Science.gov

Sample records for cern heart days

  1. Big Bang Day: The Making of CERN (Episode 1)

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    A two-part history of the CERN project. Quentin Cooper explores the fifty-year history of CERN, the European particle physics laboratory in Switzerland. The institution was created to bring scientists together after WW2 .......

  2. Big Bang Day: The Making of CERN (Episode 1)

    SciTech Connect

    2009-10-06

    A two-part history of the CERN project. Quentin Cooper explores the fifty-year history of CERN, the European particle physics laboratory in Switzerland. The institution was created to bring scientists together after WW2 .......

  3. Highlights from the CERN/ESO/NordForsk ''Gender in Physics Day''

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Primas, F.; Guinot, G.; Strandberg, L.

    2017-03-01

    In their role as observers on the EU Gender Equality Network in the European Research Area (GENERA) project, funded under the Horizon 2020 framework, CERN, ESO and NordForsk joined forces and organised a Gender in Physics Day at the CERN Globe of Science and Innovation. The one-day conference aimed to examine innovative activities promoting gender equality, and to discuss gender-oriented policies and best practice in the European Research Area (with special emphasis on intergovernmental organisations), as well as the importance of building solid networks. The event was very well attended and was declared a success. The main highlights of the meeting are reported.

  4. Sleep problems and heart rate variability over the working day.

    PubMed

    Jackowska, Marta; Dockray, Samantha; Endrighi, Romano; Hendrickx, Hilde; Steptoe, Andrew

    2012-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to discover whether greater sleep problems are associated with reduced heart rate variability during working hours and at night, and to determine whether this association is in part mediated by experienced affective states. This study involved 199 working women with a mean age of 33.8years. Sleep problems were assessed with the Jenkins Sleep Problems Scale, and the Day Reconstruction Method was used to measure positive affect and stress on the evening before and during the working day. Heart rate variability was indexed by the mean square root of the successive standard difference in heart period. Disturbed sleep was inversely related to heart rate variability during the working day (P=0.022), independently of demographic and behavioural confounders. Additional adjustment for positive affect and stress did not lead to further reductions in the association between sleep problems and reduced heart rate variability over the work day. Sleep problems were not predictive of reduced night-time heart rate variability. This report extends the findings from experimental studies and clinical samples, and suggests that disturbed sleep might impair heart rate variability in real life settings, in particular during working hours. Reduced heart rate variability might be a potential pathway linking sleep problems with cardiovascular disease. Based on the current data there was little evidence that the inverse associations between sleep problems and heart rate variability were mediated by experienced affective states.

  5. News CERN Celebration: CERN marks 20 years of the Web Workshops: Physics Teachers' Day aired live on Web Teacher Programme: Physics Teachers at CERN 2009 leaves attendees thirsty for more GIREP: Registration open for GIREP '09 Science and Creationism: Telegraph headline leads readers down wrong path Recruitment: Is recession proving to be good news for science teaching? Forthcoming Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2009-05-01

    CERN Celebration: CERN marks 20 years of the Web Workshops: Physics Teachers' Day aired live on Web Teacher Programme: Physics Teachers at CERN 2009 leaves attendees thirsty for more GIREP: Registration open for GIREP '09 Science and Creationism: Telegraph headline leads readers down wrong path Recruitment: Is recession proving to be good news for science teaching? Forthcoming Events

  6. Worse Prognosis in Heart Failure Patients with 30-Day Readmission

    PubMed Central

    Tung, Ying-Chang; Chou, Shing-Hsien; Liu, Kuan-Liang; Hsieh, I-Chang; Wu, Lung-Sheng; Lin, Chia-Pin; Wen, Ming-Shien; Chu, Pao-Hsien

    2016-01-01

    Background Heart failure (HF) readmission results in substantial expenditure on HF management. This study aimed to evaluate the readmission rate, outcome, and predictors of HF readmission. Methods Patients with reduced left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF < 40%) who were admitted for acute decompensation of de novo HF were enrolled to analyze readmission rate, mortality and predictors of readmission. Results A total of 433 de novo HF patients with LVEF < 40% were enrolled during the period August 2013 to December 2014. The in-hospital and 6-month mortality rates were 3.9% and 15.2%, respectively. In those patients surviving the index HF hospitalization, the 30-day and 6-month readmission rates were 10.9% and 27%, respectively. At the end of the 6-month follow-up, the readmission group had higher mortality than the non-readmission group (27.66% vs. 10.36%; p = 0.001). The survivors of the 30-day readmission had similar mortality rates at 6 months, regardless of the cause of readmission (cardiovascular vs. non-cardiovascular: 25% vs. 30.43%, p = 0.677). Among all the parameters, prescription of beta blockers independently reduced the risk of 30-day readmission (odds ratio 0.15; 95% confidence interval 0.02-0.99; p = 0.049). Conclusions Those HF patients who suffered from 30-day readmission had worse prognosis at the 6-month follow-up. Regardless of the readmission causes, the patients surviving the 30-day readmission had similar mortality rates at 6-month follow-up. These results underscored the importance of reducing readmission as a means to improve HF outcome. PMID:27899857

  7. The Relationship Between Nurse Staffing and 30-Day Readmission for Adults With Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Giuliano, Karen K.; Danesh, Valerie; Funk, Marjorie

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The purpose of this study was to better understand the relationship between nurse staffing and 30-day excess readmission ratios for patients with heart failure in the top US adult cardiology and heart surgery hospitals. BACKGROUND Heart failure is the most common cause of hospitalization for patients older than 65 years and is the most frequent diagnosis associated with 30-day hospital readmission in the United States. METHODS A secondary data analysis was conducted using nurse staffing data from 661 cardiology and heart surgery hospitals from the 2013 US News & World Report “Best Hospitals” survey. These data were combined with excess readmission ratios from the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services Hospital Compare database from 2013. An independent-samples t test was used to compare staffing (low/high) and excess hospital readmissions rates. RESULTS A significant difference (P = .021) was found between the low nurse staffing group (n = 358) and the high nurse staffing group (n = 303). Hospitals with a lower nurse staffing index had a significantly higher excess readmission rate. CONCLUSION These data provide further support to the body of research showing a positive relationship between nurse staffing and positive outcomes. PMID:26579974

  8. Measuring hospital mortality rates: are 30-day data enough? Ischemic Heart Disease Patient Outcomes Research Team.

    PubMed Central

    Garnick, D W; DeLong, E R; Luft, H S

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE. We compare 30-day and 180-day postadmission hospital mortality rates for all Medicare patients and those in three categories of cardiac care: coronary artery bypass graft surgery, acute myocardial infarction, and congestive heart failure. DATA SOURCES/COLLECTION. Health Care Financing Administration (HCFA) hospital mortality data for FY 1989. STUDY DESIGN. Using hospital level public use files of actual and predicted mortality at 30 and 180 days, we constructed residual mortality measures for each hospital. We ranked hospitals and used receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves to compare 0-30, 31-180, and 0-180-day postadmission mortality. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS. For the admissions we studied, we found a broad range of hospital performance when we ranked hospitals using the 30-day data; some hospitals had much lower than predicted 30-day mortality rates, while others had much higher than predicted mortality rates. Data from the time period 31-180 days postadmission yield results that corroborate the 0-30 day postadmission data. Moreover, we found evidence that hospital performance on one condition is related to performance on the other conditions, but that the correlation is much weaker in the 31-180-day interval than in the 0-30-day period. Using ROC curves, we found that the 30-day data discriminated the top and bottom fifths of the 180-day data extremely well, especially for AMI outcomes. CONCLUSIONS. Using data on cumulative hospital mortality from 180 days postadmission does not yield a different perspective from using data from 30 days postadmission for the conditions we studied. PMID:7860319

  9. Of larks and hearts--morningness/eveningness, heart rate variability and cardiovascular stress response at different times of day.

    PubMed

    Roeser, Karolin; Obergfell, Friederike; Meule, Adrian; Vögele, Claus; Schlarb, Angelika A; Kübler, Andrea

    2012-05-15

    Inter-individual differences in the circadian period of physical and mental functions can be described on the dimension of morningness/eveningness. Previous findings support the assumption that eveningness is related to greater impulsivity and susceptibility to stress than morningness. Heart rate variability (HRV) serves as a physiological correlate of self- and emotional regulation and has not yet been investigated in relation to chronotypes. The study explores differences in HRV and other cardiovascular measures in morning- and evening-types at rest and under stress at different times of day (8-11 a.m. or 4-7 p.m.). Students (N=471) were screened for chronotype and n=55 females (27 morning- and 28 evening-types) were recruited for testing. These participants performed a mental arithmetic task while heart rate (HR) and blood pressure (BP) were recorded. Spectral components and a time-domain measure of HRV were calculated on HR data from resting and mental stress periods. Evening-types had significantly higher HR and systolic BP, but lower HRV than morning-types both at baseline and during stress. Stress induced in the evening had a significantly stronger impact on absolute and baseline corrected physiological measures in both chronotypes. The interaction of chronotype and testing time did not reach the level of significance for any of the dependent variables. The enhanced physiological arousal in evening-types might contribute to increased vulnerability to psychological distress. Hence, previous behavioral findings are supported by the physiological data of this study.

  10. Prolonged use for at least 10 days of intraaortic balloon pumping (IABP) for heart failure.

    PubMed

    Oshima, Kiyohiro; Morishita, Yasuo; Hinohara, Hiroshi; Kadoi, Yuji; Hayashi, Yoshiro; Tajima, Yukio; Kunimoto, Fumio

    2005-11-01

    Intraaortic balloon pumping (IABP) is a useful therapy for refractory heart failure. However, the safe duration of this therapy and possible complications due to long-term IABP support remain unclear. In this study, we reviewed retrospectively patients requiring the long-term use of IABP, defined here as 10 days or more, to estimate the background and prognosis of patients undergoing long-term use of IABP. The characteristics and perioperative status were compared between survivors and nonsurvivors. A total of 18 patients including 12 males and 6 females required long-term IABP use. IABP was induced in 13 patients (72%) following cardiac surgery and in 5 without cardiac surgery. The mean duration of IABP support was 17 +/- 7 days. Seven patients survived and 11 died of heart failure and/or associated other organ failure. Multiple organ failure (MOF) was recognized in 10 patients, and the incidence of MOF was significantly (P = 0.005) lower in the survivors (14%) compared to the nonsurvivors (82%). The percentage of postcardiac surgery patients was also significantly (P = 0.027) higher in nonsurvivors (91%) than in survivors (43%). Logistic regression analysis identified MOF and cardiac surgery as independent predictors for death. Femoral arterial-venous fistula was the only IABP-related complication. In patients receiving long-term IABP, attention should be paid to other organ complications associated with heart failure, and the use of other circulatory supports such as PCPS or VAD to avoid MOF should be considered if necessary.

  11. Aortic baroreflex control of heart rate after 15 days of simulated microgravity exposure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crandall, Craig G.; Engelke, Keith A.; Convertino, Victor A.; Raven, Peter B.

    1994-01-01

    To determine the effects of simulated microgravity on aortic baroreflex control of heart rate, we exposed seven male subjects to 15 days of bed rest in the 6 deg head-down position. The sensitivity of the aortic-cardiac baroreflex was determined during a steady-state phenylephrine-induced increase in mean arterial pressure combined with lower body negative pressure to counteract central venous pressure increases and neck pressure to offset the increased carotid sinus transmural pressure. The aortic-cardiac baroreflex gain was assessed by determining the ratio of the change in heart rate to the change in mean arterial pressure between baseline conditions and aortic baroreceptor-isolated conditions (i.e., phenylephrine + lower body negative pressure + neck pressure stage). Fifteen days of head-down tilt increased the gain of the aortic-cardiac baroreflex. Reductions in blood volume and/or maximal aerobic capacity may represent the underlying mechanism(s) responsible for increased aortic baroreflex responsiveness after exposure to a ground-based analogue of microgravity.

  12. Comparison of 60-day mortality in hospitalized heart failure patients with versus without hypothermia.

    PubMed

    Payvar, Saeed; Orlandi, Cesare; Stough, Wendy Gattis; Elkayam, Uri; Ouyang, John; Casscells, S Ward; Gheorghiade, Mihai

    2006-12-01

    The use of aggressive treatments and the modification of current treatment in patients with heart failure (HF) relies heavily on the assessment of disease severity using prognostic markers. However, many such markers are unavailable in routine clinical practice, and others have little prognostic value. This study tested the hypothesis that low body temperature could predict short-term survival after discharge in patients hospitalized for HF. Data from the Acute and Chronic Therapeutic Impact of a Vasopressin Antagonist in Congestive Heart Failure (ACTIV in CHF) trial, which randomized 319 patients hospitalized for HF to receive placebo or tolvaptan, were retrospectively analyzed. Hypothermia was defined a priori as an oral body temperature <35.8 degrees C at randomization. Cox regression was used to analyze survival within a 60-day follow-up period. Hypothermia was observed in 32 patients (10%). Mortality rates at 60 days after discharge were 6.3% (20 of 319) overall, 9.4% (3 of 32) in hypothermic patients, and 5.9% (17 of 287) in nonhypothermic patients. Hypothermia was a strong multivariate predictor of mortality; hypothermic patients were 3.9 times more likely to die within 60 days than nonhypothermic patients (95% confidence interval 1.002 to 15.16, p = 0.0497) after adjustment for treatment group, age, and other confounders. Hypothermia was associated with such indicators of low cardiac output as an elevated blood urea nitrogen/creatinine ratio, narrow pulse pressure, and a reduced ejection fraction. In conclusion, hypothermia appears to be a strong predictor of mortality in patients with HF.

  13. Assessing Risk and Preventing 30-Day Readmissions in Decompensated Heart Failure: Opportunity to Intervene?

    PubMed

    Dunbar-Yaffe, Richard; Stitt, Audra; Lee, Joseph J; Mohamed, Shanas; Lee, Douglas S

    2015-10-01

    Heart failure (HF) patients are at high risk of hospital readmission, which contributes to substantial health care costs. There is great interest in strategies to reduce rehospitalization for HF. However, many readmissions occur within 30 days of initial hospital discharge, presenting a challenge for interventions to be instituted in a short time frame. Potential strategies to reduce readmissions for HF can be classified into three different forms. First, patients who are at high risk of readmission can be identified even before their initial index hospital discharge. Second, ambulatory remote monitoring strategies may be instituted to identify early warning signs before acute decompensation of HF occurs. Finally, strategies may be employed in the emergency department to identify low-risk patients who may not need hospital readmission. If symptoms improve with initial therapy, low-risk patients could be referred to specialized, rapid outpatient follow-up care where investigations and therapy can occur in an outpatient setting.

  14. Derivation and validation of a 30-day heart failure readmission model.

    PubMed

    Fleming, Lisa M; Gavin, Michael; Piatkowski, Gail; Chang, James D; Mukamal, Kenneth J

    2014-11-01

    In 2006, there were >1 million hospital admissions for heart failure (HF), and the estimated cost to the United States in 2009 was >$37.2 billion. Better models to target aggressive therapy to patients at the highest risk for readmission are clearly needed. We studied 3,413 consecutive admissions for HF based on discharge diagnosis codes from October 2007 to August 2011 from a single academic center. We randomly generated derivation and validation sets in a 3:1 ratio. We used generalized estimating equations to develop our models, accounting for repeated hospitalizations and the Hosmer-Lemeshow test to examine model calibration. The 30-day readmission rate was 24.2% in the derivation set. Of 25 candidate variables, the best fitting model included creatinine, troponin, hematocrit, and hyponatremia at discharge; race; zip code of residence; discharge hour; and number of hospitalizations in the previous year. Insignificant variables included intravenous diuretic use on day of discharge, discharge service, diabetes, atrial fibrillation, age, and gender. The risk of 30-day readmission increased with increasing decile of predicted risk in both the validation and derivation cohorts. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve for the model was 0.69 in the derivation set and 0.66 in the validation set. In conclusion, we derived and validated a simple model relating discharge-specific characteristics at risk of 30-day readmission. Application of this approach may facilitate targeted intervention to reduce the burden of rehospitalization in patients with HF, but our results suggest that the best readmission models may require incorporation of both clinical and local system factors for optimal prediction.

  15. Relationship between Early Physician Follow-Up and 30-Day Readmission after Acute Myocardial Infarction and Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Tung, Yu-Chi; Chang, Guann-Ming; Chang, Hsien-Yen

    2017-01-01

    Background Thirty-day readmission rates after acute myocardial infarction (AMI) and heart failure are important patient outcome metrics. Early post-discharge physician follow-up has been promoted as a method of reducing 30-day readmission rates. However, the relationships between early post-discharge follow-up and 30-day readmission for AMI and heart failure are inconclusive. We used nationwide population-based data to examine associations between 7-day physician follow-up and 30-day readmission, and further associations of 7-day same physician (during the index hospitalization and at follow-up) and cardiologist follow-up with 30-day readmission for non-ST-segment-elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI) or heart failure. Methods We analyzed all patients 18 years or older with NSTEMI and heart failure and discharged from hospitals in 2010 in Taiwan through Taiwan’s National Health Insurance Research Database. Cox proportional hazard models with robust sandwich variance estimates and propensity score weighting were performed after adjustment for patient and hospital characteristics to test associations between 7-day physician follow-up and 30-day readmission. Results The study population for NSTEMI and heart failure included 5,008 and 13,577 patients, respectively. Early physician follow-up was associated with a lower hazard ratio of readmission compared with no early physician follow-up for patients with NSTEMI (hazard ratio [HR], 0.47; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.39–0.57), and for patients with heart failure (HR, 0.54; 95% CI, 0.48–0.60). Same physician follow-up was associated with a reduced hazard ratio of readmission compared with different physician follow-up for patients with NSTEMI (HR, 0.56; 95% CI, 0.48–0.65), and for patients with heart failure (HR, 0.69; 95% CI, 0.62–0.76). Conclusions For each condition, patients who have an outpatient visit with a physician within 7 days of discharge have a lower risk of 30-day readmission. Moreover

  16. Etiologies, Trends, and Predictors of 30-Day Readmission in Patients With Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Arora, Shilpkumar; Patel, Prashant; Lahewala, Sopan; Patel, Nilay; Patel, Nileshkumar J; Thakore, Kosha; Amin, Aditi; Tripathi, Byomesh; Kumar, Varun; Shah, Harshil; Shah, Mahek; Panaich, Sidakpal; Deshmukh, Abhishek; Badheka, Apurva; Gidwani, Umesh; Gopalan, Radha

    2017-03-01

    Heart failure (HF) is the most common discharge diagnosis across the United States, and these patients are particularly vulnerable to readmissions, increasing attention to potential ways to address the problem. The study cohort was derived from the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project's National Readmission Data 2013, sponsored by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. HF was identified using appropriate International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification codes. Readmission was defined as a subsequent hospital admission within 30 days after discharge day of index admission. Readmission causes were identified using International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, codes in primary diagnosis filed. The primary outcome was 30-day readmission. Hierarchical 2-level logistic models were used to evaluate study outcomes. From a total 301,892 principal admissions (73.4% age ≥65 years and 50.6% men), 55,857 (18.5%) patients were readmitted with a total of 64,264 readmissions during the study year. Among the etiologies of readmission, cardiac causes (49.8%) were most common (HF being most common followed by coronary artery disease and arrhythmias), whereas pulmonary causes were responsible for 13.1% and renal causes for 8.9% of the readmissions. Significant predictors of increased 30-day readmission included diabetes (odds ratio, 95% confidence interval, p value: 1.06, 1.03 to 1.08, p <0.001), chronic lung disease (1.13, 1.11 to 1.16, p <0.001), renal failure/electrolyte imbalance (1.12, 1.10 to 1.15, p <0.001), discharge to facilities (1.07, 1.04 to 1.09, p <0.001), lengthier hospital stay, and transfusion during index admission. In conclusion, readmission after a hospitalization for HF is common. Although it may be necessary to readmit some patients, the striking rate of readmission demands efforts to further clarify the determinants of readmission and develop strategies in terms of quality of care and care transitions to

  17. Results of animal experiments using an undulation pump total artificial heart: analysis of 10 day and 19 day survival.

    PubMed

    Mochizuki, S; Abe, Y; Chinzei, T; Isoyama, T; Ono, T; Saito, I; Guba, P; Karita, T; Sun, Y P; Kouno, A; Suzuki, T; Baba, K; Mabuchi, K; Imachi, K

    2000-01-01

    An undulation pump is a special rotary blood pump in which rotation of a brushless DC motor is transformed to an undulating motion by a disc in the pump housing attached by means of a special link mechanism. In the blood pump, a closed line between the disc and housing moves from the inlet to the outlet by this undulating disc motion, which sucks and pushes the blood from the inlet to the outlet. Because the same phenomena occurs at both sides of the disc, a continuous flow is obtained when the motor rotational speed is constant. The pump flow pattern can be easily changed from continuous flow to pulsatile flow by controlling the motor drive current pattern. A seal membrane made of segmented polyurethane protects the blood from invading the link mechanism as well as the motor. UPTAH is fabricated with two undulation pumps and two brushless DC motors. Its size is 75 mm in diameter and 80 mm long, and it has one of the great advantage of no compliance chamber required in the system. UPTAHs were implanted under cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) into the chest cavities of 16 goats, each weighing between 41 and 72 kg. No anticoagulant and antiplatelet agent was used after the surgery. The left atrial pressure was automatically controlled to prevent its elevation and sucking of the atrial wall into the atrial cuff. The following results were obtained: (1) UPTAHs fit well into all the goats; (2) the longest survival was 19.8 days, the cause of death was bleeding from the aortic anastomosis; (3) No thrombus was observed in the blood pump despite no anticoagulant use. Hemolysis depended upon the length of CPB during surgery. When CPB time was within 2 hours, hemolysis level returned to baseline within a few days of the surgery. UPTAH is a promising implantable TAH, because of its small size and easy controllability.

  18. 78 FR 26639 - Proposed Collection; 60-Day Comment Request: The Framingham Heart Study (FHS)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-07

    ... Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI), the National Institutes of Health (NIH) will publish periodic...... 1220 292 * Number of participants as reflected in Rows I.A. and I.B. above. Summary of 3...

  19. The effects of prenatal exposure to a 900-MHz electromagnetic field on the 21-day-old male rat heart.

    PubMed

    Türedi, Sibel; Hancı, Hatice; Topal, Zehra; Ünal, Deniz; Mercantepe, Tolga; Bozkurt, İlyas; Kaya, Haydar; Odacı, Ersan

    2015-01-01

    The growing spread of mobile phone use is raising concerns about the effect on human health of the electromagnetic field (EMF) these devices emit. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects on rat pup heart tissue of prenatal exposure to a 900 megahertz (MHz) EMF. For this purpose, pregnant rats were divided into experimental and control groups. Experimental group rats were exposed to a 900 MHz EMF (1 h/d) on days 13-21 of pregnancy. Measurements were performed with rats inside the exposure box in order to determine the distribution of EMF intensity. Our measurements showed that pregnant experimental group rats were exposed to a mean electrical field intensity of 13.77 V/m inside the box (0.50 W/m(2)). This study continued with male rat pups obtained from both groups. Pups were sacrificed on postnatal day 21, and the heart tissues were extracted. Malondialdehyde, superoxide dismutase and catalase values were significantly higher in the experimental group rats, while glutathione values were lower. Light microscopy revealed irregularities in heart muscle fibers and apoptotic changes in the experimental group. Electron microscopy revealed crista loss and swelling in the mitochondria, degeneration in myofibrils and structural impairments in Z bands. Our study results suggest that exposure to EMF in the prenatal period causes oxidative stress and histopathological changes in male rat pup heart tissue.

  20. Hospital Nursing and 30-Day Readmissions among Medicare Patients with Heart Failure, Acute Myocardial Infarction, and Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    McHugh, Matthew D.; Ma, Chenjuan

    2013-01-01

    Background Provisions of the Affordable Care Act that increase hospitals’ financial accountability for preventable readmissions have heightened interest in identifying system-level interventions to reduce readmissions. Objectives To determine the relationship between hospital nursing; i.e. nurse work environment, nurse staffing levels, and nurse education, and 30-day readmissions among Medicare patients with heart failure, acute myocardial infarction, and pneumonia. Method and Design Analysis of linked data from California, New Jersey, and Pennsylvania that included information on the organization of hospital nursing (i.e., work environment, patient-to-nurse ratios, and proportion of nurses holding a BSN degree) from a survey of nurses, as well as patient discharge data, and American Hospital Association Annual Survey data. Robust logistic regression was used to estimate the relationship between nursing factors and 30-day readmission. Results Nearly one-quarter of heart failure index admissions (23.3% [n=39,954]); 19.1% (n=12,131) of myocardial infarction admissions; and 17.8% (n=25,169) of pneumonia admissions were readmitted within 30-days. Each additional patient per nurse in the average nurse’s workload was associated with a 7% higher odds of readmission for heart failure (OR=1.07, [1.05–1.09]), 6% for pneumonia patients (OR=1.06, [1.03–1.09]), and 9% for myocardial infarction patients (OR=1.09, [1.05–1.13]). Care in a hospital with a good versus poor work environment was associated with odds of readmission that were 7% lower for heart failure (OR = 0.93, [0.89–0.97]); 6% lower for myocardial infarction (OR = 0.94, [0.88–0.98]); and 10% lower for pneumonia (OR = 0.90, [0.85–0.96]) patients. Conclusions Improving nurses’ work environments and staffing may be effective interventions for preventing readmissions. PMID:23151591

  1. Comparison of sleep-disordered breathing and heart rate variability between hemodialysis and non-hemodialysis days in hemodialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Sukegawa, Mayo; Noda, Akiko; Soga, Taro; Adachi, Yuki; Tsuruta, Yoshinari; Ozaki, Norio; Koike, Yasuo

    2008-08-01

    Sleep disturbances manifesting as insomnia, daytime sleepiness, fatigue, and other symptoms are frequently found in patients with end-stage renal disease that is being treated with dialysis. Many factors, including neurosis, uremic symptoms, dialysis drugs, and sleep-wake rhythms have been suggested as potential causes for these sleep disturbances. We examined sleep apnea/hypopnea and heart rate variability (HRV) reflecting autonomic activity in hemodialysis patients on their hemodialysis and non-hemodialysis days using a home medical care device (Morpheus C, TEIJIN). Eleven hemodialysis patients and 14 healthy adults were enrolled in this study. We calculated the number of apnea/hypopnea episodes per hour (apnea/hypopnea index: AHI) and HRV (percentage of R-R intervals that differ by at least 50 ms from the previous interval: pNN50, very low frequency: VLF, low frequency: LF, high frequency: HF and LF/ HF). There was no significant difference in the AHI between hemodialysis and non-hemodialysis days. The heart rate in hemodialysis patients on non-hemodialysis days was significantly higher than in the controls, whereas the pNN50 was significantly lower in hemodialysis patients on non-hemodialysis days than in the controls. Although VLF was significantly lower in hemodialysis patients on non-hemodialysis days compared to the controls, there were no significant differences in LF, HF or LF/HF between the two groups. Hemodialysis itself might not be an important contributing factor in sleep-related breathing disturbances. The simultaneous analysis of HRV reflecting autonomic activity and sleep-disordered breathing on both hemodialysis and non-hemodialysis days provides important information.

  2. Entropy information of heart rate variability and its power spectrum during day and night

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Li; Jun, Wang

    2013-07-01

    Physiologic systems generate complex fluctuations in their output signals that reflect the underlying dynamics. We employed the base-scale entropy method and the power spectral analysis to study the 24 hours heart rate variability (HRV) signals. The results show that such profound circadian-, age- and pathologic-dependent changes are accompanied by changes in base-scale entropy and power spectral distribution. Moreover, the base-scale entropy changes reflect the corresponding changes in the autonomic nerve outflow. With the suppression of the vagal tone and dominance of the sympathetic tone in congestive heart failure (CHF) subjects, there is more variability in the date fluctuation mode. So the higher base-scale entropy belongs to CHF subjects. With the decrease of the sympathetic tone and the respiratory frequency (RSA) becoming more pronounced with slower breathing during sleeping, the base-scale entropy drops in CHF subjects. The HRV series of the two healthy groups have the same diurnal/nocturnal trend as the CHF series. The fluctuation dynamics trend of data in the three groups can be described as “HF effect”.

  3. Evolution of a 90-day model of care for bundled episodic payments for congestive heart failure in home care.

    PubMed

    Feld, April; Madden-Baer, Rose; McCorkle, Ruth

    2016-01-01

    The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services Innovation Center's Episode-Based Payment initiatives propose a large opportunity to reduce cost from waste and variation and stand to align hospitals, physicians, and postacute providers in the redesign of care that achieves savings and improve quality. Community-based organizations are at the forefront of this care redesign through innovative models of care aimed at bridging gaps in care coordination and reducing hospital readmissions. This article describes a community-based provider's approach to participation under the Bundled Payments for Care Improvement initiative and a 90-day model of care for congestive heart failure in home care.

  4. Canine fetal heart rate: do accelerations or decelerations predict the parturition day in bitches?

    PubMed

    Gil, E M U; Garcia, D A A; Giannico, A T; Froes, T R

    2014-10-15

    Ultrasonography is a safe and efficient technique for monitoring fetal development and viability. One of the most important and widely used parameters to verify fetal viability is the fetal heart rate (HR). In human medicine, the fetal HR normally oscillates during labor in transient accelerations and decelerations associated with uterine contractions. The present study investigated whether these variations also occur in canine fetuses and its relationship to parturition. A cohort study was conducted in 15 pregnant bitches undergoing two-dimensional high-resolution ultrasonographic examination during the 8th and 9th week of gestation. Fetal HR was assessed in M-mode for 5 minutes in each fetus in all bitches. In addition, the bitches were monitored for clinical signs of imminent parturition. Associations between the HR, antepartum time, and delivery characteristics were evaluated with a Poisson regression model. Fetal HR acceleration and deceleration occurred in canine fetuses and predicted the optimal time of parturition. These findings can help veterinarians and sonographers better understand this phenomenon in canine fetuses.

  5. Increased heart rate on first day in Intensive Care Unit is associated with increased mortality

    PubMed Central

    Kara, Duygu; Akinci, Seda Banu; Babaoglu, Gulcin; Aypar, Ulku

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the association of maximum HR during the first day of intensive care unit (ICU) and mortality. Methods: Data of 850 patients over 45 years of age, who were hospitalized in ICU, was retrospectively analyzed. They were divided into two groups; Group-I, patients with maximum HR<100/min Group-II, patients with maximum HR≥100/min on first day. The groups were compared regarding age, sex, use of beta-blockers, use of inotropic and vasopressor drugs, hemodynamic parameters, anemia, mechanical ventilation, length of hospitalization (ICU and total), mortality (ICU and total), and CHARLSON & APACHE-II scores. Results: The mean age of patients was 63±12 years and 86% were after non-cardiac surgery. Maximum HR was 83±11 in Group-I and 115±14/min in Group-II (p=0.002). Group-II patients had more frequent vasopressor and inotropic drugs usage, (p<0.001), anemia, mechanical ventilation (p<0.005), higher CHARLSON & APACHE-II scores, stayed longer in ICU and hospital, and had higher ICU and hospital mortality compared to group-I (p<0.05). APACHE-II scores and maximum HR<100/min were independent variables predicting ICU mortality in multivariate logistic regression analysis whereas usage of beta-blockers was not. Conclusions: Our study showed that maximum HR less than100/minute during the first day of ICU is associated with decreased mortality in Intensive Care Unit. PMID:28083034

  6. Influence of second- and third-degree heart block on 30-day outcome following acute myocardial infarction in the drug-eluting stent era.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hack-Lyoung; Kim, Sang-Hyun; Seo, Jae-Bin; Chung, Woo-Young; Zo, Joo-Hee; Kim, Myung-A; Park, Kyung-Woo; Koo, Bon-Kwon; Kim, Hyo-Soo; Chae, In-Ho; Choi, Dong-Ju; Cho, Myeong-Chan; Kim, Young-Jo; Kim, Ju Han; Ahn, Youngkeun; Jeong, Myung Ho

    2014-12-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the prognostic value of heart block among patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI) treated with drug-eluting stents. A total of 13,862 patients with AMI, registered in the nation-wide AMI database from January 2005 to June 2013, were analyzed. Second- (Mobitz type I or II) and third-degree atrioventricular block were considered as heart block in this study. Thirty-day major adverse cardiac events (MACE) including all causes of death, recurrent myocardial infarction, and revascularization were evaluated. Percutaneous coronary intervention with implantation of drug-eluting stent was performed in 89.8% of the patients. Heart block occurred in 378 patients (2.7%). Thirty-day MACE occurred in 1,144 patients (8.2%). Patients with heart block showed worse clinical parameters at initial admission, and the presence of heart block was associated with 30-day MACE in univariate analyses. However, the prognostic impact of heart block was not significant after adjustment of potential confounders (p = 0.489). Among patients with heart block, patients with a culprit in the left anterior descending (LAD) coronary artery had worse clinical outcomes than those of patients with a culprit in the left circumflex or right coronary artery. LAD culprit was a significant risk factor for 30-day MACE even after controlling for confounders (odds ratio 5.28, 95% confidence interval 1.22 to 22.81, p = 0.026). In conclusion, despite differences in clinical parameters at the initial admission, heart block was not an independent risk factor for 30-day MACE in adjusted analyses. However, a LAD culprit was an independent risk factor for 30-day MACE among patients with heart block.

  7. Kansas City Cardiomyopathy Questionnaire Utility in Prediction of 30-Day Readmission Rate in Patients with Chronic Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Gui, Junhong; Zhu, Xiang; Malhotra, Divyanshu; Li, Shenjing; Virkram, Fnu; Chada, Aditya; Jiang, Haibing

    2016-01-01

    Background. Heart failure (HF) is one of the most common diagnoses associated with hospital readmission. We designed this prospective study to evaluate whether Kansas City Cardiomyopathy Questionnaire (KCCQ) score is associated with 30-day readmission in patients hospitalized with decompensated HF. Methods and Results. We enrolled 240 patients who met the study criteria. Forty-eight (20%) patients were readmitted for decompensated HF within thirty days of hospital discharge, and 192 (80%) patients were not readmitted. Compared to readmitted patients, nonreadmitted patients had a higher average KCCQ score (40.8 versus 32.6, P = 0.019) before discharge. Multivariate analyses showed that a high KCCQ score was associated with low HF readmission rate (adjusted OR = 0.566, P = 0.022). The c-statistic for the base model (age + gender) was 0.617. The combination of home medication and lab tests on the base model resulted in an integrated discrimination improvement (IDI) increase of 3.9%. On that basis, the KCQQ further increased IDI of 2.7%. Conclusions. The KCCQ score determined before hospital discharge was significantly associated with 30-day readmission rate in patients with HF, which may provide a clinically useful measure and could significantly improve readmission prediction reliability when combined with other clinical components. PMID:27872790

  8. Hypotension During Hospitalization for Acute Heart Failure Is Independently Associated With 30-Day Mortality: Findings from ASCEND-HF

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Priyesh A.; Heizer, Gretchen; O’Connor, Christopher M.; Schulte, Phillip J.; Dickstein, Kenneth; Ezekowitz, Justin A.; Armstrong, Paul W.; Hasselblad, Vic; Mills, Roger M.; McMurray, John J.; Starling, Randall C.; Wilson Tang, W. H.; Califf, Robert M.; Hernandez, Adrian F.

    2015-01-01

    Background Outcomes associated with episodes of hypotension while hospitalized are not well understood. Methods and Results Using data from ASCEND-HF, we assessed factors associated with inhospital hypotension and subsequent 30-day outcomes. Patients were classified as having symptomatic or asymptomatic hypotension. Multivariable logistic regression was used to determine factors associated with in-hospital hypotension, and Cox proportional hazards models were used to assess the association between hypotension and 30-day outcomes. We also tested for treatment interaction with nesiritide on 30-day outcomes and the association between inhospital hypotension and renal function at hospital discharge. Overall, 1555/7141 (21.8%) patients had an episode of hypotension, of which 73.1% were asymptomatic and 26.9% were symptomatic. Factors strongly associated with in-hospital hypotension included randomization to nesiritide (odds ratio [OR] 1.98, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.76–2.23; p<0.001), chronic metolazone therapy (OR 1.74, 95% CI 1.17–2.60; p<0.001), and baseline orthopnea (OR 1.31, 95% CI 1.13–1.52; p=0.001) or S3 gallop (OR 1.21, 95% CI 1.06–1.40; p=0.006). In-hospital hypotension was associated with increased hazards of 30-day mortality (hazard ratio [HR] 2.03, 95% CI 1.57–2.61; p<0.001), 30-day heart failure (HF) hospitalization or mortality (HR 1.58, 95% CI 1.34–1.86; p<0.001), and 30-day all-cause hospitalization or mortality (HR 1.40, 95% CI 1.22–1.61; p<0.001). Nesiritide had no interaction on the relationship between hypotension and 30-day outcomes (interaction p=0.874 for death, p=0.908 for death/HF hospitalization, p=0.238 death/all-cause hospitalization). Conclusions Hypotension while hospitalized for acute decompensated HF is an independent risk factor for adverse 30-day outcomes, and its occurrence highlights the need for modified treatment strategies. Clinical Trial Registration URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT

  9. First Report of 90-Day Support of Two Calves with a Continuous-Flow Total Artificial Heart

    PubMed Central

    Karimov, Jamshid H.; Moazami, Nader; Kobayashi, Mariko; Sale, Shiva; Such, Kimberly; Byram, Nicole; Sunagawa, Gengo; Horvath, David; Gao, Shengqiang; Kuban, Barry; Golding, Leonard A.; Fukamachi, Kiyotaka

    2015-01-01

    Objective The Cleveland Clinic continuous-flow total artificial heart (CFTAH) is a compact, single-piece, valveless, pulsatile pump providing self-regulated hemodynamic output to left/right circulation. We evaluated chronic in vivo pump performance, physiologic and hemodynamic parameters, and biocompatibility of the CFTAH in a well-established calf model. Methods CFTAH pumps have been implanted in 17 calves total. Hemodynamics, pump performance, and device-related adverse events were evaluated during studies and at necropsy. Results In vivo experiments demonstrated good hemodynamic performance (pump flow, 7.3 ± 0.7 L/min; left atrial pressure [LAP], 16 ± 3 mm Hg; right atrial pressure [RAP], 17 ± 3 mm Hg; RAP-LAP difference, 1 ± 2 mm Hg; mean arterial pressure, 103 ± 7 mm Hg; arterial pulse pressure, 30 ± 11 mm Hg; pulmonary arterial pressure, 34 ± 5 mm Hg). The CFTAH has operated within design specifications and never failed. With ever-improving pump design, the implants have shown no chronic hemolysis. Three recent animals with the CFTAH recovered well, with no postoperative anticoagulation, during planned in vivo durations of 30, 90, and 90 days (last two were intended to be 90-day studies). All these longest-surviving cases showed good biocompatibility, with no thromboembolism in organs. Conclusions The current CFTAH has demonstrated reliable self-regulation of hemodynamic output and acceptable biocompatibility without anticoagulation throughout 90 days of chronic implantation in calves. Meeting these milestones is in accord with our strategy to achieve transfer of this unique technology to surgical practice, thus filling the urgent need for cardiac replacement devices as destination therapy. PMID:26173607

  10. The conduction system and expressions of hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated cation channel 4 and connexin43 expressions in the hearts of fetal day 13 mice.

    PubMed

    Wen, Y; Li, B

    2017-01-01

    We investigated the development of the sinus node of the heart conduction system by localizing hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated cation channel 4 (HCN4) and connexin43 (Cx43) in the hearts of fetal day 13 mice. Horizontal serial sections of day 13 whole fetuses were stained by hematoxylin and eosin and immunofluorescence to identify myocardial cells that express HCN4, hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated cation channel 2 (HCN2) and Cx43. Expression levels of HCN4 and Cx43 were determined by quantitative RT-PCR in both fetal day 13 and adult mice. We found that both Cx43 and HCN4 expressions were located on the cell membranes in the hearts of fetal day 13 mice, but Cx43 was distributed throughout the myocardial cells. HCN4 expression was concentrated mainly in the left dorsal epicardium of the right atrium where Cx43 expression was low or absent. Quantitative RT-PCR demonstrated that HCN4 expression was significantly higher and HCN2 expression was significantly lower in fetal day 13 mice than in adults. We found no statistically significant difference in Cx43 expression between fetal day 13 mice and adults. HCN4 stained myocardial cells in the left dorsal epicardium of the right atrium are the origin of the sinus node and the remainder of the heart conduction system.

  11. News UK public libraries offer walk-in access to research Atoms for Peace? The Atomic Weapons Establishment and UK universities Students present their research to academics: CERN@school Science in a suitcase: Marvin and Milo visit Ethiopia Inspiring telescopes A day for everyone teaching physics 2014 Forthcoming Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2014-05-01

    UK public libraries offer walk-in access to research Atoms for Peace? The Atomic Weapons Establishment and UK universities Students present their research to academics: CERN@school Science in a suitcase: Marvin and Milo visit Ethiopia Inspiring telescopes A day for everyone teaching physics 2014 Forthcoming Events

  12. Reduction of psycho-spiritual distress of an elderly with advanced congestive heart failure by life review interview in a palliative care day center

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Kwok-Ying; Lau, Vikki Wai-Kee; Cheung, Ka-Chi; Chang, Richard Shek-Kwan; Chan, Man-Lui

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Major depression is common in patients hospitalized with congestive heart failure and is independently associated with increased re-hospitalization and mortality. Methods: Hereby, we report the treatment for an elderly congestive heart failure patient with frequent emergency department visits having major depression and hopelessness. Results: Treatment outcomes measured showed that depressed scores of psychosocial needs were reduced with life review interview therapy in a palliative care day center. Conclusion: We hypothesize that multidisciplinary team’s approach to treatment was important for this case. PMID:27621805

  13. The effect of gender on one-day-old infants' behavior and heart rate responses to music decibel level.

    PubMed

    Dureau, Stephanie J

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine gender differences among full term infants' responses to music played at a range of decibel levels. These responses were measured by physiological data (heart rate) and behavioral data (behavior state score). All subjects (N = 36) were healthy, 24-48 hours old, and had passed a hearing screening at the time of testing. Heart rate and behavior state were recorded as male (n = 18) and female (n = 18) subjects listened to alternating 3-minute periods of silence and music for 21 minutes. The music--an excerpt of an instrumental lullaby--was presented via small speakers placed on either side of each subject's head and played at three different loudness levels: 55-60 dB, 65-70 dB, and 75-80 dB. Heart rate was measured using a pulse oximeter with a Y-sensor attached to each subject's great toe, and behavior state was measured using a scale adapted from the Neonatal Behavioral Assessment Scale (Brazelton & Nugent, 1995). A two-way analysis of variance with repeated measures computed for both order and gender found no significant difference in heart rate or behavior state during the three loudness levels. Possible reasons for this lack of difference include enjoyment of the music regardless of intensity or physical inability to discriminate between the different levels.

  14. Signature CERN-URSS

    SciTech Connect

    2006-01-24

    Le DG W.Jentschke souhaite la bienvenue à l'assemblée et aux invités pour la signature du protocole entre le Cern et l'URSS qui est un événement important. C'est en 1955 que 55 visiteurs soviétiques ont visité le Cern pour la première fois. Le premier DG au Cern, F.Bloch, et Mons.Amaldi sont aussi présents. Tandis que le discours anglais de W.Jentschke est traduit en russe, le discours russe de Mons.Morozov est traduit en anglais.

  15. Effects of 20-day litter weight on weaned piglets’ fighting behavior after group mixing and on heart rate variability in an isolation test

    PubMed Central

    Sun, YaNan; Lian, XinMing; Bo, YuKun; Guo, YuGuang; Yan, PeiShi

    2017-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of 20-day litter weight on behavior and heart rate variability (HRV) of piglets under stress. Methods Forty four original litters were categorized as high litter weight (HW) litters (n = 22) and low litter weight (LW) litters (n = 22) by 20-day litter weight. From each original HW litter, three males and three females were randomly selected after weaning and the 12 piglets from two original litters with similar age of days were regrouped into one new high litter weight (NHW) litter (11 NHW litters in total). The original LW litters were treated with a same program, so that there were 11 new low litter weight (NLW) litters as well. The latencies to first fighting, fighting frequencies and duration within three hours were recorded after regrouping and the lesions on body surface within 48 hours were scored. Besides, HR (heart rate, bpm, beats per minute) and activity count (ACT), time domain indexes and frequency domain indexes of the piglets were measured in an isolation trial to analyze the discrepancy in coping with stress between the original HW and LW litters. Results The results exhibited that piglets from the HW litters launched fighting sooner and got statistically higher skin lesion score than those from the LW litters (p = 0.03 and 0.02, respectively). Regarding the HRV detection, compared with the HW litters, the LW litters exhibited a lower mean HR (p<0.05). In the isolation test, a highly significant higher ACT value was observed between the HW litters, compared to the LW litters (p<0.01). Significant differences were observed in standard deviation of R-R intervals, standard deviation of all normal to normal intervals, and most frequency-domain indicators: very low-frequency, low-frequency, and high frequency between the HW and LW litters as well. The difference in LF:HF was not significant (p = 0.779). Conclusion This study suggests that compared with litters of low 20-day litter

  16. Heart failure - medicines

    MedlinePlus

    CHF - medicines; Congestive heart failure - medicines; Cardiomyopathy - medicines; HF - medicines ... You will need to take most of your heart failure medicines every day. Some medicines are taken ...

  17. Predictors of early dyspnoea relief in acute heart failure and the association with 30-day outcomes: findings from ASCEND-HF

    PubMed Central

    Mentz, Robert J.; Hernandez, Adrian F.; Stebbins, Amanda; Ezekowitz, Justin A.; Felker, G. Michael; Heizer, Gretchen M.; Atar, Dan; Teerlink, John R.; Califf, Robert M.; Massie, Barry M.; Hasselblad, Vic; Starling, Randall C.; O'Connor, Christopher M.; Ponikowski, Piotr

    2013-01-01

    Aims To examine the characteristics associated with early dyspnoea relief during acute heart failure (HF) hospitalization, and its association with 30-day outcomes. Methods and results ASCEND-HF was a randomized trial of nesiritide vs. placebo in 7141 patients hospitalized with acute HF in which dyspnoea relief at 6 h was measured on a 7-point Likert scale. Patients were classified as having early dyspnoea relief if they experienced moderate or marked dyspnoea improvement at 6 h. We analysed the clinical characteristics, geographical variation, and outcomes (mortality, mortality/HF hospitalization, and mortality/hospitalization at 30 days) associated with early dyspnoea relief. Early dyspnoea relief occurred in 2984 patients (43%). In multivariable analyses, predictors of dyspnoea relief included older age and oedema on chest radiograph; higher systolic blood pressure, respiratory rate, and natriuretic peptide level; and lower serum blood urea nitrogen (BUN), sodium, and haemoglobin (model mean C index = 0.590). Dyspnoea relief varied markedly across countries, with patients enrolled from Central Europe having the lowest risk-adjusted likelihood of improvement. Early dyspnoea relief was associated with lower risk-adjusted 30-day mortality/HF hospitalization [hazard ratio (HR) 0.81; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.68–0.96] and mortality/hospitalization (HR 0.85; 95% CI 0.74–0.99), but similar mortality. Conclusion Clinical characteristics such as respiratory rate, pulmonary oedema, renal function, and natriuretic peptide levels are associated with early dyspnoea relief, and moderate or marked improvement in dyspnoea was associated with a lower risk for 30-day outcomes. PMID:23159547

  18. Signature CERN-URSS

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    Le DG W.Jentschke souhaite la bienvenue à l'assemblée et aux invités pour la signature du protocole entre le Cern et l'URSS qui est un événement important. C'est en 1955 que 55 visiteurs soviétiques ont visité le Cern pour la première fois. Le premier DG au Cern, F.Bloch, et Mons.Amaldi sont aussi présents. Tandis que le discours anglais de W.Jentschke est traduit en russe, le discours russe de Mons.Morozov est traduit en anglais.

  19. The significance of Cern

    SciTech Connect

    2006-03-29

    Le Prof. V.Weisskopf, DG du Cern de 1961 à 1965, est né à Vienne, a fait ses études à Göttingen et a une carrière académique particulièrement riche. Il a travaillé à Berlin, Copenhague et Berlin et est parti aux Etats Unis pour participer au projet Manhattan et était Prof. au MTT jusqu'à 1960. Revenu en Europe, il a été DG du Cern et lui a donné l'impulsion que l'on sait.

  20. NASA's Functional Task Test: High Intensity Exercise Improves the Heart Rate Response to a Stand Test Following 70 Days of Bedrest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laurie, Steven S.; Lee, Stuart M. C.; Phillips, Tiffany R.; Dillon, E. Lichar; Sheffield-Moore, Melinda; Urban, Randall J.; Ploutz-Snyder, Lori; Stenger, Michael B.; Bloomberg, Jacob J.

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular adaptations due to spaceflight are modeled with 6deg head-down tilt bed rest (BR) and result in decreased orthostatic tolerance. We investigated if high-intensity resistive and aerobic exercise with and without testosterone supplementation would improve the heart rate (HR) response to a 3.5-min stand test and how quickly these changes recovered following BR. During 70 days of BR male subjects performed no exercise (Control, n=10), high intensity supine resistive and aerobic exercise (Exercise, n=9), or supine exercise plus supplemental testosterone (Exercise+T, n=8; 100 mg i.m., weekly in 2-week on/off cycles). We measured HR for 2 min while subjects were prone and for 3 min after standing twice before and 0, 1, 6, and 11 days after BR. Mixed-effects linear regression models were used to evaluate group, time, and interaction effects. Compared to pre-bed rest, prone HR was elevated on BR+0 and BR+1 in Control, but not Exercise or Exercise+T groups, and standing HR was greater in all 3 groups. The increase in prone and standing HR in Control subjects was greater than either Exercise or Exercise+T groups and all groups recovered by BR+6. The change in HR from prone to standing more than doubled on BR+0 in all groups, but was significantly less in the Exericse+T group compared to the Control, but not Exercise group. Exercise reduces, but does not prevent the increase in HR observed in response to standing. The significantly lower HR response in the Exercise+T group requires further investigation to determine physiologic significance.

  1. No Increases in Biomarkers of Genetic Damage or Pathological Changes in Heart and Brain Tissues in Male Rats Administered Methylphenidate Hydrochloride (Ritalin) for 28 Days

    PubMed Central

    Witt, Kristine L.; Malarkey, David E.; Hobbs, Cheryl A.; Davis, Jeffrey P.; Kissling, Grace E.; Caspary, William; Travlos, Gregory; Recio, Leslie

    2009-01-01

    Following a 2005 report of chromosomal damage in children with attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) who were treated with the commonly prescribed medication methylphenidate (MPH), numerous studies have been conducted to clarify the risk for MPH-induced genetic damage. Although most of these studies reported no changes in genetic damage endpoints associated with exposure to MPH, one recent study (Andreazza et al. 2007) reported an increase in DNA damage detected by the Comet assay in blood and brain cells of Wistar rats treated by intraperitoneal injection with 1, 2, or 10 mg/kg MPH; no increases in micronucleated lymphocyte frequencies were observed in these rats. To clarify these findings, we treated adult male Wistar Han rats with 0, 2, 10, or 25 mg/kg MPH by gavage once daily for 28 consecutive days and measured micronucleated reticulocyte (MN-RET) frequencies in blood, and DNA damage in blood, brain, and liver cells 4 hr after final dosing. Flow cytometric evaluation of blood revealed no significant increases in MN-RET. Comet assay evaluations of blood leukocytes and cells of the liver, as well as of the striatum, hippocampus, and frontal cortex of the brain showed no increases in DNA damage in MPH-treated rats in any of the three treatment groups. Thus, the previously reported observations of DNA damage in blood and brain tissue of rats exposed to MPH for 28 days were not confirmed in this study. Additionally, no histopathological changes in brain or heart, or elevated serum biomarkers of cardiac injury were observed in these MPH-exposed rats. PMID:19634155

  2. No increases in biomarkers of genetic damage or pathological changes in heart and brain tissues in male rats administered methylphenidate hydrochloride (Ritalin) for 28 days.

    PubMed

    Witt, Kristine L; Malarkey, David E; Hobbs, Cheryl A; Davis, Jeffrey P; Kissling, Grace E; Caspary, William; Travlos, Gregory; Recio, Leslie

    2010-01-01

    Following a 2005 report of chromosomal damage in children with attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) who were treated with the commonly prescribed medication methylphenidate (MPH), numerous studies have been conducted to clarify the risk for MPH-induced genetic damage. Although most of these studies reported no changes in genetic damage endpoints associated with exposure to MPH, one recent study (Andreazza et al. [2007]: Prog Neuropsychopharmacol Biol Psychiatry 31:1282-1288) reported an increase in DNA damage detected by the Comet assay in blood and brain cells of Wistar rats treated by intraperitoneal injection with 1, 2, or 10 mg/kg MPH; no increases in micronucleated lymphocyte frequencies were observed in these rats. To clarify these findings, we treated adult male Wistar Han rats with 0, 2, 10, or 25 mg/kg MPH by gavage once daily for 28 consecutive days and measured micronucleated reticulocyte (MN-RET) frequencies in blood, and DNA damage in blood, brain, and liver cells 4 hr after final dosing. Flow cytometric evaluation of blood revealed no significant increases in MN-RET. Comet assay evaluations of blood leukocytes and cells of the liver, as well as of the striatum, hippocampus, and frontal cortex of the brain showed no increases in DNA damage in MPH-treated rats in any of the three treatment groups. Thus, the previously reported observations of DNA damage in blood and brain tissue of rats exposed to MPH for 28 days were not confirmed in this study. Additionally, no histopathological changes in brain or heart, or elevated serum biomarkers of cardiac injury were observed in these MPH-exposed rats.

  3. A predictive analytics approach to reducing 30-day avoidable readmissions among patients with heart failure, acute myocardial infarction, pneumonia, or COPD.

    PubMed

    Shams, Issac; Ajorlou, Saeede; Yang, Kai

    2015-03-01

    Hospital readmission has become a critical metric of quality and cost of healthcare. Medicare anticipates that nearly $17 billion is paid out on the 20 % of patients who are readmitted within 30 days of discharge. Although several interventions such as transition care management have been practiced in recent years, the effectiveness and sustainability depends on how well they can identify patients at high risk of rehospitalization. Based on the literature, most current risk prediction models fail to reach an acceptable accuracy level; none of them considers patient's history of readmission and impacts of patient attribute changes over time; and they often do not discriminate between planned and unnecessary readmissions. Tackling such drawbacks, we develop a new readmission metric based on administrative data that can identify potentially avoidable readmissions from all other types of readmission. We further propose a tree-based classification method to estimate the predicted probability of readmission that can directly incorporate patient's history of readmission and risk factors changes over time. The proposed methods are validated with 2011-12 Veterans Health Administration data from inpatients hospitalized for heart failure, acute myocardial infarction, pneumonia, or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in the State of Michigan. Results shows improved discrimination power compared to the literature (c-statistics >80 %) and good calibration.

  4. NEWS: A trip to CERN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellison, A. D.

    2000-07-01

    Two years ago John Kinchin and myself were lucky enough to attend the Goldsmith's particle physics course. As well as many interesting lectures and activities, this course included a visit to CERN. To most physics teachers CERN is Mecca, a hallowed place where gods manipulate and manufacture matter. The experience of being there was even better. Alison Wright was an enthusiastic and very knowledgeable host who ensured the visit went smoothly and we all learned a lot. While we were there, John and I discussed the possibility of bringing a party of A-level students to see real physics in action. In February of this year we managed it. 33 students from two schools, Boston Grammar School and Northampton School for Boys, and four staff left England and caught the 2 am ferry to France. Many hours and a few `short cuts' later we arrived at our hotel in St Genis, not far from CERN. The first day was spent sight-seeing in Lausanne and Geneva. The Olympic museum in Lausanne is well worth a visit. Unfortunately, the famous fountain in Geneva was turned off, but then you can't have everything. The following morning we turned up at CERN late due to the coach's brakes being iced up! We were met once again by Alison Wright who forgave us and introduced the visit by giving an excellent talk on CERN, its background and its reason for existing. At this point we met another member of our Goldsmith's course and his students so we joined forces once again. We then piled back into the coach to re-cross the border and visit ALEPH. ALEPH is a monster of a detector 150 m below ground. We divided into four groups, each with a very able and knowledgeable guide, and toured the site. The size and scale of the detector are awesome and the students were suitably impressed. We repeated the speed of sound experiment of two years ago at the bottom of a 150 m concrete shaft (320 m s-1), posed for a group photo in front of the detector (figure 1) and returned to the main site for lunch in

  5. Time-of-day variation in cardiovascular response to maximal exercise testing in coronary heart disease patients taking a beta-blocker.

    PubMed

    Dufour Doiron, Monique; Prud'homme, Denis; Boulay, Pierre

    2007-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of a beta-blocker (atenolol and metoprolol) on exercise heart rate (HR) and rate pressure product (RPP) during a morning and afternoon maximal exercise test (maxET) in patients with coronary heart disease (CHD). Twenty-one CHD patients (59.9 +/- 8.9 years of age) treated with either atenolol or metoprolol participated in this study. All subjects underwent a morning and afternoon symptom-limited maximal exercise test (maxET) 2-3 h and 8-10 h after medication intake. No significant differences in exercise capacity (atenolol: 8.3 +/- 1.9 vs. 8.3 +/- 2.1 metabolic equivalents (METs); metoprolol: 8.8 +/- 2.0 vs. 8.7 +/- 2.0 METs) or rate of perceived exertion (atenolol: 7.4 +/- 1.9 vs. 7.4 +/- 1.7 METs; metoprolol: 7.2 +/- 1.5 vs. 6.8 +/- 0.9 METs) were observed between the 2 maxETs in either group. However, there was a discrepancy in cardiovascular and ischemic responses between morning and afternoon maxET. Subjects treated with atenolol demonstrated better overall control of HR and RPP during the afternoon maxET. The difference between morning and afternoon HRmax (11 +/- 8 vs. 19 +/- 9 beats.min-1; p = 0.05) was significantly higher in the metoprolol group, but did not attain significance for RPP (31 +/- 30 vs. 54 +/- 28 mmHg.beats.min-1.10-2; p = 0.09). Also, nearly one quarter of our subjects who had a normal morning maxET demonstrated an abnormal electrocardiogram response and (or) ischemia when exercise testing was done in the late afternoon. These changes were more prevalent in subjects taking metoprolol. The results of this study suggest that there is considerable time-of-day variation in the cardiovascular response to a maxET in CHD patients treated with a beta-blocker.

