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Sample records for cervical cancer reported

  1. Cervical Cancer Working Group report.

    PubMed

    Konno, Ryo; Sagae, Satoru; Yoshikawa, Hiroyuki; Basu, Partha Sarathi; Hanley, Sharon J B; Tan, Jeffrey H J; Shin, Hai-Rim

    2010-09-01

    Disease burden of cervical cancer in Asia was summarized. Human papillomavirus 16 is the most oncogenic human papillomavirus type. Korea's national cervical cancer screening program targets women aged 30 or over, with coverage of almost 80%. Japan has a long history (50 years) of cervical cancer screening, and cytological screening programs have reduced the incidence/mortality of cervical cancer by 70%. But, recent cervical cancer screening coverage is ∼24%. Modeling suggested that vaccination of all 12-year-old girls would reduce cervical cancer cases by 73% in Japan. India has no cervical cancer screening program, as well as a serious lack of awareness in the general population, medical professionals and policy-makers. A realistic, affordable approach would be a low-volume, once-in-a-lifetime human papillomavirus-based screening program. In Australia, the national cervical cancer program has been very successful in reducing the incidence and mortality of cervical cancer. Australia was the first country to implement free, national human papillomavirus immunization (April 2007), expected to reduce human papillomavirus 16 infections by 56% in 2010 and 92% in 2050. A comparison of the UK and Japan was demonstrated that in the UK, cervical cancer screening and human papillomavirus vaccination uptakes are high because the government provides adequate education/funding. The Japanese government needs to put more emphasis on women's health and preventative medicine. Our conclusion and recommendations are that heightened public awareness of cervical cancer prevention, focusing on screening and vaccination will lead to improved survival and a better quality of life.

  2. Cervical Cancer Screening | Cancer Trends Progress Report

    Cancer.gov

    The Cancer Trends Progress Report, first issued in 2001, summarizes our nation's advances against cancer in relation to Healthy People targets set forth by the Department of Health and Human Services.

  3. Cervical Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... cervical cancers are caused by the human papillomavirus (HPV). Cervical cancer is the easiest gynecological cancer to prevent with ... HPV on a woman's cervix. Certain types of HPV can lead to cervical cancer. Your doctor will swab the cervix for cells. ...

  4. Cervical Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... the place where a baby grows during pregnancy. Cervical cancer is caused by a virus called HPV. ... for a long time, or have HIV infection. Cervical cancer may not cause any symptoms at first. ...

  5. Cervical cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... therapy: Uses light to burn abnormal tissue A hysterectomy (surgery to remove the uterus but not the ... for more advanced cervical cancer may include: Radical hysterectomy, which removes the uterus and much of the ...

  6. Get Tested for Cervical Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Print This Topic En español Get Tested for Cervical Cancer Browse Sections The Basics Overview Cervical Cancer ... Cervical Cancer 1 of 5 sections The Basics: Cervical Cancer What is cervical cancer? Cervical cancer is ...

  7. Brief Report: Knowledge, attitudes, practices and perceived risk of cervical cancer among Kenyan women

    PubMed Central

    Sudenga, Staci L.; Rositch, Anne F.; Otieno, Walter A.; Smith, Jennifer S.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES Eastern Africa has the highest incidence and mortality rates from cervical cancer worldwide. It is important to describe the differences among women and their perceived risk of cervical cancer in order to determine target groups to increase cervical cancer screening. METHOD In this cross-sectional study we surveyed women seeking reproductive health services in Kisumu, Kenya to assess their perceived risk of cervical cancer and risk factors influencing cervical cancer screening uptake. Chi-square statistics and t-tests were used to determine significant factors, which were incorporated into a logistic model to determine factors independently associated with cervical cancer risk perception. RESULTS While 91% of the surveyed women had heard of cancer, only 29% of the 388 surveyed women had previously heard of cervical cancer. The majority had received their information from healthcare workers. Few women (6%) had ever been screened for cervical cancer and cited barriers such as fear, time, and lacking knowledge about cervical cancer. Nearly all previously screened women (22/24, 92%) believed that cervical cancer was curable if detected early, and that screening should be conducted annually (86%). Most women (254/388, 65%) felt they were at risk for cervical cancer. Women with perceived risk of cervical cancer were older (OR=1.06, 95% CI 1.02, 1.10), reported a history of marriage (OR=2.08, CI 1.00, 4.30), were less likely to feel adequately informed about cervical cancer by healthcare providers (OR= 0.76, CI 0.18, 0.83) and more likely to intend to have cervical cancer screening in the future (OR= 10.59, CI 3.96, 28.30). Only 5% of women reported that they would not be willing to undergo screening, regardless of cost. Conclusions Cervical cancer is a major health burden for women in sub-Saharan Africa, yet only one-third of women had ever heard of cervical cancer in Kisumu, Kenya. Understanding factors associated with women’s perceived risk of cervical

  8. Invasive and in situ cervical cancer reported to the vaccine adverse event reporting system (VAERS).

    PubMed

    Wong, Charlene; Krashin, Jamie; Rue-Cover, Alison; Saraiya, Mona; Unger, Elizabeth; Calugar, Angela; Markowitz, Lauri

    2010-03-01

    The quadrivalent human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine was recommended in 2006 for routine vaccination of 11 or 12-year-old girls, with catchup through age 26 years, for the prevention of genital HPV-related diseases. The Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System (VAERS) is a national spontaneous surveillance system of adverse events following vaccination in the United States. The objective of this study was to identify and review VAERS reports of invasive and in situ cervical cancer in women immunized with the quadrivalent HPV vaccine. A VAERS database search was performed to identify such cases reported in the United States from January 1, 2006, through April 9, 2009. Medical Dictionary for Regulatory Activities (MedDRA) search terms used were "cervix carcinoma," "cervix carcinoma stage 0," "cervix carcinoma stage III," "carcinoma in situ," and "cervical dysplasia." Case inclusion required a report to contain a clear statement of a cervical carcinoma or carcinoma in situ diagnosis on any screening or diagnostic test after at least one dose of the HPV vaccine. All reports were reviewed by two investigators. Four VAERS reports for MedDRA term "cervix carcinoma," one for "cervix carcinoma stage 0," none for "cervix carcinoma stage III," three for "carcinoma in situ," and 53 for "cervical dysplasia" were identified. Of these, three cases of carcinoma in situ and one case of microinvasive cervical cancer met study inclusion criteria. Cases of cervical cancer and precancers are not unexpected in vaccinated women. Cervical cancer screening continues to be important, even for women who have received the HPV vaccine.

  9. Cervical Cancer Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... cervical cancer screening? • If I have had a hysterectomy, do I still need cervical cancer screening? • Are ... past 5 years. If I have had a hysterectomy, do I still need cervical cancer screening? If ...

  10. Cervical Cancer Stage IIIA

    MedlinePlus

    ... hyphen, e.g. -historical Searches are case-insensitive Cervical Cancer Stage IIIA Add to My Pictures View / ... 1275x1275 View Download Large: 2550x2550 View Download Title: Cervical Cancer Stage IIIA Description: Stage IIIA cervical cancer; ...

  11. Cervical Cancer Stage IIIB

    MedlinePlus

    ... hyphen, e.g. -historical Searches are case-insensitive Cervical Cancer Stage IIIB Add to My Pictures View / ... 1425x1326 View Download Large: 2850x2651 View Download Title: Cervical Cancer Stage IIIB Description: Stage IIIB cervical cancer; ...

  12. Cervical Cancer Stage IVB

    MedlinePlus

    ... hyphen, e.g. -historical Searches are case-insensitive Cervical Cancer Stage IVB Add to My Pictures View / ... 1200x1305 View Download Large: 2400x2610 View Download Title: Cervical Cancer Stage IVB Description: Stage IVB cervical cancer; ...

  13. Cervical Cancer Stage IVA

    MedlinePlus

    ... hyphen, e.g. -historical Searches are case-insensitive Cervical Cancer Stage IVA Add to My Pictures View / ... 1575x1200 View Download Large: 3150x2400 View Download Title: Cervical Cancer Stage IVA Description: Stage IVA cervical cancer; ...

  14. Cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Shepherd, John H

    2012-06-01

    Standard treatment for invasive cervical cancer involves either radical surgery or radiotherapy. Childbearing is therefore impossible after either of these treatments. A fertility-sparing option, however, by radical trachelectomy has been shown to be effective, provided that strict criteria for selection are followed. Fertility rates are high, whereas recurrence is low, indicating that a more conservative approach to dealing with early small cervical tumours is feasible. Careful preoperative assessment by magnetic resonance imaging scans allows accurate measurement of the tumour with precise definition to plan surgery. This will ensure an adequate clear margin by wide excision of the tumour excising the cervix by radical vaginal trachelectomy with surrounding para-cervical and upper vaginal tissues. An isthmic cerclage is inserted to provide competence at the level of the internal orifice. A primary vagino-isthmic anastomosis is conducted to restore continuity of the lower genital tract. Subsequent pregnancies require careful monitoring in view of the high risk of spontaneous premature rupture of the membranes. Delivery by classical caesarean section is necessary at the onset of labour or electively before term. Over 1100 such procedures have been carried out vaginally or abdominally, resulting in 240 live births. Radical vaginal trachelectomy with a laparoscopic pelvic-node dissection offers the least morbid and invasive route for surgery, provided that adequate surgical skills have been obtained.

  15. Vaccines against cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Jansen, Kathrin U

    2004-11-01

    Cervical cancer and precancerous lesions of the genital tract are a major threat to women's health worldwide. Although the introduction of screening tests to detect cervical cancer and its precursor lesions has reduced overall cervical cancer rates in the developed world, the approach was largely unsuccessful for developing countries, primarily due to a lack of appropriate infrastructures and high costs. Annually, 470,000 cervical cancer cases are diagnosed worldwide, of which 80% occur in developing countries. Despite advances in treatment of cervical cancer, approximately half of the women afflicted with the disease will die. Over 20 years of dedicated research has provided conclusive evidence that a subset of human papillomaviruses are the aetiological agents for cervical cancer. Finding a viral origin for this disease provided the basis to fight cervical cancer using prophylactic or therapeutic vaccination. Both vaccine approaches are reviewed here, with an emphasis on recent clinical data.

  16. High-Grade Cervical Dysplasia following Radiation Therapy for Invasive Cervical Cancer: A Report of Four Cases

    PubMed Central

    Salcedo, Mila Pontremoli; Milbourne, Andrea M.; Jhingran, Anuja; Eifel, Patricia J.; Ramirez, Pedro T.; Schmeler, Kathleen M.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The standard treatment for locally advanced cervical cancer is chemoradiation, with the majority of patients having a complete response to the therapy. The current surveillance recommendations from the Society of Gynecologic Oncology include annual cytology, with a small proportion of patients subsequently diagnosed with high-grade cervical dysplasia (CIN 2/3). To date, there is limited information regarding the optimal treatment and outcome for patients diagnosed with CIN 2/3. The current report describes the diagnosis, management and outcome of 4 patients diagnosed with CIN 2/3 following chemoradiation. Case Description We describe 4 patients who developed CIN 2/3 seven months to 8 years following radiation therapy for locally advanced cervical cancer. All 4 patients were asymptomatic and the abnormalities were first detected by a Pap test. Three of the patients were managed conservatively with observation, and the CIN 2/3 resolved without intervention. One patient underwent 2 cervical conizations followed by a hysterectomy with no residual dysplasia noted on the hysterectomy specimen. Conclusion The majority of patients with recurrent cervical cancer after chemoradiation are symptomatic, and most cases are detected by a physical examination. The role of cytology, colposcopy and biopsies may be of limited value. Furthermore, the significance of the diagnosis of CIN 2/3 in patients previously treated with radiation therapy was not associated with recurrent disease in the 4 patients described. Our results suggest that cytology may be of limited value in detecting recurrence in patients following radiation therapy, even when CIN 2/3 is detected. PMID:26078740

  17. Accuracy of Self-Reported Cervical and Breast Cancer Screening by Women with Intellectual Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Son, Esther; Parish, Susan L.; Swaine, Jamie G.; Luken, Karen

    2013-01-01

    This study examines the accuracy of self-report of cervical and breast cancer screening by women with intellectual disability ("n" ?=? 155). Data from face-to-face interviews and medical records were analyzed. Total agreement, sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value were calculated. Total…

  18. Accuracy of Self-Reported Cervical and Breast Cancer Screening by Women with Intellectual Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Son, Esther; Parish, Susan L.; Swaine, Jamie G.; Luken, Karen

    2013-01-01

    This study examines the accuracy of self-report of cervical and breast cancer screening by women with intellectual disability ("n" ?=? 155). Data from face-to-face interviews and medical records were analyzed. Total agreement, sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value were calculated. Total…

  19. Cervical Spine pain as a presenting complaint in metastatic pancreatic cancer: a case report.

    PubMed

    Rosenberg, Emily; Buchtel, Lindsey

    2016-01-01

    A 48 year-old female presented to her primary care physician with a two-month history of neck pain with negative cervical spine x-rays. During that office visit, the patient was noted to be tachycardic with EKG revealing ST depressions, which led to hospital admission. Acute coronary syndrome was ruled out, however, persistent neck pain warranted inpatient MRI of the cervical spine, which revealed a cervical spine lesion. Extensive investigation and biopsy ultimately confirmed stage IV pancreatic adenocarcinoma with metastases to the bone, liver, and likely lung. In the literature, the findings of a primary metastatic site being bone is rare with only a few case reports showing vertebral or sternal metastasis as the first clinical manifestation of pancreatic cancer. The uniqueness of this case lies in the only presenting complaint being cervical spine pain in the setting of extensive metastases to the liver, bone, and likely lung.

  20. Signs and Symptoms of Cervical Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Detection, Diagnosis, and Staging Signs and Symptoms of Cervical Cancer Women with early cervical cancers and pre- ... Ask Your Doctor About Cervical Cancer? More In Cervical Cancer About Cervical Cancer Causes, Risk Factors, and ...

  1. Solitary cardiac metastasis of uterine cervical cancer with antemortem diagnosis: A case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Tsuchida, Keisuke; Oike, Takahiro; Ohtsuka, Toshiyuki; Ide, Munenori; Takakusagi, Yosuke; Noda, Shin-Ei; Tamaki, Tomoaki; Kubo, Nobuteru; Hirota, Yuka; Ohno, Tatsuya; Nakano, Takashi

    2016-05-01

    Cardiac metastasis of uterine cervical cancer with antemortem diagnosis is extremely rare. Therefore, its landscape epidemiology has not been well elucidated to date. In the present study, a case of solitary cardiac metastasis of uterine cervical cancer diagnosed antemortem is reported, and a review of the currently available literature (which includes 18 cases of cardiac metastasis of uterine cervical cancer) is conducted. In January 2013, a 78-year-old woman with squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the uterine cervix (International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stage IIIb) underwent definitive radiotherapy at Gunma University Hospital (Gunma, Japan). Follow-up examination at 5 months after completion of the treatment indicated no evidence of recurrence or metastasis. In April 2014, the patient reported epigastric discomfort and general malaise. Electrocardiogram suggested myocardial dysfunction. Transthoracic echocardiography revealed the presence of a mass occupying the right ventricle and pericardial effusion. Cine magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated a filling defect in the right ventricle, and transcatheter biopsy confirmed SCC. The patient was diagnosed with a solitary cardiac metastasis of uterine cervical cancer. Despite aggressive medical therapy, the patient succumbed to disease 31 days after admission to hospital. A review of the current literature revealed that 84% of cases of cardiac metastasis develop within 2 years of completion of the initial treatment, and that electrocardiogram and echocardiography reveal findings of myocardial dysfunction and the presence of a mass in the right ventricle, respectively. A treatment strategy for cardiac metastasis of uterine cervical cancer has not been standardized thus far, and the prognosis is very poor, as the majority of patients succumbed to disease within 1 year. In summary, the current case and the literature review conducted in the present study suggest that: i) Cardiac metastasis should be

  2. [Pregnancy and invasive cervical cancer].

    PubMed

    Kornovski, Ia; Gorchev, G; Trendafilova

    2008-01-01

    A case of 27-year old woman with spinocellular cervical cancer stage IB1 (FIGO) associated with pregnancy (36 g.w.) was reported. Authors performed cesarean radical hysterectomy with pelvic lymphadenectomy and transposition of the ovaries. The review of the literature revealed an algorithm and and practical recommendations in terms of management of cervical cancer during pregnancy, depending on the stage of the pregnancy and the tumor.

  3. Cervical Cancer Stage IB

    MedlinePlus

    ... hyphen, e.g. -historical Searches are case-insensitive Cervical Cancer Stage IB Add to My Pictures View / ... 1613x1200 View Download Large: 3225x2400 View Download Title: Cervical Cancer Stage IB Description: Stage IB1 and IB2 ...

  4. Cervical Cancer Stage IA

    MedlinePlus

    ... hyphen, e.g. -historical Searches are case-insensitive Cervical Cancer Stage IA Add to My Pictures View / ... 1500x1200 View Download Large: 3000x2400 View Download Title: Cervical Cancer Stage IA Description: Stage IA1 and IA2 ...

  5. Cervical Cancer Prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... oral contraceptives, over a 10 year period, the risk of cervical cancer returns to that of women who never used oral contraceptives. Smoking cigarettes Among women who are infected with HPV, ... smoke have an increased risk of cervical cancer. The risk increases with the ...

  6. The reporting of cervical cancer in the mass media: a study of UK newspapers.

    PubMed

    Bell, L; Seale, C

    2011-05-01

    Cervical cancer disproportionately affects those in lower socio-economic groups. Mass media, including newspapers, are an important source of information about disease and how to prevent it. An analysis of UK national newspaper content between 2000 and 2009 is reported, assessing the extent to which information is provided about early signs and symptoms, risk factors and ways of preventing cervical cancer. The messages in newspapers targeted at readers in lower socio-economic groups are compared with the messages in other newspapers, and the impact of reporting the illness and death of the reality TV star, Jade Goody, on the level of medical information contained in articles is assessed. Tabloid or 'popular' newspapers are found to provide more information about early signs and symptoms, and no less information about risk factors, when compared with broadsheets or 'serious' papers. This is due to their greater use of personal stories of people with cervical cancer. The Jade Goody story was associated with an increase in information about early signs and symptoms, and about screening, but not (with the exception of the role played by social deprivation) about risk factors. Suggestions about how to approach public education via an entertainment format in mass media are made.

  7. Non-Invasive Cervical Cancer Radiotherapy for Stage IB-IVB

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-05-16

    Cervical Cancer; Cervical Cancer Stage; Cervical Cancer Stage IB2; Cervical Cancer Stage IB1; Cervical Cancer Stage I; Cervical Cancer Stage IB; Cervical Cancer Stage II; Cervical Cancer Stage IIa; Cervical Cancer, Stage IIB; Cervical Cancer, Stage III; Cervical Cancer Stage IIIB; Cervical Cancer Stage IIIA; Cervical Cancer Stage Iv; Cervical Cancer Stage IVA; Cervical Cancer Stage IVB

  8. ADXS11-001 High Dose HPV+ Cervical Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-17

    Effects of Immunotherapy; Metastatic/Recurrent Cervical Cancer; Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Cell Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Cervical Small Cell Carcinoma; Stage III Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer; Stage IVB Cervical Cancer

  9. Immunotherapy for Cervical Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    In an early phase NCI clinical trial, two patients with metastatic cervical cancer had a complete disappearance of their tumors after receiving treatment with a form of immunotherapy called adoptive cell transfer.

  10. Cervical Cancer Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... cervical cancer in women aged 30–65 years. Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV): A virus that attacks certain cells of the body’s immune system and causes acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). Human Papillomavirus ( ...

  11. Cervical Cancer - Multiple Languages

    MedlinePlus

    ... Supplements Videos & Tools You Are Here: Home → Multiple Languages → All Health Topics → Cervical Cancer URL of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/languages/cervicalcancer.html Other topics A-Z Expand Section ...

  12. Vaginal cancer in a patient treated for cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN 3): case report.

    PubMed

    Androutsopoulos, G; Adonakis, G; Ravazoula, P; Kourounis, G

    2006-01-01

    In 1% to 3% of patients with cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN), vaginal intraepithelial neoplasia (VAIN) will either coexist or occur at a later date. The time interval from an earlier diagnosis of CIN 3 to a current diagnosis of VAIN 3 varies from two to 17 years. Invasive vaginal cancer occurred in a woman five years after total abdominal hysterectomy for cervical intraepithelial neoplasia. In women who have undergone total hysterectomy for cervical intraepithelial neoplasia or cervical cancer, postoperative cytologic and colposcopic follow-up of the vagina is necessary.

  13. Veliparib, Topotecan Hydrochloride, and Filgrastim or Pegfilgrastim in Treating Patients With Persistent or Recurrent Cervical Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-12-07

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Cervical Small Cell Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Cervical Carcinoma; Stage III Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer; Stage IVB Cervical Cancer

  14. Cervical cancer -- screening and prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... ency/patientinstructions/000419.htm Cervical cancer - screening and prevention To use the sharing features on this page, ... no visible warts or other symptoms. Vaccines to Prevent Cervical Cancer A vaccine is available to protect ...

  15. Breast, Cervical, and Colorectal Cancers - Early Detection Summary Table | Cancer Trends Progress Report

    Cancer.gov

    The Cancer Trends Progress Report, first issued in 2001, summarizes our nation's advances against cancer in relation to Healthy People targets set forth by the Department of Health and Human Services.

  16. Bevacizumab, Radiation Therapy, and Cisplatin in Treating Patients With Previously Untreated Locally Advanced Cervical Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-09-22

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Cell Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage III Cervical Cancer

  17. Peritoneal bladder fistula following radiotherapy for cervical cancer: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Fan; Wang, Tao; Wang, Jiquan; Hui, Beina; Chai, Yanlan; Wang, Juan; Liu, Zi

    2016-01-01

    The occurrence of a peritoneal bladder fistula as a result of radiation cystitis following radiotherapy for cervical cancer is extremely rare and, to the best of our knowledge, has not been reported previously. The present study reports the case of a 50-year-old woman who was diagnosed with cervical cancer 20 years previously and was treated with radiotherapy. The patient was diagnosed with radiation cystitis 10 years ago, which was treated with Chinese medicine, and began experiencing sudden abdominal pain and bowel difficulties following urination 3 years ago. B-ultrasound examination at The People's Hospital of Tongchuan (Tongchuan, China) detected the presence of abdominal pelvic fluid. Following antibiotic (levofloxacin for 5 days) and ascites extraction treatment, symptoms were relieved without recurrence. However, 5 days prior to admission to the First Affiliated Hospital of Xi'an Jiatong University (Xi'an, China) on June 25, 2014, the patient experienced difficulty when urinating, abdominal pain and bloating, but did not experience frequent urination, hematuria or fever. Cystoscopic examination revealed a visible fistula on the bladder wall measuring 1×1 cm in diameter. Cytoscopic examination 1 month after catheterization and ascites extraction revealed no evidence of the fistula. The patient was followed up every 3 months for a year and a half, and is currently alive and well. In conclusion, the occurrence of peritoneal bladder fistula following radiation therapy is rare and cystoscopy is the preferred method of examination and diagnosis. Early detection and treatment may significantly improve the prognosis of patients. PMID:27602129

  18. Uterine leiomyoma associated non-puerperal uterine inversion misdiagnosed as advanced cervical cancer: A case report.

    PubMed

    Umeononihu, Osita Samuel; Adinma, Joseph Ifeanyi; Obiechina, Nworah J; Eleje, George Uchenna; Udegbunam, Onyebuchi Izuchukwu; Mbachu, Ikechukwu Innocent

    2013-01-01

    Uterine inversion is an un-common complication of parturition which often occurs in the immediate postpartum period. The chronic (non-puerperal) uterine inversion is rarer and most times tumour associated. A 51-year old grand multiparous lady presented with a month history of abnormal vaginal bleeding associated with offensive vaginal discharge, lower abdominal pain and dizziness. The initial evaluation suggested severe anaemia secondary to advanced cervical cancer. Examination under anaesthesia (EUA), staging and biopsy was attempted but this was however inconclusive due to profuse haemorrhage. A repeat EUA revealed chronic uterine inversion secondary to fundal submucous uterine leiomyoma. Myomectomy was done with tissue histology confirming benign uterine leiomyoma. Two weeks later, a modified Haultain's procedure was done followed by simple hysterectomy and posterior colpoperineorrhaphy. She had satisfactory recovery. This is the first reported case of chronic non-puerperal uterine inversion in our hospital. When it occurs, it is usually tumour associated with the commonest tumour being prolapsed myoma and leiomyosarcoma. The diagnosis is based on high index of suspicion. Chronic uterine inversion is a rare gynaecological condition and can be misdiagnosed as advanced cervical cancer or other causes of severe genital haemorrhage in women. A high index of suspicion is needed for its proper diagnosis. Sometimes, an EUA and biopsy was required to determine the cause here and conveniently it could be described as a "gynaecolological near miss". Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  19. Human papillomavirus and cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Crook, T; Farthing, A

    Cervical cancer is the fifth most common cancer worldwide, and is second only to breast cancer as the leading cause of cancer deaths in women. Half a million cases are diagnosed annually with the highest rates in developing countries.

  20. Atezolizumab and Bevacizumab in Treating Patients With Recurrent, Persistent, or Metastatic Cervical Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-09-28

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma, Not Otherwise Specified; Recurrent Cervical Carcinoma; Stage IV Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer; Stage IVB Cervical Cancer

  1. Spontaneous perforation of pyometra in a cervical cancer patient: a case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Ajay; Prakash, Mahesh; Kapoor, Rakesh; Kumar, Pankaj; Khandelwal, Niranjan

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Pyometra is an uncommon condition with an incidence of less than 1% in gynaecologic patients. Spontaneous rupture of pyometra in cervical cancer presenting as generalized peritonitis is very rare. Only four cases have been described in the English literature to the best of our knowledge and from a PubMed search. The index case is an elderly postmenopausal female who was diagnosed with cervical cancer, started on radiotherapy and presented with features of generalized peritonitis. Contrast-enhanced CT revealed uterine perforation at the fundus with multiple abdominal and pelvic collections. A brief review of all the cases of ruptured pyometra in cervical cancer in the literature and a discussion of the role of imaging is presented. PMID:19419914

  2. [Primary cervical cancer screening].

    PubMed

    Vargas-Hernández, Víctor Manuel; Vargas-Aguilar, Víctor Manuel; Tovar-Rodríguez, José María

    2015-01-01

    Cervico-uterine cancer screening with cytology decrease incidence by more than 50%. The cause of this cancer is the human papilloma virus high risk, and requires a sensitive test to provide sufficient sensitivity and specificity for early detection and greater interval period when the results are negative. The test of the human papilloma virus high risk, is effective and safe because of its excellent sensitivity, negative predictive value and optimal reproducibility, especially when combined with liquid-based cytology or biomarkers with viral load, with higher sensitivity and specificity, by reducing false positives for the detection of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 2 or greater injury, with excellent clinical benefits to cervical cancer screening and related infection of human papilloma virus diseases, is currently the best test for early detection infection of human papillomavirus and the risk of carcinogenesis.

  3. [Do media reports and public brochures facilitate informed decision making about cervical cancer prevention?].

    PubMed

    Neumeyer-Gromen, A; Bodemer, N; Müller, S M; Gigerenzer, G

    2011-11-01

    With the introduction and recommendation of the new HPV (human papillomavirus) vaccination in 2007, cervical cancer prevention has evoked large public interest. Is the public able to make informed decisions on the basis of media reports and brochures? To answer this question, an analysis of media coverage of HPV vaccination (Gardasil®) and Pap (Papanicolaou) screening was conducted from 2007-2009, which investigated the minimum requirement of completeness (pros and cons), transparency (absolute numbers), and correctness (references concerning outcome, uncertainty, magnitude) of the information. As a bench mark, facts boxes with concise data on epidemiology, etiology, benefits, harms, and costs were compiled in advance. Although all vaccination reports and brochures covered the impact of prevention, only 41% provided concrete numbers on effectiveness (90/220) and 2% on absolute risk reductions for the cancer surrogate dysplasia (5/220), whereby none of the latter numbers was correct. The prevention potential was correctly presented once. Only 48% (105/220) mentioned pros and cons. With regard to screening, 20% (4/20) provided explicit data on test quality and one expressed these in absolute numbers, while 25% (5/20) reported the prevention potential; all given numbers were correct. Finally, 25% (5/20) mentioned the possibility of false positive results. Minimum requirements were fulfilled by 1/220 vaccination and 1/20 screening reports. At present, informed decision making based on media coverage is hardly possible.

  4. Self-reported use of internet by cervical cancer clients in two National Referral Hospitals in Kenya

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Cervical cancer remains a devastating disease in Kenya accounting for more than 2000 deaths each year. Lack of information on cervical cancer prevention and management has been attributed to the apathy among women in seeking health interventions. Use of internet-based and mobile e-health tools could increase information access among cervical cancer patients. The objective of the study was; to establish the extent of use of mobile phones and internet by cervical cancer patients in accessing information related to cancer treatment and management.; find out the characteristics of patients associated with internet use and identify barriers faced by the patients in internet use. A cross sectional descriptive survey of 199 cervical patients visiting the two main referral hospitals in Kenya was done. A structured questionnaire was used to collect data. Findings The average length of illness was 2.43 years (SD ± 3.0). Only 7.5 %( n=15) reported to having used the internet as a source of information. 92.5 %( n=184) did not use internet. With Multiple options, 70.9% did not know how to use a computer, 29.2% did not have access to a computer, 14.6% lacked the money to use computers at the local cyber cafe while other barriers identified accounted for 11.1%. Patients reported that the internet had an important role in the management of cancer of the cervix in health education (17.6%), online consultation (14.6%), booking of patients (13.6%), referrals (8.5%) and collecting data (7%). The 96.5% of the respondents who had access to a mobile phone, recommended mobile phones for health education messages (31.7%), reminder alerts for medication (29.7%) and booking appointments (21.6%). There was a statistically significant association between income of the patients and internet use (p = 0.026) in this study. Conclusions There is low level use of the internet by cervical cancer clients attended in Public referral facilities in Kenya. This was attributed to; lack of

  5. Port site metastasis after robotic-assisted laparoscopic hysterectomy for uterine cervical cancer: a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Kim, Bokyong; Huh, Seung Jae; Kim, Byoung-Gie

    2013-12-01

    The incidence of port site metastasis after robotic-assisted laparoscopic surgery for cervical cancer is not well known. According to recent studies of gynecological malignancies, the reported incidence is low and comparable to the results of conventional laparoscopic surgery. Here, we report the case of a patient who suffered port site metastasis after robotic-assisted laparoscopic hysterectomy for stage IB1 uterine cervical cancer. The current case is, as we know, only the third episode of port site metastasis after robotic-assisted laparoscopic surgery for cervical cancer documented in the medical literature. Following diagnosis of the port site metastasis, the patient was treated with concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CRT) and experienced a remarkable early response. We reviewed the patient's medical chart and imaging studies, and searched the Medline database to evaluate the incidence, prognosis and treatment outcomes of such cases of port site metastasis in uterine cervical cancer patients. CRT resulted in a rapid decrease in tumor size and relief of abdominal pain in our patient. CRT might be considered as a salvage or palliative modality in patients with port site metastasis and/or locoregional recurrence. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. Radiation Therapy Plus Cisplatin and Gemcitabine in Treating Patients With Cervical Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-12-23

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Cervical Small Cell Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage III Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer

  7. Association of Schistosoma haematobium and human papillomavirus in cervical cancer: a case report.

    PubMed

    Savardekar, Lalita S; Balaiah, Donta; Mali, Bapurao N

    2010-01-01

    The association between Schistosoma haematobium and cervical cancer has been reported for a long time. However, recently human papillomavirus, a cofactor in the genesis of cervical cancer, has been confirmed. A case of squamous intraepithelial lesion after S haematobium infection is presented, and the relation between schistosomiasis, human papillomavirus and squamous intraepithelial lesion, with long-term follow-up by Papanicolaou smear, is discussed. A 33-year-old, normal, healthy woman with a history of Copper intrauterine device (IUD) use for 3.9 years presented for her annual contraceptive follow-up. Her Pap smear revealed inflammation with a S haematobium egg. She was followed up with Pap smears for 4 years. Retrospective contraceptive history revealed use ofa copper IUD on 5 occasions with a total duration of 13 years and 1 month. Similarly, annual follow-up of Pap smears for the past 13 years showed mild inflammation with bacterial vaginitis and monilial infection. Subsequent smears showed an Actinomyces-like organism and then human papillomavirus infection with atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance followed by human papillomavirus-associated low/high grade squamous intraepithelial lesion. Caution is required while screening routine Pap smears. Apart from nuclear abnormalities, one can observe unusual findings. Long-term followup by Pap smear following detection of S haematobium revealed that in the absence of human papillomavirus, S haematobium alone is not the causative agent for the abnormal proliferation of squamous epithelium of the cervix. Genital Schistosomia acts as a cofactor by traumatizing the genital epithelium or immune suppression to favor human papillomavirus infection.

  8. Cervical Cancer Awareness and Screening in Botswana

    PubMed Central

    Mingo, Alicea M.; Panozzo, Catherine A.; DiAngi, Yumi Taylor; Smith, Jennifer S.; Steenhoff, Andrew P.; Ramogola-Masire, Doreen; Brewer, Noel T.

    2012-01-01

    Objective Cervical cancer remains a leading cause of death in many developing countries due to limited screening by Papanicolaou (Pap) smear. We sought to better understand women’s beliefs about cervical cancer and screening in Botswana, a middle income African country with high rates of cervical cancer. Methods We interviewed 289 women attending general medicine or human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) clinics, where Pap testing was available, in Gaborone, Botswana in January 2009. Results About three-quarters (72%) of respondents reported having ever had a Pap smear. HIV-positive women were more likely to have had a Pap smear than HIV-negative women (80% vs. 64%, OR=1.97, 95% CI: 1.10, 3.55). Screening was also more common among women who were older, had higher incomes, or had heard of cervical cancer. Almost all participants reported a desire to have a Pap smear. Reasons included to determine cervical health (56%), to improve overall health (33%), and to obtain early treatment (34%). About half (54%) of respondents said they did not know what causes cervical cancer, and almost none attributed the disease to HPV infection. Conclusion Study findings can inform interventions that seek to increase cervical cancer awareness and uptake of screening as it becomes more widely available. PMID:22367370

  9. Encrusted cystitis after definitive radiotherapy for cervical cancer: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Lancellotta, Valentina; Benedetto, Maika di; Palumbo, Isabella; Matrone, Fabio; Chiodi, Marino; Lombi, Riccardo; Marcantonini, Marta; Mariucci, Cristina; Aristei, Cynthia

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Encrusted cystitis is a rare chronic inflammatory disease characterized by calcified plaques of the bladder, previously altered by varies conditions as urological procedures, caused by urea-splitting bacteria. Only one case has been reported on encrusted cystitis occurring after surgery and radiation therapy for a pelvic neoplasm. We report on encrusted cystitis occurred after definitive radiotherapy for bulky uterine cervix cancer, and examine the doses to the bladder wall and the procedure of radiation treatment performed as a possible cause of the onset of the disease. Case presentation A 52-year-old female developed encrusted cystitis, caused by Corynebacterium spp., after 14 months from definitive chemo-radiotherapy and 2/D brachytherapy treatment for FIGO stage IB2 uterine cervix cancer. For pelvic radiotherapy, the mean bladder dose was 48.47 Gy (range 31.20–51.91); maximal bladder point doses at each brachytherapy insertions were 7.62 Gy, 4.94 Gy and 6.27 Gy at first, second, and third fraction, respectively. Total biological effective dose (BED) at bladder point was 140.05 Gy3. The patient was administered antibiotic therapy with linezolid and urine acidification with vitamin C; dietary norms were also suggested. After therapy, complete remission of symptoms and radiological findings were achieved, and the planned surgery for removing the calcified plaques was not completed. After 5 years from the cervical cancer diagnosis, the patient was disease-free without urinary symptoms. Conclusions The high doses administered to the bladder wall and the repeated catheterizations performed at each brachytherapy insertions may have favored the infection and promoted the occurrence of the encrusted cystitis. PMID:28115961

  10. [Analysis of the reported data of national rural cervical cancer screening project from 2012 to 2013, China].

    PubMed

    Luo, X M; Song, L; Wu, J L; Liu, Y; Di, J L; Song, B; Zheng, R M; Ma, L

    2016-04-01

    To analyze the reported data of national rural cervical cancer screening project from 2012 to 2013 and to evaluate the project implementation condition. Data of the national breast carcinoma and cervical cancer (two-cancer) screening project for rural women were collected from the online report system of key women and children's public health service programs.The screening items included: preliminary screening of cervical lesions (cervical cytology, using Traian Bethesda System(TBS) or Pap grading for classification and reporting), acetate/iodide staining (VIA/VILI), colposcopy, histopathological examination, and pathological diagnosis. The study collected the quarterly reported data from 1 183 counties of 30 provinces in 2014 and 1 130 counties of 30 provinces in 2013. Chi-square test was used to test the difference of positive detection rate, as well as precancerous cervical lesions, and cervical cancer detection rates among difference preliminary screening methods in 2012 and 2013. In 2012 and 2013, the number of cervical cancer screening was 10 621 482 and 10 321 835. The percentage of using ThinPrep cytological test as the screening method was 77.17% (n=8 196 627) and 77.07% (n=7 954 949) in 2012 and 2013, respectively. Among these ThinPrep cytological tests in these two years, 65.49% (n=5 368 194) and 71.67% (n=5 701 033) used TBS report system. The abnormality rate of colposcopy increased from 27.29% (170 063/623 161) to 31.15% (203 397/652 935) (χ(2)=2 295.94,P<0.001). The abnormality rate of histopathology test increased from 19.54% (37 992/194 394) to 35.43% (59 004/166 518) (χ(2)=11 523.58, P<0.001). All together, 27 341 cervical cancer or precancerous lesions have been detected in these two years. The detection rate of invasive cervical cancer increased from 18.02/100 000 in 2012 to 19.71/100 000 (χ(2)=7.90,P=0.005) in 2013 and that of precancerous lesions rose from 106.85/100 000 to 119.26/100 000 (χ(2)=70.82,P<0.001). The early detection rate was

  11. Cervical Dysplasia: Is It Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... showed cervical dysplasia. What does that mean? Is it cancer? Answers from Shannon K. Laughlin-Tommaso, M. ... or glandular cells. Dysplasia could go away on its own. Or, rarely, it could develop into cancer. ...

  12. Innovations in understanding the biology of cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Judith K; Franco, Eduardo L; Arbeit, Jeffery M; Shroyer, Kenneth R; Wu, Tzyy-Choou; Runowicz, Carolyn D; Tortolero-Luna, Guillermo; Herrero, Rolando; Crum, Christopher P

    2003-11-01

    Revelation of the connection between the human papillomavirus (HPV) and cervical neoplasia and invasive cervical cancer is prompting new investigations to expand that understanding and promote vaccines, gene therapy, and other interventions. At the Second International Conference on Cervical Cancer (Houston, TX, April 11-14, 2002), laboratory and clinical researchers reported advances in new studies meant to increase understanding of the natural history of HPV and cervical intraepithelial neoplasia, to evaluate new cervical cancer screening techniques, and to promote new therapies. Using K14-HPV type 16 transgenic mice, researchers are investigating the effects of estrogen on cervical cancer carcinogenesis, and results are lending support to epidemiological theories showing a difference in HPV infection rates and the development of cervical lesions in women using oral contraceptives. Other work involves investigating genes that are up-regulated by HPV infection and the role of the p53 homologue, p63, in cervical neoplasia evolution. Telomerase also is under investigation as a biomarker in high-risk populations. Gene therapy that replaced p53 in cervical cancer cell lines in vitro and a nude mouse model inhibited cell and tumor growth, confirming previous findings in squamous epithelial carcinomas of the head and neck. Furthermore, research in intracellular targeting of antigens to subcellular locations shows promise for treating cervical cancer preclinically. Identification of molecular changes in cervical cancer and knowledge about the importance of HPV infection in cervical cancer can lead to new therapies to treat existing cervical cancer and, in the long term, prevent the disease.

  13. Cisplatin and Radiation Therapy With or Without Tirapazamine in Treating Patients With Cervical Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-06-18

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Cell Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage III Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer

  14. Epidemiology of cervical cancer in Colombia.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, Nubia; Bravo, Luis Eduardo

    2012-10-01

    Worldwide, cervical cancer is the third most common cancer in women, and the first or second most common in developing countries. Cervical cancer remains in Colombia the first cause of cancer mortality and the second cause of cancer incidence among women, despite the existence of screening programs during the last 3 decades. Bucaramanga, Manizales and Cali reported rates around 20 per 100,000and Pasto 27 per 100,000. The Cali cancer registry has reported a progressive decrease in the age standardized incidence and mortality rates of cervical cancer over the past 40 years. Reasons for the decline in incidence and mortality of cervical cancer are multiple and probably include: improvement in socio-economic conditions, decrease in parity rates and some effect of screening programs. Human papilloma Virus is the main cause of cervical cancer, HPV natural history studies have now revealed that HPVs are the commonest of the sexually transmitted infections in most populations. Most HPV exposures result in spontaneous clearance without clinical manifestations and only a small fraction of the infected persons, known as chronic or persistent carriers, will retain the virus and progress to precancerous and cancer. HPV 16 and 18 account for 70% of cervical cancer and the 8 most common types. (HPV 16, 18, 45, 33, 31, 52, 58 and 35) account for about 90% of cervical cancer. Case-control studies also allowed the identification of the following cofactors that acting together with HPV increase the risk of progression from HPV persistent infection to cervical cancer: tobacco, high parity, long term use of oral contraceptives and past infections with herpes simplex type 2 and Chlamydia trachomatis. The demonstration that infection with certain types of human papillomavirus (HPV) is not only the main cause but also a necessary cause of cervical cancer has led to great advances in the prevention of this disease on two fronts: (i) Primary prevention by the use of prophylactic HPV

  15. Epidemiology of cervical cancer in Colombia

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz, Nubia

    2012-01-01

    Worldwide, cervical cancer is the third most common cancer in women, and the first or second most common in developing countries. Cervical cancer remains in Colombia the first cause of cancer mortality and the second cause of cancer incidence among women, despite the existence of screening programs during the last 3 decades. Bucaramanga, Manizales and Cali reported rates around 20 per 100,000and Pasto 27 per 100,000. The Cali cancer registry has reported a progressive decrease in the age standardized incidence and mortality rates of cervical cancer over the past 40 years. Reasons for the decline in incidence and mortality of cervical cancer are multiple and probably include: improvement in socio-economic conditions, decrease in parity rates and some effect of screening programs. Human papilloma Virus is the main cause of cervical cancer, HPV natural history studies have now revealed that HPVs are the commonest of the sexually transmitted infections in most populations. Most HPV exposures result in spontaneous clearance without clinical manifestations and only a small fraction of the infected persons, known as chronic or persistent carriers, will retain the virus and progress to precancerous and cancer. HPV 16 and 18 account for 70% of cervical cancer and the 8 most common types. (HPV 16, 18, 45, 33, 31, 52, 58 and 35) account for about 90% of cervical cancer. Case-control studies also allowed the identification of the following cofactors that acting together with HPV increase the risk of progression from HPV persistent infection to cervical cancer: tobacco, high parity, long term use of oral contraceptives and past infections with herpes simplex type 2 and Chlamydia trachomatis. The demonstration that infection with certain types of human papillomavirus (HPV) is not only the main cause but also a necessary cause of cervical cancer has led to great advances in the prevention of this disease on two fronts: (i) Primary prevention by the use of prophylactic HPV

  16. Individual management of cervical cancer in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Hecking, Thomas; Abramian, Alina; Domröse, Christian; Engeln, Tabea; Thiesler, Thore; Leutner, Claudia; Gembruch, Ulrich; Keyver-Paik, Mignon-Denise; Kuhn, Walther; Kübler, Kirsten

    2016-05-01

    The management of cervical cancer in pregnancy persists to be challenging. Therefore, identification of factors that influence the choice of therapeutic management is pivotal for an adequate patient counseling. We present a literature review of 26 studies reporting 121 pregnancies affected by cervical cancer. Additionally, we add a retrospective case series of five patients with pregnancy-associated cervical cancer diagnosed and treated in our clinic between 2006 and 2013. The literature review revealed that the therapeutic management during pregnancy varies according to the gestational age at diagnosis, while in the postpartum period no influence on the treatment choice could be detected. Also in our case series the choice of oncologic therapy was influenced by the gestational age, the wish to continue the pregnancy and the risks of delaying definitive treatment. There are no standardized procedures concerning the treatment of cervical cancer in pregnancy. Therefore, in consultation with the patient and a multidisciplinary team, an adequate individualized treatment plan should be determined.

  17. How Colposcopy Misses Invasive Cervical Cancer: A Case Report from the IMPROVE-COLPO Study

    PubMed Central

    Livingston, Jeff

    2016-01-01

    Colposcopy with biopsy is pivotal to cervical cancer prevention programs as it is called to identify the precancerous lesions on patients that screen positive. We present a cervical cancer case from IMPROVE-COLPO, a postmarketing, multicenter, two-arm observational study on US community colposcopy that collects outcomes with the adjunctive Dynamic Spectral Imaging (DSI) in its prospective arm. A 45-year-old woman was seen for suffering of heavy periods. She had cytology of Atypical Squamous Cells of Undetermined Significance (ASC-US) and was Human Papillomavirus (HPV) positive. Her colposcopy did not recognize the underlying condition and opted for no biopsy. The DSI assessment led to a biopsy of a lesion challenging traditional colposcopic templates: small, away from the cervical os, with slow acetowhitening development. Pathology review revealed the presence of invasive squamous carcinoma. In the era of sensitive screening, it is concerning that invasive cancers can challenge colposcopy and that the way to improve colposcopy is to collect multiple biopsies from each patient. The case presented indicates that the adjunctive objective assessment by DSI increases reassurance that observations outside of traditional standard visual templates are not underestimated or ignored. PMID:27830099

  18. Cervical cancer screening.

    PubMed Central

    Katz, A.

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To review the role of family physicians in screening for cancer of the cervix, to review the evidence for screening, in particular, frequency and technique for screening, and to review the reasons cervical cancer has not been prevented and the role of family physicians in addressing these failures. QUALITY OF EVIDENCE: The value of screening has been established with level II evidence. Many of the unresolved issues are not supported either way by good evidence; level II and III evidence predominates. MAIN FINDINGS: In Canada, 1350 women were predicted to be diagnosed with cancer of the cervix in 1996. Most of these women had not been screened. Minority, rural, low-income, and older women face important barriers to screening. Family physicians have a role in reaching out to these women to provide effective health care, including cancer screening. When cancer screening is performed, it should conform to recommended techniques with appropriate follow up of abnormal test results. CONCLUSIONS: Family physicians have an important role in preventing cancer of the cervix. Efforts should be concentrated on encouraging a greater proportion of eligible women to be screened. Criteria are suggested for effective screening. PMID:9721422

  19. Triapine, Cisplatin, and Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients With Cervical Cancer or Vaginal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-04-21

    Recurrent Cervical Cancer; Recurrent Vaginal Cancer; Stage IB Cervical Cancer; Stage II Vaginal Cancer; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage III Cervical Cancer; Stage III Vaginal Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Vaginal Cancer; Stage IVB Cervical Cancer; Stage IVB Vaginal Cancer; Therapy-related Toxicity

  20. Multicentre evaluation of a novel vaginal dose reporting method in 153 cervical cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Westerveld, Henrike; de Leeuw, Astrid; Kirchheiner, Kathrin; Dankulchai, Pittaya; Oosterveld, Bernard; Oinam, Arun; Hudej, Robert; Swamidas, Jamema; Lindegaard, Jacob; Tanderup, Kari; Pötter, Richard; Kirisits, Christian

    2016-09-01

    Recently, a vaginal dose reporting method for combined EBRT and BT in cervical cancer patients was proposed. The current study was to evaluate vaginal doses with this method in a multicentre setting, wherein different applicators, dose rates and protocols were used. In a subset of patients from the EMBRACE study, vaginal doses were evaluated. Doses at the applicator surface left/right and anterior/posterior and at 5mm depth were measured. In addition, the dose at the Posterior-Inferior Border of Symphysis (PIBS) vaginal dose point and PIBS±2cm, corresponding to the mid and lower vagina, was measured. 153 patients from seven institutions were included. Large dose variations expressed in EQD2 with α/β=3Gy were seen between patients, in particular at the top left and right vaginal wall (median 195 (range 61-947)Gy/178 (61-980)Gy, respectively). At 5mm depth, doses were 98 (55-212)Gy/91 (54-227)Gy left/right, and 71 (51-145)Gy/67 (49-189)Gy anterior/posterior, respectively. The dose at PIBS and PIBS±2cm was 41 (3-81)Gy, 54 (32-109)Gy and 5 (1-51)Gy, respectively. At PIBS+2cm (mid vagina) dose variation was coming from BT. The variation at PIBS-2cm (lower vagina) was mainly dependent on EBRT field border location. This novel method for reporting vaginal doses coming from EBRT and BT through well-defined dose points gives a robust representation of the dose along the vaginal axis. In addition, it allows comparison of vaginal dose between patients from different centres. The doses at the PIBS points represent the doses at the mid and lower parts of the vagina. Large variations in dose throughout the vagina were observed between patients and centres. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Cisplatin and Radiation Therapy Followed by Paclitaxel and Carboplatin in Treating Patients With Stage IB-IVA Cervical Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-05-03

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma, Not Otherwise Specified; Stage IB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIB Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer

  2. Cervical cancer metastasis to the brain: A case report and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Fetcko, Kaleigh; Gondim, Dibson D; Bonnin, Jose M; Dey, Mahua

    2017-01-01

    Intracranial metastasis from cervical cancer is a rare occurrence. In this study we describe a case of cervical cancer metastasis to the brain and perform an extensive review of literature from 1956 to 2016, to characterize clearly the clinical presentation, treatment options, molecular markers, targeted therapies, and survival of patients with this condition. An elderly woman with history of cervical cancer in remission, presented 2 years later with a right temporo-parietal tumor, which was treated with surgery and subsequent stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) to the resection cavity. She then returned 5 months later with a second solitary right lesion; she again underwent surgery and SRS to the resection cavity with no signs of recurrence 6 months later. According to the reviewed literature, the most common clinical presentation included females with median age of 48 years; presenting symptoms such as headache, weakness/hemiplegia/hemiparesis, seizure, and altered mental status (AMS)/confusion; multiple lesions mostly supratentorially located; poorly differentiated squamous cell carcinoma; and additional recurrences at other sites. The best approach to treatment is a multimodal plan, consisting of SRS or whole brain radiation therapy (WBRT) for solitary brain metastases followed by chemotherapy for systemic disease, surgery and WBRT for solitary brain lesions without systemic disease, and SRS or WBRT followed by chemotherapy for palliative care. The overall prognosis is poor with a mean and median survival time from diagnosis of brain metastasis of 7 and 4.6 months, respectively. Future efforts through large prospective randomized trials are warranted to better describe the clinical presentation and identify more effective treatment plans.

  3. [The preliminary report of cervical cancer treated with californium-252 neutron after loading intracavitary radiotherapy].

    PubMed

    Luo, G; Zheng, C; Shan, J

    2001-12-01

    To observe the therapeutic effectiveness and complications of californium-252 (252Cf) brachytherapy in cervical cancer. Fifty one cases of cervical cancer were diagnosed according to the standard of the International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics (FIGO), II a:8 cases, II b:31 cases, III a:8 cases, III b:4 cases. Treatment schedule: 252Cf after loading brachytherapy, 10-12 Gy/fraction/week, the total dose of reference point A was 36-40 Gy in three to four implant sessions. In the second day after 252Cf therapy, the whole pelvis was treated with 6 MV X-ray external beam radiotherapy, 200 cGy per fraction, 4 times per week. The total dose of external beam radiotherapy was 40 to 50 Gy (the middle of pelvis was blocked at width of 4 cm after 20-30 Gy), then the total dose of reference point B was 50-55 Gy;the total treatment time was 5-6 weeks. The average time of complete tumor regression was 25 days, the local control rate of 2 year was 100%, the total 2 year survival rate was 92%, i.e., II a: 8/8 cases, II b: 30/31 cases (97%), III a: 6/8 cases, III b: 3/4 cases; the late radiation complications of bladder and rectum was 2% respectively during these 2 years. It is concluded that combined 252 Cf brachytherapy and high energy X-ray external beam radiotherapy may be safe and effective in the management of cervical cancer. 252Cf has advantages of high local control rate; rapidly regression of bulky tumors and low-grade radiation complications.

