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Sample records for cern intersecting storage

  1. The CERN intersecting storage rings (ISR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hübner, Kurt

    2012-03-01

    The CERN Intersecting Storage Rings (ISR) was the first facility ever built providing colliding hadron beams. It mainly operated with protons with beam energies of 15 to 31 GeV. The ISR was conceived in the years 1960 to 1964 and was approved in 1965. It came into operation at the beginning of 1971 and was decommissioned as a collider in 1983. A number of accelerator technologies have been either much improved or developed at the ISR which subsequently have become enabling technologies for a number of hadron storage rings and large colliders. Prominent examples of such technologies are ultra-high vacuum technology, beam diagnostics based on Schottky signals and stochastic cooling. The experiences obtained with the ISR were later exploited at the proton-antiproton facility in the CERN SPS, the Tevatron at Fermilab, the RHIC at Brookhaven and, finally, by the LHC at CERN.

  2. Determination of the angular and energy dependence of hard constituent scattering from. pi. /sup 0/ pair events at the CERN intersecting storage rings

    SciTech Connect

    Angelis, A.L.S.; Besch, H.J.; Blumenfeld, B.J.

    1982-08-23

    We present data on proton-proton collisions, obtained at the CERN Intersecting Storage Rings, in which two roughly back-to-back ..pi../sup 0/'s of high transverse momentum (p/sub T/) were produced. The angular distribution of the dipion axis relative to the collision axis is found to be independent of both the effective mass m of the dipion system and the centre-of-mass energy ..sqrt..s of the proton-proton collision. The cross-sections dsigma/dm at the two values of ..sqrt..s satisfy a scaling law of the form dsigma/dm = G(x)/m/sup n/, where x = m(..pi../sup 0/,..pi../sup 0/)/..sqrt..s and n = 6.5 +- 0.5. We show from our data that the leading ..pi../sup 0/ carries most of the momentum of the scattered parton. Given this fact, the axis of the dipion system follows closely the direction of the scattered constituents, and we exploit this to determine the angular dependence of the hard-scattering subprocess. We also compare our data with the lowest order QCD predictions using structure functions as determined in deep-inelastic scattering and fragmentation functions from electron-positron annihilation.

  3. Disk storage at CERN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mascetti, L.; Cano, E.; Chan, B.; Espinal, X.; Fiorot, A.; González Labrador, H.; Iven, J.; Lamanna, M.; Lo Presti, G.; Mościcki, JT; Peters, AJ; Ponce, S.; Rousseau, H.; van der Ster, D.

    2015-12-01

    CERN IT DSS operates the main storage resources for data taking and physics analysis mainly via three system: AFS, CASTOR and EOS. The total usable space available on disk for users is about 100 PB (with relative ratios 1:20:120). EOS actively uses the two CERN Tier0 centres (Meyrin and Wigner) with 50:50 ratio. IT DSS also provide sizeable on-demand resources for IT services most notably OpenStack and NFS-based clients: this is provided by a Ceph infrastructure (3 PB) and few proprietary servers (NetApp). We will describe our operational experience and recent changes to these systems with special emphasis to the present usages for LHC data taking, the convergence to commodity hardware (nodes with 200-TB each with optional SSD) shared across all services. We also describe our experience in coupling commodity and home-grown solution (e.g. CERNBox integration in EOS, Ceph disk pools for AFS, CASTOR and NFS) and finally the future evolution of these systems for WLCG and beyond.

  4. The CERN Intersecting Storage Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myers, Stephen

    The following sections are included: * Introduction and history * Phase displacement and stacking * Vacuum * Working lines and space charge compensation * Schottky scans * Centring the accumulated beam in the aperture * Inserting markers in the stack * Acceleration by phase displacement * Computer control of accelerators * Working close to the integer * Low β insertions and luminosity * Stochastic cooling * Summary: What did ISR teach us? * References

  5. Oracle and storage IOs, explanations and experience at CERN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grancher, Eric

    2010-04-01

    The Oracle database system is used extensively in the High Energy Physics community. Critical to the efficient running of these databases is the storage subsystem, and over the years Oracle has introduced new ways to access and manage this storage, e.g. ASM (Oracle database version 10.1), Direct NFS (Oracle database version 11.1), and Exadata (Oracle database version 11.1). This paper presents CERN's experience over the past few years with the different storage access and management features, and gives a comparison of each functionality. Also compared are the different solutions used at CERN, and the Tier 1 sites for storing Oracle databases.

  6. Building an organic block storage service at CERN with Ceph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Ster, Daniel; Wiebalck, Arne

    2014-06-01

    Emerging storage requirements, such as the need for block storage for both OpenStack VMs and file services like AFS and NFS, have motivated the development of a generic backend storage service for CERN IT. The goals for such a service include (a) vendor neutrality, (b) horizontal scalability with commodity hardware, (c) fault tolerance at the disk, host, and network levels, and (d) support for geo-replication. Ceph is an attractive option due to its native block device layer RBD which is built upon its scalable, reliable, and performant object storage system, RADOS. It can be considered an "organic" storage solution because of its ability to balance and heal itself while living on an ever-changing set of heterogeneous disk servers. This work will present the outcome of a petabyte-scale test deployment of Ceph by CERN IT. We will first present the architecture and configuration of our cluster, including a summary of best practices learned from the community and discovered internally. Next the results of various functionality and performance tests will be shown: the cluster has been used as a backend block storage system for AFS and NFS servers as well as a large OpenStack cluster at CERN. Finally, we will discuss the next steps and future possibilities for Ceph at CERN.

  7. Online data storage service strategy for the CERN computer Centre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cancio, G.; Duellmann, D.; Lamanna, M.; Pace, A.

    2011-12-01

    The Data and Storage Services group at CERN is conducting several service and software development projects to address possible scalability issues, to prepare the integration of upcoming technologies and to anticipate changing access patterns. Particular emphasis is put on: very high performance disk pools for analysis based on XROOTD [1] lower latency archive storage using large, cost and power effective disk pools more efficient use of tape resources by aggregation of user data collections on the tape media a consolidated system for monitoring and usage trend analysis This contribution will outline the underlying storage architecture and focus on the key functional and operational advantages, which drive the development. The discussion will include a review of proof-of-concept and prototype studies and propose a plan for the integration of these components in the existing storage infrastructure at CERN.

  8. EOS as the present and future solution for data storage at CERN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, AJ; Sindrilaru, EA; Adde, G.

    2015-12-01

    EOS is an open source distributed disk storage system in production since 2011 at CERN. Development focus has been on low-latency analysis use cases for LHC1 and non- LHC experiments and life-cycle management using JBOD2 hardware for multi PB storage installations. The EOS design implies a split of hot and cold storage and introduced a change of the traditional HSM3 functionality based workflows at CERN. The 2015 deployment brings storage at CERN to a new scale and foresees to breach 100 PB of disk storage in a distributed environment using tens of thousands of (heterogeneous) hard drives. EOS has brought to CERN major improvements compared to past storage solutions by allowing quick changes in the quality of service of the storage pools. This allows the data centre to quickly meet the changing performance and reliability requirements of the LHC experiments with minimal data movements and dynamic reconfiguration. For example, the software stack has met the specific needs of the dual computing centre set-up required by CERN and allowed the fast design of new workflows accommodating the separation of long-term tape archive and disk storage required for the LHC Run II. This paper will give a high-level state of the art overview of EOS with respect to Run II, introduce new tools and use cases and set the roadmap for the next storage solutions to come.

  9. Evaluation of the Huawei UDS cloud storage system for CERN specific data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zotes Resines, M.; Heikkila, S. S.; Duellmann, D.; Adde, G.; Toebbicke, R.; Hughes, J.; Wang, L.

    2014-06-01

    Cloud storage is an emerging architecture aiming to provide increased scalability and access performance, compared to more traditional solutions. CERN is evaluating this promise using Huawei UDS and OpenStack SWIFT storage deployments, focusing on the needs of high-energy physics. Both deployed setups implement S3, one of the protocols that are emerging as a standard in the cloud storage market. A set of client machines is used to generate I/O load patterns to evaluate the storage system performance. The presented read and write test results indicate scalability both in metadata and data perspectives. Futher the Huawei UDS cloud storage is shown to be able to recover from a major failure of losing 16 disks. Both cloud storages are finally demonstrated to function as back-end storage systems to a filesystem, which is used to deliver high energy physics software.

  10. User and group storage management the CMS CERN T2 centre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerminara, G.; Franzoni, G.; Pfeiffer, A.

    2015-12-01

    A wide range of detector commissioning, calibration and data analysis tasks is carried out by CMS using dedicated storage resources available at the CMS CERN Tier-2 centre. Relying on the functionalities of the EOS disk-only storage technology, the optimal exploitation of the CMS user/group resources has required the introduction of policies for data access management, data protection, cleanup campaigns based on access pattern, and long term tape archival. The resource management has been organised around the definition of working groups and the delegation to an identified responsible of each group composition. In this paper we illustrate the user/group storage management, and the development and operational experience at the CMS CERN Tier-2 centre in the 2012-2015 period.

  11. 40th Anniversary of the First Proton-Proton Collisions in the CERN Intersecting Storage Rings (ISR)

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    Welcome, Luigi di Lella and Rolf HeuerDesign and Construction of the ISR, Kurt HubnerPhysics at small angles, Ugo Amaldi (TERA Foundation)The Impact of the ISR on Accelerator Physics and Technology, Philip J. BryantPhysics at high transverse momentum, Pierre Darriulat (VATLY-Hanoi)Concluding remarks, Rolf Heuer

  12. Experience with highly-parallel software for the storage system of the ATLAS Experiment at CERN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colombo, T.; Vandelli, W.

    2012-12-01

    The ATLAS experiment records proton-proton collisions delivered by the LHC accelerator. The ATLAS Trigger and Data Acquisition (TDAQ) system selects interesting events on-line in a three-level trigger system in order to store them at a budgeted rate of several hundred Hz. This paper focuses on the TDAQ data-logging system and in particular on the implementation and performance of a novel parallel software design. The main challenge presented by a parallel data-logging implementation is the conflict between the largely parallel nature of the event processing, especially the recently introduced event compression, and the constraint of sequential file writing and hash-sum evaluation. This is further complicated by the necessity of operating in a fully data-driven mode, to cope with continuously evolving trigger and detector configurations. In this paper we report on the design of the new ATLAS on-line storage software. In particular we will discuss our development experience using recent concurrency-oriented libraries. Finally we will show the new system performance with respect to the old, single-threaded software design.

  13. Study of Double Pomeron Exchange with the SFM detector at the CERN ISR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, H. G.; Geist, W.; Makariev, M.

    2014-11-01

    Selected results from the study of Double Pomeron Exchange with the Split Field Magnet detector at the CERN Intersecting Storage Rings are presented. This concerns various general features of central pionic systems as well as the spectroscopy in the π+π- channel, emphasizing the production properties of the f2(1270) meson. This summary refers to a series of publications over a time span of 17 years based on the work of the CCHK1,2 and ABCDHW3-7 collaborations at the CERN ISR.

  14. Sealing intersecting vane machines

    DOEpatents

    Martin, Jedd N.; Chomyszak, Stephen M.

    2005-06-07

    The invention provides a toroidal intersecting vane machine incorporating intersecting rotors to form primary and secondary chambers whose porting configurations minimize friction and maximize efficiency. Specifically, it is an object of the invention to provide a toroidal intersecting vane machine that greatly reduces the frictional losses through intersecting surfaces without the need for external gearing by modifying the width of one or both tracks at the point of intermeshing. The inventions described herein relate to these improvements.

  15. Sealing intersecting vane machines

    DOEpatents

    Martin, Jedd N.; Chomyszak, Stephen M.

    2007-06-05

    The invention provides a toroidal intersecting vane machine incorporating intersecting rotors to form primary and secondary chambers whose porting configurations minimize friction and maximize efficiency. Specifically, it is an object of the invention to provide a toroidal intersecting vane machine that greatly reduces the frictional losses through intersecting surfaces without the need for external gearing by modifying the width of one or both tracks at the point of intermeshing. The inventions described herein relate to these improvements.

  16. The Intersection Challenge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roman, Harry T.

    2011-01-01

    Street intersections are a source of accidents--for both automobiles and pedestrians. This article presents an intersection challenge that allows students to explore some possible ways to change the traditional intersection. In this challenge, teachers open up the boundaries and allow students to redesign their world. The first step is to help…

  17. Deburring small intersecting holes

    SciTech Connect

    Gillespie, L.K.

    1980-08-01

    Deburring intersecting holes is one of the most difficult deburring tasks faced by many industries. Only 14 of the 37 major deburring processes are applicable to most intersecting hole applications. Only five of these are normally applicable to small or miniature holes. Basic process capabilities and techniques used as a function of hole sizes and intersection depths are summarized.

  18. The Intersection Challenge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roman, Harry T.

    2011-01-01

    Street intersections are a source of accidents--for both automobiles and pedestrians. This article presents an intersection challenge that allows students to explore some possible ways to change the traditional intersection. In this challenge, teachers open up the boundaries and allow students to redesign their world. The first step is to help…

  19. Influence of fracture intersections under unsaturated, low flow conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas R. Wood; Michael J. Nicholl; Robert J. Glass

    2005-04-01

    Recent experimental evidence suggests that the capillary heterogeneity associated with fracture intersections can act to impose temporal and spatial structure on network-scale flows. A simple intersection between orthogonal fractures, one horizontal and the other vertical, has been shown to integrate unsaturated flows. At low flows the intersection forms a capillary barrier that accumulates water in a growing pool. Eventually, the retaining meniscus snaps, discharging a pulse of water. Here we develop a mechanistic explanation for this observed behavior and experimentally consider three perturbations to the geometry of the simple orthogonal intersection. Two of the perturbations also act as capillary barriers, while the third formed a capillary bridge across the intersection. At low flow, all of our experimental intersections imposed a temporal signal, with the nature of that signal dependent on intersection geometry and participation by the horizontal fractures in dynamic storage. At high flow a continuous fluid tendril spanned the system from inlet to outlet with water pooled above the intersection caused by a narrow fluid connection that restricted flow across the intersection. Results from all experiments suggest that pulsation is critically sensitive to small variations in the geometry of fracture intersections and storage in the horizontal fractures. When combined with dependency on supply rate, this sensitivity can generate pulsation of flow across a wide range of time periods and discharge volumes.

  20. 3. View facing west from the intersection of Harris and ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. View facing west from the intersection of Harris and Kinsley avenues showing the Silvertop Diner, Providence Fruit & Produce Building, and Merchants' Cold Storage Warehouse. - Provisions Warehouse Historic District, Kinsley & Harris Avenues, Providence, Providence County, RI

  1. Intersecting vane machines

    DOEpatents

    Bailey, H. Sterling; Chomyszak, Stephen M.

    2007-01-16

    The invention provides a toroidal intersecting vane machine incorporating intersecting rotors to form primary and secondary chambers whose porting configurations minimize friction and maximize efficiency. Specifically, it is an object of the invention to provide a toroidal intersecting vane machine that greatly reduces the frictional losses through meshing surfaces without the need for external gearing by modifying the function of one or the other of the rotors from that of "fluid moving" to that of "valving" thereby reducing the pressure loads and associated inefficiencies at the interface of the meshing surfaces. The inventions described herein relate to these improvements.

  2. CERN welcomes new members

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2017-08-01

    Lithuania is on course to become an associate member of CERN, pending final approval by the Lithuanian parliament. Associate membership will allow representatives of the Baltic nation to take part in meetings of the CERN Council, which oversees the Geneva-based physics lab.

  3. Signature CERN-URSS

    SciTech Connect

    2006-01-24

    Le DG W.Jentschke souhaite la bienvenue à l'assemblée et aux invités pour la signature du protocole entre le Cern et l'URSS qui est un événement important. C'est en 1955 que 55 visiteurs soviétiques ont visité le Cern pour la première fois. Le premier DG au Cern, F.Bloch, et Mons.Amaldi sont aussi présents. Tandis que le discours anglais de W.Jentschke est traduit en russe, le discours russe de Mons.Morozov est traduit en anglais.

  4. Considering Intersectionality in Multiculturalism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, Madeline

    2015-01-01

    The intersection of feminist theory and multiculturalism is discussed. Although Frisby makes several strong points, there are several aspects of his definition of multiculturalism that are simplistic. Expansion of ideas borrowed from feminism has potential to increase the nuance and accuracy of the conceptualization of multiculturalism.

  5. Seal arrangement for intersecting conduits

    DOEpatents

    Goedicke, Friedrich E.

    1980-01-01

    A seal arrangement in which two intersecting conduits are sealed from each other. A sleeve insert is locked in a sealed relationship within one conduit enclosing the openings of the intersecting conduit.

  6. Signature CERN-URSS

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    Le DG W.Jentschke souhaite la bienvenue à l'assemblée et aux invités pour la signature du protocole entre le Cern et l'URSS qui est un événement important. C'est en 1955 que 55 visiteurs soviétiques ont visité le Cern pour la première fois. Le premier DG au Cern, F.Bloch, et Mons.Amaldi sont aussi présents. Tandis que le discours anglais de W.Jentschke est traduit en russe, le discours russe de Mons.Morozov est traduit en anglais.

  7. The new CERN tape software - getting ready for total performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cano, E.; Murray, S.; Kruse, D. F.; Kotlyar, V.; Côme, D.

    2015-12-01

    CASTOR (the CERN Advanced STORage system) is used to store the custodial copy of all of the physics data collected from the CERN experiments, both past and present. CASTOR is a hierarchical storage management system that has a disk-based front-end and a tape-based back-end. The software responsible for controlling the tape back-end has been redesigned and redeveloped over the last year and was put in production at the beginning of 2015. This paper summarises the motives behind the redesign, describes in detail the redevelopment work and concludes with the short and long-term benefits.

  8. The significance of Cern

    SciTech Connect

    2006-03-29

    Le Prof. V.Weisskopf, DG du Cern de 1961 à 1965, est né à Vienne, a fait ses études à Göttingen et a une carrière académique particulièrement riche. Il a travaillé à Berlin, Copenhague et Berlin et est parti aux Etats Unis pour participer au projet Manhattan et était Prof. au MTT jusqu'à 1960. Revenu en Europe, il a été DG du Cern et lui a donné l'impulsion que l'on sait.

  9. Inflation from Intersecting Branes

    SciTech Connect

    Leblond, Louis

    2007-11-20

    We propose a new scenario for D-term inflation which appears quite straightforwardly in the open string sector of intersecting brane models. We take the inflaton to be a chiral field in a bifundamental representation of the hidden sector and we argue that a sufficiently flat potential can be brane engineered. This type of model generically predicts a near gaussian red spectrum with negligible tensor modes.

  10. CERN goes iconic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2017-06-01

    There are more than 1800 emoji that can be sent and received in text messages and e-mails. Now, the CERN particle-physics lab near Geneva has got in on the act and released its own collection of 35 images that can be used by anyone with an Apple device.

  11. Intersections et Convergence

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-01-01

    ardus : Par exemple, celui d’intersections, ou racines. Nos ordinateurs se bloquaient. De toute ur- gence, il fallait mettre sur pied une m6thode... ordinateurs atteignaient la limite du quart d’heure qui, par pr~caution, en limitait la dur~e! Et de plus, il fallait agir vite, tr~s vite. .. .pour...l’cipoque ohi le calcul des fonctions n’citait pas encore tr~s au point, au niveau des ordinateurs , les formules simplificies de Arc sin et Arc cos nous

  12. The significance of Cern

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    Le Prof. V.Weisskopf, DG du Cern de 1961 à 1965, est né à Vienne, a fait ses études à Göttingen et a une carrière académique particulièrement riche. Il a travaillé à Berlin, Copenhague et Berlin et est parti aux Etats Unis pour participer au projet Manhattan et était Prof. au MTT jusqu'à 1960. Revenu en Europe, il a été DG du Cern et lui a donné l'impulsion que l'on sait.

  13. Wolfgang Kummer at CERN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schopper, Herwig

    Wolfgang Kummer was not only a great theorist but also a man with a noble spirit and extensive education, based on a fascinating long-term Austrian cultural tradition. As an experimentalist I am not sufficiently knowledgeable to evaluate his contributions to theoretical physics - this will certainly be done by more competent scientists. Nevertheless I admired him for not only being attached to fundamental and abstract problems like quantum field theory, quantum gravity or black holes, but for his interest in down to earth questions like electron-proton scattering or the toponium mass. I got to know Wolfgang Kummer very well and appreciate his human qualities during his long attachment to CERN, in particular when he served as president of the CERN Council, the highest decision taking authority of this international research centre, from 1985 to 1987 falling into my term as Director-General…

  14. History of Cern

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    Cérémonie à l'occasion de l'apparition du premier volume du livre sur l'histoire du Cern, avec plusieurs personnes présentes qui jouaient un rôle important dans cette organisation européenne couronnée de succès grâce à l'esprit des membres fondateurs qui est et restera essentiel

  15. History of Cern

    SciTech Connect

    2007-12-20

    Cérémonie à l'occasion de l'apparition du premier volume du livre sur l'histoire du Cern, avec plusieurs personnes présentes qui jouaient un rôle important dans cette organisation européenne couronnée de succès grâce à l'esprit des membres fondateurs qui est et restera essentiel

  16. Exploring Class-Based Intersectionality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Block, David; Corona, Victor

    2014-01-01

    This paper argues that language, culture and identity researchers need to take the intersectionality of identity inscriptions seriously and, further to this, that an intersectional approach which emanates from an interest in social class provides a productive way to examine the lives and experience of individuals living in multicultural societies.…

  17. Exploring Class-Based Intersectionality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Block, David; Corona, Victor

    2014-01-01

    This paper argues that language, culture and identity researchers need to take the intersectionality of identity inscriptions seriously and, further to this, that an intersectional approach which emanates from an interest in social class provides a productive way to examine the lives and experience of individuals living in multicultural societies.…

  18. CERN: A global project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voss, Rüdiger

    2017-07-01

    In the most important shift of paradigm of its membership rules in 60 years, CERN in 2010 introduced a policy of “Geographical Enlargement” which for the first time opened the door for membership of non-European States in the Organization. This short article reviews briefly the history of CERN’s membership rules, discusses the rationale behind the new policy, its relationship with the emerging global roadmap of particle physics, and gives a short overview of the status of the enlargement process.

  19. Monitoring Evolution at CERN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrade, P.; Fiorini, B.; Murphy, S.; Pigueiras, L.; Santos, M.

    2015-12-01

    Over the past two years, the operation of the CERN Data Centres went through significant changes with the introduction of new mechanisms for hardware procurement, new services for cloud provisioning and configuration management, among other improvements. These changes resulted in an increase of resources being operated in a more dynamic environment. Today, the CERN Data Centres provide over 11000 multi-core processor servers, 130 PB disk servers, 100 PB tape robots, and 150 high performance tape drives. To cope with these developments, an evolution of the data centre monitoring tools was also required. This modernisation was based on a number of guiding rules: sustain the increase of resources, adapt to the new dynamic nature of the data centres, make monitoring data easier to share, give more flexibility to Service Managers on how they publish and consume monitoring metrics and logs, establish a common repository of monitoring data, optimise the handling of monitoring notifications, and replace the previous toolset by new open source technologies with large adoption and community support. This contribution describes how these improvements were delivered, present the architecture and technologies of the new monitoring tools, and review the experience of its production deployment.

  20. Intersectional perspective in elderly care

    PubMed Central

    Cuesta, Marta; Rämgård, Margareta

    2016-01-01

    Earlier research has shown that power relationships at workplaces are constructed by power structures. Processes related to power always influence the working conditions for (in this study in elderly care) the working groups involved. Power structures are central for intersectional analysis, in the sense that the intersectional perspective highlights aspects such as gender and ethnicity (subjective dimensions) and interrelates them to processes of power (objective dimension). This qualitative study aims to explore in what way an intersectional perspective could contribute to increased knowledge of power structures in a nursing home where the employees were mostly immigrants from different countries. By using reflexive dialogues related to an intersectional perspective, new knowledge which contributes to the employees’ well-being could develop. Narrative analysis was the method used to conduct this study. Through a multi-stage focus group on six occasions over 6 months, the staff were engaged in intersectional and critical reflections about power relationship with the researchers, by identifying patterns in their professional activities that could be connected to their subjectivities (gender, ethnicity, etc.). The result of this study presents three themes that express the staff's experiences and connect these experiences to structural discrimination. 1) Intersectionality, knowledge, and experiences of professionalism; 2) Intersectionality, knowledge, and experiences of collaboration; and 3) Intersectionality, knowledge, and experiences of discrimination. The result demonstrates that an intersectional perspective reinforces the involved abilities, during the conversations, into being clear about, for example, their experiences of discrimination, and consequently developing a better understanding of their professionalism and collaboration. Such deeper reflections became possible through a process of consciousness raising, strengthening the employee's self

  1. INTERIOR OF COLD STORAGE ROOM, SHOWING MOVABLE HANGING RACKS. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR OF COLD STORAGE ROOM, SHOWING MOVABLE HANGING RACKS. - Naval Air Station Barbers Point, Aircraft Storehouse, Between Midway & Card Streets at Enterprise Avenue intersection, Ewa, Honolulu County, HI

  2. Gravity Anomaly Intersects Moon Basin

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2012-12-05

    A linear gravity anomaly intersecting the Crisium basin on the nearside of the moon has been revealed by NASA GRAIL mission. The GRAIL gravity gradient data are shown at left, with the location of the anomaly indicated.

  3. Calculating intersections of surfaces in screen space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, David C.

    1993-01-01

    When surfaces intersect, one may desire to highlight the intersection curve in order to make the shape of the penetrating surfaces more visible. Highlighting the intersection is especially helpful when the surfaces become transparent, because transparency makes the intersections less evident. A technique for locating intersections in screen space using only the information locally available to a pixel is discussed. The technique is designed to exploit parallelism at the pixel level and was implemented on the Pixel-Planes 5 graphics supercomputer.

  4. CERN Collider, France-Switzerland

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-08-23

    This image, acquired by NASA Terra spacecraft, is of the CERN Large Hadron Collider, the world largest and highest-energy particle accelerator laying beneath the French-Swiss border northwest of Geneva yellow circle.

  5. Toward a petabyte-scale AFS service at CERN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Ster, Daniel; Moscicki, Jakub T.; Wiebalck, Arne

    2014-06-01

    AFS is a mature and reliable storage service at CERN, having worked for more than 20 years as the provider of Unix home directories and project areas. Recently, the AFS service has grown at unprecedented rates (200% in the past year); this growth was unlocked thanks to innovations in both the hardware and software components of our file servers. This work presents how AFS is used at CERN and how the service offering is evolving with the increasing storage needs of its local and remote user communities. In particular, we demonstrate the usage patterns for home directories, workspaces and project spaces, as well as show the daily work which is required to rebalance data and maintaining stability and performance. Finally, we highlight some recent changes and optimisations made to the AFS Service, thereby revealing how AFS can possibly operate at all while being subjected to frequent-almost DDOS-like-attacks from its users.

  6. 25th Birthday Cern- Amphi

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    Cérémonie du 25ème anniversaire du Cern avec 2 orateurs: le Prof.Weisskopf parle de la signification et le rôle du Cern et le Prof.Casimir(?) fait un exposé sur les rélations entre la science pure et la science appliquée et la "big science" (science légère)

  7. Tracer mixing at fracture intersections

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Guomin

    2001-02-10

    Discrete network models are one of the approaches used to simulate a dissolved contaminant, which is usually represented as a tracer in modeling studies, in fractured rocks. The discrete models include large numbers of individual fractures within the network structure, with flow and transport described on the scale of an individual fracture. Numerical simulations for the mixing characteristics and transfer probabilities of a tracer through a fracture intersection are performed for this study. A random-walk, particle-tracking model is applied to simulate tracer transport in fracture intersections by moving particles through space using individual advective and diffusive steps. The simulation results are compared with existing numerical and analytical solutions for a continuous intersection over a wide range of Peclet numbers. This study attempts to characterize the relative concentration at the outflow branches for a continuous intersection with different flow fields. The simulation results demonstrate that the mixing characteristics at the fracture intersections are a function not only of the Peclet number but also of the flow field pattern.

  8. View from intersection. Ninestory reinforced concrete building infilled with brick. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View from intersection. Nine-story reinforced concrete building infilled with brick. The street facades on beaubien and east grand are faced with stone accents and elaborate brick work. Brick pilasters run the entire height of the building. Steel tiebacks are apparent running up the height of the building on the east side. The large tower appears at the northeast and southeast corners - Detroit Storage Company, 2937 East Grand Boulevard, Detroit, MI

  9. 5. VIEW LOOKING SOUTH DOWN SIXTH STREET AT THE INTERSECTION ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. VIEW LOOKING SOUTH DOWN SIXTH STREET AT THE INTERSECTION WITH CENTRAL AVENUE. AS PART OF THE INITIAL SITE DEVELOPMENT, A RAILROAD SPUR, ACCESS ROADS, POWER LINES, AND TELEPHONE LINES WERE BUILT. ALL FACILITIES WERE HEATED BY STEAM GENERATED IN BUILDING 443 AND PIPED THROUGHOUT THE SITE. THE BUILDING IN THE BACKGROUND OF THE PHOTOGRAPH IS BUILDING 664, A LOW - LEVEL WASTE STORAGE FACILITY. - Rocky Flats Plant, Bounded by Indiana Street & Routes 93, 128 & 72, Golden, Jefferson County, CO

  10. Virtual Prototyping at CERN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gennaro, Silvano De

    The VENUS (Virtual Environment Navigation in the Underground Sites) project is probably the largest Virtual Reality application to Engineering design in the world. VENUS is just over one year old and offers a fully immersive and stereoscopic "flythru" of the LHC pits for the proposed experiments, including the experimental area equipment and the surface models that are being prepared for a territorial impact study. VENUS' Virtual Prototypes are an ideal replacement for the wooden models traditionally build for the past CERN machines, as they are generated directly from the EUCLID CAD files, therefore they are totally reliable, they can be updated in a matter of minutes, and they allow designers to explore them from inside, in a one-to-one scale. Navigation can be performed on the computer screen, on a stereoscopic large projection screen, or in immersive conditions, with an helmet and 3D mouse. By using specialised collision detection software, the computer can find optimal paths to lower each detector part into the pits and position it to destination, letting us visualize the whole assembly probess. During construction, these paths can be fed to a robot controller, which can operate the bridge cranes and build LHC almost without human intervention. VENUS is currently developing a multiplatform VR browser that will let the whole HEP community access LHC's Virtual Protoypes over the web. Many interesting things took place during the conference on Virtual Reality. For more information please refer to the Virtual Reality section.

  11. CERN@school: bringing CERN into the classroom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whyntie, T.; Cook, J.; Coupe, A.; Fickling, R. L.; Parker, B.; Shearer, N.

    2016-04-01

    CERN@school brings technology from CERN into the classroom to aid with the teaching of particle physics. It also aims to inspire the next generation of physicists and engineers by giving participants the opportunity to be part of a national collaboration of students, teachers and academics, analysing data obtained from detectors based on the ground and in space to make new, curiosity-driven discoveries at school. CERN@school is based around the Timepix hybrid silicon pixel detector developed by the Medipix 2 Collaboration, which features a 300 μm thick silicon sensor bump-bonded to a Timepix readout ASIC. This defines a 256-by-256 grid of pixels with a pitch of 55 μm, the data from which can be used to visualise ionising radiation in a very accessible way. Broadly speaking, CERN@school consists of a web portal that allows access to data collected by the Langton Ultimate Cosmic ray Intensity Detector (LUCID) experiment in space and the student-operated Timepix detectors on the ground; a number of Timepix detector kits for ground-based experiments, to be made available to schools for both teaching and research purposes; and educational resources for teachers to use with LUCID data and detector kits in the classroom. By providing access to cutting-edge research equipment, raw data from ground and space-based experiments, CERN@school hopes to provide the foundation for a programme that meets the many of the aims and objectives of CERN and the project's supporting academic and industrial partners. The work presented here provides an update on the status of the programme as supported by the UK Science and Technology Facilities Council (STFC) and the Royal Commission for the Exhibition of 1851. This includes recent results from work with the GridPP Collaboration on using grid resources with schools to run GEANT4 simulations of CERN@school experiments.

  12. Line intersect sampling: Ell-shaped transects and multiple intersections

    Treesearch

    Timothy G. Gregoire; Harry T. Valentine

    2003-01-01

    The probability of selecting a population element under line intersect sampling depends on the width of the particle in the direction perpendicular to the transect, as is well known. The consequence of this when using ell-shaped transects rather than straight-line transects are explicated, and modifications that preserve design-unbiasedness of Kaiser's (1983)...

  13. Integrating new Storage Technologies into EOS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, Andreas J.; van der Ster, Dan C.; Rocha, Joaquim; Lensing, Paul

    2015-12-01

    The EOS[1] storage software was designed to cover CERN disk-only storage use cases in the medium-term trading scalability against latency. To cover and prepare for long-term requirements the CERN IT data and storage services group (DSS) is actively conducting R&D and open source contributions to experiment with a next generation storage software based on CEPH[3] and ethernet enabled disk drives. CEPH provides a scale-out object storage system RADOS and additionally various optional high-level services like S3 gateway, RADOS block devices and a POSIX compliant file system CephFS. The acquisition of CEPH by Redhat underlines the promising role of CEPH as the open source storage platform of the future. CERN IT is running a CEPH service in the context of OpenStack on a moderate scale of 1 PB replicated storage. Building a 100+PB storage system based on CEPH will require software and hardware tuning. It is of capital importance to demonstrate the feasibility and possibly iron out bottlenecks and blocking issues beforehand. The main idea behind this R&D is to leverage and contribute to existing building blocks in the CEPH storage stack and implement a few CERN specific requirements in a thin, customisable storage layer. A second research topic is the integration of ethernet enabled disks. This paper introduces various ongoing open source developments, their status and applicability.

  14. Intersection-Controller Software Module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bachelder, Aaron; Foster, Conrad

    2005-01-01

    An important part of the emergency-vehicle traffic-light-preemption system summarized in the preceding article is a software module executed by a microcontroller in each intersection controller. This module monitors the broadcasts from all nearby participating emergency vehicles and intersections. It gathers the broadcast data pertaining to the positions and velocities of the vehicles and the timing of traffic and pedestrian lights and processes the data into predictions of the future positions of the vehicles. Analyzing the predictions by a combination of proximity tests, map-matching techniques, and statistical calculations designed to minimize the adverse effects of uncertainties in vehicle positions and headings, the module decides whether to preempt and issues the appropriate commands to the traffic lights, pedestrian lights, and electronic warning signs at the intersection. The module also broadcasts its state to all nearby vehicles and intersections. The module is designed to mitigate the effects of missing data and of unpredictable delays in the system. It has been intensively tested and refined so that it fails to warn in very few cases and issues very few false warnings.

  15. Using Intersectionality in Student Affairs Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strayhorn, Terrell L.

    2017-01-01

    This chapter presents intersectionality as a useful heuristic for conducting research in higher education and student affairs contexts. Much more than just another theory, intersectionality can powerfully shape student affairs research in both obvious and tacit ways.

  16. Scaling the CERN OpenStack cloud

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, T.; Bompastor, B.; Bukowiec, S.; Castro Leon, J.; Denis, M. K.; van Eldik, J.; Fermin Lobo, M.; Fernandez Alvarez, L.; Fernandez Rodriguez, D.; Marino, A.; Moreira, B.; Noel, B.; Oulevey, T.; Takase, W.; Wiebalck, A.; Zilli, S.

    2015-12-01

    CERN has been running a production OpenStack cloud since July 2013 to support physics computing and infrastructure services for the site. In the past year, CERN Cloud Infrastructure has seen a constant increase in nodes, virtual machines, users and projects. This paper will present what has been done in order to make the CERN cloud infrastructure scale out.

  17. Intersecting Adjectives in Syllogistic Logic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moss, Lawrence S.

    The goal of natural logic is to present and study logical systems for reasoning with sentences of (or which are reasonably close to) ordinary language. This paper explores simple systems of natural logic which make use of intersecting adjectives; these are adjectives whose interpretation does not vary with the noun they modify. Our project in this paper is to take one of the simplest syllogistic fragments, that of all and some, and to add intersecting adjectives. There are two ways to do this, depending on whether one allows iteration or prefers a "flat" structure of at most one adjective. We present rules of inference for both types of syntax, and these differ. The main results are four completeness theorems: for each of the two types of syntax we have completeness for the all fragment and for the full language of this paper.

  18. 1D-3D mixed-ligand frameworks with an unusual dmp topology tuned by intersection angles of isomeric benzenedicarboxylates: magnetic properties, gas-dependent calcination-thermolysis and energy storage performances.

    PubMed

    Li, Zuo-Xi; Ye, Gan; Han, Juan; Yang, Ying; Zou, Kang-Yu; Wang, Xin; Wang, Xiao-Ling; Gou, Xiao-Feng

    2015-05-21

    In this work, three isomeric benzenedicarboxylates, 1,2-benzenedicarboxylic acid (o-H2bdc), 1,3-benzenedicarboxylic acid (m-H2bdc), and 1,4-benzenedicarboxylic acid (p-H2bdc) have been utilized as the ancillary ligands to perform a systematic study on the structural diversity of mixed-ligand frameworks. The solvothermal reactions of Co(NO3)2 with these aromatic acids and the primary ligand 4,4'-bis(imidazolyl)biphenyl (bibp) afford three novel coordination polymers, {[Co6(bibp)3(o-bdc)6(H2O)](CH3CN)1.5}∞ (1), [Co(bibp)(m-bdc)]∞ (2), and [Co(bibp)(p-bdc)]∞ (3). Owing to the different orientations of the carboxylate groups, the benzenedicarboxylates adopt various bridging modes to connect the Co(II) ions into a series of 1D carboxylate∩cobalt architectures based on the 1D chain, binuclear and single-ion magnetic units, respectively. These 1D architectures are further decorated by the bibp ligand to afford a 1D belt for , 2D double-bridging (4,4) sheet for 2, and an unusual 3D dmp framework for 3. Significantly in 3, three equivalent frameworks are interlocked with each other to represent an unprecedented three-fold interpenetrating dmp network. The structural diversity indicates that the benzenedicarboxylate plays an essential role in the assembly of mixed-ligand frameworks, and the orientation of the carboxylate group exerts an important influence on the nucleation, dimensionality and also interpenetration. Furthermore, the magnetic properties of 1 and 2 have been studied by fitting the experimental data as possible, and the magneto-structural correlation of 2 has also been well discussed. Importantly, CoO and Co3O4 were obtained from the controllable thermolysis of crystals of 1 via simple calcination treatment under different gas environments. The as-synthesized cobalt oxides display good crystallinity and appear as micro- or nanoparticles, which can be applied as supercapacitor electrodes as demonstrated by their energy storage performance in 2 M KOH

  19. The ELENA Project at CERN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oelert, W.

    CERN has a longstanding tradition of pursuing fundamental physics on extreme low and high energy scales. The present physics knowledge is successfully described by the Standard Model and the General Relativity. In the anti-matter regime many predictions of this established theory still remain experimentally unverified and one of the most fundamental open problems in physics concerns the question of asymmetry between particles: why is the observable and visible universe apparently composed almost entirely of matter and not of anti-matter? There is a huge interest in the very compelling scientiic case for anti-hydrogen and low energy anti-proton physics, here to name especially the Workshop on New Opportunities in the Physics Landscape at CERN which was convened in May 2009 by the CERN Directorate and culminated in the decision for the final approval of the construction of the Extra Low ENergy Antiproton (ELENA) ring by the Research Board in June 2011. ELENA is a CERN project aiming to construct a small 30 m circumference synchrotron to further decelerate anti-protons from the Antiproton Decelerator (AD) from 5.3 MeV down to 100 keV.

  20. CERN's approach to public outreach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landua, Rolf

    2016-03-01

    CERN's communication goes beyond publishing scientific results. Education and outreach are equally important ways of communicating with the general public, and in particular with the young generation. Over the last decade, CERN has significantly increased its efforts to accommodate the very large interest of the general public (about 300,000 visit requests per year), by ramping up its capacity for guided tours from 25,000 to more than 100,000 visitors per year, by creating six new of state-of-the-art exhibitions on-site, by building and operating a modern physics laboratory for school teachers and students, and by showing several traveling exhibitions in about 10 countries per year. The offer for school teachers has also been expanded, to 35-40 weeks of teacher courses with more than 1000 participants from more than 50 countries per year. The talk will give an overview about these and related activities.

  1. The Compass Experiment at CERN

    SciTech Connect

    Magnon, A.

    2005-02-10

    The COMPASS experiment at the CERN SPS has a broad physics program focused on the study of the spin structure of the nucleon and on hadron spectroscopy. Key measurements for the spin program are the gluon contribution to the spin of the nucleon, flavor dependent quark spin distribution, and the measurement of the transverse spin structure function. The apparatus consists of a two-stage spectrometer designed for high data rates and equipped with high-resolution tracking, particle identification, electromagnetic and hadronic calorimetry. Data taking has started in 2002. Following the CERN SPS shut down in 2005, the experiment will resume data taking in 2006 and is planned to continue (at least) until 2010. Few hundreds of Terabytes of data are put on tape each year. Out of this large amount of data first important physics results have been obtained.

  2. The Proton Synchrotron (PS): At the Core of the CERN Accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cundy, Donald; Gilardoni, Simone

    The following sections are included: * Introduction * Extraction: Getting the Beam to Leave the Accelerator * Acceleration and Bunch Gymnastics * Boosting PS Beam Intensity * Capacitive Energy Storage Replaces Flywheel * Taking the Neutrinos by the Horns * OMEGA: Towards the Electronic Bubble Chamber * ISOLDE: Targeting a New Era in Nuclear Physics * The CERN n_TOF Facility: Catching Neutrons on the Fly * References

  3. Intersection of parametric surfaces using lookup tables

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanna, S. L.; Abel, J. F.; Greenberg, D. P.

    1984-01-01

    When primitive structures in the form of parametric surfaces are combined and modified interactively to form complex intersecting surfaces, it becomes important to find the curves of intersection. One must distinguish between finding the shape of the intersection curve, which may only be useful for display purposes, and finding an accurate mathematical representation of the curve, which is important for any meaningful geometric modeling, analysis, design, or manufacturing involving the intersection. The intersection curve between two or more parametric surfaces is important in a variety of computer-aided design and manufacture areas. A few examples are shape design, analysis of groins, design of fillets, and computation of numerically controlled tooling paths. The algorithm presented here provides a mathematical representation of the intersection curve to a specified accuracy. It also provides the database that can simplify operations such as hidden-surface removal, surface rendering, profile identification, and interference or clearance computations.

  4. Intersecting Channels near Olympica Fossae

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-09-21

    This complicated area contains various types of channels, pits and fractures. We can determine the relative ages of the pits and channels based on which features cross-cut others. Older channels appear smooth-edged and shallow. Younger channels and pits are deeper and more sharp-edged, as well as less sinuous than the shallower channels. What caused this array of various channels and intersecting pits? This region is covered in vast lava flows. The collapse pits here may be collapsed lava tubes or where overlying rock "drained" into voids created by extensional faulting. The older smoother channel that seems to source from this region may have carried an outflow of groundwater. It continues on for over 100 kilometers (62 miles). The orientation and shapes of these features make an interesting geological puzzle. http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA21066

  5. Conical intersection dynamics of the primary photoisomerization event in vision.

    PubMed

    Polli, Dario; Altoè, Piero; Weingart, Oliver; Spillane, Katelyn M; Manzoni, Cristian; Brida, Daniele; Tomasello, Gaia; Orlandi, Giorgio; Kukura, Philipp; Mathies, Richard A; Garavelli, Marco; Cerullo, Giulio

    2010-09-23

    Ever since the conversion of the 11-cis retinal chromophore to its all-trans form in rhodopsin was identified as the primary photochemical event in vision, experimentalists and theoreticians have tried to unravel the molecular details of this process. The high quantum yield of 0.65 (ref. 2), the production of the primary ground-state rhodopsin photoproduct within a mere 200 fs (refs 3-7), and the storage of considerable energy in the first stable bathorhodopsin intermediate all suggest an unusually fast and efficient photoactivated one-way reaction. Rhodopsin's unique reactivity is generally attributed to a conical intersection between the potential energy surfaces of the ground and excited electronic states enabling the efficient and ultrafast conversion of photon energy into chemical energy. But obtaining direct experimental evidence for the involvement of a conical intersection is challenging: the energy gap between the electronic states of the reacting molecule changes significantly over an ultrashort timescale, which calls for observational methods that combine high temporal resolution with a broad spectral observation window. Here we show that ultrafast optical spectroscopy with sub-20-fs time resolution and spectral coverage from the visible to the near-infrared allows us to follow the dynamics leading to the conical intersection in rhodopsin isomerization. We track coherent wave-packet motion from the photoexcited Franck-Condon region to the photoproduct by monitoring the loss of reactant emission and the subsequent appearance of photoproduct absorption, and find excellent agreement between the experimental observations and molecular dynamics calculations that involve a true electronic state crossing. Taken together, these findings constitute the most compelling evidence to date for the existence and importance of conical intersections in visual photochemistry.

  6. UpSet: Visualization of Intersecting Sets

    PubMed Central

    Lex, Alexander; Gehlenborg, Nils; Strobelt, Hendrik; Vuillemot, Romain; Pfister, Hanspeter

    2016-01-01

    Understanding relationships between sets is an important analysis task that has received widespread attention in the visualization community. The major challenge in this context is the combinatorial explosion of the number of set intersections if the number of sets exceeds a trivial threshold. In this paper we introduce UpSet, a novel visualization technique for the quantitative analysis of sets, their intersections, and aggregates of intersections. UpSet is focused on creating task-driven aggregates, communicating the size and properties of aggregates and intersections, and a duality between the visualization of the elements in a dataset and their set membership. UpSet visualizes set intersections in a matrix layout and introduces aggregates based on groupings and queries. The matrix layout enables the effective representation of associated data, such as the number of elements in the aggregates and intersections, as well as additional summary statistics derived from subset or element attributes. Sorting according to various measures enables a task-driven analysis of relevant intersections and aggregates. The elements represented in the sets and their associated attributes are visualized in a separate view. Queries based on containment in specific intersections, aggregates or driven by attribute filters are propagated between both views. We also introduce several advanced visual encodings and interaction methods to overcome the problems of varying scales and to address scalability. UpSet is web-based and open source. We demonstrate its general utility in multiple use cases from various domains. PMID:26356912

  7. Fault and Fracture Intersections and Earthquake Nucleation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brumbaugh, D. S.

    2008-05-01

    Laboratory experments and computer modeling studies have shown in some detail that when stresses are applied to prefractured materials the result is a complex change in the stress field in the vicinity of fracture intersections (Shengri, 2003; Gangopadhyay and Talwani, 2005). This can result in slip on the fractures and energy release simulating earthquake triggering. A search of the literature reveals a number of cases where earthquakes have nucleated on or near fracture intersections of two intersecting strike-slip faults or a strike-slip fault and a fracture linear. The acute angle between the two fractures/faults ranges from 18 degrees to a maximum of 90 degrees. The cases cited had epicentral locations near to or possibly on the intersection site. Magnitudes of events ranged from microearthquake size up to M7.9. A few cases exist where the initial event was not located at the intersection but triggered a second event at the intersection site (Elmore Ranch;Tango,Japan), or where an earthquake at the intersection triggered a second event elsewhere (Denali,Alaska). The recognition of the potential of stresses concentrated at intersection points of faults/fractures to nucleate potentially damaging earthquakes is important in seismic hazard studies.

  8. The Evolution of CERN EDMS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wardzinska, Aleksandra; Petit, Stephan; Bray, Rachel; Delamare, Christophe; Garcia Arza, Griselda; Krastev, Tsvetelin; Pater, Krzysztof; Suwalska, Anna; Widegren, David

    2015-12-01

    Large-scale long-term projects such as the LHC require the ability to store, manage, organize and distribute large amounts of engineering information, covering a wide spectrum of fields. This information is a living material, evolving in time, following specific lifecycles. It has to reach the next generations of engineers so they understand how their predecessors designed, crafted, operated and maintained the most complex machines ever built. This is the role of CERN EDMS. The Engineering and Equipment Data Management Service has served the High Energy Physics Community for over 15 years. It is CERN's official PLM (Product Lifecycle Management), supporting engineering communities in their collaborations inside and outside the laboratory. EDMS is integrated with the CAD (Computer-aided Design) and CMMS (Computerized Maintenance Management) systems used at CERN providing tools for engineers who work in different domains and who are not PLM specialists. Over the years, human collaborations and machines grew in size and complexity. So did EDMS: it is currently home to more than 2 million files and documents, and has over 6 thousand active users. In April 2014 we released a new major version of EDMS, featuring a complete makeover of the web interface, improved responsiveness and enhanced functionality. Following the results of user surveys and building upon feedback received from key users group, we brought what we think is a system that is more attractive and makes it easy to perform complex tasks. In this paper we will describe the main functions and the architecture of EDMS. We will discuss the available integration options, which enable further evolution and automation of engineering data management. We will also present our plans for the future development of EDMS.

  9. Experience in running relational databases on clustered storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaspar Aparicio, Ruben; Potocky, Miroslav

    2015-12-01

    For past eight years, CERN IT Database group has based its backend storage on NAS (Network-Attached Storage) architecture, providing database access via NFS (Network File System) protocol. In last two and half years, our storage has evolved from a scale-up architecture to a scale-out one. This paper describes our setup and a set of functionalities providing key features to other services like Database on Demand [1] or CERN Oracle backup and recovery service. It also outlines possible trend of evolution that, storage for databases could follow.

  10. NEWS: A trip to CERN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellison, A. D.

    2000-07-01

    Two years ago John Kinchin and myself were lucky enough to attend the Goldsmith's particle physics course. As well as many interesting lectures and activities, this course included a visit to CERN. To most physics teachers CERN is Mecca, a hallowed place where gods manipulate and manufacture matter. The experience of being there was even better. Alison Wright was an enthusiastic and very knowledgeable host who ensured the visit went smoothly and we all learned a lot. While we were there, John and I discussed the possibility of bringing a party of A-level students to see real physics in action. In February of this year we managed it. 33 students from two schools, Boston Grammar School and Northampton School for Boys, and four staff left England and caught the 2 am ferry to France. Many hours and a few `short cuts' later we arrived at our hotel in St Genis, not far from CERN. The first day was spent sight-seeing in Lausanne and Geneva. The Olympic museum in Lausanne is well worth a visit. Unfortunately, the famous fountain in Geneva was turned off, but then you can't have everything. The following morning we turned up at CERN late due to the coach's brakes being iced up! We were met once again by Alison Wright who forgave us and introduced the visit by giving an excellent talk on CERN, its background and its reason for existing. At this point we met another member of our Goldsmith's course and his students so we joined forces once again. We then piled back into the coach to re-cross the border and visit ALEPH. ALEPH is a monster of a detector 150 m below ground. We divided into four groups, each with a very able and knowledgeable guide, and toured the site. The size and scale of the detector are awesome and the students were suitably impressed. We repeated the speed of sound experiment of two years ago at the bottom of a 150 m concrete shaft (320 m s-1), posed for a group photo in front of the detector (figure 1) and returned to the main site for lunch in

  11. CERN single sign on solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ormancey, E.

    2008-07-01

    The need for Single Sign On has always been restricted by the absence of cross platform solutions: a single sign on working only on one platform or technology is nearly useless. The recent improvements in Web Services Federation (WS-Federation) standard enabling federation of identity, attribute, authentication and authorization information can now provide real extended Single Sign On solutions. Various solutions have been investigated at CERN and now, a Web SSO solution using some parts of WS-Federation technology is available. Using the Shibboleth Service Provider module for Apache hosted web sites and Microsoft ADFS as the identity provider linked to Active Directory user, users can now authenticate on any web application using a single authentication platform, providing identity, user information (building, phone...) as well as group membership enabling authorization possibilities. A typical scenario: a CERN user can now authenticate on a Linux/Apache website using Windows Integrated credentials, and his Active Directory group membership can be checked before allowing access to a specific web page.

  12. Learning with the ATLAS Experiment at CERN

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnett, R. M.; Johansson, K. E.; Kourkoumelis, C.; Long, L.; Pequenao, J.; Reimers, C.; Watkins, P.

    2012-01-01

    With the start of the LHC, the new particle collider at CERN, the ATLAS experiment is also providing high-energy particle collisions for educational purposes. Several education projects--education scenarios--have been developed and tested on students and teachers in several European countries within the Learning with ATLAS@CERN project. These…

  13. Learning with the ATLAS Experiment at CERN

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnett, R. M.; Johansson, K. E.; Kourkoumelis, C.; Long, L.; Pequenao, J.; Reimers, C.; Watkins, P.

    2012-01-01

    With the start of the LHC, the new particle collider at CERN, the ATLAS experiment is also providing high-energy particle collisions for educational purposes. Several education projects--education scenarios--have been developed and tested on students and teachers in several European countries within the Learning with ATLAS@CERN project. These…

  14. 13. Interior, storage room of depot located at north end, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. Interior, storage room of depot located at north end, looking northeast from southwest corner of room - Missouri Pacific Railway Depot, Natches Street (State Highway 15) & Pine Street intersection, northeast corner, Wisner, Franklin Parish, LA

  15. 12. Interior, storage room of depot located at north end, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. Interior, storage room of depot located at north end, looking south - Missouri Pacific Railway Depot, Natches Street (State Highway 15) & Pine Street intersection, northeast corner, Wisner, Franklin Parish, LA

  16. 2. SOUTHEAST SIDE. HIGH PRESSURE HELIUM STORAGE TANKS AT LEFT. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. SOUTHEAST SIDE. HIGH PRESSURE HELIUM STORAGE TANKS AT LEFT. - Edwards Air Force Base, Air Force Rocket Propulsion Laboratory, Helium Compression Plant, Test Area 1-115, intersection of Altair & Saturn Boulevards, Boron, Kern County, CA

  17. Intersection of Paschen's curves for argon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Yangyang; Yang, Shuo; Zou, Xiaobing; Luo, Haiyun; Wang, Xinxin

    2016-09-01

    The intersection of Paschen's curves for argon with a same gap length but a different electrode radius was observed. While the breakdown voltage increases with the increase of the nonuniformity in the electric field of the gap at lower pressures, it decreases at higher pressures. The reason for the intersection of Paschen's curves was given based on the mean free path length of the electrons inversely proportional to the gas pressure and the electron impact ionization coefficient exponentially increasing with the electric field. The intersection of the Paschen's curves was qualitatively reproduced by a numerical simulation.

  18. Elastic waves along a fracture intersection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abell, Bradley Charles

    Fractures and fracture networks play a significant role in the subsurface hydraulic connectivity within the Earth. While a significant amount of research has been performed on the seismic response of single fractures and sets of fractures, few studies have examined the effect of fracture intersections on elastic wave propagation. Intersections play a key role in the connectivity of a fracture network that ultimately affects the hydraulic integrity of a rock mass. In this dissertation two new types of coupled waves are examined that propagate along intersections. 1) A coupled wedge wave that propagates along a surface fracture with particle motion highly localized to the intersection of a fracture with a free surface, and 2) fracture intersection waves that propagate along the intersection between two orthogonal fractures. Theoretical formulations were derived to determine the particle motion and velocity of intersection waves. Vibrational modes calculated from the theoretical formulation match those predicted by group theory based on the symmetry of the problem. For the coupled wedge wave, two vibrational modes exist that range in velocity between the wedge wave and Rayleigh wave velocity and exhibit either wagging or breathing motion depending on the Poisson's ratio. For the intersection waves, the observed modes depend on the properties of the fractures forming the intersection. If both fractures have equal stiffness four modes exist, two with wagging and two with breathing motion. If the fractures have unequal stiffness, four modes also exist, but the motion depends on the Poisson's ratio. The velocity of intersection waves depends on the coupling or stiffness of the intersection and frequency of the signal. In general, the different modes travel with speeds between the wedge wave and bulk shear wave velocity. Laboratory experiments were performed on isotropic and anisotropic samples to verify the existence of these waves. For both waves, the observed signals

  19. Local bulk physics from intersecting modular Hamiltonians

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kabat, Daniel; Lifschytz, Gilad

    2017-06-01

    We show that bulk quantities localized on a minimal surface homologous to a boundary region correspond in the CFT to operators that commute with the modular Hamiltonian associated with the boundary region. If two such minimal surfaces intersect at a point in the bulk then CFT operators which commute with both extended modular Hamiltonians must be localized at the intersection point. We use this to construct local bulk operators purely from CFT considerations, without knowing the bulk metric, using intersecting modular Hamiltonians. For conformal field theories at zero and finite temperature the appropriate modular Hamiltonians are known explicitly and we recover known expressions for local bulk observables.

  20. 25th Birthday Cern- Restaurant

    SciTech Connect

    2006-05-05

    Cérémonie du 25ème anniversaire du Cern avec plusieurs orateurs et la présence de nombreux autorités cantonales et communales genevoises et personnalités, directeurs généraux, ministres, chercheurs.... Le conseiller féderal et chef du département des affaires étrangères de la confédération Monsieur Pierre Aubert prend la parole pour célébrer à la fois les résultats très remarquables de la coopération internationale en matière scientifique, mais aussi la volonté politique des états européens de mettre en commun leurs ressources pour faire oeuvre d'avenir. Un grand hommage est aussi donné aux deux directeurs disparus, les prof.Bakker et Gregory.

  1. Ceremony 25th birthday Cern

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    Célébration du 25ème anniversaire du Cern (jour par jour) avec discours de L.Van Hove et J.B.Adams, des interludes musicals offerts par Mme Mey et ses collègues (au debut 1.mouvement du quatuor avec piano no 3 de L.van Beethoven) Les directeurs généraux procéderont à la remise du souvenir aux membres de personnel ayant 25 années de service dans l'organisation. Un témoignage de reconnaissance est auss fait à l'interprète Mme Zwerner

  2. CERN ELENA project progress report

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartmann, Wolfgang; Belochitskii, Pavel; Breuker, Horst; Butin, François; Carli, C.; Eriksson, Tommy; Oelert, Walter; Maury, Stephan; Pasinelli, Sergio; Tranquille, Gerard

    2015-05-01

    The Extra Low Energy Antiproton ring (ELENA) is a CERN project aiming at constructing a 30 m circumference synchrotron to further decelerate antiprotons from the Antiproton Decelerator (AD) from 5.3 MeV to 100 keV. The additional deceleration complemented by an electron cooler to reduce emittances will allow the existing AD experiments to increase substantially their antiproton capture efficiencies and render new experiments possible. The ELENA design is now well advanced and the project has entered the construction stage, in particular for what concerns the infrastructure. Installation of the machine components is foreseen during the second half of 2015 and beginning of 2016 followed by ring commissioning until the end of 2016. New electrostatic transfer lines to the experiments will be installed and commissioned during the first half of 2017 followed by the first physics operation with AD/ELENA end of 2017. Main ELENA related infrastructure progresses as well as the status of the project are reported.