  6. Reviews Book: Voyage to the Heart of the Matter: The ATLAS Experiment at CERN Equipment: SEP Spectroscope Books: Quantum Gods / The Universe Places to visit: The Royal Institution of Great Britain Book: What is this Thing Called Science? Book: Don't be Such a Scientist: Talking Substance in the Age of Style Equipment: La Crosse Anemometer Book: Wonder and Delight Web Watch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2010-05-01

    WE RECOMMEND SEP Spectroscope Flatpacked classroom equipment for pupils aged 10 and over Quantum Gods Book attacks spiritualism and religion with physics The Universe Study of whether physics alone can explain origin of universe La Crosse Anemometer Handheld monitor is packed with useful features Wonder and Delight Essays in science education in honour of Eric Rogers WORTH A LOOK Voyage to the Heart of the Matter: The ATLAS Experiment at CERN Pop-up book explains background to complex physics The Royal Institution of Great Britain RI museum proves interesting but not ideal for teaching What is this Thing Called Science? Theory and history of science in an opinionated study Don't be Such a Scientist: Talking Substance in the Age of Style Explanation of how science is best communicated to the public WEB WATCH Particle physics simulations vary in complexity, usefulness and how well they work

  7. The significance of Cern

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    Le Prof. V.Weisskopf, DG du Cern de 1961 à 1965, est né à Vienne, a fait ses études à Göttingen et a une carrière académique particulièrement riche. Il a travaillé à Berlin, Copenhague et Berlin et est parti aux Etats Unis pour participer au projet Manhattan et était Prof. au MTT jusqu'à 1960. Revenu en Europe, il a été DG du Cern et lui a donné l'impulsion que l'on sait.

  8. History of Cern

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    Cérémonie à l'occasion de l'apparition du premier volume du livre sur l'histoire du Cern, avec plusieurs personnes présentes qui jouaient un rôle important dans cette organisation européenne couronnée de succès grâce à l'esprit des membres fondateurs qui est et restera essentiel

  9. Monitoring Evolution at CERN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrade, P.; Fiorini, B.; Murphy, S.; Pigueiras, L.; Santos, M.

    2015-12-01

    Over the past two years, the operation of the CERN Data Centres went through significant changes with the introduction of new mechanisms for hardware procurement, new services for cloud provisioning and configuration management, among other improvements. These changes resulted in an increase of resources being operated in a more dynamic environment. Today, the CERN Data Centres provide over 11000 multi-core processor servers, 130 PB disk servers, 100 PB tape robots, and 150 high performance tape drives. To cope with these developments, an evolution of the data centre monitoring tools was also required. This modernisation was based on a number of guiding rules: sustain the increase of resources, adapt to the new dynamic nature of the data centres, make monitoring data easier to share, give more flexibility to Service Managers on how they publish and consume monitoring metrics and logs, establish a common repository of monitoring data, optimise the handling of monitoring notifications, and replace the previous toolset by new open source technologies with large adoption and community support. This contribution describes how these improvements were delivered, present the architecture and technologies of the new monitoring tools, and review the experience of its production deployment.

  10. Pericarditis - after heart attack

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000166.htm Pericarditis - after heart attack To use the sharing features on this page, ... occur in the days or weeks following a heart attack . Causes Two types of pericarditis can occur after ...

  11. Day to Day

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jurecki, Dennis

    2006-01-01

    A clean, healthy and safe school provides students, faculty and staff with an environment conducive to learning and working. However, budget and staff reductions can lead to substandard cleaning practices and unsanitary conditions. Some school facility managers have been making the switch to a day-schedule to reduce security and energy costs, and…

  12. Heart Health - Brave Heart

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Cover Story Heart Health Brave Heart Past Issues / Winter 2009 Table of Contents For ... you can have a good life after a heart attack." Lifestyle Changes Surviving—and thriving—after such ...

  13. 25th Birthday Cern- Amphi

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    Cérémonie du 25ème anniversaire du Cern avec 2 orateurs: le Prof.Weisskopf parle de la signification et le rôle du Cern et le Prof.Casimir(?) fait un exposé sur les rélations entre la science pure et la science appliquée et la "big science" (science légère)

  14. Virtual Prototyping at CERN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gennaro, Silvano De

    The VENUS (Virtual Environment Navigation in the Underground Sites) project is probably the largest Virtual Reality application to Engineering design in the world. VENUS is just over one year old and offers a fully immersive and stereoscopic "flythru" of the LHC pits for the proposed experiments, including the experimental area equipment and the surface models that are being prepared for a territorial impact study. VENUS' Virtual Prototypes are an ideal replacement for the wooden models traditionally build for the past CERN machines, as they are generated directly from the EUCLID CAD files, therefore they are totally reliable, they can be updated in a matter of minutes, and they allow designers to explore them from inside, in a one-to-one scale. Navigation can be performed on the computer screen, on a stereoscopic large projection screen, or in immersive conditions, with an helmet and 3D mouse. By using specialised collision detection software, the computer can find optimal paths to lower each detector part into the pits and position it to destination, letting us visualize the whole assembly probess. During construction, these paths can be fed to a robot controller, which can operate the bridge cranes and build LHC almost without human intervention. VENUS is currently developing a multiplatform VR browser that will let the whole HEP community access LHC's Virtual Protoypes over the web. Many interesting things took place during the conference on Virtual Reality. For more information please refer to the Virtual Reality section.

  15. Heart Failure

    MedlinePlus

    ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. Heart Failure What is Heart Failure? In heart failure, the heart cannot pump enough ... failure often experience tiredness and shortness of breath. Heart Failure is Serious Heart failure is a serious and ...

  16. Heart MRI

    MedlinePlus

    Magnetic resonance imaging - cardiac; Magnetic resonance imaging - heart; Nuclear magnetic resonance - cardiac; NMR - cardiac; MRI of the heart; Cardiomyopathy - MRI; Heart failure - MRI; Congenital heart disease - MRI

  17. Target Heart Rates

    MedlinePlus

    ... Terms and Conditions and Privacy Policy Lower Your Sodium in 21 Days! Learn how you can lower your sodium and change your salty ways in 21 Days! Popular Articles 1 Understanding Blood Pressure Readings 2 Sodium and Salt 3 Target Heart Rates 4 Heart ...

  18. Big Bang Day : Physics Rocks

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    Is particle physics the new rock 'n' roll? The fundamental questions about the nature of the universe that particle physics hopes to answer have attracted the attention of some very high profile and unusual fans. Alan Alda, Ben Miller, Eddie Izzard, Dara O'Briain and John Barrowman all have interests in this branch of physics. Brian Cox - CERN physicist, and former member of 90's band D:Ream, tracks down some very well known celebrity enthusiasts and takes a light-hearted look at why this subject can appeal to all of us.

  19. Big Bang Day : Physics Rocks

    SciTech Connect

    2009-10-07

    Is particle physics the new rock 'n' roll? The fundamental questions about the nature of the universe that particle physics hopes to answer have attracted the attention of some very high profile and unusual fans. Alan Alda, Ben Miller, Eddie Izzard, Dara O'Briain and John Barrowman all have interests in this branch of physics. Brian Cox - CERN physicist, and former member of 90's band D:Ream, tracks down some very well known celebrity enthusiasts and takes a light-hearted look at why this subject can appeal to all of us.

  20. Heart murmurs

    MedlinePlus

    Chest sounds - murmurs; Heart sounds - abnormal; Murmur - innocent; Innocent murmur; Systolic heart murmur; Diastolic heart murmur ... The heart has 4 chambers: Two upper chambers (atria) Two lower chambers (ventricles) The heart has valves that close ...

  1. ULTRASTRUCTURAL ANALYSES OF STONE HEART SYNDROME AT ONSET AND SIX DAYS LATER FOLLOWING TOTAL SUPPORT OF THE CIRCULATION WITH A PARTIAL ARTIFICIAL HEART OR LEFT VENTRICULAR ASSIST DEVICE (ALVAD)

    PubMed Central

    Sturm, J. T.; Bossart, M. I.; Holub, D. A.; Milam, J. D.; Norman, J. C.

    1979-01-01

    Ischemic myocardial contracture developed in a 21-year-old man following aortic and mitral valve replacement. The patient's circulation was supported totally for 6 days with an abdominal left ventricular assist device (ALVAD). Cardiac allografting was then undertaken. Samples of myocardium taken at the original operation and 6 days later at transplantation were analyzed ultrastructurally. At the onset of ischemic cortracture, left ventricular abnormalities included hypercontraction of myofibrils, loss of normal A-band and Z-band patterns, mitochondrial swelling with fusion of cristae, interfibrillar edema and glycogen depletion. Capillaries demonstrated swelling of endothelial cells and basement membrane disruption. Six days later, ultrastructural morphology showed further degeneration. The myofibrils remained hypercontracted, but were more fragmented. Degenerative changes in mitochondria were more advanced and calcium deposition in cristae was present. No glycogen was seen. The right ventricular myocardium exhibited significantly fewer ultrastructural abnormalities. The principal right ventricular changes were endothelial swelling and basement membrane disruption. Glycogen granules were present. Ischemic contracture affects the left ventricle more than the right, and the morphology becomes more abnormal with time. To our knowledge, this is the first instance wherein morphologic progressions of the ultrastructural alterations of ischemic contracture have been documented. Images PMID:15216023

  2. CERN, ESA and ESO Launch "Physics On Stage"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2000-03-01

    countries of at least one of the participating organisations or the European Union: Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, the Czech Republic, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Ireland, Italy, Luxembourg, the Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, the Slovak Republic, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, United Kingdom. Statements by the Directors General of CERN, ESA and ESO Luciano Maiani (CERN) : "Science is a critical resource for mankind and, among natural sciences, physics will continue to play a crucial role, well into the next century. The young people of Europe deserve the best possible physics teaching. An enormous resource of first class teachers, teaching materials and innovative thinking exists in our countries. The "Physics on Stage" project will bring these together to generate a new interest in physics education which will be to the long term benefit of children all over Europe. CERN is delighted to take part in this collaboration between the European Community and the continent's three leading physics research organizations." Antonio Rodotà (ESA) : "Space has become an integral part of every day life. The immense technological development that has led to this achievement has taken place and might be taken for granted. But now is the time to follow up and form the future on this basis, a future that has to made by the youth and has to give its benefits to the youth. The European Space Agency is dedicated to support the youth in its development to become a space generation. Many activities have been done and are taking place, and many more are planned for the future. Teachers and educational institutions and organisations form a key role in this development. ESA is enthusiastic about co-operating with ESO and CERN to create an opportunity to receiving ideas from the educational society and will perform a dedicated effort in finding ways to support the realisation of those ideas." Catherine Cesarsky (ESO) : "Astronomy and Astrophysics are at the very heart of

  3. The ELENA Project at CERN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oelert, W.

    CERN has a longstanding tradition of pursuing fundamental physics on extreme low and high energy scales. The present physics knowledge is successfully described by the Standard Model and the General Relativity. In the anti-matter regime many predictions of this established theory still remain experimentally unverified and one of the most fundamental open problems in physics concerns the question of asymmetry between particles: why is the observable and visible universe apparently composed almost entirely of matter and not of anti-matter? There is a huge interest in the very compelling scientiic case for anti-hydrogen and low energy anti-proton physics, here to name especially the Workshop on New Opportunities in the Physics Landscape at CERN which was convened in May 2009 by the CERN Directorate and culminated in the decision for the final approval of the construction of the Extra Low ENergy Antiproton (ELENA) ring by the Research Board in June 2011. ELENA is a CERN project aiming to construct a small 30 m circumference synchrotron to further decelerate anti-protons from the Antiproton Decelerator (AD) from 5.3 MeV down to 100 keV.

  4. Uptake of a Consumer-Focused mHealth Application for the Assessment and Prevention of Heart Disease: The <30 Days Study

    PubMed Central

    Morita, Plinio P; Picton, Peter; Seto, Emily; Zbib, Ahmad; Cafazzo, Joseph A

    2016-01-01

    Background Lifestyle behavior modification can reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease, one of the leading causes of death worldwide, by up to 80%. We hypothesized that a dynamic risk assessment and behavior change tool delivered as a mobile app, hosted by a reputable nonprofit organization, would promote uptake among community members. We also predicted that the uptake would be influenced by incentives offered for downloading the mobile app. Objective The primary objective of our study was to evaluate the engagement levels of participants using the novel risk management app. The secondary aim was to assess the effect of incentives on the overall uptake and usage behaviors. Methods We publicly launched the app through the iTunes App Store and collected usage data over 5 months. Aggregate information included population-level data on download rates, use, risk factors, and user demographics. We used descriptive statistics to identify usage patterns, t tests, and analysis of variance to compare group means. Correlation and regression analyses determined the relationship between usage and demographic variables. Results We captured detailed mobile usage data from 69,952 users over a 5-month period, of whom 23,727 (33.92%) were registered during a 1-month AIR MILES promotion. Of those who completed the risk assessment, 73.92% (42,380/57,330) were female, and 59.38% (34,042/57,330) were <30 years old. While the older demographic had significantly lower uptake than the younger demographic, with only 8.97% of users aged ≥51 years old downloading the app, the older demographic completed more challenges than their younger counterparts (F 8, 52,422 = 55.10, P<.001). In terms of engagement levels, 84.94% (44,537/52,431) of users completed 1–14 challenges over a 30-day period, and 10.03% (5,259/52,431) of users completed >22 challenges. On average, users in the incentives group completed slightly more challenges during the first 30 days of the intervention (mean 7.9, SD 0

  5. What to Expect After Heart Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... on Twitter. What To Expect After Heart Surgery Recovery in the Hospital You may spend a day ... heart rate, blood pressure, breathing, and incision site(s). Recovery at Home People respond differently to heart surgery. ...

  6. Usefulness of combining admission brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) plus hospital discharge bioelectrical impedance vector analysis (BIVA) in predicting 90 days cardiovascular mortality in patients with acute heart failure.

    PubMed

    Santarelli, Simona; Russo, Veronica; Lalle, Irene; De Berardinis, Benedetta; Navarin, Silvia; Magrini, Laura; Piccoli, Antonio; Codognotto, Marta; Castello, Luigi Maria; Avanzi, Gian Carlo; Villacorta, Humberto; Precht, Bernardo Luiz Campanário; de Araújo Porto, Pilar Barreto; Villacorta, Aline Sterque; Di Somma, Salvatore

    2016-12-16

    Heart failure is a disease characterized by high prevalence and mortality, and frequent rehospitalizations. The aim of this study is to investigate the prognostic power of combining brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) and congestion status detected by bioelectrical impedance vector analysis (BIVA) in acute heart failure patients. This is an observational, prospective, and a multicentre study. BNP assessment was measured upon hospital arrival, while BIVA analysis was obtained at the time of discharge. Cardiovascular deaths were evaluated at 90 days by a follow up phone call. 292 patients were enrolled. Compared to survivors, BNP was higher in the non-survivors group (mean value 838 vs 515 pg/ml, p < 0.001). At discharge, BIVA shows a statistically significant difference in hydration status between survivors and non-survivors [respectively, hydration index (HI) 85 vs 74, p < 0.001; reactance (Xc) 26.7 vs 37, p < 0.001; resistance (R) 445 vs 503, p < 0.01)]. Discharge BIVA shows a prognostic value in predicting cardiovascular death [HI: area under the curve (AUC) 0.715, 95% confidence interval (95% CI) 0.65-0.76; p < 0.004; Xc: AUC 0.712, 95% CI 0.655-0.76, p < 0.007; R: AUC 0.65, 95% CI 0.29-0.706, p < 0.0247]. The combination of BIVA with BNP gives a greater prognostic power for cardiovascular mortality [combined receiving operating characteristic (ROC): AUC 0.74; 95% CI 0.68-0.79; p < 0.001]. In acute heart failure patients, higher BNP levels upon hospital admission, and congestion detected by BIVA at discharge have a significant predictive value for 90 days cardiovascular mortality. The combined use of admission BNP and BIVA discharge seems to be a useful tool for increasing prognostic power in these patients.

  7. CERN's approach to public outreach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landua, Rolf

    2016-03-01

    CERN's communication goes beyond publishing scientific results. Education and outreach are equally important ways of communicating with the general public, and in particular with the young generation. Over the last decade, CERN has significantly increased its efforts to accommodate the very large interest of the general public (about 300,000 visit requests per year), by ramping up its capacity for guided tours from 25,000 to more than 100,000 visitors per year, by creating six new of state-of-the-art exhibitions on-site, by building and operating a modern physics laboratory for school teachers and students, and by showing several traveling exhibitions in about 10 countries per year. The offer for school teachers has also been expanded, to 35-40 weeks of teacher courses with more than 1000 participants from more than 50 countries per year. The talk will give an overview about these and related activities.

  8. Heart Transplant

    MedlinePlus

    ... including how to maximize your recovery at home. Congenital Heart Defects • Home • About Congenital Heart Defects • The ... Physical Activity Recommendations for Heart Health • Tools & Resources Congenital Heart Defect Publications If Your Child Has a ...

  9. Mapping the Heart

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hulse, Grace

    2012-01-01

    In this article, the author describes how her fourth graders made ceramic heart maps. The impetus for this project came from reading "My Map Book" by Sara Fanelli. This book is a collection of quirky, hand-drawn and collaged maps that diagram a child's world. There are maps of her stomach, her day, her family, and her heart, among others. The…

  10. The Evolution of CERN EDMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wardzinska, Aleksandra; Petit, Stephan; Bray, Rachel; Delamare, Christophe; Garcia Arza, Griselda; Krastev, Tsvetelin; Pater, Krzysztof; Suwalska, Anna; Widegren, David

    2015-12-01

    Large-scale long-term projects such as the LHC require the ability to store, manage, organize and distribute large amounts of engineering information, covering a wide spectrum of fields. This information is a living material, evolving in time, following specific lifecycles. It has to reach the next generations of engineers so they understand how their predecessors designed, crafted, operated and maintained the most complex machines ever built. This is the role of CERN EDMS. The Engineering and Equipment Data Management Service has served the High Energy Physics Community for over 15 years. It is CERN's official PLM (Product Lifecycle Management), supporting engineering communities in their collaborations inside and outside the laboratory. EDMS is integrated with the CAD (Computer-aided Design) and CMMS (Computerized Maintenance Management) systems used at CERN providing tools for engineers who work in different domains and who are not PLM specialists. Over the years, human collaborations and machines grew in size and complexity. So did EDMS: it is currently home to more than 2 million files and documents, and has over 6 thousand active users. In April 2014 we released a new major version of EDMS, featuring a complete makeover of the web interface, improved responsiveness and enhanced functionality. Following the results of user surveys and building upon feedback received from key users group, we brought what we think is a system that is more attractive and makes it easy to perform complex tasks. In this paper we will describe the main functions and the architecture of EDMS. We will discuss the available integration options, which enable further evolution and automation of engineering data management. We will also present our plans for the future development of EDMS.

  11. Heart Failure

    MedlinePlus

    Heart failure is a condition in which the heart can't pump enough blood to meet the body's needs. Heart failure does not mean that your heart has stopped ... Tiredness and shortness of breath Common causes of heart failure are coronary artery disease, high blood pressure and ...

  12. Dinosaur Day!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nakamura, Sandra; Baptiste, H. Prentice

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the authors describe how they capitalized on their first-grade students' love of dinosaurs by hosting a fun-filled Dinosaur Day in their classroom. On Dinosaur Day, students rotated through four dinosaur-related learning stations that integrated science content with art, language arts, math, and history in a fun and time-efficient…

  13. CEMI Days

    SciTech Connect

    2015-07-01

    CEMI Days are an important channel of engagement between DOE and the manufacturing industry to identify challenges and opportunities for increasing U.S. manufacturing competitiveness. CEMI Days that are held at manufacturing companies’ facilities can include tours of R&D operations or other points of interest determined by the host company.

  14. CERN single sign on solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ormancey, E.

    2008-07-01

    The need for Single Sign On has always been restricted by the absence of cross platform solutions: a single sign on working only on one platform or technology is nearly useless. The recent improvements in Web Services Federation (WS-Federation) standard enabling federation of identity, attribute, authentication and authorization information can now provide real extended Single Sign On solutions. Various solutions have been investigated at CERN and now, a Web SSO solution using some parts of WS-Federation technology is available. Using the Shibboleth Service Provider module for Apache hosted web sites and Microsoft ADFS as the identity provider linked to Active Directory user, users can now authenticate on any web application using a single authentication platform, providing identity, user information (building, phone...) as well as group membership enabling authorization possibilities. A typical scenario: a CERN user can now authenticate on a Linux/Apache website using Windows Integrated credentials, and his Active Directory group membership can be checked before allowing access to a specific web page.

  15. Learning with the ATLAS Experiment at CERN

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnett, R. M.; Johansson, K. E.; Kourkoumelis, C.; Long, L.; Pequenao, J.; Reimers, C.; Watkins, P.

    2012-01-01

    With the start of the LHC, the new particle collider at CERN, the ATLAS experiment is also providing high-energy particle collisions for educational purposes. Several education projects--education scenarios--have been developed and tested on students and teachers in several European countries within the Learning with ATLAS@CERN project. These…

  16. Heart rate monitoring mobile applications

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Total number of times a heart beats in a minute is known as the heart rate. Traditionally, heart rate was measured using clunky gadgets but these days it can be measured with a smartphone’s camera. This can help you measure your heart rate anywhere and at anytime, especially during workouts so you can adjust your workout intensity to achieve maximum health benefits. With simple and easy to use mobile app, ‘Unique Heart Rate Monitor’, you can also maintain your heart rate history for personal reflection and sharing with a provider. PMID:28293594

  17. Heart attack

    MedlinePlus

    ... infarction; Non-ST - elevation myocardial infarction; NSTEMI; CAD - heart attack; Coronary artery disease - heart attack ... made up of cholesterol and other cells. A heart attack may occur when: A tear in the ...

  18. Heart palpitations

    MedlinePlus

    ... occur. Try deep relaxation or breathing exercises. Practice yoga, meditation, or tai chi. Get regular exercise. Do ... M. Editorial team. Images Heart chambers Heart beat Yoga Arrhythmia Read more Atrial Fibrillation Read more Heart ...

  19. Career Day

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA's 2013 Career Days was a joint collaboration between NASA Langley and the Newport News Shipbuilding where 600 high school students from Virginia took on two design challenges -- designing a ca...

  20. CERN ELENA project progress report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartmann, Wolfgang; Belochitskii, Pavel; Breuker, Horst; Butin, François; Carli, C.; Eriksson, Tommy; Oelert, Walter; Maury, Stephan; Pasinelli, Sergio; Tranquille, Gerard

    2015-05-01

    The Extra Low Energy Antiproton ring (ELENA) is a CERN project aiming at constructing a 30 m circumference synchrotron to further decelerate antiprotons from the Antiproton Decelerator (AD) from 5.3 MeV to 100 keV. The additional deceleration complemented by an electron cooler to reduce emittances will allow the existing AD experiments to increase substantially their antiproton capture efficiencies and render new experiments possible. The ELENA design is now well advanced and the project has entered the construction stage, in particular for what concerns the infrastructure. Installation of the machine components is foreseen during the second half of 2015 and beginning of 2016 followed by ring commissioning until the end of 2016. New electrostatic transfer lines to the experiments will be installed and commissioned during the first half of 2017 followed by the first physics operation with AD/ELENA end of 2017. Main ELENA related infrastructure progresses as well as the status of the project are reported.

  1. Cosmic Ray Physics at CERN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandéz, A.; Gámez, E.; López, R.; Román, S.; Zepeda, A.

    2003-06-01

    In recent decades, cosmic ray air showers initiated by high-energy proton or nucleus collisions in the atmosphere have been studied with large area experiments on the surface of the Earth or with muon measurements deep underground. In principle, these cosmic ray experiments explore two completely different realms of physics, particle astrophysics and particle interaction physics, which are, however, intimately related by the interpretation of the data. In this paper we briefly review the cosmic ray physics activities developed at CERN in the last years. In particular we present some results from a small underground cosmic ray experiment and we discuss the capabilities of ALICE to detect high multiplicity muon events arising from cosmic ray air showers and some other astroparticle phenomena.

  2. [The CERN and the megascience].

    PubMed

    Aguilar Peris, José

    2006-01-01

    In this work we analyse the biggest particle accelerator in the world: the LHC (Large Hadron Collider). The ring shaped tunnel is 27 km long and it is buried over 110 meters underground, straddling the border betwen France and Switzerland at the CERN laboratory near Geneva. Its mission is to recreate the conditions that existed shortly after the Big-Bang and to look for the hypothesised Higgs particle. The LHC will accelerate protons near the speed of the light and collide them head on at an energy of to 14 TeV (1 TeV = 10(12) eV). Keeping such high energy in the proton beams requires enormous magnetic fields which are generated by superconducting electromagnets chilled to less than two degrees above absolute zero. It is expected that LHC will be inaugurated in summer 2007.

  3. Ceremony 25th birthday Cern

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    Célébration du 25ème anniversaire du Cern (jour par jour) avec discours de L.Van Hove et J.B.Adams, des interludes musicals offerts par Mme Mey et ses collègues (au debut 1.mouvement du quatuor avec piano no 3 de L.van Beethoven) Les directeurs généraux procéderont à la remise du souvenir aux membres de personnel ayant 25 années de service dans l'organisation. Un témoignage de reconnaissance est auss fait à l'interprète Mme Zwerner

  4. 25th Birthday Cern- Restaurant

    SciTech Connect

    2006-05-05

    Cérémonie du 25ème anniversaire du Cern avec plusieurs orateurs et la présence de nombreux autorités cantonales et communales genevoises et personnalités, directeurs généraux, ministres, chercheurs.... Le conseiller féderal et chef du département des affaires étrangères de la confédération Monsieur Pierre Aubert prend la parole pour célébrer à la fois les résultats très remarquables de la coopération internationale en matière scientifique, mais aussi la volonté politique des états européens de mettre en commun leurs ressources pour faire oeuvre d'avenir. Un grand hommage est aussi donné aux deux directeurs disparus, les prof.Bakker et Gregory.

  5. How Can I Prepare for Heart Surgery?

    MedlinePlus

    ... heart Treatments + Tests How Can I Prepare for Heart Surgery? Doctors do successful heart surgery every day. But it’s normal to be concerned ... recovery to begin. How Can I Prepare for Heart Surgery? HOW CAN I LEARN MORE? Call 1-800- ...

  6. EFQPSK Versus CERN: A Comparative Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borah, Deva K.; Horan, Stephen

    2001-01-01

    This report presents a comparative study on Enhanced Feher's Quadrature Phase Shift Keying (EFQPSK) and Constrained Envelope Root Nyquist (CERN) techniques. These two techniques have been developed in recent times to provide high spectral and power efficiencies under nonlinear amplifier environment. The purpose of this study is to gain insights into these techniques and to help system planners and designers with an appropriate set of guidelines for using these techniques. The comparative study presented in this report relies on effective simulation models and procedures. Therefore, a significant part of this report is devoted to understanding the mathematical and simulation models of the techniques and their set-up procedures. In particular, mathematical models of EFQPSK and CERN, effects of the sampling rate in discrete time signal representation, and modeling of nonlinear amplifiers and predistorters have been considered in detail. The results of this study show that both EFQPSK and CERN signals provide spectrally efficient communications compared to filtered conventional linear modulation techniques when a nonlinear power amplifier is used. However, there are important differences. The spectral efficiency of CERN signals, with a small amount of input backoff, is significantly better than that of EFQPSK signals if the nonlinear amplifier is an ideal clipper. However, to achieve such spectral efficiencies with a practical nonlinear amplifier, CERN processing requires a predistorter which effectively translates the amplifier's characteristics close to those of an ideal clipper. Thus, the spectral performance of CERN signals strongly depends on the predistorter. EFQPSK signals, on the other hand, do not need such predistorters since their spectra are almost unaffected by the nonlinear amplifier, Ibis report discusses several receiver structures for EFQPSK signals. It is observed that optimal receiver structures can be realized for both coded and uncoded EFQPSK

  7. Heart Transplantation

    MedlinePlus

    A heart transplant removes a damaged or diseased heart and replaces it with a healthy one. The healthy heart comes from a donor who has died. It is the last resort for people with heart failure when all other treatments have failed. The ...

  8. Heart Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    ... you're like most people, you think that heart disease is a problem for others. But heart disease is the number one killer in the ... of disability. There are many different forms of heart disease. The most common cause of heart disease ...

  9. Capitol Day

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    Stennis Space Center Director Gene Goldman visits with Mississippi Gov. Haley Barbour during NASA Day at the Capitol activities on Feb. 19. During the visit, Goldman presented the governor with a model of the J-2X rocket engine currently in development. Stennis engineers did early component testing for the new engine.

  10. Inspire Day

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bohach, Barbara M.; Meade, Birgitta

    2014-01-01

    The authors collaborated on hosting a "Spring Inspire Day." planned and delivered by preservice elementary teachers as a social studies/science methods project. Projects that have authentic application opportunities can make learning meaningful for prospective teachers as well as elementary students. With the impetus for an integrated…

  11. 34 CFR 300.11 - Day; business day; school day.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Day; business day; school day. 300.11 Section 300.11... CHILDREN WITH DISABILITIES General Definitions Used in This Part § 300.11 Day; business day; school day. (a) Day means calendar day unless otherwise indicated as business day or school day. (b) Business...

  12. 34 CFR 300.11 - Day; business day; school day.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2011-07-01 2010-07-01 true Day; business day; school day. 300.11 Section 300.11... CHILDREN WITH DISABILITIES General Definitions Used in This Part § 300.11 Day; business day; school day. (a) Day means calendar day unless otherwise indicated as business day or school day. (b) Business...

  13. INTEGRATED OPERATIONAL DOSIMETRY SYSTEM AT CERN.

    PubMed

    Dumont, Gérald; Pedrosa, Fernando Baltasar Dos Santos; Carbonez, Pierre; Forkel-Wirth, Doris; Ninin, Pierre; Fuentes, Eloy Reguero; Roesler, Stefan; Vollaire, Joachim

    2016-11-24

    CERN, the European Organization for Nuclear Research, upgraded its operational dosimetry system in March 2013 to be prepared for the first Long Shutdown of CERN's facilities. The new system allows the immediate and automatic checking and recording of the dosimetry data before and after interventions in radiation areas. To facilitate the analysis of the data in context of CERN's approach to As Low As Reasonably Achievable (ALARA), this new system is interfaced to the Intervention Management Planning and Coordination Tool (IMPACT). IMPACT is a web-based application widely used in all CERN's accelerators and their associated technical infrastructures for the planning, the coordination and the approval of interventions (work permit principle). The coupling of the operational dosimetry database with the IMPACT repository allows a direct and almost immediate comparison of the actual dose with the estimations, in addition to enabling the configuration of alarm levels in the dosemeter in function of the intervention to be performed.

  14. Recent results from CERN-WA98

    SciTech Connect

    Stankus, P.; WA98 Collaboration

    1997-02-01

    The CERN experiment WA98 is a general-survey, open-spectrometer experiment designed to examine 160 A GeV/c Pb+A collisions at the CERN-SPS. The experiment has a broad physics agenda, as suggested by its many different subsystems. A diagram of the experiment as it stood in 1995 is shown in the report. Detectors whose results are presented here are described briefly.

  15. CERN Computing Resources Lifecycle Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tselishchev, Alexey; Tedesco, Paolo; Ormancey, Emmanuel; Isnard, Christian

    2011-12-01

    Computing environments in High Energy Physics are typically complex and heterogeneous, with a wide variety of hardware resources, operating systems and applications. The research activity in all its aspects is carried out by international collaborations constituted by a growing number of participants with a high manpower turnover. These factors can increase the administrative workload required to manage the computing infrastructure and to track resource usage and inheritance. It is therefore necessary to rationalize and formalize the computing resources management, while respecting the requirement of flexibility of scientific applications and services. This paper shows how during the last years the CERN computing infrastructure has been moving in this direction, establishing well-defined policies and lifecycles for resource management. Applications are being migrated towards proposed common identity, authentication and authorization models, reducing their complexity while increasing security and usability. Regular tasks like the creation of primary user accounts are being automated, and self-service facilities are being introduced for common operations, like creation of additional accounts, group subscriptions and password reset. This approach is leading to more efficient and manageable systems.

  16. The new CERN Controls Middleware

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dworak, A.; Ehm, F.; Charrue, P.; Sliwinski, W.

    2012-12-01

    The Controls Middleware (CMW) project was launched over ten years ago. Its main goal was to unify middleware solutions used to operate the CERN accelerator complex. A key part of the project, the equipment access library RDA, was based on CORBA, an unquestionable middleware standard at the time. RDA became an operational and critical part of the infrastructure, yet the demanding run-time environment revealed shortcomings of the system. Accumulation of fixes and workarounds led to unnecessary complexity. RDA became difficult to maintain and to extend. CORBA proved to be rather a cumbersome product than a panacea. Fortunately, many new transport frameworks appeared since then. They boasted a better design and supported concepts that made them easier to use. Willing to profit from the coming long LHC shutdown which will make it possible to update the operational software, the CMW team reviewed user requirements and in their terms investigated eventual CORBA substitutes. Evaluation of several market recognized products helped to identify the most-suitable middleware solution: ZeroMQ. This article presents the results of the evaluation process, the proposed design and functionality of the new system as well as the plan of its integration with the currently deployed system.

  17. 25th Birthday Cern- Restaurant

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    Cérémonie du 25ème anniversaire du Cern avec plusieurs orateurs et la présence de nombreux autorités cantonales et communales genevoises et personnalités, directeurs généraux, ministres, chercheurs.... Le conseiller féderal et chef du département des affaires étrangères de la confédération Monsieur Pierre Aubert prend la parole pour célébrer à la fois les résultats très remarquables de la coopération internationale en matière scientifique, mais aussi la volonté politique des états européens de mettre en commun leurs ressources pour faire oeuvre d'avenir. Un grand hommage est aussi donné aux deux directeurs disparus, les prof.Bakker et Gregory.

  18. Isidor I. Rabi and CERN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krige, John

    2005-06-01

    Isidor I. Rabi (1898 1988) is the acknowledged “father of CERN,” today one of the most important particle-physics laboratories in the world. I explore his motives for promoting the idea in 1950 that Western Europe should build a “Brookhaven” with national governments replacing universities. I unravel the many ways in which a major accelerator facility in Geneva, Switzerland, could both stimulate European science and serve the interests of the American scientific community. Rabi was careful to avoid giving any official support to steps then under way in Europe to build a research reactor, even though Brookhaven National Laboratory on Long Island, New York, had one from the outset. I suggest that his main motive for doing so was that he wanted West Germany to be part of the collaborative venture. Rabi was well aware of the foreign-policy objectives of the U.S. State Department in the European theater in 1950, and he wanted to situate politically the new research center in the framework of the Marshall Plan for the postwar reconstruction of the continent, “remaking the Old World in the image of the New.”

  19. Zika Virus May Also Harm the Heart

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_164009.html Zika Virus May Also Harm the Heart 8 Venezuelan ... 9, 2017 THURSDAY, March 9, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Zika may cause heart problems in some people infected ...

  20. Heart pacemaker

    MedlinePlus

    ... PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2015:chap 37. Swerdlow CD, Wang PJ, Zipes DP. Pacemakers and implantable cardioverter-defibrillators. ... and lifestyle Controlling your high blood pressure Dietary fats explained Fast food tips Heart attack - discharge Heart ...

  1. Heart Block

    MedlinePlus

    ... not used to treat first-degree heart block. All types of heart block may increase your risk for other arrhythmias, such as atrial fibrillation (A-tre-al fih-brih-LA-shun). Talk with your doctor ...

  2. Heart Attack

    MedlinePlus

    ... a million people in the U.S. have a heart attack. About half of them die. Many people have permanent heart damage or die because they don't get ... It's important to know the symptoms of a heart attack and call 9-1-1 if someone ...

  3. CERN achievements in relativistic heavy ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eugenio Bruno, Giuseppe

    2015-05-01

    Twenty years after a Letter of Intent by the GSI and LBL groups for the "Study of particle production and target fragmentation in central 20Ne on Pb reactions, at 12 GeV per nucleon energy of the CERN PS external beam" [1], based on the results found by the NA45/CERES, NA49, NA50, and WA97/NA57 experiments at the SPS, CERN announced compelling evidence for the formation of a new state of matter in heavyion collisions at CERN-SPS energies [2]. Some of the experiments were indeed the 2nd or 3rd generation successors of the apparatuses originally proposed by the GSI-LBL collaboration. Actually, the CERN ion program initiated at the SPS with the acceleration of oxygen ions at 60 and 200 GeV/nucleon only in 1986, and continued with sulphur ions at 200 GeV/nucleon up to 1993. The rest is history: lead-ion beams at 160 GeV/nucleon became available at the SPS in 1994; the LHC accelerated and collided lead beams at a center of mass energy per nucleon pair √sNN = 2.76 TeV in 2010. Heavy ion physics is definitely in the future program of CERN: ALICE will operate a major upgrade of its detectors during the second long shutdown of the LHC, in 2018-2019, and the associated physics program will span the third and fourth LHC runs, till late 2020s.

  4. Global atmospheric particle formation from CERN CLOUD measurements.

    PubMed

    Dunne, Eimear M; Gordon, Hamish; Kürten, Andreas; Almeida, João; Duplissy, Jonathan; Williamson, Christina; Ortega, Ismael K; Pringle, Kirsty J; Adamov, Alexey; Baltensperger, Urs; Barmet, Peter; Benduhn, Francois; Bianchi, Federico; Breitenlechner, Martin; Clarke, Antony; Curtius, Joachim; Dommen, Josef; Donahue, Neil M; Ehrhart, Sebastian; Flagan, Richard C; Franchin, Alessandro; Guida, Roberto; Hakala, Jani; Hansel, Armin; Heinritzi, Martin; Jokinen, Tuija; Kangasluoma, Juha; Kirkby, Jasper; Kulmala, Markku; Kupc, Agnieszka; Lawler, Michael J; Lehtipalo, Katrianne; Makhmutov, Vladimir; Mann, Graham; Mathot, Serge; Merikanto, Joonas; Miettinen, Pasi; Nenes, Athanasios; Onnela, Antti; Rap, Alexandru; Reddington, Carly L S; Riccobono, Francesco; Richards, Nigel A D; Rissanen, Matti P; Rondo, Linda; Sarnela, Nina; Schobesberger, Siegfried; Sengupta, Kamalika; Simon, Mario; Sipilä, Mikko; Smith, James N; Stozkhov, Yuri; Tomé, Antonio; Tröstl, Jasmin; Wagner, Paul E; Wimmer, Daniela; Winkler, Paul M; Worsnop, Douglas R; Carslaw, Kenneth S

    2016-12-02

    Fundamental questions remain about the origin of newly formed atmospheric aerosol particles because data from laboratory measurements have been insufficient to build global models. In contrast, gas-phase chemistry models have been based on laboratory kinetics measurements for decades. We built a global model of aerosol formation by using extensive laboratory measurements of rates of nucleation involving sulfuric acid, ammonia, ions, and organic compounds conducted in the CERN CLOUD (Cosmics Leaving Outdoor Droplets) chamber. The simulations and a comparison with atmospheric observations show that nearly all nucleation throughout the present-day atmosphere involves ammonia or biogenic organic compounds, in addition to sulfuric acid. A considerable fraction of nucleation involves ions, but the relatively weak dependence on ion concentrations indicates that for the processes studied, variations in cosmic ray intensity do not appreciably affect climate through nucleation in the present-day atmosphere.

  5. Global atmospheric particle formation from CERN CLOUD measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunne, Eimear M.; Gordon, Hamish; Kürten, Andreas; Almeida, João; Duplissy, Jonathan; Williamson, Christina; Ortega, Ismael K.; Pringle, Kirsty J.; Adamov, Alexey; Baltensperger, Urs; Barmet, Peter; Benduhn, Francois; Bianchi, Federico; Breitenlechner, Martin; Clarke, Antony; Curtius, Joachim; Dommen, Josef; Donahue, Neil M.; Ehrhart, Sebastian; Flagan, Richard C.; Franchin, Alessandro; Guida, Roberto; Hakala, Jani; Hansel, Armin; Heinritzi, Martin; Jokinen, Tuija; Kangasluoma, Juha; Kirkby, Jasper; Kulmala, Markku; Kupc, Agnieszka; Lawler, Michael J.; Lehtipalo, Katrianne; Makhmutov, Vladimir; Mann, Graham; Mathot, Serge; Merikanto, Joonas; Miettinen, Pasi; Nenes, Athanasios; Onnela, Antti; Rap, Alexandru; Reddington, Carly L. S.; Riccobono, Francesco; Richards, Nigel A. D.; Rissanen, Matti P.; Rondo, Linda; Sarnela, Nina; Schobesberger, Siegfried; Sengupta, Kamalika; Simon, Mario; Sipilä, Mikko; Smith, James N.; Stozkhov, Yuri; Tomé, Antonio; Tröstl, Jasmin; Wagner, Paul E.; Wimmer, Daniela; Winkler, Paul M.; Worsnop, Douglas R.; Carslaw, Kenneth S.

    2016-12-01

    Fundamental questions remain about the origin of newly formed atmospheric aerosol particles because data from laboratory measurements have been insufficient to build global models. In contrast, gas-phase chemistry models have been based on laboratory kinetics measurements for decades. We built a global model of aerosol formation by using extensive laboratory measurements of rates of nucleation involving sulfuric acid, ammonia, ions, and organic compounds conducted in the CERN CLOUD (Cosmics Leaving Outdoor Droplets) chamber. The simulations and a comparison with atmospheric observations show that nearly all nucleation throughout the present-day atmosphere involves ammonia or biogenic organic compounds, in addition to sulfuric acid. A considerable fraction of nucleation involves ions, but the relatively weak dependence on ion concentrations indicates that for the processes studied, variations in cosmic ray intensity do not appreciably affect climate through nucleation in the present-day atmosphere.

  6. The CERN intersecting storage rings (ISR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hübner, Kurt

    2012-03-01

    The CERN Intersecting Storage Rings (ISR) was the first facility ever built providing colliding hadron beams. It mainly operated with protons with beam energies of 15 to 31 GeV. The ISR was conceived in the years 1960 to 1964 and was approved in 1965. It came into operation at the beginning of 1971 and was decommissioned as a collider in 1983. A number of accelerator technologies have been either much improved or developed at the ISR which subsequently have become enabling technologies for a number of hadron storage rings and large colliders. Prominent examples of such technologies are ultra-high vacuum technology, beam diagnostics based on Schottky signals and stochastic cooling. The experiences obtained with the ISR were later exploited at the proton-antiproton facility in the CERN SPS, the Tevatron at Fermilab, the RHIC at Brookhaven and, finally, by the LHC at CERN.

  7. What is Broken Heart Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... most people who experience it have a full recovery, usually within days or weeks. The heart muscle is not permanently damaged, and the risk of broken heart syndrome happening again is low. Rate This Content: NEXT >> Updated: October 8, 2014 Twitter ...

  8. Vidyo@CERN: A Service Update

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandes, J.; Baron, T.

    2015-12-01

    We will present an overview of the current real-time video service offering for the LHC, in particular the operation of the CERN Vidyo service will be described in terms of consolidated performance and scale: The service is an increasingly critical part of the daily activity of the LHC collaborations, topping recently more than 50 million minutes of communication in one year, with peaks of up to 852 simultaneous connections. We will elaborate on the improvement of some front-end key features such as the integration with CERN Indico, or the enhancements of the Unified Client and also on new ones, released or in the pipeline, such as a new WebRTC client and CERN SSO/Federated SSO integration. An overview of future infrastructure improvements, such as virtualization techniques of Vidyo routers and geo-location mechanisms for load-balancing and optimum user distribution across the service infrastructure will also be discussed. The work done by CERN to improve the monitoring of its Vidyo network will also be presented and demoed. As a last point, we will touch the roadmap and strategy established by CERN and Vidyo with a clear objective of optimizing the service both on the end client and backend infrastructure to make it truly universal, to serve Global Science. To achieve those actions, the introduction of the multitenant concept to serve different communities is needed. This is one of the consequences of CERN's decision to offer the Vidyo service currently operated for the LHC, to other Sciences, Institutions and Virtual Organizations beyond HEP that might express interest for it.

  9. Review of CERN Data Centre Infrastructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrade, P.; Bell, T.; van Eldik, J.; McCance, G.; Panzer-Steindel, B.; Coelho dos Santos, M.; Traylen and, S.; Schwickerath, U.

    2012-12-01

    The CERN Data Centre is reviewing strategies for optimizing the use of the existing infrastructure and expanding to a new data centre by studying how other large sites are being operated. Over the past six months, CERN has been investigating modern and widely-used tools and procedures used for virtualisation, clouds and fabric management in order to reduce operational effort, increase agility and support unattended remote data centres. This paper gives the details on the project's motivations, current status and areas for future investigation.

  10. CERN and high energy physics, the grand picture

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    The lecture will touch on several topics, to illustrate the role of CERN in the present and future of high-energy physics: how does CERN work? What is the role of the scientific community, of bodies like Council and SPC, and of international cooperation, in the definition of CERN's scientific programme? What are the plans for the future of the LHC and of the non-LHC physics programme? What is the role of R&D; and technology transfer at CERN?

  11. Heart regeneration.

    PubMed

    Breckwoldt, Kaja; Weinberger, Florian; Eschenhagen, Thomas

    2016-07-01

    Regenerating an injured heart holds great promise for millions of patients suffering from heart diseases. Since the human heart has very limited regenerative capacity, this is a challenging task. Numerous strategies aiming to improve heart function have been developed. In this review we focus on approaches intending to replace damaged heart muscle by new cardiomyocytes. Different strategies for the production of cardiomyocytes from human embryonic stem cells or human induced pluripotent stem cells, by direct reprogramming and induction of cardiomyocyte proliferation are discussed regarding their therapeutic potential and respective advantages and disadvantages. Furthermore, different methods for the transplantation of pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes are described and their clinical perspectives are discussed. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Cardiomyocyte Biology: Integration of Developmental and Environmental Cues in the Heart edited by Marcus Schaub and Hughes Abriel.

  12. N° 15-2000: ESA, CERN and ESO launch "Physics on Stage"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2000-03-01

    European public. Why ESA, CERN, and ESO? As Europe's principal organisations in physics research (particle physics, space and astronomy), the three recognised their mutual responsibility to address the issue with the launch of a new initiative and the creative use of their own research to attract the attention of the general public and teachers alike. About the "European Science and Technology Week" The objective of the "European Science and Technology Week" is to improve the public's knowledge and understanding of science and technology - including the associated benefits for society as a whole. The week focuses on the European dimension of research, such as pan-European scientific and technological co-operation. The rationale for holding the Week has its roots in the importance of the role of science and technology in modern societies and the need therefore, to ensure that the public recognises its significance in our lives. The Week is a framework for special TV programmes, exhibitions, contests, conferences, electronic networking, and other science related activities to promote the public understanding of science and technology. The Week was launched in 1993, on the initiative of the European Commission. Raising public awareness of science and technology is now the subject of a clearly defined action within the Human Potential Programme of the Fifth Framework Programme. Notes [1] The same press release is published also by CERN and ESO. [2] The 22 countries are the member countries of at least one of the participating organisations or the European Union: Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, the Czech Republic, Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Ireland, Italy, Luxembourg, the Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Portugal, the Slovak Republic, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, United Kingdom. Statements by the Directors General of ESA, CERN, and ESO Antonio Rodotà (ESA): "Space has become an integral part of every day life. The immense technological development that has led

  13. Hypoplastic left heart syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    HLHS; Congenital heart - hypoplastic left heart; Cyanotic heart disease - hypoplastic left heart ... Hypoplastic left heart is a rare type of congenital heart disease. It is more common in males than in females. As ...

  14. Bye-bye CERN's ‘bump’

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2016-09-01

    The ATLAS and CMS collaborations at the CERN particle-physics lab in Geneva have confirmed that a small excess of diphoton events at 750 GeV - detected in their preliminary data last year - was a mere statistical fluctuation that disappeared in the light of more data.

  15. WorldWide Web: Hypertext from CERN.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nickerson, Gord

    1992-01-01

    Discussion of software tools for accessing information on the Internet focuses on the WorldWideWeb (WWW) system, which was developed at the European Particle Physics Laboratory (CERN) in Switzerland to build a worldwide network of hypertext links using available networking technology. Its potential for use with multimedia documents is also…

  16. Status and Roadmap of CernVM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berzano, D.; Blomer, J.; Buncic, P.; Charalampidis, I.; Ganis, G.; Meusel, R.

    2015-12-01

    Cloud resources nowadays contribute an essential share of resources for computing in high-energy physics. Such resources can be either provided by private or public IaaS clouds (e.g. OpenStack, Amazon EC2, Google Compute Engine) or by volunteers computers (e.g. LHC@Home 2.0). In any case, experiments need to prepare a virtual machine image that provides the execution environment for the physics application at hand. The CernVM virtual machine since version 3 is a minimal and versatile virtual machine image capable of booting different operating systems. The virtual machine image is less than 20 megabyte in size. The actual operating system is delivered on demand by the CernVM File System. CernVM 3 has matured from a prototype to a production environment. It is used, for instance, to run LHC applications in the cloud, to tune event generators using a network of volunteer computers, and as a container for the historic Scientific Linux 5 and Scientific Linux 4 based software environments in the course of long-term data preservation efforts of the ALICE, CMS, and ALEPH experiments. We present experience and lessons learned from the use of CernVM at scale. We also provide an outlook on the upcoming developments. These developments include adding support for Scientific Linux 7, the use of container virtualization, such as provided by Docker, and the streamlining of virtual machine contextualization towards the cloud-init industry standard.

  17. The Bells' Capture note TH-3054-CERN

    SciTech Connect

    Hartouni, Ed P.

    2014-01-29

    This document revisits the paper by M. Bell and J. S. Bell “Capture of Cooling Electrons by Cool Protons” TH-3054-CERN (March 30, 1981). I expand the treatment to include e+e- capture.

  18. The heavy ion program at CERN

    SciTech Connect

    Lissauer, D.

    1986-09-30

    During two periods in 1986 and 1987, oxygen ion beams with energies up to 3.2 TeV will be available at the CERN-SPS. A brief review of the five large heavy ion experiments is presented and the different physics addressed by each of the experiments is discussed. 11 refs., 5 figs.

  19. Heart transplant

    MedlinePlus

    ... catheterization Tests to look for cancer Tissue and blood typing , to help make sure your body will not reject the donated heart Ultrasound of your neck and legs You will ... heart pump enough blood to the body. Most often, this is a ...

  20. Heart Anatomy

    MedlinePlus

    ... español An Incredible Machine Bonus poster (PDF) The Human Heart Anatomy Blood The Conduction System The Coronary Arteries The Heart Valves The Heartbeat Vasculature of the Arm Vasculature of the Head Vasculature of the Leg Vasculature of the Torso ...

  1. Who Really Needs All Those Heart Tests?

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/news/fullstory_164529.html Who Really Needs All Those Heart Tests? Overtreatment may lead to excess ... April 6, 2017 HealthDay Copyright (c) 2017 HealthDay . All rights reserved. News stories are written and provided ...

  2. Preventing Heart Disease - At Any Age

    MedlinePlus

    ... how to add more color now! Lower Your Sodium in 21 Days! Learn how you can lower your sodium and change your salty ways in 21 Days! ... Popular Articles 1 Understanding Blood Pressure Readings 2 Sodium and Salt 3 Target Heart Rates 4 Heart ...

  3. Particle Detectors: Research and Development at CERN

    SciTech Connect

    Fabjan, C. W.

    2008-04-21

    Over the past 15 years a worldwide Detector R and D Programme has made the LHC experiments possible. These experiments operate at a new level of event rate and detection capabilities. Based on these advances, Detector R and D is continuing at CERN in close collaboration with University and Research Institutes. Several main directions are being pursued for solid-state and gaseous tracking devices, advanced crystal and noble liquid calorimetry, particle identification methods, and advanced signal-processing techniques. This effort is directed towards experiments at even higher collision rates at the LHC, the requirements for the next generation of linear electron-positron colliders and for applications outside particle physics, such as medical diagnostics instrumentation. We shall illustrate this challenging, stimulating and creative programme with examples and show how these developments are taking place in close collaboration between CERN and institutions around the globe.

  4. The NA62 experiment at CERN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venditti, Stefano

    2016-12-01

    The goal of the NA62 experiment at CERN is to collect O(100) events of the ultrarare K+→ π +ν bar {ν } decay in two years. After a long R&D phase and a successful pilot run in 2014, the first data-taking phase took place in 2015. In this paper the importance of the experiment's physics goal, as well as the experimental solutions adopted in order to attain it, will be reviewed.

  5. New radiation protection calibration facility at CERN.

    PubMed

    Brugger, Markus; Carbonez, Pierre; Pozzi, Fabio; Silari, Marco; Vincke, Helmut

    2014-10-01

    The CERN radiation protection group has designed a new state-of-the-art calibration laboratory to replace the present facility, which is >20 y old. The new laboratory, presently under construction, will be equipped with neutron and gamma sources, as well as an X-ray generator and a beta irradiator. The present work describes the project to design the facility, including the facility placement criteria, the 'point-zero' measurements and the shielding study performed via FLUKA Monte Carlo simulations.

  6. Wine and heart health

    MedlinePlus

    Health and wine; Wine and heart disease; Preventing heart disease - wine; Preventing heart disease - alcohol ... more often just to lower your risk of heart disease. Heavier drinking can harm the heart and ...

  7. What Causes Heart Failure?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Topics Arrhythmia Congenital Heart Defects Coronary Heart Disease Heart Valve Disease High Blood Pressure Send a link to NHLBI ... with the heart’s structure are present at birth. Heart valve disease . Occurs if one or more of your heart ...

  8. What Is Heart Failure?

    MedlinePlus

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Heart Failure? Heart failure is a condition in which the heart can' ... force. Some people have both problems. The term "heart failure" doesn't mean that your heart has stopped ...

  9. Plans for an ERL Test Facility at CERN

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, Erik; Bruning, O S; Calaga, Buchi Rama Rao; Schirm, Karl-Martin; Torres-Sanchez, R; Valloni, Alessandra; Aulenbacher, Kurt; Bogacz, Slawomir; Hutton, Andrew; Klein, M

    2014-12-01

    The baseline electron accelerator for LHeC and one option for FCC-he is an Energy Recovery Linac. To prepare and study the necessary key technologies, CERNhas started – in collaboration with JLAB and Mainz University – the conceptual design of an ERL Test Facility (ERL-TF). Staged construction will allow the study under different conditions with up to 3 passes, beam energies of up to about 1 GeV and currents of up to 50 mA. The design and development of superconducting cavity modules, including coupler and HOM damper designs, are also of central importance for other existing and future accelerators and their tests are at the heart of the current ERL-TF goals. However, the ERL-TF could also provide a unique infrastructure for several applications that go beyond developing and testing the ERL technology at CERN. In addition to experimental studies of beam dynamics, operational and reliability issues in an ERL, it could equally serve for quench tests of superconducting magnets, as physics experimental facility on its own right or as test stand for detector developments. This contribution will describe the goals and the concept of the facility and the status of the R&D.

  10. Heart Attack

    MedlinePlus

    ... yourself MedlinePlus for More Information National Institute on Aging Related Topics Heart Failure High Blood Cholesterol High ... us | Customer Support | site map National Institute on Aging | U.S. National Library of Medicine | National Institutes of ...

  11. Hearts Wish.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Lethonee A.

    1989-01-01

    Investigates characteristics and themes in 102 drawings by sexually abused children. Themes of the drawings included genitalia, the absence of specific body parts, phallic symbols, inappropriate smiles, distorted body images, kinetic activity, prominent hands and fingers, and hearts. (RJC)

  12. Heart Failure

    MedlinePlus

    ... for people who can't tolerate ACE inhibitors. Beta blockers. This class of drugs not only slows your ... rhythms and lessen your chance of dying unexpectedly. Beta blockers may reduce signs and symptoms of heart failure, ...

  13. What Is a Heart Murmur?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Heart Murmur Related Topics Anemia Congenital Heart Defects Heart Valve Disease Holes in the Heart How the Heart Works ... heart defect that is present since birth or heart valve disease. Depending on the heart problem causing the abnormal ...

  14. Correlates of hot day air-conditioning use among middle-aged and older adults with chronic heart and lung diseases: the role of health beliefs and cues to action.

    PubMed

    Richard, Lucie; Kosatsky, Tom; Renouf, Annie

    2011-02-01

    Extreme ambient heat is a serious public health threat, especially for the elderly and persons with pre-existing health conditions. Although much of the excess mortality and morbidity associated with extreme heat is preventable, the adoption of effective preventive strategies is limited. The study reported here tested the predictive power of selected components of the Health Belief Model for air-conditioning (AC) use among 238 non-institutionalized middle-aged and older adults with chronic heart failure and/or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease living in Montréal, Canada. Respondents were recruited through clinics (response rate 71%) and interviews were conducted in their homes or by telephone. Results showed that 73% of participants reported having a home air conditioner. The average number of hours spent per 24-hour period in air-conditioned spaces during heat waves was 14.5 hours (SD = 9.4). Exploratory structural equation modeling showed that specific beliefs about the benefits of and drawbacks to AC as well as internal cues to action were predictive of its level of use, whereas the perceived severity of the effects of heat on health was not. The findings are discussed in light of the need to adequately support effective response to extreme heat in this vulnerable population.