  4. [Current perspectives in cervical cancer].

    PubMed

    Valdespino Gómez, Víctor M; Valdespino Castillo, Víctor E

    2004-01-01

    Cervical cancer is a Public Health problem among women worldwide, especially in the developing world. The understanding of the HPV association with the high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions and cervical cancer and the knowledge of the pre-invasive lesions natural history have strengthened the justification of different means of cancer prevention and screening programs, the application of different pre-invasive lesion treatments and particularly advances in conventional treatments of cervical cancer. In the last thirty years, cervical cancer's incidence and mortality rates have decreased in more than 75% in developed nations due to efficient application of secondary prevention based on cytology and colposcopy screening programs plus to in-office implementation of precursor lesions treatment methods. In the developing nations, these achievements can be obtained using specific steps of primary prevention, massive participation of risk patients in screening programs and improving ambulatory application of pre-invasive cervical lesion treatments. In Mexico several indicators suggest that this condition has began. New knowledge paradigms of the local immune response to HPV-cervical cancer pre-invasive and invasive lesions are being added to the construction of new preventive and therapeutic anti-cancer strategies. The preventive vaccines anti-high risk oncogenic-HPVs offer a good perspective in short term, also the use of different cellular immunotherapy strategies anti-cervical cancer as adyuvant of conventional treatments offer an encouraging panorama in not long term. In the next years, the improving of specific genes determination and their correlation with biologic features of the specific tumor which are involved on pre-invasive and invasive stages of cervical cancer will raise the understanding and the treatment of these patients.

  5. Combination cisplatin and dichloromethotrexate in patients with advanced or recurrent cervical cancer: a preliminary report.

    PubMed

    Roberts, J A; Morley, G W; Natale, R B; Wheeler, R H

    1984-10-01

    The chemotherapy combination of cisplatin and dichloromethotrexate was administered to 14 patients with measurable cervical cancer. Six (46%) have had a complete response for 6+, 7, 11, 14, 15, and 21 months. Four (30%) have had a partial response for 1, 6, 10, and 11 months. Two patients (15%) have had stable disease for 6 and 11 months. Only one patient failed to respond to this combination. In six of these patients, the measurable mass was located in a previously radiated area. This combination was well tolerated with only three instances of severe toxicity. No irreversible renal dysfunction was seen in any patient.

  6. Curcumin Nanoformulation for Cervical Cancer Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Zaman, Mohd S.; Chauhan, Neeraj; Yallapu, Murali M.; Gara, Rishi K.; Maher, Diane M.; Kumari, Sonam; Sikander, Mohammed; Khan, Sheema; Zafar, Nadeem; Jaggi, Meena; Chauhan, Subhash C.

    2016-01-01

    Cervical cancer is one of the most common cancers among women worldwide. Current standards of care for cervical cancer includes surgery, radiation, and chemotherapy. Conventional chemotherapy fails to elicit therapeutic responses and causes severe systemic toxicity. Thus, developing a natural product based, safe treatment modality would be a highly viable option. Curcumin (CUR) is a well-known natural compound, which exhibits excellent anti-cancer potential by regulating many proliferative, oncogenic, and chemo-resistance associated genes/proteins. However, due to rapid degradation and poor bioavailability, its translational and clinical use has been limited. To improve these clinically relevant parameters, we report a poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) based curcumin nanoparticle formulation (Nano-CUR). This study demonstrates that in comparison to free CUR, Nano-CUR effectively inhibits cell growth, induces apoptosis, and arrests the cell cycle in cervical cancer cell lines. Nano-CUR treatment modulated entities such as miRNAs, transcription factors, and proteins associated with carcinogenesis. Moreover, Nano-CUR effectively reduced the tumor burden in a pre-clinical orthotopic mouse model of cervical cancer by decreasing oncogenic miRNA-21, suppressing nuclear β-catenin, and abrogating expression of E6/E7 HPV oncoproteins including smoking compound benzo[a]pyrene (BaP) induced E6/E7 and IL-6 expression. These superior pre-clinical data suggest that Nano-CUR may be an effective therapeutic modality for cervical cancer. PMID:26837852

  7. Advocating for cervical cancer prevention.

    PubMed

    Sherris, J; Agurto, I; Arrossi, S; Dzuba, I; Gaffikin, L; Herdman, C; Limpaphayom, K; Luciani, S

    2005-05-01

    Cervical cancer is a significant health problem among women in developing countries. Contributing to the cervical cancer health burden in many countries is a lack of understanding and political will to address the problem. Broad-based advocacy efforts that draw on research and program findings from developing-country settings are key to gaining program and policy support, as are cost-effectiveness analyses based on these findings. The Alliance for Cervical Cancer Prevention (ACCP) has undertaken advocacy efforts at the international, regional, national, and local levels to raise awareness and understanding of the problem (and workable solutions), galvanize funders and governments to take action, and engage local stakeholders in ensuring program success. ACCP experience demonstrates the role that evidence-based advocacy efforts play in the ultimate success of cervical cancer prevention programs, particularly when new screening and treatment approaches-and, ultimately, radically new approaches such as a human papillomavirus vaccine-are available.

  8. Cervical Cancer Screening - Multiple Languages

    MedlinePlus

    ... Supplements Videos & Tools You Are Here: Home → Multiple Languages → All Health Topics → Cervical Cancer Screening URL of this page: https://medlineplus.gov/languages/cervicalcancerscreening.html Other topics A-Z Expand Section ...

  9. [Health technology assessment report: Computer-assisted Pap test for cervical cancer screening].

    PubMed

    Della Palma, Paolo; Moresco, Luca; Giorgi Rossi, Paolo

    2012-01-01

    Point can be used on conventional smears. Cytology screening has some critical points: there is a shortage of cytologists/cytotechnicians; the quality strongly depends on the experience and ability of the cytologist; there is a subjective component in the cytological diagnosis; in highly screened populations, the prevalence of lesions is very low and the activity of cytologists is very monotonous. On the other hand, a progressive shift to molecular screening using HPV-DNA test as primary screening test is very likely in the near future; cytology will be used as triage test, dramatically reducing the number of slides to process and increasing the prevalence of lesions in those Pap tests. In this Report we assume that the diagnostic accuracy of computer-assisted Pap test is equal to the accuracy of manual Pap test and, consequently, that screening using computer-assisted Pap test has the same efficacy in reducing cervical cancer incidence and mortality. Under this assumption, the effectiveness/ benefit/utility is the same for the two screening modes, i.e. the economic analysis will be a cost minimization study. Furthermore, the screening process is identical for the two modalities in all the phases except for slide interpretation. The cost minimization analysis will be limited to the only phase differing between the two modes, i.e. the study will be a differential cost analysis between a labour-intensive strategy (traditional Pap test) and a technology-intensive strategy (the computer-assisted Pap test). Briefly, the objectives of this HTA Report are: to determine the break even point of computer-assisted Pap test systems, i.e. the volume of slides processed per year at which putting in place a computer-assisted Pap test system becomes economically convenient; to quantify the cost per Pap test in different scenarios according to screening centre activity volume, productivity of cytologist, type of cytology (conventional smear or liquid-based, fully automated or semi

  10. Drugs Approved for Cervical Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for cervical cancer. The list includes generic names, brand names, and common drug combinations, which are shown in capital letters. The drug names link to NCI's Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  11. Cetuximab, Cisplatin, and Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients With Stage IB, Stage II, Stage III, or Stage IVA Cervical Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-12-29

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Cervical Small Cell Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage III Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer

  12. Rapid and complete radiological resolution of an intradural cervical cord lung cancer metastasis treated with spinal stereotactic radiosurgery: case report.

    PubMed

    Bennett, E Emily; Berriochoa, Camille; Habboub, Ghaith; Brigeman, Scott; Chao, Samuel T; Angelov, Lilyana

    2017-01-01

    Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) has emerged as a treatment option for patients with spinal metastatic disease. Although SRS has been shown to be successful in a multitude of extradural metastatic tumors causing cord compression, very few cases of intradural treatment have been reported. The authors present a rare case of an intradural extramedullary metastatic small cell lung cancer lesion to the cervical spine resulting in cord compression in an area that had also been extensively pretreated with conventional external-beam radiation therapy. The patient underwent successful SRS to this metastatic site, with rapid and complete resolution of his lesion.

  13. Program for the control of cervical cancer in Peru.

    PubMed

    1996-12-01

    This brief article presents a profile of cervical cancer prevention in Peru. Limited information is available on the extent of cervical cancer due to lack of a national cancer registry. The only statistics on cervical cancer pertain to Lima. During 1952-91, 44.6% of cases treated were due to cervical cancer, according to the National Institute of Neoplastic Diseases in Lima. The Anti-Cancer League reports that 95.9% of the 1403 cancers of the genital organs among 500,445 women examined during 1953-94 were cervical cancers. 80%-86% of these cancers were advanced-stage cervical neoplasms. The Maes-Heller Center for Research on Cancer reports that the incidence of cervical cancer declined during 1970-80. Reproductive health care provided through the Ministry of Health focuses on reducing maternal mortality and promoting family planning. PAHO/WHO funding has been limited to reducing maternal mortality and to promoting family planning. The focus is on obstetric care rather than gynecologic care. Funding deficits are a constraint to the development of a centralized national program for the control of cervical cancer. In the year 2000, the Ministry of Health should have established the new Reproductive Health and Family Planning Program. One of the program goals is to provide at least 30% of Peruvian women with an annual Pap smear.

  14. Postoperative Intensity-Modulated Arc Therapy for Cervical and Endometrial Cancer: A Prospective Report on Toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Vandecasteele, Katrien; Tummers, Philippe; Makar, Amin; Eijkeren, Marc van; Delrue, Louke; Denys, Hannelore; Lambert, Bieke; Beerens, Anne-Sophie; Van den Broecke, Rudy; Lambein, Kathleen; Fonteyne, Valerie; De Meerleer, Gert

    2012-10-01

    Purpose: To report on toxicity after postoperative intensity-modulated arc therapy (IMAT) for cervical (CC) and endometrial cancer (EC). Methods and Materials: Twenty-four CC and 41 EC patients were treated with postoperative IMAT. If indicated, para-aortic lymph node irradiation (preventive or when affected, PALN) and/or concomitant cisplatin (40 mg/m Superscript-Two , weekly) was administered. The prescribed dose for IMAT was 45 Gy (CC, 25 fractions) and 46 Gy (EC, 23 fractions), followed by a brachytherapeutic boost if possible. Radiation-related toxicity was assessed prospectively. The effect of concomitant cisplatin and PALN irradiation was evaluated. Results: Regarding acute toxicity (n = 65), Grade 3 and 2 acute gastrointestinal toxicity was observed in zero and 63% of patients (79% CC, 54% EC), respectively. Grade 3 and 2 acute genitourinary toxicity was observed in 1% and 18% of patients, respectively. Grade 2 (21%) and 3 (12%) hematologic toxicity (n = 41) occurred only in CC patients. Seventeen percent of CC patients and 2% of EC patients experienced Grade 2 fatigue and skin toxicity, respectively. Adding cisplatin led to an increase in Grade >2 nausea (57% vs. 9%; p = 0.01), Grade 2 nocturia (24% vs. 4%; p = 0.03), Grade {>=}2 hematologic toxicity (38% vs. nil, p = 0.003), Grade {>=}2 leukopenia (33% vs. nil, p = 0.009), and a strong trend toward more fatigue (14% vs. 2%; p = 0.05). Para-aortic lymph node irradiation led to an increase of Grade 2 nocturia (31% vs. 4%, p = 0.008) and a strong trend toward more Grade >2 nausea (44% vs. 18%; p = 0.052). Regarding late toxicity (n = 45), no Grade 3 or 4 late toxicity occurred. Grade 2 gastrointestinal toxicity, genitourinary toxicity, and fatigue occurred in 4%, 9%, and 1% of patients. Neither concomitant cisplatin nor PALN irradiation increased late toxicity rates. Conclusions: Postoperative IMAT for EC or CC is associated with low acute and late toxicity. Concomitant chemotherapy and PALN irradiation

  15. Time costs associated with cervical cancer screening.

    PubMed

    Shireman, T I; Tsevat, J; Goldie, S J

    2001-01-01

    Time costs borne by women when undergoing cervical cancer screening have rarely been elucidated, although such costs may pose substantial barriers to care. The purpose of this project was to quantify the opportunity costs associated with cervical cancer screening in young women attending Planned Parenthood Clinics. We conducted a self-report survey of 105 women from six clinics to measure travel, waiting, and exam times associated with cervical cancer screening. Respondents recorded their time of arrival and departure, length of time in the waiting room, age, income level, and hours per week they worked outside of the home. Time costs were valued three ways: through self-reported hourly wage, age- and gender-adjusted minimum earnings, and national age- and gender-adjusted hourly wages. Respondents were on average 24 years old, worked 29 hours per week outside the home, and earned less than $20,000 per year. Mean time for one-way travel was 18.7 minutes; waiting room time was 16.9 minutes; and exam time was 50.8 minutes. Time costs were estimated to be $14.08 per visit based upon the self-reported hourly wage; $16.46 per visit based upon age- and gender-adjusted minimum earnings; and $19.63 per visit based upon age- and gender-adjusted national wage rates. Time costs associated with cervical cancer screening represent an important opportunity cost and should be considered in studies attempting to identify barriers to screening adherence. Our results indicate that time costs accounted for up to 25% of cervical cancer screening costs. Time costs should be identified, measured, valued, and included in cost-effectiveness analyses of cervical cancer screening.

  16. Cervical Cancer Risk Prediction Models

    Cancer.gov

    Developing statistical models that estimate the probability of developing cervical cancer over a defined period of time will help clinicians identify individuals at higher risk of specific cancers, allowing for earlier or more frequent screening and counseling of behavioral changes to decrease risk.

  17. Preventing Cervical Cancer with HPV Vaccines

    Cancer.gov

    Cervical cancer can be prevented with HPV vaccines. NCI-supported researchers helped establish HPV as a cause of cervical cancer. They also helped create the first HPV vaccines, were involved in the vaccine trials, and contribute to ongoing studies.

  18. MRI and PET Imaging in Predicting Treatment Response in Patients With Stage IB-IVA Cervical Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-06-27

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma, Not Otherwise Specified; Cervical Undifferentiated Carcinoma; Recurrent Cervical Carcinoma; Stage IB2 Cervical Cancer; Stage II Cervical Cancer; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage III Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIB Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer

  19. Factors Associated with Self-Reported Cervical Cancer Screening Among Women Aged 18 Years and Older in the United States.

    PubMed

    Miles-Richardson, Stephanie; Allen, Shari; Claridy, Mechelle D; Booker, Elaine Archie; Gerbi, Gemechu

    2017-02-01

    In 2016, an estimated 4120 women will die as a result of cervical cancer. The objective of this study was to examine the factors associated with cervical cancer screening among women 18 years of age and older in the United States (U.S.). Using the 2012 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System survey, women over the age of 18 in the U.S. were examined to assess factors associated with cervical cancer screening. Analyses were conducted using SAS 9.2. Of the 272,692 study participants, 258,496 (95 %) had obtained cervical cancer screening. After adjusting for demographic and socioeconomic factors, being non-Hispanic White, Hispanic or Latino, Asian, Native Hawaiian or Other Pacific Islander, in the age group 18-44 years and 75 years and above, having less than a high school education and an annual household income of less than a $25,000, having never married, and residing in the West region of the U.S. reduced the likelihood of participation in cervical cancer screening. Also, after adjusting for demographic and socioeconomic factors, being between the ages of 45-74 years of age, having more than a high school education, having a higher income, and residing in the South region of the U.S. increased the likelihood of participation in cervical cancer screening. The results of this study suggest that socio-demographic factors and region of residence are predictors of cervical cancer screening. These findings highlight the need to identify potential prevention strategies to promote cervical cancer screening among at-risk populations and groups.

  20. Cervical cancer screening at crossroads.

    PubMed

    Lynge, Elsebeth; Rygaard, Carsten; Baillet, Miguel Vazquez-Prada; Dugué, Pierre-Antoine; Sander, Bente Braad; Bonde, Jesper; Rebolj, Matejka

    2014-08-01

    Cervical screening has been one of the most successful public health prevention programmes. For 50 years, cytology formed the basis for screening, and detected cervical intraepithelial lesions (CIN) were treated surgically to prevent progression to cancer. In a high-risk country as Denmark, screening decreased the incidence of cervical cancer from 34 to 11 per 100,000, age-standardized rate (World Standard Population). Screening is, however, also expensive; Denmark (population: 5.6 million) undertakes close to half a million tests per year, and has 6-8 CIN-treated women for each prevented cancer case. The discovery of human papillomavirus (HPV) as the cause of cervical cancer dramatically changed perspectives for disease control. Screening with HPV testing was launched around 1990, and preventive HPV vaccination was licensed in 2006. Long-term randomized controlled trials (RCT) demonstrated that HPV testing provides better protection against cervical cancer than cytology, but it requires extra repeated testing. HPV vaccination RCTs, furthermore, have proved that HPV vaccination protects against vaccine-type high-grade CIN in women vaccinated prior to sexual activity, but less so in women vaccinated later. The challenge now is therefore to find an algorithm for screening of a heterogeneous population including non-vaccinated women; women vaccinated prior to start of sexual activity; and women vaccinated later. © 2014 APMIS. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Cervical cancer: A global health crisis.

    PubMed

    Small, William; Bacon, Monica A; Bajaj, Amishi; Chuang, Linus T; Fisher, Brandon J; Harkenrider, Matthew M; Jhingran, Anuja; Kitchener, Henry C; Mileshkin, Linda R; Viswanathan, Akila N; Gaffney, David K

    2017-07-01

    Cervical cancer is the fourth most common malignancy diagnosed in women worldwide. Nearly all cases of cervical cancer result from infection with the human papillomavirus, and the prevention of cervical cancer includes screening and vaccination. Primary treatment options for patients with cervical cancer may include surgery or a concurrent chemoradiotherapy regimen consisting of cisplatin-based chemotherapy with external beam radiotherapy and brachytherapy. Cervical cancer causes more than one quarter of a million deaths per year as a result of grossly deficient treatments in many developing countries. This warrants a concerted global effort to counter the shocking loss of life and suffering that largely goes unreported. This article provides a review of the biology, prevention, and treatment of cervical cancer, and discusses the global cervical cancer crisis and efforts to improve the prevention and treatment of the disease in underdeveloped countries. Cancer 2017;123:2404-12. © 2017 American Cancer Society. © 2017 American Cancer Society.

  2. Radiation Therapy and Cisplatin With or Without Epoetin Alfa in Treating Patients With Cervical Cancer and Anemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-12-29

    Anemia; Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Drug Toxicity; Radiation Toxicity; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage III Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer

  3. Cervical Cancer Screening and Perceived Information Needs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whynes, David K.; Clarke, Katherine; Philips, Zoe; Avis, Mark

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To identify women's sources of information about cervical cancer screening, information which women report receiving during Pap consultations, information they would like to receive, and the relationships between perceived information needs, personal characteristics and information sources. Design/methodology/approach: Logistic regression…

  4. Cervical Cancer Screening and Perceived Information Needs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whynes, David K.; Clarke, Katherine; Philips, Zoe; Avis, Mark

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: To identify women's sources of information about cervical cancer screening, information which women report receiving during Pap consultations, information they would like to receive, and the relationships between perceived information needs, personal characteristics and information sources. Design/methodology/approach: Logistic regression…

  5. Men's knowledge and attitudes about cervical cancer screening in Kenya.

    PubMed

    Rosser, Joelle I; Zakaras, Jennifer M; Hamisi, Sabina; Huchko, Megan J

    2014-11-22

    A number of studies have identified male involvement as an important factor affecting reproductive health outcomes, particularly in the areas of family planning, antenatal care, and HIV care. As access to cervical cancer screening programs improves in resource-poor settings, particularly through the integration of HIV and cervical cancer services, it is important to understand the role of male partner support in women's utilization of screening and treatment. We administered an oral survey to 110 men in Western Kenya about their knowledge and attitudes regarding cervical cancer and cervical cancer screening. Men who had female partners eligible for cervical cancer screening were recruited from government health facilities where screening was offered free of charge. Specific knowledge about cervical cancer risk factors, prevention, and treatment was low. Only half of the men perceived their partners to be at risk for cervical cancer, and many reported that a positive screen would be emotionally upsetting. Nevertheless, all participants said they would encourage their partners to get screened. Future interventions should tailor cervical cancer educational opportunities towards men. Further research is needed among both men and couples to better understand barriers to male support for screening and treatment and to determine how to best involve men in cervical cancer prevention efforts.

  6. Cervical Cancer Screening with AMIGAS

    PubMed Central

    Lairson, David R.; Chang, Yu-Chia; Byrd, Theresa L.; Smith, Judith Lee; Fernandez, Maria E.; Wilson, Katherine M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Hispanic women have a higher incidence of cervical cancer than all other races and ethnicities. In Hispanic subgroups, Mexican American women were among the least likely to have received cervical cancer screening. In a recent RCT, Ayudando a las Mujeres con Información, Guia, y Amor para su Salud (AMIGAS) was shown to increase cervical cancer screening rates among women of Mexican descent at 6 months in all intervention arms compared to the control arm. Limited information exists about the economics of interventions to increase cervical cancer screening rates among women of Mexican descent. Purpose This study aims to estimate the cost-effectiveness of the alternative AMIGAS intervention methods for increasing cervical cancer screening among low-income women of Mexican descent in three U.S. communities. Methods Cost data were collected from 2008 to 2011 alongside the AMIGAS study of 613 women. Receipt of Pap test within 6 months of intervention was the primary outcome measure in the cost-effectiveness analysis, conducted during 2012–2013. Results The cost per additional woman screened comparing the video-only intervention to usual care was $980. The cost increased to $1,309 with participant time cost included. With an additional cost per participant of $3.90 compared to flipchart only, the full AMIGAS program (video plus flipchart) yielded 6.8% additional women screened. Conclusions Results on the average and incremental cost-effectiveness of the AMIGAS program elements may assist health policymakers and program managers to select and appropriately budget for interventions shown to increase cervical cancer screening among low-income women of Mexican descent. PMID:24842738

  7. Cervical cancer stem cells: opportunities and challenges.

    PubMed

    Chhabra, Ravindresh

    2015-11-01

    Cervical cancer remains a leading cause of cancer-related deaths in women in spite of screening and vaccination programs. The current treatment strategies including chemotherapy and surgery could only prolong the patient's survival rather than provide a permanent cure. In case of advanced cervical cancer, radical surgery remains the only option which not only affects the child-bearing ability of the patient, but also comes with a continual risk of recurrence of the disease. Hence, there is a need to develop innovative therapeutics. The cancer stem cell hypothesis states that a tumor has a hierarchical cellular structure in which only a small subpopulation, referred to as cancer stem cells (CSCs), is capable of tumorigenesis. The CSCs possess the stem-like properties of self-renewal and can differentiate into non-stem tumor cells. A large number of studies suggest that CSCs are resistant to the conventional therapies used for cancer treatment. These therapies rather enrich the proportion of CSCs in the tumor by eliminating non-stem tumor cells, thereby causing enhanced drug resistance resulting in relapse of the disease. This makes CSCs as the most likely targets for therapeutic intervention. Also, the increase in the proportion of CSCs in patient samples is associated with poor survival rate, thus highlighting their potential role as prognostic biomarker. The CSCs have been identified and characterized in cervical cancer cell lines, but there are hardly any reports of CSCs in cervical cancer patient samples. This review highlights the current status of research on cervical CSCs, their clinical significance and the challenges in the field.

  8. Human Papillomavirus and Cervical Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Burd, Eileen M.

    2003-01-01

    Of the many types of human papillomavirus (HPV), more than 30 infect the genital tract. The association between certain oncogenic (high-risk) strains of HPV and cervical cancer is well established. Although HPV is essential to the transformation of cervical epithelial cells, it is not sufficient, and a variety of cofactors and molecular events influence whether cervical cancer will develop. Early detection and treatment of precancerous lesions can prevent progression to cervical cancer. Identification of precancerous lesions has been primarily by cytologic screening of cervical cells. Cellular abnormalities, however, may be missed or may not be sufficiently distinct, and a portion of patients with borderline or mildly dyskaryotic cytomorphology will have higher-grade disease identified by subsequent colposcopy and biopsy. Sensitive and specific molecular techniques that detect HPV DNA and distinguish high-risk HPV types from low-risk HPV types have been introduced as an adjunct to cytology. Earlier detection of high-risk HPV types may improve triage, treatment, and follow-up in infected patients. Currently, the clearest role for HPV DNA testing is to improve diagnostic accuracy and limit unnecessary colposcopy in patients with borderline or mildly abnormal cytologic test results. PMID:12525422

  9. Cervical cancer in Latin America.

    PubMed

    Eluf-Neto, J; Nascimento, C M

    2001-04-01

    Cervical cancer is a common cause of morbidity and mortality in developing countries. In Latin America, the incidence rates in several cities are among the highest worldwide, probably due to a high frequency of risk factors and/or a low screening coverage for cervical cancer. Epidemiologic studies conducted in Latin America (and some in the Caribbean), that have investigated the main risk factors for the disease, as well as screening coverage by Papanicolaou (Pap) smear, were reviewed. The prevalence of human papillomavirus (HPV) infection among women with negative Pap smears does not seem to explain the risk observed in Latin American countries. Results of some studies have suggested that reproductive factors and male sexual behavior might be responsible, at least partially, for the high occurrence of cervical cancer in Latin America. Concerning cytology screening, many women have a smear taken regularly (some every year). However, a significant proportion of women, probably those with a high risk of cancer of the cervix, have never had a Pap test. To reduce cervical cancer in these countries, screening programs in Latin America should have a wider coverage, especially reaching those women at higher risk. Semin Oncol 28:188-197.

  10. Cervical Cancer Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... Feelings and Cancer Adjusting to Cancer Self-Image & Sexuality Day-to-Day Life Support for Caregivers Survivorship ... Coping Feelings & Cancer Adjusting to Cancer Self Image & Sexuality Day to Day Life Survivorship Support for Caregivers ...

  11. CDC's Cervical Cancer Study

    MedlinePlus

    ... 2014 Cancer Screening Prevalence Among Adults with Disabilities Economic Evaluation of CDC’s Colorectal Cancer Control Program State ... Cancer Screening Capacity in the United States The Economics of Breast Cancer in Younger Women in the ...

  12. Biomarker discovery for neuroendocrine cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Lin, Li-Hsun; Chang, Shing-Jyh; Hu, Ren-Yu; Lin, Meng-Wei; Lin, Szu-Ting; Huang, Shun-Hong; Lyu, Ping-Chiang; Chou, Hsiu-Chuan; Lai, Zih-Yin; Chuang, Yung-Jen; Chan, Hong-Lin

    2014-07-01

    Neuroendocrine cervical cancer is an aggressive but rare form of cervical cancer. The majority of neuroendocrine cervical cancer patients present with advanced-stage diseases. However, the limited numbers of neuroendocrine tumor markers are insufficient for clinical purposes. Thus, we used a proteomic approach combining lysine labeling 2D-DIGE and MALDI-TOF MS to investigate the biomarkers for neuroendocrine cervical cancer. By analyzing the global proteome alteration between the neuroendocrine cervical cancer line (HM-1) and non-neuroendocrine cervical cancer lines (CaSki cells, ME-180 cells, and Hela cells), we identified 82 proteins exhibiting marked changes between HM-1 and CaSki cells, and between ME-180 and Hela cells. Several proteins involved in protein folding, cytoskeleton, transcription control, signal transduction, glycolysis, and redox regulation exhibited significant changes in abundance. Proteomic and immunoblot analyses indicated respective 49.88-fold and 25-fold increased levels of transgelin in HM-1 cells compared with that in other non-neuroendocrine cervical cancer cell lines, implying that transgelin is a biomarker for neuroendocrine cervical cancer. In summary, we used a comprehensive neuroendocrine/non-neuroendocrine cervical cancer model based proteomic approach for identifying neuroendocrine cervical cancer markers, which might contribute to the prognosis and diagnosis of neuroendocrine cervical cancer.

  13. Lymphedema After Surgery in Patients With Endometrial Cancer, Cervical Cancer, or Vulvar Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-12-23

    Lymphedema; Stage IA Cervical Cancer; Stage IA Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IA Vulvar Cancer; Stage IB Cervical Cancer; Stage IB Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IB Vulvar Cancer; Stage II Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage II Vulvar Cancer; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIA Vulvar Cancer; Stage IIIB Vulvar Cancer; Stage IIIC Vulvar Cancer; Stage IVB Vulvar Cancer

  14. [Cervical cancer prevention: an update].

    PubMed

    Irico, G; Escobar, H; Marinelli, B

    2005-01-01

    It has been seen an increase of the cervical cancer and of intraepithelial cancer in the last years. The most important risk factors for cervical cancer are sexual conduct, early of sexual relationships, number of partners, cigarettes, oral anticonceptive, pregnancy, immunosuppression, sexually transmitted illness. And an important role of the Human Papilloma Virus. The HPV has been classified in 3 groups; low risk, the most frequents are 11 and 6, middle risk, tipe 31, 33 and 35, and high risk, 16 and 18, that have frequent association with cervical cancer and with high grade intraepithelial lesions. The cervicovaginal citology is still the most accurate diagnosis method to detect SIL or CIN and invasive cancer in early stages, it is discussed the periodicity and group of women to whom the method must point. There are different options depending if it is a SIL of low or high grade or and cancer. With the possibility of doing follow up or treatment, such as. LLETZ, Laser, Criotraphy, cone and interferon for the preneoplastic lesions. The achievement of a vaccine for HPV could have a significant impact on these pathology.

  15. [Health technology assessment report: HPV DNA based primary screening for cervical cancer precursors].

    PubMed

    Ronco, Guglielmo; Biggeri, Annibale; Confortini, Massimo; Naldoni, Carlo; Segnan, Nereo; Sideri, Mario; Zappa, Marco; Zorzi, Manuel; Calvia, Maria; Accetta, Gabriele; Giordano, Livia; Cogo, Carla; Carozzi, Francesca; Gillio Tos, Anna; Arbyn, Marc; Mejier, Chris J L M; Snijders, Peter J F; Cuzick, Jack; Giorgi Rossi, Paolo

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVE OF THE PROJECT: The introduction of the HPV test as a primary screening test will cause important changes in the screening system based on cytology. The purposes of this report are: to define the best screening policies with HPV-based screening on the basis of the resulting efficacy and of undesired effects; comparing them to cytology-based screening; to identify their best conditions of application; to evaluate economic cost, feasibility and impact on the organisation of services of such policy in the Italian situation. This report contains a section on efficacy and undesired effects based on a systematic review of literature conducted in strict coordination with the preparation of a supplement to the European Guidelines for quality assurance in cervical cancer screening. This chapter corresponds to a preliminary version of the chapter of the European Guidelines on primary screening with HPV. The sections on costs, impact on organisation, and social, ethical and legal impact reflect the Italian situation; they are based on a review of the available Italian data (including unpublished data, mainly from on-going pilot projects) and on a structured analysis of what will result if the proposed protocol is applied to the Italian situation. Efficacy and undesired effects. There is clear scientific evidence that a screening based on validated tests for the DNA of oncogenic HPV as primary test and applying an appropriate protocol is more effective than screening based on cytology in preventing invasive cancers of the uterine cervix. In addition, it entails a limited--if any--increase of the undesired effects both in terms of unneeded referral to diagnostic work-up and in terms of over-diagnosis and consequent overtreatment of spontaneously regressive lesions. The crucial elements of such protocol are the followings: HPV-positive women are not to be directly referred to colposcopy, but the use of triage systems is essential. The currently recommendable method is

  16. Cervical cancer risk factors among HIV-infected Nigerian women

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Cervical cancer is the third most common cancer among women worldwide, and in Nigeria it is the second most common female cancer. Cervical cancer is an AIDS-defining cancer; however, HIV only marginally increases the risk of cervical pre-cancer and cancer. In this study, we examine the risk factors for cervical pre-cancer and cancer among HIV-positive women screened for cervical cancer at two medical institutions in Abuja, Nigeria. Methods A total of 2,501 HIV-positive women participating in the cervical cancer screen-and-treat program in Abuja, Nigeria consented to this study and provided socio-demographic and clinical information. Log-binomial models were used to calculate relative risk (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (95%CI) for the risk factors of cervical pre-cancer and cancer. Results There was a 6% prevalence of cervical pre-cancer and cancer in the study population of HIV-positive women. The risk of screening positivity or invasive cancer diagnosis reduced with increasing age, with women aged 40 years and older having the lowest risk (RR=0.4; 95%CI=0.2–0.7). Women with a CD4 count of 650 per mm3 or more also had lower risk of screening positivity or invasive cancer diagnosis (RR=0.3, 95%CI=0.2–0.6). Other factors such as having had 5 or more abortions (RR=1.8, 95%CI=1.0–3.6) and the presence of other vaginal wall abnormalities (RR=1.9, 95%CI=1.3–2.8) were associated with screening positivity or invasive cancer diagnosis. Conclusion The prevalence of screening positive lesions or cervical cancer was lower than most previous reports from Africa. HIV-positive Nigerian women were at a marginally increased risk of cervical pre-cancer and cancer. These findings highlight the need for more epidemiological studies of cervical cancer and pre-cancerous lesions among HIV-positive women in Africa and an improved understanding of incidence and risk factors. PMID:23767681

  17. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy followed by conization to spare fertility in cases of locally advanced cervical cancer: A case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Yanling; Cao, Tiefeng; Wang, Yin; Huang, He; Xie, Yujie; Liu, Jihong

    2016-01-01

    The average age when cervical cancer is diagnosed is decreasing, resulting in a larger proportion of patients seeking fertility preservation. Therefore, a less radical approach that aims to preserve the potential for fertility during the treatment of cervical carcinoma is crucial. The present study reported a case of a patient with stage IB2 cervical cancer who exhibited pathological complete regression to neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT). This patient underwent deep cervical conization and laparoscopic lymphadenectomy to preserve her fertility. The patient gave birth at 29 weeks of gestation and exhibited no recurrent disease until May 2016 (72 months after surgery). This is the first, to the best of our knowledge, IB2 case treatment by NACT, followed by conization plus lymphadenectomy, producing favorable oncological and obstetrical outcome. The present study, together with data from a limited number of published articles, offers a new perspective in the preservation of fertility in young women with cervical cancer. Additional studies are required in a selected population. PMID:27699036

  18. Teaching tools to engage Anishinaabek First Nations women in cervical cancer screening: Report of an educational workshop.

    PubMed

    Zehbe, Ingeborg; Wood, Brianne; Wakewich, Pamela; Maar, Marion; Escott, Nicholas; Jumah, Naana; Little, Julian

    2016-04-01

    To explore educational strategies for engaging First Nations women in Canada to attend cervical cancer screening. Within a participatory action research framework, semi-structured interviews with health-care providers in First Nations communities revealed that education about the value of screening is perceived as being a key factor to promote cervical cancer screening. To obtain feedback from workshop informants, a 1-day educational workshop was held to identify appropriate educational intervention strategies, which would be applied in a forthcoming randomised controlled cervical screening trial. Common discussion and discussion groups, which were facilitated by a First Nations workshop moderator and a note taker. This workshop helped to strengthen the ethical space dialogue with the First Nations communities with whom the study team had established research partnerships. The workshop atmosphere was relaxed and the invited informants decided that an educational health promotion event for community women needed to be held prior to inviting them to the cervical screening trial. Such an event would provide an opportunity to communicate the importance of attending regular cervical screening allowing women to make informed decisions about screening participation. Complementary promotional items, including an eye-catching pamphlet and storytelling, were also suggested. The key messages from the events and promotional items can help to destigmatise women who develop a type of cancer that is caused by a sexually transmitted virus that affects both men and women. Developing and implementing positive health education that respectfully depicts female bodies, sexuality and health behaviours through a First Nations lens is strongly warranted.

  19. Glycoprotein and Glycan in Tissue and Blood Samples of Patients With Stage IB-IVA Cervical Cancer Undergoing Surgery to Remove Pelvic and Abdominal Lymph Nodes

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-26

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Cervical Small Cell Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma, Not Otherwise Specified; Stage IB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage III Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer

  20. Somatic Variations in Cervical Cancers in Indian Patients

    PubMed Central

    Das, Poulami; Bansal, Akanksha; Rao, Sudha Narayan; Deodhar, Kedar; Mahantshetty, Umesh; Shrivastava, Shyam K.; Sivaraman, Karthikeyan; Mulherkar, Rita

    2016-01-01

    There are very few reports that describe the mutational landscape of cervical cancer, one of the leading cancers in Indian women. The aim of the present study was to investigate the somatic mutations that occur in cervical cancer. Whole exome sequencing of 10 treatment naïve tumour biopsies with matched blood samples, from a cohort of Indian patients with locally advanced disease, was performed. The data revealed missense mutations across 1282 genes, out of 1831 genes harbouring somatic mutations. These missense mutations (nonsynonymous + stop-gained) when compared with pre-existing mutations in the COSMIC database showed that 272 mutations in 250 genes were already reported although from cancers other than cervical cancer. More than 1000 novel somatic variations were obtained in matched tumour samples. Pathways / genes that are frequently mutated in various other cancers were found to be mutated in cervical cancers. A significant enrichment of somatic mutations in the MAPK pathway was observed, some of which could be potentially targetable. This is the first report of whole exome sequencing of well annotated cervical cancer samples from Indian women and helps identify trends in mutation profiles that are found in an Indian cohort of cervical cancer. PMID:27829003

  1. Teaching Tools to Engage Anishinaabek First Nations Women in Cervical Cancer Screening: Report of an Educational Workshop

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zehbe, Ingeborg; Wood, Brianne; Wakewich, Pamela; Maar, Marion; Escott, Nicholas; Jumah, Naana; Little, Julian

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To explore educational strategies for engaging First Nations women in Canada to attend cervical cancer screening. Design: Within a participatory action research framework, semi-structured interviews with health-care providers in First Nations communities revealed that education about the value of screening is perceived as being a key…

  2. The using of megavoltage computed tomography in image-guided brachytherapy for cervical cancer: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Janla-or, Suwapim; Wanwilairat, Somsak; Chakrabandhu, Somvilai; Klunklin, Pitchayaponne; Onchan, Wimrak; Supawongwattana, Bongkot; Galalae, Razvan M.; Chitapanarux, Imjai

    2015-01-01

    We present a case of cervical cancer treated by concurrent chemoradiation. In radiation therapy part, the combination of the whole pelvic helical tomotherapy plus image-guided brachytherapy with megavoltage computed tomography of helical tomotherapy was performed. We propose this therapeutic approach could be considered in a curative setting in some problematic situation as our institution. PMID:26157686

  3. Teaching Tools to Engage Anishinaabek First Nations Women in Cervical Cancer Screening: Report of an Educational Workshop

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zehbe, Ingeborg; Wood, Brianne; Wakewich, Pamela; Maar, Marion; Escott, Nicholas; Jumah, Naana; Little, Julian

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To explore educational strategies for engaging First Nations women in Canada to attend cervical cancer screening. Design: Within a participatory action research framework, semi-structured interviews with health-care providers in First Nations communities revealed that education about the value of screening is perceived as being a key…

  4. Internet-Based Cervical Cancer Screening Program

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-05-01

    AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH-04-C-0083 TITLE: Internet-Based Cervical Cancer Screening...DEC 2007 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Internet-Based Cervical Cancer Screening Program 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-04-C-0083 5c...care information systems, cervical cancer 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT 18. NUMBER OF PAGES 19a. NAME OF

  5. Condyloma acuminata induces focal intense FDG uptake mimicking vaginal stump recurrence from uterine cervical cancer: a case report.

    PubMed

    Kishimoto, T; Mabuchi, S; Kato, H; Kimura, T

    2013-01-01

    The 2-deoxy-2-[18F] fluoro-D-glucose position emission tomography/computed tomography (FDG PET/CT) findings of condyloma acuminata in a patient with FIGO Stage IB1 cervical cancer who had previously been treated with radical hysterectomy, pelvic chemoradiotherapy, and consolidation chemotherapy is described in this article. This case highlights the importance of considering condyloma acuminata during the differential diagnosis of abnormal vaginal FDG uptake in patients who have been treated for gynecological cancer.

  6. Palliative care in cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Suhatno

    2000-05-01

    1. Cervical cancer is the most frequent cancer in females and also the most frequent among female genital cancers. 2. Ever though the modality of diagnostic procedures for early detection has improved, in fact most of the patients present in the late stages, so the disease is already incurable, and palliative care is really needed. 3. Palliative care is needed not only for the terminally ill patients, but can be started at the time the cancer is diagnosed. 4. Palliative care is a multidisciplinary approach requiring teamwork. 5. Palliative care in Indonesia, especially in Dr. Soetomo Hospital, is a new modality in the fight against cancer, so we suffer many disadvantages, e.g., disability, limitation, lack of experience. However, such problems will stimulate the team to learn more.

  7. Nanotechnology in the management of cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jiezhong; Gu, Wenyi; Yang, Lei; Chen, Chen; Shao, Renfu; Xu, Kewei; Xu, Zhi Ping

    2015-03-01

    Cervical cancer is a major disease with high mortality. All cervical cancers are caused by infection with human papillomaviruses (HPV). Although preventive vaccines for cervical cancer are successful, treatment of cervical cancer is far less satisfactory because of multidrug resistance and side effects. In this review, we summarize the recent application of nanotechnology to the diagnosis and treatment of cervical cancer as well as the development of HPV vaccines. Early detection of cervical cancer enables tumours to be efficiently removed by surgical procedures, leading to increased survival rate. The current method of detecting cervical cancer by Pap smear can only achieve 50% sensitivity, whereas nanotechnology has been used to detect HPVs with greatly improved sensitivity. In cervical cancer treatment, nanotechnology has been used for the delivery of anticancer drugs to increase treatment efficacy and decrease side effects. Nanodelivery of HPV preventive and therapeutic vaccines has also been investigated to increase vaccine efficacy. Overall, these developments suggest that nanoparticle-based vaccine may become the most effective way to prevent and treat cervical cancer, assisted or combined with some other nanotechnology-based therapy.

  8. Prevent Cervical Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Statistics Rates by Race and Ethnicity Rates by State Trends Related Links Ovarian Cancer Basic Information What Are the Risk Factors? What Can ... Statistics Rates by Race and Ethnicity Rates by State Trends Related Links Uterine Cancer Basic Information What Are the Risk Factors? What Can ...

  9. [Therapy of recurrent cervical cancer].

    PubMed

    Sekiba, K; Hayase, R

    1990-09-01

    1,122 uterine cancer patients above FIGO stage I a were treated at our hospital in the decade from 1980 to 1989. Total 69 patients diagnosed as recurrent cervical cancer had 82 lesions in 11 sites. The most frequent recurrent sites were uterus, vaginal stump and vaginal wall; the second sites were parametrium and pelvic wall. Radiotherapy and hyperthermia were done to patients with these lesions. Chemotherapy and radiotherapy were used to patients with distant metastatic lesions to left supraclavicular lymph nodes and lung. But there has been no good results.

  10. Mapping HPV Vaccination and Cervical Cancer Screening Practice in the Pacific Region-Strengthening National and Regional Cervical Cancer Prevention.

    PubMed

    Obel, J; McKenzie, J; Buenconsejo-Lum, L E; Durand, A M; Ekeroma, A; Souares, Y; Hoy, D; Baravilala, W; Garland, S M; Kjaer, S K; Roth, A

    2015-01-01

    To provide background information for strengthening cervical cancer prevention in the Pacific by mapping current human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination and cervical cancer screening practices, as well as intent and barriers to the introduction and maintenance of national HPV vaccination programmes in the region. A cross-sectional questionnaire-based survey among ministry of health officials from 21 Pacific Island countries and territories (n=21). Cervical cancer prevention was rated as highly important, but implementation of prevention programs were insufficient, with only two of 21 countries and territories having achieved coverage of cervical cancer screening above 40%. Ten of 21 countries and territories had included HPV vaccination in their immunization schedule, but only two countries reported coverage of HPV vaccination above 60% among the targeted population. Key barriers to the introduction and continuation of HPV vaccination were reported to be: (i) Lack of sustainable financing for HPV vaccine programs; (ii) Lack of visible government endorsement; (iii) Critical public perception of the value and safety of the HPV vaccine; and (iv) Lack of clear guidelines and policies for HPV vaccination. Current practices to prevent cervical cancer in the Pacific Region do not match the high burden of disease from cervical cancer. A regional approach, including reducing vaccine prices by bulk purchase of vaccine, technical support for implementation of prevention programs, operational research and advocacy could strengthen political momentum for cervical cancer prevention and avoid risking the lives of many women in the Pacific.

  11. Epidemiology of cervical cancer in Latin America

    PubMed Central

    Capote Negrin, Luis G

    2015-01-01

    The basic aspects of the descriptive epidemiology of cervical cancer in Latin America are presented. A decrease in the incidence and mortality rates has been observed in the period from 2000 to 2012 in all countries across the region, this has not occurred at the same proportions, and in many countries, observed figures of incidence and mortality are among the highest levels in the world. In Latin America, calculating a mean measure of the numbers from the GLOBOCAN data from 2000 to 2012, we can observe a difference of up to fivefold of the incidence (Puerto Rico 9,73 Vs Bolivia 50,73) and almost seven times for mortality (Puerto Rico 3,3 Vs Nicaragua 21,67). A report of the epidemiology, risk factors, and evaluation of screening procedures regarding the possible impact of the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine I in the prevention of cervical cancer is presented. PMID:26557875

  12. Prevalence and risk factors for cervical neoplasia: a cervical cancer screening program in Beijing.

    PubMed

    Tao, Lixin; Han, Lili; Li, Xia; Gao, Qi; Pan, Lei; Wu, Lijuan; Luo, Yanxia; Wang, Wei; Zheng, Zihe; Guo, Xiuhua

    2014-11-19

    Cervical cancer is the second most common cancer and cause of cancer-related death for women worldwide. The aims of this study were to investigate the prevalence of cervical neoplasia and examine factors associated with high-grade cervical squamous intraepithelial lesions (HSIL) among women taking part in a cervical cancer screening program in Beijing. Women aged 25-65 years were screened using the ThinPrep cytologic test and gynecologic examination. Univariate and multivariate logistic regressions were conducted to investigate factors associated with HSIL. Among 728,704 women screened, the prevalence of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) I, II, III was 50.2, 34.0, and 36.4 per 100,000, respectively. Prevalence of cervical cancer was 12.2 per 100,000. Risk factors for HSIL included being in age group of 46-55 years (adjusted odds ratio [aOR] = 1.15, 95% CI: 1.07-1.44, compared with the 25-35 age group), bleeding after intercourse (aOR = 2.08, 95% CI: 1.40-3.10), and presence of trichomonas vaginalis infection (aOR = 2.62, 95% CI: 1.35-5.07), cervical inflammation (aOR = 4.22, 95% CI: 3.39-5.26), and genital warts (aOR = 3.89, 95% CI: 2.54-7.70). High education level (college and above compared with junior middle school or lower) was found to be protective (aOR = 0.79, 95% CI: 0.37-0.90). The prevalence of cervical neoplasia is relatively high in Beijing. Women aged 46-55 years, those with a lower education level, those reporting bleeding after intercourse, and those affected by Trichomonas vaginalis infection, cervical inflammation and genital warts are at higher risk for HSIL. Particular efforts should be made to ensure these women are included in cervical cancer screening programs.

  13. CT of the normal and abnormal parametria in cervical cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Vick, C.W.; Walsh, J.W.; Wheelock, J.B.; Brewer, W.H.

    1984-09-01

    To evaluate CT criteria for differentiating a cervical cancer confined to the cervix from a lesion that invades the parametria, 16 patients with newly diagnosed, untreated cervical cancer were studied with CT. Twenty-five parameria were confined by radical hysterectomy, transvaginal parametrial fine-needle aspiration cytology, or excretory urography. In 17 tumor-positive parametria, CT findings associated with parametrial tumor invasion were: 1) irregularity or poor definition of the lateral cervical margins; 2) prominent parametrial soft-tissue strands; 3) obliteration of the periureteral fat plane; and 4) an eccentric parametrial soft-tissue mass. Irregularity of the cervical margins and prominent parametrial strands were seen most commonly with parametrial tumor invasion, but were also occasionally seen with parametrial inflammation. On the basis of the criteria developed in this report, CT may be used as an adjunct to the physical examination in differentiating stage I cervical cancer from more advanced disease in selected patients.

  14. Teaching tools to engage Anishinaabek First Nations women in cervical cancer screening: Report of an educational workshop

    PubMed Central

    Zehbe, Ingeborg; Wood, Brianne; Wakewich, Pamela; Maar, Marion; Escott, Nicholas; Jumah, Naana; Little, Julian

    2016-01-01

    Objective To explore educational strategies for engaging First Nations women in Canada to attend cervical cancer screening. Design Within a participatory action research framework, semi-structured interviews with health-care providers in First Nations communities revealed that education about the value of screening is perceived as being a key factor to promote cervical cancer screening. Setting To obtain feedback from workshop informants, a 1-day educational workshop was held to identify appropriate educational intervention strategies, which would be applied in a forthcoming randomised controlled cervical screening trial. Methods Common discussion and discussion groups, which were facilitated by a First Nations workshop moderator and a note taker. Results This workshop helped to strengthen the ethical space dialogue with the First Nations communities with whom the study team had established research partnerships. The workshop atmosphere was relaxed and the invited informants decided that an educational health promotion event for community women needed to be held prior to inviting them to the cervical screening trial. Such an event would provide an opportunity to communicate the importance of attending regular cervical screening allowing women to make informed decisions about screening participation. Complementary promotional items, including an eye-catching pamphlet and storytelling, were also suggested. Conclusion The key messages from the events and promotional items can help to destigmatise women who develop a type of cancer that is caused by a sexually transmitted virus that affects both men and women. Developing and implementing positive health education that respectfully depicts female bodies, sexuality and health behaviours through a First Nations lens is strongly warranted. PMID:27867211

  15. Improving the effectiveness of cervical cancer screening

    PubMed Central

    Ellman, Ruth; Chamberlain, Jocelyn

    1984-01-01

    A review of 100 cases of invasive cervical cancer was designed to assess what changes in cervical screening services might be most effective in reducing mortality. In 68 cases there had apparently never been screening: no system of individual invitation existed for unscreened women. In 10 cases the last smear was reported as normal over five years earlier: a five-year recall system existed but was inefficient. In 13 cases suspicious cervical smear reports had not been followed up adequately. Two cases might have been diagnosed earlier, in spite of `normal or inflammatory' smears, if the symptoms had been fully elicited. For the remaining seven cases one or more smear was reported as normal within five years of diagnosis of invasive cancer. Overall, 15 cases might have been picked up earlier if suitable opportunities for screening which did arise had been exploited. It was concluded that a substantial proportion of these 100 women might have received treatment at an earlier stage solely by the rigorous implementation of the present screening policy. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2. PMID:6492026

  16. Cervical cancer in India and HPV vaccination.

    PubMed

    Kaarthigeyan, K

    2012-01-01

    Cervical cancer, mainly caused by Human Papillomavirus infection, is the leading cancer in Indian women and the second most common cancer in women worldwide. Though there are several methods of prevention of cervical cancer, prevention by vaccination is emerging as the most effective option, with the availability of two vaccines. Several studies have been published examining the vaccine's efficacy, immunogenicity and safety. Questions and controversy remain regarding mandatory vaccination, need for booster doses and cost-effectiveness, particularly in the Indian context.

  17. Oral contraceptives, human papillomavirus and cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    La Vecchia, Carlo; Boccia, Stefania

    2014-03-01

    Oncogenic human papillomavirus is the key determinant of cervical cancer, but other risk factors interact with it to define individual risk. Among these, there is oral contraceptive (OC) use. A quantitative review of the link between OCs and cervical cancer was performed. Long-term (>5 year) current or recent OC use has been related to an about two-fold excess risk of cervical cancer. Such an excess risk, however, levels off after stopping use, and approaches unity 10 or more years after stopping. The public health implications of OC use for cervical cancer are limited. In any case, such implications are greater in middle-income and low-income countries, as well as in central and eastern Europe and Latin America, where cervical cancer screening and control remain inadequate.

