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Sample records for cervical cancer management

  1. Nanotechnology in the management of cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jiezhong; Gu, Wenyi; Yang, Lei; Chen, Chen; Shao, Renfu; Xu, Kewei; Xu, Zhi Ping

    2015-03-01

    Cervical cancer is a major disease with high mortality. All cervical cancers are caused by infection with human papillomaviruses (HPV). Although preventive vaccines for cervical cancer are successful, treatment of cervical cancer is far less satisfactory because of multidrug resistance and side effects. In this review, we summarize the recent application of nanotechnology to the diagnosis and treatment of cervical cancer as well as the development of HPV vaccines. Early detection of cervical cancer enables tumours to be efficiently removed by surgical procedures, leading to increased survival rate. The current method of detecting cervical cancer by Pap smear can only achieve 50% sensitivity, whereas nanotechnology has been used to detect HPVs with greatly improved sensitivity. In cervical cancer treatment, nanotechnology has been used for the delivery of anticancer drugs to increase treatment efficacy and decrease side effects. Nanodelivery of HPV preventive and therapeutic vaccines has also been investigated to increase vaccine efficacy. Overall, these developments suggest that nanoparticle-based vaccine may become the most effective way to prevent and treat cervical cancer, assisted or combined with some other nanotechnology-based therapy.

  2. Nanotechnology in the management of cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jiezhong; Gu, Wenyi; Yang, Lei; Chen, Chen; Shao, Renfu; Xu, Kewei; Xu, Zhi Ping

    2015-03-01

    Cervical cancer is a major disease with high mortality. All cervical cancers are caused by infection with human papillomaviruses (HPV). Although preventive vaccines for cervical cancer are successful, treatment of cervical cancer is far less satisfactory because of multidrug resistance and side effects. In this review, we summarize the recent application of nanotechnology to the diagnosis and treatment of cervical cancer as well as the development of HPV vaccines. Early detection of cervical cancer enables tumours to be efficiently removed by surgical procedures, leading to increased survival rate. The current method of detecting cervical cancer by Pap smear can only achieve 50% sensitivity, whereas nanotechnology has been used to detect HPVs with greatly improved sensitivity. In cervical cancer treatment, nanotechnology has been used for the delivery of anticancer drugs to increase treatment efficacy and decrease side effects. Nanodelivery of HPV preventive and therapeutic vaccines has also been investigated to increase vaccine efficacy. Overall, these developments suggest that nanoparticle-based vaccine may become the most effective way to prevent and treat cervical cancer, assisted or combined with some other nanotechnology-based therapy. PMID:25752817

  3. Laparoscopic Fertility Sparing Management of Cervical Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Facchini, Chiara; Rapacchia, Giuseppina; Montanari, Giulia; Casadio, Paolo; Pilu, Gianluigi; Seracchioli, Renato

    2014-01-01

    Fertility can be preserved after conservative cervical surgery. We report on a 29-year-old woman who was obese, para 0, and diagnosed with cervical insufficiency at the first trimester of current pregnancy due to a previous trachelectomy. She underwent laparoscopic transabdominal cervical cerclage (LTCC) for cervical cancer. The surgery was successful and she was discharged two days later. The patient underwent a caesarean section at 38 weeks of gestation. Laparoscopic surgery is a minimally invasive approach associated with less pain and faster recovery, feasible even in obese women. PMID:24696772

  4. Cervical Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... the place where a baby grows during pregnancy. Cervical cancer is caused by a virus called HPV. The ... for a long time, or have HIV infection. Cervical cancer may not cause any symptoms at first. Later, ...

  5. Cervical Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... dysplasia of the cervix, vagina, or vulva • A family history of cervical cancer •Smoking •Certain sexually transmitted infections , such as chlamydia • ... to treat your cancer, you still need cervical cancer screening. Cells are taken from the upper vagina ... smallest units of a structure in the body; the building blocks for all ...

  6. Management of pre-invasive cervical cancer in low-resource setting.

    PubMed

    Chichareon, Saibua B

    2004-10-01

    Cervical cancer is one of the health burdens in many developing countries. The advanced knowledge in the past decade reassured the important role of human papillomavirus as the necessary cause of cervical cancer and makes a clear understanding of its natural history. Cervical cancer has a long period of pre-invasive stage, and only a small proportion of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) that can progress to be an invasive lesion. Appropriate management of CIN can prevent invasive cervical cancer. The contemporary treatment of CIN is more conservative and requires effective follow-up process. However inappropriate management of CIN is still be found at the international and national survey of less developed countries. Although no apparent superior surgical technique for treating CIN, loop electrosurgical excision procedure (LEEP) and cryotherapy are fascinated for the low-resource setting. Other alternative approach, which eliminates cytology and colposcopy may be considered in the ultrashort- resource setting with a high prevalence of cervical cancer. In this article, the contemporary knowledge about the natural history of cervical cancer, especially the implication of human papillomavirus (HPV) for pre-invasive cervical cancer, is summarized. The current approaches for treatment of CIN are reviewed from the perspective of low-resource settings. The various strategies for management approaches are demonstrated, and the cost-effectiveness is discussed. The pattern of pre-invasive cervical cancer management in developing countries, including in the south of Thailand is exhibited, and the single-visit service for cervical cancer prevention in the northeast is challenged.

  7. General Information about Cervical Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Research Cervical Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Cervical Cancer Go to Health Professional Version ... the NCI website . Cervical Cancer During Pregnancy General Information About Cervical Cancer During Pregnancy Treatment of cervical ...

  8. Cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Shepherd, John H

    2012-06-01

    Standard treatment for invasive cervical cancer involves either radical surgery or radiotherapy. Childbearing is therefore impossible after either of these treatments. A fertility-sparing option, however, by radical trachelectomy has been shown to be effective, provided that strict criteria for selection are followed. Fertility rates are high, whereas recurrence is low, indicating that a more conservative approach to dealing with early small cervical tumours is feasible. Careful preoperative assessment by magnetic resonance imaging scans allows accurate measurement of the tumour with precise definition to plan surgery. This will ensure an adequate clear margin by wide excision of the tumour excising the cervix by radical vaginal trachelectomy with surrounding para-cervical and upper vaginal tissues. An isthmic cerclage is inserted to provide competence at the level of the internal orifice. A primary vagino-isthmic anastomosis is conducted to restore continuity of the lower genital tract. Subsequent pregnancies require careful monitoring in view of the high risk of spontaneous premature rupture of the membranes. Delivery by classical caesarean section is necessary at the onset of labour or electively before term. Over 1100 such procedures have been carried out vaginally or abdominally, resulting in 240 live births. Radical vaginal trachelectomy with a laparoscopic pelvic-node dissection offers the least morbid and invasive route for surgery, provided that adequate surgical skills have been obtained. PMID:22353492

  9. Cervical Cancer Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancer found early may be easier to treat. Cervical cancer screening is usually part of a woman's health ... may do more tests, such as a biopsy. Cervical cancer screening has risks. The results can sometimes be ...

  10. Biomarkers in Cervical Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yim, Eun-Kyoung; Park, Jong-Sup

    2006-01-01

    Cervical cancer, a potentially preventable disease, remains the second most common malignancy in women worldwide. Human papillomavirus (HPV) is the single most important etiological agent in cervical cancer, contributing to neoplastic progression through the action of viral oncoproteins, mainly E6 and E7. Cervical screening programs using Pap smear testing have dramatically improved cervical cancer incidence and reduced deaths, but cervical cancer still remains a global health burden. The biomarker discovery for accurate detection and diagnosis of cervical carcinoma and its malignant precursors (collectively referred to as high-grade cervical disease) represents one of the current challenges in clinical medicine and cytopathology. PMID:19690652

  11. Development of protocol for the management of cervical cancer symptoms in resource-constrained developing countries.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Ramaiah Vinay; Bhasker, Suman

    2015-02-01

    Cervical cancer is the commonest malignancy of women in economically emerging countries. Patients have distressing symptoms from presentation through follow-up or end of life. Cervical cancer imposes significant burden on health care system due to distressing symptoms and associated loss of quality-adjusted life years (QALY). Multitude of drugs and surgical measures in various combinations can relieve these distressing symptoms and various clinical conditions. The protocols and guidelines for alleviation or relief of symptoms by general pharmacological and surgical measures form an important policy subject in planning cervical cancer management program. These protocol and guidelines are based on the mechanism of action of drugs, extrapolation from management of similar symptoms, and clinical situations arising out of other non-cancerous conditions and experience of health care professionals. Therefore, rigorous evaluation of effectiveness of supportive health care services in developing countries is the need of hour. However, evaluation of such protocol and guidelines are not feasible in emerging economies due to resource constraint. Industrialized affluent nations are also not able to implement and further support care guidelines despite its recognition as an integral part of multidisciplinary management of cancer. Aforementioned factors have created blind spot zone of management purview of cervical cancer. Hence, we attempt to develop protocol for management of adverse events of cervical cancer. Symptoms' and medical conditions' management guidelines evolved on the basis of empirical clinical practice in community and premier oncology centers in resource-constrained developing countries has been presented in this short report. This report should not be an end in itself but has to attract attention of policy-makers, academicians, researchers, and practitioners toward advancing supportive care needs of cancer patients in low- and middle-income countries (LMIC).

  12. Development of protocol for the management of cervical cancer symptoms in resource-constrained developing countries.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Ramaiah Vinay; Bhasker, Suman

    2015-02-01

    Cervical cancer is the commonest malignancy of women in economically emerging countries. Patients have distressing symptoms from presentation through follow-up or end of life. Cervical cancer imposes significant burden on health care system due to distressing symptoms and associated loss of quality-adjusted life years (QALY). Multitude of drugs and surgical measures in various combinations can relieve these distressing symptoms and various clinical conditions. The protocols and guidelines for alleviation or relief of symptoms by general pharmacological and surgical measures form an important policy subject in planning cervical cancer management program. These protocol and guidelines are based on the mechanism of action of drugs, extrapolation from management of similar symptoms, and clinical situations arising out of other non-cancerous conditions and experience of health care professionals. Therefore, rigorous evaluation of effectiveness of supportive health care services in developing countries is the need of hour. However, evaluation of such protocol and guidelines are not feasible in emerging economies due to resource constraint. Industrialized affluent nations are also not able to implement and further support care guidelines despite its recognition as an integral part of multidisciplinary management of cancer. Aforementioned factors have created blind spot zone of management purview of cervical cancer. Hence, we attempt to develop protocol for management of adverse events of cervical cancer. Symptoms' and medical conditions' management guidelines evolved on the basis of empirical clinical practice in community and premier oncology centers in resource-constrained developing countries has been presented in this short report. This report should not be an end in itself but has to attract attention of policy-makers, academicians, researchers, and practitioners toward advancing supportive care needs of cancer patients in low- and middle-income countries (LMIC

  13. Optimal management of cervical cancer in HIV-positive patients: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Ntekim, Atara; Campbell, Oladapo; Rothenbacher, Dietrich

    2015-01-01

    The clinical management of cervical cancer in HIV-positive patients has challenges mainly due to the concerns on immune status. At present, their mode of management is similar to HIV-seronegative patients involving the use of chemotherapy and radiotherapy concurrently as indicated. HIV infection, cancer, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy lower immunity through reduction in CD4 cell counts. At present there are no treatment guidelines for HIV-positive patients. This study was done to systematically review the literature on cervical cancer management in HIV-positive patients and treatment outcomes. A systematic literature search was done in the major databases to identify studies on the management of HIV-positive patients with cervical cancer. Identified studies were assessed for eligibility and inclusion in the review following the guidelines of The Cochrane Handbook for Systematic Reviews and CRD's (Centre for Reviews and Dissemination) guidance for undertaking reviews in health care. Eight eligible studies were identified from the literature. Three of them were prospective while five were retrospective studies. Notably, the average age at diagnosis of cervical cancer in HIV-positive patients was a decade lower than in seronegative patients. There was no difference in distribution of stages of disease at presentation between HIV-positive and negative patients. Mild acute toxicity (Grades 1 and 2) was higher in HIV-positive patients than in HIV-negative patients in hematopoietic system. In the grades 3 and 4 reactions, anemia was reported in 4% versus 2% while gastrointestinal reactions were reported in 5% versus 2% respectively. In general, patients who were started early on HAART had higher rates of treatment completion. The study supports the suggestion that HAART should be commenced early at cervical cancer diagnosis in HIV-positive patients diagnosed with cervical cancer to ensure less toxicity and better treatment compliance. PMID:26136407

  14. Optimal management of cervical cancer in HIV-positive patients: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Ntekim, Atara; Campbell, Oladapo; Rothenbacher, Dietrich

    2015-09-01

    The clinical management of cervical cancer in HIV-positive patients has challenges mainly due to the concerns on immune status. At present, their mode of management is similar to HIV-seronegative patients involving the use of chemotherapy and radiotherapy concurrently as indicated. HIV infection, cancer, radiotherapy, and chemotherapy lower immunity through reduction in CD4 cell counts. At present there are no treatment guidelines for HIV-positive patients. This study was done to systematically review the literature on cervical cancer management in HIV-positive patients and treatment outcomes. A systematic literature search was done in the major databases to identify studies on the management of HIV-positive patients with cervical cancer. Identified studies were assessed for eligibility and inclusion in the review following the guidelines of The Cochrane Handbook for Systematic Reviews and CRD's (Centre for Reviews and Dissemination) guidance for undertaking reviews in health care. Eight eligible studies were identified from the literature. Three of them were prospective while five were retrospective studies. Notably, the average age at diagnosis of cervical cancer in HIV-positive patients was a decade lower than in seronegative patients. There was no difference in distribution of stages of disease at presentation between HIV-positive and negative patients. Mild acute toxicity (Grades 1 and 2) was higher in HIV-positive patients than in HIV-negative patients in hematopoietic system. In the grades 3 and 4 reactions, anemia was reported in 4% versus 2% while gastrointestinal reactions were reported in 5% versus 2% respectively. In general, patients who were started early on HAART had higher rates of treatment completion. The study supports the suggestion that HAART should be commenced early at cervical cancer diagnosis in HIV-positive patients diagnosed with cervical cancer to ensure less toxicity and better treatment compliance. PMID:26136407

  15. Drugs Approved for Cervical Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Professionals Questions to Ask about Your Treatment Research Drugs Approved for Cervical Cancer This page lists cancer ... in cervical cancer that are not listed here. Drugs Approved to Prevent Cervical Cancer Cervarix (Recombinant HPV ...

  16. Cervical cancer - screening and prevention

    MedlinePlus

    Cancer cervix - screening; HPV - cervical cancer screening; Dysplasia - cervical cancer screening ... Almost all cervical cancers are caused by HPV (human papilloma virus). HPV is a common virus that spreads through sexual contact. Certain types ...

  17. Cost and resource utilization in cervical cancer management: a real-world retrospective cost analysis

    PubMed Central

    Cromwell, I.; Ferreira, Z.; Smith, L.; van der Hoek, K.; Ogilvie, G.; Coldman, A.; Peacock, S.J.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives We set out to assess the health care resource utilization and cost of cervical cancer from the perspective of a single-payer health care system. Methods Retrospective observational data for women diagnosed with cervical cancer in British Columbia between 2004 and 2009 were analyzed to calculate patient-level resource utilization patterns from diagnosis to death or 5-year discharge. Domains of resource use within the scope of this cost analysis were chemotherapy, radiotherapy, and brachytherapy administered by the BC Cancer Agency; resource utilization related to hospitalization and outpatient visits as recorded by the B.C. Ministry of Health; medically required services billed under the B.C. Medical Services Plan; and prescriptions dispensed under British Columbia’s health insurance programs. Unit costs were applied to radiotherapy and brachytherapy, producing per-patient costs. Results The mean cost per case of treating cervical cancer in British Columbia was $19,153 (standard error: $3,484). Inpatient hospitalizations, at 35%, represented the largest proportion of the total cost (95% confidence interval: 32.9% to 36.9%). Costs were compared for subgroups of the total cohort. Conclusions As health care systems change the way they manage, screen for, and prevent cervical cancer, cost-effectiveness evaluations of the overall approach will require up-to-date data for resource utilization and costs. We provide information suitable for such a purpose and also identify factors that influence costs. PMID:26985142

  18. Preventing cervical cancer globally.

    PubMed

    Schmeler, Kathleen M

    2012-11-01

    Cervical cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer and cancer-related deaths among women worldwide. More than 85% of cases and deaths occur in the developing world where the availability of effective screening is limited. In this issue of the journal, Pierce and colleagues (beginning on page 1273) describe a novel technique using a high-resolution microendoscope (HRME) to diagnose cervical dysplasia. This perspective reviews the limitations of existing cervical cancer screening methods currently in use in low-resource settings and the potential for HRME imaging to contribute to cervical cancer prevention in the developing world.

  19. Cervical Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s (CDC) Inside Knowledge: Get the Facts About Gynecologic Cancer campaign. The ... the facts about gynecologic cancer, providing important “inside knowledge” about their bodies and health. Get the Facts ...

  20. Using communication to manage uncertainty about cervical cancer screening guideline adherence among Appalachian women

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Elisia L.; Gordon, Allison Scott; Record, Rachael; Shaunfield, Sara; Jones, Grace M.; Collins, Tom

    2015-01-01

    Changes to the United States Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommendations for cervical cancer preventive services have led to patient confusion, especially in medically underserved populations. We investigated how patient uncertainty concerning cervical cancer screening guidelines is appraised and managed through communication with healthcare providers by conducting in-depth, face-to-face interviews with 24 adult women between the ages of 24 and 65 (m = 41, SD = 14) living in Appalachia Kentucky. In general, participants expressed a high degree of uncertainty about the updated cervical cancer screening guidelines and appraised this uncertainty as both a danger and an opportunity. Communication with healthcare providers served both to exacerbate and to mitigate patient uncertainty. The study identifies how health care providers may use the change in USPSTF guidelines as a ‘teachable moment’ to productively counsel patients on the importance of timely screening, the typical progression of certain types of high-risk HPV infection to cervical cancer, and the importance of follow-up care. PMID:26949274

  1. FDG and FMISO PET Hypoxia Evaluation in Cervical Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-06-03

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage III Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer; Stage IVB Cervical Cancer

  2. Exploring the barriers to health care and psychosocial challenges in cervical cancer management in Kenya

    PubMed Central

    Ngutu, Mariah; Nyamongo, Isaac K

    2015-01-01

    Cervical cancer is the most frequent cancer among women aged between 15 years and 44 years in Kenya, resulting in an estimated 4,802 women being diagnosed with cervical cancer and 2,451 dying from the disease annually. It is often detected at its advanced invasive stages, resulting in a protracted illness upon diagnosis. This qualitative study looked at the illness trajectories of women living with cervical cancer enrolled for follow-up care at Kenyatta National Hospital cancer treatment center and the Nairobi Hospice, both in Nairobi county, Kenya. Using the qualitative phenomenological approach, data were collected through 18 in-depth interviews with women living with cervical cancer between April and July 2011. In-depth interviews with their caregivers, key informant interviews with health care workers, and participant observation field notes were used to provide additional qualitative data. These data were analyzed based on grounded theory’s inductive approach. Two key themes on which the data analysis was then anchored were identified, namely, psychosocial challenges of cervical cancer and structural barriers to quality health care. Findings indicated a prolonged illness trajectory with psychosocial challenges, fueled by structural barriers that women were faced with after a cervical cancer diagnosis. To address issues relevant to the increasing numbers of women with cervical cancer, research studies need to include larger samples of these women. Also important are studies that allow in-depth understanding of the experiences of women living with cervical cancer. PMID:26346001

  3. ADXS11-001 High Dose HPV+ Cervical Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-17

    Effects of Immunotherapy; Metastatic/Recurrent Cervical Cancer; Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Cell Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Cervical Small Cell Carcinoma; Stage III Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer; Stage IVB Cervical Cancer

  4. Invasive cervical cancer in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    La Russa, M; Jeyarajah, A R

    2016-05-01

    Detection of invasive cervical cancer during pregnancy is rare, with reported incidence rates ranging from 0.05% to 0.1%. However, cervical cancer is one of the most common malignancies diagnosed during pregnancy. The management of invasive cervical cancer in pregnancy is extremely challenging and requires a multidisciplinary team approach to optimise the treatment for the patient by simultaneously providing the best chance of survival for the foetus. The approach is based mainly on the following factors: gestational age at the time of the diagnosis, stage, histological subtype, desire regarding fertility and quality of life. The gold standard treatment for this condition in pregnancy is not yet established. This is due to the absence of prospective studies and clinical trials. Therefore, its management presents a dilemma that requires individualisation of care. The various factors that need to be considered for obtaining a good outcome for both mother and child are described in this study. PMID:26586539

  5. Prevent Cervical Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Fighting Cervical Cancer Worldwide Stay Informed Printable Versions Standard quality PDF [PDF-877KB] High-quality PDF for professional ... uterus, vagina, and vulva. Stay Informed Printable Versions Standard quality PDF [PDF-877KB] High-quality PDF for professional ...

  6. Cervical Cancer Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... cervical cancer in women aged 30–65 years. Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV): A virus that attacks certain cells of the body’s immune system and causes acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). Human Papillomavirus ( ...

  7. Immunotherapy for Cervical Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    In an early phase NCI clinical trial, two patients with metastatic cervical cancer had a complete disappearance of their tumors after receiving treatment with a form of immunotherapy called adoptive cell transfer.

  8. Veliparib, Topotecan Hydrochloride, and Filgrastim or Pegfilgrastim in Treating Patients With Persistent or Recurrent Cervical Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-25

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Cervical Small Cell Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Cervical Carcinoma; Stage III Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer; Stage IVB Cervical Cancer

  9. Radiation-sparing managements for cervical cancer: a developing countries perspective

    PubMed Central

    Candelaria, Myrna; Cetina, Lucely; Garcia-Arias, Alicia; Lopez-Graniel, Carlos; de la Garza, Jaime; Robles, Elizabeth; Duenas-Gonzalez, Alfonso

    2006-01-01

    Cervical cancer is the seventh most frequent cancer worldwide but more than 80% of cases occur in developing countries. Till date, radiation therapy with external beam and brachytherapy remains as the core treatment for most stages of cervical cancer. However, radiation treatment protocols and equipment modelled on the best developed countries can be seldom applied directly to developing countries owing to financial constraints and lack of qualified personnel, thus, a substantial proportion of patients do not have access to even palliative radiation therapy. Treatment options when the standard therapy is either not available or difficult to reproduce in particular settings is highly desirable with the potential to save lives that otherwise could be lost by the lack of adequate treatment. These options of treatment ideally had to have show, 1) that these are not inferior to the "standard" in terms of either survival or quality of life; 2) that these can be delivered in settings were the "standard" is not available or if available its quality is poor; and 3) that the treatment option be accepted by the population to be treated. Based on these considerations, it is obvious that cervical cancer patients, particularly those who live in countries with limited resources and therefore may not have sufficient radiation therapy resources are in need of newer therapeutical options. There is now a considerable amount of information emanating from clinical studies where surgery has a major role in treating this disease. These forms of "radiation-sparing" treatments include total mesometrial resection that could make unnecessary the use of adjuvant radiation; neoadjuvant chemotherapy that could avoid the use of adjuvant radiation in around 85% of patients and preoperative chemoradiation that could make brachytherapy dispensable. The feasibility and therapeutical value of these potential forms of management need to be prospectively evaluated. PMID:17101048

  10. Integrating Chemotherapy in the Management of Cervical Cancer: A Critical Appraisal.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Lalit; Gupta, Sudeep

    2016-01-01

    The management of locally advanced cervix cancer has undergone a paradigm shift during the last decade. Concurrent chemoradiation (CCRT) (with cisplatin alone or in combination) is currently the standard treatment approach. CCRT results in a 5-year overall survival rate of 66% and a disease-free survival of 58%. About 30-40% of patients with locally advanced cervical cancer fail to achieve complete response to CCRT; alternative approaches are needed to improve the outcome for such patients. Weekly paclitaxel and carboplatin for 4-6 weeks as dose-dense chemotherapy prior to CCRT could be one such potential approach. The role of adjuvant chemotherapy after CCRT in patients with positive lymph nodes, larger tumor volume and stage III-IVA disease needs further exploration. Adjuvant chemotherapy is also being investigated for early-stage (stages IA2, IB1 or IIA) cervical cancer with presence of risk factors such as lymph node metastasis, lymphovascular space invasion and invasion depth of more than 10 mm, microscopic parametrial invasion, non-squamous histology and positive surgical margins. For patients with early-stage disease (IA2-IIA), short-course chemotherapy prior to surgery is associated with an improved outcome in many studies. Neo-adjuvant chemotherapy followed by fertility preservation surgery is feasible in carefully selected young patients with bulky stage IB1 disease. Recently, a number of molecular pathways have been identified as potential therapeutic targets. Bevacizumab - an inhibitor of vascular endothelial growth factor - is associated with improved survival in patients with recurrent/metastatic cervical cancer. Whether bevacizumab and other similar novel agents targeting molecular pathways could be used in front-line treatment along with cytotoxic chemotherapy is likely to be an area of research in future studies. PMID:27464068

  11. Incorporating a 3-dimensional printer into the management of early-stage cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Baek, Min-Hyun; Kim, Dae-Yeon; Kim, Namkug; Rhim, Chae Chun; Kim, Jong-Hyeok; Nam, Joo-Hyun

    2016-08-01

    We used a 3-dimensional (3D) printer to create anatomical replicas of real lesions and tested its application in cervical cancer. Our study patient decided to undergo radical hysterectomy after seeing her 3D model which was then used to plan and simulate this surgery. Using 3D printers to create patient-specific 3D tumor models may aid cervical cancer patients make treatment decisions. This technology will lead to better surgical and oncological outcomes for cervical cancer patients. J. Surg. Oncol. 2016;114:150-152. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Incorporating a 3-dimensional printer into the management of early-stage cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Baek, Min-Hyun; Kim, Dae-Yeon; Kim, Namkug; Rhim, Chae Chun; Kim, Jong-Hyeok; Nam, Joo-Hyun

    2016-08-01

    We used a 3-dimensional (3D) printer to create anatomical replicas of real lesions and tested its application in cervical cancer. Our study patient decided to undergo radical hysterectomy after seeing her 3D model which was then used to plan and simulate this surgery. Using 3D printers to create patient-specific 3D tumor models may aid cervical cancer patients make treatment decisions. This technology will lead to better surgical and oncological outcomes for cervical cancer patients. J. Surg. Oncol. 2016;114:150-152. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27222318

  13. Ovarian and cervical cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Williams, C.

    1992-01-01

    Death rates from cervical cancer have already fallen this century and for patients with invasive cervical cancer five year survival rates are greater than for most solid tumours. Better screening for premalignant changes may further reduce the incidence of invasive cancer; indeed, it has been claimed that the reduction in mortality could be as high as 90%, though estimates of screening efficacy have varied greatly. For those with advanced invasive carcinoma neoadjuvant chemotherapy may reduce the risk of relapse and improve survival. Images FIG 2 p1504-a PMID:1611377

  14. Bevacizumab, Radiation Therapy, and Cisplatin in Treating Patients With Previously Untreated Locally Advanced Cervical Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-09-22

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Cell Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage III Cervical Cancer

  15. How Are Cervical Cancers and Pre-Cancers Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... How is cervical cancer staged? How is cervical cancer diagnosed? The first step in finding cervical cancer ... systems. Tests for women with symptoms of cervical cancer or abnormal Pap results Medical history and physical ...

  16. [Primary cervical cancer screening].

    PubMed

    Vargas-Hernández, Víctor Manuel; Vargas-Aguilar, Víctor Manuel; Tovar-Rodríguez, José María

    2015-01-01

    Cervico-uterine cancer screening with cytology decrease incidence by more than 50%. The cause of this cancer is the human papilloma virus high risk, and requires a sensitive test to provide sufficient sensitivity and specificity for early detection and greater interval period when the results are negative. The test of the human papilloma virus high risk, is effective and safe because of its excellent sensitivity, negative predictive value and optimal reproducibility, especially when combined with liquid-based cytology or biomarkers with viral load, with higher sensitivity and specificity, by reducing false positives for the detection of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 2 or greater injury, with excellent clinical benefits to cervical cancer screening and related infection of human papilloma virus diseases, is currently the best test for early detection infection of human papillomavirus and the risk of carcinogenesis.

  17. MRI and PET Imaging in Predicting Treatment Response in Patients With Stage IB-IVA Cervical Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-24

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Cervical Undifferentiated Carcinoma; Recurrent Cervical Carcinoma; Stage IB2 Cervical Cancer; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIB Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer

  18. Radiation Therapy Plus Cisplatin and Gemcitabine in Treating Patients With Cervical Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-12-23

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Cervical Small Cell Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage III Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer

  19. [Preventing cervical cancer].

    PubMed

    Simon, P; Noël, J-C

    2015-09-01

    The incidence of cervical cancer has hopefully been dropping down in our industrialized countries since the introduction of both primary and secondary prevention. Nevertheless, it is still lethal in one out of two affected women though the introduction of cytological screening has dramatically reduced the mortality. Progressive diffusion of anti-HPV vaccination, the broadening of the viral types concerned, its association with existing screening measures and finally the introduction of viral detection as a screening tool must optimize the results already obtained.

  20. Nonsurgical Management of Cervical Cancer: Locally Advanced, Recurrent, and Metastatic Disease, Survivorship, and Beyond

    PubMed Central

    Mackay, Helen J.; Wenzel, Lari; Mileshkin, Linda

    2016-01-01

    Overview Despite the declining incidence of cervical cancer as a result of the introduction of screening programs, globally it remains a leading cause of cancer-related death in women. Outcomes for patients who are diagnosed with anything but early-stage disease remain poor. Here we examine emerging strategies to improve the treatment of locally advanced disease. We discuss emerging biologic data, which are informing our investigation of new therapeutic interventions in persistent, recurrent, and metastatic cervical cancer. We recognize the importance of interventions to improve quality of life and to prevent long-term sequelae in women undergoing treatment. Finally, and perhaps most importantly, we recognize the need for global collaboration and advocacy to improve the outcome for all women at risk of and diagnosed with this disease. PMID:25993189

  1. Cisplatin and Radiation Therapy With or Without Tirapazamine in Treating Patients With Cervical Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-06-18

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Cell Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage III Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer

  2. Chemoradiation Therapy and Ipilimumab in Treating Patients With Locally Advanced Cervical Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-25

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma, Not Otherwise Specified; Stage IB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIB Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer

  3. Radiotherapy of Cervical Cancer.

    PubMed

    Vordermark, Dirk

    2016-01-01

    Curative-intent radical radiotherapy of cervical cancer consists of external-beam radiotherapy, brachytherapy, and concomitant chemotherapy with cisplatin. For each element, new developments aim to improve tumor control rates or treatment tolerance. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) has been shown to reduce gastrointestinal toxicity and can be used to selectively increase the radiotherapy dose. Individualized, image-guided brachytherapy enables better adaptation of high-dose volumes to the tumor extension. Intensification of concomitant or sequential systemic therapy is under evaluation. PMID:27614991

  4. Management of cervical cancer and surgical-pathological staging (SPS). Report of our clinical case series.

    PubMed

    Onnis, A; Marchetti, M; Maggino, T; Cascio, A; Cerri, G; Dipasquale, C; Meneghello, E; Romagnolo, C; Rozzo, M L

    1988-01-01

    FIGO staging is imprecise in a relevant number of cases of cervical cancer, especially in advanced stages, when the prognosis and the choice of the therapy are most delicate. The Authors examine their case series about the index of correction of FIGO staging after Surgical Pathological Staging (SPS). Surgical Pathological Staging was applied systematically in 788 cases and revealed errors in FIGO staging in 16% of cases at stage I; 77% at stage II; and 96% at stage III. SPS allows a more precise knowledge of neoplastic diffusion and consequently to the elimination of many false advanced stages and to adequate the treatment. Furthermore 5 year survival rate confirms the role of SPS and Surgical therapy alone or combined with Radiotherapy and Chemotherapy in every stages of diffusion of cervical cancer. PMID:3383889

  5. Cervical cancer screening.

    PubMed Central

    Katz, A.

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To review the role of family physicians in screening for cancer of the cervix, to review the evidence for screening, in particular, frequency and technique for screening, and to review the reasons cervical cancer has not been prevented and the role of family physicians in addressing these failures. QUALITY OF EVIDENCE: The value of screening has been established with level II evidence. Many of the unresolved issues are not supported either way by good evidence; level II and III evidence predominates. MAIN FINDINGS: In Canada, 1350 women were predicted to be diagnosed with cancer of the cervix in 1996. Most of these women had not been screened. Minority, rural, low-income, and older women face important barriers to screening. Family physicians have a role in reaching out to these women to provide effective health care, including cancer screening. When cancer screening is performed, it should conform to recommended techniques with appropriate follow up of abnormal test results. CONCLUSIONS: Family physicians have an important role in preventing cancer of the cervix. Efforts should be concentrated on encouraging a greater proportion of eligible women to be screened. Criteria are suggested for effective screening. PMID:9721422

  6. Simple trachelectomy during pregnancy for cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    Moreno-Luna, Estefania; Alonso, Patricia; Santiago, Javier De; Zapardiel, Ignacio

    2016-01-01

    Invasive cervical cancer is rare during a pregnancy, even though it is one of the most frequently diagnosed neoplasias during that time. It is noted that around 30% of women diagnosed with cervical cancer are of reproductive age. This means that up to 3% of cases of cervical cancer are found in pregnant women or those who are in the post-birth period. A cervicovaginal Pap smear is performed as part of the regular checkup for a pregnant woman during the first visit so that cervical cancer can easily be diagnosed early in these women, detecting it early in up to 70–80% of cases. We present here the case of a patient with initial diagnosis of cervical cancer made around 20th week of pregnancy. It was then treated by a simple trachelectomy and cerclage during week 24. The pregnant woman gave birth to a healthy baby at the end of her pregnancy. Definitive treatment was completed three months after giving birth with a total hysterectomy and laparoscopic bilateral salpingectomy while preserving both ovaries. After 17 months of monitoring the patient showed no signs of reoccurrence. In conclusion, during the early stage of cervical cancer conservative management may be a reasonable option to preserve the current pregnancy. PMID:27610199

  7. Simple trachelectomy during pregnancy for cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Moreno-Luna, Estefania; Alonso, Patricia; Santiago, Javier De; Zapardiel, Ignacio

    2016-01-01

    Invasive cervical cancer is rare during a pregnancy, even though it is one of the most frequently diagnosed neoplasias during that time. It is noted that around 30% of women diagnosed with cervical cancer are of reproductive age. This means that up to 3% of cases of cervical cancer are found in pregnant women or those who are in the post-birth period. A cervicovaginal Pap smear is performed as part of the regular checkup for a pregnant woman during the first visit so that cervical cancer can easily be diagnosed early in these women, detecting it early in up to 70-80% of cases. We present here the case of a patient with initial diagnosis of cervical cancer made around 20th week of pregnancy. It was then treated by a simple trachelectomy and cerclage during week 24. The pregnant woman gave birth to a healthy baby at the end of her pregnancy. Definitive treatment was completed three months after giving birth with a total hysterectomy and laparoscopic bilateral salpingectomy while preserving both ovaries. After 17 months of monitoring the patient showed no signs of reoccurrence. In conclusion, during the early stage of cervical cancer conservative management may be a reasonable option to preserve the current pregnancy. PMID:27610199

  8. Simple trachelectomy during pregnancy for cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    Moreno-Luna, Estefania; Alonso, Patricia; Santiago, Javier De; Zapardiel, Ignacio

    2016-01-01

    Invasive cervical cancer is rare during a pregnancy, even though it is one of the most frequently diagnosed neoplasias during that time. It is noted that around 30% of women diagnosed with cervical cancer are of reproductive age. This means that up to 3% of cases of cervical cancer are found in pregnant women or those who are in the post-birth period. A cervicovaginal Pap smear is performed as part of the regular checkup for a pregnant woman during the first visit so that cervical cancer can easily be diagnosed early in these women, detecting it early in up to 70–80% of cases. We present here the case of a patient with initial diagnosis of cervical cancer made around 20th week of pregnancy. It was then treated by a simple trachelectomy and cerclage during week 24. The pregnant woman gave birth to a healthy baby at the end of her pregnancy. Definitive treatment was completed three months after giving birth with a total hysterectomy and laparoscopic bilateral salpingectomy while preserving both ovaries. After 17 months of monitoring the patient showed no signs of reoccurrence. In conclusion, during the early stage of cervical cancer conservative management may be a reasonable option to preserve the current pregnancy.

  9. Management of low-risk early-stage cervical cancer: Should conization, simple trachelectomy, or simple hysterectomy replace radical surgery as the new standard of care?

    PubMed Central

    Ramirez, Pedro T.; Pareja, Rene; Rendón, Gabriel J.; Millan, Carlos; Frumovitz, Michael; Schmeler, Kathleen M.

    2014-01-01

    The standard treatment for women with early-stage cervical cancer (IA2-IB1) remains radical hysterectomy with pelvic lymphadenectomy. In select patients interested in future fertility, the option of radical trachelectomy with pelvic lymphadenectomy is also considered a viable option. The possibility of less radical surgery may be appropriate not only for patients desiring to preserve fertility but also for all patients with low-risk early-stage cervical cancer. Recently, a number of studies have explored less radical surgical options for early-stage cervical cancer, including simple hysterectomy, simple trachelectomy, and cervical conization with or without sentinel lymph node biopsy and pelvic lymph node dissection. Such options may be available for patients with low-risk early-stage cervical cancer. Criteria that define this low-risk group include: squamous carcinoma, adenocarcinoma, or adenosquamous carcinoma, tumor size <2 cm, stromal invasion <10mm, and no lymph-vascular space invasion. In this report, we provide a review of the existing literature on the conservative management of cervical cancer and describe ongoing multi-institutional trials evaluating the role of conservative surgery in selected patients with early-stage cervical cancer. PMID:24041877

  10. Using the Cancer Risk Management Model to evaluate the health and economic impacts of cytology compared with human papillomavirus DNA testing for primary cervical cancer screening in Canada

    PubMed Central

    Popadiuk, C.; Gauvreau, C.L.; Bhavsar, M.; Nadeau, C.; Asakawa, K.; Flanagan, W.M.; Wolfson, M.C.; Coldman, A.J.; Memon, S.; Fitzgerald, N.; Lacombe, J.; Miller, A.B.

    2016-01-01

    Background In Canada, discussion about changing from cytology to human papillomavirus (hpv) dna testing for primary screening in cervical cancer is ongoing. However, the Canadian Task Force on Preventive Health Care has not yet made a recommendation, concluding that the evidence is insufficient. Methods We used the cervical cancer and hpv transmission models of the Cancer Risk Management Model to study the health and economic outcomes of primary cytology compared with hpv dna testing in 14 screening scenarios with varying screening modalities and intervals. Projected cervical cancer cases, deaths, colposcopies, screens, costs, and incremental cost-effectiveness were evaluated. We performed sensitivity analyses for hpv dna test costs. Results Compared with triennial cytology from age 25, 5-yearly hpv dna screening alone from age 30 resulted in equivalent incident cases and deaths, but 55% (82,000) fewer colposcopies and 43% (1,195,000) fewer screens. At hpv dna screening intervals of 3 years, whether alone or in an age-based sequence with cytology, screening costs are greater, but at intervals of more than 5 years, they are lower. Scenarios on the cost-effectiveness frontier were hpv dna testing alone every 10, 7.5, 5, or 3 years, and triennial cytology starting at age 21 or 25 when combined with hpv dna testing every 3 years. Conclusions Changing from cytology to hpv dna testing as the primary screening test for cervical cancer would be an acceptable strategy in Canada with respect to incidence, mortality, screening and diagnostic test volumes. PMID:26985148

  11. Cervical cancer: Biomarkers for diagnosis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Dasari, Subramanyam; Wudayagiri, Rajendra; Valluru, Lokanatha

    2015-05-20

    Cervical cancer is a major gynecological cancer which involves uncontrolled cell division and tissue invasiveness of the female uterine cervix. With the availability of new technologies researchers have increased their efforts to develop novel biomarkers for early diagnosis, and evaluation and monitoring of therapeutic treatments. This approach will help in the development of early diagnosis and in increasing treatment efficacy with decreased recurrence. The present review explains the currently available biomarkers for cervical cancer diagnosis and prognosis. Apart from the currently available biomarkers the review also explains strategies for the development of biomarkers based on cellular and molecular approaches such as DNA, protein and other metabolic markers with suitable clinical examples. The investigations of specific proteins, enzymes and metabolites will establish more useful biomarkers for accurate detection and management of gynecological cancers especially cervical cancer.

  12. Triapine, Cisplatin, and Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients With Cervical Cancer or Vaginal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-04-21

    Recurrent Cervical Cancer; Recurrent Vaginal Cancer; Stage IB Cervical Cancer; Stage II Vaginal Cancer; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage III Cervical Cancer; Stage III Vaginal Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Vaginal Cancer; Stage IVB Cervical Cancer; Stage IVB Vaginal Cancer; Therapy-related Toxicity

  13. Invasive Cervical Cancer and Antidepressants

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Hsiang-Lin; Hsieh, Yi-Hsuan; Lin, Chiao-Fan; Liang, Hsin-Yi; Huang, Kuo-You; Chiu, Wei-Che; Lee, Yena; McIntyre, Roger S.; Chen, Vincent Chin-Hung

    2015-01-01

    Abstract To our knowledge, no prior population-based study has been published wherein the primary aim was to evaluate whether an association between psychotropic drug prescription and cervical cancer exists. Herein we have conducted the first study that primarily aimed to determine the association between antidepressants use and risk of invasive cervical cancer in the general population. This is a population-based study utilizing Taiwan's National Health Insurance Research Database. We identified 26,262 cases with invasive cervical cancer and 129,490 controls. We adopted the conditional logistic regression model as the statistical method and adjusted for potential confounding factors. The prescription of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) (adjusted OR = 0.93, 95% CI = 0.84–1.04), tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs), monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs), serotonin norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs), mirtazapine and bupropion, adjusting for cumulative dose, was not associated with an increased, or decreased, risk for invasive cervical cancer. An association between trazodone prescription and invasive cervical cancer was observed (adjusted OR = 1.22, 95% CI = 1.03–1.43). An association between the major classes of antidepressants and invasive cervical cancer was not observed herein. Our preliminary finding regarding a possible association between trazodone and cervical cancer requires replication. PMID:26496343

  14. Cisplatin and Radiation Therapy Followed by Paclitaxel and Carboplatin in Treating Patients With Stage IB-IVA Cervical Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-16

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIB Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer

  15. Atezolizumab and Bevacizumab in Treating Patients With Recurrent, Persistent, or Metastatic Cervical Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-10

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma, Not Otherwise Specified; Recurrent Cervical Carcinoma; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer; Stage IVB Cervical Cancer

  16. Nivolumab in Treating Patients With Persistent, Recurrent, or Metastatic Cervical Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-11-01

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma, Not Otherwise Specified; Recurrent Cervical Carcinoma; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer; Stage IVB Cervical Cancer

  17. Get Tested for Cervical Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... help understanding your Pap test result . What about cost? Testing for cervical cancer is covered under the ... may be able to get tested at no cost to you. If you have private insurance, check ...

  18. Drugs Approved for Cervical Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for cervical cancer. The list includes generic names, brand names, and common drug combinations, which are shown in capital letters. The drug names link to NCI's Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  19. Cetuximab, Cisplatin, and Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients With Stage IB, Stage II, Stage III, or Stage IVA Cervical Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-12-29

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Cervical Small Cell Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage III Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer

  20. Cervical Cancer Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... Laboratory for Cancer Research Partners & Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer ... Centers Frederick National Lab Partners & Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists NCI Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer ...

  1. Cervical cancer: a preventable death.

    PubMed

    Nour, Nawal M

    2009-01-01

    Cervical cancer kills 260,000 women annually, and nearly 85% of these deaths occur in developing nations, where it is the leading cause of cancer deaths in women. Disparities of health and poverty play a large role in this high mortality rate. Whereas routine Papanicolaou and human papillomavirus (HPV) testing has dramatically reduced cervical cancer deaths in Western nations, without proper infrastructure, facilities, and medical training, the rates of cervical cancer in developing nations will remain high. Studies on HPV DNA testing and the low-technology method of "screen and treat" are promising. In addition, reducing the cost and increasing the availability of HPV vaccines in developing nations brings hope and promise to the next generation of women. PMID:20111660

  2. Preventing Cervical Cancer with HPV Vaccines

    Cancer.gov

    Cervical cancer can be prevented with HPV vaccines. NCI-supported researchers helped establish HPV as a cause of cervical cancer. They also helped create the first HPV vaccines, were involved in the vaccine trials, and contribute to ongoing studies.

  3. Cervical Cancer Risk Prediction Models

    Cancer.gov

    Developing statistical models that estimate the probability of developing cervical cancer over a defined period of time will help clinicians identify individuals at higher risk of specific cancers, allowing for earlier or more frequent screening and counseling of behavioral changes to decrease risk.

  4. Cervical cancer screening at crossroads.

    PubMed

    Lynge, Elsebeth; Rygaard, Carsten; Baillet, Miguel Vazquez-Prada; Dugué, Pierre-Antoine; Sander, Bente Braad; Bonde, Jesper; Rebolj, Matejka

    2014-08-01

    Cervical screening has been one of the most successful public health prevention programmes. For 50 years, cytology formed the basis for screening, and detected cervical intraepithelial lesions (CIN) were treated surgically to prevent progression to cancer. In a high-risk country as Denmark, screening decreased the incidence of cervical cancer from 34 to 11 per 100,000, age-standardized rate (World Standard Population). Screening is, however, also expensive; Denmark (population: 5.6 million) undertakes close to half a million tests per year, and has 6-8 CIN-treated women for each prevented cancer case. The discovery of human papillomavirus (HPV) as the cause of cervical cancer dramatically changed perspectives for disease control. Screening with HPV testing was launched around 1990, and preventive HPV vaccination was licensed in 2006. Long-term randomized controlled trials (RCT) demonstrated that HPV testing provides better protection against cervical cancer than cytology, but it requires extra repeated testing. HPV vaccination RCTs, furthermore, have proved that HPV vaccination protects against vaccine-type high-grade CIN in women vaccinated prior to sexual activity, but less so in women vaccinated later. The challenge now is therefore to find an algorithm for screening of a heterogeneous population including non-vaccinated women; women vaccinated prior to start of sexual activity; and women vaccinated later.

  5. Radiation Therapy and Cisplatin With or Without Epoetin Alfa in Treating Patients With Cervical Cancer and Anemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-12-29

    Anemia; Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Drug Toxicity; Radiation Toxicity; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage III Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer

  6. What's New in Cervical Cancer Research and Treatment?

    MedlinePlus

    ... resources for cervical cancer What`s new in cervical cancer research and treatment? New ways to prevent and treat ... Your Doctor After Treatment What`s New in Cervical Cancer Research? Other Resources and References Cancer Information Cancer Basics ...

  7. 6 Common Cancers - Gynecologic Cancers Cervical, Endometrial, and Ovarian

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues 6 Common Cancers - Gynecologic Cancers Cervical, Endometrial, and Ovarian Past Issues / Spring 2007 ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Gynecologic Cancers Cervical, Endometrial, and Ovarian NCI estimates that endometrial, ...

  8. Molecular imaging in cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Khan, Sairah R; Rockall, Andrea G; Barwick, Tara D

    2016-06-01

    Despite the development of screening and of a vaccine, cervix cancer is a major cause of cancer death in young women worldwide. A third of women treated for the disease will recur, almost inevitably leading to death. Functional imaging has the potential to stratify patients at higher risk of poor response or relapse by improved delineation of disease extent and tumor characteristics. A number of molecular imaging biomarkers have been shown to predict outcome at baseline and/or early during therapy in cervical cancer. In future this could help tailor the treatment plan which could include selection of patients for close follow up, adjuvant therapy or trial entry for novel agents or adaptive clinical trials. The use of molecular imaging techniques, FDG PET/CT and functional MRI, in staging and response assessment of cervical cancer is reviewed. PMID:26859085

  9. Lymphedema After Surgery in Patients With Endometrial Cancer, Cervical Cancer, or Vulvar Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-12-23

    Lymphedema; Stage IA Cervical Cancer; Stage IA Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IA Vulvar Cancer; Stage IB Cervical Cancer; Stage IB Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IB Vulvar Cancer; Stage II Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage II Vulvar Cancer; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIA Vulvar Cancer; Stage IIIB Vulvar Cancer; Stage IIIC Vulvar Cancer; Stage IVB Vulvar Cancer

  10. Cervical cancer: screening, diagnosis and staging.

    PubMed

    Tsikouras, Panagiotis; Zervoudis, Stefanos; Manav, Bachar; Tomara, Eirini; Iatrakis, George; Romanidis, Constantinos; Bothou, Anastasia; Galazios, George

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Despite the widespread screening programs, cervical cancer remains the third most common cancer in developing countries. Based on the implementation of cervical screening programs with the referred adoption of improved screening methods in cervical cytology with the knowledge of the important role of the human papilloma virus (HPV) it's incidence is decreased in the developed world. Even if cervical HPV infection is incredibly common, cervical cancer is relatively rare. Depending on the rarity of invasive disease and the improvement of detection of pre-cancerous lesions due to the participation in screening programs, the goal of screening is to detect the cervical lesions early in order to be treated before cancer is developed. In populations with many preventive screening programs, a decrease in cervical cancer mortality of 50-75% is mentioned over the past 50 years. The preventive examination of vagina and cervix smear, Pap test, and the HPV DNA test are remarkable diagnostic tools according to the American Cancer Association guidelines, in the investigation of asymptomatic women and in the follow up of women after the treatment of pre-invasive cervical cancer. The treatment of cervical cancer is based on the FIGO 2009 cervical cancer staging.

  11. Cervical cancer: screening, diagnosis and staging.

    PubMed

    Tsikouras, Panagiotis; Zervoudis, Stefanos; Manav, Bachar; Tomara, Eirini; Iatrakis, George; Romanidis, Constantinos; Bothou, Anastasia; Galazios, George

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Despite the widespread screening programs, cervical cancer remains the third most common cancer in developing countries. Based on the implementation of cervical screening programs with the referred adoption of improved screening methods in cervical cytology with the knowledge of the important role of the human papilloma virus (HPV) it's incidence is decreased in the developed world. Even if cervical HPV infection is incredibly common, cervical cancer is relatively rare. Depending on the rarity of invasive disease and the improvement of detection of pre-cancerous lesions due to the participation in screening programs, the goal of screening is to detect the cervical lesions early in order to be treated before cancer is developed. In populations with many preventive screening programs, a decrease in cervical cancer mortality of 50-75% is mentioned over the past 50 years. The preventive examination of vagina and cervix smear, Pap test, and the HPV DNA test are remarkable diagnostic tools according to the American Cancer Association guidelines, in the investigation of asymptomatic women and in the follow up of women after the treatment of pre-invasive cervical cancer. The treatment of cervical cancer is based on the FIGO 2009 cervical cancer staging. PMID:27273940

  12. Practice Bulletin No. 157 Summary: Cervical Cancer Screening and Prevention.

    PubMed

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of cervical cancer in the United States has decreased more than 50% in the past 30 years because of widespread screening. In 1975, the rate was 14.8 per 100,000 women. By 2011, it decreased to 6.7 per 100,000 women. Mortality from the disease has undergone a similar decrease from 5.55 per 100,000 women in 1975 to 2.3 per 100,000 women in 2011 (1). The American Cancer Society (ACS) estimated that there would be 12,900 new cases of cervical cancer in the United States in 2015, with 4,100 deaths from the disease (2). Cervical cancer is much more common worldwide, particularly in countries without screening programs, with an estimated 527,624 new cases of the disease and 265,672 resultant deaths each year (3). When cervical cancer screening programs have been introduced into communities, marked reductions in cervical cancer incidence have followed (4, 5).New technologies for cervical cancer screening continue to evolve, as do recommendations for managing the results. In addition, there are different risk-benefit considerations for women at different ages, as reflected in age-specific screening recommendations. In 2011, the ACS, the American Society for Colposcopy and Cervical Pathology (ASCCP), and the American Society for Clinical Pathology (ASCP) updated their joint guidelines for cervical cancer screening (6), as did the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) (7). Subsequently, in 2015, ASCCP and the Society of Gynecologic Oncology (SGO) issued interim guidance for the use of a human papillomavirus (HPV) test for primary screening for cervical cancer that was approved in 2014 by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) (8). The purpose of this document is to provide a review of the best available evidence regarding the prevention and early detection of cervical cancer.

  13. Practice Bulletin No. 157: Cervical Cancer Screening and Prevention.

    PubMed

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of cervical cancer in the United States has decreased more than 50% in the past 30 years because of widespread screening. In 1975, the rate was 14.8 per 100,000 women. By 2011, it decreased to 6.7 per 100,000 women. Mortality from the disease has undergone a similar decrease from 5.55 per 100,000 women in 1975 to 2.3 per 100,000 women in 2011 (). The American Cancer Society (ACS) estimated that there would be 12,900 new cases of cervical cancer in the United States in 2015, with 4,100 deaths from the disease (). Cervical cancer is much more common worldwide, particularly in countries without screening programs, with an estimated 527,624 new cases of the disease and 265,672 resultant deaths each year (). When cervical cancer screening programs have been introduced into communities, marked reductions in cervical cancer incidence have followed ().New technologies for cervical cancer screening continue to evolve, as do recommendations for managing the results. In addition, there are different risk-benefit considerations for women at different ages, as reflected in age-specific screening recommendations. In 2011, the ACS, the American Society for Colposcopy and Cervical Pathology (ASCCP), and the American Society for Clinical Pathology (ASCP) updated their joint guidelines for cervical cancer screening (), as did the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) (). Subsequently, in 2015, ASCCP and the Society of Gynecologic Oncology (SGO) issued interim guidance for the use of a human papillomavirus (HPV) test for primary screening for cervical cancer that was approved in 2014 by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) (). The purpose of this document is to provide a review of the best available evidence regarding the prevention and early detection of cervical cancer.

  14. Practice Bulletin No. 157: Cervical Cancer Screening and Prevention.

    PubMed

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of cervical cancer in the United States has decreased more than 50% in the past 30 years because of widespread screening. In 1975, the rate was 14.8 per 100,000 women. By 2011, it decreased to 6.7 per 100,000 women. Mortality from the disease has undergone a similar decrease from 5.55 per 100,000 women in 1975 to 2.3 per 100,000 women in 2011 (). The American Cancer Society (ACS) estimated that there would be 12,900 new cases of cervical cancer in the United States in 2015, with 4,100 deaths from the disease (). Cervical cancer is much more common worldwide, particularly in countries without screening programs, with an estimated 527,624 new cases of the disease and 265,672 resultant deaths each year (). When cervical cancer screening programs have been introduced into communities, marked reductions in cervical cancer incidence have followed ().New technologies for cervical cancer screening continue to evolve, as do recommendations for managing the results. In addition, there are different risk-benefit considerations for women at different ages, as reflected in age-specific screening recommendations. In 2011, the ACS, the American Society for Colposcopy and Cervical Pathology (ASCCP), and the American Society for Clinical Pathology (ASCP) updated their joint guidelines for cervical cancer screening (), as did the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) (). Subsequently, in 2015, ASCCP and the Society of Gynecologic Oncology (SGO) issued interim guidance for the use of a human papillomavirus (HPV) test for primary screening for cervical cancer that was approved in 2014 by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) (). The purpose of this document is to provide a review of the best available evidence regarding the prevention and early detection of cervical cancer. PMID:26695583

  15. Practice Bulletin No. 157 Summary: Cervical Cancer Screening and Prevention.

    PubMed

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of cervical cancer in the United States has decreased more than 50% in the past 30 years because of widespread screening. In 1975, the rate was 14.8 per 100,000 women. By 2011, it decreased to 6.7 per 100,000 women. Mortality from the disease has undergone a similar decrease from 5.55 per 100,000 women in 1975 to 2.3 per 100,000 women in 2011 (1). The American Cancer Society (ACS) estimated that there would be 12,900 new cases of cervical cancer in the United States in 2015, with 4,100 deaths from the disease (2). Cervical cancer is much more common worldwide, particularly in countries without screening programs, with an estimated 527,624 new cases of the disease and 265,672 resultant deaths each year (3). When cervical cancer screening programs have been introduced into communities, marked reductions in cervical cancer incidence have followed (4, 5).New technologies for cervical cancer screening continue to evolve, as do recommendations for managing the results. In addition, there are different risk-benefit considerations for women at different ages, as reflected in age-specific screening recommendations. In 2011, the ACS, the American Society for Colposcopy and Cervical Pathology (ASCCP), and the American Society for Clinical Pathology (ASCP) updated their joint guidelines for cervical cancer screening (6), as did the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) (7). Subsequently, in 2015, ASCCP and the Society of Gynecologic Oncology (SGO) issued interim guidance for the use of a human papillomavirus (HPV) test for primary screening for cervical cancer that was approved in 2014 by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) (8). The purpose of this document is to provide a review of the best available evidence regarding the prevention and early detection of cervical cancer. PMID:26695578

  16. Practice Bulletin No. 168: Cervical Cancer Screening and Prevention.

    PubMed

    2016-10-01

    The incidence of cervical cancer in the United States has decreased more than 50% in the past 30 years because of widespread screening. In 1975, the rate was 14.8 per 100,000 women. By 2011, it decreased to 6.7 per 100,000 women. Mortality from the disease has undergone a similar decrease from 5.55 per 100,000 women in 1975 to 2.3 per 100,000 women in 2011 (1). The American Cancer Society (ACS) estimated that there would be 12,900 new cases of cervical cancer in the United States in 2015, with 4,100 deaths from the disease (2). Cervical cancer is much more common worldwide, particularly in countries without screening programs, with an estimated 527,624 new cases of the disease and 265,672 resultant deaths each year (3). When cervical cancer screening programs have been introduced into communities, marked reductions in cervical cancer incidence have followed (4, 5).New technologies for cervical cancer screening continue to evolve, as do recommendations for managing the results. In addition, there are different risk-benefit considerations for women at different ages, as reflected in age-specific screening recommendations. In 2011, the ACS, the American Society for Colposcopy and Cervical Pathology (ASCCP), and the American Society for Clinical Pathology (ASCP) updated their joint guidelines for cervical cancer screening (6), as did the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) (7). Subsequently, in 2015, ASCCP and the Society of Gynecologic Oncology (SGO) issued interim guidance for the use of a human papillomavirus (HPV) test for primary screening for cervical cancer that was approved in 2014 by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) (8). The purpose of this document is to provide a review of the best available evidence regarding the prevention and early detection of cervical cancer. PMID:27661651

  17. Practice Bulletin No. 168 Summary: Cervical Cancer Screening and Prevention.

    PubMed

    2016-10-01

    The incidence of cervical cancer in the United States has decreased more than 50% in the past 30 years because of widespread screening. In 1975, the rate was 14.8 per 100,000 women. By 2011, it decreased to 6.7 per 100,000 women. Mortality from the disease has undergone a similar decrease from 5.55 per 100,000 women in 1975 to 2.3 per 100,000 women in 2011 (1). The American Cancer Society (ACS) estimated that there would be 12,900 new cases of cervical cancer in the United States in 2015, with 4,100 deaths from the disease (2). Cervical cancer is much more common worldwide, particularly in countries without screening programs, with an estimated 527,624 new cases of the disease and 265,672 resultant deaths each year (3). When cervical cancer screening programs have been introduced into communities, marked reductions in cervical cancer incidence have followed (4, 5).New technologies for cervical cancer screening continue to evolve, as do recommendations for managing the results. In addition, there are different risk-benefit considerations for women at different ages, as reflected in age-specific screening recommendations. In 2011, the ACS, the American Society for Colposcopy and Cervical Pathology (ASCCP), and the American Society for Clinical Pathology (ASCP) updated their joint guidelines for cervical cancer screening (6), as did the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) (7). Subsequently, in 2015, ASCCP and the Society of Gynecologic Oncology (SGO) issued interim guidance for the use of a human papillomavirus (HPV) test for primary screening for cervical cancer that was approved in 2014 by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) (8). The purpose of this document is to provide a review of the best available evidence regarding the prevention and early detection of cervical cancer. PMID:27661643

  18. Glycoprotein and Glycan in Tissue and Blood Samples of Patients With Stage IB-IVA Cervical Cancer Undergoing Surgery to Remove Pelvic and Abdominal Lymph Nodes

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-26

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Cervical Small Cell Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma, Not Otherwise Specified; Stage IB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage III Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer

  19. Epidemiology of uterine cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Brinton, L A; Fraumeni, J F

    1986-01-01

    The epidemiology of cervical cancer presents a number of unique challenges, mainly with respect to disentangling correlated factors and to elucidating biological mechanisms. The available evidence suggests a complex multifactorial etiology, although the relative contributions of risk factors and their interactions remain obscure. Infectious agents are strongly suspected, but as yet not conclusively identified. It is also unclear whether there are subgroups of women or periods of life that are most susceptible to the action of infectious agents, and the contribution of the "male factor" needs to be defined. Several epidemiologic leads can be pursued through biochemical and molecular techniques. Most promising is the recent evidence linking certain HPV types to cervical abnormalities, including cancer, and newly developed probes can be incorporated into epidemiologic studies to evaluate an array of risk factors. Endocrine and metabolic assays may be helpful in clarifying the role of exogenous and possibly endogenous hormones. The effects of cigarette smoking may be further evaluated by studying constituents of tobacco smoke and their metabolites in cervical mucus. Finally, the relationship of diet to cervical cancer should be assessed by examining the levels of micronutrients, trace minerals, and other nutritional indices in body tissues and fluids, as well as through interview data. An understanding of cervical cancer etiology will require a better identification of risk factors for precursor lesions as well as factors that enhance their progression to invasive cancer. Through studies that focus on disease stage and time-related events, it should be possible to clarify the multi-stage processes involved in cervical carcinogenesis, and those factors that may inhibit as well as promote transition rates. The protective effects of screening programs deserve further attention, and research into dietary factors may lead in time to nutritional intervention. Investigation

  20. Cisplatin and Radiation Therapy With or Without Triapine in Treating Patients With Previously Untreated Stage IB-IVA Cervical Cancer or Stage II-IVA Vaginal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-25

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IB2 Cervical Cancer; Stage II Vaginal Cancer; Stage IIA1 Cervical Cancer; Stage IIA2 Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage III Vaginal Cancer; Stage IIIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIB Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Vaginal Cancer; Vaginal Adenocarcinoma; Vaginal Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Vaginal Squamous Cell Carcinoma

  1. Stages of Cervical Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... checked under a microscope for signs of cancer. Laparoscopy : A surgical procedure to look at the organs ... a laparoscope , the operation is called a total laparoscopic hysterectomy. Enlarge Hysterectomy. The uterus is surgically removed ...

  2. Conservative Surgery for Early Cervical Cancer.

    PubMed

    Rema, P; Ahmed, Iqbal

    2016-09-01

    There is a rising incidence of early cervical cancer in young patients as a result of screening and early detection. Treatment of cervical cancer by surgery or radiotherapy results in permanent infertility which affects the quality of life of cancer survivors. Now with improved survival rates among early cervical cancer patients, conservative surgery aiming at fertility preservation in those desiring future pregnancy is an accepted treatment. Conservative surgery is possible in early cervical cancer including micro invasive cancer and stage IB cancers less than 2 cm. Stage IA1 cervical cancer is treated effectively by cervical conisation. In stage IA2 cancers and stage IB1 cancers less than 2 cm the fertility preservation surgery is radical trachelectomy. Radical trachelectomy removes the cervix with medial parametrium and upper 2 cm vaginal cuff retaining the uterus and adnexa to allow future pregnancy. Radical trachelectomy is a safe procedure in selected patients with cancer cervix with acceptable oncologic risks and promising obstetric outcome. It should be avoided in tumours larger than 2 cm and aggressive histologic types. This article focuses on the current options of conservative surgery in early cervical cancer. PMID:27651696

  3. A review of cervical cancer research in malaysia.

    PubMed

    Zaridah, S

    2014-08-01

    Despite cervical cancer being potentially preventable, it is the second most common cancer among women in Malaysia. One hundred and five articles related to Cervical Cancer were found in a search through a database dedicated to indexing all original data relevant to medicine published in Malaysia between the years 2000-2013. Fifty seven articles were selected and reviewed for the articles' clinical relevance and future research implications. This article reviews the various aspects of cervical cancer in Malaysia, mainly persistent infection of high risk human papillomavirus (HPV), primary prevention (HPV vaccination), screening method (Pap smear issues), and the attitude and knowledge of various groups of Malaysian women that contributed to the failure to reduce the incidence and mortality of cervical cancer. Most of the studies focused on prevention, Pap smear issues, HPV DNA testing, HPV vaccination and various recommendations for prevention of cervical cancer. Secondary prevention by screening is still an important aspect because even with HPV vaccination, screening still plays an important role as vaccination does not cover all high risk HPVs. There is a need to seriously consider a properly organised screening programme, taking into consideration what we already know about the attitude and knowledge of Malaysian women, economic factors and psychosocial issues of the screening method. There is also a large gap in clinical studies on the outcome, management and survival of cervical cancer patients in Malaysia. PMID:25417949

  4. Oral contraceptives, human papillomavirus and cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    La Vecchia, Carlo; Boccia, Stefania

    2014-03-01

    Oncogenic human papillomavirus is the key determinant of cervical cancer, but other risk factors interact with it to define individual risk. Among these, there is oral contraceptive (OC) use. A quantitative review of the link between OCs and cervical cancer was performed. Long-term (>5 year) current or recent OC use has been related to an about two-fold excess risk of cervical cancer. Such an excess risk, however, levels off after stopping use, and approaches unity 10 or more years after stopping. The public health implications of OC use for cervical cancer are limited. In any case, such implications are greater in middle-income and low-income countries, as well as in central and eastern Europe and Latin America, where cervical cancer screening and control remain inadequate.

  5. Breast, Cervical Cancer More Deadly in Developing Nations: Report

    MedlinePlus

    ... More Health News on: Breast Cancer Cervical Cancer Health Disparities Recent Health News Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Breast Cancer Cervical Cancer Health Disparities About MedlinePlus Site Map FAQs Contact Us Get ...

  6. Risk of invasive cervical cancer after atypical glandular cells in cervical screening: nationwide cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Andrae, Bengt; Sundström, Karin; Ström, Peter; Ploner, Alexander; Elfström, K Miriam; Arnheim-Dahlström, Lisen; Dillner, Joakim; Sparén, Pär

    2016-01-01

    within six months, much less than after HSIL (86%). Among women with histology assessment within six months, the incidence rate of cervical cancer after AGC was significantly higher than that after HSIL for up to 6.5 years. Conclusions AGC found at cervical screening is associated with a high and persistent risk of cervical cancer for up to 15 years, particularly for cervical adenocarcinoma and women with AGC at age 30-39. Compared with the reduction in risk of cancer seen after HSIL management, management of AGC seems to have been suboptimal in preventing cervical cancer. Research to optimise management is needed, and a more aggressive assessment strategy is warranted. PMID:26869597

  7. Network Topologies Decoding Cervical Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Jalan, Sarika; Kanhaiya, Krishna; Rai, Aparna; Bandapalli, Obul Reddy; Yadav, Alok

    2015-01-01

    According to the GLOBOCAN statistics, cervical cancer is one of the leading causes of death among women worldwide. It is found to be gradually increasing in the younger population, specifically in the developing countries. We analyzed the protein-protein interaction networks of the uterine cervix cells for the normal and disease states. It was found that the disease network was less random than the normal one, providing an insight into the change in complexity of the underlying network in disease state. The study also portrayed that, the disease state has faster signal processing as the diameter of the underlying network was very close to its corresponding random control. This may be a reason for the normal cells to change into malignant state. Further, the analysis revealed VEGFA and IL-6 proteins as the distinctly high degree nodes in the disease network, which are known to manifest a major contribution in promoting cervical cancer. Our analysis, being time proficient and cost effective, provides a direction for developing novel drugs, therapeutic targets and biomarkers by identifying specific interaction patterns, that have structural importance. PMID:26308848

  8. [Cervical cancer: particularities in HIV patients].

