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Sample records for cerium titanium manganese

  1. Steric and electronic effects of 1,3-disubstituted cyclopentadienyl ligands on metallocene derivatives of Cerium, Titanium, Manganese, and Iron

    SciTech Connect

    Sofield, C.D.

    2000-05-19

    Sterically demanding 1,3-disubstituted cyclopentadienyl ligands were used to modify the physical properties of the corresponding metallocenes. Sterically demanding ligands provided kinetic stabilization for trivalent cerium compounds. Tris(di-t-butylcyclopentadienyl)cerium was prepared and anion competition between halides and cyclopentadienyl groups which had complicated synthesis of the tris(cyclopentadienyl)compound was qualitatively examined. Bis(di-t-butylcyclopentadienyl)cerium methyl was prepared and its rate of decomposition, by ligand redistribution, to tris(di-t-butylcyclopentadienyl)cerium was shown to be slower than the corresponding rate for less sterically demanding ligands. Asymmetrically substituted ligands provided a symmetry label for examination of chemical exchange processes. Tris[trimethylsilyl(t-butyl)cyclopentadienyl]cerium was prepared and the rate of interconversion between the C1 and C3 isomers was examined. The enthalpy difference between the two distereomers is 7.0 kJ/mol. The sterically demanding cyclopentadienyl ligands ansa-di-t-butylcyclopentadiene (Me2Si[(Me3C)2C5H3]2), ansa-bis(trimethylsilyl)cyclopentadiene (Me2Si[(Me3Si)2C5H3]2) and tetra-t-butylfulvalene and metallocene derivatives of the ligands were prepared and their structures were examined by single crystal X-ray crystallography. The effect that substituents on the cyclopentadienyl ring have on the pi-electron system of the ligand was examined through interaction between ligand and metal orbitals. A series of 1,3-disubstituted manganocenes was prepared and their electronic states were determined by solid-state magnetic susceptibility, electron paramagnetic resonance, X-ray crystallography, and variable temperature UV-vis spectroscopy. Spin-equilibria in [(Me3C)2C5H3]2Mn and [(Me3C)(Me3Si)C5H3]2Mn were examined and indicate an enthalpy difference of 15 kJ/mol between the high-spin and low-spin forms. Cyclopentadienyl groups resistant to intramolecular oxidative addition

  2. Nanoparticulate cerium dioxide and cerium dioxide-titanium dioxide composite thin films on glass by aerosol assisted chemical vapour deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qureshi, Uzma; Dunnill, Charles W.; Parkin, Ivan P.

    2009-11-01

    Two series of composite thin films were deposited on glass by aerosol assisted chemical vapour deposition (AACVD)—nanoparticulate cerium dioxide and nanoparticulate cerium dioxide embedded in a titanium dioxide matrix. The films were analysed by a range of techniques including UV-visible absorption spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive analysis by X-rays. The AACVD prepared films showed the functional properties of photocatalysis and super-hydrophilicity. The CeO 2 nanoparticle thin films displaying photocatalysis and photo-induced hydrophilicity almost comparable to that of anatase titania.

  3. Cyclic thermochemical process for producing hydrogen using cerium-titanium compounds

    DOEpatents

    Bamberger, Carlos E.

    1980-01-01

    A thermochemical cyclic process for producing hydrogen employs the reaction between ceric oxide and titanium dioxide to form cerium titanate and oxygen. The titanate is treated with an alkali metal hydroxide to give hydrogen, ceric oxide, an alkali metal titanate and water. Alkali metal titanate and water are boiled to give titanium dioxide which, along with ceric oxide, is recycled.

  4. Cyclic thermochemical process for producing hydrogen using cerium-titanium compounds

    DOEpatents

    Bamberger, C.E.

    A thermochemical cyclic process for producing hydrogen employs the reaction between ceric oxide and titanium dioxide to form cerium titanate and oxygen. The titanate is treated with an alkali metal hydroxide to give hydrogen, ceric oxide, an alkali metal titanate and water. Alkali metal titanate and water are boiled to give titanium dioxide which, along with ceric oxide, is recycled.

  5. Phenotypic and genomic responses to titanium dioxide and cerium oxide nanoparticles in Arabidopsis germinants

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effects of exposure to two nanoparticles (NPs) -titanium dioxide (nano-titania) and cerium oxide (nano-ceria) at 500 mg NPs L-1 on gene expression and growth in Arabidopsis thaliana germinants were studied using microarrays and phenotype studies. After 12 days post treatment,...

  6. Phenotypic and genomic responses to titanium dioxide and cerium oxide nanoparticles in Arabidopsis germinants.

    PubMed

    Tumburu, Laxminath; Andersen, Christian P; Rygiewicz, Paul T; Reichman, Jay R

    2015-01-01

    The effects of exposure to nanoparticles of titanium dioxide (nano-titanium) and cerium oxide (nano-cerium) on gene expression and growth in Arabidopsis thaliana germinants were studied by using microarrays and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR), and by evaluating germinant phenotypic plasticity. Exposure to 12 d of either nano-titania or nano-ceria altered the regulation of 204 and 142 genes, respectively. Genes induced by the nanoparticles mainly include ontology groups annotated as stimuli responsive, including both abiotic (oxidative stress, salt stress, water transport) and biotic (respiratory burst as a defense against pathogens) stimuli. Further analysis of the differentially expressed genes indicates that both nanoparticles affected a range of metabolic processes (deoxyribonucleic acid [DNA] metabolism, hormone metabolism, tetrapyrrole synthesis, and photosynthesis). Individual exposures to the nanoparticles increased percentages of seeds with emergent radicles, early development of hypocotyls and cotyledons, and those with fully grown leaves. Although there were distinct differences between the nanoparticles in their affect on molecular mechanisms attributable to enhancing germinant growth, both particles altered similar suites of genes related to various pathways and processes related to enhanced growth.

  7. Phenotypic and genomic responses to titanium dioxide and cerium oxide nanoparticles in Arabidopsis germinants.

    PubMed

    Tumburu, Laxminath; Andersen, Christian P; Rygiewicz, Paul T; Reichman, Jay R

    2015-01-01

    The effects of exposure to nanoparticles of titanium dioxide (nano-titanium) and cerium oxide (nano-cerium) on gene expression and growth in Arabidopsis thaliana germinants were studied by using microarrays and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR), and by evaluating germinant phenotypic plasticity. Exposure to 12 d of either nano-titania or nano-ceria altered the regulation of 204 and 142 genes, respectively. Genes induced by the nanoparticles mainly include ontology groups annotated as stimuli responsive, including both abiotic (oxidative stress, salt stress, water transport) and biotic (respiratory burst as a defense against pathogens) stimuli. Further analysis of the differentially expressed genes indicates that both nanoparticles affected a range of metabolic processes (deoxyribonucleic acid [DNA] metabolism, hormone metabolism, tetrapyrrole synthesis, and photosynthesis). Individual exposures to the nanoparticles increased percentages of seeds with emergent radicles, early development of hypocotyls and cotyledons, and those with fully grown leaves. Although there were distinct differences between the nanoparticles in their affect on molecular mechanisms attributable to enhancing germinant growth, both particles altered similar suites of genes related to various pathways and processes related to enhanced growth. PMID:25242526

  8. Germination and early plant development of ten plant species exposed to titanium dioxide and cerium oxide nanoparticles

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ten agronomic plant species were exposed to different concentrations of nano titanium dioxide (nTiO2) or nano cerium oxide (nCeO2) (0, 250, 500 and 1000 mg/L) to examine potential effects on germination and early seedling development. We modified a standard test protocol develop...

  9. The effect of lanthanum(III) and cerium(III) ions between layers of manganese oxide on water oxidation.

    PubMed

    Najafpour, Mohammad Mahdi; Isaloo, Mohsen Abbasi; Hołyńska, Małgorzata; Shen, Jian-Ren; Allakhverdiev, Suleyman I; Allakhverdiev, Suleyman

    2015-12-01

    Manganese oxide structure with lanthanum(III) or cerium(III) ions between the layers was synthesized by a simple method. The ratio of Mn to Ce or La in samples was 0.00, 0.04, 0.08, 0.16, 0.32, 0.5, 0.82, or 1.62. The compounds were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction studies, and atomic absorption spectroscopy. The compounds show efficient catalytic activity of water oxidation in the presence of cerium(IV) ammonium nitrate with a turnover frequency of 1.6 mmol O2/mol Mn.s. In contrast to the water-oxidizing complex in Photosystem II, calcium(II) has no specific role to enhance the water-oxidizing activity of the layered manganese oxides and other cations can be replaced without any significant decrease in water-oxidizing activities of these layered Mn oxides. Based on this and previously reported results from oxygen evolution in the presence of H 2 (18) O, we discuss the mechanism and the important factors influencing the water-oxidizing activities of the manganese oxides. PMID:25701552

  10. Synthesis of manganese oxide supported on mesoporous titanium oxide: Influence of the block copolymer

    SciTech Connect

    Schmit, F.; Bois, L.; Chiriac, R.; Toche, F.; Chassagneux, F.; Besson, M.; Descorme, C.; Khrouz, L.

    2015-01-15

    Manganese oxides supported on mesoporous titanium oxides were synthesized via a sol–gel route using block copolymer self-assembly. The oxides were characterized by X-ray diffraction, infrared spectroscopy, thermal analyses, nitrogen adsorption/desorption, electron microscopy and electronic paramagnetic resonance. A mesoporous anatase containing amorphous manganese oxide particles could be obtained with a 0.2 Mn:Ti molar ratio. At higher manganese loading (0.5 Mn:Ti molar ratio), segregation of crystalline manganese oxide occurred. The influence of block copolymer and manganese salt on the oxide structure was discussed. The evolution of the textural and structural characteristics of the materials upon hydrothermal treatment was also investigated. - Graphical abstract: One-pot amorphous MnO{sub 2} supported on mesoporous anataseTiO{sub 2}. - Highlights: • Mesoporous manganese titanium oxides were synthesized using block copolymer. • Block copolymers form complexes with Mn{sup 2+} from MnCl{sub 2}. • With block copolymer, manganese oxide can be dispersed around the titania crystallites. • With Mn(acac){sub 2}, manganese is dispersed inside titania. • MnOOH crystallizes outside mesoporous titania during hydrothermal treatment.

  11. Changes in Physiological and Agronomical Parameters of Barley (Hordeum vulgare) Exposed to Cerium and Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Marchiol, Luca; Mattiello, Alessandro; Pošćić, Filip; Fellet, Guido; Zavalloni, Costanza; Carlino, Elvio; Musetti, Rita

    2016-01-01

    The aims of our experiment were to evaluate the uptake and translocation of cerium and titanium oxide nanoparticles and to verify their effects on the growth cycle of barley (Hordeum vulgare L.). Barley plants were grown to physiological maturity in soil enriched with either 0, 500 or 1000 mg·kg−1 cerium oxide nanoparticles (nCeO2) or titanium oxide nanoparticles (nTiO2) and their combination. The growth cycle of nCeO2 and nTiO2 treated plants was about 10 days longer than the controls. In nCeO2 treated plants the number of tillers, leaf area and the number of spikes per plant were reduced respectively by 35.5%, 28.3% and 30% (p ≤ 0.05). nTiO2 stimulated plant growth and compensated for the adverse effects of nCeO2. Concentrations of Ce and Ti in aboveground plant fractions were minute. The fate of nanomaterials within the plant tissues was different. Crystalline nTiO2 aggregates were detected within the leaf tissues of barley, whereas nCeO2 was not present in the form of nanoclusters. PMID:26999181

  12. Changes in Physiological and Agronomical Parameters of Barley (Hordeum vulgare) Exposed to Cerium and Titanium Dioxide Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Marchiol, Luca; Mattiello, Alessandro; Pošćić, Filip; Fellet, Guido; Zavalloni, Costanza; Carlino, Elvio; Musetti, Rita

    2016-03-17

    The aims of our experiment were to evaluate the uptake and translocation of cerium and titanium oxide nanoparticles and to verify their effects on the growth cycle of barley (Hordeum vulgare L.). Barley plants were grown to physiological maturity in soil enriched with either 0, 500 or 1000 mg · kg(-1) cerium oxide nanoparticles (nCeO₂) or titanium oxide nanoparticles (nTiO₂) and their combination. The growth cycle of nCeO₂ and nTiO₂ treated plants was about 10 days longer than the controls. In nCeO₂ treated plants the number of tillers, leaf area and the number of spikes per plant were reduced respectively by 35.5%, 28.3% and 30% (p ≤ 0.05). nTiO₂ stimulated plant growth and compensated for the adverse effects of nCeO₂. Concentrations of Ce and Ti in aboveground plant fractions were minute. The fate of nanomaterials within the plant tissues was different. Crystalline nTiO₂ aggregates were detected within the leaf tissues of barley, whereas nCeO₂ was not present in the form of nanoclusters.

  13. Mesoporous titanium-manganese dioxide for sulphur mustard and soman decontamination

    SciTech Connect

    Stengl, Vaclav; Bludska, Jana; Oplustil, Frantisek; Nemec, Tomas

    2011-11-15

    Highlights: {yields} New nano-dispersive materials for warfare agents decontamination. {yields} 95% decontamination activities for sulphur mustard. {yields} New materials base on titanium and manganese oxides. -- Abstract: Titanium(IV)-manganese(IV) nano-dispersed oxides were prepared by a homogeneous hydrolysis of potassium permanganate and titanium(IV) oxo-sulphate with 2-chloroacetamide. Synthesised samples were characterised using Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area and Barrett-Joiner-Halenda porosity (BJH), X-ray diffraction (XRD), infrared spectroscopy (IR), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). These oxides were taken for an experimental evaluation of their reactivity with sulphur mustard (HD or bis(2-chloroethyl)sulphide) and soman (GD or (3,3'-dimethylbutan-2-yl)-methylphosphonofluoridate). Mn{sup 4+} content affects the decontamination activity; with increasing Mn{sup 4+} content the activity increases for sulphur mustard and decreases for soman. The best decontamination activities for sulphur mustard and soman were observed for samples TiMn{sub 3}7 with 18.6 wt.% Mn and TiMn{sub 5} with 2.1 wt.% Mn, respectively.

  14. Cerium, gallium and zinc containing mesoporous bioactive glass coating deposited on titanium alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shruti, S.; Andreatta, F.; Furlani, E.; Marin, E.; Maschio, S.; Fedrizzi, L.

    2016-08-01

    Surface modification is one of the methods for improving the performance of medical implants in biological environment. In this study, cerium, gallium and zinc substituted 80%SiO2-15%CaO-5%P2O5 mesoporous bioactive glass (MBG) in combination with polycaprolactone (PCL) were coated over Ti6Al4 V substrates by dip-coating method in order to obtain an inorganic-organic hybrid coating (MBG-PCL). Structural characterization was performed using XRD, nitrogen adsorption, SEM-EDXS, FTIR. The MBG-PCL coating uniformly covered the substrate with the thickness found to be more than 1 μm. Glass and polymer phases were detected in the coating along with the presence of biologically potent elements cerium, gallium and zinc. In addition, in vitro bioactivity was investigated by soaking the coated samples in simulated body fluid (SBF) for up to 30 days at 37 °C. The apatite-like layer was monitored by FTIR, SEM-EDXS and ICP measurements and it formed in all the samples within 15 days except zinc samples. In this way, an attempt was made to develop a new biomaterial with improved in vitro bioactive response due to bioactive glass coating and good mechanical strength of Ti6Al4 V alloy along with inherent biological properties of cerium, gallium and zinc.

  15. Copper and cerium co-doped titanium dioxide on catalytic photo reduction of carbon dioxide with water: Experimental and theoretical studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Dongmei; Bi, Ye; Kan, Wei; Zhang, Ning; Hong, Sanguo

    2011-05-01

    The catalytic activities of copper and cerium co-doped titanium dioxide were studied experimentally and theoretically in the synthesis of methanol by the photo reduction of carbon dioxide with water firstly. Photo catalysts copper and cerium co-doped titanium dioxide were prepared via the equivalent-volume incipient wetness impregnation method. The catalysts were characterized by XRD, Raman, BET, and electrochemistry analyses. The catalytic properties were determined in the synthesis of methanol from CO 2 in the aqueous solution. The experimental results suggested that Cu/Ce-TiO 2 catalysts obviously enhanced the efficiency of the photocatalytic reduction of CO 2. The methanol yield could reach up to 180.3 μmol/g-cat rapidly. The different effects of copper and cerium on the surface of titanium dioxide have been calculated at the Becke's three-parameter hybrid exchange functional together with the Lee-Yang-Parr correlation functional (B3LYP) level. Our results revealed that Ce atoms affect the reaction more profoundly than Cu atoms do. Ce atoms activated H 2O and CO 2 molecules, while Cu atoms act as the channel of photoelectrons in real time and prevent the recombination of electrons and holes.

  16. Manganese

    MedlinePlus

    ... Taking manganese by mouth in combination with calcium, zinc, and copper seems to help reduce spinal bone ... Vitrum osteomag) containing manganese, calcium, vitamin D, magnesium, zinc, copper, and boron for one year seems to ...

  17. Catalyst support of mixed cerium zirconium titanium oxide, including use and method of making

    DOEpatents

    Willigan, Rhonda R.; Vanderspurt, Thomas Henry; Tulyani, Sonia; Radhakrishnan, Rakesh; Opalka, Susanne Marie; Emerson, Sean C.

    2011-01-18

    A durable catalyst support/catalyst is capable of extended water gas shift operation under conditions of high temperature, pressure, and sulfur levels. The support is a homogeneous, nanocrystalline, mixed metal oxide of at least three metals, the first being cerium, the second being Zr, and/or Hf, and the third importantly being Ti, the three metals comprising at least 80% of the metal constituents of the mixed metal oxide and the Ti being present in a range of 5% to 45% by metals-only atomic percent of the mixed metal oxide. The mixed metal oxide has an average crystallite size less than 6 nm and forms a skeletal structure with pores whose diameters are in the range of 4-9 nm and normally greater than the average crystallite size. The surface area of the skeletal structure per volume of the material of the structure is greater than about 240 m.sup.2/cm.sup.3. The method of making and use are also described.

  18. Role of cobalt, iron, lead, manganese, mercury, platinum, selenium, and titanium in carcinogenesis.

    PubMed Central

    Kazantzis, G

    1981-01-01

    The possible carcinogenicity of cobalt, iron, lead, manganese, mercury, platinum, selenium, and titanium is reviewed, taking into account epidemiological data, the results of animal experimental studies, data on mutagenic effects and on other in vitro test systems. Of the great variety of occupations where exposure to one of these metals may occur, only haematite mining has been clearly shown to involve an increased human cancer risk. While the possibility that haematite might in some way act as a carcinogen has to be taken into consideration it is more likely that other carcinogens are responsible. Certain platinum coordination complexes are used in cancer chemotherapy, are mutagenic, and likely to be carcinogenic. Cobalt, its oxide and sulfide, certain lead salts, one organomanganese, and one organotitanium compound have been shown to have a limited carcinogenic effect in experimental animal studies, and except for titanium appear to be mutagenic. Certain mercury compounds are mutagenic but none have been shown to be carcinogenic. The presently available data are inadequate to assess the possible carcinogenicity of selenium compounds, but a few observations suggest that selenium may suppress the effect of other carcinogens administered to experimental animals and may even be associated with lower cancer mortality rates in man. Epidemiological observations are essential for the assessment of a human cancer risk, but the difficulty in collecting past exposure data in occupational groups and the complexity of multiple occupational exposures with changes over time, limits the usefulness of retrospective epidemiological studies. PMID:7023929

  19. Effects of Cerium and Titanium Oxide Nanoparticles in Soil on the Nutrient Composition of Barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) Kernels

    PubMed Central

    Pošćić, Filip; Mattiello, Alessandro; Fellet, Guido; Miceli, Fabiano; Marchiol, Luca

    2016-01-01

    The implications of metal nanoparticles (MeNPs) are still unknown for many food crops. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of cerium oxide (nCeO2) and titanium oxide (nTiO2) nanoparticles in soil at 0, 500 and 1000 mg·kg−1 on the nutritional parameters of barley (Hordeum vulgare L.) kernels. Mineral nutrients, amylose, β-glucans, amino acid and crude protein (CP) concentrations were measured in kernels. Whole flour samples were analyzed by ICP-AES/MS, HPLC and Elemental CHNS Analyzer. Results showed that Ce and Ti accumulation under MeNPs treatments did not differ from the control treatment. However, nCeO2 and nTiO2 had an impact on composition and nutritional quality of barley kernels in contrasting ways. Both MeNPs left β-glucans unaffected but reduced amylose content by approximately 21%. Most amino acids and CP increased. Among amino acids, lysine followed by proline saw the largest increase (51% and 37%, respectively). Potassium and S were both negatively impacted by MeNPs, while B was only affected by 500 mg nCeO2·kg−1. On the contrary Zn and Mn concentrations were improved by 500 mg nTiO2·kg−1, and Ca by both nTiO2 treatments. Generally, our findings demonstrated that kernels are negatively affected by nCeO2 while nTiO2 can potentially have beneficial effects. However, both MeNPs have the potential to negatively impact malt and feed production. PMID:27294945

  20. Variations in structure and electrochemistry of iron- and titanium-doped lithium nickel manganese oxyfluoride spinels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Höweling, Andres; Stenzel, David; Gesswein, Holger; Kaus, Maximilian; Indris, Sylvio; Bergfeldt, Thomas; Binder, Joachim R.

    2016-05-01

    Doping of cathode materials can considerably improve electrochemical performance and stability. Here, the high-voltage LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 spinel is used as a candidate material. It is high-voltage cycling at a potential of approximately 4.7 V and the ability to host 2 eq. Li, thus leading to a theoretical capacity of 294 mAh g-1, that makes this material interesting. In order to improve stability and electronic conductivity, the spinel is doped with titanium and iron. Cycling in a voltage range of 2.0-5.0 V leads to a cooperative Jahn-Teller distortion accompanied by a phase transformation from cubic to tetragonal symmetry. This causes a severe capacity fade. To improve capacity retention, the as-prepared spinel is post-doped with fluorine. Influence of different fluorine amounts in LiNi0.5Mn1.4Fe0.1Ti0.027O4-xFx (x = 0-0.3) on the capacity and stability is analyzed. The initial capacities decrease with increasing fluorine content but the low voltage capacity is stabilized. Best electrochemical results are obtained with a fluorine content of x = 0.15. Furthermore, an additional redox couple is found. The intensity of this depends on the fluorine content. It is assumed that manganese, either in the tetrahedral sites or in octahedral sites, bound to fluorine lead to a higher voltage.

  1. Manganese

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Manganese ; CASRN 7439 - 96 - 5 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinogenic Effect

  2. Synthesis and characterization of nano-manganese dioxide and titanium dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peddi, Sasya

    Nano sized manganese dioxide was synthesized using hydrothermal and co-precipitation methods by the reduction of hydrogen peroxide and potassium permanganate in respective methods. The co-precipitation method of synthesis was expanded to synthesize nano sized Titanium Dioxide. Characterization of the synthesized material was carried out by Elemental Analysis, X-Ray Diffraction (XRD), Thermal Gravimetric Analysis (TGA), Differential Thermal Analysis (DTA), Infra Red Spectroscopy (FTIR) and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM). SEM analysis showed that the MnO2 prepared by hydrothermal method is made of spherical nanoparticles with sizes ranging from 15 nm--30 nm and the MnO2 prepared by co-precipitation method showed nanospheres of 20 nm--100 nm with several nano disks incorporated in these sphere of about 5 nm--50 nm in diameter. X-ray revealed that the MnO2 prepared by hydrothermal shows two different transitions from amorphous MnO2 to crystalline Mn2O3 and Mn2O3- Mn2O 3 Bixbyte with substantial amount of unreacted PVP in it, which is lost when heated to higher temperatures which are supported by data from DTA and TGA. In co-precipitation only one transition is observed that is from amorphous MnO2 to crystalline Mn2O3 Bixbyte and traces of unreacted PVP. Titanium Dioxide synthesized using PVP led to uniform spherical nano particles of 20 nm--100 nm with some unreacted PVP. X-Ray analysis shows one transition from amorphous TiO2 to crystalline TiO 2 Anatase. The TiO2 prepared without PVP is poorly crystalline to X-rays and identified as Brookite when heated to higher temperature. The SEM micrographs of TiO2 without PVP did not show any uniformity in particle size and shape distribution and lost homogeneity. The results from our study suggest that the clean, uniform and homogeneous nanoparticles can be prepared using a simple, room temperature, non-expensive co-precipitation method using PVP.

  3. Nano-cerium-element-doped titanium dioxide induces apoptosis of Bel 7402 human hepatoma cells in the presence of visible light

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Long; Mao, Jian; Zhang, Gao-Hua; Tu, Ming-Jing

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the apoptotic effect of photoexcited titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles in the presence of visible light on human hepatoma cell line (Bel 7402) and to study the underlying mechanism. METHODS: Cerium-element-doped titanium dioxide nanoparticles were prepared by impregnation method. Bel 7402 human hepatoma cells were cultured in RPMI 1640 medium in a humidified incubator with 50 mL/L CO2 at 37°C. A 15 W fluorescent lamp with continuous wavelength light was used as light source in the photocatalytic test. Fluorescence morphology and agarose gel eletrophoresis pattern were performed to analyze apoptotic cells. RESULTS: The Ce (IV)-doped TiO2 nanoparticles displayed their superiority. The adsorption edge shifted to the 400-450 nm region. With visible light illuminated for 10 min, 10 μg/cm3 Ce (IV)-doped TiO2 induced micronuclei and significant apoptosis in 4 and 24 h, respectively. Hochest 33 258 staining of the fixed cells revealed typical apoptotic structures (apoptotic bodies), agarose gel electrophoresis showed typical DNA ladder pattern in treated cells but not in untreated ones. CONCLUSION: Ce (IV) doped TiO2 nanoparticles can induce apoptosis of Bel 7402 human hepatoma cells in the presence of visible light. PMID:17663520

  4. TEM characterization of precipitates in the segregated regions of a low-carbon, low-manganese, titanium-added steel.

    PubMed

    Aminorroaya, Sima; Dippenaar, Rian

    2007-08-01

    A concentric solidification technique has been employed to simulate sulphide precipitation at the centreline of a continuously cast low-carbon, low-manganese, titanium-added steel slab. Selected precipitates were identified using transmission electron microscopy following sample preparation by focused ion beam milling techniques. FeTiS(2) and hexagonal MnS containing iron atoms form in close proximity to each other in super-saturated areas of the concentrically solidified sample. The presence of FeTiS(2) precipitates in low-carbon steel has been verified for the first time, and the crystal structure determined by electron diffraction analysis as a trigonal CdI(2)-type with a P3 m1 space group and lattice parameters of a= 0.341 nm and c= 0.569 nm.

  5. [application of the analytical transmission electron microscopy techniques for detection, identification and visualization of localization of nanoparticles of titanium and cerium oxides in mammalian cells].

    PubMed

    Shebanova, A S; Bogdanov, A G; Ismagulova, T T; Feofanov, A V; Semenyuk, P I; Muronets, V I; Erokhina, M V; Onishchenko, G E; Kirpichnikov, M P; Shaitan, K V

    2014-01-01

    This work represents the results of the study on applicability of the modern methods of analytical transmission electron microscopy for detection, identification and visualization of localization of nanoparticles of titanium and cerium oxides in A549 cell, human lung adenocarcinoma cell line. A comparative analysis of images of the nanoparticles in the cells obtained in the bright field mode of transmission electron microscopy, under dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy and high-angle annular dark field scanning transmission electron was performed. For identification of nanoparticles in the cells the analytical techniques, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and electron energy loss spectroscopy, were compared when used in the mode of obtaining energy spectrum from different particles and element mapping. It was shown that the method for electron tomography is applicable to confirm that nanoparticles are localized in the sample but not coated by contamination. The possibilities and fields of utilizing different techniques for analytical transmission electron microscopy for detection, visualization and identification of nanoparticles in the biological samples are discussed.

  6. Cerium Oxide and Cerium Compounds

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    EPA / 635 / R - 08 / 002F www.epa.gov / iris TOXICOLOGICAL REVIEW OF Cerium Oxide and Cerium Compounds ( CAS No . 1306 - 38 - 3 ) In Support of Summary Information on the Integrated Risk Information System ( IRIS ) September 2009 U.S . Environmental Protection Agency Washington , DC ii DISCLAIMER Th

  7. Electrochemical and structural characterization of titanium-substituted manganese oxides based on Na0.44MnO2

    SciTech Connect

    Doeff, Marca M.; Richardson, Thomas J.; Hwang, Kwang-Taek

    2004-03-01

    A series of titanium-substituted manganese oxides, Li{sub x}Ti{sub y}Mn{sub 1-y}O{sub 2} (y = 0.11, 0.22, 0.33, 0.44, and 0.55) with the Na{sub 0.44}MnO{sub 2} structure were prepared from Na{sub x}Ti{sub y}Mn{sub 1-y}O{sub 2} (x {approx} 0.44) precursors. The electrochemical characteristics of these compounds, which retain the unique double-tunnel structure during ion exchange, were examined in lithium/polymer electrolyte cells operating at 85 C. All of the substituted cathode materials intercalated lithium reversibly, with Li{sub x}Ti{sub 0.22}Mn{sub 0.78}O{sub 2} exhibiting the highest capacity in polymer cells, about 10-20% greater than that of unsubstituted Li{sub x}MnO{sub 2} made from Na{sub 0.44}MnO{sub 2}. In common with Li{sub x}MnO{sub 2}, the Ti-substituted materials exhibited good capacity retention over one hundred or more cycles, with some compositions exhibiting a fade rate of less than 0.03% per cycle.

  8. Titanium

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, G.J.

    1997-01-01

    The article contains a summary of factors pertinent to titanium use. Geology and exploitation, production processes, global production, titanium dioxide and alloy applications, and the titanium market are reviewed. Potential applications outlined are for oil and gas equipment and for the automotive industry. Titanium alloys were selected for drilling risers for North Sea oil and gas drilling platforms due to a high strength-to-weight ratio and corrosion resistance. These properties also make titanium alloys attractive for auto parts, although the cost is currently prohibitive.

  9. Titanium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bedinger, G.M.

    2013-01-01

    Titanium is the ninth most abundant element in the earth’s crust and can be found in nearly all rocks and sediments. It is a lithophile element with a strong affinity for oxygen and is not found as a pure metal in nature. Titanium was first isolated as a pure metal in 1910, but it was not until 1948 that metal was produced commercially using the Kroll process (named after its developer, William Kroll) to reduce titanium tetrachloride with magnesium to produce titanium metal.

  10. Thermochemical cyclic system for decomposing H.sub.2 O and/or CO.sub.2 by means of cerium-titanium-sodium-oxygen compounds

    SciTech Connect

    Bamberger, Carlos E.

    1982-01-01

    A thermochemical closed cyclic process for the decomposition of water and/or carbon dioxide to hydrogen and/or carbon monoxide begins with the reaction of ceric oxide (CeO.sub.2), titanium dioxide (TiO.sub.2) and sodium titanate (Na.sub.2 TiO.sub.3) to form sodium cerous titanate (NaCeTi.sub.2 O.sub.6) and oxygen. Sodium cerous titanate (NaCeTi.sub.2 O.sub.6) reacted with sodium carbonate (Na.sub.2 CO.sub.3) in the presence of steam, produces hydrogen. The same reaction, in the absence of steam, produces carbon monoxide. The products, ceric oxide and sodium titanate, obtained in either case, are treated with carbon dioxide and water to produce ceric oxide, titanium dioxide, sodium titanate, and sodium bicarbonate. After dissolving sodium bicarbonate from the mixture in water, the remaining insoluble compounds are used as starting materials for a subsequent cycle. The sodium bicarbonate can be converted to sodium carbonate by heating and returned to the cycle.

  11. Thermochemical cyclic system for decomposing H/sub 2/O and/or CO/sub 2/ by means of cerium-titanium-sodium-oxygen compounds

    DOEpatents

    Bamberger, C.E.

    1980-04-24

    A thermochemical closed cyclic process for the decomposition of water and/or carbon dioxide to hydrogen and/or carbon monoxide begins with the reaction of ceric oxide (CeO/sub 2/), titanium dioxide (TiO/sub 2/) and sodium titanate (Na/sub 2/TiO/sub 3/) to form sodium cerous titanate (NaCeTi/sub 2/O/sub 6/) and oxygen. Sodium cerous titanate (NaCeTi/sub 2/O/sub 6/) reacted with sodium carbonate (Na/sub 2/CO/sub 3/) in the presence of steam, produces hydrogen. The same reaction, in the absence of steam, produces carbon monoxide. The products, ceric oxide and sodium titanate, obtained in either case, are treated with carbon dioxide and water to produce ceric oxide, titanium dioxide, sodium titanate, and sodium bicarbonate. After dissolving sodium bicarbonate from the mixture in water, the remaining insoluble compounds are used as starting materials for a subsequent cycle. The sodium bicarbonate can be converted to sodium carbonate by heating and returned to the cycle.

  12. Virus removal by biogenic cerium.

    PubMed

    De Gusseme, Bart; Du Laing, Gijs; Hennebel, Tom; Renard, Piet; Chidambaram, Dev; Fitts, Jeffrey P; Bruneel, Els; Van Driessche, Isabel; Verbeken, Kim; Boon, Nico; Verstraete, Willy

    2010-08-15

    The rare earth element cerium has been known to exert antifungal and antibacterial properties in the oxidation states +III and +IV. This study reports on an innovative strategy for virus removal in drinking water by the combination of Ce(III) on a bacterial carrier matrix. The biogenic cerium (bio-Ce) was produced by addition of aqueous Ce(III) to actively growing cultures of either freshwater manganese-oxidizing bacteria (MOB) Leptothrix discophora or Pseudomonas putida MnB29. X-ray absorption spectroscopy results indicated that Ce remained in its trivalent state on the bacterial surface. The spectra were consistent with Ce(III) ions associated with the phosphoryl groups of the bacterial cell wall. In disinfection assays using a bacteriophage as model, it was demonstrated that bio-Ce exhibited antiviral properties. A 4.4 log decrease of the phage was observed after 2 h of contact with 50 mg L(-1) bio-Ce. Given the fact that virus removal with 50 mg L(-1) Ce(III) as CeNO(3) was lower, the presence of the bacterial carrier matrix in bio-Ce significantly enhanced virus removal. PMID:20704235

  13. Virus Removal by Biogenic Cerium

    SciTech Connect

    De Gusseme, B.; Du Laing, G; Hennebel, T; Renard, P; Chidambaram, D; Fitts, J; Bruneel, E; Van Driessche, I; Verbeken, K; et. al.

    2010-01-01

    The rare earth element cerium has been known to exert antifungal and antibacterial properties in the oxidation states +III and +IV. This study reports on an innovative strategy for virus removal in drinking water by the combination of Ce(III) on a bacterial carrier matrix. The biogenic cerium (bio-Ce) was produced by addition of aqueous Ce(III) to actively growing cultures of either freshwater manganese-oxidizing bacteria (MOB) Leptothrix discophora or Pseudomonas putida MnB29. X-ray absorption spectroscopy results indicated that Ce remained in its trivalent state on the bacterial surface. The spectra were consistent with Ce(III) ions associated with the phosphoryl groups of the bacterial cell wall. In disinfection assays using a bacteriophage as model, it was demonstrated that bio-Ce exhibited antiviral properties. A 4.4 log decrease of the phage was observed after 2 h of contact with 50 mg L{sup -1} bio-Ce. Given the fact that virus removal with 50 mg L{sup -1} Ce(III) as CeNO{sub 3} was lower, the presence of the bacterial carrier matrix in bio-Ce significantly enhanced virus removal.

  14. PLUTONIUM-CERIUM ALLOY

    DOEpatents

    Coffinberry, A.S.

    1959-01-01

    An alloy is presented for use as a reactor fuel. The binary alloy consists essentially of from about 5 to 90 atomic per cent cerium and the balance being plutonium. A complete phase diagram for the cerium--plutonium system is given.

  15. Titanium dioxide nanoparticles cause genotoxicity in human lung epithelial cells

    EPA Science Inventory

    The use of engineered nanoparticles in consumer products is steadily increasing. However, the health effects of exposure to these nanoparticles are not thoroughly understood. This study investigated the genotoxicity of six titanium dioxide and two cerium oxide nanoparticles of va...

  16. Manganese Intoxication

    PubMed Central

    Hine, Charles H.; Pasi, Aurelio

    1975-01-01

    We have reported two cases of chronic manganese poisoning. Case 1 followed exposure to manganese fumes in cutting and burning manganese steel. Case 2 resulted from exposure to dusts of manganese dioxide, an ingredient used in glazing of ceramics. There were initial difficulties in establishing the correct diagnosis. Prominent clinical features were severe and persistent chronic depressive psychosis (Case 1), transient acute brain syndrome (Case 2) and the presence of various extrapyramidal symptoms in both cases. Manganese intoxication has not previously been reported as occurring in California. With increasing use of the metal, the disease should be considered in the differential diagnosis of neurologic and psychiatric disease. Our observations were made in the period 1964 through 1968. Recently the prognosis of victims of manganese poisoning has been improved dramatically by the introduction of levodopa as a therapeutic agent. PMID:1179714

  17. Direct growth of cerium oxide nanorods on diverse substrates for superhydrophobicity and corrosion resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Young Jun; Jang, Hanmin; Lee, Kwan-Soo; Kim, Dong Rip

    2015-06-01

    Superhydrophobic surfaces with anti-corrosion properties have attracted great interest in many industrial fields, particularly to enhance the thermal performance of offshore applications such as heat exchangers, pipelines, power plants, and platform structures. Nanostructures with hydrophobic materials have been widely utilized to realize superhydrophobicity of surfaces, and cerium oxide has been highlighted due to its good corrosion resistive and intrinsically hydrophobic properties. However, few studies of direct growth of cerium oxide nanostructures on diverse substrates have been reported. Herein we report a facile hydrothermal method to directly grow cerium oxide nanorods on diverse substrates, such as aluminum alloy, stainless steel, titanium, and silicon. Diverse substrates with cerium oxide nanorods exhibited superhydrophobicity with no hydrophobic modifiers on their surfaces, and showed good corrosion resistive properties in corrosive medium. We believe our method could pave the way for realization of scalable and sustainable corrosion resistive superhydrophobic surfaces in many industrial fields.

  18. Cerium compounds as scintillators

    SciTech Connect

    Wojtowicz, A.J.; Berman, E.; Koepke, C.; Lempicki, A.

    1991-01-01

    Stoichiometric Ce-materials with negligible Ce-Ce interactions should have superior scintillator properties. We present two materials: CeF{sub 3} and Ce{sub x}La{sub 1-x}P{sub 5}O{sub 14}. While cerium trifluoride is a known scintillator, pentaphosphate is of a limited usefulness, except as a remarkable model material. We show that quenching in fluoride is responsible for loss of 50% of the light output and is the cause of the, so-called, ultra fast component (2 ns). Light output of fluoride (about 50% of BGO) could be significantly improved. Deeper understanding of Ce-systems is needed to fully exploit their potentials. 10 figs., 6 refs.

  19. Cerium compounds as scintillators

    SciTech Connect

    Wojtowicz, A.J.; Berman, E.; Koepke, C.; Lempicki, A.

    1991-12-31

    Stoichiometric Ce-materials with negligible Ce-Ce interactions should have superior scintillator properties. We present two materials: CeF{sub 3} and Ce{sub x}La{sub 1-x}P{sub 5}O{sub 14}. While cerium trifluoride is a known scintillator, pentaphosphate is of a limited usefulness, except as a remarkable model material. We show that quenching in fluoride is responsible for loss of 50% of the light output and is the cause of the, so-called, ultra fast component (2 ns). Light output of fluoride (about 50% of BGO) could be significantly improved. Deeper understanding of Ce-systems is needed to fully exploit their potentials. 10 figs., 6 refs.

  20. Preparation of cerium halide solvate complexes

    DOEpatents

    Vasudevan, Kalyan V; Smith, Nickolaus A; Gordon, John C; McKigney, Edward A; Muenchaussen, Ross E

    2013-08-06

    Crystals of a solvated cerium(III) halide solvate complex resulted from a process of forming a paste of a cerium(III) halide in an ionic liquid, adding a solvent to the paste, removing any undissolved solid, and then cooling the liquid phase. Diffusing a solvent vapor into the liquid phase also resulted in crystals of a solvated cerium(III) halide complex.

  1. Catalytic Degradation of Benzene over Nanocatalysts containing Cerium and Manganese

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhen; Deng, Yuzhou; Shen, Genli; Akram, Sadia; Han, Ning

    2016-01-01

    Abstract A Ce–Mn composite oxide possessing a rod‐like morphology (with a fixed molar ratio of Ce/Mn=3:7) was synthesized through a hydrothermal method. Mn ions were doped into a CeO2 framework to replace Ce ions, thereby increasing the concentration of oxygen vacancies. The formation energies of O vacancies for the Ce–Mn composite oxide were calculated by applying density functional theory (DFT). The data showed that it was easier to form an O vacancy in the composite. The catalytic behavior of the Ce–Mn composite oxide for benzene degradation was researched in detail, which exhibited a higher activity than the pure phases. Based on this, the Ce–Mn composite oxide was chosen as a supporter to load PdO nanoparticles. The activity was enhanced further compared with that of the supporter alone (for the supporter, the reaction rate R 214 °C=0.68×10−4 mol gcat −1 s−1 and apparent activation energy E a=12.75 kJ mol−1; for the supporting catalyst, R 214 °C=1.46×10−4 mol gcat −1 s−1, E a=10.91 kJ mol−1). The corresponding catalytic mechanism was studied through in situ Raman and FTIR spectroscopy, which indicated that the process of benzene oxidation was related to different types of oxygen species existing at the surface of the catalysts. PMID:27777843

  2. PLUTONIUM-CERIUM-COBALT AND PLUTONIUM-CERIUM-NICKEL ALLOYS

    DOEpatents

    Coffinberry, A.S.

    1959-08-25

    >New plutonium-base teroary alloys useful as liquid reactor fuels are described. The alloys consist of 10 to 20 atomic percent cobalt with the remainder plutonium and cerium in any desired proportion, with the plutonium not in excess of 88 atomic percent; or, of from 10 to 25 atomic percent nickel (or mixture of nickel and cobalt) with the remainder plutonium and cerium in any desired proportion, with the plutonium not in excess of 86 atomic percent. The stated advantages of these alloys over unalloyed plutonium for reactor fuel use are a lower melting point and a wide range of permissible plutonium dilution.

  3. The sensitized luminescence of manganese-activated calcite

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schulman, J.H.; Evans, L.W.; Ginther, R.J.; Murata, K.J.

    1947-01-01

    Synthetic manganese-activated calcites are shown to be practically inert to ultraviolet excitation in the range 2000-3500A, while they are luminescent under cathode-ray excitation. The incorporation of small amounts of an auxiliary impurity along with the manganese produces the strong response to ultraviolet radiation hitherto ascribed to CaCO3:Mn itself. Three such impurities have been studied: lead, thallium, and cerium. The first two induce excitation in the neighborhood of the mercury resonance line, while the cerium introduces a response principally to longer wave ultraviolet. The strong response to 2537A excitation shown by some natural calcites is likewise found to be due to the presence of lead along with the manganese, rather than to the manganese alone. The data do not warrant ascribing the longer wave-length ultraviolet-excited luminescence of all natural calcites to the action of an auxiliary impurity. The essential identity of the cathode-ray excited luminescence spectra of CaCO 3:Mn, CaCO3: (Pb+Mn), CaCO3:(Tl+Mn), and CaCO3:(Ce+Mn) with the 2537A-excited spectra of the latter three is evidence that the luminescent center in all cases is the manganese ion or the MnO6 group. It is shown that a "cascade" mechanism for the action of the auxiliary impurities, lead, thallium, and cerium, is incorrect; and that the phenomenon must be considered as a case of sensitized luminescence. Owing to the nature of cathode-ray excitation, the manganese activator can be excited by this agent even in the absence of a second impurity. For optical excitation, however, an absorption band for the ultraviolet must be established by building into the CaCO3:Mn a second impurity or "sensitizer.".

  4. Cerium ion conducting solid electrolyte

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasegawa, Yasunori; Imanaka, Nobuhito; Adachi, Gin-ya

    2003-02-01

    A cerium ion conducting solid electrolyte, (Ce xZr 1- x) 4/4- xNb(PO 4) 3, was successfully realized with the NASICON-type structure which possesses a three-dimensional network, especially suitable for bulky ion migration. The cerium ion conductivity exceeds approximately one order of magnitude in comparison to that of the rare-earth ion conducting R2(WO 4) 3 and R1/3Zr 2(PO 4) 3 ( R=Sc, Y, Eu-Lu) series and the value is in the range between typical oxide anion conductors of yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) and calcia stabilized zirconia (CSZ). Since cerium ion has been demonstrated to be another migrating ion species in solid electrolyte field, a promising application for various functional materials is greatly expected.

  5. PLUTONIUM-CERIUM-COPPER ALLOYS

    DOEpatents

    Coffinberry, A.S.

    1959-05-12

    A low melting point plutonium alloy useful as fuel is a homogeneous liquid metal fueled nuclear reactor is described. Vessels of tungsten or tantalum are useful to contain the alloy which consists essentially of from 10 to 30 atomic per cent copper and the balance plutonium and cerium. with the plutontum not in excess of 50 atomic per cent.

  6. IRIS Toxicological Review of Cerium Oxide and Cerium Compounds (External Review Draft)

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA conducted a peer review of the scientific basis supporting the human health hazard and dose-response assessment of cerium oxide and cerium compounds that will appear on the Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS) database.

  7. Manganese nodules

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hein, James R.; Harff, Jan; Petersen, Sven; Thiede, Jorn

    2014-01-01

    The existence of manganese (Mn) nodules (Fig. 1) has been known since the late 1800s when they were collected during the Challenger expedition of 1873–1876. However, it was not until after WWII that nodules were further studied in detail for their ability to adsorb metals from seawater. Many of the early studies did not distinguish Mn nodules from Mn crusts. Economic interest in Mn nodules began in the late 1950s and early 1960s when John Mero finished his Ph.D. thesis on this subject, which was published...

  8. Nanoparticle cerium oxide and mixed cerium oxides for improved fuel cell lifetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, Stephen Michael

    While there is a rich body of literature concerning of properties of bulk cerium oxide and cerium cations in solution, the discussion has been inappropriately applied to nanoscale cerium oxide resulting in many unexpected or unexplained results. In particular, there is very limited understanding about the properties of cerium oxide and its potential use as a radical scavenger, and how the catalytic properties of cerium oxide change as the particle size approaches the nanoscale. For example, the involvement of Ce+4 and Ce+3 cations in reactions such as hydrogen peroxide decomposition have been investigated for both cerium cations and bulk cerium oxide. However, while both are assumed to decompose hydrogen peroxide through the same mechanism, whereby Ce+4 is involved in peroxide decomposition while Ce +3 is involved in radical scavenging, there has been very little done to address how the selectivity and activity of these reactions are affected by changing the majority cation population, as cerium cations in solution are predominantly in the +3 oxidation state while cerium cations are predominantly in the +4 oxidation state in cerium oxide. This matter is further complicated in cerium oxide nanoparticles where the surface concentration of Ce +3 cations is increased due to particle curvature effects. Due to the potential of controlling the surface cerium oxidation state using particle size and using this control to change the catalytic properties, this project investigated the effect of particle size and composition and the activity and selectivity of cerium oxide nanoparticles, and has served to expand the understanding of the properties of pure and mixed nanoparticle cerium oxide. This work explains the metric developed for measuring the catalytic properties of pure and mixed cerium oxide nanoparticles, which is also good at predicting the immediate and long-term behavior of nanoparticles in hydrogen fuel cells. This work also directly demonstrates praseodymium

  9. Grain Growth in Cerium Metal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooley, Jason; Katz, Martha; Mielke, Charles; Montalvo, Joel

    We report on grain growth in forged and rolled cerium plate for temperatures from 350 to 700 degrees C and times from 30 to 120 minutes. The cerium was made by arc-melting into a 25 mm deep by 80 mm diameter copper mold. The resulting disk was forged at room temperature to a 25% reduction of thickness four times with a 350 degree C strain relief heat treatment for 60 minutes between forging steps. The resulting 8 mm thick plate was clock rolled at room temperature to a 25% reduction of thickness three times with a 350 C strain relief heat treatment between steps resulting in a plate approximately 3 mm thick. 5 x 10 mm coupons were cut from the plate for the grain growth study.

  10. ADSORPTION OF CERIUM VALUES FROM AQUEOUS SOLUTIONS

    DOEpatents

    Roberts, F.P.

    1963-08-13

    Cerium can be removed from aqueous nitric acid (2 to 13 M) solutions by passing the latter over a PbO/sub 2/-containing anion exchange resin. The cerium is taken up by the resin, while any lanthanides, yttrium, and strontium present remain in the solution. (AEC)

  11. Characterization of a zinc-cerium flow battery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leung, P. K.; Ponce-de-León, C.; Low, C. T. J.; Shah, A. A.; Walsh, F. C.

    The performance of a divided, parallel-plate zinc-cerium redox flow battery using methanesulfonic acid electrolytes was studied. Eight two and three-dimensional electrodes were tested under both constant current density and constant cell voltage discharge. Carbon felt and the three-dimensional platinised titanium mesh electrodes exhibited superior performance over the 2-dimensional electrodes. The charge and discharge characteristics of the redox flow battery were studied under different operating conditions and Zn/Ce reactant, as well as methansulfonic acid concentration. The cell performance improved at higher operating temperatures and faster electrolyte flow velocities. The number of possible cycles increased at reduced states of charge. During 15 min charge/discharge per cycle experiment, 57 cycles were obtained and the zinc reaction was found to be the limiting process during long term operation.

  12. Fabrication and characterization of cerium-doped barium titanate inverse opal by sol-gel method

    SciTech Connect

    Jin Yi; Zhu Yihua Yang Xiaoling; Li Chunzhong; Zhou Jinghong

    2007-01-15

    Cerium-doped barium titanate inverted opal was synthesized from barium acetate contained cerous acetate and tetrabutyl titanate in the interstitial spaces of a polystyrene (PS) opal. This procedure involves infiltration of precursors into the interstices of the PS opal template followed by hydrolytic polycondensation of the precursors to amorphous barium titanate and removal of the PS opal by calcination. The morphologies of opal and inverse opal were characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM). The pores were characterized by mercury intrusion porosimetry (MIP). X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) investigation showed the doping structure of cerium, barium and titanium. And powder X-ray diffraction allows one to observe the influence of doping degree on the grain size. The lattice parameters, crystal size and lattice strain were calculated by the Rietveld refinement method. The synthesis of cerium-doped barium titanate inverted opals provides an opportunity to electrically and optically engineer the photonic band structure and the possibility of developing tunable three-dimensional photonic crystal devices. - Graphical abstract: Cerium-doped barium titanate inverted opal was synthesized from barium acetate acid contained cerous acetate and tetrabutyl titanate in the interstitial spaces of a PS opal, which involves infiltration of precursors into the interstices of the PS opal template and removal of the PS opal by calcination.

  13. Formulation and method for preparing gels comprising hydrous cerium oxide

    DOEpatents

    Collins, Jack L; Chi, Anthony

    2013-05-07

    Formulations useful for preparing hydrous cerium oxide gels contain a metal salt including cerium, an organic base, and a complexing agent. Methods for preparing gels containing hydrous cerium oxide include heating a formulation to a temperature sufficient to induce gel formation, where the formulation contains a metal salt including cerium, an organic base, and a complexing agent.

  14. Chronic manganese intoxication

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, C.C.; Chu, N.S.; Lu, C.S.; Wang, J.D.; Tsai, J.L.; Tzeng, J.L.; Wolters, E.C.; Calne, D.B. )

    1989-10-01

    We report six cases of chronic manganese intoxication in workers at a ferromanganese factory in Taiwan. Diagnosis was confirmed by assessing increased manganese concentrations in the blood, scalp, and pubic hair. In addition, increased manganese levels in the environmental air were established. The patients showed a bradykinetic-rigid syndrome indistinguishable from Parkinson's disease that responded to treatment with levodopa.

  15. Pharmacological potential of cerium oxidenanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celardo, Ivana; Pedersen, Jens Z.; Traversa, Enrico; Ghibelli, Lina

    2011-04-01

    Nanotechnology promises a revolution in pharmacology to improve or create ex novo therapies. Cerium oxidenanoparticles (nanoceria), well-known as catalysts, possess an astonishing pharmacological potential due to their antioxidant properties, deriving from a fraction of Ce3+ ions present in CeO2. These defects, compensated by oxygen vacancies, are enriched at the surface and therefore in nanosized particles. Reactions involving redox cycles between the Ce3+ and Ce4+oxidation states allow nanoceria to react catalytically with superoxide and hydrogen peroxide, mimicking the behavior of two key antioxidant enzymes, superoxide dismutase and catalase, potentially abating all noxious intracellularreactive oxygen species (ROS) via a self-regenerating mechanism. Hence nanoceria, apparently well tolerated by the organism, might fight chronic inflammation and the pathologies associated with oxidative stress, which include cancer and neurodegeneration. Here we review the biological effects of nanoceria as they emerge from in vitro and in vivo studies, considering biocompatibility and the peculiar antioxidant mechanisms.

  16. Titanium 2013

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    2014-01-01

    Titanium is the ninth most abundant element in the earth's crust and can be found in nearly all rocks and sediments. It is a lithophile element with a strong affinity for oxygen and is not found as a pure metal in nature. Titanium was first isolated as a pure metal in 1910, but it was not until 1948 that the metal was produced commercially using the Kroll process (named after its developer, William Kroll) to reduce titanium tetrachloride with magnesium to produce titanium metal.

  17. Cerium anomaly at microscale in fossils.

    PubMed

    Gueriau, Pierre; Mocuta, Cristian; Bertrand, Loïc

    2015-09-01

    Patterns in rare earth element (REE) concentrations are essential instruments to assess geochemical processes in Earth and environmental sciences. Excursions in the "cerium anomaly" are widely used to inform on past redox conditions in sediments. This proxy resources to the specificity of cerium to adopt both the +III and +IV oxidation states, while most rare earths are purely trivalent and share very similar reactivity and transport properties. In practical terms, the level of cerium anomaly is established through elemental point quantification and profiling. All these models rely on a supposed homogeneity of the cerium oxidation state within the samples. However, this has never been demonstrated, whereas the cerium concentration can significantly vary within a sample, as shown for fossils, which would vastly complicate interpretation of REE patterns. Here, we report direct micrometric mapping of Ce speciation through synchrotron X-ray absorption spectroscopy and production of local rare earth patterns in paleontological fossil tissues through X-ray fluorescence mapping. The sensitivity of the approach is demonstrated on well-preserved fishes and crustaceans from the Late Cretaceous (ca. 95 million years (Myr) old). The presence of Ce under the +IV form within the fossil tissues is attributed to slightly oxidative local conditions of burial and agrees well with the limited negative cerium anomaly observed in REE patterns. The [Ce(IV)]/[Ce(tot)] ratio appears remarkably stable at the microscale within each fossil and is similar between fossils from the locality. Speciation maps were obtained from an original combination of synchrotron microbeam X-ray fluorescence, absorption spectroscopy, and diffraction, together with light and electron microscopy. This work also highlights the need for more systematic studies of cerium geochemistry at the microscale in paleontological contexts, in particular across fossil histologies.

  18. Cerium anomaly at microscale in fossils.

    PubMed

    Gueriau, Pierre; Mocuta, Cristian; Bertrand, Loïc

    2015-09-01

    Patterns in rare earth element (REE) concentrations are essential instruments to assess geochemical processes in Earth and environmental sciences. Excursions in the "cerium anomaly" are widely used to inform on past redox conditions in sediments. This proxy resources to the specificity of cerium to adopt both the +III and +IV oxidation states, while most rare earths are purely trivalent and share very similar reactivity and transport properties. In practical terms, the level of cerium anomaly is established through elemental point quantification and profiling. All these models rely on a supposed homogeneity of the cerium oxidation state within the samples. However, this has never been demonstrated, whereas the cerium concentration can significantly vary within a sample, as shown for fossils, which would vastly complicate interpretation of REE patterns. Here, we report direct micrometric mapping of Ce speciation through synchrotron X-ray absorption spectroscopy and production of local rare earth patterns in paleontological fossil tissues through X-ray fluorescence mapping. The sensitivity of the approach is demonstrated on well-preserved fishes and crustaceans from the Late Cretaceous (ca. 95 million years (Myr) old). The presence of Ce under the +IV form within the fossil tissues is attributed to slightly oxidative local conditions of burial and agrees well with the limited negative cerium anomaly observed in REE patterns. The [Ce(IV)]/[Ce(tot)] ratio appears remarkably stable at the microscale within each fossil and is similar between fossils from the locality. Speciation maps were obtained from an original combination of synchrotron microbeam X-ray fluorescence, absorption spectroscopy, and diffraction, together with light and electron microscopy. This work also highlights the need for more systematic studies of cerium geochemistry at the microscale in paleontological contexts, in particular across fossil histologies. PMID:26239283

  19. Process for synthesizing titanium carbide, titanium nitride and titanium carbonitride

    DOEpatents

    Koc, R.; Glatzmaier, G.C.