  15. Heart failure

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Heart failure occurs in 3% to 4% of adults aged over 65 years, usually as a consequence of coronary artery disease or hypertension, and causes breathlessness, effort intolerance, fluid retention, and increased mortality. The 5-year mortality in people with systolic heart failure ranges from 25% to 75%, often owing to sudden death following ventricular arrhythmia. Risks of cardiovascular events are increased in people with left ventricular systolic dysfunction (LVSD) or heart failure. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of multidisciplinary interventions for heart failure? What are the effects of exercise in people with heart failure? What are the effects of drug treatments for heart failure? What are the effects of devices for treatment of heart failure? What are the effects of coronary revascularisation for treatment of heart failure? What are the effects of drug treatments in people at high risk of heart failure? What are the effects of treatments for diastolic heart failure? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to August 2010 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically; please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 80 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: aldosterone receptor antagonists, amiodarone, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, angiotensin II receptor blockers, anticoagulation, antiplatelet agents, beta-blockers, calcium

  16. 34 CFR 300.11 - Day; business day; school day.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Day; business day; school day. 300.11 Section 300.11 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF SPECIAL EDUCATION AND REHABILITATIVE SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION ASSISTANCE TO STATES FOR THE EDUCATION...

  17. 34 CFR 300.11 - Day; business day; school day.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Day; business day; school day. 300.11 Section 300.11 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF SPECIAL EDUCATION AND REHABILITATIVE SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION ASSISTANCE TO STATES FOR THE EDUCATION...

  18. 34 CFR 300.11 - Day; business day; school day.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Day; business day; school day. 300.11 Section 300.11 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education (Continued) OFFICE OF SPECIAL EDUCATION AND REHABILITATIVE SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION ASSISTANCE TO STATES FOR THE EDUCATION...

  19. No Treatment Day School.

    PubMed

    DeJong, Judith A; Holder, Stanley R

    2006-01-01

    At the No Treatment Day School, less than 15% of students used the dormitory during the school week. Located in the heart of a reservation and serving local students, the K-12 school enrolled over 1,000 students. The site received Therapeutic Residential Model funding for the 2001-2002 school year. Initial evaluation of this site found an array of daunting problems throughout the school structure and functioning. There were some successes, including implementation of the Morningside reading program in the elementary school and some response from the community to the comprehensive evaluation report which provided an overview of the situation to policy-makers and community members. However instability in the system and a mid-year change in leadership complicated the process of implementation. By the end of the first year, it was clear that the feasibility of the original proposal was questionable and that an overhaul of the school's system and culture was necessary before a Therapeutic Residential Model could be implemented or significant change could come about. Therapeutic Residential Model funding was terminated at the end of the school year. As there was no substantial implementation of a Therapeutic Residential Model program, data gathered were utilized as representing a naturally occurring control or minimal treatment site.

  20. Helix Nebula and CERN: A Symbiotic approach to exploiting commercial clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barreiro Megino, Fernando H.; Jones, Robert; Kucharczyk, Katarzyna; Medrano Llamas, Ramón; van der Ster, Daniel

    2014-06-01

    The recent paradigm shift toward cloud computing in IT, and general interest in "Big Data" in particular, have demonstrated that the computing requirements of HEP are no longer globally unique. Indeed, the CERN IT department and LHC experiments have already made significant R&D investments in delivering and exploiting cloud computing resources. While a number of technical evaluations of interesting commercial offerings from global IT enterprises have been performed by various physics labs, further technical, security, sociological, and legal issues need to be address before their large-scale adoption by the research community can be envisaged. Helix Nebula - the Science Cloud is an initiative that explores these questions by joining the forces of three European research institutes (CERN, ESA and EMBL) with leading European commercial IT enterprises. The goals of Helix Nebula are to establish a cloud platform federating multiple commercial cloud providers, along with new business models, which can sustain the cloud marketplace for years to come. This contribution will summarize the participation of CERN in Helix Nebula. We will explain CERN's flagship use-case and the model used to integrate several cloud providers with an LHC experiment's workload management system. During the first proof of concept, this project contributed over 40.000 CPU-days of Monte Carlo production throughput to the ATLAS experiment with marginal manpower required. CERN's experience, together with that of ESA and EMBL, is providing a great insight into the cloud computing industry and highlighted several challenges that are being tackled in order to ease the export of the scientific workloads to the cloud environments.

  1. A Healthy Middle-Aged Heart May Protect Your Brain Later

    MedlinePlus

    ... A Healthy Middle-Aged Heart May Protect Your Brain Later Dementia expert says take up heart-healthy ... 11, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Healthy aging of the brain relies on the health of your heart and ...

  2. Heart failure

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Heart failure occurs in 3% to 4% of adults aged over 65 years, usually as a consequence of coronary artery disease or hypertension, and causes breathlessness, effort intolerance, fluid retention, and increased mortality. The 5-year mortality in people with systolic heart failure ranges from 25% to 75%, often owing to sudden death following ventricular arrhythmia. Risks of cardiovascular events are increased in people with left ventricular systolic dysfunction (LVSD) or heart failure. Methods and outcomes We conducted a systematic review and aimed to answer the following clinical questions: What are the effects of non-drug treatments, and of drug and invasive treatments, for heart failure? What are the effects of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors in people at high risk of heart failure? What are the effects of treatments for diastolic heart failure? We searched: Medline, Embase, The Cochrane Library, and other important databases up to May 2009 (Clinical Evidence reviews are updated periodically, please check our website for the most up-to-date version of this review). We included harms alerts from relevant organisations such as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the UK Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA). Results We found 85 systematic reviews, RCTs, or observational studies that met our inclusion criteria. We performed a GRADE evaluation of the quality of evidence for interventions. Conclusions In this systematic review we present information relating to the effectiveness and safety of the following interventions: aldosterone receptor antagonists, amiodarone, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, angiotensin II receptor blockers, anticoagulation, antiplatelet agents, beta-blockers, calcium channel blockers, cardiac resynchronisation therapy, digoxin (in people already receiving diuretics and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors), exercise, hydralazine plus isosorbide dinitrate, implantable cardiac

  3. Healthy Heart Quizzes

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cholesterol Tools & Resources Congenital Defects Children & Adults About Congenital Heart Defects The Impact of Congenital Heart Defects Understand Your Risk for Congenital Heart Defects Symptoms & ...

  4. Exercise Beats Weight Loss At Helping Seniors' Hearts

    MedlinePlus

    ... 163858.html Exercise Beats Weight Loss at Helping Seniors' Hearts Both are healthy goals, but getting active ... 1, 2017 WEDNESDAY, March 1, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Seniors who want to give their hearts a healthy ...

  5. Exercise a Great Prescription to Help Older Hearts

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_164253.html Exercise a Great Prescription to Help Older Hearts Not ... 2017 THURSDAY, March 23, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Regular exercise is potent medicine for older adults with heart ...

  6. The NA62 experiment at CERN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piccini, Mauro

    2016-11-01

    The rare decays K → πvv¯ are excellent processes to make tests of new physics at the highest scale complementary to LHC thanks to their theoretically cleanness. The NA62 experiment at CERN SPS aims to collect of the order of 100 events in two years of data taking for the decay K+ → π+vv¯, keeping the background at the level of 10%. Part of the experimental apparatus has been commissioned during a technical run in 2012. The diverse and innovative experimental techniques will be explained and some preliminary results obtained during the 2014 pilot run will be reviewed.

  7. Open Hardware for CERN's accelerator control systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Bij, E.; Serrano, J.; Wlostowski, T.; Cattin, M.; Gousiou, E.; Alvarez Sanchez, P.; Boccardi, A.; Voumard, N.; Penacoba, G.

    2012-01-01

    The accelerator control systems at CERN will be upgraded and many electronics modules such as analog and digital I/O, level converters and repeaters, serial links and timing modules are being redesigned. The new developments are based on the FPGA Mezzanine Card, PCI Express and VME64x standards while the Wishbone specification is used as a system on a chip bus. To attract partners, the projects are developed in an `Open' fashion. Within this Open Hardware project new ways of working with industry are being evaluated and it has been proven that industry can be involved at all stages, from design to production and support.

  8. When Every Day Is Professional Development Day

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tienken, Christopher H.; Stonaker, Lew

    2007-01-01

    In the Monroe Township (New Jersey) Public Schools, teachers' learning occurs daily, not just on one day in October and February. Central office and school-level administrators foster job-embedded teacher growth. Every day is a professional development day in the district, but that has not always been so. How did the district become a system with…

  9. Simple, heart-smart substitutions

    MedlinePlus

    Coronary artery disease - heart smart substitutions; Atherosclerosis - heart smart substitutions; Cholesterol - heart smart substitutions; Coronary heart disease - heart smart substitutions; Healthy diet - heart smart substitutions; Wellness - heart smart substitutions

  10. Women's Heart Disease: Heart Attack Symptoms

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Women's Heart Disease Heart Attack Symptoms Past Issues / Winter 2014 Table ... NHLBI has uncovered some of the causes of heart diseases and conditions, as well as ways to prevent ...

  11. Heart Health: The Heart Truth Campaign 2009

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Cover Story Heart Health The Heart Truth Campaign 2009 Past Issues / Winter 2009 Table ... one of the celebrities supporting this year's The Heart Truth campaign. Both R&B singer Ashanti (center) ...

  12. Women's Heart Disease: Heart Disease Risk Factors

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Women's Heart Disease Heart Disease Risk Factors Past Issues / Winter 2014 Table ... or habits may raise your risk for coronary heart disease (CHD). These conditions are known as risk ...

  13. Heart Health - Heart Disease: Symptoms, Diagnosis, Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Cover Story Heart Health Heart Disease: Symptoms, Diagnosis, Treatment Past Issues / Winter 2009 ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Most heart attacks happen when a clot in the coronary ...

  14. Heart Attack

    MedlinePlus

    ... to the heart.Usually, a blockage starts with atherosclerosis. Atherosclerosis is the buildup of fatty deposits (called plaque) ... Americans and native Hawaiians are at greater risk.Atherosclerosis (hardening of the arteries)Lack of exerciseStressObesitySex (Gender)-- ...

  15. Heart Truth

    MedlinePlus

    ... trademark of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services and American Heart Association. Skip footer links and go to content Twitter Facebook YouTube Google+ SITE INDEX | ACCESSIBILITY | ... OIG | CONTACT US National Institutes of Health Department of Health and Human Services USA.gov

  16. Hands on CERN: A Well-Used Physics Education Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johansson, K. E.

    2006-01-01

    The "Hands on CERN" education project makes it possible for students and teachers to get close to the forefront of scientific research. The project confronts the students with contemporary physics at its most fundamental level with the help of particle collisions from the DELPHI particle physics experiment at CERN. It now exists in 14 languages…

  17. Heart disease and diet

    MedlinePlus

    Diet - heart disease; CAD - diet; Coronary artery disease - diet; Coronary heart disease - diet ... diet and lifestyle can reduce your risk of: Heart disease, heart attacks, and stroke Conditions that lead ...

  18. Coronary heart disease

    MedlinePlus

    Heart disease, Coronary heart disease, Coronary artery disease; Arteriosclerotic heart disease; CHD; CAD ... buildup of plaque in the arteries to your heart. This may also be called hardening of the ...

  19. What Is Heart Surgery?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Another type of heart surgery is called off-pump, or beating heart, surgery. It's like traditional open- ... heart-lung bypass machine isn't used. Off-pump heart surgery is limited to CABG. Surgeons can ...

  20. Anatomy of the Heart

    MedlinePlus

    ... picture of the outside of a normal, healthy, human heart. Heart Exterior Figure A shows the location of ... picture of the inside of a normal, healthy, human heart. Heart Interior Figure A shows the location of ...

  1. Diabetic Heart Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... be coronary heart disease (CHD), heart failure, and diabetic cardiomyopathy. Diabetes by itself puts you at risk for heart disease. Other risk factors include Family history of heart disease Carrying extra ...

  2. Heart disease - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - heart disease ... The following organizations are good resources for information on heart disease: American Heart Association -- www.heart.org Centers for Disease Control and Prevention -- www.cdc.gov/heartdisease

  3. Pediatric heart surgery

    MedlinePlus

    Heart surgery - pediatric; Heart surgery for children; Acquired heart disease; Heart valve surgery - children ... There are many kinds of heart defects. Some are minor, and others are more serious. Defects can occur inside the heart or in the large blood vessels ...

  4. Heart Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    James Antaki and a group of researchers from the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine used many elements of the Technology Utilization Program while looking for a way to visualize and track material points within the heart muscle. What they needed were tiny artificial "eggs" containing copper sulfate solution, small enough (about 2 mm in diameter) that they would not injure the heart, and large enough to be seen in Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) images; they also had to be biocompatible and tough enough to withstand the beating of the muscle. The group could not make nor buy sufficient containers. After reading an article on microspheres in NASA Tech Briefs, and a complete set of reports on microencapsulation from the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), JPL put Antaki in touch with Dr.Taylor Wang of Vanderbilt University who helped construct the myocardial markers. The research is expected to lead to improved understanding of how the heart works and what takes place when it fails.

  5. Taking Aspirin to Protect Your Heart

    MedlinePlus

    Toolkit No. 23 Taking Aspirin to Protect Your Heart What can taking aspirin do for me? If you are at high risk for or if you have heart disease, taking a low dose aspirin every day may help. Aspirin can also help ...

  6. Schoolwide Literacy Days.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Polder, Darlene D.

    2000-01-01

    Describes 10 "literacy day" activities that one California elementary school has used successfully schoolwide, typically one such day per month, to make reading fun and purposeful, while developing a sense of community. Includes: spread-a-quilt day; teacher exchange day; turn off the TV; Dr. Seuss day; community readers; schoolwide…

  7. Monitoring tools of COMPASS experiment at CERN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodlak, M.; Frolov, V.; Huber, S.; Jary, V.; Konorov, I.; Levit, D.; Novy, J.; Salac, R.; Tomsa, J.; Virius, M.

    2015-12-01

    This paper briefly introduces the data acquisition system of the COMPASS experiment and is mainly focused on the part that is responsible for the monitoring of the nodes in the whole newly developed data acquisition system of this experiment. The COMPASS is a high energy particle experiment with a fixed target located at the SPS of the CERN laboratory in Geneva, Switzerland. The hardware of the data acquisition system has been upgraded to use FPGA cards that are responsible for data multiplexing and event building. The software counterpart of the system includes several processes deployed in heterogenous network environment. There are two processes, namely Message Logger and Message Browser, taking care of monitoring. These tools handle messages generated by nodes in the system. While Message Logger collects and saves messages to the database, the Message Browser serves as a graphical interface over the database containing these messages. For better performance, certain database optimizations have been used. Lastly, results of performance tests are presented.

  8. Adult Day Care

    MedlinePlus

    ... Page Resize Text Printer Friendly Online Chat Adult Day Care Adult Day Care Centers are designed to provide care and ... adults who need assistance or supervision during the day. Programs offer relief to family members and caregivers, ...

  9. Congenital Heart Defects (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... heart, lungs, and blood vessels make up the circulatory system . The heart is the central pump of this ... Heart Defects Getting an EKG (Video) Your Heart & Circulatory System Heart Murmurs Mitral Valve Prolapse Movie: Heart & Circulatory ...

  10. CGH Supports World Cancer Day Every Day

    Cancer.gov

    We celebrate World Cancer Day every year on February 4th. This year the theme “We can. I can.” invites us to think not only about how we can work with one another to reduce the global burden of cancer, but how we as individuals can make a difference. Every day the staff at CGH work to establish and build upon programs that are aimed at improving the lives of people affected by cancer.

  11. Novel apparatus and methods for performing remotely controlled particle-solid interaction experiments at CERN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krause, H. F.; Deveney, E. F.; Jones, N. L.; Vane, C. R.; Datz, S.; Knudsen, H.; Grafström, P.; Schuch, R.

    1997-04-01

    Recent atomic physics studies involving ultrarelativistic Pb ions required solid target positioners, scintillators, and a sophisticated data acquisition and control system placed in a remote location at the CERN Super Proton Synchrotron near Geneva, Switzerland. The apparatus, installed in a high-radiation zone underground, had to (i) function for months, (ii) automatically respond to failures such as power outages and particle-induced computer upsets, and (iii) communicate with the outside world via a telephone line. The heart of the apparatus developed was an Apple Macintosh-based CAMAC system that answered the telephone and interpreted and executed remote control commands that (i) sensed and set targets, (ii) controlled voltages and discriminator levels for scintillators, (iii) modified data acquisition hardware logic, (iv) reported control information, and (v) automatically synchronized data acquisition to the CERN spill cycle via a modem signal and transmitted experimental data to a remote computer. No problems were experienced using intercontinental telephone connections at 1200 baud. Our successful "virtual laboratory" approach that uses off-the-shelf electronics is generally adaptable to more conventional bench-type experiments.

  12. Adult Day Services

    MedlinePlus

    A Smart Choice Adult Day Services Comparison At-a-Glance 1 Adult Day Services Assisted Living Home Care Nursing Homes Live at home with family ... supervision Nursing care available as needed during the day Flexibility to receive care only on days when ...

  13. Security in the CernVM File System and the Frontier Distributed Database Caching System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dykstra, D.; Blomer, J.

    2014-06-01

    Both the CernVM File System (CVMFS) and the Frontier Distributed Database Caching System (Frontier) distribute centrally updated data worldwide for LHC experiments using http proxy caches. Neither system provides privacy or access control on reading the data, but both control access to updates of the data and can guarantee the authenticity and integrity of the data transferred to clients over the internet. CVMFS has since its early days required digital signatures and secure hashes on all distributed data, and recently Frontier has added X.509-based authenticity and integrity checking. In this paper we detail and compare the security models of CVMFS and Frontier.

  14. Security in the CernVM File System and the Frontier Distributed Database Caching System

    SciTech Connect

    Dykstra, D.; Blomer, J.

    2014-01-01

    Both the CernVM File System (CVMFS) and the Frontier Distributed Database Caching System (Frontier) distribute centrally updated data worldwide for LHC experiments using http proxy caches. Neither system provides privacy or access control on reading the data, but both control access to updates of the data and can guarantee the authenticity and integrity of the data transferred to clients over the internet. CVMFS has since its early days required digital signatures and secure hashes on all distributed data, and recently Frontier has added X.509-based authenticity and integrity checking. In this paper we detail and compare the security models of CVMFS and Frontier.

  15. The ATLAS Experiment at the CERN Large Hadron Collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ATLAS Collaboration; Aad, G.; Abat, E.; Abdallah, J.; Abdelalim, A. A.; Abdesselam, A.; Abdinov, O.; Abi, B. A.; Abolins, M.; Abramowicz, H.; Acerbi, E.; Acharya, B. S.; Achenbach, R.; Ackers, M.; Adams, D. L.; Adamyan, F.; Addy, T. N.; Aderholz, M.; Adorisio, C.; Adragna, P.; Aharrouche, M.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahles, F.; Ahmad, A.; Ahmed, H.; Aielli, G.; Åkesson, P. F.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akimov, A. V.; Alam, S. M.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Aleppo, M.; Alessandria, F.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alimonti, G.; Aliyev, M.; Allport, P. P.; Allwood-Spiers, S. E.; Aloisio, A.; Alonso, J.; Alves, R.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amako, K.; Amaral, P.; Amaral, S. P.; Ambrosini, G.; Ambrosio, G.; Amelung, C.; Ammosov, V. V.; Amorim, A.; Amram, N.; Anastopoulos, C.; Anderson, B.; Anderson, K. J.; Anderssen, E. C.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Andricek, L.; Andrieux, M.-L.; Anduaga, X. S.; Anghinolfi, F.; Antonaki, A.; Antonelli, M.; Antonelli, S.; Apsimon, R.; Arabidze, G.; Aracena, I.; Arai, Y.; Arce, A. T. H.; Archambault, J. P.; Arguin, J.-F.; Arik, E.; Arik, M.; Arms, K. E.; Armstrong, S. R.; Arnaud, M.; Arnault, C.; Artamonov, A.; Asai, S.; Ask, S.; Åsman, B.; Asner, D.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astbury, A.; Athar, B.; Atkinson, T.; Aubert, B.; Auerbach, B.; Auge, E.; Augsten, K.; Aulchenko, V. M.; Austin, N.; Avolio, G.; Avramidou, R.; Axen, A.; Ay, C.; Azuelos, G.; Baccaglioni, G.; Bacci, C.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Bachy, G.; Badescu, E.; Bagnaia, P.; Bailey, D. C.; Baines, J. T.; Baker, O. K.; Ballester, F.; Baltasar Dos Santos Pedrosa, F.; Banas, E.; Banfi, D.; Bangert, A.; Bansal, V.; Baranov, S. P.; Baranov, S.; Barashkou, A.; Barberio, E. L.; Barberis, D.; Barbier, G.; Barclay, P.; Bardin, D. Y.; Bargassa, P.; Barillari, T.; Barisonzi, M.; Barnett, B. M.; Barnett, R. M.; Baron, S.; Baroncelli, A.; Barone, M.; Barr, A. J.; Barreiro, F.; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, J.; Barrillon, P.; Barriuso Poy, A.; Barros, N.; Bartheld, V.; Bartko, H.; Bartoldus, R.; Basiladze, S.; Bastos, J.; Batchelor, L. E.; Bates, R. L.; Batley, J. R.; Batraneanu, S.; Battistin, M.; Battistoni, G.; Batusov, V.; Bauer, F.; Bauss, B.; Baynham, D. E.; Bazalova, M.; Bazan, A.; Beauchemin, P. H.; Beaugiraud, B.; Beccherle, R. B.; Beck, G. A.; Beck, H. P.; Becks, K. H.; Bedajanek, I.; Beddall, A. J.; Beddall, A.; Bednár, P.; Bednyakov, V. A.; Bee, C.; Behar Harpaz, S.; Belanger, G. A. N.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Belhorma, B.; Bell, P. J.; Bell, W. H.; Bella, G.; Bellachia, F.; Bellagamba, L.; Bellina, F.; Bellomo, G.; Bellomo, M.; Beltramello, O.; Belymam, A.; Ben Ami, S.; Ben Moshe, M.; Benary, O.; Benchekroun, D.; Benchouk, C.; Bendel, M.; Benedict, B. H.; Benekos, N.; Benes, J.; Benhammou, Y.; Benincasa, G. P.; Benjamin, D. P.; Bensinger, J. R.; Benslama, K.; Bentvelsen, S.; Beretta, M.; Berge, D.; Bergeaas, E.; Berger, N.; Berghaus, F.; Berglund, S.; Bergsma, F.; Beringer, J.; Bernabéu, J.; Bernardet, K.; Berriaud, C.; Berry, T.; Bertelsen, H.; Bertin, A.; Bertinelli, F.; Bertolucci, S.; Besson, N.; Beteille, A.; Bethke, S.; Bialas, W.; Bianchi, R. M.; Bianco, M.; Biebel, O.; Bieri, M.; Biglietti, M.; Bilokon, H.; Binder, M.; Binet, S.; Bingefors, N.; Bingul, A.; Bini, C.; Biscarat, C.; Bischof, R.; Bischofberger, M.; Bitadze, A.; Bizzell, J. P.; Black, K. M.; Blair, R. E.; Blaising, J. J.; Blanch, O.; Blanchot, G.; Blocker, C.; Blocki, J.; Blondel, A.; Blum, W.; Blumenschein, U.; Boaretto, C.; Bobbink, G. J.; Bocci, A.; Bocian, D.; Bock, R.; Boehm, M.; Boek, J.; Bogaerts, J. A.; Bogouch, A.; Bohm, C.; Bohm, J.; Boisvert, V.; Bold, T.; Boldea, V.; Bondarenko, V. G.; Bonino, R.; Bonis, J.; Bonivento, W.; Bonneau, P.; Boonekamp, M.; Boorman, G.; Boosten, M.; Booth, C. N.; Booth, P. S. L.; Booth, P.; Booth, J. R. A.; Borer, K.; Borisov, A.; Borjanovic, I.; Bos, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bosi, F.; Bosman, M.; Bosteels, M.; Botchev, B.; Boterenbrood, H.; Botterill, D.; Boudreau, J.; Bouhova-Thacker, E. V.; Boulahouache, C.; Bourdarios, C.; Boutemeur, M.; Bouzakis, K.; Boyd, G. R.; Boyd, J.; Boyer, B. H.; Boyko, I. R.; Bozhko, N. I.; Braccini, S.; Braem, A.; Branchini, P.; Brandenburg, G. W.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, O.; Bratzler, U.; Braun, H. M.; Bravo, S.; Brawn, I. P.; Brelier, B.; Bremer, J.; Brenner, R.; Bressler, S.; Breton, D.; Brett, N. D.; Breugnon, P.; Bright-Thomas, P. G.; Brochu, F. M.; Brock, I.; Brock, R.; Brodbeck, T. J.; Brodet, E.; Broggi, F.; Broklova, Z.; Bromberg, C.; Brooijmans, G.; Brouwer, G.; Broz, J.; Brubaker, E.; Bruckman de Renstrom, P. A.; Bruncko, D.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Bruschi, M.; Buanes, T.; Buchanan, N. J.; Buchholz, P.; Budagov, I. A.; Büscher, V.; Bugge, L.; Buira-Clark, D.; Buis, E. J.; Bujor, F.; Buran, T.; Burckhart, H.; Burckhart-Chromek, D.; Burdin, S.; Burns, R.; Busato, E.; Buskop, J. J. F.; Buszello, K. P.; Butin, F.; Butler, J. M.; Buttar, C. M.; Butterworth, J.; Butterworth, J. M.; Byatt, T.; Cabrera Urbán, S.; Cabruja Casas, E.; Caccia, M.; Caforio, D.; Cakir, O.; Calafiura, P.; Calderini, G.; Calderón Terol, D.; Callahan, J.; Caloba, L. P.; Caloi, R.; Calvet, D.; Camard, A.; Camarena, F.; Camarri, P.; Cambiaghi, M.; Cameron, D.; Cammin, J.; Campabadal Segura, F.; Campana, S.; Canale, V.; Cantero, J.; Capeans Garrido, M. D. M.; Caprini, I.; Caprini, M.; Caprio, M.; Caracinha, D.; Caramarcu, C.; Carcagno, Y.; Cardarelli, R.; Cardeira, C.; Cardiel Sas, L.; Cardini, A.; Carli, T.; Carlino, G.; Carminati, L.; Caron, B.; Caron, S.; Carpentieri, C.; Carr, F. S.; Carter, A. A.; Carter, J. R.; Carvalho, J.; Casadei, D.; Casado, M. P.; Cascella, M.; Caso, C.; Castelo, J.; Castillo Gimenez, V.; Castro, N.; Castrovillari, F.; Cataldi, G.; Cataneo, F.; Catinaccio, A.; Catmore, J. R.; Cattai, A.; Caughron, S.; Cauz, D.; Cavallari, A.; Cavalleri, P.; Cavalli, D.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cavasinni, V.; Ceradini, F.; Cerna, C.; Cernoch, C.; Cerqueira, A. S.; Cerri, A.; Cerutti, F.; Cervetto, M.; Cetin, S. A.; Cevenini, F.; Chalifour, M.; Chamizo llatas, M.; Chan, A.; Chapman, J. W.; Charlton, D. G.; Charron, S.; Chekulaev, S. V.; Chelkov, G. A.; Chen, H.; Chen, L.; Chen, T.; Chen, X.; Cheng, S.; Cheng, T. L.; Cheplakov, A.; Chepurnov, V. F.; Cherkaoui El Moursli, R.; Chesneanu, D.; Cheu, E.; Chevalier, L.; Chevalley, J. L.; Chevallier, F.; Chiarella, V.; Chiefari, G.; Chikovani, L.; Chilingarov, A.; Chiodini, G.; Chouridou, S.; Chren, D.; Christiansen, T.; Christidi, I. A.; Christov, A.; Chu, M. L.; Chudoba, J.; Chuguev, A. G.; Ciapetti, G.; Cicalini, E.; Ciftci, A. K.; Cindro, V.; Ciobotaru, M. D.; Ciocio, A.; Cirilli, M.; Citterio, M.; Ciubancan, M.; Civera, J. V.; Clark, A.; Cleland, W.; Clemens, J. C.; Clement, B. C.; Clément, C.; Clements, D.; Clifft, R. W.; Cobal, M.; Coccaro, A.; Cochran, J.; Coco, R.; Coe, P.; Coelli, S.; Cogneras, E.; Cojocaru, C. D.; Colas, J.; Colijn, A. P.; Collard, C.; Collins-Tooth, C.; Collot, J.; Coluccia, R.; Comune, G.; Conde Muiño, P.; Coniavitis, E.; Consonni, M.; Constantinescu, S.; Conta, C.; Conventi, F. A.; Cook, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper-Smith, N. J.; Cornelissen, T.; Corradi, M.; Correard, S.; Corso-Radu, A.; Coss, J.; Costa, G.; Costa, M. J.; Costanzo, D.; Costin, T.; Coura Torres, R.; Courneyea, L.; Couyoumtzelis, C.; Cowan, G.; Cox, B. E.; Cox, J.; Cragg, D. A.; Cranmer, K.; Cranshaw, J.; Cristinziani, M.; Crosetti, G.; Cuenca Almenar, C.; Cuneo, S.; Cunha, A.; Curatolo, M.; Curtis, C. J.; Cwetanski, P.; Czyczula, Z.; D'Auria, S.; D'Onofrio, M.; Da Rocha Gesualdi Mello, A.; Da Silva, P. V. M.; Da Silva, R.; Dabrowski, W.; Dael, A.; Dahlhoff, A.; Dai, T.; Dallapiccola, C.; Dallison, S. J.; Dalmau, J.; Daly, C. H.; Dam, M.; Damazio, D.; Dameri, M.; Danielsen, K. M.; Danielsson, H. O.; Dankers, R.; Dannheim, D.; Darbo, G.; Dargent, P.; Daum, C.; Dauvergne, J. P.; David, M.; Davidek, T.; Davidson, N.; Davidson, R.; Dawson, I.; Dawson, J. W.; Daya, R. K.; De, K.; de Asmundis, R.; de Boer, R.; DeCastro, S.; DeGroot, N.; de Jong, P.; de La Broise, X.; DeLa Cruz-Burelo, E.; DeLa Taille, C.; DeLotto, B.; DeOliveira Branco, M.; DePedis, D.; de Saintignon, P.; DeSalvo, A.; DeSanctis, U.; DeSanto, A.; DeVivie DeRegie, J. B.; DeZorzi, G.; Dean, S.; Dedes, G.; Dedovich, D. V.; Defay, P. O.; Degele, R.; Dehchar, M.; Deile, M.; DelPapa, C.; DelPeso, J.; DelPrete, T.; Delagnes, E.; Delebecque, P.; Dell'Acqua, A.; Della Pietra, M.; della Volpe, D.; Delmastro, M.; Delpierre, P.; Delruelle, N.; Delsart, P. A.; Deluca Silberberg, C.; Demers, S.; Demichev, M.; Demierre, P.; Demirköz, B.; Deng, W.; Denisov, S. P.; Dennis, C.; Densham, C. J.; Dentan, M.; Derkaoui, J. E.; Derue, F.; Dervan, P.; Desch, K. K.; Dewhurst, A.; Di Ciaccio, A.; Di Ciaccio, L.; Di Domenico, A.; Di Girolamo, A.; Di Girolamo, B.; Di Luise, S.; Di Mattia, A.; Di Simone, A.; Diaz Gomez, M. M.; Diehl, E. B.; Dietl, H.; Dietrich, J.; Dietsche, W.; Diglio, S.; Dima, M.; Dindar, K.; Dinkespiler, B.; Dionisi, C.; Dipanjan, R.; Dita, P.; Dita, S.; Dittus, F.; Dixon, S. D.; Djama, F.; Djilkibaev, R.; Djobava, T.; do Vale, M. A. B.; Dobbs, M.; Dobinson, R.; Dobos, D.; Dobson, E.; Dobson, M.; Dodd, J.; Dogan, O. B.; Doherty, T.; Doi, Y.; Dolejsi, J.; Dolenc, I.; Dolezal, Z.; Dolgoshein, B. A.; Domingo, E.; Donega, M.; Dopke, J.; Dorfan, D. E.; Dorholt, O.; Doria, A.; Dos Anjos, A.; Dosil, M.; Dotti, A.; Dova, M. T.; Dowell, J. D.; Doyle, A. T.; Drake, G.; Drakoulakos, D.; Drasal, Z.; Drees, J.; Dressnandt, N.; Drevermann, H.; Driouichi, C.; Dris, M.; Drohan, J. G.; Dubbert, J.; Dubbs, T.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Dudarev, A.; Dührssen, M.; Dür, H.; Duerdoth, I. P.; Duffin, S.; Duflot, L.; Dufour, M.-A.; Dumont Dayot, N.; Duran Yildiz, H.; Durand, D.; Dushkin, A.; Duxfield, R.; Dwuznik, M.; Dydak, F.; Dzahini, D.; Díez Cornell, S.; Düren, M.; Ebenstein, W. L.; Eckert, S.; Eckweiler, S.; Eerola, P.; Efthymiopoulos, I.; Egede, U.; Egorov, K.; Ehrenfeld, W.; Eifert, T.; Eigen, G.; Einsweiler, K.; Eisenhandler, E.; Ekelof, T.; Eklund, L. M.; El Kacimi, M.; Ellert, M.; Elles, S.; Ellis, N.; Elmsheuser, J.; Elsing, M.; Ely, R.; Emeliyanov, D.; Engelmann, R.; Engström, M.; Ennes, P.; Epp, B.; Eppig, A.; Epshteyn, V. S.; Ereditato, A.; Eremin, V.; Eriksson, D.; Ermoline, I.; Ernwein, J.; Errede, D.; Errede, S.; Escalier, M.; Escobar, C.; Espinal Curull, X.; Esposito, B.; Esteves, F.; Etienne, F.; Etienvre, A. I.; Etzion, E.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Evtoukhovitch, P.; Eyring, A.; Fabbri, L.; Fabjan, C. W.; Fabre, C.; Faccioli, P.; Facius, K.; Fadeyev, V.; Fakhrutdinov, R. M.; Falciano, S.; Falleau, I.; Falou, A. C.; Fang, Y.; Fanti, M.; Farbin, A.; Farilla, A.; Farrell, J.; Farthouat, P.; Fasching, D.; Fassi, F.; Fassnacht, P.; Fassouliotis, D.; Fawzi, F.; Fayard, L.; Fayette, F.; Febbraro, R.; Fedin, O. L.; Fedorko, I.; Feld, L.; Feldman, G.; Feligioni, L.; Feng, C.; Feng, E. J.; Fent, J.; Fenyuk, A. B.; Ferencei, J.; Ferguson, D.; Ferland, J.; Fernando, W.; Ferrag, S.; Ferrari, A.; Ferrari, P.; Ferrari, R.; Ferrer, A.; Ferrer, M. L.; Ferrere, D.; Ferretti, C.; Ferro, F.; Fiascaris, M.; Fichet, S.; Fiedler, F.; Filimonov, V.; Filipčič, A.; Filippas, A.; Filthaut, F.; Fincke-Keeler, M.; Finocchiaro, G.; Fiorini, L.; Firan, A.; Fischer, P.; Fisher, M. J.; Fisher, S. M.; Flaminio, V.; Flammer, J.; Flechl, M.; Fleck, I.; Flegel, W.; Fleischmann, P.; Fleischmann, S.; Fleta Corral, C. M.; Fleuret, F.; Flick, T.; Flix, J.; Flores Castillo, L. R.; Flowerdew, M. J.; Föhlisch, F.; Fokitis, M.; Fonseca Martin, T. M.; Fopma, J.; Forbush, D. A.; Formica, A.; Foster, J. M.; Fournier, D.; Foussat, A.; Fowler, A. J.; Fox, H.; Francavilla, P.; Francis, D.; Franz, S.; Fraser, J. T.; Fraternali, M.; Fratianni, S.; Freestone, J.; French, R. S.; Fritsch, K.; Froidevaux, D.; Frost, J. A.; Fukunaga, C.; Fulachier, J.; Fullana Torregrosa, E.; Fuster, J.; Gabaldon, C.; Gadomski, S.; Gagliardi, G.; Gagnon, P.; Gallas, E. J.; Gallas, M. V.; Gallop, B. J.; Gan, K. K.; Gannaway, F. C.; Gao, Y. S.; Gapienko, V. A.; Gaponenko, A.; Garciá, C.; Garcia-Sciveres, M.; Garcìa Navarro, J. E.; Garde, V.; Gardner, R. W.; Garelli, N.; Garitaonandia, H.; Garonne, V. G.; Garvey, J.; Gatti, C.; Gaudio, G.; Gaumer, O.; Gautard, V.; Gauzzi, P.; Gavrilenko, I. L.; Gay, C.; Gayde, J.-C.; Gazis, E. N.; Gazo, E.; Gee, C. N. P.; Geich-Gimbel, C.; Gellerstedt, K.; Gemme, C.; Genest, M. H.; Gentile, S.; George, M. A.; George, S.; Gerlach, P.; Gernizky, Y.; Geweniger, C.; Ghazlane, H.; Ghete, V. M.; Ghez, P.; Ghodbane, N.; Giacobbe, B.; Giagu, S.; Giakoumopoulou, V.; Giangiobbe, V.; Gianotti, F.; Gibbard, B.; Gibson, A.; Gibson, M. D.; Gibson, S. M.; Gieraltowski, G. F.; Gil Botella, I.; Gilbert, L. M.; Gilchriese, M.; Gildemeister, O.; Gilewsky, V.; Gillman, A. R.; Gingrich, D. M.; Ginzburg, J.; Giokaris, N.; Giordani, M. P.; Girard, C. G.; Giraud, P. F.; Girtler, P.; Giugni, D.; Giusti, P.; Gjelsten, B. K.; Glasman, C.; Glazov, A.; Glitza, K. W.; Glonti, G. L.; Gnanvo, K. G.; Godlewski, J.; Göpfert, T.; Gössling, C.; Göttfert, T.; Goldfarb, S.; Goldin, D.; Goldschmidt, N.; Golling, T.; Gollub, N. P.; Golonka, P. J.; Golovnia, S. N.; Gomes, A.; Gomes, J.; Gonçalo, R.; Gongadze, A.; Gonidec, A.; Gonzalez, S.; González de la Hoz, S.; González Millán, V.; Gonzalez Silva, M. L.; Gonzalez-Pineiro, B.; González-Sevilla, S.; Goodrick, M. J.; Goodson, J. J.; Goossens, L.; Gorbounov, P. A.; Gordeev, A.; Gordon, H.; Gorelov, I.; Gorfine, G.; Gorini, B.; Gorini, E.; Gorišek, A.; Gornicki, E.; Gorokhov, S. A.; Gorski, B. T.; Goryachev, S. V.; Goryachev, V. N.; Gosselink, M.; Gostkin, M. I.; Gouanère, M.; Gough Eschrich, I.; Goujdami, D.; Goulette, M.; Gousakov, I.; Gouveia, J.; Gowdy, S.; Goy, C.; Grabowska-Bold, I.; Grabski, V.; Grafström, P.; Grah, C.; Grahn, K.-J.; Grancagnolo, F.; Grancagnolo, S.; Grassmann, H.; Gratchev, V.; Gray, H. M.; Graziani, E.; Green, B.; Greenall, A.; Greenfield, D.; Greenwood, D.; Gregor, I. M.; Grewal, A.; Griesmayer, E.; Grigalashvili, N.; Grigson, C.; Grillo, A. A.; Grimaldi, F.; Grimm, K.; Gris, P. L. Y.; Grishkevich, Y.; Groenstege, H.; Groer, L. S.; Grognuz, J.; Groh, M.; Gross, E.; Grosse-Knetter, J.; Grothe, M. E. M.; Grudzinski, J.; Gruse, C.; Gruwe, M.; Grybel, K.; Grybos, P.; Gschwendtner, E. M.; Guarino, V. J.; Guicheney, C. J.; Guilhem, G.; Guillemin, T.; Gunther, J.; Guo, B.; Gupta, A.; Gurriana, L.; Gushchin, V. N.; Gutierrez, P.; Guy, L.; Guyot, C.; Gwenlan, C.; Gwilliam, C. B.; Haas, A.; Haas, S.; Haber, C.; Haboubi, G.; Hackenburg, R.; Hadash, E.; Hadavand, H. K.; Haeberli, C.; Härtel, R.; Haggerty, R.; Hahn, F.; Haider, S.; Hajduk, Z.; Hakimi, M.; Hakobyan, H.; Hakobyan, H.; Haller, J.; Hallewell, G. D.; Hallgren, B.; Hamacher, K.; Hamilton, A.; Han, H.; Han, L.; Hanagaki, K.; Hance, M.; Hanke, P.; Hansen, C. J.; Hansen, F. H.; Hansen, J. R.; Hansen, J. B.; Hansen, J. D.; Hansen, P. H.; Hansl-Kozanecka, T.; Hanson, G.; Hansson, P.; Hara, K.; Harder, S.; Harel, A.; Harenberg, T.; Harper, R.; Hart, J. C.; Hart, R. G. G.; Hartjes, F.; Hartman, N.; Haruyama, T.; Harvey, A.; Hasegawa, Y.; Hashemi, K.; Hassani, S.; Hatch, M.; Hatley, R. W.; Haubold, T. G.; Hauff, D.; Haug, F.; Haug, S.; Hauschild, M.; Hauser, R.; Hauviller, C.; Havranek, M.; Hawes, B. M.; Hawkings, R. J.; Hawkins, D.; Hayler, T.; Hayward, H. S.; Haywood, S. J.; Hazen, E.; He, M.; He, Y. P.; Head, S. J.; Hedberg, V.; Heelan, L.; Heinemann, F. E. W.; Heldmann, M.; Hellman, S.; Helsens, C.; Henderson, R. C. W.; Hendriks, P. J.; Henriques Correia, A. M.; Henrot-Versille, S.; Henry-Couannier, F.; Henß, T.; Herten, G.; Hertenberger, R.; Hervas, L.; Hess, M.; Hessey, N. P.; Hicheur, A.; Hidvegi, A.; Higón-Rodriguez, E.; Hill, D.; Hill, J.; Hill, J. C.; Hill, N.; Hillier, S. J.; Hinchliffe, I.; Hindson, D.; Hinkelbein, C.; Hodges, T. A.; Hodgkinson, M. C.; Hodgson, P.; Hoecker, A.; Hoeferkamp, M. R.; Hoffman, J.; Hoffmann, A. E.; Hoffmann, D.; Hoffmann, H. F.; Holder, M.; Hollins, T. I.; Hollyman, G.; Holmes, A.; Holmgren, S. O.; Holt, R.; Holtom, E.; Holy, T.; Homer, R. J.; Homma, Y.; Homola, P.; Honerbach, W.; Honma, A.; Hooton, I.; Horazdovsky, T.; Horn, C.; Horvat, S.; Hostachy, J.-Y.; Hott, T.; Hou, S.; Houlden, M. A.; Hoummada, A.; Hover, J.; Howell, D. F.; Hrivnac, J.; Hruska, I.; Hryn'ova, T.; Huang, G. S.; Hubacek, Z.; Hubaut, F.; Huegging, F.; Huffman, B. T.; Hughes, E.; Hughes, G.; Hughes-Jones, R. E.; Hulsbergen, W.; Hurst, P.; Hurwitz, M.; Huse, T.; Huseynov, N.; Huston, J.; Huth, J.; Iacobucci, G.; Ibbotson, M.; Ibragimov, I.; Ichimiya, R.; Iconomidou-Fayard, L.; Idarraga, J.; Idzik, M.; Iengo, P.; Iglesias Escudero, M. C.; Igonkina, O.; Ikegami, Y.; Ikeno, M.; Ilchenko, Y.; Ilyushenka, Y.; Imbault, D.; Imbert, P.; Imhaeuser, M.; Imori, M.; Ince, T.; Inigo-Golfin, J.; Inoue, K.; Ioannou, P.; Iodice, M.; Ionescu, G.; Ishii, K.; Ishino, M.; Ishizawa, Y.; Ishmukhametov, R.; Issever, C.; Ito, H.; Ivashin, A. V.; Iwanski, W.; Iwasaki, H.; Izen, J. M.; Izzo, V.; Jackson, J.; Jackson, J. N.; Jaekel, M.; Jagielski, S.; Jahoda, M.; Jain, V.; Jakobs, K.; Jakubek, J.; Jansen, E.; Jansweijer, P. P. M.; Jared, R. C.; Jarlskog, G.; Jarp, S.; Jarron, P.; Jelen, K.; Jen-La Plante, I.; Jenni, P.; Jeremie, A.; Jez, P.; Jézéquel, S.; Jiang, Y.; Jin, G.; Jin, S.; Jinnouchi, O.; Joffe, D.; Johansen, L. G.; Johansen, M.; Johansson, K. E.; Johansson, P.; Johns, K. A.; Jon-And, K.; Jones, M.; Jones, R.; Jones, R. W. L.; Jones, T. W.; Jones, T. J.; Jones, A.; Jonsson, O.; Joo, K. K.; Joos, D.; Joos, M.; Joram, C.; Jorgensen, S.; Joseph, J.; Jovanovic, P.; Junnarkar, S. S.; Juranek, V.; Jussel, P.; Kabachenko, V. V.; Kabana, S.; Kaci, M.; Kaczmarska, A.; Kado, M.; Kagan, H.; Kagawa, S.; Kaiser, S.; Kajomovitz, E.; Kakurin, S.; Kalinovskaya, L. V.; Kama, S.; Kambara, H.; Kanaya, N.; Kandasamy, A.; Kandasamy, S.; Kaneda, M.; Kantserov, V. A.; Kanzaki, J.; Kaplan, B.; Kapliy, A.; Kaplon, J.; Karagounis, M.; Karagoz Unel, M.; Karr, K.; Karst, P.; Kartvelishvili, V.; Karyukhin, A. N.; Kashif, L.; Kasmi, A.; Kass, R. D.; Kastanas, A.; Kataoka, M.; Kataoka, Y.; Katsoufis, E.; Katunin, S.; Kawagoe, K.; Kawai, M.; Kawamoto, T.; Kayumov, F.; Kazanin, V. A.; Kazarinov, M. Y.; Kazarov, A.; Kazi, S. I.; Keates, J. R.; Keeler, R.; Keener, P. T.; Kehoe, R.; Keil, M.; Kekelidze, G. D.; Kelly, M.; Kennedy, J.; Kenyon, M.; Kepka, O.; Kerschen, N.; Kerševan, B. P.; Kersten, S.; Ketterer, C.; Khakzad, M.; Khalilzade, F.; Khandanyan, H.; Khanov, A.; Kharchenko, D.; Khodinov, A.; Kholodenko, A. G.; Khomich, A.; Khomutnikov, V. P.; Khoriauli, G.; Khovanskiy, N.; Khovanskiy, V.; Khramov, E.; Khubua, J.; Kieft, G.; Kierstead, J. A.; Kilvington, G.; Kim, H.; Kim, H.; Kim, S. H.; Kind, P.; King, B. T.; Kirk, J.; Kirsch, G. P.; Kirsch, L. E.; Kiryunin, A. E.; Kisielewska, D.; Kisielewski, B.; Kittelmann, T.; Kiver, A. M.; Kiyamura, H.; Kladiva, E.; Klaiber-Lodewigs, J.; Kleinknecht, K.; Klier, A.; Klimentov, A.; Kline, C. R.; Klingenberg, R.; Klinkby, E. B.; Klioutchnikova, T.; Klok, P. F.; Klous, S.; Kluge, E.-E.; Kluit, P.; Klute, M.; Kluth, S.; Knecht, N. K.; Kneringer, E.; Knezo, E.; Knobloch, J.; Ko, B. R.; Kobayashi, T.; Kobel, M.; Kodys, P.; König, A. C.; König, S.; Köpke, L.; Koetsveld, F.; Koffas, T.; Koffeman, E.; Kohout, Z.; Kohriki, T.; Kokott, T.; Kolachev, G. M.; Kolanoski, H.; Kolesnikov, V.; Koletsou, I.; Kollefrath, M.; Kolos, S.; Kolya, S. D.; Komar, A. A.; Komaragiri, J. R.; Kondo, T.; Kondo, Y.; Kondratyeva, N. V.; Kono, T.; Kononov, A. I.; Konoplich, R.; Konovalov, S. P.; Konstantinidis, N.; Kootz, A.; Koperny, S.; Kopikov, S. V.; Korcyl, K.; Kordas, K.; Koreshev, V.; Korn, A.; Korolkov, I.; Korotkov, V. A.; Korsmo, H.; Kortner, O.; Kostrikov, M. E.; Kostyukhin, V. V.; Kotamäki, M. J.; Kotchetkov, D.; Kotov, S.; Kotov, V. M.; Kotov, K. Y.; Kourkoumelis, C.; Koutsman, A.; Kovalenko, S.; Kowalewski, R.; Kowalski, H.; Kowalski, T. Z.; Kozanecki, W.; Kozhin, A. S.; Kral, V.; Kramarenko, V.; Kramberger, G.; Kramer, A.; Krasel, O.; Krasny, M. W.; Krasznahorkay, A.; Krepouri, A.; Krieger, P.; Krivkova, P.; Krobath, G.; Kroha, H.; Krstic, J.; Kruchonak, U.; Krüger, H.; Kruger, K.; Krumshteyn, Z. V.; Kubik, P.; Kubischta, W.; Kubota, T.; Kudin, L. G.; Kudlaty, J.; Kugel, A.; Kuhl, T.; Kuhn, D.; Kukhtin, V.; Kulchitsky, Y.; Kundu, N.; Kupco, A.; Kupper, M.; Kurashige, H.; Kurchaninov, L. L.; Kurochkin, Y. A.; Kus, V.; Kuykendall, W.; Kuzhir, P.; Kuznetsova, E. K.; Kvasnicka, O.; Kwee, R.; La Marra, D.; La Rosa, M.; La Rotonda, L.; Labarga, L.; Labbe, J. A.; Lacasta, C.; Lacava, F.; Lacker, H.; Lacour, D.; Lacuesta, V. R.; Ladygin, E.; Lafaye, R.; Laforge, B.; Lagouri, T.; Lai, S.; Lamanna, E.; Lambacher, M.; Lambert, F.; Lampl, W.; Lancon, E.; Landgraf, U.; Landon, M. P. J.; Landsman, H.; Langstaff, R. R.; Lankford, A. J.; Lanni, F.; Lantzsch, K.; Lanza, A.; Lapin, V. V.; Laplace, S.; Laporte, J. F.; Lara, V.; Lari, T.; Larionov, A. V.; Lasseur, C.; Lau, W.; Laurelli, P.; Lavorato, A.; Lavrijsen, W.; Lazarev, A. B.; LeBihan, A.-C.; LeDortz, O.; LeManer, C.; LeVine, M.; Leahu, L.; Leahu, M.; Lebel, C.; Lechowski, M.; LeCompte, T.; Ledroit-Guillon, F.; Lee, H.; Lee, J. S. H.; Lee, S. C.; Lefebvre, M.; Lefevre, R. P.; Legendre, M.; Leger, A.; LeGeyt, B. C.; Leggett, C.; Lehmacher, M.; Lehmann Miotto, G.; Lehto, M.; Leitner, R.; Lelas, D.; Lellouch, D.; Leltchouk, M.; Lendermann, V.; Leney, K. J. C.; Lenz, T.; Lenzen, G.; Lepidis, J.; Leroy, C.; Lessard, J.-R.; Lesser, J.; Lester, C. G.; Letheren, M.; Fook Cheong, A. Leung; Levêque, J.; Levin, D.; Levinson, L. J.; Levitski, M. S.; Lewandowska, M.; Leyton, M.; Li, J.; Li, W.; Liabline, M.; Liang, Z.; Liang, Z.; Liberti, B.; Lichard, P.; Liebig, W.; Lifshitz, R.; Liko, D.; Lim, H.; Limper, M.; Lin, S. C.; Lindahl, A.; Linde, F.; Lindquist, L.; Lindsay, S. W.; Linhart, V.; Lintern, A. J.; Liolios, A.; Lipniacka, A.; Liss, T. M.; Lissauer, A.; List, J.; Litke, A. M.; Liu, S.; Liu, T.; Liu, Y.; Livan, M.; Lleres, A.; Llosá Llácer, G.; Lloyd, S. L.; Lobkowicz, F.; Loch, P.; Lockman, W. S.; Loddenkoetter, T.; Loebinger, F. K.; Loginov, A.; Loh, C. W.; Lohse, T.; Lohwasser, K.; Lokajicek, M.; Loken, J.; Lokwitz, S.; Long, M. C.; Lopes, L.; Lopez Mateos, D.; Losty, M. J.; Lou, X.; Loureiro, K. F.; Lovas, L.; Love, J.; Lowe, A.; Lozano Fantoba, M.; Lu, F.; Lu, J.; Lu, L.; Lubatti, H. J.; Lucas, S.; Luci, C.; Lucotte, A.; Ludwig, A.; Ludwig, I.; Ludwig, J.; Luehring, F.; Lüke, D.; Luijckx, G.; Luisa, L.; Lumb, D.; Luminari, L.; Lund, E.; Lund-Jensen, B.; Lundberg, B.; Lundquist, J.; Lupi, A.; Lupu, N.; Lutz, G.; Lynn, D.; Lynn, J.; Lys, J.; Lysan, V.; Lytken, E.; López-Amengual, J. M.; Ma, H.; Ma, L. L.; Maaß en, M.; Maccarrone, G.; Mace, G. G. R.; Macina, D.; Mackeprang, R.; Macpherson, A.; MacQueen, D.; Macwaters, C.; Madaras, R. J.; Mader, W. F.; Maenner, R.; Maeno, T.; Mättig, P.; Mättig, S.; Magrath, C. A.; Mahalalel, Y.; Mahboubi, K.; Mahout, G.; Maidantchik, C.; Maio, A.; Mair, G. M.; Mair, K.; Makida, Y.; Makowiecki, D.; Malecki, P.; Maleev, V. P.; Malek, F.; Malon, D.; Maltezos, S.; Malychev, V.; Malyukov, S.; Mambelli, M.; Mameghani, R.; Mamuzic, J.; Manabe, A.; Manara, A.; Manca, G.; Mandelli, L.; Mandić, I.; Mandl, M.; Maneira, J.; Maneira, M.; Mangeard, P. S.; Mangin-Brinet, M.; Manjavidze, I. D.; Mann, W. A.; Manolopoulos, S.; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A.; Mansoulie, B.; Manz, A.; Mapelli, A.; Mapelli, L.; March, L.; Marchand, J. F.; Marchesotti, M.; Marcisovsky, M.; Marin, A.; Marques, C. N.; Marroquim, F.; Marshall, R.; Marshall, Z.; Martens, F. K.; Garcia, S. Marti i.; Martin, A. J.; Martin, B.; Martin, B.; Martin, F. F.; Martin, J. P.; Martin, Ph; Martinez, G.; Martínez Lacambra, C.; Martinez Outschoorn, V.; Martini, A.; Martins, J.; Maruyama, T.; Marzano, F.; Mashimo, T.; Mashinistov, R.; Masik, J.; Maslennikov, A. L.; Maß, M.; Massa, I.; Massaro, G.; Massol, N.; Mathes, M.; Matheson, J.; Matricon, P.; Matsumoto, H.; Matsunaga, H.; Maugain, J. M.; Maxfield, S. J.; May, E. N.; Mayer, J. K.; Mayri, C.; Mazini, R.; Mazzanti, M.; Mazzanti, P.; Mazzoni, E.; Mazzucato, F.; McKee, S. P.; McCarthy, R. L.; McCormick, C.; McCubbin, N. A.; McDonald, J.; McFarlane, K. W.; McGarvie, S.; McGlone, H.; McLaren, R. A.; McMahon, S. J.; McMahon, T. R.; McMahon, T. J.; McPherson, R. A.; Mechtel, M.; Meder-Marouelli, D.; Medinnis, M.; Meera-Lebbai, R.; Meessen, C.; Mehdiyev, R.; Mehta, A.; Meier, K.; Meinhard, H.; Meinhardt, J.; Meirosu, C.; Meisel, F.; Melamed-Katz, A.; Mellado Garcia, B. R.; Mendes Jorge, P.; Mendez, P.; Menke, S.; Menot, C.; Meoni, E.; Merkl, D.; Merola, L.; Meroni, C.; Merritt, F. S.; Messmer, I.; Metcalfe, J.; Meuser, S.; Meyer, J.-P.; Meyer, T. C.; Meyer, W. T.; Mialkovski, V.; Michelotto, M.; Micu, L.; Middleton, R.; Miele, P.; Migliaccio, A.; Mijović, L.; Mikenberg, G.; Mikestikova, M.; Mikestikova, M.; Mikulec, B.; Mikuž, M.; Miller, D. W.; Miller, R. J.; Miller, W.; Milosavljevic, M.; Milstead, D. A.; Mima, S.; Minaenko, A. A.; Minano, M.; Minashvili, I. A.; Mincer, A. I.; Mindur, B.; Mineev, M.; Mir, L. M.; Mirabelli, G.; Miralles Verge, L.; Misawa, S.; Miscetti, S.; Misiejuk, A.; Mitra, A.; Mitrofanov, G. Y.; Mitsou, V. A.; Miyagawa, P. S.; Miyazaki, Y.; Mjörnmark, J. U.; Mkrtchyan, S.; Mladenov, D.; Moa, T.; Moch, M.; Mochizuki, A.; Mockett, P.; Modesto, P.; Moed, S.; Mönig, K.; Möser, N.; Mohn, B.; Mohr, W.; Mohrdieck-Möck, S.; Moisseev, A. M.; Moles Valls, R. M.; Molina-Perez, J.; Moll, A.; Moloney, G.; Mommsen, R.; Moneta, L.; Monnier, E.; Montarou, G.; Montesano, S.; Monticelli, F.; Moore, R. W.; Moore, T. B.; Moorhead, G. F.; Moraes, A.; Morel, J.; Moreno, A.; Moreno, D.; Morettini, P.; Morgan, D.; Morii, M.; Morin, J.; Morley, A. K.; Mornacchi, G.; Morone, M.-C.; Morozov, S. V.; Morris, E. J.; Morris, J.; Morrissey, M. C.; Moser, H. G.; Mosidze, M.; Moszczynski, A.; Mouraviev, S. V.; Mouthuy, T.; Moye, T. H.; Moyse, E. J. W.; Mueller, J.; Müller, M.; Muijs, A.; Muller, T. R.; Munar, A.; Munday, D. J.; Murakami, K.; Murillo Garcia, R.; Murray, W. J.; Myagkov, A. G.; Myska, M.; Nagai, K.; Nagai, Y.; Nagano, K.; Nagasaka, Y.; Nairz, A. M.; Naito, D.; Nakamura, K.; Nakamura, Y.; Nakano, I.; Nanava, G.; Napier, A.; Nassiakou, M.; Nasteva, I.; Nation, N. R.; Naumann, T.; Nauyock, F.; Nderitu, S. K.; Neal, H. A.; Nebot, E.; Nechaeva, P.; Neganov, A.; Negri, A.; Negroni, S.; Nelson, C.; Nemecek, S.; Nemethy, P.; Nepomuceno, A. A.; Nessi, M.; Nesterov, S. Y.; Neukermans, L.; Nevski, P.; Newcomer, F. M.; Nichols, A.; Nicholson, C.; Nicholson, R.; Nickerson, R. B.; Nicolaidou, R.; Nicoletti, G.; Nicquevert, B.; Niculescu, M.; Nielsen, J.; Niinikoski, T.; Niinimaki, M. J.; Nikitin, N.; Nikolaev, K.; Nikolic-Audit, I.; Nikolopoulos, K.; Nilsen, H.; Nilsson, B. S.; Nilsson, P.; Nisati, A.; Nisius, R.; Nodulman, L. J.; Nomachi, M.; Nomoto, H.; Noppe, J.-M.; Nordberg, M.; Norniella Francisco, O.; Norton, P. R.; Novakova, J.; Nowak, M.; Nozaki, M.; Nunes, R.; Nunes Hanninger, G.; Nunnemann, T.; Nyman, T.; O'Connor, P.; O'Neale, S. W.; O'Neil, D. C.; O'Neill, M.; O'Shea, V.; Oakham, F. G.; Oberlack, H.; Obermaier, M.; Oberson, P.; Ochi, A.; Ockenfels, W.; Odaka, S.; Odenthal, I.; Odino, G. A.; Ogren, H.; Oh, S. H.; Ohshima, T.; Ohshita, H.; Okawa, H.; Olcese, M.; Olchevski, A. G.; Oliver, C.; Oliver, J.; Olivo Gomez, M.; Olszewski, A.; Olszowska, J.; Omachi, C.; Onea, A.; Onofre, A.; Oram, C. J.; Ordonez, G.; Oreglia, M. J.; Orellana, F.; Oren, Y.; Orestano, D.; Orlov, I. O.; Orr, R. S.; Orsini, F.; Osborne, L. S.; Osculati, B.; Osuna, C.; Otec, R.; Othegraven, R.; Ottewell, B.; Ould-Saada, F.; Ouraou, A.; Ouyang, Q.; Øye, O. K.; Ozcan, V. E.; Ozone, K.; Ozturk, N.; Pacheco Pages, A.; Padhi, S.; Padilla Aranda, C.; Paganis, E.; Paige, F.; Pailler, P. M.; Pajchel, K.; Palestini, S.; Palla, J.; Pallin, D.; Palmer, M. J.; Pan, Y. B.; Panikashvili, N.; Panin, V. N.; Panitkin, S.; Pantea, D.; Panuskova, M.; Paolone, V.; Paoloni, A.; Papadopoulos, I.; Papadopoulou, T.; Park, I.; Park, W.; Parker, M. A.; Parker, S.; Parkman, C.; Parodi, F.; Parsons, J. A.; Parzefall, U.; Pasqualucci, E.; Passardi, G.; Passeri, A.; Passmore, M. S.; Pastore, F.; Pastore, Fr; Pataraia, S.; Pate, D.; Pater, J. R.; Patricelli, S.; Pauly, T.; Pauna, E.; Peak, L. S.; Peeters, S. J. M.; Peez, M.; Pei, E.; Peleganchuk, S. V.; Pellegrini, G.; Pengo, R.; Pequenao, J.; Perantoni, M.; Perazzo, A.; Pereira, A.; Perepelkin, E.; Perera, V. J. O.; Perez Codina, E.; Perez Reale, V.; Peric, I.; Perini, L.; Pernegger, H.; Perrin, E.; Perrino, R.; Perrodo, P.; Perrot, G.; Perus, P.; Peshekhonov, V. D.; Petereit, E.; Petersen, J.; Petersen, T. C.; Petit, P. J. F.; Petridou, C.; Petrolo, E.; Petrucci, F.; Petti, R.; Pezzetti, M.; Pfeifer, B.; Phan, A.; Phillips, A. W.; Phillips, P. W.; Piacquadio, G.; Piccinini, M.; Pickford, A.; Piegaia, R.; Pier, S.; Pilcher, J. E.; Pilkington, A. D.; Pimenta Dos Santos, M. A.; Pina, J.; Pinfold, J. L.; Ping, J.; Pinhão, J.; Pinto, B.; Pirotte, O.; Placakyte, R.; Placci, A.; Plamondon, M.; Plano, W. G.; Pleier, M.-A.; Pleskach, A. V.; Podkladkin, S.; Podlyski, F.; Poffenberger, P.; Poggioli, L.; Pohl, M.; Polak, I.; Polesello, G.; Policicchio, A.; Polini, A.; Polychronakos, V.; Pomarede, D. M.; Pommès, K.; Ponsot, P.; Pontecorvo, L.; Pope, B. G.; Popescu, R.; Popovic, D. S.; Poppleton, A.; Popule, J.; Portell Bueso, X.; Posch, C.; Pospelov, G. E.; Pospichal, P.; Pospisil, S.; Postranecky, M.; Potrap, I. N.; Potter, C. J.; Poulard, G.; Pousada, A.; Poveda, J.; Prabhu, R.; Pralavorio, P.; Prasad, S.; Prast, J.; Prat, S.; Prata, M.; Pravahan, R.; Preda, T.; Pretzl, K.; Pribyl, L.; Price, D.; Price, L. E.; Price, M. J.; Prichard, P. M.; Prieur, D.; Primavera, M.; Primor, D.; Prokofiev, K.; Prosso, E.; Proudfoot, J.; Przysiezniak, H.; Puigdengoles, C.; Purdham, J.; Purohit, M.; Puzo, P.; Pylaev, A. N.; Pylypchenko, Y.; Qi, M.; Qian, J.; Qian, W.; Qian, Z.; Qing, D.; Quadt, A.; Quarrie, D. R.; Quayle, W. B.; Rabbers, J. J.; Radeka, V.; Rafi, J. M.; Ragusa, F.; Rahimi, A. M.; Rahm, D.; Raine, C.; Raith, B.; Rajagopalan, S.; Rajek, S.; Rammer, H.; Ramstedt, M.; Rangod, S.; Ratoff, P. N.; Raufer, T.; Rauscher, F.; Rauter, E.; Raymond, M.; Reads, A. L.; Rebuzzi, D.; Redlinger, G. R.; Reeves, K.; Rehak, M.; Reichold, A.; Reinherz-Aronis, E.; Reisinger, I.; Reljic, D.; Rembser, C.; Ren, Z.; Renaudin-Crepe, S. R. C.; Renkel, P.; Rensch, B.; Rescia, S.; Rescigno, M.; Resconi, S.; Resende, B.; Rewiersma, P.; Rey, J.; Rey-Campagnolle, M.; Rezaie, E.; Reznicek, P.; Richards, R. A.; Richer, J.-P.; Richter, R. H.; Richter, R.; Richter-Was, E.; Ridel, M.; Riegler, W.; Rieke, S.; Rijpstra, M.; Rijssenbeek, M.; Rimoldi, A.; Rios, R. R.; Riu Dachs, I.; Rivline, M.; Rivoltella, G.; Rizatdinova, F.; Robertson, S. H.; Robichaud-Veronneau, A.; Robins, S.; Robinson, D.; Robson, A.; Rochford, J. H.; Roda, C.; Rodier, S.; Roe, S.; Røhne, O.; Rohrbach, F.; Roldán, J.; Rolli, S.; Romance, J. B.; Romaniouk, A.; Romanov, V. M.; Romeo, G.; Roos, L.; Ros, E.; Rosati, S.; Rosenbaum, F.; Rosenbaum, G. A.; Rosenberg, E. I.; Rosselet, L.; Rossi, L. P.; Rossi, L.; Rotaru, M.; Rothberg, J.; Rottländer, I.; Rousseau, D.; Rozanov, A.; Rozen, Y.; Ruber, R.; Ruckert, B.; Rudolph, G.; Rühr, F.; Ruggieri, F.; Ruggiero, G.; Ruiz, H.; Ruiz-Martinez, A.; Rulikowska-Zarebska, E.; Rumiantsev, V.; Rumyantsev, L.; Runge, K.; Runolfsson, O.; Rusakovich, N. A.; Rust, D. R.; Rutherfoord, J. P.; Ruwiedel, C.; Ryabov, Y. F.; Ryadovikov, V.; Ryan, P.; Rybkine, G.; da Costa, J. Sá; Saavedra, A. F.; Saboumazrag, S.; F-W Sadrozinski, H.; Sadykov, R.; Sakamoto, H.; Sala, P.; Salamon, A.; Saleem, M.; Salihagic, D.; Salt, J.; Saltó Bauza, O.; Salvachúa Ferrando, B. M.; Salvatore, D.; Salzburger, A.; Sampsonidis, D.; Samset, B. H.; Sánchez Sánchez, C. A.; Sanchis Lozano, M. A.; Sanchis Peris, E.; Sandaker, H.; Sander, H. G.; Sandhoff, M.; Sandvoss, S.; Sankey, D. P. C.; Sanny, B.; Sansone, S.; Sansoni, A.; Santamarina Rios, C.; Santander, J.; Santi, L.; Santoni, C.; Santonico, R.; Santos, J.; Sapinski, M.; Saraiva, J. G.; Sarri, F.; Sasaki, O.; Sasaki, T.; Sasao, N.; Satsounkevitch, I.; Sauvage, D.; Sauvage, G.; Savard, P.; Savine, A. Y.; Savinov, V.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Savva, P.; Saxon, D. H.; Says, L. P.; Sbarra, C.; Sbrissa, E.; Sbrizzi, A.; Scannicchio, D. A.; Schaarschmidt, J.; Schacht, P.; Schäfer, U.; Schaffer, A. C.; Schaile, D.; Schaller, M.; Schamov, A. G.; Schegelsky, V. A.; Scheirich, D.; Schernau, M.; Scherzer, M. I.; Schiavi, C.; Schick, H.; Schieck, J.; Schieferdecker, P.; Schioppa, M.; Schlager, G.; Schlenker, S.; Schlereth, J. L.; Schmid, P.; Schmidt, M. P.; Schmitt, C.; Schmitt, K.; Schmitz, M.; Schmücker, H.; Schoerner, T.; Scholte, R. C.; Schott, M.; Schouten, D.; Schram, M.; Schricker, A.; Schroff, D.; Schuh, S.; Schuijlenburg, H. W.; Schuler, G.; Schultes, J.; Schultz-Coulon, H.-C.; Schumacher, J.; Schumacher, M.; Schune, Ph; Schwartzman, A.; Schweiger, D.; Schwemling, Ph; Schwick, C.; Schwienhorst, R.; Schwierz, R.; Schwindling, J.; Scott, W. G.; Secker, H.; Sedykh, E.; Seguin-Moreau, N.; Segura, E.; Seidel, S. C.; Seiden, A.; Seixas, J. M.; Sekhniaidze, G.; Seliverstov, D. M.; Selldén, B.; Seman, M.; Semprini-Cesari, N.; Serfon, C.; Serin, L.; Seuster, R.; Severini, H.; Sevior, M. E.; Sexton, K. A.; Sfyrla, A.; Shah, T. P.; Shan, L.; Shank, J. T.; Shapiro, M.; Shatalov, P. B.; Shaver, L.; Shaw, C.; Shears, T. G.; Sherwood, P.; Shibata, A.; Shield, P.; Shilov, S.; Shimojima, M.; Shin, T.; Shiyakova, M.; Shmeleva, A.; Shoa, M.; Shochet, M. J.; Shupe, M. A.; Sicho, P.; Sidoti, A.; Siebel, A.; Siebel, M.; Siegrist, J.; Sijacki, D.; Silva, J.; Silverstein, S. B.; Simak, V.; Simic, Lj; Simion, S.; Simmons, B.; Simonyan, M.; Sinervo, P.; Sipica, V.; Siragusa, G.; Sisakyan, A. N.; Sivoklokov, S.; Sjölin, J.; Skubic, P.; Skvorodnev, N.; Slattery, P.; Slavicek, T.; Sliwa, K.; Sloan, T. J.; Sloper, J.; Smakhtin, V.; Small, A.; Smirnov, S. Yu; Smirnov, Y.; Smirnova, L.; Smirnova, O.; Smith, N. A.; Smith, B. C.; Smith, D. S.; Smith, J.; Smith, K. M.; Smith, B.; Smizanska, M.; Smolek, K.; Snesarev, A. A.; Snow, S. W.; Snow, J.; Snuverink, J.; Snyder, S.; Soares, M.; Soares, S.; Sobie, R.; Sodomka, J.; Söderberg, M.; Soffer, A.; Solans, C. A.; Solar, M.; Sole, D.; Solfaroli Camillocci, E.; Solodkov, A. A.; Solov'yanov, O. V.; Soloviev, I.; Soluk, R.; Sondericker, J.; Sopko, V.; Sopko, B.; Sorbi, M.; Soret Medel, J.; Sosebee, M.; Sosnovtsev, V. V.; Sospedra Suay, L.; Soukharev, A.; Soukup, J.; Spagnolo, S.; Spano, F.; Speckmayer, P.; Spegel, M.; Spencer, E.; Spighi, R.; Spigo, G.; Spila, F.; Spiriti, E.; Spiwoks, R.; Spogli, L.; Spousta, M.; Sprachmann, G.; Spurlock, B.; St. Denis, R. D.; Stahl, T.; Staley, R. J.; Stamen, R.; Stancu, S. N.; Stanecka, E.; Stanek, R. W.; Stanescu, C.; Stapnes, S.; Starchenko, E. A.; Staroba, P.; Stastny, J.; Staude, A.; Stavina, P.; Stavrianakou, M.; Stavropoulos, G.; Stefanidis, E.; Steffens, J. L.; Stekl, I.; Stelzer, H. J.; Stenzel, H.; Stewart, G.; Stewart, T. D.; Stiller, W.; Stockmanns, T.; Stodulski, M.; Stonjek, S.; Stradling, A.; Straessner, A.; Strandberg, J.; Strandlie, A.; Strauss, M.; Strickland, V.; Striegel, D.; Strizenec, P.; Ströhmer, R.; Strom, D. M.; Strong, J. A.; Stroynowski, R.; Stugu, B.; Stumer, I.; Su, D.; Subramania, S.; Suchkov, S. I.; Sugaya, Y.; Sugimoto, T.; Suk, M.; Sulin, V. V.; Sultanov, S.; Sun, Z.; Sundal, B.; Sushkov, S.; Susinno, G.; Sutcliffe, P.; Sutton, M. R.; Sviridov, Yu M.; Sykora, I.; Szczygiel, R. R.; Szeless, B.; Szymocha, T.; Sánchez, J.; Ta, D.; Taboada Gameiro, S.; Tadel, M.; Tafirout, R.; Taga, A.; Takai, H.; Takashima, R.; Takeda, H.; Takeshita, T.; Talby, M.; Talyshev, A.; Tamsett, M. C.; Tanaka, J.; Tanaka, K.; Tanaka, R.; Tanaka, S.; Tanaka, S.; Tanaka, Y.; Tappern, G. P.; Tapprogge, S.; Tarem, S.; Tarrade, F.; Tarrant, J.; Tartarelli, G.; Tas, P.; Tasevsky, M.; Tayalati, Y.; Taylor, F. E.; Taylor, G.; Taylor, G. N.; Taylor, R. P.; Tcherniatine, V.; Tegenfeldt, F.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Ten Kate, H.; Teng, P. K.; Ter-Antonyan, R.; Terada, S.; Terron, J.; Terwort, M.; Teuscher, R. J.; Tevlin, C. M.; Thadome, J.; Thion, J.; Thioye, M.; Thomas, A.; Thomas, J. P.; Thomas, T. L.; Thomas, E.; Thompson, R. J.; Thompson, A. S.; Thun, R. P.; Tic, T.; Tikhomirov, V. O.; Tikhonov, Y. A.; Timm, S.; Timmermans, C. J. W. P.; Tipton, P.; Tique Aires Viegas, F. J.; Tisserant, S.; Titov, M.; Tobias, J.; Tocut, V. M.; Toczek, B.; Todorova-Nova, S.; Tojo, J.; Tokár, S.; Tokushuku, K.; Tomasek, L.; Tomasek, M.; Tomasz, F.; Tomoto, M.; Tompkins, D.; Tompkins, L.; Toms, K.; Tonazzo, A.; Tong, G.; Tonoyan, A.; Topfel, C.; Topilin, N. D.; Torrence, E.; Torres Pais, J. G.; Toth, J.; Touchard, F.; Tovey, D. R.; Tovey, S. N.; Towndrow, E. F.; Trefzger, T.; Treichel, M.; Treis, J.; Tremblet, L.; Tribanek, W.; Tricoli, A.; Trigger, I. M.; Trilling, G.; Trincaz-Duvoid, S.; Tripiana, M. F.; Trischuk, W.; Trka, Z.; Trocmé, B.; Troncon, C.; C-L Tseng, J.; Tsiafis, I.; Tsiareshka, P. V.; Tsipolitis, G.; Tskhadadze, E. G.; Tsukerman, I. I.; Tsulaia, V.; Tsuno, S.; Turala, M.; Turk Cakir, I.; Turlay, E.; Tuts, P. M.; Twomey, M. S.; Tyndel, M.; Typaldos, D.; Tyrvainen, H.; Tzamarioudaki, E.; Tzanakos, G.; Ueda, I.; Uhrmacher, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Ullán Comes, M.; Unal, G.; Underwood, D. G.; Undrus, A.; Unel, G.; Unno, Y.; Urkovsky, E.; Usai, G.; Usov, Y.; Vacavant, L.; Vacek, V.; Vachon, B.; Vahsen, S.; Valderanis, C.; Valenta, J.; Valente, P.; Valero, A.; Valkar, S.; Valls Ferrer, J. A.; Van der Bij, H.; van der Graaf, H.; van der Kraaij, E.; Van Eijk, B.; van Eldik, N.; van Gemmeren, P.; van Kesteren, Z.; van Vulpen, I.; Van Berg, R.; Vandelli, W.; Vandoni, G.; Vaniachine, A.; Vannucci, F.; Varanda, M.; Varela Rodriguez, F.; Vari, R.; Varnes, E. W.; Varouchas, D.; Vartapetian, A.; Varvell, K. E.; Vassilakopoulos, V. I.; Vassilieva, L.; Vataga, E.; Vaz, L.; Vazeille, F.; Vedrine, P.; Vegni, G.; Veillet, J. J.; Vellidis, C.; Veloso, F.; Veness, R.; Veneziano, S.; Ventura, A.; Ventura, S.; Vercesi, V.; Verducci, M.; Verkerke, W.; Vermeulen, J. C.; Vertogardov, L.; Vetterli, M. C.; Vichou, I.; Vickey, T.; Viehhauser, G. H. A.; Vigeolas, E.; Villa, M.; Villani, E. G.; Villate, J.; Villella, I.; Vilucchi, E.; Vincent, P.; Vincke, H.; Vincter, M. G.; Vinogradov, V. B.; Virchaux, M.; Viret, S.; Virzi, J.; Vitale, A.; Vivarelli, I.; Vives, R.; Vives Vaques, F.; Vlachos, S.; Vogt, H.; Vokac, P.; Vollmer, C. F.; Volpi, M.; Volpini, G.; von Boehn-Buchholz, R.; von der Schmitt, H.; von Toerne, E.; Vorobel, V.; Vorobiev, A. P.; Vorozhtsov, A. S.; Vorozhtsov, S. B.; Vos, M.; Voss, K. C.; Voss, R.; Vossebeld, J. H.; Vovenko, A. S.; Vranjes, N.; Vrba, V.; Vreeswijk, M.; Anh, T. Vu; Vuaridel, B.; Vudragovic, M.; Vuillemin, V.; Vuillermet, R.; Wänanen, A.; Wahlen, H.; Walbersloh, J.; Walker, R.; Walkowiak, W.; Wall, R.; Wallny, R. S.; Walsh, S.; Wang, C.; Wang, J. C.; Wappler, F.; Warburton, A.; Ward, C. P.; Warner, G. P.; Warren, M.; Warsinsky, M.; Wastie, R.; Watkins, P. M.; Watson, A. T.; Watts, G.; Waugh, A. T.; Waugh, B. M.; Weaverdyck, C.; Webel, M.; Weber, G.; Weber, J.; Weber, M.; Weber, P.; Weidberg, A. R.; Weilhammer, P. M.; Weingarten, J.; Weiser, C.; Wellenstein, H.; Wellisch, H. P.; Wells, P. S.; Wemans, A.; Wen, M.; Wenaus, T.; Wendler, S.; Wengler, T.; Wenig, S.; Wermes, N.; Werneke, P.; Werner, P.; Werthenbach, U.; Wheeler-Ellis, S. J.; Whitaker, S. P.; White, A.; White, M. J.; White, S.; Whittington, D.; Wicek, F.; Wicke, D.; Wickens, F. J.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wielers, M.; Wienemann, P.; Wiesmann, M.; Wiesmann, M.; Wijnen, T.; Wildauer, A.; Wilhelm, I.; Wilkens, H. G.; Williams, H. H.; Willis, W.; Willocq, S.; Wilmut, I.; Wilson, J. A.; Wilson, A.; Wingerter-Seez, I.; Winton, L.; Witzeling, W.; Wlodek, T.; Woehrling, E.; Wolter, M. W.; Wolters, H.; Wosiek, B.; Wotschack, J.; Woudstra, M. J.; Wright, C.; Wu, S. L.; Wu, X.; Wuestenfeld, J.; Wunstorf, R.; Xella-Hansen, S.; Xiang, A.; Xie, S.; Xie, Y.; Xu, G.; Xu, N.; Yamamoto, A.; Yamamoto, S.; Yamaoka, H.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yan, Z.; Yang, H.; Yang, J. C.; Yang, S.; Yang, U. K.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Z.; Yao, W.-M.; Yao, Y.; Yarradoddi, K.; Yasu, Y.; Ye, J.; Yilmaz, M.; Yoosoofmiya, R.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, H.; Yoshida, R.; Young, C.; Youssef, S. P.; Yu, D.; Yu, J.; Yu, M.; Yu, X.; Yuan, J.; Yurkewicz, A.; Zaets, V. G.; Zaidan, R.; Zaitsev, A. M.; Zajac, J.; Zajacova, Z.; Zalite, A. Yu; Zalite, Yo K.; Zanello, L.; Zarzhitsky, P.; Zaytsev, A.; Zdrazil, M.; Zeitnitz, C.; Zeller, M.; Zema, P. F.; Zendler, C.; Zenin, A. V.; Zenis, T.; Zenonos, Z.; Zenz, S.; Zerwas, D.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, J.; Zheng, W.; Zhang, X.; Zhao, L.; Zhao, T.; Zhao, X.; Zhao, Z.; Zhelezko, A.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zheng, S.; Zhichao, L.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, N.; Zhou, S.; Zhou, Y.; Zhu, C. G.; Zhu, H. Z.; Zhuang, X. A.; Zhuravlov, V.; Zilka, B.; Zimin, N. I.; Zimmermann, S.; Ziolkowski, M.; Zitoun, R.; Zivkovic, L.; Zmouchko, V. V.; Zobernig, G.; Zoccoli, A.; Zoeller, M. M.; Zolnierowski, Y.; Zsenei, A.; zur Nedden, M.; Zychacek, V.