    PubMed

    Grellier, Noémie; Quéro, Laurent

    2014-11-01

    Cervical cancer is the second most common cancer in women worldwide. It represents one of the most challenging public health problems in developing countries. HIV-infected women have a higher risk of cervical cancer which is an AIDS defining cancer. Cervical cancer treatment in HIV-infected and non-infected women is the same. HIV naive women must be prescribed combination antiretroviral therapy at the moment of HIV cancer diagnosis. A close collaboration between oncologist and infectiologist is mandatory to optimize HIV treatment. Among HIV-infected women, PAP-smear screening for early detection and treatment of precancerous cervical lesions is recommended. HPV vaccination is also recommended with the same efficacy and safety profile as the general population.

  9. Targeted treatments for cervical cancer: a review.

    PubMed

    Peralta-Zaragoza, Oscar; Bermúdez-Morales, Víctor Hugo; Pérez-Plasencia, Carlos; Salazar-León, Jonathan; Gómez-Cerón, Claudia; Madrid-Marina, Vicente

    2012-01-01

    Cervical cancer is the second most common cause of cancer death in women worldwide and the development of new diagnosis, prognostic, and treatment strategies merits special attention. Although surgery and chemoradiotherapy can cure 80%-95% of women with early stage cancer, the recurrent and metastatic disease remains a major cause of cancer death. Many efforts have been made to design new drugs and develop gene therapies to treat cervical cancer. In recent decades, research on treatment strategies has proposed several options, including the role of HPV E6 and E7 oncogenes, which are retained and expressed in most cervical cancers and whose respective oncoproteins are critical to the induction and maintenance of the malignant phenotype. Other efforts have been focused on antitumor immunotherapy strategies. It is known that during the development of cervical cancer, a cascade of abnormal events is induced, including disruption of cellular cycle control, perturbation of antitumor immune response, alteration of gene expression, and deregulation of microRNA expression. Thus, in this review article we discuss potential targets for the treatment of cervical cancer associated with HPV infection, with special attention to immunotherapy approaches, clinical trials, siRNA molecules, and their implications as gene therapy strategies against cervical cancer development. PMID:23144564

  10. Challenges in Prevention and Care Delivery for Women with Cervical Cancer in Sub-Saharan Africa.

    PubMed

    Randall, Thomas C; Ghebre, Rahel

    2016-01-01

    Virtually all cases of invasive cervical cancer are associated with infection by high-risk strains of human papilloma virus. Effective primary and secondary prevention programs, as well as effective treatment for early-stage invasive cancer have dramatically reduced the burden of cervical cancer in high-income countries; 85% of the mortality from cervical cancer now occurs in low- and middle-income countries. This article provides an overview of challenges to cervical cancer care in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) and identifies areas for programmatic development to meet the global development goal to reduce cancer-related mortality. Advanced stage at presentation and gaps in prevention, screening, diagnostic, and treatment capacities contribute to reduced cervical cancer survival. Cost-effective cervical cancer screening strategies implemented in low resource settings can reduce cervical cancer mortality. Patient- and system-based barriers need to be addressed as part of any cervical cancer control program. Limited human capacity and infrastructure in SSA are major barriers to comprehensive cervical cancer care. Management of early-stage, locally advanced or metastatic cervical cancer involves multispecialty care, including gynecology oncology, medical oncology, radiology, pathology, radiation oncology, and palliative care. Investment in cervical cancer care programs in low- and middle-income countries will need to include effective recruitment programs to engage women in the community to access cancer screening and diagnosis services. Though cervical cancer is a preventable and treatable cancer, the challenges to cervical control in SSA are great and will require a broadly integrated and sustained effort by multiple stakeholders before meaningful progress can be achieved.

  11. Challenges in Prevention and Care Delivery for Women with Cervical Cancer in Sub-Saharan Africa.

    PubMed

    Randall, Thomas C; Ghebre, Rahel

    2016-01-01

    Virtually all cases of invasive cervical cancer are associated with infection by high-risk strains of human papilloma virus. Effective primary and secondary prevention programs, as well as effective treatment for early-stage invasive cancer have dramatically reduced the burden of cervical cancer in high-income countries; 85% of the mortality from cervical cancer now occurs in low- and middle-income countries. This article provides an overview of challenges to cervical cancer care in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) and identifies areas for programmatic development to meet the global development goal to reduce cancer-related mortality. Advanced stage at presentation and gaps in prevention, screening, diagnostic, and treatment capacities contribute to reduced cervical cancer survival. Cost-effective cervical cancer screening strategies implemented in low resource settings can reduce cervical cancer mortality. Patient- and system-based barriers need to be addressed as part of any cervical cancer control program. Limited human capacity and infrastructure in SSA are major barriers to comprehensive cervical cancer care. Management of early-stage, locally advanced or metastatic cervical cancer involves multispecialty care, including gynecology oncology, medical oncology, radiology, pathology, radiation oncology, and palliative care. Investment in cervical cancer care programs in low- and middle-income countries will need to include effective recruitment programs to engage women in the community to access cancer screening and diagnosis services. Though cervical cancer is a preventable and treatable cancer, the challenges to cervical control in SSA are great and will require a broadly integrated and sustained effort by multiple stakeholders before meaningful progress can be achieved. PMID:27446806

  12. Challenges in Prevention and Care Delivery for Women with Cervical Cancer in Sub-Saharan Africa

    PubMed Central

    Randall, Thomas C.; Ghebre, Rahel

    2016-01-01

    Virtually all cases of invasive cervical cancer are associated with infection by high-risk strains of human papilloma virus. Effective primary and secondary prevention programs, as well as effective treatment for early-stage invasive cancer have dramatically reduced the burden of cervical cancer in high-income countries; 85% of the mortality from cervical cancer now occurs in low- and middle-income countries. This article provides an overview of challenges to cervical cancer care in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) and identifies areas for programmatic development to meet the global development goal to reduce cancer-related mortality. Advanced stage at presentation and gaps in prevention, screening, diagnostic, and treatment capacities contribute to reduced cervical cancer survival. Cost-effective cervical cancer screening strategies implemented in low resource settings can reduce cervical cancer mortality. Patient- and system-based barriers need to be addressed as part of any cervical cancer control program. Limited human capacity and infrastructure in SSA are major barriers to comprehensive cervical cancer care. Management of early-stage, locally advanced or metastatic cervical cancer involves multispecialty care, including gynecology oncology, medical oncology, radiology, pathology, radiation oncology, and palliative care. Investment in cervical cancer care programs in low- and middle-income countries will need to include effective recruitment programs to engage women in the community to access cancer screening and diagnosis services. Though cervical cancer is a preventable and treatable cancer, the challenges to cervical control in SSA are great and will require a broadly integrated and sustained effort by multiple stakeholders before meaningful progress can be achieved. PMID:27446806

  13. [Induction chemotherapy for locally advanced cervical cancer].

    PubMed

    Morkhov, K Yu; Nechushkina, V M; Kuznetsov, V V

    2015-01-01

    The main methods of treatment for cervical cancer are surgery, radiotherapy or their combination. During past two decades chemotherapy are increasingly being used not only in patients with disseminated forms of this disease but also in patients undergoing chemoradiotherapy or as induction therapy. Possibilities of adjuvant chemotherapy for cervical cancer are being studied. According to A.D.Kaprin and V.V. Starinskiy in 2013 in Russia, 32% of patients with newly diagnosed cervical cancer underwent only radiation therapy, 32%--combined or complex treatment, 27.3%--only surgery, and just 8.7%--chemoradiotherapy. PMID:26087600

  14. Triapine With Chemotherapy and Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients With IB2-IVA Cervical or Vulvar Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-28

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma, Not Otherwise Specified; Stage IB Vulvar Cancer; Stage IB2 Cervical Cancer; Stage II Vulvar Cancer; Stage IIA1 Cervical Cancer; Stage IIA2 Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIA Vulvar Cancer; Stage IIIB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIB Vulvar Cancer; Stage IIIC Vulvar Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Vulvar Cancer; Vulvar Adenocarcinoma; Vulvar Squamous Cell Carcinoma

  15. Colposcopy and High Resolution Anoscopy in Screening For Anal Dysplasia in Patients With Cervical, Vaginal, or Vulvar Dysplasia or Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2012-06-08

    Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia Grade 1; Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia Grade 2; Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia Grade 3; Recurrent Cervical Cancer; Recurrent Vaginal Cancer; Recurrent Vulvar Cancer; Stage 0 Cervical Cancer; Stage 0 Vaginal Cancer; Stage 0 Vulvar Cancer; Stage I Vaginal Cancer; Stage I Vulvar Cancer; Stage IA Cervical Cancer; Stage IB Cervical Cancer; Stage II Vaginal Cancer; Stage II Vulvar Cancer; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage III Cervical Cancer; Stage III Vaginal Cancer; Stage III Vulvar Cancer; Stage IV Vulvar Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Vaginal Cancer; Stage IVB Cervical Cancer; Stage IVB Vaginal Cancer

  16. Health systems challenges in cervical cancer prevention program in Malawi

    PubMed Central

    Maseko, Fresier C.; Chirwa, Maureen L.; Muula, Adamson S.

    2015-01-01

    Background Cervical cancer remains the leading cause of cancer death among women in sub-Saharan Africa. In Malawi, very few women have undergone screening and the incidence of cervical cancer is on the increase as is the case in most developing countries. We aimed at exploring and documenting health system gaps responsible for the poor performance of the cervical cancer prevention program in Malawi. Design The study was carried out in 14 randomly selected districts of the 29 districts of Malawi. All cervical cancer service providers in these districts were invited to participate. Two semi-structured questionnaires were used, one for the district cervical cancer coordinators and the other for the service providers. The themes of both questionnaires were based on World Health Organization (WHO) health system frameworks. A checklist was also developed to audit medical supplies and equipment in the cervical cancer screening facilities. The two questionnaires together with the medical supplies and equipment checklist were piloted in Chikwawa district before being used as data collection tools in the study. Quantitative data were analyzed using STATA and qualitative in NVIVO. Results Forty-one service providers from 21 health facilities and 9 district coordinators participated in the study. Our findings show numerous health system challenges mainly in areas of health workforce and essential medical products and technologies. Seven out of the 21 health facilities provided both screening and treatment. Results showed challenges in the management of the cervical cancer program at district level; inadequate service providers who are poorly supervised; lack of basic equipment and stock-outs of basic medical supplies in some health facilities; and inadequate funding of the program. In most of the health facilities, services providers were not aware of the policy which govern their work and that they did not have standards and guidelines for cervical cancer screening and

  17. Cervical cancer: disease prevention and informational support.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Lindsay Ashley

    2009-01-01

    Cervical cancer and Human Papillomavirus (HPV) are significant health care concerns for women worldwide. Globally, in 2006, cervical cancer remains the second most common cancer in women. Infection with high-risk strains of HPV is found to be present in approximately 99% of cervical cancer cases. The Supportive Care Framework developed by Fitch (2008) will serve as a guide to the paper. The need for informational support and disease prevention initiatives will be explored. Knowledge and awareness of HPV and its link to cervical cancer amongst the general population are low. Once women are made aware of the relationship between HPV and cervical cancer, they want more information on disease prevention, transmission, detection, treatment information, symptoms and risk for developing cancer. Evidence-based nursing interventions that focus on meeting the informational needs of women and increasing awareness of HPV and cervical cancer will be proposed. Information on HPV-prophylactic vaccines and Papanicolaou (PAP) screening as primary and secondary disease prevention strategies will be discussed.

  18. Unmet clinical needs in cervical cancer screening.

    PubMed

    Rao, Jianyu; Escobar-Hoyos, Luisa; Shroyer, Kenneth R

    2016-01-01

    Cancer rates worldwide are expected to increase disproportionally in coming decades relative to the projected increase in population, especially in the developing world. The general unavailability of the Pap test and the cost of the HPV test in the developing world have precluded the deployment of effective cervical cancer screening programs in many developing countries. Recent improvements in testing technology arise from a need to overcome the significant limitations of the Pap test and HPV test, but results require first-world technology and validation. Developing countries, where cervical cancer remains one of the most important causes of cancer death, have the greatest need for an affordable, easy-to-use, and highly reliable cancer screening method that can return a diagnosis through efficient laboratory analysis or, more easily, at a woman's point of care. While research, testing, and vaccine improvements in recent years continue to lower the incidence of cervical cancer in some developed countries such as the U.S., HPV testing research needs to do more than test for the presence of virus. The tests must determine the presence and progression of cervical disease. Tests should be more sensitive and specific than Pap tests and Pap-related tests, and should be accurate in more than 90 percent of cases. Tests also need to be low-cost, objective, and easy to perform so screening programs can be widely implemented in developing countries where the need for a better cervical cancer screening test is highest. Such tests may be available through the recent advances in specific biomarkers of cervical cancer and multiplex detection technologies. Development of the next generation of cervical cancer tests that are more specific, sensitive, and informative than the traditional Pap or HPV test will make a significant impact on the reduction of cervical cancer worldwide.

  19. Epidemiology of cervical cancer in Colombia.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, Nubia; Bravo, Luis Eduardo

    2012-10-01

    Worldwide, cervical cancer is the third most common cancer in women, and the first or second most common in developing countries. Cervical cancer remains in Colombia the first cause of cancer mortality and the second cause of cancer incidence among women, despite the existence of screening programs during the last 3 decades. Bucaramanga, Manizales and Cali reported rates around 20 per 100,000and Pasto 27 per 100,000. The Cali cancer registry has reported a progressive decrease in the age standardized incidence and mortality rates of cervical cancer over the past 40 years. Reasons for the decline in incidence and mortality of cervical cancer are multiple and probably include: improvement in socio-economic conditions, decrease in parity rates and some effect of screening programs. Human papilloma Virus is the main cause of cervical cancer, HPV natural history studies have now revealed that HPVs are the commonest of the sexually transmitted infections in most populations. Most HPV exposures result in spontaneous clearance without clinical manifestations and only a small fraction of the infected persons, known as chronic or persistent carriers, will retain the virus and progress to precancerous and cancer. HPV 16 and 18 account for 70% of cervical cancer and the 8 most common types. (HPV 16, 18, 45, 33, 31, 52, 58 and 35) account for about 90% of cervical cancer. Case-control studies also allowed the identification of the following cofactors that acting together with HPV increase the risk of progression from HPV persistent infection to cervical cancer: tobacco, high parity, long term use of oral contraceptives and past infections with herpes simplex type 2 and Chlamydia trachomatis. The demonstration that infection with certain types of human papillomavirus (HPV) is not only the main cause but also a necessary cause of cervical cancer has led to great advances in the prevention of this disease on two fronts: (i) Primary prevention by the use of prophylactic HPV

  20. Priority Setting for Improvement of Cervical Cancer Prevention in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Majidi, Azam; Ghiasvand, Reza; Hadji, Maryam; Nahvijou, Azin; Mousavi, Azam-Sadat; Pakgohar, Minoo; Khodakarami, Nahid; Abedini, Mehrandokht; Amouzegar Hashemi, Farnaz; Rahnamaye Farzami, Marjan; Shahsiah, Reza; Sajedinejhad, Sima; Mohagheghi, Mohammad Ali; Nadali, Fatemeh; Rashidian, Arash; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Mogensen, Ole; Zendehdel, Kazem

    2016-01-01

    Background: Cervical cancer is the fourth most common cancer among women worldwide. Organized cervical screening and vaccination against human papilloma virus (HPV) have been successful interventions for prevention of invasive cervical cancer (ICC). Because of cultural and religious considerations, ICC has low incidence in Iran and many other Muslim countries. There is no organized cervical screening in these countries. Therefore, ICC is usually diagnosed in advanced stages with poor prognosis in these countries. We performed a priority setting exercise and suggested priorities for prevention of ICC in this setting. Methods: We invited experts and researchers to a workshop and asked them to list important suggestions for ICC prevention in Iran. After merging similar items and removing the duplicates, we asked the experts to rank the list of suggested items. We used a strategy grid and Go-zone analysis to determine final list of priorities for ICC prevention in Iran. Results: From 26 final items suggested as priorities for prevention of ICC, the most important priorities were developing national guidelines for cervical screening and quality control protocol for patient follow-up and management of precancerous lesions. In addition, we emphasized considering insurance coverage for cervical screening, public awareness, and research priorities, and establishment of a cervical screening registry. Conclusion: A comprehensive approach and implementation of organized cervical screening program is necessary for prevention of ICC in Iran and other low incidence Muslim countries. Because of high cost for vaccination and low incidence of cervical cancer, we do not recommend HPV vaccination for the time being in Iran. PMID:27239863

  1. Epidemiology and Early Detection of Cervical Cancer.

    PubMed

    Hillemanns, Peter; Soergel, Phillip; Hertel, Hermann; Jentschke, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    The new German S3 guideline 'Prevention of Cervical Cancer' published in 2016 is based on the latest available evidence about cervical cancer screening and treatment of cervical precancer. Large randomized controlled trials indicate that human papillomavirus (HPV)-based screening may provide better protection against cervical cancer than cytology alone through improved detection of premalignant disease in the first screening round prior to progression. Therefore, women aged 30 years and older should preferably be screened with HPV testing every 3-5 years (cytology alone every 2 years is an acceptable alternative). Co-testing is not recommended. Screening should start at 25 years using cytology alone every 2 years. The preferred triage test after a positive HPV screening test is cytology. Women positive for HPV 16 and HPV 18 should receive immediate colposcopy. Another alternative triage method is p16/Ki-67 dual stain cytology. The mean yearly participation rate in Germany is between 45 and 50%. Offering devices for HPV self-sampling has the potential to increase participation rates in those women who are at higher risk of developing cervical cancer. Regarding primary prevention, the 9-valent vaccine may provide protection against up to 85% of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) 3 and 90% of cervical cancer, and is available in Europe as a 2-dose schedule from May 2016. PMID:27614953

  2. [Screening for cervical and breast cancer].

    PubMed

    Wilm, J; Schüler-Toprak, S; Ortmann, O

    2016-09-01

    Screening programs for cervical cancer and breast cancer lead to a clear reduction of mortality. Starting in 2018 screening for cervical cancer will be structured as an organized program as already exists for breast cancer. In future screening for cervical cancer will be primarily performed by human papillomavirus (HPV) testing at intervals of 5 years while cytological examination (Pap smear) will also be available as an additional or alternative procedure. For breast cancer screening in Germany an annual clinical examination with palpation and mammography screening at 2‑year intervals is provided for women aged between 50 and 69 years. In Germany only approximately 50 % of invited women have used the opportunity to participate in screening in recent years. Weighing the benefits against the harms of cancer screening programs is always important in the process of evaluation of different strategies. PMID:27577734

  3. Cervical cancer: screening and therapeutic perspectives.

    PubMed

    Sankaranarayanan, Rengaswamy; Thara, Somanathan; Esmy, Pulikottil Okkuru; Basu, Partha

    2008-01-01

    Cervical cancer is a major cause of mortality and premature death among women in their most productive years in low- and medium-resourced countries in Asia, Africa and Latin America, despite the fact that it is an eminently preventable cancer. While cytology screening programmes have resulted in a substantial reduction of cervical cancer mortality in developed countries, they have been shown to have a wide range of sensitivity in most routine settings including in developing countries. Although liquid-based cytology improves sample adequacy, claims on improved sensitivity remain controversial. Human papillomavirus testing is more sensitive than cytology, but whether this gain represents protection against future cervical cancer is not clear. Recently, in a randomized trial, the use of visual inspection with 4% acetic acid was shown to reduce cervical cancer incidence and mortality. Cryotherapy and large loop excision of the transformation zone are effective and safe treatment methods for cervical intraepithelial neoplasia. The clinical stage of cancer is the single most important prognostic factor and should be carefully evaluated in choosing optimal treatment between surgery and radiotherapy, with or without chemotherapy. At the public health level, health care infrastructure, affordability and capacity for initiating and sustaining vaccination and screening programmes are critical factors in cervical cancer control. On the other hand, an informed practitioner can utilize the multiple opportunities in routine primary care interactions for prevention, screening, early detection and prompt referral for treatment. PMID:18685274

  4. Current imaging strategies for the evaluation of uterine cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Bourgioti, Charis; Chatoupis, Konstantinos; Moulopoulos, Lia Angela

    2016-04-28

    Uterine cervical cancer still remains an important socioeconomic issue because it largely affects women of reproductive age. Prognosis is highly depended on extent of the disease at diagnosis and, therefore, accurate staging is crucial for optimal management. Cervical cancer is clinically staged, according to International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics guidelines, but, currently, there is increased use of cross sectional imaging modalities [computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), positron emission tomography-CT (PET-CT)] for the study of important prognostic factors like tumor size, parametrial invasion, endocervical extension, pelvic side wall or adjacent/distal organs involvement and lymph node status. Imaging indications also include cervical cancer follow-up, evaluation of tumor response to treatment and selection of suitable candidates for less radical surgeries like radical trachelectomy for fertility preservation. The preferred imaging method for local cervical cancer evaluation is MRI; CT is equally effective for evaluation of extrauterine spread of the disease. PET-CT shows high diagnostic performance for the detection of tumor relapse and metastatic lymph nodes. The aim of this review is to familiarize radiologists with the MRI appearance of cervical carcinoma and to discuss the indications of cross sectional imaging during the course of the disease in patients with cervical carcinoma.

  5. Current imaging strategies for the evaluation of uterine cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bourgioti, Charis; Chatoupis, Konstantinos; Moulopoulos, Lia Angela

    2016-01-01

    Uterine cervical cancer still remains an important socioeconomic issue because it largely affects women of reproductive age. Prognosis is highly depended on extent of the disease at diagnosis and, therefore, accurate staging is crucial for optimal management. Cervical cancer is clinically staged, according to International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics guidelines, but, currently, there is increased use of cross sectional imaging modalities [computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), positron emission tomography-CT (PET-CT)] for the study of important prognostic factors like tumor size, parametrial invasion, endocervical extension, pelvic side wall or adjacent/distal organs involvement and lymph node status. Imaging indications also include cervical cancer follow-up, evaluation of tumor response to treatment and selection of suitable candidates for less radical surgeries like radical trachelectomy for fertility preservation. The preferred imaging method for local cervical cancer evaluation is MRI; CT is equally effective for evaluation of extrauterine spread of the disease. PET-CT shows high diagnostic performance for the detection of tumor relapse and metastatic lymph nodes. The aim of this review is to familiarize radiologists with the MRI appearance of cervical carcinoma and to discuss the indications of cross sectional imaging during the course of the disease in patients with cervical carcinoma. PMID:27158421

  6. NIH Research Leads to Cervical Cancer Vaccine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Transmitted Diseases NIH Research Leads to Cervical Cancer Vaccine Past Issues / Fall 2008 Table of Contents For ... Douglas Lowy (left) and John Schiller developed the vaccine to prevent HPV infection in women, the cause ...

  7. Cervical cancer: A comprehensive approach towards extermination.

    PubMed

    Bava, Smitha V; Thulasidasan, Arun Kumar T; Sreekanth, Chanickal N; Anto, Ruby John

    2016-01-01

    Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) is one of the most common sexually transmitted pathogen, globally. Oncogenic types of HPV are the causative agents of many neoplastic diseases, including cervical cancer, which ranks as the most common cancer affecting females in developing countries. HPV infection of the cervical epithelium and the subsequent integration of viral DNA into the host genome are the major risk factors for cervical cancer. The scientific discovery of HPV as the causal agent of cervical cancer has led to the development of HPV-based diagnostic tools. Prophylactic vaccines, based on the oncogenic HPV type virus-like particles have been introduced in several developed countries as a preliminary preventive approach. Nevertheless, it remains a continuous threat to women in developing countries, where the prophylactic vaccines are unaffordable and organized screening programmes are lacking. This warrants implementation of prevention strategies that will reduce cervical cancer-related mortality. In this review, we have discussed molecular pathogenesis of HPV infection and the risk factors associated with it. The diagnosis, treatment and prevention strategies of HPV-related cervical cancer have also been discussed.

  8. The Future of Vaccines for Cervical Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Huh, Warner K.; Roden, Richard B.S.

    2015-01-01

    Cervical cancer continues to cause significant morbidity and mortality worldwide, making prophylactic cervical cancer vaccines an important focus for cervical cancer prevention. The increasing accessibility of these vaccines worldwide has the potential to greatly decrease the incidence and burden of disease in the future. However, current prophylactic vaccines offer no therapeutic benefit for persons already infected with human papillomavirus types targeted by vaccines or persons with precancerous lesions or cervical cancer. The protection offered by current vaccines is primarily against human papillomavirus types used to derive the vaccine, although partial cross-protection for related virus types has been observed. Herein, we describe findings from preclinical and clinical studies that employ vaccine strategies that have the potential to shape the future of vaccines against cervical cancer. Modalities include prophylactic strategies to target more oncogenic virus types by using the minor capsid antigen L2 and/or by increasing the number of types used to derive virus-like particle vaccines. Therapeutic strategies include the development of vaccines against human papillomavirus early proteins (targets for cellular immunity) for the resolution of precancerous lesions and cervical cancer. Future applications of existing VLP-based vaccines are also discussed. PMID:18482559

  9. Studying the Physical Function and Quality of Life Before and After Surgery in Patients With Stage I Cervical Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-26

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma, Not Otherwise Specified; Lymphedema; Sexual Dysfunction and Infertility; Stage IA1 Cervical Cancer; Stage IA2 Cervical Cancer; Stage IB1 Cervical Cancer

  10. Surgical Treatment of Early-Stage Cervical Cancer.

    PubMed

    Brucker, Sara Y; Ulrich, Uwe A

    2016-01-01

    Surgical treatment of cervical cancer has been a cornerstone in the management of this malignancy for more than 100 years. Today, for early-stage and low-risk cervical cancer, surgery is still considered the gold standard. If the preoperative assessment of the tumor reveals a situation prompting postoperative adjuvant radiochemotherapy, the latter should be planned as the primary treatment option, being preceded by staging laparoscopy including pelvic and paraaortic lymph node dissection. As an alternative to the open approach, the definitive surgical treatment should be either performed laparoscopically, or be laparoscopic-assisted, or laparoscopically robotic-assisted. PMID:27614875

  11. [Human papillomavirus detection in cervical cancer prevention].

    PubMed

    Picconi, María Alejandra

    2013-01-01

    Cervical cancer (CC), which is strongly associated to high-risk human papillomavirus (hr-HPV) infection, continues being a significant health problem in Latin America. The use of conventional cytology to detect precancerous cervical lesions has had no major impact on reducing CC incidence and mortality rates, which are still high in the region. New screening tools to detect precancerous lesions became available, which provide great opportunities for CC prevention, as do highly efficacious HPV vaccines able to prevent nearly all lesions associated with HPV-16 and -18 when applied before viral exposure. Currently, hr-HPV testing represents an invaluable component of clinical guidelines for screening, management and treatment of CC and their precursor lesions. Many testing strategies have been developed that can detect a broad spectrum of hr-HPV types in a single assay; however, only a small subset of them has documented clinical performance for any of the standard HPV testing indications. HPV tests that have not been validated and lack proof of reliability, reproducibility and accuracy should not be used in clinical management. Once incorporated into the lab, it is essential to submit the whole procedure of HPV testing to continuous and rigorous quality assurance to avoid sub-optimal, potentially harmful practices. Recent progress and current status of these methods are discussed in this article.

  12. Curcumin Nanoformulation for Cervical Cancer Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Zaman, Mohd S.; Chauhan, Neeraj; Yallapu, Murali M.; Gara, Rishi K.; Maher, Diane M.; Kumari, Sonam; Sikander, Mohammed; Khan, Sheema; Zafar, Nadeem; Jaggi, Meena; Chauhan, Subhash C.

    2016-01-01

    Cervical cancer is one of the most common cancers among women worldwide. Current standards of care for cervical cancer includes surgery, radiation, and chemotherapy. Conventional chemotherapy fails to elicit therapeutic responses and causes severe systemic toxicity. Thus, developing a natural product based, safe treatment modality would be a highly viable option. Curcumin (CUR) is a well-known natural compound, which exhibits excellent anti-cancer potential by regulating many proliferative, oncogenic, and chemo-resistance associated genes/proteins. However, due to rapid degradation and poor bioavailability, its translational and clinical use has been limited. To improve these clinically relevant parameters, we report a poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) based curcumin nanoparticle formulation (Nano-CUR). This study demonstrates that in comparison to free CUR, Nano-CUR effectively inhibits cell growth, induces apoptosis, and arrests the cell cycle in cervical cancer cell lines. Nano-CUR treatment modulated entities such as miRNAs, transcription factors, and proteins associated with carcinogenesis. Moreover, Nano-CUR effectively reduced the tumor burden in a pre-clinical orthotopic mouse model of cervical cancer by decreasing oncogenic miRNA-21, suppressing nuclear β-catenin, and abrogating expression of E6/E7 HPV oncoproteins including smoking compound benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) induced E6/E7 and IL-6 expression. These superior pre-clinical data suggest that Nano-CUR may be an effective therapeutic modality for cervical cancer. PMID:26837852

  13. [Epigenetic alterations in cervical cancer progression].

    PubMed

    Ríos-Romero, Magdalena; Soto-Valladares, Ana Guadalupe; Piña-Sánchez, Patricia

    2015-01-01

    Despite the use of the screening test, such as Papanicolaou, and the detection of human papillomavirus (HPV), cervical cancer remains as a public health problem in México and it is the second leading cause of death for malignant neoplasias among women. High-risk HPV infection is the main risk factor for the development of premalignant lesions and cervical cancer; however, HPV infection is not the only factor; there are various genetic and epigenetic alterations required for the development of neoplasias; some of them have been described and even in some cases they have been suggested as biomarkers for prognosis. However, in contrast with other cancer types, such as breast cancer, in cervical cancer the use of biomarkers has not been established for clinical applications. Unlike genetic alterations, epigenetic alterations are potentially reversible; in this sense, their characterization is important, since they have not only a potential use as biomarkers, but they also could represent new therapeutic targets for treatment of cervical cancer. This review describes some of the more common epigenetic alterations in cervical cancer and its potential use in routine clinical practice.

  14. Cisplatin and Radiation Therapy With or Without Carboplatin and Paclitaxel in Patients With Locally Advanced Cervical Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-26

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Chemotherapeutic Agent Toxicity; Cognitive Side Effects of Cancer Therapy; Psychological Impact of Cancer; Radiation Toxicity; Sexual Dysfunction and Infertility; Stage IB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage III Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer

  15. Knockdown of Legumain Suppresses Cervical Cancer Cell Migration and Invasion.

    PubMed

    Meng, Fei; Liu, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Cervical cancer is the second leading type of cancer in women living in less developed countries. The pathological and molecular mechanisms of cervical cancer are not comprehensively known. Though legumain has been found to be highly expressed in various types of solid tumors, its expression and biological function in cervical cancer remain unknown. In this study, we aimed to investigate legumain expression and functions in cervical cancer. We found that legumain was highly expressed in cervical cancer cells. When knocked down, legumain expression in HeLa and SiHa cells significantly reduced its migration and invasion abilities compared with control cells. Furthermore, legumain silencing suppressed the activation of matrix metalloproteases (MMP2 and MMP3) in cervical cancer cells. This study indicates that legumain might play an important role in cervical cancer cell migration and invasion. Legumain might be a potential therapeutic target for cervical cancer therapy.

  16. Risks of Cervical Cancer Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... Laboratory for Cancer Research Partners & Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer ... Centers Frederick National Lab Partners & Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists NCI Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer ...

  17. Naturopathic Management of Females with Cervical Atypia: A Delphi Process to Explore Current Practice

    PubMed Central

    Leaver, Cynthia Ann; Miller-Davis, Claiborne; Wallen, Gwenyth R.

    2013-01-01

    Background Human papillomavirus is the most significant factor contributing to cervical cancer. Naturopathic doctors (NDs) implement an integrative approach to treat cervical atypia. This study explored practice consensus and variance among NDs. Methods A purposefully selected panel of six NDs participated in a modified Delphi study to validate practice. Three electronic web-based surveys were completed over nine months. Results Local and systemic treatments were included in all ND protocols. Six protocols included cervical cancer screening guidelines, green tea suppositories, and oral folic acid. Five protocols included oral green tea, diindoylemethane (DIM), and cartenoids. Four protocols incorporated Vitamin C. Two NDs considered escharotics when managing cervical atypia. All NDs included health behavior management in their protocols. Conclusion Naturopathic management of cervical atypia varies across practitioners. However, in general, elements of management include (1) cervical cancer screening guidelines, (2) local and systemic treatments, (3) health behavior/lifestyle recommendations, and (4) immune system support. PMID:23399786

  18. Cigarette smoking and invasive cervical cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Brinton, L.A.; Schairer, C.; Haenszel, W.; Stolley, P.; Lehman, H.F.; Levine, R.; Savitz, D.A.

    1986-06-20

    A case-control study of 480 patients with invasive cervical cancer and 797 population controls, conducted in five geographic areas in the United States, included an evaluation of the relationship of several cigarette smoking variables to cervical cancer risk. Although smoking was correlated with both age at first intercourse and number of sexual partners, a significant smoking-related risk persisted for squamous cell carcinoma after adjustment for these factors (relative risk, 1.5). Twofold excess risks were seen for those smoking 40 or more cigarettes per day and those smoking for 40 or more years. Increased risks, however, were observed only among recent and continuous smokers. In contrast to squamous cell cancer, no relationship was observed between smoking and risk of adenocarcinoma or adenosquamous carcinoma. These results suggest a causal relationship between cigarette smoking and invasive squamous cell cervical cancer, perhaps through a late-stage or promotional event, although the mechanisms of action require further elucidation.

  19. Are Fewer Cervical Cancer Screenings Needed After HPV Vaccine?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Are Fewer Cervical Cancer Screenings Needed After HPV Vaccine? Less testing could reduce risk of false positives ... cervical cancer screening depends on the type of vaccine she had, the researchers said. Women vaccinated with ...

  20. Surgical Management of Cervical Spondylotic Myelopathy

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Wesley; Dorsi, Michael J.; Witham, Timothy F.

    2010-01-01

    Cervical spondylosis is a common degenerative condition that is a significant cause of morbidity. This review discusses the pathophysiology and natural history of cervical spondylotic myelopathy and focuses on the current literature evaluating the clinical management of these patients. PMID:20191085

  1. Innovations in the treatment of invasive cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Stehman, Frederick B; Rose, Peter G; Greer, Benjamin E; Roy, Michel; Plante, Marie; Penalver, Manuel; Jhingran, Anuja; Eifel, Patricia; Montz, Fredrick; Wharton, J Taylor

    2003-11-01

    Invasive cervical cancer is characterized by basement membrane-invading lesions capable of metastasizing through the lymphatic and vascular systems. Treatment methods were reviewed by panelists at the Second International Conference on Cervical Cancer (Houston, TX, April 11-14, 2002), and new opportunities for translational research were discussed. Reviews encompassed hysterectomy with or without lymph node dissection or cervical conization in cases with microinvasion and radical trachelectomy with or without lymph node dissection as fertility-sparing surgery. Chemoradiation is used to treat advanced cervical malignancies, and the risks and benefits of radiotherapy are significant. Pelvic exenteration is used to treat certain types of recurrences. Use of the Miami pouch for continent urinary diversion was highlighted. Gynecologic oncologists expect novel in vivo imaging techniques currently being developed to help guide therapy choices within the next decade. The most significant research priorities are large group-randomized trials involving fertility-sparing procedures and the management of microinvasive carcinoma (MICA); better identification of candidates for chemoradiation; and the development of innovative approaches to exenteration. Improving diagnostic technologies, refining the criteria by which therapies are chosen, and preserving fertility remain challenges in selecting the most appropriate treatment for invasive cervical cancer. Research advances in both diagnosis and treatment are expected to improve therapy and outcomes.

  2. Margins for cervical and vulvar cancer.

    PubMed

    Khanna, Namita; Rauh, Lisa A; Lachiewicz, Mark P; Horowitz, Ira R

    2016-03-01

    Surgery is the primary treatment for vulvar cancer as well as early-stage carcinoma of the cervix. This article reviews the significance of margin status after surgery on overall survival, need for further surgical intervention, and role for possible adjuvant therapy. It summarizes the abundant literature on margin status in vulvar cancer and highlights the need for further investigation on the prognostic significance of margins in cervical cancer. In addition, it reviews other important operative considerations.

  3. Effects of irradiation for cervical cancer on subsequent breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Harlan, L.C.M.

    1985-01-01

    Previous research suggests that cervical cancer patients have a lower risk of breast cancer than women in the general population. Possible explanations include opposing risk factors for cervical cancer and breast cancer, the effect of irradiation used to treat cervical cancer, or both. The purpose of this study was to explore the relationship between irradiation for cervical cancer and the subsequent development of breast cancer. There was no statistically significant relationship between radiation to the ovarian area and the risk of breast cancer in this study. However, the results were consistent with a 19% reduction in risk for women irradiated for cervical cancer when compared to nonirradiated women. In a dose-response analysis, there was a nonsignificant trend of decreased risk of breast cancer with increased radiation up to 1800 rad. There was no consistent pattern for higher doses. The trend, although nonsignificant, differed by age. Women <60 years of age at irradiation were generally at a lower risk of breast cancer than nonirradiated women. Women over 59 years were at an increased risk. There are some potentially important findings from this study which might influence medical care. These should be examined in the larger International Radiation Study.

  4. HPV-Based Screening, Triage, Treatment, and Followup Strategies in the Management of Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Peralta-Zaragoza, Oscar; Deas, Jessica; Gómez-Cerón, Claudia; García-Suastegui, Wendy Argelia; Fierros-Zárate, Geny del Socorro; Jacobo-Herrera, Nadia Judith

    2013-01-01

    Cervical cancer is the second most common cause of death from cancer in women worldwide, and the development of new diagnostic, prognostic, and treatment strategies merits special attention. Many efforts have been made to design new drugs and develop immunotherapy and gene therapy strategies to treat cervical cancer. HPV genotyping has potentially valuable applications in triage of low-grade abnormal cervical cytology, assessment of prognosis and followup of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia, and in treatment strategies for invasive cervical cancer. It is known that during the development of cervical cancer associated with HPV infection, a cascade of abnormal events is induced, including disruption of cellular cycle control, alteration of gene expression, and deregulation of microRNA expression. Thus, the identification and subsequent functional evaluation of host proteins associated with HPV E6 and E7 oncoproteins may provide useful information in understanding cervical carcinogenesis, identifying cervical cancer molecular markers, and developing specific targeting strategies against tumor cells. Therefore, in this paper, we discuss the main diagnostic methods, management strategies, and followup of HPV-associated cervical lesions and review clinical trials applying gene therapy strategies against the development of cervical cancer. PMID:23690785

  5. Laboratory management of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia: proposing a new paradigm.

    PubMed

    Herfs, Michael; Crum, Christopher P

    2013-03-01

    Since the discovery of human papillomavirus (HPV) type 16 in early 80s, the link between HPV and cervical cancer has been established with certainty, a function of the discovery and cloning of a range of HPV types associated with both cancer precursors (cervical intraepithelial neoplasia or CIN) and carcinomas and extensive epidemiologic, clinical, pathologic, and experimental data. These accumulated results have culminated in new paradigms of cancer prevention through screening and triage. Despite this, the management of women with CIN is still suboptimal and the overtreatment of these conditions still occurs, largely due to the lack of clarity regarding which precancerous lesions are most likely to progress in grade. Recently, a discrete population of cuboidal cells was discovered at the cervical squamocolumnar junction, the anatomic site where the large majority of HPV-related (pre)neoplastic lesions develop. These cells seem to be embryonic in nature and participate both in benign metaplasias and the initial phase of precancer development. This review summarizes the historical evolution of precursor management, assesses the potential role of this and other discoveries in segregating lower from higher-risk precursors, and examines their potential impact on the management of women with real or potential cervical cancer precursors.

  6. [Chromosomal instability in carcinogenesis of cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    de Los Santos-Munive, Victoria; Alonso-Avelino, Juan Angel

    2013-01-01

    In order to spot common chromosomal imbalances in early and late lesions of cervical cancer that might be used as progression biomarkers, we made a search of literature in PubMed from 1996 to 2011. The medical subject headings employed were chromosomal alterations, loss of heterozygosis, cervical cancer, cervical tumorigenesis, chromosomal aberrations, cervical intraepithelial neoplasm and low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion. The common chromosomal imbalances were gains in 8q24 (77.7 %), 20q13 (66.9 %), 3q26 (47.1 %), Xp22 (43.8 %), and 5p15 (60 %), principally. On the other hand, integration of the high-risk human papillomavirus genome into the host chromosome has been associated with the development of neoplasia, but the chromosomal imbalances seem to precede and promote such integration. Chromosomal imbalances in 8q24, 20q13, 3q21-26 and 5p15-Xp22, determined by fluorescent in situ hybridization assay or comparative genomic hybridization assay for early detection of the presence of high-risk human papillomavirus, are promising markers of cervical cancer progression.

  7. Nanomechanical clues from morphologically normal cervical squamous cells could improve cervical cancer screening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, Li; Feng, Jiantao; Sun, Quanmei; Liu, Jing; Hua, Wenda; Li, Jing; Ao, Zhuo; You, Ke; Guo, Yanli; Liao, Fulong; Zhang, Youyi; Guo, Hongyan; Han, Jinsong; Xiong, Guangwu; Zhang, Lufang; Han, Dong

    2015-09-01

    Applying an atomic force microscope, we performed a nanomechanical analysis of morphologically normal cervical squamous cells (MNSCs) which are commonly used in cervical screening. Results showed that nanomechanical parameters of MNSCs correlate well with cervical malignancy, and may have potential in cancer screening to provide early diagnosis.Applying an atomic force microscope, we performed a nanomechanical analysis of morphologically normal cervical squamous cells (MNSCs) which are commonly used in cervical screening. Results showed that nanomechanical parameters of MNSCs correlate well with cervical malignancy, and may have potential in cancer screening to provide early diagnosis. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr03662c

  8. From cancer screening to treatment: service delivery and referral in the National Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection Program.

    PubMed

    Miller, Jacqueline W; Hanson, Vivien; Johnson, Gale D; Royalty, Janet E; Richardson, Lisa C

    2014-08-15

    The National Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection Program (NBCCEDP) provides breast and cervical cancer screening and diagnostic services to low-income and underserved women through a network of providers and health care organizations. Although the program serves women 40-64 years old for breast cancer screening and 21-64 years old for cervical cancer screening, the priority populations are women 50-64 years old for breast cancer and women who have never or rarely been screened for cervical cancer. From 1991 through 2011, the NBCCEDP provided screening and diagnostic services to more than 4.3 million women, diagnosing 54,276 breast cancers, 2554 cervical cancers, and 123,563 precancerous cervical lesions. A critical component of providing screening services is to ensure that all women with abnormal screening results receive appropriate and timely diagnostic evaluations. Case management is provided to assist women with overcoming barriers that would delay or prevent follow-up care. Women diagnosed with cancer receive treatment through the states' Breast and Cervical Cancer Treatment Programs (a special waiver for Medicaid) if they are eligible. The NBCCEDP has performance measures that serve as benchmarks to monitor the completeness and timeliness of care. More than 90% of the women receive complete diagnostic care and initiate treatment less than 30 days from the time of their diagnosis. Provision of effective screening and diagnostic services depends on effective program management, networks of providers throughout the community, and the use of evidence-based knowledge, procedures, and technologies.

  9. [Wnt signalling pathway and cervical cancer].

    PubMed

    Ramos-Solano, Moisés; Álvarez-Zavala, Monserrat; García-Castro, Beatriz; Jave-Suárez, Luis Felipe; Aguilar-Lemarroy, Adriana

    2015-01-01

    Cervical cancer (CC) is a pathology that arises in the cervical epithelium, whose major cause of risk is human papillomavirus (HPV) infection. Due to the fact that HPV infection per se is not enough to generate a carcinogenic process, it has been proposed that alterations in the Wnt signaling pathway are involved in cervical carcinogenesis. The Wnt family consists of 13 receptors and 19 ligands, and it is highly conserved phylogenetically due to its contribution in different biological processes, such as embryogenesis and tissue regeneration. Additionally, this signaling pathway modulates various cellular functions, for instance: cell proliferation, differentiation, migration and cell polarity. This paper describes the Wnt signaling pathways and alterations that have been found in members of this family in different cancer types and, especially, in CC.

  10. [Cervical cancer screening in Switzerland - current practice and future challenges].

    PubMed

    Untiet, Sarah; Schmidt, Nicole; Low, Nicola; Petignat, Patrick

    2013-04-01

    At the beginning of the 20th Century, cervical cancer was the leading cause of death from cancer in women. A marked decline in cervical cancer has been observed since the 1960s, in parallel with the introduction of the Papanicolau (Pap) test as a cytological screening method. Today, Pap smear screening is still the most widely used tool for cervical cancer prevention. Testing for human papillomavirus (HPV) in cervical specimens or a combination of Pap and HPV testing are also now available. In this article we compare current guidelines for cervical cancer screening in Switzerland with those in other European countries. In view of the opportunities offered by HPV testing and, since 2008, HPV vaccination, current guidelines for cervical cancer screening should be updated. Both the choice of screening tests and general organization of cervical cancer screening should be reviewed.

  11. Cervical cancer: Can it be prevented?

    PubMed Central

    Aggarwal, Pakhee

    2014-01-01

    Cervical cancer prevention requires a multipronged approach involving primary, secondary and tertiary prevention. The key element under primary prevention is human papilloma virus (HPV) vaccination. So far, only prophylactic HPV vaccines which prevent HPV infection by one or more subtypes are commercially available. Therapeutic HPV vaccines which aid in clearing established infection are still under trial. Secondary prevention entails early detection of precancerous lesions and its success is determined by the population coverage and the efficacy of the screening technique. A number of techniques are in use, including cytology, visual inspection (using the naked eye, magnivisualizer, acetic acid and Lugol’s iodine), HPV testing and a combination of these methods. Updated screening guidelines have been advocated by the American Cancer Society in light of the role of HPV on cervical carcinogenesis. Recent research has also focussed on novel biomarkers that can predict progression to cancer in screen positive women and help to differentiate those who need treatment from those who can be left for follow-up. Last but not the least, effective treatment of precancerous lesions can help to reduce the incidence of invasive cervical cancer and this constitutes tertiary prevention. A combination of these approaches can help to prevent the burden of cervical cancer and its antecedent morbidity and mortality, but all of these are not feasible in all settings due to resource and allocation constraints. Thus, all countries, especially low and middle income ones, have to determine their own cocktail of approaches that work before we can say with certainty that yes, cervical cancer can be prevented. PMID:25302177

  12. Cervical Cancer: paradigms at home and abroad

    Cancer.gov

    NCI funded a clinical trial that will have an impact on the treatment of late-stage cervical cancer, and also supported a screening trial in India using a network of community outreach workers offering low tech-screening by direct visualization of the cer

  13. Cervical Cancer Screening and Perceived Information Needs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whynes, David K.; Clarke, Katherine; Philips, Zoe; Avis, Mark

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To identify women's sources of information about cervical cancer screening, information which women report receiving during Pap consultations, information they would like to receive, and the relationships between perceived information needs, personal characteristics and information sources. Design/methodology/approach: Logistic regression…

  14. Flexitouch® Home Maintenance Therapy or Standard Home Maintenance Therapy in Treating Patients With Lower-Extremity Lymphedema Caused by Treatment for Cervical Cancer, Vulvar Cancer, or Endometrial Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-12-29

    Lymphedema; Stage 0 Cervical Cancer; Stage 0 Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage 0 Vulvar Cancer; Stage I Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage I Vulvar Cancer; Stage IA Cervical Cancer; Stage IB Cervical Cancer; Stage II Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage II Vulvar Cancer; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage III Cervical Cancer; Stage III Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage III Vulvar Cancer; Stage IV Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer; Stage IVB Cervical Cancer; Stage IVB Vulvar Cancer

  15. The role of trachelectomy in cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    Halaska, MJ; Robova, H; Pluta, M; Rob, L

    2015-01-01

    Cervical cancer is one of the most common cancers in women worldwide. Because it often affects women of childbearing age (19–45 years), fertility-sparing surgery is an important issue. The article reviews current viable fertility-sparing options with a special focus on trachelectomy, including vaginal radical trachelectomy, abdominal radical trachelectomy and simple trachelectomy. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy is also discussed. Finally, the decision to proceed with fertility-sparing treatment should be a patient-driven process. PMID:25729419

  16. Robotic surgery for early stage cervical cancer: Evolution and current trends.

    PubMed

    Medlin, Erin E; Kushner, David M; Barroilhet, Lisa

    2015-12-01

    The management of early stage cervical cancer often includes surgery in the form of radical hysterectomy, radical trachelectomy, or radical parametrectomy. Surgical techniques have evolved to include minimal invasive approaches, and more recently, to include robotic assisted techniques. This review highlights the evolution of surgical management of early cervical cancer and specifically explores robotic assisted radical hysterectomy, radical trachelectomy, radical parametrectomy, and the role of neoadjuvant chemotherapy.

  17. Robotic surgery for early stage cervical cancer: Evolution and current trends.

    PubMed

    Medlin, Erin E; Kushner, David M; Barroilhet, Lisa

    2015-12-01

    The management of early stage cervical cancer often includes surgery in the form of radical hysterectomy, radical trachelectomy, or radical parametrectomy. Surgical techniques have evolved to include minimal invasive approaches, and more recently, to include robotic assisted techniques. This review highlights the evolution of surgical management of early cervical cancer and specifically explores robotic assisted radical hysterectomy, radical trachelectomy, radical parametrectomy, and the role of neoadjuvant chemotherapy. PMID:26768315

  18. Study to Understand Cervical Cancer Early Endpoints and Determinants (SUCCEED)

    Cancer.gov

    A study to comprehensively assess biomarkers of risk for progressive cervical neoplasia, and thus develop a new set of biomarkers that can distinguish those at highest risk of cervical cancer from those with benign infection

  19. Neck dissection with cervical sensory preservation in thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Xue, Shuai; Wang, Peisong; Chen, Guang

    2013-11-01

    Thyroid cancer is the most common endocrine malignancy. Recently, controversy has focused on the management of lymph node metastases, which represent approximately 90% of disease recurrences and may require considerable time, effort, and resources to diagnose and treat. Neck dissections play an essential role in the management of head and neck cancer. A modified radical neck dissection (MND) refers to resection of the lymph nodes in levels II through V and often including the central nodes in level VI. When performing modified neck dissection, we recommend to protect more reserved cervical plexus. The purpose is to better protect patient's neck skin feeling.

  20. The paradigm shift in cervical cancer screening in Germany.

    PubMed

    Hillemanns, Peter

    2016-01-01

    With the adoption of the Cancer Screening and Registration Law (KFRG, 2013) based on the National Cancer Plan, the so far opportunistic cervical cancer screening in Germany is to be converted to an organized screening program. This decision in Germany is consistent with the new EU Guidelines and, in anticipation of the upcoming German S3 guideline for cervical cancer screening.

  1. Airway management in cervical spine injury

    PubMed Central

    Austin, Naola; Krishnamoorthy, Vijay; Dagal, Arman

    2014-01-01

    To minimize risk of spinal cord injury, airway management providers must understand the anatomic and functional relationship between the airway, cervical column, and spinal cord. Patients with known or suspected cervical spine injury may require emergent intubation for airway protection and ventilatory support or elective intubation for surgery with or without rigid neck stabilization (i.e., halo). To provide safe and efficient care in these patients, practitioners must identify high-risk patients, be comfortable with available methods of airway adjuncts, and know how airway maneuvers, neck stabilization, and positioning affect the cervical spine. This review discusses the risks and benefits of various airway management strategies as well as specific concerns that affect patients with known or suspected cervical spine injury. PMID:24741498

  2. Human papillomavirus and cervical cancer: issues for biobehavioral and psychosocial research.

    PubMed

    Waller, Jo; McCaffery, Kirsten J; Forrest, Sue; Wardle, Jane

    2004-02-01

    There is now overwhelming evidence that high-risk, sexually transmitted types of human papillomavirus (HPV) are the main causal agent in cervical cancer. Biobehavioral and psychosocial research is uniquely capable of addressing many of the issues raised by HPV and its link with cervical cancer. In this article we review current findings in this area and identify issues for future research. The first of the three sections explores issues associated with the introduction of HPV testing for the detection and management of cervical abnormalities and the impact of growing public awareness of the sexually transmitted nature of cervical cancer. The implications for public understanding of cervical cancer, psychosocial issues associated with screening, and the potential impact on screening uptake are discussed. The second section addresses the role of biobehavioral factors in the persistence and progression of HPV infection as well as possible interventions to minimize the risk of persistence. Finally, primary prevention of HPV is discussed.

  3. [Cervical cancer is a clinical challenge].

    PubMed

    Bjurberg, Maria; Beskow, Catharina; Kannisto, Päivi; Lindahl, Gabriel

    2015-01-01

    Cervical cancer is the third most common female cancer world wide. In Sweden, some 450 cases are diagnosed annually. One out of three affected Swedish women is under the age of 40. Survival for all stages is 73 % in Sweden. Human papilloma virus (HPV) can be detected in the majority of all cervical cancers. Treatment consists of surgery for early stages, and a combination of chemoradiation and brachytherapy for locally advanced disease. For metastatic disease, the treatment is palliative. Late side effects after treatment may have serious impact on the quality of life. There is a strong need for more efficient treatment of metastatic disease. Current lines of research include surgical strategies, optimised radiotherapy, neoadjuvant therapy, targeted therapy, and immunotherapy including therapeutic vaccines. PMID:26646957

  4. Optical coherence tomography in diagnosing cervical cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznetzova, Irina A.; Shakhova, Natalia M.; Kachalina, Tatiana S.; Gladkova, Natalia D.; Myakov, Alexey V.; Iksanov, Rashid R.; Feldchtein, Felix I.

    2000-05-01

    Cervical cancer remains one of the most significant problem in oncogynecology. It tends towards treatment approaches that provide termination of pathological processes along with preservation of the patient's life quality. There is a need in earlier and more accurate diagnosis of pathological states, objective assessment of physiological processes, and adequate monitoring of the course of treatment. In our previous publications we have reported unique capabilities of the Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) to image in vivo the mucosa structure of the cervix and to monitor various physiological and pathological alterations. In this report, we present results of OCT application to diagnose different stages of cervical cancer and to control its treatment at early stages. We have performed OCT-colposcopy in 11 female patients with cervical cancer to derive OCT criteria of this disease, to provide exact demarcation of a pathological area, and to determine a real size of a tumor. We have found that, in general, borders of a tumor, defined visually and detected with OCT by violation of the basement membrane in exocervix, do not coincide. The mismatch depends on a stage of cancer and can be as much as several millimeters. This information is especially important for evaluation of linear dimension of tumors with 3 - 5 mm invasion and also for differential diagnosis between the T1 and T2 stages with cancer extension onto vagina.

  5. [Papillomavirus and cervical cancer in Chile].

    PubMed

    O'Ryan, Miguel; Valenzuela, María Teresa

    2008-11-01

    Molecular, clinical and epidemiological studies have established beyond doubt that human papiloma viruses (HPV) cause cervical cancer. The virus is also associated with genital warts and other less common cancers in oropharynx, vulva, vagina and penis. Worldwide, VPH genotypes 16 and 18 are the most common high risk genotypes, detected in near 70% of women with cervical cancer. The discovery of a cause-effect relationship between several carcinogenic microorganisms and cancer open avenues for new diagnostic, treatment and prevention strategies. In this issue of Revista Médica de Chile, two papers on HPV are presented. Guzman and colleagues demonstrate that HPV can be detected in 66% to 77% of healthy male adolescents bypolymerase chain reaction and that positivity depends on the site of the penis that is sampled. These results support the role of male to female transmission of high risk HPVs in Chile and should lead to even more active educational campaigns. The second paper provides recommendations for HPV vaccine use in Chile, generated by the Immunization Advisory Committee of the Chilean Infectious Disease Society. To issue these recommendations, the Committee analyzes the epidemiological information available on HPV infection and cervical cancer in Chile, vaccine safety and effectiveness data, and describes cost-effectiveness studies. Taking into account that universal vaccination is controversial, the Committee favors vaccine use in Chile and it's incorporation into a national program. However, there is an indication that the country requires the implementation of an integrated surveillance approach including cross matching of data obtained from HPV genotype surveillance, monitoring of vaccination coverage, and surveillance of cervical cancer. The final decision of universal vaccine use in Chile should be based on a through analysis of information.ev Mid Chile

  6. Biological implications and therapeutic significance of DNA methylation regulated genes in cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Bhat, Samatha; Kabekkodu, Shama Prasada; Noronha, Ashish; Satyamoorthy, Kapaettu

    2016-02-01

    Cervical cancer is the second most common cancer among women worldwide. About 528,000 women are diagnosed with cervical cancer contributing to around 266,000 deaths, across the globe every year. Out of these, the burden of 226,000 (85%) deaths occurs in the developing countries, who are less resource intensive to manage the disease. This is despite the fact that cervical cancer is amenable for early detection due to its long and relatively well-known natural history prior to its culmination as invasive disease. Infection with high risk human papillomavirus (hrHPVs) is essential but not sufficient to cause cervical cancer. Although it was thought that genetic mutations alone was sufficient to cause cervical cancer, the current epidemiological and molecular studies have shown that HPV infection along with genetic and epigenetic changes are frequently associated and essential for initiation, development and progression of the disease. Moreover, aberrant DNA methylation in host and HPV genome can be utilized not only as biomarkers for early detection, disease progression, diagnosis and prognosis of cervical cancer but also to design effective therapeutic strategies. In this review, we focus on recent studies on DNA methylation changes in cervical cancer and their potential role as biomarkers for early diagnosis, prognosis and targeted therapy.

  7. Epidemiology of cervical cancer in Latin America

    PubMed Central

    Capote Negrin, Luis G

    2015-01-01

    The basic aspects of the descriptive epidemiology of cervical cancer in Latin America are presented. A decrease in the incidence and mortality rates has been observed in the period from 2000 to 2012 in all countries across the region, this has not occurred at the same proportions, and in many countries, observed figures of incidence and mortality are among the highest levels in the world. In Latin America, calculating a mean measure of the numbers from the GLOBOCAN data from 2000 to 2012, we can observe a difference of up to fivefold of the incidence (Puerto Rico 9,73 Vs Bolivia 50,73) and almost seven times for mortality (Puerto Rico 3,3 Vs Nicaragua 21,67). A report of the epidemiology, risk factors, and evaluation of screening procedures regarding the possible impact of the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine I in the prevention of cervical cancer is presented. PMID:26557875

  8. Human papillomavirus, current vaccines, and cervical cancer prevention.

    PubMed

    Teitelman, Anne M; Stringer, Marilyn; Averbuch, Tali; Witkoski, Amy

    2009-01-01

    Human papillomavirus infection, the most common sexually transmitted infection in the United States, is associated with the development of cervical cancer. The new human papillomavirus vaccine advances cervical cancer prevention; however, provider-recommended screening with Papanicolaou tests and lifestyle modifications are still needed. Widespread implementation of the vaccine and delivering cervical cancer screening to underserved populations remain a challenge. Nurses are ideally suited to address these needs by providing education to patients and families. PMID:19208050

  9. Promoter polymorphism in the matrix metalloproteinase-1 and risk of cervical cancer in Korean women.

    PubMed

    Ju, Woong; Kang, Sokbom; Kim, Jae Weon; Park, Noh Hyun; Song, Yong Sang; Kang, Soon Beom; Lee, Hyo Pyo

    2005-01-20

    The aim of this investigation was to analyze the association between a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-1 promoter gene -1607 bp region and cervical cancer risk in Korean women. The blood samples of 232 cervical cancer patients and 332 non-cancer control subjects who managed at Seoul National University Hospital from 1999 to 2002 were collected. Polymorphism in MMP-1 promoter -1607 region was determined using TaqMan method. Allele frequency and genotype distribution in the cervical cancer group were compared with those of the control group to determine whether this polymorphism elevates the susceptibility of Korean women to cervical cancer. The relationship between this SNP and cancer invasiveness was also evaluated by collating clinicopathologic data of those in the cancer group, such as FIGO stage, lymph node status, histologic type and parametrial invasion. In the cervical cancer group, the allele frequency of 2G was 66.1%, in the control group 68.2%, showing no significant difference (P=0.41). Similarly the genotypes with insertion (2G/2G) or deletion (1G/1G) polymorphism showed no increased risk for cervical cancer susceptibility compared with 1G/2G genotype. A subgroup analysis of the clinicopathologic parameters in cancer group also showed no significant difference suggesting the lack of an association between SNP of the MMP-1 promoter -1607 bp region and cervical cancer invasiveness. In conclusion, this study shows that Korean with specific polymorphism in MMP-1 are neither more susceptible to develop cervical cancer nor more vulnerable for cancer progression.

  10. Drug Delivery Approaches for the Treatment of Cervical Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ordikhani, Farideh; Erdem Arslan, Mustafa; Marcelo, Raymundo; Sahin, Ilyas; Grigsby, Perry; Schwarz, Julie K.; Azab, Abdel Kareem

    2016-01-01

    Cervical cancer is a highly prevalent cancer that affects women around the world. With the availability of new technologies, researchers have increased their efforts to develop new drug delivery systems in cervical cancer chemotherapy. In this review, we summarized some of the recent research in systematic and localized drug delivery systems and compared the advantages and disadvantages of these methods. PMID:27447664

  11. A decision support system based on an ensemble of random forests for improving the management of women with abnormal findings at cervical cancer screening.

    PubMed

    Bountris, Panagiotis; Haritou, Maria; Pouliakis, Abraham; Karakitsos, Petros; Koutsouris, Dimitrios

    2015-08-01

    In most cases, cervical cancer (CxCa) develops due to underestimated abnormalities in the Pap test. Today, there are ancillary molecular biology techniques available that provide important information related to CxCa and the Human Papillomavirus (HPV) natural history, including HPV DNA tests, HPV mRNA tests and immunocytochemistry techniques such as overexpression of p16. These techniques are either highly sensitive or highly specific, however not both at the same time, thus no perfect method is available today. In this paper we present a decision support system (DSS) based on an ensemble of Random Forests (RFs) for the intelligent combination of the results of classic and ancillary techniques that are available for CxCa detection, in order to exploit the benefits of each technique and produce more accurate results. The proposed system achieved both, high sensitivity (86.1%) and high specificity (93.3%), as well as high overall accuracy (91.8%), in detecting cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 2 or worse (CIN2+). The system's performance was better than any other single test involved in this study. Moreover, the proposed architecture of employing an ensemble of RFs proved to be better than the single classifier approach. The presented system can handle cases with missing tests and more importantly cases with inadequate cytological outcome, thus it can also produce accurate results in the case of stand-alone HPV-based screening, where Pap test is not applied. The proposed system may identify women at true risk of developing CxCa and guide personalised management and therapeutic interventions.

  12. Nonoperative Management of Cervical Radiculopathy.

    PubMed

    Childress, Marc A; Becker, Blair A

    2016-05-01

    Cervical radiculopathy describes pain in one or both of the upper extremities, often in the setting of neck pain, secondary to compression or irritation of nerve roots in the cervical spine. It can be accompanied by motor, sensory, or reflex deficits and is most prevalent in persons 50 to 54 years of age. Cervical radiculopathy most often stems from degenerative disease in the cervical spine. The most common examination findings are painful neck movements and muscle spasm. Diminished deep tendon reflexes, particularly of the triceps, are the most common neurologic finding. The Spurling test, shoulder abduction test, and upper limb tension test can be used to confirm the diagnosis. Imaging is not required unless there is a history of trauma, persistent symptoms, or red flags for malignancy, myelopathy, or abscess. Electrodiagnostic testing is not needed if the diagnosis is clear, but has clinical utility when peripheral neuropathy of the upper extremity is a likely alternate diagnosis. Patients should be reassured that most cases will resolve regardless of the type of treatment. Nonoperative treatment includes physical therapy involving strengthening, stretching, and potentially traction, as well as nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, muscle relaxants, and massage. Epidural steroid injections may be helpful but have higher risks of serious complications. In patients with red flag symptoms or persistent symptoms after four to six weeks of treatment, magnetic resonance imaging can identify pathology amenable to epidural steroid injections or surgery. PMID:27175952

  13. Cervical cancer screening in low- and middle-income countries.

    PubMed

    Ditzian, Lauren R; David-West, Gizelka; Maza, Mauricio; Hartmann, Beatrix; Shirazian, Taraneh; Cremer, Miriam

    2011-01-01

    Cervical cancer is a leading cause of death among women in the developing world. Conventional cytology-based cervical cancer screening programs have been largely ineffectual at reducing the cervical cancer burden in low-resource settings. In response, alternative strategies have been tested, such as visual inspection with acetic acid (VIA) screening and human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA-based testing. This manuscript reviews literature addressing the programmatic approaches to implementing cervical cancer screening programs in low-resource settings, highlighting the challenges, barriers, and successes related to the use of cytology, VIA, and HPV-DNA based screening programs.

  14. Molecular mechanisms of cisplatin resistance in cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Haiyan; Luo, Hui; Zhang, Wenwen; Shen, Zhaojun; Hu, Xiaoli; Zhu, Xueqiong

    2016-01-01

    Patients with advanced or recurrent cervical cancer have poor prognosis, and their 1-year survival is only 10%–20%. Chemotherapy is considered as the standard treatment for patients with advanced or recurrent cervical cancer, and cisplatin appears to treat the disease effectively. However, resistance to cisplatin may develop, thus substantially compromising the efficacy of cisplatin to treat advanced or recurrent cervical cancer. In this article, we systematically review the recent literature and summarize the recent advances in our understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying cisplatin resistance in cervical cancer. PMID:27354763

  15. Radiation Therapy and Cisplatin With or Without Triapine in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Stage IB2, II, or IIIB-IVA Cervical Cancer or Stage II-IVA Vaginal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-11-03

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma, Not Otherwise Specified; Stage IB2 Cervical Cancer; Stage II Vaginal Cancer; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage III Vaginal Cancer; Stage IIIB Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Vaginal Cancer; Stage IVB Vaginal Cancer

  16. DNA probes for papillomavirus strains readied for cervical cancer screening

    SciTech Connect

    Merz, B.

    1988-11-18

    New Papillomavirus tests are ready to come to the aid of the standard Papanicolauo test in screening for cervical cancer. The new tests, which detect the strains of human papillomavirus (HPV) most commonly associated with human cervical cancer, are designed to be used as an adjunct to rather than as a replacement for the Papanicolaou smears. Their developers say that they can be used to indicated a risk of developing cancer in women whose Papanicolaou smears indicate mild cervical dysplasia, and, eventually, to detect papillomavirus infection in normal Papanicolaou smears. The rationale for HPV testing is derived from a growing body of evidence that HPV is a major factor in the etiology of cervical cancer. Three HPV tests were described recently in Chicago at the Third International Conference on Human Papillomavirus and Squamous Cervical Cancer. Each relies on DNA probes to detect the presence of papillomavirus in cervical cells and/or to distinguish the strain of papillomavirus present.

  17. [Cervical cancer screening in Germany. Current status].