    1995-05-23

    A process is disclosed for synthesizing titanium carbide, titanium nitride or titanium carbonitride. The process comprises placing particles of titanium, a titanium salt or titanium dioxide within a vessel and providing a carbon-containing atmosphere within the vessel. The vessel is heated to a pyrolysis temperature sufficient to pyrolyze the carbon to thereby coat the particles with a carbon coating. Thereafter, the carbon-coated particles are heated in an inert atmosphere to produce titanium carbide, or in a nitrogen atmosphere to produce titanium nitride or titanium carbonitride, with the heating being of a temperature and time sufficient to produce a substantially complete solid solution.

  20. Process for synthesizing titanium carbide, titanium nitride and titanium carbonitride

    DOEpatents

    Koc, Rasit; Glatzmaier, Gregory C.

    1995-01-01

    A process for synthesizing titanium carbide, titanium nitride or titanium carbonitride. The process comprises placing particles of titanium, a titanium salt or titanium dioxide within a vessel and providing a carbon-containing atmosphere within the vessel. The vessel is heated to a pyrolysis temperature sufficient to pyrolyze the carbon to thereby coat the particles with a carbon coating. Thereafter, the carbon-coated particles are heated in an inert atmosphere to produce titanium carbide, or in a nitrogen atmosphere to produce titanium nitride or titanium carbonitride, with the heating being of a temperature and time sufficient to produce a substantially complete solid solution.

  1. Manganese uptake of imprinted polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Susanna Ventura

    2015-09-30

    Batch tests of manganese imprinted polymers of variable composition to assess their ability to extract lithium and manganese from synthetic brines at T=45C . Data on manganese uptake for two consecutive cycles are included.

  2. α-Radioactivity of cerium-142

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Senftle, F.E.; Stern, T.W.; Alekna, V.P.

    1959-01-01

    JOHNSON AND NIER1 have measured the atomic masses of some of the rare-earth isotopes and have shown that the mass difference cerium-142—(barium-138 + helium-4) is equivalent to 1.68 ± 0.10 MeV. Similar results for the naturally occurring samarium and neodymium isotopes show that the α-active isotope of each element is the one having the largest possible decay energy. Rasmussen and others2 suggest that the two or three neutrons just beyond the closed shell of 82 neutrons have decreased binding energies and hence the α-energy has a maximum about 84 neutrons. Johnson and Nier suggest that the α-decay of cerium-142 may take place with enough energy to be experimentally observable. Porschen and Riezler3 examined a sample of un-enriched cerium ammonium citrate using nuclear track plates sensitive to α-particles. No α-activity was observed after a 30-day exposure of 1.2 mgm. of the cerium salt. In 1957 Riezler and Kauw4 reported an alpha activity for an enriched sample of cerium-142. From their results they calculated a half-life of 5.1 × 1015 years with an uncertainty factor of 2.

  3. Nanocrystalline cerium oxide materials for solid fuel cell systems

    SciTech Connect

    Brinkman, Kyle S

    2015-05-05

    Disclosed are solid fuel cells, including solid oxide fuel cells and PEM fuel cells that include nanocrystalline cerium oxide materials as a component of the fuel cells. A solid oxide fuel cell can include nanocrystalline cerium oxide as a cathode component and microcrystalline cerium oxide as an electrolyte component, which can prevent mechanical failure and interdiffusion common in other fuel cells. A solid oxide fuel cell can also include nanocrystalline cerium oxide in the anode. A PEM fuel cell can include cerium oxide as a catalyst support in the cathode and optionally also in the anode.

  4. Divalent fluoride doped cerium fluoride scintillator

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, David F.; Sparrow, Robert W.

    1991-01-01

    The use of divalent fluoride dopants in scintillator materials comprising cerium fluoride is disclosed. The preferred divalent fluoride dopants are calcium fluoride, strontium fluoride, and barium fluoride. The preferred amount of divalent fluoride dopant is less than about two percent by weight of the total scintillator. Cerium fluoride scintillator crystals grown with the addition of a divalent fluoride have exhibited better transmissions and higher light outputs than crystals grown without the addition of such dopants. These scintillators are useful in radiation detection and monitoring applications, and are particularly well suited for high-rate applications such as positron emission tomography (PET).

  5. Cerium migration during PEM fuel cell accelerated stress testing

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, Andrew M.; Mukundan, Rangachary; Borup, Rodney L.; Spernjak, Dusan; Judge, Elizabeth J.; Advani, Suresh G.; Prasad, Ajay K.

    2016-01-01

    Cerium is a radical scavenger which improves polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell durability. During operation, however, cerium rapidly migrates in the PEM and into the catalyst layers (CLs). In this work, membrane electrode assemblies (MEAs) were subjected to accelerated stress tests (ASTs) under different humidity conditions. Cerium migration was characterized in the MEAs after ASTs using X-ray fluorescence. During fully humidified operation, water flux from cell inlet to outlet generated in-plane cerium gradients. Conversely, cerium profiles were flat during low humidity operation, where in-plane water flux was negligible, however, migration from the PEM into the CLs was enhanced. Humidity cycling resulted in both in-plane cerium gradients due to water flux during the hydration component of the cycle, and significant migration into the CLs. Fluoride and cerium emissions into effluent cell waters were measured during ASTs and correlated, which signifies that ionomer degradation products serve as possible counter-ions for cerium emissions. Fluoride emission rates were also correlated to final PEM cerium contents, which indicates that PEM degradation and cerium migration are coupled. Lastly, it is proposed that cerium migrates from the PEM due to humidification conditions and degradation, and is subsequently stabilized in the CLs by carbon catalyst supports.

  6. Cerium migration during PEM fuel cell accelerated stress testing

    DOE PAGES

    Baker, Andrew M.; Mukundan, Rangachary; Borup, Rodney L.; Spernjak, Dusan; Judge, Elizabeth J.; Advani, Suresh G.; Prasad, Ajay K.

    2016-01-01

    Cerium is a radical scavenger which improves polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell durability. During operation, however, cerium rapidly migrates in the PEM and into the catalyst layers (CLs). In this work, membrane electrode assemblies (MEAs) were subjected to accelerated stress tests (ASTs) under different humidity conditions. Cerium migration was characterized in the MEAs after ASTs using X-ray fluorescence. During fully humidified operation, water flux from cell inlet to outlet generated in-plane cerium gradients. Conversely, cerium profiles were flat during low humidity operation, where in-plane water flux was negligible, however, migration from the PEM into the CLs was enhanced. Humiditymore » cycling resulted in both in-plane cerium gradients due to water flux during the hydration component of the cycle, and significant migration into the CLs. Fluoride and cerium emissions into effluent cell waters were measured during ASTs and correlated, which signifies that ionomer degradation products serve as possible counter-ions for cerium emissions. Fluoride emission rates were also correlated to final PEM cerium contents, which indicates that PEM degradation and cerium migration are coupled. Lastly, it is proposed that cerium migrates from the PEM due to humidification conditions and degradation, and is subsequently stabilized in the CLs by carbon catalyst supports.« less

  7. An investigation of the continuum resonance effect in cerium and cerium oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, Mark W.

    1998-10-01

    Large x-ray emission resonances associated with the M shell in cerium and cerium oxide were investigated. The device used in this investigation consisted of an energy dispersive x-ray detector and a double-pass cylindrical mirror electron analyzer within an ultra-high vacuum system. Observations were made of the x-ray and electron emissions from samples bombarded by mono-energetic electrons from an electron gun. The x-ray and electron data were recorded with the system pressure in the low 10-9 torr range. X-ray data were obtained using incident electron energies from 865 eV to 925 eV; the binding energies of the cerium M5 and M4 subshells and the x-ray continuum resonances are contained within this energy range. The x- ray detector was set to count x-rays in a fixed energy window 120 eV wide, centered on 900 eV. Differentiated electron spectra from the samples were recorded using a lock-in amplifier. Vacuum evaporation and condensation were used to deposit cerium metal samples onto a wheel which was then rotated to position a given sample in front of the electron gun. Cerium oxide samples were obtained by exposing cerium metal deposits to room air at atmospheric pressure and then repumping the system. The x-ray yield spectra from the cerium and cerium oxide samples show large resonances for incident electron energies near the M5 and M4 level ionization energies. There are no features in the electron spectra which correspond to the large resonances observed in the x-ray yield spectra. These findings are in agreement with results previously obtained by Chamberlain et al. and by Mason. The maxima in the x-ray resonances for cerium oxide occur at slightly lower incident electron energy than those for cerium metal. There is also a large increase in the intensity of the x-ray continuum resonance yield in cerium oxide above that in the metal. Possible explanations for these observations are presented.

  8. Uptake and accumulation of bulk and nanosized cerium oxide particles and ionic cerium by radish (Raphanus sativus L.).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Weilan; Ebbs, Stephen D; Musante, Craig; White, Jason C; Gao, Cunmei; Ma, Xingmao

    2015-01-21

    The potential toxicity and accumulation of engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) in agricultural crops has become an area of great concern and intense investigation. Interestingly, although below-ground vegetables are most likely to accumulate the highest concentrations of ENMs, little work has been done investigating the potential uptake and accumulation of ENMs for this plant group. The overall objective of this study was to evaluate how different forms of cerium (bulk cerium oxide, cerium oxide nanoparticles, and the cerium ion) affected the growth of radish (Raphanus sativus L.) and accumulation of cerium in radish tissues. Ionic cerium (Ce(3+)) had a negative effect on radish growth at 10 mg CeCl3/L, whereas bulk cerium oxide (CeO2) enhanced plant biomass at the same concentration. Treatment with 10 mg/L cerium oxide nanoparticles (CeO2 NPs) had no significant effect on radish growth. Exposure to all forms of cerium resulted in the accumulation of this element in radish tissues, including the edible storage root. However, the accumulation patterns and their effect on plant growth and physiological processes varied with the characteristics of cerium. This study provides a critical frame of reference on the effects of CeO2 NPs versus their bulk and ionic counterparts on radish growth.

  9. [Function and disease in manganese].

    PubMed

    Kimura, Mieko

    2016-07-01

    Manganese is a metal that has been known named a Greek word "Magnesia" meaning magnesia nigra from Roman Empire. Manganese provide the wide range of metablic function and the multiple abnomalities from its deficiency or toxicity. In 1931, the essentiality of manganese was demonstrated with the authoritative poor growth and declined reproduction in its deficiency. Manganese deficiency has been recognized in a number of species and its signs are impaired growth, impaired reproduction, ataxia, skeletal abnormalities and disorders in lipid and carbohydrate metabolism. Manganese toxicity is also acknowledged as health hazard for animals and humans. Here manganese nutrition, metabolism and metabolic function are summarized. PMID:27455810

  10. Synthesis of Cerium-Doped Titania Nanoparticles and Nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Cao, Wei; Suzuki, Takuya; Elsayed-Ali, Hani E; Abdel-Fattah, Tarek M

    2015-03-01

    Cerium-doped titania nanoparticles and nanotubes were synthesized via hydrothermal processes. X-Ray Diffraction revealed that cerium-doped titania nanoparticles have an anatase crystal structure, while cerium-doped titania nanotubes have an H2Ti3O7-type structure. Scanning electron microscopy and high resolution transmission electron microscopy showed that both types of titania are well crystallized with relatively uniform size distribution. The photocatalytic degradation of methylthioninium chloride known as methylene blue dye was tested and both cerium-doped titania nanoparticles and nanotubes. The preliminary photocatalytic degradation of Methylene Blue data showed significantly improved visible light photocatalytic activities as compared to commercial titania powders.

  11. Antimony promoted bismuth cerium molybdate catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Brazdil, J.F.; Glaeser, L.C.; Grasselli, R.K.

    1990-05-01

    This patent describes an improvement in antimony-promoted bismuth cerium molybdate whereby the tendency of the catalyst to lose efectiveness over time is significantly reduced. This patent describes new catalysts which are also useful in other oxidation-type reactions such as the oxidation of acrolein and methacrolein to produce the corresponding unsaturated aldehydes and acids and the oxydehydrogenation of various olefins such as isoamylenes to produce the corresponding diolefins such as isoprene.

  12. Atomic Transition Probabilities for Neutral Cerium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawler, J. E.; den Hartog, E. A.; Wood, M. P.; Nitz, D. E.; Chisholm, J.; Sobeck, J.

    2009-10-01

    The spectra of neutral cerium (Ce I) and singly ionized cerium (Ce II) are more complex than spectra of other rare earth species. The resulting high density of lines in the visible makes Ce ideal for use in metal halide (MH) High Intensity Discharge (HID) lamps. Inclusion of cerium-iodide in a lamp dose can improve both the Color Rendering Index and luminous efficacy of a MH-HID lamp. Basic spectroscopic data including absolute atomic transition probabilities for Ce I and Ce II are needed for diagnosing and modeling these MH-HID lamps. Recent work on Ce II [1] is now being augmented with similar work on Ce I. Radiative lifetimes from laser induced fluorescence measurements [2] on neutral Ce are being combined with emission branching fractions from spectra recorded using a Fourier transform spectrometer. A total of 14 high resolution spectra are being analyzed to determine branching fractions for 2000 to 3000 lines from 153 upper levels in neutral Ce. Representative data samples and progress to date will be presented. [4pt] [1] J. E. Lawler, C. Sneden, J. J. Cowan, I. I. Ivans, and E. A. Den Hartog, Astrophys. J. Suppl. Ser. 182, 51-79 (2009). [0pt] [2] E. A. Den Hartog, K. P. Buettner, and J. E. Lawler, J. Phys. B: Atomic, Molecular & Optical Physics 42, 085006 (7pp) (2009).

  13. Occupational exposure to manganese.

    PubMed

    Sarić, M; Markićević, A; Hrustić, O

    1977-05-01

    The relationship between the degree of exposure and biological effects of manganese was studied in a group of 369 workers employed in the production of ferroalloys. Two other groups of workers, from an electrode plant and from an aluminium rolling mill, served as controls. Mean manganese concentrations at work places where ferroalloys were produced varied from 0-301 to 20-442 mg/m3. The exposure level of the two control groups was from 2 to 30 microgram/m3 and from 0-05 to 0-07 microgram/m3, in the electrode plant and rolling mill respectively. Sixty-two (16-8%) manganese alloy workers showed some signs of neurological impairment. These signs were noticeably less in the two control groups (5-8% and 0%) than in the occupationally exposed group. Subjective symptoms, which are nonspecific but may be symptoms of subclinical manganism, were not markedly different in the three groups. However, in the manganese alloy workers some of the subjective symptoms occurred more frequently in heavier smokers than in light smokers or nonsmokers. Heavier smokers engaged in manganese alloy production showed some of the subjective symptoms more often than heavier smokers from the control groups.

  14. Manganese As a Metal Accumulator

    EPA Science Inventory

    Manganese deposits in water distribution systems accumulate metals, radionuclides and oxyanions by a combination of surface complexation, adsorption and solid substitution, as well as a combination of oxidation followed by manganese reduction and sorption of the oxidized constitu...

  15. Manganese in silicon carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linnarsson, M. K.; Hallén, A.

    2012-02-01

    Structural disorder and relocation of implanted Mn in semi-insulating 4H-SiC has been studied. Subsequent heat treatment of Mn implanted samples has been performed in the temperature range 1400-2000 °C. The depth distribution of manganese is recorded by secondary ion mass spectrometry. Rutherford backscattering spectrometry has been employed for characterization of crystal disorder. Ocular inspection of color changes of heat-treated samples indicates that a large portion of the damage has been annealed. However, Rutherford backscattering shows that after heat treatment, most disorder from the implantation remains. Less disorder is observed in the [0 0 0 1] channel direction compared to [ 1 1 2¯ 3] channel direction. A substantial rearrangement of manganese is observed in the implanted region. No pronounced manganese diffusion deeper into the sample is recorded.

  16. Preparation of titanium diboride powder

    DOEpatents

    Brynestad, Jorulf; Bamberger, Carlos E.

    1985-01-01

    Finely-divided titanium diboride or zirconium diboride powders are formed by reacting gaseous boron trichloride with a material selected from the group consisting of titanium powder, zirconium powder, titanium dichloride powder, titanium trichloride powder, and gaseous titanium trichloride.

  17. Local Structure of Cerium in Aluminophosphate and Silicophosphate Glasses

    SciTech Connect

    Rygel, Jennifer L.; Chen, Yongsheng; Pantano, Carlo G.; Shibata, Tomohiro; Du, Jincheng; Kokou, Leopold; Woodman, Robert; Belcher, James

    2011-09-20

    The local structure of cerium in two systematic compositional series of glasses, nominally CeP{sub 3}O{sub 9}-AlP{sub 3}O{sub 9} and CeP{sub 3}O{sub 9}-SiP{sub 2}O{sub 7}, was interrogated using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) spectroscopy. XPS revealed that, for glasses melted in air, {>=}95% of cerium ions are Ce{sup 3+}. This was independently confirmed using X-ray absorption near edge spectroscopy (XANES). Ce K-edge extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) has been used to determine the local structure of Ce{sup 3+}. Near the metaphosphate composition, cerium was found to have an average cerium coordination number of {approx}7.0 and an average cerium-oxygen bond length of 2.41 {angstrom}. The average cerium coordination number and average cerium-oxygen bond distance were found to increase with decreasing cerium concentration in both compositional series. Rare-earth clustering is suggested based on numerical calculations for glasses containing {>=}14 and {>=}15 mol% Ce{sub 2}O{sub 3} for the aluminophosphate and silicophosphate series, respectively.

  18. Study of the cerium(IV)-picrate system in acetonitrile.

    PubMed

    Kratochvil, B; Tipler, M; McKay, B

    1966-07-01

    A potentiometric and spectrophotometric study has been made of the reaction between hexanitratocerate and picrate in dry acetonitrile. Several cerium(IV)-picrate complexes are formed; the formation constant for the first is estimated to be 4 from spectrophotometric measurements. The catalytic effect of picrate on hydroquinone oxidation by nitratocerate is postulated to be due to more rapid electron transfer by cerium picrate complexes.

  19. RECOVERY OF Pu FROM CERIUM TRIFLUORIDE BY FLUORINATION

    DOEpatents

    Brown, H.S.; Bohlmann, E.G.

    1959-02-10

    An improved process is prcsented for selectively recovering plutonium from a solution containing fission products comprising precipitating cerium trifluoride in the solution for effccting carrier precipitation of plutonium. The resulting carrier precipitate is dried and subjected to fluorination at about 600 C. The plutonium forms a volatile fiuoridc and is so separated from the nonvolatile cerium fluoride.

  20. Cerium migration during PEM fuel cell assembly and operation

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, Andrew M.; Torraco, Dennis; Judge, Elizabeth J.; Spernjak, Dusan; Mukundan, Rangachary; Borup, Rod L.; Advani, Suresh G.; Prasad, Ajay K.

    2015-10-02

    Cerium migration between PEM fuel cell components is influenced by potential-driven mobility, ionic diffusion, and gradients in water content. These factors were investigated in ex situ experiments and in operating fuel cells. Potential-induced migration was measured ex situ in hydrated window cells. Cerium-containing MEAs were also fabricated and tested under ASTs. MEA disassembly and subsequent XRF analysis were used to observe rapid cerium migration during cell assembly and operation. During MEA hot pressing, humidification, and low RH operation at OCV, ionic diffusion causes uniform migration from the membrane into the catalyst layers. During high RH operation at OCV, in-plane cerium gradients arise due to variations in water content. These gradients may diminish the scavenging efficacy of cerium by reducing its proximity to generated radicals.

  1. Cerium migration during PEM fuel cell assembly and operation

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, Andrew M.; Torraco, Dennis; Judge, Elizabeth J.; Spernjak, Dusan; Mukundan, Rangachary; Borup, Rod L.; Advani, Suresh G.; Prasad, Ajay K.

    2015-09-14

    Cerium migration between PEM fuel cell components is influenced by potential-driven mobility, ionic diffusion, and gradients in water content. These factors were investigated in ex situ experiments and in operating fuel cells. Potential-induced migration was measured ex situ in hydrated window cells. Cerium-containing MEAs were also fabricated and tested under ASTs. MEA disassembly and subsequent XRF analysis were used to observe rapid cerium migration during cell assembly and operation. During MEA hot pressing, humidification, and low RH operation at OCV, ionic diffusion causes uniform migration from the membrane into the catalyst layers. During high RH operation at OCV, in-plane cerium gradients arise due to variations in water content. These gradients may diminish the scavenging efficacy of cerium by reducing its proximity to generated radicals.

  2. Manganese, Metallogenium, and Martian Microfossils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stein, L. Y.; Nealson, K. H.

    1999-01-01

    Manganese could easily be considered an abundant element in the Martian regolith, assuming that the composition of martian meteorites reflects the composition of the planet. Mineralogical analyses of 5 SNC meteorites have revealed an average manganese oxide concentration of 0.48%, relative to the 0.1% concentration of manganese found in the Earth's crust. On the Earth, the accumulation of manganese oxides in oceans, soils, rocks, sedimentary ores, fresh water systems, and hydrothermal vents can be largely attributed to microbial activity. Manganese is also a required trace nutrient for most life forms and participates in many critical enzymatic reactions such as photosynthesis. The wide-spread process of bacterial manganese cycling on Earth suggests that manganese is an important element to both geology and biology. Furthermore, there is evidence that bacteria can be fossilized within manganese ores, implying that manganese beds may be good repositories for preserved biomarkers. A particular genus of bacteria, known historically as Metallogenium, can form star-shaped manganese oxide minerals (called metallogenium) through the action of manganese oxide precipitation along its surface. Fossilized structures that resemble metallogenium have been found in Precambrian sedimentary formations and in Cretaceous-Paleogene cherts. The Cretaceous-Paleogene formations are highly enriched in manganese and have concentrations of trace elements (Fe, Zn, Cu, and Co) similar to modern-day manganese oxide deposits in marine environments. The appearance of metallogenium-like fossils associated with manganese deposits suggests that bacteria may be preserved within the minerals that they form. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  3. Ultrathin, epitaxial cerium dioxide on silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flege, Jan Ingo; Kaemena, Björn; Höcker, Jan; Bertram, Florian; Wollschläger, Joachim; Schmidt, Thomas; Falta, Jens

    2014-03-01

    It is shown that ultrathin, highly ordered, continuous films of cerium dioxide may be prepared on silicon following substrate prepassivation using an atomic layer of chlorine. The as-deposited, few-nanometer-thin Ce2O3 film may very effectively be converted at room temperature to almost fully oxidized CeO2 by simple exposure to air, as demonstrated by hard X-ray photoemission spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. This post-oxidation process essentially results in a negligible loss in film crystallinity and interface abruptness.

  4. Ultrathin, epitaxial cerium dioxide on silicon

    SciTech Connect

    Flege, Jan Ingo Kaemena, Björn; Höcker, Jan; Schmidt, Thomas; Falta, Jens; Bertram, Florian; Wollschläger, Joachim

    2014-03-31

    It is shown that ultrathin, highly ordered, continuous films of cerium dioxide may be prepared on silicon following substrate prepassivation using an atomic layer of chlorine. The as-deposited, few-nanometer-thin Ce{sub 2}O{sub 3} film may very effectively be converted at room temperature to almost fully oxidized CeO{sub 2} by simple exposure to air, as demonstrated by hard X-ray photoemission spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction. This post-oxidation process essentially results in a negligible loss in film crystallinity and interface abruptness.

  5. 21 CFR 184.1449 - Manganese citrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Manganese citrate. 184.1449 Section 184.1449 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1449 Manganese citrate. (a) Manganese citrate (Mn3(C6H5O7)2, CAS... manganese carbonate from manganese sulfate and sodium carbonate solutions. The filtered and...

  6. 21 CFR 184.1449 - Manganese citrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Manganese citrate. 184.1449 Section 184.1449 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1449 Manganese citrate. (a) Manganese citrate (Mn3(C6H5O7)2, CAS... manganese carbonate from manganese sulfate and sodium carbonate solutions. The filtered and...

  7. 21 CFR 184.1449 - Manganese citrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Manganese citrate. 184.1449 Section 184.1449 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1449 Manganese citrate. (a) Manganese citrate (Mn3(C6H5O7)2, CAS... manganese carbonate from manganese sulfate and sodium carbonate solutions. The filtered and...

  8. Photodissociation of Cerium Oxide Nanocluster Cations.

    PubMed

    Akin, S T; Ard, S G; Dye, B E; Schaefer, H F; Duncan, M A

    2016-04-21

    Cerium oxide cluster cations, CexOy(+), are produced via laser vaporization in a pulsed nozzle source and detected with time-of-flight mass spectrometry. The mass spectrum displays a strongly preferred oxide stoichiometry for each cluster with a specific number of metal atoms x, with x ≤ y. Specifically, the most prominent clusters correspond to the formula CeO(CeO2)n(+). The cluster cations are mass selected and photodissociated with a Nd:YAG laser at either 532 or 355 nm. The prominent clusters dissociate to produce smaller species also having a similar CeO(CeO2)n(+) formula, always with apparent leaving groups of (CeO2). The production of CeO(CeO2)n(+) from the dissociation of many cluster sizes establishes the relative stability of these clusters. Furthermore, the consistent loss of neutral CeO2 shows that the smallest neutral clusters adopt the same oxidation state (IV) as the most common form of bulk cerium oxide. Clusters with higher oxygen content than the CeO(CeO2)n(+) masses are present with much lower abundance. These species dissociate by the loss of O2, leaving surviving clusters with the CeO(CeO2)n(+) formula. Density functional theory calculations on these clusters suggest structures composed of stable CeO(CeO2)n(+) cores with excess oxygen bound to the surface as a superoxide unit (O2(-)). PMID:27035210

  9. The surface chemistry of cerium oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Mullins, David R.

    2015-01-29

    Our review covers the structure of, and chemical reactions on, well-defined cerium oxide surfaces. Ceria, or mixed oxides containing ceria, are critical components in automotive three-way catalysts due to their well-known oxygen storage capacity. Ceria is also emerging as an important material in a number of other catalytic processes, particularly those involving organic oxygenates and the water–gas shift reaction. Ceria's acid–base properties, and thus its catalytic behavior, are closely related to its surface structure where different oxygen anion and cerium cation environments are present on the low-index structural faces. The actual structure of these various faces has been the focus of a number of theoretical and experimental investigations. Ceria is also easily reducible from CeO2 to CeO2-X. The presence of oxygen vacancies on the surface often dramatically alters the adsorption and subsequent reactions of various adsorbates, either on a clean surface or on metal particles supported on the surface. We conducted surface science studies on the surfaces of thin-films rather than on the surfaces of bulk single crystal oxides. The growth, characterization and properties of these thin-films are also examined.

  10. The surface chemistry of cerium oxide

    DOE PAGES

    Mullins, David R.

    2015-01-29

    Our review covers the structure of, and chemical reactions on, well-defined cerium oxide surfaces. Ceria, or mixed oxides containing ceria, are critical components in automotive three-way catalysts due to their well-known oxygen storage capacity. Ceria is also emerging as an important material in a number of other catalytic processes, particularly those involving organic oxygenates and the water–gas shift reaction. Ceria's acid–base properties, and thus its catalytic behavior, are closely related to its surface structure where different oxygen anion and cerium cation environments are present on the low-index structural faces. The actual structure of these various faces has been the focusmore » of a number of theoretical and experimental investigations. Ceria is also easily reducible from CeO2 to CeO2-X. The presence of oxygen vacancies on the surface often dramatically alters the adsorption and subsequent reactions of various adsorbates, either on a clean surface or on metal particles supported on the surface. We conducted surface science studies on the surfaces of thin-films rather than on the surfaces of bulk single crystal oxides. The growth, characterization and properties of these thin-films are also examined.« less

  11. The surface chemistry of cerium oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mullins, David R.

    2015-03-01

    This review covers the structure of, and chemical reactions on, well-defined cerium oxide surfaces. Ceria, or mixed oxides containing ceria, are critical components in automotive three-way catalysts due to their well-known oxygen storage capacity. Ceria is also emerging as an important material in a number of other catalytic processes, particularly those involving organic oxygenates and the water-gas shift reaction. Ceria's acid-base properties, and thus its catalytic behavior, are closely related to its surface structure where different oxygen anion and cerium cation environments are present on the low-index structural faces. The actual structure of these various faces has been the focus of a number of theoretical and experimental investigations. Ceria is also easily reducible from CeO2 to CeO2-X. The presence of oxygen vacancies on the surface often dramatically alters the adsorption and subsequent reactions of various adsorbates, either on a clean surface or on metal particles supported on the surface. Most surface science studies have been conducted on the surfaces of thin-films rather than on the surfaces of bulk single crystal oxides. The growth, characterization and properties of these thin-films are also examined.

  12. Microstructure of surface cerium hydride growth sites

    SciTech Connect

    Brierley, Martin; Knowles, John; Montgomery, Neil; Preuss, Michael

    2014-05-15

    Samples of cerium were exposed to hydrogen under controlled conditions causing cerium hydride sites to nucleate and grow on the surface. The hydriding rate was measured in situ, and the hydrides were characterised using secondary ion mass spectrometry, scanning electron microscopy, and optical microscopy. The results show that the hydriding rate proceeded more quickly than earlier studies. Characterisation confirmed that the hydrogen is confined to the sites. The morphology of the hydrides was confirmed to be oblate, and stressed material was observed surrounding the hydride, in a number of cases lathlike features were observed surrounding the hydride sites laterally with cracking in the surface oxide above them. It is proposed that during growth the increased lattice parameter of the CeH{sub 2} induces a lateral compressive stress around the hydride, which relieves by the ca. 16% volume collapse of the γ-Ce to α-Ce pressure induced phase transition. Cracking of the surface oxide above the laths reduces the diffusion barrier to hydrogen reaching the metal/oxide interface surrounding the hydride site and contributes to the anisotropic growth of the hydrides.

  13. Optical properties of cerium-codoped high power laser fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unger, S.; Schwuchow, A.; Jetschke, S.; Grimm, S.; Scheffel, A.; Kirchhof, J.

    2013-03-01

    The photodarkening resistivity of ytterbium doped alumosilicate fibers can be remarkably improved by cerium codoping. Here we report on systematical investigations of the influence of cerium on an optimized fiber design. Fibers with different ytterbium, aluminium and cerium contents have been prepared both under reducing and oxydizing conditions and characterized concerning refractive index, absorption and emission from UV to NIR. Typical spectral features in the UV and visible range have been analysed with respect to the ratio of Ce3+ / Ce4+. Photodarkening tests have been accomplished in order to correlate the power stability with the Ce content and valency state.

  14. Antibacterial activity of cerium colloids against opportunistic microorganisms in vitro.

    PubMed

    Babenko, L P; Zholobak, N M; Shcherbakov, A B; Voychuk, S I; Lazarenko, L M; Spivak, M Ya

    2012-01-01

    The CeO2 sol with the size of nanoparticles 2-4 nm has been synthesized. It has been determined that the synthesized nanocrystalline cerium has antibacterial activity in vitro against different groups of opportunistic microorganisms: clinical strains of Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus and Candida albicans. The rate of viability depression of test-cultures depends on the concentration of cerium dioxide nanoparticles and time of incubation. It is shown that the sol interacts with the bacterial cell surface. It is suggested that the observed differences of antibacterial action of nanocrystalline cerium dioxide can be related to the structural characteristics of the cell surface.

  15. 21 CFR 184.1446 - Manganese chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... GRAS § 184.1446 Manganese chloride. (a) Manganese chloride (MnCl2, CAS Reg. No. 7773-01-5) is a pink... manganous oxide, pyrolusite ore (MnO2), or reduced manganese ore in hydrochloric acid. The...

  16. 21 CFR 184.1446 - Manganese chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1446 Manganese chloride. (a) Manganese chloride (MnCl2, CAS Reg.... It is prepared by dissolving manganous oxide, pyrolusite ore (MnO2), or reduced manganese ore...

  17. 21 CFR 184.1446 - Manganese chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1446 Manganese chloride. (a) Manganese chloride (MnCl2, CAS Reg.... It is prepared by dissolving manganous oxide, pyrolusite ore (MnO2), or reduced manganese ore...

  18. Opportunities in the electrowinning of molten titanium from titanium dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Vuuren, D. S.; Engelbrecht, A. D.; Hadley, T. D.

    2005-10-01

    The value chain of titanium products shows that the difference between the cost of titanium ingot and titanium dioxide is about 9/kg titanium. In contrast, the price of aluminum, which is produced in a similar way, is only about 1.7/kg. Electrowinning of molten titanium from titanium dioxide is therefore believed to have significant potential to reduce the cost of titanium products. The process is hampered by the high operating temperatures and sophisticated materials of construction required; the high affinity of titanium for carbon, oxygen, and nitrogen; and physical and chemical properties of the different titanium oxide species when reducing titanium from Ti4+ to metallic titanium.

  19. A radiotracer study of cerium and manganese uptake onto suspended particles in Chesapeake Bay

    SciTech Connect

    Moffett, J.W. )

    1994-01-01

    The oxidation kinetics of Ce(III) and Mn(II) were studied in Chesapeake Bay in March and July 1990 to establish the role of water column redox processes in contributing to Ce anomalies observed in this estuary (SHOLKOVITZ and ELDERFIELD, 1988; SHOLKOVITZ et al., 1992). Oxidation was measured by adding Mn(II) and Ce(III) to freshly collected water samples as radiotracers and measuring their uptake onto the ambient suspended particle assemblage. Mn(II) oxidation was measured by following the uptake of [sup 54]Mn(II) onto suspended particles and utilizing protocols established by other workers to distinguish oxidation from Mn(II) adsorption. The same protocols were applicable to Ce(III), using [sup 139]Ce(III), and were supported by the use of [sup 152]Eu(III) as a nonredox reactive control. Specific rates of Ce(III) and MN(II) oxidation measured at a station in the North Bay (depth = 4 m) in July were 2016% per day and 4032% per day, respectively. In March, at the same station, the specific rate of Mn(II) of oxidation was only 1-% per day, and Ce(III) oxidation was undetectable. Both Ce(III) and Mn(II) oxidation processes were inhibited by azide, indicating that they were microbially mediated. The seasonal differences probably reflect strong seasonal variation in the abundance of Mn oxidizing bacteria. No Ce(III) oxidation occured in samples collected below the oxic/anoxic interface in July. The specific rates of oxidation for both elements were over 1000 times higher than those measured in the Sargasso Sea. However, the specific rates for Ce(III) and Mn(II) were very similar to each other. This fact, coupled with similar spatial and temporal trends for specific oxidation rates, suggests a common mechanism of oxidation of both elements which may be significant in a wide range of marine environments.

  20. Optical glass surfaces polishing by cerium oxide particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouzid, D.; Belkhie, N.; Aliouane, T.

    2012-02-01

    The use of powders in metallic oxides as means of grinding and polishing of the optical glass components have seen recently a large application in optical industry. In fact, cerium oxide abrasive is more used in the optical glass polishing. It is used as grains abrasive in suspension or fixed abrasive (pellets); these pellets are manufactured from a mixture made of cerium oxide abrasive and a organic binder. The cerium oxide used in the experiments is made by (Logitech USA) of 99 % purity, the average grain size of the particle is 300 nm, the density being 6,74 g /cm3 and the specific surface is 3,3042 m2/g. In this study, we are interested in the surfaces quality of the optical glass borosilicate crown (BK7) polished by particles in cerium oxide bounded by epoxy. The surfaces of the optical glass treated are characterized by the roughness, the flatness by using the microscope Zygo and the SEM.

  1. Cerium migration during PEM fuel cell assembly and operation

    DOE PAGES

    Baker, Andrew M.; Torraco, Dennis; Judge, Elizabeth J.; Spernjak, Dusan; Mukundan, Rangachary; Borup, Rod L.; Advani, Suresh G.; Prasad, Ajay K.

    2015-09-14

    Cerium migration between PEM fuel cell components is influenced by potential-driven mobility, ionic diffusion, and gradients in water content. These factors were investigated in ex situ experiments and in operating fuel cells. Potential-induced migration was measured ex situ in hydrated window cells. Cerium-containing MEAs were also fabricated and tested under ASTs. MEA disassembly and subsequent XRF analysis were used to observe rapid cerium migration during cell assembly and operation. During MEA hot pressing, humidification, and low RH operation at OCV, ionic diffusion causes uniform migration from the membrane into the catalyst layers. During high RH operation at OCV, in-plane ceriummore » gradients arise due to variations in water content. These gradients may diminish the scavenging efficacy of cerium by reducing its proximity to generated radicals.« less

  2. Effects of the Rare Earth Cerium on Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Sobek, Joseph M.; Talburt, Dwight E.

    1968-01-01

    The rare earth cerium was found to bind rapidly to Escherichia coli. Cerium inhibited oxygen uptake in the presence of glucose as well as the endogenous respiration of glucose-grown cells. For a cell concentration of 4 mg per ml, maximal inhibition was obtained at 120 μg per ml. Greater concentrations did not increase the inhibitory effect. Cerium inhibited 14CO2 evolution and 14C uptake from uniformly labeled glucose. Marked changes in the distribution of 14C incorporated into different chemical fractions of the cell were noted. The most striking changes occurred in the alcohol- and alcohol ether-soluble fractions, in which the 14C activity was increased 5- to 20-fold in the presence of cerium. PMID:4866102

  3. Heteroaggregation of cerium oxide nanoparticles and nanoparticles of pyrolyzed biomass

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Heteroaggregation with indigenous particles is an important process controlling the mobility of engineered nanomaterials in the environment. We studied heteroaggregation of cerium oxide nanoparticles (n-CeO2), which are widely used commercially, with nanoparticles of pyrogenic carbonaceous material ...

  4. Cerium stable isotope ratios in ferromanganese deposits and their potential as a paleo-redox proxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakada, Ryoichi; Takahashi, Yoshio; Tanimizu, Masaharu

    2016-05-01

    The cerium (Ce) anomaly observed in rare earth element (REE) patterns has been used to estimate the redox state of paleo-marine environments. Cerium is unique because it forms tetravalent cations under oxic conditions, in contrast to the other REEs that occur in a trivalent state. This characteristic leads to anomalously high or low Ce concentrations relative to neighboring REEs. However, the use of Ce anomaly as a paleo-redox proxy is not well calibrated. This study shows that coupling of the Ce anomaly and Ce stable isotope ratio (δ142Ce) is more quantitative redox proxy to distinguish suboxic and oxic redox conditions. Our results revealed a progressive enrichment in heavy Ce isotopes in consecutive formations of iron (Fe) and manganese (Mn) precipitate from hot spring water without any associated change in REE patterns. The δ142Ce values of Mn precipitates were approximately 0.35‰ heavier than those of the Fe precipitates, which was consistent with experiment-based predictions. The δ142Ce values of marine ferromanganese deposits with three different formation processes were hydrogenetic (+0.25‰) > diagenetic (+0.10‰) ⩾ hydrothermal (+0.05‰), which also reflects redox conditions of their formation environment. These observations suggest that the Ce stable isotope ratios yield more quantitative information regarding redox state than REE patterns alone. We thus suggest that this novel proxy can be successfully utilized to reconstruct marine redox states, particularly from slightly oxic to highly oxic conditions such as the Great Oxidation Event (GOE).

  5. Method of applying a cerium diffusion coating to a metallic alloy

    DOEpatents

    Jablonski, Paul D.; Alman, David E.

    2009-06-30

    A method of applying a cerium diffusion coating to a preferred nickel base alloy substrate has been discovered. A cerium oxide paste containing a halide activator is applied to the polished substrate and then dried. The workpiece is heated in a non-oxidizing atmosphere to diffuse cerium into the substrate. After cooling, any remaining cerium oxide is removed. The resulting cerium diffusion coating on the nickel base substrate demonstrates improved resistance to oxidation. Cerium coated alloys are particularly useful as components in a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC).

  6. Control of cerium oxidation state through metal complex secondary structures

    DOE PAGES

    Levin, Jessica R.; Dorfner, Walter L.; Carroll, Patrick J.; Schelter, Eric J.

    2015-08-11

    A series of alkali metal cerium diphenylhydrazido complexes, Mx(py)y[Ce(PhNNPh)4], M = Li, Na, and K, x = 4 (Li and Na) or 5 (K), and y = 4 (Li), 8 (Na), or 7 (K), were synthesized to probe how a secondary coordination sphere would modulate electronic structures at a cerium cation. The resulting electronic structures of the heterobimetallic cerium diphenylhydrazido complexes were found to be strongly dependent on the identity of the alkali metal cations. When M = Li+ or Na+, the cerium(III) starting material was oxidized with concomitant reduction of 1,2-diphenylhydrazine to aniline. Reduction of 1,2-diphenylhydrazine was not observedmore » when M = K+, and the complex remained in the cerium(III) oxidation state. Oxidation of the cerium(III) diphenylhydrazido complex to the Ce(IV) diphenylhydrazido one was achieved through a simple cation exchange reaction of the alkali metals. As a result, UV-Vis spectroscopy, FTIR spectroscopy, electrochemistry, magnetic susceptibility, and DFT studies were used to probe the oxidation state and the electronic changes that occurred at the metal centre.« less

  7. Control of cerium oxidation state through metal complex secondary structures

    SciTech Connect

    Levin, Jessica R.; Dorfner, Walter L.; Carroll, Patrick J.; Schelter, Eric J.

    2015-08-11

    A series of alkali metal cerium diphenylhydrazido complexes, Mx(py)y[Ce(PhNNPh)4], M = Li, Na, and K, x = 4 (Li and Na) or 5 (K), and y = 4 (Li), 8 (Na), or 7 (K), were synthesized to probe how a secondary coordination sphere would modulate electronic structures at a cerium cation. The resulting electronic structures of the heterobimetallic cerium diphenylhydrazido complexes were found to be strongly dependent on the identity of the alkali metal cations. When M = Li+ or Na+, the cerium(III) starting material was oxidized with concomitant reduction of 1,2-diphenylhydrazine to aniline. Reduction of 1,2-diphenylhydrazine was not observed when M = K+, and the complex remained in the cerium(III) oxidation state. Oxidation of the cerium(III) diphenylhydrazido complex to the Ce(IV) diphenylhydrazido one was achieved through a simple cation exchange reaction of the alkali metals. As a result, UV-Vis spectroscopy, FTIR spectroscopy, electrochemistry, magnetic susceptibility, and DFT studies were used to probe the oxidation state and the electronic changes that occurred at the metal centre.

  8. Method for dehydrating manganese dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Marincic, N.; Fuksa, R.

    1987-05-05

    A method is described for preparing a water-free lithium-manganese dioxide battery comprising: assembling the battery comprising lithium anode, a cathode comprising carbon and manganese dioxide, and a cell container; adding to the cell container a fluid containing a dehydrating agent which reacts with water bound to the manganese dioxide to form a reaction product that is extractable from the manganese dioxide; removing the fluid from the cell container; hermetically sealing and connecting the container to a vacuum source; establishing a vacuum within the compartment to pull off any remaining amount of the fluid and any volatile reaction product from the manganese dioxide; releasing the vacuum; and adding anhydrous electrolyte and hermetically sealing the cell.

  9. Titanium hermetic seals

    DOEpatents

    Brow, Richard K.; Watkins, Randall D.

    1995-07-04

    Titanium is prenitrided by being heated in a nitrogen environment under conditions which give rise to the formation of a titanium-nitride surface layer on the titanium. Titanium thus prenitrided may be used in electrical components which are hermetically sealed using silicate glasses and standard glass sealing techniques. According to the method of the invention, alkali volatilization and formation of deleterious interfacial silicide are inhibited.

  10. Titanium hermetic seals

    DOEpatents

    Brow, Richard K.; Watkins, Randall D.

    1995-01-01

    Titanium is prenitrided by being heated in a nitrogen environment under conditions which give rise to the formation of a titanium-nitride surface layer on the titanium. Titanium thus prenitrided may be used in electrical components which are hermetically sealed using silicate glasses and standard glass sealing techniques. According to the method of the invention, alkali volatilization and formation of deleterious interfacial silicide are inhibited.

  11. Cytotoxicity of titanium and titanium alloying elements.

    PubMed

    Li, Y; Wong, C; Xiong, J; Hodgson, P; Wen, C

    2010-05-01

    It is commonly accepted that titanium and the titanium alloying elements of tantalum, niobium, zirconium, molybdenum, tin, and silicon are biocompatible. However, our research in the development of new titanium alloys for biomedical applications indicated that some titanium alloys containing molybdenum, niobium, and silicon produced by powder metallurgy show a certain degree of cytotoxicity. We hypothesized that the cytotoxicity is linked to the ion release from the metals. To prove this hypothesis, we assessed the cytotoxicity of titanium and titanium alloying elements in both forms of powder and bulk, using osteoblast-like SaOS(2) cells. Results indicated that the metal powders of titanium, niobium, molybdenum, and silicon are cytotoxic, and the bulk metals of silicon and molybdenum also showed cytotoxicity. Meanwhile, we established that the safe ion concentrations (below which the ion concentration is non-toxic) are 8.5, 15.5, 172.0, and 37,000.0 microg/L for molybdenum, titanium, niobium, and silicon, respectively.

  12. Sealing glasses for titanium and titanium alloys

    DOEpatents

    Brow, R.K.; Watkins, R.D.

    1988-01-21

    Glass compositions containing CaO, Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/, B/sub 2/O/sub 3/, SrO and BaO of various combinations of mole % are provided. These compositions are capable of forming stable glass-to-metal seals with titanium and titanium alloys, for use in components such as seals for battery headers.

  13. Sealing glasses for titanium and titanium alloys

    DOEpatents

    Brow, Richard K.; Watkins, Randall D.

    1992-01-01

    Glass compositions containing CaO, Al.sub.2 O.sub.3, B.sub.2 O.sub.3, SrO and BaO of various combinations of mole % are provided. These compositions are capable of forming stable glass-to-metal seals with titanium and titanium alloys, for use in components such as seals for battery headers.

  14. 21 CFR 184.1452 - Manganese gluconate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Manganese gluconate. 184.1452 Section 184.1452... Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1452 Manganese gluconate. (a) Manganese gluconate... manganese carbonate with gluconic acid in aqueous medium and then crystallizing the product. (b)...

  15. 21 CFR 184.1452 - Manganese gluconate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Manganese gluconate. 184.1452 Section 184.1452... Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1452 Manganese gluconate. (a) Manganese gluconate... manganese carbonate with gluconic acid in aqueous medium and then crystallizing the product. (b)...

  16. 21 CFR 184.1452 - Manganese gluconate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Manganese gluconate. 184.1452 Section 184.1452 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1452 Manganese gluconate. (a) Manganese gluconate (C12H22MnO14... manganese carbonate with gluconic acid in aqueous medium and then crystallizing the product. (b)...

  17. 21 CFR 184.1452 - Manganese gluconate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Manganese gluconate. 184.1452 Section 184.1452... Listing of Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1452 Manganese gluconate. (a) Manganese gluconate... manganese carbonate with gluconic acid in aqueous medium and then crystallizing the product. (b)...

  18. Mineral of the month: manganese

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Corathers, Lisa

    2005-01-01

    Manganese is one of the most important ferrous metals and one of the few for which the United States is totally dependent on imports. It is a black, brittle element predominantly used in metallurgical applications as an alloying addition, particularly in steel and cast iron production, which together provide the largest market for manganese (about 83 percent). It is also used as an alloy with nonferrous metals such as aluminum and copper. Nonmetallurgical applications of manganese include battery cathodes, soft ferrite magnets used in electronics, micronutrients found in fertilizers and animal feed, water treatment chemicals, and a colorant for bricks and ceramics.

  19. Titanium Process Technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Steven J. Gerdemann

    2001-07-01

    Titanium has a unique set of properties: low density, high specific strength, high temperature strength, and exceptional resistance to corrosion. Titanium is the fourth most common structural metal in the earth's crust. Only iron, aluminum, and magnesium are more abundant. More titanium is available than nickel, copper, chromium, lead, tin, and zinc put together. However, the current titanium production system is extremely labor and capital intensive. Titanium is expensive only because the current process for refining the ore to metal is a multi-step, high temperature batch process. This article will first describe current titanium technology, and will then discuss four of the most promising approaches to reduce the cost of titanium. These include the Kroll, Hunter, Cambridge, and Armstrong processes.

  20. IRIS TOXICOLOGICAL REVIEW AND SUMMARY DOCUMENTS FOR CERIUM OXIDE (STABLE) AND COMPOUNDS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cerium is a member of the lanthanoid series of rare earth metals. It is also the most abundant and most reactive of the rare earth metals. Cerium oxidizes at room temperature and forms a variety of salt compounds including oxides, hydroxides, sulfates and chlorides. Cerium is ...

  1. Potential for recovery of cerium contained in automotive catalytic converters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bleiwas, Donald I.

    2013-01-01

    Catalytic converters (CATCONs) are required by Federal law to be installed in nearly all gasoline- and diesel-fueled onroad vehicles used in the United States. About 85 percent of the light-duty vehicles and trucks manufactured worldwide are equipped with CATCONs. Portions of the CATCONs (called monoliths) are recycled for their platinum-group metal (PGM) content and for the value of the stainless steel they contain. The cerium contained in the monoliths, however, is disposed of along with the slag produced from the recycling process. Although there is some smelter capacity in the United States to treat the monoliths in order to recover the PGMs, a great percentage of monoliths is exported to Europe and South Africa for recycling, and a lesser amount is exported to Japan. There is presently no commercial-scale capacity in place domestically to recover cerium from the monoliths. Recycling of cerium or cerium compounds from the monoliths could help ensure against possible global supply shortages by increasing the amount that is available in the supply chain as well as the number and geographic distribution of the suppliers. It could also reduce the amount of material that goes into landfills. Also, the additional supply could lower the price of the commodity. This report analyzes how much cerium oxide is contained in CATCONs and how much could be recovered from used CATCONs.

  2. Mechanical and Thermophysical Properties of Cerium Monopnictides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhalla, Vyoma; Singh, Devraj; Jain, S. K.

    2016-03-01

    The ultrasonic attenuation due to phonon-phonon interaction, thermoelastic relaxation and dislocation damping mechanisms has been investigated in cerium monopnictides CeX (X: N, P, As, Sb and Bi) for longitudinal and shear waves along {< }100{rangle }, {< }110{rangle } and {< }111{rangle } directions. The second- and third-order elastic constants of CeX have also been computed in the temperature range 0 K to 500 K using Coulomb and Born-Mayer potential upto second nearest neighbours. The computed values of these elastic constants have been applied to find out Young's moduli, bulk moduli, Breazeale's non-linearity parameters, Zener anisotropy, ultrasonic velocity, ultrasonic Grüneisen parameter, thermal relaxation time, acoustic coupling constants and ultrasonic attenuation. The fracture/toughness ratio is less than 1.75, which shows that the chosen materials are brittle in nature as found for other monopnictides. The drag coefficient acting on the motion of screw and edge dislocations due to shear and compressional phonon viscosities of the lattice have also been evaluated for both the longitudinal and shear waves. The thermoelastic loss and dislocation damping loss are negligible in comparison to loss due to Akhieser damping (phonon-phonon interaction). The obtained results for CeX are in qualitative agreement with other semi-metallic monopnictides.

  3. Characterization of cerium fluoride nanocomposite scintillators

    SciTech Connect

    Stange, Sy; Esch, Ernst I; Brown, Leif O; Couture, Aaron J; Mckigney, Edward A; Muenchausen, Ross E; Del Sesto, Rico E; Gilbertson, Robert D; Mccleskey, T Mark; Reifarth, Rene

    2009-01-01

    Measurement of the neutron capture cross-sections of a number of short-lived isotopes would advance both pure and applied scientific research. These cross-sections are needed for calculation of criticality and waste production estimates for the Advanced Fuel Cycle Initiative, for analysis of data from nuclear weapons tests, and to improve understanding of nucleosynthesis. However, measurement of these cross-sections would require a detector with a faster signal decay time than those used in existing neutron capture experiments. Crystals of faster detector materials are not available in sufficient sizes and quantities to supply these large-scale experiments. Instead, we propose to use nanocomposite detectors, consisting of nanoscale particles of a scintillating material dispersed in a matrix material. We have successfully fabricated cerium fluoride (CeF{sub 3}) nanoparticles and dispersed them in a liquid matrix. We have characterized this scintillator and have measured its response to neutron capture. Results of the optical, structural, and radiation characterization will be presented.

  4. Environmental Geochemistry of Cerium: Applications and Toxicology of Cerium Oxide Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Dahle, Jessica T.; Arai, Yuji

    2015-01-01

    Cerium is the most abundant of rare-earth metals found in the Earth’s crust. Several Ce-carbonate, -phosphate, -silicate, and -(hydr)oxide minerals have been historically mined and processed for pharmaceutical uses and industrial applications. Of all Ce minerals, cerium dioxide has received much attention in the global nanotechnology market due to their useful applications for catalysts, fuel cells, and fuel additives. A recent mass flow modeling study predicted that a major source of CeO2 nanoparticles from industrial processing plants (e.g., electronics and optics manufactures) is likely to reach the terrestrial environment such as landfills and soils. The environmental fate of CeO2 nanoparticles is highly dependent on its physcochemical properties in low temperature geochemical environment. Though there are needs in improving the analytical method in detecting/quantifying CeO2 nanoparticles in different environmental media, it is clear that aquatic and terrestrial organisms have been exposed to CeO2 NPs, potentially yielding in negative impact on human and ecosystem health. Interestingly, there has been contradicting reports about the toxicological effects of CeO2 nanoparticles, acting as either an antioxidant or reactive oxygen species production-inducing agent). This poses a challenge in future regulations for the CeO2 nanoparticle application and the risk assessment in the environment. PMID:25625406

  5. Manganese status, gut endogenous losses of manganese, and antioxidant enzyme activity in rats fed varying levels of manganese and fat.

    PubMed

    Malecki, E A; Huttner, D L; Greger, J L

    1994-07-01

    We hypothesized that manganese deficient animals fed high vs moderate levels of polyunsaturated fat would either manifest evidence of increased oxidative stress or would experience compensatory changes in antioxidant enzymes and/or shifts in manganese utilization that result in decreased endogenous gut manganese losses. Rats (females in Study 1, males in Study 2, n = 8/treatment) were fed diets that contained 5 or 20% corn oil by weight and either 0.01 or 1.5 mumol manganese/g diet. In study 2, 54Mn complexed to albumin was injected into the portal vein to assess gut endogenous losses of manganese. The manganese deficient rats: 1. Had 30-50% lower liver, tibia, kidney, spleen, and pancreas manganese concentrations than manganese adequate rats; 2. Conserved manganese through approximately 70-fold reductions in endogenous fecal losses of manganese; 3. Had lower heart manganese superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) activity; and 4. Experienced only two minor compensatory changes in the activity of copper-zinc superoxide dismutase (CuZnSOD) and catalase. Gut endogenous losses of manganese tended to account for a smaller proportion of absorbed manganese in rats fed high-fat diets; otherwise fat intake had few effects on tissue manganese concentrations. PMID:7986658

  6. Manganese oxidation model for rivers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hess, Glen W.; Kim, Byung R.; Roberts, Philip J.W.

    1989-01-01

    The presence of manganese in natural waters (>0.05 mg/L) degrades water-supply quality. A model was devised to predict the variation of manganese concentrations in river water released from an impoundment with the distance downstream. The model is one-dimensional and was calibrated using dissolved oxygen, biochemical oxygen demand, pH, manganese, and hydraulic data collected in the Duck River, Tennessee. The results indicated that the model can predict manganese levels under various conditions. The model was then applied to the Chattahoochee River, Georgia. Discrepancies between observed and predicted may be due to inadequate pH data, precipitation of sediment particles, unsteady flow conditions in the Chattahoochee River, inaccurate rate expressions for the low pH conditions, or their combinations.

