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Sample records for cervical anterior transpedicular

  1. Cervical anterior transpedicular screw fixation (ATPS)—Part II. Accuracy of manual insertion and pull-out strength of ATPS

    PubMed Central

    Acosta, Frank; Tauber, Mark; Fox, Michael; Martin, Hudelmaier; Forstner, Rosmarie; Augat, Peter; Penzkofer, Rainer; Pirich, Christian; Kässmann, H.; Resch, Herbert; Hitzl, Wolfgang

    2008-01-01

    Reconstruction after multilevel decompression of the cervical spine, especially in the weakened osteoporotic, neoplastic or infectious spine often requires circumferential stabilization and fusion. To avoid the additional posterior surgery in these cases while increasing rigidity of anterior-only screw-plate constructs, the authors introduce the concept of anterior transpedicular screw (ATPS) fixation. We demonstrated its morphological feasibility as well as its indications in a previous study in Part I of our project. Consequently, the objectives of the current study were to assess the ex vivo accuracy of placing ATPS into the cervical vertebra as well as the biomechanical performance of ATPS in comparison to traditional vertebral body screws (VBS) in terms of pull-out strength (POS). Twenty-three ATPS were inserted alternately to two screws into the pedicles and vertebral bodies, respectively, of six cadaveric specimens from C3–T1. For insertion of ATPS, a manual fluoroscopically assisted technique was used. Pre- and post insertional CT-scans were used to assess accuracy of ATPS insertion in the axial and sagittal planes. A newly designed grading system and accuracy score were used to delineate accuracy of ATPS insertion. Following insertion of screws, 23 ATPS and 22 VBS were subjected to pull-out testing (POT). The bone mineral density (BMD) of each specimen was assessed prior to POT. Statistical analysis showed that the incidence of correctly placed screws and non-critical pedicles breaches in axial plane was 78.3%, and 95.7% in sagittal plane. Hence, according to our definition of “critical” pedicle breach that exposes neurovascular structures at risk, 21.7% (n = 5) of all ATPS inserted showed a critical pedicle breach in axial plane. Notably, no critical pedicle perforation occurred at the C6 to T1 levels. Pull-out testing of ATPS and VBS revealed that pull-out resistance of ATPS was 2.5-fold that of VBS. Mean POS of 23 ATPS with a mean BMD of 0.566

  2. [Anterior cervical hypertrichosis: case report].

    PubMed

    Orozco-Gutiérrez, Mario H; Sánchez-Corona, José; García-Ortiz, José E; Castañeda-Cisneros, Gema; Dávalos-Rodríguez, Nory O; Corona-Rivera, Jorge R; García-Cruz, Diana

    2016-10-01

    The non-syndromic anterior cervical hypertrichosis (OMIM N° 600457) is a genetic disorder characterized by a patch of hair at the level of the laryngeal prominence. We present a 12-year-old boy with anterior cervical hypertrichosis and mild generalized hypertrichosis. He has no neurological, ophthalmological or skeletal anomalies. The clinical follow up is 10 years.

  3. [Anterior cervical hypertrichosis: case report].

    PubMed

    Orozco-Gutiérrez, Mario H; Sánchez-Corona, José; García-Ortiz, José E; Castañeda-Cisneros, Gema; Dávalos-Rodríguez, Nory O; Corona-Rivera, Jorge R; García-Cruz, Diana

    2016-10-01

    The non-syndromic anterior cervical hypertrichosis (OMIM N° 600457) is a genetic disorder characterized by a patch of hair at the level of the laryngeal prominence. We present a 12-year-old boy with anterior cervical hypertrichosis and mild generalized hypertrichosis. He has no neurological, ophthalmological or skeletal anomalies. The clinical follow up is 10 years. PMID:27606653

  4. Anterior cervical hypertrichosis: a sporadic case

    PubMed Central

    Bostan, Sezen; Yaşar, Şirin; Serdar, Zehra Aşiran; Gizlenti, Sevda

    2016-01-01

    Anterior cervical hypertrichosis is a very rare form of primary localized hypertrichosis. It consists of a tuft of terminal hair on the anterior neck just above the laryngeal prominence. The etiology is still unknown. In this article, we reported a 15-year-old female patient who presented to our clinic with a complaint of hypertrichosis on the anterior aspect of the neck for the last five years. Her past medical history revealed no pathology except for vesicoureteral reflux. On the basis of clinical presentation, our patient was diagnosed with anterior cervical hypertrichosis and she was considered to be a sporadic case due to lack of other similar cases in familial history. To date, 33 patients with anterior cervical hypertrichosis have been reported. Anterior cervical hypertrichosis can be associated with other abnormalities, but it frequently presents as an isolated defect (70%). The association of vesicoureteral reflux and anterior cervical hypertrichosis which was observed in our patient might be coincidental. So far, no case of anterior cervical hypertrichosis associated with vesicoureteral reflux has been reported in the literature. PMID:27103865

  5. Anterior Cervical Spine Surgery for Degenerative Disease: A Review

    PubMed Central

    SUGAWARA, Taku

    Anterior cervical spine surgery is an established surgical intervention for cervical degenerative disease and high success rate with excellent long-term outcomes have been reported. However, indications of surgical procedures for certain conditions are still controversial and severe complications to cause neurological dysfunction or deaths may occur. This review is focused mainly on five widely performed procedures by anterior approach for cervical degenerative disease; anterior cervical discectomy, anterior cervical discectomy and fusion, anterior cervical corpectomy and fusion, anterior cervical foraminotomy, and arthroplasty. Indications, procedures, outcomes, and complications of these surgeries are discussed. PMID:26119899

  6. Pharyngocutaneous fistula after anterior cervical spine surgery

    PubMed Central

    Sansur, Charles A.; Early, Stephen; Reibel, James

    2009-01-01

    Pharyngocutaneous fistulae are rare complications of anterior spine surgery occurring in less than 0.1% of all anterior surgery cases. We report a case of a 19 year old female who sustained a C6 burst fracture with complete quadriplegia. She was treated urgently with a C6 corpectomy with anterior cage and plating followed by posterior cervical stabilization at another institution. Post operatively she developed a pharyngocutaneous fistula that failed to heal despite several attempts of closure and esophageal exclusion with a Jpeg tube. The patient was eventually successfully treated with a three-stage procedure consisting of firstly a posterior approach to reinforce the posterior stabilization of the cervical spine that was felt to be inadequate, secondly an anterior approach with removal of all the anterior instrumentation followed by iliac crest bone graft and thirdly a superior based sternocleidomastoid flap that was interposed between the esophagus and the anterior cervical spine. The patient's fistula healed successfully. However, yet asymptomatic, the anterior iliac crest bone graft resorbed almost completely at 16 months follow up. In light of this complication, we discuss the surgical options for the treatment of pharyngocutaneous fistulae and the closure of this fistula using a superiorly based sternocleidomastoid muscle flap. PMID:19330360

  7. Adjacent Segment Pathology after Anterior Cervical Fusion.

    PubMed

    Chung, Jae Yoon; Park, Jong-Beom; Seo, Hyoung-Yeon; Kim, Sung Kyu

    2016-06-01

    Anterior cervical fusion has become a standard of care for numerous pathologic conditions of the cervical spine. However, subsequent development of clinically significant disc disease at levels adjacent to fused discs is a serious long-term complication of this procedure. As more patients live longer after surgery, it is foreseeable that adjacent segment pathology (ASP) will develop in increasing numbers of patients. Also, ASP has been studied more intensively with the recent popularity of motion preservation technologies like total disc arthroplasty. The true nature and scope of ASP remains poorly understood. The etiology of ASP is most likely multifactorial. Various factors including altered biomechanical stresses, surgical disruption of soft tissue and the natural history of cervical disc disease contribute to the development of ASP. General factors associated with disc degeneration including gender, age, smoking and sports may play a role in the development of ASP. Postoperative sagittal alignment and type of surgery are also considered potential causes of ASP. Therefore, a spine surgeon must be particularly careful to avoid unnecessary disruption of the musculoligamentous structures, reduced risk of direct injury to the disc during dissection and maintain a safe margin between the plate edge and adjacent vertebrae during anterior cervical fusion.

  8. Adjacent Segment Pathology after Anterior Cervical Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Jae Yoon; Park, Jong-Beom; Seo, Hyoung-Yeon

    2016-01-01

    Anterior cervical fusion has become a standard of care for numerous pathologic conditions of the cervical spine. However, subsequent development of clinically significant disc disease at levels adjacent to fused discs is a serious long-term complication of this procedure. As more patients live longer after surgery, it is foreseeable that adjacent segment pathology (ASP) will develop in increasing numbers of patients. Also, ASP has been studied more intensively with the recent popularity of motion preservation technologies like total disc arthroplasty. The true nature and scope of ASP remains poorly understood. The etiology of ASP is most likely multifactorial. Various factors including altered biomechanical stresses, surgical disruption of soft tissue and the natural history of cervical disc disease contribute to the development of ASP. General factors associated with disc degeneration including gender, age, smoking and sports may play a role in the development of ASP. Postoperative sagittal alignment and type of surgery are also considered potential causes of ASP. Therefore, a spine surgeon must be particularly careful to avoid unnecessary disruption of the musculoligamentous structures, reduced risk of direct injury to the disc during dissection and maintain a safe margin between the plate edge and adjacent vertebrae during anterior cervical fusion. PMID:27340541

  9. Anterior cervical discectomy and fusion for noncontiguous cervical spondylotic myelopathy

    PubMed Central

    Qizhi, Sun; Peijia, Li; Lei, Sun; Junsheng, Chen; Jianmin, Li

    2016-01-01

    Background: Noncontiguous cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM) is a special degenerative disease because of the intermediate normal level or levels between supra and infraabnormal levels. Some controversy exists over the optimal procedure for two noncontiguous levels of CSM. The study was to evaluate the outcomes of the anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) with zero-profile devices for two noncontiguous levels of CSM. Materials and Methods: 17 consecutive patients with two noncontiguous levels of CSM operated between December 2009 and August 2012 were included in the study. There were 12 men and 5 women with a mean age of 60.7 years (range 45–75 years). Involved disc levels were C3/4 and C5/6 in 11 patients and C4/5 and C6/7 in six patients. Preoperative plain radiographs, computed tomography (CT) with 3-D reconstruction and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the cervical spine were taken in all patients. All radiographs were independently evaluated by 2 spine surgeons and 1 radiologist. The outcomes were assessed by the average operative time, blood loss, Japanese Orthopedic Association (JOA) score, improvement rate, neck dysfunction index (NDI), swallowing quality of life (SWAL-QOL) score, the cervical lordosis and complications. Results: The mean followup was 48.59 months (range 24-56 months). The average operative time and blood loss was 105.29 min and 136.47 ml, respectively. The preoperative JOA score was 8.35, which significantly increased to 13.7 at the final followup (P < 0.01). The NDI score was significantly decreased from preoperative 13.06 to postoperative 3.35 (P < 0.01). The operation also provided a significant increase in the cervical lordosis (P < 0.01) from preoperative 10.17° to postoperative 17.06°. The fusion rate was 94.1% at 6 months postoperatively, and 100% at 12 months after surgery. The mean SWAL-QOL score decreased from preoperative 68.06 to immediate postoperatively 65.65 and then increased to 67.65 at final followup

  10. Dysphagia Secondary to Anterior Osteophytes of the Cervical Spine.

    PubMed

    Egerter, Alexander C; Kim, Eric S; Lee, Darrin J; Liu, Jonathan J; Cadena, Gilbert; Panchal, Ripul R; Kim, Kee D

    2015-10-01

    Study Design Retrospective case series. Objective Diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis (DISH) or Forestier disease involves hyperostosis of the spinal column. Hyperostosis involving the anterior margin of the cervical vertebrae can cause dysphonia, dyspnea, and/or dysphagia. However, the natural history pertaining to the risk factors remain unknown. We present the surgical management of two cases of dysphagia secondary to cervical hyperostosis and discuss the etiology and management of DISH based on the literature review. Methods This is a retrospective review of two patients with DISH and anterior cervical osteophytes. We reviewed the preoperative and postoperative images and clinical history. Results Two patients underwent anterior cervical osteophytectomies due to severe dysphagia. At more than a year follow-up, both patients noted improvement in swallowing as well as their associated pain. Conclusion The surgical removal of cervical osteophytes can be highly successful in treating dysphagia if refractory to prolonged conservative therapy. PMID:26430607

  11. Complications of Anterior and Posterior Cervical Spine Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, Jason Pui Yin

    2016-01-01

    Cervical spine surgery performed for the correct indications yields good results. However, surgeons need to be mindful of the many possible pitfalls. Complications may occur starting from the anaesthestic procedure and patient positioning to dura exposure and instrumentation. This review examines specific complications related to anterior and posterior cervical spine surgery, discusses their causes and considers methods to prevent or treat them. In general, avoiding complications is best achieved with meticulous preoperative analysis of the pathology, good patient selection for a specific procedure and careful execution of the surgery. Cervical spine surgery is usually effective in treating most pathologies and only a reasonable complication rate exists. PMID:27114784

  12. The Effect of the PEEK Cage on the Cervical Lordosis in Patients Undergoing Anterior Cervical Discectomy

    PubMed Central

    Gulsen, Salih

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Loss of cervical lordosis is a significant factor in the development of degeneration of the spine with aging. This degenerative changings of the cervical spine would cause pressure effect on the cervical root and/or medulla spinalis. AIM: Our goal is to understand the effect of the PEEK cage on cervical lordosis in the early postoperative period. Also, to interpret the effects of one- level, two- level, three-level and four- level disc pathologies on cervical lordosis. MATERIAL AND METHODS: We retrospectively investigated our archive, and we selected thirty-four patients undergoing anterior cervical discectomy and fusion with PEEK cage filled with demineralized bone matrix (ACDFP). RESULTS: We determined that ACDFP provides improvement in the cervical lordosis angle in both groups. Also, we found statistically significant difference between group 1 and 2 regarding causes of radiculomyelopathy statistically. CONCLUSION: We achieved better cervical lordotic angles at the postoperative period by implanting one-level, two-level, three-level or four-level PEEK cage filled with demineralized bone matrix. Also, the causes of cervical root and or medulla spinalis impingement were different in group1 and 2. While extruded cervical disc impingement was the first pathology in group 1, osteophyte formation was the first pathology in group 2. PMID:27275224

  13. Anterior Cervical Discectomy and Fusion (ACDF): Comparison Between Zero Profile Implants and Anterior Cervical Plate and Spacer

    PubMed Central

    Alimi, Marjan; Njoku, Innocent; Hofstetter, Christoph P; Tsiouris, Apostolos J; Kesavabhotla, Kartik; Boockvar, John; Härtl, Roger

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Interposition grafts combined with anterior plating currently remain the gold standard for anterior cervical discectomy and fusion. The use of anterior plates increases fusion rates but may be associated with higher rates of postoperative dysphagia. The aim of the current study was to determine the clinical and radiological outcomes following anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) using zero-profile anchored spacers versus standard interposition grafts with anterior plating. Methods: This was a retrospective case series. A total of 53 male and 51 female consecutive patients (164 total operated levels) who underwent ACDF between 2007 and 2011 were included. The mean clinical follow-up was 15.7 ± 1.2 (SEM) months for patients with zero-profile implants and 14.8 ± 2.1 months for patients with conventional ACDF with anterior plating. Patient demographics, operative details, clinical outcomes, complications, and radiographic imaging were reviewed. Dysphagia was determined using the Bazaz criteria. Results: Clinical outcome scores improved in both groups as measured by the modified Japanese Orthopedic Association and Nurick scores. Zero-profile constructs gave rise to significantly less prevertebral soft tissue swelling compared to constructs with anterior plates postoperatively (15.74 ± 0.52 as compared to 20.48 ± 0.85 mm, p < 0.001) and at the latest follow-up (10.88 ± 0.39 mm vs. 13.72 ± 0.67 mm, p < 0.001). There was a significant difference in the incidence of dysphagia at the latest follow-up (1.5% vs. 20%, p=0.001, zero-profile vs. anterior plate, respectively). Conclusion: Zero-profile implants lead to functional outcomes similar to standard anterior plate constructs. Avoiding the use of an anterior locking plate may decrease the risk of persistent postoperative dysphagia. PMID:27200226

  14. Anterior Cervical Reconstruction Using Free Vascularized Fibular Graft after Cervical Corpectomy.

    PubMed

    Addosooki, Ahmad Ibraheem; Alam-Eldin, Mohamed; Abdel-Wanis, Mohamed El-Sayed; Yousef, Mohamed Abdelhamid Ali; Dionigi, Paolo; Kenawey, Mohamed Omar

    2016-05-01

    Study Design Prospective study. Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical and radiologic results of using free vascularized fibular graft (FVFG) for anterior reconstruction of the cervical spine following with varying levels of corpectomy. Methods Ten patients underwent anterior cervical reconstruction using an FVFG after cervical corpectomy augmented with internal instrumentation. All patients were evaluated neurologically according to the Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) and modified JOA scoring systems and the Nurick grading system. The neurologic recovery rate was determined, and the clinical outcome was assessed based on three factors: neck pain, dependence on pain medication, and ability to return to work. The fusion status and maintenance of lordotic correction by the strut graft were determined by measuring the lordosis angle and fused segment height (FSH). Results All patients achieved successful fusion. The mean follow-up period was 35.2 months (range, 28 to 44 months). Graft union occurred at a mean of 3.5 months. The mean loss of lordotic correction was 0.95 degrees, and the mean change in FSH was <1 mm. The neurologic recovery rate was excellent in four patients, good in five, and fair in one. All patients achieved satisfactory clinical outcome. No neurologic injuries occurred during the operations. Conclusion The use of FVFG is a valuable and effective technique in anterior cervical reconstruction for complex disorders. PMID:27099811

  15. Hybrid Surgery Versus Anterior Cervical Discectomy and Fusion in Multilevel Cervical Disc Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jianfeng; Meng, Fanxin; Ding, Yan; Li, Jie; Han, Jian; Zhang, Xintao; Dong, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Abstract To investigate the outcomes and reliability of hybrid surgery (HS) versus anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) for the treatment of multilevel cervical spondylosis and disc diseases. Hybrid surgery, combining cervical disc arthroplasty (CDA) with fusion, is a novel treatment to multilevel cervical degenerated disc disease in recent years. However, the effect and reliability of HS are still unclear compared with ACDF. To investigate the studies of HS versus ACDF in patients with multilevel cervical disease, electronic databases (Medline, Embase, Pubmed, Cochrane library, and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials) were searched. Studies were included when they compared HS with ACDF and reported at least one of the following outcomes: functionality, neck pain, arm pain, cervical range of motion (ROM), quality of life, and incidence of complications. No language restrictions were used. Two authors independently assessed the methodological quality of included studies and extracted the relevant data. Seven clinical controlled trials were included in this study. Two trials were prospective and the other 5 were retrospective. The results of the meta-analysis indicated that HS achieved better recovery of NDI score (P = 0.038) and similar recovery of VAS score (P = 0.058) compared with ACDF at 2 years follow-up. Moreover, the total cervical ROM (C2–C7) after HS was preserved significantly more than the cervical ROM after ACDF (P = 0.000) at 2 years follow-up. Notably, the compensatory increase of the ROM of superior and inferior adjacent segments was significant in ACDF groups at 2-year follow-up (P < 0.01), compared with HS. The results demonstrate that HS provides equivalent outcomes and functional recovery for cervical disc diseases, and significantly better preservation of cervical ROM compared with ACDF in 2-year follow-up. This suggests the HS is an effective alternative invention for the treatment of multilevel cervical

  16. Anterior cervical disc arthroplasty (ACDA) versus anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF): a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Maharaj, Monish M.; Mobbs, Ralph J.; Hogan, Jarred; Zhao, Dong Fang; Rao, Prashanth J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Surgical approaches are usually required in cases of severe cervical disc disease. The traditional method of anterior cervical disc fusion (ACDF) has been associated with reduced local mobility and increased occurrence of adjacent segment disease. The newer method of anterior cervical disc arthroplasty (ACDA) relies upon artificial discs of various products. Current literature is inconsistent in the comparative performance of these methods with regards to clinical, radiological and patient outcomes. Methods Electronic databases, including OVID Medline, PubMed, Scopus, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials and Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, were comprehensively searched to retrieve studies comparing the treatment outcomes of ACDF and ACDA. Baseline characteristics and outcome data were extracted from eligible articles. Results Two hundred and fifty five articles were identified through the database searches, and after screening 28 studies were included in the systematic review and meta-analysis. A total of 4,070 patients were included (2156 ACDA, 1914 ACDF). There was no significant difference between the two groups in operation time, blood loss during operation, long-term all-complication rate and reoperation rate at the level of injury. The ACDA group had significantly better neurological outcomes, as well as a significantly lower rate of adjacent segment diseases. Conclusions Compared with ACDF, the ACDA procedure is associated with improved reoperation rate and reduction in neurological deficits amongst previously demonstrated benefits. There is heterogeneity in ACDA devices; future studies are required to investigate the impact of this technique on treatment outcomes.

  17. Are External Cervical Orthoses Necessary after Anterior Cervical Discectomy and Fusion: A Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Ajayi, Olaide O; Asgarzadie, Farbod

    2016-01-01

    Introduction & Background: The use of external cervical orthosis (ECO) after anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) varies from physician to physician due to an absence of clear guidelines. Our purpose is to evaluate and present evidence answering the question, “Does ECO after ACDF improve fusion rates?” through a literature review of current evidence for and against ECO after ACDF.  Review: A PubMed database search was conducted using specific ECO and ACDF related keywords. Our search yielded a total of 1,267 abstracts and seven relevant articles. In summary, one study provided low quality of evidence results supporting the conclusion that external bracing is not associated with improved fusion rates after ACDF.  The remaining six studies provide very low quality of evidence results; two studies concluded that external bracing after cervical procedures is not associated with improved fusion rates, one study concluded that external bracing after cervical procedures is associated with improved fusion rates, and the remaining three studies lacked sufficient evidence to draw an association between external bracing after ACDF and improved fusion rates. Conclusion: We recommend against the routine use of ECO after ACDF due to a lack of improved fusion rates associated with external bracing after surgery. PMID:27555986

  18. Adjacent level spondylodiscitis after anterior cervical decompression and fusion.

    PubMed

    Basu, Saumyajit; Sreeramalingam, Rathinavelu

    2012-05-01

    Postoperative spondylodiscitis after anterior cervical decompression and fusion (ACDF) is rare, but the same occurring at adjacent levels without disturbing the operated level is very rare. We report a case, with 5 year followup, who underwent ACDF from C5 to C7 for cervical spondylotic myelopathy. He showed neurological improvement after surgery but developed discharging sinus after 2 weeks, which healed with antibiotics. He improved on his preoperative symptoms well for the first 2 months. He started developing progressive neck pain and myelopathy after 3 months and investigations revealed spondylodiscitis at C3 and C4 with erosion, collapse, and kyphosis, without any evidence of implant failure or graft rejection at the operated level. He underwent reexploration and implant removal at the operated level (there was good fusion from C5 to C7) followed by debridement/decompression at C3, C4 along with iliac crest bone grafting and stabilization with plate and screws after maximum correction of kyphosis. The biopsy specimen grew Pseudomonas aeruginosa and appropriate sensitive antibiotics (gentamycin and ciprofloxacin) were given for 6 weeks. He was under regular followup for 5 years his myelopathy resolved completely and he is back to work. Complete decompression of the cord and fusion from C2 to C7 was demonstrable on postoperative imaging studies without any evidence of implant loosening or C1/C2 instability at the last followup. PMID:22719127

  19. Anterior Herniation of Partially Calcified and Degenerated Cervical Disc Causing Dysphagia.

    PubMed

    Ozdol, Cagatay; Turk, Cezmi Cagri; Yildirim, Ali Erdem; Dalgic, Ali

    2015-08-01

    We report a rare case of anterior cervical disc herniation associated with dysphagia. A 32-year-old man presented with complaints of dysphagia and concomitant pain in the right arm resistant to conservative therapy. On physical examination with respect to the muscle strength, the right shoulder abduction and flexion of the forearm were 3/5. Lateral X-ray revealed calcified osteophytes at the anterior C4-5 level. Magnetic resonance imaging showed soft disc herniation involving the right C6 root at the C5-6 level and anterior herniation of the C4-5 cervical disc. Anterior discectomies for C4-5 and C5-6 levels stabilized and ameliorated the dysphagia and pain. Cervical disc herniation usually presents with radicular findings. However, dysphagia may be an uncommon presentation. Anterior cervical disc herniation should be considered in a patient presenting with dysphagia. PMID:26240723

  20. Oropharyngeal Dysphagia after Anterior Cervical Spine Surgery: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Karen K.; Arnold, Paul M.

    2013-01-01

    Study Design Review. Objective Postoperative oropharyngeal dysphagia is one of the most common complications following anterior cervical spine surgery (ACSS). We review and summarize recent literature in order to provide a general overview of clinical signs and symptoms, assessment, incidence and natural history, pathophysiology, risk factors, treatment, prevention, and topics for future research. Methods A search of English literature regarding dysphagia following anterior cervical spine surgery was conducted using PubMed and Google Scholar. The search was focused on articles published since the last review on this topic was published in 2005. Results Patients who develop dysphagia after ACSS show significant alterations in swallowing biomechanics. Patient history, physical examination, X-ray, direct or indirect laryngoscopy, and videoradiographic swallow evaluation are considered the primary modalities for evaluating oropharyngeal dysphagia. There is no universally accepted objective instrument for assessing dysphagia after ACSS, but the most widely used instrument is the Bazaz Dysphagia Score. Because dysphagia is a subjective sensation, patient-reported instruments appear to be more clinically relevant and more effective in identifying dysfunction. The causes of oropharyngeal dysphagia after ACSS are multifactorial, involving neuronal, muscular, and mucosal structures. The condition is usually transient, most often beginning in the immediate postoperative period but sometimes beginning more than 1 month after surgery. The incidence of dysphagia within one week after ACSS varies from 1 to 79% in the literature. This wide variance can be attributed to variations in surgical techniques, extent of surgery, and size of the implant used, as well as variations in definitions and measurements of dysphagia, time intervals of postoperative evaluations, and relatively small sample sizes used in published studies. The factors most commonly associated with an

  1. Current status of bone graft options for anterior interbody fusion of the cervical and lumbar spine.

    PubMed

    Chau, Anthony Minh Tien; Xu, Lileane Liang; Wong, Johnny Ho-Yin; Mobbs, Ralph Jasper

    2014-01-01

    Anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) and anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF) are common surgical procedures for degenerative disc disease of the cervical and lumbar spine. Over the years, many bone graft options have been developed and investigated aimed at complimenting or substituting autograft bone, the traditional fusion substrate. Here, we summarise the historical context, biological basis and current best evidence for these bone graft options in ACDF and ALIF. PMID:23743981

  2. Symptomatic Anterior Cervical Osteophyte Causing Dysphagia: Case Report, Imaging, and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Sung, Kwang; Tharin, Suzanne

    2016-01-01

    Anterior cervical osteophytes are found in 20-30% of elderly patients. Rarely, severe osteophytes can cause dysphagia, dysphonia, and dyspnea. Here, we illustrate a case of severe dysphagia caused by a large post-traumatic osteophyte with oropharyngeal swallow study showing a significant mass effect on the pharynx and resolution following osteophytectomy. We also review the literature regarding the etiology, diagnosis, and treatment of symptomatic anterior cervical osteophytes.  PMID:27004150

  3. Late Results of Anterior Cervical Discectomy and Fusion with Interbody Cages

    PubMed Central

    Dağlı, Murat; Şimşek, Serkan; Bavbek, Murad

    2013-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective analysis. Purpose To evaluate the effectiveness of anterior cervical discectomy with fusion for degenerative cervical disc disease. Overview of Literature Anterior spinal surgery originated in the mid-1950s and graft for fusion was also employed. Currently anterior cervical microdiscectomy and fusion with an intervertebral cage is a widely accepted procedure for treatment of cervical disc hernia. Artificial grafts and cages for fusion are preferred because of their lower morbidity, reduced operating time and acceptable fusion rate. Methods The study involved retrospective analysis and investigation of long-term results for 41 consecutive patients who had undergone anterior cervical discectomy and fusion with an intervertebral cage for cervical disc hernia. The angle of lordosis, segmental height and range of motion were evaluated preoperatively and postoperatively at 1 month and 2 years. The clinical outcome was assessed by the visual analog scale and Odom's criteria. Results The angle of lordosis increased by 2.62° and the range of motion angle increased by 5.14° after the operation. The segmental height did not change. The visual analog scale and Odom's criteria scores decreased significantly after the operation. Conclusions Using a cage in anterior cervical discectomy prevents segmental collapse, so the segmental height and the angle of lordosis are preserved and newly-developed pain does not occur. PMID:23508467

  4. Delayed cerebral infarct following anterior cervical diskectomy and fusion

    PubMed Central

    Graffeo, Christopher S.; Puffer, Ross C.; Wijdicks, Eelco F. M.; Krauss, William E.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Ischemic stroke following anterior cervical diskectomy and fusion (ACDF) is an exceedingly rare complication. There are only three previous cases focusing on this problem in the literature; here, we present the fourth case. Case Description: A patient, cared for at an outside institution, developed a delayed ischemic stroke 3 days following an ACDF. This complication was attributed to carotid manipulation precipitating vascular injury in the setting of multiple comorbid vascular and coagulopathic risk factors, including previously undiagnosed carotid atherosclerosis, a prior history of pulmonary embolus requiring Warfarin anticoagulation (held perioperatively), acute dehydration, and atrial fibrillation. Conclusions: This case demonstrates the importance of focused history and examination in appropriate patients prior to ACDF, with special consideration given to the significance of age, comorbidities including coagulopathy and arrhythmia, and potential underlying vascular disease as markers for increased risk of perioperative thrombotic stroke associated with carotid manipulation. Patients at higher risk warrant comprehensive preoperative assessment, including medical evaluation, carotid imaging, and consideration for alternative surgical approaches. PMID:27713852

  5. Mental retardation in a boy with anterior cervical hypertrichosis.

    PubMed

    Corona-Rivera, J Román; González-Abarca, Sergio; Hernández-Rocha, Juan; García-Cruz, Diana; Corona-Rivera, Alfredo

    2005-05-15

    Anterior cervical hypertrichosis (ACH) is a rare form of localized hypertrichosis with 15 previously reported cases. ACH has been considered to be a dominant phenotype, either X-linked or autosomal [OMIM 600457]. ACH was associated with hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy (HMSN) in one family, in which the proband also exhibited severe chorioretinal degeneration and optic atrophy, probably as a different entity [OMIM 239840]. A Mexican boy with congenital ACH associated with moderate mental retardation, abnormal EEG, mild microcephaly, hypertrichosis on the back, and hallux valgus is presented here. An equal sex ratio found in 16 reported cases as well as the suggestion of a paternal age effect in one report appear most consistent with an autosomal dominant mode of inheritance for this trait. It remains unclear if isolated ACH, ACH-HMSN, or other associated findings reported in patients with ACH, including unusual features found in our case, are part of ACH or fortuitous associations, due to the small number of affected patients and different ascertainment biases present in previous reports. PMID:15800907

  6. Mental retardation in a boy with anterior cervical hypertrichosis.

    PubMed

    Corona-Rivera, J Román; González-Abarca, Sergio; Hernández-Rocha, Juan; García-Cruz, Diana; Corona-Rivera, Alfredo

    2005-05-15

    Anterior cervical hypertrichosis (ACH) is a rare form of localized hypertrichosis with 15 previously reported cases. ACH has been considered to be a dominant phenotype, either X-linked or autosomal [OMIM 600457]. ACH was associated with hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy (HMSN) in one family, in which the proband also exhibited severe chorioretinal degeneration and optic atrophy, probably as a different entity [OMIM 239840]. A Mexican boy with congenital ACH associated with moderate mental retardation, abnormal EEG, mild microcephaly, hypertrichosis on the back, and hallux valgus is presented here. An equal sex ratio found in 16 reported cases as well as the suggestion of a paternal age effect in one report appear most consistent with an autosomal dominant mode of inheritance for this trait. It remains unclear if isolated ACH, ACH-HMSN, or other associated findings reported in patients with ACH, including unusual features found in our case, are part of ACH or fortuitous associations, due to the small number of affected patients and different ascertainment biases present in previous reports.

  7. Effect of posterior subsidence on cervical alignment after anterior cervical corpectomy and reconstruction using titanium mesh cages in degenerative cervical disease.

    PubMed

    Jang, Jae-Won; Lee, Jung-Kil; Lee, Jung-Heon; Hur, Hyuk; Kim, Tae-Wan; Kim, Soo-Han

    2014-10-01

    Subsidence after anterior cervical reconstruction using a titanium mesh cage (TMC) has been a matter of debate. The authors investigated and analyzed subsidence and its effect on clinical and radiologic parameters after cervical reconstruction using a TMC for degenerative cervical disease. Thirty consecutive patients with degenerative cervical spine disorders underwent anterior cervical corpectomy followed by reconstruction with TMC. Twenty-four patients underwent a single-level corpectomy, and six patients underwent a two-level corpectomy. Clinical outcomes were assessed using a Visual Analogue Scale (VAS), the Japanese Orthopedic Association (JOA) score and the Neck Disability Index (NDI). Fusion status, anterior and posterior subsidence of the TMC, segmental angle (SA) and cervical sagittal angle (CSA) were assessed by lateral and flexion-extension radiographs of the neck. The mean follow-up period was 27.6 months (range, 24 to 49 months). The VAS, NDI and JOA scores were all significantly improved at the last follow-up. No instances of radiolucency or motion-related pseudoarthrosis were detected on radiographic analysis, yielding a fusion rate of 100%. Subsidence occurred in 28 of 30 patients (93.3%). The average anterior subsidence of the cage was 1.4 ± 0.9 mm, and the average posterior subsidence was 2.9 ± 1.2 mm. The SA and CSA at the final follow-up were significantly increased toward a lordotic angle. Anterior cervical reconstruction using TMC and plating in patients with cervical degenerative disease provides good clinical and radiologic outcomes. Cage subsidence occurred frequently, especially at the posterior part of the cage. Despite the prominent posterior subsidence of the TMC, SA and CSA were improved on final follow-up radiographs, suggesting that posterior subsidence may contribute to cervical lordosis.

  8. Tantalum trabecular metal implants in anterior cervical corpectomy and fusion: 2-year prospective analysis.

    PubMed

    King, V; Swart, A; Winder, M J

    2016-10-01

    Anterior cervical decompression for two or more cervical spondylotic levels can be performed using either multiple anterior cervical discectomies and fusion or anterior cervical corpectomy and fusion (ACCF). A variety of options for ACCF implants exist but to our knowledge, there is no clinical data for the use of tantalum trabecular metal implants (TTMI) for ACCF. A retrospective review was performed of prospectively collected data for ten patients undergoing ACCF with TTMI between 2011 and 2012. Radiological outcome was assessed by measuring the change in cervical (C) lordosis (fusion Cobb and C2-C7 Cobb), graft subsidence (anterior/posterior, determined by the subsidence of anterior/posterior body height of fused segments; cranial/caudal, determined by the cranial/caudal plate-to-disc distances) and rate of fusion using lateral cervical X-rays of patients at 0, 6, 12 and 24months post-operatively. The Neck Disability Index (NDI) assessed clinical outcome pre-operatively and at 6, 12 and 24months post-operatively. Cervical lordosis (Cobb angle of fused segment) was 5.2° (± 4.2°) at 0months and 6.0° (± 5.7°) at 24months post-operatively. Graft subsidence was observed to occur at 6months post-operatively and continued throughout follow-up. Anterior, posterior and caudal subsidence occurred more in the first 12months post-operatively than in the following 12months (p<0.05). Average pre-operative NDI was 45%. Average NDIs were 18%, 13% and 10% at 6, 12 and 24months post-operatively, respectively. ACCF patients treated with TTMI demonstrated stable cervical lordosis over 2years of follow-up and 100% fusion rates after 2years. Measures of subsidence appeared to decrease with time. Patients experienced improved clinical outcomes over the 2-year period. PMID:27515543

  9. Anterior Cervical Corpectomy with free vascularized fibular graft versus multilevel discectomy and grafting for Cervical Spondylotic Myelopathy

    PubMed Central

    Addosooki, Ahmad I; El-deen, Mohamed Alam

    2015-01-01

    Purpose A retrospective study to compare the radiologic and clinical outcomes of 2 different anterior approaches, multilevel anterior cervical discectomy with fusion (ACDF) using autologus ticortical bone graft versus anterior cervical corpectomy with fusion (ACCF) using free vascularized fibular graft (FVFG) for the management of cervical spondylotic myelopathy(CSM). Methods A total of 15 patients who underwent ACDF or ACCF using FVFG for multilevel CSM were divided into two groups. Group A (n = 7) underwent ACDF and group B (n = 8) ACCF. Clinical outcomes using Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) score, perioperative parameters including operation time and hospital stay, radiological parameters including fusion rate and cervical lordosis, and complications were compared. Results Both group A and group B demonstrated significant increases in JOA scores. Patients who underwent ACDF experienced significantly shorter operation times and hospital stay. Both groups showed significant increases in postoperative cervical lordosis and achieved the same fusion rate (100 %). No major complications were encountered in both groups. Conclusion Both ACDF and ACCF using FVFG provide satisfactory clinical outcomes and fusion rates for multilevel CSM. However, multilevel ACDF is associated with better radiologic parameters, shorter hospital stay and shorter operative times. PMID:26767152

  10. Value of intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring to reduce neurological complications in patients undergoing anterior cervical spine procedures for cervical spondylotic myelopathy.

    PubMed

    Thirumala, Parthasarathy D; Muralidharan, Aditya; Loke, Yoon K; Habeych, Miguel; Crammond, Donald; Balzer, Jeffrey

    2016-03-01

    The primary aim of this study was to conduct a systematic review of reports of patients with cervical spondylotic myelopathy and to assess the value of intraoperative monitoring (IOM), including somatosensory evoked potentials, transcranial motor evoked potentials and electromyography, in anterior cervical procedures. A search was conducted to collect a small database of relevant papers using key words describing disorders and procedures of interest. The database was then shortlisted using selection criteria and data was extracted to identify complications as a result of anterior cervical procedures for cervical spondylotic myelopathy and outcome analysis on a continuous scale. In the 22 studies that matched the screening criteria, only two involved the use of IOM. The average sample size was 173 patients. In procedures done without IOM a mean change in Japanese Orthopaedic Association score of 3.94 points and Nurick score by 1.20 points (both less severe post-operatively) was observed. Within our sub-group analysis, worsening myelopathy and/or quadriplegia was seen in 2.71% of patients for studies without IOM and 0.91% of patients for studies with IOM. Variations persist in the existing literature in the evaluation of complications associated with anterior cervical spinal procedures. Based on the review of published studies, sufficient evidence does not exist to make recommendations regarding the use of different IOM modalities to reduce neurological complications during anterior cervical procedures. However, future studies with objective measures of neurological deficits using a specific IOM modality may establish it as an effective and reliable indicator of injury during such surgeries. PMID:26677786

  11. A Prospective Study of the Functional Outcome of Anterior Cervical Discectomy With Fusion in Single Level Degenerative Cervical Disc Prolapse

    PubMed Central

    Kamani, Mayur M; Shetty, Vikram; Rai, H. Ravindranath; Hegde, Deepak

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Cervical spondylotic myelo-radiculopathy is a form of spinal cord dysfunction syndrome and usually accompanies age related degeneration of the spine. Aim To determine the functional outcome of anterior cervical discectomy with fusion and plating in single level degenerative cervical disc prolapse. Materials and Methods A total of 20 patients diagnosed with degenerative single level cervical disc prolapse who presented to the Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Justice KS Hegde Charitable Hospital, Mangalore from the period of November 2012 to May 2014 were enrolled in the study. Complete clinical and radiological evaluation of the patients was done. A trial of conservative management was tried in all these patients for a period of two months. They were taken up for surgery only when conservative management had failed. Scoring of neck function before the surgery was done as per the Modified Japanese Orthopaedic Association (MJOA) score. All patients underwent anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) with tricortical iliac crest bone grafting. Fixation was performed with titanium locking cervical plates. All patients were reviewed at 6 weeks and 6 months postoperatively. Assessment of neck function was done as per the MJOA scoring during all the reviews. Radiographic assessment was also done during all the reviews. The complications noted were documented. The statistical analysis was done using percentages; the arithmetic mean was calculated using SPSS software (version 16.0). Results Amongst the 20 patients included in the study, 1 patient died postoperatively due to oesophageal rupture. of the remaining 19 patients reviewed and followed up, all of them had improvement of symptoms and were reported to be in the ‘mild category’ as per the MJOA score. One patient developed dysphonia, in the immediate postoperative period due to recurrent laryngeal nerve palsy which recovered in a period of three months postoperative. Conclusion Single level

  12. Current Concepts of Anterior Cervical Discectomy and Fusion: A Review of Literature

    PubMed Central

    Song, Kyung-Jin

    2014-01-01

    Anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) is a safe and effective procedure for degenerative cervical spinal disease unresponsive to conservative management and its outstanding results have been reported. To increase fusion rates and decrease complications, numerous graft materials, cage, anterior plating and total disc replacement have been developed, and better results were reported from those, but still there are areas that have not been established. Therefore, we are going to analyze the treatment outcome with the various procedure through the literature review and determine the efficacy of ACDF. PMID:25187874

  13. Hybrid Surgery Versus Anterior Cervical Discectomy and Fusion in Multilevel Cervical Disc Diseases: A Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jianfeng; Meng, Fanxin; Ding, Yan; Li, Jie; Han, Jian; Zhang, Xintao; Dong, Wei

    2016-05-01

    To investigate the outcomes and reliability of hybrid surgery (HS) versus anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) for the treatment of multilevel cervical spondylosis and disc diseases.Hybrid surgery, combining cervical disc arthroplasty (CDA) with fusion, is a novel treatment to multilevel cervical degenerated disc disease in recent years. However, the effect and reliability of HS are still unclear compared with ACDF.To investigate the studies of HS versus ACDF in patients with multilevel cervical disease, electronic databases (Medline, Embase, Pubmed, Cochrane library, and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials) were searched. Studies were included when they compared HS with ACDF and reported at least one of the following outcomes: functionality, neck pain, arm pain, cervical range of motion (ROM), quality of life, and incidence of complications. No language restrictions were used. Two authors independently assessed the methodological quality of included studies and extracted the relevant data.Seven clinical controlled trials were included in this study. Two trials were prospective and the other 5 were retrospective. The results of the meta-analysis indicated that HS achieved better recovery of NDI score (P = 0.038) and similar recovery of VAS score (P = 0.058) compared with ACDF at 2 years follow-up. Moreover, the total cervical ROM (C2-C7) after HS was preserved significantly more than the cervical ROM after ACDF (P = 0.000) at 2 years follow-up. Notably, the compensatory increase of the ROM of superior and inferior adjacent segments was significant in ACDF groups at 2-year follow-up (P < 0.01), compared with HS.The results demonstrate that HS provides equivalent outcomes and functional recovery for cervical disc diseases, and significantly better preservation of cervical ROM compared with ACDF in 2-year follow-up. This suggests the HS is an effective alternative invention for the treatment of multilevel cervical spondylosis to

  14. Hybrid Surgery Versus Anterior Cervical Discectomy and Fusion in Multilevel Cervical Disc Diseases: A Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jianfeng; Meng, Fanxin; Ding, Yan; Li, Jie; Han, Jian; Zhang, Xintao; Dong, Wei

    2016-05-01

    To investigate the outcomes and reliability of hybrid surgery (HS) versus anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) for the treatment of multilevel cervical spondylosis and disc diseases.Hybrid surgery, combining cervical disc arthroplasty (CDA) with fusion, is a novel treatment to multilevel cervical degenerated disc disease in recent years. However, the effect and reliability of HS are still unclear compared with ACDF.To investigate the studies of HS versus ACDF in patients with multilevel cervical disease, electronic databases (Medline, Embase, Pubmed, Cochrane library, and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials) were searched. Studies were included when they compared HS with ACDF and reported at least one of the following outcomes: functionality, neck pain, arm pain, cervical range of motion (ROM), quality of life, and incidence of complications. No language restrictions were used. Two authors independently assessed the methodological quality of included studies and extracted the relevant data.Seven clinical controlled trials were included in this study. Two trials were prospective and the other 5 were retrospective. The results of the meta-analysis indicated that HS achieved better recovery of NDI score (P = 0.038) and similar recovery of VAS score (P = 0.058) compared with ACDF at 2 years follow-up. Moreover, the total cervical ROM (C2-C7) after HS was preserved significantly more than the cervical ROM after ACDF (P = 0.000) at 2 years follow-up. Notably, the compensatory increase of the ROM of superior and inferior adjacent segments was significant in ACDF groups at 2-year follow-up (P < 0.01), compared with HS.The results demonstrate that HS provides equivalent outcomes and functional recovery for cervical disc diseases, and significantly better preservation of cervical ROM compared with ACDF in 2-year follow-up. This suggests the HS is an effective alternative invention for the treatment of multilevel cervical spondylosis to

  15. Stand-Alone Cages for Anterior Cervical Fusion: Are There No Problems?

    PubMed Central

    Han, Sang Youp; Lee, Cheol Young; Kim, Hong Rye; Park, Dong Ho

    2016-01-01

    Objective There are complications in stand-alone cage assisted anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF), such as cage subsidence and kyphosis. Here we report our clinical result on ACDF, comparing with stand-alone cages and with cervical plate system for degenerative cervical spine diseases. Methods Patients with degenerative cervical disease who were diagnosed and treated in Konyang University Hospital between January 2004 and December 2014 were included in this study. Patients who had operation in single level ACDF were selected. Patients scored the degree of pain using visual analog scale before and after the surgery. Subsidence was defined as ≥3-mm decrease of the segmental height, and cervical kyphosis was defined as progression of ≥5° at 12 months after postoperative follow-up compared to that measured at the immediate postoperative period. Results A total of 81 patients were enrolled for this study. Forty-five patients were included in a cervical plate group and the others were in stand-alone cage group. There was no statistical difference in pain score between the 2 groups. Segmental subsidence was observed in 7 patients (15.6%) in plate-assisted cervical fusion group, and 13 patients (36.1%) in stand-alone cage group. Segmental kyphosis was observed in 4 patients (8.9%) in plate-assisted cervical fusion group, and 10 patients (27.8%) in stand-alone cage group. There was statistical difference between the 2 groups. Conclusion There was no difference in pain between 2 groups. But stand-alone case group showed higher incidence rate than plate-assisted cervical fusion group in segmental subsidence and cervical kyphosis. When designing cervical fusion, more attention should be given selecting the surgical technique. PMID:27123025

  16. Acute cervical cord infarction in anterior spinal artery territory with acute swelling mimicking myelitis.

    PubMed

    Abou Al-Shaar, Hussam; AbouAl-Shaar, Iyad; Al-Kawi, Mohammed Z

    2015-10-01

    Acute infarction of the cervical segment of the spinal cord is extremely uncommon. Patients may present with signs and symptoms mimicking that of acute myelitis. On imaging, both conditions may present as a hyperintense area on T-2 weighted MRI. History of sudden onset is essential in establishing the diagnosis. We report a case of cervical spinal cord infarction in a 40-year-old man who was diagnosed with acute transverse myelitis, and was treated with high dose intravenous corticosteroids followed by 5 sessions of plasma exchange. An MRI of the spine revealed abnormal high T2 signal intensity extending from the C2 to C7 level involving the anterior two-thirds of the cord with more central involvement. The findings were consistent with anterior spinal artery territory cervical cord infarction.

  17. Anatomic Study of Anterior Transdiscal Axial Screw Fixation for Subaxial Cervical Spine Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Wei; Zheng, Minghui; Qu, Dongbin; Zou, Lin; Chen, Yongquan; Chen, Jianting; Zhu, Qingan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Anterior transdiscal axial screw (ATAS) fixation is an alternative or supplement to the plate and screw constructs for the upper cervical spine injury. However, no existing literatures clarified the anatomic feasibility of this technique for subaxial cervical spine. Therefore, the objective of this study was to evaluate the anatomical feasibility and to establish guidelines for the use of the ATAS fixation for the subaxial cervical spine injury. Fifty normal cervical spines had radiographs to determine the proposed screw trajectory (the screw length and insertion angle) and the interbody graft-related parameters (the disc height and depth, and the distance between anterior vertebral margin and the screw) for all levels of the subaxial cervical spine. Following screw insertion in 8 preserved human cadaver specimens, surgical simulation and dissection verified the feasibility and safety of the ATAS fixation. Radiographic measurements showed the mean axial screw length and cephalic incline angle of all levels were 41.2 mm and 25.2°, respectively. The suitable depth of the interbody graft was >11.7 mm (the distance between anterior vertebral margin and the screw), but <17.1 mm (disc depth). Except the axial screw length, increase in all the measurements was seen with level up to C5–C6 segment. Simulated procedure in the preserved specimens demonstrated that ATAS fixation could be successfully performed at C2–C3, C3–C4, C4–C5, and C5–C6 levels, but impossible at C6–C7 due to the obstacle of the sternum. All screws were placed accurately. None of the screws penetrated into the spinal canal and caused fractures determined by dissecting the specimens. The anterior transdiscal axial screw fixation, as an alternative or supplementary instrumentation for subaxial cervical spine injuries, is feasible and safe with meticulous surgical planning. PMID:27495016

  18. Ruptured anterior spinal artery aneurysm from a herniated cervical disc. A case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Nakhla, Jonathan; Nasser, Rani; Yassari, Reza; Pasquale, David; Altschul, David

    2016-01-01

    Background: Subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) caused by a ruptured cervical anterior spinal artery aneurysm is extremely rare and in the setting of cervical spondylosis. This case presentation reviews the diagnosis, management, and treatment of such aneurysms. Case Presentation: An 88-year-old female presented with the worst headache of her life without focal deficits. She was found to have diffuse SAH in the basal cisterns extending inferiorly down the spinal canal. Review of the neurodiagnostic images revealed an anterior spinal artery aneurysm in the setting of cervical spondylosis. Conclusions: Clinicians should be suspicious of cervical spondylosis as a rare etiology for an SAH when cerebral angiograms prove negative for intracranial aneurysms. PMID:26862449

  19. Late prevertebral abscess with sinus following anterior cervical corpectomy and fusion

    PubMed Central

    Bhise, Swapnil D.; Mathesul, Ambarish A.; Deokate, Pravin; Chandanwale, Ajay S.; Bartakke, Girish D.

    2015-01-01

    Anterior cervical discectomy/corpectomy and fusion is performed in degenerative, traumatic and neoplastic etiologies of the cervical spine. This procedure is highly successful and associated with fewer complications. The rates of early and late postoperative infection have been reported to be between 0.1% and 1.6%, the late infections are being very rare. We report a rare case of a 30-year-old HIV negative, non-diabetic male who developed a late prevertebral cervical abscess with discharging sinus over posterior triangle of neck 3 years after an anterior cervical C6 corpectomy with fibular grafting and buttress screw fixation performed elsewhere for traumatic fracture C6 vertebra. The abscess was drained using radical neck dissection approach with complete excision of sinus track and removal of the infected implant. On culture, the organism was found to be beta-hemolytic streptococci, for which appropriate antibiotics were administered postoperatively. The sinus tract completely healed in 3 months time. Late infection as a complication of anterior cervical spine surgeries is rare and is associated with esophageal perforation, implant migration, seeding of the deep prevertebral space with oropharyngeal flora, or from surgical site/bacteremia or with Zenker's diverticulum. Few cases have been reported till date, but none have presented with a sinus tract. We present a case of delayed prevertebral abscess after cervical spine instrumentation that followed abnormal path causing sinus track to be developed in the site (the posterior triangle of the neck) other than previous incision site. Exploring both triangles of the neck using radical neck dissection approach was essential for complete excision of sinus track, removal of screw and debridement. PMID:26396628

  20. Acquired Pharyngeal Diverticulum after Anterior Cervical Fusion Operation Misdiagnosed as Typical Zenker Diverticulum.

    PubMed

    Park, Jong Myung; Kim, Chang Wan; Kim, Do Hyung

    2016-08-01

    A pharyngeal diverticulum is a rare complication of an anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF). We present a case of a pharyngeal diverticulum after an ACDF, which was misdiagnosed as a typical Zenker diverticulum. A 54-year-old woman presented with dysphagia and a sense of irritation in the neck following C5 through C7 cervical fusion 3 years prior. The patient underwent open surgery to resect the diverticulum with concurrent cricopharyngeal myotomy. An ACDF-related diverticulum is difficult to distinguish from a typical Zenker diverticulum. PMID:27525244

  1. Acquired Pharyngeal Diverticulum after Anterior Cervical Fusion Operation Misdiagnosed as Typical Zenker Diverticulum

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jong Myung; Kim, Chang Wan; Kim, Do Hyung

    2016-01-01

    A pharyngeal diverticulum is a rare complication of an anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF). We present a case of a pharyngeal diverticulum after an ACDF, which was misdiagnosed as a typical Zenker diverticulum. A 54-year-old woman presented with dysphagia and a sense of irritation in the neck following C5 through C7 cervical fusion 3 years prior. The patient underwent open surgery to resect the diverticulum with concurrent cricopharyngeal myotomy. An ACDF-related diverticulum is difficult to distinguish from a typical Zenker diverticulum. PMID:27525244

  2. Subsidence and Nonunion after Anterior Cervical Interbody Fusion Using a Stand-Alone Polyetheretherketone (PEEK) Cage

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jae Jun; Yu, Chang Hun; Yeom, Jin Sup; Lee, Jae Hyup; Lee, Choon-Ki

    2011-01-01

    Background The purposes of the present study are to evaluate the subsidence and nonunion that occurred after anterior cervical discectomy and fusion using a stand-alone intervertebral cage and to analyze the risk factors for the complications. Methods Thirty-eight patients (47 segments) who underwent anterior cervical fusion using a stand-alone polyetheretherketone (PEEK) cage and an autologous cancellous iliac bone graft from June 2003 to August 2008 were enrolled in this study. The anterior and posterior segmental heights and the distance from the anterior edge of the upper vertebra to the anterior margin of the cage were measured on the plain radiographs. Subsidence was defined as ≥ a 2 mm (minor) or 3 mm (major) decrease of the segmental height at the final follow-up compared to that measured at the immediate postoperative period. Nonunion was evaluated according to the instability being ≥ 2 mm in the interspinous distance on the flexion-extension lateral radiographs. Results The anterior and posterior segmental heights decreased from the immediate postoperative period to the final follow-up at 1.33 ± 1.46 mm and 0.81 ± 1.27 mm, respectively. Subsidence ≥ 2 mm and 3 mm were observed in 12 segments (25.5%) and 7 segments (14.9%), respectively. Among the expected risk factors for subsidence, a smaller anteroposterior (AP) diameter (14 mm vs. 12 mm) of cages (p = 0.034; odds ratio [OR], 0.017) and larger intraoperative distraction (p = 0.041; OR, 3.988) had a significantly higher risk of subsidence. Intervertebral nonunion was observed in 7 segments (7/47, 14.9%). Compared with the union group, the nonunion group had a significantly higher ratio of two-level fusion to one-level fusions (p = 0.001). Conclusions Anterior cervical fusion using a stand-alone cage with a large AP diameter while preventing anterior intraoperative over-distraction will be helpful to prevent the subsidence of cages. Two-level cervical fusion might require more careful attention

  3. Absorbable anterior cervical plate for corpectomy and fusion in a 2-year-old child with neurofibromatosis. Technical note.

    PubMed

    Lidar, Zvi; Constantini, Shlomi; Regev, Gilad J; Salame, Khalil

    2012-04-01

    Postlaminectomy cervical kyphosis is one of the most challenging entities in spine surgery. Correction of this deformity usually requires anterior fusion with plating and a strut graft or interbody cage and posterior fusion with screws and rods. The situation is more complicated in the young child because fusion may affect future growth of the cervical spine. There is also a paucity of adequate instrumentation for the small bony structures. Some authors have reported utilization of absorbable cervical plates for fusion in pediatric patients with favorable results. The authors present a modified surgical technique that was used for circumferential fusion in a 2-year-old girl with cervical kyphosis and recurrent neurofibroma. Anterior fusion was performed using an autologous rib graft and an absorbable cervical plate. This was followed by posterior fusion using rib bone and cables. Previous reports on the use of absorbable cervical plates are reviewed and the advantages of the current technique are discussed. PMID:22462712

  4. Comparison of Radiologic Outcomes of Different Methods in Single-Level Anterior Cervical Discectomy and Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, O Ik; Lee, Sang Weon; Song, Geun Sung

    2016-01-01

    Objective Anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) is a choice of surgical procedure for cervical degenerative diseases associated with radiculopathy or myelopathy. However, the patients undergoing ACDF still have problems. The purpose of the present study is to evaluate the radiologic results of 3 different methods in single-level ACDF. Methods We conducted a retrospective collection of radiological data from January 2011 to December 2014. A total of 67 patients were included in this study. The patients were divided into 3 groups by operation procedure: using stand-alone cage (group cage, n=20); polyether-ether-ketone (PEEK)-titanium combined anchored cage (group AC, n=21); and anterior cervical cage-plate (group CP, n=26). Global cervical lordosis (C2-C7 Cobb angle), fused segment height, fusion rate, and cervical range of motion (ROM) were measured and analyzed at serial preoperative, postoperative, 6-month, and final 1-year follow-up. Results Successful bone fusion was achieved in all patients at the final follow-up examination; however, the loss of disc height over 3 mm at the surgical level was observed in 6 patients in group cage. Groups AC and CP yielded significantly better outcomes than group cage in fused segment height and cervical ROM(p=0.01 and p=0.02, respectively). Furthermore, group AC had similar radiologic outcomes to those of group CP. Conclusion The PEEK-titanium combined anchored cage may be a good alternative procedure in terms of reducing complications induced by plate after ACDF. PMID:27799985

  5. Anterior decompression, fusion and plating in cervical spine injury: Early experience in Abuja, Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Ogungbo, Biodun

    2011-01-01

    Background: We present a review of the results of the current surgical management of acute cervical spine injuries in the Federal Capital Territory, Abuja, Nigeria. This is the first detailed retrospective study on the surgical management of patients with cervical spine injuries from Nigeria. Methods: The medical reports of patients with traumatic cervical spine and spinal cord injuries undergoing surgery from 1 August 2009 till 30 August 2010 were reviewed. Management and early results of outcome were ascertained and detailed consecutively in a prospective Microsoft Office Access® database (Microsoft Group of Companies). Frankel grading was used for pre- and immediate post-operative evaluation (within 48 hours). The Barthel index (BI) was used to classify patients as dependent or independent at follow-up. Results: Twenty consecutive patients presented with acute cervical spine and spinal cord injuries since August 2009. Twenty anterior cervical spine decompression and fixation with an iliac graft and an anterior cervical plate (ACDF) were performed in 18 patients. All operations were performed with general anaesthesia using standard techniques but without a microscope or a high speed drill. Of the 18 patients who were operated, 4 patients died within a short period following surgical intervention. Seven patients have made a full recovery and seven remain fully dependent. Only two of the dependent quadriplegic patients have become reintegrated back into the society. Conclusion: The management of spinal cord injuries in Abuja is evolving. The operations were performed adequately with much limited complement of equipment. Poor intensive care therapy is a major challenge and improvements in this area of care will likely lead to better patient outcomes. PMID:22140641

  6. Esophageal, pharyngeal and hemorrhagic complications occurring in anterior cervical surgery: Three illustrative cases

    PubMed Central

    Paradells, Víctor Rodrigo; Pérez, Juan Bosco Calatayud; Vicente, Francisco Javier Díar; Florez, Luciano Bances; de la Viuda, Marta Claramonte; Villagrasa, Francisco Javier

    2014-01-01

    Background: The number of esophageal and pharyngeal perforations occurring in anterior cervical surgeries ranges from 0.25% to 1% and 0.2% to 1.2%, respectively. Symptoms usually appear postoperatively and are attributed to: Local infection, fistula, sepsis, or mediastinitis. Acute postoperative hematoma, although very rare (<1%), is the first complication to rule out due to its life-threatening complications (e.g. acute respiratory failure). Case Description: Over a 36-year period, the author(s) described three severe esophageal/pharyngeal complications attributed to anterior cervical surgery. As these complications were appropriately recognized/treated, patients had favorable outcomes. Conclusions: Anterior cervical spine surgery is a safe approach and is associated with few major esophageal/pharyngeal complications, which most commonly include transient dysphagia and dysphonia. If symptoms persist, patients should be assessed for esophageal/pharyngeal defects utilizing appropriate imaging studies. Notably, even if the major complications listed above are adequately treated, optimal results are in no way guaranteed. PMID:24843808

  7. Modified transcorporeal anterior cervical microforaminotomy assisted by O-arm-based navigation: a technical case report.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jin-Sung; Eun, Sang Soo; Prada, Nicolas; Choi, Gun; Lee, Sang-Ho

    2011-07-01

    This study was done to present our surgical experience of modified transcorporeal anterior cervical microforaminotomy (MTACM) assisted by the O-arm-based navigation system for the treatment of cervical disc herniation. We present eight patients with foraminal disc herniations at the C5-C6, C6-C7, and C7-T1 levels. All patients had unilateral radicular arm pain and motor weakness. The inclusion criteria for the patients were the presence of single-level unilateral foraminal cervical disc herniation manifesting persistent radiculopathy despite conservative treatment. Hard disc herniation, down-migrated disc herniation, concomitant moderate to severe bony spur and foraminal stenosis were excluded. We performed MTACM to expose the foraminal area of the cervical disc and removed the herniated disc fragments successfully using O-arm-based navigation. Postoperatively, the patients' symptoms improved and there was no instability during the follow-up period. MTACM assisted by O-arm-based navigation is an effective, safe, and precise minimally invasive procedure that tends to preserve non-degenerated structures as much as possible while providing a complete removal of ruptured disc fragments in the cervical spine.

  8. Retrospective Evaluation of Efficiency and Safety of an Anterior Percutaneous Approach for Cervical Discectomy

    PubMed Central

    Schubert, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective case series. Purpose The purpose of the study was to evaluate the efficiency and complication rate of a percutaneous anterior approach to herniated cervical disks with or without concomitant foraminal stenosis and/or spondylosis. Overview of Literature Recent publications reflect that minimally invasive procedures gain in importance in patients and spine surgeons as they are generally associated with less tissue damage and shorter recovery times. However, for anterior percutaneous cervical discectomy, very little data is available for relevant patient populations. Methods Charts from patients with herniated cervical disc confirmed by magnetic resonance imaging, mainly radicular symptoms and irresponsive to conservative treatment who underwent anterior percutaneous discectomy were evaluated retrospectively. All patients were asked to return questionnaires that included visual analogue scores (VAS), MacNab score as well as subjective satisfaction data 2 years after surgery. Results Ninety-five patients were included. There were no neurological or vascular complications; only one patient suffered from transient hoarseness. During the two years after surgery, 9 patients underwent reoperation. 90.5% of the patients returned the questionnaire at 2 years' follow-up. 87.7% of them reported excellent or good outcome, 11.1% rated results as fair and 1.2% as unsatisfactory. On average, arm and neck pain improved significantly by 6.1 points and 5.8 points respectively on a ten point VAS. 94.5% stated that they would choose the same procedure again. Conclusions This procedure has proved a safe and sufficient option for symptomatic cervical disk herniations with or without concomitant spondylosis and/or foraminal stenosis. PMID:25187857

  9. Dynamic Cervical Implant versus Anterior Cervical Diskectomy and Fusion: A Prospective Study of Clinical and Radiologic Outcome.

    PubMed

    Richter, Heiko; Seule, Martin; Hildebrandt, Gerhard; Fournier, Jean-Yves

    2016-07-01

    Objective To evaluate clinical and radiologic outcome in patients treated with a dynamic cervical implant (DCI) or anterior cervical diskectomy and fusion (ACDF). Study Design A prospective comparative cohort study. Methods The study included 60 patients with one- or two-level cervical degenerative disk disease (DDD) undergoing treatment with either DCI (n = 30) or ACDF (n = 30). Clinical and radiologic outcomes were assessed 3 and 12 months after surgery. Clinical scoring systems included the Visual Analog Scale for Neck (VAS-N) and Arm pain (VAS-A), the Neck Pain and Disability Scale (NPAD), and the European Quality of Life Scale (EQ-5D). Results Both the DCI and ACDF group showed significant clinical improvement 12 months after surgery using the VAS-N (p = 0.034 and p < 0.001, respectively), VAS-A (p < 0.001 and p < 0.001, respectively), NPAD (p < 0.001 and p < 0.001, respectively), and EQ-5D (p < 0.001 and p < 0.001, respectively). There were no significant differences in clinical outcome comparing both groups at the 3- and 12-month follow-up. The fusion rate at 12 months after surgery was 39.4% and 80.0% in the DCI and ACDF groups, respectively. Radiolucency was found in 90.9% in the DCI group at 12-month follow-up. Conclusion The clinical results for DCI treatment are equivalent to those for ACDF in the treatment of one- and two-level cervical DDD at 12 months after surgery. Further studies are necessary to investigate the high rates of radiolucency and fusion associated with DCI treatment. PMID:27088592

  10. Dynamic Cervical Implant versus Anterior Cervical Diskectomy and Fusion: A Prospective Study of Clinical and Radiologic Outcome.

    PubMed

    Richter, Heiko; Seule, Martin; Hildebrandt, Gerhard; Fournier, Jean-Yves

    2016-07-01

    Objective To evaluate clinical and radiologic outcome in patients treated with a dynamic cervical implant (DCI) or anterior cervical diskectomy and fusion (ACDF). Study Design A prospective comparative cohort study. Methods The study included 60 patients with one- or two-level cervical degenerative disk disease (DDD) undergoing treatment with either DCI (n = 30) or ACDF (n = 30). Clinical and radiologic outcomes were assessed 3 and 12 months after surgery. Clinical scoring systems included the Visual Analog Scale for Neck (VAS-N) and Arm pain (VAS-A), the Neck Pain and Disability Scale (NPAD), and the European Quality of Life Scale (EQ-5D). Results Both the DCI and ACDF group showed significant clinical improvement 12 months after surgery using the VAS-N (p = 0.034 and p < 0.001, respectively), VAS-A (p < 0.001 and p < 0.001, respectively), NPAD (p < 0.001 and p < 0.001, respectively), and EQ-5D (p < 0.001 and p < 0.001, respectively). There were no significant differences in clinical outcome comparing both groups at the 3- and 12-month follow-up. The fusion rate at 12 months after surgery was 39.4% and 80.0% in the DCI and ACDF groups, respectively. Radiolucency was found in 90.9% in the DCI group at 12-month follow-up. Conclusion The clinical results for DCI treatment are equivalent to those for ACDF in the treatment of one- and two-level cervical DDD at 12 months after surgery. Further studies are necessary to investigate the high rates of radiolucency and fusion associated with DCI treatment.

  11. Anterior Cervical Corpectomy Non-Fusion Model Produced by a Novel Implant

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Jun; Lu, Meng; Liang, Baobao; Zhai, Xu; Qin, Jie; He, Xijing

    2016-01-01

    Background Anterior cervical corpectomy and fusion are frequently used in the treatment of cervical spinal disease. However, the range of motion (ROM) of the operative level is unavoidably lost due to fusion. This study aims to establish an anterior cervical corpectomy goat non-fusion model and to evaluate the ROM of adjacent and operative levels. Material/Methods Six adult-male goats (in vivo group) and twelve adult-male goat cervical spine specimens (randomly divided equally into intact group or in vitro group) were included. The non-fusion model was established by implanting a novel implant at C4 level. Imagiological examinations for the in vivo group were performed to inspect the position of the implant and spinal cord status. Specimens were harvested six months after the operation. Biomechanical testing was conducted to obtain the ROM in flexion-extension, lateral bending, and axial rotation at upper adjacent level (C2–3), operative levels (C3–4 and C4–5) and at C2–5. Specimens in the intact group were first tested as intact and then tested as fixed and became the fixation group. Results Imagiological examinations revealed that the position of the implant and the spinal cord status were good. The specimens in the in vivo and in vitro groups had significantly decreased C2–3 ROM, increased C3–4 and C4–5 ROM and similar C2–5 ROM compared with the fixation group. Conclusions This study presents a novel method for potential non-fusion treatment strategies for cervical spinal disease. However, improvement of this model and additional studies are needed. PMID:27049839

  12. Cervical intervertebral disc herniation treatment via radiofrequency combined with low-dose collagenase injection into the disc interior using an anterior cervical approach.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhi-Jian; Zhu, Meng-Ye; Liu, Xiao-Jian; Zhang, Xue-Xue; Zhang, Da-Ying; Wei, Jian-Mei

    2016-06-01

    This study aimed to determine the therapeutic effect of radiofrequency combined with low-dose collagenase injected into the disc interior via an anterior cervical approach for cervical intervertebral disc herniation.Forty-three patients (26-62-year old; male/female ratio: 31/12) with cervical intervertebral disc herniation received radiofrequency combined with 60 to 100 U of collagenase, injected via an anterior cervical approach. The degree of nerve function was assessed using the current Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) scoring system at 3 and 12 months postoperation. A visual analogue scale (VAS) was used to evaluate the degree of pain preoperation and 7 days postoperation. The preoperative and 3 month postoperative protrusion areas were measured and compared via magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and picture archiving and communication systems (PACS).Compared with the preoperative pain scores, the 7-day postoperative pain was significantly reduced (P <0.01). The excellent and good rates of nerve function amelioration were 93.0% and 90.7% at 3 and 12 months postoperation, respectively, which was not significantly different. Twenty-seven cases exhibited a significantly reduced protrusion area (P <0.01) at 3 months postoperation. No serious side effects were noted.To our knowledge, this is the first study to demonstrate that the use of radiofrequency combined with low-dose collagenase injection into the disc interior via an anterior cervical approach is effective and safe for the treatment of cervical intervertebral disc herniation.