    2008-08-01

    The ATLAS detector as installed in its experimental cavern at point 1 at CERN is described in this paper. A brief overview of the expected performance of the detector when the Large Hadron Collider begins operation is also presented.

  16. Intriguing aspects of strangeness production at CERN energies

    SciTech Connect

    Odyniec, G.

    1996-07-01

    Strange particle production in pp, pA and AA collisions at CERN SPS energies is reviewed. First results from Pb beam experiments are briefly presented. The emerging picture (still incomplete) is discussed.

  17. CERN and 60 years of science for peace

    SciTech Connect

    Heuer, Rolf-Dieter

    2015-02-24

    This paper presents CERN as it celebrates its 60{sup th} Anniversary since its founding. The presentation first discusses the mission of CERN and its role as an inter-governmental Organization. The paper also reviews aspects of the particle physics research programme, looking at both current and future accelerator-based facilities at the high-energy and intensity frontiers. Finally, the paper considers issues beyond fundamental research, such as capacity-building and the interface between Art and Science.

  18. HIGH ENERGY PHYSICS: Bulgarians Sue CERN for Leniency.

    PubMed

    Koenig, R

    2000-10-13

    In cash-strapped Bulgaria, scientists are wondering whether a ticket for a front-row seat in high-energy physics is worth the price: Membership dues in CERN, the European particle physics lab, nearly equal the country's entire budget for competitive research grants. Faced with that grim statistic and a plea for leniency from Bulgaria's government, CERN's governing council is considering slashing the country's membership dues for the next 2 years.

  19. Prospects for observation at CERN in NA62

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahn, F.; NA62 Collaboration; Aglieri Rinella, G.; Aliberti, R.; Ambrosino, F.; Angelucci, B.; Antonelli, A.; Anzivino, G.; Arcidiacono, R.; Azhinenko, I.; Balev, S.; Bendotti, J.; Biagioni, A.; Biino, C.; Bizzeti, A.; Blazek, T.; Blik, A.; Bloch-Devaux, B.; Bolotov, V.; Bonaiuto, V.; Bragadireanu, M.; Britton, D.; Britvich, G.; Brook, N.; Bucci, F.; Butin, F.; Capitolo, E.; Capoccia, C.; Capussela, T.; Carassiti, V.; Cartiglia, N.; Cassese, A.; Catinaccio, A.; Cecchetti, A.; Ceccucci, A.; Cenci, P.; Cerny, V.; Cerri, C.; Chikilev, O.; Ciaranfi, R.; Collazuol, G.; Cooke, P.; Cooper, P.; Corradi, G.; Cortina Gil, E.; Costantini, F.; Cotta Ramusino, A.; Coward, D.; D'Agostini, G.; Dainton, J.; Dalpiaz, P.; Danielsson, H.; Degrange, J.; De Simone, N.; Di Filippo, D.; Di Lella, L.; Dixon, N.; Doble, N.; Duk, V.; Elsha, V.; Engelfried, J.; Enik, T.; Falaleev, V.; Fantechi, R.; Federici, L.; Fiorini, M.; Fry, J.; Fucci, A.; Fulton, L.; Gallorini, S.; Gatignon, L.; Gianoli, A.; Giudici, S.; Glonti, L.; Goncalves Martins, A.; Gonnella, F.; Goudzovski, E.; Guida, R.; Gushchin, E.; Hahn, F.; Hallgren, B.; Heath, H.; Herman, F.; Hutchcroft, D.; Iacopini, E.; Jamet, O.; Jarron, P.; Kampf, K.; Kaplon, J.; Karjavin, V.; Kekelidze, V.; Kholodenko, S.; Khoriauli, G.; Khudyakov, A.; Kiryushin, Yu; Kleinknecht, K.; Kluge, A.; Koval, M.; Kozhuharov, V.; Krivda, M.; Kudenko, Y.; Kunze, J.; Lamanna, G.; Lazzeroni, C.; Leitner, R.; Lenci, R.; Lenti, M.; Leonardi, E.; Lichard, P.; Lietava, R.; Litov, L.; Lomidze, D.; Lonardo, A.; Lurkin, N.; Madigozhin, D.; Maire, G.; Makarov, A.; Mannelli, I.; Mannocchi, G.; Mapelli, A.; Marchetto, F.; Massarotti, P.; Massri, K.; Matak, P.; Mazza, G.; Menichetti, E.; Mirra, M.; Misheva, M.; Molokanova, N.; Morant, J.; Morel, M.; Moulson, M.; Movchan, S.; Munday, D.; Napolitano, M.; Newson, F.; Norton, A.; Noy, M.; Nuessle, G.; Obraztsov, V.; Padolski, S.; Page, R.; Palladino, V.; Pardons, A.; Pedreschi, E.; Pepe, M.; Perez Gomez, F.; Perrin-Terrin, M.; Petrov, P.; Petrucci, F.; Piandani, R.; Piccini, M.; Pietreanu, D.; Pinzino, J.; Pivanti, M.; Polenkevich, I.; Popov, I.; Potrebenikov, Yu; Protopopescu, D.; Raffaelli, F.; Raggi, M.; Riedler, P.; Romano, A.; Rubin, P.; Ruggiero, G.; Russo, V.; Ryjov, V.; Salamon, A.; Salina, G.; Samsonov, V.; Santovetti, E.; Saracino, G.; Sargeni, F.; Schifano, S.; Semenov, V.; Sergi, A.; Serra, M.; Shkarovskiy, S.; Sotnikov, A.; Sougonyaev, V.; Sozzi, M.; Spadaro, T.; Spinella, F.; Staley, R.; Statera, M.; Sutcliffe, P.; Szilasi, N.; Tagnani, D.; Valdata-Nappi, M.; Valente, P.; Vasile, M.; Vassilieva, V.; Velghe, B.; Veltri, M.; Venditti, S.; Vormstein, M.; Wahl, H.; Wanke, R.; Wertelaers, P.; Winhart, A.; Winston, R.; Wrona, B.; Yushchenko, O.; Zamkovsky, M.; Zinchenko, A.

    2015-07-01

    The rare decays are excellent processes to probe the Standard Model and indirectly search for new physics complementary to the direct LHC searches. The NA62 experiment at CERN SPS aims to collect and analyse O(1013) kaon decays before the CERN long-shutdown 2 (in 2018). This will allow to measure the branching ratio to a level of 10% accuracy. The experimental apparatus has been commissioned during a first run in autumn 2014.

  20. Heart Failure Readmission Reduction.

    PubMed

    Drozda, Joseph P; Smith, Donna A; Freiman, Paul C; Pursley, Janet; VanSlette, Jeffrey A; Smith, Timothy R

    Little is known regarding effectiveness of readmission reduction programs over time. The Heart Failure Management Program (HFMP) of St. John's Physician Group Practice (PGP) Demonstration provided an opportunity to assess outcomes over an extended period. Data from an electronic health record, an inpatient database, a disease registry, and the Social Security Death Master File were analyzed for patients admitted with heart failure (HF) for 5 years before (Period 1) and 5 years after (Period 2) inception of PGP. HF admissions decreased (Period 1, 58.3/month; Period 2, 52.4/month, P = .007). Thirty-day all-cause readmission rate dropped from Period 1 (annual average 18.8% [668/3545]) to year 1 of Period 2 (16.9% [136/804], P = .04) and remained stable thereafter (annual average 16.8% [589/3503]). Thirty-day mortality rate was flat throughout. HFMP was associated with decreased readmissions, primarily related to outpatient case management, while mortality remained stable.

  1. Management of advanced heart failure.

    PubMed

    Van Bakel, Adrian B; Chidsey, Geoffrey

    2002-01-01

    Congestive heart failure (CHF) due to progressive systolic dysfunction has become a modern-day epidemic. Despite the increased incidence and prevalence, significant progress has been made in the past 10 to 15 years in the treatment of CHF at all stages. The current outlook for patients with newly diagnosed, mild heart failure is encouraging. It should be noted, however, that most of the morbidity and health care expenditure is incurred by a minority of patients diagnosed with CHF who are in the advanced stages of their disease. The thrust of this article will be to provide practical advice beyond current guidelines on the management of advanced CHF.

  2. Right heart ventriculography

    MedlinePlus

    Angiography - right heart ... moved forward into the right side of the heart. As the catheter is advanced, the doctor can ... is injected into the right side of the heart. It helps the cardiologist determine the size and ...

  3. Left heart catheterization

    MedlinePlus

    Catheterization - left heart ... to help guide the catheters up into your heart and arteries. Dye (sometimes called "contrast") will be ... in the blood vessels that lead to your heart. The catheter is then moved through the aortic ...

  4. Heart disease and women

    MedlinePlus

    ... disease: a report of the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association Task Force on Practice Guidelines, ... the American Heart Association and American College of Cardiology Foundation endorsed by the World Heart Federation and ...

  5. Honolulu Heart Program

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-13

    Cardiovascular Diseases; Coronary Disease; Cerebrovascular Accident; Heart Diseases; Heart Failure, Congestive; Myocardial Infarction; Asthma; Emphysema; Lung Diseases, Obstructive; Aortic Aneurysm, Abdominal; Bronchitis; Dementia; Hypertension; Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease; Heart Failure

  6. Heart Attack Recovery FAQs

    MedlinePlus

    ... Peripheral Artery Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Heart Attack Recovery FAQs Updated:Sep 19,2016 Most people ... recovery. View an animation of a heart attack . Heart Attack Recovery Questions and Answers What treatments will I ...

  7. Heart Surgery Terms

    MedlinePlus

    ... the hearts of humans who have died (cadavers). Angina pectoris The discomfort experienced by individuals when their heart ... performed during symptoms suggestive of coronary artery disease angina pectoris , abnormalities may confirm the diagnosis of ischemic heart ...

  8. Heart disease and depression

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/ency/patientinstructions/000790.htm Heart disease and depression To use the sharing features on this page, ... a heart attack or heart surgery Signs of Depression It is pretty common to feel down or ...

  9. Getting a New Heart

    MedlinePlus

    ... About Heart Transplants American Society of Transplantation 1120 Route 73, Suite 200 Mount Laurel, NJ 08054 Phone: ... of heart disease; these patients have no other choice. The best treatment for your heart failure will ...

  10. Scale out databases for CERN use cases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baranowski, Zbigniew; Grzybek, Maciej; Canali, Luca; Lanza Garcia, Daniel; Surdy, Kacper

    2015-12-01

    Data generation rates are expected to grow very fast for some database workloads going into LHC run 2 and beyond. In particular this is expected for data coming from controls, logging and monitoring systems. Storing, administering and accessing big data sets in a relational database system can quickly become a very hard technical challenge, as the size of the active data set and the number of concurrent users increase. Scale-out database technologies are a rapidly developing set of solutions for deploying and managing very large data warehouses on commodity hardware and with open source software. In this paper we will describe the architecture and tests on database systems based on Hadoop and the Cloudera Impala engine. We will discuss the results of our tests, including tests of data loading and integration with existing data sources and in particular with relational databases. We will report on query performance tests done with various data sets of interest at CERN, notably data from the accelerator log database.

  11. Nuclear orientation at isolde/cern

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlösser, K.; Berkes, I.; Hagn, E.; Herzog, P.; Niinikoski, T.; Postma, H.; Richard-Serre, C.; Rikovska, J.; Stone, N. J.; Vanneste, L.; Zech, E.

    1988-12-01

    A facility for Nuclear Implantation into Cold On-Line Equipment (NICOLE) is being installed at the new on-line isotope separator ISOLDE 3 at CERN. The first on-line run was in the beginning of July 1988. The low temperature equipment has been successfully tested and first off-line experiments on various isotopes have been performed. NMR/ON has been done on vaious isotopes (Co, Xe, Pt, Au) in iron host. First experience with the top-loading dilution refrigertor (Oxford Instruments Limited) shows that it performs very well. The cooling power is 400 μW at 100 mK and 34 μW at 25 mK. The base temperature can be kept continuously well below 5 mK. NMR/ON can be performed at temperatures below 5.5 mK. The base temperature on-line is expected to be lower then 6 mK. The sample can be cooled down from room temperature to 10 mK within two hours, to 6 mK within 3 hours which is not only important for off-line but also for on-line experiments when samples have to be changed to remove long lived daughter activity. The latest results will be reported.

  12. The SHiP project at CERN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Lellis, G.; SHiP Collaboration

    2016-07-01

    The discovery of the Higgs boson has fully confirmed the Standard Model of particles and fields. Nevertheless, there are still fundamental phenomena, like the existence of dark matter and the baryon asymmetry, which deserve an explanation that could come from the discovery of new particles. Searches for new physics with accelerators are performed at the LHC, looking for high massive particles coupled to matter with ordinary strength. A new experimental facility at CERN meant to search for very weakly coupled particles in the few GeV mass domain has been recently proposed. The existence of such particles, foreseen in different theoretical models beyond the Standard Model, is largely unexplored. A beam dump facility using 400 GeV protons is a copious factory of charmed hadrons and could be used to probe the existence of such particles. The beam dump is also a copious source of neutrinos and in particular it is an ideal source of tau neutrinos, the less known particle in the Standard Model. Indeed, tau anti-neutrinos have not been directly observed so far. We report the physics potential of such an experiment. Resistive Plate Chambers could play a role in the SHiP detector.

  13. Continue Service Improvement at CERN Computing Centre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barroso Lopez, M.; Everaerts, L.; Meinhard, H.; Baehler, P.; Haimyr, N.; Guijarro, J. M.

    2014-06-01

    Using the framework of ITIL best practises, the service managers within CERN-IT have engaged into a continuous improvement process, mainly focusing on service operation. This implies an explicit effort to understand and improve all service management aspects in order to increase efficiency and effectiveness. We will present the requirements, how they were addressed and share our experiences. We will describe how we measure, report and use the data to continually improve both the processes and the services being provided. The focus is not the tool or the process, but the results of the continuous improvement effort from a large team of IT experts providing services to thousands of users, supported by the tool and its local team. This is not an initiative to address user concerns in the way the services are managed but rather an on-going working habit of continually reviewing, analysing and improving the service management processes and the services themselves, having in mind the currently agreed service levels and whose results also improve the experience of the users about the current services.