  7. Thermodynamic Calculation among Cerium, Oxygen, and Sulfur in Liquid Iron

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Fei; Zhang, Jian; Chen, Hao-Long; Su, Yen-Hsun; Su, Yen-Hao; Hwang, Weng-Sing

    2016-01-01

    Thermodynamic calculation has been applied to predict the inclusion formation in molten SS400 steel. When the Cerium addition in liquid iron is 70 ppm and the initial Oxygen and Sulphur are both 110 ppm, the formation of oxides containing Cerium would experience the transformation from Ce2O3 to CeO2 and also the formation of sulfides containing Cerium would experience the transformation from CeS to Ce2S3 and then to Ce3S4. Below 2000 K the most thermodynamic stable matter is CeO2 and the less thermodynamic stable inclusion is CeS. Only when the amount of [O] is extremely low and the amount of [S] and [Ce] is relatively high, Ce2S3 has the possibility to form. PMID:27767092

  8. Dehydrogenation of isopropanol on a cerium-nickel catalyst

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Platonov, E. A.; Naumkin, A. V.; Maslakov, K. I.; Yagodovskii, V. D.

    2012-12-01

    The effect of a cerium additive on the catalytic activity of a 2 wt % Ni/SiO2 catalyst is studied. It found that under both flow and static conditions the activity of (2 wt % Ni + 0.2 wt % Ce)/SiO2 catalyst is higher than that of the original sample; the increase in activity results from a sharp increase in the number of active sites. A change in the composition of the surface layer of the catalysts is analyzed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. It was found that the fraction of nickel decreases and the fraction of carbon increases in cerium-containing catalyst. An explanation of the change in the elemental composition of the catalytic active sites of a nickel catalyst in the presence of cerium is proposed on the basis of XPS data and previous quantum chemical calculations.

  9. Synthesis and characterization of magnesium doped cerium oxide for the fuel cell application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Amit; Kumari, Monika; Kumar, Mintu; Kumar, Sacheen; Kumar, Dinesh

    2016-05-01

    Cerium oxide has attained much attentions in global nanotechnology market due to valuable application for catalytic, fuel additive, and widely as electrolyte in solid oxide fuel cell. Doped cerium oxide has large oxygen vacancies that allow for greater reactivity and faster ion transport. These properties make cerium oxide suitable material for SOFCs application. Cerium oxide electrolyte requires lower operation temperature which shows improvement in processing and the fabrication technique. In our work, we synthesized magnesium doped cerium oxide by the co-precipitation method. With the magnesium doping catalytic reactivity of CeO2 was increased. Synthesized nanoparticle were characterized by the XRD and UV absorption techniques.

  10. In situ growth of epitaxial cerium tungstate (100) thin films.

    PubMed

    Skála, Tomáš; Tsud, Nataliya; Orti, Miguel Ángel Niño; Menteş, Tevfik Onur; Locatelli, Andrea; Prince, Kevin Charles; Matolín, Vladimír

    2011-04-21

    The deposition of ceria on a preoxidized W(110) crystal at 870 K has been studied in situ by photoelectron spectroscopy and low-energy electron diffraction. Formation of an epitaxial layer of crystalline cerium tungstate Ce(6)WO(12)(100), with the metals in the Ce(3+) and W(6+) chemical states, has been observed. The interface between the tungsten substrate and the tungstate film consists of WO suboxide. At thicknesses above 0.89 nm, cerium dioxide grows on the surface of Ce(6)WO(12), favoured by the limited diffusion of tungsten from the substrate. PMID:21399780

  11. Optical and electrical studies of cerium mixed oxides

    SciTech Connect

    Sherly, T. R.; Raveendran, R.

    2014-10-15

    The fast development in nanotechnology makes enthusiastic interest in developing nanomaterials having tailor made properties. Cerium mixed oxide materials have received great attention due to their UV absorption property, high reactivity, stability at high temperature, good electrical property etc and these materials find wide applications in solid oxide fuel cells, solar control films, cosmetics, display units, gas sensors etc. In this study cerium mixed oxide compounds were prepared by co-precipitation method. All the samples were doped with Zn (II) and Fe (II). Preliminary characterizations such as XRD, SEM / EDS, TEM were done. UV - Vis, Diffuse reflectance, PL, FT-IR, Raman and ac conductivity studies of the samples were performed.

  12. The effective thermal conductivity of an adsorbent - Praseodymium cerium oxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Secary, J. J.; Tong, T. W.

    1992-01-01

    The results of an experimental study to determine the effective thermal conductivity of praseodymium cerium oxide are reported. Praseodymium cerium oxide is an adsorbent used in the development of adsorption compressors for spaceborne refrigeration systems. A guarded-hot-plate apparatus was built for this study. Measurements were carried out for mean temperatures ranging from 300 to 600 C under a vacuum of 10 exp -5 torr. For the temperature range studied, the effective thermal conductivity increased from 0.14 to 0.76 W/m per C with increasing temperature, while displaying a cubic temperature dependency.

  13. Manganese exposure, essentiality & toxicity.

    PubMed

    Santamaria, A B

    2008-10-01

    Manganese (Mn) is an essential element present in all living organisms and is naturally present in rocks, soil, water, and food. Exposure to high oral, parenteral, or ambient air concentrations of Mn can result in elevations in Mn tissue levels and neurological effects. However, current understanding of the impact of Mn exposure on the nervous system leads to the hypothesis that there should be no adverse effects at low exposures, because Mn is an essential element; therefore, there should be some threshold for exposure above which adverse effects may occur and adverse effects may increase in frequency with higher exposures beyond that threshold. Data gaps regarding Mn neurotoxicity include what the clinical significance is of the neurobehavioural, neuropsychological, or neurological endpoints measured in many of the occupational studies that have evaluated cohorts exposed to relatively low levels of Mn. Specific early biomarkers of effect, such as subclinical neurobehavioural or neurological changes or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) changes have not been established or validated for Mn, although some studies have attempted to correlate biomarkers with neurological effects. Experimental studies with rodents and monkeys provide valuable information about the absorption, bioavailability, and tissue distribution of various Mn compounds with different solubilities and oxidation states in different age groups. Studies have shown that rodents and primates maintain stable tissue manganese levels as a result of homeostatic mechanisms that tightly regulate absorption and excretion. In addition, physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models are being developed to provide for the ability to conduct route-to-route extrapolations, evaluate nasal uptake to the CNS, and evaluate lifestage differences in Mn pharmacokinetics. Such models will facilitate more rigorous quantitative analysis of the available pharmacokinetic data for Mn and will be used to identify situations

  14. Cerium phosphate nanotubes: synthesis, characterization and biosensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Ling; Yang, Lige; Zhou, Bo; Cai, Chenxin

    2009-01-01

    Cerium phosphate (CeP) nanotubes have been synthesized and confirmed by x-ray diffraction (XRD) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The 1D nanomaterial has a monoclinic crystal structure with a mean width of 15-20 nm and a length up to several micrometers. The nanotubes have been employed as electrode substrates for immobilization and direct electrochemistry of heme proteins/enzymes with myoglobin (Mb) as a model. The electrochemical characteristics of the Mb-CeP/GC electrode were studied by voltammetry. After being immobilized on the nanotubes, Mb can keep its natural structure and undergo effective direct electron transfer reaction with a pair of well-defined redox peaks at -(367 ± 3) mV (pH 7.5). The apparent electron transfer rate constant is (9.1 ± 1.4) s-1. The electrode displays good features in the electrocatalytic reduction of H2O2, and thus can be used as a biosensor for detecting the substrate with a low detection limit (0.5 ± 0.05 µM), a wide linear range (0.01-2 mM), high sensitivity (14.4 ± 1.2 µA mM-1), as well as good stability and reproducibility. CeP nanotubes can become a simple and effective biosensing platform for the integration of heme proteins/enzymes and electrodes, which can provide analytical access to a large group of enzymes for a wide range of bioelectrochemical applications.

  15. Dichloromethane photodegradation using titanium catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Tanguay, J.F.; Suib, S.L.; Coughlin, R.W. )

    1989-06-01

    The use of titanium dioxide and titanium aluminosilicates in the photocatalytic destruction of chlorinated hydrocarbons is investigated. Titanium-exchanged clays, titanium-pillared clays, and titanium dioxide in the amorphous, anatase, and rutile forms are used to photocatalytically degrade dichloromethane to hydrochloric acid and carbon dioxide. Bentonite clays pillared by titanium dioxide are observed to be more catalytically active than titanium-exchanged clays. Clays pillared by titanium aluminum polymeric cations display about the same catalytic activity as that of titanium-exchanged clays. The rutile form of titanium dioxide is the most active catalyst studied for the dichloromethane degradation reaction. The anatase form of titanium dioxide supported on carbon felt was also used as a catalyst. This material is about five times more active than titanium dioxide-pillared clays. Degradation of dichloromethane using any of these catalysts can be enhanced by oxygen enrichment of the reaction solution or by preirradiating the catalyst with light.

  16. Bog Manganese Ore: A Resource for High Manganese Steel Making

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pani, Swatirupa; Singh, Saroj K.; Mohapatra, Birendra K.

    2016-06-01

    Bog manganese ore, associated with the banded iron formation of the Iron Ore Group (IOG), occurs in large volume in northern Odisha, India. The ore is powdery, fine-grained and soft in nature with varying specific gravity (2.8-3.9 g/cm3) and high thermo-gravimetric loss, It consists of manganese (δ-MnO2, manganite, cryptomelane/romanechite with minor pyrolusite) and iron (goethite/limonite and hematite) minerals with sub-ordinate kaolinite and quartz. It shows oolitic/pisolitic to globular morphology nucleating small detritus of quartz, pyrolusite/romanechite and hematite. The ore contains around 23% Mn and 28% Fe with around 7% of combined alumina and silica. Such Mn ore has not found any use because of its sub-grade nature and high iron content, and is hence considered as waste. The ore does not respond to any physical beneficiation techniques because of the combined state of the manganese and iron phases. Attempts have been made to recover manganese and iron value from such ore through smelting. A sample along with an appropriate charge mix when processed through a plasma reactor, produced high-manganese steel alloy having 25% Mn within a very short time (<10 min). Minor Mn content from the slag was recovered through acid leaching. The aim of this study has been to recover a value-added product from the waste.

  17. Hydrothermal preparation of fractal dendrites: Cerium carbonate hydroxide and cerium oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Mingzai; Zhang Qihua; Liu Yanmei; Fang Qingqing; Liu Xiansong

    2009-06-03

    The surfactant-assisted hydrothermal route was used to prepare fractal dendrite cerium carbonate hydroxide (CeOHCO{sub 3}) microstructures. After annealing at 600 deg. C for 4 h, the products were transformed to CeO{sub 2}. The crystal structures of the two compounds were determined by X-ray diffraction (XRD). The morphologies and microstructures were characterized by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). Room temperature photoluminescence (PL) showed that a strong ultraviolet emission at 336 nm was observed for CeOHCO{sub 3}, and that centered at 415 nm for CeO{sub 2} microstructures. Both of these emission peaks are different from those reported for CeOHCO{sub 3} and CeO{sub 2} with other shapes. In addition, the possible growth mechanism of dendrite CeOHCO{sub 3} microstructures and the role of surfactant polyvinyl pyrrolidone (PVP) were also investigated in this paper.

  18. Purification of cerium, neodymium and gadolinium for low background experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boiko, R. S.; Barabash, A. S.; Belli, P.; Bernabei, R.; Cappella, F.; Cerulli, R.; Danevich, F. A.; Incicchitti, A.; Laubenstein, M.; Mokina, V. M.; Nisi, S.; Poda, D. V.; Polischuk, O. G.; Tretyak, V. I.

    2014-01-01

    Cerium, neodymium and gadolinium contain double beta active isotopes. The most interesting are 150Nd and 160Gd (promising for 0ν2β search), 136Ce (2β+ candidate with one of the highest Q2β). The main problem of compounds containing lanthanide elements is their high radioactive contamination by uranium, radium, actinium and thorium. The new generation 2β experiments require development of methods for a deep purification of lanthanides from the radioactive elements. A combination of physical and chemical methods was applied to purify cerium, neodymium and gadolinium. Liquid-liquid extraction technique was used to remove traces of Th and U from neodymium, gadolinium and for purification of cerium from Th, U, Ra and K. Co-precipitation and recrystallization methods were utilized for further reduction of the impurities. The radioactive contamination of the samples before and after the purification was tested by using ultra-low-background HPGe gamma spectrometry. As a result of the purification procedure the radioactive contamination of gadolinium oxide (a similar purification efficiency was reached also with cerium and neodymium oxides) was decreased from 0.12 Bq/kg to 0.007 Bq/kg in 228Th, from 0.04 Bq/kg to <0.006 Bq/kg in 226Ra, and from 0.9 Bq/kg to 0.04 Bq/kg in 40K. The purification methods are much less efficient for chemically very similar radioactive elements like actinium, lanthanum and lutetium.

  19. Cerium; crystal structure and position in the periodic table.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Börje; Luo, Wei; Li, Sa; Ahuja, Rajeev

    2014-09-17

    The properties of the cerium metal have intrigued physicists and chemists for many decades. In particular a lot of attention has been directed towards its high pressure behavior, where an isostructural volume collapse (γ phase → α phase) has been observed. Two main models of the electronic aspect of this transformation have been proposed; one where the 4f electron undergoes a change from being localized into an itinerant metallic state, and one where the focus is on the interaction between the 4f electron and the conduction electrons, often referred to as the Kondo volume collapse model. However, over the years it has been repeatedly questioned whether the cerium collapse really is isostructural. Most recently, detailed experiments have been able to remove this worrisome uncertainty. Therefore the isostructural aspect of the α-γ transition has now to be seriously addressed in the theoretical modeling, something which has been very much neglected. A study of this fundamental characteristic of the cerium volume collapse is made in present paper and we show that the localized [rlhar2 ] delocalized 4f electron picture provides an adequate description of this unique behavior. This agreement makes it possible to suggest that an appropriate crossroad position for cerium in The Periodic Table.

  20. Cerium; Crystal Structure and Position in The Periodic Table

    PubMed Central

    Johansson, Börje; Luo, Wei; Li, Sa; Ahuja, Rajeev

    2014-01-01

    The properties of the cerium metal have intrigued physicists and chemists for many decades. In particular a lot of attention has been directed towards its high pressure behavior, where an isostructural volume collapse (γ phase → α phase) has been observed. Two main models of the electronic aspect of this transformation have been proposed; one where the 4f electron undergoes a change from being localized into an itinerant metallic state, and one where the focus is on the interaction between the 4f electron and the conduction electrons, often referred to as the Kondo volume collapse model. However, over the years it has been repeatedly questioned whether the cerium collapse really is isostructural. Most recently, detailed experiments have been able to remove this worrisome uncertainty. Therefore the isostructural aspect of the α-γ transition has now to be seriously addressed in the theoretical modeling, something which has been very much neglected. A study of this fundamental characteristic of the cerium volume collapse is made in present paper and we show that the localized ⇌ delocalized 4f electron picture provides an adequate description of this unique behavior. This agreement makes it possible to suggest that an appropriate crossroad position for cerium in The Periodic Table. PMID:25227991

  1. 40 CFR 721.8657 - Cerium, hydroxy oleate propionate complexes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... complexes. 721.8657 Section 721.8657 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.8657 Cerium, hydroxy oleate propionate complexes. (a) Chemical substance..., hydroxy oleate propionate complexes (PMN P-99-0026) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  2. Electrode electrolyte interlayers containing cerium oxide for electrochemical fuel cells

    DOEpatents

    Borglum, Brian P.; Bessette, Norman F.

    2000-01-01

    An electrochemical cell is made having a porous fuel electrode (16) and a porous air electrode (13), with solid oxide electrolyte (15) therebetween, where the air electrode surface opposing the electrolyte has a separate, attached, dense, continuous layer (14) of a material containing cerium oxide, and where electrolyte (16) contacts the continuous oxide layer (14), without contacting the air electrode (13).

  3. 21 CFR 582.5461 - Manganese sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5461 Manganese sulfate. (a) Product. Manganese sulfate. (b) Conditions of use....

  4. 21 CFR 582.5449 - Manganese citrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5449 Manganese citrate. (a) Product. Manganese citrate. (b) Conditions of use....

  5. 21 CFR 582.5458 - Manganese hypophosphite.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5458 Manganese hypophosphite. (a) Product. Manganese hypophosphite. (b) Conditions of...

  6. 21 CFR 582.5461 - Manganese sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5461 Manganese sulfate. (a) Product. Manganese sulfate. (b) Conditions of use....

  7. 21 CFR 582.5446 - Manganese chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5446 Manganese chloride. (a) Product. Manganese chloride. (b) Conditions of use....

  8. 21 CFR 582.5446 - Manganese chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5446 Manganese chloride. (a) Product. Manganese chloride. (b) Conditions of use....

  9. 21 CFR 582.5446 - Manganese chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5446 Manganese chloride. (a) Product. Manganese chloride. (b) Conditions of use....

  10. 21 CFR 582.5458 - Manganese hypophosphite.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5458 Manganese hypophosphite. (a) Product. Manganese hypophosphite. (b) Conditions of...

  11. 21 CFR 582.5449 - Manganese citrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5449 Manganese citrate. (a) Product. Manganese citrate. (b) Conditions of use....

  12. 21 CFR 582.5452 - Manganese gluconate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5452 Manganese gluconate. (a) Product. Manganese gluconate. (b) Conditions of use....

  13. 21 CFR 582.5449 - Manganese citrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5449 Manganese citrate. (a) Product. Manganese citrate. (b) Conditions of use....

  14. 21 CFR 582.5446 - Manganese chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5446 Manganese chloride. (a) Product. Manganese chloride. (b) Conditions of use....

  15. 21 CFR 582.5461 - Manganese sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5461 Manganese sulfate. (a) Product. Manganese sulfate. (b) Conditions of use....

  16. 21 CFR 582.5452 - Manganese gluconate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5452 Manganese gluconate. (a) Product. Manganese gluconate. (b) Conditions of use....

  17. 21 CFR 582.5446 - Manganese chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5446 Manganese chloride. (a) Product. Manganese chloride. (b) Conditions of use....

  18. 21 CFR 582.5449 - Manganese citrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5449 Manganese citrate. (a) Product. Manganese citrate. (b) Conditions of use....

  19. 21 CFR 582.5458 - Manganese hypophosphite.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5458 Manganese hypophosphite. (a) Product. Manganese hypophosphite. (b) Conditions of...

  20. 21 CFR 582.5458 - Manganese hypophosphite.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5458 Manganese hypophosphite. (a) Product. Manganese hypophosphite. (b) Conditions of...

  1. 21 CFR 582.5452 - Manganese gluconate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5452 Manganese gluconate. (a) Product. Manganese gluconate. (b) Conditions of use....

  2. 21 CFR 582.5461 - Manganese sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5461 Manganese sulfate. (a) Product. Manganese sulfate. (b) Conditions of use....

  3. 21 CFR 582.5452 - Manganese gluconate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5452 Manganese gluconate. (a) Product. Manganese gluconate. (b) Conditions of use....

  4. 21 CFR 582.5461 - Manganese sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5461 Manganese sulfate. (a) Product. Manganese sulfate. (b) Conditions of use....

  5. 21 CFR 582.5449 - Manganese citrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5449 Manganese citrate. (a) Product. Manganese citrate. (b) Conditions of use....

  6. 21 CFR 582.5452 - Manganese gluconate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5452 Manganese gluconate. (a) Product. Manganese gluconate. (b) Conditions of use....

  7. 21 CFR 582.5458 - Manganese hypophosphite.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... DRUGS, FEEDS, AND RELATED PRODUCTS SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients and/or Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5458 Manganese hypophosphite. (a) Product. Manganese hypophosphite. (b) Conditions of...

  8. Biomarkers of manganese intoxication.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Wei; Fu, Sherleen X; Dydak, Ulrike; Cowan, Dallas M

    2011-01-01

    Manganese (Mn), upon absorption, is primarily sequestered in tissue and intracellular compartments. For this reason, blood Mn concentration does not always accurately reflect Mn concentration in the targeted tissue, particularly in the brain. The discrepancy between Mn concentrations in tissue or intracellular components means that blood Mn is a poor biomarker of Mn exposure or toxicity under many conditions and that other biomarkers must be established. For group comparisons of active workers, blood Mn has some utility for distinguishing exposed from unexposed subjects, although the large variability in mean values renders it insensitive for discriminating one individual from the rest of the study population. Mn exposure is known to alter iron (Fe) homeostasis. The Mn/Fe ratio (MIR) in plasma or erythrocytes reflects not only steady-state concentrations of Mn or Fe in tested individuals, but also a biological response (altered Fe homeostasis) to Mn exposure. Recent human studies support the potential value for using MIR to distinguish individuals with Mn exposure. Additionally, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), in combination with noninvasive assessment of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) by magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS), provides convincing evidence of Mn exposure, even without clinical symptoms of Mn intoxication. For subjects with long-term, low-dose Mn exposure or for those exposed in the past but not the present, neither blood Mn nor MRI provides a confident distinction for Mn exposure or intoxication. While plasma or erythrocyte MIR is more likely a sensitive measure, the cut-off values for MIR among the general population need to be further tested and established. Considering the large accumulation of Mn in bone, developing an X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy or neutron-based spectroscopy method may create yet another novel non-invasive tool for assessing Mn exposure and toxicity. PMID:20946915

  9. Sealing glasses for titanium and titanium alloys

    DOEpatents

    Brow, Richard K.; McCollister, Howard L.; Phifer, Carol C.; Day, Delbert E.

    1997-01-01

    Barium lanthanoborate sealing-glass compositions are provided comprising various combinations (in terms of mole-%) of boron oxide (B.sub.2 O.sub.3), barium oxide (BaO), lanthanum oxide (La.sub.2 O.sub.3), and at least one other oxide selected from the group consisting of aluminum oxide (Al.sub.2 O.sub.3), calcium oxide (CaO), lithium oxide (Li.sub.2 O), sodium oxide (Na.sub.2 O), silicon dioxide (SiO.sub.2), or titanium dioxide (TiO.sub.2). These sealing-glass compositions are useful for forming hermetic glass-to-metal seals with titanium and titanium alloys having an improved aqueous durability and favorable sealing characteristics. Examples of the sealing-glass compositions are provided having coefficients of thermal expansion about that of titanium or titanium alloys, and with sealing temperatures less than about 900.degree. C., and generally about 700.degree.-800.degree. C. The barium lanthanoborate sealing-glass compositions are useful for components and devices requiring prolonged exposure to moisture or water, and for implanted biomedical devices (e.g. batteries, pacemakers, defibrillators, pumps).

  10. Sealing glasses for titanium and titanium alloys

    DOEpatents

    Brow, R.K.; McCollister, H.L.; Phifer, C.C.; Day, D.E.

    1997-07-15

    Barium lanthanoborate sealing-glass compositions are provided comprising various combinations (in terms of mole-%) of boron oxide (B{sub 2}O{sub 3}), barium oxide (BaO), lanthanum oxide (La{sub 2}O{sub 3}), and at least one other oxide selected from the group consisting of aluminum oxide (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}), calcium oxide (CaO), lithium oxide (Li{sub 2}O), sodium oxide (Na{sub 2}O), silicon dioxide (SiO{sub 2}), or titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}). These sealing-glass compositions are useful for forming hermetic glass-to-metal seals with titanium and titanium alloys having an improved aqueous durability and favorable sealing characteristics. Examples of the sealing-glass compositions are provided having coefficients of thermal expansion about that of titanium or titanium alloys, and with sealing temperatures less than about 900 C, and generally about 700--800 C. The barium lanthanoborate sealing-glass compositions are useful for components and devices requiring prolonged exposure to moisture or water, and for implanted biomedical devices (e.g. batteries, pacemakers, defibrillators, pumps). 1 fig.

  11. 21 CFR 184.1449 - Manganese citrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Manganese citrate. 184.1449 Section 184.1449 Food... GRAS § 184.1449 Manganese citrate. (a) Manganese citrate (Mn3(C6H5O7)2, CAS Reg. No. 10024-66-5) is a pale orange or pinkish white powder. It is obtained by precipitating manganese carbonate from...

  12. 21 CFR 184.1452 - Manganese gluconate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Manganese gluconate. 184.1452 Section 184.1452... GRAS § 184.1452 Manganese gluconate. (a) Manganese gluconate (C12H22MnO14·2H2O, CAS Reg. No. 648-0953-0998) is a slightly pink colored powder. It is obtained by reacting manganese carbonate with...

  13. 21 CFR 184.1461 - Manganese sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Manganese sulfate. 184.1461 Section 184.1461 Food... GRAS § 184.1461 Manganese sulfate. (a) Manganese sulfate (MnSO4·H2O, CAS Reg. No. 7785-0987-097) is a pale pink, granular, odorless powder. It is obtained by reacting manganese compounds with sulfuric...

  14. Cerium as a surrogate in the plutonium immobilization waste form

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marra, James Christopher

    In the aftermath of the Cold War, approximately 50 tonnes (MT) of weapons useable plutonium (Pu) has been identified as excess. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) has decided that at least a portion of this material will be immobilized in a titanate-based ceramic for final disposal in a geologic repository. The baseline formulation was designed to produce a ceramic consisting primarily of a highly substituted pyrochlore with minor amounts of brannerite and hafnia-substituted rutile. Since development studies with actual actinide materials is difficult, surrogates have been used to facilitate testing. Cerium has routinely been used as an actinide surrogate in actinide chemistry and processing studies. Although cerium appeared as an adequate physical surrogate for powder handling and general processing studies, cerium was found to act significantly different from a chemical perspective in the Pu ceramic form. The reduction of cerium at elevated temperatures caused different reaction paths toward densification of the respective forms resulting in different phase assemblages and microstructural features. Single-phase fabrication studies and cerium oxidation state analyses were performed to further quantify these behavioral differences. These studies indicated that the major phases in the final phase assemblages contained point defects likely leading to their stability. Additionally, thermochemical arguments predicted that the predominant pyrochlore phase in the ceramic was metastable. The apparent metastabilty associated with primary phase in the Pu ceramic form indicated that additional studies must be performed to evaluate the thermodynamic properties of these compounds. Moreover, the metastability of this predominant phase must be considered in assessment of long-term behavior (e.g. radiation stability) of this ceramic.

  15. Sprayable titanium composition

    DOEpatents

    Tracy, Chester E.; Kern, Werner; Vibronek, Robert D.

    1980-01-01

    The addition of 2-ethyl-1-hexanol to an organometallic titanium compound dissolved in a diluent and optionally containing a lower aliphatic alcohol spreading modifier, produces a solution that can be sprayed onto a substrate and cured to form an antireflection titanium oxide coating having a refractive index of from about 2.0 to 2.2.

  16. Manganese depresses rat heart muscle respiration

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    It has previously been reported that moderately high dietary manganese (Mn) in combination with marginal magnesium (Mg) resulted in ultrastructural damage to heart mitochondria. Manganese may replace Mg in biological functions, including the role of enzyme cofactor. Manganese may accumulate and subs...

  17. 21 CFR 582.5455 - Manganese glycerophosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Manganese glycerophosphate. 582.5455 Section 582.5455 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5455 Manganese glycerophosphate. (a) Product. Manganese glycerophosphate....

  18. 21 CFR 582.5455 - Manganese glycerophosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Manganese glycerophosphate. 582.5455 Section 582.5455 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5455 Manganese glycerophosphate. (a) Product. Manganese glycerophosphate....

  19. 21 CFR 582.5455 - Manganese glycerophosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Manganese glycerophosphate. 582.5455 Section 582.5455 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5455 Manganese glycerophosphate. (a) Product. Manganese glycerophosphate....

  20. 21 CFR 582.5455 - Manganese glycerophosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Manganese glycerophosphate. 582.5455 Section 582.5455 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5455 Manganese glycerophosphate. (a) Product. Manganese glycerophosphate....

  1. 21 CFR 582.5455 - Manganese glycerophosphate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Manganese glycerophosphate. 582.5455 Section 582.5455 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Dietary Supplements 1 § 582.5455 Manganese glycerophosphate. (a) Product. Manganese glycerophosphate....

  2. 21 CFR 184.1446 - Manganese chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1446 Manganese chloride. (a) Manganese chloride (MnCl2·4H2O, CAS... dichloride. It is prepared by dissolving manganous oxide, pyrolusite ore (MnO2), or reduced manganese ore...

  3. 21 CFR 184.1446 - Manganese chloride.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1446 Manganese chloride. (a) Manganese chloride (MnCl2·4H2O, CAS... dichloride. It is prepared by dissolving manganous oxide, pyrolusite ore (MnO2), or reduced manganese ore...

  4. Genotoxic Effects of Titanium Dioxide and Cerium Dioxide Nanoparticles in Human Respiratory Epithelial Cells

    EPA Science Inventory

    The nanomaterial industry has recently seen rapid growth, therefore, the risk assessment of human exposure to nanomaterials in consumer products is of paramount importance. The genotoxicity of nanomaterials is a fundamental aspect of hazard identification and regulatory guidance....

  5. The Genotoxicity of Titanium Dioxide and Cerium Dioxide Nanoparticles in Human Respiratory Epithelial Cells

    EPA Science Inventory

    Due to the exponential growth of the nanomaterial industry, risk assessment of human exposure to nanomaterials in consumer products is of paramount importance. The genotoxicity of nanomaterials is an important aspect of hazard identification and regulatory guidance. However, this...

  6. Toxicity assessment of Titanium Dioxide and Cerium Oxide nanoparticles in Arabidopsis thaliana L.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The production and applications of nanoparticles (NP) in diverse fields has steadily increased in recent decades; however, knowledge about risks of NP to human health and ecosystems is still scarce. In this study, we assessed potential toxicity of two commercially used engineere...

  7. Oxidative Stress, Inflammation, and DNA Damage Responses Elicited by Silver, Titanium Dioxide, and Cerium Oxide Nanomaterials

    EPA Science Inventory

    Previous literature on the biological effects of engineered nanomaterials has focused largely on oxidative stress and inflammation endpoints without further investigating potential pathways. Here we examine time-sensitive biological response pathways affected by engineered nanoma...

  8. The genotoxicity of titanium dioxide and cerium oxide nanoparticles in vitro

    EPA Science Inventory

    The use ofengineered nanoparticles in both current and future consumer products is steadily increasing. However, the health effects of exposure to these nanoparticles are not thoroughly understood. Recently, particular emphasis has been placed on particle characterization and the...

  9. SEPARATING PROTOACTINIUM WITH MANGANESE DIOXIDE

    DOEpatents

    Seaborg, G.T.; Gofman, J.W.; Stoughton, R.W.

    1958-04-22

    The preparation of U/sup 235/ and an improved method for isolating Pa/ sup 233/ from foreign products present in neutronirradiated thorium is described. The method comprises forming a solution of neutron-irradiated thorium together with a manganous salt, then adding potassium permanganate to precipitate the manganese as manganese dioxide whereby protoactinium is carried down with the nnanganese dioxide dissolving the precipitate, adding a soluble zirconium salt, and adding phosphate ion to precipitate zirconium phosphate whereby protoactinium is then carried down with the zirconium phosphate to effect a further concentration.

  10. [Determination of silver and cerium in the liver and the kidney from a severely burned infant treated with silver sulfadiazine and cerium nitrate].

    PubMed

    Hirakawa, K

    1983-02-01

    Silver and cerium in the liver and the kidney from severely burned infant were analyzed by neutron activation method. The patient was treated topically with cerium nitrate/silver sulfadiazine cream and cerium nitrate solution for 3 months. Then, the treatment with these drugs was stopped because of abdominal distention. The patient died 1 month after the cessation of the treatment with these drugs. The tissue specimens, blank liver sample and reference standards were irradiated with TRIGA MARK II Reactor of Rikkyo University. About 1 month after the irradiation, the activities were measured with a Ge(Li) detector coupled to a 4096 channel pulse height analyzer. A large amount of silver was detected both in the liver and in the kidney and a trace of cerium only in the liver. A considerable amount of silver was detected in the liver and its quantity was about 1600 times more than that of normal livers reported by Hamilton, Minski and Cleary (1972-73). Neither silver nor cerium were detected in the blank liver. These results suggest that prolonged topical chemotherapy of cerium nitrate/silver sulfadiazine cream and cerium nitrate solution for the extensive burn injuries causes considerable absorption of silver and cerium into the liver and the kidney. PMID:6867381

  11. Sorption of trivalent cerium by a mixture of microbial cells and manganese oxides: Effect of microbial cells on the oxidation of trivalent cerium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohnuki, Toshihiko; Jiang, Mingyu; Sakamoto, Fuminori; Kozai, Naofumi; Yamasaki, Shinya; Yu, Qianqian; Tanaka, Kazuya; Utsunomiya, Satoshi; Xia, Xiaobin; Yang, Ke; He, Jianhua

    2015-08-01

    Sorption of Ce by mixtures of synthetic Mn oxides and microbial cells of Pseudomonas fluorescens was investigated to elucidate the role of microorganisms on Ce(III) oxidative migration in the environment. The mixtures, upon which Ce was sorbed following exposure to solutions containing 1.0 × 10-4 or 1.0 × 10-5 mol L-1 Ce(III), were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM-EDS) and micro-X-ray fluorescence (micro-XRF) at synchrotron facilities. A Ce LIII-edge micro XANES spectra analysis was also performed to determine the oxidation states of Ce adsorbed to the Mn oxides and microbial cells in the mixtures. The distribution ratios (Kd) of Ce between the individual solids and solution increased with increasing pH of the solution, and was nearly the same in mixtures containing varying amounts of microbial cells. SEM-EDS and micro-XRF analyses showed that Ce was sorbed by both MnO2 and microbial cells (1.7 × 10-1 or 3.3 × 10-1 g L-1). In addition, nano-particles containing Ce and P developed on the surface of the microbial cells. XANES analysis showed that lower fractions of Ce(III) were oxidized to Ce(IV) in the mixtures containing greater amounts of microbial cells. Micro-XANES analysis revealed that Ce was present as Ce(III) on the microbial cells and as Ce(IV) on Mn oxides. These results strongly suggest that the association of Ce(III) with the microbial cell surface and the formation of Ce phosphate nano-particles are responsible for suppressing the oxidation of Ce(III) to Ce(IV) in the mixtures.

  12. Fundamental aspects of regenerative cerium oxide nanoparticles and their applications in nanobiotechnology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patil, Swanand D.

    Cerium oxide has been used extensively for various applications over the past two decades. The use of cerium oxide nanoparticles is beneficial in present applications and can open avenues for future applications. The present study utilizes the microemulsion technique to synthesize uniformly distributed cerium oxide nanoparticles. The same technique was also used to synthesize cerium oxide nanoparticles doped with trivalent elements (La and Nd). The fundamental study of cerium oxide nanoparticles identified variations in properties as a function of particle size and also due to doping with trivalent elements (La and Nd). It was found that the lattice parameter of cerium oxide nanoparticles increases with decrease in particle size. Also Raman allowed mode shift to lower energies and the peak at 464 cm-1 becomes broader and asymmetric. The size dependent changes in cerium oxide were correlated to increase in oxygen vacancy concentration in the cerium oxide lattice. The doping of cerium oxide nanoparticles with trivalent elements introduces more oxygen vacancies and expands the cerium oxide lattice further (in addition to the lattice expansion due to the size effect). The lattice expansion is greater for La-doped cerium oxide nanoparticles compared to Nd-doping due to the larger ionic radius of La compared to Nd, the lattice expansion is directly proportional to the dopant concentration. The synthesized cerium oxide nanoparticles were used to develop an electrochemical biosensor of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). The sensor was useful to detect H2O2 concentrations as low as 1muM in water. Also the preliminary testing of the sensor on tomato stem and leaf extracts indicated that the sensor can be used in practical applications such as plant physiological studies etc. The nanomolar concentrations of cerium oxide nanoparticles were also found to be useful in decreasing ROS (reactive oxygen species) mediated cellular damages in various in vitro cell cultures. Cerium oxide

  13. Influence of essential elements on manganese intoxication

    SciTech Connect

    Khandelwal, S.; Ashquin, M.; Tandon, S.K.

    1984-01-01

    With a view to explore the influence of essential metals in manganese intoxication, the effect of calcium, iron or zinc supplementation on the uptake of manganese and on the activity of manganese sensitive enzymes, succinic dehydrogenase and cytochrome oxidase in brain and liver of rat was investigated. The choice of the two mitochondrial enzymes was based on the fact that the mitochondria are the chief site of manganese accumulation and their activity in brain, liver and blood of rats is significantly influenced by manganese.

  14. An Insoluble Titanium-Lead Anode for Sulfate Electrolytes

    SciTech Connect

    Ferdman, Alla

    2005-05-11

    The project is devoted to the development of novel insoluble anodes for copper electrowinning and electrolytic manganese dioxide (EMD) production. The anodes are made of titanium-lead composite material produced by techniques of powder metallurgy, compaction of titanium powder, sintering and subsequent lead infiltration. The titanium-lead anode combines beneficial electrochemical behavior of a lead anode with high mechanical properties and corrosion resistance of a titanium anode. In the titanium-lead anode, the titanium stabilizes the lead, preventing it from spalling, and the lead sheathes the titanium, protecting it from passivation. Interconnections between manufacturing process, structure, composition and properties of the titanium-lead composite material were investigated. The material containing 20-30 vol.% of lead had optimal combination of mechanical and electrochemical properties. Optimal process parameters to manufacture the anodes were identified. Prototypes having optimized composition and structure were produced for testing in operating conditions of copper electrowinning and EMD production. Bench-scale, mini-pilot scale and pilot scale tests were performed. The test anodes were of both a plate design and a flow-through cylindrical design. The cylindrical anodes were composed of cylinders containing titanium inner rods and fitting over titanium-lead bushings. The cylindrical design allows the electrolyte to flow through the anode, which enhances diffusion of the electrolyte reactants. The cylindrical anodes demonstrate higher mass transport capabilities and increased electrical efficiency compared to the plate anodes. Copper electrowinning represents the primary target market for the titanium-lead anode. A full-size cylindrical anode performance in copper electrowinning conditions was monitored over a year. The test anode to cathode voltage was stable in the 1.8 to 2.0 volt range. Copper cathode morphology was very smooth and uniform. There was no

  15. [Preparation and Characterization of Manganese and Fluorine Co-Modified Hydroxyapatite Composite Coating].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xue-jiao; Hao, Min; Qiao, Hai-xia; Zhang, Xiao-yun; Huang, Yong; Nian, Xiao-feng; Pang, Xiao-feng

    2016-03-01

    Titanium and titanium alloys have been widely used as orthopedic, dental implants and cardiovascular stents owing to their superior physical properties. However, titanium surface is inherently bio-inert, thus could not form efficient osseointegration with surrounding bone tissue. Therefore, to improve the surface property of titanium implant is significantly important in clinical application. Manganese and fluorine co-doped hydroxyapatite (FMnHAP) coatings were prepared on titanium substrate by electrochemical deposition technique. The as-prepared coatings were examined by scanning electron microscope (SEM), energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) tests. The results indicated that the FMnHAP coatings take the morphology of nanoscale-villous-like, the composite coating becomes more compact. The FTIR test indicated that the symmetry of bending vibration modes of hydroxyl changed, simulated body fluid immersion test proved that the FMnHAP coatings had induce carbonate-apatite formation, indicating that the composite coating possess excellent biocompatibility. In the electrochemical corrosion testing, the FMnHAP coatings showed stronger corrosion resistance than pure Ti.

  16. Study of cerium diffusion in undoped lithium-6 enriched glass with Rutherford backscattering spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaodong; Moore, Michael E.; Lee, Kyung-Min; Lukosi, Eric D.; Hayward, Jason P.

    2016-07-01

    Undoped lithium-6 enriched glasses coated with pure cerium (99.9%) with a gold protection layer on top were heated at three different temperatures (500, 550, and 600 °C) for varied durations (1, 2, and 4 h). Diffusion profiles of cerium in such glasses were obtained with the conventional Rutherford backscattering technique. Through fitting the diffusion profiles with the thin-film solution of Fick's second law, diffusion coefficients of cerium with different annealing temperatures and durations were solved. Then, the activation energy of cerium for the diffusion process in the studied glasses was found to be 114 kJ/mol with the Arrhenius equation.

  17. Isomorphic phase transformation in shocked cerium using molecular dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Dupont, Virginie; Germann, Timothy C; Chen, Shao - Ping

    2010-08-12

    Cerium (Ce) undergoes a significant ({approx}16%) volume collapse associated with an isomorphic fcc-fcc phase transformation when subject to compressive loading. We present here a new Embedded Atom Method (EAM) potential for Cerium that models two minima for the two fcc phases. We show results from its use in Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations of Ce samples subjected to shocks with pressures ranging from 0.5 to 25 GPa. A split wave structure is observed, with an elastic precursor followed by a plastic wave. The plastic wave causes the expected fcc-fcc phase transformation. Comparisons to experiments and MD simulations on Cesium (Cs) indicate that three waves could be observed. The construction of the EAM potential may be the source of the difference.

  18. Liquid-phase oxidation of cyclohexanone over cerium oxide catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, H.C. ); Weng, H.S. )

    1990-05-01

    Catalytic oxidation of cyclohexanone in the liquid phase with glacial acetic acid as the solvent over cerium oxide was studied between 5 and 15 atm and 98 and 118 {degrees} C in a batch reactor. The products were adipic acid, glutaric acid, succinic acid, caprolactone, carbon oxides, etc. The reaction undergoes a short induction period prior to a rapid reaction regime. In both regimes, the reaction is independent of oxygen pressure when the system pressure is above 10 atm. The induction period is inversely proportional to both of the catalyst weight and cyclohexanone concentration.During the rapid reaction regime, the reaction rate was found to be proportional to the 0.5 power of the catalyst weight and to the 1.5 power of the cyclohexanone concentration. Reaction mechanisms and rate expressions are proposed. The carbon oxides produced in this study were much lower than those previously reported. The cerium oxide catalyst is stable during the reaction.

  19. Electroplating on titanium alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowery, J. R.

    1971-01-01

    Activation process forms adherent electrodeposits of copper, nickel, and chromium on titanium alloy. Good adhesion of electroplated deposits is obtained by using acetic-hydrofluoric acid anodic activation process.

  20. Engineered cerium oxide nanoparticles: Effects on bacterial growth and viability

    SciTech Connect

    Pelletier, Dale A; Suresh, Anil K; Holton, Gregory A; McKeown, Catherine K; Wang, Wei; Gu, Baohua; Mortensen, Ninell P; Allison, David P; Joy, David Charles; Allison, Martin R; Brown, Steven D; Phelps, Tommy Joe; Doktycz, Mitchel John

    2010-01-01

    Interest in engineered nanostructures has risen in recent years due to their use in energy conservation strategies and biomedicine. To ensure prudent development and use of nanomaterials, the fate and effects of such engineered structures on the environment should be understood. Interactions of nanomaterials with environmental microorganisms are inevitable, but the general consequences of such interactions remain unclear. Further, standardized methods for assessing such interactions are lacking. Therefore, we have initiated a multianalytical approach to understand the interactions of synthesized nanoparticles with bacterial systems. These efforts are focused initially on cerium oxide nanoparticles and model bacteria in order to evaluate characterization procedures and the possible fate of such materials in the environment. In this study the effects of cerium oxide nanoparticles on the growth and viability of Gram-negative Escherichia coli and Shewanella oneidensis, a metal-reducing bacteria, and Gram-positive Bacillus subtilis were examined relative to particle size, growth media, pH, and dosage. A hydrothermal based synthesis procedure was used to prepare cerium oxide nanoparticles of defined sizes in order to eliminate complications originating from the use of organic solvents and surfactants. Bactericidal effects were determined by minimum inhibitory concentration, colony forming units, disc diffusion tests and Live/Dead assays. In growth inhibition experiments involving E. coli and B. subtilis, a clear strain and size-dependent inhibition was observed. S. oneidensis appeared to be unaffected by the cerium oxide nanoparticles. Transmission electron microscopy along with microarray-based transcriptional profiling have been used to understand the response mechanism of the bacteria. The use of multiple analytical approaches adds confidence to toxicity assessments while the use of different bacterial systems highlights the potential wide-ranging effects of

  1. Monomers, Dimers, and Helices: Complexities of Cerium and Plutonium Phenanthrolinecarboxylates.

    PubMed

    Cary, Samantha K; Ferrier, Maryline G; Baumbach, Ryan E; Silver, Mark A; Lezama Pacheco, Juan; Kozimor, Stosh A; La Pierre, Henry S; Stein, Benjamin W; Arico, Alexandra A; Gray, Danielle L; Albrecht-Schmitt, Thomas E

    2016-05-01

    The reaction of Ce(III) or Pu(III) with 1,10-phenanthroline-2,9-dicarboxylic acid (PDAH2) results in the formation of new f-element coordination complexes. In the case of cerium, Ce(PDA)(H2O)2Cl·H2O (1) or [Ce(PDAH)(PDA)]2[Ce(PDAH)(PDA)] (2) was isolated depending on the Ce/ligand ratio in the reaction. The structure of 2 is composed of two distinct substructures that are constructed from the same monomer. This monomer is composed of a Ce(III) cation bound by one PDA(2-) dianionic ligand and one PDAH(-) monoanionic ligand, both of which are tetradentate. Bridging by the carboxylate moieties leads to either [Ce(PDAH)(PDA)]2 dimers or [Ce(PDAH)(PDA)]1∞ helical chains. For plutonium, Pu(PDA)2 (3) was the only product isolated regardless of the Pu/ligand ratio employed in the reaction. During the reaction of plutonium with PDAH2, Pu(III) is oxidized to Pu(IV), generating 3. This assignment is consistent with structural metrics and the optical absorption spectrum. Ambiguity in the assignment of the oxidation state of cerium in 1 and 2 from UV-vis-near-IR spectra invoked the use of Ce L3,2-edge X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy, magnetic susceptibility, and heat capacity measurements. These experiments support the assignment of Ce(III) in both compounds. The bond distances and coordination numbers are also consistent with these assignments. 3 contains 8-coordinate Pu(IV), whereas the cerium centers in 1 and 2 are 9- and/or 10-coordinate, which correlates with the increased size of Ce(III) versus Pu(IV). Taken together, these data provide an example of a system where the differences in the redox behavior between these f elements creates more complex chemistry with cerium than with plutonium. PMID:27070401

  2. Fungus mediated synthesis of biomedically important cerium oxide nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Khan, Shadab Ali; Ahmad, Absar

    2013-10-15

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • First time biological synthesis of cerium oxide oxide nanoparticles using fungus Humicola sp. • Complete characterization of cerium oxide nanoparticles. • Biosynthesis of naturally protein capped, luminescent and water dispersible CeO{sub 2} nanoparticles. • Biosynthesized CeO{sub 2} nanoparticles can be used for many biomedical applications. - Abstract: Nanomaterials can be synthesized by chemical, physical and the more recently discovered biological routes. The biological routes are advantageous over the chemical and physical ones as unlike these, the biological synthesis protocols occur at ambient conditions, are cheap, non-toxic and eco-friendly. Although purely biological and bioinspired methods for the synthesis of nanomaterials are environmentally benign and energy conserving processes, their true potential has not been explored yet and attempts are being made to extend the formation of technologically important nanoparticles using microorganisms like fungi. Though there have been reports on the biosynthesis of oxide nanoparticles by our group in the past, no attempts have been made to employ fungi for the synthesis of nanoparticles of rare earth metals or lanthanides. Here we report for the first time, the bio-inspired synthesis of biomedically important cerium oxide (CeO{sub 2}) nanoparticles using the thermophilic fungus Humicola sp. The fungus Humicola sp. when exposed to aqueous solutions of oxide precursor cerium (III) nitrate hexahydrate (CeN{sub 3}O{sub 9}·6H{sub 2}O) results in the extracellular formation of CeO{sub 2} nanoparticles containing Ce (III) and Ce (IV) mixed oxidation states, confirmed by X-ray Photoemission Spectroscopy (XPS). The formed nanoparticles are naturally capped by proteins secreted by the fungus and thus do not agglomerate, are highly stable, water dispersible and are highly fluorescent as well. The biosynthesized nanoparticles were characterized by UV–vis spectroscopy

  3. Optical Response of Shocked Cerium-Doped Lutetium Oxyorthosilicate

    SciTech Connect

    G. D. Stevens

    2003-03-01

    Shock experiments were performed in order to characterize the triboluminescent signature of cerium-doped lutetium oxyorthosilicate (LSO:Ce). This material shows prompt, nano-second timescale light emission when driven by explosive detonation. When properly applied to a surface, it may be used as a shock arrival sensor, and also for imaging the propagation of a shock front. Triboluminescent rise times, spectral content, and spatial resolution measurements are presented.

  4. Synthesis, characterization, optical and sensing property of manganese oxide nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Manigandan, R.; Suresh, R.; Giribabu, K.; Narayanan, V.; Vijayalakshmi, L.; Stephen, A.

    2014-01-28

    Manganese oxide nanoparticles were prepared by thermal decomposition of manganese oxalate. Manganese oxalate was synthesized by reacting 1:1 mole ratio of manganese acetate and ammonium oxalate along with sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS). The structural characterization of manganese oxalate and manganese oxide nanoparticles was analyzed by XRD. The XRD spectrum confirms the crystal structure of the manganese oxide and manganese oxalate. In addition, the average grain size, lattice parameter values were also calculated using XRD spectrum. Moreover, the diffraction peaks were broadened due to the smaller size of the particle. The band gap of manganese oxide was calculated from optical absorption, which was carried out by DRS UV-Visible spectroscopy. The morphology of manganese oxide nanoparticles was analyzed by SEM images. The FT-IR analysis confirms the formation of the manganese oxide from manganese oxalate nanoparticles. The electrochemical sensing behavior of manganese oxide nanoparticles were investigated using hydrogen peroxide by cyclic voltammetry.

  5. Antibacterial Activity of Polymer Coated Cerium Oxide Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Vishal; Shah, Shreya; Shah, Hirsh; Rispoli, Fred J.; McDonnell, Kevin T.; Workeneh, Selam; Karakoti, Ajay; Kumar, Amit; Seal, Sudipta

    2012-01-01

    Cerium oxide nanoparticles have found numerous applications in the biomedical industry due to their strong antioxidant properties. In the current study, we report the influence of nine different physical and chemical parameters: pH, aeration and, concentrations of MgSO4, CaCl2, KCl, natural organic matter, fructose, nanoparticles and Escherichia coli, on the antibacterial activity of dextran coated cerium oxide nanoparticles. A least-squares quadratic regression model was developed to understand the collective influence of the tested parameters on the anti-bacterial activity and subsequently a computer-based, interactive visualization tool was developed. The visualization allows us to elucidate the effect of each of the parameters in combination with other parameters, on the antibacterial activity of nanoparticles. The results indicate that the toxicity of CeO2 NPs depend on the physical and chemical environment; and in a majority of the possible combinations of the nine parameters, non-lethal to the bacteria. In fact, the cerium oxide nanoparticles can decrease the anti-bacterial activity exerted by magnesium and potassium salts. PMID:23110109

  6. Synthesis and characterization of polyvinylpyrrolidone coated cerium oxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Merrifield, Ruth C; Wang, Zhi Wei; Palmer, Richard E; Lead, Jamie R

    2013-01-01

    There is a pressing need for the development of standard and reference nanomaterials for environmental nanoscience and nanotoxicology. To that aim, suspensions of polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP)-coated ceria nanoparticles (NPs) were produced. Four differently sized monodispersed samples were produced by using different PVP chain lengths. The chemical and physical properties of these NPs were characterized as prepared and in different ecotoxicology exposure media. Dynamic light scattering analysis showed that the samples were monodispersed, with an unchanged size when suspended in the different media over a 72 h period. Electron microscopy confirmed this and revealed that the larger (ca. 20 nm) particles were aggregates composed of the smaller individual particles (4-5 nm). Electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) showed that the smallest and largest samples were composed almost entirely of cerium(III) oxide, with only small amounts of cerium(IV) present in the largest sample. Dissolved cerium concentrations in media were low and constant, showing that the NPs did not dissolve over time. The simple synthesis of the these NPs and their physical and chemical stability in different environmental conditions make them potentially suitable for use as reference materials for (eco)toxicology and surface water environmental studies.

  7. Jet formation in cerium metal to examine material strength

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, B. J. Cherne, F. J.; Prime, M. B.; Yeager, J. D.; Ramos, K. J.; Hooks, D. E.; Cooley, J. C.; Dimonte, G.; Fezzaa, K.; Iverson, A. J.; Carlson, C. A.

    2015-11-21

    Examining the evolution of material properties at extreme conditions advances our understanding of numerous high-pressure phenomena from natural events like meteorite impacts to general solid mechanics and fluid flow behavior. Recent advances in synchrotron diagnostics coupled with dynamic compression platforms have introduced new possibilities for examining in-situ, spatially resolved material response with nanosecond time resolution. In this work, we examined jet formation from a Richtmyer-Meshkov instability in cerium initially shocked into a transient, high-pressure phase, and then released to a low-pressure, higher-temperature state. Cerium's rich phase diagram allows us to study the yield stress following a shock induced solid-solid phase transition. X-ray imaging was used to obtain images of jet formation and evolution with 2–3 μm spatial resolution. From these images, an analytic method was used to estimate the post-shock yield stress, and these results were compared to continuum calculations that incorporated an experimentally validated equation-of-state (EOS) for cerium coupled with a deviatoric strength model. Reasonable agreement was observed between the calculations and the data illustrating the sensitivity of jet formation on the yield stress values. The data and analysis shown here provide insight into material strength during dynamic loading which is expected to aid in the development of strength aware multi-phase EOS required to predict the response of matter at extreme conditions.

  8. Titanium Allergy: A Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Goutam, Manish; Giriyapura, Chandu; Mishra, Sunil Kumar; Gupta, Siddharth

    2014-01-01

    Titanium has gained immense popularity and has successfully established itself as the material of choice for dental implants. In both medical and dental fields, titanium and its alloys have demonstrated success as biomedical devices. Owing to its high resistance to corrosion in a physiological environment and the excellent biocompatibility that gives it a passive, stable oxide film, titanium is considered the material of choice for intraosseous use. There are certain studies which show titanium as an allergen but the resources to diagnose titanium sensivity are very limited. Attention is needed towards the development of new and precise method for early diagnosis of titanium allergy and also to find out the alternative biomaterial which can be used in place of titanium. A review of available articles from the Medline and PubMed database was done to find literature available regarding titanium allergy, its diagnosis and new alternative material for titanium. PMID:25484409

  9. Induction of pulmonary fibrosis by cerium oxide nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Jane Y.; Mercer, Robert R.; Barger, Mark; Schwegler-Berry, Diane; Scabilloni, James; Ma, Joseph K.; Castranova, Vincent

    2012-08-01

    Cerium compounds have been used as a diesel engine catalyst to lower the mass of diesel exhaust particles, but are emitted as cerium oxide (CeO{sub 2}) nanoparticles in the diesel exhaust. In a previous study, we have demonstrated a wide range of CeO{sub 2}-induced lung responses including sustained pulmonary inflammation and cellular signaling that could lead to pulmonary fibrosis. In this study, we investigated the fibrogenic responses induced by CeO{sub 2} in a rat model at various time points up to 84 days post-exposure. Male Sprague Dawley rats were exposed to CeO{sub 2} by a single intratracheal instillation. Alveolar macrophages (AM) were isolated by bronchial alveolar lavage (BAL). AM-mediated cellular responses, osteopontin (OPN) and transform growth factor (TGF)-β1 in the fibrotic process were investigated. The results showed that CeO{sub 2} exposure significantly increased fibrotic cytokine TGF-β1 and OPN production by AM above controls. The collagen degradation enzymes, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and -9 and the tissue inhibitor of MMP were markedly increased in the BAL fluid at 1 day- and subsequently declined at 28 days after exposure, but remained much higher than the controls. CeO{sub 2} induced elevated phospholipids in BAL fluid and increased hydroxyproline content in lung tissue in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Immunohistochemical analysis showed MMP-2, MMP-9 and MMP-10 expressions in fibrotic regions. Morphological analysis noted increased collagen fibers in the lungs exposed to a single dose of 3.5 mg/kg CeO{sub 2} and euthanized at 28 days post-exposure. Collectively, our studies show that CeO{sub 2} induced fibrotic lung injury in rats, suggesting it may cause potential health effects. -- Highlights: ► Cerium oxide exposure significantly affected the following parameters in the lung. ► Induced fibrotic cytokine OPN and TGF-β1 production and phospholipidosis. ► Caused imbalance of the MMP-9/ TIMP-1 ratio that favors fibrosis

  10. Spectroscopic characterization of manganese minerals.

    PubMed

    Lakshmi Reddy, S; Padma Suvarna, K; Udayabhaska Reddy, G; Endo, Tamio; Frost, R L

    2014-01-01

    Manganese minerals ardenite, alleghanyite and leucopoenicite originated from Madhya Pradesh, India, Nagano prefecture Japan, Sussex Country and Parker Shaft Franklin, Sussex Country, New Jersey respectively are used in the present work. In these minerals manganese is the major constituent and iron if present is in traces only. An EPR study of on all of the above samples confirms the presence of Mn(II) with g around 2.0. Optical absorption spectrum of the mineral alleghanyite indicates that Mn(II) is present in two different octahedral sites and in leucophoenicite Mn(II) is also in octahedral geometry. Ardenite mineral gives only a few Mn(II) bands. NIR results of the minerals ardenite, leucophoenicite and alleghanyite are due to hydroxyl and silicate anions which confirming the formulae of the minerals.