    PubMed

    Schneider, V

    2012-07-01

    Cervical cancer screening was introduced in Germany 40 years ago and the incidence of cancer of the cervix has subsequently decreased by close to 70%. The remaining incidence of 5,600 cases per year represents only 2.8% of all newly occurring cases of cancer in women and these cases occur mainly in patients who do not participate in regular screening. Thus, cervical cancer screening by cytological smears has been proven to be successful. The structure of the German cancer screening program is characterized by decentralized organization, exclusive involvement of medical specialists such as gynecologists and pathologists and strict quality assurance. The recruitment is 50% on a yearly basis and the cumulative participation over 3 years reaches 79%. Since 2008 all laboratories are required to report complete data sets to local quality control agencies.The Joint Federal Committee in charge of evaluating new technologies in Germany mandated an inquiry into the possible role of screening by human papillomavirus (HPV) testing. According to this report published by the Institute for Quality Assurance and Efficiency in Healthcare there are indications for advantages. There are, however, no data in the literature as to possible disadvantages of HPV testing. A similar study for the US Preventive Services Task Force was published in May 2011 with almost identical conclusions.

  18. Association between war and cervical cancer among Vietnamese women.

    PubMed

    Huynh, My Linh D; Raab, Stephen S; Suba, Eric J

    2004-07-10

    Decades ago, cervical cancer was the leading form of cancer among women in both North Vietnam and South Vietnam. Currently, cervical cancer rates are considerably lower in the northern region of the country. We performed a case-control study to measure factors associated with the development of cervical cancer among Vietnamese women. Questionnaire-based interviews were conducted with 202 women in southern Vietnam and 97 women in northern Vietnam. Case subjects were women hospitalized with cervical cancer. Control subjects were women hospitalized with extrauterine neoplasms. Data were analyzed using logistic regression, and odds ratios for the development of invasive cervical cancer were measured. The development of invasive cervical cancer was significantly associated with military service by husbands during the Second Indochinese War and with parity status. Odds ratio for the development of cervical cancer among southern Vietnamese women whose husbands had served in the armed forces was 2.6 (95% CI = 1.2-5.5). Odds ratio for the development of cervical cancer among northern women whose husbands had served in the armed forces was 3.9 (95% CI = 1.5-10.4) if their husbands had been stationed in South Vietnam during the war years. Northern women whose husbands had served in the military experienced no significant increase in cervical cancer risk if their husbands had been stationed in North Vietnam during the war years. Geographic and temporal variation in cervical cancer rates among Vietnamese women was associated with the movement of soldiers. These findings may be useful for cervical cancer prevention efforts in Vietnam and in other countries.

  19. Treatment Option Overview (Cervical Cancer)

    MedlinePlus

    ... checked under a microscope for signs of cancer. Laparoscopy : A surgical procedure to look at the organs ... a laparoscope , the operation is called a total laparoscopic hysterectomy. Enlarge Hysterectomy. The uterus is surgically removed ...

  20. Human papillomavirus testing in the prevention of cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Schiffman, Mark; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Wacholder, Sholom; Kinney, Walter; Gage, Julia C; Castle, Philip E

    2011-03-01

    Strong evidence now supports the adoption of cervical cancer prevention strategies that explicitly focus on persistent infection with the causal agent, human papillomavirus (HPV). To inform an evidence-based transition to a new public health approach for cervical cancer screening, we summarize the natural history and cervical carcinogenicity of HPV and discuss the promise and uncertainties of currently available screening methods. New HPV infections acquired at any age are virtually always benign, but persistent infections with one of approximately 12 carcinogenic HPV types explain virtually all cases of cervical cancer. In the absence of an overtly persistent HPV infection, the risk of cervical cancer is extremely low. Thus, HPV test results predict the risk of cervical cancer and its precursors (cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 3) better and longer than cytological or colposcopic abnormalities, which are signs of HPV infection. The logical and inevitable move to HPV-based cervical cancer prevention strategies will require longer screening intervals that will disrupt current gynecologic and cytology laboratory practices built on frequent screening. A major challenge will be implementing programs that do not overtreat HPV-positive women who do not have obvious long-term persistence of HPV or treatable lesions at the time of initial evaluation. The greatest potential for reduction in cervical cancer rates from HPV screening is in low-resource regions that can implement infrequent rounds of low-cost HPV testing and treatment.

  1. Programmed management of acute cervical cord trauma.

    PubMed

    White, R J; Bryk, J P; Yashon, D; Albin, M S; Demian, Y K

    Results in ten patients admitted with the diagnosis of complete traumatic quadriplegia and with fracture-dislocation of the cervical spine are reviewed. Emphasis is placed on aggressive emergency surgical treatment of these lesions such as tracheostomy, laminectomy and cord cooling, incorporated into a detailed protocol of overall management.

  2. Clinical Implementation of an Online Adaptive Plan-of-the-Day Protocol for Nonrigid Motion Management in Locally Advanced Cervical Cancer IMRT

    SciTech Connect

    Heijkoop, Sabrina T. Langerak, Thomas R.; Quint, Sandra; Bondar, Luiza; Mens, Jan Willem M.; Heijmen, Ben J.M.; Hoogeman, Mischa S.

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the clinical implementation of an online adaptive plan-of-the-day protocol for nonrigid target motion management in locally advanced cervical cancer intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Methods and Materials: Each of the 64 patients had four markers implanted in the vaginal fornix to verify the position of the cervix during treatment. Full and empty bladder computed tomography (CT) scans were acquired prior to treatment to build a bladder volume-dependent cervix-uterus motion model for establishment of the plan library. In the first phase of clinical implementation, the library consisted of one IMRT plan based on a single model-predicted internal target volume (mpITV), covering the target for the whole pretreatment observed bladder volume range, and a 3D conformal radiation therapy (3DCRT) motion-robust backup plan based on the same mpITV. The planning target volume (PTV) combined the ITV and nodal clinical target volume (CTV), expanded with a 1-cm margin. In the second phase, for patients showing >2.5-cm bladder-induced cervix-uterus motion during planning, two IMRT plans were constructed, based on mpITVs for empty-to-half-full and half-full-to-full bladder. In both phases, a daily cone beam CT (CBCT) scan was acquired to first position the patient based on bony anatomy and nodal targets and then select the appropriate plan. Daily post-treatment CBCT was used to verify plan selection. Results: Twenty-four and 40 patients were included in the first and second phase, respectively. In the second phase, 11 patients had two IMRT plans. Overall, an IMRT plan was used in 82.4% of fractions. The main reasons for selecting the motion-robust backup plan were uterus outside the PTV (27.5%) and markers outside their margin (21.3%). In patients with two IMRT plans, the half-full-to-full bladder plan was selected on average in 45% of the first 12 fractions, which was reduced to 35% in the last treatment fractions. Conclusions: The implemented

  3. Fertility-preserving options for cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Plante, Marie; Roy, Michel

    2006-04-01

    Childbearing is one of the most important life goals for many women, and fertility preservation is a very important factor in the overall quality of life of cancer survivors. Cervical cancer frequently affects young women; because some women tend to delay childbearing, fertility preservation must be considered when treatment options are discussed. Over the past decade, the radical trachelectomy procedure has become a well established fertility-preserving option for young women with early-stage cancer; this procedure is associated with low morbidity, good oncologic outcome, and a high proportion of pregnancies that reach the third trimester and babies that are delivered at term. This article will review available literature on the vaginal radical trachelectomy procedure and data from other surgical approaches, such as the abdominal radical trachelectomy. In addition, the potential future application of neoadjuvant chemotherapy followed by fertility-preserving surgery in patients with locally advanced cervical cancer will be examined. Finally, ultraconservative surgical approaches (eg, conization alone with or without laparoscopic lymphadenectomy) in very early-stage disease will be discussed.

  4. Image-based brachytherapy for cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Vargo, John A; Beriwal, Sushil

    2014-12-10

    Cervical cancer is the third most common cancer in women worldwide; definitive radiation therapy and concurrent chemotherapy is the accepted standard of care for patients with node positive or locally advanced tumors > 4 cm. Brachytherapy is an important part of definitive radiotherapy shown to improve overall survival. While results for two-dimensional X-ray based brachytherapy have been good in terms of local control especially for early stage disease, unexplained toxicities and treatment failures remain. Improvements in brachytherapy planning have more recently paved the way for three-dimensional image-based brachytherapy with volumetric optimization which increases tumor control, reduces toxicity, and helps predict outcomes. Advantages of image-based brachytherapy include: improved tumor coverage (especially for large volume disease), decreased dose to critical organs (especially for small cervix), confirmation of applicator placement, and accounting for sigmoid colon dose. A number of modalities for image-based brachytherapy have emerged including: magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), computed tomography (CT), CT-MRI hybrid, and ultrasound with respective benefits and outcomes data. For practical application of image-based brachytherapy the Groupe Europeen de Curietherapie-European Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology Working Group and American Brachytherapy Society working group guideline serve as invaluable tools, additionally here-in we outline our institutional clinical integration of these guidelines. While the body of literature supporting image-based brachytherapy continues to evolve a number of uncertainties and challenges remain including: applicator reconstruction, increasing resource/cost demands, mobile four-dimensional targets and organs-at-risk, and accurate contouring of "grey zones" to avoid marginal miss. Ongoing studies, including the prospective EMBRACE (an international study of MRI-guided brachytherapy in locally advanced cervical

  5. The causal relation between human papillomavirus and cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bosch, F X; Lorincz, A; Muñoz, N; Meijer, C J L M; Shah, K V

    2002-01-01

    The causal role of human papillomavirus infections in cervical cancer has been documented beyond reasonable doubt. The association is present in virtually all cervical cancer cases worldwide. It is the right time for medical societies and public health regulators to consider this evidence and to define its preventive and clinical implications. A comprehensive review of key studies and results is presented. PMID:11919208

  6. Social Construction of Cervical Cancer Screening among Panamanian Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calvo, Arlene; Brown, Kelli McCormack; McDermott, Robert J.; Bryant, Carol A.; Coreil, Jeanine; Loseke, Donileen

    2012-01-01

    Background: Understanding how "health issues" are socially constructed may be useful for creating culturally relevant programs for Hispanic/Latino populations. Purpose: We explored the constructed meanings of cervical cancer and cervical cancer screening among Panamanian women, as well as socio-cultural factors that deter or encourage screening…

  7. Para-aortic nodal metastases in cervical cancer: a blind spot in the International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics staging system: current diagnosis and management.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Lindsay; Bailey, April; Lea, Jayanthi; Albuquerque, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    In cervical cancer, para-aortic nodal (PALN) metastases at presentation is a strong indicator of poor prognosis. Despite this, International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics staging system does not require evaluation of lymph node involvement and does not incorporate clinically detected PALN into the staging system. In the USA, despite screening, a significant number of women still present at an advanced stage often with nodal metastases. While the presence of PALN metastases often indicates occult systemic disease, it is possible with modern therapies to provide long-term control of disease in a percentage of patients. We review the epidemiology, diagnosis and treatment of PALN metastases in cervical cancer outlining advances in modern imaging and combined modality therapies (surgery, chemotherapy and radiation therapy). PMID:25591841

  8. Cervical cancer prevention: new tools and old barriers.

    PubMed

    Scarinci, Isabel C; Garcia, Francisco A R; Kobetz, Erin; Partridge, Edward E; Brandt, Heather M; Bell, Maria C; Dignan, Mark; Ma, Grace X; Daye, Jane L; Castle, Philip E

    2010-06-01

    Cervical cancer is the second most common female tumor worldwide, and its incidence is disproportionately high (>80%) in the developing world. In the United States, in which Papanicolaou (Pap) tests have reduced the annual incidence to approximately 11,000 cervical cancers, >60% of cases are reported to occur in medically underserved populations as part of a complex of diseases linked to poverty, race/ethnicity, and/or health disparities. Because carcinogenic human papillomavirus (HPV) infections cause virtually all cervical cancer, 2 new approaches for cervical cancer prevention have emerged: 1) HPV vaccination to prevent infections in younger women (aged < or =18 years) and 2) carcinogenic HPV detection in older women (aged > or =30 years). Together, HPV vaccination and testing, if used in an age-appropriate manner, have the potential to transform cervical cancer prevention, particularly among underserved populations. Nevertheless, significant barriers of access, acceptability, and adoption to any cervical cancer prevention strategy remain. Without understanding and addressing these obstacles, these promising new tools for cervical cancer prevention may be futile. In the current study, the delivery of cervical cancer prevention strategies to these US populations that experience a high cervical cancer burden (African-American women in South Carolina, Alabama, and Mississippi; Haitian immigrant women in Miami; Hispanic women in the US-Mexico Border; Sioux/Native American women in the Northern Plains; white women in the Appalachia; and Vietnamese-American women in Pennsylvania and New Jersey) is reviewed. The goal was to inform future research and outreach efforts to reduce the burden of cervical cancer in underserved populations.

  9. Cervical Cancer Prevention: New Tools and Old Barriers

    PubMed Central

    Scarinci, Isabel C.; Garcia, Francisco A. R.; Kobetz, Erin; Partridge, Edward E.; Brandt, Heather M.; Bell, Maria C.; Dignan, Mark; Ma, Grace X.; Daye, Jane L.; Castle, Philip E.

    2010-01-01

    Cervical cancer is the second most common female tumor worldwide and its incidence is disproportionately high (>80%) in the developing world. In the U.S., where Pap tests have reduced the annual incidence to approximately 11,000 cervical cancers, more than 60% of cases occur in medically-underserved populations as part of a complex of diseases linked to poverty, race/ethnicity, and/or health disparities. Because carcinogenic human papillomavirus (HPV) infections cause virtually all cervical cancer, two new approaches for cervical cancer prevention have emerged: 1) HPV vaccination to prevent infections in younger women (≤18 years old) and 2) carcinogenic HPV detection in older women (≥30 years old). Together, HPV vaccination and testing, if used in an age-appropriate manner, have the potential to transform cervical cancer prevention particularly among underserved populations. Yet significant barriers of access, acceptability, and adoption to any cervical cancer prevention strategy remain. Without understanding and addressing these obstacles, these promising new tools for cervical cancer prevention may be futile. We share our experiences in the delivery of cervical cancer prevention strategies to U.S. populations experiencing high cervical cancer burden: African-American women in South Carolina, Alabama, Mississippi; Haitian immigrant women in Miami; Hispanic women in the U.S.-Mexico Border; Sioux/Native American women in the Northern Plains; white women in the Appalachia; and Vietnamese-American women in Pennsylvania and New Jersey. Our goal is to inform future research and outreach efforts to reduce the burden of cervical cancer in underserved populations. PMID:20310056

  10. Fludeoxyglucose F 18 PET Scan, CT Scan, and Ferumoxtran-10 MRI Scan Before Chemotherapy and Radiation Therapy in Finding Lymph Node Metastasis in Patients With Locally Advanced Cervical Cancer or High-Risk Endometrial Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-19

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Cell Carcinoma; Cervical Small Cell Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Endometrial Clear Cell Carcinoma; Endometrial Papillary Serous Carcinoma; Stage I Endometrial Carcinoma; Stage IB Cervical Cancer; Stage II Endometrial Carcinoma; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage III Cervical Cancer; Stage III Endometrial Carcinoma; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer

  11. Advancing cervical cancer prevention in India: implementation science priorities.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, Suneeta; Madsen, Emily; Porterfield, Deborah; Varghese, Beena

    2013-01-01

    Cervical cancer is the leading cause of cancer mortality in India, accounting for 17% of all cancer deaths among women aged 30 to 69 years. At current incidence rates, the annual burden of new cases in India is projected to increase to 225,000 by 2025, but there are few large-scale, organized cervical cancer prevention programs in the country. We conducted a review of the cervical cancer prevention research literature and programmatic experiences in India to summarize the current state of knowledge and practices and recommend research priorities to address the gap in services. We found that research and programs in India have demonstrated the feasibility and acceptability of cervical cancer prevention efforts and that screening strategies requiring minimal additional human resources and laboratory infrastructure can reduce morbidity and mortality. However, additional evidence generated through implementation science research is needed to ensure that cervical cancer prevention efforts have the desired impact and are cost-effective. Specifically, implementation science research is needed to understand individual- and community-level barriers to screening and diagnostic and treatment services; to improve health care worker performance; to strengthen links among screening, diagnosis, and treatment; and to determine optimal program design, outcomes, and costs. With a quarter of the global burden of cervical cancer in India, there is no better time than now to translate research findings to practice. Implementation science can help ensure that investments in cervical cancer prevention and control result in the greatest impact.

  12. 75 FR 7282 - Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection and Control Advisory Committee (BCCEDCAC)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-18

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection and... Force guidelines for breast and cervical cancer screening; Impact of the revised clinical screening recommendations for both breast and cervical cancer on the National Breast and Cervical Cancer Early...

  13. Human Papillomavirus 45 Genetic Variation and Cervical Cancer Risk Worldwide

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Alyce A.; Heideman, Daniëlle A. M.; Boon, Debby; Gheit, Tarik; Snijders, Peter J. F.; Tommasino, Massimo; Franceschi, Silvia

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Human papillomavirus 45 (HPV45) is a member of the HPV18-related alpha-7 species and accounts for approximately 5% of all cervical cancer cases worldwide. This study evaluated the genetic diversity of HPV45 and the association of HPV45 variants with the risk of cervical cancer by sequencing the entire E6 and E7 open reading frames of 300 HPV45-positive cervical samples from 36 countries. A total of 43 HPV45 sequence variants were identified that formed 5 phylogenetic sublineages, A1, A2, A3, B1, and B2, the distribution of which varied by geographical region. Among 192 cases of cervical cancer and 101 controls, the B2 sublineage was significantly overrepresented in cervical cancer, both overall and in Africa and Europe separately. We show that the sequence analysis of E6 and E7 allows the classification of HPV45 variants and that the risk of cervical cancer may differ by HPV45 variant sublineage. IMPORTANCE This work describes the largest study to date of human papillomavirus 45 (HPV45)-positive cervical samples and provides a comprehensive reference for phylogenetic classification for use in epidemiological studies of the carcinogenicity of HPV45 genetic variants, particularly as our findings suggest that the B2 sublineage of HPV45 is associated with a higher risk of cervical cancer. PMID:24501412

  14. [Photodynamic therapy (PDT) for early cervical cancer].

    PubMed

    Muroya, T; Suehiro, Y; Umayahara, K; Akiya, T; Iwabuchi, H; Sakunaga, H; Sakamoto, M; Sugishita, T; Tenjin, Y

    1996-01-01

    The incidence of carcinoma in situ (CIS) and dysplasia of the uterine cervix has been increasing among young women in recent years. Most of these patients want to preserve their fertility. Also, to accommodate high-risk patients with complications, elderly patients, and those who refuse surgery, we perform PDT as a method to preserve fertility. The technique required for PDT is relatively simple, and can be performed without anesthesia, since it causes no pain or bleeding. PDT, with the use of Excimer Dye Laser (EDL), a type of low pulse laser, has a considerably higher degree of tissue penetration, even compared to PDT using Argon Dye Laser (ADL). Also, PDT using EDL can manage glandular involvement of CIN, and its special feature of selective destruction of malignant cells with almost no effect on normal tissues is noteworthy. Beginning in 1995, PDT using YAG-OPO Laser with a variable laser wavelength has been performed. PDT is performed 48 hours after intravenous injection of 1.5 mg/kg to 2 mg/kg photosensitizer Porfimer sodium (PHE) when the difference in density of PHE becomes greatest between malignant cells and normal tissue. The most advanced features of our method compared to conventional radiation which uses cut fiber are: First, by using colposcope with an optical path for the laser, it is possible to show a 10 mm circular spot at the focus of observation. With this method, cervical lesions can be observed and checked while receiving stable and precise photoradiation by using colposcope through direct observation. Second, for cervical canal treatment, by using a cervical probe to administer photoradiation in the forward direction in the cervical canal and to the side walls, 70% of the laser light is scattered to the side walls, so that all of the cervical canal can be radiated. Also, the cervical canal probe used to administer photoradiation, by inserting 2 cm to 3 cm depending on the conditions of the cervical canal and withdrawing the probe 1 mm, can

  15. HPV testing as a screen for cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Goodman, Annekathryn

    2015-06-30

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) has been identified as a necessary factor in the development of pre-invasive and invasive cancers of the lower genital tract, of which cervical cancer is the most prevalent. A molecular understanding of malignant transformation and epidemiologic information has led to the development of many strategies for detection and early intervention. Newer tests for oncogenic subtypes of HPV have made it possible to predict the risk of future development of cervical cancer. This review summarizes the current understanding of HPV related disease and examines the role of HPV testing as a screening tool for cervical cancer. It summarizes the data from prospective and randomized controlled trials on HPV screening from Europe and North America and includes smaller studies from low and middle income countries where cervical cancer is the most common cancer in women.

  16. Patient, Physician, and Nurse Factors Associated With Entry Onto Clinical Trials and Finishing Treatment in Patients With Primary or Recurrent Uterine, Endometrial, or Cervical Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-26

    Recurrent Cervical Carcinoma; Recurrent Uterine Corpus Carcinoma; Recurrent Uterine Corpus Sarcoma; Stage I Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage I Uterine Sarcoma; Stage IA Cervical Cancer; Stage IB Cervical Cancer; Stage II Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage II Uterine Sarcoma; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage III Cervical Cancer; Stage III Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage III Uterine Sarcoma; Stage IV Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IV Uterine Sarcoma; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer; Stage IVB Cervical Cancer

  17. Screening for cervical cancer: when theory meets reality

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Cervical cancer screening reduces morbidity and mortality due to cervical cancer. However, there are many factors that determine the success of any cervical cancer prevention effort: the prevalence of human papillomavirus infection in general population, the existence of an organized screening program and the corresponding coverage, the existence and quality of the field and laboratory facilities for screening and diagnostic follow-up, and the facilities available for treating diagnosed lesions. Monitoring the patient path or "chain of action" for each patient with an abnormal screening result is of crucial importance. Cost-effectiveness models are widely used by decision-makers to determine which cervical cancer screening program would maximize health benefits within a given, usually limited, set of resources. Regardless of their level of sophistication, however, these models cannot replace empirical evaluations of the effectiveness of screening programs. Cervical cancer prevention activities need to be monitored and evaluated in each country where they are introduced to see that they meet performance standards. Policy-makers responsible for allocating resources for cervical cancer prevention have a duty to allocate resources not only for cervical cancer screening, but also for screening program surveillance. PMID:21668947

  18. Update on prevention and screening of cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    McGraw, Shaniqua L; Ferrante, Jeanne M

    2014-01-01

    Cervical cancer is the third most common cause of cancer in women in the world. During the past few decades tremendous strides have been made toward decreasing the incidence and mortality of cervical cancer with the implementation of various prevention and screening strategies. The causative agent linked to cervical cancer development and its precursors is the human papillomavirus (HPV). Prevention and screening measures for cervical cancer are paramount because the ability to identify and treat the illness at its premature stage often disrupts the process of neoplasia. Cervical carcinogenesis can be the result of infections from multiple high-risk HPV types that act synergistically. This imposes a level of complexity to identifying and vaccinating against the actual causative agent. Additionally, most HPV infections spontaneously clear. Therefore, screening strategies should optimally weigh the benefits and risks of screening to avoid the discovery and needless treatment of transient HPV infections. This article provides an update of the preventative and screening methods for cervical cancer, mainly HPV vaccination, screening with Pap smear cytology, and HPV testing. It also provides a discussion of the newest United States 2012 guidelines for cervical cancer screening, which changed the age to begin and end screening and lengthened the screening intervals. PMID:25302174

  19. Cervical cancer pathogenesis is associated with one-carbon metabolism.

    PubMed

    Pathak, Sujata; Bhatla, Neerja; Singh, Neeta

    2012-10-01

    Cervical cancer is the most common cancer among women in India and a leading cause of death in these women. Most cases of cervical cancer are associated with human papillomavirus (HPV) infection of the high-risk type. It has been reported that aberrant DNA methylation can be associated with HPV infection and cervical cancer, and folate is directly involved in DNA methylation via one-carbon metabolism. We aimed to study the importance of one-carbon metabolism in the progression of cervical carcinogenesis by examining serum levels of vitamin B(12) (cobalamin), homocysteine, and folate and DNA methylation of tumor suppressor genes CDH1, HIC1, and Retinoic acid receptor beta (RARβ) amid these women ranging from normal to squamous intraepithelial neoplastic lesions (SIL) to cervical cancer. Blood and tissue samples were collected from normal (n = 35), SILs (n = 27), and cervical cancer patients (n = 38) in the age group of 26-70 years. Measurement of serum vitamin B(12), folate, and homocysteine were done using kits (Immulite). Promoter methylation was examined using methylation-specific PCR. The frequency of promoter hypermethylation for all the three tumor suppressor genes CDH1, HIC1, and RARβ showed an increasing trend from normal to dysplastic to invasive cervical cancer (p < 0.05). We observed that lower folate and vitamin B(12) status were associated with HPV infection. Taken together, our findings suggest a role of folate and vitamin B(12) in modulating the risk of cervical cancer and HPV infection. CDH1, HIC1, and RARβ genes can be used as potential biomarkers of cervical cancer risk assessment.

  20. Application of the Carolina Framework for Cervical Cancer Prevention

    PubMed Central

    Moss, Jennifer L.; McCarthy, Schatzi H.; Gilkey, Melissa B.; Brewer, Noel T.

    2014-01-01

    Objective The Carolina Framework for Cervical Cancer Prevention describes 4 main causes of cervical cancer incidence: human papillomavirus (HPV) infection, lack of screening, screening errors, and not receiving follow-up care. We present 2 applications of the Carolina Framework in which we identify high-need counties in North Carolina and generate recommendations for improving prevention efforts. Methods We created a cervical cancer prevention need index (CCPNI) that ranked counties on cervical cancer mortality, HPV vaccine initiation and completion, Pap smear screening, and provision of Pap tests to rarely- or never-screened women. In addition, we conducted in-depth interviews with 19 key informants from programs and agencies involved in cervical cancer prevention in North Carolina. Results North Carolina’s 100 counties varied widely on individual CCPNI components, including annual cervical cancer mortality (median 2.7/100,000 women; range 0.0–8.0), adolescent girls’ HPV vaccine initiation (median 42%; range 15%–62%), and Pap testing in the previous 3 years among Medicaid-insured adult women (median 59%; range 40%–83%). Counties with the greatest prevention needs formed 2 distinct clusters in the northeast and south-central regions of the state. Interviews generated 9 recommendations to improve cervical cancer prevention in North Carolina, identifying applications to specific programs and policies in the state. Conclusions This study found striking geographic disparities in cervical cancer prevention need in North Carolina. Future prevention efforts in the state should prioritize high-need regions as well as recommended strategies and applications in existing programs. Other states can use the Carolina Framework to increase the impact of their cervical cancer prevention efforts. PMID:24333357

  1. Long-Term Survival After Local Resection of Cervical Esophageal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Ali Mohammad, Farah Hanif; Go, Pauline; Ghanem, Tamer; Stachler, Robert; Hammoud, Zane

    2015-06-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma of the esophagus may be seen in patients with history of head and neck malignancies. Anatomic factors may limit management options. We present a case of second primary early cervical esophageal squamous cell cancer managed by local resection with reconstruction using a radial forearm flap. PMID:26046877

  2. CT of the normal and abnormal parametria in cervical cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Vick, C.W.; Walsh, J.W.; Wheelock, J.B.; Brewer, W.H.

    1984-09-01

    To evaluate CT criteria for differentiating a cervical cancer confined to the cervix from a lesion that invades the parametria, 16 patients with newly diagnosed, untreated cervical cancer were studied with CT. Twenty-five parameria were confined by radical hysterectomy, transvaginal parametrial fine-needle aspiration cytology, or excretory urography. In 17 tumor-positive parametria, CT findings associated with parametrial tumor invasion were: 1) irregularity or poor definition of the lateral cervical margins; 2) prominent parametrial soft-tissue strands; 3) obliteration of the periureteral fat plane; and 4) an eccentric parametrial soft-tissue mass. Irregularity of the cervical margins and prominent parametrial strands were seen most commonly with parametrial tumor invasion, but were also occasionally seen with parametrial inflammation. On the basis of the criteria developed in this report, CT may be used as an adjunct to the physical examination in differentiating stage I cervical cancer from more advanced disease in selected patients.

  3. Preventive and Therapeutic Vaccines against Human Papillomaviruses Associated Cervical Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Nayereh, Khadem Ghaebi; Khadem, Ghaeb

    2012-01-01

    Cervical cancer is, globally known to be, one of the most common cancers among women especially in developing countries. More than 90% of cervical cancers are associated with high-risk human papillomaviruses (HPVs) particularly HPV types 16 and 18. Two major strategies have been developed for prevention and treatment of cervical cancer and other HPV-associated malignancies; the first one is based on HPV virus-like particles (VLPs) containing HPV structural proteins. VLP based vaccines can induce genotype specific virus neutralizing antibodies for preventing HPV infections. The other strategy is based on HPV early genes especially E6 and E7 for eliminating the established HPV infections; therefore they are classified as HPV therapeutic vaccines. This article reviews the preventive and therapeutic vaccines against HPV infections and cervical cancer. PMID:23493151

  4. TP53 polymorphism, HPV infection, and risk of cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Klug, S J; Wilmotte, R; Santos, C; Almonte, M; Herrero, R; Guerrero, I; Caceres, E; Peixoto-Guimaraes, D; Lenoir, G; Hainaut, P; Walboomers, J M; Muñoz, N

    2001-09-01

    The role of a polymorphism at position 72 of the tumor suppressor gene TP53 in the development of cervical cancer is not well established. The arginine variant of the p53 protein could be more susceptible to degradation by human papillomavirus (HPV) E6 protein than the protein containing proline. Recent studies show controversial results. We investigated a possible association between TP53 polymorphism and cervical cancer in a Peruvian population with high prevalence of HPV infection. HPV status and TP53 polymorphism were determined for 119 cases of invasive cervical cancer and 127 control women from Peru. HPV infection was detected by PCR of cervical cells or tumor biopsies. For determination of TP53 polymorphism, exon 4 of the TP53 gene was amplified by PCR, and DNA was subsequently subjected to restriction enzyme digest. Associations between TP53 polymorphism, HPV infection, and cervical cancer were assessed using logistic regression. Women homozygotes for arginine had a 2.2-fold increased risk (95% confidence interval: 0.6-7.6) for cervical cancer. The odds ratio for women heterozygotes for Arg/Pro was 3.5 (95% confidence interval: 0.9-14). Similarly increased risks were found when restricting analysis to HPV-positive women only. The distribution of TP53 genotypes in this Peruvian population was comparable with that found in Caucasians. Our results cannot rule out an association between the TP53 polymorphism at codon 72, HPV infection, and the etiology of cervical cancer. PMID:11535556

  5. Pathways of cervical cancer screening among Chinese women

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Grace X; Wang, Min Qi; Ma, Xiang S; Shive, Steven E; Tan, Yin; Toubbeh, Jamil I

    2013-01-01

    Background The purpose of this community-based study was to develop a structural equation model for factors contributing to cervical cancer screening among Chinese American women. Methods A cross-sectional design included a sample of 573 Chinese American women aged 18 years and older. The initial step involved use of confirmatory factor analysis, that included the following variables: access to and satisfaction with health care, and enabling and predisposing cultural and health beliefs. Structural equation model analyses were conducted on factors related to cervical cancer screening. Results Age, marital status, employment, household income, and having health insurance, but not educational level, were significantly related to cervical screening status. Predisposing and enabling factors were positively associated with cervical cancer screening. The cultural factor was significantly related to the enabling factor or the satisfaction with health care factor. Conclusion This model highlights the significance of sociocultural factors in relation to cervical cancer screening. These factors were significant, with cultural, predisposing, enabling, and health belief factors and access to and satisfaction with health care reinforcing the need to assist Chinese American women with poor English fluency in translation and awareness of the importance of cervical cancer screening. Community organizations may play a role in assisting Chinese American women, which could enhance cervical cancer screening rates. PMID:23843708

  6. [Epidemiological overview of uterine cervical cancer].

    PubMed

    Hernández-Hernández, Dulce M; Apresa-García, Teresa; Patlán-Pérez, Rosa Ma

    2015-01-01

    The World Health Organization (WHO) reported more than 6 million cases of cancer worldwide in women during 2008; 57.2 % of those cases occurred in less developed countries. Cervical cancer (CC) ranks third in the world in all cancers affecting women, with an estimated of 530 000 new cases. CC has multiple causes and it arises by the association of various risk factors. The main factor is related to the human papillomavirus infection (HPV), which acts as a necessary but not sufficient cause. Also, the interaction with other cofactors has an impact on the development and severity of this neoplasm. Survival is related to the timeliness of care and, therefore, to more access to health services. CC is a neoplasm considered a preventable cancer; thus, it is possible to save more than 150 000 lives by 2030 if control measures are applied with opportunity. The aim of this work is to review the CC in different geographical areas and to make an analysis of risk factors related to this neoplasm.

  7. Management of oral cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Brown, A. E.; Langdon, J. D.

    1995-01-01

    Oral cancer is a serious disease that is on the increase. The most pressing need is early recognition and referral for specialist treatment. Too many cases present with advanced tumours. Radiotherapy and surgery remain the primary modalities of curative treatment, but understanding of tumour pathology and developments in surgical and radiotherapeutic technique have combined to produce a rational approach to management. In many instances 'radical' methods of surgical access can be combined with a more 'conservative' resection of the mandible or cervical lymph nodes. One-stage reconstructive procedures, often incorporating osteotomy techniques, miniature bone plating and free tissue transfer, have minimised the morbidity and functional deficit so often seen after earlier operations. All surgeons involved in the modern management of oral cancer should have expertise in these techniques or be part of a team which can provide them. PMID:8540656

  8. Embryonic stem cell-specific signature in cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Organista-Nava, Jorge; Gómez-Gómez, Yazmín; Gariglio, Patricio

    2014-03-01

    The wide range of invasive and noninvasive lesion phenotypes associated with high-risk human papillomavirus (HR-HPV) infection in cervical cancer (CC) indicates that not only the virus but also specific cervical epithelial cells in the transformation zone (TZ), such as stem cells (SCs), play an important part in the development of cervical neoplasia. In this review, we focused in an expression signature that is specific to embryonic SCs and to poorly differentiated cervical malignant tumors and we hypothesize that this expression signature may play an important role to promote cell growth, survival, colony formation, lack of adhesion, as well as cell invasion and migration in CC.

  9. [Medical management of cervical arterial dissections].

    PubMed

    Vuillier, F; Tatu, L; Moulin, T

    2002-12-01

    Medical management of cervical arterial dissections is not standardized and has not been the subject of randomized trials. Management is mainly based on the presumed pathophysiology of secondary cerebral infarcts associated with dissections and the individual experience of each treating team. First, a review of the literature regarding medical management of acute and chronic dissections is presented. Then, results from a national study sponsored by the Société Française Neuro-Vasculaire and the Société Française de Neuro-Radiologie evaluating the medical management of this pathology in French neuro-vascular centers will be presented. These data will be useful to generate practical management recommendations and establish guidelines for further studies.

  10. Can We Be Less Radical with Surgery for Early Cervical Cancer?

    PubMed

    Macdonald, Madeleine C; Tidy, John A

    2016-03-01

    Although a rare cancer in the developed world due to the success of cervical screening programmes, cervical cancer remains one of the most common cancers diagnosed in women under the age of 35 years old. Radical hysterectomy and more recently radical trachelectomy have been highly effective in curing the majority of women with early stage disease. Many, however, are left with long-term 'survivorship' issues including bowel, bladder and sexual dysfunction. In view of these chronic co-morbidities, many clinicians now consider whether a less radical approach to surgery may be an option for some women. This review focuses on the current evidence for the safety of conservative surgery for early stage cervical cancer with regard to cure rates in comparison to standard management, as well as any improvement in short and long-term morbidity associated with a more conservative approach. PMID:26838586

  11. EF5 in Finding Oxygen in Tumor Cells of Patients Who Are Undergoing Surgery or Biopsy for Cervical, Endometrial, or Ovarian Epithelial Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-15

    Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage I Endometrial Carcinoma; Stage I Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IA Cervical Cancer; Stage IB Cervical Cancer; Stage II Endometrial Carcinoma; Stage II Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage III Cervical Cancer; Stage III Endometrial Carcinoma; Stage III Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IV Endometrial Carcinoma; Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer; Stage IVB Cervical Cancer

  12. HPV vaccination: The most pragmatic cervical cancer primary prevention strategy.

    PubMed

    Sankaranarayanan, Rengaswamy

    2015-10-01

    The evidence that high-risk HPV infections cause cervical cancers has led to two new approaches for cervical cancer control: vaccination to prevent HPV infections, and HPV screening to detect and treat cervical precancerous lesions. Two vaccines are currently available: quadrivalent vaccine targeting oncogenic HPV types 16, 18, 6, and 11, and bivalent vaccine targeting HPV 16 and 18. Both vaccines have demonstrated remarkable immunogenicity and substantial protection against persistent infection and high-grade cervical cancer precursors caused by HPV 16 and 18 in HPV-naïve women, and have the potential to prevent 70% of cervical cancers in adequately vaccinated populations. HPV vaccination is now implemented in national programs in 62 countries, including some low- and middle-income countries. The early findings from routine national programs in high-income countries are instructive to encourage low- and middle-income countries with a high risk of cervical cancer to roll out HPV vaccination programs and to introduce resource-appropriate cervical screening programs.

  13. Survival analysis of cervical cancer using stratified Cox regression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purnami, S. W.; Inayati, K. D.; Sari, N. W. Wulan; Chosuvivatwong, V.; Sriplung, H.

    2016-04-01

    Cervical cancer is one of the mostly widely cancer cause of the women death in the world including Indonesia. Most cervical cancer patients come to the hospital already in an advanced stadium. As a result, the treatment of cervical cancer becomes more difficult and even can increase the death's risk. One of parameter that can be used to assess successfully of treatment is the probability of survival. This study raises the issue of cervical cancer survival patients at Dr. Soetomo Hospital using stratified Cox regression based on six factors such as age, stadium, treatment initiation, companion disease, complication, and anemia. Stratified Cox model is used because there is one independent variable that does not satisfy the proportional hazards assumption that is stadium. The results of the stratified Cox model show that the complication variable is significant factor which influent survival probability of cervical cancer patient. The obtained hazard ratio is 7.35. It means that cervical cancer patient who has complication is at risk of dying 7.35 times greater than patient who did not has complication. While the adjusted survival curves showed that stadium IV had the lowest probability of survival.

  14. Fluorescence spectra of blood and urine for cervical cancer detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masilamani, Vadivel; AlSalhi, Mohamad Saleh; Vijmasi, Trinka; Govindarajan, Kanaganaj; Rathan Rai, Ram; Atif, Muhammad; Prasad, Saradh; Aldwayyan, Abdullah S.

    2012-09-01

    In the current study, the fluorescence emission spectra (FES) and Stokes shift spectra (SSS) of blood and urine samples of cervical cancer patients were obtained and compared to those of normal controls. Both spectra showed that the relative intensity of biomolecules such as porphyrin, collagen, Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide, and flavin were quite out of proportion in cervical cancer patients. The biochemical mechanism for the elevation of these fluorophores is not yet definitive; nevertheless, these biomolecules could serve as tumor markers for diagnosis, screening, and follow-up of cervical cancers. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on FES and SSS of blood and urine of cervical cancer patients to give a sensitivity of 80% and specificity of 78%.

  15. Bevacizumab improves survival for patients with advanced cervical cancer

    Cancer.gov

    Patients with advanced, recurrent, or persistent cervical cancer that was not curable with standard treatment who received the drug bevacizumab (Avastin) lived 3.7 months longer than patients who did not receive the drug, according to an interim analysis

  16. Grantee Spotlight: Dr. Kolawole Okuyemi - Improving Cervical Cancer Screening Attitudes

    Cancer.gov

    Dr. Kolawole Okuyumi is studying cervical cancer screening attitudes and behaviors of African immigrants and refugees in Minnesota, and introducing “cancer” and “cervix” to their everyday vocabulary.

  17. Cervical Cancer Worry and Screening Among Appalachian Women

    PubMed Central

    Schoenberg, Nancy; Wilson, Tomorrow D.; Atkins, Elvonna; Dickinson, Stephanie; Paskett, Electra

    2015-01-01

    Although many have sought to understand cervical cancer screening (CCS) behavior, little research has examined worry about cervical cancer and its relationship to CCS, particularly in the underserved, predominantly rural Appalachian region. Our mixed method investigation aimed to obtain a more complete and theoretically-informed understanding of the role of cancer worry in CCS among Appalachian women, using the Self-Regulation Model (SRM). Our quantitative analysis indicated that the perception of being at higher risk of cervical cancer and having greater distress about cancer were both associated with greater worry about cancer. In our qualitative analysis, we found that, consistent with the SRM, negative affect had a largely concrete-experiential component, with many women having first-hand experience of the physical consequences of cervical cancer. Based on the results of this manuscript, we describe a number of approaches to lessen the fear associated with CCS. Intervention in this elevated risk community is merited and may focus on decreasing feelings of worry about cervical cancer and increasing communication of objective risk and need for screening. From a policy perspective, increasing the quantity and quality of care may also improve CCS rates and decrease the burden of cancer in Appalachia. PMID:25416153

  18. Cervical cancer worry and screening among appalachian women.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Kimberly M; Schoenberg, Nancy; Wilson, Tomorrow D; Atkins, Elvonna; Dickinson, Stephanie; Paskett, Electra

    2015-04-01

    Although many have sought to understand cervical cancer screening (CCS) behavior, little research has examined worry about cervical cancer and its relationship to CCS, particularly in the underserved, predominantly rural Appalachian region. Our mixed method investigation aimed to obtain a more complete and theoretically-informed understanding of the role of cancer worry in CCS among Appalachian women, using the Self-Regulation Model (SRM). Our quantitative analysis indicated that the perception of being at higher risk of cervical cancer and having greater distress about cancer were both associated with greater worry about cancer. In our qualitative analysis, we found that, consistent with the SRM, negative affect had a largely concrete-experiential component, with many women having first-hand experience of the physical consequences of cervical cancer. Based on the results of this manuscript, we describe a number of approaches to lessen the fear associated with CCS. Intervention in this elevated risk community is merited and may focus on decreasing feelings of worry about cervical cancer and increasing communication of objective risk and need for screening. From a policy perspective, increasing the quantity and quality of care may also improve CCS rates and decrease the burden of cancer in Appalachia.

  19. A lectin-based diagnostic system using circulating antibodies to detect cervical intraepithelial neoplasia and cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Jin, Yingji; Kim, Seung Cheol; Kim, Hyoung Jin; Ju, Woong; Kim, Yun Hwan; Kim, Hong-Jin

    2016-01-01

    In the present study, we developed serological strategies using immunoglobulin fractions obtained by protein A chromatography to screen for cervical cancer and cervical intraepithelial neoplasia I (CIN I). The reactivities of the immunoglobulins purified from sera of women with normal cytology, CIN I and cervical cancer were compared in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA) and enzyme-linked lectin assays (ELLAs). To capture the immunoglobulins, ELISAs and ELLAs were performed in protein A immobilized microplates. The reactivity of immunoglobulin in ELISA was in the increasing order normal cytology, CIN I and cervical cancer, while that in ELLAs for detecting fucosylation was in the decreasing order normal cytology, CIN I and cervical cancer. It was confirmed that women with CIN I were distinguishable from women with normal cytology or women with cervical cancer in the ELISA or the ELLA for detecting fucosylation with considerable sensitivity and specificity. Women with cervical cancer were also distinguishable from women with normal cytology with high sensitivity (ELISA: 97%, ELLA: 87%) and specificity (ELISA: 69%, ELLA: 72%). Moreover, the logistic regression model of the ELISA and the ELLA discriminated cervical cancer from normal cytology with 93% sensitivity and 93% specificity. These results indicate that the ELISAs and the ELLAs have great potential as strategies for primary screening of cervical cancer and CIN. It is expected that the ELISA and the ELLA can provide new insights to understand systemic changes of serum immunoglobulins during cervical cancer progression.

  20. Survival rates of cervical cancer patients in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Muhamad, Nor Asiah; Kamaluddin, Muhammad Amir; Adon, Mohd Yusoff; Noh, Mohamed Asyraf; Bakhtiar, Mohammed Faizal; Ibrahim Tamim, Nor Saleha; Mahmud, Siti Haniza; Aris, Tahir

    2015-01-01

    Cervical cancer is the most common malignant cancer of the female reproductive organs worldwide. Currently, cervical cancer can be prevented by vaccination and detected at an early stage via various screening methods. Malaysia, as a developing country faces a heavy disease burden of cervical cancer as it is the second most common cancer among Malaysian women. This population based study was carried out to fulfil the primary aim of determining the survival rates of Malaysian women with cervical cancer and associated factors. Data were obtained from two different sources namely, the Malaysian National Cancer Registry (MNCR) and National Health Informatics Centre (NHIC) from 1st January 2000 to 31st December 2005. Kaplan Meier analyses were conducted to identify the overall survival rates and median survival time. Differences in survival among different ethnic and age group were compared using the log-rank test. A total of 5,859 patients were included. The median survival time for cervical cancer in this study was 65.8 months and the 5-year survival rate was 71.1%. The overall observed survival rates at 1, 3 and 5 years were 94.1%, 79.3% and 71.1% respectively. The log-rank test finding also showed that there were significant differences in the 5-year survival rate among different ethnic groups. Malays had the lowest survival rate of 59.2% followed by Indians (69.5%) and Chinese (73.8%). The overall 5-year survival rate among patients with cervical cancer in Malaysia is relatively good. Age and ethnic groups remain as significant determining factors for cervical cancer survival rate.

  1. Objective Diagnosis of Cervical Cancer by Tissue Protein Profile Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patil, Ajeetkumar; Bhat, Sujatha; Rai, Lavanya; Kartha, V. B.; Chidangil, Santhosh

    2011-07-01

    Protein profiles of homogenized normal cervical tissue samples from hysterectomy subjects and cancerous cervical tissues from biopsy samples collected from patients with different stages of cervical cancer were recorded using High Performance Liquid Chromatography coupled with Laser Induced Fluorescence (HPLC-LIF). The Protein profiles were subjected to Principle Component Analysis to derive statistically significant parameters. Diagnosis of sample types were carried out by matching three parameters—scores of factors, squared residuals, and Mahalanobis Distance. ROC and Youden's Index curves for calibration standards were used for objective estimation of the optimum threshold for decision making and performance.

  2. Determinants of risk of invasive cervical cancer in young women.

    PubMed Central

    Parazzini, F.; Chatenoud, L.; La Vecchia, C.; Negri, E.; Franceschi, S.; Bolis, G.

    1998-01-01

    We analysed determinants of risk of cervical cancer in women aged less than 45 years using data from a case-control study conducted in Italy. Cases were 261 women aged < 45 years with histologically confirmed invasive cervical cancer. Controls were 257 women aged < 45 years, with acute, non-neoplastic conditions, judged to be unrelated to any of the known or suspected risk factors for cervical cancer. In comparison with women reporting one or no sexual partner, the multivariate odds ratio (OR) of cervical cancer was 2.4 (95% confidence interval, CI, 1.3-4.6), for women reporting two or more sexual partners, and, in comparison with women reporting their first intercourse at 17 years of age or before, the multivariate OR was 0.5 (95% CI 0.3-0.9) in women aged > or =23 years at first intercourse. The risk of cervical cancer was higher in parous women and increased with number of births (OR = 8.1 for three or more births). Among parous women the risk tended to increase with later age at last birth; in comparison with parous women reporting their last birth before age 25, the OR was 1.9 in those reporting their last birth at > or =35 years. No clear association emerged between oral contraceptive use, smoking, education, social class and risk of cervical cancer. PMID:9514067

  3. Men's sexual behaviour affects their wives' risk of cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    1996-01-01

    Various types of human papillomavirus have been implicated as causes of cervical cancer. However, researchers have suggested that the transmission of the virus can be reduced through condom use. At least 23% of all cervical cancer in Thailand may be attributed to the lack of condom use among the customers of prostitutes. The husbands of 225 women with cervical cancer and 791 controls in Bangkok and Chiang Mai were interviewed in a study to determine whether husbands' lack of condom use with prostitutes affects their wives' risk of developing cervical cancer. The cases studied were reported between 1979 and 1988 and were limited to women born after 1930 in Bangkok and after 1925 in Chiang Mai who had lived for at least 1 year in the areas served by the three hospitals which participated in the research. Among women whose husbands first had sex with a prostitute in their teens or 20s and who did not use condoms at that time, the risk of cervical cancer is twice that of women whose husbands had never visited a prostitute. All women reported having been married only once and having had sex only with their husbands. The period between date of marriage and diagnosis of cervical cancer ranged from 6 to 45 years, with a mean and median of 24 years.

  4. Proteasome inhibition mediates p53 reactivation and anti-cancer activity of 6-gingerol in cervical cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Rastogi, Namrata; Duggal, Shivali; Singh, Shailendra Kumar; Porwal, Konica; Srivastava, Vikas Kumar; Maurya, Rakesh; Bhatt, M L B; Mishra, Durga Prasad

    2015-12-22

    Human papilloma virus (HPV) expressing E6 and E7 oncoproteins, is known to inactivate the tumor suppressor p53 through proteasomal degradation in cervical cancers. Therefore, use of small molecules for inhibition of proteasome function and induction of p53 reactivation is a promising strategy for induction of apoptosis in cervical cancer cells. The polyphenolic alkanone, 6-Gingerol (6G), present in the pungent extracts of ginger (Zingiber officinale Roscoe) has shown potent anti-tumorigenic and pro-apoptotic activities against a variety of cancers. In this study we explored the molecular mechanism of action of 6G in human cervical cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. 6G potently inhibited proliferation of the HPV positive cervical cancer cells. 6G was found to: (i) inhibit the chymotrypsin activity of proteasomes, (ii) induce reactivation of p53, (iii) increase levels of p21, (iv) induce DNA damage and G2/M cell cycle arrest, (v) alter expression levels of p53-associated apoptotic markers like, cleaved caspase-3 and PARP, and (vi) potentiate the cytotoxicity of cisplatin. 6G treatment induced significant reduction of tumor volume, tumor weight, proteasome inhibition and p53 accumulation in HeLa xenograft tumor cells in vivo. The 6G treatment was devoid of toxic effects as it did not affect body weights, hematological and osteogenic parameters. Taken together, our data underscores the therapeutic and chemosensitizing effects of 6G in the management and treatment of cervical cancer.

  5. Proteasome inhibition mediates p53 reactivation and anti-cancer activity of 6-Gingerol in cervical cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Rastogi, Namrata; Duggal, Shivali; Singh, Shailendra Kumar; Porwal, Konica; Srivastava, Vikas Kumar; Maurya, Rakesh; Bhatt, Madan L.B.; Mishra, Durga Prasad

    2015-01-01

    Human papilloma virus (HPV) expressing E6 and E7 oncoproteins, is known to inactivate the tumor suppressor p53 through proteasomal degradation in cervical cancers. Therefore, use of small molecules for inhibition of proteasome function and induction of p53 reactivation is a promising strategy for induction of apoptosis in cervical cancer cells. The polyphenolic alkanone, 6-Gingerol (6G), present in the pungent extracts of ginger (Zingiber officinale Roscoe) has shown potent anti-tumorigenic and pro-apoptotic activities against a variety of cancers. In this study we explored the molecular mechanism of action of 6G in human cervical cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. 6G potently inhibited proliferation of the HPV positive cervical cancer cells. 6G was found to: (i) inhibit the chymotrypsin activity of proteasomes, (ii) induce reactivation of p53, (iii) increase levels of p21, (iv) induce DNA damage and G2/M cell cycle arrest, (v) alter expression levels of p53-associated apoptotic markers like, cleaved caspase-3 and PARP, and (vi) potentiate the cytotoxicity of cisplatin. 6G treatment induced significant reduction of tumor volume, tumor weight, proteasome inhibition and p53 accumulation in HeLa xenograft tumor cells in vivo. The 6G treatment was devoid of toxic effects as it did not affect body weights, hematological and osteogenic parameters. Taken together, our data underscores the therapeutic and chemosensitizing effects of 6G in the management and treatment of cervical cancer. PMID:26621832

  6. Proteasome inhibition mediates p53 reactivation and anti-cancer activity of 6-gingerol in cervical cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Rastogi, Namrata; Duggal, Shivali; Singh, Shailendra Kumar; Porwal, Konica; Srivastava, Vikas Kumar; Maurya, Rakesh; Bhatt, M L B; Mishra, Durga Prasad

    2015-12-22

    Human papilloma virus (HPV) expressing E6 and E7 oncoproteins, is known to inactivate the tumor suppressor p53 through proteasomal degradation in cervical cancers. Therefore, use of small molecules for inhibition of proteasome function and induction of p53 reactivation is a promising strategy for induction of apoptosis in cervical cancer cells. The polyphenolic alkanone, 6-Gingerol (6G), present in the pungent extracts of ginger (Zingiber officinale Roscoe) has shown potent anti-tumorigenic and pro-apoptotic activities against a variety of cancers. In this study we explored the molecular mechanism of action of 6G in human cervical cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. 6G potently inhibited proliferation of the HPV positive cervical cancer cells. 6G was found to: (i) inhibit the chymotrypsin activity of proteasomes, (ii) induce reactivation of p53, (iii) increase levels of p21, (iv) induce DNA damage and G2/M cell cycle arrest, (v) alter expression levels of p53-associated apoptotic markers like, cleaved caspase-3 and PARP, and (vi) potentiate the cytotoxicity of cisplatin. 6G treatment induced significant reduction of tumor volume, tumor weight, proteasome inhibition and p53 accumulation in HeLa xenograft tumor cells in vivo. The 6G treatment was devoid of toxic effects as it did not affect body weights, hematological and osteogenic parameters. Taken together, our data underscores the therapeutic and chemosensitizing effects of 6G in the management and treatment of cervical cancer. PMID:26621832

  7. Integrality in cervical cancer care: evaluation of access

    PubMed Central

    Brito-Silva, Keila; Bezerra, Adriana Falangola Benjamin; Chaves, Lucieli Dias Pedreschi; Tanaka, Oswaldo Yoshimi

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate integrity of access to uterine cervical cancer prevention, diagnosis and treatment services. METHODS The tracer condition was analyzed using a mixed quantitative and qualitative approach. The quantitative approach was based on secondary data from the analysis of cytology and biopsy exams performed between 2008 and 2010 on 25 to 59 year-old women in a municipality with a large population and with the necessary technological resources. Data were obtained from the Health Information System and the Regional Cervical Cancer Information System. Statistical analysis was performed using PASW statistic 17.0 software. The qualitative approach involved semi-structured interviews with service managers, health care professionals and users. NVivo 9.0 software was used for the content analysis of the primary data. RESULTS Pap smear coverage was low, possible due to insufficient screening and the difficulty of making appointments in primary care. The numbers of biopsies conducted are similar to those of abnormal cytologies, reflecting easy access to the specialized services. There was higher coverage among younger women. More serious diagnoses, for both cytologies and biopsies, were more prevalent in older women. CONCLUSIONS Insufficient coverage of cytologies, reported by the interviewees allows us to understand access difficulties in primary care, as well as the fragility of screening strategies. PMID:24897045

  8. Socioecological perspectives on cervical cancer and cervical cancer screening among Asian American women.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jongwon; Carvallo, Mauricio

    2014-10-01

    Although cervical cancer is one of the most commonly diagnosed cancers among Vietnamese American women (VAW) and Korean American women (KAW), both groups consistently report much lower rates of cervical cancer screening compared with other Asian ethnic subgroups and non-Hispanic Whites. This study aimed to explore multilevel factors that may underlie low screening rates among VAW and KAW living in a city where their ethnic communities are relatively small. The socioecological model was used as a conceptual framework. Thirty participants were conveniently recruited from ethnic beauty salons run by VA and KA cosmetologists in Albuquerque, New Mexico. The participants' average age was 44.6 years (SD = .50; range = 21-60). Most participants were married (80 %) and employed (73.3 %), and had health insurance (83.3 %). A qualitative interview was conducted in Vietnamese or Korean and transcribed verbatim. A thematic content analysis was used to identify major codes, categories, and patterns across the transcripts. The study identified several factors at the individual (e.g., pregnancy, poverty, personality), interpersonal (e.g., family responsibility, mother as influential referent), and community (e.g., lack of availability, community size) levels. The study sheds light on four major areas that must be taken into consideration in the development of culturally appropriate, community-based interventions aimed to reduce disparities in cervical cancer screening among ethnic minority women in the United States: (1) ethnic community size and geographic location; (2) cross-cultural similarities and dissimilarities; (3) targeting of not only unmarried young women, but also close referents; and (4) utilization of trusted resources within social networks. PMID:24863746

  9. [Cervical nodules: diagnosis and management].

    PubMed

    Grosjean, Pierre; Monnier, Philippe

    2004-06-01

    Family physicians frequently encounter patients with neck lumps. The causes are numerous but in the adult the origin is most often a lymph node, the majority of which are malignant. Inappropriate management may often lead to a very poor outcome. Relevant investigations must therefore be correctly chosen. The risk for a neck lump to be malignant depends mainly on age, male sex, and alcohol and tobacco consumption and to a lesser extent on a family history for head and neck malignancy. Careful medical history looks for symptoms such as dysphagia, pain, dysphonia, otalgia, or weight loss. On physical examination, the location, size, consistency and mobility of the mass is described. A careful inspection of the scalp, skin of the face and mucosal surface of the upper aerodigestive tract is performed followed by palpation. If no inflammatory or tumoral lesion is identified, the next step is to perform a fine needle aspiration biopsy of the neck mass which will most often lead to a definite diagnosis. When this is not the case, an otolaryngology consultation and excisional biopsy should be obtained. PMID:15293445

  10. Nuclear expression of Rac1 in cervical premalignant lesions and cervical cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Abnormal expression of Rho-GTPases has been reported in several human cancers. However, the expression of these proteins in cervical cancer has been poorly investigated. In this study we analyzed the expression of the GTPases Rac1, RhoA, Cdc42, and the Rho-GEFs, Tiam1 and beta-Pix, in cervical pre-malignant lesions and cervical cancer cell lines. Methods Protein expression was analyzed by immunochemistry on 102 cervical paraffin-embedded biopsies: 20 without Squamous Intraepithelial Lesions (SIL), 51 Low- grade SIL, and 31 High-grade SIL; and in cervical cancer cell lines C33A and SiHa, and non-tumorigenic HaCat cells. Nuclear localization of Rac1 in HaCat, C33A and SiHa cells was assessed by cellular fractionation and Western blotting, in the presence or not of a chemical Rac1 inhibitor (NSC23766). Results Immunoreacivity for Rac1, RhoA, Tiam1 and beta-Pix was stronger in L-SIL and H-SIL, compared to samples without SIL, and it was significantly associated with the histological diagnosis. Nuclear expression of Rac1 was observed in 52.9% L-SIL and 48.4% H-SIL, but not in samples without SIL. Rac1 was found in the nucleus of C33A and SiHa cells but not in HaCat cells. Chemical inhibition of Rac1 resulted in reduced cell proliferation in HaCat, C33A and SiHa cells. Conclusion Rac1 is expressed in the nucleus of epithelial cells in SILs and cervical cancer cell lines, and chemical inhibition of Rac1 reduces cellular proliferation. Further studies are needed to better understand the role of Rho-GTPases in cervical cancer progression. PMID:22443139

  11. Inflammatory pathways in cervical cancer - the UCT contribution.

    PubMed

    Sales, Kurt Jason; Katz, Arieh Anthony

    2012-03-23

    Cervical cancer is the leading gynaecological malignancy in Southern Africa. The main causal factor for development of the disease is infection of the cervix with human papillomavirus. It is a multi-step disease with several contributing co-factors including multiple sexual partners, a compromised immune system and cervical inflammation caused by infections with Chlamydia trachomatis or Neisseria gonorrhoeae. Inflammation involves extensive tissue remodelling events which are orchestrated by complex networks of cytokines, chemokines and bio-active lipids working across multiple cellular compartments to maintain tissue homeostasis. Many pathological disorders or diseases, including cervical cancer, are characterised by the exacerbated activation and maintenance of inflammatory pathways. In this review we highlight our findings pertaining to activation of inflammatory pathways in cervical cancers, addressing their potential role in pathological changes of the cervix and the significance of these findings for intervention strategies.

  12. Overview of cervical cancer screening practices in the extended Middle East and North Africa countries.

    PubMed

    Sancho-Garnier, Hélène; Khazraji, Youssef Chami; Cherif, Moktar Hamdi; Mahnane, Abbes; Hsairi, Mohamed; El Shalakamy, Amr; Osgul, Nejat; Tuncer, Murat; Jumaan, Aisha O; Seoud, Muhieddine

    2013-12-30

    National Organized Cervical Cancer Screening (NOCCS) programs are lacking in most of the "Extended Middle East and North Africa" (EMENA) countries. Consequently, most cervical cancers are diagnosed late and are associated with high mortality. In fact, in most of these countries, national mortality data are unknown due to the absence of population-based mortality registries. Most countries of the EMENA practice more or less limited opportunistic, cytology-based, screening tests, which often lack quality assurance and follow-up care. A few countries, within the initiation of a National Cancer Control Plan, have just started to implement organized screening programs using, for cervical cancer detection, visual inspection with acetic acid (Morocco) or cytology (Turkey). Moreover, most countries of the EMENA lack national guideline, as well as resources for the management of abnormal cytologic screening (or any other screening test). The main obstacle for the implementation of NOCCS is a lack of political understanding to support such public health programs and provide the necessary resources. Other obstacles that hinder the participation of women in cervical screening include a lack of knowledge of the disease, socio-religious and cultural barriers, and geographic and economic difficulties in accessing medical services. These countries are already convinced that prevention of cervical cancers in women who have cervical intraepithelial neoplasia is possible through various screening and treatment algorithms, but most countries still need to invest in well organized programs that can reduce cervical cancer incidence and mortality in women. This article forms part of a regional report entitled "Comprehensive Control of HPV Infections and Related Diseases in the Extended Middle East and North Africa Region" Vaccine Volume 31, Supplement 6, 2013. Updates of the progress in the field are presented in a separate monograph entitled "Comprehensive Control of HPV Infections and

  13. Overview of cervical cancer screening practices in the extended Middle East and North Africa countries.

    PubMed

    Sancho-Garnier, Hélène; Khazraji, Youssef Chami; Cherif, Moktar Hamdi; Mahnane, Abbes; Hsairi, Mohamed; El Shalakamy, Amr; Osgul, Nejat; Tuncer, Murat; Jumaan, Aisha O; Seoud, Muhieddine

    2013-12-30

    National Organized Cervical Cancer Screening (NOCCS) programs are lacking in most of the "Extended Middle East and North Africa" (EMENA) countries. Consequently, most cervical cancers are diagnosed late and are associated with high mortality. In fact, in most of these countries, national mortality data are unknown due to the absence of population-based mortality registries. Most countries of the EMENA practice more or less limited opportunistic, cytology-based, screening tests, which often lack quality assurance and follow-up care. A few countries, within the initiation of a National Cancer Control Plan, have just started to implement organized screening programs using, for cervical cancer detection, visual inspection with acetic acid (Morocco) or cytology (Turkey). Moreover, most countries of the EMENA lack national guideline, as well as resources for the management of abnormal cytologic screening (or any other screening test). The main obstacle for the implementation of NOCCS is a lack of political understanding to support such public health programs and provide the necessary resources. Other obstacles that hinder the participation of women in cervical screening include a lack of knowledge of the disease, socio-religious and cultural barriers, and geographic and economic difficulties in accessing medical services. These countries are already convinced that prevention of cervical cancers in women who have cervical intraepithelial neoplasia is possible through various screening and treatment algorithms, but most countries still need to invest in well organized programs that can reduce cervical cancer incidence and mortality in women. This article forms part of a regional report entitled "Comprehensive Control of HPV Infections and Related Diseases in the Extended Middle East and North Africa Region" Vaccine Volume 31, Supplement 6, 2013. Updates of the progress in the field are presented in a separate monograph entitled "Comprehensive Control of HPV Infections and

  14. Pseudarthrosis of the Cervical Spine: Risk Factors, Diagnosis and Management

    PubMed Central

    Leven, Dante

    2016-01-01

    Cervical myelopathy and radiculopathy are common pathologies that often improve with spinal decompression and fusion. Postoperative complications include pseudarthrosis, which can be challenging to diagnose and manage. We reviewed the literature with regard to risk factors, diagnosis, controversies, and management of cervical pseudarthrosis. PMID:27559462

  15. Epidemiology of cervical cancer with special focus on India

    PubMed Central

    Sreedevi, Aswathy; Javed, Reshma; Dinesh, Avani

    2015-01-01

    Cervical cancer is on the declining trend in India according to the population-based registries; yet it continues to be a major public health problem for women in India. Multifactorial causation, potential for prevention, and the sheer threat it poses make cervical cancer an important disease for in-depth studies, as has been attempted by this paper. This paper attempts to review the available knowledge regarding the epidemiology and pattern of cervical cancer; types of HPV (human papilloma virus) prevalent among cervical cancer patients and among women in general, high-risk groups such as commercial sex workers, and HIV (human immunodeficiency virus)-positive women; and the role of the national program on cancer in control efforts. The peak age of incidence of cervical cancer is 55–59 years, and a considerable proportion of women report in the late stages of disease. Specific types of oncogenic HPV-16, 18 have been identified in patients with cervical cancer. Other epidemiological risk factors are early age at marriage, multiple sexual partners, multiple pregnancies, poor genital hygiene, malnutrition, use of oral contraceptives, and lack of awareness. A multipronged approach is necessary which can target areas of high prevalence identified by registries with a combination of behavior change communication exercises and routine early screening with VIA. Sensitizing the people of the area, including menfolk, is necessary to increase uptake levels. Vaccination against types 16 and 18 can also be undertaken after taking into confidence all stakeholders, including the parents of adolescent girls. Preventing and treating cervical cancer and reducing the burden are possible by targeting resources to the areas with high prevalence. PMID:25931830

  16. Disparities in cervical and breast cancer mortality in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Girianelli, Vania Reis; Gamarra, Carmen Justina; Azevedo e Silva, Gulnar

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To analyze cervical and breast cancer mortality in Brazil according to socioeconomic and welfare indicators. METHODS Data on breast and cervical cancer mortality covering a 30-year period (1980-2010) were analyzed. The data were obtained from the National Mortality Database, population data from the Brazilian Institute of Geography and Statistics database, and socioeconomic and welfare information from the Institute of Applied Economic Research. Moving averages were calculated, disaggregated by capital city and municipality. The annual percent change in mortality rates was estimated by segmented linear regression using the joinpoint method. Pearson’s correlation coefficients were conducted between average mortality rate at the end of the three-year period and selected indicators in the state capital and each Brazilian state. RESULTS There was a decline in cervical cancer mortality rates throughout the period studied, except in municipalities outside of the capitals in the North and Northeast. There was a decrease in breast cancer mortality in the capitals from the end of the 1990s onwards. Favorable socioeconomic indicators were inversely correlated with cervical cancer mortality. A strong direct correlation was found with favorable indicators and an inverse correlation with fertility rate and breast cancer mortality in inner cities. CONCLUSIONS There is an ongoing dynamic process of increased risk of cervical and breast cancer and attenuation of mortality because of increased, albeit unequal, access to and provision of screening, diagnosis and treatment.  PMID:25119941

  17. Cervical cancer among Hispanic women: assessing the impact on farmworkers.

    PubMed

    Boucher, Faith; Schenker, Marc B

    2002-07-01

    The purpose of this paper was to review the literature on Hispanic populations to outline: 1) demographics; 2) general health status; 3) cervical cancer incidence and mortality; 4) Pap smear screening rates; and 5) barriers to preventive care services. The methods: MEDLINE, Med66, Med75, and Med85 files, from 1966 to 1999, were searched for key words Hispanic health, cervical cancer and Hispanics, cervical cancer and Mexico, migrants and health, agricultural occupational health, farmworkers and cancer, and farmworker health. AGRICOLA (1982-98) was searched for key words farmworker health, agricultural workers and health, and agriculture and cancer. The results show that Hispanic immigrant women may have cervical cancer incidence rates ranging between the California rates for 1991-93 (19.8/100,000) and for Mexico in 1990 (115-220 per 100,000). Mortality rates for the same periods were 3.9/100,000 and 16.11/100,000 respectively. While survey results report Hispanic Pap smear rates above 70%, these surveys count urban women who do not share the barriers to care experienced by poor rural Hispanics. Since validated self-reports of survey responses are 20-50% lower than reported lower rates and Pap smear screening persist in Hispanic Pap evaluations and are reflected in higher morbidity and mortality from cervical cancer. That targeted community interventions have been successful in raising Pap smear rates among poor Spanish-speaking women. Such interventions should be a priority for preventive health care policy and practice. PMID:16228759

  18. Multihelix rotating shield brachytherapy for cervical cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Dadkhah, Hossein; Kim, Yusung; Flynn, Ryan T.; Wu, Xiaodong

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: To present a novel brachytherapy technique, called multihelix rotating shield brachytherapy (H-RSBT), for the precise angular and linear positioning of a partial shield in a curved applicator. H-RSBT mechanically enables the dose delivery using only linear translational motion of the radiation source/shield combination. The previously proposed approach of serial rotating shield brachytherapy (S-RSBT), in which the partial shield is rotated to several angular positions at each source dwell position [W. Yang et al., “Rotating-shield brachytherapy for cervical cancer,” Phys. Med. Biol. 58, 3931–3941 (2013)], is mechanically challenging to implement in a curved applicator, and H-RSBT is proposed as a feasible solution. Methods: A Henschke-type applicator, designed for an electronic brachytherapy source (Xoft Axxent™) and a 0.5 mm thick tungsten partial shield with 180° or 45° azimuthal emission angles and 116° asymmetric zenith angle, is proposed. The interior wall of the applicator contains six evenly spaced helical keyways that rigidly define the emission direction of the partial radiation shield as a function of depth in the applicator. The shield contains three uniformly distributed protruding keys on its exterior wall and is attached to the source such that it rotates freely, thus longitudinal translational motion of the source is transferred to rotational motion of the shield. S-RSBT and H-RSBT treatment plans with 180° and 45° azimuthal emission angles were generated for five cervical cancer patients with a diverse range of high-risk target volume (HR-CTV) shapes and applicator positions. For each patient, the total number of emission angles was held nearly constant for S-RSBT and H-RSBT by using dwell positions separated by 5 and 1.7 mm, respectively, and emission directions separated by 22.5° and 60°, respectively. Treatment delivery time and tumor coverage (D{sub 90} of HR-CTV) were the two metrics used as the basis for evaluation and

  19. Advances in diagnosis and treatment of metastatic cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Li, Haoran; Wu, Xiaohua; Cheng, Xi

    2016-07-01

    Cervical cancer is one of the most common cancers in women worldwide. The outcome of patients with metastatic cervical cancer is poor. We reviewed the relevant literature concerning the treatment and diagnosis of metastatic cervical cancer. There are two types of metastasis related to different treatments and survival rates: hematogenous metastasis and lymphatic metastasis. Patients with hematogenous metastasis have a higher risk of death than those with lymphatic metastasis. In terms of diagnosis, fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) and PET-computed tomography are effective tools for the evaluation of distant metastasis. Concurrent chemoradiotherapy and subsequent chemotherapy are well-tolerated and efficient for lymphatic metastasis. As for lung metastasis, chemotherapy and/or surgery are valuable treatments for resistant, recurrent metastatic cervical cancer and chemoradiotherapy may be the optimal choice for stage IVB cervical cancer. Chemotherapy and bone irradiation are promising for bone metastasis. A better survival is achieved with multimodal therapy. Craniotomy or stereotactic radiosurgery is an optimal choice combined with radiotherapy for solitary brain metastases. Chemotherapy and palliative brain radiation may be considered for multiple brain metastases and other organ metastases.

