts transitioning into upper units dominated by locally derived Proterozoic basement mixed with previously unrecognized andesitic Oligocene volcanics. Paleoflow directions and thicknesses of the preserved unit indicate the Telluride Conglomerate was deposited by a large, high-energy WNW- flowing braided river system. Detrital zircon analysis indicates minimum ages for individual grains within the Telluride Conglomerate of 28.0 to 31.5 Ma. This, plus the entrained volcanic clasts, redefines the unit as being of Oligocene age and indicates that conglomeratic deposition overlapped with regional San Juan volcanism and just predated major caldera eruptions at 28.4 Ma (San Juan and Uncompahgre) and 27.6 Ma (Silverton). We interpret the deposition of the Telluride Conglomerate to be the depositional response to regional uplift and erosion related to early stages of San Juan magmatism. These units have undergone significant post-depositional tectonism: the Telluride Conglomerate is found at ~9,000ft elevation near Telluride, CO, but is at ~13,000' at its westernmost exposure at Mt. Wilson. We attribute this differential uplift to be associated with faulting, pluton emplacement, and additional mantle driven uplift associated with the emplacement and cooling of the Wilson Stock in the last 20-22 Ma as documented by Miocene cooling seen in apatite helium (AHe) ages. This cooling fits into our regional compilation of published apatite fission track (AFT) and AHe data showing temporally and spatially partitioned Cenozoic cooling indicative of multistage uplift of the Rocky Mountain

  9. Near-infrared photodetectors based on mercury indium telluride single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaolei; Sun, Weiguo; Lu, Zhengxiong; Zhang, Liang; Zhao, Lan; Ding, JiaXin; Yan, Guoqing

    2008-03-01

    Attempt to form the Schottky barrier on mercury indium telluride (MIT) surface by deposition transparent conducting electrode (TCE) and avoid the negative results by non-rectifier contacts nature, we have investigated the oxidation of clean MIT surfaces to form an insulating layer to overcome this disadvantage by metal-insulator-semiconductor (MIS) photodetectors designing. Oxide film is grown on the MIT surface by plasma enhance chemical vapor deposition (PECVD). Previously cleaned MIT wafers were dipped and boiled in solution, which consists of mixture of bromine and an organic solvent in ratio of 1:50. By the way of using these films as intermediate slightly conducting insulator, a fast-response MIT based surface-barrier photodetectors have been developed. Pt films were used as TCE frontal electrode by vacuum magnetron sputtering (VMS). The current-voltage characteristic is described quantitatively based on the energy diagram and the found parameters of the Schottky barrier. Details of oxidation process, Schottky diodes, as well as the photodetectors fabrication and characterizations are discussed.

  10. Study of a high-resolution, 3-D positioning cadmium zinc telluride detector for PET

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Y; Matteson, J L; Skelton, R T; Deal, A C; Stephan, E A; Duttweiler, F; Gasaway, T M; Levin, C S

    2011-01-01

    This paper investigates the performance of 1 mm resolution Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT) detectors for positron emission tomography (PET) capable of positioning the 3-D coordinates of individual 511 keV photon interactions. The detectors comprise 40 mm × 40 mm × 5 mm monolithic CZT crystals that employ a novel cross-strip readout with interspersed steering electrodes to obtain high spatial and energy resolution. The study found a single anode FWHM energy resolution of 3.06±0.39% at 511 keV throughout most the detector volume. Improved resolution is expected with properly shielded front-end electronics. Measurements made using a collimated beam established the efficacy of the steering electrodes in facilitating enhanced charge collection across anodes, as well as a spatial resolution of 0.44±0.07 mm in the direction orthogonal to the electrode planes. Finally, measurements based on coincidence electronic collimation yielded a point spread function with 0.78±0.10 mm FWHM, demonstrating 1 mm spatial resolution capability transverse to the anodes – as expected from the 1 mm anode pitch. These findings indicate that the CZT-based detector concept has excellent performance and shows great promise for a high-resolution PET system. PMID:21335649

  11. Reproductive toxicity and gender differences induced by cadmium telluride quantum dots in an invertebrate model organism

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Si-Qi; Xing, Rui; Zhou, Yan-Feng; Li, Kai-Le; Su, Yuan-Yuan; Qiu, Jian-Feng; Zhang, Yun-Hu; Zhang, Ke-Qin; He, Yao; Lu, Xiao-Ping; Xu, Shi-Qing

    2016-01-01

    Sexual glands are key sites affected by nanotoxicity, but there is no sensitive assay for measuring reproductive toxicity in animals. The aim of this study was to investigate the toxic effects of cadmium telluride quantum dots (CdTe-QDs) on gonads in a model organism, Bombyx mori. After dorsal vein injection of 0.32 nmol of CdTe-QDs per individual, the QDs passed through the outer membranes of gonads via the generation of ROS in the membranes of spermatocysts and ovarioles, as well as internal germ cells, thereby inducing early germ cell death or malformations via complex mechanisms related to apoptosis and autophagy through mitochondrial and lysosomal pathways. Histological observations of the gonads and quantitative analyses of germ cell development showed that the reproductive toxicity was characterized by obvious male sensitivity. Exposure to QDs in the early stage of males had severe adverse effects on the quantity and quality of sperm, which was the main reason for the occurrence of unfertilized eggs. Ala- or Gly-conjugated QDs could reduce the nanotoxicity of CdTe-QDs during germ cell development and fertilization of their offspring. The results demonstrate that males are preferable models for evaluating the reproductive toxicity of QDs in combined in vivo/in vitro investigations. PMID:27669995