  13. Cervical intervertebral disc herniation treatment via radiofrequency combined with low-dose collagenase injection into the disc interior using an anterior cervical approach

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhi-Jian; Zhu, Meng-Ye; Liu, Xiao-Jian; Zhang, Xue-Xue; Zhang, Da-Ying; Wei, Jian-Mei

    2016-01-01

    Abstract This study aimed to determine the therapeutic effect of radiofrequency combined with low-dose collagenase injected into the disc interior via an anterior cervical approach for cervical intervertebral disc herniation. Forty-three patients (26–62-year old; male/female ratio: 31/12) with cervical intervertebral disc herniation received radiofrequency combined with 60 to 100 U of collagenase, injected via an anterior cervical approach. The degree of nerve function was assessed using the current Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) scoring system at 3 and 12 months postoperation. A visual analogue scale (VAS) was used to evaluate the degree of pain preoperation and 7 days postoperation. The preoperative and 3 month postoperative protrusion areas were measured and compared via magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and picture archiving and communication systems (PACS). Compared with the preoperative pain scores, the 7-day postoperative pain was significantly reduced (P <0.01). The excellent and good rates of nerve function amelioration were 93.0% and 90.7% at 3 and 12 months postoperation, respectively, which was not significantly different. Twenty-seven cases exhibited a significantly reduced protrusion area (P <0.01) at 3 months postoperation. No serious side effects were noted. To our knowledge, this is the first study to demonstrate that the use of radiofrequency combined with low-dose collagenase injection into the disc interior via an anterior cervical approach is effective and safe for the treatment of cervical intervertebral disc herniation. PMID:27336892

  14. Cervical intervertebral disc herniation treatment via radiofrequency combined with low-dose collagenase injection into the disc interior using an anterior cervical approach.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhi-Jian; Zhu, Meng-Ye; Liu, Xiao-Jian; Zhang, Xue-Xue; Zhang, Da-Ying; Wei, Jian-Mei

    2016-06-01

    This study aimed to determine the therapeutic effect of radiofrequency combined with low-dose collagenase injected into the disc interior via an anterior cervical approach for cervical intervertebral disc herniation.Forty-three patients (26-62-year old; male/female ratio: 31/12) with cervical intervertebral disc herniation received radiofrequency combined with 60 to 100 U of collagenase, injected via an anterior cervical approach. The degree of nerve function was assessed using the current Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) scoring system at 3 and 12 months postoperation. A visual analogue scale (VAS) was used to evaluate the degree of pain preoperation and 7 days postoperation. The preoperative and 3 month postoperative protrusion areas were measured and compared via magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and picture archiving and communication systems (PACS).Compared with the preoperative pain scores, the 7-day postoperative pain was significantly reduced (P <0.01). The excellent and good rates of nerve function amelioration were 93.0% and 90.7% at 3 and 12 months postoperation, respectively, which was not significantly different. Twenty-seven cases exhibited a significantly reduced protrusion area (P <0.01) at 3 months postoperation. No serious side effects were noted.To our knowledge, this is the first study to demonstrate that the use of radiofrequency combined with low-dose collagenase injection into the disc interior via an anterior cervical approach is effective and safe for the treatment of cervical intervertebral disc herniation. PMID:27336892

  15. Esophageal perforation after anterior cervical spine surgery: a systematic review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Halani, Sameer H; Baum, Griffin R; Riley, Jonathan P; Pradilla, Gustavo; Refai, Daniel; Rodts, Gerald E; Ahmad, Faiz U

    2016-09-01

    OBJECTIVE Esophageal perforation is a rare but well-known complication of anterior cervical spine surgery. The authors performed a systematic review of the literature to evaluate symptomatology, direct causes, repair methods, and associated complications of esophageal injury. METHODS A PubMed search that adhered to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines included relevant clinical studies and case reports (articles written in the English language that included humans as subjects) that reported patients who underwent anterior spinal surgery and sustained some form of esophageal perforation. Available data on clinical presentation, the surgical procedure performed, outcome measures, and other individual variables were abstracted from 1980 through 2015. RESULTS The PubMed search yielded 65 articles with 153 patients (mean age 44.7 years; range 14-85 years) who underwent anterior spinal surgery and sustained esophageal perforation, either during surgery or in a delayed fashion. The most common indications for initial anterior cervical spine surgery in these cases were vertebral fracture/dislocation (n = 77), spondylotic myelopathy (n = 15), and nucleus pulposus herniation (n = 10). The most commonly involved spinal levels were C5-6 (n = 51) and C6-7 (n = 39). The most common presenting symptoms included dysphagia (n =63), fever (n = 24), neck swelling (n = 23), and wound leakage (n = 18). The etiology of esophageal perforation included hardware failure (n = 31), hardware erosion (n = 23), and intraoperative injury (n = 14). The imaging modalities used to identify the esophageal perforations included modified contrast dye swallow studies, CT, endoscopy, plain radiography, and MRI. Esophageal repair was most commonly achieved using a modified muscle flap, as well as with primary closure. Outcomes measured in the literature were often defined by the time to oral intake following esophageal repair. Complications included

  16. Complications of Anterior Cervical Fusion using a Low-dose Recombinant Human Bone Morphogenetic Protein-2

    PubMed Central

    Kukreja, Sunil; Ahmed, Osama I; Haydel, Justin; Nanda, Anil

    2015-01-01

    Objective There are several reports, which documented a high incidence of complications following the use of recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (rhBMP-2) in anterior cervical fusions (ACFs). The objective of this study is to share our experience with low-dose rhBMP-2 in anterior cervical spine. Methods We performed a retrospective analysis of 197 patients who underwent anterior cervical fusion (ACF) with the use of recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (rhBMP-2) during 2007-2012. A low-dose rhBMP-2 (0.7mg/level) sponge was placed exclusively within the cage. In 102 patients demineralized bone matrix (DBM) was filled around the BMP sponge. Incidence and severity of dysphagia was determined by 5 points SWAL-QOL scale. Results Two patients had prolonged hospitalization due to BMP unrelated causes. Following the discharge, 13.2%(n=26) patients developed dysphagia and 8.6%(n=17) patients complained of neck swelling. More than half of the patients (52.9%, n=9) with neck swelling also had associated dysphagia; however, only 2 of these patients necessitated readmission. Both of these patients responded well to the intravenous dexamethasone. The use of DBM did not affect the incidence and severity of complications (p>0.05). Clinico-radiological evidence of fusion was not observed in 2 patients. Conclusion A low-dose rhBMP-2 in ACFs is not without risk. However, the incidence and severity of complications seem to be lower with low-dose BMP placed exclusively inside the cage. Packing DBM putty around the BMP sponge does not affect the safety profile of rhBMP-2 in ACFs. PMID:26217385

  17. Application of bioabsorbable screw fixation for anterior cervical decompression and bone grafting

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Bo; Qiu, Xiaowen; Wang, Dong; Li, Haopeng; He, Xijing

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To examine the application of bioabsorbable screws for anterior cervical decompression and bone grafting fixation and to study their clinical effects in the treatment of cervical spondylosis. METHODS: From March 2007 to September 2012, 56 patients, 36 males and 20 females (38-79 years old, average 58.3±9.47 years), underwent a novel operation. Grafts were fixed by bioabsorbable screws (PLLA, 2.7 mm in diameter) after anterior decompression. The bioabsorbable screws were inserted from the midline of the graft bone to the bone surface of the upper and lower vertebrae at 45 degree angles. Patients were evaluated post-operatively to observe the improvement of symptoms and evaluate the fusion of the bone. The Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) score was used to evaluate the recovery of neurological functions. RESULTS: All screws were successfully inserted, with no broken screws. The rate of symptom improvement was 87.5%. All of the grafts fused well with no extrusion. The average time for graft fusion was 3.8±0.55 months (range 3-5 months). Three-dimensional reconstruction of CT scans demonstrated that the grafts fused with adjacent vertebrae well and that the screws were absorbed as predicted. The MRI findings showed that the cerebrospinal fluid was unobstructed. No obvious complications appeared in any of the follow-up evaluations. CONCLUSIONS: Cervical spondylosis with one- or two-level involvement can be effectively treated by anterior decompression and bone grafting with bioabsorbable screw fixation. This operative method is safe and can avoid the complications induced by metal implants. PMID:27438565

  18. [Pharyngo-esophageal risk of surgery of the cervical spine using an anterior approach].

    PubMed

    Crampette, L; Mondain, M; Guerrier, B; Fuentes, J M; Segnarbieux, F

    1989-01-01

    The authors report six cases of pharyngo-oesophageal damage associated with fractures of the cervical spine treated by osteo-synthesis via the anterior route. These complications, not previously described, may have life threatening (especially mediastinitis) and functional consequences. They discuss the relative responsibility of: the initial trauma, which should be better defined by an initial endoscopic assessment. the surgical approach, the principles of which and its dangers and preventive aspects are discussed, early or late fixation failure justifying careful surveillance of the osteosynthesis material and in certain cases its systematic removal.

  19. Results of the biocompatible osteoconductive polymer (BOP) as an intersomatic graft in anterior cervical surgery.

    PubMed

    Ibáñez, J; Carreño, A; García-Amorena, C; Caral, J; Gastón, F; Ferrer, E

    1998-01-01

    Eighty-two patients operated on in our Department between 1989 and 1995 with an anterior cervical approach for soft and hard cervical disc herniations and cervical stenosis were included in this study. In 41 cases a heterologous intersomatic bovine graft (Surgibone) was used. Another 41 patients underwent surgery with a biocompatible osteoconductive polymer (BOP) as intervertebral graft. Both groups were retrospectively reviewed and compared with the objectives of evaluating the biodynamic behaviour of the grafts in the intersomatic space, the complications which appeared (specially those related to the grafts), the bone fusion rate achieved and the clinical outcome of the patients. The results of our study show that the BOP group presented a higher tendency to intersomatic space collapse 6 months after discectomy. There were no differences in the general surgical complications between both groups, but those related directly to the graft were significantly higher in the BOP group. The vast majority of the graft complications recorded had no clinical correlation. Without a strict radiological follow-up such complications would never have been discovered. Bone fusion in the BOP group was significantly slower and worse. Finally, the clinical outcome in both groups did not show any significant difference. PMID:10398991

  20. Anterior cervical interbody constructs: effect of a repetitive compressive force on the endplate.

    PubMed

    Ordway, Nathaniel R; Rim, Byeong Cheol; Tan, Rong; Hickman, Rebecca; Fayyazi, Amir H

    2012-04-01

    Graft subsidence following anterior cervical reconstruction can result in the loss of sagittal balance and recurring foraminal stenosis. This study examined the implant-endplate interface using a cyclic fatigue loading protocol in an attempt to model the subsidence seen in vivo. The superior endplate from 30 cervical vertebrae (C3 to T1) were harvested and biomechanically tested in axial compression with one of three implants: Fibular allograft; titanium mesh cage packed with cancellous chips; and trabecular metal. Each construct was cyclically loaded from 50 to 250 N for 10,000 cycles. Nondestructive cyclic loading of the cervical endplate-implant construct resulted in a stiffer construct independent of the type of the interbody implant tested. The trabecular metal construct demonstrated significantly more axial stability and significantly less subsidence in comparison to the titanium mesh construct. Although the allograft construct resulted in more subsidence than the trabecular metal construct, the difference was not significant and no difference was found when comparing axial stability. For all constructs, the majority of the subsidence during the cyclic testing occurred during the first 500 cycles and was followed by a more gradual settling in the remaining 9,500 cycles.

  1. Cervical Disc Arthroplasty with Prestige LP Disc Versus Anterior Cervical Discectomy and Fusion: Seven-Year Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Burkus, J. Kenneth; Shaffrey, Mark E.; Nian, Hui; Harrell, Frank E.

    2016-01-01

    Background Cervical disc arthroplasty (CDA) has emerged as an alternative to anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) for the treatment of cervical pathologies. Studies are on-going to assess the long term outcomes of CDA. This study assessed the safety and efficacy of the Prestige® LP Disc at 84-months follow up. Methods Prospective data from 280 CDA patients with single-level cervical disc disease with radiculopathy or myelopathy were compared with 265 historical control ACDF patients. Clinical and radiographic follow up was completed pre-operatively, intraoperatively, and at intervals up to 84 months. Results Follow-up rate was 75.9% for CDA and 70.0% for ACDF patients. Statistical improvements (p < 0.001) in Neck Disability Index (NDI), neck/arm pain, and SF-36 were achieved by 1.5 months in both groups and maintained through 84 months. At 84 months, 86.1% of CDA versus 80.1% of ACDF patients achieved NDI success, (≥15-point improvement over baseline). Mean NDI score improvements exceeded 30 points in both groups. SF-36 PCS/MCS mean improvements were 13.1±11.9/8.2±12.3 points for CDA and 10.7±11.8/8.3±13.6 points for ACDF. Neurological success was 92.8% for CDA and 79.7% for ACDF patients. The rate of Overall Success was 74.9% for CDA and 63.2% for ACDF. At 84 months, 17.5% of CDA and 16.6% of ACDF patients had a possibly implant- or implant-surgical procedure-related adverse event. Eighteen (6.4%) CDA and 29 (10.9%) ACDF patients had a second surgery at the index level. In CDA patients, mean angular motion at the target level was maintained at 24 (7.5°) and 84 (6.9°) months. Bridging bone was reported in 5.9%/9.5%/10.2%/13.0% of CDA patients at 24/36/60/84 months. Change in mean preoperative angulation of the adjacent segment above/below the index level was1.06±4.39/1.25±4.06 for CDA and (-0.23)±5.37/1.25±5.07 for ACDF patients. At 84 months, 90.9% of CDA and 85.6% of ACDF patients were satisfied with the results of their treatment

  2. [Anterior cervical fusion with tantalum interbody implants. Clinical and radiological results in a prospective study].

    PubMed

    Vicario, C; Lopez-Oliva, F; Sánchez-Lorente, T; Zimmermann, M; Asenjo-Siguero, J J; Ladero, F; Ibarzábal, A

    2006-04-01

    Anterior cervical discectomy and interbody fusion (ACDF) is a widely accepted surgical technique in the treatment of cervical disc disease. Tantalum cages have been recently introduced in spine surgery for interbody fusion because of the advantages of their mechanical properties. We present the results of a prospective clinical and radiological study on 24 consecutive patients who underwent an ACDF with tantalum cages. Clinical evaluation was assessed preoperatively and after surgery by a questionnaire that included a Visual Analogic Scale (VAS) of neck and arm pain, the Oswestry Disability Index and the Zung Depression Scale. Results were classified by Odom's criteria. Radiological evaluation included flexion-extension X-rays, and changes in distance between spinous processes and Cobb angle were measured. Postoperatively patients were reviewed 3 and 12 months after surgery. A statistical significative improvement in all clinical data was reported. According to Odom's criteria in 75% of patients the results were considered like excellent or good. Only one case of radiological and clinical pseudoarthrosis was confirmed. No significative differences were reported 3 and 12 months after surgery. Tantalum cages are a very promising and usefull alternative among implants available for ACDF. Compatibility with MRI postoperative studies and the unnecessariness of autograft are some of their advantages. PMID:16721480

  3. [Anterior cervical fusion with tantalum interbody implants. Clinical and radiological results in a prospective study].

    PubMed

    Vicario, C; Lopez-Oliva, F; Sánchez-Lorente, T; Zimmermann, M; Asenjo-Siguero, J J; Ladero, F; Ibarzábal, A

    2006-04-01

    Anterior cervical discectomy and interbody fusion (ACDF) is a widely accepted surgical technique in the treatment of cervical disc disease. Tantalum cages have been recently introduced in spine surgery for interbody fusion because of the advantages of their mechanical properties. We present the results of a prospective clinical and radiological study on 24 consecutive patients who underwent an ACDF with tantalum cages. Clinical evaluation was assessed preoperatively and after surgery by a questionnaire that included a Visual Analogic Scale (VAS) of neck and arm pain, the Oswestry Disability Index and the Zung Depression Scale. Results were classified by Odom's criteria. Radiological evaluation included flexion-extension X-rays, and changes in distance between spinous processes and Cobb angle were measured. Postoperatively patients were reviewed 3 and 12 months after surgery. A statistical significative improvement in all clinical data was reported. According to Odom's criteria in 75% of patients the results were considered like excellent or good. Only one case of radiological and clinical pseudoarthrosis was confirmed. No significative differences were reported 3 and 12 months after surgery. Tantalum cages are a very promising and usefull alternative among implants available for ACDF. Compatibility with MRI postoperative studies and the unnecessariness of autograft are some of their advantages.

  4. Polyetheretherketone (PEEK) cage filled with cancellous allograft in anterior cervical discectomy and fusion

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Jen-Chung; Chen, Wen-Jer; Chen, Lih-Huei

    2007-01-01

    From July 2004 to June 2005, 19 patients with 25 discs underwent anterior cervical discectomy and interbody fusion (ACDF) in which polyetheretherketone (PEEK) cages were filled with freeze-dried cancellous allograft bone. This kind of bone graft was made from femoral condyle that was harvested during total knee arthroplasty. Patient age at surgery was 52.9 (28–68) years. All patients were followed up at least 1 year. We measured the height of the disc and segmental sagittal angulation by pre-operative and post-operative radiographs. CT scan of the cervical spine at 1 year was used to evaluate fusion rates. Odom's criteria were used to assess the clinical outcome. All interbody disc spaces achieved successful union at 1-year follow-up. The use of a PEEK cage was found to increase the height of the disc immediately after surgery (5.0 mm pre-operatively, 7.3 mm immediately post-operatively). The final disc height was 6.2 mm, and the collapse of the disc height was 1.1 mm. The segmental lordosis also increased after surgery (2.0° pre-operatively, 6.6° immediately post-operatively), but the mean loss of lordosis correction was 3.3° at final follow-up. Seventy-four percent of patients (14/19) exhibited excellent/good clinical outcomes. Analysis of the results indicated the cancellous allograft bone-filled PEEK cage used in ACDF is a good choice for patients with cervical disc disease, and avoids the complications of harvesting iliac autograft. PMID:17639386

  5. Cervical Laminoplasty

    MedlinePlus

    ... Treatments for Spinal Pain Surgical Options Anterior Cervical Fusion Artificial Disc Replacement Bone Graft Alternatives Bone Morphogenetic ... Discectomy Percutaneous Vertebral Augmentation Posterior Cervical Foraminotomy Spinal Fusion ... Medicine Cervical Laminoplasty What is ...

  6. Surgical Outcome of a Zero-profile Device Comparing with Stand-alone Cage and Anterior Cervical Plate with Iliac Bone Graft in the Anterior Cervical Discectomy and Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Jae Sik; Cho, Pyoung Goo

    2014-01-01

    Objective A Zero-profile device is a cervical stand-alone cage with integrated segmental fixation device. We characteristically evaluated the radiological changes as well as clinical outcomes in the application of Zero-profile devices compared with stand-alone cages and anterior cervical plates with iliac bone grafts for the cervical disease. Methods Retrospectively, total 60 patients at least more than one year follow-up were enrolled. Twenty patients were treated with Zero-profile devices (Group A), twenty patients with stand-alone cages (Group B) and twenty patients with anterior cervical plates and iliac bone grafts (Group C) for a single level cervical disease. The clinical outcomes were evaluated by Odom's criteria and Bazaz-Yoo dysphagia index. The radiologic parameters were by subsidence and the changes of the midpoint interbody height (IBH), the segmental kyphotic angle (SKA), the overall kyphotic angle (OKA) in index level. Results Although there was no significant clinical difference according to the Odom's criteria among them(p=0.766), post-operative dysphagia was significantly decreased in the Group A and B compared with the Group C (p=0.04). From the immediate postoperative to the last follow-up time, the mean change of IBH decrement and SKA increment were significant in the Group B compared with the Group A (p=0.025, p=0.033) and the Group C (p=0.001, p=0.000). The subsidence rate was not significant among all groups (p=0.338). Conclusion This Zero-profile device is a valuable alternative to the anterior cervical discectomy and fusion with a low incidence of postoperative dysphagia and without segmental kyphotic change. PMID:25346764

  7. Effect of steroid use in anterior cervical discectomy and fusion: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Jeyamohan, Shiveindra B; Kenning, Tyler J; Petronis, Karen A; Feustel, Paul J; Drazin, Doniel; DiRisio, Darryl J

    2015-08-01

    OBJECT Anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) is an effective procedure for the treatment of cervical radiculopathy and/or myelopathy; however, postoperative dysphagia is a significant concern. Dexamethasone, although potentially protective against perioperative dysphagia and airway compromise, could inhibit fusion, a generally proinflammatory process. The authors conducted a prospective, randomized, double-blinded, controlled study of the effects of steroids on swallowing, the airway, and arthrodesis related to multilevel anterior cervical reconstruction in patients who were undergoing ACDF at Albany Medical Center between 2008 and 2012. The objective of this study was to determine if perioperative steroid use improves perioperative dysphagia and airway edema. METHODS A total of 112 patients were enrolled and randomly assigned to receive saline or dexamethasone. Data gathered included demographics, functional status (including modified Japanese Orthopaedic Association myelopathy score, neck disability index, 12-Item Short-Form Health Survey score, and patient-reported visual analog scale score of axial and radiating pain), functional outcome swallowing scale score, interval postoperative imaging, fusion status, and complications/reoperations. Follow-up was performed at 1, 3, 6, 12, and 24 months, and CT was performed 6, 12, and 24 months after surgery for fusion assessment. RESULTS Baseline demographics were not significantly different between the 2 groups, indicating adequate randomization. In terms of patient-reported functional and pain-related outcomes, there were no differences in the steroid and placebo groups. However, the severity of dysphagia in the postoperative period up to 1 month proved to be significantly lower in the steroid group than in the placebo group (p = 0.027). Furthermore, airway difficulty and a need for intubation trended toward significance in the placebo group (p = 0.057). Last, fusion rates at 6 months proved to be

  8. Effects of retractor application on cuff pressure and vocal cord function in patients undergoing anterior cervical discectomy and fusion.

    PubMed

    Garg, Rakesh; Rath, Girija P; Bithal, Parmod K; Prabhakar, Hemanshu; Marda, Manish K

    2010-07-01

    Anterior cervical discectomy and fusion is a commonly performed procedure for prolapse of cervical intervertebral disc. It involves retraction of soft tissue of neck for adequate exposure of anterior spinal canal. Increased cuff pressure with retractor application may affect the postoperative vocal cord function. Cuff pressures of tracheal tube were measured continuously in 37 patients using air-filled pressure transducer connected to the pilot balloon. Changes of pressure from baseline values were noted after application of cervical retractor. At the end of procedure, vocal cord movement was observed using fibreoptic bronchoscope. Significant increase in cuff pressure (168% of baseline values) and airway pressure of tracheal tube during cervical retraction was observed. The vocal cord function was assessed using fibreoptic laryngoscope. One patient developed right vocal cord palsy (2.7%) and two patients had postoperative hoarseness of voice (5.4%). All these complications improved over a period of time. It is suggested that the cuff of tracheal tube should be inflated to achieve 'just seal', with adequate cuff pressure monitoring. Intermittent release of cervical retraction may help to prevent laryngeal morbidities.

  9. Effects of retractor application on cuff pressure and vocal cord function in patients undergoing anterior cervical discectomy and fusion

    PubMed Central

    Garg, Rakesh; Rath, Girija P; Bithal, Parmod K; Prabhakar, Hemanshu; Marda, Manish K

    2010-01-01

    Anterior cervical discectomy and fusion is a commonly performed procedure for prolapse of cervical intervertebral disc. It involves retraction of soft tissue of neck for adequate exposure of anterior spinal canal. Increased cuff pressure with retractor application may affect the postoperative vocal cord function. Cuff pressures of tracheal tube were measured continuously in 37 patients using air-filled pressure transducer connected to the pilot balloon. Changes of pressure from baseline values were noted after application of cervical retractor. At the end of procedure, vocal cord movement was observed using fibreoptic bronchoscope. Significant increase in cuff pressure (168% of baseline values) and airway pressure of tracheal tube during cervical retraction was observed. The vocal cord function was assessed using fibreoptic laryngoscope. One patient developed right vocal cord palsy (2.7%) and two patients had postoperative hoarseness of voice (5.4%). All these complications improved over a period of time. It is suggested that the cuff of tracheal tube should be inflated to achieve ‘just seal’, with adequate cuff pressure monitoring. Intermittent release of cervical retraction may help to prevent laryngeal morbidities. PMID:20882169

  10. Bilateral posterior cervical cages provide biomechanical stability: assessment of stand-alone and supplemental fixation for anterior cervical discectomy and fusion

    PubMed Central

    Voronov, Leonard I; Siemionow, Krzysztof B; Havey, Robert M; Carandang, Gerard; Phillips, Frank M; Patwardhan, Avinash G

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Supplemental posterior instrumentation has been widely used to enhance stability and improve fusion rates in higher risk patients undergoing anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF). These typically involve posterior lateral mass or pedicle screw fixation with significant inherent risks and morbidities. More recently, cervical cages placed bilaterally between the facet joints (posterior cervical cages) have been used as a less disruptive alternative for posterior fixation. The purpose of this study was to compare the stability achieved by both posterior cages and ACDF at a single motion segment and determine the stability achieved with posterior cervical cages used as an adjunct to single- and multilevel ACDF. Methods Seven cadaveric cervical spine (C2–T1) specimens were tested in the following sequence: intact, C5–C6 bilateral posterior cages, C6–C7 plated ACDF with and without posterior cages, and C3–C5 plated ACDF with and without posterior cages. Range of motion in flexion–extension, lateral bending, and axial rotation was measured for each condition under moment loading up to ±1.5 Nm. Results All fusion constructs significantly reduced the range of motion compared to intact in flexion–extension, lateral bending, and axial rotation (P<0.05). Similar stability was achieved with bilateral posterior cages and plated ACDF at a single level. Posterior cages, when placed as an adjunct to ACDF, further reduced range of motion in both single- and multilevel constructs (P<0.05). Conclusion The biomechanical effectiveness of bilateral posterior cages in limiting cervical segmental motion is comparable to single-level plated ACDF. Furthermore, supplementation of single- and multilevel ACDF with posterior cervical cages provided a significant increase in stability and therefore may be a potential, minimally disruptive option for supplemental fixation for improving ACDF fusion rates. PMID:27471414

  11. A rare cause of dysphagia: compression of the esophagus by an anterior cervical osteophyte due to ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Albayrak, Ilknur; Bağcacı, Sinan; Sallı, Ali; Kucuksen, Sami; Uğurlu, Hatice

    2013-09-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is a chronic inflammatory rheumatological disease affecting the axial skeleton with various extra-articular complications. Dysphagia due to a giant anterior osteophyte of the cervical spine in AS is extremely rare. We present a 48-year-old male with AS suffering from progressive dysphagia to soft foods and liquids. Esophagography showed an anterior osteophyte at C5-C6 resulting in esophageal compression. The patient refused surgical resection of the osteophyte and received conservative therapy. However, after 6 months there was no improvement in dysphagia. This case illustrates that a large cervical osteophyte may be the cause of dysphagia in patients with AS and should be included in the diagnostic workup in early stages of the disease.

  12. Postoperative dysphagia correlates with increased morbidity, mortality, and costs in anterior cervical fusion.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Jacob R; Smith, Brandon W; Mummaneni, Praveen V; La Marca, Frank; Park, Paul

    2016-09-01

    Anterior cervical fusion (ACF) after discectomy and/or corpectomy is a common procedure with traditionally good patient outcomes. Though typically mild, postoperative dysphagia can result in significant patient morbidity. In this study, we examine the relationship between postoperative dysphagia and in-hospital outcomes, readmissions, and overall costs. The University HealthSystem Consortium (UHC) database was utilized to perform a retrospective cohort study of all adults who underwent a principal procedure of ACF of the anterior column (International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision [ICD-9] procedure code 81.02) between 2013 and 2015. Patients with a diagnosis of dysphagia (ICD-9 78720-78729) were compared to those without. Patient demographics, length of stay, in-hospital mortality, 30-day readmissions, and direct costs were recorded. A total of 49,300 patients who underwent ACF were identified. Mean age was 54.5years and 50.2% were male. Dysphagia was documented in 3,137 patients (6.4%) during their hospital stay. Patients with dysphagia had an average 2.1 comorbidities, while patients without dysphagia had 1.5 (p<0.01). Mean length of stay was 6.38days in patients with dysphagia, and 2.13days in those without (p<0.01). In-hospital mortality was 0.10% in patients without dysphagia, and 0.61% in those with dysphagia (p<0.01). Direct costs were $13,099 in patients without dysphagia, and $21,245 in those with dysphagia (p<0.01). Thirty-day readmission rate was 2.9% in patients without dysphagia, and 5.3% in those with dysphagia (p=0.01). In summary, dysphagia in patients who undergo ACF correlates with significantly increased length of stay, 30-day readmissions, and in-hospital mortality. Direct costs are similarly increased as a result.

  13. Recurrence of cervical myelopathy secondary to a strut graft fracture 20 years after anterior decompression and fusion: a case report.

    PubMed

    Kida, Kazunobu; Takaya, Shogo; Tadokoro, Nobuaki; Kumon, Masashi; Kiyasu, Katsuhito; Kato, Tomonari; Takemasa, Ryuichi; Ikeuchi, Masahiko; Tani, Toshikazu

    2015-08-01

    This study reports on a 70-year-old man with recurrent cervical myelopathy 20 years after anterior decompression and fusion of C4-7 using a free vascularised strut graft. The recurrent myelopathy was secondary to a kyphotic deformity of a fractured graft and residual ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament with stenosis at C3/4. Intraoperative spinal cord-evoked potentials indicated that spinal cord traction secondary to progressive kyphosis of the cervical spine after the graft fracture was the cause. The patient underwent laminoplasty at C3 and laminectomy at C4 to decompress the stenosis at C3/4 as well as posterior cervical spinal fusion at C3-7 with pedicle screws and a lateral mass screw and a bone graft to prevent further progression of the kyphosis. At postoperative 18 months, the patient's Japanese Orthopaedic Association score had improved to 14 from 8, and he could walk without support. PMID:26321562

  14. Efficacy of PEEK Cages and Plate Augmentation in Three-Level Anterior Cervical Fusion of Elderly Patients

    PubMed Central

    Song, Kyung Jin; Kim, Gyu Hyung

    2011-01-01

    Background To evaluate the clinical efficacy of three-level anterior cervical arthrodesis with polyethyletherketone (PEEK) cages and plate fixation for aged and osteoporotic patients with degenerative cervical spinal disorders. Methods Twenty one patients, who had undergone three-level anterior cervical arthrodesis with a cage and plate construct for degenerative cervical spinal disorder from November 2001 to April 2007 and were followed up for at least two years, were enrolled in this study. The mean age was 71.7 years and the mean T-score using the bone mineral density was -2.8 SD. The fusion rate, change in cervical lordosis, adjacent segment degeneration were analyzed by plain radiographs and computed tomography, and the complications were assessed by the medical records. The clinical outcomes were analyzed using the SF-36 physical composite score (PCS) and neck disability index (NDI). Results Radiological fusion was observed at a mean of 12.3 weeks (range, 10 to 15 weeks) after surgery. The average angle of cervical lordosis was 5° preoperatively, 17.6° postoperatively and 16.5° at the last follow-up. Degenerative changes in the adjacent segments occurred in 3 patients (14.3%), but revision surgery was unnecessary. In terms of instrument-related complications, there was cage subsidence in 5 patients (23.8%) with an average of 2.8 mm, and loosening of the plate and screw occurred in 3 patients (14.3%) but there were no clinical problems. The SF-36 PCS before surgery, second postoperative week and at the last follow-up was 29.5, 43.1, and 66.2, respectively. The respective NDI was 55.3, 24.6, and 15.9. Conclusions For aged and osteoporotic patients with degenerative cervical spinal disorders, three-level anterior cervical arthrodesis with PEEK cages and plate fixation reduced the pseudarthrosis and adjacent segment degeneration and improved the clinical outcomes. This method is considered to be a relatively safe and effective treatment modality. PMID:21369473

  15. Biomechanical performance of rigid compared to dynamic anterior cervical plating: analysis of adjacent upper and lower level compressive forces.

    PubMed

    Connor, David E; Shamieh, Khader Samer; Ogden, Alan L; Mukherjee, Debi P; Sin, Anthony; Nanda, Anil

    2012-12-01

    Dynamic anterior cervical plating is well established as a means of enhancing graft loading and subsequent arthrodesis. Current concerns center on the degree of adjacent-level stress induced by these systems. The aim of this study was to evaluate and compare the load transferred to adjacent levels for single-level anterior cervical discectomy and fusion utilizing rigid compared to dynamic anterior plating systems. Nine cadaveric adult human cervical spine specimens were subjected to range-of-motion testing prior to and following C5-C6 anterior cervical discectomy and fusion procedures. Interbody grafting was performed with human fibula tissue. Nondestructive biomechanical testing included flexion/extension and lateral bending loading modes. A constant displacement of 5mm was applied in each direction and the applied load was measured in newtons (N). Specimens were tested in the following order: intact, following discectomy, after rigid plating, then after dynamic plating. Adjacent level (C4-C5 [L(S)] and C6-C7 [L(I)]) compressive forces were measured using low profile load cells inserted into each disc space. The measured load values for plating systems were then normalized using values measured for the intact specimens. Mean loads transferred to L(S) and L(I) during forced flexion in specimens with rigid plating were 23.47 N and 8.76 N, respectively; while the corresponding values in specimens with dynamic plating were 18.55 N and 1.03 N, respectively. Dynamic plating yielded no significant change at L(I) and a 21.0% decrease in load at L(S) when compared with rigid plating, although the difference was not significant. The observed trend suggests that dynamic plating may diminish superior adjacent level compressive stresses.

  16. Posterior longitudinal ligament resection or preservation in anterior cervical decompression surgery.

    PubMed

    Avila, M J; Skoch, J; Sattarov, K; Abbasi Fard, S; Patel, A; Walter, C M; Baaj, A A

    2015-07-01

    We reviewed the literature to determine differences in clinical outcomes for the removal or preservation of the posterior longitudinal ligament (PLL) in anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF). The outcomes are surgeon and case-dependent for both practices. A literature review was performed in PubMed from the years 1960 to 2014 to identify studies describing surgeries where the PLL was removed or preserved during ACDF. Searches were performed using Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) and references included in the reviewed articles were also considered. Additionally we searched recent articles that cited those from the original search. The search yielded 79 articles and 115 pertinent citations. These 194 articles were reviewed for specific discussions of PLL resection or preservation. Four articles containing 122 patients were included in the final analysis. In 69 patients the PLL was removed and in 53 the PLL was preserved. Both groups improved in clinical scores during follow up. One patient in the PLL removal group had a cerebrospinal fluid leak. MRI and correlative outcome data suggest that a non-ossified PLL itself does not contribute to significant cord compression. Postoperative MRI of patients with the PLL removed showed a larger spinal cord diameter. Resection of the PLL is safe and common in ACDF surgery but there does not appear to be a demonstrable clinical difference in patients where it is resected. The ultimate decision is likely surgeon and case-dependent. Randomized trials could further determine the importance of PLL removal in ACDF treated patients.

  17. Radiologic Changes of Operated and Adjacent Segments after Anterior Cervical Microforaminotomy

    PubMed Central

    Ahn, Jang Ho; Park, Moon Sun; Kim, Seong Min; Chung, Seung Young; Lee, Do Sung

    2016-01-01

    Objective Anterior cervical microforaminotomy (ACMF) is a motion-preserving surgical procedure. The purpose of this study is to assess radiologic changes of operated and adjacent segments after ACMF. Methods We retrospectively reviewed 52 patients who underwent ACMF between 1998 and 2008. From X-ray film-based changes, disc height and sagittal range of motion (ROM) of operated and adjacent segments were compared at preoperative and last follow-up periods. Radiological degeneration of both segments was analyzed as well. Results The mean follow-up period was 48.2 months. There were 78 operated, 52 upper adjacent, and 38 lower adjacent segments. There were statistically significant differences in the ROM and disc height of operated segment between preoperative and last follow-up periods. However, there were no statistically significant differences in the ROM and disc height of adjacent segment between both periods. Radiological degenerative changes of operated segments were observed in 30%. That of adjacent segments was observed in 11 and 11% at upper and lower segments, respectively. Conclusion After mean 4-year follow-up periods, there were degenerative changes of operated segments. However, ACMF preserved motion and prevented degenerative changes of adjacent segments. PMID:27799993

  18. Long-term results of anterior cervical corpectomy and fusion with nano-hydroxyapatite/polyamide 66 strut for cervical spondylotic myelopathy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yuan; Deng, Xu; Jiang, Dianming; Luo, Xiaoji; Tang, Ke; Zhao, Zenghui; Zhong, Weiyang; Lei, Tao; Quan, Zhengxue

    2016-05-01

    To assess the long-term clinical and radiographic outcomes of anterior cervical corpectomy and fusion (ACCF) with a neotype nano-hydroxyapatite/polyamide 66 (n-HA/PA66) strut in the treatment of cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM). Fifty patients with CSM who underwent 1- or 2-level ACCF with n-HA/PA66 struts were retrospectively investigated. With a mean follow-up of 79.6 months, the overall mean JOA score, VAS and cervical alignment were improved significantly. At last follow-up, the fusion rate was 98%, and the subsidence rate of the n-HA/PA66 strut was 8%. The “radiolucent gap” at the interface between the n-HA/PA66 strut and the vertebra was further noted to evaluate the osteoconductivity and osseointegration of the strut, and the incidence of it was 62% at the last follow-up. Three patients suffered symptomatic adjacent segment degeneration (ASD). No significant difference was detected in the outcomes between 1- and 2-level corpectomy at follow-ups. In conclusion, the satisfactory outcomes in this study indicated that the n-HA/PA66 strut was an effective graft for cervical reconstruction. Moreover, the osteoconductivity and osseointegration of the strut is still need to be optimized for future clinical application owing to the notably presence of “radiolucent gap” in present study.

  19. Long-term results of anterior cervical corpectomy and fusion with nano-hydroxyapatite/polyamide 66 strut for cervical spondylotic myelopathy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuan; Deng, Xu; Jiang, Dianming; Luo, Xiaoji; Tang, Ke; Zhao, Zenghui; Zhong, Weiyang; Lei, Tao; Quan, Zhengxue

    2016-01-01

    To assess the long-term clinical and radiographic outcomes of anterior cervical corpectomy and fusion (ACCF) with a neotype nano-hydroxyapatite/polyamide 66 (n-HA/PA66) strut in the treatment of cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM). Fifty patients with CSM who underwent 1- or 2-level ACCF with n-HA/PA66 struts were retrospectively investigated. With a mean follow-up of 79.6 months, the overall mean JOA score, VAS and cervical alignment were improved significantly. At last follow-up, the fusion rate was 98%, and the subsidence rate of the n-HA/PA66 strut was 8%. The "radiolucent gap" at the interface between the n-HA/PA66 strut and the vertebra was further noted to evaluate the osteoconductivity and osseointegration of the strut, and the incidence of it was 62% at the last follow-up. Three patients suffered symptomatic adjacent segment degeneration (ASD). No significant difference was detected in the outcomes between 1- and 2-level corpectomy at follow-ups. In conclusion, the satisfactory outcomes in this study indicated that the n-HA/PA66 strut was an effective graft for cervical reconstruction. Moreover, the osteoconductivity and osseointegration of the strut is still need to be optimized for future clinical application owing to the notably presence of "radiolucent gap" in present study. PMID:27225189

  20. Long-term results of anterior cervical corpectomy and fusion with nano-hydroxyapatite/polyamide 66 strut for cervical spondylotic myelopathy

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yuan; Deng, Xu; Jiang, Dianming; Luo, Xiaoji; Tang, Ke; Zhao, Zenghui; Zhong, Weiyang; Lei, Tao; Quan, Zhengxue

    2016-01-01

    To assess the long-term clinical and radiographic outcomes of anterior cervical corpectomy and fusion (ACCF) with a neotype nano-hydroxyapatite/polyamide 66 (n-HA/PA66) strut in the treatment of cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM). Fifty patients with CSM who underwent 1- or 2-level ACCF with n-HA/PA66 struts were retrospectively investigated. With a mean follow-up of 79.6 months, the overall mean JOA score, VAS and cervical alignment were improved significantly. At last follow-up, the fusion rate was 98%, and the subsidence rate of the n-HA/PA66 strut was 8%. The “radiolucent gap” at the interface between the n-HA/PA66 strut and the vertebra was further noted to evaluate the osteoconductivity and osseointegration of the strut, and the incidence of it was 62% at the last follow-up. Three patients suffered symptomatic adjacent segment degeneration (ASD). No significant difference was detected in the outcomes between 1- and 2-level corpectomy at follow-ups. In conclusion, the satisfactory outcomes in this study indicated that the n-HA/PA66 strut was an effective graft for cervical reconstruction. Moreover, the osteoconductivity and osseointegration of the strut is still need to be optimized for future clinical application owing to the notably presence of “radiolucent gap” in present study. PMID:27225189

  1. Locally aggressive aneurysmal bone cyst of C4 vertebra treated by total en bloc excision and anterior plus posterior cervical instrumentation

    PubMed Central

    Parmar, Himanshu N.; Agrawal, Vinod A.; Shah, Munjal S.; Nanda, Saurav N.

    2015-01-01

    We are presenting a case of cervical (C4) aneurysmal bone cyst in a 13-year-old girl, came to the outpatient department with neck pain and stiffness since 6 months and normal neurology. We did an en bloc excision of locally aggressive tumor through anterior plus posterior approach and stabilization by lateral mass screw fixation and anterior cervical instrumentation. Involvement of several adjacent cervical vertebrae by an aneurysmal bone cyst is rare, and conventional treatment with curettage and bone grafting is most likely to carry a high rate of recurrence and spinal instability. We recommend complete excision of the tumor and instrumentation in a single stage to avoid instability. PMID:26288549

  2. Outcomes of contemporary use of rectangular titanium stand-alone cages in anterior cervical discectomy and fusion: cage subsidence and cervical alignment.

    PubMed

    Yamagata, Toru; Takami, Toshihiro; Uda, Takehiro; Ikeda, Hidetoshi; Nagata, Takashi; Sakamoto, Shinichi; Tsuyuguchi, Naohiro; Ohata, Kenji

    2012-12-01

    Cervical intervertebral disc replacement using a rectangular titanium stand-alone cage has become a standard procedure for anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF). We examined outcomes resulting from the contemporary use of rectangular titanium stand-alone cages for ACDF, particularly focusing on cage subsidence and subsequent kyphotic malalignment. Patient data were collected prospectively, and a total of 47 consecutive patients who underwent periodic follow-up of at least 1 year's duration after ACDF were studied retrospectively. Sixty-three rectangular titanium cages were implanted during 31 1-level and 16 2-level procedures. None of the patients developed surgery-related complications (including cage displacement or extrusion). Mean Neurosurgical Cervical Spine Scale scores were significantly improved at 1 year after surgery. Twelve of the 63 inserted cages (19.0%) were found to have cage subsidence, occurring in 11 of 47 patients (23.4%). There was no significant difference in functional recovery between patients with and without cage subsidence. Logistic regression analysis indicated that fusion level, cage size and cage position were significantly related to cage subsidence. The distraction ratio among patients with cage subsidence was significantly higher than that among patients without cage subsidence. Cage subsidence resulted in early deterioration of local angle and total alignment of the cervical spine. Although a longer follow-up is warranted, a good surgical outcome with negligible complications appears to justify the use of rectangular titanium stand-alone cages in 1- and 2-level ACDF. Excessive distraction at the fusion level should be avoided, and cage position should be adjusted to the anterior vertical line.

  3. Prospective, Randomized Comparison of One-level Mobi-C Cervical Total Disc Replacement vs. Anterior Cervical Discectomy and Fusion: Results at 5-year Follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Zigler, Jack E.; Jackson, Robert; Nunley, Pierce D.; Bae, Hyun W.; Kim, Kee D.; Ohnmeiss, Donna D.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction There is increasing interest in the role of cervical total disc replacement (TDR) as an alternative to anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF). Multiple prospective randomized studies with minimum 2 year follow-up have shown TDR to be at least as safe and effective as ACDF in treating symptomatic degenerative disc disease at a single level. The purpose of this study was to compare outcomes of cervical TDR using the Mobi-C® with ACDF at 5-year follow-up. Methods This prospective, randomized, controlled trial was conducted as a Food and Drug Administration regulated Investigational Device Exemption trial across 23 centers with 245 patients randomized (2:1) to receive TDR with Mobi-C® Cervical Disc Prosthesis or ACDF with anterior plate and allograft. Outcome assessments included a composite overall success score, Neck Disability Index (NDI), visual analog scales (VAS) assessing neck and arm pain, Short Form-12 (SF-12) health survey, patient satisfaction, major complications, subsequent surgery, segmental range of motion, and adjacent segment degeneration. Results The 60-month follow-up rate was 85.5% for the TDR group and 78.9% for the ACDF group. The composite overall success was 61.9% with TDR vs. 52.2% with ACDF, demonstrating statistical non-inferiority. Improvements in NDI, VAS neck and arm pain, and SF-12 scores were similar between groups and were maintained from earlier follow-up through 60 months. There was no significant difference between TDR and ACDF in adverse events or major complications. Range of motion was maintained with TDR through 60 months. Device-related subsequent surgeries (TDR: 3.0%, ACDF: 11.1%, p<0.02) and adjacent segment degeneration at the superior level (TDR: 37.1%, ACDF: 54.7%, p<0.03) were significantly lower for TDR patients. Conclusions Five-year results demonstrate the safety and efficacy of TDR with the Mobi-C as a viable alternative to ACDF with the potential advantage of lower rates of reoperation and

  4. Comparative Analysis of Cervical Arthroplasty Using Mobi-C® and Anterior Cervical Discectomy and Fusion Using the Solis® -Cage

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jin Hoon; Roh, Kwang Ho; Cho, Ji Young; Ra, Young Shin; Rhim, Seung Chul

    2008-01-01

    Objective Although anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) is the standard treatment for degenerative cervical disc disease, concerns regarding adjacent level degeneration and loss of motion have suggested that arthroplasty may be a better alternative. We have compared clinical and radiological results in patients with cervical disc herniations treated with arthroplasty and ACDF. Methods We evaluated 53 patients treated for cervical disc herniations with radiculopathy, 21 of whom underwent arthroplasty and 32 of whom underwent ACDF. Clinical results included the Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) score for upper extremity radiculopathy, neck disability index (NDI), duration of hospital stay and convalescence time. All patients were assessed radiologically by measuring cervical lordosis, segmental lordosis and segmental range-of-movement (ROM) of operated and adjacent disc levels. Results Mean hospital stay (5.62 vs. 6.26 days, p<0.05) and interval between surgery and return to work (1.10 vs. 2.92 weeks, p<0.05) were significantly shorter in the arthroplasty than in the fusion group. Mean NDI and extremity VAS score improved after 12 months in both groups. Although it was not significant, segmental ROM of adjacent levels was higher in the fusion group than in the arthroplasty group. And, segmental motion of operated levels in arthroplasty group maintained more than preoperative value at last follow up. Conclusion Although clinical results were similar in the two groups, postoperative recovery was significantly shorter in the arthroplasty group. Although it was not significant, ROM of adjacent segments was less in the arthroplasty group. Motion of operated levels in arthroplasty group was preserved at last follow up. PMID:19096680

  5. Anterior cervical corpectomy: review and comparison of results using titanium mesh cages and carbon fibre reinforced polymer cages.

    PubMed

    Kabir, Syed M R; Alabi, J; Rezajooi, Kia; Casey, Adrian T H

    2010-10-01

    Different types of cages have recently become available for reconstruction following anterior cervical corpectomy. We review the results using titanium mesh cages (TMC) and stackable CFRP (carbon fibre reinforced polymer) cages. Forty-two patients who underwent anterior cervical corpectomy between November 2001 and September 2008 were retrospectively reviewed. Pathologies included cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM), cervical radiculopathy, OPLL (ossified posterior longitudinal ligament), metastasis/primary bone tumour, rheumatoid arthritis and deformity correction. All patients were evaluated clinically and radiologically. Outcome was assessed on the basis of the Odom's criteria, neck disability index (NDI) and myelopathy disability index (MDI). Mean age was 60 years and mean follow-up was 1½ years. Majority of the patients had single-level corpectomy. Twenty-three patients had TMC cages while 19 patients had CFRP cages. The mean subsidence noted with TMC cage was 1.91 mm, while with the stackable CFRP cage it was 0.5 mm. This difference was statistically significant (p < 0.05). However, there was no statistically significant correlation noted between subsidence and clinical outcome (p > 0.05) or between subsidence and post-operative sagittal alignment (p > 0.05) in either of the groups. Three patients had significant subsidence (> 3 mm), one of whom was symptomatic. There were no hardware-related complications. On the basis of the Odom's criterion, 9 patients (21.4%) had an excellent outcome, 14 patients (33.3%) had a good outcome, 9 patients (21.4%) had a fair outcome and 5 patients (11.9%) had a poor outcome, i.e. symptoms and signs unchanged or exacerbated. Mean post-operative NDI was 26.27% and mean post-operative MDI was 19.31%. Fusion was noted in all 42 cases. Both TMC and stackable CFRP cages provide solid anterior column reconstruction with good outcome following anterior cervical corpectomy. However, more subsidence is noted with TMC cages though

  6. A microsurgical anterior cervical approach and the immediate impact of mechanical retractors: A case control study

    PubMed Central

    Ramos-Zúñiga, Rodrigo; Díaz-Guzmán, Laura Rocío; Velasquez, Shannen; Macías-Ornelas, Ana Magdalena; Rodríguez-Vázquez, Martín

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: A microsurgical anterior cervical approach with discectomy and fusion (MACDF) is one of the most widely used procedures for treating radicular disorders. This approach is highly successful; however, it is not free from complications. These can be associated with soft tissue injuries. Aim of the Study: The recognition of the risks for these complications should be identified for timely prevention and safe treatment. Materials and Methods: Study Design: Retrospective case control study. This study includes a retrospective case series of 37 patients, paying special attention to immediate complications related to the use of mechanical retraction of soft tissue (dysphagia, dysphonia, esophageal lesions and local hematoma); and a comparative analysis of the outcomes after changes in the retraction method. Results: All selected cases had a positive neurological symptom response in relation to neuropathic pain. Dysphagia and dysphonia were found during the first 72 h in 94.1% of the cases in which automatic mechanical retraction was used for more than one hour during the surgical procedure. A radical change was noted in the reduction of the symptoms after the use of only manual protective blades without automatic mechanical retraction: 5.1% dysphagia and 0% dysphonia in the immediate post-operative period, P = 0.001. Conclusions: Soft tissue damage due to the use of automatic retractors in MACDF is not minor and leads to general discomfort in the patient in spite of good neurological results. These problems most often occur when automatic retractors are used continuously for more than 1 hour, as well as when they are used in multiple levels. Dysphagia, dysphonia and local pain decreased with the use of transient manual blades for retraction, and with intermittent release following minimally invasive principles. PMID:26167011

  7. Anterior cervical discectomy and fusion: Comparison of titanium and polyetheretherketone cages

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Titanium (TTN) cages have a higher modulus of elasticity when compared with polyetheretherketone (PEEK) cages. This suggests that TTN-cages could show more frequent cage subsidence after anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) and therefore might lead to a higher loss of correction. We compared the long term results of stand-alone PEEK- and TTN-cages in a comparable patient collective that was operated under identical operative settings. Methods From 2002 to 2007 154 patients underwent single-level ACDF for degenerative disc disease (DDD). Clinical and radiological outcome were assessed in 86 eligible patients after a mean of 28.4 months. 44 patients received a TTN- and 42 patients a PEEK-cage. Results Solid arthrodesis was found in 93.2% of the TTN-group and 88.1% of the PEEK-group. Cage subsidence was observed in 20.5% of the TTN- and 14.3% of the PEEK-group. A significant segmental lordotic correction was achieved by both cage-types. Even though a loss of correction was found at the last follow-up in both groups, it did not reach the level of statistical significance. Statistical analysis of these results revealed no differences between the TTN- and PEEK-group. When assessed with the neck disability index (NDI), the visual analogue scale (VAS) of neck and arm pain and Odom’s criteria the clinical data showed no significant differences between the groups. Conclusions Clinical and radiological outcomes of ACDF with TTN- or PEEK-cages do not appear to be influenced by the chosen synthetic graft. The modulus of elasticity represents only one of many physical properties of a cage. Design, shape, size, surface architecture of a cage as well as bone density, endplate preparation and applied distraction during surgery need to be considered as further important factors. PMID:22978810

  8. Iliac crest autograft versus alternative constructs for anterior cervical spine surgery: Pros, cons, and costs

    PubMed Central

    Epstein, Nancy E.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Grafting choices available for performing anterior cervical diskectomy/fusion (ACDF) procedures have become a major concern for spinal surgeons, and their institutions. The “gold standard”, iliac crest autograft, may still be the best and least expensive grafting option; it deserves to be reassessed along with the pros, cons, and costs for alternative grafts/spacers. Methods: Although single or multilevel ACDF have utilized iliac crest autograft for decades, the implant industry now offers multiple alternative grafting and spacer devices; (allografts, cages, polyether-etherketone (PEEK) amongst others). While most studies have focused on fusion rates and clinical outcomes following ACDF, few have analyzed the “value-added” of these various constructs (e.g. safety/efficacy, risks/complications, costs). Results: The majority of studies document 95%-100% fusion rates when iliac crest autograft is utilized to perform single level ACDF (X-ray or CT confirmed at 6-12 postoperative months). Although many allograft studies similarly quote 90%-100% fusion rates (X-ray alone confirmed at 6-12 postoperative months), a recent “post hoc analysis of data from a prospective multicenter trial” (Riew KD et. al., CSRS Abstract Dec. 2011; unpublished) revealed a much higher delayed fusion rate using allografts at one year 55.7%, 2 years 87%, and four years 92%. Conclusion: Iliac crest autograft utilized for single or multilevel ACDF is associated with the highest fusion, lowest complication rates, and significantly lower costs compared with allograft, cages, PEEK, or other grafts. As spinal surgeons and institutions become more cost conscious, we will have to account for the “value added” of these increasingly expensive graft constructs. PMID:22905321

  9. Polyetheretherketone (PEEK) Spacers for Anterior Cervical Fusion: A Retrospective Comparative Effectiveness Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Lemcke, Johannes; Al-Zain, Ferass; Meier, Ullrich; Suess, Olaf

    2011-01-01

    Background: Anterior cervical decompression and fusion (ACDF) is the standard surgical treatment for radiculopathy and myelopathy. Polyetheretherketone (PEEK) has an elasticity similar to bone and thus appears well suited for use as the implant in ACDF procedures. The aim of this study is to examine the clinical and radiographic outcome of patients treated with standing alone PEEK spacers without bone morphogenic protein (BMP) or plating and to examine the influence of the different design of the two spacers on the rate of subsidence and dislocation. Methods: This retrospective comparative study reviewed 335 patients treated by ACDF in a specialized urban hospital for radiculopathy or myelopathy due to degenerative pathologies. The Intromed PEEK spacer was used in 181 patients from 3/2002 to 11/2004, and the AMT SHELL spacer was implanted in 154 patients from 4/2004 to 12/2007. The follow-up rate was 100% at three months post-op and 82.7% (277 patients) at one year. The patients were assessed with the Japanese Orthopedic Association (JOA) questionnaire and radiographically. Results: At the one-year follow-up there were 118/277 patients with an excellent clinical outcome on the JOA, 112/277 with a good outcome, 20/277 with a fair outcome, and 27/277 with a poor outcome. Subsidence was observed in 13.3% of patients with the Intromed spacer vs 8.4% of the patients with the AMT SHELL. Dislocation of the spacer was observed in 10 of the 181 patients with Intromed spacers but in none of the 154 patients with Shell spacers. Conclusion: The study demonstrates that ACDF with standing alone PEEK cages leads to excellent and good clinical outcomes. The differences we observed in the subsidence rate between the two spacers were not significant and cannot be related to a single design feature of the spacers. PMID:22016753

  10. Anterior cervical discectomy and fusion with titanium cages for simple or multilevel herniated discs and spur of the cervical spine: Report of 2 cases and experience in Bali

    PubMed Central

    Mahadewa Tjokorda, G. B.; Nyoman, Golden; Sri, Maliawan; Junichi, Mizuno

    2016-01-01

    This report presents two cases of cervicobrachialgia and radiculopathy due to multiple cervical herniated discs and spur formation that dealt with anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) using different titanium interbody cages. The description of the clinical presentation, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) appearances and management strategy are discussed. Both cases showed chronic neck pain and radiating pain from the shoulder to the arm. They had a history of blurry vision, cluster head ache, weakness, and numbness on the shoulder for 2 years. MRI revealed multiple herniated discs between C4-7 and accompanied by the spur formation leading to the narrowness of the spinal canal and its foramina bilaterally. ACDF were performed and complete decompression of the spinal canal and its foramina were carried out. Twin M-cages (Ammtec Inc.-Japan) were placed in the first case at C5-7 levels and single cage of Smith Robinson (SR) was placed in the second case at C5-6 levels. There were no more blurry vision, cluster headache, weakness, and numbness, immediately after surgery. To our knowledge, this is the first reported cases of ACDF, using twin M-cages and single SR cage in Indonesia, with improvement immediately after surgery. Cervical spondylosis can present with cervicobrachialgia and radiculopathy and surgical treatment produces good functional outcome.

  11. Anterior cervical discectomy and fusion with titanium cages for simple or multilevel herniated discs and spur of the cervical spine: Report of 2 cases and experience in Bali

    PubMed Central

    Mahadewa Tjokorda, G. B.; Nyoman, Golden; Sri, Maliawan; Junichi, Mizuno

    2016-01-01

    This report presents two cases of cervicobrachialgia and radiculopathy due to multiple cervical herniated discs and spur formation that dealt with anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) using different titanium interbody cages. The description of the clinical presentation, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) appearances and management strategy are discussed. Both cases showed chronic neck pain and radiating pain from the shoulder to the arm. They had a history of blurry vision, cluster head ache, weakness, and numbness on the shoulder for 2 years. MRI revealed multiple herniated discs between C4-7 and accompanied by the spur formation leading to the narrowness of the spinal canal and its foramina bilaterally. ACDF were performed and complete decompression of the spinal canal and its foramina were carried out. Twin M-cages (Ammtec Inc.-Japan) were placed in the first case at C5-7 levels and single cage of Smith Robinson (SR) was placed in the second case at C5-6 levels. There were no more blurry vision, cluster headache, weakness, and numbness, immediately after surgery. To our knowledge, this is the first reported cases of ACDF, using twin M-cages and single SR cage in Indonesia, with improvement immediately after surgery. Cervical spondylosis can present with cervicobrachialgia and radiculopathy and surgical treatment produces good functional outcome. PMID:27695567

  12. Dysphagia, short-term outcomes, and cost of care after anterior cervical disc surgery.

    PubMed

    Starmer, Heather M; Riley, Lee H; Hillel, Alexander T; Akst, Lee M; Best, Simon R A; Gourin, Christine G

    2014-02-01

    Dysphonia and dysphagia are common complications of anterior cervical discectomy (ACD). We sought to determine the relationship between dysphagia and in-hospital mortality, complications, speech therapy/dysphagia training, length of hospitalization, and costs associated with ACD. Discharge data from the Nationwide Inpatient Sample for 1,649,871 patients who underwent ACD of fewer than four vertebrae for benign acquired disease between 2001 and 2010 were analyzed using cross-tabulations and multivariate regression modeling. Dysphagia was reported in 32,922 cases (2.0 %). Speech therapy/dysphagia training was reported in less than 0.1 % of all cases and in only 0.2 % of patients with dysphagia. Dysphagia was significantly associated with age ≥65 years (OR = 1.5 [95 % CI 1.4-1.7], P < 0.001), advanced comorbidity (OR = 2.3 [2.0-2.6], P < 0.001), revision surgery (OR = 2.7 [2.3-3.1], P < 0.001), disc prosthesis placement (OR = 1.5 [1.0-2.0], P = 0.029), and vocal cord paralysis (OR = 11.6 [8.3-16.1], P < 0.001). Dysphagia was a significant predictor of aspiration pneumonia (OR = 8.6 [6.7-10.9], P < 0.001), tracheostomy (OR = 2.3 [1.6-3.3], P < 0.001), gastrostomy (OR = 30.9 [25.3-37.8], P < 0.001), and speech therapy/dysphagia training (OR = 32.0 [15.4-66.4], P < 0.001). Aspiration pneumonia was significantly associated with in-hospital mortality (OR = 15.9 [11.0-23.1], P < 0.001). Dysphagia, vocal cord paralysis, and aspiration pneumonia were significant predictors of increased length of hospitalization and hospital-related costs, with aspiration pneumonia having the single largest impact on length of hospitalization and costs. Dysphagia is significantly associated with increased morbidity, length of hospitalization, and hospital-related costs in ACD patients. Despite the known risk of dysphagia in ACD patients and an established role for the speech-language pathologist in dysphagia management, speech-language pathology

  13. Mid- to Long-Term Outcomes of Cervical Disc Arthroplasty versus Anterior Cervical Discectomy and Fusion for Treatment of Symptomatic Cervical Disc Disease: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis of Eight Prospective Randomized Controlled Trials

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Yan; Lv, Guohua; Ren, Siying; Johansen, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Purpose This study aimed to investigate the mid- to long-term outcomes of cervical disc arthroplasty (CDA) versus anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) for the treatment of 1-level or 2-level symptomatic cervical disc disease. Methods Medline, Embase, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials databases were searched to identify relevant randomized controlled trials that reported mid- to long-term outcomes (at least 48 months) of CDA versus ACDF. All data were analyzed by Review Manager 5.3 software. The relative risk (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated for dichotomous variables. The weighted mean difference (WMD) and 95%CIs were calculated for continuous variables. A random effect model was used for heterogeneous data; otherwise, a fixed effect model was used. Results Eight prospective randomized controlled trials (RCTs) were retrieved in this meta-analysis, including 1317 and 1051 patients in CDA and ACDF groups, respectively. Patients after an ACDF had a significantly lower rate of follow-up than that after CDA. Pooled analysis showed patients in CDA group achieved significantly higher rates of overall success, Neck Disability Index (NDI) success, neurological success and significantly lower rates of implant/surgery-related serious adverse events and secondary procedure compared with that in ACDF group. The long-term functional outcomes (NDI, Visual Analog Scale (VAS) neck and arm pain scores, the Short Form 36 Health Survey physical component score (SF-36 PCS)), patient satisfaction and recommendation, and the incidence of superior adjacent segment degeneration also favored patients in CDA group with statistical difference. Regarding inferior adjacent segment degeneration, patients in CDA group had a lower rate without statistical significance. Conclusions This meta-analysis showed that cervical disc arthroplasty was superior over anterior discectomy and fusion for the treatment of symptomatic cervical disc disease in

  14. Anterior Cervical Discectomy and Fusion with Stand-Alone Trabecular Metal Cages as a Surgical Treatment for Cervical Radiculopathy: Mid-Term Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    ElAbed, Khaldoun; Shawky, Ahmad; Ainscow, Donald

    2016-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective case cohort study done between 2002 and 2012. Purpose To assess the mid-term clinical and radiological outcomes of 1-level and 2-level anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) with stand-alone trabecular metal cages. Overview of Literature ACDF is the gold standard surgical treatment for cervical degenerative disease. The usual surgical practice is to use an anteriorly placed fusion plate with or without interdiscal cages. Methods Patients between 36 and 64 years of age diagnosed with cervical radiculopathy who underwent ACDF using stand-alone trabecular metal cages with at least 3 years follow-up were included in this study. Recorded clinical outcomes included residual axial neck pain, radicular arm pain, upper extremity weakness, and upper extremity altered sensation. Visual Analogue scores were also recorded. Fusion was assessed by lateral radiographs looking for bone breaching and radiolucent lines around the device at the latest follow-up. Results Ninety patients were included in the study. Fifty-one patients underwent 2-level surgery and 39 patients underwent 1-level surgery. Mean age was 44±10.4 years and mean follow-up time was 4.5±2.6 years. Patients reported excellent or good outcomes (90%), as well as improvements in axial neck pain (80%), radicular arm pain (95%), upper extremity weakness (85%), and upper extremity altered sensation (90%). Most patients (90%) progressed to fusion at the 1-year follow-up. The reoperation rate was 3.6%. There was no reported persistent dysphagia, voice complaints, dural tear, or tracheal or oesophageal perforation in any of the patients. One patient developed a deep methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infectious infarction of the spinal cord, which was treated with antibiotics. Recovery was complete at the 1-year follow up. Conclusions Mid-term results show that surgical treatment with ACDF with trabecular metal cages is a safe and effective treatment of single and 2-level

  15. Difference in canal encroachment by the fusion mass between anterior cervical discectomy and fusion with bone autograft and anterior plating, and stand-alone cage.

    PubMed

    Lee, Soo Eon; Chung, Chun Kee; Kim, Chi Heon

    2016-07-01

    We conducted a prospective randomized study comparing stand-alone cage and bone autograft and plate implants in anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (www.clinicaltrials.gov, NCT01011569). Our interim analysis showed autologous bone graft with plating was superior to a stand-alone cage for segmental lordosis. During this analysis, we noted a difference in canal encroachment by the fusion mass between the two fusion groups. A narrow cervical spinal canal is an important factor in the development of cervical spondylotic myelopathy, therefore this unexpected potential risk of spinal cord compression necessitated another interim analysis to investigate whether there was a difference in canal encroachment by the fusion mass between the two groups. Patients had a minimum 1year of follow-up. The Neck Disability Index, neck and arm pain Visual Analog Scales and lateral radiographs, including bone fusion patterns, were evaluated. Twenty-seven (16 males, 11 females, mean age 54.8years) and 31 (24 males, seven females, mean age 54.5years) patients were in the cage and plate group, respectively. Both groups improved after surgery. Fusion began at 2.6months and 1.3months and finished at 6.7months and 4.0months in 24 (88.9%) and 28 (90.3%) patients in the cage and plate group, respectively. Encroachment into the spinal canal by the fusion mass was significantly different between the fusion types, occuring in 21 (77.8%) patients in the cage group versus six (19.4%) in the plate group (p=0.003). There was a high incidence of spinal canal encroachment by the fusion mass in the stand-alone cage group, possibly limiting use in narrow spinal canals.

  16. Management of subaxial cervical instability in very young or small-for-age children using a static single-screw anterior cervical plate: indications, results, and long-term follow-up.

    PubMed

    Garber, Sarah T; Brockmeyer, Douglas L

    2016-06-01

    OBJECTIVE Subaxial cervical instability in very young or small-for-age children is uncommon and typically arises from trauma or skeletal dysplasia. Various operative techniques have been used to achieve stabilization in pediatric patients with evidence of instability, including anterior, posterior, and combined approaches. In this study, the authors report their results with subaxial cervical instability in this patient population treated using a static single-screw anterior cervical plate (ACP) system and allograft fusion. METHODS In a retrospective chart review, the authors identified all patients 6 years of age or younger who underwent an anterior cervical fusion procedure using a static single-screw ACP system either as a stand-alone construct or as part of an anterior-posterior stabilization procedure. Reasons for fusion included trauma, tumor, and congenital anomalies. RESULTS Five patients 6 years of age or younger underwent anterior cervical fusion using a static single-screw system during the 19-year study period. Follow-up ranged from 12 to 51 months (mean 26.8 months). Two patients underwent repeat surgery, one 7 days after and the other 21 months after their initial procedure. At last follow-up, a mean vertical growth of 22.8% was seen across the fused segments, with no evidence of kyphotic or lordotic abnormalities. CONCLUSIONS In very young or small-for-age children, the use of a static single-screw ACP system appears to be a safe and effective option to manage subaxial cervical instability. Bony fusion and continued longitudinal growth occur within the fused segments, with no evidence of long-term cervical malalignment.

  17. Management of subaxial cervical instability in very young or small-for-age children using a static single-screw anterior cervical plate: indications, results, and long-term follow-up.

    PubMed

    Garber, Sarah T; Brockmeyer, Douglas L

    2016-06-01

    OBJECTIVE Subaxial cervical instability in very young or small-for-age children is uncommon and typically arises from trauma or skeletal dysplasia. Various operative techniques have been used to achieve stabilization in pediatric patients with evidence of instability, including anterior, posterior, and combined approaches. In this study, the authors report their results with subaxial cervical instability in this patient population treated using a static single-screw anterior cervical plate (ACP) system and allograft fusion. METHODS In a retrospective chart review, the authors identified all patients 6 years of age or younger who underwent an anterior cervical fusion procedure using a static single-screw ACP system either as a stand-alone construct or as part of an anterior-posterior stabilization procedure. Reasons for fusion included trauma, tumor, and congenital anomalies. RESULTS Five patients 6 years of age or younger underwent anterior cervical fusion using a static single-screw system during the 19-year study period. Follow-up ranged from 12 to 51 months (mean 26.8 months). Two patients underwent repeat surgery, one 7 days after and the other 21 months after their initial procedure. At last follow-up, a mean vertical growth of 22.8% was seen across the fused segments, with no evidence of kyphotic or lordotic abnormalities. CONCLUSIONS In very young or small-for-age children, the use of a static single-screw ACP system appears to be a safe and effective option to manage subaxial cervical instability. Bony fusion and continued longitudinal growth occur within the fused segments, with no evidence of long-term cervical malalignment. PMID:26895532

  18. An Outcome Study of Anterior Cervical Discectomy and Fusion among Iranian Population

    PubMed Central

    Haghnegahdar, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aim. First-line treatment strategy for managing cervical disc herniation is conservative measures. In some cases, surgery is indicated either due to signs/symptoms of severe/progressive neurological deficits, or because of persistence of radicular pain despite 12 weeks of conservative treatment. Success for treatment of cervical disc herniation using ACDF has been successfully reported in the literature. We aim to determine the outcome of ACDF in treatment of cervical disc herniation among Iranians. Methods and Materials/Patients. In a retrospective cohort study, we evaluated 68 patients who had undergone ACDF for cervical disc herniation from March 2006 to March 2011. Outcome tools were as follows: (1) study-designed questionnaire that addressed residual and/or new complaints and subjective satisfaction with the operation; (2) recent (one week prior to the interview) postoperative VAS for neck and upper extremity radicular pain; (3) Japanese Orthopaedic Association Myelopathy Evaluation Questionnaire (JOACMEQ) (standard Persian version); and (4) follow-up cervical Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and lateral X-ray. Results. With mean follow-up time of 52.93 (months) ± 31.89 SD (range: 13–131 months), we had success rates with regard to ΔVAS for neck and radicular pain of 88.2% and 89.7%, respectively. Except QOL functional score of JOAMEQ, 100% success rate for the other 4 functional scores of JOAMEQ was achieved. Conclusion. ACDF is a successful surgical technique for the management of cervical disc herniation among Iranian population.

  19. An Outcome Study of Anterior Cervical Discectomy and Fusion among Iranian Population.

    PubMed

    Haghnegahdar, Ali; Sedighi, Mahsa

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aim. First-line treatment strategy for managing cervical disc herniation is conservative measures. In some cases, surgery is indicated either due to signs/symptoms of severe/progressive neurological deficits, or because of persistence of radicular pain despite 12 weeks of conservative treatment. Success for treatment of cervical disc herniation using ACDF has been successfully reported in the literature. We aim to determine the outcome of ACDF in treatment of cervical disc herniation among Iranians. Methods and Materials/Patients. In a retrospective cohort study, we evaluated 68 patients who had undergone ACDF for cervical disc herniation from March 2006 to March 2011. Outcome tools were as follows: (1) study-designed questionnaire that addressed residual and/or new complaints and subjective satisfaction with the operation; (2) recent (one week prior to the interview) postoperative VAS for neck and upper extremity radicular pain; (3) Japanese Orthopaedic Association Myelopathy Evaluation Questionnaire (JOACMEQ) (standard Persian version); and (4) follow-up cervical Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and lateral X-ray. Results. With mean follow-up time of 52.93 (months) ± 31.89 SD (range: 13-131 months), we had success rates with regard to ΔVAS for neck and radicular pain of 88.2% and 89.7%, respectively. Except QOL functional score of JOAMEQ, 100% success rate for the other 4 functional scores of JOAMEQ was achieved. Conclusion. ACDF is a successful surgical technique for the management of cervical disc herniation among Iranian population.