  20. Advances in diagnosis and treatment of metastatic cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Cervical cancer is one of the most common cancers in women worldwide. The outcome of patients with metastatic cervical cancer is poor. We reviewed the relevant literature concerning the treatment and diagnosis of metastatic cervical cancer. There are two types of metastasis related to different treatments and survival rates: hematogenous metastasis and lymphatic metastasis. Patients with hematogenous metastasis have a higher risk of death than those with lymphatic metastasis. In terms of diagnosis, fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) and PET-computed tomography are effective tools for the evaluation of distant metastasis. Concurrent chemoradiotherapy and subsequent chemotherapy are well-tolerated and efficient for lymphatic metastasis. As for lung metastasis, chemotherapy and/or surgery are valuable treatments for resistant, recurrent metastatic cervical cancer and chemoradiotherapy may be the optimal choice for stage IVB cervical cancer. Chemotherapy and bone irradiation are promising for bone metastasis. A better survival is achieved with multimodal therapy. Craniotomy or stereotactic radiosurgery is an optimal choice combined with radiotherapy for solitary brain metastases. Chemotherapy and palliative brain radiation may be considered for multiple brain metastases and other organ metastases. PMID:27171673

  1. Zoledronic acid induces apoptosis and autophagy in cervical cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, I-Te; Chou, Shou-Chu; Lin, Ying-Chin

    2014-12-01

    Cervical cancer is one of the most common gynecological cancers in association with high mortality and morbidity. The present study was aimed to investigate the in vitro effects of zoledronic acid (ZA) on viability and induction of apoptosis and autophagy as well as inflammatory effects in three human cervical cancer cell lines (HeLa, SiHa, and CaSki). Cell viability was measured by 3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-Diphenyltetrazolium Bromide (MTT) assay. Induction of apoptosis was determined by quantitation of expression level of B cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2) and Bax messenger RNA (mRNA) and identification of the proteolytic cleavage of poly (ADP)-ribose polymerase (PARP) and caspase-3. Autophagic effects were examined by quantitation of mRNA expression of autophagy protein 5 (ATG5) and beclin1 and identifying accumulation of microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 (LC3)-II. Inflammatory effect was determined by measuring expression and production of IL-6 and cyclooxygenase-2 (Cox-2). The results showed ZA significantly inhibited cell viability of cervical cancer cells. ZA-induced cell death displayed features characteristic to both apoptosis and autophagy and was associated with different changes in the levels of Bcl-2 and Bax in the various cervical cancer lines. Expression of metastatic cytokines, IL-6 and Cox-2, was upregulated in the presence of ZA at low concentration. Our data revealed that ZA inhibits cervical cancer cells through the synergistic effect of apoptosis induction and autophagy activation.

  2. Clinical Response of Pelvic and Para-aortic Lymphadenopathy to a Radiation Boost in the Definitive Management of Locally Advanced Cervical Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Rash, Dominique L.; Lee, Yongsook C.; Kashefi, Amir; Durbin-Johnson, Blythe; Mathai, Mathew; Valicenti, Richard; Mayadev, Jyoti S.

    2013-10-01

    Purpose: Optimal treatment with radiation for metastatic lymphadenopathy in locally advanced cervical cancer remains controversial. We investigated the clinical dose response threshold for pelvic and para-aortic lymph node boost using radiographic imaging and clinical outcomes. Methods and Materials: Between 2007 and 2011, 68 patients were treated for locally advanced cervical cancer; 40 patients had clinically involved pelvic and/or para-aortic lymph nodes. Computed tomography (CT) or 18F-labeled fluorodeoxyglucose-positron emission tomography scans obtained pre- and postchemoradiation for 18 patients were reviewed to assess therapeutic radiographic response of individual lymph nodes. External beam boost doses to involved nodes were compared to treatment response, assessed by change in size of lymph nodes by short axis and change in standard uptake value (SUV). Patterns of failure, time to recurrence, overall survival (OS), and disease-free survival (DFS) were determined. Results: Sixty-four lymph nodes suspicious for metastatic involvement were identified. Radiation boost doses ranged from 0 to 15 Gy, with a mean total dose of 52.3 Gy. Pelvic lymph nodes were treated with a slightly higher dose than para-aortic lymph nodes: mean 55.3 Gy versus 51.7 Gy, respectively. There was no correlation between dose delivered and change in size of lymph nodes along the short axis. All lymph nodes underwent a decrease in SUV with a complete resolution of abnormal uptake observed in 68%. Decrease in SUV was significantly greater for lymph nodes treated with ≥54 Gy compared to those treated with <54 Gy (P=.006). Median follow-up was 18.7 months. At 2 years, OS and DFS for the entire cohort were 78% and 50%, respectively. Locoregional control at 2 years was 84%. Conclusions: A biologic response, as measured by the change in SUV for metastatic lymph nodes, was observed at a dose threshold of 54 Gy. We recommend that involved lymph nodes be treated to this minimum dose.

  3. Nominated Texture Based Cervical Cancer Classification

    PubMed Central

    Mariarputham, Edwin Jayasingh; Stephen, Allwin

    2015-01-01

    Accurate classification of Pap smear images becomes the challenging task in medical image processing. This can be improved in two ways. One way is by selecting suitable well defined specific features and the other is by selecting the best classifier. This paper presents a nominated texture based cervical cancer (NTCC) classification system which classifies the Pap smear images into any one of the seven classes. This can be achieved by extracting well defined texture features and selecting best classifier. Seven sets of texture features (24 features) are extracted which include relative size of nucleus and cytoplasm, dynamic range and first four moments of intensities of nucleus and cytoplasm, relative displacement of nucleus within the cytoplasm, gray level cooccurrence matrix, local binary pattern histogram, tamura features, and edge orientation histogram. Few types of support vector machine (SVM) and neural network (NN) classifiers are used for the classification. The performance of the NTCC algorithm is tested and compared to other algorithms on public image database of Herlev University Hospital, Denmark, with 917 Pap smear images. The output of SVM is found to be best for the most of the classes and better results for the remaining classes. PMID:25649913

  4. [Secondary peritonitis due to rupture of pyometra in cervical cancer].

    PubMed

    Zeferino Toquero, Moisé; Bañuelos Flores, Joel

    2005-11-01

    Only 8 cases of spontaneous uterine rupture in untreated cervical cancer have been reported in the literature. We present the case of a 52-year-old female, who was admitted to the emergency room due to hypovolemic shock and signs of peritonitis. A 6x4x4 cm cervical tumor was detected at physical exam. At laparotomy 2000 mL of purulent material were found and a 1-cm perforation in the posterior portion of the uterine segment was identified. A subtotal hysterectomy was performed. The patient received antibiotic and support at Intensive Care Unit. Finally, the patient presented ascendant flaccid paralysis and died due to bronchoaspiration. Spontaneous pyometra rupture in untreated cervical cancer is a rare condition and must be considered in postmenopausal women with cervical tumors and peritonitis signs.

  5. Cervical cancer screening in the early post vaccine era.

    PubMed

    Waxman, Alan G

    2008-12-01

    The Pap test is the foundation of cervical cancer screening in North America and most industrialized countries. It has been widely used in the United States since the 1950s. But are our current screening guidelines still justified? In this article, the author reviews the current recommendations for cervical cancer screening by the American Cancer Society (ACS) and the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) and the evidence supporting them, reviews the relative efficacy of liquid-based cytology versus the conventional Pap smear, and discusses the role of HPV DNA testing in primary screening.

  6. Molecular Detection and Typing of Human Papillomaviruses in Paraffin-Embedded Cervical Cancer and Pre-Cancer Tissue Specimens

    PubMed Central

    Mahmoodi, Pezhman; Motamedi, Hossein; Seyfi Abad Shapouri, Masoud Reza; Bahrami Shehni, Mahjabin; Kargar, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Background: Cervical cancer is one of the important reasons of mortality among females. Prevention, early diagnosis and immediate treatment can affect the rate of mortality in this cancer and several epidemiological studies have shown a strong relationship between human papilloma viruses (HPVs) and cervical cancer. Objectives: The present study was conducted to survey HPV infections in a women population with cervical cancer and cervical dysplasia/metaplasia in southwest of Iran. Materials and Methods: 72 paraffin-embedded cervical biopsies which had been previously archived from women with cervical cancer and cervical dysplasia were examined by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Afterward, the detected HPV strains were typed by restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis of PCR amplicons. Results: 60 out of 72 samples had necessary requirements and HPV DNA was detected in 43.3% of these samples. Most HPV positive samples belonged to women aged from 48 to 63 years. On the other hand, HPV infection among patients with squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) was 48.78% and in women with dysplasia/metaplasia was 26.66%. The most prevalent type of the human papilloma virus was HPV16 (100%). Conclusions: Knowing the most prevalent type of the human papilloma viruses circulating in the population (HPV16) can be applied in the future screening and managing programs of this major disease and also in vaccination against the prevalent types of the virus. Meanwhile, it seems that more studies should be performed to determine the role of different risk factors involved in development of the disease, especially those related with social behaviors and traditions with respect to different areas. PMID:27366309

  7. HPV and cervical cancer testing and prevention: knowledge, beliefs, and attitudes among Hispanic women.

    PubMed

    Vanslyke, Jan Gaylord; Baum, Julie; Plaza, Veronica; Otero, Maria; Wheeler, Cosette; Helitzer, Deborah L

    2008-05-01

    Cervical cancer is a preventable disease resulting from infection with high-risk types of sexually transmitted human papillomaviruses (HPVs). Public knowledge of HPVs and their link to cervical cancer is limited. Participation in cervical cancer prevention programs, including Pap and HPV screening and HPV vaccine acceptance, is crucial for limiting the incidence of cervical cancer. Hispanic women suffer the highest cervical cancer incidence rates in the United States. In this study, we conducted community-based focus groups with Hispanic women to explore knowledge and attitudes relating to cervical cancer, HPV, HPV testing, and HPV vaccination. Study findings suggest a need to increase public health literacy in relation to HPV, the link between HPV and cervical cancer, and HPV primary and secondary prevention options. Health care providers should be prepared to share information with patients that supports and promotes informed decision making about HPV testing and vaccines and their complementary roles in cervical cancer screening and prevention.

  8. Design The Cervical Cancer Detector Use The Artificial Neural Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Intan Af'idah, Dwi; Didik Widianto, Eko; Setyawan, Budi

    2013-06-01

    Cancer is one of the contagious diseases that become a public health issue, both in the world and in Indonesia. In the world, 12% of all deaths caused by cancer and is the second killer after cardiovascular disease. Early detection using the IVA is a practical and inexpensive (only requiring acetic acid). However, the accuracy of the method is quite low, as it can not detect the stage of the cancer. While other methods have a better sensitivity than the IVA method, is a method of PAP smear. However, this method is relatively expensive, and requires an experienced pathologist-cytologist. According to the case above, Considered important to make the cancer cervics detector that is used to detect the abnormality and cervical cancer stage and consists of a digital microscope, as well as a computer application based on artificial neural network. The use of cervical cancer detector software and hardware are integrated each other. After the specifications met, the steps to design the cervical cancer detection are: Modifying a conventional microscope by adding a lens, image recording, and the lights, Programming the tools, designing computer applications, Programming features abnormality detection and staging of cancer.

  9. Physical Activity and Cervical Cancer Testing among American Indian Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muus, Kyle J.; Baker-Demaray, Twyla B.; Bogart, T. Andy; Duncan, Glen E.; Jacobsen, Clemma; Buchwald, Dedra S.; Henderson, Jeffrey A.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Studies have shown that women who engage in high levels of physical activity have higher rates of cancer screening, including Papanicalaou (Pap) tests. Because American Indian (AI) women are at high risk for cervical cancer morbidity and mortality, we examined Pap screening prevalence and assessed whether physical activity was associated…

  10. Cervical Microbiome and Cytokine Profile at Various Stages of Cervical Cancer: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Audirac-Chalifour, Astride; Torres-Poveda, Kirvis; Bahena-Román, Margarita; Téllez-Sosa, Juan; Martínez-Barnetche, Jesús; Cortina-Ceballos, Bernardo; López-Estrada, Guillermina; Delgado-Romero, Karina; Burguete-García, Ana I; Cantú, David; García-Carrancá, Alejandro; Madrid-Marina, Vicente

    2016-01-01

    Cervical cancer (CC) is caused by high-risk human papillomavirus persistence due to the immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment mediated by cytokines. Vaginal microbiota determines the presence of certain cytokines locally. We assessed the association between cervical microbiota diversity and the histopathological diagnosis of each stage of CC, and we evaluated mRNA cervical expression levels of IL-4, IL-6, IL-10, TGF-β1, TNF-α and IFN-γ across the histopathological diagnosis and specific bacterial clusters. We determined the cervical microbiota by high throughput sequencing of 16S rDNA amplicons and classified it in community state types (CST). Mean difference analyses between alpha-diversity and histopathological diagnosis were carried out, as well as a β-diversity analysis within the histological diagnosis. Cervical cytokine mRNA expression was analyzed across the CSTs and the histopathological diagnoses. We found a significant difference in microbiota's diversity in NCL-HPV negative women vs those with squamous intraepithelial lesions (SIL) and CC(p = 0.006, p = 0.036).When β-diversity was evaluated, the CC samples showed the highest variation within groups (p<0.0006) and the largest distance compared to NCL-HPV negative ones (p<0.00001). The predominant bacteria in women with normal cytology were L. crispatus and L. iners, whereas for SIL, it was Sneathia spp. and for CC, Fusobacterium spp. We found higher median cervical levels of IL-4 and TGF-β1 mRNA in the CST dominated by Fusobacterium spp. These results suggest that the cervical microbiota may be implicated in cervical cancer pathology. Further cohort studies are needed to validate these findings.

  11. Cervical Microbiome and Cytokine Profile at Various Stages of Cervical Cancer: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Bahena-Román, Margarita; Téllez-Sosa, Juan; Martínez-Barnetche, Jesús; Cortina-Ceballos, Bernardo; López-Estrada, Guillermina; Delgado-Romero, Karina; Burguete-García, Ana I.; Cantú, David; García-Carrancá, Alejandro; Madrid-Marina, Vicente

    2016-01-01

    Cervical cancer (CC) is caused by high-risk human papillomavirus persistence due to the immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment mediated by cytokines. Vaginal microbiota determines the presence of certain cytokines locally. We assessed the association between cervical microbiota diversity and the histopathological diagnosis of each stage of CC, and we evaluated mRNA cervical expression levels of IL-4, IL-6, IL-10, TGF-β1, TNF-α and IFN-γ across the histopathological diagnosis and specific bacterial clusters. We determined the cervical microbiota by high throughput sequencing of 16S rDNA amplicons and classified it in community state types (CST). Mean difference analyses between alpha-diversity and histopathological diagnosis were carried out, as well as a β-diversity analysis within the histological diagnosis. Cervical cytokine mRNA expression was analyzed across the CSTs and the histopathological diagnoses. We found a significant difference in microbiota's diversity in NCL-HPV negative women vs those with squamous intraepithelial lesions (SIL) and CC(p = 0.006, p = 0.036).When β-diversity was evaluated, the CC samples showed the highest variation within groups (p<0.0006) and the largest distance compared to NCL-HPV negative ones (p<0.00001). The predominant bacteria in women with normal cytology were L. crispatus and L. iners, whereas for SIL, it was Sneathia spp. and for CC, Fusobacterium spp. We found higher median cervical levels of IL-4 and TGF-β1 mRNA in the CST dominated by Fusobacterium spp. These results suggest that the cervical microbiota may be implicated in cervical cancer pathology. Further cohort studies are needed to validate these findings. PMID:27115350

  12. Preventing cervical cancer : overviews of the National Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection Program and 2 US immunization programs.

    PubMed

    Khan, Kris; Curtis, C Robinette; Ekwueme, Donatus U; Stokley, Shannon; Walker, Chastity; Roland, Katherine; Benard, Vicki; Saraiya, Mona

    2008-11-15

    Three federal programs with the potential to reduce cervical cancer incidence, morbidity, and mortality, especially among underserved populations, are administered by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC): the National Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection Program (NBCCEDP), the Vaccines for Children (VFC) Program, and the Section 317 immunization grant program. The NBCCEDP provides breast and cervical cancer screening and diagnostic services to uninsured and underinsured women. The VFC program and the Section 317 immunization grant program provide vaccines, including human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine, to targeted populations at no cost for these vaccines. This article describes the programs, their histories, populations served, services offered, and roles in preventing cervical cancer through HPV vaccination and cervical cancer screening. Potential long-term reduction in healthcare costs resulting from HPV vaccination is also discussed. As an example of an initiative to vaccinate uninsured women aged 19-26 years through a cancer services program, a state-based effort that was recently launched in New York, is highlighted.

  13. Improving cervical cancer screening rates in an urban HIV clinic.

    PubMed

    Cross, Sara L; Suharwardy, Sanaa H; Bodavula, Phani; Schechtman, Kenneth; Overton, E Turner; Onen, Nur F; Lane, Michael A

    2014-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected women are at increased risk of invasive cervical cancer; however, screening rates remain low. The objectives of this study were to analyze a quality improvement intervention to increase cervical cancer screening rates in an urban academic HIV clinic and to identify factors associated with inadequate screening. Barriers to screening were identified by a multidisciplinary quality improvement committee at the Washington University Infectious Diseases clinic. Several strategies were developed to address these barriers. The years pre- and post-implementation were analyzed to examine the clinical impact of the intervention. A total of 422 women were seen in both the pre-implementation and post-implementation periods. In the pre-implementation period, 222 women (53%) underwent cervical cancer screening in the form of Papanicolaou (Pap) testing. In the post-implementation period, 318 women (75.3%) underwent cervical cancer screening (p < 0.01). Factors associated with lack of screening included fewer visits attended (pre: 4.2 ± 1.5; post: 3.4 ± 1.4; p < 0.01). A multidisciplinary quality improvement intervention was successful in overcoming barriers and increasing cervical cancer screening rates in an urban academic HIV clinic.

  14. Cervical cancer control research in Vietnamese American communities.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Victoria M; Nguyen, Tung T; Jackson, J Carey; McPhee, Stephen J

    2008-11-01

    Census data show that the U.S. Vietnamese population now exceeds 1,250,000. Cervical cancer among Vietnamese American women has been identified as an important health disparity. Available data indicate the cervical cancer disparity may be due to low Papanicolaou (Pap) testing rates rather than variations in human papillomavirus infection rates and/or types. The cervical cancer incidence rates among Vietnamese and non-Latina White women in California during 2000 to 2002 were 14.0 and 7.3 per 100,000, respectively. Only 70% of Vietnamese women who participated in the 2003 California Health Interview Survey reported a recent Pap smear compared with 84% of non-Latina White women. Higher levels of cervical cancer screening participation among Vietnamese women are strongly associated with current/previous marriage, having a usual source of care/doctor, and previous physician recommendation. Vietnamese language media campaigns and lay health worker intervention programs have been effective in increasing Pap smear use in Vietnamese American communities. Cervical cancer control programs for Vietnamese women should address knowledge deficits, enable women who are without a usual source of care to find a primary care doctor, and improve patient-provider communication by encouraging health-care providers to recommend Pap testing as well as by empowering women to ask for testing. PMID:18990732

  15. Raman spectroscopy for screening and diagnosis of cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Lyng, Fiona M; Traynor, Damien; Ramos, Inês R M; Bonnier, Franck; Byrne, Hugh J

    2015-11-01

    Cervical cancer is the fourth most common cancer in women worldwide and mainly affects younger women. The mortality associated with cervical cancer can be reduced if the disease is detected at the pre-cancer stage. Current best-practice methods include cytopathology, HPV testing, and histopathology, but these methods are limited in terms of subjectivity, cost, and time. There is an unmet clinical need for new methods to aid clinicians in the early detection of cervical pre-cancer. These methods should be objective and rapid and require minimal sample preparation. Raman spectroscopy is a vibrational spectroscopic technique by which incident radiation is used to induce vibrations in the molecules of a sample and the scattered radiation may be used to characterise the sample in a rapid and non-destructive manner. Raman spectroscopy is sensitive to subtle biochemical changes occurring at the molecular level, enabling spectral variations corresponding to disease onset to be detected. Over the past 15 years, there have been numerous reports revealing the potential of Raman spectroscopy together with multivariate statistical analysis for the detection of a variety of cancers. This paper discusses the recent advances and challenges for cervical-cancer screening and diagnosis and offers some perspectives for the future.

  16. Quantitative DNA Methylation Analysis of Candidate Genes in Cervical Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Siegel, Erin M.; Riggs, Bridget M.; Delmas, Amber L.; Koch, Abby; Hakam, Ardeshir; Brown, Kevin D.

    2015-01-01

    Aberrant DNA methylation has been observed in cervical cancer; however, most studies have used non-quantitative approaches to measure DNA methylation. The objective of this study was to quantify methylation within a select panel of genes previously identified as targets for epigenetic silencing in cervical cancer and to identify genes with elevated methylation that can distinguish cancer from normal cervical tissues. We identified 49 women with invasive squamous cell cancer of the cervix and 22 women with normal cytology specimens. Bisulfite-modified genomic DNA was amplified and quantitative pyrosequencing completed for 10 genes (APC, CCNA, CDH1, CDH13, WIF1, TIMP3, DAPK1, RARB, FHIT, and SLIT2). A Methylation Index was calculated as the mean percent methylation across all CpG sites analyzed per gene (~4-9 CpG site) per sequence. A binary cut-point was defined at >15% methylation. Sensitivity, specificity and area under ROC curve (AUC) of methylation in individual genes or a panel was examined. The median methylation index was significantly higher in cases compared to controls in 8 genes, whereas there was no difference in median methylation for 2 genes. Compared to HPV and age, the combination of DNA methylation level of DAPK1, SLIT2, WIF1 and RARB with HPV and age significantly improved the AUC from 0.79 to 0.99 (95% CI: 0.97–1.00, p-value = 0.003). Pyrosequencing analysis confirmed that several genes are common targets for aberrant methylation in cervical cancer and DNA methylation level of four genes appears to increase specificity to identify cancer compared to HPV detection alone. Alterations in DNA methylation of specific genes in cervical cancers, such as DAPK1, RARB, WIF1, and SLIT2, may also occur early in cervical carcinogenesis and should be evaluated. PMID:25826459

  17. Quantitative DNA methylation analysis of candidate genes in cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Siegel, Erin M; Riggs, Bridget M; Delmas, Amber L; Koch, Abby; Hakam, Ardeshir; Brown, Kevin D

    2015-01-01

    Aberrant DNA methylation has been observed in cervical cancer; however, most studies have used non-quantitative approaches to measure DNA methylation. The objective of this study was to quantify methylation within a select panel of genes previously identified as targets for epigenetic silencing in cervical cancer and to identify genes with elevated methylation that can distinguish cancer from normal cervical tissues. We identified 49 women with invasive squamous cell cancer of the cervix and 22 women with normal cytology specimens. Bisulfite-modified genomic DNA was amplified and quantitative pyrosequencing completed for 10 genes (APC, CCNA, CDH1, CDH13, WIF1, TIMP3, DAPK1, RARB, FHIT, and SLIT2). A Methylation Index was calculated as the mean percent methylation across all CpG sites analyzed per gene (~4-9 CpG site) per sequence. A binary cut-point was defined at >15% methylation. Sensitivity, specificity and area under ROC curve (AUC) of methylation in individual genes or a panel was examined. The median methylation index was significantly higher in cases compared to controls in 8 genes, whereas there was no difference in median methylation for 2 genes. Compared to HPV and age, the combination of DNA methylation level of DAPK1, SLIT2, WIF1 and RARB with HPV and age significantly improved the AUC from 0.79 to 0.99 (95% CI: 0.97-1.00, p-value = 0.003). Pyrosequencing analysis confirmed that several genes are common targets for aberrant methylation in cervical cancer and DNA methylation level of four genes appears to increase specificity to identify cancer compared to HPV detection alone. Alterations in DNA methylation of specific genes in cervical cancers, such as DAPK1, RARB, WIF1, and SLIT2, may also occur early in cervical carcinogenesis and should be evaluated.

  18. Cervical Cancer Screening Interventions for U.S. Latinas: A Systematic Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corcoran, Jacqueline; Dattalo, Patrick; Crowley, Meghan

    2012-01-01

    The high cervical cancer mortality rate among Latinas compared with other ethnic groups in the United States is of major concern. Latina women are almost twice as likely to die from cervical cancer as non-Hispanic white women. To improve Latina cervical cancer screening rates, interventions have been developed and tested. This systematic review…

  19. 76 FR 30723 - Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection and Control Advisory Committee (BCCEDCAC)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-26

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection and... for breast and cervical cancer screening; updates on the National Breast and Cervical Cancer Early... Health and Human Services, and the Director, CDC, regarding the early detection and control of breast...

  20. 77 FR 66469 - Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection and Control Advisory Committee (BCCEDCAC)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-05

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection and... meeting of the aforementioned committee: Name: Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection and Control..., regarding the early detection and control of breast and cervical cancer. The committee makes...

  1. College Students' Knowledge of the Connection between HPV and Cervical Cancer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Applegate, Trent E.; Jones, Iesha K.

    2002-01-01

    Investigated college students' knowledge of the relationship between human papillomavirus (HPV) and cervical cancer. Few students knew what HPV was. Most of the females who had been screened knew that a Pap smear could detect HPV and cervical cancer. Over half of the students did not realize the link between HPV and cervical cancer. Students…

  2. The epidemiology of hypopharynx and cervical esophagus cancer.

    PubMed

    Popescu, C R; Bertesteanu, S V G; Mirea, D; Grigore, Raluca; lonescu, Diana; Popescu, B

    2010-01-01

    At the beginning of the 21st century the hypopharynx and the cervical esophagus cancer represents a major issue for all countries of the world. The epidemiology of the hypopharynx and cervical esophagus cancer deals with the spread of the disease in the human population with regard to sex, age, profession, time and space, as well as risk factors that contribute to these phenomena. The main goal is to investigate the causes and the factors involved in the development of the tumors at the pharyngoesophageal junction, knowledge that contributes to the latest therapeutic assessment through interdisciplinary collaboration (E.N.T. surgeon, general surgeon, radiation oncologist, chemotherapist, and nutritionist). The epidemiology of the hypopharynx and cervical esophagus cancer includes three major areas of interest: descriptive (the study of the spread in mass population), analytical (the study of causal risk factors on the disease) and experimental (that verifies by experiments on animals the prior identified hypothesis). PMID:21254737

  3. Young women's perspectives on cervical cancer prevention in Appalachian Kentucky.

    PubMed

    Head, Katharine J; Cohen, Elisia L

    2012-04-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination coupled with routine Papanicolaou (Pap) tests can prevent pervasive HPV infections causing cervical cancer. However, both HPV vaccination rates and Pap testing rates in Appalachian Kentucky are lower among all age groups than the rest of the United States. We recruited 19 young women residing in Appalachian Kentucky from university-based and rural clinical settings for group and individual interviews. After considering an integrated behavioral framework, we illustrate these women's perspectives by detailing five themes, including (a) experiential beliefs pose barriers to performing behaviors, (b) three vaccine doses complicate vaccination intention, (c) women have misunderstandings about HPV and the HPV vaccination function, (d) normative influences cue action (and inaction), and (e) specific environmental and contextual barriers exist to performing cervical cancer prevention behaviors in Appalachian Kentucky. These findings related to cervical cancer prevention in Appalachian Kentucky have implications for health-message design and clinical practice.

  4. Increase in cervical cancer mortality in Spain, 1951-1991

    PubMed Central

    Llorca, J.; Prieto, M. D.; Delgado-Rodriguez, M.

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The trend in cervical cancer mortality in Spain from 1951 to 1991 is examined. METHODS: Analysis of national mortality statistics calculating age standardised mortality rates and an age-period cohort analysis. A fit to the Gompertz function was made to estimate the influence of the environmental factors on the mortality rates evolution. MAIN RESULTS: The age standardised mortality rate in Spain is lower than in other developed countries (USA or Estonia) and equal to Norwegian and Finland rates; but whereas in these countries the trend is to decrease, the Spanish rate has increased during this period, because of a cohort effect. A misclassification bias could be responsible for the trend in women aged 40 and older but the increasing trend in younger women could not be interpreted as espurious. The Gompertzian analysis suggests an increase in environmental factors causing cervical cancer. CONCLUSIONS: Cervical cancer mortality rates are increasing in Spain because of environmental factors.   PMID:10492733

  5. The epidemiology of hypopharynx and cervical esophagus cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bertesteanu, SVG; Mirea, D; Grigore, R; Ionescu, D; Popescu, B

    2010-01-01

    At the beginning of the 21st century hypopharynx and cervical esophagus cancer represents a major issue for all countries of the world. The epidemiology of the hypopharynx and cervical esophagus cancer deals with the spread of the disease in human population in regards to sex, age, profession, time and space, as well as risk factors that contribute to these phenomena. The main goal is to investigate the causes and the factors involved in the development of the tumors at the pharyngo–esophageal junction, knowledge that contributes to latest therapeutic assessment through interdisciplinary collaboration (E.N.T. surgeon, general surgeon, radiation oncologist, chemotherapist, nutritionist). The epidemiology of the hypopharynx and cervical esophagus cancer includes three major areas of interest: descriptive (the study of the spread in mass population), analytical (the study of causal risk factors on the disease) and experimental (that verifies by experiments on animals the prior identified hypothesis). PMID:21254737

  6. The Epidemiology of Human Papillomavirus Infection and Cervical Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bosch, F. Xavier; de Sanjosé, Silvia

    2007-01-01

    Cervical cancer has been recognized as a rare outcome of a common Sexually Transmitted Infection (STI). The etiologic association is restricted to a limited number of viral types of the family of the Human Papillomaviruses (HPVs). The association is causal in nature and under optimal testing systems, HPV DNA can be identified in all specimens of invasive cervical cancer. As a consequence, it has been claimed that HPV infection is a necessary cause of cervical cancer. The evidence is consistent worldwide and implies both the Squamous Cell Carcinomas (SCC), the adenocarcinomas and the vast majority (i.e. > 95%) of the immediate precursors, namely High Grade Squamous Intraepithelial Lesions (HSIL)/Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia 3 (CIN3)/Carcinoma in situ. Co-factors that modify the risk among HPV DNA positive women include the use of oral contraceptives (OC) for five or more years, smoking, high parity (five or more full term pregnancies) and previous exposure to other sexually transmitted diseases such as Chlamydia Trachomatis (CT) and Herpes Simplex Virus type 2 (HSV-2). Women exposed to the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) are at high risk for HPV infection, HPV DNA persistency and progression of HPV lesions to cervical cancer. PMID:17627057

  7. Prevention and early detection of cervical cancer in the UK.

    PubMed

    Foran, Claire; Brennan, Arthur

    This literature review explores the prevention and early detection of cervical cancer in the UK. Current findings indicate that there is a risk for women under the age of 25 years, who may develop cervical cancer. There appears to be a gap in UK policy that may overlook these women, who are beneath the age for initial screening but exceed the age for vaccination. Despite the inextricable link between sexual activity and cervical cancer, cervical screening and sexual health promotion still appear to be disjointed, and the role of a sexually transmitted infection leading to the development of cervical cancer has not been emphasised enough in public health messages. Further training should be provided and its impact monitored, designed to address this anomaly in health promotion. There are many barriers to health promotion including, those of a societal, cultural and religious nature. Additional research is required to ascertain the types of educational and awareness interventions that would be most effective in promoting and encouraging positive sexual behaviours among young people, and to explore how these might be successfully implemented.

  8. Prevalence and risk factors for cervical cancer and pre-cancerous lesions in Rwanda

    PubMed Central

    Makuza, Jean Damascène; Nsanzimana, Sabin; Muhimpundu, Marie Aimee; Pace, Lydia Eleanor; Ntaganira, Joseph; Riedel, David James

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Cervical cancer prevalence in Rwanda has not been well-described. Visual inspection with acetic acid or Lugol solution has been shown to be effective for cervical cancer screening in low resource settings. The aim of the study is to understand the prevalence and risk factors for cervical cancer and pre- cancerous lesions among Rwandan women between 30 and 50 old undergoing screening. Methods This cross-sectional analytical study was done in 3 districts of Rwanda from October 2010 to June 2013. Women aged 30 to 50 years screened for cervical cancer by trained doctors, nurses and midwives. Prevalence of pre-cancerous and cancerous cervical lesions was determined. Bivariate and multivariate logistic regressions were used to assess risk factors associated with cervical cancer. Results The prevalence of pre-cancer and invasive cervical cancer was 5.9% (95% CI 4.5, 7.5) and 1.7% (95% CI 0.9, 2.5), respectively. Risk factors associated with cervical cancer in multivariate analysis included initiation of sexual activity at less than 20 years (OR=1.75; 95% CI=(1.01, 3.03); being unmarried (single, divorced and widowed) (OR=3.29; 95% CI=( 1.26, 8.60)); Older age of participants (OR= 0.52; 95% CI= (0.28, 0.97)), older age at the first pregnancy (OR=2.10; 95% CI=(1.20, 3.67) and higher number of children born (OR=0.42; 95%CI =(0.23, 0.76)) were protective. Conclusion Cervical cancer continues to be a public health problem in Rwanda, but screening using VIA is practical and feasible even in rural settings. PMID:26664527

  9. Rotating-shield brachytherapy for cervical cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Wenjun; Kim, Yusung; Wu, Xiaodong; Song, Qi; Liu, Yunlong; Bhatia, Sudershan K.; Sun, Wenqing; Flynn, Ryan T.

    2013-06-01

    In this treatment planning study, the potential benefits of a rotating shield brachytherapy (RSBT) technique based on a partially-shielded electronic brachytherapy source were assessed for treating cervical cancer. Conventional intracavitary brachytherapy (ICBT), intracavitary plus supplementary interstitial (IS+ICBT), and RSBT treatment plans for azimuthal emission angles of 180° (RSBT-180) and 45° (RSBT-45) were generated for five patients. For each patient, high-risk clinical target volume (HR-CTV) equivalent dose in 2 Gy fractions (EQD2) (α/β = 10 Gy) was escalated until bladder, rectum, or sigmoid colon tolerance EQD2 values were reached. External beam radiotherapy dose (1.8 Gy × 25) was accounted for, and brachytherapy was assumed to have been delivered in 5 fractions. IS+ICBT provided a greater HR-CTV D90 (minimum EQD2 to the hottest 90%) than ICBT. D90 was greater for RSBT-45 than IS+ICBT for all five patients, and greater for RSBT-180 than IS+ICBT for two patients. When the RSBT-45/180 plan with the lowest HR-CTV D90 that was greater than the D90 the ICBT or IS+ICBT plan was selected, the average (range) of D90 increases for RSBT over ICBT and IS+ICBT were 16.2 (6.3-27.2)and 8.5 (0.03-20.16) Gy, respectively. The average (range) treatment time increase per fraction of RSBT was 34.56 (3.68-70.41) min over ICBT and 34.59 (3.57-70.13) min over IS+ICBT. RSBT can increase D90 over ICBT and IS+ICBT without compromising organ-at-risk sparing. The D90 and treatment time improvements from RSBT depend on the patient and shield emission angle.

  10. A Gompertzian model with random effects to cervical cancer growth

    SciTech Connect

    Mazlan, Mazma Syahidatul Ayuni; Rosli, Norhayati

    2015-05-15

    In this paper, a Gompertzian model with random effects is introduced to describe the cervical cancer growth. The parameters values of the mathematical model are estimated via maximum likehood estimation. We apply 4-stage Runge-Kutta (SRK4) for solving the stochastic model numerically. The efficiency of mathematical model is measured by comparing the simulated result and the clinical data of the cervical cancer growth. Low values of root mean-square error (RMSE) of Gompertzian model with random effect indicate good fits.

  11. Gompertzian stochastic model with delay effect to cervical cancer growth

    SciTech Connect

    Mazlan, Mazma Syahidatul Ayuni binti; Rosli, Norhayati binti; Bahar, Arifah

    2015-02-03

    In this paper, a Gompertzian stochastic model with time delay is introduced to describe the cervical cancer growth. The parameters values of the mathematical model are estimated via Levenberg-Marquardt optimization method of non-linear least squares. We apply Milstein scheme for solving the stochastic model numerically. The efficiency of mathematical model is measured by comparing the simulated result and the clinical data of cervical cancer growth. Low values of Mean-Square Error (MSE) of Gompertzian stochastic model with delay effect indicate good fits.

  12. Gompertzian stochastic model with delay effect to cervical cancer growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazlan, Mazma Syahidatul Ayuni binti; Rosli, Norhayati binti; Bahar, Arifah

    2015-02-01

    In this paper, a Gompertzian stochastic model with time delay is introduced to describe the cervical cancer growth. The parameters values of the mathematical model are estimated via Levenberg-Marquardt optimization method of non-linear least squares. We apply Milstein scheme for solving the stochastic model numerically. The efficiency of mathematical model is measured by comparing the simulated result and the clinical data of cervical cancer growth. Low values of Mean-Square Error (MSE) of Gompertzian stochastic model with delay effect indicate good fits.

  13. A Gompertzian model with random effects to cervical cancer growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazlan, Mazma Syahidatul Ayuni; Rosli, Norhayati

    2015-05-01

    In this paper, a Gompertzian model with random effects is introduced to describe the cervical cancer growth. The parameters values of the mathematical model are estimated via maximum likehood estimation. We apply 4-stage Runge-Kutta (SRK4) for solving the stochastic model numerically. The efficiency of mathematical model is measured by comparing the simulated result and the clinical data of the cervical cancer growth. Low values of root mean-square error (RMSE) of Gompertzian model with random effect indicate good fits.

  14. Brachytherapy in the treatment of cervical cancer: a review

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Robyn; Kamrava, Mitchell

    2014-01-01

    Dramatic advances have been made in brachytherapy for cervical cancer. Radiation treatment planning has evolved from two-dimensional to three-dimensional, incorporating magnetic resonance imaging and/or computed tomography into the treatment paradigm. This allows for better delineation and coverage of the tumor, as well as improved avoidance of surrounding organs. Consequently, advanced brachytherapy can achieve very high rates of local control with a reduction in morbidity, compared with historic approaches. This review provides an overview of state-of-the-art gynecologic brachytherapy, with a focus on recent advances and their implications for women with cervical cancer. PMID:24920937

  15. Cervical screening and cervical cancer death among older women: a population-based, case-control study.

    PubMed

    Rustagi, Alison S; Kamineni, Aruna; Weinmann, Sheila; Reed, Susan D; Newcomb, Polly; Weiss, Noel S

    2014-05-01

    Recent research suggests that cervical screening of older women is associated with a considerable decrease in cervical cancer incidence. We sought to quantify the efficacy of cervical cytology screening to reduce death from this disease. Among enrollees of 2 US health plans, we compared Papanicolaou smear screening histories of women aged 55-79 years who died of cervical cancer during 1980-2010 (cases) to those of women at risk of cervical cancer (controls). Controls were matched 2:1 to cases on health plan, age, and enrollment duration. Cytology screening during the detectable preclinical phase, estimated as the 5-7 years before diagnosis during which cervical neoplasia is asymptomatic but cytologically detectable, was ascertained from medical records. A total of 39 cases and 80 controls were eligible. The odds ratio of cervical cancer death associated with screening during the presumed detectable preclinical phase was 0.26 (95% confidence interval: 0.10, 0.63) after adjustment for matching characteristics, smoking, marital status, and race/ethnicity using logistic regression. We estimate that cervical cytology screening of all women aged 55-79 years in the United States could avert 630 deaths annually. These results provide a minimum estimate of the efficacy of human papillomavirus DNA screening-a more sensitive test-to reduce cervical cancer death among older women.

  16. Cervical Screening and Cervical Cancer Death Among Older Women: A Population-Based, Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Rustagi, Alison S.; Kamineni, Aruna; Weinmann, Sheila; Reed, Susan D.; Newcomb, Polly; Weiss, Noel S.

    2014-01-01

    Recent research suggests that cervical screening of older women is associated with a considerable decrease in cervical cancer incidence. We sought to quantify the efficacy of cervical cytology screening to reduce death from this disease. Among enrollees of 2 US health plans, we compared Papanicolaou smear screening histories of women aged 55–79 years who died of cervical cancer during 1980–2010 (cases) to those of women at risk of cervical cancer (controls). Controls were matched 2:1 to cases on health plan, age, and enrollment duration. Cytology screening during the detectable preclinical phase, estimated as the 5–7 years before diagnosis during which cervical neoplasia is asymptomatic but cytologically detectable, was ascertained from medical records. A total of 39 cases and 80 controls were eligible. The odds ratio of cervical cancer death associated with screening during the presumed detectable preclinical phase was 0.26 (95% confidence interval: 0.10, 0.63) after adjustment for matching characteristics, smoking, marital status, and race/ethnicity using logistic regression. We estimate that cervical cytology screening of all women aged 55–79 years in the United States could avert 630 deaths annually. These results provide a minimum estimate of the efficacy of human papillomavirus DNA screening—a more sensitive test—to reduce cervical cancer death among older women. PMID:24685531

  17. Chlamydia Trachomatis Infection-Associated Risk of Cervical Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Haiyan; Shen, Zhaojun; Luo, Hui; Zhang, Wenwen; Zhu, Xueqiong

    2016-01-01

    Abstract As whether Chlamydia trachomatis infection increases the risk of cervical cancer is controversial in the literature, we performed a meta-analysis. Based on a comprehensive search of publications in the Medline, Cochrane, and EMBASE databases, we identified and extracted data from all relevant articles examining C. trachomatis infection and the risk of cervical cancer. The quality of each included study was assessed according to the 9-star Newcastle–Ottawa scale. The strength of association between the C. trachomatis and risk of cervical cancer was estimated by odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). This review was registered at PROSPERO with registration No. CRD42014015672. A total of 22 studies with 4291 cervical cancer cases and 7628 controls were identified. Overall, C. trachomatis was significantly linked to increased cervical cancer risk in prospective studies (OR = 2.21, 95% CI: 1.88–2.61, P < 0.001), as well as in retrospective studies (OR = 2.19, 95% CI: 1.74–2.74, P < 0.001). Additionally, with a multivariate logistic regression analysis adjusted for HPV and age, C. trachomatis infection was identified as an independent predictor of cervical cancer in 11 studies (OR = 1.76, 95% CI: 1.03–3.01, P = 0.04). Coinfection of human papilloma virus and C. trachomatis has a higher risk of cervical cancer (OR = 4.03, 95% CI: 3.15–5.16, P < 0.001). A subgroup analysis based on histological type indicated an elevated risk for both squamous cell carcinoma (OR = 2.21, 95% CI: 2.00–2.45, P < 0.001), and adenocarcinoma (OR = 1.61, 95% CI: 1.21–2.15, P = 0.001), in associated with C. trachomatis. Subgroup analysis by where C. trachomatis infection was detected showed a significantly higher risk of cervical cancer associated with C. trachomatis infection detected in serum (OR = 2.20, 95% CI: 2.01–2.42, P < 0.001), cervical tissue blocks (OR = 2.88, 95% CI: 1.21–6.83, P = 0

  18. American Cancer Society, American Society for Colposcopy and Cervical Pathology, and American Society for Clinical Pathology screening guidelines for the prevention and early detection of cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Saslow, Debbie; Solomon, Diane; Lawson, Herschel W; Killackey, Maureen; Kulasingam, Shalini L; Cain, Joanna; Garcia, Francisco A R; Moriarty, Ann T; Waxman, Alan G; Wilbur, David C; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Downs, Levi S; Spitzer, Mark; Moscicki, Anna-Barbara; Franco, Eduardo L; Stoler, Mark H; Schiffman, Mark; Castle, Philip E; Myers, Evan R

    2012-01-01

    An update to the American Cancer Society (ACS) guideline regarding screening for the early detection of cervical precancerous lesions and cancer is presented. The guidelines are based on a systematic evidence review, contributions from 6 working groups, and a recent symposium cosponsored by the ACS, the American Society for Colposcopy and Cervical Pathology, and the American Society for Clinical Pathology, which was attended by 25 organizations. The new screening recommendations address age-appropriate screening strategies, including the use of cytology and high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) testing, follow-up (eg, the management of screen positives and screening intervals for screen negatives) of women after screening, the age at which to exit screening, future considerations regarding HPV testing alone as a primary screening approach, and screening strategies for women vaccinated against HPV16 and HPV18 infections.

  19. American Cancer Society, American Society for Colposcopy and Cervical Pathology, and American Society for Clinical Pathology screening guidelines for the prevention and early detection of cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Saslow, Debbie; Solomon, Diane; Lawson, Herschel W; Killackey, Maureen; Kulasingam, Shalini L; Cain, Joanna M; Garcia, Francisco A R; Moriarty, Ann T; Waxman, Alan G; Wilbur, David C; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Downs, Levi S; Spitzer, Mark; Moscicki, Anna-Barbara; Franco, Eduardo L; Stoler, Mark H; Schiffman, Mark; Castle, Philip E; Myers, Evan R; Chelmow, David; Herzig, Abbe; Kim, Jane J; Kinney, Walter; Herschel, W Lawson; Waldman, Jeffrey

    2012-07-01

    An update to the American Cancer Society (ACS) guideline regarding screening for the early detection of cervical precancerous lesions and cancer is presented. The guidelines are based on a systematic evidence review, contributions from six working groups, and a recent symposium co-sponsored by the ACS, American Society for Colposcopy and Cervical Pathology (ASCCP), and American Society for Clinical Pathology (ASCP), which was attended by 25 organizations. The new screening recommendations address age-appropriate screening strategies, including the use of cytology and high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) testing, follow-up (e.g., management of screen positives and screening interval for screen negatives) of women after screening, age at which to exit screening, future considerations regarding HPV testing alone as a primary screening approach, and screening strategies for women vaccinated against HPV16/18 infections.

  20. American Cancer Society, American Society for Colposcopy and Cervical Pathology, and American Society for Clinical Pathology screening guidelines for the prevention and early detection of cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Saslow, Debbie; Solomon, Diane; Lawson, Herschel W; Killackey, Maureen; Kulasingam, Shalini L; Cain, Joanna; Garcia, Francisco A R; Moriarty, Ann T; Waxman, Alan G; Wilbur, David C; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Downs, Levi S; Spitzer, Mark; Moscicki, Anna-Barbara; Franco, Eduardo L; Stoler, Mark H; Schiffman, Mark; Castle, Philip E; Myers, Evan R

    2012-04-01

    An update to the American Cancer Society (ACS) guideline regarding screening for the early detection of cervical precancerous lesions and cancer is presented. The guidelines are based on a systematic evidence review, contributions from 6 working groups, and a recent symposium cosponsored by the ACS, the American Society for Colposcopy and Cervical Pathology, and the American Society for Clinical Pathology, which was attended by 25 organizations. The new screening recommendations address age-appropriate screening strategies, including the use of cytology and high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) testing, follow-up (eg, the management of screen positives and screening intervals for screen negatives) of women after screening, the age at which to exit screening, future considerations regarding HPV testing alone as a primary screening approach, and screening strategies for women vaccinated against HPV16 and HPV18 infections.

  1. American Cancer Society, American Society for Colposcopy and Cervical Pathology, and American Society for Clinical Pathology Screening Guidelines for the Prevention and Early Detection of Cervical Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Saslow, Debbie; Solomon, Diane; Lawson, Herschel W.; Killackey, Maureen; Kulasingam, Shalini; Cain, Joanna; Garcia, Francisco A. R.; Moriarty, Ann; Waxman, Alan; Wilbur, David; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Downs, Levi; Spitzer, Mark; Moscicki, Anna-Barbara; Saraiya, Mona; Franco, Eduardo L.; Stoler, Mark H.; Schiffman, Mark; Castle, Philip E.; Myers, Evan R.

    2013-01-01

    An update to the American Cancer Society (ACS) guideline regarding screening for the early detection of cervical precancerous lesions and cancer is presented. The guidelines are based on a systematic evidence review, contributions from six working groups, and a recent symposium co-sponsored by the ACS, American Society for Colposcopy and Cervical Pathology (ASCCP), and American Society for Clinical Pathology (ASCP), which was attended by 25 organizations. The new screening recommendations address age-appropriate screening strategies, including the use of cytology and high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) testing, follow-up (e.g., management of screen positives and screening interval for screen negatives) of women after screening, age at which to exit screening, future considerations regarding HPV testing alone as a primary screening approach, and screening strategies for women vaccinated against HPV16 and HPV18 infections. PMID:22418039

  2. American Cancer Society, American Society for Colposcopy and Cervical Pathology, and American Society for Clinical Pathology Screening Guidelines for the Prevention and Early Detection of Cervical Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Saslow, Debbie; Solomon, Diane; Lawson, Herschel W.; Killackey, Maureen; Kulasingam, Shalini; Cain, Joanna; Garcia, Francisco A. R.; Moriarty, Ann; Waxman, Alan; Wilbur, David; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Downs, Levi; Spitzer, Mark; Moscicki, Anna-Barbara; Franco, Eduardo L.; Stoler, Mark H.; Schiffman, Mark; Castle, Philip E.; Myers, Evan R.

    2013-01-01

    An update to the American Cancer Society (ACS) guideline regarding screening for the early detection of cervical precancerous lesions and cancer is presented. The guidelines are based on a systematic evidence review, contributions from six working groups, and a recent symposium cosponsored by the ACS, American Society for Colposcopy and Cervical Pathology (ASCCP), and American Society for Clinical Pathology (ASCP), which was attended by 25 organizations. The new screening recommendations address age-appropriate screening strategies, including the use of cytology and high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) testing, follow-up (e.g., management of screen positives and screening interval for screen negatives) of women after screening, age at which to exit screening, future considerations regarding HPV testing alone as a primary screening approach, and screening strategies for women vaccinated against HPV16 and HPV18 infections. PMID:22422631

  3. Cervical cancer: incidence and survival in migrants within Spain.

    PubMed Central

    Borràs, J M; Sánchez, V; Moreno, V; Izquierdo, A; Viladiu, P

    1995-01-01

    STUDY OBJECTIVE--This study examined the incidence of cervical cancer and survival rates according to migrant experience of women from different regions of Spain to Girona, Catalonia (Spain). DESIGN--Using data from the population based cancer registry of Girona for the period 1980-89, crude and age adjusted incidence rates were calculated for local-born and first generation migrants from other Spanish regions. The age standardised rate ratio (SRR) was calculated and Cox's regression model was used to adjust survival according to migrant status for age and stage at diagnosis. MAIN RESULTS--The incidence of cervical cancer was significantly higher in first generation Spanish migrants compared with locally born women (SRR: 2.02; 95% CI 1.40:2.92). The stage at diagnosis was more advanced among migrants. Survival probability was significantly associated with stage at diagnosis, but age and region of birth were not. CONCLUSIONS--Migrants from the southern Spanish regions show a twofold excess in the incidence of cervical cancer compared with the Girona-born female population. Cases of cervical cancer in migrants are diagnosed at a more advanced stage and as a consequence have a poorer prognosis. PMID:7798043

  4. Screening of cervical cancer in Catalonia 2006–2012

    PubMed Central

    de Sanjosé, Silvia; Ibáñez, Raquel; Rodríguez-Salés, Vanesa; Peris, Mercè; Roura, Esther; Diaz, Mireia; Torné, Aureli; Costa, Dolors; Canet, Yolanda; Falguera, Gemma; Alejo, Maria; Espinàs, Josep Alfons; Bosch, F. Xavier

    2015-01-01

    The early detection of intraepithelial lesions of the cervix, through the periodic examination of cervical cells, has been fundamental for the prevention of invasive cervical cancer and its related mortality. In this report, we summarise the cervical cancer screening activities carried out in Catalonia, Spain, within the National Health System during 2008–2011. The study population covers over two million women resident in the area. The evaluation includes 758,690 cervical cytologies performed on a total of 595,868 women. The three-year coverage of cervical cytology among women aged between 25 and 65 years was 40.8%. About 50% of first screened women with negative results had not returned to the second screening round. The introduction of high-risk human papillomavirus DNA (HPV) detection, as a primary screening cotest with cytology among women over age 40 with a poor screening history, significantly improved the detection of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 2 or worse (CIN2+), being far superior to cytology alone. Cotesting did not improve the detection of CIN2+. The use of the HPV test for the triage of atypical squamous cell undetermined significance (ASC-US) improved the selection of women at high risk of CIN2+. Sampling (both cytology and HPV test) was largely performed by midwives (66.7%), followed by obstetricians (23.8%) and nurses (7%). Over half of the centres (54.8%) had full use of online medical records. During the study period, educational activities for professionals and for women were carried out periodically. The organisation of screening as a population activity in which women are actively called to the screening visit and the introduction of HPV testing as a primary screening tool are strongly recommended to ensure the maximum population impact in the reduction of the cervical cancer burden. PMID:25987901

  5. Cervical cancer in north-eastern Libya: 2000-2008.

    PubMed

    Ben Khaial, F; Bodalal, Z; Elramli, A; Elkhwsky, F; Eltaguri, A; Bendardaf, R

    2014-08-01

    Libya is a country with a low population, listed under the EMRO. Using registers and patient records from a major primary oncology clinic, data was gathered from Libyan cervical cancer patients and various parameters were studied across 9 years. Out of 4,090 female cancer cases during the study period, 1.8% were cervical cancer (n = 74). The average age of presentation was 53 years, with most of the cases (60%, n = 44) being premenopausal. Approximately 65% (n = 48) of cervical cancer patients are diagnosed at later stages (i.e. stages III and IV). The majority of these cases are squamous cell carcinoma (83.8%, n = 62), while 16.2% (n = 12) were found to be adenocarcinoma. Patients with squamous cell carcinoma presented at later stages more often than those with adenocarcinoma. Human papilloma virus was strongly implicated in cervical cancer, with 94% (n = 63) of those who were tested being positive for HPV-16 (82.5%, n = 52) and HPV-18 (12.7%, n = 8). Diagnosis was most frequently made through biopsy (97.3%, n = 72) as opposed to Pap smears (2.7%, n = 2). Most Libyan patients were put through chemotherapy (75%, n = 55) and triple therapy (surgery with combined chemotherapy and radiotherapy) was the most common (38%, n = 28) modality of treatment. Comparisons were made between Libya and other nations, either in the developed world or neighbouring countries. The major problem of cervical cancer in Libya is delayed presentation and hence, all the recommendations focus on increased awareness for the populace, implementation of a national cancer control plan and a national screening programme.

  6. Are 20 human papillomavirus types causing cervical cancer?

    PubMed

    Arbyn, Marc; Tommasino, Massimo; Depuydt, Christophe; Dillner, Joakim

    2014-12-01

    In 2012, the International Agency for Research on Cancer concluded that there was consistent and sufficient epidemiological, experimental and mechanistic evidence of carcinogenicity to humans for 12 HPV types (HPV16, HPV18, HPV31, HPV33, HPV35, HPV39, HPV45, HPV51, HPV52, HPV56, HPV58 and HPV59) for cervical cancer. Therefore, these types were considered as 1A carcinogens. They all belong to the family of the α-Papillomaviridae, in particular to the species α5 (HPV51), α6 (HPV56), α7 (HPV18, HPV39, HPV45, HPV59) and α9 (HPV16, HPV31, HPV33, HPV35, HPV52, HPV58). Less evidence is available for a thirteenth type (HPV68, α7), which is classified as a 2A carcinogen (probably carcinogenic). Moreover, seven other phylogenetically related types (HPV26, HPV53, HPV66, HPV67, HPV68, HPV70 and HPV73) were identified as single HPV infections in certain rare cases of cervical cancer and were considered possibly carcinogenic (2B carcinogens). Recently, Halec et al [7] demonstrated that the molecular signature of HPV-induced carcinogenesis (presence of type-specific spliced E6*| mRNA; increased expression of p16; and decreased expression of cyclin D1, p53 and Rb) was similar in cervical cancers containing single infections with one of the eight afore-mentioned 2A or 2B carcinogens to those in cancers with single infections with group 1 carcinogens. Ninety six percent of cervical cancers are attributable to one of the 13 most common HPV types (groups 1 and 2A). Including the additional seven HPV types (group 2B) added 2.6%, to reach a total of 98.7% of all HPV-positive cervical cancers. From recently updated meta-analyses, it was shown that HPV68, HPV26, HPV66, HPV67, HPV73 and HPV82 were significantly more common in cancer cases than in women with normal cervical cytology, suggesting that for these HPV types, an upgrading of the carcinogen classification could be considered. However, there is no need to include them in HPV screening tests or vaccines, given their rarity in

  7. Human papillomavirus prevalence in paired urine and cervical samples in women invited for cervical cancer screening.

    PubMed

    Burroni, Elena; Bonanni, Paolo; Sani, Cristina; Lastrucci, Vieri; Carozzi, Francesca; Iossa, Anna; Andersson, Karin Louise; Brandigi, Livia; Di Pierro, Carmelina; Confortini, Massimo; Levi, Miriam; Boccalini, Sara; Indiani, Laura; Sala, Antonino; Tanini, Tommaso; Bechini, Angela; Azzari, Chiara

    2015-03-01

    With the introduction of Human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination in young girls in 2007, it is important to monitor HPV infections and epidemiological changes in this target population. The present study has evaluated the detection of human papillomavirus DNA in paired cervical and urine samples to understand if HPV testing in urine could be used as non-invasive method to monitor HPV status in young women. The study enrolled 216 twenty five-year-old women, resident in Florence and invited for the first time to the cervical cancer Screening Program within a project evaluating the impact of HPV vaccination. HPV genotyping was performed on 216 paired urine and cervical samples. The overall concordance between cervix and urine samples, investigated by HPV genotyping (INNO-LiPA HPV Genotyping Extra), was: 85.6% (184/215), 84.6% (182/215), 80% (172/215) when the same HPV, at least the same HR HPV and all HR HPV, respectively, were detected. HPV type specific concordance in paired urine and cervical samples was observed in 85.8% (175/204) of women with normal cytology and in seven out of nine women with abnormal cytology. Urine seems to be a suitable and reliable biological material for HPV DNA detection as evidenced by the high concordance with HPV detected in cervical samples. These results suggest that urine could be a good noninvasive tool to monitor HPV infection in vaccinated women.

  8. Prevalence and Genotyping of High Risk Human Papillomavirus in Cervical Cancer Samples from Punjab, Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    Siddiqa, Abida; Zainab, Maidah; Qadri, Ishtiaq; Bhatti, Muhammad Faraz; Parish, Joanna L.

    2014-01-01

    Cervical cancer is the third most common cause of cancer-related death in women worldwide. Infection with high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) is established as the cause of cervical carcinoma, therefore, high risk HPV detection may have prognostic significance for the women who are at increased risk of disease progression. The paucity of data on the incidence of cervical cancer in Pakistan makes it difficult to determine disease burden. Even less information is available regarding the prevalent HPV strains in cervical specimens collected from this region. Cervical cancer is a neglected disease in Pakistan in terms of screening, prevention, and vaccination. Identification and accurate genotyping of the virus burden in cancer specimens is important to inform intervention policies for future management of HPV associated disease and to potentially stratify patients dependent on HPV status. In this study, detection and genotyping of HPV types 16 and 18 from 77 cervical specimens were carried out. Consensus primers GP5+/GP6+, which detect 44 genital HPV types, and type specific primers (TS16 and TS18) were used in conjunction with newly designed type specific primers. Using a combination of these methods of detection, a total of 94.81% (95% CI ±4.95) of cervical lesions were positive for HPV. Single infections of HPV16 were detected in 24.68% (95% CI ±9.63) of total samples and HPV18 was found in 25.97% (95% CI ±9.79) samples. Interestingly, a high proportion of samples (40.26%, 95% CI ±10.95) was positive for both HPV16 and 18, indicating a higher incidence of co-infection than previously reported for similar ethnic regions. The HPV genotype of 3.90% of HPV positive samples remained undetected, although these samples were positive with the GP5+/GP6+ primer set indicating infection with an HPV type other than 16 or 18. These data indicate that the overall incidence of high risk HPV infection in cervical cancer and intraepithelial neoplasia specimens in Punjab

  9. Prevalence and genotyping of high risk human papillomavirus in cervical cancer samples from Punjab, Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Siddiqa, Abida; Zainab, Maidah; Qadri, Ishtiaq; Bhatti, Muhammad Faraz; Parish, Joanna L

    2014-07-01

    Cervical cancer is the third most common cause of cancer-related death in women worldwide. Infection with high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) is established as the cause of cervical carcinoma, therefore, high risk HPV detection may have prognostic significance for the women who are at increased risk of disease progression. The paucity of data on the incidence of cervical cancer in Pakistan makes it difficult to determine disease burden. Even less information is available regarding the prevalent HPV strains in cervical specimens collected from this region. Cervical cancer is a neglected disease in Pakistan in terms of screening, prevention, and vaccination. Identification and accurate genotyping of the virus burden in cancer specimens is important to inform intervention policies for future management of HPV associated disease and to potentially stratify patients dependent on HPV status. In this study, detection and genotyping of HPV types 16 and 18 from 77 cervical specimens were carried out. Consensus primers GP5+/GP6+, which detect 44 genital HPV types, and type specific primers (TS16 and TS18) were used in conjunction with newly designed type specific primers. Using a combination of these methods of detection, a total of 94.81% (95% CI ±4.95) of cervical lesions were positive for HPV. Single infections of HPV16 were detected in 24.68% (95% CI ±9.63) of total samples and HPV18 was found in 25.97% (95% CI ±9.79) samples. Interestingly, a high proportion of samples (40.26%, 95% CI ±10.95) was positive for both HPV16 and 18, indicating a higher incidence of co-infection than previously reported for similar ethnic regions. The HPV genotype of 3.90% of HPV positive samples remained undetected, although these samples were positive with the GP5+/GP6+ primer set indicating infection with an HPV type other than 16 or 18. These data indicate that the overall incidence of high risk HPV infection in cervical cancer and intraepithelial neoplasia specimens in Punjab

  10. Clinical implication of voltage-dependent anion channel 1 in uterine cervical cancer and its action on cervical cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Chih-Hsien; Lin, Yu-Wen; Wu, Tzu-Fan; Ko, Jiunn-Liang; Wang, Po-Hui

    2016-01-01

    Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry were performed to investigate the influence of human nonmetastatic clone 23 type 1 (nm23-H1), a metastasis-associated gene on proteomic alterations in cancer cells of the uterine cervix. It was validated by RT-PCR and Western blot analysis. The expression of voltage-dependent anion channel 1 (VDAC1) was increased in nm23-H1 gene silenced SiHa or CaSki cervical cancer cells. The clinical implication was shown that cervical cancer tissues with positive VDAC1 immunoreactivity exhibited deep stromal invasion (>10 mm in depth) and large tumor size (> 4 cm in diameter). Cervical cancer patients with positive VDAC1 immunoreactivity displayed higher recurrence and poorer overall survival than those with negative VDAC1. Silencing of VDAC1 reduced cell proliferation and migratory ability. Mitochondrial membrane potential was decreased and reactive oxygen species generation was increased in the VDAC1 gene-silenced cervical cancer cells. Cell cycle progression and autophagy were not changed in VDAC1 silencing cells. The cytotoxicity of cisplatin was significantly enhanced by knockdown of cellular VDAC1 and the compounds that interfere with hexokinase binding to VDAC. Therapeutic strategies may be offered using VDAC1 as a target to reduce cell growth and migration, enhance the synergistic therapeutic efficacy of cisplatin and reduce cisplatin dose-limiting toxicity. PMID:26716410

  11. Acceptability of Cervical Cancer Screening in Rural Mozambique

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Audet, Carolyn M.; Matos, Carla Silva; Blevins, Meridith; Cardoso, Aventina; Moon, Troy D.; Sidat, Mohsin

    2012-01-01

    In Zambezia province, Mozambique, cervical cancer (CC) screening was introduced to rural communities in 2010. Our study sought to determine whether women would accept screening via pelvic examination and visual inspection with acetic acid (VIA) at two clinical sites near the onset of a new CC screening program. A cross-sectional descriptive study…

  12. Caudal epidural anesthesia during intracavitary brachytherapy for cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Isoyama-Shirakawa, Yuko; Nakamura, Katsumasa; Abe, Madoka; Kunitake, Naonobu; Matsumoto, Keiji; Ohga, Saiji; Sasaki, Tomonari; Uehara, Satoru; Okushima, Kazuhiro; Shioyama, Yoshiyuki; Honda, Hiroshi

    2015-05-01

    It has been suggested that pain control during intracavitary brachytherapy for cervical cancer is insufficient in most hospitals in Japan. Our hospital began using caudal epidural anesthesia during high-dose-rate (HDR) intracavitary brachytherapy in 2011. The purpose of the present study was to retrospectively investigate the effects of caudal epidural anesthesia during HDR intracavitary brachytherapy for cervical cancer patients. Caudal epidural anesthesia for 34 cervical cancer patients was performed during HDR intracavitary brachytherapy between October 2011 and August 2013. We used the patients' self-reported Numeric Rating Scale (NRS) score at the first session of HDR intracavitary brachytherapy as a subjective evaluation of pain. We compared NRS scores of the patients with anesthesia with those of 30 patients who underwent HDR intracavitary brachytherapy without sacral epidural anesthesia at our hospital between May 2010 and August 2011. Caudal epidural anesthesia succeeded in 33 patients (97%), and the NRS score was recorded in 30 patients. The mean NRS score of the anesthesia group was 5.17 ± 2.97, significantly lower than that of the control group's 6.80 ± 2.59 (P = 0.035). The caudal epidural block resulted in no side-effects. Caudal epidural anesthesia is an effective and safe anesthesia option during HDR intracavitary brachytherapy for cervical cancer.