  3. Cosmic Ray Physics at CERN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandéz, A.; Gámez, E.; López, R.; Román, S.; Zepeda, A.

    2003-06-01

    In recent decades, cosmic ray air showers initiated by high-energy proton or nucleus collisions in the atmosphere have been studied with large area experiments on the surface of the Earth or with muon measurements deep underground. In principle, these cosmic ray experiments explore two completely different realms of physics, particle astrophysics and particle interaction physics, which are, however, intimately related by the interpretation of the data. In this paper we briefly review the cosmic ray physics activities developed at CERN in the last years. In particular we present some results from a small underground cosmic ray experiment and we discuss the capabilities of ALICE to detect high multiplicity muon events arising from cosmic ray air showers and some other astroparticle phenomena.

  4. [The CERN and the megascience].

    PubMed

    Aguilar Peris, José

    2006-01-01

    In this work we analyse the biggest particle accelerator in the world: the LHC (Large Hadron Collider). The ring shaped tunnel is 27 km long and it is buried over 110 meters underground, straddling the border betwen France and Switzerland at the CERN laboratory near Geneva. Its mission is to recreate the conditions that existed shortly after the Big-Bang and to look for the hypothesised Higgs particle. The LHC will accelerate protons near the speed of the light and collide them head on at an energy of to 14 TeV (1 TeV = 10(12) eV). Keeping such high energy in the proton beams requires enormous magnetic fields which are generated by superconducting electromagnets chilled to less than two degrees above absolute zero. It is expected that LHC will be inaugurated in summer 2007.

  5. Evaluation of bike boxes at signalized intersections.

    PubMed

    Dill, Jennifer; Monsere, Christopher M; McNeil, Nathan

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a before-after study of bike boxes at 10 signalized intersections in Portland, Oregon. The bike boxes, also known as advanced stop lines or advanced stop boxes, were installed to increase visibility of cyclists and reduce conflicts between motor vehicles and cyclists, particularly in potential "right-hook" situations. Before and after video were analyzed for seven intersections with green bike boxes, three intersections with uncolored bike boxes, and two control intersections. User perceptions were measured through surveys of cyclists passing through five of the bike box intersections and of motorists working downtown, where the boxes were concentrated. Both the observations and survey of motorists found a high rate of compliance and understanding of the markings. Overall, 73% of the stopping motor vehicles did not encroach at all into the bike box. Both motor vehicle and bicycle encroachment in the pedestrian crosswalk fell significantly at the bike box locations compared to the control intersections. The bike boxes had mixed effects on the motorists' encroachment in the bicycle lane. The number of observed conflicts at the bike box locations decreased, while the total number of cyclists and motor vehicles turning right increased. Negative-binomial models based upon the data predict fewer conflicts with the boxes, particularly as right-turning motor vehicle volumes increase. Observations of yielding behavior at two bike box and one control intersection found an improvement in motorists yielding to cyclists at the bike box locations. Differences in the traffic volumes and location contexts make firm conclusions about the effects of green coloring of the boxes difficult. Higher shares of surveyed motorists felt that the bike boxes made driving safer rather than more dangerous, even when the sample was narrowed to respondents who were not also cyclists. Over three-quarters of the surveyed cyclists thought that the boxes made the intersection safer

  6. Dynamical intersecting brane solutions of supergravity

    SciTech Connect

    Uzawa, Kunihito

    2010-02-10

    We present dynamical intersecting brane solutions in higher-dimensional gravitational theory coupled to dilaton and several forms. Assuming the forms of metric, form fields, and dilaton field, we can give the dynamical intersecting brane solutions. The dynamical solutions can be always obtained by replacing the constant modulus h{sub 0} in the warp factor for supersymmetric solutions by a linear function h{sub 0}(t) of the time coordinates t.

  7. Current Partition at Topological Channel Intersections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, Zhenhua; Jung, Jeil; Lin, Chungwei; Ren, Yafei; MacDonald, Allan H.; Niu, Qian

    2014-05-01

    An intersection between one-dimensional chiral channels functions as a topological current splitter. We find that the splitting of a chiral zero-line mode obeys very simple yet highly counterintuitive partition laws that relate current paths to the geometry of the intersection. Our results have far reaching implications for electron beam splitter and interferometer device proposals based on chiral transport, and for understanding transport in systems in which multiple topological domains lead to a statistical network of chiral channels.

  8. Multiphase flow in geometrically simple fracture intersections

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Basagaoglu, H.; Meakin, P.; Green, C.T.; Mathew, M.; ,

    2006-01-01

    A two-dimensional lattice Boltzmann (LB) model with fluid-fluid and solid-fluid interaction potentials was used to study gravity-driven flow in geometrically simple fracture intersections. Simulated scenarios included fluid dripping from a fracture aperture, two-phase flow through intersecting fractures and thin-film flow on smooth and undulating solid surfaces. Qualitative comparisons with recently published experimental findings indicate that for these scenarios the LB model captured the underlying physics reasonably well.

  9. Self-Localization at Street Intersections.

    PubMed

    Fusco, Giovanni; Shen, Huiying; Coughlan, James M

    2014-05-01

    There is growing interest among smartphone users in the ability to determine their precise location in their environment for a variety of applications related to wayfinding, travel and shopping. While GPS provides valuable self-localization estimates, its accuracy is limited to approximately 10 meters in most urban locations. This paper focuses on the self-localization needs of blind or visually impaired travelers, who are faced with the challenge of negotiating street intersections. These travelers need more precise self-localization to help them align themselves properly to crosswalks, signal lights and other features such as walk light pushbuttons. We demonstrate a novel computer vision-based localization approach that is tailored to the street intersection domain. Unlike most work on computer vision-based localization techniques, which typically assume the presence of detailed, high-quality 3D models of urban environments, our technique harnesses the availability of simple, ubiquitous satellite imagery (e.g., Google Maps) to create simple maps of each intersection. Not only does this technique scale naturally to the great majority of street intersections in urban areas, but it has the added advantage of incorporating the specific metric information that blind or visually impaired travelers need, namely, the locations of intersection features such as crosswalks. Key to our approach is the integration of IMU (inertial measurement unit) information with geometric information obtained from image panorama stitchings. Finally, we evaluate the localization performance of our algorithm on a dataset of intersection panoramas, demonstrating the feasibility of our approach.

  10. Pedestrian crash estimation models for signalized intersections.

    PubMed

    Pulugurtha, Srinivas S; Sambhara, Venkata R

    2011-01-01

    The focus of this paper is twofold: (1) to examine the non-linear relationship between pedestrian crashes and predictor variables such as demographic characteristics (population and household units), socio-economic characteristics (mean income and total employment), land use characteristics, road network characteristics (the number of lanes, speed limit, presence of median, and pedestrian and vehicular volume) and accessibility to public transit systems, and (2) to develop generalized linear pedestrian crash estimation models (based on negative binomial distribution to accommodate for over-dispersion of data) by the level of pedestrian activity and spatial proximity to extract site specific data at signalized intersections. Data for 176 randomly selected signalized intersections in the City of Charlotte, North Carolina were used to examine the non-linear relationships and develop pedestrian crash estimation models. The average number of pedestrian crashes per year within 200 feet of each intersection was considered as the dependent variable whereas the demographic characteristics, socio-economic characteristics, land use characteristics, road network characteristics and the number of transit stops were considered as the predictor variables. The Pearson correlation coefficient was used to eliminate predictor variables that were correlated to each other. Models were then developed separately for all signalized intersections, high pedestrian activity signalized intersections and low pedestrian activity signalized intersections. The use of 0.25mile, 0.5mile and 1mile buffer widths to extract data and develop models was also evaluated.

  11. Self-Localization at Street Intersections

    PubMed Central

    Fusco, Giovanni; Shen, Huiying; Coughlan, James M.

    2014-01-01

    There is growing interest among smartphone users in the ability to determine their precise location in their environment for a variety of applications related to wayfinding, travel and shopping. While GPS provides valuable self-localization estimates, its accuracy is limited to approximately 10 meters in most urban locations. This paper focuses on the self-localization needs of blind or visually impaired travelers, who are faced with the challenge of negotiating street intersections. These travelers need more precise self-localization to help them align themselves properly to crosswalks, signal lights and other features such as walk light pushbuttons. We demonstrate a novel computer vision-based localization approach that is tailored to the street intersection domain. Unlike most work on computer vision-based localization techniques, which typically assume the presence of detailed, high-quality 3D models of urban environments, our technique harnesses the availability of simple, ubiquitous satellite imagery (e.g., Google Maps) to create simple maps of each intersection. Not only does this technique scale naturally to the great majority of street intersections in urban areas, but it has the added advantage of incorporating the specific metric information that blind or visually impaired travelers need, namely, the locations of intersection features such as crosswalks. Key to our approach is the integration of IMU (inertial measurement unit) information with geometric information obtained from image panorama stitchings. Finally, we evaluate the localization performance of our algorithm on a dataset of intersection panoramas, demonstrating the feasibility of our approach. PMID:25210926

  12. EFQPSK Versus CERN: A Comparative Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borah, Deva K.; Horan, Stephen

    2001-01-01

    This report presents a comparative study on Enhanced Feher's Quadrature Phase Shift Keying (EFQPSK) and Constrained Envelope Root Nyquist (CERN) techniques. These two techniques have been developed in recent times to provide high spectral and power efficiencies under nonlinear amplifier environment. The purpose of this study is to gain insights into these techniques and to help system planners and designers with an appropriate set of guidelines for using these techniques. The comparative study presented in this report relies on effective simulation models and procedures. Therefore, a significant part of this report is devoted to understanding the mathematical and simulation models of the techniques and their set-up procedures. In particular, mathematical models of EFQPSK and CERN, effects of the sampling rate in discrete time signal representation, and modeling of nonlinear amplifiers and predistorters have been considered in detail. The results of this study show that both EFQPSK and CERN signals provide spectrally efficient communications compared to filtered conventional linear modulation techniques when a nonlinear power amplifier is used. However, there are important differences. The spectral efficiency of CERN signals, with a small amount of input backoff, is significantly better than that of EFQPSK signals if the nonlinear amplifier is an ideal clipper. However, to achieve such spectral efficiencies with a practical nonlinear amplifier, CERN processing requires a predistorter which effectively translates the amplifier's characteristics close to those of an ideal clipper. Thus, the spectral performance of CERN signals strongly depends on the predistorter. EFQPSK signals, on the other hand, do not need such predistorters since their spectra are almost unaffected by the nonlinear amplifier, Ibis report discusses several receiver structures for EFQPSK signals. It is observed that optimal receiver structures can be realized for both coded and uncoded EFQPSK

  13. Energy Storage.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eaton, William W.

    Described are technological considerations affecting storage of energy, particularly electrical energy. The background and present status of energy storage by batteries, water storage, compressed air storage, flywheels, magnetic storage, hydrogen storage, and thermal storage are discussed followed by a review of development trends. Included are…

  14. Energy Storage.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eaton, William W.

    Described are technological considerations affecting storage of energy, particularly electrical energy. The background and present status of energy storage by batteries, water storage, compressed air storage, flywheels, magnetic storage, hydrogen storage, and thermal storage are discussed followed by a review of development trends. Included are…

  15. CERN launches high-school internship programme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnston, Hamish

    2017-07-01

    The CERN particle-physics lab has hosted 22 high-school students from Hungary in a pilot programme designed to show teenagers how science, technology, engineering and mathematics is used at the particle-physics lab.

  16. Recent results from CERN-WA98

    SciTech Connect

    Stankus, P.; WA98 Collaboration

    1997-02-01

    The CERN experiment WA98 is a general-survey, open-spectrometer experiment designed to examine 160 A GeV/c Pb+A collisions at the CERN-SPS. The experiment has a broad physics agenda, as suggested by its many different subsystems. A diagram of the experiment as it stood in 1995 is shown in the report. Detectors whose results are presented here are described briefly.

  17. 25th Birthday Cern- Restaurant

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    Cérémonie du 25ème anniversaire du Cern avec plusieurs orateurs et la présence de nombreux autorités cantonales et communales genevoises et personnalités, directeurs généraux, ministres, chercheurs.... Le conseiller féderal et chef du département des affaires étrangères de la confédération Monsieur Pierre Aubert prend la parole pour célébrer à la fois les résultats très remarquables de la coopération internationale en matière scientifique, mais aussi la volonté politique des états européens de mettre en commun leurs ressources pour faire oeuvre d'avenir. Un grand hommage est aussi donné aux deux directeurs disparus, les prof.Bakker et Gregory.

  18. CERN Computing Resources Lifecycle Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tselishchev, Alexey; Tedesco, Paolo; Ormancey, Emmanuel; Isnard, Christian

    2011-12-01

    Computing environments in High Energy Physics are typically complex and heterogeneous, with a wide variety of hardware resources, operating systems and applications. The research activity in all its aspects is carried out by international collaborations constituted by a growing number of participants with a high manpower turnover. These factors can increase the administrative workload required to manage the computing infrastructure and to track resource usage and inheritance. It is therefore necessary to rationalize and formalize the computing resources management, while respecting the requirement of flexibility of scientific applications and services. This paper shows how during the last years the CERN computing infrastructure has been moving in this direction, establishing well-defined policies and lifecycles for resource management. Applications are being migrated towards proposed common identity, authentication and authorization models, reducing their complexity while increasing security and usability. Regular tasks like the creation of primary user accounts are being automated, and self-service facilities are being introduced for common operations, like creation of additional accounts, group subscriptions and password reset. This approach is leading to more efficient and manageable systems.

  19. The new CERN Controls Middleware

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dworak, A.; Ehm, F.; Charrue, P.; Sliwinski, W.

    2012-12-01

    The Controls Middleware (CMW) project was launched over ten years ago. Its main goal was to unify middleware solutions used to operate the CERN accelerator complex. A key part of the project, the equipment access library RDA, was based on CORBA, an unquestionable middleware standard at the time. RDA became an operational and critical part of the infrastructure, yet the demanding run-time environment revealed shortcomings of the system. Accumulation of fixes and workarounds led to unnecessary complexity. RDA became difficult to maintain and to extend. CORBA proved to be rather a cumbersome product than a panacea. Fortunately, many new transport frameworks appeared since then. They boasted a better design and supported concepts that made them easier to use. Willing to profit from the coming long LHC shutdown which will make it possible to update the operational software, the CMW team reviewed user requirements and in their terms investigated eventual CORBA substitutes. Evaluation of several market recognized products helped to identify the most-suitable middleware solution: ZeroMQ. This article presents the results of the evaluation process, the proposed design and functionality of the new system as well as the plan of its integration with the currently deployed system.

  20. Isidor I. Rabi and CERN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krige, John

    2005-06-01

    Isidor I. Rabi (1898 1988) is the acknowledged “father of CERN,” today one of the most important particle-physics laboratories in the world. I explore his motives for promoting the idea in 1950 that Western Europe should build a “Brookhaven” with national governments replacing universities. I unravel the many ways in which a major accelerator facility in Geneva, Switzerland, could both stimulate European science and serve the interests of the American scientific community. Rabi was careful to avoid giving any official support to steps then under way in Europe to build a research reactor, even though Brookhaven National Laboratory on Long Island, New York, had one from the outset. I suggest that his main motive for doing so was that he wanted West Germany to be part of the collaborative venture. Rabi was well aware of the foreign-policy objectives of the U.S. State Department in the European theater in 1950, and he wanted to situate politically the new research center in the framework of the Marshall Plan for the postwar reconstruction of the continent, “remaking the Old World in the image of the New.”

  1. Non-Markov effects in intersecting sprays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panchagnula, Mahesh; Kumaran, Dhivyaraja; Deevi, Sri Vallabha; Tangirala, Arun

    2016-11-01

    Sprays have been assumed to follow a Markov process. In this study, we revisit that assumption relying on experimental data from intersecting and non-intersecting sprays. A phase Doppler Particle Analyzer (PDPA) is used to measure particle diameter and velocity at various axial locations in the intersection region of two sprays. Measurements of single sprays, with one nozzle turned off alternatively are also obtained at the same locations. This data, treated as an unstructured time series is classified into three bins each for diameter (small, medium, large) and velocity (slow, medium, fast). Conditional probability analysis on this binned data showed a higher static correlation between droplet velocities, while diameter correlation is significantly alleviated (reduced) in intersecting sprays, compared to single sprays. Further analysis using serial correlation measures: auto-correlation function (ACF) and partial auto-correlation function (PACF) shows that the lagged correlations in droplet velocity are enhanced while those in the droplet diameter are significantly debilitated in intersecting sprays. We show that sprays are not necessarily Markov processes and that memory persists, even though curtailed to fewer lags in case of size, and enhanced in case of droplet velocity.

  2. Intersectant Microstructure of Hydroxyapatite Sheets of Shankbone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, B.; Luo, J.; Wang, J. G.; Yuan, Q.; Fan, J. H.

    Bone possesses excellent mechanical properties, which are closely related to its favorable microstructures optimized by nature through millions of years. In this work, a scanning electron microscope (SEM) was used to observe the microstructures of a shankbone. It showed that the bone is a kind of bioceramic composite consisting of hydroxyapatite layers and collagen protein matrix. The hydroxyapatite layers are further composed of long and thin hydroxyapatite sheets. The hydroxyapatite sheets in different hydroxyapatite layers distribute along different orientations, which composes a kind of intersectant microstructure. The maximum pullout force of the intersectant microstructure was investigated and compared with that of 0° microstructure with their representative models. The result indicated that the maximum pullout force of the intersectant microstructure is markedly larger than that of the 0° microstructure, which was experimentally verified.

  3. Modeling aggressive driver behavior at unsignalized intersections.

    PubMed

    Kaysi, Isam A; Abbany, Ali S

    2007-07-01

    The processing of vehicles at unsignalized intersections is a complex and highly interactive process, whereby each driver makes individual decisions about when, where, and how to complete the required maneuver, subject to his perceptions of distances, velocities, and own car's performance. Typically, the performance of priority-unsignalized intersections has been modeled with probabilistic approaches that consider the distribution of gaps in the major-traffic stream and their acceptance by the drivers of minor street vehicles based on the driver's "critical gap". This paper investigates the aggressive behavior of minor street vehicles at intersections that are priority-unsignalized but operate with little respect of control measures. The objective is to formulate a behavioral model that predicts the probability that a driver performs an aggressive maneuver as a function of a set of driver and traffic attributes. Parameters that were tested and modeled include driver characteristics (gender and age), car characteristics (performance and model year), and traffic attributes (number of rejected gaps, total waiting time at head of queue, and major-traffic speed). Binary probit models are developed and tested, based on a collected data set from an unsignalized intersection in the city of Beirut, to determine which of the studied variables are statistically significant in determining the aggressiveness of a specific driver. Primary conclusions reveal that age, car performance, and average speed on the major road are the major determinants of aggressive behavior. Another striking conclusion is that the total waiting time of the driver while waiting for an acceptable gap is of little significance in incurring the "forcing" behavior. The obtained model is incorporated in a simple simulation framework that reflects driver behavior and traffic stream interactions in estimating delay and conflict measures at unsignalized intersections. The simulation results were then compared

  4. Intersecting surface defects and instanton partition functions

    DOE PAGES

    Pan, Yiwen; Peelaers, Wolfger

    2017-07-14

    We analyze intersecting surface defects inserted in interacting four-dimensional N = 2 supersymmetric quantum field theories. We employ the realization of a class of such systems as the infrared xed points of renormalization group flows from larger theories, triggered by perturbed Seiberg-Witten monopole-like con gurations, to compute their partition functions. These results are cast into the form of a partition function of 4d/2d/0d coupled systems. In conclusion, our computations provide concrete expressions for the instanton partition function in the presence of intersecting defects and we study the corresponding ADHM model.

  5. Intersecting surface defects and instanton partition functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Yiwen; Peelaers, Wolfger

    2017-07-01

    We analyze intersecting surface defects inserted in interacting four-dimensional N=2 supersymmetric quantum field theories. We employ the realization of a class of such systems as the infrared fixed points of renormalization group flows from larger theories, triggered by perturbed Seiberg-Witten monopole-like configurations, to compute their partition functions. These results are cast into the form of a partition function of 4d/2d/0d coupled systems. Our computations provide concrete expressions for the instanton partition function in the presence of intersecting defects and we study the corresponding ADHM model.

  6. Best Angle to Orient Two Intersecting Lines

    SciTech Connect

    Awwal, A S; Ferguson, S W; Shull, P B

    2006-07-25

    Fiducials in the form of intersecting straight lines are used to align the target in the final target chamber of the National Ignition Facility of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. One of the techniques used to locate these lines is the Hough transform. When two lines intersect at a 90 degree angle, it is tempting to orient the lines to horizontal and vertical directions. There are other possible angles at which the lines may be oriented. One question that arises while designing the fiducials is whether there is a preferred angle or range of angles that leads to higher accuracy. This work attempts to answer this question through detailed computer simulation.

  7. On the extent and connectivity of conical intersection seams and the effects of three-state intersections.

    PubMed

    Coe, Joshua D; Ong, Mitchell T; Levine, Benjamin G; Martínez, Todd J

    2008-12-11

    We discuss the connectivity of intersection spaces and the role of minimal energy points within these intersection spaces (minimal energy conical intersections or MECIs) in promoting nonadiabatic transitions. We focus on malonaldeyde as a specific example, where there is a low-lying three-state conical intersection. This three-state intersection is the global minimum on the bright excited electronic state, but it plays a limited role in population transfer in our ab initio multiple spawning (AIMS) simulations because the molecule must traverse a series of two-state conical intersections to reach the three-state intersection. Due to the differences in seam space dimensionality separating conventional (two-state) and three-state intersections, we suggest that dynamical effects arising directly from a three-state intersection may prove difficult to observe in general. We also use a newly developed method for intersection optimization with geometric constraints to demonstrate the connectivity of all the stationary points in the intersection spaces for malonaldehyde. This supports the conjecture that all intersection spaces are connected, and that three-state intersections play a key role in extending this connectivity to all pairs of states, e.g. the S1/S0 and S2/S1 intersection spaces.

  8. On the extent and connectivity of conical intersection seams and the effects of three-state intersections

    SciTech Connect

    Coe, Joshua D; Levine, B G; Ong, M T; Martinez, T J

    2008-01-01

    We discuss the connectivity of intersection spaces and the role of minimal energy points within these intersection spaces (minimal energy conical intersections or MECIs) in promoting nonadiabatic transitions. We focus on malonaldeyde as a specific example, where there is a low-lying three-state conical intersection. This three-state intersection is the global minimum on the bright excited electronic state, but it plays a limited role in population transfer in our ab initio multiple spawning (AIMS) simulations because the molecule must traverse a series of two-state conical intersections to reach the three-state intersection. Due to the differences in seam space dimensionality separating conventional (two-state) and three-state intersections, we suggest that dynamical effects arising directly from a three-state intersection may prove difficult to observe in general. We also use a newly developed method for intersection optimization with geometric constraints to demonstrate the connectivity of all the stationary points in the intersection spaces for malonaldehyde. This supports the conjecture that all intersection spaces are connected, and that three-state intersections play a key role in extending this connectivity to all pairs of states, e.g. the S{sub 1}/S{sub 0} and S{sub 2}/S{sub 1} intersection spaces.

  9. CERN achievements in relativistic heavy ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eugenio Bruno, Giuseppe

    2015-05-01

    Twenty years after a Letter of Intent by the GSI and LBL groups for the "Study of particle production and target fragmentation in central 20Ne on Pb reactions, at 12 GeV per nucleon energy of the CERN PS external beam" [1], based on the results found by the NA45/CERES, NA49, NA50, and WA97/NA57 experiments at the SPS, CERN announced compelling evidence for the formation of a new state of matter in heavyion collisions at CERN-SPS energies [2]. Some of the experiments were indeed the 2nd or 3rd generation successors of the apparatuses originally proposed by the GSI-LBL collaboration. Actually, the CERN ion program initiated at the SPS with the acceleration of oxygen ions at 60 and 200 GeV/nucleon only in 1986, and continued with sulphur ions at 200 GeV/nucleon up to 1993. The rest is history: lead-ion beams at 160 GeV/nucleon became available at the SPS in 1994; the LHC accelerated and collided lead beams at a center of mass energy per nucleon pair √sNN = 2.76 TeV in 2010. Heavy ion physics is definitely in the future program of CERN: ALICE will operate a major upgrade of its detectors during the second long shutdown of the LHC, in 2018-2019, and the associated physics program will span the third and fourth LHC runs, till late 2020s.

  10. Photographic reproduction of original construction drawing, ca. 1930: Bay Storage ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photographic reproduction of original construction drawing, ca. 1930: Bay Storage Building, original drawing in possession of the Wyoming Army National Guard, Cheyenne, Wyoming - Torrington Armory, Hay Storage Building, West of intersection of U.S. Routes 85 & 26, Torrington, Goshen County, WY

  11. Teaching Science from Cultural Points of Intersection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grimberg, Bruna Irene; Gummer, Edith

    2013-01-01

    This study focuses on a professional development program for science teachers near or on American Indian reservations in Montana. This program was framed by culturally relevant pedagogy premises and was characterized by instructional strategies and content foci resulting from the intersection between three cultures: tribal, science teaching, and…

  12. The Priority of Intersectionality in Academic Medicine.

    PubMed

    Eckstrand, Kristen L; Eliason, Jennifer; St Cloud, Tiffani; Potter, Jennifer

    2016-07-01

    Recent societal events highlight inequities experienced by underrepresented and marginalized communities. These inequities are the impetus for ongoing efforts in academic medicine to create inclusive educational and patient care environments for diverse stakeholders. Frequently, approaches focus on singular populations or broad macroscopic concepts and do not always elucidate the complexities that arise at the intersection between multiple identities and life experiences. Intersectionality acknowledges multidimensional aspects of identity inclusive of historical, structural, and cultural factors. Understanding how multiple identity experiences impact different individuals, from patients to trainees to providers, is critical for improving health care education and delivery. Building on existing work within academic medicine, this Commentary outlines six key recommendations to advance intersectionality in academic medicine: embrace personal and collective loci of responsibility; examine and rectify unbalanced power dynamics; celebrate visibility and intersectional innovation; engage all stakeholders in the process of change; select and analyze meaningful metrics; and sustain the commitment to achieving health equity over time. Members of the academic medical community committed to advancing health equity can use these recommendations to promote and maintain meaningful changes that recognize and respond to the multidimensional voices and expressed needs of all individuals engaged in providing and receiving health care.

  13. 30 CFR 56.7055 - Intersecting holes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Intersecting holes. 56.7055 Section 56.7055 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-SURFACE METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Drilling and Rotary...

  14. 30 CFR 56.7055 - Intersecting holes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Intersecting holes. 56.7055 Section 56.7055 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-SURFACE METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Drilling and Rotary...

  15. 30 CFR 56.7055 - Intersecting holes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Intersecting holes. 56.7055 Section 56.7055 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-SURFACE METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Drilling and Rotary...

  16. 30 CFR 56.7055 - Intersecting holes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Intersecting holes. 56.7055 Section 56.7055 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-SURFACE METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Drilling and Rotary...

  17. X-48C Flies Over Intersecting Runways

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2013-02-28

    The X-48C Hybrid Wing Body research aircraft flew over the intersection of several runways adjacent to the compass rose on Rogers Dry Lake at Edwards Air Force Base during one of the sub-scale aircraft's final test flights on Feb. 28, 2013.

  18. The Intersection of Education and Incarceration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tannis, Lynette N.

    2017-01-01

    In this "Harvard Educational Review" symposium article, Lynette N. Tannis provides an in-depth look at the juncture of education and incarceration. Tannis states that the denial and/or lack of educational programs within carceral settings are concerning given the size of the US prison system. Discourse about the intersection of education…

  19. 30 CFR 57.7055 - Intersecting holes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Drilling and Rotary Jet Piercing Drilling-Surface and Underground § 57.7055 Intersecting holes. Holes shall not be...

  20. 30 CFR 56.7055 - Intersecting holes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR METAL AND NONMETAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-SURFACE METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Drilling and Rotary Jet Piercing Drilling § 56.7055 Intersecting holes. Holes shall not be drilled where there is a danger...

  1. Edge Effects in Line Intersect Sampling With

    Treesearch

    David L. R. Affleck; Timothy G. Gregoire; Harry T. Valentine

    2005-01-01

    Transects consisting of multiple, connected segments with a prescribed configuration are commonly used in ecological applications of line intersect sampling. The transect configuration has implications for the probability with which population elements are selected and for how the selection probabilities can be modified by the boundary of the tract being sampled. As...

  2. One Teacher's Journey through the Mediated Intersections

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beach, Crystal L.

    2015-01-01

    Today's classrooms often have a plethora of new ways of reading and writing entering the room, but too often these new ways of "doing" are disregarded and checked at the door. For this reason, one educator shares her journey through the mediated intersections of media, culture, and education. In this piece, she explores how literacy…

  3. Teaching Science from Cultural Points of Intersection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grimberg, Bruna Irene; Gummer, Edith

    2013-01-01

    This study focuses on a professional development program for science teachers near or on American Indian reservations in Montana. This program was framed by culturally relevant pedagogy premises and was characterized by instructional strategies and content foci resulting from the intersection between three cultures: tribal, science teaching, and…

  4. Circles and the Lines That Intersect Them

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clay, Ellen L.; Rhee, Katherine L.

    2014-01-01

    In this article, Clay and Rhee use the mathematics topic of circles and the lines that intersect them to introduce the idea of looking at the single mathematical idea of relationships--in this case, between angles and arcs--across a group of problems. They introduce the mathematics that underlies these relationships, beginning with the questions…

  5. Compelling Diversities, Educational Intersections: Policy, Practice, Parity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Yvette

    2013-01-01

    The ninth international Gender and Education Association Conference "Compelling Diversities, Educational Intersections" hosted by the Weeks Centre for Social and Policy Research, London South Bank University engages with key debates surrounding the interplay between dynamics of education, work, employment and society in the context of…

  6. Circles and the Lines That Intersect Them

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clay, Ellen L.; Rhee, Katherine L.

    2014-01-01

    In this article, Clay and Rhee use the mathematics topic of circles and the lines that intersect them to introduce the idea of looking at the single mathematical idea of relationships--in this case, between angles and arcs--across a group of problems. They introduce the mathematics that underlies these relationships, beginning with the questions…

  7. Compelling Diversities, Educational Intersections: Policy, Practice, Parity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Yvette

    2013-01-01

    The ninth international Gender and Education Association Conference "Compelling Diversities, Educational Intersections" hosted by the Weeks Centre for Social and Policy Research, London South Bank University engages with key debates surrounding the interplay between dynamics of education, work, employment and society in the context of…

  8. One Teacher's Journey through the Mediated Intersections

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beach, Crystal L.

    2015-01-01

    Today's classrooms often have a plethora of new ways of reading and writing entering the room, but too often these new ways of "doing" are disregarded and checked at the door. For this reason, one educator shares her journey through the mediated intersections of media, culture, and education. In this piece, she explores how literacy…

  9. Intersection of the Exponential and Logarithmic Curves

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boukas, Andreas; Valahas, Theodoros

    2009-01-01

    The study of the number of intersection points of y = a[superscript x] and y = log[subscript a]x can be an interesting topic to present in a single-variable calculus class. In this article, the authors present a classroom presentation outline involving the basic algebra and the elementary calculus of the exponential and logarithmic functions. The…

  10. Intersectionality as a Framework for Inclusive Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nunez, A. M.

    2016-12-01

    To create more inclusive environments for the advancement of scientific inquiry, it is critical to consider the role of intersectionality. Originating in activism and legal scholarship grounded in the realities of women of color, the concept of intersectionality emphasizes how societal power dynamics shape the differential construction of life opportunities of diverse demographic groups across a variety of social identities, contexts, and historical conditions. Importantly, intersectionality also recognizes that individuals can simultaneously hold privileged and marginalized identities. For example, while white women scientists are less represented in leadership and decision-making positions than their male counterparts, but they typically do not experience the marginalization of being mistaken for cleaning staff at their institutions, as many African American and Latina scientists report. Thus, white women are relatively privileged in this context. This case and national survey data demonstrate the critical importance of recognizing that the intersection of racial and gender identities creates complex and multi-faceted challenges for diverse women scientists in navigating the organizational culture of science. Educational research indicates that interventions seeking to create more inclusivity in science should take into account the relationships between various social identities, contexts, and broader historical conditions that affect the advancement of historically underrepresented minority groups. Therefore, this presentation will provide a conceptual framework of intersectionality to guide interventions to encourage all scientists to recognize the distinctive intellectual and social contributions of those from diverse gender, race, class, disability, sexual orientation, and other identity backgrounds. It will also address how this framework can be applied to develop programs, policies, and practices that transform organizational cultures to be more inclusive

  11. Intersections of potential energy surfaces of short-lived states: the complex analogue of conical intersections.

    PubMed

    Feuerbacher, Sven; Sommerfeld, Thomas; Cederbaum, Lorenz S

    2004-02-15

    Whereas conical intersections between potential energy surfaces of bound states are well known, the interaction of short-lived states has been investigated only rarely. Here, we present several systematically constructed model Hamiltonians to study the topology of intersecting complex potential energy surfaces describing short-lived states: We find the general phenomenon of doubly intersecting complex energy surfaces, i.e., there are two points instead of one as in the case of bound states where the potential energy surfaces coalesce. In addition, seams of intersections of the respective real and imaginary parts of the potential energy surfaces emanate from these two points. Using the Sigma* and Pi* resonance states of the chloroethene anion as a practical example, we demonstrate that our complete linear model Hamiltonian is able to reproduce all phenomena found in explicitly calculated ab initio complex potential energy surfaces.

  12. On the adiabatic to diabatic states transformation near intersections of conical intersections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yarkony, David R.

    2000-02-01

    A Hamiltonian, Hd,(2), "rigorously" diabatic in the vicinity of Rx, a point of conical intersection, is constructed using second-order degenerate perturbation theory. Near an Rx on a C2v seam of conical intersection of two states of different symmetry, Hd,(2) may exhibit a confluence with a Cs seam of conical intersection of two states of the same symmetry. Thus by construction, there exists a "rigorous" diabatic representation of the vicinity of this confluence. A procedure for defining a unique linear combination of the degenerate states at a conical intersection is found to be useful for determining the parameters for Hd,(2) and for identifying approximate symmetries in situations where point group symmetry is rigorously absent.

  13. Vidyo@CERN: A Service Update

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandes, J.; Baron, T.

    2015-12-01

    We will present an overview of the current real-time video service offering for the LHC, in particular the operation of the CERN Vidyo service will be described in terms of consolidated performance and scale: The service is an increasingly critical part of the daily activity of the LHC collaborations, topping recently more than 50 million minutes of communication in one year, with peaks of up to 852 simultaneous connections. We will elaborate on the improvement of some front-end key features such as the integration with CERN Indico, or the enhancements of the Unified Client and also on new ones, released or in the pipeline, such as a new WebRTC client and CERN SSO/Federated SSO integration. An overview of future infrastructure improvements, such as virtualization techniques of Vidyo routers and geo-location mechanisms for load-balancing and optimum user distribution across the service infrastructure will also be discussed. The work done by CERN to improve the monitoring of its Vidyo network will also be presented and demoed. As a last point, we will touch the roadmap and strategy established by CERN and Vidyo with a clear objective of optimizing the service both on the end client and backend infrastructure to make it truly universal, to serve Global Science. To achieve those actions, the introduction of the multitenant concept to serve different communities is needed. This is one of the consequences of CERN's decision to offer the Vidyo service currently operated for the LHC, to other Sciences, Institutions and Virtual Organizations beyond HEP that might express interest for it.

  14. VIEW OF BIRCH CIRCLE, FROM INTERSECTION WITH DATE DRIVE. VIEW ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF BIRCH CIRCLE, FROM INTERSECTION WITH DATE DRIVE. VIEW FACING WEST - Camp H.M. Smith and Navy Public Works Center Manana Title VII (Capehart) Housing, Intersection of Acacia Road and Brich Circle, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  15. VIEW OF ELM DRIVE FROM ITS INTERSECTION WITH ELM CIRCLE. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF ELM DRIVE FROM ITS INTERSECTION WITH ELM CIRCLE. VIEW FACING SOUTHEAST - Camp H.M. Smith and Navy Public Works Center Manana Title VII (Capehart) Housing, Intersection of Acacia Road and Brich Circle, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  16. 3. VIEW FROM EAST. EAST ELEVATION SHOWING THE ROOF INTERSECTION ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. VIEW FROM EAST. EAST ELEVATION SHOWING THE ROOF INTERSECTION OF THE EAST AND NORTH WINGS OF THE BUILDING. - Navy Yard, Ordnance Building, Intersection of Paulding & Kennon Streets, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  17. 11. DETAILTIEROD PLATES LOCATED AT THE COURTSIDE INTERSECTION OF THE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. DETAIL--TIE-ROD PLATES LOCATED AT THE COURTSIDE INTERSECTION OF THE EAST AND NORTH WINGS. - Navy Yard, Ordnance Building, Intersection of Paulding & Kennon Streets, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  18. Review of CERN Data Centre Infrastructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrade, P.; Bell, T.; van Eldik, J.; McCance, G.; Panzer-Steindel, B.; Coelho dos Santos, M.; Traylen and, S.; Schwickerath, U.

    2012-12-01

    The CERN Data Centre is reviewing strategies for optimizing the use of the existing infrastructure and expanding to a new data centre by studying how other large sites are being operated. Over the past six months, CERN has been investigating modern and widely-used tools and procedures used for virtualisation, clouds and fabric management in order to reduce operational effort, increase agility and support unattended remote data centres. This paper gives the details on the project's motivations, current status and areas for future investigation.

  19. Learning with the ATLAS experiment at CERN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnett, R. M.; Johansson, K. E.; Kourkoumelis, C.; Long, L.; Pequenao, J.; Reimers, C.; Watkins, P.

    2012-01-01

    With the start of the LHC, the new particle collider at CERN, the ATLAS experiment is also providing high-energy particle collisions for educational purposes. Several education projects—education scenarios—have been developed and tested on students and teachers in several European countries within the Learning with ATLAS@CERN project. These highly appreciated projects could become a new component in many teachers' classrooms. The Learning with ATLAS portal and the information on the ATLAS public website make it possible for teachers to design educational material for their own situations. To be able to work with real data adds a new dimension to particle physics explorations at school.

  20. Big Bang Day: The Making of CERN (Episode 1)

    SciTech Connect

    2009-10-06

    A two-part history of the CERN project. Quentin Cooper explores the fifty-year history of CERN, the European particle physics laboratory in Switzerland. The institution was created to bring scientists together after WW2 .......

  1. Big Bang Day: The Making of CERN (Episode 1)

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    A two-part history of the CERN project. Quentin Cooper explores the fifty-year history of CERN, the European particle physics laboratory in Switzerland. The institution was created to bring scientists together after WW2 .......

  2. CERN and high energy physics, the grand picture

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    The lecture will touch on several topics, to illustrate the role of CERN in the present and future of high-energy physics: how does CERN work? What is the role of the scientific community, of bodies like Council and SPC, and of international cooperation, in the definition of CERN's scientific programme? What are the plans for the future of the LHC and of the non-LHC physics programme? What is the role of R&D; and technology transfer at CERN?

  3. CERN and high energy physics, the grand picture

    SciTech Connect

    2010-06-21

    The lecture will touch on several topics, to illustrate the role of CERN in the present and future of high-energy physics: how does CERN work? What is the role of the scientific community, of bodies like Council and SPC, and of international cooperation, in the definition of CERN's scientific programme? What are the plans for the future of the LHC and of the non-LHC physics programme? What is the role of R&D; and technology transfer at CERN?

  4. Intersections of a Circle and a Square: An Investigation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Canada, Dan; Blair, Stephen

    2007-01-01

    The investigation of how a circle and square lying in the same plane could intersect each other is an excellent example of geometric problem-solving. This paper explores three facets of the investigation: (1) finding out how many points of intersection are possible, (2) classifying the different ways of intersection, and (3) determining which ways…

  5. Intersections of a Circle and a Square: An Investigation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Canada, Dan; Blair, Stephen

    2007-01-01

    The investigation of how a circle and square lying in the same plane could intersect each other is an excellent example of geometric problem-solving. This paper explores three facets of the investigation: (1) finding out how many points of intersection are possible, (2) classifying the different ways of intersection, and (3) determining which ways…

  6. Comparing the effects of infrastructure on bicycling injury at intersections and non-intersections using a case–crossover design

    PubMed Central

    Harris, M Anne; Reynolds, Conor C O; Winters, Meghan; Cripton, Peter A; Shen, Hui; Chipman, Mary L; Cusimano, Michael D; Babul, Shelina; Brubacher, Jeffrey R; Friedman, Steven M; Hunte, Garth; Monro, Melody; Vernich, Lee; Teschke, Kay

    2013-01-01

    Background This study examined the impact of transportation infrastructure at intersection and non-intersection locations on bicycling injury risk. Methods In Vancouver and Toronto, we studied adult cyclists who were injured and treated at a hospital emergency department. A case–crossover design compared the infrastructure of injury and control sites within each injured bicyclist's route. Intersection injury sites (N=210) were compared to randomly selected intersection control sites (N=272). Non-intersection injury sites (N=478) were compared to randomly selected non-intersection control sites (N=801). Results At intersections, the types of routes meeting and the intersection design influenced safety. Intersections of two local streets (no demarcated traffic lanes) had approximately one-fifth the risk (adjusted OR 0.19, 95% CI 0.05 to 0.66) of intersections of two major streets (more than two traffic lanes). Motor vehicle speeds less than 30 km/h also reduced risk (adjusted OR 0.52, 95% CI 0.29 to 0.92). Traffic circles (small roundabouts) on local streets increased the risk of these otherwise safe intersections (adjusted OR 7.98, 95% CI 1.79 to 35.6). At non-intersection locations, very low risks were found for cycle tracks (bike lanes physically separated from motor vehicle traffic; adjusted OR 0.05, 95% CI 0.01 to 0.59) and local streets with diverters that reduce motor vehicle traffic (adjusted OR 0.04, 95% CI 0.003 to 0.60). Downhill grades increased risks at both intersections and non-intersections. Conclusions These results provide guidance for transportation planners and engineers: at local street intersections, traditional stops are safer than traffic circles, and at non-intersections, cycle tracks alongside major streets and traffic diversion from local streets are safer than no bicycle infrastructure. PMID:23411678

  7. The Bells' Capture note TH-3054-CERN

    SciTech Connect

    Hartouni, Ed P.

    2014-01-29

    This document revisits the paper by M. Bell and J. S. Bell “Capture of Cooling Electrons by Cool Protons” TH-3054-CERN (March 30, 1981). I expand the treatment to include e+e- capture.

  8. The heavy ion program at CERN

    SciTech Connect

    Lissauer, D.

    1986-09-30

    During two periods in 1986 and 1987, oxygen ion beams with energies up to 3.2 TeV will be available at the CERN-SPS. A brief review of the five large heavy ion experiments is presented and the different physics addressed by each of the experiments is discussed. 11 refs., 5 figs.

  9. WorldWide Web: Hypertext from CERN.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nickerson, Gord

    1992-01-01

    Discussion of software tools for accessing information on the Internet focuses on the WorldWideWeb (WWW) system, which was developed at the European Particle Physics Laboratory (CERN) in Switzerland to build a worldwide network of hypertext links using available networking technology. Its potential for use with multimedia documents is also…

  10. Status and Roadmap of CernVM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berzano, D.; Blomer, J.; Buncic, P.; Charalampidis, I.; Ganis, G.; Meusel, R.

    2015-12-01

    Cloud resources nowadays contribute an essential share of resources for computing in high-energy physics. Such resources can be either provided by private or public IaaS clouds (e.g. OpenStack, Amazon EC2, Google Compute Engine) or by volunteers computers (e.g. LHC@Home 2.0). In any case, experiments need to prepare a virtual machine image that provides the execution environment for the physics application at hand. The CernVM virtual machine since version 3 is a minimal and versatile virtual machine image capable of booting different operating systems. The virtual machine image is less than 20 megabyte in size. The actual operating system is delivered on demand by the CernVM File System. CernVM 3 has matured from a prototype to a production environment. It is used, for instance, to run LHC applications in the cloud, to tune event generators using a network of volunteer computers, and as a container for the historic Scientific Linux 5 and Scientific Linux 4 based software environments in the course of long-term data preservation efforts of the ALICE, CMS, and ALEPH experiments. We present experience and lessons learned from the use of CernVM at scale. We also provide an outlook on the upcoming developments. These developments include adding support for Scientific Linux 7, the use of container virtualization, such as provided by Docker, and the streamlining of virtual machine contextualization towards the cloud-init industry standard.

  11. INTEGRATED OPERATIONAL DOSIMETRY SYSTEM AT CERN.

    PubMed

    Dumont, Gérald; Pedrosa, Fernando Baltasar Dos Santos; Carbonez, Pierre; Forkel-Wirth, Doris; Ninin, Pierre; Fuentes, Eloy Reguero; Roesler, Stefan; Vollaire, Joachim

    2017-04-01

    CERN, the European Organization for Nuclear Research, upgraded its operational dosimetry system in March 2013 to be prepared for the first Long Shutdown of CERN's facilities. The new system allows the immediate and automatic checking and recording of the dosimetry data before and after interventions in radiation areas. To facilitate the analysis of the data in context of CERN's approach to As Low As Reasonably Achievable (ALARA), this new system is interfaced to the Intervention Management Planning and Coordination Tool (IMPACT). IMPACT is a web-based application widely used in all CERN's accelerators and their associated technical infrastructures for the planning, the coordination and the approval of interventions (work permit principle). The coupling of the operational dosimetry database with the IMPACT repository allows a direct and almost immediate comparison of the actual dose with the estimations, in addition to enabling the configuration of alarm levels in the dosemeter in function of the intervention to be performed. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Gauge unification in supersymmetric intersecting brane worlds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blumenhagen, Ralph; Lüst, Dieter; Stieberger, Stephan

    2003-07-01

    We show that contrary to first expectations realistic three generation supersymmetric intersecting brane world models give rise to phenomenologically interesting predictions about gauge coupling unification. Assuming the most economical way of realizing the matter content of the MSSM via intersecting branes we obtain a model independent relation among the three gauge coupling constants at the string scale. In order to correctly reproduce the experimentally known values of sin2[thetaW(Mz)] and alphas(Mz) this relation leads to natural gauge coupling unification at a string scale close to the standard GUT scale 2 x 1016 GeV. Additional vector-like matter can push the unification scale up to the Planck scale.

  13. Seismic Wave Propagation Along Fracture Intersections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abell, B.; Pyrak-Nolte, L. J.; Knobloch, J.

    2012-12-01

    Past research has shown that fractures support guided-modes such as coupled Rayleigh waves as well as confined modes such as Love waves and leaky-mode compressional waves. We demonstrated experimentally that fracture intersections support a mode that is similar to interface waves but propagates at speeds below the Rayleigh wave for low applied load. In this experimental study, we demonstrated that at low stress, fracture intersections support highly-localized wedge waves whose existence depends on stress and source-receiver polarization. Wedge waves (W.W.) were propagated along the orthogonal edge of aluminum samples. The sample measured 100 x 150 x 150 mm and was machined with two orthogonal fractures, intersecting at the center, such that four independent pieces of aluminum could be measured independently or pieced together. Seismic measurements were performed for two cases: (1) two right angle blocks in contact to examine the stress dependence of two corners in contact and (2) four right angle blocks in contact to study the behavior of four intersecting corners in contact. Seismic transducers with a central frequency of 1MHz were used to propagate shear (S) waves along the corners of the blocks that form an intersection, along the fractures and through the bulk. Measurements were made with the shear transducers polarized at 0, 45, 90 and 135 deg. to the direction of loading for a range (0 to 66 kN) of applied normal loads. When only two blocks were in contact, a W.W. was observed traveling at speeds between 2650 m/s and 3000 m/s. This is below the Rayleigh speed (2830 m/s) for low stress. As the applied load was increased, the wave speed increased, indicating a change in the local stiffness. Although an increase in speed was observed for both polarizations, the measured speed was lower for 135 deg. polarization indicating that the local stiffness of the top wedge was dramatically different than the bottom aluminum block. All four blocks were also examined under

  14. Spiked instantons from intersecting D-branes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nekrasov, Nikita; Prabhakar, Naveen S.

    2017-01-01

    The moduli space of spiked instantons that arises in the context of the BPS/CFT correspondence [22] is realised as the moduli space of classical vacua, i.e. low-energy open string field configurations, of a certain stack of intersecting D1-branes and D5-branes in Type IIB string theory. The presence of a constant B-field induces an interesting dynamics involving the tachyon condensation.

  15. Reliability of drivers in urban intersections.

    PubMed

    Gstalter, Herbert; Fastenmeier, Wolfgang

    2010-01-01

    The concept of human reliability has been widely used in industrial settings by human factors experts to optimise the person-task fit. Reliability is estimated by the probability that a task will successfully be completed by personnel in a given stage of system operation. Human Reliability Analysis (HRA) is a technique used to calculate human error probabilities as the ratio of errors committed to the number of opportunities for that error. To transfer this notion to the measurement of car driver reliability the following components are necessary: a taxonomy of driving tasks, a definition of correct behaviour in each of these tasks, a list of errors as deviations from the correct actions and an adequate observation method to register errors and opportunities for these errors. Use of the SAFE-task analysis procedure recently made it possible to derive driver errors directly from the normative analysis of behavioural requirements. Driver reliability estimates could be used to compare groups of tasks (e.g. different types of intersections with their respective regulations) as well as groups of drivers' or individual drivers' aptitudes. This approach was tested in a field study with 62 drivers of different age groups. The subjects drove an instrumented car and had to complete an urban test route, the main features of which were 18 intersections representing six different driving tasks. The subjects were accompanied by two trained observers who recorded driver errors using standardized observation sheets. Results indicate that error indices often vary between both the age group of drivers and the type of driving task. The highest error indices occurred in the non-signalised intersection tasks and the roundabout, which exactly equals the corresponding ratings of task complexity from the SAFE analysis. A comparison of age groups clearly shows the disadvantage of older drivers, whose error indices in nearly all tasks are significantly higher than those of the other groups

  16. Particle Detectors: Research and Development at CERN

    SciTech Connect

    Fabjan, C. W.

    2008-04-21

    Over the past 15 years a worldwide Detector R and D Programme has made the LHC experiments possible. These experiments operate at a new level of event rate and detection capabilities. Based on these advances, Detector R and D is continuing at CERN in close collaboration with University and Research Institutes. Several main directions are being pursued for solid-state and gaseous tracking devices, advanced crystal and noble liquid calorimetry, particle identification methods, and advanced signal-processing techniques. This effort is directed towards experiments at even higher collision rates at the LHC, the requirements for the next generation of linear electron-positron colliders and for applications outside particle physics, such as medical diagnostics instrumentation. We shall illustrate this challenging, stimulating and creative programme with examples and show how these developments are taking place in close collaboration between CERN and institutions around the globe.

  17. The NA62 experiment at CERN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venditti, Stefano

    2016-12-01

    The goal of the NA62 experiment at CERN is to collect O(100) events of the ultrarare K+→ π +ν bar {ν } decay in two years. After a long R&D phase and a successful pilot run in 2014, the first data-taking phase took place in 2015. In this paper the importance of the experiment's physics goal, as well as the experimental solutions adopted in order to attain it, will be reviewed.

  18. New radiation protection calibration facility at CERN.

    PubMed

    Brugger, Markus; Carbonez, Pierre; Pozzi, Fabio; Silari, Marco; Vincke, Helmut

    2014-10-01

    The CERN radiation protection group has designed a new state-of-the-art calibration laboratory to replace the present facility, which is >20 y old. The new laboratory, presently under construction, will be equipped with neutron and gamma sources, as well as an X-ray generator and a beta irradiator. The present work describes the project to design the facility, including the facility placement criteria, the 'point-zero' measurements and the shielding study performed via FLUKA Monte Carlo simulations.

  19. Manipulating the Intersection of Angiogenesis and Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Kwee, Brian J.; Mooney, David J.

    2015-01-01

    There exists a critical need to develop strategies that promote blood vessel formation (neovascularization) in virtually all tissue engineering and regenerative medicine efforts. While research typically focuses on understanding and exploiting the role of angiogenic factors and vascular cells on new blood vessel formation, the activity of the immune system is being increasingly recognized to impact vascular formation and adaptation. This review will provide both an overview of the intersection of angiogenesis and the immune system, and how biomaterials may be designed to promote favorable interactions between these two systems to promote effective vascularization. PMID:25316589

  20. Open intersection numbers and free fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexandrov, Alexander

    2017-09-01

    A complete set of the Virasoro and W-constraints for the Kontsevich-Penner model, which conjecturally describes intersections on moduli spaces of open curves, was derived in our previous work. Here we show that these constraints can be described in terms of free bosonic fields with twisted boundary conditions, which gives a modification of the well-known construction of the W (3) algebra in conformal field theory. This description is natural from the point of view of the spectral curve description, and should serve as a new important ingredient of the topological recursion/Givental decomposition.

  1. Aircraft recognition based on the discrepancy of polygon intersection area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Xiujian; Wang, Yanfang; Feng, Qi

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, a new algorithm that based on discrepancy of polygon intersection area for aircraft recognition is presented. The recognition algorithm process involves three parts: generating polygon of aircraft, placing overlapping plane polygons and computing the area of total intersecting polygons. For the purpose of getting the polygon of aircraft, the picture that was ready to be recognized has gone through a series of pre-processing and the smallest circumference polygon algorithm was used to get approximate polygon of the target contour. To make the two compared polygons have the approximate area, the similar principle was utilized. The matching procedure was divided into four steps including computing intersecting points, computing polygon intersecting sets, computing the intersecting area and getting the intersecting rate to recognize the aircraft. The data structure of algorithm is based on doubly liked list principle. A mass of simulations illustrate that the proposed algorithm is effective and reasonable.

  2. Landscaping of highway medians and roadway safety at unsignalized intersections.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hongyun; Fabregas, Aldo; Lin, Pei-Sung

    2016-05-01

    Well-planted and maintained landscaping can help reduce driving stress, provide better visual quality, and decrease over speeding, thus improving roadway safety. Florida Department of Transportation (FDOT) Standard Index (SI-546) is one of the more demanding standards in the U.S. for landscaping design criteria at highway medians near intersections. The purposes of this study were to (1) empirically evaluate the safety results of SI-546 at unsignalized intersections and (2) quantify the impacts of geometrics, traffic, and landscaping design features on total crashes and injury plus fatal crashes. The studied unsignalized intersections were divided into (1) those without median trees near intersections, (2) those with median trees near intersections that were compliant with SI-546, and (3) those with median trees near intersections that were non-compliant with SI-546. A total of 72 intersections were selected, for which five-year crash data from 2006-2010 were collected. The sites that were compliant with SI-546 showed the best safety performance in terms of the lowest crash counts and crash rates. Four crash predictive models-two for total crashes and two for injury crashes-were developed. The results indicated that improperly planted and maintained median trees near highway intersections can increase the total number of crashes and injury plus fatal crashes at a 90% confidence level; no significant difference could be found in crash rates between sites that were compliant with SI-546 and sites without trees. All other conditions remaining the same, an intersection with trees that was not compliant with SI-546 had 63% more crashes and almost doubled injury plus fatal crashes than those at intersections without trees. The study indicates that appropriate landscaping in highway medians near intersections can be an engineering technology that not only improves roadway environmental quality but also maintains intersection safety. Copyright © 2016. Published by

  3. Research on traffic flow characteristics at signal intersection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Jun-Wei; Yu, Sen-Bin; Qian, Yong-Sheng; Wei, Xu-Ting; Feng, Xiao; Wang, Hui

    2017-09-01

    Based on the cautious driving behavior and the principle of the vehicles at left-side having priority to pass in the intersection, a two-dimensional cellular automata model for planar signalized intersection (NS-STCA) is established. The different turning vehicles are regarded as the research objects and the effect of the left-turn probability, signal cycle, vehicle flow density on traffic flow at the intersection is investigated.

  4. Simulation Study of Traffic Flow At a Three Way Intersection

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-09-01

    INTERSECTION by Chong Chul Song September 1988 Thesis Advisor: Peter A. W. Lewis Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited i~ K...II Title (Include security classification) SIMULATION STUDY OF TRAFFIC FLOW AT A THREE WAY INTERSECTION 12 Personal Author(s) Chong Chul Song 13a...distribution is unlimited. Simulation Study of Traffic Flow at a Three Way Intersection by Chong Chul Song Major, Republic Of Korea Army B.S., Korea

  5. Motorcycle and scooter speeds approaching urban intersections.

    PubMed

    Walton, D; Buchanan, J

    2012-09-01

    Five urban, uncontrolled T-intersections known to be motorcycle crash 'black spots' were monitored using instrumentation and a roadside observer. Two sets of twelve-hour observations were collected for each site (N≈100,000). Instrumentation recorded the 'events' of vehicles passing to measure, speed, direction, lane position, vehicle type (broadly characterised) and headway. Observers further recorded times of bicycle events, type of motorcycle (scooters or motorcycles), the behaviour of motorcycles and the use of 'high conspicuity' gear such as clothing or helmets. Results establish that motorcycles travel around 10% faster than the other traffic (car mean speed=34.97 km/h), with motorcycles travelling on average 3.3 km/h faster than cars. Motorcycles were 3.4 times more likely to be exceeding the speed limit than cars. Similar results are described for scooters. Also examined are the influences on mean speeds such as the time of day, the presence of a car at the t-intersection, and the influence of free headway. The results are compared for robustness across locations and days. It is concluded that in urban areas motorcycles are travelling significantly faster than other traffic. These findings are discussed against a concern to reduce motorcycle crashes by improving conspicuity and previous research that implicates a 'looked-but-failed-to-see' effect for car drivers. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Experimental RFQ as injector to the CERN Linac I

    SciTech Connect

    Boltezar, E.; Haseroth, H.; Pirkl, W.

    1981-01-01

    Since the successful development and testing of a radio-frequency quadrupole (RFQ) prototype at Los Alamos, the use of RFQs as injectors to the CERN linacs is being envisaged. As a pilot project, a 202.56-MHz RFQ for Linac I (Old Linac) is being built in close collaboration between Los Alamos and CERN. This project will be completed in about 15 months, a timescale imposed by other CERN programs. The CERN RFQ is based on the Los Alamos proven design approach, but will have to meet requirements of the existing CERN environment. The design characteristics of this accelerator are described, and some conclusions based on model work at CERN are given.

  7. On the connectivity of seams of conical intersection: seam curvature.

    PubMed

    Yarkony, David R

    2005-11-22

    The seam of conical intersection of two electronic states is said to be curved when the span of the basis vectors describing the branching plane varies along the seam. In this work degenerate perturbation theory is used to determine an approximately diabatic Hamiltonian that can reliably reproduce the potential-energy surfaces in the vicinity of a point of conical intersection. This Hamiltonian provides a rigorous description of seam curvature, and a means for obtaining the full (N(int)-2)-dimensional seam of conical intersection connected to a point of conical intersection.