  11. Spectroscopic characterization of manganese minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lakshmi Reddy, S.; Padma Suvarna, K.; Udayabhaska Reddy, G.; Endo, Tamio; Frost, R. L.

    2014-01-01

    Manganese minerals ardenite, alleghanyite and leucopoenicite originated from Madhya Pradesh, India, Nagano prefecture Japan, Sussex Country and Parker Shaft Franklin, Sussex Country, New Jersey respectively are used in the present work. In these minerals manganese is the major constituent and iron if present is in traces only. An EPR study of on all of the above samples confirms the presence of Mn(II) with g around 2.0. Optical absorption spectrum of the mineral alleghanyite indicates that Mn(II) is present in two different octahedral sites and in leucophoenicite Mn(II) is also in octahedral geometry. Ardenite mineral gives only a few Mn(II) bands. NIR results of the minerals ardenite, leucophoenicite and alleghanyite are due to hydroxyl and silicate anions which confirming the formulae of the minerals.

  12. Mineral resource of the month: manganese

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Corathers, Lisa

    2012-01-01

    Manganese is a silver-colored metal resembling iron and often found in conjunction with iron. The earliest-known human use of manganese compounds was in the Stone Age, when early humans used manganese dioxide as pigments in cave paintings. In ancient Rome and Egypt, people started using it to color or remove the color from glass - a practice that continued to modern times. Today, manganese is predominantly used in metallurgical applications as an alloying addition, particularly in steel and cast iron production. Steel and cast iron together provide the largest market for manganese (historically 85 to 90 percent), but it is also alloyed with nonferrous metals such as aluminum and copper. Its importance to steel cannot be overstated, as almost all types of steel contain manganese and could not exist without it.

  13. Environmental Controls of Biological Manganese Oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belz, A. P.; Ahn, C. C.; Nealson, K. H.

    2001-12-01

    Biological catalysis of manganese oxidation represents an important contribution to global manganese cycling; biological oxidation rates are several orders of magnitude higher than those of abiotic processes. Despite recent genetics advances, ongoing behavioral studies, and a large pool of knowledge regarding manganese chemistry, the links between biology and environmental chemistry remain unresolved. We have performed experiments on batch cultures of Leptothrix discophora SS-1 to explore the physiology of biological manganese oxidation. We have further conducted spectroscopic and microscopic studies of the mechanism as manganese proceeds from the soluble Mn2+ species to the insoluble Mn(III) and Mn(IV) phases. These investigations suggest roles for aqueous chemistry, mineralogy, and microbial physiology in controlling manganese fluxes in metal-rich environments.

  14. The photocatalytic and cytotoxic effects of titanium dioxide particles used in sunscreen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rampaul, Ashti

    Titanium dioxide nanoparticles are used in sunscreens to reflect UV radiation from the skin. However, titanium dioxide as anatase and rutile crystal forms is a well-known photocatalyst. The nanoparticles are surface coated with inert inorganic oxides such as silica and alumina or organics such as organosilanes or silicone polymers and more recently, have been doped with manganese oxide. These modifications to the titanium dioxide particles are purported to prevent the production of harmful reactive oxygen species. A range of sunscreens was tested with crystal form and modification type identified via XRD, Raman Spectroscopy, XPS and SSNMR. The particle modification and crystal form determined whether the particles were inert or rapidly degraded methylene blue dye, and killed or protected cultured human epithelium cells. Novel solid state Electron Paramagnetic Resonance analysis showed that the greatest amount of superoxide anions was formed during UVA irradiation of the mixed anatase and rutile crystal forms coated with an organosilane. These particles also degraded methylene blue at a similar rate to Degussa P25, a standard uncoated titanium dioxide powder and produced an increase in UVA induced apoptosis of human keratinocytes. Double Stranded Breaks were observed extensively in cells exposed to UVA irradiated mixed anatase and rutile titanium dioxide with organosilane. A new apoptotic-like cell death mechanism may have been recognised during the UVA irradiation of animal and human cells in the presence of titanium dioxide. This research concludes that mixed anatase and rutile crystal forms of titanium dioxide coated with organosilane or dimethicone may not be safe to use in sunscreen lotions. A less harmful alternative for sunscreen formulations is the manganese doped rutile particles or the alumina coated rutile powders, both of which exhibited a protective effect on cultured epithelial cells.

  15. 21 CFR 184.1449 - Manganese citrate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... sodium citrate to complete the reaction. (b) The ingredient must be of a purity suitable for its intended... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Manganese citrate. 184.1449 Section 184.1449 Food... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1449 Manganese citrate. (a) Manganese citrate (Mn3(C6H5O7)2,...

  16. [Clinical cases of occupational chronic manganese intoxication].

    PubMed

    Konstantinova, T N; Lakhman, O L; Katamanova, E V; Kartapol'tseva, N V; Meshcheriagin, V A; Rusanova, D V; Andreeva, O K

    2009-01-01

    Classic symptoms of manganese intoxication are very rarely seen nowadays. Clinic in Angarsk Research Institute for Occupational medicine and Human ecology registered two cases of stage I and II chronic manganese intoxication over 10 years among electric welders. The cases were diagnosed with consideration of long length of exposure to manganese with the ambient air level exceeding the MAC 1.5 times, the disease manifestation at middle age, high manganese level in serum and urine, characteristic neurologic symptoms in association with organic psychopathologic defects and polyneuropathy of limbs.

  17. Equation of state of quartz glass and cerium in their abnormal compressibility range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molodets, A. M.

    2016-09-01

    In this work, the semiempirical equation of state of quartz glass and polycrystalline γ-cerium are plotted and verified at the compressive pressures to 3 GPa. The proposed equations are shown to uniformly describe the thermophysical and physicomechanical properties of quartz glass and polycrystalline γ-cerium at their abnormal compressibility in compression. The room isotherms of these materials are discussed, as well.

  18. Cerium doped red mud catalytic ozonation for bezafibrate degradation in wastewater: Efficiency, intermediates, and toxicity.

    PubMed

    Xu, Bingbing; Qi, Fei; Sun, Dezhi; Chen, Zhonglin; Robert, Didier

    2016-03-01

    In this study, the performance of bezafibrate (BZF) degradation and detoxification in the aqueous phase using cerium-modified red mud (RM) catalysts prepared using different cerium sources and synthesis methods were evaluated. Experimental results showed that the surface cerium modification was responsible for the development of the catalytic activity of RM and this was influenced by the cerium source and the synthesis method. Catalyst prepared from cerium (IV) by precipitation was found to show the best catalytic activity in BZF degradation and detoxification. Reactive oxygen species including peroxides, hydroxyl radicals, and super oxide ions were identified in all reactions and we proposed the corresponding catalytic reaction mechanism for each catalyst that prepared from different cerium source and method. This was supported by the intermediates profiles that were generated upon BZF degradation. The surface and the structural properties of cerium-modified RM were characterized in detail by several analytical methods. Two interesting findings were made: (1) the surface texture (specific surface area and mesoporous volume) influenced the catalytic reaction pathway; and (2) Ce(III) species and oxygen vacancies were generated on the surface of the catalyst after cerium modification. This plays an important role in the development of the catalytic activity. PMID:26706928

  19. Reactions of carbonyl compounds with Grignard reagents in the presence of cerium chloride

    SciTech Connect

    Imamoto, Tsuneo; Takiyama, Nobuyuki; Nakamura, Kimikazu; Hatajima, Toshihiko; Kamiya, Yasuo )

    1989-06-07

    The addition of Grignard reagents to ketones is significantly enhanced by cerium chloride with remarkable suppression of side reactions, particularly enolization. Some esters, which are prone to side reactions, also react readily with Grignard reagents in the presence of cerium chloride to give normal reaction products in reasonable to high yields.

  20. Hydrocarbon-based polymer electrolyte cerium composite membranes for improved proton exchange membrane fuel cell durability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hyejin; Han, Myungseong; Choi, Young-Woo; Bae, Byungchan

    2015-11-01

    Hydrocarbon-based cerium composite membranes were prepared for proton exchange membrane fuel cell applications to increase oxidative stability. Different amounts of cerium ions were impregnated in sulfonated poly(arylene ether sulfone) (SPES) membranes and their physicochemical properties were investigated according to the cerium content. Field-emission scanning electron microscopy and inductively coupled plasma analyses confirmed the presence of cerium ions in the composite membranes and 1H NMR indicated the successful coordination of sulfonic acid groups with the metal ions. Increasing amounts of cerium ions resulted in decreases in the proton conductivity and water uptake, but enhanced oxidative stability. The oxidative stability of the composite membranes was proven via a hydrogen peroxide exposure experiment which mimicked fuel cell operating conditions. In addition, more than 2200 h was achieved with the composite membrane under in situ accelerated open circuit voltage (OCV) durability testing (DOE protocol), whereas the corresponding pristine SPES membrane attained only 670 h.

  1. Tuning Reactivity and Electronic Properties through Ligand Reorganization within a Cerium Heterobimetallic Framework

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, Jerome R.; Gordon, Zachary; Booth, Corwin H.; Carroll, Patrick J.; Walsh, Patrick J.; Schelter, Eric J.

    2014-06-24

    Cerium compounds have played vital roles in organic, inorganic, and materials chemistry due to their reversible redox chemistry between trivalent and tetravalent oxidation states. However, attempts to rationally access molecular cerium complexes in both oxidation states have been frustrated by unpredictable reactivity in cerium(III) oxidation chemistry. Such oxidation reactions are limited by steric saturation at the metal ion, which can result in high energy activation barriers for electron transfer. An alternative approach has been realized using a rare earth/alkali metal/1,1'-BINOLate (REMB) heterobimetallic framework, which uses redox-inactive metals within the secondary coordination sphere to control ligand reorganization. The rational syntheses of functionalized cerium(IV) products and a mechanistic examination of the role of ligand reorganization in cerium(III) oxidation are presented.

  2. Battles with iron: manganese in oxidative stress protection.

    PubMed

    Aguirre, J Dafhne; Culotta, Valeria C

    2012-04-20

    The redox-active metal manganese plays a key role in cellular adaptation to oxidative stress. As a cofactor for manganese superoxide dismutase or through formation of non-proteinaceous manganese antioxidants, this metal can combat oxidative damage without deleterious side effects of Fenton chemistry. In either case, the antioxidant properties of manganese are vulnerable to iron. Cellular pools of iron can outcompete manganese for binding to manganese superoxide dismutase, and through Fenton chemistry, iron may counteract the benefits of non-proteinaceous manganese antioxidants. In this minireview, we highlight ways in which cells maximize the efficacy of manganese as an antioxidant in the midst of pro-oxidant iron.

  3. Titanium metal: extraction to application

    SciTech Connect

    Gambogi, Joseph; Gerdemann, Stephen J.

    2002-09-01

    In 1998, approximately 57,000 tons of titanium metal was consumed in the form of mill products (1). Only about 5% of the 4 million tons of titanium minerals consumed each year is used to produce titanium metal, with the remainder primarily used to produce titanium dioxide pigment. Titanium metal production is primarily based on the direct chlorination of rutile to produce titanium tetrachloride, which is then reduced to metal using the Kroll magnesium reduction process. The use of titanium is tied to its high strength-to-weight ratio and corrosion resistance. Aerospace is the largest application for titanium. In this paper, we discuss all aspects of the titanium industry from ore deposits through extraction to present and future applications. The methods of both primary (mining of ore, extraction, and purification) and secondary (forming and machining) operations will be analyzed. The chemical and physical properties of titanium metal will be briefly examined. Present and future applications for titanium will be discussed. Finally, the economics of titanium metal production also are analyzed as well as the advantages and disadvantages of various alternative extraction methods.

  4. Mineral of the month: titanium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gambogi, Joseph

    2004-01-01

    From paint to airplanes, titanium is important in a number of applications. Commercial production comes from titanium-bearing ilmenite, rutile and leucoxene (altered ilmenite). These minerals are used to produce titanium dioxide pigment, as well as an assortment of metal and chemical products.

  5. Surface modification of titanium and titanium alloys by ion implantation.

    PubMed

    Rautray, Tapash R; Narayanan, R; Kwon, Tae-Yub; Kim, Kyo-Han

    2010-05-01

    Titanium and titanium alloys are widely used in biomedical devices and components, especially as hard tissue replacements as well as in cardiac and cardiovascular applications, because of their desirable properties, such as relatively low modulus, good fatigue strength, formability, machinability, corrosion resistance, and biocompatibility. However, titanium and its alloys cannot meet all of the clinical requirements. Therefore, to improve the biological, chemical, and mechanical properties, surface modification is often performed. In view of this, the current review casts new light on surface modification of titanium and titanium alloys by ion beam implantation.

  6. Tensile and creep properties of titanium-vanadium, titanium-molybdenum, and titanium-niobium alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gray, H. R.

    1975-01-01

    Tensile and creep properties of experimental beta-titanium alloys were determined. Titanium-vanadium alloys had substantially greater tensile and creep strength than the titanium-niobium and titanium-molybdenum alloys tested. Specific tensile strengths of several titanium-vanadium-aluminum-silicon alloys were equivalent or superior to those of commercial titanium alloys to temperatures of 650 C. The Ti-50V-3Al-1Si alloy had the best balance of tensile strength, creep strength, and metallurgical stability. Its 500 C creep strength was far superior to that of a widely used commercial titanium alloy, Ti-6Al-4V, and almost equivalent to that of newly developed commercial titanium alloys.

  7. Effects of uncoated and citric acid coated cerium oxide nanoparticles, bulk cerium oxide, cerium acetate, and citric acid on tomato plants.

    PubMed

    Barrios, Ana Cecilia; Rico, Cyren M; Trujillo-Reyes, Jesica; Medina-Velo, Illya A; Peralta-Videa, Jose R; Gardea-Torresdey, Jorge L

    2016-09-01

    Little is known about the physiological and biochemical responses of plants exposed to surface modified nanomaterials. In this study, tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) plants were cultivated for 210days in potting soil amended with uncoated and citric acid coated cerium oxide nanoparticles (nCeO2, CA+nCeO2) bulk cerium oxide (bCeO2), and cerium acetate (CeAc). Millipore water (MPW), and citric acid (CA) were used as controls. Physiological and biochemical parameters were measured. At 500mg/kg, both the uncoated and CA+nCeO2 increased shoot length by ~9 and ~13%, respectively, while bCeO2 and CeAc decreased shoot length by ~48 and ~26%, respectively, compared with MPW (p≤0.05). Total chlorophyll, chlo-a, and chlo-b were significantly increased by CA+nCeO2 at 250mg/kg, but reduced by bCeO2 at 62.5mg/kg, compared with MPW. At 250 and 500mg/kg, nCeO2 increased Ce in roots by 10 and 7 times, compared to CA+nCeO2, but none of the treatments affected the Ce concentration in above ground tissues. Neither nCeO2 nor CA+nCeO2 affected the homeostasis of nutrient elements in roots, stems, and leaves or catalase and ascorbate peroxidase in leaves. CeAc at 62.5 and 125mg/kg increased B (81%) and Fe (174%) in roots, while at 250 and 500mg/kg, increased Ca in stems (84% and 86%, respectively). On the other hand, bCeO2 at 62.5 increased Zn (152%) but reduced P (80%) in stems. Only nCeO2 at 62.5mg/kg produced higher total number of tomatoes, compared with control and the rest of the treatments. The surface coating reduced Ce uptake by roots but did not affect its translocation to the aboveground organs. In addition, there was no clear effect of surface coating on fruit production. To our knowledge, this is the first study comparing the effects of coated and uncoated nCeO2 on tomato plants.

  8. Effects of uncoated and citric acid coated cerium oxide nanoparticles, bulk cerium oxide, cerium acetate, and citric acid on tomato plants.

    PubMed

    Barrios, Ana Cecilia; Rico, Cyren M; Trujillo-Reyes, Jesica; Medina-Velo, Illya A; Peralta-Videa, Jose R; Gardea-Torresdey, Jorge L

    2016-09-01

    Little is known about the physiological and biochemical responses of plants exposed to surface modified nanomaterials. In this study, tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) plants were cultivated for 210days in potting soil amended with uncoated and citric acid coated cerium oxide nanoparticles (nCeO2, CA+nCeO2) bulk cerium oxide (bCeO2), and cerium acetate (CeAc). Millipore water (MPW), and citric acid (CA) were used as controls. Physiological and biochemical parameters were measured. At 500mg/kg, both the uncoated and CA+nCeO2 increased shoot length by ~9 and ~13%, respectively, while bCeO2 and CeAc decreased shoot length by ~48 and ~26%, respectively, compared with MPW (p≤0.05). Total chlorophyll, chlo-a, and chlo-b were significantly increased by CA+nCeO2 at 250mg/kg, but reduced by bCeO2 at 62.5mg/kg, compared with MPW. At 250 and 500mg/kg, nCeO2 increased Ce in roots by 10 and 7 times, compared to CA+nCeO2, but none of the treatments affected the Ce concentration in above ground tissues. Neither nCeO2 nor CA+nCeO2 affected the homeostasis of nutrient elements in roots, stems, and leaves or catalase and ascorbate peroxidase in leaves. CeAc at 62.5 and 125mg/kg increased B (81%) and Fe (174%) in roots, while at 250 and 500mg/kg, increased Ca in stems (84% and 86%, respectively). On the other hand, bCeO2 at 62.5 increased Zn (152%) but reduced P (80%) in stems. Only nCeO2 at 62.5mg/kg produced higher total number of tomatoes, compared with control and the rest of the treatments. The surface coating reduced Ce uptake by roots but did not affect its translocation to the aboveground organs. In addition, there was no clear effect of surface coating on fruit production. To our knowledge, this is the first study comparing the effects of coated and uncoated nCeO2 on tomato plants. PMID:26672385

  9. Cyanamide route to calcium-manganese oxide foams for water oxidation.

    PubMed

    Baktash, Elham; Zaharieva, Ivelina; Schröder, Marc; Goebel, Caren; Dau, Holger; Thomas, Arne

    2013-12-28

    In nature, photosynthetic water oxidation is efficiently catalysed at a protein-bound μ-oxido Mn4Ca cluster. This cluster consists of earth abundant, non-toxic elements and serves as a paragon for development of synthetic catalysts. In this study we developed porous calcium-manganese oxides with a unique foam-like nanostructure prepared via a facile and robust synthetic route using cyanamide as a porogen. A series of such oxide foams annealed at different temperatures was characterized by TEM, SEM, XRD, N2 physisorption, and X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) in order to correlate crystallinity, atomic structure, surface area and oxidation state of the materials with catalytic activity. Some of the resulting Ca-Mn oxides show high activity as catalysts for water oxidation in the presence of cerium(iv) ammonium nitrate as a non-oxo transfer oxidant. An amorphous calcium-manganese-oxide foam with 130 m(2) g(-1) surface area and Mn oxidation state of +3.6 was identified to be most active; its activity is superior to previously reported Ca-Mn oxides. At the atomic level, this material shares structural motifs with the biological paragon as revealed by dual-edge XAS at the Mn and Ca K-edge. Rather than nanostructure and surface area, the atomic structure of the Ca-Mn oxide and the extent of structural order appear to be crucial determinants of catalytic activity. Fully disordered low-valent Mn materials as well as high-valent but crystalline Mn-Ca oxides are unreactive. Highly disordered variants of layered manganese oxide with Ca and water molecules interfacing layer fragments are most reactive. PMID:24091767

  10. Regulation of cellular manganese and manganese transport rates in the unicellular alga Chlamydomonas

    SciTech Connect

    Sunda, W.G.; Huntsman, S.A.

    1985-01-01

    The cellular accumulation and uptake kinetics of manganese by Chlamydomonas sp. were studied in model chelate buffer systems. Cellular manganese concentrations and uptake rates were related to the computed free manganese ion concentration and were independent of the total or chelated manganese concentration. Cellular manganese was constant at about 1 mmol liter/sup -1/ of cellular volume at free manganese ion concentrations of 10/sup -7/ /sup 6/-10/sup -6/ /sup 3/ mol liter/sup -1/ and decreased below this range. Manganese uptake rates followed saturation kinetics and V/sub max/, but not K/sub s/, varied with the free manganese ion concentration in the growth medium. V/sub max/ appeared to be under negative feedback control and increased with decreasing manganese ion concentration. Variations of up to 30-fold in this parameter seemed to be instrumental in limiting the variation in cellular manganese to a sixfold range despite a 1000-fold variation in free manganese ion concentration in the growth medium.

  11. Titanium alkoxide compound

    SciTech Connect

    Boyle, Timothy J.

    2007-08-14

    A titanium alkoxide composition is provided, as represented by the chemical formula (OC.sub.6H.sub.5N).sub.2Ti(OC.sub.6H.sub.5NH.sub.2).sub.2. As prepared, the compound is a crystalline substance with a hexavalent titanium atom bonded to two OC.sub.6H.sub.5NH.sub.2 groups and two OC.sub.6H.sub.5N groups with a theoretical molecular weight of 480.38, comprising 60.01% C, 5.04% H and 11.66% N.

  12. Thermal Signatures of The Kondo Volume Collapse in Cerium

    SciTech Connect

    Lipp, M; Jackson, D; Cynn, H; Aracne, C; Evans, W; McMahan, A

    2008-05-23

    X-ray diffraction measurements of cerium in the vicinity of the isostructural {gamma}-{alpha} transition have been performed with high precision and accuracy from room temperature to almost 800 K. The disputed location of the critical point has been found to occur at 1.5 {+-} 0.1 GPa and 480 {+-} 10 K. The data is well fit by the Kondo volume collapse model plus a quasiharmonic representation of the phonons. The resultant free energy is validated against data for the thermodynamic Grueneisen parameter, and beyond the dominant spin fluctuation contribution, indicates a dramatic change in the lattice Grueneisen parameter across the transition.

  13. Identification of the Charge Carriers in Cerium Phosphate Ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Ray, Hannah L.; Jonghe, Lutgard C. De

    2010-06-02

    The total conductivity of Sr-doped cerium orthophosphate changes by nearly two orders of magnitude depending on the oxygen and hydrogen content of the atmosphere. The defect model for the system suggests that this is because the identity of the dominant charge carrier can change from electron holes to protons when the sample is in equilibrium with air vs. humidified hydrogen. In this work are presented some preliminary measurements that can help to clarify this exchange between carriers. The conduction behavior of a 2percent Sr-doped CePO4 sample under symmetric atmospheric conditions is investigated using several techniques, including AC impedance, H/D isotope effects, and chronoamperometry.

  14. Properties of hot liquid cerium by LDA + U molecular dynamics.

    PubMed

    Siberchicot, Bruno; Clérouin, Jean

    2012-11-14

    We present ab initio simulations of liquid cerium in the framework of the LDA + U formulation. The liquid density has been determined self-consistently by searching for the zero pressure equilibrium state at 1320 K with the same set of parameters (U and J) and occupation matrices as those optimized for the γ phase. We have computed static and transport properties. The liquid produced by the simulations appears more structured than the available measurements. This raises questions regarding the ability of the theory to describe such a complex liquid. Conductivity calculations and temperature dependences are nevertheless in reasonable agreement with data.

  15. Manganese nodules: thorium-230: protactinium-231 ratios.

    PubMed

    Sackett, W M

    1966-11-01

    The Th(230): Pa(231) activity ratio in 7 of 11 manganese nodules is less than 10.8, the theoretical production ratio of activities in the ocean. This finding indicates difierential accumulation of these nuclides in authigenic deposits of manganese-iron oxide.

  16. Manganese nodules: thorium-230: protactinium-231 ratios.

    PubMed

    Sackett, W M

    1966-11-01

    The Th(230): Pa(231) activity ratio in 7 of 11 manganese nodules is less than 10.8, the theoretical production ratio of activities in the ocean. This finding indicates difierential accumulation of these nuclides in authigenic deposits of manganese-iron oxide. PMID:17778807

  17. 21 CFR 184.1461 - Manganese sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1461 Manganese sulfate. (a) Manganese sulfate (MnSO4·H2O, CAS... dioxide in sulfuric acid, and the roasting of pyrolusite (MnO2) ore with solid ferrous sulfate and...

  18. 21 CFR 184.1461 - Manganese sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1461 Manganese sulfate. (a) Manganese sulfate (MnSO4·H2O, CAS... dioxide in sulfuric acid, and the roasting of pyrolusite (MnO2) ore with solid ferrous sulfate and...

  19. 21 CFR 184.1461 - Manganese sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1461 Manganese sulfate. (a) Manganese sulfate (MnSO4·H2O, CAS... dioxide in sulfuric acid, and the roasting of pyrolusite (MnO2) ore with solid ferrous sulfate and...

  20. 21 CFR 184.1461 - Manganese sulfate.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Specific Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1461 Manganese sulfate. (a) Manganese sulfate (MnSO4·H2O, CAS... dioxide in sulfuric acid, and the roasting of pyrolusite (MnO2) ore with solid ferrous sulfate and...

  1. Manganese peroxidase gene transcription in Phanerochaete chrysosporium: Activation by manganese

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, J.A.; Alic, M. Gold, M.H. )

    1991-07-01

    The expression of manganese peroxidase in nitrogen-limited cultures of Phanerochaete chrysosporium is dependent on Mn, and initial work suggested that Mn regulates transcription of the mnp gene. In this study, using Northern (RNA) blot analysis of kinetic, dose-response, and inhibitor experiments, the authors demonstrate unequivocally that Mn regulates mnp gene transcription. The amount of mnp mRNA in cells of 4-day-old nitrogen-limited cultures is a direct function of the concentration of Mn in the culture medium up to a maximum of 180 {mu}M. Addition of Mn to nitrogen-limited Mn-deficient secondary metabolic (4-, 5-, and 6-day-old) cultures results in the appearance of mnp mRNA within 40 min. The appearance of this message is completely inhibited by the RNA synthesis inhibitor dactinomycin but not by the protein synthesis inhibitor cycloheximide. Furthermore, the amount of mnp mRNA produced is a direct function of the concentration of added Mn. In contrast, addition of Mn to low-nitrogen Mn-deficient 2- or 3-day-old cultures does not result in the appearance of mnp mRNA. Manganese peroxidase protein is detected by specific immunoprecipitation of the in vitro translation products of poly(A) RNA isolated from Mn-supplemented (but nor from Mn-deficient) cells. All of these results demonstrate that Mn, the substrate for the enzyme, regulates mnp gene transcription via a growth-stage-specific and concentration-dependent mechanism.

  2. RNASeq in C. elegans Following Manganese Exposure.

    PubMed

    Parmalee, Nancy L; Maqbool, Shahina B; Ye, Bin; Calder, Brent; Bowman, Aaron B; Aschner, Michael

    2015-08-06

    Manganese is a metal that is required for optimal biological functioning of organisms. Absorption, cellular import and export, and excretion of manganese are all tightly regulated. While some genes involved in regulation, such as DMT-1 and ferroportin, are known, it is presumed that many more are involved and as yet unknown. Excessive exposure to manganese, usually in industrial settings such as mining or welding, can lead to neurotoxicity and a condition known as manganism that closely resembles Parkinson's disease. Elucidating transcriptional changes following manganese exposure could lead to the development of biomarkers for exposure. This unit presents a protocol for RNA sequencing in the worm Caenorhabditis elegans to assay for transcriptional changes following exposure to manganese. This protocol is adaptable to any environmental exposure in C. elegans. The protocol results in counts of gene transcripts in control versus exposed conditions and a ranked list of differentially expressed genes for further study.

  3. Soil organic matter influences cerium translocation and physiological processes in kidney bean plants exposed to cerium oxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Majumdar, Sanghamitra; Peralta-Videa, Jose R; Trujillo-Reyes, Jesica; Sun, Youping; Barrios, Ana C; Niu, Genhua; Margez, Juan P Flores-; Gardea-Torresdey, Jorge L

    2016-11-01

    Soil organic matter plays a major role in determining the fate of the engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) in the soil matrix and effects on the residing plants. In this study, kidney bean plants were grown in soils varying in organic matter content and amended with 0-500mg/kg cerium oxide nanoparticles (nano-CeO2) under greenhouse condition. After 52days of exposure, cerium accumulation in tissues, plant growth and physiological parameters including photosynthetic pigments (chlorophylls and carotenoids), net photosynthesis rate, transpiration rate, and stomatal conductance were recorded. Additionally, catalase and ascorbate peroxidase activities were measured to evaluate oxidative stress in the tissues. The translocation factor of cerium in the nano-CeO2 exposed plants grown in organic matter enriched soil (OMES) was twice as the plants grown in low organic matter soil (LOMS). Although the leaf cover area increased by 65-111% with increasing nano-CeO2 concentration in LOMS, the effect on the physiological processes were inconsequential. In OMES leaves, exposure to 62.5-250mg/kg nano-CeO2 led to an enhancement in the transpiration rate and stomatal conductance, but to a simultaneous decrease in carotenoid contents by 25-28%. Chlorophyll a in the OMES leaves also decreased by 27 and 18% on exposure to 125 and 250mg/kg nano-CeO2. In addition, catalase activity increased in LOMS stems, and ascorbate peroxidase increased in OMES leaves of nano-CeO2 exposed plants, with respect to control. Thus, this study provides clear evidence that the properties of the complex soil matrix play decisive roles in determining the fate, bioavailability, and biological transport of ENMs in the environment.

  4. Soil organic matter influences cerium translocation and physiological processes in kidney bean plants exposed to cerium oxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Majumdar, Sanghamitra; Peralta-Videa, Jose R; Trujillo-Reyes, Jesica; Sun, Youping; Barrios, Ana C; Niu, Genhua; Margez, Juan P Flores-; Gardea-Torresdey, Jorge L

    2016-11-01

    Soil organic matter plays a major role in determining the fate of the engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) in the soil matrix and effects on the residing plants. In this study, kidney bean plants were grown in soils varying in organic matter content and amended with 0-500mg/kg cerium oxide nanoparticles (nano-CeO2) under greenhouse condition. After 52days of exposure, cerium accumulation in tissues, plant growth and physiological parameters including photosynthetic pigments (chlorophylls and carotenoids), net photosynthesis rate, transpiration rate, and stomatal conductance were recorded. Additionally, catalase and ascorbate peroxidase activities were measured to evaluate oxidative stress in the tissues. The translocation factor of cerium in the nano-CeO2 exposed plants grown in organic matter enriched soil (OMES) was twice as the plants grown in low organic matter soil (LOMS). Although the leaf cover area increased by 65-111% with increasing nano-CeO2 concentration in LOMS, the effect on the physiological processes were inconsequential. In OMES leaves, exposure to 62.5-250mg/kg nano-CeO2 led to an enhancement in the transpiration rate and stomatal conductance, but to a simultaneous decrease in carotenoid contents by 25-28%. Chlorophyll a in the OMES leaves also decreased by 27 and 18% on exposure to 125 and 250mg/kg nano-CeO2. In addition, catalase activity increased in LOMS stems, and ascorbate peroxidase increased in OMES leaves of nano-CeO2 exposed plants, with respect to control. Thus, this study provides clear evidence that the properties of the complex soil matrix play decisive roles in determining the fate, bioavailability, and biological transport of ENMs in the environment. PMID:27343939

  5. Sintering titanium powders

    SciTech Connect

    Gerdemann, Stephen J.; Alman, David E.

    2005-09-01

    Recently, there has been renewed interest in low-cost titanium. Near-net-shape powder metallurgy offers the potential of manufacturing titanium articles without costly and difficult forming and machining operations; hence, processing methods such as conventional press-and-sinter, powder forging and powder injection molding are of interest. The sintering behavior of a variety of commercial and experimental titanium powders was studied. Commercial powders were acquired that were produced different routes: (i) sponge fines from the primary titanium processing; (ii) via the hydride-dehydride process; and (iii) gas atomization. The influence of vacuum sintering time (0.5 to 32 hrs) and temperature (1200, 1275 or 1350°C) on the microstructure (porosity present) of cold pressed powders was studied. The results are discussed in terms of the difference in powder characteristics, with the aim of identify the characteristics required for full density via press-and-sinter processing. Near-net-shape tensile bars were consolidated via cold pressed and sintered. After sintering, a sub-set of the tensile bars was hot-isostatic pressed (HIPed). The microstructure and properties of the bars were compared in the sintered and HIPed conditions.

  6. Manganese oxidation by Leptothrix discophora.

    PubMed

    Boogerd, F C; de Vrind, J P

    1987-02-01

    Cells of Leptothrix discophora SS1 released Mn2+-oxidizing factors into the medium during growth in batch culture. Manganese was optimally oxidized when the medium was buffered with HEPES (N-2-hydroxyethylpiperazine-N'-2-ethanesulfonic acid) at pH 7.5. Manganese-oxidizing activity in the culture medium in which this strain had been grown previously was sensitive to heat, phosphate, Tris, NaN3, HgCl2 NaCl, sodium dodecyl sulfate, and pronase; 0.5 mol of O2 was consumed per mol of MnO2 formed. During Mn2+ oxidation, protons were liberated. With sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, two protein-containing bands were detected in the spent culture medium. One band had an apparent molecular weight of 110,000 and was predominant in Mn2+-oxidizing activity. The second product (Mr 85,000) was only detected in some cases and probably represents a proteolytic breakdown moiety of the 110,000-Mr protein. The Mn2+-oxidizing factors were associated with the MnO2 aggregates that had been formed in spent culture medium. After solubilization of this MnO2 with ascorbate, Mn2+-oxidizing activity could be recovered. PMID:3804969

  7. Hydrothermal synthesis of cerium titanate nanorods and its application in visible light photocatalysis

    SciTech Connect

    Pei, L.Z. Liu, H.D.; Lin, N.; Yu, H.Y.

    2015-01-15

    Highlights: • Cerium titanate nanorods have been synthesized by a simple hydrothermal process. • The size of the cerium titanate nanorods can be controlled by growth conditions. • Cerium titanate nanorods exhibit good photocatalytic activities for methyl blue. - Abstract: Cerium titanate nanorods have been prepared via a hydrothermal process using sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) as the surfactant. The cerium titanate nanorods have been analyzed by X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), high-resolution TEM (HRTEM), and ultraviolet–visible (UV–vis) diffuse reflectance spectrum. XRD shows that the nanorods are composed of CeTi{sub 21}O{sub 38} phase. Electron microscopy observations indicate that the nanorods have good single crystalline nature. The diameter and length of the nanorods are about 50–200 nm and 1–2 μm, respectively. Cerium titanate nanorods have a band gap of 2.65 eV. The photocatalytic activities of the nanorods have been investigated by degrading methylene blue (MB) under visible light irradiation. MB solution with the concentration of 10 mg L{sup −1} can be degraded totally with the irradiation time increasing to 240 min. Cerium titanate nanorods exhibit great potential in photocatalytic degradation of MB under visible light irradiation.

  8. Altering properties of cerium oxide thin films by Rh doping

    SciTech Connect

    Ševčíková, Klára; Nehasil, Václav; Vorokhta, Mykhailo; Haviar, Stanislav; Matolín, Vladimír; and others

    2015-07-15

    Highlights: • Thin films of ceria doped by rhodium deposited by RF magnetron sputtering. • Concentration of rhodium has great impact on properties of Rh–CeO{sub x} thin films. • Intensive oxygen migration in films with low concentration of rhodium. • Oxygen migration suppressed in films with high amount of Rh dopants. - Abstract: Ceria containing highly dispersed ions of rhodium is a promising material for catalytic applications. The Rh–CeO{sub x} thin films with different concentrations of rhodium were deposited by RF magnetron sputtering and were studied by soft and hard X-ray photoelectron spectroscopies, Temperature programmed reaction and X-ray powder diffraction techniques. The sputtered films consist of rhodium–cerium mixed oxide where cerium exhibits a mixed valency of Ce{sup 4+} and Ce{sup 3+} and rhodium occurs in two oxidation states, Rh{sup 3+} and Rh{sup n+}. We show that the concentration of rhodium has a great influence on the chemical composition, structure and reducibility of the Rh–CeO{sub x} thin films. The films with low concentrations of rhodium are polycrystalline, while the films with higher amount of Rh dopants are amorphous. The morphology of the films strongly influences the mobility of oxygen in the material. Therefore, varying the concentration of rhodium in Rh–CeO{sub x} thin films leads to preparing materials with different properties.

  9. Pulmonary toxicity in mice following exposure to cerium chloride.

    PubMed

    Hong, Jie; Yu, Xiaohong; Pan, Xiaoyu; Zhao, Xiaoyang; Sheng, Lei; Sang, Xuezi; Lin, Anan; Zhang, Chi; Zhao, Yue; Gui, Suxin; Sun, Qingqing; Wang, Ling; Hong, Fashui

    2014-06-01

    The widespread application of lanthanoids (Lns) in manufacturing industries has raised occupational and environmental health concerns about the possible increased health risks to humans exposed to Lns in their working and living environments. Numerous studies have shown that exposures to Ln cause pulmonary injury in animals, but very little is known about the molecular mechanisms of the pulmonary inflammation caused by cerium chloride (CeCl3) exposure. In this study, we evaluated the oxidative stress and molecular mechanism underlying with the pulmonary inflammation associated with chronic lung toxicity in mice treated with nasally instilled CeCl3 for 90 consecutive days. Our findings suggest that significant cerium accumulated in the lung, leading the obvious increase of the lung indices, significant increases in inflammatory cells and levels of lactate dehydrogenase, alkaline phosphate, and total protein, overproduction of reactive oxygen species and peroxidation of lipids, reduced antioxidant capacity, and pulmonary inflammation. CeCl3 exposure also activated nuclear factor κB, increased the expression of tumor necrosis factor α, cyclooxygenase-2, heme oxygenase 1, interleukin 2, interleukin 4, interleukin 6, interleukin 8, interleukin 10, interleukin 18, interleukin 1β, and CYP1A1. However, CeCl3 reduced the expression of nuclear factor κB (NF-κB)-inhibiting factor and heat shock protein 70. These findings suggest that the pulmonary inflammation caused by CeCl3 in mice is closely associated with oxidative stress and inflammatory cytokine expression. PMID:24736977

  10. Serum ornithine carbamoyltransferase (OCT) in rats poisoned with lanthanum, cerium and praseodymium.

    PubMed

    Marciniak, M; Bałtrukiewicz, Z

    1977-01-01

    Serum ornithine carbamoyltransferase (OCT) in rats poisoned with lanthanum, cerium and praseodymium. Acta Physiol. Pol., 1977, 28 (6): 589-594. The serum ornithine carbamoyltransferase in relation to doses of lanthanum, cerium and praseodymium, administered intravenously as chlorides, was investigated. A directly proportional relationship was found between the doses of these compounds and the serum enzyme level in rats. The lowest doses at which a rise in the serum OCT level occured were determined. They were: lanthanum - 0.75 mg/kg of body weight, cerium - 1.5 mg/kg, and praseodymium - 3 mh/kg. A decreasing toxicity of these elements with increasing value of atomic number was observed.

  11. Cerium-Based Magnets: Novel High Energy Permanent Magnet Without Critical Elements

    SciTech Connect

    2012-01-01

    REACT Project: Ames Laboratory will develop a new class of permanent magnets based on the more commonly available element cerium for use in both EVs and renewable power generators. Cerium is 4 times more abundant and significantly less expensive than the rare earth element neodymium, which is frequently used in today’s most powerful magnets. Ames Laboratory will combine other metal elements with cerium to create a new magnet that can remain stable at the high temperatures typically found in electric motors. This new magnetic material will ultimately be demonstrated in a prototype electric motor, representing a cost-effective and efficient alternative to neodymium-based motors.

  12. Studies of Solution Deposited Cerium Oxide Thin Films on Textured Ni-Alloy Substractes for YBCO Superconductor

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, Erin L; Bhuiyan, Md S; Sathyamurthy, Srivatsan; Paranthaman, Mariappan Parans

    2006-01-01

    Cerium oxide (CeO2) buffer layers play an important role for the development of YBa2Cu3O7-x (YBCO) based superconducting tapes using the rolling assisted biaxially textured substrates (RABiTS) approach. The chemical solution deposition (CSD) approach has been used to grow epitaxial CeO2 films on textured Ni-3 a 4% W alloy substrates with various starting precursors of ceria. Precursors such as cerium acetate, cerium acetylacetonate, cerium 2-ethylhexanoate, cerium nitrate, and cerium trifluoroacetate were prepared in suitable solvents. The optimum growth conditions for these cerium precursors were Ar-4% H2 gas processing atmosphere, solution concentration levels of 0.2-0.5 M, a dwell time of 15 min, and a process temperature range of 1050-1150 degrees C. X-ray diffraction, AFM, SEM, and optical microscopy were used to characterize the CeO2 films. Highly textured CeO2 layers were obtained on Ni-W substrates with both cerium acetate and cerium acetylacetonate as starting precursors. YBCO films with a Jc of 1.5 MA/cm2 were obtained on cerium acetylacetonate-based CeO2 films with sputtered YSZ and CeO2 cap layers.

  13. Effect of manganese on calcification of bone

    PubMed Central

    Tal, E.; Guggenheim, K.

    1965-01-01

    1. Young mice were maintained on a basal diet composed of meat, which is poor in both manganese and calcium. 2. The addition of small amounts (2·5–5·0mg./kg. of meat) of manganese improved weight gain and calcification of bone and decreased incorporation of injected radiocalcium into bone. 3. Prolonged treatment with larger amounts (10·0–25·0mg./kg. of meat) of manganese depressed growth, induced defective calcification of bone and increased incorporation of radiocalcium into bone. PMID:14333572

  14. [Tongue play and manganese deficiency in dairy cattle].

    PubMed

    Karatzias, H; Roubies, N; Polizopoulou, Z; Papasteriades, A

    1995-09-01

    The present paper discusses "tongue rolling" observed in dairy cattle farms of a region in northern Greece associated with manganese deficiency. In these animals total body manganese status was evaluated by determining hair, as well as feed manganese content. Cows exhibiting tongue rolling had significantly lower hair manganese content, compared to non-tongue rolling control animals from other farms; in addition, feedstuff analysis demonstrated that manganese and inorganic phosphorus intake of affected cows was also significantly lower.

  15. Manganese concentrate usage in steelmaking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nokhrina, O. I.; Rozhihina, I. D.

    2015-09-01

    The results of the research process of producing metalized products by solid-phase reduction of iron using solid carbonaceous reducing agents. Thermodynamic modeling was carried out on the model of the unit the Fe-C-O and system with iron ore and coal. As a result of modeling the thermodynamic boundary reducing, oxidizing, and transition areas and the value of the ratio of carbon and oxygen in the system. Simulation of real systems carried out with the gas phase obtained in the pyrolys of coal. The simulation results allow to determine the optimal cost of coal required for complete reduction of iron ore from a given composition. The kinetics of the processes of solid-phase reduction of iron using coal of various technological brands. The paper describes experiments on effects of metal deoxidizer composition, component proportion, pelletizing mixture, particle size distribution of basic materials and flux on manganese recovering from oxides under direct melting.

  16. Corrosion of stainless steel, nickel-titanium, coated nickel-titanium, and titanium orthodontic wires.

    PubMed

    Kim, H; Johnson, J W

    1999-02-01

    Orthodontic wires containing nickel have been implicated in allergic reactions. The potential for orthodontic wires to cause allergic reactions is related to the pattern and mode of corrosion with subsequent release of metal ions, such as nickel, into the oral cavity. The purpose of this study was to determine if there is a significant difference in the corrosive potential of stainless steel, nickel titanium, nitride-coated nickel titanium, epoxy-coated nickel titanium, and titanium orthodontic wires. At least two specimens of each wire were subjected to potentiostatic anodic dissolution in 0.9% NaCl solution with neutral pH at room temperature. Using a Wenking MP 95 potentiostat and an electrochemical corrosion cell, the breakdown potential of each wire was determined. Photographs were taken of the wire speci mens using a scanning electron microscope, and surface changes were qualitatively evaluated. The breakdown potentials of stainless steel, two nickel titanium wires, nitride-coated nickel titanium, epoxy-coated nickel titanium, and titanium were 400 mV, 300 mV, 750 mV, 300 mV, 1800 mV, and >2000 mV, respectively. SEM photographs revealed that some nickel titanium and stainless steel wires were susceptible to pitting and localized corrosion. The results indicate that corrosion occurred readily in stainless steel. Variability in breakdown potential of nickel titanium alloy wires differed across vendors' wires. The nitride coating did not affect the corrosion of the alloy, but epoxy coating decreased corrosion. Titanium wires and epoxy-coated nickel titanium wires exhibited the least corrosive potential. For patients allergic to nickel, the use of titanium or epoxy-coated wires during orthodontic treatment is recommended.

  17. Secondary cell with orthorhombic alkali metal/manganese oxide phase active cathode material

    DOEpatents

    Doeff, M.M.; Peng, M.Y.; Ma, Y.; Visco, S.J.; DeJonghe, L.C.

    1996-09-24

    An alkali metal manganese oxide secondary cell is disclosed which can provide a high rate of discharge, good cycling capabilities, good stability of the cathode material, high specific energy (energy per unit of weight) and high energy density (energy per unit volume). The active material in the anode is an alkali metal and the active material in the cathode comprises an orthorhombic alkali metal manganese oxide which undergoes intercalation and deintercalation without a change in phase, resulting in a substantially linear change in voltage with change in the state of charge of the cell. The active material in the cathode is an orthorhombic structure having the formula M{sub x}Z{sub y}Mn{sub (1{minus}y)}O{sub 2}, where M is an alkali metal; Z is a metal capable of substituting for manganese in the orthorhombic structure such as iron, cobalt or titanium; x ranges from about 0.2 in the fully charged state to about 0.75 in the fully discharged state, and y ranges from 0 to 60 atomic %. Preferably, the cell is constructed with a solid electrolyte, but a liquid or gelatinous electrolyte may also be used in the cell. 11 figs.

  18. Secondary cell with orthorhombic alkali metal/manganese oxide phase active cathode material

    DOEpatents

    Doeff, Marca M.; Peng, Marcus Y.; Ma, Yanping; Visco, Steven J.; DeJonghe, Lutgard C.

    1996-01-01

    An alkali metal manganese oxide secondary cell is disclosed which can provide a high rate of discharge, good cycling capabilities, good stability of the cathode material, high specific energy (energy per unit of weight) and high energy density (energy per unit volume). The active material in the anode is an alkali metal and the active material in the cathode comprises an orthorhombic alkali metal manganese oxide which undergoes intercalation and deintercalation without a change in phase, resulting in a substantially linear change in voltage with change in the state of charge of the cell. The active material in the cathode is an orthorhombic structure having the formula M.sub.x Z.sub.y Mn.sub.(1-y) O.sub.2, where M is an alkali metal; Z is a metal capable of substituting for manganese in the orthorhombic structure such as iron, cobalt or titanium; x ranges from about 0.2 in the fully charged state to about 0.75 in the fully discharged state, and y ranges from 0 to 60 atomic %. Preferably, the cell is constructed with a solid electrolyte, but a liquid or gelatinous electrolyte may also be used in the cell.

  19. Correction: Single-molecule magnet behaviour in polynuclear assembly of trivalent cerium ions with polyoxomolybdates.

    PubMed

    Khélifa, A Ben; Belkhiria, M Salah; Huang, G; Freslon, S; Guillou, O; Bernot, K

    2016-06-01

    Correction for 'Single-molecule magnet behaviour in polynuclear assembly of trivalent cerium ions with polyoxomolybdates' by A. Ben Khélifa, et al., Dalton Trans., 2015, 44, 16458-16464. PMID:27161299

  20. Calculation of a volume effect accompanying an electronic topological transition in pure cerium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponomaryova, S. O.; Koval', Yu. M.; Ponomaryov, O. P.

    2012-10-01

    An analytic expression for estimating the volume effect accompanying an electronic topological transition (ETT) in pure cerium is derived on the basis of the microscopic Falikov-Ramirez-Kimball model.

  1. Recent advances (2010-2015) in studies of cerium oxide nanoparticles' health effects.

    PubMed

    Li, Yan; Li, Peng; Yu, Hua; Bian, Ying

    2016-06-01

    Cerium oxide nanoparticles, widespread applied in our life, have attracted much concern for their human health effects. However, most of the works addressing cerium oxide nanoparticles toxicity have only used in vitro models or in vivo intratracheal instillation methods. The toxicity studies have varied results and not all are conclusive. The information about risk assessments derived from epidemiology studies is severely lacking. The knowledge of occupational safety and health (OSH) for exposed workers is very little. Thus this review focuses on recent advances in studies of toxicokinetics, antioxidant activity and toxicity. Additionally, aim to extend previous health effects assessments of cerium oxide nanoparticles, we summarize the epidemiology studies of engineered cerium oxide nanoparticles used as automotive diesel fuel additive, aerosol particulate matter in air pollution, other industrial ultrafine and nanoparticles (e.g., fumes particles generated in welding and flame cutting processes). PMID:27088851

  2. Inhaled Diesel Emissions Generated with Cerium Oxide Nanoparticle Fuel Additive Induce Adverse Pulmonary and Systemic Effects

    EPA Science Inventory

    Diesel exhaust (DE) exposure induces adverse cardiopulmonary effects. Cerium oxide nanoparticles added to diesel fuel (DECe) increases fuel burning efficiency but leads to altered emission characteristics and potentially altered health effects. Here, we evaluated whether DECe res...

  3. Titanium: light, strong, and white

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Woodruff, Laurel; Bedinger, George

    2013-01-01

    Titanium (Ti) is a strong silver-gray metal that is highly resistant to corrosion and is chemically inert. It is as strong as steel but 45 percent lighter, and it is twice as strong as aluminum but only 60 percent heavier. Titanium dioxide (TiO2) has a very high refractive index, which means that it has high light-scattering ability. As a result, TiO2 imparts whiteness, opacity, and brightness to many products. ...Because of the unique physical properties of titanium metal and the whiteness provided by TiO2, titanium is now used widely in modern industrial societies.

  4. Titanium fasteners. [for aircraft industry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, J. L.

    1972-01-01

    Titanium fasteners are used in large quantities throughout the aircraft industry. Most of this usage is in aluminum structure; where titanium structure exists, titanium fasteners are logically used as well. Titanium fasteners offer potential weight savings to the designer at a cost of approximately $30 per pound of weight saved. Proper and least cost usage must take into consideration type of fastener per application, galvanic couples and installation characteristics of protective coatings, cosmetic appearance, paint adhesion, installation forces and methods available and fatigue performance required.

  5. MANGANESE DIOXIDE METHOD FOR PREPARATION OF PROTACTINIUM

    DOEpatents

    Katzin, L.I.

    1958-08-12

    A method of obtaining U/sup 233/ is described. An aqueous solution of neutriln irradiated thoriunn is treated by forming tberein a precipitate of manganese dioxide which carries and thus separates the Pa/sup 233/ from the solution. The carrier precipitate so formed is then dissolved in an acidic solution containing a reducing agent sufficiently electronegative to reduce the tetravalent manganese to the divalent state. Further purification of the Pa/sup 233/ may be obtained by forming another manganese dioxide carrier precipitate and subsequently dissolving it. Ater a sufficient number of such cycles have brought the Pa/sup 233/ to the desired purity, the solution is aged, allowing the formation ot U/sup 233/ by radioaetive decay. A manganese dioxide precipitate is then formed in the U/sup 233/ containing solution. This precipitate carries down any remaining Pa/sup 233/ thus leaving the separated U/sup 233/solution, from whieh it may be easily recovered.

  6. Antioxidant properties of cerium oxide nanocrystals as a function of nanocrystal diameter and surface coating.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seung Soo; Song, Wensi; Cho, Minjung; Puppala, Hema L; Nguyen, Phuc; Zhu, Huiguang; Segatori, Laura; Colvin, Vicki L

    2013-11-26

    This work examines the effect of nanocrystal diameter and surface coating on the reactivity of cerium oxide nanocrystals with H2O2 both in chemical solutions and in cells. Monodisperse nanocrystals were formed in organic solvents from the decomposition of cerium precursors, and subsequently phase transferred into water using amphiphiles as nanoparticle coatings. Quantitative analysis of the antioxidant capacity of CeO2-x using gas chromatography and a luminol test revealed that 2 mol of H2O2 reacted with every mole of cerium(III), suggesting that the reaction proceeds via a Fenton-type mechanism. Smaller diameter nanocrystals containing more cerium(III) were found to be more reactive toward H2O2. Additionally, the presence of a surface coating did not preclude the reaction between the nanocrystal surface cerium(III) and hydrogen peroxide. Taken together, the most reactive nanoparticles were the smallest (e.g., 3.8 nm diameter) with the thinnest surface coating (e.g., oleic acid). Moreover, a benchmark test of their antioxidant capacity revealed these materials were 9 times more reactive than commercial antioxidants such as Trolox. A unique feature of these antioxidant nanocrystals is that they can be applied multiple times: over weeks, cerium(IV) rich particles slowly return to their starting cerium(III) content. In nearly all cases, the particles remain colloidally stable (e.g., nonaggregated) and could be applied multiple times as antioxidants. These chemical properties were also observed in cell culture, where the materials were able to reduce oxidative stress in human dermal fibroblasts exposed to H2O2 with efficiency comparable to their solution phase reactivity. These data suggest that organic coatings on cerium oxide nanocrystals do not limit the antioxidant behavior of the nanocrystals, and that their redox cycling behavior can be preserved even when stabilized. PMID:24079896

  7. Static and dynamic high pressure experiments on cerium

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, Brian J; Velisavljevic, Nenad; Cherne, Frank J; Stevens, Gerald; Tschauner, Oliver

    2011-01-25

    There is a scientific need to obtain dynamic data to develop and validate multi phase equation-of-state (EOS) models for metals. Experiments are needed to examine the relevant pure phases, to locate phase boundaries and the associated transition kinetics, and other material properties such as strength. Cerium is an ideal material for such work because it exhibits a complex multiphase diagram at relatively moderate pressures readily accessible using standard shock wave methods. In the current work, shock wave (dynamic) and diamond anvil cell (static) experiments were performed to examine the high pressure, low temperature region of the phase diagram to obtain EOS data and to search for the {alpha}-{var_epsilon} boundary. Past work examining the shock-melt transition and the low-pressure {gamma}-{alpha} transition will be presented in brief followed by details of recent results obtained from DAC and double-shock experiments.

  8. The Spin Glass-Kondo Competition in Disordered Cerium Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magalhaes, S. G.; Zimmer, F.; Coqblin, B.

    2013-10-01

    We discuss the competition between the Kondo effect, the spin glass state and a magnetic order observed in disordered Cerium systems. We present firstly the experimental situation of disordered alloys such as CeNi1 - xCux and then the different theoretical approaches based on the Kondo lattice model, with different descriptions of the intersite exchange interaction for the spin glass. After the gaussian approach of the Sherrington-Kirkpatrick model, we discuss the Mattis and the van Hemmen models. Then, we present simple cluster calculations in order to describe the percolative evolution of the clusters from the cluster spin glass to the inhomogeneous ferromagnetic order recently observed in CeNi1 - xCux disordered alloys and finally we discuss the effect of random and transverse magnetic field.

  9. Growth of transition metals on cerium tungstate model catalyst layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skála, T.; Tsud, N.; Stetsovych, V.; Mysliveček, J.; Matolín, V.