  13. Treatment Extends Survival for Women with Cervical Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    Patients with locally advanced cervical cancer who received gemcitabine (Gemzar®) both as part of initial treatment and as part of therapy following primary treatment had improved survival compared with patients whose treatment did not include gemcitabine, according to findings presented at the 2009 ASCO meeting in Orlando.

  14. Strategies against human papillomavirus infection and cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Jung, Woon-Won; Chun, Taehoon; Sul, Donggeun; Hwang, Kwang Woo; Kang, Hyung-Sik; Lee, Duck Joo; Han, In-Kwon

    2004-12-01

    Papillomaviruses infect a wide variety of animals, including humans. The human papillomavirus (HPV), in particular, is one of the most common causes of sexually transmitted disease. More than 200 types of HPV have been identified by DNA sequence data, and 85 HPV genotypes have been well characterized to date. HPV can infect the basal epithelial cells of the skin or inner tissue linings, and are, accordingly, categorized as either cutaneous or mucosal type. HPV is associated with a panoply of clinical conditions, ranging from innocuous lesions to cervical cancer. In the early 1980s, studies first reported a link between cervical cancer and genital HPV infection. Genital HPV infections are now recognized to be a major risk factor in at least 95% of cervical cancers. 30 different HPV genotypes have been identified as causative of sexually transmitted diseases, most of which induce lesions in the cervix, vagina, vulva, penis, and anus, as the result of sexual contact. There is also direct evidence demonstrating that at least four of these genotypes are prerequisite factors in cervical cancer. The main aim of this review was to evaluate the current literature regarding the pathovirology, diagnostics, vaccines, therapy, risk groups, and further therapeutic directions for HPV infections. In addition, we reviewed the current status of HPV infections in South Korean women, as evidenced by our data.

  15. Barriers to cervical cancer screening in rural Mexico.

    PubMed

    Watkins, M M; Gabali, C; Winkleby, M; Gaona, E; Lebaron, S

    2002-01-01

    Cervical cancer is a major health problem in Mexico. The national mortality rate due to cervical cancer was estimated at 21.8 per 100,000 among women over 15 years of age in 1994. Reasons for this high prevalence have not been defined, although it may be influenced by lack of access to health care, lack of knowledge about the Pap procedure, or cultural beliefs. While some studies have examined barriers to Pap screening, most have focused on urban samples. We conducted a pilot study using direct interviews to learn about factors that may influence cervical cancer screening among rural Mexican women. We interviewed 97 rural women between the ages of 16 and 66 and found that 52% had not received a Pap smear within the last 2 years (of that group, 62% had never received a Pap smear). In our sample, the most frequent reason for not obtaining a Pap smear was anxiety regarding physical privacy (50%). Less frequent reasons were lack of knowledge (18%) and difficulty accessing health care (14%). Women who had delivered children were significantly more likely to have received a Pap smear (71%) than women who had no children (10%), P < 0.05. The responses of many women suggest that compliance with cervical cancer screening would be enhanced by addressing cultural beliefs, encouraging conversations about women's health issues, and increasing the number of female health care providers.

  16. Cervical Cancer: A Review of the Psychosocial Factors Following Treatment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilliland, Kevin Clark

    Cervical cancer is a diagnosis that has a profound psychosocial impact, constituting a physical and emotional crisis for patients as well as family. In general, research indicates that the choice of treatment and the stage of the disease are instrumental in determining the psychosocial adjustment. Disruptions are likely to occur in self-esteem,…

  17. Serum antibodies to Trichomonas vaginalis in invasive cervical cancer patients.

    PubMed Central

    Yap, E H; Ho, T H; Chan, Y C; Thong, T W; Ng, G C; Ho, L C; Singh, M

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To evaluate, by seroepidemiology, the possible role of the sexually-transmitted flagellate, Trichomonas vaginalis, in invasive cervical cancer. SUBJECTS AND METHOD--Sera from 121 invasive cervical cancer patients and 242 random age-matched female controls. Antibodies to T. vaginalis were detected by the western blot technique. RESULTS--Antibodies to T. vaginalis were detected in the sera of 41.3% (50/121) of invasive cervical cancer patients compared with only 5.0% (12/242) of female controls. All the reactive sera reacted strongly with the immunogenic surface membrane proteins of T. vaginalis of molecular weights of about 92 and 115 kDa, with variable reactivity to other immunogenic proteins of T. vaginalis. CONCLUSION--The significantly increased relative risk, RR = 3.42 (95% CI = 1.73-6.78), is comparable to the RRs derived in seroepidemiological studies of human papillomavirus, suggesting that T. vaginalis may be even more closely associated with invasive cervical cancer than previously realized. Images PMID:8566984

  18. [The role of developmental HOX genes in cervical cancer].

    PubMed

    López-Romero, Ricardo; Marrero-Rodríguez, Daniel; Romero-Morelos, Pablo; Villegas, Vanessa; Valdivia, Alejandra; Arreola, Hugo; Huerta-Padilla, Víctor; Salcedo, Mauricio

    2015-01-01

    Cervical cancer (CC) is a multifactorial disease associated to genetic, environmental and epigenetic factors, being the infection by human papillomavirus the main etiologic agent. Additionally, the alteration in the expression of transcription factors has been considered of importance for the development of this tumor. HOX genes encode a group of transcription factors involved in cellular proliferation and differentiation processes during the development of embryonic structures in vertebrates; their aberrant expression is associated with tumorigenesis and metastasis. A range of evidence suggests a role for HOX genes in the development of cervical neoplastic cell. Studies in CC cell lines, primary tumors and premalignant lesions have suggested the involvement of HOXA1, HOXC5, C6, C8 and C10, HOXD9 and HOXD13 in the process of cervical carcinogenesis. Also, the de novo expression of genes HOXB2, B4, B13 and HOXC11-C13 appears to be involved in the process of malignant transformation of cervical epithelial cell. These data would allow to open a field in search of new molecular markers in cervical cancer and the development of new therapeutic strategies for this malignancy.

  19. Optoelectronic method for detection of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia and cervical cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pruski, D.; Przybylski, M.; Kędzia, W.; Kędzia, H.; Jagielska-Pruska, J.; Spaczyński, M.

    2011-12-01

    The optoelectronic method is one of the most promising concepts of biophysical program of the diagnostics of CIN and cervical cancer. Objectives of the work are evaluation of sensitivity and specificity of the optoelectronic method in the detection of CIN and cervical cancer. The paper shows correlation between the pNOR number and sensitivity/specificity of the optoelectronic method. The study included 293 patients with abnormal cervical cytology result and the following examinations: examination with the use of the optoelectronic method — Truscreen, colposcopic examination, and histopathologic biopsy. Specificity of the optoelectronic method for LGSIL was estimated at 65.70%, for HGSIL and squamous cell carcinoma of cervix amounted to 90.38%. Specificity of the optoelectronic method used to confirm lack of cervical pathology was estimated at 78.89%. The field under the ROC curve for the optoelectronic method was estimated at 0.88 (95% CI, 0.84-0.92) which shows high diagnostic value of the test in the detection of HGSIL and squamous cell carcinoma. The optoelectronic method is characterised by high usefulness in the detection of CIN, present in the squamous epithelium and squamous cell carcinoma of cervix.

  20. [New guidelines in regard to cervical cancer screening].

    PubMed

    Vargas-Hernández, Víctor Manuel; Acosta-Altamirano, Gustavo; Moreno-Eutimio, Mario Adán; Vargas-Aguilar, Víctor Manuel

    2014-01-01

    Cancer screening programs have been successful in reducing the incidence and mortality due to cervical cancer. For more than a decade, the human papillomavirus test has been recommended as part of these programs, however, Pap tests is not currently recommended for women 65 years of age who participated adequately in screening programs, continuing with these screening programs is not needed. Screening programs will be different in special populations at greatest risk where tests are frequently needed or use of alternative methods.

  1. Tonsillar and other upper aerodigestive tract cancers among cervical cancer patients and their husbands.

    PubMed

    Hemminki, K; Dong, C; Frisch, M

    2000-12-01

    The study aimed at probing the possible role of human papillomavirus (HPV) infection in squamous cell carcinomas of the upper aerodigestive tract, with a special reference to tonsillar cancer. We used the Swedish Family Cancer Database to analyse second cancers in the upper aerodigestive tract of women first diagnosed with in-situ or invasive cervical cancer. First cancers of their husbands were also analysed. Standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) were calculated for female and male cancers, adjusted for age at diagnosis, period, sex, socio-economic status and residential area. Among women, increases were observed at many sites, but tonsillar cancers were increased only among women aged 50 years or more at diagnosis of in-situ cervical cancer (SIR 2.58). The increases at these sites are probably ascribed to the effects HPV, smoking, alcohol or their interaction. Husbands of cervical cancer patients developed an excess (SIR over 2.00) of both tonsillar cancer (SIR 2.39 when wife with in-situ cancer and SIR 2.72 when wife with invasive cervical cancer) and cancer of the tongue. The excess of tonsillar cancer among husbands of women with HPV-associated neoplastic lesions of the cervix supports the a priori hypothesis that HPV may be involved in tonsillar carcinogenesis.

  2. Concomitant cervical and transperineal parametrial high-dose-rate brachytherapy boost for locally advanced cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bailleux, Caroline; Falk, Alexander Tuan; Chand-Fouche, Marie-Eve; Gautier, Mathieu; Barranger, Emmanuel

    2016-01-01

    Purpose There is no consensus for parametrial boost technic while both transvaginal and transperineal approaches are discussed. A prototype was developed consisting of a perineal template, allowing transperineal needle insertion. This study analyzed acute toxicity of concomitant cervical and transperineal parametrial high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDRB) boost for locally advanced cervical cancer. Material and methods From 01.2011 to 12.2014, 33 patients (pts) presenting a locally advanced cervical cancer with parametrial invasion were treated. After the first course of external beam radiation therapy with cisplatinum, HDRB was performed combining endocavitary and interstitial technique for cervical and parametrial disease. Post-operative delineation (CTV, bladder, rectum, sigmoid) and planification were based on CT-scan/MRI. HDRB was delivered in 3-5 fractions over 2-3 consecutive days. Acute toxicities occurring within 6 months after HDRB were retrospectively reviewed. Results Median age was 56.4 years (27-79). Clinical stages were: T2b = 23 pts (69.7%), T3a = 1 pt (3%), T3b = 6 pts (18.2%), and T4a = 3 pts (9.1%). Median HDRB prescribed dose was 21 Gy (21-27). Median CTVCT (16 pts) and HR-CTVMRI (17 pts) were 52.6 cc (28.5-74.3), 31.9 cc (17.1-58), respectively. Median EQD2αβ10 for D90CTV and D90HR-CTV were 82.9 Gy (78.2-96.5), 84.8 Gy (80.6-91.4), respectively. Median EQD2αβ3 (CT/MRI) for D2cc bladder, rectum and sigmoid were 75.5 Gy (66.6-90.9), 64.4 Gy (51.9-77.4), and 60.4 Gy (50.9-81.1), respectively. Median follow-up was 14 months (ranged 6-51). Among the 24 pts with MFU = 24 months, 2-year LRFS rate, RRFS, and OS were 86.8%, 88.8%, and 94.1%, respectively. The rates of acute genitourinary and gastrointestinal toxicities were 36% (G1 dysuria = 8 pts, G2 infection = 2 pts, G3 infection = 2 pts), and 27% (G1 diarrhea = 9 pts), respectively. One patient presented vaginal bleeding at the time of applicator withdrawal (G3-blood transfusion); no bleeding was

  3. Primary herpes simplex virus infection mimicking cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Tomkins, Andrew; White, Catherine; Higgins, Stephen Peter

    2015-06-02

    We report the case of an 18-year-old woman presenting with ulceration of the cervix caused by primary type 2 herpes simplex infection in the absence of skin lesions. The differential diagnosis included cervical cancer and we referred the patient for urgent colposcopy. However, laboratory tests proved the viral aetiology of the cervical ulceration and the cervix had healed completely 3 weeks later. The case highlights the need to consider herpes simplex infection in the differential diagnosis of ulceration of the cervix even when there are no cutaneous signs of herpes.

  4. Tetraspanin 1 promotes invasiveness of cervical cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Hölters, Sebastian; Anacker, Jelena; Jansen, Lars; Beer-Grondke, Katrin; Dürst, Matthias; Rubio, Ignacio

    2013-08-01

    Tetraspanins are a heterogeneous group of 4-transmembrane proteins that segregate into so-called tetraspanin-enriched microdomains (TEMs) along with other cell surface proteins such as integrins. TEMs of various types are reportedly involved in the regulation of cell growth, migration and invasion of several tumour cell types, both as suppressors or supporting structures. Tetraspanin 1 (Tspan1, NET-1), a member of the transmembrane 4 superfamily (TM4SF) of tetraspanins, is overexpressed in high-grade cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) and terminal carcinomas but its precise function in the context of carcinoma of the cervix uteri is not known. Here, we present a comprehensive investigation of the role of tetraspanin 1 in the cervical cancer cell lines SiHa and HeLa. We document that tetraspanin 1 increases the invasive potential of cervical cancer cells, whereas proliferation, growth in soft agar and adhesion are largely unaffected. In line with the latter findings, our data exclude the participation of testraspanin in integrin-mediated activation of focal adhesion kinase (FAK), paxillin and phosphoinositide-3-kinase (PI3K) and in EGFR-dependent signalling to the Ras/Erk pathway. In conclusion, our data argue against a role for tetraspanin 1 as a genuine mediator of cell surface receptor signalling but rather document a role for tetraspanin 1 in the control of cervical cancer cell motility and invasion.

  5. Tetraspanin 1 promotes invasiveness of cervical cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Hölters, Sebastian; Anacker, Jelena; Jansen, Lars; Beer-Grondke, Katrin; Dürst, Matthias; Rubio, Ignacio

    2013-08-01

    Tetraspanins are a heterogeneous group of 4-transmembrane proteins that segregate into so-called tetraspanin-enriched microdomains (TEMs) along with other cell surface proteins such as integrins. TEMs of various types are reportedly involved in the regulation of cell growth, migration and invasion of several tumour cell types, both as suppressors or supporting structures. Tetraspanin 1 (Tspan1, NET-1), a member of the transmembrane 4 superfamily (TM4SF) of tetraspanins, is overexpressed in high-grade cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) and terminal carcinomas but its precise function in the context of carcinoma of the cervix uteri is not known. Here, we present a comprehensive investigation of the role of tetraspanin 1 in the cervical cancer cell lines SiHa and HeLa. We document that tetraspanin 1 increases the invasive potential of cervical cancer cells, whereas proliferation, growth in soft agar and adhesion are largely unaffected. In line with the latter findings, our data exclude the participation of testraspanin in integrin-mediated activation of focal adhesion kinase (FAK), paxillin and phosphoinositide-3-kinase (PI3K) and in EGFR-dependent signalling to the Ras/Erk pathway. In conclusion, our data argue against a role for tetraspanin 1 as a genuine mediator of cell surface receptor signalling but rather document a role for tetraspanin 1 in the control of cervical cancer cell motility and invasion. PMID:23754316

  6. Parkinsonism in a Recurrent Cervical Cancer Patient: Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Sarraf, Zahra

    2013-01-01

    A 49 year old woman diagnosed as a cervical cancer patient, after receiving appropriate treatment experienced metastasis in her abdominopelvic cavity. After aggressive management, she was well for a while. However, she developed to a poor condition consisting of urologic, gastroenterological, hematologic and neurologic problems just in a short time. In the course of hospital she presented one sided passive bradykinesia, resting tremor, cogwheel rigidity with controlateral suspicious CT scan of brain. She passed away soon after that. PMID:24971125

  7. [Human papillomavirus and cervical cancer in México: a constant struggle].

    PubMed

    Torres-Poveda, Kirvis; Madrid-Marina, Vicente

    2015-01-01

    Given that human papillomavirus and cervical cancer are a health problem in México, since they affect women of reproductive age and have a negative impact on our society, it is crucial to prevent those diseases and to raise awareness among physicians who deal with their clinical and therapeutic management. That is the reason why we show three Original contributions and 13 Current themes in this supplement of the Revista Médica del Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social.

  8. What School Nurses Need to Know about Cervical Cancer, HPV, and the New Vaccine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ehrhardt, Jeanie

    2007-01-01

    At least 12,000 women are diagnosed with cervical cancer each year in the United States, accounting for at least 4,000 deaths. Worldwide, cervical cancer is the second most common type of cancer among women. The human papilloma virus (HPV) has been linked to at least 70% of all cervical cancer. HPV can be divided into 2 categories: (a) low risk,…

  9. A molecular beacon-based method for screening cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Han, Suxia; Li, Ling; Jia, Xi; Ou, Wei; Ma, Jinlu; Wang, Hao; Zhao, Jing; Zhu, Qing

    2012-11-01

    The aim of this study is to develop a new screening method, molecular beacon (MB) imaging, for detection of cervical cancer and to determine its potential clinical applications by examining the sensitivity and specificity of target-specific MBs. Two target-specific molecular beacons were designed and synthesized for survivin and HPV16E6 mRNA. The two designed MBs and a random control MB were used to detect cervical cancer cell lines and a normal cell line. RT-PCR and western blot targeting survivin and HPV16E6 was done for verification. Furthermore the sensitivity and the specificity of the survivin and HPV16E6 mRNA MBs were examined in smears from 125 clinical cervical patients. The survivin and HPV16E6 mRNA MBs generated a strong fluorescence signal in cervical cancer cell lines, but not in the normal cell line, while the random control MB did not generated any signal in both cell lines. The fluorescence intensity correlated well with the gene expression levels in the cells determined by reverse transcription-PCR and Western blot analysis. The clinical sensitivity and the specificity of survivin MB-FITC were 72.5 and 77% while those of HPV16E6 MB-Cy3 were 96.1% and 71.6%, respectively. A parallel test of the two target MBs showed that the sensitivity increased to 98% and the specificity was 70.2%. The survivin and HPV16E6 mRNA MBs showed good reliability and sensitivity. They have great potential for clinical use in cervical cancer screening.

  10. Epidemiological Investigation and Risk Factors for Cervical Lesions: Cervical Cancer Screening Among Women in Rural Areas of Henan Province China

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qingwei; Xie, Wenyan; Wang, Feng; Li, Rong Hong; Cui, Lina; Wang, Huifen; Fu, Xiuhong; Song, Jiayu

    2016-01-01

    Background This cross-sectional study aimed to investigate the prevalence of cervical lesions and evaluate risk factors for cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) among women taking part in cervical cancer screening in rural areas of Henan province, China. Material/Methods Cervical cancer screening using the ThinPrep cytologic test (TCT) and gynecologic exam was conducted on 1315 women age 20–68 years in rural areas of Henan province, China. Colposcopy and biopsies were carried out for histopathologic diagnosis when indicated. Univariate and multivariate logistic regressions were performed to evaluate risk factors associated with cervical lesions. Results Among 1315 women screened, CIN prevalence detected by histopathology was 1.22% (0.38% of CIN 1, 0.76% of CIN 2, and 0.08% of CIN 3). Cervical cancer prevalence was 2.66%. Multivariate analysis confirmed risk factors for cervical lesions included older age (the 21–40 age group vs. the 41–66 age group, OR=0.13, 95% CI: 0.03~0.57), postmenopause (OR=0.11, 95% CI: 0.03~0.45), cervical inflammation (OR=0.06, 95% CI: 0.01~0.31), and smoking (OR=6.78, 95% CI: 1.20~38.23). Conclusions Older age (41–66 years), presence of HPV infection, postmenopause, cervical inflammation, and smoking are strong risk factors for cervical lesions among women in rural areas of Henan province, China. Particular efforts should be made to provide cervical cancer screening for these women. PMID:27249229

  11. The Prevalence of Human Papillomavirus in Cervical Cancer in Iran.

    PubMed

    Mortazavi, SH; Zali, MR; Raoufi, M; Nadji, M; Kowsarian, P; Nowroozi, A

    2002-01-01

    Background: The human papiloma virus (HPV), which is sexually transmitted, and most commonly causes genital warts, has been linked to cervical intraepithelial neoplasia and invasive carcinoma. Of ninety plus types of HPV, HPV-16 is the most prevalent in cervical cancer, followed by HPV-18, and HPV-33. As HPV's implication has not been assessed in the Middle East the main focus of this retrospective study was to determine the prevalence of HPV -16,18, and 33 in cases of cervical cancer from Iran. Material and Methods: This retrospective study covered 100 patients with uterine cervical carcinomas who were referred to two referral centers for cancer in Tehran-Iran. Pathological blocks were collected for these cases and initial review of the blocks showed poor specimens in 18 cases, which left 82 cases for the study. These samples were histologically examined to verify the presence and the type of carcinoma. The next step was in situ hybridzation for the detection of HPV common DNA. In Situ hybridization was preformed on all samples. Finally, Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) was preformed for the HPV types 16, 18, and 33. PCR amplification of exon 5 of the p53 gene was used as an internal control for the integrity of DNA. Takara PCR Human papilloma Detection method was used which includes primer for HPV 16, 18, and 33. Three primers were used alone, or in combination, in order to increase the sensitivity of the detection. Results: The majority of tumors were squamous cell carcinomas (87%). The rest were adenosquamous carcinoma and adenocarcinomas. None of the 82 different cervical carcinoma tissue samples were found to be positive by in situ hybridization. In the PCR samples, amplification of DNA was observed for 69 tumor specimens. In the remainning13 cases, the DNA in fixed tissue was degraded, as verified by the absence of an internal control band (p53). Out of the total 69 tumors (85.5%) with adequate DNA contained HPV band on PCR. The majority (73.9%) of HPV

  12. Multi-test cervical cancer diagnosis with missing data estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Tao; Huang, Xiaolei; Kim, Edward; Long, L. Rodney; Antani, Sameer

    2015-03-01

    Cervical cancer is a leading most common type of cancer for women worldwide. Existing screening programs for cervical cancer suffer from low sensitivity. Using images of the cervix (cervigrams) as an aid in detecting pre-cancerous changes to the cervix has good potential to improve sensitivity and help reduce the number of cervical cancer cases. In this paper, we present a method that utilizes multi-modality information extracted from multiple tests of a patient's visit to classify the patient visit to be either low-risk or high-risk. Our algorithm integrates image features and text features to make a diagnosis. We also present two strategies to estimate the missing values in text features: Image Classifier Supervised Mean Imputation (ICSMI) and Image Classifier Supervised Linear Interpolation (ICSLI). We evaluate our method on a large medical dataset and compare it with several alternative approaches. The results show that the proposed method with ICSLI strategy achieves the best result of 83.03% specificity and 76.36% sensitivity. When higher specificity is desired, our method can achieve 90% specificity with 62.12% sensitivity.

  13. Using the Theory of Planned Behavior to Understand Cervical Cancer Screening Among Latinas.

    PubMed

    Roncancio, Angelica M; Ward, Kristy K; Sanchez, Ingrid A; Cano, Miguel A; Byrd, Theresa L; Vernon, Sally W; Fernandez-Esquer, Maria Eugenia; Fernandez, Maria E

    2015-10-01

    To reduce the high incidence of cervical cancer among Latinas in the United States it is important to understand factors that predict screening behavior. The aim of this study was to test the utility of theory of planned behavior in predicting cervical cancer screening among a group of Latinas. A sample of Latinas (N = 614) completed a baseline survey about Pap test attitudes subjective norms, perceived behavioral control, and intention to be screened for cervical cancer. At 6 months postbaseline, cervical cancer screening behavior was assessed. Structural equation modeling was used to test the theory. Model fit statistics indicated good model fit: χ(2)(48) = 54.32, p = .246; comparative fit index = .992; root mean square error of approximation = .015; weighted root mean square residual = .687. Subjective norms (p = .005) and perceived behavioral control (p < .0001) were positively associated with intention to be screened for cervical cancer, and the intention to be screened predicted actual cervical cancer screening (p < .0001). The proportion of variance (R2) in intention accounted for by the predictors was .276 and the R2 in cervical cancer screening accounted for was .130. This study provides support for the use of the theory of planned behavior in predicting cervical cancer screening among Latinas. This knowledge can be used to inform the development of a theory of planned behavior-based intervention to increase cervical cancer screening among Latinas and reduce the high incidence of cervical cancer in this group of women.

  14. Cervical cancer prevention in Malawi: a qualitative study of women's perspectives.

    PubMed

    Ports, Katie A; Reddy, Diane M; Rameshbabu, Anjali

    2015-01-01

    Researchers posit that cervical cancer knowledge is central to participation in prevention behaviors. However, of the many barriers to cervical cancer prevention in low- and middle-income countries, cervical cancer knowledge remains severely limited among communities at great risk for the disease. Malawi is one such country where the burden of cervical cancer is considerably high. Formative research targeting cervical cancer prevention is needed, particularly research that explores ways to deliver cervical cancer information efficiently and effectively to Malawian women. In this study, the authors aimed to garner Malawian women's understanding of cervical cancer and to shed light on preferences for health information delivery, including community health advocacy. Qualitative, in-depth interviews were conducted with 30 Malawian women and analyzed for recurring themes. In general, women had limited cervical cancer knowledge, which supported misperceptions about the disease, including factors pertaining to risk and prevention. Nonetheless, women reported that receiving cervical cancer information from trusted sources would help promote preventive behaviors. Women noted that they received most of their health information from hospital personnel, but distance was a barrier. Women also expressed interest in community health advocacy. Perspectives from Malawian women may be vital toward informing efforts to increase cervical cancer knowledge and prevention.

  15. Using the Theory of Planned Behavior to Understand Cervical Cancer Screening Among Latinas.

    PubMed

    Roncancio, Angelica M; Ward, Kristy K; Sanchez, Ingrid A; Cano, Miguel A; Byrd, Theresa L; Vernon, Sally W; Fernandez-Esquer, Maria Eugenia; Fernandez, Maria E

    2015-10-01

    To reduce the high incidence of cervical cancer among Latinas in the United States it is important to understand factors that predict screening behavior. The aim of this study was to test the utility of theory of planned behavior in predicting cervical cancer screening among a group of Latinas. A sample of Latinas (N = 614) completed a baseline survey about Pap test attitudes subjective norms, perceived behavioral control, and intention to be screened for cervical cancer. At 6 months postbaseline, cervical cancer screening behavior was assessed. Structural equation modeling was used to test the theory. Model fit statistics indicated good model fit: χ(2)(48) = 54.32, p = .246; comparative fit index = .992; root mean square error of approximation = .015; weighted root mean square residual = .687. Subjective norms (p = .005) and perceived behavioral control (p < .0001) were positively associated with intention to be screened for cervical cancer, and the intention to be screened predicted actual cervical cancer screening (p < .0001). The proportion of variance (R2) in intention accounted for by the predictors was .276 and the R2 in cervical cancer screening accounted for was .130. This study provides support for the use of the theory of planned behavior in predicting cervical cancer screening among Latinas. This knowledge can be used to inform the development of a theory of planned behavior-based intervention to increase cervical cancer screening among Latinas and reduce the high incidence of cervical cancer in this group of women. PMID:25712240

  16. Less radical surgery for early-stage cervical cancer: To what extent do we justify it?-Our belief.

    PubMed

    Thomakos, Nikolaos; Trachana, Sofia-Paraskevi; Davidovic-Grigoraki, Miona; Rodolakis, Alexandros

    2016-08-01

    Cancer of the uterine cervix, following breast cancer, is the second leading cause of death among gynecological cancers in the developed world. Traditionally, surgical management of early-stage cervical carcinoma is considered as a "sterilizing" procedure, since the uterus is removed. Nowadays, because of the postponement of childbearing to an older age, women younger than 45 years old who are diagnosed with early-stage cervical cancer have a strong desire to preserve fertility. Radical trachelectomy (vaginal or abdominal route) is used for fertility preservation in cases of early-stage (International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics Stages IA-IB1) cervical carcinomas with remarkable oncological and obstetrical outcomes. However, less radical approaches for ideal candidates may prove safe when fertility preservation is probably feasible. PMID:27590369

  17. Human papillomavirus in cervical and head-and-neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Psyrri, Amanda; DiMaio, Daniel

    2008-01-01

    Cervical cancer is a major cause of cancer mortality in women worldwide and is initiated by infection with high-risk human papillomaviruses (HPVs). High-risk HPVs, especially HPV-16, are associated with other anogenital cancers and a subgroup of head-and-neck cancers. Indeed, HPV infection could account for the development of head-and-neck cancer in certain individuals that lack the classical risk factors for this disease (tobacco and alcohol abuse). This Review summarizes the main events of the HPV life cycle, the functions of the viral proteins, and the implications of HPV infection on their hosts, with an emphasis on carcinogenic mechanisms and disease outcomes in head-and-neck cancer. The demonstration that HPVs have a role in human carcinogenesis has allowed the development of preventive and therapeutic strategies aimed at reducing the incidence and mortality of HPV-associated cancers.

  18. Implementation of the National Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection Program

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Nancy C.; Wong, Faye L.; Jamison, Patricia M.; Jones, Sandra F.; Galaska, Louise; Brady, Kevin T.; Wethers, Barbara; Stokes-Townsend, George-Ann

    2015-01-01

    In 1990, Congress passed the Breast and Cervical Cancer Mortality Prevention Act because of increases in the number of low-income and uninsured women being diagnosed with breast cancer. This act authorized the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) to establish the National Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection Program (NBCCEDP) to provide high-quality and timely breast and cervical cancer screening and diagnostic services to low-income, uninsured women. The program started in 1991, and, in 1993, Congress amended the act to allow the CDC to fund American Indian and Alaska Native tribes and tribal organizations. By 1996, the program was providing cancer screening across the United States. To ensure appropriate delivery and monitoring of services, the program adopted detailed policies on program management, evidence-based guidelines for clinical services, a systematized clinical data system to track service quality, and key partnerships that expand the program’s reach. The NBCCEDP currently funds 67 programs, including all 50 states, the District of Columbia, 5 US territories, and 11 tribes or tribal organizations. PMID:25099896

  19. Computer aided decision support system for cervical cancer classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahmadwati, Rahmadwati; Naghdy, Golshah; Ros, Montserrat; Todd, Catherine

    2012-10-01

    Conventional analysis of a cervical histology image, such a pap smear or a biopsy sample, is performed by an expert pathologist manually. This involves inspecting the sample for cellular level abnormalities and determining the spread of the abnormalities. Cancer is graded based on the spread of the abnormal cells. This is a tedious, subjective and time-consuming process with considerable variations in diagnosis between the experts. This paper presents a computer aided decision support system (CADSS) tool to help the pathologists in their examination of the cervical cancer biopsies. The main aim of the proposed CADSS system is to identify abnormalities and quantify cancer grading in a systematic and repeatable manner. The paper proposes three different methods which presents and compares the results using 475 images of cervical biopsies which include normal, three stages of pre cancer, and malignant cases. This paper will explore various components of an effective CADSS; image acquisition, pre-processing, segmentation, feature extraction, classification, grading and disease identification. Cervical histological images are captured using a digital microscope. The images are captured in sufficient resolution to retain enough information for effective classification. Histology images of cervical biopsies consist of three major sections; background, stroma and squamous epithelium. Most diagnostic information are contained within the epithelium region. This paper will present two levels of segmentations; global (macro) and local (micro). At the global level the squamous epithelium is separated from the background and stroma. At the local or cellular level, the nuclei and cytoplasm are segmented for further analysis. Image features that influence the pathologists' decision during the analysis and classification of a cervical biopsy are the nuclei's shape and spread; the ratio of the areas of nuclei and cytoplasm as well as the texture and spread of the abnormalities

  20. Expanding Cervical Cancer Screening and Treatment in Tanzania: Stakeholders’ Perceptions of Structural Influences on Scale-Up

    PubMed Central

    Giattas, Mary Rose; Sahasrabuddhe, Vikrant V.; Jolly, Pauline E.; Martin, Michelle Y.; Usdan, Stuart Lawrence; Kohler, Connie; Lisovicz, Nedra

    2015-01-01

    Tanzania has the highest burden of cervical cancer in East Africa. This study aims to identify perceived barriers and facilitators that influence scale-up of regional and population-level cervical cancer screening and treatment programs in Tanzania. Convenience sampling was used to select participants for this qualitative study among 35 key informants. Twenty-eight stakeholders from public-sector health facilities, academia, government, and nongovernmental organizations completed in-depth interviews, and a seven-member municipal health management team participated in a focus group discussion. The investigation identified themes related to the infrastructure of health services for cervical cancer prevention, service delivery, political will, and sociocultural influences on screening and treatment. Decentralizing service delivery, improving access to screening and treatment, increasing the number of trained health workers, and garnering political will were perceived as key facilitators for enhancing and initiating screening and treatment services. In conclusion, participants perceived that system-level structural factors should be addressed to expand regional and population-level service delivery of screening and treatment. Implications for Practice: Tanzanian women have a high burden of cervical cancer. Understanding the perceived structural factors that may influence screening coverage for cervical cancer and availability of treatment may be beneficial for program scale-up. This study showed that multiple factors contribute to the challenge of cervical cancer screening and treatment in Tanzania. In addition, it highlighted systematic developments aimed at expanding services. This study is important because the themes that emerged from the results may help inform programs that plan to improve screening and treatment in Tanzania and potentially in other areas with high burdens of cervical cancer. PMID:25926351

  1. Perspective for Prophylaxis and Treatment of Cervical Cancer: An Immunological Approach

    PubMed Central

    Jenkins, Marjorie; Chiriva-Internati, Maurizio; Mirandola, Leonardo; Tonroy, Catherine; Tedjarati, Sean S.; Davis, Nicole; D’Cunha, Nicholas; Tijani, Lukman; Hardwick, Fred; Nguyen, Diane; Kast, W. Martin; Cobos, Everardo

    2014-01-01

    As the second most common cause of cancer-related death in women, human papilloma virus (HPV) vaccines have been a major step in decreasing the morbidity and mortality associated with cervical cancer. An estimated 490,000 women are diagnosed with cervical cancer each year. Increasing knowledge of the HPV role in the etiology of cervical cancer has led to the development and introduction of HPV-based vaccines for active immunotherapy of cervical cancer. Immunotherapies directed at preventing HPV-persistent infections. These vaccines are already accessible for prophylaxis and in the near future, they will be available for the treatment of preexisting HPV-related neoplastic lesions. PMID:22251005

  2. HPV E6, E6AP and cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    Beaudenon, Sylvie; Huibregtse, Jon M

    2008-01-01

    Every year, approximately 470,000 new cases of cervical cancer are diagnosed and approximately 230,000 women worldwide die of the disease, with the majority (~80%) of these cases and deaths occurring in developing countries. Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) are the etiological agents in nearly all cases (99.7%) of cervical cancer, and the HPV E6 protein is one of two viral oncoproteins that is expressed in virtually all HPV-positive cancers. E6 hijacks a cellular ubiquitin ligase, E6AP, resulting in the ubiquitylation and degradation of the p53 tumor suppressor, as well as several other cellular proteins. While the recent introduction of prophylactic vaccines against specific HPV types offers great promise for prevention of cervical cancer, there remains a need for therapeutics. Biochemical characterization of E6 and E6AP has suggested approaches for interfering with the activities of these proteins that could be useful for this purpose. Republished from Current BioData's Targeted Proteins database (TPdb; ). PMID:19007434

  3. New advances in vaccine technology and improved cervical cancer prevention.

    PubMed

    Huh, Warner K; Kendrick, James E; Alvarez, Ronald D

    2007-05-01

    Cervical cancer, which is caused by oncogenic types of the human papillomavirus (HPV), is the second most common cancer in women, responsible for 274,000 deaths worldwide in 2002. Approximately 70% of all cervical cancers are caused by the two most common oncogenic HPV types, HPV-16 and HPV-18; another 10% are caused by the next most common types, HPV-45 and HPV-31. Therefore, vaccines designed to prevent infection with oncogenic HPV types have the potential to decrease morbidity and mortality associated with cervical cancer and precancerous lesions. Vaccinology research recently has developed tools that may be used to improve the safety and efficacy of vaccines, and several of these tools have been used in the development of HPV vaccines. These advances include new insight into antigen selection, inclusion of adjuvants designed to enhance the immunogenicity of vaccines, and investigation into alternative routes of administration. Clinical studies of HPV vaccines that take advantage of these technological advances have reported excellent safety, immunogenicity, and efficacy results for prevention of HPV infection and incidence of associated cytopathologic abnormalities.

  4. MicroRNA-373 functions as an oncogene and targets YOD1 gene in cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Luo-Qiao; Zhang, Yue; Yan, Huan; Liu, Kai-Jiang; Zhang, Shu

    2015-04-10

    miR-373 was reported to be elevated in several tumors; however, the role of miR-373 in cervical cancer has not been investigated. In this study we aimed to investigate the role of miR-373 in tumorigenicity of cervical cancer cells in vivo and in vitro. The expression of miR-373 was investigated using real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction assay in 45 cervical specimens and cervical cancer cell lines. The role of miR-373 in tumorigenicity of cervical cancer cells was assessed by cell proliferation, colony formation in vitro as well as tumor growth assays in vivo with the overexpression of miR-373 or gene silencing. The functional target gene of miR-373 in cervical cancer cells was identified using integrated bioinformatics analysis, gene expression arrays, and luciferase assay. We founded that the expression of miR-373 is upregulated in human cervical cancer tissues and cervical carcinoma cell lines when compared to the corresponding noncancerous tissues. Ectopic overexpression of miR-373 in human cervical cancer cells promoted cell growth in vitro and tumorigenicity in vivo, whereas silencing the expression of miR-373 decreased the rate of cell growth. YOD1 was identified as a direct and functional target of miR-373 in cervical cancer cells. Expression levels of miR-373 were inversely correlated with YOD1 levels in human cervical cancer tissues. RNAi-mediated knockdown of YOD1 phenocopied the proliferation-promoting effect of miR-373. Moreover, overexpression of YOD1 abrogated miR-373-induced proliferation of cervical cancer cells. These results demonstrate that miR-373 increases proliferation by directly targeting YOD1, a new potential therapeutic target in cervical cancer.

  5. Intelligent Screening Systems for Cervical Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Siew Cheok; Abu Osman, Noor Azuan

    2014-01-01

    Advent of medical image digitalization leads to image processing and computer-aided diagnosis systems in numerous clinical applications. These technologies could be used to automatically diagnose patient or serve as second opinion to pathologists. This paper briefly reviews cervical screening techniques, advantages, and disadvantages. The digital data of the screening techniques are used as data for the computer screening system as replaced in the expert analysis. Four stages of the computer system are enhancement, features extraction, feature selection, and classification reviewed in detail. The computer system based on cytology data and electromagnetic spectra data achieved better accuracy than other data. PMID:24955419

  6. Detection of cervical intraepithelial neoplasias and cancers in cervical tissue by in vivo light scattering.

    PubMed

    Mourant, Judith R; Bocklage, Thérese J; Powers, Tamara M; Greene, Heather M; Dorin, Maxine H; Waxman, Alan G; Zsemlye, Meggan M; Smith, Harriet O

    2009-10-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine the utility of in vivo elastic light scattering measurements to identify cervical intraepithelial neoplasias (CIN) 2/3 and cancers in women undergoing colposcopy and to determine the effects of patient characteristics such as menstrual status on the elastic light scattering spectroscopic measurements. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A fiber optic probe was used to measure light transport in the cervical epithelium of patients undergoing colposcopy. Spectroscopic results from 151 patients were compared with histopathology of the measured and biopsied sites. A method of classifying the measured sites into two clinically relevant categories was developed and tested using five-fold cross-validation. RESULTS: Statistically significant effects by age at diagnosis, menopausal status, timing of the menstrual cycle, and oral contraceptive use were identified, and adjustments based upon these measurements were incorporated in the classification algorithm. A sensitivity of 77±5% and a specificity of 62±2% were obtained for separating CIN 2/3 and cancer from other pathologies and normal tissue. CONCLUSIONS: The effects of both menstrual status and age should be taken into account in the algorithm for classifying tissue sites based on elastic light scattering spectroscopy. When this is done, elastic light scattering spectroscopy shows good potential for real-time diagnosis of cervical tissue at colposcopy. Guiding biopsy location is one potential near-term clinical application area, while facilitating "see and treat" protocols is a longer term goal. Improvements in accuracy are essential. PMID:20694193

  7. Proteomic patterns of cervical cancer cell lines, a network perspective

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Cervical cancer is a major mortality factor in the female population. This neoplastic is an excellent model for studying the mechanisms involved in cancer maintenance, because the Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) is the etiology factor in most cases. With the purpose of characterizing the effects of malignant transformation in cellular activity, proteomic studies constitute a reliable way to monitor the biological alterations induced by this disease. In this contextual scheme, a systemic description that enables the identification of the common events between cell lines of different origins, is required to distinguish the essence of carcinogenesis. Results With this study, we sought to achieve a systemic perspective of the common proteomic profile of six cervical cancer cell lines, both positive and negative for HPV, and which differ from the profile corresponding to the non-tumourgenic cell line, HaCaT. Our objectives were to identify common cellular events participating in cancer maintenance, as well as the establishment of a pipeline to work with proteomic-derived results. We analyzed by means of 2D SDS-PAGE and MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry the protein extracts of six cervical cancer cell lines, from which we identified a consensus of 66 proteins. We call this group of proteins, the "central core of cervical cancer". Starting from this core set of proteins, we acquired a PPI network that pointed, through topological analysis, to some proteins that may well be playing a central role in the neoplastic process, such as 14-3-3ζ. In silico overrepresentation analysis of transcription factors pointed to the overexpression of c-Myc, Max and E2F1 as key transcription factors involved in orchestrating the neoplastic phenotype. Conclusions Our findings show that there is a "central core of cervical cancer" protein expression pattern, and suggest that 14-3-3ζ is key to determine if the cell proliferates or dies. In addition, our bioinformatics analysis suggests that

  8. Image-Based Brachytherapy for the Treatment of Cervical Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Harkenrider, Matthew M. Alite, Fiori; Silva, Scott R.; Small, William

    2015-07-15

    Cervical cancer is a disease that requires considerable multidisciplinary coordination of care and labor in order to maximize tumor control and survival while minimizing treatment-related toxicity. As with external beam radiation therapy, the use of advanced imaging and 3-dimensional treatment planning has generated a paradigm shift in the delivery of brachytherapy for the treatment of cervical cancer. The use of image-based brachytherapy, most commonly with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), requires additional attention and effort by the treating physician to prescribe dose to the proper volume and account for adjacent organs at risk. This represents a dramatic change from the classic Manchester approach of orthogonal radiographic images and prescribing dose to point A. We reviewed the history and currently evolving data and recommendations for the clinical use of image-based brachytherapy with an emphasis on MRI-based brachytherapy.

  9. Professionals' role in implementing a cervical cancer screening program.

    PubMed

    Viberga, Ilze; Engele, Ludmila; Kojalo, Una; Santare, Daiga

    2014-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to investigate the awareness, motivation, and readiness of medical staff to take part in a cervical cancer screening program (CSP), with the ultimate aim of increasing the response rate to invitation letters and improving CSP effectiveness and coverage. Certified gynecologists (GYNs) and general practitioners (GPs) practicing in the national and private healthcare systems in Latvia were given specially designed multiple-choice questionnaires. Of 213 questionnaires distributed to GYNs, 74% were completed (32% response rate of all 486 GYNs in Latvia). GPs were sent 933 questionnaires, 24% were returned (15% response rate of all 1,455 GPs in Latvia). GPs registered for 10 years or more knew significantly less about prevention and screening for cervical cancer compared to GYNs registered for the same amount of time (p = 0.05). This finding was not seen among the GYNs (p = 0.782). In the entire study group, the average score for correct answers was 5.97 (SD 2.602). Knowledge in the GP group was significantly lower (5.03, SD 2.243) than in the GYN group (7.22, SD 2.527, p < 0.001). Irrespective of specialization and place of work, knowledge was evaluated as poorer with an increase in age (RR = 0.950; p < 0.001). The knowledge, awareness, and perception of GYNs regarding cervical cancer prevention and screening in Latvia is sufficient but not good, and that of GPs is poor. Doctors would like to learn more about preventing cervical cancer. PMID:25527039

  10. Cervical cancer screening coverage in a high-incidence region.

    PubMed

    Navarro, Cibelli; Fonseca, Allex Jardim da; Sibajev, Alexander; Souza, Camila Iasmim de Andrade; Araújo, Daniela Souza; Teles, Daniele Aparecida de Freitas; Carvalho, Stéphanie Gomes Lins de; Cavalcante, Kyldery Wendell Moura; Rabelo, Wendell Lima

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To analyze the coverage of a cervical cancer screening program in a city with a high incidence of the disease in addition to the factors associated with non-adherence to the current preventive program. METHODS A cross-sectional study based on household surveys was conducted. The sample was composed of women between 25 and 59 years of age of the city of Boa Vista, RR, Northern Brazil who were covered by the cervical cancer screening program. The cluster sampling method was used. The dependent variable was participation in a women's health program, defined as undergoing at least one Pap smear in the 36 months prior to the interview; the explanatory variables were extracted from individual data. A generalized linear model was used. RESULTS 603 women were analyzed, with an mean age of 38.2 years (SD = 10.2). Five hundred and seventeen women underwent the screening test, and the prevalence of adherence in the last three years was up to 85.7% (95%CI 82.5;88.5). A high per capita household income and recent medical consultation were associated with the lower rate of not being tested in multivariate analysis. Disease ignorance, causes, and prevention methods were correlated with chances of non-adherence to the screening system; 20.0% of the women were reported to have undergone opportunistic and non-routine screening. CONCLUSIONS The informed level of coverage is high, exceeding the level recommended for the control of cervical cancer. The preventive program appears to be opportunistic in nature, particularly for the most vulnerable women (with low income and little information on the disease). Studies on the diagnostic quality of cervicovaginal cytology and therapeutic schedules for positive cases are necessary for understanding the barriers to the control of cervical cancer.

  11. Cervical cancer screening coverage in a high-incidence region

    PubMed Central

    Navarro, Cibelli; da Fonseca, Allex Jardim; Sibajev, Alexander; Souza, Camila Iasmim de Andrade; Araújo, Daniela Souza; Teles, Daniele Aparecida de Freitas; de Carvalho, Stéphanie Gomes Lins; Cavalcante, Kyldery Wendell Moura; Rabelo, Wendell Lima

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To analyze the coverage of a cervical cancer screening program in a city with a high incidence of the disease in addition to the factors associated with non-adherence to the current preventive program. METHODS A cross-sectional study based on household surveys was conducted. The sample was composed of women between 25 and 59 years of age of the city of Boa Vista, RR, Northern Brazil who were covered by the cervical cancer screening program. The cluster sampling method was used. The dependent variable was participation in a women’s health program, defined as undergoing at least one Pap smear in the 36 months prior to the interview; the explanatory variables were extracted from individual data. A generalized linear model was used. RESULTS 603 women were analyzed, with an mean age of 38.2 years (SD = 10.2). Five hundred and seventeen women underwent the screening test, and the prevalence of adherence in the last three years was up to 85.7% (95%CI 82.5;88.5). A high per capita household income and recent medical consultation were associated with the lower rate of not being tested in multivariate analysis. Disease ignorance, causes, and prevention methods were correlated with chances of non-adherence to the screening system; 20.0% of the women were reported to have undergone opportunistic and non-routine screening. CONCLUSIONS The informed level of coverage is high, exceeding the level recommended for the control of cervical cancer. The preventive program appears to be opportunistic in nature, particularly for the most vulnerable women (with low income and little information on the disease). Studies on the diagnostic quality of cervicovaginal cytology and therapeutic schedules for positive cases are necessary for understanding the barriers to the control of cervical cancer. PMID:25741655

  12. [PROGNOSTIC GROUPS FOR RELAPSE IN STAGE IB1 CERVICAL CANCER].

    PubMed

    Ismail, E; Kornovski, Y; Ivanov, S

    2015-01-01

    Risk factors for relapse in stage IB1 cervical cancer were analized and identified by the following statistical tests-Kaplan-Meier, Cox regression, Log-rank test, Breslow and Tarone-Ware tests. A quantitative analysis of significant factors for relapse in group submitted to surgery and adjuvant radiotherapy(group 1) and group submitted only to surgery (group 2), was done. These methods allow us to difine 3 different prognostic groups, requiring different therapeutic approaches.

  13. Changes in knowledge of cervical cancer following introduction of human papillomavirus vaccine among women at high risk for cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    Stewart Massad, L.; Evans, Charlesnika T.; Weber, Kathleen M.; D'Souza, Gypsyamber; Hessol, Nancy A.; Wright, Rodney L.; Colie, Christine; Strickler, Howard D.; Wilson, Tracey E.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To describe changes in knowledge of cervical cancer prevention, human papillomavirus (HPV), and HPV vaccination among women at high risk for cervical cancer in the first five years after introduction of HPV vaccination. Methods In 2007, 2008–9, and 2011, women in a multicenter U.S. cohort study completed 44-item self-report questionnaires assessing knowledge of cervical cancer prevention, HPV, and HPV vaccination. Results across time were assessed for individuals, and three study enrollment cohorts were compared. Knowledge scores were correlated with demographic variables, measures of education and attention, and medical factors. Associations were assessed in multivariable models. Results In all, 974 women completed three serial questionnaires; most were minority, low income, and current or former smokers. The group included 652 (67%) HIV infected and 322 (33%) uninfected. Summary knowledge scores (possible range 0–24) increased from 2007 (12.8, S.D. 5.8) to 2008–9 (13.9, S.D. 5.3, P < 0.001) and to 2011 (14.3, S.D. 5.2, P < 0.0001 vs 2007 and < 0.04 vs 2008–9). Higher knowledge scores at first and follow-up administration of questionnaires, higher income, and higher education level were associated with improved knowledge score at third administration. Women not previously surveyed had scores similar to those of the longitudinal group at baseline. Conclusion Substantial gaps in understanding of HPV and cervical cancer prevention exist despite years of health education. While more effective educational interventions may help, optimal cancer prevention may require opt-out vaccination programs that do not require nuanced understanding. PMID:25870859

  14. A Proof of Concept Imaging System for Automated Cervical Cancer Screening in Peru

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raza Garcia, Mabel Karel

    2013-01-01

    Cervical cancer is the second most frequent cancer in women around the world and affects half a million women per year. The World Health Organization (WHO) estimates that 275,000 women die every year, and 80% to 85% of these deaths occur in low-resource countries in Africa and South America. In Peru, cervical cancer has the highest incidence and…

  15. Challenges in breast and cervical cancer control in Japan.

    PubMed

    Sauvaget, Catherine; Nishino, Yoshikazu; Konno, Ryo; Tase, Toru; Morimoto, Tadaoki; Hisamichi, Shigeru

    2016-07-01

    Since the mid-1990s, there has been an increasing incidence of, and mortality from, cervical and breast cancers in Japan. Such an increase has raised concerns over the efficiency of Japan's screening programmes for these cancers. Although citizens benefit from universal health coverage, the Japanese health insurance system mostly focuses on tertiary prevention and disease treatment, while secondary prevention (screening) is low priority. Citizens have multiple opportunities to be screened for cancer-either through programmes organised by municipalities, or individual or collective, opportunistic and comprehensive health check-ups on a voluntary basis. Despite this, however, participation is as low as 35% of the target population for both cancers. In this Policy Review, we discuss the challenges in the prevention of breast and cervical cancers in Japan, particularly focusing on the structure of the National Health Insurance system and the National Cancer Control Plan, reasons for low participation as a result of social and political attitudes, as well as providing recommendations to overcome these challenges. Japanese women would benefit from new measures to increase participation, a national data surveillance programme to monitor screening activities, and the implementation of a quality assurance system among all providers. PMID:27396648

  16. Radical Hysterectomy for Early Stage Cervical Cancer: Laparoscopy Versus Laparotomy

    PubMed Central

    McBee, William C.; Richard, Scott D.; Edwards, Robert P.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: Gynecologic oncologists have recently begun using laparoscopic techniques to treat early stage cervical cancer. We evaluated a single institution's experience of laparoscopic radical hysterectomy and staging compared with laparotomy. Methods: A retrospective chart review identified stage IA2 and IB1 cervical cancer patients who underwent laparoscopic radical hysterectomy and pelvic lymph node dissection from July 2003 to April 2009. A 2:1 cohort of patients treated with laparotomy were matched by stage. Results: Nine laparoscopic patients (3 stage IA2, 6 stage IB1) with 18 matched controls (6 and 12) were identified. Demographics for each group were similar. None had positive margins or lymph nodes. An average of 11.2 vs.13.9 pelvic lymph nodes (P=0.237) were removed. Average operating time was 231.7 vs. 207.2 minutes (P=0.434), and average estimated blood loss was 161.1 vs. 394.4mL (P=0.059). Average length of stay was 2.9 vs. 5.5 days (P=0.012). No transfusions or operative complications were noted in the laparoscopic group vs. 3 each in the open group (P=0.194). No laparoscopic patients and 5 open patients had a postoperative wound infection (P=0.079). No recurrences were noted. Conclusions: Laparoscopic radical hysterectomy is a feasible alternative to laparotomy for early stage cervical cancer. Similar surgical outcomes are achieved with significantly less morbidity. PMID:21902978

  17. Clinical observation of laparoscopic radical hysterectomy for cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Xiang-Hua; Wang, Zhong-Qin; Yang, Shi-Zhang; Jia, Hong-Yan; Shi, Min

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate safety, feasibility and the improvement of surgical method of laparoscopic extensive hysterectomy and pelvic lymph node dissection in patients with early-stage cervical cancer. Clinical data were prospectively collected from patients with IA2-IIA cervical cancer who underwent laparoscopic extensive hysterectomy (n1=22) and laparotomy (n2=23) in Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology in the Subei People’s Hospital from June 2010 to August 2013. The successful rates in two groups of operation were 100%. Blood loss, postoperative hospital stay, complication rate, postoperative recovery of gastrointestinal tract and bladder function of the laparoscopy group of the laparoscopic group were all better than those of the laparotomy group, and there were significant differences (all P < 0.05). But in the laparoscopy group, the operative time was longer than the laparotomy group with statistical significance (P < 0.05). There was no statistically significant difference in the number of excised lymph nodes and the duration time of postoperative urinary catheterization between the two groups (P > 0.05). Laparoscopic extensive hysterectomy and pelvic lymph node dissection can fully meet the requirement of laparotomy. It has the properties of minor trauma and rapid recovery. The clinical efficacy is superior to laparotomy surgery. The results indicated laparoscopic is an ideal method for the treatment of early cervical cancer. PMID:24995098

  18. Significance of microvascular density (MVD) in cervical cancer recurrence.

    PubMed

    Cantu De León, D; Lopez-Graniel, C; Frias Mendivil, M; Chanona Vilchis, G; Gomez, C; De La Garza Salazar, J

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this retrospective study of 118 patients with squamous cell cervical cancer from January 1990 to December 1993 was to evaluate angiogenesis as predictive factor of recurrence in cervical cancer stages II-III treated with standard radiotherapy. Microvessel density (MVD) was evaluated and correlated with other prognostic factors. MVD was greater than 20 in 67.8% of patients with recurrence (P = 0.002) in comparison to 39% of patients without. Disease-free survival was shorter in stage IIA and MVD >20 (P = 0.0193) as well as for stage IIB (P < 0.05 ), but not for IIIB (P = 0.1613 ). Global survival was significantly shorter when MVD was >20 (P = 0.0316). For stage IIA and MVD >20 survival was shorter (P = 0.0008) for stage IIB (P < 0.05) but not for IIIB (P = 0.14). Patients younger than 40 years and MVD >20 had poorer disease-free interval and survival (P = 0.0029). MVD in patients with squamous cell cervical cancer stage II and age younger than 40 may play a role in predicting recurrence and survival. PMID:14675324

  19. Therapeutic Vaccines Against Human Papillomavirus and Cervical Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Cid-Arregui, Angel

    2009-01-01

    Cervical cancer and its precursor intra-epithelial lesions are linked to infection by a subset of so-called “highrisk” human papillomavirus types, which are estimated to infect nearly four hundred million women worldwide. Two prophylactic vaccines have been commercialized recently targeting HPV16 and 18, the most prevalent viral types found in cervical cancer, which operate through induction of capsid-specific neutralizing antibodies. However, in patients with persistent infection these vaccines have not been found to protect against progression to neoplasia. Attempts are being made to develop therapeutic vaccines targeting nonstructural early viral proteins. Among these, E6 and E7 are the preferred targets, since they are essential for induction and maintenance of the malignant phenotype and are constitutively expressed by the transformed epithelial cells. Here are reviewed the most relevant potential vaccines based on HPV early antigens that have shown efficacy in preclinical models and that are being tested in clinical studies, which should determine their therapeutic capacity for eradicating HPV-induced premalignant and malignant lesions and cure cervical cancer. PMID:19915722

  20. [Consensus for the prevention of cervical cancer in Mexico].

    PubMed

    Kably Ambe, Alberto; Ruiz Moreno, José Antonio; Ponce, Eduardo Lazcano; Vargas Hernández, Victor Manuel; Aguado Pérez, Rogelio A; Alonso de Ruiz, Patricia

    2011-12-01

    Cervical cancer remains a serious public health problem in the world; that is why the Mexican Federation of Schools of Obstetrics and Gynecology convened the elaboration of a consensus that is devoted this number of Ginecologia y Obstetricia de Mexico. In recent years has strengthened perceptions (public and private) in the need for preventive strategies in the medium and long terms. The development of effective vaccines against the human papilloma virus and the application of new methods of detection from viral DNA (completely automated for personal application) allow some degree of optimism. It is proposed a consensus with general recommendations in two consecutive stages: (a) primary prevention consisting of education for the prevention of cervical cancer and universal immunization and (b) secondary prevention by early detection of infections or injuries that could favor carcinogenesis. The consensus reviewed characteristics of available vaccines in detail and proposes strategies for implementation in Mexican population. Also, check out main methods of early detection of infection (or predisposing lesions) and suggests public and private strategies for implementation. Consensus places particular emphasis on early immunization for female population and correct use of methods for detection of infections or injuries that might cause cervical cancer.

  1. Therapeutic vaccines against human papillomavirus and cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Cid-Arregui, Angel

    2009-01-01

    Cervical cancer and its precursor intra-epithelial lesions are linked to infection by a subset of so-called "highrisk" human papillomavirus types, which are estimated to infect nearly four hundred million women worldwide. Two prophylactic vaccines have been commercialized recently targeting HPV16 and 18, the most prevalent viral types found in cervical cancer, which operate through induction of capsid-specific neutralizing antibodies. However, in patients with persistent infection these vaccines have not been found to protect against progression to neoplasia. Attempts are being made to develop therapeutic vaccines targeting nonstructural early viral proteins. Among these, E6 and E7 are the preferred targets, since they are essential for induction and maintenance of the malignant phenotype and are constitutively expressed by the transformed epithelial cells. Here are reviewed the most relevant potential vaccines based on HPV early antigens that have shown efficacy in preclinical models and that are being tested in clinical studies, which should determine their therapeutic capacity for eradicating HPV-induced premalignant and malignant lesions and cure cervical cancer. PMID:19915722

  2. Linking cervical cancer to the human papillomavirus: findings from a qualitative study with Mexican women.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Sandra G; Becker, Davida; Tatum, Carrie; Aldrich, Tess; Fernández-C, Araceli

    2007-02-01

    Cervical cancer is an important cause of mortality for women in developing countries. Researchers have established a link between cervical cancer and the human papillomavirus (HPV). We explored Mexican women's beliefs about cervical cancer and sexually transmitted infections (STIs), including HPV, to better understand the social implications of this linkage. We conducted eight focus groups with middle-aged and young women in Mexico City. Cervical cancer elicited different social and emotional responses than STIs; participants generally attached less culpability to it and saw it as more life threatening. Information campaigns should take into account differences in lay conceptions of these illnesses.

  3. Potential role of TRAns Cervical Endosonography (TRACE) in brachytherapy of cervical cancer: proof of concept

    PubMed Central

    Kirisits, Christian

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the gold standard for image guided adaptive brachytherapy (BT) of cervical cancer. Ultrasound is an attractive alternative with reasonable costs and high soft tissue depiction quality. This technical note aims to demonstrate the proof of principle for use of TRAns Cervical Endosonography with rotating transducer in the context of brachytherapy (TRACE BT). Material and methods TRACE BT presentation is based on a single stage IIB cervical cancer patient. Prior to second BT implant, rotating US transducer (6.9 mm diameter) was inserted in cervical canal and axial images obtained at 10 MHz, focal range of 30 mm, and axial resolution of 0.4 mm. Size and topography of hypo-echoic areas were assessed and optimal positions of interstitial needles were determined. Finally, intracavitary applicator was placed and needles inserted through vaginal ring-template according to TRACE pre-plan. MRI-based high risk clinical target volume (CTVHR) dimensions were compared with hypoechoic areas on TRACE. Topography of parametrial needles on post-insertion MRI was compared with TRACE pre-plan. Results Insertion of rotating mechanism into cervico-uterine cavity was safe, feasible and fast. The 360° imaging in axial plane enabled real-time assessment of cervix, uterus, and adjacent parametria. Qualitative comparison of TRACE with post-insertion MRI revealed favorable agreement of findings. In-plane size of CTVHR on MRI was comparable to hypoechoic areas on TRACE. Needle positions on post-insertion MRI corresponded to TRACE-based pre-plan. Main limitation of TRACE was gradual deterioration of image quality due to coupling gel removal. Conclusions Present proof of concept demonstrates potential role of TRACE-BT for cervical cancer as an attractive high-tech approach with reasonable costs. Prior to investigation of its clinical role, further development of TRACE methodology is needed. This includes reliable transducer-tissue coupling, applicator

  4. Endometrial and cervical cancer: incidence and mortality among women in the Lodz region

    PubMed Central

    Leśniczak, Beata; Krasomski, Grzegorz; Oszukowski, Przemysław; Woźniak, Piotr

    2015-01-01

    Introduction By the early 21st century the most common cancer of female genitals in Poland was cervical cancer. Now endometrial cancer ranks first. The aim of this study was to analyse the incidence and mortality of endometrial and cervical cancer among women in the Lodz region. Material and methods Data on the incidence and mortality of endometrial and cervical cancer among inhabitants of the Lodz region were obtained from the National Cancer Registry and Bulletin of Cancer Cases in the Lodz region. The analysis covered ten consecutive years beginning in 2001. Results The number of new cases reported in 2010 exceeded that observed in 2001 by 181. The standardized incidence rate of endometrial cancer increased by 6.3, while the standardized incidence rate of cervical cancer decreased by 1.4. Conclusions In the years 2001-2010, the incidence of endometrial cancer increased by 88.3% and that of cervical cancer decreased by 6.5% among inhabitants of the Lodz region. In the years 2001-2010, mortality of endometrial cancer increased by 24.5% and that of cervical cancer decreased by 12.6%. In 2010, the highest crude incidence rates in the Lodz region of both endometrial and cervical cancer at 39.1 were recorded in the district town of Piotrków. PMID:26528109

  5. Successful Management of Live Cervical Ectopic Pregnancy: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Samal, Sunita; Ghose, Seetesh; Pallavee, P; Porkkodi, P

    2015-12-01

    Cervical pregnancy is a rare form of ectopic pregnancy with potential grave consequences occurring in approximately 1:9,000 deliveries. It is life-threatening as the pregnancy is implanted in the endocervical canal and the trophoblast can penetrate through the cervical wall and into the uterine blood supply resulting in catastrophic haemorrhage. Historically, the treatment had been hysterectomy because of the considerable risk of life-threatening haemorrhage, but in the recent past various conservative management modalities have been applied to preserve fertility. Here, we report a case of successful (both medical and surgical) management of cervical ectopic pregnancy in a young woman. A 29-year-old, gravid 2, para1 and living 1 with previous caesarean section had presented with mild bleeding per vagina for 5 days following 7 weeks of amenorrhoea. Past menstrual, medical, surgical and family history were unremarkable except the previous caesarean section. On examination vital signs were normal but pelvic examination revealed a distended cervix with bulky uterus, without anyadnexal mass or tenderness and no cervical motion tenderness. Further transvaginal sonography showed a live cervical gestation of 7 weeks and 4 days and serum beta-HCG value of 1,03,113mIU/ml. Patient received conservative approach with combination of intraamniotic potassium chloride and methotrexate and suction curettage. Due to conservative approach emergency hysterectomy and blood transfusion was avoided. PMID:26816951

  6. [Perspective of cervical cancer prevention and control in developing countries and areas].

    PubMed

    Qiao, You-Lin

    2010-01-01

    Cervical cancer ranks the second common cancer in women, affecting women severely in developing countries. It is a critical issue to develop simple, rapid, accurate, safe, acceptable, and inexpensive screening tests which can be used in cervical cancer prevention programs in developing countries. Due to the shortage of funding and qualified cytological professionals in most developing countries, WHO has been actively promoting visual inspection with acetic acid/iodine solution (VIA/VILI) as the alternative approach to screening cervical cancer. After the discovery of a link between human papillomavirus (HPV) and cervical cancer, the HPV prophylactic vaccine and CareHPV test have been successfully developed. The cervical cancer will be the first cancer eliminated by the combination of vaccination, screening, early diagnosis and treatment.

  7. Development of a community cancer education program: the Forsyth County, NC cervical cancer prevention project.

    PubMed Central

    Michielutte, R; Dignan, M B; Wells, H B; Young, L D; Jackson, D S; Sharp, P C

    1989-01-01

    The authors outline the development and implementation of a public health education program for cervical cancer screening among black women in Forsyth County, NC. The educational program includes distributing electronic and printed information media messages, a program of direct education for women, and providing information on current issues in cervical screening to primary-care physicians. Program development was based on social marketing principles, the PRECEDE model, and the communication-behavior change (CBC) model. Since a true experimental design was not feasible, program evaluation is based on several complementary quasi-experimental designs. Analysis of baseline data indicate that the county where the intervention is taking place, and the control county, are similar with respect to both demographic characteristics and the current level of screening activity. Preliminary results indicate that the program has been successful in raising women's level of awareness of cervical cancer and cervical screening. PMID:2511586

  8. Development of a community cancer education program: the Forsyth County, NC cervical cancer prevention project.

    PubMed

    Michielutte, R; Dignan, M B; Wells, H B; Young, L D; Jackson, D S; Sharp, P C

    1989-01-01

    The authors outline the development and implementation of a public health education program for cervical cancer screening among black women in Forsyth County, NC. The educational program includes distributing electronic and printed information media messages, a program of direct education for women, and providing information on current issues in cervical screening to primary-care physicians. Program development was based on social marketing principles, the PRECEDE model, and the communication-behavior change (CBC) model. Since a true experimental design was not feasible, program evaluation is based on several complementary quasi-experimental designs. Analysis of baseline data indicate that the county where the intervention is taking place, and the control county, are similar with respect to both demographic characteristics and the current level of screening activity. Preliminary results indicate that the program has been successful in raising women's level of awareness of cervical cancer and cervical screening.