  8. The Role of Intersection Space Segments in Photochemical Reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Castano, Obis; Sancho, Unai; Garavelli, Marco; Olivucci, Massimo; Frutos, Luis Manuel

    2007-12-26

    We analyze here the role of the intersection space in the photochemistry of some organic compounds and how the topological properties of this space affect the mechanism of the photochemical reaction. This mechanism is related to the accessibility of different reaction paths in the relaxation in the ground state once the system reaches the intersection space (i.e. a conical intersection). It is proved that sometimes, even in the photochemistry of small organic molecules, the complete analysis of the intersection space is necessary for the correct computational prediction of the chemical mechanism and the formed photoproducts underlying the photoinduced reaction.

  9. 43. Historic American Buildings Survey L. C. Durette, Photographer INTERSECTION ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    43. Historic American Buildings Survey L. C. Durette, Photographer INTERSECTION OF SUMMER BEAM & CHIMNEY GIRT #4 ATTIC FLOOR - Doe Garrison, Lamprey River & Great Bay, Newmarket, Rockingham County, NH

  10. 45. Historic American Buildings Survey L. C. Durette, Photographer INTERSECTION ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    45. Historic American Buildings Survey L. C. Durette, Photographer INTERSECTION OF SUMMER BEAM & CHIMNEY GIRT #2, ATTIC FLOOR - Doe Garrison, Lamprey River & Great Bay, Newmarket, Rockingham County, NH

  11. 44. Historic American Buildings Survey L. C. Durette, Photographer INTERSECTION ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    44. Historic American Buildings Survey L. C. Durette, Photographer INTERSECTION OF SUMMER BEAM & CHIMNEY GIRT #4, ATTIC FLOOR - Doe Garrison, Lamprey River & Great Bay, Newmarket, Rockingham County, NH

  12. New results of intersection numbers on moduli spaces of curves

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Kefeng; Xu, Hao

    2007-01-01

    We present a series of results we obtained recently about the intersection numbers of tautological classes on moduli spaces of curves, including a simple formula of the n-point functions for Witten's τ classes, an effective recursion formula to compute higher Weil–Petersson volumes, several new recursion formulae of intersection numbers and our proof of a conjecture of Itzykson and Zuber concerning denominators of intersection numbers. We also present Virasoro and KdV properties of generating functions of general mixed κ and ψ intersections. PMID:17702863

  13. New results of intersection numbers on moduli spaces of curves.

    PubMed

    Liu, Kefeng; Xu, Hao

    2007-08-28

    We present a series of results we obtained recently about the intersection numbers of tautological classes on moduli spaces of curves, including a simple formula of the n-point functions for Witten's tau classes, an effective recursion formula to compute higher Weil-Petersson volumes, several new recursion formulae of intersection numbers and our proof of a conjecture of Itzykson and Zuber concerning denominators of intersection numbers. We also present Virasoro and KdV properties of generating functions of general mixed kappa and psi intersections.

  14. Energy storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaier, U.

    1981-04-01

    Developments in the area of energy storage are characterized, with respect to theory and laboratory, by an emergence of novel concepts and technologies for storing electric energy and heat. However, there are no new commercial devices on the market. New storage batteries as basis for a wider introduction of electric cars, and latent heat storage devices, as an aid for solar technology applications, with satisfactory performance standards are not yet commercially available. Devices for the intermediate storage of electric energy for solar electric-energy systems, and for satisfying peak-load current demands in the case of public utility companies are considered. In spite of many promising novel developments, there is yet no practical alternative to the lead-acid storage battery. Attention is given to central heat storage for systems transporting heat energy, small-scale heat storage installations, and large-scale technical energy-storage systems.

  15. Analysis of CERN computing infrastructure and monitoring data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nieke, C.; Lassnig, M.; Menichetti, L.; Motesnitsalis, E.; Duellmann, D.

    2015-12-01

    Optimizing a computing infrastructure on the scale of LHC requires a quantitative understanding of a complex network of many different resources and services. For this purpose the CERN IT department and the LHC experiments are collecting a large multitude of logs and performance probes, which are already successfully used for short-term analysis (e.g. operational dashboards) within each group. The IT analytics working group has been created with the goal to bring data sources from different services and on different abstraction levels together and to implement a suitable infrastructure for mid- to long-term statistical analysis. It further provides a forum for joint optimization across single service boundaries and the exchange of analysis methods and tools. To simplify access to the collected data, we implemented an automated repository for cleaned and aggregated data sources based on the Hadoop ecosystem. This contribution describes some of the challenges encountered, such as dealing with heterogeneous data formats, selecting an efficient storage format for map reduce and external access, and will describe the repository user interface. Using this infrastructure we were able to quantitatively analyze the relationship between CPU/wall fraction, latency/throughput constraints of network and disk and the effective job throughput. In this contribution we will first describe the design of the shared analysis infrastructure and then present a summary of first analysis results from the combined data sources.

  16. Federated data storage and management infrastructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zarochentsev, A.; Kiryanov, A.; Klimentov, A.; Krasnopevtsev, D.; Hristov, P.

    2016-10-01

    The Large Hadron Collider (LHC)’ operating at the international CERN Laboratory in Geneva, Switzerland, is leading Big Data driven scientific explorations. Experiments at the LHC explore the fundamental nature of matter and the basic forces that shape our universe. Computing models for the High Luminosity LHC era anticipate a growth of storage needs of at least orders of magnitude; it will require new approaches in data storage organization and data handling. In our project we address the fundamental problem of designing of architecture to integrate a distributed heterogeneous disk resources for LHC experiments and other data- intensive science applications and to provide access to data from heterogeneous computing facilities. We have prototyped a federated storage for Russian T1 and T2 centers located in Moscow, St.-Petersburg and Gatchina, as well as Russian / CERN federation. We have conducted extensive tests of underlying network infrastructure and storage endpoints with synthetic performance measurement tools as well as with HENP-specific workloads, including the ones running on supercomputing platform, cloud computing and Grid for ALICE and ATLAS experiments. We will present our current accomplishments with running LHC data analysis remotely and locally to demonstrate our ability to efficiently use federated data storage experiment wide within National Academic facilities for High Energy and Nuclear Physics as well as for other data-intensive science applications, such as bio-informatics.

  17. Career Goals and Decisions: An Intersectionality Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bardon, Emma

    This project explores the career paths to date of seven graduates of the University of Waterloo's Mechanical Engineering program, and examines the influences that led them to choose their university program. I particularly considered the participants' status as members of underrepresented or overrepresented groups, using the contexts of the history of the profession of Mechanical Engineering and prior research on underrepresentation in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics fields. I used semi-structured interviews and an intersectionality framework to investigate aspects of identity, interests, and career influences. I found three key themes among the participants: human influences, including information sources, role models, and mentors; influences of educational and outreach activities; and personal interests and aptitudes. I use the uncovered themes to recommend a combination of future studies and outreach programs.

  18. Threat detection system for intersection collision avoidance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jocoy, Edward H.; Pierowicz, John A.

    1998-01-01

    Calspan SRL Corporation is currently developing an on- vehicle threat detection system for intersection collision avoidance (ICA) as part of its ICA program with the National Highway Transportation Safety Administration. Crash scenarios were previously defined and an on-board radar sensor was designed. This paper describes recent efforts that include the development of a simulation of a multitarget tracker and collision avoidance algorithm used to predict system performance in a variety of target configurations in the various ICA crash scenarios. In addition, a current headway radar was mounted on the Calspan Instrumented Vehicle and in-traffic data were recorded for two limited crash scenarios. Warning functions were developed through the simulation and applied to the recorded data.

  19. Intersecting circuits generate precisely patterned retinal waves.

    PubMed

    Akrouh, Alejandro; Kerschensteiner, Daniel

    2013-07-24

    The developing retina generates spontaneous glutamatergic (stage III) waves of activity that sequentially recruit neighboring ganglion cells with opposite light responses (ON and OFF RGCs). This activity pattern is thought to help establish parallel ON and OFF pathways in downstream visual areas. The circuits that produce stage III waves and desynchronize ON and OFF RGC firing remain obscure. Using dual patch-clamp recordings, we find that ON and OFF RGCs receive sequential excitatory input from ON and OFF cone bipolar cells (CBCs), respectively. This input sequence is generated by crossover circuits, in which ON CBCs control glutamate release from OFF CBCs via diffusely stratified inhibitory amacrine cells. In addition, neighboring ON CBCs communicate directly and indirectly through lateral glutamatergic transmission and gap junctions, both of which are required for wave initiation and propagation. Thus, intersecting lateral excitatory and vertical inhibitory circuits give rise to precisely patterned stage III retinal waves.

  20. Open Hardware for CERN's accelerator control systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Bij, E.; Serrano, J.; Wlostowski, T.; Cattin, M.; Gousiou, E.; Alvarez Sanchez, P.; Boccardi, A.; Voumard, N.; Penacoba, G.

    2012-01-01

    The accelerator control systems at CERN will be upgraded and many electronics modules such as analog and digital I/O, level converters and repeaters, serial links and timing modules are being redesigned. The new developments are based on the FPGA Mezzanine Card, PCI Express and VME64x standards while the Wishbone specification is used as a system on a chip bus. To attract partners, the projects are developed in an `Open' fashion. Within this Open Hardware project new ways of working with industry are being evaluated and it has been proven that industry can be involved at all stages, from design to production and support.

  1. The NA62 experiment at CERN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piccini, Mauro

    2016-11-01

    The rare decays K → πvv¯ are excellent processes to make tests of new physics at the highest scale complementary to LHC thanks to their theoretically cleanness. The NA62 experiment at CERN SPS aims to collect of the order of 100 events in two years of data taking for the decay K+ → π+vv¯, keeping the background at the level of 10%. Part of the experimental apparatus has been commissioned during a technical run in 2012. The diverse and innovative experimental techniques will be explained and some preliminary results obtained during the 2014 pilot run will be reviewed.

  2. HST at CERN an Amazing Adventure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Restivo, Evelyn

    2009-04-01

    The High School Teacher Program (HST) at the European Organization for Nuclear Research, CERN, in Geneva, Switzerland was initiated in 1998 by a group of scientists, as a multicultural international program designed to introduce high school physics teachers to high-energy physics. The goal of the program is to provide experiences and materials that will help teachers lead their students to a better understanding of the physical world. Interacting with physics teachers from around the world leads to new approaches for dealing with educational issues that all teachers encounter. The program includes a variety of tours, a series of lectures and classroom activities about the physics expected from the Large Hadron Collider.

  3. Domestic Violence among the Black Poor: Intersectionality and Social Justice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conwill, William Louis

    2010-01-01

    There are striking gender, race, and class variations in rates of domestic violence. Some leading family theorists called for an intersectional analysis of how gender, race and class systems interact to improve domestic violence theory. This article improves domestic violence theory by: 1) using the discourse, or language, of intersectionality; 2)…

  4. The Intersection of Gender and Age: An Exploration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gander, Michelle

    2014-01-01

    The understanding of gender inequality for women entering work has not been subject to significant research or theorizing. This small study indicated that young women entering the workplace are subject to direct discrimination and by using an intersectionality approach this paper proposes that the intersection of gender and young age results in…

  5. Domestic Violence among the Black Poor: Intersectionality and Social Justice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conwill, William Louis

    2010-01-01

    There are striking gender, race, and class variations in rates of domestic violence. Some leading family theorists called for an intersectional analysis of how gender, race and class systems interact to improve domestic violence theory. This article improves domestic violence theory by: 1) using the discourse, or language, of intersectionality; 2)…

  6. VIEW OF DATE DRIVE, FROM INTERSECTION WITH BIRCH CIRCLE, WITH ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF DATE DRIVE, FROM INTERSECTION WITH BIRCH CIRCLE, WITH FACILITY 809 ON LEFT, 816 ON RIGHT. NOTE THE MANY DATE PALMS. VIEW FACING NORTHWEST - Camp H.M. Smith and Navy Public Works Center Manana Title VII (Capehart) Housing, Intersection of Acacia Road and Brich Circle, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  7. VIEW FROM ATOP ADJACENT RESIDENTIAL TOWER, SHOWING INTERSECTION OF ACACIA ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW FROM ATOP ADJACENT RESIDENTIAL TOWER, SHOWING INTERSECTION OF ACACIA ROAD WITH BIRCH CIRCLE. VIEW FACING NORTHEAST - Camp H.M. Smith and Navy Public Works Center Manana Title VII (Capehart) Housing, Intersection of Acacia Road and Brich Circle, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  8. VIEW OF BIRCH CIRCLE FROM ITS INTERSECTION WITH CEDAR DRIVE, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF BIRCH CIRCLE FROM ITS INTERSECTION WITH CEDAR DRIVE, ON THE MARINE SIDE OF THE NEIGHBORHOOD. RESIDENTIAL TOWER VISIBLE ON FAR RIGHT. VIEW FACING EAST - Camp H.M. Smith and Navy Public Works Center Manana Title VII (Capehart) Housing, Intersection of Acacia Road and Brich Circle, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  9. 3. VIEW OF WHITE ROCK ROAD FROM THE INTERSECTION OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. VIEW OF WHITE ROCK ROAD FROM THE INTERSECTION OF HIDDEN RIVER WAY (LEFT FOREGROUND) TOWARD ELEVATED INTERSECTION WITH LATROBE ROAD (AT RIGHT HORIZON); VIEW TO SOUTHWEST. - Placerville Road, White Rock Road between Clarksville & White Rock, El Dorado Hills, El Dorado County, CA

  10. Alternative Strategies for Using Intersection Cuts in Integer Programming.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    In a previous paper the author introduced a new cutting plane for integer programming, generated from the intersection of n halflines originating at...polytope whose interior contains no feasible vertex of K. Hence C can be used to generate intersection cuts that are obviously stronger than the ones considered earlier. (Author)

  11. The Intersection of Gender and Age: An Exploration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gander, Michelle

    2014-01-01

    The understanding of gender inequality for women entering work has not been subject to significant research or theorizing. This small study indicated that young women entering the workplace are subject to direct discrimination and by using an intersectionality approach this paper proposes that the intersection of gender and young age results in…

  12. Calculating the Self-Intersections of Bezier Curves.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-03-01

    Bezier Curves,*Spline Curves: Intersection, Self- Intersection 20. A81T RACT (Continue an revee side if necesavy and identify by bleck nmber1...Darmrstadt FRG Wolfgang Schwarz Reinhold Klass Jakob-Stefan-Str. 12 Daimler-Benz AG 6500 Mainz FRG AMht AIDK 0932 Sindelfmngen FRG W. Strasser Diete

  13. Intersection of Three Planes Revisited--An Algebraic Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trenkler, Götz; Trenkler, Dietrich

    2017-01-01

    Given three planes in space, a complete characterization of their intersection is provided. Special attention is paid to the case when the intersection set does not exist of one point only. Besides the vector cross product, the tool of generalized inverse of a matrix is used extensively.

  14. AERIAL VIEW OF FOURLEVEL INTERCHANGE AT INTERSECTION OF ARROYO SECO ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    AERIAL VIEW OF FOUR-LEVEL INTERCHANGE AT INTERSECTION OF ARROYO SECO PARKWAY AND HIGHWAY 101, HOLLYWOOD FREEWAY. ARROYO SECO PARKWAY ON LOWER LEVEL FROM LOWER LEFT TO UPPER RIGHT. LOOKING NORTH - Four Level Interchange, Intersection of Arroyo Seco Parkway & Harbor, Hollywood, & Santa Ana Freeways (milepost 23.69), Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  15. AERIAL VIEW OF FOURLEVEL INTERCHANGE AT INTERSECTION OF ARROYO SECO ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    AERIAL VIEW OF FOUR-LEVEL INTERCHANGE AT INTERSECTION OF ARROYO SECO PARKWAY AND HIGHWAY 101, HOLLYWOOD FREEWAY. ARROYO SECO PARKWAY ON LOWER LEVEL AT CENTER. HIGHWAY 101 AT BOTTOM. CAESAR CHAVEZ AVENUE AT CENTER. LOOKING NE - Four Level Interchange, Intersection of Arroyo Seco Parkway & Harbor, Hollywood, & Santa Ana Freeways (milepost 23.69), Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA

  16. Intersectionality and the Canadian Museum for Human Rights

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dhamoon, Rita Kaur; Hankivsky, Olena

    2015-01-01

    In this commentary, the authors propose than an intersectionality perspective can transform understandings of the contentious content of the Canadian Museum for Human Rights (CMHR). The use of an intersectionality perspective starts from the position that such discourses as racialization, gendering, capitalism, and ableism are mutually…

  17. Intersection of Three Planes Revisited--An Algebraic Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trenkler, Götz; Trenkler, Dietrich

    2017-01-01

    Given three planes in space, a complete characterization of their intersection is provided. Special attention is paid to the case when the intersection set does not exist of one point only. Besides the vector cross product, the tool of generalized inverse of a matrix is used extensively.

  18. Storage structure for nuclear waste

    SciTech Connect

    Krieger, F.

    1985-02-05

    A storage structure for storing radioactive materials is claimed. It includes tubular storage members provided near the bottom thereof with a plurality of horizontal bolts the longitudinal axes of which intersect at a common point of said axes. A plurality of support plates for said tubular member is provided at the lower end thereof. Each support plate is adapted to support one of said plurality of bolts and each support plate includes an upstanding portion. Said upstanding portion of each of said plurality of support plates is provided with an open recess including an upper relatively wide slanting entrance adapted for insertion of one of said plurality of bolts and a lower bolt-bearing surface coaxial with one of said plurality of bolts. One support plate may have several upstanding portions of which each has a recess for the insertion and the support of a bolt projecting from a different tube for storing radioactive materials.

  19. GPD study programme of COMPASS at CERN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kouznetsov, O.; COMPASS Collaboration

    2016-01-01

    COMPASS is a fixed target experiment at CERN dedicated to studies of the spin structure of the nucleon and of the spectroscopy of hadrons. High energy polarized muon beams available at CERN and the option of using either positive or negative ones, give an excellent opportunity for studying GPD, through the DVCS process and the HEMP reaction. The first result of COMPASS GPD programme came from transverse target-spin asymmetries measured in hard exclusive ρ0 production using a transversely polarized proton target. Recent results on transverse target-spin asymmetries for the exclusive ω production are presented as well. Projections of the achievable accuracies and preliminary results of 2012 DVCS pilot run measurements are discussed. Beginning of that run was devoted to commissioning of the long (2.5 m) liquid hydrogen target and new detectors, the large recoil proton detector and large angle electromagnetic calorimeter. These detectors will be a backbone for the future measurements of exclusive processes during the dedicated data taking in 2016-2017.

  20. Hands on CERN: A Well-Used Physics Education Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johansson, K. E.

    2006-01-01

    The "Hands on CERN" education project makes it possible for students and teachers to get close to the forefront of scientific research. The project confronts the students with contemporary physics at its most fundamental level with the help of particle collisions from the DELPHI particle physics experiment at CERN. It now exists in 14 languages…

  1. Hands on CERN: A Well-Used Physics Education Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johansson, K. E.

    2006-01-01

    The "Hands on CERN" education project makes it possible for students and teachers to get close to the forefront of scientific research. The project confronts the students with contemporary physics at its most fundamental level with the help of particle collisions from the DELPHI particle physics experiment at CERN. It now exists in 14 languages…

  2. Overall view of gantry crane and storage yard. Taken June ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Overall view of gantry crane and storage yard. Taken June 20, 1940. Fourteenth Naval District Photo Collection Item No. 13770 - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Exterior Cranes, Bridge Gantry Crane No. 1, Welding slab along Third Street, near intersection with Avenue G, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  3. INTERIOR OF WESTERN SECTION, SHOWING WALL OF COLD STORAGE ROOM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR OF WESTERN SECTION, SHOWING WALL OF COLD STORAGE ROOM (IN BAYS 32 TO 34) AND ROLLING DOORS AT WEST END, VIEW FACING SOUTH-SOUTHWEST. - Naval Air Station Barbers Point, Aircraft Storehouse, Between Midway & Card Streets at Enterprise Avenue intersection, Ewa, Honolulu County, HI

  4. Analyzing angle crashes at unsignalized intersections using machine learning techniques.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Aty, Mohamed; Haleem, Kirolos

    2011-01-01

    A recently developed machine learning technique, multivariate adaptive regression splines (MARS), is introduced in this study to predict vehicles' angle crashes. MARS has a promising prediction power, and does not suffer from interpretation complexity. Negative Binomial (NB) and MARS models were fitted and compared using extensive data collected on unsignalized intersections in Florida. Two models were estimated for angle crash frequency at 3- and 4-legged unsignalized intersections. Treating crash frequency as a continuous response variable for fitting a MARS model was also examined by considering the natural logarithm of the crash frequency. Finally, combining MARS with another machine learning technique (random forest) was explored and discussed. The fitted NB angle crash models showed several significant factors that contribute to angle crash occurrence at unsignalized intersections such as, traffic volume on the major road, the upstream distance to the nearest signalized intersection, the distance between successive unsignalized intersections, median type on the major approach, percentage of trucks on the major approach, size of the intersection and the geographic location within the state. Based on the mean square prediction error (MSPE) assessment criterion, MARS outperformed the corresponding NB models. Also, using MARS for predicting continuous response variables yielded more favorable results than predicting discrete response variables. The generated MARS models showed the most promising results after screening the covariates using random forest. Based on the results of this study, MARS is recommended as an efficient technique for predicting crashes at unsignalized intersections (angle crashes in this study). Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Tracer Flux Balance at an Urban Canyon Intersection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carpentieri, Matteo; Robins, Alan G.

    2010-05-01

    Despite their importance for pollutant dispersion in urban areas, the special features of dispersion at street intersections are rarely taken into account by operational air quality models. Several previous studies have demonstrated the complex flow patterns that occur at street intersections, even with simple geometry. This study presents results from wind-tunnel experiments on a reduced scale model of a complex but realistic urban intersection, located in central London. Tracer concentration measurements were used to derive three-dimensional maps of the concentration field within the intersection. In combination with a previous study (Carpentieri et al., Boundary-Layer Meteorol 133:277-296, 2009) where the velocity field was measured in the same model, a methodology for the calculation of the mean tracer flux balance at the intersection was developed and applied. The calculation highlighted several limitations of current state-of-the-art canyon dispersion models, arising mainly from the complex geometry of the intersection. Despite its limitations, the proposed methodology could be further developed in order to derive, assess and implement street intersection dispersion models for complex urban areas.

  6. Helping Students Understand Intersectionality: Reflections from a Dialogue Project in Residential Life

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Claros, Sharon Chia; Garcia, Gina A.; Johnston-Guerrero, Marc P.; Mata, Christine

    2017-01-01

    In this chapter, the authors share insights from a dialogue project focused on intersectionality within a residential life setting and discuss additional strategies for helping students understand intersectionality.

  7. Component evolution in general random intersection graphs

    SciTech Connect

    Bradonjic, Milan; Hagberg, Aric; Hengartner, Nick; Percus, Allon G

    2010-01-01

    We analyze component evolution in general random intersection graphs (RIGs) and give conditions on existence and uniqueness of the giant component. Our techniques generalize the existing methods for analysis on component evolution in RIGs. That is, we analyze survival and extinction properties of a dependent, inhomogeneous Galton-Watson branching process on general RIGs. Our analysis relies on bounding the branching processes and inherits the fundamental concepts from the study on component evolution in Erdos-Renyi graphs. The main challenge becomes from the underlying structure of RIGs, when the number of offsprings follows a binomial distribution with a different number of nodes and different rate at each step during the evolution. RIGs can be interpreted as a model for large randomly formed non-metric data sets. Besides the mathematical analysis on component evolution, which we provide in this work, we perceive RIGs as an important random structure which has already found applications in social networks, epidemic networks, blog readership, or wireless sensor networks.

  8. An efficient quantum scheme for Private Set Intersection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Run-hua; Mu, Yi; Zhong, Hong; Cui, Jie; Zhang, Shun

    2016-01-01

    Private Set Intersection allows a client to privately compute set intersection with the collaboration of the server, which is one of the most fundamental and key problems within the multiparty collaborative computation of protecting the privacy of the parties. In this paper, we first present a cheat-sensitive quantum scheme for Private Set Intersection. Compared with classical schemes, our scheme has lower communication complexity, which is independent of the size of the server's set. Therefore, it is very suitable for big data services in Cloud or large-scale client-server networks.

  9. Inkjet patterning of multiline intersections for wirings in printed electronics.

    PubMed

    Diaz, Elkin; Ramon, Eloi; Carrabina, Jordi

    2013-10-08

    Inkjet printed electronics using thermo-curable liquid inks exhibit particular geometrical characteristics in terms of regularity. This article presents a morphological analysis for inkjet printed multi line intersections that are critical structures for building circuits. We studied thin-film structures of silver conductive ink and printed by inkjet technology. Instability of the ink during printing causes the thickness irregularity of vertex, normally with peaks at these areas. We propose the usage of specific patterns for intersections as thickness regularity compensations. The results show that some patterns help to reduce this instability and improve the thickness regularity of intersections morphology.

  10. Calabi-Yau metrics for quotients and complete intersections

    DOE PAGES

    Braun, Volker; Brelidze, Tamaz; Douglas, Michael R.; ...

    2008-05-22

    We extend previous computations of Calabi-Yau metrics on projective hypersurfaces to free quotients, complete intersections, and free quotients of complete intersections. In particular, we construct these metrics on generic quintics, four-generation quotients of the quintic, Schoen Calabi-Yau complete intersections and the quotient of a Schoen manifold with Z₃ x Z₃ fundamental group that was previously used to construct a heterotic standard model. Various numerical investigations into the dependence of Donaldson's algorithm on the integration scheme, as well as on the Kähler and complex structure moduli, are also performed.

  11. CERN's Linac4 cesiated surface H- source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lettry, J.; Aguglia, D.; Bertolo, S.; Briefi, S.; Butterworth, A.; Coutron, Y.; Dallocchio, A.; David, N.; Chaudet, E.; Fantz, U.; Fink, D.; Garlasche, M.; Grudiev, A.; Guida, R.; Hansen, J.; Haase, M.; Hatayama, A.; Jones, A.; Kalvas, T.; Koszar, I.; Lallement, J.-B.; Lombardi, A.; di Lorenzo, F.; Machado, C.; Mastrostefano, C.; Mathot, S.; Mattei, S.; Moyret, P.; Nishida, K.; O'Neil, M.; Paoluzzi, M.; Raich, U.; Roncarolo, F.; Scrivens, R.; Steyaert, D.; Thaus, N.; Voulgarakis, G.

    2017-08-01

    Linac4 cesiated surface H- sources are routinely operated for the commissioning of the CERN's Linac4 and on an ion source test stand. Stable current of 40-50 mA are achieved but the transmission through the LEBT of 80% was below expectations and triggered additional beam simulation and characterization. The H- beam profile is not Gaussian and emittance measurements are larger than simulation. The status of ongoing development work is described; 36 mA H- and 20 mA D- beams were produced with a 5.5 mm aperture cesiated surface ion source. The emittances measured at the test stand are presented. During a preliminary test, the Linac4 proton source delivered a total beam intensity of 70 mA (p, H2+, H3+).

  12. John Adams and CERN: Personal Recollections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brianti, G.; Plane, D. E.

    2014-02-01

    By any standards, John Adams had a most remarkable career. He was involved in three important, emerging technologies, radar, particle accelerators and controlled fusion, and had an outstanding impact on the last two. Without a university education, he attained hierarchical positions of the highest level in prestigious national and international organizations. This article covers the CERN part of his career, by offering some personal insights into the different facets of his contributions to major accelerator projects, from the first strong-focusing synchrotron, the PS, to the SPS and its conversion to a proton--antiproton collider. In particular, it outlines his abilities as a leader of an international collaboration, which has served as an example for international initiatives in other disciplines.

  13. Cosmic-ray physics at CERN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez Cahuantzi, M.

    2017-06-01

    Accelerator experiments located underground are suitable for the study of atmospheric muons. The use of high-energy collider detectors for cosmic-ray physics was pioneered during the era of the Large Electron-Positron (LEP) collider at CERN by ALEPH, DELPHI and L3 collaborations. A development of these programs is possible at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), where experiments like ALICE and CMS will operate for many years, with the possibility of recording a large amount of cosmic-ray data. In this proceedings, a review of the results obtained by LEP and LHC experiments is presented. This material was discussed along two sessions during the VI School on Cosmic-ray Physics and Astrophysics held at the Mesoamerican Center for Theoretical Physics (MCTP) located in Tuxtla Gutierrez, Chiapas, Mexico.

  14. Detail of door and gable treatment, looking northeast at intersection ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail of door and gable treatment, looking northeast at intersection of East Wing (Wing 1) and central core - Hospital for Sick Children, 1731 Bunker Hill Road, Northeast, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  15. 3. AERIAL VIEW OF PIER, LOOKING SOUTHWEST, WITH INTERSECTION OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. AERIAL VIEW OF PIER, LOOKING SOUTHWEST, WITH INTERSECTION OF PACIFIC COAST HIGHWAY AND MAIN STREET IN FOREGROUND - Huntington Beach Municipal Pier, Pacific Coast Highway at Main Street, Huntington Beach, Orange County, CA

  16. Vision-based pedestrian behavior analysis at intersections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirazi, Mohammad Shokrolah; Morris, Brendan Tran

    2016-09-01

    This work presents a vision-based data collection system for pedestrian behavior analysis at intersections that include crossing counts, waiting time, crossing speed, and facility utilization. The tracking system uses contextual fusion of motion and appearance cues to more reliably track pedestrians during stop-and-go movements at intersections. Moreover, the pedestrian tracking system is improved through cooperation of two different tracking algorithms: bipartite graph match and optical flow algorithms. The performance of the proposed system is evaluated separately at the detection and tracking steps followed by behavior analyses of pedestrians for three different intersection videos of Las Vegas. The experimental results show the efficiency of the proposed system and intersection utilization is depicted through heat maps.

  17. 12. Intersection of Pierce and Spring streets, looking south from ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. Intersection of Pierce and Spring streets, looking south from the east side of Pierce Street. - East Greenwich, Roughly bounded by Division, Water, London, & Peirce Streets, East Greenwich, Kent County, RI

  18. 5. VIEW EAST NORTHEAST OF BUILDING 21, INTERSECTION OF HANCOCK ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. VIEW EAST NORTHEAST OF BUILDING 21, INTERSECTION OF HANCOCK AND RAILROAD AVENUES; BUILDING 18 IS AT EXTREME RIGHT OF PHOTOGRAPH - Bryant Electric Company, 1421 State Street, Bridgeport, Fairfield County, CT

  19. INTERSECTION OF 445 NORTH & 1040 EAST, SALT LAKE CITY, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERSECTION OF 445 NORTH & 1040 EAST, SALT LAKE CITY, UT. VIEW LOOKING SOUTH. REPHOTOGRAPH OF HISTORIC SHIPLER PHOTO # 18272, UTAH STATE HISTORICAL SOCIETY COLLECTION. - Salt Lake City Cemetery, 200 N Street, Salt Lake City, Salt Lake County, UT

  20. Litghospheric stress near a ridge-transform intersection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phipps, Jason; Parmentier, Morgan; Parmentier, E. M.

    1984-02-01

    Oceanic lithosphere at a ridge-tgransform intersection has distinct structural characteristics. The spreading axis and normal fault scarps, which parallel the ridge axis away fromm the intersection, locally curve towards the transform fault. This implies that the lest compressive stress direction becomes oblique to the spreading direction near a ridge-transform intersection. This stress field may be the result of a tensile ridge axis stress resisting plate separation and transform sher stress resisting relative plate motion. A plane stress plate model with prescribed plate boundary stresses is formulated to explore this hypothesis. The orientation of the least compressive horizontal stress near an intersection depends strongly on the ratio of the applied boundary stresses. Thus ridge axis curvature may place an important constraint on plate boundary forces.

  1. 6. ELEVATED, OBLIQUE VIEW OF INTERSECTION INFRASTRUCTURE AT LATROBE ROAD ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. ELEVATED, OBLIQUE VIEW OF INTERSECTION INFRASTRUCTURE AT LATROBE ROAD AND WHITE ROCK ROAD; VIEW TO SOUTHWEST. - Placerville Road, White Rock Road between Clarksville & White Rock, El Dorado Hills, El Dorado County, CA

  2. VIEW OF THE INTERSECTION OF JULIAN AVE AND MONTHAN STREET. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF THE INTERSECTION OF JULIAN AVE AND MONTHAN STREET. THE WATERS OF THE PEARL HARBOR CHANNEL ARE IN THE BACKGROUND AT LEFT. VIEW FACING NORTH. - Hickam Field, Hickam Historic Housing, Honolulu, Honolulu County, HI

  3. Vehicular traffic flow at a non-signalized intersection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebrahim Foulaadvand, M.; Belbasi, Somayyeh

    2007-07-01

    We have developed a modified Nagel Schreckenberg cellular automata model for describing a conflicting vehicular traffic flow at the intersection of two streets. No traffic lights control the traffic flow. The approaching cars to the intersection yield to each other to avoid collision. Closed boundary condition is applied to the streets. Extensive Monte Carlo simulation is taken into account to find the model characteristics. In particular, we obtain the fundamental diagrams and show that the effect of the interaction of two streets can be regarded as a dynamic impurity located at the intersection point. Our results suggest that yielding mechanism gives rise to a high total flow throughout the intersection especially in the low density regime.

  4. Looking southeast from intersection of Idaho Avenue and Line Street ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Looking southeast from intersection of Idaho Avenue and Line Street showing north end and west front - University of Idaho, University Classroom Building, Line Street between University Avenue & Idaho Avenue, Moscow, Latah County, ID

  5. 7. FRONT VIEW OF THE BUILDING FROM THE INTERSECTION OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. FRONT VIEW OF THE BUILDING FROM THE INTERSECTION OF SHELBY AND MADISON STREETS - Phoenix Hill Historic District, Ohio Falls Dye & Finishing Works Building, 731-733 East Madison Street, Louisville, Jefferson County, KY

  6. 20. VIEW TO EAST. NEAR SOUTHWEST INTERSECTION OF RANDOLPH AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    20. VIEW TO EAST. NEAR SOUTHWEST INTERSECTION OF RANDOLPH AND WABASH. PROFILE WEST PLATFORM AND SOUTHWEST STAIRCASE. NEWS STAND IN FOREGROUND. - Union Elevated Railroad, Randolph-Wabash Avenue Station, Randolph Street & Wabash Avenue, Chicago, Cook County, IL

  7. Old Big Oak Flat Road at intersection with New Tioga ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Old Big Oak Flat Road at intersection with New Tioga Road. Note gate for road to Tamarack Campground - Big Oak Flat Road, Between Big Oak Flat Entrance & Merced River, Yosemite Village, Mariposa County, CA

  8. 7. INTERIOR OF SOUTH SPAN: DETAIL OF UPPER CHORD INTERSECTION ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. INTERIOR OF SOUTH SPAN: DETAIL OF UPPER CHORD INTERSECTION WITH SWAY BRACING, VERTICALS, AND DIAGONALS; LOOKING NORTHWEST - Shaw Farm Bridge, Spanning Chippewa River at County Trunk Highway E, Island Lake, Rusk County, WI

  9. 213. 'SAFTEY FLARED INTERSECTION' NEAR COLLINGWOOD, 1932. ORIGINAL CAPTION READ ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    213. 'SAFTEY FLARED INTERSECTION' NEAR COLLINGWOOD, 1932. ORIGINAL CAPTION READ ''STREAMLINING' THE MOVEMENT OF HIGH SPEED MODERN TRAFFIC. - George Washington Memorial Parkway, Along Potomac River from McLean to Mount Vernon, VA, Mount Vernon, Fairfax County, VA

  10. 11. AERIAL VIEW OF 'SAFETY FLARED' INTERSECTION AT RIVERSIDE PICNIC ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. AERIAL VIEW OF 'SAFETY FLARED' INTERSECTION AT RIVERSIDE PICNIC AREA LOOKING EAST. - George Washington Memorial Parkway, Along Potomac River from McLean to Mount Vernon, VA, Mount Vernon, Fairfax County, VA

  11. 30. AERIAL VIEW OF 'SAFETY FLARED' INTERSECTION OF GWMP AND ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    30. AERIAL VIEW OF 'SAFETY FLARED' INTERSECTION OF GWMP AND COLLINGWOOD ROAD LOOKING NORTHWEST. - George Washington Memorial Parkway, Along Potomac River from McLean to Mount Vernon, VA, Mount Vernon, Fairfax County, VA

  12. View of intersection with west wall of north wing and ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of intersection with west wall of north wing and north wall of west wing; camera facing southeast. - Mare Island Naval Shipyard, Marine Prison, Suisun Avenue, west side between Mesa Road & San Pablo, Vallejo, Solano County, CA

  13. Perspective, environmental view looking from the intersection of West Lanvale ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Perspective, environmental view looking from the intersection of West Lanvale Street and North Carrollton Avenue - Reformed Episcopal Church of the Rock of Ages, 1210 West Lanvale Street, Baltimore, Independent City, MD

  14. General view of Flanders Field Cemetery & Memorial from intersection ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    General view of Flanders Field Cemetery & Memorial from intersection of Wortegemseweg and Flanders-Fieldweg, looking east/northeast. - Flanders Field American Cemetery & Memorial, Wortegemseweg 117, Waregem, West Flanders (Belgium)

  15. 38. AERIAL VIEW APPROACHING INTERSECTION WITH BELLE VIEW BLVD. LOOKING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    38. AERIAL VIEW APPROACHING INTERSECTION WITH BELLE VIEW BLVD. LOOKING NORTH. - George Washington Memorial Parkway, Along Potomac River from McLean to Mount Vernon, VA, Mount Vernon, Fairfax County, VA

  16. 7. View at intersection of Weybosset and Westminster streets, facing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. View at intersection of Weybosset and Westminster streets, facing southwest towards Turk's Head Building. - Downtown Providence, Roughley bounded by Woonasquatucket River, Providence River, Interstate Highway 195, & Interstate Highway 95, Providence, Providence County, RI

  17. FACING SOUTHWEST OF NORTHEASTERN CORNER OF PARK FROM INTERSECTION OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    FACING SOUTHWEST OF NORTHEASTERN CORNER OF PARK FROM INTERSECTION OF TERRACE AVENUE AND CLIFTON ROAD - Candler Park Historic District, Roughly bounded by Moreland, Dekalb, McLendon & Harold Avenues, Matthews Street & Clifton Terrace, Atlanta, Fulton County, GA

  18. Panoramic view from the intersection of Flower and Chapman looking ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Panoramic view from the intersection of Flower and Chapman looking west ( Views 11,12,13 complete 360 degree Panoramic) - National Home for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers, Marion Branch, 1700 East 38th Street, Marion, Grant County, IN

  19. Panoramic view from the intersection of Flower and Chapman looking ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Panoramic view from the intersection of Flower and Chapman looking southwest ( Views 11,12,13 complete 360 degree Panoramic) - National Home for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers, Marion Branch, 1700 East 38th Street, Marion, Grant County, IN

  20. Panoramic view from the intersection of Flower and Chapman looking ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Panoramic view from the intersection of Flower and Chapman looking northeast ( Views 11,12,13 complete 360 degree Panoramic) - National Home for Disabled Volunteer Soldiers, Marion Branch, 1700 East 38th Street, Marion, Grant County, IN

  1. 52. Photocopy of photograph of intersection of Hohman and State ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    52. Photocopy of photograph of intersection of Hohman and State (1894), photographer unknown (original located in Calumet Room, Hammond Public Library, 564 State Street, Hammond, Indiana 46320. (219) 931-5100. - Indiana Hotel, 5116 Hohman Avenue, Hammond, Lake County, IN

  2. Guideline for modeling carbon monoxide from roadway intersections

    SciTech Connect

    DiCristofaro, D.C.

    1992-11-01

    The guideline is designed to evaluate air quality impacts at one or more roadway intersections where vehicular traffic will cause or contribute to increased emissions of carbon monoxide (CO). The explicit purpose of the guideline is to provide a consistent, scientifically acceptable method for estimating the air quality impacts of vehicular traffic at intersections to determine if such impacts may exceed the National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) for CO.

  3. Decentralized Attitude Estimation Using a Quaternion Covariance Intersection Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crassidis, John L.; Cheng, Yang; Nebelecky, Christopher K.; Fosbury, Adam M.

    2009-01-01

    This paper derives an approach to combine estimates and covariances for decentralized attitude estimation using a quaternion parameterization. The approach is based on the covariance intersection method, which is modified to maintain quaternion normalization in the combination process. A practical simulation result is provided where local extended Kaiman filters are used on two star trackers, each running with common gyro measurements. The covariance intersection approach is shown to provide more accurate estimates than either of the local filters.

  4. Complicating Counterspaces: Intersectionality and the Michigan Womyn's Music Festival.

    PubMed

    McConnell, Elizabeth A; Todd, Nathan R; Odahl-Ruan, Charlynn; Shattell, Mona

    2016-06-01

    The counterspaces framework articulated by Case and Hunter (2012), follows from community psychology's long-standing interest in the potential for settings to promote well-being and liberatory responses to oppression. This framework proposes that certain settings (i.e., "counterspaces") facilitate a specific set of processes that promote the well-being of marginalized groups. We argue that an intersectional analysis is crucial to understand whether and how counterspaces achieve these goals. We draw from literature on safe spaces and present a case study of the Michigan Womyn's Music Festival (Michfest) to illustrate the value of an intersectional analysis and explore how these processes operate. Based on 20 in-person interviews, 23 responses to an online survey, and ethnographic field notes, we show how Michfest was characterized by a particular intersection of identities at the setting level, and intersectional diversity complicated experiences at the individual level. Moreover, intersectional identities provided opportunities for dialogue and change at the setting level, including the creation of counterspaces within counterspaces. Overall, we demonstrate the need to attend to intersectionality in counterspaces, and more broadly in how we conceptualize settings in community psychology. © Society for Community Research and Action 2016.

  5. NOx profile around a signalized intersection of busy roadway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kyung Hwan; Lee, Seung-Bok; Woo, Sung Ho; Bae, Gwi-Nam

    2014-11-01

    The NOx pollution profile around a signalized intersection of a busy roadway was investigated to understand the effect of traffic control on urban air pollution. Traffic flow patterns were classified into three categories of quasi-cruising, a combination of deceleration and acceleration, and a combination of deceleration, idling, and acceleration. The spatial distribution of air pollution levels around an intersection could be represented as a quasi-normal distribution, whose peak height was aggravated by increased emissions due to transient driving patterns. The peak concentration of NOx around the signalized intersection for the deceleration, idling, and acceleration category was five times higher than that for the quasi-cruising category. Severe levels of NOx pollution tailed off approximately 400 m from the center of the intersection. Approximately 200-1000 ppb of additional NOx was observed when traffic was decelerating, idling, and accelerating within the intersection zone, resulting in high exposure levels for pedestrians around the intersection. We propose a fluctuating horizontal distribution of motor vehicle-induced air pollutants as a function of time.

  6. Intersecting surface defects and two-dimensional CFT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomis, Jaume; Le Floch, Bruno; Pan, Yiwen; Peelaers, Wolfger

    2017-08-01

    We initiate the study of intersecting surface operators/defects in 4D quantum field theories (QFTs). We characterize these defects by coupled 4D/2D/0D theories constructed by coupling the degrees of freedom localized at a point and on intersecting surfaces in spacetime to each other and to the 4D QFT. We construct supersymmetric intersecting surface defects preserving just two supercharges in N =2 gauge theories. These defects are amenable to exact analysis by localization of the partition function of the underlying 4D/2D/0D QFT. We identify the 4D/2D/0D QFTs that describe intersecting surface operators in N =2 gauge theories realized by intersecting M2 branes ending on N M5 branes wrapping a Riemann surface. We conjecture and provide evidence for an explicit equivalence between the squashed four-sphere partition function of these intersecting defects and correlation functions in Liouville/Toda CFT with the insertion of arbitrary degenerate vertex operators, which are labeled by two representations of S U (N ).

  7. Energy Storage

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-05-01

    Release, Distribution Unlimited) Activities • Modeling & Simulation: – Solar availability – Effective airship solar surface area – System energy ...2007, The MITRE Corporation(Approved for Public Release, Distribution Unlimited) Energy Storage Perry Hamlyn 781-271-2137 • phamlyn@mitre.org DARPA...REPORT DATE MAY 2007 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2007 to 00-00-2007 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Energy Storage 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT

  8. Storage resource manager version 2.2: design, implementation, and testing experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donno, F.; Abadie, L.; Badino, P.; Baud, J.-P.; Corso, E.; Witt, S. D.; Fuhrmann, P.; Gu, J.; Koblitz, B.; Lemaitre, S.; Litmaath, M.; Litvintsev, D.; Presti, G. L.; Magnoni, L.; McCance, G.; Mkrtchan, T.; Mollon, R.; Natarajan, V.; Perelmutov, T.; Petravick, D.; Shoshani, A.; Sim, A.; Smith, D.; Tedesco, P.; Zappi, R.

    2008-07-01

    Storage Services are crucial components of the Worldwide LHC Computing Grid Infrastructure spanning more than 200 sites and serving computing and storage resources to the High Energy Physics LHC communities. Up to tens of Petabytes of data are collected every year by the four LHC experiments at CERN. To process these large data volumes it is important to establish a protocol and a very efficient interface to the various storage solutions adopted by the WLCG sites. In this work we report on the experience acquired during the definition of the Storage Resource Manager v2.2 protocol. In particular, we focus on the study performed to enhance the interface and make it suitable for use by the WLCG communities. At the moment 5 different storage solutions implement the SRM v2.2 interface: BeStMan (LBNL), CASTOR (CERN and RAL), dCache (DESY and FNAL), DPM (CERN), and StoRM (INFN and ICTP). After a detailed inside review of the protocol, various test suites have been written identifying the most effective set of tests: the S2 test suite from CERN and the SRM-Tester test suite from LBNL. Such test suites have helped verifying the consistency and coherence of the proposed protocol and validating existing implementations. We conclude our work describing the results achieved.

  9. The ATLAS Experiment at the CERN Large Hadron Collider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ATLAS Collaboration; Aad, G.; Abat, E.; Abdallah, J.; Abdelalim, A. A.; Abdesselam, A.; Abdinov, O.; Abi, B. A.; Abolins, M.; Abramowicz, H.; Acerbi, E.; Acharya, B. S.; Achenbach, R.; Ackers, M.; Adams, D. L.; Adamyan, F.; Addy, T. N.; Aderholz, M.; Adorisio, C.; Adragna, P.; Aharrouche, M.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahles, F.; Ahmad, A.; Ahmed, H.; Aielli, G.; Åkesson, P. F.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akimov, A. V.; Alam, S. M.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Aleppo, M.; Alessandria, F.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alimonti, G.; Aliyev, M.; Allport, P. P.; Allwood-Spiers, S. E.; Aloisio, A.; Alonso, J.; Alves, R.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amako, K.; Amaral, P.; Amaral, S. P.; Ambrosini, G.; Ambrosio, G.; Amelung, C.; Ammosov, V. V.; Amorim, A.; Amram, N.; Anastopoulos, C.; Anderson, B.; Anderson, K. J.; Anderssen, E. C.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Andricek, L.; Andrieux, M.-L.; Anduaga, X. S.; Anghinolfi, F.; Antonaki, A.; Antonelli, M.; Antonelli, S.; Apsimon, R.; Arabidze, G.; Aracena, I.; Arai, Y.; Arce, A. T. H.; Archambault, J. P.; Arguin, J.-F.; Arik, E.; Arik, M.; Arms, K. E.; Armstrong, S. R.; Arnaud, M.; Arnault, C.; Artamonov, A.; Asai, S.; Ask, S.; Åsman, B.; Asner, D.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astbury, A.; Athar, B.; Atkinson, T.; Aubert, B.; Auerbach, B.; Auge, E.; Augsten, K.; Aulchenko, V. M.; Austin, N.; Avolio, G.; Avramidou, R.; Axen, A.; Ay, C.; Azuelos, G.; Baccaglioni, G.; Bacci, C.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Bachy, G.; Badescu, E.; Bagnaia, P.; Bailey, D. C.; Baines, J. T.; Baker, O. K.; Ballester, F.; Baltasar Dos Santos Pedrosa, F.; Banas, E.; Banfi, D.; Bangert, A.; Bansal, V.; Baranov, S. P.; Baranov, S.; Barashkou, A.; Barberio, E. L.; Barberis, D.; Barbier, G.; Barclay, P.; Bardin, D. Y.; Bargassa, P.; Barillari, T.; Barisonzi, M.; Barnett, B. M.; Barnett, R. M.; Baron, S.; Baroncelli, A.; Barone, M.; Barr, A. J.; Barreiro, F.; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, J.; Barrillon, P.; Barriuso Poy, A.; Barros, N.; Bartheld, V.; Bartko, H.; Bartoldus, R.; Basiladze, S.; Bastos, J.; Batchelor, L. E.; Bates, R. L.; Batley, J. R.; Batraneanu, S.; Battistin, M.; Battistoni, G.; Batusov, V.; Bauer, F.; Bauss, B.; Baynham, D. E.; Bazalova, M.; Bazan, A.; Beauchemin, P. H.; Beaugiraud, B.; Beccherle, R. B.; Beck, G. A.; Beck, H. P.; Becks, K. H.; Bedajanek, I.; Beddall, A. J.; Beddall, A.; Bednár, P.; Bednyakov, V. A.; Bee, C.; Behar Harpaz, S.; Belanger, G. A. N.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Belhorma, B.; Bell, P. J.; Bell, W. H.; Bella, G.; Bellachia, F.; Bellagamba, L.; Bellina, F.; Bellomo, G.; Bellomo, M.; Beltramello, O.; Belymam, A.; Ben Ami, S.; Ben Moshe, M.; Benary, O.; Benchekroun, D.; Benchouk, C.; Bendel, M.; Benedict, B. H.; Benekos, N.; Benes, J.; Benhammou, Y.; Benincasa, G. P.; Benjamin, D. P.; Bensinger, J. 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W.; Schuler, G.; Schultes, J.; Schultz-Coulon, H.-C.; Schumacher, J.; Schumacher, M.; Schune, Ph; Schwartzman, A.; Schweiger, D.; Schwemling, Ph; Schwick, C.; Schwienhorst, R.; Schwierz, R.; Schwindling, J.; Scott, W. G.; Secker, H.; Sedykh, E.; Seguin-Moreau, N.; Segura, E.; Seidel, S. C.; Seiden, A.; Seixas, J. M.; Sekhniaidze, G.; Seliverstov, D. M.; Selldén, B.; Seman, M.; Semprini-Cesari, N.; Serfon, C.; Serin, L.; Seuster, R.; Severini, H.; Sevior, M. E.; Sexton, K. A.; Sfyrla, A.; Shah, T. P.; Shan, L.; Shank, J. T.; Shapiro, M.; Shatalov, P. B.; Shaver, L.; Shaw, C.; Shears, T. G.; Sherwood, P.; Shibata, A.; Shield, P.; Shilov, S.; Shimojima, M.; Shin, T.; Shiyakova, M.; Shmeleva, A.; Shoa, M.; Shochet, M. J.; Shupe, M. A.; Sicho, P.; Sidoti, A.; Siebel, A.; Siebel, M.; Siegrist, J.; Sijacki, D.; Silva, J.; Silverstein, S. B.; Simak, V.; Simic, Lj; Simion, S.; Simmons, B.; Simonyan, M.; Sinervo, P.; Sipica, V.; Siragusa, G.; Sisakyan, A. N.; Sivoklokov, S.; Sjölin, J.; Skubic, P.; Skvorodnev, N.; Slattery, P.; Slavicek, T.; Sliwa, K.; Sloan, T. J.; Sloper, J.; Smakhtin, V.; Small, A.; Smirnov, S. Yu; Smirnov, Y.; Smirnova, L.; Smirnova, O.; Smith, N. A.; Smith, B. C.; Smith, D. S.; Smith, J.; Smith, K. M.; Smith, B.; Smizanska, M.; Smolek, K.; Snesarev, A. A.; Snow, S. W.; Snow, J.; Snuverink, J.; Snyder, S.; Soares, M.; Soares, S.; Sobie, R.; Sodomka, J.; Söderberg, M.; Soffer, A.; Solans, C. A.; Solar, M.; Sole, D.; Solfaroli Camillocci, E.; Solodkov, A. A.; Solov'yanov, O. V.; Soloviev, I.; Soluk, R.; Sondericker, J.; Sopko, V.; Sopko, B.; Sorbi, M.; Soret Medel, J.; Sosebee, M.; Sosnovtsev, V. V.; Sospedra Suay, L.; Soukharev, A.; Soukup, J.; Spagnolo, S.; Spano, F.; Speckmayer, P.; Spegel, M.; Spencer, E.; Spighi, R.; Spigo, G.; Spila, F.; Spiriti, E.; Spiwoks, R.; Spogli, L.; Spousta, M.; Sprachmann, G.; Spurlock, B.; St. Denis, R. D.; Stahl, T.; Staley, R. J.; Stamen, R.; Stancu, S. N.; Stanecka, E.; Stanek, R. W.; Stanescu, C.; Stapnes, S.; Starchenko, E. A.; Staroba, P.; Stastny, J.; Staude, A.; Stavina, P.; Stavrianakou, M.; Stavropoulos, G.; Stefanidis, E.; Steffens, J. L.; Stekl, I.; Stelzer, H. J.; Stenzel, H.; Stewart, G.; Stewart, T. D.; Stiller, W.; Stockmanns, T.; Stodulski, M.; Stonjek, S.; Stradling, A.; Straessner, A.; Strandberg, J.; Strandlie, A.; Strauss, M.; Strickland, V.; Striegel, D.; Strizenec, P.; Ströhmer, R.; Strom, D. M.; Strong, J. A.; Stroynowski, R.; Stugu, B.; Stumer, I.; Su, D.; Subramania, S.; Suchkov, S. I.; Sugaya, Y.; Sugimoto, T.; Suk, M.; Sulin, V. V.; Sultanov, S.; Sun, Z.; Sundal, B.; Sushkov, S.; Susinno, G.; Sutcliffe, P.; Sutton, M. R.; Sviridov, Yu M.; Sykora, I.; Szczygiel, R. R.; Szeless, B.; Szymocha, T.; Sánchez, J.; Ta, D.; Taboada Gameiro, S.; Tadel, M.; Tafirout, R.; Taga, A.; Takai, H.; Takashima, R.; Takeda, H.; Takeshita, T.; Talby, M.; Talyshev, A.; Tamsett, M. C.; Tanaka, J.; Tanaka, K.; Tanaka, R.; Tanaka, S.; Tanaka, S.; Tanaka, Y.; Tappern, G. P.; Tapprogge, S.; Tarem, S.; Tarrade, F.; Tarrant, J.; Tartarelli, G.; Tas, P.; Tasevsky, M.; Tayalati, Y.; Taylor, F. E.; Taylor, G.; Taylor, G. N.; Taylor, R. P.; Tcherniatine, V.; Tegenfeldt, F.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Ten Kate, H.; Teng, P. K.; Ter-Antonyan, R.; Terada, S.; Terron, J.; Terwort, M.; Teuscher, R. J.; Tevlin, C. M.; Thadome, J.; Thion, J.; Thioye, M.; Thomas, A.; Thomas, J. P.; Thomas, T. L.; Thomas, E.; Thompson, R. J.; Thompson, A. S.; Thun, R. P.; Tic, T.; Tikhomirov, V. O.; Tikhonov, Y. A.; Timm, S.; Timmermans, C. J. W. P.; Tipton, P.; Tique Aires Viegas, F. J.; Tisserant, S.; Titov, M.; Tobias, J.; Tocut, V. M.; Toczek, B.; Todorova-Nova, S.; Tojo, J.; Tokár, S.; Tokushuku, K.; Tomasek, L.; Tomasek, M.; Tomasz, F.; Tomoto, M.; Tompkins, D.; Tompkins, L.; Toms, K.; Tonazzo, A.; Tong, G.; Tonoyan, A.; Topfel, C.; Topilin, N. D.; Torrence, E.; Torres Pais, J. G.; Toth, J.; Touchard, F.; Tovey, D. R.; Tovey, S. N.; Towndrow, E. F.; Trefzger, T.; Treichel, M.; Treis, J.; Tremblet, L.; Tribanek, W.; Tricoli, A.; Trigger, I. M.; Trilling, G.; Trincaz-Duvoid, S.; Tripiana, M. F.; Trischuk, W.; Trka, Z.; Trocmé, B.; Troncon, C.; C-L Tseng, J.; Tsiafis, I.; Tsiareshka, P. V.; Tsipolitis, G.; Tskhadadze, E. G.; Tsukerman, I. I.; Tsulaia, V.; Tsuno, S.; Turala, M.; Turk Cakir, I.; Turlay, E.; Tuts, P. M.; Twomey, M. S.; Tyndel, M.; Typaldos, D.; Tyrvainen, H.; Tzamarioudaki, E.; Tzanakos, G.; Ueda, I.; Uhrmacher, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Ullán Comes, M.; Unal, G.; Underwood, D. G.; Undrus, A.; Unel, G.; Unno, Y.; Urkovsky, E.; Usai, G.; Usov, Y.; Vacavant, L.; Vacek, V.; Vachon, B.; Vahsen, S.; Valderanis, C.; Valenta, J.; Valente, P.; Valero, A.; Valkar, S.; Valls Ferrer, J. A.; Van der Bij, H.; van der Graaf, H.; van der Kraaij, E.; Van Eijk, B.; van Eldik, N.; van Gemmeren, P.; van Kesteren, Z.; van Vulpen, I.; Van Berg, R.; Vandelli, W.; Vandoni, G.; Vaniachine, A.; Vannucci, F.; Varanda, M.; Varela Rodriguez, F.; Vari, R.; Varnes, E. W.; Varouchas, D.; Vartapetian, A.; Varvell, K. E.; Vassilakopoulos, V. I.; Vassilieva, L.; Vataga, E.; Vaz, L.; Vazeille, F.; Vedrine, P.; Vegni, G.; Veillet, J. J.; Vellidis, C.; Veloso, F.; Veness, R.; Veneziano, S.; Ventura, A.; Ventura, S.; Vercesi, V.; Verducci, M.; Verkerke, W.; Vermeulen, J. C.; Vertogardov, L.; Vetterli, M. C.; Vichou, I.; Vickey, T.; Viehhauser, G. H. A.; Vigeolas, E.; Villa, M.; Villani, E. G.; Villate, J.; Villella, I.; Vilucchi, E.; Vincent, P.; Vincke, H.; Vincter, M. G.; Vinogradov, V. B.; Virchaux, M.; Viret, S.; Virzi, J.; Vitale, A.; Vivarelli, I.; Vives, R.; Vives Vaques, F.; Vlachos, S.; Vogt, H.; Vokac, P.; Vollmer, C. F.; Volpi, M.; Volpini, G.; von Boehn-Buchholz, R.; von der Schmitt, H.; von Toerne, E.; Vorobel, V.; Vorobiev, A. P.; Vorozhtsov, A. S.; Vorozhtsov, S. B.; Vos, M.; Voss, K. C.; Voss, R.; Vossebeld, J. H.; Vovenko, A. S.; Vranjes, N.; Vrba, V.; Vreeswijk, M.; Anh, T. Vu; Vuaridel, B.; Vudragovic, M.; Vuillemin, V.; Vuillermet, R.; Wänanen, A.; Wahlen, H.; Walbersloh, J.; Walker, R.; Walkowiak, W.; Wall, R.; Wallny, R. S.; Walsh, S.; Wang, C.; Wang, J. C.; Wappler, F.; Warburton, A.; Ward, C. P.; Warner, G. P.; Warren, M.; Warsinsky, M.; Wastie, R.; Watkins, P. M.; Watson, A. T.; Watts, G.; Waugh, A. T.; Waugh, B. M.; Weaverdyck, C.; Webel, M.; Weber, G.; Weber, J.; Weber, M.; Weber, P.; Weidberg, A. R.; Weilhammer, P. M.; Weingarten, J.; Weiser, C.; Wellenstein, H.; Wellisch, H. P.; Wells, P. S.; Wemans, A.; Wen, M.; Wenaus, T.; Wendler, S.; Wengler, T.; Wenig, S.; Wermes, N.; Werneke, P.; Werner, P.; Werthenbach, U.; Wheeler-Ellis, S. J.; Whitaker, S. P.; White, A.; White, M. J.; White, S.; Whittington, D.; Wicek, F.; Wicke, D.; Wickens, F. J.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wielers, M.; Wienemann, P.; Wiesmann, M.; Wiesmann, M.; Wijnen, T.; Wildauer, A.; Wilhelm, I.; Wilkens, H. G.; Williams, H. H.; Willis, W.; Willocq, S.; Wilmut, I.; Wilson, J. A.; Wilson, A.; Wingerter-Seez, I.; Winton, L.; Witzeling, W.; Wlodek, T.; Woehrling, E.; Wolter, M. W.; Wolters, H.; Wosiek, B.; Wotschack, J.; Woudstra, M. J.; Wright, C.; Wu, S. L.; Wu, X.; Wuestenfeld, J.; Wunstorf, R.; Xella-Hansen, S.; Xiang, A.; Xie, S.; Xie, Y.; Xu, G.; Xu, N.; Yamamoto, A.; Yamamoto, S.; Yamaoka, H.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yan, Z.; Yang, H.; Yang, J. C.; Yang, S.; Yang, U. K.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Z.; Yao, W.-M.; Yao, Y.; Yarradoddi, K.; Yasu, Y.; Ye, J.; Yilmaz, M.; Yoosoofmiya, R.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, H.; Yoshida, R.; Young, C.; Youssef, S. P.; Yu, D.; Yu, J.; Yu, M.; Yu, X.; Yuan, J.; Yurkewicz, A.; Zaets, V. G.; Zaidan, R.; Zaitsev, A. M.; Zajac, J.; Zajacova, Z.; Zalite, A. Yu; Zalite, Yo K.; Zanello, L.; Zarzhitsky, P.; Zaytsev, A.; Zdrazil, M.; Zeitnitz, C.; Zeller, M.; Zema, P. F.; Zendler, C.; Zenin, A. V.; Zenis, T.; Zenonos, Z.; Zenz, S.; Zerwas, D.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, J.; Zheng, W.; Zhang, X.; Zhao, L.; Zhao, T.; Zhao, X.; Zhao, Z.; Zhelezko, A.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zheng, S.; Zhichao, L.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, N.; Zhou, S.; Zhou, Y.; Zhu, C. G.; Zhu, H. Z.; Zhuang, X. A.; Zhuravlov, V.; Zilka, B.; Zimin, N. I.; Zimmermann, S.; Ziolkowski, M.; Zitoun, R.; Zivkovic, L.; Zmouchko, V. V.; Zobernig, G.; Zoccoli, A.; Zoeller, M. M.; Zolnierowski, Y.; Zsenei, A.; zur Nedden, M.; Zychacek, V.