  12. Reproductive toxicity and gender differences induced by cadmium telluride quantum dots in an invertebrate model organism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Si-Qi; Xing, Rui; Zhou, Yan-Feng; Li, Kai-Le; Su, Yuan-Yuan; Qiu, Jian-Feng; Zhang, Yun-Hu; Zhang, Ke-Qin; He, Yao; Lu, Xiao-Ping; Xu, Shi-Qing

    2016-09-01

    Sexual glands are key sites affected by nanotoxicity, but there is no sensitive assay for measuring reproductive toxicity in animals. The aim of this study was to investigate the toxic effects of cadmium telluride quantum dots (CdTe-QDs) on gonads in a model organism, Bombyx mori. After dorsal vein injection of 0.32 nmol of CdTe-QDs per individual, the QDs passed through the outer membranes of gonads via the generation of ROS in the membranes of spermatocysts and ovarioles, as well as internal germ cells, thereby inducing early germ cell death or malformations via complex mechanisms related to apoptosis and autophagy through mitochondrial and lysosomal pathways. Histological observations of the gonads and quantitative analyses of germ cell development showed that the reproductive toxicity was characterized by obvious male sensitivity. Exposure to QDs in the early stage of males had severe adverse effects on the quantity and quality of sperm, which was the main reason for the occurrence of unfertilized eggs. Ala- or Gly-conjugated QDs could reduce the nanotoxicity of CdTe-QDs during germ cell development and fertilization of their offspring. The results demonstrate that males are preferable models for evaluating the reproductive toxicity of QDs in combined in vivo/in vitro investigations.

  13. Friction Consolidation Processing of n-Type Bismuth-Telluride Thermoelectric Material

    SciTech Connect

    Whalen, Scott A.; Jana, Saumyadeep; Catalini, David; Overman, Nicole R.; Sharp, Jeffrey

    2016-04-13

    This work focused on the development of a new mechanical processing route, called Friction Consolidation Processing (FCP), for densifying bismuth-telluride (Bi2Te3) powders into bulk form. FCP is a solid-state process wherein a rotating tool was used to generate severe plastic deformation within the Bi2Te3 powder, resulting in a recrystallizing flow of material. Upon cooling, the non-equilibrium microstructure within the flow was locked into the material. FCP was demonstrated on -325 mesh (~44 micron) n-type Bi2Te3 feedstock powder to form pucks with 92% theoretical density having a diameter of 25.4mm and thickness of 4.2mm. FCP was shown to achieve highly textured bulk materials, with sub-micron grain size, directly from coarse particle feedstock powders in a single process. An average grain size of 0.8 microns was determined for one sample and a multiple of uniform distribution (MUD) value of 15.49 was calculated for the (0001) pole figure from another sample. These results indicate that FCP can yield highly refined grains and textural alignment of the (0001) basal planes in Bi2Te3. ZT=0.37 at 336K was achieved for undoped stoichiometric Bi2Te3, which is near the “text book” value of ZT=0.5.

  14. A novel approach of chemical mechanical polishing for cadmium zinc telluride wafers

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhenyu; Wang, Bo; Zhou, Ping; Kang, Renke; Zhang, Bi; Guo, Dongming

    2016-01-01

    A novel approach of chemical mechanical polishing (CMP) is developed for cadmium zinc telluride (CdZnTe or CZT) wafers. The approach uses environment-friendly slurry that consists of mainly silica, hydrogen peroxide, and citric acid. This is different from the previously reported slurries that are usually composed of strong acid, alkali, and bromine methanol, and are detrimental to the environment and operators. Surface roughness 0.5 nm and 4.7 nm are achieved for Ra and peak-to-valley (PV) values respectively in a measurement area of 70 × 50 μm2, using the developed novel approach. Fundamental polishing mechanisms are also investigated in terms of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and electrochemical measurements. Hydrogen peroxide dominates the passivating process during the CMP of CZT wafers, indicating by the lowest passivation current density among silica, citric acid and hydrogen peroxide solution. Chemical reaction equations are proposed during CMP according to the XPS and electrochemical measurements. PMID:27225310

  15. Resonant Enhancement of Charge Density Wave Diffraction in the Rare-Earth Tri-Tellurides

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, W.S.; Sorini, A.P.; Yi, M.; Chuang, Y.D.; Moritz, B.; Yang, W.L.; Chu, J.-H.; Kuo, H.H.; Gonzalez, A.G.Cruz; Fisher, I.R.; Hussain, Z.; Devereau, T.P.; Shen, Z.X.

    2012-05-15

    We performed resonant soft X-ray diffraction on known charge density wave (CDW) compounds, rare earth tri-tellurides. Near the M{sub 5} (3d - 4f) absorption edge of rare earth ions, an intense diffraction peak is detected at a wavevector identical to that of CDW state hosted on Te{sub 2} planes, indicating a CDW-induced modulation on the rare earth ions. Surprisingly, the temperature dependence of the diffraction peak intensity demonstrates an exponential increase at low temperatures, vastly different than that of the CDW order parameter. Assuming 4f multiplet splitting due to the CDW states, we present a model to calculate X-ray absorption spectrum and resonant profile of the diffraction peak, agreeing well with experimental observations. Our results demonstrate a situation where the temperature dependence of resonant X-ray diffraction peak intensity is not directly related to the intrinsic behavior of the order parameter associated with the electronic order, but is dominated by the thermal occupancy of the valence states.