  14. The CMS experiment at the CERN LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    CMS Collaboration; Chatrchyan, S.; Hmayakyan, G.; Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Adam, W.; Bauer, T.; Bergauer, T.; Bergauer, H.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Friedl, M.; Frühwirth, R.; Ghete, V. M.; Glaser, P.; Hartl, C.; Hoermann, N.; Hrubec, J.; Hänsel, S.; Jeitler, M.; Kastner, K.; Krammer, M.; Magrans de Abril, I.; Markytan, M.; Mikulec, I.; Neuherz, B.; Nöbauer, T.; Oberegger, M.; Padrta, M.; Pernicka, M.; Porth, P.; Rohringer, H.; Schmid, S.; Schreiner, T.; Stark, R.; Steininger, H.; Strauss, J.; Taurok, A.; Uhl, D.; Waltenberger, W.; Walzel, G.; Widl, E.; Wulz, C.-E.; Petrov, V.; Prosolovich, V.; Chekhovsky, V.; Dvornikov, O.; Emeliantchik, I.; Litomin, A.; Makarenko, V.; Marfin, I.; Mossolov, V.; Shumeiko, N.; Solin, A.; Stefanovitch, R.; Suarez Gonzalez, J.; Tikhonov, A.; Fedorov, A.; Korzhik, M.; Missevitch, O.; Zuyeuski, R.; Beaumont, W.; Cardaci, M.; DeLanghe, E.; DeWolf, E. A.; Delmeire, E.; Ochesanu, S.; Tasevsky, M.; Van Mechelen, P.; D'Hondt, J.; DeWeirdt, S.; Devroede, O.; Goorens, R.; Hannaert, S.; Heyninck, J.; Maes, J.; Mozer, M. U.; Tavernier, S.; Van Doninck, W.; Van Lancker, L.; Van Mulders, P.; Villella, I.; Wastiels, C.; Yu, C.; Bouhali, O.; Charaf, O.; Clerbaux, B.; DeHarenne, P.; DeLentdecker, G.; Dewulf, J. P.; Elgammal, S.; Gindroz, R.; Hammad, G. H.; Mahmoud, T.; Neukermans, L.; Pins, M.; Pins, R.; Rugovac, S.; Stefanescu, J.; Sundararajan, V.; Vander Velde, C.; Vanlaer, P.; Wickens, J.; Tytgat, M.; Assouak, S.; Bonnet, J. L.; Bruno, G.; Caudron, J.; DeCallatay, B.; DeFavereau DeJeneret, J.; DeVisscher, S.; Demin, P.; Favart, D.; Felix, C.; Florins, B.; Forton, E.; Giammanco, A.; Grégoire, G.; Jonckman, M.; Kcira, D.; Keutgen, T.; Lemaitre, V.; Michotte, D.; Militaru, O.; Ovyn, S.; Pierzchala, T.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Roberfroid, V.; Rouby, X.; Schul, N.; Van der Aa, O.; Beliy, N.; Daubie, E.; Herquet, P.; Alves, G.; Pol, M. E.; Souza, M. H. G.; Vaz, M.; DeJesus Damiao, D.; Oguri, V.; Santoro, A.; Sznajder, A.; DeMoraes Gregores, E.; Iope, R. L.; Novaes, S. F.; Tomei, T.; Anguelov, T.; Antchev, G.; Atanasov, I.; Damgov, J.; Darmenov, N.; Dimitrov, L.; Genchev, V.; Iaydjiev, P.; Marinov, A.; Piperov, S.; Stoykova, S.; Sultanov, G.; Trayanov, R.; Vankov, I.; Cheshkov, C.; Dimitrov, A.; Dyulendarova, M.; Glushkov, I.; Kozhuharov, V.; Litov, L.; Makariev, M.; Marinova, E.; Markov, S.; Mateev, M.; Nasteva, I.; Pavlov, B.; Petev, P.; Petkov, P.; Spassov, V.; Toteva, Z.; Velev, V.; Verguilov, V.; Bian, J. G.; Chen, G. M.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, M.; Jiang, C. H.; Liu, B.; Shen, X. Y.; Sun, H. S.; Tao, J.; Wang, J.; Yang, M.; Zhang, Z.; Zhao, W. R.; Zhuang, H. L.; Ban, Y.; Cai, J.; Ge, Y. C.; Liu, S.; Liu, H. T.; Liu, L.; Qian, S. J.; Wang, Q.; Xue, Z. H.; Yang, Z. C.; Ye, Y. L.; Ying, J.; Li, P. J.; Liao, J.; Xue, Z. L.; Yan, D. S.; Yuan, H.; Carrillo Montoya, C. A.; Sanabria, J. C.; Godinovic, N.; Puljak, I.; Soric, I.; Antunovic, Z.; Dzelalija, M.; Marasovic, K.; Brigljevic, V.; Kadija, K.; Morovic, S.; Fereos, R.; Nicolaou, C.; Papadakis, A.; Ptochos, F.; Razis, P. A.; Tsiakkouri, D.; Zinonos, Z.; Hektor, A.; Kadastik, M.; Kannike, K.; Lippmaa, E.; Müntel, M.; Raidal, M.; Rebane, L.; Aarnio, P. A.; Anttila, E.; Banzuzi, K.; Bulteau, P.; Czellar, S.; Eiden, N.; Eklund, C.; Engstrom, P.; Heikkinen, A.; Honkanen, A.; Härkönen, J.; Karimäki, V.; Katajisto, H. M.; Kinnunen, R.; Klem, J.; Kortesmaa, J.; Kotamäki, M.; Kuronen, A.; Lampén, T.; Lassila-Perini, K.; Lefébure, V.; Lehti, S.; Lindén, T.; Luukka, P. R.; Michal, S.; Moura Brigido, F.; Mäenpää, T.; Nyman, T.; Nystén, J.; Pietarinen, E.; Skog, K.; Tammi, K.; Tuominen, E.; Tuominiemi, J.; Ungaro, D.; Vanhala, T. P.; Wendland, L.; Williams, C.; Iskanius, M.; Korpela, A.; Polese, G.; Tuuva, T.; Bassompierre, G.; Bazan, A.; David, P. Y.; Ditta, J.; Drobychev, G.; Fouque, N.; Guillaud, J. P.; Hermel, V.; Karneyeu, A.; LeFlour, T.; Lieunard, S.; Maire, M.; Mendiburu, P.; Nedelec, P.; Peigneux, J. P.; Schneegans, M.; Sillou, D.; Vialle, J. P.; Anfreville, M.; Bard, J. P.; Besson, P.; Bougamont, E.; Boyer, M.; Bredy, P.; Chipaux, R.; Dejardin, M.; Denegri, D.; Descamps, J.; Fabbro, B.; Faure, J. L.; Ganjour, S.; Gentit, F. X.; Givernaud, A.; Gras, P.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Jarry, P.; Jeanney, C.; Kircher, F.; Lemaire, M. C.; Lemoigne, Y.; Levesy, B.; Locci, E.; Lottin, J. P.; Mandjavidze, I.; Mur, M.; Pansart, J. P.; Payn, A.; Rander, J.; Reymond, J. M.; Rolquin, J.; Rondeaux, F.; Rosowsky, A.; Rousse, J. Y. A.; Sun, Z. H.; Tartas, J.; Van Lysebetten, A.; Venault, P.; Verrecchia, P.; Anduze, M.; Badier, J.; Baffioni, S.; Bercher, M.; Bernet, C.; Berthon, U.; Bourotte, J.; Busata, A.; Busson, P.; Cerutti, M.; Chamont, D.; Charlot, C.; Collard, C.; Debraine, A.; Decotigny, D.; Dobrzynski, L.; Ferreira, O.; Geerebaert, Y.; Gilly, J.; Gregory, C.; Guevara Riveros, L.; Haguenauer, M.; Karar, A.; Koblitz, B.; Lecouturier, D.; Mathieu, A.; Milleret, G.; Miné, P.; Paganini, P.; Poilleux, P.; Pukhaeva, N.; Regnault, N.; Romanteau, T.; Semeniouk, I.; Sirois, Y.; Thiebaux, C.; Vanel, J. C.; Zabi, A.; Agram, J. L.; Albert, A.; Anckenmann, L.; Andrea, J.; Anstotz, F.; Bergdolt, A. M.; Berst, J. D.; Blaes, R.; Bloch, D.; Brom, J. M.; Cailleret, J.; Charles, F.; Christophel, E.; Claus, G.; Coffin, J.; Colledani, C.; Croix, J.; Dangelser, E.; Dick, N.; Didierjean, F.; Drouhin, F.; Dulinski, W.; Ernenwein, J. P.; Fang, R.; Fontaine, J. C.; Gaudiot, G.; Geist, W.; Gelé, D.; Goeltzenlichter, T.; Goerlach, U.; Graehling, P.; Gross, L.; Hu, C. Guo; Helleboid, J. M.; Henkes, T.; Hoffer, M.; Hoffmann, C.; Hosselet, J.; Houchu, L.; Hu, Y.; Huss, D.; Illinger, C.; Jeanneau, F.; Juillot, P.; Kachelhoffer, T.; Kapp, M. R.; Kettunen, H.; Lakehal Ayat, L.; LeBihan, A. C.; Lounis, A.; Maazouzi, C.; Mack, V.; Majewski, P.; Mangeol, D.; Michel, J.; Moreau, S.; Olivetto, C.; Pallarès, A.; Patois, Y.; Pralavorio, P.; Racca, C.; Riahi, Y.; Ripp-Baudot, I.; Schmitt, P.; Schunck, J. P.; Schuster, G.; Schwaller, B.; Sigward, M. H.; Sohler, J. L.; Speck, J.; Strub, R.; Todorov, T.; Turchetta, R.; Van Hove, P.; Vintache, D.; Zghiche, A.; Ageron, M.; Augustin, J. E.; Baty, C.; Baulieu, G.; Bedjidian, M.; Blaha, J.; Bonnevaux, A.; Boudoul, G.; Brunet, P.; Chabanat, E.; Chabert, E. C.; Chierici, R.; Chorowicz, V.; Combaret, C.; Contardo, D.; Della Negra, R.; Depasse, P.; Drapier, O.; Dupanloup, M.; Dupasquier, T.; El Mamouni, H.; Estre, N.; Fay, J.; Gascon, S.; Giraud, N.; Girerd, C.; Guillot, G.; Haroutunian, R.; Ille, B.; Lethuillier, M.; Lumb, N.; Martin, C.; Mathez, H.; Maurelli, G.; Muanza, S.; Pangaud, P.; Perries, S.; Ravat, O.; Schibler, E.; Schirra, F.; Smadja, G.; Tissot, S.; Trocme, B.; Vanzetto, S.; Walder, J. P.; Bagaturia, Y.; Mjavia, D.; Mzhavia, A.; Tsamalaidze, Z.; Roinishvili, V.; Adolphi, R.; Anagnostou, G.; Brauer, R.; Braunschweig, W.; Esser, H.; Feld, L.; Karpinski, W.; Khomich, A.; Klein, K.; Kukulies, C.; Lübelsmeyer, K.; Olzem, J.; Ostaptchouk, A.; Pandoulas, D.; Pierschel, G.; Raupach, F.; Schael, S.; Schultz von Dratzig, A.; Schwering, G.; Siedling, R.; Thomas, M.; Weber, M.; Wittmer, B.; Wlochal, M.; Adamczyk, F.; Adolf, A.; Altenhöfer, G.; Bechstein, S.; Bethke, S.; Biallass, P.; Biebel, O.; Bontenackels, M.; Bosseler, K.; Böhm, A.; Erdmann, M.; Faissner, H.; Fehr, B.; Fesefeldt, H.; Fetchenhauer, G.; Frangenheim, J.; Frohn, J. H.; Grooten, J.; Hebbeker, T.; Hermann, S.; Hermens, E.; Hilgers, G.; Hoepfner, K.; Hof, C.; Jacobi, E.; Kappler, S.; Kirsch, M.; Kreuzer, P.; Kupper, R.; Lampe, H. R.; Lanske, D.; Mameghani, R.; Meyer, A.; Meyer, S.; Moers, T.; Müller, E.; Pahlke, R.; Philipps, B.; Rein, D.; Reithler, H.; Reuter, W.; Rütten, P.; Schulz, S.; Schwarthoff, H.; Sobek, W.; Sowa, M.; Stapelberg, T.; Szczesny, H.; Teykal, H.; Teyssier, D.; Tomme, H.; Tomme, W.; Tonutti, M.; Tsigenov, O.; Tutas, J.; Vandenhirtz, J.; Wagner, H.; Wegner, M.; Zeidler, C.; Beissel, F.; Davids, M.; Duda, M.; Flügge, G.; Giffels, M.; Hermanns, T.; Heydhausen, D.; Kalinin, S.; Kasselmann, S.; Kaussen, G.; Kress, T.; Linn, A.; Nowack, A.; Perchalla, L.; Poettgens, M.; Pooth, O.; Sauerland, P.; Stahl, A.; Tornier, D.; Zoeller, M. H.; Behrens, U.; Borras, K.; Flossdorf, A.; Hatton, D.; Hegner, B.; Kasemann, M.; Mankel, R.; Meyer, A.; Mnich, J.; Rosemann, C.; Youngman, C.; Zeuner, W. D.; Bechtel, F.; Buhmann, P.; Butz, E.; Flucke, G.; Hamdorf, R. H.; Holm, U.; Klanner, R.; Pein, U.; Schirm, N.; Schleper, P.; Steinbrück, G.; Van Staa, R.; Wolf, R.; Atz, B.; Barvich, T.; Blüm, P.; Boegelspacher, F.; Bol, H.; Chen, Z. Y.; Chowdhury, S.; DeBoer, W.; Dehm, P.; Dirkes, G.; Fahrer, M.; Felzmann, U.; Frey, M.; Furgeri, A.; Gregoriev, E.; Hartmann, F.; Hauler, F.; Heier, S.; Kärcher, K.; Ledermann, B.; Mueller, S.; Müller, Th; Neuberger, D.; Piasecki, C.; Quast, G.; Rabbertz, K.; Sabellek, A.; Scheurer, A.; Schilling, F. P.; Simonis, H. J.; Skiba, A.; Steck, P.; Theel, A.; Thümmel, W. H.; Trunov, A.; Vest, A.; Weiler, T.; Weiser, C.; Weseler, S.; Zhukov, V.; Barone, M.; Daskalakis, G.; Dimitriou, N.; Fanourakis, G.; Filippidis, C.; Geralis, T.; Kalfas, C.; Karafasoulis, K.; Koimas, A.; Kyriakis, A.; Kyriazopoulou, S.; Loukas, D.; Markou, A.; Markou, C.; Mastroyiannopoulos, N.; Mavrommatis, C.; Mousa, J.; Papadakis, I.; Petrakou, E.; Siotis, I.; Theofilatos, K.; Tzamarias, S.; Vayaki, A.; Vermisoglou, G.; Zachariadou, A.; Gouskos, L.; Karapostoli, G.; Katsas, P.; Panagiotou, A.; Papadimitropoulos, C.; Aslanoglou, X.; Evangelou, I.; Kokkas, P.; Manthos, N.; Papadopoulos, I.; Triantis, F. A.; Bencze, G.; Boldizsar, L.; Debreczeni, G.; Hajdu, C.; Hidas, P.; Horvath, D.; Kovesarki, P.; Laszlo, A.; Odor, G.; Patay, G.; Sikler, F.; Veres, G.; Vesztergombi, G.; Zalan, P.; Fenyvesi, A.; Imrek, J.; Molnar, J.; Novak, D.; Palinkas, J.; Szekely, G.; Beni, N.; Kapusi, A.; Marian, G.; Radics, B.; Raics, P.; Szabo, Z.; Szillasi, Z.; Trocsanyi, Z. L.; Zilizi, G.; Bawa, H. S.; Beri, S. B.; Bhandari, V.; Bhatnagar, V.; Kaur, M.; Kohli, J. M.; Kumar, A.; Singh, B.; Singh, J. B.; Arora, S.; Bhattacharya, S.; Chatterji, S.; Chauhan, S.; Choudhary, B. C.; Gupta, P.; Jha, M.; Ranjan, K.; Shivpuri, R. K.; Srivastava, A. K.; Choudhury, R. K.; Dutta, D.; Ghodgaonkar, M.; Kailas, S.; Kataria, S. K.; Mohanty, A. K.; Pant, L. M.; Shukla, P.; Topkar, A.; Aziz, T.; Banerjee, Sunanda; Bose, S.; Chendvankar, S.; Deshpande, P. V.; Guchait, M.; Gurtu, A.; Maity, M.; Majumder, G.; Mazumdar, K.; Nayak, A.; Patil, M. R.; Sharma, S.; Sudhakar, K.; Acharya, B. S.; Banerjee, Sudeshna; Bheesette, S.; Dugad, S.; Kalmani, S. D.; Lakkireddi, V. R.; Mondal, N. K.; Panyam, N.; Verma, P.; Arfaei, H.; Hashemi, M.; Najafabadi, M. Mohammadi; Moshaii, A.; Paktinat Mehdiabadi, S.; Felcini, M.; Grunewald, M.; Abadjiev, K.; Abbrescia, M.; Barbone, L.; Cariola, P.; Chiumarulo, F.; Clemente, A.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; DeFilippis, N.; DePalma, M.; DeRobertis, G.; Donvito, G.; Ferorelli, R.; Fiore, L.; Franco, M.; Giordano, D.; Guida, R.; Iaselli, G.; Lacalamita, N.; Loddo, F.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; Manna, N.; Marangelli, B.; Mennea, M. S.; My, S.; Natali, S.; Nuzzo, S.; Papagni, G.; Pinto, C.; Pompili, A.; Pugliese, G.; Ranieri, A.; Romano, F.; Roselli, G.; Sala, G.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Tempesta, P.; Trentadue, R.; Tupputi, S.; Zito, G.; Abbiendi, G.; Bacchi, W.; Battilana, C.; Benvenuti, A. C.; Boldini, M.; Bonacorsi, D.; Braibant-Giacomelli, S.; Cafaro, V. D.; Capiluppi, P.; Castro, A.; Cavallo, F. R.; Ciocca, C.; Codispoti, G.; Cuffiani, M.; D'Antone, I.; Dallavalle, G. M.; Fabbri, F.; Fanfani, A.; Finelli, S.; Giacomelli, P.; Giordano, V.; Giunta, M.; Grandi, C.; Guerzoni, M.; Guiducci, L.; Marcellini, S.; Masetti, G.; Montanari, A.; Navarria, F. L.; Odorici, F.; Paolucci, A.; Pellegrini, G.; Perrotta, A.; Rossi, A. M.; Rovelli, T.; Siroli, G. P.; Torromeo, G.; Travaglini, R.; Veronese, G. P.; Albergo, S.; Chiorboli, M.; Costa, S.; Galanti, M.; Gatto Rotondo, G.; Giudice, N.; Guardone, N.; Noto, F.; Potenza, R.; Saizu, M. A.; Salemi, G.; Sutera, C.; Tricomi, A.; Tuve, C.; Bellucci, L.; Brianzi, M.; Broccolo, G.; Catacchini, E.; Ciulli, V.; Civinini, C.; D'Alessandro, R.; Focardi, E.; Frosali, S.; Genta, C.; Landi, G.; Lenzi, P.; Macchiolo, A.; Maletta, F.; Manolescu, F.; Marchettini, C.; Masetti, L.; Mersi, S.; Meschini, M.; Minelli, C.; Paoletti, S.; Parrini, G.; Scarlini, E.; Sguazzoni, G.; Benussi, L.; Bertani, M.; Bianco, S.; Caponero, M.; Colonna, D.; Daniello, L.; Fabbri, F.; Felli, F.; Giardoni, M.; La Monaca, A.; Ortenzi, B.; Pallotta, M.; Paolozzi, A.; Paris, C.; Passamonti, L.; Pierluigi, D.; Ponzio, B.; Pucci, C.; Russo, A.; Saviano, G.; Fabbricatore, P.; Farinon, S.; Greco, M.; Musenich, R.; Badoer, S.; Berti, L.; Biasotto, M.; Fantinel, S.; Frizziero, E.; Gastaldi, U.; Gulmini, M.; Lelli, F.; Maron, G.; Squizzato, S.; Toniolo, N.; Traldi, S.; Banfi, S.; Bertoni, R.; Bonesini, M.; Carbone, L.; Cerati, G. B.; Chignoli, F.; D'Angelo, P.; DeMin, A.; Dini, P.; Farina, F. M.; Ferri, F.; Govoni, P.; Magni, S.; Malberti, M.; Malvezzi, S.; Mazza, R.; Menasce, D.; Miccio, V.; Moroni, L.; Negri, P.; Paganoni, M.; Pedrini, D.; Pullia, A.; Ragazzi, S.; Redaelli, N.; Rovere, M.; Sala, L.; Sala, S.; Salerno, R.; Tabarelli de Fatis, T.; Tancini, V.; Taroni, S.; Boiano, A.; Cassese, F.; Cassese, C.; Cimmino, A.; D'Aquino, B.; Lista, L.; Lomidze, D.; Noli, P.; Paolucci, P.; Passeggio, G.; Piccolo, D.; Roscilli, L.; Sciacca, C.; Vanzanella, A.; Azzi, P.; Bacchetta, N.; Barcellan, L.; Bellato, M.; Benettoni, M.; Bisello, D.; Borsato, E.; Candelori, A.; Carlin, R.; Castellani, L.; Checchia, P.; Ciano, L.; Colombo, A.; Conti, E.; Da Rold, M.; Dal Corso, F.; DeGiorgi, M.; DeMattia, M.; Dorigo, T.; Dosselli, U.; Fanin, C.; Galet, G.; Gasparini, F.; Gasparini, U.; Giraldo, A.; Giubilato, P.; Gonella, F.; Gresele, A.; Griggio, A.; Guaita, P.; Kaminskiy, A.; Karaevskii, S.; Khomenkov, V.; Kostylev, D.; Lacaprara, S.; Lazzizzera, I.; Lippi, I.; Loreti, M.; Margoni, M.; Martinelli, R.; Mattiazzo, S.; Mazzucato, M.; Meneguzzo, A. T.; Modenese, L.; Montecassiano, F.; Neviani, A.; Nigro, M.; Paccagnella, A.; Pantano, D.; Parenti, A.; Passaseo, M.; Pedrotta, R.; Pegoraro, M.; Rampazzo, G.; Reznikov, S.; Ronchese, P.; Sancho Daponte, A.; Sartori, P.; Stavitskiy, I.; Tessaro, M.; Torassa, E.; Triossi, A.; Vanini, S.; Ventura, S.; Ventura, L.; Verlato, M.; Zago, M.; Zatti, F.; Zotto, P.; Zumerle, G.; Baesso, P.; Belli, G.; Berzano, U.; Bricola, S.; Grelli, A.; Musitelli, G.; Nardò, R.; Necchi, M. M.; Pagano, D.; Ratti, S. P.; Riccardi, C.; Torre, P.; Vicini, A.; Vitulo, P.; Viviani, C.; Aisa, D.; Aisa, S.; Ambroglini, F.; Angarano, M. M.; Babucci, E.; Benedetti, D.; Biasini, M.; Bilei, G. M.; Bizzaglia, S.; Brunetti, M. T.; Caponeri, B.; Checcucci, B.; Covarelli, R.; Dinu, N.; Fanò, L.; Farnesini, L.; Giorgi, M.; Lariccia, P.; Mantovani, G.; Moscatelli, F.; Passeri, D.; Piluso, A.; Placidi, P.; Postolache, V.; Santinelli, R.; Santocchia, A.; Servoli, L.; Spiga, D.; Azzurri, P.; Bagliesi, G.; Balestri, G.; Basti, A.; Bellazzini, R.; Benucci, L.; Bernardini, J.; Berretta, L.; Bianucci, S.; Boccali, T.; Bocci, A.; Borrello, L.; Bosi, F.; Bracci, F.; Brez, A.; Calzolari, F.; Castaldi, R.; Cazzola, U.; Ceccanti, M.; Cecchi, R.; Cerri, C.; Cucoanes, A. S.; Dell'Orso, R.; Dobur, D.; Dutta, S.; Fiori, F.; Foà, L.; Gaggelli, A.; Gennai, S.; Giassi, A.; Giusti, S.; Kartashov, D.; Kraan, A.; Latronico, L.; Ligabue, F.; Linari, S.; Lomtadze, T.; Lungu, G. A.; Magazzu, G.; Mammini, P.; Mariani, F.; Martinelli, G.; Massa, M.; Messineo, A.; Moggi, A.; Palla, F.; Palmonari, F.; Petragnani, G.; Petrucciani, G.; Profeti, A.; Raffaelli, F.; Rizzi, D.; Sanguinetti, G.; Sarkar, S.; Segneri, G.; Sentenac, D.; Serban, A. T.; Slav, A.; Spagnolo, P.; Spandre, G.; Tenchini, R.; Tolaini, S.; Tonelli, G.; Venturi, A.; Verdini, P. G.; Vos, M.; Zaccarelli, L.; Baccaro, S.; Barone, L.; Bartoloni, A.; Borgia, B.; Capradossi, G.; Cavallari, F.; Cecilia, A.; D'Angelo, D.; Dafinei, I.; DelRe, D.; Di Marco, E.; Diemoz, M.; Ferrara, G.; Gargiulo, C.; Guerra, S.; Iannone, M.; Longo, E.; Montecchi, M.; Nuccetelli, M.; Organtini, G.; Palma, A.; Paramatti, R.; Pellegrino, F.; Rahatlou, S.; Rovelli, C.; Safai Tehrani, F.; Zullo, A.; Alampi, G.; Amapane, N.; Arcidiacono, R.; Argiro, S.; Arneodo, M.; Bellan, R.; Benotto, F.; Biino, C.; Bolognesi, S.; Borgia, M. A.; Botta, C.; Brasolin, A.; Cartiglia, N.; Castello, R.; Cerminara, G.; Cirio, R.; Cordero, M.; Costa, M.; Dattola, D.; Daudo, F.; Dellacasa, G.; Demaria, N.; Dughera, G.; Dumitrache, F.; Farano, R.; Ferrero, G.; Filoni, E.; Kostyleva, G.; Larsen, H. E.; Mariotti, C.; Marone, M.; Maselli, S.; Menichetti, E.; Mereu, P.; Migliore, E.; Mila, G.; Monaco, V.; Musich, M.; Nervo, M.; Obertino, M. M.; Panero, R.; Parussa, A.; Pastrone, N.; Peroni, C.; Petrillo, G.; Romero, A.; Ruspa, M.; Sacchi, R.; Scalise, M.; Solano, A.; Staiano, A.; Trapani, P. P.; Trocino, D.; Vaniev, V.; Vilela Pereira, A.; Zampieri, A.; Belforte, S.; Cossutti, F.; Della Ricca, G.; Gobbo, B.; Kavka, C.; Penzo, A.; Kim, Y. E.; Nam, S. K.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, G. N.; Kim, J. C.; Kong, D. J.; Ro, S. R.; Son, D. C.; Park, S. Y.; Kim, Y. J.; Kim, J. Y.; Lim, I. T.; Pac, M. Y.; Lee, S. J.; Jung, S. Y.; Rhee, J. T.; Ahn, S. H.; Hong, B. S.; Jeng, Y. K.; Kang, M. H.; Kim, H. C.; Kim, J. H.; Kim, T. J.; Lee, K. S.; Lim, J. K.; Moon, D. H.; Park, I. C.; Park, S. K.; Ryu, M. S.; Sim, K.-S.; Son, K. J.; Hong, S. J.; Choi, Y. I.; Castilla Valdez, H.; Sanchez Hernandez, A.; Carrillo Moreno, S.; Morelos Pineda, A.; Aerts, A.; Van der Stok, P.; Weffers, H.; Allfrey, P.; Gray, R. N. C.; Hashimoto, M.; Krofcheck, D.; Bell, A. J.; Bernardino Rodrigues, N.; Butler, P. H.; Churchwell, S.; Knegjens, R.; Whitehead, S.; Williams, J. C.; Aftab, Z.; Ahmad, U.; Ahmed, I.; Ahmed, W.; Asghar, M. I.; Asghar, S.; Dad, G.; Hafeez, M.; Hoorani, H. R.; Hussain, I.; Hussain, N.; Iftikhar, M.; Khan, M. S.; Mehmood, K.; Osman, A.; Shahzad, H.; Zafar, A. R.; Ali, A.; Bashir, A.; Jan, A. M.; Kamal, A.; Khan, F.; Saeed, M.; Tanwir, S.; Zafar, M. A.; Blocki, J.; Cyz, A.; Gladysz-Dziadus, E.; Mikocki, S.; Rybczynski, M.; Turnau, J.; Wlodarczyk, Z.; Zychowski, P.; Bunkowski, K.; Cwiok, M.; Czyrkowski, H.; Dabrowski, R.; Dominik, W.; Doroba, K.; Kalinowski, A.; Kierzkowski, K.; Konecki, M.; Krolikowski, J.; Kudla, I. M.; Pietrusinski, M.; Pozniak, K.; Zabolotny, W.; Zych, P.; Gokieli, R.; Goscilo, L.; Górski, M.; Nawrocki, K.; Traczyk, P.; Wrochna, G.; Zalewski, P.; Pozniak, K. T.; Romaniuk, R.; Zabolotny, W. M.; Alemany-Fernandez, R.; Almeida, C.; Almeida, N.; Araujo Vila Verde, A. S.; Barata Monteiro, T.; Bluj, M.; Da Mota Silva, S.; Tinoco Mendes, A. David; Freitas Ferreira, M.; Gallinaro, M.; Husejko, M.; Jain, A.; Kazana, M.; Musella, P.; Nobrega, R.; Rasteiro Da Silva, J.; Ribeiro, P. Q.; Santos, M.; Silva, P.; Silva, S.; Teixeira, I.; Teixeira, J. P.; Varela, J.; Varner, G.; Vaz Cardoso, N.; Altsybeev, I.; Babich, K.; Belkov, A.; Belotelov, I.; Bunin, P.; Chesnevskaya, S.; Elsha, V.; Ershov, Y.; Filozova, I.; Finger, M.; Finger, M., Jr.; Golunov, A.; Golutvin, I.; Gorbounov, N.; Gramenitski, I.; Kalagin, V.; Kamenev, A.; Karjavin, V.; Khabarov, S.; Khabarov, V.; Kiryushin, Y.; Konoplyanikov, V.; Korenkov, V.; Kozlov, G.; Kurenkov, A.; Lanev, A.; Lysiakov, V.; Malakhov, A.; Melnitchenko, I.; Mitsyn, V. V.; Moisenz, K.; Moisenz, P.; Movchan, S.; Nikonov, E.; Oleynik, D.; Palichik, V.; Perelygin, V.; Petrosyan, A.; Rogalev, E.; Samsonov, V.; Savina, M.; Semenov, R.; Sergeev, S.; Shmatov, S.; Shulha, S.; Smirnov, V.; Smolin, D.; Tcheremoukhine, A.; Teryaev, O.; Tikhonenko, E.; Urkinbaev, A.; Vasil'ev, S.; Vishnevskiy, A.; Volodko, A.; Zamiatin, N.; Zarubin, A.; Zarubin, P.; Zubarev, E.; Bondar, N.; Gavrikov, Y.; Golovtsov, V.; Ivanov, Y.; Kim, V.; Kozlov, V.; Lebedev, V.; Makarenkov, G.; Moroz, F.; Neustroev, P.; Obrant, G.; Orishchin, E.; Petrunin, A.; Shcheglov, Y.; Shchetkovskiy, A.; Sknar, V.; Skorobogatov, V.; Smirnov, I.; Sulimov, V.; Tarakanov, V.; Uvarov, L.; Vavilov, S.; Velichko, G.; Volkov, S.; Vorobyev, A.; Chmelev, D.; Druzhkin, D.; Ivanov, A.; Kudinov, V.; Logatchev, O.; Onishchenko, S.; Orlov, A.; Sakharov, V.; Smetannikov, V.; Tikhomirov, A.; Zavodthikov, S.; Andreev, Yu; Anisimov, A.; Duk, V.; Gninenko, S.; Golubev, N.; Gorbunov, D.; Kirsanov, M.; Krasnikov, N.; Matveev, V.; Pashenkov, A.; Pastsyak, A.; Postoev, V. E.; Sadovski, A.; Skassyrskaia, A.; Solovey, Alexander; Solovey, Anatoly; Soloviev, D.; Toropin, A.; Troitsky, S.; Alekhin, A.; Baldov, A.; Epshteyn, V.; Gavrilov, V.; Ilina, N.; Kaftanov, V.; Karpishin, V.; Kiselevich, I.; Kolosov, V.; Kossov, M.; Krokhotin, A.; Kuleshov, S.; Oulianov, A.; Pozdnyakov, A.; Safronov, G.; Semenov, S.; Stepanov, N.; Stolin, V.; Vlasov, E.; Zaytsev, V.; Boos, E.; Dubinin, M.; Dudko, L.; Ershov, A.; Eyyubova, G.; Gribushin, A.; Ilyin, V.; Klyukhin, V.; Kodolova, O.; Kruglov, N. A.; Kryukov, A.; Lokhtin, I.; Malinina, L.; Mikhaylin, V.; Petrushanko, S.; Sarycheva, L.; Savrin, V.; Shamardin, L.; Sherstnev, A.; Snigirev, A.; Teplov, K.; Vardanyan, I.; Fomenko, A. M.; Konovalova, N.; Kozlov, V.; Lebedev, A. I.; Lvova, N.; Rusakov, S. V.; Terkulov, A.; Abramov, V.; Akimenko, S.; Artamonov, A.; Ashimova, A.; Azhgirey, I.; Bitioukov, S.; Chikilev, O.; Datsko, K.; Filine, A.; Godizov, A.; Goncharov, P.; Grishin, V.; Inyakin, A.; Kachanov, V.; Kalinin, A.; Khmelnikov, A.; Konstantinov, D.; Korablev, A.; Krychkine, V.; Krinitsyn, A.; Levine, A.; Lobov, I.; Lukanin, V.; Mel'nik, Y.; Molchanov, V.; Petrov, V.; Petukhov, V.; Pikalov, V.; Ryazanov, A.; Ryutin, R.; Shelikhov, V.; Skvortsov, V.; Slabospitsky, S.; Sobol, A.; Sytine, A.; Talov, V.; Tourtchanovitch, L.; Troshin, S.; Tyurin, N.; Uzunian, A.; Volkov, A.; Zelepoukine, S.; Lukyanov, V.; Mamaeva, G.; Prilutskaya, Z.; Rumyantsev, I.; Sokha, S.; Tataurschikov, S.; Vasilyev, I.; Adzic, P.; Anicin, I.; Djordjevic, M.; Jovanovic, D.; Maletic, D.; Puzovic, J.; Smiljkovic, N.; Aguayo Navarrete, E.; Aguilar-Benitez, M.; Ahijado Munoz, J.; Alarcon Vega, J. M.; Alberdi, J.; Alcaraz Maestre, J.; Aldaya Martin, M.; Arce, P.; Barcala, J. M.; Berdugo, J.; Blanco Ramos, C. L.; Burgos Lazaro, C.; Caballero Bejar, J.; Calvo, E.; Cerrada, M.; Chamizo Llatas, M.; Chercoles Catalán, J. J.; Colino, N.; Daniel, M.; DeLa Cruz, B.; Delgado Peris, A.; Fernandez Bedoya, C.; Ferrando, A.; Fouz, M. C.; Francia Ferrero, D.; Garcia Romero, J.; Garcia-Abia, P.; Gonzalez Lopez, O.; Hernandez, J. M.; Josa, M. I.; Marin, J.; Merino, G.; Molinero, A.; Navarrete, J. J.; Oller, J. C.; Puerta Pelayo, J.; Puras Sanchez, J. C.; Ramirez, J.; Romero, L.; Villanueva Munoz, C.; Willmott, C.; Yuste, C.; Albajar, C.; de Trocóniz, J. F.; Jimenez, I.; Macias, R.; Teixeira, R. F.; Cuevas, J.; Fernández Menéndez, J.; Gonzalez Caballero, I.; Lopez-Garcia, J.; Naves Sordo, H.; Vizan Garcia, J. M.; Cabrillo, I. J.; Calderon, A.; Cano Fernandez, D.; Diaz Merino, I.; Duarte Campderros, J.; Fernandez, M.; Fernandez Menendez, J.; Figueroa, C.; Garcia Moral, L. A.; Gomez, G.; Gomez Casademunt, F.; Gonzalez Sanchez, J.; Gonzalez Suarez, R.; Jorda, C.; Lobelle Pardo, P.; Lopez Garcia, A.; Lopez Virto, A.; Marco, J.; Marco, R.; Martinez Rivero, C.; Martinez Ruiz del Arbol, P.; Matorras, F.; Orviz Fernandez, P.; Patino Revuelta, A.; Rodrigo, T.; Rodriguez Gonzalez, D.; Ruiz Jimeno, A.; Scodellaro, L.; Sobron Sanudo, M.; Vila, I.; Vilar Cortabitarte, R.; Barbero, M.; Goldin, D.; Henrich, B.; Tauscher, L.; Vlachos, S.; Wadhwa, M.; Abbaneo, D.; Abbas, S. M.; Ahmed, I.; Akhtar, S.; Akhtar, M. I.; Albert, E.; Alidra, M.; Ashby, S.; Aspell, P.; Auffray, E.; Baillon, P.; Ball, A.; Bally, S. L.; Bangert, N.; Barillère, R.; Barney, D.; Beauceron, S.; Beaudette, F.; Benelli, G.; Benetta, R.; Benichou, J. L.; Bialas, W.; Bjorkebo, A.; Blechschmidt, D.; Bloch, C.; Bloch, P.; Bonacini, S.; Bos, J.; Bosteels, M.; Boyer, V.; Branson, A.; Breuker, H.; Bruneliere, R.; Buchmuller, O.; Campi, D.; Camporesi, T.; Caner, A.; Cano, E.; Carrone, E.; Cattai, A.; Chatelain, J. P.; Chauvey, M.; Christiansen, T.; Ciganek, M.; Cittolin, S.; Cogan, J.; Conde Garcia, A.; Cornet, H.; Corrin, E.; Corvo, M.; Cucciarelli, S.; Curé, B.; D'Enterria, D.; DeRoeck, A.; de Visser, T.; Delaere, C.; Delattre, M.; Deldicque, C.; Delikaris, D.; Deyrail, D.; Di Vincenzo, S.; Domeniconi, A.; Dos Santos, S.; Duthion, G.; Edera, L. M.; Elliott-Peisert, A.; Eppard, M.; Fanzago, F.; Favre, M.; Foeth, H.; Folch, R.; Frank, N.; Fratianni, S.; Freire, M. A.; Frey, A.; Fucci, A.; Funk, W.; Gaddi, A.; Gagliardi, F.; Gastal, M.; Gateau, M.; Gayde, J. C.; Gerwig, H.; Ghezzi, A.; Gigi, D.; Gill, K.; Giolo-Nicollerat, A. S.; Girod, J. P.; Glege, F.; Glessing, W.; Gomez-Reino Garrido, R.; Goudard, R.; Grabit, R.; Grillet, J. P.; Gutierrez Llamas, P.; Gutierrez Mlot, E.; Gutleber, J.; Hall-wilton, R.; Hammarstrom, R.; Hansen, M.; Harvey, J.; Hervé, A.; Hill, J.; Hoffmann, H. F.; Holzner, A.; Honma, A.; Hufnagel, D.; Huhtinen, M.; Ilie, S. D.; Innocente, V.; Jank, W.; Janot, P.; Jarron, P.; Jeanrenaud, M.; Jouvel, P.; Kerkach, R.; Kloukinas, K.; Kottelat, L. J.; Labbé, J. C.; Lacroix, D.; Lagrue, X.; Lasseur, C.; Laure, E.; Laurens, J. F.; Lazeyras, P.; LeGoff, J. M.; Lebeau, M.; Lecoq, P.; Lemeilleur, F.; Lenzi, M.; Leonardo, N.; Leonidopoulos, C.; Letheren, M.; Liendl, M.; Limia-Conde, F.; Linssen, L.; Ljuslin, C.; Lofstedt, B.; Loos, R.; Lopez Perez, J. A.; Lourenco, C.; Lyonnet, A.; Machard, A.; Mackenzie, R.; Magini, N.; Maire, G.; Malgeri, L.; Malina, R.; Mannelli, M.; Marchioro, A.; Martin, J.; Meijers, F.; Meridiani, P.; Meschi, E.; Meyer, T.; Meynet Cordonnier, A.; Michaud, J. F.; Mirabito, L.; Moser, R.; Mossiere, F.; Muffat-Joly, J.; Mulders, M.; Mulon, J.; Murer, E.; Mättig, P.; Oh, A.; Onnela, A.; Oriunno, M.; Orsini, L.; Osborne, J. A.; Paillard, C.; Pal, I.; Papotti, G.; Passardi, G.; Patino-Revuelta, A.; Patras, V.; Perea Solano, B.; Perez, E.; Perinic, G.; Pernot, J. F.; Petagna, P.; Petiot, P.; Petit, P.; Petrilli, A.; Pfeiffer, A.; Piccut, C.; Pimiä, M.; Pintus, R.; Pioppi, M.; Placci, A.; Pollet, L.; Postema, H.; Price, M. J.; Principe, R.; Racz, A.; Radermacher, E.; Ranieri, R.; Raymond, G.; Rebecchi, P.; Rehn, J.; Reynaud, S.; Rezvani Naraghi, H.; Ricci, D.; Ridel, M.; Risoldi, M.; Rodrigues Simoes Moreira, P.; Rohlev, A.; Roiron, G.; Rolandi, G.; Rumerio, P.; Runolfsson, O.; Ryjov, V.; Sakulin, H.; Samyn, D.; Santos Amaral, L. C.; Sauce, H.; Sbrissa, E.; Scharff-Hansen, P.; Schieferdecker, P.; Schlatter, W. D.; Schmitt, B.; Schmuecker, H. G.; Schröder, M.; Schwick, C.; Schäfer, C.; Segoni, I.; Sempere Roldán, P.; Sgobba, S.; Sharma, A.; Siegrist, P.; Sigaud, C.; Sinanis, N.; Sobrier, T.; Sphicas, P.; Spiropulu, M.; Stefanini, G.; Strandlie, A.; Szoncsó, F.; Taylor, B. G.; Teller, O.; Thea, A.; Tournefier, E.; Treille, D.; Tropea, P.; Troska, J.; Tsesmelis, E.; Tsirou, A.; Valls, J.; Van Vulpen, I.; Vander Donckt, M.; Vasey, F.; Vazquez Acosta, M.; Veillet, L.; Vichoudis, P.; Waurick, G.; Wellisch, J. P.; Wertelaers, P.; Wilhelmsson, M.; Willers, I. M.; Winkler, M.; Zanetti, M.; Bertl, W.; Deiters, K.; Dick, P.; Erdmann, W.; Feichtinger, D.; Gabathuler, K.; Hochman, Z.; Horisberger, R.; Ingram, Q.; Kaestli, H. C.; Kotlinski, D.; König, S.; Poerschke, P.; Renker, D.; Rohe, T.; Sakhelashvili, T.; Starodumov, A.; Aleksandrov, V.; Behner, F.; Beniozef, I.; Betev, B.; Blau, B.; Brett, A. M.; Caminada, L.; Chen, Z.; Chivarov, N.; Da Silva Di Calafiori, D.; Dambach, S.; Davatz, G.; Delachenal, V.; Della Marina, R.; Dimov, H.; Dissertori, G.; Dittmar, M.; Djambazov, L.; Dröge, M.; Eggel, C.; Ehlers, J.; Eichler, R.; Elmiger, M.; Faber, G.; Freudenreich, K.; Fuchs, J. F.; Georgiev, G. M.; Grab, C.; Haller, C.; Herrmann, J.; Hilgers, M.; Hintz, W.; Hofer, Hans; Hofer, Heinz; Horisberger, U.; Horvath, I.; Hristov, A.; Humbertclaude, C.; Iliev, B.; Kastli, W.; Kruse, A.; Kuipers, J.; Langenegger, U.; Lecomte, P.; Lejeune, E.; Leshev, G.; Lesmond, C.; List, B.; Luckey, P. D.; Lustermann, W.; Maillefaud, J. D.; Marchica, C.; Maurisset, A.; Meier, B.; Milenovic, P.; Milesi, M.; Moortgat, F.; Nanov, I.; Nardulli, A.; Nessi-Tedaldi, F.; Panev, B.; Pape, L.; Pauss, F.; Petrov, E.; Petrov, G.; Peynekov, M. M.; Pitzl, D.; Punz, T.; Riboni, P.; Riedlberger, J.; Rizzi, A.; Ronga, F. J.; Roykov, P. A.; Röser, U.; Schinzel, D.; Schöning, A.; Sourkov, A.; Stanishev, K.; Stoenchev, S.; Stöckli, F.; Suter, H.; Trüb, P.; Udriot, S.; Uzunova, D. G.; Veltchev, I.; Viertel, G.; von Gunten, H. P.; Waldmeier-Wicki, S.; Weber, R.; Weber, M.; Weng, J.; Wensveen, M.; Wittgenstein, F.; Zagoursky, K.; Alagoz, E.; Amsler, C.; Chiochia, V.; Hoermann, C.; Regenfus, C.; Robmann, P.; Rommerskirchen, T.; Schmidt, A.; Steiner, S.; Tsirigkas, D.; Wilke, L.; Blyth, S.; Chang, Y. H.; Chen, E. A.; Go, A.; Hung, C. C.; Kuo, C. M.; Li, S. W.; Lin, W.; Chang, P.; Chao, Y.; Chen, K. F.; Gao, Z.; Hou, G. W. S.; Hsiung, Y. B.; Lei, Y. J.; Lin, S. W.; Lu, R. S.; Shiu, J. G.; Tzeng, Y. M.; Ueno, K.; Velikzhanin, Y.; Wang, C. C.; Wang, M.-Z.; Aydin, S.; Azman, A.; Bakirci, M. N.; Basegmez, S.; Cerci, S.; Dumanoglu, I.; Erturk, S.; Eskut, E.; Kayis Topaksu, A.; Kisoglu, H.; Kurt, P.; Ozdemir, K.; Ozdes Koca, N.; Ozkurt, H.; Ozturk, S.; Polatöz, A.; Sogut, K.; Topakli, H.; Vergili, M.; Önengüt, G.; Gamsizkan, H.; Sekmen, S.; Serin-Zeyrek, M.; Sever, R.; Zeyrek, M.; Deliomeroglu, M.; Gülmez, E.; Isiksal, E.; Kaya, M.; Kaya, O.; Ozkorucuklu, S.; Sonmez, N.; Grinev, B.; Lyubynskiy, V.; Senchyshyn, V.; Levchuk, L.; Lukyanenko, S.; Soroka, D.; Sorokin, P.; Zub, S.; Anjum, A.; Baker, N.; Hauer, T.; McClatchey, R.; Odeh, M.; Rogulin, D.; Solomonides, A.; Brooke, J. J.; Croft, R.; Cussans, D.; Evans, D.; Frazier, R.; Grant, N.; Hansen, M.; Head, R. D.; Heath, G. P.; Heath, H. F.; Hill, C.; Huckvale, B.; Jackson, J.; Lynch, C.; Mackay, C. K.; Metson, S.; Nash, S. J.; Newbold, D. M.; Presland, A. D.; Probert, M. G.; Reid, E. C.; Smith, V. J.; Tapper, R. J.; Walton, R.; Bateman, E.; Bell, K. W.; Brown, R. M.; Camanzi, B.; Church, I. T.; Cockerill, D. J. A.; Cole, J. E.; Connolly, J. F.; Coughlan, J. A.; Flower, P. S.; Ford, P.; Francis, V. B.; French, M. J.; Galagedera, S. B.; Gannon, W.; Gay, A. P. R.; Geddes, N. I.; Greenhalgh, R. J. S.; Halsall, R. N. J.; Haynes, W. J.; Hill, J. A.; Jacob, F. R.; Jeffreys, P. W.; Jones, L. L.; Kennedy, B. W.; Lintern, A. L.; Lodge, A. B.; Maddox, A. J.; Morrissey, Q. R.; Murray, P.; Patrick, G. N.; Pattison, C. A. X.; Pearson, M. R.; Quinton, S. P. H.; Rogers, G. J.; Salisbury, J. G.; Shah, A. A.; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C. H.; Smith, B. J.; Sproston, M.; Stephenson, R.; Taghavi, S.; Tomalin, I. R.; Torbet, M. J.; Williams, J. H.; Womersley, W. J.; Worm, S. D.; Xing, F.; Apollonio, M.; Arteche, F.; Bainbridge, R.; Barber, G.; Barrillon, P.; Batten, J.; Beuselinck, R.; Brambilla Hall, P. M.; Britton, D.; Cameron, W.; Clark, D. E.; Clark, I. W.; Colling, D.; Cripps, N.; Davies, G.; Della Negra, M.; Dewhirst, G.; Dris, S.; Foudas, C.; Fulcher, J.; Futyan, D.; Graham, D. J.; Greder, S.; Greenwood, S.; Hall, G.; Hassard, J. F.; Hays, J.; Iles, G.; Kasey, V.; Khaleeq, M.; Leaver, J.; Lewis, P.; MacEvoy, B. C.; Maroney, O.; McLeod, E. M.; Miller, D. G.; Nash, J.; Nikitenko, A.; Noah Messomo, E.; Noy, M.; Papageorgiou, A.; Pesaresi, M.; Petridis, K.; Price, D. R.; Qu, X.; Raymond, D. M.; Rose, A.; Rutherford, S.; Ryan, M. J.; Sciacca, F.; Seez, C.; Sharp, P.; Sidiropoulos, G.; Stettler, M.; Stoye, M.; Striebig, J.; Takahashi, M.; Tallini, H.; Tapper, A.; Timlin, C.; Toudup, L.; Virdee, T.; Wakefield, S.; Walsham, P.; Wardrope, D.; Wingham, M.; Zhang, Y.; Zorba, O.; Da Via, C.; Goitom, I.; Hobson, P. R.; Imrie, D. C.; Reid, I.; Selby, C.; Sharif, O.; Teodorescu, L.; Watts, S. J.; Yaselli, I.; Hazen, E.; Heering, A.; Heister, A.; Lawlor, C.; Lazic, D.; Machado, E.; Rohlf, J.; Sulak, L.; Varela Rodriguez, F.; Wu, S. X.; Avetisyan, A.; Bose, T.; Christofek, L.; Cutts, D.; Esen, S.; Hooper, R.; Landsberg, G.; Narain, M.; Nguyen, D.; Speer, T.; Tsang, K. V.; Breedon, R.; Case, M.; Chertok, M.; Conway, J.; Cox, P. T.; Dolen, J.; Erbacher, R.; Fisyak, Y.; Friis, E.; Grim, G.; Holbrook, B.; Ko, W.; Kopecky, A.; Lander, R.; Lin, F. C.; Lister, A.; Maruyama, S.; Pellett, D.; Rowe, J.; Searle, M.; Smith, J.; Soha, A.; Squires, M.; Tripathi, M.; Vasquez Sierra, R.; Veelken, C.; Andreev, V.; Arisaka, K.; Bonushkin, Y.; Chandramouly, S.; Cline, D.; Cousins, R.; Erhan, S.; Hauser, J.; Ignatenko, M.; Jarvis, C.; Lisowski, B.; Matthey, C.; Mohr, B.; Mumford, J.; Otwinowski, S.; Pischalnikov, Y.; Rakness, G.; Schlein, P.; Shi, Y.; Tannenbaum, B.; Tucker, J.; Valuev, V.; Wallny, R.; Wang, H. G.; Yang, X.; Zheng, Y.; Andreeva, J.; Babb, J.; Campana, S.; Chrisman, D.; Clare, R.; Ellison, J.; Fortin, D.; Gary, J. W.; Gorn, W.; Hanson, G.; Jeng, G. Y.; Kao, S. C.; Layter, J. G.; Liu, F.; Liu, H.; Luthra, A.; Pasztor, G.; Rick, H.; Satpathy, A.; Shen, B. C.; Stringer, R.; Sytnik, V.; Tran, P.; Villa, S.; Wilken, R.; Wimpenny, S.; Zer-Zion, D.; Branson, J. G.; Coarasa Perez, J. A.; Dusinberre, E.; Kelley, R.; Lebourgeois, M.; Letts, J.; Lipeles, E.; Mangano, B.; Martin, T.; Mojaver, M.; Muelmenstaedt, J.; Norman, M.; Paar, H. P.; Petrucci, A.; Pi, H.; Pieri, M.; Rana, A.; Sani, M.; Sharma, V.; Simon, S.; White, A.; Würthwein, F.; Yagil, A.; Affolder, A.; Allen, A.; Campagnari, C.; D'Alfonso, M.; Dierlamm, A.; Garberson, J.; Hale, D.; Incandela, J.; Kalavase, P.; Koay, S. A.; Kovalskyi, D.; Krutelyov, V.; Kyre, S.; Lamb, J.; Lowette, S.; Nikolic, M.; Pavlunin, V.; Rebassoo, F.; Ribnik, J.; Richman, J.; Rossin, R.; Shah, Y. S.; Stuart, D.; Swain, S.; Vlimant, J. R.; White, D.; Witherell, M.; Bornheim, A.; Bunn, J.; Chen, J.; Denis, G.; Galvez, P.; Gataullin, M.; Legrand, I.; Litvine, V.; Ma, Y.; Mao, R.; Nae, D.; Narsky, I.; Newman, H. B.; Orimoto, T.; Rogan, C.; Shevchenko, S.; Steenberg, C.; Su, X.; Thomas, M.; Timciuc, V.; van Lingen, F.; Veverka, J.; Voicu, B. R.; Weinstein, A.; Wilkinson, R.; Xia, Y.; Yang, Y.; Zhang, L. Y.; Zhu, K.; Zhu, R. Y.; Ferguson, T.; Jang, D. W.; Jun, S. Y.; Paulini, M.; Russ, J.; Terentyev, N.; Vogel, H.; Vorobiev, I.; Bunce, M.; Cumalat, J. P.; Dinardo, M. E.; Drell, B. R.; Ford, W. T.; Givens, K.; Heyburn, B.; Johnson, D.; Nauenberg, U.; Stenson, K.; Wagner, S. R.; Agostino, L.; Alexander, J.; Blekman, F.; Cassel, D.; Das, S.; Duboscq, J. E.; Gibbons, L. K.; Heltsley, B.; Jones, C. D.; Kuznetsov, V.; Patterson, J. R.; Riley, D.; Ryd, A.; Stroiney, S.; Sun, W.; Thom, J.; Vaughan, J.; Wittich, P.; Beetz, C. P.; Cirino, G.; Podrasky, V.; Sanzeni, C.; Winn, D.; Abdullin, S.; Afaq, M. A.; Albrow, M.; Amundson, J.; Apollinari, G.; Atac, M.; Badgett, W.; Bakken, J. A.; Baldin, B.; Banicz, K.; Bauerdick, L. A. T.; Baumbaugh, A.; Berryhill, J.; Bhat, P. C.; Binkley, M.; Bloch, I.; Borcherding, F.; Boubekeur, A.; Bowden, M.; Burkett, K.; Butler, J. N.; Cheung, H. W. K.; Chevenier, G.; Chlebana, F.; Churin, I.; Cihangir, S.; Dagenhart, W.; Demarteau, M.; Dykstra, D.; Eartly, D. P.; Elias, J. E.; Elvira, V. D.; Evans, D.; Fisk, I.; Freeman, J.; Gaines, I.; Gartung, P.; Geurts, F. J. M.; Giacchetti, L.; Glenzinski, D. A.; Gottschalk, E.; Grassi, T.; Green, D.; Grimm, C.; Guo, Y.; Gutsche, O.; Hahn, A.; Hanlon, J.; Harris, R. M.; Hesselroth, T.; Holm, S.; Holzman, B.; James, E.; Jensen, H.; Johnson, M.; Joshi, U.; Klima, B.; Kossiakov, S.; Kousouris, K.; Kowalkowski, J.; Kramer, T.; Kwan, S.; Lei, C. M.; Leininger, M.; Los, S.; Lueking, L.; Lukhanin, G.; Lusin, S.; Maeshima, K.; Marraffino, J. M.; Mason, D.; McBride, P.; Miao, T.; Moccia, S.; Mokhov, N.; Mrenna, S.; Murray, S. J.; Newman-Holmes, C.; Noeding, C.; O'Dell, V.; Paterno, M.; Petravick, D.; Pordes, R.; Prokofyev, O.; Ratnikova, N.; Ronzhin, A.; Sekhri, V.; Sexton-Kennedy, E.; Sfiligoi, I.; Shaw, T. M.; Skup, E.; Smith, R. P.; Spalding, W. J.; Spiegel, L.; Stavrianakou, M.; Stiehr, G.; Stone, A. L.; Suzuki, I.; Tan, P.; Tanenbaum, W.; Temple, L. E.; Tkaczyk, S.; Uplegger, L.; Vaandering, E. W.; Vidal, R.; Wands, R.; Wenzel, H.; Whitmore, J.; Wicklund, E.; Wu, W. M.; Wu, Y.; Yarba, J.; Yarba, V.; Yumiceva, F.; Yun, J. C.; Zimmerman, T.; Acosta, D.; Avery, P.; Barashko, V.; Bartalini, P.; Bourilkov, D.; Cavanaugh, R.; Dolinsky, S.; Drozdetskiy, A.; Field, R. D.; Fu, Y.; Furic, I. K.; Gorn, L.; Holmes, D.; Kim, B. J.; Klimenko, S.; Konigsberg, J.; Korytov, A.; Kotov, K.; Levchenko, P.; Madorsky, A.; Matchev, K.; Mitselmakher, G.; Pakhotin, Y.; Prescott, C.; Ramond, L.; Ramond, P.; Schmitt, M.; Scurlock, B.; Stasko, J.; Stoeck, H.; Wang, D.; Yelton, J.; Gaultney, V.; Kramer, L.; Lebolo, L. M.; Linn, S.; Markowitz, P.; Martinez, G.; Rodriguez, J. L.; Adams, T.; Askew, A.; Atramentov, O.; Bertoldi, M.; Dharmaratna, W. G. D.; Gershtein, Y.; Gleyzer, S. V.; Hagopian, S.; Hagopian, V.; Jenkins, C. J.; Johnson, K. F.; Prosper, H.; Simek, D.; Thomaston, J.; Baarmand, M.; Baksay, L.; Guragain, S.; Hohlmann, M.; Mermerkaya, H.; Ralich, R.; Vodopiyanov, I.; Adams, M. R.; Anghel, I. M.; Apanasevich, L.; Barannikova, O.; Bazterra, V. E.; Betts, R. R.; Dragoiu, C.; Garcia-Solis, E. J.; Gerber, C. E.; Hofman, D. J.; Hollis, R.; Iordanova, A.; Khalatian, S.; Mironov, C.; Shabalina, E.; Smoron, A.; Varelas, N.; Akgun, U.; Albayrak, E. A.; Ayan, A. S.; Briggs, R.; Cankocak, K.; Clarida, W.; Cooper, A.; Debbins, P.; Duru, F.; Fountain, M.; McCliment, E.; Merlo, J. P.; Mestvirishvili, A.; Miller, M. J.; Moeller, A.; Newsom, C. R.; Norbeck, E.; Olson, J.; Onel, Y.; Perera, L.; Schmidt, I.; Wang, S.; Yetkin, T.; Anderson, E. W.; Chakir, H.; Hauptman, J. M.; Lamsa, J.; Barnett, B. A.; Blumenfeld, B.; Chien, C. Y.; Giurgiu, G.; Gritsan, A.; Kim, D. W.; Lae, C. K.; Maksimovic, P.; Swartz, M.; Tran, N.; Baringer, P.; Bean, A.; Chen, J.; Coppage, D.; Grachov, O.; Murray, M.; Radicci, V.; Wood, J. S.; Zhukova, V.; Bandurin, D.; Bolton, T.; Kaadze, K.; Kahl, W. E.; Maravin, Y.; Onoprienko, D.; Sidwell, R.; Wan, Z.; Dahmes, B.; Gronberg, J.; Hollar, J.; Lange, D.; Wright, D.; Wuest, C. R.; Baden, D.; Bard, R.; Eno, S. C.; Ferencek, D.; Hadley, N. J.; Kellogg, R. G.; Kirn, M.; Kunori, S.; Lockner, E.; Ratnikov, F.; Santanastasio, F.; Skuja, A.; Toole, T.; Wang, L.; Wetstein, M.; Alver, B.; Ballintijn, M.; Bauer, G.; Busza, W.; Gomez Ceballos, G.; Hahn, K. A.; Harris, P.; Klute, M.; Kravchenko, I.; Li, W.; Loizides, C.; Ma, T.; Nahn, S.; Paus, C.; Pavlon, S.; Piedra Gomez, J.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Rudolph, M.; Stephans, G.; Sumorok, K.; Vaurynovich, S.; Wenger, E. A.; Wyslouch, B.; Bailleux, D.; Cooper, S.; Cushman, P.; DeBenedetti, A.; Dolgopolov, A.; Dudero, P. R.; Egeland, R.; Franzoni, G.; Gilbert, W. J.; Gong, D.; Grahl, J.; Haupt, J.; Klapoetke, K.; Kronkvist, I.; Kubota, Y.; Mans, J.; Rusack, R.; Sengupta, S.; Sherwood, B.; Singovsky, A.; Vikas, P.; Zhang, J.; Booke, M.; Cremaldi, L. M.; Godang, R.; Kroeger, R.; Reep, M.; Reidy, J.; Sanders, D. A.; Sonnek, P.; Summers, D.; Watkins, S.; Bloom, K.; Bockelman, B.; Claes, D. R.; Dominguez, A.; Eads, M.; Furukawa, M.; Keller, J.; Kelly, T.; Lundstedt, C.; Malik, S.; Snow, G. R.; Swanson, D.; Ecklund, K. M.; Iashvili, I.; Kharchilava, A.; Kumar, A.; Strang, M.; Alverson, G.; Barberis, E.; Boeriu, O.; Eulisse, G.; McCauley, T.; Musienko, Y.; Muzaffar, S.; Osborne, I.; Reucroft, S.; Swain, J.; Taylor, L.; Tuura, L.; Gobbi, B.; Kubantsev, M.; Kubik, A.; Ofierzynski, R. A.; Schmitt, M.; Spencer, E.; Stoynev, S.; Szleper, M.; Velasco, M.; Won, S.; Andert, K.; Baumbaugh, B.; Beiersdorf, B. A.; Castle, L.; Chorny, J.; Goussiou, A.; Hildreth, M.; Jessop, C.; Karmgard, D. J.; Kolberg, T.; Marchant, J.; Marinelli, N.; McKenna, M.; Ruchti, R.; Vigneault, M.; Wayne, M.; Wiand, D.; Bylsma, B.; Durkin, L. S.; Gilmore, J.; Gu, J.; Killewald, P.; Ling, T. Y.; Rush, C. J.; Sehgal, V.; Williams, G.; Adam, N.; Chidzik, S.; Denes, P.; Elmer, P.; Garmash, A.; Gerbaudo, D.; Halyo, V.; Jones, J.; Marlow, D.; Olsen, J.; Piroué, P.; Stickland, D.; Tully, C.; Werner, J. S.; Wildish, T.; Wynhoff, S.; Xie, Z.; Huang, X. T.; Lopez, A.; Mendez, H.; Ramirez Vargas, J. E.; Zatserklyaniy, A.; Apresyan, A.; Arndt, K.; Barnes, V. E.; Bolla, G.; Bortoletto, D.; Bujak, A.; Everett, A.; Fahling, M.; Garfinkel, A. F.; Gutay, L.; Ippolito, N.; Kozhevnikov, Y.; Laasanen, A. T.; Liu, C.; Maroussov, V.; Medved, S.; Merkel, P.; Miller, D. H.; Miyamoto, J.; Neumeister, N.; Pompos, A.; Roy, A.; Sedov, A.; Shipsey, I.; Cuplov, V.; Parashar, N.; Bargassa, P.; Lee, S. J.; Liu, J. H.; Maronde, D.; Matveev, M.; Nussbaum, T.; Padley, B. P.; Roberts, J.; Tumanov, A.; Bodek, A.; Budd, H.; Cammin, J.; Chung, Y. S.; DeBarbaro, P.; Demina, R.; Ginther, G.; Gotra, Y.; Korjenevski, S.; Miner, D. C.; Sakumoto, W.; Slattery, P.; Zielinski, M.; Bhatti, A.; Demortier, L.; Goulianos, K.; Hatakeyama, K.; Mesropian, C.; Bartz, E.; Chuang, S. H.; Doroshenko, J.; Halkiadakis, E.; Jacques, P. F.; Khits, D.; Lath, A.; Macpherson, A.; Plano, R.; Rose, K.; Schnetzer, S.; Somalwar, S.; Stone, R.; Watts, T. L.; Cerizza, G.; Hollingsworth, M.; Lazoflores, J.; Ragghianti, G.; Spanier, S.; York, A.; Aurisano, A.; Golyash, A.; Kamon, T.; Nguyen, C. N.; Pivarski, J.; Safonov, A.; Toback, D.; Weinberger, M.; Akchurin, N.; Berntzon, L.; Carrell, K. W.; Gumus, K.; Jeong, C.; Kim, H.; Lee, S. W.; McGonagill, B. G.; Roh, Y.; Sill, A.; Spezziga, M.; Thomas, R.; Volobouev, I.; Washington, E.; Wigmans, R.; Yazgan, E.; Bapty, T.; Engh, D.; Florez, C.; Johns, W.; Keskinpala, T.; Luiggi Lopez, E.; Neema, S.; Nordstrom, S.; Pathak, S.; Sheldon, P.; Andelin, D.; Arenton, M. W.; Balazs, M.; Buehler, M.; Conetti, S.; Cox, B.; Hirosky, R.; Humphrey, M.; Imlay, R.; Ledovskoy, A.; Phillips, D., II; Powell, H.; Ronquest, M.; Yohay, R.; Anderson, M.; Baek, Y. W.; Bellinger, J. N.; Bradley, D.; Cannarsa, P.; Carlsmith, D.; Crotty, I.; Dasu, S.; Feyzi, F.; Gorski, T.; Gray, L.; Grogg, K. S.; Grothe, M.; Jaworski, M.; Klabbers, P.; Klukas, J.; Lanaro, A.; Lazaridis, C.; Leonard, J.; Loveless, R.; Magrans de Abril, M.; Mohapatra, A.; Ott, G.; Smith, W. H.; Weinberg, M.; Wenman, D.; Atoian, G. S.; Dhawan, S.; Issakov, V.; Neal, H.; Poblaguev, A.; Zeller, M. E.; Abdullaeva, G.; Avezov, A.; Fazylov, M. I.; Gasanov, E. M.; Khugaev, A.; Koblik, Y. N.; Nishonov, M.; Olimov, K.; Umaraliev, A.; Yuldashev, B. S.

    2008-08-01

    The Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) detector is described. The detector operates at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. It was conceived to study proton-proton (and lead-lead) collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 14 TeV (5.5 TeV nucleon-nucleon) and at luminosities up to 1034 cm-2 s-1 (1027 cm-2 s-1). At the core of the CMS detector sits a high-magnetic-field and large-bore superconducting solenoid surrounding an all-silicon pixel and strip tracker, a lead-tungstate scintillating-crystals electromagnetic calorimeter, and a brass-scintillator sampling hadron calorimeter. The iron yoke of the flux-return is instrumented with four stations of muon detectors covering most of the 4π solid angle. Forward sampling calorimeters extend the pseudorapidity coverage to high values (|η| <= 5) assuring very good hermeticity. The overall dimensions of the CMS detector are a length of 21.6 m, a diameter of 14.6 m and a total weight of 12500 t.

  15. Every Day Is National Lab Day

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bull, Glen

    2010-01-01

    President Barack Obama recently issued a call for increased hands-on learning in U.S. schools in an address at the National Academy of Sciences. Obama concluded that the future of the United States depends on one's ability to encourage young people to "create, and build, and invent." In this article, the author discusses National Lab Day (NLD)…

  16. Every Day Is Mathematical

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barger, Rita H.; Jarrah, Adeeb M.

    2012-01-01

    March 14 is special because it is Pi Day. Mathematics is celebrated on that day because the date, 3-14, replicates the first three digits of pi. Pi-related songs, websites, trivia facts, and more are at the fingertips of interested teachers and students. Less celebrated, but still fairly well known, is National Metric Day, which falls on October…

  17. Day Care: Everybody's Problem.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of Child Development (DHEW), Washington, DC.

    This document reports on statistics regarding the need for day care facilities for children under the age of six. It also gives suggestions for making better use of local day care resources. Statistics show that: (1) There are more than 5 million children in this country under the age of 6 whose mothers work; (2) There are licensed day care…

  18. Growing degree day calculator

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Degree-day benchmarks indicate discrete biological events in the development of insect pests. For the Sparganothis fruitworm, we have isolated all key development events and linked them to degree-day accumulations. These degree-day accumulations can greatly improve treatment timings for cranberry IP...

  19. Day Care Evaluation Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council for Community Services in Metropolitan Chicago, IL.

    This manual presents instruments for evaluating the program and facilities of day care centers and family day care homes serving nonhandicapped children aged 3-5. Chapter 1 discusses child care evaluation in general and outlines the rationale underlying this evaluation system (including the principle that day care evaluation should assess program…

  20. Heart failure.

    PubMed

    Braunwald, Eugene

    2013-02-01

    Despite major improvements in the treatment of virtually all cardiac disorders, heart failure (HF) is an exception, in that its prevalence is rising, and only small prolongations in survival are occurring. An increasing fraction, especially older women with diabetes, obesity, and atrial fibrillation exhibit HF with preserved systolic function. Several pathogenetic mechanisms appear to be operative in HF. These include increased hemodynamic overload, ischemia-related dysfunction, ventricular remodeling, excessive neurohumoral stimulation, abnormal myocyte calcium cycling, excessive or inadequate proliferation of the extracellular matrix, accelerated apoptosis, and genetic mutations. Biomarkers released as a consequence of myocardial stretch, imbalance between formation and breakdown of extracellular matrix, inflammation, and renal failure are useful in the identification of the pathogenetic mechanism and, when used in combination, may become helpful in estimating prognosis and selecting appropriate therapy. Promising new therapies that are now undergoing intensive investigation include an angiotensin receptor neprilysin inhibitor, a naturally-occurring vasodilator peptide, a myofilament sensitizer and several drugs that enhance Ca++ uptake by the sarcoplasmic reticulum. Cell therapy, using autologous bone marrow and cardiac progenitor cells, appears to be promising, as does gene therapy. Chronic left ventricular assistance with continuous flow pumps is being applied more frequently and successfully as destination therapy, as a bridge to transplantation, and even as a bridge to recovery and explantation. While many of these therapies will improve the care of patients with HF, significant reductions in prevalence will require vigorous, multifaceted, preventive approaches.

  1. Hypoplastic left heart syndrome (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Hypoplastic left heart syndrome is a congenital heart condition that occurs during the development of the heart in the ... womb. During the heart's development, parts of the left side of the heart (mitral valve, left ventricle ...

  2. Heart rate reduction and longevity in mice.

    PubMed

    Gent, Sabine; Kleinbongard, Petra; Dammann, Philip; Neuhäuser, Markus; Heusch, Gerd

    2015-03-01

    Heart rate correlates inversely with life span across all species, including humans. In patients with cardiovascular disease, higher heart rate is associated with increased mortality, and such patients benefit from pharmacological heart rate reduction. However, cause-and-effect relationships between heart rate and longevity, notably in healthy individuals, are not established. We therefore prospectively studied the effects of a life-long pharmacological heart rate reduction on longevity in mice. We hypothesized, that the total number of cardiac cycles is constant, and that a 15% heart rate reduction might translate into a 15% increase in life span. C57BL6/J mice received either placebo or ivabradine at a dose of 50 mg/kg/day in drinking water from 12 weeks to death. Heart rate and body weight were monitored. Autopsy was performed on all non-autolytic cadavers, and parenchymal organs were evaluated macroscopically. Ivabradine reduced heart rate by 14% (median, interquartile range 12-15%) throughout life, and median life span was increased by 6.2% (p = 0.01). Body weight and macroscopic findings were not different between placebo and ivabradine. Life span was not increased to the same extent as heart rate was reduced, but nevertheless significantly prolonged by 6.2%.

  3. Pediatric heart surgery - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... get enough calories to heal and grow. After heart surgery, most babies and infants (younger than 12 to 15 months) can take ... valve surgery - children - discharge; Heart surgery - pediatric - discharge; Heart transplant - pediatric - discharge ... open heart surgery References Bernstein D. General principles ...

  4. Advanced Heart Failure

    MedlinePlus

    ... Artery Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Advanced Heart Failure Updated:Feb 9,2017 When heart failure (HF) ... content was last reviewed on 04/06/2015. Heart Failure • Home • About Heart Failure • Causes and Risks for ...

  5. CERN Winter School on Supergravity, Strings, and Gauge Theory 2010

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    The CERN Winter School on Supergravity, Strings, and Gauge Theory is the analytic continuation of the yearly training school of the former EC-RTN string network "Constituents, Fundamental Forces and Symmetries of the Universe". The 2010 edition of the school is supported and organized by the CERN Theory Divison, and will take place from Monday January 25 to Friday January 29, at CERN. As its predecessors, this school is meant primarily for training of doctoral students and young postdoctoral researchers in recent developments in theoretical high-energy physics and string theory. The programme of the school will consist of five series of pedagogical lectures, complemented by tutorial discussion sessions in the afternoons. Previous schools in this series were organized in 2005 at SISSA in Trieste, and in 2006, 2007, 2008, and 2009 at CERN, Geneva. Other similar schools have been organized in the past by the former related RTN network "The Quantum Structure of Spacetime and the Geometric Nature of Fundamental Interactions". This edition of the school is not funded by the European Union. The school is funded by the CERN Theory Division, and the Arnold Sommerfeld Center at Ludwig-Maximilians University of Munich. Scientific committee: M. Gaberdiel, D. Luest, A. Sevrin, J. Simon, K. Stelle, S. Theisen, A. Uranga, A. Van Proeyen, E. Verlinde Local organizers: A. Uranga, J. Walcher

  6. CERN Winter School on Supergravity, Strings, and Gauge Theory 2010

    SciTech Connect

    2010-01-22

    The CERN Winter School on Supergravity, Strings, and Gauge Theory is the analytic continuation of the yearly training school of the former EC-RTN string network "Constituents, Fundamental Forces and Symmetries of the Universe". The 2010 edition of the school is supported and organized by the CERN Theory Divison, and will take place from Monday January 25 to Friday January 29, at CERN. As its predecessors, this school is meant primarily for training of doctoral students and young postdoctoral researchers in recent developments in theoretical high-energy physics and string theory. The programme of the school will consist of five series of pedagogical lectures, complemented by tutorial discussion sessions in the afternoons. Previous schools in this series were organized in 2005 at SISSA in Trieste, and in 2006, 2007, 2008, and 2009 at CERN, Geneva. Other similar schools have been organized in the past by the former related RTN network "The Quantum Structure of Spacetime and the Geometric Nature of Fundamental Interactions". This edition of the school is not funded by the European Union. The school is funded by the CERN Theory Division, and the Arnold Sommerfeld Center at Ludwig-Maximilians University of Munich. Scientific committee: M. Gaberdiel, D. Luest, A. Sevrin, J. Simon, K. Stelle, S. Theisen, A. Uranga, A. Van Proeyen, E. Verlinde Local organizers: A. Uranga, J. Walcher

  7. Big Bang Day: Engineering Solutions

    SciTech Connect

    2009-10-07

    CERN's Large Hadron Collider is the most complicated scientific apparatus ever built. Many of the technologies it uses hadn't even been invented when scientists started building it. Adam Hart-Davis discovers what it takes to build the world's most intricate discovery machine.

  8. Big Bang Day: Engineering Solutions

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    CERN's Large Hadron Collider is the most complicated scientific apparatus ever built. Many of the technologies it uses hadn't even been invented when scientists started building it. Adam Hart-Davis discovers what it takes to build the world's most intricate discovery machine.

  9. Congenital complete heart block.

    PubMed Central

    Agarwala, B.; Sheikh, Z.; Cibils, L. A.

    1996-01-01

    Congenital complete heart block in utero has become diagnosed more frequently with the clinical use of fetal echocardiography. The fetus with complete heart block may remain asymptomatic or may develop congestive heart failure. Congenital complete heart block is more frequently seen in infants of mothers with systemic lupus erythematosus, both clinically manifested and subclinical systemic lupus erythematosus with positive antibodies (SS-A and SS-B antibodies). At birth, the neonate with complete heart block may remain asymptomatic and may not require a pacemaker to increase the heart rate. The indications for a pacemaker in neonates with complete heart block have been discussed. Both in-utero and neonatal management of congenital complete heart block are discussed to manage congestive heart failure in a fetus. Four patients with congenital complete heart block are presented covering a broad spectrum of clinical presentation, diagnosis, and management both in the fetal and neonatal period. Images Figure 1 PMID:8961692

  10. Microwave effects on isolated chick embryo hearts

    SciTech Connect

    Caddemi, A.; Tamburello, C.C.; Zanforlin, L.; Torregrossa, M.V.

    1986-01-01

    This study was designed to examine the effects of microwaves on the electric activity of hearts as a means of elucidating interactive mechanisms of nonionizing radiation with cardiac tissue. Experiments were performed on isolated hearts of 9-12-day-old chick embryos placed in small petri dishes. Oxygenated isotonic Ringer's solution at 37 degrees C permitted heart survival. Samples were irradiated at 2.45 GHz with a power density of 3 mW/cm2. The heart signal was detected with a glass micropipet inserted into the sinoatrial node and examined by means of a Berg-Fourier analyzer. Pulsed microwaves caused the locking of the heartbeat to the modulation frequency, whereas continuous wave irradiation might have induced slight bradycardia. Pulsed fields induced stimulation or regularization of the heartbeat in arrhythmia, fibrillation, or arrest of the heart.

  11. Fluid management strategies in heart failure.

    PubMed

    Albert, Nancy M

    2012-04-01

    In patients with chronic heart failure, fluid retention (or hypervolemia) is often the stimulus for acute decompensated heart failure that requires hospitalization. The pathophysiology of fluid retention is complex and involves both hemodynamic and clinical congestion. Signs and symptoms of both hemodynamic and clinical congestion should be assessed serially during hospitalization. Core heart failure drug and cardiac device therapies should be provided, and ultrafiltration may be warranted. Critical care, intermediate care, and telemetry nurses have roles in both assessment and management of patients hospitalized with acute decompensated heart failure and fluid retention. Nurse administrators and managers have heightened their attention to fluid retention because the Medicare performance measure known as the risk-standardized 30-day all-cause readmission rate after heart failure hospitalization can be attenuated by fluid management strategies initiated by nurses during a patient's hospitalization.