    2008-08-01

    The ATLAS detector as installed in its experimental cavern at point 1 at CERN is described in this paper. A brief overview of the expected performance of the detector when the Large Hadron Collider begins operation is also presented.

  10. Intriguing aspects of strangeness production at CERN energies

    SciTech Connect

    Odyniec, G.

    1996-07-01

    Strange particle production in pp, pA and AA collisions at CERN SPS energies is reviewed. First results from Pb beam experiments are briefly presented. The emerging picture (still incomplete) is discussed.

  11. Prospects for observation at CERN in NA62

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahn, F.; NA62 Collaboration; Aglieri Rinella, G.; Aliberti, R.; Ambrosino, F.; Angelucci, B.; Antonelli, A.; Anzivino, G.; Arcidiacono, R.; Azhinenko, I.; Balev, S.; Bendotti, J.; Biagioni, A.; Biino, C.; Bizzeti, A.; Blazek, T.; Blik, A.; Bloch-Devaux, B.; Bolotov, V.; Bonaiuto, V.; Bragadireanu, M.; Britton, D.; Britvich, G.; Brook, N.; Bucci, F.; Butin, F.; Capitolo, E.; Capoccia, C.; Capussela, T.; Carassiti, V.; Cartiglia, N.; Cassese, A.; Catinaccio, A.; Cecchetti, A.; Ceccucci, A.; Cenci, P.; Cerny, V.; Cerri, C.; Chikilev, O.; Ciaranfi, R.; Collazuol, G.; Cooke, P.; Cooper, P.; Corradi, G.; Cortina Gil, E.; Costantini, F.; Cotta Ramusino, A.; Coward, D.; D'Agostini, G.; Dainton, J.; Dalpiaz, P.; Danielsson, H.; Degrange, J.; De Simone, N.; Di Filippo, D.; Di Lella, L.; Dixon, N.; Doble, N.; Duk, V.; Elsha, V.; Engelfried, J.; Enik, T.; Falaleev, V.; Fantechi, R.; Federici, L.; Fiorini, M.; Fry, J.; Fucci, A.; Fulton, L.; Gallorini, S.; Gatignon, L.; Gianoli, A.; Giudici, S.; Glonti, L.; Goncalves Martins, A.; Gonnella, F.; Goudzovski, E.; Guida, R.; Gushchin, E.; Hahn, F.; Hallgren, B.; Heath, H.; Herman, F.; Hutchcroft, D.; Iacopini, E.; Jamet, O.; Jarron, P.; Kampf, K.; Kaplon, J.; Karjavin, V.; Kekelidze, V.; Kholodenko, S.; Khoriauli, G.; Khudyakov, A.; Kiryushin, Yu; Kleinknecht, K.; Kluge, A.; Koval, M.; Kozhuharov, V.; Krivda, M.; Kudenko, Y.; Kunze, J.; Lamanna, G.; Lazzeroni, C.; Leitner, R.; Lenci, R.; Lenti, M.; Leonardi, E.; Lichard, P.; Lietava, R.; Litov, L.; Lomidze, D.; Lonardo, A.; Lurkin, N.; Madigozhin, D.; Maire, G.; Makarov, A.; Mannelli, I.; Mannocchi, G.; Mapelli, A.; Marchetto, F.; Massarotti, P.; Massri, K.; Matak, P.; Mazza, G.; Menichetti, E.; Mirra, M.; Misheva, M.; Molokanova, N.; Morant, J.; Morel, M.; Moulson, M.; Movchan, S.; Munday, D.; Napolitano, M.; Newson, F.; Norton, A.; Noy, M.; Nuessle, G.; Obraztsov, V.; Padolski, S.; Page, R.; Palladino, V.; Pardons, A.; Pedreschi, E.; Pepe, M.; Perez Gomez, F.; Perrin-Terrin, M.; Petrov, P.; Petrucci, F.; Piandani, R.; Piccini, M.; Pietreanu, D.; Pinzino, J.; Pivanti, M.; Polenkevich, I.; Popov, I.; Potrebenikov, Yu; Protopopescu, D.; Raffaelli, F.; Raggi, M.; Riedler, P.; Romano, A.; Rubin, P.; Ruggiero, G.; Russo, V.; Ryjov, V.; Salamon, A.; Salina, G.; Samsonov, V.; Santovetti, E.; Saracino, G.; Sargeni, F.; Schifano, S.; Semenov, V.; Sergi, A.; Serra, M.; Shkarovskiy, S.; Sotnikov, A.; Sougonyaev, V.; Sozzi, M.; Spadaro, T.; Spinella, F.; Staley, R.; Statera, M.; Sutcliffe, P.; Szilasi, N.; Tagnani, D.; Valdata-Nappi, M.; Valente, P.; Vasile, M.; Vassilieva, V.; Velghe, B.; Veltri, M.; Venditti, S.; Vormstein, M.; Wahl, H.; Wanke, R.; Wertelaers, P.; Winhart, A.; Winston, R.; Wrona, B.; Yushchenko, O.; Zamkovsky, M.; Zinchenko, A.

    2015-07-01

    The rare decays are excellent processes to probe the Standard Model and indirectly search for new physics complementary to the direct LHC searches. The NA62 experiment at CERN SPS aims to collect and analyse O(1013) kaon decays before the CERN long-shutdown 2 (in 2018). This will allow to measure the branching ratio to a level of 10% accuracy. The experimental apparatus has been commissioned during a first run in autumn 2014.

  12. CERN and 60 years of science for peace

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heuer, Rolf-Dieter

    2015-02-01

    This paper presents CERN as it celebrates its 60th Anniversary since its founding. The presentation first discusses the mission of CERN and its role as an inter-governmental Organization. The paper also reviews aspects of the particle physics research programme, looking at both current and future accelerator-based facilities at the high-energy and intensity frontiers. Finally, the paper considers issues beyond fundamental research, such as capacity-building and the interface between Art and Science.

  13. CERN and 60 years of science for peace

    SciTech Connect

    Heuer, Rolf-Dieter

    2015-02-24

    This paper presents CERN as it celebrates its 60{sup th} Anniversary since its founding. The presentation first discusses the mission of CERN and its role as an inter-governmental Organization. The paper also reviews aspects of the particle physics research programme, looking at both current and future accelerator-based facilities at the high-energy and intensity frontiers. Finally, the paper considers issues beyond fundamental research, such as capacity-building and the interface between Art and Science.

  14. HIGH ENERGY PHYSICS: Bulgarians Sue CERN for Leniency.

    PubMed

    Koenig, R

    2000-10-13

    In cash-strapped Bulgaria, scientists are wondering whether a ticket for a front-row seat in high-energy physics is worth the price: Membership dues in CERN, the European particle physics lab, nearly equal the country's entire budget for competitive research grants. Faced with that grim statistic and a plea for leniency from Bulgaria's government, CERN's governing council is considering slashing the country's membership dues for the next 2 years.

  15. Unique expansions and intersections of Cantor sets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Simon; Kong, Derong

    2017-04-01

    To each α \\in (1/3,1/2) we associate the Cantor set Γα:={∑i=1∞ɛiαi:ɛi∈{0,1}, i⩾1}. In this paper we consider the intersection {{ Γ }α}{\\cap}≤ft({{ Γ }α}+t\\right) for any translation t\\in {R} . We pay special attention to those t with a unique {‑1, 0, 1} α-expansion, and study the set Dα:={dimH(Γα∩(Γα+t)):t has a unique {‑1,0,1} α-expansion}. We prove that there exists a transcendental number {αKL}≈ 0.394 33\\ldots such that: {{D}α} is finite for α \\in ≤ft({αKL},1/2\\right), {{D}{αKL}}} is infinitely countable, and {{D}α} contains an interval for α \\in ≤ft(1/3,{{αKL}\\right). We also prove that {{D}α} equals ≤ft[0,\\frac{log 2}{-log α}\\right] if and only if α \\in ≤ft(1/3,\\frac{3-\\sqrt{5}}{2}\\right] . As a consequence of our investigation we prove some results on the possible values of \\text{di}{{\\text{m}}H}≤ft({{ Γ }α}{\\cap}≤ft({{ Γ }α}+t\\right)\\right) when {{ Γ }α}{\\cap}≤ft({{ Γ }α}+t\\right) is a self-similar set. We also give examples of t with a continuum of {‑1, 0, 1} α-expansions for which we can explicitly calculate \\text{di}{{\\text{m}}H}≤ft({{ Γ }α}{\\cap}≤ft({{ Γ }α}+t\\right)\\right), and for which {{ Γ }α}{\\cap}≤ft({{ Γ }α}+t\\right) is a self-similar set. We also construct α and t for which {{ Γ }α}{\\cap}≤ft({{ Γ }α}+t\\right) contains only transcendental numbers. Our approach makes use of digit frequency arguments and a lexicographic characterisation of those t with a unique {‑1, 0, 1} α-expansion.

  16. The SHiP project at CERN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Lellis, G.; SHiP Collaboration

    2016-07-01

    The discovery of the Higgs boson has fully confirmed the Standard Model of particles and fields. Nevertheless, there are still fundamental phenomena, like the existence of dark matter and the baryon asymmetry, which deserve an explanation that could come from the discovery of new particles. Searches for new physics with accelerators are performed at the LHC, looking for high massive particles coupled to matter with ordinary strength. A new experimental facility at CERN meant to search for very weakly coupled particles in the few GeV mass domain has been recently proposed. The existence of such particles, foreseen in different theoretical models beyond the Standard Model, is largely unexplored. A beam dump facility using 400 GeV protons is a copious factory of charmed hadrons and could be used to probe the existence of such particles. The beam dump is also a copious source of neutrinos and in particular it is an ideal source of tau neutrinos, the less known particle in the Standard Model. Indeed, tau anti-neutrinos have not been directly observed so far. We report the physics potential of such an experiment. Resistive Plate Chambers could play a role in the SHiP detector.

  17. Continue Service Improvement at CERN Computing Centre

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barroso Lopez, M.; Everaerts, L.; Meinhard, H.; Baehler, P.; Haimyr, N.; Guijarro, J. M.

    2014-06-01

    Using the framework of ITIL best practises, the service managers within CERN-IT have engaged into a continuous improvement process, mainly focusing on service operation. This implies an explicit effort to understand and improve all service management aspects in order to increase efficiency and effectiveness. We will present the requirements, how they were addressed and share our experiences. We will describe how we measure, report and use the data to continually improve both the processes and the services being provided. The focus is not the tool or the process, but the results of the continuous improvement effort from a large team of IT experts providing services to thousands of users, supported by the tool and its local team. This is not an initiative to address user concerns in the way the services are managed but rather an on-going working habit of continually reviewing, analysing and improving the service management processes and the services themselves, having in mind the currently agreed service levels and whose results also improve the experience of the users about the current services.

  18. The SHiP experiment at CERN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Lellis, G.; SHiP Collaboration

    2017-04-01

    The discovery of the Higgs boson has fully confirmed the Standard Model of particles and fields. Nevertheless, there are still fundamental phenomena, like the existence of dark matter and the baryon asymmetry of the Universe, which deserve an explanation that could come from the discovery of new particles. Searches for new physics with accelerators are performed at the LHC, looking for high massive particles coupled to matter with ordinary strength. A new experiment at CERN meant to search for very weakly coupled particles in the few GeV mass domain has been recently proposed. The existence of such particles, foreseen in different theoretical models beyond the Standard Model, is largely unexplored. A beam dump facility using high intensity 400 GeV protons is a copious source of such unknown particles in the GeV mass range. The beam dump is also a copious source of neutrinos and in particular it is an ideal source of tau neutrinos, the less known particle in the Standard Model. Indeed, tau anti-neutrinos have not been directly observed so far. We report the physics potential of such an experiment.

  19. Nuclear orientation at isolde/cern

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlösser, K.; Berkes, I.; Hagn, E.; Herzog, P.; Niinikoski, T.; Postma, H.; Richard-Serre, C.; Rikovska, J.; Stone, N. J.; Vanneste, L.; Zech, E.

    1988-12-01

    A facility for Nuclear Implantation into Cold On-Line Equipment (NICOLE) is being installed at the new on-line isotope separator ISOLDE 3 at CERN. The first on-line run was in the beginning of July 1988. The low temperature equipment has been successfully tested and first off-line experiments on various isotopes have been performed. NMR/ON has been done on vaious isotopes (Co, Xe, Pt, Au) in iron host. First experience with the top-loading dilution refrigertor (Oxford Instruments Limited) shows that it performs very well. The cooling power is 400 μW at 100 mK and 34 μW at 25 mK. The base temperature can be kept continuously well below 5 mK. NMR/ON can be performed at temperatures below 5.5 mK. The base temperature on-line is expected to be lower then 6 mK. The sample can be cooled down from room temperature to 10 mK within two hours, to 6 mK within 3 hours which is not only important for off-line but also for on-line experiments when samples have to be changed to remove long lived daughter activity. The latest results will be reported.

  20. Recent highlights from ISOLDE@CERN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fraile, L. M.

    2005-09-01

    The ISOLDE online mass separator located at CERN provides a large variety of radioactive ion beams for research on nuclear physics, nuclear astrophysics, fundamental interactions, atomic physics, radiochemistry, nuclear medicine, condensed matter science, life sciences and others. The recently operational REX-ISOLDE post-accelerator is capable of accelerating the isotopes produced at ISOLDE to energies of up to 3.0MeV/u by using an ion trap and charge breeder and a compact linear accelerator structure. The post-accelerator is complemented by a highly segmented Ge array in conjunction with a compact silicon strip detector at one of the secondary target positions, while a general spectroscopy setup occupies a second station. REX-ISOLDE has opened up the possibility of nuclear spectroscopy studies by means of transfer reactions and Coulomb excitation of exotic nuclei. The facility maintains an extensive physics-driven target and ion source development program, which has helped ISOLDE keep its international status for more than 35 years. Some recent experimental highlights and technical developments are discussed.

  1. The SHiP experiment at CERN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonivento, Walter M.

    2017-07-01

    The discovery of the Higgs boson has fully confirmed the Standard Model of particles and fields. Nevertheless, there are still fundamental phenomena, like the existence of dark matter and the baryon asymmetry of the Universe, deserving an explanation that could come from the discovery of new particles. Searches for new physics with accelerators are performed at the LHC, looking for high massive particles coupled to matter with ordinary strength. A new experiment at CERN meant to search for very weakly coupled particles in the few GeV mass domain has been recently proposed. The existence of such particles, foreseen in different theoretical models beyond the Standard Model, is largely unexplored. A beam dump facility using high intensity 400 GeV protons is a copious source of such unknown particles in the GeV mass range. The beam dump is also a copious source of neutrinos and in particular it is an ideal source of tau neutrinos, the less known particle in the Standard Model. The neutrino detector can also search for dark matter through its scattering off the electrons. We report the physics potential of the SHiP experiment.

  2. The CMS experiment at the CERN LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    CMS Collaboration; Chatrchyan, S.; Hmayakyan, G.; Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Adam, W.; Bauer, T.; Bergauer, T.; Bergauer, H.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Friedl, M.; Frühwirth, R.; Ghete, V. M.; Glaser, P.; Hartl, C.; Hoermann, N.; Hrubec, J.; Hänsel, S.; Jeitler, M.; Kastner, K.; Krammer, M.; Magrans de Abril, I.; Markytan, M.; Mikulec, I.; Neuherz, B.; Nöbauer, T.; Oberegger, M.; Padrta, M.; Pernicka, M.; Porth, P.; Rohringer, H.; Schmid, S.; Schreiner, T.; Stark, R.; Steininger, H.; Strauss, J.; Taurok, A.; Uhl, D.; Waltenberger, W.; Walzel, G.; Widl, E.; Wulz, C.-E.; Petrov, V.; Prosolovich, V.; Chekhovsky, V.; Dvornikov, O.; Emeliantchik, I.; Litomin, A.; Makarenko, V.; Marfin, I.; Mossolov, V.; Shumeiko, N.; Solin, A.; Stefanovitch, R.; Suarez Gonzalez, J.; Tikhonov, A.; Fedorov, A.; Korzhik, M.; Missevitch, O.; Zuyeuski, R.; Beaumont, W.; Cardaci, M.; DeLanghe, E.; DeWolf, E. A.; Delmeire, E.; Ochesanu, S.; Tasevsky, M.; Van Mechelen, P.; D'Hondt, J.; DeWeirdt, S.; Devroede, O.; Goorens, R.; Hannaert, S.; Heyninck, J.; Maes, J.; Mozer, M. U.; Tavernier, S.; Van Doninck, W.; Van Lancker, L.; Van Mulders, P.; Villella, I.; Wastiels, C.; Yu, C.; Bouhali, O.; Charaf, O.; Clerbaux, B.; DeHarenne, P.; DeLentdecker, G.; Dewulf, J. P.; Elgammal, S.; Gindroz, R.; Hammad, G. H.; Mahmoud, T.; Neukermans, L.; Pins, M.; Pins, R.; Rugovac, S.; Stefanescu, J.; Sundararajan, V.; Vander Velde, C.; Vanlaer, P.; Wickens, J.; Tytgat, M.; Assouak, S.; Bonnet, J. L.; Bruno, G.; Caudron, J.; DeCallatay, B.; DeFavereau DeJeneret, J.; DeVisscher, S.; Demin, P.; Favart, D.; Felix, C.; Florins, B.; Forton, E.; Giammanco, A.; Grégoire, G.; Jonckman, M.; Kcira, D.; Keutgen, T.; Lemaitre, V.; Michotte, D.; Militaru, O.; Ovyn, S.; Pierzchala, T.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Roberfroid, V.; Rouby, X.; Schul, N.; Van der Aa, O.; Beliy, N.; Daubie, E.; Herquet, P.; Alves, G.; Pol, M. E.; Souza, M. H. G.; Vaz, M.; DeJesus Damiao, D.; Oguri, V.; Santoro, A.; Sznajder, A.; DeMoraes Gregores, E.; Iope, R. L.; Novaes, S. F.; Tomei, T.; Anguelov, T.; Antchev, G.; Atanasov, I.; Damgov, J.; Darmenov, N.; Dimitrov, L.; Genchev, V.; Iaydjiev, P.; Marinov, A.; Piperov, S.; Stoykova, S.; Sultanov, G.; Trayanov, R.; Vankov, I.; Cheshkov, C.; Dimitrov, A.; Dyulendarova, M.; Glushkov, I.; Kozhuharov, V.; Litov, L.; Makariev, M.; Marinova, E.; Markov, S.; Mateev, M.; Nasteva, I.; Pavlov, B.; Petev, P.; Petkov, P.; Spassov, V.; Toteva, Z.; Velev, V.; Verguilov, V.; Bian, J. G.; Chen, G. M.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, M.; Jiang, C. H.; Liu, B.; Shen, X. Y.; Sun, H. S.; Tao, J.; Wang, J.; Yang, M.; Zhang, Z.; Zhao, W. R.; Zhuang, H. L.; Ban, Y.; Cai, J.; Ge, Y. C.; Liu, S.; Liu, H. T.; Liu, L.; Qian, S. J.; Wang, Q.; Xue, Z. H.; Yang, Z. C.; Ye, Y. L.; Ying, J.; Li, P. J.; Liao, J.; Xue, Z. L.; Yan, D. S.; Yuan, H.; Carrillo Montoya, C. A.; Sanabria, J. C.; Godinovic, N.; Puljak, I.; Soric, I.; Antunovic, Z.; Dzelalija, M.; Marasovic, K.; Brigljevic, V.; Kadija, K.; Morovic, S.; Fereos, R.; Nicolaou, C.; Papadakis, A.; Ptochos, F.; Razis, P. A.; Tsiakkouri, D.; Zinonos, Z.; Hektor, A.; Kadastik, M.; Kannike, K.; Lippmaa, E.; Müntel, M.; Raidal, M.; Rebane, L.; Aarnio, P. A.; Anttila, E.; Banzuzi, K.; Bulteau, P.; Czellar, S.; Eiden, N.; Eklund, C.; Engstrom, P.; Heikkinen, A.; Honkanen, A.; Härkönen, J.; Karimäki, V.; Katajisto, H. M.; Kinnunen, R.; Klem, J.; Kortesmaa, J.; Kotamäki, M.; Kuronen, A.; Lampén, T.; Lassila-Perini, K.; Lefébure, V.; Lehti, S.; Lindén, T.; Luukka, P. R.; Michal, S.; Moura Brigido, F.; Mäenpää, T.; Nyman, T.; Nystén, J.; Pietarinen, E.; Skog, K.; Tammi, K.; Tuominen, E.; Tuominiemi, J.; Ungaro, D.; Vanhala, T. P.; Wendland, L.; Williams, C.; Iskanius, M.; Korpela, A.; Polese, G.; Tuuva, T.; Bassompierre, G.; Bazan, A.; David, P. Y.; Ditta, J.; Drobychev, G.; Fouque, N.; Guillaud, J. P.; Hermel, V.; Karneyeu, A.; LeFlour, T.; Lieunard, S.; Maire, M.; Mendiburu, P.; Nedelec, P.; Peigneux, J. P.; Schneegans, M.; Sillou, D.; Vialle, J. P.; Anfreville, M.; Bard, J. P.; Besson, P.; Bougamont, E.; Boyer, M.; Bredy, P.; Chipaux, R.; Dejardin, M.; Denegri, D.; Descamps, J.; Fabbro, B.; Faure, J. L.; Ganjour, S.; Gentit, F. X.; Givernaud, A.; Gras, P.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Jarry, P.; Jeanney, C.; Kircher, F.; Lemaire, M. C.; Lemoigne, Y.; Levesy, B.; Locci, E.; Lottin, J. P.; Mandjavidze, I.; Mur, M.; Pansart, J. P.; Payn, A.; Rander, J.; Reymond, J. M.; Rolquin, J.; Rondeaux, F.; Rosowsky, A.; Rousse, J. Y. A.; Sun, Z. H.; Tartas, J.; Van Lysebetten, A.; Venault, P.; Verrecchia, P.; Anduze, M.; Badier, J.; Baffioni, S.; Bercher, M.; Bernet, C.; Berthon, U.; Bourotte, J.; Busata, A.; Busson, P.; Cerutti, M.; Chamont, D.; Charlot, C.; Collard, C.; Debraine, A.; Decotigny, D.; Dobrzynski, L.; Ferreira, O.; Geerebaert, Y.; Gilly, J.; Gregory, C.; Guevara Riveros, L.; Haguenauer, M.; Karar, A.; Koblitz, B.; Lecouturier, D.; Mathieu, A.; Milleret, G.; Miné, P.; Paganini, P.; Poilleux, P.; Pukhaeva, N.; Regnault, N.; Romanteau, T.; Semeniouk, I.; Sirois, Y.; Thiebaux, C.; Vanel, J. C.; Zabi, A.; Agram, J. L.; Albert, A.; Anckenmann, L.; Andrea, J.; Anstotz, F.; Bergdolt, A. M.; Berst, J. D.; Blaes, R.; Bloch, D.; Brom, J. M.; Cailleret, J.; Charles, F.; Christophel, E.; Claus, G.; Coffin, J.; Colledani, C.; Croix, J.; Dangelser, E.; Dick, N.; Didierjean, F.; Drouhin, F.; Dulinski, W.; Ernenwein, J. P.; Fang, R.; Fontaine, J. C.; Gaudiot, G.; Geist, W.; Gelé, D.; Goeltzenlichter, T.; Goerlach, U.; Graehling, P.; Gross, L.; Hu, C. Guo; Helleboid, J. M.; Henkes, T.; Hoffer, M.; Hoffmann, C.; Hosselet, J.; Houchu, L.; Hu, Y.; Huss, D.; Illinger, C.; Jeanneau, F.; Juillot, P.; Kachelhoffer, T.; Kapp, M. R.; Kettunen, H.; Lakehal Ayat, L.; LeBihan, A. C.; Lounis, A.; Maazouzi, C.; Mack, V.; Majewski, P.; Mangeol, D.; Michel, J.; Moreau, S.; Olivetto, C.; Pallarès, A.; Patois, Y.; Pralavorio, P.; Racca, C.; Riahi, Y.; Ripp-Baudot, I.; Schmitt, P.; Schunck, J. P.; Schuster, G.; Schwaller, B.; Sigward, M. H.; Sohler, J. L.; Speck, J.; Strub, R.; Todorov, T.; Turchetta, R.; Van Hove, P.; Vintache, D.; Zghiche, A.; Ageron, M.; Augustin, J. E.; Baty, C.; Baulieu, G.; Bedjidian, M.; Blaha, J.; Bonnevaux, A.; Boudoul, G.; Brunet, P.; Chabanat, E.; Chabert, E. C.; Chierici, R.; Chorowicz, V.; Combaret, C.; Contardo, D.; Della Negra, R.; Depasse, P.; Drapier, O.; Dupanloup, M.; Dupasquier, T.; El Mamouni, H.; Estre, N.; Fay, J.; Gascon, S.; Giraud, N.; Girerd, C.; Guillot, G.; Haroutunian, R.; Ille, B.; Lethuillier, M.; Lumb, N.; Martin, C.; Mathez, H.; Maurelli, G.; Muanza, S.; Pangaud, P.; Perries, S.; Ravat, O.; Schibler, E.; Schirra, F.; Smadja, G.; Tissot, S.; Trocme, B.; Vanzetto, S.; Walder, J. P.; Bagaturia, Y.; Mjavia, D.; Mzhavia, A.; Tsamalaidze, Z.; Roinishvili, V.; Adolphi, R.; Anagnostou, G.; Brauer, R.; Braunschweig, W.; Esser, H.; Feld, L.; Karpinski, W.; Khomich, A.; Klein, K.; Kukulies, C.; Lübelsmeyer, K.; Olzem, J.; Ostaptchouk, A.; Pandoulas, D.; Pierschel, G.; Raupach, F.; Schael, S.; Schultz von Dratzig, A.; Schwering, G.; Siedling, R.; Thomas, M.; Weber, M.; Wittmer, B.; Wlochal, M.; Adamczyk, F.; Adolf, A.; Altenhöfer, G.; Bechstein, S.; Bethke, S.; Biallass, P.; Biebel, O.; Bontenackels, M.; Bosseler, K.; Böhm, A.; Erdmann, M.; Faissner, H.; Fehr, B.; Fesefeldt, H.; Fetchenhauer, G.; Frangenheim, J.; Frohn, J. H.; Grooten, J.; Hebbeker, T.; Hermann, S.; Hermens, E.; Hilgers, G.; Hoepfner, K.; Hof, C.; Jacobi, E.; Kappler, S.; Kirsch, M.; Kreuzer, P.; Kupper, R.; Lampe, H. R.; Lanske, D.; Mameghani, R.; Meyer, A.; Meyer, S.; Moers, T.; Müller, E.; Pahlke, R.; Philipps, B.; Rein, D.; Reithler, H.; Reuter, W.; Rütten, P.; Schulz, S.; Schwarthoff, H.; Sobek, W.; Sowa, M.; Stapelberg, T.; Szczesny, H.; Teykal, H.; Teyssier, D.; Tomme, H.; Tomme, W.; Tonutti, M.; Tsigenov, O.; Tutas, J.; Vandenhirtz, J.; Wagner, H.; Wegner, M.; Zeidler, C.; Beissel, F.; Davids, M.; Duda, M.; Flügge, G.; Giffels, M.; Hermanns, T.; Heydhausen, D.; Kalinin, S.; Kasselmann, S.; Kaussen, G.; Kress, T.; Linn, A.; Nowack, A.; Perchalla, L.; Poettgens, M.; Pooth, O.; Sauerland, P.; Stahl, A.; Tornier, D.; Zoeller, M. H.; Behrens, U.; Borras, K.; Flossdorf, A.; Hatton, D.; Hegner, B.; Kasemann, M.; Mankel, R.; Meyer, A.; Mnich, J.; Rosemann, C.; Youngman, C.; Zeuner, W. D.; Bechtel, F.; Buhmann, P.; Butz, E.; Flucke, G.; Hamdorf, R. H.; Holm, U.; Klanner, R.; Pein, U.; Schirm, N.; Schleper, P.; Steinbrück, G.; Van Staa, R.; Wolf, R.; Atz, B.; Barvich, T.; Blüm, P.; Boegelspacher, F.; Bol, H.; Chen, Z. Y.; Chowdhury, S.; DeBoer, W.; Dehm, P.; Dirkes, G.; Fahrer, M.; Felzmann, U.; Frey, M.; Furgeri, A.; Gregoriev, E.; Hartmann, F.; Hauler, F.; Heier, S.; Kärcher, K.; Ledermann, B.; Mueller, S.; Müller, Th; Neuberger, D.; Piasecki, C.; Quast, G.; Rabbertz, K.; Sabellek, A.; Scheurer, A.; Schilling, F. P.; Simonis, H. J.; Skiba, A.; Steck, P.; Theel, A.; Thümmel, W. H.; Trunov, A.; Vest, A.; Weiler, T.; Weiser, C.; Weseler, S.; Zhukov, V.; Barone, M.; Daskalakis, G.; Dimitriou, N.; Fanourakis, G.; Filippidis, C.; Geralis, T.; Kalfas, C.; Karafasoulis, K.; Koimas, A.; Kyriakis, A.; Kyriazopoulou, S.; Loukas, D.; Markou, A.; Markou, C.; Mastroyiannopoulos, N.; Mavrommatis, C.; Mousa, J.; Papadakis, I.; Petrakou, E.; Siotis, I.; Theofilatos, K.; Tzamarias, S.; Vayaki, A.; Vermisoglou, G.; Zachariadou, A.; Gouskos, L.; Karapostoli, G.; Katsas, P.; Panagiotou, A.; Papadimitropoulos, C.; Aslanoglou, X.; Evangelou, I.; Kokkas, P.; Manthos, N.; Papadopoulos, I.; Triantis, F. A.; Bencze, G.; Boldizsar, L.; Debreczeni, G.; Hajdu, C.; Hidas, P.; Horvath, D.; Kovesarki, P.; Laszlo, A.; Odor, G.; Patay, G.; Sikler, F.; Veres, G.; Vesztergombi, G.; Zalan, P.; Fenyvesi, A.; Imrek, J.; Molnar, J.; Novak, D.; Palinkas, J.; Szekely, G.; Beni, N.; Kapusi, A.; Marian, G.; Radics, B.; Raics, P.; Szabo, Z.; Szillasi, Z.; Trocsanyi, Z. L.; Zilizi, G.; Bawa, H. S.; Beri, S. B.; Bhandari, V.; Bhatnagar, V.; Kaur, M.; Kohli, J. M.; Kumar, A.; Singh, B.; Singh, J. B.; Arora, S.; Bhattacharya, S.; Chatterji, S.; Chauhan, S.; Choudhary, B. C.; Gupta, P.; Jha, M.; Ranjan, K.; Shivpuri, R. K.; Srivastava, A. K.; Choudhury, R. K.; Dutta, D.; Ghodgaonkar, M.; Kailas, S.; Kataria, S. K.; Mohanty, A. K.; Pant, L. M.; Shukla, P.; Topkar, A.; Aziz, T.; Banerjee, Sunanda; Bose, S.; Chendvankar, S.; Deshpande, P. V.; Guchait, M.; Gurtu, A.; Maity, M.; Majumder, G.; Mazumdar, K.; Nayak, A.; Patil, M. R.; Sharma, S.; Sudhakar, K.; Acharya, B. S.; Banerjee, Sudeshna; Bheesette, S.; Dugad, S.; Kalmani, S. D.; Lakkireddi, V. R.; Mondal, N. K.; Panyam, N.; Verma, P.; Arfaei, H.; Hashemi, M.; Najafabadi, M. Mohammadi; Moshaii, A.; Paktinat Mehdiabadi, S.; Felcini, M.; Grunewald, M.; Abadjiev, K.; Abbrescia, M.; Barbone, L.; Cariola, P.; Chiumarulo, F.; Clemente, A.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; DeFilippis, N.; DePalma, M.; DeRobertis, G.; Donvito, G.; Ferorelli, R.; Fiore, L.; Franco, M.; Giordano, D.; Guida, R.; Iaselli, G.; Lacalamita, N.; Loddo, F.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; Manna, N.; Marangelli, B.; Mennea, M. S.; My, S.; Natali, S.; Nuzzo, S.; Papagni, G.; Pinto, C.; Pompili, A.; Pugliese, G.; Ranieri, A.; Romano, F.; Roselli, G.; Sala, G.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Tempesta, P.; Trentadue, R.; Tupputi, S.; Zito, G.; Abbiendi, G.; Bacchi, W.; Battilana, C.; Benvenuti, A. C.; Boldini, M.; Bonacorsi, D.; Braibant-Giacomelli, S.; Cafaro, V. D.; Capiluppi, P.; Castro, A.; Cavallo, F. R.; Ciocca, C.; Codispoti, G.; Cuffiani, M.; D'Antone, I.; Dallavalle, G. M.; Fabbri, F.; Fanfani, A.; Finelli, S.; Giacomelli, P.; Giordano, V.; Giunta, M.; Grandi, C.; Guerzoni, M.; Guiducci, L.; Marcellini, S.; Masetti, G.; Montanari, A.; Navarria, F. L.; Odorici, F.; Paolucci, A.; Pellegrini, G.; Perrotta, A.; Rossi, A. M.; Rovelli, T.; Siroli, G. P.; Torromeo, G.; Travaglini, R.; Veronese, G. P.; Albergo, S.; Chiorboli, M.; Costa, S.; Galanti, M.; Gatto Rotondo, G.; Giudice, N.; Guardone, N.; Noto, F.; Potenza, R.; Saizu, M. A.; Salemi, G.; Sutera, C.; Tricomi, A.; Tuve, C.; Bellucci, L.; Brianzi, M.; Broccolo, G.; Catacchini, E.; Ciulli, V.; Civinini, C.; D'Alessandro, R.; Focardi, E.; Frosali, S.; Genta, C.; Landi, G.; Lenzi, P.; Macchiolo, A.; Maletta, F.; Manolescu, F.; Marchettini, C.; Masetti, L.; Mersi, S.; Meschini, M.; Minelli, C.; Paoletti, S.; Parrini, G.; Scarlini, E.; Sguazzoni, G.; Benussi, L.; Bertani, M.; Bianco, S.; Caponero, M.; Colonna, D.; Daniello, L.; Fabbri, F.; Felli, F.; Giardoni, M.; La Monaca, A.; Ortenzi, B.; Pallotta, M.; Paolozzi, A.; Paris, C.; Passamonti, L.; Pierluigi, D.; Ponzio, B.; Pucci, C.; Russo, A.; Saviano, G.; Fabbricatore, P.; Farinon, S.; Greco, M.; Musenich, R.; Badoer, S.; Berti, L.; Biasotto, M.; Fantinel, S.; Frizziero, E.; Gastaldi, U.; Gulmini, M.; Lelli, F.; Maron, G.; Squizzato, S.; Toniolo, N.; Traldi, S.; Banfi, S.; Bertoni, R.; Bonesini, M.; Carbone, L.; Cerati, G. B.; Chignoli, F.; D'Angelo, P.; DeMin, A.; Dini, P.; Farina, F. M.; Ferri, F.; Govoni, P.; Magni, S.; Malberti, M.; Malvezzi, S.; Mazza, R.; Menasce, D.; Miccio, V.; Moroni, L.; Negri, P.; Paganoni, M.; Pedrini, D.; Pullia, A.; Ragazzi, S.; Redaelli, N.; Rovere, M.; Sala, L.; Sala, S.; Salerno, R.; Tabarelli de Fatis, T.; Tancini, V.; Taroni, S.; Boiano, A.; Cassese, F.; Cassese, C.; Cimmino, A.; D'Aquino, B.; Lista, L.; Lomidze, D.; Noli, P.; Paolucci, P.; Passeggio, G.; Piccolo, D.; Roscilli, L.; Sciacca, C.; Vanzanella, A.; Azzi, P.; Bacchetta, N.; Barcellan, L.; Bellato, M.; Benettoni, M.; Bisello, D.; Borsato, E.; Candelori, A.; Carlin, R.; Castellani, L.; Checchia, P.; Ciano, L.; Colombo, A.; Conti, E.; Da Rold, M.; Dal Corso, F.; DeGiorgi, M.; DeMattia, M.; Dorigo, T.; Dosselli, U.; Fanin, C.; Galet, G.; Gasparini, F.; Gasparini, U.; Giraldo, A.; Giubilato, P.; Gonella, F.; Gresele, A.; Griggio, A.; Guaita, P.; Kaminskiy, A.; Karaevskii, S.; Khomenkov, V.; Kostylev, D.; Lacaprara, S.; Lazzizzera, I.; Lippi, I.; Loreti, M.; Margoni, M.; Martinelli, R.; Mattiazzo, S.; Mazzucato, M.; Meneguzzo, A. T.; Modenese, L.; Montecassiano, F.; Neviani, A.; Nigro, M.; Paccagnella, A.; Pantano, D.; Parenti, A.; Passaseo, M.; Pedrotta, R.; Pegoraro, M.; Rampazzo, G.; Reznikov, S.; Ronchese, P.; Sancho Daponte, A.; Sartori, P.; Stavitskiy, I.; Tessaro, M.; Torassa, E.; Triossi, A.; Vanini, S.; Ventura, S.; Ventura, L.; Verlato, M.; Zago, M.; Zatti, F.; Zotto, P.; Zumerle, G.; Baesso, P.; Belli, G.; Berzano, U.; Bricola, S.; Grelli, A.; Musitelli, G.; Nardò, R.; Necchi, M. M.; Pagano, D.; Ratti, S. P.; Riccardi, C.; Torre, P.; Vicini, A.; Vitulo, P.; Viviani, C.; Aisa, D.; Aisa, S.; Ambroglini, F.; Angarano, M. M.; Babucci, E.; Benedetti, D.; Biasini, M.; Bilei, G. M.; Bizzaglia, S.; Brunetti, M. T.; Caponeri, B.; Checcucci, B.; Covarelli, R.; Dinu, N.; Fanò, L.; Farnesini, L.; Giorgi, M.; Lariccia, P.; Mantovani, G.; Moscatelli, F.; Passeri, D.; Piluso, A.; Placidi, P.; Postolache, V.; Santinelli, R.; Santocchia, A.; Servoli, L.; Spiga, D.; Azzurri, P.; Bagliesi, G.; Balestri, G.; Basti, A.; Bellazzini, R.; Benucci, L.; Bernardini, J.; Berretta, L.; Bianucci, S.; Boccali, T.; Bocci, A.; Borrello, L.; Bosi, F.; Bracci, F.; Brez, A.; Calzolari, F.; Castaldi, R.; Cazzola, U.; Ceccanti, M.; Cecchi, R.; Cerri, C.; Cucoanes, A. S.; Dell'Orso, R.; Dobur, D.; Dutta, S.; Fiori, F.; Foà, L.; Gaggelli, A.; Gennai, S.; Giassi, A.; Giusti, S.; Kartashov, D.; Kraan, A.; Latronico, L.; Ligabue, F.; Linari, S.; Lomtadze, T.; Lungu, G. A.; Magazzu, G.; Mammini, P.; Mariani, F.; Martinelli, G.; Massa, M.; Messineo, A.; Moggi, A.; Palla, F.; Palmonari, F.; Petragnani, G.; Petrucciani, G.; Profeti, A.; Raffaelli, F.; Rizzi, D.; Sanguinetti, G.; Sarkar, S.; Segneri, G.; Sentenac, D.; Serban, A. T.; Slav, A.; Spagnolo, P.; Spandre, G.; Tenchini, R.; Tolaini, S.; Tonelli, G.; Venturi, A.; Verdini, P. G.; Vos, M.; Zaccarelli, L.; Baccaro, S.; Barone, L.; Bartoloni, A.; Borgia, B.; Capradossi, G.; Cavallari, F.; Cecilia, A.; D'Angelo, D.; Dafinei, I.; DelRe, D.; Di Marco, E.; Diemoz, M.; Ferrara, G.; Gargiulo, C.; Guerra, S.; Iannone, M.; Longo, E.; Montecchi, M.; Nuccetelli, M.; Organtini, G.; Palma, A.; Paramatti, R.; Pellegrino, F.; Rahatlou, S.; Rovelli, C.; Safai Tehrani, F.; Zullo, A.; Alampi, G.; Amapane, N.; Arcidiacono, R.; Argiro, S.; Arneodo, M.; Bellan, R.; Benotto, F.; Biino, C.; Bolognesi, S.; Borgia, M. A.; Botta, C.; Brasolin, A.; Cartiglia, N.; Castello, R.; Cerminara, G.; Cirio, R.; Cordero, M.; Costa, M.; Dattola, D.; Daudo, F.; Dellacasa, G.; Demaria, N.; Dughera, G.; Dumitrache, F.; Farano, R.; Ferrero, G.; Filoni, E.; Kostyleva, G.; Larsen, H. E.; Mariotti, C.; Marone, M.; Maselli, S.; Menichetti, E.; Mereu, P.; Migliore, E.; Mila, G.; Monaco, V.; Musich, M.; Nervo, M.; Obertino, M. M.; Panero, R.; Parussa, A.; Pastrone, N.; Peroni, C.; Petrillo, G.; Romero, A.; Ruspa, M.; Sacchi, R.; Scalise, M.; Solano, A.; Staiano, A.; Trapani, P. P.; Trocino, D.; Vaniev, V.; Vilela Pereira, A.; Zampieri, A.; Belforte, S.; Cossutti, F.; Della Ricca, G.; Gobbo, B.; Kavka, C.; Penzo, A.; Kim, Y. E.; Nam, S. K.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, G. N.; Kim, J. C.; Kong, D. J.; Ro, S. R.; Son, D. C.; Park, S. Y.; Kim, Y. J.; Kim, J. Y.; Lim, I. T.; Pac, M. Y.; Lee, S. J.; Jung, S. Y.; Rhee, J. T.; Ahn, S. H.; Hong, B. S.; Jeng, Y. K.; Kang, M. H.; Kim, H. C.; Kim, J. H.; Kim, T. J.; Lee, K. S.; Lim, J. K.; Moon, D. H.; Park, I. C.; Park, S. K.; Ryu, M. S.; Sim, K.-S.; Son, K. J.; Hong, S. J.; Choi, Y. I.; Castilla Valdez, H.; Sanchez Hernandez, A.; Carrillo Moreno, S.; Morelos Pineda, A.; Aerts, A.; Van der Stok, P.; Weffers, H.; Allfrey, P.; Gray, R. N. C.; Hashimoto, M.; Krofcheck, D.; Bell, A. J.; Bernardino Rodrigues, N.; Butler, P. H.; Churchwell, S.; Knegjens, R.; Whitehead, S.; Williams, J. C.; Aftab, Z.; Ahmad, U.; Ahmed, I.; Ahmed, W.; Asghar, M. I.; Asghar, S.; Dad, G.; Hafeez, M.; Hoorani, H. R.; Hussain, I.; Hussain, N.; Iftikhar, M.; Khan, M. S.; Mehmood, K.; Osman, A.; Shahzad, H.; Zafar, A. R.; Ali, A.; Bashir, A.; Jan, A. M.; Kamal, A.; Khan, F.; Saeed, M.; Tanwir, S.; Zafar, M. A.; Blocki, J.; Cyz, A.; Gladysz-Dziadus, E.; Mikocki, S.; Rybczynski, M.; Turnau, J.; Wlodarczyk, Z.; Zychowski, P.; Bunkowski, K.; Cwiok, M.; Czyrkowski, H.; Dabrowski, R.; Dominik, W.; Doroba, K.; Kalinowski, A.; Kierzkowski, K.; Konecki, M.; Krolikowski, J.; Kudla, I. M.; Pietrusinski, M.; Pozniak, K.; Zabolotny, W.; Zych, P.; Gokieli, R.; Goscilo, L.; Górski, M.; Nawrocki, K.; Traczyk, P.; Wrochna, G.; Zalewski, P.; Pozniak, K. T.; Romaniuk, R.; Zabolotny, W. M.; Alemany-Fernandez, R.; Almeida, C.; Almeida, N.; Araujo Vila Verde, A. S.; Barata Monteiro, T.; Bluj, M.; Da Mota Silva, S.; Tinoco Mendes, A. David; Freitas Ferreira, M.; Gallinaro, M.; Husejko, M.; Jain, A.; Kazana, M.; Musella, P.; Nobrega, R.; Rasteiro Da Silva, J.; Ribeiro, P. Q.; Santos, M.; Silva, P.; Silva, S.; Teixeira, I.; Teixeira, J. P.; Varela, J.; Varner, G.; Vaz Cardoso, N.; Altsybeev, I.; Babich, K.; Belkov, A.; Belotelov, I.; Bunin, P.; Chesnevskaya, S.; Elsha, V.; Ershov, Y.; Filozova, I.; Finger, M.; Finger, M., Jr.; Golunov, A.; Golutvin, I.; Gorbounov, N.; Gramenitski, I.; Kalagin, V.; Kamenev, A.; Karjavin, V.; Khabarov, S.; Khabarov, V.; Kiryushin, Y.; Konoplyanikov, V.; Korenkov, V.; Kozlov, G.; Kurenkov, A.; Lanev, A.; Lysiakov, V.; Malakhov, A.; Melnitchenko, I.; Mitsyn, V. V.; Moisenz, K.; Moisenz, P.; Movchan, S.; Nikonov, E.; Oleynik, D.; Palichik, V.; Perelygin, V.; Petrosyan, A.; Rogalev, E.; Samsonov, V.; Savina, M.; Semenov, R.; Sergeev, S.; Shmatov, S.; Shulha, S.; Smirnov, V.; Smolin, D.; Tcheremoukhine, A.; Teryaev, O.; Tikhonenko, E.; Urkinbaev, A.; Vasil'ev, S.; Vishnevskiy, A.; Volodko, A.; Zamiatin, N.; Zarubin, A.; Zarubin, P.; Zubarev, E.; Bondar, N.; Gavrikov, Y.; Golovtsov, V.; Ivanov, Y.; Kim, V.; Kozlov, V.; Lebedev, V.; Makarenkov, G.; Moroz, F.; Neustroev, P.; Obrant, G.; Orishchin, E.; Petrunin, A.; Shcheglov, Y.; Shchetkovskiy, A.; Sknar, V.; Skorobogatov, V.; Smirnov, I.; Sulimov, V.; Tarakanov, V.; Uvarov, L.; Vavilov, S.; Velichko, G.; Volkov, S.; Vorobyev, A.; Chmelev, D.; Druzhkin, D.; Ivanov, A.; Kudinov, V.; Logatchev, O.; Onishchenko, S.; Orlov, A.; Sakharov, V.; Smetannikov, V.; Tikhomirov, A.; Zavodthikov, S.; Andreev, Yu; Anisimov, A.; Duk, V.; Gninenko, S.; Golubev, N.; Gorbunov, D.; Kirsanov, M.; Krasnikov, N.; Matveev, V.; Pashenkov, A.; Pastsyak, A.; Postoev, V. E.; Sadovski, A.; Skassyrskaia, A.; Solovey, Alexander; Solovey, Anatoly; Soloviev, D.; Toropin, A.; Troitsky, S.; Alekhin, A.; Baldov, A.; Epshteyn, V.; Gavrilov, V.; Ilina, N.; Kaftanov, V.; Karpishin, V.; Kiselevich, I.; Kolosov, V.; Kossov, M.; Krokhotin, A.; Kuleshov, S.; Oulianov, A.; Pozdnyakov, A.; Safronov, G.; Semenov, S.; Stepanov, N.; Stolin, V.; Vlasov, E.; Zaytsev, V.; Boos, E.; Dubinin, M.; Dudko, L.; Ershov, A.; Eyyubova, G.; Gribushin, A.; Ilyin, V.; Klyukhin, V.; Kodolova, O.; Kruglov, N. A.; Kryukov, A.; Lokhtin, I.; Malinina, L.; Mikhaylin, V.; Petrushanko, S.; Sarycheva, L.; Savrin, V.; Shamardin, L.; Sherstnev, A.; Snigirev, A.; Teplov, K.; Vardanyan, I.; Fomenko, A. M.; Konovalova, N.; Kozlov, V.; Lebedev, A. I.; Lvova, N.; Rusakov, S. V.; Terkulov, A.; Abramov, V.; Akimenko, S.; Artamonov, A.; Ashimova, A.; Azhgirey, I.; Bitioukov, S.; Chikilev, O.; Datsko, K.; Filine, A.; Godizov, A.; Goncharov, P.; Grishin, V.; Inyakin, A.; Kachanov, V.; Kalinin, A.; Khmelnikov, A.; Konstantinov, D.; Korablev, A.; Krychkine, V.; Krinitsyn, A.; Levine, A.; Lobov, I.; Lukanin, V.; Mel'nik, Y.; Molchanov, V.; Petrov, V.; Petukhov, V.; Pikalov, V.; Ryazanov, A.; Ryutin, R.; Shelikhov, V.; Skvortsov, V.; Slabospitsky, S.; Sobol, A.; Sytine, A.; Talov, V.; Tourtchanovitch, L.; Troshin, S.; Tyurin, N.; Uzunian, A.; Volkov, A.; Zelepoukine, S.; Lukyanov, V.; Mamaeva, G.; Prilutskaya, Z.; Rumyantsev, I.; Sokha, S.; Tataurschikov, S.; Vasilyev, I.; Adzic, P.; Anicin, I.; Djordjevic, M.; Jovanovic, D.; Maletic, D.; Puzovic, J.; Smiljkovic, N.; Aguayo Navarrete, E.; Aguilar-Benitez, M.; Ahijado Munoz, J.; Alarcon Vega, J. M.; Alberdi, J.; Alcaraz Maestre, J.; Aldaya Martin, M.; Arce, P.; Barcala, J. M.; Berdugo, J.; Blanco Ramos, C. L.; Burgos Lazaro, C.; Caballero Bejar, J.; Calvo, E.; Cerrada, M.; Chamizo Llatas, M.; Chercoles Catalán, J. J.; Colino, N.; Daniel, M.; DeLa Cruz, B.; Delgado Peris, A.; Fernandez Bedoya, C.; Ferrando, A.; Fouz, M. C.; Francia Ferrero, D.; Garcia Romero, J.; Garcia-Abia, P.; Gonzalez Lopez, O.; Hernandez, J. M.; Josa, M. I.; Marin, J.; Merino, G.; Molinero, A.; Navarrete, J. J.; Oller, J. C.; Puerta Pelayo, J.; Puras Sanchez, J. C.; Ramirez, J.; Romero, L.; Villanueva Munoz, C.; Willmott, C.; Yuste, C.; Albajar, C.; de Trocóniz, J. F.; Jimenez, I.; Macias, R.; Teixeira, R. F.; Cuevas, J.; Fernández Menéndez, J.; Gonzalez Caballero, I.; Lopez-Garcia, J.; Naves Sordo, H.; Vizan Garcia, J. M.; Cabrillo, I. J.; Calderon, A.; Cano Fernandez, D.; Diaz Merino, I.; Duarte Campderros, J.; Fernandez, M.; Fernandez Menendez, J.; Figueroa, C.; Garcia Moral, L. A.; Gomez, G.; Gomez Casademunt, F.; Gonzalez Sanchez, J.; Gonzalez Suarez, R.; Jorda, C.; Lobelle Pardo, P.; Lopez Garcia, A.; Lopez Virto, A.; Marco, J.; Marco, R.; Martinez Rivero, C.; Martinez Ruiz del Arbol, P.; Matorras, F.; Orviz Fernandez, P.; Patino Revuelta, A.; Rodrigo, T.; Rodriguez Gonzalez, D.; Ruiz Jimeno, A.; Scodellaro, L.; Sobron Sanudo, M.; Vila, I.; Vilar Cortabitarte, R.; Barbero, M.; Goldin, D.; Henrich, B.; Tauscher, L.; Vlachos, S.; Wadhwa, M.; Abbaneo, D.; Abbas, S. M.; Ahmed, I.; Akhtar, S.; Akhtar, M. I.; Albert, E.; Alidra, M.; Ashby, S.; Aspell, P.; Auffray, E.; Baillon, P.; Ball, A.; Bally, S. L.; Bangert, N.; Barillère, R.; Barney, D.; Beauceron, S.; Beaudette, F.; Benelli, G.; Benetta, R.; Benichou, J. L.; Bialas, W.; Bjorkebo, A.; Blechschmidt, D.; Bloch, C.; Bloch, P.; Bonacini, S.; Bos, J.; Bosteels, M.; Boyer, V.; Branson, A.; Breuker, H.; Bruneliere, R.; Buchmuller, O.; Campi, D.; Camporesi, T.; Caner, A.; Cano, E.; Carrone, E.; Cattai, A.; Chatelain, J. P.; Chauvey, M.; Christiansen, T.; Ciganek, M.; Cittolin, S.; Cogan, J.; Conde Garcia, A.; Cornet, H.; Corrin, E.; Corvo, M.; Cucciarelli, S.; Curé, B.; D'Enterria, D.; DeRoeck, A.; de Visser, T.; Delaere, C.; Delattre, M.; Deldicque, C.; Delikaris, D.; Deyrail, D.; Di Vincenzo, S.; Domeniconi, A.; Dos Santos, S.; Duthion, G.; Edera, L. M.; Elliott-Peisert, A.; Eppard, M.; Fanzago, F.; Favre, M.; Foeth, H.; Folch, R.; Frank, N.; Fratianni, S.; Freire, M. A.; Frey, A.; Fucci, A.; Funk, W.; Gaddi, A.; Gagliardi, F.; Gastal, M.; Gateau, M.; Gayde, J. C.; Gerwig, H.; Ghezzi, A.; Gigi, D.; Gill, K.; Giolo-Nicollerat, A. S.; Girod, J. P.; Glege, F.; Glessing, W.; Gomez-Reino Garrido, R.; Goudard, R.; Grabit, R.; Grillet, J. 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F.; Mirabito, L.; Moser, R.; Mossiere, F.; Muffat-Joly, J.; Mulders, M.; Mulon, J.; Murer, E.; Mättig, P.; Oh, A.; Onnela, A.; Oriunno, M.; Orsini, L.; Osborne, J. A.; Paillard, C.; Pal, I.; Papotti, G.; Passardi, G.; Patino-Revuelta, A.; Patras, V.; Perea Solano, B.; Perez, E.; Perinic, G.; Pernot, J. F.; Petagna, P.; Petiot, P.; Petit, P.; Petrilli, A.; Pfeiffer, A.; Piccut, C.; Pimiä, M.; Pintus, R.; Pioppi, M.; Placci, A.; Pollet, L.; Postema, H.; Price, M. J.; Principe, R.; Racz, A.; Radermacher, E.; Ranieri, R.; Raymond, G.; Rebecchi, P.; Rehn, J.; Reynaud, S.; Rezvani Naraghi, H.; Ricci, D.; Ridel, M.; Risoldi, M.; Rodrigues Simoes Moreira, P.; Rohlev, A.; Roiron, G.; Rolandi, G.; Rumerio, P.; Runolfsson, O.; Ryjov, V.; Sakulin, H.; Samyn, D.; Santos Amaral, L. C.; Sauce, H.; Sbrissa, E.; Scharff-Hansen, P.; Schieferdecker, P.; Schlatter, W. D.; Schmitt, B.; Schmuecker, H. 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M.; Caminada, L.; Chen, Z.; Chivarov, N.; Da Silva Di Calafiori, D.; Dambach, S.; Davatz, G.; Delachenal, V.; Della Marina, R.; Dimov, H.; Dissertori, G.; Dittmar, M.; Djambazov, L.; Dröge, M.; Eggel, C.; Ehlers, J.; Eichler, R.; Elmiger, M.; Faber, G.; Freudenreich, K.; Fuchs, J. F.; Georgiev, G. M.; Grab, C.; Haller, C.; Herrmann, J.; Hilgers, M.; Hintz, W.; Hofer, Hans; Hofer, Heinz; Horisberger, U.; Horvath, I.; Hristov, A.; Humbertclaude, C.; Iliev, B.; Kastli, W.; Kruse, A.; Kuipers, J.; Langenegger, U.; Lecomte, P.; Lejeune, E.; Leshev, G.; Lesmond, C.; List, B.; Luckey, P. D.; Lustermann, W.; Maillefaud, J. D.; Marchica, C.; Maurisset, A.; Meier, B.; Milenovic, P.; Milesi, M.; Moortgat, F.; Nanov, I.; Nardulli, A.; Nessi-Tedaldi, F.; Panev, B.; Pape, L.; Pauss, F.; Petrov, E.; Petrov, G.; Peynekov, M. M.; Pitzl, D.; Punz, T.; Riboni, P.; Riedlberger, J.; Rizzi, A.; Ronga, F. J.; Roykov, P. 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V.; Breedon, R.; Case, M.; Chertok, M.; Conway, J.; Cox, P. T.; Dolen, J.; Erbacher, R.; Fisyak, Y.; Friis, E.; Grim, G.; Holbrook, B.; Ko, W.; Kopecky, A.; Lander, R.; Lin, F. C.; Lister, A.; Maruyama, S.; Pellett, D.; Rowe, J.; Searle, M.; Smith, J.; Soha, A.; Squires, M.; Tripathi, M.; Vasquez Sierra, R.; Veelken, C.; Andreev, V.; Arisaka, K.; Bonushkin, Y.; Chandramouly, S.; Cline, D.; Cousins, R.; Erhan, S.; Hauser, J.; Ignatenko, M.; Jarvis, C.; Lisowski, B.; Matthey, C.; Mohr, B.; Mumford, J.; Otwinowski, S.; Pischalnikov, Y.; Rakness, G.; Schlein, P.; Shi, Y.; Tannenbaum, B.; Tucker, J.; Valuev, V.; Wallny, R.; Wang, H. G.; Yang, X.; Zheng, Y.; Andreeva, J.; Babb, J.; Campana, S.; Chrisman, D.; Clare, R.; Ellison, J.; Fortin, D.; Gary, J. W.; Gorn, W.; Hanson, G.; Jeng, G. Y.; Kao, S. C.; Layter, J. G.; Liu, F.; Liu, H.; Luthra, A.; Pasztor, G.; Rick, H.; Satpathy, A.; Shen, B. C.; Stringer, R.; Sytnik, V.; Tran, P.; Villa, S.; Wilken, R.; Wimpenny, S.; Zer-Zion, D.; Branson, J. G.; Coarasa Perez, J. A.; Dusinberre, E.; Kelley, R.; Lebourgeois, M.; Letts, J.; Lipeles, E.; Mangano, B.; Martin, T.; Mojaver, M.; Muelmenstaedt, J.; Norman, M.; Paar, H. P.; Petrucci, A.; Pi, H.; Pieri, M.; Rana, A.; Sani, M.; Sharma, V.; Simon, S.; White, A.; Würthwein, F.; Yagil, A.; Affolder, A.; Allen, A.; Campagnari, C.; D'Alfonso, M.; Dierlamm, A.; Garberson, J.; Hale, D.; Incandela, J.; Kalavase, P.; Koay, S. A.; Kovalskyi, D.; Krutelyov, V.; Kyre, S.; Lamb, J.; Lowette, S.; Nikolic, M.; Pavlunin, V.; Rebassoo, F.; Ribnik, J.; Richman, J.; Rossin, R.; Shah, Y. S.; Stuart, D.; Swain, S.; Vlimant, J. R.; White, D.; Witherell, M.; Bornheim, A.; Bunn, J.; Chen, J.; Denis, G.; Galvez, P.; Gataullin, M.; Legrand, I.; Litvine, V.; Ma, Y.; Mao, R.; Nae, D.; Narsky, I.; Newman, H. B.; Orimoto, T.; Rogan, C.; Shevchenko, S.; Steenberg, C.; Su, X.; Thomas, M.; Timciuc, V.; van Lingen, F.; Veverka, J.; Voicu, B. R.; Weinstein, A.; Wilkinson, R.; Xia, Y.; Yang, Y.; Zhang, L. Y.; Zhu, K.; Zhu, R. Y.; Ferguson, T.; Jang, D. W.; Jun, S. Y.; Paulini, M.; Russ, J.; Terentyev, N.; Vogel, H.; Vorobiev, I.; Bunce, M.; Cumalat, J. P.; Dinardo, M. E.; Drell, B. R.; Ford, W. T.; Givens, K.; Heyburn, B.; Johnson, D.; Nauenberg, U.; Stenson, K.; Wagner, S. R.; Agostino, L.; Alexander, J.; Blekman, F.; Cassel, D.; Das, S.; Duboscq, J. E.; Gibbons, L. K.; Heltsley, B.; Jones, C. D.; Kuznetsov, V.; Patterson, J. R.; Riley, D.; Ryd, A.; Stroiney, S.; Sun, W.; Thom, J.; Vaughan, J.; Wittich, P.; Beetz, C. P.; Cirino, G.; Podrasky, V.; Sanzeni, C.; Winn, D.; Abdullin, S.; Afaq, M. A.; Albrow, M.; Amundson, J.; Apollinari, G.; Atac, M.; Badgett, W.; Bakken, J. A.; Baldin, B.; Banicz, K.; Bauerdick, L. A. T.; Baumbaugh, A.; Berryhill, J.; Bhat, P. C.; Binkley, M.; Bloch, I.; Borcherding, F.; Boubekeur, A.; Bowden, M.; Burkett, K.; Butler, J. N.; Cheung, H. W. K.; Chevenier, G.; Chlebana, F.; Churin, I.; Cihangir, S.; Dagenhart, W.; Demarteau, M.; Dykstra, D.; Eartly, D. P.; Elias, J. E.; Elvira, V. D.; Evans, D.; Fisk, I.; Freeman, J.; Gaines, I.; Gartung, P.; Geurts, F. J. M.; Giacchetti, L.; Glenzinski, D. A.; Gottschalk, E.; Grassi, T.; Green, D.; Grimm, C.; Guo, Y.; Gutsche, O.; Hahn, A.; Hanlon, J.; Harris, R. M.; Hesselroth, T.; Holm, S.; Holzman, B.; James, E.; Jensen, H.; Johnson, M.; Joshi, U.; Klima, B.; Kossiakov, S.; Kousouris, K.; Kowalkowski, J.; Kramer, T.; Kwan, S.; Lei, C. M.; Leininger, M.; Los, S.; Lueking, L.; Lukhanin, G.; Lusin, S.; Maeshima, K.; Marraffino, J. M.; Mason, D.; McBride, P.; Miao, T.; Moccia, S.; Mokhov, N.; Mrenna, S.; Murray, S. J.; Newman-Holmes, C.; Noeding, C.; O'Dell, V.; Paterno, M.; Petravick, D.; Pordes, R.; Prokofyev, O.; Ratnikova, N.; Ronzhin, A.; Sekhri, V.; Sexton-Kennedy, E.; Sfiligoi, I.; Shaw, T. M.; Skup, E.; Smith, R. P.; Spalding, W. J.; Spiegel, L.; Stavrianakou, M.; Stiehr, G.; Stone, A. L.; Suzuki, I.; Tan, P.; Tanenbaum, W.; Temple, L. E.; Tkaczyk, S.; Uplegger, L.; Vaandering, E. W.; Vidal, R.; Wands, R.; Wenzel, H.; Whitmore, J.; Wicklund, E.; Wu, W. M.; Wu, Y.; Yarba, J.; Yarba, V.; Yumiceva, F.; Yun, J. C.; Zimmerman, T.; Acosta, D.; Avery, P.; Barashko, V.; Bartalini, P.; Bourilkov, D.; Cavanaugh, R.; Dolinsky, S.; Drozdetskiy, A.; Field, R. D.; Fu, Y.; Furic, I. K.; Gorn, L.; Holmes, D.; Kim, B. J.; Klimenko, S.; Konigsberg, J.; Korytov, A.; Kotov, K.; Levchenko, P.; Madorsky, A.; Matchev, K.; Mitselmakher, G.; Pakhotin, Y.; Prescott, C.; Ramond, L.; Ramond, P.; Schmitt, M.; Scurlock, B.; Stasko, J.; Stoeck, H.; Wang, D.; Yelton, J.; Gaultney, V.; Kramer, L.; Lebolo, L. M.; Linn, S.; Markowitz, P.; Martinez, G.; Rodriguez, J. L.; Adams, T.; Askew, A.; Atramentov, O.; Bertoldi, M.; Dharmaratna, W. G. D.; Gershtein, Y.; Gleyzer, S. V.; Hagopian, S.; Hagopian, V.; Jenkins, C. J.; Johnson, K. F.; Prosper, H.; Simek, D.; Thomaston, J.; Baarmand, M.; Baksay, L.; Guragain, S.; Hohlmann, M.; Mermerkaya, H.; Ralich, R.; Vodopiyanov, I.; Adams, M. R.; Anghel, I. M.; Apanasevich, L.; Barannikova, O.; Bazterra, V. E.; Betts, R. R.; Dragoiu, C.; Garcia-Solis, E. J.; Gerber, C. E.; Hofman, D. J.; Hollis, R.; Iordanova, A.; Khalatian, S.; Mironov, C.; Shabalina, E.; Smoron, A.; Varelas, N.; Akgun, U.; Albayrak, E. A.; Ayan, A. S.; Briggs, R.; Cankocak, K.; Clarida, W.; Cooper, A.; Debbins, P.; Duru, F.; Fountain, M.; McCliment, E.; Merlo, J. P.; Mestvirishvili, A.; Miller, M. J.; Moeller, A.; Newsom, C. R.; Norbeck, E.; Olson, J.; Onel, Y.; Perera, L.; Schmidt, I.; Wang, S.; Yetkin, T.; Anderson, E. W.; Chakir, H.; Hauptman, J. M.; Lamsa, J.; Barnett, B. A.; Blumenfeld, B.; Chien, C. Y.; Giurgiu, G.; Gritsan, A.; Kim, D. W.; Lae, C. K.; Maksimovic, P.; Swartz, M.; Tran, N.; Baringer, P.; Bean, A.; Chen, J.; Coppage, D.; Grachov, O.; Murray, M.; Radicci, V.; Wood, J. S.; Zhukova, V.; Bandurin, D.; Bolton, T.; Kaadze, K.; Kahl, W. E.; Maravin, Y.; Onoprienko, D.; Sidwell, R.; Wan, Z.; Dahmes, B.; Gronberg, J.; Hollar, J.; Lange, D.; Wright, D.; Wuest, C. R.; Baden, D.; Bard, R.; Eno, S. C.; Ferencek, D.; Hadley, N. J.; Kellogg, R. G.; Kirn, M.; Kunori, S.; Lockner, E.; Ratnikov, F.; Santanastasio, F.; Skuja, A.; Toole, T.; Wang, L.; Wetstein, M.; Alver, B.; Ballintijn, M.; Bauer, G.; Busza, W.; Gomez Ceballos, G.; Hahn, K. A.; Harris, P.; Klute, M.; Kravchenko, I.; Li, W.; Loizides, C.; Ma, T.; Nahn, S.; Paus, C.; Pavlon, S.; Piedra Gomez, J.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Rudolph, M.; Stephans, G.; Sumorok, K.; Vaurynovich, S.; Wenger, E. A.; Wyslouch, B.; Bailleux, D.; Cooper, S.; Cushman, P.; DeBenedetti, A.; Dolgopolov, A.; Dudero, P. R.; Egeland, R.; Franzoni, G.; Gilbert, W. J.; Gong, D.; Grahl, J.; Haupt, J.; Klapoetke, K.; Kronkvist, I.; Kubota, Y.; Mans, J.; Rusack, R.; Sengupta, S.; Sherwood, B.; Singovsky, A.; Vikas, P.; Zhang, J.; Booke, M.; Cremaldi, L. M.; Godang, R.; Kroeger, R.; Reep, M.; Reidy, J.; Sanders, D. A.; Sonnek, P.; Summers, D.; Watkins, S.; Bloom, K.; Bockelman, B.; Claes, D. R.; Dominguez, A.; Eads, M.; Furukawa, M.; Keller, J.; Kelly, T.; Lundstedt, C.; Malik, S.; Snow, G. R.; Swanson, D.; Ecklund, K. M.; Iashvili, I.; Kharchilava, A.; Kumar, A.; Strang, M.; Alverson, G.; Barberis, E.; Boeriu, O.; Eulisse, G.; McCauley, T.; Musienko, Y.; Muzaffar, S.; Osborne, I.; Reucroft, S.; Swain, J.; Taylor, L.; Tuura, L.; Gobbi, B.; Kubantsev, M.; Kubik, A.; Ofierzynski, R. A.; Schmitt, M.; Spencer, E.; Stoynev, S.; Szleper, M.; Velasco, M.; Won, S.; Andert, K.; Baumbaugh, B.; Beiersdorf, B. A.; Castle, L.; Chorny, J.; Goussiou, A.; Hildreth, M.; Jessop, C.; Karmgard, D. J.; Kolberg, T.; Marchant, J.; Marinelli, N.; McKenna, M.; Ruchti, R.; Vigneault, M.; Wayne, M.; Wiand, D.; Bylsma, B.; Durkin, L. S.; Gilmore, J.; Gu, J.; Killewald, P.; Ling, T. Y.; Rush, C. J.; Sehgal, V.; Williams, G.; Adam, N.; Chidzik, S.; Denes, P.; Elmer, P.; Garmash, A.; Gerbaudo, D.; Halyo, V.; Jones, J.; Marlow, D.; Olsen, J.; Piroué, P.; Stickland, D.; Tully, C.; Werner, J. S.; Wildish, T.; Wynhoff, S.; Xie, Z.; Huang, X. T.; Lopez, A.; Mendez, H.; Ramirez Vargas, J. E.; Zatserklyaniy, A.; Apresyan, A.; Arndt, K.; Barnes, V. E.; Bolla, G.; Bortoletto, D.; Bujak, A.; Everett, A.; Fahling, M.; Garfinkel, A. F.; Gutay, L.; Ippolito, N.; Kozhevnikov, Y.; Laasanen, A. T.; Liu, C.; Maroussov, V.; Medved, S.; Merkel, P.; Miller, D. H.; Miyamoto, J.; Neumeister, N.; Pompos, A.; Roy, A.; Sedov, A.; Shipsey, I.; Cuplov, V.; Parashar, N.; Bargassa, P.; Lee, S. J.; Liu, J. H.; Maronde, D.; Matveev, M.; Nussbaum, T.; Padley, B. P.; Roberts, J.; Tumanov, A.; Bodek, A.; Budd, H.; Cammin, J.; Chung, Y. S.; DeBarbaro, P.; Demina, R.; Ginther, G.; Gotra, Y.; Korjenevski, S.; Miner, D. C.; Sakumoto, W.; Slattery, P.; Zielinski, M.; Bhatti, A.; Demortier, L.; Goulianos, K.; Hatakeyama, K.; Mesropian, C.; Bartz, E.; Chuang, S. H.; Doroshenko, J.; Halkiadakis, E.; Jacques, P. F.; Khits, D.; Lath, A.; Macpherson, A.; Plano, R.; Rose, K.; Schnetzer, S.; Somalwar, S.; Stone, R.; Watts, T. L.; Cerizza, G.; Hollingsworth, M.; Lazoflores, J.; Ragghianti, G.; Spanier, S.; York, A.; Aurisano, A.; Golyash, A.; Kamon, T.; Nguyen, C. N.; Pivarski, J.; Safonov, A.; Toback, D.; Weinberger, M.; Akchurin, N.; Berntzon, L.; Carrell, K. W.; Gumus, K.; Jeong, C.; Kim, H.; Lee, S. W.; McGonagill, B. G.; Roh, Y.; Sill, A.; Spezziga, M.; Thomas, R.; Volobouev, I.; Washington, E.; Wigmans, R.; Yazgan, E.; Bapty, T.; Engh, D.; Florez, C.; Johns, W.; Keskinpala, T.; Luiggi Lopez, E.; Neema, S.; Nordstrom, S.; Pathak, S.; Sheldon, P.; Andelin, D.; Arenton, M. W.; Balazs, M.; Buehler, M.; Conetti, S.; Cox, B.; Hirosky, R.; Humphrey, M.; Imlay, R.; Ledovskoy, A.; Phillips, D., II; Powell, H.; Ronquest, M.; Yohay, R.; Anderson, M.; Baek, Y. W.; Bellinger, J. N.; Bradley, D.; Cannarsa, P.; Carlsmith, D.; Crotty, I.; Dasu, S.; Feyzi, F.; Gorski, T.; Gray, L.; Grogg, K. S.; Grothe, M.; Jaworski, M.; Klabbers, P.; Klukas, J.; Lanaro, A.; Lazaridis, C.; Leonard, J.; Loveless, R.; Magrans de Abril, M.; Mohapatra, A.; Ott, G.; Smith, W. H.; Weinberg, M.; Wenman, D.; Atoian, G. S.; Dhawan, S.; Issakov, V.; Neal, H.; Poblaguev, A.; Zeller, M. E.; Abdullaeva, G.; Avezov, A.; Fazylov, M. I.; Gasanov, E. M.; Khugaev, A.; Koblik, Y. N.; Nishonov, M.; Olimov, K.; Umaraliev, A.; Yuldashev, B. S.