  16. Nanostructure Characterization of Bismuth Telluride-Based Powders and Extruded Alloys by Various Experimental Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasilevskiy, D.; Bourbia, O.; Gosselin, S.; Turenne, S.; Masut, R. A.

    2011-05-01

    High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) observations of mechanically alloyed powders and bulk extruded alloys give experimental evidence of nanosized grains in bismuth telluride-based materials. In this study we combine HRTEM observations and x-ray diffraction (XRD) measurements, of both mechanically alloyed powders and extruded samples, with mechanical spectroscopy (MS) of extruded rods. Both HRTEM and XRD show that nanostructures with an average grain size near 25 nm can be achieved within 2 h of mechanical alloying from pure elements in an attritor-type milling machine. Residual strain orthogonal to the c-axis of powder nanoparticles has been evaluated at about 1.2% by XRD peak broadening. In contrast, XRD has been found unreliable for evaluation of grain size in highly textured extruded materials for which diffraction conditions are similar to those of single crystals, while MS appears promising for study of bulk extruded samples. Nanostructured extruded alloys at room temperature exhibit an internal friction (IF) background that is one order of magnitude higher than that of conventional zone-melted material with a grain size of several millimeters. IF as a function of sample temperature gives activation energies that are also different between bulk materials having nano- and millimeter-size grains, a result that is attributed to different creep mechanisms. Nanograin size, as well as orientation and volumetric proportion, provide valuable information for optimization of technological parameters of thermoelectric alloys and should be carefully cross-examined by various independent methods.

  17. Novel Cadmium Zinc Telluride Devices for Myocardial Perfusion Imaging-Technological Aspects and Clinical Applications.

    PubMed

    Ben-Haim, Simona; Kennedy, John; Keidar, Zohar

    2016-07-01

    Myocardial perfusion imaging plays an important role in the assessment of patients with known or suspected coronary artery disease and is well established for diagnosis and for prognostic evaluation in these patients. The dedicated cardiac SPECT cameras with solid-state cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) detectors were first introduced a decade ago. A large body of evidence is building up, showing the superiority of the new technology compared with conventional gamma cameras. Not only the CZT detectors, but also new collimator geometries, the ability to perform focused imaging optimized for the heart and advances in data processing algorithms all contribute to the significantly improved sensitivity up to 8-10 times, as well as improved energy resolution and improved reconstructed spatial resolution compared with conventional technology. In this article, we provide an overview of the physical characteristics of the CZT cameras, as well as a review of the literature published so far, including validation studies in comparison with conventional myocardial perfusion imaging and with invasive coronary angiography, significant reduction in radiation dose, and new imaging protocols enabled by the new technology.

  18. Directional Solidification of Mercury Cadmium Telluride During the Second United States Microgravity Payload Mission (USMP-2)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gillies, D. C.; Lehoczky, S. L.; Szofran, F. R.; Watring, D. A.; Alexander, H. A.; Jerman, G. A.

    1996-01-01

    As a solid solution semiconductor having, a large separation between liquidus and solidus, mercury cadmium telluride (MCT) presents a formidable challenge to crystal growers desiring an alloy of high compositional uniformity. To avoid constitutional supercooling during Bridgman crystal growth it is necessary to solidify slowly in a high temperature gradient region. The necessary translation rate of less than 1 mm/hr results in a situation where fluid flow induced by gravity on earth is a significant factor in material transport. The Advanced Automated Directional Solidification Furnace (AADSF) is equipped to provide the stable thermal environment with a high gradient, and the required slow translation rate needed. Ground based experiments in AADSF show clearly the dominance of flow driven transport. The first flight of AADSF in low gravity on USMP-2 provided an opportunity to test theories of fluid flow in MCT and showed several solidification regimes which are very different from those observed on earth. Residual acceleration vectors in the orbiter during the mission were measured by the Orbital Acceleration Research Experiment (OARE), and correlated well with observed compositional differences in the samples.

  19. Spectral x-ray computed tomography scanner using a cadmium telluride detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Eiichi; Oda, Yasuyuki; Yamaguchi, Satoshi; Hagiwara, Osahiko; Matsukiyo, Hiroshi; Watanabe, Manabu; Kusachi, Shinya

    2016-10-01

    To obtain four tomograms with four different photon energy ranges simultaneously, we have developed a quad-energy Xray photon counter with a cadmium telluride (CdTe) detector and four sets of comparators and frequency-voltage converters (FVCs). X-ray photons are detected using the CdTe detector, and the event pulses from a shaping amplifier are sent to four comparators simultaneously to regulate four threshold energies of 20, 35, 50 and 65 keV. Using this counter, the energy ranges are 20-100, 35-100, 50-100 and 65-100 keV; the maximum energy corresponds to the tube voltage. Xray photons in the four ranges are counted using the comparators, and the logical pulses from the comparators are input to the FVCs. The outputs from the four FVCs are input to a personal computer through an analog-digital converter (ADC) to carry out quad-energy imaging. To observe contrast variations with changes in the threshold energy, we performed spectral computed tomography utilizing the quad-energy photon counter at a tube voltage of 100 kV and a current of 8.0 μA. In the spectral CT, four tomograms were obtained simultaneously with four energy ranges. The image contrast varied with changes in the threshold energy, and the exposure time for tomography was 9.8 min.