  20. Hybrid surgery versus anterior cervical discectomy and fusion for multilevel cervical degenerative disc diseases: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Tian, Peng; Fu, Xin; Li, Zhi-Jun; Sun, Xiao-Lei; Ma, Xin-Long

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this meta-analysis is to compare hybrid surgery (HS) and cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) for multilevel cervical degenerative disc diseases (DDD). Systematic searches of all published studies through March 2015 were identified from Cochrane Library, Medline, PubMed, Embase, ScienceDirect, CNKI, WANFANG DATA and CQVIP. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and non-RCTs involving HS and ACDF for multilevel DDD were included. All literature was searched and assessed by two independent reviewers according to the standard of Cochrane systematic review. Data of functional and radiological outcomes in two groups were pooled, which was then analyzed by RevMan 5.2 software. One RCT and four non-RCTs encompassing 160 patients met the inclusion criteria. Meta-analysis revealed significant differences in blood loss (p = 0.005), postoperative C2-C7 ROM (p = 0.002), ROM of superior adjacent segment (p < 0.00001) and ROM of inferior adjacent segment (p = 0.0007) between the HS group and the ACDF group. No significant differences were found regarding operation time (p = 0.75), postoperative VAS (p = 0.18) and complications (p = 0.73) between the groups. Hybrid surgery demonstrated excellent clinical efficacy and radiological results. Postoperative C2-C7 ROM was closer to the physiological status. No decrease in the ROM of the adjacent segment was noted in the hybrid surgery group. PMID:26307360

  1. Pelvic Floor Support Defect in Apical Anterior Vaginal Prolapse with Cervical Hypertrophy. Review with Case Report in a 20-year-old Cadaver

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Apical anterior vaginal wall prolapse (AVWP) with central defect is uncommon in young non hysterectomized patients causing considerable mortality after the fourth decade of life. Its high propensity to recurrence poses the greatest challenge to pelvic reconstructive surgeons. Approximately 40% of women with prolapse have hypertrophic cervical elongation and the extent of elongation increases with greater degrees of prolapse. Women with prolapse either have inherent hypertrophic elongation of the cervix which predisposes them to prolapse or the downward traction in prolapse leads to cervical elongation. The Pelvic Organ Prolapse Quantification (POP-Q) examination includes measurement of the location of the posterior fornix (point D) with the assumption that this measurement is associated with cervical elongation. Multifocal site involvement with apical and perineal descent primarily afflicts elderly, postmenopausal women after the fourth decade while cervical hypertrophic elongation with prolapse is observed in younger women less than 40 years of age. A review of the anatomical implication of the association of cervical hypertrophy in prolapse is carried out in this article. We observed a combination of distension type anterior vaginal prolapse with apical descent and cervical hypertrophy in a 20-year-old cadaver during routine dissection for undergraduate medical students at Sikkim Manipal Institute of Medical Sciences in 2013. Distension type anterior vaginal prolapse with central defect is rarer as most reported cases are of the displacement type, paravaginal defect. Hypertrophic cervical elongation is either the cause or consequence of prolapse and its identification before reconstructive surgery is paramount as uterine suspension in the face of cervical elongation is contraindicated. Inappropriate identification of all support defects and breaking of tissues is the primary cause of failure of laparoscopic pelvic reconstructive surgery. PMID:26557506

  2. An Outcome Study of Anterior Cervical Discectomy and Fusion among Iranian Population.

    PubMed

    Haghnegahdar, Ali; Sedighi, Mahsa

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aim. First-line treatment strategy for managing cervical disc herniation is conservative measures. In some cases, surgery is indicated either due to signs/symptoms of severe/progressive neurological deficits, or because of persistence of radicular pain despite 12 weeks of conservative treatment. Success for treatment of cervical disc herniation using ACDF has been successfully reported in the literature. We aim to determine the outcome of ACDF in treatment of cervical disc herniation among Iranians. Methods and Materials/Patients. In a retrospective cohort study, we evaluated 68 patients who had undergone ACDF for cervical disc herniation from March 2006 to March 2011. Outcome tools were as follows: (1) study-designed questionnaire that addressed residual and/or new complaints and subjective satisfaction with the operation; (2) recent (one week prior to the interview) postoperative VAS for neck and upper extremity radicular pain; (3) Japanese Orthopaedic Association Myelopathy Evaluation Questionnaire (JOACMEQ) (standard Persian version); and (4) follow-up cervical Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and lateral X-ray. Results. With mean follow-up time of 52.93 (months) ± 31.89 SD (range: 13-131 months), we had success rates with regard to ΔVAS for neck and radicular pain of 88.2% and 89.7%, respectively. Except QOL functional score of JOAMEQ, 100% success rate for the other 4 functional scores of JOAMEQ was achieved. Conclusion. ACDF is a successful surgical technique for the management of cervical disc herniation among Iranian population. PMID:27635392

  3. An Outcome Study of Anterior Cervical Discectomy and Fusion among Iranian Population

    PubMed Central

    Haghnegahdar, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aim. First-line treatment strategy for managing cervical disc herniation is conservative measures. In some cases, surgery is indicated either due to signs/symptoms of severe/progressive neurological deficits, or because of persistence of radicular pain despite 12 weeks of conservative treatment. Success for treatment of cervical disc herniation using ACDF has been successfully reported in the literature. We aim to determine the outcome of ACDF in treatment of cervical disc herniation among Iranians. Methods and Materials/Patients. In a retrospective cohort study, we evaluated 68 patients who had undergone ACDF for cervical disc herniation from March 2006 to March 2011. Outcome tools were as follows: (1) study-designed questionnaire that addressed residual and/or new complaints and subjective satisfaction with the operation; (2) recent (one week prior to the interview) postoperative VAS for neck and upper extremity radicular pain; (3) Japanese Orthopaedic Association Myelopathy Evaluation Questionnaire (JOACMEQ) (standard Persian version); and (4) follow-up cervical Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and lateral X-ray. Results. With mean follow-up time of 52.93 (months) ± 31.89 SD (range: 13–131 months), we had success rates with regard to ΔVAS for neck and radicular pain of 88.2% and 89.7%, respectively. Except QOL functional score of JOAMEQ, 100% success rate for the other 4 functional scores of JOAMEQ was achieved. Conclusion. ACDF is a successful surgical technique for the management of cervical disc herniation among Iranian population. PMID:27635392

  4. Preoperative opioid strength may not affect outcomes of anterior cervical procedures: a post hoc analysis of 2 prospective, randomized trials

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Michael P.; Anderson, Paul A.; Sasso, Rick C.; Riew, K. Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Object The aim of this study is to evaluate the relationship between preoperative opioid strength and outcomes of anterior cervical decompressive surgery. Methods A retrospective cohort of 1004 patients enrolled in 1 of 2 investigational device exemption studies comparing cervical total disc arthroplasty (TDA) and anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) for single-level cervical disease causing radiculopathy or myelopathy was selected. At a preoperative visit, opioid use data, Neck Disability Index (NDI) scores, 36-ltem Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36) scores, and numeric rating scale scores for neck and arm pain were collected. Patients were divided into strong (oxycodone/morphine/meperidine), weak (codeine/propoxyphene/ hydrocodone), and opioid-naïve groups. Preoperative and postoperative (24 months) outcomes scores were compared within and between groups using the paired t-test and ANCOVA, respectively. Results Patients were categorized as follows: 226 strong, 762 weak, and 16 opioid naïve. The strong and weak groups were similar with respect to age, sex, race, marital status, education level, Worker's Compensation status, litigation status, and alcohol use. At 24-month follow-up, no differences in change in arm or neck pain scores (arm: strong –52.3, weak –50.6, naïve –54.0, p = 0.244; neck: strong –52.7, weak –50.8, naïve –44.6, p = 0.355); NDI scores (strong –36.0, weak –33.3, naïve –32.3, p = 0.181); or SF-36 Physical Component Summary scores (strong: 14.1, weak 13.3, naïve 21.7, p = 0.317) were present. Using a 15-point improvement in NDI to determine success, the authors found no between-groups difference in success rates (strong 80.6%, weak 82.7%, naïve 73.3%, p = 0.134). No difference existed between treatment arms (TDA vs ACDF) for any outcome at any time point. Conclusions Preoperative opioid strength did not adversely affect outcomes in this analysis. Careful patient selection can yield good results in this patient

  5. DEFECTS IN CERVICAL VERTEBRAE IN BORIC ACID-EXPOSED RAT EMBRYOS ARE ASSOCIATED WITH ANTERIOR SHIFTS OF HOX GENE EXPRESSION DOMAINS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Defects in cervical vertebrae in boric acid-exposed rat embryos are associated with anterior shifts of hox gene expression domains

    Nathalie Wery,1 Michael G. Narotsky,2 Nathalie Pacico,1 Robert J. Kavlock,2 Jacques J. Picard,1 AND Francoise Gofflot,1*
    1Unit of Developme...

  6. [Anterior cervical spine hyperostosis--a rare cause of difficult intubation in emergency].

    PubMed

    Stefan, Monica; Ciupilan, Corina; Mella, Corina; Scutariu, M D

    2011-01-01

    DISH (Diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis) of cervical spine is a rare condition which causes dysphagia in 23% of cases and occasionally dyspnea. The authors report the case of a 74 years old male, known with progressive dysphagia and recurrent episodes of dysphonia and dyspnea, who suffered a sudden episode of respiratory distress that need finaly tracheotomy after ineffective attempts of orotracheal intubation. PMID:22276454

  7. Anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) autograft versus graft substitutes: what do patients prefer?—A clinical study

    PubMed Central

    Maharaj, Monish M.; Phan, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    Background Patient dissatisfaction with donor site morbidity has led to the search for alternative grafting options and techniques. This report compares patient satisfaction rates between autograft and graft substitutes for anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF). Methods This study was performed with the approval of the local area health network ethics committee. Over a 9-year period, the author performed 574 ACDF procedures (697 levels). Of these, 22 patients had previous surgery with autograft, with a subsequent ACDF procedure performed using a graft substitute. Patients rated their satisfaction with pain, recovery, and preference of autograft versus a bone graft substitute. Graft substitutes used include: tricalcium phosphate/hydroxyapatite (TCP/HA) composite and iFactor placed within a polyetheretherketone (PEEK) cage. Results Results demonstrated that 21/22 patients achieved a solid fusion with the graft substitute. A total of 20/22 patients rated the autograft incision more painful than the anterior cervical incision, and 21/22 preferred the graft substitute. Three patients had adjacent segment disc replacement performed after autograft/ACDF. All patients reported preference for the total disc replacement (TDR) procedure in terms of recovery and postoperative pain. Conclusions Patient satisfaction with bone graft substitutes is very high compared with autograft with all but one (21/22) preferring the graft substitute option. The author questions the traditional recommendation that autograft is the “gold standard” for ACDF. In modern age of graft substitutes, autograft should not be considered the gold standard, but an index option between other options for comparison. PMID:27683706

  8. Anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) autograft versus graft substitutes: what do patients prefer?—A clinical study

    PubMed Central

    Maharaj, Monish M.; Phan, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    Background Patient dissatisfaction with donor site morbidity has led to the search for alternative grafting options and techniques. This report compares patient satisfaction rates between autograft and graft substitutes for anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF). Methods This study was performed with the approval of the local area health network ethics committee. Over a 9-year period, the author performed 574 ACDF procedures (697 levels). Of these, 22 patients had previous surgery with autograft, with a subsequent ACDF procedure performed using a graft substitute. Patients rated their satisfaction with pain, recovery, and preference of autograft versus a bone graft substitute. Graft substitutes used include: tricalcium phosphate/hydroxyapatite (TCP/HA) composite and iFactor placed within a polyetheretherketone (PEEK) cage. Results Results demonstrated that 21/22 patients achieved a solid fusion with the graft substitute. A total of 20/22 patients rated the autograft incision more painful than the anterior cervical incision, and 21/22 preferred the graft substitute. Three patients had adjacent segment disc replacement performed after autograft/ACDF. All patients reported preference for the total disc replacement (TDR) procedure in terms of recovery and postoperative pain. Conclusions Patient satisfaction with bone graft substitutes is very high compared with autograft with all but one (21/22) preferring the graft substitute option. The author questions the traditional recommendation that autograft is the “gold standard” for ACDF. In modern age of graft substitutes, autograft should not be considered the gold standard, but an index option between other options for comparison.

  9. [Somatotopic Representation of the Anterior Horn within Cervical Enlargement: Reappraisal of Known Doctrine Based on Clinicopathological Findings Seen in Hirayama Disease].

    PubMed

    Hirayama, Keizo

    2016-05-01

    Clinical features (weakness and amyotrophy of intrinsic hand muscles and obliquely distributed amyotrophy of forearm muscles, figure 1), needle electromyographic findings (distribution of neurogenic activities, figure 2), and pathological findings (ischemic necroses of the anterior horns between C6 and T1, figure 3) of Hirayama disease suggest that understanding of somatotopic representation of the anterior horn innervating arm muscles in the cervical enlargement of spinal cord differs from the known doctrine. Anterior horn cells of the intrinsic hand muscles are located between C7 and T1, those of forearm muscles and triceps brachii muscle as elbow extensor are, contrary to the known doctrine, located in C5 and C6, and those of elbow flexors such as biceps brachii and brachioradialis are located in C4 and above (figure 5). Development of dexterity in human hand may reflect development of cervical enlargement in accord with larger areas representing the hand and fingers on cerebral motor cortex.

  10. Extent of Disc Degeneration after Single-Level Cervical Anterior Microforaminotomy Analyzed with Long-Term Radiological Data

    PubMed Central

    Han, Chul

    2014-01-01

    Objective To prove the extents and details of cervical degeneration after anterior microforaminotomy (AMF) with 6-years follow-up. Methods A retrospective study of 24 patients, underwent single-level AMF, was performed. Clinical and radiologic data were analyzed with office charts, questionaires, and picture achieving and communication system images. Results According to Odom's criteria, 91.6% achieved favorable outcome. The mean visual analog scale score was improved from 8.6 to 3, and the mean neck disability index was improved from 27.9 to 7.3 (p<0.01). Eighteen cases (75%) showed disc height (DH) decrease. The disc invasion was correlated with DH decrease (p<0.05). The disc height decrease correlated with static, dynamic changes of shell angle and spur formation (p<0.05). Any radiological parameters did not affect the clinical outcome. Conclusion AMF is an effective technique for treating unilateral cervical radiculopathy. It showed excellent surgical outcomes even in long-term follow-ups. However, a decrease in DH occurred in a considerable number of patients. Disc invasion during surgery may be the trigger of sequential degeneration. PMID:25368761

  11. Relief of Cervicogenic Headaches after Single-Level and Multilevel Anterior Cervical Diskectomy: A 5-Year Post Hoc Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jonathan J.; Cadena, Gilbert; Panchal, Ripul R.; Schrot, Rudolph J.; Kim, Kee D.

    2015-01-01

    Study Design  Prospective study. Objective  Because single-level disk arthroplasty or arthrodesis in the lower subaxial spine improves headaches after surgery, we studied whether this effect may be better appreciated after two-level arthroplasty. Methods  We performed an independent post hoc analysis of two concurrent prospective randomized investigational device exemption trials for cervical spondylosis, one for single-level treatment and the other for two adjacent-level treatments. Results  For the one-level study, baseline mean headache scores significantly improved at 60 months for both the cervical disk arthroplasty (CDA) and anterior cervical diskectomy and fusion (ACDF) groups (p < 0.0001). However, mean improvement in headache scores was not statistically different between the investigational and control groups from 6 months through 60 months. For the two-level study, baseline mean headache scores significantly improved at 60 months for both the CDA and ACDF groups (p < 0.0001). The CDA group demonstrated greater improvement from baseline at all points; this difference was statistically significant at 6, 12, 24, 36, and 48 months but not at 18 and 60 months. Conclusion  Both CDA and ACDF at either one or two levels are associated with sustained headache relief from baseline. Patients undergoing two-level arthroplasty had significantly greater improvement in headache at all points except for at 18 and 60 months. This difference in improvement was not observed in patients undergoing single-level arthroplasty. The mechanism of greater headache relief after two-level arthroplasty remains unclear. PMID:27555998

  12. Comparative Study between a Curved and a Wedge PEEK Cage for Single-level Anterior Cervical Discectomy and Interbody Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hwan Soo; Heo, Weon; Cha, Jae Hoon; Rhee, Dong Youl

    2012-01-01

    Objective This study evaluated the efficiency of a curved polyetheretherketone (PEEK) cage in comparison with a wedge PEEK cage according to radiologic and clinical outcomes in patients with cervical degenerative disease. Methods A total of 37 patients who suffering from cervical disc disease with radiculopathy or myelopathy were reviewed retrospectively. Seventeen patients were underwent anterior cervical discectomy and interbody fusion with a curved shape PEEK cage (curved cage group), and twenty patients with wedge shape PEEK cage (wedge cage group). Clinical assessment was graded using Odom's criteria, NDI score and VAS score. For radiologic analysis, disc height (DH), segmental angle (SA), subsidence were measured at the preoperative and last follow up. Results A comparison of the preoperative and postoperative results revealed improvements after the surgery in the DH and SA in both cage groups. The change of postoperative DH between the preoperative and the last follow-up in wedge cage group and curved cage group was 6.85% and 25.5%, respectively. The change of postoperative SA was 1.75° and 0.95°, respectively. There was no statistically significant difference in the DH and SA between the 2 groups. The subsidence rate in the wedge cage group and curved cage group was 20% and 6%, respectively. Conclusion The 2 different cage groups showed significant improvements in the disc height, segmental angle and clinical outcomes. However, the shape of PEEK Cage influences the tendency for subsidence. Increasing contact surface area and fitting into two adjacent vertebral body prevent significant subsidence. PMID:25983812

  13. PEEK Cages versus PMMA Spacers in Anterior Cervical Discectomy: Comparison of Fusion, Subsidence, Sagittal Alignment, and Clinical Outcome with a Minimum 1-Year Follow-Up

    PubMed Central

    Krüger, Marie T.; Sircar, Ronen; Kogias, Evangelos; Scholz, Christoph; Volz, Florian; Scheiwe, Christian; Hubbe, Ulrich

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. To compare radiographic and clinical outcomes after anterior cervical discectomy in patients with cervical degenerative disc disease using PEEK cages or PMMA spacers with a minimum 1-year follow-up. Methods. Anterior cervical discectomy was performed in 107 patients in one or two levels using empty PEEK cages (51 levels), Sulcem PMMA spacers (49 levels) or Palacos PMMA spacers (41 levels) between January, 2005 and February, 2009. Bony fusion, subsidence, and sagittal alignment were retrospectively assessed in CT scans and radiographs at follow-up. Clinical outcome was measured using the VAS, NDI, and SF-36. Results. Bony fusion was assessed in 65% (PEEK cage), 57% (Sulcem), and 46% (Palacos) after a mean follow-up of 2.5 years. Mean subsidence was 2.3–2.6 mm without significant differences between the groups. The most pronounced loss of lordosis was found in PEEK cages (−4.1°). VAS was 3.1 (PEEK cage), 3.6 (Sulcem), and 2.7 (Palacos) without significant differences. Functional outcome in the PEEK cage and Palacos group was superior to the Sulcem group. Conclusions. The substitute groups showed differing fusion rates. Clinical outcome, however, appears to be generally not correlated with fusion status or subsidence. We could not specify a superior disc substitute for anterior cervical discectomy. This trial is registered with DRKS00003591. PMID:25110734

  14. Comparison of long terms follow up results in patients with cervical disk disease treated with anterior PEEK cage implantation and without it in Rasoul Akram Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Mollahoseini, Reza; Khajoo, Ashkan; Motiei, Mir Abolfazl

    2012-01-01

    Background Anterior interbody fusion of the cervical spine have become the gold standard for treating spinal diseases, hence the aim of this study was to compare long term follow up results in patients with cervical disk disease treated with anterior PEEK cage implantation and without it in anterior approach. Methods Retrospectively 63 patients with known cervical discogenic disorders who went under surgery with and without cage implantation were enrolled. The neurological examination and neurologic function were assessed by using the Japanese Orthopedic Association (JOA) scoring system and neurological cervical spine scale (NCSS) before and 8 years after surgery in each patient and at the end all complications were recorded. Results In the first group, there were 15 males and 14 females (mean age: 49±10 years) and in the second group there were 27 male and 7 female (mean age: 47±9 years). The NCSS score was significantly different between two groups after surgery (p = 0.035) but there was no significant difference before surgery (p = 0.163). No statistical significance difference was also observed in JOA score and complications before and after procedure, but JOA post surgery score between two groups had significant difference (p = 0.047). Conclusion In conclusion, present study showed that PEEK cage implantation is a highly useful alternative to the conventional treatment methods. PMID:23482426

  15. Biomechanical stability of a bioabsorbable self-retaining polylactic acid/nano-sized β-tricalcium phosphate cervical spine interbody fusion device in single-level anterior cervical discectomy and fusion sheep models

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Lu; Duan, Ping-Guo; Li, Xi-Lei; Yuan, Feng-Lai; Zhao, Ming-Dong; Che, Wu; Wang, Hui-Ren; Dong, Jian

    2012-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to investigate the biomechanical stability provided by a novel, polylactic acid/nano-sized, β-tricalcium phosphate, bioabsorbable, self-retaining cervical fusion cage (BCFC). Methods Quasistatic nonconstraining torques (maximum 1.5 NM) induced flexion, extension, lateral bending (±1.5 NM), and axial rotation (±1.5 NM) on 32 sheep cervical spines (C2–C5). The motion segment C3–C4 was first tested intact; the following groups were tested after complete discectomy: autologous tricortical iliac crest bone graft, Medtronic–Wego polyetheretherketone (PEEK) cage, Solis PEEK cage, and BCFC. The autologous bone graft group was tested with an anterior plate. The mean range of motion (ROM) was calculated from the load-displacement curves. Results BCFC significantly decreased ROM in lateral bending and axial rotation compared to other implants, and no significant difference in ROM between two types of PEEK cages and BCFC could be observed in flexion and extension. Anterior cervical plate (ACP) significantly decreased ROM in flexion and extension, but no significant difference in ROM between BCFC and bone graft plus ACP could be determined in lateral bending and axial rotation. Conclusion The BCFC device showed better stability to autologous tricortical iliac crest bone graft and PEEK cages in single-level anterior cervical discectomy and fusion models and thus may be a potential alternative to the current PEEK cages. PMID:23226018

  16. Internal carotid artery dissection after anterior cervical disc replacement: first case report and literature review of vascular complications of the approach.

    PubMed

    Loret, Jean-Edouard; Francois, Patrick; Papagiannaki, Chrysanthi; Cottier, Jean-Philippe; Terrier, Louis-Marie; Zemmoura, Ilyess

    2013-07-01

    We report the case of a 41-year-old woman who underwent cervical total disc replacement at C4C5 and C5C6 levels and fusion at C6C7 level through an anterior right-side approach. After anesthesia recovery, the patient presented left hemiparesia and facial palsy due to large right hemispheric stroke. Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging was performed as soon as the patient developed neurologic symptoms of stroke and revealed a right internal carotid artery dissection. Digital substraction angiography, endovascular stenting, angioplasty and thrombectomy were performed. Six months after treatment, clinical examination showed mild left-arm spasticity. To the best of our knowledge, only two cases of internal carotid artery stroke without dissection or thrombosis are reported. In conclusion, although vascular complications are rare after anterior cervical spine procedure, internal carotid artery dissection can occur. Suspected risk factors are prolonged retraction of the carotid artery and neck extension. PMID:23728441

  17. Internal carotid artery dissection after anterior cervical disc replacement: first case report and literature review of vascular complications of the approach.

    PubMed

    Loret, Jean-Edouard; Francois, Patrick; Papagiannaki, Chrysanthi; Cottier, Jean-Philippe; Terrier, Louis-Marie; Zemmoura, Ilyess

    2013-07-01

    We report the case of a 41-year-old woman who underwent cervical total disc replacement at C4C5 and C5C6 levels and fusion at C6C7 level through an anterior right-side approach. After anesthesia recovery, the patient presented left hemiparesia and facial palsy due to large right hemispheric stroke. Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging was performed as soon as the patient developed neurologic symptoms of stroke and revealed a right internal carotid artery dissection. Digital substraction angiography, endovascular stenting, angioplasty and thrombectomy were performed. Six months after treatment, clinical examination showed mild left-arm spasticity. To the best of our knowledge, only two cases of internal carotid artery stroke without dissection or thrombosis are reported. In conclusion, although vascular complications are rare after anterior cervical spine procedure, internal carotid artery dissection can occur. Suspected risk factors are prolonged retraction of the carotid artery and neck extension.

  18. Long-Term Follow-Up Results of Anterior Cervical Inter-Body Fusion with Stand-Alone Cages

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Woong-Beom; Choi, Hoyong; Kim, Ki-Jeong; Jahng, Tae-Ahn; Kim, Hyun-Jib

    2016-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to evaluate long-term follow-up radiologic/clinical outcomes of patients who underwent anterior cervical discectomy and inter-body fusion (ACDF) with stand-alone cages (SAC) in a single academic institution. Methods Total 99 patients who underwent ACDF with SAC between February 2004 and December 2012 were evaluated retrospectively. A total of 131 segments were enrolled in this study. Basic demographic information, radiographic [segmental subsidence rate, fusion rate, C2–7 global angle, and segmental angle changes)/clinical outcomes (by Odom's criteria and visual analog score (VAS)] and complications were evaluated to determine the long-term outcomes. Results The majority were males (55 vs. 44) with average age of 53.2. Mean follow-up period was 62.9 months. The segmental subsidence rate was 53.4% and fusion rate was 73.3%. In the subsidence group, anterior intervertebral height (AIH) had more tendency of subsiding than middle or posterior intervertebral height (p=0.01). The segmental angle led kyphotic change related to the subsidence of the AIH. Adjacent segmental disease was occurred in 18 (18.2%) patients. Total 6 (6%) reoperations were performed at the index level. There was no statistical significance between clinical and radiological outcomes. But, overall long-term clinical outcome by Odom's criteria was unsatisfactory (64.64%). The neck and arm VAS score were increased by over time. Conclusion Long-term outcomes of ACDF with SAC group were acceptable but not satisfactory. For optimal decision making, more additional comparative long-term outcome data is needed between ACDF with SAC and ACDF with plating. PMID:27446521

  19. Comparison of rhBMP-2 versus Autogenous Iliac Crest Bone Graft for 2-Level Anterior Cervical Discectomy and Fusion for Cervical Spondylotic Myelopathy

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Bingyi; Wang, Haiyan; Dong, Jun; Yuan, Zenong; Wang, Dachuan; Wang, Feng

    2015-01-01

    Background Few studies have examined the efficacy of recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (rhBMP-2) in 2-level anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF). The purpose of this study was to compare the outcomes in a series of patients with CSM treated with 2-level ACDF with or without rhBMP-2. Material/Methods The retrospective study included a total of 146 patients with CSM. The rhBMP-2 group consisted of 73 patients who underwent 2-level ACDF with rhBMP-2. A total of 73 patients who also received 2-level ACDF with autogenous ICBG alone were included in the matched-pair ICBG group with a ratio of 1:1, based on age, sex, and BMI. All data, including fusion rate and time, VAS, JOA score, operative date, and complications, were assessed. Results With respect to the length of hospital stay, operative times, and blood loss, there were no significant difference between the 2 groups. However, the rhBMP-2 group presented a shorter fusion time (P<0.013) and higher fusion rate (P<0.036) than the ICBG group. In the rhBMP-2 group, 22% required additional treatment for complications compared to 18% of patients in the ICBG group, which showed no significant difference (P=0.543). Conclusions The application of rhBMP-2 in 2-level ACDF showed higher fusion rates, shorter fusion time, and similar function outcomes compared to those who received ACDF with ICBG alone. PMID:26479708

  20. Maintaining endotracheal tube cuff pressure at 20 mm Hg to prevent dysphagia after anterior cervical spine surgery; protocol of a double-blind randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In anterior cervical spine surgery a retractor is obligatory to approach the spine. Previous studies showed an increase of endotracheal tube cuff pressure after placement of a retractor. It is known that high endotracheal tube cuff pressure increases the incidence of postoperative dysphagia, hoarseness, and sore throat. However, until now no evidence supports the fact whether adjusting the endotracheal tube cuff pressure during anterior cervical spine surgery will prevent this comorbidity. We present the design of a randomized controlled trial to determine whether adjusting endotracheal tube cuff pressure after placement of a retractor during anterior cervical spine surgery will prevent postoperative dysphagia. Methods/design 177 patients (aged 18–90 years) scheduled for anterior cervical spine surgery on 1 or more levels will be included. After intubation, endotracheal tube cuff pressure is manually inflated to 20 mm Hg in all patients. Patients will be randomized into two groups. In the control group endotracheal tube cuff pressure is not adjusted after retractor placement. In the intervention group endotracheal tube cuff pressure after retractor placement is maintained at 20 mm Hg and air is withdrawn when cuff pressure exceeds 20 mm Hg. Endotracheal tube cuff pressure is measured after intubation, before and after placement and removal of the retractor. Again air is inflated if cuff pressure sets below 20 mmHg after removal of the retractor. The primary outcome measure is postoperative dysphagia. Other outcome measures are postoperative hoarseness, postoperative sore throat, degree of dysphagia, length of hospital stay, and pneumonia. The study is a single centre double blind randomized trial in which patients and research nurses will be kept blinded for the allocated treatment during the follow-up period of 2 months. Discussion Postoperative dysphagia occurs frequently after anterior cervical spine surgery. This may be related to high

  1. Fusion and failure following anterior cervical plating with dynamic or rigid plates: 6-months results of a multi-centric, prospective, randomized, controlled study

    PubMed Central

    Stulik, Jan; Chrobok, Jan; Ruffing, Sabine; Drumm, Jörg; Sova, Laurentius; Kucera, Ravel; Vyskocil, Tomas; Steudel, Wolf Ingo

    2007-01-01

    Anterior cervical plate fixation is an approved surgical technique for cervical spine stabilization in the presence of anterior cervical instability. Rigid plate design with screws rigidly locked to the plate is widely used and is thought to provide a better fixation for the treated spinal segment than a dynamic design in which the screws may slide when the graft is settling. Recent biomechanical studies showed that dynamic anterior plates provide a better graft loading possibly leading to accelerated spinal fusion with a lower incidence of implant complications. This, however, was investigated in vitro and does not necessarily mean to be the case in vivo, as well. Thus, the two major aspects of this study were to compare the speed of bone fusion and the rate of implant complications using either rigid- or dynamic plates. The study design is prospective, randomized, controlled, and multi-centric, having been approved by respective ethic committees of all participating sites. One hundred and thirty-two patients were included in this study and randomly assigned to one of the two groups, both undergoing routine level-1- or level-2 anterior cervical discectomy with autograft fusion receiving either a dynamic plate with screws being locked in ap - position (ABC, Aesculap, Germany), or a rigid plate (CSLP, Synthes, Switzerland). Segmental mobility and implant complications were compared after 3- and 6 months, respectively. All measurements were performed by an independent radiologist. Mobility results after 6 months were available for 77 patients (43 ABC/34 CSLP). Mean segmental mobility for the ABC group was 1.7 mm at the time of discharge, 1.4 mm after 3 months, and 0.8 mm after 6 months. For the CSLP- group the measurements were 1.0, 1.8, and 1.7 mm, respectively. The differences of mean segmental mobility were statistically significant between both groups after 6 months (P = 0.02). Four patients of the CSLP-group demonstrated surgical hardware complications

  2. Surgical Outcomes of Anterior Cervical Fusion Using Deminaralized Bone Matrix as Stand-Alone Graft Material: Single Arm, Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Ho-Jung; Ryu, Kyeong-Sik; Kim, Jin-Sung; Seong, Ji-Hoon

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the safety and efficacy of demineralized bone matrix (DBM) as a bone graft substitute for anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) surgery. Methods Twenty consecutive patients treated with ACDF using stand-alone polyestheretherketone (PEEK) cages (Zero-P) with DBM(CGDBM100) were prospectively evaluated with a minimum of 6 months of follow-up. Radiologic efficacy was evaluated with a 6-point scoring method for osseous fusion using plain radiograph and computed tomogrpahy scans. Clinical efficacy was evaluated using the visual analogue scale (VAS), Owestry disability index (ODI), and short-form health questionnaire-36. The safety of the bone graft substitute was assessed with vital sign monitoring and a survey measuring complications at each follow-up visit. Results There were significant improvements in VAS and ODI scores at a mean 6-month follow-up. Six months after surgery, solid fusion was achieved in all patients. Mean score on the 6-point scoring system was 5.1, and bony formation was found to score at least 4 points in all patients. There was no case with implant-related complications such as cage failure or migration, and no complications associated with the use of CGDBM100. Conclusion ACDF using CGDBM100 demonstrated good clinical and radiologic outcomes. The fusion rate was comparable with the published results of traditional ACDF. Therefore, the results of this study suggest that the use of a PEEK cage packed with DBM for ACDF is a safe and effective alternative to the gold standard of autologous iliac bone graft. PMID:27799989

  3. Artificial Cervical Vertebra and Intervertebral Complex Replacement through the Anterior Approach in Animal Model: A Biomechanical and In Vivo Evaluation of a Successful Goat Model

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Jie; He, Xijing; Wang, Dong; Qi, Peng; Guo, Lei; Huang, Sihua; Cai, Xuan; Li, Haopeng; Wang, Rui

    2012-01-01

    This was an in vitro and in vivo study to develop a novel artificial cervical vertebra and intervertebral complex (ACVC) joint in a goat model to provide a new method for treating degenerative disc disease in the cervical spine. The objectives of this study were to test the safety, validity, and effectiveness of ACVC by goat model and to provide preclinical data for a clinical trial in humans in future. We designed the ACVC based on the radiological and anatomical data on goat and human cervical spines, established an animal model by implanting the ACVC into goat cervical spines in vitro prior to in vivo implantation through the anterior approach, and evaluated clinical, radiological, biomechanical parameters after implantation. The X-ray radiological data revealed similarities between goat and human intervertebral angles at the levels of C2-3, C3-4, and C4-5, and between goat and human lordosis angles at the levels of C3-4 and C4-5. In the in vivo implantation, the goats successfully endured the entire experimental procedure and recovered well after the surgery. The radiological results showed that there was no dislocation of the ACVC and that the ACVC successfully restored the intervertebral disc height after the surgery. The biomechanical data showed that there was no significant difference in range of motion (ROM) or neural zone (NZ) between the control group and the ACVC group in flexion-extension and lateral bending before or after the fatigue test. The ROM and NZ of the ACVC group were greater than those of the control group for rotation. In conclusion, the goat provides an excellent animal model for the biomechanical study of the cervical spine. The ACVC is able to provide instant stability after surgery and to preserve normal motion in the cervical spine. PMID:23300816

  4. A novel computed method to reconstruct the bilateral digital interarticular channel of atlas and its use on the anterior upper cervical screw fixation

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Ai-Min; Wang, Wenhai; Xu, Hui; Lin, Zhong-Ke; Yang, Xin-Dong; Wang, Xiang-Yang; Xu, Hua-Zi

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. To investigate a novel computed method to reconstruct the bilateral digital interarticular channel of atlas and its potential use on the anterior upper cervical screw fixation. Methods. We have used the reverse engineering software (image-processing software and computer-aided design software) to create the approximate and optimal digital interarticular channel of atlas for 60 participants. Angles of channels, diameters of inscribed circles, long and short axes of ellipses were measured and recorded, and gender-specific analysis was also performed. Results. The channels provided sufficient space for one or two screws, and the parameters of channels are described. While the channels of females were smaller than that of males, no significant difference of angles between males and females were observed. Conclusion. Our study demonstrates the radiological features of approximate digital interarticular channels, optimal digital interarticular channels of atlas, and provides the reference trajectory of anterior transarticular screws and anterior occiput-to-axis screws. Additionally, we provide a protocol that can help make a pre-operative plan for accurate placement of anterior transarticular screws and anterior occiput-to-axis screws. PMID:26925345

  5. Adjacent segment degeneration after single-level anterior cervical decompression and fusion: disc space distraction and its impact on clinical outcomes.

    PubMed

    Li, Jia; Li, Yongqian; Kong, Fanlong; Zhang, Di; Zhang, Yingze; Shen, Yong

    2015-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to find whether excessive distraction of the disc space for cage insertion was a risk factor for adjacent segment degeneration (ASD) after anterior cervical decompression and fusion (ACDF). One hundred and sixteen consecutive patients who underwent ACDF for single-level cervical disc herniation between June 2006 and November 2008 were retrospectively reviewed. Preoperative, postoperative and final follow-up disc height (DH), sagittal segmental alignment (SSA), and sagittal alignment of the cervical spine (SACS) were measured and compared between the ASD group and non-ASD group. In 116 patients, ASD was radiographically proven in 28 (24.1%) patients. The clinical outcomes were significantly improved compared to the preoperative scores in both groups. However, the postoperative and final follow-up DH of the ASD group were significantly higher than in the non-ASD group (p<0.05). In addition, the postoperative DH was significantly correlated with the postoperative or final follow-up SSA (p<0.05). However, postoperative DH was not found to significantly correlate with postoperative or final follow-up SACS (p=0.072 and p=0.096, respectively). Multivariate analysis showed that postoperative DH was the most significant risk factor for ASD. The clinical outcomes of ACDF for single-level degenerative cervical disc disease were satisfactory. Postoperative DH (the distracted distance) had the greatest impact on the incidence of ASD. Excessive disc space distraction is a considerable risk factor for the development of radiographic ASD.

  6. Surgical management of multilevel cervical spinal stenosis and spinal cord injury complicated by cervical spine fracture

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background There are few reports regarding surgical management of multilevel cervical spinal stenosis with spinal cord injury. Our purpose is to evaluate the safety and feasibility of open-door expansive laminoplasty in combination with transpedicular screw fixation for the treatment of multilevel cervical spinal stenosis and spinal cord injury in the trauma population. Methods This was a retrospective study of 21 patients who had multilevel cervical spinal stenosis and spinal cord injury with unstable fracture. An open-door expansive posterior laminoplasty combined with transpedicular screw fixation was performed under persistent intraoperative skull traction. Outcome measures included postoperative improvement in Japanese Orthopedic Association (JOA) score and incidence of complications. Results The average operation time was 190 min, with an average blood loss of 437 ml. A total of 120 transpedicular screws were implanted into the cervical vertebrae between vertebral C3 and C7, including 20 into C3, 34 into C4, 36 into C5, 20 into C6, and 10 into C7. The mean preoperative JOA score was 3.67 ± 0.53. The patients were followed for an average of 17.5 months, and the average JOA score improved to 8.17 ± 1.59, significantly higher than the preoperative score (t = 1.798, P < 0.05), with an average improvement of 44.7 ± 11.7%. Postoperative complications in four patients included cerebrospinal fluid leakage, delayed wound healing, pulmonary infection, and urinary system infection. All four patients were responsive to antibiotic treatment; one died from respiratory failure 3 months postoperatively. Conclusions The open-door expansive laminoplasty combined with posterior transpedicular screw fixation is feasible for treating multilevel cervical spinal stenosis and spinal cord injury complicated by unstable fracture. Its advantages include minimum surgical trauma, less intraoperative blood loss, and satisfactory stable supportive effect for

  7. Multi-center, Prospective, Randomized, Controlled Investigational Device Exemption Clinical Trial Comparing Mobi-C Cervical Artificial Disc to Anterior Discectomy and Fusion in the Treatment of Symptomatic Degenerative Disc Disease in the Cervical Spine

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Hyun W.; Davis, Reginald; Gaede, Steven; Hoffman, Greg; Kim, Kee; Nunley, Pierce D.; Peterson, Daniel; Rashbaum, Ralph; Stokes, John

    2014-01-01

    Background Anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) is the gold standard for treating symptomatic cervical disc degeneration. Cervical total disc replacements (TDRs) have emerged as an alternative for some patients. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the safety and effectiveness of a new TDR device compared with ACDF for treating single-level cervical disc degeneration. Methods This was a prospective, randomized, controlled, multicenter Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regulated Investigational Device Exemption (IDE) study. A total of 245 patients were treated (164 TDR: 81 ACDF). The primary outcome measure was overall success based on improvement in Neck Disability Index (NDI), no subsequent surgical interventions, and no adverse events (AEs) classified as major complications. Secondary outcome measures included SF-12, visual analog scale (VAS) assessing neck and arm pain, patient satisfaction, radiographic range of motion, and adjacent level degeneration. Patients were evaluated preoperatively and postoperatively at 6 weeks, 3, 6, 12, 18, and 24 months. The hypothesis was that the TDR success rate was non-inferior to ACDF at 24 months. Results Overall success rates were 73.6% for TDR and 65.3% for ACDF, confirming non-inferiority (p < 0.0025). TDR demonstrated earlier improvements with significant differences in NDI scores at 6 weeks and 3 months, and VAS neck pain and SF-12 PCS scores at 6 weeks (p<0.05). Operative level range of motion in the TDR group was maintained throughout follow-up. Radiographic evidence of inferior adjacent segment degeneration was significantly greater with ACDF at 12 and 24 months (p < 0.05). AE rates were similar. Conclusions Mobi-C TDR is a safe and effective treatment for single-level disc degeneration, producing outcomes similar to ACDF with less adjacent segment degeneration. Level of Evidence: Level I. Clinical relevance: This study adds to the literature supporting cervical TDR as a viable option to ACDF in

  8. Outcomes observed during a 1-year clinical and radiographic follow-up of patients treated for 1- or 2-level cervical degenerative disease using a biodegradable anterior cervical plate.

    PubMed

    Chen, Mengcun; Yang, Shuhua; Yang, Cao; Xu, Weihua; Ye, Shunan; Wang, Jing; Feng, Yong; Yang, Wen; Liu, Xianzhe

    2016-08-01

    OBJECTIVE The purpose of this study was to present an initial surgical experience in the management of 1- or 2-level degenerative disc disease of the cervical spine using biodegradable anterior cervical plates (bACPs) in anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF). The authors also aimed to provide insight into this critical and controversial clinical issue by clarifying outcomes for patients receiving bACPs and by comparing their outcomes with those achieved using a traditional metallic anterior cervical plate (mACP) implant. METHODS A retrospective review was conducted for 2 series of patients who had undergone ACDF using either bACP (31 patients, 38 segments) or mACP (47 patients, 57 segments) instrumentation. The patients were followed up for a mean 13.5 ± 0.9 months (range 12-18 months) in the bACP group and 14.8 ± 1.5 months (range 14-22 months) in the mACP group. Clinical outcomes were determined according to scores on the visual analog scale (VAS), the modified Japanese Orthopaedic Association (mJOA) scoring system, and Odom's criteria. Radiological images were used to assess fusion rates, intervertebral height, Cobb's angle, and the width of prevertebral soft tissue. RESULTS Both VAS and mJOA scores were significantly improved at each follow-up in both groups. Excellent or good results according to Odom's criteria were achieved in 93.5% (29/31) of patients in the bACP group and 93.6% (44/47) of patients in the mACP group. At 6 months postoperatively, the fusion rate was 94.7% (36/38) in the bACP group and 96.5% (55/57) in the mACP group, but subsidence of the intervertebral space at the surgical level was more evident in the bACP group. Angulation, as measured by Cobb's angle, demonstrated obvious healing in both groups, while better maintenance was observed in the mACP group. The local inflammatory reaction was uneventful during follow-up. Dysphonia and dysphagia were observed in both groups during the follow-up. CONCLUSIONS The relatively comparable

  9. Outcomes observed during a 1-year clinical and radiographic follow-up of patients treated for 1- or 2-level cervical degenerative disease using a biodegradable anterior cervical plate.

    PubMed

    Chen, Mengcun; Yang, Shuhua; Yang, Cao; Xu, Weihua; Ye, Shunan; Wang, Jing; Feng, Yong; Yang, Wen; Liu, Xianzhe

    2016-08-01

    OBJECTIVE The purpose of this study was to present an initial surgical experience in the management of 1- or 2-level degenerative disc disease of the cervical spine using biodegradable anterior cervical plates (bACPs) in anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF). The authors also aimed to provide insight into this critical and controversial clinical issue by clarifying outcomes for patients receiving bACPs and by comparing their outcomes with those achieved using a traditional metallic anterior cervical plate (mACP) implant. METHODS A retrospective review was conducted for 2 series of patients who had undergone ACDF using either bACP (31 patients, 38 segments) or mACP (47 patients, 57 segments) instrumentation. The patients were followed up for a mean 13.5 ± 0.9 months (range 12-18 months) in the bACP group and 14.8 ± 1.5 months (range 14-22 months) in the mACP group. Clinical outcomes were determined according to scores on the visual analog scale (VAS), the modified Japanese Orthopaedic Association (mJOA) scoring system, and Odom's criteria. Radiological images were used to assess fusion rates, intervertebral height, Cobb's angle, and the width of prevertebral soft tissue. RESULTS Both VAS and mJOA scores were significantly improved at each follow-up in both groups. Excellent or good results according to Odom's criteria were achieved in 93.5% (29/31) of patients in the bACP group and 93.6% (44/47) of patients in the mACP group. At 6 months postoperatively, the fusion rate was 94.7% (36/38) in the bACP group and 96.5% (55/57) in the mACP group, but subsidence of the intervertebral space at the surgical level was more evident in the bACP group. Angulation, as measured by Cobb's angle, demonstrated obvious healing in both groups, while better maintenance was observed in the mACP group. The local inflammatory reaction was uneventful during follow-up. Dysphonia and dysphagia were observed in both groups during the follow-up. CONCLUSIONS The relatively comparable

  10. Cone beam computed tomographic evaluation of two access cavity designs and instrumentation on the thickness of peri-cervical dentin in mandibular anterior teeth

    PubMed Central

    Varghese, Vinny Sara; George, John V.; Mathew, Sylvia; Nagaraja, Shruthi; Indiresha, H. N.; Madhu, K. S.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives: The aim of the study was to determine the effect of two access cavity designs on the peri-cervical dentin thickness before and after instrumentation using cone beam computed tomography (CBCT). Materials and Methods: Sixty mandibular anterior teeth were divided into two groups of thirty teeth each: Group I: conventional access cavity preparation, where access was prepared just above the cingulum and Group II: incisal access cavity preparation, where access was prepared in proximity to the incisal edge. CBCT scans were taken preoperatively, following access cavity preparation and post instrumentation. 200 μm thick slices were obtained 4mm apical and coronal to the cemento-enamel junction. The peri-cervical dentin thickness was calculated on the facial, lingual, mesial, and distal for all the three obtained scans. Results: The analysis showed that access cavity preparation and instrumentation resulted in a significant loss of tooth structure in Group I on all surfaces, but in Group II, there was a significant loss of tooth structure only in the mesial, lingual, and distal surfaces (P < 0.05). Conclusion: Incisal access cavity preparation resulted in lesser loss of dentin in the peri-cervical region.

  11. Cone beam computed tomographic evaluation of two access cavity designs and instrumentation on the thickness of peri-cervical dentin in mandibular anterior teeth

    PubMed Central

    Varghese, Vinny Sara; George, John V.; Mathew, Sylvia; Nagaraja, Shruthi; Indiresha, H. N.; Madhu, K. S.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives: The aim of the study was to determine the effect of two access cavity designs on the peri-cervical dentin thickness before and after instrumentation using cone beam computed tomography (CBCT). Materials and Methods: Sixty mandibular anterior teeth were divided into two groups of thirty teeth each: Group I: conventional access cavity preparation, where access was prepared just above the cingulum and Group II: incisal access cavity preparation, where access was prepared in proximity to the incisal edge. CBCT scans were taken preoperatively, following access cavity preparation and post instrumentation. 200 μm thick slices were obtained 4mm apical and coronal to the cemento-enamel junction. The peri-cervical dentin thickness was calculated on the facial, lingual, mesial, and distal for all the three obtained scans. Results: The analysis showed that access cavity preparation and instrumentation resulted in a significant loss of tooth structure in Group I on all surfaces, but in Group II, there was a significant loss of tooth structure only in the mesial, lingual, and distal surfaces (P < 0.05). Conclusion: Incisal access cavity preparation resulted in lesser loss of dentin in the peri-cervical region. PMID:27656065

  12. Posterior Transpedicular Dynamic Stabilization versus Total Disc Replacement in the Treatment of Lumbar Painful Degenerative Disc Disease: A Comparison of Clinical Results

    PubMed Central

    Oktenoglu, Tunc; Ozer, Ali Fahir; Sasani, Mehdi; Ataker, Yaprak; Gomleksiz, Cengiz; Celebi, Irfan

    2013-01-01

    Study Design. Prospective clinical study. Objective. This study compares the clinical results of anterior lumbar total disc replacement and posterior transpedicular dynamic stabilization in the treatment of degenerative disc disease. Summary and Background Data. Over the last two decades, both techniques have emerged as alternative treatment options to fusion surgery. Methods. This study was conducted between 2004 and 2010 with a total of 50 patients (25 in each group). The mean age of the patients in total disc prosthesis group was 37,32 years. The mean age of the patients in posterior dynamic transpedicular stabilization was 43,08. Clinical (VAS and Oswestry) and radiological evaluations (lumbar lordosis and segmental lordosis angles) of the patients were carried out prior to the operation and 3, 12, and 24 months after the operation. We compared the average duration of surgery, blood loss during the surgery and the length of hospital stay of both groups. Results. Both techniques offered significant improvements in clinical parameters. There was no significant change in radiologic evaluations after the surgery for both techniques. Conclusion. Both dynamic systems provided spine stability. However, the posterior dynamic system had a slight advantage over anterior disc prosthesis because of its convenient application and fewer possible complications. PMID:23401784

  13. Cervical radiculopathy.

    PubMed

    Iyer, Sravisht; Kim, Han Jo

    2016-09-01

    Cervical radiculopathy is a common clinical scenario. Patients with radiculopathy typically present with neck pain, arm pain, or both. We review the epidemiology of cervical radiculopathy and discuss the diagnosis of this condition. This includes an overview of the pertinent findings on the patient history and physical examination. We also discuss relevant clinical syndromes that must be considered in the differential diagnosis including peripheral nerve entrapment syndromes and shoulder pathology. The natural history of cervical radiculopathy is reviewed and options for management are discussed. These options include conservative management, non-operative modalities such as physical therapy, steroid injections, and operative intervention. While the exact indications for surgical intervention have not yet been elucidated, we provide an overview of the available literature regarding indications and discuss the timing of intervention. The surgical outcomes of anterior cervical decompression and fusion (ACDF), cervical disc arthroplasty (CDA), and posterior cervical foraminotomy (PCF) are discussed. PMID:27250042

  14. Comparison of Hybrid Constructs with 2-Level Artificial Disc Replacement and 2-Level Anterior Cervical Discectomy and Fusion for Surgical Reconstruction of the Cervical Spine: A Kinematic Study in Whole Cadavers

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Baoge; Zeng, Zheng; Van Hoof, Tom; Kalala, Jean Pierre; Liu, Zhenyu; Wu, Bingxuan

    2015-01-01

    Background Multi-level cervical degeneration of the spine is a common clinical pathology that is often repaired by anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF). The aim of this study was to investigate the kinematics of the cervical spine after hybrid surgery compared with 2-level ACDF. Material/Methods Five freshly frozen, unembalmed whole human cadavers were used including 3 males and 2 females with a mean age of 51±8 years. After evaluating the intact spine for range of motion (ROM), sagittal alignment and instantaneous center of rotation (ICR), each cadaver underwent 4 consecutive surgeries: 2-level artificial disc replacement (ADR) from C4 to C6 (ADR surgery); 2-level ACDF from C4 to C6 (ACDF surgery); hybrid C4–5 ACDF and C5–6 ADR (ACDF+ADR surgery); and hybrid C4–5 ADR and C5–6 ACDF (ADR+ACDF surgery). The ROM and ICR of adjacent intact segments (C3–4; C6–7), and whole sagittal alignment were revaluated. Results Two-level ACDF resulted in increased ROM at C3–4 and C6–7 compared with intact spine. ROM was significantly different to intact spine using ACDF surgery at C3–C4 and C6–C7 and ROM was increased with ACDF+ADR surgery at C6–C7 (all P<0.05). No improvement in sagittal alignment was observed with any approach. The localization of the ICR shifted upwards and anteriorly at C3–C4 after reconstruction. ICR changes at C3–C4 were greatest for ADR+ACDF surgery and were significantly different to ACDF surgery (P<0.05), but not between ADR surgery and ACDF+ADR surgery. At C6–C7, the ICR was more posterior and superior than in the intact condition. The greatest change in ICR was observed in ACDF surgery at the C6–C7 level, significantly different from the other groups (P<0.05). Conclusions For 2-level reconstruction, hybrid surgery and ADR did not alter ROM and minimally changed ICR at the adjacent-level. The type of surgery had a significant impact on the ICR location. This suggests that hybrid surgery may be a viable option for 2

  15. Narrative review of the in vivo mechanics of the cervical spine after anterior arthrodesis as revealed by dynamic biplane radiography.

    PubMed

    Anderst, William

    2016-01-01

    Arthrodesis is the standard of care for numerous pathologic conditions of the cervical spine and is performed over 150,000 times annually in the United States. The primary long-term concern after this surgery is adjacent segment disease (ASD), defined as new clinical symptoms adjacent to a previous fusion. The incidence of adjacent segment disease is approximately 3% per year, meaning that within 10 years of the initial surgery, approximately 25% of cervical arthrodesis patients require a second procedure to address symptomatic adjacent segment degeneration. Despite the high incidence of ASD, until recently, there was little data available to characterize in vivo adjacent segment mechanics during dynamic motion. This manuscript reviews recent advances in our knowledge of adjacent segment mechanics after cervical arthrodesis that have been facilitated by the use of dynamic biplane radiography. The primary observations from these studies are that current in vitro test paradigms often fail to replicate in vivo spine mechanics before and after arthrodesis, that intervertebral mechanics vary among cervical motion segments, and that joint arthrokinematics (i.e., the interactions between adjacent vertebrae) are superior to traditional kinematics measurements for identifying altered adjacent segment mechanics after arthrodesis. Future research challenges are identified, including improving the biofidelity of in vitro tests, determining the natural history of in vivo spine mechanics, conducting prospective longitudinal studies on adjacent segment kinematics and arthrokinematics after single and multiple-level arthrodesis, and creating subject-specific computational models to accurately estimate muscle forces and tissue loading in the spine during dynamic activities.

  16. Cost-utility analysis modeling at 2-year follow-up for cervical disc arthroplasty versus anterior cervical discectomy and fusion: A single-center contribution to the randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Warren, Daniel; Andres, Tate; Hoelscher, Christian; Ricart-Hoffiz, Pedro; Bendo, John; Goldstein, Jeffrey

    2013-01-01

    Background Patients with cervical disc herniations resulting in radiculopathy or myelopathy from single level disease have traditionally been treated with Anterior Cervical Discectomy and Fusion (ACDF), yet Cervical Disc Arthroplasty (CDA) is a new alternative. Expert suggestion of reduced adjacent segment degeneration is a promising future result of CDA. A cost-utility analysis of these procedures with long-term follow-up has not been previously reported. Methods We reviewed single institution prospective data from a randomized trial comparing single-level ACDF and CDA in cervical disc disease. Both Medicare reimbursement schedules and actual hospital cost data for peri-operative care were separately reviewed and analyzed to estimate the cost of treatment of each patient. QALYs were calculated at 1 and 2 years based on NDI and SF-36 outcome scores, and incremental cost effectiveness ratio (ICER) analysis was performed to determine relative cost-effectiveness. Results Patients of both groups showed improvement in NDI and SF-36 outcome scores. Medicare reimbursement rates to the hospital were $11,747 and $10,015 for ACDF and CDA, respectively; these figures rose to $16,162 and $13,171 when including physician and anesthesiologist reimbursement. The estimated actual cost to the hospital of ACDF averaged $16,108, while CDA averaged $16,004 (p = 0.97); when including estimated physicians fees, total hospital costs came to $19,811 and $18,440, respectively. The cost/QALY analyses therefore varied widely with these discrepancies in cost values. The ICERs of ACDF vs CDA with Medicare reimbursements were $18,593 (NDI) and $19,940 (SF-36), while ICERs based on actual total hospital cost were $13,710 (NDI) and $9,140 (SF-36). Conclusions We confirm the efficacy of ACDF and CDA in the treatment of cervical disc disease, as our results suggest similar clinical outcomes at one and two year follow-up. The ICER suggests that the non-significant added benefit via ACDF comes at a

  17. Comparison of Hybrid Surgery Incorporating Anterior Cervical Discectomy and Fusion and Artificial Arthroplasty versus Multilevel Fusion for Multilevel Cervical Spondylosis: A Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Zang, Leyuan; Ma, Min; Hu, Jianxin; Qiu, Hao; Huang, Bo; Chu, Tongwei

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Few studies have reported the safety and efficacy of hybrid surgery (HS), and some of the studies comparing HS with ACDF have reported conflicting results. We conducted this meta-analysis to clarify the advantages of HS in the treatment of multilevel cervical spondylosis. MATERIAL AND METHODS We performed a systematic literature search in PubMed, Medline, and CNKI to identify relevant controlled trials published up to October 2015. The standardized mean difference (SMD) and 95% confidence interval (95% CI) of the perioperative parameters, visual analogue scale pain score (VAS), neck disability index (NDI), and range of motion (ROM) of C2-C7 and adjacent segments were calculated. We also analyzed complications and Odom scale scores using risk difference (RD) and 95% CI. RESULTS In total, 7 studies were included. The pooled data exhibited significant differences in blood loss between the 2 groups. However, there was no evidence indicating significant differences in operation time, complications, VAS, NDI, or Odom scale scores. Compared with the ACDF group, the HS group exhibited significantly protected C2-C7 ROM and reduced adjacent-segment ROM. CONCLUSIONS The safety of HS may be as good as that of ACDF. Furthermore, HS is superior to ACDF in conserving cervical spine ROM and decreasing adjacent-segment ROM. However, the results should be accepted cautiously due to the limitations of the study. Studies with larger sample sizes and longer follow-up periods are required to confirm and update the results of the present study. PMID:26709008

  18. Comparison of anterior decompression and fusion versus laminoplasty in the treatment of multilevel cervical ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Weijun; Hu, Ling; Chou, Po-Hsin; Liu, Ming; Kan, Wusheng; Wang, Junwen

    2016-01-01

    Purpose A meta-analysis was conducted to evaluate the clinical outcomes, complications, reoperation rates, and late neurological deterioration between anterior decompression and fusion (ADF) and laminoplasty (LAMP) in the treatment of multilevel cervical ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament (OPLL). Methods All related studies published up to August 2015 were acquired by searching PubMed and EMBASE. Exclusion criteria were case reports, revision surgeries, combined anterior and posterior surgeries, the other posterior approaches including laminectomy or laminectomy and instrumented fusion, non-English studies, and studies with quality assessment scores of <7. The main end points including Japanese Orthopedic Association (JOA) score, recovery rate of JOA, cervical lordosis, complication rate, reoperation rate, and late neurological deterioration were analyzed. All available data was analyzed using RevMan 5.2.0 and Stata 12.0. Results A total of seven studies were included in the meta-analysis. The mean surgical level of ADF was 3.1, and the mean preoperative occupation ratios of ADF and LAMP group were 55.9% and 51.9%, respectively. No statistical difference was observed with regard to preoperative occupation ratio and preoperative JOA score. Although LAMP group had a higher preoperative cervical lordosis than ADF group (P<0.05, weighted mean difference [WMD] =−5.73, 95% confidence interval [CI] =−9.67–−1.80), significantly decreased cervical lordosis was observed in LAMP group after operation. ADF group had higher postoperative JOA score (P<0.05, WMD =2.18, 95% CI =0.98–3.38) and neurological recovery rate (P<0.05, WMD =27.22, 95% CI =15.20–39.23). Furthermore, ADF group had a lower late neurological deterioration rate than the LAMP group (P<0.05, risk difference =0.16, 95% CI =0.04–0.73). The complication rates of both groups had no statistical difference. However, LAMP group had a significantly lower reoperation rate than ADF group

  19. A Meta-Analysis of the Incidence of Patient-Reported Dysphagia After Anterior Cervical Decompression and Fusion with the Zero-Profile Implant System.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yi; Ma, Litai; Liu, Hao; Xu, MangMang

    2016-04-01

    Dysphagia is a well-known complication following anterior cervical surgery. It has been reported that the Zero-profile Implant System can decrease the incidence of dysphagia following surgery, however, dysphagia after anterior cervical decompression and fusion (ACDF) with the Zero-profile Implant System remains controversial. Previous studies only focus on small sample sizes. The objective of this study was to determine the incidence of dysphagia after ACDF with the Zero-profile Implant System. Studies were collected from PubMed, EMBASE, the Cochrane library and the China Knowledge Resource Integrated Database using the keywords "Zero-profile OR Zero-p) AND (dysphagia OR [swallowing dysfunction]". The software STATA (Version 13.0) was used for statistical analysis. Statistical heterogeneity across the various trials, a test of publication bias and sensitivity analysis was performed. 30 studies with a total of 1062 patients were included in this meta-analysis. The occurrence of post-operative transient dysphagia ranged from 0 to 76 % whilst the pooled incidence was 15.6 % (95 % CI, 12.6, 18.5 %). 23 studies reported no persistent dysphagia whilst seven studies reported persistent dysphagia ranging from 1 to 7 %). In summary, the present study observed a low incidence of both transient and persistent dysphagia after ACDF using the Zero-profile Implant System. Most of the dysphagia was mild and gradually decreased during the following months. Moderate or severe dysphagia was uncommon. Future randomized controlled multi-center studies and those focusing on the mechanisms of dysphagia and methods to reduce its incidence are required.

  20. Prevalence of adjacent segment disc degeneration in patients undergoing anterior cervical discectomy and fusion based on pre-operative MRI findings.

    PubMed

    Lundine, Kristopher M; Davis, Gavin; Rogers, Myron; Staples, Margaret; Quan, Gerald

    2014-01-01

    Anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) is a widely accepted surgical treatment for symptomatic cervical spondylosis. Some patients develop symptomatic adjacent segment degeneration, occasionally requiring further treatment. The cause and prevalence of adjacent segment degeneration and disease is unclear at present. Proponents for motion preserving surgery such as disc arthroplasty argue that this technique may decrease the "strain" on adjacent discs and thus decrease the incidence of symptomatic adjacent segment degeneration. The purpose of this study was to assess the pre-operative prevalence of adjacent segment degeneration in patients undergoing ACDF. A database review of three surgeons' practice was carried out to identify patients who had undergone a one- or two-level ACDF for degenerative disc disease. Patients were excluded if they were operated on for recent trauma, had an inflammatory arthropathy (for example, rheumatoid arthritis), or had previous spine surgery. The pre-operative MRI of each patient was reviewed and graded using a standardised methodology. One hundred and six patient MRI studies were reviewed. All patients showed some evidence of intervertebral disc degeneration adjacent to the planned operative segment(s). Increased severity of disc degeneration was associated with increased age and operative level, but was not associated with sagittal alignment. Disc degeneration was more common at levels adjacent to the surgical level than at non-adjacent segments, and was more severe at the superior adjacent level compared with the inferior adjacent level. These findings support the theory that adjacent segment degeneration following ACDF is due in part to the natural history of cervical spondylosis.

  1. Embolization by Direct Puncture with a Transpedicular Approach Using an Isocenter Puncture (ISOP) Method in a Patient with a Type II Endoleak After Endovascular Aortic Repair (EVAR)

    SciTech Connect

    Ogawa, Yukihisa Hamaguchi, Shingo; Nishimaki, Hiroshi; Kon, Yuri; Chiba, Kiyoshi; Sakurai, Yuka; Murakami, Kenji; Arai, Yasunori; Miyairi, Takeshi; Nakajima, Yasuo

    2015-06-15

    BackgroundEndovascular aortic repair (EVAR) requires further intervention in 20-30 % of cases, often due to type II endoleak (T2EL). Management options for T2EL include transarterial embolization, direct puncture (DP), or transcaval embolization. We report the case of an 80-year-old man with T2EL who successfully underwent DP embolization.MethodsEmbolization by DP was performed with a transpedicular approach using an isocenter puncture (ISOP) method. An isocenter marker (ICM) was placed at a site corresponding to the aneurysm sac on fluoroscopy in two directions (frontal and lateral views). A vertebroplasty needle was inserted tangentially to the ICM under fluoroscopy and advanced to the anterior wall of the vertebral body. A 20 cm-length, 20-G-PTCD needle was inserted through the outer needle of the 13-G needle and advanced to the ICM. Sac embolization using 25 % N-buty-2-cyanoacrylate diluted with Lipiodol was performed. After complete embolization, rotational DA confirmed good filling of the sac with Lipiodol. The outer cannula and 13-G needle were removed and the procedure was completed.ResultsThe patient was discharged the next day. Contrast-enhanced computed tomography 1 and 8 months later showed no Lipiodol washout in the aneurysm sac, no endoleak recurrence, and no expansion of the excluded aneurysm.ConclusionDP with a transpedicular approach using ISOP may be useful when translumbar and transabdominal approaches prove difficult.

  2. Anterior cervical discectomy with fusion in patients with cervical disc degeneration: a prospective outcome study of 258 patients (181 fused with autologous bone graft and 77 fused with a PEEK cage)

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Anterior cervical discectomy with fusion (ACDF) is challenging with respect to both patient selection and choice of surgical procedure. The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical outcome of ACDF, with respect to both patient selection and choice of surgical procedure: fusion with an autologous iliac crest graft (AICG) versus fusion with an artificial cage made of polyetheretherketone (PEEK). Methods This was a non-randomized prospective single-center outcome study of 258 patients who underwent ACDF for cervical disc degeneration (CDD). Fusion was attained with either tricortical AICG or PEEK cages without additional anterior plating, with treatment selected at surgeon's discretion. Radicular pain, neck-pain, headache and patient satisfaction with the treatment were scored using the visual analogue scale (VAS). Results The median age was 47.5 (28.3-82.8) years, and 44% of patients were female. 59% had single-level ACDF, 40% had two level ACDF and 1% had three-level ACDF. Of the patients, 181 were fused with AICG and 77 with a PEEK-cage. After surgery, the patients showed a significant reduction in radicular pain (ΔVAS = 3.05), neck pain (ΔVAS = 2.30) and headache (ΔVAS = 0.55). Six months after surgery, 48% of patients had returned to work: however 24% were still receiving workers' compensation. Using univariate and multivariate analyses we found that high preoperative pain intensity was significantly associated with a decrease in pain intensity after surgery, for all three pain categories. There were no significant correlations between pain relief and the following patient characteristics: fusion method (AICG or PEEK-cage), sex, age, number of levels fused, disc level fused, previous neck surgery (except for neck pain), previous neck trauma, or preoperative symptom duration. Two hundred out of the 256 (78%) patients evaluated the surgical result as successful. Only 27/256 (11%) classified the surgical result as a failure. Patient satisfaction

  3. The CASCADE trial: effectiveness of ceramic versus PEEK cages for anterior cervical discectomy with interbody fusion; protocol of a blinded randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Anterior cervical discectomy with interbody fusion cages is considered the standard surgical procedure in patients with cervical disc herniation. However, PEEK or metal cages have some undesirable imaging characteristics, leading to a search for alternative materials not creating artifacts on images; silicon nitride ceramic. Whether patients treated with silicon nitride ceramic cages have similar functional outcome as patients treated with PEEK cages is not known. We present the design of the CASCADE trial on effectiveness of ceramic cages versus PEEK cages in patients with cervical disc herniation and/or osteophytes. Methods/Design Patients (age 18–75 years) with monoradicular symptoms in one or both arms lasting more than 8 weeks, due to disc herniation and/or osteophytes, are eligible for the trial. The study is designed as a randomized controlled equivalence trial in which patients are blinded to the type of cage for 1 year. The total follow-up period is 2 years. The primary outcome measure is improvement in the Neck and Disability Index (NDI). Secondary outcomes measures include improvement in arm pain and neck pain (VAS), SF-36 and patients' perceived recovery. The final elements of comparison are perioperative statistics including operating time, blood loss, length of hospital stay, and adverse events. Lateral plane films at each follow-up visit and CT scan (at 6 months) will be used to judge fusion and the incidence of subsidence. Based on a power of 90% and assuming 8% loss to follow-up, 100 patients will be randomized into the 2 groups. The first analysis will be conducted when all patients have 1 year of follow-up, and the groups will be followed for 1 additional year to judge stability of outcomes. Discussion While the new ceramic cage has received the CE Mark based on standard compliance and animal studies, a randomized comparative study with the golden standard product will provide more conclusive information for clinicians

  4. Radiologic Findings and Risk Factors of Adjacent Segment Degeneration after Anterior Cervical Discectomy and Fusion : A Retrospective Matched Cohort Study with 3-Year Follow-Up Using MRI

    PubMed Central

    So, Wan-Soo; Ku, Min-Geun; Kim, Sang-Hyeon; Kim, Dong-Won; Lee, Byung-Hun

    2016-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to figure out the radiologic findings and risk factors related to adjacent segment degeneration (ASD) after anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) using 3-year follow-up radiography, computed tomography (CT), and magnetic resonance image (MRI). Methods A retrospective matched comparative study was performed for 64 patients who underwent single-level ACDF with a cage and plate. Radiologic parameters, including upper segment range of motion (USROM), lower segment range of motion (LSROM), upper segment disc height (UDH), and lower segment disc height (LDH), clinical outcomes assessed with neck and arm visual analogue scale (VAS), and risk factors were analyzed. Results Patients were categorized into the ASD (32 patients) and non-ASD (32 patients) group. The decrease of UDH was significantly greater in the ASD group at each follow-up visit. At 36 months postoperatively, the difference for USROM value from the preoperative one significantly increased in the ASD group than non-ASD group. Preoperative other segment degeneration was significantly associated with the increased incidence of ASD at 36 months. However, pain intensity for the neck and arm was not significantly different between groups at any post-operative follow-up visit. Conclusion The main factor affecting ASD is preoperative other segment degeneration out of the adjacent segment. In addition, patients over the age of 50 are at higher risk of developing ASD. Although there was definite radiologic degeneration in the ASD group, no significant difference was observed between the ASD and non-ASD groups in terms of the incidence of symptomatic disease. PMID:26962418

  5. CSF Leaks and Their Management Following Anterior Cervical Discectomy and Fusion: A Report of 13 Cases and a Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Syre, Peter; Bohman, Leif-Erik; Baltuch, Gordon; Roux, Peter Le; Welch, William C

    2014-05-13

    : Study Design. Retrospective chart review and literature review.Objective. To identify cases where a CSF leak occurred during an ACDF and to create a management algorithm based on the findings.Summary of Background Data. Anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) is a commonly performed spinal operation. It is effective with very low complication rates. One rare complication of ACDF is a CSF leak. There is limited information on the management of CSF leaks following ACDF and management is on a surgeon-by-surgeon basis.Methods. We reviewed 3 surgeons' case logs and identified cases where a CSF leak was encountered during ACDF and reviewed the patients' medical records, operative reports and imaging to determine how these leaks were managed. We also performed a PubMed search for articles about the presentation and management of CSF leaks following ACDF.Results. Thirteen CSF leaks were identified in 1223 ACDFs, corresponding to a CSF leak rate of 1%. Of these, 9 were successfully treated with intraoperative repair. Postoperative lumbar drainage was used in the remaining 4 patients and was successful in 1 patient. Three patients underwent neck re-exploration and attempted delayed repair. Three patients, including one who was found to have hydrocephalus, ultimately required continuous CSF diversion via shunting. We identified 7 case reports of CSF leak in ADCF in the literature and 1 article that reviewed the prevalence and management of this complication.Conclusion. CSF leak following ACDF is an uncommon complication that can usually be repaired. We provide a stepwise management strategy for CSF leaks in ACDF.

  6. Quality analysis of anterior cervical discectomy and fusion in the outpatient versus inpatient setting: analysis of 7288 patients from the NSQIP database.

    PubMed

    McGirt, Matthew J; Godil, Saniya S; Asher, Anthony L; Parker, Scott L; Devin, Clinton J

    2015-12-01

    OBJECT In an era of escalating health care cost and universal pressure of improving efficiency and cost of care, ambulatory surgery centers (ASCs) have emerged as lower cost options for many surgical therapies. Anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) is one of the most prevalent spine surgeries performed and is rapidly increasing with an expanding aging population. While ASCs offer cost advantages for ACDF, there is a scarcity of evidence that ASCs allow for equivalent quality and thus superior health care value. Therefore, the authors analyzed a nationwide, prospective quality improvement registry (National Surgical Quality Improvement Program [NSQIP]) to compare the quality of ACDF surgery performed in the outpatient ASC versus the inpatient hospital setting. METHODS Patients undergoing ACDF (2005-2011) were identified from the NSQIP database based on the primary Current Procedural Terminology codes. Patients were divided into 2 cohorts (outpatient vs inpatient) based on the acute care setting documented in the NSQIP database. All 30-day surgical morbidity and mortality rates were compared between the 2 groups. Propensity score matching and multivariate logistic regression analysis were used to adjust for confounding factors and to identify the independent association of outpatient ACDF with perioperative outcomes and morbidity. RESULTS A total of 7288 ACDF cases were identified (inpatient = 6120, outpatient = 1168). Unadjusted rates of major morbidity (0.94% vs 4.5%, p < 0.001) and return to the operating room (OR) within 30 days (0.3% vs 2.0%, p < 0.001) were significantly lower in outpatient versus inpatient ACDF. After propensity matching 1442 cases (inpatient = 650, outpatient = 792) based on baseline 32 covariates, rates of major morbidity (1.4% vs 3.1%, p = 0.03), and return to the OR (0.34% vs 1.4%, p = 0.04) remained significantly lower after outpatient ACDF. Adjusted comparison using multivariate logistic regression demonstrated that ACDF

  7. Comparison of surgical outcomes after anterior cervical discectomy and fusion: does the intra-operative use of a microscope improve surgical outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Elsamadicy, Aladine; Reiser, Elizabeth; Ziegler, Cole; Freischlag, Kyle; Cheng, Joseph; Bagley, Carlos A.

    2016-01-01

    Background The primary aim of this study was to assess and compare the complications profile as well as long-term clinical outcomes between patients undergoing an Anterior Cervical Discectomy and Fusion (ACDF) procedure with and without the use of an intra-operative microscope. Methods One hundred and forty adult patients (non-microscope cohort: 81; microscope cohort: 59) undergoing ACDF at a major academic medical center were included in this study. Enrollment criteria included available demographic, surgical and clinical outcome data. All patients had prospectively collected patient-reported outcomes measures and a minimum 2-year follow-up. Patients completed the neck disability index (NDI), short-form 12 (SF-12) and visual analog pain scale (VAS) before surgery, then at 3, 6, 12, and 24 months after surgery. Clinical outcomes and complication rates were compared between both patient cohorts. Results Baseline characteristics were similar between both cohorts. The mean ± standard deviation duration of surgery was longer in the microscope cohort (microscope: 169±34 minutes vs. non-microscope: 98±42 minutes, P<0.001). There was no significant difference between cohorts in the incidence of nerve root injury (P=0.99) or incidental durotomy (P=0.32). At 3 months post-operatively, both cohorts demonstrated similar improvement in VAS-neck pain (P=0.69), NDI (P=0.86), SF-12 PCS (P=0.84) and SF-12 MCS (P=0.75). At 2-year post-operatively, both the microscope and non-microscope cohorts demonstrated similar improvement from base line in NDI (microscope: 13.52±25.77 vs. non-microscope: 19.51±27.47, P<0.18), SF-12 PCS (microscope: 4.15±26.39 vs. non-microscope: 11.98±22.96, P<0.07), SF-12 MCS (microscope: 9.47±32.38 vs. non-microscope: 16.19±30.44, P<0.21). Interestingly at 2 years, the change in VAS neck pain score was significantly different between cohorts (microscope: 2.22±4.00 vs. non-microscope: 3.69±3.61, P<0.02). Conclusions Our study demonstrates that the

  8. Anterior cervical discectomy and fusion in the outpatient ambulatory surgery setting compared with the inpatient hospital setting: analysis of 1000 consecutive cases.