    2008-08-01

    The Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) detector is described. The detector operates at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. It was conceived to study proton-proton (and lead-lead) collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 14 TeV (5.5 TeV nucleon-nucleon) and at luminosities up to 1034 cm-2 s-1 (1027 cm-2 s-1). At the core of the CMS detector sits a high-magnetic-field and large-bore superconducting solenoid surrounding an all-silicon pixel and strip tracker, a lead-tungstate scintillating-crystals electromagnetic calorimeter, and a brass-scintillator sampling hadron calorimeter. The iron yoke of the flux-return is instrumented with four stations of muon detectors covering most of the 4π solid angle. Forward sampling calorimeters extend the pseudorapidity coverage to high values (|η| <= 5) assuring very good hermeticity. The overall dimensions of the CMS detector are a length of 21.6 m, a diameter of 14.6 m and a total weight of 12500 t.

  3. Scale out databases for CERN use cases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baranowski, Zbigniew; Grzybek, Maciej; Canali, Luca; Lanza Garcia, Daniel; Surdy, Kacper

    2015-12-01

    Data generation rates are expected to grow very fast for some database workloads going into LHC run 2 and beyond. In particular this is expected for data coming from controls, logging and monitoring systems. Storing, administering and accessing big data sets in a relational database system can quickly become a very hard technical challenge, as the size of the active data set and the number of concurrent users increase. Scale-out database technologies are a rapidly developing set of solutions for deploying and managing very large data warehouses on commodity hardware and with open source software. In this paper we will describe the architecture and tests on database systems based on Hadoop and the Cloudera Impala engine. We will discuss the results of our tests, including tests of data loading and integration with existing data sources and in particular with relational databases. We will report on query performance tests done with various data sets of interest at CERN, notably data from the accelerator log database.

  4. Exploring the promises of intersectionality for advancing women's health research.

    PubMed

    Hankivsky, Olena; Reid, Colleen; Cormier, Renee; Varcoe, Colleen; Clark, Natalie; Benoit, Cecilia; Brotman, Shari

    2010-02-11

    Women's health research strives to make change. It seeks to produce knowledge that promotes action on the variety of factors that affect women's lives and their health. As part of this general movement, important strides have been made to raise awareness of the health effects of sex and gender. The resultant base of knowledge has been used to inform health research, policy, and practice. Increasingly, however, the need to pay better attention to the inequities among women that are caused by racism, colonialism, ethnocentrism, heterosexism, and able-bodism, is confronting feminist health researchers and activists. Researchers are seeking new conceptual frameworks that can transform the design of research to produce knowledge that captures how systems of discrimination or subordination overlap and "articulate" with one another. An emerging paradigm for women's health research is intersectionality. Intersectionality places an explicit focus on differences among groups and seeks to illuminate various interacting social factors that affect human lives, including social locations, health status, and quality of life. This paper will draw on recently emerging intersectionality research in the Canadian women's health context in order to explore the promises and practical challenges of the processes involved in applying an intersectionality paradigm. We begin with a brief overview of why the need for an intersectionality approach has emerged within the context of women's health research and introduce current thinking about how intersectionality can inform and transform health research more broadly. We then highlight novel Canadian research that is grappling with the challenges in addressing issues of difference and diversity. In the analysis of these examples, we focus on a largely uninvestigated aspect of intersectionality research - the challenges involved in the process of initiating and developing such projects and, in particular, the meaning and significance of social

  5. Exploring the promises of intersectionality for advancing women's health research

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Women's health research strives to make change. It seeks to produce knowledge that promotes action on the variety of factors that affect women's lives and their health. As part of this general movement, important strides have been made to raise awareness of the health effects of sex and gender. The resultant base of knowledge has been used to inform health research, policy, and practice. Increasingly, however, the need to pay better attention to the inequities among women that are caused by racism, colonialism, ethnocentrism, heterosexism, and able-bodism, is confronting feminist health researchers and activists. Researchers are seeking new conceptual frameworks that can transform the design of research to produce knowledge that captures how systems of discrimination or subordination overlap and "articulate" with one another. An emerging paradigm for women's health research is intersectionality. Intersectionality places an explicit focus on differences among groups and seeks to illuminate various interacting social factors that affect human lives, including social locations, health status, and quality of life. This paper will draw on recently emerging intersectionality research in the Canadian women's health context in order to explore the promises and practical challenges of the processes involved in applying an intersectionality paradigm. We begin with a brief overview of why the need for an intersectionality approach has emerged within the context of women's health research and introduce current thinking about how intersectionality can inform and transform health research more broadly. We then highlight novel Canadian research that is grappling with the challenges in addressing issues of difference and diversity. In the analysis of these examples, we focus on a largely uninvestigated aspect of intersectionality research - the challenges involved in the process of initiating and developing such projects and, in particular, the meaning and significance of social

  6. Modeling Driver Behavior near Intersections in Hidden Markov Model

    PubMed Central

    Li, Juan; He, Qinglian; Zhou, Hang; Guan, Yunlin; Dai, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Intersections are one of the major locations where safety is a big concern to drivers. Inappropriate driver behaviors in response to frequent changes when approaching intersections often lead to intersection-related crashes or collisions. Thus to better understand driver behaviors at intersections, especially in the dilemma zone, a Hidden Markov Model (HMM) is utilized in this study. With the discrete data processing, the observed dynamic data of vehicles are used for the inference of the Hidden Markov Model. The Baum-Welch (B-W) estimation algorithm is applied to calculate the vehicle state transition probability matrix and the observation probability matrix. When combined with the Forward algorithm, the most likely state of the driver can be obtained. Thus the model can be used to measure the stability and risk of driver behavior. It is found that drivers’ behaviors in the dilemma zone are of lower stability and higher risk compared with those in other regions around intersections. In addition to the B-W estimation algorithm, the Viterbi Algorithm is utilized to predict the potential dangers of vehicles. The results can be applied to driving assistance systems to warn drivers to avoid possible accidents. PMID:28009838

  7. Modeling Driver Behavior near Intersections in Hidden Markov Model.

    PubMed

    Li, Juan; He, Qinglian; Zhou, Hang; Guan, Yunlin; Dai, Wei

    2016-12-21

    Intersections are one of the major locations where safety is a big concern to drivers. Inappropriate driver behaviors in response to frequent changes when approaching intersections often lead to intersection-related crashes or collisions. Thus to better understand driver behaviors at intersections, especially in the dilemma zone, a Hidden Markov Model (HMM) is utilized in this study. With the discrete data processing, the observed dynamic data of vehicles are used for the inference of the Hidden Markov Model. The Baum-Welch (B-W) estimation algorithm is applied to calculate the vehicle state transition probability matrix and the observation probability matrix. When combined with the Forward algorithm, the most likely state of the driver can be obtained. Thus the model can be used to measure the stability and risk of driver behavior. It is found that drivers' behaviors in the dilemma zone are of lower stability and higher risk compared with those in other regions around intersections. In addition to the B-W estimation algorithm, the Viterbi Algorithm is utilized to predict the potential dangers of vehicles. The results can be applied to driving assistance systems to warn drivers to avoid possible accidents.

  8. Numerical simulations of Mach stem formation via intersecting bow shocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, E. C.; Frank, A.; Hartigan, P.; Yirak, K.

    2015-12-01

    Hubble Space Telescope observations show bright knots of Hα emission within outflowing young stellar jets. Velocity variations in the flow create secondary bow shocks that may intersect and lead to enhanced emission. When the bow shocks intersect at or above a certain critical angle, a planar shock called a Mach stem is formed. These shocks could produce brighter Hα emission since the incoming flow to the Mach stem is parallel to the shock normal. In this paper we report first results of a study using 2-D numerical simulations designed to explore Mach stem formation at the intersection of bow shocks formed by hypersonic ;bullets; or ;clumps;. Our 2-D simulations show how the bow shock shapes and intersection angles change as the adiabatic index γ changes. We show that the formation or lack of a Mach stem in our simulations is consistent with the steady-state Mach stem formation theory. Our ultimate goal, which is part of an ongoing research effort, is to characterize the physical and observational consequences of bow shock intersections including the formation of Mach stems.

  9. PowerSet: A Comprehensive Visualization of Set Intersections.

    PubMed

    Alsallakh, Bilal; Ren, Liu

    2017-01-01

    When analyzing a large amount of data, analysts often define groups over data elements that share certain properties. Using these groups as the unit of analysis not only reduces the data volume, but also allows detecting various patterns in the data. This involves analyzing intersection relations between these groups, and how the element attributes vary between these intersections. This kind of set-based analysis has various applications in a variety of domains, due to the generic and powerful notion of sets. However, visualizing intersections relations is challenging because their number grows exponentially with the number of sets. We present a novel technique based on Treemaps to provide a comprehensive overview of non-empty intersections in a set system in a scalable way. It enables gaining insight about how elements are distributed across these intersections as well as performing fine-grained analysis to explore and compare their attributes both in overview and in detail. Interaction allows querying and filtering these elements based on their set memberships. We demonstrate how our technique supports various use cases in data exploration and analysis by providing insights into set-based data, beyond the limits of state-of-the-art techniques.

  10. Energy Storage

    SciTech Connect

    Mukundan, Rangachary

    2014-09-30

    Energy storage technology is critical if the U.S. is to achieve more than 25% penetration of renewable electrical energy, given the intermittency of wind and solar. Energy density is a critical parameter in the economic viability of any energy storage system with liquid fuels being 10 to 100 times better than batteries. However, the economical conversion of electricity to fuel still presents significant technical challenges. This project addressed these challenges by focusing on a specific approach: efficient processes to convert electricity, water and nitrogen to ammonia. Ammonia has many attributes that make it the ideal energy storage compound. The feed stocks are plentiful, ammonia is easily liquefied and routinely stored in large volumes in cheap containers, and it has exceptional energy density for grid scale electrical energy storage. Ammonia can be oxidized efficiently in fuel cells or advanced Carnot cycle engines yielding water and nitrogen as end products. Because of the high energy density and low reactivity of ammonia, the capital cost for grid storage will be lower than any other storage application. This project developed the theoretical foundations of N2 catalysis on specific catalysts and provided for the first time experimental evidence for activation of Mo 2N based catalysts. Theory also revealed that the N atom adsorbed in the bridging position between two metal atoms is the critical step for catalysis. Simple electrochemical ammonia production reactors were designed and built in this project using two novel electrolyte systems. The first one demonstrated the use of ionic liquid electrolytes at room temperature and the second the use of pyrophosphate based electrolytes at intermediate temperatures (200 – 300 ºC). The mechanism of high proton conduction in the pyrophosphate materials was found to be associated with a polyphosphate second phase contrary to literature claims and ammonia production rates as high as 5X 10

  11. Hangout with CERN: a direct conversation with the public

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Achintya; Goldfarb, Steven; Kahle, Kate

    2016-04-01

    Hangout with CERN refers to a weekly, half-hour-long, topical webcast hosted at CERN. The aim of the programme is threefold: (i) to provide a virtual tour of various locations and facilities at CERN, (ii) to discuss the latest scientific results from the laboratory, and, most importantly, (iii) to engage in conversation with the public and answer their questions. For each ;episode;, scientists gather around webcam-enabled computers at CERN and partner institutes/universities, connecting to one another using the Google+ social network's ;Hangouts; tool. The show is structured as a conversation mediated by a host, usually a scientist, and viewers can ask questions to the experts in real time through a Twitter hashtag or YouTube comments. The history of Hangout with CERN can be traced back to ICHEP 2012, where several physicists crowded in front of a laptop connected to Google+, using a ;Hangout On Air; webcast to explain to the world the importance of the discovery of the Higgs-like boson, announced just two days before at the same conference. Hangout with CERN has also drawn inspiration from two existing outreach endeavours: (i) ATLAS Virtual Visits, which connected remote visitors with scientists in the ATLAS Control Room via video conference, and (ii) the Large Hangout Collider, in which CMS scientists gave underground tours via Hangouts to groups of schools and members of the public around the world. In this paper, we discuss the role of Hangout with CERN as a bi-directional outreach medium and an opportunity to train scientists in effective communication.

  12. Practical Private Set Intersection Protocols with Linear Complexity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Cristofaro, Emiliano; Tsudik, Gene

    The constantly increasing dependence on anytime-anywhere availability of data and the commensurately increasing fear of losing privacy motivate the need for privacy-preserving techniques. One interesting and common problem occurs when two parties need to privately compute an intersection of their respective sets of data. In doing so, one or both parties must obtain the intersection (if one exists), while neither should learn anything about other set elements. Although prior work has yielded a number of effective and elegant Private Set Intersection (PSI) techniques, the quest for efficiency is still underway. This paper explores some PSI variations and constructs several secure protocols that are appreciably more efficient than the state-of-the-art.

  13. The field theory of intersecting D3-branes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mintun, Eric; Polchinski, Joseph; Sun, Sichun

    2015-08-01

    We examine the defect gauge theory on two perpendicular D3-branes with a 1+1 dimensional intersection, consisting of U(1) fields on the D3-branes and charged hypermultiplets on the intersection. We argue that this gauge theory must have a magnetically charged soliton corresponding to the D-string stretched between the branes. We show that the hypermultiplets actually source magnetic as well as electric fields. The magnetic charges are confined if the hypermultiplet action is canonical, but considerations of periodicity of the hypermultiplet space in string theory imply a nontrivial Gibbons-Hawking metric, and we show that there is then the expected magnetic kink solution. The hypermultiplet metric has a singularity, which we argue must be resolved by embedding in the full string theory. Another interesting feature is that the classical field equations have logarithmic divergences at the intersection, which lead to a classical renormalization group flow in the action.

  14. Beyond dichotomies: Gender and intersecting inequalities in climate change studies.

    PubMed

    Djoudi, Houria; Locatelli, Bruno; Vaast, Chloe; Asher, Kiran; Brockhaus, Maria; Basnett Sijapati, Bimbika

    2016-12-01

    Climate change and related adaptation strategies have gender-differentiated impacts. This paper reviews how gender is framed in 41 papers on climate change adaptation through an intersectionality lens. The main findings show that while intersectional analysis has demonstrated many advantages for a comprehensive study of gender, it has not yet entered the field of climate change and gender. In climate change studies, gender is mostly handled in a men-versus-women dichotomy and little or no attention has been paid to power and social and political relations. These gaps which are echoed in other domains of development and gender research depict a 'feminization of vulnerability' and reinforce a 'victimization' discourse within climate change studies. We argue that a critical intersectional assessment would contribute to unveil agency and emancipatory pathways in the adaptation process by providing a better understanding of how the differential impacts of climate change shape, and are shaped by, the complex power dynamics of existing social and political relations.

  15. Dynamical Outcomes of Quenching: Reflections on a Conical Intersection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehman, Julia H.; Lester, Marsha I.

    2014-04-01

    This review focuses on experimental studies of the dynamical outcomes following collisional quenching of electronically excited OH A2Σ+ radicals by molecular partners. The experimental observables include the branching between reactive and nonreactive decay channels, kinetic energy release, and quantum state distributions of the products. Complementary theoretical investigations reveal regions of strong nonadiabatic coupling, known as conical intersections, which facilitate the quenching process. The dynamical outcomes observed experimentally are connected to the local forces and geometric properties of the nuclei in the conical intersection region. Dynamical calculations for the benchmark OH-H2 system are in good accord with experimental observations, demonstrating that the outcomes reflect the strong coupling in the conical intersection region as the system evolves from the excited electronic state to quenched products.

  16. Ion transport through a T-intersection of nanofluidic channels.

    PubMed

    Daiguji, Hirofumi; Adachi, Takuma; Tatsumi, Naoya

    2008-08-01

    Ion transport through a T-intersection of two silica nanochannels (a main channel, 5-mum long and 30-nm wide, and a subchannel, 5-microm long and 15-nm wide) with a surface charge distribution was investigated based on continuum dynamics calculations. The surface charge within 250 nm of the intersection in the main channel and the entire subchannel was positive and that in the main channel outside this intersection region was negative. This nanofluidic system is analogous to a p-n-p transistor. The calculation results revealed that, by adjusting the electric potentials at the ends of the nanochannels, the ionic current could be (1) cut off, (2) regulated in the main channel, (3) diverged into the main and subchannels, (4) turned from the main channel to the subchannel, and (5) merged into the subchannel. A series connection of this nanofluidic system can therefore be used in biotechnological applications for electrophoretic separation and for sorting of ions and biomolecules.

  17. Thermal Analysis of the European XFEL Intersection Control Rack

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Concha, P.; Vazquez, C.

    2014-04-01

    The three undulator segments of the European X-ray Free Electron Laser contain a total of 88 intersections cells. Each intersection accommodates a quadrupole magnet on top of a high precision X-Y positioning table, a beam position monitor, four air coil correctors and a phase shifter. The Intersection Control Rack is an electrical cabinet containing the necessary electronics to control both the quadrupole and the phase shifter movements (which are stepper motor based) with a repeatability of less than 1 um and 10 um, respectively. Four different cabinets have been extensively tested to ensure that they meet specifications. These tests include a thermal analysis to study position measurements dependence on the temperature. This paper introduces a description of the thermal issue, analyses the causes and consequences of heating, presents the results of the different tests performed, and concludes the best design and operating conditions to achieve a good performance.

  18. Hydrogen Storage

    SciTech Connect

    2008-11-01

    This 2-page fact sheet provides a brief introduction to hydrogen storage technologies. Intended for a non-technical audience, it explains the different ways in which hydrogen can be stored, as well as the technical challenges and research goals for storing hydrogen on board a vehicle.

  19. Archive Storage Media Alternatives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ranade, Sanjay

    1990-01-01

    Reviews requirements for a data archive system and describes storage media alternatives that are currently available. Topics discussed include data storage; data distribution; hierarchical storage architecture, including inline storage, online storage, nearline storage, and offline storage; magnetic disks; optical disks; conventional magnetic…

  20. Teleparallel loop quantum cosmology in a system of intersecting branes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sepehri, Alireza; Pradhan, Anirudh; Beesham, Aroonkumar; de Haro, Jaume

    2016-09-01

    Recently, some authors have removed the big bang singularity in teleparallel Loop Quantum Cosmology (LQC) and have shown that the universe may undergo a number of oscillations. We investigate the origin of this type of teleparallel theory in a system of intersecting branes in M-theory in which the angle between them changes with time. This system is constructed by two intersecting anti-D8-branes, one compacted D4-brane and a D3-brane. These branes are built by joining M0-branes which develop in decaying fundamental strings. The compacted D4-brane is located between two intersecting anti-D8 branes and glues to one of them. Our universe is located on the D3 brane which wraps around the D4 brane from one end and sticks to one of the anti-D8 branes from the other one. In this system, there are three types of fields, corresponding to compacted D4 branes, intersecting branes and D3-branes. These fields interact with each other and make the angle between branes oscillate. By decreasing this angle, the intersecting anti-D8 branes approach each other, the D4 brane rolls, the D3 brane wraps around the D4 brane, and the universe contracts. By separating the intersecting branes and increasing the angle, the D4 brane rolls in the opposite direction, the D3 brane separates from it and the expansion branch begins. Also, the interaction between branes in this system gives us the exact form of the relevant Lagrangian for teleparallel LQC.

  1. Intersection Monitor for Traffic-Light-Preemption System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bachelder, Aaron; Foster, Conrad

    2006-01-01

    The figure shows an intersection monitor that is a key subsystem of an emergency traffic-light-preemption system that could be any of the systems described in the three immediately preceding articles and in Systems Would Preempt Traffic Lights for Emergency Vehicles (NPO-30573), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 28, No. 10 (October 2004), page 36. This unit is so named because it is installed at an intersection, where it monitors the phases (in the sense of timing) of the traffic lights. The mode of operation of this monitor is independent of the type of traffic-light-controller hardware or software in use at the intersection. Moreover, the design of the monitor is such that (1) the monitor does not, by itself, affect the operation of the traffic- light controller and (2) in the event of a failure of the monitor, the trafficlight controller continues to function normally (albeit without preemption). The monitor is installed in series with the traffic-light controller at an intersection. The control signals of interest are monitored by use of high-impedance taps on affected control lines. These taps are fully isolated and further protected by high-voltage diodes that prevent any voltages or short circuits that arise within the monitor from affecting the controller. The signals from the taps are processed digitally and cleaned up by use of high-speed logic gates, and the resulting data are passed on to other parts of the traffic-light-preemption intersection subsystem. The data are compared continuously with data from vehicles and used to calculate timing for reliable preemption of the traffic lights. The pedestrian crossing at the intersection is also monitored, and pedestrians are warned not to cross during preemption.

  2. Turbine component cooling channel mesh with intersection chambers

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Ching-Pang; Marra, John J

    2014-05-06

    A mesh (35) of cooling channels (35A, 35B) with an array of cooling channel intersections (42) in a wall (21, 22) of a turbine component. A mixing chamber (42A-C) at each intersection is wider (W1, W2)) than a width (W) of each of the cooling channels connected to the mixing chamber. The mixing chamber promotes swirl, and slows the coolant for more efficient and uniform cooling. A series of cooling meshes (M1, M2) may be separated by mixing manifolds (44), which may have film cooling holes (46) and/or coolant refresher holes (48).

  3. Phase structure of a single urban intersection: a simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebrahim Foulaadvand, M.; Fukui, M.; Belbasi, S.

    2010-07-01

    We study the phase structure of a cellular automata model proposed by Belbasi and Foulaadvand to describe the vehicular traffic flow at the intersection of two perpendicular streets. A set of traffic lights operating in a fixed-time scheme controls the traffic flow. A closed boundary condition is applied to the streets, each of which conducts a unidirectional flow. Streets are single-lane and cars cannot turn upon reaching the intersection. Via extensive Monte Carlo simulations it is shown that the model phase diagram consists of ten phases. The flow characteristics in each phase are investigated and the types of phase transitions between phases are specified.

  4. The fuzzy intersection rule in variational analysis with applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Bingwu

    2006-11-01

    The fuzzy intersection rule for Frechet normal cones in Asplund spaces was established by Mordukhovich and the author using the extremal principle, which appears more convenient to apply in some applications. In this paper, we present a complete discussion of this rule in various aspects. We show that the fuzzy intersection rule is another characterization of the Asplund property of the space. Various applications are considered as well. In particular, a complete set of fuzzy calculus rules for general lower semicontinuous functions are established.

  5. Intersection democracy for winding branes and stabilization of extra dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rador, Tonguç

    2005-08-01

    We show that, in the context of pure Einstein gravity, a democratic principle for intersection possibilities of branes winding around extra dimensions in a given partitioning yield stabilization, while what the observed space follows is matter-like dust evolution. Here democracy is used in the sense that, in a given decimation of extra dimensions, all possible wrappings and hence all possible intersections are allowed. Generally, the necessary and sufficient condition for this is that the dimensionality m of the observed space dimensions obey 3 ⩽ m ⩽ N for N ⩾ 3, where N is the decimation order of the extra dimensions.

  6. An Algorithm to Find the Intersection of Two Convex Polygons

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-09-01

    I NSWCDD/TR-93/345/ I AD-A274 722I I I~IIIIIIII IIlllllil llllllllllllili I AN ALGORITHM TO FIND THE INTERSECTION OF TWO CONVEX POLYGONSI I BY ARMIDO...CENTER DAHLGREN DIVISIONmIN A Dahlgren. Virginia 22448-5000 I* • ( 94-01450 I �I 12 0 43 ~~~l NSWCDD/TR-93/345 AN ALGORITHM TO FIND THE...Division (LIO) of the Strike Systems Department. A description of the analysis and software developed to find the intersection of two convex polygons is

  7. Viewing equitable practices through the lens of intersecting identities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyons, Renée; Dsouza, Nikeetha; Quigley, Cassie

    2016-12-01

    This review explores Archer, Dawson, Seakins, and Wong's "Disorienting, fun or meaningful? Disadvantaged families' experiences of a science museum visit" by examining the analytic frameworks guiding this study. To expand on Archer et al.'s use of feminist post-structuralist theories of identity we draw from the theory of intersectionality to provide a more robust framework for analyzing barriers to engagement within an informal learning space. Our response to this work ends by exploring the types of solutions generated from an intersectionality framework—solutions aimed at transforming institutional programs and practices to create more equitable spaces for learning.

  8. CERN Winter School on Supergravity, Strings, and Gauge Theory 2010

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    The CERN Winter School on Supergravity, Strings, and Gauge Theory is the analytic continuation of the yearly training school of the former EC-RTN string network "Constituents, Fundamental Forces and Symmetries of the Universe". The 2010 edition of the school is supported and organized by the CERN Theory Divison, and will take place from Monday January 25 to Friday January 29, at CERN. As its predecessors, this school is meant primarily for training of doctoral students and young postdoctoral researchers in recent developments in theoretical high-energy physics and string theory. The programme of the school will consist of five series of pedagogical lectures, complemented by tutorial discussion sessions in the afternoons. Previous schools in this series were organized in 2005 at SISSA in Trieste, and in 2006, 2007, 2008, and 2009 at CERN, Geneva. Other similar schools have been organized in the past by the former related RTN network "The Quantum Structure of Spacetime and the Geometric Nature of Fundamental Interactions". This edition of the school is not funded by the European Union. The school is funded by the CERN Theory Division, and the Arnold Sommerfeld Center at Ludwig-Maximilians University of Munich. Scientific committee: M. Gaberdiel, D. Luest, A. Sevrin, J. Simon, K. Stelle, S. Theisen, A. Uranga, A. Van Proeyen, E. Verlinde Local organizers: A. Uranga, J. Walcher

  9. CERN Winter School on Supergravity, Strings, and Gauge Theory 2010

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    The CERN Winter School on Supergravity, Strings, and Gauge Theory is the analytic continuation of the yearly training school of the former EC-RTN string network "Constituents, Fundamental Forces and Symmetries of the Universe". The 2010 edition of the school is supported and organized by the CERN Theory Divison, and will take place from Monday January 25 to Friday January 29, at CERN. As its predecessors, this school is meant primarily for training of doctoral students and young postdoctoral researchers in recent developments in theoretical high-energy physics and string theory. The programme of the school will consist of five series of pedagogical lectures, complemented by tutorial discussion sessions in the afternoons. Previous schools in this series were organized in 2005 at SISSA in Trieste, and in 2006, 2007, 2008, and 2009 at CERN, Geneva. Other similar schools have been organized in the past by the former related RTN network "The Quantum Structure of Spacetime and the Geometric Nature of Fundamental Interactions". This edition of the school is not funded by the European Union. The school is funded by the CERN Theory Division, and the Arnold Sommerfeld Center at Ludwig-Maximilians University of Munich. Scientific committee: M. Gaberdiel, D. Luest, A. Sevrin, J. Simon, K. Stelle, S. Theisen, A. Uranga, A. Van Proeyen, E. Verlinde Local organizers: A. Uranga, J. Walcher

  10. CERN Winter School on Supergravity, Strings, and Gauge Theory 2010

    SciTech Connect

    2010-01-22

    The CERN Winter School on Supergravity, Strings, and Gauge Theory is the analytic continuation of the yearly training school of the former EC-RTN string network "Constituents, Fundamental Forces and Symmetries of the Universe". The 2010 edition of the school is supported and organized by the CERN Theory Divison, and will take place from Monday January 25 to Friday January 29, at CERN. As its predecessors, this school is meant primarily for training of doctoral students and young postdoctoral researchers in recent developments in theoretical high-energy physics and string theory. The programme of the school will consist of five series of pedagogical lectures, complemented by tutorial discussion sessions in the afternoons. Previous schools in this series were organized in 2005 at SISSA in Trieste, and in 2006, 2007, 2008, and 2009 at CERN, Geneva. Other similar schools have been organized in the past by the former related RTN network "The Quantum Structure of Spacetime and the Geometric Nature of Fundamental Interactions". This edition of the school is not funded by the European Union. The school is funded by the CERN Theory Division, and the Arnold Sommerfeld Center at Ludwig-Maximilians University of Munich. Scientific committee: M. Gaberdiel, D. Luest, A. Sevrin, J. Simon, K. Stelle, S. Theisen, A. Uranga, A. Van Proeyen, E. Verlinde Local organizers: A. Uranga, J. Walcher

  11. CERN Winter School on Supergravity, Strings, and Gauge Theory 2010

    SciTech Connect

    2010-01-22

    The CERN Winter School on Supergravity, Strings, and Gauge Theory is the analytic continuation of the yearly training school of the former EC-RTN string network "Constituents, Fundamental Forces and Symmetries of the Universe". The 2010 edition of the school is supported and organized by the CERN Theory Divison, and will take place from Monday January 25 to Friday January 29, at CERN. As its predecessors, this school is meant primarily for training of doctoral students and young postdoctoral researchers in recent developments in theoretical high-energy physics and string theory. The programme of the school will consist of five series of pedagogical lectures, complemented by tutorial discussion sessions in the afternoons. Previous schools in this series were organized in 2005 at SISSA in Trieste, and in 2006, 2007, 2008, and 2009 at CERN, Geneva. Other similar schools have been organized in the past by the former related RTN network "The Quantum Structure of Spacetime and the Geometric Nature of Fundamental Interactions". This edition of the school is not funded by the European Union. The school is funded by the CERN Theory Division, and the Arnold Sommerfeld Center at Ludwig-Maximilians University of Munich. Scientific committee: M. Gaberdiel, D. Luest, A. Sevrin, J. Simon, K. Stelle, S. Theisen, A. Uranga, A. Van Proeyen, E. Verlinde Local organizers: A. Uranga, J. Walcher

  12. Development of Road Traffic CA Model of 4-Way Intersection to Study Travel Time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawniczak, Anna T.; di Stefano, Bruno N.

    We describe our development of a road traffic CA (Cellular Automata) model of the four most common types of 4-way intersection (Yield-controlled intersections, Stop-controlled intersections, Signal-controlled intersections, and Roundabout-based intersection). We developed this model to study how these four different types of 4-way intersection affect road traffic flow and congestion in general and “travel time” in particular. In this paper we describe the model and 4WayCA.exe, the traffic simulator software package in which the model has been implemented. We focus in particular on the model abstractions and on the simulator architecture.