    2016-10-01

    Two model catalytic metal/oxide systems were investigated by photoelectron spectroscopy and scanning tunneling microscopy. The mixed-oxide support was a cerium tungstate epitaxial thin layer grown in situ on the W(1 1 0) single crystal. Active particles consisted of palladium and platinum 3D islands deposited on the tungstate surface at 300 K. Both metals were found to interact weakly with the oxide support and the original chemical state of both support and metals was mostly preserved. Electronic and morphological changes are discussed during the metal growth and after post-annealing at temperatures up to 700 K. Partial transition-metal coalescence and self-cleaning from the CO and carbon impurities were observed.

  10. Redox reactivity of cerium oxide nanoparticles against dopamine.

    PubMed

    Hayat, Akhtar; Andreescu, Daniel; Bulbul, Gonca; Andreescu, Silvana

    2014-03-15

    The interaction between dopamine and the redox active cerium oxide nanoparticles, or nanoceria was studied using a suite of spectroscopic and surface characterization methods. Changes in the chemical reactivity and concentration of dopamine upon exposure to nanoceria was assessed in aqueous solutions and a human physiological fluid--human serum. The results indicate strong attachment of dopamine to the nanoparticle surface through oxidation followed by chemisorption of the oxidative product with formation of a charge transfer complex. Such oxidation/surface adsorption processes between nanoceria and dopamine lead to a reduction of the concentration of free dopamine in aqueous environments. These findings suggest that the redox reactivity of nanoceria may alter dopamine levels in biological systems exposed to these particles and indicate the need for a comprehensive assessment of the potential neurological consequences that might result from intended or unintended exposure to these particles. PMID:24461841

  11. Growth of transition metals on cerium tungstate model catalyst layers.

    PubMed

    Skála, T; Tsud, N; Stetsovych, V; Mysliveček, J; Matolín, V

    2016-10-01

    Two model catalytic metal/oxide systems were investigated by photoelectron spectroscopy and scanning tunneling microscopy. The mixed-oxide support was a cerium tungstate epitaxial thin layer grown in situ on the W(1 1 0) single crystal. Active particles consisted of palladium and platinum 3D islands deposited on the tungstate surface at 300 K. Both metals were found to interact weakly with the oxide support and the original chemical state of both support and metals was mostly preserved. Electronic and morphological changes are discussed during the metal growth and after post-annealing at temperatures up to 700 K. Partial transition-metal coalescence and self-cleaning from the CO and carbon impurities were observed. PMID:27494195

  12. An Alkali Metal-Capped Cerium(IV) Imido Complex.

    PubMed

    Solola, Lukman A; Zabula, Alexander V; Dorfner, Walter L; Manor, Brian C; Carroll, Patrick J; Schelter, Eric J

    2016-06-01

    Structurally authenticated, terminal lanthanide-ligand multiple bonds are rare and expected to be highly reactive. Even capped with an alkali metal cation, poor orbital energy matching and overlap of metal and ligand valence orbitals should result in strong charge polarization within such bonds. We expand on a new strategy for isolating terminal lanthanide-ligand multiple bonds using cerium(IV) complexes. In the current case, our tailored tris(hydroxylaminato) ligand framework, TriNOx(3-), provides steric protection against ligand scrambling and metal complex oligomerization and electronic protection against reduction. This strategy culminates in isolation of the first formal Ce═N bonded moiety in the complex [K(DME)2][Ce═N(3,5-(CF3)2C6H3)(TriNOx)], whose Ce═N bond is the shortest known at 2.119(3) Å. PMID:27163651

  13. Room-temperature ferromagnetism in cerium dioxide powders

    SciTech Connect

    Rakhmatullin, R. M. Pavlov, V. V.; Semashko, V. V.; Korableva, S. L.

    2015-08-15

    Room-temperature ferromagnetism is detected in a CeO{sub 2} powder with a grain size of about 35 nm and a low (<0.1 at %) manganese and iron content. The ferromagnetism in a CeO{sub 2} sample with a submicron crystallite size and the same manganese and iron impurity content is lower than in the nanocrystalline sample by an order of magnitude. Apart from ferromagnetism, both samples exhibit EPR spectra of localized paramagnetic centers, the concentration of which is lower than 0.01 at %. A comparative analysis of these results shows that the F-center exchange (FCE) mechanism cannot cause ferromagnetism. This conclusion agrees with the charge-transfer ferromagnetism model proposed recently.

  14. Role of nanocrystalline cerium oxide coatings on austenitic stainless steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Haiying

    Protective nanocrystalline cerium oxide coating has been applied to ASTM grade 304L and 304 austenitic stainless steels to improve its oxidation resistance at elevated temperatures. Experimentally, the selected alloy was exposed to 800°C/1000°C under dry air conditions. Weight changes (DeltaW/A) were monitored as a function of time and the results were compared with uncoated alloys tested under similar conditions. It was found that the oxidation resistances of 304L and 304 stainless steels were significantly improved. A comparison of the oxidation rates indicated that the nanocrystalline cerium oxide coating reduced the rate of oxidation by more than two orders of magnitude. Nevertheless, a comprehensive understanding of the mechanisms responsible for the reduction in the oxidation rate is not clear. Consequently, this work is aimed at investigating the mechanisms involved during scale growth in the presence or absence of nanocrystalline coatings. For this purpose, density functional theory was carried out in order to predict oxygen and iron diffusion microscopic activation energies and reveal the intrinsic characteristics of nanocrystalline coatings. A numerical simulation of corrosion process has also been conducted to predict the corrosion rates of alloys with and without coatings. Hence, the results from simulations are compared with the experimental outcome, and possible explanations are given to account for the reduction in the exhibited oxidation rates. The simulation results will provide a highly valuable tool for the realization of functional nanostructures and architectures "by design", particularly in the development of novel coatings, and a new approach of life assessment.

  15. Induction of pulmonary fibrosis by cerium oxide nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Jane Y.; Mercer, Robert R.; Barger, Mark; Schwegler-Berry, Diane; Scabilloni, James; Ma, Joseph K.; Castranova, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    Cerium compounds have been used as a diesel engine catalyst to lower the mass of diesel exhaust particles, but are emitted as cerium oxide (CeO2) nanoparticles in the diesel exhaust. In a previous study, we have demonstrated a wide range of CeO2-induced lung responses including sustained pulmonary inflammation and cellular signaling that could lead to pulmonary fibrosis. In this study, we investigated the fibrogenic responses induced by CeO2 in a rat model at various time points up to 84 days post-exposure. Male Sprague Dawley rats were exposed to CeO2 by a single intratracheal instillation. Alveolar macrophages (AM) were isolated by bronchial alveolar lavage (BAL). AM-mediated cellular responses, osteopontin (OPN) and transform growth factor (TGF)-β1 in the fibrotic process were investigated. The results showed that CeO2 exposure significantly increased fibrotic cytokine TGF-β1 and OPN production by AM above controls. The collagen degradation enzymes, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and -9 and the tissue inhibitor of MMP were markedly increased in the BAL fluid at 1 day- and subsequently declined at 28 days after exposure, but remained much higher than the controls. CeO2 induced elevated phospholipids in BAL fluid and increased hydroxyproline content in lung tissue in a dose- and time-dependent manner. Immunohistochemical analysis showed MMP-2, MMP-9 and MMP-10 expressions in fibrotic regions. Morphological analysis noted increased collagen fibers in the lungs exposed to a single dose of 3.5 mg/kg CeO2 and euthanized at 28 days post-exposure. Collectively, our studies show that CeO2 induced fibrotic lung injury in rats, suggesting it may cause potential health effects. PMID:22613087

  16. Synthesis and catalytic properties of microemulsion-derived cerium oxide nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Kockrick, Emanuel; Schrage, Christian; Grigas, Anett; Geiger, Dorin; Kaskel, Stefan

    2008-07-15

    The synthesis of cerium dioxide nanoparticles using an inverse microemulsion technique and precipitation method was investigated. Cerium hydroxide nanoparticles were synthesized by adding diluted ammonia to n-heptane-surfactant-cerium nitrate system. The micelle and particle size in the range of 5-12 nm were controlled by varying the molar water to surfactant ratio and analyzed by dynamic light scattering (DLS), small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). Cerium hydroxide nanoparticles were isolated and subsequently treated at 100-600 deg. C to obtain nanoscale ceria. Crystallite sizes of cerium dioxide in the range of 6-16 nm were estimated by Scherrer analysis by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and HRTEM. The catalytic activity of particles annealed at 400 and 600 deg. C in soot combustion reactions was characterized by temperature-programmed oxidation (TPO) indicating a size-dependant activity. Crystallite sizes and catalytic stability of elevated ceria systems were tested in second combustion cycles. - Graphical abstract: The synthesis of cerium dioxide nanoparticles using an inverse microemulsion technique and precipitation method was investigated using small angle X-ray scattering, dynamic light scattering and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. Catalytic activity of ceria nanoparticles was tested in soot combustion reaction indicating size-dependent reactivity.

  17. Magnesium and Manganese Content of Halophilic Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Médicis, Eveline De; Paquette, Jean; Gauthier, Jean-Jacques; Shapcott, Dennis

    1986-01-01

    Magnesium and manganese contents were measured by atomic absorption spectrophotometry in bacteria of several halophilic levels, in Vibrio costicola, a moderately halophilic eubacterium growing in 1 M NaCl, Halobacterium volcanii, a halophilic archaebacterium growing in 2.5 M NaCl, Halobacterium cutirubrum, an extremely halophilic archaebacterium growing in 4 M NaCl, and Escherichia coli, a nonhalophilic eubacterium growing in 0.17 M NaCl. Magnesium and manganese contents varied with the growth phase, being maximal at the early log phase. Magnesium and manganese molalities in cell water were shown to increase with the halophilic character of the logarithmically growing bacteria, from 30 mmol of Mg per kg of cell water and 0.37 mmol of Mn per kg of cell water for E. coli to 102 mmol of Mg per kg of cell water and 1.6 mmol of Mn per kg of cell water for H. cutirubrum. The intracellular concentrations of manganese were determined independently by a radioactive tracer technique in V. costicola and H. volcanii. The values obtained by 54Mn loading represented about 70% of the values obtained by atomic absorption. The increase of magnesium and manganese contents associated with the halophilic character of the bacteria suggests that manganese and magnesium play a role in haloadaptation. Images PMID:16347151

  18. Autonomic function in manganese alloy workers

    SciTech Connect

    Barrington, W.W.; Angle, C.R.; Willcockson, N.K.; Padula, M.A.; Korn, T.

    1998-07-01

    The observation of orthostatic hypotension in an index case of manganese toxicity lead to this prospective attempt to evaluate cardiovascular autonomic function and cognitive and emotional neurotoxicity in eight manganese alloy welders and machinists. The subjects consisted of a convenience sample consisting of an index case of manganese dementia, his four co-workers in a frog shop for gouging, welding, and grinding repair of high manganese railway track and a convenience sample of three mild steel welders with lesser manganese exposure also referred because of cognitive or autonomic symptoms. Frog shop air manganese samples 9.6--10 years before and 1.2--3.4 years after the diagnosis of the index case exceeded 1.0 mg/m{sup 3} in 29% and 0.2 mg/m{sup 3} in 62%. Twenty-four-hour electrocardiographic (Holter) monitoring was used to determine the temporal variability of the heartrate (RR{prime} interval) and the rates of change at low frequency and high frequency. MMPI and MCMI personality assessment and short-term memory, figure copy, controlled oral word association, and symbol digit tests were used.

  19. Manganese recycling in the United States in 1998

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jones, Thomas S.

    2001-01-01

    This report describes the flow and processing of manganese within the U.S. economy in 1998 with emphasis on the extent to which manganese is recycled. Manganese was used mostly as an alloying agent in alloys in which it was a minor component. Manganese was recycled mostly within scrap of iron and steel. A small amount was recycled within aluminum used beverage cans. Very little manganese was recycled from materials being recovered specifically for their manganese content. For the United States in 1998, 218,000 metric tons of manganese was estimated to have been recycled from old scrap, of which 96% was from iron and steel scrap. Efficiency of recycling was estimated as 53% and recycling rate as 37%. Metallurgical loss of manganese was estimated to be about 1.7 times that recycled. This loss was mostly into slags from iron and steel production, from which recovery of manganese has yet to be shown economically feasible.

  20. Toenail, Blood and Urine as Biomarkers of Manganese Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Laohaudomchok, Wisanti; Lin, Xihong; Herrick, Robert F.; Fang, Shona C.; Cavallari, Jennifer M.; Christiani, David C.; Weisskopf, Marc G.

    2011-01-01

    Objective This study examined the correlation between manganese exposure and manganese concentrations in different biomarkers. Methods Air measurement data and work histories were used to determine manganese exposure over a workshift and cumulative exposure. Toenail samples (n=49), as well as blood and urine before (n=27) and after (urine, n=26; blood, n=24) a workshift were collected. Results Toenail manganese, adjusted for age and dietary manganese, was significantly correlated with cumulative exposure in months 7-9, 10-12, and 7-12 before toenail clipping date, but not months 1-6. Manganese exposure over a work shift was not correlated with changes in blood nor urine manganese. Conclusions Toenails appeared to be a valid measure of cumulative manganese exposure 7 to 12 months earlier. Neither change in blood nor urine manganese appeared to be suitable indicators of exposure over a typical workshift. PMID:21494156

  1. Titanium Optics for Ion Thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soulas, George C.; Haag, Thomas W.; Patterson, Michael J.; Rawlin, Vincent K.

    1999-01-01

    Ion thruster total impulse capability is limited, in part, by accelerator grid sputter erosion. A development effort was initiated to identify a material with a lower accelerator grid volumetric sputter erosion rate than molybdenum, but that could utilize the present NSTAR thruster grid design and fabrication techniques to keep development costs low, and perform as well as molybdenum optics. After comparing the sputter erosion rates of several atomic materials to that of molybdenum at accelerator voltages, titanium was found to offer a 45% reduction in volumetric erosion rates. To ensure that screen grid sputter erosion rates are not higher at discharge chamber potentials, titanium and molybdenum sputter erosion rates were measured at these potentials. Preliminary results showed only a slightly higher volumetric erosion rate for titanium, so that screen grid erosion is insignificant. A number of material, thermal, and mechanical properties were also examined to identify any fabrication, launch environment, and thruster operation issues. Several titanium grid sets were successfully fabricated. A titanium grid set was mounted onto an NSTAR 30 cm engineering model ion thruster and tested to determine optics performance. The titanium optics operated successfully over the entire NSTAR power range of 0.5 to 2.3 kW. Differences in impingement-limited perveances and electron backstreaming limits were found to be due to a larger cold gap for the titanium optics. Discharge losses for titanium grids were lower than those for molybdenum, likely due to a slightly larger titanium screen grid open area fraction. Radial distributions of beam current density with titanium optics were very similar to those with molybdenum optics at all power levels. Temporal electron backstreaming limit measurements showed that titanium optics achieved thermal equilibrium faster than molybdenum optics.

  2. Titanium minerals of placer deposits as a source for new materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotova, Olga; Ponaryadov, Alexey

    2015-04-01

    Heavy mineral deposits are a source of the economic important element titanium, which is contained in ilmenite and leucoxene. The mineral composition of placer titanium ore and localization pattern of ore minerals determine their processing and enriching technologies. New data on the mineralogy of titanium ores from modern coastal-marine placer in Stradbroke Island, Eastern Australia, and Pizhma paleoplacer in Middle Timan, Russia, and materials on their basis are presented. The samples were studied by the following methods: optical-mineralogical (stereomicroscope MBS-10, polarizing microscope POLAM L-311), semiquantitative x-ray phase analysis (x-ray difractometer X'Pert PRO MPD). Besides microprobe (VEGA 3 TESCAN) and x-ray fluorescent analysis (XRF-1800 Shimadzu) were used. By the mineralogical composition ores of the both deposits are complex: enriched by valuable minerals. Apart from main ore concentrates it is possible to obtain accompanying nonmetallic products. This will increase the efficiency of deposit exploitation. Ilmenite dominates in ore sands of Stradbroke Island, and leucoxene dominates in the ores of the Pizhma titanium deposit. Australian ilmenite and its altered varieties are mainly characterized by a very high MnO content (from 5.24 to 11.08 %). The irregular distribution of iron oxides, titanium and manganese in the altered ilmenite was shown in the paper. E.g., in the areas of substitution of ilmenite by pseudorutile the concentrations of the given elements are greatly various due to various ratios of basic components in each grain. Their ratios are equal in the area of rutile evolution. Moreover, the high content of gold, diamonds and also rare earth elements (REE) and rare metals (their forms are not determined) were studied. We found native copper on the surface of minerals composing titanium-bearing sandstones of the Pizhma placer. According to the technological features of rocks (density and magnetic) studied placers are close. The

  3. Electrokinetic remediation of manganese and ammonia nitrogen from electrolytic manganese residue.

    PubMed

    Shu, Jiancheng; Liu, Renlong; Liu, Zuohua; Du, Jun; Tao, Changyuan

    2015-10-01

    Electrolytic manganese residue (EMR) is a solid waste found in filters after sulphuric acid leaching of manganese carbonate ore, which mainly contains manganese and ammonia nitrogen and seriously damages the ecological environment. This work demonstrated the use of electrokinetic (EK) remediation to remove ammonia nitrogen and manganese from EMR. The transport behavior of manganese and ammonia nitrogen from EMR during electrokinetics, Mn fractionation before and after EK treatment, the relationship between Mn fractionation and transport behavior, as well as the effects of electrolyte and pretreatment solutions on removal efficiency and energy consumption were investigated. The results indicated that the use of H2SO4 and Na2SO4 as electrolytes and pretreatment of EMR with citric acid and KCl can reduce energy consumption, and the removal efficiencies of manganese and ammonia nitrogen were 27.5 and 94.1 %, respectively. In these systems, electromigration and electroosmosis were the main mechanisms of manganese and ammonia nitrogen transport. Moreover, ammonia nitrogen in EMR reached the regulated level, and the concentration of manganese in EMR could be reduced from 455 to 37 mg/L. In general, the electrokinetic remediation of EMR is a promising technology in the future.

  4. Electrokinetic remediation of manganese and ammonia nitrogen from electrolytic manganese residue.

    PubMed

    Shu, Jiancheng; Liu, Renlong; Liu, Zuohua; Du, Jun; Tao, Changyuan

    2015-10-01

    Electrolytic manganese residue (EMR) is a solid waste found in filters after sulphuric acid leaching of manganese carbonate ore, which mainly contains manganese and ammonia nitrogen and seriously damages the ecological environment. This work demonstrated the use of electrokinetic (EK) remediation to remove ammonia nitrogen and manganese from EMR. The transport behavior of manganese and ammonia nitrogen from EMR during electrokinetics, Mn fractionation before and after EK treatment, the relationship between Mn fractionation and transport behavior, as well as the effects of electrolyte and pretreatment solutions on removal efficiency and energy consumption were investigated. The results indicated that the use of H2SO4 and Na2SO4 as electrolytes and pretreatment of EMR with citric acid and KCl can reduce energy consumption, and the removal efficiencies of manganese and ammonia nitrogen were 27.5 and 94.1 %, respectively. In these systems, electromigration and electroosmosis were the main mechanisms of manganese and ammonia nitrogen transport. Moreover, ammonia nitrogen in EMR reached the regulated level, and the concentration of manganese in EMR could be reduced from 455 to 37 mg/L. In general, the electrokinetic remediation of EMR is a promising technology in the future. PMID:26062467

  5. Biogeochemical cycling of manganese in Oneida Lake, New York: whole lake studies of manganese

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aguilar, C.; Nealson, K. H.

    1998-01-01

    Oneida Lake, New York is a eutrophic freshwater lake known for its abundant manganese nodules and a dynamic manganese cycle. Temporal and spatial distribution of soluble and particulate manganese in the water column of the lake were analyzed over a 3-year period and correlated with other variables such as oxygen, pH, and temperature. Only data from 1988 are shown. Manganese is removed from the water column in the spring via conversion to particulate form and deposited in the bottom sediments. This removal is due to biological factors, as the lake Eh/pH conditions alone can not account for the oxidation of the soluble manganese Mn(II). During the summer months the manganese from microbial reduction moves from the sediments to the water column. In periods of stratification the soluble Mn(II) builds up to concentrations of 20 micromoles or more in the bottom waters. When mixing occurs, the soluble Mn(II) is rapidly removed via oxidation. This cycle occurs more than once during the summer, with each manganese atom probably being used several times for the oxidation of organic carbon. At the end of the fall, whole lake concentrations of manganese stabilize, and remain at about 1 micromole until the following summer, when the cycle begins again. Inputs and outflows from the lake indicate that the active Mn cycle is primarily internal, with a small accumulation each year into ferromanganese nodules located in the oxic zones of the lake.

  6. [Manganese neurotoxic effect and its susceptibility biomarkers of choice].

    PubMed

    Shao, Hua

    2015-10-01

    Long-term occupational exposure to manganese might cause manganese poisoning, which would had adverse effects on nervous system of workers. The basal nucleus was damaged and dopaminergic neuron was injuried by manganese. The mechanism could be related with interfering the energy metabolism of central nerve, changing neurotransmitters, activating oxidation system and so on. Genetic factors may also plays a significant role in the neurotoxicity caused by manganese. Study the effects of manganese exposure biomarker, the neurotoxicity of biomarkers and the genetic susceptibility to early and susceptibility biomarkers will contribute to the prevention and control of manganese neurotoxicity.

  7. Study of high performance alloy electroforming. [nickel manganese and nickel cobalt manganese alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malone, G. A.

    1984-01-01

    Nickel-manganese alloy electrodeposits from an electrolyte containing more manganese ion than previously used is being evaluated at two bath operating temperatures with a great variety of pulse plating conditions. Saccharine was added as a stress reducing agent for the electroforming of several of the samples with highest manganese content. All specimens for mechanical property testing have been produced but are not through the various heat treatments as yet. One of the heat treatment will be at 343 C (650 F), the temperature at which the MCC outer electroformed nickel shell is stress relieved. A number of retainer specimens from prior work have been tested for hardness before and after heat treatment. There appears to be a fairly good correlation between hardness and mechanical properties. Comparison of representative mechanical properties with hardnesses are made for nickel-manganese electrodeposits and nickel-cobalt-manganese deposits.

  8. Polyisocyanides of titanium.

    PubMed

    Rayón, Víctor M; Redondo, Pilar; Valdés, Haydee; Barrientos, Carmen; Largo, Antonio

    2009-02-26

    Neutral Ti[CN](n) complexes have been investigated with quantum chemistry techniques. According to our theoretical predictions, these complexes are shown to prefer isocyanide arrangements. Therefore, these compounds are good candidates to be the first polyisocyanides to be characterized. The theoretical calculations predict Ti(NC)(4), a methane-like tetrahedral structure with four isocyanide ligands, as the most stable neutral complex. The fact that the isocyanide ligand is a better pi-donor than the cyanide one seems to be the key factor for the preference for isocyanides in neutral titanium complexes.

  9. Cardiovascular Toxicities Upon Manganese Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Yueming; Zheng, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Manganese (Mn)-induced Parkinsonism has been well documented; however, little attention has been devoted to Mn-induced cardiovascular dysfunction. This review summarizes literature data from both animal and human studies on Mn’s effect on cardiovascular function. Clinical and epidemiological evidence suggests that the incidence of abnormal electrocardiogram (ECG) is significantly higher in Mn-exposed workers than that in the control subjects. The main types of abnormal ECG include sinus tachycardia, sinus bradycardia, sinus arrhythmia, sinister megacardia, and ST-T changes. The accelerated heartbeat and shortened P-R interval appear to be more prominent in female exposed workers than in their male counterparts. Mn-exposed workers display a mean diastolic blood pressure that is significantly lower than that of the control subjects, especially in the young and female exposed workers. Animal studies indicate that Mn is capable of quickly accumulating in heart tissue, resulting in acute or sub-acute cardiovascular disorders, such as acute cardiodepression and hypotension. These toxic outcomes appear to be associated with Mn-induced mitochondrial damage and interaction with the calcium channel in the cardiovascular system. PMID:16382172

  10. Copper, Boron, and Cerium Additions in Type 347 Austenitic Steel to Improve Creep Rupture Strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laha, Kinkar; Kyono, J.; Shinya, Norio

    2012-04-01

    Type 347 austenitic stainless steel (18Cr-12Ni-Nb) was alloyed with copper (3 wt pct), boron (0.01 to 0.06 wt pct), and cerium (0.01 wt pct) with an aim to increase the creep rupture strength of the steel through the improved deformation and cavitation resistance. Short-term creep rupture strength was found to increase with the addition of copper in the 347 steel, but the long-term strength was inferior. Extensive creep cavitation deprived the steel of the beneficial effect of creep deformation resistance induced by nano-size copper particles. Boron and cerium additions in the copper-containing steel increased its creep rupture strength and ductility, which were more for higher boron content. Creep deformation, grain boundary sliding, and creep cavity nucleation and growth in the steel were found to be suppressed by microalloying the copper-containing steel with boron and cerium, and the suppression was more for higher boron content. An auger electron spectroscopic study revealed the segregation of boron instead of sulfur on the cavity surface of the boron- and cerium-microalloyed steel. Cerium acted as a scavenger for soluble sulfur in the steels through the precipitation of cerium sulfide (CeS). This inhibited the segregation of sulfur and facilitated the segregation of boron on cavity surface. Boron segregation on the nucleated cavity surface reduced its growth rate. Microalloying the copper-containing 347 steel with boron and cerium thus enabled to use the full extent of creep deformation resistance rendered by copper nano-size particle by increase in creep rupture strength and ductility.

  11. Hypersensitivity reactions to titanium: diagnosis and management.

    PubMed

    Wood, Megan M; Warshaw, Erin M

    2015-01-01

    Titanium is notable for its biocompatibility and is used as biologic implant material across surgical specialties, especially in metal-sensitive individuals. However, rare cases of titanium hypersensitivity reactions are reported in the literature. This article discusses the properties and biological behavior of titanium and provides a thorough review of the literature on reported cases, diagnostic techniques, and approach to management of titanium hypersensitivity.

  12. Globally sustainable manganese metal production and use.

    PubMed

    Hagelstein, Karen

    2009-09-01

    The "cradle to grave" concept of managing chemicals and wastes has been a descriptive analogy of proper environmental stewardship since the 1970s. The concept incorporates environmentally sustainable product choices-such as metal alloys utilized steel products which civilization is dependent upon. Manganese consumption is related to the increasing production of raw steel and upgrading ferroalloys. Nonferrous applications of manganese include production of dry-cell batteries, plant fertilizer components, animal feed and colorant for bricks. The manganese ore (high grade 35% manganese) production world wide is about 6 million ton/year and electrolytic manganese metal demand is about 0.7 million ton/year. The total manganese demand is consumed globally by industries including construction (23%), machinery (14%), and transportation (11%). Manganese is recycled within scrap of iron and steel, a small amount is recycled within aluminum used beverage cans. Recycling rate is 37% and efficiency is estimated as 53% [Roskill Metals and Minerals Reports, January 13, 2005. Manganese Report: rapid rise in output caused by Chinese crude steel production. Available from: http://www.roskill.com/reports/manganese.]. Environmentally sustainable management choices include identifying raw material chemistry, utilizing clean production processes, minimizing waste generation, recycling materials, controlling occupational exposures, and collecting representative environmental data. This paper will discuss two electrolytically produced manganese metals, the metal production differences, and environmental impacts cited to date. The two electrolytic manganese processes differ due to the addition of sulfur dioxide or selenium dioxide. Adverse environmental impacts due to use of selenium dioxide methodology include increased water consumption and order of magnitude greater solid waste generation per ton of metal processed. The use of high grade manganese ores in the electrolytic process also

  13. Globally sustainable manganese metal production and use.

    PubMed

    Hagelstein, Karen

    2009-09-01

    The "cradle to grave" concept of managing chemicals and wastes has been a descriptive analogy of proper environmental stewardship since the 1970s. The concept incorporates environmentally sustainable product choices-such as metal alloys utilized steel products which civilization is dependent upon. Manganese consumption is related to the increasing production of raw steel and upgrading ferroalloys. Nonferrous applications of manganese include production of dry-cell batteries, plant fertilizer components, animal feed and colorant for bricks. The manganese ore (high grade 35% manganese) production world wide is about 6 million ton/year and electrolytic manganese metal demand is about 0.7 million ton/year. The total manganese demand is consumed globally by industries including construction (23%), machinery (14%), and transportation (11%). Manganese is recycled within scrap of iron and steel, a small amount is recycled within aluminum used beverage cans. Recycling rate is 37% and efficiency is estimated as 53% [Roskill Metals and Minerals Reports, January 13, 2005. Manganese Report: rapid rise in output caused by Chinese crude steel production. Available from: http://www.roskill.com/reports/manganese.]. Environmentally sustainable management choices include identifying raw material chemistry, utilizing clean production processes, minimizing waste generation, recycling materials, controlling occupational exposures, and collecting representative environmental data. This paper will discuss two electrolytically produced manganese metals, the metal production differences, and environmental impacts cited to date. The two electrolytic manganese processes differ due to the addition of sulfur dioxide or selenium dioxide. Adverse environmental impacts due to use of selenium dioxide methodology include increased water consumption and order of magnitude greater solid waste generation per ton of metal processed. The use of high grade manganese ores in the electrolytic process also

  14. Compaction of Titanium Powders

    SciTech Connect

    Stephen J. Gerdemann; Paul D. Jablonski

    2010-11-01

    Accurate modeling of powder densification has been an area of active research for more than 60 years. The earliest efforts were focused on linearization of the data because computers were not readily available to assist with curve-fitting methods. In this work, eight different titanium powders (three different sizes of sponge fines <150 μm, <75 μm, and < 45 μm; two different sizes of a hydride-dehydride [HDH] <75 μm and < 45 μm; an atomized powder; a commercially pure [CP] Ti powder from International Titanium Powder [ITP]; and a Ti 6 4 alloy powder) were cold pressed in a single-acting die instrumented to collect stress and deformation data during compaction. From these data, the density of each compact was calculated and then plotted as a function of pressure. The results show that densification of all the powders, regardless of particle size, shape, or chemistry, can be modeled accurately as the sum of an initial density plus the sum of a rearrangement term and a work-hardening term. These last two terms are found to be a function of applied pressure and take the form of an exponential rise.

  15. Electrorotation of titanium microspheres.

    PubMed

    Arcenegui, Juan J; Ramos, Antonio; García-Sánchez, Pablo; Morgan, Hywel

    2013-04-01

    Electrorotation (ROT) data for solid titanium micrometer-sized spheres in an electrolyte are presented for three different ionic conductivities, over the frequency range of 10 Hz to 100 kHz. The direction of rotation was found to be opposite to the direction of rotation of the electric field vector (counterfield electrorotation), with a single rotation peak. The maximum rotation rate occurs at a frequency of the order of the reciprocal RC time constant for charging the particle double layer capacitance through the resistor of the electrolyte bulk. A model for the electrical torque acting on a metallic sphere is presented, using a constant phase element impedance to describe the metal/electrolyte interface. The titanium spheres are much denser than the electrolyte and rest on the bottom substrate. Therefore, the electrical and viscous torques near a wall are considered in the analysis. Good agreement is found between the predicted and measured rotational speed as a function of frequency. Theory shows that there is no effect of induced charge electroosmotic flow on the ROT, as observed experimentally.

  16. Compaction of Titanium Powders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerdemann, Stephen J.; Jablonski, Paul D.

    2011-05-01

    Accurate modeling of powder densification has been an area of active research for more than 60 years. The earliest efforts were focused on linearization of the data because computers were not readily available to assist with curve-fitting methods. In this work, eight different titanium powders (three different sizes of sponge fines <150 μm, <75 μm, and < 45 μm; two different sizes of a hydride-dehydride [HDH] <75 μm and < 45 μm; an atomized powder; a commercially pure [CP] Ti powder from International Titanium Powder [ITP]; and a Ti 6 4 alloy powder) were cold pressed in a single-acting die instrumented to collect stress and deformation data during compaction. From these data, the density of each compact was calculated and then plotted as a function of pressure. The results show that densification of all the powders, regardless of particle size, shape, or chemistry, can be modeled accurately as the sum of an initial density plus the sum of a rearrangement term and a work-hardening term. These last two terms are found to be a function of applied pressure and take the form of an exponential rise.

  17. Exposure and Health Effects Review of Engineered Nanoscale Cerium and Cerium Dioxide Associated with its Use as a Fuel Additive - NOW IN PRINT IN THE JOURNAL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Advances of nanoscale science have produced nanomaterials with unique physical and chemical properties at commercial levels that are now incorporated into over 1000 products. Nanoscale cerium (di) oxide (Ce02) has recently gained a wide range of applications which includes coatin...

  18. Exposure, Health and Ecological Effects Review of Engineered Nanoscale Cerium and Cerium Oxide Associated with its Use as a Fuel Additive

    EPA Science Inventory

    Advances of nanoscale science have produced nanomaterials with unique physical and chemical properties at commercial levels which are now incorporated into over 1000 products. Nanoscale cerium (di) oxide (CeO(2)) has recently gained a wide range of applications which includes coa...

  19. Biliary manganese excretion in conscious rats is affected by acute and chronic manganese intake but not by dietary fat.

    PubMed

    Malecki, E A; Radzanowski, G M; Radzanowski, T J; Gallaher, D D; Greger, J L

    1996-02-01

    We hypothesized that biliary excretion of manganese would be sensitive to acute and chronic variations in manganese and fat intakes. In the acute study, we gavaged rats with solutions containing 54Mn with either 0, 0.2, 1 or 10 mg Mn as MnCl2. We collected bile from unanesthesized rats that were simultaneously reinfused with bile acids. Total manganese excretion (from 0.5 to 6.5 h after dosing) was proportional to the acute doses (approximately 3.4% of doses). In the chronic study, weanling rats were fed diets containing 5 or 20 g corn oil/g diet and 0.49 or 72 micrograms Mn/g diet for 8 wk and then deprived of food for 12 h before bile collection. Manganese-deficient animals excreted only 0.7% as much manganese in bile as manganese-replete animals, but this reduction was not sufficient to prevent 50-80% reduction of tissue manganese concentrations. Moreover, biliary manganese excretion (calculated for 24 h) by both manganese-deficient and manganese-replete rats (deprived of food for previous 12 h) accounted for only 1% of their manganese intake on the previous day. Dietary fat and manganese concentrations had few effects on excretion of total or individual bile acids. Ours is the first report of biliary excretion of orally administered manganese by conscious rats. PMID:8632223

  20. Thermochemical Modeling of the Uranium-Cerium-Oxygen System

    SciTech Connect

    Voit, Stewart L; Besmann, Theodore M

    2010-10-01

    with actinide materials, fundamental studies with uranium are performed using surrogate materials as stand-ins for transuranic elements. In most cases, cerium can be used as a suitable substitute for plutonium when performing O:M and sintering kinetics studies because of identical valence states. Differences exist between the magnitude of reported thermodynamic data of (U,Pu)O{sub x} and (U,Ce)O{sub x}, however the change in oxygen potential versus O:M follows the same trend for both systems. Cerium is also a major fission product element, and thus understanding its behavior in fuel is an important issue as well.

  1. Real-Time Manganese Phase Dynamics during Biological and Abiotic Manganese Oxide Reduction.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Jena E; Savalia, Pratixa; Davis, Ryan; Kocar, Benjamin D; Webb, Samuel M; Nealson, Kenneth H; Fischer, Woodward W

    2016-04-19

    Manganese oxides are often highly reactive and easily reduced, both abiotically, by a variety of inorganic chemical species, and biologically during anaerobic respiration by microbes. To evaluate the reaction mechanisms of these different reduction routes and their potential lasting products, we measured the sequence progression of microbial manganese(IV) oxide reduction mediated by chemical species (sulfide and ferrous iron) and the common metal-reducing microbe Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 under several endmember conditions, using synchrotron X-ray spectroscopic measurements complemented by X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy on precipitates collected throughout the reaction. Crystalline or potentially long-lived phases produced in these experiments included manganese(II)-phosphate, manganese(II)-carbonate, and manganese(III)-oxyhydroxides. Major controls on the formation of these discrete phases were alkalinity production and solution conditions such as inorganic carbon and phosphate availability. The formation of a long-lived Mn(III) oxide appears to depend on aqueous Mn(2+) production and the relative proportion of electron donors and electron acceptors in the system. These real-time measurements identify mineralogical products during Mn(IV) oxide reduction, contribute to understanding the mechanism of various Mn(IV) oxide reduction pathways, and assist in interpreting the processes occurring actively in manganese-rich environments and recorded in the geologic record of manganese-rich strata. PMID:27018915

  2. Silver manganese oxide electrodes for lithium batteries

    DOEpatents

    Thackeray, Michael M.; Vaughey, John T.; Dees, Dennis W.

    2006-05-09

    This invention relates to electrodes for non-aqueous lithium cells and batteries with silver manganese oxide positive electrodes, denoted AgxMnOy, in which x and y are such that the manganese ions in the charged or partially charged electrodes cells have an average oxidation state greater than 3.5. The silver manganese oxide electrodes optionally contain silver powder and/or silver foil to assist in current collection at the electrodes and to improve the power capability of the cells or batteries. The invention relates also to a method for preparing AgxMnOy electrodes by decomposition of a permanganate salt, such as AgMnO4, or by the decomposition of KMnO4 or LiMnO4 in the presence of a silver salt.

  3. Coupled redox transformations of catechol and cerium at the surface of a cerium(III) phosphate mineral

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cervini-Silva, Javiera; Gilbert, Benjamin; Fakra, Sirine; Friedlich, Stephan; Banfield, Jillian

    2008-05-01

    Highly insoluble Ce-bearing phosphate minerals form by weathering of apatite [Ca5(PO4)3.(OH,F,Cl)], and are important phosphorous repositories in soils. Although these phases can be dissolved via biologically-mediated pathways, the dissolution mechanisms are poorly understood. In this paper we report spectroscopic evidence to support coupling of redox transformations of organic carbon and cerium during the reaction of rhabdophane (CePO4·H2O) and catechol, a ubiquitous biogenic compound, at pH 5. Results show that the oxic-anoxic conditions influence the mineral dissolution behavior. Under anoxic conditions, the release of P and Ce occurs stoichiometrically. In contrast, under oxic conditions, the mineral dissolution behavior is incongruent, with dissolving Ce3+ ions oxidizing to CeO2. Reaction product analysis shows the formation of CO2, polymeric C, and oxalate and malate. The presence of more complex forms of organic carbon was also confirmed. Near edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy measurements at Ce-M4,5 and C-K absorption edges on reacted CePO4·H2O samples in the absence or presence of catechol and dissolved oxygen confirm that (1) the mineral surface converts to the oxide during this reaction, while full oxidation is limited to the near-surface region only; (2) the Ce valence remains unchanged when the reaction between CePO4·H2O and O2 but in the absence of catechol. Carbon K-edge spectra acquired from rhabdophane reacted with catechol under oxic conditions show spectral features before and after reaction that are considerably different from catechol, indicating the formation of more complex organic molecules. Decreases in intensity of characteristic catechol peaks are accompanied by the appearance of new π∗ resonances due to carbon in carboxyl (ca. 288.5 eV) and carbonyl (ca. 289.3 eV) groups, and the development of broad structure in the σ∗ region characteristic of aliphatic carbon. Evolution of the C K-edge spectra is consistent

  4. Beta titanium alloys and their role in the titanium industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bania, Paul J.

    1994-07-01

    The class of titanium alloys generically referred to as the beta alloys is arguably the most versatile in the titanium family. Since these alloys offer the highest strength-to-weight ratios and deepest hardenability of all titanium alloys, one might expect them to compete favorably for a variety of aerospace applications. To the contrary, however, except for one very successful application (Ti-13V-11Cr-3Al on the SR-71), the beta alloys have remained a very small segment of the industry. As a perspective on this situation, this article reviews some past and present applications of titanium alloys. It also descibes some unique new alloys and applications that promise to reverse historical trends.

  5. Diffusion bonding of titanium-titanium aluminide-alumina sandwich

    SciTech Connect

    Wickman, H.A.; Chin, E.S.C.; Biederman, R.R.

    1995-12-31

    Diffusion bonding of a metallic-intermetallic-ceramic sandwich is of interest for potential armor applications. Low cost titanium, titanium diboride reinforced titanium aluminide (Ti-48at.%Al), and aluminum oxide are diffusion bonded in a vacuum furnace between 1,000 C and 1,400 C. Metallographic examination of the prior bonding interface showed excellent metallurgical coupling between the Ti-48at.%Al composite and the low cost Ti. A series of microstructures representative of phases consistent with a hypothetical Ti-Al-B phase diagram is visible. The alumina-Ti-48at.%Al interfacial bond is achieved through penetration of titanium-aluminum phases into the existing alumina porosity. A detailed microstructural analysis identifying mechanisms of interfacial bonding will be presented for each interfacial zone.

  6. A new class of homogeneous visible-light photocatalysts: molecular cerium vanadium oxide clusters.

    PubMed

    Seliverstov, Andrey; Streb, Carsten

    2014-07-28

    The first systematic access to molecular cerium vanadium oxides is presented. A family of structurally related, di-cerium-functionalized vanadium oxide clusters and their use as visible-light-driven photooxidation catalysts is reported. Comparative analyses show that photocatalytic activity is controlled by the cluster architecture. Increased photoreactivity of the cerium vanadium oxides in the visible range compared with nonfunctionalized vanadates is observed. Based on the recent discovery of the first molecular cerium vanadate cluster, (nBu4 N)2 [(Ce(dmso)3 )2 V12 O33 Cl]⋅2 DMSO (1), two new di-cerium-containing vanadium oxide clusters [(Ce(dmso)4 )2 V11 O30 Cl]⋅DMSO (2) and [(Ce(nmp)4 )2 V12 O32 Cl]⋅NMP⋅Me2 CO (3; NMP=N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone) were obtained by using a novel fragmentation and reassembly route. Pentagonal building units {(V)M5 } (M=V, Ce) reminiscent of "Müller-type" pentagons are observed in 2 and 3. Compounds 1-3 feature high visible-light photooxidative activity, and quantum efficiencies >10 % for indigo photooxidation are observed. Photocatalytic performance increases in the order 1<3<2. Mechanistic studies show that the irradiation wavelength and the presence of oxygen strongly affect photoreactivity. Initial findings suggest that the photooxidation mechanism proceeds by intermediate formation of hydroxyl radicals. The findings open new avenues for the bottom-up design of sunlight-driven photocatalysts.

  7. Exposure of cerium oxide nanoparticles to kidney bean shows disturbance in the plant defense mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Majumdar, Sanghamitra; Peralta-Videa, Jose R; Bandyopadhyay, Susmita; Castillo-Michel, Hiram; Hernandez-Viezcas, Jose-Angel; Sahi, Shivendra; Gardea-Torresdey, Jorge L

    2014-08-15

    Overwhelming use of engineered nanoparticles demands rapid assessment of their environmental impacts. The transport of cerium oxide nanoparticles (nCeO2) in plants and their impact on cellular homeostasis as a function of exposure duration is not well understood. In this study, kidney bean plants were exposed to suspensions of ∼ 8 ± 1 nm nCeO2 (62.5 to 500 mg/L) for 15 days in hydroponic conditions. Plant parts were analyzed for cerium accumulation after one, seven, and 15 days of nCeO2 exposure. The primary indicators of stress like lipid peroxidation, antioxidant enzyme activities, total soluble protein and chlorophyll contents were studied. Cerium in tissues was localized using scanning electron microscopy and synchrotron μ-XRF mapping, and the chemical forms were identified using μ-XANES. In the root epidermis, cerium was primarily shown to exist as nCeO2, although a small fraction (12%) was biotransformed to Ce(III) compound. Cerium was found to reach the root vascular tissues and translocate to aerial parts with time. Upon prolonged exposure to 500 mg nCeO2/L, the root antioxidant enzyme activities were significantly reduced, simultaneously increasing the root soluble protein by 204%. In addition, leaf's guaiacol peroxidase activity was enhanced with nCeO2 exposure in order to maintain cellular homeostasis. PMID:24981679

  8. Catalysts with Cerium in a Membrane Reactor for the Removal of Formaldehyde Pollutant from Water Effluents.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez-Arzaluz, Mirella; Noreña-Franco, Luis; Ángel-Cuevas, Saúl; Mugica-Álvarez, Violeta; Torres-Rodríguez, Miguel

    2016-01-01

    We report the synthesis of cerium oxide, cobalt oxide, mixed cerium, and cobalt oxides and a Ce-Co/Al₂O₃ membrane, which are employed as catalysts for the catalytic wet oxidation (CWO) reaction process and the removal of formaldehyde from industrial effluents. Formaldehyde is present in numerous waste streams from the chemical industry in a concentration low enough to make its recovery not economically justified but high enough to create an environmental hazard. Common biological degradation methods do not work for formaldehyde, a highly toxic but refractory, low biodegradability substance. The CWO reaction is a recent, promising alternative that also permits much lower temperature and pressure conditions than other oxidation processes, resulting in economic benefits. The CWO reaction employing Ce- and Co-containing catalysts was carried out inside a slurry batch reactor and a membrane reactor. Experimental results are reported. Next, a mixed Ce-Co oxide film was supported on an γ-alumina membrane used in a catalytic membrane reactor to compare formaldehyde removal between both types of systems. Catalytic materials with cerium and with a relatively large amount of cerium favored the transformation of formaldehyde. Cerium was present as cerianite in the catalytic materials, as indicated by X-ray diffraction patterns. PMID:27231888

  9. Precipitation-Redispersion of Cerium Oxide Nanoparticles with Poly(acrylic acid): Toward Stable Dispersions

    SciTech Connect

    Sehgal,A.; Lalatonne, Y.; Berret, J.; Morvan, M.

    2005-01-01

    We exploit a precipitation-redispersion mechanism for complexation of short chain polyelectrolytes with cerium oxide nanoparticles to extend their stability ranges. As synthesized, cerium oxide sols at pH 1.4 consist of monodisperse cationic nanocrystalline particles having a hydrodynamic diameter of 10 nm and a molecular weight of 400 000 g mol{sup -1}. We show that short chain uncharged poly(acrylic acid) at low pH when added to a cerium oxide sols leads to macroscopic precipitation. As the pH is increased, the solution spontaneously redisperses into a clear solution of single particles with an anionic poly(acrylic acid) corona. The structure and dynamics of cerium oxide nanosols and their hybrid polymer-inorganic complexes in solution are investigated by static and dynamic light scattering, X-ray scattering, and chemical analysis. Quantitative analysis of the redispersed sol gives rise to an estimate of 40-50 polymer chains per particle for stable suspension. This amount represents 20% of the mass of the polymer-nanoparticle complexes. This complexation adds utility to the otherwise unstable cerium oxide dispersions by extending the range of stability of the sols in terms of pH, ionic strength, and concentration.

  10. Bacterial manganese reduction and growth with manganese oxide as the sole electron acceptor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, Charles R.; Nealson, Kenneth H.

    1988-01-01

    Microbes that couple growth to the reduction of manganese could play an important role in the biogeochemistry of certain anaerobic environments. Such a bacterium, Alteromonas putrefaciens MR-1, couples its growth to the reduction of manganese oxides only under anaerobic conditions. The characteristics of this reduction are consistent with a biological, and not an indirect chemical, reduction of manganese, which suggest that this bacterium uses manganic oxide as a terminal electron acceptor. It can also utilize a large number of other compounds as terminal electron acceptors; this versatility could provide a distinct advantage in environments where electron-acceptor concentrations may vary.

  11. 40 CFR 721.10003 - Manganese heterocyclic tetraamine complex (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Manganese heterocyclic tetraamine... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10003 Manganese heterocyclic tetraamine complex (generic). (a) Chemical... as manganese heterocyclic tetraamine complex (PMNs P-98-625/626/627/628/629 and P-00-614/617)...

  12. 40 CFR 721.10003 - Manganese heterocyclic tetraamine complex (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Manganese heterocyclic tetraamine... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10003 Manganese heterocyclic tetraamine complex (generic). (a) Chemical... as manganese heterocyclic tetraamine complex (PMNs P-98-625/626/627/628/629 and P-00-614/617)...

  13. 40 CFR 721.10003 - Manganese heterocyclic tetraamine complex (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Manganese heterocyclic tetraamine... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10003 Manganese heterocyclic tetraamine complex (generic). (a) Chemical... as manganese heterocyclic tetraamine complex (PMNs P-98-625/626/627/628/629 and P-00-614/617)...

  14. 40 CFR 721.10003 - Manganese heterocyclic tetraamine complex (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Manganese heterocyclic tetraamine... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10003 Manganese heterocyclic tetraamine complex (generic). (a) Chemical... as manganese heterocyclic tetraamine complex (PMNs P-98-625/626/627/628/629 and P-00-614/617)...

  15. Essentiality, Toxicity and Uncertainty in the Risk Assessment of Manganese

    EPA Science Inventory

    Risk assessments of manganese by inhalation or oral routes of exposure typically acknowledge the duality of manganese as an essential element at low doses and a toxic metal at high doses. Previously, however, risk assessors were unable to describe manganese pharmacokinetics quant...

  16. 40 CFR 721.10011 - Barium calcium manganese strontium oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10011 Barium calcium manganese strontium oxide. (a) Chemical substance... manganese strontium oxide (PMN P-00-1124; CAS No. 359427-90-0) is subject to reporting under this section... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Barium calcium manganese...

  17. 40 CFR 721.10011 - Barium calcium manganese strontium oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10011 Barium calcium manganese strontium oxide. (a) Chemical substance... manganese strontium oxide (PMN P-00-1124; CAS No. 359427-90-0) is subject to reporting under this section... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Barium calcium manganese...

  18. Antioxidant Cerium Oxide Nanoparticles in Biology and Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Bryant C.; Johnson, Monique E.; Walker, Marlon L.; Riley, Kathryn R.; Sims, Christopher M.

    2016-01-01

    Previously, catalytic cerium oxide nanoparticles (CNPs, nanoceria, CeO2-x NPs) have been widely utilized for chemical mechanical planarization in the semiconductor industry and for reducing harmful emissions and improving fuel combustion efficiency in the automobile industry. Researchers are now harnessing the catalytic repertoire of CNPs to develop potential new treatment modalities for both oxidative- and nitrosative-stress induced disorders and diseases. In order to reach the point where our experimental understanding of the antioxidant activity of CNPs can be translated into useful therapeutics in the clinic, it is necessary to evaluate the most current evidence that supports CNP antioxidant activity in biological systems. Accordingly, the aims of this review are three-fold: (1) To describe the putative reaction mechanisms and physicochemical surface properties that enable CNPs to both scavenge reactive oxygen species (ROS) and to act as antioxidant enzyme-like mimetics in solution; (2) To provide an overview, with commentary, regarding the most robust design and synthesis pathways for preparing CNPs with catalytic antioxidant activity; (3) To provide the reader with the most up-to-date in vitro and in vivo experimental evidence supporting the ROS-scavenging potential of CNPs in biology and medicine. PMID:27196936

  19. Deposition and investigation of lanthanum-cerium hexaboride thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Kuzanyan, A.S. . E-mail: akuzan@ipr.sci.am; Harutyunyan, S.R.; Vardanyan, V.O.; Badalyan, G.R.; Petrosyan, V.A.; Kuzanyan, V.S.; Petrosyan, S.I.; Karapetyan, V.E.; Wood, K.S.; Wu, H.-D.

    2006-09-15

    Thin films of lanthanum-cerium hexaboride, the promising thermoelectric material for low-temperature applications, are deposited on various substrates by the electron-beam evaporation, pulsed laser deposition and magnetron sputtering. The influence of the deposition conditions on the films X-ray characteristics, composition, microstructure and physical properties, such as the resistivity and Seebeck coefficient, is studied. The preferred (100) orientation of all films is obtained from XRD traces. In the range of 780-800 deg. C deposition temperature the highest intensity of diffractions peaks and the highest degree of the preferred orientation are observed. The temperature dependence of the resistivity and the Seebeck coefficient of films are investigated in the temperature range of 4-300 K. The features appropriate to Kondo effect in the dependences {rho}(T) and S(T) are detected at temperatures below 20 K. Interplay between the value of the Seebeck coefficient, metallic parameters and Kondo scattering of investigated films is discussed. - Graphical abstract: Kondo scattering in (La,Ce)B{sub 6} films: temperature dependence of the resistivity of (La,Ce)B{sub 6} films on various substrates and the ceramics La{sub 0.99}Ce{sub 0.01}B{sub 6}.

  20. Toxicity of Cerium Oxide Nanoparticles in Human Lung Cancer Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Weisheng, Lin; Huang, Yue-wern; Zhou, Xiao Dong; Ma, Yinfa

    2006-12-31

    With the fast development of nanotechnology, the nanomaterials start to cause people's attention for potential toxic effect. In this paper, the cytotoxicity and oxidative stress caused by 20-nm cerium oxide (CeO2) nanoparticles in cultured human lung cancer cells was investigated. The sulforhodamine B method was employed to assess cell viability after exposure to 3.5, 10.5, and 23.3 μg/ml of CeO2 nanoparticles for 24, 48, and 72 h. Cell viability decreased significantly as a function of nanoparticle dose and exposure time. Indicators of oxidative stress and cytotoxicity, including total reactive oxygen species, glutathione, malondialdehyde, α-tocopherol, and lactate dehydrogenase, were quantitatively assessed. It is concluded from the results that free radicals generated by exposure to 3.5 to 23.3 μg/ml CeO2 nanoparticles produce significant oxidative stress in the cells, as reflected by reduced glutathione and α-tocopherol levels; the toxic effects of CeO2 nanoparticles are dose dependent and time dependent; elevated oxidative stress increases the production of malondialdehyde and lactate dehydrogenase, which are indicators of lipid peroxidation and cell membrane damage, respectively.

  1. Antioxidant Cerium Oxide Nanoparticles in Biology and Medicine.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Bryant C; Johnson, Monique E; Walker, Marlon L; Riley, Kathryn R; Sims, Christopher M

    2016-05-17

    Previously, catalytic cerium oxide nanoparticles (CNPs, nanoceria, CeO2-x NPs) have been widely utilized for chemical mechanical planarization in the semiconductor industry and for reducing harmful emissions and improving fuel combustion efficiency in the automobile industry. Researchers are now harnessing the catalytic repertoire of CNPs to develop potential new treatment modalities for both oxidative- and nitrosative-stress induced disorders and diseases. In order to reach the point where our experimental understanding of the antioxidant activity of CNPs can be translated into useful therapeutics in the clinic, it is necessary to evaluate the most current evidence that supports CNP antioxidant activity in biological systems. Accordingly, the aims of this review are three-fold: (1) To describe the putative reaction mechanisms and physicochemical surface properties that enable CNPs to both scavenge reactive oxygen species (ROS) and to act as antioxidant enzyme-like mimetics in solution; (2) To provide an overview, with commentary, regarding the most robust design and synthesis pathways for preparing CNPs with catalytic antioxidant activity; (3) To provide the reader with the most up-to-date in vitro and in vivo experimental evidence supporting the ROS-scavenging potential of CNPs in biology and medicine.

  2. Antioxidant cerium oxide nanoparticle hydrogels for cellular encapsulation.

    PubMed

    Weaver, Jessica D; Stabler, Cherie L

    2015-04-01

    Oxidative stress and the resulting radical by-products cause significant toxicity and graft loss in cellular transplantation. Here, the engineering of an auto-catalytic, antioxidant, self-renewing cerium oxide nanoparticle (CONP)-composite hydrogel is reported. This enzyme-mimetic material ubiquitously scavenges ambient free radicals, with the potential to provide indefinite antioxidant protection. The potential of this system to enhance the protection of encapsulated beta cells was evaluated. Co-incubation of CONPs free in solution with beta cells demonstrated potent cytoprotection from superoxide exposure; however, phagocytosis of the CONPs by the beta cells resulted in cytotoxicity at concentrations as low as 1mM. When CONPs were embedded within alginate hydrogels, the composite hydrogel provided cytoprotection to encapsulated beta cells from free radical attack without cytotoxicity, even up to 10mM. This nanocomposite hydrogel has wide applicability in cellular transplantation, with the unique advantage of localization of these potent antioxidant CONPs and their capacity for sustained, long-term scavenging. PMID:25620795

  3. Catalytic Properties and Biomedical Applications of Cerium Oxide Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Walkey, Carl; Das, Soumen; Seal, Sudipta; Erlichman, Joseph; Heckman, Karin; Ghibelli, Lina; Traversa, Enrico; McGinnis, James F.; Self, William T.