  12. [Infants in Day Care].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pawl, Jeree, Ed.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    This newsletter theme issue looks at infant day care models including those emphasizing early intervention with special needs infants. The lead article, "Infants in Day Care: Reflections on Experiences, Expectations and Relationships," by Jeree H. Pawl, stresses the importance of understanding infants' and toddlers' capacities and needs in…

  13. Rainy Day Activities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Child Care, 1997

    1997-01-01

    Experienced caregivers plan ahead for rainy days. This article describes specific rainy day activities for young children, such as books and crafts to learn about rain (rain in a jar, making a rainbow), simple cooking activities (taffy pull, cinnamon candy tea), and games (mummy wrap, hunt the thimble, rain lotto). (EV)

  14. Science Challenge Day

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siegel, Deborah

    2013-01-01

    Science fairs can be good motivators, but as extracurricular activities, they leave some students behind. However, by staging a Science Challenge Day at school, educators can involve all students in doing everything from choosing activities to judging projects. This article presents a model for running a successful Science Challenge Day. The…

  15. RED-LETTER DAYS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The word "red-letter" is an adjective meaning "of special significance." It's origin is from the practice of marking Christian holy days in red letters on calendars. The "red-letter days" to which I refer occurred while I was a graduate student of ...

  16. Family Science Day

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCubbins, Sara; Thomas, Bethany; Vetere, Michael

    2014-01-01

    This article describes a family-friendly science day event that encourages scientific discovery through hands-on activities, while also providing an opportunity to learn about scientific careers from actual research scientists and science educators, thereby raising awareness of the importance of STEM in our society. The one-day event bought…

  17. The Presidents' Day Game

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maxwell, D. Jackson

    2008-01-01

    The history behind the holiday commonly called "Presidents' Day" is a bit confusing. It started as a federal holiday called Washington's Birthday. It was a day set aside to honor George Washington for his accomplishments as a founding father of the country. Later, many northern states began to recognize Abraham Lincoln's Birthday as well for his…

  18. Day of the Dead

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dann, Tammy; Murphy, Amy

    2012-01-01

    Foreign Language in Elementary School (FLES) teachers in the West Des Moines schools incorporate the Day of the Dead into the fourth grade curriculum each year. The teachers discuss the Day of the Dead celebration at the Art Center, and many ask for volunteers from fourth grade to participate in the event. Student presentations include a wide…

  19. School Building Day, 2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council of Educational Facility Planners, International, Scottsdale, AZ.

    This document presents information and development materials about "School Building Day" (an event spotlighting the school facility and developing support and pride in the community's schools) to help local school districts conduct their own "School Building Day" to be held on April 20th of 2001. Included are lists of suggested…

  20. Service management at CERN with Service-Now

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toteva, Z.; Alvarez Alonso, R.; Alvarez Granda, E.; Cheimariou, M.-E.; Fedorko, I.; Hefferman, J.; Lemaitre, S.; Clavo, D. Martin; Martinez Pedreira, P.; Pera Mira, O.

    2012-12-01

    The Information Technology (IT) and the General Services (GS) departments at CERN have decided to combine their extensive experience in support for IT and non-IT services towards a common goal - to bring the services closer to the end user based on Information Technology Infrastructure Library (ITIL) best practice. The collaborative efforts have so far produced definitions for the incident and the request fulfilment processes which are based on a unique two-dimensional service catalogue that combines both the user and the support team views of all services. After an extensive evaluation of the available industrial solutions, Service-now was selected as the tool to implement the CERN Service-Management processes. The initial release of the tool provided an attractive web portal for the users and successfully implemented two basic ITIL processes; the incident management and the request fulfilment processes. It also integrated with the CERN personnel databases and the LHC GRID ticketing system. Subsequent releases continued to integrate with other third-party tools like the facility management systems of CERN as well as to implement new processes such as change management. Independently from those new development activities it was decided to simplify the request fulfilment process in order to achieve easier acceptance by the CERN user community. We believe that due to the high modularity of the Service-now tool, the parallel design of ITIL processes e.g., event management and non-ITIL processes, e.g., computer centre hardware management, will be easily achieved. This presentation will describe the experience that we have acquired and the techniques that were followed to achieve the CERN customization of the Service-Now tool.

  1. AAS 227: Day 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-01-01

    Editors Note:This week were at the 227th AAS Meeting in Kissimmee, FL. Along with several fellow authors from astrobites.com, I will bewritingupdates on selectedevents at themeeting and posting at the end of each day. Follow along here or atastrobites.com, or catch ourlive-tweeted updates from the@astrobites Twitter account. The usual posting schedule for AAS Nova will resumenext week.Welcome to Day 2 of the winter American Astronomical Society (AAS) meeting in Kissimmee! Several of us are attending the conference this year, and we will report highlights from each day here on astrobites. If youd like to see more timely updates during the day, we encourage you to follow @astrobites on twitter or search the #aas227 hashtag.Plenary Session: Black Hole Physics with the Event Horizon Telescope (by Susanna Kohler)If anyone needed motivation to wake up early this morning, they got it in the form of Feryal Ozel (University of Arizona) enthralling us all with exciting pictures, videos, and words about black holes and the Event Horizon Telescope. Ozel spoke to a packed room (at 8:30am!) about where the project currently stands, and where its heading in the future.The EHT has pretty much the coolest goal ever: actually image the event horizons of black holes in our universe. The problem is that the largest black hole we can look at (Sgr A*, in the center of our galaxy) has an event horizon size of 50 as. For this kind of resolution roughly equivalent to trying to image a DVD on the Moon! wed need an Earth-sized telescope. EHT has solved this problem by linking telescopes around the world, creating one giant, mm-wavelength effective telescope with a baseline the size of Earth.Besides producing awesome images, the EHT will be able to test properties of black-hole spacetime, the no-hair theorem, and general relativity (GR) in new regimes.Ozel walked us through some of the theory prep work we need to do now in order to get the most science out of the EHT, including devising new

  2. Medical Applications at CERN and the ENLIGHT Network

    PubMed Central

    Dosanjh, Manjit; Cirilli, Manuela; Myers, Steve; Navin, Sparsh

    2016-01-01

    State-of-the-art techniques derived from particle accelerators, detectors, and physics computing are routinely used in clinical practice and medical research centers: from imaging technologies to dedicated accelerators for cancer therapy and nuclear medicine, simulations, and data analytics. Principles of particle physics themselves are the foundation of a cutting edge radiotherapy technique for cancer treatment: hadron therapy. This article is an overview of the involvement of CERN, the European Organization for Nuclear Research, in medical applications, with specific focus on hadron therapy. It also presents the history, achievements, and future scientific goals of the European Network for Light Ion Hadron Therapy, whose co-ordination office is at CERN. PMID:26835422

  3. Medical Applications at CERN and the ENLIGHT Network.

    PubMed

    Dosanjh, Manjit; Cirilli, Manuela; Myers, Steve; Navin, Sparsh

    2016-01-01

    State-of-the-art techniques derived from particle accelerators, detectors, and physics computing are routinely used in clinical practice and medical research centers: from imaging technologies to dedicated accelerators for cancer therapy and nuclear medicine, simulations, and data analytics. Principles of particle physics themselves are the foundation of a cutting edge radiotherapy technique for cancer treatment: hadron therapy. This article is an overview of the involvement of CERN, the European Organization for Nuclear Research, in medical applications, with specific focus on hadron therapy. It also presents the history, achievements, and future scientific goals of the European Network for Light Ion Hadron Therapy, whose co-ordination office is at CERN.

  4. HIGH ENERGY PHYSICS: CERN Link Breathes Life Into Russian Physics.

    PubMed

    Stone, R

    2000-10-13

    Without fanfare, 600 Russian scientists here at CERN, the European particle physics laboratory, are playing key roles in building the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), a machine that will explore fundamental questions such as why particles have mass, as well as search for exotic new particles whose existence would confirm supersymmetry, a popular theory that aims to unify the four forces of nature. In fact, even though Russia is not one of CERN's 20 member states, most top high-energy physicists in Russia are working on the LHC. Some say their work could prove the salvation of high-energy physics back home.

  5. Towards a 21st century telephone exchange at CERN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valentín, F.; Hesnaux, A.; Sierra, R.; Chapron, F.

    2015-12-01

    The advent of mobile telephony and Voice over IP (VoIP) has significantly impacted the traditional telephone exchange industry—to such an extent that private branch exchanges are likely to disappear completely in the near future. For large organisations, such as CERN, it is important to be able to smooth this transition by implementing new multimedia platforms that can protect past investments and the flexibility needed to securely interconnect emerging VoIP solutions and forthcoming developments such as Voice over LTE (VoLTE). We present the results of ongoing studies and tests at CERN of the latest technologies in this area.

  6. Day care health risks

    MedlinePlus

    ... This infection causes diarrhea, stomach cramps, and gas. Ear infections, colds, coughs, sore throats, and runny noses ... Head lice and scabies are other common health problems that occur in day care centers. You can ...

  7. Career Day 2012

    NASA Video Gallery

    More than 200 high school juniors and seniors with interests in science, technology, engineering and math met one-on-one with professionals at NASA's Langley Research Center during Career Day 2012,...

  8. Pregnancy - identifying fertile days

    MedlinePlus

    ... between days 7 and 20 of a woman's menstrual cycle. In order to become pregnant, having sex every ... hours of ovulation. If you have an irregular menstrual cycle, an ovulation predictor kit can help you know ...

  9. Stennis Day Camper

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    Sara Beth Casey, 5, proudly displays her artwork, 'Planets.' Sara Beth created the art as a student of Stennis Day Camp, a free camp for Stennis Space Center employees' children whose schools have not resumed since Hurricane Katrina hit the region on Aug. 29. The camp has registered nearly 200 children and averages 100 children each day. The camp will continue until all schools are back in session.

  10. Risks for Heart Valve Problems

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cholesterol Tools & Resources Congenital Defects Children & Adults About Congenital Heart Defects The Impact of Congenital Heart Defects Understand Your Risk for Congenital Heart Defects Symptoms & ...

  11. Sun-Earth Days

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thieman, J.; Ng, C.; Lewis, E.; Cline, T.

    2010-08-01

    Sun-Earth Day is a well-coordinated series of programs, resources and events under a unique yearly theme highlighting the fundamentals of heliophysics research and missions. A menu of activities, conducted throughout the year, inspire and educate participants. Sun-Earth Day itself can vary in date, but usually is identified by a celebration on or near the spring equinox. Through the Sun-Earth Day framework we have been able to offer a series of coordinated events that promote and highlight the Sun, its connection to Earth and the other planets. Sun-Earth Day events are hosted by educators, museums, amateur astronomers and scientists and occur at schools, community groups, parks, planetaria and science centers around the globe. Sun-Earth Day raises the awareness and knowledge of formal and informal education audiences concerning space weather and heliophysics. By building on the success of Sun-Earth Day yearly celebrations, we seek to affect people of all backgrounds and ages with the wonders of heliophysics science, discovery, and exploration in ways that are both tangible and meaningful to their lives.

  12. Poor Diet Tied to Half of U.S. Deaths from Heart Disease, Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... html Poor Diet Tied to Half of U.S. Deaths From Heart Disease, Diabetes Study explores which foods ... 7, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Nearly half of all deaths from heart disease, stroke and diabetes in the ...

  13. Flu Shot May Curb Respiratory Infections in People with Heart Failure

    MedlinePlus

    ... Shot May Curb Respiratory Infections in People With Heart Failure Doctors should consider high-dose vaccine for those ... HealthDay News) -- Flu and pneumonia vaccines may reduce heart failure patients' risk of dangerous respiratory infections, a new ...

  14. Possible Experiments with Heavy Ions at the PS/SPS: CERN SPC 1982

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafelski, Johann

    I present the heavy ion program development at CERN, reproducing much of the pivotal discussion at the 123th meeting of the CERN Scientific Policy Committee (SPC), Geneva—21 and 22 June 1982, based on the Draft Minutes of the meeting (CERN/SPC/0490/Draft, 1982) and related clarifications as marked.

  15. Dissemination of CERN's Technology Transfer: Added Value from Regional Transfer Agents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hofer, Franz

    2005-01-01

    Technologies developed at CERN, the European Organization for Nuclear Research, are disseminated via a network of external technology transfer officers. Each of CERN's 20 member states has appointed at least one technology transfer officer to help establish links with CERN. This network has been in place since 2001 and early experiences indicate…

  16. Hangout with CERN: Reaching the Public with the Collaborative Tools of Social Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldfarb, S.; Kahle, K. L. M.; Rao, A.

    2014-06-01

    On 4 July 2012, particle physics became a celebrity. Around 1,000,000,000 people (yes, 1 billion) [1] saw rebroadcasts of two technical presentations announcing the discovery of a new boson. The occasion was a joint seminar of the CMS [2] and ATLAS [3] collaborations, and the target audience were particle physicists. Yet the world ate it up like a sporting event. Roughly two days later, in a parallel session of ICHEP in Melbourne, Australia [4], a group of physicists decided to explain the significance of this discovery to the public. They used a tool called "Hangout", part of the relatively new Google+ social media platform [5], to converse directly with the public via a webcast videoconference. The demand to join this Hangout [6] overloaded the server several times. In the end, a compromise involving Q&A via comments was set up, and the conversation was underway. We present a new project born shortly after this experience called Hangout with CERN [7], and discuss its success in creating an effective conversational channel between the public and particle physicists. We review earlier efforts by both CMS and ATLAS contributing to this development, and then describe the current programme, involving nearly all aspects of CERN, and some topics that go well beyond that. We conclude by discussing the potential of the programme both to improve our accountability to the public and to train our community for public communication.

  17. Heart transplantation in adult congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Burchill, Luke J

    2016-12-01

    Heart failure (HF) in adult congenital heart disease (ACHD) is vastly different to that observed in acquired heart disease. Unlike acquired HF in which pharmacological strategies are the cornerstone for protecting and improving ventricular function, ACHD-related HF relies heavily upon structural and other interventions to achieve these aims. patients with ACHD constitute a small percentage of the total adult heart transplant population (∼3%), although the number of ACHD heart transplant recipients is growing rapidly with a 40% increase over the last two decades. The worldwide experience to date has confirmed heart transplantation as an effective life-extending treatment option in carefully selected patients with ACHD with end-stage cardiac disease. Opportunities for improving outcomes in patients with ACHD-related HF include (i) earlier recognition and referral to centres with combined expertise in ACHD and HF, (ii) increased awareness of arrhythmia and sudden cardiac death risk in this population, (iii) greater collaboration between HF and ACHD specialists at the time of heart transplant assessment, (iv) expert surgical planning to reduce ischaemic time and bleeding risk at the time of transplant, (v) tailored immunosuppression in the post-transplant period and (vi) development and validation of ACHD-specific risk scores to predict mortality and guide patient selection. The purpose of this article is to review current approaches to diagnosing and treating advanced HF in patients with ACHD including indications, contraindications and clinical outcomes after heart transplantation.

  18. High neutral transverse energy events at the CERN ISR

    SciTech Connect

    Cox, P. T.

    1983-01-01

    The CERN-Oxford-Rockefeller (COR) collaboration has obtained neutral transverse energy, E/sub T//sup 0/, spectra in pp collisions at ..sqrt..s = 30.5, 45.0, and 62.3 GeV. Evidence is presented for the increasing dominance of 2-jet events as E/sub T//sup 0/ increases.

  19. Contextualized Magnetism in Secondary School: Learning from the LHC (CERN)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cid, Ramon

    2005-01-01

    Physics teachers in secondary schools usually mention the world's largest particle physics laboratory--CERN (European Organization for Nuclear Research)--only because of the enormous size of the accelerators and detectors used there, the number of scientists involved in their activities and also the necessary international scientific…

  20. TOWARDS A NOVEL MODULAR ARCHITECTURE FOR CERN RADIATION MONITORING.

    PubMed

    Boukabache, Hamza; Pangallo, Michel; Ducos, Gael; Cardines, Nicola; Bellotta, Antonio; Toner, Ciarán; Perrin, Daniel; Forkel-Wirth, Doris

    2016-11-30

    The European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) has the legal obligation to protect the public and the people working on its premises from any unjustified exposure to ionising radiation. In this context, radiation monitoring is one of the main concerns of the Radiation Protection Group. After 30 y of reliable service, the ARea CONtroller (ARCON) system is approaching the end of its lifecycle, which raises the need for new, more efficient radiation monitors with a high level of modularity to ensure better maintainability. Based on these two main principles, new detectors are currently being developed that will be capable of measuring very low dose rates down to 50 nSv h(-1), whilst being able to measure radiation over an extensive range of 8 decades without any auto scaling. To reach these performances, CERN Radiation MOnitoring Electronics (CROME), the new generation of CERN radiation monitors, is based on the versatile architecture that includes new read-out electronics developed by the Instrumentation and Logistics section of the CERN Radiation Protection Group as well as a reconfigurable system on chip capable of performing complex processing calculations. Beside the capabilities of CROME to continuously measure the ambient dose rate, the system generates radiation alarms, provides interlock signals, drives alarm display units through a fieldbus and provides long-term, permanent and reliable data logging. The measurement tests performed during the first phase of the development show very promising results that pave the way to the second phase: the certification.

  1. Commissioning the CERN IT Agile Infrastructure with experiment workloads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medrano Llamas, Ramón; Harald Barreiro Megino, Fernando; Kucharczyk, Katarzyna; Kamil Denis, Marek; Cinquilli, Mattia

    2014-06-01

    In order to ease the management of their infrastructure, most of the WLCG sites are adopting cloud based strategies. In the case of CERN, the Tier 0 of the WLCG, is completely restructuring the resource and configuration management of their computing center under the codename Agile Infrastructure. Its goal is to manage 15,000 Virtual Machines by means of an OpenStack middleware in order to unify all the resources in CERN's two datacenters: the one placed in Meyrin and the new on in Wigner, Hungary. During the commissioning of this infrastructure, CERN IT is offering an attractive amount of computing resources to the experiments (800 cores for ATLAS and CMS) through a private cloud interface. ATLAS and CMS have joined forces to exploit them by running stress tests and simulation workloads since November 2012. This work will describe the experience of the first deployments of the current experiment workloads on the CERN private cloud testbed. The paper is organized as follows: the first section will explain the integration of the experiment workload management systems (WMS) with the cloud resources. The second section will revisit the performance and stress testing performed with HammerCloud in order to evaluate and compare the suitability for the experiment workloads. The third section will go deeper into the dynamic provisioning techniques, such as the use of the cloud APIs directly by the WMS. The paper finishes with a review of the conclusions and the challenges ahead.

  2. Building an organic block storage service at CERN with Ceph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Ster, Daniel; Wiebalck, Arne

    2014-06-01

    Emerging storage requirements, such as the need for block storage for both OpenStack VMs and file services like AFS and NFS, have motivated the development of a generic backend storage service for CERN IT. The goals for such a service include (a) vendor neutrality, (b) horizontal scalability with commodity hardware, (c) fault tolerance at the disk, host, and network levels, and (d) support for geo-replication. Ceph is an attractive option due to its native block device layer RBD which is built upon its scalable, reliable, and performant object storage system, RADOS. It can be considered an "organic" storage solution because of its ability to balance and heal itself while living on an ever-changing set of heterogeneous disk servers. This work will present the outcome of a petabyte-scale test deployment of Ceph by CERN IT. We will first present the architecture and configuration of our cluster, including a summary of best practices learned from the community and discovered internally. Next the results of various functionality and performance tests will be shown: the cluster has been used as a backend block storage system for AFS and NFS servers as well as a large OpenStack cluster at CERN. Finally, we will discuss the next steps and future possibilities for Ceph at CERN.

  3. Results from NA60 experiment at the CERN SPS

    SciTech Connect

    Usai, G.; Cicalo, C.; De Falco, A.; Floris, M.; Masoni, A.; Puddu, G.; Serci, S.; Arnaldi, R.; Colla, A.; Cortese, P.; Ferretti, A.; Oppedisano, C.; Averbeck, R.; Drees, A.; Banicz, K.; Castor, J.; Devaux, A.; Force, P.; Manso, F.; Chaurand, B.

    2006-07-11

    The NA60 experiment studies open charm and prompt dimuon production in proton-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus collisions at the CERN SPS. During 2003 the experiment collected data in Indium-Indium collisions at 158 GeV per nucleon. In this paper the first results on low mass dimuons, intermediate mass dimuons and J/{psi} suppression are presented.

  4. [Cyanotic heart disease. Part 2].

    PubMed

    Masuda, Munetaka

    2011-07-01

    Tetralogy of Fallot is the most common cyanotic heart disease. Its operative mortality and long-term result are quite good in these days. At the late phase after the correction, pulmonary valve regurgitation associated with right side heart failure, aortic valve regurgitation, arrhythmia and sudden death become major adverse outcomes. Double-outlet right ventricle is a cyanotic heart disease with a wide spectrum of morphology and is divided according to the site of ventricular septal defect: subaortic, subpulmonary, doubly committed and remote type. Its operative methods are completely dependent on its morphology, and vary such as intracardiac tunnel repair, Rastelli type repair, arterial switch procedure and Fontan type repair. Left ventricular outflow tract obstruction is one of the most important problems after the correction. Recent operative strategies for the treatment of tricuspid atresia and single ventricle are quite similar and its final goal is the completion of right heart bypass operation using total cavo-pulmonary connection with staging strategy. Pleural effusion, ascites, protein loosing enteropathy and supraventricular arrhythmia are major adverse outcomes after Fontan type repair, while extracardiac total cavopulmonary connection is expected to reduce the incidence of supraventricular arrhythmia.

  5. Day to day variability in fat oxidation and the effect after only 1 day of change in diet composition.

    PubMed

    Støa, Eva Maria; Nyhus, Lill-Katrin; Børresen, Sandra Claveau; Nygaard, Caroline; Hovet, Åse Marie; Bratland-Sanda, Solfrid; Helgerud, Jan; Støren, Øyvind

    2016-04-01

    Indirect calorimetry is a common and noninvasive method to estimate rate of fat oxidation (FatOx) during exercise, and test-retest reliability should be considered when interpreting results. Diet also has an impact on FatOx. The aim of the present study was to investigate day to day variations in FatOx during moderate exercise given the same diet and 2 different isoenergetic diets. Nine healthy, moderately-trained females participated in the study. They performed 1 maximal oxygen uptake test and 4 FatOx tests. Habitual diets were recorded and repeated to assess day to day variability in FatOx. FatOx was also measured after 1 day of fat-rich (26.8% carbohydrates (CHO), 23.2% protein, 47.1% fat) and 1 day of CHO-rich diet (62.6% CHO, 20.1% protein, 12.4% fat). The reliability test revealed no differences in FatOx, respiratory exchange ratio (RER), oxygen uptake, carbon dioxide production, heart rate, blood lactate concentration, or blood glucose between the 2 habitual diet days. FatOx decreased after the CHO-rich diet compared with the habitual day 2 (from 0.42 ± 0.15 to 0.29 ± 0.13 g·min(-1), p < 0.05). No difference was found in FatOx between fat-rich diet and the 2 habitual diet days. FatOx was 31% lower (from 0.42 ± 0.14 to 0.29 ± 0.13 g·min(-1), p < 0.01) after the CHO-rich diet compared with the fat-rich diet. Using RER data to measure FatOx is a reliable method as long as the diet is strictly controlled. However, even a 1-day change in macronutrient composition will likely affect the FatOx results.

  6. Offering Global Collaboration Services beyond CERN and HEP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandes, J.; Ferreira, P.; Baron, T.

    2015-12-01

    The CERN IT department has built over the years a performant and integrated ecosystem of collaboration tools, from videoconference and webcast services to event management software. These services have been designed and evolved in very close collaboration with the various communities surrounding the laboratory and have been massively adopted by CERN users. To cope with this very heavy usage, global infrastructures have been deployed which take full advantage of CERN's international and global nature. If these services and tools are instrumental in enabling the worldwide collaboration which generates major HEP breakthroughs, they would certainly also benefit other sectors of science in which globalization has already taken place. Some of these services are driven by commercial software (Vidyo or Wowza for example), some others have been developed internally and have already been made available to the world as Open Source Software in line with CERN's spirit and mission. Indico for example is now installed in 100+ institutes worldwide. But providing the software is often not enough and institutes, collaborations and project teams do not always possess the expertise, or human or material resources that are needed to set up and maintain such services. Regional and national institutions have to answer needs, which are growingly global and often contradict their operational capabilities or organizational mandate and so are looking at existing worldwide service offers such as CERN's. We believe that the accumulated experience obtained through the operation of a large scale worldwide collaboration service combined with CERN's global network and its recently- deployed Agile Infrastructure would allow the Organization to set up and operate collaborative services, such as Indico and Vidyo, at a much larger scale and on behalf of worldwide research and education institutions and thus answer these pressing demands while optimizing resources at a global level. Such services would

  7. How Can I Live with Heart Failure?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Understand Your Risk for Congenital Heart Defects Symptoms & Diagnosis of Congenital Heart Defects Care & Treatment for Congenital Heart Defects Congenital Heart Defects Tools & Resources Heart Attack About Heart Attacks Warning Signs of a Heart ...

  8. Heart PET scan

    MedlinePlus

    Heart nuclear medicine scan; Heart positron emission tomography; Myocardial PET scan ... Udelson JE, Dilsizian V, Bonow RO. Nuclear cardiology. In: Mann DL, ... A Textbook of Cardiovascular Medicine . 10th ed. Philadelphia, ...

  9. Inflammation and Heart Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Inflammation and Heart Disease Updated:Oct 12,2016 Understand the risks of ... inflammation causes cardiovascular disease, inflammation is common for heart disease and stroke patients and is thought to be ...

  10. Heart disease - risk factors

    MedlinePlus

    Heart disease - prevention; CVD - risk factors; Cardiovascular disease - risk factors; Coronary artery disease - risk factors; CAD - risk ... a certain health condition. Some risk factors for heart disease you cannot change, but some you can. ...

  11. Heart bypass surgery

    MedlinePlus

    Off-pump coronary artery bypass; OPCAB; Beating heart surgery; Bypass surgery - heart; CABG; Coronary artery bypass graft; Coronary artery bypass surgery; Coronary bypass surgery; Coronary artery disease - CABG; CAD - CABG; Angina - ...

  12. Problem: Heart Valve Regurgitation

    MedlinePlus

    ... Options • Recovery and Healthy Living Goals • Personal Stories Heart Valve Disease Symptoms Dr. Robert Bonow describes the symptoms that may alert you to heart valve disease. Support Network: You're Not Alone Popular Articles ...

  13. Nuclear Heart Scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... into your blood and travels to your heart. Nuclear heart scans use single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) or cardiac positron emission tomography (PET) to detect the energy from the tracer to make pictures of your ...

  14. Congenital Heart Defects

    MedlinePlus

    ... Treatment can include medicines, catheter procedures, surgery, and heart transplants. The treatment depends on the type of the defect, how severe it is, and a child's age, size, and general health. NIH: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute

  15. Heart failure - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... Heart failure - overview Heart pacemaker High blood pressure Implantable cardioverter-defibrillator Smoking - tips on how to quit ... ask your doctor How to read food labels Implantable cardioverter defibrillator - discharge Low-salt diet Mediterranean diet ...

  16. Menopause and Heart Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... minutes, you can get your own personal heart score and life plan. Live better with Life's Simple ... and wellness. Popular Articles 1 Understanding Blood Pressure Readings 2 Sodium and Salt 3 Target Heart Rates ...

  17. Know Your Heart's Numbers

    MedlinePlus

    ... of body fat based on height and weight), waist circumference, blood sugar and weight. The telephone survey of ... for heart health. Just 36 percent knew that waist circumference is important measure of heart disease risk. The ...

  18. Heart attack - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... syndromes: a report of the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association Task Force on practice guidelines. ... disease: a report of the American College of Cardiology Foundation/American Heart Association Task Force on practice ...

  19. Tachycardia | Fast Heart Rate

    MedlinePlus

    ... heart disease and stroke. Start exploring today ! Printable Arrhythmia Information Sheets What is Arrhythmia? What is Atrial ... Card See all Answers by Heart patient sheets Arrhythmia • Home • About Arrhythmia Introduction Atrial Fibrillation Bradycardia Conduction ...

  20. Types of Heart Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... conditions that make open-heart surgery very risky. Arrhythmia Treatment An arrhythmia (ah-RITH-me-ah) is a problem with ... rate or rhythm of the heartbeat. During an arrhythmia, the heart can beat too fast, too slow, ...

  1. American Heart Association

    MedlinePlus

    ... Educator CPR & ECC Shop Causes Advocate Giving Media American Heart Association Check out Scientific Sessions 2016 news -- translated for ... do not always represent the views of the American Heart Association. Keep color fresh and vibrant by knowing how ...

  2. Overview of Heart Tumors

    MedlinePlus

    ... the heart. Most heart tumors are metastatic cancer. Did You Know... Noncancerous tumors can be as deadly ... slow the tumor's growth. Resources In This Article Did You Know 1 Did You Know... Table 2 ...

  3. Men and Heart Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... this? Submit What's this? Submit Button Related CDC Web Sites Heart Disease Stroke High Blood Pressure Salt ... this? Submit What's this? Submit Button Related CDC Web Sites Heart Disease Stroke High Blood Pressure Salt ...

  4. Heart Disease Risk Factors

    MedlinePlus

    ... this? Submit What's this? Submit Button Related CDC Web Sites Division for Heart Disease and Stroke Prevention ... this? Submit What's this? Submit Button Related CDC Web Sites Division for Heart Disease and Stroke Prevention ...

  5. Heart failure - tests

    MedlinePlus

    CHF - tests; Congestive heart failure - tests; Cardiomyopathy - tests; HF - tests ... An echocardiogram (Echo) is a test that uses sound waves to create a moving picture of the heart. The picture is much more detailed than a plain ...

  6. How the Heart Works

    MedlinePlus

    ... Your heart is at the center of your circulatory system. This system consists of a network of blood ... the walls contract, blood is pumped into your circulatory system. Inlet and outlet valves in your heart chambers ...

  7. Heart and Stroke Encyclopedia

    MedlinePlus

    ... Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More The Heart and Stroke Encyclopedia Click a letter below to get a ... dozens of cardiovascular terms from our Heart and Stroke Encyclopedia and get links to in-depth information. ...

  8. Heart Murmurs (For Kids)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Dictionary of Medical Words En Español What Other Kids Are Reading Taking Care of Your Ears Taking ... Getting an X-ray Heart Murmurs KidsHealth > For Kids > Heart Murmurs Print A A A What's in ...

  9. About Heart Attacks

    MedlinePlus

    ... called plaque. This slow process is known as atherosclerosis . When a plaque in a heart artery breaks, ... called plaque. This slow process is known as atherosclerosis . When a plaque in a heart artery breaks, ...

  10. Congenital heart disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... defect - heartbeat Patent ductus arteriosis (PDA) - series References Fraser CD, Carberry KE. Congenital heart disease. In: Townsend ... ASD) Coarctation of the aorta Ellis-van Creveld syndrome Fetal alcohol syndrome Hypoplastic left heart syndrome Marfan ...

  11. [Understanding heart failure].

    PubMed

    Boo, José Fernando Guadalajara

    2006-01-01

    Heart failure is a disease with several definitions. The term "heart failure" is used by has brougth about confusion in the terminology. For this reason, the value of the ejection fraction (< 0.40 or < 0.35) is used in most meganalyses on the treatment of heart failure, avoiding the term "heart failure" that is a confounding concept. In this paper we carefully analyze the meaning of contractility, ventricular function or performance, preload, afterload, heart failure, compensation mechanisms in heart failure, myocardial oxygen consumption, inadequate, adequate and inappropriate hypertrophy, systole, diastole, compliance, problems of relaxation, and diastolic dysfunction. Their definitions are supported by the original scientific descriptions in an attempt to clarify the concepts about ventricular function and heart failure and, in this way, use the same scientific language about the meaning of ventricular function, heart failure, and diastolic dysfunction.

  12. Jupiter Night and Day

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    Day and night side narrow angle images taken on January 1, 2001 illustrating storms visible on the day side which are the sources of visible lightning when viewed on the night side. The images have been enhanced in contrast. Note the two day-side occurrences of high clouds, in the upper and lower parts of the image, are coincident with lightning storms seen on the darkside. The storms occur at 34.5 degrees and 23.5 degrees North latitude, within one degree of the latitudes at which similar lightning features were detected by the Galileo spacecraft. The images were taken at different times. The storms' longitudinal separation changes from one image to the next because the winds carrying them blow at different speeds at the two latitudes.

  13. How Is Heart Failure Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... in a pocket, or hung around your neck. Nuclear Heart Scan A nuclear heart scan shows how well blood is flowing ... blood is reaching your heart muscle. During a nuclear heart scan, a safe, radioactive substance called a ...

  14. Congenital Heart Disease in Adults

    MedlinePlus

    ... and genetics may play a role. Why congenital heart disease resurfaces in adulthood Some adults may find that ... in following adults with congenital heart disease. Congenital heart disease and pregnancy Women with congenital heart disease who ...

  15. Living with Heart Valve Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. Living With Heart Valve Disease Heart valve disease is a lifelong condition. However, ... all of your medicines as prescribed. Pregnancy and Heart Valve Disease Mild or moderate heart valve disease during pregnancy ...

  16. Heart Disease and Stroke Prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... Heart disease and stroke prevention Heart Health and Stroke Heart disease and stroke prevention Related information Learn more about healthy eating ... to top More information on Heart disease and stroke prevention Read more from womenshealth.gov A Lifetime ...

  17. Life After a Heart Attack

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. Life After a Heart Attack Many people survive heart attacks and live active, ... a few weeks. Anxiety and Depression After a Heart Attack After a heart attack, many people worry about ...

  18. What Is a Heart Attack?

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is a Heart Attack? Español A heart attack happens when the flow ... This Content: NEXT >> Featured Video What is a heart attack? 05/22/2014 Describes how a heart attack ...

  19. What Happens After Heart Surgery?

    MedlinePlus

    ANSWERS by heart Treatments + Tests What Happens After Heart Surgery? What are the ICU and CCU? In a ... doctors. This is where patients go after open-heart surgery or a heart attack. You’re watched around ...

  20. Heart Disease in Women

    MedlinePlus

    ... United States, 1 in 4 women dies from heart disease. The most common cause of heart disease in both men and women is narrowing ... the blood vessels that supply blood to the heart itself. This is called coronary artery disease, and ...

  1. The Heart of Coaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Docheff, Dennis M.; Gerdes, Dan

    2015-01-01

    This article challenges coaches to address the more personal, human elements of coaching--the HEART of coaching. While there is much research on numerous aspects of coaching, this article provides ideas that make a lasting impact on the hearts of athletes. Using HEART as an acronym, five elements of effective coaching are presented: Humility,…

  2. Heart Valve Diseases

    MedlinePlus

    Your heart has four valves. Normally, these valves open to let blood flow through or out of your heart, and then shut to keep it from flowing ... close tightly. It's one of the most common heart valve conditions. Sometimes it causes regurgitation. Stenosis - when ...

  3. Working Model Hearts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brock, David

    2009-01-01

    Despite student interest, the heart is often a poorly understood topic in biology. To help students understand this vital organ's physiology, the author created this investigation activity involving the mammalian heart and its role in the circulatory system. Students design, build, and demonstrate working artificial "hearts" to exhibit what they…

  4. Heart bypass surgery

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    Heart bypass surgery begins with an incision made in the chest, with the breastbone cut exposing the heart. Next, a portion of the saphenous vein is ... used to bypass the blocked arteries in the heart. The venous graft is sewn to the aorta ...

  5. Cancer and the heart

    SciTech Connect

    Kapoor, A.S.

    1986-01-01

    This book contains 28 chapters. Some of the titles are: Computed tomography of neoplastic disease of the pericardium; Radiation therapy and the heart; Valvular involvement in cancer; Smoking, lung cancer, and coronary heart disease; Carcinoid heart disease; Cardiac amyloidosis; and Anemia of cancer and its cardiac effects.

  6. Implantable Heart Aid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    CPI's human-implantable automatic implantable defibrillator (AID) is a heart assist system, derived from NASA's space circuitry technology, that can prevent erratic heart action known as arrhythmias. Implanted AID, consisting of microcomputer power source and two electrodes for sensing heart activity, recognizes onset of ventricular fibrillation (VF) and delivers corrective electrical countershock to restore rhythmic heartbeat.

  7. AAS 227: Day 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-01-01

    The mission was featured on the front pages of 450 newspapers worldwide on every single continent (including Antartica!)New Horizons reached the Moon in9 HOURSafter launch (compared to the ~3 days it took the Apollo missions)The mission controllers were aiming for a 100km window of space all the way from EarthThere was a window of ~400seconds which the probe had to arrive within the probe arrived90 seconds early! Putting tardy astronomers everywhere to shame.Charon was the only satellite of Pluto known at the time of the mission proposalThe canyon found on Charon is not only bigger than the Grand Canyon but bigger than Mariner Valley on Mars which is already4000 km (2500 mi) long and reaches depths of up to 7 km (4 mi)!Charons surface. Tectonic feature runs about 1500 km, around 10 km deep. Eat it, Mars. #aas227 pic.twitter.com/blewwJaXEn Danny Barringer (@HeavyFe_H) January 5, 2016The mountains ringing the Sputnik Planum (aka the heart of Pluto) are over 4km high and are snow capped with methane icePlutos mountain ranges. Means surface nitrogen layer is thin, probably water ice according to @AlanStern. #aas227 pic.twitter.com/0yyHZvpBOE Danny Barringer (@HeavyFe_H) January 5, 2016Plutos atmosphere has a dozendistincthaze layers but how they arecreated is a mystery#aas227 hazes on Pluto wow pic.twitter.com/VPx99ZhPj1 Lisa StorrieLombardi (@lisajsl) January 5, 2016Alan also spoke about the future of New Horizons there is a new mission proposal for a fly by of a Kuiper Belt object 2014MU69 in Jan 2019 which should give us a better understanding of this icy frontier at the edge ofthe Solar System. As a parting gift Alan playedthemost gorgeously detailed fly over video of Plutos surface that had all in the room melting into their flip flops. Its safe to say that the whole room is now Pluto-curious and wondering whether a change of discipline is in order!Press Conference: Black Holes and Exoplanets (by Susanna Kohler)This morning marked the first press conference of the meeting

  8. 21-Day Content Screen

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Under PRIA, EPA has 21 days after it receives the pesticide application and the fee to conduct an initial screen of the application’s contents for completeness and for the applicant to make necessary corrections. This page provides the checklists we use.

  9. Day Care: Nutrition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foster, Florence P.; And Others

    This collection of 12 short, bilingual papers on nutrition and preschool children is part of a series of papers on various aspects of day care published by the Canadian Department of Health and Welfare. Each paper is presented in both English and French. Topics dealt with include an overview of children's nutritional needs; development of…

  10. 90-Day Cycle Handbook

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Park, Sandra; Takahashi, Sola

    2013-01-01

    90-Day Cycles are a disciplined and structured form of inquiry designed to produce and test knowledge syntheses, prototyped processes, or products in support of improvement work. With any type of activity, organizations inevitably encounter roadblocks to improving performance and outcomes. These barriers might include intractable problems at…

  11. We Love Science Day.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kepler, Lynne

    1986-01-01

    Describes the goals and outcomes of the "We Love Science Day" programs that resulted from the inservice course, "Creative Integration of Science in Elementary Education" for Pennsylvania teachers. Provides samples of the hands-on activities that were offered to students, parents, and teachers. Includes a calendar of…

  12. Word of the Day

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abrar-Ul-Hassan, Shahid

    2010-01-01

    Independent lexical development initiatives empower and equip language learners with skills to boost their lexical repertoires. Language instructors can train learners to be autonomous word learners. A sample activity, namely word of the day, is presented in this article. The activity is an independent lexical learning task, which aims to develop…

  13. Every Child, Every Day

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allington, Richard L.; Gabriel, Rachael E.

    2012-01-01

    We know more now than we ever did before about how to make every child a successful reader, write Allington and Gabriel in this research review. Yet, few students regularly receive the best reading instruction we know how to give. The authors present research supporting their recommendation that every child, every day, should (1) read something he…

  14. Make a Splash Day

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coverdale, Greg; Rust, April; Jensen, Belinda

    2004-01-01

    At the annual, all-day events-sponsored by Project WET (Water Education for Teachers) and held in nearly every state across the country each September--students participate in interactive activities and exhibits to learn about water resources and explore how human behaviors, such as development and recreation, can affect the quality of the…

  15. Sun-Earth Day

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    Michael Sandras, a member of the Pontchartrain Astronomical Society, explains his solar telescope to students of Second Street in Bay St. Louis, Hancock County and Nicholson elementary schools in StenniSphere's Millennium Hall on April 10. The students participated in several hands-on activities at Stennis Space Center's Sun-Earth Day celebration.

  16. An Earth Day Reader.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moser, Don, Ed.

    1990-01-01

    Presents what the author believes to be some of the most important environmental books published since Earth Day 1970. Discusses each selection and how it provides the historical background, basic information, and appreciation necessary to understand the character of our environmental dilemma and our need to address it. (MCO)

  17. First Day of School

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bort, Nancy

    2004-01-01

    In this brief article, the author, a science teacher at F. C. Hammond Middle School in Alexandria, Virginia, describes how the setting up of a simple science experiment on the first day of school can get students excited about learning science. The experiment involves heating a small amount of water in a flask, then covering the opening of the…

  18. One Play a Day

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blankenship, Mark

    2007-01-01

    Undergraduate theater students rarely get the chance to work on a major world premiere, but this year hundreds of them will. Currently, more than 70 colleges and universities are participating in "365 Days/365 Plays," an ambitious project from Pulitzer Prize-winning playwright Suzan-Lori Parks. Every week, as they mount their portion of this epic…

  19. Fabulous Weather Day

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marshall, Candice; Mogil, H. Michael

    2007-01-01

    Each year, first graders at Kensington Parkwood Elementary School in Kensington, Maryland, look forward to Fabulous Weather Day. Students learn how meteorologists collect data about the weather, how they study wind, temperature, precipitation, basic types/characteristics of clouds, and how they forecast. The project helps the students grow in…

  20. Heart muscle performance after experimental viral myocarditis.

    PubMed Central

    Adesanya, C O; Goldberg, A H; Phear, W P; Thorp, K A; Young, N A; Abelmann, W H

    1976-01-01

    As part of an inquiry into possible antecedents of idiopathic cardiomyopathy, acute experimental coxsackie virus myocarditis was studied for late structural and functional sequelae. Myocarditis was induced in 12- and 22-day-old hamsters by inoculation with coxsackie virus B3. Early viremia occurred, followed by virus replication in heart muscle. Maximum peak developed tension (Tpd) of isometrically contracting isolated heart muscle was depressed 17 and 43% in the animals inoculated at 12 days, and studied 18 and 90 days later, respectively, as compared to their uninoculated controls. In both infected groups, less muscle stretch was required to reach the length at which Tpd was produced. Animals studied 180 days after inoculation did not differ from controls. The muscles from animals inoculated at 22 days of age and studied 18 days later showed a 15% depression of Tpd compared to their controls. Glycerinated muscles from this infected group developed 50% less tension than their controls. The muscles of hamsters inoculated with virus at 22 days and studied 90 and 180 days later showed no change in Tpd. The data suggest that contractility and compliance of heart muscle are decreased 18 days after inoculation, but recover by 90 days if the animals are inoculated at age 22 days. However, if the animals are inoculated at a younger age (12 days), depression of myocardial performance persists for at least an additional 90 days. It is concluded that the inflammatory stage of experimental acute coxsackie virus B3 myocarditis in the Syrian golden hamster may be followed by residual alterations in contractile proteins and myocardial function. PMID:1249200

  1. ChIP-seq Identification of Weakly Conserved Heart Enhancers

    SciTech Connect

    Blow, Matthew J.; McCulley, David J.; Li, Zirong; Zhang, Tao; Akiyama, Jennifer A.; Holt, Amy; Plajzer-Frick, Ingrid; Shoukry, Malak; Wright, Crystal; Chen, Feng; Afzal, Veena; Bristow, James; Ren, Bing; Black, Brian L.; Rubin, Edward M.; Visel, Axel; Pennacchio, Len A.

    2010-07-01

    Accurate control of tissue-specific gene expression plays a pivotal role in heart development, but few cardiac transcriptional enhancers have thus far been identified. Extreme non-coding sequence conservation successfully predicts enhancers active in many tissues, but fails to identify substantial numbers of heart enhancers. Here we used ChIP-seq with the enhancer-associated protein p300 from mouse embryonic day 11.5 heart tissue to identify over three thousand candidate heart enhancers genome-wide. Compared to other tissues studied at this time-point, most candidate heart enhancers are less deeply conserved in vertebrate evolution. Nevertheless, the testing of 130 candidate regions in a transgenic mouse assay revealed that most of them reproducibly function as enhancers active in the heart, irrespective of their degree of evolutionary constraint. These results provide evidence for a large population of poorly conserved heart enhancers and suggest that the evolutionary constraint of embryonic enhancers can vary depending on tissue type.

  2. Heart Failure: A Primer.

    PubMed

    Lee, Christopher S; Auld, Jonathan

    2015-12-01

    Heart failure is a complex and multisystem clinical syndrome that results from impaired ventricular contractility and/or relaxation. Hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and coronary artery disease are common antecedents to heart failure. The main pathogenic mechanisms involved in heart failure include sympathetic nervous and renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system activation, as well as inflammation. A detailed history and physical examination and additional diagnostic tests may be needed to diagnose heart failure. Most treatment strategies target neurohormonal systems. Nonpharmacologic interventions and effective engagement in self-care are also important in overall heart failure management. Therapeutic strategies are geared toward prolonging life and optimizing quality of life.

  3. Heart rate and physical activity patterns in persons with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities.

    PubMed

    Waninge, Aly; van der Putten, Annette A J; Stewart, Roy E; Steenbergen, Bert; van Wijck, Ruud; van der Schans, Cees P

    2013-11-01

    Because physical fitness and health are related to physical activity, it is important to gain an insight into the physical activity levels of persons with profound intellectual and multiple disabilities (PIMD). The purpose of this study was to examine heart rate patterns to measure the activity levels of persons with PIMD and to analyze these heart rate patterns according to participant characteristics, observed level of activity, days, and time of day. The heart rate patterns of 24 participants with PIMD were measured continuously using a heart rate monitor for 8 h · d for a period of 6 days. Physical activity levels were measured with questionnaires. Data were analyzed using multilevel analysis. The results indicate that the participants use only 32% of their heart rate reserve over 6 days. The intensity of heart rate reserve ranged from 1 to 62%. On a given day, wide ranges in heart rates between participants and within persons were observed. Between days, only small ranges in the heart rate were found. The participants could be grouped into 4 classes according to their heart rate. In addition, factors such as time of day, physical activity, and age are significantly related to heart rate patterns. In conclusion, this study is an important first step in exploring activity patterns based on heart rate patterns in persons with PIMD. The participants used relatively small fractions of their heart rate reserves. Time of day and age appear to have a considerable influence on heart rate patterns. The observed classes in heart rate patterns suggest that other probably more personal and psychosocial factors have significant influences on heart rate patterns, as well.

  4. Hypertensive heart failure in Nigerian Africans: insights from the Abeokuta Heart Failure Registry.

    PubMed

    Ogah, Okechukwu S; Sliwa, Karen; Akinyemi, Joshua O; Falase, Ayodele O; Stewart, Simon

    2015-04-01

    Data from the Abeokuta Heart Failure Registry were used to determine the clinical characteristics, mode of treatment, and short- and medium-term outcomes of patients with hypertensive heart failure. A total of 320 patients were consecutively studied, comprising 184 men (57.5%) and 136 women (42.5%) aged 58.4±12.4 and 60.6±14.5 years, respectively. Most patients (80%) presented with New York Heart Association functional class III or IV and around one third (35%) had preserved systolic function. Median hospital stay was 9 days (interquartile range 5-21) while intra-hospital mortality was 3.4%. The 30-day, 90-day, and 180-day mortality rates were 0.9% (95% confidence interval, -0.2 to 3.5), 3.5% (95% confidence interval, -1.7 to 7.3), and 11.7% (95% confidence interval, -7.8 to 17.5), respectively. In a multiple logistic regression analysis, only serum creatinine was an independent predictor of mortality at 180 days (adjusted odds ratio, 1.76; 95% confidence interval, -1.17 to 2.64). Hypertension is the most common etiological risk factor for heart failure in Nigeria. Most patients present in the fourth decade of life with severe heart failure and secondary valvular dysfunction and significant in-hospital mortality.

  5. The changes of vaccinia related kinase 1 in grafted heart after rat heart transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Shiguo; Yang, Xuechao; Wu, Kunpeng; Lv, Qiangsheng; Zhang, Yuanyuan; Dai, Jiahong; Chen, Cheng

    2014-01-01

    Objective To assess the expression and significance of vaccinia-related kinase 1 (VRK1) after rat heart transplantation. Materials and methods Lewis and Wistar rats weighing 250 to 300 g were used as donors and recipients. Allografts were from Wistar transplanted into Lewis, and isografts were transplanted from Lewis into Lewis. Grafts were harvested at 1, 3, 5, and 7 days after transplantation. We performed Western Blot of heart tissues after cardiac transplantation. To analyze VRK1 express between the isografts and allografts for immunohistochemical staining. At 5th day after heart transplantation use related cytokines VRK1 for immunohistochemical. We used double immunofluorescent staining on transverse cryosections of graft tissues by co-labeling with different markers, including those for VRK1, activate caspase-3, α-actinin, VCAM-1, CD4. Results Compared with rare expression in syngeneic Lewis rat hearts, VRK1 protein level in allogeneic hearts were detected at various survival times after heterotopic heart transplantation, which observably expressed on day 5 postoperative. In addition, we examined the expression of activate caspase-3 in allogeneic hearts, which has a similar expression with VRK1. Immunohistochemical and immunofluorescent method displayed that VRK1 was widely expressed in cytoplasm of cardiac tissue and activate caspase-3 was also expressed in cardiomyocytes. However, the VRK1 wasn’t express in inflammation. Conclusions The VRK1 expression has increased after heart transplantation in allograft and isograft, and VRK1 may play a significant role in myocardial apoptosis after heterotopic heart transplantation in rats. PMID:25589968

  6. Kindergarten Evaluation Study: Full-Day Alternate Day Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minnesota State Dept. of Education, St. Paul.

    In this evaluation study, two groups of children who attended kindergarten either one-half day every day or full-day on alternate days were compared. An opinion survey was conducted to obtain the observations of parents, kindergarten teachers, and elementary principals in relation to the all-day alternate day schedule in 55 school districts. Data…

  7. Flight Day 2 Highlights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    The STS-107 second flight day begins with a shot of the Spacehab Research Double Module. Live presentations of experiments underway inside of the Spacehab Module are presented. Six experiments are shown. As part of the Space Technology and Research Student Payload, students from Australia, China, Israel, Japan, New York, and Liechtenstein are studying the effect that microgravity has on ants, spiders, silkworms, fish, bees, granular materials, and crystals. Mission Specialist Kalpana Chawla is seen working with the zeolite crystal growth experiment.

  8. Microgravity Day for Educators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    The arnual conference for the Educator Resource Center Network (ERCN) Coordinators was held at Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field in Cleveland, Ohio. The conference included participants from NASA's Educator Resource Centers located throughout the country. The Microgravity Science Division at Glenn sponsored a Microgravity Day for all the conference participants. Kathy Higgins of the National Center for Microgravity Research at GRC explains educational resources to teachers. This image is from a digital still camera; higher resolution is not available.

  9. For Heart Attack Survivors, a Risk of Suicide?

    MedlinePlus

    ... https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_162414.html For Heart Attack Survivors, a Risk of Suicide? Study findings underscore ... 2016 (HealthDay News) -- People who've suffered a heart attack or unstable angina may face a higher-than- ...

  10. Upgrade of the cryogenic CERN RF test facility

    SciTech Connect

    Pirotte, O.; Benda, V.; Brunner, O.; Inglese, V.; Maesen, P.; Vullierme, B.; Koettig, T.

    2014-01-29

    With the large number of superconducting radiofrequency (RF) cryomodules to be tested for the former LEP and the present LHC accelerator a RF test facility was erected early in the 1990’s in the largest cryogenic test facility at CERN located at Point 18. This facility consisted of four vertical test stands for single cavities and originally one and then two horizontal test benches for RF cryomodules operating at 4.5 K in saturated helium. CERN is presently working on the upgrade of its accelerator infrastructure, which requires new superconducting cavities operating below 2 K in saturated superfluid helium. Consequently, the RF test facility has been renewed in order to allow efficient cavity and cryomodule tests in superfluid helium and to improve its thermal performances. The new RF test facility is described and its performances are presented.

  11. The CERN PS/SL Controls Java Application Programming Interface

    SciTech Connect

    I. Deloose; J. Cuperus; P. Charrue; F. DiMaio; K. Kostro; M. Vanden Eynden; W. Watson

    1999-10-01

    The PS/SL Convergence Project was launched in March 1998. Its objective is to deliver a common control as infrastructure for the CERN accelerators by year 2001. In the framework of this convergence activity, a project was launched to develop a Java Application Programming Interface (API) between programs written in the Java language and the PS and SL accelerator equipment. This Java API was specified and developed in collaboration with TJNAF. It is based on the Java CDEV [1] package that has been extended in order to end up with a CERN/TJNAF common product. It implements a detailed model composed of devices organized in named classes that provide a property-based interface. It supports data subscription and introspection facilities. The device model is presented and the capabilities of the API are described with syntax examples. The software architecture is also described.

  12. Charmonium dissociation in matter: perspectives from CERN to Jlab

    SciTech Connect

    A. Sibirtsev

    2010-07-01

    The J/Psi-meson dissociation in nuclear matter remains one of the most surprising problems in physics. In 2000 the NA50 Collaboration at CERN reported anomalous results on J/Psi absorption that was considered as evidence of Quark-Gluon Plasma formation. On the other hand, there may be other mechanisms which produce an increase in J/Psi absorption in a hot dense medium due to the modification of the charm mesons. Our detailed calculations were one of the first indications that the CERN data can indeed be well explained by a mechanism different from QGP formation. For further clarification we proposed to study the modification of charm in nuclei through antiproton annihilation, which is now part of the PANDA project at FAIR GSI. The experiment on charmonium dissociation in nuclei is under discussion at JLab as part of its 12 GeV upgrade.

  13. Charmonium dissociation in matter: perspectives from CERN to JLab

    SciTech Connect

    Sibirtsev, A.

    2010-07-27

    The J/{Psi}-meson dissociation in nuclear matter remains one of the most surprising problems in physics. In 2000 the NA50 Collaboration at CERN reported anomalous results on J/{Psi} absorption that was considered as evidence of Quark-Gluon Plasma formation. On the other hand, there may be other mechanisms which produce an increase in J/{Psi} absorption in a hot dense medium due to the modification of the charm mesons. Our detailed calculations were one of the first indications that the CERN data can indeed be well explained by a mechanism different from QGP formation. For further clarification we proposed to study the modification of charm in nuclei through antiproton annihilation, which is now part of the PANDA project at FAIR GSI. The experiment on charmonium dissociation in nuclei is under discussion at JLab as part of its 12 GeV upgrade.

  14. CERN and the Hunt for Elementary Particles and Forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsesmelis, Emmanuel

    2008-04-01

    CERN is the European Laboratory for Particle Physics, the world's largest particle physics research centre. Founded in 1954, the Laboratory was one of Europe's first joint ventures and has become a premier example of international collaboration. CERN's subject of study is pure science and is concentrated on exploring the Universe's most fundamental questions, such as What is it made of? and How did it come to be the way it is? The Laboratory's tools, the particle accelerators and particle detectors, are amongst the world's largest and most complex scientific instruments. The Laboratory's primary aims will be presented and a look at past achievements and present endeavours, particularly the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), will be reviewed. A brief look into the future will also be given.

  15. Online data storage service strategy for the CERN computer Centre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cancio, G.; Duellmann, D.; Lamanna, M.; Pace, A.

    2011-12-01

    The Data and Storage Services group at CERN is conducting several service and software development projects to address possible scalability issues, to prepare the integration of upcoming technologies and to anticipate changing access patterns. Particular emphasis is put on: very high performance disk pools for analysis based on XROOTD [1] lower latency archive storage using large, cost and power effective disk pools more efficient use of tape resources by aggregation of user data collections on the tape media a consolidated system for monitoring and usage trend analysis This contribution will outline the underlying storage architecture and focus on the key functional and operational advantages, which drive the development. The discussion will include a review of proof-of-concept and prototype studies and propose a plan for the integration of these components in the existing storage infrastructure at CERN.

  16. An aspirin a day.

    PubMed

    Majerus, Philip W

    2014-01-01

    The title of this article is also its punch line. The thesis that I will prove is that every adult, with a few exceptions, should take one 325 mg aspirin tablet each day. The drug is extraordinary and is beneficial in myriad ways. In this dosage the toxicity of the treatment is minimal. Since the drug is sold "over the counter", not requiring prescription, it is cheap and its benefits are easily underestimated. I do not use extensive reference citations; but just tell the story of aspirin.

  17. Building and testing a high school calorimeter at CERN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biesot, L.; Crane, R.; Engelen, M. A. G.; van Haren, A. M. A.; van Kleef, R. H. B.; Leenders, O. R.; Timmermans, C.

    2016-11-01

    We have designed, built and tested a crystal calorimeter in the context of CERN’s first beam line for schools competition. The results of the tests at CERN show that the light output of our calorimeter depends on the energy deposited by particles (electrons and muons) hitting the crystals. Our design can be reproduced by high schools around the world, as we have avoided the use of toxic chemicals.

  18. PARTICLE PHYSICS: CERN Collider Glimpses Supersymmetry--Maybe.

    PubMed

    Seife, C

    2000-07-14

    Last week, particle physicists at the CERN laboratory in Switzerland announced that by smashing together matter and antimatter in four experiments, they detected an unexpected effect in the sprays of particles that ensued. The anomaly is subtle, and physicists caution that it might still be a statistical fluke. If confirmed, however, it could mark the long-sought discovery of a whole zoo of new particles--and the end of a long-standing model of particle physics.