    PubMed

    Adamson, Tim; Godil, Saniya S; Mehrlich, Melissa; Mendenhall, Stephen; Asher, Anthony L; McGirt, Matthew J

    2016-06-01

    OBJECTIVE In an era of escalating health care costs and pressure to improve efficiency and cost of care, ambulatory surgery centers (ASCs) have emerged as lower-cost options for many surgical therapies. Anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) is one of the most prevalent spine surgeries performed, and the frequency of its performance is rapidly increasing as the aging population grows. Although ASCs offer significant cost advantages over hospital-based surgical centers, concern over the safety of outpatient ACDF has slowed its adoption. The authors intended to 1) determine the safety of the first 1000 consecutive ACDF surgeries performed in their outpatient ASC, and 2) compare the safety of these outpatient ACDFs with that of consecutive ACDFs performed during the same time period in the hospital setting. METHODS A total of 1000 consecutive patients who underwent ACDF in an ACS (outpatient ACDF) and 484 consecutive patients who underwent ACDF at Vanderbilt University Hospital (inpatient ACDF) from 2006 to 2013 were included in this retrospective study of patients' medical records. Data were collected on patient demographics, comorbidities, operative details, and perioperative and 90-day morbidity. Perioperative morbidity and hospital readmission were compared between the outpatient and inpatient ACDF groups. RESULTS Of the first 1000 outpatient ACDF cases performed in the authors' ASC, 629 (62.9%) were 1-level and 365 (36.5%) were 2-level ACDFs. Mean patient age was 49.5 ± 8.6, and 484 (48.4%) were males. All patients were observed postoperatively at the ASC postanesthesia care unit (PACU) for 4 hours before being discharged home. Eight patients (0.8%) were transferred from the surgery center to the hospital postoperatively (for pain control [n = 3], chest pain and electrocardiogram changes [n = 2], intraoperative CSF leak [n = 1], postoperative hematoma [n = 1], and profound postoperative weakness and surgical reexploration [n = 1]). No perioperative

  9. Anterior cervical discectomy and fusion in the outpatient ambulatory surgery setting compared with the inpatient hospital setting: analysis of 1000 consecutive cases.

    PubMed

    Adamson, Tim; Godil, Saniya S; Mehrlich, Melissa; Mendenhall, Stephen; Asher, Anthony L; McGirt, Matthew J

    2016-06-01

    OBJECTIVE In an era of escalating health care costs and pressure to improve efficiency and cost of care, ambulatory surgery centers (ASCs) have emerged as lower-cost options for many surgical therapies. Anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) is one of the most prevalent spine surgeries performed, and the frequency of its performance is rapidly increasing as the aging population grows. Although ASCs offer significant cost advantages over hospital-based surgical centers, concern over the safety of outpatient ACDF has slowed its adoption. The authors intended to 1) determine the safety of the first 1000 consecutive ACDF surgeries performed in their outpatient ASC, and 2) compare the safety of these outpatient ACDFs with that of consecutive ACDFs performed during the same time period in the hospital setting. METHODS A total of 1000 consecutive patients who underwent ACDF in an ACS (outpatient ACDF) and 484 consecutive patients who underwent ACDF at Vanderbilt University Hospital (inpatient ACDF) from 2006 to 2013 were included in this retrospective study of patients' medical records. Data were collected on patient demographics, comorbidities, operative details, and perioperative and 90-day morbidity. Perioperative morbidity and hospital readmission were compared between the outpatient and inpatient ACDF groups. RESULTS Of the first 1000 outpatient ACDF cases performed in the authors' ASC, 629 (62.9%) were 1-level and 365 (36.5%) were 2-level ACDFs. Mean patient age was 49.5 ± 8.6, and 484 (48.4%) were males. All patients were observed postoperatively at the ASC postanesthesia care unit (PACU) for 4 hours before being discharged home. Eight patients (0.8%) were transferred from the surgery center to the hospital postoperatively (for pain control [n = 3], chest pain and electrocardiogram changes [n = 2], intraoperative CSF leak [n = 1], postoperative hematoma [n = 1], and profound postoperative weakness and surgical reexploration [n = 1]). No perioperative

  10. [Fusion in adolescent idiopathic scoliosis : Anterior, posterior or combined? One-stage or two-stage?].

    PubMed

    Quack, V; Rath, B; Schenker, H; Schulze, A; El Mansy, Y; Tingart, M; Betsch, M

    2015-11-01

    Scoliosis is a complex, three-dimensional spinal deformity with various causes. Adolescent idiopathic scoliosis (AIS) is the most common form. Surgical treatment is indicated for curves greater than 45-50° meaured using the Cobb method. We can distinguish among posterior, anterior or combined surgical procedures. Today, the posterior, transpedicular approach has revolutionized scoliosis surgery. This review gives an overview of current surgical options in scoliosis treatment.

  11. Hospital charges associated with "never events": comparison of anterior cervical discectomy and fusion, posterior lumbar interbody fusion, and lumbar laminectomy to total joint arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Daniels, Alan H; Kawaguchi, Satoshi; Contag, Alec G; Rastegar, Farbod; Waagmeester, Garrett; Anderson, Paul A; Arthur, Melanie; Hart, Robert A

    2016-08-01

    OBJECTIVE Beginning in 2008, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Service (CMS) determined that certain hospital-acquired adverse events such as surgical site infection (SSI) following spine surgery should never occur. The following year, they expanded the ruling to include deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE) following total joint arthroplasty. Due to their ruling that "never events" are not the payers' responsibility, CMS insists that the costs of managing these complications be borne by hospitals and health care providers, rather than billings to health care payers for additional care required in their management. Data comparing the expected costs of such adverse events in patients undergoing spine and orthopedic surgery have not previously been reported. METHODS The California State Inpatient Database (CA-SID) from 2008 to 2009 was used for the analysis. All patients with primary procedure codes indicating anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF), posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF), lumbar laminectomy (LL), total knee replacement (TKR), and total hip replacement (THR) were analyzed. Patients with diagnostic and/or treatment codes for DVT, PE, and SSI were separated from patients without these complication codes. Patients with more than 1 primary procedure code or more than 1 complication code were excluded. Median charges for treatment from primary surgery through 3 months postoperatively were calculated. RESULTS The incidence of the examined adverse events was lowest for ACDF (0.6% DVT, 0.1% PE, and 0.03% SSI) and highest for TKA (1.3% DVT, 0.3% PE, 0.6% SSI). Median inpatient charges for uncomplicated LL was $51,817, compared with $73,432 for ACDF, $143,601 for PLIF, $74,459 for THR, and $70,116 for TKR. Charges for patients with DVT ranged from $108,387 for TKR (1.5 times greater than index) to $313,536 for ACDF (4.3 times greater than index). Charges for patients with PE ranged from $127,958 for TKR (1.8 times greater than

  12. Percutaneous Transpedicular Fixation: Technical tips and Pitfalls of Sextant and Pathfinder Systems

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, Ahmed Salah Aldin

    2016-01-01

    Study Design The efficacy of the operative techniques, possible benefits as well as pitfalls and limitations of the techniques are discussed. Potential drawbacks are also detected. Purpose This study aims to report indications, techniques, and our experience with the use of the Sextant and PathFinder percutaneous transpedicular screw fixation systems. Overview of Literature Percutaneous pedicle screw insertion is a novel technique. Successful percutaneous placement of pedicle screws requires surgical skill and experience because of lack of anatomic surface landmarks. Fluoroscopy-guided percutaneous placement of pedicle screws is effective. Many systems are now available. Methods We conducted a prospective operative and postoperative analysis of 40 patients with absolute indication for thoracic or lumbar instability between January 2009 and June 2013. All procedures were performed with the Sextant (group A) and PathFinder (group B) systems under fluoroscopic guidance. Operative techniques are discussed and the results compared. Results Percutaneous transpedicular screw fixation minimizes the morbidity associated with open techniques without compromising the quality of fixation. A total of 190 screws were inserted. There was no additional morbidity. Postoperative computed tomography images and plain X-rays were analyzed. Reduction of visual analog scale scores of back pain was evident. Conclusions Fluoroscopy-guided percutaneous pedicular screws are feasible and can be safely done. Current systems allow multi-segmental fixation with significantly less difficulties. The described techniques have acceptable intra- and postoperative complication rates, and overall sufficient pain control with early mobilization of patients. PMID:26949466

  13. Posterior interbody fusion using a diagonal cage with unilateral transpedicular screw fixation for lumbar stenosis.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jian; Zhang, Feng; Chen, Xiaoqing; Yao, Yu

    2011-03-01

    Few reports have described the combined use of unilateral pedicle screw fixation and interbody fusion for lumbar stenosis. We retrospectively reviewed 79 patients with lumbar stenosis. The rationale and effectiveness of unilateral pedicle screw fixation were studied from biomechanical and clinical perspectives, aiming to reduce stiffness of the implant. All patients were operated with posterior interbody fusion using a diagonal cage in combination with unilateral transpedicular screw fixation and had reached the 3-year follow-up interval after operation. The mean operating time was 115 minutes (range=95-150 min) and the mean estimated blood loss was 150 mL (range=100-200 mL). The mean duration of hospital stay was 10 days (range=7-15 days). Clinical outcomes were assessed prior to surgery and reassessed at intervals using Denis' pain and work scales. Fusion status was determined from X-rays and CT scans. At the final follow-up, the clinical results were satisfactory and patients showed significantly improved scores (p<0.01) either on the pain or the work scale. Successful fusion was achieved in all patients. There were no new postoperative radiculopathies, or instances of malpositioned or fractured hardware. Posterior interbody fusion using a diagonal cage with unilateral transpedicular fixation is an effective treatment for decompressive surgery for lumbar stenosis.

  14. Postlaminectomy cervical deformity.

    PubMed

    Deutsch, Harel; Haid, Regis W; Rodts, Gerald E; Mummaneni, Praveen V

    2003-09-15

    Postlaminectomy cervical kyphosis is an important consideration when performing surgery. Identifying factors predisposing to postoperative deformity is essential. The goal is to prevent postlaminectomy cervical kyphosis while exposing the patient to minimal additional morbidity. When postlaminectomy kyphosis does occur, surgical correction is often required and performed via an anterior, posterior, or combined approach. The authors discuss the indications for surgical approaches as well as clinical results. PMID:15347223

  15. Cervical spondylosis and hypertension: a clinical study of 2 cases.

    PubMed

    Peng, Baogan; Pang, Xiaodong; Li, Duanming; Yang, Hong

    2015-03-01

    Cervical spondylosis and hypertension are all common diseases, but the relationship between them has never been studied. Patients with cervical spondylosis are often accompanied with vertigo. Anterior cervical discectomy and fusion is an effective method of treatment for cervical spondylosis with cervical vertigo that is unresponsive to conservative therapy. We report 2 patients of cervical spondylosis with concomitant cervical vertigo and hypertension who were treated successfully with anterior cervical discectomy and fusion. Stimulation of sympathetic nerve fibers in pathologically degenerative disc could produce sympathetic excitation, and induce a sympathetic reflex to cause cervical vertigo and hypertension. In addition, chronic neck pain could contribute to hypertension development through sympathetic arousal and failure of normal homeostatic pain regulatory mechanisms. Cervical spondylosis may be one of the causes of secondary hypertension. Early treatment for resolution of symptoms of cervical spondylosis may have a beneficial impact on cardiovascular disease risk in patients with cervical spondylosis. PMID:25761188

  16. Heterotopic ossification following single-level anterior cervical discectomy and fusion: results from the prospective, multicenter, historically controlled trial comparing allograft to an optimized dose of rhBMP-2.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Paul M; Anderson, Karen K; Selim, Abdulhafez; Dryer, Randall F; Kenneth Burkus, J

    2016-09-01

    OBJECTIVE Heterotopic ossification (HO) has been reported following total hip, knee, cervical, and lumbar arthroplasty, as well as following posterolateral lumbar fusion using recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (rhBMP-2). Data regarding HO following anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) with rhBMP-2 are sparse. A subanalysis was done of the prospective, multicenter, investigational device exemption trial that compared rhBMP-2 on an absorbable collagen sponge (ACS) versus allograft in ACDF for patients with symptomatic single-level cervical degenerative disc disease. METHODS To assess differences in types of HO observed in the treatment groups and effects of HO on functional and efficacy outcomes, clinical outcomes from previous disc replacement studies were compared between patients who received rhBMP-2/ACS versus allograft. Rate, location, grade, and size of ossifications were assessed preoperatively and at 24 months, and correlated with clinical outcomes. RESULTS Heterotopic ossification was primarily anterior in both groups. Preoperatively in both groups, and including osteophytes in the target regions, HO rates were high at 40.9% and 36.9% for the rhBMP-2/ACS and allograft groups, respectively (p = 0.350). At 24 months, the rate of HO in the rhBMP-2/ACS group was higher than in the allograft group (78.6% vs 59.2%, respectively; p < 0.001). At 24 months, the rate of superior-anterior adjacent-level Park Grade 3 HO was 4.2% in both groups, whereas the rate of Park Grade 2 HO was 19.0% in the rhBMP-2/ACS group compared with 9.8% in the allograft group. At 24 months, the rate of inferior-anterior adjacent-level Park Grade 2/3 HO was 11.9% in the rhBMP-2/ACS group compared with 5.9% in the allograft group. At 24 months, HO rates at the target implant level were similar (p = 0.963). At 24 months, the mean length and anteroposterior diameter of HO were significantly greater in the rhBMP-2/ACS group compared with the allograft group (p = 0.033 and

  17. Percutaneous Transpedicular Interbody Fusion Technique in Percutaneous Pedicle Screw Stabilization for Pseudoarthrosis Following Pyogenic Spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Ikuta, Ko; Masuda, Keigo; Yonekura, Yutaka; Kitamura, Takahiro; Senba, Hideyuki; Shidahara, Satoshi

    2016-04-01

    This report introduces a percutaneous transpedicular interbody fusion (PTPIF) technique in posterior stabilization using percutaneous pedicle screws (PPSs). An 81-year-old man presented with pseudoarthrosis following pyogenic spondylitis 15 months before. Although no relapse of infection was found, he complained of obstinate low back pain and mild neurological symptoms. Radiological evaluations showed a pseudoarthrosis following pyogenic spondylitis at T11-12. Posterior stabilization using PPSs from Th9 to L2 and concomitant PTPIF using autologous iliac bone graft at T11-12 were performed. Low back pain and neurological symptoms were immediately improved after surgery. A solid interbody fusion at T11-12 was completed 9 months after surgery. The patient had no restriction of daily activity and could play golf at one year after surgery. PTPIF might be a useful option for perform segmental fusion in posterior stabilization using PPSs. PMID:27114777

  18. Role of Transpedicular Percutaneous Vertebral Biopsy for Diagnosis of Pathology in Vertebral Compression Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Nadkarni, Sunil; Hardikar, Sharad Moreshwar; Hardikar, Madan Sharad

    2016-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective observational study. Purpose To identify the role of percutaneous vertebral biopsy in histopathological diagnosis of vertebral compression fractures and to identify the frequency of unexpected malignancy in vertebral compression fractures. Overview of Literature Vertebral compression fractures are common in the Indian population. Magnetic resonance imaging and nuclear imaging have some limitations in the diagnosis of definitive pathology of vertebral compression fractures. Therefore, histological confirmation is necessary for definitive diagnosis and to plan appropriate management for patient. Methods A retrospective observational study was conducted involving 84 patients who underwent percutaneous vertebral biopsy between 2010 and 2014. We performed C-arm guided percutaneous transpedicular core vertebral biopsy of vertebral compression fractures under combination of local anesthesia and intravenous conscious sedation. Results Sufficient biopsy material was obtained in 79 of the 84 cases. In the other five cases, biopsy material was not sufficient for reporting. Out of the 79 cases, osteoporotic pathology was detected in 69 patients, malignancy was detected in 8 patients and no pathology was found in 2 patients. Two patients with distant metastases to vertebra were identified. Primary spinal malignancy was detected in 6 patients (1 unsuspected plasmacytoma, 5 diagnosed malignancy preoperatively). So, the frequency of unsuspected malignancy of this study was 1.19% (1/84). None of the patients had any complications. Conclusions C-arm guided percutaneous transpedicular vertebral biopsy is useful in obtaining definitive histopathological diagnosis of vertebral compression fractures, especially in differentiating malignant and non-malignant vertebral compression fractures and helping plan appropriate management of patients. The rate of unexpected malignancy in vertebral compression fracture was 1.19%. PMID:27790322

  19. Posterior lumbar interbody fusion using one diagonal fusion cage with transpedicular screw/rod fixation.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jie; Hou, Tiesheng; Wang, Xinwei; Ma, Shengzhong

    2003-04-01

    Posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) using threaded cages has gained wide popularity for lumbosacral spinal disease. Our biomechanical tests showed that PLIF using a single diagonal cage with unilateral facetectomy does add a little to spinal stability and provides equal or even higher postoperative stability than PLIF using two posterior cages with bilateral facetectomy. Studies also demonstrated that cages placed using a posterior approach did not cause the same increase in spinal stiffness seen with pedicle screw instrumentation, and we concluded that cages should not be used posteriorly without other forms of fixation. On the other hand, placement of two cages using a posterior approach does have the disadvantage of risk to the bilateral nerve roots. We therefore performed a prospective study to determine whether PLIF can be accomplished by utilizing a single diagonal fusion cage with the application of supplemental transpedicular screw/rod instrumentation. Twenty-seven patients underwent a PLIF using one single fusion cage (BAK, Sulzer Spine-Tech, Minneapolis, MN, USA) inserted posterolaterally and oriented anteromedially on the symptomatic side with unilateral facetectomy and at the same level supplemental fixation with a transpedicular screw/rod system. The internal fixation systems included 12 SOCON spinal systems (Aesculap AG, Germany) and 15 TSRH spinal systems (Medtronic Sofamor Danek, USA). The inclusion criteria were grade 1 to 2 lumbar isthmic spondylolisthesis, lumbar degenerative spondylolisthesis, and recurrent lumbar disc herniations with instability. Patients had at least 1 year of low back pain and/or unilateral sciatica and a severely restricted functional ability in individuals aged 28-55 years. Patients with more than grade 2 spondylolisthesis or adjacent-level degeneration were excluded from the study. Patients were clinically assessed prior to surgery by an independent assessor; they were then reassessed at 1, 3, 6, 12, 18, and 24

  20. Late vertebral body fracture after lumbar transpedicular fixation. Report of three cases.

    PubMed

    Missori, Paolo; Ramieri, Alessandro; Costanzo, Giuseppe; Peschillo, Simone; Paolini, Sergio; Miscusi, Massimo; D'Andrea, Giancarlo; Delfini, Roberto

    2005-07-01

    Late-onset vertebral body (VB) fracture after lumbar transpedicular fixation has not been previously described in the literature. The authors present three cases in which VB fracture occurred several months after posterolateral fixation in patients with degenerative disease or traumatic injury. The authors suggest that postoperative osteopenia, modified load-sharing function, and intravertebral clefts were responsible for the fractures. Two women and one man were evaluated at a mean follow-up interval of 3 months. Two patients suffered recurrent lumbar pain. Radiography and magnetic resonance imaging revealed fracture of some of the instrumentation-treated VBs. These two patients underwent surgical superior or inferior extension of instrumentation. The third, an asymptomatic patient, received conservative management. The two patients who underwent reoperation made complete recoveries, and there was no evidence of further bone collapse in any case. The authors speculate that alterations in the VBs may occur following application of spinal instrumentation. In rare cases, the device can fracture and consequently lead to recurrent lumbar back pain. Recovery can be achieved by extending the instrumentation in the appropriate direction.

  1. The addition of cervical unilateral posterior-anterior mobilisation in the treatment of patients with shoulder impingement syndrome: a randomised clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Cook, Chad; Learman, Ken; Houghton, Steve; Showalter, Christopher; O'Halloran, Bryan

    2014-02-01

    Shoulder impingement syndrome (SIS) is a complex, multi-factorial problem that is treated with a variety of different conservative options. One conservative option that has shown effectiveness is manual therapy to the thoracic spine. Another option, manual therapy to the cervical spine, has been studied only once with good results, evaluating short-term outcomes, in a small sample size. The purpose of this study was to investigate the benefit of neck manual therapy for patients with SIS. The study was a randomised, single blinded, clinical trial where both groups received pragmatic, evidence-based treatment to the shoulder and one group received neck manual therapy. Subjects with neck pain were excluded from the study. Comparative pain, disability, rate of recovery and patient acceptable symptom state (PASS) measures were analyzed on the 68 subjects seen over an average of 56.1 days (standard deviation (SD)=55.4). Eighty-six percent of the sample reported an acceptable change on the PASS at discharge. There were no between-groups differences in those who did or did not receive neck manual therapy; however, both groups demonstrated significant within-groups improvements. On average both groups improved 59.7% (SD=25.1) for pain and 53.5% (SD=40.2) for the Quick Disabilities of the Shoulder and Hand Questionnaire (QuickDASH) from baseline. This study found no value when neck manual therapy was added to the treatment of SIS. Reasons may include the lack of therapeutic dosage provided for the manual therapy approach or the lack of benefit to treating the neck in subjects with SIS who do not have concomitant neck problems.

  2. Anterior cervical fusion with a bio-resorbable composite cage (beta TCP-PLLA): clinical and radiological results from a prospective study on 20 patients.

    PubMed

    Debusscher, F; Aunoble, S; Alsawad, Y; Clement, D; Le Huec, Jean-Charles

    2009-09-01

    A resorbable composite material (40% PLLA and 60% beta TCP) with a high breaking strength and capacity to withstand plastic and elastic strain has been developed for cervical interbody fusion. This is a prospective study to evaluate clinical and radiological results of 20 patients implanted with 27 cages (mean follow-up, 27 months). Clinical (neck disability index, VAS, neurological evaluation) and radiological (anteroposterior, lateral, bending X-rays) data were assessed before and after surgery. At the end of the study, CT scan was performed to evaluate fusion, resorption of the cage and density of the new tissue substituting the cage. The mean patient age was 50.3 years (range, 18-79 years). The average improvement was 55% for neck pain, 83% for arm pain and 65% for NDI, with 85% good or excellent results at final outcomes. Radiologically, lordosis was significantly improved (mean gain of 5.4 degrees and 3.7 degrees for overall and segmental lordosis, respectively). This correction was conserved in 95% of cases. Fusion was obtained in 96% (CT evaluation). Resorption was started in all cases and completed in an average of 36 months after surgery. The mean density of tissue substituting the cage was 659 UH with a range, of 455-911 UH (compatible with bone nature). Over time, the amount of bony tissue increased and the graft remodelled with an increase in density value. This demonstrates a biological activity and changing bone mineral content of this tissue. The new composite cage under investigation provides long-term fusion without loss of correction or inflammatory reaction. The ceramic block guarantees the maintenance of the disc height and its slow resorption allows long-term fusion and stability with good and reliable clinical and radiological outcomes. PMID:19533180

  3. Anterior cervical fusion with a bio-resorbable composite cage (beta TCP–PLLA): clinical and radiological results from a prospective study on 20 patients

    PubMed Central

    Debusscher, F.; Aunoble, S.; Alsawad, Y.; Clement, D.

    2009-01-01

    A resorbable composite material (40% PLLA and 60% beta TCP) with a high breaking strength and capacity to withstand plastic and elastic strain has been developed for cervical interbody fusion. This is a prospective study to evaluate clinical and radiological results of 20 patients implanted with 27 cages (mean follow-up, 27 months). Clinical (neck disability index, VAS, neurological evaluation) and radiological (anteroposterior, lateral, bending X-rays) data were assessed before and after surgery. At the end of the study, CT scan was performed to evaluate fusion, resorption of the cage and density of the new tissue substituting the cage. The mean patient age was 50.3 years (range, 18–79 years). The average improvement was 55% for neck pain, 83% for arm pain and 65% for NDI, with 85% good or excellent results at final outcomes. Radiologically, lordosis was significantly improved (mean gain of 5.4° and 3.7° for overall and segmental lordosis, respectively). This correction was conserved in 95% of cases. Fusion was obtained in 96% (CT evaluation). Resorption was started in all cases and completed in an average of 36 months after surgery. The mean density of tissue substituting the cage was 659 UH with a range, of 455–911 UH (compatible with bone nature). Over time, the amount of bony tissue increased and the graft remodelled with an increase in density value. This demonstrates a biological activity and changing bone mineral content of this tissue. The new composite cage under investigation provides long-term fusion without loss of correction or inflammatory reaction. The ceramic block guarantees the maintenance of the disc height and its slow resorption allows long-term fusion and stability with good and reliable clinical and radiological outcomes. PMID:19533180

  4. Degenerative cervical myelopathy.

    PubMed

    Kato, So; Fehlings, Michael

    2016-09-01

    Cervical myelopathy is the most common cause of acquired spinal cord compromise. The concept of degenerative cervical myelopathy (DCM), defined as symptomatic myelopathy associated with degenerative arthropathic changes in the spine axis, is being introduced. Given its progressive nature, treatment options have to be chosen in a timely manner. Surgical options include anterior discectomy and fusion (ACDF), anterior corpectomy and fusion (ACCF), arthroplasty (in highly select cases), posterior laminectomy with/without fusion, and laminoplasty. Indications for each should be carefully considered in individual patients. Riluzole, a sodium-glutamate antagonist, is a promising option to optimize neurologic outcomes post-surgery and is being examined in the CSM-Protect Randomized Controlled Trial. Preoperative risk assessment is mandatory for prognostication. Sagittal alignment is known to play an important role to optimize surgical outcome. Guidelines for optimal management of DCM are in process. In principle, all but the mildest cases of DCM should be offered surgery for optimal outcome. PMID:27250040

  5. Pathogenesis, Diagnosis, and Treatment of Cervical Vertigo.

    PubMed

    Li, Yongchao; Peng, Baogan

    2015-01-01

    Cervical vertigo is characterized by vertigo from the cervical spine. However, whether cervical vertigo is an independent entity still remains controversial. In this narrative review, we outline the basic science and clinical evidence for cervical vertigo according to the current literature. So far, there are 4 different hypotheses explaining the vertigo of a cervical origin, including proprioceptive cervical vertigo, Barré-Lieou syndrome, rotational vertebral artery vertigo, and migraine-associated cervicogenic vertigo. Proprioceptive cervical vertigo and rotational vertebral artery vertigo have survived with time. Barré-Lieou syndrome once was discredited, but it has been resurrected recently by increased scientific evidence. Diagnosis depends mostly on patients' subjective feelings, lacking positive signs, specific laboratory examinations and clinical trials, and often relies on limited clinical experiences of clinicians. Neurological, vestibular, and psychosomatic disorders must first be excluded before the dizziness and unsteadiness in cervical pain syndromes can be attributed to a cervical origin. Treatment for cervical vertigo is challenging. Manual therapy is recommended for treatment of proprioceptive cervical vertigo. Anterior cervical surgery and percutaneous laser disc decompression are effective for the cervical spondylosis patients accompanied with Barré-Liéou syndrome. As to rotational vertebral artery vertigo, a rare entity, when the exact area of the arterial compression is identified through appropriate tests such as magnetic resonance angiography (MRA), computed tomography angiography (CTA) or digital subtraction angiography (DSA) decompressive surgery should be the chosen treatment.

  6. Post laminoplasty cervical kyphosis—Case report

    PubMed Central

    Dugoni, D.E.; Mancarella, C.; Landi, A.; Tarantino, R.; Ruggeri, A.G.; Delfini, R.

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Cervical kyphosis is a progressive cervical sagittal plane deformity that may cause a reduction in the ability to look horizontally, breathing and swallowing difficulties, sense of thoracic oppression and social isolation. Moreover, cervical kyphosis can cause myelopathy due to a direct compression by osteo-articular structures on the spinal cord or to a transitory ischaemic injury. The treatment of choice is surgery. The goals of surgery are: nervous structures decompression, cervical and global sagittal balance correction and vertebral stabilization and fusion. PRESENTATION OF CASE In October 2008 a 35 years old woman underwent surgical removal of a cervical-bulbar ependymoma with C1–C5 laminectomy and a C2–C5 laminoplasty. Five months after surgery, the patient developed a kyphotic posture, with intense neck and scapular girdle pain. The patients had a flexible cervical kyphosis. Therefore, we decided to perform an anterior surgical approach. We performed a corpectomy C4–C5 in order to achieve the anterior decompression; we placed a titanium expansion mesh. DISCUSSION Cervical kyphosis can be flexible or fixed. Some authors have reported the use of anterior surgery only for flexible cervical kyphosis as discectomy and corpectomy. This approach is useful for anterior column load sharing however it is not required for deformity correction. CONCLUSION The anterior approach is a good surgical option in flexible cervical kyphosis. It is of primary importance the sagittal alignment of the cervical spine in order to decompress the nervous structures and to guarantee a long-term stability. PMID:25462050

  7. Cervical Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... the place where a baby grows during pregnancy. Cervical cancer is caused by a virus called HPV. The ... for a long time, or have HIV infection. Cervical cancer may not cause any symptoms at first. Later, ...

  8. A minimum 2-year comparative study of autologous cancellous bone grafting versus beta-tricalcium phosphate in anterior cervical discectomy and fusion using a rectangular titanium stand-alone cage.

    PubMed

    Yamagata, Toru; Naito, Kentaro; Arima, Hironori; Yoshimura, Masaki; Ohata, Kenji; Takami, Toshihiro

    2016-07-01

    Although titanium stand-alone cages are commonly used in anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF), there are several concerns such as cage subsidence after surgery. The efficacy of β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) granules as a packing material in 1- or 2-level ACDF using a rectangular titanium stand-alone cage is not fully understood. The purpose of this study is to investigate the validity of rectangular titanium stand-alone cages in 1- and 2-level ACDF with β-TCP. This retrospective study included 55 consecutive patients who underwent ACDF with autologous iliac cancellous bone grafting and 45 consecutive patients with β-TCP grafting. All patients completed at least 2-year postoperative follow-up. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to examine the associations between study variables and nonunion after surgery. Significant neurological recovery after surgery was obtained in both groups. Cage subsidence was noted in 14 of 72 cages (19.4 %) in the autograft group and 12 of 64 cages (18.8 %) in the β-TCP group. A total of 66 cages (91.7 %) in the autograft group showed osseous or partial union, and 58 cages (90.6 %) in the β-TCP group showed osseous or partial union by 2 years after surgery. There were no significant differences in cage subsidence and the bony fusion rate between the two groups. Multivariate analysis using a logistic regression model showed that fusion level at C6/7, 2-level fusion, and cage subsidence of grades 2-3 were significantly associated with nonunion at 2 years after surgery. Although an acceptable surgical outcome with negligible complication appears to justify the use of rectangular titanium stand-alone cages in 1- and 2-level ACDF with β-TCP, cage subsidence after surgery needs to be avoided to achieve acceptable bony fusion at the fused segments. Fusion level at C6/7 or 2-level fusion may be another risk factor of nonunion. PMID:27098659

  9. A minimum 2-year comparative study of autologous cancellous bone grafting versus beta-tricalcium phosphate in anterior cervical discectomy and fusion using a rectangular titanium stand-alone cage.

    PubMed

    Yamagata, Toru; Naito, Kentaro; Arima, Hironori; Yoshimura, Masaki; Ohata, Kenji; Takami, Toshihiro

    2016-07-01

    Although titanium stand-alone cages are commonly used in anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF), there are several concerns such as cage subsidence after surgery. The efficacy of β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) granules as a packing material in 1- or 2-level ACDF using a rectangular titanium stand-alone cage is not fully understood. The purpose of this study is to investigate the validity of rectangular titanium stand-alone cages in 1- and 2-level ACDF with β-TCP. This retrospective study included 55 consecutive patients who underwent ACDF with autologous iliac cancellous bone grafting and 45 consecutive patients with β-TCP grafting. All patients completed at least 2-year postoperative follow-up. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to examine the associations between study variables and nonunion after surgery. Significant neurological recovery after surgery was obtained in both groups. Cage subsidence was noted in 14 of 72 cages (19.4 %) in the autograft group and 12 of 64 cages (18.8 %) in the β-TCP group. A total of 66 cages (91.7 %) in the autograft group showed osseous or partial union, and 58 cages (90.6 %) in the β-TCP group showed osseous or partial union by 2 years after surgery. There were no significant differences in cage subsidence and the bony fusion rate between the two groups. Multivariate analysis using a logistic regression model showed that fusion level at C6/7, 2-level fusion, and cage subsidence of grades 2-3 were significantly associated with nonunion at 2 years after surgery. Although an acceptable surgical outcome with negligible complication appears to justify the use of rectangular titanium stand-alone cages in 1- and 2-level ACDF with β-TCP, cage subsidence after surgery needs to be avoided to achieve acceptable bony fusion at the fused segments. Fusion level at C6/7 or 2-level fusion may be another risk factor of nonunion.

  10. [Cervical disc herniation].

    PubMed

    Schnake, K J; Hoffmann, C-H; Kandziora, F

    2012-12-01

    The cervical disc herniation is characterized by prolapsed nucleus pulposus material through the annulus into the spinal canal. The local mechanical or chemical irritation of neural structures typically leads to symptoms of radiculopathy, cervicocephalgia or myelopathy. Pronounced sensorimotor deficits or intractable pain constitute surgical treatment. In all other cases conservative treatment is indicated, including pain medication, active and passive physiotherapy, and local injections, respectively. Anterior cervical discectomy and interbody fusion (ACDF) is still the surgical treatment of choice. Predominantly, cages with or without plates are in use to obtain solid fusion. The implantation of a total disc replacement is a viable alternative, if no contraindications exist. Other surgical techniques may be performed in proper selected cases. The overall clinical and radiological results of both surgical and conservative treatment are good. PMID:23296562

  11. Cervical spondylosis. An update.

    PubMed Central

    McCormack, B M; Weinstein, P R

    1996-01-01

    Cervical spondylosis is caused by degenerative disc disease and usually produces intermittent neck pain in middle-aged and elderly patients. This pain usually responds to activity modification, neck immobilization, isometric exercises, and medication. Neurologic symptoms occur infrequently, usually in patients with congenital spinal stenosis. For these patients, magnetic resonance imaging is the preferred initial diagnostic study. Because involvement of neurologic structures on imaging studies may be asymptomatic, consultation with a neurologist is advised to rule out other neurologic diseases. In most cases of spondylotic radiculopathy, the results of conservative treatment are so favorable that surgical intervention is not considered unless pain persists or unless there is progressive neurologic deficit. If indicated, a surgical procedure may be done through the anterior or posterior cervical spine; results are gratifying, with long-term improvement in 70% to 80% of patients. Cervical spondylotic myelopathy is the most serious and disabling condition of this disease. Because many patients have nonprogressive minor impairment, neck immobilization is a reasonable treatment in patients presenting with minor neurologic findings or in whom an operation is contraindicated. This simple remedy will result in improvement in 30% to 50% of patients. Surgical intervention is indicated for patients presenting with severe or progressive neurologic deficits. Anterior cervical approaches are generally preferred, although there are still indications for laminectomy. Surgical results are modest, with good initial results expected in about 70% of patients. Functional outcome noticeably declines with long-term follow-up, which raises the question of whether, and how much, surgical treatment affects the natural course of the disease. Prospective randomized studies are needed to answer these questions. Images Figure 1. Figure 2. Figure 3. PMID:8855684

  12. Cervical cerclage.

    PubMed

    Suhag, Anju; Berghella, Vincenzo

    2014-09-01

    Cervical cerclage is an obstetric procedure performed for prevention of prematurity. Cerclage was first introduced by Drs Shirodkar and McDonald in the mid-1950s for women with repeated second trimester losses and cervical changes in current pregnancy. Currently, cerclage placement is based on 3 common indications in singleton gestations, including history-indicated (prior multiple early preterm births or second trimester losses), ultrasound-indicated (cervical length <25 mm before 24-wk gestational age in women with prior spontaneous preterm birth) and physical examination-indicated (cervical dilation on manual or physical examination before 24 wk).

  13. Cervical Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... dysplasia of the cervix, vagina, or vulva • A family history of cervical cancer •Smoking •Certain sexually transmitted infections , such as chlamydia • ... to treat your cancer, you still need cervical cancer screening. Cells are taken from the upper vagina ... smallest units of a structure in the body; the building blocks for all ...

  14. Cervical pedicle morphometry in a Latin American population

    PubMed Central

    Herrero, Carlos Fernando; Luis do Nascimento, Anderson; Maranho, Daniel Augusto Carvalho; Ferreira-Filho, Narcélio Mendes; Nogueira, Carolina Pinto; Nogueira-Barbosa, Marcello Henrique; Defino, Helton Luis Aparecido

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The goal of this study was to conduct a detailed computed tomography (CT) assessment in the Brazilian population of the screw starting point, trajectory, and dimensions of pedicle in the cervical spine. Two hundred consecutive patients were retrospectively evaluated using cervical spine CT, with imaging reconstruction of each cervical vertebrae in the axial plane with 2 mm, and in sagittal reconstructions with 3 mm. Parameters in axial plane included the pedicle width (PW), pedicle axis length (PAL), pedicle transverse angle (PTA), and the distance from the entry point to the point between the lamina and spinous process (DEP). Measurements in the sagittal plane involved the pedicle height (PH) and the pedicle sagittal angle (PSA). The mean PW and PH were smaller in females than in males in all cervical vertebrae, but there were no significant differences of PTA among genders. PSA ranged from 15.2° to 23.7°. Mean values of PAL and DEP had a tendency to decrease from the proximal to distal cervical vertebrae. PW was <4 mm in 7.5% of men (C3) and 25% of women (C3), and <4.5 mm in 20% (C3 male) and 66% (C3 female). The intra- and inter-observer reliability were very good for the tomographic measurement of PW, and good for PH. For PAL, the intraobserver reliability was good, but the interobserver reliability varied from moderate to good. Considering PTA and PSA, the intraobserver reliability was good, but the interobserver reliability moderate for PTA and poor or fair for PSA. DEP measurements showed poor intraobserver reliability, and poor or moderate interobserver reliability. Our results presented similar trend of previous studies, but the frequency of patients with PW <4.5 mm in our population is higher, suggesting an increased risk during the attempting of transpedicular screw technique. PMID:27336889

  15. [Cervical cerclage].

    PubMed

    Akladios, C Y; Sananes, N; Gaudineau, A; Boudier, E; Langer, B

    2015-10-01

    Cervical cerclage aims to strengthen not only the mechanical properties of the cervix, but also its immunological and anti-infectious functions. The demonstration of a strong interrelation between cervical insufficiency as well as decreased cervical length at endo-vaginal ultrasonography and infection has changed the indications cerclage. Actually we can distinguish three indications for cerclage: prophylactic, for obstetrical history; therapeutic, for shortened cervical length at ultrasonography in patients at risk and; emergency cerclage in case of threatening cervix at physical examination. The McDonald's technique is the most recommended. In case of failure, it is proposed to realize cerclage at a higher level on the cervix either by vaginal or abdominal route. PMID:26144289

  16. Cervical Cap

    MedlinePlus

    ... and remove the cap. How Much Does It Cost? A cervical cap costs about $70 and should be replaced every year. In addition, there is also the cost of the doctor's visit. Many health insurance plans ...

  17. Cervical spondylosis

    MedlinePlus

    Cervical osteoarthritis; Arthritis - neck; Neck arthritis; Chronic neck pain; Degenerative disk disease ... pain using stretches. The therapist will teach you exercises that make your neck muscles stronger. The therapist ...

  18. Cervical polyps

    MedlinePlus

    Vaginal bleeding - polyps ... The exact cause of cervical polyps is not known. They may occur with: An abnormal response to increased levels of the female hormone estrogen Chronic inflammation Clogged ...

  19. Cervical interfacet spacers and maintenance of cervical lordosis.

    PubMed

    Tan, Lee A; Straus, David C; Traynelis, Vincent C

    2015-05-01

    OBJECT The cervical interfacet spacer (CIS) is a relatively new technology that can increase foraminal height and area by facet distraction. These offer the potential to provide indirect neuroforaminal decompression while simultaneously enhancing fusion potential due to the relatively large osteoconductive surface area and compressive forces exerted on the grafts. These potential benefits, along with the relative ease of implantation during posterior cervical fusion procedures, make the CIS an attractive adjuvant in the management of cervical pathology. One concern with the use of interfacet spacers is the theoretical risk of inducing iatrogenic kyphosis. This work tests the hypothesis that interfacet spacers are associated with loss of cervical lordosis. METHODS Records from patients undergoing posterior cervical fusion at Rush University Medical Center between March 2011 and December 2012 were reviewed. The FacetLift CISs were used in all patients. Preoperative and postoperative radiographic data were reviewed and the Ishihara indices and cervical lordotic angles were measured and recorded. Statistical analyses were performed using STATA software. RESULTS A total of 64 patients were identified in whom 154 cervical levels were implanted with machined allograft interfacet spacers. Of these, 15 patients underwent anterior-posterior fusions, 4 underwent anterior-posterior-anterior fusions, and the remaining 45 patients underwent posterior-only fusions. In the 45 patients with posterior-only fusions, a total of 110 levels were treated with spacers. There were 14 patients (31%) with a single level treated, 16 patients (36%) with two levels treated, 5 patients (11%) with three levels treated, 5 patients (11%) with four levels treated, 1 patient (2%) with five levels treated, and 4 patients (9%) with six levels treated. Complete radiographic data were available in 38 of 45 patients (84%). On average, radiographic follow-up was obtained at 256.9 days (range 48-524 days

  20. [Therapy of cervical rheumatoid arthritis].

    PubMed

    Kothe, R; Wiesner, L; Rüther, W

    2004-08-01

    The rheumatoid involvement of the cervical spine can be divided into three phases. In the early stage of the disease there is an isolated atlantoaxial subluxation (AAS), followed by vertical instability and subaxial instability. If patients show clear symptoms of cervical myelopathy, which can occur during any stage of the disease, the progression cannot be stopped by conservative treatment, which is of great importance at the beginning of the cervical manifestation. Patient education, physiotherapy and immobilization with a stiff collar can significantly reduce pain. Early and effective DMARD therapy can have a positive effect on the natural history of the disease. In case of progressive instability, cervical myelopathy or severe pain operative treatment is indicated. If there is an isolated AAS, fusion can be restricted to the C1/C2 segment. The Magerl transarticular screw fixation is the preferred technique for stabilization. If there is evidence for vertical instability or severe destruction of the C0/C1 joints, occipital cervical fusion has to be performed. Durin the preoperative planning it is necessary to look for signs of subaxial instability. If this is the case, fusion should include the entire cervical spine. Transoral decompression may be necessary when there is persistent anterior compression of the myelon, typically seen in fixed AAS. Non-ambulatory myelopathic patients are more likely to develop severe surgical complications. Therefore, it is important to avoid the development of severe cervical instability by early surgical intervention. The right timing for surgery is still a matter of controversy. Future prospective randomized trials should address this topic to improve the treatment concept for the rheumatoid patient.

  1. A 10-year follow-up of transpedicular screw fixation and intervertebral autogenous posterior iliac crest bone graft or intervertebral B-Twin system in failed back surgery syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Cincu, Rafael; Lorente, Francisco de Asis; Gomez, Joaquin; Eiras, Jose; Agrawal, Amit

    2015-01-01

    Background: The spine surgeons have been combining anterior and posterolateral fusion (circumferential fusion) as the final solution to treat spinal disorders and many have been using it to treat failed back surgery syndrome (FBSS). In present study, we analyzed and compared the clinical and radiological outcomes in patients with transpedicular screw fixation and intervertebral autogenous posterior iliac crest bone graft or in patients with transpedicular screw fixation and intervertebral B-Twin system for FBSS with a follow-up period of 10 years after the surgery. Materials and Methods: This study was a retrospective case study performed on 55 patients with FBSS. Clinical and radiological changes were compared between the two groups of patients on the basis of improvement of back pain, radicular pain, and work capacity. Outcome was measured in terms of Oswestry Low Back Pain Disability Index, and the changes in pain and function were documented every year from before surgery until 2012. We analyzed the evolution of 55 cases of FBSS those underwent segmental circumferential posterior fusions from June 2001 to February 2003, operated by a single surgeon and followed up during 10 years until February 2012. The patients were divided into 2 groups: In 25 patients, posterolateral fusions with Legacy™ (Medtronic, Inc. NYSE: MDT) screws and intersomatic autogenous posterior iliac crest bone graft was performed, and, in 30 patients, posterolateral fusions with the same screws and intersomatic fusion B-Twin (Biomet Spain Orthopaedics, S.L.) system was performed. In all cases, we used posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF)/transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) approach for intervertebral graft, and the artrodesis was supplemented at intertransverse level with Autologus Growth Factor (AGF-MBA INCORPORADO, S.A.). The outcome was measured in terms of Oswestry Low Back Pain Disability Index, and the changes in pain and function were documented every year and compared

  2. Impact on Neurological Recovery of Transforaminal Debridement and Interbody Fusion versus Transpedicular Decompression in Combination with Pedicle Screw Instrumentation for Treating Thoracic and Lumbar Spinal Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Choovongkomol, Kongtush; Piyapromdee, Urawit; Leownorasate, Manoon

    2016-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective study. Purpose To compare the neurological outcome of transforaminal debridement and interbody fusion with transpedicular decompression for treatment of thoracic and lumbar spinal tuberculosis. Overview of Literature Few articles have addressed the impact of neurological recovery in patients with tuberculosis who were treated by two different operative methods via the posterior-only approach. Methods Clinical and radiographic results of one-stage posterior instrumented spinal fusion for treatment of tuberculous spondylodiscitis with neurological deficits were reviewed and analyzed from 2009 to 2013. The extensive (E) group consisted of patients who received transforaminal debridement and interbody fusion, whereas transpedicular decompression was performed on limited (L) group. Rapid recovery was improvement of at least one Frankel grade within 6 weeks after operation. Otherwise, it was slow recovery. Results All 39 patients had improved neurological signs. The median follow-up period was 24 months. Proportionately younger patients (under 65 years of age) received extensive surgery (15 of 18, 83.3% vs. 11 of 21, 52.4%; p=0.04). The mean operative time and blood loss in the group E were higher than in the group L (both p<0.01). With regard to type of procedure, especially at thoracic and thoracolumbar spine, patients who underwent extensive surgery had rapid neurological recovery significantly different from those of limited surgery (p=0.01; Relative Risk, 3.06; 95% Confidence Interval, 1.13 to 8.29). Conclusions Transforaminal debridement and interbody fusion provides more rapid neurological recovery in patients with thoracic and thoracolumbar spinal tuberculosis compared to transpedicular decompression. PMID:27340536

  3. Clinical outcomes after posterior dynamic transpedicular stabilization with limited lumbar discectomy: Carragee classification system for lumbar disc herniations

    PubMed Central

    Kaner, Tuncay; Sasani, Mehdi; Oktenoglu, Tunc; Cosar, Murat; Ozer, Ali Fahir

    2010-01-01

    Background The observed rate of recurrent disc herniation after limited posterior lumbar discectomy is highest in patients with posterior wide annular defects, according to the Carragee classification of type II (fragment-defect) disc hernia. Although the recurrent herniation rate is lower in both type III (fragment-contained) and type IV (no fragment-contained) patients, recurrent persistent sciatica is observed in both groups. A higher rate of recurrent disc herniation and sciatica was observed in all 3 groups in comparison to patients with type I (fragment-fissure) disc hernia. Methods In total, 40 single-level lumbar disc herniation cases were treated with limited posterior lumbar microdiscectomy and posterior dynamic stabilization. The mean follow-up period was 32.75 months. Cases were selected after preoperative magnetic resonance imaging and intraoperative observation. We used the Carragee classification system in this study and excluded Carragee type I (fragment-fissure) disc herniations. Clinical results were evaluated with visual analog scale scores and Oswestry scores. Patients’ reherniation rates and clinical results were evaluated and recorded at 3, 12, and 24 months postoperatively. Results The most common herniation type in our study was type III (fragment-contained), with 45% frequency. The frequency of fragment-defects was 25%, and the frequency of no fragment-contained defects was 30%. The perioperative complications observed were as follows: 1 patient had bladder retention that required catheterization, 1 patient had a superficial wound infection, and 1 patient had a malpositioned transpedicular screw. The malpositioned screw was corrected with a second operation, performed 1 month after the first. Recurrent disc herniation was not observed during the follow-up period. Conclusions We observed that performing discectomy with posterior dynamic stabilization decreased the risk of recurrent disc herniations in Carragee type II, III, and IV groups

  4. Resection of cervical ependymoma.

    PubMed

    Lanzino, Giuseppe; Morales-Valero, Saul F; Krauss, William E; Campero, Mario; Marsh, W Richard

    2014-09-01

    Intramedullary ependymomas are surgically curable tumors. However, their surgical resection poses several challenges. In this intraoperative video we illustrate the main steps for the surgical resection of a cervical intramedullary ependymoma. These critical steps include: adequate exposure of the entire length of the tumor; use of the intraoperative ultrasound; identification of the posterior median sulcus and separation of the posterior columns; Identification of the plane between the spinal cord and the tumor; mobilization and debulking of the tumor and disconnection of the vascular supply (usually from small anterior spinal artery branches). Following these basic steps a complete resection can be safely achieved in many cases. The video can be found here: http://youtu.be/QMYXC_F4O4U. PMID:25175575

  5. Cervical disc hernia operations through posterior laminoforaminotomy

    PubMed Central

    Yolas, Coskun; Ozdemir, Nuriye Guzin; Okay, Hilmi Onder; Kanat, Ayhan; Senol, Mehmet; Atci, Ibrahim Burak; Yilmaz, Hakan; Coban, Mustafa Kemal; Yuksel, Mehmet Onur; Kahraman, Umit

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The most common used technique for posterolateral cervical disc herniations is anterior approach. However, posterior cervical laminotoforaminomy can provide excellent results in appropriately selected patients with foraminal stenosis in either soft disc prolapse or cervical spondylosis. The purpose of this study was to present the clinical outcomes following posterior laminoforaminotomy in patients with radiculopathy. Materials and Methods: We retrospectively evaluated 35 patients diagnosed with posterolateral cervical disc herniation and cervical spondylosis with foraminal stenosis causing radiculopathy operated by the posterior cervical keyhole laminoforaminotomy between the years 2010 and 2015. Results: The file records and the radiographic images of the 35 patients were assessed retrospectively. The mean age was 46.4 years (range: 34-66 years). Of the patients, 19 were males and 16 were females. In all of the patients, the neurologic deficit observed was radiculopathy. The posterolaterally localized disc herniations and the osteophytic structures were on the left side in 18 cases and on the right in 17 cases. In 10 of the patients, the disc level was at C5-6, in 18 at C6-7, in 2 at C3-4, in 2 at C4-5, in 1 at C7-T1, in 1 patient at both C5-6 and C6-7, and in 1 at both C4-5 and C5-6. In 14 of these 35 patients, both osteophytic structures and protruded disc herniation were present. Intervertebral foramen stenosis was present in all of the patients with osteophytes. Postoperatively, in 31 patients the complaints were relieved completely and four patients had complaints of neck pain and paresthesia radiating to the arm (the success of operation was 88.5%). On control examinations, there was no finding of instability or cervical kyphosis. Conclusion: Posterior cervical laminoforaminotomy is an alternative appropriate choice in both cervical soft disc herniations and cervical stenosis. PMID:27217655

  6. Transpedicular wedge osteotomy for treatment of kyphosis after L1 fracture using intraoperative, full rotation, three-dimensional image (O-arm)-based navigation: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yijie; Li, Xuefeng; Sun, Han; Yang, Huilin; Jiang, Weimin

    2015-01-01

    There has been a large series in the literature reporting on results of osteotomy for the correction of kyphotic deformity secondary to post-traumatic thoracolumbar fracture. However, there are few reports on using intraoperative, full rotation, three dimensional image (O-arm)-based navigation, transpedicular wedge osteotomy for the correction of kyphotic deformity in old thoracolumbar fracture. A 45-year-old woman with L1 old fracture, presented to us with a Cobb angle of 45 degrees. The preoperative standard anteroposterior, lateral views and computed tomography (CT) reconstructions revealed kyphotic deformity. After attaching the reference arc of the 3D-imaging system, the thoracolumbar spine was screened using an O-arm without anatomical registration. The location, angle and depth of osteotomy, as well as screw fixation were performed using a guide tube while referring to the reconstructed 3D-anatomical views. The surgery was successful without nervous and vascular injuries. Using intraoperative, full rotation, three dimensional image (O-arm)-based navigation, the transpedicular wedge osteotomy is a safe and effective treatment for kyphosis after the thoracolumbar fracture, which can insert the pedicular screw accurately, trace the real-time wedge osteotomy and reduce the loss of correction of kyphotic deformity. PMID:26770513

  7. General Information about Cervical Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Research Cervical Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Cervical Cancer Go to Health Professional Version ... the NCI website . Cervical Cancer During Pregnancy General Information About Cervical Cancer During Pregnancy Treatment of cervical ...

  8. [Cervical radiculopathy].

    PubMed

    Kuijper, B

    2014-10-01

    Cervical radiculopathy is a common cause of pain in the arm. It is caused by nerve root compression in the neck, as a consequence of a herniated disc, or spondyliotic foraminal stenosis. It causes severe pain, especially during the first few weeks, and paraesthesias in the forearm and hand. Patients also suffer from neck pain and loss of strength in the relevant arm. The arm pain can be exacerbated by certain movements of the head; these should be avoided as much as possible. Diagnosis can be made on the basis of history and physical examination. The pain generally disappears without active patient treatment. A semi-rigid cervical collar is recommended to accelerate pain relief. In cases of persistent pain, surgery will be considered. In such cases an MRI should be performed to show the cause and level of nerve root compression. PMID:26185991

  9. [Cervical radiculopathy].

    PubMed

    Kuijper, B

    2014-10-01

    Cervical radiculopathy is a common cause of pain in the arm. It is caused by nerve root compression in the neck, as a consequence of a herniated disc, or spondyliotic foraminal stenosis. It causes severe pain, especially during the first few weeks, and paraesthesias in the forearm and hand. Patients also suffer from neck pain and loss of strength in the relevant arm. The arm pain can be exacerbated by certain movements of the head; these should be avoided as much as possible. Diagnosis can be made on the basis of history and physical examination. The pain generally disappears without active patient treatment. A semi-rigid cervical collar is recommended to accelerate pain relief. In cases of persistent pain, surgery will be considered. In such cases an MRI should be performed to show the cause and level of nerve root compression.

  10. The use of rigid internal fixation in the surgical management of cervical spondylosis.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Brian K; Vaccaro, Alexander R; Grauer, Jonathan N; Beiner, John M

    2007-01-01

    In the surgical management of cervical spondylosis, the application of rigid internal fixation can enhance the immediate stability of the cervical spine. The sophistication of such internal fixation systems and the indications for their use are continuously evolving. A sound understanding of regional anatomy, biomechanics, and kinematics within the cervical spine is essential for the safe and effective application of internal fixation. Numerous options currently exist for anterior cervical plating systems; some lock the screws to the plate rigidly (constrained), whereas others allow for some rotational or translational motion between the screw and plate (semiconstrained). The role of anterior fixation in single and multilevel fusions is still the subject of some controversy. Long anterior cervical reconstructions may require additional posterior fixation to reliably promote fusion. Rigid fixation in the posterior cervical spine can be achieved with lateral mass screws or pedicle screws. Although lateral mass screws provide excellent fixation within the subaxial cervical spine, the regional anatomy of C2 and C7 often make it difficult to place such screws, and pedicle screws at these levels are advocated. Pedicle screws achieve fixation into both the anterior and posterior column and are arguably the most stable form of rigid internal fixation within the cervical spine. Familiarity with these internal fixation techniques can be an extremely valuable tool for the spine surgeon managing these degenerative disorders of the cervical spine.

  11. Cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Shepherd, John H

    2012-06-01

    Standard treatment for invasive cervical cancer involves either radical surgery or radiotherapy. Childbearing is therefore impossible after either of these treatments. A fertility-sparing option, however, by radical trachelectomy has been shown to be effective, provided that strict criteria for selection are followed. Fertility rates are high, whereas recurrence is low, indicating that a more conservative approach to dealing with early small cervical tumours is feasible. Careful preoperative assessment by magnetic resonance imaging scans allows accurate measurement of the tumour with precise definition to plan surgery. This will ensure an adequate clear margin by wide excision of the tumour excising the cervix by radical vaginal trachelectomy with surrounding para-cervical and upper vaginal tissues. An isthmic cerclage is inserted to provide competence at the level of the internal orifice. A primary vagino-isthmic anastomosis is conducted to restore continuity of the lower genital tract. Subsequent pregnancies require careful monitoring in view of the high risk of spontaneous premature rupture of the membranes. Delivery by classical caesarean section is necessary at the onset of labour or electively before term. Over 1100 such procedures have been carried out vaginally or abdominally, resulting in 240 live births. Radical vaginal trachelectomy with a laparoscopic pelvic-node dissection offers the least morbid and invasive route for surgery, provided that adequate surgical skills have been obtained. PMID:22353492

  12. Cervical spine surgery in professional athletes: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Joaquim, Andrei F; Hsu, Wellington K; Patel, Alpesh A

    2016-04-01

    Cervical surgery is one of the most common surgical spinal procedures performed around the world. The authors performed a systematic review of the literature reporting the outcomes of cervical spine surgery in high-level athletes in order to better understand the nuances of cervical spine pathology in this population. A search of the MEDLINE database using the search terms "cervical spine" AND "surgery" AND "athletes" yielded 54 abstracts. After exclusion of publications that did not meet the criteria for inclusion, a total of 8 papers reporting the outcome of cervical spine surgery in professional or elite athletes treated for symptoms secondary to cervical spine pathology (focusing in degenerative conditions) remained for analysis. Five of these involved the management of cervical disc herniation, 3 were specifically about traumatic neurapraxia. The majority of the patients included in this review were American football players. Anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) was commonly performed in high-level athletes for the treatment of cervical disc herniation. Most of the studies suggested that return to play is safe for athletes who are asymptomatic after ACDF for cervical radiculopathy due to disc herniation. Surgical treatment may provide a higher rate of return to play for these athletes than nonsurgical treatment. Return to play after cervical spinal cord contusion may be possible in asymptomatic patients. Cervical cord signal changes on MRI may not be an absolute contraindication for return to play in neurologically intact patients, according to some authors. Cervical contusions secondary to cervical stenosis may be associated with a worse outcome and a higher recurrence rate than those those secondary to disc herniation. The evidence is low (Level IV) and individualized treatment must be recommended.

  13. Cervical spine surgery in professional athletes: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Joaquim, Andrei F; Hsu, Wellington K; Patel, Alpesh A

    2016-04-01

    Cervical surgery is one of the most common surgical spinal procedures performed around the world. The authors performed a systematic review of the literature reporting the outcomes of cervical spine surgery in high-level athletes in order to better understand the nuances of cervical spine pathology in this population. A search of the MEDLINE database using the search terms "cervical spine" AND "surgery" AND "athletes" yielded 54 abstracts. After exclusion of publications that did not meet the criteria for inclusion, a total of 8 papers reporting the outcome of cervical spine surgery in professional or elite athletes treated for symptoms secondary to cervical spine pathology (focusing in degenerative conditions) remained for analysis. Five of these involved the management of cervical disc herniation, 3 were specifically about traumatic neurapraxia. The majority of the patients included in this review were American football players. Anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) was commonly performed in high-level athletes for the treatment of cervical disc herniation. Most of the studies suggested that return to play is safe for athletes who are asymptomatic after ACDF for cervical radiculopathy due to disc herniation. Surgical treatment may provide a higher rate of return to play for these athletes than nonsurgical treatment. Return to play after cervical spinal cord contusion may be possible in asymptomatic patients. Cervical cord signal changes on MRI may not be an absolute contraindication for return to play in neurologically intact patients, according to some authors. Cervical contusions secondary to cervical stenosis may be associated with a worse outcome and a higher recurrence rate than those those secondary to disc herniation. The evidence is low (Level IV) and individualized treatment must be recommended. PMID:27032913

  14. The 100 Most Influential Articles in Cervical Spine Surgery.

    PubMed

    Skovrlj, Branko; Steinberger, Jeremy; Guzman, Javier Z; Overley, Samuel C; Qureshi, Sheeraz A; Caridi, John M; Cho, Samuel K

    2016-02-01

    Study Design Literature review. Objective To identify and analyze the top 100 cited articles in cervical spine surgery. Methods The Thomson Reuters Web of Knowledge was searched for citations of all articles relevant to cervical spine surgery. The number of citations, authorship, year of publication, journal of publication, country of publication, and institution were recorded for each article. Results The most cited article was the classic from 1991 by Vernon and Mior that described the Neck Disability Index. The second most cited was Smith's 1958 article describing the anterior cervical diskectomy and fusion procedure. The third most cited article was Hilibrand's 1999 publication evaluating the incidence, prevalence, and radiographic progression of symptomatic adjacent segment disease following anterior cervical arthrodesis. The majority of the articles originated in the United States (65), and most were published in Spine (39). Most articles were published in the 1990s (34), and the three most common topics were cervical fusion (17), surgical complications (9), and biomechanics (9), respectively. Author Abumi had four articles in the top 100 list, and authors Goffin, Panjabi, and Hadley had three each. The Department of Orthopaedic Surgery at Hokkaido University in Sapporo, Japan, had five articles in the top 100 list. Conclusion This report identifies the top 100 articles in cervical spine surgery and acknowledges those individuals who have contributed the most to the advancement of the study of the cervical spine and the body of knowledge used to guide evidence-based clinical decision making in cervical spine surgery today.

  15. Cervical radiculopathy: epidemiology, etiology, diagnosis, and treatment.

    PubMed

    Woods, Barrett I; Hilibrand, Alan S

    2015-06-01

    Cervical radiculopathy is a relatively common neurological disorder resulting from nerve root dysfunction, which is often due to mechanical compression; however, inflammatory cytokines released from damaged intervertebral disks can also result in symptoms. Cervical radiculopathy can often be diagnosed with a thorough history and physical examination, but an magnetic resonance imaging or computed tomographic myelogram should be used to confirm the diagnosis. Because of the ubiquity of degenerative changes found on these imaging modalities, the patient's symptoms must correlate with pathology for a successful diagnosis. In the absence of myelopathy or significant muscle weakness all patients should be treated conservatively for at least 6 weeks. Conservative treatments consist of immobilization, anti-inflammatory medications, physical therapy, cervical traction, and epidural steroid injections. Cervical radiculopathy typically is self-limiting with 75%-90% of patients achieving symptomatic improvement with nonoperative care. For patients who are persistently symptomatic despite conservative treatment, or those who have a significant functional deficit surgical treatment is appropriate. Surgical options include anterior cervical decompression and fusion, cervical disk arthroplasty, and posterior foraminotomy. Patient selection is critical to optimize outcome. PMID:25985461

  16. Biomarkers in Cervical Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yim, Eun-Kyoung; Park, Jong-Sup

    2006-01-01

    Cervical cancer, a potentially preventable disease, remains the second most common malignancy in women worldwide. Human papillomavirus (HPV) is the single most important etiological agent in cervical cancer, contributing to neoplastic progression through the action of viral oncoproteins, mainly E6 and E7. Cervical screening programs using Pap smear testing have dramatically improved cervical cancer incidence and reduced deaths, but cervical cancer still remains a global health burden. The biomarker discovery for accurate detection and diagnosis of cervical carcinoma and its malignant precursors (collectively referred to as high-grade cervical disease) represents one of the current challenges in clinical medicine and cytopathology. PMID:19690652

  17. Laminoplasty Techniques for the Treatment of Multilevel Cervical Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Mitsunaga, Lance K.; Klineberg, Eric O.; Gupta, Munish C.

    2012-01-01

    Laminoplasty is one surgical option for cervical spondylotic myelopathy. It was developed to avoid the significant risk of complications associated with alternative surgical options such as anterior decompression and fusion and laminectomy with or without posterior fusion. Various laminoplasty techniques have been described. All of these variations are designed to reposition the laminae and expand the spinal canal while retaining the dorsal elements to protect the dura from scar formation and to preserve postoperative cervical stability and alignment. With the right surgical indications, reliable results can be expected with laminoplasty in treating patients with multilevel cervical myelopathy. PMID:22496982

  18. Diaphragm paralysis from cervical disc lesions.

    PubMed

    Cloward, R B

    1988-01-01

    An opera singer, who "made her living with her diaphragm", developed a post-traumatic unilateral radiculopathy due to cervical disc lesions, C3 to C6. During one year of severe neck and left arm pain she gradually lost the ability to sing difficult operatic passages which brought an end to her music career. Following a three level anterior cervical decompression and fusion, the neck and arm pain was immediately relieved. One week later her voice and singing ability returned to its full strength and power permitting her to resume her activities as a vocalist. The diagnosis of paresis of the left hemi-diaphragm as part of the cervical disc syndrome was implied by postoperative retrospective inference.

  19. [Recent Advances of Biomechanical Studies on Cervical Fusion and Non-fusion Surgery].

    PubMed

    Liao, Zhenhua; Liu, Weiqiang

    2016-02-01

    This article reviews the progress of biomechanical studies on anterior cervical fusion and non-fusion surgery in recent years. The similarities and differences between animal and human cervical spines as well as the major three biomechanical test methods are introduced. Major progresses of biomechanical evaluation in anterior cervical fusion and non-fusion devices, hybrid surgery, coupled motion and biomechanical parameters, such as the instant center of rotation, are classified and summarized. Future development of loading method, multilevel hybrid surgery and coupling character are also discussed. PMID:27382760

  20. [Injury of upper cervical spine].

    PubMed

    Ryba, Luděk; Cienciala, Jan; Chaloupka, Richard; Repko, Martin; Vyskočil, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Injuries of the upper cervical spine represent 1/3 of all cervical spine injuries and approximately 40 % result by the death. Every level of the cervical spine can be injured - fractures of condyles of the occipital bone (CO), atlantooccipital dislocation (AOD), fractures of the Atlas (C1), atlantoaxial dislocation (AAD) and fractures of the axis (C2). Most of cases in younger patients are caused by high-energy trauma, while by elderly people, because of the osteoporosis, is needed much less energy and even simple falls can cause the injury of the cervical spine. That´s why the etiology of injuries can be different. In younger patients are caused mainly by car accidents, motorcycle and bicycle accidents and pedestrian crashes by car and in elderly populations are the main reason falls. The mechanism of the injury is axial force, hyperflexion, hyperextension, latero-flexion, rotation and combination of all. The basic diagnostic examination is X ray in AP, lateral and transoral projection. But in the most of cases is CT examination necessary and in the suspicion of the ligamentous injury and neurological deterioration must be MRI examination added. Every injury of the upper cervical spine has its own classification. Clinical symptoms can vary from the neck pain, restricted range of motion, antalgic position of the head, injury of the cranial nerves and different neurologic symptoms from the irritation of nerves to quadriplegia. A large percentage of deaths is at the time of the injury. Therapy is divided to conservative treatment, which is indicated in bone injuries with minimal dislocation. In more severe cases, with the dislocation and ligamentous injury, when is high chance of the instability, is indicated the surgical treatment. We can use anterior or posterior approach, make the osteosynthesis, stabilisation and fusion of the spine. Complex fractures and combination of different types of injuries are often present in this part of the spine. Correct and early

  1. Combined operative technique with anterior surgical approach and video-assisted thoracoscopic surgical lobectomy for anterior superior sulcus tumours.

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, Yuhei; Chen, Fengshi; Aoyama, Akihiro; Sato, Toshihiko; Date, Hiroshi

    2014-11-01

    Video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS) has been widely used, but surgical resections of superior sulcus tumours remain challenging because of their anatomical location. For such cases, less-invasive procedures, such as the anterior transcervical-thoracic and transmanubrial approaches, have been widely performed because of their excellent visualization of the subclavian vessels. Recently, a combined operative technique with an anterior surgical approach and VATS for anterior superior sulcus tumours has been introduced. Herein, we report three cases of anterior superior sulcus tumours successfully resected by surgical approaches combined with a VATS-based lobectomy. In all cases, operability was confirmed by VATS, and upper lobectomies with hilar and mediastinal lymph node dissections were performed. Subsequently, dissections of the anterior inlet of the tumours were performed using the transmanubrial approach in two patients and the anterior trans-cervical-thoracic approach in one patient. Both approaches provided excellent access to the anterior inlet of the tumour and exposure of the subclavian vessels, resulting in radical resection of the tumour with concomitant resection of the surrounding anatomical structures, including the chest wall and vessels. In conclusion, VATS lobectomy combined with the anterior surgical approach might be an excellent procedure for the resection of anterior superior sulcus tumours.

  2. Cervical Scoliosis: Clinical and Radiographic Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Mesfin, Addisu; Bakhsh, Wajeeh R.; Chuntarapas, Tapanut; Riew, K. Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective study. Objective Cervical scoliosis is a rare condition that can arise from various etiologies. Few reports on the surgical management of cervical scoliosis exist. Our objective was to evaluate clinical and radiographic outcomes following surgical management of cervical scoliosis. Methods We evaluated our cervical spine surgical database for patients with cervical scoliosis (Cobb angle > 10 degrees) from 2005 to 2010. Demographic data including age, gender, diagnoses, and primary versus revision surgery was collected. Surgical data including procedure (anterior versus posterior), estimated blood loss (EBL), length of surgery, length of hospitalization, and complications was recorded. Preoperative and postoperative Cobb angle measurements and Neck Disability Index (NDI) scores were recorded. Results Cervical scoliosis was identified in 18 patients. We excluded 5, leaving 5 men and 8 women with an average age of 50.7 (median 52, range 25 to 65). The average follow-up was 40 months (median 36.5, range 5 to 87). An anterior-only approach was used in 6 cases (average 4 levels fused), 5 cases were posterior-only approach (average 8.7 levels fused), and 2 cases were combined anterior-posterior approach. The EBL was an average of 286 mL (median 150, range 50 to 900), the average surgical time was 266 minutes (median 239, range 136 to 508), and the average hospital stay was 2.7 days (median 2, range 1 to 7). Complications occurred in 7 patients, and 2 developed adjacent segment pathology. The average coronal Cobb angle preoperatively was 35.1 degrees (median 31, range 13 to 63) and corrected was 15.7 degrees (median 10.5, range 2 to 59) postoperatively (p < 0.005). The average NDI preoperatively was 24.9 (median 26, range 6 to 37) and was reduced to 17.8 (median 18, range 7 to 30) postoperatively (p < 0.02). Conclusion Surgical management of cervical scoliosis can result in deformity correction and improvement in patient

  3. Cervical Cancer Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancer found early may be easier to treat. Cervical cancer screening is usually part of a woman's health ... may do more tests, such as a biopsy. Cervical cancer screening has risks. The results can sometimes be ...

  4. Cervical spondylosis (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Cervical spondylosis is a disorder that results from abnormal growth of the bones of the neck and ... Progressive neck pain is a key indication of cervical spondylosis. It may be the only symptom in ...

  5. Anterior spinal cord infarction caused by fibrocartilaginous embolism.

    PubMed

    Piao, Yue-Shan; Lu, De-Hong; Su, Ying-Ying; Yang, Xiao-Ping

    2009-04-01

    Fibrocartilaginous embolism is a rare cause of anterior spinal cord infarction. We report a case of anterior spinal cord infarction caused by a fibrocartilaginous embolism of 3 months duration in a 23-year-old man. Ten days after a trivial strike to the neck and back, he had sudden back pain, weakness of the upper and lower extremities, developed dyspnea and became unconscious. Cervical MRI showed an enlargement of the lower medulla and cervical cord with abnormal signals in the ventral portion. The follow-up MRI performed 2 months later showed atrophy of the above lesion. On histopathological examination, there was a recent, extensive infarct in the cervical cord and lower medulla. The lesion was symmetrical, and predominantly involved the anterior part of the spinal cord. Moreover, many basophilic, alcian blue-positive emboli in the arteries and veins of the lesion were detected. This is the first autopsy case of anterior spinal cord infarction caused by a fibrocartilaginous embolism that has been confirmed in China. The clinicopathological features of this case are reviewed in this paper.

  6. Veliparib, Topotecan Hydrochloride, and Filgrastim or Pegfilgrastim in Treating Patients With Persistent or Recurrent Cervical Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-25

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Cervical Small Cell Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Cervical Carcinoma; Stage III Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer; Stage IVB Cervical Cancer

  7. Cervical disc herniation as a trigger for temporary cervical cord ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Acker, Güliz; Schneider, Ulf C.; Grozdanovic, Zarko; Vajkoczy, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Background Disc herniations are only reported in few case reports as a rare cause of acute spinal ischemia. A surgical treatment has not been described so far in these reports with analysis of diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DWI/MRI) before and after surgery. The aim of our study is to report a case of cervical spinal cord ischemia caused by cervical disc herniation and discuss the literature concerning diagnostic and treatment options. Methods A 72-year-old female patient developed an acute progressive tetraparesis with emphasis on the upper extremities. MRI showed a disc herniation at the cervical segment 5/6 (C5/6) with consecutive spinal canal stenosis and additional signs of spinal cord ischemia in T2-weighted imaging (T2WI) and DWI reaching from C3 to C5 level. With the MRI being highly suggestive for anterior spinal cord ischemia, we hypothesized that this might be caused by compression of the anterior spinal artery through the significant disc herniation. Therefore, we decided to perform an anterior discectomy and fusion at C5/6 level. Results Following surgery, the patient’s symptoms showed immediate regression with complete recovery after two months in correspondence with the normalization in the control MRI scan of cervical cord. Conclusions Assumedly our patient suffered from a partial anterior spinal artery syndrome, possibly caused by a disc herniation-related compression that was reversible following surgery. This was accompanied by a complete resolution of spinal cord signal abnormalities in T2WI and DWI.