    2014-01-01

    Cerium oxide nanoparticles (Nanoceria) have shown promise as catalytic antioxidants in the test tube, cell culture models and animal models of disease. However given the reactivity that is well established at the surface of these nanoparticles, the biological utilization of Nanoceria as a therapeutic still poses many challenges. Moreover the form that these particles take in a biological environment, such as the changes that can occur due to a protein corona, are not well established. This review aims to summarize the existing literature on biological use of Nanoceria, and to raise questions about what further study is needed to apply this interesting catalytic material to biomedical applications. These questions include: 1) How does preparation, exposure dose, route and experimental model influence the reported effects of Nanoceria in animal studies? 2) What are the considerations to develop Nanoceria as a therapeutic agent in regards to these parameters? 3) What biological targets of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) are relevant to this targeting, and how do these properties also influence the safety of these nanomaterials? PMID:26207185

  4. Antioxidant Cerium Oxide Nanoparticle Hydrogels for Cellular Encapsulation

    PubMed Central

    Weaver, Jessica D; Stabler, Cherie L

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress and the resulting radical by-products cause significant toxicity and graft loss in cellular transplantation. Here, the engineering of an auto-catalytic, antioxidant, self-renewing cerium oxide nanoparticle (CONP)-composite hydrogel is reported. This enzyme-mimetic material ubiquitously scavenges ambient free radicals, with the potential to provide indefinite antioxidant protection. Here, we evaluated the potential of this system to enhance the protection of encapsulated beta cells. Co-incubation of CONPs, free in solution with beta cells, demonstrated potent cytoprotection from superoxide exposure; however, phagocytosis of the CONPs by the beta cells resulted in cytotoxicity at concentrations as low as 1 mM. When CONPs were embedded within alginate hydrogels, the composite hydrogel provided cytoprotection to encapsulated beta cells from free radical attack without cytotoxicity, even up to 10 mM concentrations. This nanocomposite hydrogel has wide applicability in cellular transplantation, with the unique advantage of localization of these potent antioxidant CONPs and their capacity for sustained, long-term scavenging. PMID:25620795

  5. Metal Uptake by Manganese Superoxide Dismutase

    PubMed Central

    Whittaker, James W.

    2009-01-01

    Manganese superoxide dismutase is an important antioxidant defense metalloenzyme that protects cells from damage by the toxic oxygen metabolite, superoxide free radical, formed as an unavoidable by-product of aerobic metabolism. Many years of research have gone into understanding how the metal cofactor interacts with small molecules in its catalytic role. In contrast, very little is presently known about how the protein acquires its metal cofactor, an important step in the maturation of the protein and one that is absolutely required for its biological function. Recent work is beginning to provide insight into the mechanisms of metal delivery to manganese superoxide dismutase in vivo and in vitro. PMID:19699328

  6. Manganese oxidation by bacteria: biogeochemical aspects.

    PubMed

    Sujith, P P; Bharathi, P A Loka

    2011-01-01

    Manganese is an essential trace metal that is not as readily oxidizable like iron. Several bacterial groups posses the ability to oxidize Mn effectively competing with chemical oxidation. The oxides of Mn are the strongest of the oxidants, next to oxygen in the aquatic environment and therefore control the fate of several elements. Mn oxidizing bacteria have a suit of enzymes that not only help to scavenge Mn but also other associated elements, thus playing a crucial role in biogeochemical cycles. This article reviews the importance of manganese and its interaction with microorganisms in the oxidative Mn cycle in aquatic realms.

  7. Advanced titanium processing

    SciTech Connect

    Hartman, Alan D.; Gerdemann, Stephen J.; Schrems, Karol K.; Holcomb, Gordon R.; Argetsinger, Edward R.; Hansen, Jeffrey S.; Paige, Jack I.; Turner, Paul C.

    2001-01-01

    The Albany Research Center of the U.S. Department of Energy has been investigating a means to form useful wrought products by direct and continuous casting of titanium bars using cold-wall induction melting rather than current batch practices such as vacuum arc remelting. Continuous ingots produced by cold-wall induction melting, utilizing a bottomless water-cooled copper crucible, without slag (CaF2) additions had minor defects in the surface such as ''hot tears''. Slag additions as low as 0.5 weight percent were used to improve the surface finish. Therefore, a slag melted experimental Ti-6Al-4V alloy ingot was compared to a commercial Ti-6Al-4V alloy ingot in the areas of physical, chemical, mechanical, and corrosion attributes to address the question, ''Are any detrimental effects caused by slag addition''?

  8. Brazing titanium to stainless steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Batista, R. I.

    1980-01-01

    Titanium and stainless-steel members are usually joined mechanically for lack of any other effective method. New approach using different brazing alloy and plating steel member with nickel resolves problem. Process must be carried out in inert atmosphere.

  9. THERMAL EFFECTS ON MASS AND SPATIAL RESOLUTION DURING LASER PULSE ATOM PROBE TOMOGRAPHY OF CERIUM OXIDE

    SciTech Connect

    Rita Kirchhofer; Melissa C. Teague; Brian P. Gorman

    2013-05-01

    Cerium oxide (CeO2) is an ideal surrogate material for trans-uranic elements and fission products found in nuclear fuels due to similarities in their thermal properties; therefore, cerium oxide was used to determine the best run condition for atom probe tomography (APT). Laser pulse APT is a technique that allows for spatial resolution in the nm scale and isotopic/elemental chemical identification. A systematic study of the impact of laser pulse energy and specimen base temperature on the mass resolution, measurement of stoichiometry, multiples, and evaporation mechanisms are reported in this paper. It was demonstrated that using laser pulse APT stoichiometric field evaporation of cerium oxide was achieved at 1 pJ laser pulse energy and 20 K specimen base temperature.

  10. Synthesis and characterization of cerium and yttrium alkoxide complexes supported by ferrocene-based chelating ligands.

    PubMed

    Broderick, Erin M; Thuy-Boun, Peter S; Guo, Neng; Vogel, Carola S; Sutter, Jörg; Miller, Jeffrey T; Meyer, Karsten; Diaconescu, Paula L

    2011-04-01

    Two series of Schiff base metal complexes were investigated, where each series was supported by an ancillary ligand incorporating a ferrocene backbone and different N=X functionalities. One ligand is based on an imine, while the other is based on an iminophosphorane group. Cerium(IV), cerium(III), and yttrium(III) alkoxide complexes supported by the two ligands were synthesized. All metal complexes were characterized by cyclic voltammetry. Additionally, NMR, Mössbauer, X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES), and absorption spectroscopies were used. The experimental data indicate that iron remains in the +2 oxidation state and that cerium(IV) does not engage in a redox behavior with the ancillary ligand.

  11. Photoemission of the Oxidation of Cerium Overlayers on GaSb(110) Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Qi; Wu, Jian-xin; Ji, Ming-rong; Ma, Mao-sheng; Liu, Xian-ming; Zhang, Yu-heng

    1997-10-01

    We have used x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy to study the oxidation of cerium overlayers on a semiconductor GaSb(110) surface. A GaSb(110) sample covered with 10 monolayers Ce was used to adsorb oxygen. When the exposure of O2 was up to 50 L, the oxide of cerium, Ce2O3, began to change into unstable CeO2. The dissociation of CeO2 resulted in strong oxidation of the substrate. The main products are Ga2O3, Sb2O3, and then Sb2O5. After annealing, a part of the oxygen atoms transferred from cerium dioxide toward Ga and Sb.

  12. Excitation induced spectroscopic study and quenching effect in cerium samarium codoped lithium aluminoborate glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaur, Parvinder; Kaur, Simranpreet; Singh, Gurinder Pal; Arora, Deepawali; Kumar, Sunil; Singh, D. P.

    2016-08-01

    Lithium aluminium borate host has been codoped with cerium and samarium to prepare glass by conventional melt quench technique. Their structural and spectroscopic investigation has been carried out using XRD, FTIR and density measurements. The UV-Vis absorption spectra and fluorescence spectra (λexc.=380 nm and 400 nm) have been studied for spectroscopic analysis. The amorphous nature of the prepared samples is shown by XRD. The density is increasing with addition of cerium at the expense of aluminium, keeping other components constant. FTIR study also shows the presence of compact and stable tetrahedral BO4 units thus supporting the density results. The UV- Vis absorption spectra show a shift of optical absorption edge towards longer wavelength along with an increase in intensity of peaks with rising samarium concentration. The fluorescence spectra show a blue shift and subsequent suppression of cerium peaks with addition of samarium.

  13. Development of graphene-nanometre-sized cerium oxide-incorporated aluminium and its electrochemical evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashraf, P. Muhamed; Thomas, Saly N.; Edwin, Leela

    2016-02-01

    Graphene-nanometre-sized cerium oxide-incorporated aluminium was prepared and its electrochemical and surface morphological characteristics were studied. The atomic force micrographs and scanning electron micrographs evaluation highlighted that the graphene and nanometre-sized cerium oxide in aluminium had decreased the surface roughness and improved the surface morphological characteristics. The graphene: nanometre-sized cerium oxide (ratios 1:2 or 2:1) with lesser amounts of particle in the matrix showed excellent corrosion resistance in the marine environment as evidenced by linear polarization, electrochemical impedance and weight loss studies. Introduction of graphene in the aluminium matrix showed a barrier separation between the outermost layer and inner layer, increased roughness and increased corrosion. The material is found to be a potential candidate for use in marine environment.

  14. Fabrication of Cerium Oxide and Uranium Oxide Microspheres for Space Nuclear Power Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Jeffrey A. Katalenich; Michael R. Hartman; Robert C. O'Brien

    2013-02-01

    Cerium oxide and uranium oxide microspheres are being produced via an internal gelation sol-gel method to investigate alternative fabrication routes for space nuclear fuels. Depleted uranium and non-radioactive cerium are being utilized as surrogates for plutonium-238 (Pu-238) used in radioisotope thermoelectric generators and for enriched uranium required by nuclear thermal rockets. While current methods used to produce Pu-238 fuels at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) involve the generation of fine powders that pose a respiratory hazard and have a propensity to contaminate glove boxes, the sol-gel route allows for the generation of oxide microsphere fuels through an aqueous route. The sol-gel method does not generate fine powders and may require fewer processing steps than the LANL method with less operator handling. High-quality cerium dioxide microspheres have been fabricated in the desired size range and equipment is being prepared to establish a uranium dioxide microsphere production capability.

  15. Green synthesized cerium oxide nanoparticle: A prospective drug against oxidative harm.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Debanjan; Mukherjee, Riya; Patra, Mousumi; Banik, Milon; Dasgupta, Rakhi; Mukherjee, Manabendra; Basu, Tarakdas

    2016-11-01

    Cerium oxide nanoparticle (CeONP) of size 2-3nm was synthesized by a new, simple and green method at ambient temperature, using cerium nitrate as prime precursor and Aloe vera leaf extract as stabilizing agent. Of the two oxidation states (+3) and (+4) of cerium, it was dominantly present in (+3) state in CeONP and cyclic conversion of Ce(III)O→Ce(IV)O→Ce(III)O by reaction with H2O2 implied uninterrupted antioxidant property of CeONP. Moreover, the higher oxygen defect in the crystal lattice produced particles with higher antioxidant activity. CeONP was found to neutralize the deleterious effects of H2O2 viz., cell death, generation of intracellular reactive oxygen species and loss of connectivity in mouse neural cells. Therefore, CeONP might have potential use in future as an anti-oxidant drug.

  16. Eucalyptus tolerance mechanisms to lanthanum and cerium: subcellular distribution, antioxidant system and thiol pools.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yichang; Zhang, Shirong; Li, Sen; Xu, Xiaoxun; Jia, Yongxia; Gong, Guoshu

    2014-12-01

    Guanglin 9 (Eucalyptus grandis × Eucalyptus urophlla) and Eucalyptus grandis 5 are two eucalyptus species which have been found to grow normally in soils contaminated with lanthanum and cerium, but the tolerance mechanisms are not clear yet. In this study, a pot experiment was conducted to investigate the tolerance mechanisms of the eucalyptus to lanthanum and cerium. Cell walls stored 45.40-63.44% of the metals under lanthanum or cerium stress. Peroxidase and catalase activities enhanced with increasing soil La or Ce concentrations up to 200 mg kg(-1), while there were no obvious changes in glutathione and ascorbate concentrations. Non-protein thiols concentrations increased with increasing treatment levels up to 200 mg kg(-1), and then decreased. Phytochelatins concentrations continued to increase under La or Ce stress. Therefore, the two eucalyptus species are La and Ce tolerant plants, and the tolerance mechanisms include cell wall deposition, antioxidant system response, and thiol compound synthesis. PMID:25303462

  17. Green synthesized cerium oxide nanoparticle: A prospective drug against oxidative harm.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Debanjan; Mukherjee, Riya; Patra, Mousumi; Banik, Milon; Dasgupta, Rakhi; Mukherjee, Manabendra; Basu, Tarakdas

    2016-11-01

    Cerium oxide nanoparticle (CeONP) of size 2-3nm was synthesized by a new, simple and green method at ambient temperature, using cerium nitrate as prime precursor and Aloe vera leaf extract as stabilizing agent. Of the two oxidation states (+3) and (+4) of cerium, it was dominantly present in (+3) state in CeONP and cyclic conversion of Ce(III)O→Ce(IV)O→Ce(III)O by reaction with H2O2 implied uninterrupted antioxidant property of CeONP. Moreover, the higher oxygen defect in the crystal lattice produced particles with higher antioxidant activity. CeONP was found to neutralize the deleterious effects of H2O2 viz., cell death, generation of intracellular reactive oxygen species and loss of connectivity in mouse neural cells. Therefore, CeONP might have potential use in future as an anti-oxidant drug. PMID:27478962

  18. Low cost titanium--myth or reality

    SciTech Connect

    Turner, Paul C.; Hartman, Alan D.; Hansen, Jeffrey S.; Gerdemann, Stephen J.

    2001-01-01

    In 1998, approximately 57,000 tons of titanium metal was consumed in the form of mill products (1). Only about 5% of the 4 million tons of titanium minerals consumed each year is used to produce titanium metal, with the remainder primarily used to produce titanium dioxide pigment. Titanium metal production is primarily based on the direct chlorination of rutile to produce titanium tetrachloride, which is then reduced to metal using the Kroll magnesium reduction process. The use of titanium is tied to its high strength-to-weight ratio and corrosion resistance. Aerospace is the largest application for titanium, and titanium cost has prevented its use in non-aerospace applications including the automotive and heavy vehicle industries.

  19. Synthesis and photocatalytic activity of mesoporous cerium doped TiO{sub 2} as visible light sensitive photocatalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Aman, Noor; Satapathy, P.K.; Mishra, T.; Mahato, M.; Das, N.N.

    2012-02-15

    Graphical abstract: Cerium doped titania having optimum 5 wt% of cerium can decompose methylene blue and reduce selenium (IV) efficiently under visible light. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Effect of cerium doping on the surface properties and visible light mediated photocatalytic reaction is studied. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cerium doping increases the anatase phase stability, surface area (up to 137 m{sup 2}/g) and visible light absorption. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Importance of Ce{sup 3+}/Ce{sup 4+}, oxygen vacancy, surface area and crystallinity is correlated with improved catalytic activity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Material with 5 wt% Ce is found to be most active photocatalyst for methylene blue decomposition and Se (IV) reduction. -- Abstract: Cerium doped titania materials were synthesized varying the cerium concentration from 0 to 10 wt%. Materials are characterised by XRD, TEM, XPS and N{sub 2} adsorption desorption method. Surface area and visible light absorption substantially increases and crystallite size decreases with the increasing cerium content. Cerium doping stabilizes the anatase phase and surface area even at 600 Degree-Sign C calcination. Photocatalytic activity towards methylene blue decomposition and selenium (IV) reduction is found to increase with the cerium content up to 5 wt% and then decreases. Materials calcined at 600 Degree-Sign C shows better activity than that calcined at 400 Degree-Sign C, even though surface area decreases. Anatase crystallinity mostly decides the photocatalytic activity rather than only surface area. It can be concluded that the optimum visible light absorption and oxygen vacancy with 5% cerium doping enhances the photocatalytic activity. In addition photocatalytic performance is found to depend on the presence of Ce{sup 4+}/Ce{sup 3+} rather than only visible light absorption.

  20. Investigations of nano-particle toxicity and uptake of Cerium oxide and Titanium dioxide in Arabidopsis thaliana (L.)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The emergence of nanotechnology and incorporation of nanoparticles in consumer products necessitates risk assessment from an environmental and health safety standpoint. To date, very few studies have examined nanoparticle effects on terrestrial species, especially plants. In ...

  1. Laser Surface Alloying of Copper, Manganese, and Magnesium with Pure Aluminum Substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiru, Woldetinsay G.; Sankar, M. Ravi; Dixit, Uday S.

    2016-03-01

    Laser surface alloying is one of the recent technologies used in the manufacturing sector for improving the surface properties of the metals. Light weight materials like aluminum alloys, titanium alloys, and magnesium alloys are used in the locomotive, aerospace, and structural applications. In the present work, an experimental study was conducted to improve the surface hardness of commercially pure aluminum plate. CO2 laser is used to melt pre-placed powders of pure copper, manganese, and magnesium. Microstructure of alloyed surface was analyzed using optical microscope. The best surface alloying was obtained at the optimum values of laser parameters, viz., laser power, scan speed, and laser beam diameter. In the alloyed region, microhardness increased from 30 HV0.5 to 430 HV0.5, while it was 60 HV0.5 in the heat-affected region. Tensile tests revealed some reduction in the strength and total elongation due to alloying. On the other hand, corrosion resistance improved.

  2. Ab initio studies of anisotropic magnetism in uranium and cerium monopnictides and monochalcogenides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, Eric Mason

    We have applied two ab initio based methods to investigate the origin in the electronic structure of the unusual magnetic behavior of the cerium and uranium monopnictides and monochalcogenides. First, we have carried out spin-polarized electronic structure calculations, based on the full potential linear muffin tin (FPLMTO) method, with spin polarization (orbital polarization only via spin-orbit coupling) and also with orbital polarization correction. Second, we have carried out ab initio based calculations synthesizing (1) a phenomenological theory of orbitally driven magnetism based on the Anderson and Kondo, lattice model which incorporates explicitly the hybridization induced and the Coulomb exchange interactions on an equal footing, and (2) FPLMTO electronic structure calculations allowing a first principles evaluation of all the parameters entering the model Hamiltonian. For the cerium compounds, we also include the crystal field interactions on an equal footing with the hybridization and Coulomb exchange interactions with a scaling determined by experiment. The results for the uranium compound calculations show that both methods are limited to the extremes to which they are best suited. The pure band structure calculations provide the best agreement for the lighter uranium compounds, while the model hamiltonian approach provides better agreement for the heavier uranium compounds. In the case of the cerium compounds, while the pure FPLMTO calculations yield values for the magnetic moment in agreement with experiment for the lighter cerium chalcogenides, they fail to give, even qualitatively, the magnetic properties for all other systems. On the other hand, the ab initio based model Hamiltonian calculations reveal for the first time the interplay of hybridization, Coulomb exchange, and crystal field interactions across the cerium series, and give results for the low-temperature moment and ordering temperature in excellent agreement with experiment, for the

  3. Manganese homeostasis in the nervous system.

    PubMed

    Chen, Pan; Chakraborty, Sudipta; Mukhopadhyay, Somshuvra; Lee, Eunsook; Paoliello, Monica M B; Bowman, Aaron B; Aschner, Michael

    2015-08-01

    Manganese (Mn) is an essential heavy metal that is naturally found in the environment. Daily intake through dietary sources provides the necessary amount required for several key physiological processes, including antioxidant defense, energy metabolism, immune function and others. However, overexposure from environmental sources can result in a condition known as manganism that features symptomatology similar to Parkinson's disease (PD). This disorder presents with debilitating motor and cognitive deficits that arise from a neurodegenerative process. In order to maintain a balance between its essentiality and neurotoxicity, several mechanisms exist to properly buffer cellular Mn levels. These include transporters involved in Mn uptake, and newly discovered Mn efflux mechanisms. This review will focus on current studies related to mechanisms underlying Mn import and export, primarily the Mn transporters, and their function and roles in Mn-induced neurotoxicity. Though and essential metal, overexposure to manganese may result in neurodegenerative disease analogous to Parkinson's disease. Manganese homeostasis is tightly regulated by transporters, including transmembrane importers (divalent metal transporter 1, transferrin and its receptor, zinc transporters ZIP8 and Zip14, dopamine transporter, calcium channels, choline transporters and citrate transporters) and exporters (ferroportin and SLC30A10), as well as the intracellular trafficking proteins (SPCA1 and ATP12A2). A manganese-specific sensor, GPP130, has been identified, which affords means for monitoring intracellular levels of this metal.

  4. ADVERSE HEALTH EFFECTS FROM ENVIRONMENTAL MANGANESE EXPOSURE.

    EPA Science Inventory

    The ubiquitous element, manganese (Mn), is an essential nutrient, but toxic at excessive exposure levels. Therefore, the US EPA set guideline levels for Mn exposure through inhalation (reference concentration-RfC=0.05 ?g/m3) and ingestion (reference dose-RfD=0.14 mg/kg/day (10 mg...

  5. Geology of the manganese deposits of Cuba

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Simons, Frank S.; Straczek, John A.

    1958-01-01

    Deposits of manganese ore have been found in five of the six provinces of Cuba and have been reported from the sixth.  Only Oriente and Pinar del Rio provinces have more than a few known deposits and only the deposits of Oriente have yielded any appreciable amount of ore.

  6. 21 CFR 73.2775 - Manganese violet.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... pyrophosphate complex having the approximate formula: Mn(III)NH4P2O7. (b) Specifications. Manganese violet shall.... Mercury (as Hg), not more than 1 part per million. Total color, based on Mn content in “as is” sample,...

  7. 21 CFR 73.2775 - Manganese violet.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... pyrophosphate complex having the approximate formula: Mn(III)NH4P2O7. (b) Specifications. Manganese violet shall.... Mercury (as Hg), not more than 1 part per million. Total color, based on Mn content in “as is” sample,...

  8. 21 CFR 73.2775 - Manganese violet.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... pyrophosphate complex having the approximate formula: Mn(III)NH4P2O7. (b) Specifications. Manganese violet shall.... Mercury (as Hg), not more than 1 part per million. Total color, based on Mn content in “as is” sample,...

  9. 21 CFR 73.2775 - Manganese violet.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... pyrophosphate complex having the approximate formula: Mn(III)NH4P2O7. (b) Specifications. Manganese violet shall.... Mercury (as Hg), not more than 1 part per million. Total color, based on Mn content in “as is” sample,...

  10. 21 CFR 73.2775 - Manganese violet.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... pyrophosphate complex having the approximate formula: Mn(III)NH4P2O7. (b) Specifications. Manganese violet shall.... Mercury (as Hg), not more than 1 part per million. Total color, based on Mn content in “as is” sample,...

  11. Competition for Manganese at the Host-Pathogen Interface.

    PubMed

    Kelliher, J L; Kehl-Fie, T E

    2016-01-01

    Transition metals such as manganese are essential nutrients for both pathogen and host. Vertebrates exploit this necessity to combat invading microbes by restricting access to these critical nutrients, a defense known as nutritional immunity. During infection, the host uses several mechanisms to impose manganese limitation. These include removal of manganese from the phagolysosome, sequestration of extracellular manganese, and utilization of other metals to prevent bacterial acquisition of manganese. In order to cause disease, pathogens employ a variety of mechanisms that enable them to adapt to and counter nutritional immunity. These adaptations include, but are likely not limited to, manganese-sensing regulators and high-affinity manganese transporters. Even though successful pathogens can overcome host-imposed manganese starvation, this defense inhibits manganese-dependent processes, reducing the ability of these microbes to cause disease. While the full impact of host-imposed manganese starvation on bacteria is unknown, critical bacterial virulence factors such as superoxide dismutases are inhibited. This chapter will review the factors involved in the competition for manganese at the host-pathogen interface and discuss the impact that limiting the availability of this metal has on invading bacteria. PMID:27571690

  12. Manganese ore tailing: optimization of acid leaching conditions and recovery of soluble manganese.

    PubMed

    Santos, Olívia de Souza Heleno; Carvalho, Cornélio de Freitas; Silva, Gilmare Antônia da; Santos, Cláudio Gouvêa Dos

    2015-01-01

    Manganese recovery from industrial ore processing waste by means of leaching with sulfuric acid was the objective of this study. Experimental conditions were optimized by multivariate experimental design approaches. In order to study the factors affecting leaching, a screening step was used involving a full factorial design with central point for three variables in two levels (2(3)). The three variables studied were leaching time, concentration of sulfuric acid and sample amount. The three factors screened were shown to be relevant and therefore a Doehlert design was applied to determine the best working conditions for leaching and to build the response surface. By applying the best leaching conditions, the concentrations of 12.80 and 13.64 %w/w of manganese for the global sample and for the fraction -44 + 37 μm, respectively, were found. Microbeads of chitosan were tested for removal of leachate acidity and recovering of soluble manganese. Manganese recovery from the leachate was 95.4%. Upon drying the leachate, a solid containing mostly manganese sulfate was obtained, showing that the proposed optimized method is efficient for manganese recovery from ore tailings.

  13. Omega phase formation in titanium and titanium alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, G.T. III; Morris, C.E.; Lawson, A.C.

    1992-05-01

    Although the response of titanium alloys to dynamic loading is receiving increased attention in the literature (particularly in the area of shear-band formation), a more limited experimental database exists concerning the detailed structure/property relationships of titanium alloys subjected to shock loading. In this study, preliminary results concerning the influence of alloy chemistry on the property of omega-phase formation and its structure in three titanium alloys are presented. The influence of shock-wave deformation on the phase stability and substructure evolution of high-purity (low-interstitial) titanium, A-70 (3700 ppm oxygen) titanium, and Ti-6Al-4V were probed utilizing real-time velocity interferometry (VISAR) and ``soft`` shock-recovery techniques. VISAR wave profiles of shock-loaded high-purity titanium revealed the omega-phase pressure-induced transition to occur at approximately 10.4 GPa. Wave profile measurements on A-70 Ti shocked to pressures up to 35 GPa and Ti-6Al-4V shocked to pressures up to 25 GPa exhibited no evidence of a three-wave structure indicative of a pressure-induced phase transition. Neutron and X-ray diffractometry and TEM analysis confirmed the presence of retained {omega}-phase in the electrolytic-Ti and the absence of {omega}-phase in the shock-recovered A-70 Ti and Ti-6Al-4V. Suppression of the {alpha}-{omega} phase transition in A-70 Ti, containing a high interstitial oxygen content, is seen to simultaneously correlate with suppression of deformation twinning. Neutron diffraction was used to measure the in-situ bulk lattice constants and volume fraction of the {alpha} and {omega} phases in the recovered high-purity titanium samples that were shock loaded. The influence of alloy content on the kinetics of formation/retention of {omega}-phase and substructure evolution is discussed and contrasted in light of previous literature studies.

  14. The investigation of cerium as a cathodic inhibitor for aluminum-copper alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Aldykewicz, A.J. Jr.; Isaacs, H.S.; Davenport, A.J.

    1995-10-01

    In situ current density mapping, scanning electron microscopy , and energy dispersive spectroscopy were used to study the effects of cerium as a corrosion inhibitor for an aluminum copper alloy (Al 2024-T4) in chloride containing solutions. It was found that cerium inhibits corrosion of this alloy by reducing the rate of the cathodic reaction. This was due to the carried out on an aluminum/copper galvanic couple, which was used to simulate the electrochemical behavior of the copper containing intermetallics, showed that corrosion inhibition was associated with the formation of a Ce-rich film over the copper in agreement with that observed for the alloy.

  15. Synthesis and characterization of two dimensional metal organic framework of cerium with tetraaza macrocyclic

    SciTech Connect

    Bt Safiin, Nurul Atikah; Yarmo, Ambar; Yamin, Bohari M.

    2013-11-27

    A two dimensional metal organic framework containing cerium sufate layers and ethylenediaminium between layers was obtained by refluxing the mixture of cerium sulphate and 5,5,7,12,12,14-hexamethyl-1,4,8,11-tetraazacyclotetradeca-7, 14-diene bromide. The complex was characterized by infrared spectroscopy and microelemental analysis. X-ray study showed that the complex adopts eleven coordination environments about the central atom. Thermogravimetric study showed the removal of water molecules at about 70°C followed by a gradual mass loss until the whole structure collapsed at about 400°C.

  16. METHOD OF SEPARATING TETRAVALENT PLUTONIUM VALUES FROM CERIUM SUB-GROUP RARE EARTH VALUES

    DOEpatents

    Duffield, R.B.; Stoughton, R.W.

    1959-02-01

    A method is presented for separating plutonium from the cerium sub-group of rare earths when both are present in an aqueous solution. The method consists in adding an excess of alkali metal carbonate to the solution, which causes the formation of a soluble plutonium carbonate precipitate and at the same time forms an insoluble cerium-group rare earth carbonate. The pH value must be adjusted to bctween 5.5 and 7.5, and prior to the precipitation step the plutonium must be reduced to the tetravalent state since only tetravalent plutonium will form the soluble carbonate complex.

  17. Systematic variation of rare-earth elements in cerium-earth minerals

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Murata, K.J.; Rose, H.J.; Carron, M.K.; Glass, J.J.

    1957-01-01

    In a continuation of a study reported previously, rare-earth elements and thorium have been determined in monazite, allanite, cerite, bastnaesite, and a number of miscellaneous cerium-earth minerals. A quantity called sigma (???), which is the sum of the atomic percentages of La, Ce, and Pr, is proposed as an index of composition of all cerium-earth minerals with respect to the rare-earth elements. The value of ??? for all of the minerals analysed falls between 58 and 92 atomic per cent. Monazites, allanites, and cerites cover the entire observed range, whereas bastnaesites are sharply restricted to the range between 80 and 92 atomic per cent. The minimum value of ??? for a cerium-earth mineral corresponds to the smallest possible unit-cell size of the mineral. In monazite, this structurally controlled minimum value of ??? is estimated to be around 30 atomic per cent. Neodymium, because of its abundance, and yttrium, because of its small size, have dominant roles in contraction of the structure. In the other direction, the limit of variation in composition will be reached when lanthanum becomes the sole rare-earth element in a cerium-earth mineral. Cerium-earth minerals from alkalic rocks are all characterized by values of ??? greater than 80 atomic per cent, indicating that the processes that formed these rocks were unusually efficient in fractionating the rare-earth elements-efficient in the sense that a highly selected assemblage is produced without eliminating the bulk of these elements. Analyses of inner and outer parts of two large crystals of monazite from different deposits show no difference in ??? in one crystal and a slightly smaller value of ??? in the outer part of the other crystal compared to the inner part. The ??? of monazites from pegmatites that intrude genetically related granitic rocks in North Carolina is found to be either higher or lower than the ??? of monazites in the intruded host rock. These results indicate that the fractionation of the

  18. Analysis of the world distribution of metal-rich subsea manganese nodules

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McKelvey, Vincent Ellis; Wright, Nancy A.; Bowen, Roger W.

    1983-01-01

    principal metals present, but the three metal types described above do not include the maximum reported values for several other elements, such as titanium (8.9 percent), vanadium (0.5), zinc (9.0), and lead (0.75). It seems possible, therefore, that there may be other kinds of metal-rich types, some of which may have p6tential economic value. Many of the variations in nodule composition are in large part a function of variations in mineral composition, to which many factors contribute. Some of the regional variations can be broadly related to oceanic circulation, basin morphology, and depth, but a better understanding of ocean processes and regional oceanography and geology is needed to explain all the variations observed in the composition of manganese nodules.

  19. Soil manganese enrichment from industrial inputs: a gastropod perspective.

    PubMed

    Bordean, Despina-Maria; Nica, Dragos V; Harmanescu, Monica; Banatean-Dunea, Ionut; Gergen, Iosif I

    2014-01-01

    Manganese is one of the most abundant metal in natural environments and serves as an essential microelement for all living systems. However, the enrichment of soil with manganese resulting from industrial inputs may threaten terrestrial ecosystems. Several studies have demonstrated harmful effects of manganese exposure by cutaneous contact and/or by soil ingestion to a wide range of soil invertebrates. The link between soil manganese and land snails has never been made although these invertebrates routinely come in contact with the upper soil horizons through cutaneous contact, egg-laying, and feeding activities in soil. Therefore, we have investigated the direct transfer of manganese from soils to snails and assessed its toxicity at background concentrations in the soil. Juvenile Cantareus aspersus snails were caged under semi-field conditions and exposed first, for a period of 30 days, to a series of soil manganese concentrations, and then, for a second period of 30 days, to soils with higher manganese concentrations. Manganese levels were measured in the snail hepatopancreas, foot, and shell. The snail survival and shell growth were used to assess the lethal and sublethal effects of manganese exposure. The transfer of manganese from soil to snails occurred independently of food ingestion, but had no consistent effect on either the snail survival or shell growth. The hepatopancreas was the best biomarker of manganese exposure, whereas the shell did not serve as a long-term sink for this metal. The kinetics of manganese retention in the hepatopancreas of snails previously exposed to manganese-spiked soils was significantly influenced by a new exposure event. The results of this study reveal the importance of land snails for manganese cycling in terrestrial biotopes and suggest that the direct transfer from soils to snails should be considered when precisely assessing the impact of anthropogenic Mn releases on soil ecosystems.

  20. Soil Manganese Enrichment from Industrial Inputs: A Gastropod Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Bordean, Despina-Maria; Nica, Dragos V.; Harmanescu, Monica; Banatean-Dunea, Ionut; Gergen, Iosif I.

    2014-01-01

    Manganese is one of the most abundant metal in natural environments and serves as an essential microelement for all living systems. However, the enrichment of soil with manganese resulting from industrial inputs may threaten terrestrial ecosystems. Several studies have demonstrated harmful effects of manganese exposure by cutaneous contact and/or by soil ingestion to a wide range of soil invertebrates. The link between soil manganese and land snails has never been made although these invertebrates routinely come in contact with the upper soil horizons through cutaneous contact, egg-laying, and feeding activities in soil. Therefore, we have investigated the direct transfer of manganese from soils to snails and assessed its toxicity at background concentrations in the soil. Juvenile Cantareus aspersus snails were caged under semi-field conditions and exposed first, for a period of 30 days, to a series of soil manganese concentrations, and then, for a second period of 30 days, to soils with higher manganese concentrations. Manganese levels were measured in the snail hepatopancreas, foot, and shell. The snail survival and shell growth were used to assess the lethal and sublethal effects of manganese exposure. The transfer of manganese from soil to snails occurred independently of food ingestion, but had no consistent effect on either the snail survival or shell growth. The hepatopancreas was the best biomarker of manganese exposure, whereas the shell did not serve as a long-term sink for this metal. The kinetics of manganese retention in the hepatopancreas of snails previously exposed to manganese-spiked soils was significantly influenced by a new exposure event. The results of this study reveal the importance of land snails for manganese cycling in terrestrial biotopes and suggest that the direct transfer from soils to snails should be considered when precisely assessing the impact of anthropogenic Mn releases on soil ecosystems. PMID:24454856

  1. Variations in Reactivity on Different Crystallographic Orientations of Cerium Oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Mullins, David R; Albrecht, Peter M; Calaza, Florencia C

    2013-01-01

    Cerium oxide is a principal component in many heterogeneous catalytic processes. One of its key characteristics is the ability to provide or remove oxygen in chemical reactions. The different crystallographic faces of ceria present significantly different surface structures and compositions that may alter the catalytic reactivity. The structure and composition determine the number of coordination vacancies surrounding surface atoms, the availability of adsorption sites, the spacing between adsorption sites and the ability to remove O from the surface. To investigate the role of surface orientation on reactivity, CeO2 films were grown with two different orientations. CeO2(100) films were grown ex situ by pulsed laser deposition on Nb-doped SrTiO3(100). CeO2(111) films were grown in situ by thermal deposition of Ce metal onto Ru(0001) in an oxygen atmosphere. The chemical reactivity was characterized by the adsorption and decomposition of various molecules such as alcohols, aldehydes and organic acids. In general the CeO2(100) surface was found to be more active, i.e. molecules adsorbed more readily and reacted to form new products, especially on a fully oxidized substrate. However the CeO2(100) surface was less selective with a greater propensity to produce CO, CO2 and water as products. The differences in chemical reactivity are discussed in light of possible structural terminations of the two surfaces. Recently nanocubes and nano-octahedra have been synthesized that display CeO2(100) and CeO2(111) faces, respectively. These nanoparticles enable us to correlate reactions on high surface area model catalysts at atmospheric pressure with model single crystal films in a UHV environment.

  2. Effect of cerium oxide nanoparticles on intestinal serotonin in zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Özel, Rıfat Emrah; Hayat, Akhtar; Wallace, Kenneth N.; Andreescu, Silvana

    2013-01-01

    Cerium oxide nanoparticles or nanoceria are emerging as a new and promising class of nanoparticle technology for biomedical applications. The safe implementation of these particles in clinical applications requires evaluation of their redox properties and reactivity that might cause neurotoxic effects by interacting with redox components of the physiological environment. We report in vitro and in vivo studies to evaluate the impact of nanoceria exposure on serotonin (5-HT), an important neurotransmitter that plays a critical role in various physiological processes including motility and secretion in the digestive system. In vitro studies of 5-HT in the presence of nanoceria using spectroscopic, electrochemical and surface characterization methods demonstrate that nanoceria interacts with 5-HT and forms a surface adsorbed 5-HT-nanoceria complex. Further in vivo studies in live zebrafish embryos indicate depletion of the 5-HT level in the intestine for exposure periods longer than three days. Intestinal 5-HT was assessed quantitatively in live embryos using implantable carbon fiber microelectrodes and the results were compared to immunohistochemistry of the dissected intestine. 20 and 50 ppm nanoparticle exposure decreased the 5-HT level to 20.5 (±1.3) and 5.3 (±1.5) nM respectively as compared to 30.8 (±3.4) nM for unexposed control embryos. The results suggest that internalized nanoceria particles can concentrate 5-HT at the nanoparticle accumulation site depleting it from the surrounding tissue. This finding might have long term implications in the neurophysiology and functional development of organisms exposed to these particles through intended or unintended exposure. PMID:24015353

  3. Cerium oxide nanoparticle treatment ameliorates peritonitis-induced diaphragm dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Asano, Shinichi; Arvapalli, Ravikumar; Manne, Nandini DPK; Maheshwari, Mani; Ma, Bing; Rice, Kevin M; Selvaraj, Vellaisamy; Blough, Eric R

    2015-01-01

    The severe inflammation observed during sepsis is thought to cause diaphragm dysfunction, which is associated with poor patient prognosis. Cerium oxide (CeO2) nanoparticles have been posited to exhibit anti-inflammatory and antioxidative activities suggesting that these particles may be of potential use for the treatment of inflammatory disorders. To investigate this possibility, Sprague Dawley rats were randomly assigned to the following groups: sham control, CeO2 nanoparticle treatment only (0.5 mg/kg iv), sepsis, and sepsis+CeO2 nanoparticles. Sepsis was induced by the introduction of cecal material (600 mg/kg) directly into the peritoneal cavity. Nanoparticle treatment decreased sepsis-associated impairments in diaphragmatic contractile (Po) function (sham: 25.6±1.6 N/cm2 vs CeO2: 23.4±0.8 N/cm2 vs Sep: 15.9±1.0 N/cm2 vs Sep+CeO2: 20.0±1.0 N/cm2, P<0.05). These improvements in diaphragm contractile function were accompanied by a normalization of protein translation signaling (Akt, FOXO-1, and 4EBP1), diminished proteolysis (caspase 8 and ubiquitin levels), and decreased inflammatory signaling (Stat3 and iNOS). Histological analysis suggested that nanoparticle treatment was associated with diminished sarcolemma damage and diminished inflammatory cell infiltration. These data indicate CeO2 nanoparticles may improve diaphragmatic function in the septic laboratory rat. PMID:26491293

  4. Effect of cerium oxide nanoparticles on intestinal serotonin in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Ozel, Rıfat Emrah; Hayat, Akhtar; Wallace, Kenneth N; Andreescu, Silvana

    2013-09-21

    Cerium oxide nanoparticles or nanoceria are emerging as a new and promising class of nanoparticle technology for biomedical applications. The safe implementation of these particles in clinical applications requires evaluation of their redox properties and reactivity that might cause neurotoxic effects by interacting with redox components of the physiological environment. We report in vitro and in vivo studies to evaluate the impact of nanoceria exposure on serotonin (5-HT), an important neurotransmitter that plays a critical role in various physiological processes including motility and secretion in the digestive system. In vitro studies of 5-HT in the presence of nanoceria using spectroscopic, electrochemical and surface characterization methods demonstrate that nanoceria interacts with 5-HT and forms a surface adsorbed 5-HT-nanoceria complex. Further in vivo studies in live zebrafish embryos indicate depletion of the 5-HT level in the intestine for exposure periods longer than three days. Intestinal 5-HT was assessed quantitatively in live embryos using implantable carbon fiber microelectrodes and the results were compared to immunohistochemistry of the dissected intestine. 20 and 50 ppm nanoparticle exposure decreased the 5-HT level to 20.5 (±1.3) and 5.3 (±1.5) nM respectively as compared to 30.8 (±3.4) nM for unexposed control embryos. The results suggest that internalized nanoceria particles can concentrate 5-HT at the nanoparticle accumulation site depleting it from the surrounding tissue. This finding might have long term implications in the neurophysiology and functional development of organisms exposed to these particles through intended or unintended exposure. PMID:24015353

  5. Effects of Cerium Oxide Nanoparticles on Sorghum Plant Traits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mu, L.; Chen, Y.; Darnault, C. J. G.; Rauh, B.; Kresovich, S.; Korte, C.

    2015-12-01

    Nanotechnology and nanomaterials are considered as the development of the modern science. However, besides with that wide application, nanoparticles arouse to the side effects on the environment and human health. As the catalyst of ceramics and fuel industry, Cerium (IV) oxide nanoparticles (CeO2 NPs) can be found in the environment following their use and life-cycle. Therefore, it is critical to assess the potential effects that CeO2 NPs found in soils may have on plants. In this study, CeO2 NPs were analyzed for the potential influence on the sorghum [Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench] (Reg. no. 126) (PI 154844) growth and traits. The objectives of this research were to determine whether CeO2 NPs impact the sorghum germination and growth characteristics. The sorghum was grown in the greenhouse located at Biosystems Research Complex, Clemson University under different CeO2 NPs treatments (0mg; 100mg; 500mg; 1000mg CeO2 NPs/Kg soil) and harvested around each month. At the end of the each growing period, above ground vegetative tissue was air-dried, ground to 2mm particle size and compositional traits estimated using near-infrared spectroscopy. Also, the NPK value of the sorghum tissue was tested by Clemson Agriculture Center. After the first harvest, the result showed that the height of above ground biomass under the nanoparticles stress was higher than that of control group. This difference between the control and the nanoparticles treatments was significant (F>F0.05; LSD). Our results also indicated that some of the compositional traits were impacted by the different treatments, including the presence and/or concentrations of the nanoparticles.

  6. Interfacial oxidations of pure titanium and titanium alloys with investments.

    PubMed

    Ban, S; Watanabe, T; Mizutani, N; Fukui, H; Hasegawa, J; Nakamura, H

    2000-12-01

    External oxides of a commercially pure titanium (cpTi), Ti6Al4V alloy, and an experimental beta-type titanium alloy (Ti 53.4 wt%, Nb 29 wt%, Ta 13 wt%, and Zr 4.6 wt%) were characterized after heating to 600, 900, 1150, and 1400 degrees C in contact with three types of investments (alumina cement, magnesia cement, and phosphate-bonded) in air. XRD studies demonstrated that MgO, Li2TiO3 and/or Li2Ti3O7 were formed through reactions with the metal and the constituents in the magnesia cement-investment after heating to 900, 1150, and 1400 degrees C. Except for these conditions, TiO2 (rutile) was only formed on cpTi. For titanium alloys, the other components apart from Ti also formed simple and complex oxides such as Al2O3 and Al2TiO5 on Ti6Al4V, and Zr0.25Ti0.75Nb2O7 on the beta-type titanium alloy. However, no oxides containing V or Ta were formed. These results suggest that the constituents of titanium alloys reacted with the investment oxides and atmospheric oxygen to form external oxides due to the free energy of oxide formation and the concentration of each element on the metal surface.

  7. Cell response of anodized nanotubes on titanium and titanium alloys.

    PubMed

    Minagar, Sepideh; Wang, James; Berndt, Christopher C; Ivanova, Elena P; Wen, Cuie

    2013-09-01

    Titanium and titanium alloy implants that have been demonstrated to be more biocompatible than other metallic implant materials, such as Co-Cr alloys and stainless steels, must also be accepted by bone cells, bonding with and growing on them to prevent loosening. Highly ordered nanoporous arrays of titanium dioxide that form on titanium surface by anodic oxidation are receiving increasing research interest due to their effectiveness in promoting osseointegration. The response of bone cells to implant materials depends on the topography, physicochemistry, mechanics, and electronics of the implant surface and this influences cell behavior, such as adhesion, proliferation, shape, migration, survival, and differentiation; for example the existing anions on the surface of a titanium implant make it negative and this affects the interaction with negative fibronectin (FN). Although optimal nanosize of reproducible titania nanotubes has not been reported due to different protocols used in studies, cell response was more sensitive to titania nanotubes with nanometer diameter and interspace. By annealing, amorphous TiO2 nanotubes change to a crystalline form and become more hydrophilic, resulting in an encouraging effect on cell behavior. The crystalline size and thickness of the bone-like apatite that forms on the titania nanotubes after implantation are also affected by the diameter and shape. This review describes how changes in nanotube morphologies, such as the tube diameter, the thickness of the nanotube layer, and the crystalline structure, influence the response of cells.

  8. Titanium nanostructures for biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulkarni, M.; Mazare, A.; Gongadze, E.; Perutkova, Š.; Kralj-Iglič, V.; Milošev, I.; Schmuki, P.; Iglič, A.; Mozetič, M.

    2015-02-01

    Titanium and titanium alloys exhibit a unique combination of strength and biocompatibility, which enables their use in medical applications and accounts for their extensive use as implant materials in the last 50 years. Currently, a large amount of research is being carried out in order to determine the optimal surface topography for use in bioapplications, and thus the emphasis is on nanotechnology for biomedical applications. It was recently shown that titanium implants with rough surface topography and free energy increase osteoblast adhesion, maturation and subsequent bone formation. Furthermore, the adhesion of different cell lines to the surface of titanium implants is influenced by the surface characteristics of titanium; namely topography, charge distribution and chemistry. The present review article focuses on the specific nanotopography of titanium, i.e. titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanotubes, using a simple electrochemical anodisation method of the metallic substrate and other processes such as the hydrothermal or sol-gel template. One key advantage of using TiO2 nanotubes in cell interactions is based on the fact that TiO2 nanotube morphology is correlated with cell adhesion, spreading, growth and differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells, which were shown to be maximally induced on smaller diameter nanotubes (15 nm), but hindered on larger diameter (100 nm) tubes, leading to cell death and apoptosis. Research has supported the significance of nanotopography (TiO2 nanotube diameter) in cell adhesion and cell growth, and suggests that the mechanics of focal adhesion formation are similar among different cell types. As such, the present review will focus on perhaps the most spectacular and surprising one-dimensional structures and their unique biomedical applications for increased osseointegration, protein interaction and antibacterial properties.

  9. Titanium nanostructures for biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, M; Mazare, A; Gongadze, E; Perutkova, Š; Kralj-Iglič, V; Milošev, I; Schmuki, P; A Iglič; Mozetič, M

    2015-02-13

    Titanium and titanium alloys exhibit a unique combination of strength and biocompatibility, which enables their use in medical applications and accounts for their extensive use as implant materials in the last 50 years. Currently, a large amount of research is being carried out in order to determine the optimal surface topography for use in bioapplications, and thus the emphasis is on nanotechnology for biomedical applications. It was recently shown that titanium implants with rough surface topography and free energy increase osteoblast adhesion, maturation and subsequent bone formation. Furthermore, the adhesion of different cell lines to the surface of titanium implants is influenced by the surface characteristics of titanium; namely topography, charge distribution and chemistry. The present review article focuses on the specific nanotopography of titanium, i.e. titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanotubes, using a simple electrochemical anodisation method of the metallic substrate and other processes such as the hydrothermal or sol-gel template. One key advantage of using TiO2 nanotubes in cell interactions is based on the fact that TiO2 nanotube morphology is correlated with cell adhesion, spreading, growth and differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells, which were shown to be maximally induced on smaller diameter nanotubes (15 nm), but hindered on larger diameter (100 nm) tubes, leading to cell death and apoptosis. Research has supported the significance of nanotopography (TiO2 nanotube diameter) in cell adhesion and cell growth, and suggests that the mechanics of focal adhesion formation are similar among different cell types. As such, the present review will focus on perhaps the most spectacular and surprising one-dimensional structures and their unique biomedical applications for increased osseointegration, protein interaction and antibacterial properties. PMID:25611515

  10. Titanium nanostructures for biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, M; Mazare, A; Gongadze, E; Perutkova, Š; Kralj-Iglič, V; Milošev, I; Schmuki, P; A Iglič; Mozetič, M

    2015-02-13

    Titanium and titanium alloys exhibit a unique combination of strength and biocompatibility, which enables their use in medical applications and accounts for their extensive use as implant materials in the last 50 years. Currently, a large amount of research is being carried out in order to determine the optimal surface topography for use in bioapplications, and thus the emphasis is on nanotechnology for biomedical applications. It was recently shown that titanium implants with rough surface topography and free energy increase osteoblast adhesion, maturation and subsequent bone formation. Furthermore, the adhesion of different cell lines to the surface of titanium implants is influenced by the surface characteristics of titanium; namely topography, charge distribution and chemistry. The present review article focuses on the specific nanotopography of titanium, i.e. titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanotubes, using a simple electrochemical anodisation method of the metallic substrate and other processes such as the hydrothermal or sol-gel template. One key advantage of using TiO2 nanotubes in cell interactions is based on the fact that TiO2 nanotube morphology is correlated with cell adhesion, spreading, growth and differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells, which were shown to be maximally induced on smaller diameter nanotubes (15 nm), but hindered on larger diameter (100 nm) tubes, leading to cell death and apoptosis. Research has supported the significance of nanotopography (TiO2 nanotube diameter) in cell adhesion and cell growth, and suggests that the mechanics of focal adhesion formation are similar among different cell types. As such, the present review will focus on perhaps the most spectacular and surprising one-dimensional structures and their unique biomedical applications for increased osseointegration, protein interaction and antibacterial properties.

  11. Cerium Oxide Nanoparticles and Bulk Cerium Oxide Leading to Different Physiological and Biochemical Responses in Brassica rapa.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xingmao; Wang, Qiang; Rossi, Lorenzo; Zhang, Weilan

    2016-07-01

    Cerium oxide nanoparticles (CeO2NPs) have been incorporated into many commercial products, and their potential release into the environment through the use and disposal of these products has caused serious concerns. Despite the previous efforts and rapid progress on elucidating the environmental impact of CeO2NPs, the long-term impact of CeO2NPs to plants, a key component of the ecosystem, is still not well understood. The potentially different impact of CeO2NPs and their bulk counterparts to plants is also unclear. The main objectives of this study were (1) to investigate whether continued irrigation with solutions containing different concentrations of CeO2NPs (0, 10, and 100 mg/L) would induce physiological and biochemical adjustments in Brassica rapa in soil growing conditions and (2) to determine whether CeO2NPs and bulk CeO2 particles exert different impacts on plants. The results indicated that bulk CeO2 at 10 and 100 mg/L enhanced plant biomass by 28% and 35%, respectively, while CeO2NPs at equivalent concentrations did not. While the bulk CeO2 treatment resulted in significantly higher concentrations of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in plant tissues at the vegetative stage, CeO2NPs led to significantly higher H2O2 levels in plant tissues at the floral stage. The activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD) in Brassica rapa also displayed a growth-stage dependent response to different sizes of CeO2 while catalase (CAT) activity was not affected by either size of CeO2 throughout the life cycle of Brassica rapa. Altogether, the results demonstrated that plant responses to CeO2 exposure varied with the particle sizes and the growth stages of plants.

  12. Cerium Oxide Nanoparticles and Bulk Cerium Oxide Leading to Different Physiological and Biochemical Responses in Brassica rapa.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xingmao; Wang, Qiang; Rossi, Lorenzo; Zhang, Weilan

    2016-07-01

    Cerium oxide nanoparticles (CeO2NPs) have been incorporated into many commercial products, and their potential release into the environment through the use and disposal of these products has caused serious concerns. Despite the previous efforts and rapid progress on elucidating the environmental impact of CeO2NPs, the long-term impact of CeO2NPs to plants, a key component of the ecosystem, is still not well understood. The potentially different impact of CeO2NPs and their bulk counterparts to plants is also unclear. The main objectives of this study were (1) to investigate whether continued irrigation with solutions containing different concentrations of CeO2NPs (0, 10, and 100 mg/L) would induce physiological and biochemical adjustments in Brassica rapa in soil growing conditions and (2) to determine whether CeO2NPs and bulk CeO2 particles exert different impacts on plants. The results indicated that bulk CeO2 at 10 and 100 mg/L enhanced plant biomass by 28% and 35%, respectively, while CeO2NPs at equivalent concentrations did not. While the bulk CeO2 treatment resulted in significantly higher concentrations of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) in plant tissues at the vegetative stage, CeO2NPs led to significantly higher H2O2 levels in plant tissues at the floral stage. The activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD) in Brassica rapa also displayed a growth-stage dependent response to different sizes of CeO2 while catalase (CAT) activity was not affected by either size of CeO2 throughout the life cycle of Brassica rapa. Altogether, the results demonstrated that plant responses to CeO2 exposure varied with the particle sizes and the growth stages of plants. PMID:26691446

  13. Plasma quench production of titanium from titanium tetrachloride

    SciTech Connect

    Sears, J.W.

    1994-10-01

    This project, Plasma Quench Production of Titanium from Titanium Tetrachloride, centers on developing a technique for rapidly quenching the high temperature metal species and preventing back reactions with the halide. The quenching technique chosen uses the temperature drop produced in a converging/diverging supersonic nozzle. The rapid quench provided by this nozzle prevents the back reaction of the halide and metal. The nature of the process produces nanosized particles (10 to 100 nm). The powders are collected by cyclone separators, the hydrogen flared, and the acid scrubbed. Aluminum and titanium powders have been produced in the laboratory-scale device at 1 gram per hour. Efforts to date to scale up this process have not been successful.

  14. Titanium diaphragm makes excellent amplitron cathode support

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teich, W. W.

    1965-01-01

    Cathode support structure designed around a titanium diaphragm prevents radial misalignment between the cathode and anode in amplitrons. The titanium exhibits low thermal conductivity, tolerates lateral thermal expansion of the cathode, and is a poor primary and secondary emission medium.

  15. Titanium pigmentation. An electron probe microanalysis study

    SciTech Connect

    Dupre, A.; Touron, P.; Daste, J.; Lassere, J.; Bonafe, J.L.; Viraben, R.

    1985-05-01

    A patient had an unusual pigmentary disease induced by titanium dioxide. The use of a topical cream containing titanium dioxide caused a xanthomalike appearance on the patient's penis. Electron probe microanalysis was valuable in establishing the cause of this balanitis.

  16. Method for Surface Texturing Titanium Products

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Bruce A. (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    The present invention teaches a method of producing a textured surface upon an arbitrarily configured titanium or titanium alloy object for the purpose of improving bonding between the object and other materials such as polymer matrix composites and/or human bone for the direct in-growth of orthopaedic implants. The titanium or titanium alloy object is placed in an electrolytic cell having an ultrasonically agitated solution of sodium chloride therein whereby a pattern of uniform "pock mark" like pores or cavities are produced upon the object's surface. The process is very cost effective compared to other methods of producing rough surfaces on titanium and titanium alloy components. The surface textures produced by the present invention are etched directly into the parent metal at discrete sites separated by areas unaffected by the etching process. Bonding materials to such surface textures on titanium or titanium alloy can thus support a shear load even if adhesion of the bonding material is poor.