  19. Status of non-LHC experiments at CERN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlatter, Dieter

    2005-06-01

    From the few non-LHC experiments still done at CERN, three experiments are presented. One experiment is completed (NA48 on direct CP violation in kaon decays), two others (NA48/1 on rare kaon decays and DIRAC on Pionium lifetime) have first physics results. The last chapter is a reminder of the SMC experiment in memory of Vernon Hughes (1921-2003), who was the spokesperson.

  20. Astrophysics at n_TOF Facility at CERN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tagliente, G.; Abbondanno, U.; Aerts, G.; Alvarez, H.; Alvarez-Velarde, F.; Andriamonje, S.; Andrzejewski, J.; Audouin, L.; Badurek, G.; Baumann, P.; Bečvář, F.; Belloni, F.; Berthoumieux, E.; Bisterzo, S.; Calviño, F.; Calviani, M.; Cano-Ott, D.; Capote, R.; Carrapiço, C.; Cennini, P.; Chepel, V.; Chiaveri, E.; Colonna, N.; Cortes, G.; Couture, A.; Cox, J.; Dahlfors, M.; David, S.; Dillman, I.; Domingo-Pardo, C.; Dridi, W.; Duran, I.; Eleftheriadis, C.; Embid-Segura, M.; Ferrari, A.; Ferreira-Marques, R.; Fujii, K.; Furman, W.; Gallino, R.; Goncalves, I.; Gonzalez-Romero, E.; Gramegna, F.; Guerrero, C.; Gunsing, F.; Haas, B.; Haight, R.; Heil, M.; Herrera-Martinez, A.; Igashira, M.; Jericha, E.; Käppeler, F.; Kadi, Y.; Karadimos, D.; Karamanis, D.; Kerveno, M.; Koehler, P.; Kossionides, E.; Krtička, M.; Leeb, H.; Lindote, A.; Lopes, I.; Lozano, M.; Lukic, S.; Marganiec, J.; Marrone, S.; Martinez, T.; Massimi, C.; Mastinu, P.; Mengoni, A.; Milazzo, P. M.; Mosconi, M.; Neves, F.; Oberhummer, H.; Pancin, J.; Papachristodoulou, C.; Papadopoulos, C.; Paradela, C.; Patronis, N.; Pavlik, A.; Pavlopoulos, P.; Perrot, L.; Pigni, M. T.; Plag, R.; Plompen, A.; Plukis, A.; Poch, A.; Praena, J.; Pretel, C.; Quesada, J.; Rauscher, T.; Reifarth, R.; Rubbia, C.; Rudolf, G.; Rullhusen, P.; Salgado, J.; Santos, C.; Sarchiapone, L.; Savvidis, I.; Stephan, C.; Tain, J. L.; Tassan-Got, L.; Tavora, L.; Terlizzi, R.; Vannini, G.; Vaz, P.; Ventura, A.; Villamarin, D.; Vincente, M. C.; Vlachoudis, V.; Vlastou, R.; Voss, F.; Walter, S.; Wendler, H.; Wiescher, M.; Wisshak, K.

    2011-09-01

    The neutron time of flight (n_TOF) facility at CERN is a spallation neutron source with white neutron energy spectrum (from thermal to several GeV), covering the full energy range of interest for nuclear astrophysics, in particular for measurements of the neutron capture cross section required in s-process nucleosynthesis. This contribution presents an overview on the astrophysical program carried on at the n_TOF facility, the main results and their implications.

  1. Reproducibility of heart rate turbulence indexes in heart failure patients.

    PubMed

    D'Addio, Gianni; Cesarelli, Mario; Corbi, Graziamaria; Romano, Maria; Furgi, Giuseppe; Ferrara, Nicola; Rengo, Franco

    2010-01-01

    Cardiovascular oscillations following spontaneous ventricular premature complexes (VPC) are characterized by a short-term heart rate fluctuation known as heart rate turbulence (HRT) described by the so-called turbulence onset (TO) and slope (TS). Despite a recent written consensus on the standard of HRT measurement, reproducibility data are lacking. Aim of the paper was a reproducibility study of HRT indexes in heart failure patients (HF). Eleven HF patients underwent two 24h ECG Holter recordings, spaced 7 ± 5 days. A paired t test was used to assess the clinical stability of patients during the study period and the number of PVC in Holter recordings' couples. Both TO and TS indexes were calculated for each isolated VPC, and due to their skewed distribution, reproducibility of median and mean TO and TS was studied by Bland-Altman technique. Results showed that median HRT indexes might be preferred to commonly suggested mean values and that, although TO showed lower bias value than TS, TS can be considered much more reproducible than TO, comparing limits of agreements with normal values. This preliminary results suggest the use of medians instead of mean HRT indexes values and a reliability of the turbulence slope greater than the turbulence onset index.

  2. Early Onset Hot Flashes May Signal Higher Heart Risks

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_164627.html Early Onset Hot Flashes May Signal Higher Heart Risks Study found ... 13, 2017 THURSDAY, April 13, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Hot flashes may be more than a troublesome nuisance ...

  3. More Exercise, Fewer Pounds: Cut Your Heart Failure Risk

    MedlinePlus

    ... https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_163806.html More Exercise, Fewer Pounds: Cut Your Heart Failure Risk Link ... MONDAY, Feb. 27, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Getting regular exercise and staying slim can lower the risk for ...

  4. Mediterranean Diet Plus Olive Oil a Boost to Heart Health?

    MedlinePlus

    ... gov/news/fullstory_163557.html Mediterranean Diet Plus Olive Oil a Boost to Heart Health? It enhances ... HealthDay News) -- A Mediterranean diet high in virgin olive oil may boost the protective effects of "good" ...

  5. A Little Planning Helps Your Heart--and Your Budget

    MedlinePlus

    ... Lifestyle Recommendations Making Healthy Choices Heart-Healthy Grocery Shopping Healthy For Life National Eating Healthy Day Nutrition ... the ingredients you need when you go grocery shopping. Keep an eye out for fresh, seasonal items ...

  6. Three-day fever.

    PubMed

    Akakpo, A J

    2015-08-01

    Three-day fever is a viral disease caused by an Ephemerovirus of the family Rhabdoviridae, transmitted by arthropod vectors. It is common in tropical and sub-tropical regions, where it affects mainly domestic cattle and buffaloes, especially in intensive dairy or fattening production systems. It is of economic importance because it reduces milk production and fertility and causes abortion. The disease is generally benign. It manifests in several susceptible subjects simultaneously, with a sudden episode of fever accompanied by muscle involvement with arthritis, stiffness of the limbs, and lameness, followed by rapid recovery. The presence of a serofibrinous exudate in the joints is indicative of the disease. Clinical diagnosis is often difficult in the absence of pathognomonic signs. Epidemiological factors (proliferation of arthropod vectors), associated with a short-lived fever and the presence of many immature neutrophils, point strongly to three-day fever. In the absence of any specific treatment, the symptoms are treated with antibiotics and anti-inflammatories. Medical prophylaxis currently uses live attenuated vaccines, pending the development of recombinant vaccines, which are giving promising results.

  7. Heart transplantation: review

    PubMed Central

    Mangini, Sandrigo; Alves, Bárbara Rubim; Silvestre, Odílson Marcos; Pires, Philippe Vieira; Pires, Lucas José Tachotti; Curiati, Milena Novaes Cardoso; Bacal, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Heart transplantation is currently the definitive gold standard surgical approach in the treatment of refractory heart failure. However, the shortage of donors limits the achievement of a greater number of heart transplants, in which the use of mechanical circulatory support devices is increasing. With well-established indications and contraindications, as well as diagnosis and treatment of rejection through defined protocols of immunosuppression, the outcomes of heart transplantation are very favorable. Among early complications that can impact survival are primary graft failure, right ventricular dysfunction, rejection, and infections, whereas late complications include cardiac allograft vasculopathy and neoplasms. Despite the difficulties for heart transplantation, in particular, the shortage of donors and high mortality while on the waiting list, in Brazil, there is a great potential for both increasing effective donors and using circulatory assist devices, which can positively impact the number and outcomes of heart transplants. PMID:26154552

  8. Swan-Ganz - right heart catheterization

    MedlinePlus

    ... Congenital heart disease Heart failure Kidney disease Leaky heart valves (valvular regurgitation) Shock It may also be done ... flow problems, such as heart failure or shock Heart valve disease Lung disease Structural problems with the heart, ...

  9. [Music, pulse, heart and sport].

    PubMed

    Gasenzer, E R; Leischik, R

    2017-01-23

    Music, with its various elements, such as rhythm, sound and melody had the unique ability even in prehistoric, ancient and medieval times to have a special fascination for humans. Nowadays, it is impossible to eliminate music from our daily lives. We are accompanied by music in shopping arcades, on the radio, during sport or leisure time activities and in wellness therapy. Ritualized drumming was used in the medical sense to drive away evil spirits or to undergo holy enlightenment. Today we experience the varied effects of music on all sensory organs and we utilize its impact on cardiovascular and neurological rehabilitation, during invasive cardiovascular procedures or during physical activities, such as training or work. The results of recent studies showed positive effects of music on heart rate and in therapeutic treatment (e. g. music therapy). This article pursues the impact of music on the body and the heart and takes sports medical aspects from the past and the present into consideration; however, not all forms of music and not all types of musical activity are equally suitable and are dependent on the type of intervention, the sports activity or form of movement and also on the underlying disease. This article discusses the influence of music on the body, pulse, on the heart and soul in the past and the present day.

  10. Proceedings, Dean's Day 1999

    SciTech Connect

    Zanner, M.A.

    1999-03-01

    On January 14--15, 1999, Sandia National Laboratories sponsored Deans Day, a conference for the Deans of Engineering and other executive-level representatives from 29 invited universities. Through breakout sessions and a wrap-up discussion, university and Sandia participants identified activities to further develop their strategic relationships. The four primary activities are: (A) concentrate joint efforts on current and future research strengths and needs; (B) attract the best students (at all grade levels) to science and engineering; (C) promote awareness of the need for and work together to influence a national science and technology R and D policy; and (D) enable the universities and Sandia to be true allies, jointly pursuing research opportunities and funding from government agencies and industry.

  11. Heart Rate Monitors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Under a NASA grant, Dr. Robert M. Davis and Dr. William M. Portnoy came up with a new type of electrocardiographic electrode that would enable long term use on astronauts. Their invention was an insulated capacitive electrode constructed of a thin dielectric film. NASA subsequently licensed the electrode technology to Richard Charnitski, inventor of the VersaClimber, who founded Heart Rate, Inc., to further develop and manufacture personal heart monitors and to produce exercise machines using the technology for the physical fitness, medical and home markets. Same technology is on both the Home and Institutional Model VersaClimbers. On the Home Model an infrared heart beat transmitter is worn under exercise clothing. Transmitted heart rate is used to control the work intensity on the VersaClimber using the heart rate as the speedometer of the exercise. This offers advantages to a full range of users from the cardiac rehab patient to the high level physical conditioning of elite athletes. The company manufactures and markets five models of the 1*2*3 HEART RATE monitors that are used wherever people exercise to accurately monitor their heart rate. Company is developing a talking heart rate monitor that works with portable headset radios. A version of the heart beat transmitter will be available to the manufacturers of other aerobic exercise machines.

  12. Texas Heart Institute

    MedlinePlus

    ... Texas Heart Institute, The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, MD Anderson Cancer Center, and The University of Houston. Held most ... for Physicians Fellowships & Residencies School ...

  13. PREFACE: Lectures from the CERN Winter School on Strings, Supergravity and Gauge Theories, CERN, 9-13 February 2009 Lectures from the CERN Winter School on Strings, Supergravity and Gauge Theories, CERN, 9-13 February 2009

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uranga, A. M.

    2009-11-01

    This special section is devoted to the proceedings of the conference `Winter School on Strings, Supergravity and Gauge Theories', which took place at CERN, the European Centre for Nuclear Research, in Geneva, Switzerland 9-13 February 2009. This event is part of a yearly series of scientific schools, which represents a well established tradition. Previous events have been held at SISSA, in Trieste, Italy, in February 2005 and at CERN in January 2006, January 2007 and January 2008, and were funded by the European Mobility Research and Training Network `Constituents, Fundamental Forces and Symmetries of the Universe'. The next event will take place again at CERN, in January 2010. The school was primarily meant for young doctoral students and postdoctoral researchers working in the area of string theory. It consisted of several general lectures of four hours each, whose notes are published in this special section, and six working group discussion sessions, focused on specific topics of the network research program. It was well attended by over 200 participants. The topics of the lectures were chosen to provide an introduction to some of the areas of recent progress, and to the open problems, in string theory. One of the most active areas in string theory in recent years has been the AdS/CFT or gauge/gravity correspondence, which proposes the complete equivalence of string theory on (asymptotically) anti de Sitter spacetimes with certain quantum (gauge) field theories. The duality has recently been applied to understanding the hydrodynamical properties of a hot plasma in gauge theories (like the quark-gluon plasma created in heavy ion collisions at the RHIC experiment at Brookhaven, and soon at the LHC at CERN) in terms of a dual gravitational AdS theory in the presence of a black hole. These developments were reviewed in the lecture notes by M Rangamani. In addition, the AdS/CFT duality has been proposed as a tool to study interesting physical properties in other

  14. Nuts and Your Heart: Eating Nuts for Heart Health

    MedlinePlus

    Diseases and Conditions Heart disease Eating nuts helps your heart. Discover how walnuts, almonds and other nuts can help lower your cholesterol when ... a healthy diet may be good for your heart. Nuts contain unsaturated fatty acids and other nutrients. ...

  15. Dimensional analysis of heart rate variability in heart transplant recipients

    SciTech Connect

    Zbilut, J.P.; Mayer-Kress, G.; Geist, K.

    1987-01-01

    We discuss periodicities in the heart rate in normal and transplanted hearts. We then consider the possibility of dimensional analysis of these periodicities in transplanted hearts and problems associated with the record.

  16. The triple day.

    PubMed

    Smith, V

    1980-08-01

    The risks are high and the returns low when Peruvian women work outside the home, but they have few other options. Most have large families, and their husbands scramble to earn a few dollars. For some women the day begins at 3:30 a.m. when they go to Lima to peddle fish, combs, or whatever commodity is available. The poor women who live in the pueblos jovenes of Lima, the newly formed outskirts, have banded together in a Christian group called Luz y Esperanza, or Light and Hope. The group has a 10-year history of coping with unsanitary water and resultant health problems, child care, and lack of electricity. The women began with neighborhood issues but have also developed an interest in trade unions and other less local concerns. Members have also started to attend union meetings in Lima and involved themselves in recent trade union struggles. The development of the women's political consciousness is closely intertwined with their Christian faith. They believe Christ is the source of the energy they need to persevere.

  17. AAS 227: Day 4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-01-01

    Editors Note:This week were at the 227th AAS Meeting in Kissimmee, FL. Along with several fellow authors from astrobites.com, I will bewritingupdates on selectedevents at themeeting and posting at the end of each day. Follow along here or atastrobites.com, or catch ourlive-tweeted updates from the@astrobites Twitter account. The usual posting schedule for AAS Nova will resumenext week.Welcome to Day 4 of the winter American Astronomical Society (AAS) meeting in Kissimmee! Several of us are attending the conference this year, and we will report highlights from each day here on astrobites. If youd like to see more timely updates during the day, we encourage you to follow @astrobites on twitter or search the #aas227 hashtag.Helen B. Warner Prize: Origins of Structure in Planetary Systems (by Erika Nesvold)Another excellent prize lecture started off todays sessions. The Helen B. Warner Prize is awarded for achievement in observational or theoretical astrophysics by a young researcher (no more than eight years after their Ph.D.). This years Warner Prize was presented to Ruth Murray-Clay of UC Santa Barbara. For her award lecture, Murray-Clay told us all about planetary system architecture: the number, masses, and orbits of planets in a given system.Ruth Murray-Clay [photo from http://web.physics.ucsb.edu/ ~murray/biocv.html]The underlying question motivating this type of research is: How rare is the Solar System? In other words, how likely is it that a given planetary system will have rocky planets close to their star, gas giants farther out, and ice giants at the outer reaches of the system? Answering this question will help us solve the physics problem of how and where planets form, and will also help us on our search for other planets like Earth.The data on exoplanet population from transit and radial velocity observations and from direct imaging tell us that our Solar System is not common (many systems we observe have much more eccentric gas giants), but that doesnt

  18. [LAPAROSCOPIC "SLEEVE" GASTRECTOMY POST HEART TRANSPLANTION].

    PubMed

    Mahler, Ilanit; Ben Gal, Tuvia; Kashtan, Hanoch; Keidar, Andrei

    2016-03-01

    Morbid obesity affects the function of the transplanted heart either directly, by damaging many elements that affect cardiac function or indirectly, by the initial appearance or worsening of co-morbidities that affect the heart. Bariatric surgery is the most effective treatment for a significant and sustained decrease in weight and it leads to the disappearance of co-morbidities such as diabetes, hypertension and dyslipidemia in high rates. These diseases can damage the blood vessels of the graft and impair its function. We report a case study of a 47-year-old morbidly obese male (BMI 36 kg/m2] who underwent heart transplantation three years previously, developed gradual weight gain and symptoms of aggravating heart failure. Coronary artery disease in the implanted heart was diagnosed. Clinically, he started suffering from shortness of breath and chest pain during minimal effort. In addition, he also suffered from high blood pressure and kidney failure. Laparoscopic sleeve gastrectomy was successfully performed and he was discharged four days later. On follow-up the patient has lost 35 kg. His present weight is 74 kg (BMI 25.7). All symptoms of heart failure improved and oral medications for hypertension and heart failure were withdrawn. Our conclusion is that it is justified to consider bariatric surgery in heart transplant recipients suffering from morbid obesity, as long as the long-term benefit outweighs the surgical risk. The decision to perform bariatric surgery should be made by a multidisciplinary team and the operation should take place at a center with extensive experience in bariatric surgery.

  19. Women's Heart Foundation

    MedlinePlus

    ... by Dr. Stephen Sinatra - "Should I take a Statin?" - TED TALK by Dr. Noel Bairey Merz - discusses new heart diagnostics for women - TED TALK by Dr. Joel Furhman - discusses how to eat to prevent and reverse heart disease - Women get their own stroke guidelines - AHA - Speak ...

  20. Heart imaging method

    DOEpatents

    Collins, H. Dale; Gribble, R. Parks; Busse, Lawrence J.

    1991-01-01

    A method for providing an image of the human heart's electrical system derives time-of-flight data from an array of EKG electrodes and this data is transformed into phase information. The phase information, treated as a hologram, is reconstructed to provide an image in one or two dimensions of the electrical system of the functioning heart.

  1. Anxiety and Heart Disease

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-01-01

    disability among women and men in the United States. By the year 2020, CHD is projected to be the number one cause of death worldwide.( American Heart Association , 2002...combined.( American Heart Association , 2002) The effect of various demographic (e.g., age, gender) and clinical (e.g., presence of comorbidities

  2. The total artificial heart.

    PubMed

    Cook, Jason A; Shah, Keyur B; Quader, Mohammed A; Cooke, Richard H; Kasirajan, Vigneshwar; Rao, Kris K; Smallfield, Melissa C; Tchoukina, Inna; Tang, Daniel G

    2015-12-01

    The total artificial heart (TAH) is a form of mechanical circulatory support in which the patient's native ventricles and valves are explanted and replaced by a pneumatically powered artificial heart. Currently, the TAH is approved for use in end-stage biventricular heart failure as a bridge to heart transplantation. However, with an increasing global burden of cardiovascular disease and congestive heart failure, the number of patients with end-stage heart failure awaiting heart transplantation now far exceeds the number of available hearts. As a result, the use of mechanical circulatory support, including the TAH and left ventricular assist device (LVAD), is growing exponentially. The LVAD is already widely used as destination therapy, and destination therapy for the TAH is under investigation. While most patients requiring mechanical circulatory support are effectively treated with LVADs, there is a subset of patients with concurrent right ventricular failure or major structural barriers to LVAD placement in whom TAH may be more appropriate. The history, indications, surgical implantation, post device management, outcomes, complications, and future direction of the TAH are discussed in this review.

  3. The total artificial heart

    PubMed Central

    Cook, Jason A.; Shah, Keyur B.; Quader, Mohammed A.; Cooke, Richard H.; Kasirajan, Vigneshwar; Rao, Kris K.; Smallfield, Melissa C.; Tchoukina, Inna

    2015-01-01

    The total artificial heart (TAH) is a form of mechanical circulatory support in which the patient’s native ventricles and valves are explanted and replaced by a pneumatically powered artificial heart. Currently, the TAH is approved for use in end-stage biventricular heart failure as a bridge to heart transplantation. However, with an increasing global burden of cardiovascular disease and congestive heart failure, the number of patients with end-stage heart failure awaiting heart transplantation now far exceeds the number of available hearts. As a result, the use of mechanical circulatory support, including the TAH and left ventricular assist device (LVAD), is growing exponentially. The LVAD is already widely used as destination therapy, and destination therapy for the TAH is under investigation. While most patients requiring mechanical circulatory support are effectively treated with LVADs, there is a subset of patients with concurrent right ventricular failure or major structural barriers to LVAD placement in whom TAH may be more appropriate. The history, indications, surgical implantation, post device management, outcomes, complications, and future direction of the TAH are discussed in this review. PMID:26793338

  4. Diabetic Heart Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... cardiomyopathy (KAR-de-o-mi-OP-ah-thee). Coronary Heart Disease In CHD, a waxy substance called plaque (plak) ... DHD tend to have less success with some heart disease treatments, such as coronary artery bypass grafting and percutaneous coronary intervention , also ...

  5. Human heart by art.

    PubMed

    Tamir, Abraham

    2012-11-01

    Heart is of great importance in maintaining the life of the body. Enough to stop working for a few minutes to cause death, and hence the great importance in physiology, medicine, and research. This fact was already emphasized in the Bible in the Book of Proverbs, chapter 4 verse 23: "Keep your heart with all diligence, for out of it is the wellspring of life." Art was able to demonstrate the heart from various aspects; realistically, as done by Leonardo de Vinci who demonstrated the halves of the heart and its blood vessels. Symbolically, as a source of life, the heart was demonstrated by the artist Mrs. Erlondeiel, as a caricature by Salvador Dali, as an open heart by Sawaya, etc. Finally, it should be emphasized that different demonstrations of the human heart by many artworks make this most important organ of our body (that cannot be seen from outside) more familiar and clearer to us. And this is the purpose of this article-to demonstrate the heart through a large number of artworks of different kinds.

  6. Music and the heart.

    PubMed

    Koelsch, Stefan; Jäncke, Lutz

    2015-11-21

    Music can powerfully evoke and modulate emotions and moods, along with changes in heart activity, blood pressure (BP), and breathing. Although there is great heterogeneity in methods and quality among previous studies on effects of music on the heart, the following findings emerge from the literature: Heart rate (HR) and respiratory rate (RR) are higher in response to exciting music compared with tranquilizing music. During musical frissons (involving shivers and piloerection), both HR and RR increase. Moreover, HR and RR tend to increase in response to music compared with silence, and HR appears to decrease in response to unpleasant music compared with pleasant music. We found no studies that would provide evidence for entrainment of HR to musical beats. Corresponding to the increase in HR, listening to exciting music (compared with tranquilizing music) is associated with a reduction of heart rate variability (HRV), including reductions of both low-frequency and high-frequency power of the HRV. Recent findings also suggest effects of music-evoked emotions on regional activity of the heart, as reflected in electrocardiogram amplitude patterns. In patients with heart disease (similar to other patient groups), music can reduce pain and anxiety, associated with lower HR and lower BP. In general, effects of music on the heart are small, and there is great inhomogeneity among studies with regard to methods, findings, and quality. Therefore, there is urgent need for systematic high-quality research on the effects of music on the heart, and on the beneficial effects of music in clinical settings.

  7. Morphogenesis of univentricular hearts.

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, R H; Becker, A E; Wilkinson, J L; Gerlis, L M

    1976-01-01

    Two main theories exist for the explanation of univentricular hearts. One states that the bulboventricular septum becomes realigned to form the interventricular septum, and that univentricular hearts are a consequence of failure of this realignment. The other states that bulboventricular and interventricular septa are different structures, and that the univentricular heart results from failure of formation of the posterior interventricular septum. Four hearts are described in which both the posterior septum and an anterior bulboventricular septum are present. In each heart, therefore, the right ventricular sinus is separated both from the left ventricular sinus and from a discrete outlet chamber which supports the pulmonary artery. It is argued that these findings militate strongly against theories proposing reorientation of the bulboventricular septum to form the definitive interventricular septum. They support strongly the concept that the definitive right ventricle is formed in part from the bulbus and in part from the primitive ventricle. On the basis of these findings, it is suggested that the distinctive feature of the univentricular heart is absence of the posterior septum. Such hearts can properly be termed 'primitive ventricle'. It is also suggested that hearts with atretic or straddling valves should be included within this category. Images PMID:1275986

  8. Cyanotic heart disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... the body and flows through the heart and lungs. Blood that is low in oxygen (blue blood) returns ... the way blood flows through the heart and lungs. This causes non-oxygenated blood to be pumped out to the body without ...

  9. Patterns of Heart Attacks

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-06-01

    36 5.1 Pattern of gradually increasing occurrence of COPD .............................................. 37 5.2 Pattern of...deaths [1]. According to the Heart Disease and Stroke Statistics - 2010 Update from the American Heart Association, the estimated annual incidence of MI...7]. The study combined the insurance claims from the Medicare and the Manitoba Health Services Commission claims database with hospitalization

  10. H2-blocker modulates heart rate variability.

    PubMed

    Ooie, T; Saikawa, T; Hara, M; Ono, H; Seike, M; Sakata, T

    1999-01-01

    The use of H2-blockers in the treatment of patients with peptic ulcer has become popular. However, this treatment has adverse cardiovascular effects. The aim of this study was to investigate proarrhythmic rhythm and autonomic nervous activity by analyzing heart rate variability in patients treated with omeprazole, ranitidine, and plaunotol. Nineteen patients (mean age 67.5 +/- 2.7 years) with active gastric ulcer were treated with omeprazole (20 mg/day) for 8 weeks, then ranitidine (300 mg/day) for the next 4 months, and finally plaunotol (240 mg/day). At each stage of the treatment, Holter electrocardiography was performed, and heart rate variability and arrhythmias analyzed. Heart rate variability yielded power in the low- (0.04-0.15 Hz) and high-frequency components (0.15-0.4 Hz). Although both ranitidine and omeprazole induced little change in cardiac rhythm, the high-frequency power was higher (10.3 +/- 0.8 vs 8.6 +/- 0.6 ms, P < 0.05) and the ratio of low-to-high frequency power was lower (1.41 +/-0.10 vs 1.59 +/- 0.09. P < 0.05) during ranitidine than during plaunotol treatment. Cosinor analysis of heart rate variability revealed a decreased amplitude of low-frequency power during omeprazole compared with during ranitidine and plaunotol treatment. Ranitidine modulated high-frequency power which may be related to the adverse cardiovascular effects of H2-blocker.

  11. International Women's Day speech.

    PubMed

    Kazibwe, S W

    1993-01-01

    The objectives of the International Women's Day are: 1) to celebrate the struggle for women's rights in the economic, social, political, and cultural domain; 2) to reaffirm women's solidarity in the struggle for peace; 3) and to show what women have achieved. In 1988, Uganda's government of the National Resistance Movement created the Ministry of Women in Development. The period 1988-1990 was one of consultations, needs assessment, planning, and recruiting staff for the Ministry. From 1990 to 1993, measurable results have been achieved. The Ministry's gender concerns pertained to the sector policies of the Ministries of Agriculture, Animal Industry and Fisheries, Education, Health, Water, Energy, Minerals, and Environment Protection. Under the Umbrella Project for Women in Development, gender sensitization has been achieved with policy makers in ministries, at district level, and in the media. Gender issues have also been incorporated in the National Political School Curriculum. The Ministry has also trained a corps of 73 women trainers from 38 districts. The Ministry, with funding from DANIDA, collected women's views on the constitution through meetings and seminars in all the districts in the country. Recommendations were submitted in a consolidated report to the Constitution Commission. A pilot para-legal scheme is successfully being implemented in Kamuli district. A community-based pool of legal advisors has been developed. Legal matters that affect both women and men are undertaken at the community level. The economic emancipation of women is a crucial part of the Ministry's mandate. In conjunction with NGOs, pilot credit programs are being run in Mukono, Jinja, Mbale, and Kapchorwa districts. Cross-sectoral programs are in close collaboration with the rural water and sanitation program, the Northern Uganda rehabilitation program, and the integrated Basic Education Pilot Project to be implemented in 8 districts.

  12. AAS 227: Day 3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-01-01

    Editors Note:This week were at the 227th AAS Meeting in Kissimmee, FL. Along with several fellow authors from astrobites.com, I will bewritingupdates on selectedevents at themeeting and posting at the end of each day. Follow along here or atastrobites.com, or catch ourlive-tweeted updates from the@astrobites Twitter account. The usual posting schedule for AAS Nova will resumenext week.Welcome to Day 3 of the winter American Astronomical Society (AAS) meeting in Kissimmee! Several of us are attending the conference this year, and we will report highlights from each day here on astrobites. If youd like to see more timely updates during the day, we encourage you to follow @astrobites on twitter or search the #aas227 hashtag.Henry Norris Russell Lecture: Viewing the Universe with Infrared Eyes: The Spitzer Space Telescope (by Erika Nesvold)The Henry Norris Russell Award is the highest honor given by the AAS, for a lifetime of eminence in astronomy research. This years award went to Giovanni Fazio of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics. Fazio became a leader in gamma ray astronomy before switching mid-career to the study of infrared astronomy, and he gave his award lecture on the latter subject, specifically on the Spitzer Space Telescope, one of the most successful infrared telescopes of all time.Artists rendering of the Spitzer space telescope. [NASA/JPL-Caltech]Spitzer has been operating for more than twelve years, and has resulted in over six thousand papers in refereed journals in that time. The telescope sits in an Earth-trailing orbit around the Sun, and is now farther from the Earth (1.4 AU) than the Earth is from the Sun. Fazio gave the audience a fascinating overview of the science done by Spitzer over more than a decade. One of the most productive areas of research for Spitzer is the study of exoplanets, which hadnt even been discovered when the Spitzer Telescope was first conceived. Spitzers high sensitivity and ability to observe exoplanets over

  13. Franco, the Early Days

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siemssen, R. H.

    2004-04-01

    As this meeting is to honour Franco on the occasion of his 60 birthday I thought that it might be fitting to report on some early reminiscences of Franco of the pre-IBA days. Franco first came to Groningen in 1972 for a seminar on the invitation of Alex Lande. Alex and Franco had known each other from the Niels Bohr Institute in Copenhagen, where they had collaborated. In 1972 both Alex and I had been freshly appointed at Groningen, Alex on the Faculty of the Theory Department, and I myself as the new director of the KVI. A position for a Senior Scientist in theory had been newly created at the KVI with the aim to establish a strong in-house theory group. Needless to say that everyone who met Franco was deeply impressed by him. We thus were extremely happy to be able to entice Franco to join the KVI as a Senior Scientist in 1974, after he had spent a few weeks in Groningen in 1973 as a visitor. So characteristic of Franco he immediately took a strong interest in the experimental program as evidenced by the following publications on the weak-coupling description of three-nucleon pickup in the (p, α) reaction [1] and the spreading width of deep-hole states [2]. Both topics appear to have maintained their actuality, looking at the many papers that have been published since on these and related topics. But this brief citation of the "other Franco" would not do justice to him without mentioning the diverse palette of Franco's work also listed in the KVI 1974 Annual Report, reflecting Franco's extremely broad and diversified scientific interests. [3-10]...

  14. Acute Decompensated Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Joseph, Susan M.; Cedars, Ari M.; Ewald, Gregory A.; Geltman, Edward M.; Mann, Douglas L.

    2009-01-01

    Hospitalizations for acute decompensated heart failure are increasing in the United States. Moreover, the prevalence of heart failure is increasing consequent to an increased number of older individuals, as well as to improvement in therapies for coronary artery disease and sudden cardiac death that have enabled patients to live longer with cardiovascular disease. The main treatment goals in the hospitalized patient with heart failure are to restore euvolemia and to minimize adverse events. Common in-hospital treatments include intravenous diuretics, vasodilators, and inotropic agents. Novel pharmaceutical agents have shown promise in the treatment of acute decompensated heart failure and may simplify the treatment and reduce the morbidity associated with the disease. This review summarizes the contemporary management of patients with acute decompensated heart failure. PMID:20069075

  15. Living with Diabetic Heart Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. Living With Diabetic Heart Disease Diabetic heart disease (DHD) increases the likelihood of earlier and more ... also tend to have less success from certain heart disease treatments, such as coronary artery bypass grafting and ...

  16. Guidelines for Better Heart Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home Current Issue Past Issues Guidelines for Better Heart Health Past Issues / Winter 2007 Table of Contents For ... Heart Association (AHA) released new guidelines for preventing heart disease and stroke ... health. Those guidelines, still in effect today, adopted the ...

  17. What Causes Heart Valve Disease?

    MedlinePlus

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Causes Heart Valve Disease? Heart conditions and other disorders, age-related changes, ... valve disease. Other Conditions and Factors Linked to Heart Valve Disease Many other conditions and factors are linked to ...

  18. Signs of a Heart Attack

    MedlinePlus

    ... attack Heart Health and Stroke Signs of a heart attack Related information Make the Call. Don't Miss ... to top More information on Signs of a heart attack Read more from womenshealth.gov Make the Call, ...

  19. What Are Congenital Heart Defects?

    MedlinePlus

    ... heart disease. Google+ Hangout on the first large-scale gene sequencing analysis of congenital heart disease 05/ ... in the journal Nature, about the first large-scale sequencing analysis of congenital heart disease. This NHLBI- ...

  20. Types of Congenital Heart Defects

    MedlinePlus

    ... heart disease. Google+ Hangout on the first large-scale gene sequencing analysis of congenital heart disease 05/ ... in the journal Nature, about the first large-scale sequencing analysis of congenital heart disease. This NHLBI- ...

  1. Preparing Children for Heart Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... Physical Activity Recommendations for Heart Health • Tools & Resources Web Booklets on Congenital Heart Defects These online publications ... to you or your child’s defect and concerns. Web Booklet: Adults With Congenital Heart Defects Web Booklet: ...

  2. EPA Heathy Heart Program Webinar

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA is raising awareness of heart disease and its link to air pollution and other environmental factors as a partner in the Million Hearts, a national initiative to prevent 1 million heart attacks and strokes by 2017.

  3. Substances and Heart Rhythm Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... that trigger the heartbeat. Caffeine, Diet and Heart Arrhythmias Caffeine is the most common substance linked with abnormal heart rhythms ( arrhythmias ). Some people feel heart palpitations (fast heartbeats) when ...

  4. Data and Statistics: Heart Failure

    MedlinePlus

    ... this? Submit What's this? Submit Button Related CDC Web Sites Heart Disease Stroke High Blood Pressure Salt ... to Prevent and Control Chronic Diseases Million Hearts® Web Sites with More Information About Heart Failure For ...

  5. Illegal Drugs and Heart Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... vessels and heart valves. Many drugs, such as cocaine, heroin and various forms of amphetamine, affect the ... heart attacks, seizures, and respiratory arrest More about Cocaine - the "perfect heart-attack drug" The powdered form ...

  6. Dorothy Day: A Love of Fiction and Her Love of the Poor

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brady, Judith Ann

    2010-01-01

    Dorothy Day's love of the poor originated from reading novels that portrayed the poor as persons worthy of respect. This article explores how Day's reading novels opened her mind and heart to the realities of poverty. The methodology is literature-based. Dorothy Day's autobiography reveals the novelists who captivated her mind and cultivated a…

  7. Heart period and heart period variability during sleep on the MIR space station.

    PubMed

    Gundel, A; Drescher, J; Spatenko, Y A; Polyakov, V V

    1999-03-01

    The long-term acclimation of cardiac rhythms to microgravity was studied in four astronauts aboard the Russian space station MIR during wakefulness and sleep. Sleep polygraphies were obtained between the third and the 30th day in space and, in addition, prior to mission on the ground. From each of the sleep polygraphies, beat-to-beat intervals of cardiac rhythms were determined. The response of heart period and heart period variability to the stimulus microgravity was tested during sleep across sleep stages and during waking. A lengthening of heart period by about 100 ms was found in space compared to measurements on the ground. The slowing of heart rate was more pronounced for non-REM sleep than for REM sleep. A systematic change in heart period in relation to the duration of the stay in space could not be detected. An analysis of heart period variability in the high frequency (respiratory sinus arrhythmia) band supports the hypothesis that the decrease of heart rate under microgravity is produced by an increase in parasympathetic activity. Testing the response of cardiac rhythms to microgravity across distinct behavioural states seems to be a powerful tool to investigate the cardiovascular system.

  8. Uptake of myocardial imaging agents by rejected hearts

    SciTech Connect

    Bergsland, J.; Carr, E.A.; Carroll, M.; Wright, J.W.; Feldman, M.J.; Massucci, J.; Bhayana, J.N.; Gona, J.M.

    1985-09-01

    Technetium 99 m pyrophosphate, Gallium 67 and Thallium 201 uptakes were measured in heterotopically transplanted rat hearts. Five days after transplantation, Technetium 99 m pyrophosphate, and Gallium 67 uptakes were significantly higher in allogeneic grafts than in syngeneic grafts. At an early stage of rejection (three days after transplantation), only Technetium 99 m pyrophosphate uptake in the left ventricle of allogeneic grafts showed a significant difference (p less than 0.04). At five days, Thallium 201 uptake was significantly lower in allo- than syngeneic grafts. There was a positive correlation between radionuclide uptake and histologic degree of rejection for Technetium 99 m pyrophosphate and Gallium 67 while Thallium 201 uptake correlated negatively. Analysis of variance revealed that hearts with no or minimal rejection had statistically different uptakes than hearts with mild to moderate rejection. These results suggest that uptake of imaging agents might be useful in the diagnosis of rejection of the transplanted heart.

  9. [Heart disease or sick at heart].

    PubMed

    Nager, F

    1993-02-27

    It is attempted to draw attention to the demanding and complementary reality of the modern cardiologist by confronting cardiology and cordiology (symbolistic theory of the heart). After a short survey of the symbolic and mythological world of the heart, the question of compatibility between the apparently opposing poles of cardiologic curative technology and cordiologic emotionalism is posed. With respect to the comprehensive cardiology of tomorrow, it is crucial whether the modern cardiac specialist will be capable of a difficult quadruple synthesis, namely: (1) the harmonious interaction between a rational basic position (raison de la mathématique) and an irrational-emotional standpoint (raison du coeur), (2) the increasing closeness of science and humanity, (3) the balanced care and culture of technology and medical language, and (4) the increasing harmony of male and female norms. Future cardiology must follow the call of the complementary, which reflects the apparent contrast between the scientific and the poetic heart; between having a symbolic heart condition and being heartsick.

  10. Government-Backed Salt Reduction Efforts Could Deliver Big Health Pay Day

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_162976.html Government-Backed Salt Reduction Efforts Could Deliver Big Health Pay Day Researchers estimate a 10 percent cut in salt could save millions worldwide from heart disease To ...

  11. 2016 SPD: Day 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-06-01

    Editors note: This week were in Boulder, Colorado at the 47th meeting of the AAS Solar Physics Division (SPD). Follow along to catch some of the latest news from the field of solar physics!The 2016 SPD meeting was launched this morning from the University of Colorado Boulder campus. Two of the hot topics at this years meeting include celebration of the recent move of the National Solar Observatorys headquarters to Boulder, and discussion of the future Daniel K. Inouye Solar Telescope (DKIST, formerly the Advanced Technology Solar Telescope, ATST). DKIST, planned for a 2019 completion in Hawaii, is the next big telescope on the horizon for solar physics.Todays press conference had an interesting focus: instruments providing new high-energy observations of the Sun. Representatives from four different instruments were here to talk about some of the latest X-ray solar observations.GRIPSThe GRIPS payload flew at 130,000 ft over Antarctica on a giant balloon in January 2016. [NASA/Albert Shih]First up, Albert Shih (NASA Goddard) described the Gamma-Ray Imager/Polarimeter for Solar flares, or GRIPS. GRIPS is a balloon-borne instrument designed to detect X-rays and gamma rays emitted during solar flares. Up to tens of a percent of the energy in solar flares is emitted in the form of accelerated particles, but the physics behind this process is not well understood. GRIPS observes where the highest-energy particles are accelerated, in an effort to learn more about the process.GRIPS was launched on 19 January, 2016 and flew for roughly 12 days gathering ~1 million seconds of data! The logistics of this instruments flight are especially interesting, since it was launched from Antarctica and carried by a balloon at a whopping elevation of 130,000 ft (to get high enough that the atmosphere doesnt absorb all the photons GRIPS is trying to observe). Though the data from the mission has been retrieved, the bulk of the hardware remains where it landed at the end of January. It must

  12. 2016 SPD: Day 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-06-01

    advances in simulating sunspot formation. He and his collaborators have used high-performance computing to build a model that successfully reproduces many of the key properties of sunspots that are observed.In particular, these simulations track the motions of the magnetic field starting within the interior of the Sun (8000 km below the surface!). The magnetic field is generated and intensified by convection deep within the solar interior. Bundles of magnetic field then rise through the convection zone, eventually breaking through the solar surface and giving rise to sunspots.This process of tracking the flow as it travels from the convective layer all the way through the solar surface has resulted in what may be some of the highest fidelity simulations of sunspots thus far. The structures produced in these simulations compares very favorably with actual observations of sunspots including the asymmetry seen in most sunspots.Counting Spots on the SunContinuing the discussion of sunspots, Leif Svalgaard (Stanford University) next took us on a historical journey from the 1600s through the present. For the last 400 years starting with Galileo people have kept records of the number of sunspots visible on the Suns disk.One of Galileos drawings of his sunspot observations from 1612. [The Galileo Project]This turns out to be a very useful practice! Total solar irradiance, a measure used as input into climate models, is reconstructed from sunspot numbers. Therefore, the historical record of sunspots over the last 400 years impacts our estimates of the long-term trends in solar activity.Based on raw sunspot counts, studies have argued that solar activity has been steadily increasing over time. But could this be a misinterpretation resulting from the fact that our technology and therefore our ability to detect sunspots has improved over time? Svalgaard believes so.By studying and reconstructing 18th century telescopes, he demonstrates that modern-day sunspot counts are able to detect

  13. Data acquisition using the 168/E. [CERN ISR

    SciTech Connect

    Carroll, J.T.; Cittolin, S.; Demoulin, M.; Fucci, A.; Martin, B.; Norton, A.; Porte, J.P.; Rossi, P.; Storr, K.M.

    1983-03-01

    Event sizes and data rates at the CERN anti p p collider compose a formidable environment for a high level trigger. A system using three 168/E processors for experiment UA1 real-time event selection is described. With 168/E data memory expanded to 512K bytes, each processor holds a complete event allowing a FORTRAN trigger algorithm access to data from the entire detector. A smart CAMAC interface reads five Remus branches in parallel transferring one word to the target processor every 0.5 ..mu..s. The NORD host computer can simultaneously read an accepted event from another processor.

  14. The cern axion solar telescope (CAST): an update

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andriamonje, S.; Arsov, V.; Aune, S.; Aune, T.; Avignone, F. T.; Barth, K.; Belov, A.; Beltran, B.; Bräuninger, H.; Carmona, J.; Cebrián, S.; Chesi, E.; Cipolla, G.; Collar, J.; Creswick, R.; Dafni, T.; Davenport, M.; Dedousis, S.; Delattre, M.; Delbart, A.; Deoliveira, R.; Dilella, L.; Eleftheriadis, C.; Engelhauser, J.; Fanourakis, G.; Farach, H.; Ferrer, E.; Fischer, H.; Formenti, F.; Franz, J.; Friedrich, P.; Geralis, T.; Giomataris, I.; Gninenko, S.; Golubev, N.; Hartmann, R.; Hasinoff, M.; Heinsius, F.-H.; Hoffmann, D. H. H.; Irastorza, I.; Jacoby, J.; Joux, J.-N.; Kang, D.; Königsmann, K.; Kotthaus, R.; Krcmar, M.; Kuster, M.; Lakic, B.; Lasseur, C.; Liolios, A.; Lippitsch, A.; Ljubicic, A.; Lutz, G.; Luzon, G.; Morales, A.; Morales, J.; Mutterer, M.; Nikolaidis, A.; de Solorzano, A. Ortiz; Papaevangelou, T.; Placci, A.; Raffelt, G.; Rammos, P.; Robert, J. P.; Ruz, J.; Sarsa, M.; Schill, C.; Serber, W.; Semertzidis, Y.; Vieira, J.; Villar, J.; Vullierme, B.; Walckiers, L.; Zioutas, K.

    2005-01-01

    The CERN Axion Solar Telescope (CAST), a 10 meter long LHC, 9 Tesla, test magnet is mounted on a moving platform that tracks the sun about 1.5 hours during sunrise, again during sunset. It moves ±80 vertically and ±400 horizontally. It has been taking data continuously since July 10, 2003. Data analyzed thus far yield an upper bound on the photon-axion coupling constant, gaγγ ⩽ 3 × 10-10 GeV-1 for axion masses less than 5 × 10-2 eV.

  15. Family Day Care Training Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nakatsu, Gail

    California's Family Day Care Training Program was designed to recruit and train in 7 weeks, Lao, Vietnamese, and Chinese refugees to establish their own state-licensed, family day care homes. Topics in the program's curriculum include an introduction to family day care, state licenses for family day care, state licensing requirements for family…

  16. 2016 SPD: Day 3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-06-01

    last the longest 2 minutes and 40 seconds is the small town of Hopkinsville, KY. WKU is located a little over an hour away, and both locations are prepared for a large influx of people on eclipse day!Partial solar eclipse as viewed by the space-based Solar Dynamics Observatory. [NASA/SDO]WKU is located just off the centerline of eclipse path, which has some advantages: this provides better viewing of some of the chromospheric features of the Sun during the eclipse, like priminences and solar loops. WKU is setting up a variety of educational and public outreach activities at their football stadium and the WKU farm, and they encourage you to come visit for the eclipse!In addition, they are participating in a nationwide experiment called Citizen CATE, short for the Continental American Telescopic Eclipse. This project will use 60 telescopes spanning the 2500 mile path of totality to record continuous data of the eclipse as it travels across the US. The result will be data of a remarkable 90 minutes of totality, revealing the activity of the solar corona and providing an extended view of the eclipse as has never been seen before.Science During the EclipseNext up was Shadia Habbal (University of Hawaii), who is a co-leader of the AAS 2017 Eclipse Task Force. In addition to her education and outreach efforts associated with the eclipse, however, Habbal is a solar eclipse researcher. She and her collaborators are known as the Solar Wind Sherpas, due to the fact that they hand-carry their science equipment around the world for solar eclipses!Solar corona during a 2008 eclipse, with color overlay indicating emission from highly ionized iron lines. [Habbal et al. 2010]The primary science done during solar eclipses is the study of the solar corona, the region that extends from the solar surface out to several solar radii. This region is too faint to observe normally, but when the light from the Suns disk is blocked out, we can examine it.Unfortunately, the space telescopes that

  17. AAS 228: Day 4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-06-01

    Editors Note: Lastweek we were at the 228th AAS Meeting in San Diego, CA. Here is a final post aboutselectedevents on the last day of the meeting, written by authors fromastrobites.com, a grad-student collaborative project with which we recently announced a new partnership! Starting in July,keep an eye out for astrobites postsat AAS Nova in between Highlights(i.e., on Tuesdays and Thursdays).Were excited to be working together to bring you more recent astronomy research from AAS journals!Extrasolar Planets: Detection (by Leonardo dos Santos)Thursdays first session on exoplanets was about detecting these distant worlds, and the opening talk was given by Robert Siverd (Las Cumbres Observatory). He describes the NRES, a network of spectrographs that will look for exoplanets using the radial velocity method. One of the coolest aspects of this instrument is that it will feature an on the fly scheduling system that will perform observations as efficiently as possible. The spectrograph is still being tested, but a unit will be deployed at CTIO later this year.@lcogt contracted by @NASA_TESS for follow up of their candidates. #aas228 Jessie Christiansen (@aussiastronomer) June 16, 2016Measuring the depths of transits and eclipses in Spitzer has been problematic in the past, since the Spitzer instrument IRAC (InfraRed Array Camera) has a non-uniform response in its detectors pixels. But, as reported by James Ingalls (Spitzer Science Center, Caltech), observers are circumventing this issue by using what they call the staring mode (avoiding large pointing jumps) and an algorithm to pick sweet spot pixels. Moreover, the results from the IRAC Data Challenge are helping to better understand its behavior. Giuseppe Morello (University College London), on the other hand, explained how his research group gets rid of instrumental effects from IRAC using machine learning. This method removes systematics from exoplanet transit data no matter if the noise source is from an instrument or

  18. Heart rate turbulence.

    PubMed

    Cygankiewicz, Iwona

    2013-01-01

    Heart rate turbulence (HRT) is a baroreflex-mediated biphasic reaction of heart rate in response to premature ventricular beats. Heart rate turbulence is quantified by: turbulence onset (TO) reflecting the initial acceleration of heart rate following premature beat and turbulence slope (TS) describing subsequent deceleration of heart rate. Abnormal HRT identifies patients with autonomic dysfunction or impaired baroreflex sensitivity due to variety of disorders, but also may reflect changes in autonomic nervous system induced by different therapeutic modalities such as drugs, revascularization, or cardiac resynchronization therapy. More importantly, impaired HRT has been shown to identify patients at high risk of all-cause mortality and sudden death, particularly in postinfarction and congestive heart failure patients. It should be emphasized that abnormal HRT has a well-established role in stratification of postinfarction and heart failure patients with relatively preserved left ventricular ejection fraction. The ongoing clinical trials will document whether HRT can be used to guide implantation of cardioverter-defibrillators in this subset of patients, not covered yet by ICD guidelines. This review focuses on the current state-of-the-art knowledge regarding clinical significance of HRT in detection of autonomic dysfunction and regarding the prognostic significance of this parameter in predicting all-cause mortality and sudden death.

  19. Pacemaker Use Following Heart Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Mallidi, Hari R.; Bates, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Background: The incidence of permanent pacemaker implantation after orthotopic heart transplantation has been reported to be 2%-24%. Transplanted hearts usually exhibit sinus rhythm in the operating room following reperfusion, and most patients do not exhibit significant arrhythmias during the postoperative period. However, among the patients who do exhibit abnormalities, pacemakers may be implanted for early sinus node dysfunction but are rarely used after 6 months. Permanent pacing is often required for atrioventricular block. A different cohort of transplant patients presents later with bradycardia requiring pacemaker implantation, reported to occur in approximately 1.5% of patients. The objectives of this study were to investigate the indications for pacemaker implantation, compare the need for pacemakers following bicaval vs biatrial anastomosis, and examine the long-term outcomes of heart transplant patients who received pacemakers. Methods: For this retrospective, case-cohort, single-institution study, patients were identified from clinical research and administrative transplant databases. Information was supplemented with review of the medical records. Standard statistical techniques were used, with chi-square testing for categorical variables and the 2-tailed t test for continuous variables. Survival was compared with the use of log-rank methods. Results: Between January 1968 and February 2008, 1,450 heart transplants were performed at Stanford University. Eighty-four patients (5.8%) were identified as having had a pacemaker implanted. Of these patients, 65.5% (55) had the device implanted within 30 days of transplantation, and 34.5% (29) had late implantation. The mean survival of patients who had an early pacemaker implant was 6.4 years compared to 7.7 years for those with a late pacemaker implant (P<0.05). Sinus node dysfunction and heart block were the most common indications for pacemaker implantation. Starting in 1997, a bicaval technique was used

  20. Heart Truth for Women: If You Have Heart Disease

    MedlinePlus

    THE FOR WO MEN TRUTH THE HEART TRUTH FoR WoMEN: iF You HAVE HEART DisEAsE If you have heart disease, or think you do, it’s vital to take action to protect your heart health. Fortunately, there’s a lot you can do. ...

  1. Heart to Heart Art: Empowering Homeless Children and Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shepard, Jerri; Booth, Deborah

    2009-01-01

    This article describes Heart to Heart Art, an after-school program developed for homeless children and youth at the YWCA in Spokane, Washington. Pre-service teacher candidates from a local university create meaningful activities that engage homeless students in visual art, music, drama, cooking, and community service. Heart to Heart Art was…

  2. Migration of ATLAS PanDA to CERN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, Graeme Andrew; Klimentov, Alexei; Koblitz, Birger; Lamanna, Massimo; Maeno, Tadashi; Nevski, Pavel; Nowak, Marcin; Emanuel De Castro Faria Salgado, Pedro; Wenaus, Torre

    2010-04-01

    The ATLAS Production and Distributed Analysis System (PanDA) is a key component of the ATLAS distributed computing infrastructure. All ATLAS production jobs, and a substantial amount of user and group analysis jobs, pass through the PanDA system, which manages their execution on the grid. PanDA also plays a key role in production task definition and the data set replication request system. PanDA has recently been migrated from Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) to the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), a process we describe here. We discuss how the new infrastructure for PanDA, which relies heavily on services provided by CERN IT, was introduced in order to make the service as reliable as possible and to allow it to be scaled to ATLAS's increasing need for distributed computing. The migration involved changing the backend database for PanDA from MySQL to Oracle, which impacted upon the database schemas. The process by which the client code was optimised for the new database backend is discussed. We describe the procedure by which the new database infrastructure was tested and commissioned for production use. Operations during the migration had to be planned carefully to minimise disruption to ongoing ATLAS offline computing. All parts of the migration were fully tested before commissioning the new infrastructure and the gradual migration of computing resources to the new system allowed any problems of scaling to be addressed.

  3. Techniques for hazard analysis and their use at CERN.

    PubMed

    Nuttall, C; Schönbacher, H

    2001-01-01

    CERN, The European Organisation for Nuclear Research is situated near Geneva and has its accelerators and experimental facilities astride the Swiss and French frontiers attracting physicists from all over the world to this unique laboratory. The main accelerator is situated in a 27 km underground ring and the experiments take place in huge underground caverns in order to detect the fragments resulting from the collision of subatomic particles at speeds approaching that of light. These detectors contain many hundreds of tons of flammable materials, mainly plastics in cables and structural components, flammable gases in the detectors themselves, and cryogenic fluids such as helium and argon. The experiments consume high amounts of electrical power, thus the dangers involved have necessitated the use of analytical techniques to identify the hazards and quantify the risks to personnel and the infrastructure. The techniques described in the paper have been developed in the process industries where they have been to be of great value. They have been successfully applied to CERN industrial and experimental installations and, in some cases, have been instrumental in changing the philosophy of the experimentalists and their detectors.

  4. Southeast Elevation, Attic Stair Nosing, Day Room Fireplace Details, Day ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Southeast Elevation, Attic Stair Nosing, Day Room Fireplace Details, Day Room Mantel Shelf, Northeast Elevation - National Home for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers - Battle Mountain Sanitarium, Ward 4, 500 North Fifth Street, Hot Springs, Fall River County, SD

  5. Heart Surgery: MedlinePlus Health Topic

    MedlinePlus

    ... disease, or peripheral arterial disease. NIH: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Start Here Cardiac Procedures and Surgeries (American Heart Association) What Is Heart Surgery? (National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute) Latest News Taking Statins May Boost Heart ...

  6. Heart, front view (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... the heart. The vessels colored blue indicate the transport of blood with relatively low content of oxygen ... carbon dioxide. The vessels colored red indicate the transport of blood with relatively high content of oxygen ...

  7. [Heart involvement in sarcoglycanopathies].

    PubMed

    Fayssoil, A; Nardi, O; Orlikowski, D; Annane, D

    2012-11-01

    Sarcoglycanopathies (SG) are autosomic recessive muscular dystrophies, secondary to mutations of the sarcoglycan complex. Clinical pictures include muscle weakness affecting mainly the proximal limb girdle musculature. We review heart involvement in this group of disease.

  8. Sleepless Nights, Unhealthy Hearts?

    MedlinePlus

    ... heart attack or stroke, a research review from China suggests. "We found that difficulty initiating sleep, difficulty ... fully understood, said He, a graduate student at China Medical University in Shenyang. However, the study doesn' ...

  9. Heart Truth for Latinas

    MedlinePlus

    ... salt and other forms of sodium, getting regular physical activity, maintaining a healthy weight, and, if you drink ... are physically inactive—they do no spare-time physical activity. Regular physical activity lowers your risk of heart ...

  10. Keeping Hearts Pumping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    A collaboration between NASA, Dr. Michael DeBakey, Dr. George Noon, and MicroMed Technology, Inc., resulted in a life-saving heart pump for patients awaiting heart transplants. The MicroMed DeBakey VAD functions as a "bridge to heart transplant" by pumping blood throughout the body to keep critically ill patients alive until a donor heart is available. Weighing less than 4 ounces and measuring 1 inch by 3 inches, the pump is approximately one-tenth the size of other currently marketed pulsatile VADs. This makes it less invasive and ideal for smaller adults and children. Because of the pump's small size, less than 5 percent of the patients implanted developed device-related infections. It can operate up to 8 hours on batteries, giving patients the mobility to do normal, everyday activities.The MicroMed DeBakey VAD is a registered trademark of MicroMed Technology, Inc.

  11. Types of Heart Block

    MedlinePlus

    ... is less serious than Mobitz type II. The animation below shows how your heart's electrical system works. ... block. Click the "start" button to play the animation. Written and spoken explanations are provided with each ...

  12. Heart failure overview

    MedlinePlus

    ... heart failure: Fast or difficult breathing Leg swelling (edema) Neck veins that stick out (are distended) Sounds ( ... pacemaker High blood pressure Implantable cardioverter-defibrillator Pulmonary edema Stable angina Ventricular assist device Patient Instructions ACE ...

  13. Heart Diseases and Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... damage the heart muscle or valves. Electrical Disorders Arrhythmias that start in the heart’s upper chambers, the ... low blood count) or hyperthyroidism (overactive thyroid gland). Arrhythmias that originate in the heart’s lower chambers, the ...