  18. Prospects for cervical cancer vaccines.

    PubMed

    Crawford, L

    1993-01-01

    As we have seen, the technical problems of developing cheap, effective vaccines against HPV associated tumours are formidable, but they are by no means insuperable. Experiments in cows with BPV2 show that both therapeutic and prophylactic vaccines work to some extent and the immunogens used are by no means the best that could now be envisaged. The fact that human trials are now under consideration or in progress with both protein vaccines and recombinant vaccinia virus vectors is also very encouraging. There are still both practical and ethical problems, as with any sexually transmitted disease, but the main problem is one of support. Pharmaceutical companies see no immediate profit in vaccines of this type, preferring to invest in drugs for treatment or diagnostic kits for detection. Vaccines against HPV are unlikely to be forthcoming, and indeed, the people most in need of protection against cervical cancer are the least able to afford any sort of treatment, especially a preventive one. This leaves the cancer charities, and these in their present financial difficulties are understandably reluctant to commit substantial resources to the long term programmes that are needed to tackle the problems of developing and evaluating candidate vaccines. It seems certain that intervention against HPV and cervical cancer will come in time, but with the present level of commitment, progress is inevitably going to be less rapid than one would like.

  19. Estrogen and ERα: Culprits in Cervical Cancer?

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Sang-Hyuk; Franceschi, Silvia; Lambert, Paul F.

    2010-01-01

    Estrogen and its receptors are implicated in the promotion and prevention of various cancers. While the uterine cervix is highly responsive to estrogen, the role of estrogen in cervical cancer, which is strongly associated with human papillomavirus (HPV) infections, is poorly understood. Recent studies in HPV transgenic mouse models provide evidence that estrogen and its nuclear receptor promote cervical cancer in combination with HPV oncogenes. While epidemiological studies further support this hypothesis, there is little experimental data assessing the hormonal responsiveness of human cervical cancers. If these cancers are dependent upon estrogen, then drugs targeting estrogen and its receptors may be effective in treating and/or preventing cervical cancer, the second leading cause of death by cancer amongst women worldwide. PMID:20456973

  20. Cervical cancer: is vaccination necessary in India?

    PubMed

    Farhath, Seema; Vijaya, P P; Mumtaj, P

    2013-01-01

    In India, cervical cancer is the most common woman-related cancer, followed by breast cancer. The rate of cervical cancer in India is fourth worldwide. Two vaccines, Gardasil and Cervarix, both targeting HPV-16 and 18 which account for 70% of invasive cervical carcinomas, are licensed in the United States and numerous countries worldwide. Both vaccine formulations have shown excellent efficacy with minimal toxicity in active female population but numerous questions arise in vaccinating like cost effectiveness, lack of proven efficacy against other HPV strains, social acceptance of HPV vaccination and other ethical issues. The main objective of this study is to emphasis the advantages and disadvantages of the vaccination in India.

  1. [Chemoradiotherapy for locally advanced cervical cancer].

    PubMed

    Bazaeva, I Ia; Gorbunova, V A; Kravets, O A; Khokhlova, S V; Limareva, S V; Panov, V O; Strel'tsova, O N; Tarachkova, E V

    2014-01-01

    Cervical cancer takes second place in morbidity and third place in mortality from gynecological cancer. Advanced stages among newly diagnosed cases is still large. The "gold standard" of treatment for locally advanced cervical cancer is chemoradiotherapy with cisplatin that results in a lower risk of death. Improvement of radiotherapy methods allowed to bring optimal dose to the primary tumor with the inclusion of regional metastasis areas with less risk of damage to surrounding healthy tissue and organs. The search for alternative combinations of cytostatics, modes of drug administration, adjuvant chemotherapy after chemoradiotherapy showed an increase in survival of patients with locally advanced cervical cancer.

  2. Integrated genomic and molecular characterization of cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    2017-03-16

    Cervical cancer remains one of the leading causes of cancer-related deaths worldwide. Here we report the extensive molecular characterization of 228 primary cervical cancers, one of the largest comprehensive genomic studies of cervical cancer to date. We observed notable APOBEC mutagenesis patterns and identified SHKBP1, ERBB3, CASP8, HLA-A and TGFBR2 as novel significantly mutated genes in cervical cancer. We also discovered amplifications in immune targets CD274 (also known as PD-L1) and PDCD1LG2 (also known as PD-L2), and the BCAR4 long non-coding RNA, which has been associated with response to lapatinib. Integration of human papilloma virus (HPV) was observed in all HPV18-related samples and 76% of HPV16-related samples, and was associated with structural aberrations and increased target-gene expression. We identified a unique set of endometrial-like cervical cancers, comprised predominantly of HPV-negative tumours with relatively high frequencies of KRAS, ARID1A and PTEN mutations. Integrative clustering of 178 samples identified keratin-low squamous, keratin-high squamous and adenocarcinoma-rich subgroups. These molecular analyses reveal new potential therapeutic targets for cervical cancers.

  3. Burden of invasive cervical cancer in North Carolina.

    PubMed

    Denslow, Sheri A; Knop, Gabriel; Klaus, Christian; Brewer, Noel T; Rao, Chandrika; Smith, Jennifer S

    2012-01-01

    Cervical cancer causes over 4000 deaths yearly in the United States, although highly preventable through vaccination, screening, and early treatment. We aimed to determine demographic correlates for cervical cancer in North Carolina to identify target populations for interventions and to create a framework for state-level analyses. Data on all reported invasive cervical cancer cases from 1998 to 2007 were obtained from the North Carolina Central Cancer Registry. Age-adjusted incidence and mortality rates were estimated using population data from the National Center for Health Statistics. Cervical cancer incidence and mortality rates varied greatly by county and were inversely associated with county prosperity. Hispanic women had the highest incidence rate, black women the highest mortality rate, although white women accounted for most cases. Incidence rates remained fairly steady above age 35 and mortality rates steadily increased with age. A later stage at diagnosis was more common for older women and for women without private insurance. Registry-based assessment illustrates the economic, racial, and age disparities associated with cervical cancer. This localized focus on demographic correlates is an important step toward eliminating this preventable disease and offers a template for cervical cancer prevention programs in other states. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Network Topologies Decoding Cervical Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Jalan, Sarika; Kanhaiya, Krishna; Rai, Aparna; Bandapalli, Obul Reddy; Yadav, Alok

    2015-01-01

    According to the GLOBOCAN statistics, cervical cancer is one of the leading causes of death among women worldwide. It is found to be gradually increasing in the younger population, specifically in the developing countries. We analyzed the protein-protein interaction networks of the uterine cervix cells for the normal and disease states. It was found that the disease network was less random than the normal one, providing an insight into the change in complexity of the underlying network in disease state. The study also portrayed that, the disease state has faster signal processing as the diameter of the underlying network was very close to its corresponding random control. This may be a reason for the normal cells to change into malignant state. Further, the analysis revealed VEGFA and IL-6 proteins as the distinctly high degree nodes in the disease network, which are known to manifest a major contribution in promoting cervical cancer. Our analysis, being time proficient and cost effective, provides a direction for developing novel drugs, therapeutic targets and biomarkers by identifying specific interaction patterns, that have structural importance. PMID:26308848

  5. Recommendations for cervical cancer prevention in Asia Pacific.

    PubMed

    Garland, Suzanne M; Cuzick, Jack; Domingo, Efren J; Goldie, Sue J; Kim, Young-Tak; Konno, Ryo; Parkin, D Maxwell; Qiao, You-Lin; Sankaranarayanan, Rengaswamy; Stern, Peter L; Tay, Sun Kuie; Bosch, F Xavier

    2008-08-19

    Asia Oceania includes countries from both the Asia Pacific region and Australasia, which cover very diverse geographical areas and populations as well as bearing 52% of the cervical cancer burden in the world. Human papillomavirus (HPV) genotype distribution in women with normal cytology varies between countries in this region, as well as with the distribution typically observed in worldwide estimates or in Western countries. HPV-16 remains the predominant oncogenic type for high-grade cervical dysplasia and cervical cancer across the region, and HPV-18 is generally among the five most common types. HPV-58 is commonly found in cervical cancer as well as in women with normal cytology, and HPV-31, 33 and 35 are relatively less frequent in these regions compared to the West. While screening programmes have been proposed and implemented in several populations, successful programmes are rather limited and the majority of countries still have no or minimal screening services. Prophylactic HPV vaccination will only be feasible when it becomes affordable, thus the current priority and the short-term goal for cervical cancer control is to identify feasible and effective screening measures, and to find the most effective way to combine vaccination with sustainable screening programmes. This Regional Report has carefully described the disease burden of HPV and cervical cancer and the current situations in cervical cancer prevention for many countries in the Asia Oceania region. These data identify the many challenges and opportunities to be considered for policy decisions for cervical cancer control. Furthermore, this report presents the results of advanced decision analytic models calibrated to countries in the region that provide early insight into what strategies are most promising and those likely to be cost-effective and affordable. It thus provides a synthesis of the available evidence-based scientific information, in the context of a significant and systematic

  6. Triapine With Chemotherapy and Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients With IB2-IVA Cervical or Vulvar Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-09-12

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma, Not Otherwise Specified; Stage IB Vulvar Cancer; Stage IB2 Cervical Cancer; Stage II Vulvar Cancer; Stage IIA1 Cervical Cancer; Stage IIA2 Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIA Vulvar Cancer; Stage IIIB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIB Vulvar Cancer; Stage IIIC Vulvar Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Vulvar Cancer; Vulvar Adenocarcinoma; Vulvar Squamous Cell Carcinoma

  7. Colposcopy and High Resolution Anoscopy in Screening For Anal Dysplasia in Patients With Cervical, Vaginal, or Vulvar Dysplasia or Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2012-06-08

    Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia Grade 1; Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia Grade 2; Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia Grade 3; Recurrent Cervical Cancer; Recurrent Vaginal Cancer; Recurrent Vulvar Cancer; Stage 0 Cervical Cancer; Stage 0 Vaginal Cancer; Stage 0 Vulvar Cancer; Stage I Vaginal Cancer; Stage I Vulvar Cancer; Stage IA Cervical Cancer; Stage IB Cervical Cancer; Stage II Vaginal Cancer; Stage II Vulvar Cancer; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage III Cervical Cancer; Stage III Vaginal Cancer; Stage III Vulvar Cancer; Stage IV Vulvar Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Vaginal Cancer; Stage IVB Cervical Cancer; Stage IVB Vaginal Cancer

  8. Human papillomavirus genotype distribution in cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 2/3 and invasive cervical cancer in Japanese women.

    PubMed

    Azuma, Yukari; Kusumoto-Matsuo, Rika; Takeuchi, Fumihiko; Uenoyama, Asami; Kondo, Kazunari; Tsunoda, Hajime; Nagasaka, Kazunori; Kawana, Kei; Morisada, Tohru; Iwata, Takashi; Aoki, Daisuke; Kukimoto, Iwao

    2014-10-01

    Human papillomavirus vaccines are being introduced worldwide and are expected to reduce the incidence of cervical cancer. Here we report a cross-sectional study using a validated human papillomavirus genotyping method to reveal the human papillomavirus prevalence and genotype distribution in Japanese women with cervical intraepithelial neoplasia Grade 2/3 and invasive cervical cancer. Cervical exfoliated cells were collected from 647 patients with abnormal cervical histology (cervical intraepithelial neoplasia Grade 2, n = 164; cervical intraepithelial neoplasia Grade 3, n = 334; and invasive cervical cancer, n = 149), and subjected to the PGMY-PCR-based genotyping assay. The association between human papillomavirus infection and lesion severity was calculated using a prevalence ratio. Overall, the prevalence of human papillomavirus deoxyribonucleic acid was 96.3% in cervical intraepithelial neoplasia Grade 2, 98.8% in cervical intraepithelial neoplasia Grade 3 and 88.0% in invasive cervical cancer (97.8% in squamous cell carcinoma and 71.4% in adenocarcinoma). The three most prevalent types were as follows: human papillomavirus 16 (29.3%), human papillomavirus 52 (27.4%) and human papillomavirus 58 (22.0%) in cervical intraepithelial neoplasia Grade 2; human papillomavirus 16 (44.9%), human papillomavirus 52 (26.0%) and human papillomavirus 58 (17.4%) in cervical intraepithelial neoplasia Grade 3; and human papillomavirus 16 (47.7%), human papillomavirus 18 (23.5%) and human papillomavirus 52 (8.7%) in invasive cervical cancer. The prevalence ratio of human papillomavirus 16 was significantly higher in cervical intraepithelial neoplasia Grade 3 compared with cervical intraepithelial neoplasia Grade 2 (prevalence ratio, 1.62; 95% confidence interval, 1.26-2.13) and in squamous cell carcinoma compared with cervical intraepithelial neoplasia Grade 3 (prevalence ratio, 1.55; 95% confidence interval, 1.25-1.87). Multiple infections decreased from cervical

  9. Epidemiology and Early Detection of Cervical Cancer.

    PubMed

    Hillemanns, Peter; Soergel, Phillip; Hertel, Hermann; Jentschke, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    The new German S3 guideline 'Prevention of Cervical Cancer' published in 2016 is based on the latest available evidence about cervical cancer screening and treatment of cervical precancer. Large randomized controlled trials indicate that human papillomavirus (HPV)-based screening may provide better protection against cervical cancer than cytology alone through improved detection of premalignant disease in the first screening round prior to progression. Therefore, women aged 30 years and older should preferably be screened with HPV testing every 3-5 years (cytology alone every 2 years is an acceptable alternative). Co-testing is not recommended. Screening should start at 25 years using cytology alone every 2 years. The preferred triage test after a positive HPV screening test is cytology. Women positive for HPV 16 and HPV 18 should receive immediate colposcopy. Another alternative triage method is p16/Ki-67 dual stain cytology. The mean yearly participation rate in Germany is between 45 and 50%. Offering devices for HPV self-sampling has the potential to increase participation rates in those women who are at higher risk of developing cervical cancer. Regarding primary prevention, the 9-valent vaccine may provide protection against up to 85% of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) 3 and 90% of cervical cancer, and is available in Europe as a 2-dose schedule from May 2016. © 2016 S. Karger GmbH, Freiburg.

  10. Cervical cancer: screening and therapeutic perspectives.

    PubMed

    Sankaranarayanan, Rengaswamy; Thara, Somanathan; Esmy, Pulikottil Okkuru; Basu, Partha

    2008-01-01

    Cervical cancer is a major cause of mortality and premature death among women in their most productive years in low- and medium-resourced countries in Asia, Africa and Latin America, despite the fact that it is an eminently preventable cancer. While cytology screening programmes have resulted in a substantial reduction of cervical cancer mortality in developed countries, they have been shown to have a wide range of sensitivity in most routine settings including in developing countries. Although liquid-based cytology improves sample adequacy, claims on improved sensitivity remain controversial. Human papillomavirus testing is more sensitive than cytology, but whether this gain represents protection against future cervical cancer is not clear. Recently, in a randomized trial, the use of visual inspection with 4% acetic acid was shown to reduce cervical cancer incidence and mortality. Cryotherapy and large loop excision of the transformation zone are effective and safe treatment methods for cervical intraepithelial neoplasia. The clinical stage of cancer is the single most important prognostic factor and should be carefully evaluated in choosing optimal treatment between surgery and radiotherapy, with or without chemotherapy. At the public health level, health care infrastructure, affordability and capacity for initiating and sustaining vaccination and screening programmes are critical factors in cervical cancer control. On the other hand, an informed practitioner can utilize the multiple opportunities in routine primary care interactions for prevention, screening, early detection and prompt referral for treatment.

  11. New Guidelines for Cervical Cancer Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... without any treatment. If you have had a hysterectomy , you still may need to have cervical cancer ... to have screening tests depends on why your hysterectomy was needed, whether your cervix was removed, and ...

  12. NIH Research Leads to Cervical Cancer Vaccine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Transmitted Diseases NIH Research Leads to Cervical Cancer Vaccine Past Issues / Fall 2008 Table of Contents For ... Douglas Lowy (left) and John Schiller developed the vaccine to prevent HPV infection in women, the cause ...

  13. Ezrin contributes to cervical cancer progression through induction of epithelial-mesenchymal transition.

    PubMed

    Kong, Jienan; Di, Chunchan; Piao, Junjie; Sun, Jie; Han, Longzhe; Chen, Liyan; Yan, Guanghai; Lin, Zhenhua

    2016-04-12

    Cervical cancer is the third most common cancer in females worldwide. The treatment options for advanced cervical cancer are limited, leading to high mortality. Ezrin is a membrane-cytoskeleton-binding protein recently reported to act as a tumor promoter, and we previously indicated that the aberrant localization and overexpression of Ezrin could be an independent effective biomarker for prognostic evaluation of cervical cancers. In this study, we identified Ezrin as a regulator of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and metastasis in cervical cancer. Ezrin knock-down inhibited anchorage-independent growth, cell migration, and invasion of cervical cancer cell lines in vitro and in vivo. EMT was inhibited in Ezrin-depleted cells, with up-regulation of E-cadherin and Cytokeratin-18 (CK-18) and down-regulation of mesenchymal markers. Ezrin knock-down also induced Akt phosphorylation. These results implicate Ezrin as an EMT regulator and tumor promoter in cervical cancer, and down-regulation of Ezrin suppressed cervical cancer progression, possibly via the phosphoinositide 3-kinase/Akt pathway. Furthermore, the expression pattern of Ezrin protein was closely related with the lymphovascular invasion status of cervical cancer by immunohistochemistry, and the survival analysis revealed that the cervical cancer patients with the perinuclear Ezrin expression pattern had longer survival time than those with the cytoplasmic Ezrin expression pattern. Ezrin thus represents a promising target for the development of novel and effective strategies aimed at preventing the progression of cervical cancer.

  14. Cervical Cancer Stigma in Rural Kenya: What Does HIV Have to Do with It?

    PubMed

    Rosser, Joelle I; Njoroge, Betty; Huchko, Megan J

    2016-06-01

    Cervical cancer is a leading cause of cancer-related death amongst women in sub-Saharan Africa, largely due to the lack of early screening and treatment. In addition to poor access to screening services, inadequate uptake of available services is a barrier to early identification of precancerous lesions. Given that cervical cancer is caused by a sexually transmitted virus and is associated with HIV positivity, stigma is one of the potential barriers to the utilization of cervical cancer programs in sub-Saharan Africa. We conducted a cross-sectional survey of 419 women attending health facilities in rural western Kenya to measure levels of cervical cancer and HIV stigma and to measure the associations between cervical cancer stigma, HIV stigma, and HIV status. Women who qualified for cervical cancer screening were asked to complete an oral questionnaire using a modified 9-point HIV stigma scale. Low cervical cancer stigma was reported in this study, with only 85/419 (20.3 %) of respondents answering yes to at least one cervical cancer stigma question. However, cervical cancer stigma was highly correlated with HIV stigma (correlation coefficient 0.72) and was significantly lower in HIV-positive women (p < 0.001). Reducing cervical cancer stigma in the general population is an important part of promoting screening in sub-Saharan Africa.

  15. Nuclear expression of Rac1 in cervical premalignant lesions and cervical cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Abnormal expression of Rho-GTPases has been reported in several human cancers. However, the expression of these proteins in cervical cancer has been poorly investigated. In this study we analyzed the expression of the GTPases Rac1, RhoA, Cdc42, and the Rho-GEFs, Tiam1 and beta-Pix, in cervical pre-malignant lesions and cervical cancer cell lines. Methods Protein expression was analyzed by immunochemistry on 102 cervical paraffin-embedded biopsies: 20 without Squamous Intraepithelial Lesions (SIL), 51 Low- grade SIL, and 31 High-grade SIL; and in cervical cancer cell lines C33A and SiHa, and non-tumorigenic HaCat cells. Nuclear localization of Rac1 in HaCat, C33A and SiHa cells was assessed by cellular fractionation and Western blotting, in the presence or not of a chemical Rac1 inhibitor (NSC23766). Results Immunoreacivity for Rac1, RhoA, Tiam1 and beta-Pix was stronger in L-SIL and H-SIL, compared to samples without SIL, and it was significantly associated with the histological diagnosis. Nuclear expression of Rac1 was observed in 52.9% L-SIL and 48.4% H-SIL, but not in samples without SIL. Rac1 was found in the nucleus of C33A and SiHa cells but not in HaCat cells. Chemical inhibition of Rac1 resulted in reduced cell proliferation in HaCat, C33A and SiHa cells. Conclusion Rac1 is expressed in the nucleus of epithelial cells in SILs and cervical cancer cell lines, and chemical inhibition of Rac1 reduces cellular proliferation. Further studies are needed to better understand the role of Rho-GTPases in cervical cancer progression. PMID:22443139

  16. Epidemiology of cervical cancer with special focus on India.

    PubMed

    Sreedevi, Aswathy; Javed, Reshma; Dinesh, Avani

    2015-01-01

    Cervical cancer is on the declining trend in India according to the population-based registries; yet it continues to be a major public health problem for women in India. Multifactorial causation, potential for prevention, and the sheer threat it poses make cervical cancer an important disease for in-depth studies, as has been attempted by this paper. This paper attempts to review the available knowledge regarding the epidemiology and pattern of cervical cancer; types of HPV (human papilloma virus) prevalent among cervical cancer patients and among women in general, high-risk groups such as commercial sex workers, and HIV (human immunodeficiency virus)-positive women; and the role of the national program on cancer in control efforts. The peak age of incidence of cervical cancer is 55-59 years, and a considerable proportion of women report in the late stages of disease. Specific types of oncogenic HPV-16, 18 have been identified in patients with cervical cancer. Other epidemiological risk factors are early age at marriage, multiple sexual partners, multiple pregnancies, poor genital hygiene, malnutrition, use of oral contraceptives, and lack of awareness. A multipronged approach is necessary which can target areas of high prevalence identified by registries with a combination of behavior change communication exercises and routine early screening with VIA. Sensitizing the people of the area, including menfolk, is necessary to increase uptake levels. Vaccination against types 16 and 18 can also be undertaken after taking into confidence all stakeholders, including the parents of adolescent girls. Preventing and treating cervical cancer and reducing the burden are possible by targeting resources to the areas with high prevalence.

  17. Epidemiology of cervical cancer with special focus on India

    PubMed Central

    Sreedevi, Aswathy; Javed, Reshma; Dinesh, Avani

    2015-01-01

    Cervical cancer is on the declining trend in India according to the population-based registries; yet it continues to be a major public health problem for women in India. Multifactorial causation, potential for prevention, and the sheer threat it poses make cervical cancer an important disease for in-depth studies, as has been attempted by this paper. This paper attempts to review the available knowledge regarding the epidemiology and pattern of cervical cancer; types of HPV (human papilloma virus) prevalent among cervical cancer patients and among women in general, high-risk groups such as commercial sex workers, and HIV (human immunodeficiency virus)-positive women; and the role of the national program on cancer in control efforts. The peak age of incidence of cervical cancer is 55–59 years, and a considerable proportion of women report in the late stages of disease. Specific types of oncogenic HPV-16, 18 have been identified in patients with cervical cancer. Other epidemiological risk factors are early age at marriage, multiple sexual partners, multiple pregnancies, poor genital hygiene, malnutrition, use of oral contraceptives, and lack of awareness. A multipronged approach is necessary which can target areas of high prevalence identified by registries with a combination of behavior change communication exercises and routine early screening with VIA. Sensitizing the people of the area, including menfolk, is necessary to increase uptake levels. Vaccination against types 16 and 18 can also be undertaken after taking into confidence all stakeholders, including the parents of adolescent girls. Preventing and treating cervical cancer and reducing the burden are possible by targeting resources to the areas with high prevalence. PMID:25931830

  18. Chemoradiation Therapy and Ipilimumab in Treating Patients With Stages IB2-IIB or IIIB-IVA Cervical Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-09-28

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma, Not Otherwise Specified; Positive Para-Aortic Lymph Node; Positive Pelvic Lymph Node; Stage IB2 Cervical Cancer; Stage II Cervical Cancer; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIB Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer

  19. Simple trachelectomy during pregnancy for cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    Moreno-Luna, Estefania; Alonso, Patricia; Santiago, Javier De; Zapardiel, Ignacio

    2016-01-01

    Invasive cervical cancer is rare during a pregnancy, even though it is one of the most frequently diagnosed neoplasias during that time. It is noted that around 30% of women diagnosed with cervical cancer are of reproductive age. This means that up to 3% of cases of cervical cancer are found in pregnant women or those who are in the post-birth period. A cervicovaginal Pap smear is performed as part of the regular checkup for a pregnant woman during the first visit so that cervical cancer can easily be diagnosed early in these women, detecting it early in up to 70–80% of cases. We present here the case of a patient with initial diagnosis of cervical cancer made around 20th week of pregnancy. It was then treated by a simple trachelectomy and cerclage during week 24. The pregnant woman gave birth to a healthy baby at the end of her pregnancy. Definitive treatment was completed three months after giving birth with a total hysterectomy and laparoscopic bilateral salpingectomy while preserving both ovaries. After 17 months of monitoring the patient showed no signs of reoccurrence. In conclusion, during the early stage of cervical cancer conservative management may be a reasonable option to preserve the current pregnancy. PMID:27610199

  20. Breast and cervical cancer screening: exploring perceptions and barriers with Hmong women and men in Oregon.

    PubMed

    Kue, Jennifer; Zukoski, Ann; Keon, Karen Levy; Thorburn, Sheryl

    2014-06-01

    Hmong women are reported to have very low rates of breast and cervical cancer screening compared to other Asian and White women in the USA. Reasons for low cancer screening rates among this population are not well understood. This qualitative study (n=83) explored Hmong women and men's perceptions of breast and cervical cancer and cancer screening, women's experiences with breast and cervical cancer screening, and health care system barriers to screening. Hmong women and men perceived breast cancer to be more severe than other types of cancers. Participants believed that breast cancer is curable if detected early. Cervical cancer was not well understood and was of greater concern than breast cancer because of its location within the body and its consequences for reproduction. In general, few participants had personal experiences with breast and/or cervical cancer. Overall, women and men had positive things to say about screenings for breast and cervical cancer, expressing that screenings offered a 'proof of illness.' The majority of women did not report any concerns with the exams themselves, although some discussed embarrassment, pain, and discomfort. Barriers to screening included lack of health insurance, making co-payments, language, and issues related to scheduling appointments. Barriers differed for younger and older women. Results of this study provide new insight into perceptions, experiences, and barriers to breast and cervical cancer screening among Hmong women and men. These findings have implications for developing culturally appropriate interventions to increase breast and cervical cancer screening in this population.

  1. Evaluation of the association between perineural invasion and clinical and histopathological features of cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Wei, You-Sheng; Yao, De-Sheng; Long, Ying

    2016-09-01

    Perineural invasion (PNI) has been investigated as a new prognostic factor in a number of carcinomas. However, studies on PNI in cervical cancer are limited, and inconsistent conclusions have been reported by different groups. The aim of the present study was to analyze the relationship between perineural invasion (PNI) and clinical and histopathological features of cervical cancer, and to evaluate the clinical significance of PNI of cervical cancer. Retrospective review identified 206 patients with cervical cancer who underwent radical hysterectomy plus pelvic lymphadenectomy between December 2012 and August 2014. The association between PNI and clinical and histopathological features of cervical cancer and post-operative radiotherapy was evaluated based on univariate and multivariate analyses. PNI of cervical cancer was identified in 33 of 206 (16%) cervical cancer patients. Univariate analysis demonstrated that PNI was associated with clinical stage, tumor grade, tumor size, depth of invasion, lymphovascular space invasion (LVSI), and lymph node metastasis (P<0.05), but not associated with age and histopathological types (P>0.05). Multivariate analysis suggests that LVSI and lymph node metastasis were associated with PNI of cervical cancer (P<0.05). In addition, post-operative radiotherapy was significantly more recommended for patients with PNI than those without PNI (P<0.001). In conclusion, PNI of cervical cancer is associated with LVSI and lymph node metastasis and can be used as an index for the determination of post-operative radiotherapy for cervical cancer patients.

  2. Cervical Cancer Along with Unknown Cirrhosis: A Misdiagnosed Case

    PubMed Central

    Aminimoghaddam, Soheila; Mahmoudzadeh, Fatemeh; Maghsoudnia, Andisheh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Cervical cancer is the second most common malignancy in women worldwide. Vaginal bleeding and vaginal discharge are the most common symptoms. Although ascites has been reported in cases with cervical cancer, it is due to other causes such as ovarian metastasis. Case Presentation: A 78-year-old diabetic woman who presented with ascites and abdominopelvic mass was misdiagnosed with ovarian cancer and treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy followed by radical hysterectomy and adjuvant radiotherapy. However, pathology confirmed locally advanced cervical cancer stage IV in this patient. She was discharged from the hospital three weeks after surgery with no serious complications. Discussion: Considering all signs and symptoms to reach a verdict would reduce such malpractices and consequently lead to select the best management and treatment. PMID:26913238

  3. The Knowledge of South African Men Relating to Cervical Cancer and Cervical Cancer Screening.

    PubMed

    Rwamugira, Jeniffer; Maree, Johanna E; Mafutha, Nokuthula

    2017-09-06

    Cervical cancer is the second most common cancer in South African women, but the most common cancer in Black women. Despite having a national cervical cancer screening programme, most women present with advanced disease. Men play a role in cervical cancer as the HPV, the major cause of cervical cancer, is sexually transmitted. The purpose of our study was to describe the knowledge men, living in Muldersdrift, had about cervical cancer, cervical cancer screening and the cervical cancer screening programme and how they preferred to be taught about these health issues. We used a survey design and convenience sampling to select 101 men older than 18 years (n = 101). A pretested self-developed questionnaire was used as the data collection instrument, and the data were analyzed using the SPSS version 22-computer program and quantitative content analyses. The Fischer's exact test measured associations between variables (p = 0.05). The ages of the sample (n = 101) ranged from 18 to 92 years; most were from the Zulu cultural group, unemployed and unmarried. The majority (66.3%, n = 67) had not heard of cervical cancer, the cervical cancer screening programme (60.4%, n = 61) or the Pap smear (67.3%, n = 68). Age and educational level did not influence having ever heard of these health issues. HPV infection was the most well-known risk factor, and the very late symptoms of cervical cancer were the least known. Most men preferred to be educated in a group, which provided a practical, feasible and cost effective way of educating men living in this community about these health issues.

  4. Human papillomavirus and cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Crosbie, Emma J; Einstein, Mark H; Franceschi, Silvia; Kitchener, Henry C

    2013-09-07

    Cervical cancer is caused by human papillomavirus infection. Most human papillomavirus infection is harmless and clears spontaneously but persistent infection with high-risk human papillomavirus (especially type 16) can cause cancer of the cervix, vulva, vagina, anus, penis, and oropharynx. The virus exclusively infects epithelium and produces new viral particles only in fully mature epithelial cells. Human papillomavirus disrupts normal cell-cycle control, promoting uncontrolled cell division and the accumulation of genetic damage. Two effective prophylactic vaccines composed of human papillomavirus type 16 and 18, and human papillomavirus type 16, 18, 6, and 11 virus-like particles have been introduced in many developed countries as a primary prevention strategy. Human papillomavirus testing is clinically valuable for secondary prevention in triaging low-grade cytology and as a test of cure after treatment. More sensitive than cytology, primary screening by human papillomavirus testing could enable screening intervals to be extended. If these prevention strategies can be implemented in developing countries, many thousands of lives could be saved.

  5. Investigating the disparities in cervical cancer screening among Namibian women.

    PubMed

    Kangmennaang, Joseph; Thogarapalli, Nandini; Mkandawire, Paul; Luginaah, Isaac

    2015-08-01

    We examined the influence of knowledge and information, health care access and different socio-economic variables on women's decision to screen for cervical cancer using a nationally representative dataset. We use hierarchical binary logit regression models to explore the determinants of screening for cervical cancer among women who reported hearing about cervical cancer. This enabled us to include the effect of unobserved heterogeneity at the cluster level that may affect screening behaviors. Among women who have heard about cervical cancer (N=6542), only 39% of them did undergo screening with a mean age of 33 years. The univariate results reveal that women who are educated, insured, can afford money needed for treatment and reported distance not a barrier to accessing healthcare were more likely to screen. Our multivariate results indicate that insured women (OR=1.89, p=0.001) and women who had access to information through education and contact with a health worker (OR=1.41, p=0.001) were more likely to undertake screening compared to uninsured women and those with no contact with a health personnel, after controlling for relevant variables. The adoption of a universal health insurance scheme that ensures equity in access to health care and extension of public health information targeting women in rural communities especially within the Caprivi region may be needed for a large scale increase in cervical cancer screening in Namibia. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Cervical cancer control in developing countries: memorandum from a WHO meeting.

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    This memorandum summarizes the report of a WHO Consultation on the Control of Cervical Cancer in Developing Countries, held on 6-7 November 1994, in New Delhi, India. Evaluated was the current situation with regard to cervical cancer and the relevance of current practices in screening. New pragmatic approaches to cervical cancer were proposed that are relevant for developing countries; this includes empowerment of women to come forward, and visual inspection-"downstaging". PMID:8823955

  7. Cervical cancer control in developing countries: memorandum from a WHO meeting.

    PubMed

    1996-01-01

    This memorandum summarizes the report of a WHO Consultation on the Control of Cervical Cancer in Developing Countries, held on 6-7 November 1994, in New Delhi, India. Evaluated was the current situation with regard to cervical cancer and the relevance of current practices in screening. New pragmatic approaches to cervical cancer were proposed that are relevant for developing countries; this includes empowerment of women to come forward, and visual inspection-"downstaging".

  8. Cervical cancer in India and HPV vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Kaarthigeyan, K.

    2012-01-01

    Cervical cancer, mainly caused by Human Papillomavirus infection, is the leading cancer in Indian women and the second most common cancer in women worldwide. Though there are several methods of prevention of cervical cancer, prevention by vaccination is emerging as the most effective option, with the availability of two vaccines. Several studies have been published examining the vaccine's efficacy, immunogenicity and safety. Questions and controversy remain regarding mandatory vaccination, need for booster doses and cost-effectiveness, particularly in the Indian context. PMID:22754202

  9. High-Dose Rate Brachytherapy Using Inverse Planning Simulated Annealing for Locoregionally Advanced Cervical Cancer: A Clinical Report With 2-Year Follow-Up

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Daniel H.; Wang-Chesebro, Alice; Weinberg, Vivian; Pouliot, Jean; Chen, Lee-May; Speight, Joycelyn; Littell, Ramey; Hsu, I.-Chow

    2009-12-01

    Purpose: We present clinical outcomes of image-guided brachytherapy using inverse planning simulated annealing (IPSA) planned high-dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy boost for locoregionally advanced cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: From February 2004 through December 2006, 51 patients were treated at the University of California, San Francisco with HDR brachytherapy boost as part of definitive radiation for International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics Stage IB1 to Stage IVA cervical cancer. Of the patients, 46 received concurrent chemotherapy, 43 with cisplatin alone and 3 with cisplatin/5-fluorouracil. All patients had IPSA-planned HDR brachytherapy boost after whole-pelvis external radiation to a total tumor dose of 85 Gy or greater (for alpha/beta = 10). Toxicities are reported according to National Cancer Institute CTCAE v3.0 (Common Terminology Criteria for Adverse Events version 3.0) guidelines. Results: At a median follow-up of 24.3 months, there were no toxicities of Grade 4 or greater and the frequencies of Grade 3 acute and late toxicities were 4% and 2%, respectively. The proportion of patients having Grade 1 or 2 gastrointestinal and genitourinary acute toxicities was 48% and 52%, respectively. Low-grade late toxicities included Grade 1 or 2 vaginal, gastrointestinal, and hormonal toxicities in 31%, 18%, and 4% of patients, respectively. During the follow-up period, local recurrence developed in 2 patients, regional recurrence developed in 2, and new distant metastases developed in 15. The rates of locoregional control of disease and overall survival at 24 months were 91% and 86%, respectively. Conclusions: Definitive radiation by use of inverse planned HDR brachytherapy boost for locoregionally advanced cervical cancer is well tolerated and achieves excellent local control of disease.

  10. Remission of recurrent cervical cancer with paclitaxel and carboplatin: a case report and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Termrungruanglert, W; Kudelka, A P; Piamsomboon, S; Edwards, C L; Verschraegen, C F; Loyer, E; Kavanagh, J J

    1996-01-01

    We report the case of a patient with recurrent squamous cell carcinoma of the cervix, that metastasized to the paraaortic and supraclavicular lymph nodes and the lungs after primary radiotherapy for stage IIB. The tumor was refractory to multiple drug regimens. A combination of paclitaxel (135 mg/m2 intravenous infusion over 24) hours and carboplatin with a target area under the curve of 7.5 mg-min/mL were then administered and repeated every 4 weeks. The patient tolerated the chemotherapy well with myeloprotection from granulocyte colony-stimulating factor and the disease went into remission. Thus, the combination of paclitaxel and carboplatin may have antitumor activity in advanced or recurrent squamous cell carcinoma of the cervix.

  11. Studying the Physical Function and Quality of Life Before and After Surgery in Patients With Stage I Cervical Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-08-22

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma, Not Otherwise Specified; Lymphedema; Sexual Dysfunction and Infertility; Stage IA1 Cervical Cancer; Stage IA2 Cervical Cancer; Stage IB1 Cervical Cancer

  12. [Epigenetic alterations in cervical cancer progression].

    PubMed

    Ríos-Romero, Magdalena; Soto-Valladares, Ana Guadalupe; Piña-Sánchez, Patricia

    2015-01-01

    Despite the use of the screening test, such as Papanicolaou, and the detection of human papillomavirus (HPV), cervical cancer remains as a public health problem in México and it is the second leading cause of death for malignant neoplasias among women. High-risk HPV infection is the main risk factor for the development of premalignant lesions and cervical cancer; however, HPV infection is not the only factor; there are various genetic and epigenetic alterations required for the development of neoplasias; some of them have been described and even in some cases they have been suggested as biomarkers for prognosis. However, in contrast with other cancer types, such as breast cancer, in cervical cancer the use of biomarkers has not been established for clinical applications. Unlike genetic alterations, epigenetic alterations are potentially reversible; in this sense, their characterization is important, since they have not only a potential use as biomarkers, but they also could represent new therapeutic targets for treatment of cervical cancer. This review describes some of the more common epigenetic alterations in cervical cancer and its potential use in routine clinical practice.

  13. To Your Health: NLM update transcript - Reassessing cervical cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... here' section of MedlinePlus.gov's cervical cancer health topic page . The National Cancer Institute provides additional information about ... factors' section of MedlinePlus.gov's cervical cancer health topic page. MedlinePlus.gov's cervical cancer health topic page also ...

  14. [Lithopedion in cervical pregnancy: a case report].

    PubMed

    Bustamante Sarabia, J; Flores Gil, O; Rubio, J E; Plata Nuñez, P

    1989-12-01

    One clinical case of cervical pregnancy studied, at the Hospital Regional ISSSTE in Acapulco, Guerrero, México, is presented. Clinically it was manifested as a true cervical pregnancy, with intermittent vaginal bleeding, fetid leukorrhea and slight pelvic pain. Literature reveals that diagnosis is rarely, if ever made, except by direct observation of the cervix. The case fulfills the Rubin's criteria for cervical pregnancy. Cervical pregnancy is extremely rare as evidenced by the paucity of cases in literature. Although it is an abnormal gestation, cervical pregnancy and a lithopedion formation makes this report rare and unique in world literature.

  15. Cisplatin and Radiation Therapy With or Without Carboplatin and Paclitaxel in Patients With Locally Advanced Cervical Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-26

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Chemotherapeutic Agent Toxicity; Cognitive Side Effects of Cancer Therapy; Psychological Impact of Cancer; Radiation Toxicity; Sexual Dysfunction and Infertility; Stage IB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage III Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer

  16. Breast and cervical cancers diagnosed and stage at diagnosis among women served through the National Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection Program.

    PubMed

    Miller, Jacqueline W; Royalty, Janet; Henley, Jane; White, Arica; Richardson, Lisa C

    2015-05-01

    To assess cancers diagnosed and the stage of cancer at the time of diagnosis among low-income, under-insured, or uninsured women who received services through the National Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection Program (NBCCEDP). Using the NBCCEDP database, we examined the number and percent of women diagnosed during 2009-2011 with in situ breast cancer, invasive breast cancer, and invasive cervical cancer by demographic and clinical characteristics, including age, race and ethnicity, test indication (screening or diagnostic), symptoms (for breast cancer), and screening history (for cervical cancer). We examined these characteristics by stage at diagnosis, a new variable included in the database obtained by linking with state-based central cancer registries. There were 11,569 women diagnosed with invasive breast cancer, 1,988 with in situ breast cancer, and 583 with invasive cervical cancer through the NBCCEDP. Women who reported breast symptoms or who had diagnostic mammography were more likely to be diagnosed with breast cancer, and at a later stage, than those who did not have symptoms or who had screening mammography. Women who had been rarely or never screened for cervical cancer were more likely to be diagnosed with cervical cancer, and at a later stage, than women who received regular screenings. Women served through the NBCCEDP who have not had prior screening or who have symptoms were more often diagnosed with late-stage disease.

  17. Emerging therapeutic agents for cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Cornelio, Daniela B; Roesler, Rafael; Schwartsmann, Gilberto

    2009-11-01

    Cervical cancer is the second most frequent malignancy affecting women worldwide. The highest incidences occur in the developing world, where, in most countries, cervical cancer is the leading cause of cancer mortality in women. Although surgery and chemoradiotherapy can cure 80-95% of women with early stage cancer and 60% of locoregionally advanced cancer, the recurrent and metastatic disease remains a major cause of cancer death. The current cytotoxic treatment options for advanced and metastatic cancer demonstrate modest results, with response rates of maximum 30% and overall survival of less than 10 months. Given this limited degree of success with conventional therapies, interest has increased in other therapeutic alternatives. In this way, targeted agents are emerging as potential candidates for improving survival in cervical cancer patients. In this review we highlight the main current therapeutic strategies for cervical cancer and summarize the most relevant patents from the latest five years. Special attention was given to patents with potential applications in the clinical practice.

  18. Potential links between health literacy and cervical cancer screening behaviors: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyounghae; Han, Hae-Ra

    2016-02-01

    The objective of this study is to critically appraise empirical evidence investigating pathways between health literacy (HL) and cervical cancer screening. A comprehensive search was undertaken to identify English-language studies published before May 2014 that measured HL and cervical cancer screening. After screening for eligibility, we identified 12 articles that met inclusion criteria. Nine studies yielded a positive association between HL and cervical cancer screening. Five studies investigated the relationships between HL, psychosocial variables, and cervical cancer screening and found that HL was associated with cervical cancer knowledge (n = 4) and cancer worry (n = 2). Separately, cancer knowledge (n = 2) and perceived barriers (n = 1) were correlated with cervical cancer screening. One study investigated an indirect pathway of HL to cervical cancer screening through health knowledge, although the indirect pathway was non-significant. Overall, the investigations tended to focus on print-related HL domain only and included only English-speaking or Spanish-speaking women. In addition, the studies were limited by lack of theoretical basis (n = 10) or temporality (n = 10) and use of self-reported screening status (n = 7). Evidence supports a positive link between HL and cervical cancer screening. There is only limited evidence to delineate indirect pathways linking HL and cervical cancer screening. Studies using a multidimensional validated measure of HL are needed in diverse groups of women, particularly those with a heightened burden of cervical cancer. With continuing cervical cancer disparities among culturally and linguistically diverse women, delineating how HL influences cervical cancer screening may help develop effective intervention strategies to reduce the disparities experienced by these women. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. CERVICAL CANCER CONTROL RESEARCH IN VIETNAMESE AMERICAN COMMUNITIES

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Victoria M.; Nguyen, Tung T.; Jackson, J. Carey; McPhee, Stephen J.

    2009-01-01

    Census data show that the US Vietnamese population now exceeds 1,250,000. Cervical cancer among Vietnamese American women has been identified as an important health disparity. Available data indicate the cervical cancer disparity may be due to low Pap testing rates rather than variations in HPV infection rates and/or types. The cervical cancer incidence rates among Vietnamese and non-Latina white women in California during 2000–2002 were 14.0 and 7.3 per 100,000, respectively. Only 70% of Vietnamese women who participated in the 2003 California Health Interview Survey reported a recent Pap smear, compared to 84% of non-Latina white women. Higher levels of cervical cancer screening participation among Vietnamese women are strongly associated with current/previous marriage, having a usual source of care/doctor, and previous physician recommendation. Vietnamese language media campaigns and lay health worker intervention programs have been effective in increasing Pap smear use in Vietnamese American communities. Cervical cancer control programs for Vietnamese women should address knowledge deficits; enable women who are without a usual source of care to find a primary care doctor; and improve patient-provider communication by encouraging health care providers to recommend Pap testing, as well as by empowering women to ask for testing. PMID:18990732

  20. January is Cervical Cancer Awareness Month

    Cancer.gov

    The Center for Global Health supports global activities to advance global cancer research, build expertise, and leverage resources across nations to address the challenges of cancer and reduce cancer deaths worldwide. Towards these aims, NCI has partnered with Pink Ribbon Red Ribbon, a global organization founded on public-private partnerships dedicated to saving women’s lives by advancing prevention, screening, and treatment for breast and cervical cancer in sub-Saharan Africa and Latin America.

  1. Who is being screened for cervical cancer?

    PubMed Central

    Kleinman, J C; Kopstein, A

    1981-01-01

    Data from the 1973 National Health Interview Survey, a probability sample of the United States population, are used to examine the relationship between Pap testing and four socioeconomic variables. It was found that women at highest risk of cervical cancer are least likely to have had Pap tests. The proportion of women who report never having had a Pap test is greater among Blacks, the poor, the elderly and nonmetropolitan residents. In particular, poor Black women in nonmetropolitan areas have extremely high proportions reporting no Pap test. However, high risk women are only slightly less likely to have visited a doctor in the two years preceding interview. These results suggest that improvement in Pap test coverage among high risk women could be attained by encouraging the use of the Pap test in regular ambulatory medical care. PMID:7258434

  2. Cigarette smoking and invasive cervical cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Brinton, L.A.; Schairer, C.; Haenszel, W.; Stolley, P.; Lehman, H.F.; Levine, R.; Savitz, D.A.

    1986-06-20

    A case-control study of 480 patients with invasive cervical cancer and 797 population controls, conducted in five geographic areas in the United States, included an evaluation of the relationship of several cigarette smoking variables to cervical cancer risk. Although smoking was correlated with both age at first intercourse and number of sexual partners, a significant smoking-related risk persisted for squamous cell carcinoma after adjustment for these factors (relative risk, 1.5). Twofold excess risks were seen for those smoking 40 or more cigarettes per day and those smoking for 40 or more years. Increased risks, however, were observed only among recent and continuous smokers. In contrast to squamous cell cancer, no relationship was observed between smoking and risk of adenocarcinoma or adenosquamous carcinoma. These results suggest a causal relationship between cigarette smoking and invasive squamous cell cervical cancer, perhaps through a late-stage or promotional event, although the mechanisms of action require further elucidation.

  3. Cervical stump cancer: a study of 14 cases.

    PubMed

    Silva, Cléber S; Cardoso, Cristina O; Menegaz, Renato A; Adad, Sheila J; Angotti, Luís F R; Murta, Eddie F C

    2004-09-01

    This is a report on 14 patients with cervical stump cancer, aged 30 to 68 years old (median = 53 years), seen in a public university hospital. Over a 15-year period, 363 cases of cervical cancer were treated, of which fourteen (3.85%) were in the cervical stump. The time interval between subtotal hysterectomy and the diagnosis of the neoplasm varied from 9 days to 27 years (median = 9.3 years). 28.6% of the patients were in stage I, 42.9% in stage II and 28.6% in stage III. Fibromyoma was the major reason for the subtotal hysterectomy. Three patients underwent Wertheim-Meigs surgery, 1 in association with radiotherapy, and the other 11 patients had radiotherapy alone. The survival ranged from 12 to 120 months (median = 53.3 months). Subtotal hysterectomy should be avoided whenever possible in populations with restricted access to screening programs for cancer of the uterine cervix.

  4. What`s New in Cervical Cancer Research and Treatment?

    MedlinePlus

    ... About Cervical Cancer What's New in Cervical Cancer Research and Treatment? New ways to prevent and treat ... This drug continues to be studied. Hyperthermia Some research indicates that adding hyperthermia to radiation may help ...

  5. [Epidemiological overview of uterine cervical cancer].

    PubMed

    Hernández-Hernández, Dulce M; Apresa-García, Teresa; Patlán-Pérez, Rosa Ma

    2015-01-01

    The World Health Organization (WHO) reported more than 6 million cases of cancer worldwide in women during 2008; 57.2 % of those cases occurred in less developed countries. Cervical cancer (CC) ranks third in the world in all cancers affecting women, with an estimated of 530 000 new cases. CC has multiple causes and it arises by the association of various risk factors. The main factor is related to the human papillomavirus infection (HPV), which acts as a necessary but not sufficient cause. Also, the interaction with other cofactors has an impact on the development and severity of this neoplasm. Survival is related to the timeliness of care and, therefore, to more access to health services. CC is a neoplasm considered a preventable cancer; thus, it is possible to save more than 150 000 lives by 2030 if control measures are applied with opportunity. The aim of this work is to review the CC in different geographical areas and to make an analysis of risk factors related to this neoplasm.

  6. Trends in cervical cancer in New Zealand.

    PubMed

    Cox, B; Skegg, D C

    1986-10-22

    Analysis of mortality and incidence rates over a 30-year period discloses differing trends in the risk of cervical cancer in older and younger women. Age-specific rates have been declining in older women, but there has been a marked rise in incidence among women under 40. Birth-cohort analyses show declining risks in successive cohorts of women born from late in the last century until the 1930's, except that risks were slightly elevated in the generation who were young adults during the Second World War. The risk of cervical cancer has increased very rapidly in cohorts born since the 1930s. A mathematical model suggests that women born around 1957 may have over three times the risk experienced by women born around 1932. The numbers of New Zealand women developing, and dying from, cervical cancer will increase strikingly over the next few decades unless effective control measures are introduced.

  7. Bladder and bowel symptoms in cervical and endometrial cancer survivors.

    PubMed

    Donovan, Kristine A; Boyington, Alice R; Judson, Patricia L; Wyman, Jean F

    2014-06-01

    Previous studies likely underestimate the prevalence of bowel and bladder symptoms in gynecologic cancer survivors. We sought to estimate the prevalence of these symptoms in cervical and endometrial cancer survivors who had completed treatment 1 year previously compared with non-cancer controls, and to examine factors associated with more severe symptoms in survivors. As part of a larger quality of life study, survivors who were 1-year posttreatment for cervical or endometrial cancer (n = 104) completed measures of bladder and bowel symptoms. An age-matched and race/ethnicity-matched sample of women with no history of cancer was recruited for comparison purposes. Survivors reported a higher prevalence of bladder symptoms, specifically storage and incontinence symptoms, than non-cancer controls. Prevalence rates for bowel symptoms in survivors were higher than those reported in previous studies. Greater symptom severity was associated with younger age, lower annual incomes, and less education. Other correlates included higher body mass index and history of smoking. As hypothesized, more severe symptoms were associated with radical hysterectomy and pelvic radiation. Bladder and bowel symptoms are more prevalent in cervical and endometrial cancer survivors than non-cancer controls. Future research should replicate these findings in a larger, prospective study. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Socioecological perspectives on cervical cancer and cervical cancer screening among Asian American women.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jongwon; Carvallo, Mauricio

    2014-10-01

    Although cervical cancer is one of the most commonly diagnosed cancers among Vietnamese American women (VAW) and Korean American women (KAW), both groups consistently report much lower rates of cervical cancer screening compared with other Asian ethnic subgroups and non-Hispanic Whites. This study aimed to explore multilevel factors that may underlie low screening rates among VAW and KAW living in a city where their ethnic communities are relatively small. The socioecological model was used as a conceptual framework. Thirty participants were conveniently recruited from ethnic beauty salons run by VA and KA cosmetologists in Albuquerque, New Mexico. The participants' average age was 44.6 years (SD = .50; range = 21-60). Most participants were married (80 %) and employed (73.3 %), and had health insurance (83.3 %). A qualitative interview was conducted in Vietnamese or Korean and transcribed verbatim. A thematic content analysis was used to identify major codes, categories, and patterns across the transcripts. The study identified several factors at the individual (e.g., pregnancy, poverty, personality), interpersonal (e.g., family responsibility, mother as influential referent), and community (e.g., lack of availability, community size) levels. The study sheds light on four major areas that must be taken into consideration in the development of culturally appropriate, community-based interventions aimed to reduce disparities in cervical cancer screening among ethnic minority women in the United States: (1) ethnic community size and geographic location; (2) cross-cultural similarities and dissimilarities; (3) targeting of not only unmarried young women, but also close referents; and (4) utilization of trusted resources within social networks.