  8. FDG and FMISO PET Hypoxia Evaluation in Cervical Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-06-03

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage III Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer; Stage IVB Cervical Cancer

  9. ADXS11-001 High Dose HPV+ Cervical Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-17

    Effects of Immunotherapy; Metastatic/Recurrent Cervical Cancer; Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Cell Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Cervical Small Cell Carcinoma; Stage III Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer; Stage IVB Cervical Cancer

  10. Bilateral Anterior Shoulder Dislocation

    PubMed Central

    Siu, Yuk Chuen; Lui, Tun Hing

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Unilateral anterior shoulder dislocation is one of the most common problems encountered in orthopedic practice. However, simultaneous bilateral anterior dislocation of the shoulders is quite rare. Case Presentation: We report a case of a 75-year-old woman presented with simultaneous bilateral anterior shoulder dislocation following a trauma, complicated with a traction injury to the posterior cord of the brachial plexus. Conclusions: Bilateral anterior shoulder dislocation is very rare. The excessive traction force during closed reduction may lead to nerve palsy. Clear documentation of neurovascular status and adequate imaging before and after a reduction should be performed. PMID:25685749

  11. The 100 Most Influential Articles in Cervical Spine Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Skovrlj, Branko; Steinberger, Jeremy; Guzman, Javier Z.; Overley, Samuel C.; Qureshi, Sheeraz A.; Caridi, John M.; Cho, Samuel K.

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Literature review. Objective To identify and analyze the top 100 cited articles in cervical spine surgery. Methods The Thomson Reuters Web of Knowledge was searched for citations of all articles relevant to cervical spine surgery. The number of citations, authorship, year of publication, journal of publication, country of publication, and institution were recorded for each article. Results The most cited article was the classic from 1991 by Vernon and Mior that described the Neck Disability Index. The second most cited was Smith's 1958 article describing the anterior cervical diskectomy and fusion procedure. The third most cited article was Hilibrand's 1999 publication evaluating the incidence, prevalence, and radiographic progression of symptomatic adjacent segment disease following anterior cervical arthrodesis. The majority of the articles originated in the United States (65), and most were published in Spine (39). Most articles were published in the 1990s (34), and the three most common topics were cervical fusion (17), surgical complications (9), and biomechanics (9), respectively. Author Abumi had four articles in the top 100 list, and authors Goffin, Panjabi, and Hadley had three each. The Department of Orthopaedic Surgery at Hokkaido University in Sapporo, Japan, had five articles in the top 100 list. Conclusion This report identifies the top 100 articles in cervical spine surgery and acknowledges those individuals who have contributed the most to the advancement of the study of the cervical spine and the body of knowledge used to guide evidence-based clinical decision making in cervical spine surgery today. PMID:26835204

  12. Comparison of Cervical Spine Anatomy in Calves, Pigs and Humans

    PubMed Central

    Sheng, Sun-Ren; Xu, Hua-Zi; Wang, Yong-Li; Zhu, Qing-An; Mao, Fang-Min; Lin, Yan; Wang, Xiang-Yang

    2016-01-01

    Background Context Animals are commonly used to model the human spine for in vitro and in vivo experiments. Many studies have investigated similarities and differences between animals and humans in the lumbar and thoracic vertebrae. However, a quantitative anatomic comparison of calf, pig, and human cervical spines has not been reported. Purpose To compare fundamental structural similarities and differences in vertebral bodies from the cervical spines of commonly used experimental animal models and humans. Study Design Anatomical morphometric analysis was performed on cervical vertebra specimens harvested from humans and two common large animals (i.e., calves and pigs). Methods Multiple morphometric parameters were directly measured from cervical spine specimens of twelve pigs, twelve calves and twelve human adult cadavers. The following anatomical parameters were measured: vertebral body width (VBW), vertebral body depth (VBD), vertebral body height (VBH), spinal canal width (SCW), spinal canal depth (SCD), pedicle width (PW), pedicle depth (PD), pedicle inclination (PI), dens width (DW), dens depth (DD), total vertebral width (TVW), and total vertebral depth (TVD). Results The atlantoaxial (C1–2) joint in pigs is similar to that in humans and could serve as a human substitute. The pig cervical spine is highly similar to the human cervical spine, except for two large transverse processes in the anterior regions ofC4–C6. The width and depth of the calf odontoid process were larger than those in humans. VBW and VBD of calf cervical vertebrae were larger than those in humans, but the spinal canal was smaller. Calf C7 was relatively similar to human C7, thus, it may be a good substitute. Conclusion Pig cervical vertebrae were more suitable human substitutions than calf cervical vertebrae, especially with respect to C1, C2, and C7. The biomechanical properties of nerve vascular anatomy and various segment functions in pig and calf cervical vertebrae must be

  13. Cervical injuries suffered in automobile crashes.

    PubMed

    Huelke, D F; O'Day, J; Mendelsohn, R A

    1981-03-01

    The National Crash Severity Study data in which occupants sustained severe, critical-to-life, or fatal cervical injuries were reviewed. Of passenger cars damaged severely enough to be towed from the scene, it is estimated that one in 300 occupants sustained a neck injury of a severe nature. The neck-injury rate rose to one in 14 occupants for those ejected from their cars, although many of these injuries resulted from contacts within the car before or during the process of ejection. Severe neck injuries were rather rare in cars struck in the rear, but were more common in frontal and side impacts. Occupants between 16 and 25 years of age had such injuries more than twice as often as those in any other age group. Most of the neck injuries of a more severe nature involved the cervical spine or spinal cord. Injuries of the anterior aspect of the neck were relatively infrequent, and usually resulted from direct blunt impacts. National projections of the number of fatalities related to cervical injuries indicates that 5940 deaths, or approximately 20% of all in-car deaths, include fatal cervical spine injuries, and that about 500 cases of quadriplegia per year result from automobile accidents. PMID:7463132

  14. Intradiscal Pressure Changes during Manual Cervical Distraction: A Cadaveric Study.

    PubMed

    Gudavalli, M R; Potluri, T; Carandang, G; Havey, R M; Voronov, L I; Cox, J M; Rowell, R M; Kruse, R A; Joachim, G C; Patwardhan, A G; Henderson, C N R; Goertz, C

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to measure intradiscal pressure (IDP) changes in the lower cervical spine during a manual cervical distraction (MCD) procedure. Incisions were made anteriorly, and pressure transducers were inserted into each nucleus at lower cervical discs. Four skilled doctors of chiropractic (DCs) performed MCD procedure on nine specimens in prone position with contacts at C5 or at C6 vertebrae with the headpiece in different positions. IDP changes, traction forces, and manually applied posterior-to-anterior forces were analyzed using descriptive statistics. IDP decreases were observed during MCD procedure at all lower cervical levels C4-C5, C5-C6, and C6-C7. The mean IDP decreases were as high as 168.7 KPa. Mean traction forces were as high as 119.2 N. Posterior-to-anterior forces applied during manual traction were as high as 82.6 N. Intraclinician reliability for IDP decrease was high for all four DCs. While two DCs had high intraclinician reliability for applied traction force, the other two DCs demonstrated only moderate reliability. IDP decreases were greatest during moving flexion and traction. They were progressevely less pronouced with neutral traction, fixed flexion and traction, and generalized traction.

  15. Intradiscal Pressure Changes during Manual Cervical Distraction: A Cadaveric Study

    PubMed Central

    Gudavalli, M. R.; Potluri, T.; Carandang, G.; Havey, R. M.; Voronov, L. I.; Cox, J. M.; Rowell, R. M.; Kruse, R. A.; Joachim, G. C.; Patwardhan, A. G.; Henderson, C. N. R.; Goertz, C.

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to measure intradiscal pressure (IDP) changes in the lower cervical spine during a manual cervical distraction (MCD) procedure. Incisions were made anteriorly, and pressure transducers were inserted into each nucleus at lower cervical discs. Four skilled doctors of chiropractic (DCs) performed MCD procedure on nine specimens in prone position with contacts at C5 or at C6 vertebrae with the headpiece in different positions. IDP changes, traction forces, and manually applied posterior-to-anterior forces were analyzed using descriptive statistics. IDP decreases were observed during MCD procedure at all lower cervical levels C4-C5, C5-C6, and C6-C7. The mean IDP decreases were as high as 168.7 KPa. Mean traction forces were as high as 119.2 N. Posterior-to-anterior forces applied during manual traction were as high as 82.6 N. Intraclinician reliability for IDP decrease was high for all four DCs. While two DCs had high intraclinician reliability for applied traction force, the other two DCs demonstrated only moderate reliability. IDP decreases were greatest during moving flexion and traction. They were progressevely less pronouced with neutral traction, fixed flexion and traction, and generalized traction. PMID:24023587

  16. Drugs Approved for Cervical Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Professionals Questions to Ask about Your Treatment Research Drugs Approved for Cervical Cancer This page lists cancer ... in cervical cancer that are not listed here. Drugs Approved to Prevent Cervical Cancer Cervarix (Recombinant HPV ...

  17. Cervical cancer - screening and prevention

    MedlinePlus

    Cancer cervix - screening; HPV - cervical cancer screening; Dysplasia - cervical cancer screening ... Almost all cervical cancers are caused by HPV (human papilloma virus). HPV is a common virus that spreads through sexual contact. Certain types ...

  18. A case of T2 radiculopathy after anterior C5-6 fusion.

    PubMed

    Takenaka, Tomofumi; Ohnishi, Yu-Ichiro; Oshino, Satoru

    2016-01-01

    Thoracic radiculopathy is a rare entity. Symptomatic adjacent-segment disease after anterior cervical fusion occurs commonly in the lower cervical spine segment. We describe the clinical presentation and treatment of T2 radiculopathy after C5-6 anterior fusion. A 60-year-old man presented with the right axillary pain for 3 months. He had undergone C5-6 anterior fusion for cervical spondylosis 5 years prior. Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance images showed T2-3 degenerative disease. C5-6 anterior fusion exacerbated the T2-3 segment involved in the patient's scoliotic deformity. After 2 months of conservative treatment, we decompressed the T2 foramen via T2-3 hemilaminectomy and partial facet resection. After the surgery, his symptoms disappeared. T2 radiculopathy is rare but should be considered in the differential diagnosis of chest pain. Surgeons should pay attention not only to adjacent-segment disease but also to segmental degeneration at the apex of a scoliotic deformity after cervical anterior fusion. PMID:27197614

  19. A case of T2 radiculopathy after anterior C5–6 fusion

    PubMed Central

    Takenaka, Tomofumi; Ohnishi, Yu-ichiro; Oshino, Satoru

    2016-01-01

    Thoracic radiculopathy is a rare entity. Symptomatic adjacent-segment disease after anterior cervical fusion occurs commonly in the lower cervical spine segment. We describe the clinical presentation and treatment of T2 radiculopathy after C5–6 anterior fusion. A 60-year-old man presented with the right axillary pain for 3 months. He had undergone C5–6 anterior fusion for cervical spondylosis 5 years prior. Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance images showed T2–3 degenerative disease. C5–6 anterior fusion exacerbated the T2–3 segment involved in the patient’s scoliotic deformity. After 2 months of conservative treatment, we decompressed the T2 foramen via T2–3 hemilaminectomy and partial facet resection. After the surgery, his symptoms disappeared. T2 radiculopathy is rare but should be considered in the differential diagnosis of chest pain. Surgeons should pay attention not only to adjacent-segment disease but also to segmental degeneration at the apex of a scoliotic deformity after cervical anterior fusion. PMID:27197614

  20. Changes in cervical sagittal alignment after single-level posterior percutaneous endoscopic cervical diskectomy.

    PubMed

    Kim, Chi Heon; Shin, Kyung-Hyun; Chung, Chun Kee; Park, Sung Bae; Kim, Jung Hee

    2015-02-01

    Study Design Case series. Objective Posterior percutaneous endoscopic cervical diskectomy (PECD) can preserve the disk in patients with a foraminal disk herniation. However, progressive angulation at the operated segment is a concern, especially for patients with cervical lordosis < 10 degrees. The change in cervical lordosis after posterior PECD was analyzed. Methods Medical records were reviewed of 32 consecutive patients (22 men, 10 women; mean age, 49 ± 12 years) who had single-level foraminal soft disk herniation. The operation levels were as follows: C4-5 in 1 patient, C5-6 in 12, C6-7 in 18, and C7-T1 in 1. All patients were discharged the day after the operation, and neck motion was encouraged. All patients were followed for 30 ± 7 months (range, 24 to 46 months), and 21/32 patients (66%) had radiographs taken at 25 ± 11 months (range, 12 to 45 months). Radiologic parameters were assessed, including cervical curvature (C2-7), segmental Cobb's angle (SA), and anterior and posterior disk height (AH and PH, respectively) at the operative level. Results At the last follow-up, 29/32 patients (91%) had no or minimal pain, and 3/32 patients had occasional pain. SA, AH, and PH were not significantly changed. Cervical lordosis < 10 degrees was present in 10/21 patients preoperatively and in 3/21 patients at the last follow-up. For patients with cervical lordosis < 10 degrees, cervical curvature changed from -2.5 ± 8.0 to -11.3 ± 9.3 degrees (p = 0.01). For patients with cervical lordosis ≥ 10 degrees, cervical curvature changed from -17.5 ± 5.8 to -19.9 ± 5.7 degrees (p = 0.24). Conclusions Cervical curvature does not worsen after posterior PECD. PMID:25648214

  1. Changes in Cervical Sagittal Alignment after Single-Level Posterior Percutaneous Endoscopic Cervical Diskectomy

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Chi Heon; Shin, Kyung-Hyun; Chung, Chun Kee; Park, Sung Bae; Kim, Jung Hee

    2014-01-01

    Study Design Case series. Objective Posterior percutaneous endoscopic cervical diskectomy (PECD) can preserve the disk in patients with a foraminal disk herniation. However, progressive angulation at the operated segment is a concern, especially for patients with cervical lordosis < 10 degrees. The change in cervical lordosis after posterior PECD was analyzed. Methods Medical records were reviewed of 32 consecutive patients (22 men, 10 women; mean age, 49 ± 12 years) who had single-level foraminal soft disk herniation. The operation levels were as follows: C4–5 in 1 patient, C5–6 in 12, C6–7 in 18, and C7–T1 in 1. All patients were discharged the day after the operation, and neck motion was encouraged. All patients were followed for 30 ± 7 months (range, 24 to 46 months), and 21/32 patients (66%) had radiographs taken at 25 ± 11 months (range, 12 to 45 months). Radiologic parameters were assessed, including cervical curvature (C2–7), segmental Cobb's angle (SA), and anterior and posterior disk height (AH and PH, respectively) at the operative level. Results At the last follow-up, 29/32 patients (91%) had no or minimal pain, and 3/32 patients had occasional pain. SA, AH, and PH were not significantly changed. Cervical lordosis < 10 degrees was present in 10/21 patients preoperatively and in 3/21 patients at the last follow-up. For patients with cervical lordosis < 10 degrees, cervical curvature changed from −2.5 ± 8.0 to −11.3 ± 9.3 degrees (p = 0.01). For patients with cervical lordosis ≥ 10 degrees, cervical curvature changed from −17.5 ± 5.8 to −19.9 ± 5.7 degrees (p = 0.24). Conclusions Cervical curvature does not worsen after posterior PECD. PMID:25648214

  2. Cervical insufficiency and cervical cerclage.

    PubMed

    Brown, Richard; Gagnon, Robert; Delisle, Marie-France; Gagnon, Robert; Bujold, Emmanuel; Basso, Melanie; Bos, Hayley; Brown, Richard; Cooper, Stephanie; Crane, Joan; Davies, Gregory; Gouin, Katy; Menticoglou, Savas; Mundle, William; Pylypjuk, Christy; Roggensack, Anne; Sanderson, Frank; Senikas, Vyta

    2013-12-01

    Objectif : La présente directive clinique a pour but de fournir un cadre de référence que les cliniciens pourront utiliser pour identifier les femmes qui sont exposées aux plus grands risques de connaître une insuffisance cervicale, ainsi que pour déterminer les circonstances en présence desquelles la mise en place d’un cerclage pourrait s’avérer souhaitable. Résultats : La littérature publiée a été récupérée par l’intermédiaire de recherches menées dans PubMed ou MEDLINE, CINAHL et The Cochrane Library en 2012 au moyen d’un vocabulaire contrôlé (p. ex. « uterine cervical incompetence ») et de mots clés appropriés (p. ex. « cervical insufficiency », « cerclage », « Shirodkar », « cerclage », « MacDonald », « cerclage », « abdominal », « cervical length », « mid-trimester pregnancy loss »). Les résultats ont été restreints aux analyses systématiques, aux essais comparatifs randomisés / essais cliniques comparatifs et aux études observationnelles. Aucune restriction n’a été appliquée en matière de date ou de langue. Les recherches ont été mises à jour de façon régulière et intégrées à la directive clinique jusqu’en janvier 2011. La littérature grise (non publiée) a été identifiée par l’intermédiaire de recherches menées dans les sites Web d’organismes s’intéressant à l’évaluation des technologies dans le domaine de la santé et d’organismes connexes, dans des collections de directives cliniques, dans des registres d’essais cliniques et auprès de sociétés de spécialité médicale nationales et internationales. Valeurs : La qualité des résultats est évaluée au moyen des critères décrits dans le rapport du Groupe d’étude canadien sur les soins de santé préventifs (Tableau). Recommandations 1. Les femmes qui sont enceintes ou qui planifient connaître une grossesse devraient faire l’objet d’une évaluation visant les facteurs de

  3. Surgical Treatment in Patients with Cervical Osteomyelitis: Single Institute's Experiences

    PubMed Central

    Hahn, Bang Sang; Kim, Kyung-Hyun; Park, Jung Yoon; Chin, Dong-Kyu; Kim, Keun-Su; Cho, Yong-Eun

    2014-01-01

    Objective To study practical guidelines and strategies in the treatment of cervical osteomyelitis. Methods We retrospectively reviewed 14 patients who underwent surgical treatment for cervical osteomyelitis from May 2000 to July 2008. We investigated their clinical course, antibiotic regimen, surgical methods, and laboratory and radiologic findings including X-ray, CT and MRI. Results 5 patients had primary spondylodiscitis, 5 patients had post operative spondylodiscitis and 4 patients had tuberculosis in cervical spine. The causative microorganisms were MRSA (5), P. aeruginosa (1), Methicillin resistant coagulase negative streptococcus (1), P. aeruginosa changed to MRSA (1), and 2 patients showed no growth on culture studies. Patients were treated 13.8 weeks (range, 5.4-25.8) with IV antibiotics and then treated for 58.2 days (range, 13-106) with oral antibiotics. Antituberculotic medications were used for a mean of 383.8 days. Patients were treated with anterior debridement and fusion (5), irrigation and debridement (5), simultaneous cervical anterior interbody and transthoracic thoracic interbody fusion (1). 3 patients underwent the planned 2-staged operation, which included an anterior debridement with or without fusion for the 1st operation and posterior instrumentation for 2nd operation. 10 patients (71.4%) had neurologic deficits at the time of diagnosis and 7 patients (70%) among them improved post-operatively. Conclusion Anterior cervical spine surgery is the preferable treatment option in patients with neurological deterioration, extensive bony destruction with expected kyphotic deformity, and uncontrolled infection being managed only with antibiotics. Antibiotics are also important for thorough treatment. PMID:25346763

  4. Preventing cervical cancer globally.

    PubMed

    Schmeler, Kathleen M

    2012-11-01

    Cervical cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer and cancer-related deaths among women worldwide. More than 85% of cases and deaths occur in the developing world where the availability of effective screening is limited. In this issue of the journal, Pierce and colleagues (beginning on page 1273) describe a novel technique using a high-resolution microendoscope (HRME) to diagnose cervical dysplasia. This perspective reviews the limitations of existing cervical cancer screening methods currently in use in low-resource settings and the potential for HRME imaging to contribute to cervical cancer prevention in the developing world.

  5. Cervical nucleolysis: indications, technique, results. 190 patients.

    PubMed

    Krause, D; Drape, J L; Jambon, F; de Souza-Lima, A; Tongio, J; Maitrot, D; Orenstein, D; Giannetti, A; Boyer, P; Srour, R

    1993-03-01

    For many years now percutaneous techniques have proved effective in the curative treatment of lumbar disc herniation, mostly in young subjects. This technique, however, is seldom indicated, let alone performed, in the cervical spine for a variety of reasons: a) the neck contains several closely arranged structures such as the vasculo-nervous bundles, the airway-digestive tract and the cervical spine around the spinal cord; b) the disc is approached by the anterior route, in contrast with the lumbo-sacral spine where the approach is posterolateral; c) the manufacturers insist on restrictions in the use of chymopapain in view of the potential risk of spinal cord damage, either by possible breaks in the meninges of by accidental diffusion of the enzyme into perimedullary epidural structures which support a particularly developed venous plexus; d) legal protection may be denied to operators who perform cervical chemonucleolysis, since the product has not yet been officially authorized, in France and perhaps elsewhere*, for treatment of cervical disc herniation. Several years of experience in the practice of cervical nucleolysis have convinced the authors that this method is remarkably effective and can be used in the treatment of cervicobrachial neuralgia (CBN) occurring in young subjects. Radiculalgia is essentially due to a disc fragment being positioned within the vertebral canal or a foramen, thereby compressing the nerve roots. During several years microsurgery of the disc has been effective in the treatment of refractory radiculalgia, and to compete with this procedure familiar to neurosurgeons cervical nucleolysis must convincingly demonstrate that its therapeutic value is at least as good as that of surgery. Finally, the vast majority of cervical disc herniations is made up of free disc fragments located within the meshes of the posterior longitudinal ligament of the spine (transligamentous fragment). Cervical nucleolysis was introduced in France by Bonafe and

  6. Clinical Case Report of Expansive Laminoplasty for Cervical Myelopathy Due to Both Disc Herniation and Developmental Cervical Spinal Canal Stenosis in Older Adolescents.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Hua; Sun, Yu; Zhang, Fengshan; Dang, Gengting; Liu, Zhongjun

    2016-02-01

    Reports on adolescent patients with cervical myelopathy who underwent anterior cervical discectomy and fusion are scarce. However, to our knowledge, no cases of expansive laminoplasty for cervical myelopathy associated with progressive neurological deficit after a series of conservative treatment, caused by both disc herniation and developmental cervical spinal canal stenosis, have been reported.From January 2006 to July 2012, we retrospectively studied 3 patients in late adolescence presenting with cervical myelopathy who underwent expansive unilateral open-door laminoplasty at our hospital. The outcomes after the surgery were evaluated according to the Japanese Orthopedic Association scores.Symptoms presented by these patients were due to both disc herniation and developmental cervical spinal canal stenosis. No major complications occurred after the surgical procedures. The median follow-up time was 66 months (range 36-112 months). The Japanese Orthopedic Association scores after surgery showed a significant increase. Long-term outcomes after surgery were satisfactory according to the evaluation criteria for the Japanese Orthopedic Association scores. However, the ranges of motion of the cervical spine decreased, especially the ranges of motion on flexion after surgery showed a significant decrease.Expansive laminoplasty is helpful for older adolescent patients with cervical myelopathy due to both disc herniation and developmental cervical spinal canal stenosis, presenting with progressive neurological deficit after long conservative treatment. PMID:26937923

  7. Clinical Case Report of Expansive Laminoplasty for Cervical Myelopathy Due to Both Disc Herniation and Developmental Cervical Spinal Canal Stenosis in Older Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Hua; Sun, Yu; Zhang, Fengshan; Dang, Gengting; Liu, Zhongjun

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Reports on adolescent patients with cervical myelopathy who underwent anterior cervical discectomy and fusion are scarce. However, to our knowledge, no cases of expansive laminoplasty for cervical myelopathy associated with progressive neurological deficit after a series of conservative treatment, caused by both disc herniation and developmental cervical spinal canal stenosis, have been reported. From January 2006 to July 2012, we retrospectively studied 3 patients in late adolescence presenting with cervical myelopathy who underwent expansive unilateral open-door laminoplasty at our hospital. The outcomes after the surgery were evaluated according to the Japanese Orthopedic Association scores. Symptoms presented by these patients were due to both disc herniation and developmental cervical spinal canal stenosis. No major complications occurred after the surgical procedures. The median follow-up time was 66 months (range 36–112 months). The Japanese Orthopedic Association scores after surgery showed a significant increase. Long-term outcomes after surgery were satisfactory according to the evaluation criteria for the Japanese Orthopedic Association scores. However, the ranges of motion of the cervical spine decreased, especially the ranges of motion on flexion after surgery showed a significant decrease. Expansive laminoplasty is helpful for older adolescent patients with cervical myelopathy due to both disc herniation and developmental cervical spinal canal stenosis, presenting with progressive neurological deficit after long conservative treatment. PMID:26937923

  8. Bevacizumab, Radiation Therapy, and Cisplatin in Treating Patients With Previously Untreated Locally Advanced Cervical Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-09-22

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Cell Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage III Cervical Cancer

  9. Anterior knee pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... as running, jumping or twisting, skiing, or playing soccer). You have flat feet. Anterior knee pain is ... to the kneecap Runners, jumpers, skiers, bicyclists, and soccer players who exercise often Teenagers and healthy young ...

  10. Spontaneous delivery through a cervical tear without cervical os dilatation.

    PubMed

    Djokovic, Dusan; Costa, Cristina; Martins, Ana; Abushad, Shadi

    2015-01-01

    Spontaneous delivery through a cervical tear, provoked by prostaglandin-induced uterine contractions, was described in a G2P0 woman with a history of cervical dilatation and uterine curettage. This rare complication with potentially serious maternal-fetal consequences can be predicted by an aberrant cervical response to prostaglandins in parturients with previous cervical interventions. PMID:25678963

  11. Spontaneous delivery through a cervical tear without cervical os dilatation

    PubMed Central

    Djokovic, Dusan; Costa, Cristina; Martins, Ana; Abushad, Shadi

    2015-01-01

    Key Clinical Message Spontaneous delivery through a cervical tear, provoked by prostaglandin-induced uterine contractions, was described in a G2P0 woman with a history of cervical dilatation and uterine curettage. This rare complication with potentially serious maternal–fetal consequences can be predicted by an aberrant cervical response to prostaglandins in parturients with previous cervical interventions. PMID:25678963

  12. Cervical Discitis in Children.

    PubMed

    Scheuerman, Oded; Landau, Daniel; Schwarz, Michael; Hoffer, Vered; Marcus, Nufar; Hoffnung, Liat Ashkenazi; Levy, Itzhak

    2015-07-01

    Cervical discitis, though rare, should be included in the differential diagnosis of torticollis, neck pain and neurodevelopmental regression in motor skills in children and infants. Magnetic resonance imaging is the diagnostic method of choice. Treatment should be conservative with antibiotics only. The aim of this study was to describe the 10-year experience of a tertiary pediatric medical center with cervical discitis. PMID:25886786

  13. Intraoperative computed tomography navigation for transpedicular screw fixation to treat unstable thoracic and lumbar spine fractures: clinical analysis of a case series (CARE-compliant).

    PubMed

    Lee, Ching-Yu; Wu, Meng-Huang; Li, Yen-Yao; Cheng, Chin-Chang; Hsu, Chu-Hsiang; Huang, Tsung-Jen; Hsu, Robert Wen-Wei

    2015-05-01

    Transpedicular screw (TPS) fixation in unstable thoracic and lumbar (TL) spine fractures remains technically difficult because of destroyed anatomical landmarks, unstable gross segments, and discrepancies in anatomic orientation using conventional anatomic landmarks, fluoroscopic guidance, or computed tomography (CT)-based navigation. In this study, we evaluated the safety and accuracy of TPS placement under intraoperative computed tomography (iCT) navigation in managing unstable TL spine fractures.From 2010 to 2013, we retrospectively reviewed the Spine Operation Registry records of patients who underwent posterior instrumented fusion to treat unstable TL spine fractures via the iCT navigation system. An unstable spine fracture was identified as AO/Magerl classification type B or type C.In all, 316 screws in 37 patients with unstable TL spine fractures were evaluated and involved 7 thoracic, 23 thoracolumbar junctional, and 7 lumbar fractures. The accuracy of TPS positioning in the pedicle without breach was 98% (310/316). The average number of iCT scans per patient was 2.1 (range 2-3). The average total radiation dose to patients was 15.8 mSv; the dose per single level exposure was 2.7 mSv. The TPS intraoperative revision rate was 0.6% (2/316) and no neurovascular sequela was observed. TPS fixation using the iCT navigation system obtained a 98% accuracy in stabilizing unstable TL spine fractures. A malplaced TPS could be revised during real-time confirmation of the TPS position, and no secondary operation was required to revise malplaced screws.The iCT navigation system provides accurate and safe management of unstable TL spine fractures. In addition, operating room personnel, including surgeons and nurses, did not need to wear heavy lead aprons as they were not exposed to radiation. PMID:25997042

  14. Fatal Vertebral Artery Injury in Penetrating Cervical Spine Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Tannoury, Chadi; Degiacomo, Anthony

    2015-01-01

    Study Design. This case illustrates complications to a vertebral artery injury (VAI) resulting from penetrating cervical spine trauma. Objectives. To discuss the management of both VAI and cervical spine trauma after penetrating gunshot wound to the neck. Summary of Background Data. Vertebral artery injury following cervical spine trauma is infrequent, and a unilateral VAI often occurs without neurologic sequela. Nevertheless, devastating complications of stroke and death do occur. Methods. A gunshot wound to the neck resulted in a C6 vertebral body fracture and C5–C7 transverse foramina fractures. Neck CT angiogram identified a left vertebral artery occlusion. A cerebral angiography confirmed occlusion of the left extracranial vertebral artery and patency of the remaining cerebrovascular system. Following anterior cervical corpectomy and stabilization, brainstem infarction occurred and resulted in death. Results. A fatal outcome resulted from vertebral artery thrombus propagation with occlusion of the basilar artery triggering basilar ischemia and subsequent brainstem and cerebellar infarction. Conclusions. Vertebral artery injury secondary to cervical spine trauma can lead to potentially devastating neurologic sequela. Early surgical stabilization, along with anticoagulation therapy, contributes towards managing the combination of injuries. Unfortunately, despite efforts, a poor outcome is sometimes inevitable when cervical spine trauma is coupled with a VAI. PMID:26640731

  15. MRI and PET Imaging in Predicting Treatment Response in Patients With Stage IB-IVA Cervical Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-24

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Cervical Undifferentiated Carcinoma; Recurrent Cervical Carcinoma; Stage IB2 Cervical Cancer; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIB Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer

  16. [Cervical myelopathy in a patient with congenital cervico-cerebral vascular malformation].

    PubMed

    Naito, Kosuke; Oya, Fusaichi; Takei, Yo-ichi; Yamamoto, Kanji; Ikeda, Shu-ichi

    2004-09-01

    We report a 50 year-old woman with cervical myelopathy. The patient, who had cutaneous angiomas in the right orbital area, became aware of left upper limb weakness when she woke up, followed by painful abnormal sensation in both axilla and arms. MRI revealed an intramedullar lesion mainly located in cervical cord at the level of C3-C4. Angiography showed that serpentine left vertebral artery entered the canalis vertebralis at C3 and fed the blood flow of bilateral middle cerebral arteries. In this case, the upper cervical spinal cord ischemia might be induced by hemodynamic insufficiency of the anterior spinal artery ascribed to congenital cervico-cerebral vascular malformation.

  17. Low-dose chemonucleolysis combined with percutaneous nucleotomy in herniated cervical disks.

    PubMed

    Hoogland, T; Scheckenbach, C

    1995-06-01

    The combination of low-dose chemonucleolysis with 500 IU chymopapain followed by an automated percutaneous nucleotomy of the cervical spine is a new procedure. A follow-up of at least 1 year of the first 22 patients showed in 19 patients good or excellent results. In one patient a fair result was obtained, and in two patients the symptoms were unchanged; one of these patients subsequently underwent diskectomy and anterior cervical spine fusion. Preoperatively, all patients showed a clear cervical disk herniation with predominantly radicular pain. The procedure has been performed so far in approximately 100 patients. No intra- or postoperative complications have been noted. PMID:7670215

  18. Anterior skull base oncocytoma.

    PubMed

    López, Fernando; Vivanco, Blanca; Suárez, Carlos; Llorente, José L

    2013-03-01

    Oncocytic neoplasms are tumors composed of oncocytes (ie, epithelial cells with a large cytoplasm that is rich in mitochondria). Most cases are benign and originate from the salivary glands. Although there have been a few reported cases of oncocytomas being found in the sinonasal tract, most if not all cases seem not to involve the anterior skull base. We report a rare case of oncocytoma involving the anterior skull base occurring in a 44-year-old male patient. Preoperative carotid angiography and selective embolization was performed. The patient underwent an expanded endoscopic endonasal anterior craniofacial resection, which allowed complete resection of the tumor, with a low morbidity. The pathological diagnosis was oncocytoma. At 36 months after the initial treatment, the patient is free of disease. Based on our literature search, this may be the first such reported case. A brief review of the available literature examining the known body of knowledge regarding these neoplasms is presented.

  19. [Cervical cerclage in 2008].

    PubMed

    Fuchs, F; Senat, M-V; Gervaise, A; Deffieux, X; Faivre, E; Frydman, R; Fernandez, H

    2008-11-01

    Cervical cerclage is a common surgical technique that has been used for more than 50 years to prevent preterm deliveries and in the management of a threatened second trimester loss. However, it remains one of the most controversial interventions in obstetrics and this is probably due to difficulties in diagnosing cervical insufficiency, which is based on a history of recurrent second trimester loss or early preterm delivery following painless cervical dilatation in the absence of contractions or bleeding. This article reviews in 2008 the current literature regarding the efficacy of elective cerclage, ultrasound-indicated cerclage, emergency cerclage, and cervico-isthmic cerclage for singletons and multiple pregnancies.

  20. [Cervical cerclage in 2008].

    PubMed

    Fuchs, F; Senat, M-V; Gervaise, A; Deffieux, X; Faivre, E; Frydman, R; Fernandez, H

    2008-11-01

    Cervical cerclage is a common surgical technique that has been used for more than 50 years to prevent preterm deliveries and in the management of a threatened second trimester loss. However, it remains one of the most controversial interventions in obstetrics and this is probably due to difficulties in diagnosing cervical insufficiency, which is based on a history of recurrent second trimester loss or early preterm delivery following painless cervical dilatation in the absence of contractions or bleeding. This article reviews in 2008 the current literature regarding the efficacy of elective cerclage, ultrasound-indicated cerclage, emergency cerclage, and cervico-isthmic cerclage for singletons and multiple pregnancies. PMID:18922730

  1. Anterior tibial striations.

    PubMed

    Daffner, R H

    1984-09-01

    Radiolucent horizontal striations of the anterior cortex of the tibia were seen in 10 athletes who were evaluated for "shin-splints." There were seven basketball players, two professional dancers, and one hurdler. Each patient's history included vigorous leaping in performance of athletic feats. All the lesions were similar in location and appearance and were accompanied by thickening of the anterior tibial cortex. These striations are considered stress fractures and were not observed in a group of runners who were evaluated for shin-splints.

  2. Congenital anterior urethral diverticulum.

    PubMed

    Singh, Sanjeet Kumar; Ansari, Ms

    2014-09-01

    Congenital anterior urethral diverticulum (CAUD) may be found all along the anterior urethra and may present itself at any age, from infant to adult. Most children with this condition present with difficulty in initiating micturition, dribbling of urine, poor urinary stream, or urinary tract infection. A careful history will reveal that these children never had a good urinary stream since birth, and the telltale sign is a cystic swelling of the penile urethra. In this paper, we present two cases of CAUD that were managed by excision of the diverticulum with primary repair. PMID:26328174

  3. Prevent Cervical Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Fighting Cervical Cancer Worldwide Stay Informed Printable Versions Standard quality PDF [PDF-877KB] High-quality PDF for professional ... uterus, vagina, and vulva. Stay Informed Printable Versions Standard quality PDF [PDF-877KB] High-quality PDF for professional ...

  4. Cervical Cancer Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... cervical cancer in women aged 30–65 years. Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV): A virus that attacks certain cells of the body’s immune system and causes acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). Human Papillomavirus ( ...

  5. Immunotherapy for Cervical Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    In an early phase NCI clinical trial, two patients with metastatic cervical cancer had a complete disappearance of their tumors after receiving treatment with a form of immunotherapy called adoptive cell transfer.

  6. Radiation Therapy Plus Cisplatin and Gemcitabine in Treating Patients With Cervical Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-12-23

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Cervical Small Cell Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage III Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer

  7. Pseudoactinomyces in cervical mucus.

    PubMed

    Deen, Suha; Ashford, Keith; Harwood, Andrew; Gray, Trevor

    2011-05-01

    Actinomyces israelii are gram-positive filamentous bacteria forming yellow sulfur granules. They are the most well known complication of intrauterine contraceptive devices (IUCD). Healthcare staff dealing with reporting cervical smears should be aware of pseudoactinomyces entity in a cervical smears and biopsies as it may raise a false alarm to the clinician and may lead to unnecessary removal of IUCD and/or medical treatment.

  8. A biomechanical analysis of decompression and reconstruction methods in the cervical spine. Emphasis on a carbon-fiber-composite cage.

    PubMed

    Shono, Y; McAfee, P C; Cunningham, B W; Brantigan, J W

    1993-11-01

    Biomechanical analysis of three different patterns of instability--that created by fifth and sixth cervical anterior discectomy, that created by one-level (fifth cervical) anterior corpectomy, and that created by two-level (fourth and fifth cervical) corpectomy--was performed in eighteen calf spines. Three types of anterior reconstruction--anterior iliac strut bone-grafting, use of an anterior carbon-fiber-composite cage packed with cancellous bone graft, as well as use of polymethylmethacrylate anteriorly--were cyclically tested in axial compression, torsion, and flexion-extension. Each of these types of reconstruction was also tested with supplemental posterior wire stabilization (the triple-wire technique of Bohlman). Regardless of the type of anterior instability, the carbon-fiber-reinforced cage packed with cancellous bone graft was more rigid than the iliac bone graft alone. The cage resulted in good stiffness in the axial compression and rotation tests and was the most rigid construct in the flexion-extension tests. The superior aspect of the polymethylmethacrylate constructs loosened at the bone-cement interface in eight of the twelve specimens during flexion-extension testing. The addition of the supplemental posterior wiring to the anterior constructs provided additional rigidity in flexion-extension testing.

  9. Atezolizumab and Bevacizumab in Treating Patients With Recurrent, Persistent, or Metastatic Cervical Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-10

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma, Not Otherwise Specified; Recurrent Cervical Carcinoma; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer; Stage IVB Cervical Cancer

  10. Nivolumab in Treating Patients With Persistent, Recurrent, or Metastatic Cervical Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-11-01

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma, Not Otherwise Specified; Recurrent Cervical Carcinoma; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer; Stage IVB Cervical Cancer

  11. Head size, weaponry, and cervical adaptation: Testing craniocervical evolutionary hypotheses in Ceratopsia.

    PubMed

    VanBuren, Collin S; Campione, Nicolás E; Evans, David C

    2015-07-01

    The anterior cervical vertebrae form the skeletal connection between the cranial and postcranial skeletons in higher tetrapods. As a result, the morphology of the atlas-axis complex is likely to be shaped by selection pressures acting on either the head or neck. The neoceratopsian (Reptilia:Dinosauria) syncervical represents one of the most highly modified atlas-axis regions in vertebrates, being formed by the complete coalescence of the three most anterior cervical vertebrae. In ceratopsids, the syncervical has been hypothesized to be an adaptation to support a massive skull, or to act as a buttress during intraspecific head-to-head combat. Here, we test these functional/adaptive hypotheses within a phylogenetic framework and critically examine the previously proposed methods for quantifying relative head size in the fossil record for the first time. Results indicate that neither the evolution of cranial weaponry nor large head size correlates with the origin of cervical fusion in ceratopsians, and we, therefore, reject both adaptive hypotheses for the origin of the syncervical. Anterior cervical fusion has evolved independently in a number of amniote clades, and further research on extant groups with this peculiar anatomy is needed to understand the evolutionary basis for cervical fusion in Neoceratopsia.

  12. Severe neurologic manifestations from cervical spine instability in spondylo-megaepiphyseal-metaphyseal dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Simon, Marleen; Campos-Xavier, Ana Belinda; Mittaz-Crettol, Lauréane; Valadares, Eugenia Ribeiro; Carvalho, Daniel; Speck-Martins, Carlos Eduardo; Nampoothiri, Sheela; Alanay, Yasemin; Mihci, Ercan; van Bever, Yolande; Garcia-Segarra, Nuria; Cavalcanti, Denise; Mortier, Geert; Bonafé, Luisa; Superti-Furga, Andrea

    2012-08-15

    Spondylo-megaepiphyseal-metaphyseal dysplasia (SMMD; OMIM 613330) is a dysostosis/dysplasia caused by recessive mutations in the homeobox-containing gene, NKX3-2 (formerly known as BAPX1). Because of the rarity of the condition, its diagnostic features and natural course are not well known. We describe clinical and radiographic findings in six patients (five of which with homozygous mutations in the NKX3-2 gene) and highlight the unusual and severe changes in the cervical spine and the neurologic complications. In individuals with SMMD, the trunk and the neck are short, while the limbs, fingers and toes are disproportionately long. Radiographs show a severe ossification delay of the vertebral bodies with sagittal and coronal clefts, missing ossification of the pubic bones, large round "balloon-like" epiphyses of the long bones, and presence of multiple pseudoepiphyses at all metacarpals and phalanges. Reduced or absent ossification of the cervical vertebrae leads to cervical instability with anterior or posterior kinking of the cervical spine (swan neck-like deformity, kyknodysostosis). As a result of the cervical spine instability or deformation, five of six patients in our series suffered cervical cord injury that manifested clinically as limb spasticity. Although the number of individuals observed is small, the high incidence of cervical spine deformation in SMMD is unique among skeletal dysplasias. Early diagnosis of SMMD by recognition of the radiographic pattern might prevent of the neurologic complications via prophylactic cervical spine stabilization. PMID:22791571

  13. Spinal surgery -- cervical - series (image)

    MedlinePlus

    The cervical spinal column is made up of vertebral bodies which protect the spinal cord. ... spinal nerves, trauma, and narrowing (stenosis) of the spinal column around the spinal cord. Symptoms of cervical spine ...

  14. Cervical Radiculopathy: Incidence and Treatment of 1,420 Consecutive Cases

    PubMed Central

    Nemani, Venu M.; Piyaskulkaew, Chaiwat; Vargas, Samuel Romero; Riew, K. Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective case series. Purpose To determine the incidence of cervical radiculopathy requiring operative intervention by level and to report on the methods of treatment. Overview of Literature Cervical radiculopathy is a common cause of pain and can result in progressive neurological deficits. Although the pathology is well understood, the actual incidence of cervical radiculopathy at particular spinal levels ultimately requiring operative intervention is unknown. Methods A large consecutive series of patients operated on by a single surgeon were retrospectively analyzed. The incidence of cervical radiculopathy at each level was defined for every patient. Procedures used for operative treatment were noted. Health related quality of life (HRQL) scores were collected both pre-operatively and postoperatively. Results There were 1305 primary and 115 revision operations performed. The most common primary procedures performed were anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF, 50%) and anterior cervical corpectomy and fusion (ACCF, 28%). The most commonly affected levels were C6 (66%) and C7 (62%). Reasons for revision were pseudarthrosis (27%), clinical adjacent segment pathology (CASP, 63%), persistent radiculopathy (11%), and hardware-related (2.6%). The most common procedures performed in the revision group were posterior cervical decompression and fusion (PCDF, 42%) and ACDF (40%). The most commonly affected levels were C7 (43%) and C5 (30%). Among patients that had their index surgery at our institution, the revision rate was 6.4%. In both primary and revision cases there was a significant improvement in Neck Disability Index and visual analogue scale scores postoperatively. Postoperative HRQL scores in the revision cases were significantly worse than those in the primary cases (p <0.01). Conclusions This study provides the largest description of the incidence of cervical radiculopathy by level and operative outcomes in patients undergoing cervical

  15. Posterior Cervical Microscopic Foraminotomy and Discectomy with Laser for Unilateral Radiculopathy.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Hyo-Cheol; Kim, Cheol-Soo; Kim, Suk-Cheol; Kim, Tae-Ho; Jang, Jae-Won; Choi, Ki-Young; Moon, Bong Ju; Lee, Jung-Kil

    2015-12-01

    Surgical decompression for cervical radiculopathy includes anterior cervical discectomy and fusion, anterior or posterior cervical foraminotomy, and cervical arthroplasty after decompression. The aim of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of a CO2 laser in posterior-approach surgery for unilateral cervical radiculopathy. From January 2006 to December 2008, 12 consecutive patients with unilateral cervical radiculopathy from either foraminal stenosis or disc herniation, which was confirmed with imaging studies, underwent posterior foraminotomy and discectomy with the use of a microscope and CO2 laser. For annulotomy and discectomy, we used about 300 joules of CO2 laser energy. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was used to evaluate the extent of disc removal or foraminal decompression. Clinical outcome was evaluated by using visual analogue scale scores for radicular pain and Odom's criteria. For evaluation of spinal stability, cervical flexion and extension radiographs were obtained. Single-level foraminotomy was performed in 10 patients and two-level foraminotomies were performed in 2 patients. Preoperative radicular symptoms were improved immediately after surgery in all patients. No surgery-related complications developed in our cases. Postoperative MRI demonstrated effective decompression of ventral lesions and widened foraminal spaces in all cases. There was no development of cervical instability during the follow-up period. Posterior foraminotomy and discectomy using a microscope and CO2 laser is an effective surgical tool for unilateral cervical radiculopathy caused by lateral or foraminal disc herniations or spondylotic stenosis. Long-term follow-up with radiographs showed no significant kyphotic changes or spinal instability.

  16. Posterior Cervical Microscopic Foraminotomy and Discectomy with Laser for Unilateral Radiculopathy

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Hyo-Cheol; Kim, Cheol-Soo; Kim, Suk-Cheol; Kim, Tae-Ho; Jang, Jae-Won; Choi, Ki-Young; Moon, Bong Ju

    2015-01-01

    Surgical decompression for cervical radiculopathy includes anterior cervical discectomy and fusion, anterior or posterior cervical foraminotomy, and cervical arthroplasty after decompression. The aim of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of a CO2 laser in posterior-approach surgery for unilateral cervical radiculopathy. From January 2006 to December 2008, 12 consecutive patients with unilateral cervical radiculopathy from either foraminal stenosis or disc herniation, which was confirmed with imaging studies, underwent posterior foraminotomy and discectomy with the use of a microscope and CO2 laser. For annulotomy and discectomy, we used about 300 joules of CO2 laser energy. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was used to evaluate the extent of disc removal or foraminal decompression. Clinical outcome was evaluated by using visual analogue scale scores for radicular pain and Odom's criteria. For evaluation of spinal stability, cervical flexion and extension radiographs were obtained. Single-level foraminotomy was performed in 10 patients and two-level foraminotomies were performed in 2 patients. Preoperative radicular symptoms were improved immediately after surgery in all patients. No surgery-related complications developed in our cases. Postoperative MRI demonstrated effective decompression of ventral lesions and widened foraminal spaces in all cases. There was no development of cervical instability during the follow-up period. Posterior foraminotomy and discectomy using a microscope and CO2 laser is an effective surgical tool for unilateral cervical radiculopathy caused by lateral or foraminal disc herniations or spondylotic stenosis. Long-term follow-up with radiographs showed no significant kyphotic changes or spinal instability. PMID:26730364

  17. Cervical facet dislocation adjacent to the fused motion segment.

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, Kunio; Kawanishi, Masahiro; Yamada, Makoto; Tanaka, Hidekazu; Ito, Yutaka; Kuroiwa, Toshihiko

    2016-01-01

    This study reports on a case that forces re-examination of merits and demerits of anterior cervical fusion. A 79-year-old male was brought to the emergency room (ER) of our hospital after he fell and struck the occipital region of his head following excessive alcohol consumption. Four years prior, he had undergone anterior cervical discectomy and fusion of C5/6 and a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) performed 3 years after this surgery indicated that he was suffering from degeneration of C6/7 intervertebral discs. After arriving at the ER, he presented motor impairment at level C7 and lower of manual muscle testing grade 1 as well as moderate loss of physical sensation from the trunk and peripheries of both upper limbs to the peripheries of both lower limbs (Frankel B). Cervical computed tomography (CT) indicated anterior dislocation of C6/7, and MRI indicated severe spinal cord edema. We performed manipulative reduction of C6/7 with the patient under general anesthesia. Next, we performed laminectomy on C5-T1 and posterior fusion on C6/7. Postoperative CT indicated that cervical alignment had improved, and MRI indicated that the spinal cord edema observed prior to surgery had been mitigated. Three months after surgery, motor function and sensory impairment of the lower limbs had improved, and the patient was ambulatory upon discharge from the hospital (Frankel D). In the present case, although C5 and 6 were rigidly fused, degeneration of the C6/7 intervertebral disc occurred and stability was compromised. As a result, even slight trauma placed a severe dynamic burden on the facet joint of C6/7, which led to dislocation.

  18. Minimally invasive central corpectomy for ossified posterior longitudinal ligament in the cervical spine.

    PubMed

    Hirano, Yoshitaka; Mizuno, Junichi; Nakagawa, Hiroshi; Itoh, Yasunobu; Kubota, Keiichi; Watanabe, Sadayoshi; Matsuoka, Hidenori; Numazawa, Shinichi; Tomii, Masato; Watanabe, Kazuo

    2011-01-01

    Minimally invasive central corpectomy (MICC) for cervical segmental ossified posterior longitudinal ligament (OPLL) is described. The procedure of MICC includes upper- or lower-half central corpectomy of the involved cervical spine, transdiscal decompression of the adjacent disc level, dissection and partial removal of the OPLL, removal of the OPLL behind the vertebral body via these windows, and fusion with cylindrical titanium cages. Anterior plate fixation is not necessary. From January 2008 to December 2009 we surgically treated three patients with cervical OPLL by MICC. All three patients showed remarkable improvement of their symptoms within a few days after the operation. No neurological or radiological complication was observed during that period. MICC is beneficial in avoiding complete corpectomy and long fusion, usage of an anterior plate, and usage of a large external orthosis. MICC also reduces the risk of postoperative esophageal perforation due to a screw backing out of the plate. PMID:20888772

  19. Management of Neglected Traumatic Bilateral Cervical Facet Dislocations Without Neurological Deficit

    PubMed Central

    Farooque, Kamran; Khatri, Kavin; Gupta, Babita; Sharma, Vijay

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Sub axial cervical spine dislocations are common and managing these cases by closed reduction is successful in the majority of cases. However, treatment of old and neglected cases is difficult and the results may vary in terms of neurological and functional outcomes. Case Presentation: We present two cases of traumatic bilateral cervical facet dislocation with no neurological deficit (ND) who referred four months after the injury. They were managed via single stage anterior discectomy, posterior facet reduction, instrumentation, and then anterior reconstruction with bone graft and cervical plate. The patients had no ND in the postoperative period and returned to work. Discussion: Patients presenting with neck pain after a history of trauma should be evaluated thoroughly with radiographs and computed tomography. The management of old neglected facet dislocations is difficult, lengthy, and fraught with potential neurological complications; operative intervention can substantially improve the quality of life in these patients. PMID:26543838

  20. National trends in outpatient surgical treatment of degenerative cervical spine disease.

    PubMed

    Baird, Evan O; Egorova, Natalia N; McAnany, Steven J; Qureshi, Sheeraz A; Hecht, Andrew C; Cho, Samuel K

    2014-08-01

    Study Design Retrospective population-based observational study. Objective To assess the growth of cervical spine surgery performed in an outpatient setting. Methods A retrospective study was conducted using the United States Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project's State Inpatient and Ambulatory Surgery Databases for California, New York, Florida, and Maryland from 2005 to 2009. Current Procedural Terminology, fourth revision (CPT-4) and International Classification of Diseases, ninth revision Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM) codes were used to identify operations for degenerative cervical spine diseases in adults (age > 20 years). Disposition and complication rates were examined. Results There was an increase in cervical spine surgeries performed in an ambulatory setting during the study period. Anterior cervical diskectomy and fusion accounted for 68% of outpatient procedures; posterior decompression made up 21%. Younger patients predominantly underwent anterior fusion procedures, and patients in the eighth and ninth decades of life had more posterior decompressions. Charlson comorbidity index and complication rates were substantially lower for ambulatory cases when compared with inpatients. The majority (>99%) of patients were discharged home following ambulatory surgery. Conclusions Recently, the number of cervical spine surgeries has increased in general, and more of these procedures are being performed in an ambulatory setting. The majority (>99%) of patients are discharged home but the nature of analyzing administrative data limits accurate assessment of postoperative complications and thus patient safety. This increase in outpatient cervical spine surgery necessitates further discussion of its safety.

  1. The degenerative cervical spine.

    PubMed

    Llopis, E; Belloch, E; León, J P; Higueras, V; Piquer, J

    2016-04-01

    Imaging techniques provide excellent anatomical images of the cervical spine. The choice to use one technique or another will depend on the clinical scenario and on the treatment options. Plain-film X-rays continue to be fundamental, because they make it possible to evaluate the alignment and bone changes; they are also useful for follow-up after treatment. The better contrast resolution provided by magnetic resonance imaging makes it possible to evaluate the soft tissues, including the intervertebral discs, ligaments, bone marrow, and spinal cord. The role of computed tomography in the study of degenerative disease has changed in recent years owing to its great spatial resolution and its capacity to depict osseous components. In this article, we will review the anatomy and biomechanical characteristics of the cervical spine, and then we provide a more detailed discussion of the degenerative diseases that can affect the cervical spine and their clinical management. PMID:26878769

  2. The degenerative cervical spine.

    PubMed

    Llopis, E; Belloch, E; León, J P; Higueras, V; Piquer, J

    2016-04-01

    Imaging techniques provide excellent anatomical images of the cervical spine. The choice to use one technique or another will depend on the clinical scenario and on the treatment options. Plain-film X-rays continue to be fundamental, because they make it possible to evaluate the alignment and bone changes; they are also useful for follow-up after treatment. The better contrast resolution provided by magnetic resonance imaging makes it possible to evaluate the soft tissues, including the intervertebral discs, ligaments, bone marrow, and spinal cord. The role of computed tomography in the study of degenerative disease has changed in recent years owing to its great spatial resolution and its capacity to depict osseous components. In this article, we will review the anatomy and biomechanical characteristics of the cervical spine, and then we provide a more detailed discussion of the degenerative diseases that can affect the cervical spine and their clinical management.

  3. Role of Decompression in Late Presentation of Cervical Spinal Cord Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Sakale, Harshal; Dulani, Rajesh; Singh, Pradeep K; Sanrakhia, Manoj

    2014-01-01

    Study Design Prospective study conducted at Jawaharlal Nehru Medical College, Datta Meghe Institute of Medical Sciences, Wardha, India. Purpose To show the efficacy of decompression in the late presentation of cervical spinal cord disorders. Overview of Literature Studies by various authors have shown that early spinal decompression results in better neurological outcomes. Methods From January 2003 to January 2005, 11 of the 41 patients with cervical spinal cord compression, meeting the inclusion criteria, underwent anterior decompression; interbody graft placement and stabilization by anterior cervical locking plate. The neurologic and functional outcomes were recorded. Results Five patients had spinal cord injury and 6 patients had compressive cervical myelopathy. Complications included 1 death and 1 plate loosening. No patient lost their preoperative neurological status. One patient had no improvement, 2 patients showed full recovery. The mean follow-up is 28.3 month. At the of rehabilitation, 6 were able to walk without support), 2 could walk with support, and 1 needed a wheelchair. The average American Spinal Injury Association motor score on admission to the hospital, 32.8 (standard deviation [SD], 30.5); admission to rehabilitation, 38.6 (SD, 32.4); discharge from rehabilitation, 46.2 (SD, 33.7). The most recent follow-up was 64.0 (SD, 35.3). Conclusions The anterior approach for cervical decompression allows for adequate decompression. This decompression is the best chance offered in even late reported cases, including posttraumatic cases where there is no evidence of cord transactions. The use of anterior cervical plates reduces the chances of graft loosening, extruding, or collapsing. PMID:24761201

  4. Ovarian and cervical cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Williams, C.

    1992-01-01

    Death rates from cervical cancer have already fallen this century and for patients with invasive cervical cancer five year survival rates are greater than for most solid tumours. Better screening for premalignant changes may further reduce the incidence of invasive cancer; indeed, it has been claimed that the reduction in mortality could be as high as 90%, though estimates of screening efficacy have varied greatly. For those with advanced invasive carcinoma neoadjuvant chemotherapy may reduce the risk of relapse and improve survival. Images FIG 2 p1504-a PMID:1611377

  5. Tibialis Anterior Tendon Transfer.

    PubMed

    Mulhern, Jennifer L; Protzman, Nicole M; Brigido, Stephen A

    2016-01-01

    Tendon transfer procedures are used commonly for the correction of soft tissue imbalances and instabilities. The complete transfer and the split transfer of the tibialis anterior tendon are well-accepted methods for the treatment of idiopathic equinovarus deformity in children and adults. Throughout the literature, complete and split transfer have been shown to yield significant improvements in ankle and foot range of motion and muscle function. At present, there is insufficient evidence to recommend one procedure over the other, although the split procedure has been advocated for consistently achieving inversion to eversion muscle balance without overcorrection.

  6. Cisplatin and Radiation Therapy With or Without Tirapazamine in Treating Patients With Cervical Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-06-18

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Cell Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage III Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer

  7. Chemoradiation Therapy and Ipilimumab in Treating Patients With Locally Advanced Cervical Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-25

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma, Not Otherwise Specified; Stage IB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIB Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer

  8. Hyperpathia in the central cervical cord syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Hopkins, Anthony; Rudge, Peter

    1973-01-01

    Seven patients are described with hyperextension or flexion injury to the cervical cord. They illustrate the symptoms and signs previously associated with damage to the centre of the cord, in that weakness is greater in the upper limbs than the lower. We do not believe that the relative sparing of the legs can be accounted for on the basis that corticospinal fibres passing to the lumbar anterior horn cells lie laterally in the pyramidal tract, as has previously been suggested by Schneider, Cherry, and Pantek (1954) as there is no evidence that there is such lamination in man. Severe pain in the shoulders and arms was a major symptom in six of the patients, even in those with relatively minor injuries. The nature of this pain was initially often not recognized. PMID:4731333

  9. Neglected dislocation in sub-axial cervical spine: Case series and a suggested treatment protocol

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Sudhir Kumar; Aggarwal, Rishi Anil; Bhosale, Sunil Krishna; Nemade, Pradip Sharad

    2016-01-01

    Context: Approaches suggested for treatment of neglected dislocations in the subaxial cervical spine (SACS) include only anterior approach (a), only posterior approach (b), posterior-anterior approach, posterior-anterior-posterior approach, and anterior-posterior-anterior-posterior approach. No protocol is suggested in literature to guide surgeons treating neglected dislocations. Aim: To describe a protocol for the treatment of neglected dislocation in the SACS. Settings and Designs: Retrospective case series and review of literature. Materials and Methods: Six consecutive patients of neglected dislocation (presenting to us more than 3 weeks following trauma) of the SACS were operated as per the protocol suggested in this paper. A retrospective review of the occupational therapy reports, patient records, and radiographs was performed. Only cases with time lapse of more than 3 weeks between the time of injury and initial management have been included in the review. Results: Closed reduction (CR) was achieved in three patients following cervical traction and these were managed by anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF). Open reduction via posterior approach and soft tissue release was required to achieve reduction in two patients. Following reduction posterior instrumented fusion was done in them. One patient with preoperative neurological deficit needed a facetectomy to achieve reduction. Following short-segment fixation, ACDF was also performed in this patient. None of the patients deteriorated neurologically following surgery. Fusion was achieved in all patients. Conclusions: Preoperative and intraoperative traction have a role in the management of neglected dislocations in the cervical spine. If CR is achieved the patient may be managed by ACDF. If CR is not achieved, posterior soft tissue release may be done to achieve reduction and partial facetectomy must be reserved for cases in which reduction is not achieved after soft tissue release. A treatment

  10. Cervical Neoplasia Probe Control

    1997-01-24

    This software, which consists of a main executive and several subroutines, performs control of the optics, image acquisition, and Digital Signal Processing (DSP) of this image, of an optical based medical instrument that performs fluoresence detection of precancerous lesions (neoplasia) of the human cervix. The hardware portion of this medical instrument is known by the same name Cervical Neoplasia Probe (CNP)

  11. Cervical spine trauma

    PubMed Central

    Torretti, Joel A; Sengupta, Dilip K

    2007-01-01

    Cervical spine trauma is a common problem with a wide range of severity from minor ligamentous injury to frank osteo-ligamentous instability with spinal cord injury. The emergent evaluation of patients at risk relies on standardized clinical and radiographic protocols to identify injuries; elucidate associated pathology; classify injuries; and predict instability, treatment and outcomes. The unique anatomy of each region of the cervical spine demands a review of each segment individually. This article examines both upper cervical spine injuries, as well as subaxial spine trauma. The purpose of this article is to provide a review of the broad topic of cervical spine trauma with reference to the classic literature, as well as to summarize all recently available literature on each topic. Identification of References for Inclusion: A Pubmed and Ovid search was performed for each topic in the review to identify recently published articles relevant to the review. In addition prior reviews and classic references were evaluated individually for inclusion of classic papers, classifications and previously unidentified references. PMID:21139776

  12. Congenital Midline Cervical Cleft

    PubMed Central

    Villanueva-Meyer, Javier; Glastonbury, Christine; Marcovici, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Congenital midline cervical cleft is a rare anomaly that typically presents in the neonatal period as a thin suprasternal vertical band of erythematous skin with a nipple-like projection superiorly, which may exude fluid. We present the clinical and pathophysiologic features and the imaging findings of this uncommon, and rarely described entity in a newborn girl. PMID:25926928

  13. Anterior endoscopic correction of scoliosis.

    PubMed

    Picetti, George D; Ertl, Janos P; Bueff, H Ulrich

    2002-04-01

    Our technique of anterior endoscopic scoliosis correction demonstrates the ability to perform an anterior approach through a minimally invasive technique with minimal disruption of the local biology. The initial results appear to equal curve correction and fusion rates to those of a formal open anterior approach. Additional benefits are: 1) shortened operative time, 2) lower blood loss, 3) shortened rehabilitation time, 4) less pain, and 5) shortened hospital stays. Endoscopic technique shows great promise in the management of scoliosis curves; however, this is a technically demanding procedure that requires cross-training in endoscopic discectomy and scoliosis management as well as familiarity with the anterior approach anatomy. PMID:12389288

  14. Multimodal intraoperative monitoring (MIOM) during cervical spine surgical procedures in 246 patients

    PubMed Central

    Sutter, Martin A.; Grob, Dieter; Jeszenszky, Dezsö; Porchet, François; Dvorak, Jiri

    2007-01-01

    A prospective study of 246 patients who received multimodal intraoperative monitoring during cervical spine surgery between March 2000 and December 2005. To determine the sensitivity and specificity of MIOM techniques used to monitor spinal cord and nerve root function during cervical spine surgery. It is appreciated that complication rate of cervical spine surgery is low, however, there is a significant risk of neurological injury. The combination of monitoring of ascending and descending pathways may provide more sensitive and specific results giving immediate feedback information and/or alert regarding any neurological changes during the operation to the surgeon. Intraoperative somatosensory spinal and cerebral evoked potentials combined with continuous EMG and motor-evoked potentials of the spinal cord and muscles were evaluated and compared with postoperative clinical neurological changes. A total of 246 consecutive patients with cervical pathologies, majority spinal stenosis due to degenerative changes of cervical spine were monitored by means of MIOM during the surgical procedure. About 232 patients presented true negative while 2 patients false negative responses. About ten patients presented true positive responses where neurological deficit after the operation was predicted and two patients presented false positive findings. The sensitivity of MIOM applied during cervical spine procedure (anterior and/or posterior) was 83.3% and specificity of 99.2%. MIOM is an effective method of monitoring the spinal cord functional integrity during cervical spine surgery and can help to reduce the risk of neurological deficit by alerting the surgeon when monitoring changes are observed. PMID:17610090

  15. Bioengineered anterior cruciate ligament

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Altman, Gregory (Inventor); Kaplan, David (Inventor); Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana (Inventor); Martin, Ivan (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    The present invention provides a method for producing an anterior cruciate ligament ex vivo. The method comprises seeding pluripotent stem cells in a three dimensional matrix, anchoring the seeded matrix by attachment to two anchors, and culturing the cells within the matrix under conditions appropriate for cell growth and regeneration, while subjecting the matrix to one or more mechanical forces via movement of one or both of the attached anchors. Bone marrow stromal cells are preferably used as the pluripotent cells in the method. Suitable matrix materials are materials to which cells can adhere, such as a gel made from collagen type I. Suitable anchor materials are materials to which the matrix can attach, such as Goinopra coral and also demineralized bone. Optimally, the mechanical forces to which the matrix is subjected mimic mechanical stimuli experienced by an anterior cruciate ligament in vivo. This is accomplished by delivering the appropriate combination of tension, compression, torsion, and shear, to the matrix. The bioengineered ligament which is produced by this method is characterized by a cellular orientation and/or matrix crimp pattern in the direction of the applied mechanical forces, and also by the production of collagen type I, collagen type III, and fibronectin proteins along the axis of mechanical load produced by the mechanical forces. Optimally, the ligament produced has fiber bundles which are arranged into a helical organization. The method for producing an anterior cruciate ligament can be adapted to produce a wide range of tissue types ex vivo by adapting the anchor size and attachment sites to reflect the size of the specific type of tissue to be produced, and also adapting the specific combination of forces applied, to mimic the mechanical stimuli experienced in vivo by the specific type of tissue to be produced. The methods of the present invention can be further modified to incorporate other stimuli experienced in vivo by the

  16. Human enamel veneer restoration: an alternative technique to restore anterior primary teeth.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Luciana Butini; Tamay, Tereza Keiko; Oliveira, Marta Dutra Machado; Rodrigues, Célia Martins Delgado; Wanderley, Marcia Turolla

    2006-01-01

    Restoration of severely decayed primary teeth is a clinical challenge in Pediatric Dentistry. Among the restorative treatment options, the use of prefabricated crowns and resin composite restorations, either by means of direct or indirect techniques is mentioned in the literature. The purpose of this article is to describe the rehabilitation of primary anterior teeth in a 5-year-old patient. Dental treatment consisted on an anterior space maintainer prosthesis made with natural primary teeth, plus human dental enamel veneer (facet) restorations. The advantages of this technique are better esthetics and the natural enamel has physiologic wear and offers superficial smoothness and cervical adaptation compatible with those of the surrounding teeth.

  17. Human enamel veneer restoration: an alternative technique to restore anterior primary teeth.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Luciana Butini; Tamay, Tereza Keiko; Oliveira, Marta Dutra Machado; Rodrigues, Célia Martins Delgado; Wanderley, Marcia Turolla

    2006-01-01

    Restoration of severely decayed primary teeth is a clinical challenge in Pediatric Dentistry. Among the restorative treatment options, the use of prefabricated crowns and resin composite restorations, either by means of direct or indirect techniques is mentioned in the literature. The purpose of this article is to describe the rehabilitation of primary anterior teeth in a 5-year-old patient. Dental treatment consisted on an anterior space maintainer prosthesis made with natural primary teeth, plus human dental enamel veneer (facet) restorations. The advantages of this technique are better esthetics and the natural enamel has physiologic wear and offers superficial smoothness and cervical adaptation compatible with those of the surrounding teeth. PMID:16937849

  18. Cervical Stenosis in a Patient with Arthrogryposis: Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Du, Jerry; Aichmair, Alexander; Lykissas, Marios; Girardi, Federico

    2014-01-01

    Study Design Case report. Objective Amyoplasia-type arthrogryposis is a rare congenital disease that presents as multiple contractures involving various areas of the body. To the authors' knowledge, there have been no reports of adults with amyoplasia in the current literature. We report a case of an adult patient with cervical stenosis in the setting of amyoplasia. Patients and Methods A 48-year-old patient with amyoplasia and over 30 previous orthopedic reconstructive surgeries presented with neck pain radiating down his left shoulder and into the fingers, dysesthesia in his fingertips, and left-sided periauricular headache. A diagnosis of central spinal canal stenosis and bilateral foraminal stenosis at C3–C7 with radiculopathy was made based on computed tomography scans. Because of a prior right-side sternocleidomastoid muscle transfer, a left-side C3–C4, C5–C7 anterior cervical discectomy and fusion procedure was performed. Results The patient experienced significant improvement in symptoms that was transient. Symptoms returned to preoperative values after 1 year, despite significant and persistent improvement in stenosis. Conclusions Both amyoplasia and cervical stenosis can manifest in neurologic symptoms. Distinguishing the causing pathology can be challenging. The radiographic improvement of cervical stenosis in a patient with amyoplasia is not always associated with long-standing pain relief. PMID:24715873

  19. Lateral cervical sinus: specific sonographic findings in two pediatric cases.

    PubMed

    Hosokawa, Takahiro; Yamada, Yoshitake; Sato, Yumiko; Tanami, Yutaka; Amano, Hizuru; Fujiogi, Michimasa; Kawashima, Hiroshi; Oguma, Eiji

    2015-10-01

    A lateral cervical sinus, also known as a second pharyngeal or branchial cleft fistula/sinus, occurs when the second pharyngeal arch fails to grow caudally over the third and fourth arches, leaving remnants of the second branchial clefts in contact with the surface of the neck via a narrow canal. This type of sinus is detected on the lateral aspect of the neck directly anterior to the sternocleidomastoid muscle. We report two pediatric cases with lateral cervical sinus, and pathognomonic sonographic findings to confirm the diagnosis. The first case involved a 3-month-old boy with a sinus on the lateral neck and occasional drainage from a cervical sinus opening. Sonography revealed that the sinus tract extended between the external and internal carotid arteries. In case two, a 1-month-old girl presented with a sinus on the lateral neck and signs of acute infection at the site of a pinpoint opening. Sonography revealed an oval-shaped cystic lesion and sinus tract extending between the external and internal carotid arteries. Sonography does not require radiation or sedation for children. The best choice for the first examination for lateral cervical sinus is sonography, rather than CT, MRI, or contrast fistulograms. PMID:26576989

  20. Cervical stenosis in a patient with arthrogryposis: case report.

    PubMed

    Du, Jerry; Aichmair, Alexander; Lykissas, Marios; Girardi, Federico

    2014-04-01

    Study Design Case report. Objective Amyoplasia-type arthrogryposis is a rare congenital disease that presents as multiple contractures involving various areas of the body. To the authors' knowledge, there have been no reports of adults with amyoplasia in the current literature. We report a case of an adult patient with cervical stenosis in the setting of amyoplasia. Patients and Methods A 48-year-old patient with amyoplasia and over 30 previous orthopedic reconstructive surgeries presented with neck pain radiating down his left shoulder and into the fingers, dysesthesia in his fingertips, and left-sided periauricular headache. A diagnosis of central spinal canal stenosis and bilateral foraminal stenosis at C3-C7 with radiculopathy was made based on computed tomography scans. Because of a prior right-side sternocleidomastoid muscle transfer, a left-side C3-C4, C5-C7 anterior cervical discectomy and fusion procedure was performed. Results The patient experienced significant improvement in symptoms that was transient. Symptoms returned to preoperative values after 1 year, despite significant and persistent improvement in stenosis. Conclusions Both amyoplasia and cervical stenosis can manifest in neurologic symptoms. Distinguishing the causing pathology can be challenging. The radiographic improvement of cervical stenosis in a patient with amyoplasia is not always associated with long-standing pain relief.