  9. Down-regulating overexpressed human Lon in cervical cancer suppresses cell proliferation and bioenergetics.

    PubMed

    Nie, Xiaobo; Li, Min; Lu, Bin; Zhang, Yuxin; Lan, Linhua; Chen, Lin; Lu, Jianxin

    2013-01-01

    The human mitochondrial ATP-dependent Lon protease functions in regulating the metabolism and quality control of proteins and mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). However, the role of Lon in cancer is not well understood. Therefore, this study was undertaken to investigate the importance of Lon in cervical cancer cells from patients and in established cell lines. Microarray analysis from 30 cancer and 10 normal cervical tissues were analyzed by immunohistochemistry for Lon protein levels. The expression of Lon was also examined by immunoblotting 16 fresh cervical cancer tissues and their respective non-tumor cervical tissues. In all cases, Lon expression was significantly elevated in cervical carcinomas as compared to normal tissues. Augmented Lon expression in tissue microarrays did not vary between age, tumor-node-metastasis grades, or lymph node metastasis. Knocking down Lon in HeLa cervical cancer cells by lentivrial transduction resulted in a substantial decrease in both mRNA and protein levels. Such down-regulation of Lon expression significantly blocked HeLa cell proliferation. In addition, knocking down Lon resulted in decreased cellular bioenergetics as determined by measuring aerobic respiration and glycolysis using the Seahorse XF24 extracellular flux analyzer. Together, these data demonstrate that Lon plays a potential role in the oncogenesis of cervical cancer, and may be a useful biomarker and target in the treatment of cervical cancer. Lon; immunohistochemistry; cervical cancer; cell proliferation; cellular bioenergetics.

  10. MicroRNA-373 functions as an oncogene and targets YOD1 gene in cervical cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Luo-Qiao; Zhang, Yue; Yan, Huan; Liu, Kai-Jiang Zhang, Shu

    2015-04-10

    miR-373 was reported to be elevated in several tumors; however, the role of miR-373 in cervical cancer has not been investigated. In this study we aimed to investigate the role of miR-373 in tumorigenicity of cervical cancer cells in vivo and in vitro. The expression of miR-373 was investigated using real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction assay in 45 cervical specimens and cervical cancer cell lines. The role of miR-373 in tumorigenicity of cervical cancer cells was assessed by cell proliferation, colony formation in vitro as well as tumor growth assays in vivo with the overexpression of miR-373 or gene silencing. The functional target gene of miR-373 in cervical cancer cells was identified using integrated bioinformatics analysis, gene expression arrays, and luciferase assay. We founded that the expression of miR-373 is upregulated in human cervical cancer tissues and cervical carcinoma cell lines when compared to the corresponding noncancerous tissues. Ectopic overexpression of miR-373 in human cervical cancer cells promoted cell growth in vitro and tumorigenicity in vivo, whereas silencing the expression of miR-373 decreased the rate of cell growth. YOD1 was identified as a direct and functional target of miR-373 in cervical cancer cells. Expression levels of miR-373 were inversely correlated with YOD1 levels in human cervical cancer tissues. RNAi-mediated knockdown of YOD1 phenocopied the proliferation-promoting effect of miR-373. Moreover, overexpression of YOD1 abrogated miR-373-induced proliferation of cervical cancer cells. These results demonstrate that miR-373 increases proliferation by directly targeting YOD1, a new potential therapeutic target in cervical cancer. - Highlights: • The expression of miR-373 is upregulated in human cervical cancer tissues. • miR-373 effects as oncogenic miRNA in cervical cancer in vitro and in vivo. • miR-373 increases proliferation of cervical cancer cells by directly targeting YOD1.

  11. Treatment Options by Stage (Cervical Cancer)

    MedlinePlus

    ... checked under a microscope for signs of cancer. Laparoscopy : A surgical procedure to look at the organs ... a laparoscope , the operation is called a total laparoscopic hysterectomy. Enlarge Hysterectomy. The uterus is surgically removed ...

  12. CDC Vital Signs: Cervical Cancer is Preventable

    MedlinePlus

    ... Search The CDC Cancel Submit Search The CDC Vital Signs Note: Javascript is disabled or is not supported ... message, please visit this page: About CDC.gov . Vital Signs Current issue Infographic Topics Covered Alcohol Cancer Cardiovascular ...

  13. Delays in diagnosis of young females with symptomatic cervical cancer in England: an interview-based study

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Anita W; Ramirez, Amanda J; Hamilton, William; Sasieni, Peter; Patnick, Julietta; Forbes, Lindsay JL

    2014-01-01

    Background Diagnosis may be delayed in young females with cervical cancer because of a failure to recognise symptoms. Aim To examine the extent and determinants of delays in diagnosis of young females with symptomatic cervical cancer. Design and setting A national descriptive study of time from symptoms to diagnosis of cervical cancer and risk factors for delay in diagnosis at all hospitals diagnosing cervical cancer in England. Method One-hundred and twenty-eight patients <30 years with a recent diagnosis of cervical cancer were interviewed. Patient delay was defined as ≥3 months from symptom onset to first presentation and provider delay as ≥ 3 months from first presentation to diagnosis. Results Forty (31%) patients had presented symptomatically: 11 (28%) delayed presentation. Patient delay was more common in patients <25 than patients aged 25–29 (40% versus 15%, P = 0.16). Vaginal discharge was more common among patients who delayed presentation than those who did not; many reported not recognising this as a possible cancer symptom. Provider delay was reported by 24/40 (60%); in some no report was found in primary care records of a visual inspection of the cervix and some did not re-attend after the first presentation for several months. Gynaecological symptoms were common (84%) among patients who presented via screening. Conclusions Young females with cervical cancer frequently delay presentation, and not recognising symptoms as serious may increase the risk of delay. Delay in diagnosis after first presentation is also common. There is some evidence that UK guidelines for managing young females with abnormal bleeding are not being followed. PMID:25267045

  14. Comprehensive knowledge about cervical cancer is low among women in Northwest Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Cervical cancer is the first most common cancer in women in sub-Saharan Africa followed by breast cancer. In Ethiopia, the incidence of cervical cancer is high i.e. 35.9 per 100,000 women. Low level of awareness, lack of effective screening programs, overshadowed by other health priorities (such as acquired immune deficiency syndrome, tuberculosis and malaria) and insufficient attention to women’s health are the possible factors for the observed higher incidence rate of cervical cancers in the country. Data on knowledge of Ethiopian women regarding cervical cancer is lacking. The aim of this study was to assess the knowledge of women about cervical cancer and associated factors. Methods A community based cross-sectional survey was conducted from April 4-16, 2010 in Gondar town, Northwest Ethiopia. A total of 633 women aged 15 years and above were interviewed using semi-structured questionnaire by 8 trained data collectors and 2 supervisors. SPSS Windows version 15.0 was employed for data entry and analysis. Result Of all the respondents, 495 (78.7%) of them had heard about cervical cancer and only 195 (31%) of them were knowledgeable about the disease. Conclusion The knowledge of women on cervical cancer was found to be poor. Education about the disease must include information on risk factors, sign and symptoms of cervical cancer. PMID:23282173

  15. [Epidemiology of cervical cancer in a region of western Algeria, 2006-2010].

    PubMed

    Boublenza, L; Hadef, K; Beldjillali, H; Chabni, N; Reguegba, D; Meguenni, K

    2013-05-01

    The authors present a retrospective analysis of data about cervical cancer from 2006 through 2010 in the province (wilaya) of Tlemcen (Algeria). During this five-year study period, 196 cases of cervical cancer were recorded, with a mean age at onset of 48.5 years. These cervical cancers accounted for 13% of all gynecologic cancers. It is the second leading cancer among women in this province, with an incidence of 13.3 per 100 000 women. The health authorities in Algeria must set up an organized screening policy and appropriate treatment to reduce the mortality rate from this cancer.

  16. Waiting time for radiotherapy in women with cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    do Nascimento, Maria Isabel; Azevedo e Silva, Gulnar

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE To describe the waiting time for radiotherapy for patients with cervical cancer. METHODS This descriptive study was conducted with 342 cervical cancer cases that were referred to primary radiotherapy, in the Baixada Fluminense region, RJ, Southeastern Brazil, from October 1995 to August 2010. The waiting time was calculated using the recommended 60-day deadline as a parameter to obtaining the first cancer treatment and considering the date at which the diagnosis was confirmed, the date of first oncological consultation and date when the radiotherapy began. Median and proportional comparisons were made using the Kruskal Wallis and Chi-square tests. RESULTS Most of the women (72.2%) began their radiotherapy within 60 days from the diagnostic confirmation date. The median of this total waiting time was 41 days. This median worsened over the time period, going from 11 days (1995-1996) to 64 days (2009-2010). The median interval between the diagnostic confirmation and the first oncological consultation was 33 days, and between the first oncological consultation and the first radiotherapy session was four days. The median waiting time differed significantly (p = 0.003) according to different stages of the tumor, reaching 56 days, 35 days and 30 days for women whose cancers were classified up to IIA; from IIB to IIIB, and IVA-IVB, respectively. CONCLUSIONS Despite most of the women having had access to radiotherapy within the recommended 60 days, the implementation of procedures to define the stage of the tumor and to reestablish clinical conditions took a large part of this time, showing that at least one of these intervals needs to be improved. Even though the waiting times were ideal for all patients, the most advanced cases were quickly treated, which suggests that access to radiotherapy by women with cervical cancer has been reached with equity. PMID:26786473

  17. Point-of-care test for cervical cancer in LMICs

    PubMed Central

    Mohammed, Sulma I.; Ren, Wen; Flowers, Lisa; Rajwa, Bartek; Chibwesha, Carla J.; Parham, Groesbeck P.; Irudayaraj, Joseph M.K.

    2016-01-01

    Cervical cancer screening using Papanicolaou's smear test has been highly effective in reducing death from this disease. However, this test is unaffordable in low- and middle-income countries, and its complexity has limited wide-scale uptake. Alternative tests, such as visual inspection with acetic acid or Lugol's iodine and human papillomavirus DNA, are sub-optimal in terms of specificity and sensitivity, thus sensitive and affordable tests with high specificity for on-site reporting are needed. Using proteomics and bioinformatics, we have identified valosin-containing protein (VCP) as differentially expressed between normal specimens and those with cervical intra-epithelial neoplasia grade 2/3 (CIN2/CIN3+) or worse. VCP-specific immunohistochemical staining (validated by a point-of-care technology) provided sensitive (93%) and specific (88%) identification of CIN2/CIN3+ and may serve as a critical biomarker for cervical-cancer screening. Future efforts will focus on further refinements to enhance analytic sensitivity and specificity of our proposed test, as well as on prototype development. PMID:26934314

  18. HPV types and cofactors causing cervical cancer in Peru.

    PubMed

    Santos, C; Muñoz, N; Klug, S; Almonte, M; Guerrero, I; Alvarez, M; Velarde, C; Galdos, O; Castillo, M; Walboomers, J; Meijer, C; Caceres, E

    2001-09-28

    We conducted a hospital-based case-control study in Peru of 198 women with histologically confirmed cervical cancer (173 squamous cell carcinomas and 25 cases of adenocarcinoma/adenosquamous carcinoma) and 196 control women. Information on risk factors was obtained by personal interview. Using PCR-based assays on exfoliated cervical cells and biopsy specimens, HPV DNA was detected in 95.3% of women with squamous cell carcinoma and in 92.0% of women with adenocarcinoma/adenosquamous carcinoma compared with 17.7% in control women. The age-adjusted odds ratio was 116.0 (95% Cl = 48.6-276.0) for squamous cell carcinoma and 51.4 (95% Cl = 11.4-232.0) for adenocarcinoma/adenosquamous carcinoma. The commonest types in women with cervical cancer were HPV 16, 18, 31, 52 and 35. The association with the various HPV types was equally strong for the two most common types (HPV 16 and 18) as for the other less common types. In addition to HPV, long-term use of oral contraceptives and smoking were associated with an increased risk. HPV is the main cause of both squamous cell carcinoma and adenocarcinoma in Peruvian women. PMID:11592767

  19. Awareness of cervical cancer prevention among mothers of adolescent daughters in Korea: qualitative research

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hae Won; Kim, Duck Hee

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Korean adolescent girls are unprepared for cervical cancer prevention due to the lack of a mandatory policy regarding human papilloma virus (HPV) vaccination and school health education regarding cervical cancer. The aim of this study was to determine how aware mothers are about cervical cancer prevention in their adolescent daughters, with a view to developing strategies for expanding primary cervical cancer prevention for adolescent girls through the mothers’ involvement. Design A qualitative design was employed. Nine mothers with adolescent daughters participated in this study and were interviewed using open-ended questions. The themes were extracted by content analysis. Setting A general living area in Seoul, South Korea. Participants The snowball method was used to select mothers. Results Five themes emerged. In general, the mothers’ awareness of cervical cancer was not clear, and they exhibited a lack of awareness of the importance of having a regular Papanicolaou screening test. The mothers recognised that they were role models for their daughters, and realised and accepted the necessity of educating their daughters regarding cervical cancer; however, they perceived barriers related to the prevention of cervical cancer in their daughters. The mothers recommended enforcing sex education in schools and the provision of financial support for HPV vaccination. Conclusions The mothers’ awareness and preparedness with respect to the prevention of cervical cancer in their adolescent daughters were low and inadequate. Mothers should be informed and motivated to play a role in the education of their daughters regarding cervical cancer prevention. Strategies for disseminating information regarding early cervical cancer prevention for adolescent girls are recommended by communicating with both the girls and their mothers and providing them with education regarding cervical cancer prevention. PMID:25976761

  20. Synergistic Effects of Hemoglobin and Tumor Perfusion on Tumor Control and Survival in Cervical Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Mayr, Nina A. Wang, Jian Z.; Zhang Dongqing; Montebello, Joseph F.; Grecula, John C.; Lo, Simon S.; Fowler, Jeffery M.; Yuh, William T.C.

    2009-08-01

    Purpose: The tumor oxygenation status is likely influenced by two major factors: local tumor blood supply (tumor perfusion) and its systemic oxygen carrier, hemoglobin (Hgb). Each has been independently shown to affect the radiotherapy (RT) outcome in cervical cancer. This study assessed the effect of local tumor perfusion, systemic Hgb levels, and their combination on the treatment outcome in cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: A total of 88 patients with cervical cancer, Stage IB2-IVA, who were treated with RT/chemotherapy, underwent serial dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DCE-MRI) before RT, at 20-22 Gy, and at 45-50 Gy. The DCE-MRI perfusion parameters, mean and lowest 10th percentile of the signal intensity distribution in the tumor pixels, and the Hgb levels, including pre-RT, nadir, and mean Hgb (average of weekly Hgb during RT), were correlated with local control and disease-specific survival. The median follow-up was 4.6 years. Results: Local recurrence predominated in the group with both a low mean Hgb (<11.2 g/dL) and low perfusion (lowest 10th percentile of signal intensity <2.0 at 20-22 Gy), with a 5-year local control rate of 60% vs. 90% for all other groups (p = .001) and a disease-specific survival rate of 41% vs. 72% (p = .008), respectively. In the group with both high mean Hgb and high perfusion, the 5-year local control rate and disease-specific survival rate was 100% and 78%, respectively. Conclusion: These results suggest that the compounded effects of Hgb level and tumor perfusion during RT influence the radioresponsiveness and survival in cervical cancer patients. The outcome was worst when both were impaired. The management of Hgb may be particularly important in patients with low tumor perfusion.

  1. 76 FR 55915 - Request for Nominations of Candidates to Serve on the Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-09

    ... on the Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection and Control Advisory Committee (BCCEDCAC) The... the CDC on the early detection and control of breast and cervical cancer. The role of the BCCEDCAC...

  2. The chiropractic management of two cases of cervical spondylotic radiculopathy

    PubMed Central

    Dufton, John A.; Giantomaso, Tony

    2003-01-01

    Cervical spondylotic radiculopathy (CSR) is one of the potential sources of radiculopathy, particularly in patients aged 40 to 60 years. The hallmark sign of cervical-brachial pain presents in the majority of the cases, however a definitive clinical diagnosis is often difficult in the absence of reliable and valid diagnostic tests. Two cases of presumed CSR illustrate the usefulness of applying a comprehensive mechanical assessment that guides the patient's rehabilitation regardless of the traditional anatomical diagnosis. A brief overview of the epidemiology, clinical presentation, and management of CSR is also presented.

  3. Metal artefacts in MRI-guided brachytherapy of cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    Owrangi, Amir; Ravi, Ananth; Song, William Y.

    2016-01-01

    The importance of assessing the metal-induced artefacts in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided brachytherapy is growing along with the increasing interest of integrating MRI into the treatment procedure of cervical cancer. Examples of metal objects in use include intracavitary cervical applicators and interstitial needles. The induced artefacts increase the uncertainties in the clinical workflow and can be a potential obstacle for the accurate delivery of the treatment. Overcoming this problem necessitates a good understanding of its originating sources. Several efforts are recorded in the literature to quantify the extent of such artefacts, in phantoms and in clinical practice. Here, we elaborate on the origin of metal-induced artefacts in the light of brachytherapy applications, while summarizing recent efforts that have been made to assess and overcome the induced distortions.

  4. Metal artefacts in MRI-guided brachytherapy of cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Soliman, Abraam S; Owrangi, Amir; Ravi, Ananth; Song, William Y

    2016-08-01

    The importance of assessing the metal-induced artefacts in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided brachytherapy is growing along with the increasing interest of integrating MRI into the treatment procedure of cervical cancer. Examples of metal objects in use include intracavitary cervical applicators and interstitial needles. The induced artefacts increase the uncertainties in the clinical workflow and can be a potential obstacle for the accurate delivery of the treatment. Overcoming this problem necessitates a good understanding of its originating sources. Several efforts are recorded in the literature to quantify the extent of such artefacts, in phantoms and in clinical practice. Here, we elaborate on the origin of metal-induced artefacts in the light of brachytherapy applications, while summarizing recent efforts that have been made to assess and overcome the induced distortions. PMID:27648092

  5. Metal artefacts in MRI-guided brachytherapy of cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    Owrangi, Amir; Ravi, Ananth; Song, William Y.

    2016-01-01

    The importance of assessing the metal-induced artefacts in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided brachytherapy is growing along with the increasing interest of integrating MRI into the treatment procedure of cervical cancer. Examples of metal objects in use include intracavitary cervical applicators and interstitial needles. The induced artefacts increase the uncertainties in the clinical workflow and can be a potential obstacle for the accurate delivery of the treatment. Overcoming this problem necessitates a good understanding of its originating sources. Several efforts are recorded in the literature to quantify the extent of such artefacts, in phantoms and in clinical practice. Here, we elaborate on the origin of metal-induced artefacts in the light of brachytherapy applications, while summarizing recent efforts that have been made to assess and overcome the induced distortions. PMID:27648092

  6. Metal artefacts in MRI-guided brachytherapy of cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Soliman, Abraam S; Owrangi, Amir; Ravi, Ananth; Song, William Y

    2016-08-01

    The importance of assessing the metal-induced artefacts in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided brachytherapy is growing along with the increasing interest of integrating MRI into the treatment procedure of cervical cancer. Examples of metal objects in use include intracavitary cervical applicators and interstitial needles. The induced artefacts increase the uncertainties in the clinical workflow and can be a potential obstacle for the accurate delivery of the treatment. Overcoming this problem necessitates a good understanding of its originating sources. Several efforts are recorded in the literature to quantify the extent of such artefacts, in phantoms and in clinical practice. Here, we elaborate on the origin of metal-induced artefacts in the light of brachytherapy applications, while summarizing recent efforts that have been made to assess and overcome the induced distortions.

  7. Factors Associated with the Uptake of Cervical Cancer Screening Among Women in Portland, Jamaica

    PubMed Central

    Ncube, Butho; Bey, Amita; Knight, Jeremy; Bessler, Patricia; Jolly, Pauline E.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Cervical cancer is the second most common cancer among women worldwide and is the leading cause of deaths in developing countries. Despite the strong evidence that cervical cancer screening results in decreased mortality from this disease, the uptake for cervical screening among Jamaican women remains low. Aims: This study was carried out to identify factors associated with Jamaican women's decisions to screen for cervical cancer. Materials and Methods: Cross-sectional descriptive study of 403 women aged 19 years and older from Portland, Jamaica. An interviewer-administered questionnaire assessed the women's cervical cancer screening history, as well as their knowledge, attitudes, and practices regarding the disease and screening. Results: Of the 403 women interviewed, 66% had a Papanicolaou (Pap) smear and only 16% had a Pap test within the past year. Significant predicators of uptake of screening were being married, age, parity, discussing cancer with health provider, perception of consequences of not having a Pap smear, and knowing a person with cervical cancer. Women who did not know where to go for a Pap smear were 85% less likely to have been screened (prevalence odds ratio (POR): 0.15, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.04, 0.52). Conclusions: This study showed suboptimal uptake of cervical cancer screening among Jamaican women. Multipronged approaches are needed to address barriers to screening, as well as identify and support conditions that encourage women's use of reproductive health services, thereby reducing incidence and mortality rates from cervical cancer. PMID:25839002

  8. The blame game: cervical cancer, knowledge of its link to human papillomavirus and stigma.

    PubMed

    Shepherd, Melissa A; Gerend, Mary A

    2013-01-01

    This two-study paper examined stigma toward women with cervical cancer. Cervical cancer is caused by human papillomavirus (HPV), a sexually transmitted infection (STI). For Study 1, participants (N = 352) were randomly assigned to one of four conditions in which they read a brief description of a patient with either cervical or ovarian cancer in which the cause of the patient's cancer was either specified (cervical: HPV, a STI vs. ovarian: family history) or unspecified. Participants in the cervical cancer/cause-specified condition rated the patient as more dirty, dishonest and unwise, and reported feeling more moral disgust and 'grossed out' than participants in the cervical cancer/cause-unspecified condition. For Study 2, participants (N = 126) were randomly assigned to read a vignette about a patient with cervical cancer in which the cause of cancer was either specified or unspecified. Consistent with Study 1, participants in the cause-specified condition rated the patient as more unwise, and reported feeling more moral disgust and 'grossed out' than participants in the cause-unspecified condition. These effects were mediated by attributions of blame toward the patient. Findings suggest that women with cervical cancer may be stigmatised and blame may play a role in this process.

  9. Cervical cancer and the global health agenda: Insights from multiple policy-analysis frameworks

    PubMed Central

    Parkhurst, Justin O.; Vulimiri, Madhulika

    2013-01-01

    Cervical cancer is the second leading cause of cancer deaths for women globally, with an estimated 88% of deaths occurring in the developing world. Available technologies have dramatically reduced mortality in high-income settings, yet cervical cancer receives considerably little attention on the global health policy landscape. The authors applied four policy-analysis frameworks to literature on global cervical cancer to explore the question of why cervical cancer may not be receiving the international attention it may otherwise warrant. Each framework explores the process of agenda setting and discerns factors that either facilitate or hinder policy change in cases where there is both a clear problem and a potential effective solution. In combination, these frameworks highlight a number of crucial elements that may be needed to raise the profile of cervical cancer on global health agendas, including improving local (national or sub-national) information on the condition; increasing mobilisation of affected civil society groups; framing cervical cancer debates in ways that build upon its classification as a non-communicable disease (NCD) and an issue of women's rights; linking cervical cancer screening to well-funded services such as those for HIV treatment in some countries; and identifying key global policy windows of opportunity to promote the cervical cancer agenda, including emerging NCD global health discussions and post-2015 reviews of the Millennium Development Goals. PMID:24236409

  10. Lysophosphatidic Acid Inhibits Apoptosis Induced by Cisplatin in Cervical Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sui, Yanxia; Yang, Ya; Wang, Ji; Li, Yi; Ma, Hongbing; Cai, Hui; Liu, Xiaoping; Zhang, Yong; Wang, Shufeng; Li, Zongfang; Zhang, Xiaozhi; Wang, Jiansheng; Liu, Rui; Yan, Yanli; Xue, Chaofan; Shi, Xiaowei; Tan, Li; Ren, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Cervical cancer is the second most common cause of cancer death in women worldwide. Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) level has been found significantly increased in the serum of patients with ovarian, cervical, and colon cancers. LPA level in cervical cancer patients is significantly higher than in healthy controls. LPA receptors were found highly expressed in cervical cancer cells, suggesting LPA may play a role in the development of cervical cancer. The aim of this study is to investigate the effect of LPA on the apoptosis induced by cisplatin (DDP) in cervical cancer cell line and the underlying changes in signaling pathways. Our study found that cisplatin induced apoptosis of Hela cell through inhibiting expression of Bcl-2, upregulating the expression of Bax, Fas-L, and the enzyme activity of caspase-3 (p < 0.05); LPA significantly provided protection against the apoptosis induced by cisplatin by inhibiting the above alterations in apoptotic factor caused by cisplatin (p < 0.05). Moreover, PI3K/AKT pathway was found to be important for the LPA antiapoptosis effect, and administration of PI3K/AKT partially reversed the LPA-mediated protection against cisplatin-induced apoptosis (p < 0.05). These findings have shed new lights on the LPA bioactivity in cervical cancer cells and pointed to a possible sensitization scheme through combined administration of PI3K inhibitor and cisplatin for better treatment of cervical cancer patients, especially those with elevated LPA levels. PMID:26366416

  11. Self-reported use of internet by cervical cancer clients in two National Referral Hospitals in Kenya

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Cervical cancer remains a devastating disease in Kenya accounting for more than 2000 deaths each year. Lack of information on cervical cancer prevention and management has been attributed to the apathy among women in seeking health interventions. Use of internet-based and mobile e-health tools could increase information access among cervical cancer patients. The objective of the study was; to establish the extent of use of mobile phones and internet by cervical cancer patients in accessing information related to cancer treatment and management.; find out the characteristics of patients associated with internet use and identify barriers faced by the patients in internet use. A cross sectional descriptive survey of 199 cervical patients visiting the two main referral hospitals in Kenya was done. A structured questionnaire was used to collect data. Findings The average length of illness was 2.43 years (SD ± 3.0). Only 7.5 %( n=15) reported to having used the internet as a source of information. 92.5 %( n=184) did not use internet. With Multiple options, 70.9% did not know how to use a computer, 29.2% did not have access to a computer, 14.6% lacked the money to use computers at the local cyber cafe while other barriers identified accounted for 11.1%. Patients reported that the internet had an important role in the management of cancer of the cervix in health education (17.6%), online consultation (14.6%), booking of patients (13.6%), referrals (8.5%) and collecting data (7%). The 96.5% of the respondents who had access to a mobile phone, recommended mobile phones for health education messages (31.7%), reminder alerts for medication (29.7%) and booking appointments (21.6%). There was a statistically significant association between income of the patients and internet use (p = 0.026) in this study. Conclusions There is low level use of the internet by cervical cancer clients attended in Public referral facilities in Kenya. This was attributed to; lack of

  12. Human Papillomavirus Genotype Distribution in Invasive Cervical Cancer in Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    Loya, Asif; Serrano, Beatriz; Rasheed, Farah; Tous, Sara; Hassan, Mariam; Clavero, Omar; Raza, Muhammad; De Sanjosé, Silvia; Bosch, F. Xavier; Alemany, Laia

    2016-01-01

    Few studies have assessed the burden of human papillomavirus (HPV) infection in Pakistan. We aim to provide specific information on HPV-type distribution in invasive cervical cancer (ICC) in the country. A total of 280 formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue blocks were consecutively selected from Shaukat Khanum Memorial Cancer Hospital and Research Centre (Lahore, Pakistan). HPV-DNA was detected by SPF10 broad-spectrum PCR followed by DNA enzyme immunoassay and genotyping by LiPA25. HPV-DNA prevalence was 87.5% (95%CI: 83.0–91.1), with 96.1% of cases histologically classified as squamous cell carcinoma. Most of the HPV-DNA positive cases presented single infections (95.9%). HPV16 was the most common type followed by HPV18 and 45. Among HPV-DNA positive, a significantly higher contribution of HPV16/18 was detected in Pakistan (78.4%; 72.7–83.3), compared to Asia (71.6%; 69.9–73.4) and worldwide (70.8%; 69.9–71.8) and a lower contribution of HPVs31/33/45/52/58 (11.1%; 7.9–15.7 vs. 19.8%; 18.3–21.3 and 18.5%; 17.7–19.3). HPV18 or HPV45 positive ICC cases were significantly younger than cases infected by HPV16 (mean age: 43.3, 44.4, 50.5 years, respectively). A routine cervical cancer screening and HPV vaccination program does not yet exist in Pakistan; however, the country could benefit from national integrated efforts for cervical cancer prevention and control. Calculated estimations based on our results show that current HPV vaccine could potentially prevent new ICC cases. PMID:27483322

  13. Early stage cervical cancer: psychosocial and sexual outcomes of treatment.

    PubMed

    Cull, A; Cowie, V J; Farquharson, D I; Livingstone, J R; Smart, G E; Elton, R A

    1993-12-01

    Eighty-three women, mean age 45 years, successfully treated by surgery (S) or radiotherapy (RT) for stage 1b cervical cancer were assessed a mean of 97 weeks post treatment. Forty to 50% reported persistent tiredness, lack of energy and weight gain. Sixty per cent had not resumed their full premorbid functional status. Mean scores for anxiety and depression were higher than general population means and this sample scored higher for psychological distress than published data quoted for disease free cancer patients. These women reported many concerns about cervical cancer, most commonly fear of recurrent disease (91%). More than one-third blamed themselves for the disease. There were no significant differences in functional outcome or psychological status between treatment groups or by age or time since treatment. Psychological distress scores were significantly correlated with physical complaints (P < 0.001) and functional outcomes (P < 0.02). For the 61 women who were sexually active, sexual function post-treatment was rated as significantly poorer than subjectively recalled premorbid sexual function (P < 0.005). RT treated patients were more likely to report pain on intercourse and loss of enjoyment. Psychological as well as physical problems were highly correlated with sexual outcome (P < 0.01) 44% were unable to talk adequately with their partners about their experience. The majority felt they needed more information about cervical cancer, its treatment and how to help themselves rehabilitate. Forty-nine per cent would have liked to have had counselling. Even with the same physical morbidity the functional, emotional and sexual status of these women could be improved by giving more attention to their psychological and sexual concerns. PMID:8260376

  14. Cervical Cancer Rates by Race and Ethnicity

    MedlinePlus

    ... P25–1130). For more information, see the USCS technical notes. †Race categories are not mutually exclusive ... with caution. For more information, see the USCS technical notes. ¶ Data are compiled from cancer registries ...

  15. Pretreatment plasma levels and diagnostic utility of hematopoietic cytokines in cervical cancer or cervical intraepithelial neoplasia patients.

    PubMed

    Ławicki, Sławomir; Będkowska, Grażyna E; Gacuta-Szumarska, Ewa; Knapp, Paweł; Szmitkowski, Maciej

    2012-07-04

    In this study, we compared plasma levels and the diagnostic utility of hematopoietic growth factors (HGFs) with SCC-Ag in cervical cancer patients in relation to control groups and cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) patients and healthy subjects. Pretreatment plasma levels of HGFs (SCF, GM-CSF, G-CSF and M-CSF) were determined by the use of immunoenzyme assay (ELISA), and SCC-Ag by chemiluminescent microparticle immunoassay (CMIA). Significantly different concentrations of GM-CSF, G-CSF and M-CSF were observed in the group of patients with cervical cancer and CIN compared to the healthy controls. Significant differences in plasma levels of GM-CSF and M-CSF between cervical cancer and benign lesions patients were also found. The HGFs and SCC-Ag diagnostic specificities received high values. The diagnostic sensitivity and the predictive value of a positive and negative test result were higher for M-CSF than for antigen SCC in the cancer group. The M-CSF area under the ROC curve (AUC) was the largest from hematopoietic cytokines and SCC-Ag. These results suggest the potential utility of M-CSF as a good candidate for a marker of cervical cancer as well as benign lesions of this organ (CIN).

  16. Interventions for encouraging sexual behaviours intended to prevent cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    Shepherd, Jonathan P; Frampton, Geoff K; Harris, Petra

    2014-01-01

    Background Human papillomavirus (HPV) is the key risk factor for cervical cancer. Continuing high rates of HPV and other sexually transmitted infections (STIs) in young people demonstrate the need for effective behavioural interventions. Objectives To assess the effectiveness of behavioural interventions for young women to encourage safer sexual behaviours to prevent transmission of STIs (including HPV) and cervical cancer. Search methods Systematic literature searches were performed on the following databases: Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL Issue 4, 2009) Cochrane Gynaecological Cancer Review Group (CGCRG) Specialised Register, MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, PsychINFO, Social Science Citation Index and Trials Register of Promoting Health Interventions (TRoPHI) up to the end of 2009. All references were screened for inclusion against selection criteria. Selection criteria Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of behavioural interventions for young women up to the age of 25 years that included, amongst other things, information provision about the transmission and prevention of STIs. Trials had to measure behavioural outcomes (e.g. condom use) and/or biological outcomes (e.g. incidence of STIs, cervical cancer). Data collection and analysis A narrative synthesis was conducted. Meta-analysis was not considered appropriate due to heterogeneity between the interventions and trial populations. Main results A total of 5271 references were screened and of these 23 RCTs met the inclusion criteria. Most were conducted in the USA and in health-care clinics (e.g. family planning). The majority of interventions provided information about STIs and taught safer sex skills (e.g. communication), occasionally supplemented with provision of resources (e.g. free sexual health services). They were heterogeneous in duration, contact time, provider, behavioural aims and outcomes. A variety of STIs were addressed including HIV and chlamydia. None of the trials explicitly

  17. Examining connections between screening for breast, cervical and prostate cancer and colorectal cancer screening

    PubMed Central

    Wirth, Michael D; Brandt, Heather M; Dolinger, Heather; Hardin, James W; Sharpe, Patricia A; Eberth, Jan M

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Aim To compare participation in breast, cervical and prostate cancer screening with colorectal cancer (CRC) screening. Materials & methods This random digit-dialed survey includes participants (aged 50–75 years) from South Carolina (USA). Past participation information in fecal occult blood test, flexible sigmoidoscopy, colonoscopy, mammography, clinical breast examination, Pap test, prostate-specific antigen and digital rectal examination was obtained.Adjusted odds ratios are reported. Results Among European–American women, any cervical or breast cancer screening was associated with adherence to any CRC screening. Among African–American women, mammography was associated with adherence to any CRC screening. Digital rectal examination and prostate-specific antigen tests were associated with adherence to any CRC screening test among all men. Conclusion Future research should explore approaches inclusive of cancer screening recommendations for multiple cancer types for reduction of cancer screening disparities. PMID:25143785

  18. Surgical management of multilevel cervical spinal stenosis and spinal cord injury complicated by cervical spine fracture

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background There are few reports regarding surgical management of multilevel cervical spinal stenosis with spinal cord injury. Our purpose is to evaluate the safety and feasibility of open-door expansive laminoplasty in combination with transpedicular screw fixation for the treatment of multilevel cervical spinal stenosis and spinal cord injury in the trauma population. Methods This was a retrospective study of 21 patients who had multilevel cervical spinal stenosis and spinal cord injury with unstable fracture. An open-door expansive posterior laminoplasty combined with transpedicular screw fixation was performed under persistent intraoperative skull traction. Outcome measures included postoperative improvement in Japanese Orthopedic Association (JOA) score and incidence of complications. Results The average operation time was 190 min, with an average blood loss of 437 ml. A total of 120 transpedicular screws were implanted into the cervical vertebrae between vertebral C3 and C7, including 20 into C3, 34 into C4, 36 into C5, 20 into C6, and 10 into C7. The mean preoperative JOA score was 3.67 ± 0.53. The patients were followed for an average of 17.5 months, and the average JOA score improved to 8.17 ± 1.59, significantly higher than the preoperative score (t = 1.798, P < 0.05), with an average improvement of 44.7 ± 11.7%. Postoperative complications in four patients included cerebrospinal fluid leakage, delayed wound healing, pulmonary infection, and urinary system infection. All four patients were responsive to antibiotic treatment; one died from respiratory failure 3 months postoperatively. Conclusions The open-door expansive laminoplasty combined with posterior transpedicular screw fixation is feasible for treating multilevel cervical spinal stenosis and spinal cord injury complicated by unstable fracture. Its advantages include minimum surgical trauma, less intraoperative blood loss, and satisfactory stable supportive effect for

  19. Training in the prevention of cervical cancer: advantages of e-learning

    PubMed Central

    Company, Assumpta; Montserrat, Mireia; Bosch, Francesc X; de Sanjosé, Silvia

    2015-01-01

    Cervical cancer remains the second most common cancer for women worldwide and is the cancer priority in most low- and middle-income countries (LMIC). The development of vaccines against the human papilloma virus (HPV) and the impact of technology both for the detection of HPV and cervical cancer represent milestones and new opportunities in prevention. New internet-based technologies are generating mass access to training programmes. This article presents the methodology for developing an online training programme for the prevention of cervical cancer as well as the results obtained during the four year period wherein the same programme was delivered in Latin America. PMID:26557878

  20. Public health national approach to reducing breast and cervical cancer disparities.

    PubMed

    Miller, Jacqueline W; Plescia, Marcus; Ekwueme, Donatus U

    2014-08-15

    Breast and cervical cancer have had disparate impact on the lives of women. The burden of breast and cervical cancer is more prominent among some racial and ethnic minority women. Providing comprehensive care to all medically underserved women is a critical element in continuing the battle to reduce cancer burden and eliminate disparities. The National Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection Program is the only nationally organized cancer screening program for underserved women in the United States. Its public health goal is to ensure access to high-quality screening, follow-up, and treatment services for diverse and vulnerable populations that, in turn, may reduce disparities.

  1. Actual versus Perceived Risk of Cervical Cancer among College Women Smokers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saules, Karen K.; Vannest, Neo O.; Mehringer, Ann M.; Pomerleau, Cynthia S.; Lee, Keleigh; Opipari, Anthony W.; Midgley, A. Rees; Kleinsmith, Lewis J.; Sen, Ananda; Snedecor, Sandy M.

    2007-01-01

    Cervical cancer is a well-established smoking-related illness, but many at-risk women are unaware of this link. Objective: The authors designed this study to (1) investigate the relationship of smoking behavior with the history of abnormal Pap test results, sexual history, and perceived risk of cervical cancer and (2) determine whether…

  2. Cervical Cancer Screening after Perimenopause: How Is Human Papillomavirus Test Performed?

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Cervical cancer is the third most prevalent cancer in women around the world. Recently in Korea, the incidence of cervical cancer has decreased, but in all stages of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN), CIN has shown a 91% increase from 1999 to 2008. Persistent human papillomavirus (HPV) infection has been found to be the main cause of cervical cancer. HPV types 16 and 18 have been found in 70% of cervical cancer patients around the world. Cervical cancer screening such as cytology has limitations in terms of sensitivity and specificity. A discussion about the need for the HPV test is becoming active in order to compensate for the limitation of cytology. After the role of HPV in cervical cancer was identified, the importance of HPV detection test as a screening was emphasized. Several tests have been developed and each test has its own advantages and disadvantages, and new test method to overcome the disadvantages is still being developed. Today's guidelines and tests are those you would choose from among the large number of cervical cancer screening guidelines and tests, based on the consideration that the selected guidelines and the test are effective. PMID:27617239

  3. Cervical Cancer Screening after Perimenopause: How Is Human Papillomavirus Test Performed?

    PubMed

    Chung, Soo-Ho

    2016-08-01

    Cervical cancer is the third most prevalent cancer in women around the world. Recently in Korea, the incidence of cervical cancer has decreased, but in all stages of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN), CIN has shown a 91% increase from 1999 to 2008. Persistent human papillomavirus (HPV) infection has been found to be the main cause of cervical cancer. HPV types 16 and 18 have been found in 70% of cervical cancer patients around the world. Cervical cancer screening such as cytology has limitations in terms of sensitivity and specificity. A discussion about the need for the HPV test is becoming active in order to compensate for the limitation of cytology. After the role of HPV in cervical cancer was identified, the importance of HPV detection test as a screening was emphasized. Several tests have been developed and each test has its own advantages and disadvantages, and new test method to overcome the disadvantages is still being developed. Today's guidelines and tests are those you would choose from among the large number of cervical cancer screening guidelines and tests, based on the consideration that the selected guidelines and the test are effective. PMID:27617239

  4. Cervical Cancer Screening after Perimenopause: How Is Human Papillomavirus Test Performed?

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Cervical cancer is the third most prevalent cancer in women around the world. Recently in Korea, the incidence of cervical cancer has decreased, but in all stages of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN), CIN has shown a 91% increase from 1999 to 2008. Persistent human papillomavirus (HPV) infection has been found to be the main cause of cervical cancer. HPV types 16 and 18 have been found in 70% of cervical cancer patients around the world. Cervical cancer screening such as cytology has limitations in terms of sensitivity and specificity. A discussion about the need for the HPV test is becoming active in order to compensate for the limitation of cytology. After the role of HPV in cervical cancer was identified, the importance of HPV detection test as a screening was emphasized. Several tests have been developed and each test has its own advantages and disadvantages, and new test method to overcome the disadvantages is still being developed. Today's guidelines and tests are those you would choose from among the large number of cervical cancer screening guidelines and tests, based on the consideration that the selected guidelines and the test are effective.

  5. Cervical and Breast Cancer-Screening Knowledge of Women with Developmental Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parish, Susan L.; Swaine, Jamie G.; Luken, Karen; Rose, Roderick A.; Dababnah, Sarah

    2012-01-01

    Women with developmental disabilities are significantly less likely than women without disabilities to receive cervical and breast cancer screening according to clinical guidelines. The reasons for this gap are not understood. The present study examined the extent of women's knowledge about cervical and breast cancer screening, with the intention…

  6. Using the Theory of Planned Behavior to Understand Cervical Cancer Screening among Latinas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roncancio, Angelica M.; Ward, Kristy K.; Sanchez, Ingrid A.; Cano, Miguel A.; Byrd, Theresa L.; Vernon, Sally W.; Fernandez-Esquer, Maria Eugenia; Fernandez, Maria E.

    2015-01-01

    To reduce the high incidence of cervical cancer among Latinas in the United States it is important to understand factors that predict screening behavior. The aim of this study was to test the utility of theory of planned behavior in predicting cervical cancer screening among a group of Latinas. A sample of Latinas (N = 614) completed a baseline…

  7. Using Intervention Mapping as a Participatory Strategy: Development of a Cervical Cancer Screening Intervention for Hispanic Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Byrd, Theresa L.; Wilson, Katherine M.; Smith, Judith Lee; Heckert, Andrea; Orians, Carlyn E.; Vernon, Sally W.; Fernandez-Esquer, Maria E.; Fernandez, Maria E.

    2012-01-01

    Cervical cancer is preventable with treatment of precancerous lesions and treatable at early stages. Hispanics have higher rates of cervical cancer and lower rates of screening. "Ayndando a las Mujeres con Informaccion, Guia, y Amor para su Salud" (AMIGAS) is an intervention to increase cervical cancer screening in U.S. women of Mexican origin.…

  8. Gynecologic examination and cervical biopsies after (chemo) radiation for cervical cancer to identify patients eligible for salvage surgery

    SciTech Connect

    Nijhuis, Esther R.; Zee, Ate G.J. van der; Hout, Bertha A. in 't; Boomgaard, Jantine J.; Hullu, Joanne A. de; Pras, Elisabeth; Hollema, Harry; Aalders, Jan G.; Nijman, Hans W.; Willemse, Pax H.B.; Mourits, Marian J.E. . E-mail: m.j.e.mourits@og.umcg.nl

    2006-11-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate efficacy of gynecologic examination under general anesthesia with cervical biopsies after (chemo) radiation for cervical cancer to identify patients with residual disease who may benefit from salvage surgery. Methods and Materials: In a retrospective cohort study data of all cervical cancer patients with the International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) Stage IB1 to IVA treated with (chemo) radiation between 1994 and 2001 were analyzed. Patients underwent gynecologic examination under anesthesia 8 to 10 weeks after completion of treatment. Cervical biopsy samples were taken from patients judged to be operable. In case of residual cancer, salvage surgery was performed. Results: Between 1994 and 2001, 169 consecutive cervical cancer patients received primary (chemo) radiation, of whom 4 were lost to follow-up. Median age was 56 years (interquartile range [IQR], 44-71) and median follow-up was 3.5 years (IQR, 1.5-5.9). In each of 111 patients a biopsy sample was taken, of which 90 (81%) showed no residual tumor. Vital tumor cells were found in 21 of 111 patients (19%). Salvage surgery was performed in 13 of 21 (62%) patients; of these patients, 5 (38%) achieved long-term, complete remission after salvage surgery (median follow-up, 5.2 years; range, 3.9-8.8 years). All patients with residual disease who did not undergo operation (8/21) died of progressive disease. Locoregional control was more often obtained in patients who underwent operation (7 of 13) than in patients who were not selected for salvage surgery (0 of 8 patients) (p < 0.05). Conclusions: Gynecologic examination under anesthesia 8 to 10 weeks after (chemo) radiation with cervical biopsies allows identification of those cervical cancer patients who have residual local disease, of whom a small but significant proportion may be salvaged by surgery.

  9. Evaluation of an educational program on cervical cancer for rural women in Mangalore, Southern India.

    PubMed

    Mary, Bright; D'Sa, Juliana Linnette

    2014-01-01

    Cervical cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer in women worldwide. One way by which the incidence of this malignant disease can be minimized is by imparting knowledge through health education. This study aimed at developing an educational package on cervical cancer (EPCC) and determining its effectiveness in terms of significant increase in knowledge of rural women regarding cervical cancer. A one group pre-test, post-test design was adopted. Thirty rural women were selected using a convenient sampling method. Data were collected using a demographic questionnaire and a structured knowledge questionnaire developed by the researchers. The EPCC was designed for a duration of one hour and 10 minutes. The structured knowledge questionnaire was first administered as the pre-test, following which knowledge on cervical cancer was imparted using the EPCC. On the 8th day, the post-test was administered. Data were analyzed using descriptive and inferential statistics. The mean post-test knowledge score of the women regarding cervical cancer was significantly higher than that of their mean pre-test score, indicating that the EPCC was effective in improving the knowledge of rural women on cervical cancer. The association between pre-test knowledge scores and selected demo-graphic variables were computed using chi-square test showed that pre-test knowledge score of the women regarding cervical cancer was independent of all the socio-demographic variables. It was concluded that the EPCC is effective in improving the knowledge of women, regarding cervical cancer. Since the prevalence of cervical cancer is high, there is an immediate need to educate women on prevention of cervical cancer. PMID:25169495

  10. Inhibiting CD146 by its Monoclonal Antibody AA98 Improves Radiosensitivity of Cervical Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Huawen

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Cervical cancer is one of the major causes of cancer death of females worldwide. Radiotherapy is considered effective for cervical cancer treatment, but the low radiosensitivity found in some cases severely affects therapeutic outcomes. This study aimed to reveal the role of CD146, an important adhesion molecule facilitating tumor angiogenesis, in regulating radiosensitivity of cervical cancer cells. MATERIAL AND METHODS CD146 protein expression was compared in normal cells, cervical cancer cells with lower radiosensitivity, and cervical cancer cells with higher sensitivity from cervical squamous cell carcinoma patients. Anti-CD146 monoclonal antibody AA98 was used to inhibit CD146 in human cervical cancer SiHa cells with relatively low radiosensitivity, and then the cell survival and apoptosis changes after radiation were detected by colony formation assay and flow cytometry. RESULTS CD146 protein was significantly up-regulated in cervical cancer cells (P<0.001), especially in cancer cells with lower radiosensitivity. The SiHa cells treated with AA98 showed more obvious inhibition in cell survival (P<0.05) and promotion in cell apoptosis (P<0.01) after radiation, compared to the untreated cells. More dramatic changes in apoptotic factors Caspase 3 and Bcl-XL were also detected in AA98-treated cells. CONCLUSIONS These results indicate that inhibiting CD146 improves the effect of radiation in suppressing SiHa cells. This study shows the potential of CD146 as a target for increasing radiosensitivity of cervical cancer cells, which might allow improvement in treatment outcome in cervical cancer. Further studies are necessary for understanding the detailed mechanism of CD146 in regulating radiosensitivity. PMID:27647179

  11. Inhibiting CD146 by its Monoclonal Antibody AA98 Improves Radiosensitivity of Cervical Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Huawen

    2016-01-01

    Background Cervical cancer is one of the major causes of cancer death of females worldwide. Radiotherapy is considered effective for cervical cancer treatment, but the low radiosensitivity found in some cases severely affects therapeutic outcomes. This study aimed to reveal the role of CD146, an important adhesion molecule facilitating tumor angiogenesis, in regulating radiosensitivity of cervical cancer cells. Material/Methods CD146 protein expression was compared in normal cells, cervical cancer cells with lower radiosensitivity, and cervical cancer cells with higher sensitivity from cervical squamous cell carcinoma patients. Anti-CD146 monoclonal antibody AA98 was used to inhibit CD146 in human cervical cancer SiHa cells with relatively low radiosensitivity, and then the cell survival and apoptosis changes after radiation were detected by colony formation assay and flow cytometry. Results CD146 protein was significantly up-regulated in cervical cancer cells (P<0.001), especially in cancer cells with lower radiosensitivity. The SiHa cells treated with AA98 showed more obvious inhibition in cell survival (P<0.05) and promotion in cell apoptosis (P<0.01) after radiation, compared to the untreated cells. More dramatic changes in apoptotic factors Caspase 3 and Bcl-XL were also detected in AA98-treated cells. Conclusions These results indicate that inhibiting CD146 improves the effect of radiation in suppressing SiHa cells. This study shows the potential of CD146 as a target for increasing radiosensitivity of cervical cancer cells, which might allow improvement in treatment outcome in cervical cancer. Further studies are necessary for understanding the detailed mechanism of CD146 in regulating radiosensitivity. PMID:27647179

  12. Qualitative study of barriers to cervical cancer screening among Nigerian women

    PubMed Central

    Isa Modibbo, Fatima; Dareng, Eileen; Bamisaye, Patience; Jedy-Agba, Elima; Adewole, Ayodele; Oyeneyin, Lawal; Olaniyan, Olayinka; Adebamowo, Clement

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To explore the barriers to cervical cancer screening, focusing on religious and cultural factors, in order to inform group-specific interventions that may improve uptake of cervical cancer screening programmes. Design We conducted four focus group discussions among Muslim and Christian women in Nigeria. Setting Discussions were conducted in two hospitals, one in the South West and the other in the North Central region of Nigeria. Participants 27 Christian and 22 Muslim women over the age of 18, with no diagnosis of cancer. Results Most participants in the focus group discussions had heard about cervical cancer except Muslim women in the South Western region who had never heard about cervical cancer. Participants believed that wizardry, multiple sexual partners and inserting herbs into the vagina cause cervical cancer. Only one participant knew about the human papillomavirus. Among the Christian women, the majority of respondents had heard about cervical cancer screening and believed that it could be used to prevent cervical cancer. Participants mentioned religious and cultural obligations of modesty, gender of healthcare providers, fear of disclosure of results, fear of nosocomial infections, lack of awareness, discrimination at hospitals, and need for spousal approval as barriers to uptake of screening. These barriers varied by religion across the geographical regions. Conclusions Barriers to cervical cancer screening vary by religious affiliations. Interventions to increase cervical cancer awareness and screening uptake in multicultural and multireligious communities need to take into consideration the varying cultural and religious beliefs in order to design and implement effective cervical cancer screening intervention programmes. PMID:26754174

  13. Robotic thyroidectomy and cervical neck dissection for thyroid cancer

    PubMed Central

    Paek, Se Hyun

    2016-01-01

    A robotic approach for thyroid surgery was developed to overcome the limitations of endoscopic thyroidectomy and provide many technical advantages. This approach facilitates the surgeon’s control through a magnified three-dimensional view, decreased tremor, and freedom of motion with articulated instruments. Robotic thyroidectomy is safe and technically feasible in patients with well-differentiated, low-risk thyroid cancer. Furthermore, robotic thyroidectomy may become a good surgical alternative option for patients with more advanced thyroid cancer. Our modified bilateral axillo-breast approach (BABA) for central and lateral cervical neck lymph node (LN) dissection has yielded excellent surgical outcomes as an open procedure. The incorporation of robotics in thyroid cancer surgery will continue to evolve, and the surgical indications for robotic thyroidectomy will continue to expand. Further analyses that include long-term outcomes and randomized comparative trials remain important. PMID:27294043

  14. Robotic thyroidectomy and cervical neck dissection for thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Paek, Se Hyun; Kang, Kyung Ho

    2016-06-01

    A robotic approach for thyroid surgery was developed to overcome the limitations of endoscopic thyroidectomy and provide many technical advantages. This approach facilitates the surgeon's control through a magnified three-dimensional view, decreased tremor, and freedom of motion with articulated instruments. Robotic thyroidectomy is safe and technically feasible in patients with well-differentiated, low-risk thyroid cancer. Furthermore, robotic thyroidectomy may become a good surgical alternative option for patients with more advanced thyroid cancer. Our modified bilateral axillo-breast approach (BABA) for central and lateral cervical neck lymph node (LN) dissection has yielded excellent surgical outcomes as an open procedure. The incorporation of robotics in thyroid cancer surgery will continue to evolve, and the surgical indications for robotic thyroidectomy will continue to expand. Further analyses that include long-term outcomes and randomized comparative trials remain important.

  15. Polymorphisms in TP53 (rs1042522), p16 (rs11515 and rs3088440) and NQO1 (rs1800566) genes in Thai cervical cancer patients with HPV 16 infection.

    PubMed

    Chansaenroj, Jira; Theamboonlers, Apiradee; Junyangdikul, Pairoj; Swangvaree, Sukumarn; Karalak, Anant; Chinchai, Teeraporn; Poovorawan, Yong

    2013-01-01

    The risk of cervical cancer development in women infected with HPV varies in relation to the individual host's genetic makeup. Many studies on polymorphisms as genetic factors have been aimed at analyzing associations with cervical cancer. In this study, single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 3 genes were investigated in relation to cervical cancer progression in HPV16 infected women with lesions. Two thousand cervical specimens were typed by PCR sequencing methods for TP53 (rs1042522), p16 (rs11515 and rs3088440) and NQO1 (rs1800566). Ninety two HPV16 positive cases and thirty two normal cases were randomly selected. Analysis of TP53 (rs1042522) showed a significantly higher frequency in cancer samples (OR=1.22, 95%CI=1.004-1.481, p-value=0.016) while differences in frequency were not significant within each group (p-value=0.070). The genotype distributions of p16 (rs11515 and rs3088440) and NQO1 (rs1800566) did not show any significantly higher frequency in cancer samples (p-value=0.106, 0.675 and 0.132, respectively) or within each group (p-value=0.347, 0.939 and 0.111, respectively). The results indicated that the polymorphism in TP53 (rs1042522) might be associated with risk of cervical cancer development in HPV16 infected women. Further studies of possible mechanisms of influence on cervical cancer development would be useful to manage HPV infected patients. PMID:23534750

  16. Knowledge, Attitudes, and Practices for Cervical Cancer Screening Among the Bhutanese Refugee Community in Omaha, Nebraska

    PubMed Central

    Haworth, Rebecca J.; Margalit, Ruth; Ross, Christine; Nepal, Tikka

    2014-01-01

    Cervical cancer is the second most common cause of cancer mortality among women with the vast majority of patients in developing countries. Bhutanese refugees in the United States are from South Central Asia, the 4th leading region of the world for cervical cancer incidence. Over the past few years, Bhutanese refugees have increased significantly in Nebraska. This study evaluates current knowledge of cervical cancer and screening practices among the Bhutanese refugee women in Omaha, Nebraska. The study aimed to investigate cervical cancer and screening knowledge and perceptions about the susceptibility and severity of cervical cancer and perceived benefits and barriers to screening. Self-administered questionnaires and focus groups based on the Health Belief Model were conducted among 42 healthy women from the Bhutanese refugee community in Omaha. The study revealed a significant lack of knowledge in this community regarding cervical cancer and screening practices, with only 22.2 % reporting ever hearing of a Pap test and 13.9 % reporting ever having one. Only 33.3 % of women were in agreement with their own perceived susceptibility to cervical cancer. Women who reported ever hearing about the Pap test tended to believe more strongly about curability of the disease if discovered early than women who never heard about the test (71.4 vs. 45.0 %, for the two groups. respectively). Refugee populations in the United States are in need for tailored cancer education programs especially when being resettled from countries with high risk for cancer. PMID:25060231

  17. Current Evidence and Potential Mechanisms of Therapeutic Action of PEDF in Cervical Cancer Treatment.

    PubMed

    Han, J; Guo, J

    2015-01-01

    Cervical cancer is the second leading gynecological malignancy threat to the health of women in the world. However, few improvements in the efficacy of treatments of cervical cancer have been reported for the recurrent and metastasis patterns. As an endogenous antitumor agent, pigment epithelium derived factor (PEDF) has attracted wide attention, and its sensitivity to estrogen suggests a special role in female tumors, including cervical cancer. This review aims to summarize recent findings, the role of PEDF in cervical cancer treatment, and enhance the current understanding of the antitumor properties of PEDF such as inhibiting angiogenesis and metastasis, inducing tumor cell apoptosis and differentiation, and modulating cellular immunity against cervical cancer. The production and delivery of PEDF, as well as derived short peptides and their respective receptors will also be discussed.

  18. Lessons and implications from association studies and post-GWAS analyses of cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Chen, Dan; Gyllensten, Ulf

    2015-01-01

    Cervical cancer has a heritable genetic component. A large number of genetic associations with cervical cancer have been reported in hypothesis-driven candidate gene studies, but many of these results are either inconsistent or have failed to be independently replicated. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have identified additional susceptibility loci previously not implicated in cervical cancer development, highlighting the power of genome-wide unbiased association analyses. Post-GWAS analyses including pathway-based analysis and functional characterization of associated variants have provided new insights into the pathogenesis of cervical cancer. In this review we summarize findings from candidate gene association studies, GWAS, and post-GWAS analyses of cervical cancer. We also discuss gaps in our understanding, possible clinical implications of the findings, and lessons for studies of other complex diseases.

  19. Multiple Biopsies and Detection of Cervical Cancer Precursors at Colposcopy

    PubMed Central

    Wentzensen, Nicolas; Walker, Joan L.; Gold, Michael A.; Smith, Katie M.; Zuna, Rosemary E.; Mathews, Cara; Dunn, S. Terence; Zhang, Roy; Moxley, Katherine; Bishop, Erin; Tenney, Meaghan; Nugent, Elizabeth; Graubard, Barry I.; Wacholder, Sholom; Schiffman, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Women with abnormal cervical cancer screening results are referred to colposcopy and biopsy for diagnosis of cervical cancer precursors (high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions [HSILs]). Colposcopy with a single biopsy can miss identification of HSILs. No systematic study has quantified the improved detection of HSIL by taking multiple lesion-directed biopsies. Methods The Biopsy Study was an observational study of 690 women referred to colposcopy after abnormal cervical cancer screening results. Up to four directed biopsies were taken from distinct acetowhite lesions and ranked by colposcopic impression. A nondirected biopsy of a normal-appearing area was added if fewer than four directed biopsies were taken. HSIL identified by any biopsy was the reference standard of disease used to evaluate the incremental yield and sensitivity of multiple biopsies. Results In the overall population, sensitivities for detecting HSIL increased from 60.6% (95% CI, 54.8% to 66.6%) from a single biopsy to 85.6% (95% CI, 80.3% to 90.2%) after two biopsies and to 95.6% (95% CI, 91.3% to 99.2%) after three biopsies. A significant increase in sensitivity of multiple biopsies was observed in all subgroups. The highest increase in yield of HSIL was observed for women with a high-grade colposcopic impression, HSIL cytology, and human papillomavirus (HPV) type 16 positivity. Only 2% of all HSILs diagnosed in the participants were detected by biopsies of normal-appearing transformation zone. Conclusion Collection of additional lesion-directed biopsies during colposcopy increased detection of histologic HSIL, regardless of patient characteristics. Taking additional biopsies when multiple lesions are present should become the standard practice of colposcopic biopsy. PMID:25422481

  20. Cervical and Breast Cancer Screening Among Mexican Migrant Women, 2013

    PubMed Central

    Guerrero, Natalie; Zhang, Xiao; Rangel, Gudelia; Gonzalez-Fagoaga, J. Eduardo

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Information on cervical and breast cancer screening among Latinas in the United States is limited. Even less information is available on screening practices of migrant women who engage in circular migration. We examined rates of cervical and breast cancer screening and the extent to which sociodemographics and other characteristics explain screening practices of Mexican migrant women who return to Mexico from the United States. Methods We used data from a cross-sectional probability survey of Mexico-born migrant women who returned, through Tijuana, to Mexico from the United States in 2013. The sample consisted of women who returned involuntarily (via deportation) or voluntarily; 177 reported authorized documentation status, and 36 reported unauthorized documentation status in the previous 12 months. Descriptive statistics were calculated and logistic regressions were estimated. Results Of 36 undocumented migrant women, 8 (22.2%) had a Papanicolaou test and 11 (30.6%) had a mammogram in the previous year; of 177 documented migrants, 83 (46.9%) had a Papanicolaou test and 68 (38.4%) had a mammogram. Undocumented migrants were less likely than documented migrants to receive a Papanicolaou test (odds ratio [OR] = 0.29; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.12–0.67); the likelihood was similar after adjustment for sociodemographic, migration, and acculturation factors (adjusted OR = 0.33; 95% CI, 0.12–0.90). Having health insurance (adjusted OR = 4.17; 95% CI, 1.80–9.65) and a regular source of health care (adjusted OR = 2.83; 95% CI, 1.05–7.65) were significant predictors of receiving a mammogram but not a Papanicolaou test. Conclusion Public health programs are needed to improve access to cervical and breast cancer screenings for Latina migrant women in general and undocumented circular migrants in particular. PMID:27513995

  1. Dosimetrically Triggered Adaptive Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy for Cervical Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, Karen; Stewart, James; Kelly, Valerie; Xie, Jason; Brock, Kristy K.; Moseley, Joanne; Cho, Young-Bin; Fyles, Anthony; Lundin, Anna; Rehbinder, Henrik; Löf, Johan; Jaffray, David A.; Milosevic, Michael

    2014-09-01

    Purpose: The widespread use of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) for cervical cancer has been limited by internal target and normal tissue motion. Such motion increases the risk of underdosing the target, especially as planning margins are reduced in an effort to reduce toxicity. This study explored 2 adaptive strategies to mitigate this risk and proposes a new, automated method that minimizes replanning workload. Methods and Materials: Thirty patients with cervical cancer participated in a prospective clinical study and underwent pretreatment and weekly magnetic resonance (MR) scans over a 5-week course of daily external beam radiation therapy. Target volumes and organs at risk (OARs) were contoured on each of the scans. Deformable image registration was used to model the accumulated dose (the real dose delivered to the target and OARs) for 2 adaptive replanning scenarios that assumed a very small PTV margin of only 3 mm to account for setup and internal interfractional motion: (1) a preprogrammed, anatomy-driven midtreatment replan (A-IMRT); and (2) a dosimetry-triggered replan driven by target dose accumulation over time (D-IMRT). Results: Across all 30 patients, clinically relevant target dose thresholds failed for 8 patients (27%) if 3-mm margins were used without replanning. A-IMRT failed in only 3 patients and also yielded an additional small reduction in OAR doses at the cost of 30 replans. D-IMRT assured adequate target coverage in all patients, with only 23 replans in 16 patients. Conclusions: A novel, dosimetry-triggered adaptive IMRT strategy for patients with cervical cancer can minimize the risk of target underdosing in the setting of very small margins and substantial interfractional motion while minimizing programmatic workload and cost.

  2. Carbon nanowall scaffold to control culturing of cervical cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Hitoshi; Kondo, Hiroki; Okamoto, Yukihiro; Hiramatsu, Mineo; Sekine, Makoto; Baba, Yoshinobu; Hori, Masaru

    2014-12-01

    The effect of carbon nanowalls (CNWs) on the culturing rate and morphological control of cervical cancer cells (HeLa cells) was investigated. CNWs with different densities were grown using plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition and subjected to post-growth plasma treatment for modification of the surface terminations. Although the surface wettability of the CNWs was not significantly dependent on the CNW densities, the cell culturing rates were significantly dependent. Morphological changes of the cells were not significantly dependent on the density of CNWs. These results indicate that plasma-induced surface morphology and chemical terminations enable nanobio applications using carbon nanomaterials.

  3. Time since first sexual intercourse and the risk of cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    Plummer, Martyn; Peto, Julian; Franceschi, Silvia

    2014-01-01

    Young age at first sexual intercourse is an important risk factor for cervical cancer, but no simple statistical model of its influence has been established. We investigated the relationship between risk of cervical carcinoma and time since first intercourse using data on monogamous women (5,074 cases and 16,137 controls) from the International Collaboration of Epidemiological Studies of Cervical Cancer. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated from pooled data on 20 studies using conditional logistic regression. The OR for invasive cervical carcinoma is approximately proportional to the square of time since first intercourse (exponent 1.95, 95% CI: 1.76–2.15) up to age 45. First cervical infection with human papillomavirus (HPV) often occurs soon after first sexual intercourse, so early age at first sexual intercourse is a reasonable proxy for early age at first exposure to HPV. In addition, age-specific incidence rates of cervical cancer in unscreened populations remain fairly constant above age 45. Cervical cancer thus resembles other cancers caused by strong early-stage carcinogens, with incidence rates proportional to a power of time since first exposure and also resembles cancers of the breast and other hormone-dependent epithelia where a similar flattening of age-specific incidence rates is seen at the time menopausal changes start. Taken together, these observations suggest that HPV vaccination may prevent the majority of cervical cancers by delaying HPV infection without necessarily providing lifetime protection against HPV. PMID:21702036

  4. Prolactin and prolactin receptor expression in cervical intraepithelial neoplasia and cancer.

    PubMed

    Ascencio-Cedillo, Rafael; López-Pulido, Edgar Ivan; Muñoz-Valle, José Francisco; Villegas-Sepúlveda, Nicolás; Del Toro-Arreola, Susana; Estrada-Chávez, Ciro; Daneri-Navarro, Adrian; Franco-Topete, Ramón; Pérez-Montiel, Delia; García-Carrancá, Alejandro; Pereira-Suárez, Ana Laura

    2015-04-01

    Prolactin receptor (PRLR) overexpression could play a role in tumorigenesis. The aim of this study was to determine prolactin (PRL) and PRLR expression in biopsies from patients with precursor lesions and uterine cervical cancer. PRLR expression was analyzed in 63 paraffin-embedded biopsies of uterine cervical tissue. In total, eleven low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (LSIL), 23 high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (HSIL), 21 uterine cervical cancers (UCC) and 8 normal epithelium (NE) were examined using immunoperoxidase staining and Western blot analysis. Additionally, PRL expression was identified in human cervical cancer serum and tissues. The PRLR expression was found to be significantly increased in cervical cancer in comparison with normal tissue and precursor lesions (P < 0.0003). The presence of the long isoform of the PRLR was observed only in cervical cancer tissues. Serum PRL levels were normal in all samples and local prolactin expression was similar in precursor lesions and cervical cancer by Western blot analysis. Our data suggest a possible role for PRLR in the progression of cervical cancer.