  17. A simple route to synthesize manganese germanate nanorods

    SciTech Connect

    Pei, L.Z. Yang, Y.; Yuan, C.Z.; Duan Taike; Zhang Qianfeng

    2011-06-15

    Manganese germanate nanorods have been synthesized by a simple route using germanium dioxide and manganese acetate as the source materials. X-ray diffraction observation shows that the nanorods are composed of orthorhombic and monoclinic manganese germanate phases. Scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy observations display that the manganese germanate nanorods have flat tips with the length of longer than 10 micrometers and diameter of 60-350 nm, respectively. The role of the growth conditions on the formation of the manganese germanate nanorods shows that the proper selection and combination of the growth conditions are the key factor for controlling the formation of the manganese germanate nanorods. The photoluminescence spectrum of the manganese germanate nanorods exhibits four fluorescence emission peaks centered at 422 nm, 472 nm, 487 nm and 530 nm showing the application potential for the optical devices. - Research Highlights: {yields} Manganese germanate nanorods have been synthesized by simple hydrothermal process. {yields} The formation of manganese germanate nanorods can be controlled by growth conditions. {yields} Manganese germanate nanorods exhibit good PL emission ability for optical device.

  18. The effects of cerium doping on the size, morphology, and optical properties of α-hematite nanoparticles for ultraviolet filtration

    SciTech Connect

    Cardillo, Dean; Konstantinov, Konstantin; Devers, Thierry

    2013-11-15

    Highlights: • Possible application of cerium-doped α-hematite as ultraviolet filter. • Nanoparticles obtained through co-precipitation technique using various cerium doping levels followed by annealing. • Comprehensive materials characterisation utilizing XRD, DSC/TGA, STEM, UV–vis spectroscopy. • Increasing cerium content reduces particle sizing and alters morphology. • Solubility of cerium in hematite seen between 5 and 10% doping, 10% cerium doping greatly enhances attenuation in ultraviolet region and increases optical bandgap. - Abstract: Metal oxide nanoparticles have potential use in energy storage, electrode materials, as catalysts and in the emerging field of nanomedicine. Being able to accurately tailor the desirable properties of these nanoceramic materials, such as particle size, morphology and optical bandgap (E{sub g}) is integral in the feasibility of their use. In this study we investigate the altering of both the structure and physical properties through the doping of hematite (α-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}) nanocrystals with cerium at a range of concentrations, synthesised using a one-pot co-precipitation method. This extremely simple synthesis followed by thermal treatment results in stable Fe{sub 2−x}Ce{sub x}O{sub y} nanoceramics resulting from the burning of any unreacted precursors and transformation of goethite-cerium doped nanoparticle intermediate. The inclusion of Ce into the crystal lattice of these α-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanoparticles causes a significantly large reduction in mean crystalline size and alteration in particle morphology with increasing cerium content. Finally we report an increase optical semiconductor bandgap, along with a substantial increase in the ultraviolet attenuation found for a 10% Ce-doping concentration which shows the potential application of cerium-doped hematite nanocrystals to be used as a pigmented ultraviolet filter for cosmetic products.

  19. Lightweight Protective Coatings For Titanium Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiedemann, Karl E.; Taylor, Patrick J.; Clark, Ronald K.

    1992-01-01

    Lightweight coating developed to protect titanium and titanium aluminide alloys and titanium-matrix composite materials from attack by environment when used at high temperatures. Applied by sol-gel methods, and thickness less than 5 micrometers. Reaction-barrier and self-healing diffusion-barrier layers combine to protect titanium alloy against chemical attack by oxygen and nitrogen at high temperatures with very promising results. Can be extended to protection of other environmentally sensitive materials.

  20. Process for reproducibly preparing titanium subhydride

    DOEpatents

    Carlson, Richard S.

    1982-01-01

    Titanium subhydride is produced in a reactor by heating a selected amount of finely divided titanium compound at a selected temperature for a selected period of time under dynamic vacuum conditions. Hydrogen is removed substantially uniformly from each powder grain and there is produced a subhydride of substantially uniform titanium-hydrogen composition. Selection of the amount, temperature and time produces a subhydride of selected titanium-hydrogen composition.

  1. Synthesis and characterization of linear cerium(IV) Schiff-base coordination polymers

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, H.; Cronin, J.A.; Archer, R.D. . Dept. of Chemistry)

    1994-04-11

    The first soluble linear Schiff-base rare earth coordination polymer, catena-poly[cerium-(4)-[mu]-N,N[prime],N[double prime],N[prime][double prime]-tetrasalicylidene (3,3[prime]-diaminobenzidinato)-O,N,N[prime],O[prime],O[double prime],N[double prime],N[prime][double prime],O[prime][double prime

  2. Cerium (IV) oxide nanotubes prepared by low temperature deposition at normal pressure.

    PubMed

    Boehme, M; Fu, G; Ionescu, E; Ensinger, W

    2011-02-11

    This paper reports the synthesis of cerium dioxide nanotubes (CeNTs) by electroless deposition using ion-track-etched polycarbonate templates. To achieve nanotubes with thin walls and small surface roughness the tubes were generated by a several-step-containing procedure under aqueous conditions. The approach reported below will process open end nanotubes with well-defined outer diameter and wall thickness.

  3. Pits confined in ultrathin cerium(IV) oxide for studying catalytic centers in carbon monoxide oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yongfu; Liu, Qinghua; Gao, Shan; Cheng, Hao; Lei, Fengcai; Sun, Zhihu; Jiang, Yong; Su, Haibin; Wei, Shiqiang; Xie, Yi

    2013-11-01

    Finding ideal material models for studying the role of catalytic active sites remains a great challenge. Here we propose pits confined in an atomically thin sheet as a platform to evaluate carbon monoxide catalytic oxidation at various sites. The artificial three-atomic-layer thin cerium(IV) oxide sheet with approximately 20% pits occupancy possesses abundant pit-surrounding cerium sites having average coordination numbers of 4.6 as revealed by X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Density-functional calculations disclose that the four- and five-fold coordinated pit-surrounding cerium sites assume their respective role in carbon monoxide adsorption and oxygen activation, which lowers the activation barrier and avoids catalytic poisoning. Moreover, the presence of coordination-unsaturated cerium sites increases the carrier density and facilitates carbon monoxide diffusion along the two-dimensional conducting channels of surface pits. The atomically thin sheet with surface-confined pits exhibits lower apparent activation energy than the bulk material (61.7 versus 122.9 kJ mol-1), leading to reduced conversion temperature and enhanced carbon monoxide catalytic ability.

  4. Calculation of the volume effect at an electron phase transition in pure cerium and praseodymium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponomareva, S. A.; Koval', Yu. N.; Ponomarev, A. P.

    2014-03-01

    The experimental values of the volume effect at an electronic phase transition in several rare-earth metals are discussed. Specifically, volume changes at phase transitions in cerium and praseodymium are calculated using a semiphenomenological relationship derived in terms of the Falikov-Ramirez-Kimball model. A number of factors influencing the amount of the volume effect at electronic phase transitions are analyzed.

  5. Synthesis, electrical and dielectric characterization of cerium doped nano copper ferrites

    SciTech Connect

    Malana, Muhammad Aslam Qureshi, Raheela Beenish; Ashiq, Muhammad Naeem; Zafar, Zafar Iqbal

    2013-11-15

    Graphical abstract: Lattice constant (a) and activation energy (Ea) as a function of Ce (cerium) content. - Highlights: • The simple and economic method has been adopted for the synthesis of nanoferrites. • The electrical resistivity increases with cerium concentration. • DC electrical resistivity of these materials favours their use in microwave devices. • Dielectric measurements show semiconductor nature of the synthesized ferrites. - Abstract: The nanosized CuFe{sub 2−x}Ce{sub x}O{sub 4} (x = 0.0, 0.2, 0.4, 0.6, 0.8) ferrites doped with cerium are synthesized by chemical co-precipitation method. The synthesized materials are characterized by XRD, FTIR, TGA and SEM. XRD analysis of cerium substituted copper ferrites confirms the cubic spinel structure. The average crystallite size calculated by using Scherrer's formula ranges from 37 to 53 nm. The values of cell constant and cell volume vary with the dopant concentration. These variations can be explained in terms of their ionic radii. The DC electrical resistivity, measured by two point probe method, increases with increase in dopant concentration while it decreases with rise in temperature exhibiting semiconductor behaviour. Energy of activation of these ferrites is calculated by using Arrhenius type resistivity plots. Dielectric measurements of the synthesized compounds show exponential decrease in dielectric constant and dielectric loss factor with increase in frequency. This indicates the normal dielectric behaviour of ferrites.

  6. Pits confined in ultrathin cerium(IV) oxide for studying catalytic centers in carbon monoxide oxidation.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yongfu; Liu, Qinghua; Gao, Shan; Cheng, Hao; Lei, Fengcai; Sun, Zhihu; Jiang, Yong; Su, Haibin; Wei, Shiqiang; Xie, Yi

    2013-01-01

    Finding ideal material models for studying the role of catalytic active sites remains a great challenge. Here we propose pits confined in an atomically thin sheet as a platform to evaluate carbon monoxide catalytic oxidation at various sites. The artificial three-atomic-layer thin cerium(IV) oxide sheet with approximately 20% pits occupancy possesses abundant pit-surrounding cerium sites having average coordination numbers of 4.6 as revealed by X-ray absorption spectroscopy. Density-functional calculations disclose that the four- and five-fold coordinated pit-surrounding cerium sites assume their respective role in carbon monoxide adsorption and oxygen activation, which lowers the activation barrier and avoids catalytic poisoning. Moreover, the presence of coordination-unsaturated cerium sites increases the carrier density and facilitates carbon monoxide diffusion along the two-dimensional conducting channels of surface pits. The atomically thin sheet with surface-confined pits exhibits lower apparent activation energy than the bulk material (61.7 versus 122.9 kJ mol(-1)), leading to reduced conversion temperature and enhanced carbon monoxide catalytic ability.

  7. Cerium oxide coated anodes for aluminum electrowinning: Topical report, October 1, 1986-June 30, 1987

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, J. K.

    1987-12-01

    Because of the cost of building and maintaining a carbon anode plant and the energy penalties associated with the use of carbon anodes in the production of aluminum, the use of inert anodes has long been proposed. Various cermet anodes have been investigated. In this paper, tests on a material, cerium oxyfluoride (CEROX), deposited in situ as an anode, are reported. (JDH)

  8. Demonstration of enhanced K-edge angiography using a cerium target x-ray generator

    SciTech Connect

    Sato, Eiichi; Tanaka, Etsuro; Mori, Hidezo; Kawai, Toshiaki; Ichimaru, Toshio; Sato, Shigehiro; Takayama, Kazuyoshi; Ido, Hideaki

    2004-11-01

    The cerium target x-ray generator is useful in order to perform enhanced K-edge angiography using a cone beam because K-series characteristic x rays from the cerium target are absorbed effectively by iodine-based contrast mediums. The x-ray generator consists of a main controller, a unit with a Cockcroft-Walton circuit and a fixed anode x-ray tube, and a personal computer. The tube is a glass-enclosed diode with a cerium target and a 0.5-mm-thick beryllium window. The maximum tube voltage and current were 65 kV and 0.4 mA, respectively, and the focal-spot sizes were 1.0x1.3 mm. Cerium K{alpha} lines were left using a barium sulfate filter, and the x-ray intensity was 0.48 {mu}C/kg at 1.0 m from the source with a tube voltage of 60 kV, a current of 0.40 mA, and an exposure time of 1.0 s. Angiography was performed with a computed radiography system using iodine-based microspheres. In coronary angiography of nonliving animals, we observed fine blood vessels of approximately 100 {mu}m with high contrasts.

  9. Phosphate ester hydrolysis of biologically relevant molecules by cerium oxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Kuchma, Melissa Hirsch; Komanski, Christopher B; Colon, Jimmie; Teblum, Andrew; Masunov, Artëm E; Alvarado, Beatrice; Babu, Suresh; Seal, Sudipta; Summy, Justin; Baker, Cheryl H

    2010-12-01

    In an effort to characterize the interaction of cerium oxide nanoparticles (CNPs) in biological systems, we explored the reactivity of CNPs with the phosphate ester bonds of p-nitrophenylphosphate (pNPP), ATP, o-phospho-l-tyrosine, and DNA. The activity of the bond cleavage for pNPP at pH 7 is calculated to be 0.860 ± 0.010 nmol p-nitrophenol/min/μg CNPs. Interestingly, when CNPs bind to plasmid DNA, no cleavage products are detected. While cerium(IV) complexes generally exhibit the ability to break phosphorus-oxygen bonds, the reactions we report appear to be dependent on the availability of cerium(III) sites, not cerium(IV) sites. We investigated the dephosphorylation mechanism from the first principles and find the reaction proceeds through inversion of the phosphate group similar to an S(N)2 mechanism. The ability of CNPs to interact with phosphate ester bonds of biologically relevant molecules has important implications for their use as potential therapeutics.

  10. Long range ordered alloys modified by addition of niobium and cerium

    DOEpatents

    Liu, C.T.

    1984-08-22

    Long range ordered alloys are described having the nominal composition (Fe,Ni,Co)/sub 3/ (V,M) where M is a ductility enhancing metal selected from the group Ti, Zr, Hf with additions of small amounts of cerium and niobium to dramatically enhance the creep properties of the resulting alloys.

  11. Long range ordered alloys modified by addition of niobium and cerium

    DOEpatents

    Liu, Chain T.

    1987-01-01

    Long range ordered alloys are described having the nominal composition (Fe,Ni,Co).sub.3 (V,M) where M is a ductility enhancing metal selected from the group Ti, Zr, Hf with additions of small amounts of cerium and niobium to drammatically enhance the creep properties of the resulting alloys.

  12. Resonant photoemission study of the 4f spectral function of cerium in Ce/Fe(100) interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Witkowski, N.; Bertran, F.; Gourieux, T.; Kierren, B.; Malterre, D.; Panaccione, G. |

    1997-11-01

    In this paper, we present a resonant photoemission study of the cerium 4f spectral function in Ce/Fe(100) interfaces. By covering cerium ultrathin films with lanthanum, we completely suppress the surface contribution of the spectra. Then we show that the cerium atoms at the interface are in an intermediate valent state, whereas the f{sup 1} configuration is stabilized in the top layer. This method allows us to obtain the genuine 4f spectral function of the interface, and could be extended to a study of Ce-based compounds. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  13. 21 CFR 73.575 - Titanium dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Titanium dioxide. 73.575 Section 73.575 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Foods § 73.575 Titanium dioxide. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive titanium dioxide is synthetically prepared TiO2, free from admixture with other substances. (2)...

  14. 21 CFR 73.575 - Titanium dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Titanium dioxide. 73.575 Section 73.575 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Foods § 73.575 Titanium dioxide. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive titanium dioxide is synthetically prepared TiO2, free from admixture with other substances. (2)...

  15. 21 CFR 73.3126 - Titanium dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Titanium dioxide. 73.3126 Section 73.3126 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Medical Devices § 73.3126 Titanium dioxide. (a) Identity and specifications. The color additive titanium dioxide (CAS Reg. No. 13463-67-7), Color Index No. 77891,...

  16. 40 CFR 180.1195 - Titanium dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Titanium dioxide. 180.1195 Section 180.1195 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS... Titanium dioxide. Titanium dioxide is exempted from the requirement of a tolerance for residues in or...

  17. 40 CFR 180.1195 - Titanium dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Titanium dioxide. 180.1195 Section 180.1195 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS... Titanium dioxide. Titanium dioxide (CAS Reg. No. 13463-67-7) is exempted from the requirement of...

  18. 40 CFR 180.1195 - Titanium dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Titanium dioxide. 180.1195 Section 180.1195 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS... Titanium dioxide. Titanium dioxide is exempted from the requirement of a tolerance for residues in or...

  19. 21 CFR 73.3126 - Titanium dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Titanium dioxide. 73.3126 Section 73.3126 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Medical Devices § 73.3126 Titanium dioxide. (a) Identity and specifications. The color additive titanium dioxide (CAS Reg. No. 13463-67-7), Color Index No. 77891,...

  20. 40 CFR 180.1195 - Titanium dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Titanium dioxide. 180.1195 Section 180.1195 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS... Titanium dioxide. Titanium dioxide is exempted from the requirement of a tolerance for residues in or...

  1. 21 CFR 73.3126 - Titanium dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Titanium dioxide. 73.3126 Section 73.3126 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Medical Devices § 73.3126 Titanium dioxide. (a) Identity and specifications. The color additive titanium dioxide (CAS Reg. No. 13463-67-7), Color Index No. 77891,...

  2. 21 CFR 73.575 - Titanium dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Titanium dioxide. 73.575 Section 73.575 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Foods § 73.575 Titanium dioxide. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive titanium dioxide is synthetically prepared TiO2, free from admixture with other substances. (2)...

  3. 40 CFR 180.1195 - Titanium dioxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Titanium dioxide. 180.1195 Section 180.1195 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS... Titanium dioxide. Titanium dioxide (CAS Reg. No. 13463-67-7) is exempted from the requirement of...

  4. Photonuclear reactions on titanium isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Belyshev, S. S.; Dzhilavyan, L. Z.; Ishkhanov, B. S.; Kapitonov, I. M.; Kuznetsov, A. A. Orlin, V. N.; Stopani, K. A.

    2015-03-15

    The photodisintegration of titanium isotopes in the giant-dipole-resonance energy region is studied by the photon-activation method. Bremsstrahlung photons whose spectrum has the endpoint energy of 55 MeV is used. The yields and integrated cross sections are determined for photoproton reactions on the titanium isotopes {sup 47,48,49,50}Ti. The respective experimental results are compared with their counterparts calculated on the basis of the TALYS code and a combined photonucleon-reaction model. The TALYS code disregards the isospin structure of the giant dipole resonance and is therefore unable to describe the yield of photoproton reactions on the heavy titanium isotopes {sup 49,50}Ti.

  5. Adaptive mesh refinement in titanium

    SciTech Connect

    Colella, Phillip; Wen, Tong

    2005-01-21

    In this paper, we evaluate Titanium's usability as a high-level parallel programming language through a case study, where we implement a subset of Chombo's functionality in Titanium. Chombo is a software package applying the Adaptive Mesh Refinement methodology to numerical Partial Differential Equations at the production level. In Chombo, the library approach is used to parallel programming (C++ and Fortran, with MPI), whereas Titanium is a Java dialect designed for high-performance scientific computing. The performance of our implementation is studied and compared with that of Chombo in solving Poisson's equation based on two grid configurations from a real application. Also provided are the counts of lines of code from both sides.

  6. Suppressing Manganese Dissolution from Lithium Manganese Oxide Spinel Cathodes with Single-Layer Graphene

    SciTech Connect

    Jaber-Ansari, Laila; Puntambekar, Kanan P.; Kim, Soo; Aykol, Muratahan; Luo, Langli; Wu, Jinsong; Myers, Benjamin D.; Iddir, Hakim; Russell, John T.; Saldana, Spencer J.; Kumar, Rajan; Thackeray, Michael M.; Curtiss, Larry A.; Dravid, Vinayak P.; Wolverton, Christopher M.; Hersam, Mark C.

    2015-06-24

    Spinel-structured LiMn 2 O 4 (LMO) is a desirable cathode material for Li-ion batteries due to its low cost, abundance, and high power capability. However, LMO suffers from limited cycle life that is triggered by manganese dissolution into the electrolyte during electrochemical cycling. Here, it is shown that single-layer graphene coatings suppress manganese dissolution, thus enhancing the performance and lifetime of LMO cathodes. Relative to lithium cells with uncoated LMO cathodes, cells with graphene-coated LMO cathodes provide improved capacity retention with enhanced cycling stability. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy reveals that graphene coatings inhibit manganese depletion from the LMO surface. Additionally, transmission electron microscopy demonstrates that a stable solid electrolyte interphase is formed on graphene, which screens the LMO from direct contact with the electrolyte. Density functional theory calculations provide two mechanisms for the role of graphene in the suppression of manganese dissolution. First, common defects in single-layer graphene are found to allow the transport of lithium while concurrently acting as barriers for manganese diffusion. Second, graphene can chemically interact with Mn 3+ at the LMO electrode surface, promoting an oxidation state change to Mn 4+ , which suppresses dissolution.

  7. Preparation of manganese sulfate from low-grade manganese carbonate ores by sulfuric acid leaching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Qing-quan; Gu, Guo-hua; Wang, Hui; Zhu, Ren-feng; Liu, You-cai; Fu, Jian-gang

    2016-05-01

    In this study, a method for preparing pure manganese sulfate from low-grade ores with a granule mean size of 0.47 mm by direct acid leaching was developed. The effects of the types of leaching agents, sulfuric acid concentration, reaction temperature, and agitation rate on the leaching efficiency of manganese were investigated. We observed that sulfuric acid used as a leaching agent provides a similar leaching efficiency of manganese and superior selectivity against calcium compared to hydrochloric acid. The optimal leaching conditions in sulfuric acid media were determined; under the optimal conditions, the leaching efficiencies of Mn and Ca were 92.42% and 9.61%, respectively. Moreover, the kinetics of manganese leaching indicated that the leaching follows the diffusion-controlled model with an apparent activation energy of 12.28 kJ·mol-1. The purification conditions of the leaching solution were also discussed. The results show that manganese dioxide is a suitable oxidant of ferrous ions and sodium dimethyldithiocarbamate is an effective precipitant of heavy metals. Finally, through chemical analysis and X-ray diffraction analysis, the obtained product was determined to contain 98% of MnSO4·H2O.

  8. 4d → 4f resonance in photoabsorption of cerium ion Ce3+ and endohedral cerium in fullerene complex {\\rm{Ce}}@{{{\\rm{C}}}_{82}}^{+}

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schrange-Kashenock, G.

    2016-09-01

    The theoretical investigation of the single-photoionization spectra in the 4d-resonance region (120-150 eV) for the ionic cerium Ce3+ and cerium in the endohedral complex {{Ce}}@{{{{C}}}82}+ (in practice, {{{Ce}}}3+@{{{{C}}}82}2-) is presented. The fullerene cage is modeled by ab initio spherical jellium shell with an accurate account for the real distribution of carbon electron density. The oscillator strengths are calculated within the multiconfiguration Dirac-Fock (MCDF) approach for phototransitions from the outermost shells of the ion Ce3+ with and without the influence of the potential generated by a fullerene cage. It is shown that the integrated oscillator strengths have the main contribution from the Ce3+ 4d → 4f (ten possible from the phototransitions {}2F{7/2,5/2}\\to {}2D{3/2,5/2},{}2F{5/2,7/2},{}2G{5/2,7/2}) resonance photoexcitations. The corresponding precise MCDF values for the oscillator strengths and the transition energies are presented for the first time. It is demonstrated that the resonance {f}4d\\to 4f oscillator strengths are slightly affected by the presence of the cage potential, despite the fact that the spectral levels structure is changed when the effect of this potential is included. The Auger 4d -1 decay from the cerium free ion Ce3+ and the encapsulated endohedral ion Ce3+@ are considered within the two-step model and the corresponding Lorentzian profiles are presented. This model clearly reveals the correspondence of the complex resonance profile in the Ce3+ photoabsorption to the fine structure of ion energy levels. The smoothing of the resonance profile in the photoabsorption of the endohedral system {{Ce}}@{{{{C}}}82}+ compared with the free ion Ce3+ is attributed to increasing the linewidths of the Auger transitions. This increase is estimated from the relevant experiment (Müller et al 2008 Phys. Rev. Lett. 101 133001) to be strong; as at least three times the value for an isolated ion. The presence of the confining fullerene

  9. 4d → 4f resonance in photoabsorption of cerium ion Ce3+ and endohedral cerium in fullerene complex {\\rm{Ce}}@{{{\\rm{C}}}_{82}}^{+}

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schrange-Kashenock, G.

    2016-09-01

    The theoretical investigation of the single-photoionization spectra in the 4d-resonance region (120–150 eV) for the ionic cerium Ce3+ and cerium in the endohedral complex {{Ce}}@{{{{C}}}82}+ (in practice, {{{Ce}}}3+@{{{{C}}}82}2-) is presented. The fullerene cage is modeled by ab initio spherical jellium shell with an accurate account for the real distribution of carbon electron density. The oscillator strengths are calculated within the multiconfiguration Dirac–Fock (MCDF) approach for phototransitions from the outermost shells of the ion Ce3+ with and without the influence of the potential generated by a fullerene cage. It is shown that the integrated oscillator strengths have the main contribution from the Ce3+ 4d → 4f (ten possible from the phototransitions {}2F{7/2,5/2}\\to {}2D{3/2,5/2},{}2F{5/2,7/2},{}2G{5/2,7/2}) resonance photoexcitations. The corresponding precise MCDF values for the oscillator strengths and the transition energies are presented for the first time. It is demonstrated that the resonance {f}4d\\to 4f oscillator strengths are slightly affected by the presence of the cage potential, despite the fact that the spectral levels structure is changed when the effect of this potential is included. The Auger 4d ‑1 decay from the cerium free ion Ce3+ and the encapsulated endohedral ion Ce3+@ are considered within the two-step model and the corresponding Lorentzian profiles are presented. This model clearly reveals the correspondence of the complex resonance profile in the Ce3+ photoabsorption to the fine structure of ion energy levels. The smoothing of the resonance profile in the photoabsorption of the endohedral system {{Ce}}@{{{{C}}}82}+ compared with the free ion Ce3+ is attributed to increasing the linewidths of the Auger transitions. This increase is estimated from the relevant experiment (Müller et al 2008 Phys. Rev. Lett. 101 133001) to be strong; as at least three times the value for an isolated ion. The presence of the confining

  10. International Strategic Minerals Inventory summary report; manganese

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    DeYoung, Jr., John H.; Sutphin, David M.; Cannon, William F.

    1984-01-01

    Major world resources of manganese, a strategic mineral commodity, are described in this summary report of information in the International Strategic Minerals Inventory {ISMI). ISMI is a cooperative data-collection effort of earth-science and mineral-resource agencies in Australia, Canada, the Federal Republic of Germany, the Republic of South Africa, and the United States of America. This report, designed to be of benefit to policy analysts, contains two parts. Part I presents an overview of the resources and potential supply of manganese on the basis of inventory information. Part II contains tables of some of the geologic information and mineral-resource and production data that were collected by ISMI participants.

  11. Importance of effective dimensionality in manganese pnictides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zingl, Manuel; Assmann, Elias; Seth, Priyanka; Krivenko, Igor; Aichhorn, Markus

    2016-07-01

    In this paper we investigate the two manganese pnictides BaMn2As2 and LaMnAsO, using fully charge self-consistent density functional plus dynamical mean-field theory calculations. These systems have a nominally half-filled d shell, and as a consequence, electronic correlations are strong, placing these compounds at the verge of a metal-insulator transition. Although their crystal structure is composed of similar building blocks, our analysis shows that the two materials exhibit a very different effective dimensionality, LaMnAsO being a quasi-two-dimensional material in contrast to the much more three-dimensional BaMn2As2 . We demonstrate that the experimentally observed differences in the Néel temperature, the band gap, and the optical properties of the manganese compounds under consideration can be traced back to exactly this effective dimensionality. Our calculations show excellent agreement with measured optical spectra.

  12. Conversion of aminonitrotoluenes by fungal manganese peroxidase.

    PubMed

    Scheibner, K; Hofrichter, M

    1998-01-01

    Preparations of extracellular manganese peroxidase from the white-rot fungus Nematoloma frowardii and the litter decaying fungus Stropharia rugosoannulata converted rapidly the main intermediates of the explosive 2,4,-trinitrotoluene--the aminonitrotoluenes. In a cell-free system, 2-amino-4,6-dinitrotoluene, 4-amino-2,6-dinitrotoluene and 2,6-diamino-4-nitrotoluene were degraded without formation of identifiable metabolites. Radioactive experiments using a complex mixture of uniform ring-labeled 14C-TNT reduction products demonstrated the partial direct mineralization of these compounds by manganese peroxidase. The extent of aminonitrotoluene conversion as well as the release of 14CO2 from TNT reduction products were considerably enhanced in the presence of thiols like reduced glutathione or the amino acid L-cystein, which probably act as secondary mediators.

  13. Cerium, uranium, and plutonium behavior in glass-bonded sodalite, a ceramic nuclear waste form.

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, M. A.; Lexa, D.; Morss, L. R.; Richmann, M. K.

    1999-09-03

    Glass-bonded sodalite is being developed as a ceramic waste form (CWF) to immobilize radioactive fission products, actinides, and salt residues from electrometallurgical treatment of spent nuclear reactor fuel. The CWF consists of about 75 mass % sodalite, 25 mass % glass, and small amounts of other phases. This paper presents some results and interpretation of physical measurements to characterize the CWF structure, and dissolution tests to measure the release of matrix components and radionuclides from the waste form. Tests have been carried out with specimens of the CWF that contain rare earths at concentrations similar to those expected in the waste form. Parallel tests have been carried out on specimens that have uranium or plutonium as well as the rare earths at concentrations similar to those expected in the waste forms; in these specimens UCl{sub 3} forms UO{sub 2} and PuCl{sub 3} forms PuO{sub 2}. The normalized releases of rare earths in dissolution tests were found to be much lower than those of matrix elements (B, Si, Al, Na). When there is no uranium in the CWF, the release of cerium is two to ten times lower than the release of the other rare earths. The low release of cerium may be due to its tetravalent state in uranium-free CWF. However, when there is uranium in the CWF, the release of cerium is similar to that of the other rare earths. This trivalent behavior of cerium is attributed to charge transfer or covalent interactions among cerium, uranium, and oxygen in (U,Ce)O{sub 2}.

  14. Kinetics of decomposition of manganese slimes by sulfur dioxide

    SciTech Connect

    Dzhaparidze, P.I.; Kelbakiani, N.V.

    1982-02-20

    Lean manganese ores, and slimes obtained during mechanical beneficiation of Chiatura manganese ores, have been treated by the sulfite process, by saturation of suspensions with sulfur dioxide. The kinetics of saturation of the suspensions with sulfur dioxide, and transfer of manganese into solution was studied. Manganese was leached out by passing sulfur dioxide through the slime suspension. The sulfur dioxide dissolved in water to form the weakly dissociated sulfurous acid in equilibrium with its anhydrides. The leaching was conducted without access of air at room temperature. An equation for determination of the rate of sulfur dioxide adsorption by a manganese-containing slurry and for calculation of the degree of manganese extraction into solution was developed from the experimental results. The reaction order and the control regime of the processes were determined.

  15. Cation adsorption on manganese dioxide impregnated fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, S. ); Stahel, E.P. )

    1992-12-01

    Complete removal of radioactive cations by standard mixed bed ion exchange resins is sometimes not achieved in liquid radwaste systems. Based on a literature survey, acrylic fibers impregnated with manganese dioxide were chosen as a media warranting study of their ability to adsorb the cations present in radwaste systems in the hope of improving performance of such treatment processes. A system to produce impregnated fiber with a heavy MnO[sub 2] loading was designed, constructed, and operated. The system produced fiber at an average fiber loading of 22.5 percent MnO[sub 2] by weight. Leaching tests made on the MnO[sub 2] fiber exhibited no signs of soluble manganese, insoluble MnO[sub 2], acrylonitrile leaching or fiber loss. Laboratory testing has been performed on the adsorption of calcium, cadmium, cesium, cobalt, iron, and manganese on MnO[sub 2] impregnated fiber. Removal of metals from solution was measured at levels specific for each metal tested. The removal efficiency when they were present in combination was also evaluated.

  16. Manganese-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MEMRI).

    PubMed

    Koretsky, Alan P; Silva, Afonso C

    2004-12-01

    Manganese ion (Mn2+) is an essential metal that participates as a cofactor in a number of critical biological functions, such as electron transport, detoxification of free radicals and synthesis of neurotransmitters. Mn2+ can enter excitable cells using some of the same transport systems as Ca2+ and it can bind to a number of intracellular sites because it has high affinity for Ca2+ and Mg2+ binding sites on proteins and nucleic acids. Paramagnetic forms of manganese ions are potent MRI relaxation agents. Indeed, Mn2+ was the first contrast agent proposed for use in MRI. Recently, there has been renewed interest in combining the strong MRI relaxation effects of Mn2+ with its unique biology, in order to further expand the already broad assortment of useful information that can be measured by MRI. Such an approach has been continuously developed in the past several years to provide unique tissue contrast, to assess tissue viability, to act as a surrogate marker of calcium influx into cells and to trace neuronal connections. This special issue of NMR in Biomedicine on manganese-enhanced MRI (MEMRI) is aimed at providing the readers of this journal with an extensive review of some of the most prominent applications of MEMRI in biological systems. Written by several of the leaders in the field, the reviews and original research articles featured in this special issue are likely to offer an exciting and inspiring view of the broad range of applications of MEMRI.

  17. Manganese deposition in drinking water distribution systems.

    PubMed

    Gerke, Tammie L; Little, Brenda J; Barry Maynard, J

    2016-01-15

    This study provides a physicochemical assessment of manganese deposits on brass and lead components from two fully operational drinking water distributions systems. One of the systems was maintained with chlorine; the other, with secondary chloramine disinfection. Synchrotron-based in-situ micro X-ray adsorption near edge structure was used to assess the mineralogy. In-situ micro X-ray fluorescence mapping was used to demonstrate the spatial relationships between manganese and potentially toxic adsorbed metal ions. The Mn deposits ranged in thickness from 0.01 to 400 μm. They were composed primarily of Mn oxides/oxhydroxides, birnessite (Mn(3+) and Mn(4+)) and hollandite (Mn(2+) and Mn(4+)), and a Mn silicate, braunite (Mn(2+) and Mn(4+)), in varying proportions. Iron, chromium, and strontium, in addition to the alloying elements lead and copper, were co-located within manganese deposits. With the exception of iron, all are related to specific health issues and are of concern to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (U.S. EPA). The specific properties of Mn deposits, i.e., adsorption of metals ions, oxidation of metal ions and resuspension are discussed with respect to their influence on drinking water quality.

  18. Hypervelocity-impact studies on titanium, titanium alloys, and beryllium

    SciTech Connect

    Lundberg, L.B.; Bless, S.J.; Girrens, S.P.; Green, J.E.

    1982-08-01

    The hypervelocity-impact behavior of commercial-pure, Grade 2 Ti, Ti-5Al-2.5Sn, Ti-6Al-2Sn-4Zr-2Mo-0.25Si, and pure beryllium was studied by impacting targets of these materials with millimeter-sized spheres of glass, copper, aluminum, and cadmium propelled from a light-gas gun at velocities ranging from 4.5 to 7.6 km/s. Target temperatures ranged from 295 to 775/sup 0/K when impacted. Semi-infinite targets were impacted to determine cratering behavior, and some correlations were made to thin-target perforation. Thin titanium targets with a variety of surface coatings and finishes were also impacted. Titanium and the titanium alloys were found to behave in a ductile manner when impacted, but beryllium was found to be brittle even at 775/sup 0/K. An extrapolation equation was used to optimize a titanium heat pipe radiator mass for a space nuclear power application.

  19. Manganese oxide nanowires, films, and membranes and methods of making

    DOEpatents

    Suib, Steven Lawrence; Yuan, Jikang

    2011-02-15

    Nanowires, films, and membranes comprising ordered porous manganese oxide-based octahedral molecular sieves and methods of making the same are disclosed. A method for forming nanowires includes hydrothermally treating a chemical precursor composition in a hydrothermal treating solvent to form the nanowires, wherein the chemical precursor composition comprises a source of manganese cations and a source of counter cations, and wherein the nanowires comprise ordered porous manganese oxide-based octahedral molecular sieves.

  20. Method of making multilayered titanium ceramic composites

    DOEpatents

    Fisher, George T., II; Hansen; Jeffrey S.; Oden; Laurance L.; Turner; Paul C.; Ochs; Thomas L.

    1998-08-25

    A method making a titanium ceramic composite involves forming a hot pressed powder body having a microstructure comprising at least one titanium metal or alloy layer and at least one ceramic particulate reinforced titanium metal or alloy layer and hot forging the hot pressed body follwed by hot rolling to substantially reduce a thickness dimension and substantially increase a lateral dimension thereof to form a composite plate or sheet that retains in the microstructure at least one titanium based layer and at least one ceramic reinforced titanium based layer in the thickness direction of the composite plate or sheet.

  1. Method of making multilayered titanium ceramic composites

    DOEpatents

    Fisher, G.T. II; Hansen, J.S.; Oden, L.L.; Turner, P.C.; Ochs, T.L.

    1998-08-25

    A method making a titanium ceramic composite involves forming a hot pressed powder body having a microstructure comprising at least one titanium metal or alloy layer and at least one ceramic particulate reinforced titanium metal or alloy layer and hot forging the hot pressed body followed by hot rolling to substantially reduce a thickness dimension and substantially increase a lateral dimension thereof to form a composite plate or sheet that retains in the microstructure at least one titanium based layer and at least one ceramic reinforced titanium based layer in the thickness direction of the composite plate or sheet. 3 figs.

  2. Method of making multilayered titanium ceramic composites

    DOEpatents

    Fisher, II, George T.; Hansen, Jeffrey S.; Oden, Laurance L.; Turner, Paul C.; Ochs, Thomas L.

    1998-01-01

    A method making a titanium ceramic composite involves forming a hot pressed powder body having a microstructure comprising at least one titanium metal or alloy layer and at least one ceramic particulate reinforced titanium metal or alloy layer and hot forging the hot pressed body follwed by hot rolling to substantially reduce a thickness dimension and substantially increase a lateral dimension thereof to form a composite plate or sheet that retains in the microstructure at least one titanium based layer and at least one ceramic reinforced titanium based layer in the thickness direction of the composite plate or sheet.

  3. 40 CFR 424.60 - Applicability; description of the electrolytic manganese products subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... electrolytic manganese products subcategory. 424.60 Section 424.60 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... CATEGORY Electrolytic Manganese Products Subcategory § 424.60 Applicability; description of the electrolytic manganese products subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to...

  4. 40 CFR 424.60 - Applicability; description of the electrolytic manganese products subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... electrolytic manganese products subcategory. 424.60 Section 424.60 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... CATEGORY Electrolytic Manganese Products Subcategory § 424.60 Applicability; description of the electrolytic manganese products subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to...

  5. 40 CFR 424.60 - Applicability; description of the electrolytic manganese products subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... electrolytic manganese products subcategory. 424.60 Section 424.60 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... CATEGORY Electrolytic Manganese Products Subcategory § 424.60 Applicability; description of the electrolytic manganese products subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to...

  6. 40 CFR 424.60 - Applicability; description of the electrolytic manganese products subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... electrolytic manganese products subcategory. 424.60 Section 424.60 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... CATEGORY Electrolytic Manganese Products Subcategory § 424.60 Applicability; description of the electrolytic manganese products subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to...

  7. 40 CFR 424.60 - Applicability; description of the electrolytic manganese products subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... electrolytic manganese products subcategory. 424.60 Section 424.60 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... CATEGORY Electrolytic Manganese Products Subcategory § 424.60 Applicability; description of the electrolytic manganese products subcategory. The provisions of this subpart are applicable to...

  8. Nanostructured manganese oxides as highly active water oxidation catalysts: a boost from manganese precursor chemistry.

    PubMed

    Menezes, Prashanth W; Indra, Arindam; Littlewood, Patrick; Schwarze, Michael; Göbel, Caren; Schomäcker, Reinhard; Driess, Matthias

    2014-08-01

    We present a facile synthesis of bioinspired manganese oxides for chemical and photocatalytic water oxidation, starting from a reliable and versatile manganese(II) oxalate single-source precursor (SSP) accessible through an inverse micellar molecular approach. Strikingly, thermal decomposition of the latter precursor in various environments (air, nitrogen, and vacuum) led to the three different mineral phases of bixbyite (Mn2 O3 ), hausmannite (Mn3 O4 ), and manganosite (MnO). Initial chemical water oxidation experiments using ceric ammonium nitrate (CAN) gave the maximum catalytic activity for Mn2 O3 and MnO whereas Mn3 O4 had a limited activity. The substantial increase in the catalytic activity of MnO in chemical water oxidation was demonstrated by the fact that a phase transformation occurs at the surface from nanocrystalline MnO into an amorphous MnOx (1manganese oxides including the newly formed amorphous MnOx . Both Mn2 O3 and the amorphous MnOx exhibit tremendous enhancement in oxygen evolution during photocatalysis and are much higher in comparison to so far known bioinspired manganese oxides and calcium-manganese oxides. Also, for the first time, a new approach for the representation of activities of water oxidation catalysts has been proposed by determining the amount of accessible manganese centers. PMID:25044528

  9. Nanostructured manganese oxides as highly active water oxidation catalysts: a boost from manganese precursor chemistry.

    PubMed

    Menezes, Prashanth W; Indra, Arindam; Littlewood, Patrick; Schwarze, Michael; Göbel, Caren; Schomäcker, Reinhard; Driess, Matthias

    2014-08-01

    We present a facile synthesis of bioinspired manganese oxides for chemical and photocatalytic water oxidation, starting from a reliable and versatile manganese(II) oxalate single-source precursor (SSP) accessible through an inverse micellar molecular approach. Strikingly, thermal decomposition of the latter precursor in various environments (air, nitrogen, and vacuum) led to the three different mineral phases of bixbyite (Mn2 O3 ), hausmannite (Mn3 O4 ), and manganosite (MnO). Initial chemical water oxidation experiments using ceric ammonium nitrate (CAN) gave the maximum catalytic activity for Mn2 O3 and MnO whereas Mn3 O4 had a limited activity. The substantial increase in the catalytic activity of MnO in chemical water oxidation was demonstrated by the fact that a phase transformation occurs at the surface from nanocrystalline MnO into an amorphous MnOx (1manganese oxides including the newly formed amorphous MnOx . Both Mn2 O3 and the amorphous MnOx exhibit tremendous enhancement in oxygen evolution during photocatalysis and are much higher in comparison to so far known bioinspired manganese oxides and calcium-manganese oxides. Also, for the first time, a new approach for the representation of activities of water oxidation catalysts has been proposed by determining the amount of accessible manganese centers.

  10. A biokinetic model for manganese for use in radiation protection

    SciTech Connect

    Leggett, Richard Wayne

    2011-01-01

    The ICRP is updating its recommendations regarding occupational exposure to radionuclides including the biokinetic models used to derive dose coefficients and assess bioassay data for internally deposited radionuclides. This report reviews biokinetic data for manganese and proposes a biokinetic model for systemic manganese consistent with the current database. The model provides a more detailed and biologically realistic description of the movement of absorbed manganese in the body than the model currently recommended by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP). The proposed model and current ICRP model yield broadly similar estimates of dose per unit activity of inhaled or ingested radio-manganese but differ substantially with regard to interpretation of bioassay data.

  11. Manganese-enhanced magnetic resonance microscopy of mineralization

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chesnick, I.E.; Todorov, T.I.; Centeno, J.A.; Newbury, D.E.; Small, J.A.; Potter, K.

    2007-01-01

    Paramagnetic manganese (II) can be employed as a calcium surrogate to sensitize magnetic resonance microscopy (MRM) to the processing of calcium during bone formation. At high doses, osteoblasts can take up sufficient quantities of manganese, resulting in marked changes in water proton T1, T2 and magnetization transfer ratio values compared to those for untreated cells. Accordingly, inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) results confirm that the manganese content of treated cell pellets was 10-fold higher than that for untreated cell pellets. To establish that manganese is processed like calcium and deposited as bone, calvaria from the skull of embryonic chicks were grown in culture medium supplemented with 1 mM MnCl2 and 3 mM CaCl2. A banding pattern of high and low T2 values, consistent with mineral deposits with high and low levels of manganese, was observed radiating from the calvarial ridge. The results of ICP-MS studies confirm that manganese-treated calvaria take up increasing amounts of manganese with time in culture. Finally, elemental mapping studies with electron probe microanalysis confirmed local variations in the manganese content of bone newly deposited on the calvarial surface. This is the first reported use of manganese-enhanced MRM to study the process whereby calcium is taken up by osteoblasts cells and deposited as bone. ?? 2007 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Synthesis and properties of nanoscale titanium boride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Efimova, K. A.; Galevskiy, G. V.; Rudneva, V. V.

    2015-09-01

    This work reports the scientific and technological grounds for plasma synthesis of titanium diboride, including thermodynamic and kinetic conditions of boride formation when titanium and titanium dioxide are interacting with products resulting from boron gasification in the nitrogen - hydrogen plasma flow, and two variations of its behavior using the powder mixtures: titanium - boron and titanium dioxide - boron. To study these technology variations, the mathematical models were derived, describing the relation between element contents in the synthesized products of titanium and free boron and basic parameters. The probable mechanism proposed for forming titanium diboride according to a "vapour - melt - crystal" pattern was examined, covering condensation of titanium vapour in the form of aerosol, boriding of nanoscale melt droplets by boron hydrides and crystallization of titanium - boron melt. The comprehensive physical - chemical certification of titanium diboride was carried out, including the study of its crystal structure, phase and chemical composition, dispersion, morphology and particle oxidation. Technological application prospects for use of titanium diboride nanoscale powder as constituent element in the wettable coating for carbon cathodes having excellent physical and mechanical performance and protective properties.

  13. Radioactive waste forms stabilized by ChemChar gasification: characterization and leaching behavior of cerium, thorium, protactinium, uranium, and neptunium.

    PubMed

    Marrero, T W; Morris, J S; Manahan, S E

    2004-02-01

    The uses of a thermally reductive gasification process in conjunction with vitrification and cementation for the long-term disposal of low level radioactive materials have been investigated. gamma-ray spectroscopy was used for analysis of carrier-free protactinium-233 and neptunium-239 and a stoichiometric amount of cerium (observed cerium-141) subsequent to gasification and leaching, up to 48 days. High resolution ICP-MS was used to analyze the cerium, thorium, and uranium from 46 to 438 days of leaching. Leaching procedures followed the guidance of ASTM Procedure C 1220-92, Standard Test Method for Static Leaching of Monolithic Waste Forms for Disposal of Radioactive Waste. The combination of the thermally reductive pretreatment, vitrification and cementation produced a highly non-leachable form suitable for long-term disposal of cerium, thorium, protactinium, uranium, and neptunium.

  14. Radioactive waste forms stabilized by ChemChar gasification: characterization and leaching behavior of cerium, thorium, protactinium, uranium, and neptunium.

    PubMed

    Marrero, T W; Morris, J S; Manahan, S E

    2004-02-01

    The uses of a thermally reductive gasification process in conjunction with vitrification and cementation for the long-term disposal of low level radioactive materials have been investigated. gamma-ray spectroscopy was used for analysis of carrier-free protactinium-233 and neptunium-239 and a stoichiometric amount of cerium (observed cerium-141) subsequent to gasification and leaching, up to 48 days. High resolution ICP-MS was used to analyze the cerium, thorium, and uranium from 46 to 438 days of leaching. Leaching procedures followed the guidance of ASTM Procedure C 1220-92, Standard Test Method for Static Leaching of Monolithic Waste Forms for Disposal of Radioactive Waste. The combination of the thermally reductive pretreatment, vitrification and cementation produced a highly non-leachable form suitable for long-term disposal of cerium, thorium, protactinium, uranium, and neptunium. PMID:14637345

  15. A chemical-spectrochemical method for the determination of rare earth elements and thorium in cerium minerals

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rose, H.J.; Murata, K.J.; Carron, M.K.

    1954-01-01

    In a combined chemical-spectrochemical procedure for quantitatively determining rare earth elements in cerium minerals, cerium is determined volumetrically, a total rare earths plus thoria precipitate is separated chemically, the ceria content of the precipitate is raised to 80??0 percent by adding pure ceria, and the resulting mixture is analyzed for lanthanum, praseodymium, neodymium, samarium, gadolinium, yttrium, and thorium spectrochemically by means of the d.c. carbon arc. Spectral lines of singly ionized cerium are used as internal standard lines in the spectrochemical determination which is patterned after Fassel's procedure [1]. Results of testing the method with synthetic mixtures of rare earths and with samples of chemically analyzed cerium minerals show that the coefficient of variation for a quadruplicate determination of any element does not exceed 5??0 (excepting yttrium at concentrations less than 1 percent) and that the method is free of serious systematic error. ?? 1954.

  16. Manganese Catalyzed C-H Halogenation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei; Groves, John T

    2015-06-16

    The remarkable aliphatic C-H hydroxylations catalyzed by the heme-containing enzyme, cytochrome P450, have attracted sustained attention for more than four decades. The effectiveness of P450 enzymes as highly selective biocatalysts for a wide range of oxygenation reactions of complex substrates has driven chemists to develop synthetic metalloporphyrin model compounds that mimic P450 reactivity. Among various known metalloporphyrins, manganese derivatives have received considerable attention since they have been shown to be versatile and powerful mediators for alkane hydroxylation and olefin epoxidation. Mechanistic studies have shown that the key intermediates of the manganese porphyrin-catalyzed oxygenation reactions include oxo- and dioxomanganese(V) species that transfer an oxygen atom to the substrate through a hydrogen abstraction/oxygen recombination pathway known as the oxygen rebound mechanism. Application of manganese porphyrins has been largely restricted to catalysis of oxygenation reactions until recently, however, due to ultrafast oxygen transfer rates. In this Account, we discuss recently developed carbon-halogen bond formation, including fluorination reactions catalyzed by manganese porphyrins and related salen species. We found that biphasic sodium hypochlorite/manganese porphyrin systems can efficiently and selectively convert even unactivated aliphatic C-H bonds to C-Cl bonds. An understanding of this novel reactivity derived from results obtained for the oxidation of the mechanistically diagnostic substrate and radical clock, norcarane. Significantly, the oxygen rebound rate in Mn-mediated hydroxylation is highly correlated with the nature of the trans-axial ligands bound to the manganese center (L-Mn(V)═O). Based on the ability of fluoride ion to decelerate the oxygen rebound step, we envisaged that a relatively long-lived substrate radical could be trapped by a Mn-F fluorine source, effecting carbon-fluorine bond formation. Indeed, this idea

  17. [Early Detection of Manganese Intoxication Based on Occupational History and T1-weighted MRI].

    PubMed

    Fukutake, Toshio; Yano, Hajime; Kushida, Ryutaro; Sunada, Yoshihide

    2016-02-01

    Manganese regulates many enzymes and is essential for normal cell function. Chronic manganese intoxication has an insidious and progressive course terminating to atypical parkinsonism with little therapeutic efficacy. For subjects with chronic manganese exposure such as welders, manganese intoxication can be detected early based on the presence of hyperintensity in the globus pallidus on T(1)-weighted MRI and abnormally high urinary excretion of manganese with a chelating agent even in cases of normal serum/urine level of manganese.

  18. Lactobacillusassisted synthesis of titanium nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    2007-01-01

    An eco-friendlylactobacillussp. (microbe) assisted synthesis of titanium nanoparticles is reported. The synthesis is performed at room temperature. X-ray and transmission electron microscopy analyses are performed to ascertain the formation of Ti nanoparticles. Individual nanoparticles as well as a number of aggregates almost spherical in shape having a size of 40–60 nm are found.

  19. PLUTONIUM-URANIUM-TITANIUM ALLOYS

    DOEpatents

    Coffinberry, A.S.

    1959-07-28

    A plutonium-uranium alloy suitable for use as the fuel element in a fast breeder reactor is described. The alloy contains from 15 to 60 at.% titanium with the remainder uranium and plutonium in a specific ratio, thereby limiting the undesirable zeta phase and rendering the alloy relatively resistant to corrosion and giving it the essential characteristic of good mechanical workability.

  20. Manganese-Cycling Microbial Communities Inside Deep-Sea Manganese Nodules.

    PubMed

    Blöthe, Marco; Wegorzewski, Anna; Müller, Cornelia; Simon, Frank; Kuhn, Thomas; Schippers, Axel

    2015-07-01

    Polymetallic nodules (manganese nodules) have been formed on deep sea sediments over millions of years and are currently explored for their economic potential, particularly for cobalt, nickel, copper, and manganese. Here we explored microbial communities inside nodules from the northeastern equatorial Pacific. The nodules have a large connected pore space with a huge inner surface of 120 m(2)/g as analyzed by computer tomography and BET measurements. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and electron microprobe analysis revealed a complex chemical fine structure. This consisted of layers with highly variable Mn/Fe ratios (<1 to >500) and mainly of turbostratic phyllomanganates such as 7 and 10 Å vernadites alternating with layers of Fe-bearing vernadite (δ-MnO2) epitaxially intergrown with amorphous feroxyhyte (δ-FeOOH). Using molecular 16S rRNA gene techniques (clone libraries, pyrosequencing, and real-time PCR), we show that polymetallic nodules provide a suitable habitat for prokaryotes with an abundant and diverse prokaryotic community dominated by nodule-specific Mn(IV)-reducing and Mn(II)-oxidizing bacteria. These bacteria were not detected in the nodule-surrounding sediment. The high abundance and dominance of Mn-cycling bacteria in the manganese nodules argue for a biologically driven closed manganese cycle inside the nodules relevant for their formation and potential degradation.

  1. Photosynthetic water oxidation: insights from manganese model chemistry.

    PubMed

    Young, Karin J; Brennan, Bradley J; Tagore, Ranitendranath; Brudvig, Gary W

    2015-03-17

    Catalysts for light-driven water oxidation are a critical component for development of solar fuels technology. The multielectron redox chemistry required for this process has been successfully deployed on a global scale in natural photosynthesis by green plants and cyanobacteria using photosystem II (PSII). PSII employs a conserved, cuboidal Mn4CaOX cluster called the O2-evolving complex (OEC) that offers inspiration for artificial O2-evolution catalysts. In this Account, we describe our work on manganese model chemistry relevant to PSII, particularly the functional model [Mn(III/IV)2(terpy)2(μ-O)2(OH2)2](NO3)3 complex (terpy = 2,2';6',2″-terpyridine), a mixed-valent di-μ-oxo Mn dimer with two terminal aqua ligands. In the presence of oxo-donor oxidants such as HSO5(-), this complex evolves O2 by two pathways, one of which incorporates solvent water in an O-O bond-forming reaction. Deactivation pathways of this catalyst include comproportionation to form an inactive Mn(IV)Mn(IV) dimer and also degradation to MnO2, a consequence of ligand loss when the oxidation state of the complex is reduced to labile Mn(II) upon release of O2. The catalyst's versatility has been shown by its continued catalytic activity after direct binding to the semiconductor titanium dioxide. In addition, after binding to the surface of TiO2 via a chromophoric linker, the catalyst can be oxidized by a photoinduced electron-transfer mechanism, mimicking the natural PSII process. Model oxomanganese complexes have also aided in interpreting biophysical and computational studies on PSII. In particular, the μ-oxo exchange rates of the Mn-terpy dimer have been instrumental in establishing that the time scale for μ-oxo exchange of high-valent oxomanganese complexes with terminal water ligands is slower than O2 evolution in the natural photosynthetic system. Furthermore, computational studies on the Mn-terpy dimer and the OEC point to similar Mn(IV)-oxyl intermediates in the O-O bond

  2. Three manganese oxide-rich marine sediments harbor similar communities of acetate-oxidizing manganese-reducing bacteria.