  1. Cetuximab, Cisplatin, and Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients With Stage IB, Stage II, Stage III, or Stage IVA Cervical Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-12-29

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Cervical Small Cell Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage III Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer

  2. Cisplatin and Radiation Therapy Followed by Paclitaxel and Carboplatin in Treating Patients With Stage IB-IVA Cervical Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-16

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIB Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer

  3. Atypical Anterior Spinal Artery Infarction due to Left Vertebral Artery Occlusion Presenting with Bilateral Hand Weakness

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Min-Ji; Jang, Mi-Hee; Choi, Mi-Song; Kang, Suk Yun; Kim, Joo Yong; Kwon, Ki-Han; Kang, Ik-Won

    2014-01-01

    Background Infarct of the anterior spinal artery is the most common subtype of spinal cord infarct, and is characterized by bilateral motor deficits with spinothalamic sensory deficits. We experienced a case with atypical anterior-spinal-artery infarct that presented with bilateral hand weakness but without sensory deficits. Case Report A 29-year-old man presented with sudden neck pain and bilateral weakness of the hands. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain did not reveal any lesion. His motor symptoms improved rapidly except for mild weakness in his left wrist and fingers. Magnetic resonance angiography showed proximal occlusion of the left vertebral artery; a spine MRI revealed left cervical cord infarction. Conclusions Bilateral or unilateral hand weakness can be the sole symptom of a cervical cord infarct. PMID:24829605

  4. Clinical aspects of cervical insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Lotgering, Frederik K

    2007-06-01

    Fetal loss is a painful experience. A history of second or early third trimester fetal loss, after painless dilatation of the cervix, prolapse or rupture of the membranes, and expulsion of a live fetus despite minimal uterine activity, is characteristic for cervical insufficiency. In such cases the risk of recurrence is high, and a policy of prophylactic cerclage may be safer than one of serial cervical length measurements followed by cerclage, tocolysis and bed rest in case of cervical shortening or dilatation. In low risk cases, however, prophylactic cerclage is not useful. There is a need for more basic knowledge of cervical ripening, objective assessment of cervical visco-elastic properties, and randomized controlled trials of technical aspects of cervical cerclage (e.g. suturing technique).

  5. Adenocarcinoma of the cervical stump

    SciTech Connect

    Goodman, H.M.; Niloff, J.M.; Buttlar, C.A.; Welch, W.R.; Marck, A.; Feuer, E.J.; Lahman, E.A.; Jenison, E.; Knapp, R.C. )

    1989-11-01

    Sixteen women with adenocarcinoma of the cervical stump were treated over a 15-year period. The median survivals of 40 months for stage IB and 17 months for stages II and III were significantly worse compared with those for patients treated for cervical adenocarcinoma of the intact uterus or squamous carcinoma of the cervical stump. The poor results were due to both local and distant failure. Implications regarding tumor radiosensitivity and adjuvant therapy in these high-risk patients are discussed.

  6. Operations for cervical incompetence.

    PubMed

    Branch, D W

    1986-06-01

    At present, cervical cerclage is indicated in those patients with a classic history of cervical incompetence. For the majority of these patients, a postconceptional cerclage procedure is better suited because it is done after the fetus has been evaluated ultrasonographically for obvious abnormalities and after the risk for spontaneous abortion is past. The greatest experience is with the Shirodkar and the McDonald procedures; allowing for operator differences, neither appears to have an important advantage. The transabdominal cervicoisthmic cerclage may be a useful postconceptional procedure in the selected patient whose cervix is either markedly foreshortened, deeply lacerated, or infected. Preconceptional cerclages are best reserved for those rare patients in whom a markedly foreshortened incompetent cervix is associated with early second-trimester pregnancy losses (preconceptional isthmic cerclage) or in whom the cervix has a single, identifiable scar or deep laceration extending through the internal os (Lash procedure). PMID:3522005

  7. [Primary cervical cancer screening].

    PubMed

    Vargas-Hernández, Víctor Manuel; Vargas-Aguilar, Víctor Manuel; Tovar-Rodríguez, José María

    2015-01-01

    Cervico-uterine cancer screening with cytology decrease incidence by more than 50%. The cause of this cancer is the human papilloma virus high risk, and requires a sensitive test to provide sufficient sensitivity and specificity for early detection and greater interval period when the results are negative. The test of the human papilloma virus high risk, is effective and safe because of its excellent sensitivity, negative predictive value and optimal reproducibility, especially when combined with liquid-based cytology or biomarkers with viral load, with higher sensitivity and specificity, by reducing false positives for the detection of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 2 or greater injury, with excellent clinical benefits to cervical cancer screening and related infection of human papilloma virus diseases, is currently the best test for early detection infection of human papillomavirus and the risk of carcinogenesis.

  8. [Preventing cervical cancer].

    PubMed

    Simon, P; Noël, J-C

    2015-09-01

    The incidence of cervical cancer has hopefully been dropping down in our industrialized countries since the introduction of both primary and secondary prevention. Nevertheless, it is still lethal in one out of two affected women though the introduction of cytological screening has dramatically reduced the mortality. Progressive diffusion of anti-HPV vaccination, the broadening of the viral types concerned, its association with existing screening measures and finally the introduction of viral detection as a screening tool must optimize the results already obtained.

  9. Asymptomatic cervical bruits.

    PubMed Central

    Côté, R.; Battista, R. N.

    1984-01-01

    The diagnosis, significance and management of asymptomatic cervical bruits have been the focus of considerable controversy. The literature does not support an aggressive approach but, rather, careful follow-up of patients with this disorder. This paper reviews the available data and discusses the management options of family practitioners who may detect this disorder during a routine physical examination, during an examination prompted by an unrelated problem or preoperatively when elective surgery is being considered. PMID:6367922

  10. Osteotomies in the Cervical Spine

    PubMed Central

    Nemani, Venu M.; Derman, Peter B.

    2016-01-01

    Rigid cervical deformities are difficult problems to treat. The goals of surgical treatment include deformity correction, achieving a rigid fusion, and performing a thorough neural decompression. In stiff and ankylosed cervical spines, osteotomies are required to restore sagittal and coronal balance. In this chapter, we describe the clinical and radiographic workup for patients with cervical deformities, and delineate the various factors that must be considered when planning surgical treatment. We also describe in detail the various types of cervical osteotomies, along with their surgical technique, advantages, and potential complications. PMID:26949476

  11. [Ultrastructure of cervical mucus].

    PubMed

    Chretien, F C

    1973-09-01

    This discussion covers the chemical structure of cervical mucus, accepted thoeries of its ultrastructure, and the author's data from the scanning electron microscope. A theory of the ultrastructure of cervical mucus must explain how it can be viscous and hostile to sperm for most of the cycle, but elastic and arranged parallel to their upward migration at ovulation. Cervical mucus is a hydrogel with 2%-12% solid phase composed of glucoproteins, probably meshed noncovalently into protein chains, with oligosaccharide side chains ending in sialic acid. A popular thoery generated by nuclear magnetic resonnance studies suggests that there may be sheaves of fibers arranged into micelles, with transverse fibers forming a netwrok that enlarges at ovulation. The light microscope is useless for studying mucus structure, but transmission electron microscopes have tentatively verified this hypothesis. The author's work with the scanning electron microscope showed a tangled web of filaments approximately 500-750 Angstroms, 1000-1500 or 300-6000 Angstroms thick. Usually the margin of the specimen appeared thin, like a spider web, but the center appeared thick with open channels, like the skeleton of a sponge, with a secondary network at the level of the oblique and transverse fibers.

  12. En bloc resection of a C2–C3 upper cervical chordoma: Technical note

    PubMed Central

    Weil, Alexander G.; Shehadeh, Mohammed; Ayad, Tareck; Abboud, Olivier; Shedid, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Background: Recently, en bloc spondylectomy for upper cervical chordomas has been reported. Most authors utilize the combined approaches (e.g., transoral tumor resection with anterior column reconstruction and primary pharyngeal closure without up-front flap repair). However, the 60% incidence of posterior pharyngeal wall dehiscence delays oral intake, typically requires an additional surgery (e.g. free-flap), and delays radiation therapy. Methods: Here, we demonstrate the efficacy of en bloc C2–C3 spondylectomy for the treatment of upper cervical chordomas utilizing a combined transoral followed by posterior approach. We used a novel anterior de-epithelialized submental island flap (SIF) as an underlay graft between the pharyngeal wall and cage/hardware to prevent pharyngeal wound dehiscence. Results: Despite a small pharyngeal fistula, the construct healed and the patient was disease-free 40 months later. Conclusion: En bloc C2–C3 spondylectomy for the treatment of an upper cervical chordoma typically requires a combined transoral and posterior approaches. This required utilization of an anterior SIF to promote adequate wound healing. This maneuver avoided incurring the typical complications of combined approaches (e.g. transoral tumor resection with anterior column reconstruction and primary pharyngeal closure without up-front flap repair). PMID:26693391

  13. Radiation Therapy and Cisplatin With or Without Epoetin Alfa in Treating Patients With Cervical Cancer and Anemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-12-29

    Anemia; Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Drug Toxicity; Radiation Toxicity; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage III Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer

  14. 360° fusion for realignment of high grade cervical kyphosis by one step surgery: Case report.

    PubMed

    Landi, Alessandro; Marotta, Nicola; Mancarella, Cristina; Dugoni, Demo Eugenio; Tarantino, Roberto; Delfini, Roberto

    2014-07-16

    Surgical treatment for cervical kyphotic deformity is still controversial. Circumferential approach has been well described in the literature but long terms outcomes are not well reported. Important to decide the correct treatment option is the preoperative radiological exams to value the type of deformity (flexible or fixed). We report the case of a 67-year-old woman affected by a severe cervical kyphotic deformity who underwent combined anterior/posterior surgical approach, getting a good reduction of the deformity and an optimal stability in a long term follow up.

  15. 360° fusion for realignment of high grade cervical kyphosis by one step surgery: Case report

    PubMed Central

    Landi, Alessandro; Marotta, Nicola; Mancarella, Cristina; Dugoni, Demo Eugenio; Tarantino, Roberto; Delfini, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    Surgical treatment for cervical kyphotic deformity is still controversial. Circumferential approach has been well described in the literature but long terms outcomes are not well reported. Important to decide the correct treatment option is the preoperative radiological exams to value the type of deformity (flexible or fixed). We report the case of a 67-year-old woman affected by a severe cervical kyphotic deformity who underwent combined anterior/posterior surgical approach, getting a good reduction of the deformity and an optimal stability in a long term follow up. PMID:25032205

  16. Return to Play in Athletes Receiving Cervical Surgery: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Molinari, Robert W.; Pagarigan, Krystle; Dettori, Joseph R.; Molinari, Robert; Dehaven, Kenneth E.

    2016-01-01

    Study Design Systematic review. Clinical Questions Among athletes who undergo surgery of the cervical spine, (1) What proportion return to play (RTP) after their cervical surgery? (2) Does the proportion of those cleared for RTP depend on the type of surgical procedure (artificial disk replacement, fusion, nonfusion foraminotomies/laminoplasties), number of levels (1, 2, or more levels), or type of sport? (3) Among those who return to their presurgery sport, how long do they continue to play? (4) Among those who return to their presurgery sport, how does their postoperative performance compare with their preoperative performance? Objectives To evaluate the extent and quality of published literature on the topic of return to competitive athletic completion after cervical spinal surgery. Methods Electronic databases and reference lists of key articles published up to August 19, 2015, were searched to identify studies reporting the proportion of athletes who RTP after cervical spine surgery. Results Nine observational, retrospective series consisting of 175 patients were included. Seven reported on professional athletes and two on recreational athletes. Seventy-five percent (76/102) of professional athletes returned to their respective sport following surgery for mostly cervical herniated disks. Seventy-six percent of recreational athletes (51/67) age 10 to 42 years RTP in a variety of sports following surgery for mostly herniated disks. No snowboarder returned to snowboarding (0/6) following surgery for cervical fractures. Most professional football players and baseball pitchers returned to their respective sport at their presurgery performance level. Conclusions RTP decisions after cervical spine surgery remain controversial, and there is a paucity of existing literature on this topic. Successful return to competitive sports is well described after single-level anterior cervical diskectomy and fusion surgery for herniated disk. RTP outcomes involving

  17. Return to Play in Athletes Receiving Cervical Surgery: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Molinari, Robert W; Pagarigan, Krystle; Dettori, Joseph R; Molinari, Robert; Dehaven, Kenneth E

    2016-02-01

    Study Design Systematic review. Clinical Questions Among athletes who undergo surgery of the cervical spine, (1) What proportion return to play (RTP) after their cervical surgery? (2) Does the proportion of those cleared for RTP depend on the type of surgical procedure (artificial disk replacement, fusion, nonfusion foraminotomies/laminoplasties), number of levels (1, 2, or more levels), or type of sport? (3) Among those who return to their presurgery sport, how long do they continue to play? (4) Among those who return to their presurgery sport, how does their postoperative performance compare with their preoperative performance? Objectives To evaluate the extent and quality of published literature on the topic of return to competitive athletic completion after cervical spinal surgery. Methods Electronic databases and reference lists of key articles published up to August 19, 2015, were searched to identify studies reporting the proportion of athletes who RTP after cervical spine surgery. Results Nine observational, retrospective series consisting of 175 patients were included. Seven reported on professional athletes and two on recreational athletes. Seventy-five percent (76/102) of professional athletes returned to their respective sport following surgery for mostly cervical herniated disks. Seventy-six percent of recreational athletes (51/67) age 10 to 42 years RTP in a variety of sports following surgery for mostly herniated disks. No snowboarder returned to snowboarding (0/6) following surgery for cervical fractures. Most professional football players and baseball pitchers returned to their respective sport at their presurgery performance level. Conclusions RTP decisions after cervical spine surgery remain controversial, and there is a paucity of existing literature on this topic. Successful return to competitive sports is well described after single-level anterior cervical diskectomy and fusion surgery for herniated disk. RTP outcomes involving

  18. Return to Play in Athletes Receiving Cervical Surgery: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Molinari, Robert W; Pagarigan, Krystle; Dettori, Joseph R; Molinari, Robert; Dehaven, Kenneth E

    2016-02-01

    Study Design Systematic review. Clinical Questions Among athletes who undergo surgery of the cervical spine, (1) What proportion return to play (RTP) after their cervical surgery? (2) Does the proportion of those cleared for RTP depend on the type of surgical procedure (artificial disk replacement, fusion, nonfusion foraminotomies/laminoplasties), number of levels (1, 2, or more levels), or type of sport? (3) Among those who return to their presurgery sport, how long do they continue to play? (4) Among those who return to their presurgery sport, how does their postoperative performance compare with their preoperative performance? Objectives To evaluate the extent and quality of published literature on the topic of return to competitive athletic completion after cervical spinal surgery. Methods Electronic databases and reference lists of key articles published up to August 19, 2015, were searched to identify studies reporting the proportion of athletes who RTP after cervical spine surgery. Results Nine observational, retrospective series consisting of 175 patients were included. Seven reported on professional athletes and two on recreational athletes. Seventy-five percent (76/102) of professional athletes returned to their respective sport following surgery for mostly cervical herniated disks. Seventy-six percent of recreational athletes (51/67) age 10 to 42 years RTP in a variety of sports following surgery for mostly herniated disks. No snowboarder returned to snowboarding (0/6) following surgery for cervical fractures. Most professional football players and baseball pitchers returned to their respective sport at their presurgery performance level. Conclusions RTP decisions after cervical spine surgery remain controversial, and there is a paucity of existing literature on this topic. Successful return to competitive sports is well described after single-level anterior cervical diskectomy and fusion surgery for herniated disk. RTP outcomes involving

  19. [Anterior pituitary hypersecretion syndromes].

    PubMed

    Gómez, F; Steinhäuslin, F; Crottaz, B; Temler, E

    1987-01-17

    Anterior pituitary hypersecretion can be due to abnormal hypothalamic regulation, decreased peripheral hormone feedback or pituitary tumor. In some cases hypersecretion gives rise to a typical clinical syndrome involving acromegaly, hyperprolactinemia, and excess corticotropin (ACTH). The etiology of acromegaly is a growth hormone (GH)-secreting pituitary tumor in the vast majority of cases. Hyperprolactinemia and excess cortisol, however, may be due to many causes among which prolactin (PRL)- and ACTH-secreting pituitary tumors are not frequent. Glycoprotein-secreting pituitary tumors, especially gonadotropin (LH and FSH) and free subunits usually do not cause a typical excess hormone syndrome. Perhaps for this reason they are seldom recognized clinically, although histopathological studies are increasingly disclosing the gonadotrope nature of many pituitary tumors. Mixed hormonal secretions are common. When pituitary hormone secretion can be selectively suppressed by medical therapy, a significant reduction of tumor size is by no means rare. In other cases, pituitary irradiation or surgery, or even treatment aimed at a peripheral target gland, may be necessary. PMID:3029861

  20. Pallidal deep brain stimulation in patients with cervical dystonia and severe cervical dyskinesias with cervical myelopathy

    PubMed Central

    Krauss, J; Loher, T; Pohle, T; Weber, S; Taub, E; Barlocher, C; Burgunder, J

    2002-01-01

    Objectives: Surgical treatment of complex cervical dystonia and of cervical dyskinesias associated with cervical myelopathy is challenging. In this prospective study, the long term effect of chronic pallidal stimulation in cervical dystonia and on combining the technique with spinal surgery in patients with severe cervical dyskinesias and secondary cervical myelopathy is described. Methods: Eight patients with a history of chronic dystonia who did not achieve adequate benefit from medical treatment or botulinum toxin injection participated in the study. Five patients had complex cervical dystonia with tonic postures and phasic movements. Three patients had rapidly progressive cervical myelopathy secondary to severe cervical dyskinesias and dystonia in the context of a generalised movement disorder. Quadripolar electrodes were implanted in the posteroventral lateral globus pallidus internus with stereotactic CT and microelectrode guidance. In the three patients with secondary cervical myelopathy, spinal surgery was performed within a few weeks and included multilevel laminectomies and a four level cervical corporectomy with spinal stabilisation. Results: Improvement of the movement disorder was noted early after pallidal surgery, but the full benefit could be appreciated only with a delay of several months during chronic stimulation. Three months after surgery, patients with cervical dystonia had improved by 38% in the severity score, by 54% in the disability score, and by 38% in the pain score of a modified version of the Toronto western spasmodic torticollis rating scale. At a mean follow up of 20 months, the severity score had improved by 63%, the disability score by 69%, and the pain score by 50% compared with preoperatively. There was also sustained amelioration of cervical dyskinesias in the three patients who underwent spinal surgery. Lead fractures occurred in two patients. The mean amplitude needed for chronic deep brain stimulation was 3.8 V at a mean

  1. Robotic Anterior and Midline Skull Base Surgery: Preclinical Investigations

    SciTech Connect

    O'Malley, Bert W. Weinstein, Gregory S.

    2007-10-01

    Purpose: To develop a minimally invasive surgical technique to access the midline and anterior skull base using the optical and technical advantages of robotic surgical instrumentation. Methods and Materials: Ten experimental procedures focusing on approaches to the nasopharynx, clivus, sphenoid, pituitary sella, and suprasellar regions were performed on one cadaver and one live mongrel dog. Both the cadaver and canine procedures were performed in an approved training facility using the da Vinci Surgical Robot. For the canine experiments, a transoral robotic surgery (TORS) approach was used, and for the cadaver a newly developed combined cervical-transoral robotic surgery (C-TORS) approach was investigated and compared with standard TORS. The ability to access and dissect tissues within the various areas of the midline and anterior skull base were evaluated, and techniques to enhance visualization and instrumentation were developed. Results: Standard TORS approaches did not provide adequate access to the midline and anterior skull base; however, the newly developed C-TORS approach was successful in providing the surgical access to these regions of the skull base. Conclusion: Robotic surgery is an exciting minimally invasive approach to the skull base that warrants continued preclinical investigation and development.

  2. Burnei’s anterior transthoracic retropleural approach of the thoracic spine: a new operative technique in the treatment of spinal disorders

    PubMed Central

    Gavriliu, TS; Japie, EM; Ghiță, RA; Hamei, Ș; Dughilă, C; Țiripa, IL; Elnayef, T

    2015-01-01

    Background: Up to the middle of the last century, the thoracic spine, especially in its upper part, has been considered an unapproachable site, a no-man’s land, but the constant evolution of medicine imposed techniques of the spine at these levels in order to solve a large area of pathology (infectious, tumoral, traumatic, and last but not least, deformative). This way, a series of anterior approaches allowed surgeons to gain access to the anterior part of the spine and the posterior mediastinum. The approaches described by Hodgson, Mirbaha or transthoracic transpleural approach (T4-T11), are enumerated. The idea to allow a more visible and extensive approach, but to avoid respiratory issues due to the lesion of the pleura, led to the description of a new anterior approach by Burnei in 2000. Material and method: Burnei’s approach represents an anterior approach to the thoracic spine, being a transthoracic and retropleural one. This approach allows a large area of spinal pathology due to infectious, traumatic, tumoral and degenerative (idiopathic or congenital scoliosis) causes. Statistically, this approach has been performed more frequently in cases of spinal instrumentation after diskectomy, in order to perform a partial correction of severe, rigid idiopathic scoliosis with more than 70 degrees Cobb and in cases of congenital scoliosis for hemivertebra resection and somatic synthesis to correct the scoliotic curve. Results: This kind of anterior approach allows the surgeon a large visibility of the anterior thoracic spine, diskectomies of up to 5 levels to tender the curve of the deformity and to ensure somatic or/ and transpedicular synthesis of up to 6 thoracic vertebrae. By performing a thoracotomy involving the resection of the posterior arches of the ribs, a thoracoplasty is also ensured with functional and aesthetic effects, by ameliorating the thoracic hump due to the scoliotic deformity. Conclusions: Burnei’s approach joins all the other anterior

  3. The development and evaluation of individualized templates to assist transoral C2 articular mass or transpedicular screw placement in TARP-IV procedures: adult cadaver specimen study

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xue-Shi; Wu, Zeng-Hui; Xia, Hong; Ma, Xiang-Yang; Ai, Fu-Zhi; Zhang, Kai; Wang, Jian-Hua; Mai, Xiao-Hong; Yin, Qing-Shui

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The transoral atlantoaxial reduction plate system treats irreducible atlantoaxial dislocation from transoral atlantoaxial reduction plate-I to transoral atlantoaxial reduction plate-III. However, this system has demonstrated problems associated with screw loosening, atlantoaxial fixation and concealed or manifest neurovascular injuries. This study sought to design a set of individualized templates to improve the accuracy of anterior C2 screw placement in the transoral atlantoaxial reduction plate-IV procedure. METHODS: A set of individualized templates was designed according to thin-slice computed tomography data obtained from 10 human cadavers. The templates contained cubic modules and drill guides to facilitate transoral atlantoaxial reduction plate positioning and anterior C2 screw placement. We performed 2 stages of cadaveric experiments with 2 cadavers in stage one and 8 in stage two. Finally, guided C2 screw placement was evaluated by reading postoperative computed tomography images and comparing the planned and inserted screw trajectories. RESULTS: There were two cortical breaching screws in stage one and three in stage two, but only the cortical breaching screws in stage one were ranked critical. In stage two, the planned entry points and the transverse angles of the anterior C2 screws could be simulated, whereas the declination angles could not be simulated due to intraoperative blockage of the drill bit and screwdriver by the upper teeth. CONCLUSIONS: It was feasible to use individualized templates to guide transoral C2 screw placement. Thus, these drill templates combined with transoral atlantoaxial reduction plate-IV, may improve the accuracy of transoral C2 screw placement and reduce related neurovascular complications. PMID:25518033

  4. Cervical incompetence: diagnosis and outcome.

    PubMed

    Barford, D A; Rosen, M G

    1984-08-01

    The results of 147 cervical cerclage procedures were reviewed in a retrospective study. Patient history and past reproductive performance were assessed to determine which factors were predictive of successful pregnancy outcome after cervical cerclage. A past history of spontaneous second trimester abortion or premature labor was associated with a better outcome than was a history classically associated with cervical incompetence. Morbidity immediately following the procedure was low, however significant morbidity related to cervical scarring occurred at the time of delivery. There was poor correlation between the clinical history, examination and adjunctive tests of cervical incompetence, and the pregnancy outcome following cerclage. These observations indicate the need for a prospective, randomized study of the efficacy of this procedure.

  5. The Biomechanics of Cervical Spondylosis

    PubMed Central

    Ferrara, Lisa A.

    2012-01-01

    Aging is the major risk factor that contributes to the onset of cervical spondylosis. Several acute and chronic symptoms can occur that start with neck pain and may progress into cervical radiculopathy. Eventually, the degenerative cascade causes desiccation of the intervertebral disc resulting in height loss along the ventral margin of the cervical spine. This causes ventral angulation and eventual loss of lordosis, with compression of the neural and vascular structures. The altered posture of the cervical spine will progress into kyphosis and continue if the load balance and lordosis is not restored. The content of this paper will address the physiological and biomechanical pathways leading to cervical spondylosis and the biomechanical principles related to the surgical correction and treatment of kyphotic progression. PMID:22400120

  6. The biomechanics of cervical spondylosis.

    PubMed

    Ferrara, Lisa A

    2012-01-01

    Aging is the major risk factor that contributes to the onset of cervical spondylosis. Several acute and chronic symptoms can occur that start with neck pain and may progress into cervical radiculopathy. Eventually, the degenerative cascade causes desiccation of the intervertebral disc resulting in height loss along the ventral margin of the cervical spine. This causes ventral angulation and eventual loss of lordosis, with compression of the neural and vascular structures. The altered posture of the cervical spine will progress into kyphosis and continue if the load balance and lordosis is not restored. The content of this paper will address the physiological and biomechanical pathways leading to cervical spondylosis and the biomechanical principles related to the surgical correction and treatment of kyphotic progression. PMID:22400120

  7. Anterior Knee Pain (Chondromalacia Patellae).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garrick, James G.

    1989-01-01

    This article presents a pragmatic approach to the definition, diagnosis, and management of anterior knee pain. Symptoms and treatment are described. Emphasis is on active involvement of the patient in the rehabilitation exercise program. (IAH)

  8. Sudden onset odontoid fracture caused by cervical instability in hypotonic cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Shiohama, Tadashi; Fujii, Katsunori; Kitazawa, Katsuhiko; Takahashi, Akiko; Maemoto, Tatsuo; Honda, Akihito

    2013-11-01

    Fractures of the upper cervical spine rarely occur but carry a high rate of mortality and neurological disabilities in children. Although odontoid fractures are commonly caused by high-impact injuries, cerebral palsy children with cervical instability have a risk of developing spinal fractures even from mild trauma. We herein present the first case of an odontoid fracture in a 4-year-old boy with cerebral palsy. He exhibited prominent cervical instability due to hypotonic cerebral palsy from infancy. He suddenly developed acute respiratory failure, which subsequently required mechanical ventilation. Neuroimaging clearly revealed a type-III odontoid fracture accompanied by anterior displacement with compression of the cervical spinal cord. Bone mineral density was prominently decreased probably due to his long-term bedridden status and poor nutritional condition. We subsequently performed posterior internal fixation surgically using an onlay bone graft, resulting in a dramatic improvement in his respiratory failure. To our knowledge, this is the first report of an odontoid fracture caused by cervical instability in hypotonic cerebral palsy. Since cervical instability and decreased bone mineral density are frequently associated with cerebral palsy, odontoid fractures should be cautiously examined in cases of sudden onset respiratory failure and aggravated weakness, especially in hypotonic cerebral palsy patients.

  9. Extraordinary incidence of cervical ribs indicates vulnerable condition in Late Pleistocene mammoths

    PubMed Central

    Reumer, Jelle W.F.; ten Broek, Clara M.A.

    2014-01-01

    The number of cervical vertebrae in mammals is highly conserved at seven. We have shown that changes of this number are selected against due to a coupling with major congenital abnormalities (pleiotropic effects). Here we show that the incidence of abnormal cervical vertebral numbers in Late Pleistocene mammoths from the North Sea is high (33.3%) and approximately 10 times higher than that of extant elephants (3.6%). Abnormal numbers were due to the presence of large cervical ribs on the seventh vertebra, which we deduced from the presence of rib articulation facets on sixth (posterior side) and seventh (anterior side) cervical vertebrae. The incidence of abnormal cervical vertebral numbers in mammoths appears to be much higher than in other mammalian species, apart from exceptional sloths, manatees and dugongs and indicates a vulnerable condition. We argue that the increased incidence of cervical ribs in mammoths is probably caused by inbreeding and adverse conditions that impact early pregnancies in declining populations close to extinction in the Late Pleistocene. PMID:24711969

  10. Extraordinary incidence of cervical ribs indicates vulnerable condition in Late Pleistocene mammoths.

    PubMed

    Reumer, Jelle W F; Ten Broek, Clara M A; Galis, Frietson

    2014-01-01

    The number of cervical vertebrae in mammals is highly conserved at seven. We have shown that changes of this number are selected against due to a coupling with major congenital abnormalities (pleiotropic effects). Here we show that the incidence of abnormal cervical vertebral numbers in Late Pleistocene mammoths from the North Sea is high (33.3%) and approximately 10 times higher than that of extant elephants (3.6%). Abnormal numbers were due to the presence of large cervical ribs on the seventh vertebra, which we deduced from the presence of rib articulation facets on sixth (posterior side) and seventh (anterior side) cervical vertebrae. The incidence of abnormal cervical vertebral numbers in mammoths appears to be much higher than in other mammalian species, apart from exceptional sloths, manatees and dugongs and indicates a vulnerable condition. We argue that the increased incidence of cervical ribs in mammoths is probably caused by inbreeding and adverse conditions that impact early pregnancies in declining populations close to extinction in the Late Pleistocene.

  11. Extraordinary incidence of cervical ribs indicates vulnerable condition in Late Pleistocene mammoths.

    PubMed

    Reumer, Jelle W F; Ten Broek, Clara M A; Galis, Frietson

    2014-01-01

    The number of cervical vertebrae in mammals is highly conserved at seven. We have shown that changes of this number are selected against due to a coupling with major congenital abnormalities (pleiotropic effects). Here we show that the incidence of abnormal cervical vertebral numbers in Late Pleistocene mammoths from the North Sea is high (33.3%) and approximately 10 times higher than that of extant elephants (3.6%). Abnormal numbers were due to the presence of large cervical ribs on the seventh vertebra, which we deduced from the presence of rib articulation facets on sixth (posterior side) and seventh (anterior side) cervical vertebrae. The incidence of abnormal cervical vertebral numbers in mammoths appears to be much higher than in other mammalian species, apart from exceptional sloths, manatees and dugongs and indicates a vulnerable condition. We argue that the increased incidence of cervical ribs in mammoths is probably caused by inbreeding and adverse conditions that impact early pregnancies in declining populations close to extinction in the Late Pleistocene. PMID:24711969

  12. Fractures of the cervical spine

    PubMed Central

    Marcon, Raphael Martus; Cristante, Alexandre Fogaça; Teixeira, William Jacobsen; Narasaki, Douglas Kenji; Oliveira, Reginaldo Perilo; de Barros Filho, Tarcísio Eloy Pessoa

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to review the literature on cervical spine fractures. METHODS: The literature on the diagnosis, classification, and treatment of lower and upper cervical fractures and dislocations was reviewed. RESULTS: Fractures of the cervical spine may be present in polytraumatized patients and should be suspected in patients complaining of neck pain. These fractures are more common in men approximately 30 years of age and are most often caused by automobile accidents. The cervical spine is divided into the upper cervical spine (occiput-C2) and the lower cervical spine (C3-C7), according to anatomical differences. Fractures in the upper cervical spine include fractures of the occipital condyle and the atlas, atlanto-axial dislocations, fractures of the odontoid process, and hangman's fractures in the C2 segment. These fractures are characterized based on specific classifications. In the lower cervical spine, fractures follow the same pattern as in other segments of the spine; currently, the most widely used classification is the SLIC (Subaxial Injury Classification), which predicts the prognosis of an injury based on morphology, the integrity of the disc-ligamentous complex, and the patient's neurological status. It is important to correctly classify the fracture to ensure appropriate treatment. Nerve or spinal cord injuries, pseudarthrosis or malunion, and postoperative infection are the main complications of cervical spine fractures. CONCLUSIONS: Fractures of the cervical spine are potentially serious and devastating if not properly treated. Achieving the correct diagnosis and classification of a lesion is the first step toward identifying the most appropriate treatment, which can be either surgical or conservative. PMID:24270959

  13. Radiotherapy of Cervical Cancer.

    PubMed

    Vordermark, Dirk

    2016-01-01

    Curative-intent radical radiotherapy of cervical cancer consists of external-beam radiotherapy, brachytherapy, and concomitant chemotherapy with cisplatin. For each element, new developments aim to improve tumor control rates or treatment tolerance. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) has been shown to reduce gastrointestinal toxicity and can be used to selectively increase the radiotherapy dose. Individualized, image-guided brachytherapy enables better adaptation of high-dose volumes to the tumor extension. Intensification of concomitant or sequential systemic therapy is under evaluation. PMID:27614991

  14. Electrodiagnosis of cervical radiculopathy.

    PubMed

    Hakimi, Kevin; Spanier, David

    2013-02-01

    Cervical radiculopathy is a common diagnosis with a peak onset in the fifth decade. The most commonly affected nerve root is C7, C6, and C8. The etiology is often compressive, but may arise from noncompressive sources. Patients commonly complain of pain, weakness, numbness, and/or tingling. Examination may reveal sensory or motor disturbance in a dermatomal/myotomal distribution. Neural compression and tension signs may be positive. Diagnostic tests include imaging and electrodiagnostic study. Electrodiagnostic study serves as an extension of the neurologic examination. Electrodiagnostic findings can be useful for patients with atypical symptoms, potential pain-mediated weakness, and nonfocal imaging findings.

  15. [Cervical spine instability in the surgical patient].

    PubMed

    Barbeito, A; Guerri-Guttenberg, R A

    2014-03-01

    Many congenital and acquired diseases, including trauma, may result in cervical spine instability. Given that airway management is closely related to the movement of the cervical spine, it is important that the anesthesiologist has detailed knowledge of the anatomy, the mechanisms of cervical spine instability, and of the effects that the different airway maneuvers have on the cervical spine. We first review the normal anatomy and biomechanics of the cervical spine in the context of airway management and the concept of cervical spine instability. In the second part, we review the protocols for the management of cervical spine instability in trauma victims and some of the airway management options for these patients.

  16. Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Arcuri, Francisco; Barclay, Fernando; Nacul, Ivan

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The most recent advances in ACL reconstruction try to reproduce the anatomic femoral and tibial footprints as close as possible. Creating independent tunnels would allow an optimal of the entry point and the femoral tunnel obliquity, and together with an adequate reamer diameter they wouldreproduce with greater certainty the anatomy. Objective: To compare the radiographic parameters of the femoral and tibial tunnel positions in two groups of patients, one operated with a transtibial and other with transportal anatomic techniques. Materials and Methods: From December 2012 to December 2013, 59 patients with a primary ACL reconstruction divided in two groups, a trans tibial technique (TT), 19 patients, and an transportal one (TP) with 40 patients were prospectively evaluated with AP and lateral X-rays. The femoral tunnel angle, the insertion site with respect of the Blumensaat line, the trans osseous distance, the tibial tunnel position as a percentage of the tibial plateau in the AP and lateral views. And finally the tibial tunnel angle in the AP and Lateral views. Results: The femoral tunnel angle was in the TP group of 45,92º and in the TT one 24,53º, p 0,002. The insertion site percentage of the Blumensaat line was of 20,96 in TP and 20,74 in the TT, p 0,681.Trans osseous distance was in the TP of 3,43 cm and in the TT of 4,79 cm, p <0,000. The tibial tunnel position as a percentage in the AP tibial plateau was of 44,35 in TP and of 40,80 TT with a p of 0,076. The tibial tunnel position as a percentage of the lateral tibial plateau was of 28,70 in TP and 34,53 in TT with a p 0,367. Tibial tunnel angle in the AP was of 73,48º in TP and 62,81 in TT with a p of 0,002, and in the lateral plateau of 114,69º in TP and 112,79º in TT with a p of 0,427. Conclusion: It is possible to create tibial and femoral tunnel in optimal positions but not equal between both groups. Creating independent tunnels allow a more anterior and vertical tibial tunnel

  17. Man-In-The-Barrel. A Case of Cervical Spinal Cord Infarction and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Antelo, María José García; Facal, Teresa Lema; Sánchez, Tamara Pablos; Facal, María Soledad López; Nazabal, Eduardo Rubio

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Man-in-the-barrel syndrome was initially observed in patients with signs of serious cerebral hypoperfusion, in the border zone of the anterior and medial cerebral artery, but other causes were communicated later. Methods: a healthy 43-year-old woman who showed intense cervical pain, irradiating over both shoulders and arms. Physical examination on admission highlighted notable brachial diparesis, tacto-algesic hypoesthesia of both arms and sensory level C4-D9. Results: cervical Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) on admission revealed a hyperintense intramedullar lesion at C3-C7 level, due to a cervical cord infarction. Conclusions: our case reveals that conventional neurological consideration about the specific anatomical location of man-in-the-barrel syndrome in the brain should be extended to other locations such as the cervical column and not only the brain area. PMID:23407685

  18. Invasive Cervical Cancer and Antidepressants

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Hsiang-Lin; Hsieh, Yi-Hsuan; Lin, Chiao-Fan; Liang, Hsin-Yi; Huang, Kuo-You; Chiu, Wei-Che; Lee, Yena; McIntyre, Roger S.; Chen, Vincent Chin-Hung

    2015-01-01

    Abstract To our knowledge, no prior population-based study has been published wherein the primary aim was to evaluate whether an association between psychotropic drug prescription and cervical cancer exists. Herein we have conducted the first study that primarily aimed to determine the association between antidepressants use and risk of invasive cervical cancer in the general population. This is a population-based study utilizing Taiwan's National Health Insurance Research Database. We identified 26,262 cases with invasive cervical cancer and 129,490 controls. We adopted the conditional logistic regression model as the statistical method and adjusted for potential confounding factors. The prescription of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) (adjusted OR = 0.93, 95% CI = 0.84–1.04), tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs), monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs), serotonin norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs), mirtazapine and bupropion, adjusting for cumulative dose, was not associated with an increased, or decreased, risk for invasive cervical cancer. An association between trazodone prescription and invasive cervical cancer was observed (adjusted OR = 1.22, 95% CI = 1.03–1.43). An association between the major classes of antidepressants and invasive cervical cancer was not observed herein. Our preliminary finding regarding a possible association between trazodone and cervical cancer requires replication. PMID:26496343

  19. Comparison of two reconstructive techniques in the surgical management of four-level cervical spondylotic myelopathy.

    PubMed

    Li, FengNing; Li, ZhongHai; Huang, Xuan; Chen, Zhi; Zhang, Fan; Shen, HongXing; Kang, YiFan; Zhang, YinQuan; Cai, Bin; Hou, TieSheng

    2015-01-01

    To compare the clinical efficacy and radiological outcome of treating 4-level cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM) with either anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) or "skip" corpectomy and fusion, 48 patients with 4-level CSM who had undergone ACDF or SCF at our hospital were analyzed retrospectively between January 2008 and June 2011. Twenty-seven patients received ACDF (Group A) and 21 patients received SCF. Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) score, Neck Disability Index (NDI) score, and Cobb's angles of the fused segments and C2-7 segments were compared in the two groups. The minimum patient follow-up was 2 years. No significant differences between the groups were found in demographic and baseline disease characteristics, duration of surgery, or follow-up time. Our study demonstrates that there was no significant difference in the clinical efficacy of ACDF and SCF, but ACDF involves less intraoperative blood loss, better cervical spine alignment, and fewer postoperative complications than SCF. PMID:25692140

  20. Multilevel oblique corpectomies as an effective surgical option to treat cervical chordoma in a young girl.

    PubMed

    Delfini, Roberto; Marruzzo, Daniele; Tarantino, Roberto; Marotta, Nicola; Landi, Alessandro

    2014-03-16

    Chordomas are malignant tumors arising from notochordal remnants. They are the most frequent tumors of the spine after plasmacytomas. Only 6% of chordomas are localized to the cervical level. In young patients, chordomas are rare and unpredictable. Despite this, the treatment of choice remains the total resection, as much as possible, followed by proton beam radiation. This case was managed using a precarotid and retrocarotid approach at the same time. The tumor was completely resected with the edges free from disease. The cervical spine was stabilized with an anterior plating C2-C4. Eighteen months after surgery the patient is still free from illness. Multilevel oblique corpectomies are an available and safe option for the treatment of upper cervical chordomas.

  1. Multilevel oblique corpectomies as an effective surgical option to treat cervical chordoma in a young girl

    PubMed Central

    Delfini, Roberto; Marruzzo, Daniele; Tarantino, Roberto; Marotta, Nicola; Landi, Alessandro

    2014-01-01

    Chordomas are malignant tumors arising from notochordal remnants. They are the most frequent tumors of the spine after plasmacytomas. Only 6% of chordomas are localized to the cervical level. In young patients, chordomas are rare and unpredictable. Despite this, the treatment of choice remains the total resection, as much as possible, followed by proton beam radiation. This case was managed using a precarotid and retrocarotid approach at the same time. The tumor was completely resected with the edges free from disease. The cervical spine was stabilized with an anterior plating C2-C4. Eighteen months after surgery the patient is still free from illness. Multilevel oblique corpectomies are an available and safe option for the treatment of upper cervical chordomas. PMID:24653986

  2. An unusual homicidal stab wound of the cervical spinal cord: A single case examined by post-mortem computed tomography angiography (PMCTA).

    PubMed

    Savall, Frederic; Dedouit, Fabrice; Mokrane, Fatima-Zohra; Rougé, Daniel; Saint-Martin, Pauline; Telmon, Norbert

    2015-09-01

    We report an unusual case of homicidal stab wound of the cervical spinal cord, which illustrates the value of post-mortem computed tomography angiography (PMCTA) in cases of vascular injury. First, we noted a posterior and horizontal trajectory to the neck with complete section of the cervical spinal cord between the first and second cervical vertebrae. This lesion was accompanied by section of the right vertebral and right deep cervical arteries. We also noted an anterior cervical trajectory with an injury to the right internal jugular vein and an anterior right chest wound with a lung trajectory and section of the internal mammary vessels. Cases of spinal cord injuries secondary to stab wounds are rare in the literature. Only one large series has been published from Cape Town. Complete section of the cervical spinal cord accounts for only 4.5% of all cases. Furthermore, lethal cases are rare and classically victims survive and present neurological sequelae. We found only one similar case but despite the transection of the cervical spinal cord the patient survived. Some studies suggest that PMCTA may be very helpful in visualizing vascular system injuries. Our observations are consistent with this proposal. The use of different-time acquisitions was essential for detection of the injured vessels.

  3. [Use of the PEEK cage in cervical spondylosis treatment].

    PubMed

    Joachin-Hernández, Pedro; Alpízar-Aguirre, Armando; Zárate-Kalfópulus, Barón; Rosales-Olivares, Luis Miguel; Sánchez-Bringas, Guadalupe; Reyes-Sánchez, Alejandro Antonio

    2013-01-01

    Antecedentes: la descompresión y artrodesis con auto-injerto es el patrón de referencia para el tratamiento del conducto cervical estrecho. El uso de cajas de PEEK polímero no reabsorbible, con elasticidad similar al hueso, radiolúcido, y mismo grado de fusión reduce la morbilidad. aterial y métodos: estudio de serie de casos, prospectivo, longitudinal, de intervención deliberada, evaluación en grupol antes y después, seguimiento a dos años. Discoidectomía y colocación de caja de PEEK con injerto autólogo. Se evaluaron artrodesis, lordosis cervical, altura del espacio intervertebral, dolor mediante escala visual análoga, índice de discapacidad cervical, tiempo quirúrgico, sangrado transoperatorio, estancia intrahospitalaria y complicaciones. Análisis estadístico con t de Student, Wilcoxon y exacta de Fisher. Resultados: de 17 pacientes estudiados, 9 (53%) eran del sexo femenino. La edad promedio 62 años. Sangrado promedio de 187 mL. El nivel más afectado fue C5-C6, C6-C7 en cinco pacientes. Se encontró fusión al 100% sin hundimiento ni migración de la caja, altura del espacio conservada, pero no se conservó la lordosis segmentaria. Mejoría clínica en todos los pacientes, y del índice de discapacidad. Conclusión: la disminución de los síntomas, la conservación de la altura del espacio anterior y posterior, la no conservación de la lordosis segmentaria y la fusión con caja de PEEK fueron congruentes con lo reportado en la bibliografía. Se sugiere utilizar la placa anterior para mantener la lordosis cervical. El índice de fusión encontrado fue de 100%, con disminución de los síntomas de dolor y discapacidad. Pérdida de lordosis cervical global.

  4. Anterior Orbit and Adnexal Amyloidosis

    PubMed Central

    Al Hussain, Hailah; Edward, Deepak P.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To describe six cases of anterior orbital and adnexal amyloidosis and to report on proteomic analysis to characterize the nature of amyloid in archived biopsies in two cases. Materials and Methods: The clinical features, radiological findings, pathology, and outcome of six patients with anterior orbit and adnexal amyloidosis were retrieved from the medical records. The biochemical nature of the amyloid was determined using liquid chromatography/mass spectroscopy archived paraffin-embedded tissue in two cases. Results: Of the six cases, three had unilateral localized anterior orbit and lacrimal gland involvement. Four of the six patients were female with an average duration of 12.8 years from the time of onset to presentation eyelid infiltration by amyloid caused ptosis in five cases. CT scan in patients with lacrimal gland involvement (n = 3) demonstrated calcified deformable anterior orbital masses and on pathological exmaintionamyloid and calcific deposits replaced the lacrimal gland acini. Ptosis repair was performed in three patients with good outcomes. One patient required repeated debulking of the mass and one patient had recurrenct disease. Proteomic analysis revealed polyclonal IgG-associated amyloid deposition in one patient and AL kappa amyloid in the second patient. Conclusion: Amyloidosis of the anterior orbit and lacrimal gland can present with a wide spectrum of findings with good outcomes after surgical excision. The nature of amyloid material can be precisely determined in archival pathology blocks using diagnostic proteomic analysis. PMID:24014979

  5. Feedforward activity of the cervical flexor muscles during voluntary arm movements is delayed in chronic neck pain.

    PubMed

    Falla, D; Jull, G; Hodges, P W

    2004-07-01

    The objective of this study was to compare onset of deep and superficial cervical flexor muscle activity during rapid, unilateral arm movements between ten patients with chronic neck pain and 12 control subjects. Deep cervical flexor (DCF) electromyographic activity (EMG) was recorded with custom electrodes inserted via the nose and fixed by suction to the posterior mucosa of the oropharynx. Surface electrodes were placed over the sternocleidomastoid (SCM) and anterior scalene (AS) muscles. While standing, subjects flexed and extended the right arm in response to a visual stimulus. For the control group, activation of DCF, SCM and AS muscles occurred less than 50 ms after the onset of deltoid activity, which is consistent with feedforward control of the neck during arm flexion and extension. When subjects with a history of neck pain flexed the arm, the onsets of DCF and contralateral SCM and AS muscles were significantly delayed ( p<0.05). It is concluded that the delay in neck muscle activity associated with movement of the arm in patients with neck pain indicates a significant deficit in the automatic feedforward control of the cervical spine. As the deep cervical muscles are fundamentally important for support of the cervical lordosis and the cervical joints, change in the feedforward response may leave the cervical spine vulnerable to reactive forces from arm movement.

  6. Cervical Tissue Engineering Using Silk Scaffolds and Human Cervical Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez, Cristina C.; Rice, William L.; Socrate, Simona; Kaplan, David L.

    2010-01-01

    Spontaneous preterm birth is a frequent complication of pregnancy and a common cause of morbidity in childhood. Obstetricians suspect abnormalities of the cervix are implicated in a significant number of preterm births. The cervix is composed of fibrous connective tissue and undergoes significant remodeling in preparation for birth. We hypothesized that a tissue engineering strategy could be used to develop three-dimensional cervical-like tissue constructs that would be suitable for investigating cervical remodeling. Cervical cells were isolated from two premenopausal women undergoing hysterectomy for a benign gynecological condition, and the cells were seeded on porous silk scaffolds in the presence or absence of dynamic culture and with 10% or 20% serum. Morphological, biochemical, and mechanical properties were measured during the 8-week culture period. Cervical cells proliferated in three-dimensions and synthesized an extracellular matrix with biochemical constituents and morphology similar to native tissue. Compared to static culture, dynamic culture was associated with significantly increased collagen deposition (p < 0.05), sulfated glycosaminoglycan synthesis (p < 0.05), and mechanical stiffness (p < 0.05). Serum concentration did not affect measured variables. Relevant human tissue-engineered cervical-like constructs constitute a novel model system for a range of fundamental and applied studies related to cervical remodeling. PMID:20121593

  7. Cervical Stenosis, Myelopathy and Radiculopathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... between the vertebrae results in narrowing of the space for the spinal cord and its branches, known ... and cervical stenosis refers to narrowing of the space for the spinal cord or nerve branches in ...

  8. Get Tested for Cervical Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... help understanding your Pap test result . What about cost? Testing for cervical cancer is covered under the ... may be able to get tested at no cost to you. If you have private insurance, check ...

  9. [Diagnosis and therapy of cervical insufficiency].

    PubMed

    Matijević, Ratko; Grgić, Ozren; Klobucar, Ante

    2003-01-01

    Cervical insufficiency is one of the risk factors for late spontaneous miscarriage and preterm labor. As cervical insufficiency can reoccur in the every subsequent pregnancy, there is a need for precise diagnostic modality and therapeutic procedure in order to reduce perinatal mortality and morbidity. Traditionally, the diagnosis of cervical insufficiency was made based on the patient's history. In this cases the intervention in the form of the cervical cerclage, was not found to be useful, i.e. perinatal mortality and morbidity remained unchanged. It is a similar situation in cervical insufficiency suspected based on hysterosalpingography and clinical examination. Recently, ultrasound, or more precisely transvaginal cervical assessment--cervicometry, was introduced in order to assess the morphological changes indicative for cervical insufficiency. In this literature review, we analyzed ultrasound based markers of cervical insufficiency, with their specificity, sensitivity, positive and negative predictive value, as well as usefulness of cervical cerclage in such cases.

  10. How Are Cervical Cancers and Pre-Cancers Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... How is cervical cancer staged? How is cervical cancer diagnosed? The first step in finding cervical cancer ... systems. Tests for women with symptoms of cervical cancer or abnormal Pap results Medical history and physical ...

  11. Glycoprotein and Glycan in Tissue and Blood Samples of Patients With Stage IB-IVA Cervical Cancer Undergoing Surgery to Remove Pelvic and Abdominal Lymph Nodes

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-26

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Cervical Small Cell Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma, Not Otherwise Specified; Stage IB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage III Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer

  12. Cervical cord injury after massage.

    PubMed

    Lee, Tzu-Han; Chiu, Jan-Wei; Chan, Rai-Chi

    2011-10-01

    We present the case of a 47-yr-old gentleman with cervical cord injury after he received massage in the neck area. Magnetic resonance imaging of the cervical spine showed a herniation of the nucleus pulposus and compressive myelopathy. The patient required surgical intervention and rehabilitation. Despite 6 mos of rehabilitation, residual hand dysfunction and minor ambulation problems persisted. Although massage has many benefits, this case reminds us that there is potential danger in performing neck massage. PMID:21862908

  13. Clinical Features of Herniated Disc at Cervicothoracic Junction Level Treated by Anterior Approach

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jun Gue; Kim, Hyeun Sung; Ju, Chang Il

    2016-01-01

    Objective The anterior approach for C7-T1 disc herniation may be challenging because of obstruction by the manubrium and the narrow operative field. This study aimed to investigate the clinical and neurological outcomes of anterior approach for C7-T1 disc herniation. Methods We retrospectively evaluated 13 patients who underwent the anterior approach for C7-T1 disc herniation by a single surgeon within a period of 11 years (2003-2014). The minimum follow-up duration was 6 months. We describe the clinical presentation, radiographic findings, neurological outcome, and related complications. Results Of 372 patients with single-level anterior discectomy and fusion or artificial disc replacement for cervical disc herniation, 13 (3.5%) had C7-T1 disc herniation. The main clinical presentation was unilateral motor weakness in intrinsic hand muscles (11 patients), along with numbness, pain, and tingling sensation that radiate down the arm to the little finger. Most of the patients improved after surgery via the anterior approach. Ten patients underwent successful anterior discectomy and fusion by the standard supramanubrial Smith-Robinson approach, but 2 needed additional manubriotomy and sternotomy. In 1 patient, we performed surgery at a wrong level because the correct level was difficult to identify intraoperatively. Two patients had transient vocal dysfunction, but none had major complications related to injuries of the great vessels such as the thoracic duct or esophagus. Conclusion For patients who require direct anterior decompression for C7-T1 disc herniation, the anterior approach is relatively feasible. However, care should be taken to overcome physical constraints by the manubrium and slope. PMID:27437013

  14. EVALUATION OF THE CERVICAL SPINE AMONG PATIENTS WITH RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS

    PubMed Central

    Passos Cardoso, André Luiz; Da Silva, Nilzio Antonio; Daher, Sérgio; De Moraes, Frederico Barra; Do Carmo, Humberto Franco

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the prevalence of cervical spine abnormalities among patients with rheumatoid arthritis and correlate the imaging findings with the clinical state. Methods: A cross-sectional study on 35 patients was carried out at the School of Medicine of the Federal University of Goiás (UFG) in 2004. The following were evaluated: age, use of medications and the clinical picture of pain and neurological characteristics. The erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) and rheumatoid factor were tested, and radiographs of the cervical spine were produced in anteroposterior, lateral and dynamic views. To evaluate the influence of the variables on the emergence of instabilities, univariate and multivariate logistic regression tests were used (p < 0.05). Results: Among the 35 patients evaluated, 13 (37.1%) presented a stable cervical spine. Out of the 22 patients with instability, six presented more than one type. Atlantoaxial instability was found in 15 patients, with a mean anterior atlantodental distance of 3.40 mm in the neutral lateral radiographic view and 6.54 mm in the lateral view with flexion. Basilar invagination was found in five patients and subaxial subluxation in seven patients. Two thirds of the asymptomatic patients had instabilities. Bicipital hyperreflexia presented statistically significant correlations with atlantoaxial instability (p = 0.024) and subaxial instability (p = 0.01). Age at diagnosis correlated with subaxial instability (p = 0.02). Conclusions: The prevalence of cervical instability was 62.9 % (22/35). The most frequent instabilities were: atlantoaxial subluxation (42.9 %), subaxial subluxation (20%) and basilar invagination (14.3%). The correlation between instabilities and clinical signs and symptoms was poor. The patients with subaxial subluxation presented disease onset at a younger age. Dynamic radiography was important for diagnosing atlantoaxial subluxation. PMID:27022536

  15. Ossified Posterior Longitudinal Ligament With Massive Ossification of the Anterior Longitudinal Ligament Causing Dysphagia in a Diffuse Idiopathic Skeletal Hyperostosis Patient.

    PubMed

    Murayama, Kazuhiro; Inoue, Shinichi; Tachibana, Toshiya; Maruo, Keishi; Arizumi, Fumihiro; Tsuji, Shotaro; Yoshiya, Shinichi

    2015-08-01

    Descriptive case report.To report a case of a diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis (DISH) patient with both massive ossification of the anterior longitudinal ligament (OALL) leading to severe dysphagia as well as ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament (OPLL) causing mild cervical myelopathy, warranting not only an anterior approach but also a posterior one.Although DISH can cause massive OALL in the cervical spine, severe dysphagia resulting from DISH is a rare occurrence. OALLs are frequently associated with OPLL. Treatment for a DISH patient with OPLL in setting of OALL-caused dysphagia is largely unknown.A 70-year-old man presented with severe dysphagia with mild cervical myelopathy. Neurological examination showed mild spastic paralysis and hyper reflex in his lower extremities. Plane radiographs and computed tomography of the cervical spine revealed a discontinuous massive OALL at C4-5 and continuous type OPLL at C2-6. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed pronounced spinal cord compression due to OPLL at C4-5. Esophagram demonstrated extrinsic compression secondary to OALL at C4-5.We performed posterior decompressive laminectomy with posterior lateral mass screw fixation, as well as both resection of OALL and interbody fusion at C4-5 by the anterior approach. We performed posterior decompressive laminectomy with posterior lateral mass screw fixation, as well as both resection of OALL and interbody fusion at C4-5 by the anterior approach. Severe dysphagia markedly improved without any complications.We considered that this patient not only required osteophytectomy and fusion by the anterior approach but also required decompression and spinal fusion by the posterior approach to prevent both deterioration of cervical myelopathy and recurrence of OALL after surgery. PMID:26266365

  16. Transpedicular vertebral body augmentation reinforced with pedicle screw fixation in fresh traumatic A2 and A3 lumbar fractures: comparison between two devices and two bone cements.

    PubMed

    Korovessis, Panagiotis; Vardakastanis, Konstantinos; Repantis, Thomas; Vitsas, Vasilios

    2014-07-01

    This retrospective study compares efficacy and safety of balloon kyphoplasty (BK) with calcium phosphate (Group A) versus KIVA implant with PMMA (Group B) reinforced with three vertebrae pedicle screw constructs for A2 and A3 single fresh non-osteoporotic lumbar (L1-L4) fractures in 38 consecutive age- and diagnosis-matched patient populations. Extracanal leakage of both low-viscosity PMMA and calcium phosphate (CP) as well as the following roentgenographic parameters: segmental kyphosis (SKA), anterior (AVBHr) and posterior (PVBHr) vertebral body height ratio, spinal canal encroachment (SCE) clearance, and functional outcome measures: VAS and SF-36, were recorded and compared between the two groups. All patients in both groups were followed for a minimum 26 (Group A) and 25 (Group B) months. Extracanal CP and PMMA leakage was observed in four (18 %) and three (15 %) vertebrae/patients of group A and B, respectively. Hybrid fixation improved AVBHr, SKA, SCE, but PVBHr only in group B. VAS and SF-36 improved postoperatively in the patients of both groups. Short-segment construct with the novel KIVA implant restored better than BK-fractured lumbar vertebral body, but this had no impact in functional outcome. Since there was no leakage difference between PMMA and calcium phosphate and no short-term adverse related to PMMA use were observed, we advice the use of PMMA in fresh traumatic lumbar fractures.

  17. Anterior cruciate ligament - updating article.

    PubMed

    Luzo, Marcus Vinicius Malheiros; Franciozi, Carlos Eduardo da Silveira; Rezende, Fernando Cury; Gracitelli, Guilherme Conforto; Debieux, Pedro; Cohen, Moisés

    2016-01-01

    This updating article on the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) has the aim of addressing some of the most interesting current topics in this field. Within this stratified approach, it contains the following sections: ACL remnant; anterolateral ligament and combined intra and extra-articular reconstruction; fixation devices; and ACL femoral tunnel creation techniques. PMID:27517015

  18. Anterior cruciate ligament - updating article.

    PubMed

    Luzo, Marcus Vinicius Malheiros; Franciozi, Carlos Eduardo da Silveira; Rezende, Fernando Cury; Gracitelli, Guilherme Conforto; Debieux, Pedro; Cohen, Moisés

    2016-01-01

    This updating article on the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) has the aim of addressing some of the most interesting current topics in this field. Within this stratified approach, it contains the following sections: ACL remnant; anterolateral ligament and combined intra and extra-articular reconstruction; fixation devices; and ACL femoral tunnel creation techniques.

  19. The effects of orthopedic forces on the craniofacial complex utilizing cervical and headgear appliances.

    PubMed

    Chaconas, S J; Caputo, A A; Davis, J C

    1976-05-01

    1. A three-dimensional anatomic model of a human skull was produced with birefringent materials for photoelastic analysis. By means of photoelastic techniques during application of high-pull and cervical extraoral traction, stresses were visualized within the model. 2. Extraoral anchorage affected the position of the maxillary molar and its resulting alveolar development. Cervical headgear had a much greater tipping effect on the maxillary molar than did the high-pull headgear. Both appliances examined could produce stresses which may be transmitted to distant eraniofacial sutures. As opposed to high-pull traction, cervical pull in general stressed more areas and to a much greater degree. 4. The pterygoid plates of the sphenoid bone, the zygomatic arches, the junction of the maxilla with the lacrimal bone and the ethmoid, and the maxillary teeth were affected by both types of headgear. 5. Only cervical traction produced stresses at the frontal process of the maxilla and the Zygomaticofrontal suture. 6. There were two findings which had not been previously reported: First, cervical traction tended to open the palate in the posterior region. Second, high-pull traction produced compressive stresses at the junction of the right and left maxillae inferior to the anterior nasal spine.

  20. Specialized core stability exercise: a neglected component of anterior cruciate ligament rehabilitation programs.

    PubMed

    Shi, Dong-liang; Li, Jing-long; Zhai, Hua; Wang, Hui-fang; Meng, Han; Wang, Yu-bin

    2012-01-01

    The incidence of anterior cruciate ligament injury has continued to increase over the last two decades. This injury is associated with abnormal gait patterns and osteoarthritis of the knee. In order to accelerate recovery, the introduction of core stability exercises into the rehabilitation program is proposed. The theory underlying the use of core stability exercise relates to the neuroplasticity that follows anterior cruciate ligament injury. Neuroplasticity in lumbar, thoracic, cervical and brain regions diminish activation in the contralateral thalamus, postparietal cortex, SM1, basal ganglia-external globus pallidus, SII, cingulated motor area, premotor cortex, and in the ipsilateral cerebellum and SM1 and increase activation in pre-SMA, SIIp, and pITG, indicating modifications of the CNS. In addition, the neuroplasticity can regulate the movement of trunk muscles, for example, sternocleidomastoid and lower trapezius muscles. Core stability also demonstrates a negative correlation with the incidence of anterior cruciate ligament injury. Therefore, we propose that core stability exercises may improve the rehabilitation of anterior cruciate ligament injuries by increasing core motor control. Specialized core stability exercises aimed at rectifying biomechanical problems associated with gait and core stability may play a key role in the management of anterior cruciate ligament injury.

  1. Analysis of digitized cervical images to detect cervical neoplasia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferris, Daron G.

    2004-05-01

    Cervical cancer is the second most common malignancy in women worldwide. If diagnosed in the premalignant stage, cure is invariably assured. Although the Papanicolaou (Pap) smear has significantly reduced the incidence of cervical cancer where implemented, the test is only moderately sensitive, highly subjective and skilled-labor intensive. Newer optical screening tests (cervicography, direct visual inspection and speculoscopy), including fluorescent and reflective spectroscopy, are fraught with certain weaknesses. Yet, the integration of optical probes for the detection and discrimination of cervical neoplasia with automated image analysis methods may provide an effective screening tool for early detection of cervical cancer, particularly in resource poor nations. Investigative studies are needed to validate the potential for automated classification and recognition algorithms. By applying image analysis techniques for registration, segmentation, pattern recognition, and classification, cervical neoplasia may be reliably discriminated from normal epithelium. The National Cancer Institute (NCI), in cooperation with the National Library of Medicine (NLM), has embarked on a program to begin this and other similar investigative studies.

  2. Cervical insufficiency: re-evaluating the prophylactic cervical cerclage.

    PubMed

    Abenhaim, Haim A; Tulandi, Togas

    2009-06-01

    Historically, placement of a cervical cerclage was based almost entirely on the obstetrical history. Over the past two decades however, we have recognised that history alone may not be the only indication for cerclage but rather, complementing the obstetrical history with ultrasonographic and biochemical findings may better identify those women who may benefit most from the placement of a cervical cerclage. Review of the literature appears to suggest that the best approach towards the management of a cervical insufficiency is to first categorise women as being either high risk of low risk-based on obstetrical history. Although women with an obstetrical history of at least three 2nd trimester losses are likely to benefit from a prophylactic cerclage than those without this history may better be managed with progesterone and serial cervical length measurements. This approach can in turn be used to identify those women with early cervical shortening that may require an emergency cerclage. Although randomised controlled trials are still lacking, recent studies suggests that this approach may be more effective especially when combined with markers of intra-amniotic inflammation. As for the prophylactic cerclage itself, with the abdominal cerclage being less invasive given the possibility of a laparoscopic placement, it may prove to be a more effective alternative to the conventionally placed McDonald cerclage. This however, remains to be evaluated more carefully.

  3. The Role of Posterior Longitudinal Ligament in Cervical Disc Replacement: An Ovine Cadaveric Biomechanical Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Cheng-Cheng; Hao, Ding-Jun; Ma, Yu-Li; Huang, Da-Geng; Li, Hou-Kun; Feng, Hang; Hou, Qian

    2016-01-01

    Background Cervical disc replacement (CDR) has been widely used to restore and maintain mobility and function of the treated and adjacent motion segments. Posterior longitudinal ligament (PLL) resection has been shown to be efficient in anterior cervical decompression and fusion. However, less is known about the biomechanical effect of PLL removal versus preservation in cervical disc arthroplasty. Material/Methods Three motion segments of 24 ovine cervical spines (C2–C5) were evaluated in a robotic spine system with axial compressive loads of 50 N. These cervical spines were divided in three groups according to the following conditions: (1) intact spine, (2) C3/C4 CDR with the Prestige LP prosthesis and PLL preservation, and (3) C3/C4 CDR with the Prestige LP prosthesis and PLL removal. The ranges of motion (ROMs) were recorded and analyzed in each group. Results The C3/C4 ROM in group 3 (CDR with PLL removed) increased significantly in flexion-extension and axial rotation compared with group 1 (intact spine). Moreover, in flexion-extension, the mean total ROM was significantly larger in group 3 than in group 1. All the ROM observed in group 2 (CDR with PLL preserved) did not significantly differ from the ROM observed in group 1. Conclusions Compared with intact spines, CDR with PLL removal partly increased ROM. Moreover, the ROM in CDR with PLL preservation did not significantly differ from the ROM observed in intact spines. The PLL appears to contribute to the balance and stability of the cervical spine and should thus be preserved in cervical disc replacement provided that the posterior longitudinal ligament is not degenerative and the compression can be removed without PLL takedown. PMID:27243444

  4. The Role of Posterior Longitudinal Ligament in Cervical Disc Replacement: An Ovine Cadaveric Biomechanical Analysis.

    PubMed

    Yu, Cheng-Cheng; Hao, Ding-Jun; Ma, Yu-Li; Huang, Da-Geng; Li, Hou-Kun; Feng, Hang; Hou, Qian

    2016-05-31

    BACKGROUND Cervical disc replacement (CDR) has been widely used to restore and maintain mobility and function of the treated and adjacent motion segments. Posterior longitudinal ligament (PLL) resection has been shown to be efficient in anterior cervical decompression and fusion. However, less is known about the biomechanical effect of PLL removal versus preservation in cervical disc arthroplasty. MATERIAL AND METHODS Three motion segments of 24 ovine cervical spines (C2-C5) were evaluated in a robotic spine system with axial compressive loads of 50 N. These cervical spines were divided in three groups according to the following conditions: (1) intact spine, (2) C3/C4 CDR with the Prestige LP prosthesis and PLL preservation, and (3) C3/C4 CDR with the Prestige LP prosthesis and PLL removal. The ranges of motion (ROMs) were recorded and analyzed in each group. RESULTS The C3/C4 ROM in group 3 (CDR with PLL removed) increased significantly in flexion-extension and axial rotation compared with group 1 (intact spine). Moreover, in flexion-extension, the mean total ROM was significantly larger in group 3 than in group 1. All the ROM observed in group 2 (CDR with PLL preserved) did not significantly differ from the ROM observed in group 1. CONCLUSIONS Compared with intact spines, CDR with PLL removal partly increased ROM. Moreover, the ROM in CDR with PLL preservation did not significantly differ from the ROM observed in intact spines. The PLL appears to contribute to the balance and stability of the cervical spine and should thus be preserved in cervical disc replacement provided that the posterior longitudinal ligament is not degenerative and the compression can be removed without PLL takedown.

  5. Radiological study of C3–C4 level surgical cases of cervical spondylosis

    PubMed Central

    Tomii, Masato; Mizuno, Junichi; Watanabe, Kazuo

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to elucidate the pathological characteristics of C3-C4 cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM) from the radiological study. Materials and Methods: A total of 31 patients with single level anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) at C3-C4 and 46 patients with single level ACDF at C5-C6 were included in this study. We selected C5-C6 level as a representative of the lower cervical level. The C3-C4 and C5-C6 levels were routinely examined to investigate the areas of the vertebral canal, subarachnoid space, and spinal cord in the cervical canal. Results: The clinical study of C3-C4 ACDF patients showed that as for the C3-C4 area, the area of the cervical vertebral canal, the area of the subarachnoid space, and he transverse surface area of the spinal cord were all significantly smaller in C3-C4 ACDF patients than in C5-C6 ACDF patients. Moreover, as for the C5-C6 area, only the area of the subarachnoid space was significantly smaller in C5-C6 ACDF patients than in C3-C4 ACDF patients. Spondylotic changes predominated at both the C3-C4 and C5-C6 levels. However, in the C5-C6 ACDF patients, spondylotic changes tended to predominate only at the operation level at C5-C6. Conclusions: Aging process develops from lower cervical to upper cervical level. Moreover, this static factor in conjunction with dynamic factor (instability) was the causative factors for the CSM in C3-C4 ACDF patients. PMID:27366255

  6. American Society for Colposcopy and Cervical Pathology

    MedlinePlus

    ... Prevention of Cervical Cancer ASCCP has endorsed American Society of Clinical Oncology's Guidelines for Secondary Prevention of ... 7227 Toll-Free (240) 575-9880 Fax © American Society for Colposcopy and Cervical Pathology * Required * First Name: * ...

  7. Preventing Cervical Cancer with HPV Vaccines

    Cancer.gov

    Cervical cancer can be prevented with HPV vaccines. NCI-supported researchers helped establish HPV as a cause of cervical cancer. They also helped create the first HPV vaccines, were involved in the vaccine trials, and contribute to ongoing studies.

  8. Cervical Spine Injuries in the Athlete.

    PubMed

    Schroeder, Gregory D; Vaccaro, Alexander R

    2016-09-01

    Cervical spine injuries are extremely common and range from relatively minor injuries, such as cervical muscle strains, to severe, life-threatening cervical fractures with spinal cord injuries. Although cervical spine injuries are most common in athletes who participate in contact and collision sports, such as American football and rugby, they also have been reported in athletes who participate in noncontact sports, such as baseball, gymnastics, and diving. Cervical spine injuries in athletes are not necessarily the result of substantial spine trauma; some athletes have chronic conditions, such as congenital stenosis, that increase their risk for a serious cervical spine injury after even minor trauma. Therefore, physicians who cover athletic events must have a thorough knowledge of cervical spine injures and the most appropriate ways in which they should be managed. Although cervical spine injuries can be career-ending injuries, athletes often are able to return to play after appropriate treatment if the potential for substantial re-injury is minimized.

  9. Morphological comparison of cervical vertebrae in adult females with different sagittal craniofacial patterns: A cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Alkan, Özer; Aydoğan, Cihan; Akkaya, Sevil

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Cervical vertebral maturation (CVM) methods have gained popularity to assess growth and development status for orthodontic patients. Although craniofacial and craniocervical structures are known to be associated, there is no evidence in the literature if this relation might negatively affect the accuracy of CVM assessments. Therefore, this study aimed to comparatively investigate the sizes of the 2nd, 3rd, and 4th cervical vertebrae in adult females (radius union stage of skeletal maturity) who have different sagittal skeletal patterns. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted, and 151 lateral cephalometric radiographs of adult female patients were assessed in the study. Patients were assigned to three groups according to ANB angle. Parameters including concavity depth at the lower border of the 2nd, 3rd, and 4th cervical vertebrae and base length, upper border length, body length, posterior height, anterior height, and body height of the 3rd and 4th cervical vertebrae bodies were measured. One-way analysis of variance was used for between-group comparisons. Results: No statistically significant differences were found between groups in terms of concavity depth at the lower borders of the 2nd, 3rd, and 4th cervical vertebrae (P > 0.05). Base length, upper border length, body length, posterior height, anterior height, and body height of the 3rd and 4th cervical vertebrae were also similar between groups (P > 0.05). Conclusions: The results of this study supports that sagittal craniofacial pattern has no effect on the accuracy of using the methods assessing CVM and calculating cervical vertebral age. PMID:27630474

  10. Morphological comparison of cervical vertebrae in adult females with different sagittal craniofacial patterns: A cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Alkan, Özer; Aydoğan, Cihan; Akkaya, Sevil

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Cervical vertebral maturation (CVM) methods have gained popularity to assess growth and development status for orthodontic patients. Although craniofacial and craniocervical structures are known to be associated, there is no evidence in the literature if this relation might negatively affect the accuracy of CVM assessments. Therefore, this study aimed to comparatively investigate the sizes of the 2nd, 3rd, and 4th cervical vertebrae in adult females (radius union stage of skeletal maturity) who have different sagittal skeletal patterns. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted, and 151 lateral cephalometric radiographs of adult female patients were assessed in the study. Patients were assigned to three groups according to ANB angle. Parameters including concavity depth at the lower border of the 2nd, 3rd, and 4th cervical vertebrae and base length, upper border length, body length, posterior height, anterior height, and body height of the 3rd and 4th cervical vertebrae bodies were measured. One-way analysis of variance was used for between-group comparisons. Results: No statistically significant differences were found between groups in terms of concavity depth at the lower borders of the 2nd, 3rd, and 4th cervical vertebrae (P > 0.05). Base length, upper border length, body length, posterior height, anterior height, and body height of the 3rd and 4th cervical vertebrae were also similar between groups (P > 0.05). Conclusions: The results of this study supports that sagittal craniofacial pattern has no effect on the accuracy of using the methods assessing CVM and calculating cervical vertebral age.