  20. Transition-metal doped sulfide, selenide, and telluride laser crystal and lasers

    DOEpatents

    Krupke, William F.; Page, Ralph H.; DeLoach, Laura D.; Payne, Stephen A.

    1996-01-01

    A new class of solid state laser crystals and lasers are formed of transition metal doped sulfide, selenide, and telluride host crystals which have four fold coordinated substitutional sites. The host crystals include II-VI compounds. The host crystal is doped with a transition metal laser ion, e.g., chromium, cobalt or iron. In particular, Cr.sup.2+ -doped ZnS and ZnSe generate laser action near 2.3 .mu.m. Oxide, chloride, fluoride, bromide and iodide crystals with similar structures can also be used. Important aspects of these laser materials are the tetrahedral site symmetry of the host crystal, low excited state absorption losses and high luminescence efficiency, and the d.sup.4 and d.sup.6 electronic configurations of the transition metal ions. The same materials are also useful as saturable absorbers for passive Q-switching applications. The laser materials can be used as gain media in amplifiers and oscillators; these gain media can be incorporated into waveguides and semiconductor lasers.

  1. Transition-metal doped sulfide, selenide, and telluride laser crystal and lasers

    DOEpatents

    Krupke, W.F.; Page, R.H.; DeLoach, L.D.; Payne, S.A.

    1996-07-30

    A new class of solid state laser crystals and lasers are formed of transition metal doped sulfide, selenide, and telluride host crystals which have four fold coordinated substitutional sites. The host crystals include II-VI compounds. The host crystal is doped with a transition metal laser ion, e.g., chromium, cobalt or iron. In particular, Cr{sup 2+}-doped ZnS and ZnSe generate laser action near 2.3 {micro}m. Oxide, chloride, fluoride, bromide and iodide crystals with similar structures can also be used. Important aspects of these laser materials are the tetrahedral site symmetry of the host crystal, low excited state absorption losses and high luminescence efficiency, and the d{sup 4} and d{sup 6} electronic configurations of the transition metal ions. The same materials are also useful as saturable absorbers for passive Q-switching applications. The laser materials can be used as gain media in amplifiers and oscillators; these gain media can be incorporated into waveguides and semiconductor lasers. 18 figs.

  2. A novel approach of chemical mechanical polishing for cadmium zinc telluride wafers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhenyu; Wang, Bo; Zhou, Ping; Kang, Renke; Zhang, Bi; Guo, Dongming

    2016-05-01

    A novel approach of chemical mechanical polishing (CMP) is developed for cadmium zinc telluride (CdZnTe or CZT) wafers. The approach uses environment-friendly slurry that consists of mainly silica, hydrogen peroxide, and citric acid. This is different from the previously reported slurries that are usually composed of strong acid, alkali, and bromine methanol, and are detrimental to the environment and operators. Surface roughness 0.5 nm and 4.7 nm are achieved for Ra and peak-to-valley (PV) values respectively in a measurement area of 70 × 50 μm2, using the developed novel approach. Fundamental polishing mechanisms are also investigated in terms of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and electrochemical measurements. Hydrogen peroxide dominates the passivating process during the CMP of CZT wafers, indicating by the lowest passivation current density among silica, citric acid and hydrogen peroxide solution. Chemical reaction equations are proposed during CMP according to the XPS and electrochemical measurements.

  3. Use of Rutherford backscattering and optical spectroscopy to study boron implantation in cadmium telluride. Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Jamieson, D.N.; Bowman, R.C.; Adams, P.M.; Knudsen, J.F.; Downing, R.G.

    1988-10-03

    The effect of large-dose boron implantation in single-crystal cadmium telluride (CdTe) was investigated by Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS), with channeling double-crystal x-ray diffraction (DCD), and photoreflectance (PR) spectroscopy. Comparisons are made with the results of identical B implantations of silicon and gallium arsenides crystals. Multiple energy implantations were performed at room temperature and liquid nitrogen temperature with total doses up to 1.5 x 10 W B ions/sq. cm. The implanted B distribution was measured with neutron depth profiling (NDP) and found to agree well with Monte Carlo ion-range calculations. The RBS results showed that the CdTe crystals had not been rendered completely amorphous even for the highest-dose implantation unlike GaAs and Si. Furthermore, the DCD results showed little implantation-induced structure in the rocking curves from the implanted CdTe crystals, in contrast to GaAs. The consequences of annealing at 500 C in an attempt to regrow the crystal structure are also discussed.

  4. Temperature dependent van der Pauw-Hall measurements on sodium doped single crystalline cadmium telluride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Faisal R.