  5. Requirement for Estrogen Receptor Alpha in a Mouse Model for Human Papillomavirus-Associated Cervical Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Sang-Hyuk; Wiedmeyer, Kerri; Shai, Anny; Korach, Kenneth S.; Lambert, Paul F.

    2008-01-01

    The majority of human cervical cancers are associated with the high-risk human papillomaviruses (HPVs), which encode the potent E6 and E7 oncogenes. Upon prolonged treatment with physiological levels of exogenous estrogen, K14E7 transgenic mice expressing HPV-16 E7 oncoprotein in their squamous epithelia succumb to uterine cervical cancer. Furthermore, prolonged withdrawal of exogenous estrogen results in complete or partial regression of tumors in this mouse model. In the current study we investigated whether estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) is required for the development of cervical cancer in K14E7 transgenic mice. We demonstrate that exogenous estrogen fails to promote either dysplasia or cervical cancer in K14E7/ERα−/− mice despite the continued presence of the presumed cervical cancer precursor cell type, reserve cells, and evidence for E7 expression therein. We also observed that cervical cancers in our mouse models are strictly associated with atypical squamous metaplasia (ASM), which is believed to be the precursor for cervical cancer in women. Consistently, E7 and exogenous estrogen failed to promote ASM in the absence of ERα. We conclude that ERα plays a crucial role at an early stage of cervical carcinogenesis in this mouse model. PMID:19047174

  6. Expression of transcription factor grainyhead-like 2 is diminished in cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    Torres-Reyes, Luis A; Alvarado-Ruiz, Liliana; Piña-Sánchez, Patricia; Martínez-Silva, María G; Ramos-Solano, Moisés; Olimón-Andalón, Vicente; Ortiz-Lazareno, Pablo C; Hernández-Flores, Georgina; Bravo-Cuellar, Alejandro; Aguilar-Lemarroy, Adriana; Jave-Suarez, Luis F

    2014-01-01

    The transcription factor grainyhead-like 2 (GRHL2) is evolutionarily conserved in many different species, and is involved in morphogenesis, epithelial differentiation, and the control of the epithelial-mesenchymal transition. It has also recently been implicated in carcinogenesis, but its role in this remains controversial. Expression of GRHL2 has not previously been reported in cervical cancer, so the present study aimed to characterize GRHL2 expression in cervical cancer-derived cell lines (CCCLs) and cervical tissues with different grades of lesions. Microarray analysis found that the expression of 58 genes was down-regulated in CCCLs compared to HaCaT cells (non-tumorigenic human epithelial cell line). The expression of eight of these genes was validated by quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR), and GRHL2 was found to be the most down-regulated. Western blot assays corroborated that GRHL2 protein levels were strongly down-regulated in CCCLs. Cervical cells from women without cervical lesions were shown to express GRHL2, while immunohistochemistry found that positivity to GRHL2 decreased in cervical cancer tissues. In conclusion, a loss or strong reduction in GRHL2 expression appears to be a characteristic of cervical cancer, suggesting that GRHL2 down-regulation is a necessary step during cervical carcinogenesis. However, further studies are needed to delineate the role of GRHL2 in cervical cancer and during malignant progression. PMID:25550776

  7. Knowledge of Human Papillomavirus Infection, Cervical Cancer and Willingness to pay for Cervical Cancer Vaccination among Ethnically Diverse Medical Students in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Maharajan, Mari Kannan; Rajiah, Kingston; Num, Kelly Sze Fang; Yong, Ng Jin

    2015-01-01

    The primary objective of this study was to assess the knowledge of medical students and determine variation between different cultural groups. A secondary aim was to find out the willingness to pay for cervical cancer vaccination and the relationships between knowledge and attitudes towards Human Papillomavirus vaccination. A cross-sectional survey was conducted in a private medical university between June 2014 and November 2014 using a convenient sampling method. A total of 305 respondents were recruited and interviewed with standard questionnaires for assessment of knowledge, attitudes and practice towards human papilloma virus and their willingness to pay for HPV vaccination. Knowledge regarding human papilloma virus, human papilloma virus vaccination, cervical cancer screening and cervical cancer risk factors was good. Across the sample, a majority (90%) of the pupils demonstrated a high degree of knowledge about cervical cancer and its vaccination. There were no significant differences between ethnicity and the participants' overall knowledge of HPV infection, Pap smear and cervical cancer vaccination. Some 88% of participants answered that HPV vaccine can prevent cervical cancer, while 81.5% of medical students said they would recommend HPV vaccination to the public although fewer expressed an intention to receive vaccination for themselves. PMID:26320444

  8. LncRNAs: key players and novel insights into cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Peng, Li; Yuan, Xiaoqing; Jiang, Binyuan; Tang, Zaili; Li, Guan-Cheng

    2016-03-01

    Cervical cancer contributed the second highest number of deaths in female cancers, exceeded only by breast cancer, carrying high risks of morbidity and mortality. There was a great need and urgency in searching novel treatment targets and prognosis biomarkers to improve the survival rate of cervical cancer patients. Many long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) were emerging as pivotal regulators in various biological processes and took vitally an effect on the oncogenesis and progression of cervical cancer. In this review, we summarized the origin and overview function of lncRNAs; highlighted the roles of lncRNAs in cervical cancer in terms of prognosis and tumor progression, invasion and metastasis, apoptosis, and radio-resistance; and outlined the molecular mechanisms of lncRNAs in cervical cancer from the aspects of the interaction of lncRNAs with proteins/mRNAs (especially in HPV protein) and miRNAs, as well as RNA N-methyladenosine (m6A) methylation of lncRNAs. Meanwhile, the application of lncRNAs as biomarkers in cervical cancer prognosis and predictors for metastasis was also discussed. An overview of these researches will be valuable for broadening horizons into mechanisms, selection of meritorious biomarkers for diagnosis as well as prognosis, and future targeted therapy of cervical cancer.

  9. Neither One-Time Negative Screening Tests nor Negative Colposcopy Provides Absolute Reassurance against Cervical Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Castle, Philip E.; Rodríguez, Ana C.; Burk, Robert D.; Herrero, Rolando; Hildesheim, Allan; Solomon, Diane; Sherman, Mark E.; Jeronimo, Jose; Alfaro, Mario; Morales, Jorge; Guillén, Diego; Hutchinson, Martha L.; Wacholder, Sholom; Schiffman, Mark

    2009-01-01

    A population sample of 10,049 women living in Guanacaste, Costa Rica was recruited into a natural history of human papillomavirus (HPV) and cervical neoplasia study in 1993–4. At the enrollment visit, we applied multiple state-of-the-art cervical cancer screening methods to detect prevalent cervical cancer and to prevent subsequent cervical cancers by the timely detection and treatment of precancerous lesions. Women were screened at enrollment with 3 kinds of cytology (often reviewed by more than one pathologist), visual inspection, and Cervicography. Any positive screening test led to colposcopic referral and biopsy and/or excisional treatment of CIN2 or worse. We retrospectively tested stored specimens with an early HPV test (Hybrid Capture Tube Test) and for >40 HPV genotypes using a research PCR assay. We followed women typically 5–7 years and some up to 11 years. Nonetheless, sixteen cases of invasive cervical cancer were diagnosed during follow-up. Six cancer cases were failures at enrollment to detect abnormalities by cytology screening; three of the six were also negative at enrollment by sensitive HPV DNA testing. Seven cancers represent failures of colposcopy to diagnose cancer or a precancerous lesion in screen-positive women. Finally, three cases arose despite attempted excisional treatment of precancerous lesions. Based on this evidence, we suggest that no current secondary cervical cancer prevention technologies applied once in a previously under-screened population is likely to be 100% efficacious in preventing incident diagnoses of invasive cervical cancer. PMID:19569231

  10. LncRNAs: key players and novel insights into cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Peng, Li; Yuan, Xiaoqing; Jiang, Binyuan; Tang, Zaili; Li, Guan-Cheng

    2016-03-01

    Cervical cancer contributed the second highest number of deaths in female cancers, exceeded only by breast cancer, carrying high risks of morbidity and mortality. There was a great need and urgency in searching novel treatment targets and prognosis biomarkers to improve the survival rate of cervical cancer patients. Many long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) were emerging as pivotal regulators in various biological processes and took vitally an effect on the oncogenesis and progression of cervical cancer. In this review, we summarized the origin and overview function of lncRNAs; highlighted the roles of lncRNAs in cervical cancer in terms of prognosis and tumor progression, invasion and metastasis, apoptosis, and radio-resistance; and outlined the molecular mechanisms of lncRNAs in cervical cancer from the aspects of the interaction of lncRNAs with proteins/mRNAs (especially in HPV protein) and miRNAs, as well as RNA N-methyladenosine (m6A) methylation of lncRNAs. Meanwhile, the application of lncRNAs as biomarkers in cervical cancer prognosis and predictors for metastasis was also discussed. An overview of these researches will be valuable for broadening horizons into mechanisms, selection of meritorious biomarkers for diagnosis as well as prognosis, and future targeted therapy of cervical cancer. PMID:26715267

  11. ACOG Practice Bulletin No.142: Cerclage for the management of cervical insufficiency.

    PubMed

    2014-02-01

    The inability of the uterine cervix to retain a pregnancy in the second trimester is referred to as cervical insufficiency. Controversy exists in the medical literature pertaining to issues of pathophysiology, screening, diagnosis, and management of cervical insufficiency. The purpose of this document is to provide a review of current evidence of cervical insufficiency, including screening of asymptomatic at-risk women, and to offer guidelines on the use of cerclage for management. The diagnosis and management of other cervical issues during pregnancy, such as short cervical length, are discussed more in-depth in other publications of the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists.

  12. Detection of High-Risk Human Papillomaviruses in the Prevention of Cervical Cancer in India.

    PubMed

    Baskaran, Krishnan; Kumar, P Kranthi; Karunanithi, Santha; Sethupathy, Subramanian; Thamaraiselvi, B; Swaruparani, S

    2015-01-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) are small, non-enveloped, double-stranded DNA viruses that infect epithelial tissues. Specific genotypes of human papillomavirus are the single most common etiological agents of cervical intraepithelial lesions and cervical cancer. Cervical cancer usually arises at squamous metaplastic epithelium of transformation zone (TZ) of the cervix featuring infection with one or more oncogenic or high-risk HPV (HR- HPV) types. A hospital- based study in a rural set up was carried out to understand the association of HR-HPV with squamous intraepithelial lesions (SILs) and cervical cancer. In the present study, HR-HPV was detected in 65.7% of low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (LSILs), 84.6% of high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (HSILs) and 94% of cervical cancer as compared to 10.7% of controls. The association of HPV infection with SIL and cervical cancer was analyzed with Chi square test (p<0.001). The significant association found confirmed that detection of HR-HPV is a suitable candidate for early identification of cervical precancerous lesions and in the prevention of cervical cancer in India.

  13. Hedgehog pathway regulators influence cervical cancer cell proliferation, survival and migration

    SciTech Connect

    Samarzija, Ivana; Beard, Peter

    2012-08-17

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Unknown cellular mutations complement papillomavirus-induced carcinogenesis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hedgehog pathway components are expressed by cervical cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Hedgehog pathway activators and inhibitors regulate cervical cancer cell biology. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cell immortalization by papillomavirus and activation of Hedgehog are independent. -- Abstract: Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is considered to be a primary hit that causes cervical cancer. However, infection with this agent, although needed, is not sufficient for a cancer to develop. Additional cellular changes are required to complement the action of HPV, but the precise nature of these changes is not clear. Here, we studied the function of the Hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway in cervical cancer. The Hh pathway can have a role in a number of cancers, including those of liver, lung and digestive tract. We found that components of the Hh pathway are expressed in several cervical cancer cell lines, indicating that there could exists an autocrine Hh signaling loop in these cells. Inhibition of Hh signaling reduces proliferation and survival of the cervical cancer cells and induces their apoptosis as seen by the up-regulation of the pro-apoptotic protein cleaved caspase 3. Our results indicate that Hh signaling is not induced directly by HPV-encoded proteins but rather that Hh-activating mutations are selected in cells initially immortalized by HPV. Sonic Hedgehog (Shh) ligand induces proliferation and promotes migration of the cervical cancer cells studied. Together, these results indicate pro-survival and protective roles of an activated Hh signaling pathway in cervical cancer-derived cells, and suggest that inhibition of this pathway may be a therapeutic option in fighting cervical cancer.

  14. A centralised cytology screening programme for cervical cancer in Florence.

    PubMed Central

    Palli, D; Carli, S; Cecchini, S; Venturini, A; Piazzesi, G; Buiatti, E

    1990-01-01

    STUDY OBJECTIVE--The aim of the study was to evaluate the effectiveness of a centralised population based cervical cytology screening programme. DESIGN--The study was a case-control investigation. SETTING--Cases and controls were confined to the province of Florence. PARTICIPANTS--191 out of 208 cases of cervical cancer in women less than 75 years old at diagnosis in the period 1982-85 were interviewed. For each case three living controls were selected, strictly matched by year of birth and district of residence; in all 573 controls were eventually identified. Of these, 15 had had a hysterectomy (2.6%) and were excluded, and a further 18 (3.2%) did not take part for other reasons, leaving a total of 540 controls. MEASUREMENT AND RESULTS--Screening history was taken from a computerised archive for both cases and controls. A mail questionnaire was used to collect information on several potential confounding variables. For women screened only once in comparison with those never screened, the reduction in risk was about 70% (odds ratio 0.29. 95% confidence limits 0.15-0.55), while the reduction was even greater for those screened twice or more. No trend of increasing risk with increasing interval since last test was shown: considering separately women who had only had one test and those who had had two or more tests, the risk estimates were stable across different time intervals since the last test. CONCLUSIONS--There is a strong protective effect against developing invasive cervical cancer through participation in the screening programme. PMID:2348148

  15. Increasing cervical cancer screening for a multiethnic population of women in South Texas.

    PubMed

    Fornos, Laura B; Urbansky, Kathleen A; Villarreal, Roberto

    2014-03-01

    Cervical cancer is a preventable disease. Precancers can be identified and treated through cervical screenings. The HPV vaccine prevents precancers from becoming cancers. The aim of the A Su Salud Cervical Cancer Prevention Program was to apply well-understood health promotion techniques and increase the rate of cervical cancer screening among a high-risk, multiethnic, low-income population in South Texas. Qualitative research was used to identify uptake barriers and tailor media messaging. Using existing resources, we applied evidence-based strategies in novel ways that changed personal behaviors, leading to cancer screening, risk reduction, and early detection. We created a database to track a cohort of 32,807 women and measured cervical cancer screenings over 3 years. Our analysis revealed an increase in cervical cancer screenings after use of highly targeted automated telephone reminders and media dissemination on multiple platforms. Those women at low risk for cervical cancer obtained the highest proportion of Pap tests. This innovative, theory-based program increased overall Pap tests up to 9% among women enrolled in a safety net hospital financial assistance plan. This study fills a gap in research on Pap test compliance in uninsured, mostly Hispanic women by building on cultural strengths and tailored messaging.

  16. Increasing cervical cancer screening for a multiethnic population of women in South Texas.

    PubMed

    Fornos, Laura B; Urbansky, Kathleen A; Villarreal, Roberto

    2014-03-01

    Cervical cancer is a preventable disease. Precancers can be identified and treated through cervical screenings. The HPV vaccine prevents precancers from becoming cancers. The aim of the A Su Salud Cervical Cancer Prevention Program was to apply well-understood health promotion techniques and increase the rate of cervical cancer screening among a high-risk, multiethnic, low-income population in South Texas. Qualitative research was used to identify uptake barriers and tailor media messaging. Using existing resources, we applied evidence-based strategies in novel ways that changed personal behaviors, leading to cancer screening, risk reduction, and early detection. We created a database to track a cohort of 32,807 women and measured cervical cancer screenings over 3 years. Our analysis revealed an increase in cervical cancer screenings after use of highly targeted automated telephone reminders and media dissemination on multiple platforms. Those women at low risk for cervical cancer obtained the highest proportion of Pap tests. This innovative, theory-based program increased overall Pap tests up to 9% among women enrolled in a safety net hospital financial assistance plan. This study fills a gap in research on Pap test compliance in uninsured, mostly Hispanic women by building on cultural strengths and tailored messaging. PMID:24170274

  17. Unmet Needs in the Management of Cervical Dystonia

    PubMed Central

    Contarino, Maria Fiorella; Smit, Marenka; van den Dool, Joost; Volkmann, Jens; Tijssen, Marina A. J.

    2016-01-01

    Cervical dystonia (CD) is a movement disorder which affects daily living of many patients. In clinical practice, several unmet treatment needs remain open. This article focuses on the four main aspects of treatment. We describe existing and emerging treatment approaches for CD, including botulinum toxin injections, surgical therapy, management of non-motor symptoms, and rehabilitation strategies. The unsolved issues regarding each of these treatments are identified and discussed, and possible future approaches and research lines are proposed. PMID:27733842

  18. [Early detection of cervical cancer in Chile: time for change].

    PubMed

    Léniz Martelli, Javiera; Van De Wyngard, Vanessa; Lagos, Marcela; Barriga, María Isabel; Puschel Illanes, Klaus; Ferreccio Readi, Catterina

    2014-08-01

    Mortality rates for cervical cancer (CC) in Chile are higher than those of developed countries and it has an unequal socioeconomic distribution. The recognition of human papilloma virus (HPV) as the causal agent of cervical cancer in the early 80's changed the prevention paradigms. Current goals are to prevent HPV infection by vaccination before the onset of sexual activity and to detect HPV infection in women older than 30 years. This article reviews CC prevention and early detection methods, discusses relevant evidence to support a change in Chile and presents an innovation proposal. A strategy of primary screening based on HPV detection followed by triage of HPV-positive women by colposcopy in primary care or by cytological or molecular reflex testing is proposed. Due to the existence in Chile of a well-organized nationwide CC prevention program, the replacement of a low-sensitivity screening test such as the Papanicolau test with a highly sensitive one such as HPV detection, could quickly improve the effectiveness of the program. The program also has a network of personnel qualified to conduct naked-eye inspections of the cervix, who could easily be trained to perform triage colposcopy. The incorporation of new prevention strategies could reduce the deaths of Chilean women and correct inequities.

  19. Cervical Cancer: Development of Targeted Therapies Beyond Molecular Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Knoff, Jayne; Yang, Benjamin; Hung, Chien-Fu; Wu, T.-C.

    2014-01-01

    It is well known that human papillomavirus (HPV) is the causative agent of cervical cancer. The integration of HPV genes into the host genome causes the upregulation of E6 and E7 oncogenes. E6 and E7 proteins inactivate and degrade tumor suppressors p53 and retinoblastoma, respectively, leading to malignant progression. HPV E6 and E7 antigens are ideal targets for the development of therapies for cervical cancer and precursor lesions because they are constitutively expressed in infected cells and malignant tumors but not in normal cells and they are essential for cell immortalization and transformation. Immunotherapies are being developed to target E6/E7 by eliciting antigen-specific immune responses. siRNA technologies target E6/E7 by modulating the expression of the oncoproteins. Proteasome inhibitors and histone deacetylase inhibitors are being developed to indirectly target E6/E7 by interfering with their oncogenic activities. The ultimate goal for HPV-targeted therapies is the progression through clinical trials to commercialization. PMID:24533233

  20. Cervical Cancer Screening: Defining the Need for Research

    PubMed Central

    Simoes, E.; Brucker, S.; Beckmann, M. W.; Ortmann, O.; Albring, C.; Wallwiener, D.

    2013-01-01

    With the development of a National Cancer Plan published in 2012, Germany has followed the recommendations of the WHO and the EU. The first area of action listed in Germanyʼs National Cancer Plan is improving the early detection of cancer. Both citizens and medical specialists are encouraged to take responsibility themselves and contribute to the efforts being made to meet the challenge of cancer. Screening for cervical cancer has long been an integral part of the German Directive for the Early Detection of Cancer and now – following the recommendations given in the European Guideline – an organised screening approach shall be developed to maximise the benefits and minimise the risks through a partial reorganisation of existing structures. Before this can be rolled out nationwide, it will be necessary to check the feasibility and suitability of new contents and organisational structures. The Federal Joint Committee which is largely responsible for the process according to the draft law on the implementation of the National Cancer Plan has emphasised the importance of evidence-based medicine and of collaboration between the autonomous governing bodies within the healthcare system to obtain viable results. For medical specialists, the follow-on question is which areas will need more research in future. New process steps need to be developed and verified to see whether they offer evidence which will support defined approaches or whether such evidence needs to be newly compiled, e.g. by testing invitation procedures for screening in trial schemes. The experience gained during the implementation of the existing directive on early detection of cancer should be integrated into the new process. Research initiated by specialists could encourage the development of a new version of the Directive for the Early Detection of Cancer suitable for the Germanyʼs healthcare system. PMID:26633900

  1. Human Papillomavirus 18 Genetic Variation and Cervical Cancer Risk Worldwide

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Alyce A.; Gheit, Tarik; Franceschi, Silvia

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Human papillomavirus 18 (HPV18) is the second most carcinogenic HPV type, after HPV16, and it accounts for approximately 12% of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) as well as 37% of adenocarcinoma (ADC) of the cervix worldwide. We aimed to evaluate the worldwide diversity and carcinogenicity of HPV18 genetic variants by sequencing the entire long control region (LCR) and the E6 open reading frame of 711 HPV18-positive cervical samples from 39 countries, taking advantage of the International Agency for Research on Cancer biobank. A total of 209 unique HPV18 sequence variants were identified that formed three phylogenetic lineages (A, B, and C). A and B lineages each divided into four sublineages, including a newly identified candidate B4 sublineage. The distribution of lineages varied by geographical region, with B and C lineages found principally in Africa. HPV18 (sub)lineages were compared between 453 cancer cases and 236 controls, as well as between 81 ADC and 160 matched SCC cases. In region-stratified analyses, there were no significant differences in the distribution of HPV18 variant lineages between cervical cancer cases and controls or between ADC and SCC. In conclusion, our findings do not support the role of HPV18 (sub)lineages for discriminating cancer risk or explaining why HPV18 is more strongly linked with ADC than SCC. IMPORTANCE This is the largest and most geographically/ethnically diverse study of the genetic variation of HPV18 to date, providing a comprehensive reference for phylogenetic classification of HPV18 sublineages for epidemiological and biological studies. PMID:26269181

  2. Human papillomavirus induced transformation in cervical and head and neck cancers.

    PubMed

    Adams, Allie K; Wise-Draper, Trisha M; Wells, Susanne I

    2014-09-15

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is one of the most widely publicized and researched pathogenic DNA viruses. For decades, HPV research has focused on transforming viral activities in cervical cancer. During the past 15 years, however, HPV has also emerged as a major etiological agent in cancers of the head and neck, in particular squamous cell carcinoma. Even with significant strides achieved towards the screening and treatment of cervical cancer, and preventive vaccines, cervical cancer remains the leading cause of cancer-associated deaths for women in developing countries. Furthermore, routine screens are not available for those at risk of head and neck cancer. The current expectation is that HPV vaccination will prevent not only cervical, but also head and neck cancers. In order to determine if previous cervical cancer models for HPV infection and transformation are directly applicable to head and neck cancer, clinical and molecular disease aspects must be carefully compared. In this review, we briefly discuss the cervical and head and neck cancer literature to highlight clinical and genomic commonalities. Differences in prognosis, staging and treatment, as well as comparisons of mutational profiles, viral integration patterns, and alterations in gene expression will be addressed.

  3. Human Papillomavirus Induced Transformation in Cervical and Head and Neck Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Allie K.; Wise-Draper, Trisha M.; Wells, Susanne I.

    2014-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is one of the most widely publicized and researched pathogenic DNA viruses. For decades, HPV research has focused on transforming viral activities in cervical cancer. During the past 15 years, however, HPV has also emerged as a major etiological agent in cancers of the head and neck, in particular squamous cell carcinoma. Even with significant strides achieved towards the screening and treatment of cervical cancer, and preventive vaccines, cervical cancer remains the leading cause of cancer-associated deaths for women in developing countries. Furthermore, routine screens are not available for those at risk of head and neck cancer. The current expectation is that HPV vaccination will prevent not only cervical, but also head and neck cancers. In order to determine if previous cervical cancer models for HPV infection and transformation are directly applicable to head and neck cancer, clinical and molecular disease aspects must be carefully compared. In this review, we briefly discuss the cervical and head and neck cancer literature to highlight clinical and genomic commonalities. Differences in prognosis, staging and treatment, as well as comparisons of mutational profiles, viral integration patterns, and alterations in gene expression will be addressed. PMID:25226287

  4. Cervical cancer screening of HPV vaccinated populations: Cytology, molecular testing, both or none.

    PubMed

    El-Zein, Mariam; Richardson, Lyndsay; Franco, Eduardo L

    2016-03-01

    Cervical cancer control includes primary prevention through vaccination to prevent human papillomavirus (HPV) infection and secondary prevention through screening to detect and treat cervical precancerous lesions. This review summarizes the evidence for the population impact of vaccines against oncogenic HPV types in reducing the prevalence of cervical precancerous lesions. We examine the gradual shift in screening technology from cervical cytology alone to cytology and HPV cotesting, and finally to the recognition that HPV testing can serve alone as the new screening paradigm, particularly in the initial post-vaccination era. We should expect an impact on screening performance and practices, as cohorts of HPV-vaccinated girls and adolescents reach cervical cancer screening age. In preparation for changes in the screening paradigm for the vaccination era, we propose that policymaking on cervical cancer screening should mirror current practices with other cancers as benchmarks. Cervical precancerous lesions will become a very rare condition following the widespread implementation of HPV vaccines with broader coverage in the number of preventable oncogenic types. Irrespective of screening technology, the false positive results will far outnumber the true positive ones, a tipping point that will herald a new period when the harms from cervical cancer screening will outweigh its benefits. We present a conceptual framework to guide decision making when we reach this point within 25-30 years. PMID:26631958

  5. Increasing Cervical Cancer Awareness and Screening in Jamaica: Effectiveness of a Theory-Based Educational Intervention.

    PubMed

    Coronado Interis, Evelyn; Anakwenze, Chidinma P; Aung, Maug; Jolly, Pauline E

    2015-12-22

    Despite declines in cervical cancer mortality in developed countries, cervical cancer incidence and mortality rates remain high in Jamaica due to low levels of screening. Effective interventions are needed to decrease barriers to preventive behaviors and increase adoption of behaviors and services to improve prospects of survival. We enrolled 225 women attending health facilities in an intervention consisting of a pre-test, educational presentation and post-test. The questionnaires assessed attitudes, knowledge, risk factors, and symptoms of cervical cancer among women. Changes in knowledge and intention to screen were assessed using paired t-tests and tests for correlated proportions. Participants were followed approximately six months post-intervention to determine cervical cancer screening rates. We found statistically significant increases from pre-test to post-test in the percentage of questions correctly answered and in participants' intention to screen for cervical cancer. The greatest improvements were observed in responses to questions on knowledge, symptoms and prevention, with some items increasing up to 62% from pre-test to post-test. Of the 123 women reached for follow-up, 50 (40.7%) screened for cervical cancer. This theory-based education intervention significantly increased knowledge of and intention to screen for cervical cancer, and may be replicated in similar settings to promote awareness and increase screening rates.

  6. Knowledge and views of secondary school students in Kuala Lumpur on cervical cancer and its prevention.

    PubMed

    Rashwan, Hesham; Ishak, Ismarulyusda; Sawalludin, Nurhidayah

    2013-01-01

    Cervical cancer is one of the most frequent cancers in women worldwide. Persistent infection with a human papillomavirus (HPV) is the main cause for cervical cancer. Vaccination and Pap smear screening are the best methods for prevention of the disease. The objective of this cross-sectional study was to assess the knowledge and views of upper secondary school female students in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, toward prevention of cervical cancer. This study was conducted from April 2009 to September 2009 in 8 schools in Kuala Lumpur area using pre-tested and validated questionnaires. Results indicated that the respondents had low knowledge of cervical cancer and its prevention although the majority of students (80.4%) had heard about the disease. The level of knowledge of cervical cancr and its prevention was significantly higher among students from the science stream (p<0.001) compared to students from the art stream. Most students (69.3%) agreed to take the vaccination if the service was available in schools. A high percentage of students (82.2%) agreed that the vaccination should be compulsory to the students. In conclusion, most students had low knowledge of cervical cancer and its prevention but they had positive attitude toward vaccination and agreed that vaccination should be compulsory. Therefore, suitable educational programmes should be developed to improve the knowledge of secondary school students on the prevention of cervical cancer.

  7. Prevalence of cervical cancer and associated mortality in Grenada, 2000-2010.

    PubMed

    Bahadoor-Yetman, A; Riley, L; Gibbons, A; Fields, P J; Mapp-Alexander, V; Hage, R; Baldwin, A

    2016-04-01

    Objective To assess cervical cancer prevalence and associated mortality in Grenada, West Indies during 2000-2010. Methods Records of visits to hospital and clinical facilities were obtained from the histopathology laboratory of the Grenada General Hospital. Records were de-identified and electronically compiled. Cervical cancer prevalence was assessed via cross-sectional analysis of this secondary data. Of a total 12 012 records, 2 527 were selected for analysis using sampling without replacement. Cases were matched to corresponding patient data from death registries, where possible, and used to calculate associated mortality rates. Results The observed prevalence of cervical cancer was 52.4 per 100 000 women (ages 15 and above). The highest rates of cervical cancer occurred in the 35-44 age group, with the second highest among 45-64-year-olds. A total of 65 deaths were attributable to cervical cancer during 2000-2010, more than 50% of which were among women > 65 years old. The observed mortality rate was 16.7 per 100 000, almost twice the rate estimated by WHO for the region. Conclusions This study demonstrates the need for a comprehensive cervical cancer-screening program in Grenada. Results should contribute to informing future studies on how to appropriately generate and execute public health policy for education, screening, prevention, and control of cervical cancer in Grenada. PMID:27657184

  8. Matrix metalloproteinase-9 is a prognostic marker for patients with cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Li, Yi; Wu, Tao; Zhang, Beilei; Yao, Yuanqing; Yin, Guowu

    2012-12-01

    Cervical cancer remains one of the most common malignancies in women. Previous study proved MMP-9 might be prognostic marker for multiple human malignancies. The present study was to investigate the protein expression of MMP-9 in cervical cancer and its association with clinicopathological characteristics as well as prognosis of patients. Cervical cancer specimens from 225 cases who had not received chemotherapy or radiotherapy prior to surgery were collected. Immunochemistry assays were utilized to investigate MMP-9 protein expression. Results showed that MMP-9 expression was increased in cervical cancer and associated with stromal invasion, FIGO stage, lymph node metastasis, and vascular invasion. Kaplan-Meier analysis showed that patients with cervical cancer of positive MMP-9 staining tend to have worse overall survival. In multivariate analysis stratified for known prognostic variables, MMP-9 was proved to be an independent prognostic factor. The present study confirmed that MMP-9 expression in cervical cancer was an independent prognostic factor of patients, which might be a potential diagnostic and even therapeutic target of cervical cancer.

  9. Increasing Cervical Cancer Awareness and Screening in Jamaica: Effectiveness of a Theory-Based Educational Intervention

    PubMed Central

    Coronado Interis, Evelyn; Anakwenze, Chidinma P.; Aung, Maug; Jolly, Pauline E.

    2015-01-01

    Despite declines in cervical cancer mortality in developed countries, cervical cancer incidence and mortality rates remain high in Jamaica due to low levels of screening. Effective interventions are needed to decrease barriers to preventive behaviors and increase adoption of behaviors and services to improve prospects of survival. We enrolled 225 women attending health facilities in an intervention consisting of a pre-test, educational presentation and post-test. The questionnaires assessed attitudes, knowledge, risk factors, and symptoms of cervical cancer among women. Changes in knowledge and intention to screen were assessed using paired t-tests and tests for correlated proportions. Participants were followed approximately six months post-intervention to determine cervical cancer screening rates. We found statistically significant increases from pre-test to post-test in the percentage of questions correctly answered and in participants’ intention to screen for cervical cancer. The greatest improvements were observed in responses to questions on knowledge, symptoms and prevention, with some items increasing up to 62% from pre-test to post-test. Of the 123 women reached for follow-up, 50 (40.7%) screened for cervical cancer. This theory-based education intervention significantly increased knowledge of and intention to screen for cervical cancer, and may be replicated in similar settings to promote awareness and increase screening rates. PMID:26703641

  10. The role of MALAT1 correlates with HPV in cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yan; Li, Yuehui; Fang, Shujuan; Jiang, Binyuan; Qin, Changfei; Xie, Pingli; Zhou, Guohua; Li, Guancheng

    2014-06-01

    Cervical cancer, the second most common type of cancer in women worldwide, is responsible for >275,100 mortalities each year and is associated with high-risk human papilloma virus (HR-HPV). HPVs have two important oncogenes, E6 and E7, which have crucial roles in malignant transformation in cervical cancer. Metastasis-associated lung adenocarcinoma transcript 1 (MALAT1) is a long non-coding RNA originally identified in non-small cell lung cancer. Previous studies have revealed that MALAT1 is expressed in numerous tissue types, and is significant in maintaining the normal function of the body. However, it also appeared to be notably upregulated in numerous carcinoma types compared with adjacent non-cancerous tissues. In the present study, it was identified that MALAT1 expression was upregulated in cervical cancer cell lines compared with normal cervical squamous cell samples. Further study into the effect of MALAT1 on cellular phenotype revealed that MALAT1 was able to promote cell migration and proliferation. Of note, it was revealed that the expression of MALAT1 was decreased with the knockdown of HPV16 E6/E7 in CaSki cells. Furthermore, the investigations in clinical samples also revealed that MALAT1 was expressed in HPV-positive cervical squamous cells, but not in HPV-negative normal cervical squamous cells. These results indicate that HPV correlates with MALAT1 deregulation in cervical cancer.

  11. The comparative and cost-effectiveness of HPV-based cervical cancer screening algorithms in El Salvador.

    PubMed

    Campos, Nicole G; Maza, Mauricio; Alfaro, Karla; Gage, Julia C; Castle, Philip E; Felix, Juan C; Cremer, Miriam L; Kim, Jane J

    2015-08-15

    Cervical cancer is the leading cause of cancer death among women in El Salvador. Utilizing data from the Cervical Cancer Prevention in El Salvador (CAPE) demonstration project, we assessed the health and economic impact of HPV-based screening and two different algorithms for the management of women who test HPV-positive, relative to existing Pap-based screening. We calibrated a mathematical model of cervical cancer to epidemiologic data from El Salvador and compared three screening algorithms for women aged 30-65 years: (i) HPV screening every 5 years followed by referral to colposcopy for HPV-positive women (Colposcopy Management [CM]); (ii) HPV screening every 5 years followed by treatment with cryotherapy for eligible HPV-positive women (Screen and Treat [ST]); and (iii) Pap screening every 2 years followed by referral to colposcopy for Pap-positive women (Pap). Potential harms and complications associated with overtreatment were not assessed. Under base case assumptions of 65% screening coverage, HPV-based screening was more effective than Pap, reducing cancer risk by ∼ 60% (Pap: 50%). ST was the least costly strategy, and cost $2,040 per year of life saved. ST remained the most attractive strategy as visit compliance, costs, coverage, and test performance were varied. We conclude that a screen-and-treat algorithm within an HPV-based screening program is very cost-effective in El Salvador, with a cost-effectiveness ratio below per capita GDP.

  12. Factors Mediating the Relationship Between Intimate Partner Violence and Cervical Cancer Among Thai Women.

    PubMed

    Thananowan, Nanthana; Vongsirimas, Nopporn

    2016-02-01

    Previous research suggests that intimate partner violence (IPV), particularly physical or sexual violence, was associated with cervical cancer. However, there is less work examining the mechanism of the relationship between IPV and cervical cancer. The purpose of this cross-sectional study was to examine psychosocial factors (e.g., stress, social support, self-esteem, and depressive symptoms) as mediators of the relationship between IPV and cervical cancer among 532 Thai women with gynecological problems. About 21.1% of participants reported any type of IPV (e.g., physical, sexual, or emotional violence) in the past year and 22.2% had cervical cancer. IPV was significantly positively associated with stress, depressive symptoms, and cervical cancer but negatively correlated with social support and self-esteem. Results from structural equation modeling indicated that not only did IPV exhibit significantly direct effects on social support, stress, and depressive symptoms, and indirect effects on self-esteem, but it also had a significant, positive, total effect on cervical cancer. IPV exhibited the significant indirect effect on cervical cancer through social support, self-esteem, stress, and depressive symptoms. The model fitted very well to the empirical data and explained 9% of variance. The findings affirmed that those psychosocial factors were mediators of the relationship between IPV and cervical cancer. Health care protocols for abused women should include screening for and treatment of IPV-related psychosocial factors. Interventions that provide social support and protect self-esteem should reduce stress and depressive symptoms among abused women, thereby reducing the risk of cervical cancer.

  13. Radiation Dose and Subsequent Risk for Stomach Cancer in Long-term Survivors of Cervical Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Kleinerman, Ruth A.; Smith, Susan A.; Holowaty, Eric; Hall, Per; Pukkala, Eero; Vaalavirta, Leila; Stovall, Marilyn; Weathers, Rita; Gilbert, Ethel; Aleman, Berthe M.P.; Kaijser, Magnus; Andersson, Michael; Storm, Hans; Joensuu, Heikki; Lynch, Charles F.; and others

    2013-08-01

    Purpose: To assess the dose–response relationship for stomach cancer after radiation therapy for cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: We conducted a nested, matched case–control study of 201 cases and 378 controls among 53,547 5-year survivors of cervical cancer diagnosed from 1943 to 1995, from 5 international, population-based cancer registries. We estimated individual radiation doses to the site of the stomach cancer for all cases and to corresponding sites for the matched controls (overall mean stomach tumor dose, 2.56 Gy, range 0.03-46.1 and after parallel opposed pelvic fields, 1.63 Gy, range 0.12-6.3). Results: More than 90% of women received radiation therapy, mostly with external beam therapy in combination with brachytherapy. Stomach cancer risk was nonsignificantly increased (odds ratio 1.27-2.28) for women receiving between 0.5 and 4.9 Gy to the stomach cancer site and significantly increased at doses ≥5 Gy (odds ratio 4.20, 95% confidence interval 1.41-13.4, P{sub trend}=.047) compared with nonirradiated women. A highly significant radiation dose–response relationship was evident when analyses were restricted to the 131 cases (251 controls) whose stomach cancer was located in the middle and lower portions of the stomach (P{sub trend}=.003), whereas there was no indication of increasing risk with increasing dose for 30 cases (57 controls) whose cancer was located in the upper stomach (P{sub trend}=.23). Conclusions: Our findings show for the first time a significant linear dose–response relationship for risk of stomach cancer in long-term survivors of cervical cancer.

  14. YouTube as a Source of Information on Cervical Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Adhikari, Janak; Sharma, Priyadarshani; Arjyal, Lubina; Uprety, Dipesh

    2016-01-01

    Background: Cervical cancer is the third most common cancer worldwide. Accurate information about cervical cancer to general public can lower the burden of the disease including its mortality. Aims: We aimed to look at the quality of information available in YouTube for cervical cancer. Materials and Methods: We searched YouTube (http://www.youtube.com) for videos using the keyword Cervical cancer on November 12, 2015. Videos were then analyzed for their source and content of information. Results: We studied 172 videos using the keyword Cervical cancer on November 12, 2015. We found that there were videos describing the personal stories, risk factors, and the importance of screening. However, videos discussing all the aspects of cancers were lacking. Likewise, videos from the reputed organization were also lacking. Conclusion: Although there were numerous videos available in cervical cancer, videos from reputed organizations including Center for Disease Control and Prevention, American Cancer Society, and World Health Organization were lacking. We strongly believe that quality videos from such organizations via YouTube can help lower the burden of disease. PMID:27213142

  15. HPV genotypes detected in cervical cancers from Alaska Native women, 1980–2007

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Janet J.; Unger, Elizabeth R.; Dunne, Eileen F.; Murphy, Neil J.; Tiesinga, James; Koller, Kathy R.; Swango-Wilson, Amy; Philemonof, Dino; Lounmala, Xay; Markowitz, Lauri E.; Steinau, Martin; Hennessy, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Background Human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine prevents cervical pre-cancers and cancers caused by HPV types 16 and 18. This study provides information on the HPV types detected in cervical cancers of Alaska Native (AN) women. Methods Cases of invasive cervical cancer diagnosed in AN women aged 18 and above between 1980 and 2007 were identified from the Alaska Native Tumor Registry. A representative formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded archived pathology block was retrieved and serially sectioned to allow histologic confirmation of lesion (first and last sections) and PCR testing of intervening sections. Extracted DNA was tested for HPV using Linear Array HPV Genotyping Test (Roche Diagnostics) with additional INNO-LiPA HPV Genotyping Assay (Innogenetics) testing on negative or inadequate specimens. All specimens were tested for a minimum 37 HPV types. Results Of 62 cervical cancer specimens evaluated, 57 (91.9%) contained one or more HPV types. Thirty-eight (61.2%) cancers contained HPV types 16 or 18, and 18 (29%) contained an oncogenic type other than type 16 or 18. Conclusions Overall, almost two-thirds (61.2%) of the archived cervical cancers had detectible HPV types 16 or 18, a finding similar to studies of US women. As expected, a proportion of cancers would not be prevented by the current vaccines. HPV vaccination and cervical cancer screening are important prevention strategies for AN women. PMID:23984281

  16. Second cancers following radiation treatment for cervical cancer. An international collaboration among cancer registries

    SciTech Connect

    Boice, J.D. Jr.; Day, N.E.; Andersen, A.; Brinton, L.A.; Brown, R.; Choi, N.W.; Clarke, E.A.; Coleman, M.P.; Curtis, R.E.; Flannery, J.T.

    1985-05-01

    The numbers of second cancers among 182,040 women treated for cervical cancer that were reported to 15 cancer registries in 8 countries were compared to the numbers expected had the same risk prevailed as in the general population. A small 9% excess of second cancers (5,146 observed vs. 4,736 expected) occurred 1 or more years after treatment. Large radiation doses experienced by 82,616 women did not dramatically alter their risk of developing a second cancer; at most, about 162 of 3,324 second cancers (approximately equal to 5%) could be attributed to radiation. The relative risk (RR = 1.1) for developing cancer in organs close to the cervix that had received high radiation exposures--most notably, the bladder, rectum, uterine corpus, ovary, small intestine, bone, and connective tissue--and for developing multiple myeloma increased with time since treatment. No similar increase was seen for 99,424 women not treated with radiation. Only a slight excess of acute and non-lymphocytic leukemia was found among irradiated women (RR = 1.3), and substantially fewer cases were observed than expected on the basis of current radiation risk estimates. The small risk of leukemia may be associated with low doses of radiation absorbed by the bone marrow outside the pelvis, inasmuch as the marrow in the pelvis may have been destroyed or rendered inactive by very large radiotherapy exposures. There was little evidence of a radiation effect for cancers of the stomach, colon, liver, and gallbladder, for melanoma and other skin cancers, or for chronic lymphocytic leukemia despite substantial exposures.

  17. Socioeconomic disparity in cervical cancer screening among Korean women: 1998–2010

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Cervical cancer is the sixth most common cause of cancer among Korean women and is one of the most preventable cancers in the world. This study aimed to investigate the change in cervical cancer screening rates, the level of socioeconomic disparities in cervical cancer screening participation, and whether there was a reduction in these disparities between 1998 and 2010. Methods Using the Korean Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, women 30 years or older without a history of cervical cancer and who completed a health questionnaire, physical examination, and nutritional survey were included (n = 17,105). Information about participation in cervical cancer screening was collected using a self-administered questionnaire. Multiple logistic regression analysis was performed to investigate the relationship between cervical cancer screening participation and the socioeconomic status of the women. Results The cervical cancer screening rate increased from 40.5% in 1998 to 52.5% in 2010. Socioeconomic disparities influenced participation, and women with lower educational levels and lower household income were less likely to be screened. Compared with the lowest educational level, the adjusted odds ratios (ORs) for screening in women with the highest educational level were 1.56 (95% confidence interval (CI): 1.05–2.30) in 1998, and 1.44 (95% CI: 1.12–1.87) in 2010. Compared with women with the lowest household income level, the adjusted ORs for screening in women with the highest household income level were 1.80 (95% CI: 1.22–2.68), 2.82 (95% CI: 2.01–3.96), and 1.45 (95% CI: 1.08–1.94) in 2001, 2005, and 2010, respectively. Conclusion Although population-wide progress has been made in participation in cervical cancer screening over the 12-year period, socioeconomic status remained an important factor in reducing compliance with cancer screening. PMID:23742100

  18. Cervical cancer screening: A never-ending developing program

    PubMed Central

    Comparetto, Ciro; Borruto, Franco

    2015-01-01

    With the term “oncological screening”, we define the overall performances made to detect early onset of tumors. These tests are conducted on a population that does not have any signs or symptoms related to a neoplasm. The whole population above a certain age, only one sex, only subjects with a high risk of developing cancer due to genetic, professional, discretionary reasons may be involved. Screening campaigns should be associated, when risk factors that can be avoided are known, with campaigns for the prevention of cancer by means of suitable behavior. The goal of cancer screening cannot however be limited to the diagnosis of a greater number of neoplasms. Screening will be useful only if it leads to a reduction in overall mortality or at least in mortality related to the tumor. Screening should then allow the diagnosis of the disease at a stage when there is a possibility of healing, possibility that is instead difficult when the disease is diagnosed at the appearance of signs or symptoms. This is the reason why not all campaigns of cancer screening have the same effectiveness. In Italy, every year there are about 150000 deaths due to cancer. Some of these tumors can be cured with a very high percentage of success if diagnosed in time. Cervical cancer can be diagnosed with non-invasive tests. The screening test used all over the world is Papanicolaou (Pap) test. This test may be carried out over the entire healthy population potentially exposed to the risk of contracting cancer. Public health has begun the screening campaigns in the hope of saving many of the approximately 270000 new cases of cancer reported each year. Screening is done following protocols that guarantee quality at the national level: these protocols are subject to change over time to reflect new realities or to correct any errors in the system. A simplified sketch of a possible route of cancer screening is as follows: (1) after selecting the target population, for example all women between

  19. Cervical cancer screening: A never-ending developing program.

    PubMed

    Comparetto, Ciro; Borruto, Franco

    2015-07-16

    With the term "oncological screening", we define the overall performances made to detect early onset of tumors. These tests are conducted on a population that does not have any signs or symptoms related to a neoplasm. The whole population above a certain age, only one sex, only subjects with a high risk of developing cancer due to genetic, professional, discretionary reasons may be involved. Screening campaigns should be associated, when risk factors that can be avoided are known, with campaigns for the prevention of cancer by means of suitable behavior. The goal of cancer screening cannot however be limited to the diagnosis of a greater number of neoplasms. Screening will be useful only if it leads to a reduction in overall mortality or at least in mortality related to the tumor. Screening should then allow the diagnosis of the disease at a stage when there is a possibility of healing, possibility that is instead difficult when the disease is diagnosed at the appearance of signs or symptoms. This is the reason why not all campaigns of cancer screening have the same effectiveness. In Italy, every year there are about 150000 deaths due to cancer. Some of these tumors can be cured with a very high percentage of success if diagnosed in time. Cervical cancer can be diagnosed with non-invasive tests. The screening test used all over the world is Papanicolaou (Pap) test. This test may be carried out over the entire healthy population potentially exposed to the risk of contracting cancer. Public health has begun the screening campaigns in the hope of saving many of the approximately 270000 new cases of cancer reported each year. Screening is done following protocols that guarantee quality at the national level: these protocols are subject to change over time to reflect new realities or to correct any errors in the system. A simplified sketch of a possible route of cancer screening is as follows: (1) after selecting the target population, for example all women between 25

  20. The influence of time perspective on cervical cancer screening among Latinas in the United States.

    PubMed

    Roncancio, Angelica M; Ward, Kristy K; Fernandez, Maria E

    2014-12-01

    To develop effective interventions to increase cervical cancer screening among Latinas, we should understand the role of cultural factors, such as time perspective, in the decision to be screened. We examined the relation between present time orientation, future time orientation, and self-reported cervical cancer screening among Latinas. A group of 206 Latinas completed a survey measuring factors associated with screening. Logistic regression analyses revealed that future time orientation was significantly associated with self-reported screening. Understanding the influence of time orientation on cervical cancer screening will assist us in developing interventions that effectively target time perspective and screening.

  1. The Influence of Time Perspective on Cervical Cancer Screening among Latinas in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Roncancio, Angelica M.; Ward, Kristy K.; Fernandez, Maria E.

    2014-01-01

    To develop effective interventions to increase cervical cancer screening among Latinas, we should understand the role of cultural factors, such as time perspective, in the decision to be screened. We examined the relation between present time orientation, future time orientation and self-reported cervical cancer screening among Latinas. A group of 206 Latinas completed a survey measuring factors associated with screening. Logistic regression analyses revealed that future time orientation was significantly associated with self-reported screening. Understanding the influence of time orientation on cervical cancer screening will assist us in developing interventions that effectively target time perspective and screening. PMID:23928988

  2. Cervical cancer prevention in Australia: Planning for the future.

    PubMed

    Saville, A Marion

    2016-04-01

    The high rate of coverage that has been achieved to date by the Australian government's Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Vaccination Program has already led to profound reductions in the prevalence of biopsy-confirmed, high-grade abnormalities and of vaccine-preventable HPV types in Australia. Declines in the prevalence of vaccine preventable HPV have occurred not only in vaccinated women but also in unvaccinated women, suggesting a herd-immunity affect. These declines were anticipated on the basis of modelling and were the major drivers for the changes proposed to the Australian National Cervical Screening Program. The federal and state-based Australian governments established a "Renewal Steering Committee," which conducted a literature search and a review of the available evidence to assess its applicability and quality. Together with this information the committee also used modeling to determine the optimal screening pathway for cervical cancer screening and constructed a plan for implementing the changes that will be required to transition from the currently successful screening program to the renewed program. The committee recommended that Australia move to a screening program based on testing every 5 years using an HPV test with partial genotyping with reflex liquid-based cytology (LBC) triage for HPV-vaccinated and unvaccinated women ages 25 to 69 years, and an additional exit test for women up to age 74 years. Primary HPV testing and reflex LBC will be funded by government. Symptomatic women outside the screening program will also be able to access government funded testing. The new screening program, to be rolled out in 2017, will also provide a cost-effective framework for an evaluation of the national HPV vaccination program, enabling ongoing monitoring of HPV genotypes and cervical lesions in screened women.

  3. Minimization of curative surgery for treatment of early cervical cancer: a review.

    PubMed

    Arimoto, Takahide; Kawana, Kei; Adachi, Katsuyuki; Ikeda, Yuji; Nagasaka, Kazunori; Tsuruga, Tetsushi; Yamashita, Aki; Oda, Katsutoshi; Ishikawa, Mitsuya; Kasamatsu, Takahiro; Onda, Takashi; Konishi, Ikuo; Yoshikawa, Hiroyuki; Yaegashi, Nobuo

    2015-07-01

    Surgery is effective and useful for curative treatment of patients with early invasive cervical cancer, yet minimization of surgical procedures provides many additional advantages for patients. Because the mean age of patients diagnosed with cervical precancer and invasive cancer has been decreasing, the need for minimization of surgery to reduce disruption of fertility is increasing. Trachelectomy is an innovative procedure for young patients with invasive cancer. Minimally invasive procedures are increasingly implemented in the treatment of patients with early cervical cancer, such as laparoscopic/robotic surgery and sentinel lymph node navigation. The use of modified radical hysterectomy may not only be curative but also minimally invasive for Stage IA2-IB1 patients with a tumor size <2 cm in diameter. Here, we have summarized and discussed the minimally invasive procedures for the treatment of patients with early cervical cancer. PMID:25888708

  4. The use of MYBL2 as a novel candidate biomarker of cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Martin, Cara M; Astbury, Katharine; Kehoe, Louise; O'Crowley, Jacqueline Barry; O'Toole, Sharon; O'Leary, John J

    2015-01-01

    Cervical cancer is the third most common cancer affecting women worldwide. It is characterized by chromosomal aberrations and alteration in the expression levels of many cell cycle regulatory proteins, driven primarily by transforming human papillomavirus (HPV) infection. MYBL2 is a member of the MYB proto-oncogene family that encodes DNA binding proteins. These proteins are involved in cell proliferation and control of cellular differentiation. We have previously demonstrated the utility of MYBL2 as a putative biomarker for cervical pre-cancer and cancer. In this chapter we describe the methodological approach for testing MYBL2 protein expression in tissue biopsies from cases of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) and cervical cancer, using immunohistochemistry techniques on the automated immunostaining platform, the Ventana BenchMark LT. The protocol outlines the various steps in the procedure from cutting tissue sections, antibody optimization, antigen retrieval, immunostaining, and histological review.

  5. NR2F6 Expression Correlates with Pelvic Lymph Node Metastasis and Poor Prognosis in Early-Stage Cervical Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Chunhao; Sun, Xiaoying; Zhang, Weijing; Li, Han; Xu, Liqun; Li, Jun; Xu, Benke; Zhang, Yanna

    2016-01-01

    Background: There is an abnormal expression of nuclear receptor subfamily 2 group F member 6 (NR2F6) in human cancers such as breast cancer, colon cancer, and acute myelogenous leukemia. However, its clinical significance in cervical cancer has not been established. We explored NR2F6 expression and its clinicopathological significance in early-stage cervical cancer. Methods: NR2F6 expression in cervical cancer cell lines and cervical cancer tissues was determined by Western blotting, real-time PCR, and immunochemistry (IHC). NR2F6 expression in 189 human early-stage cervical cancer tissue samples was evaluated using IHC. The relevance between NR2F6 expression and early-stage cervical cancer prognosis and clinicopathological features was determined. Results: There was marked NR2F6 mRNA and protein overexpression in the cervical cancer cells and clinical tissues compared with an immortalized squamous cell line and adjacent noncancerous cervical tissues, respectively. In the 189 cervical cancer samples, NR2F6 expression was positively related to International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO) stage (p = 0.006), squamous cell carcinoma antigen (p = 0.006), vital status (p < 0.001), tumor recurrence (p = 0.001), chemotherapy (p = 0.039), and lymph node metastasis (p < 0.001). Overall and disease-free survival was shorter in patients with early-stage cervical cancer and higher NR2F6 levels than in patients with lower levels of NR2F6. Univariate and multivariate analysis determined that NR2F6 was an independent prognostic factor of survival in early-stage cervical cancer. Conclusions: Taken together, our findings suggest that high NR2F6 expression predicts pelvic lymph node metastasis, tumor recurrence and poor prognosis in early-stage cervical cancer. NR2F6 might be a novel prognostic biomarker and potential therapeutic target of cervical cancer. PMID:27775588

  6. [Global expression analysis in uterine cervical cancer: metabolic pathways and altered genes].

    PubMed

    Vázquez-Ortíz, Guelaguetza; Piña-Sanchez, Patricia; Hidalgo, Alfredo; Lazos, Minerva; Moreno, José; Alvarado, Isabel; Cruz, Fernando; Hernández, Dulce M; Pérez-Plascencia, Carlos; Salcedo, Mauricio

    2005-01-01

    High risk human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is considered to be the most important etiological factor of Cervical Uterine Cancer. In order to determine the global expression pattern and to identify possible molecular markers of cervical cancer, cDNA arrays with probe sets complementary to 8,000 human genes were used to examine the expression profiles among 5 cell lines derived from human cervical cancer, three HPV16(+) tumor samples and three normal cervical tissues HPV(-). The levels of expression of different cellular processes were identified. Hierarchical clustering was performed and the gene expression using RT-PCR was confirmed. Two genes were found to be consistently overexpressed in invasive cervical cancer biopsies; one of them, IL-6 was previously reported to be overexpressed in cervical cancer and one novel gene, MMP10, previously not known to be related to cervical cancer. Hierarchical clustering of the expression data revealed that samples with common HPV type infection grouped together, maybe this could mean that differences between HPV types could be indirectly determined by expression profiles.

  7. Risk factors for and prevention of human papillomaviruses (HPV), genital warts and cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Chelimo, Carol; Wouldes, Trecia A; Cameron, Linda D; Elwood, J Mark

    2013-03-01

    Genital HPV infection is associated with development of cervical cancer, cervical neoplasia, anogenital warts, and other anogenital cancers. A number of reviews have primarily addressed the role of HPV infection in cervical carcinogenesis, and differences in human papillomavirus (HPV) subtypes found in cervical cancer cases by histology and geographical region. This review provides an informative summary of the broad body of literature on the burden of HPV, the risk factors for HPV infection, genital warts and cervical cancer, and preventive measures against these conditions in females. Studies have identified the main risk factors for genital HPV infection in females as follows: acquisition of new male partners; an increasing number of lifetime sexual partners both in females and their male partners; and having non-monogamous male partners. Cervical cancer screening and HPV vaccination are the primary measures currently recommended to prevent cervical cancer. There is also an ongoing debate and conflicting findings on whether male circumcision and condom use protect against HPV infection and subsequent development of HPV-related illnesses in females.

  8. Implementation of mass media community health education: the Forsyth County Cervical Cancer Prevention Project.

    PubMed

    Dignan, M; Bahnson, J; Sharp, P; Beal, P; Smith, M; Michielutte, R

    1991-09-01

    The Forsyth County Cervical Cancer Prevention Project (FCP) is a community-based health education project funded by the National Cancer Institute. The target population includes around 25 000 black women age 18 and older who reside in Forsyth County, North Carolina. The overall goal of the program is to prevent mortality from cervical cancer by promoting Pap smears and return for follow-up care when needed. Based on the principles of social marketing, a plan to reach the target population with mass media educational messages through electronic and print channels was developed. Guided by marketing objectives, the target population was divided into relatively discrete segments. The segments included church attenders, patients in waiting rooms of public and selected health providers, female students at local colleges, shoppers, viewers of radio and television, newspaper readers, and business owners and managers. Introduction of the program was based on strategies developed for reaching the target population in each segment with television, radio and print mass media messages. Qualitative assessment of the mass media developed by the program indicated that all forms of communication helped to increase awareness of the program.

  9. Distribution of human papillomavirus genotypes among cervical intraepithelial neoplasia and invasive cancers in Macao.

    PubMed

    Hlaing, Thazin; Yip, Yuk-Ching; Ngai, Karry L K; Vong, Heong-Ting; Wong, Sio-In; Ho, Wendy C S; Batalha, Sellma L S C; Chan, Paul K S

    2010-09-01

    Macao is a densely populated city situated in East Asia where a relatively high prevalence of human papillomavirus (HPV) types 52 and 58 has been reported in women with invasive cervical cancer. To provide data for a population-specific estimation on the impact of HPV vaccines, paraffin-embedded tissues collected from women with invasive cervical cancer or cervical intrapeitheilal neoplasia grade 2 or 3 confirmed histologically were examined for HPV using the INNO-LiPa kit. Of the 35 HPV-positive patients with invasive cancer, one HPV type was detected in 68.6%, and 31.4% were co-infected with more than one HPV type. Overall, HPV 16, HPV 18, HPV 52, and HPV 54 were the most common types found respectively in 57.1%, 17%, 11.4%, and 8.5% of patients with invasive cervical cancer. Among the 59 HPV-positive patients with cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 2/3, 55.9% hardbored one HPV type, and 44.1% had co-infections. The common HPV types found included HPV 16 (52.5%), HPV 52 (23.7%), HPV 58 (18.7%), and HPV 33 (17%). Although HPV 11 (a low-risk type) was also found commonly in invasive cervical cancers (14.3%) and cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 2/3 (15.3%), the fact that they all existed as co-infections with another high-risk type suggested HPV 11 was not the cause of the lesion. The current vaccines targeting HPV 16/18 are expected to cover 62.9-74.3% of invasive cervical cancers and 32.2-55.9% of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia 2/3 in Macao. Widespread HPV vaccination is expected to reduce substantially the disease burden associated with cervical neoplasia in Macao.

  10. Adjuvant platinum-based chemotherapy for early stage cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    Rosa, Daniela D; Medeiros, Lídia RF; Edelweiss, Maria I; Pohlmann, Paula R; Stein, Airton T

    2014-01-01

    Background This is an updated version of the original Cochrane review published in The Cochrane Library 2009, Issue 3. Most women with early cervical cancer (stages I to IIA) are cured with surgery or radiotherapy, or both. We performed this review originally because it was unclear whether cisplatin-based chemotherapy after surgery, radiotherapy or both, in women with early stage disease with risk factors for recurrence, was associated with additional survival benefits or risks. Objectives To evaluate the effectiveness and safety of platinum-based chemotherapy after radical hysterectomy, radiotherapy, or both in the treatment of early stage cervical cancer. Search methods For the original 2009 review, we searched the Cochrane Gynaecological Cancer Group Trials Register, The Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) in The Cochrane Library 2009, Issue 1), MEDLINE, EMBASE, LILACS, BIOLOGICAL ABSTRACTS and CancerLit, the National Research Register and Clinical Trials register, with no language restriction. We handsearched abstracts of scientific meetings and other relevant publications. We extended the database searches to November 2011 for this update. Selection criteria Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) comparing adjuvant cisplatin-based chemotherapy (after radical surgery, radiotherapy or both) with no adjuvant chemotherapy, in women with early stage cervical cancer (stage IA2-IIA) with at least one risk factor for recurrence. Data collection and analysis Two review authors extracted data independently. Meta-analysis was performed using a random-effects model, with death and disease progression as outcomes. Main results For this updated version, we identified three additional ongoing trials but no new studies for inclusion. Three trials including 368 evaluable women with early cervical cancer were included in the meta-analyses. The median follow-up period in these trials ranged from 29 to 42 months. All women had undergone surgery first. Two trials

  11. Cervical cancer screening and treatment of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia in female sex workers using “screen and treat” approach

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Smita; Kulkarni, Vinay; Darak, Trupti; Mahajan, Uma; Srivastava, Yogesh; Gupta, Sanjay; Krishnan, Sumitra; Mandolkar, Mahesh; Bharti, Alok Chandra

    2015-01-01

    Objective Female sex workers (FSWs) are at an increased risk of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) as well as human papillomavirus (HPV) infections and thus have an increased risk of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) and cervical cancer. We evaluated the feasibility of “screen and treat approach” for cervical cancer prevention and the performance of different screening tests among FSWs. Methods Women were screened using cytology, VIA (visual inspection with acetic acid), and VILI (visual inspection with Lugol’s iodine) and underwent colposcopy, biopsy, and immediate treatment using cold coagulation, if indicated, at the same visit. Results We screened 300 FSWs of whom 200 (66.67%) were HIV uninfected and 100 (33.34%) were HIV infected. The overall prevalence of CIN 2–3 lesions was 4.7%. But all women with CIN 2–3 lesions were HIV infected, and thus the prevalence of CIN 2–3 lesions in HIV-infected FSWs was 14/100 (14%, 95% confidence interval: 7.2–20.8). All of them screened positive by all three screening tests. Cold coagulation was well tolerated, with no appreciable side effects. Conclusion Cervical cancer prevention by “screen and treat” approach using VIA, followed by ablative treatment, in this high-risk group of women is feasible and can be implemented through various targeted intervention programs. PMID:25999765

  12. Secondary Primary Malignancy Risk in Patients With Cervical Cancer in Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Teng, Chung-Jen; Huon, Leh-Kiong; Hu, Yu-Wen; Yeh, Chiu-Mei; Chao, Yee; Yang, Muh-Hwa; Chen, Tzeng-Ji; Hung, Yi-Ping; Liu, Chia-Jen

    2015-01-01

    Abstract To evaluate the risk of secondary primary malignancy (SPM) in patients with cervical cancer using a nationwide population-based dataset. Patients newly diagnosed with cervical cancer between 1997 and 2011 were identified using Taiwan's National Health Insurance database. Patients with antecedent malignancies were excluded. Standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) for SPM were calculated by comparing with the cancer incidence in the general population. Risk factors for cancer development were analyzed using Cox proportional hazard models. During the 14-year study period (follow-up of 223,062 person-years), 2004 cancers developed in 35,175 patients with cervical cancer. The SIR for all cancers was 1.56 (95% confidence interval, 1.50–1.63, P < 0.001). SIRs for follow-up periods of >10, 5 to 10, 1 to 5, and <1 year were 1.37, 1.51, 1.34, and 2.59, respectively. After the exclusion of SPM occurring within 1 year of cervical cancer diagnosis, SIRs were significantly higher for cancers of the esophagus (2.05), stomach (1.38), colon, rectum, and anus (1.36); lung and mediastinum (2.28), bone and soft tissue (2.23), uterus (3.76), bladder (2.26), and kidneys (1.41). Multivariate analysis showed that age ≥60 was a significant SPM risk factor (hazard ratio [HR] 1.59). Different treatments for cervical cancer, including radiotherapy (HR 1.41) and chemotherapy (HR 1.27), had different impacts on SPM risk. Carboplatin and fluorouracil independently increased SPM risk in cervical cancer patients. Patients with cervical cancer are at increased risk of SPM development. Age ≥60 years, chemotherapy, and radiotherapy are independent risk factors. Carboplatin and fluorouracil also increased SPM risk independently. Close surveillance of patients at high risk should be considered for the early detection of SPMs. PMID:26512575

  13. Performance of Implementing Guideline Driven Cervical Cancer Screening Measures in an Inner City Hospital System

    PubMed Central

    Wieland, Daryl L.; Reimers, Laura L.; Wu, Eijean; Nathan, Lisa M.; Gruenberg, Tammy; Abadi, Maria; Einstein, Mark H.

    2013-01-01

    Objective In 2006, the American Society for Colposcopy and Cervical Pathology (ASCCP) updated evidence based guidelines recommending screening intervals for women with abnormal cervical cytology. In our low-income inner city population, we sought to improve performance by uniformly applying the guidelines to all patients. We report the prospective performance of a comprehensive tracking, evidence-based algorithmically driven call-back and appointment scheduling system for cervical cancer screening in a resource-limited inner city population. Materials and Methods Outreach efforts were formalized with algorithm-based protocols for triage to colposcopy, with universal adherence to evidence-based guidelines. During implementation from August 2006 through July 2008, we prospectively tracked performance using the electronic medical record with administrative and pathology reports to determine performance variables such as the total number of Pap tests, colposcopy visits, and the distribution of abnormal cytology and histology results, including all CIN 2,3 diagnoses. Results 86,257 gynecologic visits and 41,527 Pap tests were performed system-wide during this period of widespread and uniform implementation of standard cervical cancer screening guidelines. The number of Pap tests performed per month varied little. The incidence of CIN 1 significantly decreased from 117/171 (68.4%) the first tracked month to 52/95 (54.7%) the last tracked month (p=0.04). The monthly incidence rate of CIN 2,3, including incident cervical cancers did not change. The total number of colposcopy visits declined, resulting in a 50% decrease in costs related to colposcopy services and approximately a 12% decrease in costs related to excisional biopsies. Conclusions Adherence to cervical cancer screening guidelines reduced the number of unnecessary colposcopies without increasing numbers of potentially missed CIN 2,3 lesions, including cervical cancer. Uniform implementation of administrative

  14. Cervical cancer screening in Malaysia: Are targeted interventions necessary?

    PubMed

    Dunn, Richard A; Tan, Andrew K G

    2010-09-01

    This study examines the determinants of Papanicolaou Smear Test (PST) screening for cervical cancer among women in Malaysia. Attention is focused on the reasons different population subgroups give for non-screening. We find that Indian women are the least likely to have had a PST and also the least likely to know the reasons why one is screened. Malay women are less likely than Chinese women to have received a PST and are more likely to report embarrassment as the reason for not being tested. Urban women are less likely than rural women to have been tested and more likely to state lack of time as the reason. These results suggest targeted interventions may be necessary to increase screening rates in Malaysia.