  11. [Cervical incompetence after previous cervical dilatation and curettage (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Grünberger, W; Riss, P

    1979-07-15

    Out of a total of 3502 deliveries over a period of two years 254 patients (7.25%) had a surgical closure of the cervix according to Shirodkar because of cervical incompetence. All 3502 records were reviewed with regard to previous obstetrical and gynecological history. In the group with Shirodkar operation the percentage of women with a history of spontaneous or induced abortions was almost twice as high as in the comparison group. The reason for the development of cervical incompetence could be a trauma to the endocervix due to mechanical dilatation since diagnostic or therapeutic dilatation and curettage was found five times more often in women with Shirodkar operation than in patients without cervical incompetence. The results show that dilatation and curettage for any indication should be performed as carefully as possible, especially in younger women of childbearing age. Chemical dilatation of the endocervix--for example with prostaglandins--seems to be preferable to mechanical dilatation.

  12. Cervical cancer screening.

    PubMed Central

    Katz, A.

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To review the role of family physicians in screening for cancer of the cervix, to review the evidence for screening, in particular, frequency and technique for screening, and to review the reasons cervical cancer has not been prevented and the role of family physicians in addressing these failures. QUALITY OF EVIDENCE: The value of screening has been established with level II evidence. Many of the unresolved issues are not supported either way by good evidence; level II and III evidence predominates. MAIN FINDINGS: In Canada, 1350 women were predicted to be diagnosed with cancer of the cervix in 1996. Most of these women had not been screened. Minority, rural, low-income, and older women face important barriers to screening. Family physicians have a role in reaching out to these women to provide effective health care, including cancer screening. When cancer screening is performed, it should conform to recommended techniques with appropriate follow up of abnormal test results. CONCLUSIONS: Family physicians have an important role in preventing cancer of the cervix. Efforts should be concentrated on encouraging a greater proportion of eligible women to be screened. Criteria are suggested for effective screening. PMID:9721422

  13. Cervical incompetence: preliminary evaluation with MR imaging.

    PubMed

    Hricak, H; Chang, Y C; Cann, C E; Parer, J T

    1990-03-01

    The ability of magnetic resonance (MR) imaging to demonstrate cervical incompetence in nonpregnant women was investigated in a prospective study of 41 volunteers referred in random order. These included 20 patients with normal cervices, 11 with cervical incompetence of traumatic or congenital origin, and 10 with clinically small cervices due to in utero diethylstilbestrol (DES) exposure. On MR images of the normal patients, cervical length was 33.0 mm +/- 1.0 (mean +/- standard error of the mean) and the width of the internal cervical os was 3.3 mm +/- 0.1. In patients with cervical incompetence, the cervical length did not significantly differ from those in the normal group. However, the internal cervical os was significantly wider (4.5 mm +/- 0.3, P less than .001), and localized irregularity of the endocervical canal was demonstrated in two patients. The MR appearance of the cervical stroma varied from normal, uniformly low signal intensity (n = 4) to uniformly (n = 3) or partially (n = 4) medium-to-high signal intensity on T2-weighted images. In the patients with in utero DES exposure, the mean length of the cervical canal (22.9 mm +/- 1.7) was significantly shorter than that of the normal group. The width of the internal cervical os and the MR signal intensity of the cervical stroma were normal. In summary, MR findings of a cervical length shorter than 3.1 mm (95% confidence limit), an internal cervical os wider than 4.2 mm (95% confidence limit), or abnormal signal intensity in the cervical stroma are highly suggestive of incompetent cervix and should assist in planning further therapeutic decisions. PMID:2305065

  14. Cervical cancer screening at crossroads.

    PubMed

    Lynge, Elsebeth; Rygaard, Carsten; Baillet, Miguel Vazquez-Prada; Dugué, Pierre-Antoine; Sander, Bente Braad; Bonde, Jesper; Rebolj, Matejka

    2014-08-01

    Cervical screening has been one of the most successful public health prevention programmes. For 50 years, cytology formed the basis for screening, and detected cervical intraepithelial lesions (CIN) were treated surgically to prevent progression to cancer. In a high-risk country as Denmark, screening decreased the incidence of cervical cancer from 34 to 11 per 100,000, age-standardized rate (World Standard Population). Screening is, however, also expensive; Denmark (population: 5.6 million) undertakes close to half a million tests per year, and has 6-8 CIN-treated women for each prevented cancer case. The discovery of human papillomavirus (HPV) as the cause of cervical cancer dramatically changed perspectives for disease control. Screening with HPV testing was launched around 1990, and preventive HPV vaccination was licensed in 2006. Long-term randomized controlled trials (RCT) demonstrated that HPV testing provides better protection against cervical cancer than cytology, but it requires extra repeated testing. HPV vaccination RCTs, furthermore, have proved that HPV vaccination protects against vaccine-type high-grade CIN in women vaccinated prior to sexual activity, but less so in women vaccinated later. The challenge now is therefore to find an algorithm for screening of a heterogeneous population including non-vaccinated women; women vaccinated prior to start of sexual activity; and women vaccinated later.

  15. Prediction of Cervical Endplate Size: One Size Does Not Fit All.

    PubMed

    Soo, Adrianne Elizabeth; Olsson, Eric; Lim, Moe

    2016-05-01

    Significant variations exist in the footprint size of cervical vertebral endplates. In anterior cervical spine surgery, an implant that maximizes coverage of the endplate and contacts the apophyses may reduce subsidence and decrease risk of endplate fracture. The ability to accurately predict a patient's vertebral endplate size may be helpful for surgeons to preoperatively choose the optimal implant for the patient's specific anatomy. The purpose of this study was to (1) demonstrate the range of vertebral endplate sizes between individual patients and cervical levels and (2) determine if vertebral endplate size can be predicted based on patient characteristics and vertebral level. Fifty cervical computed tomography scans of patients 18 to 65 years old were selected for analysis. Superior vertebral endplate sizes of C3-C7 were measured medial-laterally and anteriorly-posteriorly. The medial-laterally measurement was taken from the midbody coronal view at the flat central region of the superior endplate, and the anteriorly-posteriorly measurement was taken at the midbody axial view from the front to back edge of the vertebral body. Age, height, weight, gender, and race were recorded for all patients. One-way analysis of variance, linear regressions, and multivariate regressions were performed. Patient height, age, gender, and race accounted for 51% to 71% of the variance between individuals, and endplate size increased by 1 mm in width and 0.6 mm in depth for each progressively more caudal vertebral level. Vertebral endplate size could be reliably calculated based on patient height, age, gender, and vertebral level. These data may be useful to assist surgeons in preoperative planning for patient-specific implant selection. [Orthopedics. 2016; 39(3):e526-e531.]. PMID:27135446

  16. Probabilistic design analysis of the influence of material property on the human cervical spine.

    PubMed

    Ng, Hong Wan; Teo, Ee Chon

    2004-04-01

    Studies reported previously in the literature have described the importance of material variation on the cervical responses and have examined some effects by varying the material properties, but there is no systematic approach using statistical methods to understand the influence of material variation on a cervical spine model under a full range of loading conditions, especially under compression and anterior and posterior shear. A probabilistic design system based on Monte Carlo simulation methods using Latin hypercube sampling techniques is used to analyze the material sensitivity of a C4-C6 cervical spine model involving 13 uncertain input parameters on the biomechanical responses and disc annulus stresses under compression, anterior shear, posterior shear, flexion, extension, lateral bending, and axial rotation. The loading types and range of values were as follows: compression, 0-1 mm; anterior shear, 0-2 mm; posterior shear, 0-3.5 mm; flexion, extension, lateral bending, and axial rotation. 0-1.8 Nm with 73.6-N preload. For each case, the load-deflection and key stress values at various spinal components were captured after each load step. The model was also validated under the same conditions. The minimum and maximum predicted responses were within the range of the experimental data. Ignoring compression loading, the combined effects on the biomechanical responses of the cervical ligaments under the remaining loads are enormous. Their total impacts are almost equal to or slightly less than the influence of disc annulus. Results show that the fiber mechanical properties did not have a significant effect on the compressive stiffness. This study reveals important features that help us identify the critical input parameters and enable us to reduce the development time of a patient-specific biomechanical model. PMID:15260096

  17. 38 CFR 3.379 - Anterior poliomyelitis.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 38 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Anterior poliomyelitis. 3... Specific Diseases § 3.379 Anterior poliomyelitis. If the first manifestations of acute anterior poliomyelitis present themselves in a veteran within 35 days of termination of active military service, it...

  18. 21 CFR 884.5250 - Cervical cap.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Cervical cap. 884.5250 Section 884.5250 Food and... OBSTETRICAL AND GYNECOLOGICAL DEVICES Obstetrical and Gynecological Therapeutic Devices § 884.5250 Cervical cap. (a) Identification. A cervical cap is a flexible cuplike receptacle that fits over the cervix...

  19. 21 CFR 884.3200 - Cervical drain.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cervical drain. 884.3200 Section 884.3200 Food and... OBSTETRICAL AND GYNECOLOGICAL DEVICES Obstetrical and Gynecological Prosthetic Devices § 884.3200 Cervical drain. (a) Identification. A cervical drain is a device designed to provide an exit channel for...

  20. 21 CFR 884.3200 - Cervical drain.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Cervical drain. 884.3200 Section 884.3200 Food and... OBSTETRICAL AND GYNECOLOGICAL DEVICES Obstetrical and Gynecological Prosthetic Devices § 884.3200 Cervical drain. (a) Identification. A cervical drain is a device designed to provide an exit channel for...

  1. 21 CFR 884.5250 - Cervical cap.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Cervical cap. 884.5250 Section 884.5250 Food and... OBSTETRICAL AND GYNECOLOGICAL DEVICES Obstetrical and Gynecological Therapeutic Devices § 884.5250 Cervical cap. (a) Identification. A cervical cap is a flexible cuplike receptacle that fits over the cervix...

  2. 21 CFR 884.5250 - Cervical cap.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Cervical cap. 884.5250 Section 884.5250 Food and... OBSTETRICAL AND GYNECOLOGICAL DEVICES Obstetrical and Gynecological Therapeutic Devices § 884.5250 Cervical cap. (a) Identification. A cervical cap is a flexible cuplike receptacle that fits over the cervix...

  3. 21 CFR 884.3200 - Cervical drain.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Cervical drain. 884.3200 Section 884.3200 Food and... OBSTETRICAL AND GYNECOLOGICAL DEVICES Obstetrical and Gynecological Prosthetic Devices § 884.3200 Cervical drain. (a) Identification. A cervical drain is a device designed to provide an exit channel for...

  4. 21 CFR 884.3200 - Cervical drain.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Cervical drain. 884.3200 Section 884.3200 Food and... OBSTETRICAL AND GYNECOLOGICAL DEVICES Obstetrical and Gynecological Prosthetic Devices § 884.3200 Cervical drain. (a) Identification. A cervical drain is a device designed to provide an exit channel for...

  5. 21 CFR 884.5250 - Cervical cap.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Cervical cap. 884.5250 Section 884.5250 Food and... OBSTETRICAL AND GYNECOLOGICAL DEVICES Obstetrical and Gynecological Therapeutic Devices § 884.5250 Cervical cap. (a) Identification. A cervical cap is a flexible cuplike receptacle that fits over the cervix...

  6. Cervix Regression and Motion During the Course of External Beam Chemoradiation for Cervical Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Beadle, Beth M.; Jhingran, Anuja; Salehpour, Mohammad; Sam, Marianne; Iyer, Revathy B.; Eifel, Patricia J.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the magnitude of cervix regression and motion during external beam chemoradiation for cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: Sixteen patients with cervical cancer underwent computed tomography scanning before, weekly during, and after conventional chemoradiation. Cervix volumes were calculated to determine the extent of cervix regression. Changes in the center of mass and perimeter of the cervix between scans were used to determine the magnitude of cervix motion. Maximum cervix position changes were calculated for each patient, and mean maximum changes were calculated for the group. Results: Mean cervical volumes before and after 45 Gy of external beam irradiation were 97.0 and 31.9 cc, respectively; mean volume reduction was 62.3%. Mean maximum changes in the center of mass of the cervix were 2.1, 1.6, and 0.82 cm in the superior-inferior, anterior-posterior, and right-left lateral dimensions, respectively. Mean maximum changes in the perimeter of the cervix were 2.3 and 1.3 cm in the superior and inferior, 1.7 and 1.8 cm in the anterior and posterior, and 0.76 and 0.94 cm in the right and left lateral directions, respectively. Conclusions: Cervix regression and internal organ motion contribute to marked interfraction variations in the intrapelvic position of the cervical target in patients receiving chemoradiation for cervical cancer. Failure to take these variations into account during the application of highly conformal external beam radiation techniques poses a theoretical risk of underdosing the target or overdosing adjacent critical structures.

  7. Invasive cervical cancer in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    La Russa, M; Jeyarajah, A R

    2016-05-01

    Detection of invasive cervical cancer during pregnancy is rare, with reported incidence rates ranging from 0.05% to 0.1%. However, cervical cancer is one of the most common malignancies diagnosed during pregnancy. The management of invasive cervical cancer in pregnancy is extremely challenging and requires a multidisciplinary team approach to optimise the treatment for the patient by simultaneously providing the best chance of survival for the foetus. The approach is based mainly on the following factors: gestational age at the time of the diagnosis, stage, histological subtype, desire regarding fertility and quality of life. The gold standard treatment for this condition in pregnancy is not yet established. This is due to the absence of prospective studies and clinical trials. Therefore, its management presents a dilemma that requires individualisation of care. The various factors that need to be considered for obtaining a good outcome for both mother and child are described in this study. PMID:26586539

  8. Cervical cancer: a preventable death.

    PubMed

    Nour, Nawal M

    2009-01-01

    Cervical cancer kills 260,000 women annually, and nearly 85% of these deaths occur in developing nations, where it is the leading cause of cancer deaths in women. Disparities of health and poverty play a large role in this high mortality rate. Whereas routine Papanicolaou and human papillomavirus (HPV) testing has dramatically reduced cervical cancer deaths in Western nations, without proper infrastructure, facilities, and medical training, the rates of cervical cancer in developing nations will remain high. Studies on HPV DNA testing and the low-technology method of "screen and treat" are promising. In addition, reducing the cost and increasing the availability of HPV vaccines in developing nations brings hope and promise to the next generation of women. PMID:20111660

  9. Cervical Spondylotic Myelopathy Secondary to Dropped Head Syndrome: Report of a Case and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Soufiani, Housain F.; Rahimizadeh, Saghayegh

    2016-01-01

    The dropped head syndrome (DHS) is a disabling condition caused by severe weakness of the neck extensor muscles causing progressive reducible kyphosis of the cervical spine and the inability to hold the head up. Weakness can occur in isolation or in association with a generalized neuromuscular disorder. Isolated cases are owed to the late onset of noninflammatory myopathy designated as INEM, where persistent chin to chest deformity may gradually cause or aggravate preexisting degenerative changes of the cervical spine and ultimately result in myelopathy. In review of the literature, we could find only 5 cases, with no unique guidelines to address the management of these two concomitant pathologies. Herein, a 69-year-old man who had developed cervical myelopathy 2 years after being affected by isolated dropped head syndrome is presented. Chin to chest deformity and cervical myelopathy were managed through three-level anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) combined with decompressive cervical laminectomy and stabilization with C2 to C7 pedicle screw-rod construct. At 4-month follow-up, despite recovery in patient's neurological status, flexion deformity reappeared with recurrence of dropped head due to C7 pedicle screws pull-out. However, this was successfully managed with extension of the construct to the upper thoracic levels. PMID:27034870

  10. Combined Posterior and Anterior Ankle Arthroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Scholten, Peter E.; van Dijk, C. Niek

    2012-01-01

    Treatment of combined anterior and posterior ankle pathology usually consists of either combined anterior and posterior arthrotomies or anterior ankle arthroscopy with an additional posterolateral portal. The first technique bears the risk of complications associated with the extensive exposure, the latter technique provides limited access to the posterior ankle joint. A case is described of combined anterior and posterior arthroscopy, with the patient lying prone and then turned supine, addressing both anterior and posterior ankle pathologies in one tempo. This minimally invasive combined approach allows quick recovery and early return to work and sports activities. PMID:23227391

  11. Spontaneous cervical and mediastinal emphysema.

    PubMed

    Parker, G S; Mosborg, D A; Foley, R W; Stiernberg, C M

    1990-09-01

    Subcutaneous cervical emphysema often appears as a result of surgery or trauma. However, when it occurs spontaneously, the patient may present with clinically impressive and dramatic features. The etiology is related to the rupture of terminal alveoli and dissection of air along the pulmonary vasculature. Exercise may contribute to the process by increases in intrathoracic pressure. Six cases of spontaneous cervical emphysema, all related to SCUBA diving training at a Naval facility, were recently seen at our institution. Proper management entails having a high index of suspicion for diagnosis, and then being able to identify potentially life-threatening complications.

  12. Stress-induced cervical lesions.

    PubMed

    Braem, M; Lambrechts, P; Vanherle, G

    1992-05-01

    The increasing occurrence of dental lesions at the cervical surfaces requires more knowledge of the causes of the process. Acidic and abrasive mechanisms have clearly been documented as causes but the stress theory by Lee and Eakle is still controversial. This report describes several incidences of possible stress-induced lesions according to the characteristics described by Lee and Eakle. The occurrences of subgingival lesions lend credence to the stress-induction theory by exclusion of other superimposing etiologic factors. With the current concepts, a perceptive approach to the treatment of cervical lesions can be executed. PMID:1527763

  13. No Carious Cervical Lesions: Abfraction

    PubMed Central

    Shetty, Sumanth M; Shetty, Rashmi G; Mattigatti, Sudha; Managoli, Noopur A; Rairam, Surabhi G; Patil, Ashwini M

    2013-01-01

    Abfraction or Theory of Abfraction is a theory explaining the non-carious cervical lesions (NCCL). It suggests that they are caused by flexural forces, usually from cyclic loading; the enamel, especially at the cementoenamel junction (CEJ), undergoes this pattern of destruction by separating the enamel rods. Clinical aspect importance of these ineart lesions are at most important to be detected for early intervention and treatment modalities as options during the progression of the disease. How to cite this article: Shetty SM, Shetty RG, Mattigatti S, Managoli NA, Rairam SG, Patil AM. No Carious Cervical Lesions: Abfraction. J Int Oral Health 2013; 5(5):142-5. PMID:24324319

  14. Cervical spine pain in the competitive athlete.

    PubMed

    Krabak, Brian J; Kanarek, Samantha L

    2011-08-01

    Cervical pain is a common complaint in both the well-conditioned athlete and the weekend warrior. Some injuries are mild in nature, responding to conservative treatment, including rest, medication, physical therapy, and time. However, more serious injuries, especially those involving the cervical spine, can have devastating consequences. Having a comprehensive understanding of the evaluation and management of cervical pain and cervical spine emergencies is crucial for physicians providing coverage for organized athletic events or for those who serve as team physicians. This article reviews the common causes of cervical spine pain in the competitive athlete.

  15. Cervical spine in Treacher Collins syndrome.

    PubMed

    Pun, Amy Hoi-Ying; Clark, Bruce Eric; David, David John; Anderson, Peter John

    2012-05-01

    Treacher Collins syndrome is a congenital syndrome with characteristic craniofacial malformations, which are well described in the literature. However, the presence of cervical spine dysmorphology in this syndrome has been minimally described. This study reviews cervical spine radiographs of 40 patients with Treacher Collins syndrome. In this sample, 7 of 40 patients displayed cervical spine anomalies, with 3 of these patients displaying multiple cervical spine anomalies. The patterns of spinal anomalies were variable, suggesting that the underlying genetic mutation has variable expressivity in cervical spine development as it does elsewhere in the craniofacial skeleton.

  16. Cervical Whiplash: Considerations in the Rehabilitation of Cervical Myofascial Injury

    PubMed Central

    Ameis, Arthur

    1986-01-01

    Cervical whiplash, usually the result of impact injuries at high speed, is a typically 20th-century problem. This article describes the biomechanical stresses that result in whiplash and outlines the treatment programs that can be expected to help the patient through the four stages of recovery to achieve functional rehabilitation. PMID:21267293

  17. Cervical epidural arteriovenous fistula with radiculopathy mimicking cervical spondylosis.

    PubMed

    Kawabori, Masahito; Hida, Kazutoshi; Yano, Shunsuke; Asano, Takeshi; Iwasaki, Yoshinobu

    2009-03-01

    A 65-year-old woman presented with a rare case of cervical epidural arteriovenous fistula (AVF) manifesting as radiculopathy of the right upper extremity that mimicked cervical spondylosis. She had a 2-month history of gradually progressive right-hand motor weakness and sensory disturbance. The initial diagnosis was cervical disk herniation. However, computed tomography with contrast medium showed abnormal enhancement at the right C5-6 and C6-7 intervertebral foramina. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging with gadolinium disclosed an enhanced abnormal epidural mass at the dorsal surface of the dural tube between the C5 and C6 vertebrae. T(2)-weighted MR imaging showed a slight flow void on the dorsal and ventral surfaces of the spinal cord between C3 and T4. Digital subtraction angiography disclosed cervical epidural and dural AVFs fed by the C5 and C6 radicular arteries. The diagnosis was concomitant epidural and dural AVFs. The dilated internal vertebral venous plexus attributable to epidural AVF was considered to be responsible for the radiculopathy. Transarterial embolization using n-butylcyanoacrylate achieved complete occlusion of the lesions. Her symptoms improved immediately and MR imaging and angiography performed 10 days postembolization showed reduction of both the epidural and dural AVFs.

  18. Foraminotomia cervical posterior en el tratamiento de conflictos foraminales

    PubMed Central

    Campero, Álvaro; Barrera, Ramiro; Ajler, Pablo

    2012-01-01

    Introducción: La foraminomotima cervical posterior es un procedimiento utilizado para la descompresion radicular por via posterior y constituye una alternativa a la via clásica anterior. En este trabajo evaluamos nuestra serie de pacientes tratados por esta via. Método: Desde enero de 2008 a diciembre de 2011, 17 pacientes (18 foraminotomías) fueron operados por presentar cervicobraquialgia a causa de un conflicto foraminal, realizando un foraminotomía cervical posterior. Los pacientes fueron evaluados en el postoperatorio inmediato, al mes y a los 3 meses de la cirugía. Los parámetros para valorar los resultados fueron la Escala Análoga del Dolor (VAS), la Neck Disability Index y los criterios de Odom. Resultados: El dolor radicular por conflicto foraminal secundario a hernia de disco cervical fue el síntoma y la patología predominante. El nivel más afectado fue C5-C6. La resolución completa del dolor radicular se observó en casi todos los pacientes. La VAS preoperatoria en promedio fue de 8.8 (mínimo 8 – máximo 10), con una franca mejoría en todos los casos (0.4 en el último control). La media en la Neck Disability Index al inicio fue de 35.3 (mínimo 32 – máximo 45), con una evolución favorable en la evaluación final (0.6). Los Criterios de Odom para la evaluación de pacientes operados de columna cervical fueron satisfactorios con un promedio de 1.17. Se observaron complicaciones en 4 pacientes (23%), todas tuvieron una evolución favorable. No hubo infecciones, discitis ni empeoramiento de los síntomas preexistentes en ningún paciente. Conclusión: La foraminotomía cervical posterior es un procedimiento efectivo para el tratamiento del dolor radicular en los conflictos foraminales PMID:23596556

  19. Percutaneous cervical nucleoplasty in the treatment of cervical disc herniation.

    PubMed

    Li, Jian; Yan, Deng-lu; Zhang, Zai-Heng

    2008-12-01

    Percutaneous disc decompression procedures have been performed in the past. Various percutaneous techniques such as percutaneous discectomy, laser discectomy, and nucleoplasty have been successful. Our prospective study was directly to evaluate the results of percutaneous cervical nucleoplasty (PCN) surgery for cervical disc herniation, and illustrate the effectiveness of PCN in symptomatic patients who had cervical herniated discs. From July of 2002 to June of 2005, 126 consecutive patients with contained cervical disc herniations have presented at the authors' clinic and treated by PCN. The patients' gender distribution for PCN was 65 male, 61 female. The age of patients ranged from 34 to 66 years (mean 51.9 +/- 10.2 years). The levels of involvement were 21 cases at C3-4, 30 cases at C4-5, 40 cases at C5-6, and 35 cases at C6-7. The clinical outcomes, pain reduction and the segment stability were all recorded during this study. A clinical outcome was quantified by the Macnab standard and using VAS. The angular displacement (AD) > or =11 degrees or horizontal displacement (HD) > or =3 mm was considered to be radiographically unstable. In the results of this study, puncture of the needle into the disc space was accurately performed under X-ray guidance in all cases. There was one case where the Perc-D Spine Wand had broken in the disc space during the procedure. The partial Perc-D Spine Wand, which had broken in the disc space could not be removed by the percutaneous cervical discectomy and thus remained there. There were no recurrent cases or complications in our series. Macnab standard results were excellent in 62 cases, good in 41 cases and fair in 23 cases. The rate of excellent and good was 83.73%. The VAS scores demonstrated statistically significant improvement in PCN at the 2-week, 1, 3, 6, and 12-month follow-up visits when compared to preoperational values (P < 0.01). There were no cases of instability following the PCN procedure. There was no

  20. [Cervical pessary and prevention of preterm birth].

    PubMed

    Sentilhes, L; Descamps, P; Legendre, G

    2014-01-01

    Cervical pessary is a promising tool to prevent preterm birth in high risk pregnant women with shortened midtrimester ultrasonographic cervical length. It is well tolerated by women. PECEP and ProTWIN trials have opened new fields of clinical research. Their results suggest that cervical pessary may prevent preterm birth in women with (i) singleton and cervical length ≤25 mm at 18-22weeks, and with (ii) twins and cervical length ≤37mm at 16-22weeks. These results must be confirmed by other randomized controlled trial before a generalization of cervical pessary in these situations. The role of cervical pessary in the existing strategies to prevent birth (progesterone, cerclage or combinations thereof) has to be determined.

  1. Palliative Surgery in Treating Painful Metastases of the Upper Cervical Spine

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xinghuo; Ye, Zhewei; Pu, Feifei; Chen, Songfeng; Wang, Baichuan; Zhang, Zhicai; Yang, Cao; Yang, Shuhua; Shao, Zengwu

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Increased incidence of upper cervical metastases and higher life expectancy resulted in higher operative rates in patients. The purpose of this study was to explore the methods and the clinical outcomes of palliative surgery for cervical spinal metastases. A systematic review of a 15-case series of upper cervical metastases treated with palliative surgery was performed. All cases underwent palliative surgery, including anterior tumor resection and internal fixation in 3 cases, posterior tumor resection and internal fixation in 10 cases, and combined anterior and posterior tumor resection and internal fixation in 2 cases. Patients were followed-up clinically and radiologically after the operation, and visual analog scale (VAS) and activities of daily living scores were calculated. In addition, a literature review was performed and patients with upper cervical spine metastases were analyzed. The mean follow-up period was 12.5 months (range, 3–26 months) in this consecutive case series. The pain was substantially relieved in 93.3% (14/15) of the patients after the operation. The VAS and Japanese Orthopedic Association scores showed improved clinical outcomes, from 7.86 ± 1.72 and 11.13 ± 2.19 preoperatively to 2.13 ± 1.40 and 14.26 ± 3.03 postoperatively, respectively. The mean survival time was 9.5 months (range, 5–26 months). Dural tear occurred in 1 patient. Wound infections, instrumentation failure, and postoperative death were not observed. Among our cases and other cases reported in the literature, 72% of the patients were treated with simple anterior or posterior operation, and only 12% of the patients (3/25) underwent complex combined anterior and posterior operation. Metastatic upper cervical spine disease is not a rare occurrence. Balancing the perspective of patients on palliative surgery concerning the clinical benefits of operation versus its operative risks can assist the decision for surgery. PMID:27149472

  2. Variability of Marker-Based Rectal Dose Evaluation in HDR Cervical Brachytherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Zhou; Jaggernauth, Wainwright; Malhotra, Harish K.; Podgorsak, Matthew B.

    2010-01-01

    In film-based intracavitary brachytherapy for cervical cancer, position of the rectal markers may not accurately represent the anterior rectal wall. This study was aimed at analyzing the variability of rectal dose estimation as a result of interfractional variation of marker placement. A cohort of five patients treated with multiple-fraction tandem and ovoid high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy was studied. The cervical os point and the orientation of the applicators were matched among all fractional plans for each patient. Rectal points obtained from all fractions were then input into each clinical treated plan. New fractional rectal doses were obtained and a new cumulative rectal dose for each patient was calculated. The maximum interfractional variation of distances between rectal dose points and the closest source positions was 1.1 cm. The corresponding maximum variability of fractional rectal dose was 65.5%. The percentage difference in cumulative rectal dose estimation for each patient was 5.4%, 19.6%, 34.6%, 23.4%, and 13.9%, respectively. In conclusion, care should be taken when using rectal markers as reference points for estimating rectal dose in HDR cervical brachytherapy. The best estimate of true rectal dose for each fraction should be determined by the most anterior point among all fractions.

  3. Cervical Cancer Risk Prediction Models

    Cancer.gov

    Developing statistical models that estimate the probability of developing cervical cancer over a defined period of time will help clinicians identify individuals at higher risk of specific cancers, allowing for earlier or more frequent screening and counseling of behavioral changes to decrease risk.

  4. Nonoperative Management of Cervical Radiculopathy.

    PubMed

    Childress, Marc A; Becker, Blair A

    2016-05-01

    Cervical radiculopathy describes pain in one or both of the upper extremities, often in the setting of neck pain, secondary to compression or irritation of nerve roots in the cervical spine. It can be accompanied by motor, sensory, or reflex deficits and is most prevalent in persons 50 to 54 years of age. Cervical radiculopathy most often stems from degenerative disease in the cervical spine. The most common examination findings are painful neck movements and muscle spasm. Diminished deep tendon reflexes, particularly of the triceps, are the most common neurologic finding. The Spurling test, shoulder abduction test, and upper limb tension test can be used to confirm the diagnosis. Imaging is not required unless there is a history of trauma, persistent symptoms, or red flags for malignancy, myelopathy, or abscess. Electrodiagnostic testing is not needed if the diagnosis is clear, but has clinical utility when peripheral neuropathy of the upper extremity is a likely alternate diagnosis. Patients should be reassured that most cases will resolve regardless of the type of treatment. Nonoperative treatment includes physical therapy involving strengthening, stretching, and potentially traction, as well as nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, muscle relaxants, and massage. Epidural steroid injections may be helpful but have higher risks of serious complications. In patients with red flag symptoms or persistent symptoms after four to six weeks of treatment, magnetic resonance imaging can identify pathology amenable to epidural steroid injections or surgery. PMID:27175952

  5. Drugs Approved for Cervical Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for cervical cancer. The list includes generic names, brand names, and common drug combinations, which are shown in capital letters. The drug names link to NCI's Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  6. Nanomechanical clues from morphologically normal cervical squamous cells could improve cervical cancer screening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, Li; Feng, Jiantao; Sun, Quanmei; Liu, Jing; Hua, Wenda; Li, Jing; Ao, Zhuo; You, Ke; Guo, Yanli; Liao, Fulong; Zhang, Youyi; Guo, Hongyan; Han, Jinsong; Xiong, Guangwu; Zhang, Lufang; Han, Dong

    2015-09-01

    Applying an atomic force microscope, we performed a nanomechanical analysis of morphologically normal cervical squamous cells (MNSCs) which are commonly used in cervical screening. Results showed that nanomechanical parameters of MNSCs correlate well with cervical malignancy, and may have potential in cancer screening to provide early diagnosis.Applying an atomic force microscope, we performed a nanomechanical analysis of morphologically normal cervical squamous cells (MNSCs) which are commonly used in cervical screening. Results showed that nanomechanical parameters of MNSCs correlate well with cervical malignancy, and may have potential in cancer screening to provide early diagnosis. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr03662c

  7. What you need to know about ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament to optimize cervical spine surgery: A review

    PubMed Central

    Epstein, Nancy E.

    2014-01-01

    What are the risks, benefits, alternatives, and pitfalls for operating on cervical ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament (OPLL)? To successfully diagnose OPLL, it is important to obtain Magnetic Resonance Images (MR). These studies, particularly the T2 weighted images, provide the best soft-tissue documentation of cord/root compression and intrinsic cord abnormalities (e.g. edema vs. myelomalacia) on sagittal, axial, and coronal views. Obtaining Computed Tomographic (CT) scans is also critical as they best demonstrate early OPLL, or hypertrophied posterior longitudinal ligament (HPLL: hypo-isodense with punctate ossification) or classic (frankly ossified) OPLL (hyperdense). Furthermore, CT scans reveal the “single layer” and “double layer” signs indicative of OPLL penetrating the dura. Documenting the full extent of OPLL with both MR and CT dictates whether anterior, posterior, or circumferential surgery is warranted. An adequate cervical lordosis allows for posterior cervical approaches (e.g. lamionplasty, laminectomy/fusion), which may facilitate addressing multiple levels while avoiding the risks of anterior procedures. However, without lordosis and with significant kyphosis, anterior surgery may be indicated. Rarely, this requires single/multilevel anterior cervical diskectomy/fusion (ACDF), as this approach typically fails to address retrovertebral OPLL; single or multilevel corpectomies are usually warranted. In short, successful OPLL surgery relies on careful patient selection (e.g. assess comorbidities), accurate MR/CT documentation of OPLL, and limiting the pros, cons, and complications of these complex procedures by choosing the optimal surgical approach. Performing OPLL surgery requires stringent anesthetic (awake intubation/positioning) and also the following intraoperative monitoring protocols: Somatosensory evoked potentials (SSEP), motor evoked potentials (MEP), and electromyography (EMG). PMID:24843819

  8. Anterior cruciate ligament tunnel placement.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Brian R; Ramme, Austin J; Britton, Carla L; Amendola, Annunziato

    2014-08-01

    The purpose of this cadaveric study was to analyze variation in anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tunnel placement between surgeons and the influence of preferred surgical technique and surgeon experience level using three-dimensional (3D) computed tomography (CT). In this study, 12 surgeons drilled ACL tunnels on six cadaveric knees each. Surgeons were divided by experience level and preferred surgical technique (two-incision [TI], medial portal [MP], and transtibial [TT]). ACL tunnel aperture locations were analyzed using 3D CT scans and compared with radiographic ACL footprint criteria. The femoral tunnel location from front to back within the notch demonstrated a range of means of 16% with the TI tunnels the furthest back. A range of means of only 5% was found for femoral tunnel low to high positions by technique. The anterior to posterior tibial tunnel measure demonstrated wider variation than the medial to lateral position. The mean tibial tunnel location drilled by TT surgeons was more posterior than surgeons using the other techniques. Overall, 82% of femoral tunnels and 78% of tibial tunnels met all radiographic measurement criteria. Slight (1-7%) differences in mean tunnel placement on the femur and tibia were found between experienced and new surgeons. The location of the femoral tunnel aperture in the front to back plane relative to the notch roof and the anterior to posterior position on the tibia were the most variable measures. Surgeon experience level did not appear to significantly affect tunnel location. This study provides background information that may be beneficial when evaluating multisurgeon and multicenter collaborative ACL studies.

  9. Anterior femoroacetabular impingement: an update.

    PubMed

    Lequesne, Michel; Bellaïche, Laurence

    2012-05-01

    Anterior femoroacetabular impingement can cause early hip osteoarthritis. The typical patient is an adult younger than 50 years of age, often with a history of sporting activities. The main symptom is intermittent pain triggered by static flexion (low seats) or dynamic flexion (during sporting or occupational activities that require repeated hip flexion). The characteristic physical finding is pain triggered by placing the hip in internal rotation and 70 to 110° of flexion. In additional to anteroposterior and false-profile radiographs, lateral Dunn or Ducroquet views should be obtained on both sides to visualize the anterior part of the head-neck junction. Instead of being concave, the head-neck junction is either flat or convex, causing a cam effect that damages the labrum and anterosuperior cartilage. Non-sphericity of the femoral head with an anterior ovoid bulge induces a similar cam effect. In pincer impingement, which is less common, over-coverage by the anterosuperior acetabular rim pinches the labrum between the rim and the femoral head-neck junction when the hip is flexed. Pincer impingement is related to acetabular retroversion or protrusion. Arthrography coupled with computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging visualizes the morphological abnormalities (e.g., ovoid shape of the femoral head or retroversion of the acetabulum) and detects secondary lesions such as labral tears or separation or damage to the anterosuperior cartilage. Arthroscopy allows removal of the damaged labrum and correction of the morphological abnormalities via femoroplasty to restore the normal concave shape of the neck and/or acetabuloplasty to eliminate over-coverage. Short- or mid-term results are satisfactory in 75 to 80% of patients. However, the presence of degenerative lesions in about two-thirds of patients at the time of arthroplastic surgery limits the probability of achieving good long-term results. PMID:22281229

  10. Cervical Footprint Anthropometry in Indian Population: Implications on Design of Artificial Disc Replacement Devices

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Vishwanath Mahabaleshwar; Bangalore, Shashidhar Kantharajanna; Saraf, Abhishek

    2016-01-01

    Study Design Cross-sectional study. Purpose To accurately measure the dimensions of cervical endplates based on computed tomography (CT) scans in Indian population and assess accuracy of match with currently available cervical disc prostheses. Overview of Literature The dimensions of currently available cervical disc replacement implants are based on early published geometrical measurements of vertebrae endplates for Caucasian population. To author's knowledge, similar study has not been published for patients from Indian subcontinent. Methods CT scans of cervical spine of patients from Indian subcontinent were collected and reviewed. Seventy patients (54 men and 16 women; aged 18–56 years with average of 37 years) who underwent CT scans of cervical spine were included in study. 3D CT scans of sub axial cervical spine (C3 to C7) were analyzed. The anterior-posterior (AP) and central mediolateral (CML) dimensions of superior and inferior endplates from C3 to C7 were measured using digital measuring system. Results A total of 560 endplates of 70 patients were included in the study. The AP diameter of cervical endplates ranged from 0.87 to 2.47 cm. The CML diameters ranged from 0.84 to 2.98 cm. For levels C3/C4 and C4/C5 for AP dimension Prestige-LP (90.5%) and Prodisc-C (89%) discs showed higher percentage of matching than Discover discs (58.5%). For CML diameter, Prestige-LP (69.5%), Prodisc-C (70%) and Discover (39.5%) discs showed almost similar matching with measured endplates. For levels C5/C6 and C6/C7 for AP dimension, Prestige-LP (67.25%), Prodisc-C (49.35%) and Discover (51.5%) discs showed similar matching. For CML diameter Prestige-LP (32%), Prodisc-C (27.5%) and Discover (42.2%) discs showed poor matching with measured endplates. Conclusions This study indicates need for redesign of cervical disc prostheses to match Indian patients. The collected anthropometric dimensions from this study may be used to design and develop indigenous artificial total disc

  11. Age-Related Incidence of Cervical Spondylosis in Residents of Jeju Island

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Min-Geun; Park, Bong-Keun; Park, Min-Suk

    2016-01-01

    Study Design Cervical spine radiograms of 460 Jeju islanders. Purpose To investigate the age-matched incidences and severity of the cervical disc degeneration and associated pathologic findings. Overview of Literature Several related studies on the incidences of disc and Luschka's and facet joint degeneration have provided some basic data for clinicians. Methods Cervical radiographs of 460 (220 males and 240 females) patients in their fourth to ninth decade were analyzed. Ninety patients in their third decade were excluded because of absence of spondylotic findings. Results Overall incidence of cervical spondylosis was 47.8% (220 of 460 patients). The percentile incidences of spondylosis in the fourth, fifth, sixth, seventh, eighth and ninth decade was 13.2% (10 of 76 patients), 34.6% (37 of 107 patients), 58.9% (66 of 112 patients), 58.8% (50 of 85 patients), 70.3% (45 of 64 patients) and 75.0% (12 of 16 patients), respectively. The percentile incidences of one, two, three, four and five level spondylosis among 220 spondylosis patients was 45.5% (n=100), 34.1% (n=75), 15.0% (n=33), 4.5% (n=10), and 0.9% (n=2). Severity of disc degeneration ranged from ± to ++++, and was ± in 6.0% (24 segments), + in 49.6% (198 segments), ++ in 35.3% (141 segments), +++ in 9.0% (36 segments) and ++++ in 0.25% (one segment). Spurs and anterior ligament ossicle formed at the spondylotic segments, mostly at C4~6. The rate of posterior corporal spurs formation was very low. Olisthesis and ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament were rarely combined with spondylosis. Cervical lordotic curve decreased gradually according to the progress of severity of spondylosis. Conclusions The incidence of cervical spondylosis and number of spondylotic segments increase, and degeneration gradually becomes more severe with age. PMID:27790313

  12. A systematic review of the use of expandable cages in the cervical spine.

    PubMed

    Elder, Benjamin D; Lo, Sheng-Fu; Kosztowski, Thomas A; Goodwin, C Rory; Lina, Ioan A; Locke, John E; Witham, Timothy F

    2016-01-01

    Expandable vertebral body replacement cages (VBRs) have been widely used for reconstruction of the thoracolumbar spine following corpectomy. However, their use in the cervical spine is less common, and currently, no expandable cages on the market are cleared or approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for use in the cervical spine. The objective of this study was to perform a systematic review on the use of expandable cages in the treatment of cervical spine pathology with a focus on fusion rates, deformity correction, complications, and indications. A comprehensive Medline search was performed, and 24 applicable articles were identified and included in this review. The advantages of expandable cages include greater ease of implantation with less risk of damage to the end plate, less intraoperative manipulation of the device, and potentially greater control over lordosis. They may be particularly advantageous in cases with poor bone quality, such as patients with osteoporosis or metastatic tumors that have been radiated. However, there is a potential risk of overdistraction, which is increased in the cervical spine, their minimum height limits their use in cases with collapsed vertebra, and the amount of hardware in the expansion mechanism may limit the surface area available for fusion. The use of expandable VBRs are a valuable tool in the armamentarium for reconstruction of the anterior column of the cervical spine with an acceptable safety profile. Although expandable cervical cages are clearly beneficial in certain clinical situations, widespread use following all corpectomies is not justified due to their significantly greater cost compared to structural bone grafts or non-expandable VBRs, which can be utilized to achieve similar clinical outcomes. PMID:26212700

  13. Anatomic Variations of Cervical and High Thoracic Ligamentum Flavum

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Sang Pil; Kim, Hyun Jung

    2014-01-01

    Background Epidural blocks are widely used for the management of acute and chronic pain. The technique of loss of resistance is frequently adopted to determine the epidural space. A discontinuity of the ligamentum flavum may increase the risk of failure to identify the epidural space. The purpose of this study was to investigate the anatomic variations of the cervical and high thoracic ligamentum flavum in embalmed cadavers. Methods Vertebral column specimens of 15 human cadavers were obtained. After vertebral arches were detached from pedicles, the dural sac and epidural connective tissue were removed. The ligamentum flavum from C3 to T6 was directly examined anteriorly. Results The incidence of midline gaps in the ligamentum flavum was 87%-100% between C3 and T2. The incidence decreased below this level and was the lowest at T4-T5 (8%). Among the levels with a gap, the location of a gap in the caudal third of the ligamentum flavum was more frequent than in the middle or cephalic portion of the ligamentum flavum. Conclusions The cervical and high thoracic ligamentum flavum frequently has midline intervals with various features, especially in the caudal portion of the intervertebral space. Therefore, the ligamentum flavum is not always reliable as a perceptible barrier to identify the epidural space at these vertebral levels. Additionally, it may be more useful to insert the needle into the cephalic portion of the intervertebral space than in the caudal portion. PMID:25317280

  14. Painless squeaking following cervical disc replacement: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Siddiqui, Athar; Hulme, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    Background We present a case of painless squeaking following cervical disc replacement which to our knowledge has not previously been reported in the literature. Methods A 45 year old gentleman presented with severe right sided C6 radiculopathy. He complained of more than 6 weeks of severe dysaesthesia in the right arm with pain radiating into the hand, thumb, index, middle and ring fingers. MRI confirmed severe impingement of C6 and C7 nerve roots. After trying a period of conservative treatment he underwent anterior cervical decompression with total cervical disc replacement of C5-6 and C6-7. Results Being a keen athlete he started running at 6 months post operatively. At his 12 month outpatient he presented us with an audio file containing squeaking from his neck. This was recorded immediately following a 9.5 mile hard surface run. The squeak got progressively less in intensity over 12 hours and disappeared after 24 hours. All instances of squeaking occurred after exercise where impact (running) or vibration (cycling) took place. This was first noticed 6 months post operatively when he restarted exercising. All episodes were completely painless. At his 18 month outpatient review the squeaking had reduced in frequency and intensity. At his 24 month review it had abated completely. Conclusion The aetiology of this painless squeaking has been elusive and is likely to be multifactorial. However we hypothesise that the audible squeak associated with the prestige LP disc maybe related to specific design characteristics and needs further evaluation. PMID:26484007

  15. Cervical spine abnormalities in institutionalized adults with Down's syndrome.

    PubMed

    MacLachlan, R A; Fidler, K E; Yeh, H; Hodgetts, P G; Pharand, G; Chau, M

    1993-06-01

    The prevalence of increased anterior atlanto-odontoid distance (AAOD), a risk factor for spinal cord compression, and degenerative disease of the cervical spine (DDCS) in a population of institutionalized adults with Down's syndrome (DS) was determined and compared with age- and sex-matched 'normals' presenting to a hospital emergency department. Radiographs of the cervical spines of 99 adults with DS and 198 'normals' were compared using a standardized rating scale. The prevalence of an AAOD of 3 mm or greater, the threshold of risk from the literature, was 8% for DS cases and 2% for controls (P < 0.01). The mean AAOD for DS cases was 2.0 +/- 1 mm and for controls 1.5 +/- 0.5 mm (P < 0.01). There was a negative correlation between AAOD and age of DS cases. The prevalence of any degree of DDCS among the DS cases was 64%, the controls 39% (P < 0.001); for moderate or severe DDCS the prevalence among DS cases was 45%, controls 12% (P < 0.001). The prevalence of DDCS increased with age in both groups, but the severity of DDCS was significantly increased with age in both groups, but the severity of DDCS was significantly greater for DS individuals in all age groups. The levels of the cervical spine affected ranged from C2 to C6; the most commonly affected level was C5-C6. While DS adults are at increased theoretical risk for spinal cord compression due to increased AAOD, its clinical significance would appear to be small and to decline with age.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  16. Preliminary Experiences of the Combined Midline-Splitting French Door Laminoplasty with Polyether Ether Ketone (PEEK) Plate for Cervical Spondylosis and OPLL

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Chang Hyun; Ji, Gyu Yeul; Hur, Junseok W.; Choi, Won-Seok; Shin, Dong Ah

    2015-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to evaluate the safety and efficacy of cervical midline-splitting French-door laminoplasty with a polyether ether ketone (PEEK) plate. The authors retrospectively analyzed the results of patients with cervical laminoplasty miniplate (MAXPACER®) without bone grafts in multilevel cervical stenosis. Methods Fifteen patients (13 males and 2 females, mean age 50.0 years (range 35-72)) with multilevel cervical stenosis (ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament and cervical spondylotic myelopathy) underwent a combined surgery of midline-splitting French-door laminoplasty with or without mini plate. All 15 patients were followed for at least 12 months (mean follow-up 13.3 months) after surgery, and a retrospective review of the clinical, radiological and surgical data was conducted. Results The radiographic results showed a significant increase over the postoperative period in anterior-posterior diameter (9.4±2.2 cm to 16.2±1.1 cm), open angles in cervical lamina (46.5±16.0° to 77.2±13.1°), and sectional volume of cervical central canal (100.5±0.7 cm2 to 146.5±4.9 cm2) (p<0.001). The sagittal alignment of the cervical spine was well preserved (31.7±10.0° to 31.2±7.6°, p=0.877) during the follow-up period. The clinical results were successful, and there were no significant intraoperative complications except for screw displacement in two cases. The mini plate constructs did not fail during the 12 month follow-up period, and the decompression was maintained. Conclusion Despite the small cohort and short follow-up duration, the present study demonstrated that combined cervical expansive laminoplasty using the mini plate is an effective treatment for multilevel cervical stenosis. PMID:26217382

  17. C1 anterior arch preservation in transnasal odontoidectomy using three-dimensional endoscope: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Zenga, Francesco; Marengo, Nicola; Pacca, Paolo; Pecorari, Giancarlo; Ducati, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    Background: The transoral ventral corridor is the most common approach used to reach the craniovertebral junction (CVJ). Over the last decade, many case reports have demonstrated the transnasal corridor to the odontoid peg represents a practicable route to remove the tip of the odontoid process. The biomechanical consequences of the traditional odontoidectomy led to the necessity of a cervical spine stabilization. Preserving the inferior portion of the C1 anterior arch should prevent instability. Case Description: This is the first report in which the technique to remove the tip of the odontoid while preserving the C1 anterior arch is described by means of a three-dimensional (3D) endoscope. A 53-year-old man underwent a transnasal 3D endoscopic approach because of a complex CVJ malformation. The upper-medial portion of the C1 anterior arch was removed preserving its continuity, and the odontoidectomy was performed. After surgery, a dynamic X-ray scan showed no difference in CVJ motility in comparison with the preoperative one. Conclusions: The stereoscopic perception augmented the precision of the surgical gesture in the deep field. The importance of a 3D view relates to the depth of field, which a two-dimensional endoscopy cannot provide. This affects the preservation of the C1 anterior arch because of the presence of critical structures that are exposed to potential damage if not displayed. PMID:26759737

  18. A Broken Drill-bit Fragment Causing Severe Radiating Pain after Cervical Total Disc Replacement: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chong-Suh; Chung, Sung-Soo; Park, Jae-Chul; Shin, Seong-Kee; Park, Yong-Serk

    2011-01-01

    This is a case report of a 38-year-old man with severe radiating pain on upper extremity after cervical total disc replacement (TDR). We faced an unusual complication that has not been reported yet. He underwent cervical TDR for left central disc protrusion on C5-6. After the surgery, preoperative symptom disappeared. However, at postoperative 1 year, he complained severe right-sided radiating pain that had a sudden onset. On postoperative X-ray, a metal fragment which seemed like a broken drill bit was shown within the spinal canal. To remove that, right-sided anterior microforaminotomy on C5-6 was performed and the metal fragment was removed successfully. After that, anterior fusion was done because the motion of the artificial disc was minimal and the removed structure seemed to attenuate stability during cervical motion. The operation resulted in prompt symptomatic relief. During cervical TDR, particular attention should be paid to the procedures that require using drill-bits. PMID:21629488

  19. A Broken Drill-bit Fragment Causing Severe Radiating Pain after Cervical Total Disc Replacement: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chong-Suh; Chung, Sung-Soo; Park, Jae-Chul; Shin, Seong-Kee; Park, Yong-Serk; Kang, Kyung-Chung

    2011-06-01

    This is a case report of a 38-year-old man with severe radiating pain on upper extremity after cervical total disc replacement (TDR). We faced an unusual complication that has not been reported yet. He underwent cervical TDR for left central disc protrusion on C5-6. After the surgery, preoperative symptom disappeared. However, at postoperative 1 year, he complained severe right-sided radiating pain that had a sudden onset. On postoperative X-ray, a metal fragment which seemed like a broken drill bit was shown within the spinal canal. To remove that, right-sided anterior microforaminotomy on C5-6 was performed and the metal fragment was removed successfully. After that, anterior fusion was done because the motion of the artificial disc was minimal and the removed structure seemed to attenuate stability during cervical motion. The operation resulted in prompt symptomatic relief. During cervical TDR, particular attention should be paid to the procedures that require using drill-bits. PMID:21629488

  20. Inadequate Surgical Decompression in Patients with Cervical Myelopathy: A Retrospective Review

    PubMed Central

    Bhalla, Amandeep; Rolfe, Kevin W.

    2015-01-01

    Study Design  Retrospective study. Objective  We reviewed cases of surgically treated cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM) or chronic, degenerative myelopathy of the subaxial cervical spine to study the incidence of inadequate surgical decompression. Methods  We included all persons treated at our institution after a first surgical decompression for CSM over a 3-year period. Inadequate original surgical decompression was defined as neurologic decline within 12 months postoperatively and ongoing impingement of the spinal cord with <1-mm change in anteroposterior canal dimension from pre- to postoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) leading to revision decompressive surgery. Revisions for other reasons were not counted as inadequate. Results  Of 50 patients, 5 (10%) required revision decompression for neurologic decline and inadequate change in space available for the cord on postoperative imaging; 4 patients declined within the first 6 months and 1 patient at 8 months postoperatively. None of the 5 declined further after posterior revision, but none recovered from the interval loss. All 5 had undergone anterior approaches, for an anterior inadequacy rate of 23% (5 of 22). None of the 28 patients having posterior or combined approach declined at 2 years or had <1-mm change on postoperative MRI. The difference between anterior and posterior approaches was statistically significant (p = 0.018). Conclusions  The rate of inadequate surgical decompression for CSM was greater than expected in this series and directly associated with an anterior approach. No cases of inadequacy occurred for posterior or combined approaches. Postoperative neuroradiographic imaging such as MRI should be entertained routinely for this entity or at least for anterior-only approaches. PMID:27555995

  1. Cervical cancer: screening, diagnosis and staging.

    PubMed

    Tsikouras, Panagiotis; Zervoudis, Stefanos; Manav, Bachar; Tomara, Eirini; Iatrakis, George; Romanidis, Constantinos; Bothou, Anastasia; Galazios, George

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Despite the widespread screening programs, cervical cancer remains the third most common cancer in developing countries. Based on the implementation of cervical screening programs with the referred adoption of improved screening methods in cervical cytology with the knowledge of the important role of the human papilloma virus (HPV) it's incidence is decreased in the developed world. Even if cervical HPV infection is incredibly common, cervical cancer is relatively rare. Depending on the rarity of invasive disease and the improvement of detection of pre-cancerous lesions due to the participation in screening programs, the goal of screening is to detect the cervical lesions early in order to be treated before cancer is developed. In populations with many preventive screening programs, a decrease in cervical cancer mortality of 50-75% is mentioned over the past 50 years. The preventive examination of vagina and cervix smear, Pap test, and the HPV DNA test are remarkable diagnostic tools according to the American Cancer Association guidelines, in the investigation of asymptomatic women and in the follow up of women after the treatment of pre-invasive cervical cancer. The treatment of cervical cancer is based on the FIGO 2009 cervical cancer staging.

  2. Cervical cancer: screening, diagnosis and staging.

    PubMed

    Tsikouras, Panagiotis; Zervoudis, Stefanos; Manav, Bachar; Tomara, Eirini; Iatrakis, George; Romanidis, Constantinos; Bothou, Anastasia; Galazios, George

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Despite the widespread screening programs, cervical cancer remains the third most common cancer in developing countries. Based on the implementation of cervical screening programs with the referred adoption of improved screening methods in cervical cytology with the knowledge of the important role of the human papilloma virus (HPV) it's incidence is decreased in the developed world. Even if cervical HPV infection is incredibly common, cervical cancer is relatively rare. Depending on the rarity of invasive disease and the improvement of detection of pre-cancerous lesions due to the participation in screening programs, the goal of screening is to detect the cervical lesions early in order to be treated before cancer is developed. In populations with many preventive screening programs, a decrease in cervical cancer mortality of 50-75% is mentioned over the past 50 years. The preventive examination of vagina and cervix smear, Pap test, and the HPV DNA test are remarkable diagnostic tools according to the American Cancer Association guidelines, in the investigation of asymptomatic women and in the follow up of women after the treatment of pre-invasive cervical cancer. The treatment of cervical cancer is based on the FIGO 2009 cervical cancer staging. PMID:27273940

  3. Stereopsis after anterior temporal lobectomy.

    PubMed

    Verhoef, Bram-Ernst; Decramer, Thomas; van Loon, Johannes; Goffin, Jan; Van Paesschen, Wim; Janssen, Peter; Theys, Tom

    2016-09-01

    Brain areas critical for stereopsis have been investigated in non-human primates but are largely unknown in the human brain. Microelectrode recordings and functional MRI (fMRI) studies in monkeys have shown that in monkeys the inferior temporal cortex is critically involved in 3D shape categorization. Furthermore, some human fMRI studies similarly suggest an involvement of visual areas in the temporal lobe in depth perception. We aimed to investigate the role of the human anterior temporal neocortex in stereopsis by assessing stereoscopic depth perception before and after anterior temporal lobectomy. Eighteen epilepsy surgery patients were tested, pre- and postoperatively, in 3 different depth discrimination tasks. Sensitivity for local and global disparity was tested in a near-far discrimination task and sensitivity for 3D curvature was assessed in a convex-concave discrimination task, where 3D shapes were presented at different positions in depth. We found no evidence that temporal lobe epilepsy surgery has a significant effect on stereopsis. In contrast with earlier findings, we conclude that local as well as global stereopsis is maintained after unilateral resection of the temporal pole in epilepsy surgery patients. Our findings, together with previous studies, suggest that in humans more posterior visual regions underlie depth perception. PMID:27344239

  4. A case of cervical esophageal duplication cyst in a newborn infant.

    PubMed

    Kawashima, Shoko; Segawa, Osamu; Kimura, Shuri; Tsuchiya, Masayoshi; Henmi, Nobuhide; Hasegawa, Hisaya; Fujibayashi, Mariko; Naritaka, Yoshihiko

    2016-12-01

    Esophageal duplication cyst is a rare congenital anomaly resulting from a foregut budding error during the fourth to sixth week of embryonic development. Cervical esophageal duplication cysts are very rare and may cause respiratory distress in infancy. A full-term newborn girl who was born by normal delivery was transferred to our hospital because of swelling of the right anterior neck since birth. Cervical ultrasonography showed a 40 × 24 × 33 mm simple cyst on the right neck. Tracheal intubation was required at 2 weeks of age because of worsening external compression of the trachea. Fine-needle aspiration cytology revealed the existence of ciliated epithelium. At 1 month of age, exploration was performed through a transverse neck incision. The cyst had a layer of muscle connected to the lateral wall of the esophagus. Histopathological diagnosis was a cervical esophageal duplication cyst. We describe the clinical features of infantile cervical esophageal duplication cysts based on our experience of this rare disease in a neonate, along with a review of 19 cases previously reported in literature.

  5. Degenerative pathological irritations to cervical PLL may play a role in presenting sympathetic symptoms.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhanchao; Wang, Xinwei; Yuan, Wen; Jiang, Dongjie

    2011-11-01

    The mechanism of cervical vertigo remains unknown. Stimulation of arterial vertebralis caused by osteophyte of the Luschka joint or segmental instability of the cervical spine was considered to be a potential factor contributing to it. Years of studies found that the ischemia of the vertebral artery is not directly correlated with the clinical symptoms of vertigo, and can not be used to explain cervical vertigo as a sole reason. As proven by clinical practical experience, the routine anterior cervical decompression and fusion (ACDF) procedure, in which the degenerative disc and posterior longitudinal ligament (PLL) were often removed, shows positive results for elimination of the sympathetic symptoms. In this article, we hypothesize that: (1) there are sympathetic nerve postganglionic fibers distributed in the PLL or discs; (2) pathological changes secondary to degeneration of the intervertebral disc may cause irritation of sympathetic nerve fibers in PLL or discs, leading to sympathetic symptoms via certain pathways; (3) removal of the PLL or stabilization of the segment which decreases the irritation to PLL will help to eliminate the sympathetic symptoms.

  6. A case of cervical esophageal duplication cyst in a newborn infant.

    PubMed

    Kawashima, Shoko; Segawa, Osamu; Kimura, Shuri; Tsuchiya, Masayoshi; Henmi, Nobuhide; Hasegawa, Hisaya; Fujibayashi, Mariko; Naritaka, Yoshihiko

    2016-12-01

    Esophageal duplication cyst is a rare congenital anomaly resulting from a foregut budding error during the fourth to sixth week of embryonic development. Cervical esophageal duplication cysts are very rare and may cause respiratory distress in infancy. A full-term newborn girl who was born by normal delivery was transferred to our hospital because of swelling of the right anterior neck since birth. Cervical ultrasonography showed a 40 × 24 × 33 mm simple cyst on the right neck. Tracheal intubation was required at 2 weeks of age because of worsening external compression of the trachea. Fine-needle aspiration cytology revealed the existence of ciliated epithelium. At 1 month of age, exploration was performed through a transverse neck incision. The cyst had a layer of muscle connected to the lateral wall of the esophagus. Histopathological diagnosis was a cervical esophageal duplication cyst. We describe the clinical features of infantile cervical esophageal duplication cysts based on our experience of this rare disease in a neonate, along with a review of 19 cases previously reported in literature. PMID:27037803

  7. Incidental Anterior Cruciate Ligament Calcification: Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, Hisami; Fischer, Hans

    2016-01-01

    The calcification of knee ligaments is a finding noted only in a handful of case reports. The finding of an anterior cruciate ligament calcification has been reported once in the literature. Comparable studies involving the posterior cruciate ligament, medial collateral ligament and an ossicle within the anterior cruciate ligament are likewise discussed in reports of symptomatic patients. We report a case of incidentally discovered anterior cruciate ligament calcification. We discuss the likely etiology and clinical implications of this finding. PMID:27200163

  8. [FUNCTIONAL PLASTIC OF ANTERIOR ABDOMINAL WALL HERNIAS].

    PubMed

    Grubnik, V V; Parfentyeva, N D; Parfentyev, R S

    2015-07-01

    In order to improve the treatment efficacy of postoperative anterior abdominal wall hernias the method of plastic with restoration of anatomical and physiological properties of the muscles of the anterior abdominal wall was used. After the intervention by the improved method, regardless of the location of the hernia defect yielded promising results for the conservation of anterior abdominal wall muscle function in 75% of cases completely restored functional ability of muscles recti abdomini. PMID:26591212

  9. Incidental Anterior Cruciate Ligament Calcification: Case Report.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Hisami; Fischer, Hans

    2016-03-01

    The calcification of knee ligaments is a finding noted only in a handful of case reports. The finding of an anterior cruciate ligament calcification has been reported once in the literature. Comparable studies involving the posterior cruciate ligament, medial collateral ligament and an ossicle within the anterior cruciate ligament are likewise discussed in reports of symptomatic patients. We report a case of incidentally discovered anterior cruciate ligament calcification. We discuss the likely etiology and clinical implications of this finding.

  10. Epidemiology of uterine cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Brinton, L A; Fraumeni, J F

    1986-01-01

    The epidemiology of cervical cancer presents a number of unique challenges, mainly with respect to disentangling correlated factors and to elucidating biological mechanisms. The available evidence suggests a complex multifactorial etiology, although the relative contributions of risk factors and their interactions remain obscure. Infectious agents are strongly suspected, but as yet not conclusively identified. It is also unclear whether there are subgroups of women or periods of life that are most susceptible to the action of infectious agents, and the contribution of the "male factor" needs to be defined. Several epidemiologic leads can be pursued through biochemical and molecular techniques. Most promising is the recent evidence linking certain HPV types to cervical abnormalities, including cancer, and newly developed probes can be incorporated into epidemiologic studies to evaluate an array of risk factors. Endocrine and metabolic assays may be helpful in clarifying the role of exogenous and possibly endogenous hormones. The effects of cigarette smoking may be further evaluated by studying constituents of tobacco smoke and their metabolites in cervical mucus. Finally, the relationship of diet to cervical cancer should be assessed by examining the levels of micronutrients, trace minerals, and other nutritional indices in body tissues and fluids, as well as through interview data. An understanding of cervical cancer etiology will require a better identification of risk factors for precursor lesions as well as factors that enhance their progression to invasive cancer. Through studies that focus on disease stage and time-related events, it should be possible to clarify the multi-stage processes involved in cervical carcinogenesis, and those factors that may inhibit as well as promote transition rates. The protective effects of screening programs deserve further attention, and research into dietary factors may lead in time to nutritional intervention. Investigation

  11. What's New in Cervical Cancer Research and Treatment?

    MedlinePlus

    ... resources for cervical cancer What`s new in cervical cancer research and treatment? New ways to prevent and treat ... Your Doctor After Treatment What`s New in Cervical Cancer Research? Other Resources and References Cancer Information Cancer Basics ...

  12. Intrathoracic toxic thyroid nodule causing hyperthyroidism with a multinodular normal functional cervical thyroid gland.

    PubMed

    Serim, Burcu Dirlik; Korkmaz, Ulku; Can, Unal; Altun, Gulay Durmus

    2016-01-01

    Radionuclide scintigraphy with I-131 and Tc-99m pertechnetate ((99)mTc04) has been widely used in detecting toxic nodules. Intrathoracic goiter usually presents as an anterior mediastinal mass. Mostly the connection between intrathoracic mass and the cervical thyroid gland is clearly and easily identified occurring as a result of inferior extension of thyroid tissue in the neck, which is called as secondary intrathoracic goiter. Completely separated, aberrant or in other words primary intrathoracic goiters arise as a result of abnormal embryologic migration of ectopic thyroid closely associated with aortic sac and descend into the mediastinum. Intrathoracic goiters are generally nontoxic nodules existing with mass effect without causing hyperthyroidism. However, mostly reported cases had enlarged thyroid glands in the neck. This report demonstrates the usefulness of I-131 and (99)mTc04 scintigraphy for detecting intrathoracic goiter causing hyperthyroidism with a normal functioned cervical thyroid gland.

  13. Denosumab for Treatment of a Recurrent Cervical Giant-Cell Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Kajiwara, Daisuke; Yonemoto, Tsukasa; Iwata, Shintaro; Ishii, Takeshi; Tsukanishi, Toshinori; Ohtori, Seiji; Yamazaki, Masashi; Okawa, Akihiko

    2016-01-01

    A 43-year-old male patient with C5 giant cell tumor (GCT) underwent tumor resection and anterior bone fusion of C4–C6. The tumor recurred locally 9 months after surgery with the patient complaining of neck and shoulder pain similar to his preoperative symptoms. Denosumab was administered and his pain disappeared after a two-month administration, with a sclerotic rim formation seen at the tumor site on computed tomography. He has been followed for 18 months with no evidence of tumor recurrence. Complete resection is generally recommended, but is not easy for many patients with cervical GCT because of the existence of neurovascular structures. Some patients suffer from recurrence and treatment becomes more difficult. As such, denosumab may be an efficacious option for treatment of recurrent GCT of the cervical spine, although long-term follow-up is required to monitor for presence or absence of recurrence. PMID:27340537

  14. Cortex-sparing infarction in triple cervical artery dissection following chiropractic neck manipulation

    PubMed Central

    Melikyan, Gayane; Kamran, Saadat; Akhtar, Naveed; Deleu, Dirk; Miyares, Francisco Ruiz

    2015-01-01

    Background: Multivessel cervical dissection with cortical sparing is exceptional in clinical practice. Case presentation: A 55-year-old man presented with acute-onset neck pain with associated sudden onset right-sided hemiparesis and dysphasia after chiropractic manipulation for chronic neck pain. Results and Discussion: Magnetic resonance imaging revealed bilateral internal carotid artery dissection and left extracranial vertebral artery dissection with bilateral anterior cerebral artery territory infarctions and large cortical-sparing left middle cerebral artery infarction. This suggests the presence of functionally patent and interconnecting leptomeningeal anastomoses between cerebral arteries, which may provide sufficient blood flow to salvage penumbral regions when a supplying artery is occluded. Conclusion: Chiropractic cervical manipulation can result in catastrophic vascular lesions preventable if these practices are limited to highly specialized personnel under very specific situations. PMID:26835412

  15. Intrathoracic toxic thyroid nodule causing hyperthyroidism with a multinodular normal functional cervical thyroid gland

    PubMed Central

    Serim, Burcu Dirlik; Korkmaz, Ulku; Can, Unal; Altun, Gulay Durmus

    2016-01-01

    Radionuclide scintigraphy with I-131 and Tc-99m pertechnetate (99mTc04) has been widely used in detecting toxic nodules. Intrathoracic goiter usually presents as an anterior mediastinal mass. Mostly the connection between intrathoracic mass and the cervical thyroid gland is clearly and easily identified occurring as a result of inferior extension of thyroid tissue in the neck, which is called as secondary intrathoracic goiter. Completely separated, aberrant or in other words primary intrathoracic goiters arise as a result of abnormal embryologic migration of ectopic thyroid closely associated with aortic sac and descend into the mediastinum. Intrathoracic goiters are generally nontoxic nodules existing with mass effect without causing hyperthyroidism. However, mostly reported cases had enlarged thyroid glands in the neck. This report demonstrates the usefulness of I-131 and 99mTc04 scintigraphy for detecting intrathoracic goiter causing hyperthyroidism with a normal functioned cervical thyroid gland. PMID:27385899

  16. Denosumab for Treatment of a Recurrent Cervical Giant-Cell Tumor.

    PubMed

    Kajiwara, Daisuke; Kamoda, Hiroto; Yonemoto, Tsukasa; Iwata, Shintaro; Ishii, Takeshi; Tsukanishi, Toshinori; Ohtori, Seiji; Yamazaki, Masashi; Okawa, Akihiko

    2016-06-01

    A 43-year-old male patient with C5 giant cell tumor (GCT) underwent tumor resection and anterior bone fusion of C4-C6. The tumor recurred locally 9 months after surgery with the patient complaining of neck and shoulder pain similar to his preoperative symptoms. Denosumab was administered and his pain disappeared after a two-month administration, with a sclerotic rim formation seen at the tumor site on computed tomography. He has been followed for 18 months with no evidence of tumor recurrence. Complete resection is generally recommended, but is not easy for many patients with cervical GCT because of the existence of neurovascular structures. Some patients suffer from recurrence and treatment becomes more difficult. As such, denosumab may be an efficacious option for treatment of recurrent GCT of the cervical spine, although long-term follow-up is required to monitor for presence or absence of recurrence. PMID:27340537

  17. Intrathoracic toxic thyroid nodule causing hyperthyroidism with a multinodular normal functional cervical thyroid gland.

    PubMed

    Serim, Burcu Dirlik; Korkmaz, Ulku; Can, Unal; Altun, Gulay Durmus

    2016-01-01

    Radionuclide scintigraphy with I-131 and Tc-99m pertechnetate ((99)mTc04) has been widely used in detecting toxic nodules. Intrathoracic goiter usually presents as an anterior mediastinal mass. Mostly the connection between intrathoracic mass and the cervical thyroid gland is clearly and easily identified occurring as a result of inferior extension of thyroid tissue in the neck, which is called as secondary intrathoracic goiter. Completely separated, aberrant or in other words primary intrathoracic goiters arise as a result of abnormal embryologic migration of ectopic thyroid closely associated with aortic sac and descend into the mediastinum. Intrathoracic goiters are generally nontoxic nodules existing with mass effect without causing hyperthyroidism. However, mostly reported cases had enlarged thyroid glands in the neck. This report demonstrates the usefulness of I-131 and (99)mTc04 scintigraphy for detecting intrathoracic goiter causing hyperthyroidism with a normal functioned cervical thyroid gland. PMID:27385899

  18. Cervical ligamentous instability in a canine in vivo model.

    PubMed

    Whitehill, R; Moran, D J; Fechner, R E; Ruch, W W; Drucker, S; Hooper, W E; McCoig, J A

    1987-12-01

    A canine in vivo model of midcervical ligamentous instability was developed by dividing the anterior longitudinal ligament, anulus fibrosus, and all posterior ligamentous structures including the ligamentum flavum. The natural history of healing in the model, the effect on its healing by an adjacent one-level arthrodesis, and the effect of a one-level arthrodesis on normal adjacent ligamentous structures were studied radiographically, mechanically, and histologically. The authors determined that healing takes place primarily by anterior scar formation in their instability model but not to a degree sufficient to recreate normal mechanical stability. After three months, healing in the model was not affected by an adjacent arthrodesis; however, acutely, instability apparently was increased as three animals became quadriplegic between the second and fourth postoperative days. Arthrodesis did not affect adjacent normal ligamentous structures, during this period. Incomplete healing in the authors' model supports those who advocate arthrodesis as the treatment of choice for destabilizing cervical ligamentous injury. The authors previously reported the case of a patient who sustained bilateral facet dislocations adjacent to an arthrodesed segment and questioned whether this resulted from a stress-concentrating effect. This study indicates that this could well have been the case acutely. Thus, inadvertent exclusion of an unstable segment from an arthrodesis has potentially catastrophic results. Finally, the authors also have previously questioned whether arthrodesis of a midcervical segment could lead to instability of adjacent normal segments. This project does not support such a concern, at least for the three postoperative months of study. PMID:3441821

  19. Anterior knee pain associated with an anterior superior patellar bony spur: a case report.

    PubMed

    Adekoya-Cole, T O; Enweluzo, G O; Akinmokun, O I; Olugbemi, O O

    2013-01-01

    Anterior knee pain is a common presentation in Orthopaedic out patient practice. However anterior superior patellar spur is an uncommon cause.This case presentation is to highlight an anterior superior patellar spur with quadriceps tendonitis. The patient is a 52 year old man who presented with a recurrent anterior knee pain. The radiographic study revealed an anterio-superior patellar spur. The patient had a depo steroid injection as an adjunct therapy to physiotherapy and has been pain free.