    2015-03-01

    In this report, results of the temperature dependent electrical conductivity measurements conducted on single crystalline cadmium telluride (CdTe), containing sodium (Na) impurities are presented and discussed. The electrical conductivity measurements were conducted using an apparatus that allowed the implementation of a standard van der Pauw-Hall effect technique through which the electrical resistivity, concentration of majority carriers, as well as the carrier mobility were determined for temperatures ranging between 24 K and 350 K. Over this temperature range, the electrical resistivity was observed to change by 7 orders of magnitude. Hall measurements showed that the hole concentration at 300 K was ˜3 × 1015 cm-3 and the hole mobility at the same temperature was ˜80 cm2/V s. Measuring the concentration of holes as a function of the sample temperature enabled the estimation of the acceptor energy level with respect to the valence band maximum to be ˜60 meV. The same data also revealed the potential presence of a compensating donor level. Furthermore, the hole mobility was also analyzed over the entire temperature range and the data revealed that above 100 K, the carrier mobility was dominated by the scattering of holes from lattice vibrations.

  5. Improved performance of silicon nanowire/cadmium telluride quantum dots/organic hybrid solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ge, Zhaoyun; Xu, Ling; Zhang, Renqi; Xue, Zhaoguo; Wang, Hongyu; Xu, Jun; Yu, Yao; Su, Weining; Ma, Zhongyuan; Chen, Kunji

    2015-04-01

    We fabricated silicon nanowire/cadmium telluride quantum dots (CdTe QDs)/organic hybrid solar cells and investigated their structure and electrical properties. Transmission electron microscope revealed that CdTe QDs were uniformly distributed on the surface of the silicon nanowires, which made PEDOT:PSS easily filled the space between SiNWs. The current density-voltage (J-V) characteristics of hybrid solar cells were investigated both in dark and under illumination. The result shows that the performance of the hybrid solar cells with CdTe QDs layer has an obvious improvement. The optimal short-circuit current density (Jsc) of solar cells with CdTe QDs layer can reach 33.5 mA/cm2. Compared with the solar cells without CdTe QDs, Jsc has an increase of 15.1%. Power conversion efficiency of solar cells also increases by 28.8%. The enhanced performance of the hybrid solar cells with CdTe QDs layers are ascribed to down-shifting effect of CdTe QDs and the modification of the silicon nanowires surface with CdTe QDs. The result of our experiments suggests that hybrid solar cells with CdTe QDs modified are promising candidates for solar cell application.

  6. Characterization of Pixelated Cadmium-Zinc-Telluride Detectors for Astrophysical Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaskin, Jessica; Sharma, Dharma; Ramsey, Brian; Seller, Paul

    2003-01-01

    Comparisons of charge sharing and charge loss measurements between two pixelated Cadmium-Zinc-Telluride (CdZnTe) detectors are discussed. These properties along with the detector geometry help to define the limiting energy resolution and spatial resolution of the detector in question. The first detector consists of a 1-mm-thick piece of CdZnTe sputtered with a 4x4 array of pixels with pixel pitch of 750 microns (inter-pixel gap is 100 microns). Signal readout is via discrete ultra-low-noise preamplifiers, one for each of the 16 pixels. The second detector consists of a 2-mm-thick piece of CdZnTe sputtered with a 16x16 array of pixels with a pixel pitch of 300 microns (inter-pixel gap is 50 microns). This crystal is bonded to a custom-built readout chip (ASIC) providing all front-end electronics to each of the 256 independent pixels. These detectors act as precursors to that which will be used at the focal plane of the High Energy Replicated Optics (HERO) telescope currently being developed at Marshall Space Flight Center. With a telescope focal length of 6 meters, the detector needs to have a spatial resolution of around 200 microns in order to take full advantage of the HERO angular resolution. We discuss to what degree charge sharing will degrade energy resolution but will improve our spatial resolution through position interpolation.

  7. Inhibition of autophagy contributes to the toxicity of cadmium telluride quantum dots in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Junpeng; Shao, Ming; Lai, Lu; Liu, Yi; Xie, Zhixiong

    2016-01-01

    Cadmium telluride quantum dots (CdTe QDs) are used as near-infrared probes in biologic and medical applications, but their cytological effects and mechanism of potential toxicity are still unclear. In this study, we evaluated the toxicity of CdTe QDs of different sizes and investigated their mechanism of toxicity in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. A growth inhibition assay revealed that orange-emitting CdTe (O-CdTe) QDs (half inhibitory concentration [IC50] =59.44±12.02 nmol/L) were more toxic than green-emitting CdTe QDs (IC50 =186.61±19.74 nmol/L) to S. cerevisiae. Further studies on toxicity mechanisms using a transmission electron microscope and green fluorescent protein tagged Atg8 processing assay revealed that O-CdTe QDs could partially inhibit autophagy at a late stage, which differs from the results reported in mammalian cells. Moreover, autophagy inhibited at a late stage by O-CdTe QDs could be partially recovered by enhancing autophagy with rapamycin (an autophagy activator), combined with an increased number of living cells. These results indicate that inhibition of autophagy acts as a toxicity mechanism of CdTe QDs in S. cerevisiae. This work reports a novel toxicity mechanism of CdTe QDs in yeast and provides valuable information on the effect of CdTe QDs on the processes of living cells. PMID:27524895

  8. Investigation of the Electronic Properties of Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT) Detectors using a Nuclear Microprobe

    SciTech Connect

    BRUNETT,BRUCE A.; DOYLE,BARNEY L.; JAMES,RALPH B.; VIZKELETHY,GYORGY; WALSH,DAVID S.