  9. Gynecologic Cancer InterGroup (GCIG) consensus review for cervical adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Hiroyuki; Yokota, Harushige; Monk, Bradley; Treilleux, Isabelle; Devouassoux-Shisheboran, Mojgan; Davis, Alison; Kim, Jae-Weon; Mahner, Sven; Stany, Michael; Pignata, Sandro; Ray-Coquard, Isabelle; Fujiwara, Keiichi

    2014-11-01

    Cervical adenocarcinoma is known to be less common than squamous cell carcinoma of the cervix comprising approximately 25% of all cervical carcinomas. Differences in associated human papillomavirus types, patterns of spread, and prognosis call for treatments that are not always like those for squamous cancers. In this review, we report a consensus developed by the Gynecologic Cancer InterGroup surrounding cervical adenocarcinoma for epidemiology, pathology, treatment, and unanswered questions. Prospective clinical trials are needed to help develop treatment guidelines.

  10. Review of the Cervical Cancer Burden and Population-Based Cervical Cancer Screening in China.

    PubMed

    Di, Jiangli; Rutherford, Shannon; Chu, Cordia

    2015-01-01

    Cervical cancer continues to be a serious public health problem in the developing world, including China. Because of its large population with geographical and socioeconomic inequities, China has a high burden of cervical cancer and important disparities among different regions. In this review, we first present an overview of the cervical cancer incidence and mortality over time, and focus on diversity and disparity in access to care for various subpopulations across geographical regions and socioeconomic strata in China. Then, we describe population-based cervical cancer screening in China, and in particular implementation of the National Cervical Cancer Screening Program in Rural Areas (NACCSPRA) and the challenges that this program faces. These include low screening coverage, shortage of qualified health care personnel and limited funds. To improve prevention of cervical cancer and obtain better cancer outcomes, the Chinese government needs to urgently consider the following key factors: reducing disparities in health care access, collecting accurate and broadly representative data in cancer registries, expanding target population size and increasing allocation of government funding for training of personnel, improving health education for women, enhancing quality control of screening services and improving a system to increase follow up for women with positive results.

  11. Total Microlaparoscopic Radical Hysterectomy in Early Cervical Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gallotta, Valerio; Fagotti, Anna; Rossitto, Cristiano; Piovano, Elisa; Scambia, Giovanni

    2013-01-01

    Background and Objective: In less than 2 decades, laparoscopy has contributed to modification in the management of early cervical cancer patients, and all comparisons between open and laparoscopic-based radical operations showed an identical oncological outcome. The aim of this study is to describe surgical instrumentations and technique to perform total microlaparoscopy radical hysterectomy in early cervical cancer patients and report our preliminary results in terms of operative time and perioperative outcomes. Methods: Between January 1, 2012, and March 25, 2012, 4 consecutive early cervical cancer patients were enrolled in this study. Results: We performed 3 type B2 and 1 type C1-B2 total microlaparoscopy radical hysterectomy, and in all cases concomitant bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy and pelvic lymphadenectomy were carried out. Median operative time was 165 minutes (range: 155 to 215) (mean: 186), and median estimated blood loss was 30 mL (range: 20 to 50). Median number of pelvic lymph nodes removed was 12 (range: 11 to 15). All procedures were completed without 5-mm port insertion and without conversion. No intraoperative or early postoperative complications were reported. Conclusions: This report suggests a role of microlaparoscopy in the surgical management of early cervical cancer with adequate oncological results, superimposable operative time, and perioperative outcomes with respect to standard laparoscopy. PMID:23743381

  12. New technology for cervical cancer screening.

    PubMed

    Gong, Jiao-Mei; Shen, Yong; He, Yan-Xia; Lei, Dong-Mei; Zhang, Zhan; Li, Xiao-Fu

    2012-11-01

    Cervical cancer is the second most common cancer among women worldwide. With the introduction of organized cervical cytological screening programs, the incidence of cervical cancer has been dramatically reduced. This study aimed to determine the new technology that can potentially afford unique advantages for cervical cancer screening. Cervical specimens collected in PreservCyt were processed for ThinPrep cytological test, the new technology test and human papillomavirus detection. The concordance between the new technology and ThinPrep cytological test was 96.34%, with 931 cases positive and 148 cases negative with both tests (κ = 0.857). The sensitivity and the specificity of the new technology were 99.04% (931/940) and 82.22% (148/180), respectively. Youden index was 0.81. The positive predictive value and the negative predictive value were 96.68% (931/963) and 94.27% (148/157), respectively. In the 124 positive cases of the new technology, human papillomavirus DNA test was positive in 109 cases (87.9%) and negative in 15 cases (12.1%). Compared to the histopathological diagnosis, the sensitivity and the negative predictive value of the new technology were 98.57% (69/70) and 95.45% (21/22), respectively. The screening design will enable evaluation of several competing screening technologies in reducing the incidence of and mortality from cervical cancer. In particular, if the new technology is used as the screening test, it can be a quick screening test and does not depend on the subjective judgment of the doctors. As such, it could potentially afford unique advantages for screening.

  13. [Chromosomal instability in carcinogenesis of cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    de Los Santos-Munive, Victoria; Alonso-Avelino, Juan Angel

    2013-01-01

    In order to spot common chromosomal imbalances in early and late lesions of cervical cancer that might be used as progression biomarkers, we made a search of literature in PubMed from 1996 to 2011. The medical subject headings employed were chromosomal alterations, loss of heterozygosis, cervical cancer, cervical tumorigenesis, chromosomal aberrations, cervical intraepithelial neoplasm and low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion. The common chromosomal imbalances were gains in 8q24 (77.7 %), 20q13 (66.9 %), 3q26 (47.1 %), Xp22 (43.8 %), and 5p15 (60 %), principally. On the other hand, integration of the high-risk human papillomavirus genome into the host chromosome has been associated with the development of neoplasia, but the chromosomal imbalances seem to precede and promote such integration. Chromosomal imbalances in 8q24, 20q13, 3q21-26 and 5p15-Xp22, determined by fluorescent in situ hybridization assay or comparative genomic hybridization assay for early detection of the presence of high-risk human papillomavirus, are promising markers of cervical cancer progression.

  14. Limited education as a risk factor in cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Corral, F; Cueva, P; Yépez, J; Montes, E

    1996-12-01

    The study reported here analyzes the influence of formal education on the behavior and age at onset of carcinoma of the cervix in 2204 women in Quito, Ecuador, between 1985 and 1994. The results indicate that education had a considerable degree of influence on the behavior of this neoplasia. That is, women with primary education or less were found to have almost twice the cervical cancer incidence of those with secondary or higher education, while those who were illiterate had almost six times the incidence found among university-educated women. Overall, it seems reasonable to consider women's education a key factor in defining risk groups for cervical cancer-so much so that grouping by instructional level would make it possible to improve the effectiveness of cervical cytology-based preventive measures.

  15. Nanomechanical clues from morphologically normal cervical squamous cells could improve cervical cancer screening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, Li; Feng, Jiantao; Sun, Quanmei; Liu, Jing; Hua, Wenda; Li, Jing; Ao, Zhuo; You, Ke; Guo, Yanli; Liao, Fulong; Zhang, Youyi; Guo, Hongyan; Han, Jinsong; Xiong, Guangwu; Zhang, Lufang; Han, Dong

    2015-09-01

    Applying an atomic force microscope, we performed a nanomechanical analysis of morphologically normal cervical squamous cells (MNSCs) which are commonly used in cervical screening. Results showed that nanomechanical parameters of MNSCs correlate well with cervical malignancy, and may have potential in cancer screening to provide early diagnosis.Applying an atomic force microscope, we performed a nanomechanical analysis of morphologically normal cervical squamous cells (MNSCs) which are commonly used in cervical screening. Results showed that nanomechanical parameters of MNSCs correlate well with cervical malignancy, and may have potential in cancer screening to provide early diagnosis. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr03662c

  16. Risks of Cervical Cancer Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... Feelings and Cancer Adjusting to Cancer Self-Image & Sexuality Day-to-Day Life Support for Caregivers Survivorship ... Coping Feelings & Cancer Adjusting to Cancer Self Image & Sexuality Day to Day Life Survivorship Support for Caregivers ...

  17. Knowledge, attitudes, and practices for cervical cancer screening among the Bhutanese refugee community in Omaha, Nebraska.

    PubMed

    Haworth, Rebecca J; Margalit, Ruth; Ross, Christine; Nepal, Tikka; Soliman, Amr S

    2014-10-01

    Cervical cancer is the second most common cause of cancer mortality among women with the vast majority of patients in developing countries. Bhutanese refugees in the United States are from South Central Asia, the 4th leading region of the world for cervical cancer incidence. Over the past few years, Bhutanese refugees have increased significantly in Nebraska. This study evaluates current knowledge of cervical cancer and screening practices among the Bhutanese refugee women in Omaha, Nebraska. The study aimed to investigate cervical cancer and screening knowledge and perceptions about the susceptibility and severity of cervical cancer and perceived benefits and barriers to screening. Self-administered questionnaires and focus groups based on the Health Belief Model were conducted among 42 healthy women from the Bhutanese refugee community in Omaha. The study revealed a significant lack of knowledge in this community regarding cervical cancer and screening practices, with only 22.2 % reporting ever hearing of a Pap test and 13.9 % reporting ever having one. Only 33.3 % of women were in agreement with their own perceived susceptibility to cervical cancer. Women who reported ever hearing about the Pap test tended to believe more strongly about curability of the disease if discovered early than women who never heard about the test (71.4 vs. 45.0 %, for the two groups. respectively). Refugee populations in the United States are in need for tailored cancer education programs especially when being resettled from countries with high risk for cancer.

  18. [Wnt signalling pathway and cervical cancer].

    PubMed

    Ramos-Solano, Moisés; Álvarez-Zavala, Monserrat; García-Castro, Beatriz; Jave-Suárez, Luis Felipe; Aguilar-Lemarroy, Adriana

    2015-01-01

    Cervical cancer (CC) is a pathology that arises in the cervical epithelium, whose major cause of risk is human papillomavirus (HPV) infection. Due to the fact that HPV infection per se is not enough to generate a carcinogenic process, it has been proposed that alterations in the Wnt signaling pathway are involved in cervical carcinogenesis. The Wnt family consists of 13 receptors and 19 ligands, and it is highly conserved phylogenetically due to its contribution in different biological processes, such as embryogenesis and tissue regeneration. Additionally, this signaling pathway modulates various cellular functions, for instance: cell proliferation, differentiation, migration and cell polarity. This paper describes the Wnt signaling pathways and alterations that have been found in members of this family in different cancer types and, especially, in CC.

  19. [Anterior cervical hypertrichosis: case report].

    PubMed

    Orozco-Gutiérrez, Mario H; Sánchez-Corona, José; García-Ortiz, José E; Castañeda-Cisneros, Gema; Dávalos-Rodríguez, Nory O; Corona-Rivera, Jorge R; García-Cruz, Diana

    2016-10-01

    The non-syndromic anterior cervical hypertrichosis (OMIM N° 600457) is a genetic disorder characterized by a patch of hair at the level of the laryngeal prominence. We present a 12-year-old boy with anterior cervical hypertrichosis and mild generalized hypertrichosis. He has no neurological, ophthalmological or skeletal anomalies. The clinical follow up is 10 years.

  20. [Cervical cancer screening in Switzerland - current practice and future challenges].

    PubMed

    Untiet, Sarah; Schmidt, Nicole; Low, Nicola; Petignat, Patrick

    2013-04-01

    At the beginning of the 20th Century, cervical cancer was the leading cause of death from cancer in women. A marked decline in cervical cancer has been observed since the 1960s, in parallel with the introduction of the Papanicolau (Pap) test as a cytological screening method. Today, Pap smear screening is still the most widely used tool for cervical cancer prevention. Testing for human papillomavirus (HPV) in cervical specimens or a combination of Pap and HPV testing are also now available. In this article we compare current guidelines for cervical cancer screening in Switzerland with those in other European countries. In view of the opportunities offered by HPV testing and, since 2008, HPV vaccination, current guidelines for cervical cancer screening should be updated. Both the choice of screening tests and general organization of cervical cancer screening should be reviewed.

  1. An overview of prevention and early detection of cervical cancers

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Gauravi A.; Pimple, Sharmila A.; Shastri, Surendra S.

    2011-01-01

    Cervical cancer still remains the most common cancer affecting the Indian women. India alone contributes 25.41% and 26.48% of the global burden of cervical cancer cases and mortality, respectively. Ironically, unlike most other cancers, cervical cancer can be prevented through screening by identifying and treating the precancerous lesions, any time during the course of its long natural history, thus preventing the potential progression to cervical carcinoma. Several screening methods, both traditional and newer technologies, are available to screen women for cervical precancers and cancers. No screening test is perfect and hence the choice of screening test will depend on the setting where it is to be used. Similarly, various methods are available for treatment of cervical precancers and the selection will depend on the cost, morbidity, requirement of reliable biopsy specimens, resources available, etc. The recommendations of screening for cervical cancer in the Indian scenario are discussed. PMID:22557777

  2. MicroRNA-373 functions as an oncogene and targets YOD1 gene in cervical cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Luo-Qiao; Zhang, Yue; Yan, Huan; Liu, Kai-Jiang Zhang, Shu

    2015-04-10

    miR-373 was reported to be elevated in several tumors; however, the role of miR-373 in cervical cancer has not been investigated. In this study we aimed to investigate the role of miR-373 in tumorigenicity of cervical cancer cells in vivo and in vitro. The expression of miR-373 was investigated using real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction assay in 45 cervical specimens and cervical cancer cell lines. The role of miR-373 in tumorigenicity of cervical cancer cells was assessed by cell proliferation, colony formation in vitro as well as tumor growth assays in vivo with the overexpression of miR-373 or gene silencing. The functional target gene of miR-373 in cervical cancer cells was identified using integrated bioinformatics analysis, gene expression arrays, and luciferase assay. We founded that the expression of miR-373 is upregulated in human cervical cancer tissues and cervical carcinoma cell lines when compared to the corresponding noncancerous tissues. Ectopic overexpression of miR-373 in human cervical cancer cells promoted cell growth in vitro and tumorigenicity in vivo, whereas silencing the expression of miR-373 decreased the rate of cell growth. YOD1 was identified as a direct and functional target of miR-373 in cervical cancer cells. Expression levels of miR-373 were inversely correlated with YOD1 levels in human cervical cancer tissues. RNAi-mediated knockdown of YOD1 phenocopied the proliferation-promoting effect of miR-373. Moreover, overexpression of YOD1 abrogated miR-373-induced proliferation of cervical cancer cells. These results demonstrate that miR-373 increases proliferation by directly targeting YOD1, a new potential therapeutic target in cervical cancer. - Highlights: • The expression of miR-373 is upregulated in human cervical cancer tissues. • miR-373 effects as oncogenic miRNA in cervical cancer in vitro and in vivo. • miR-373 increases proliferation of cervical cancer cells by directly targeting YOD1.

  3. Screening of cervical cancer in Catalonia 2006-2012.

    PubMed

    de Sanjosé, Silvia; Ibáñez, Raquel; Rodríguez-Salés, Vanesa; Peris, Mercè; Roura, Esther; Diaz, Mireia; Torné, Aureli; Costa, Dolors; Canet, Yolanda; Falguera, Gemma; Alejo, Maria; Espinàs, Josep Alfons; Bosch, F Xavier

    2015-01-01

    The early detection of intraepithelial lesions of the cervix, through the periodic examination of cervical cells, has been fundamental for the prevention of invasive cervical cancer and its related mortality. In this report, we summarise the cervical cancer screening activities carried out in Catalonia, Spain, within the National Health System during 2008-2011. The study population covers over two million women resident in the area. The evaluation includes 758,690 cervical cytologies performed on a total of 595,868 women. The three-year coverage of cervical cytology among women aged between 25 and 65 years was 40.8%. About 50% of first screened women with negative results had not returned to the second screening round. The introduction of high-risk human papillomavirus DNA (HPV) detection, as a primary screening cotest with cytology among women over age 40 with a poor screening history, significantly improved the detection of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 2 or worse (CIN2+), being far superior to cytology alone. Cotesting did not improve the detection of CIN2+. The use of the HPV test for the triage of atypical squamous cell undetermined significance (ASC-US) improved the selection of women at high risk of CIN2+. Sampling (both cytology and HPV test) was largely performed by midwives (66.7%), followed by obstetricians (23.8%) and nurses (7%). Over half of the centres (54.8%) had full use of online medical records. During the study period, educational activities for professionals and for women were carried out periodically. The organisation of screening as a population activity in which women are actively called to the screening visit and the introduction of HPV testing as a primary screening tool are strongly recommended to ensure the maximum population impact in the reduction of the cervical cancer burden.

  4. Screening of cervical cancer in Catalonia 2006–2012

    PubMed Central

    de Sanjosé, Silvia; Ibáñez, Raquel; Rodríguez-Salés, Vanesa; Peris, Mercè; Roura, Esther; Diaz, Mireia; Torné, Aureli; Costa, Dolors; Canet, Yolanda; Falguera, Gemma; Alejo, Maria; Espinàs, Josep Alfons; Bosch, F. Xavier

    2015-01-01

    The early detection of intraepithelial lesions of the cervix, through the periodic examination of cervical cells, has been fundamental for the prevention of invasive cervical cancer and its related mortality. In this report, we summarise the cervical cancer screening activities carried out in Catalonia, Spain, within the National Health System during 2008–2011. The study population covers over two million women resident in the area. The evaluation includes 758,690 cervical cytologies performed on a total of 595,868 women. The three-year coverage of cervical cytology among women aged between 25 and 65 years was 40.8%. About 50% of first screened women with negative results had not returned to the second screening round. The introduction of high-risk human papillomavirus DNA (HPV) detection, as a primary screening cotest with cytology among women over age 40 with a poor screening history, significantly improved the detection of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 2 or worse (CIN2+), being far superior to cytology alone. Cotesting did not improve the detection of CIN2+. The use of the HPV test for the triage of atypical squamous cell undetermined significance (ASC-US) improved the selection of women at high risk of CIN2+. Sampling (both cytology and HPV test) was largely performed by midwives (66.7%), followed by obstetricians (23.8%) and nurses (7%). Over half of the centres (54.8%) had full use of online medical records. During the study period, educational activities for professionals and for women were carried out periodically. The organisation of screening as a population activity in which women are actively called to the screening visit and the introduction of HPV testing as a primary screening tool are strongly recommended to ensure the maximum population impact in the reduction of the cervical cancer burden. PMID:25987901

  5. Cervical cancer: Can it be prevented?

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, Pakhee

    2014-10-10

    Cervical cancer prevention requires a multipronged approach involving primary, secondary and tertiary prevention. The key element under primary prevention is human papilloma virus (HPV) vaccination. So far, only prophylactic HPV vaccines which prevent HPV infection by one or more subtypes are commercially available. Therapeutic HPV vaccines which aid in clearing established infection are still under trial. Secondary prevention entails early detection of precancerous lesions and its success is determined by the population coverage and the efficacy of the screening technique. A number of techniques are in use, including cytology, visual inspection (using the naked eye, magnivisualizer, acetic acid and Lugol's iodine), HPV testing and a combination of these methods. Updated screening guidelines have been advocated by the American Cancer Society in light of the role of HPV on cervical carcinogenesis. Recent research has also focussed on novel biomarkers that can predict progression to cancer in screen positive women and help to differentiate those who need treatment from those who can be left for follow-up. Last but not the least, effective treatment of precancerous lesions can help to reduce the incidence of invasive cervical cancer and this constitutes tertiary prevention. A combination of these approaches can help to prevent the burden of cervical cancer and its antecedent morbidity and mortality, but all of these are not feasible in all settings due to resource and allocation constraints. Thus, all countries, especially low and middle income ones, have to determine their own cocktail of approaches that work before we can say with certainty that yes, cervical cancer can be prevented.

  6. Cervical cancer: Can it be prevented?

    PubMed Central

    Aggarwal, Pakhee

    2014-01-01

    Cervical cancer prevention requires a multipronged approach involving primary, secondary and tertiary prevention. The key element under primary prevention is human papilloma virus (HPV) vaccination. So far, only prophylactic HPV vaccines which prevent HPV infection by one or more subtypes are commercially available. Therapeutic HPV vaccines which aid in clearing established infection are still under trial. Secondary prevention entails early detection of precancerous lesions and its success is determined by the population coverage and the efficacy of the screening technique. A number of techniques are in use, including cytology, visual inspection (using the naked eye, magnivisualizer, acetic acid and Lugol’s iodine), HPV testing and a combination of these methods. Updated screening guidelines have been advocated by the American Cancer Society in light of the role of HPV on cervical carcinogenesis. Recent research has also focussed on novel biomarkers that can predict progression to cancer in screen positive women and help to differentiate those who need treatment from those who can be left for follow-up. Last but not the least, effective treatment of precancerous lesions can help to reduce the incidence of invasive cervical cancer and this constitutes tertiary prevention. A combination of these approaches can help to prevent the burden of cervical cancer and its antecedent morbidity and mortality, but all of these are not feasible in all settings due to resource and allocation constraints. Thus, all countries, especially low and middle income ones, have to determine their own cocktail of approaches that work before we can say with certainty that yes, cervical cancer can be prevented. PMID:25302177

  7. Flexitouch® Home Maintenance Therapy or Standard Home Maintenance Therapy in Treating Patients With Lower-Extremity Lymphedema Caused by Treatment for Cervical Cancer, Vulvar Cancer, or Endometrial Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-12-29

    Lymphedema; Stage 0 Cervical Cancer; Stage 0 Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage 0 Vulvar Cancer; Stage I Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage I Vulvar Cancer; Stage IA Cervical Cancer; Stage IB Cervical Cancer; Stage II Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage II Vulvar Cancer; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage III Cervical Cancer; Stage III Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage III Vulvar Cancer; Stage IV Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer; Stage IVB Cervical Cancer; Stage IVB Vulvar Cancer

  8. Cervical Cancer Screening Among Arab Women in the United States: An Integrative Review.

    PubMed

    Abboud, Sarah; De Penning, Emily; Brawner, Bridgette M; Menon, Usha; Glanz, Karen; Sommers, Marilyn S

    2017-01-01

    Arab American women are an ethnic minority and immigrant population in the United States with unique and nuanced sociocultural factors that influence preventive health behaviors. The aims of this article are to evaluate and synthesize the existing evidence on cervical cancer screening behaviors, as well as determine factors that influence these behaviors, among Arab American women.
. Extensive literature searches were performed using PubMed, CINAHL®, Scopus, Embase, and Cochrane databases; articles published through October 2015 were sought. 
. Of 17 articles, 14 explicitly identified Arab and/or Muslim women and cervical cancer screening in either the title or the abstract; the remaining three focused on cancer attitudes and behaviors in Arab Americans in general but measured cervical cancer screening. Eleven articles reported different aspects of one intervention. Because of methodologic heterogeneity, the current authors synthesized results narratively.
. Key factors influencing cervical cancer screening were identified as the following. Cervical cancer screening rates among Arab American women are comparable to other ethnic minorities and lower than non-Hispanic White women. Findings are inconsistent regarding factors influencing cervical cancer screening behaviors in this underrepresented group. 
. Significant need exists for more research to better understand cervical cancer prevention behaviors in this group to inform culturally relevant interventions. Healthcare providers play a crucial role in increasing cervical cancer screening awareness and recommendations for Arab American women.

  9. Cervical Cancer: paradigms at home and abroad

    Cancer.gov

    NCI funded a clinical trial that will have an impact on the treatment of late-stage cervical cancer, and also supported a screening trial in India using a network of community outreach workers offering low tech-screening by direct visualization of the cer

  10. Oncologic safety of cervical nerve preservation in neck dissection for head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Honda, Keigo; Asato, Ryo; Tsuji, Jun; Miyazaki, Masakazu; Kada, Shinpei; Tsujimura, Takashi; Kataoka, Michiko

    2017-09-01

    Although the functional merits of preserving cervical nerves in neck dissection for head and neck cancer have been reported, the oncologic safety has not yet been determined. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to evaluate the safety of cervical nerve preservation. A retrospective chart review was performed on patients with head and neck cancer who had been treated by neck dissection between 2009 and 2014 at Kyoto Medical Center. Management of cervical nerves and clinical results were analyzed. A total of 335 sides of neck dissection had been performed in 222 patients. Cervical nerves were preserved in 175 neck sides and resected in 160 sides. The 5-year overall survival (OS) rate calculated by the Kaplan-Meier method was 71%. The 5-year neck control rate was 95% in cervical nerve preserved sides and 89% in cervical nerve resected sides. Preserving cervical nerves in neck dissection is oncologically safe in selected cases. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Urinary selenium excretion in patients with cervical uterine cancer.

    PubMed

    Navarrete, M; Gaudry, A; Revel, G; Martínez, T; Cabrera, L

    2001-02-01

    In this work, we report on a relationship between urinary selenium and the development of cervical uterine cancer. A simple chemical method was developed to concentrate trace amounts of selenium from relatively large urine samples by use of small activated carbon filters. When these filters are irradiated with thermal neutrons, selenium can be determined either by 77mSe (t1/2 = 17.5 s) or 75Se (t1/2 = 120 d). In this article, we report the results for 82 urine samples from women with cervical uterine cancer in several stages of development and from healthy controls. These results show a statistically significant increase of selenium excretion in cancer patients as compared to controls. Urinary selenium excretion is highest for patients in the intermediate stages of the disease.

  12. Primary herpes simplex virus infection mimicking cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Tomkins, Andrew; White, Catherine; Higgins, Stephen Peter

    2015-06-02

    We report the case of an 18-year-old woman presenting with ulceration of the cervix caused by primary type 2 herpes simplex infection in the absence of skin lesions. The differential diagnosis included cervical cancer and we referred the patient for urgent colposcopy. However, laboratory tests proved the viral aetiology of the cervical ulceration and the cervix had healed completely 3 weeks later. The case highlights the need to consider herpes simplex infection in the differential diagnosis of ulceration of the cervix even when there are no cutaneous signs of herpes.

  13. Knowledge and perceptions of cervical cancer and healthcare in Vanuatu.

    PubMed

    Fotinatos, Nina; Warmington, Adrian; Walker, Todd; Pilbeam, Mark

    2010-08-01

    There is increasing evidence of unacceptably high levels of cervical cancer abnormalities in Vanuatu. The purpose of this research was to determine cervical health awareness in local women from rural and urban environments. Women from hospitals, health clinics and small local villages were invited to participate in a health survey. This investigated health knowledge, current information sources and perceived limitations in accessing health information. A total of 422 surveys were undertaken, a response rate of 93% in urban centres and 95% in rural areas. There was a direct relationship between the number of school years completed and awareness of cancer. Nurses, doctors and village health workers all played a vital role in providing women's health care information. General embarrassment and a lack of knowledge were the greatest limitations reported to affect the ability and confidence for women to investigate health concerns. Vanuatu women are poorly educated regarding health issues, particularly cervical cancer. Strategies to improve cervical cancer awareness may include travelling workshops, an active media campaign and the introduction of culturally sensitive education programs tailored to formal and non-formal environments. Programs should inform whole communities and health care professionals.

  14. Association of Long Non-Coding RNA HOTAIR Polymorphisms with Cervical Cancer Risk in a Chinese Population

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Liangsheng; Lu, Xueguan; Zheng, Lijun; Liu, Xianying; Hu, Min

    2016-01-01

    Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs), HOTAIR has been reported to be upregulated in cervical cancer development and progression. However, SNPs (single nucleotide polymorphisms) in the lncRNAs and their associations with cervical cancer susceptibility have not been reported. In the current study, we hypothesized that SNPs within the lncRNA HOTAIR may influence the risk of cervical cancer. We performed a case-control study including 510 cervical cancer patients (cases) and 713 cancer-free individuals (controls) to investigate the association between three haplotype-tagging SNPs (rs920778, rs1899663 and rs4759314) in the lncRNA HOTAIR and the risk of cervical cancer. We found a strong association between the SNP rs920778 in the intronic enhancer of the HOTAIR and cervical cancer (P<10−4). Moreover, the cervical cancer patients with homozygous TT genotype were significantly associated with tumor-node-metastasis (TNM) stage. In vitro assays with allele-specific reporter constructs indicated that the reporter constructs bearing rs920778T allele conferred elevated reporter gene transcriptional activity when compared to the reporter constructs containing rs920778C allele. Furthermore, HOTAIR expression was higher in cervical cancer tissues than that in corresponding normal tissues, and the high expression was associated with the risk-associated allele T. In summary, our studies provide strong functional evidence that functional SNP rs920778 regulates HOTAIR expression, and may ultimately influence the predisposition for cervical cancer. PMID:27467165

  15. Perceived risk of cervical cancer among low-income women

    PubMed Central

    Asiedu, Gladys B.; Breitkopf, Carmen Radecki; Breitkopf, Daniel M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Risk perception is an important predictor of cancer prevention behaviors. We examined perceived risk of cervical cancer among an ethnically diverse population of women of lower socioeconomic status. Materials and Methods Females attending a women's health clinic were recruited for a study addressing cervical cancer prevention. Survey questions evaluated lifetime perceived risk of cervical cancer (0% to 100%), beliefs about the accuracy of the Pap test, and estimated incidence of abnormal Pap test results. Risk estimates for oneself were followed with an item seeking a brief, qualitative explanation of the risk estimate. Results Surveys were completed by 338 women. The mean (M ±SD) age of respondents was 29.9 ±8.6 years. Women self-identified as Hispanic/Latina (32%, n=107), White (34%, n=116), and African American (34%, n=115). Estimated perceived lifetime risk of getting cervical cancer ranged from 0% to 100% (M=59.2 ±29.5). Risk estimates were associated with perceived prevalence of abnormal results, r=0.24, p<0.001, and perceptions regarding the accuracy of the Pap test, r=0.13, p<0.05. On average, women estimated that nearly half of all women have ever had an abnormal result (49.2 ± 26.9; n=335; range 0%-100%), with African-American women estimating a higher percentage compared to Hispanic/Latina and White women. Women who themselves experienced an abnormal Pap test result reported higher proportions of other women experiencing an abnormal result, t(333) = −3.67, p<0.01. Conclusions This study advances our understanding of misperception of risk and how women qualitatively view their risk of cervical cancer. The findings underscore areas for practitioners to enhance patient education efforts. PMID:24633172

  16. The role of thallium-201 whole body scan with pelvic SPECT in patients with uterine cervical cancer treated by radiation therapy: a preliminary report.

    PubMed

    Liang, Ji-An; Kao, Chia-Hung; Chen, Shang-Wen; Yang, Shih-Neng; Sun, Shung-Shung

    2003-10-01

    Evaluation of tumor extent before treatment and its response to therapy is important. The aim of this report is to assess the usefulness with thallium-201 (Tl-201) imaging study including whole body scan and pelvic single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) in patients with uterine cervical cancers treated by radiation therapy. Before irradiation, eleven patients received detailed physical examination and Tl-201 imaging studies. A 4-score grading system was set for evaluation. The interval between Tl-201 imaging follow-up and completion of radiotherapy is one to four months, and its findings were compared with those from CT scan and clinical evidence. Before radiation, left supraclavicular and paraaortic lymphadenopathy was identified in one patient from whole body scan. Accumulation of Tl-201 uptake is observed from pelvic SPECT in all patients. It seems that patients with more tumor bulk had more intense uptake, except for one case with history of suspected pelvic inflammatory disease (PID). After radiotherapy, complete or partial regression is observed. For 6 patients with complete regression (score = 0), no evidence of recurrence is confirmed by follow-up examinations. For three patients with little residual uptake (score = 1), one is suspected with residual density and she is under close follow-up, the other two patients seem due to uterine myoma or short latency. These three patients received another Tl-201 scan 6 months after irradiation completion and the score became zero. One patient with residual intense uptake (score = 2) suffered from relapse in the pelvis and abdomen. This preliminary report indicates that Tl-201 whole body scan and pelvic SPECT has potential in the assessment of response to radiotherapy in patients with uterine cervical cancers. However, further studies including more cases and longer follow-up are needed.

  17. Study to Understand Cervical Cancer Early Endpoints and Determinants (SUCCEED)

    Cancer.gov

    A study to comprehensively assess biomarkers of risk for progressive cervical neoplasia, and thus develop a new set of biomarkers that can distinguish those at highest risk of cervical cancer from those with benign infection

  18. Patient Reported Outcomes in a Practice Changing Randomized Trial of Bevacizumab in the Treatment of Advanced Cervical Cancer: An NRG Oncology/Gynecologic Oncology Group Study

    PubMed Central

    Penson, Richard T.; Huang, Helen Q.; Wenzel, Lari B.; Monk, Bradley J.; Stockman, Sharon; Long, Harry J.; Ramondetta, Lois M.; Landrum, Lisa M.; Oaknin, Ana; Reid, Thomas J.A.; Leitao, Mario M.; Method, Michael; Michael, Helen; Tewari, Krishnansu S.

    2015-01-01

    Background To analyze patient reported outcomes (PROs) in GOG 240, the practice-changing, randomized phase 3 trial that concluded that chemotherapy (cisplatin-paclitaxel or topotecan-paclitaxel) plus bevacizumab significantly improves overall survival (OS), progression-free survival (PFS), and response rates compared to chemotherapy alone in advanced cervical cancer. Trial registration number: NCT00803062. Methods Patients were assessed pre-cycle 1, 2, and 5 and at 6 and 9 months post-cycle 1 with the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Cervix Trial Outcome Index (FACT-Cx TOI), and items from the FACT/GOG-Neurotoxicity (Ntx) subscale, and a worst pain item from the Brief Pain Inventory (BPI). Differences in FACT-Cx TOI scores were assessed using a linear mixed model adjusting for baseline score and age. A mixed effects mixed distributions model was fitted to evaluate treatment differences of likelihood to report neurotoxicity and pain, and severity of these symptoms, once reported. The association between baseline health-related quality of life and survival was analyzed using Cox proportional hazards models. Findings Among 390 evaluable patients, PRO completion rates declined from 96% (baseline) to 63% (9 months post-cycle 1). Completion rates were not statistically different among treatment regimens (p=0.67). Patients receiving chemotherapy plus bevacizumab reported 1.2 points lower on average (98.75% CI: −4.1, 1.7; p=0.30) in the FACT-Cx TOI scores than those with chemotherapy alone. Patients treated with chemotherapy plus bevacizumab were less likely to report neurotoxicty (overall odds ratio: 0.58; 98.75% CI: 0.17, 0.98; p=0.01). Severity of neurotoxic symptoms did not differ between the two groups (p=0.69). Both groups had similar odds of complaining of pain (odds ratio=0.96; 95% CI: 0.39, 1.52; p=0.78) and reported similar severity of pain (p=0.1). For the entire population, the baseline FACT-Cx TOI score was significantly associated with OS (HR 0

  19. Perceived susceptibility, and cervical cancer screening benefits and barriers in malaysian women visiting outpatient clinics.

    PubMed

    Baskaran, Pryma; Subramanian, Pathmawathi; Rahman, Rasnah Abdul; Ping, Wong Li; Mohd Taib, Nur Aishah; Rosli, Roshaslina

    2013-01-01

    A main reason for increasing incidence of cervical cancer worldwide is the lack of regular cervical cancer screening. Coverage and uptake remain major challenges and it is crucial to determine the perceived susceptibility to cervical cancer, as well as the benefits of, and barriers to, cervical cancer screening among women. A cross-sectional survey was conducted among 369 women attending an outpatient centre in Malaysia and data were collected by administering a self-report questionnaire. The majority of the participants (265, 71.8%) showed good level of perception of their susceptibility to cervical cancer. Almost all responded positively to four statements about the perceived benefits of cervical cancer screening (agree, 23.1% or strongly agree, 52.5%), whereas negative responses were received from most of the participants (agree, 29.9%or strongly agree, 14.6 %) about the eleven statements on perceived barriers. Significant associations were observed between age and perceived susceptibility(x2=9.030, p=0.029); between employment status (p<0.001) as well as ethnicity and perceived benefits (p<0.05 [P=0.003]); and between education and perceived barriers to cervical cancer screening (p<0.001). Perceived susceptibility, including knowledge levels and personal risk assessment, should be emphasized through education and awareness campaigns to improve uptake of cervical cancer screening in Malaysia.

  20. A systematic study on dysregulated microRNAs in cervical cancer development.

    PubMed

    He, Yuqing; Lin, Juanjuan; Ding, Yuanlin; Liu, Guodong; Luo, Yanhong; Huang, Mingyuan; Xu, Chengkai; Kim, Taek-Kyun; Etheridge, Alton; Lin, Mi; Kong, Danli; Wang, Kai

    2016-03-15

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are short regulatory RNAs that modulate the transcriptome and proteome at the post-transcriptional level. To obtain a better understanding on the role of miRNAs in the progression of cervical cancer, meta-analysis and gene set enrichment analysis were used to analyze published cervical cancer miRNA studies. From 85 published reports, which include 3,922 cases and 2,099 noncancerous control tissue samples, 63 differentially expressed miRNAs (DEmiRNAs) were identified in different stages of cervical cancer development (CIN 1-3 and CC). It was found that some of the dysregulated miRNAs were associated with specific stages of cervical cancer development. To illustrate the impact of miRNAs on the pathogenesis of cervical cancer, a miRNA-mRNA interaction network on selected pathways was built by integrating viral oncoproteins, dysregulated miRNAs and their predicted/validated targets. The results indicated that the deregulated miRNAs at the different stages of cervical cancer were functionally involved in several key cancer related pathways, such as cell cycle, p53 and Wnt signaling pathways. These dysregulated miRNAs could play an important role in cervical cancer development. Some of the stage-specific miRNAs can also be used as biomarkers for cancer classification and monitoring the progression of cancer development.

  1. Recommendations for a national agenda to substantially reduce cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    Brewer, Noel T.; Saslow, Debbie; Alexander, Kenneth; Chernofsky, Mildred R.; Crosby, Richard; Derting, Libby; Devlin, Leah; Dunton, Charles J.; Engle, Jeffrey; Fernandez, Maria; Fouad, Mona; Huh, Warner; Kinney, Walter; Pierce, Jennifer; Rios, Elena; Rothholz, Mitchel C.; Shlay, Judith C.; Shedd-Steele, Rivienne; Vernon, Sally W.; Walker, Joan; Wynn, Theresa; Zimet, Gregory D.; Casey, Baretta R.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Prophylactic human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines and new HPV screening tests, combined with traditional Pap test screening, provide an unprecedented opportunity to greatly reduce cervical cancer in the USA. Despite these advances, thousands of women continue to be diagnosed with and die of this highly preventable disease each year. This paper describes the initiatives and recommendations of national cervical cancer experts toward preventing and possibly eliminating this disease. Methods In May 2011, Cervical Cancer-Free America, a national initiative, convened a cervical cancer summit in Washington, DC. Over 120 experts from the public and private sector met to develop a national agenda for reducing cervical cancer morbidity and mortality in the USA. Results Summit participants evaluated four broad challenges to reducing cervical cancer: (1) low use of HPV vaccines, (2) low use of cervical cancer screening, (3) screening errors, and (4) lack of continuity of care for women diagnosed with cervical cancer. The summit offered 12 concrete recommendations to guide future national and local efforts toward this goal. Conclusions Cervical cancer incidence and mortality can be greatly reduced by better deploying existing methods and systems. The challenge lies in ensuring that the array of available prevention options are accessible and utilized by all age-appropriate women—particularly minority and underserved women who are disproportionately affected by this disease. The consensus was that cervical cancer can be greatly reduced and that prevention efforts can lead the way towards a dramatic reduction in this preventable disease in our country. PMID:23828553

  2. A study of chronic fatigue in Norwegian cervical cancer survivors.

    PubMed

    Steen, Rita; Dahl, Alv A; Hess, Siri Lothe; Kiserud, Cecilie E

    2017-09-01

    Chronic fatigue after treatment is a common adverse event in cancer patients, but there are few studies in long-term survivors of cervical cancer. The aim of this investigation was to explore the prevalence of chronic fatigue and its association with various clinical and treatment-related factors in a population-based cohort of Norwegian cervical cancer survivors treated by any modality. All patients, treated for cervical cancer from 2000 through 2007 in the Health Region of South-Eastern Norway, cancer-free, alive and aged ≤75years by the end 2013 (n=822) received a questionnaire covering chronic fatigue and other clinical variables. 461 of 822 survivors (56%) completed the questionnaire and 382 entered the analyses. Chronic fatigue was reported by 23% (95% confidence interval 19%-27%) with a median age of 52years (range 32-75) at survey, 11years (range 7-15) after diagnosis. Among survivors treated by minimal invasive- or radical surgery, 19% had chronic fatigue, while the prevalence was 28% in those treated with radiation and concomitant chemotherapy (chemoradiation). The chronic fatigue group reported significantly more cardiovascular disease, obesity, less physical activity, more treatment-related symptom experience, more menopausal symptoms, higher levels of anxiety and depressive symptoms, and poorer quality of life than the non-fatigued group. In multivariate analysis only increased level of depression and poorer global quality of life were significantly associated with chronic fatigue. Chronic fatigue was reported by 23% of long-term survivors after cervical cancer at a mean of 11years after treatment. Some of the associated factors are amenable to prevention and/or treatment and should be subjects of attention at follow-up. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. [Papillomavirus and cervical cancer in Chile].

    PubMed

    O'Ryan, Miguel; Valenzuela, María Teresa

    2008-11-01

    Molecular, clinical and epidemiological studies have established beyond doubt that human papiloma viruses (HPV) cause cervical cancer. The virus is also associated with genital warts and other less common cancers in oropharynx, vulva, vagina and penis. Worldwide, VPH genotypes 16 and 18 are the most common high risk genotypes, detected in near 70% of women with cervical cancer. The discovery of a cause-effect relationship between several carcinogenic microorganisms and cancer open avenues for new diagnostic, treatment and prevention strategies. In this issue of Revista Médica de Chile, two papers on HPV are presented. Guzman and colleagues demonstrate that HPV can be detected in 66% to 77% of healthy male adolescents bypolymerase chain reaction and that positivity depends on the site of the penis that is sampled. These results support the role of male to female transmission of high risk HPVs in Chile and should lead to even more active educational campaigns. The second paper provides recommendations for HPV vaccine use in Chile, generated by the Immunization Advisory Committee of the Chilean Infectious Disease Society. To issue these recommendations, the Committee analyzes the epidemiological information available on HPV infection and cervical cancer in Chile, vaccine safety and effectiveness data, and describes cost-effectiveness studies. Taking into account that universal vaccination is controversial, the Committee favors vaccine use in Chile and it's incorporation into a national program. However, there is an indication that the country requires the implementation of an integrated surveillance approach including cross matching of data obtained from HPV genotype surveillance, monitoring of vaccination coverage, and surveillance of cervical cancer. The final decision of universal vaccine use in Chile should be based on a through analysis of information.ev Mid Chile

  4. Adjuvant chemotherapy for early-stage cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Asano, Hiroshi; Todo, Yukiharu; Watari, Hidemichi

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this review is to address the current status of adjuvant chemotherapy alone in early-stage cervical cancer treatments in the literature. At present, the therapeutic effect of adjuvant chemotherapy alone after radical surgery (RS) has not yet been established, and radiation therapy (RT) or concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) is recommended as the standard adjuvant therapy after RS for early-stage cervical cancer in various guidelines. The main purpose of adjuvant therapy after RS, however, should be to reduce extrapelvic recurrence rather than local recurrence, although adjuvant RT or CCRT has survival benefits for patients with intermediate- or high-risk factors for recurrence. Moreover, several studies reported that adjuvant therapies including RT were associated with a higher incidence of complications, such as lymphedema, bowel obstruction and urinary disturbance, and a lower grade of long-term quality of life (QOL) or sexual functioning than adjuvant chemotherapy alone. The effect of adjuvant chemotherapy alone for early-stage cervical cancer with intermediate- or high-risk factors for recurrence were not fully investigated in prospective studies, but several retrospective studies suggest that the adjuvant effects of chemotherapy alone are at least similar to that of RT or CCRT in terms of recurrence rate, disease-free survival, or overall survival (OS) with lower incidence of complications. Whereas cisplatin based combination regimens were used in these studies, paclitaxel/cisplatin (TP) regimen, which is currently recognized as a standard chemotherapy regimen for patients with metastatic, recurrent or persistent cervical cancer by Gynecologic Oncology Group (GOG), had also survival benefit as an adjuvant therapy. Therefore, it may be worth considering a prospective randomized controlled trial (RCT) of adjuvant chemotherapy alone using TP regimen versus adjuvant RT as an alternative adjuvant therapy. Because early-stage cervical cancer is a curable

  5. Adjuvant chemotherapy for early-stage cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    Asano, Hiroshi; Todo, Yukiharu; Watari, Hidemichi

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this review is to address the current status of adjuvant chemotherapy alone in early-stage cervical cancer treatments in the literature. At present, the therapeutic effect of adjuvant chemotherapy alone after radical surgery (RS) has not yet been established, and radiation therapy (RT) or concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) is recommended as the standard adjuvant therapy after RS for early-stage cervical cancer in various guidelines. The main purpose of adjuvant therapy after RS, however, should be to reduce extrapelvic recurrence rather than local recurrence, although adjuvant RT or CCRT has survival benefits for patients with intermediate- or high-risk factors for recurrence. Moreover, several studies reported that adjuvant therapies including RT were associated with a higher incidence of complications, such as lymphedema, bowel obstruction and urinary disturbance, and a lower grade of long-term quality of life (QOL) or sexual functioning than adjuvant chemotherapy alone. The effect of adjuvant chemotherapy alone for early-stage cervical cancer with intermediate- or high-risk factors for recurrence were not fully investigated in prospective studies, but several retrospective studies suggest that the adjuvant effects of chemotherapy alone are at least similar to that of RT or CCRT in terms of recurrence rate, disease-free survival, or overall survival (OS) with lower incidence of complications. Whereas cisplatin based combination regimens were used in these studies, paclitaxel/cisplatin (TP) regimen, which is currently recognized as a standard chemotherapy regimen for patients with metastatic, recurrent or persistent cervical cancer by Gynecologic Oncology Group (GOG), had also survival benefit as an adjuvant therapy. Therefore, it may be worth considering a prospective randomized controlled trial (RCT) of adjuvant chemotherapy alone using TP regimen versus adjuvant RT as an alternative adjuvant therapy. Because early-stage cervical cancer is a curable

  6. Obesity-associated endometrial and cervical cancers.

    PubMed

    Gu, Wenyi; Chen, Chen; Zhao, Kong-Nan

    2013-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have indicated that obesity (body mass index-BMI>30) and overweight (BMI>25) directly associated with risk of many cancers. The association of obesity with cancer risks may be explained by the alterations in the metabolism of endogenous hormones, production of specific proteins and cytokines, adipose related inflammatory reactions, and genetic factors. This review aims to illustrate the link between obesity and occurrence and prognosis of endometrial and cervical cancers. Convincing scientific evidence shows that nutrition and lifestyle factors initiate the development of obesity with excessive adipose tissues, which trigger production of hormones, cytokines and other factors to promote growth of cancer cells. Obese women with either endometrial or cervical cancer, especially in postmenopausal period, have shown a significantly higher mortality. This is mainly due to that the obese women are more vulnerable in cancer occurrence and they are more likely to miss routine cancer screening, putting them at a greater risk for delayed diagnosis of these cancers and deteriorate prognosis. Thus, healthcare providers should pay particular attention to this more vulnerable group of women.

  7. Post laminoplasty cervical kyphosis-Case report.

    PubMed

    Dugoni, D E; Mancarella, C; Landi, A; Tarantino, R; Ruggeri, A G; Delfini, R

    2014-01-01

    Cervical kyphosis is a progressive cervical sagittal plane deformity that may cause a reduction in the ability to look horizontally, breathing and swallowing difficulties, sense of thoracic oppression and social isolation. Moreover, cervical kyphosis can cause myelopathy due to a direct compression by osteo-articular structures on the spinal cord or to a transitory ischaemic injury. The treatment of choice is surgery. The goals of surgery are: nervous structures decompression, cervical and global sagittal balance correction and vertebral stabilization and fusion. In October 2008 a 35 years old woman underwent surgical removal of a cervical-bulbar ependymoma with C1-C5 laminectomy and a C2-C5 laminoplasty. Five months after surgery, the patient developed a kyphotic posture, with intense neck and scapular girdle pain. The patients had a flexible cervical kyphosis. Therefore, we decided to perform an anterior surgical approach. We performed a corpectomy C4-C5 in order to achieve the anterior decompression; we placed a titanium expansion mesh. Cervical kyphosis can be flexible or fixed. Some authors have reported the use of anterior surgery only for flexible cervical kyphosis as discectomy and corpectomy. This approach is useful for anterior column load sharing however it is not required for deformity correction. The anterior approach is a good surgical option in flexible cervical kyphosis. It is of primary importance the sagittal alignment of the cervical spine in order to decompress the nervous structures and to guarantee a long-term stability. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  8. [Lymphedema after surgical treatment of cervical and vulvar cancer].

    PubMed

    Nesvold, Inger-Lise; Fosså, Sophie D

    2002-10-30

    Lack of information after surgery for cervical cancer to women who are at risk of developing lymphoedema can lead to delay in diagnosis and treatment of this side effect. Former patients with cervical cancer and vulvar cancer were asked whether they remembered having been counselled about lymphoedema post-operatively and whether they were satisfied with the information received. 83 out of 92 returned a mailed questionnaire assessing the standard of the information given before discharge. 30% of the patients were satisfied with the information given. About 30% reported that they had received neither written nor oral information about lymphoedema. 18 women stated the importance of oral information. 20% had symptoms of lymphoedema of the lower limbs. The study confirms the importance of patient education given verbally before discharge. Health personnel with extensive knowledge and experience in the area should give this information.

  9. Issues in cervical cancer incidence and treatment in HIV.

    PubMed

    Einstein, Mark H; Phaëton, Rébécca

    2010-09-01

    Cervical disease burden continues to be especially high in HIV-infected women, even in the era of effective antiretroviral medications. This review discusses the multiple issues surrounding HIV-associated cervical cancer. Also, the unique treatment-related issues in HIV-associated cervical cancer are addressed. The incidence of invasive cervical cancer has remained stable in industrialized nations; however, it is only estimated in developing countries secondary to a relative lack of data collection and registries. Trends in HIV-associated cervical cancer have changed in the highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) era. Recent molecular pathways suggest that the natural progression of human papillomavirus infection, the causal agent in all cervical cancers, may be related to immune system dysfunction as well as HIV/human papillomavirus synergistic mechanisms. When highly active retroviral therapies are used, invasive cervical cancer treatments are impacted by concomitant drug toxicities that could potentially limit therapeutic benefit of either HAART or the standard of care treatment for locally advanced cervical cancer, concomitant chemoradiotherapy. The significance and care of the patient with invasive cervical cancer is becoming a geographically relevant phenomenon such that it may be time to re-address the global definition. Further studies in treatment issues and drug-drug interactions with cervical cancer treatments in the setting of HIV are paramount.

  10. Update knowledge on cervical cancer incidence and prevalence in Asia.

    PubMed

    Daniyal, Muhammad; Akhtar, Naheed; Ahmad, Saeed; Fatima, Urooj; Akram, Muhammad; Asif, Hafiz Muhammad

    2015-01-01

    Cervical cancer is the second most common cause of cancer-related death among women worldwide, with over 500,000 new cases diagnosed annually and 50% mortality rate in Asia. In the United States, approximately 10,370 new cases of cervical cancer are diagnosed annually, and estimated 3,710 deaths occur from the disease, making it the sixth most common cause of malignancy among American women. This study aims to provide awareness about cervical cancer as well as an updated knowledge about the prevalence and incidence of cervical cancer in Asia.

  11. The influence of time perspective on cervical cancer screening among Latinas in the United States.

    PubMed

    Roncancio, Angelica M; Ward, Kristy K; Fernandez, Maria E

    2014-12-01

    To develop effective interventions to increase cervical cancer screening among Latinas, we should understand the role of cultural factors, such as time perspective, in the decision to be screened. We examined the relation between present time orientation, future time orientation, and self-reported cervical cancer screening among Latinas. A group of 206 Latinas completed a survey measuring factors associated with screening. Logistic regression analyses revealed that future time orientation was significantly associated with self-reported screening. Understanding the influence of time orientation on cervical cancer screening will assist us in developing interventions that effectively target time perspective and screening. © The Author(s) 2013.

  12. The Influence of Time Perspective on Cervical Cancer Screening among Latinas in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Roncancio, Angelica M.; Ward, Kristy K.; Fernandez, Maria E.