  13. The ALICE experiment at the CERN LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ALICE Collaboration; Aamodt, K.; Abrahantes Quintana, A.; Achenbach, R.; Acounis, S.; Adamová, D.; Adler, C.; Aggarwal, M.; Agnese, F.; Aglieri Rinella, G.; Ahammed, Z.; Ahmad, A.; Ahmad, N.; Ahmad, S.; Akindinov, A.; Akishin, P.; Aleksandrov, D.; Alessandro, B.; Alfaro, R.; Alfarone, G.; Alici, A.; Alme, J.; Alt, T.; Altinpinar, S.; Amend, W.; Andrei, C.; Andres, Y.; Andronic, A.; Anelli, G.; Anfreville, M.; Angelov, V.; Anzo, A.; Anson, C.; Anticić, T.; Antonenko, V.; Antonczyk, D.; Antinori, F.; Antinori, S.; Antonioli, P.; Aphecetche, L.; Appelshäuser, H.; Aprodu, V.; Arba, M.; Arcelli, S.; Argentieri, A.; Armesto, N.; Arnaldi, R.; Arefiev, A.; Arsene, I.; Asryan, A.; Augustinus, A.; Awes, T. C.; Äysto, J.; Danish Azmi, M.; Bablock, S.; Badalà, A.; Badyal, S. K.; Baechler, J.; Bagnasco, S.; Bailhache, R.; Bala, R.; Baldisseri, A.; Baldit, A.; Bán, J.; Barbera, R.; Barberis, P.-L.; Barbet, J. M.; Barnäfoldi, G.; Barret, V.; Bartke, J.; Bartos, D.; Basile, M.; Basmanov, V.; Bastid, N.; Batigne, G.; Batyunya, B.; Baudot, J.; Baumann, C.; Bearden, I.; Becker, B.; Belikov, J.; Bellwied, R.; Belmont-Moreno, E.; Belogianni, A.; Belyaev, S.; Benato, A.; Beney, J. L.; Benhabib, L.; Benotto, F.; Beolé, S.; Berceanu, I.; Bercuci, A.; Berdermann, E.; Berdnikov, Y.; Bernard, C.; Berny, R.; Berst, J. D.; Bertelsen, H.; Betev, L.; Bhasin, A.; Baskar, P.; Bhati, A.; Bianchi, N.; Bielčik, J.; Bielčiková, J.; Bimbot, L.; Blanchard, G.; Blanco, F.; Blanco, F.; Blau, D.; Blume, C.; Blyth, S.; Boccioli, M.; Bogdanov, A.; Bøggild, H.; Bogolyubsky, M.; Boldizsár, L.; Bombara, M.; Bombonati, C.; Bondila, M.; Bonnet, D.; Bonvicini, V.; Borel, H.; Borotto, F.; Borshchov, V.; Bortoli, Y.; Borysov, O.; Bose, S.; Bosisio, L.; Botje, M.; Böttger, S.; Bourdaud, G.; Bourrion, O.; Bouvier, S.; Braem, A.; Braun, M.; Braun-Munzinger, P.; Bravina, L.; Bregant, M.; Bruckner, G.; Brun, R.; Bruna, E.; Brunasso, O.; Bruno, G. E.; Bucher, D.; Budilov, V.; Budnikov, D.; Buesching, H.; Buncic, P.; Burns, M.; Burachas, S.; Busch, O.; Bushop, J.; Cai, X.; Caines, H.; Calaon, F.; Caldogno, M.; Cali, I.; Camerini, P.; Campagnolo, R.; Campbell, M.; Cao, X.; Capitani, G. P.; Romeo, G. Cara; Cardenas-Montes, M.; Carduner, H.; Carena, F.; Carena, W.; Cariola, P.; Carminati, F.; Casado, J.; Casanova Diaz, A.; Caselle, M.; Castillo Castellanos, J.; Castor, J.; Catanescu, V.; Cattaruzza, E.; Cavazza, D.; Cerello, P.; Ceresa, S.; Černý, V.; Chambert, V.; Chapeland, S.; Charpy, A.; Charrier, D.; Chartoire, M.; Charvet, J. L.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chepurnov, V.; Chernenko, S.; Cherney, M.; Cheshkov, C.; Cheynis, B.; Chochula, P.; Chiavassa, E.; Chibante Barroso, V.; Choi, J.; Christakoglou, P.; Christiansen, P.; Christensen, C.; Chykalov, O. A.; Cicalo, C.; Cifarelli-Strolin, L.; Ciobanu, M.; Cindolo, F.; Cirstoiu, C.; Clausse, O.; Cleymans, J.; Cobanoglu, O.; Coffin, J.-P.; Coli, S.; Colla, A.; Colledani, C.; Combaret, C.; Combet, M.; Comets, M.; Conesa Balbastre, G.; Conesa del Valle, Z.; Contin, G.; Contreras, J.; Cormier, T.; Corsi, F.; Cortese, P.; Costa, F.; Crescio, E.; Crochet, P.; Cuautle, E.; Cussonneau, J.; Dahlinger, M.; Dainese, A.; Dalsgaard, H. H.; Daniel, L.; Das, I.; Das, T.; Dash, A.; Da Silva, R.; Davenport, M.; Daues, H.; DeCaro, A.; de Cataldo, G.; DeCuveland, J.; DeFalco, A.; de Gaspari, M.; de Girolamo, P.; de Groot, J.; DeGruttola, D.; DeHaas, A.; DeMarco, N.; DePasquale, S.; DeRemigis, P.; de Vaux, D.; Decock, G.; Delagrange, H.; DelFranco, M.; Dellacasa, G.; Dell'Olio, C.; Dell'Olio, D.; Deloff, A.; Demanov, V.; Dénes, E.; D'Erasmo, G.; Derkach, D.; Devaux, A.; Di Bari, D.; Di Bartelomen, A.; Di Giglio, C.; Di Liberto, S.; Di Mauro, A.; Di Nezza, P.; Dialinas, M.; Diaz, L.; Díaz Valdes, R.; Dietel, T.; Dima, R.; Ding, H.; Dinca, C.; Divià, R.; Dobretsov, V.; Dobrin, A.; Doenigus, B.; Dobrowolski, T.; Domínguez, I.; Dorn, M.; Drouet, S.; Dubey, A. E.; Ducroux, L.; Dumitrache, F.; Dumonteil, E.; Dupieux, P.; Duta, V.; Dutta Majumdar, A.; Dutta Majumdar, M.; Dyhre, Th; Efimov, L.; Efremov, A.; Elia, D.; Emschermann, D.; Engster, C.; Enokizono, A.; Espagnon, B.; Estienne, M.; Evangelista, A.; Evans, D.; Evrard, S.; Fabjan, C. W.; Fabris, D.; Faivre, J.; Falchieri, D.; Fantoni, A.; Farano, R.; Fearick, R.; Fedorov, O.; Fekete, V.; Felea, D.; Feofilov, G.; Férnandez Téllez, A.; Ferretti, A.; Fichera, F.; Filchagin, S.; Filoni, E.; Finck, C.; Fini, R.; Fiore, E. M.; Flierl, D.; Floris, M.; Fodor, Z.; Foka, Y.; Fokin, S.; Force, P.; Formenti, F.; Fragiacomo, E.; Fragkiadakis, M.; Fraissard, D.; Franco, A.; Franco, M.; Frankenfeld, U.; Fratino, U.; Fresneau, S.; Frolov, A.; Fuchs, U.; Fujita, J.; Furget, C.; Furini, M.; Fusco Girard, M.; Gaardhøje, J.-J.; Gabrielli, A.; Gadrat, S.; Gagliardi, M.; Gago, A.; Gaido, L.; Gallas Torreira, A.; Gallio, M.; Gandolfi, E.; Ganoti, P.; Ganti, M.; Garabatos, J.; Garcia Lopez, A.; Garizzo, L.; Gaudichet, L.; Gemme, R.; Germain, M.; Gheata, A.; Gheata, M.; Ghidini, B.; Ghosh, P.; Giolu, G.; Giraudo, G.; Giubellino, P.; Glasow, R.; Glässel, P.; Ferreiro, E. G.; Gonzalez Gutierrez, C.; Gonzales-Trueba, L. H.; Gorbunov, S.; Gorbunov, Y.; Gos, H.; Gosset, J.; Gotovac, S.; Gottschlag, H.; Gottschalk, D.; Grabski, V.; Grassi, T.; Gray, H.; Grebenyuk, O.; Grebieszkow, K.; Gregory, C.; Grigoras, C.; Grion, N.; Grigoriev, V.; Grigoryan, A.; Grigoryan, C.; Grigoryan, S.; Grishuk, Y.; Gros, P.; Grosse-Oetringhaus, J.; Grossiord, J.-Y.; Grosso, R.; Grynyov, B.; Guarnaccia, C.; Guber, F.; Guerin, F.; Guernane, R.; Guerzoni, M.; Guichard, A.; Guida, M.; Guilloux, G.; Gulkanyan, H.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Gunji, T.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, V.; Gustafsson, H.-A.; Gutbrod, H.; Hadjidakis, C.; Haiduc, M.; Hamar, G.; Hamagaki, H.; Hamblen, J.; Hansen, J. C.; Hardy, P.; Hatzifotiadou, D.; Harris, J. W.; Hartig, M.; Harutyunyan, A.; Hayrapetyan, A.; Hasch, D.; Hasegan, D.; Hehner, J.; Heine, N.; Heinz, M.; Helstrup, H.; Herghelegiu, A.; Herlant, S.; Herrera Corral, G.; Herrmann, N.; Hetland, K.; Hille, P.; Hinke, H.; Hippolyte, B.; Hoch, M.; Hoebbel, H.; Hoedlmoser, H.; Horaguchi, T.; Horner, M.; Hristov, P.; Hřivnáčová, I.; Hu, S.; Guo, C. Hu; Humanic, T.; Hurtado, A.; Hwang, D. S.; Ianigro, J. C.; Idzik, M.; Igolkin, S.; Ilkaev, R.; Ilkiv, I.; Imhoff, M.; Innocenti, P. G.; Ionescu, E.; Ippolitov, M.; Irfan, M.; Insa, C.; Inuzuka, M.; Ivan, C.; Ivanov, A.; Ivanov, M.; Ivanov, V.; Jacobs, P.; Jacholkowski, A.; Jančurová, L.; Janik, R.; Jasper, M.; Jena, C.; Jirden, L.; Johnson, D. P.; Jones, G. T.; Jorgensen, C.; Jouve, F.; Jovanović, P.; Junique, A.; Jusko, A.; Jung, H.; Jung, W.; Kadija, K.; Kamal, A.; Kamermans, R.; Kapusta, S.; Kaidalov, A.; Kakoyan, V.; Kalcher, S.; Kang, E.; Kapitan, J.; Kaplin, V.; Karadzhev, K.; Karavichev, O.; Karavicheva, T.; Karpechev, E.; Karpio, K.; Kazantsev, A.; Kebschull, U.; Keidel, R.; Mohsin Khan, M.; Khanzadeev, A.; Kharlov, Y.; Kikola, D.; Kileng, B.; Kim, D.; Kim, D. S.; Kim, D. W.; Kim, H. N.; Kim, J. S.; Kim, S.; Kinson, J. B.; Kiprich, S. K.; Kisel, I.; Kiselev, S.; Kisiel, A.; Kiss, T.; Kiworra, V.; Klay, J.; Klein Bösing, C.; Kliemant, M.; Klimov, A.; Klovning, A.; Kluge, A.; Kluit, R.; Kniege, S.; Kolevatov, R.; Kollegger, T.; Kolojvari, A.; Kondratiev, V.; Kornas, E.; Koshurnikov, E.; Kotov, I.; Kour, R.; Kowalski, M.; Kox, S.; Kozlov, K.; Králik, I.; Kramer, F.; Kraus, I.; Kravčáková, A.; Krawutschke, T.; Krivda, M.; Kryshen, E.; Kucheriaev, Y.; Kugler, A.; Kuhn, C.; Kuijer, P.; Kumar, L.; Kumar, N.; Kumpumaeki, P.; Kurepin, A.; Kurepin, A. N.; Kushpil, S.; Kushpil, V.; Kutovsky, M.; Kvaerno, H.; Kweon, M.; Labbé, J.-C.; Lackner, F.; Ladron de Guevara, P.; Lafage, V.; La Rocca, P.; Lamont, M.; Lara, C.; Larsen, D. T.; Laurenti, G.; Lazzeroni, C.; LeBornec, Y.; LeBris, N.; LeGailliard, C.; Lebedev, V.; Lecoq, J.; Lee, K. S.; Lee, S. C.; Lefévre, F.; Legrand, I.; Lehmann, T.; Leistam, L.; Lenoir, P.; Lenti, V.; Leon, H.; Monzon, I. Leon; Lévai, P.; Li, Q.; Li, X.; Librizzi, F.; Lietava, R.; Lindegaard, N.; Lindenstruth, V.; Lippmann, C.; Lisa, M.; Listratenko, O. M.; Littel, F.; Liu, Y.; Lo, J.; Lobanov, V.; Loginov, V.; López Noriega, M.; López-Ramírez, R.; López Torres, E.; Lorenzo, P. M.; Løvhøiden, G.; Lu, S.; Ludolphs, W.; Lunardon, M.; Luquin, L.; Lusso, S.; Lutz, J.-R.; Luvisetto, M.; Lyapin, V.; Maevskaya, A.; Magureanu, C.; Mahajan, A.; Majahan, S.; Mahmoud, T.; Mairani, A.; Mahapatra, D.; Makarov, A.; Makhlyueva, I.; Malek, M.; Malkiewicz, T.; Mal'Kevich, D.; Malzacher, P.; Mamonov, A.; Manea, C.; Mangotra, L. K.; Maniero, D.; Manko, V.; Manso, F.; Manzari, V.; Mao, Y.; Marcel, A.; Marchini, S.; Mareš, J.; Margagliotti, G. V.; Margotti, A.; Marin, A.; Marin, J.-C.; Marras, D.; Martinengo, P.; Martínez, M. I.; Martinez-Davalos, A.; Martínez Garcia, G.; Martini, S.; Marzari Chiesa, A.; Marzocca, C.; Masciocchi, S.; Masera, M.; Masetti, M.; Maslov, N. I.; Masoni, A.; Massera, F.; Mast, M.; Mastroserio, A.; Matthews, Z. L.; Mayer, B.; Mazza, G.; Mazzaro, M. D.; Mazzoni, A.; Meddi, F.; Meleshko, E.; Menchaca-Rocha, A.; Meneghini, S.; Meoni, M.; Mercado Perez, J.; Mereu, P.; Meunier, O.; Miake, Y.; Michalon, A.; Michinelli, R.; Miftakhov, N.; Mignone, M.; Mikhailov, K.; Milosevic, J.; Minaev, Y.; Minafra, F.; Mischke, A.; Miśkowiec, D.; Mitsyn, V.; Mitu, C.; Mohanty, B.; Moisa, D.; Molnar, L.; Mondal, M.; Mondal, N.; Montaño Zetina, L.; Monteno, M.; Morando, M.; Morel, M.; Moretto, S.; Morhardt, Th; Morsch, A.; Moukhanova, T.; Mucchi, M.; Muccifora, V.; Mudnic, E.; Müller, H.; Müller, W.; Munoz, J.; Mura, D.; Musa, L.; Muraz, J. F.; Musso, A.; Nania, R.; Nandi, B.; Nappi, E.; Navach, F.; Navin, S.; Nayak, T.; Nazarenko, S.; Nazarov, G.; Nellen, L.; Nendaz, F.; Nianine, A.; Nicassio, M.; Nielsen, B. S.; Nikolaev, S.; Nikolic, V.; Nikulin, S.; Nikulin, V.; Nilsen, B.; Nitti, M.; Noferini, F.; Nomokonov, P.; Nooren, G.; Noto, F.; Nouais, D.; Nyiri, A.; Nystrand, J.; Odyniec, G.; Oeschler, H.; Oinonen, M.; Oldenburg, M.; Oleks, I.; Olsen, E. K.; Onuchin, V.; Oppedisano, C.; Orsini, F.; Ortiz-Velázquez, A.; Oskamp, C.; Oskarsson, A.; Osmic, F.; Österman, L.; Otterlund, I.; Ovrebekk, G.; Oyama, K.; Pachr, M.; Pagano, P.; Paić, G.; Pajares, C.; Pal, S.; Pal, S.; Pálla, G.; Palmeri, A.; Pancaldi, G.; Panse, R.; Pantaleo, A.; Pappalardo, G. S.; Pastirčák, B.; Pastore, C.; Patarakin, O.; Paticchio, V.; Patimo, G.; Pavlinov, A.; Pawlak, T.; Peitzmann, T.; Pénichot, Y.; Pepato, A.; Pereira, H.; Peresunko, D.; Perez, C.; Perez Griffo, J.; Perini, D.; Perrino, D.; Peryt, W.; Pesci, A.; Peskov, V.; Pestov, Y.; Peters, A. J.; Petráček, V.; Petridis, A.; Petris, M.; Petrov, V.; Petrov, V.; Petrovici, M.; Peyré, J.; Piano, S.; Piccotti, A.; Pichot, P.; Piemonte, C.; Pikna, M.; Pilastrini, R.; Pillot, P.; Pinazza, O.; Pini, B.; Pinsky, L.; Pinto Morais, V.; Pismennaya, V.; Piuz, F.; Platt, R.; Ploskon, M.; Plumeri, S.; Pluta, J.; Pocheptsov, T.; Podesta, P.; Poggio, F.; Poghosyan, M.; Poghosyan, T.; Polák, K.; Polichtchouk, B.; Polozov, P.; Polyakov, V.; Pommeresch, B.; Pompei, F.; Pop, A.; Popescu, S.; Posa, F.; Pospíšil, V.; Potukuchi, B.; Pouthas, J.; Prasad, S.; Preghenella, R.; Prino, F.; Prodan, L.; Prono, G.; Protsenko, M. A.; Pruneau, C. A.; Przybyla, A.; Pshenichnov, I.; Puddu, G.; Pujahari, P.; Pulvirenti, A.; Punin, A.; Punin, V.; Putschke, J.; Quartieri, J.; Quercigh, E.; Rachevskaya, I.; Rachevski, A.; Rademakers, A.; Radomski, S.; Radu, A.; Rak, J.; Ramello, L.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Rasmussen, O. B.; Rasson, J.; Razin, V.; Read, K.; Real, J.; Redlich, K.; Reichling, C.; Renard, C.; Renault, G.; Renfordt, R.; Reolon, A. R.; Reshetin, A.; Revol, J.-P.; Reygers, K.; Ricaud, H.; Riccati, L.; Ricci, R. A.; Richter, M.; Riedler, P.; Rigalleau, L. M.; Riggi, F.; Riegler, W.; Rindel, E.; Riso, J.; Rivetti, A.; Rizzi, M.; Rizzi, V.; Rodriguez Cahuantzi, M.; Røed, K.; Röhrich, D.; Román-López, S.; Romanato, M.; Romita, R.; Ronchetti, F.; Rosinsky, P.; Rosnet, P.; Rossegger, S.; Rossi, A.; Rostchin, V.; Rotondo, F.; Roukoutakis, F.; Rousseau, S.; Roy, C.; Roy, D.; Roy, P.; Royer, L.; Rubin, G.; Rubio, A.; Rui, R.; Rusanov, I.; Russo, G.; Ruuskanen, V.; Ryabinkin, E.; Rybicki, A.; Sadovsky, S.; Šafařík, K.; Sahoo, R.; Saini, J.; Saiz, P.; Salur, S.; Sambyal, S.; Samsonov, V.; Šándor, L.; Sandoval, A.; Sann, H.; Santiard, J.-C.; Santo, R.; Santoro, R.; Sargsyan, G.; Saturnini, P.; Scapparone, E.; Scarlassara, F.; Schackert, B.; Schiaua, C.; Schicker, R.; Schioler, T.; Schippers, J. D.; Schmidt, C.; Schmidt, H.; Schneider, R.; Schossmaier, K.; Schukraft, J.; Schutz, Y.; Schwarz, K.; Schweda, K.; Schyns, E.; Scioli, G.; Scomparin, E.; Snow, H.; Sedykh, S.; Segato, G.; Sellitto, S.; Semeria, F.; Senyukov, S.; Seppänen, H.; Serci, S.; Serkin, L.; Serra, S.; Sesselmann, T.; Sevcenco, A.; Sgura, I.; Shabratova, G.; Shahoyan, R.; Sharkov, E.; Sharma, S.; Shigaki, K.; Shileev, K.; Shukla, P.; Shurygin, A.; Shurygina, M.; Sibiriak, Y.; Siddi, E.; Siemiarczuk, T.; Sigward, M. H.; Silenzi, A.; Silvermyr, D.; Silvestri, R.; Simili, E.; Simion, V.; Simon, R.; Simonetti, L.; Singaraju, R.; Singhal, V.; Sinha, B.; Sinha, T.; Siska, M.; Sitár, B.; Sitta, M.; Skaali, B.; Skowronski, P.; Slodkowski, M.; Smirnov, N.; Smykov, L.; Snellings, R.; Snoeys, W.; Soegaard, C.; Soerensen, J.; Sokolov, O.; Soldatov, A.; Soloviev, A.; Soltveit, H.; Soltz, R.; Sommer, W.; Soos, C.; Soramel, F.; Sorensen, S.; Soyk, D.; Spyropoulou-Stassinaki, M.; Stachel, J.; Staley, F.; Stan, I.; Stavinskiy, A.; Steckert, J.; Stefanini, G.; Stefanek, G.; Steinbeck, T.; Stelzer, H.; Stenlund, E.; Stocco, D.; Stockmeier, M.; Stoicea, G.; Stolpovsky, P.; Strmeň, P.; Stutzmann, J. S.; Su, G.; Sugitate, T.; Šumbera, M.; Suire, C.; Susa, T.; Sushil Kumar, K.; Swoboda, D.; Symons, J.; Szarka, I.; Szostak, A.; Szuba, M.; Szymanski, P.; Tadel, M.; Tagridis, C.; Tan, L.; Tapia Takaki, D.; Taureg, H.; Tauro, A.; Tavlet, M.; Tejeda Munoz, G.; Thäder, J.; Tieulent, R.; Timmer, P.; Tolyhy, T.; Topilskaya, N.; Torcato de Matos, C.; Torii, H.; Toscano, L.; Tosello, F.; Tournaire, A.; Traczyk, T.; Tröger, G.; Tromeur, W.; Truesdale, D.; Trzaska, W.; Tsiledakis, G.; Tsilis, E.; Tsvetkov, A.; Turcato, M.; Turrisi, R.; Tuveri, M.; Tveter, T.; Tydesjo, H.; Tykarski, L.; Tywoniuk, K.; Ugolini, E.; Ullaland, K.; Urbán, J.; Urciuoli, G. M.; Usai, G. L.; Usseglio, M.; Vacchi, A.; Vala, M.; Valiev, F.; Vande Vyvre, P.; Van Den Brink, A.; Van Eijndhoven, N.; Van Der Kolk, N.; van Leeuwen, M.; Vannucci, L.; Vanzetto, S.; Vanuxem, J.-P.; Vargas, M. A.; Varma, R.; Vascotto, A.; Vasiliev, A.; Vassiliou, M.; Vasta, P.; Vechernin, V.; Venaruzzo, M.; Vercellin, E.; Vergara, S.; Verhoeven, W.; Veronese, F.; Vetlitskiy, I.; Vernet, R.; Victorov, V.; Vidak, L.; Viesti, G.; Vikhlyantsev, O.; Vilakazi, Z.; Villalobos Baillie, O.; Vinogradov, A.; Vinogradov, L.; Vinogradov, Y.; Virgili, T.; Viyogi, Y.; Vodopianov, A.; Volpe, G.; Vranic, D.; Vrláková, J.; Vulpescu, B.; Wabnitz, C.; Wagner, V.; Wallet, L.; Wan, R.; Wang, Y.; Wang, Y.; Wheadon, R.; Weis, R.; Wen, Q.; Wessels, J.; Westergaard, J.; Wiechula, J.; Wiesenaecker, A.; Wikne, J.; Wilk, A.; Wilk, G.; Williams, C.; Willis, N.; Windelband, B.; Witt, R.; Woehri, H.; Wyllie, K.; Xu, C.; Yang, C.; Yang, H.; Yermia, F.; Yin, Z.; Yin, Z.; Ky, B. Yun; Yushmanov, I.; Yuting, B.; Zabrodin, E.; Zagato, S.; Zagreev, B.; Zaharia, P.; Zalite, A.; Zampa, G.; Zampolli, C.; Zanevskiy, Y.; Zarochentsev, A.; Zaudtke, O.; Závada, P.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zepeda, A.; Zeter, V.; Zgura, I.; Zhalov, M.; Zhou, D.; Zhou, S.; Zhu, G.; Zichichi, A.; Zinchenko, A.; Zinovjev, G.; Zoccarato, Y.; Zubarev, A.; Zucchini, A.; Zuffa, M.

    2008-08-01

    ALICE (A Large Ion Collider Experiment) is a general-purpose, heavy-ion detector at the CERN LHC which focuses on QCD, the strong-interaction sector of the Standard Model. It is designed to address the physics of strongly interacting matter and the quark-gluon plasma at extreme values of energy density and temperature in nucleus-nucleus collisions. Besides running with Pb ions, the physics programme includes collisions with lighter ions, lower energy running and dedicated proton-nucleus runs. ALICE will also take data with proton beams at the top LHC energy to collect reference data for the heavy-ion programme and to address several QCD topics for which ALICE is complementary to the other LHC detectors. The ALICE detector has been built by a collaboration including currently over 1000 physicists and engineers from 105 Institutes in 30 countries. Its overall dimensions are 16 × 16 × 26 m3 with a total weight of approximately 10 000 t. The experiment consists of 18 different detector systems each with its own specific technology choice and design constraints, driven both by the physics requirements and the experimental conditions expected at LHC. The most stringent design constraint is to cope with the extreme particle multiplicity anticipated in central Pb-Pb collisions. The different subsystems were optimized to provide high-momentum resolution as well as excellent Particle Identification (PID) over a broad range in momentum, up to the highest multiplicities predicted for LHC. This will allow for comprehensive studies of hadrons, electrons, muons, and photons produced in the collision of heavy nuclei. Most detector systems are scheduled to be installed and ready for data taking by mid-2008 when the LHC is scheduled to start operation, with the exception of parts of the Photon Spectrometer (PHOS), Transition Radiation Detector (TRD) and Electro Magnetic Calorimeter (EMCal). These detectors will be completed for the high-luminosity ion run expected in 2010. This

  14. Influences of hydraulic gradient, surface roughness, intersecting angle, and scale effect on nonlinear flow behavior at single fracture intersections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Bo; Liu, Richeng; Jiang, Yujing

    2016-07-01

    Fluid flow tests were conducted on two crossed fracture models for which the geometries of fracture segments and intersections were measured by utilizing a visualization technique using a CCD (charged coupled device) camera. Numerical simulations by solving the Navier-Stokes equations were performed to characterize the fluid flow at fracture intersections. The roles of hydraulic gradient, surface roughness, intersecting angle, and scale effect in the nonlinear fluid flow behavior through single fracture intersections were investigated. The simulation results of flow rate agreed well with the experimental results for both models. The experimental and simulation results showed that with the increment of the hydraulic gradient, the ratio of the flow rate to the hydraulic gradient, Q/J, decreases and the relative difference of Q/J between the calculation results employing the Navier-Stokes equations and the cubic law, δ, increases. When taking into account the fracture surface roughness quantified by Z2 ranging 0-0.42 for J = 1, the value of δ would increase by 0-10.3%. The influences of the intersecting angle on the normalized flow rate that represents the ratio of the flow rate in a segment to the total flow rate, Ra, and the ratio of the hydraulic aperture to the mechanical aperture, e/E, are negligible when J < 10-3, whereas their values change significantly when J > 10-2. Based on the regression analysis on simulation results, a mathematical expression was proposed to quantify e/E, involving variables of J and Rr, where Rr is the radius of truncating circles centered at an intersection. For E/Rr > 10-2, e/E varies significantly and the scale of model has large impacts on the nonlinear flow behavior through intersections, while for E/Rr < 10-3, the scale effect is negligibly small. Finally, a necessary condition to apply the cubic law to fluid flow through fracture intersections is suggested as J < 10-3, E/Rr < 10-3, and Z2 = 0.

  15. Performance Tests of CMSSW on the CernVM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petek, Marko; Gowdy, Stephen

    2012-12-01

    The CERN Virtual Machine (CernVM) Software Appliance is a project developed in CERN with the goal of allowing the execution of the experiment's software on different operating systems in an easy way for the users. To achieve this it makes use of Virtual Machine images consisting of a JEOS (Just Enough Operating System) Linux image, bundled with CVMFS, a distributed file system for software. This image can then be run with a proper virtualizer on most of the platforms available. It also aggressively caches data on the local user's machine so that it can operate disconnected from the network. CMS wanted to compare the performance of the CMS Software running in the virtualized environment with the same software running on a native Linux box. To answer this wish, a series of tests were made on a controlled environment during 2010-2011. This work presents the results of those tests.

  16. Service management at CERN with Service-Now

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toteva, Z.; Alvarez Alonso, R.; Alvarez Granda, E.; Cheimariou, M.-E.; Fedorko, I.; Hefferman, J.; Lemaitre, S.; Clavo, D. Martin; Martinez Pedreira, P.; Pera Mira, O.

    2012-12-01

    The Information Technology (IT) and the General Services (GS) departments at CERN have decided to combine their extensive experience in support for IT and non-IT services towards a common goal - to bring the services closer to the end user based on Information Technology Infrastructure Library (ITIL) best practice. The collaborative efforts have so far produced definitions for the incident and the request fulfilment processes which are based on a unique two-dimensional service catalogue that combines both the user and the support team views of all services. After an extensive evaluation of the available industrial solutions, Service-now was selected as the tool to implement the CERN Service-Management processes. The initial release of the tool provided an attractive web portal for the users and successfully implemented two basic ITIL processes; the incident management and the request fulfilment processes. It also integrated with the CERN personnel databases and the LHC GRID ticketing system. Subsequent releases continued to integrate with other third-party tools like the facility management systems of CERN as well as to implement new processes such as change management. Independently from those new development activities it was decided to simplify the request fulfilment process in order to achieve easier acceptance by the CERN user community. We believe that due to the high modularity of the Service-now tool, the parallel design of ITIL processes e.g., event management and non-ITIL processes, e.g., computer centre hardware management, will be easily achieved. This presentation will describe the experience that we have acquired and the techniques that were followed to achieve the CERN customization of the Service-Now tool.

  17. Becoming Black Women: Intimate Stories and Intersectional Identities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilkins, Amy C.

    2012-01-01

    In this article, I argue that intimate stories are an important resource for the achievement of intersectional identities. Drawing on in-depth interviews with black college students at two predominantly white universities, I examine the stories black college women tell about interracial relationships between black men and white women. I argue that…

  18. View of baseball back stop on sports field at intersection ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of baseball back stop on sports field at intersection of South Twenty-Sixth Street and Foothill Avenue. Buildings No. 36, 37, 38, and 35, from to right. Foothill Avenue at center rear. Looking east-northeast - Easter Hill Village, Bordered by South Twenty-sixth Street, South Twenty-eighth Street, Hinkley Avenue, Foothill Avenue & Corto Square, Richmond, Contra Costa County, CA

  19. View of sports field from Easter Hill looking at intersection ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of sports field from Easter Hill looking at intersection of South Twenty-Sixth Street and Foothill Avenue at left center rear. Buildings No. 36, 35, 25, 27, and 29, from left to right. Looking northeast - Easter Hill Village, Bordered by South Twenty-sixth Street, South Twenty-eighth Street, Hinkley Avenue, Foothill Avenue & Corto Square, Richmond, Contra Costa County, CA

  20. 12. Readville showing the intersection of the Franklin Branch crossing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. Readville showing the intersection of the Franklin Branch crossing the Northeast Corridor (formerly the Boston & Providence RR) on the bridge; Readville Station to the right of bridge. Readville, Suffolk Co., MA. Sec. 4116, MP 219.41. - Northeast Railroad Corridor, Amtrak Route between RI/MA State Line & South Station, Boston, Suffolk County, MA

  1. 4. VIEW LOOKING WEST DOWN CENTRAL AVENUE AT THE INTERSECTION ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. VIEW LOOKING WEST DOWN CENTRAL AVENUE AT THE INTERSECTION WITH SEVENTH STREET. THE PLANT HAS MOST OF THE AMENITIES OF A SMALL TOWN - WATER SUPPLY, WASTE WATER TREATMENT, POLICE FORCE, FIRE DEPARTMENT, FOOD SERVICES, HOSPITAL, COMMUNICATIONS NETWORK, STEAM GENERATION, VEHICLE MAINTENANCE, TRANSPORTATION, AND A GOVERNMENT. - Rocky Flats Plant, Bounded by Indiana Street & Routes 93, 128 & 72, Golden, Jefferson County, CO

  2. 19. PIPELINE INTERSECTION AT THE MOUTH OF WAIKOLU VALLEY ON ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    19. PIPELINE INTERSECTION AT THE MOUTH OF WAIKOLU VALLEY ON THE BEACH. VALVE AT RIGHT (WITH WRENCH NEARBY) OPENS TO FLUSH VALLEY SYSTEM OUT. VALVE AT LEFT CLOSES TO KEEP WATER FROM ENTERING SYSTEM ALONG THE PALI DURING REPAIRS. - Kalaupapa Water Supply System, Waikolu Valley to Kalaupapa Settlement, Island of Molokai, Kalaupapa, Kalawao County, HI

  3. Revisiting Street Intersections Using Slot-Based Systems.

    PubMed

    Tachet, Remi; Santi, Paolo; Sobolevsky, Stanislav; Reyes-Castro, Luis Ignacio; Frazzoli, Emilio; Helbing, Dirk; Ratti, Carlo

    2016-01-01

    Since their appearance at the end of the 19th century, traffic lights have been the primary mode of granting access to road intersections. Today, this centuries-old technology is challenged by advances in intelligent transportation, which are opening the way to new solutions built upon slot-based systems similar to those commonly used in aerial traffic: what we call Slot-based Intersections (SIs). Despite simulation-based evidence of the potential benefits of SIs, a comprehensive, analytical framework to compare their relative performance with traffic lights is still lacking. Here, we develop such a framework. We approach the problem in a novel way, by generalizing classical queuing theory. Having defined safety conditions, we characterize capacity and delay of SIs. In the 2-road crossing configuration, we provide a capacity-optimal SI management system. For arbitrary intersection configurations, near-optimal solutions are developed. Results theoretically show that transitioning from a traffic light system to SI has the potential of doubling capacity and significantly reducing delays. This suggests a reduction of non-linear dynamics induced by intersection bottlenecks, with positive impact on the road network. Such findings can provide transportation engineers and planners with crucial insights as they prepare to manage the transition towards a more intelligent transportation infrastructure in cities.

  4. Intersecting Scapes and New Millennium Identities in Language Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Higgins, Christina

    2015-01-01

    This paper examines how flows of people, media, money, technology, and ideologies move through the world, with attention to how these scapes (Appadurai 1990, 1996, 2013) shape identity construction among language learners, both in and out of classrooms. After illustrating intersecting scapes in sociolinguistic terms, I explore the relevance of…

  5. Crossroads: Modern Interactive Intersections and Accessible Pedestrian Signals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barlow, Janet M.; Franck, Lukas

    2005-01-01

    This article discusses the interactive nature of modern actuated intersections and the effect of that interface on pedestrians who are visually impaired. Information is provided about accessible pedestrian signals (APS), the role of blindness professionals in APS installation decisions, and techniques for crossing streets with APS.

  6. 35. PHOTOCOPY OF PHOTOGRAPH. VIEW OF ARMORY FROM INTERSECTION OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    35. PHOTOCOPY OF PHOTOGRAPH. VIEW OF ARMORY FROM INTERSECTION OF SOUTH 3RD AND EAST WALNUT STREET LOOKING SOUTHWEST CIRCA 1917. THIS IS A COPY OF A POST CARD SIZED PRINT LOANED BY THE YAKIMA VALLEY MUSEUM AND HISTORICAL ASSOCIATION. PHOTOGRAPHER UNKNOWN. - Yakima National Guard Armory, 202 South Third Street, Yakima, Yakima County, WA

  7. Mathematics and Language Intersections for Hispanic Bilingual Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kessler, Carolyn

    This paper examines intersections between mathematical and language performance in light of data collected from Hispanic students at varying stages of acquiring English as a second language at school. Emphasis is on aspects of the developing linguistic system as it affects underlying metacognitive processes related to mathematical performance.…

  8. Disciplinarity and Methodology in Intersectionality Theory and Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Syed, Moin

    2010-01-01

    Comments on the original article, "Intersectionality and research in psychology," by E. R. Cole. Cole's article, says the current author, makes a welcome and valuable contribution to the field of psychology. Particularly useful are the three questions that she posed, highlighting how these questions are relevant and pressing for all researchers,…

  9. Wind tunnel measurements of pollutant turbulent fluxes in urban intersections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carpentieri, Matteo; Hayden, Paul; Robins, Alan G.

    2012-01-01

    Wind tunnel experiments have been carried out at the EnFlo laboratory to measure mean and turbulent tracer fluxes in geometries of real street canyon intersections. The work was part of the major DAPPLE project, focussing on the area surrounding the intersection between Marylebone Road and Gloucester Place in Central London, UK. Understanding flow and dispersion in urban streets is a very important issue for air quality management and planning, and turbulent mass exchange processes are important phenomena that are very often neglected in urban modelling studies. The adopted methodology involved the combined use of laser Doppler anemometry and tracer concentration measurements. This methodology was applied to quantify the mean and turbulent flow and dispersion fields within several street canyon intersections. Vertical profiles of turbulent tracer flux were also measured. The technique, despite a number of limitations, proved reliable and allowed tracer balance calculations to be undertaken in the selected street canyon intersections. The experience gained in this work will enable much more precise studies in the future as issues affecting the accuracy of the experimental technique have been identified and resolved.

  10. Using Dynamic Geometry Software for the Intersection Surfaces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koparan, Timur; Yilmaz, Gül Kaleli

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to define prospective teacher views about using dynamic geometry software for intersection surfaces. The study was conducted as a case study. For this purpose, data collection tool was developed based on the opinion of two experts. The data collection tool consists of 4 open-ended questions related to the intersection…

  11. Design unbiased estimation in line intersect sampling using segmented transects

    Treesearch

    David L.R. Affleck; Timothy G. Gregoire; Harry T. Valentine; Harry T. Valentine

    2005-01-01

    In many applications of line intersect sampling. transects consist of multiple, connected segments in a prescribed configuration. The relationship between the transect configuration and the selection probability of a population element is illustrated and a consistent sampling protocol, applicable to populations composed of arbitrarily shaped elements, is proposed. It...

  12. 1. VIEW OF COULTERVILLE, CALIFORNIA AT INTERSECTION OF HIGHWAY 149 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. VIEW OF COULTERVILLE, CALIFORNIA AT INTERSECTION OF HIGHWAY 149 IN FOREGROUND AND CALIFORNIA ROAD J20 IN CENTER. LOOKING NE. GIS: N-37 42 38.7 / W-120 11 50.1 - Coulterville Road, Between Foresta & All-Weather Highway, Yosemite Village, Mariposa County, CA

  13. Intersections of Spirituality, Religion and Gender in Children's Literature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trousdale, Ann M.

    2005-01-01

    This paper explores the intersections of spirituality, religion and gender in contemporary children's books published in the United States. Background for the discussion includes a history of religion in children's literature and the history of women's roles in the Christian tradition. Representative works of realistic fiction--historical and…

  14. DEDRICK DRIVE, LOOKING SOUTH FROM NORTHEAST CORNER OF INTERSECTION OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DEDRICK DRIVE, LOOKING SOUTH FROM NORTHEAST CORNER OF INTERSECTION OF SECOND STREET AND DEDRICK DRIVE - Pacific Coast Torpedo Station, Keyport Industrial District, Both sides of Second Street, between Dedrick Drive and Liberty Bay and one building west of Dedrick Drive and south of Second Street, Keyport, Kitsap County, WA

  15. 1. EXTERIOR VIEW OF HILLSIDE PLANT FROM INTERSECTION OF LINCOLN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. EXTERIOR VIEW OF HILLSIDE PLANT FROM INTERSECTION OF LINCOLN STREET AND 2ND AVENUE. HILLSIDE PLANT WAS BUILT AS CALLAWAY MILLS HILLSIDE COTTON MILL (PARK A. DALLIS, 1914-15). THIS TWO-STORY SECTION WAS BUILT AS A WEAVE SHED. - Hillside Cotton Mill, 1300 Brownwood Avenue, La Grange, Troup County, GA

  16. Intersections of Spirituality, Religion and Gender in Children's Literature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trousdale, Ann M.

    2005-01-01

    This paper explores the intersections of spirituality, religion and gender in contemporary children's books published in the United States. Background for the discussion includes a history of religion in children's literature and the history of women's roles in the Christian tradition. Representative works of realistic fiction--historical and…

  17. Are intersecting staple lines a hazard in intestinal anastomosis?

    PubMed

    Zilling, T; Walther, B S

    1992-09-01

    To determine the safety of intersecting staple lines, 22 pigs were operated upon with a functional end-to-end enteroanastomosis 40 cm distal to the ligament of Treitz using linear stapling devices. The procedure was repeated on the colon, where a colocolostomy was created. The blood flow at intersecting staple lines and single-row staple lines for each anastomosis was studied with the reference organ method 24 hours after the first operation. The purpose was to evaluate whether there is a reduction in blood flow at the site of intersecting staple lines, causing an increased risk for anastomotic leakage. The reduction in mean blood flow in crossing compared with noncrossing staple lines was 6 percent (-5-17 percent) for small bowel anastomoses and 7 percent (-6-19 percent) for colonic anastomoses. An equivalence test showed that, if a reduction in blood flow exists between crossing and noncrossing staple lines, it is most likely less than 30 percent (P less than 0.001) for both small bowel and colonic anastomoses. This experimental study demonstrates that intersecting staple lines in small bowel and colonic anastomoses do not reduce anastomotic blood flow to a dangerous level.

  18. Investigating the Intersection of Race and Histories in the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martell, Christopher C.

    2012-01-01

    In this practitioner research study, a social studies teacher examined the intersection between his students' race/ethnicity and their experiences learning history. Using the theory of culturally relevant pedagogy as a lens, this study employed mixed methods, analyzing teacher journaling, classroom artifacts, and student reflections, as well as…

  19. Indices of 1-forms, intersection indices, and Newton polyhedra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esterov, A. I.

    2006-08-01

    The intersection indices of a certain kind of analytic set (resultant cycles) are expressed in terms of the Newton polyhedra of the corresponding defining systems of functions, provided that the principal parts of the functions are in general position. Among special cases of resultant cycles are complete intersections and the loci of matrix rank drop. Among special cases of the intersection indices of such sets are the index of a singularity of a Poincaré-Hopf vector field and its generalizations to the case of singular varieties, the index of a system of germs of 1-forms at an isolated singularity of a Gusein-Zade-Ebeling complete intersection, and the Suwa residue of a system of germs of sections of a vector bundle. One also obtains as a consequence the well-known Kushnirenko-Oka formula for the Milnor number of the germ of a map in terms of the Newton polyhedra of its components. A generalization of the well-known equality of the above-mentioned invariants of singularities to the dimensions of certain local rings is also presented.

  20. Becoming Black Women: Intimate Stories and Intersectional Identities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilkins, Amy C.

    2012-01-01

    In this article, I argue that intimate stories are an important resource for the achievement of intersectional identities. Drawing on in-depth interviews with black college students at two predominantly white universities, I examine the stories black college women tell about interracial relationships between black men and white women. I argue that…

  1. View of northern portion of Mueller property from the intersection ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of northern portion of Mueller property from the intersection of East Avenue and Highland Avenue, looking south. North side of the Mueller House visible in the background. Remnants of citrus grove in background. - Ernst Mueller House, 6563 East Avenue, Rancho Cucamonga, San Bernardino County, CA

  2. 8. INTERIOR, EMERGENCY ROOM, NORTHEAST OF MAIN CORRIDOR INTERSECTION (NEAR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. INTERIOR, EMERGENCY ROOM, NORTHEAST OF MAIN CORRIDOR INTERSECTION (NEAR WESTERN, MAIN ENTRY), FROM ENTRY IN NORTHWESTERN CORNER, LOOKING SOUTHEAST. - Oakland Naval Supply Center, Administration Building-Dental Annex-Dispensary, Between E & F Streets, East of Third Street, Oakland, Alameda County, CA

  3. The Intersectional Workings of Whiteness: A Representative Anecdote

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zingsheim, Jason; Goltz, Dustin Bradley

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the authors engage critical performance pedagogy scholarship on whiteness to both question and extend two persistent trends in the literature. Although intersectionality is commonly referenced in the literature, the larger impulse underscoring Crenshaw's (1991) concept is often footnoted, tangentially marked, or given mere surface…

  4. Ethnic, Gender and Class Intersections in British Women's Leadership Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Showunmi, Victoria; Atewologun, Doyin; Bebbington, Diane

    2016-01-01

    A qualitative study was conducted to examine how gender and ethnicity influenced leadership experiences of a mixed ethnic sample of British women. An intersectional framework was used which took the viewpoint that socio-demographic identities should be considered simultaneously in order to challenge universalist, gender and ethnic neutral…

  5. 1. Intersection of US Route 4 and NH Route 143, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Intersection of US Route 4 and NH Route 143, showing farmhouse on left, barn at right. Looking east. - Batchelder-Edgerly Farmstead, Barn, U.S. Route 4, southwest side, southeast corner of New Hampshire Route 43, Northwood, Rockingham County, NH

  6. Revisiting Street Intersections Using Slot-Based Systems

    PubMed Central

    Tachet, Remi; Santi, Paolo; Sobolevsky, Stanislav; Reyes-Castro, Luis Ignacio; Frazzoli, Emilio; Helbing, Dirk; Ratti, Carlo

    2016-01-01

    Since their appearance at the end of the 19th century, traffic lights have been the primary mode of granting access to road intersections. Today, this centuries-old technology is challenged by advances in intelligent transportation, which are opening the way to new solutions built upon slot-based systems similar to those commonly used in aerial traffic: what we call Slot-based Intersections (SIs). Despite simulation-based evidence of the potential benefits of SIs, a comprehensive, analytical framework to compare their relative performance with traffic lights is still lacking. Here, we develop such a framework. We approach the problem in a novel way, by generalizing classical queuing theory. Having defined safety conditions, we characterize capacity and delay of SIs. In the 2-road crossing configuration, we provide a capacity-optimal SI management system. For arbitrary intersection configurations, near-optimal solutions are developed. Results theoretically show that transitioning from a traffic light system to SI has the potential of doubling capacity and significantly reducing delays. This suggests a reduction of non-linear dynamics induced by intersection bottlenecks, with positive impact on the road network. Such findings can provide transportation engineers and planners with crucial insights as they prepare to manage the transition towards a more intelligent transportation infrastructure in cities. PMID:26982532

  7. 7. MAIN STREET LOOKING NORTH FROM INTERSECTION OF WEST THIRD ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. MAIN STREET LOOKING NORTH FROM INTERSECTION OF WEST THIRD STREET. THE 1932 POST OFFICE IS ON THE LEFT. SANDSTONE FROM INDIANA AND BRICK WERE USED FOR THE EXTERIOR WALLS, WHILE WASTE BRICK FROM THE SMELTER WAS USED FOR THE INTERIOR FOUNDATION AND BASEMENT WALLS - Anaconda Historic District, Park & Commercial Streets, Main Street vicinity, Anaconda, Deer Lodge County, MT

  8. The Intersectional Workings of Whiteness: A Representative Anecdote

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zingsheim, Jason; Goltz, Dustin Bradley

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the authors engage critical performance pedagogy scholarship on whiteness to both question and extend two persistent trends in the literature. Although intersectionality is commonly referenced in the literature, the larger impulse underscoring Crenshaw's (1991) concept is often footnoted, tangentially marked, or given mere surface…

  9. Dyslexia, Mothering and Work: Intersecting Identities, Reframing, "Drowning" and Resistance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skinner, Tina

    2011-01-01

    This paper focuses on the ways in which mothering, work and dyslexia intersect in lived experience. The theoretical framework used to interpret these experiences draws on competing discourses variously imposed on and internalised by the individual; however, it also stresses the ability (however limited) of the individual to reframe and therefore…

  10. 3. GENERAL VIEW LOOKING NORTH FROM THE INTERSECTION OF WALKER ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. GENERAL VIEW LOOKING NORTH FROM THE INTERSECTION OF WALKER AND LUMBER STREETS, SHOWING TWO HOUSES FRONTING ON LUMBER STREET, AND CENTRAL OF GEORGIA COACH AND PAINT SHOP IN BACKGROUND AT END OF STREET - Frogtown District, Bounded by Jones, I-66 Ramp, & West Boundary Streets, Savannah, Chatham County, GA

  11. VIEW OF PIEDMONT AVENUE TRAFFIC CIRCLE AT INTERSECTION OF CHANNING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF PIEDMONT AVENUE TRAFFIC CIRCLE AT INTERSECTION OF CHANNING WAY. SEEN FROM NE CORNER LOOKING SW. Photograph by Fredrica Drotos and Michael Kelly, July 9, 2006 - Piedmont Way & the Berkeley Property Tract, East of College Avenue between Dwight Way & U.C. Memorial Stadium, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  12. VIEW OF PIEDMONT AVENUE TRAFFIC CIRCLE AT INTERSECTION OF CHANNING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF PIEDMONT AVENUE TRAFFIC CIRCLE AT INTERSECTION OF CHANNING WAY VIEW OF 2401 PIEDMONT, ALPHA EPSILON PHI HOUSE BY RATCLIFF & RATCLIFF, 1958. SEEN FROM NW CORNER LOOKING SE. Photograph by Brian Grogan, July 8, 2007 - Piedmont Way & the Berkeley Property Tract, East of College Avenue between Dwight Way & U.C. Memorial Stadium, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  13. View of Hinkley Avenue from former intersection with Hoffman Boulevard. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of Hinkley Avenue from former intersection with Hoffman Boulevard. Note reconstructed Easter Hill Buildings No. 2, 3, and 4 from left to right at rear. Looking north - Easter Hill Village, Bordered by South Twenty-sixth Street, South Twenty-eighth Street, Hinkley Avenue, Foothill Avenue & Corto Square, Richmond, Contra Costa County, CA

  14. View of Hinkley Avenue looking towards former intersection with Hoffman ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of Hinkley Avenue looking towards former intersection with Hoffman Boulevard. Note former building site of Building No. 1 at right rear. Looking southwest - Easter Hill Village, Bordered by South Twenty-sixth Street, South Twenty-eighth Street, Hinkley Avenue, Foothill Avenue & Corto Square, Richmond, Contra Costa County, CA

  15. Intersecting Discourses of Militarism: Military and Academic Gendered Organizations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taber, Nancy

    2015-01-01

    This article explores the ways in which military constructions of gender intersect with academic ones. Its focus is to connect military discourses of duty, honour and service before self with academic ones of commitment and productivity. As such, it engages in an institutional analysis of the gendered organizations of the military and academia and…

  16. Conclusion: The Intersection of Student Voice and Policy Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitra, Dana L.

    2015-01-01

    This concluding chapter examines how this book on student voice intersects with previous research about policy, especially policy implementation and sustainability. Mapping onto the themes of this volume, Discovering, Developing, and Demonstrating the power of student voice, I focus on three issues--legitimizing the role of young people in the…

  17. Facilitating Difficult Dialogues at the Intersections of Religious Privilege

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watt, Sherry K.

    2009-01-01

    A core definition of a "difficult dialogue" is a verbal or written exchange of ideas or opinions among citizens within a community that centers on an awakening of potentially conflicting views about beliefs and values. As informed by Fried's definition of religious privilege (2007), difficult dialogue at the intersections of religious privilege…

  18. Intersectional Identity Negotiation: The Case of Young Immigrant Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Compton-Lilly, Catherine; Papoi, Kristin; Venegas, Patricia; Hamman, Laura; Schwabenbauer, Briana

    2017-01-01

    We cast our lens on intersectional networks of identity negotiated by young children in immigrant families. Although some scholars discuss identity construction, we reference identity negotiation to capture the active, strategic, and agential work that we witnessed in our study. We begin by synthesizing relevant research on children's identity…

  19. Ethnic, Gender and Class Intersections in British Women's Leadership Experiences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Showunmi, Victoria; Atewologun, Doyin; Bebbington, Diane

    2016-01-01

    A qualitative study was conducted to examine how gender and ethnicity influenced leadership experiences of a mixed ethnic sample of British women. An intersectional framework was used which took the viewpoint that socio-demographic identities should be considered simultaneously in order to challenge universalist, gender and ethnic neutral…

  20. Intersections of adelic groups on a surface

    SciTech Connect

    Budylin, R Ya; Gorchinskiy, S O

    2013-12-31

    We solve a technical problem related to adeles on an algebraic surface. Given a finite set of natural numbers, one can associate with it an adelic group. We show that this operation commutes with taking intersections if the surface is defined over an uncountable field, and we provide a counterexample otherwise. Bibliography: 12 titles.

  1. Intersection of Trajectories: A Newcomer in a Community of Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Matthew; Verenikina, Irina; Herrington, Anthony

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to provide a case study of a newcomer to the practice of policing to explore conceptualisations of learning through practice. It aims to position learning as the intersections of trajectories of being and becoming within a community of practice. The paper seeks to argue that learners need to be understood with…

  2. Biased estimation of forest log characteristics using intersect diameters

    Treesearch

    Lisa J. Bate; Torolf R. Torgersen; Michael J. Wisdom; Edward O. Garton

    2009-01-01

    Logs are an important structural feature of forest ecosystems, and their abundance affects many resources and forest processes, including fire regimes, soil productivity, silviculture, carbon cycling, and wildlife habitat. Consequently, logs are often sampled to estimate their frequency, percent cover, volume, and weight. The line-intersect method (LIM) is one of the...

  3. Intersectional Identity Negotiation: The Case of Young Immigrant Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Compton-Lilly, Catherine; Papoi, Kristin; Venegas, Patricia; Hamman, Laura; Schwabenbauer, Briana

    2017-01-01

    We cast our lens on intersectional networks of identity negotiated by young children in immigrant families. Although some scholars discuss identity construction, we reference identity negotiation to capture the active, strategic, and agential work that we witnessed in our study. We begin by synthesizing relevant research on children's identity…

  4. Intersecting Scapes and New Millennium Identities in Language Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Higgins, Christina

    2015-01-01

    This paper examines how flows of people, media, money, technology, and ideologies move through the world, with attention to how these scapes (Appadurai 1990, 1996, 2013) shape identity construction among language learners, both in and out of classrooms. After illustrating intersecting scapes in sociolinguistic terms, I explore the relevance of…

  5. DETAIL VIEW OF PIEDMONT AVENUE TRAFFIC CIRCLE AT INTERSECTION OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL VIEW OF PIEDMONT AVENUE TRAFFIC CIRCLE AT INTERSECTION OF CHANNING WAY. SEEN FROM EAST SIDE OF CIRCLE LOOKING NORTH AT 2395 PIEDMONT, SIGMA PI HOUSE BY FREDERICK H. REIMERS, 1928. Photograph by Brian Grogan, July 8, 2007 - Piedmont Way & the Berkeley Property Tract, East of College Avenue between Dwight Way & U.C. Memorial Stadium, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  6. VIEW OF PIEDMONT AVENUE TRAFFIC CIRCLE AT INTERSECTION OF CHANNING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF PIEDMONT AVENUE TRAFFIC CIRCLE AT INTERSECTION OF CHANNING WAY. SEEN FROM SW CORNER TOWARDS 2395 PIEDMONT, SIGMA PI HOUSE BY FREDERICK H. REIMERS, 1928. LOOKING NORTH. Photograph by Brian Grogan, July 8, 2007 - Piedmont Way & the Berkeley Property Tract, East of College Avenue between Dwight Way & U.C. Memorial Stadium, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  7. VIEW OF PIEDMONT AVENUE AT INTERSECTION OF HASTE STREET, NOTE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF PIEDMONT AVENUE AT INTERSECTION OF HASTE STREET, NOTE RECONSTRUCTION OF MEDIAN FROM PREVIOUS VIEW IN PHOTOGRAPH CA-2-5. LOOKING NW. Photograph by Brian Grogan, July 8, 2007 - Piedmont Way & the Berkeley Property Tract, East of College Avenue between Dwight Way & U.C. Memorial Stadium, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  8. Disciplinarity and Methodology in Intersectionality Theory and Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Syed, Moin

    2010-01-01

    Comments on the original article, "Intersectionality and research in psychology," by E. R. Cole. Cole's article, says the current author, makes a welcome and valuable contribution to the field of psychology. Particularly useful are the three questions that she posed, highlighting how these questions are relevant and pressing for all researchers,…

  9. View of southeast elevation of Building No. 42. Intersection of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of southeast elevation of Building No. 42. Intersection of Foothill Avenue (at left) and South 28th Street (at right) in foreground, Building No. 40 at left rear. Looking northwest - Easter Hill Village, Building No. 42, Northwest corner of Foothill Avenue & South Twenty-eighth Street, Richmond, Contra Costa County, CA

  10. Intersecting Discourses of Militarism: Military and Academic Gendered Organizations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taber, Nancy

    2015-01-01

    This article explores the ways in which military constructions of gender intersect with academic ones. Its focus is to connect military discourses of duty, honour and service before self with academic ones of commitment and productivity. As such, it engages in an institutional analysis of the gendered organizations of the military and academia and…

  11. Conclusion: The Intersection of Student Voice and Policy Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitra, Dana L.

    2015-01-01

    This concluding chapter examines how this book on student voice intersects with previous research about policy, especially policy implementation and sustainability. Mapping onto the themes of this volume, Discovering, Developing, and Demonstrating the power of student voice, I focus on three issues--legitimizing the role of young people in the…

  12. VIEW OF PIEDMONT AVENUE AT INTERSECTION OF HASTE STREET, CHATEAU ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF PIEDMONT AVENUE AT INTERSECTION OF HASTE STREET, CHATEAU APARTMENTS BY CLARENCE CASEBOLT DAKIN, 1929 AT 2747 HASTE ON WEST SIDE OF PIEDMONT. LOOKING NORTH. Photograph by Fredrica Drotos and Michael Kelly, July 8, 2006 - Piedmont Way & the Berkeley Property Tract, East of College Avenue between Dwight Way & U.C. Memorial Stadium, Berkeley, Alameda County, CA

  13. Towards a 21st century telephone exchange at CERN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valentín, F.; Hesnaux, A.; Sierra, R.; Chapron, F.

    2015-12-01

    The advent of mobile telephony and Voice over IP (VoIP) has significantly impacted the traditional telephone exchange industry—to such an extent that private branch exchanges are likely to disappear completely in the near future. For large organisations, such as CERN, it is important to be able to smooth this transition by implementing new multimedia platforms that can protect past investments and the flexibility needed to securely interconnect emerging VoIP solutions and forthcoming developments such as Voice over LTE (VoLTE). We present the results of ongoing studies and tests at CERN of the latest technologies in this area.

  14. HIGH ENERGY PHYSICS: CERN Link Breathes Life Into Russian Physics.

    PubMed

    Stone, R

    2000-10-13

    Without fanfare, 600 Russian scientists here at CERN, the European particle physics laboratory, are playing key roles in building the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), a machine that will explore fundamental questions such as why particles have mass, as well as search for exotic new particles whose existence would confirm supersymmetry, a popular theory that aims to unify the four forces of nature. In fact, even though Russia is not one of CERN's 20 member states, most top high-energy physicists in Russia are working on the LHC. Some say their work could prove the salvation of high-energy physics back home.

  15. Medical Applications at CERN and the ENLIGHT Network.

    PubMed

    Dosanjh, Manjit; Cirilli, Manuela; Myers, Steve; Navin, Sparsh

    2016-01-01

    State-of-the-art techniques derived from particle accelerators, detectors, and physics computing are routinely used in clinical practice and medical research centers: from imaging technologies to dedicated accelerators for cancer therapy and nuclear medicine, simulations, and data analytics. Principles of particle physics themselves are the foundation of a cutting edge radiotherapy technique for cancer treatment: hadron therapy. This article is an overview of the involvement of CERN, the European Organization for Nuclear Research, in medical applications, with specific focus on hadron therapy. It also presents the history, achievements, and future scientific goals of the European Network for Light Ion Hadron Therapy, whose co-ordination office is at CERN.

  16. Medical Applications at CERN and the ENLIGHT Network

    PubMed Central

    Dosanjh, Manjit; Cirilli, Manuela; Myers, Steve; Navin, Sparsh

    2016-01-01

    State-of-the-art techniques derived from particle accelerators, detectors, and physics computing are routinely used in clinical practice and medical research centers: from imaging technologies to dedicated accelerators for cancer therapy and nuclear medicine, simulations, and data analytics. Principles of particle physics themselves are the foundation of a cutting edge radiotherapy technique for cancer treatment: hadron therapy. This article is an overview of the involvement of CERN, the European Organization for Nuclear Research, in medical applications, with specific focus on hadron therapy. It also presents the history, achievements, and future scientific goals of the European Network for Light Ion Hadron Therapy, whose co-ordination office is at CERN. PMID:26835422

  17. Older driver distraction: a naturalistic study of behaviour at intersections.

    PubMed

    Charlton, Judith L; Catchlove, Matthew; Scully, Michelle; Koppel, Sjaan; Newstead, Stuart

    2013-09-01

    This study examined older driver engagement in distracting behaviours (secondary activities) at intersections using naturalistic driving data from a larger study based in Melbourne, Australia. Of interest was whether engagement in secondary activities at intersections was influenced by factors such as driver gender and situational variables, in particular, those relating to the complexity of the driving environment. Specifically we expected that when making left/right turns, older drivers would reduce the proportion of time engaged in secondary behaviours at intersections which required gap judgements (partly controlled or uncontrolled) compared with intersections that were fully controlled by traffic signals. Consideration was given to engagement in secondary activity with hands off the wheel and when the vehicle was moving versus stationary. Older drivers aged between 65 and 83 years drove an instrumented vehicle (IV) on their regular trips for approximately two weeks. The IV was equipped with a video camera system, enabling recording of the road environment and driver and a data acquisition unit, enabling recording of trip distance, vehicle speed, braking, accelerating, steering and indicator use. Driving experience and demographics were collected and functional abilities were assessed using the Useful Field of View (UFOV), Trail Making Test B, Mini Mental Status Examination (MMSE), visual acuity and contrast sensitivity. The study yielded a total of 371 trips with 4493 km (99.8 h) of naturalistic driving data including 1396 left and right turns. Trips were randomly selected from the dataset and in-depth analysis was conducted on 200 intersection manoeuvres (approximately 50% left turns, 50% right turns). The most frequently observed secondary activities were scratching/grooming (42.5%), talking/singing (30.2%) and manipulating the vehicle control panel (12.2%). Glances "off road" 2s or longer were associated with reading, reaching and manipulation of the

  18. Safety effectiveness of converting signalized intersections to roundabouts.

    PubMed

    Gross, Frank; Lyon, Craig; Persaud, Bhagwant; Srinivasan, Raghavan

    2013-01-01

    Roundabouts may be new builds but often are conversions from existing intersections. When contemplating the later, there is a need to estimate the safety effects of conversions. Several studies have estimated large reductions in crashes and severity; however, these results pertain mainly to conversions from unsignalized intersections. Results for conversions from signalized intersections have been less conclusive or consistent and tend to be somewhat dated. The objective of this study was to fill this void by estimating the safety effectiveness of converting signalized intersections to roundabouts. Several states helped to identify signalized intersections that were converted to roundabouts in the recent past. In total, 28 conversions were identified in the United States. The empirical Bayes (EB) method was employed in an observational before-after study to estimate the safety effects. Data from select states were also used in a cross-sectional analysis to investigate the compatibility of results from cross-sectional and before-after studies. The EB results indicated a safety benefit for converting signalized intersections to roundabouts. There were reductions in both total and injury crashes, with a larger benefit for injury crashes. Further analysis indicated that the safety benefit of roundabouts for total crashes decreased as traffic volumes increase, a result that suggests the need for the development of a crash modification function, a task for which more data would be required. The safety benefit for injury crashes was sustained across all traffic volumes. Both trends were supported by the cross-sectional analysis. Based on the analysis, it appears that roundabouts have the potential to significantly reduce crashes and severity at signalized intersections. A key aspect of the study was the estimation of the standard deviation of the distribution of the CMF in addition to the conventionally estimated standard error of the mean CMF value. For some CMFs

  19. Intersecting kink bands quantified by laser scanning and differential geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunham, R. E.; Crider, J. G.

    2010-12-01

    Microtopography derived from laser scanning is expressed by DEMs that can be analyzed using differential geometry. We apply this technique to rock hand samples containing intersecting kink bands in order to quantitatively describe the shape of a folded surface and understand the localization of strain in deformed rocks. This study is the first to apply laser scanning and geometric curvature analysis to intersecting kink bands in order to better describe the variation of kink band geometries and intersections in plan view and to evaluate relationships between different kink band parameters. A complex set of monoclinal contractional kink bands is well exposed in outcrops of the Darrington Phyllite on Samish Island, northwestern Washington, which provide a three-dimensional view of kink band geometries. Kink bands in cross section have straight, parallel boundaries that deform a well-defined foliation; in plan view, however, kink band hinges curve and anastomose across the foliation surface, and adjacent bands commonly intersect. Three types of intersections are common: crossing (X), bifurcating (Y), and obliquely truncating (λ); many kink bands also taper out along strike. Geometric curvature analyses were performed on millimeter-resolution DEMs of hand samples containing intersecting kink bands. Maps of different curvature parameters (e.g. mean curvature, geologic curvature) clearly outline kink bands in the samples and illuminate the behavior of kink band hinges in each type of intersection. In X-type intersections, curvature increases where two hinges of similar kink sense cross (i.e. anticlinal/anticlinal hinges), increasing strain; where two hinges of opposing sense cross (anticlinal/synclinal), curvature decreases and the surface is effectively unfolded. In Y-type intersections, a single parent band widens and splits into two equally narrow daughter bands, and new inner hinges are nucleated below the bifurcation point. The two daughter bands accommodate

  20. Dissemination of CERN's Technology Transfer: Added Value from Regional Transfer Agents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hofer, Franz

    2005-01-01

    Technologies developed at CERN, the European Organization for Nuclear Research, are disseminated via a network of external technology transfer officers. Each of CERN's 20 member states has appointed at least one technology transfer officer to help establish links with CERN. This network has been in place since 2001 and early experiences indicate…

  1. Dissemination of CERN's Technology Transfer: Added Value from Regional Transfer Agents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hofer, Franz

    2005-01-01

    Technologies developed at CERN, the European Organization for Nuclear Research, are disseminated via a network of external technology transfer officers. Each of CERN's 20 member states has appointed at least one technology transfer officer to help establish links with CERN. This network has been in place since 2001 and early experiences indicate…

  2. Quantitative Intersectionality: A Critical Race Analysis of the Chicana/o Educational Pipeline

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Covarrubias, Alejandro

    2011-01-01

    Utilizing the critical race framework of intersectionality, this research reexamines the Chicana/o educational pipeline through a quantitative intersectional analysis. This approach disaggregates data along the intersection of race, class, gender, and citizenship status to provide a detailed portrait of the educational trajectory of Mexican-origin…

  3. Quantitative Intersectionality: A Critical Race Analysis of the Chicana/o Educational Pipeline

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Covarrubias, Alejandro

    2011-01-01

    Utilizing the critical race framework of intersectionality, this research reexamines the Chicana/o educational pipeline through a quantitative intersectional analysis. This approach disaggregates data along the intersection of race, class, gender, and citizenship status to provide a detailed portrait of the educational trajectory of Mexican-origin…

  4. Information Points and Optimal Discharging Speed: Effects on the Saturation Flow at Signalized Intersections

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gao, Lijun

    2015-01-01

    An information point was defined in this study as any object, structure, or activity located outside of a traveling vehicle that could potentially attract the visual attention of the driver. Saturation flow rates were studied for three pairs of signalized intersections in Toledo, Ohio. Each pair of intersections consisted of one intersection with…

  5. Information Points and Optimal Discharging Speed: Effects on the Saturation Flow at Signalized Intersections

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gao, Lijun

    2015-01-01

    An information point was defined in this study as any object, structure, or activity located outside of a traveling vehicle that could potentially attract the visual attention of the driver. Saturation flow rates were studied for three pairs of signalized intersections in Toledo, Ohio. Each pair of intersections consisted of one intersection with…

  6. Commissioning the CERN IT Agile Infrastructure with experiment workloads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medrano Llamas, Ramón; Harald Barreiro Megino, Fernando; Kucharczyk, Katarzyna; Kamil Denis, Marek; Cinquilli, Mattia

    2014-06-01

    In order to ease the management of their infrastructure, most of the WLCG sites are adopting cloud based strategies. In the case of CERN, the Tier 0 of the WLCG, is completely restructuring the resource and configuration management of their computing center under the codename Agile Infrastructure. Its goal is to manage 15,000 Virtual Machines by means of an OpenStack middleware in order to unify all the resources in CERN's two datacenters: the one placed in Meyrin and the new on in Wigner, Hungary. During the commissioning of this infrastructure, CERN IT is offering an attractive amount of computing resources to the experiments (800 cores for ATLAS and CMS) through a private cloud interface. ATLAS and CMS have joined forces to exploit them by running stress tests and simulation workloads since November 2012. This work will describe the experience of the first deployments of the current experiment workloads on the CERN private cloud testbed. The paper is organized as follows: the first section will explain the integration of the experiment workload management systems (WMS) with the cloud resources. The second section will revisit the performance and stress testing performed with HammerCloud in order to evaluate and compare the suitability for the experiment workloads. The third section will go deeper into the dynamic provisioning techniques, such as the use of the cloud APIs directly by the WMS. The paper finishes with a review of the conclusions and the challenges ahead.

  7. Results from CERN experiment NA36 on strangeness production

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-12-01

    Measurements of the production of strange particles in the reactions S + Pb and S + S at beam momentum 200GeV/c per nucleon are presented. A short description of CERN experiment NA36 and the methods of raw data analysis, is followed by physics results concentrating on the dependence of strange particle production on multiplicity. Transverse momentum distributions are also presented.