    PubMed

    Vandieken, Verona; Pester, Michael; Finke, Niko; Hyun, Jung-Ho; Friedrich, Michael W; Loy, Alexander; Thamdrup, Bo

    2012-11-01

    Dissimilatory manganese reduction dominates anaerobic carbon oxidation in marine sediments with high manganese oxide concentrations, but the microorganisms responsible for this process are largely unknown. In this study, the acetate-utilizing manganese-reducing microbiota in geographically well-separated, manganese oxide-rich sediments from Gullmar Fjord (Sweden), Skagerrak (Norway) and Ulleung Basin (Korea) were analyzed by 16S rRNA-stable isotope probing (SIP). Manganese reduction was the prevailing terminal electron-accepting process in anoxic incubations of surface sediments, and even the addition of acetate stimulated neither iron nor sulfate reduction. The three geographically distinct sediments harbored surprisingly similar communities of acetate-utilizing manganese-reducing bacteria: 16S rRNA of members of the genera Colwellia and Arcobacter and of novel genera within the Oceanospirillaceae and Alteromonadales were detected in heavy RNA-SIP fractions from these three sediments. Most probable number (MPN) analysis yielded up to 10(6) acetate-utilizing manganese-reducing cells cm(-3) in Gullmar Fjord sediment. A 16S rRNA gene clone library that was established from the highest MPN dilutions was dominated by sequences of Colwellia and Arcobacter species and members of the Oceanospirillaceae, supporting the obtained RNA-SIP results. In conclusion, these findings strongly suggest that (i) acetate-dependent manganese reduction in manganese oxide-rich sediments is catalyzed by members of taxa (Arcobacter, Colwellia and Oceanospirillaceae) previously not known to possess this physiological function, (ii) similar acetate-utilizing manganese reducers thrive in geographically distinct regions and (iii) the identified manganese reducers differ greatly from the extensively explored iron reducers in marine sediments. PMID:22572639

  3. Manganese: brain transport and emerging research needs.

    PubMed

    Aschner, M

    2000-06-01

    Idiopathic Parkinson's disease (IPD) represents a common neurodegenerative disorder. An estimated 2% of the U.S. population, age 65 and older, develops IPD. The number of IPD patients will certainly increase over the next several decades as the baby-boomers gradually step into this high-risk age group, concomitant with the increase in the average life expectancy. While many studies have suggested that industrial chemicals and pesticides may underlie IPD, its etiology remains elusive. Among the toxic metals, the relationship between manganese intoxication and IPD has long been recognized. The neurological signs of manganism have received close attention because they resemble several clinical disorders collectively described as extrapyramidal motor system dysfunction, and in particular, IPD and dystonia. However, distinct dissimilarities between IPD and manganism are well established, and it remains to be determined whether Mn plays an etiologic role in IPD. It is particularly noteworthy that as a result of a recent court decision, methylcyclopentadienyl Mn tricarbonyl (MMT) is presently available in the United States and Canada for use in fuel, replacing lead as an antiknock additive. The impact of potential long-term exposure to low levels of MMT combustion products that may be present in emissions from automobiles has yet to be fully evaluated. Nevertheless, it should be pointed out that recent studies with various environmental modeling approaches in the Montreal metropolitan (where MMT has been used for more than 10 years) suggest that airborne Mn levels were quite similar to those in areas where MMT was not used. These studies also show that Mn is emitted from the tail pipe of motor vehicles primarily as a mixture of manganese phosphate and manganese sulfate. This brief review characterizes the Mn speciation in the blood and the transport kinetics of Mn into the central nervous system, a critical step in the accumulation of Mn within the brain, outlines the

  4. Manganese depresses rat heart muscle respiration.

    PubMed

    Miller, Kevin B; Caton, Joel S; Finley, John W

    2006-01-01

    It has previously been reported that moderately high dietary manganese (Mn) in combination with marginal magnesium (Mg) resulted in ultrastructural damage to heart mitochondria. Manganese may replace Mg in biological functions, including the role of enzyme cofactor. Manganese may accumulate and substitute for Mg during the condition of Mg-deficiency. The objective of the current study was to determine whether high Mn alters heart muscle respiration and Mg-enzyme activity as well as whole body Mn retention under marginal Mg. An additional objective was to determine whether high Mn results in increased oxidative stress. In experiment 1: forty-eight rats were fed a 2 x 3 factorial arrangement of Mn (10, 100, or 1000 mg/kg) and Mg (200 or 500 mg/kg). In experiment 2: thirty-two rats were fed one of four diets in a 2 x 2 factorial arrangement of Mn (10 or 250 mg/kg) and Mg (200 or 500 mg/kg). In experiment 3: thirty-two rats were fed one of four diets in a 2 x 2 factorial arrangement of Mn (10 or 650 mg/kg) and Mg (200 or 500 mg/kg). In experiment 2, high Mn and marginal Mg reduced (P<0.05) oxygen consumption of left ventricle muscle. Marginal Mg, but not Mn, reduced (P<0.05) activity of sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium-ATPase enzyme. Dietary Mg had no affect on (54)Mn kinetics, but high dietary Mn decreased (P<0.01) absorption, retention, and rate of excretion of (54)Mn. Neither cellular stress, measured by Comet assay, nor antioxidant activities were increased by high Mn. A strong interaction (P<0.001) between increasing Mn and adequate Mg on hematology was observed. These results confirm previous research in swine that high Mn alters myocardial integrity as well as function, but not as a result of altered calcium transport or oxidative stress.

  5. 40 CFR 721.10201 - Cobalt lithium manganese nickel oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Cobalt lithium manganese nickel oxide... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10201 Cobalt lithium manganese nickel oxide. (a) Chemical substance and... nickel oxide (PMN P-04-269; CAS No. 182442-95-1) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  6. 40 CFR 721.10201 - Cobalt lithium manganese nickel oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Cobalt lithium manganese nickel oxide... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10201 Cobalt lithium manganese nickel oxide. (a) Chemical substance and... nickel oxide (PMN P-04-269; CAS No. 182442-95-1) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  7. 40 CFR 721.10201 - Cobalt lithium manganese nickel oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Cobalt lithium manganese nickel oxide... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10201 Cobalt lithium manganese nickel oxide. (a) Chemical substance and... nickel oxide (PMN P-04-269; CAS No. 182442-95-1) is subject to reporting under this section for...

  8. 64 FR 23675 - Electrolytic Manganese Dioxide From Greece and Japan

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    1999-05-03

    ... orders on imports of electrolytic manganese dioxide from Greece and Japan (54 FR 15243). The Commission..., including the text of subpart F of part 207, are published at 63 FR 30599, June 5, 1998, and may be... COMMISSION Electrolytic Manganese Dioxide From Greece and Japan AGENCY: United States International...

  9. 40 CFR 721.10011 - Barium calcium manganese strontium oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 31 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Barium calcium manganese strontium... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10011 Barium calcium manganese strontium oxide. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as barium...

  10. 40 CFR 721.10011 - Barium calcium manganese strontium oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Barium calcium manganese strontium... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10011 Barium calcium manganese strontium oxide. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as barium...

  11. 40 CFR 721.10011 - Barium calcium manganese strontium oxide.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Barium calcium manganese strontium... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10011 Barium calcium manganese strontium oxide. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified as barium...

  12. 40 CFR 721.10003 - Manganese heterocyclic tetraamine complex (generic).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... complex (generic). 721.10003 Section 721.10003 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.10003 Manganese heterocyclic tetraamine complex (generic). (a) Chemical... as manganese heterocyclic tetraamine complex (PMNs P-98-625/626/627/628/629 and P-00-614/617)...

  13. Formation of manganese oxides by bacterially generated superoxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Learman, D. R.; Voelker, B. M.; Vazquez-Rodriguez, A. I.; Hansel, C. M.

    2011-02-01

    Manganese oxide minerals are among the strongest sorbents and oxidants in the environment. The formation of these minerals controls the fate of contaminants, the degradation of recalcitrant carbon, the cycling of nutrients and the activity of anaerobic-based metabolisms. Oxidation of soluble manganese(II) ions to manganese(III/IV) oxides has been primarily attributed to direct enzymatic oxidation by microorganisms. However, the physiological reason for this process remains unknown. Here we assess the ability of a common species of marine bacteria-Roseobacter sp. AzwK-3b-to oxidize manganese(II) in the presence of chemical and biological inhibitors. We show that Roseobacter AzwK-3b oxidizes manganese(II) by producing the strong and versatile redox reactant superoxide. The oxidation of manganese(II), and concomitant production of manganese oxides, was inhibited in both the light and dark in the presence of enzymes and metals that scavenge superoxide. Oxidation was also inhibited by various proteases, enzymes that break down bacterial proteins, confirming that the superoxide was bacterially generated. We conclude that bacteria can oxidize manganese(II) indirectly, through the enzymatic generation of extracellular superoxide radicals. We suggest that dark bacterial production of superoxide may be a driving force in metal cycling and mineralization in the environment.

  14. Manganese enzymes with binuclear active sites

    SciTech Connect

    Dismukes, G.C.

    1996-11-01

    The purpose of this article is twofold. First, to review the recent literature dealing with the mechanisms of catalysis by binuclear manganese enzymes. Second, to summarize and illustrate the general principles of catalysis which distinguish binuclear metalloenzymes from monometallic centers. This review covers primarily the published literature from 1991 up to May 1996. A summary of the major structurally characterized dimanganese enzymes is given. These perform various reaction types including several redox reactions, (de)hydrations, isomerizations, (de)phosphorylation, and phosphoryl transfer. 114 refs.

  15. Oxidation state of marine manganese nodules

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Piper, D.Z.; Basler, J.R.; Bischoff, J.L.

    1984-01-01

    Analyses of the bulk oxidation state of marine manganese nodules indicates that more than 98% of the Mn in deep ocean nodules is present as Mn(IV). The samples were collected from three quite different areas: the hemipelagic environment of the Guatemala Basin, the pelagic area of the North Pacific, and seamounts in the central Pacific. Results of the study suggest that todorokite in marine nodules is fully oxidized and has the following stoichiometry: (K, Na, Ca, Ba).33(Mg, Cu, Ni).76Mn5O22(H2O)3.2. ?? 1984.

  16. Titanium-Oxygen Reactivity Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chafey, J. E.; Scheck, W. G.; Witzell, W. E.

    1962-01-01

    A program has been conducted at Astronautics to investigate the likelihood of occurrence of the catastrophic oxidation of titanium alloy sheet under conditions which simulate certain cases of accidental failure of the metal while it is in contact with liquid or gaseous oxygen. Three methods of fracturing the metal were used; they consisted of mechanical puncture, tensile fracture of welded joints, and perforation by very high velocity particles. The results of the tests which have been conducted provide further evidence of the reactivity of titanium with liquid and gaseous oxygen. The evidence indicates that the rapid fracturing of titanium sheet while it is in contact with oxygen initiates the catastrophic oxidation reaction. Initiation occurred when the speed of the fracture was some few feet per second, as in both the drop-weight puncture tests and the static tensile fracture tests of welded joints, as well as when the speed was several thousand feet per second, as in the simulated micrometeoroid penetration tests. The slow propagation of a crack, however, did not initiate the reaction. It may logically be concluded that the localized frictional heat of rapid fracture and/or spontaneous oxidation (exothermic) of minute particles emanating from the fracture cause initiation of the reaction. Under conditions of slow fracture, however, the small heat generated may be adequately dissipated and the reaction is not initiated. A portion of the study conducted consisted of investigating various means by which the reaction might be retarded or prevented. Providing a "barrier" at the titanium-oxygen interface consisting of either aluminum metal or a coating of a petroleum base corrosion inhibitor appeared to be only partially effective in retarding the reaction. The accidental puncturing or similar rupturing of thin-walled pressurized oxygen tanks on missiles and space vehicle will usually constitute loss of function, and may sometimes cause their catastrophic destruction

  17. Long-term testing of in-situ cerium oxide coated anodes for aluminum electrowinning

    SciTech Connect

    King, H.L.

    1989-10-01

    The ELTECH Anode Phase 2 Project (Contract Number AC07-86ID12655), as supported by the Department of Energy (DOE) from December 1988 through April 1989, focused on long-term testing of in-situ anodically deposited cerium oxide (CEROX) coatings on nickel ferrite/Cu cermets. The specific objective of this research was to determine the effectiveness of the CEROX coating in reducing the transfer of cermet components to the produced aluminum. A dosing regimen was first established for the minimum addition of cerium to the cell necessary to produce targeted CEROX coatings on the cermet anode and the periodic additions necessary to maintain coating thicknesses. The effects of the addition of CeF{sub 3} on CEROX coating formation was evaluated for targeted coating thicknesses at three different current densities. Analytical procedures were identified for determining alumina concentrations and the cryolite bath ratio for quasi-commercial baths.

  18. A DFT + U study of cerium solubility in La₂Zr₂O₇

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, X. J.; Xiao, Haiyan Y.; Zu, Xiaotao; Weber, William J.

    2012-02-17

    Density functional theory plus Hubbard U correction is employed to study the solubility of cerium in La₂Zr₂O₇. The results show that La₂Zr₂O₇ and Ce₂Zr₂O₇ form a solid solution over the whole range of cerium content. The solubility of Ce in La₂Zr₂O₇ can be partially attributed to the similar ionic radii of La³+ and Ce³+. Electronic structures of the La₂₋yCeyZr₂O₇ solid solution have been analyzed. The Ce 4ƒ states are found to be partially occupied, and Ce in the La₂₋yCeyZr₂O₇ solid solution exhibits a reduced charge state.

  19. Cerium Binding Activity of Pectins Isolated from the Seagrasses Zostera marina and Phyllospadix iwatensis

    PubMed Central

    Khotimchenko, Yuri; Khozhaenko, Elena; Kovalev, Valeri; Khotimchenko, Maxim

    2012-01-01

    Cerium binding activity of three different water soluble pectin compounds of different origin was studied in a batch sorption system. The Langmuir, Freundlich and BET sorption models were adopted to describe the binding reactions between metal ions and pectin molecules. The Langmuir model provided the best fit. Within the pH range from 4.0 to 6.0, the largest amount of the cerium ions was bound by pectin isolated from the seagrass Phylospadix iwatensis in comparison to pectin extracted from the seagrass Zostera marina and pectin obtained from citrus peel (commercial grade). The Langmuir constants were also highest for the pectin samples isolated from the seagrass P. iwatensis. The results obtained from this study suggest that pectin is a prospective source for the development of radioisotope-removing pharmaceuticals. PMID:22690146

  20. Measurement of the magnetic behaviour of 147Eu and 149Eu in cerium and platinum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dietrich, M.; Zeitz, W.-D.; Weber, A.; Potzger, K.; Unterricker, S.; Schneider, F.; Samokhvalov, V.; Isolde Collaboration

    2005-07-01

    The local magnetism at europium in platinum and in cerium was studied using perturbed angular correlation (PAC) spectroscopy. In platinum, europium shows the electronic properties of the trivalent status, which has a non-magnetic ground state ( J=0). As a consequence, the Van Vleck contributions from the complete multiplet-level system predominantly determine the magnetic behaviour. In cerium, the measured data are close to the predictions for divalent europium. Here, only the electronic ground state, the pure spin state ( J=5/2), has to be taken into account. The measurements were done utilising the isomeric 11/2 - nuclear levels in 147Eu and 149Eu at 625 and 496 keV, respectively, after the precursors had been produced at the ion beam laboratory ISL Berlin or the on-line mass separator ISOLDE in Geneva.

  1. Luminescent Properties of Cerium Doped Potassium Iodide Single Crystals in Response to γ-irradiation.

    PubMed

    Bangaru, S; Saradha, K; Muralidharan, G

    2015-05-01

    Potassium iodide doped with cerium ions were prepared by Bridgemann Stockbarger technique and investigated by optical absorption, Photoluminescence(PL), Thermoluminescence(TL), Photostimulated Luminescence(PSL) and TL emission. The optical absorption measurement indicates that F and V centers are formed in the crystals during the γ-ray irradiation process. Optical absorption and Photoluminescence studies confirm the presence of cerium ions in the trivalent state. Spectral distribution under the Thermoluminescence Emission(TLE) and Optically Stimulated Luminescence(OSL) support the idea that the defect annihilation process to be due to thermal release of F-electron in KI:Ce(3+) crystals. Both Ce(3+) and Ce(2+) emissions were observed in the Thermoluminescence emission of the crystals. Thermoluminescence(TL) has been identified to be due to thermal release of electron produced during colouration process. PMID:25744528

  2. Variation of electronic transitions and reduction potentials of cerium(IV) complexes.

    PubMed

    Williams, Ursula J; Schneider, David; Dorfner, Walter L; Maichle-Mössmer, Cäcilia; Carroll, Patrick J; Anwander, Reiner; Schelter, Eric J

    2014-11-21

    The trivalent compound K[Ce[N(SiHMe2)2]4] was synthesized and oxidized, providing a convenient route to the reported cerium(IV) compound Ce[N(SiHMe2)2]4. Protonolysis reactions of Ce[N(SiHMe2)2]4 with tert-butanol, substituted benzyl alcohols, and 2,6-diphenylphenol yielded the neutral tetravalent compounds Ce(O(t)Bu)4(py)2, Ce2(OCH2C6R5)8(thf)2 (R = Me, F), and Ce(Odpp)4 (dpp = 2,6-(C6H5)2-C6H3). Spectroscopic and electrochemical characterization of the monometallic cerium(IV) silylamide, alkoxide, and aryloxide compounds revealed variable ligand-to-metal charge transfer transitions and metal-based reduction potentials. Computational bonding analyses were performed to complement the physical characterization of the complexes.

  3. Thermodynamics of the α -γ transition in cerium studied by an LDA + Gutzwiller method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Ming-Feng; Song, Hai-Feng; Liu, Hai-Feng; Wang, Cong; Fang, Zhong; Dai, Xi

    2015-03-01

    Utilizing the local-density approximation (LDA) + Gutzwiller method, we have studied the α -γ transition in cerium. Our results indicate that the volume collapse transition between α and γ phases is present at zero temperature with negative pressure. By further providing a newly finite temperature generalization of the LDA + Gutzwiller method (using the mean-field potential approach), the entropy contributed by both electronic quasiparticles and lattice vibration included, we obtain the Gibbs free energy at a given volume and temperature, from which we get the α -γ transition at finite temperature and pressure. Our results indicate that the electronic entropy and lattice vibrational entropy both play important roles in the α -γ transition. We also calculated the equation of state and phase diagram of cerium, finding good agreement with the experiments.

  4. A cerium-lead redox flow battery system employing supporting electrolyte of methanesulfonic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Na, Zhaolin; Xu, Shengnan; Yin, Dongming; Wang, Limin

    2015-11-01

    A novel cerium-lead redox flow battery (RFB) employing Ce(IV)/Ce(III) and Pb(II)/Pb redox couples in the supporting electrolyte of methanesulfonic acid (MSA) is developed and preliminarily investigated. The RFB requires no additional catalyst and uses kinetically favorable reactions between low-cost reactants, and provides a desirable discharge voltage of approximately 1.7 V, with high average coulombic efficiency (CE) of 92% and energy efficiency (EE) of 86% over 800 cycles at 298 K. Stable cycling with an acceptable performance is achieved for a board operating temperature range of 253 K-313 K. The excellent performance obtained from the preliminary study suggests that the cerium-lead RFB promises to be applicable to large-scale energy storage for electricity grids.

  5. Improvement and analysis of the hydrogen-cerium redox flow cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tucker, Michael C.; Weiss, Alexandra; Weber, Adam Z.

    2016-09-01

    The H2-Ce redox flow cell is optimized using commercially-available cell materials. Cell performance is found to be sensitive to the upper charge cutoff voltage, membrane boiling pretreatment, methanesulfonic-acid concentration, (+) electrode surface area and flow pattern, and operating temperature. Performance is relatively insensitive to membrane thickness, Cerium concentration, and all features of the (-) electrode including hydrogen flow. Cell performance appears to be limited by mass transport and kinetics in the cerium (+) electrode. Maximum discharge power of 895 mW cm-2 was observed at 60 °C; an energy efficiency of 90% was achieved at 50 °C. The H2-Ce cell is promising for energy storage assuming one can optimize Ce reaction kinetics and electrolyte.

  6. Some factors influencing cadmium-manganese interaction in adult rats

    SciTech Connect

    Gruden, N.; Matausic, S. )

    1989-07-01

    Recent data show that even a low dose of cadmium (20 {mu}g/day/rat) significantly suppresses manganese transduodenal transport when administered during a three-day period. The inhibitory effect of cadmium upon manganese absorption is enhanced by concurrently administered iron-fortified milk diet. This suggests that the (synergistic) action of cadmium and iron upon manganese and the competition between these (three) ions in the intestine depend on their relative concentrations and affinity for the binding sites within the intestinal mucosa. For this reason the authors considered it worthwhile examining whether this inhibitory effect of cadmium would be affected by simultaneously administered manganese-fortified milk. Since the absorption of heavy metals and, at the same time, the demand for manganese is higher in the young than in the old animals, they also studied how this interaction depends upon the animals' age and sex and whether it is the same in the whole small intestine.

  7. [Analysis of the copper and manganese body allowances of athletes].

    PubMed

    Rusin, V Ia; Nasolodin, V V; Vorob'ev, V A

    1979-01-01

    Forty-eight sportswomen of various qualification and 19 women not engaged in the sports were under observation. The total losses of copper and manganese excreted with feces, urine and sweat in the sportswomen under conditions of muscular training proved higher than in the untrained women. During summer the copper and manganese content in a day diet of the sportswomen corresponded to the recommended standards while during winter the copper content was below the normal. Starting the active training in the beginner sportswomen is attended by the copper and manganese accumulation in the blood cells. Meat and weat food stuffs in the Yaroslavi region are rich in copper, with vegetable products showing the highest content of manganese, and dairy products having a low content of copper and manganese.

  8. Cerium Regulates Expression of Alternative Methanol Dehydrogenases in Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b

    PubMed Central

    Farhan Ul Haque, Muhammad; Kalidass, Bhagyalakshmi; Bandow, Nathan; Turpin, Erick A.; DiSpirito, Alan A.

    2015-01-01

    Methanotrophs have multiple methane monooxygenases that are well known to be regulated by copper, i.e., a “copper switch.” At low copper/biomass ratios the soluble methane monooxygenase (sMMO) is expressed while expression and activity of the particulate methane monooxygenase (pMMO) increases with increasing availability of copper. In many methanotrophs there are also multiple methanol dehydrogenases (MeDHs), one based on Mxa and another based on Xox. Mxa-MeDH is known to have calcium in its active site, while Xox-MeDHs have been shown to have rare earth elements in their active site. We show here that the expression levels of Mxa-MeDH and Xox-MeDH in Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b significantly decreased and increased, respectively, when grown in the presence of cerium but the absence of copper compared to the absence of both metals. Expression of sMMO and pMMO was not affected. In the presence of copper, the effect of cerium on gene expression was less significant, i.e., expression of Mxa-MeDH in the presence of copper and cerium was slightly lower than in the presence of copper alone, but Xox-MeDH was again found to increase significantly. As expected, the addition of copper caused sMMO and pMMO expression levels to significantly decrease and increase, respectively, but the simultaneous addition of cerium had no discernible effect on MMO expression. As a result, it appears Mxa-MeDH can be uncoupled from methane oxidation by sMMO in M. trichosporium OB3b but not from pMMO. PMID:26296730

  9. PURIFICATION OF PLUTONIUM USING A CERIUM PRECIPITATE AS A CARRIER FOR FISSION PRODUCTS

    DOEpatents

    Faris, B.F.; Olson, C.M.

    1961-07-01

    Bismuth phosphate carrier precipitation processes are described for the separation of plutonium from fission products wherein in at least one step bismuth phosphate is precipitated in the presence of hexavalent plutonium thereby carrying a portion of the fission products from soluble plu tonium values. In this step, a cerium phosphate precipitate is formed in conjunction with the bismuth phosphate precipitate, thereby increasing the amount of fission products removed from solution.

  10. Cerium regulates expression of alternative methanol dehydrogenases in Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b.

    PubMed

    Farhan Ul Haque, Muhammad; Kalidass, Bhagyalakshmi; Bandow, Nathan; Turpin, Erick A; DiSpirito, Alan A; Semrau, Jeremy D

    2015-11-01

    Methanotrophs have multiple methane monooxygenases that are well known to be regulated by copper, i.e., a "copper switch." At low copper/biomass ratios the soluble methane monooxygenase (sMMO) is expressed while expression and activity of the particulate methane monooxygenase (pMMO) increases with increasing availability of copper. In many methanotrophs there are also multiple methanol dehydrogenases (MeDHs), one based on Mxa and another based on Xox. Mxa-MeDH is known to have calcium in its active site, while Xox-MeDHs have been shown to have rare earth elements in their active site. We show here that the expression levels of Mxa-MeDH and Xox-MeDH in Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b significantly decreased and increased, respectively, when grown in the presence of cerium but the absence of copper compared to the absence of both metals. Expression of sMMO and pMMO was not affected. In the presence of copper, the effect of cerium on gene expression was less significant, i.e., expression of Mxa-MeDH in the presence of copper and cerium was slightly lower than in the presence of copper alone, but Xox-MeDH was again found to increase significantly. As expected, the addition of copper caused sMMO and pMMO expression levels to significantly decrease and increase, respectively, but the simultaneous addition of cerium had no discernible effect on MMO expression. As a result, it appears Mxa-MeDH can be uncoupled from methane oxidation by sMMO in M. trichosporium OB3b but not from pMMO. PMID:26296730

  11. Development of Lymantria dispar affected by manganese in food.

    PubMed

    Kula, Emanuel; Martinek, Petr; Chromcová, Lucie; Hedbávný, Josef

    2014-10-01

    We studied the response of gypsy moth (Lymantria dispar (Linnaeus) (Lepidoptera: Lymantriidae)) to the content of manganese in food in the laboratory breeding of caterpillars. The food of the caterpillars {Betula pendula Roth (Fagales: Betulaceae) leaves} was contaminated by dipping in the solution of MnCl2 · 4H2O with manganese concentrations of 0, 0.5, 5 and 10 mg ml(-1), by which differentiated manganese contents (307; 632; 4,087 and 8,124 mg kg(-1)) were reached. Parameters recorded during the rearing were as follows: effect of manganese on food consumption, mortality and length of the development of caterpillars, pupation and hatching of imagoes. At the same time, manganese concentrations were determined in the offered and unconsumed food, excrements, and exuviae of the caterpillars, pupal cases and imagoes by using the AAS method. As compared with the control, high manganese contents in the food of gypsy moth caterpillars affected the process of development particularly by increased mortality of the first instar caterpillars (8 % mortality for caterpillars with no Mn contamination (T0) and 62 % mortality for subjects with the highest contamination by manganese (T3)), by prolonged development of the first-third instar (18.7 days (T0) and 27.8 days (T3)) and by increased food consumption of the first-third instar {0.185 g of leaf dry matter (T0) and 0.483 g of leaf dry matter (T3)}. The main defence strategy of the caterpillars to prevent contamination by the increased manganese content in food is the translocation of manganese into frass and exuviae castoff in the process of ecdysis. In the process of development, the content of manganese was reduced by excretion in imagoes to 0.5 % of the intake level even at its maximum inputs in food.

  12. Development of Lymantria dispar affected by manganese in food.

    PubMed

    Kula, Emanuel; Martinek, Petr; Chromcová, Lucie; Hedbávný, Josef

    2014-10-01

    We studied the response of gypsy moth (Lymantria dispar (Linnaeus) (Lepidoptera: Lymantriidae)) to the content of manganese in food in the laboratory breeding of caterpillars. The food of the caterpillars {Betula pendula Roth (Fagales: Betulaceae) leaves} was contaminated by dipping in the solution of MnCl2 · 4H2O with manganese concentrations of 0, 0.5, 5 and 10 mg ml(-1), by which differentiated manganese contents (307; 632; 4,087 and 8,124 mg kg(-1)) were reached. Parameters recorded during the rearing were as follows: effect of manganese on food consumption, mortality and length of the development of caterpillars, pupation and hatching of imagoes. At the same time, manganese concentrations were determined in the offered and unconsumed food, excrements, and exuviae of the caterpillars, pupal cases and imagoes by using the AAS method. As compared with the control, high manganese contents in the food of gypsy moth caterpillars affected the process of development particularly by increased mortality of the first instar caterpillars (8 % mortality for caterpillars with no Mn contamination (T0) and 62 % mortality for subjects with the highest contamination by manganese (T3)), by prolonged development of the first-third instar (18.7 days (T0) and 27.8 days (T3)) and by increased food consumption of the first-third instar {0.185 g of leaf dry matter (T0) and 0.483 g of leaf dry matter (T3)}. The main defence strategy of the caterpillars to prevent contamination by the increased manganese content in food is the translocation of manganese into frass and exuviae castoff in the process of ecdysis. In the process of development, the content of manganese was reduced by excretion in imagoes to 0.5 % of the intake level even at its maximum inputs in food. PMID:25028315

  13. Effect of quantity and route of administration of manganese monoxide on feed intake and serum manganese in ruminants

    SciTech Connect

    Black, J.R.; Ammerman, C.B.; Henry, P.R.

    1985-02-01

    The experiment investigated effects of high quantities of manganese and route of administration (diet versus capsule-dosed) on feed intake and blood characteristics in sheep. Twenty-four Florida native or Florida native by St. Croix crossbred wethers, 47 kg initially, were assigned randomly to eight treatments including basal diet supplemented with 0, 3000, 6000, or 9000 ppm manganese as a reagent grade manganese monoxide or basal diet plus gelatin capsules containing the equivalent of 0, 3000, 6000, or 9000 ppm manganese based on intake of the previous day. Three sheep per treatment were provided feed and tap water for ad libitum intake. Sheep were fed basal diet for 7 days followed by a 21-day experimental period, then placed back on the basal diet for 7 days. Average daily feed intake was reduced by increasing supplemental manganese, regardless of route. Animals dosed by capsule consumed less feed than those administered manganese in the diet. Serum manganese increased as manganese supplementation increased, but route of administration had no effect.

  14. State of manganese in the photosynthetic apparatus. 2. X-ray absorption edge studies on manganese in photosynthetic membrane

    SciTech Connect

    Kirby, J. A.; Goodin, D. B.; Wydrzynski, T.; Robertson, A. S.; Klein, M. P.

    1981-09-01

    X-ray absorption spectra at the Manganese K-edge are presented for spinach chloroplasts, and chloroplasts which have been Tris treated and hence unable to evolve oxygen. A significant change in the electronic environment of manganese is observed and is attributed to the release of manganese from the thylakoid membranes with a concomitant change in oxidation state. A correlation of the K-edge energy, defined as the energy at the first inflection point, with coordination charge has been established for a number of manganese compounds of known structure and oxidation state. In this study, comparison of the manganese K-edge energies of the chloroplast samples with the reference compounds places the average oxidation state of the chloroplasts between 2+ and 3+. Using the edge spectra for Tris treated membranes which were osmotically shocked to remove the released manganese, difference edge spectra were synthesized to approximate the active pool of manganese. Coordination charge predictions for this fraction are consistent with an average resting oxidation state higher than 2+. The shape at the edge is also indicative of heterogeneity of the manganese site, of low symmetry, or both.

  15. Cerium Oxide Nanoparticles Reduce Microglial Activation and Neurodegenerative Events in Light Damaged Retina

    PubMed Central

    Fiorani, Lavinia; Passacantando, Maurizio; Santucci, Sandro; Di Marco, Stefano; Bisti, Silvia; Maccarone, Rita

    2015-01-01

    The first target of any therapy for retinal neurodegeneration is to slow down the progression of the disease and to maintain visual function. Cerium oxide or ceria nanoparticles reduce oxidative stress, which is known to play a pivotal role in neurodegeneration. Our aim was to investigate whether cerium oxide nanoparticles were able to mitigate neurodegeneration including microglial activation and related inflammatory processes induced by exposure to high intensity light. Cerium oxide nanoparticles were injected intravitreally or intraveinously in albino Sprague-Dawley rats three weeks before exposing them to light damage of 1000 lux for 24 h. Electroretinographic recordings were performed a week after light damage. The progression of retinal degeneration was evaluated by measuring outer nuclear layer thickness and TUNEL staining to quantify photoreceptors death. Immunohistochemical analysis was used to evaluate retinal stress, neuroinflammatory cytokines and microglial activation. Only intravitreally injected ceria nanoparticles were detected at the level of photoreceptor outer segments 3 weeks after the light damage and electoretinographic recordings showed that ceria nanoparticles maintained visual response. Moreover, this treatment reduced neuronal death and “hot spot” extension preserving the outer nuclear layer morphology. It is noteworthy that in this work we demonstrated, for the first time, the ability of ceria nanoparticles to reduce microglial activation and their migration toward outer nuclear layer. All these evidences support ceria nanoparticles as a powerful therapeutic agent in retinal neurodegenerative processes. PMID:26469804

  16. Application of cerium nitrate-silver sulphadiazine allows for postponement of excision and grafting.

    PubMed

    Vehmeyer-Heeman, M; Tondu, T; Van den Kerckhove, E; Boeckx, W

    2006-02-01

    Early excision and grafting cannot always be performed due to patient's medical status, and the lack of adequate donor sites. The use of cerium nitrate-silver sulphadiazine cream, which causes the formation of a leather-like eschar with excellent resistance to infection, is an alternative method. In order to postpone operations by using cerium nitrate-silver sulphadiazine, we compared the differences in contamination of the grafted areas between early and delayed excision. Eighteen patients underwent excision and grafting within 5 days post burn and nineteen patients were surgically treated after 5 days. Twelve months later the grafted areas were evaluated. Contamination of the grafted area occurred in 17 patients. No differences in contamination occurred between the early and delayed excision group, 8 versus 9. Also no differences in type of organism cultured and follow-up results were found between the early and delayed excision group. Cerium nitrate-silver sulphadiazine allows surgical treatment to be delayed without an increase of contamination of the grafted area and does not adversely affect the long-term outcome.

  17. Cerium Biomagnification in a Terrestrial Food Chain: Influence of Particle Size and Growth Stage.

    PubMed

    Majumdar, Sanghamitra; Trujillo-Reyes, Jesica; Hernandez-Viezcas, Jose A; White, Jason C; Peralta-Videa, Jose R; Gardea-Torresdey, Jorge L

    2016-07-01

    Mass-flow modeling of engineered nanomaterials (ENMs) indicates that a major fraction of released particles partition into soils and sediments. This has aggravated the risk of contaminating agricultural fields, potentially threatening associated food webs. To assess possible ENM trophic transfer, cerium accumulation from cerium oxide nanoparticles (nano-CeO2) and their bulk equivalent (bulk-CeO2) was investigated in producers and consumers from a terrestrial food chain. Kidney bean plants (Phaseolus vulgaris var. red hawk) grown in soil contaminated with 1000-2000 mg/kg nano-CeO2 or 1000 mg/kg bulk-CeO2 were presented to Mexican bean beetles (Epilachna varivestis), which were then consumed by spined soldier bugs (Podisus maculiventris). Cerium accumulation in plant and insects was independent of particle size. After 36 days of exposure to 1000 mg/kg nano- and bulk-CeO2, roots accumulated 26 and 19 μg/g Ce, respectively, and translocated 1.02 and 1.3 μg/g Ce, respectively, to shoots. The beetle larvae feeding on nano-CeO2 exposed leaves accumulated low levels of Ce since ∼98% of Ce was excreted in contrast to bulk-CeO2. However, in nano-CeO2 exposed adults, Ce in tissues was higher than Ce excreted. Additionally, Ce content in tissues was biomagnified by a factor of 5.3 from the plants to adult beetles and further to bugs.

  18. Application of Cerium (IV) as an Oxidimetric Agent for the Determination of Ethionamide in Pharmaceutical Formulations

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Two simple methods are described for the determination of ethionamide (ETM) in bulk drug and tablets using cerium (IV) sulphate as the oxidimetric agent. In both methods, the sample solution is treated with a measured excess of cerium (IV) solution in H2SO4 medium, and after a fixed standing time, the residual oxidant is determined either by back titration with standard iron (II) solution to a ferroin end point in titrimetry or by reacting with o-dianisidine followed by measurement of the absorbance of the orange-red coloured product at 470 nm in spectrophotometry. In titrimetry, the reaction proceeded with a stoichiometry of 1 : 2 (ETM : Ce (IV)) and the amount of cerium (IV) consumed by ETM was related to the latter's amount, and the method was applicable over 1.0–8.0 mg of drug. In spectrophotometry, Beer's law was obeyed over the concentration range of 0.5–5.0 μg/mL ETM with a molar absorptivity value of 2.66 × 104 L/(mol·cm). The limits of detection (LOD) and quantification (LOQ) calculated according to ICH guidelines were 0.013 and 0.043 μg/mL, respectively. The proposed titrimetric and spectrophotometric methods were found to yield reliable results when applied to bulk drug and tablets analysis, and hence they can be applied in quality control laboratories.

  19. Unveiling the mechanism of uptake and sub-cellular distribution of cerium oxide nanoparticles†

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Sanjay; Kumar, Amit; Karakoti, Ajay; Seal, Sudipta; Self, William T.

    2011-01-01

    Cerium oxide nanoparticles (CNPs) have been recently studied for their potent superoxide scavenging properties in both cell and animal model systems. Data from these model systems have shown that exposure of cells to CNPs results in the protection against reactive oxygen species (ROS). Despite these exciting findings, very little is known regarding the uptake or subcellular distribution of these nanomaterials inside cells. In this study we utilized fluorophore (carboxyfluorescein) conjugated cerium oxide NPs (CCNPs) to study the mechanism of uptake and to elucidate the subcellular localization of CNPs using a keratinocyte model system. We observed rapid uptake (within 3 h) of CCNPs that was governed by energy-dependent, clathrin-mediated and caveolae-mediated endocytic pathways. We found CCNPs co-localized with mitochondria, lysosomes and endoplasmic reticulum as well as being abundant in the cytoplasm and the nucleus. Given the radical scavenging properties of cerium oxide and the widespread cellular disposition we observed, CNPs likely act as cellular antioxidants in multiple compartments of the cell imparting protection against a variety of oxidant injuries. PMID:20697616

  20. The role of hydrogen peroxide in the deposition of cerium-based conversion coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scholes, F. H.; Soste, C.; Hughes, A. E.; Hardin, S. G.; Curtis, P. R.

    2006-12-01

    Cerium-based conversion coatings are progressing as an effective alternative to hazardous chromate-based systems used in the treatment of metal surfaces. However, there is still considerable debate over the mechanism by which these coatings are formed. Here, titrations of cerium-based conversion coating solutions were carried out in order to model the reactions that occur at the metal-solution interface during coating, with a particular emphasis on investigating the role of hydrogen peroxide (H 2O 2). The titration curves obtained support the proposed formation of Ce(III) peroxo complexes such as Ce(H 2O 2) 3+ as an initial step, followed by deprotonation, oxidation and precipitation to form peroxo-containing Ce(IV) species such as Ce (IV)(O 2)(OH) 2. The precipitates resulting from titrations were characterised by Raman spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction and thermogravimetric analysis, confirming the presence of peroxo bonds, and nano-sized CeO 2 crystallites that decreased in size with increasing H 2O 2 concentration. Characterisation of cerium conversion coatings on aluminium alloy surfaces confirmed the presence of peroxo species in the coatings, thereby supporting the titration model.

  1. Aqueous Co-precipitation of Pd-doped Cerium Oxide Nanoparticles: Chemistry Structure and Particle Growth

    SciTech Connect

    Liang H.; Zhang L.; Raitano J.M.; He G.; Akey A.J.; Herman I.P.; Chan S.-W.

    2012-01-01

    Nanoparticles of palladium-doped cerium oxide (Pd-CeO{sub 2}) have been prepared by aqueous co-precipitation resulting in a single phase cubic structure after calcination according to X-ray diffraction (XRD). Inhomogeneous strain, calculated using the Williamson-Hall method, was found to increase with palladium content, and the lattice contracts slightly, relative to nano-cerium oxide, as palladium content is increased. Moreover, high resolution transmission electron microscopy reveals some instances of defective microstructure. These factors combined imply that palladium is in solid solution with CeO{sub 2} in these nanoparticles, but palladium (II) oxide (PdO) peaks in the Raman spectra indicate that solid solution formation is partial and that highly dispersed PdO is present as well as the solid solution. Nevertheless, the addition of palladium to the CeO{sub 2} lattice inhibits the growth of the 6% Pd-CeO{sub 2} particles compared to pure CeO{sub 2} between 600 and 850 C. Activation energies for grain growth of 54 {+-} 7 and 79 {+-} 8 kJ/mol were determined for 6% Pd-CeO{sub 2} and pure CeO{sub 2}, respectively, along with pre-exponential Arrhenius factors of 10 for the doped sample and 600 for pure cerium oxide.

  2. Controlled Redox Chemistry at Cerium within a Tripodal Nitroxide Ligand Framework.

    PubMed

    Bogart, Justin A; Lippincott, Connor A; Carroll, Patrick J; Booth, Corwin H; Schelter, Eric J

    2015-12-01

    Ligand reorganization has been shown to have a profound effect on the outcome of cerium redox chemistry. Through the use of a tethered, tripodal, trianionic nitroxide ligand, [((2-tBuNOH)C6 H4 CH2 )3 N](3-) (TriNOx (3-) ), controlled redox chemistry at cerium was accomplished, and typically reactive complexes of tetravalent cerium were isolated. These included rare cationic complexes [Ce(TriNOx )thf][BAr(F) 4 ], in which Ar(F) =3,5-(CF3 )2 -C6 H3 , and [Ce(TriNOx )py][OTf]. A rare complete Ce-halide series, Ce(TriNOx )X, in which X=F(-) , Cl(-) , Br(-) , I(-) , was also synthesized. The solution chemistry of these complexes was explored through detailed solution-phase electrochemistry and (1) H NMR experiments and showed a unique shift in the ratio of species with inner- and outer-sphere anions with size of the anionic X(-) group. DFT calculations on the series of calculations corroborated the experimental findings.

  3. Microstructure and electrochemical behavior of cerium conversion coating modified with silane agent on magnesium substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Li; Shi, Jing; Wang, Xin; Liu, Dan; Xu, Haigang

    2016-07-01

    The cerium conversion coating with and without different concentrations of silane agent bis-(γ-triethoxysilylpropyl)-tetrasulfide (BTESPT) modification is obtained on magnesium alloys. Detailed properties of the coatings and the role of BTESPT as an additive are studied and followed with careful discussion. The coating morphology, wettability, chemical composition and corrosion resistance are characterized by scanning electronic microscope (SEM), water contact-angle, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), potentiodynamic measurements and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The electrochemical behavior of the coatings is investigated using EIS. The results indicate that the coating morphology and composition can be controlled by changing silane concentration. The combination of cerium ions and silane molecules could promote the formation of more homogenous and higher hydrophobic coating. The coating turns to be more compact and the adhesive strength between the coating and the magnesium substrate are strongly improved with the formation of Sisbnd Osbnd Si and Sisbnd Osbnd M chemical bonds. The optimum corrosion resistance of the coating in the corrosive media is obtained by 25 ml L-1 BTESPT modification. This whole study implies that the cerium conversion coating modified with certain silane agent deserves cautiousness before its application for corrosion resistance.

  4. Ultrafine-grained titanium for medical implants

    DOEpatents

    Zhu, Yuntian T.; Lowe, Terry C.; Valiev, Ruslan Z.; Stolyarov, Vladimir V.; Latysh, Vladimir V.; Raab, Georgy J.

    2002-01-01

    We disclose ultrafine-grained titanium. A coarse-grained titanium billet is subjected to multiple extrusions through a preheated equal channel angular extrusion (ECAE) die, with billet rotation between subsequent extrusions. The resulting billet is cold processed by cold rolling and/or cold extrusion, with optional annealing. The resulting ultrafine-grained titanium has greatly improved mechanical properties and is used to make medical implants.

  5. Production of titanium from ilmenite: a review

    SciTech Connect

    Kohli, R.

    1981-12-01

    The general principles for beneficiation of titanium ores are reviewed and the specific processes used in individual units in various countries are discussed. This is followed by a critical evaluation of various current and potential reduction methods for the production of titanium metal from the processed concentrates. Finally, the report outlines a research program for the development of a commercially viable alternative method for the production of titanium metal.

  6. Manganese removal during bench-scale biofiltration.

    PubMed

    Burger, Mark S; Mercer, Stephen S; Shupe, Gordon D; Gagnon, Graham A

    2008-12-01

    As biological manganese (Mn) removal becomes a more popular water treatment technology, there is still a large gap in understanding the key mechanisms and range of operational characteristics. This research aimed to expand on previous bench-scale experiments by directly comparing small filtration columns inoculated with indigenous biofilms from a Mn filtration plant and filtration columns inoculated with a liquid suspension of Leptothrix discophora SP-6. Batch tests found that in the absence of manganese oxidizing bacteria Mn was not removed by air alone, whereas a mixed population and Leptothrix strain achieved greater than 90% removal of Mn. The bench-scale biofiltration experiments found that biological filters can be inoculated with a pure culture of L. discophora SP-6 and achieve a similar removal of indigenous biofilm. While Mn oxidizing bacteria (MOB) seem to be necessary for the auto-catalytic nature of these biological filters, Mn removal is achieved with a combination of adsorption to Mn oxides and biological oxidation. Additionally, it was demonstrated that biological Mn removal is possible over a broader "field of activity" (e.g., Mn removal occurred at a pH level as low as 6.5) than has previously been reported. The ability of this treatment technology to work over a broader range of influent conditions allows for more communities to consider biological treatment as an option to remove Mn from their drinking water. PMID:18809196

  7. Rates of manganese oxidation in aqueous systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hem, J.D.

    1981-01-01

    The rate of crystal growth of Mn3O4 (hausmannite) and ??MnOOH (feitknechtite) in aerated aqueous manganous perchlorate systems, near 0.01 M in total manganese, was determined at pH levels ranging from 7.00 to 9.00 and at temperatures from 0.5 to 37.4??C. The process is autocatalytic, but becomes psuedo first-order in dissolved Mn2+ activity when the amount of precipitate surface is large compared to the amount of unreacted manganese. Reaction rates determined by titrations using an automated pH-stat were fitted to an equation for precipitate growth. The rates are proportional to surface area of oxide and degree of supersaturation with respect to Mn2+. The oxide obtained at the higher temperature was Mn3O4, but at 0.5?? C only ??MnOOH was formed. At intermediate temperatures, mixtures of these solids were formed. The rate of precipitation of hausmannite is strongly influenced by temperature, and that of feitknechtite much less so. The difference in activation energy may be related to differences in crystal structure of the oxides and the geometry of polymeric hydroxy ion precursors. ?? 1981.

  8. Manganese-Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MEMRI)

    PubMed Central

    Massaad, Cynthia A.; Pautler, Robia G.

    2012-01-01

    The use of manganese ions (Mn2+) as an MRI contrast agent was introduced over 20 years ago in studies of Mn2+ toxicity in anesthetized rats (1). Manganese-enhanced MRI (MEMRI) evolved in the late nineties when Koretsky and associates pioneered the use of MEMRI for brain activity measurements (2) as well as neuronal tract tracing (3). Currently, MEMRI has three primary applications in biological systems: (1) contrast enhancement for anatomical detail, (2) activity-dependent assessment and (3) tracing of neuronal connections or tract tracing. MEMRI relies upon the following three main properties of Mn2+: (1) it is a paramagnetic ion that shortens the spin lattice relaxation time constant (T1) of tissues, where it accumulates and hence functions as an excellent T1 contrast agent; (2) it is a calcium (Ca2+) analog that can enter excitable cells, such as neurons and cardiac cells via voltage-gated Ca2+ channels; and (3) once in the cells Mn2+ can be transported along axons by microtubule-dependent axonal transport and can also cross synapses trans-synaptically to neighboring neurons. This chapter will emphasize the methodological approaches towards the use of MEMRI in biological systems. PMID:21279601

  9. Thermochemistry of iron manganese oxide spinels

    SciTech Connect

    Guillemet-Fritsch, Sophie; Navrotsky, Alexandra . E-mail: anavrotsky@ucdavis.edu; Tailhades, Philippe; Coradin, Herve; Wang Miaojun

    2005-01-15

    Oxide melt solution calorimetry has been performed on iron manganese oxide spinels prepared at high temperature. The enthalpy of formation of (Mn{sub x}Fe{sub 1-x}){sub 3}O{sub 4} at 298K from the oxides, tetragonal Mn{sub 3}O{sub 4} (hausmannite) and cubic Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} (magnetite), is negative from x=0 to x=0.67 and becomes slightly positive for 0.670.6) spinels of intermediate compositions. The enthalpies of formation are discussed in terms of three factors: oxidation-reduction relative to the end-members, cation distribution, and tetragonality. A combination of measured enthalpies and Gibbs free energies of formation in the literature provides entropies of mixing. {delta}S{sub mix}, consistent with a cation distribution in which all trivalent manganese is octahedral and all other ions are randomly distributed for x>0.5, but the entropy of mixing appears to be smaller than these predicted values for x<0.4.

  10. Recovery of titanium values from titanium grinding swarf by electric furnace smelting

    DOEpatents

    Gerdemann, Stephen J.; White, Jack C.

    1999-01-01

    A method for the recovery of valuable materials from titanium grinding swarf is provided comprising the steps of sieving the accumulated titanium grinding swarf to remove unwanted coarse trash and grinding wheel fragments, pelletizing, and smelting in an electric arc furnace to produce ferrotitanium and/or high titanium slag.

  11. Recovery of titanium values from titanium grinding swarf by electric furnace smelting

    DOEpatents

    Gerdemann, Stephen J.; White, Jack C.

    1998-01-01

    A method for the recovery of valuable materials from titanium grinding swarf is provided comprising the steps of sieving the accumulated titanium grinding swarf to remove unwanted coarse trash and grinding wheel fragments, pelletizing, and smelting in an electric arc furnace to produce ferrotitanium and/or high titanium slag.

  12. Recovery of titanium values from titanium grinding swarf by electric furnace smelting

    SciTech Connect

    Gerdemann, S.J.; White, J.C.

    1999-10-19

    A method for the recovery of valuable materials from titanium grinding swarf is provided comprising the steps of sieving the accumulated titanium grinding swarf to remove unwanted coarse trash and grinding wheel fragments, pelletizing, and smelting in an electric arc furnace to produce ferrotitanium and/or high titanium slag.

  13. Recovery of titanium values from titanium grinding swarf by electric furnace smelting

    DOEpatents

    Gerdemann, S.J.; White, J.C.

    1998-08-04

    A method for the recovery of valuable materials from titanium grinding swarf is provided comprising the steps of sieving the accumulated titanium grinding swarf to remove unwanted coarse trash and grinding wheel fragments, pelletizing, and smelting in an electric arc furnace to produce ferrotitanium and/or high titanium slag. 1 fig.

  14. Method for producing titanium aluminide weld rod

    DOEpatents

    Hansen, Jeffrey S.; Turner, Paul C.; Argetsinger, Edward R.

    1995-01-01

    A process for producing titanium aluminide weld rod comprising: attaching one end of a metal tube to a vacuum line; placing a means between said vacuum line and a junction of the metal tube to prevent powder from entering the vacuum line; inducing a vacuum within the tube; placing a mixture of titanium and aluminum powder in the tube and employing means to impact the powder in the tube to a filled tube; heating the tube in the vacuum at a temperature sufficient to initiate a high-temperature synthesis (SHS) reaction between the titanium and aluminum; and lowering the temperature to ambient temperature to obtain a intermetallic titanium aluminide alloy weld rod.

  15. Grain Growth Behavior, Tensile Impact Ductility, and Weldability of Cerium-Doped Iridium Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    McKamey, C.G.

    2002-05-28

    An iridium alloy doped with small amounts of cerium and thorium is being developed as a potential replacement for the iridium-based DOP-26 alloy (doped with thorium only) that is currently used by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) for cladding and post-impact containment of the radioactive fuel in radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG) heat sources which provide electric power for interplanetary spacecraft. This report summarizes results of studies conducted to date under the Iridium Alloy Characterization and Development subtask of the Radioisotope Power System Materials Production and Technology Program to characterize the properties of the iridium-based alloy (designated as DOP-40) containing both cerium and thorium. Included within this report are data on grain growth of sheet material in vacuum and low-pressure oxygen environments, grain growth in vacuum of the clad vent set cup material, weldability, and the effect of grain size and test temperature on tensile properties. Where applicable, data for the DOP-26 alloy are included for comparison. Both grain size and grain-boundary cohesion affect the ductility of iridium alloys. In this study it was found that cerium and thorium, when added together, refine grain size more effectively than when thorium is added by itself (especially at high temperatures). In addition, the effect of cerium additions on grain-boundary cohesion is similar to that of thorium. Mechanical testing at both low ({approx} 10{sup -3}s{sup -1}) and high ({approx} 10{sup -3}s{sup -1}) strain rates showed that the Ce/Th-doped alloys have tensile ductilities that are as good or better than the DOP-26 alloy. The general conclusion from these studies is that cerium can be used to replace some of the radioactive thorium currently used in DOP-26 while maintaining or improving its metallurgical properties. The current DOP-26 alloy meets all requirements for cladding the radioactive fuel in the RTG heat source, but the

  16. Using cerium anomaly as an indicator of redox reactions in constructed wetland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, R.

    2013-12-01

    dissolved oxygen (5 ppm) but the NH4 content is still high, which indicates a non-equilibrium condition. In this study, the cerium anomaly is alternatively utilized to evaluate the water redox state. The results demonstrate that the input water has the negative cerium anomaly of -0.16. Along the flow path, the cerium negative anomaly does not change in the first two cells and dramatically becomes -0.23 in cell 3. The trend of cerium anomaly is more close to the removal efficiency of NH4 rather than dissolve oxygen. Accordingly, cerium anomaly could become a better indicator of removal efficiency of constructed wetland.

  17. Photo-catalytic Degradation and Sorption of Radio-cobalt from EDTA-Co Complexes Using Manganese Oxide Materials - 12220

    SciTech Connect

    Koivula, Risto; Harjula, Risto; Tusa, Esko

    2012-07-01

    very promising for the treatment of EDTA complexed Co solutions. The better performance values and cheaper production cost of manganese oxide, compared to titanium dioxide, is so big driving force that further studies on the material are evident. The possibilities for continuous treatment, instead of the fluidized bed -type batch experiment are investigated and the effects of other compounds affecting the de-complexation of Co-EDTA are further studied. (authors)

  18. Methanogenesis from wastewater stimulated by addition of elemental manganese.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Sen; Tian, Tian; Qi, Benyu; Zhou, Jiti

    2015-08-05

    This study presents a novel procedure for accelerating methanogenesis from wastewater by adding elemental manganese into the anaerobic digestion system. The results indicated that elemental manganese effectively enhanced both the methane yield and the production rate. Compared to the control test without elemental manganese, the total methane yield and production rate with 4 g/L manganese addition increased 3.4-fold (from 0.89 ± 0.03 to 2.99 ± 0.37 M/gVSS within 120 h) and 4.4-fold (from 6.2 ± 0.1 to 27.2 ± 2.2 mM/gVSS/h), respectively. Besides, more acetate consumption and less propionate generation were observed during the methanogenesis with manganese. Further studies demonstrated that the elemental manganese served as electron donors for the methanogenesis from carbon dioxide, and the final proportion of methane in the total generated gas with 4 g/L manganese addition reached 96.9%, which was 2.1-fold than that of the control (46.6%).

  19. Selection and Use of Manganese Dioxide by Neanderthals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heyes, Peter J.; Anastasakis, Konstantinos; de Jong, Wiebren; van Hoesel, Annelies; Roebroeks, Wil; Soressi, Marie

    2016-02-01

    Several Mousterian sites in France have yielded large numbers of small black blocs. The usual interpretation is that these ‘manganese oxides’ were collected for their colouring properties and used in body decoration, potentially for symbolic expression. Neanderthals habitually used fire and if they needed black material for decoration, soot and charcoal were readily available, whereas obtaining manganese oxides would have incurred considerably higher costs. Compositional analyses lead us to infer that late Neanderthals at Pech-de-l’Azé I were deliberately selecting manganese dioxide. Combustion experiments and thermo-gravimetric measurements demonstrate that manganese dioxide reduces wood’s auto-ignition temperature and substantially increases the rate of char combustion, leading us to conclude that the most beneficial use for manganese dioxide was in fire-making. With archaeological evidence for fire places and the conversion of the manganese dioxide to powder, we argue that Neanderthals at Pech-de-l’Azé I used manganese dioxide in fire-making and produced fire on demand.

  20. Potential Role of Epigenetic Mechanism in Manganese Induced Neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Tarale, Prashant; Chakrabarti, Tapan; Sivanesan, Saravanadevi; Naoghare, Pravin; Bafana, Amit; Krishnamurthi, Kannan

    2016-01-01

    Manganese is a vital nutrient and is maintained at an optimal level (2.5-5 mg/day) in human body. Chronic exposure to manganese is associated with neurotoxicity and correlated with the development of various neurological disorders such as Parkinson's disease. Oxidative stress mediated apoptotic cell death has been well established mechanism in manganese induced toxicity. Oxidative stress has a potential to alter the epigenetic mechanism of gene regulation. Epigenetic insight of manganese neurotoxicity in context of its correlation with the development of parkinsonism is poorly understood. Parkinson's disease is characterized by the α-synuclein aggregation in the form of Lewy bodies in neuronal cells. Recent findings illustrate that manganese can cause overexpression of α-synuclein. α-Synuclein acts epigenetically via interaction with histone proteins in regulating apoptosis. α-Synuclein also causes global DNA hypomethylation through sequestration of DNA methyltransferase in cytoplasm. An individual genetic difference may also have an influence on epigenetic susceptibility to manganese neurotoxicity and the development of Parkinson's disease. This review presents the current state of findings in relation to role of epigenetic mechanism in manganese induced neurotoxicity, with a special emphasis on the development of Parkinson's disease. PMID:27314012