    2014-01-01

    To develop effective interventions to increase cervical cancer screening among Latinas, we should understand the role of cultural factors, such as time perspective, in the decision to be screened. We examined the relation between present time orientation, future time orientation and self-reported cervical cancer screening among Latinas. A group of 206 Latinas completed a survey measuring factors associated with screening. Logistic regression analyses revealed that future time orientation was significantly associated with self-reported screening. Understanding the influence of time orientation on cervical cancer screening will assist us in developing interventions that effectively target time perspective and screening. PMID:23928988

  13. Cervical and female breast cancers in the Americas: current situation and opportunities for action.

    PubMed

    Luciani, Silvana; Cabanes, Anna; Prieto-Lara, Elisa; Gawryszewski, Vilma

    2013-09-01

    To understand better the current regional situation and public health response to cervical cancer and female breast cancer in the Americas. Data on cervical cancer and female breast cancers in 33 countries, for the period from 2000 to the last year with available data, were extracted from the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO) Regional Mortality Database and analysed. Changes in mortality rates over the study period - in all countries except those with small populations and large fluctuations in time-series mortality data - were calculated using Poisson regression models. Information from the PAHO Country Capacity Survey on noncommunicable diseases was also analysed. The Bahamas, Trinidad and Tobago and Uruguay showed relatively high rates of death from breast cancer, whereas the three highest rates of death from cervical cancer were observed in El Salvador, Nicaragua and Paraguay. Several countries - particularly Paraguay and Venezuela - have high rates of death from both types of cancer. Although mortality from cervical cancer has generally been decreasing in the Americas, decreases in mortality from breast cancer have only been observed in a few countries in the Region of the Americas. All but one of the 25 countries in the Americas included in the PAHO Country Capacity Survey reported having public health services for the screening and treatment of breast and cervical cancers. Most countries in the Americas have the public health capacity needed to screen for - and treat - breast and cervical cancers and, therefore, the potential to reduce the burden posed by these cancers.

  14. Breast and Cervical Cancer Screening: Exploring Perceptions and Barriers with Hmong Women and Men in Oregon

    PubMed Central

    Kue, Jennifer; Zukoski, Ann; Keon, Karen Levy; Thorburn, Sheryl

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Hmong women are reported to have very low rates of breast and cervical cancer screening compared to other Asian and White women in the U.S. Reasons for low cancer screening rates among this population are not well understood. METHODS This qualitative study (n=83) explored Hmong women and men’s perceptions of breast and cervical cancer and cancer screening, women’s experiences with breast and cervical cancer screening, and health care system barriers to screening. RESULTS Hmong women and men perceived breast cancer to be more severe than other types of cancers. Participants believed that breast cancer is curable if detected early. Cervical cancer was not well understood and was of greater concern than breast cancer because of its location within the body and its consequences for reproduction. In general, few participants had personal experiences with breast and/or cervical cancer. Overall, women and men had positive things to say about screenings for breast and cervical cancer, expressing that screenings offered a “proof of illness.” The majority of women did not report any concerns with the exams themselves, although some discussed embarrassment, pain, and discomfort. Barriers to screening included lack of health insurance, making co-payments, language, and issues related to scheduling appointments. Barriers differed for younger and older women. CONCLUSION Results of this study provide new insight into perceptions, experiences, and barriers to breast and cervical cancer screening among Hmong women and men. These findings have implications for developing culturally appropriate interventions to increase breast and cervical cancer screening in this population. PMID:23477387

  15. Expression of transcription factor grainyhead-like 2 is diminished in cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    Torres-Reyes, Luis A; Alvarado-Ruiz, Liliana; Piña-Sánchez, Patricia; Martínez-Silva, María G; Ramos-Solano, Moisés; Olimón-Andalón, Vicente; Ortiz-Lazareno, Pablo C; Hernández-Flores, Georgina; Bravo-Cuellar, Alejandro; Aguilar-Lemarroy, Adriana; Jave-Suarez, Luis F

    2014-01-01

    The transcription factor grainyhead-like 2 (GRHL2) is evolutionarily conserved in many different species, and is involved in morphogenesis, epithelial differentiation, and the control of the epithelial-mesenchymal transition. It has also recently been implicated in carcinogenesis, but its role in this remains controversial. Expression of GRHL2 has not previously been reported in cervical cancer, so the present study aimed to characterize GRHL2 expression in cervical cancer-derived cell lines (CCCLs) and cervical tissues with different grades of lesions. Microarray analysis found that the expression of 58 genes was down-regulated in CCCLs compared to HaCaT cells (non-tumorigenic human epithelial cell line). The expression of eight of these genes was validated by quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR), and GRHL2 was found to be the most down-regulated. Western blot assays corroborated that GRHL2 protein levels were strongly down-regulated in CCCLs. Cervical cells from women without cervical lesions were shown to express GRHL2, while immunohistochemistry found that positivity to GRHL2 decreased in cervical cancer tissues. In conclusion, a loss or strong reduction in GRHL2 expression appears to be a characteristic of cervical cancer, suggesting that GRHL2 down-regulation is a necessary step during cervical carcinogenesis. However, further studies are needed to delineate the role of GRHL2 in cervical cancer and during malignant progression. PMID:25550776

  16. Expression of transcription factor grainyhead-like 2 is diminished in cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Torres-Reyes, Luis A; Alvarado-Ruiz, Liliana; Piña-Sánchez, Patricia; Martínez-Silva, María G; Ramos-Solano, Moisés; Olimón-Andalón, Vicente; Ortiz-Lazareno, Pablo C; Hernández-Flores, Georgina; Bravo-Cuellar, Alejandro; Aguilar-Lemarroy, Adriana; Jave-Suarez, Luis F

    2014-01-01

    The transcription factor grainyhead-like 2 (GRHL2) is evolutionarily conserved in many different species, and is involved in morphogenesis, epithelial differentiation, and the control of the epithelial-mesenchymal transition. It has also recently been implicated in carcinogenesis, but its role in this remains controversial. Expression of GRHL2 has not previously been reported in cervical cancer, so the present study aimed to characterize GRHL2 expression in cervical cancer-derived cell lines (CCCLs) and cervical tissues with different grades of lesions. Microarray analysis found that the expression of 58 genes was down-regulated in CCCLs compared to HaCaT cells (non-tumorigenic human epithelial cell line). The expression of eight of these genes was validated by quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR), and GRHL2 was found to be the most down-regulated. Western blot assays corroborated that GRHL2 protein levels were strongly down-regulated in CCCLs. Cervical cells from women without cervical lesions were shown to express GRHL2, while immunohistochemistry found that positivity to GRHL2 decreased in cervical cancer tissues. In conclusion, a loss or strong reduction in GRHL2 expression appears to be a characteristic of cervical cancer, suggesting that GRHL2 down-regulation is a necessary step during cervical carcinogenesis. However, further studies are needed to delineate the role of GRHL2 in cervical cancer and during malignant progression.

  17. The investment case for cervical cancer elimination.

    PubMed

    Tsu, Vivien Davis; Ginsburg, Ophira

    2017-07-01

    We already know what causes cervical cancer, how to prevent it, and how to treat it, even in resource-constrained settings. Inequitable access to human papillomavirus vaccine for girls and screening and precancer treatment for women in low- and middle-income countries is unacceptable on ethical, social, and financial grounds. The burden of cervical cancer falls on the poor and extends beyond the narrow bounds of the family, affecting national economic development and community life, as family resources are drained and poverty tightens its grip. Proven solutions are available and the priorities for the next few years are clear, as shown by the papers in this Supplement. Sustained political commitment and strategic investments in cervical cancer prevention can not only save millions of lives over the next 10 years, but can also pave the way for the broader fight against all cancers. © 2017 The Authors. International Journal of Gynecology & Obstetrics published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics.

  18. Human papillomavirus and cervical cancer: Gardasil vaccination status and knowledge amongst a nationally representative sample of Australian secondary school students.

    PubMed

    Agius, Paul A; Pitts, Marian K; Smith, Anthony M A; Mitchell, Anne

    2010-06-17

    The aim of this paper was to measure student knowledge of HPV and risks associated with cervical cancer, explore associated factors, correlate knowledge of HPV and cervical cancer with other domains of sexual health related knowledge and estimate student self-reported rates of HPV immunisation. Data were from a nationally representative cross-sectional stratified cluster sample of year 10 and 12 students in the Australian secondary school system. Contingency table, comparison of means, correlation and multiple OLS regression analyses of students answering HPV (n=1927) and cervical cancer (n=2680) knowledge questions was undertaken. Student HPV and cervical cancer knowledge was generally poor. Young women exhibited better knowledge than young men however the difference was, to some extent, accounted for by vaccination for HPV. Sexually active students and those having more sexual partners in the previous year did not report higher levels of HPV and cervical cancer knowledge. The large majority of young women surveyed reported a HPV vaccination as did a small proportion of young men. Students who reported being vaccinated had higher levels of knowledge about HPV and cervical cancer. Student knowledge of HPV and cervical cancer is considerably limited. There is some evidence that being vaccinated for HPV improves a person's level of understanding of the disease and cervical cancer. The recent national public health campaign focussing on cervical cancer vaccination for young women may be partly responsible for a lack of understanding of HPV as a common STI.

  19. Radiation therapy for stage IVA cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Naoya; Kasamatsu, Takahiro; Morota, Madoka; Sumi, Minako; Inaba, Koji; Ito, Yoshinori; Itami, Jun

    2013-11-01

    To evaluate the outcome and discover predictive factors for patients with stage IVA cervical cancer treated with definitive radiation therapy. We retrospectively reviewed 34 patients with stage IVA cervical cancer who received definitive radiation therapy between 1992 and 2009. On univariate analysis, statistically significant prognostic factors for improved local control rate (LCR) were absence of pyometra (p=0.037) and equivalent dose in 2 Gy fractions (EQD2) at point A greater than 60 Gy (p=0.023). Prognostic factors for improved progression-free survival (PFS) were absence of pelvic lymph node metastasis at initial presentation (p=0.014), and EQD2 at point A greater than 60 Gy (p=0.023). Patients with stage IVA disease had poor median survival. However adequate radiation dose to point A produced favorable LCR and PFS, therefore efforts should be made to increase the point A dose.

  20. Cervical cancer prevention and treatment in Latin America.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Melissa S; Baker, Ellen S; Maza, Mauricio; Fontes-Cintra, Georgia; Lopez, Aldo; Carvajal, Juan M; Nozar, Fernanda; Fiol, Veronica; Schmeler, Kathleen M

    2017-02-07

    Cervical cancer is a preventable disease with a known etiology (human papillomavirus), effective preventive vaccines, excellent screening methods, and a treatable pre-invasive phase. Surgery is the primary treatment for pre-invasive and early-stage disease and can safely be performed in many low-resource settings. However, cervical cancer rates remain high in many areas of Latin America. This article presents a number of evidence-based strategies being implemented to improve cervical cancer outcomes in Latin America.

  1. Drug Delivery Approaches for the Treatment of Cervical Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ordikhani, Farideh; Erdem Arslan, Mustafa; Marcelo, Raymundo; Sahin, Ilyas; Grigsby, Perry; Schwarz, Julie K.; Azab, Abdel Kareem

    2016-01-01

    Cervical cancer is a highly prevalent cancer that affects women around the world. With the availability of new technologies, researchers have increased their efforts to develop new drug delivery systems in cervical cancer chemotherapy. In this review, we summarized some of the recent research in systematic and localized drug delivery systems and compared the advantages and disadvantages of these methods. PMID:27447664

  2. Cervical cancer: does our message promote screening? A pilot study in a South African context.

    PubMed

    Maree, Johanna E; Wright, Susanna C D

    2011-04-01

    The purpose of the study was to explore if cervical cancer information presented in a non-stigmatizing manner could promote screening in women living in a resource poor environment in Tshwane, South Africa. An exploratory, contextual, quantitative door-to-door survey was conducted. The sampling method was convenience (n = 105). Structured interviews were used to gather self-reported data. Chi-square tests were used for secondary data analyses. The study provided evidence that presenting information on cervical cancer in a non-stigmatizing manner based on the theme of self protection promoted cervical screening. The study further provided evidence that women preferred a cervical cancer message that does not focus on the sexual risk factors of this disease. More than a third of the sample preferring a message introducing cervical cancer as a sexually transmitted infection (n = 32) were of the opinion that this message were stigmatizing, blameful and displayed misunderstanding of their lives. Cervical cancer screening is indeed not simple. The screening rate not only in South Africa but many other countries serves as proof. It can therefore not be afforded to add to the barriers by presenting information on cervical cancer in a way perceived as stigmatizing and blameful. Presenting information in way that women prefer might not only promote cervical screening, but might motivate them in such a way that they are screened. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Involvement of retinoblastoma-associated protein 48 during photodynamic therapy of cervical cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shuxia; Wang, Lijun; Ren, Xingye; Pan, Yulu; Peng, Yan; Zou, Xiaoyan; Shi, Cuige; Zhang, Youzhong

    2017-03-01

    5-Aminolevulinic acid-mediated photodynamic therapy (ALA‑PDT) is an effective treatment option for cervical intraepithelial neoplasia, the precancerous lesion of cervical cancer, and early cervical cancer, particularly for young or nulliparous women who want to remain fertile. A previous report described the involvement of histone deacetylases (HDAC) during ALA‑PDT mediated apoptosis in the cerebral cortex of a mouse model. Retinoblastoma‑associated protein 48 (RbAp48), a highly abundant component of HDACs, is a critical mediator that controls the transforming activity of human papillomavirus 16 in cervical cancer cells. The aim of the present study was to investigate the involvement of RbAp48 in ALA‑PDT‑induced cell death in cervical cancer cells. RbAp48 was significantly upregulated in cervical cancer cell lines treated with ALA‑PDT, including SiHa and HeLa cells. To establish the relevance of RbAp48 and the efficacy of ALA‑PDT in cervical cancer cells, the effect of ALA‑PDT was investigated in SiHa or HeLa cells following the depletion of RbAp48 by small interfering RNA (siRNA). Reduction of RbAp48 led to the reduced suppression of proliferation and apoptosis induced by ALA‑PDT in cervical cancer cells, which was associated with a reduction in tumor suppressor protein 53 (p53), retinoblastoma (Rb), apoptosis‑related enzyme caspase‑3, and increased levels of the oncogenic genes, human papillomavirus E6 and E7. These results provide evidence that RbAp48 is an important contributor to the efficacy of ALA‑PDT in cervical cancer cells. RbAp48 may be a therapeutic target that may help to improve the treatment of cervical cancer.

  4. Mothers' attitudes in Japan regarding cervical cancer screening correlates with intention to recommend cervical cancer screening for daughters.

    PubMed

    Egawa-Takata, Tomomi; Ueda, Yutaka; Tanaka, Yusuke; Morimoto, Akiko; Kubota, Satoshi; Yagi, Asami; Terai, Yoshito; Ohmichi, Masahide; Ichimura, Tomoyuki; Sumi, Toshiyuki; Murata, Hiromi; Okada, Hidetaka; Nakai, Hidekatsu; Mandai, Masaki; Yoshino, Kiyoshi; Kimura, Tadashi; Saito, Junko; Kudo, Risa; Sekine, Masayuki; Enomoto, Takayuki; Horikoshi, Yorihiko; Takagi, Tetsu; Shimura, Kentaro

    2016-10-01

    Cervical cancer and its precancerous lesions caused by human papilloma virus (HPV) are steadily increasing in women in Japan. In comparison with women in other resource-rich countries, young women in Japan have a dismally low screening rate for cervical cancer. Our preliminary research has shown that 20-year-old women in Japan usually ask their mothers for advice regarding their initial cervical cancer screening. The objective of our current research is to determine the social factors among mothers in Japan that are causing them to give advice to their daughters regarding the HPV vaccine and cervical cancer screening. The survey's targets were mothers who had 20-year-old daughters. We recruited respondents from the roster of a commercial internet survey panel. We analyzed for correlations between a mother's knowledge concerning cervical cancer, her recent cancer screening history, and the advice she gave to her daughter regarding cervical cancer screening. We obtained 618 valid answers to the survey. Compared with mothers who did not get screening, mothers who had cervical cancer screening had significantly more knowledge about cervical cancer and its screening (p < 0.05). The daughters of mothers with recent screening had received HPV vaccination more often than those of mothers without recent screening (p = 0.018). Mothers with recent screening histories tended more often to encourage their daughters to have cervical cancer screening (p < 0.05). When mothers were properly educated concerning cervical cancer and its screening, they were significantly more likely than before to recommend that their daughters have it (p < 0.0001). In young Japanese women, given the important role their mothers have in their lives, it is probable that we could improve their cervical cancer screening rate significantly by giving their mothers better medical information, and a chance to experience cervical cancer screening for themselves.

  5. The Prevalence of Human Papillomavirus in Cervical Cancer in Iran.

    PubMed

    Mortazavi, SH; Zali, MR; Raoufi, M; Nadji, M; Kowsarian, P; Nowroozi, A

    2002-01-01

    positive tumors contained HPV-16; the rest (11.6%) demonstrated type 18 and 33. There was no correlation between the histology of carcinoma and presence of types of HPV. Conclusion: The prevalence of HPV in carcinomas of uterine cervix in Iran is similar to those reported in other regions of the world. Similarly, it appears that HPV-16 is the most common type associated with cervical cancer in Iran. Further studies on larger samples of patients, particularly in those with pre-invasive forms of the disease, are needed to elucidate the carcinogenic role of HPV types in cervical cancer in Iranian women.

  6. Molecular mechanisms of cisplatin resistance in cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Haiyan; Luo, Hui; Zhang, Wenwen; Shen, Zhaojun; Hu, Xiaoli; Zhu, Xueqiong

    2016-01-01

    Patients with advanced or recurrent cervical cancer have poor prognosis, and their 1-year survival is only 10%–20%. Chemotherapy is considered as the standard treatment for patients with advanced or recurrent cervical cancer, and cisplatin appears to treat the disease effectively. However, resistance to cisplatin may develop, thus substantially compromising the efficacy of cisplatin to treat advanced or recurrent cervical cancer. In this article, we systematically review the recent literature and summarize the recent advances in our understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying cisplatin resistance in cervical cancer. PMID:27354763

  7. Sentinel Lymph Node Evaluation in Women with Cervical Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Holman, Laura L.; Levenback, Charles F.; Frumovitz, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Lymph node status is the most important prognosticator of survival among women with early stage cervical cancer. This means that many cervical cancer patients will undergo pelvic lymphadenectomy as part of their treatment. Unfortunately, this procedure is associated with significant morbidity. Utilizing the sentinel lymph node technique for women with cervical cancer has the potential to decrease this morbidity. Multiple studies have suggested that sentinel lymph node mapping in these patients is feasible with excellent detection rates and sensitivity. This review examines the current body of literature regarding sentinel lymph node biopsy among women with cervical cancer. PMID:24407177

  8. Cervical cancer screening in low- and middle-income countries.

    PubMed

    Ditzian, Lauren R; David-West, Gizelka; Maza, Mauricio; Hartmann, Beatrix; Shirazian, Taraneh; Cremer, Miriam

    2011-01-01

    Cervical cancer is a leading cause of death among women in the developing world. Conventional cytology-based cervical cancer screening programs have been largely ineffectual at reducing the cervical cancer burden in low-resource settings. In response, alternative strategies have been tested, such as visual inspection with acetic acid (VIA) screening and human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA-based testing. This manuscript reviews literature addressing the programmatic approaches to implementing cervical cancer screening programs in low-resource settings, highlighting the challenges, barriers, and successes related to the use of cytology, VIA, and HPV-DNA based screening programs.

  9. Primary Health Care and Cervical Cancer Mortality Rates in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Rocha, Thiago Augusto Hernandes; da Silva, Núbia Cristina; Thomaz, Erika Bárbara Abreu Fonseca; Queiroz, Rejane Christine de Sousa; de Souza, Marta Rovery; Lein, Adriana; Alvares, Viviane; de Almeida, Dante Grapiuna; Barbosa, Allan Claudius Queiroz; Thumé, Elaine; Staton, Catherine; Vissoci, João Ricardo Nickenig; Facchini, Luiz Augusto

    2017-01-01

    Cervical cancer is a common neoplasm that is responsible for nearly 230 000 deaths annually in Brazil. Despite this burden, cervical cancer is considered preventable with appropriate care. We conducted a longitudinal ecological study from 2002 to 2012 to examine the relationship between the delivery of preventive primary care and cervical cancer mortality rates in Brazil. Brazilian states and the federal district were the unit of analysis (N = 27). Results suggest that primary health care has contributed to reducing cervical cancer mortality rates in Brazil; however, the full potential of preventive care has yet to be realized. PMID:28252500

  10. Interventions for encouraging sexual behaviours intended to prevent cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Shepherd, Jonathan P; Frampton, Geoff K; Harris, Petra

    2011-04-13

    outcomes (e.g. increasing condom use) were common, though not universal and varied according to the type of outcome. There were no statistically significant effects of abstaining from or reducing sexual activity. There were few statistically significant effects on biological (STI) outcomes. Considerable uncertainty exists in the risk of bias due to incomplete or ambiguous reporting. Behavioural interventions for young women which aim to promote sexual behaviours protective of STI transmission can be effective, primarily at encouraging condom use. Future evaluations should include a greater focus on HPV and its link to cervical cancer, with long-term follow-up to assess impact on behaviour change, rates of HPV infection and progression to cervical cancer. Studies should use an RCT design where possible with integral process evaluation and cost-effectiveness analysis where appropriate. Given the predominance of USA studies in this systematic review evaluations conducted in other countries would be particularly useful.

  11. Cervical cancer screening: who is not screened and why?

    PubMed Central

    Harlan, L C; Bernstein, A B; Kessler, L G

    1991-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The decline in death rates from cervical cancer in the United States has been widely attributed to the use of Papanicolaou (Pap) smears for early detection of cervical cancer. METHODS: Pap smear screening rates, beliefs about appropriate screening intervals and factors affecting screening were examined using 1987 National Health Interview Survey data. RESULTS: Results indicate that through age 69, Blacks are screened at similar or higher rates than Whites. Hispanics, particularly those speaking only or mostly Spanish, are least likely to have received a Pap smear within the last three years. Of women who had never heard of or never had a Pap smear, nearly 80 percent reported contact with a medical practitioner in the past two years, while more than 90 percent reported a contact in the past five years. Overall, the most frequently reported reason for not having a recent Pap smear was procrastinating or not believing it was necessary. CONCLUSIONS: Thus, in developing screening programs, Hispanics, particularly Spanish speakers, must be targeted. In addition, educational programs should target unscreened women who forego the test due to underestimating its importance, procrastination, or because their medical care provider did not suggest the procedure. Women must be intensively educated that Pap smears should be scheduled routinely to detect asymptomatic cervical cancer. PMID:2053665

  12. Cervical cancer screening: who is not screened and why?

    PubMed

    Harlan, L C; Bernstein, A B; Kessler, L G

    1991-07-01

    The decline in death rates from cervical cancer in the United States has been widely attributed to the use of Papanicolaou (Pap) smears for early detection of cervical cancer. Pap smear screening rates, beliefs about appropriate screening intervals and factors affecting screening were examined using 1987 National Health Interview Survey data. Results indicate that through age 69, Blacks are screened at similar or higher rates than Whites. Hispanics, particularly those speaking only or mostly Spanish, are least likely to have received a Pap smear within the last three years. Of women who had never heard of or never had a Pap smear, nearly 80 percent reported contact with a medical practitioner in the past two years, while more than 90 percent reported a contact in the past five years. Overall, the most frequently reported reason for not having a recent Pap smear was procrastinating or not believing it was necessary. Thus, in developing screening programs, Hispanics, particularly Spanish speakers, must be targeted. In addition, educational programs should target unscreened women who forego the test due to underestimating its importance, procrastination, or because their medical care provider did not suggest the procedure. Women must be intensively educated that Pap smears should be scheduled routinely to detect asymptomatic cervical cancer.

  13. CERVICAL CANCER: ASSESSMENT OF DIAGNOSIS AND TREATMENT FACILITIES IN PUBLIC HEALTH INSTITUTIONS IN ADDIS ABABA, ETHIOPIA.

    PubMed

    Wondimu, Yehualashet Tadesse

    2015-04-01

    Cervical cancer is the second most common cancer in women globally and the leading cause of cancer deaths in women in low income countries. The majority of cervical cancer related deaths occur in the developing world. It is also an important public health problem in Ethiopia, a country without a well-established control program for the disease. This study assessed the diagnostic and therapeutic facility for cervical cancer (including health providers' awareness of the disease) in Addis Ababa public health institutions which can be used to develop control strategies and to visualize the amount of resources required. A cross-sectional study was conducted including all public health institutions in Addis Ababa in August 2010. Health providers' awareness of cervical cancer was assessed using a self-administered questionnaire. Checklist was used to register diagnostic and therapeutic infrastructure in each health facility. Data was analyzed using STATA. All health providers responded they had heard about cervical cancer. Half of the participants were able to identify common symptoms of the disease. Only 23% of the participants mentioned human papilloma virus (HPV) as the primary cause of cervical cancer. A significant association between awareness and profession was seen. Absence of skilled manpower, equipment and proper documentation was reported in the majority of the institutions. This study assessed the existing skilled man power and infrastructure to diagnose and treat cervical cancer in public institutions in Addis Ababa which is important to develop an effective cervical cancer control program. In addition, the study showed the more work that should be done to improve health providers' awareness in cervical cancer through education and training.

  14. The Partnership for Cancer Prevention: Addressing Access to Cervical Cancer Screening among Latinas in South Carolina

    PubMed Central

    Parra-Medina, Deborah; Hilfinger Messias, DeAnne K.; Fore, Elizabeth; Mayo, Rachel; Petry, Denyse; Das, Irene Prabhu

    2015-01-01

    Background Cancer is a leading cause of morbidity and morality among Hispanics, the fastest growing population group in South Carolina (SC). The Partnership for Cancer Prevention (PCP) was established to build partnerships and community capacity to address cervical cancer early detection and control among the growing Latina population in SC. In this paper we report on the initial PCP community-based participatory research (CBPR) project. Methods PCP members engaged in a multi-method, participatory research project to assess cervical cancer related resources and needs among Latinas and healthcare providers. To explore attitudes and behaviors related to women's health in general and more specifically, female cancer, PCP members conducted 8 focus group sessions with 38 Spanish-speaking women. To assess the availability and perceived importance of culturally and linguistically appropriate services, PCP members conducted a survey of providers (n=46) and support personnel (n=30) at 14 clinical sites that provide cancer screening services. Results Health care access issues were Latinas' main concerns. For information and assistance in accessing and navigating the health care system, they relied on informal social networks and community outreach workers. Latina participants voiced misunderstandings about cancer risk and most appeared to lack a prevention orientation. Practitioners’ concerns included the assessment and documentation of patients' language preference and ability, provision of language assistance for limited-English-proficient (LEP) patients, and bilingual staff. Conclusions Building on the findings of this participatory research initiative, PCP members identified the following action strategies to promote cervical cancer screening among Latinas in SC: culturally appropriate cervical cancer awareness messages and outreach strategies geared towards increasing participation in cervical cancer screening and follow-up; maintenance of active community

  15. Cervical cancer screening in England.

    PubMed

    Patnick, J

    2000-11-01

    Cervical screening in England is provided free of charge by the National Health Service to all women aged 20-64 years. Computerised call and recall was introduced in 1988 and women receive an invitation every 3-5 years. Smears are taken by the local family doctor, by his/her nurse or at community clinics. Approximately 85% of English women have had a smear in the last 5 years. Quality assurance programmes have recently been established for laboratories and colposcopy clinics and lessons have been learned from previous failures of the service. The incidence has fallen from 16 per 100000 in 1986 to 9.3 per 100000 in 1997. Mortality is currently falling by 7% per year.

  16. DNA probes for papillomavirus strains readied for cervical cancer screening

    SciTech Connect

    Merz, B.

    1988-11-18

    New Papillomavirus tests are ready to come to the aid of the standard Papanicolauo test in screening for cervical cancer. The new tests, which detect the strains of human papillomavirus (HPV) most commonly associated with human cervical cancer, are designed to be used as an adjunct to rather than as a replacement for the Papanicolaou smears. Their developers say that they can be used to indicated a risk of developing cancer in women whose Papanicolaou smears indicate mild cervical dysplasia, and, eventually, to detect papillomavirus infection in normal Papanicolaou smears. The rationale for HPV testing is derived from a growing body of evidence that HPV is a major factor in the etiology of cervical cancer. Three HPV tests were described recently in Chicago at the Third International Conference on Human Papillomavirus and Squamous Cervical Cancer. Each relies on DNA probes to detect the presence of papillomavirus in cervical cells and/or to distinguish the strain of papillomavirus present.

  17. Pembrolizumab in cervical cancer: latest evidence and clinical usefulness.

    PubMed

    Borcoman, Edith; Le Tourneau, Christophe

    2017-06-01

    Cervical cancer is the fourth most common cause of cancer-related deaths in women worldwide. With the development of detection of precancerous lesions and preventive human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination program, a survival improvement has been observed in these patients in developed countries, although disparities in accessibility to treatments exist across countries. While early-stage cervical cancer can be curable with surgery, prognosis of patients who recur remains poor, with limited treatment options. In this latter setting, recently, bevacizumab, an antiangiogenic monoclonal antibody targeting vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), has been shown to improve overall survival in combination with chemotherapy as compared with chemotherapy alone. No standard treatments exist beyond this treatment regimen. New effective treatments are therefore much needed in this setting. Immunotherapy has represented a breakthrough in recent years in oncology, with antitumor activity reported with immune-checkpoint inhibitors in a variety of tumor types. We discuss here the latest evidence and clinical usefulness of pembrolizumab, anti-PD-1 checkpoint inhibitor, in the treatment of advanced cervical cancer.

  18. Violence against women and cervical cancer screening: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Leite, Franciéle Marabotti Costa; Amorim, Maria Helena Costa; Primo, Cândida Caniçali; Gigante, Denise Petrucci

    2017-08-01

    To present a systematic review of papers published on the relationship between violence against women and cervical cancer screening. Violence against women is a serious public health problem. This phenomenon can have negative effects on victims' health and affect the frequency at which they receive cervical cancer screening. A systematic literature review. This study was carried out in October 2015 with searches of the Lilacs, PubMed and Web of Science databases using the following keywords: violence, domestic violence, battered women, spouse abuse, Papanicolaou test, vaginal smears, early detection of cancer and cervix uteri. Eight papers published between 2002-2013 were included in this review, most of which were cross-sectional studies. Three studies found no association between victimisation and receiving Pap testing, and five studies reported an association. These contradictory results were due to higher or lower examination frequencies among the women who had experienced violence. The results of this study indicate that the association between violence against women and cervical cancer screening remains inconclusive, and they demonstrate the need for more detailed studies to help clarify this relationship. Professionals who aid women should be knowledgeable regarding the perception and detection of violence so that they can interrupt the cycle of aggression, which has harmful impacts on victims' health. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Knowledge and barriers towards cervical cancer screening among young women in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Al-Naggar, Redhwan Ahmed; Low, W Y; Isa, Zaleha Md

    2010-01-01

    This study examined the level of knowledge and barriers towards cervical cancer screening of female university students. A cross-sectional design was used for 287 female students at a tertiary institution located in Selangor, Malaysia. A name list of all students in the all faculties were obtained from each faculty's registrar and the ethics committee of the Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, approved the study. Respondents completed a consent form before they were given the questionnaire consisting of four sections: socio-demographic characteristics (six questions); risk factor of cervical cancer (six); knowledge about cervical cancer and the Pap smear test (ten); and finally barriers to Pap screening (eleven). Data were analyzed using SPSS version 13. The prevalence of ever having had a Pap test was 6%. Majority of the participants had adequate knowledge about risk factors of cervical cancer. The highest knowledge about cervical cancer risk factor reported by the respondents was having more than one sex partner (77.5%), whereas the lowest was the relationship between HPV and cervical cancer (51.2%). Age, marital status, ethnicity, monthly family income and faculty were significantly associated with knowledge of cervical cancer screening (p=0.003; p=0.001; p=0.002; p=0.002; p=0.001 and p=0.002; respectively). The most common barriers of cervical cancer screening were the Pap smear test will make them worry (95.8%) whereas the least common barrier reported among participants was no encouragement from the partner (8.8%). Some misconceptions and barriers in uptaking Pap smear test are still serious problems among young women. Although knowledge about cervical cancer screening is adequate they have a very poor practice of Pap smear test. The introduction of reproductive health subjects is warranted for all university students.

  20. Association between war and cervical cancer among Vietnamese women.

    PubMed

    Huynh, My Linh D; Raab, Stephen S; Suba, Eric J

    2004-07-10

    Decades ago, cervical cancer was the leading form of cancer among women in both North Vietnam and South Vietnam. Currently, cervical cancer rates are considerably lower in the northern region of the country. We performed a case-control study to measure factors associated with the development of cervical cancer among Vietnamese women. Questionnaire-based interviews were conducted with 202 women in southern Vietnam and 97 women in northern Vietnam. Case subjects were women hospitalized with cervical cancer. Control subjects were women hospitalized with extrauterine neoplasms. Data were analyzed using logistic regression, and odds ratios for the development of invasive cervical cancer were measured. The development of invasive cervical cancer was significantly associated with military service by husbands during the Second Indochinese War and with parity status. Odds ratio for the development of cervical cancer among southern Vietnamese women whose husbands had served in the armed forces was 2.6 (95% CI = 1.2-5.5). Odds ratio for the development of cervical cancer among northern women whose husbands had served in the armed forces was 3.9 (95% CI = 1.5-10.4) if their husbands had been stationed in South Vietnam during the war years. Northern women whose husbands had served in the military experienced no significant increase in cervical cancer risk if their husbands had been stationed in North Vietnam during the war years. Geographic and temporal variation in cervical cancer rates among Vietnamese women was associated with the movement of soldiers. These findings may be useful for cervical cancer prevention efforts in Vietnam and in other countries.

  1. Cervical Cancer Screening Among Arab Women in the United States: An Integrative Review

    PubMed Central

    Abboud, Sarah; De Penning, Emily; Brawner, Bridgette M.; Menon, Usha; Glanz, Karen; Sommers, Marilyn S.

    2017-01-01

    Problem Identification Arab American women are an ethnic minority and immigrant population in the United States with unique and nuanced sociocultural factors that influence preventive health behaviors. The aims of this article are to evaluate and synthesize the existing evidence on cervical cancer screening behaviors, as well as determine factors that influence these behaviors, among Arab American women. Literature Search Extensive literature searches were performed using PubMed, CINAHL®, Scopus, Embase, and Cochrane databases; articles published through October 2015 were sought. Data Evaluation Of 17 articles, 14 explicitly identified Arab and/or Muslim women and cervical cancer screening in either the title or the abstract; the remaining three focused on cancer attitudes and behaviors in Arab Americans in general but measured cervical cancer screening. Eleven articles reported different aspects of one intervention. Because of methodologic heterogeneity, the current authors synthesized results narratively. Synthesis Key factors influencing cervical cancer screening were identified as the following: knowledge of cervical cancer screening and prevention; attitudes and beliefs; healthcare setting; education, marital status, income, and social support; and immigration and acculturation. Conclusions Cervical cancer screening rates among Arab American women are comparable to other ethnic minorities and lower than non-Hispanic White women. Findings are inconsistent regarding factors influencing cervical cancer screening behaviors in this underrepresented group. Implications for Research Significant need exists for more research to better understand cervical cancer prevention behaviors in this group to inform culturally relevant interventions. Healthcare providers play a crucial role in increasing cervical cancer screening awareness and recommendations for Arab American women. PMID:27991600

  2. Obesity and screening for breast, cervical, and colorectal cancer in women: a review.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Sarah S; Palmieri, Rachel T; Nyante, Sarah J; Koralek, Daniel O; Kim, Sangmi; Bradshaw, Patrick; Olshan, Andrew F

    2008-05-01

    The literature examining obesity as a barrier to screening for breast, cervical, and colorectal cancer has not been evaluated systematically. With the increasing prevalence of obesity and its impact on cancer incidence and mortality, it is important to determine whether obesity is a barrier to screening so that cancers among women at increased risk because of their body size can be detected early or prevented entirely. On the basis of 32 relevant published studies (10 breast cancer studies, 14 cervical cancer studies, and 8 colorectal cancer studies), the authors reviewed the literature regarding associations between obesity and recommended screening tests for these cancer sites among women in the U.S. The most consistent associations between obesity and screening behavior were observed for cervical cancer. Most studies reported an inverse relation between decreased cervical cancer screening and increasing body size, and several studies reported that the association was more consistent among white women than among black women. For breast cancer, obesity was associated with decreased screening behavior among white women but not among black women. The literature regarding obesity and colorectal cancer screening adherence was mixed, with some studies reporting an inverse effect of body size on screening behavior and others reporting no effect. Overall, the results indicated that obesity most likely is a barrier to screening for breast and cervical cancers, particularly among white women; the evidence for colorectal cancer screening was inconclusive. Thus, efforts to identify barriers and increase screening for breast and cervical cancers may be targeted toward obese women, whereas outreach to all women should remain the objective for colorectal cancer screening programs.

  3. Primary care residents' characteristics and motives for providing differential medical treatment of cervical cancer screening.

    PubMed Central

    Arredondo, Elva M.; Pollak, Kathryn I.; Costanzo, Philip; McNeilly, Maya; Myers, Evan

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cervical cancer screening rates in the United States are sub-optimal. Physician factors likely contribute to these lower rates. Previous studies provide inconclusive evidence about the association between physician characteristics and the likelihood of addressing cervical cancer. This report assesses potential mechanisms that explain why certain providers do not address cervical cancer screening. METHODS: One hundred primary care residents from various specialties were asked to indicate the preventive topics they would address with a hypothetical white female in her early 20s, who was portrayed as living a "high risk" lifestyle, and visiting her provider only for acute care reasons. RESULTS: Among the provider characteristics assessed, only residents' ethnicity was associated with the likelihood of and time spent addressing cervical cancer screening. In particular, Asian-American residents were least likely to address cervical cancer, while African-American residents were most likely. A mediation analyses revealed that perceived barriers for addressing cervical cancer accounted for this difference. CONCLUSIONS: Study results suggest that there may be cultural factors among health care providers that may account for differential referral and treatment practices. Findings from this study may help identify factors that explain why cervical cancer screening rates are not higher. PMID:12911255

  4. The Effects of an Educational Intervention on Preventing Cervical Cancer Among Vietnamese Women in Southern Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Lee, Fang-Hsin; Wang, Hsiu-Hung; Yang, Yung-Mei; Tsai, Hsiu-Min; Huang, Joh-Jong

    2016-03-05

    This paper aims to conduct and evaluate an educational intervention on preventing cervical cancer among married immigrant women of Vietnamese origin. The study design was a quasi-experimental method with two groups. In total, 260 married immigrant women of Vietnamese origin with national health insurance at least 30 years of age were recruited from November 2013 to January 2015 in southern Taiwan. The effects of the educational intervention, including cervical cancer and Papanicolaou test knowledge, attitudes towards cervical cancer, fatalism, barriers to receiving Papanicolaou tests, intention for receiving Papanicolaou tests within the next year, and intention for receiving Papanicolaou tests within the next 3 years, were evaluated. Repeated measures analyses of variance showed significant interactions between the intervention group and time for cervical cancer knowledge, knowledge of Papanicolaou test, attitudes towards cervical cancer, and intention for receiving a Papanicolaou test within the next 3 years; in addition, 71.4 % reported being satisfied or very satisfied with the intervention. The results of this study can provide information for governments to make appropriate health policies for screening behavior of cervical cancer, increase healthcare professionals' competencies towards Vietnamese women, and increase Papanicolaou test screening rates to decrease cervical cancer mortality. Effective interventions may require particular consideration of married immigrant women.

  5. [Cervical cancer screening: past--present--future].

    PubMed

    Breitenecker, G

    2009-12-01

    Despite the undisputed and impressive success which has been achieved since the 1960s by cervical cytology in the fight against cervical cancer and its precursor stages, during which the mortality rate in industrialized countries over the last 40 years has been reduced by two-thirds to three-quarters, a perfect and error-free screening procedure is still a long way off and will probably never be reached. There are two main reasons for this, the lack of adequate coverage and suboptimal quality and assessment of smears. Two screening procedures are in use Europe, an opportunistic and an organized system. Both systems have many advantages but also disadvantages. In organized programs the coverage is higher (up to 80%), although similar numbers are also achieved by non-organized programs over a 3-year cycle, even if they cannot be so exactly documented. The decision on which system is used depends on the health system of the country, public or non-public, and many other national circumstances. However, in both systems prerequisites for a satisfactory result is a high quality in the sampling technique, the processing and the assessment. Therefore, several guidelines have been introduced by state and medical societies for internal and external quality assurance. New technologies, such as thin-layer cytology or automation for replacement or support of conventional cytology liquid-based cytology proved not to be superior enough to justify the high costs of these systems. The recognition of the strong causal relationship between persistent infection with high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) types and cervical cancer and its precursors has resulted in the development of comparably simple tests. Primary screening using HPV typing alone is not recommended in opportunistic screening due to the low specificity but high sensitivity because it leads to many clinically irrelevant results which place women under stress. In organized screening HPV testing is always and only possible

  6. Human Papillomavirus Testing in the Prevention of Cervical Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wentzensen, Nicolas; Wacholder, Sholom; Kinney, Walter; Gage, Julia C.; Castle, Philip E.

    2011-01-01

    Strong evidence now supports the adoption of cervical cancer prevention strategies that explicitly focus on persistent infection with the causal agent, human papillomavirus (HPV). To inform an evidence-based transition to a new public health approach for cervical cancer screening, we summarize the natural history and cervical carcinogenicity of HPV and discuss the promise and uncertainties of currently available screening methods. New HPV infections acquired at any age are virtually always benign, but persistent infections with one of approximately 12 carcinogenic HPV types explain virtually all cases of cervical cancer. In the absence of an overtly persistent HPV infection, the risk of cervical cancer is extremely low. Thus, HPV test results predict the risk of cervical cancer and its precursors (cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 3) better and longer than cytological or colposcopic abnormalities, which are signs of HPV infection. The logical and inevitable move to HPV-based cervical cancer prevention strategies will require longer screening intervals that will disrupt current gynecologic and cytology laboratory practices built on frequent screening. A major challenge will be implementing programs that do not overtreat HPV-positive women who do not have obvious long-term persistence of HPV or treatable lesions at the time of initial evaluation. The greatest potential for reduction in cervical cancer rates from HPV screening is in low-resource regions that can implement infrequent rounds of low-cost HPV testing and treatment. PMID:21282563

  7. Pelvic Fractures After Radiotherapy for Cervical Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Schmeler, Kathleen M.; Jhingran, Anuja; Iyer, Revathy B.; Sun, Charlotte C.; Eifel, Patricia J.; Soliman, Pamela T.; Ramirez, Pedro T.; Frumovitz, Michael; Bodurka, Diane C.; Sood, Anil K.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND The incidence of pelvic fractures and associated risk factors was determined in women treated with curative-intent radiotherapy for cervical cancer. METHODS The records of 516 women treated with curative-intent radiotherapy for cervical cancer between 2001 and 2006 at the University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center were reviewed. Among these, 300 patients had at least 1 post-treatment computed tomography scan or magnetic resonance imaging study available for review, and they comprised our study population. All imaging studies were re-reviewed by a single radiologist to evaluate for fractures. RESULTS Pelvic fractures were noted in 29 of 300 patients (9.7%). Fracture sites included sacrum (n = 24; 83%), sacrum and pubis (n = 3; 10%), iliac crest (n = 1; 3%), and sacrum and acetabulum (n = 1; 3%). Thirteen patients (45%) were symptomatic, with pain being the most common presenting symptom. The median time from the completion of radiotherapy to the detection of fractures on imaging studies was 14.1 months (range, 2.1–63.1 months), with 38% of patients diagnosed within 1 year and 83% diagnosed within 2 years of completing therapy. The median age of the patients at diagnosis was higher in the women who developed a fracture compared with the women who did not (56.5 years vs 46.7 years; P = .04). A higher number of women with a fracture were postmenopausal (62% vs 37%; P = .03). The median body mass index was lower in the women who had a fracture (26.0 kg/m2 vs 28.0 kg/m2; P = .03). CONCLUSIONS Pelvic fractures were detected in a substantial proportion of women after radiotherapy for cervical cancer. Bone mineral density screening and pharmacologic intervention should be considered in these women. PMID:20052724

  8. Image-based brachytherapy for cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    Vargo, John A; Beriwal, Sushil

    2014-01-01

    Cervical cancer is the third most common cancer in women worldwide; definitive radiation therapy and concurrent chemotherapy is the accepted standard of care for patients with node positive or locally advanced tumors > 4 cm. Brachytherapy is an important part of definitive radiotherapy shown to improve overall survival. While results for two-dimensional X-ray based brachytherapy have been good in terms of local control especially for early stage disease, unexplained toxicities and treatment failures remain. Improvements in brachytherapy planning have more recently paved the way for three-dimensional image-based brachytherapy with volumetric optimization which increases tumor control, reduces toxicity, and helps predict outcomes. Advantages of image-based brachytherapy include: improved tumor coverage (especially for large volume disease), decreased dose to critical organs (especially for small cervix), confirmation of applicator placement, and accounting for sigmoid colon dose. A number of modalities for image-based brachytherapy have emerged including: magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), computed tomography (CT), CT-MRI hybrid, and ultrasound with respective benefits and outcomes data. For practical application of image-based brachytherapy the Groupe Europeen de Curietherapie-European Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology Working Group and American Brachytherapy Society working group guideline serve as invaluable tools, additionally here-in we outline our institutional clinical integration of these guidelines. While the body of literature supporting image-based brachytherapy continues to evolve a number of uncertainties and challenges remain including: applicator reconstruction, increasing resource/cost demands, mobile four-dimensional targets and organs-at-risk, and accurate contouring of “grey zones” to avoid marginal miss. Ongoing studies, including the prospective EMBRACE (an international study of MRI-guided brachytherapy in locally advanced

  9. Image-based brachytherapy for cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Vargo, John A; Beriwal, Sushil

    2014-12-10

    Cervical cancer is the third most common cancer in women worldwide; definitive radiation therapy and concurrent chemotherapy is the accepted standard of care for patients with node positive or locally advanced tumors > 4 cm. Brachytherapy is an important part of definitive radiotherapy shown to improve overall survival. While results for two-dimensional X-ray based brachytherapy have been good in terms of local control especially for early stage disease, unexplained toxicities and treatment failures remain. Improvements in brachytherapy planning have more recently paved the way for three-dimensional image-based brachytherapy with volumetric optimization which increases tumor control, reduces toxicity, and helps predict outcomes. Advantages of image-based brachytherapy include: improved tumor coverage (especially for large volume disease), decreased dose to critical organs (especially for small cervix), confirmation of applicator placement, and accounting for sigmoid colon dose. A number of modalities for image-based brachytherapy have emerged including: magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), computed tomography (CT), CT-MRI hybrid, and ultrasound with respective benefits and outcomes data. For practical application of image-based brachytherapy the Groupe Europeen de Curietherapie-European Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology Working Group and American Brachytherapy Society working group guideline serve as invaluable tools, additionally here-in we outline our institutional clinical integration of these guidelines. While the body of literature supporting image-based brachytherapy continues to evolve a number of uncertainties and challenges remain including: applicator reconstruction, increasing resource/cost demands, mobile four-dimensional targets and organs-at-risk, and accurate contouring of "grey zones" to avoid marginal miss. Ongoing studies, including the prospective EMBRACE (an international study of MRI-guided brachytherapy in locally advanced cervical

  10. Cervical cancer prevention and treatment research in Africa: a systematic review from a public health perspective.

    PubMed

    Finocchario-Kessler, Sarah; Wexler, Catherine; Maloba, May; Mabachi, Natabhona; Ndikum-Moffor, Florence; Bukusi, Elizabeth

    2016-06-04

    Women living in Africa experience the highest burden of cervical cancer. Research and investment to improve vaccination, screening, and treatment efforts are critically needed. We systematically reviewed and characterized recent research within a broader public health framework to organize and assess the range of cervical cancer research in Africa. We searched online databases and the Internet for published articles and cervical cancer reports in African countries. Inclusion criteria included publication between 2004 and 2014, cervical cancer-related content pertinent to one of the four public health categories (primary, secondary, tertiary prevention or quality of life), and conducted in or specifically relevant to countries or regions within the African continent. The study design, geographic region/country, focus of research, and key findings were documented for each eligible article and summarized to illustrate the weight and research coverage in each area. Publications with more than one focus (e.g. secondary and tertiary prevention) were categorized by the primary emphasis of the paper. Research specific to HIV-infected women or focused on feasibility issues was delineated within each of the four public health categories. A total of 380 research articles/reports were included. The majority (54.6 %) of cervical cancer research in Africa focused on secondary prevention (i.e., screening). The number of publication focusing on primary prevention (23.4 %), particularly HPV vaccination, increased significantly in the past decade. Research regarding the treatment of precancerous lesions and invasive cervical cancer is emerging (17.6 %), but infrastructure and feasibility challenges in many countries have impeded efforts to provide and evaluate treatment. Studies assessing aspects of quality of life among women living with cervical cancer are severely limited (4.1 %). Across all categories, 11.3 % of publications focused on cervical cancer among HIV

  11. Perceived Risk of Human Papillomavirus Infection and Cervical Cancer among Adolescent Women in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yi-Jung; Fan, Lir-Wan; Tu, Yu-Ching

    2016-03-01

    High-risk types of human papillomavirus (HPV) are a critical etiologic factor behind cervical cancer. Adolescents are a vulnerable group for HPV infection. However, the literature on adolescent women for HPV infection and cervical cancer is limited. This study was to investigate HPV-related knowledge and perceived risk of HPV infection and cervical cancer among Taiwanese adolescent women in order to assess intervention strategies for prevention of cervical cancer and maintenance of reproductive health. A descriptive cross-sectional study design was implemented. There were 610 adolescent women from three colleges in Southern Taiwan who participated in this study. Data were collected using an anonymous self-administered questionnaire survey. The results showed that the percentage of appropriate answers to HPV-related knowledge questions was only 36.8%, and smoking as the leading cause of cervical cancer received the lowest mean score for appropriate answers among the HPV-related knowledge items. The perceived risk of HPV infection and cervical cancer were moderate, with relatively lower susceptibility to infection with HPV than to cervical cancer (p < .001). Only 11.5% of the participants reported that they had received information about HPV vaccination from healthcare professionals. Participants lacked a comprehensive understanding of cervical cancer prevention and were not aware of their susceptibility to HPV infection. Adolescent women rarely obtained HPV-related information from healthcare professionals. Appropriate education strategies should be developed and conducted by healthcare professionals to reduce the risk of cervical cancer threat from adolescence. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. Long non-coding RNA HOTAIR is associated with human cervical cancer progression.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hee Jung; Lee, Dae Woo; Yim, Ga Won; Nam, Eun Ji; Kim, Sunghoon; Kim, Sang Wun; Kim, Young Tae

    2015-02-01

    The functions of many long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) in human cancers remain to be clarified. The lncRNA Hox transcript antisense intergenic RNA (HOTAIR) has been reported to reprogram chromatin organization and promote breast and colorectal cancer metastasis, the involvement of lncRNAs in cervical cancer is just beginning to be studied. In the present study, we examined the expression and the functional role of HOTAIR in cervical cancer. HOTAIR expression was determined in cervical cancer tissues (n=111) and corresponding normal tissues (n=40) by using real-time polymerase chain reaction, and its correlation with clinical parameters and prognosis were analyzed. To determine the effect of HOTAIR knockdown and overexpression in cervical cancer cell lines, we used the CCK-8 assay, wound healing migration and matrigel invasion assay. The expression level of HOTAIR in cervical cancer tissues was higher than that in corresponding non-cancerous tissues. High HOTAIR expression correlated with lymph node metastasis, and reduced overall survival. A multivariate analysis showed that HOTAIR was a prognostic factor for predicting cervical cancer recurrence. Knockdown of HOTAIR reduced cell proliferation, migration, and invasion in cervical cancer cell lines. Moreover, HOTAIR regulated the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor, matrix metalloproteinase-9 and epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT)-related genes, which are important for cell motility and metastasis. Therefore, HOTAIR may promote tumor aggressiveness through the upregulation of VEGF and MMP-9 and EMT-related genes. These findings indicate that HOTAIR may represent a novel biomarker for predicting recurrence and prognosis and serve as a promising therapeutic target in cervical cancer.