    1999-10-18

    The electronic transport properties of Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT) determine the charge collection efficiency (i.e. the signal quality) of CZT detectors. These properties vary on both macroscopic and microscopic scale and depend on the presence of impurities and defects introduced during the crystal growth. Ion Beam Induced Charge Collection (IBICC) is a proven method to measure the charge collection efficiency. Using an ion microbeam, the charge collection efficiency can be mapped with submicron resolution, and the map of electronic properties (such as drift length) can be calculated from the measurement. A more sophisticated version of IBICC, the Time Resolved IBICC (TRIBICC) allows them to determine the mobility and the life time of the charge carriers by recording and analyzing the transient waveform of the detector signal. Furthermore, lateral IBICC and TRIBICC can provide information how the charge collection efficiency depends on the depth where the charge carriers are generated. This allows one to deduce information on the distribution of the electric field and transport properties of the charge carriers along the detector axis. IBICC and TRIBICC were used at the Sandia microbeam facility to image electronic properties of several CZT detectors. From the lateral TRIBICC measurement the electron and hole drift length profiles were calculated.

  9. One-Dimensional Fast Transient Simulator for Modeling Cadmium Sulfide/Cadmium Telluride Solar Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Da

    Solar energy, including solar heating, solar architecture, solar thermal electricity and solar photovoltaics, is one of the primary alternative energy sources to fossil fuel. Being one of the most important techniques, significant research has been conducted in solar cell efficiency improvement. Simulation of various structures and materials of solar cells provides a deeper understanding of device operation and ways to improve their efficiency. Over the last two decades, polycrystalline thin-film Cadmium-Sulfide and Cadmium-Telluride (CdS/CdTe) solar cells fabricated on glass substrates have been considered as one of the most promising candidate in the photovoltaic technologies, for their similar efficiency and low costs when compared to traditional silicon-based solar cells. In this work a fast one dimensional time-dependent/steady-state drift-diffusion simulator, accelerated by adaptive non-uniform mesh and automatic time-step control, for modeling solar cells has been developed and has been used to simulate a CdS/CdTe solar cell. These models are used to reproduce transients of carrier transport in response to step-function signals of different bias and varied light intensity. The time-step control models are also used to help convergence in steady-state simulations where constrained material constants, such as carrier lifetimes in the order of nanosecond and carrier mobility in the order of 100 cm2/Vs, must be applied.

  10. Characterization of Pixelated Cadmium-Zinc-Telluride Detectors for Astrophysical Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaskin, Jessica; Sharma, Dharma; Ramsey, Brian; Seller, Paul

    2003-01-01

    Comparisons of charge sharing and charge loss measurements between two pixelated Cadmium-Zinc-Telluride (CdZnTe) detectors are discussed. These properties along with the detector geometry help to define the limiting energy resolution and spatial resolution of the detector in question. The first detector consists of a 1-mm-thick piece of CdZnTe sputtered with a 4x4 array of pixels with pixel pitch of 750 microns (inter-pixel gap is 100 microns). Signal readout is via discrete ultra-low-noise preamplifiers, one for each of the 16 pixels. The second detector consists of a 2-mm-thick piece of CdZnTe sputtered with a 16x16 array of pixels with a pixel pitch of 300 microns (inter-pixel gap is 50 microns). This crystal is bonded to a custom-built readout chip (ASIC) providing all front-end electronics to each of the 256 independent pixels. These detectors act as precursors to that which will be used at the focal plane of the High Energy Replicated Optics (HERO) telescope currently being developed at Marshall Space Flight Center. With a telescope focal length of 6 meters, the detector needs to have a spatial resolution of around 200 microns in order to take full advantage of the HERO angular resolution. We discuss to what degree charge sharing will degrade energy resolution but will improve our spatial resolution through position interpolation.

  11. LEACHING OF CADMIUM, TELLURIUM AND COPPER FROM CADMIUM TELLURIDE PHOTOVOLTAIC MODULES.

    SciTech Connect

    FTHENAKIS,V.

    2004-02-03

    Separating the metals from the glass is the first step in recycling end-of-life cadmium telluride photovoltaic modules and manufacturing scrap. We accomplished this by leaching the metals in solutions of various concentrations of acids and hydrogen peroxide. A relatively dilute solution of sulfuric acid and hydrogen peroxide was found to be most effective for leaching cadmium and tellurium from broken pieces of CdTe PV modules. A solution comprising 5 mL of hydrogen peroxide per kg of PV scrap in 1 M sulfuric acid, gave better results than the 12 mL H{sub 2}O{sub 2}/kg, 3.2 M H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} solution currently used in the industry. Our study also showed that this dilute solution is more effective than hydrochloric-acid solutions and it can be reused after adding a small amount of hydrogen peroxide. These findings, when implemented in large-scale operation, would result in significant savings due to reductions in volume of the concentrated leaching agents (H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} and H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) and of the alkaline reagents required to neutralize the residuals of leaching.

  12. Cadmium telluride photovoltaic manufacturing technology. Annual subcontract report, 7 January 1994--6 January 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Weisiger, D.; Albright, S.P.; Brines, J.; Thompson, R.