  15. Cervical cancer screening in Malaysia: Are targeted interventions necessary?

    PubMed

    Dunn, Richard A; Tan, Andrew K G

    2010-09-01

    This study examines the determinants of Papanicolaou Smear Test (PST) screening for cervical cancer among women in Malaysia. Attention is focused on the reasons different population subgroups give for non-screening. We find that Indian women are the least likely to have had a PST and also the least likely to know the reasons why one is screened. Malay women are less likely than Chinese women to have received a PST and are more likely to report embarrassment as the reason for not being tested. Urban women are less likely than rural women to have been tested and more likely to state lack of time as the reason. These results suggest targeted interventions may be necessary to increase screening rates in Malaysia. PMID:20685019

  16. Low Proteolytic Clipping of Histone H3 in Cervical Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sandoval-Basilio, Jorge; Serafín-Higuera, Nicolás; Reyes-Hernandez, Octavio D.; Serafín-Higuera, Idanya; Leija-Montoya, Gabriela; Blanco-Morales, Magali; Sierra-Martínez, Monica; Ramos-Mondragon, Roberto; García, Silvia; López-Hernández, Luz Berenice; Yocupicio-Monroy, Martha; Alcaraz-Estrada, Sofia L.

    2016-01-01

    Chromatin in cervical cancer (CC) undergoes chemical and structural changes that alter the expression pattern of genes. Recently, a potential mechanism, which regulates gene expression at transcriptional levels is the proteolytic clipping of histone H3. However, until now this process in CC has not been reported. Using HeLa cells as a model of CC and human samples from patients with CC, we identify that the H3 cleavage was lower in CC compared with control tissue. Additionally, the histone H3 clipping was performed by serine and aspartyl proteases in HeLa cells. These results suggest that histone H3 clipping operates as part of post-translational modification system in CC. PMID:27698925

  17. Low Proteolytic Clipping of Histone H3 in Cervical Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sandoval-Basilio, Jorge; Serafín-Higuera, Nicolás; Reyes-Hernandez, Octavio D.; Serafín-Higuera, Idanya; Leija-Montoya, Gabriela; Blanco-Morales, Magali; Sierra-Martínez, Monica; Ramos-Mondragon, Roberto; García, Silvia; López-Hernández, Luz Berenice; Yocupicio-Monroy, Martha; Alcaraz-Estrada, Sofia L.

    2016-01-01

    Chromatin in cervical cancer (CC) undergoes chemical and structural changes that alter the expression pattern of genes. Recently, a potential mechanism, which regulates gene expression at transcriptional levels is the proteolytic clipping of histone H3. However, until now this process in CC has not been reported. Using HeLa cells as a model of CC and human samples from patients with CC, we identify that the H3 cleavage was lower in CC compared with control tissue. Additionally, the histone H3 clipping was performed by serine and aspartyl proteases in HeLa cells. These results suggest that histone H3 clipping operates as part of post-translational modification system in CC.

  18. Development of Cervical Cancer Control Interventions for Chinese Immigrants

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, J. Carey; Do, Hoai; Chitnarong, Kamolthip; Tu, Shin-Ping; Marchand, Ann; Hislop, Gregory; Taylor, Vicky

    2006-01-01

    The objective of the study was to develop a culturally relevant video and a pamphlet for use as a cervical cancer screening educational intervention among North-American Chinese women. The project conducted 87 qualitative interviews and nine focus groups to develop a culturally tailored intervention to improve Pap testing rates. The intervention consisted of an educational/motivational video, a pamphlet, and home visits. Less acculturated Chinese women draw on a rich tradition of herbal knowledge and folk practices historically based on Chinese medical theory, now mixed with new information from the media and popular culture. The video, the pamphlet, and the outreach workers knowledge base were designed using these results and combined with biomedical information to address potential obstacles to Pap testing. Culturally relevant information for reproductive health promotion was easily retrieved through qualitative interviews and used to create educational materials modeling the integration of Pap testing into Chinese women’s health practices. PMID:16228758

  19. Klotho inhibits the capacity of cell migration and invasion in cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Chang, Boogi; Kim, Jinsun; Jeong, Dongjun; Jeong, Yujun; Jeon, Seob; Jung, Sam-Il; Yang, Young; Kim, Keun Il; Lim, Jong-Seok; Kim, Changjin; Lee, Myeong-Sok

    2012-09-01

    Aberrant activation of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway is common in human cervical cancers. However, the mechanisms of Wnt activation in cervical cancer remain largely unknown. In the present study, we demonstrate that Klotho, a Wnt antagonist, is downregulated in invasive human cervical tumors and in a cell line we analyzed. Our data demonstrated that in vivo Klotho expression was not observed in invasive cervical carcinoma. In vitro restoration of Klotho expression in SiHa cells resulted in a decreased cell motility and invasiveness through upregulation of E-cadherin, downregulation of N-cadherin and reduced expression of MMP7 and -9. Ectopic expression of Klotho also reduced the expression of the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) transcription factors Slug and Twist. Furthermore, Klotho causes a significant inhibition of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway in cervical cancer cells, as supported by the expression of Wnt/β-catenin transcriptional target genes such as c-Myc and cyclin D1. Consequently, our findings demonstrate for the first time that Klotho regulates tumor invasion through the EMT process and provide novel mechanistic insights into the role of Klotho in cervical cancer progression and contribute to treatment for metastatic cervical cancer patients.

  20. The road ahead for cervical cancer prevention and control.

    PubMed

    Tota, J E; Ramana-Kumar, A V; El-Khatib, Z; Franco, E L

    2014-04-01

    Since the early 1950s, Papanicolaou ("Pap") cytology screening has dramatically reduced cervical cancer mortality in most high-income settings. Currently, human papillomavirus (hpv) vaccination has the greatest potential to reduce the global burden of cervical cancer and precancerous lesions. However, as the prevalence of precancerous lesions declines, maintaining cytology as the primary screening test in settings with established programs might become less efficient. A reduction in test performance (sensitivity, specificity, and positive predictive value) would lead to an increase in unnecessary colposcopy referrals. Fortunately, hpv dna testing has emerged as a suitable candidate to replace cytology. Compared with the Pap test, hpv testing is less specific but much more sensitive in detecting high-grade precancerous lesions, less prone to human error, and more reproducible across settings. Linkage of hpv vaccination and screening registries could serve the added role of monitoring vaccine efficacy. As a triage test, cytology is expected to perform with sufficient accuracy because most hpv-positive smears would contain relevant abnormalities. This approach and others-for example, hpv testing followed by genotyping-are being evaluated in large population studies and have already been recommended in some settings. Other specific biomarkers that might perform well for screening and triage include hpv E6/E7 messenger rna testing, methylation of host or viral genes, and p16(INK4a) staining. Considering the rapid pace of major discoveries and the anticipated arrival of a nonavalent hpv vaccine (currently in phase iii trials), the evidence base in this field has become an elusive target and will continue to be an obstacle for policymakers.

  1. Patterns of lymph node metastasis in locally advanced cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhikai; Hu, Ke; Liu, An; Shen, Jie; Hou, Xiaorong; Lian, Xin; Sun, Shuai; Yan, Junfang; Zhang, Fuquan

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate patterns and locations of lymph node metastasis in locally advanced cervical cancers.A total of 244 consecutive patients with stage IIb cervical cancer were retrospectively evaluated. Contrast-enhanced CT scans were used for lymph node grading. Lymph nodes with the shortest axis (>1 cm) were categorized as positive and those between 0.5 and 1 cm were categorized as suspicious. All lymph nodes (LNs) were also classified by their anatomic locations.Nine hundred thirty-one LNs (136 positive and 795 suspicious) were identified. Sixty-three (25.8%) patients had positive LNs, and 153 (62.7%) patients had only suspicious LNs. The metastatic pattern was predictable traveling from level 1 (external iliac, internal iliac, obturator, and mesorectum groups) through level 2 (common iliac and presacral groups) to level 3 (para-aortic groups). In most groups, LNs were located within 1.0 cm of main blood vessels. Our novel findings were: presacral LNs metastases were rare (2/244, 0.82%); the left common iliac group (LCI) had significantly more enlarged nodes than the right common iliac group (P = 0.00); the LCI and left down-para-aortic group were further away from blood vessels than expected (1.2 cm and 1.4 cm, respectively); no additional margin was needed in anterolateral direction for external iliac groups.The lymph node metastatic patterns are relatively predicable. Different expansions from vessels should be used to include LNs for different groups. Presacral nodes metastases are rare, and further study is warranted to see whether this region can be excluded from nodal CTV. PMID:27684810

  2. Upper Cervical Epidural Abscess in Clinical Practice: Diagnosis and Management

    PubMed Central

    Al-Hourani, Khalid; Al-Aref, Rami; Mesfin, Addisu

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Narrative review. Objective Upper cervical epidural abscess (UCEA) is a rare surgical emergency. Despite increasing incidence, uncertainty remains as to how it should initially be managed. Risk factors for UCEA include immunocompromised hosts, diabetes mellitus, and intravenous drug use. Our objective is to provide a comprehensive overview of the literature including the history, clinical manifestations, diagnosis, and management of UCEA. Methods Using PubMed, studies published prior to 2015 were analyzed. We used the keywords “Upper cervical epidural abscess,” “C1 osteomyelitis,” “C2 osteomyelitis,” “C1 epidural abscess,” “C2 epidural abscess.” We excluded cases with tuberculosis. Results The review addresses epidemiology, etiology, imaging, microbiology, and diagnosis of this condition. We also address the nonoperative and operative management options and the relative indications for each as reviewed in the literature. Conclusion A high index of suspicion is required to diagnose this rare condition with magnetic resonance imaging being the imaging modality of choice. There has been a shift toward surgical management of this condition in recent times, with favorable outcomes. PMID:27190742

  3. The 46359CT polymorphism of DNMT3B is associated with the risk of cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Sotelo, Daniel; García-Aguilar, Rubén; Castro-Coronel, Yaneth; Magaña, Jonathan J; Leyva-Vazquez, Marco Antonio; Alarcón-Romero, Luz del Carmen; López-Bayghen, Esther; Illades-Aguiar, Berenice

    2013-07-01

    Abnormal methylation is related to cancer development. Since DNMT3B is an enzyme that modulates genomic methylation, we hypothesized that genetic variants of the promoter DNMT3B may be associated with an increased risk of developing cervical cancer. Our aim was to investigate the association between -579GT and 46359CT polymorphisms of DNMT3B and cervical cancer, high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (HSIL), and low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (LSIL). Samples from 200 healthy women and 130 women with squamous intraepithelial lesions (70 with cervical cancer, 30 with HSIL, and 30 with LSIL) were analyzed. Polymorphism genotyping was performed using PCR and restriction fragment length polymorphism. The -579GT polymorphism was not associated with cervical cancer, HSIL, or LSIL. The CT genotype of 46359CT polymorphism was significantly associated with cervical cancer risk (OR 8.75, CI 1.27-374.1), whereas the TT genotype was associated with a significantly decreased risk of HSIL (OR 0.66, CI 0.01-0.32) and LSIL (OR 0.11, CI 0.026-0.45). Our results suggest that genotyping the 46359CT polymorphism in DNMT3B may help identify women who are genetically susceptible to cervical cancer development. Additional studies with larger sample sizes are necessary to confirm our findings.

  4. High expression of prolactin receptor is associated with cell survival in cervical cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The altered expression of prolactin (PRL) and its receptor (PRLR) has been implicated in breast and other types of cancer. There are few studies that have focused on the analysis of PRL/PRLR in cervical cancer where the development of neoplastic lesions is influenced by the variation of the hormonal status. The aim of this study was to evaluate the expression of PRL/PRLR and the effect of PRL treatment on cell proliferation and apoptosis in cervical cancer cell lines. Results High expression of multiple PRLR forms and PRLvariants of 60–80 kDa were observed in cervical cancer cell lines compared with non-tumorigenic keratinocytes evaluated by Western blot, immunofluorecence and real time PCR. Treatment with PRL (200 ng/ml) increased cell proliferation in HeLa cells determined by the MTT assay at day 3 and after 1 day a protective effect against etoposide induced apoptosis in HeLa, SiHa and C-33A cervical cancer cell lines analyzed by the TUNEL assay. Conclusions Our data suggests that PRL/PRLR signaling could act as an important survival factor for cervical cancer. The use of an effective PRL antagonist may provide a better therapeutic intervention in cervical cancer. PMID:24148306

  5. Knowledge and acceptability of human papillomavirus vaccination and cervical cancer screening among women in Karnataka, India.

    PubMed

    Montgomery, Martha P; Dune, Tanaka; Shetty, Prasanna K; Shetty, Avinash K

    2015-03-01

    Cervical cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related mortality among women in India; however, participation in prevention and screening is low and the reasons for this are not well understood. In a cross-sectional survey in August 2008, 202 healthy women in Karnataka, India completed a questionnaire regarding knowledge, attitudes, and practices related to human papillomavirus (HPV) and cervical cancer. Factors associated with vaccination and Papanicolau (Pap) smear screening acceptance were explored. Thirty-six percent of women had heard of HPV while 15% had heard of cervical cancer. Five percent of women reported ever having a Pap smear, and 4% of women felt at risk of HPV infection. Forty-six percent of women were accepting of vaccination, but fewer (21%) were willing to have a Pap smear. Overall, knowledge related to HPV and cervical cancer topics was low. Women with negative attitudes toward HPV infection were 5.3 (95% confidence interval (CI) 2.8-10) times more likely to accept vaccination but were not significantly more likely to accept Pap smear (odds ratio 1.5, 95% CI 0.7-3.0). Cost and a low level of perceived risk were the most frequent factors cited as potential barriers. Improving awareness of HPV and cervical cancer through health care providers in addition to increasing access to vaccination and screening through government-sponsored programs may be feasible and effective methods to reduce cervical cancer burden in India.

  6. Health-care providers' perceptions, attitudes towards and recommendation practice of cervical cancer screening.

    PubMed

    Hweissa, N Ab; Lim, J N W; Su, T T

    2016-09-01

    In Libya, cervical cancer is ranked third as the most frequent cancer among women with early diagnosis being shown to reduce morbidity and mortality. Health-care providers can influence women's screening behaviours, and their lack of recommendations for screening can be one of the barriers that affect women's participation in screening programmes. This study aims to assess the health-care provider's perception around cervical cancer screening. In-depth, face-to-face interviews were conducted with 16 health-care providers, from both public and private sectors in Az-Zawiya city, Libya, between February and July of 2014. The interviews were recorded and transcribed, then analysed using thematic analysis. Our findings suggest that health-care providers did not provide sufficient information regarding cervical cancer screening for women who attend health-care facilities. The results highlight the role played by health-care professionals in motivating women to attend cervical cancer screening programs, and the need for health education of health-care providers to offer a precious advice regarding the screening. On the other hand, health-care providers highlighted that implementation of reminding system of cervical cancer screening will support them to improve screening attendance. In addition, health-care providers stressed the necessity for educational and awareness campaigns of cervical cancer screening among Libyan women. PMID:27350095

  7. A comprehensive review on host genetic susceptibility to human papillomavirus infection and progression to cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chattopadhyay, Koushik

    2011-01-01

    Cervical cancer is the second most common cancer in women worldwide. This is caused by oncogenic types of human papillomavirus (HPV) infection. Although large numbers of young sexually active women get HPV-infected, only a small fraction develop cervical cancer. This points to different co-factors for regression of HPV infection or progression to cervical cancer. Host genetic factors play an important role in the outcome of such complex or multifactor diseases such as cervical cancer and are also known to regulate the rate of disease progression. The aim of this review is to compile the advances in the field of host genetics of cervical cancer. MEDLINE database was searched using the terms, ‘HPV’, ‘cervical’, ‘CIN’, ‘polymorphism(s)’, ‘cervical’+ *the name of the gene* and ‘HPV’+ *the name of the gene*. This review focuses on the major host genes reported to affect the progression to cervical cancer in HPV infected individuals. PMID:22345983

  8. Health-care providers' perceptions, attitudes towards and recommendation practice of cervical cancer screening.

    PubMed

    Hweissa, N Ab; Lim, J N W; Su, T T

    2016-09-01

    In Libya, cervical cancer is ranked third as the most frequent cancer among women with early diagnosis being shown to reduce morbidity and mortality. Health-care providers can influence women's screening behaviours, and their lack of recommendations for screening can be one of the barriers that affect women's participation in screening programmes. This study aims to assess the health-care provider's perception around cervical cancer screening. In-depth, face-to-face interviews were conducted with 16 health-care providers, from both public and private sectors in Az-Zawiya city, Libya, between February and July of 2014. The interviews were recorded and transcribed, then analysed using thematic analysis. Our findings suggest that health-care providers did not provide sufficient information regarding cervical cancer screening for women who attend health-care facilities. The results highlight the role played by health-care professionals in motivating women to attend cervical cancer screening programs, and the need for health education of health-care providers to offer a precious advice regarding the screening. On the other hand, health-care providers highlighted that implementation of reminding system of cervical cancer screening will support them to improve screening attendance. In addition, health-care providers stressed the necessity for educational and awareness campaigns of cervical cancer screening among Libyan women.

  9. Predictors of Cervical Cancer Screening Adherence in the United States: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Limmer, Karen; LoBiondo-Wood, Geri; Dains, Joyce

    2014-01-01

    Cervical cancer incidence rates have decreased dramatically since the implementation of the Papanicolaou (Pap) smear. Nevertheless, the American Cancer Society (ACS) estimates for 2013 predicted more than 12,000 new cases of cervical cancer in the United States. Given that some subpopulations in the United States are at a higher risk for cervical cancer than others, efforts to increase screening adherence are warranted. Many studies have explored the demographics of underscreened women, but no systematic reviews of screening demographics in adult US women were identified in the past 10 years, after release of the 2002 ACS cervical cancer screening guidelines. Knowledge of adherence to these guidelines becomes important as new guidelines were developed and released in 2012. The purpose of this systematic review of relevant studies was to identify factors that predict the use of cervical cancer screening in US women. Variables found to be significantly associated with adherence to screening included education, financial status, acculturation, psychosocial issues, and marital status. Using this information, nurse practitioners and other providers can target specific at-risk populations to increase screening by educating women about the need for cervical cancer screening and ensuring access to methods for prevention and early detection of the disease. PMID:25032031

  10. Activation of miR-9 by human papillomavirus in cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Liu, Weijun; Gao, Ge; Hu, Xiaoxia; Wang, Yuhui; Schwarz, Julie K; Chen, Jason J; Grigsby, Perry W; Wang, Xiaowei

    2014-11-30

    Cervical cancer is the third most common cancer in women worldwide, leading to about 300,000 deaths each year. Most cervical cancers are caused by human papillomavirus (HPV) infection. However, persistent transcriptional activity of HPV oncogenes, which indicates active roles of HPV in cervical cancer maintenance and progression, has not been well characterized. Using our recently developed assays for comprehensive profiling of HPV E6/E7 transcripts, we have detected transcriptional activities of 10 high-risk HPV strains from 87 of the 101 cervical tumors included in the analysis. These HPV-positive patients had significantly better survival outcome compared with HPV-negative patients, indicating HPV transcriptional activity as a favorable prognostic marker for cervical cancer. Furthermore, we have determined microRNA (miRNA) expression changes that were correlated with tumor HPV status. Our profiling and functional analyses identified miR-9 as the most activated miRNA by HPV E6 in a p53-independent manner. Further target validation and functional studies showed that HPV-induced miR-9 activation led to significantly increased cell motility by downregulating multiple gene targets involved in cell migration. Thus, our work helps to understand the molecular mechanisms as well as identify potential therapeutic targets for cervical cancer and other HPV-induced cancers.

  11. [Analysis of the reasons for abandoning the follow-up and treatment process in women with pre-cancerous cervical lesions in the province of Jujuy: implications for health management].

    PubMed

    Paolino, Melisa; Arrossi, Silvina

    2012-12-01

    Adequate follow-up and treatment of women with high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (HSIL) and cancer is key in reducing cervical cancer mortality. This research study aims to analyze the magnitude of abandonment in the follow-up and treatment process, as well as the reasons for this abandonment, in women with HSIL who received care in public health services in the province of Jujuy in 2010. Secondary sources were analyzed and women were interviewed in their homes. The abandonment rate within the study population was 23.5%. Among these women, 40.5% mentioned organizational problems in the health care system as a reason for abandoning and 30.9% mentioned subjective reasons. Our results have been used in the reorganization of the follow-up and treatment process being carried out in the province. PMID:23681458

  12. [Analysis of the reasons for abandoning the follow-up and treatment process in women with pre-cancerous cervical lesions in the province of Jujuy: implications for health management].

    PubMed

    Paolino, Melisa; Arrossi, Silvina

    2012-12-01

    Adequate follow-up and treatment of women with high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (HSIL) and cancer is key in reducing cervical cancer mortality. This research study aims to analyze the magnitude of abandonment in the follow-up and treatment process, as well as the reasons for this abandonment, in women with HSIL who received care in public health services in the province of Jujuy in 2010. Secondary sources were analyzed and women were interviewed in their homes. The abandonment rate within the study population was 23.5%. Among these women, 40.5% mentioned organizational problems in the health care system as a reason for abandoning and 30.9% mentioned subjective reasons. Our results have been used in the reorganization of the follow-up and treatment process being carried out in the province.

  13. The cervical cancer prevention programme in Costa Rica

    PubMed Central

    Rojas, Ileana Quirós

    2015-01-01

    Cervical and uterine cancer continues to be an important issue for women around the world, although neoplasia has the greatest demonstrated potential for prevention. Costa Rica has achieved important advances in the reduction of the incidence and mortality of these cancers since the last century. This is the result of a series of policies, programmes, and plans, not only at the level of the health care system, but also in other areas. Increased access for women to care in health centres, fundamentally at the primary level, has been vital, as has ensuring the quality of cytology readings and access to diagnosis and treatment for precursor lesions for in situ and invasive cancers. Despite all of these achievements, there are still challenges to be overcome, which are widespread in many countries in Latin America and the Caribbean. It is important to learn from the experiences of other countries in order to improve women’s health not only as a health objective, but also as an ethical imperative to promote the exercise of women’s rights to life and health. PMID:26557876

  14. Cell membrane softening in human breast and cervical cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Händel, Chris; Schmidt, B. U. Sebastian; Schiller, Jürgen; Dietrich, Undine; Möhn, Till; Kießling, Tobias R.; Pawlizak, Steve; Fritsch, Anatol W.; Horn, Lars-Christian; Briest, Susanne; Höckel, Michael; Zink, Mareike; Käs, Josef A.

    2015-08-01

    Biomechanical properties are key to many cellular functions such as cell division and cell motility and thus are crucial in the development and understanding of several diseases, for instance cancer. The mechanics of the cellular cytoskeleton have been extensively characterized in cells and artificial systems. The rigidity of the plasma membrane, with the exception of red blood cells, is unknown and membrane rigidity measurements only exist for vesicles composed of a few synthetic lipids. In this study, thermal fluctuations of giant plasma membrane vesicles (GPMVs) directly derived from the plasma membranes of primary breast and cervical cells, as well as breast cell lines, are analyzed. Cell blebs or GPMVs were studied via thermal membrane fluctuations and mass spectrometry. It will be shown that cancer cell membranes are significantly softer than their non-malignant counterparts. This can be attributed to a loss of fluid raft forming lipids in malignant cells. These results indicate that the reduction of membrane rigidity promotes aggressive blebbing motion in invasive cancer cells.

  15. Cervical cancer control in Latin America: A call to action.

    PubMed

    Bychkovsky, Brittany L; Ferreyra, Mayra E; Strasser-Weippl, Kathrin; Herold, Christina I; de Lima Lopes, Gilberto; Dizon, Don S; Schmeler, Kathleen M; Del Carmen, Marcela; Randall, Tom C; Nogueira-Rodrigues, Angelica; de Carvalho Calabrich, Aknar Freire; St Louis, Jessica; Vail, Caroline M; Goss, Paul E

    2016-02-15

    Cervical cancer (CC) is second most common cause of cancer in Latin America and is a leading cause of cancer mortality among women. In 2015, an estimated 74,488 women will be diagnosed with CC in Latin America and 31,303 will die of the disease. CC mortality is projected to increase by 45% by 2030 despite human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination and screening efforts. In this setting, the goal was of the current study was to examine CC control efforts in Latin America and identify deficiencies in these efforts that could be addressed to reduce CC incidence and mortality. The authors found that HPV vaccination has been introduced in the majority of Latin American countries, and there is now a need to monitor the success (or shortcomings) of these programs and to ensure that these programs are sustainable. This topic was also reviewed in light of emerging data demonstrating that visual inspection with acetic acid and HPV DNA testing without Papanicolaou tests have efficacy from a screening perspective and are good alternatives to cytology-based screening programs. Overall, there is a need to build capacity for CC control in Latin America and the best strategy will depend on the country/region and must be tailored to meet the needs of the population as well as available resources.

  16. Antibodies to human papillomavirus and to other genital infectious agents and invasive cervical cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Jha, P K; Beral, V; Peto, J; Hack, S; Hermon, C; Deacon, J; Mant, D; Chilvers, C; Vessey, M P; Pike, M C

    1993-05-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) play an important part in the development of cervical cancer, but the role of other infectious agents, such as herpes simplex virus (HSV), is not clear. We assayed serum samples collected from 219 women with cervical cancer and from 387 controls for antibody to infectious agents. HPV 16-E7 and/or HPV 18-E7 antibodies were significantly related to cervical cancer risk (RR 1.9, 95% CI 1.2-3.2). Antibodies to HSV types 1 and 2, Chlamydia trachomatis, and to multiple infectious agents were associated with cervical cancer when seroprevalence rates in all cases and controls were compared, but when HPV-seropositive cases and controls were compared these associations were weaker and non-significant. This finding suggests that past infections with sexually transmitted infections other than HPV may be surrogate markers of exposure to HPV, and of no separate aetiological significance.

  17. Negative HPV screening test predicts low cervical cancer risk better than negative Pap test

    Cancer.gov

    Based on a study that included more than 1 million women, investigators at NCI have determined that a negative test for HPV infection compared to a negative Pap test provides greater safety, or assurance, against future risk of cervical cancer.

  18. [Intraoperative complications of surgical treatment of cervical cancer stages I and II in FIGO].

    PubMed

    Kornovski, Y; Iamail, E; Ivanov, S; Kovachev, E

    2013-01-01

    With this study are presented the types of intraoperative complications and their frequency in radical hysterectomy and lymph node dissection (pelvic and paraaortic) as surgical treatment of 294 patients with invasive cervical cancer FIGO stages I and II.

  19. Cervical cancer survival prediction using hybrid of SMOTE, CART and smooth support vector machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purnami, S. W.; Khasanah, P. M.; Sumartini, S. H.; Chosuvivatwong, V.; Sriplung, H.

    2016-04-01

    According to the WHO, every two minutes there is one patient who died from cervical cancer. The high mortality rate is due to the lack of awareness of women for early detection. There are several factors that supposedly influence the survival of cervical cancer patients, including age, anemia status, stage, type of treatment, complications and secondary disease. This study wants to classify/predict cervical cancer survival based on those factors. Various classifications methods: classification and regression tree (CART), smooth support vector machine (SSVM), three order spline SSVM (TSSVM) were used. Since the data of cervical cancer are imbalanced, synthetic minority oversampling technique (SMOTE) is used for handling imbalanced dataset. Performances of these methods are evaluated using accuracy, sensitivity and specificity. Results of this study show that balancing data using SMOTE as preprocessing can improve performance of classification. The SMOTE-SSVM method provided better result than SMOTE-TSSVM and SMOTE-CART.

  20. Detection of Cervical Cancer through Visual Inspection of Cervix with Acetic Acid (VIA) and Colposcopy at Mymensingh Medical College Hospital.

    PubMed

    Rahman, M F; Akhter, S N; Alam, M J; Sarker, A S; Uddin, M J; Bashar, A; Banu, S

    2016-07-01

    Cervical cancer is the second most common cause of cancer related morbidity and mortality in women with 50% mortality rate. It is preventable if cervical cellular changes are detected and managed at early stage. This was a retrospective study conducted at VIA center of outpatient department and Colposcopy clinic at in-patient department of Mymensingh Medical College Hospital, Bangladesh covering a period from September 2013 to November 2014. Objective of this study was detection of cervical cancer and precancerous condition amongst patients reported to VIA center and Colposcopy clinic. In primary screening at VIA Center, total respondents were 3604, their mean age was 35.9 and highest were in the age group 31 to 40 years. At VIA center, 110(3.05%) were found positive and highest were between 31 to 40 years. In Colposcopy Clinic, out of 700 patients, 51.7% were CIN 1, 4.9% CIN 2, 1.4% CIN 3, invasive carcinoma was 0.3% and unsatisfactory or inconclusive were 34.3%. Most of the respondents were housewives and majority had poor monthly income. Amongst respondents, 72.1% were from rural area and Colposcopic findings revealed in 62.5% abnormal cervical changes, 46.5% were from rural area. Mean age at marriage or age at first coitus was found 16.25 years and 92.7% were in 11 to 20 years. Maximum abnormal cervical findings including CIN were between the ages ranged from 11 to 20 years of marriage age. In patients having 1 - 5 number of child having abnormal (58%) cervical changes, 48% were CIN 1. Histopathology reports found 19.6% CIN 1 (Total CIN 20.7%), cervical carcinoma 1.3%, inflammatory 7.0% and 0.42% cases were reported normal. Amongst 438 histopathology advised cases, 230 respondent's reports with patients were not available. VIA followed by Colposcopy has been a feasible, easy and reliable tools for screening cervical cancer in Bangladesh. PMID:27612882

  1. Resources Required for Cervical Cancer Prevention in Low- and Middle-Income Countries

    PubMed Central

    Campos, Nicole G.; Sharma, Monisha; Clark, Andrew; Kim, Jane J.; Resch, Stephen C.

    2016-01-01

    Background Cervical cancer is the fourth leading cause of cancer death in women, with 85% of cases and deaths occurring in developing countries. While organized screening programs have reduced cervical cancer incidence in high-income countries through detection and treatment of precancerous lesions, the implementation of organized screening has not been effective in low-resource settings due to lack of infrastructure and limited budgets. Our objective was to estimate the cost of comprehensive primary and secondary cervical cancer prevention in low- and middle-income countries. Methods and Findings We performed a modeling analysis to estimate 1) for girls aged 10 years, the cost of 2-dose human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination; and 2) for women aged 30 to 49 years, the cost of cervical cancer screening (with visual inspection with acetic acid (VIA), HPV testing, or cytology) and preventive treatment in 102 low- and middle-income countries from 2015 to 2024. We used an Excel-based costing and service utilization model to estimate financial costs (2013 US$) based on prevalence of HPV, prevalence of precancerous lesions, and screening test performance. Where epidemiologic data were unavailable, we extrapolated from settings with data using an individual-based microsimulation model of cervical carcinogenesis (calibrated to 20 settings) and multivariate regression. Total HPV vaccination costs ranged from US$8.6 billion to US$24.2 billion for all scenarios considered (immediate, 5-year, or 10-year roll-out; price per dose US$4.55-US$70 by country income level). The total cost of screening and preventive treatment ranged from US$5.1 billion (10-year roll-out, screening once at age 35 years) to US$42.3 billion (immediate roll-out, high intensity screening). Limitations of this analysis include the assumption of standardized protocols by country income level that did not account for the potential presence of multiple screening modalities or management strategies within a

  2. The association of lymph node volume with cervical metastatic lesions in head and neck cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Liang, Ming-Tai; Chen, Clayton Chi-Chang; Wang, Ching-Ping; Wang, Chen-Chi; Lin, Whe-Dar; Liu, Shih-An

    2009-06-01

    The aim of this study was to determine if volume of cervical lymph node measured via computed tomography (CT) could differentiate metastatic from benign lesions in head and neck cancer patients. We conducted a retrospective review of chart and images in a tertiary referring center in Taiwan. Patients with head and neck cancers underwent radical, modified radical or functional neck dissection were enrolled. The CT images before operation were reassessed by a radiologist and were compared with the results of pathological examination. A total of 102 patients were included for final analyses. Most patients were male (n = 96, 94%) and average age was 50.1 years. Although the average nodal volume in patients with cervical metastases was higher than those of patients without cervical metastases, it was not an independent factor associated with cervical metastasis after controlling for other variables; however, central nodal necrosis on enhanced CT image [odds ratio (OR) 18.95, P = 0.008) and minimal axial diameter >7.5 mm (OR 6.868, P = 0.001) were independent factors correlated with cervical metastasis. Therefore, the volume of cervical lymph node measured from CT images cannot predict cervical metastases in head and neck cancer patients. Measurement of minimal axial diameter of the largest lymph node is a simple and more accurate way to predict cervical metastasis instead.

  3. Bone Density in Patients with Cervical Cancer or Endometrial Cancer in comparison with Healthy Control; According to the stages

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yubin; Kim, Ari; Kim, Heung Yeol; Eo, Wan Kyu; Lee, Eun Sil; Chun, Sungwook

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the bone mineral density (BMD) in the lumbar spine and femur in postmenopausal women with cervical cancer and endometrial cancer without bone metastasis in comparison with that in healthy control postmenopausal women, and to assess the loss of BMD according to the cancer stage. Materials and methods: We analyzed the BMD of the lumbar spine and femur using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) in 218 patients with cervical cancer, 85 patients with endometrial cancer, and 259 healthy controls. The serum levels of calcium (Ca), phosphorus (P), osteocalcin (OSC), and total alkaline phosphatase (ALP), and urine deoxypyridinoline(DPL) were measured in all participants. Results: Age, body mass index, parity, and time since menopause were not significantly different between the three groups. Serum Ca level was higher in the cervical cancer group (p = 0.000), however, urine DPL was lower in endometrial cancer group (p = 0.000). The T-scores of basal BMD at the second and fourth lumbar vertebra (L2, L4) were significantly lower in patients with cervical cancer (p = 0.038, 0.000, respectively) compared to those in the healthy control groups. Additionally, the incidence of osteoporosis and osteopenia basal status of bone mass was significantly higher in patients with cervical cancer compared to that in controls (p = 0.016). No differences in basal BMD of the lumbar spine and femur were observed between patients with cervical cancer according to their stages. Conclusion: Our results suggest that postmenopausal women with cervical cancer have a lower BMD and are at increased risk of osteoporosis in the lumbar spine before receiving anticancer treatment compared with postmenopausal women with endometrial cancer. PMID:26185529

  4. Determinants of cervical cancer screening adherence in urban areas of Nakhon Ratchasima Province, Thailand.

    PubMed

    Visanuyothin, Sawitree; Chompikul, Jiraporn; Mongkolchati, Aroonsri

    2015-01-01

    Cervical cancer is the most common disease among Thai women. The cervical cancer mortality rate has increased in the previous decade. Therefore, this cross-sectional study was conducted to examine the factors associated with cervical cancer screening adherence. Stratified sampling with the proportional to size method was used to select registered women aged 30-60 years. Of the 700 self-administered questionnaires distributed during July and September of 2012, 675 were returned, resulting in a response rate of 96.2%. Approximately 65.4% of the women were considered to be adherent to cervical cancer screening (i.e., maintainers) as defined by at least one screening within the recommended 5-year screening interval and the expectation of attending a screening in the future. Chi-square tests revealed that occupation, marital status, number of children, sexual activity, health insurance scheme, history of oral contraceptive pill use, perceived barriers, perceived benefits, and knowledge about cervical cancer prevention were significantly associated with cervical cancer screening adherence. After adjusting for occupation, marital status, number of children, and health insurance in the model, perceived barriers (Adj OR=1.97, 95% CI=1.24-3.10) and knowledge (Adj OR=1.65, 95% CI=1.13-2.41) remained significant predictors of cervical cancer screening adherence. These findings suggest that the non-housewives, women of single/separated/divorced/widowed status, and women with no children should be the first priorities for getting Pap tests. Strategies for overcoming the barriers of these women, such as using mobile units for cervical cancer screening, should be promoted. Education programs should be strengthened and promoted to overcome negative perceptions and knowledge deficiencies.

  5. Expression of COL6A1 predicts prognosis in cervical cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Teng; Tong, Chongjie; Kazobinka, Gallina; Zhang, Weijing; Huang, Xin; Huang, Yongwen; Zhang, Yanna

    2016-01-01

    COL6A1 has been shown to play an important role in tumor initiation and progression. The present study is to investigate the clinical significance of COL6A1 in cervical cancer. In this study, the COL6A1 expression levels in 10 paired cervical cancer tissues and the adjacent non-tumor tissues were examined by real-time PCR. The expression of COL6A1 protein was examined in 162 cervical cancer samples by immunohistochemistry, and the correlation of COL6A1 expression with clinicopathologic factors was analyzed. The overall and recurrent-free survival rates were estimated using Kaplan-Meier method and compared with the log-rank test. The prognostic analysis was carried out with multivariate Cox regressions model. The result showed that COL6A1 expression was up-regulated in cervical cancer tissues in compared with that in non-tumor tissues. High expression of COL6A1 was significantly correlated with FIGO stage (P<0.001), tumor size (P=0.025) and lymph node metastasis (P=0.028) of the disease. Moreover, survival analysis showed that high expression of COL6A1 was significantly associated with poorer overall (OS) and recurrent free (RFS) survival (p=0.004 and =0.001, respectively) of cervical cancer patients. Multivariate analysis suggested that COL6A1 expression was an independent prognostic marker of cervical cancer (P=0.029). Thus, COL6A1 may serve as an oncogene in the initiation and progression of cervical cancer, and as a predictor of poor prognosis in cervical cancer patients. PMID:27398167

  6. Knowledge of cervical cancer pathology of high school students in San Carlos, Costa Rica.

    PubMed

    Carlson, Lauren M; Gonzalez, Sam

    2014-09-01

    In Costa Rica, cervical cancer is the second most common female cancer, despite accessibility of screening through the universal health care system. There is little understanding of knowledge levels of the adolescent population on cervical cancer, although this population is the most exposed to risk factors. This study sought to learn about male and female adolescent knowledge of preventative methods, infection acquisition, clinical manifestations and medical services. A total of 533 students from grades 7-12 from five public high schools in the rural San Carlos region participated in the study from March through April 2012. Students were found to lack knowledge, as only 30.8% of students stated that they knew what cervical cancer is. Additionally, a connection was lacking between cervical cancer concepts, as for example 75.2% of students had heard of Human Papiloma Virus, but only 33.9% of those students knew that HPV is related to cervical cancer. Age had a positive relationship with knowledge of main concepts (p < 0.001). More women than men had heard of cervical cancer and the Papanicolaou (p = 0.025, p < 0.0001), but otherwise no significant difference in mean response between genders was found. Students were found to have a limited awareness of the educational cervical cancer campaign (7.7% of the student population) and the ability to go alone to the doctor to receive medical attention (30.6% of students). Additionally, the public education system does not require cervical cancer to be included in the present curriculum. Hence, as students lack education on prevention and risk factors, the majority of prevention responsibility falls only on the universal health care system to regularly perform Papanicolaou exams to detect pre-cancerous or cancerous changes. The findings indicated the importance of including cervical cancer in the sexual education curriculum of the public education system in Costa Rica to educate the at-risk population of preventative methods

  7. RANKL/RANK interaction promotes the growth of cervical cancer cells by strengthening the dialogue between cervical cancer cells and regulation of IL-8 secretion.

    PubMed

    Shang, Wen-Qing; Li, Hui; Liu, Li-Bing; Chang, Kai-Kai; Yu, Jia-Jun; Xie, Feng; Li, Ming-Qing; Yu, Jin-Jin

    2015-12-01

    Receptor activator for nuclear factor κB ligand (RANKL) is a member of the tumor necrosis factor (TNF) family. The interaction between RANKL and its receptor RANK plays an important role in the development and function of diverse tissues. However, the expression and role of RANKL in cervical cancer are still unknown. In the present study, we found that RANKL and RANK were highly co-expressed in cervical cancer. HeLa and SiHa cells secreted soluble RANKL (sRANKL), expressed member RANKL (mRANKL) and RANK. Recombinant human RANKL protein had no effect on the viability of HeLa and SiHa cells. Yet, blocking RANKL with an anti-human RANKL neutralizing antibody (α-RANKL) or recombinant human osteoprotegrin (OPG) protein resulted in the downregulation of Ki-67 and B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2) expression and an increase in Fas and Fas ligand (FasL) expression, as well as a high level of viability and a low level of apoptosis in the HeLa and SiHa cells. In addition, α-RANKL led to a decrease in IL-8 secretion. Recombinant human IL-8 protein reversed the effect of α-RANKL on the expression of proliferation- and apoptosis‑related molecules, and proliferation and apoptosis in the HeLa and SiHa cells. The present study suggests that a high level of mRANKL/RANK expression in cervical cancer lesions plays an important role in the rapid growth of cervical cancer cells possibly through strengthening the dialogue between cervical cancer cells and regulation of IL-8 secretion, which may be a possible target for cervical cancer therapy.

  8. Laparoscopic Indocyanine Green Sentinel Lymph Node Mapping in Pregnant Cervical Cancer Patients.

    PubMed

    Papadia, Andrea; Mohr, Stefan; Imboden, Sara; Lanz, Susanne; Bolla, Daniele; Mueller, Michael D

    2016-02-01

    We present cases of 2 pregnant patients with early-stage cervical cancer who have undergone indocyanine green (ICG) sentinel lymph node (SLN) mapping followed by laparoscopic SLN biopsy, pelvic lymphadenectomy, and cervical conization. Eight milliliters of ICG were injected in the 4 quadrants of the cervix after having obtained an adequate pneumoperitoneum and having inspected the abdominal cavity. SLNs were identified in both hemipelvises in both patients. In the final pathologic analysis, both SLNs and non-SLNs were negative for metastatic disease. No adverse events from ICG injection were recorded. ICG SLN mapping seems to be feasible in pregnant cervical cancer patients.

  9. Neutrophils of the patients with cervical cancer after femtosecond laser radiation in vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abakumova, Tatyana; Sysoliatin, Alexey; Antoneeva, Inna; Svetukhin, Vyacheslav; Arslanova, Dinara; Gening, Snezhanna

    2012-03-01

    The cytochemical analysis of the aerobic and anaerobic bactericidal, phagocytic activity, phagocytosis completeness, as well as membrane topology and rigidity has been performed with the Scanning probe microscopy (Solver Pro, NT-MDT, Russia) in neutrophils of the patients with cervical carcinoma treated with the Erbium laser radiation at different intensity. The obtained data reveal a significant effect of the femtosecond laser radiation on neutrophil morphofunctional state in patients with cervical cancer. The efficiency of the femtosecond radiation depends on its intensity and clinical stage of the cervical cancer.

  10. Syzygium cumini inhibits growth and induces apoptosis in cervical cancer cell lines: a primary study.

    PubMed

    Barh, D; Viswanathan, G

    2008-01-01

    Cervical cancer is common among women in the Indian subcontinent and the incidences and death rates are gradually increasing over the years. Several dietary phytochemicals have been reported to have growth inhibitory and apoptotic effect on HeLa and other cervical cell lines. In this study, using Hoechst 33342 staining, MTT, Annexin V-FLUOS/PI and TUNEL assays we demonstrated that Syzygium cumini extract inhibits the growth and induces apoptosis in HeLa and SiHa cervical cancer cell lines in a dose- and time-dependent manner. The phytochemical, its mode of action and safety issues are yet to be determined. PMID:22275971

  11. Location and Density of Immune Cells in Precursor Lesions and Cervical Cancer.

    PubMed

    Bedoya, Astrid M; Jaramillo, Roberto; Baena, Armando; Castaño, Jorge; Olaya, Natalia; Zea, Arnold H; Herrero, Rolando; Sanchez, Gloria I

    2013-04-01

    Only a small proportion of women infected with Human Papillomavirus (HPV) develop cervical cancer. Host immune response seems to play a role eliminating the viral infection and preventing progression to cancer. Characterization of tumor infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) in cervical pre-neoplastic lesions and cervical cancer may be helpful to understand the mechanisms that mediate this protection. The aim of this study was to determine if there are differences in the localization and density (cells/mm(2)) of CD8+ T-cells, CD4+ T-cells and Tregs (CD25 + Foxp3+) in cervical pre-neoplastic lesions and cervical cancer. Immunohistochemical analysis of sections of 96 (26 CIN1, 21 CIN2, 25 CIN3, and 24 SCC) samples revealed that regardless of CIN grades, CD8+ T-cells are more abundant than CD4+, CD25+ and Foxp3+ cells in both the stroma and epithelium. There was a higher density of CD8+ cells in the stroma of cervical cancer compared to CIN3 (OR = 4.20, 95% CI 1.2-15), CIN2 (OR = 7.86, 95% CI 1.7-36.4) and CIN1 (OR = 4.25, 95% CI 1.1-17). Studies evaluating whether these cells are recruited before or after cancer progression will be helpful to understand the role of these cells in the natural history of HPV-induced lesions.

  12. Perceptions of cervical cancer risk and screening among transmasculine individuals: patient and provider perspectives.

    PubMed

    Agénor, Madina; Peitzmeier, Sarah M; Bernstein, Ida M; McDowell, Michal; Alizaga, Natalie M; Reisner, Sari L; Pardee, Dana J; Potter, Jennifer

    2016-10-01

    Transmasculine people (individuals assigned a female sex at birth who identify as male or masculine) are at risk of cervical cancer. Despite low rates of Pap test use in this population, research examining the determinants of cervical cancer screening among transmasculine individuals is scarce. We conducted in-depth interviews and focus groups with 49 participants (32 transmasculine patients and 17 healthcare providers) in order to examine transmasculine individuals' and healthcare providers' perceptions of cervical cancer risk and screening among individuals on the transmasculine continuum. Overall, patients believed that transmasculine individuals should receive regular Pap tests, especially in the event of gynaecological concerns. While healthcare providers' views varied, many perceived transmasculine individuals to be at low risk of cervical cancer. Contrary to existing screening guidelines, several providers believed that transmasculine individuals who did not engage in penile-vaginal intercourse with cisgender men, expressed discomfort about Pap testing or intended to obtain a hysterectomy might not need to be screened regularly or at all. Our findings underscore the importance of educating patients and providers about cervical cancer risk among transmasculine individuals and establishing evidence-based guidelines for cervical cancer screening in this underserved population.

  13. Cervical Cancer Incidence and Mortality Among American Indian and Alaska Native Women, 1999–2009

    PubMed Central

    Benard, Vicki; Thomas, Cheryll; Brayboy, Annie; Paisano, Roberta; Becker, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. We analyzed cervical cancer incidence and mortality data in American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) women compared with women of other races. Methods. We improved identification of AI/AN race, cervical cancer incidence, and mortality data using Indian Health Service (IHS) patient records; our analyses focused on residents of IHS Contract Health Service Delivery Area (CHSDA) counties. Age-adjusted incidence and death rates were calculated for AI/AN and White women from 1999 to 2009. Results. AI/AN women in CHSDA counties had a death rate from cervical cancer of 4.2, which was nearly twice the rate in White women (2.0; rate ratio [RR] = 2.11). AI/AN women also had higher incidence rates of cervical cancer compared with White women (11.0 vs 7.1; RR = 1.55) and were more often diagnosed with later-stage disease (RR = 1.84 for regional stage and RR = 1.74 for distant stage). Death rates decreased for AI/AN women from 1990 to 1993 (−25.8%/year) and remained stable thereafter. Conclusions. Although rates decreased over time, AI/AN women had disproportionately higher cervical cancer incidence and mortality. The persistently higher rates among AI/AN women compared with White women require continued improvements in identifying and treating cervical cancer and precancerous lesions. PMID:24754650

  14. Burden of hospital admissions for cervical cancer in Spain during 1999-2002.

    PubMed

    Gil, Angel; San-Martín, María; Gil, Ruth; Hernández, Valentín; Ribes, Josepa; González, Antonio

    2007-01-01

    Population-based retrospective epidemiological study to estimate the burden of to hospitalizations by cervical cancer in Spain. It was conducted by using hospital discharge data from the national surveillance system for hospital data, Conjunto Mínimo Básico de Datos (CMBD). Records of all patients admitted to hospital with a diagnosis of malignant neoplasm of the cervix (ICD-9-MC codes 180.0-180.9) or carcinoma in situ of cervix (code 233.1) during a four year period (1999-2002), were selected. An annual average of 4,151 hospitalizations with a primary or secondary diagnosis of cervical cancer and 2,761 hospitalizations due to carcinoma in situ were identified. Annually there were 25.5 and 17.0 hospitalizations by cervical cancer and carcinoma in situ per 100,000 women > or =20 years of age, respectively. Hospitalization rate by cervical cancer and carcinoma in situ peaks in between 45 and 59 years of age (39.4 admissions per 100,000 women) and 30 to 44 years of age (32.2 per 100,000 women), respectively. The mean cost of a hospitalization by cervical cancer and carcinoma in situ euro3,098 and euro2,192, respectively. The estimated annual cost of hospitalizations cervical cancer and carcinoma in situ in Spain was 19 million euro.

  15. Reducing the Excess Burden of Cervical Cancer Among Latinas: Translating Science into Health Promotion Initiatives

    PubMed Central

    Baezconde-Garbanati, Lourdes; Murphy, Sheila T.; Moran, Meghan Bridgid; Cortessis, Victoria K.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Although deaths from cervical cancer are declining, Latinas are not benefiting equally in this decline. Incidence of invasive cervical cancer among Los Angeles’, California Latinas is much higher than among non-Latina Whites (14.7 versus 8.02 per 100,000). This paper examines cervical cancer screening among Latinas. Methods Ninety-seven women of Mexican origin participated in 12 focus groups exploring barriers to screening. Saturation was reached. Results All participants knew what a Pap test was and most knew its purpose. More acculturated participants understood the link between HPV and cervical cancer. More recent immigrants did not. There was confusion whether women who were not sexually active need to be screened. Most frequently mentioned barriers were lack of time and concern over missing work. Lower income and less acculturated women were less likely to be aware of free/low-cost clinics. Older and less acculturated participants held more fatalistic beliefs, were more embarrassed about getting a Pap test, were more fearful of being perceived as sexually promiscuous, and were more fearful of receiving disapproval from their husbands. Conclusions Latinas are informed regarding cervical cancer screening; rather they encounter barriers such as a lack of time, money and support. Health promotion interventions can be enhanced via peer-to-peer education, by addressing barriers to cervical cancer screening with in-language, culturally tailored interventions, and working with clinics on systemic changes, such as extended clinic hours. PMID:24587769

  16. Purity and passion: risk and morality in Latina immigrants' and physicians' beliefs about cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Martinez, R G; Chavez, L R; Hubbell, F A

    1997-06-01

    This paper examines how physicians' beliefs about risk factors for cervical cancer compare with Mexican and Salvadoran immigrant women's views (hereafter Latina immigrants). Between August 15, 1991 and August 15, 1992, we conducted ethnographic interviews with 39 Mexican immigrant women, 28 Salvadoran immigrant women, and 30 physicians in northern Orange County, California. Physicians and Latina immigrants converge on their beliefs that sexual behavior is a predominant risk factor for cervical cancer. They diverge, however, on their reasons. Latina immigrants' perceptions of health risks are embedded in a larger set of cultural values centering around gender relations, sexuality, and morality. Latina immigrants also emphasized men's behavior as risk factors. Physicians' views, on the other hand, are largely based on the epidemiology of cervical cancer risk factors. They emphasized beginning sexual relations at an early age, multiple sexual partners, and infection with sexually transmitted viruses. Some physicians, however, displayed moral interpretations of the sex-based risk factors for cervical cancer through the use of the culturally-loaded term "promiscuous" in place of "multiple sexual partners," through specific references to morality, and through characterizations of women at risk for cervical cancer. Both the physicians and the Latina immigrants in our study paid considerably less attention to socioeconomic factors. Our results have important implications for physicians who provide health care for Latina immigrants. Physicians should be clear to point out that women need not be "promiscuous" to get cervical cancer.

  17. Perceptions of cervical cancer risk and screening among transmasculine individuals: patient and provider perspectives.

    PubMed

    Agénor, Madina; Peitzmeier, Sarah M; Bernstein, Ida M; McDowell, Michal; Alizaga, Natalie M; Reisner, Sari L; Pardee, Dana J; Potter, Jennifer

    2016-10-01

    Transmasculine people (individuals assigned a female sex at birth who identify as male or masculine) are at risk of cervical cancer. Despite low rates of Pap test use in this population, research examining the determinants of cervical cancer screening among transmasculine individuals is scarce. We conducted in-depth interviews and focus groups with 49 participants (32 transmasculine patients and 17 healthcare providers) in order to examine transmasculine individuals' and healthcare providers' perceptions of cervical cancer risk and screening among individuals on the transmasculine continuum. Overall, patients believed that transmasculine individuals should receive regular Pap tests, especially in the event of gynaecological concerns. While healthcare providers' views varied, many perceived transmasculine individuals to be at low risk of cervical cancer. Contrary to existing screening guidelines, several providers believed that transmasculine individuals who did not engage in penile-vaginal intercourse with cisgender men, expressed discomfort about Pap testing or intended to obtain a hysterectomy might not need to be screened regularly or at all. Our findings underscore the importance of educating patients and providers about cervical cancer risk among transmasculine individuals and establishing evidence-based guidelines for cervical cancer screening in this underserved population. PMID:27142466

  18. Oncogenic potential of Human Papillomavirus (HPV) and its relation with cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Human Papillomavirus (HPV) is the most common cause of cervical cancer. Cervical cancer being the second most common cancer after lung cancer, affecting women of different age groups; has a prevalence of about 20% in young sexually active women. Among different types of HPV, HPV16 the major strain causing this cancer and is sexually transmitted had been unnoticed for decades. Keeping in mind the multiple risk factors related with cervical cancer such as early age sexual activities, teenage pregnancies, smoking, use of oral contraceptives, having multiple sex partners, hormone replacement therapies and various other unknown factors lead to the onset of the disease. Awareness for various diagnostic procedures such as Pap smears screening prove to be an effective way in eradicating the oncogenic potential of HPV. PMID:21635792

  19. Use of process evaluation to guide health education in Forsyth County's project to prevent cervical cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Dignan, M B; Michielutte, R; Sharp, P C; Young, L D; Daniels, L A

    1991-01-01

    The Forsyth County, NC, Cervical Cancer Prevention Project is a 5-year public health education program designed to increase the proportion of black women in the county who are appropriately screened for cervical cancer. In this paper, the authors report on process evaluation--the procedures used to monitor the intervention and to insure that the target population was reached with a high quality, community-based health education program. A system that encompasses documentation of program activities, interviews with women in waiting rooms of primary care providers, semiannual interviews with a panel of approximately 100 women from the target population, and telephone followup with participants in direct education workshops was designed and implemented. Through October 1990, more than 2,100 interviews had been conducted. Data from these activities have facilitated continued development and refinement of educational materials, provided guidance for developing new strategies for reaching the target population, and provided continuous feedback to program managers to allow monitoring the impact of all program activities. PMID:1899943

  20. Clinical application of DNA ploidy to cervical cancer screening: A review

    PubMed Central

    Garner, David

    2014-01-01

    Screening for cervical cancer with DNA ploidy assessment by automated quantitative image cytometry has spread throughout China over the past decade and now an estimated 1 million tests per year are done there. Compared to conventional liquid based cytology, DNA ploidy has competitive accuracy with much higher throughput per technician. DNA ploidy has the enormous advantage that it is an objective technology that can be taught in typically 2 or 3 wk, unlike qualitative cytology, and so it can enable screening in places that lack sufficient qualified cytotechnologists and cytopathologists for conventional cytology. Most papers on experience with application of the technology to cervical cancer screening over the past decade were published in the Chinese language. This review aims to provide a consistent framework for analysis of screening data and to summarize some of the work published from 2005 to the end of 2013. Of particular interest are a few studies comparing DNA ploidy with testing for high risk human papilloma virus (hrHPV) which suggest that DNA ploidy is at least equivalent, easier and less expensive than hrHPV testing. There may also be patient management benefits to combining hrHPV testing with DNA ploidy. Some knowledge gaps are identified and some suggestions are made for future research directions. PMID:25493231

  1. The association between methylated CDKN2A and cervical carcinogenesis, and its diagnostic value in cervical cancer: a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jinyun; Zhou, Chongchang; Zhou, Haojie; Bao, Tianlian; Gao, Tengjiao; Jiang, Xiangling; Ye, Meng

    2016-01-01

    Background Cervical cancer is the second deadliest gynecologic malignancy, characterized by apparently precancerous lesions and cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN), and having a long course from the development of CIN to cervical cancer. Cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 2A (CDKN2A) is a well-documented tumor suppressor gene and is commonly methylated in cervical cancer. However, the relationship between methylated CDKN2A and carcinogenesis in cervical cancer is inconsistent, and the diagnostic accuracy of methylated CDKN2A is underinvestigated. In this study, we attempted to quantify the association between CDKN2A methylation and the carcinogenesis of cervical cancer, and its diagnostic power. Methods We systematically reviewed four electronic databases and identified 26 studies involving 1,490 cervical cancers, 1,291 CINs, and 964 controls. A pooled odds ratio (OR) with corresponding 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) was calculated to evaluate the association between methylated CDKN2A and the carcinogenesis of cervical cancer. Specificity, sensitivity, the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve, and the diagnostic odds ratio were computed to assess the effect of methylated CDKN2A in the diagnosis of cervical cancer. Results Our results indicated an upward trend in the methylation frequency of CDKN2A in the carcinogenesis of cervical cancer (cancer vs control: OR =23.67, 95% CI =15.54–36.06; cancer vs CIN: OR =2.53, 95% CI =1.79–3.5; CIN vs control: OR =9.68, 95% CI =5.82–16.02). The specificity, sensitivity, area under the receiver operating characteristic curve, and diagnostic odds ratio were 0.99 (95% CI: 0.97–0.99), 0.36 (95% CI: 0.28–0.45), 0.93 (95% CI: 0.91–0.95), and 43 (95% CI: 19–98), respectively. Conclusion Our findings indicate that abnormal CDKN2A methylation may be strongly correlated with the pathogenesis of cervical cancer. Our results also demonstrate that CDKN2A methylation might serve as an early detector of

  2. American Cancer Society Guideline for human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine use to prevent cervical cancer and its precursors.

    PubMed

    Saslow, Debbie; Castle, Philip E; Cox, J Thomas; Davey, Diane D; Einstein, Mark H; Ferris, Daron G; Goldie, Sue J; Harper, Diane M; Kinney, Walter; Moscicki, Anna-Barbara; Noller, Kenneth L; Wheeler, Cosette M; Ades, Terri; Andrews, Kimberly S; Doroshenk, Mary K; Kahn, Kelly Green; Schmidt, Christy; Shafey, Omar; Smith, Robert A; Partridge, Edward E; Garcia, Francisco

    2007-01-01

    The American Cancer Society (ACS) has developed guidelines for the use of the prophylactic human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine for the prevention of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia and cervical cancer. These recommendations are based on a formal review of the available evidence. They address the use of prophylactic HPV vaccines, including who should be vaccinated and at what age, as well as a summary of policy and implementation issues. Implications for screening are also discussed.

  3. A panel of autoantibodies as potential early diagnostic serum biomarkers in patients with cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Huangfu, Mingmei; Xu, Shuang; Li, Siyao; Sun, Baosheng; Lee, Kuang-Hui; Liu, Linlin; Sun, Shilong

    2016-07-01

    The study was designed to test whether circulating autoantibodies against associated antigens (TAAs) were altered in early cervical cancer and benign cervical tumors. A total of 111 cervical cancer patients, 137 cervical benign tumor patients, and 160 healthy volunteers matched in age were recruited in this study. The expression of autoantibodies was tested using in-house developed enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) with linear peptide envelope antigens derived from TAAs. One-way ANOVA test showed that there was no difference in the CD25 autoantibody expression among the cervical cancer group, benign tumor group, and healthy control group (P = 0.063; P = 0.191). The expression of autoantibodies against survivin and TP53 in the cervical cancer group was significantly higher than that in the benign tumor group (P < 0.001; P < 0.001). The levels of autoantibodies against cyclinB-1 and ANXA-1 were higher in the cervical cancer group than in the healthy control group (P = 0.010; P = 0.001), while autoantibodies in the cervical cancer group showed no difference in expression compared with that in the benign tumor group. The panel of five TAAs showed a sensitivity of 37.8 % and a specificity of 90 %, which was much higher than the sensitivity of the single-TAA testing group. The data from this study further support our previous hypothesis that the detection of autoantibodies for the diagnosis of a specific cancer type can be enhanced using a panel of several selected TAAs as target antigens.

  4. Screening for Cervical, Prostate, and Breast Cancer: Interpreting the Evidence.

    PubMed

    Carter, Stacy M; Williams, Jane; Parker, Lisa; Pickles, Kristen; Jacklyn, Gemma; Rychetnik, Lucie; Barratt, Alexandra

    2015-08-01

    Cancer screening is an important component of prevention and early detection in public health and clinical medicine. The evidence for cancer screening, however, is often contentious. A description and explanation of disagreements over the evidence for cervical, breast, and prostate screening may assist physicians, policymakers, and citizens faced with screening decisions and suggest directions for future screening research. There are particular issues to be aware of in the evidence base for each form of screening, which are summarized in this paper. Five tensions explain existing conflicts over the evidence: (1) data from differing contexts may not be comparable; (2) screening technologies affect evidence quality, and thus evidence must evolve with changing technologies; (3) the quality of evidence of benefit varies, and the implications are contested; (4) evidence about harm is relatively new, there are gaps in that evidence, and there is disagreement over what it means; and (5) evidence about outcomes is often poorly communicated. The following principles will assist people to evaluate and use the evidence: (1) attend closely to transferability; (2) consider the influence of technologies on the evidence base; (3) query the design of meta-analyses; (4) ensure harms are defined and measured; and (5) improve risk communication practices. More fundamentally, there is a need to question the purpose of cancer screening and the values that inform that purpose, recognizing that different stakeholders may value different things. If implemented, these strategies will improve the production and interpretation of the methodologically challenging and always-growing evidence for and against cancer screening. PMID:26091929

  5. Immunotherapy for human papillomavirus-associated disease and cervical cancer: review of clinical and translational research.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sung Jong; Yang, Andrew; Wu, T C; Hung, Chien Fu

    2016-09-01

    Cervical cancer is the fourth most lethal women's cancer worldwide. Current treatments against cervical cancer include surgery, radiotherapy, chemotherapy, and anti-angiogenic agents. However, despite the various treatments utilized for the treatment of cervical cancer, its disease burden remains a global issue. Persistent infection of human papillomavirus (HPV) has been identified as an essential step of pathogenesis of cervical cancer and many other cancers, and nation-wide HPV screening as well as preventative HPV vaccination program have been introduced globally. However, even though the commercially available prophylactic HPV vaccines, Gardasil (Merck) and Cervarix (GlaxoSmithKline), are effective in blocking the entry of HPV into the epithelium of cervix through generation of HPV-specific neutralizing antibodies, they cannot eliminate the pre-existing HPV infection. For these reason, other immunotherapeutic options against HPV-associated diseases, including therapeutic vaccines, have been continuously explored. Therapeutic HPV vaccines enhance cell-mediated immunity targeting HPV E6 and E7 antigens by modulating primarily dendritic cells and cytotoxic T lymphocyte. Our review will cover various therapeutic vaccines in development for the treatment of HPV-associated lesions and cancers. Furthermore, we will discuss the potential of immune checkpoint inhibitors that have recently been adopted and tested for their treatment efficacy against HPV-induced cervical cancer.

  6. Immunotherapy for human papillomavirus-associated disease and cervical cancer: review of clinical and translational research

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Cervical cancer is the fourth most lethal women's cancer worldwide. Current treatments against cervical cancer include surgery, radiotherapy, chemotherapy, and anti-angiogenic agents. However, despite the various treatments utilized for the treatment of cervical cancer, its disease burden remains a global issue. Persistent infection of human papillomavirus (HPV) has been identified as an essential step of pathogenesis of cervical cancer and many other cancers, and nation-wide HPV screening as well as preventative HPV vaccination program have been introduced globally. However, even though the commercially available prophylactic HPV vaccines, Gardasil (Merck) and Cervarix (GlaxoSmithKline), are effective in blocking the entry of HPV into the epithelium of cervix through generation of HPV-specific neutralizing antibodies, they cannot eliminate the pre-existing HPV infection. For these reason, other immunotherapeutic options against HPV-associated diseases, including therapeutic vaccines, have been continuously explored. Therapeutic HPV vaccines enhance cell-mediated immunity targeting HPV E6 and E7 antigens by modulating primarily dendritic cells and cytotoxic T lymphocyte. Our review will cover various therapeutic vaccines in development for the treatment of HPV-associated lesions and cancers. Furthermore, we will discuss the potential of immune checkpoint inhibitors that have recently been adopted and tested for their treatment efficacy against HPV-induced cervical cancer. PMID:27329199

  7. Cervical and female breast cancers in the Americas: current situation and opportunities for action

    PubMed Central

    Cabanes, Anna; Prieto-Lara, Elisa; Gawryszewski, Vilma

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Objective To understand better the current regional situation and public health response to cervical cancer and female breast cancer in the Americas. Methods Data on cervical cancer and female breast cancers in 33 countries, for the period from 2000 to the last year with available data, were extracted from the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO) Regional Mortality Database and analysed. Changes in mortality rates over the study period – in all countries except those with small populations and large fluctuations in time–series mortality data – were calculated using Poisson regression models. Information from the PAHO Country Capacity Survey on noncommunicable diseases was also analysed. Findings The Bahamas, Trinidad and Tobago and Uruguay showed relatively high rates of death from breast cancer, whereas the three highest rates of death from cervical cancer were observed in El Salvador, Nicaragua and Paraguay. Several countries – particularly Paraguay and Venezuela – have high rates of death from both types of cancer. Although mortality from cervical cancer has generally been decreasing in the Americas, decreases in mortality from breast cancer have only been observed in a few countries in the Region of the Americas. All but one of the 25 countries in the Americas included in the PAHO Country Capacity Survey reported having public health services for the screening and treatment of breast and cervical cancers. Conclusion Most countries in the Americas have the public health capacity needed to screen for – and treat – breast and cervical cancers and, therefore, the potential to reduce the burden posed by these cancers. PMID:24101780

  8. Association of Long Non-Coding RNA HOTAIR Polymorphisms with Cervical Cancer Risk in a Chinese Population

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Liangsheng; Lu, Xueguan; Zheng, Lijun; Liu, Xianying; Hu, Min

    2016-01-01

    Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs), HOTAIR has been reported to be upregulated in cervical cancer development and progression. However, SNPs (single nucleotide polymorphisms) in the lncRNAs and their associations with cervical cancer susceptibility have not been reported. In the current study, we hypothesized that SNPs within the lncRNA HOTAIR may influence the risk of cervical cancer. We performed a case-control study including 510 cervical cancer patients (cases) and 713 cancer-free individuals (controls) to investigate the association between three haplotype-tagging SNPs (rs920778, rs1899663 and rs4759314) in the lncRNA HOTAIR and the risk of cervical cancer. We found a strong association between the SNP rs920778 in the intronic enhancer of the HOTAIR and cervical cancer (P<10−4). Moreover, the cervical cancer patients with homozygous TT genotype were significantly associated with tumor-node-metastasis (TNM) stage. In vitro assays with allele-specific reporter constructs indicated that the reporter constructs bearing rs920778T allele conferred elevated reporter gene transcriptional activity when compared to the reporter constructs containing rs920778C allele. Furthermore, HOTAIR expression was higher in cervical cancer tissues than that in corresponding normal tissues, and the high expression was associated with the risk-associated allele T. In summary, our studies provide strong functional evidence that functional SNP rs920778 regulates HOTAIR expression, and may ultimately influence the predisposition for cervical cancer. PMID:27467165