  13. microRNA-328 inhibits cervical cancer cell proliferation and tumorigenesis by targeting TCF7L2

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xuan; Xia, Ying

    2016-06-24

    microRNAs (miRNAs) play a vital role in tumor development and progression. In this study, we aimed to determine the expression and biological roles of miR-328 in cervical cancer and identify its direct target gene. Our data showed that miR-328 was significantly downregulated in human cervical cancer tissues and cells. Re-expression of miR-328 inhibited cervical cancer cell proliferation and colony formation in vitro and suppressed the growth of xenograft tumors in vivo. Bioinformatic analysis predicted TCF7L2 (an essential effector of canonical Wnt signaling) as a target gene of miR-328, which was confirmed by luciferase reporter assays. Enforced expression of miR-328 led to a decline in the expression of endogenous TCF7L2 in cervical cancer cells. In cervical cancer tissues, TCF7L2 protein levels were negatively correlated with miR-328 expression levels (r = −0.462, P = 0.017). Small interfering RNA-mediated knockdown of TCF7L2 significantly impaired the proliferation and colony formation of cervical cancer cells. Ectopic expression of a miRNA-resistant form of TCF7L2 significantly reversed the growth suppressive effects of miR-328 on cervical cancer cells, which was accompanied by induction of cyclin D1 expression. Taken together, our results provide first evidence for the growth suppressive activity of miR-328 in cervical cancer, which is largely ascribed to downregulation of TCF7L2. Restoration of miR-328 may have therapeutic potential in cervical cancer. -- Highlights: •miR-328 inhibits cervical cancer cell growth and tumorigenesis. •TCF7L2 is a direct target gene of miR-328 in cervical cancer. •Knockdown of TCF7L2 impairs the proliferation and colony formation of cervical cancer cells.

  14. Sine oculis homeobox homolog 1 promotes DNA replication and cell proliferation in cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dan; Zhang, Xiao-Xue; Xi, Bi-Xin; Wan, Dong-Yi; Li, Li; Zhou, Jin; Wang, Wei; Ma, Ding; Wang, Hui; Gao, Qing-Lei

    2014-09-01

    Malignant proliferation is the fundamental trait of tumor cells. The initiation of DNA replication represents a key process for cell proliferation, and has a marked impact on tumorigenesis and progression. Here we report that Sine oculis homeobox homolog 1 (SIX1) functions as a master regulator in DNA replication of cervical cancer cells. The expression of SIX1 was induced by the E7 oncoprotein of human papillomaviruses in cervical intraepithelial neoplasia and cervical cancer. The increase of SIX1 expression resulted in the upregulation of multiple genes related to the initiation of DNA replication, including the genes coding for the proteins in minichromosome maintenance complex (MCM2, MCM3, MCM6), DNA polymerase α-primase complex (POLA1, PRIM1, PRIM2), clamp loader (RFC3, RFC4, RFC5), DNA polymerase δ complex (POLD3) and DNA polymerase ε complex (POLE2). In line with this, the increase of SIX1 expression enhanced DNA synthesis, accelerated G1 to S phase progression, and promoted the proliferation of cervical cancer cells and the growth of cervical cancer. Consistently, knockdown of SIX1 could hamper DNA synthesis, slow down G1 to S phase progression, and suppress tumor cell proliferation and tumor growth. Importantly, SIX1 could more efficiently promote anchorage-independent cell growth. These results suggest that the increase of SIX1 expression could promote tumorigenesis, progression and invasive growth of cervical cancer by promoting DNA replication, and that targeting SIX1 may have significant therapeutic value in cervical cancer treatment.

  15. Endometrial cancer following radiation therapy for cervical cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Gallion, H.H.; van Nagell, J.R. Jr.; Donaldson, E.S.; Powell, D.E.

    1987-05-01

    The clinical and histologic features of eight cases of carcinoma of the endometrium which developed following radiation therapy for squamous cell carcinoma of the cervix are described. No patient had a well-differentiated tumor and significant myometrial invasion was present in all cases. Three of the eight tumors were papillary serous adenocarcinoma. Five of the eight patients developed recurrent tumor and died of their disease. The risk of endometrial cancer in patients previously radiated for cervical cancer is evaluated.

  16. Social Construction of Cervical Cancer Screening among Panamanian Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calvo, Arlene; Brown, Kelli McCormack; McDermott, Robert J.; Bryant, Carol A.; Coreil, Jeanine; Loseke, Donileen

    2012-01-01

    Background: Understanding how "health issues" are socially constructed may be useful for creating culturally relevant programs for Hispanic/Latino populations. Purpose: We explored the constructed meanings of cervical cancer and cervical cancer screening among Panamanian women, as well as socio-cultural factors that deter or encourage…

  17. Social Construction of Cervical Cancer Screening among Panamanian Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calvo, Arlene; Brown, Kelli McCormack; McDermott, Robert J.; Bryant, Carol A.; Coreil, Jeanine; Loseke, Donileen

    2012-01-01

    Background: Understanding how "health issues" are socially constructed may be useful for creating culturally relevant programs for Hispanic/Latino populations. Purpose: We explored the constructed meanings of cervical cancer and cervical cancer screening among Panamanian women, as well as socio-cultural factors that deter or encourage…

  18. Cervical Cancer Screening for Women Living with HIV.

    PubMed

    Chapman, Crystal Lambert; Harris, Allyssa L

    2016-01-01

    Studies suggest that women living with HIV are not being adequately screened for cervical cancer. In this article we review the latest recommendations for cervical cancer screening in women with HIV and make recommendations for clinical practice. © 2016 AWHONN, the Association of Women’s Health, Obstetric and Neonatal Nurses.

  19. Cervical cancer screening coverage in a high-incidence region

    PubMed Central

    Navarro, Cibelli; da Fonseca, Allex Jardim; Sibajev, Alexander; Souza, Camila Iasmim de Andrade; Araújo, Daniela Souza; Teles, Daniele Aparecida de Freitas; de Carvalho, Stéphanie Gomes Lins; Cavalcante, Kyldery Wendell Moura; Rabelo, Wendell Lima

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To analyze the coverage of a cervical cancer screening program in a city with a high incidence of the disease in addition to the factors associated with non-adherence to the current preventive program. METHODS A cross-sectional study based on household surveys was conducted. The sample was composed of women between 25 and 59 years of age of the city of Boa Vista, RR, Northern Brazil who were covered by the cervical cancer screening program. The cluster sampling method was used. The dependent variable was participation in a women’s health program, defined as undergoing at least one Pap smear in the 36 months prior to the interview; the explanatory variables were extracted from individual data. A generalized linear model was used. RESULTS 603 women were analyzed, with an mean age of 38.2 years (SD = 10.2). Five hundred and seventeen women underwent the screening test, and the prevalence of adherence in the last three years was up to 85.7% (95%CI 82.5;88.5). A high per capita household income and recent medical consultation were associated with the lower rate of not being tested in multivariate analysis. Disease ignorance, causes, and prevention methods were correlated with chances of non-adherence to the screening system; 20.0% of the women were reported to have undergone opportunistic and non-routine screening. CONCLUSIONS The informed level of coverage is high, exceeding the level recommended for the control of cervical cancer. The preventive program appears to be opportunistic in nature, particularly for the most vulnerable women (with low income and little information on the disease). Studies on the diagnostic quality of cervicovaginal cytology and therapeutic schedules for positive cases are necessary for understanding the barriers to the control of cervical cancer. PMID:25741655

  20. Cervical Cancer Screening: MedlinePlus Health Topic

    MedlinePlus

    ... in Spanish HPV Test (American Association for Clinical Chemistry) Pap and HPV Testing (National Cancer Institute) Also in Spanish Pap Smear (American Association for Clinical Chemistry) Screening for Cervical Cancer (U.S. Preventive Services Task ...

  1. U.S. Deaths from Cervical Cancer May Be Underestimated

    MedlinePlus

    ... City. "This is an ongoing problem with many socioeconomic factors," she said. "Better community outreach for preventative care ... Cancer Health Disparities Recent Health News Related MedlinePlus Health Topics African American Health Cervical Cancer Health Disparities ...

  2. ‘Abnormal’ cervical imaging?: Cervical pneumatocysts – A case report of a cervical spine pneumatocyst

    PubMed Central

    Renshaw, Hanna; Patel, Amit; Boctor, Daniel Sherif Zakaria Matta; Hakmi, Mohamed Atef

    2015-01-01

    To our knowledge there are only 15 reported cases of pneumatocysts in the cervical spine, but awareness of their existence should help the clinician when diagnosing abnormalities in radiological images. When faced with intravertebral gas, in addition to considering more sinister causes, one should consider the differentials including pneumatocysts. Despite our relative lack of understanding of these benign lesions the knowledge that they can change over time should prevent unnecessary testing or treating. We present a patient who fell down stairs and was found to have cervical intravertebral gas, on computed tomography imaging, with the typical appearance of a pneumatocyst. PMID:26719615

  3. Long noncoding RNA PVT1 promotes cervical cancer progression through epigenetically silencing miR-200b.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shaorong; Zhang, Guanli; Liu, Jingying

    2016-08-01

    Long noncoding RNA PVT1 has been reported to be dysregulated and play vital roles in a variety of cancers. However, the functions and molecular mechanisms of PVT1 in cervical cancer remain unclear. The objective of this study was to investigate the expression, clinical significance, biological roles, and underlying functional mechanisms of PVT1 in cervical cancer. Our results revealed that PVT1 is upregulated in cervical cancer tissues. Enhanced expression of PVT1 is associated with larger tumor size, advanced International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stage, and poor prognosis of cervical cancer patients. Using gain-of-function and loss-of-function approaches, we demonstrated that overexpression of PVT1 promotes cervical cancer cells proliferation, cell cycle progression and migration, and depletion of PVT1 inhibits cervical cancer cell proliferation, cell cycle progression, and migration. Mechanistically, we verified that PVT1 binds to EZH2, recruits EZH2 to the miR-200b promoter, increases histone H3K27 trimethylation level on the miR-200b promoter, and inhibits miR-200b expression. Furthermore, the effects of PVT1 on cervical cell proliferation and migration depend upon silencing of miR-200b. Taken together, our findings confirmed that PVT1 functions as an oncogene in cervical cancer and indicated that PVT1 is not only an important prognostic marker, but also a potential therapy target for cervical cancer.

  4. Wnt-11 overexpression promoting the invasion of cervical cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Wei, Heng; Wang, Ning; Zhang, Yao; Wang, Shizhuo; Pang, Xiaoao; Zhang, Shulan

    2016-09-01

    Wnt-11 is a positive regulator of the Wnt signaling pathway, which plays a crucial role in carcinogenesis. However, Wnt-11 expression in cervical cancer has not been well investigated. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of Wnt-11 in cervical tumor proliferation and invasion. This study examined 24 normal cervical squamous epithelia, 29 cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN), and 78 cervical cancer samples. The expression of Wnt-11 was investigated by immunohistochemistry and quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analysis. The expression of the high-risk human papilloma virus (HR-HPV) E6 oncoprotein was also investigated by immunohistochemistry. In addition, the expression of Wnt-11, HR-HPV E6, JNK-1, phosphorylated JNK-1(P-JNK1), and β-catenin was examined by western blot analysis following Wnt-11 knockdown or overexpression in HeLa or SiHa cells, respectively. The promotion of cervical cancer cell proliferation and invasion was investigated using the cell counting kit-8 and Matrigel invasion assay, respectively. Wnt-11 and HR-HPV E6 expression increased in a manner that corresponded with the progression of cervical cancer and was significantly correlated with the International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics cancer stage, lymph node metastasis, tumor size, and HPV infection. Wnt-11 protein expression was positively associated with HR-HPV E6 protein expression in all 78 cervical cancer samples (P < 0.001). Furthermore, Wnt-11 was positively associated with P-JNK1 expression and promoted cervical cancer cell proliferation and invasion. These observations suggest that the increased Wnt-11 expression observed in cervical cancer cells may lead to the phosphorylation and activation of JNK-1 and significantly promote tumor cell proliferation and cell migration/invasion through activation of the Wnt/JNK pathway. Consequently, Wnt-11 may serve as a novel target for cervical cancer therapy.

  5. Association between cervical screening and prevention of invasive cervical cancer in Ontario: a population-based case-control study.

    PubMed

    Vicus, Danielle; Sutradhar, Rinku; Lu, Yan; Kupets, Rachel; Paszat, Lawrence

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to estimate the effect of cervical screening in the prevention of invasive cervical cancer among age groups, using a population-based case-control study in the province of Ontario, Canada. Exposure was defined as cervical cytology history greater than 3 months before the diagnosis date of cervical cancer (index date). Cases were women who were diagnosed with cervical cancer between January 1, 1998, and December 31, 2008. Controls were women without a diagnosis of cervical cancer on, or before, December 31, 2008. Two controls were matched to each case on year of birth and income quintile, as of the index date. Conditional logistic regression was used to estimate the odds ratio for having been screened among those with cervical cancer. Cervical cancer screening performed between 3 and 36 months before the index date was protective against invasive cervical cancer in women aged 40 through 69 years. In women younger than 40 years, cervical cancer screening performed 3 to 36 months before the index date was not protective. Cervical screening is associated with a reduced risk for invasive cervical cancer among women older than 40 years. Cervical cancer resources should be focused on maximizing the risk reduction.

  6. Performance of Implementing Guideline Driven Cervical Cancer Screening Measures in an Inner City Hospital System

    PubMed Central

    Wieland, Daryl L.; Reimers, Laura L.; Wu, Eijean; Nathan, Lisa M.; Gruenberg, Tammy; Abadi, Maria; Einstein, Mark H.

    2013-01-01

    Objective In 2006, the American Society for Colposcopy and Cervical Pathology (ASCCP) updated evidence based guidelines recommending screening intervals for women with abnormal cervical cytology. In our low-income inner city population, we sought to improve performance by uniformly applying the guidelines to all patients. We report the prospective performance of a comprehensive tracking, evidence-based algorithmically driven call-back and appointment scheduling system for cervical cancer screening in a resource-limited inner city population. Materials and Methods Outreach efforts were formalized with algorithm-based protocols for triage to colposcopy, with universal adherence to evidence-based guidelines. During implementation from August 2006 through July 2008, we prospectively tracked performance using the electronic medical record with administrative and pathology reports to determine performance variables such as the total number of Pap tests, colposcopy visits, and the distribution of abnormal cytology and histology results, including all CIN 2,3 diagnoses. Results 86,257 gynecologic visits and 41,527 Pap tests were performed system-wide during this period of widespread and uniform implementation of standard cervical cancer screening guidelines. The number of Pap tests performed per month varied little. The incidence of CIN 1 significantly decreased from 117/171 (68.4%) the first tracked month to 52/95 (54.7%) the last tracked month (p=0.04). The monthly incidence rate of CIN 2,3, including incident cervical cancers did not change. The total number of colposcopy visits declined, resulting in a 50% decrease in costs related to colposcopy services and approximately a 12% decrease in costs related to excisional biopsies. Conclusions Adherence to cervical cancer screening guidelines reduced the number of unnecessary colposcopies without increasing numbers of potentially missed CIN 2,3 lesions, including cervical cancer. Uniform implementation of administrative

  7. Incidence of cervical cancer in Montenegro.

    PubMed

    Colaković, B; Colaković-Popović, V

    2008-01-01

    To analyze the development of the number of cervical cancer cases and those who died of the disease in Montenegro. We used data on the number of cases and deaths over a eight-year period (2000-2007). In Montenegro 550 women developed cervical cancer in that period, which is 45% of all cancers affecting the female genital organs. In the first five years, the average disease rate was 19.52/100,000, but in the last three years it amounted to 25,61/100,000 (around 24% higher). The trend suggests significant growth. The average mortality rate was 4.2/100,000. The trend suggests very slight growth. The majority of cases were aged between 40 and 49 years (196 cases out of 550 or 35.64%). Almost 2/3 of the cases (64.19%) were aged between 40 and 59 years. There is a need to organize screening of the entire female population aged between 20 and 65-70 years. There is also a need to establish a central registry for malignant diseases in Montenegro.

  8. Cervical Cancer Prevention: New Tools and Old Barriers

    PubMed Central

    Scarinci, Isabel C.; Garcia, Francisco A. R.; Kobetz, Erin; Partridge, Edward E.; Brandt, Heather M.; Bell, Maria C.; Dignan, Mark; Ma, Grace X.; Daye, Jane L.; Castle, Philip E.

    2010-01-01

    Cervical cancer is the second most common female tumor worldwide and its incidence is disproportionately high (>80%) in the developing world. In the U.S., where Pap tests have reduced the annual incidence to approximately 11,000 cervical cancers, more than 60% of cases occur in medically-underserved populations as part of a complex of diseases linked to poverty, race/ethnicity, and/or health disparities. Because carcinogenic human papillomavirus (HPV) infections cause virtually all cervical cancer, two new approaches for cervical cancer prevention have emerged: 1) HPV vaccination to prevent infections in younger women (≤18 years old) and 2) carcinogenic HPV detection in older women (≥30 years old). Together, HPV vaccination and testing, if used in an age-appropriate manner, have the potential to transform cervical cancer prevention particularly among underserved populations. Yet significant barriers of access, acceptability, and adoption to any cervical cancer prevention strategy remain. Without understanding and addressing these obstacles, these promising new tools for cervical cancer prevention may be futile. We share our experiences in the delivery of cervical cancer prevention strategies to U.S. populations experiencing high cervical cancer burden: African-American women in South Carolina, Alabama, Mississippi; Haitian immigrant women in Miami; Hispanic women in the U.S.-Mexico Border; Sioux/Native American women in the Northern Plains; white women in the Appalachia; and Vietnamese-American women in Pennsylvania and New Jersey. Our goal is to inform future research and outreach efforts to reduce the burden of cervical cancer in underserved populations. PMID:20310056

  9. Fludeoxyglucose F 18 PET Scan, CT Scan, and Ferumoxtran-10 MRI Scan Before Chemotherapy and Radiation Therapy in Finding Lymph Node Metastasis in Patients With Locally Advanced Cervical Cancer or High-Risk Endometrial Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-11-14

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Cell Carcinoma; Cervical Small Cell Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Endometrial Clear Cell Carcinoma; Endometrial Papillary Serous Carcinoma; Stage I Endometrial Carcinoma; Stage IB Cervical Cancer; Stage II Endometrial Carcinoma; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage III Cervical Cancer; Stage III Endometrial Carcinoma; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer

  10. Syzygium cumini inhibits growth and induces apoptosis in cervical cancer cell lines: a primary study

    PubMed Central

    Barh, D; Viswanathan, G

    2008-01-01

    Cervical cancer is common among women in the Indian subcontinent and the incidences and death rates are gradually increasing over the years. Several dietary phytochemicals have been reported to have growth inhibitory and apoptotic effect on HeLa and other cervical cell lines. In this study, using Hoechst 33342 staining, MTT, Annexin V-FLUOS/PI and TUNEL assays we demonstrated that Syzygium cumini extract inhibits the growth and induces apoptosis in HeLa and SiHa cervical cancer cell lines in a dose- and time-dependent manner. The phytochemical, its mode of action and safety issues are yet to be determined. PMID:22275971

  11. Syzygium cumini inhibits growth and induces apoptosis in cervical cancer cell lines: a primary study.

    PubMed

    Barh, D; Viswanathan, G

    2008-01-01

    Cervical cancer is common among women in the Indian subcontinent and the incidences and death rates are gradually increasing over the years. Several dietary phytochemicals have been reported to have growth inhibitory and apoptotic effect on HeLa and other cervical cell lines. In this study, using Hoechst 33342 staining, MTT, Annexin V-FLUOS/PI and TUNEL assays we demonstrated that Syzygium cumini extract inhibits the growth and induces apoptosis in HeLa and SiHa cervical cancer cell lines in a dose- and time-dependent manner. The phytochemical, its mode of action and safety issues are yet to be determined.

  12. Second cancers following radiotherapy for cervical cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Kleinerman, R.A.; Curtis, R.E.; Boice, J.D. Jr.; Flannery, J.T.; Fraumeni, J.F. Jr.

    1982-11-01

    Incidence of second primary cancers was evaluated in 7,127 women with invasive cancer of the cervix uteri, diagnosed between 1935 and 1978, and followed up to 38 years (average, 8.9 yr) in Connecticut. Among 5,997 women treated with radiation, 449 developed second primary cancers compared with 313 expected (relative risk . 1.4) on the basis of rates from the Connecticut Tumor Registry. Excess incidence was noticeable 15 years or more after radiotherapy and attributed mostly to cancers of sites in or near the radiation field, especially the bladder, kidneys, rectum, corpus uteri, and ovaries. No excess was found for these sites among the 1,130 nonirradiated women. The ratio of observed to expected cancers for these sites did not vary appreciably by age at irradiation. The data suggested that high-dose pelvic irradiation was associated with increase in cancers of the bladder, kidneys, rectum, ovaries, corpus uteri, and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma but, apparently, not leukemia, Hodgkin's disease, breast cancer, or colon cancer.

  13. Cervical cancer awareness and cervical screening uptake at the Mater Misericordiae Hospital, Afikpo, Southeast Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Eze, Justus N; Umeora, Odidika U; Obuna, Johnson A; Egwuatu, Vincent E; Ejikeme, Brown N

    2012-01-01

    Cervical cancer is the most common genital tract malignancy among women in developing countries. To assess the awareness of cervical cancer among Igbo women in a rural population of Southeastern Nigerian and determine their uptake of cervical screening services. A questionnaire-based descriptive cross-sectional study. Structured questionnaires were administered to female attendees to the antenatal and gynecological clinics of a secondary hospital in the outskirts of Afikpo, Southeast Nigeria over a six-month period (1 st July to 31 st December 2007). Data analysis was by SPSS. Five hundred questionnaires were given out. Three hundred and sixty were correctly filled (72%) and analyzed. The mean age of respondents was 36.2 years, 25.0% had tertiary education and 40.3% were self employed. All the respondents were sexually active. There were high incidences of premarital sex, multiple sexual partners and abnormal vaginal discharge and low condom use. Awareness of cervical cancer (37.5%), its preventable nature (31.9%), cervical screening (25%) and screening centers (20.8%) were generally low and screening uptake (0.6%) was abysmally low. Lack of awareness, non-availability of screening centers locally, cost and time were the main reasons adduced by respondents for not being screened. Overall, 62.5% of all the respondents indicated willingness to be screened. The exposure to conditions that predispose women to cervical cancer was high, and the levels of awareness of cervical cancer and cervical screening uptake were low. Continued awareness creation, local provision of cheap and affordable services and poverty alleviation are needed to improve cervical screening uptake with the hope of reducing the incidence of cervical cancer in the long term.

  14. Cervical Adenoid Basal Carcinoma: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Argon, Asuman; Şener, Alper; Zekioğlu, Osman; Terek, Coşan; Özdemir, Necmettin

    2012-01-01

    Adenoid basal carcinoma (ABC) is a rare epithelial tumor of the cervix. It makes up approximately 1% of all cervical adenocarcinomas. Rare cases have been associated with common cervical epithelial tumors. We present a case of ABC associated with typical squamous cell carcinoma. A 54-year-old post-menopausal woman underwent D&C for vaginal bleeding. Histologically, the tumor was characterized by small cells with a narrow cytoplasm, making up islands and cords. Peripheral palissading in the cells surrounding the cystic areas that contained central cellular debris and keratin was noted. The patient underwent total hysterectomy, bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy, pelvic lymphadenectomy and omentectomy. Large cell keratinized type squamous cell carcinoma areas in the cervix were noted besides the limited ABC areas. After surgery, the patient was treated with radiation therapy. A retroperitoneal metastasis was found on the first year and chemotherapy was administered. The patient has no evidence of disease 27 months after the first diagnosis. ABC makes up quite a rare group of cervical cancers and should be kept in mind during the evaluation so that a differentiation can be made with tumors with similar morphology as it can show various histological patterns, and can be seen together with more aggressive cancers. PMID:25207054

  15. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy in cervical cancer in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Ilancheran, Arunachalam

    2016-05-01

    Cervical cancer is the most common gynecological cancer encountered in pregnancy. The standard treatment of early cervical cancer is usually surgical removal of the cervix (in selected cases) or, more commonly, the uterus. However, when cervical cancer develops during pregnancy, definitive surgical treatment often needs to be postponed until the fetus reaches maturity. Neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NACT) is an innovative approach in the management of these patients. It helps in controlling the disease and delaying delivery. The paper presents a literature review of the history of NACT, as well as practice points and agenda for further research. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  16. 75 FR 7282 - Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection and Control Advisory Committee (BCCEDCAC)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-18

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection and... Force guidelines for breast and cervical cancer screening; Impact of the revised clinical screening recommendations for both breast and cervical cancer on the National Breast and Cervical Cancer Early...

  17. Uterine cervical cancer with brain metastasis as the initial site of presentation.

    PubMed

    Sato, Yumi; Tanaka, Kei; Kobayashi, Yoichi; Shibuya, Hiromi; Nishigaya, Yoshiko; Momomura, Mai; Matsumoto, Hironori; Iwashita, Mitsutoshi

    2015-07-01

    Brain metastasis from uterine cervical cancer is rare, with an incidence of 0.5%, and usually occurs late in the course of the disease. We report a case of uterine cervical cancer with brain metastasis as the initial site of presentation. A 50-year-old woman with headache, vertigo, amnesia and loss of appetite was admitted for persistent vomiting. Contrast enhanced computed tomography showed a solitary right frontal cerebral lesion with ring enhancement and uterine cervical tumor. She was diagnosed with uterine cervical squamous cell carcinoma with parametrium invasion and no other distant affected organs were detected. The cerebral lesion was surgically removed and pathologically proved to be metastasis of uterine cervical squamous cell carcinoma. The patient underwent concurrent chemoradiotherapy, followed by cerebral radiation therapy, but multiple metastases to the liver and lung developed and the patient died 7 months after diagnosis of brain metastasis.

  18. Knowledge and acceptability of human papillomavirus vaccination and cervical cancer screening among women in Karnataka, India.

    PubMed

    Montgomery, Martha P; Dune, Tanaka; Shetty, Prasanna K; Shetty, Avinash K

    2015-03-01

    Cervical cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related mortality among women in India; however, participation in prevention and screening is low and the reasons for this are not well understood. In a cross-sectional survey in August 2008, 202 healthy women in Karnataka, India completed a questionnaire regarding knowledge, attitudes, and practices related to human papillomavirus (HPV) and cervical cancer. Factors associated with vaccination and Papanicolau (Pap) smear screening acceptance were explored. Thirty-six percent of women had heard of HPV while 15% had heard of cervical cancer. Five percent of women reported ever having a Pap smear, and 4% of women felt at risk of HPV infection. Forty-six percent of women were accepting of vaccination, but fewer (21%) were willing to have a Pap smear. Overall, knowledge related to HPV and cervical cancer topics was low. Women with negative attitudes toward HPV infection were 5.3 (95% confidence interval (CI) 2.8-10) times more likely to accept vaccination but were not significantly more likely to accept Pap smear (odds ratio 1.5, 95% CI 0.7-3.0). Cost and a low level of perceived risk were the most frequent factors cited as potential barriers. Improving awareness of HPV and cervical cancer through health care providers in addition to increasing access to vaccination and screening through government-sponsored programs may be feasible and effective methods to reduce cervical cancer burden in India.

  19. Experiences and unmet needs of women undergoing Pap smear cervical cancer screening: impact on uptake of cervical cancer screening in south eastern Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Chigbu, Chibuike O; Onyebuchi, Azubuike K; Egbuji, Chuma C; Ezugwu, Eusebus C

    2015-03-01

    The burden of cervical cancer is on the increase in sub-Saharan Africa mainly due to inadequate provision and utilisation of cervical cancer prevention services. Several evidence-based strategies have been deployed to improve cervical cancer screening uptake without much success. However, patients' experiences and satisfaction with service provision has not been adequately studied. Inefficiencies in service delivery and less fulfilling experiences by women who attend cervical cancer screening could have considerable impact in future voluntary uptake of cervical cancer screening. Six hundred and eighty women who underwent Pap smear screening in three health care facilities in two states in south eastern Nigeria were interviewed to evaluate their satisfaction, willingness to undertake future voluntary screening, unmet needs and correlation between satisfaction level and willingness to undergo future screening. Satisfaction with Pap smear screening correlated positively with willingness to undertake future voluntary screening (Pearson's correlation coefficient = 0.78, P = 0.001). The mean satisfaction score was significantly higher among participants handled by nurses than those handled by the physicians (3.16 ± 0.94 vs 2.52 ± 0.77, P = 0.001). 'Scrapping discomfort' of the spatula was reported as the most dissatisfying aspect of Pap smear experience. The need for less invasive screening procedures was the most unmet need. It was concluded that improving the Pap smear screening experience of women and providing less invasive methods of cervical cancer screening with immediate results could improve uptake of cervical cancer screening in south eastern Nigeria.

  20. Novel predictive biomarkers for cervical cancer prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Moreno-Acosta, Pablo; Carrillo, Schyrly; Gamboa, Oscar; Romero-Rojas, Alfredo; Acosta, Jinneth; Molano, Monica; Balart-Serra, Joseph; Cotes, Martha; Rancoule, Chloé; Magné, Nicolas

    2016-01-01

    High hypoxic, glycolytic and acidosis metabolisms characterize cervical cancer tumors and have been described to be involved in chemoradioresistance mechanisms. Based on these observations, the present study assessed four selected novel biomarkers on the prognosis of locally advanced cervical carcinoma. A total of 66 patients with stage IIB/IIIB cervical cancer were retrospectively included. The protein expression levels of glucose transporter 1 (GLUT1), carbonic anhydrase 9 (CAIX) and hexokinase 1 (HKII) were investigated by immunohistochemistry on tumor biopsies, hemoglobin was measured and the disease outcome was monitored. A total of 53 patients (80.3%) presented a complete response. For these patients, the protein expression levels of GLUT1, CAIX and HKII were overexpressed. A significant difference was observed (P=0.0127) for hemoglobin levels (≤11 g/dl) in responsive compared with non-responsive patients. The expression of GLUT1 is associated with a lower rate of both overall and disease-free survival, with a trend of decreased risk of 1.1x and 1.5x, respectively. Co-expression of GLUT1 and HKII is associated with a decreased trend risk of 1.6x for overall survival. Patients with hemoglobin levels ≤11 g/dl had a 4.3-fold risk (P=0.02) in decreasing both to the rate of overall and disease-free survival. The presence of anemic hypoxia (hemoglobin ≤11 g/dl) and the expression of GLUT1 and/or HKII influence treatment response and are associated with a lower overall and disease-free survival. The present results demonstrated that these biomarkers may be used as predictive markers and suggested that these metabolic pathways can be used as potential novel therapeutic targets. PMID:28101358

  1. Clinical significance of Gremlin 1 in cervical cancer and its effects on cancer stem cell maintenance.

    PubMed

    Sato, Masakazu; Kawana, Kei; Fujimoto, Asaha; Yoshida, Mitsuyo; Nakamura, Hiroe; Nishida, Haruka; Inoue, Tomoko; Taguchi, Ayumi; Takahashi, Juri; Adachi, Katsuyuki; Nagasaka, Kazunori; Matsumoto, Yoko; Wada-Hiraike, Osamu; Oda, Katsutoshi; Osuga, Yutaka; Fujii, Tomoyuki

    2016-01-01

    Gremlin 1 is one of the bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) antagonists and is also related to differentiation in combination with BMPs and is associated with various types of diseases. Gremlin 1 is overexpressed in various types of human cancers and has been reported to play a role in cervical cancer oncogenesis. However, there is no report concerning the relationship between Gremlin 1 and cervical cancer stem cells (CSCs). The objective of the present study was to identify the clinical significance of Gremlin 1 in cervical cancer and its effects on CSC-like properties in vitro. Clinical samples were obtained. Gremlin 1 mRNA expression levels in the cervical cancer tissues were measured by RT-qPCR and assessed for correlation with their clinical prognosis [overall survival (OS), progression-free survival (PFS)] and with other prognostic factors. In vitro, cervical cancer, CaSki cells, exposed to Gremlin 1 (1,000 ng/ml) for 24 h were evaluated for expression of undifferentiated-cell markers (Nanog, Oct3/4, Sox2) by RT-qPCR, the population of ALDH-positive cells by flow cytometry and sphere-forming ability on a ultra-low attachment culture dish. Cervical cancer tissues from 104 patients were collected. A high mRNA expression level of Gremlin 1 was an independent poor prognostic factor of PFS but not of OS. A high mRNA expression level of Gremlin 1 was correlated with bulky (>4 cm) tumors. The Nanog mRNA expression level was significantly increased in the CaSki cells exposed to Gremlin 1 (P=0.0008) but not Oct3/4 and Sox2 mRNA expression levels. The population of ALDH-positive cells in the Gremlin 1-exposed cells was 1.41-fold higher compared with the control (P=0.0184). Sphere-forming ability was increased when 1,000 Gremlin 1-exposed cells were seeded (P=0.0379). In cervical cancer, it is suggested that Gremlin 1 may have a role in clinical recurrence and maintaining CSC-like properties.

  2. HPV testing as a screen for cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Goodman, Annekathryn

    2015-06-30

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) has been identified as a necessary factor in the development of pre-invasive and invasive cancers of the lower genital tract, of which cervical cancer is the most prevalent. A molecular understanding of malignant transformation and epidemiologic information has led to the development of many strategies for detection and early intervention. Newer tests for oncogenic subtypes of HPV have made it possible to predict the risk of future development of cervical cancer. This review summarizes the current understanding of HPV related disease and examines the role of HPV testing as a screening tool for cervical cancer. It summarizes the data from prospective and randomized controlled trials on HPV screening from Europe and North America and includes smaller studies from low and middle income countries where cervical cancer is the most common cancer in women.

  3. Vaginal dose point reporting in cervical cancer patients treated with combined 2D/3D external beam radiotherapy and 2D/3D brachytherapy.

    PubMed

    Westerveld, Henrike; Pötter, Richard; Berger, Daniel; Dankulchai, Pittaya; Dörr, Wolfgang; Sora, Mircea-Constantin; Pötter-Lang, Sarah; Kirisits, Christian

    2013-04-01

    Traditionally, vaginal dose points have been defined at the vaginal source level, thus not providing dose information for the entire vagina. Since reliable vaginal dose volume/surface histograms are unavailable, a strategy for comprehensive vaginal dose reporting for combined EBRT and BT was established and investigated. An anatomical vaginal reference point was defined at the level of the Posterior-Inferior Border of Symphysis (PIBS), plus two points ±2 cm (mid/introitus vagina). For BT extra points were selected for the upper vagina at 12/3/6/9 o'clock, at the vaginal surface and 5 mm depth. A vaginal reference length (VRL) was defined from ring centre to PIBS. Fifty-nine patients treated for cervical cancer were included in this retrospective feasibility study. The method was applicable to all patients. Total EQD2 doses at PIBS and ±2 cm were 36.7 Gy (3.1-68.2), 49.6 Gy (32.1-89.6) and 4.3 Gy (1.0-46.6). At the vaginal surface at ring level doses were respectively 266.1 Gy (67.6-814.5)/225.9 Gy (61.5-610.5) at 3/9 o'clock, and 85.1 Gy (55.4-140.3)/72.0 Gy (49.1-108.9) at 12/6 o'clock. Mean VRL on MRI was 5.6 cm (2.0-9.4). With this novel system, a comprehensive reporting of vaginal doses is feasible. The present study has demonstrated large dose variations between patients observed in all parts of the vagina, resulting from different contributions from EBRT and BT. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Patient, Physician, and Nurse Factors Associated With Entry Onto Clinical Trials and Finishing Treatment in Patients With Primary or Recurrent Uterine, Endometrial, or Cervical Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-26

    Recurrent Cervical Carcinoma; Recurrent Uterine Corpus Carcinoma; Recurrent Uterine Corpus Sarcoma; Stage I Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage I Uterine Sarcoma; Stage IA Cervical Cancer; Stage IB Cervical Cancer; Stage II Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage II Uterine Sarcoma; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage III Cervical Cancer; Stage III Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage III Uterine Sarcoma; Stage IV Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IV Uterine Sarcoma; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer; Stage IVB Cervical Cancer

  5. Update on prevention and screening of cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    McGraw, Shaniqua L; Ferrante, Jeanne M

    2014-01-01

    Cervical cancer is the third most common cause of cancer in women in the world. During the past few decades tremendous strides have been made toward decreasing the incidence and mortality of cervical cancer with the implementation of various prevention and screening strategies. The causative agent linked to cervical cancer development and its precursors is the human papillomavirus (HPV). Prevention and screening measures for cervical cancer are paramount because the ability to identify and treat the illness at its premature stage often disrupts the process of neoplasia. Cervical carcinogenesis can be the result of infections from multiple high-risk HPV types that act synergistically. This imposes a level of complexity to identifying and vaccinating against the actual causative agent. Additionally, most HPV infections spontaneously clear. Therefore, screening strategies should optimally weigh the benefits and risks of screening to avoid the discovery and needless treatment of transient HPV infections. This article provides an update of the preventative and screening methods for cervical cancer, mainly HPV vaccination, screening with Pap smear cytology, and HPV testing. It also provides a discussion of the newest United States 2012 guidelines for cervical cancer screening, which changed the age to begin and end screening and lengthened the screening intervals. PMID:25302174

  6. Integration of human papillomavirus type 16 in cervical cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Kanopiene, Daiva; Stumbryte, Ausra; Bausyte, Raminta; Kirvelaitis, Edgaras; Simanaviciene, Vaida; Zvirbliene, Aurelija

    2015-01-01

    Cervical cancer remains an important cause of women morbidity and mortality. The progression of cervical pathology correlates with the HPV integration into the host genome. However, the data on the viral integration status in cervical dysplasias are controversial. The aim of the current study was to evaluate the status of HPV integration in two types of cervical pathology – invasive and non invasive cervical cancer (e.g. carcinoma in situ). 156 women were included in the study: 66 women were diagnosed with invasive cervical cancer (CC) and 90 with non invasive cervical cancer (carcinoma in situ, CIS). 74.2% [95% PI: 63.64÷84.76] of specimens collected from women with diagnosed CC and 85.6% [95% PI: 85.53÷92.85] of CIS specimens were positive for HPV. The most prevalent HPV genotype in both groups was HPV16. To evaluate HPV integration, three selected HPV16 E2 gene fragments were analyzed by PCR. In the majority of CC and CIS specimens the amplification of all three HPV16 E2 gene fragments was observed. The episomal HPV16 form was detected in the majority of CC and CIS specimens. The deletion of all three HPV16 E2 gene fragments was detected in 9.4% of CC specimens and 2.2% of CIS specimens. Finally, integration status could not be used as diagnostical additional test to distinguish between invasive and non invasive cervical cancer. PMID:28352670

  7. MicroRNA-195 inhibits proliferation of cervical cancer cells by targeting cyclin D1a.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ning; Wei, Heng; Yin, Duo; Lu, Yanming; Zhang, Yao; Zhang, Qiao; Ma, Xiaoxin; Zhang, Shulan

    2016-04-01

    Cervical cancer is one of the most frequent gynecological malignancies in women worldwide. MicroRNA-195 (miR-195) was recently found highly expressed in cervical cancer. However, the role of miR-195 in the pathology of cervical cancer remains poorly understood. In this study, we first confirmed the downregulation of miR-195 in primary cervical cancer tissues. For the functional study, we introduced the sequences of miR-195 or miR-195 inhibitor into Hela and SiHa cervical cancer cell lines. Overexpression of miR-195 inhibited the proliferation of both Hela and SiHa cells. In contrast, reducing the endogenous miR-195 level by miR-195 inhibitor promoted the proliferation of cervical cancer cells. Flow cytometric assay showed that overexpression of miR-195 induced G1 phase arrest, whereas miR-195 inhibitor shortened G1 phase of cervical cancer cells. In addition, the suppressive role of miR-195 in cell cycle was also demonstrated by the western blot results of various cell cycle indicators, such as phosphorylated retinoblastoma (p-Rb) and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), in the gain and loss of function experiments. Furthermore, Dual-Luciferase Reporter Assay revealed that miR-195 targeted the 3'-untranslated region of cyclin D1a transcript, such as to regulate cyclin D1 expression. In summary, our results suggest that miR-195 acts as a suppressor in the proliferation and cell cycle of cervical cancer cells by directly targeting cyclin D1a mRNA.

  8. [CERVICAL CANCER IN ISRAEL 2016: FACTS, INSIGHTS AND THOUGHTS FOR THE FUTURE].

    PubMed

    Fisher, Menahem; Schejter, Eduardo; Solt, Ido; Renart, Gad

    2016-09-01

    The natural history of precancerous lesions and cervical cancer in Israeli women differs from that reported in the world. In 2011, 244 women were diagnosed in Israel with invasive cervical cancer, with the mortality of 79 women. The incidence of cervical cancer in Israel is about 5 new cases per year per 100,000 women (5.4 Jewish, 3.2 Arab). This figure is very low compared with statistics presented in other countries and has not changed over the last decades. The vast majority of Israeli women were diagnosed due to symptoms and not following Pap smear screening. The mortality rate in Israel is similar to that of other OECD countries. In Israel, 71% of patients survive five years or more, the rate is not significantly different from the percentage of survival of other OECD countries. Over half of the Israeli patients are diagnosed in the late stage disease. This delay in cervical cancer diagnosis is probably due to the lack of a national screening program. We recommend more efficient routing of national expenditure for cervical cancer screening and prevention in Israel, scanning asymptomatic women and targeting disadvantaged populations. By applying the proposed screening strategy, redirection of resources will reduce cervical cancer morbidity and mortality, and will increase the percentage of women from low socioeconomic populations tested in Israel.

  9. Physical Activity and Cervical Cancer Testing Among American Indian Women

    PubMed Central

    Muus, Kyle J.; Baker-Demaray, Twyla B.; Bogart, T. Andy; Duncan, Glen E.; Jacobsen, Clemma; Buchwald, Dedra S.; Henderson, Jeffrey A.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose Studies have shown that women who engage in high levels of physical activity have higher rates of cancer screening, including Papanicalaou (Pap) tests. Because American Indian (AI) women are at high risk for cervical cancer morbidity and mortality, we examined Pap screening prevalence and assessed whether physical activity was associated with screening adherence among AI women from 2 culturally distinct regions in the Northern Plains and the Southwest. Methods A total of 1,979 AI women at least 18 years of age participating in a cross-sectional cohort study reported whether they received a Pap test within the previous 3 years. Physical activity level was expressed as total metabolic equivalent (MET) scores and grouped into quartiles. We used binary logistic regression to model the association of Pap testing and MET quartile, adjusting for demographic and health factors. Findings Overall, 60% of women received a Pap test within the previous 3 years. After controlling for covariates, increased physical activity was associated with higher odds of Pap screening (OR = 1.1 per increase in MET quartile; 95% CI = 1.1, 1.2). Conclusions This is the first study to examine physical activity patterns and receipt of cancer screening in AIs. While recent Pap testing was more common among physically active AI women, prevalence was still quite low in all subgroups. Efforts are needed to increase awareness of the importance of cervical cancer screening among AI women. PMID:22757957

  10. Inadequate Systems to Support Breast and Cervical Cancer Screening in Primary Care Practice.

    PubMed

    Schapira, Marilyn M; Sprague, Brian L; Klabunde, Carrie N; Tosteson, Anna N A; Bitton, Asaf; Chen, Jane S; Beaber, Elisabeth F; Onega, Tracy; MacLean, Charles D; Harris, Kimberly; Howe, Kathleen; Pearson, Loretta; Feldman, Sarah; Brawarsky, Phyllis; Haas, Jennifer S

    2016-10-01

    Despite substantial resources devoted to cancer screening nationally, the availability of clinical practice-based systems to support screening guidelines is not known. To characterize the prevalence and correlates of practice-based systems to support breast and cervical cancer screening, with a focus on the patient-centered medical home (PCMH). Web and mail survey of primary care providers conducted in 2014. The survey assessed provider (gender, training) and facility (size, specialty training, physician report of National Committee for Quality Assurance (NCQA) PCMH recognition, and practice affiliation) characteristics. A hierarchical multivariate analysis clustered by clinical practice was conducted to evaluate characteristics associated with the adoption of practice-based systems and technology to support guideline-adherent screening. Primary care physicians in family medicine, general internal medicine, and obstetrics and gynecology, and nurse practitioners or physician assistants from four clinical care networks affiliated with PROSPR (Population-based Research Optimizing Screening through Personalized Regimens) consortium research centers. The prevalence of routine breast cancer risk assessment, electronic health record (EHR) decision support, comparative performance reports, and panel reports of patients due for routine screening and follow-up. There were 385 participants (57.6 % of eligible). Forty-seven percent (47.0 %) of providers reported NCQA recognition as a PCMH. Less than half reported EHR decision support for breast (48.8 %) or cervical cancer (46.2 %) screening. A minority received comparative performance reports for breast (26.2 %) or cervical (19.7 %) cancer screening, automated reports of patients overdue for breast (18.7 %) or cervical (16.4 %) cancer screening, or follow-up of abnormal breast (18.1 %) or cervical (17.6 %) cancer screening tests. In multivariate analysis, reported NCQA recognition as a PCMH was associated with greater use of

  11. Application of the Carolina Framework for Cervical Cancer Prevention

    PubMed Central

    Moss, Jennifer L.; McCarthy, Schatzi H.; Gilkey, Melissa B.; Brewer, Noel T.

    2014-01-01

    Objective The Carolina Framework for Cervical Cancer Prevention describes 4 main causes of cervical cancer incidence: human papillomavirus (HPV) infection, lack of screening, screening errors, and not receiving follow-up care. We present 2 applications of the Carolina Framework in which we identify high-need counties in North Carolina and generate recommendations for improving prevention efforts. Methods We created a cervical cancer prevention need index (CCPNI) that ranked counties on cervical cancer mortality, HPV vaccine initiation and completion, Pap smear screening, and provision of Pap tests to rarely- or never-screened women. In addition, we conducted in-depth interviews with 19 key informants from programs and agencies involved in cervical cancer prevention in North Carolina. Results North Carolina’s 100 counties varied widely on individual CCPNI components, including annual cervical cancer mortality (median 2.7/100,000 women; range 0.0–8.0), adolescent girls’ HPV vaccine initiation (median 42%; range 15%–62%), and Pap testing in the previous 3 years among Medicaid-insured adult women (median 59%; range 40%–83%). Counties with the greatest prevention needs formed 2 distinct clusters in the northeast and south-central regions of the state. Interviews generated 9 recommendations to improve cervical cancer prevention in North Carolina, identifying applications to specific programs and policies in the state. Conclusions This study found striking geographic disparities in cervical cancer prevention need in North Carolina. Future prevention efforts in the state should prioritize high-need regions as well as recommended strategies and applications in existing programs. Other states can use the Carolina Framework to increase the impact of their cervical cancer prevention efforts. PMID:24333357

  12. Provider Attitudes and Screening Practices Following Changes in Breast and Cervical Cancer Screening Guidelines.

    PubMed

    Haas, Jennifer S; Sprague, Brian L; Klabunde, Carrie N; Tosteson, Anna N A; Chen, Jane S; Bitton, Asaf; Beaber, Elisabeth F; Onega, Tracy; Kim, Jane J; MacLean, Charles D; Harris, Kimberly; Yamartino, Phillip; Howe, Kathleen; Pearson, Loretta; Feldman, Sarah; Brawarsky, Phyllis; Schapira, Marilyn M

    2016-01-01

    Changes to national guidelines for breast and cervical cancer screening have created confusion and controversy for women and their primary care providers. To characterize women's primary health care provider attitudes towards screening and changes in practice in response to recent revisions in guidelines for breast and cervical cancer screening. In 2014, we distributed a confidential web and mail survey to 668 women's health care providers affiliated with the four clinical care networks participating in the three PROSPR (Population-based Research Optimizing Screening through Personalized Regimens) consortium breast cancer research centers (385 respondents; response rate 57.6 %). We assessed self-reported attitudes toward breast and cervical cancer screening, as well as practice changes in response to the most recent revisions of the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) recommendations. The majority of providers believed that mammography screening was effective for reducing cancer mortality among women ages 40-74 years, and that Papanicolaou (Pap) testing was very effective for women ages 21-64 years. While the USPSTF breast and cervical cancer screening recommendations were widely perceived by the respondents as influential, 75.7 and 41.2 % of providers (for mammography and cervical cancer screening, respectively) reported screening practices in excess of those recommended by USPSTF. Provider-reported barriers to concordance with guideline recommendations included: patient concerns (74 and 36 % for breast and cervical, respectively), provider disagreement with the recommendations (50 and 14 %), health system measurement of a provider's screening practices that use conflicting measurement criteria (40 and 21 %), concern about malpractice risk (33 and 11 %), and lack of time to discuss the benefits and harms with their patients (17 and 8 %). Primary care providers do not consistently follow recent USPSTF breast and cervical cancer screening recommendations

  13. Cost of the Cervical Cancer Screening Program at the Mexican Social Security Institute.

    PubMed

    Granados-García, Víctor; Flores, Yvonne N; Pérez, Ruth; Rudolph, Samantha E; Lazcano-Ponce, Eduardo; Salmerón, Jorge

    2014-01-01

    To estimate the annual cost of the National Cervical Cancer Screening Program (CCSP) of the Mexican Institute of Social Security (IMSS). This cost analysis examined regional coverage rates reported by IMSS. We estimated the number of cytology, colposcopy, biopsy and pathology evaluations, as well as the diagnostic test and treatment costs for cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade II and III (CIN 2/3) and cervical cancer. Diagnostic test costs were estimated using a micro-costing technique. Sensitivity analyses were performed. The cost to perform 2.7 million cytology tests was nearly 38 million dollars, which represents 26.1% of the total program cost (145.4 million). False negatives account for nearly 43% of the program costs. The low sensitivity of the cytology test generates high rates of false negatives, which results in high institutional costs from the treatment of undetected cervical cancer cases.

  14. Situation analysis for cervical cancer diagnosis and treatment in east, central and southern African countries.

    PubMed Central

    Chirenje, Z. M.; Rusakaniko, S.; Kirumbi, L.; Ngwalle, E. W.; Makuta-Tlebere, P.; Kaggwa, S.; Mpanju-Shumbusho, W.; Makoae, L.

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the factors influencing cervical cancer diagnosis and treatment in countries of East, Central and Southern Africa (ECSA). METHODS: Data were collected from randomly selected primary health care centres, district and provincial hospitals, and tertiary hospitals in each participating country. Health care workers were interviewed, using a questionnaire; the facilities for screening, diagnosing, and treating cervical cancer in each institution were recorded, using a previously designed checklist. FINDINGS: Although 95% of institutions at all health care levels in ECSA countries had the basic infrastructure to carry out cervical cytology screening, only a small percentage of women were actually screened. Lack of policy guidelines, infrequent supply of basic materials, and a lack of suitable qualified staff were the most common reasons reported. CONCLUSIONS: This study demonstrates that there is an urgent need for more investment in the diagnosis and treatment of cervical cancer in ECSA countries. In these, and other countries with low resources, suitable screening programmes should be established. PMID:11242819

  15. Radiotherapy combined with surgery as treatment for advanced cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Perches, R D; Lobaton, A T; Garcia, M C

    1983-12-01

    Experience obtained in a group of 44 patients with advanced cervical cancer is reported here. In this study, patients with residual cancer underwent laparotomy eight weeks after one or two different radiotherapy protocols. Sixty-eight percent of patients underwent radical surgery, 85% of patients pelvic exenterations, and 15% radical hysterectomies. In 27% of patients, no evidence of residual cancer was found in surgical specimens. Radical surgery was well tolerated, and one-third of patients were free of disease for one year or more. Control of disease was obtained in 50% of pelvic exenterations and in 60% of radical hysterectomies, regardless of prognosis, clinical stage or radiotherapy scheme. Although results show an improvement of up to 22% when comparing this to other more conventional treatments, we have concluded that we must obtain a wider experience in order to support our findings.