    1995-11-01

    This report describes work performed by Golden Photon, Inc. (GPI), to conduct research under the PVMaT program, Phase 2B. The objective of the research is to advance GPI`s manufacturing technology, reduce module production costs, increase average module performance, and identify ways to expand production capacity. More specifically, the tasks established for Phase I were to design and install leasehold improvements for the 2-MW production line; to improve and develop product design, efficiency, and marketability; to ensure uninterrupted qualified supplies and raw materials for production; to address environmental, health, and safety issues encountered during production of photovoltaic modules; and to reduce the cost of manufacturing modules. During the first half of this reporting period, the development, design, and debugging of cell interconnection equipment critical to start-up was completed. During the second and third quarters, the primary focus was on the substrate deposition steps (tin oxide, cadmium sulfide, and cadmium telluride) and cell interconnection steps (division). In general, process development, engineering, and quality teams continued to focus on identifying, baselining, and improving (through redesign) actual process equipment operation parameters to meet the required PV panel specifications and improve process throughput rates and yields.

  13. Spectroscopic ellipsometry as a process control tool for manufacturing cadmium telluride thin film photovoltaic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Westcott P.

    In recent decades, there has been concern regarding the sustainability of fossil fuels. One of the more promising alternatives is Cadmium Telluride (CdTe) thin-film photovoltaic (PV) devices. Improved quality measurement techniques may aid in improving this existing technology. Spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) is a common, non-destructive technique for measuring thin films in the silicon wafer industry. SE results have also been tied to properties believed to play a role in CdTe PV device efficiency. A study assessing the potential of SE for use as a quality measurement tool had not been previously reported. Samples of CdTe devices produced by both laboratory and industrial scale processes were measured by SE and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). Mathematical models of the optical characteristics of the devices were developed and fit to SE data from multiple angles and locations on each sample. Basic statistical analysis was performed on results from the automated fits to provide an initial evaluation of SE as a quantitative quality measurement process. In all cases studied, automated SE models produced average stack thickness values within 10% of the values produced by SEM, and standard deviations for the top bulk layer thickness were less than 1% of the average values.

  14. Optimal thallium-201 dose in cadmium-zinc-telluride SPECT myocardial perfusion imaging.

    PubMed

    Ishihara, Masaru; Taniguchi, Yasuyo; Onoguchi, Masahisa; Shibutani, Takayuki

    2016-12-22

    We aimed to determine the optimal thallium 201 chloride (thallium-201) dose using a novel ultrafast cardiac gamma camera with cadmium-zinc-telluride (CZT) solid-state semiconductor detectors (D-SPECT). The optimal thallium-201 dose for obtaining left ventricular (LV) myocardial counts was determined from a phantom study. Consecutive 292 patients underwent stress myocardial perfusion imaging with a thallium-201 injection. Stress test comprised exercise or pharmacological (adenosine) provocation. We calculated an optimal thallium-201 dose that resulted in better LV myocardial counts during 6 minutes of acquisition time. We corrected the respective values according to the patient's age, sex, body mass index (BMI), and type of stress test. The lowest thallium-201 dose for obtaining acceptable imaging was 1.2 million counts. Radiopharmaceutical doses showed a positive correlation with the patient's age (P < .001), sex (P = .012), BMI (P < .001), and type of stress test (P < .001). Multivariate analysis revealed that the patient's BMI and the type of stress test were statistically significant factors for determining the correct radiopharmaceutical dose (P < .001 for both). For clinical use of the CZT SPECT system, the optimal individual thallium-201 doses can be determined based on the patient's BMI and type of stress test.

  15. Semiconductor nanocrystals functionalized with antimony telluride zintl ions for nanostructured thermoelectrics.

    PubMed

    Kovalenko, Maksym V; Spokoyny, Boris; Lee, Jong-Soo; Scheele, Marcus; Weber, Andrew; Perera, Susanthri; Landry, Daniel; Talapin, Dmitri V

    2010-05-19

    The energy efficiency of heat engines could be improved by the partial recovery of waste heat using thermoelectric (TE) generators. We show the possibility of designing nanostructured TE materials using colloidal inorganic nanocrystals functionalized with molecular antimony telluride complexes belonging to the family of Zintl ions. The unique advantage of using Zintl ions as the nanocrystal surface ligands is the possibility to convert them into crystalline metal chalcogenides, thus linking individual nanobuilding blocks into a macroscopic assembly of electronically coupled functional modules. This approach allows preserving the benefits of nanostructuring and quantum confinement while enabling facile charge transport through the interparticle boundaries. A developed methodology was applied for solution-based fabrication of nanostructured n- and p-type Bi(2-x)Sb(x)Te(3) alloys with tunable composition and PbTe-Sb(2)Te(3) nanocomposites with controlled grain size. Characterization of the TE properties of these materials showed that their Seebeck coefficients, electrical and thermal conductivities, and ZT values compared favorably with those of previously reported solution-processed TE materials.

  16. Energy-discriminating X-ray computed tomography system utilizing a cadmium telluride detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Eiichi; Abderyim, Purkhet; Enomoto, Toshiyuki; Watanabe, Manabu; Hitomi, Keitaro; Takahasi, Kiyomi; Sato, Shigehiro; Ogawae, Akira; Onagawa, Jun

    2010-07-01

    An energy-discriminating K-edge X-ray computed tomography (CT) system is useful for increasing contrast resolution of a target region utilizing contrast media and for reducing the absorbed dose for patients. The CT system is of the first-generation type with a cadmium telluride (CdTe) detector, and a projection curve is obtained by translation scanning using the CdTe detector in conjunction with an x-stage. An object is rotated by the rotation step angle using a turntable between the translation scans. Thus, CT is carried out by repeating the translation scanning and the rotation of an object. Penetrating X-ray photons from the object are detected by the CdTe detector, and event signals of X-ray photons are produced using charge-sensitive and shaping amplifiers. Both the photon energy and the energy width are selected by use of a multi-channel analyzer, and the number of photons is counted by a counter card. Demonstration of enhanced iodine K-edge X-ray CT was carried out by selecting photons with energies just beyond the iodine K-edge energy of 33.2 keV.