  20. Molecular imaging in cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Khan, Sairah R; Rockall, Andrea G; Barwick, Tara D

    2016-06-01

    Despite the development of screening and of a vaccine, cervix cancer is a major cause of cancer death in young women worldwide. A third of women treated for the disease will recur, almost inevitably leading to death. Functional imaging has the potential to stratify patients at higher risk of poor response or relapse by improved delineation of disease extent and tumor characteristics. A number of molecular imaging biomarkers have been shown to predict outcome at baseline and/or early during therapy in cervical cancer. In future this could help tailor the treatment plan which could include selection of patients for close follow up, adjuvant therapy or trial entry for novel agents or adaptive clinical trials. The use of molecular imaging techniques, FDG PET/CT and functional MRI, in staging and response assessment of cervical cancer is reviewed. PMID:26859085

  1. [Hpv cofactors in cervical carcinogenesis].

    PubMed

    Pinto, Alvaro P; Tulio, Siumara; Cruz, Olívia Russo

    2002-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) plays a central rule in uterine cervix carcinogenesis. Other factors direct or indirectly influence the installation of this mechanism in cervical squamous epithelium. Investigations regarding mechanisms of interaction of these factors with viral elements are found in the literature of the last 20 years. The present review article discusses possible co-factors of HPV in the genesis of the squamous carcinoma of uterine cervix, taking into account only the factors whose association with the virus or cervical cancer has been documented by experimental studies, and not based just on clinical or epidemiological data. Among the approached parameters are immunological factors (local and humoral immune response), the association with Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome, genetic factors as protein p53 polymorphism, tabagism and the use of oral contraceptives. All these factors interact in variable intensity with oncoproteins and other HPV elements, increasing and facilitating the virus action in host cells, leading to the development of immortalization and carcinogenesis. PMID:12185639

  2. Schwannomatosis of Cervical Vagus Nerve

    PubMed Central

    Sasi, M. P.

    2016-01-01

    Cervical vagal schwannoma is a rare entity among lesions presenting as a neck mass. They are usually slow-growing benign lesions closely associated with the vagus nerve. They are usually solitary and asymptomatic. Multiple schwannomas occurring in patients without neurofibromatosis (NF) are rare and have recently been referred to as schwannomatosis. Here, we present a case of a neck mass that had imaging features suggestive of vagal schwannoma and was operated upon. Intraoperatively, it was discovered to be a case of multiple vagal cervical schwannoma, all directly related to the right vagus nerve, and could be resected from the nerve in toto preserving the function of the vagus nerve. Final HPR confirmed our pre-op suspicion of vagal schwannomatosis.

  3. [Inequalities in cervical screening practices].

    PubMed

    Döbrőssy, Lajos; Kovács, Attila; Budai, András

    2015-06-14

    Theoretically, the cytology-based cervical screening is capable of early detection of precancerous epithelial lesions of cervix uteri and its cancer, and of early referral to treatment. In this way, screening can inmprove the quality of life of the patients and reduce mortality from the target disease. Unfortunately, this often remains unexploited, because there might be inequalities on both "supply" and "demand" side of screening. In addition to the geopolitical situation of a country, inequalities might result from differences in the health care systems, and heavy access to the screening services. On the other hand, the socioeconomic status, the health-conciousness of the target population, and their knowledge and information of the benefits and potential harms of screening examination might have a bearing on the acceptance or refusal of the offered screening. Efforts need to be made to increase the uptake of cervical screening programmes.

  4. Cervical teratoma in a dog.

    PubMed

    Lambrechts, N E; Pearson, J

    2001-03-01

    A young adult boxer dog was examined for a painless swelling in the left cranial cervical area that was refractory to antibiotic therapy. Ultrasound examination revealed a hypoechoic mass abutting the rostrolateral aspect of the left mandibular salivary gland. The cystic mass was excised and was found to extend through the capsule of the salivary gland and appeared to be confluent with the glandular tissue at this point. Histopathological examination of the excised tissue demonstrated tissue from all 3 germinal layers. There was no indication of malignancy and the mass was diagnosed as a benign cervical teratoma. Hypotheses regarding the origin of teratomas in general are discussed and the origin of the teratoma in this case is suggested.

  5. Cyclic AMP in cervical mucus.

    PubMed

    Póvoa, H; Figueira, D R; Campos da Paz, A; Spichler, E R; Lopes, E R

    1981-01-01

    Cyclic adenosine monophosphate normally stimulates motility of spermatozoa. Its concentration in cervical mucus was studied by an isotopic competitive method in 15 normal women aged between 20 and 50 years. Values were very high, particularly in the periovulatory period, with a mean (+/-SD) value of 167.90 +/- 154.96 nmol/l. These are very high when compared with values in other biological fluids (blood serum and urine).

  6. Human papilloma virus and cervical preinvasive disease

    PubMed Central

    Bari, M; Iancu, G; Popa, F

    2009-01-01

    Cervical cancer lesions represent a major threat to the health of the women worldwide. Human Papillomavirus (HPV) is responsible for 99.7% of cervical cancer cases, the infectious etiology giving the possibility of preventing cervical cancer by vaccination. The most aggressive HPV types are 16 and 18, which cause about 70% of cases of invasive cancer. The vaccination is recommended to the girls aged 11–12. The diagnosis and the treatment of cervical preinvasive disease allow the doctor to prevent the development of the invasive disease. PMID:20108750

  7. Laparoscopic Fertility Sparing Management of Cervical Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Facchini, Chiara; Rapacchia, Giuseppina; Montanari, Giulia; Casadio, Paolo; Pilu, Gianluigi; Seracchioli, Renato

    2014-01-01

    Fertility can be preserved after conservative cervical surgery. We report on a 29-year-old woman who was obese, para 0, and diagnosed with cervical insufficiency at the first trimester of current pregnancy due to a previous trachelectomy. She underwent laparoscopic transabdominal cervical cerclage (LTCC) for cervical cancer. The surgery was successful and she was discharged two days later. The patient underwent a caesarean section at 38 weeks of gestation. Laparoscopic surgery is a minimally invasive approach associated with less pain and faster recovery, feasible even in obese women. PMID:24696772

  8. Nanotechnology in the management of cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jiezhong; Gu, Wenyi; Yang, Lei; Chen, Chen; Shao, Renfu; Xu, Kewei; Xu, Zhi Ping

    2015-03-01

    Cervical cancer is a major disease with high mortality. All cervical cancers are caused by infection with human papillomaviruses (HPV). Although preventive vaccines for cervical cancer are successful, treatment of cervical cancer is far less satisfactory because of multidrug resistance and side effects. In this review, we summarize the recent application of nanotechnology to the diagnosis and treatment of cervical cancer as well as the development of HPV vaccines. Early detection of cervical cancer enables tumours to be efficiently removed by surgical procedures, leading to increased survival rate. The current method of detecting cervical cancer by Pap smear can only achieve 50% sensitivity, whereas nanotechnology has been used to detect HPVs with greatly improved sensitivity. In cervical cancer treatment, nanotechnology has been used for the delivery of anticancer drugs to increase treatment efficacy and decrease side effects. Nanodelivery of HPV preventive and therapeutic vaccines has also been investigated to increase vaccine efficacy. Overall, these developments suggest that nanoparticle-based vaccine may become the most effective way to prevent and treat cervical cancer, assisted or combined with some other nanotechnology-based therapy.

  9. Nanotechnology in the management of cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jiezhong; Gu, Wenyi; Yang, Lei; Chen, Chen; Shao, Renfu; Xu, Kewei; Xu, Zhi Ping

    2015-03-01

    Cervical cancer is a major disease with high mortality. All cervical cancers are caused by infection with human papillomaviruses (HPV). Although preventive vaccines for cervical cancer are successful, treatment of cervical cancer is far less satisfactory because of multidrug resistance and side effects. In this review, we summarize the recent application of nanotechnology to the diagnosis and treatment of cervical cancer as well as the development of HPV vaccines. Early detection of cervical cancer enables tumours to be efficiently removed by surgical procedures, leading to increased survival rate. The current method of detecting cervical cancer by Pap smear can only achieve 50% sensitivity, whereas nanotechnology has been used to detect HPVs with greatly improved sensitivity. In cervical cancer treatment, nanotechnology has been used for the delivery of anticancer drugs to increase treatment efficacy and decrease side effects. Nanodelivery of HPV preventive and therapeutic vaccines has also been investigated to increase vaccine efficacy. Overall, these developments suggest that nanoparticle-based vaccine may become the most effective way to prevent and treat cervical cancer, assisted or combined with some other nanotechnology-based therapy. PMID:25752817

  10. Clinical technique for invasive cervical root resorption

    PubMed Central

    Silveira, Luiz Fernando Machado; Silveira, Carina Folgearini; Martos, Josué; Piovesan, Edno Moacir; César Neto, João Batista

    2011-01-01

    This clinical case report describes the diagnosis and treatment of an external invasive cervical resorption. A 17-year-old female patient had a confirmed diagnosis of invasive cervical resorption class 4 by cone beam computerized tomography. Although, there was no communication with the root canal, the invasive resorption process was extending into the cervical and middle third of the root. The treatment of the cervical resorption of the lateral incisor interrupted the resorptive process and restored the damaged root surface and the dental functions without any esthetic sequelae. Both the radiographic examination and computed tomography are imperative to reveal the extent of the defect in the differential diagnosis. PMID:22144822

  11. Studying the Physical Function and Quality of Life Before and After Surgery in Patients With Stage I Cervical Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-26

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma, Not Otherwise Specified; Lymphedema; Sexual Dysfunction and Infertility; Stage IA1 Cervical Cancer; Stage IA2 Cervical Cancer; Stage IB1 Cervical Cancer

  12. Cervical Intradural Disc Herniation Causing Progressive Quadriparesis After Spinal Manipulation Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Hwan-Seo; Oh, Young-Min; Eun, Jong-Pil

    2016-01-01

    anterior cervical discectomy and fusion. The patient's limb weakness improved rapidly within 1 day postoperatively, and he was discharged 4 weeks later. At his 12-month follow-up, the patient had recovered nearly full muscle power. We presented an extremely rare case of cervical IDH causing progressive quadriparesis after excessive spinal manipulation therapy. The presence of a “halo” and “Y-sign” were useful MRI markers for cervical IDH in this case. PMID:26871842

  13. Dentulous appliance for upper anterior edentulous span.

    PubMed

    Chalakkal, Paul; Devi, Ramisetty Sabitha; Srinivas, G Vijay; Venkataramana, Pammi

    2013-12-01

    This article discusses about a fixed dentulous appliance that was constructed to replace the primary upper anterior edentulous span in a four year old girl. It constituted a design, whereby the maxillary primary second molars were used to support the appliance through bands and a wire that contained an acrylic flange bearing trimmed acrylic teeth, anteriorly. The appliance was functionally and aesthetically compliant.

  14. Relationship of Specific Bacteria in the Cervical and Vaginal Microbiotas with Cervicitis

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, Sujatha; Fiedler, Tina L.; Morgan, Martin T.; Balkus, Jennifer E.; McClelland, R. Scott; Fredricks, David N.; Marrazzo, Jeanne M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Cervicitis is an inflammatory condition of the cervix associated with upper genital tract infection and reproductive complications. Although cervicitis can be caused by several known pathogens, the etiology frequently remains obscure. Here we investigate vaginal bacteria associated with bacterial vaginosis as potential causes of cervicitis. Methods Associations between vaginal bacteria and cervicitis were assessed in a retrospective case control study of women attending a Seattle STD clinic. Individual bacterial species were detected using two molecular methods: quantitative PCR (qPCR) and broad range 16S rRNA gene PCR with pyrosequencing. The primary finding from this initial study was evaluated using qPCR in a second cohort of Kenyan women. Results The presence of Mageeibacillus indolicus, formerly BVAB3, in the cervix was associated with cervicitis, while the presence of Lactobacillus jensenii was inversely associated. Quantities of these bacteria did not differ between cervicitis cases and controls, though in a model inclusive of presence and abundance, M. indolicus remained significantly associated with cervicitis after adjustment for other cervicitis-causing pathogens. M. indolicus was not associated with cervicitis in our study of Kenyan women, possibly due to differences in the clinical definition of cervicitis. Conclusions Colonization of the endocervix with M. indolicus may contribute to the clinical manifestations of cervicitis, but further study is needed to determine whether this finding is repeatable and applicable to diverse groups of women. Colonization of the cervix with L. jensenii could be a marker of health, perhaps reducing inflammation or inhibiting pathogenic infection. PMID:26267872

  15. Anterior Shoulder Instability with Concomitant Superior Labrum from Anterior to Posterior (SLAP) Lesion Compared to Anterior Instability without SLAP Lesion

    PubMed Central

    Durban, Claire Marie C.; Kim, Je Kyun; Kim, Sae Hoon

    2016-01-01

    Background The aims of this study were to investigate the clinical characteristics of patients with combined anterior instability and superior labrum from anterior to posterior (SLAP) lesions, and to analyze the effect of concomitant SLAP repair on surgical outcomes. Methods We retrospectively reviewed patients who underwent arthroscopic stabilization for anterior shoulder instability between January 2004 and March 2013. A total of 120 patients were available for at least 1-year follow-up. Forty-four patients with reparable concomitant detached SLAP lesions (group I) underwent combined SLAP and anterior stabilization, and 76 patients without SLAP lesions (group II) underwent anterior stabilization alone. Patient characteristics, preoperative and postoperative pain scores, Rowe scores, and shoulder ranges of motion were compared between the 2 groups. Results Patients in group I had higher incidences of high-energy trauma (p = 0.03), worse preoperative pain visual analogue scale (VAS) (p = 0.02), and Rowe scores (p = 0.04). The postoperative pain VAS and Rowe scores improved equally in both groups without significant differences. Limitation in postoperative range of motion was similar between the groups (all p-value > 0.05). Conclusions Anterior instability with SLAP lesion may not be related to frequent episodes of dislocation but rather to a high-energy trauma. SLAP fixation with anterior stabilization procedures did not lead to poor functional outcomes if appropriate surgical techniques were followed. PMID:27247742

  16. SU-E-J-88: The Study of Setup Error Measured by CBCT in Postoperative Radiotherapy for Cervical Carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Runxiao, L; Aikun, W; Xiaomei, F; Jing, W

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To compare two registration methods in the CBCT guided radiotherapy for cervical carcinoma, analyze the setup errors and registration methods, determine the margin required for clinical target volume(CTV) extending to planning target volume(PTV). Methods: Twenty patients with cervical carcinoma were enrolled. All patients were underwent CT simulation in the supine position. Transfering the CT images to the treatment planning system and defining the CTV, PTV and the organs at risk (OAR), then transmit them to the XVI workshop. CBCT scans were performed before radiotherapy and registered to planning CT images according to bone and gray value registration methods. Compared two methods and obtain left-right(X), superior-inferior(Y), anterior-posterior (Z) setup errors, the margin required for CTV to PTV were calculated. Results: Setup errors were unavoidable in postoperative cervical carcinoma irradiation. The setup errors measured by method of bone (systemic ± random) on X(1eft.right),Y(superior.inferior),Z(anterior.posterior) directions were(0.24±3.62),(0.77±5.05) and (0.13±3.89)mm, respectively, the setup errors measured by method of grey (systemic ± random) on X(1eft-right), Y(superior-inferior), Z(anterior-posterior) directions were(0.31±3.93), (0.85±5.16) and (0.21±4.12)mm, respectively.The spatial distributions of setup error was maximum in Y direction. The margins were 4 mm in X axis, 6 mm in Y axis, 4 mm in Z axis respectively.These two registration methods were similar and highly recommended. Conclusion: Both bone and grey registration methods could offer an accurate setup error. The influence of setup errors of a PTV margin would be suggested by 4mm, 4mm and 6mm on X, Y and Z directions for postoperative radiotherapy for cervical carcinoma.

  17. Bilateral cervical ribs in a Dobermann Pinscher.

    PubMed

    Ricciardi, M; De Simone, A; Gernone, F; Giannuzzi, P

    2015-01-01

    An 11-year-old intact female Doberman Pinscher was presented with the complaint of non-ambulatory tetraparesis. Clinical and neurological examination revealed a caudal cervical spinal cord disfunction (C6-T2 spinal cord segments). Magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomographic (CT) findings of the cervical spine were consistent with caudal cervical spondylomyelopathy (CSM). During the diagnostic work-up for the cervical spine, bilateral bone anomalies involving the seventh cervical vertebra and the first ribs were found on radiographs and CT examination. The rib anomalies found in this dog appear similar to cervical ribs widely described in human medicine. In people, cervical ribs are associated with a high rate of stillbirth, early childhood cancer, and can cause the thoracic outlet syndrome, characterized by neurovascular compression at level of superior aperture of the chest. In dogs, only some sporadic anatomopathological descriptions of cervical ribs exist. In this report the radiographic and CT findings of these particular vertebral and rib anomalies along with their relationships with adjacent vasculature and musculature are shown intravitam in a dog. Specific radiographic and CT findings described in this report may help in reaching a presumptive diagnosis of this anomaly. Finally, their clinical and evolutionary significance are discussed.

  18. Surgical Management of Cervical Spondylotic Myelopathy

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Wesley; Dorsi, Michael J.; Witham, Timothy F.

    2010-01-01

    Cervical spondylosis is a common degenerative condition that is a significant cause of morbidity. This review discusses the pathophysiology and natural history of cervical spondylotic myelopathy and focuses on the current literature evaluating the clinical management of these patients. PMID:20191085

  19. 21 CFR 884.3200 - Cervical drain.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Cervical drain. 884.3200 Section 884.3200 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES... drain. (a) Identification. A cervical drain is a device designed to provide an exit channel for...

  20. Cervical Spine MRI in Abused Infants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feldman, Kenneth W.; And Others

    1997-01-01

    This study attempted to use cervical spine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to detect cord injury in 12 dead children with head injury from child abuse. Eighty percent of children autopsied had small cervical spine hemorrhages; MRI did not identify them and did not identify cord injury in any child studied, indicating that MRI scans are probably…

  1. Cervical Spine Injuries in the Athlete.

    PubMed

    Schroeder, Gregory D; Vaccaro, Alexander R

    2016-09-01

    Cervical spine injuries are extremely common and range from relatively minor injuries, such as cervical muscle strains, to severe, life-threatening cervical fractures with spinal cord injuries. Although cervical spine injuries are most common in athletes who participate in contact and collision sports, such as American football and rugby, they also have been reported in athletes who participate in noncontact sports, such as baseball, gymnastics, and diving. Cervical spine injuries in athletes are not necessarily the result of substantial spine trauma; some athletes have chronic conditions, such as congenital stenosis, that increase their risk for a serious cervical spine injury after even minor trauma. Therefore, physicians who cover athletic events must have a thorough knowledge of cervical spine injures and the most appropriate ways in which they should be managed. Although cervical spine injuries can be career-ending injuries, athletes often are able to return to play after appropriate treatment if the potential for substantial re-injury is minimized. PMID:27479833

  2. Iso-C3D navigation assisted pedicle screw placement in deformities of the cervical and thoracic spine

    PubMed Central

    Rajan, Vinod V; Kamath, Vijay; Shetty, Ajoy Prasad; Rajasekaran, S

    2010-01-01

    Background: Pedicle screw instrumentation of the deformed cervical and thoracic spine is challenging to even the most experienced surgeon and associated with increased incidence of screw misplacement. Iso-C3D based navigation has been reported to improve the accuracy of pedicle screw placement, however, there are very few studies assessing its efficacy in the presence of deformity. We conducted a study to evaluate the accuracy of Iso-C3D based navigation in pedicle screw fixation in the deformed cervical and thoracic spine. Materials and Methods: We inserted 98 cervical pedicle screws (18 patients) and 242 thoracic pedicle screws (17 patients) using Iso-C3D based navigation for deformities of spine due to scoliosis, ankylosing spondylitis, post traumatic and degenerative disorders. Two independent observers determined and graded the accuracy of screw placement from postoperative computed tomography (CT) scans. Results: Postoperative CT scans of the cervical spine showed 90.8% perfectly placed screws with 7 (7%) grade I pedicle breaches, 2 (2%) grade II pedicle breaches and one anterior cortex penetration (< 2mm). Five lateral pedicle breaches violated the vertebral artery foramen and three medial pedicle breaches penetrated the spinal canal; however, no patient had any neurovascular complications. In the thoracic spine there were 92.2% perfectly placed screws with only six (2%) grade II pedicle breaches, eight (3%) grade I pedicle breaches and five screws (2%) penetrating the anterior or lateral cortex. No neuro-vascular complications were encountered. Conclusion: Iso-C3D based navigation improves the accuracy of pedicle screw placement in deformities of the cervical and thoracic spine. The low incidence of pedicle breach implies increased safety for the patient. PMID:20419003

  3. Oral contraceptives, human papillomavirus and cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    La Vecchia, Carlo; Boccia, Stefania

    2014-03-01

    Oncogenic human papillomavirus is the key determinant of cervical cancer, but other risk factors interact with it to define individual risk. Among these, there is oral contraceptive (OC) use. A quantitative review of the link between OCs and cervical cancer was performed. Long-term (>5 year) current or recent OC use has been related to an about two-fold excess risk of cervical cancer. Such an excess risk, however, levels off after stopping use, and approaches unity 10 or more years after stopping. The public health implications of OC use for cervical cancer are limited. In any case, such implications are greater in middle-income and low-income countries, as well as in central and eastern Europe and Latin America, where cervical cancer screening and control remain inadequate.

  4. Mechanical and cellular processes driving cervical myelopathy

    PubMed Central

    Dolan, Roisin T; Butler, Joseph S; O’Byrne, John M; Poynton, Ashley R

    2016-01-01

    Cervical myelopathy is a well-described clinical syndrome that may evolve from a combination of etiological mechanisms. It is traditionally classified by cervical spinal cord and/or nerve root compression which varies in severity and number of levels involved. The vast array of clinical manifestations of cervical myelopathy cannot fully be explained by the simple concept that a narrowed spinal canal causes compression of the cord, local tissue ischemia, injury and neurological impairment. Despite advances in surgical technology and treatment innovations, there are limited neuro-protective treatments for cervical myelopathy, which reflects an incomplete understanding of the pathophysiological processes involved in this disease. The aim of this review is to provide a comprehensive overview of the key pathophysiological processes at play in the development of cervical myelopathy. PMID:26807352

  5. Cervical Vertebral Body Chordoma in a Cat.

    PubMed

    Hampel, R; Taylor-Brown, F; Priestnall, S L

    2016-05-01

    A 9-year-old, neutered female Maine Coon cat with a 6-week history of progressive ataxia was diagnosed with a cervical vertebral body mass using magnetic resonance imaging. The mass displaced and compressed the cervical spinal cord. The cat was humanely destroyed and necropsy examination confirmed a mass within the second cervical vertebral body. Microscopically, the mass was composed of large, clear, vacuolated ('physaliferous') cells. Immunohistochemically, the neoplastic cells expressed both cytokeratin and vimentin and the final diagnosis was a cervical, vertebral body chordoma. This is only the third report of a chordoma in this species and the first in this location. Chordoma should be considered as a potential differential diagnosis for tumours arising from the cervical vertebrae in the cat.

  6. Triapine, Cisplatin, and Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients With Cervical Cancer or Vaginal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-04-21

    Recurrent Cervical Cancer; Recurrent Vaginal Cancer; Stage IB Cervical Cancer; Stage II Vaginal Cancer; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage III Cervical Cancer; Stage III Vaginal Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Vaginal Cancer; Stage IVB Cervical Cancer; Stage IVB Vaginal Cancer; Therapy-related Toxicity

  7. Anterior instability in the throwing shoulder.

    PubMed

    Savoie, Felix H; O'Brien, Michael J

    2014-06-01

    The disabled throwing shoulder is a multifactorial problem. Laxity of the glenohumeral joint is necessary to achieve a satisfactory velocity. Normal wear and tear with throwing may convert this normal amount of excessive translation into instability. Instability in the throwing athlete manifests itself in 2 forms: traumatic anterior instability that happens to occur in a throwing athlete and excessive anterior subluxation because of overuse that occurs in conjunction with the disabled throwing shoulder. In most cases, it is difficult to determine by physical examination or imaging how much laxity is too much; therefore, the managing physician should always err on the side of caution. A trial of rest and rehabilitation should always be attempted before any consideration of surgery. The multifactorial issues in the disabled throwing athlete should be corrected during this phase of treatment, including assessment and treatment of hip abnormalities, restoration of satisfactory core strength, correction of scapular dyskinesis, and an evaluation and correction of any biomechanical abnormalities in the throwing mechanism. Surgical management of anterior instability in the throwing shoulder depends on the mechanism of injury. The traumatic anterior instability patient is managed by acute surgical repair without a shift, utilizing mattress sutures to prevent suture chondromalacia on the humeral head or glenoid. The anterior laxity management centers on the posterior superior labrum, although occasionally the anterior labrum or capsule may be involved as well. Overall, symptomatic anterior instability is less common in the throwing shoulder. Jobe and colleagues are credited with the first successful technique for the correction of anterior instability in the throwing athlete, the anterior capsulolabral reconstruction by a subscapularis split. The success of this technique paved the way for the adoption of the current arthroscopic techniques that are utilized to correct

  8. Reoperations Following Cervical Disc Replacement.

    PubMed

    Skovrlj, Branko; Lee, Dong-Ho; Caridi, John Michael; Cho, Samuel Kang-Wook

    2015-06-01

    Cervical disc replacement (CDR) has emerged as an alternative surgical option to cervical arthrodesis. With increasing numbers of patients and longer follow-ups, complications related to the device and/or aging spine are growing, leaving us with a new challenge in the management and surgical revision of CDR. The purpose of this study is to review the current literature regarding reoperations following CDR and to discuss about the approaches and solutions for the current and future potential complications associated with CDR. The published rates of reoperation (mean, 1.0%; range, 0%-3.1%), revision (mean, 0.2%; range, 0%-0.5%), and removal (mean, 1.2%; range, 0%-1.9%) following CDR are low and comparable to the published rates of reoperation (mean, 1.7%; range; 0%-3.4%), revision (mean, 1.5%; range, 0%-4.7%), and removal (mean, 2.0%; range, 0%-3.4%) following cervical arthrodesis. The surgical interventions following CDR range from the repositioning to explantation followed by fusion or the reimplantation to posterior foraminotomy or fusion. Strict patient selection, careful preoperative radiographic review and surgical planning, as well as surgical technique may reduce adverse events and the need for future intervention. Minimal literature and no guidelines exist for the approaches and techniques in revision and for the removal of implants following CDR. Adherence to strict indications and precise surgical technique may reduce the number of reoperations, revisions, and removals following CDR. Long-term follow-up studies are needed, assessing the implant survivorship and its effect on the revision and removal rates. PMID:26097667

  9. Trypan blue dye for anterior segment surgeries

    PubMed Central

    Jhanji, V; Chan, E; Das, S; Zhang, H; Vajpayee, R B

    2011-01-01

    Use of vital dyes in ophthalmic surgery has gained increased importance in the past few years. Trypan blue (TB) has been a popular choice among anterior segment surgeons mainly due to its safety, ease of availability, and remarkable ability to enable an easy surgery in difficult situations mostly related to visibility of the targeted tissue. It is being used in cataract surgery since nearly a decade and its utilization has been extended to other anterior segment surgeries like trabeculectomy and corneal transplantation. This review will discuss the techniques and outcome of TB dye-assisted anterior segment surgeries. PMID:21681214

  10. Quadriceps muscle contraction protects the anterior cruciate ligament during anterior tibial translation.

    PubMed

    Aune, A K; Cawley, P W; Ekeland, A

    1997-01-01

    The proposed skiing injury mechanism that suggests a quadriceps muscle contraction can contribute to anterior cruciate ligament rupture was biomechanically investigated. The effect of quadriceps muscle force on a knee specimen loaded to anterior cruciate ligament failure during anterior tibial translation was studied in a human cadaveric model. In both knees from six donors, average age 41 years (range, 31 to 65), the joint capsule and ligaments, except the anterior cruciate ligament, were cut. The quadriceps tendon, patella, patellar tendon, and menisci were left intact. One knee from each pair was randomly selected to undergo destructive testing of the anterior cruciate ligament by anterior tibial translation at a displacement rate of 30 mm/sec with a simultaneously applied 889 N quadriceps muscle force. The knee flexion during testing was 30 degrees. As a control, the contralateral knee was loaded correspondingly, but only 5 N of quadriceps muscle force was applied. The ultimate load for the knee to anterior cruciate ligament failure when tested with 889 N quadriceps muscle force was 22% +/- 18% higher than that of knees tested with 5 N of force. The linear stiffness increased by 43% +/- 30%. These results did not support the speculation that a quadriceps muscle contraction contributes to anterior cruciate ligament failure. In this model, the quadriceps muscle force protected the anterior cruciate ligament from injury during anterior tibial translation.

  11. How I do it: Anterior pull-through tympanoplasty for anterior eardrum perforations.

    PubMed

    Harris, Jeffrey P; Wong, Yu-Tung; Yang, Tzong-Hann; Miller, Mia

    2016-01-01

    Conclusions This technique is offered as a convenient and reliable method for cases with anterior TM perforation and inadequate anterior remnant. Objectives Chronic otitis media surgery is one of the most common procedures in otology. Anterior tympanic membrane (TM) perforation with inadequate anterior remnant is associated with higher rates of graft failure. It was the goal of this series to evaluate the anatomical and functional outcomes of a modified underlay myringoplasty technique-the anterior pull-through method. Materials and methods In a retrospective clinical study, 13 patients with anterior TM perforations with inadequate anterior remnants underwent tympanoplasty with anterior pull-through technique. The anterior tip of the temporalis fascia was pulled through and secured in a short incision lateral to the anterior part of the annulus. Data on graft take rate, pre-operative, and post-operative hearing status were analyzed. Results A graft success rate of 84.6% (11 out of 13) was achieved, without lateralization, blunting, atelectasia, or epithelial pearls. The air-bone gap was 21.5 ± 6.8 dB before intervention and 11.75 ± 5.7 dB after surgery (p = 0.003). PMID:26988908

  12. Recurrent laryngeal edema imitating angioedema caused by dislocated screw after anterior spine surgery.

    PubMed

    Wójtowicz, Piotr; Szafarowski, Tomasz; Migacz, Ewa; Krzeski, Antoni

    2015-01-01

    The anterior cervical spine surgery is a common procedure to stabilize vertebrae damaged by various diseases. The plates and screws are usually used in the spine fixation. This kind of instrumentation may detach from the bones which is a rare but well-known complication. A 77-year-old male presented to the otorhinolaryngology department with throat pain, choking, and dysphagia. At first the angioedema was diagnosed and he was treated conservatively. The endoscopy revealed laryngeal edema, being more defined on the right side with right vocal fold paresis. CT scans showed the stabilizing plate with two screws attached tightly and the back-out of the third screw toward soft tissue of the neck. In the meantime, his condition deteriorated and he needed tracheotomy. In few days the surgical removal of the dislocated screw was performed successfully. Although two-month follow-up reported no obstruction of the larynx, the vocal folds paresis with gradual functional improvement was observed. Long-term complication of anterior spine surgery sometimes may suggest laryngeal angioedema at first. If the conservative treatment is ineffective and there is a history of anterior spine surgery, the clinicians should consider the displacement of the plate or screws in differential diagnosis. PMID:25755901

  13. 21 CFR 884.4260 - Hygroscopic Laminaria cervical dilator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Hygroscopic Laminaria cervical dilator. 884.4260 Section 884.4260 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES... cervical dilator is a device designed to dilate (stretch open) the cervical os by cervical insertion of...

  14. 21 CFR 884.1040 - Viscometer for cervical mucus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Viscometer for cervical mucus. 884.1040 Section... Devices § 884.1040 Viscometer for cervical mucus. (a) Identification. A viscometer for cervical mucus is a device that is intended to measure the relative viscoelasticity of cervical mucus collected from a...

  15. 21 CFR 884.1040 - Viscometer for cervical mucus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Viscometer for cervical mucus. 884.1040 Section... Devices § 884.1040 Viscometer for cervical mucus. (a) Identification. A viscometer for cervical mucus is a device that is intended to measure the relative viscoelasticity of cervical mucus collected from a...

  16. 21 CFR 884.1040 - Viscometer for cervical mucus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Viscometer for cervical mucus. 884.1040 Section... Devices § 884.1040 Viscometer for cervical mucus. (a) Identification. A viscometer for cervical mucus is a device that is intended to measure the relative viscoelasticity of cervical mucus collected from a...

  17. 21 CFR 884.4250 - Expandable cervical dilator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Expandable cervical dilator. 884.4250 Section 884....4250 Expandable cervical dilator. (a) Identification. An expandable cervical dilator is an instrument with two handles and two opposing blades used manually to dilate (stretch open) the cervical os....

  18. 21 CFR 884.4250 - Expandable cervical dilator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Expandable cervical dilator. 884.4250 Section 884....4250 Expandable cervical dilator. (a) Identification. An expandable cervical dilator is an instrument with two handles and two opposing blades used manually to dilate (stretch open) the cervical os....

  19. 21 CFR 884.4250 - Expandable cervical dilator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Expandable cervical dilator. 884.4250 Section 884....4250 Expandable cervical dilator. (a) Identification. An expandable cervical dilator is an instrument with two handles and two opposing blades used manually to dilate (stretch open) the cervical os....

  20. 21 CFR 884.1040 - Viscometer for cervical mucus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Viscometer for cervical mucus. 884.1040 Section... Devices § 884.1040 Viscometer for cervical mucus. (a) Identification. A viscometer for cervical mucus is a device that is intended to measure the relative viscoelasticity of cervical mucus collected from a...

  1. 21 CFR 884.4250 - Expandable cervical dilator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Expandable cervical dilator. 884.4250 Section 884....4250 Expandable cervical dilator. (a) Identification. An expandable cervical dilator is an instrument with two handles and two opposing blades used manually to dilate (stretch open) the cervical os....

  2. 21 CFR 884.4250 - Expandable cervical dilator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Expandable cervical dilator. 884.4250 Section 884....4250 Expandable cervical dilator. (a) Identification. An expandable cervical dilator is an instrument with two handles and two opposing blades used manually to dilate (stretch open) the cervical os....

  3. 21 CFR 884.1040 - Viscometer for cervical mucus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Viscometer for cervical mucus. 884.1040 Section... Devices § 884.1040 Viscometer for cervical mucus. (a) Identification. A viscometer for cervical mucus is a device that is intended to measure the relative viscoelasticity of cervical mucus collected from a...

  4. Comparison of 2 Zero-Profile Implants in the Treatment of Single-Level Cervical Spondylotic Myelopathy: A Preliminary Clinical Study of Cervical Disc Arthroplasty versus Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Li-Li; Liu, Zu-De; Yuan, Wen

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Cervical disc arthroplasty (CDA) with Discover prosthesis or anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) with Zero-P cage has been widely used in the treatment of cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM). However, little is known about the comparison of the 2 zero-profile implants in the treatment of single-level CSM. The aim was to compare the clinical outcomes and radiographic parameters of CDA with Discover prosthesis and ACDF with Zero-P cage for the treatment of single-level CSM. Methods A total of 128 consecutive patients who underwent 1-level CDA with Discover prosthesis or ACDF with Zero-P cage for single-level CSM between September 2009 and December 2012 were included in this study. Clinical outcomes were evaluated using the Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) score and Neck Disability Index (NDI). For radiographic assessment, the overall sagittal alignment (OSA), functional spinal unit (FSU) angle, and range of motion (ROM) at the index and adjacent levels were measured before and after surgery. Additionally, the complications were also recorded. Results Both treatments significantly improved all clinical parameters (P < 0.05), without statistically relevant differences between the 2 groups. The OSA and FSU angle increased significantly in both groups (P <0.05). Compared with Zero-P group, ROMs at the index levels were well maintained in the Discover group (P < 0.05). However, there were no statistical differences in the ROMs of adjacent levels between the 2 groups (P > 0.05). Besides, no significant differences existed in dysphagia, subsidence, or adjacent disc degeneration between the 2 groups (P > 0.05). However, significant differences occurred in prosthesis migration in CDA group. Conclusions The results of this study showed that clinical outcomes and radiographic parameters were satisfactory and comparable with the 2 techniques. However, more attention to prosthesis migration of artificial cervical disc should be paid in the

  5. Revision Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Wilde, Jeffrey; Bedi, Asheesh; Altchek, David W.

    2014-01-01

    Context: Reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is one of the most common surgical procedures, with more than 200,000 ACL tears occurring annually. Although primary ACL reconstruction is a successful operation, success rates still range from 75% to 97%. Consequently, several thousand revision ACL reconstructions are performed annually and are unfortunately associated with inferior clinical outcomes when compared with primary reconstructions. Evidence Acquisition: Data were obtained from peer-reviewed literature through a search of the PubMed database (1988-2013) as well as from textbook chapters and surgical technique papers. Study Design: Clinical review. Level of Evidence: Level 4. Results: The clinical outcomes after revision ACL reconstruction are largely based on level IV case series. Much of the existing literature is heterogenous with regard to patient populations, primary and revision surgical techniques, concomitant ligamentous injuries, and additional procedures performed at the time of the revision, which limits generalizability. Nevertheless, there is a general consensus that the outcomes for revision ACL reconstruction are inferior to primary reconstruction. Conclusion: Excellent results can be achieved with regard to graft stability, return to play, and functional knee instability but are generally inferior to primary ACL reconstruction. A staged approach with autograft reconstruction is recommended in any circumstance in which a single-stage approach results in suboptimal graft selection, tunnel position, graft fixation, or biological milieu for tendon-bone healing. Strength-of-Recommendation Taxonomy (SORT): Good results may still be achieved with regard to graft stability, return to play, and functional knee instability, but results are generally inferior to primary ACL reconstruction: Level B. PMID:25364483

  6. Maintenance of graft compression in the adult cervical spine.

    PubMed

    Bolger, Ciaran; Bourlion, Maurice; Leroy, Xavier; Petit, Dominique; Vanacker, Gerard; McEvoy, Linda; Nagaria, Jabir

    2006-08-01

    It is generally advised that the graft inserted in adult cervical spine should be pre-loaded with a compressive force or that the screws are inserted in a divergent orientation, in order to maximise compression and the chance of graft incorporation (Truumees et al. in Spine 28:1097-1102, 2003). However, there is little evidence that a compressive force is maintained once the force applicator has been removed, or that the divergent screws enhance compression. This study compared the maintenance of applied pre-load force, across cervical spine graft, between standard anterior plating technique with pre-load and divergent screws and a novel plate technique, which allows its application prior to removal of the force applicator. Six intact adult cadaveric human cervical spines were exposed by standard surgical technique. A Casper type distracter was inserted across the disc space of interest, the disc was removed. In 14 experiments, following the disc removal, an autologous iliac crest bone graft was inserted under distraction, together with a strain gauge pressure transducer. A resting output from the transducer was recorded. The voltage output has a linear relationship with compressive force. A standardised compressive force was applied across the graft through the "Casper type" distracter/compressor (7.5 kg, torque). The pre-load compressive force was measured using a torque drill. Then two different procedures were used in order to compare the final applied strain on the bone graft. In eight experiments (procedure 1), the "Casper type" distracter/compressor was removed and a standard anterior cervical plate with four divergent screws was inserted. In six experiments (procedure 2), a novel plate design was inserted prior to removal of the distracter/compressor, which is not possible with the standard plate design. A final compressive force across the graft was measured. For the standard plate construct (procedure 1), the applied compression force is significantly

  7. Dynamic relationships of the mandibular anterior segment.

    PubMed

    Braun, S; Hnat, W P

    1997-05-01

    The hyperbolic cosine function is shown to be an accurate representation of the form of the mandibular anterior teeth from the canine/first premolar contact on one side around the perimeter to the opposite side (r = 0.951). On the basis of this mathematical function, the changes in canine width, anterior segment depth, arch perimeter, and their related incisor angular alterations are forecastable. This knowledge will allow the clinician to predict the effects on various aspects of the anterior segment arch form as one or more of these variables are altered without resorting to trial and error or performing a wax-up. For example, the clinician can predict the change in the anterior segment arch depth and incisor angulation that would occur with alterations in canine width.

  8. Invasive Cervical Resorption: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Kandalgaonkar, Shilpa D; Gharat, Leena A; Tupsakhare, Suyog D; Gabhane, Mahesh H

    2013-01-01

    Invasive cervical resorption is a relatively uncommon form of external root resorption exhibiting no external signs. The resorptive condition is often detected by routine radiographic examination. The clinical features vary from a small defect at the gingival margin to a pink coronal discoloration of the tooth crown resulting in ultimate cavitation of the overlying enamel which is painless unless pulpal or periodontal infection supervenes. Radiographic features of lesions vary from well-delineated to irregularly bordered mottled radiolucencies, and these can be confused with dental caries. A characteristic radiopaque line generally separates the image of the lesion from that of the root canal, because the pulp remains protected by a thin layer of predentin until late in the process. Histopathologically, the lesions contain fibrovascular tissue with resorbing clastic cells adjacent to the dentin surface. More advanced lesions display fibro-osseous characteristics with deposition of ectopic bonelike calcifications both within the resorbing tissue and directly on the dentin surface. How to cite this article: Kandalgaonkar SD, Gharat LA, Tupsakhare SD, Gabhane MH. Invasive Cervical Resorption: A Review. J Int Oral Health 2013;5(6):124-30 . PMID:24453457

  9. Network Topologies Decoding Cervical Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Jalan, Sarika; Kanhaiya, Krishna; Rai, Aparna; Bandapalli, Obul Reddy; Yadav, Alok

    2015-01-01

    According to the GLOBOCAN statistics, cervical cancer is one of the leading causes of death among women worldwide. It is found to be gradually increasing in the younger population, specifically in the developing countries. We analyzed the protein-protein interaction networks of the uterine cervix cells for the normal and disease states. It was found that the disease network was less random than the normal one, providing an insight into the change in complexity of the underlying network in disease state. The study also portrayed that, the disease state has faster signal processing as the diameter of the underlying network was very close to its corresponding random control. This may be a reason for the normal cells to change into malignant state. Further, the analysis revealed VEGFA and IL-6 proteins as the distinctly high degree nodes in the disease network, which are known to manifest a major contribution in promoting cervical cancer. Our analysis, being time proficient and cost effective, provides a direction for developing novel drugs, therapeutic targets and biomarkers by identifying specific interaction patterns, that have structural importance. PMID:26308848

  10. Dentulous Appliance for Upper Anterior Edentulous Span

    PubMed Central

    Chalakkal, Paul; Devi, Ramisetty Sabitha; Srinivas, G. Vijay; Venkataramana, Pammi

    2013-01-01

    This article discusses about a fixed dentulous appliance that was constructed to replace the primary upper anterior edentulous span in a four year old girl. It constituted a design, whereby the maxillary primary second molars were used to support the appliance through bands and a wire that contained an acrylic flange bearing trimmed acrylic teeth, anteriorly. The appliance was functionally and aesthetically compliant. PMID:24551736

  11. Erlotinib-related bilateral anterior uveitis

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Kashif; Kumar, Indu; Usman-Saeed, Muniba; Usman Saeed, Muhammad

    2011-01-01

    The authors report the case of a 68-year-old woman with secondary adenocarcinoma of the lungs from an unknown primary. Erlotinib was started which produced symptoms suggestive of uveitis. Erlotinib was stopped and restarted a month later at a lower dose, which resulted in severe bilateral anterior uveitis. The uveitis settled after stopping erlotinib and treatment with topical steroids and cycloplegics. To the best of the authors’ knowledge, this is the first case of erlotinib-related anterior uveitis. PMID:22694887

  12. Rehabilitation of anterior cruciate ligament injuries.

    PubMed

    Halling, A H; Howard, M E; Cawley, P W

    1993-04-01

    Rehabilitation of the anterior cruciate ligament absent or reconstructed knee is becoming a true artform. Accelerated, but controlled rehabilitation, is becoming more commonplace. Scientific-based data along with clinical experiences are the basis of the rehabilitation guidelines brought forth in this article. Anterior cruciate ligament strain and implications for exercise, continuous passive motion, proprioceptive exercise, and the role of knee bracing are all discussed in relation to the overall rehabilitation program.

  13. Anterior capsular defect with acute anterior subcapsular cataract in herpetic keratouveitis

    PubMed Central

    Arora, Tarun; Sharma, Namrata; Arora, Supriya; Titiyal, Jeewan S

    2014-01-01

    A 20-year-old man presented with a recurrent episode of herpetic keratouveitis in his right eye. The patient was treated with oral acyclovir and topical steroids. One week later the patient reported a sudden diminution of vision. Slitlamp biomicroscopy revealed the presence of a central anterior capsular defect and anterior subcapsular cataract. Dosage of steroids was temporarily increased and progression of cataract monitored. Subsequently, the anterior chamber reaction decreased and steroids were tapered. PMID:25228677

  14. Volumetric Imaging by Megavoltage Computed Tomography for Assessment of Internal Organ Motion During Radiotherapy for Cervical Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Collen, Christine; Engels, Benedikt; Duchateau, Michael; Tournel, Koen; De Ridder, Mark; Bral, Samuel; Verellen, Dirk; Storme, Guy

    2010-08-01

    Purpose: To assess the internal organ motion of the cervix and uterus by megavoltage computed tomography (MVCT) during intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT). Methods and Materials: Ten patients with Stage IIB-IVA cervical cancer underwent daily MVCT imaging. Internal organ motion was evaluated on 150 pretreatment MVCT images by measuring shifts in their boundaries between the MVCT and kilovoltage (kV) planning CT scan in the anterior, posterior, left and right lateral, and superior and inferior direction. Additional intrafractional patient movement was evaluated on 50 posttreatment MVCT images. Results: Measured cervical motion (mean {+-} SD) was 0.4 {+-} 10.1 mm in the anterior, -3.0 {+-} 6.9 mm in the posterior direction, -3.5 {+-} 4.9 mm in the left and 0.2 {+-} 4.5 mm in the right lateral direction, 2.2 {+-} 8.0 mm in the superior and 0.5 {+-} 5.0 mm in the inferior direction. Compared to the cervix, larger uterine motion was observed. Patient movement during treatment was limited to 1.1 {+-} 1.3 mm, -0.3 {+-} 1.6 mm, and 0.2 {+-} 2.3 mm in anteroposterior, laterolateral and superoinferior direction respectively. Conclusions: MVCT imaging can be used to study patient setup accuracy and cervical and uterine motion during IMRT. This data may be used to refine treatment margins.

  15. Epidemiology and Early Detection of Cervical Cancer.

    PubMed

    Hillemanns, Peter; Soergel, Phillip; Hertel, Hermann; Jentschke, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    The new German S3 guideline 'Prevention of Cervical Cancer' published in 2016 is based on the latest available evidence about cervical cancer screening and treatment of cervical precancer. Large randomized controlled trials indicate that human papillomavirus (HPV)-based screening may provide better protection against cervical cancer than cytology alone through improved detection of premalignant disease in the first screening round prior to progression. Therefore, women aged 30 years and older should preferably be screened with HPV testing every 3-5 years (cytology alone every 2 years is an acceptable alternative). Co-testing is not recommended. Screening should start at 25 years using cytology alone every 2 years. The preferred triage test after a positive HPV screening test is cytology. Women positive for HPV 16 and HPV 18 should receive immediate colposcopy. Another alternative triage method is p16/Ki-67 dual stain cytology. The mean yearly participation rate in Germany is between 45 and 50%. Offering devices for HPV self-sampling has the potential to increase participation rates in those women who are at higher risk of developing cervical cancer. Regarding primary prevention, the 9-valent vaccine may provide protection against up to 85% of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) 3 and 90% of cervical cancer, and is available in Europe as a 2-dose schedule from May 2016. PMID:27614953

  16. Conservative Surgery for Early Cervical Cancer.

    PubMed

    Rema, P; Ahmed, Iqbal

    2016-09-01

    There is a rising incidence of early cervical cancer in young patients as a result of screening and early detection. Treatment of cervical cancer by surgery or radiotherapy results in permanent infertility which affects the quality of life of cancer survivors. Now with improved survival rates among early cervical cancer patients, conservative surgery aiming at fertility preservation in those desiring future pregnancy is an accepted treatment. Conservative surgery is possible in early cervical cancer including micro invasive cancer and stage IB cancers less than 2 cm. Stage IA1 cervical cancer is treated effectively by cervical conisation. In stage IA2 cancers and stage IB1 cancers less than 2 cm the fertility preservation surgery is radical trachelectomy. Radical trachelectomy removes the cervix with medial parametrium and upper 2 cm vaginal cuff retaining the uterus and adnexa to allow future pregnancy. Radical trachelectomy is a safe procedure in selected patients with cancer cervix with acceptable oncologic risks and promising obstetric outcome. It should be avoided in tumours larger than 2 cm and aggressive histologic types. This article focuses on the current options of conservative surgery in early cervical cancer. PMID:27651696

  17. Fatal Cervical Spine Injury From Diving Accident.

    PubMed

    Voland, Christelle; Vilarino, Raquel; Grabherr, Silke; Lobrinus, Johannes Alexander; Palmiere, Cristian

    2015-09-01

    Spinal cord injuries result after diving into shallow water, often after incautious jumps head first into water of unknown depth during recreational or sport activities. Mortality is generally due to upper cervical trauma. The authors present a case of a diving-related death in a young woman who underwent medicolegal investigations. The measured water depth at the supposed dive site was 1.40 m. Postmortem radiology and autopsy revealed fractures of the body and the posterior arch of the fifth cervical vertebra, a fracture of the right transverse process of the sixth cervical vertebra and hemorrhages involving the cervical paraspinal muscles. Neuropathology showed a posterior epidural hematoma involving the whole cervical region and a symmetric laceration of the spinal cord located at the fourth and fifth cervical vertebra level, surrounded by multiple petechial hemorrhages. Toxicology revealed the presence of ethanol in both blood and urine samples. The death was attributed to cervical spine fracture (C5-C6), spinal cord contusion, and subsequent drowning. This case highlights the usefulness of postmortem radiology, examination of the deep structures of the neck, toxicology, neuropathology, and a detailed research of signs of drowning to formulate appropriate hypotheses pertaining to the cause and mechanism of death.

  18. Anterior Eye Imaging with Optical Coherence Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, David; Li, Yan; Tang, Maolong

    The development of corneal and anterior segment optical coherence tomography (OCT) technology has advanced rapidly in recently years. The scan geometry and imaging wavelength are both important choices to make in designing anterior segment OCT systems. Rectangular scan geometry offers the least image distortion and is now used in most anterior OCT systems. The wavelength of OCT light source affects resolution and penetration. An optimal choice of the OCT imaging wavelength (840, 1,050, or 1,310 nm) depends on the application of interest. Newer generation Fourier-domain OCT technology can provide scan speed 100-1000 times faster than the time-domain technology. Various commercial anterior OCT systems are available on the market. A wide spectrum of diagnostic and surgical applications using anterior segment OCT had been investigated, including mapping of corneal and epithelial thicknesses, keratoconus screening, measuring corneal refractive power, corneal surgery planning and evaluation in LASIK, intracorneal ring implantation, assessment of angle closure glaucoma, anterior chamber biometry and intraocular lens implants, intraocular lens power calculation, and eye bank donor cornea screening.

  19. Flail arm syndrome with cytoplasmic vacuoles in remaining anterior horn motor neurons: A peculiar variant of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Hino, Shuji; Sasaki, Shoichi

    2015-12-01

    Flail arm (FA) syndrome, a minor subtype of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), is characterized by progressive weakness and upper girdle wasting, but the associated pathological changes remain unclear. A 59-year-old man was admitted to our hospital with a 3-year history of upper girdle weakness. Bulbar symptom and gait disturbance gradually developed, and he was clinically diagnosed with FA syndrome. After a 10-year disease course, he died of pulmonary adenocarcinoma. Neuropathological examination revealed severe motor neuronal loss in the brain stem and anterior horn of the cervical spinal cord with bilateral pyramidal tract degeneration. The histological findings were consistent with typical ALS, including Bunina bodies and Lewy body-like and skein-like inclusions. Cytoplasmic vacuoles were found in the remaining anterior horn motor neurons of the lumbar spinal cord. This is a unique autopsy case with a long-standing clinical course that suggests that FA syndrome is an atypical form of ALS.

  20. Novel reconstruction of the anterior craniocervical junction using an expandable cage with integrated fixation after total C2 spondylectomy for chordoma.

    PubMed

    Wewel, Joshua T; Nunna, Ravi S; Tan, Lee A; Kasliwal, Manish K; O'Toole, John E

    2016-08-01

    Chordoma is a locally aggressive malignant tumor that generally occurs in the clivus, mobile spine and sacrum. While en bloc resection with wide margins has been advocated as the only cure for chordomas, tumor characteristics and violation of critical anatomical boundaries may preclude pursuing this treatment option in the cervical spine. We present a C2 chordoma in a 35-year-old man with epidural and prevertebral extension that was treated with a single stage anterior-posterior total C2 spondylectomy with novel reconstruction using an expandable cage with integrated fixation followed by stereotactic radiosurgery. Single stage intralesional total C2 spondylectomy via anterior transoral and posterior approaches was performed. The anterior column was reconstructed using an expandable cage with integrated fixation from the clivus to C3. The patient maintained his intact neurological status at 6 month follow-up with full resumption of activities of daily living without any significant morbidity.

  1. Optimized Planning Target Volume for Intact Cervical Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Khan, Alvin; Jensen, Lindsay G.; Sun Shuai; Song, William Y.; Yashar, Catheryn M.; Mundt, Arno J.; Zhang Fuquan; Jiang, Steve B.; Mell, Loren K.

    2012-08-01

    Purpose: To model interfraction clinical target volume (CTV) variation in patients with intact cervical cancer and design a planning target volume (PTV) that minimizes normal tissue dose while maximizing CTV coverage. Methods and Materials: We analyzed 50 patients undergoing external-beam radiotherapy for intact cervical cancer using daily online cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). The CBCTs (n = 972) for each patient were rigidly registered to the planning CT. The CTV was delineated on the planning CT (CTV{sub 0}) and the set of CBCTs ({l_brace}CTV{sub 1}-CTV{sub 25}{r_brace}). Manual (n = 98) and automated (n = 668) landmarks were placed over the surface of CTV{sub 0} with reference to defined anatomic structures. Normal vectors were extended from each landmark, and the minimum length required for a given probability of encompassing CTV{sub 1}-CTV{sub 25} was computed. The resulting expansions were used to generate an optimized PTV. Results: The mean (SD; range) normal vector length to ensure 95% coverage was 4.3 mm (2.7 mm; 1-16 mm). The uniform expansion required to ensure 95% probability of CTV coverage was 13 mm. An anisotropic margin of 20 mm anteriorly and posteriorly and 10 mm superiorly, inferiorly, and laterally also would have ensured a 95% probability of CTV coverage. The volume of the 95% optimized PTV (1470 cm{sup 3}) was significantly lower than both the anisotropic PTV (2220 cm{sup 3}) and the uniformly expanded PTV (2110 cm{sup 3}) (p < 0.001). For a 95% probability of CTV coverage, normal lengths of 1-3 mm were found along the superior and lateral regions of CTV{sub 0}, 5-10 mm along the interfaces of CTV{sub 0} with the bladder and rectum, and 10-14 mm along the anterior surface of CTV{sub 0} at the level of the uterus. Conclusion: Optimizing PTV definition according to surface landmarking resulted in a high probability of CTV coverage with reduced PTV volumes. Our results provide data justifying planning margins to use in practice and

  2. Prognosis for Patients With Traumatic Cervical Spinal Cord Injury Combined With Cervical Radiculopathy

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Seo Yeon; Kim, Tae Uk; Lee, Seong Jae

    2014-01-01

    Objective To delineate cervical radiculopathy that is found in combination with traumatic cervical spinal cord injury (SCI) and to determine whether attendant cervical radiculopathy affects the prognosis and functional outcome for SCI patients. Methods A total of 66 patients diagnosed with traumatic cervical SCI were selected for neurological assessment (using the International Standards for the Neurological Classification of Spinal Cord Injury [ISNCSCI]) and functional evaluation (based on the Korean version Modified Barthel Index [K-MBI] and Functional Independence Measure [FIM]) at admission and upon discharge. All of the subjects received a preliminary electrophysiological assessment, according to which they were divided into two groups as follows: those with cervical radiculopathy (the SCI/Rad group) and those without (the SCI group). Results A total of 32 patients with cervical SCI (48.5%) had cervical radiculopathy. The initial ISNCSCI scores for sensory and motor, K-MBI, and total FIM did not significantly differ between the SCI group and the SCI/Rad group. However, at discharge, the ISNCSCI scores for motor, K-MBI, and FIM of the SCI/Rad group showed less improvement (5.44±8.08, 15.19±19.39 and 10.84±11.49, respectively) than those of the SCI group (10.76±9.86, 24.79±19.65 and 17.76±15.84, respectively) (p<0.05). In the SCI/Rad group, the number of involved levels of cervical radiculopathy was negatively correlated with the initial and follow-up motors score by ISNCSCI. Conclusion Cervical radiculopathy is not rare in patients with traumatic cervical SCI, and it can impede neurological and functional improvement. Therefore, detection of combined cervical radiculopathy by electrophysiological assessment is essential for accurate prognosis of cervical SCI patients in the rehabilitation unit. PMID:25229022

  3. [Induction chemotherapy for locally advanced cervical cancer].

    PubMed

    Morkhov, K Yu; Nechushkina, V M; Kuznetsov, V V

    2015-01-01

    The main methods of treatment for cervical cancer are surgery, radiotherapy or their combination. During past two decades chemotherapy are increasingly being used not only in patients with disseminated forms of this disease but also in patients undergoing chemoradiotherapy or as induction therapy. Possibilities of adjuvant chemotherapy for cervical cancer are being studied. According to A.D.Kaprin and V.V. Starinskiy in 2013 in Russia, 32% of patients with newly diagnosed cervical cancer underwent only radiation therapy, 32%--combined or complex treatment, 27.3%--only surgery, and just 8.7%--chemoradiotherapy. PMID:26087600

  4. Finite element modelling of the cervical spinal cord injury -- clinical assessment.

    PubMed

    Czyż, Marcin; Ścigała, Krzysztof; Będziński, Romuald; Jarmundowicz, Włodzimierz

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the efficiency of Finite Element Method (FEM) modelling of the clinical cases of traumatic cervical spinal cord injury (SCI). The study population consisted of 28 patients suffering from traumatic cervical spine injury with (study group) and without (control) neurological deficits. A numerical simulation of the trauma event was performed, based on validated 3D FEM model. All the results obtained underwent statistical analysis. Statistically significant differences between both groups were found in severity of bony and neural structure damage as well as in stress and strain ratios. The highest values of tensile stress and deformation were noted in the sagittal (Y) axis. The maximum stress and strain were found in anterior spinothalamic, lateral spinothalamic and dorsal columns. It was also found that stress and strain in each segment and axis of the spinal cord model were positively correlated with the severity of the cervical spine injury (R-Spearman 0.39 to 0.64) and neurological symptoms of SCI (R-Spearman: 0.43 to 0.82). It is possible to create a clinical numerical model of the SCI with the use of FEM. The correlations between the mechanical force and neurological deficits show tendencies which require further studies based on an improved model and a greater number of patients.

  5. First aid and treatment for cervical spinal cord injury with fracture and dislocation

    PubMed Central

    Yisheng, W; Fuying, Z; Limin, W; Junwei, Li; Guofu, P; Weidong, W

    2007-01-01

    Background: Traumatic cervical spinal cord injury with subaxial fracture and dislocation not only indicates a highly unstable spine but can also induce life-threatening complications. This makes first aid critically important before any definitive operative procedure is undertaken. The present study analyzes the various first aid measures and operative procedures for such injury. Materials and Methods: Two hundred and ninety-five patients suffered from cervical spinal cord injury with fracture and dislocation. The average period between injury and admission was 4.5 days (range 5 h-12 weeks). The injury includes burst fractures (n = 90), compression fractures with herniated discs (n = 50), fractures and dislocation (n = 88) and pure dislocation (n = 36). Other injuries including developmental spinal canal stenosis and/or multi-segment spinal cord compression associated with trauma (n = 12), lamina fractures compressing the spinal cord (n = 6), ligament injuries (n = 7) and hematoma (n = 6) were observed in the present study. The injury level was C4 (n = 17), C5 (n = 29), C6 (n = 39), C7 (n = 35), C4-5 (n = 38), C5-6 (n = 58), C6-7 (n = 49), C4-6 (n = 16) and C5-7 (n = 14). According to the Frankel grading system, grade A was observed in 20 cases, grade B in 91, grade C in 124 and grade D in 60. One hundred and eighteen (40%) patients had a high fever and difficulty in breathing on presentation. First aid measures included early reduction and immobilization of the injured cervical spine, controlling the temperature, breathing support, and administration of high-dose methylprednisolone within eight hours of the injury (n = 12) and administration of dehydration and neurotrophy medicine. Oxygen support was given and tracheotomy was performed for patients with serious difficulty in breathing. Measures were taken to prevent bedsores and infections of the respiratory and urological systems. Two hundred and thirty six patients were treated with anterior decompression, 31

  6. Cervical sprains, disc herniations, minor fractures, and other cervical injuries in the athlete.

    PubMed

    Zmurko, Matthew G; Tannoury, Tony Y; Tannoury, Chadi A; Anderson, D Greg

    2003-07-01

    In today's health-conscious society, more people are participating in athletic endeavors. As participation increases, so does the incidence of cervical injuries. Fortunately, most of the cervical injuries seen in sports are minor and can be treated successfully with minimal morbidity. It is important, however, to accurately assess the patient sustaining a cervical injury to rule out the presence of a more severe cervical injury. When practitioners understand the pathophysiology and treatment of common injuries, including sprains, strains, contusions, disc herniations, and simple fractures, most athletes can be returned to full function.

  7. Cisplatin and Radiation Therapy With or Without Triapine in Treating Patients With Previously Untreated Stage IB-IVA Cervical Cancer or Stage II-IVA Vaginal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-25

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IB2 Cervical Cancer; Stage II Vaginal Cancer; Stage IIA1 Cervical Cancer; Stage IIA2 Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage III Vaginal Cancer; Stage IIIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIB Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Vaginal Cancer; Vaginal Adenocarcinoma; Vaginal Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Vaginal Squamous Cell Carcinoma

  8. Cisplatin and Radiation Therapy With or Without Carboplatin and Paclitaxel in Patients With Locally Advanced Cervical Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-26

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Chemotherapeutic Agent Toxicity; Cognitive Side Effects of Cancer Therapy; Psychological Impact of Cancer; Radiation Toxicity; Sexual Dysfunction and Infertility; Stage IB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage III Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer

  9. Cervicitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... include: Avoid irritants such as douches and deodorant tampons. Make sure that any foreign objects you insert into your vagina (such as tampons) are properly placed. Be sure to follow instructions ...

  10. [Cervical cancer: particularities in HIV patients].

    PubMed

    Grellier, Noémie; Quéro, Laurent

    2014-11-01

    Cervical cancer is the second most common cancer in women worldwide. It represents one of the most challenging public health problems in developing countries. HIV-infected women have a higher risk of cervical cancer which is an AIDS defining cancer. Cervical cancer treatment in HIV-infected and non-infected women is the same. HIV naive women must be prescribed combination antiretroviral therapy at the moment of HIV cancer diagnosis. A close collaboration between oncologist and infectiologist is mandatory to optimize HIV treatment. Among HIV-infected women, PAP-smear screening for early detection and treatment of precancerous cervical lesions is recommended. HPV vaccination is also recommended with the same efficacy and safety profile as the general population.

  11. Cervical Human Papillomavirus Screening among Older Women

    PubMed Central

    Grainge, Matthew J.; Seth, Rashmi; Guo, Li; Neal, Keith R.; Coupland, Carol; Vryenhoef, Paul; Johnson, Jane; Jenkins, David

    2005-01-01

    Rates of acquisition and clearance of cervical human papillomavirus (HPV) during a 3-year period in women 51 years of age were compared with rates in younger women to provide data on cervical screening for women >50 years of age. Paired, cytologically negative, archived cervical smears taken 3 years apart from 710 women in Nottingham, United Kingdom, were retrieved and tested for HPV infection with polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with GP5+/6+ primers. Seventy-one (21.3%) of 333 women 51 years of age who were HPV negative at baseline were positive 3 years later. This percentage was higher than the corresponding acquisition rates among women 21 (15.2%), 31 (14.1%), and 41 (13.3%) years of age, although these differences were not significant. This retrospective study shows that HPV-negative women >50 years of age can acquire HPV and, therefore, require cervical screening. PMID:16318718

  12. Traumatic cervical spine fractures in the adult.

    PubMed

    Copley, Phillip; Tilliridou, Vicky; Jamjoom, Aimun

    2016-09-01

    This article reviews fractures of the cervical spine, highlighting the pertinent goals of initial management, the indications for different imaging modalities and the different fracture patterns. Basic principles of management of these different fracture patterns are outlined. PMID:27640656

  13. Airway management in cervical spine injury

    PubMed Central

    Austin, Naola; Krishnamoorthy, Vijay; Dagal, Arman

    2014-01-01

    To minimize risk of spinal cord injury, airway management providers must understand the anatomic and functional relationship between the airway, cervical column, and spinal cord. Patients with known or suspected cervical spine injury may require emergent intubation for airway protection and ventilatory support or elective intubation for surgery with or without rigid neck stabilization (i.e., halo). To provide safe and efficient care in these patients, practitioners must identify high-risk patients, be comfortable with available methods of airway adjuncts, and know how airway maneuvers, neck stabilization, and positioning affect the cervical spine. This review discusses the risks and benefits of various airway management strategies as well as specific concerns that affect patients with known or suspected cervical spine injury. PMID:24741498

  14. NIH Research Leads to Cervical Cancer Vaccine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Transmitted Diseases NIH Research Leads to Cervical Cancer Vaccine Past Issues / Fall 2008 Table of Contents For ... Douglas Lowy (left) and John Schiller developed the vaccine to prevent HPV infection in women, the cause ...

  15. Midline cervical cleft. A case report.

    PubMed

    Ikuzawa, M; Matsumoto, K; Amino, K; Sakuda, M

    1992-10-01

    A case of incomplete midline cervical cleft of the upper neck is reported. It showed histological resemblance to a mature teratoma with three different germ-cell components, including cartilage, striated muscles, small salivary glands, and nerves.

  16. The role of C2-C7 and O-C2 angle in the development of dysphagia after cervical spine surgery.

    PubMed

    Tian, Wei; Yu, Jie

    2013-06-01

    Dysphagia is a known complication of cervical surgery and may be prolonged or occasionally serious. A previous study showed that dysphagia after occipitocervical fusion was caused by oropharyngeal stenosis resulting from O-C2 (upper cervical lordosis) fixation in a flexed position. However, there have been few reports analyzing the association between the C2-C7 angle (middle-lower cervical lordosis) and postoperative dysphagia. The aim of this study was to analyze the relationship between cervical lordosis and the development of dysphagia after anterior and posterior cervical spine surgery (AC and PC). Three hundred fifty-four patients were reviewed in this retrospective clinical study, including 172 patients who underwent the AC procedure and 182 patients who had the PC procedure between June 2007 and May 2010. The presence and duration of postoperative dysphagia were recorded via face-to-face questioning or telephone interview performed at least 1 year after the procedure. Plain cervical radiographs before and after surgery were collected. The O-C2 angle and the C2-C7 angle were measured. Changes in the O-C2 angle and the C2-C7 angle were defined as dO-C2 angle = postoperative O-C2 angle - preoperative O-C2 angle and dC2-C7 angle = postoperative C2-C7 angle - preoperative C2-C7 angle. The association between postoperative dysphagia with dO-C2 angle and dC2-C7 angle was studied. Results showed that 12.8 % of AC and 9.4 % of PC patients reported dysphagia after cervical surgery. The dC2-C7 angle has considerable impact on postoperative dysphagia. When the dC2-C7 angle is greater than 5°, the chance of developing postoperative dysphagia is significantly greater. The dO-C2 angle, age, gender, BMI, operative time, blood loss, procedure type, revision surgery, most cephalic operative level, and number of operative levels did not significantly influence the incidence of postoperative dysphagia. No relationship was found between the dC2-C7 angle and the degree of

  17. Rehabilitation of anterior teeth with customised incisal guide table

    PubMed Central

    Mall, Priyanka; Singh, Kamleshwar; Rao, Jitendra; Kumar, Lakshya

    2013-01-01

    Restoration of anterior guidance is a major challenge to the clinician in planning of all restorative treatments. An accurate anterior guidance is important for proper function, aesthetics, comfort and phonetics. This article describes anterior rehabilitation of a patient who met with a road traffic accident and lost his anterior teeth. Anterior guidance developed in the provisional restorations was accurately recorded in the customised incisal guide table and permanent restorations were fabricated accordingly. PMID:23709546

  18. Unmet clinical needs in cervical cancer screening.

    PubMed

    Rao, Jianyu; Escobar-Hoyos, Luisa; Shroyer, Kenneth R

    2016-01-01

    Cancer rates worldwide are expected to increase disproportionally in coming decades relative to the projected increase in population, especially in the developing world. The general unavailability of the Pap test and the cost of the HPV test in the developing world have precluded the deployment of effective cervical cancer screening programs in many developing countries. Recent improvements in testing technology arise from a need to overcome the significant limitations of the Pap test and HPV test, but results require first-world technology and validation. Developing countries, where cervical cancer remains one of the most important causes of cancer death, have the greatest need for an affordable, easy-to-use, and highly reliable cancer screening method that can return a diagnosis through efficient laboratory analysis or, more easily, at a woman's point of care. While research, testing, and vaccine improvements in recent years continue to lower the incidence of cervical cancer in some developed countries such as the U.S., HPV testing research needs to do more than test for the presence of virus. The tests must determine the presence and progression of cervical disease. Tests should be more sensitive and specific than Pap tests and Pap-related tests, and should be accurate in more than 90 percent of cases. Tests also need to be low-cost, objective, and easy to perform so screening programs can be widely implemented in developing countries where the need for a better cervical cancer screening test is highest. Such tests may be available through the recent advances in specific biomarkers of cervical cancer and multiplex detection technologies. Development of the next generation of cervical cancer tests that are more specific, sensitive, and informative than the traditional Pap or HPV test will make a significant impact on the reduction of cervical cancer worldwide.

  19. Cervical intra-/extramedullary solitary fibrous tumour.

    PubMed

    Ogungbo, B; Prakash, S; Kulkarni, G; Bradey, N; Marks, S M; Scoones, D

    2005-06-01

    A 53-year-old man presented with a 9-month history of symptoms of right-sided weakness, tingling and hypersentivity to clothes on both sides of the body. MRI revealed a large intraspinal intradural tumour at the level of C3-C4 in the cervical cord. The final histology was a solitary fibrous tumour (SFT) of the cervical spinal cord. The radiological diagnosis, surgical management and histology are reviewed.

  20. [Surgical anatomy of the anterior mediastinum].

    PubMed

    Biondi, Alberto; Rausei, Stefano; Cananzi, Ferdinando C M; Zoccali, Marco; D'Ugo, Stefano; Persiani, Roberto

    2007-01-01

    The mediastinum is located from the thoracic inlet to the diaphragm between the left and right pleural cavities and contains vital structures of the circulatory, respiratory, digestive, and nervous system. Over the years, since there are no fascial or anatomic planes, anatomists and radiologists have suggested various schemes for subdividing the mediastinum and several anatomical and radiological classifications of the mediastinum are reported in the literature. The most popular of these scheme divides medistinum, for purposes of description, into two parts: an upper portion, above the upper level of the pericardium, which is named the superior mediastinum; and a lower portion, below the upper level of the pericardium. For clinical purposes, the mediastinum may be subdivided into three major areas, i.e. anterior, middle, and posterior compartments. The anterior mediastinum is defined as the region posterior to the sternum and anterior to the heart and brachiocephalic vessels. It extends from the thoracic inlet to the diaphragm and contains the thymus gland, fat, and lymph nodes. This article will review surgical anatomy of the anterior mediastinum and will focus on the surgical approch to anterior mediastinum and thymic diseases.