  16. Cervical cytology in serous and endometrioid endometrial cancer.

    PubMed

    Roelofsen, Thijs; Geels, Yvette P; Pijnenborg, Johanna M A; van Ham, Maaike A P C; Zomer, Saskia F; van Tilburg, Johanna M Wiersma; Snijders, Marc P M L; Siebers, Albert G; Bulten, Johan; Massuger, Leon F A G

    2013-07-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the frequency of abnormal cervical cytology in preoperative cervical cytology of patients diagnosed with uterine papillary serous carcinoma (UPSC) and endometrioid endometrial carcinoma (EEC). In addition, associations between abnormal cervical cytology and clinicopathologic factors were evaluated. In this multicentre study, EEC patients diagnosed at two hospitals from 1999 to 2009 and UPSC patients diagnosed at five hospitals from 1992 to 2009, were included. Revision of the histologic slides was performed systematically and independently by 3 gynecopathologists. Cervical cytology within six months before histopathologic diagnosis of endometrial carcinoma was available for 267 EEC and 80 UPSC patients. Cervical cytology with atypical, malignant, or normal endometrial cells in postmenopausal women was considered as abnormal cytology, specific for endometrial pathology. Abnormal cervical cytology was found in 87.5% of UPSC patients, compared with 37.8% in EEC patients. In UPSC, abnormal cytology was associated with extrauterine spread of disease (P=0.043). In EEC, abnormal cytology was associated with cervical involvement (P=0.034). In both EEC and UPSC patients, abnormal cervical cytology was not associated with survival. In conclusion, abnormal cervical cytology was more frequently found in UPSC patients. It was associated with extrauterine disease in UPSC patients, and with cervical involvement in EEC patients. More prospective research should be performed to assess the true clinical value of preoperative cervical cytology in endometrial cancer patients.

  17. Ino80 promotes cervical cancer tumorigenesis by activating Nanog expression

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Jing; Liu, Jie; Chen, Aozheng; Lyu, Jia; Ai, Guihai; Zeng, Qiongjing; Sun, Yi; Chen, Chunxia; Wang, Jinbo; Qiu, Jin; Wu, Yi; Cheng, Jiajing; Shi, Xiujuan; Song, Liwen

    2016-01-01

    Ino80 ATPase is an integral component of the INO80 ATP-dependent chromatin-remodeling complex, which regulates transcription, DNA repair and replication. We found that Ino80 was highly expressed in cervical cancer cell lines and tumor samples. Ino80 knockdown inhibited cervical cancer cell proliferation, induced G0/G1 phase cell cycle arrest in vitro and suppressed tumor growth in vivo. However, Ino80 knockdown did not affect cell apoptosis, migration or invasion in vitro. Ino80 overexpression promoted proliferation in the H8 immortalized cervical epithelial cell line, which has low endogenous Ino80 expression as compared to cervical cancer cell lines. Ino80 bound to the Nanog transcription start site (TSS) and enhanced its expression in cervical cancer cells. Nanog overexpression in Ino80 knockdown cell lines promoted cell proliferation. This study demonstrated for the first time that Ino80 was upregulated in cervical cancer and promoted cell proliferation and tumorigenesis. Our findings suggest that Ino80 may be a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of cervical cancer. PMID:27750218

  18. Radiation Therapy and Cisplatin With or Without Triapine in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Stage IB2, II, or IIIB-IVA Cervical Cancer or Stage II-IVA Vaginal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-10-09

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma, Not Otherwise Specified; Stage IB2 Cervical Cancer; Stage II Cervical Cancer; Stage II Vaginal Cancer; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage III Vaginal Cancer; Stage IIIB Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Vaginal Cancer; Stage IVB Vaginal Cancer; Vaginal Adenocarcinoma; Vaginal Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Vaginal Squamous Cell Carcinoma, Not Otherwise Specified

  19. [Human papillomavirus detection in cervical cancer prevention].

    PubMed

    Picconi, María Alejandra

    2013-01-01

    Cervical cancer (CC), which is strongly associated to high-risk human papillomavirus (hr-HPV) infection, continues being a significant health problem in Latin America. The use of conventional cytology to detect precancerous cervical lesions has had no major impact on reducing CC incidence and mortality rates, which are still high in the region. New screening tools to detect precancerous lesions became available, which provide great opportunities for CC prevention, as do highly efficacious HPV vaccines able to prevent nearly all lesions associated with HPV-16 and -18 when applied before viral exposure. Currently, hr-HPV testing represents an invaluable component of clinical guidelines for screening, management and treatment of CC and their precursor lesions. Many testing strategies have been developed that can detect a broad spectrum of hr-HPV types in a single assay; however, only a small subset of them has documented clinical performance for any of the standard HPV testing indications. HPV tests that have not been validated and lack proof of reliability, reproducibility and accuracy should not be used in clinical management. Once incorporated into the lab, it is essential to submit the whole procedure of HPV testing to continuous and rigorous quality assurance to avoid sub-optimal, potentially harmful practices. Recent progress and current status of these methods are discussed in this article.

  20. Cervical and Breast Cancer Screening Among Mexican Migrant Women, 2013

    PubMed Central

    Guerrero, Natalie; Zhang, Xiao; Rangel, Gudelia; Gonzalez-Fagoaga, J. Eduardo

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Information on cervical and breast cancer screening among Latinas in the United States is limited. Even less information is available on screening practices of migrant women who engage in circular migration. We examined rates of cervical and breast cancer screening and the extent to which sociodemographics and other characteristics explain screening practices of Mexican migrant women who return to Mexico from the United States. Methods We used data from a cross-sectional probability survey of Mexico-born migrant women who returned, through Tijuana, to Mexico from the United States in 2013. The sample consisted of women who returned involuntarily (via deportation) or voluntarily; 177 reported authorized documentation status, and 36 reported unauthorized documentation status in the previous 12 months. Descriptive statistics were calculated and logistic regressions were estimated. Results Of 36 undocumented migrant women, 8 (22.2%) had a Papanicolaou test and 11 (30.6%) had a mammogram in the previous year; of 177 documented migrants, 83 (46.9%) had a Papanicolaou test and 68 (38.4%) had a mammogram. Undocumented migrants were less likely than documented migrants to receive a Papanicolaou test (odds ratio [OR] = 0.29; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.12–0.67); the likelihood was similar after adjustment for sociodemographic, migration, and acculturation factors (adjusted OR = 0.33; 95% CI, 0.12–0.90). Having health insurance (adjusted OR = 4.17; 95% CI, 1.80–9.65) and a regular source of health care (adjusted OR = 2.83; 95% CI, 1.05–7.65) were significant predictors of receiving a mammogram but not a Papanicolaou test. Conclusion Public health programs are needed to improve access to cervical and breast cancer screenings for Latina migrant women in general and undocumented circular migrants in particular. PMID:27513995

  1. Prevalence and risk factors of cervical cancer among women in an urban community of Kwara State, north central Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Durowade, K A; Osagbemi, G K; Salaudeen, A G; Musa, O I; Akande, T M; Babatunde, O A; Raji, H O; Okesina, B S; Fowowe, A A; Ibrahim, O O K; Kolawole, O M

    2012-12-01

    Cervical cancer is the second most common malignancy in women worldwide with a high incidence in under-developed countries and Nigeria is one of these countries. This study aimed at screening for cervical cancer using Papanicolaou smear and to identify risk factors for cervical cancer among women in Olufadi community, Kwara State, North-central Nigeria. This was a cross-sectional study involving the screening of women aged 25-64 years for cervical cancer using Papanicolaou smear. Respondents were selected through systematic random sampling of households. Interviewer- administered questionnaire and clinical report form were also used to collect data. In addition, Pap smear samples were taken. Data was analyzed using SPSS version 15. Only 10 (5.0%) respondents had positive cytology result, while the rest were normal. Of the 10 positive cytology results, 1 (10.0%) was high grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (HGSIL) while the remaining 9 (90.0%) were low grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (LGSIL) which corresponds to 0.5% and 4.5% of the total respondents respectively. Risk factors for cervical cancer identified included coitarche, tobacco smoking, number of sexual partners and family history of cervical cancer. The findings from this study attest to the increasing burden of cervical cancer. The high number of positive results obtained from the study coupled with the presence of risk factors was an indication of how useful regular screening will be in the early detection of cervical cancer.

  2. The significance of G-CSF expression and myeloid-derived suppressor cells in the chemoresistance of uterine cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Kawano, Mahiru; Mabuchi, Seiji; Matsumoto, Yuri; Sasano, Tomoyuki; Takahashi, Ryoko; Kuroda, Hiromasa; Kozasa, Katsumi; Hashimoto, Kae; Isobe, Aki; Sawada, Kenjiro; Hamasaki, Toshimitsu; Morii, Eiichi; Kimura, Tadashi

    2015-12-15

    Granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) producing malignant tumor has been reported to occur in various organs, and has been associated with poor clinical outcome. The aim of this study is to investigate the significance of tumor G-CSF expression in the chemosensitivity of uterine cervical cancer. The clinical data of recurrent or advanced cervical cancer patients who were treated with platinum-based chemotherapy were analyzed. Clinical samples, cervical cancer cell lines, and a mouse model of cervical cancer were employed to examine the mechanisms responsible for the development of chemoresistance in G-CSF-producing cervical cancer, focusing on myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC). As a result, the tumor G-CSF expression was significantly associated with increased MDSC frequencies and compromised survival. In vitro and in vivo experiments demonstrated that the increased MDSC induced by tumor-derived G-CSF is involved in the development of chemoresistance. The depletion of MDSC via splenectomy or the administration of anti-Gr-1 antibody sensitized G-CSF-producing cervical cancer to cisplatin. In conclusion, tumor G-CSF expression is an indicator of an extremely poor prognosis in cervical cancer patients that are treated with chemotherapy. Combining MDSC-targeting treatments with current standard chemotherapies might have therapeutic efficacy as a treatment for G-CSF-producing cervical cancer.

  3. Colonial legacy and the experience of First Nations women in cervical cancer screening: a Canadian multi-community study.

    PubMed

    Wakewich, Pamela; Wood, Brianne; Davey, Crystal; Laframboise, Ashlie; Zehbe, Ingeborg

    2016-01-01

    Regular Papanicolaou (Pap) screening has dramatically reduced cervical cancer incidence in Canada since the 1950s. However, Indigenous women's rates of cervical cancer remain disproportionately high, a factor which is not acknowledged in national media or in educational materials reporting Canada's new cervical cancer screening guidelines. Here, we present findings from a cervical cancer screening initiative in Northwestern Ontario. Based on participatory action research, we worked with 10 First Nations communities in the Robinson Superior Treaty area to increase awareness of cervical cancer risk, develop culturally sensitive tools for screening and education and test the efficacy of human papillomavirus (HPV) self-sampling as an alternative to Pap cytology. We conducted 16 interviews with health care professionals and 9 focus groups with 69 women from the communities. A central theme for both health care providers (HCPs) and community members was the colonial legacy and its influence on women's experiences of cervical cancer screening. This was evidenced by a strong sense of body shyness, including shame related to sexuality and sexually transmitted infections, concerns about confidentiality in clinical encounters and distrust or caution around HCPs. Reaffirming women's traditional caregiving and educational roles, enhancing mother and daughter communication, improving cultural sensitivity in health care and education and adoption of HPV self-sampling to increase women's privacy and control of the cervical cancer screening experience were endorsed. We argue that education and screening initiatives must reflect the cultural preferences of Indigenous women, empowering them to take control of their experiences of health and body in cervical cancer screening.

  4. Cervical and female breast cancers in the Americas: current situation and opportunities for action

    PubMed Central

    Cabanes, Anna; Prieto-Lara, Elisa; Gawryszewski, Vilma

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Objective To understand better the current regional situation and public health response to cervical cancer and female breast cancer in the Americas. Methods Data on cervical cancer and female breast cancers in 33 countries, for the period from 2000 to the last year with available data, were extracted from the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO) Regional Mortality Database and analysed. Changes in mortality rates over the study period – in all countries except those with small populations and large fluctuations in time–series mortality data – were calculated using Poisson regression models. Information from the PAHO Country Capacity Survey on noncommunicable diseases was also analysed. Findings The Bahamas, Trinidad and Tobago and Uruguay showed relatively high rates of death from breast cancer, whereas the three highest rates of death from cervical cancer were observed in El Salvador, Nicaragua and Paraguay. Several countries – particularly Paraguay and Venezuela – have high rates of death from both types of cancer. Although mortality from cervical cancer has generally been decreasing in the Americas, decreases in mortality from breast cancer have only been observed in a few countries in the Region of the Americas. All but one of the 25 countries in the Americas included in the PAHO Country Capacity Survey reported having public health services for the screening and treatment of breast and cervical cancers. Conclusion Most countries in the Americas have the public health capacity needed to screen for – and treat – breast and cervical cancers and, therefore, the potential to reduce the burden posed by these cancers. PMID:24101780

  5. The role of ureaplasma urealyticum infection in cervical intraepithelial neoplasia and cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Xiaolei, C; Taot, H; Zongli, S; Hongying, Y

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the role of ureaplasma urealyticum (UU) infection in cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) and cervical cancer and to study the correlation between UU and HPV infection in CIN/cervical cancer. A total of 233 research subjects were divided into the case group and the control group. UU and pathogenic load UU were detected in the case group and the control group by fluorescence quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method, human papillomavirus (HPV) in case group by PCR + membrane hybridization method. There was statistically significant difference in the case group and control group with respect to the positive rate and pathogenic load of UU (p < 0.05). The positive rate of UU among CIN II group, CIN III group, and the cervical cancer group were not statistically significant difference (p > 0.05). There may be statistically significant difference in the result of testing UU coinfection with HPV (p = 0.002). Positive rate and the pathogenic load of UU infection may be related to the genesis of cervical cancer. Significant combined effect could strengthen the process of the disease and lead to the pathogenesis of cervical cancer between infection of HPV and UU.

  6. Embryonic stem cell-specific signature in cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Organista-Nava, Jorge; Gómez-Gómez, Yazmín; Gariglio, Patricio

    2014-03-01

    The wide range of invasive and noninvasive lesion phenotypes associated with high-risk human papillomavirus (HR-HPV) infection in cervical cancer (CC) indicates that not only the virus but also specific cervical epithelial cells in the transformation zone (TZ), such as stem cells (SCs), play an important part in the development of cervical neoplasia. In this review, we focused in an expression signature that is specific to embryonic SCs and to poorly differentiated cervical malignant tumors and we hypothesize that this expression signature may play an important role to promote cell growth, survival, colony formation, lack of adhesion, as well as cell invasion and migration in CC.

  7. EF5 in Finding Oxygen in Tumor Cells of Patients Who Are Undergoing Surgery or Biopsy for Cervical, Endometrial, or Ovarian Epithelial Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-01-15

    Primary Peritoneal Cavity Cancer; Stage I Endometrial Carcinoma; Stage I Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IA Cervical Cancer; Stage IB Cervical Cancer; Stage II Endometrial Carcinoma; Stage II Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage III Cervical Cancer; Stage III Endometrial Carcinoma; Stage III Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IV Endometrial Carcinoma; Stage IV Ovarian Epithelial Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer; Stage IVB Cervical Cancer

  8. HPV vaccination: The most pragmatic cervical cancer primary prevention strategy.

    PubMed

    Sankaranarayanan, Rengaswamy

    2015-10-01

    The evidence that high-risk HPV infections cause cervical cancers has led to two new approaches for cervical cancer control: vaccination to prevent HPV infections, and HPV screening to detect and treat cervical precancerous lesions. Two vaccines are currently available: quadrivalent vaccine targeting oncogenic HPV types 16, 18, 6, and 11, and bivalent vaccine targeting HPV 16 and 18. Both vaccines have demonstrated remarkable immunogenicity and substantial protection against persistent infection and high-grade cervical cancer precursors caused by HPV 16 and 18 in HPV-naïve women, and have the potential to prevent 70% of cervical cancers in adequately vaccinated populations. HPV vaccination is now implemented in national programs in 62 countries, including some low- and middle-income countries. The early findings from routine national programs in high-income countries are instructive to encourage low- and middle-income countries with a high risk of cervical cancer to roll out HPV vaccination programs and to introduce resource-appropriate cervical screening programs. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.

  9. Chemoradiotherapy in the treatment of cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Eifel, Patricia J

    2006-07-01

    The advantage of concurrent chemoradiotherapy over radiotherapy alone in patients with cervical cancer has now been well documented in a series of prospective randomized trials. Six of these trials compared a cisplatin-based regimen (either cisplatin alone administered weekly or a combination of cisplatin and 5-fluorouracil) with radiotherapy alone or radiotherapy plus another, less effective chemotherapy; 5 of these 6 trials showed a benefit with concurrent chemotherapy. Individual trials have also suggested that epirubicin and the combination of mitomycin plus 5-fluorouracil are effective when administered concurrently with radiotherapy. Other drugs, particularly biologic response modifiers, are currently being studied for their potential benefit in combination with radiation and cisplatin. Although the side effects of chemoradiotherapy with weekly cisplatin or cisplatin plus 5-fluorouracil are tolerable for most patients, the addition of concurrent chemotherapy to radiotherapy markedly increases hematologic and gastrointestinal side effects and adds to the overall complexity of treatment. Successful management requires particularly close monitoring of hematologic parameters, fluid balance, electrolyte levels, dietary condition, and social support. Careful coordination between caregivers is crucial. Although early publication of some trials precluded mature analysis of late radiation effects, available data suggest that the addition of concurrent chemotherapy does not markedly increase the risk of major late complications. Most women with locoregionally advanced cervical cancers (stage IB2 or greater or positive pelvic lymph nodes) that are confined to the pelvis are candidates for chemoradiotherapy. However, the benefit of adding concurrent chemotherapy to radiotherapy should always be weighed against the risk of serious acute side effects, particularly in patients who have serious coexisting medical conditions that would have precluded or discouraged enrollment

  10. Survival analysis of cervical cancer using stratified Cox regression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purnami, S. W.; Inayati, K. D.; Sari, N. W. Wulan; Chosuvivatwong, V.; Sriplung, H.

    2016-04-01

    Cervical cancer is one of the mostly widely cancer cause of the women death in the world including Indonesia. Most cervical cancer patients come to the hospital already in an advanced stadium. As a result, the treatment of cervical cancer becomes more difficult and even can increase the death's risk. One of parameter that can be used to assess successfully of treatment is the probability of survival. This study raises the issue of cervical cancer survival patients at Dr. Soetomo Hospital using stratified Cox regression based on six factors such as age, stadium, treatment initiation, companion disease, complication, and anemia. Stratified Cox model is used because there is one independent variable that does not satisfy the proportional hazards assumption that is stadium. The results of the stratified Cox model show that the complication variable is significant factor which influent survival probability of cervical cancer patient. The obtained hazard ratio is 7.35. It means that cervical cancer patient who has complication is at risk of dying 7.35 times greater than patient who did not has complication. While the adjusted survival curves showed that stadium IV had the lowest probability of survival.

  11. Provider Perspectives on Promoting Cervical Cancer Screening Among Refugee Women.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ying; Ornelas, India J; Do, H Hoai; Magarati, Maya; Jackson, J Carey; Taylor, Victoria M

    2016-11-12

    Many refugees in the United States emigrated from countries where the incidence of cervical cancer is high. Refugee women are unlikely to have been screened for cervical cancer prior to resettlement in the U.S. National organizations recommend cervical cancer screening for refugee women soon after resettlement. We sought to identify health and social service providers' perspectives on promoting cervical cancer screening in order to inform the development of effective programs to increase screening among recently resettled refugees. This study consisted of 21 in-depth key informant interviews with staff from voluntary refugee resettlement agencies, community based organizations, and healthcare clinics serving refugees in King County, Washington. Interview transcripts were analyzed to identify themes. We identified the following themes: (1) refugee women are unfamiliar with preventive care and cancer screening; (2) providers have concerns about the timing of cervical cancer education and screening; (3) linguistic and cultural barriers impact screening uptake; (4) provider factors and clinic systems facilitate promotion of screening; and (5) strategies for educating refugee women about screening. Our findings suggest that refugee women are in need of health education on cervical cancer screening during early resettlement. Frequent messaging about screening could help ensure that women receive screening within the early resettlement period. Health education videos may be effective for providing simple, low literacy messages in women's native languages. Appointments with female clinicians and interpreters, as well as clinic systems that remind clinicians to offer screening at each appointment could increase screening among refugee women.

  12. Prioritizing US Cervical Cancer Prevention With Results From a Geospatial Model

    PubMed Central

    Kish, Jonathan K.; Rolin, Alicia I.; Zou, Zhaohui; Cucinelli, James E.; Tatalovich, Zaria; Saraiya, Mona; Altekruse, Sean F.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To determine if differences in screening and vaccination patterns across the population may accentuate ethnic and geographic variation in future burden of disease. Methods Using Cancer in North America data provided by the North American Association of Central Cancer Registries, county cervical cancer incidence trends from 1995 to 2009 were modeled for the entire United States using ecologic covariates. Rates for health service areas were also modeled by ethnicity. State-level incidence was mapped together with Papanicolaou (Pap) screening, past 3 years (women ≥ 18 years old), and three-dose human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine coverage (girls 13 to 17 years old) to identify potential priority areas for preventive services. Results US cervical cancer incidence decreased more during the periods 1995 to 1999 and 2000 to 2004 than during the period 2005 to 2009. During these 15 years, the most affected areas became increasingly confined to Appalachia, the lower Mississippi Valley, the Deep South, Texas, and Florida. Hispanic and black women experienced a higher incidence of cervical cancer than both white and Asian and Pacific Islander women during each period. Women in 10 of 17 states/districts with a high incidence (≥ 8.14/100,000) reported low Pap testing (< 78.5%), HPV vaccine coverage (< 33.9%), or both prevention technologies. Conclusion The decline in cervical cancer incidence has slowed in recent years. Access to HPV vaccination, targeted screening, and treatment in affected populations is needed to reduce cervical cancer disparities in the future.

  13. Grantee Spotlight: Dr. Kolawole Okuyemi - Improving Cervical Cancer Screening Attitudes

    Cancer.gov

    Dr. Kolawole Okuyumi is studying cervical cancer screening attitudes and behaviors of African immigrants and refugees in Minnesota, and introducing “cancer” and “cervix” to their everyday vocabulary.

  14. Bevacizumab improves survival for patients with advanced cervical cancer

    Cancer.gov

    Patients with advanced, recurrent, or persistent cervical cancer that was not curable with standard treatment who received the drug bevacizumab (Avastin) lived 3.7 months longer than patients who did not receive the drug, according to an interim analysis

  15. Delivering cervical cancer prevention services in low-resource settings.

    PubMed

    Bradley, J; Barone, M; Mahé, C; Lewis, R; Luciani, S

    2005-05-01

    The goals of any cervical cancer prevention program should be threefold: to achieve high coverage of the population at risk, to screen women with an accurate test as part of high-quality services, and to ensure that women with positive test results are properly managed. This article focuses on the experiences of the Alliance for Cervical Cancer Prevention (ACCP) in delivery of screening and treatment services as part of cervical cancer prevention projects in Africa, Latin America, and Asia. Research and experience show that cervical cancer can be prevented when strategies and services are well planned and well managed and when attention is paid to program monitoring and evaluation. Coordination of program components, reduction of the number of visits, improvement of service quality, and flexibility in how services are delivered are all essential features of an effective service.

  16. Older Hispanic women, health literacy, and cervical cancer screening.

    PubMed

    Flores, Bertha E; Acton, Gayle J

    2013-11-01

    Approximately 90 million people in the United States lack basic literacy skills, which affect health behaviors. Cervical cancer is preventable and treatable, yet few older Hispanic women seek screening and continue to be a high-risk group for cervical cancer. A literature review was conducted to address the relationship between cervical cancer screening, health literacy, and older Hispanic women. Eighty studies were reviewed, and nine addressed health literacy and Hispanic women. One study addressed the association between functional health literacy and Pap smear screening among older Hispanic women. Few studies have explored the association between preventive cervical cancer screening and health literacy among older Hispanic women. Nurses must assess health literacy and be prepared to provide care, which is culturally, and linguistically appropriate to improve health outcomes. Further research is needed to be inclusive of all populations including older Hispanic women.

  17. Image-Guided Radiotherapy and -Brachytherapy for Cervical Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Dutta, Suresh; Nguyen, Nam Phong; Vock, Jacqueline; Kerr, Christine; Godinez, Juan; Bose, Satya; Jang, Siyoung; Chi, Alexander; Almeida, Fabio; Woods, William; Desai, Anand; David, Rick; Karlsson, Ulf Lennart; Altdorfer, Gabor

    2015-01-01

    Conventional radiotherapy for cervical cancer relies on clinical examination, 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT), and 2-dimensional intracavitary brachytherapy. Excellent local control and survival have been obtained for small early stage cervical cancer with definitive radiotherapy. For bulky and locally advanced disease, the addition of chemotherapy has improved the prognosis but toxicity remains significant. New imaging technology such as positron-emission tomography and magnetic resonance imaging has improved tumor delineation for radiotherapy planning. Image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) may decrease treatment toxicity of whole pelvic radiation because of its potential for bone marrow, bowel, and bladder sparring. Tumor shrinkage during whole pelvic IGRT may optimize image-guided brachytherapy (IGBT), allowing for better local control and reduced toxicity for patients with cervical cancer. IGRT and IGBT should be integrated in future prospective studies for cervical cancer. PMID:25853092

  18. Image-guided radiotherapy and -brachytherapy for cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Dutta, Suresh; Nguyen, Nam Phong; Vock, Jacqueline; Kerr, Christine; Godinez, Juan; Bose, Satya; Jang, Siyoung; Chi, Alexander; Almeida, Fabio; Woods, William; Desai, Anand; David, Rick; Karlsson, Ulf Lennart; Altdorfer, Gabor

    2015-01-01

    Conventional radiotherapy for cervical cancer relies on clinical examination, 3-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT), and 2-dimensional intracavitary brachytherapy. Excellent local control and survival have been obtained for small early stage cervical cancer with definitive radiotherapy. For bulky and locally advanced disease, the addition of chemotherapy has improved the prognosis but toxicity remains significant. New imaging technology such as positron-emission tomography and magnetic resonance imaging has improved tumor delineation for radiotherapy planning. Image-guided radiotherapy (IGRT) may decrease treatment toxicity of whole pelvic radiation because of its potential for bone marrow, bowel, and bladder sparring. Tumor shrinkage during whole pelvic IGRT may optimize image-guided brachytherapy (IGBT), allowing for better local control and reduced toxicity for patients with cervical cancer. IGRT and IGBT should be integrated in future prospective studies for cervical cancer.

  19. Immunotherapy and targeted therapy for cervical cancer: an update.

    PubMed

    Menderes, Gulden; Black, Jonathan; Schwab, Carlton L; Santin, Alessandro D

    2016-01-01

    The prognosis of patients with metastatic cervical cancer is poor with a median survival of 8-13 months. Despite the potency of chemotherapeutic drugs, this treatment is rarely curative and should be considered palliative only. In the last few years, a better understanding of Human papillomavirus tumor-host immune system interactions and the development of new therapeutics targeting immune check points have renewed interest in the use of immunotherapy in cervical cancer patients. Moreover, next generation sequencing has emerged as an attractive option for the identification of actionable driver mutations and other markers. In this review, we provide background information on the molecular biology of cervical cancer and summarize immunotherapy studies, targeted therapies, including those with angiogenesis inhibitors and tyrosine kinase inhibitors recently completed or currently on-going in cervical cancer patients.

  20. Screening, HPV Vaccine Can Prevent Cervical Cancer: FDA

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_163464.html Screening, HPV Vaccine Can Prevent Cervical Cancer: FDA Agency recommends getting ... by the human papillomavirus (HPV). An FDA-approved vaccine called Gardasil 9 protects against 9 HPV types ...

  1. Remedies and life changes among invasive cervical cancer survivors.

    PubMed

    Greenwald, Howard P; McCorkle, Ruth

    2007-02-01

    This study addresses health practices and perceived disease impact among long-term survivors of invasive cervical cancer. Little is now known about how these women adapt and how often positive changes may result from their experience. Interviews were conducted with 208 individuals 6 to 29 years post-invasive cervical cancer diagnosis identified through the Connecticut Tumor Registry. Questioning focused on alternative remedies used, health practices, life priorities, and health status. Despite the challenges associated with a history of cervical cancer, women interviewed in this study found opportunities for adaptation and growth. Health professionals should inform cervical cancer patients about remedies that women have found valuable in promoting recovery, as well as share information about how survivors have grown personally through the disease experience.

  2. Interventions for encouraging sexual behaviours intended to prevent cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    Shepherd, Jonathan P; Frampton, Geoff K; Harris, Petra

    2014-01-01

    mentioned HPV or cervical cancer prevention. Statistically significant effects for behavioural outcomes (e.g. increasing condom use) were common, though not universal and varied according to the type of outcome. There were no statistically significant effects of abstaining from or reducing sexual activity. There were few statistically significant effects on biological (STI) outcomes. Considerable uncertainty exists in the risk of bias due to incomplete or ambiguous reporting. Authors’ conclusions Behavioural interventions for young women which aim to promote sexual behaviours protective of STI transmission can be effective, primarily at encouraging condom use. Future evaluations should include a greater focus on HPV and its link to cervical cancer, with long-term follow-up to assess impact on behaviour change, rates of HPV infection and progression to cervical cancer. Studies should use an RCT design where possible with integral process evaluation and cost-effectiveness analysis where appropriate. Given the predominance of USA studies in this systematic review evaluations conducted in other countries would be particularly useful. PMID:21491379

  3. Cervical cancer worry and screening among appalachian women.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Kimberly M; Schoenberg, Nancy; Wilson, Tomorrow D; Atkins, Elvonna; Dickinson, Stephanie; Paskett, Electra

    2015-04-01

    Although many have sought to understand cervical cancer screening (CCS) behavior, little research has examined worry about cervical cancer and its relationship to CCS, particularly in the underserved, predominantly rural Appalachian region. Our mixed method investigation aimed to obtain a more complete and theoretically-informed understanding of the role of cancer worry in CCS among Appalachian women, using the Self-Regulation Model (SRM). Our quantitative analysis indicated that the perception of being at higher risk of cervical cancer and having greater distress about cancer were both associated with greater worry about cancer. In our qualitative analysis, we found that, consistent with the SRM, negative affect had a largely concrete-experiential component, with many women having first-hand experience of the physical consequences of cervical cancer. Based on the results of this manuscript, we describe a number of approaches to lessen the fear associated with CCS. Intervention in this elevated risk community is merited and may focus on decreasing feelings of worry about cervical cancer and increasing communication of objective risk and need for screening. From a policy perspective, increasing the quantity and quality of care may also improve CCS rates and decrease the burden of cancer in Appalachia.

  4. [Current Status and Perspective of Chemoradiotherapy for Uterine Cervical Cancer].

    PubMed

    Toita, Takafumi; Ariga, Takuro; Kasuya, Goro; Hashimoto, Seiji; Maemoto, Hitoshi; Heianna, Joichi; Kakinohana, Yasumasa; Murayama, Sadayuki

    2015-10-01

    Fifteen years has passed since the NCI announced the clinical importance of concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) in radiotherapy for patients with locoregionally advanced uterine cervical cancer. Numerous clinical trials have been performed to further improve the outcomes of CCRT. In addition to investigations of chemotherapeutic regimens and schedules, adaptation of novel radiotherapy methods such as image-guided brachytherapy (IGBT) and intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) is encouraged in CCRT for cervical cancer.

  5. Comparison of Quality of Life and Sexuality between Cervical Cancer Survivors and Healthy Women.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yumi; Lim, Myong Cheol; Kim, Se Ik; Joo, Jungnam; Lee, Dong Ock; Park, Sang-Yoon

    2016-10-01

    The purpose of this study is to compare quality of life (QoL) and sexual functioning between sexually active cervical cancer survivors and healthy women. In this cross-sectional study, propensity-score-matched cervical cancer survivors (n=104) and healthy women (n=104) were compared. All women had engaged in sexual activity within the previous 3 months, and cervical cancer survivors showed no evidence of disease after primary treatment. QoL and sexual functioning were assessed using three questionnaires; the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire Core 30 (EORTC QLQ-C30), Cervical Cancer Module (EORTC QLQ-CX24), and the Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI). Significantly higher scores for lymphedema were observed in the cervical cancer survivors group compared with the healthy women group (mean, 20.2 vs. 12.2; p < 0.05). Sexuality, both in terms of sexual activity, sexual enjoyment, and sexual worry (EORTC QLQ-CX24), and in terms of desire, arousal, lubrication, orgasm, satisfaction, and pain (FSFI) were similar between the groups. When the scale of sexual/vaginal functioning in EORTC QLQ-CX24 was divided into individual questions, cervical cancer survivors reported shorter vaginal length than the control group, but without statistical significance (mean, 80.6 vs. 85.4; p=0.077). Compared with healthy women, sexuality was not impaired in cervical cancer survivors who showed no evidence of disease after primary treatment and engaging in sexual activity. Further prospective cohort studies are warranted to confirm this finding.

  6. Comparison of Quality of Life and Sexuality between Cervical Cancer Survivors and Healthy Women

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yumi; Lim, Myong Cheol; Kim, Se Ik; Joo, Jungnam; Lee, Dong Ock; Park, Sang-Yoon

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study is to compare quality of life (QoL) and sexual functioning between sexually active cervical cancer survivors and healthy women. Materials and Methods In this cross-sectional study, propensity-score-matched cervical cancer survivors (n=104) and healthy women (n=104) were compared. All women had engaged in sexual activity within the previous 3 months, and cervical cancer survivors showed no evidence of disease after primary treatment. QoL and sexual functioning were assessed using three questionnaires; the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire Core 30 (EORTC QLQ-C30), Cervical Cancer Module (EORTC QLQ-CX24), and the Female Sexual Function Index (FSFI). Results Significantly higher scores for lymphedema were observed in the cervical cancer survivors group compared with the healthy women group (mean, 20.2 vs. 12.2; p < 0.05). Sexuality, both in terms of sexual activity, sexual enjoyment, and sexual worry (EORTC QLQ-CX24), and in terms of desire, arousal, lubrication, orgasm, satisfaction, and pain (FSFI) were similar between the groups. When the scale of sexual/vaginal functioning in EORTC QLQ-CX24 was divided into individual questions, cervical cancer survivors reported shorter vaginal length than the control group, but without statistical significance (mean, 80.6 vs. 85.4; p=0.077). Conclusion Compared with healthy women, sexuality was not impaired in cervical cancer survivors who showed no evidence of disease after primary treatment and engaging in sexual activity. Further prospective cohort studies are warranted to confirm this finding. PMID:26875196

  7. Epidemiology and costs of cervical cancer screening and cervical dysplasia in Italy

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, Paolo Giorgi; Ricciardi, Alessandro; Cohet, Catherine; Palazzo, Fabio; Furnari, Giacomo; Valle, Sabrina; Largeron, Nathalie; Federici, Antonio

    2009-01-01

    Background We estimated the number of women undergoing cervical cancer screening annually in Italy, the rates of cervical abnormalities detected, and the costs of screening and management of abnormalities. Methods The annual number of screened women was estimated from National Health Interview data. Data from the Italian Group for Cervical Cancer Screening were used to estimate the number of positive, negative and unsatisfactory Pap smears. The incidence of CIN (cervical intra-epithelial neoplasia) was estimated from the Emilia Romagna Cancer Registry. Patterns of follow-up and treatment costs were estimated using a typical disease management approach based on national guidelines and data from the Italian Group for Cervical Cancer Screening. Treatment unit costs were obtained from Italian National Health Service and Hospital Information System of the Lazio Region. Results An estimated 6.4 million women aged 25–69 years undergo screening annually in Italy (1.2 million and 5.2 million through organized and opportunistic screening programs, respectively). Approximately 2.4% of tests have positive findings. There are approximately 21,000 cases of CIN1 and 7,000–17,000 cases of CIN2/3. Estimated costs to the healthcare service amount to €158.5 million for screening and €22.9 million for the management of cervical abnormalities. Conclusion Although some cervical abnormalities might have been underestimated, the total annual cost of cervical cancer prevention in Italy is approximately €181.5 million, of which 87% is attributable to screening. PMID:19243586

  8. Risk of invasive cervical cancer after atypical glandular cells in cervical screening: nationwide cohort study.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jiangrong; Andrae, Bengt; Sundström, Karin; Ström, Peter; Ploner, Alexander; Elfström, K Miriam; Arnheim-Dahlström, Lisen; Dillner, Joakim; Sparén, Pär

    2016-02-11

    To investigate the risks of invasive cervical cancer after detection of atypical glandular cells (AGC) during cervical screening. Nationwide population based cohort study. Cancer and population registries in Sweden. 3,054,328 women living in Sweden at any time between 1 January 1980 and 1 July 2011 who had any record of cervical cytological testing at ages 23-59. Of these, 2,899,968 women had normal cytology results at the first screening record. The first recorded abnormal result was atypical glandular cells (AGC) in 14 625, high grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (HSIL) in 65 633, and low grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (LSIL) in 244 168. Cumulative incidence of invasive cervical cancer over 15.5 years; proportion of invasive cervical cancer within six months of abnormality (prevalence); crude incidence rates for invasive cervical cancer over 0.5-15.5 years of follow-up; incidence rate ratios compared with women with normal cytology, estimated with Poisson regression adjusted for age and stratified by histopathology of cancer; distribution of clinical assessment within six months after the abnormality. The prevalence of cervical cancer was 1.4% for women with AGC, which was lower than for women with HSIL (2.5%) but higher than for women with LSIL (0.2%); adenocarcinoma accounted for 73.2% of the prevalent cases associated with AGC. The incidence rate of invasive cervical cancer after AGC was significantly higher than for women with normal results on cytology for up to 15.5 years and higher than HSIL and LSIL for up to 6.5 years. The incidence rate of adenocarcinoma was 61 times higher than for women with normal results on cytology in the first screening round after AGC, and remained nine times higher for up to 15.5 years. Incidence and prevalence of invasive cervical cancer was highest when AGC was found at ages 30-39. Only 54% of women with AGC underwent histology assessment within six months, much less than after HSIL (86%). Among women with histology

  9. Risk of invasive cervical cancer after atypical glandular cells in cervical screening: nationwide cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Andrae, Bengt; Sundström, Karin; Ström, Peter; Ploner, Alexander; Elfström, K Miriam; Arnheim-Dahlström, Lisen; Dillner, Joakim; Sparén, Pär

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To investigate the risks of invasive cervical cancer after detection of atypical glandular cells (AGC) during cervical screening. Design Nationwide population based cohort study. Setting Cancer and population registries in Sweden. Participants 3 054 328 women living in Sweden at any time between 1 January 1980 and 1 July 2011 who had any record of cervical cytological testing at ages 23-59. Of these, 2 899 968 women had normal cytology results at the first screening record. The first recorded abnormal result was atypical glandular cells (AGC) in 14 625, high grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (HSIL) in 65 633, and low grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (LSIL) in 244 168. Main outcome measures Cumulative incidence of invasive cervical cancer over 15.5 years; proportion of invasive cervical cancer within six months of abnormality (prevalence); crude incidence rates for invasive cervical cancer over 0.5-15.5 years of follow-up; incidence rate ratios compared with women with normal cytology, estimated with Poisson regression adjusted for age and stratified by histopathology of cancer; distribution of clinical assessment within six months after the abnormality. Results The prevalence of cervical cancer was 1.4% for women with AGC, which was lower than for women with HSIL (2.5%) but higher than for women with LSIL (0.2%); adenocarcinoma accounted for 73.2% of the prevalent cases associated with AGC. The incidence rate of invasive cervical cancer after AGC was significantly higher than for women with normal results on cytology for up to 15.5 years and higher than HSIL and LSIL for up to 6.5 years. The incidence rate of adenocarcinoma was 61 times higher than for women with normal results on cytology in the first screening round after AGC, and remained nine times higher for up to 15.5 years. Incidence and prevalence of invasive cervical cancer was highest when AGC was found at ages 30-39. Only 54% of women with AGC underwent histology assessment

  10. Survival rates of cervical cancer patients in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Muhamad, Nor Asiah; Kamaluddin, Muhammad Amir; Adon, Mohd Yusoff; Noh, Mohamed Asyraf; Bakhtiar, Mohammed Faizal; Ibrahim Tamim, Nor Saleha; Mahmud, Siti Haniza; Aris, Tahir

    2015-01-01

    Cervical cancer is the most common malignant cancer of the female reproductive organs worldwide. Currently, cervical cancer can be prevented by vaccination and detected at an early stage via various screening methods. Malaysia, as a developing country faces a heavy disease burden of cervical cancer as it is the second most common cancer among Malaysian women. This population based study was carried out to fulfil the primary aim of determining the survival rates of Malaysian women with cervical cancer and associated factors. Data were obtained from two different sources namely, the Malaysian National Cancer Registry (MNCR) and National Health Informatics Centre (NHIC) from 1st January 2000 to 31st December 2005. Kaplan Meier analyses were conducted to identify the overall survival rates and median survival time. Differences in survival among different ethnic and age group were compared using the log-rank test. A total of 5,859 patients were included. The median survival time for cervical cancer in this study was 65.8 months and the 5-year survival rate was 71.1%. The overall observed survival rates at 1, 3 and 5 years were 94.1%, 79.3% and 71.1% respectively. The log-rank test finding also showed that there were significant differences in the 5-year survival rate among different ethnic groups. Malays had the lowest survival rate of 59.2% followed by Indians (69.5%) and Chinese (73.8%). The overall 5-year survival rate among patients with cervical cancer in Malaysia is relatively good. Age and ethnic groups remain as significant determining factors for cervical cancer survival rate.

  11. Objective Diagnosis of Cervical Cancer by Tissue Protein Profile Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patil, Ajeetkumar; Bhat, Sujatha; Rai, Lavanya; Kartha, V. B.; Chidangil, Santhosh

    2011-07-01

    Protein profiles of homogenized normal cervical tissue samples from hysterectomy subjects and cancerous cervical tissues from biopsy samples collected from patients with different stages of cervical cancer were recorded using High Performance Liquid Chromatography coupled with Laser Induced Fluorescence (HPLC-LIF). The Protein profiles were subjected to Principle Component Analysis to derive statistically significant parameters. Diagnosis of sample types were carried out by matching three parameters—scores of factors, squared residuals, and Mahalanobis Distance. ROC and Youden's Index curves for calibration standards were used for objective estimation of the optimum threshold for decision making and performance.

  12. Experiences of Cervical Cancer Survivors in Rural Eastern North Carolina: a Qualitative Assessment.

    PubMed

    Richman, Alice R; Troutman, Jamie L; Torres, Essie

    2016-06-01

    Little qualitative research has been conducted with cervical cancer survivors. We sought to understand the experiences of survivors in rural Eastern North Carolina and identify any barriers which may have kept women from receiving preventive Papanicolaou screenings or follow-up care. We conducted semi-structured in-depth interviews with 15 low-income and underserved cervical cancer survivors living in Eastern North Carolina. Participants included English-speaking women who attended a large cancer center for care between March 2012 and March 2013. Participants ranged from being recently diagnosed with cervical cancer to being 15 years post-diagnosis. Interviews lasted approximately 1 h and were audio-tape-recorded. On average, women were 55 years old (range 35-85) and were diagnosed with cervical cancer 3 years prior to the interview (range 0.2 to 180 months). A good proportion was uninsured or Medicaid-insured (60 %). Half reported an annual household income of less than $20,000, and 13 % reported having a college degree. The majority of survivors had limited understanding of cervical cancer, experienced persistent symptoms related to their cancer before seeking care, and were nonadherent to Papanicolaou screening recommendations. The main barriers to care reported by participants was lack of money and health insurance, followed by the perception of overall health (which equated to the belief that medical care was not needed), transportation issues, and discomfort with provider. Health professionals should focus educational efforts on the benefits of Papanicolaou screenings, the symptoms sometimes associated with cervical cancer, and the free or low-cost services available to low-income women.

  13. An analysis of key stakeholders' attitudes and beliefs about barriers and facilitating factors in the development of a cervical cancer prevention program in South Africa.

    PubMed

    Francis, Shelley A; Leser, Kendall A; Esmont, Emma E; Griffith, Fareeda M

    2013-03-01

    Cervical cancer is the leading cause of cancer related deaths among women. Each year there are approximately 250,000 deaths; most of which occurred in Sub-Saharan Africa, South Asia, and Latin America. The purpose of this report is to examine key stakeholders experience and knowledge of HPV and cervical cancer, examine their experiences with the current cervical cancer screening and treatment policy, and identify barriers and facilitating factors to vaccine implementation and uptake. Fifteen indepth interviews were conducted with key stakeholders in Cape Town and Johannesburg, South Africa. The interviews revealed several key findings including: 1) knowledge about HPV and cervical cancer varied across participants, 2) knowledge about cervical cancer was also mixed while knowledge about the relationship between HPV and cervical cancer was low among participants. Our findings indicate that key stakeholders are concerned about women's health and wellbeing. In addition, they believe that the government, families, and the media need to play a prominent role in prevention efforts.

  14. CD38 enhances the proliferation and inhibits the apoptosis of cervical cancer cells by affecting the mitochondria functions.

    PubMed

    Liao, Shan; Xiao, Songshu; Chen, Hongxiang; Zhang, Manying; Chen, Zhifang; Long, Yuehua; Gao, Lu; Zhu, Guangchao; He, Junyu; Peng, Shuping; Xiong, Wei; Zeng, Zhaoyang; Li, Zheng; Zhou, Ming; Li, Xiaoling; Ma, Jian; Wu, Minghua; Xiang, Juanjuan; Li, Guiyuan; Zhou, Yanhong

    2017-10-01

    Cervical cancer is one of the most common malignant tumors in women all over the world. The exact mechanism of occurrence and development of cervical cancer has not been fully elucidated. CD38 is a type II transmembrane glycoprotein, which was found to mediate diverse activities, including signal transduction, cell adhesion, and cyclic ADP-ribose synthesis. Here, we reported that CD38 promoted cell proliferation and inhibited cell apoptosis in cervical cancer cells by affecting the mitochondria functions. We established stable cervical cancer cell lines with CD38 over-expressed. CCK8 assay and colony formation assay indicated that CD38 promoted cervical cancer cell proliferation. Nude mouse tumorigenicity assay showed that CD38 significantly promotes tumor growth in vivo. CD38 also induced S phase accumulation in cell cycle analysis and suppressed cell apoptosis in cervical cancer cells. Meanwhile, flow cytometry analysis of mitochondria functions suggested that CD38 decreased intracellular Ca(2+) levels in cervical cancer cells and CD38 was involved in down-regulation of ROS levels and prevented mitochondrial apoptosis in cervical cancer cells. The percentage of cells with loss of mitochondrial membrane potential (Δψm) in CD38-overexpressed cervical cancer cells was less than control groups. Furthermore, we found an up-regulation of MDM2, cyclinA1, CDK4, cyclinD1, NF-kB P65, c-rel, and a downregulation of P53, P21, and P38 by Western blot analysis. These results indicated that CD38 enhanced the proliferation and inhibited the apoptosis of cervical cancer cells by affecting the mitochondria functions. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. HPV Infection in Cervical and Other Cancers in Saudi Arabia: Implication for Prevention and Vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Alsbeih, Ghazi

    2014-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is closely associated with cervical cancer that the incidence of this tumor is regarded as a surrogate marker for HPV infection in countries lacking epidemiological studies. HPV is also implicated in subsets of anogenital and oropharyngeal cancers. Although cervical cancer is the third most common cancer in women worldwide, its reported incidence is low in Saudi Arabia, ranking number 12 between all cancers in females and accounts only for 2.4% of all new cases, despite the lack of national screening programs. However, the limited available studies from Saudi Arabia indicate that HPV prevalence and genotypes’ distribution in invasive cervical cancer show similar pattern as in the world. Cytology screening (Pap smear) and HPV vaccinations are the two preventive measures against cervical cancer. The two available vaccines are effective against the two most common HPV genotypes (HPV-16 and -18). Since 92% of cervical tumors in the Kingdom are infected with HPV of which 78% are HPV-16 and -18 genotypes, vaccination is expected to protect against more than two-third of cervical cancers in Saudi Arabia. Nevertheless, due to its low incidence (2.1/100,000 women), a proper cost-effectiveness analysis is required to justify the implementation of a costly vaccine bearing in mind that HPV could potentially be associated with about 3% of all cancers. However, further studies are needed to ascertain the real prevalence of HPV at the population level at large, its association with various types of cancers, and also the impact of local tradition and emerging behavioral trends that could affect HPV transmission and consequently the effectiveness of applying national vaccination program. PMID:24744990

  16. [Expression and clinical significance of Pin1 and Cyclin D1 in cervical cancer cell lines and cervical epithelial tissues].

    PubMed

    Li, Hong-Yu; Xu, Qian; Zhu, Tao; Zhou, Jin-Hua; Deng, Dong-Rui; Wang, Shi-Xuan; Lu, Yun-Ping; Ma, Ding

    2006-03-01

    Peptidyl-prolyl cis/trans isomerase Pin1 is prevalently overexpressed in human cancers. Up-regulation of Pin1 elevates the expression of Cyclin D1, and plays an important role in tumorigenesis and tumor progression. This study was to investigate the expression and clinical significance of Pin1 and Cyclin D1 in cervical cancer cell lines and cervical epithelial tissues. The expression of Pin1 and Cyclin D1 in cervical cancer cell lines HeLa, SiHa, C33a and Caski were detected by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and Western blot. Their expression in 88 samples of cervical tissues, including 10 samples of normal cervix, 21 samples of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN), and 57 samples of invasive cervical cancer, were detected by immunohistochemistry. The mRNA and protein levels of Pin1 were significantly higher in HeLa, SiHa, C33a, and Caski cells than in normal cervical epithelial tissues (P<0.05). The expression of Pin1 increased progressively along with the disease process from normal cervix to CIN, and to invasive cervical cancer (0%, 47.62%, 64.91%, P<0.05). Pin1 expression had no relation to disease stage (FIGO), pathologic grade, and pelvic lymph node metastasis status (P>0.05). The positive rate of Pin1 was significantly higher in cervical adenocarcinoma than in cervical squamous cell carcinoma (100% vs. 60.0%, P<0.05). In cervical cancer tissues, the overexpression of Pin1 was positively correlated to that of Cyclin D1 (P<0.05). Pin1 is overexpressed in HeLa, SiHa, C33a and Caski cell lines as well as in cervical cancer tissues. The overexpression of Pin1 is closely related to Cyclin D1 expression in cervical cancer. The aberrant expression of Pin1 and Cyclin D1 might contribute to tumorigenesis of cervical cancer.

  17. Prognostic significance of clusterin expression in advanced-stage cervical cancer treated with curative intended radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Watari, Hidemichi; Kinoshita, Rumiko; Han, Yimin; Wang, Lei; Hosaka, Masayoshi; Taguchi, Hiroshi; Tsuchiya, Kazuhiko; Tanaka, Shinya; Shirato, Hiroki; Sakuragi, Noriaki

    2012-03-01

    Overexpression of clusterin (CLU), an antiapoptotic molecule, has been reported to induce resistance to radiotherapy (RT) in a variety of cancer cell types. The aim of this study was to evaluate the significance of CLU expression to predict survival of patients with advanced-stage cervical cancer who received curative intended RT. Biopsy tissue specimens of advanced-stage cervical cancer before curative intended RT were obtained from 34 patients who were treated at Hokkaido University Hospital between 1998 and 2008 and whose complete medical records were available. The expression of CLU protein was analyzed by immunohistochemistry. Findings were evaluated in relation to several clinicopathological factors. Survival analyses were performed using the Kaplan-Meier curves and the log-rank test. Independent prognostic factors were determined by multivariate Cox regression analysis. Clusterin protein was mainly present in the cytoplasm of cervical cancer cells. The expression of CLU protein in cervical cancer tissues before curative intended RT was not significantly related to any clinicopathological factors analyzed, including age, clinical stage, histologic type, and response to RT. Univariate analysis on prognostic factors showed that histologic type (P = 0.001), and CLU expression (P = 0.02) were related to survival. Multivariate analysis revealed that both histologic type (P = 0.002), and CLU expression (P = 0.02) were independent prognostic factors for overall survival. We conclude that CLU could be a new molecular marker to predict overall survival of patients with advanced-stage cervical cancer treated with curative intended RT.

  18. Health systems challenges in cervical cancer prevention program in Malawi

    PubMed Central

    Maseko, Fresier C.; Chirwa, Maureen L.; Muula, Adamson S.