  8. CAST - A CERN Experiment to Search for Solar Axions

    SciTech Connect

    Arik, E.; Boydag, F. S.; Cetin, S. A.; Dogan, O. B.; Hikmet, I.; Aune, S.; Dafni, T.; Ferrer-Ribas, E.; Giomataris, I.; Autiero, D.; Barth, K.; Davenport, M.; Di Lella, L.; Lasseur, C.; Papaevangelou, T.; Placci, A.; Riege, H.; Stewart, L.; Walckiers, L.; Belov, A.

    2007-04-23

    The CAST experiment at CERN is the only running solar axion telescope. The first results obtained so far with CAST - PHASE I is presented, which compete with the best astrophysically derived limits of the axion-to-photon coupling. The ongoing PHASE II of the experiment as well as the scheduled upgrades, which improve the axion discovery potential of CAST, are discussed.

  9. High neutral transverse energy events at the CERN ISR

    SciTech Connect

    Cox, P. T.

    1983-01-01

    The CERN-Oxford-Rockefeller (COR) collaboration has obtained neutral transverse energy, E/sub T//sup 0/, spectra in pp collisions at ..sqrt..s = 30.5, 45.0, and 62.3 GeV. Evidence is presented for the increasing dominance of 2-jet events as E/sub T//sup 0/ increases.

  10. Contextualized Magnetism in Secondary School: Learning from the LHC (CERN)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cid, Ramon

    2005-01-01

    Physics teachers in secondary schools usually mention the world's largest particle physics laboratory--CERN (European Organization for Nuclear Research)--only because of the enormous size of the accelerators and detectors used there, the number of scientists involved in their activities and also the necessary international scientific…

  11. Contextualized Magnetism in Secondary School: Learning from the LHC (CERN)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cid, Ramon

    2005-01-01

    Physics teachers in secondary schools usually mention the world's largest particle physics laboratory--CERN (European Organization for Nuclear Research)--only because of the enormous size of the accelerators and detectors used there, the number of scientists involved in their activities and also the necessary international scientific…

  12. Results from NA60 experiment at the CERN SPS

    SciTech Connect

    Usai, G.; Cicalo, C.; De Falco, A.; Floris, M.; Masoni, A.; Puddu, G.; Serci, S.; Arnaldi, R.; Colla, A.; Cortese, P.; Ferretti, A.; Oppedisano, C.; Averbeck, R.; Drees, A.; Banicz, K.; Castor, J.; Devaux, A.; Force, P.; Manso, F.; Chaurand, B.

    2006-07-11

    The NA60 experiment studies open charm and prompt dimuon production in proton-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus collisions at the CERN SPS. During 2003 the experiment collected data in Indium-Indium collisions at 158 GeV per nucleon. In this paper the first results on low mass dimuons, intermediate mass dimuons and J/{psi} suppression are presented.

  13. Offering Global Collaboration Services beyond CERN and HEP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandes, J.; Ferreira, P.; Baron, T.

    2015-12-01

    The CERN IT department has built over the years a performant and integrated ecosystem of collaboration tools, from videoconference and webcast services to event management software. These services have been designed and evolved in very close collaboration with the various communities surrounding the laboratory and have been massively adopted by CERN users. To cope with this very heavy usage, global infrastructures have been deployed which take full advantage of CERN's international and global nature. If these services and tools are instrumental in enabling the worldwide collaboration which generates major HEP breakthroughs, they would certainly also benefit other sectors of science in which globalization has already taken place. Some of these services are driven by commercial software (Vidyo or Wowza for example), some others have been developed internally and have already been made available to the world as Open Source Software in line with CERN's spirit and mission. Indico for example is now installed in 100+ institutes worldwide. But providing the software is often not enough and institutes, collaborations and project teams do not always possess the expertise, or human or material resources that are needed to set up and maintain such services. Regional and national institutions have to answer needs, which are growingly global and often contradict their operational capabilities or organizational mandate and so are looking at existing worldwide service offers such as CERN's. We believe that the accumulated experience obtained through the operation of a large scale worldwide collaboration service combined with CERN's global network and its recently- deployed Agile Infrastructure would allow the Organization to set up and operate collaborative services, such as Indico and Vidyo, at a much larger scale and on behalf of worldwide research and education institutions and thus answer these pressing demands while optimizing resources at a global level. Such services would

  14. Gas storage materials, including hydrogen storage materials

    DOEpatents

    Mohtadi, Rana F; Wicks, George G; Heung, Leung K; Nakamura, Kenji

    2013-02-19

    A material for the storage and release of gases comprises a plurality of hollow elements, each hollow element comprising a porous wall enclosing an interior cavity, the interior cavity including structures of a solid-state storage material. In particular examples, the storage material is a hydrogen storage material such as a solid state hydride. An improved method for forming such materials includes the solution diffusion of a storage material solution through a porous wall of a hollow element into an interior cavity.

  15. Gas storage materials, including hydrogen storage materials

    DOEpatents

    Mohtadi, Rana F; Wicks, George G; Heung, Leung K; Nakamura, Kenji

    2014-11-25

    A material for the storage and release of gases comprises a plurality of hollow elements, each hollow element comprising a porous wall enclosing an interior cavity, the interior cavity including structures of a solid-state storage material. In particular examples, the storage material is a hydrogen storage material, such as a solid state hydride. An improved method for forming such materials includes the solution diffusion of a storage material solution through a porous wall of a hollow element into an interior cavity.

  16. More than culture: structural racism, intersectionality theory, and immigrant health.

    PubMed

    Viruell-Fuentes, Edna A; Miranda, Patricia Y; Abdulrahim, Sawsan

    2012-12-01

    Explanations for immigrant health outcomes often invoke culture through the use of the concept of acculturation. The over reliance on cultural explanations for immigrant health outcomes has been the topic of growing debate, with the critics' main concern being that such explanations obscure the impact of structural factors on immigrant health disparities. In this paper, we highlight the shortcomings of cultural explanations as currently employed in the health literature, and argue for a shift from individual culture-based frameworks, to perspectives that address how multiple dimensions of inequality intersect to impact health outcomes. Based on our review of the literature, we suggest specific lines of inquiry regarding immigrants' experiences with day-to-day discrimination, as well as on the roles that place and immigration policies play in shaping immigrant health outcomes. The paper concludes with suggestions for integrating intersectionality theory in future research on immigrant health. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Pedestrian Behavior at Five Dangerous and Busy Manhattan Intersections.

    PubMed

    Basch, Corey H; Ethan, Danna; Zybert, Patricia; Basch, Charles E

    2015-08-01

    Technology-related distracted behavior is an emergent national concern. Listening to, looking at or talking into an electronic device while walking divides attention, increasing the risk of injury. The purpose of this study was to quantify technology-related distracted pedestrian behavior at five dangerous and busy Manhattan intersections. Data were collected over ten cycles of signal changes at each of the four corners of five intersections at four times of day. Data for 'Walk' and 'Don't Walk' signals were tallied separately. A total of 21,760 pedestrians were observed. Nearly one-third crossing on a 'Walk' signal (n = 5414, 27.8%), and nearly half crossing on a 'Don't Walk' signal (n = 974; 42.0%) were wearing headphones, talking on a mobile phone, and/or looking down at an electronic device. Headphone use was the most common distraction.

  18. Multiple intersection properties of optical resonance modes in metallic metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tokuda, Yasunori; Sakaguchi, Koichiro; Yamaguchi, Yuki; Takano, Keisuke

    2017-03-01

    Unusual behavior of Fabry-Perot-like waveguide resonance modes is presented for a quasi-dielectric metamaterial that consists of two metallic sub-wavelength cut-through slit-array slabs separated by an air-gap region. Simulations based on the finite-difference time-domain method were conducted. The unique optical properties were interpreted in terms of multiple intersection of the resonance modes. Depending on the intersection conditions of the optical modes, furthermore, a variety of crossing characteristics, i.e., fade-out crossing with/without an isolated loop, anticrossing with/without intensity reduction, and anticrossing with/without frequency repulsion, were identified for the air-gap dependence of the transmission spectra. These findings, which were obtained by careful observation of the properties of this type of metamaterial, present a novel and interesting aspect of the behavior of the optical resonance modes.

  19. Holomorphic Yukawa couplings for complete intersection Calabi-Yau manifolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blesneag, Stefan; Buchbinder, Evgeny I.; Lukas, Andre

    2017-01-01

    We develop methods to compute holomorphic Yukawa couplings for heterotic compactifications on complete intersection Calabi-Yau manifolds, generalising results of an earlier paper for Calabi-Yau hypersurfaces. Our methods are based on constructing the required bundle-valued forms explicitly and evaluating the relevant integrals over the projective ambient space. We also show how our approach relates to an earlier, algebraic one to calculate the holomorphic Yukawa couplings. A vanishing theorem, which we prove, implies that certain Yukawa couplings allowed by low-energy symmetries are zero due to topological reasons. To illustrate our methods, we calculate Yukawa couplings for SU(5)-based standard models on a co-dimension two complete intersection manifold.

  20. 36. PHOTOCOPY OF PHOTOGRAPH. VIEW OF ARMORY FROM INTERSECTION OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    36. PHOTOCOPY OF PHOTOGRAPH. VIEW OF ARMORY FROM INTERSECTION OF SOUTH 3RD STREET AND EAST WALNUT STREET CIRCA 1937. NOTE PAVED STREETS, STREET LIGHTS AND WINDOWS ON MONITOR OPEN FOR VENTILATION. THIS IS A COPY OF A POST CARD SIZED PRINT LOANED BY THE YAKIMA VALLEY MUSEUM AND HISTORICAL ASSOCIATION. PHOTOGRAPHER UNKNOWN. - Yakima National Guard Armory, 202 South Third Street, Yakima, Yakima County, WA

  1. 79. Conoco Gas Station (1927) at the intersection of Wyoming ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    79. Conoco Gas Station (1927) at the intersection of Wyoming and Granite Streets. This was one of the first gas stations in Butte, and has a wooden canopy supported on steel beams on brick piers, with a pressed metal ceiling. The roof turns upwards on the north side, and the east and west ends have jerkin-headed gables. The pumps date from the 1950s. - Butte Historic District, Bounded by Copper, Arizona, Mercury & Continental Streets, Butte, Silver Bow County, MT

  2. 2. GENERAL VIEW, LOOKING EAST, SHOWING INTERSECTION OF THREE RAILROADS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. GENERAL VIEW, LOOKING EAST, SHOWING INTERSECTION OF THREE RAILROADS AT THREE LEVELS. AT GROUND LEVEL IS THE FORMER RICHMOND & YORK RIVER RAILROAD (NOW THE WEST POINT BRANCH OF THE SOUTHERN); THE VIADUCT STRUCTURE APPEARING AT THE UPPER LEFT CORNER OF THE PHOTOGRAPH WAS CONSTRUCTED BY THE CHESAPEAKE & OHIO RAILROAD IN 1900. IT PASSES OVER THE SEABOARD AIRLINE BRIDGE WHICH ALSO WAS BUILT IN 1900. - Triple Railroad Crossing, East Byrd Street at Sixteenth Street, Richmond, Independent City, VA

  3. Cryptanalysis and improvement of a quantum private set intersection protocol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Xiaogang; Guo, Ren; Chen, Yonghong

    2017-02-01

    A recent Quantum Private Set Intersection (QPSI) scheme is crypt-analyzed. The original claimed communication overhead is shown to be not accurate. And the original security definition is passive and not fair. To ensure fairness, a passive third party is introduced. It is also shown that unconditional fairness of QPSI protocol is impossible. Since otherwise, it would violate a well-known impossible quantum cryptography result.

  4. Fuels Performance: Navigating the Intersection of Fuels and Combustion (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2014-12-01

    Researchers at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), the only national laboratory dedicated 100% to renewable energy and energy efficiency, recognize that engine and infrastructure compatibility can make or break the impact of even the most promising fuel. NREL and its industry partners navigate the intersection of fuel chemistry, ignition kinetics, combustion, and emissions, with innovative approaches to engines and fuels that meet drivers' expectations, while minimizing petroleum use and GHGs.

  5. View southwest showing the intersection of Routes 6 and 169 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View southwest showing the intersection of Routes 6 and 169 and the Brooklyn Town Hall with the Unitarian Church to the south - Brooklyn Green, North Green, South Green, & West Green, parts of Brown Road, Canterbury Road (Route 169), Hartford Road (Route 6), Hyde Road, Pomfret Road (Route 169), Prince Hill Road, Providence Road (Route 6), Wauregan Road (Routes 169 & 205), & Wolf Den Road, Brooklyn, Windham County, CT

  6. Highline Canal, Sand Creek Lateral, Beginning at intersection of Peoria ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Highline Canal, Sand Creek Lateral, Beginning at intersection of Peoria Street & Highline Canal in Arapahoe County (City of Aurora), Sand Creek lateral Extends 15 miles Northerly through Araphoe County, City & County of Denver, & Adams County to its end point, approximately 1/4 mile Southest of intersectioin of D Street & Ninth Avenue in Adams County (Rocky Mountain Arsenal, Commerce City Vicinity), Commerce City, Adams County, CO

  7. The Molecular Geometric Phase and Light-Induced Conical Intersections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zak, Emil J.

    2017-06-01

    Potential energy surfaces for electronic states of molecules in strong electromagnetic fields can be described in the dressed-state formalism, which introduces light-induced potentials. A light-induced conical intersection (LICI) [1] appears when two electronic states intersect due to the presence of an external electric field and when the dipole coupling between the field and the molecule vanishes. There are several aspects of quantum dynamics near LICIs, which still require a thorough investigation. How do non-adiabatic effects manifest themselves in polyatomic molecules in strong electromagnetic fields? Are the natural conical-intersections (NCI) and the light-induced conical intersections identical in nature? Do topological effects (Berry phase) [2] influence the nuclear dynamics around NCIs and LICIs? To answer these questions, a computer code for time-propagation of the ro-vibronic wavefunction on multiple coupled potential energy surfaces has been developed. The time-independent zero-order basis is taken from the DUO suite [3], which solves the full ro-vibronic Schrödinger equation for diatomic molecules. Non-adiabatic nuclear dynamics near LICIs will be presented on the examples of NaH and CaF molecules, with a perspective for extension to polyatomics. G. J. Halász, A Vibók, M. Sindelka, N. Moiseyev, L. S. Cederbaum, 2011 J. Phys. B: At. Mol. Opt. Phys. 44 175102 C. Wittig, Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys., 2012, 14, 6409-6432 S. N. Yurchenko, L. Lodi, J. Tennyson, A. V. Stolyarov, Comput. Phys. Commun., 202, 262, 2016

  8. 18. THIRD STREET FROM ITS INTERSECTION WITH F STREET, LOOKING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    18. THIRD STREET FROM ITS INTERSECTION WITH F STREET, LOOKING NORTH, For the purpose of clarity and simplicity, directions relate to the nearly north-south orientation of the Naval Supply Center, and not to true north. The alignment of streets and buildings in the NSC are roughly related to magnetic north, and are thus about 10 degrees clockwise from true north. WITH BUILDINGS 222 AND 221 ON LEFT. - Oakland Naval Supply Center, Maritime Street at Seventh Street, Oakland, Alameda County, CA

  9. 7. VIEW LOOKING WEST DOWN CENTRAL AVENUE AT THE INTERSECTION ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. VIEW LOOKING WEST DOWN CENTRAL AVENUE AT THE INTERSECTION WITH SEVENTH STREET. THE PLANT WAS BUILT ON THE SITE WITH FOUR SEPARATE PRODUCTION AREAS, AND AN ADMINISTRATION AND SUPPORT AREA. THIS PHOTOGRAPH SHOWS THE EASTERN EDGE OF THE CORE ADMINSTRATION AND SUPPORT AREA, BUILT IN THE EARLY 1950S. IN THE LEFT FOREGROUND OF THE PHOTOGRAPH IS BUILDING 442, USED TO TEST ALL HEPA FILTERS ON SITE. - Rocky Flats Plant, Bounded by Indiana Street & Routes 93, 128 & 72, Golden, Jefferson County, CO

  10. Droplets coalescence at microchannel intersection chambers with different shapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhaomiao; Wang, Xiang; Cao, Rentuo; Pang, Yan

    2016-11-01

    The influence of microchannel intersection chamber shape on droplets coalescence process is investigated in this study. Three kinds of chamber shapes (half-round, triangle and camber) are designed to realize head-on droplets coalescence. The coalescence processes are visualized with high-speed camera system and the internal flow patterns are resolved with micro-PIV system. Experimental analyses on droplets coalescence position, coalescence time and the critical conditions are discussed. Both direct coalescence and late coalescence can be observed in the camber junction while only the late coalescence is present for the half-round and the triangle junction. The critical capillary number Ca* varies for different working systems or intersection shapes. Ca* in the camber junction is larger than that in the other two junctions for each working system and it decreases with the increase of the viscosity ratios for each intersection shape. Moreover, the characteristics of the velocity fields for different coalescence cases are analyzed for in-depth understanding of the process. The authors do appreciate the financial support of No.11572013 of National Nature Scicence Funding of China.

  11. Conical intersection seams in polyenes derived from their chemical composition.

    PubMed

    Nenov, Artur; de Vivie-Riedle, Regina

    2012-08-21

    The knowledge of conical intersection seams is important to predict and explain the outcome of ultrafast reactions in photochemistry and photobiology. They define the energetic low-lying reachable regions that allow for the ultrafast non-radiative transitions. In complex molecules it is not straightforward to locate them. We present a systematic approach to predict conical intersection seams in multifunctionalized polyenes and their sensitivity to substituent effects. Included are seams that facilitate the photoreaction of interest as well as seams that open competing loss channels. The method is based on the extended two-electron two-orbital method [A. Nenov and R. de Vivie-Riedle, J. Chem. Phys. 135, 034304 (2011)]. It allows to extract the low-lying regions for non-radiative transitions, which are then divided into small linear segments. Rules of thumb are introduced to find the support points for these segments, which are then used in a linear interpolation scheme for a first estimation of the intersection seams. Quantum chemical optimization of the linear interpolated structures yields the final energetic position. We demonstrate our method for the example of the electrocyclic isomerization of trifluoromethyl-pyrrolylfulgide.

  12. Injury severity, vehicle safety features, and intersection crashes.

    PubMed

    Obeng, K

    2008-01-01

    This article examines injury severity in crashes that occur within signalized intersections and identifies some factors that explain them. It uses a random effect ordered logit model and an unbalanced longitudinal panel data for 303 intersections for one medium-size city. Among its findings are 3% and 0.29% lower probabilities of sustaining evident and disabling injuries respectively when vehicle occupants wear three-point seat belts and corresponding 1.71% and 0.16% lower probabilities when they wear only shoulder belts. Also, the probabilities of sustaining evident and disabling injuries reduce by 0.87% and 0.08% when vehicles with airbags are involved in crashes. But, when front airbags deploy the probabilities of sustaining disabling, evident, and possible injuries increase by 1.3%, 11.93%, and 26.80%, respectively. Similarly, both side airbags deploying increases disabling and evident injuries by 1.8% and 15.53%, respectively. In addition, we find that the probability of sustaining severe injuries increases in head-on crashes. These results emphasize the effectiveness of seat belt use, especially three-point seat belts, the inclusion of airbags in all vehicles, increased awareness of possible injuries from airbags deploying, signalized intersection designs that include pedestrian crossing signals, and additional research to identify the predominant types of injuries associated with airbags deploying.

  13. Substituent effects on dynamics at conical intersections: cycloheptatrienes.

    PubMed

    Schalk, Oliver; Boguslavskiy, Andrey E; Schuurman, Michael S; Brogaard, Rasmus Y; Unterreiner, Andreas N; Wrona-Piotrowicz, Anna; Werstiuk, Nick H; Stolow, Albert

    2013-10-10

    Using selective methyl substitution, we study the effects of vibrational dynamics at conical intersections in unsaturated hydrocarbons. Here, we investigate the excited state nonadiabatic dynamics of cycloheptatriene (CHT) and its relation to dynamics in other polyenes by comparing CHT with 7-methyl CHT, 7-ethyl CHT, and perdeuterated CHT using time-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy and photoelectron anisotropy. Our results suggest that, upon ππ*-excitation to the bright 2A" state, we observe an early intersection with the dark 2A' state close to the Franck-Condon region with evidence of wavepacket bifurcation. This indicates that the wavepacket evolves on both states, likely along a planarization coordinate, with the majority of the flux undergoing nonadiabatic transition via conical intersections within 100 fs following light absorption. In CHT, large amplitude motion along the planarization coordinate improves the intra-ring π-overlap, yielding a delocalized electronic density. However, substitutions in 7 position, chosen to modify the inertia of the planarization motion, did not markedly alter the first step in the sequential kinetic scheme. This suggests that there is a crossing of potential energy surfaces before planarization is achieved and, thus, nonadiabatic transition likely takes place far away from a local minimum.

  14. Conical intersection seams in polyenes derived from their chemical composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nenov, Artur; de Vivie-Riedle, Regina

    2012-08-01

    The knowledge of conical intersection seams is important to predict and explain the outcome of ultrafast reactions in photochemistry and photobiology. They define the energetic low-lying reachable regions that allow for the ultrafast non-radiative transitions. In complex molecules it is not straightforward to locate them. We present a systematic approach to predict conical intersection seams in multifunctionalized polyenes and their sensitivity to substituent effects. Included are seams that facilitate the photoreaction of interest as well as seams that open competing loss channels. The method is based on the extended two-electron two-orbital method [A. Nenov and R. de Vivie-Riedle, J. Chem. Phys. 135, 034304 (2011)], 10.1063/1.3608924. It allows to extract the low-lying regions for non-radiative transitions, which are then divided into small linear segments. Rules of thumb are introduced to find the support points for these segments, which are then used in a linear interpolation scheme for a first estimation of the intersection seams. Quantum chemical optimization of the linear interpolated structures yields the final energetic position. We demonstrate our method for the example of the electrocyclic isomerization of trifluoromethyl-pyrrolylfulgide.

  15. Caregiver Well-Being: Intersections of Relationship and Gender.

    PubMed

    Chappell, Neena L; Dujela, Carren; Smith, André

    2015-08-01

    We know much about caregiving women compared with caregiving men and caregiving spouses compared with caregiving adult children. We know less about the intersections of relationship and gender. This article explores this intersection through the well-being (burden and self-esteem) of caregivers to family members with dementia. Throughout British Columbia, Canada, 873 caregivers were interviewed in person for on average, over 1½ hours. The results reveal that daughters experience the highest burden but also the highest self-esteem, suggesting the role is less salient for their self-identities. Wives emerge as the most vulnerable of the four groups when both burden and self-esteem are considered. The data confirm the usefulness of the intersectionality framework for understanding co-occupancy of more than one status and indicate that positive cognitive well-being and negative affective well-being can be differentially related. Multivariate analyses confirm the importance of caregiver, not patient, characteristics for burden and self-esteem. © The Author(s) 2014.

  16. Failure at Frame-Stringer Intersections in PRSEUS Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jegley, Dawn C.

    2012-01-01

    NASA, the Air Force Research Laboratory and The Boeing Company have worked to develop new low-cost, light-weight composite structures for aircraft. A Pultruded Rod Stitched Efficient Unitized Structure (PRSEUS) concept has been developed which offers advantages over traditional metallic structures. In this concept a stitched carbon-epoxy material system has been developed with the potential for reducing the weight and cost of transport aircraft structure by eliminating fasteners, thereby reducing part count and labor. By adding unidirectional carbon rods to the top of stiffeners, the panel becomes more structurally efficient. This combination produces a more damage tolerant design. This study focuses on the intersection between the rod-stiffener and the foam-filled frame in a PRSEUS specimen. Compression loading is considered, which induces stress concentrations at the intersection point that can lead to failures. An experiment with accompanying analysis for a single-frame specimen is described, followed by a parametric study of simple reinforcements to reduce strains in the intersection region.

  17. Conical intersection seams in polyenes derived from their chemical composition

    SciTech Connect

    Nenov, Artur; Vivie-Riedle, Regina de

    2012-08-21

    The knowledge of conical intersection seams is important to predict and explain the outcome of ultrafast reactions in photochemistry and photobiology. They define the energetic low-lying reachable regions that allow for the ultrafast non-radiative transitions. In complex molecules it is not straightforward to locate them. We present a systematic approach to predict conical intersection seams in multifunctionalized polyenes and their sensitivity to substituent effects. Included are seams that facilitate the photoreaction of interest as well as seams that open competing loss channels. The method is based on the extended two-electron two-orbital method [A. Nenov and R. de Vivie-Riedle, J. Chem. Phys. 135, 034304 (2011)]. It allows to extract the low-lying regions for non-radiative transitions, which are then divided into small linear segments. Rules of thumb are introduced to find the support points for these segments, which are then used in a linear interpolation scheme for a first estimation of the intersection seams. Quantum chemical optimization of the linear interpolated structures yields the final energetic position. We demonstrate our method for the example of the electrocyclic isomerization of trifluoromethyl-pyrrolylfulgide.

  18. Ion transport through a T-intersection of nanofluidic channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daiguji, Hirofumi; Adachi, Takuma; Tatsumi, Naoya

    2008-08-01

    Ion transport through a T-intersection of two silica nanochannels (a main channel, 5-μm long and 30-nm wide, and a subchannel, 5-μm long and 15-nm wide) with a surface charge distribution was investigated based on continuum dynamics calculations. The surface charge within 250nm of the intersection in the main channel and the entire subchannel was positive and that in the main channel outside this intersection region was negative. This nanofluidic system is analogous to a p-n-p transistor. The calculation results revealed that, by adjusting the electric potentials at the ends of the nanochannels, the ionic current could be (1) cut off, (2) regulated in the main channel, (3) diverged into the main and subchannels, (4) turned from the main channel to the subchannel, and (5) merged into the subchannel. A series connection of this nanofluidic system can therefore be used in biotechnological applications for electrophoretic separation and for sorting of ions and biomolecules.

  19. Binary Interval Search: a scalable algorithm for counting interval intersections

    PubMed Central

    Layer, Ryan M.; Skadron, Kevin; Robins, Gabriel; Hall, Ira M.; Quinlan, Aaron R.

    2013-01-01

    Motivation: The comparison of diverse genomic datasets is fundamental to understand genome biology. Researchers must explore many large datasets of genome intervals (e.g. genes, sequence alignments) to place their experimental results in a broader context and to make new discoveries. Relationships between genomic datasets are typically measured by identifying intervals that intersect, that is, they overlap and thus share a common genome interval. Given the continued advances in DNA sequencing technologies, efficient methods for measuring statistically significant relationships between many sets of genomic features are crucial for future discovery. Results: We introduce the Binary Interval Search (BITS) algorithm, a novel and scalable approach to interval set intersection. We demonstrate that BITS outperforms existing methods at counting interval intersections. Moreover, we show that BITS is intrinsically suited to parallel computing architectures, such as graphics processing units by illustrating its utility for efficient Monte Carlo simulations measuring the significance of relationships between sets of genomic intervals. Availability: https://github.com/arq5x/bits. Contact: arq5x@virginia.edu Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:23129298

  20. Comparison of Two Algebraic Methods for Curve/curve Intersection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demontaudouin, Y.; Tiller, W.

    1985-01-01

    Most geometric modeling systems use either polynomial or rational functions to represent geometry. In such systems most computational problems can be formulated as systems of polynomials in one or more variables. Classical elimination theory can be used to solve such systems. Here Cayley's method of elimination is summarized and it is shown how it can best be used to solve the curve/curve intersection problem. Cayley's method was found to be a more straightforward approach. Furthermore, it is computationally simpler, since the elements of the Cayley matrix are one variable instead of two variable polynomials. Researchers implemented and tested both methods and found Cayley's to be more efficient. Six pairs of curves, representing mixtures of lines, circles, and cubic arcs were used. Several examples had multiple intersection points. For all six cases Cayley's required less CPU time than the other method. The average time ratio of method 1 to method 2 was 3.13:1, the least difference was 2.33:1, and the most dramatic was 6.25:1. Both of the above methods can be extended to solve the surface/surface intersection problem.

  1. Traffic light detection and intersection crossing using mobile computer vision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grewei, Lynne; Lagali, Christopher

    2017-05-01

    The solution for Intersection Detection and Crossing to support the development of blindBike an assisted biking system for the visually impaired is discussed. Traffic light detection and intersection crossing are key needs in the task of biking. These problems are tackled through the use of mobile computer vision, in the form of a mobile application on an Android phone. This research builds on previous Traffic Light detection algorithms with a focus on efficiency and compatibility on a resource-limited platform. Light detection is achieved through blob detection algorithms utilizing training data to detect patterns of Red, Green and Yellow in complex real world scenarios where multiple lights may be present. Also, issues of obscurity and scale are addressed. Safe Intersection crossing in blindBike is also discussed. This module takes a conservative "assistive" technology approach. To achieve this blindBike use's not only the Android device but, an external bike cadence Bluetooth/Ant enabled sensor. Real world testing results are given and future work is discussed.

  2. Chapter 4: Ultrafast Internal Conversion of Pyrazine via Conical Intersection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, T.; Suzuki, Y. I.

    2014-04-01

    We describe recent experimental studies of internal conversion via conical intersection in pyrazine. Ultrafast S2 - S1 internal conversion is observed in real time using a time-resolved photoelectron imaging (TRPEI) method with a time resolution of 22 fs. This method enables us to obtain a time-energy map of the photoelectron angular anisotropy, which unambiguously reveals the signature of internal conversion. Furthermore, the time-energy map of the photoelectron kinetic energy distribution (PKED) exhibits vibrational quantum beats of totally symmetric modes in S1 after internal conversion. We also studied similar conical intersections between D1(π-1) and D0(n-1) by He(I) photoelectron spectroscopy and pulsed field ionization photoelectron spectroscopy. The existence of ultrafast internal conversion from D1 to D0 is confirmed by broadening of He(I) photoelectron spectra of pyrazine and deuterated pyrazine. Comparison of these spectra with one-color resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization (REMPI) spectra of the 3s Rydberg states clearly indicates that the conical intersection between D1 and D0 induces ultrafast internal conversion from the Rydberg state with a D1 ion core to that with a D0 ion core.

  3. Predicting crash-relevant violations at stop sign-controlled intersections for the development of an intersection driver assistance system.

    PubMed

    Scanlon, John M; Sherony, Rini; Gabler, Hampton C

    2016-09-01

    Intersection crashes resulted in over 5,000 fatalities in the United States in 2014. Intersection Advanced Driver Assistance Systems (I-ADAS) are active safety systems that seek to help drivers safely traverse intersections. I-ADAS uses onboard sensors to detect oncoming vehicles and, in the event of an imminent crash, can either alert the driver or take autonomous evasive action. The objective of this study was to develop and evaluate a predictive model for detecting whether a stop sign violation was imminent. Passenger vehicle intersection approaches were extracted from a data set of typical driver behavior (100-Car Naturalistic Driving Study) and violations (event data recorders downloaded from real-world crashes) and were assigned weighting factors based on real-world frequency. A k-fold cross-validation procedure was then used to develop and evaluate 3 hypothetical stop sign warning algorithms (i.e., early, intermediate, and delayed) for detecting an impending violation during the intersection approach. Violation detection models were developed using logistic regression models that evaluate likelihood of a violation at various locations along the intersection approach. Two potential indicators of driver intent to stop-that is, required deceleration parameter (RDP) and brake application-were used to develop the predictive models. The earliest violation detection opportunity was then evaluated for each detection algorithm in order to (1) evaluate the violation detection accuracy and (2) compare braking demand versus maximum braking capabilities. A total of 38 violating and 658 nonviolating approaches were used in the analysis. All 3 algorithms were able to detect a violation at some point during the intersection approach. The early detection algorithm, as designed, was able to detect violations earlier than all other algorithms during the intersection approach but gave false alarms for 22.3% of approaches. In contrast, the delayed detection algorithm sacrificed

  4. An FeF(3)·0.5H2O polytype: a microporous framework compound with intersecting tunnels for Li and Na batteries.

    PubMed

    Li, Chilin; Yin, Congling; Gu, Lin; Dinnebier, Robert E; Mu, Xiaoke; van Aken, Peter A; Maier, Joachim

    2013-08-07

    To improve the energy/power density of energy storage materials, numerous efforts have focused on the exploration of new structure prototypes, in particular metal-organic fameworks, Prussian blue analogues, open-framework oxides, and polyanion salts. Here we report a novel pyrochlore phase that appears to be useful as a high-capacity cathode for Li and Na batteries. It is an iron fluoride polymorph characterized by an intersecting tunnel structure, providing the space for accommodation and transport of Li and Na ions. It is prepared using hydrolyzable ionic liquids, which serve as reaction educts and structure-directing agents not only as far as the chemical structure is concerned but also in terms of morphology (shape, defect structure, electrode network structure). A capacity higher than 220 mA h g(-1) (for Li and Na storage) and a lifetime of at least 300 cycles (for Li storage) are demonstrated.

  5. Biomarker for Glycogen Storage Diseases

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-07-03

    Fructose Metabolism, Inborn Errors; Glycogen Storage Disease; Glycogen Storage Disease Type I; Glycogen Storage Disease Type II; Glycogen Storage Disease Type III; Glycogen Storage Disease Type IV; Glycogen Storage Disease Type V; Glycogen Storage Disease Type VI; Glycogen Storage Disease Type VII; Glycogen Storage Disease Type VIII

  6. Seasonal thermal energy storage

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, R.D.; Kannberg, L.D.; Raymond, J.R.

    1984-05-01

    This report describes the following: (1) the US Department of Energy Seasonal Thermal Energy Storage Program, (2) aquifer thermal energy storage technology, (3) alternative STES technology, (4) foreign studies in seasonal thermal energy storage, and (5) economic assessment.

  7. Charmonium dissociation in matter: perspectives from CERN to Jlab

    SciTech Connect

    A. Sibirtsev

    2010-07-01

    The J/Psi-meson dissociation in nuclear matter remains one of the most surprising problems in physics. In 2000 the NA50 Collaboration at CERN reported anomalous results on J/Psi absorption that was considered as evidence of Quark-Gluon Plasma formation. On the other hand, there may be other mechanisms which produce an increase in J/Psi absorption in a hot dense medium due to the modification of the charm mesons. Our detailed calculations were one of the first indications that the CERN data can indeed be well explained by a mechanism different from QGP formation. For further clarification we proposed to study the modification of charm in nuclei through antiproton annihilation, which is now part of the PANDA project at FAIR GSI. The experiment on charmonium dissociation in nuclei is under discussion at JLab as part of its 12 GeV upgrade.

  8. Charmonium dissociation in matter: perspectives from CERN to JLab

    SciTech Connect

    Sibirtsev, A.

    2010-07-27

    The J/{Psi}-meson dissociation in nuclear matter remains one of the most surprising problems in physics. In 2000 the NA50 Collaboration at CERN reported anomalous results on J/{Psi} absorption that was considered as evidence of Quark-Gluon Plasma formation. On the other hand, there may be other mechanisms which produce an increase in J/{Psi} absorption in a hot dense medium due to the modification of the charm mesons. Our detailed calculations were one of the first indications that the CERN data can indeed be well explained by a mechanism different from QGP formation. For further clarification we proposed to study the modification of charm in nuclei through antiproton annihilation, which is now part of the PANDA project at FAIR GSI. The experiment on charmonium dissociation in nuclei is under discussion at JLab as part of its 12 GeV upgrade.

  9. CERN and the Hunt for Elementary Particles and Forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsesmelis, Emmanuel

    2008-04-01

    CERN is the European Laboratory for Particle Physics, the world's largest particle physics research centre. Founded in 1954, the Laboratory was one of Europe's first joint ventures and has become a premier example of international collaboration. CERN's subject of study is pure science and is concentrated on exploring the Universe's most fundamental questions, such as What is it made of? and How did it come to be the way it is? The Laboratory's tools, the particle accelerators and particle detectors, are amongst the world's largest and most complex scientific instruments. The Laboratory's primary aims will be presented and a look at past achievements and present endeavours, particularly the Large Hadron Collider (LHC), will be reviewed. A brief look into the future will also be given.

  10. The CERN PS/SL Controls Java Application Programming Interface

    SciTech Connect

    I. Deloose; J. Cuperus; P. Charrue; F. DiMaio; K. Kostro; M. Vanden Eynden; W. Watson

    1999-10-01

    The PS/SL Convergence Project was launched in March 1998. Its objective is to deliver a common control as infrastructure for the CERN accelerators by year 2001. In the framework of this convergence activity, a project was launched to develop a Java Application Programming Interface (API) between programs written in the Java language and the PS and SL accelerator equipment. This Java API was specified and developed in collaboration with TJNAF. It is based on the Java CDEV [1] package that has been extended in order to end up with a CERN/TJNAF common product. It implements a detailed model composed of devices organized in named classes that provide a property-based interface. It supports data subscription and introspection facilities. The device model is presented and the capabilities of the API are described with syntax examples. The software architecture is also described.

  11. Upgrade of the cryogenic CERN RF test facility

    SciTech Connect

    Pirotte, O.; Benda, V.; Brunner, O.; Inglese, V.; Maesen, P.; Vullierme, B.; Koettig, T.

    2014-01-29

    With the large number of superconducting radiofrequency (RF) cryomodules to be tested for the former LEP and the present LHC accelerator a RF test facility was erected early in the 1990’s in the largest cryogenic test facility at CERN located at Point 18. This facility consisted of four vertical test stands for single cavities and originally one and then two horizontal test benches for RF cryomodules operating at 4.5 K in saturated helium. CERN is presently working on the upgrade of its accelerator infrastructure, which requires new superconducting cavities operating below 2 K in saturated superfluid helium. Consequently, the RF test facility has been renewed in order to allow efficient cavity and cryomodule tests in superfluid helium and to improve its thermal performances. The new RF test facility is described and its performances are presented.

  12. Status of non-LHC experiments at CERN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlatter, Dieter

    2005-06-01

    From the few non-LHC experiments still done at CERN, three experiments are presented. One experiment is completed (NA48 on direct CP violation in kaon decays), two others (NA48/1 on rare kaon decays and DIRAC on Pionium lifetime) have first physics results. The last chapter is a reminder of the SMC experiment in memory of Vernon Hughes (1921-2003), who was the spokesperson.

  13. TOWARDS A NOVEL MODULAR ARCHITECTURE FOR CERN RADIATION MONITORING.

    PubMed

    Boukabache, Hamza; Pangallo, Michel; Ducos, Gael; Cardines, Nicola; Bellotta, Antonio; Toner, Ciarán; Perrin, Daniel; Forkel-Wirth, Doris

    2017-04-01

    The European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) has the legal obligation to protect the public and the people working on its premises from any unjustified exposure to ionising radiation. In this context, radiation monitoring is one of the main concerns of the Radiation Protection Group. After 30 y of reliable service, the ARea CONtroller (ARCON) system is approaching the end of its lifecycle, which raises the need for new, more efficient radiation monitors with a high level of modularity to ensure better maintainability. Based on these two main principles, new detectors are currently being developed that will be capable of measuring very low dose rates down to 50 nSv h-1, whilst being able to measure radiation over an extensive range of 8 decades without any auto scaling. To reach these performances, CERN Radiation MOnitoring Electronics (CROME), the new generation of CERN radiation monitors, is based on the versatile architecture that includes new read-out electronics developed by the Instrumentation and Logistics section of the CERN Radiation Protection Group as well as a reconfigurable system on chip capable of performing complex processing calculations. Beside the capabilities of CROME to continuously measure the ambient dose rate, the system generates radiation alarms, provides interlock signals, drives alarm display units through a fieldbus and provides long-term, permanent and reliable data logging. The measurement tests performed during the first phase of the development show very promising results that pave the way to the second phase: the certification. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press.

  14. PARTICLE PHYSICS: CERN Collider Glimpses Supersymmetry--Maybe.

    PubMed

    Seife, C

    2000-07-14

    Last week, particle physicists at the CERN laboratory in Switzerland announced that by smashing together matter and antimatter in four experiments, they detected an unexpected effect in the sprays of particles that ensued. The anomaly is subtle, and physicists caution that it might still be a statistical fluke. If confirmed, however, it could mark the long-sought discovery of a whole zoo of new particles--and the end of a long-standing model of particle physics.

  15. Building and testing a high school calorimeter at CERN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biesot, L.; Crane, R.; Engelen, M. A. G.; van Haren, A. M. A.; van Kleef, R. H. B.; Leenders, O. R.; Timmermans, C.

    2016-11-01

    We have designed, built and tested a crystal calorimeter in the context of CERN’s first beam line for schools competition. The results of the tests at CERN show that the light output of our calorimeter depends on the energy deposited by particles (electrons and muons) hitting the crystals. Our design can be reproduced by high schools around the world, as we have avoided the use of toxic chemicals.

  16. Astrophysics at n_TOF Facility at CERN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tagliente, G.; Abbondanno, U.; Aerts, G.; Alvarez, H.; Alvarez-Velarde, F.; Andriamonje, S.; Andrzejewski, J.; Audouin, L.; Badurek, G.; Baumann, P.; Bečvář, F.; Belloni, F.; Berthoumieux, E.; Bisterzo, S.; Calviño, F.; Calviani, M.; Cano-Ott, D.; Capote, R.; Carrapiço, C.; Cennini, P.; Chepel, V.; Chiaveri, E.; Colonna, N.; Cortes, G.; Couture, A.; Cox, J.; Dahlfors, M.; David, S.; Dillman, I.; Domingo-Pardo, C.; Dridi, W.; Duran, I.; Eleftheriadis, C.; Embid-Segura, M.; Ferrari, A.; Ferreira-Marques, R.; Fujii, K.; Furman, W.; Gallino, R.; Goncalves, I.; Gonzalez-Romero, E.; Gramegna, F.; Guerrero, C.; Gunsing, F.; Haas, B.; Haight, R.; Heil, M.; Herrera-Martinez, A.; Igashira, M.; Jericha, E.; Käppeler, F.; Kadi, Y.; Karadimos, D.; Karamanis, D.; Kerveno, M.; Koehler, P.; Kossionides, E.; Krtička, M.; Leeb, H.; Lindote, A.; Lopes, I.; Lozano, M.; Lukic, S.; Marganiec, J.; Marrone, S.; Martinez, T.; Massimi, C.; Mastinu, P.; Mengoni, A.; Milazzo, P. M.; Mosconi, M.; Neves, F.; Oberhummer, H.; Pancin, J.; Papachristodoulou, C.; Papadopoulos, C.; Paradela, C.; Patronis, N.; Pavlik, A.; Pavlopoulos, P.; Perrot, L.; Pigni, M. T.; Plag, R.; Plompen, A.; Plukis, A.; Poch, A.; Praena, J.; Pretel, C.; Quesada, J.; Rauscher, T.; Reifarth, R.; Rubbia, C.; Rudolf, G.; Rullhusen, P.; Salgado, J.; Santos, C.; Sarchiapone, L.; Savvidis, I.; Stephan, C.; Tain, J. L.; Tassan-Got, L.; Tavora, L.; Terlizzi, R.; Vannini, G.; Vaz, P.; Ventura, A.; Villamarin, D.; Vincente, M. C.; Vlachoudis, V.; Vlastou, R.; Voss, F.; Walter, S.; Wendler, H.; Wiescher, M.; Wisshak, K.

    2011-09-01

    The neutron time of flight (n_TOF) facility at CERN is a spallation neutron source with white neutron energy spectrum (from thermal to several GeV), covering the full energy range of interest for nuclear astrophysics, in particular for measurements of the neutron capture cross section required in s-process nucleosynthesis. This contribution presents an overview on the astrophysical program carried on at the n_TOF facility, the main results and their implications.

  17. Non-Large Hadron Collider Physics Program at CERN

    SciTech Connect

    Rondio, Ewa

    2011-08-17

    CERN has a diversified program at the chain of accelerators also used as LHC injectors. Selected examples of recent results will be used to illustrate the depth and the breadth of the overall physics program. Starting from lowest energies – the only decelerator at CERN (AD) is looking at antimatter production and trapping. First trapped anti-hydrogen were reported in 2010. Interdisciplinary team is working in the CLOUD experiment, where systematic studies on condensation have just started with the unique equipment allowing control of contamination, temperature and radiation dose. They may affect our understanding of climate changes. At SPS, results from Compass on the studies of nucleon spin structure bring the conclusion on how much gluons contribute to the nucleon spin. These results will be presented in more details. SPS beam is also used to produce high energy neutrinos which are sent towards Gran Sasso underground laboratory where OPERA and ICARUS detectors are waiting to register them. First observation of tau neutrino interaction was reported by OPERA last year. It is expected that the broad and evolving physics program will be supported at CERN to complement the research at the energy frontier.

  18. A driving simulator evaluation of potential speed reductions using two innovative designs for signalised urban intersections.

    PubMed

    Stephens, Amanda N; Beanland, Vanessa; Candappa, Nimmi; Mitsopoulos-Rubens, Eve; Corben, Bruce; Lenné, Michael G

    2017-01-01

    Intersections are typically associated with a higher level of crash risk than other types of facilities on the road network. Standard cross-road intersections are particularly hazardous because by their very design, drivers may travel through at speeds that are incompatible with human biomechanical tolerance should a crash occur. Further, drivers are exposed to dangerous conflict angles, which are likely to result in serious injury. This paper examines the effectiveness of two new intersection designs aimed at restricting potentially dangerous conflict angles while reducing driver speeds through the intersection. These designs, named the "Cut-Through" and the "Squircle", incorporate key features of both signalised intersections and roundabouts. The intersections are controlled by signals similar to a signalised roundabout. Instead of a standard central island, right turning traffic (equivalent to left turns in jurisdictions that drive on the right) cut through the central island, thereby avoiding traffic interlocks and delays that can occur with the traditional signalised roundabout. Across two driving simulator studies, vehicle speed data were collected on approach to and through each of the proposed intersection designs. Performance was benchmarked against equivalent standard signalised cross-road intersections and standard non-signalised roundabouts. Notably, drivers reduced their speeds by approximately 30-40% when negotiating both the Cut-Through and the Squircle compared to the standard signalised intersections. The safety potentials of the two new intersection designs are discussed within the guidelines of the Safe Systems principles. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Turning movements, vehicle offsets and ageing drivers driving behaviour at channelized and unchannelized intersections.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jaisung; Tay, Richard; Kim, Sangyoup; Jeong, Seungwon

    2017-11-01

    Ageing drivers experience a higher risk of intersection crashes because of their decrease in driving efficiency, including the decline in cognitive ability, head and neck flexibility, and visual acuity. Although several studies have been conducted to examine the factors associated with ageing driver crashes at intersections, little research has been conducted to examine the differences in the factors related to ageing drivers' turning paths and intersection geometric features. This study aims to improve the safety of ageing drivers at intersections by identifying the maneuvers that are risky for them and tracking their turning movements at selected intersections. We find that ageing drivers experience more crashes at intersections than younger drivers, especially crashes involving turning movements. Furthermore, ageing drivers experience more crashes at unchannelized intersections compared to channelized intersections. In addition, this study finds that ageing drivers exhibit greater and more inconsistent offsets during turning movements compared to those of younger drivers at both channelized and unchannelized intersections. Ageing drivers also tend to make relatively sharper or tighter turns than younger drivers. Hence, transportation engineers and road safety professionals should consider appropriate countermeasures to reduce the risks of crashes involving ageing drivers at intersections. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Improving cultural competence education: the utility of an intersectional framework.

    PubMed

    Powell Sears, Karen

    2012-06-01

    Most US medical schools have instituted cultural competence education in the undergraduate curriculum. This training is intended to improve the quality of care that doctors, the majority of whom are White, deliver to ethnic and racial minority patients. Research into the outcomes of cultural competence training programmes reveals that they have been largely ineffective in improving doctors' skills. In varied curricular formats, programmes tend to teach group-specific cultural knowledge, despite the vast heterogeneity of racial and ethnic groups. This cultural essentialism diminishes training effectiveness. This paper proposes key curriculum content changes and suggests the inclusion of an intersectional framework in the cultural competence curriculum. This framework maintains that racial and ethnic minority groups hold multiple social statuses, called social locations, which interact with one another to uniquely shape the health views, needs and experiences of the individuals within the groups. Social locations include those defined by race, ethnicity, gender, social class and sexuality, which are experienced multiplicatively, not additively, within a particular social context. Cultural competence education must go beyond simplified cultural understandings to explore these more complex meanings. Doctors' ability to understand, communicate with and treat diverse groups can be vastly improved by applying an intersectional framework in academic research, self-awareness exercises and clinical training. Integrating an intersectional framework into cultural competency education can better prepare doctors for caring for racial and ethnic minority patients. This paper recommends curriculum elements for the classroom and clinical training that can improve doctor knowledge and skills for caring for diverse groups. Medical schools can use the proposed model to facilitate the development of new educational strategies and learning experiences. These improvements can lead to

  1. Evaluation of Intersection Traffic Control Measures through Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asaithambi, Gowri; Sivanandan, R.

    2015-12-01

    Modeling traffic flow is stochastic in nature due to randomness in variables such as vehicle arrivals and speeds. Due to this and due to complex vehicular interactions and their manoeuvres, it is extremely difficult to model the traffic flow through analytical methods. To study this type of complex traffic system and vehicle interactions, simulation is considered as an effective tool. Application of homogeneous traffic models to heterogeneous traffic may not be able to capture the complex manoeuvres and interactions in such flows. Hence, a microscopic simulation model for heterogeneous traffic is developed using object oriented concepts. This simulation model acts as a tool for evaluating various control measures at signalized intersections. The present study focuses on the evaluation of Right Turn Lane (RTL) and Channelised Left Turn Lane (CLTL). A sensitivity analysis was performed to evaluate RTL and CLTL by varying the approach volumes, turn proportions and turn lane lengths. RTL is found to be advantageous only up to certain approach volumes and right-turn proportions, beyond which it is counter-productive. CLTL is found to be advantageous for lower approach volumes for all turn proportions, signifying the benefits of CLTL. It is counter-productive for higher approach volume and lower turn proportions. This study pinpoints the break-even points for various scenarios. The developed simulation model can be used as an appropriate intersection lane control tool for enhancing the efficiency of flow at intersections. This model can also be employed for scenario analysis and can be valuable to field traffic engineers in implementing vehicle-type based and lane-based traffic control measures.

  2. Simulated car crashes at intersections in drivers with Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Rizzo, M; McGehee, D V; Dawson, J D; Anderson, S N

    2001-01-01

    Current evidence suggests that car crashes in cognitively impaired older drivers often occur because of failure to notice other drivers at intersections. We tested whether licensed drivers with mild to moderate cognitive impairment due to Alzheimer disease (AD) are at greater risk for intersection crashes. In this experiment, 30 participants drove on a virtual highway in a simulator scenario where the approach to within 3.6 seconds of an intersection triggered an illegal incursion by another vehicle. To avoid collision with the incurring vehicle, the driver had to perceive, attend to, and interpret the roadway situation; formulate an evasive plan; and then exert appropriate action on the accelerator, brake, or steering controls, all under pressure of time. The results showed that 6 of 18 drivers with AD (33%) experienced crashes versus none of 12 nondemented drivers of similar age. Use of a visual tool that plots control over steering wheel position, brake and accelerator pedals, vehicle speed, and vehicle position during the 5 seconds preceding a crash event showed inattention and control responses that were either inappropriate or too slow. The findings were combined with those in another recent study of collision avoidance in drivers with AD that focused on potential rear end collisions. Predictors of crashes in the combined studies included visuospatial impairment, disordered attention, reduced processing of visual motion cues, and overall cognitive decline. The results help to specify the linkage between decline in certain cognitive domains and increased crash risk in AD and also support the use of high-fidelity simulation and neuropsychologic assessment in an effort to standardize the assessment of fitness to drive in persons with medical impairments.

  3. Moving, sensing intersectionality: a case study of Miss China Europe.

    PubMed

    Chow, Yiu Fai

    2011-01-01

    Every year, Miss China Europe, a transnational beauty pageant organized for the Chinese diaspora, is held in the Netherlands. The hypervisuality of Chinese diasporic women at the event stands in painful contrast to their everyday invisibility, whether in the Netherlands, China, or elsewhere in the world. Informed by intersectional and transnational feminist scholarship, this empirical study zooms in on one group of women, ethnic Chinese born and/or growing up in the Netherlands, to identify and recuperate their neglected lived experience in a particular historical-cultural context. It takes their own voices as central, hopefully to contribute to their visibility. It aims to provide an understanding of diasporic Chinese women as living in the dynamics not only of their multiple subordinations but also of their subjective consciousness, experienced autonomy, and agency. Drawing insights from the subjective accounts of both contestants and audiences of Miss China Europe, I suggest that one way to foreground marginalized women's agency is to understand their intersectionality in terms of movements and sensory experiences. On the one hand, while the contestants articulated a readiness to perform their modern and yet Chinese selves, they were making movements along two intersecting axes of inequality and power relations - Chineseness and Dutchness - precisely to negotiate their sense of inequality and power relations. On the other hand, among the audiences, two major topics - the blood issue (or whether Chineseness should be defined by ancestry) and the language problem (or whether Chineseness should be defined by the ability to speak Chinese) - were raised regularly, underscoring a complex viewing experience of seeing and hearing, of the tension between visual and audio identifications.

  4. Roadside measurements of ultrafine particles at a busy urban intersection.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yungang; Zhu, Yifang; Salinas, Robert; Ramirez, David; Karnae, Saritha; John, Kuruvilla

    2008-11-01

    A field sampling campaign on ultrafine particles (UFPs, diameter <100 nm) was conducted at a busy traffic intersection from December 2006 to June 2007 in Corpus Christi, TX. This traffic intersection consisted of South Padre Island Drive (SPID, Highway 358) and Staples Street. Traffic densities on SPID were 9102/hr and 7880/hr for weekdays and weekends, respectively. Staples Street traffic densities were 2795/hr and 2572/hr, respectively. There were approximately 3.7% heavy-duty diesel vehicles (HDDVs) on both roadways. Peak traffic flows occurred early in the morning and late in the evening during weekdays and around noon on weekends. The average UFP total number concentration collected by a condensation particle counter (CPC 3785; TSI) was 66 x 10(3) cm(-3). A direct relationship between the UFP number concentration and traffic density was observed, but the HDDV traffic density was found to be a better estimator of the UFP number concentration than total traffic density. A scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS 3936 with DMA 3081 and CPC 3785, TSI) measuring the particle size distribution from 7 to 290 nm was rotated among four corners of the intersection. The upwind and downwind size distributions were both bimodal in shape, exhibiting a nucleation mode at 10-30 nm and a secondary mode at 50-70 nm. The highest and lowest particle concentrations were observed on the downwind and upwind sides of both roadways, respectively, indicating the importance of wind direction. Wind speed also played an important role in overall particle concentrations; UFP concentrations were inversely proportional to wind speed. A negative correlation was observed between particle number concentrations and ambient temperature. The particle number concentration was 3.5 times greater when traffic was idling at a red light than moving at a green light.

  5. Energy storage criteria handbook

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hull, J. R.; Cole, R. L.; Hull, A. B.

    1982-10-01

    The purpose of this handbook is to provide information and criteria necessary for the selection and sizing of energy storage technologies for use at U.S. Naval facilities. The handbook gives Naval base personnel procedures and information to select the most viable energy storage options to provide the space conditioning (heating and cooling) and domestic hot water needs of their facility. The handbook may also be used by contractors, installers, designers, engineers, architects, and manufacturers who intend to enter the energy storage business. The handbook is organized into three major sections: a general section, a technical section, and an example section. While a technical background is assumed for the latter two sections, the general section is simply written and can serve as an introduction to the field of energy storage. The technical section examines the following energy storage technologies: sensible heat storage, latent heat storage, cold storage, thermochemical storage, mechanical storage, pumped hydro storage, and electrochemical storage. The example section is limited to thermal storage and includes examples for: water tank storage, rockbed storage, latent heat storage, and cold water storage.

  6. Vehicular headways on signalized intersections: theory, models, and reality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krbálek, Milan; Šleis, Jiří

    2015-01-01

    We discuss statistical properties of vehicular headways measured on signalized crossroads. On the basis of mathematical approaches, we formulate theoretical and empirically inspired criteria for the acceptability of theoretical headway distributions. Sequentially, the multifarious families of statistical distributions (commonly used to fit real-road headway statistics) are confronted with these criteria, and with original empirical time clearances gauged among neighboring vehicles leaving signal-controlled crossroads after a green signal appears. Using three different numerical schemes, we demonstrate that an arrangement of vehicles on an intersection is a consequence of the general stochastic nature of queueing systems, rather than a consequence of traffic rules, driver estimation processes, or decision-making procedures.

  7. Unpacking Pat Parker: Intersections and Revolutions in "Movement in Black".

    PubMed

    Washburn, Amy

    2015-01-01

    This article explores Pat Parker's poem "Movement in Black." It examines the ways in which she emblematizes intersectionality and simultaneity as forms of revolution in struggles of self and society. It begins with a theoretical and historical apparatus to contextualize Parker as an artist and activist. Then it offers a literary analysis of the poem, focusing on themes of time and space, marginalization and movement, difference and power, visibility and invisibility, and history and memory. It argues that Parker uses autobiographical writing to fuse personal and political sites of resistance.

  8. Stability of distributed MPC in an intersection scenario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sprodowski, T.; Pannek, J.

    2015-11-01

    The research topic of autonomous cars and the communication among them has attained much attention in the last years and is developing quickly. Among others, this research area spans fields such as image recognition, mathematical control theory, communication networks, and sensor fusion. We consider an intersection scenario where we divide the shared road space in different cells. These cells form a grid. The cars are modelled as an autonomous multi-agent system based on the Distributed Model Predictive Control algorithm (DMPC). We prove that the overall system reaches stability using Optimal Control for each multi-agent and demonstrate that by numerical results.

  9. Overview of Common Sleep Disorders and Intersection with Dermatologic Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Walia, Harneet K.; Mehra, Reena

    2016-01-01

    Sleep disorders are very common, often under-recognized and therefore undertreated, are associated with a myriad of medical conditions and could lead to significant impairment of quality of life. This review provides an up-to-date synopsis of common sleep disorders encompassing insufficient sleep syndrome, insomnia, circadian rhythm disorders and obstructive sleep apnea with a brief overview of epidemiology, screening, diagnostic testing and treatment. We also emphasize the emerging area of the intersection of sleep disorders and dermatologic conditions and present compelling data regarding underlying mechanisms including sleep dysfunction in relation to disorders of skin inflammation, aging and skin cancer. PMID:27144559

  10. Dual intersection syndrome of the forearm: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Zhari, Bouchra; Edderai, Meryem; Boumdine, Hassan; Amil, Touriya; En-nouali, Hassan

    2015-01-01

    The intersection syndrome, described since the 19th century, is an uncommon disorder associated with rubbing at the crossing point between the first dorsal compartment muscles and the radial wrist extensor muscles. Imaging modalities used to diagnosis this syndrome includes ultrasonography and magnetic resonance imaging. We reported a case of a 60-year-old man presented to our formation with painful swelling on the dorsum of the wrist and forearm. An MRI and an ultrasound were performed, and objectified a dual cross syndrome of the forearm. PMID:26587172

  11. Intersecting D 3 -D3 ' -brane system at finite temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cottrell, William; Hanson, James; Hashimoto, Akikazu; Loveridge, Andrew; Pettengill, Duncan

    2017-02-01

    We analyze the dynamics of the intersecting D 3 -D3 ' -brane system overlapping in 1 +1 dimensions, in a holographic treatment where N D3 branes are manifested as anti-de Sitter Schwartzschild geometry, and the D3 ' brane is treated as a probe. We extract the thermodynamic equation of state from the set of embedding solutions, and analyze the stability at the perturbative and the nonperturbative level. We review a systematic procedure to resolve local instabilities and multivaluedness in the equations of state based on classic ideas of convexity in the microcanonical ensemble. We then identify a runaway behavior which was not noticed previously for this system.