  14. What Causes Heart Block?

    MedlinePlus

    ... of congenital heart block occurs in babies whose mothers have autoimmune diseases, such as lupus. People who have these diseases make proteins called antibodies that attack and damage the body's tissues or ...

  15. Open heart surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cornwell LD, Bakaeen FG. Acquired heart disease: coronary insufficiency. In: Townsend CM Jr, Beauchamp RD, Evers BM, ... Pulmonary atresia Tetralogy of Fallot Total anomalous pulmonary venous return Ventricular septal defect Review Date 4/13/ ...

  16. Hypertensive heart disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... DL, Zipes DP, Libby P, Bonow RO, Braunwald E, eds. Braunwald's Heart Disease: A Textbook of Cardiovascular Medicine . 10th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier ... Updated by: Michael A. Chen, MD, PhD, Associate Professor of Medicine, ...

  17. Heart bypass surgery - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... Thrombosis, 9th ed: American College of Chest Physicians Evidence-Based Clinical Practice Guidelines. Chest . 2012;141(2 ... surgery Heart failure - overview High blood cholesterol levels Smoking - ...

  18. Heart pacemaker - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... please enable JavaScript. A pacemaker is a small, battery-operated device that senses when your heart is ... pacemaker is placed under your skin. These include: Battery powered cordless tools (such as screwdrivers and drills) ...

  19. Caffeine and Heart Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... a Healthy Heart Healthy Kids Our Kids Programs Childhood Obesity What is childhood obesity? Overweight in Children BMI in Children Is Childhood Obesity an Issue in Your Home? Addressing your Child's ...

  20. Alcohol and Heart Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... a Healthy Heart Healthy Kids Our Kids Programs Childhood Obesity What is childhood obesity? Overweight in Children BMI in Children Is Childhood Obesity an Issue in Your Home? Addressing your Child's ...

  1. Meditation and Heart Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... a Healthy Heart Healthy Kids Our Kids Programs Childhood Obesity What is childhood obesity? Overweight in Children BMI in Children Is Childhood Obesity an Issue in Your Home? Addressing your Child's ...

  2. Protein and Heart Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... a Healthy Heart Healthy Kids Our Kids Programs Childhood Obesity What is childhood obesity? Overweight in Children BMI in Children Is Childhood Obesity an Issue in Your Home? Addressing your Child's ...

  3. Target Heart Rate Calculator

    MedlinePlus

    ... try exercising within the upper range of your target zone. (If just beginning an exercise program, consult your doctor first.) Source: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute ... Information Cancer Prevention & Detection Cancer Basics Signs & Symptoms of Cancer Treatments & Side ...

  4. Heart attack first aid

    MedlinePlus

    First aid - heart attack; First aid - cardiopulmonary arrest; First aid - cardiac arrest ... of patients with unstable angina/non-ST-elevation myocardial infarction (updating the 2007 guideline and replacing the 2011 ...

  5. Living with Heart Failure

    MedlinePlus

    ... help you in the future. Follow Your Treatment Plan Treatment can relieve your symptoms and make daily ... or nurse about getting flu and pneumonia vaccines. Plan Ahead If you have heart failure, it's important ...

  6. Left heart ventricular angiography

    MedlinePlus

    ... pressure when the catheter is inserted. Occasionally, a flushing sensation or a feeling that you need to ... E, eds. Braunwald's Heart Disease: A Textbook of Cardiovascular Medicine . 10th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2015: ...

  7. Problem: Heart Valve Stenosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... valve . Learn about the different types of stenosis: Aortic stenosis Tricuspid stenosis Pulmonary stenosis Mitral stenosis Outlook for ... Disease "Innocent" Heart Murmur Problem: Valve Stenosis - Problem: Aortic Valve Stenosis - Problem: Mitral Valve Stenosis - Problem: Tricuspid Valve Stenosis - ...

  8. Heart valve surgery - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... surgery - minimally invasive Aortic valve surgery - open Bicuspid aortic valve Endocarditis Heart valve surgery Mitral valve prolapse Mitral valve surgery - minimally invasive Mitral valve surgery - open Pulmonary valve stenosis Smoking - tips on how to quit Patient Instructions ...

  9. Heart Disease (For Kids)

    MedlinePlus

    ... a variety of problems, including high blood pressure , hardening of the arteries, chest pain, heart attacks, and ... teer-ee-oh-skluh-ROW-sus): also called hardening of the arteries, arteriosclerosis means the arteries become ...

  10. Heart transplant - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... ency/presentations/100086.htm Heart transplant - series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing features on this page, ... Bethesda, MD 20894 U.S. Department of Health and Human Services National Institutes of Health Page last updated: ...

  11. Congenital Heart Information Network

    MedlinePlus

    ... Baemayr for The Congenital Heart Information Network Exempt organization under Section 501(c)3. Copyright ©1996 - 2016 C.H.I.N. All rights reserved TX4-390-685 Original site design and HTML by Panoptic Communications

  12. Keeping a Beat on the Heart

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liszka, Kathy J.; Mackin, Michael A.; Liehter, Michael J.; York, David W.; Pillai, Dilip; Rosenbaum, David S.

    2005-01-01

    Feel the relief of a patient suffering from heart arrhythmia, who is able to return home while having her heart monitored by health professionals 24 hours a day, without the fear that she will miss an important indicator and suffer a fatal heart attack - using technology originally developed to conduct experiments on the Space Shuttle. Approximately 400,000 Americans die every year from sudden heart attacks . Medical research revealed that patterns of electrical activity in the heart can act as predictors of these lethal cardiac events known as arrhythmias. Fortunately, certain arrhythmias such as ventricular fibrillation (loss of regular heartbeat and subsequent loss of function) and ventricular tachycardia (rapid heartbeats), can be detected and appropriately treated. Today, patients at moderate risk of arrhythmias can benefit from technology that would permit long- term continuous monitoring of electrical cardiac rhythms outside the hospital environment in the comfort of their own homes. Medical telemetry systems, also known as telemedicine, are evolving rapidly as wireless communication technology advances, evidenced by the commercial products and research prototypes for remote health monitoring that have appeared in recent years. Wireless systems allow patients to move freely in their home and work environment while being monitored remotely by health care professionals.

  13. Heart failure in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Rutherford, John D

    2012-12-01

    With increasing maternal age and the presence of comorbid conditions such as hypertension, cardiovascular assessment and monitoring is the responsibility of all clinicians caring for pregnant patients. Furthermore, there are specific conditions, such as mitral stenosis, peripartum cardiomyopathy, and preeclampsia, that can be associated with heart failure and secondary maternal (and fetal) mortality and morbidity. The important causes of heart failure in pregnancy are discussed.

  14. Heart Rate Monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    In the mid 70's, NASA saw a need for a long term electrocardiographic electrode suitable for use on astronauts. Heart Rate Inc.'s insulated capacitive electrode is constructed of thin dielectric film applied to stainless steel surface, originally developed under a grant by Texas Technical University. HRI, Inc. was awarded NASA license and continued development of heart rate monitor for use on exercise machines for physical fitness and medical markets.

  15. Risks for Heart Disease & Stroke

    MedlinePlus

    ... for Heart Disease & Stroke Risks for Heart Disease & Stroke About 1.5 million heart attacks and strokes happen every year in the United States. You ... some of your risks for heart disease and stroke, but you can manage many of your risks ...

  16. Heart valve surgery - series (image)

    MedlinePlus

    There are four valves in the heart: aortic valve, mitral valve, tricuspid valve, and pulmonary valve. The valves are designed to control the direction of blood flow through the heart. The opening and closing of the heart valves produce the heart-beat sounds.

  17. Decompensated heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Mangini, Sandrigo; Pires, Philippe Vieira; Braga, Fabiana Goulart Marcondes; Bacal, Fernando

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Heart failure is a disease with high incidence and prevalence in the population. The costs with hospitalization for decompensated heart failure reach approximately 60% of the total cost with heart failure treatment, and mortality during hospitalization varies according to the studied population, and could achieve values of 10%. In patients with decompensated heart failure, history and physical examination are of great value for the diagnosis of the syndrome, and also can help the physician to identify the beginning of symptoms, and give information about etiology, causes and prognosis of the disease. The initial objective of decompensated heart failure treatment is the hemodynamic and symptomatic improvement preservation and/or improvement of renal function, prevention of myocardial damage, modulation of the neurohormonal and/or inflammatory activation and control of comorbidities that can cause or contribute to progression of the syndrome. According to the clinical-hemodynamic profile, it is possible to establish a rational for the treatment of decompensated heart failure, individualizing the proceedings to be held, leading to reduction in the period of hospitalization and consequently reducing overall mortality. PMID:24136770

  18. [Heart failure and comorbidities].

    PubMed

    Boully, Clémence; Hanon, Olivier

    2015-03-01

    Heart failure is a frequent disease in the elderly. Its clinical presentation is less typical and the prognosis more severe than in younger subjects because heart failure occurs in patients with multiple comorbidities. A comprehensive geriatric assessment should therefore be performed to detect the vulnerabilities and manage the comorbidities. The main diseases associated with heart failure are dementia, depression, malnutrition, atrial fibrillation, coronary artery disease, orthostatic hypotension, renal failure, anemia and iron deficiency. Comorbidities worsen heart failure and makes its treatment more difficult. The identification and treatment of comorbidities improve the prognosis in terms of mortality but especially in terms of quality of life. Caution with drugs is necessary because of pharmacokinetic or pharmacodynamic changes related to aging and the comorbidities. In this context, clinical and laboratory monitoring should be increased, mostly during an acute event (acute heart failure, infection, dehydration, fall, new therapy…). Therefore, the follow-up of elderly patients with heart failure requires a multidisciplinary approach that involves close cooperation between cardiologists, geriatricians, general practitioners, nurses, and pharmacists.

  19. "Young at heart": Regenerative potential linked to immature cardiac phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Renata S M; Skroblin, Philipp; Munster, Alex B; Tomlins, Hannah; Langley, Sarah R; Zampetaki, Anna; Yin, Xiaoke; Wardle, Fiona C; Mayr, Manuel

    2016-03-01

    The adult human myocardium is incapable of regeneration; yet, the zebrafish (Danio rerio) can regenerate damaged myocardium. Similar to the zebrafish heart, hearts of neonatal, but not adult mice are capable of myocardial regeneration. We performed a proteomics analysis of adult zebrafish hearts and compared their protein expression profile to hearts from neonatal and adult mice. Using difference in-gel electrophoresis (DIGE), there was little overlap between the proteome from adult mouse (>8weeks old) and adult zebrafish (18months old) hearts. Similarly, there was a significant degree of mismatch between the protein expression in neonatal and adult mouse hearts. Enrichment analysis of the selected proteins revealed over-expression of DNA synthesis-related proteins in the cardiac proteome of the adult zebrafish heart similar to neonatal and 4days old mice, whereas in hearts of adult mice there was a mitochondria-related predominance in protein expression. Importantly, we noted pronounced differences in the myofilament composition: the adult zebrafish heart lacks many of the myofilament proteins of differentiated adult cardiomyocytes such as the ventricular isoforms of myosin light chains and nebulette. Instead, troponin I and myozenin 1 were expressed as skeletal isoforms rather than cardiac isoforms. The relative immaturity of the adult zebrafish heart was further supported by cardiac microRNA data. Our assessment of zebrafish and mammalian hearts challenges the assertions on the translational potential of cardiac regeneration in the zebrafish model. The immature myofilament composition of the fish heart may explain why adult mouse and human cardiomyocytes lack this endogenous repair mechanism.

  20. Effects of head-down bed rest on complex heart rate variability: Response to LBNP testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldberger, Ary L.; Mietus, Joseph E.; Rigney, David R.; Wood, Margie L.; Fortney, Suzanne M.

    1994-01-01

    Head-down bed rest is used to model physiological changes during spaceflight. We postulated that bed rest would decrease the degree of complex physiological heart rate variability. We analyzed continuous heart rate data from digitized Holter recordings in eight healthy female volunteers (age 28-34 yr) who underwent a 13-day 6 deg head-down bed rest study with serial lower body negative pressure (LBNP) trials. Heart rate variability was measured on a 4-min data sets using conventional time and frequency domain measures as well as with a new measure of signal 'complexity' (approximate entropy). Data were obtained pre-bed rest (control), during bed rest (day 4 and day 9 or 11), and 2 days post-bed rest (recovery). Tolerance to LBNP was significantly reduced on both bed rest days vs. pre-bed rest. Heart rate variability was assessed at peak LBNP. Heart rate approximate entropy was significantly decreased at day 4 and day 9 or 11, returning toward normal during recovery. Heart rate standard deviation and the ratio of high- to low-power frequency did not change significantly. We conclude that short-term bed rest is associated with a decrease in the complex variability of heart rate during LBNP testing in healthy young adult women. Measurement of heart rate complexity, using a method derived from nonlinear dynamics ('chaos theory'), may provide a sensitive marker of this loss of physiological variability, complementing conventional time and frequency domain statistical measures.

  1. Federal Involvement in Day Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malone, Margaret

    Because of the expanding need for child care for preschool children, and for older children in after-school hours, there is greater interest in programs for day care, and increasing acceptance of the concept of publicly-financed day care. This paper describes the market for day care, the federal programs which exist and the standards which have…

  2. Principles of Effective Day Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silcock, Anne

    1981-01-01

    Examines the role of day care in the Australian community and offers six principles of effective day care. The principles are based on the assumption that good quality day care facilitates and enhances child development and does not jeopardize the attachment between mothers and their children. (Author/CM)

  3. The 4 Day School Week

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dam, Ai

    2006-01-01

    Colorado law requires school districts to schedule 1080 hours per year of instructional time for secondary schools and 990 instructional hours for elementary schools. The 1080 hours equate to six hours per day for 180 days. The 990 hours equate to five and one-half hours per day. Up to 24 hours may be counted for parent-teacher conferences, staff…

  4. Family Day Care Provider Handbook

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York State Office of Children and Family Services, 2006

    2006-01-01

    Family day care providers are responsible for creating a high-quality program where children have opportunities to grow, learn and thrive. Part of providing high-quality child care includes complying with the family day care regulations from the New York State Office of Children and Family Services (OCFS). This Handbook will help day care…

  5. Family Day Care in Denmark.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wagner, Mary; Wagner, Marsden G.

    The present report describes a system for the care of children during the day in Denmark: care in private family homes. Begun in 1966, this program organized a formal system of family day care homes initiated and supervised by the government; this is an extension of the former system of licensing privately initiated family day care homes. From the…

  6. Perspectives on Infant Day Care.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elardo, Richard, E.; Pagan, Betty, Ed.

    These proceedings of the first annual SACUS workshop on infant day care contain the papers presented at the conference, plus an appendix--Developmental Objectives for Infants and Toddlers. The papers are: "Infant Day Care--Fads, Facts, and Fancies" by Bettye M. Caldwell; "Family Day Care""A Broad Perspective" by Malcolm S. Host; "Getting…

  7. Guides for Day Care Licensing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Child Development Services Bureau (DHEW/OCD), Washington, DC.

    This booklet provides source materials for the development of state and local regulations applicable to day care service facilities. Sections discuss: (1) the Model State Day Care Licensing Act, (2) Day care program and staffing, (3) Health and sanitation, (4) Fire and safety regulations, (5) Principles of zoning, and (6) Principles of…

  8. Myth or Truth: Independence Day.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gardner, Traci

    Most Americans think of the Fourth of July as Independence Day, but is it really the day the U.S. declared and celebrated independence? By exploring myths and truths surrounding Independence Day, this lesson asks students to think critically about commonly believed stories regarding the beginning of the Revolutionary War and the Independence Day…

  9. Acellular human heart matrix: A critical step toward whole heart grafts.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, Pedro L; Fernández-Santos, M Eugenia; Costanza, Salvatore; Climent, Andreu M; Moscoso, Isabel; Gonzalez-Nicolas, M Angeles; Sanz-Ruiz, Ricardo; Rodríguez, Hugo; Kren, Stefan M; Garrido, Gregorio; Escalante, Jose L; Bermejo, Javier; Elizaga, Jaime; Menarguez, Javier; Yotti, Raquel; Pérez del Villar, Candelas; Espinosa, M Angeles; Guillem, María S; Willerson, James T; Bernad, Antonio; Matesanz, Rafael; Taylor, Doris A; Fernández-Avilés, Francisco

    2015-08-01

    The best definitive treatment option for end-stage heart failure currently is transplantation, which is limited by donor availability and immunorejection. Generating an autologous bioartificial heart could overcome these limitations. Here, we have decellularized a human heart, preserving its 3-dimensional architecture and vascularity, and recellularized the decellularized extracellular matrix (dECM). We decellularized 39 human hearts with sodium-dodecyl-sulfate for 4-8 days. Cell removal and architectural integrity were determined anatomically, functionally, and histologically. To assess cytocompatibility, we cultured human cardiac-progenitor cells (hCPC), bone-marrow mesenchymal cells (hMSCs), human endothelial cells (HUVECs), and H9c1 and HL-1 cardiomyocytes in vitro on dECM ventricles up to 21 days. Cell survival, gene expression, organization and/or electrical coupling were analyzed and compared to conventional 2-dimensional cultures. Decellularization removed cells but preserved the 3-dimensional cardiac macro and microstructure and the native vascular network in a perfusable state. Cell survival was observed on dECM for 21 days. hCPCs and hMSCs expressed cardiocyte genes but did not adopt cardiocyte morphology or organization; HUVECs formed a lining of endocardium and vasculature; differentiated cardiomyocytes organized into nascent muscle bundles and displayed mature calcium dynamics and electrical coupling in recellularized dECM. In summary, decellularization of human hearts provides a biocompatible scaffold that retains 3-dimensional architecture and vascularity and that can be recellularized with parenchymal and vascular cells. dECM promotes cardiocyte gene expression in stem cells and organizes existing cardiomyocytes into nascent muscle showing electrical coupling. These findings represent a first step toward manufacturing human heart grafts or matrix components for treating cardiovascular disease.

  10. Development of the cryogenic system of AEgIS at CERN

    SciTech Connect

    Derking, J. H.; Bremer, J.; Burghart, G.; Doser, M.; Dudarev, A.; Haider, S.

    2014-01-29

    The AEgIS (Antimatter Experiment: Gravity, Interferometry, Spectroscopy) experiment is located at the antiproton decelerator complex of CERN. The main goal of the experiment is to perform the first direct measurement of the Earth’s gravitational acceleration on antihydrogen atoms within 1% precision. The antihydrogen is produced in a cylindrical Penning trap by combining antiprotons with positrons. To reach the precision of 1%, the antihydrogen has to be cooled to 100 mK to reduce its random velocity. A dilution refrigerator is selected to deliver the necessary cooling capacity of 100 μW at 50 mK. The AEgIS cryogenic system basically consists of cryostats for a 1-T and for a 5-T superconducting magnet, a central region cryostat, a dilution refrigerator cryostat and a measurement cryostat with a Moiré deflectometer to measure the gravitational acceleration. In autumn 2012, the 1-T cryostat, 5-T cryostat and central region cryostat were assembled and commissioned. The apparatus is cooled down in eight days using 2500 L of liquid helium and liquid nitrogen. During operation, the average consumption of liquid helium is 150 L⋅day{sup −1} and of liquid nitrogen 5 L⋅day{sup −1}. The temperature sensors at the Penning traps measured 12 K to 18 K, which is higher than expected. Simulations show that this is caused by a bad thermalization of the trap wiring. The implementation of the sub-kelvin region is foreseen for mid-2015. The antihydrogen will be cooled down to 100 mK in an ultra-cold trap consisting of multiple high-voltage electrodes made of sapphire with gold plated electrode sectors.

  11. Development of the cryogenic system of AEgIS at CERN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derking, J. H.; Bremer, J.; Burghart, G.; Doser, M.; Dudarev, A.; Haider, S.

    2014-01-01

    The AEgIS (Antimatter Experiment: Gravity, Interferometry, Spectroscopy) experiment is located at the antiproton decelerator complex of CERN. The main goal of the experiment is to perform the first direct measurement of the Earth's gravitational acceleration on antihydrogen atoms within 1% precision. The antihydrogen is produced in a cylindrical Penning trap by combining antiprotons with positrons. To reach the precision of 1%, the antihydrogen has to be cooled to 100 mK to reduce its random velocity. A dilution refrigerator is selected to deliver the necessary cooling capacity of 100 μW at 50 mK. The AEgIS cryogenic system basically consists of cryostats for a 1-T and for a 5-T superconducting magnet, a central region cryostat, a dilution refrigerator cryostat and a measurement cryostat with a Moiré deflectometer to measure the gravitational acceleration. In autumn 2012, the 1-T cryostat, 5-T cryostat and central region cryostat were assembled and commissioned. The apparatus is cooled down in eight days using 2500 L of liquid helium and liquid nitrogen. During operation, the average consumption of liquid helium is 150 Lṡday-1 and of liquid nitrogen 5 Lṡday-1. The temperature sensors at the Penning traps measured 12 K to 18 K, which is higher than expected. Simulations show that this is caused by a bad thermalization of the trap wiring. The implementation of the sub-kelvin region is foreseen for mid-2015. The antihydrogen will be cooled down to 100 mK in an ultra-cold trap consisting of multiple high-voltage electrodes made of sapphire with gold plated electrode sectors.

  12. Vulnerability of the Developing Heart to Oxygen Deprivation as a Cause of Congenital Heart Defects

    PubMed Central

    Kenchegowda, Doreswamy; Liu, Hongbin; Thompson, Keyata; Luo, Liping; Martin, Stuart S.; Fisher, Steven A.

    2014-01-01

    Background The heart develops under reduced and varying oxygen concentrations, yet there is little understanding of oxygen metabolism in the normal and mal‐development of the heart. Here we used a novel reagent, the ODD‐Luc hypoxia reporter mouse (oxygen degradation domain, ODD) of Hif‐1α fused to Luciferase (Luc), to assay the activity of the oxygen sensor, prolyl hydroxylase, and oxygen reserve, in the developing heart. We tested the role of hypoxia‐dependent responses in heart development by targeted inactivation of Hif‐1α. Methods and Results ODD‐Luciferase activity was 14‐fold higher in mouse embryonic day 10.5 (E10.5) versus adult heart and liver tissue lysates. ODD‐Luc activity decreased in 2 stages, the first corresponding with the formation of a functional cardiovascular system for oxygen delivery at E15.5, and the second after birth consistent with complete oxygenation of the blood and tissues. Reduction of maternal inspired oxygen to 8% for 4 hours caused minimal induction of luciferase activity in the maternal tissues but robust induction in the embryonic tissues in proportion to the basal activity, indicating a lack of oxygen reserve, and corresponding induction of a hypoxia‐dependent gene program. Bioluminescent imaging of intact embryos demonstrated highest activity in the outflow portion of the E13.5 heart. Hif‐1α inactivation or prolonged hypoxia caused outflow and septation defects only when targeted to this specific developmental window. Conclusions Low oxygen concentrations and lack of oxygen reserve during a critical phase of heart organogenesis may provide a basis for vulnerability to the development of common septation and conotruncal heart defects. PMID:24855117

  13. Projects for ultra-high-energy circular colliders at CERN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogomyagkov, A. V.; Koop, I. A.; Levichev, E. B.; Piminov, P. A.; Sinyatkin, S. V.; Shatilov, D. N.; Benedict, M.; Oide, K.; Zimmermann, F.

    2016-12-01

    Within the Future Circular Collider (FCC) design study launched at CERN in 2014, it is envisaged to construct hadron (FCC-hh) and lepton (FCC-ee) ultra-high-energy machines aimed to replace the LHC upon the conclusion of its research program. The Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics is actively involved in the development of the FCC-ee electron-positron collider. The Crab Waist (CR) scheme of the collision region that has been proposed by INP and will be implemented at FCC-ee is expected to provide high luminosity over a broad energy range. The status and development of the FCC project are described, and its parameters and limitations are discussed for the lepton collider in particular.

  14. Past, present and future low energy antiproton facilities at CERN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartmann, W.; Belochitskii, P.; Breuker, H.; Butin, F.; Carli, C.; Eriksson, T.; Maury, S.; Oelert, W.; Pasinelli, S.; Tranquille, G.

    2014-05-01

    Low energy antiprotons are available for physics experiments at CERN since the 1980s and have been used by a large variety of experiments. The Low Energy Antiproton Ring LEAR has been constructed as a complementary use of antiprotons available at that time for high energy physics and delivered beam to experiments mainly using slow extraction. After completion of LEAR exploitation, the Antiproton Decelerator (AD) was constructed (adaptation of the existing Antiproton Collector, AC) to allow for a simpler low energy antiproton scheme (only one accelerator operated with Antiprotons) with fast extraction well suited for trap experiments. The Extra Low ENergy Antiproton ring ELENA is a small synchrotron presently constructed to further decelerate antiprotons from the AD in a controlled manner, and to reduce emittances with the help of an electron cooler to improve the capture efficiencies of existing experiments and allow for additional ones.

  15. Web Based Monitoring in the CMS Experiment at CERN

    SciTech Connect

    Badgett, William; Borrello, Laura; Chakaberia, Irakli; Gigi, Dominique; Jo, Young-Kwon; Lopez-Perez, Juan Antonio; Maeshima, Kaori; Maruyama, Sho; Patrick, James; Rapsevicius, Valdas; Soha, Aron; Sulmanas, Balys; Wan, Zongru

    2014-09-03

    The Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) is a large and complex general purpose experiment at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC), built and maintained by many collaborators from around the world. Efficient operation of the detector requires widespread and timely access to a broad range of monitoring and status information. To this end the Web Based Monitoring (WBM) system was developed to present data to users located anywhere from many underlying heterogeneous sources, from real time messaging systems to relational databases. This system provides the power to combine and correlate data in both graphical and tabular formats of interest to the experimenters, including data such as beam conditions, luminosity, trigger rates, detector conditions, and many others, allowing for flexibility on the user side. This paper describes the WBM system architecture and describes how the system was used during the first major data taking run of the LHC.

  16. Hadron distributions - recent results from the CERN experiment NA44

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, N.

    1996-09-01

    Proton distributions at midrapidity have been measured for 158A{circ}GeV/c Pb + Pb collisions in the focusing spectrometer experiment NA44 at CERN. A high degree of nuclear stopping is found in the truly heavy ion collisions. Systematic results of single particle transverse momentum distributions of pions, kaons, and protons, of 200A-GeV/c S+S and 158A{circ}GeV/c Pb+Pb central collisions will be addressed within the context of thermalization. By comparing these data with thermal and transport models, freeze-out parameters such as the temperature parameter T{sub fo} and mean collective flow velocity ({Beta}) are extracted. Preliminary results of the particle ratios of K{sup -}/K{sup +} and p/p are discussed in the context of cascade models of RQMD and VENUS.

  17. KTAG: The Kaon Identification Detector for CERN experiment NA62

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fry, J. R.

    2016-07-01

    In the study of ultra-rare kaon decays, CERN experiment NA62 exploits an unseparated monochromatic (75 GeV/c) beam of charged particles of flux 800 MHz, of which 50 MHz are K+. Kaons are identified with more than 95% efficiency, a time resolution of better than 100 ps, and misidentification of less than 10-4 using KTAG, a differential, ring-focussed, Cherenkov detector. KTAG utilises 8 sets of 48 Hamamatsu PMTs, of which 32 are of type 9880 and 16 of type 7400, with signals fed directly to the differential inputs of NINO front-end boards and then to TDC cards within the TEL62 system. Leading and trailing edges of the PMT signal are digitised, enabling slewing corrections to be made, and a mean hit rate of 5 MHz per PMT is supported. The electronics is housed within a cooled and insulated Faraday cage with environmental monitoring capabilities.

  18. Shielding design for the front end of the CERN SPL.

    PubMed

    Magistris, Matteo; Silari, Marco; Vincke, Helmut

    2005-01-01

    CERN is designing a 2.2-GeV Superconducting Proton Linac (SPL) with a beam power of 4 MW, to be used for the production of a neutrino superbeam. The SPL front end will initially accelerate 2 x 10(14) negative hydrogen ions per second up to an energy of 120 MeV. The FLUKA Monte Carlo code was employed for shielding design. The proposed shielding is a combined iron-concrete structure, which also takes into consideration the required RF wave-guide ducts and access labyrinths to the machine. Two beam-loss scenarios were investigated: (1) constant beam loss of 1 Wm(-1) over the whole accelerator length and (2) full beam loss occurring at various locations. A comparison with results based on simplified approaches is also presented.

  19. First results from the CERN axion solar telescope.

    PubMed

    Zioutas, K; Andriamonje, S; Arsov, V; Aune, S; Autiero, D; Avignone, F T; Barth, K; Belov, A; Beltrán, B; Bräuninger, H; Carmona, J M; Cebrián, S; Chesi, E; Collar, J I; Creswick, R; Dafni, T; Davenport, M; Di Lella, L; Eleftheriadis, C; Englhauser, J; Fanourakis, G; Farach, H; Ferrer, E; Fischer, H; Franz, J; Friedrich, P; Geralis, T; Giomataris, I; Gninenko, S; Goloubev, N; Hasinoff, M D; Heinsius, F H; Hoffmann, D H H; Irastorza, I G; Jacoby, J; Kang, D; Königsmann, K; Kotthaus, R; Krcmar, M; Kousouris, K; Kuster, M; Lakić, B; Lasseur, C; Liolios, A; Ljubicić, A; Lutz, G; Luzón, G; Miller, D W; Morales, A; Morales, J; Mutterer, M; Nikolaidis, A; Ortiz, A; Papaevangelou, T; Placci, A; Raffelt, G; Ruz, J; Riege, H; Sarsa, M L; Savvidis, I; Serber, W; Serpico, P; Semertzidis, Y; Stewart, L; Vieira, J D; Villar, J; Walckiers, L; Zachariadou, K

    2005-04-01

    Hypothetical axionlike particles with a two-photon interaction would be produced in the sun by the Primakoff process. In a laboratory magnetic field ("axion helioscope"), they would be transformed into x-rays with energies of a few keV. Using a decommissioned Large Hadron Collider test magnet, the CERN Axion Solar Telescope ran for about 6 months during 2003. The first results from the analysis of these data are presented here. No signal above background was observed, implying an upper limit to the axion-photon coupling g(agamma)<1.16x10(-10) GeV-1 at 95% C.L. for m(a) less, similar 0.02 eV. This limit, assumption-free, is comparable to the limit from stellar energy-loss arguments and considerably more restrictive than any previous experiment over a broad range of axion masses.

  20. The electron accelerator for the AWAKE experiment at CERN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pepitone, K.; Doebert, S.; Burt, G.; Chevallay, E.; Chritin, N.; Delory, C.; Fedosseev, V.; Hessler, Ch.; McMonagle, G.; Mete, O.; Verzilov, V.; Apsimon, R.

    2016-09-01

    The AWAKE collaboration prepares a proton driven plasma wakefield acceleration experiment using the SPS beam at CERN. A long proton bunch extracted from the SPS interacts with a high power laser and a 10 m long rubidium vapour plasma cell to create strong wakefields allowing sustained electron acceleration. The electron bunch to probe these wakefields is supplied by a 20 MeV electron accelerator. The electron accelerator consists of an RF-gun and a short booster structure. This electron source should provide beams with intensities between 0.1 and 1 nC, bunch lengths between 0.3 and 3 ps and an emittance of the order of 2 mm mrad. The wide range of parameters should cope with the uncertainties and future prospects of the planned experiments. The layout of the electron accelerator, its instrumentation and beam dynamics simulations are presented.

  1. Research on data from the ATLAS experiment at CERN

    SciTech Connect

    Purohit, Milind V.

    2015-07-31

    In this report senior investigator Prof. Milind V. Purohit describes research done with data from the ATLAS experiment at CERN. This includes preparing papers on the performance of the CSC detector, searches for SUSY using a new modern ''big data'' technique, and a search for supersymmetry (SUSY) using the "zero leptons razor" (0LRaz) technique. The prediction of the W=Z+jets background processes by the ATLAS simulation prior to the fit is found to be overestimated in the phase space of interest. In all new signal regions presented in this analysis the number of events observed is consistent with the post-fit SM expectations. Assuming R-parity conservation, the limit on the gluino mass exceeds 1150 GeV at 95% confidence level, for an LSP mass smaller than 100 GeV. Other USC personnel who participated in this project during the period of this grant were a graduate student, Anton Kravchenko.

  2. High duty factor plasma generator for CERN's Superconducting Proton Linac.

    PubMed

    Lettry, J; Kronberger, M; Scrivens, R; Chaudet, E; Faircloth, D; Favre, G; Geisser, J-M; Küchler, D; Mathot, S; Midttun, O; Paoluzzi, M; Schmitzer, C; Steyaert, D

    2010-02-01

    CERN's Linac4 is a 160 MeV linear accelerator currently under construction. It will inject negatively charged hydrogen ions into CERN's PS-Booster. Its ion source is a noncesiated rf driven H(-) volume source directly inspired from the one of DESY and is aimed to deliver pulses of 80 mA of H(-) during 0.4 ms at a 2 Hz repetition rate. The Superconducting Proton Linac (SPL) project is part of the luminosity upgrade of the Large Hadron Collider. It consists of an extension of Linac4 up to 5 GeV and is foreseen to deliver protons to a future 50 GeV synchrotron (PS2). For the SPL high power option (HP-SPL), the ion source would deliver pulses of 80 mA of H(-) during 1.2 ms and operate at a 50 Hz repetition rate. This significant upgrade motivates the design of the new water cooled plasma generator presented in this paper. Its engineering is based on the results of a finite element thermal study of the Linac4 H(-) plasma generator that identified critical components and thermal barriers. A cooling system is proposed which achieves the required heat dissipation and maintains the original functionality. Materials with higher thermal conductivity are selected and, wherever possible, thermal barriers resulting from low pressure contacts are removed by brazing metals on insulators. The AlN plasma chamber cooling circuit is inspired from the approach chosen for the cesiated high duty factor rf H(-) source operating at SNS.

  3. Acute Complete Heart Block in Dogs

    PubMed Central

    Starzl, T. E.; Gaertner, R. A.; Baker, R. Robinson

    2010-01-01

    A study has been conducted immediately and up to 18 days after the surgical production of complete heart block in dogs. Immediately after surgery cardiac output, coronary flow, and mean arterial pressure were reduced in rough proportion to the degree of bradycardia. In time, these measures began to return toward preoperative levels. Paralleling the diminished left ventricular work was a diminished left ventricular oxygen consumption with little consequent change in myocardial efficiency. Small rises were detected in central venous pressure. At autopsy, the only unequivocal abnormality was myocardial hypertrophy which became measurable between 2 and 18 days after operation. PMID:14390703

  4. Thoracic ectopia cordis with anatomically normal heart.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Flávio Donizete; Novaes, Fernando Rotatori; Maia, Marcelo Alves; Barros, Francisco de Assis

    2007-01-01

    Ectopia cordis is a rare congenital malformation, which is commonly associated with other intracardiac defects. At two-day-old full-term baby girl was admitted to Santa Casade Misericórdia Hospital Montes Claros, NG, Brazil, with thoracic ectopia cordis. A transthoracic echocardiographic study did not identify any associated congenital heart diseases. The infant underwent surgical treatment using a rib graft to create a neo-sternum. She was discharged after presenting a good outcome on the 20th postoperative day.

  5. [Heart failure and anemia].

    PubMed

    Reda, S; Motloch, L J; Hoppe, U C

    2013-09-01

    Chronic heart failure has an age-dependent prevalence of 2% and is therefore one of the most frequent diseases in western societies. A reduced hemoglobin concentration according to the definition of the World Health Organization is a common comorbidity affecting more than half of all heart failure patients. Elderly patients, patients suffering from renal impairment and women are more likely to develop anemia but a definitive etiology of anemia is only identified in the minority of cases. Anemia is associated with a poor clinical status and a greater risk of hospitalization and is a predictive factor for increased mortality. The incidence of anemia appears to increase with a poorer functional class. Intravenous iron therapy improves the exercise capacity in patients with systolic heart failure and iron deficiency and is currently being recommended for patients with persistent symptoms despite optimal medical and device therapy. However, erythropoietin-stimulating agents as a treatment for anemia in chronic heart failure have failed to improve clinical outcome in a large randomized trial. In patients with heart failure but with maintained ejection fraction, anemia is also associated with a poor prognosis. Specific therapeutic recommendations for these patients are still not available.

  6. Effects of x radiation on the canine heart

    SciTech Connect

    Stryker, J.A.; Lee, K.J.; Abt, A.B.

    1980-04-01

    Ten dogs received a single exposure of 10 MeV x rays to the heart. Five dogs received 1500 rad to the midline and five received 1000 rad. When the dogs expired or were killed 73 to 85 days after irradiation, their hearts were examined pathologicaly. The changes most frequently observed were pericardial effusion in the right atrium, myocardial necrosis, and fibrosis. The data suggest that under the conditions of this experiment, irradiation of the canine heart causes greatest damage to the right atrium.

  7. [Heart functions in monkeys during a 2-week antiorthostatic hypokinesia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krotov, V. P.; Convertino, V.; Korol'kov, V. I.; Latham, R.; Trambovetskii, E. V.; Fanton, J.; Crisman, R.; Truzhennikov, A. N.; Evert, D.; Nosovskii, A. M.; Conolly, J.

    1996-01-01

    Dynamics of the left heart ventricular muscle contractility and compliance was studied in 4 monkeys in the head down position (antiorthostatic hypokinesia) with the body angle 10 during 2 weeks. Functional tests on a tilt table and under two conditions of centrifuge rotation were performed prior to and after the antiorthostatic hypokinesia. No changes in the left heart ventricular muscle contractility was found. However, the sensitivity level of the baroreflex control decreased. Compliance of the left heart myocardial fibre increased in the first hours and days of the antiorthostatic hypokinesia.

  8. Micro-CernVM: slashing the cost of building and deploying virtual machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blomer, J.; Berzano, D.; Buncic, P.; Charalampidis, I.; Ganis, G.; Lestaris, G.; Meusel, R.; Nicolaou, V.

    2014-06-01

    The traditional virtual machine (VM) building and and deployment process is centered around the virtual machine hard disk image. The packages comprising the VM operating system are carefully selected, hard disk images are built for a variety of different hypervisors, and images have to be distributed and decompressed in order to instantiate a virtual machine. Within the HEP community, the CernVM File System (CernVM-FS) has been established in order to decouple the distribution from the experiment software from the building and distribution of the VM hard disk images. We show how to get rid of such pre-built hard disk images altogether. Due to the high requirements on POSIX compliance imposed by HEP application software, CernVM-FS can also be used to host and boot a Linux operating system. This allows the use of a tiny bootable CD image that comprises only a Linux kernel while the rest of the operating system is provided on demand by CernVM-FS. This approach speeds up the initial instantiation time and reduces virtual machine image sizes by an order of magnitude. Furthermore, security updates can be distributed instantaneously through CernVM-FS. By leveraging the fact that CernVM-FS is a versioning file system, a historic analysis environment can be easily re-spawned by selecting the corresponding CernVM-FS file system snapshot.

  9. Successful bridge to transplant using the Berlin Heart left ventricular assist device in a 3-month-old infant.

    PubMed

    Dunnington, Gansevoort H; Sleasman, Justin; Alkhaldi, Abdulaziz; Pelletier, Marc P; Reitz, Bruce A; Robbins, Robert C

    2006-03-01

    The EXCOR Berlin Heart (Berlin Heart, Berlin, Germany) was successfully used as a pediatric left ventricular assist device as a bridge to cardiac transplantation. The pneumatically driven paracorporeal device successfully supported a 7 kg patient for 53 days until a suitable heart was obtained for transplantation.

  10. Heart transplantation in adults with congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Houyel, Lucile; To-Dumortier, Ngoc-Tram; Lepers, Yannick; Petit, Jérôme; Roussin, Régine; Ly, Mohamed; Lebret, Emmanuel; Fadel, Elie; Hörer, Jürgen; Hascoët, Sébastien

    2017-02-22

    With the advances in congenital cardiac surgery and postoperative care, an increasing number of children with complex congenital heart disease now reach adulthood. There are already more adults than children living with a congenital heart defect, including patients with complex congenital heart defects. Among these adults with congenital heart disease, a significant number will develop ventricular dysfunction over time. Heart failure accounts for 26-42% of deaths in adults with congenital heart defects. Heart transplantation, or heart-lung transplantation in Eisenmenger syndrome, then becomes the ultimate therapeutic possibility for these patients. This population is deemed to be at high risk of mortality after heart transplantation, although their long-term survival is similar to that of patients transplanted for other reasons. Indeed, heart transplantation in adults with congenital heart disease is often challenging, because of several potential problems: complex cardiac and vascular anatomy, multiple previous palliative and corrective surgeries, and effects on other organs (kidney, liver, lungs) of long-standing cardiac dysfunction or cyanosis, with frequent elevation of pulmonary vascular resistance. In this review, we focus on the specific problems relating to heart and heart-lung transplantation in this population, revisit the indications/contraindications, and update the long-term outcomes.

  11. Study of the Half-Day/Full-Day Kindergarten Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McInroy, Thomas R.

    2012-01-01

    This case study and problem analysis was an in-depth investigation of the half-day/full-day kindergarten model by utilizing interviews and focus groups to provide insight from parents, teachers, and other district personnel as to how the model has impacted the social, emotional, and academic development of the participating students. This study…

  12. Zoning for Day Care (from Models for Day Care Licensing).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Day Care and Child Development Council of America, Inc., Washington, DC.

    Recommendations and regulations regarding the zoning of child development day care programs are discussed. Zoning in general is discussed, as is the treatment of child development day care in zoning ordinance, the background of program planning, modular housing, the impelmentation of zoning, and model provisions regarding characteristics of…

  13. Epigenetic regulation of cardiac myofibril gene expression during heart development.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Weian; Liu, Lingjuan; Pan, Bo; Xu, Yang; Zhu, Jing; Nan, Changlong; Huang, Xupei; Tian, Jie

    2015-07-01

    Cardiac gene expression regulation is controlled not only by genetic factors but also by environmental, i.e., epigenetic factors. Several environmental toxic effects such as oxidative stress and ischemia can result in abnormal myofibril gene expression during heart development. Troponin, one of the regulatory myofibril proteins in the heart, is a well-known model in study of cardiac gene regulation during the development. In our previous studies, we have demonstrated that fetal form troponin I (ssTnI) expression in the heart is partially regulated by hormones, such as thyroid hormone. In the present study, we have explored the epigenetic role of histone modification in the regulation of ssTnI expression. Mouse hearts were collected at different time of heart development, i.e., embryonic day 15.5, postnatal day 1, day 7, day 14 and day 21. Levels of histone H3 acetylation (acH3) and histone H3 lysine 9 trimethylation (H3K9me(3)) were detected using chromatin immunoprecipitation assays in slow upstream regulatory element (SURE) domain (TnI slow upstream regulatory element), 300-bp proximal upstream domain and the first intron of ssTnI gene, which are recognized as critical regions for ssTnI regulation. We found that the levels of acH3 on the SURE region were gradually decreased, corresponding to a similar decrease of ssTnI expression in the heart, whereas the levels of H3K9me(3) in the first intron of ssTnI gene were gradually increased. Our results indicate that both histone acetylation and methylation are involved in the epigenetic regulation of ssTnI expression in the heart during the development, which are the targets for environmental factors.

  14. Rethinking the Day of Silence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, Adriana

    2013-01-01

    Back in 2006, 7th and 8th graders at Green Acres, the K-8 independent school where the author taught in suburban Maryland, participated in the Day of Silence. The Day of Silence is a national event: Students across the country take a one-day pledge of silence to show that they want to make schools safe for all students, regardless of their sexual…

  15. Sun-Earth Day, 2001

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, Mitzi L.; Mortfield, P.; Hathaway, D. H.; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    To promote awareness of the Sun-Earth connection, NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center, in collaboration with the Stanford SOLAR Center, sponsored a one-day Sun-Earth Day event on April 27, 2001. Although "celebrated" on only one day, teachers and students from across the nation, prepared for over a month in advance. Workshops were held in March to train teachers. Students performed experiments, results of which were shared through video clips and an internet web cast. Our poster includes highlights from student experiments (grades 2 - 12), lessons learned from the teacher workshops and the event itself, and plans for Sun-Earth Day 2002.

  16. Congestive Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Scott, Michael C; Winters, Michael E

    2015-08-01

    Patients with acute decompensated heart failure are usually critically ill and require immediate treatment. However, most are not volume overloaded. Emergency department (ED) management is based on rapid initiation of noninvasive positive-pressure ventilation and aggressive titration of nitrates. Afterload reduction with an angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor can be considered. A diuretic should not be administered before optimal preload and afterload reduction has been achieved. Short-term inotropic therapy can be considered in select patients with cardiogenic shock and acute decompensated heart failure (ADHF) who fail to respond to standard therapy.

  17. Implantable Heart Aid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    Medrad utilized NASA's Apollo technology to develop a new device called the AID implantable automatic pulse generator which monitors the heart continuously, recognizes the onset of ventricular fibrillation and delivers a corrective electrical shock. AID pulse generator is, in effect, a miniaturized version of the defibrillator used by emergency squads and hospitals to restore rhythmic heartbeat after fibrillation, but has the unique advantage of being permanently available to the patient at risk. Once implanted, it needs no specially trained personnel or additional equipment. AID system consists of a microcomputer, a power source and two electrodes which sense heart activity.

  18. Towards defining heart failure in adults with congenital heart disease.

    PubMed

    Bolger, Aidan P; Gatzoulis, Michael A

    2004-12-01

    Injury to the myocardium disrupts geometric integrity and results in changes to intracardiac pressure, wall stress and tension, and the pattern of blood flow through the heart. Significant disruption to pump function results in heart failure which is defined in terms of symptoms: breathlessness and fatigue, signs of salt and water retention, and neurohormonal activation. This syndrome most commonly occurs in the context of injury due to ischaemic heart disease and dilated cardiomyopathy but because patients with congenital heart disease (CHD) are born with sometimes gross distortions of cardiac anatomy they too are subject to the forces that drive heart failure. This paper explores the available data relating to the clinical and neurohormonal manifestations of heart failure in patients with congenital heart disease and describes how, by additionally exploring events at a cellular level, we may be able to arrive at a definition of heart failure relevant to this population.

  19. 3 CFR 8810 - Proclamation 8810 of May 1, 2012. Law Day, U.S.A., 2012

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... renew our commitment to a democracy sustained by the rule of law. This year’s Law Day theme, “No Courts... protection and due process remain at the heart of our democracy, and on Law Day, we recommit to...

  20. Infant Development in Day Care

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doyle, Anna-Beth

    1975-01-01

    This study compared the intellectual development, attachment to mother, peer interaction, and physical health of day care and maternal home care children. The results indicate that very young children who experience high quality group day care differ little from home-reared children. (JMB)

  1. Montessori All Day, All Year

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Black, Connie; Davis, Liza

    2015-01-01

    Introducing real community into the Children's House goes back to the roots of Montessori education through all-day Montessori. The all-day environment is a house where children live with a "developmental room" of Montessori materials including a living room, kitchen, dining area, bedroom, bathroom, greeting rooms, and outdoor spaces.…

  2. In Defense of Snow Days

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodman, Joshua

    2015-01-01

    In snowy climates, school superintendents must frequently decide whether an impending storm warrants closing schools for the day. Concerns about student and teacher safety must be weighed against the loss of student learning time, along with state requirements for days of instruction and the cost and inconvenience of extending the school year into…

  3. Youth Field Day Planning Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wisconsin State Dept. of Natural Resources, Madison.

    Youth field days expose children to outdoor activities, land use ethics, and habitat conservation and encourage adults to be mentors in these areas. A typical youth field day could have programs in archery, fishing, boating, shooting, or safety. The event requires a diverse steering committee that usually includes sporting clubs and state…

  4. Day Care Infection Control Protocol.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seattle-King County Dept. of Public Health, Seattle, WA.

    This day care infection control manual was assembled to provide technical guidance for the prevention and control of communicable diseases to child day care facilities in Seattle and King County, Washington. For each disease, the manual provides background information, public health control recommendations, and letters that can be used to…

  5. Day Care Center Enrichment Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    West Virginia State Dept. of Welfare, Charleston.

    This guide to a West Virginia Department of Welfare project for upgrading the quality of day care centers throughout the state presents samples of the forms used in the program, accompanied by a brief description of the program's format, requirements and procedures. The Day Care Center Enrichment Program provides a monetary incentive for…

  6. Celebrate International School Library Day

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Braxton, Barbara

    2004-01-01

    The Fourth Monday in October is International School Library Day (ISLD)--an opportunity for school libraries around the world to celebrate the contribution they make to the education of the children in their care. International School Library Day was proclaimed in 1999 by Dr Blanche Woolls, president of the International Association of School…

  7. Heart Health: Learn the Truth About Your Heart

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Cover Story Heart Health Learn the Truth About Your Heart Past Issues / Winter 2009 Table of Contents For ... turn Javascript on. Photo: iStock February is American Heart Month. Now is the time to make sure ...

  8. Women's Heart Disease: Join the Heart Truth Community

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Women's Heart Disease Join The Heart Truth Community Past Issues / Winter 2014 Table of Contents National Symbol The centerpiece of The Heart Truth ® is The Red Dress ® which was introduced ...

  9. Million Hearts: Key to Collaboration to Reduce Heart Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brinkman, Patricia

    2016-01-01

    Extension has taught successful classes to address heart disease, yet heart disease remains the number one killer in the United States. The U.S. government's Million Hearts initiative seeks collaboration among colleges, local and state health departments, Extension and other organizations, and medical providers in imparting a consistent message…

  10. How Will I Recover from My Heart Attack?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Understand Your Risk for Congenital Heart Defects Symptoms & Diagnosis of Congenital Heart Defects Care & Treatment for Congenital Heart Defects Congenital Heart Defects Tools & Resources Heart Attack About Heart Attacks Warning Signs of a Heart ...

  11. Panic Attack or Heart Attack?

    MedlinePlus

    ... with echocardiography. It is a good first-line test for a woman with symptoms and risk factors for heart disease. Echocardiography uses sound waves technology to give detailed information about the heart muscle, ...

  12. Heart failure - fluids and diuretics

    MedlinePlus

    ... In: Mann DL, Zipes DP, Libby P, Bonow RO, Braunwald E, eds. Braunwald's Heart Disease: A Textbook ... In: Mann DL, Zipes DP, Libby P, Bonow RO, Braunwald E, eds. Braunwald's Heart Disease: A Textbook ...

  13. Give your heart a workout

    MedlinePlus

    Exercise - heart workout; CAD prevention - workout; Cardiovascular disease prevention - workout ... Exercise helps your heart in several ways. Burns calories. This can help you lose extra pounds (kilograms) or stay at a healthy weight. ...

  14. Ejection Fraction Heart Failure Measurement

    MedlinePlus

    ... Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Ejection Fraction Heart Failure Measurement Updated:Feb 15,2017 The ejection fraction (EF) is an important measurement in determining how well your heart is pumping ...

  15. Angioplasty and stent placement - heart

    MedlinePlus

    ... syndromes: a report of the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association Task Force on Practice Guidelines. ... disease: a report of the American College of Cardiology Foundation/American Heart Association Task Force on Practice ...

  16. Thrombolytic drugs for heart attack

    MedlinePlus

    ... syndromes: a report of the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association Task Force on Practice Guidelines. ... infarction: a report of the American College of Cardiology Foundation/American Heart Association Task Force on Practice ...

  17. All about Heart Rate (Pulse)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Giving for Heart.org Media for Heart.org Arrhythmia About Arrhythmia Why Arrhythmia Matters Understand Your Risk for Arrhythmia Symptoms, Diagnosis & Monitoring of Arrhythmia Prevention & Treatment of ...

  18. Heart Disease: Know Your Risk

    MedlinePlus

    A project of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Office on Women's Health Skip ... Heart disease risk factors you can't control Other possible heart disease risk factors Stroke: Know your ...

  19. Hispanics and Heart Disease, Stroke

    MedlinePlus

    ... Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Hispanics and Heart Disease, Stroke Updated:Aug 30,2016 Heart disease is the No. 1 killer for all Americans and stroke is the fifth leading cause of death. Hispanics ...

  20. What Causes a Heart Attack?

    MedlinePlus

    ... After Clinical Trials Links Related Topics Angina Arrhythmia Atherosclerosis Coronary Heart Disease Heart Failure Send a link ... up in the arteries, the condition is called atherosclerosis . The buildup of plaque occurs over many years. ...

  1. Heart Attack Symptoms in Women

    MedlinePlus

    ... Peripheral Artery Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Heart Attack Symptoms in Women Updated:Jan 10,2017 Heart Attack Signs in Women Uncomfortable pressure, squeezing, fullness or ...

  2. Heart Failure Society of America

    MedlinePlus

    ... hfsa.org Events Calendar>> Copyright © 2017 Heart Failure Society of America. All Rights Reserved 2017 Call for ... for Organ Sharing (UNOS) asks the Heart Failure Society of America (HFSA) members to comment on the ...

  3. Diabetes, Heart Disease, and Stroke

    MedlinePlus

    ... Disease, & Other Dental Problems Diabetes & Sexual & Urologic Problems Diabetes, Heart Disease, and Stroke Having diabetes means that ... help to stop. What is the link between diabetes, heart disease, and stroke? Over time, high blood ...

  4. Infant open heart surgery (image)

    MedlinePlus

    During open-heart surgery an incision is made through the breastbone (sternum) while the child is under general anesthesia. ... During open-heart surgery an incision is made through the breastbone (sternum) while the child is under general anesthesia.

  5. Heart Disease and Stroke Statistics

    MedlinePlus

    ... failure on the rise; cardiovascular diseases remain leading killer AHA News: Heart failure projected to increase dramatically, ... failure on the rise; cardiovascular diseases remain leading killer 2017 Statistics At-a-Glance Heart Disease and ...

  6. How Is Heart Disease Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... structures inside your chest, such as your heart, lungs, and blood vessels. A chest x ray can reveal signs ... disease and is sponsored by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI), part of the National Institutes of ...

  7. Living with Coronary Heart Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... disease and is sponsored by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI), part of the National Institutes of ... disease and is sponsored by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI), part of the National Institutes of ...

  8. What Is Coronary Heart Disease?

    MedlinePlus

    ... disease and is sponsored by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI), part of the National Institutes of ... disease and is sponsored by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI), part of the National Institutes of ...

  9. [Heart and Steinert's disease].

    PubMed

    Fayssoil, A; Nardi, O

    2011-08-01

    Myotonic dystrophy type 1 (Steinert disease) is an autosomal dominant disease characterized by myotonia and multiorgan damage. This latter is the most frequent of the adult-onset muscular dystrophies. Heart involvement is often associated, including cardiomyopathies, atrioventricular block, atrial and ventricular arrhythmias.

  10. Sweet & Simple Clay Hearts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Heather

    2010-01-01

    Nothing pleases parents more than receiving handmade gifts from their children, especially if the gift is in the shape of a heart. Nothing pleases an art teacher more than having a lesson that is easy to follow, teaches basic skills, and enables students to be successful with the activity. In this article, the author describes how to create a…

  11. Heart and vascular services

    MedlinePlus

    ... MedlinePlus GO GO About MedlinePlus Site Map FAQs Customer Support Health Topics Drugs & Supplements Videos & Tools Español You Are Here: Home → Medical Encyclopedia → Heart and vascular services URL of this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/ ...

  12. Heart disease and intimacy

    MedlinePlus

    ... hard to talk to your heart doctor about these topics, talk to your primary care provider. If you are depressed, anxious, or afraid, medicine or talk therapy may help. Classes in lifestyle change, stress management, or therapy may help you, family members, and ...

  13. Heart Ed 101

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Lynne E.

    2008-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death for men and women in the United States. Risk factors and health behaviors combine over time to contribute to the disease process. College communities provide a unique environment for health promotion, risk reduction, and primary intervention. Heart health should be an integral part of college…

  14. Feedback on heart attack.

    PubMed

    Pearce, Lynne

    2016-04-13

    The Royal Brompton & Harefield NHS Foundation Trust in London is the largest heart and lung centre in the UK. This article explores a project carried out by nurses at the trust looking at the experiences of having an acute myocardial infarction, and how patients felt about taking part in a research study.

  15. Exercise and Your Heart.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Heart and Lung Inst. (DHHS/NIH), Bethesda, MD.

    This pamphlet presents information on the effects of physical activity on the heart and practical guidelines for starting and staying on an exercise program. The following topics are discussed: (1) the benefits of getting sufficient exercise; (2) possible risks in exercising compared to benefits; (3) when to seek doctor's advice and prevention of…

  16. Adult Congenital Heart Association

    MedlinePlus

    ... my congenital heart … Read More Let's Talk About Love... BY Kelly DiMaggio Being in love and in a relationship is one of the ... are born they have … Read More Learning to Love the Scar BY Clare Almand I wrote about ...

  17. Be Still My Heart.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barber, Betsy; Ball, Rhonda

    This project description is designed to show how graphing calculators and calculator-based laboratories (CBLs) can be used to explore topics in physics and health sciences. The activities address such topics as respiration, heart rate, and the circulatory system. Teaching notes and calculator instructions are included as are blackline masters. (MM)

  18. Educating the Heart

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwartz, Sherry

    2007-01-01

    Japan's elementary and junior high schools have a formal, nationally mandated moral curriculum called Kokoro-no-kyoiku--education of the heart. Japanese educators include moral growth as an integral part of one's intellectual growth and believe that democratic societies must promote virtuous decision making. Moral education in Japan nurtures the…

  19. About Heart Failure

    MedlinePlus

    ... prescribe an ACE inhibitor  Last, they prescribe a beta-blocker This is what these medicines do to help ... ARBs. This medicine works similar to ACE inhibitors. Beta-blockers:  Protect the heart by slowing down the heartbeat  ...

  20. Experimental results from CERN on reaction mechanisms in high energy heavy ion collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Sorensen, S.P. Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN . Dept. of Physics)

    1990-01-01

    Three main experimental results from CERN concerning reaction mechanisms in high energy heavy ion collisions are discussed: (1) the striking validity of the single particle picture, (2) the nuclear stopping power and (3) the attained energy densities.