  17. Simulation study comparing high-purity germanium and cadmium zinc telluride detectors for breast imaging

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, DL; Peterson, TE

    2014-01-01

    We conducted simulations to compare the potential imaging performance for breast cancer detection with High-Purity Germanium (HPGe) and Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT) systems with 1% and 3.8% energy resolution at 140 keV, respectively. Using the Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP5) simulation package, we modelled both 5 mm-thick CZT and 10 mm-thick HPGe detectors with the same parallel-hole collimator for the imaging of a breast/torso phantom. Simulated energy spectra were generated, and planar images were created for various energy windows around the 140-keV photopeak. Relative sensitivity and scatter and the torso fractions were calculated along with tumour contrast and signal-to-noise ratios (SNR). Simulations showed that utilizing a ±1.25% energy window with an HPGe system better suppressed torso background and small-angle scattered photons than a comparable CZT system using a −5%/+10% energy window. Both systems provided statistically similar contrast and SNR, with HPGe providing higher relative sensitivity. Lowering the counts of HPGe images to match CZT count density still yielded equivalent contrast between HPGe and CZT. Thus, an HPGe system may provide equivalent breast imaging capability at lower injected radioactivity levels when acquiring for equal imaging time. PMID:25360792

  18. Simulation study comparing high-purity germanium and cadmium zinc telluride detectors for breast imaging.

    PubMed

    Campbell, D L; Peterson, T E

    2014-11-21

    We conducted simulations to compare the potential imaging performance for breast cancer detection with High-Purity Germanium (HPGe) and Cadmium Zinc Telluride (CZT) systems with 1% and 3.8% energy resolution at 140 keV, respectively. Using the Monte Carlo N-Particle (MCNP5) simulation package, we modelled both 5 mm-thick CZT and 10 mm-thick HPGe detectors with the same parallel-hole collimator for the imaging of a breast/torso phantom. Simulated energy spectra were generated, and planar images were created for various energy windows around the 140 keV photopeak. Relative sensitivity and scatter and the torso fractions were calculated along with tumour contrast and signal-to-noise ratios (SNR). Simulations showed that utilizing a ±1.25% energy window with an HPGe system better suppressed torso background and small-angle scattered photons than a comparable CZT system using a -5%/+10% energy window. Both systems provided statistically similar contrast and SNR, with HPGe providing higher relative sensitivity. Lowering the counts of HPGe images to match CZT count density still yielded equivalent contrast between HPGe and CZT. Thus, an HPGe system may provide equivalent breast imaging capability at lower injected radioactivity levels when acquiring for equal imaging time.

  19. The behaviour of Gd in lead and tin tellurides and its effect on their physical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zayachuk, D. M.; Matulenis, E. L.; Mikityuk, V. I.

    1992-06-01

    The behaviour of gadolinium in Pb 1- xSn xTe (0 ⩽ x ⩽ 0.3) introduced during Bridgman growth and its effect on the composition profiles and free carrier concentration is investigated. The Gd, Pb, Sn and Te contents in crystals were determined by electron microprobe analysis, and the free carrier concentration was obtained by Hall measurements. The results indicate that Gd behaves like an impurity with a segregation coefficient larger than unity, which strongly depends on the Gd concentration N( L) Gd in the melt and is given by KS = 1 + Aexp( - BN( L) Gd), where A takes values of 8 or 9 and B a value of about 10 -20 cm 3. The effect of such a strong KS( N( L) Gd) dependence is that all the Gd impurity concentrates in the first-to-freeze section, leaving the rest of the ingot free from the impurity. Thus, by introducing Gd during melt growth of lead-tin telluride crystals, one can obtain high quality crystals of the solid solutions studied.

  20. Advanced methods for preparation and characterization of infrared detector materials. [mercury cadmium tellurides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lehoczky, S. L.; Szofran, F. R.; Martin, B. G.

    1980-01-01

    Mercury cadmium telluride crystals were prepared by the Bridgman method with a wide range of crystal growth rates and temperature gradients adequate to prevent constitutional supercooling under diffusion-limited, steady state, growth conditions. The longitudinal compositional gradients for different growth conditions and alloy compositions were calculated and compared with experimental data to develop a quantitative model of the crystal growth kinetics for the Hg(i-x)CdxTe alloys, and measurements were performed to ascertain the effect of growth conditions on radial compositional gradients. The pseudobinary HgTe-CdTe constitutional phase diagram was determined by precision differential thermal analysis measurements and used to calculate the segregation coefficient of Cd as a function of x and interface temperature. Computer algorithms specific to Hg(1-x)CdxTe were developed for calculations of the charge carrier concentrations, charge carrier mobilities, Hall coefficient, optical absorptance, and Fermi energy as functions of x, temperature, ionized donor and acceptor concentrations, and neutral defect concentrations.