  12. Intersection Syndrome in a Handcyclist: Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Intersection syndrome describes a rare inflammatory condition located at the crossing point between the first dorsal compartment muscles and the radial wrist extensor muscles. It is a repetitive motion injury that affects patients who overuse their wrists. The present report reviews the incidence of the condition as well as the special populations it affects. The anatomy of the wrist is presented and clinical findings and physical examination techniques are reviewed to help the reader reach a quick but correct diagnosis. Finally, the most appropriate treatment approach is presented, incorporating rehabilitative methods designed to ensure a full and prompt functional recovery and resumption of physical activity. PMID:23960708

  13. PREFACE: Lectures from the CERN Winter School on Strings, Supergravity and Gauge Theories, CERN, 9-13 February 2009 Lectures from the CERN Winter School on Strings, Supergravity and Gauge Theories, CERN, 9-13 February 2009

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uranga, A. M.

    2009-11-01

    This special section is devoted to the proceedings of the conference `Winter School on Strings, Supergravity and Gauge Theories', which took place at CERN, the European Centre for Nuclear Research, in Geneva, Switzerland 9-13 February 2009. This event is part of a yearly series of scientific schools, which represents a well established tradition. Previous events have been held at SISSA, in Trieste, Italy, in February 2005 and at CERN in January 2006, January 2007 and January 2008, and were funded by the European Mobility Research and Training Network `Constituents, Fundamental Forces and Symmetries of the Universe'. The next event will take place again at CERN, in January 2010. The school was primarily meant for young doctoral students and postdoctoral researchers working in the area of string theory. It consisted of several general lectures of four hours each, whose notes are published in this special section, and six working group discussion sessions, focused on specific topics of the network research program. It was well attended by over 200 participants. The topics of the lectures were chosen to provide an introduction to some of the areas of recent progress, and to the open problems, in string theory. One of the most active areas in string theory in recent years has been the AdS/CFT or gauge/gravity correspondence, which proposes the complete equivalence of string theory on (asymptotically) anti de Sitter spacetimes with certain quantum (gauge) field theories. The duality has recently been applied to understanding the hydrodynamical properties of a hot plasma in gauge theories (like the quark-gluon plasma created in heavy ion collisions at the RHIC experiment at Brookhaven, and soon at the LHC at CERN) in terms of a dual gravitational AdS theory in the presence of a black hole. These developments were reviewed in the lecture notes by M Rangamani. In addition, the AdS/CFT duality has been proposed as a tool to study interesting physical properties in other

  14. Novel Intersection Type Recognition for Autonomous Vehicles Using a Multi-Layer Laser Scanner

    PubMed Central

    An, Jhonghyun; Choi, Baehoon; Sim, Kwee-Bo; Kim, Euntai

    2016-01-01

    There are several types of intersections such as merge-roads, diverge-roads, plus-shape intersections and two types of T-shape junctions in urban roads. When an autonomous vehicle encounters new intersections, it is crucial to recognize the types of intersections for safe navigation. In this paper, a novel intersection type recognition method is proposed for an autonomous vehicle using a multi-layer laser scanner. The proposed method consists of two steps: (1) static local coordinate occupancy grid map (SLOGM) building and (2) intersection classification. In the first step, the SLOGM is built relative to the local coordinate using the dynamic binary Bayes filter. In the second step, the SLOGM is used as an attribute for the classification. The proposed method is applied to a real-world environment and its validity is demonstrated through experimentation. PMID:27447640

  15. Novel Intersection Type Recognition for Autonomous Vehicles Using a Multi-Layer Laser Scanner.

    PubMed

    An, Jhonghyun; Choi, Baehoon; Sim, Kwee-Bo; Kim, Euntai

    2016-07-20

    There are several types of intersections such as merge-roads, diverge-roads, plus-shape intersections and two types of T-shape junctions in urban roads. When an autonomous vehicle encounters new intersections, it is crucial to recognize the types of intersections for safe navigation. In this paper, a novel intersection type recognition method is proposed for an autonomous vehicle using a multi-layer laser scanner. The proposed method consists of two steps: (1) static local coordinate occupancy grid map (SLOGM) building and (2) intersection classification. In the first step, the SLOGM is built relative to the local coordinate using the dynamic binary Bayes filter. In the second step, the SLOGM is used as an attribute for the classification. The proposed method is applied to a real-world environment and its validity is demonstrated through experimentation.

  16. Characteristics of traffic flow at nonsignalized T-shaped intersection with U-turn movements.

    PubMed

    Fan, Hong-Qiang; Jia, Bin; Li, Xin-Gang; Tian, Jun-Fang; Yan, Xue-Dong

    2013-01-01

    Most nonsignalized T-shaped intersections permit U-turn movements, which make the traffic conditions of intersection complex. In this paper, a new cellular automaton (CA) model is proposed to characterize the traffic flow at the intersection of this type. In present CA model, new rules are designed to avoid the conflicts among different directional vehicles and eliminate the gridlock. Two kinds of performance measures (i.e., flux and average control delay) for intersection are compared. The impacts of U-turn movements are analyzed under different initial conditions. Simulation results demonstrate that (i) the average control delay is more practical than flux in measuring the performance of intersection, (ii) U-turn movements increase the range and degree of high congestion, and (iii) U-turn movements on the different direction of main road have asymmetrical influences on the traffic conditions of intersection.

  17. The intersection numbers of the p-spin curves from random matrix theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brézin, E.; Hikami, S.

    2013-02-01

    The intersection numbers of p-spin curves are computed through correlation functions of Gaussian ensembles of random matrices in an external matrix source. The p-dependence of intersection numbers is determined as polynomial in p; the large p behavior is also considered. The analytic continuation of intersection numbers to negative values of p is discussed in relation to SL(2,R)/U(1) black hole sigma model.

  18. "The intersections of trans women and lesbian identities, communities, and movements": An introduction.

    PubMed

    Beemyn, Genny; Eliason, Mickey

    2016-01-01

    This introduction to the special issue on "The Intersections of Trans Women and Lesbian Identities, Communities, and Movements" considers the interconnectedness of "trans" and "lesbian" as identities and as concepts. Our approach challenges a reading of the two communities as largely separate and adversarial. In reviewing the articles included in this issue, we highlight places of intersection between the two identities, including the experiences of the individuals who live at the intersectional point: trans lesbians.

  19. Health care barriers, racism, and intersectionality in Australia.

    PubMed

    Bastos, João L; Harnois, Catherine E; Paradies, Yin C

    2017-05-04

    While racism has been shown to negatively affect health care quality, little is known about the extent to which racial discrimination works with and through gender, class, and sexuality to predict barriers to health care (e.g., perceived difficulty accessing health services). Additionally, most existing studies focus on racial disparities in the U.S. context, with few examining marginalized groups in other countries. To address these knowledge gaps, we analyze data from the 2014 Australian General Social Survey, a nationally representative survey of individuals aged 15 and older living in 12,932 private dwellings. Following an intersectional perspective, we estimate a series of multivariable logit regression models to assess three hypotheses: racial discrimination will be positively associated with perceived barriers to health care (H1); the effect of perceived racial discrimination will be particularly severe for women, sexual minorities, and low socio-economic status individuals (H2); and, in addition to racial discrimination, other forms of perceived discrimination will negatively impact perceived barriers to health care (H3). Findings show that perceptions of racial discrimination are significantly associated with perceived barriers to health care, though this relationship is not significantly stronger for low status groups. In addition, our analyses reveal that perceived racism and other forms of discrimination combine to predict perceived barriers to health care. Taken together, these results speak to the benefits of an intersectional approach for examining racial inequalities in perceived access to health care. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Obliquely-intersecting Hiemenz stagnation-point flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weidman, Patrick

    2012-11-01

    The interaction of two obliquely-intersecting Hiemenz stagnation point flows normal to a flat plate is studied. One flow of strain rate a aligned along the x-axis intersects the other of strain rate b at angle Phi from the x-axis. When transformed to principal axes, a similarity reduction of the Navier-Stokes equation yields two ordinary differential equations with coefficients depending on the strain rate ratio Sigma = b/a and Phi. These equations are then tranformed to Howarth's equations via a two-parameter mapping. The large-Sigma asymptotic behavior of solutions for the limiting angles Phi = 0 and 90 deg. are determined. Numerical solutions of the principal axes equations for values of Sigma in the saddle-point and nodal-point regions at Phi = 0, 15, 30, 45, 60, 75 and 90 deg. compare precisely with those obtained from the two-parameter mapping. Plots of the wall shear stress parameters, the normalized displacement thicknesses and sample velocity profiles are presented.

  1. Cooperative crossing of traffic intersections in a distributed robot system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rausch, Alexander; Oswald, Norbert; Levi, Paul

    1995-09-01

    In traffic scenarios a distributed robot system has to cope with problems like resource sharing, distributed planning, distributed job scheduling, etc. While travelling along a street segment can be done autonomously by each robot, crossing of an intersection as a shared resource forces the robot to coordinate its actions with those of other robots e.g. by means of negotiations. We discuss the issue of cooperation on the design of a robot control architecture. Task and sensor specific cooperation between robots requires the robots' architectures to be interlinked at different hierarchical levels. Inside each level control cycles are running in parallel and provide fast reaction on events. Internal cooperation may occur between cycles of the same level. Altogether the architecture is matrix-shaped and contains abstract control cycles with a certain degree of autonomy. Based upon the internal structure of a cycle we consider the horizontal and vertical interconnection of cycles to form an individual architecture. Thereafter we examine the linkage of several agents and its influence on an interacting architecture. A prototypical implementation of a scenario, which combines aspects of active vision and cooperation, illustrates our approach. Two vision-guided vehicles are faced with line following, intersection recognition and negotiation.

  2. Convoys of care: theorizing intersections of formal and informal care.

    PubMed

    Kemp, Candace L; Ball, Mary M; Perkins, Molly M

    2013-01-01

    Although most care to frail elders is provided informally, much of this care is paired with formal care services. Yet, common approaches to conceptualizing the formal-informal intersection often are static, do not consider self-care, and typically do not account for multi-level influences. In response, we introduce the "convoy of care" model as an alternative way to conceptualize the intersection and to theorize connections between care convoy properties and caregiver and recipient outcomes. The model draws on Kahn and Antonucci's (1980) convoy model of social relations, expanding it to include both formal and informal care providers and also incorporates theoretical and conceptual threads from life course, feminist gerontology, social ecology, and symbolic interactionist perspectives. This article synthesizes theoretical and empirical knowledge and demonstrates the convoy of care model in an increasingly popular long-term care setting, assisted living. We conceptualize care convoys as dynamic, evolving, person- and family-specific, and influenced by a host of multi-level factors. Care convoys have implications for older adults' quality of care and ability to age in place, for job satisfaction and retention among formal caregivers, and for informal caregiver burden. The model moves beyond existing conceptual work to provide a comprehensive, multi-level, multi-factor framework that can be used to inform future research, including research in other care settings, and to spark further theoretical development. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Ultrafast charge transfer via a conical intersection in dimethylaminobenzonitrile.

    PubMed

    Fuss, Werner; Pushpa, Kumbil Kuttan; Rettig, Wolfgang; Schmid, Wolfram E; Trushin, Sergei A

    2002-04-01

    The L(a)-like S2 state (2A) of 4-(dimethylamino)benzonitrile was pumped at 267 nm in the gas phase at 130 degrees C. Nonresonant multiphoton ionization at 800 nm with mass-selective detection then probed the subsequent processes. Whereas ionization at the Franck-Condon geometry only gave rise to the parent ion, fragmentation increased on motion towards the charge-transfer (CT) state. This useful difference is ascribed to a geometry-dependent resonance in the ion. The time constants found are interpreted by ultrafast (approximately 68 fs) relaxation through a conical intersection to both the CT and the L(b)-type S1 state (1B). Then the population equilibrates between these two states within 1 ps. From there the molecule relaxes within 90 ps to a lower excited state which can only be a triplet state (T(n)) and then decomposes within 300 ps. Previous experiments either investigated only 1B --> CT relaxation-which does not take place in the gas phase or nonpolar solvents for energetic reasons--or, starting from S2 excitation, typically had insufficient time resolution (>1 ps) to detect the temporary charge transfer. Only recently temporary population of the CT state was found in a nonpolar solvent (Kwok et al., J. Phys. Chem. A. 2000, 104, 4188), a result fully consistent with our mechanism. We also show that S2 --> S1 relaxation does not occur vertically but involves an intermediate strong geometrical distortion, passing through a conical intersection.

  4. Illegal pedestrian crossing at signalised intersections: incidence and relative risk.

    PubMed

    King, Mark J; Soole, David; Ghafourian, Ameneh

    2009-05-01

    Illegal pedestrian behaviour is common and is reported as a factor in many pedestrian crashes. Since walking is being promoted for its health and environmental benefits, minimisation of its associated risks is of interest. The risk associated with illegal road crossing is unclear, and better information would assist in setting a rationale for enforcement and priorities for public education. An observation survey of pedestrian behaviour was conducted at signalised intersections in the Brisbane CBD (Queensland, Australia) on typical workdays, using behavioural categories that were identifiable in police crash reports. The survey confirmed high levels of crossing against the lights, or close enough to the lights that they should legally have been used. Measures of exposure for crossing legally, against the lights, and close to the lights were generated by weighting the observation data. Relative risk ratios were calculated for these categories using crash data from the observation sites and adjacent midblocks. Crossing against the lights and crossing close to the lights both exhibited a crash risk per crossing event approximately eight times that of legal crossing at signalised intersections. The implications of these results for enforcement and education are discussed, along with the limitations of the study.

  5. Convoys of care: Theorizing intersections of formal and informal care

    PubMed Central

    Kemp, Candace L.; Ball, Mary M.; Perkins, Molly M.

    2013-01-01

    Although most care to frail elders is provided informally, much of this care is paired with formal care services. Yet, common approaches to conceptualizing the formal–informal intersection often are static, do not consider self-care, and typically do not account for multi-level influences. In response, we introduce the “convoy of care” model as an alternative way to conceptualize the intersection and to theorize connections between care convoy properties and caregiver and recipient outcomes. The model draws on Kahn and Antonucci's (1980) convoy model of social relations, expanding it to include both formal and informal care providers and also incorporates theoretical and conceptual threads from life course, feminist gerontology, social ecology, and symbolic interactionist perspectives. This article synthesizes theoretical and empirical knowledge and demonstrates the convoy of care model in an increasingly popular long-term care setting, assisted living. We conceptualize care convoys as dynamic, evolving, person- and family-specific, and influenced by a host of multi-level factors. Care convoys have implications for older adults’ quality of care and ability to age in place, for job satisfaction and retention among formal caregivers, and for informal caregiver burden. The model moves beyond existing conceptual work to provide a comprehensive, multi-level, multi-factor framework that can be used to inform future research, including research in other care settings, and to spark further theoretical development. PMID:23273553

  6. Intersection Syndrome: The Subtle Squeak of an Overused Wrist.

    PubMed

    Skinner, Thomas M

    2017-01-01

    Patient histories that include wrist pain can be pivotal in the distinction between intersection syndrome (IS) and the more common de Quervain's tenosynovitis (DQT). Presented here is a 26-year-old pregnant woman with a history of rowing who developed left radial/dorsal wrist pain and a rubbing/squeaking sensation. Nine months of conservative DQT therapy and a landmark-guided corticosteroid injection failed to relieve her symptoms. An in-clinic ultrasound showed tenosynovitis at the intersection of the first and second compartments, confirming a diagnosis of IS. She found immediate relief with ultrasound-guided saline hydrodissection, the injection of saline into the intercompartmental space to reduce adhesions. Both DQT and IS are overuse injuries caused by repetitive wrist extension, as occurs in rowing, and either condition can worsen after pregnancy. Distinguishing the subtleties between DQT and IS can be challenging. Close attention to the patient's description of the pain can guide treatment, potentially expediting recovery. In addition, saline hydrodissection can be both a diagnostic tool and a potentially therapeutic alternative to steroid injections for such tendinopathies. © Copyright 2017 by the American Board of Family Medicine.

  7. The MERIT High-Power Target Experiment at the CERN PS.

    SciTech Connect

    Kirk,H.G.; Tsang, T.; Efthymiopoulos, I.; Fabich, A.; Haug, F.; Lettry, J.; Palm, M.; Pereira, H.; Mokhov, N.; Striganov, S.; Carroll, A.J.; Graves, V.B.; Spampinato, P.T.; McDonald, K.T.; Bennett, J.R.J.; Caretta, O.; Loveridge, P.; Park, H.

    2008-06-23

    The MERIT experiment was designed as a proof-of-principle test of a target system based on a free mercury jet inside a 15-T solenoid that is capable of sustaining proton beam powers of up to 4 MW. The experiment was run at CERN in the fall of 2007. We describe the results of the tests and their implications. Plans are being discussed for possible future machines which can deliver proton beams with multi-MW beam powers. A prominent application for these powerful beams will be to produce intense secondary beams suitable for investigating important physics issues. Examples include investigations of rare decay processes and neutrino oscillations. The Neutrino Factory and Muon Collider Collaboration [1] has proposed a target system [2, 3] which will be capable of supporting proton beam powers of 4 MW with the purpose of producing and collecting intense muon beams for eventual use in storage rings. The core of this proposed target system consists of a high-Z, free-flowing liquid mercury jet which intercepts the proton beam within the confines of a high-field (15-20 T) solenoid. An important attribute of this system is that the liquid jet target can be replaced for subsequent proton pulses. The experiment described in this paper was designed to provide a proof-of-principle demonstration of this concept. Preparations for this experiment have been previously reported [4].

  8. Commissioning of the helium cryogenic system for the HIE- ISOLDE accelerator upgrade at CERN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delruelle, N.; Inglese, V.; Leclercq, Y.; Pirotte, O.; Williams, L.

    2015-12-01

    The High Intensity and Energy ISOLDE (HIE-ISOLDE) project is a major upgrade of the existing ISOLDE and REX-ISOLDE facilities at CERN. The most significant improvement will come from replacing the existing REX accelerating structure by a superconducting linear accelerator (SC linac) composed ultimately of six cryo-modules installed in series, each containing superconducting RF cavities and solenoids operated at 4.5 K. In order to provide the cooling capacity at all temperature levels between 300 K and 4.5 K for the six cryo-modules, an existing helium refrigerator, manufactured in 1986 and previously used to cool the ALEPH magnet during LEP operation from 1989 to 2000, has been refurbished, reinstalled and recommissioned in a dedicated building located next to the HIE-ISOLDE experimental hall. This helium refrigerator has been connected to a new cryogenic distribution line, consisting of a 30-meter long vacuum-insulated transfer line, a 2000-liter storage dewar and six interconnecting valve boxes, one for each cryo-module. This paper describes the whole cryogenic system and presents the commissioning results including the preliminary operation at 4.5 K of the first cryo- module in the experimental hall.

  9. Fault intersections along the Hosgri Fault Zone, Central California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watt, J. T.; Johnson, S. Y.; Langenheim, V. E.

    2011-12-01

    It is well-established that stresses concentrate at fault intersections or bends when subjected to tectonic loading, making focused studies of these areas particularly important for seismic hazard analysis. In addition, detailed fault models can be used to investigate how slip on one fault might transfer to another during an earthquake. We combine potential-field, high-resolution seismic-reflection, and multibeam bathymetry data with existing geologic and seismicity data to investigate the fault geometry and connectivity of the Hosgri, Los Osos, and Shoreline faults offshore of San Luis Obispo, California. The intersection of the Hosgri and Los Osos faults in Estero Bay is complex. The offshore extension of the Los Osos fault, as imaged with multibeam and high-resolution seismic data, is characterized by a west-northwest-trending zone (1-3 km wide) of near vertical faulting. Three distinct strands (northern, central, and southern) are visible on shallow seismic reflection profiles. The steep dip combined with dramatic changes in reflection character across mapped faults within this zone suggests horizontal offset of rock units and argues for predominantly strike-slip motion, however, the present orientation of the fault zone suggests oblique slip. As the Los Osos fault zone approaches the Hosgri fault, the northern and central strands become progressively more northwest-trending in line with the Hosgri fault. The northern strand runs subparallel to the Hosgri fault along the edge of a long-wavelength magnetic anomaly, intersecting the Hosgri fault southwest of Point Estero. Geophysical modeling suggests the northern strand dips 70° to the northeast, which is in agreement with earthquake focal mechanisms that parallel this strand. The central strand bends northward and intersects the Hosgri fault directly west of Morro Rock, corresponding to an area of compressional deformation visible in shallow seismic-reflection profiles. The southern strand of the Los Osos

  10. Complex Road Intersection Modelling Based on Low-Frequency GPS Track Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, J.; Deng, M.; Zhang, Y.; Liu, H.

    2017-09-01

    It is widely accepted that digital map becomes an indispensable guide for human daily traveling. Traditional road network maps are produced in the time-consuming and labour-intensive ways, such as digitizing printed maps and extraction from remote sensing images. At present, a large number of GPS trajectory data collected by floating vehicles makes it a reality to extract high-detailed and up-to-date road network information. Road intersections are often accident-prone areas and very critical to route planning and the connectivity of road networks is mainly determined by the topological geometry of road intersections. A few studies paid attention on detecting complex road intersections and mining the attached traffic information (e.g., connectivity, topology and turning restriction) from massive GPS traces. To the authors' knowledge, recent studies mainly used high frequency (1 s sampling rate) trajectory data to detect the crossroads regions or extract rough intersection models. It is still difficult to make use of low frequency (20-100 s) and easily available trajectory data to modelling complex road intersections geometrically and semantically. The paper thus attempts to construct precise models for complex road intersection by using low frequency GPS traces. We propose to firstly extract the complex road intersections by a LCSS-based (Longest Common Subsequence) trajectory clustering method, then delineate the geometry shapes of complex road intersections by a K-segment principle curve algorithm, and finally infer the traffic constraint rules inside the complex intersections.

  11. The research of single intersection sensor signal control based on section data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yunxiang; Huang, Yue; Wang, Hao

    2016-12-01

    Propose a sensing signal intersection control design electronic license based on the design by setting the intersection readers to interact with active electronic tags equipped vehicles, vehicle information obtained on the road section. In the vehicle detection sensor may control the green density as evaluation criteria are extended when the vehicle is higher than the threshold, the green density continuity, whereas the switching phases. Induction showed improved control strategy can achieve real-time traffic signal control effectively in high saturation intersection, to overcome the traditional sensor control failure at high saturation drawbacks and improve the utilization of urban Intersection comparative analysis by simulation.

  12. Teaching Domestic Violence in the New Millennium: Intersectionality as a Framework for Social Change.

    PubMed

    McQueeney, Krista

    2016-10-01

    This article describes an intersectional approach to teaching about domestic violence (DV), which aims to empower students as critical thinkers and agents of change by merging theory, service learning, self-reflection, and activism. Three intersectional strategies and techniques for teaching about DV are discussed: promoting difference-consciousness, complicating gender-only power frameworks, and organizing for change. The author argues that to empower future generations to end violence, educators should put intersectionality into action through their use of scholarship, teaching methods, and pedagogical authority. Finally, the benefits and challenges of intersectional pedagogy for social justice education are considered. © The Author(s) 2016.

  13. Effects of digital countdown timer on intersection safety and efficiency: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Fu, Chuanyun; Zhang, Yaping; Qi, Weiwei; Cheng, Shaowu

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the available evidence referring to the effectiveness of digital countdown timers (DCTs) in improving the safety and operational efficiency of signalized intersection. A systematic review was performed according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analysis (PRISMA) statement guidelines. Relevant literature was searched from electronic databases using key terms. Based on study selection and methodological quality assessment, 14 studies were included in the review. Findings of the studies were synthesized in a narrative analysis. Three types of DCT had different effects on intersection safety and operational efficiency. Green signal countdown timers (GSCTs) reduced red light violations, type I dilemma zone distributions, and rear-end collision likelihood but increased crossing after yellow onset and had mixed impacts on type II dilemma zone distributions and intersection capacity. In contrast, red signal countdown timers (RSCTs) increased intersection capacity, although their effectiveness in reducing red light violations dissipated over time. Likewise, continuous countdown timers (CCTs) significantly enhanced intersection capacity but had mixed influences on red light violations and crossing after yellow onset. Due to the limited and inconsistent evidence regarding DCTs' effects on intersection safety and efficiency, it is not sufficient to recommend any type of DCT to be installed at signalized intersections to improve safety and operational efficiency. Nevertheless, it is apparent that both RSCTs and CCTs enhance intersection capacity, though their impacts on intersection safety are unclear. Future studies need to further verify those anticipated safe and operational benefits of DCTs with enriched field observation data.

  14. The acceleration and storage of radioactive ions for a neutrino factory

    SciTech Connect

    B. Autin et al.

    2003-12-23

    The term beta-beam has been coined for the production of a pure beam of electron neutrinos or their antiparticles through the decay of radioactive ions circulating in a storage ring. This concept requires radioactive ions to be accelerated to a Lorentz gamma of 150 for {sup 6}He and 60 for {sup 18}Ne. The neutrino source itself consists of a storage ring for this energy range, with long straight sections in line with the experiment(s). Such a decay ring does not exist at CERN today, nor does a high-intensity proton source for the production of the radioactive ions. Nevertheless, the existing CERN accelerator infrastructure could be used as this would still represent an important saving for a beta-beam facility. This paper outlines the first study, while some of the more speculative ideas will need further investigations.

  15. Data acquisition using the 168/E. [CERN ISR

    SciTech Connect

    Carroll, J.T.; Cittolin, S.; Demoulin, M.; Fucci, A.; Martin, B.; Norton, A.; Porte, J.P.; Rossi, P.; Storr, K.M.

    1983-03-01

    Event sizes and data rates at the CERN anti p p collider compose a formidable environment for a high level trigger. A system using three 168/E processors for experiment UA1 real-time event selection is described. With 168/E data memory expanded to 512K bytes, each processor holds a complete event allowing a FORTRAN trigger algorithm access to data from the entire detector. A smart CAMAC interface reads five Remus branches in parallel transferring one word to the target processor every 0.5 ..mu..s. The NORD host computer can simultaneously read an accepted event from another processor.

  16. The cern axion solar telescope (CAST): an update

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andriamonje, S.; Arsov, V.; Aune, S.; Aune, T.; Avignone, F. T.; Barth, K.; Belov, A.; Beltran, B.; Bräuninger, H.; Carmona, J.; Cebrián, S.; Chesi, E.; Cipolla, G.; Collar, J.; Creswick, R.; Dafni, T.; Davenport, M.; Dedousis, S.; Delattre, M.; Delbart, A.; Deoliveira, R.; Dilella, L.; Eleftheriadis, C.; Engelhauser, J.; Fanourakis, G.; Farach, H.; Ferrer, E.; Fischer, H.; Formenti, F.; Franz, J.; Friedrich, P.; Geralis, T.; Giomataris, I.; Gninenko, S.; Golubev, N.; Hartmann, R.; Hasinoff, M.; Heinsius, F.-H.; Hoffmann, D. H. H.; Irastorza, I.; Jacoby, J.; Joux, J.-N.; Kang, D.; Königsmann, K.; Kotthaus, R.; Krcmar, M.; Kuster, M.; Lakic, B.; Lasseur, C.; Liolios, A.; Lippitsch, A.; Ljubicic, A.; Lutz, G.; Luzon, G.; Morales, A.; Morales, J.; Mutterer, M.; Nikolaidis, A.; de Solorzano, A. Ortiz; Papaevangelou, T.; Placci, A.; Raffelt, G.; Rammos, P.; Robert, J. P.; Ruz, J.; Sarsa, M.; Schill, C.; Serber, W.; Semertzidis, Y.; Vieira, J.; Villar, J.; Vullierme, B.; Walckiers, L.; Zioutas, K.

    2005-01-01

    The CERN Axion Solar Telescope (CAST), a 10 meter long LHC, 9 Tesla, test magnet is mounted on a moving platform that tracks the sun about 1.5 hours during sunrise, again during sunset. It moves ±80 vertically and ±400 horizontally. It has been taking data continuously since July 10, 2003. Data analyzed thus far yield an upper bound on the photon-axion coupling constant, gaγγ ⩽ 3 × 10-10 GeV-1 for axion masses less than 5 × 10-2 eV.

  17. Particle Physics Aspects of Antihydrogen Studies with ALPHA at CERN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujiwara, M. C.; Andresen, G. B.; Bertsche, W.; Bowe, P. D.; Bray, C. C.; Butler, E.; Cesar, C. L.; Chapman, S.; Charlton, M.; Fajans, J.; Funakoshi, R.; Gill, D. R.; Hangst, J. S.; Hardy, W. N.; Hayano, R. S.; Hayden, M. E.; Humphries, A. J.; Hydomako, R.; Jenkins, M. J.; Jørgensen, L. V.; Kurchaninov, L.; Lai, W.; Lambo, R.; Madsen, N.; Nolan, P.; Olchanski, K.; Olin, A.; Povilus, A.; Pusa, P.; Robicheaux, F.; Sarid, E.; El Nasr, S. Seif; Silveira, D. M.; Storey, J. W.; Thompson, R. I.; van der Werf, D. P.; Wasilenko, L.; Wurtele, J. S.; Yamazaki, Y.

    2008-08-01

    We discuss aspects of antihydrogen studies, that relate to particle physics ideas and techniques, within the context of the ALPHA experiment at CERN's Antiproton Decelerator facility. We review the fundamental physics motivations for antihydrogen studies, and their potential physics reach. We argue that initial spectroscopy measurements, once antihydrogen is trapped, could provide competitive tests of CPT, possibly probing physics at the Planck Scale. We discuss some of the particle detection techniques used in ALPHA. Preliminary results from commissioning studies of a partial system of the ALPHA Si vertex detector are presented, the results of which highlight the power of annihilation vertex detection capability in antihydrogen studies.

  18. Has CERN made the stuff of the newborn universe?

    SciTech Connect

    Taubes, G.

    1996-09-13

    For the past 10 years physicists have been trying to recreate a quark-gluon plasma in their particle accelerators, and in May 1996, physicists at CERN, the European particle physics laboratory reported evidence suggesting that they might indeed have done it. It it is a quark-gluon plasma, it will be the first sample of the stuff of the new born universe and provide grounds for optimism that it could be produced in quantity in future more powerful accelerators. This article describes the background of this discovery, the evidence for it, and what lies ahead.

  19. Digital image storage.

    PubMed

    Wallack, Seth

    2008-01-01

    Digital image archival requires less physical storage space, allows for rapid storage and retrieval and avoids loss in image quality over time or with image duplication compared with film storage. Because medical imaging data are critically important and, by law, must be stored in a safe, accessible manner, it is imperative not to have one computer error destroy all copies of the image data. Several options for image storage media are available including magnetic tape, optical media, spinning disks and solid state. Other considerations include on-site vs. off-site storage, redundancy, on-line vs. off-line storage, and removable storage media for disaster recovery. The different storage media can be used in different configurations to provide sufficient protection of digital data. Choose a storage system that will keep your data safe from unauthorized access, hardware failure, and clinic disasters.

  20. Storage and flood routing

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carter, R.W.; Godfrey, R.G.

    1960-01-01

    The basic equations used in flood routing are developed from the law of continuity. In each method the assumptions are discussed to enable the user to select an appropriate technique. In the stage-storage method the storage is related to the mean gage height in the reach under consideration. In the discharge-storage method the storage is determined, from weighted values of inflow and outflow discharge. In the reservoir-storage method the storage is considered as a function of outflow discharge alone. A detailed example is given for each method to illustrate that particular technique.

  1. Initial blood storage experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Surgenor, Douglas MACN.

    1988-01-01

    The possibility of conducting experiments with the formed elements of the blood under conditions of microgravity opens up important opportunities to improve the understanding of basic formed element physiology, as well as, contribution to improved preservation of the formed elements for use in transfusion. The physiological, biochemical, and physical changes of the membrane of the erythrocyte, platelet, and leukocyte was studied during storage under two specific conditions: standard blood bank conditions and microgravity, utilizing three FDA approved plastic bags. Storage lesions; red cell storage on Earth; platelet storage on Earth; and leukocyte storage Earth were examined. The interaction of biomaterials and blood cells was studied during storage.

  2. At the Intersection of Networks and Highly Interactive Online Games

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armitage, Grenville

    The game industry continues to evolves its techniques for extracting the most realistic 'immersion' experience for players given the vagaries on best-effort Internet service. A key challenge for service providers is understanding the characteristics of traffic imposed on networks by games, and their service quality requirements. Interactive online games are particularly susceptible to the side effects of other non-interactive (or delay- and loss-tolerant) traffic sharing next- generation access links. This creates challenges out toward the edges, where high-speed home LANs squeeze through broadband consumer access links to reach the Internet. In this chapter we identify a range of research work exploring many issues associated with the intersection of highly interactive games and the Internet, and hopefully stimulate some further thinking along these lines.

  3. Intersection of child abuse and children's exposure to domestic violence.

    PubMed

    Herrenkohl, Todd I; Sousa, Cynthia; Tajima, Emiko A; Herrenkohl, Roy C; Moylan, Carrie A

    2008-04-01

    This review addresses research on the overlap in physical child abuse and domestic violence, the prediction of child outcomes, and resilience in children exposed to family violence. The authors explore current findings on the intersection of physical child abuse and domestic violence within the context of other risk factors, including community violence and related family and environmental stressors. Evidence from the studies reviewed suggests considerable overlap, compounding effects, and possible gender differences in outcomes of violence exposure. The data indicate a need to apply a broad conceptualization of risk to the study of family violence and its effects on children. Further testing of competing theoretical models will advance understanding of the pathways through which exposure leads to later problems in youth, as well as protective factors and processes through which resilience unfolds.

  4. Holography, brane intersections and six-dimensional SCFTs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bobev, Nikolay; Dibitetto, Giuseppe; Gautason, Friðrik Freyr; Truijen, Brecht

    2017-02-01

    We study supersymmetric intersections of NS5-, D6- and D8-branes in type IIA string theory. We focus on the supergravity description of this system and identify a "near horizon" limit in which we recover the recently classified supersymmetric seven-dimensional AdS solutions of massive type IIA supergravity. Using a consistent truncation to seven-dimensional gauged supergravity we construct a universal supersymmetric deformation of these AdS vacua. In the holographic dual six-dimensional (1,0) superconformal field theory this deformation describes a universal RG flow on the tensor branch of the vacuum moduli space triggered by a vacuum expectation value for a protected scalar operator of dimension four.

  5. GENERAL VIEW, LOOKING SOUTHEAST FROM THE INTERSECTION OF CECIL B. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    GENERAL VIEW, LOOKING SOUTHEAST FROM THE INTERSECTION OF CECIL B. MOORE (FORMERLY COLUMBIA) AVENUE AND FIFTEENTH STREET. THE PHILADELPHIA REAL ESTATE RECORD AND BUILDERS’ GUIDE OBSERVED IN ITS JANUARY 3, 1887 ISSUE THAT “COLUMBIA AVENUE IN THE PAST TWO YEARS HAS SHOWN CONSIDERABLE IMPROVEMENT,” FURTHER ADDING, “WITHIN THE PAST 12 MONTHS COLUMBIA AVENUE BETWEEN BROAD & 23RD HAS UNDERGONE SOME VERY GREAT CHANGES, AT LEAST 50 OF THE PRIVATE DWELLINGS HAVE BEEN TURNED INTO STORES.” THE THREE-STORY COMMERCIAL BLOCK ON THE SOUTHEAST CORNER OF COLUMBIA AND FIFTEENTH WAS NOT A CONVERSION; HOWEVER, IT STILL CONTRIBUTED TO COLUMBIA AVENUE’S 1880S TRANSFORMATION FROM RESIDENTIAL THOROUGHFARE INTO NORTH PHILADELPHIA’S PREMIER SHOPPING CORRIDOR. - 1400 Block Cecil B. Moore Avenue (Stores), South side of Cecil B. Moore Avenue between Carlisle & Fifteenth Streets, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  6. Lessons learned at the intersection of immunology and neuroscience.

    PubMed

    Steinman, Lawrence

    2012-04-01

    Neurobiologists and immunologists study concepts often signified with identical terminology. Scientists in both fields study a structure known as the synapse, and each group analyzes a subject called memory. Is this a quirk of human language, or are there real similarities between these two physiological systems? Not only are the linguistic concepts expressed in the words "synapse" and "memory" shared between the fields, but the actual molecules of physiologic importance in one system play parallel roles in the other: complement, the major histocompatibility molecules, and even "neuro"-transmitters all have major impacts on health and on disease in both the brain and the immune system. Not only are the same molecules found in diverse roles in each system, but we have learned that there is real "hard-wired" crosstalk between nerves and lymphoid organs. This issue of the JCI highlights some of the lessons learned from experts who are working at this scintillating intersection between immunology and neuroscience.

  7. The Intersection of Financial Exploitation and Financial Capacity

    PubMed Central

    Lichtenberg, P.A.

    2016-01-01

    Research in the past decade has documented that financial exploitation of older adults has become a major problem and Psychology is only recently increasing its presence in efforts to reduce exploitation. During the same time period, Psychology has been a leader in setting best practices for the assessment of diminished capacity in older adults culminating in the 2008 ABA/APA joint publication on a handbook for psychologists. Assessment of financial decision making capacity is often the cornerstone assessment needed in cases of financial exploitation. This paper will examine the intersection of financial exploitation and decision making capacity; introduce a new conceptual model and new tools for both the investigation and prevention of financial exploitation. PMID:27159438

  8. Intersectionality at Work: Determinants of Labor Supply among Immigrant Latinas.

    PubMed

    Flippen, Chenoa

    2014-06-01

    This article borrows from the intersectionality literature to investigate how legal status, labor market position, and family characteristics structure the labor supply of immigrant Latinas in Durham, NC, a new immigrant destination. The analysis takes a broad view of labor force participation, analyzing the predictors of whether or not women work; whether and how the barriers to work vary across occupations; and variation in hours and weeks worked among the employed. I also explicitly investigate the extent to which family constraints interact with other social characteristics, especially legal status, in shaping women's labor market position. Results highlight that immigrant Latinas experience multiple, interrelated constraints on employment owing to their position as low-skill workers in a labor market highly segregated by gender and nativity, to their status as members of a largely undocumented population, and as wives and mothers in an environment characterized by significant work-family conflict.

  9. Negotiating the Intersection of Racial Oppression and Heteronormativity.

    PubMed

    Smith, Lance C; Shin, Richard Q

    2015-01-01

    This qualitative study examines the narratives of seven heterosexual, cisgender individuals who identify both as persons of color and as positively disposed toward LGB and transgender-identified persons. Using psycho-discursive qualitative methodology, the authors will present the narrative strategies taken up by these positively disposed cisgender heterosexuals of color as they attempt to position themselves as supportive of LGB and transgender persons while negotiating the discourse of heteronormativity. The three narrative strategies have been titled differentiation, empathy, and coherence. In addition to mapping the three narrative strategies, the authors also explore why informants may choose certain strategies over others and argue that the intersection of social identities must be considered when attempting to understand social oppression. Implications for the human services fields will be discussed.

  10. Constructive and Destructive Interference in Nonadiabatic Tunneling via Conical Intersections

    DOE PAGES

    Xie, Changjian; Kendrick, Brian K.; Yarkony, David R.; ...

    2017-03-31

    As a manifestation of the molecular Aharonov–Bohm effect, tunneling-facilitated dissociation under a conical intersection (CI) requires the inclusion of the geometric phase (GP) to ensure a single-valued adiabatic wave function encircling the CI. Here, we demonstrate using a simple two-dimensional model that the GP induces destructive interference for vibrational states with even quanta in the coupling mode, but it leads to constructive interference for those with odd quanta. The interference patterns are manifested in tunneling wave functions and clearly affect the tunneling lifetime. Furthermore, we show that the inclusion of the diagonal Born–Oppenheimer correction is necessary for agreement with exactmore » results.« less

  11. Nature and frequency of secondary conflicts at unsignalized intersections

    SciTech Connect

    Katamine, N.M.

    2000-04-01

    This research aims to shed more light on the nature and frequency of secondary conflicts. Data for 15 unsignalized intersections located in Amman, Jordan, were collected by the use of a video camera. It was concluded that conflict types and grades are correlated significantly with their corresponding secondary conflict types and grades. Also, conflicts are more closely correlated with their secondary conflicts for through-cross movements, rather than for same-direction movements. Secondary conflicts of a particular grade and type may result from any conflict grade and type. It was found that for every 100 conflicts, approximately 14 secondary conflicts resulted. Moreover, same-direction secondary conflicts (C1--C4) together with through-cross secondary conflicts (C8 and C11), constitute approximately 69.1% of the total secondary conflicts. In addition, through-cross conflicts (C8 and C11) result in the highest percentage of the severest grade (G4) secondary conflicts.

  12. The intersection of identity, culture and science engagement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strong, LaToya

    2016-06-01

    Ivã Gurgel, Mauricio Pietrocola, and Graciella Watanabe expand upon the existing literature, which links identity and science engagement. Specifically, the authors focus on ways in which the cultural identities of students relate to their engagement in physics. In doing so, Gurgel, Pietrocola, and Watanabe further build upon the idea that one's identity is not immutable, but rather is continually re-constituted throughout life. Employing the lens of ontological authenticity, the authors use three interventions with the purpose of revealing the intersection of students' cultural identity and science. In this paper I extend the dialogue on how we can further explore the link between identity and science engagement, starting first with a consideration of student identity and its significance, before extending this inquiry into the specific field of science.

  13. Primary Immunodeficiencies and Inflammatory Disease: A Growing Genetic Intersection

    PubMed Central

    Fodil, Nassima; Langlais, David; Gros, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in genome analysis have provided important insights into the genetic architecture of infectious and inflammatory diseases. The combined analysis of loci detected by genome-wide association studies (GWAS) in 22 inflammatory diseases has revealed a shared genetic core and associated biochemical pathways that play a central role in pathological inflammation. Parallel whole exome sequencing studies have identified 265 genes mutated in primary immunodeficiencies (PID). Here we examine the overlap between these two datasets, and find that it consists of genes essential for protection against infections and in which persistent activation causes pathological inflammation. Based on this intersection, we propose that although strong or inactivating mutations (rare variants) in these genes may cause severe disease (PIDs), their more subtle modulation potentially by common regulatory/coding variants may contribute to chronic inflammation. PMID:26791050

  14. Photodissociation of methyl formate: Conical intersections, roaming and triple fragmentation

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, King-Chuen; Tsai, Po-Yu; Chao, Meng-Hsuan; Kasai, Toshio; Lombardi, Andrea; Palazzetti, Federico; Aquilanti, Vincenzo

    2015-12-31

    The photodissociation channels of methyl formate have been extensively investigated by two different advanced experimental techniques, ion imaging and Fourier-Transform-Infrared emission spectroscopy, combined with quantum chemical calculations and molecular dynamics simulations. Our aim is to characterize the role of alternative routes to the conventional transition-state mediated pathway: the roaming and the triple fragmentation processes. The photolysis experiments, carried out at a range of laser wavelengths in the vicinity of the triple fragmentation threshold, beside the simulation of large bunches of classical trajectories with different initial conditions, have shown that both mechanisms share a common path that involves a conical intersection during the relaxation process from the electronic excited state S{sub 1} to the ground state S{sub 0}.

  15. Behavior of queues at signalized intersections in heavy traffic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Posner, E. C.; Rodemich, E. R.

    1976-01-01

    This paper derives the asymptotic behavior of traffic queues at signalized intersections when the excess of departure capacity over arrivals approaches zero from above. The most interesting result is that the distribution of queue length approaches a negative exponential, with fewer restrictive assumptions than hitherto known. The main improvement results from more precise use of a combinatorial lemma of Spitzer, giving the maximum of the partial sums of a sequence of independent identically distributed random variables, plus some specific constructive probability calculations, many of them involving the Fourier transform. New results are presented on the probability that the queue be below a fixed bound and/or on the probability that the queue be empty. Applications to on-line estimators for real-time traffic control are suggested.

  16. Using the computer to understand the chemistry of conical intersections.

    PubMed

    Schapiro, Igor; Melaccio, Federico; Laricheva, Elena N; Olivucci, Massimo

    2011-06-01

    The application of computational chemistry in resolving photochemical and photobiological problems depends on theoretical models and calculation strategies that allow an understanding of how and when the energy contained in a photon can be used or dissipated by a molecule. Progress in this arena has been the result of a scientific journey that can be traced from the 1960s and 1970s with the development of the concept of the "photochemical funnel", and again from the 1980s and 1990s with the development and application of ab initio multiconfigurational quantum chemistry. Mainly following the viewpoint and contributions of the corresponding author (together with others), here we show that both the early and the ongoing research points to a central role of conical intersections in the molecular-level control of the selectivity and efficiency of photochemical reactions and internal conversion processes.

  17. Coordinated signal control for arterial intersections using fuzzy logic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kermanian, Davood; Zare, Assef; Balochian, Saeed

    2013-09-01

    Every day growth of the vehicles has become one of the biggest problems of urbanism especially in major cities. This can waste people's time, increase the fuel consumption, air pollution, and increase the density of cars and vehicles. Fuzzy controllers have been widely used in many consumer products and industrial applications with success over the past two decades. This article proposes a comprehensive model of urban traffic network using state space equations and then using Fuzzy Logic Tool Box and SIMULINK Program MATLAB a fuzzy controller in order to optimize and coordinate signal control at two intersections at an arterial road. The fuzzy controller decides to extend, early cut or terminate a signal phase and phase sequence to ensure smooth flow of traffic with minimal waiting time and length of queue. Results show that the performance of the proposed traffic controller at novel fuzzy model is better that of conventional controllers under normal and abnormal traffic conditions.

  18. Higher-order intersections in low-dimensional topology

    PubMed Central

    Conant, Jim; Schneiderman, Rob; Teichner, Peter

    2011-01-01

    We show how to measure the failure of the Whitney move in dimension 4 by constructing higher-order intersection invariants of Whitney towers built from iterated Whitney disks on immersed surfaces in 4-manifolds. For Whitney towers on immersed disks in the 4-ball, we identify some of these new invariants with previously known link invariants such as Milnor, Sato–Levine, and Arf invariants. We also define higher-order Sato–Levine and Arf invariants and show that these invariants detect the obstructions to framing a twisted Whitney tower. Together with Milnor invariants, these higher-order invariants are shown to classify the existence of (twisted) Whitney towers of increasing order in the 4-ball. A conjecture regarding the nontriviality of the higher-order Arf invariants is formulated, and related implications for filtrations of string links and 3-dimensional homology cylinders are described. PMID:21518909

  19. High-charge energetic ions generated by intersecting laser pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, L.; Deng, Z. G.; Yu, M. Y.; Wang, X. G.

    2016-08-15

    Ion acceleration from the interaction of two intersecting intense laser pulses with an overdense plasma is investigated using a three-dimensional particle-in-cell simulation. It is found that, comparing with the single-pulse case, the charge of the resulting energetic ion bunch can be increased by more than an order of magnitude without much loss of quality. Dependence of the ion charge on the interaction parameters, including separation distance and incidence angles of the lasers, is considered. It is shown that the charge of the accelerated ion bunch can be optimized by controlling the degree of laser overlapping. The improved performance can be attributed to the enhanced laser intensity as well as stochastic heating of the accelerated electrons. Since at present the intensity of readily available lasers is limited, the two pulse scheme should be useful for realizing higher laser intensity in order to achieve higher-energy target normal sheath acceleration ions.

  20. Intersecting branes and Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model

    SciTech Connect

    Dhar, Avinash; Nag, Partha

    2009-06-15

    We discuss chiral symmetry breaking in the intersecting brane model of Sakai and Sugimoto at weak coupling for a generic value of separation L between the flavor D8 and anti-D8-branes. For any finite value of the radius R of the circle around which the color D4-branes wrap, a nonlocal Nambu-Jona-Lasinio-type short-range interaction couples the flavor branes and antibranes. We argue that chiral symmetry is broken in this model only above a certain critical value of the four-dimensional 't Hooft coupling and confirm this through numerical calculations of solutions to the gap equation. We also numerically investigate chiral symmetry breaking in the limit R{yields}{infinity} keeping L fixed, but find that simple ways of implementing this limit do not lead to a consistent picture of chiral symmetry breaking in the noncompact version of the nonlocal Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model.

  1. Precategorical Acoustic Storage and Postcategorical Lexical Storage.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richardson, John T. E.

    1979-01-01

    A system of precategorized acoustic storage has accounted for the recency effect obtained in the immediate serial recall of sequences of digits, consonants, or syllables. Four experiments in recall of word sequences investigated fit to this model. A system of postcategorical lexical storage was concluded to explain the results. (Author/RD)

  2. The Effect of Gender and Race Intersectionality on Student Learning Outcomes in Engineering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ro, Hyun Kyoung; Loya, Karla I.

    2015-01-01

    Women and underrepresented minorities in traditionally White and male-dominated disciplines tend to report lower learning outcomes than their White peers. Adopting a feminist intersectionality framework, this study looks at the intersections of gender and race to investigate differences in self-assessed learning outcomes in engineering…

  3. New Visual Methods for Teaching Intersectionality from a Spatial Perspective in a Geography and Gender Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baylina Ferré, Mireia; Rodó de Zárate, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Intersectionality is a complex concept to deal with when doing research but also when teaching the interrelationships between space and social relations. Here we present "Relief Maps" as a visual tool for teaching intersectionality and its spatial dimension in higher education courses. "Relief Maps" are a model developed for…

  4. Objects of Protection, Enduring Nodes of Difference: Disability Intersections with "Other" Differences, 1916 to 2016

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Artiles, Alfredo J.; Dorn, Sherman; Bal, Aydin

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this chapter is to contribute a cultural-historical analytical perspective on disability and its intersections. We assume that disability is socially, historically, and spatially constructed. This standpoint enables us to understand and disrupt disparities in education that affect students living at the intersection of disability…

  5. A toy model for gauge-mediation in intersecting brane models

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Jason

    2009-03-15

    We discuss the phenomenology of a toy intersecting brane model where supersymmetry is dynamically broken in an open-string hidden sector and gauge-mediated to the visible sector. Scalar masses {approx}TeV are easily realizable, and R-symmetry is broken. These ideas are easily generalizable to other intersecting brane models.

  6. Objects of Protection, Enduring Nodes of Difference: Disability Intersections with "Other" Differences, 1916 to 2016

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Artiles, Alfredo J.; Dorn, Sherman; Bal, Aydin

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this chapter is to contribute a cultural-historical analytical perspective on disability and its intersections. We assume that disability is socially, historically, and spatially constructed. This standpoint enables us to understand and disrupt disparities in education that affect students living at the intersection of disability…

  7. Teaching Note--Teaching Intersectionality: Transforming Cultural Competence Content in Social Work Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Michael Allen; Cross-Denny, Bronwyn; Lee, Karen Kyeunghae; Werkmeister Rozas, Lisa Marie; Yamada, Ann-Marie

    2016-01-01

    Intersectionality has been gaining momentum among social workers as a framework to allow a fuller understanding of the complexity of diverse social identities and the impact of social structures on power, privilege, and oppression. However, the application of intersectionality to teaching in social work education has been relatively absent in the…

  8. Some Implications of the Union-Intersection Principle for Tests of Sphericity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Venables, W.

    1976-01-01

    Recent results of Bloomfield and Watson and Knott are used to derive a class of union-intersection tests for sphericity from likelihood ratio tests of independence of two sets of variates. It is shown that the ordinary likelihood ratio test for sphericity has a natural union-intersection interpretation. (Author/RC)

  9. Expanding the Therapy Paradigm with Queer Couples: A Relational Intersectional Lens.

    PubMed

    Addison, Sheila M; Coolhart, Deborah

    2015-09-01

    North American and global cultures in general-and the field of Couple and Family Therapy in particular-have made significant strides toward recognizing and validating LGBTQ identities and relationships. However, clinical assessment and conceptualization of queer couples still lack the complexity needed to encompass the issues involved in treatment. Existing literature provides clinicians a basic understanding of queer couples and the dynamics that make them unique from nonqueer couples. However, much of this knowledge has been normed on White middle-class couples and has rarely included couples with transgender or bisexual members. This article invites clinicians and researchers to apply a feminist model of intersectionality to understand queer couples. Our proposed intersectional lens considers multiple axes of identity and power and their interrelationships (Crenshaw, 1989, 1991). We argue that intersectionality is important for understanding all identities, whether privileged or marginalized (Falicov, 2003). This application of the concept of intersectionality is unique in its relational focus, emphasizing how partners' complex individual identities overlap with and intersect with one another. Additionally, this lens considers how the therapists' and clients' multidimensional identities intersect. Three case studies are presented to illustrate application of the intersectional lens. In each case, exploring the partners' multiple social locations, their influences on one another, and the therapist's intersections of identity all proved critical to the direction of therapy. © 2015 Family Process Institute.

  10. Intersectionality and Social Work: Omissions of Race, Class, and Sexuality in Graduate School Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bubar, Roe; Cespedes, Karina; Bundy-Fazioli, Kimberly

    2016-01-01

    In 2008 EPAS Standards on "Engaging Diversity and Difference in Practice" (2.1.4) added intersectionality (a theory developed by feminist of color) as one aspect to understand diversity, difference, and power in social work curriculum. We consider how intersectionality is omitted in graduate student learning even when class assignments…

  11. A "Nation-ized" Intersectional Analysis: The Politics of Transnational Campus Unity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Okazawa-Rey, Margo

    2017-01-01

    The author introduces the concept of "nation" as an analytic category in contemporary diversity discourse and intersectional analysis of social relations in U.S. higher educational institutions. She then suggests how an intersectional lens that includes nation can expand possibilities for understanding the experiences of international…

  12. Intersecting Work and Learning: Assembling Advanced Liberal Regimes of Governing Workers in Australia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reich, Ann

    2008-01-01

    Much had been written over the past few years on the intersections of work and learning. This article suggests that the analysis of the intersections of work and learning can benefit greatly from understanding the ways in which governing workers as individuals and populations has changed in Western liberal democracies in the latter part of the…

  13. Application of Mixed-Methods Approaches to Higher Education and Intersectional Analyses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griffin, Kimberly A.; Museus, Samuel D.

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the authors discuss the utility of combining quantitative and qualitative methods in conducting intersectional analyses. First, they discuss some of the paradigmatic underpinnings of qualitative and quantitative research, and how these methods can be used in intersectional analyses. They then consider how paradigmatic pragmatism…

  14. Intersection crossing considered as intercepting a moving traffic gap: effects of task and environmental constraints.

    PubMed

    Louveton, Nicolas; Bootsma, Reinoud J; Guerin, Perrine; Berthelon, Catherine; Montagne, Gilles

    2012-11-01

    Safely crossing an intersection requires that drivers actively control their approach to the intersection with respect to characteristics of the flow of incoming traffic. To further our understanding of the perceptual-motor processes involved in this demanding manoeuvre, we designed a driving simulator experiment in which 13 participants actively negotiated intersections by passing through a gap in the train of incoming traffic. Task constraints were manipulated by varying the size of the traffic gap and the initial conditions with respect to the time of arrival of the traffic gap at the intersection. Environment constraints were manipulated by varying the intersection geometry through changes in the angle formed by the crossroads. The results revealed that the task constraints systematically gave rise to continuous and gradual adjustments in approach velocity, initiated well before arriving at the intersection. These functionally appropriate adjustments allowed the drivers to safely cross the intersection, generally just slightly ahead of the center of the traffic gap. Notwithstanding the fact that the geometry of the intersection did not affect the spatiotemporal constraints of the crossing task, approach behavior varied systematically over geometries, suggesting that drivers rely on the traffic gap's bearing angle. Overall, the pattern of results is indicative of a continuous coupling between perception and action, analogous to that observed in locomotor interception tasks.

  15. Application of Mixed-Methods Approaches to Higher Education and Intersectional Analyses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griffin, Kimberly A.; Museus, Samuel D.

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the authors discuss the utility of combining quantitative and qualitative methods in conducting intersectional analyses. First, they discuss some of the paradigmatic underpinnings of qualitative and quantitative research, and how these methods can be used in intersectional analyses. They then consider how paradigmatic pragmatism…

  16. The Effect of Gender and Race Intersectionality on Student Learning Outcomes in Engineering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ro, Hyun Kyoung; Loya, Karla I.

    2015-01-01

    Women and underrepresented minorities in traditionally White and male-dominated disciplines tend to report lower learning outcomes than their White peers. Adopting a feminist intersectionality framework, this study looks at the intersections of gender and race to investigate differences in self-assessed learning outcomes in engineering…

  17. The Promises and Challenges of Teaching from an Intersectional Perspective: Core Components and Applied Strategies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Susan R.; Wijeyesinghe, Charmaine L.

    2011-01-01

    This chapter explores how the framework of intersectionality can be used by faculty in course development and classroom teaching. An overview of intersectionality, highlighting core assumptions and tenets of the framework, is presented first. These assumptions and tenets are then applied to classroom dynamics and the practice of teaching in…

  18. Intersection of Language, Class, Ethnicity, and Policy: Toward Disrupting Inequality for English Language Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jiménez-Castellanos, Oscar; García, Eugene

    2017-01-01

    This chapter proposes a conceptual framework that merges intersectionality and policy analysis as an analytical tool to understand the nuanced, multilayered, compounded educational inequality encountered specifically by low-income, Latino Spanish-speaking students in Arizona K-12 public schools as a function of intersecting educational policies.…

  19. New Visual Methods for Teaching Intersectionality from a Spatial Perspective in a Geography and Gender Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baylina Ferré, Mireia; Rodó de Zárate, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Intersectionality is a complex concept to deal with when doing research but also when teaching the interrelationships between space and social relations. Here we present "Relief Maps" as a visual tool for teaching intersectionality and its spatial dimension in higher education courses. "Relief Maps" are a model developed for…

  20. An Intersectional Analysis of Latin@ College Women's Counter-Stories in Mathematics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leyva, Luis A.

    2016-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses the intersectionality of mathematics experiences for two Latin@ college women pursuing mathematics-intensive STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) majors at a large, predominantly White university. The author employs intersectionality and poststructural theories to explore and make meaning…