    2015-01-01

    Background Cervical cancer remains the leading cause of cancer death among women in sub-Saharan Africa. In Malawi, very few women have undergone screening and the incidence of cervical cancer is on the increase as is the case in most developing countries. We aimed at exploring and documenting health system gaps responsible for the poor performance of the cervical cancer prevention program in Malawi. Design The study was carried out in 14 randomly selected districts of the 29 districts of Malawi. All cervical cancer service providers in these districts were invited to participate. Two semi-structured questionnaires were used, one for the district cervical cancer coordinators and the other for the service providers. The themes of both questionnaires were based on World Health Organization (WHO) health system frameworks. A checklist was also developed to audit medical supplies and equipment in the cervical cancer screening facilities. The two questionnaires together with the medical supplies and equipment checklist were piloted in Chikwawa district before being used as data collection tools in the study. Quantitative data were analyzed using STATA and qualitative in NVIVO. Results Forty-one service providers from 21 health facilities and 9 district coordinators participated in the study. Our findings show numerous health system challenges mainly in areas of health workforce and essential medical products and technologies. Seven out of the 21 health facilities provided both screening and treatment. Results showed challenges in the management of the cervical cancer program at district level; inadequate service providers who are poorly supervised; lack of basic equipment and stock-outs of basic medical supplies in some health facilities; and inadequate funding of the program. In most of the health facilities, services providers were not aware of the policy which govern their work and that they did not have standards and guidelines for cervical cancer screening and

  19. Health systems challenges in cervical cancer prevention program in Malawi.

    PubMed

    Maseko, Fresier C; Chirwa, Maureen L; Muula, Adamson S

    2015-01-01

    Background Cervical cancer remains the leading cause of cancer death among women in sub-Saharan Africa. In Malawi , very few women have undergone screening and the incidence of cervical cancer is on the increase as is the case in most developing countries. We aimed at exploring and documenting health system gaps responsible for the poor performance of the cervical cancer prevention program in Malawi. Design The study was carried out in 14 randomly selected districts of the 29 districts of Malawi. All cervical cancer service providers in these districts were invited to participate. Two semi-structured questionnaires were used, one for the district cervical cancer coordinators and the other for the service providers. The themes of both questionnaires were based on World Health Organization (WHO) health system frameworks. A checklist was also developed to audit medical supplies and equipment in the cervical cancer screening facilities. The two questionnaires together with the medical supplies and equipment checklist were piloted in Chikwawa district before being used as data collection tools in the study. Quantitative data were analyzed using STATA and qualitative in NVIVO. Results Forty-one service providers from 21 health facilities and 9 district coordinators participated in the study. Our findings show numerous health system challenges mainly in areas of health workforce and essential medical products and technologies. Seven out of the 21 health facilities provided both screening and treatment. Results showed challenges in the management of the cervical cancer program at district level; inadequate service providers who are poorly supervised; lack of basic equipment and stock-outs of basic medical supplies in some health facilities; and inadequate funding of the program. In most of the health facilities, services providers were not aware of the policy which govern their work and that they did not have standards and guidelines for cervical cancer screening and

  20. Health systems challenges in cervical cancer prevention program in Malawi.

    PubMed

    Maseko, Fresier C; Chirwa, Maureen L; Muula, Adamson S

    2015-01-01

    Cervical cancer remains the leading cause of cancer death among women in sub-Saharan Africa. In Malawi, very few women have undergone screening and the incidence of cervical cancer is on the increase as is the case in most developing countries. We aimed at exploring and documenting health system gaps responsible for the poor performance of the cervical cancer prevention program in Malawi. The study was carried out in 14 randomly selected districts of the 29 districts of Malawi. All cervical cancer service providers in these districts were invited to participate. Two semi-structured questionnaires were used, one for the district cervical cancer coordinators and the other for the service providers. The themes of both questionnaires were based on World Health Organization (WHO) health system frameworks. A checklist was also developed to audit medical supplies and equipment in the cervical cancer screening facilities. The two questionnaires together with the medical supplies and equipment checklist were piloted in Chikwawa district before being used as data collection tools in the study. Quantitative data were analyzed using STATA and qualitative in NVIVO. Forty-one service providers from 21 health facilities and 9 district coordinators participated in the study. Our findings show numerous health system challenges mainly in areas of health workforce and essential medical products and technologies. Seven out of the 21 health facilities provided both screening and treatment. RESULTS showed challenges in the management of the cervical cancer program at district level; inadequate service providers who are poorly supervised; lack of basic equipment and stock-outs of basic medical supplies in some health facilities; and inadequate funding of the program. In most of the health facilities, services providers were not aware of the policy which govern their work and that they did not have standards and guidelines for cervical cancer screening and treatment. Numerous health

  1. Cervical cytology and the diagnosis of cervical cancer in older women

    PubMed Central

    Landy, Rebecca; Castanon, Alejandra; Dudding, Nick; Lim, Anita Wey Wey; Hollingworth, Antony; Hamilton, Willie

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Most non-screen-detected cervical cancers are advanced stage. We assess the potential for cytology to expedite diagnosis when used outside of routine call and recall screening for cervical cancer. Methods Two cohorts of women with cytology that did not appear to have been taken as part of routine screening, nested within a census of cervical cytology, in England between April 2007 and March 2010 were studied: 93,322 women aged 40–69 at first cytology, and 14,668 women aged ≥70. The diagnostic performance of high grade cervical squamous intraepithelial lesion (HSIL) or worse cytology was estimated. We also estimated case-fatality from stage distribution in women aged ≥66 with and without cytology in the year prior to diagnosis. Results There were 259 cancers diagnosed in women aged 40–69 at first cytology, and 78 in women aged ≥70. The sensitivity of cytology ≥ HSIL for cancer was 89% and 83% respectively, and the number of women needed to test to identify one cancer was 404 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 355–462) and 226 (95% CI: 177–292) respectively. Women aged ≥66 with cytology within a year of diagnosis had earlier stage cancers than those without, corresponding to a 17–22% reduction in case fatality. Conclusions Cervical cytology is an excellent identifier of cancer among women tested outside routine screening call and recall. Its use as a triage tool, for instance in women with vague gynaecological symptoms, could facilitate earlier stage diagnosis and reduce cervical cancer mortality. PMID:26346038

  2. Cervical cytology and the diagnosis of cervical cancer in older women.

    PubMed

    Landy, Rebecca; Castanon, Alejandra; Dudding, Nick; Lim, Anita Wey Wey; Hollingworth, Antony; Hamilton, Willie; Sasieni, Peter D

    2015-12-01

    Most non-screen-detected cervical cancers are advanced stage. We assess the potential for cytology to expedite diagnosis when used outside of routine call and recall screening for cervical cancer. Two cohorts of women with cytology that did not appear to have been taken as part of routine screening, nested within a census of cervical cytology, in England between April 2007 and March 2010 were studied: 93,322 women aged 40-69 at first cytology, and 14,668 women aged ≥70. The diagnostic performance of high grade cervical squamous intraepithelial lesion (HSIL) or worse cytology was estimated. We also estimated case-fatality from stage distribution in women aged ≥66 with and without cytology in the year prior to diagnosis. There were 259 cancers diagnosed in women aged 40-69 at first cytology, and 78 in women aged ≥70. The sensitivity of cytology ≥ HSIL for cancer was 89% and 83% respectively, and the number of women needed to test to identify one cancer was 404 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 355-462) and 226 (95% CI: 177-292) respectively. Women aged ≥66 with cytology within a year of diagnosis had earlier stage cancers than those without, corresponding to a 17-22% reduction in case fatality. Cervical cytology is an excellent identifier of cancer among women tested outside routine screening call and recall. Its use as a triage tool, for instance in women with vague gynaecological symptoms, could facilitate earlier stage diagnosis and reduce cervical cancer mortality. © The Author(s) 2015.

  3. Near-Infrared Micro-Raman Spectroscopy for in Vitro Detection of Cervical Cancer

    PubMed Central

    KAMEMOTO, LORI E.; MISRA, ANUPAM K.; SHARMA, SHIV K.; GOODMAN, MARC T.; LUK, HUGH; DYKES, AVA C.; ACOSTA, TAYRO

    2010-01-01

    Near-infrared Raman spectroscopy is a powerful analytical tool for detecting critical differences in biological samples with minimum interference in the Raman spectra from the native fluorescence of the samples. The technique is often suggested as a potential screening tool for cancer. In this article we report in vitro Raman spectra of squamous cells in normal and cancerous cervical human tissue from seven patients, which have good signal-to-noise ratio and which were found to be reproducible. These preliminary results show that several Raman features in these spectra could be used to distinguish cancerous cervical squamous cells from normal cervical squamous cells. In general, the Raman spectra of cervical cancer cells show intensity differences compared to those of normal squamous cell spectra. For example, several well-defined Raman peaks of collagen in the 775 to 975 cm −1 region are observed in the case of normal squamous cells, but these are below the detection limit of normal Raman spectroscopy in the spectra of invasive cervical cancer cells. In the high frequency 2800 to 3100 cm −1 region, it is found that the peak area under the CH stretching band is lower by a factor of approximately six in the spectra of cervical cancer cells as compared with that of the normal cells. The Raman chemical maps of regions of cancer and normal cells in the cervical epithelium made from the spectral features in the 775 to 975 cm −1 and 2800 to 3100 cm −1 regions are also found to show good correlation with each other. PMID:20223058

  4. Knowledge about cervical cancer and barriers of screening program among women in Wufeng County, a high-incidence region of cervical cancer in China.

    PubMed

    Jia, Yao; Li, Shuang; Yang, Ru; Zhou, Hang; Xiang, Qunying; Hu, Ting; Zhang, Qinghua; Chen, Zhilan; Ma, Ding; Feng, Ling

    2013-01-01

    Cervical cancer screening is an effective method for reducing the incidence and mortality of cervical cancer, but the screening attendance rate in developing countries is far from satisfactory, especially in rural areas. Wufeng is a region of high cervical cancer incidence in China. This study aimed to investigate the issues that concern cervical cancer and screening and the factors that affect women's willingness to undergo cervical cancer screening in the Wufeng area. A cross-sectional survey of women was conducted to determine their knowledge about cervical cancer and screening, demographic characteristics and the barriers to screening. Women who were willing to undergo screenings had higher knowledge levels. "Anxious feeling once the disease was diagnosed" (47.6%), "No symptoms/discomfort" (34.1%) and "Do not know the benefits of cervical cancer screening" (13.4%) were the top three reasons for refusing cervical cancer screening. Women who were younger than 45 years old or who had lower incomes, positive family histories of cancer, secondary or higher levels of education, higher levels of knowledge and fewer barriers to screening were more willing to participate in cervical cancer screenings than women without these characteristics. Efforts are needed to increase women's knowledge about cervical cancer, especially the screening methods, and to improve their perceptions of the screening process for early detection to reduce cervical cancer incidence and mortality rates.

  5. Knowledge about Cervical Cancer and Barriers of Screening Program among Women in Wufeng County, a High-Incidence Region of Cervical Cancer in China

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Hang; Xiang, Qunying; Hu, Ting; Zhang, Qinghua; Chen, Zhilan; Ma, Ding; Feng, Ling

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Cervical cancer screening is an effective method for reducing the incidence and mortality of cervical cancer, but the screening attendance rate in developing countries is far from satisfactory, especially in rural areas. Wufeng is a region of high cervical cancer incidence in China. This study aimed to investigate the issues that concern cervical cancer and screening and the factors that affect women’s willingness to undergo cervical cancer screening in the Wufeng area. Participants and Methods A cross-sectional survey of women was conducted to determine their knowledge about cervical cancer and screening, demographic characteristics and the barriers to screening. Results Women who were willing to undergo screenings had higher knowledge levels. “Anxious feeling once the disease was diagnosed” (47.6%), “No symptoms/discomfort” (34.1%) and “Do not know the benefits of cervical cancer screening” (13.4%) were the top three reasons for refusing cervical cancer screening. Women who were younger than 45 years old or who had lower incomes, positive family histories of cancer, secondary or higher levels of education, higher levels of knowledge and fewer barriers to screening were more willing to participate in cervical cancer screenings than women without these characteristics. Conclusion Efforts are needed to increase women’s knowledge about cervical cancer, especially the screening methods, and to improve their perceptions of the screening process for early detection to reduce cervical cancer incidence and mortality rates. PMID:23843976

  6. Beyond cervical cancer: burden of other HPV-related cancers among men and women.

    PubMed

    Chaturvedi, Anil K

    2010-04-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is a necessary cause of cervical cancer, and is etiologically associated with a subset of cancers of the anus, oropharynx, penis, vagina, and vulva. Current data indicate that HPV infection is potentially associated with 90%-93% of anal cancers, 12%-63% of oropharyngeal cancers, 36%-40% of penile cancers, 40%-64% of vaginal cancers, and 40%-51% of vulvar cancers. HPV infection accounts for up to 492,800 cervical cancers and 97,215 cases of noncervical HPV-related cancers worldwide during 2002, including up to 50,780 cancers among men (13,485 anal cancers, 26,775 oropharyngeal cancers, and 10,520 penile cancers) and up to 46,435 cancers among women (14,787 anal cancers, 6,048 oropharyngeal cancers, and 25,600 vaginal/vulvar cancers). In the United States annually (1998-2003), up to 10,846 cervical cancers, 4,753 noncervical cancers among men, and 4,128 noncervical cancers among women are potentially attributable to HPV infection. Incidence rates for cervical cancer have declined significantly during the past 30 years in the United States, consistent with the success of Pap smear screening. However, incidence rates for anal, oropharyngeal, and vulvar cancers have increased substantially in recent years. The high proportion of cervical and noncervical cancers caused by HPV types 16 and 18, that is, 70%-76% for cervical cancers and 63%-95% for noncervical cancers, underscores the potential for prevention of a majority of cervical as well as noncervical HPV-related cancers through prophylactic HPV vaccination.

  7. Down-regulation of miR-320 associated with cancer progression and cell apoptosis via targeting Mcl-1 in cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ting; Zou, Ping; Wang, Tiejun; Xiang, Jingying; Cheng, Jing; Chen, Daozhen; Zhou, Jianwei

    2016-07-01

    Our previous studies have demonstrated overexpression of Mcl-1 in cervical cancer tumorigenesis. However, the molecular mechanism of its overexpression remains not elucidated. MiR-320 has been reported to be down-regulated in various types of cancer, and bioinformatics prediction indicated that it may regulate the expression of Mcl-1. The aim of this study is to investigate the role of miR-320 and its target gene Mcl-1 in cervical cancer progression and to assess their clinical significance. miR-320 and Mcl-1 expressions in human cervical cancer tissues were investigated by qRT-PCR, in situ hybridization, and immunohistochemical staining, respectively. The clinicopathological implications of these molecules were analyzed. Bioinformatic prediction and luciferase assays were employed to identify the predicted microRNA (miRNA) which regulates Mcl-1. The apoptosis, proliferation, migration, and invasion assays were performed to investigate the effect of miR-320 on the cervical cancer cells. MiR-320 expression is significantly down-regulated versus Mcl-1 expression is up-regulated in cervical cancer tissues compared with normal controls with a negative correlation between them. Luciferase assay showed that miR-320 negatively regulates Mcl-1 expression. In addition, miR-320 induces apoptosis via down-regulation of Mcl-1 and activation of caspase-3 but inhibits cell proliferation, migration, invasion, and tumorigenesis in cervical cancer cells. Our studies show that miR-320 expression is decreased in cervical cancer, and its expression is negatively correlated with Mcl-1 expression in cervical cancer. In addition, miR-320 inhibits cervical cancer progression by down-regulation of Mcl-1. These results indicate that miR-320 may be an important biomarker and target for diagnosis and treatment of cervical cancer patient.

  8. Association Between Risky Sexual Behavior and Cervical Cancer Screening Among Women in Kenya: A Population-Based Study.

    PubMed

    Haile, Zelalem T; Kingori, Caroline; Chavan, Bhakti; Francescon, John; Teweldeberhan, Asli K

    2017-08-03

    Women residing in Eastern Africa are disproportionately affected by cervical cancer. Previous studies have identified risky sexual behavior as a major risk factor for cervical cancer. However, population-based studies examining the relationship between sexual behavior and cervical cancer screening are currently lacking. This descriptive cross-sectional study utilized nationally representative secondary data from the 2014 Kenya Demographic and Health Survey (n = 6104) to examine the association between risky sexual behavior and cervical cancer screening among sexually active women. Both descriptive and inferential statistical methods were utilized. Overall, 20.2% of the study sample reported having cervical cancer examination. Approximately 13.1% of the participants reported involvement in risky sexual behavior. Significantly lower proportion of women engaged in risky sexual behavior reported having cervical cancer examination (14.5 vs. 21.0%; p = 0.001). In the multivariable model, we found a significant interaction between risky sexual behavior and marital status on cervical cancer examination. Among women who were married/living together, risky sexual behavior was negatively associated with cervical cancer examination after adjusting for potential confounders (Prevalence Ratio, 95% CI) (0.42; 0.24-0.74; p = 0.002). The prevalence of having visual inspection with VIA or VILI were lower among women who were involved in risky sexual behavior (0.39; 0.18-0.87; p = 0.022). However, we were unable to detect any significant association between risky sexual behavior and having Papanicolaou test. With increasing incidence of cervical cancer in resource-limited settings, it is critical to identify populations at increased risk of infection and provide effective screening and follow-up services.

  9. The roles of genetic and environmental factors on risk of cervical cancer: a review of classical twin studies.

    PubMed

    Moore, Elya E; Wark, John D; Hopper, John L; Erbas, Bircan; Garland, Suzanne M

    2012-02-01

    Cervical cancer is the third most common cancer in women worldwide. Persistent infection with an oncogenic human papillomavirus (HPV) is necessary, but not sufficient, for its development. Over many years, only a small proportion of women with chronic HPV infection progress to develop disease. The role of host genes and environmental factors in the pathogenesis of, or predisposition to, cervical cancer is still unclear. We conducted a systematic review of published literature in MEDLINE-PubMed to identify studies of cervical cancer susceptibility that used a twin study design. We used standard MeSH terms (controlled vocabulary) as well as specific free-text terms and combinations of terms related to cervical cancer, with no restriction on publication date. We performed a full text review to ensure the identified articles met our inclusion criteria and, if so, extracted information on demographics, sample size, study definitions, and key statistical findings. Of the 285 articles identified, three utilized a classical twin design and reported results specific to cervical cancer. The studies were based on cancer registry data from Scandinavia, with sample sizes ranging from 312 to 710 twin pairs. The findings from one study were consistent with a genetic mechanism for the causation of carcinoma in situ. Future research studies using the strength of the classic twin design, together with incorporation of HPV DNA status, are indicated to determine whether there is a potential role for genetic factors in the development of cervical cancer or high-grade cervical dysplasia from chronic oncogenic HPV infection.

  10. Chemotherapy and molecular targeting therapy for recurrent cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Tsuda, Naotake; Watari, Hidemichi; Ushijima, Kimio

    2016-04-01

    For patients with primary stage ⅣB, persistent, or recurrent cervical cancer, chemotherapy remains the standard treatment, although it is neither curative nor associated with long-term disease control. In this review, we summarized the history of treatment of recurrent cervical cancer, and the current recommendation for chemotherapy and molecular targeted therapy. Eligible articles were identified by a search of the MEDLINE bibliographical database for the period up to November 30, 2014. The search strategy included the following any or all of the keywords: "uterine cervical cancer", "chemotherapy", and "targeted therapies". Since cisplatin every 21 days was considered as the historical standard treatment for recurrent cervical cancer, subsequent trials have evaluated and demonstrated activity for other agents including paclitaxel, gemcitabine, topotecan and vinorelbine among others. Accordingly, promising agents were incorporated into phase Ⅲ trials. To examine the best agent to combine with cisplatin, several landmark phase Ⅲ clinical trials were conducted by Gynecologic Oncology Group (GOG) and Japan Clinical Oncology Group (JCOG). Through, GOG204 and JCOG0505, paclitaxel/cisplatin (TP) and paclitaxel/carboplatin (TC) are now considered to be the recommended therapies for recurrent cervical cancer patients. However, the prognosis of patients who are already resistant to chemotherapy, are very poor. Therefore new therapeutic strategies are urgently required. Molecular targeted therapy will be the most hopeful candidate of these strategies. From the results of GOG240, bevacizumab combined with TP reached its primary endpoint of improving overall survival (OS). Although, the prognosis for recurrent cervical cancer patients is still poor, the results of GOG240 shed light on the usefulness of molecular target agents to chemotherapy in cancer patients. Recurrent cervical cancer is generally considered incurable and current chemotherapy regiments offer only

  11. Cervical cancer screening at a tertiary care center in Rwanda.

    PubMed

    Ruzigana, George; Bazzet-Matabele, Lisa; Rulisa, Stephen; Martin, Allison N; Ghebre, Rahel G

    2017-08-01

    In limited resource settings such as Rwanda, visual inspection with acetic acid (VIA) is the primary model for cervical cancer screening. The objective of this study was to describe clinical characteristics and outcomes for women presenting for cervical cancer screening. A prospective, observational study was conducted between September 2015 and February 2016 at Kigali University Teaching Hospital (CHUK). Women referred to the VIA clinic were enrolled and completed a semi-structured questionnaire. During the six-month study period, 150 women were enrolled and evaluated with VIA followed by colposcopy directed biopsy for VIA positive. The median age was 42 years (IQR 36-49). Only 20 (13.3%) asymptomatic women presented for screening exam, whereas 126 (84%) were symptomatic. Among symptomatic patients, more than one-third had never had a speculum exam prior to referral (n = 43). Twenty-two (14.7%) women were VIA positive, and 8 (5.3%) had lesions suspicious for cancer, while 120 (80%) were found to be VIA negative. Among women undergoing biopsy (n = 30), 11 were normal (36.7%), 5 cases showed CIN 1 (16.6%), 4 cases showed CIN 2 (13.3%), 2 cases showed CIN 3 (6.7%) and 8 were confirmed cervical cancers (26.7%). In Rwanda, VIA is the current method for cervical cancer screening. In this study, few asymptomatic patients presented for cervical cancer screening. Increasing knowledge about cervical cancer screening and expanding access are key elements to improving cervical cancer control in Rwanda.

  12. Disparities in cervical and breast cancer mortality in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Girianelli, Vania Reis; Gamarra, Carmen Justina; Azevedo e Silva, Gulnar

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To analyze cervical and breast cancer mortality in Brazil according to socioeconomic and welfare indicators. METHODS Data on breast and cervical cancer mortality covering a 30-year period (1980-2010) were analyzed. The data were obtained from the National Mortality Database, population data from the Brazilian Institute of Geography and Statistics database, and socioeconomic and welfare information from the Institute of Applied Economic Research. Moving averages were calculated, disaggregated by capital city and municipality. The annual percent change in mortality rates was estimated by segmented linear regression using the joinpoint method. Pearson’s correlation coefficients were conducted between average mortality rate at the end of the three-year period and selected indicators in the state capital and each Brazilian state. RESULTS There was a decline in cervical cancer mortality rates throughout the period studied, except in municipalities outside of the capitals in the North and Northeast. There was a decrease in breast cancer mortality in the capitals from the end of the 1990s onwards. Favorable socioeconomic indicators were inversely correlated with cervical cancer mortality. A strong direct correlation was found with favorable indicators and an inverse correlation with fertility rate and breast cancer mortality in inner cities. CONCLUSIONS There is an ongoing dynamic process of increased risk of cervical and breast cancer and attenuation of mortality because of increased, albeit unequal, access to and provision of screening, diagnosis and treatment.  PMID:25119941

  13. Breast and cervical cancer knowledge and awareness among university students.

    PubMed

    Altay, Birsen; Avci, Ilknur Aydin; Rizalar, Selda; Oz, Hatice; Meral, Damla

    2015-01-01

    Breast and cervical cancers are the most common types of cancer in women worldwide. Previous studies in Asia have shown that related knowledge and awareness is low among female university students. The goal of this study was to assess breast and cervical cancer knowledge, practices, and awareness among female university students in Samsun,Turkey. This research was a cross-sectional survey of female university students using a self-administered. questionnaire to investigate participant awareness and knowledge of breast and cervical cancer. A total of 301 female university students participated. Descriptive statistics and chi square tests were used for data analysis. The mean age of the participants in this study was 22.0 ± 5.91 years. Regarding family history, 89.7 % of the students had no known familial history of breast cancer. Students (65.4%) had knowledge about breast self examination and 52.2 % of them had performed breast self examinationm while 55.1% of them had knowledge about prevention of cervical cancer. Although the results are preliminary, the study points to an insufficient knowledge of university students in Samsun about breast and cervical cancer.

  14. Multihelix rotating shield brachytherapy for cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    Dadkhah, Hossein; Kim, Yusung; Wu, Xiaodong; Flynn, Ryan T.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To present a novel brachytherapy technique, called multihelix rotating shield brachytherapy (H-RSBT), for the precise angular and linear positioning of a partial shield in a curved applicator. H-RSBT mechanically enables the dose delivery using only linear translational motion of the radiation source/shield combination. The previously proposed approach of serial rotating shield brachytherapy (S-RSBT), in which the partial shield is rotated to several angular positions at each source dwell position [W. Yang et al., “Rotating-shield brachytherapy for cervical cancer,” Phys. Med. Biol. 58, 3931–3941 (2013)], is mechanically challenging to implement in a curved applicator, and H-RSBT is proposed as a feasible solution. Methods: A Henschke-type applicator, designed for an electronic brachytherapy source (Xoft Axxent™) and a 0.5 mm thick tungsten partial shield with 180° or 45° azimuthal emission angles and 116° asymmetric zenith angle, is proposed. The interior wall of the applicator contains six evenly spaced helical keyways that rigidly define the emission direction of the partial radiation shield as a function of depth in the applicator. The shield contains three uniformly distributed protruding keys on its exterior wall and is attached to the source such that it rotates freely, thus longitudinal translational motion of the source is transferred to rotational motion of the shield. S-RSBT and H-RSBT treatment plans with 180° and 45° azimuthal emission angles were generated for five cervical cancer patients with a diverse range of high-risk target volume (HR-CTV) shapes and applicator positions. For each patient, the total number of emission angles was held nearly constant for S-RSBT and H-RSBT by using dwell positions separated by 5 and 1.7 mm, respectively, and emission directions separated by 22.5° and 60°, respectively. Treatment delivery time and tumor coverage (D90 of HR-CTV) were the two metrics used as the basis for evaluation and

  15. Multihelix rotating shield brachytherapy for cervical cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Dadkhah, Hossein; Kim, Yusung; Flynn, Ryan T.; Wu, Xiaodong

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: To present a novel brachytherapy technique, called multihelix rotating shield brachytherapy (H-RSBT), for the precise angular and linear positioning of a partial shield in a curved applicator. H-RSBT mechanically enables the dose delivery using only linear translational motion of the radiation source/shield combination. The previously proposed approach of serial rotating shield brachytherapy (S-RSBT), in which the partial shield is rotated to several angular positions at each source dwell position [W. Yang et al., “Rotating-shield brachytherapy for cervical cancer,” Phys. Med. Biol. 58, 3931–3941 (2013)], is mechanically challenging to implement in a curved applicator, and H-RSBT is proposed as a feasible solution. Methods: A Henschke-type applicator, designed for an electronic brachytherapy source (Xoft Axxent™) and a 0.5 mm thick tungsten partial shield with 180° or 45° azimuthal emission angles and 116° asymmetric zenith angle, is proposed. The interior wall of the applicator contains six evenly spaced helical keyways that rigidly define the emission direction of the partial radiation shield as a function of depth in the applicator. The shield contains three uniformly distributed protruding keys on its exterior wall and is attached to the source such that it rotates freely, thus longitudinal translational motion of the source is transferred to rotational motion of the shield. S-RSBT and H-RSBT treatment plans with 180° and 45° azimuthal emission angles were generated for five cervical cancer patients with a diverse range of high-risk target volume (HR-CTV) shapes and applicator positions. For each patient, the total number of emission angles was held nearly constant for S-RSBT and H-RSBT by using dwell positions separated by 5 and 1.7 mm, respectively, and emission directions separated by 22.5° and 60°, respectively. Treatment delivery time and tumor coverage (D{sub 90} of HR-CTV) were the two metrics used as the basis for evaluation and

  16. Optical diagnosis of colon and cervical cancer by support vector machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukhopadhyay, Sabyasachi; Kurmi, Indrajit; Dey, Rajib; Das, Nandan K.; Pradhan, Sanjay; Pradhan, Asima; Ghosh, Nirmalya; Panigrahi, Prasanta K.; Mohanty, Samarendra

    2016-05-01

    A probabilistic robust diagnostic algorithm is very much essential for successful cancer diagnosis by optical spectroscopy. We report here support vector machine (SVM) classification to better discriminate the colon and cervical cancer tissues from normal tissues based on elastic scattering spectroscopy. The efficacy of SVM based classification with different kernel has been tested on multifractal parameters like Hurst exponent, singularity spectrum width in order to classify the cancer tissues.

  17. Cervical cancer screening in Thailand: an overview.

    PubMed

    Sriamporn, Supannee; Khuhaprema, Thiravud; Parkin, Max

    2006-01-01

    In Thailand, there have been no 'organized' programmes of screening for cervical cancer. For the most part, screening has been unsystematic or provided to women 'on demand'. In 2002, the Department of Medical Services of the Ministry of Public Health proposed the screening of the entire population of women in Thailand at 5-yearly intervals from the ages of 35 to 60 years. As a first step, measures to increase the capacity for obtaining and interpreting papanicolaou (Pap) smears have been put in place. Research studies have examined the effectiveness of screening with Pap smears in Thailand, and confirmed that, as elsewhere, protection is related to the number of previous tests and the time elapsed since the most recent one. Coverage of the population remains low. Other methods of screening are being investigated in Thailand, including visual inspection following acetic acid (VIA), followed by immediate treatment of observed lesions by cryotherapy ('see and treat'). Other research studies have examined the acceptability and performance of self-sampling as a means of obtaining Pap smears, and the use of mobile clinics to increase coverage of at-risk women in rural settings. Human papillomavirus (HPV) testing has been used to identify high-risk women, or to help decide which women with low-grade abnormality on cytology should undergo more intensive follow-up. Prevalence of HPV in normal women in Thailand is 9-20%, but HPV testing has not been used on any systematic basis to date. Current screening programmes in Thailand are not very effective. The national cancer control programme aims to increase the coverage of screening. The population-based cancer registry will provide an effective and economical method of evaluating the impact of early diagnosis and screening at community level.

  18. [Isolated splenic metastases from cervical cancer: a rare entity].

    PubMed

    Villalón-López, José Sebastián; Souto-del Bosque, Rosalía; Montañez-Lugo, Juan Ignacio; Chávez-González, Bruno

    2014-01-01

    Splenic metastases from solid tumors are a rare event with an incidence of only 2.9% to 9%. Splenic metastases from cervical cancer are a rare entity. Only a few cases have been reported of isolated spleen metastases from cervical cancer. We present the case of a 76-year-old woman with moderately differentiated endocervical adenocarcinoma stromal and endocervical invasion. Clinical stage was Ib1 and Ca-125 values of 150 U. She was managed with hysterectomy and pelvic lymphadenectomy. She received pelvic radiotherapy (45 Gy) followed 24 Gy of brachytherapy. Two years later she presented with abdominal pain. Abdominal computed tomography showed two splenic parenchymal lesions without disease in the remainder of the abdominal cavity and chest with a Ca-125 of 2,733 U. The patient is submitted to splenectomy. Histopathology demonstrates splenic metastases of well-differentiated adenocarcinoma from the endocervix. Immunohistochemical stain showed positivity from carcinoembryonic antigen; estrogen and progesterone receptors are negative. Ca-125 level 8 weeks after surgery was 16 U/ml. The patient received six cycles of adjuvant chemotherapy with paclitaxel and cisplatin. At 12 months follow-up the patient is alive and without evidence of tumor activity. The spleen is an uncommon site of metastasis. Splenectomy is considered the appropriate treatment in order to avoid complications such as splenic rupture and splenic vein thrombosis as well as to improve pain control from splenomegaly. Twelve months after surgery our patient is alive and without evidence of tumor activity.

  19. Integrality in cervical cancer care: evaluation of access.

    PubMed

    Brito-Silva, Keila; Bezerra, Adriana Falangola Benjamin; Chaves, Lucieli Dias Pedreschi; Tanaka, Oswaldo Yoshimi

    2014-04-01

    To evaluate integrity of access to uterine cervical cancer prevention, diagnosis and treatment services. The tracer condition was analyzed using a mixed quantitative and qualitative approach. The quantitative approach was based on secondary data from the analysis of cytology and biopsy exams performed between 2008 and 2010 on 25 to 59 year-old women in a municipality with a large population and with the necessary technological resources. Data were obtained from the Health Information System and the Regional Cervical Cancer Information System. Statistical analysis was performed using PASW statistic 17.0 software. The qualitative approach involved semi-structured interviews with service managers, health care professionals and users. NVivo 9.0 software was used for the content analysis of the primary data. Pap smear coverage was low, possible due to insufficient screening and the difficulty of making appointments in primary care. The numbers of biopsies conducted are similar to those of abnormal cytologies, reflecting easy access to the specialized services. There was higher coverage among younger women. More serious diagnoses, for both cytologies and biopsies, were more prevalent in older women. Insufficient coverage of cytologies, reported by the interviewees allows us to understand access difficulties in primary care, as well as the fragility of screening strategies.

  20. Integrality in cervical cancer care: evaluation of access

    PubMed Central

    Brito-Silva, Keila; Bezerra, Adriana Falangola Benjamin; Chaves, Lucieli Dias Pedreschi; Tanaka, Oswaldo Yoshimi

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate integrity of access to uterine cervical cancer prevention, diagnosis and treatment services. METHODS The tracer condition was analyzed using a mixed quantitative and qualitative approach. The quantitative approach was based on secondary data from the analysis of cytology and biopsy exams performed between 2008 and 2010 on 25 to 59 year-old women in a municipality with a large population and with the necessary technological resources. Data were obtained from the Health Information System and the Regional Cervical Cancer Information System. Statistical analysis was performed using PASW statistic 17.0 software. The qualitative approach involved semi-structured interviews with service managers, health care professionals and users. NVivo 9.0 software was used for the content analysis of the primary data. RESULTS Pap smear coverage was low, possible due to insufficient screening and the difficulty of making appointments in primary care. The numbers of biopsies conducted are similar to those of abnormal cytologies, reflecting easy access to the specialized services. There was higher coverage among younger women. More serious diagnoses, for both cytologies and biopsies, were more prevalent in older women. CONCLUSIONS Insufficient coverage of cytologies, reported by the interviewees allows us to understand access difficulties in primary care, as well as the fragility of screening strategies. PMID:24897045

  1. Priority Setting for Improvement of Cervical Cancer Prevention in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Majidi, Azam; Ghiasvand, Reza; Hadji, Maryam; Nahvijou, Azin; Mousavi, Azam-Sadat; Pakgohar, Minoo; Khodakarami, Nahid; Abedini, Mehrandokht; Amouzegar Hashemi, Farnaz; Rahnamaye Farzami, Marjan; Shahsiah, Reza; Sajedinejhad, Sima; Mohagheghi, Mohammad Ali; Nadali, Fatemeh; Rashidian, Arash; Weiderpass, Elisabete; Mogensen, Ole; Zendehdel, Kazem

    2016-01-01

    Background: Cervical cancer is the fourth most common cancer among women worldwide. Organized cervical screening and vaccination against human papilloma virus (HPV) have been successful interventions for prevention of invasive cervical cancer (ICC). Because of cultural and religious considerations, ICC has low incidence in Iran and many other Muslim countries. There is no organized cervical screening in these countries. Therefore, ICC is usually diagnosed in advanced stages with poor prognosis in these countries. We performed a priority setting exercise and suggested priorities for prevention of ICC in this setting. Methods: We invited experts and researchers to a workshop and asked them to list important suggestions for ICC prevention in Iran. After merging similar items and removing the duplicates, we asked the experts to rank the list of suggested items. We used a strategy grid and Go-zone analysis to determine final list of priorities for ICC prevention in Iran. Results: From 26 final items suggested as priorities for prevention of ICC, the most important priorities were developing national guidelines for cervical screening and quality control protocol for patient follow-up and management of precancerous lesions. In addition, we emphasized considering insurance coverage for cervical screening, public awareness, and research priorities, and establishment of a cervical screening registry. Conclusion: A comprehensive approach and implementation of organized cervical screening program is necessary for prevention of ICC in Iran and other low incidence Muslim countries. Because of high cost for vaccination and low incidence of cervical cancer, we do not recommend HPV vaccination for the time being in Iran. PMID:27239863

  2. Age-specific prevalence of HPV16/18 genotypes in cervical cancer: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Hammer, Anne; Rositch, Anne; Qeadan, Fares; Gravitt, Patti E; Blaakaer, Jan

    2016-06-15

    The prevalence of HPV16/18 in cervical cancer has been reported to decline with age in some papers. However, whether this decline in proportion of cancers positive for HPV16/18 is consistently observed across studies remains to be elucidated. Thus, the aim of this study was to identify papers reporting data on age-specific prevalence of HPV16/18 in cervical cancer and to summarize the results. We employed MEDLINE and Embase for a systematic literature search and thereby identified a total of 644 papers published in the period 1999-2015, of which 15 papers, reporting cross-sectional data, were included for review (11,526 cervical cancers). The prevalence of HPV16/18 in cervical cancer declined significantly with age (ρ = -0.83, p = 0.04) from 74.8% (95% CI 67.6-80.8) in women aged 30-39 years to 56.8% (95% CI 43.9-68.8) in women aged ≥70 years. As the HPV16/18 positive cancers are prevented in fully vaccinated cohorts, the age-specific epidemiology of cervical cancer is anticipated to change, with a shift in peak incidence rate to older ages. It will be important for integrated vaccination and screening strategies to consider predicted change in the age-specific epidemiology of cervical cancer. © 2015 UICC.

  3. [The strategy for establishment of comprehensive cervical cancer prevention and control in the world].

    PubMed

    Bao, H L; Fang, L W; Wang, L H

    2017-01-06

    Cervical cancer is one of the most common malignancies among women. Screening programs for cervical cancer have been implemented in many developed countries. Comprehensive systems for cervical cancer prevention and control have improved over the past 30 years, which has led to a significant decline in the morbidity and mortality of cervical cancer. Since 2009, the Chinese government has conducted the Cervical Cancer and Breast Cancer Screening Program for Rural Women on a national scale, which has substantially improved cervical cancer prevention and control. However, a comprehensive system for cervical cancer prevention has been not established in China. It is essential to investigate suitable strategies for cervical cancer prevention system in the country by referring to the experiences of developed nations in comparison with the situation in China, with respect to system operations, compatibility with the existing health care system, choice of suitable technologies, and information and evaluation platforms.

  4. Large scale study of HPV genotypes in cervical cancer and different cytological cervical specimens in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Chansaenroj, Jira; Junyangdikul, Pairoj; Chinchai, Teeraporn; Swangvaree, Sukumarn; Karalak, Anant; Gemma, Nobuhiro; Poovorawan, Yong

    2014-04-01

    Identification of high-risk HPV genotypes in patients is essential for vaccination and prevention programs while the geographic distribution of cervical cancer varies widely. HPV 16 is the major cause of cervical cancer followed by HPV 18, HPV 31, HPV 52, or HPV 58 depending on geographic area. In this study, the distribution of HPV genotypes in cervical specimens from women living in Thailand was analyzed by HPV testing with electrochemical DNA chip and PCR direct sequencing. The 716 specimens were grouped according to their cytological grades; 100 normal, 100 low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions, 100 high grade squamous intraepithelial lesions, and 416 specimens of cervical cancer. The results showed that HPV 16, HPV 18, HPV 52, and HPV 58 are the most common HPV genotypes in Thailand, respectively. With respect to age, women below the age of 26 years were almost negative for high-risk HPV DNA exclusively. Conversely, high prevalence of high-risk HPV DNA and abnormal cytology were usually found in women between 26 and 45 years while cervical cancer was detected mainly in women above the age of 45 years. To increase protection efficiency, a vaccine including HPV 52 and HPV 58 should be offered to Asian women, and primary HPV screening should start at 26-30 years of age. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Cervical cancer prevention knowledge and abnormal Pap test experiences among women living with HIV/AIDS

    PubMed Central

    Wigfall, Lisa T.; Bynum, Shalanda A; Brandt, Heather M.; Friedman, Daniela B.; Bond, Sharon M.; Lazenby, Gweneth B.; Richter, Donna L.; Glover, Saundra H.; Hébert, James R.

    2014-01-01

    Background Cervical cancer prevention knowledge deficits persist among women living with HIV/AIDS (WLHA) despite increased risk of developing cervical dysplasia/cancer. We examined associations between WLHA’s cervical cancer prevention knowledge and abnormal Pap test history. Methods We recruited 145 urban and rural WLHA from Ryan White-funded clinics and AIDS service organizations located in the southeastern United States between March 2011 and April 2012. For this analysis, women who reported a history of cervical cancer (n=3) or had a complete hysterectomy (n=14), and observations with missing data (n=22) were excluded. Stata/IC 13 was used to perform cross-tabulations and chi-squared tests. Results Our sample included 106 predominantly non-Hispanic Black (92%) WLHA. Mean age was 46.3±10.9 years. Half (50%) had ≤ high school education. One-third (37%) had low health literacy. The majority (83%) had a Pap test <1 year ago and 84% knew that WLHA should have a Pap test every year, once two tests are normal. Many (68%) have had an abnormal Pap test. Abnormal Pap test follow-up care knowledge varied. While 86% knew follow-up care could include a repeat Pap test, only 56% knew this could also include an HPV test. Significantly more women who had an abnormal Pap test knew follow-up care could include a biopsy (p=0.001). Conclusions For WLHA to make informed/shared decisions about their cervical health, they need to be knowledgeable about cervical cancer care options across the cancer control continuum. Providing WLHA with prevention knowledge beyond screening recommendations seems warranted given their increased risk of developing cervical dysplasia/neoplasia. PMID:24928481

  6. Trends in cervical cancer mortality in the Americas.

    PubMed

    Robles, S C; White, F; Peruga, A

    1996-12-01

    This article presents an assessment of cervical cancer mortality trends in the Americas based on PAHO data. Trends were estimated for countries where data were available for at least 10 consecutive years, the number of cervical cancer deaths was considerable, and at least 75% of the deaths from all causes were registered. In contrast to Canada and the United States, whose general populations had been screened for many years and where cervical cancer mortality has declined steadily (to about 1.4 and 1.7 deaths per 100,000 women, respectively, as of 1990), most Latin American and Caribbean countries with available data have experienced fairly constant levels of cervical cancer mortality (typically in the range of 5-6 deaths per 100,000 women). In addition, several other countries (Chile, Costa Rica, and Mexico) have exhibited higher cervical cancer mortality as well as a number of noteworthy changes in this mortality over time. Overall, while actual declining trends could be masked by special circumstances in some countries, cervical cancer mortality has not declined in Latin America as it has in developed countries. Correlations between declining mortality and the intensity of screening in developed countries suggest that a lack of screening or screening program shortcomings in Latin America could account for this. Among other things, where large-scale cervical cancer screening efforts have been instituted in Latin America and Caribbean, these efforts have generally been linked to family planning and prenatal care programs serving women who are typically under 30; while the real need is for screening of older women who are at substantially higher risk.

  7. Chemotherapy and molecular targeting therapy for recurrent cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tsuda, Naotake; Watari, Hidemichi; Ushijima, Kimio

    2016-01-01

    For patients with primary stage ⅣB, persistent, or recurrent cervical cancer, chemotherapy remains the standard treatment, although it is neither curative nor associated with long-term disease control. In this review, we summarized the history of treatment of recurrent cervical cancer, and the current recommendation for chemotherapy and molecular targeted therapy. Eligible articles were identified by a search of the MEDLINE bibliographical database for the period up to November 30, 2014. The search strategy included the following any or all of the keywords: “uterine cervical cancer”, “chemotherapy”, and “targeted therapies”. Since cisplatin every 21 days was considered as the historical standard treatment for recurrent cervical cancer, subsequent trials have evaluated and demonstrated activity for other agents including paclitaxel, gemcitabine, topotecan and vinorelbine among others. Accordingly, promising agents were incorporated into phase Ⅲ trials. To examine the best agent to combine with cisplatin, several landmark phase Ⅲ clinical trials were conducted by Gynecologic Oncology Group (GOG) and Japan Clinical Oncology Group (JCOG). Through, GOG204 and JCOG0505, paclitaxel/cisplatin (TP) and paclitaxel/carboplatin (TC) are now considered to be the recommended therapies for recurrent cervical cancer patients. However, the prognosis of patients who are already resistant to chemotherapy, are very poor. Therefore new therapeutic strategies are urgently required. Molecular targeted therapy will be the most hopeful candidate of these strategies. From the results of GOG240, bevacizumab combined with TP reached its primary endpoint of improving overall survival (OS). Although, the prognosis for recurrent cervical cancer patients is still poor, the results of GOG240 shed light on the usefulness of molecular target agents to chemotherapy in cancer patients. Recurrent cervical cancer is generally considered incurable and current chemotherapy regiments

  8. Direct costs of cervical cancer management in Morocco.

    PubMed

    Berraho, Mohamed; Najdi, Adil; Mathoulin-Pelissier, Simone; Salamon, Roger; Nejjari, Chakib

    2012-01-01

    For cervical cancer the epidemiological profile is poorly known in Morocco and no data is available concerning the direct medical costs. The purpose of this work is to estimate the direct cost of medical management of invasive cervical cancer during the first year after diagnosis in Morocco. The estimation of direct costs of medical management of invasive cervical cancer during the first year after diagnosis in Morocco is based on the estimation of individual cost in each stage which covers diagnosis, treatment and follow-up during first year. The cost was estimated per patient and whole cycle-set using the costs for each drug and procedure as indicated by the Moroccan National Agency for Health Insurance. Extrapolation of the results to the whole country was used to calculate the total annual cost of cervical cancer treatments in Morocco. Overall approximately 1,978 new cases of cervical cancer occur each year in Morocco. The majority (82.96%) of these cases were diagnosed at a late stage (stage II or more). The cost of one case of cervical cancer depends on stage of diagnosis, the lowest cost is $382 for stage Cis followed by the cost of stage IA1 for young women (<40 years) which is $2,952. The highest cost is for stage IV, which is $7,827. The total cost of cervical cancer care for one year after diagnosis is estimated at $13,589,360. The share allocated to treatment is the most important part of the global care budget with an annual sum of $13,027,609 whereas other cost components are represented as follows: $435,694 for annual follow-up activity and $126,057 for diagnosis and preclinical staging. This study provides health decision-makers with a first estimate of costs and the opportunity to achieve the optimal use of available data to estimate the needs of health facilities in Morocco.

  9. HPV-beyond cervical cancer (online resource center).

    PubMed

    Alexander, Kenneth A; Giuliano, Anna R

    2012-07-01

    The human papillomavirus (HPV) causes more than 99% of all cervical cancers (see Am J Med Resource Center: http://supplements.amjmed.com/2011/HPV/). Exposure to HPV infections occurs in a high proportion of the overall population; however, 2 safe and effective vaccines, HPV2 and HPV4, are approved for the prevention of HPV-16 and HPV-18 infection, the most common causes of cervical cancer. Additionally, HPV4 prevents HPV-6 and HPV-11-related genital warts. While prevention of cervical cancer in women has been the initial aim of vaccination programs, it has now become apparent that HPV causes other types of cancer as well, including vulvar and vaginal cancers in women, penile cancer in men, and anal cancer in both sexes. Furthermore, these viruses have been implicated in head and neck cancers in both men and women as well. It is estimated that HPV-related cancers occur in 10,000 American males annually, suggesting that limiting vaccination programs to females may be underserving a significant proportion of the population. The efficacy of the 2 available vaccines against oncogenic HPV is more than 90% for both cervical and anal intraepithelial neoplasia. For those receiving the HPV4 vaccine, efficacy against genital warts is nearly 90%. Adverse effects are few and include episodes of syncope in the period immediately following vaccination. Benefits of vaccinating males include reduction in disease burden in men and enhanced herd immunity to reduce disease burden in women. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. Performance of implementing guideline-driven cervical cancer screening measures in an inner-city hospital system.

    PubMed

    Wieland, Daryl L; Reimers, Laura L; Wu, Eijean; Nathan, Lisa M; Gruenberg, Tammy; Abadi, Maria; Einstein, Mark H

    2011-10-01

    : In 2006, the American Society for Colposcopy and Cervical Pathology updated evidence-based guidelines recommending screening intervals for women with abnormal cervical cytology diagnosis. In our low-income inner-city population, we sought to improve performance by uniformly applying the guidelines to all patients. We report the prospective performance of a comprehensive tracking, evidence-based algorithmically driven call back, and appointment scheduling system for cervical cancer screening in a resource-limited inner-city population. : Outreach efforts were formalized with algorithm-based protocols for triage to colposcopy, with universal adherence to evidence-based guidelines. During implementation from August 2006 to July 2008, we prospectively tracked performance using the electronic medical record with administrative and pathology reports to determine performance variables such as the total number of Pap tests, colposcopy visits, and the distribution of abnormal cytology and histology results, including all cervical intraepithelial neoplasia 2, 3 diagnoses. : A total of 86,257 gynecologic visits and 41,527 Pap tests were performed system-wide during this period of widespread and uniform implementation of standard cervical cancer screening guidelines. The number of Pap tests performed per month varied little. The incidence of CIN 1 significantly decreased from 117 (68.4%) of 171 during the first tracked month to 52 (54.7%) of 95 during the last tracked month (p = 0.04). The monthly incidence rate of CIN 2, 3, including incident cervical cancers, did not change. The total number of colposcopy visits declined, resulting in a 50% decrease in costs related to colposcopy services and approximately a 12% decrease in costs related to excisional biopsies. : Adherence to cervical cancer screening guidelines reduced the number of unnecessary colposcopies without increasing numbers of potentially missed CIN 2, 3 lesions, including cervical cancer. Uniform implementation

  11. Current imaging strategies for the evaluation of uterine cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bourgioti, Charis; Chatoupis, Konstantinos; Moulopoulos, Lia Angela

    2016-01-01

    Uterine cervical cancer still remains an important socioeconomic issue because it largely affects women of reproductive age. Prognosis is highly depended on extent of the disease at diagnosis and, therefore, accurate staging is crucial for optimal management. Cervical cancer is clinically staged, according to International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics guidelines, but, currently, there is increased use of cross sectional imaging modalities [computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), positron emission tomography-CT (PET-CT)] for the study of important prognostic factors like tumor size, parametrial invasion, endocervical extension, pelvic side wall or adjacent/distal organs involvement and lymph node status. Imaging indications also include cervical cancer follow-up, evaluation of tumor response to treatment and selection of suitable candidates for less radical surgeries like radical trachelectomy for fertility preservation. The preferred imaging method for local cervical cancer evaluation is MRI; CT is equally effective for evaluation of extrauterine spread of the disease. PET-CT shows high diagnostic performance for the detection of tumor relapse and metastatic lymph nodes. The aim of this review is to familiarize radiologists with the MRI appearance of cervical carcinoma and to discuss the indications of cross sectional imaging during the course of the disease in patients with cervical carcinoma. PMID:27158421

  12. Cervical cancer screening in Belgium and overscreening of adolescents.

    PubMed

    Van Kerrebroeck, Helena; Makar, Amin

    2016-03-01

    There has been a marked decrease in the incidence of cervical cancer thanks to cytological screening with the Pap smear test. In Belgium, this screening is rather opportunistic. Over 39% of Belgian women between 25 and 64 years of age are never or only rarely screened by cytological tests. Moreover, there is an excess use of Pap smears because of women who rely on their yearly cervical smear and because many Pap smears are obtained from women beyond the target age range of 25 to 64 years. Sexually active adolescents are increasingly being recognized as a population distinct from adult women. They are at a high risk of acquiring the human papillomavirus (HPV), but most infections and cervical intraepithelial lesions caused by HPV are efficiently cleared by the immune system. We present a description of cervical cancer screening in Belgium using the database of the National Health Insurance Institute (RIZIV/INAMI) and the Belgian Health Care Knowledge Centre (KCE). We describe why elimination of Pap testing in the adolescent population reduces costs and harms without increasing cervical cancer rates. Expectant management, education on the risk factors for cervical cancer and HPV persistence, and HPV vaccination are very important in adolescents and young adults.

  13. Cervical Cancer Growth Is Regulated by a c-ABL-PLK1 Signaling Axis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xu; Chen, Gang; Li, Wei; Peng, Changmin; Zhu, Yue; Yang, Xiaoming; Li, Teng; Cao, Cheng; Pei, Huadong

    2017-03-01

    The nonreceptor tyrosine kinase c-ABL controls cell growth but its contributions in solid tumors are not fully understood. Here we report that the Polo-like kinase PLK1, an essential mitotic kinase regulator, is an important downstream effector of c-ABL in regulating the growth of cervical cancer. c-ABL interacted with and phosphorylated PLK1. Phosphorylation of PLK1 by c-ABL inhibited PLK1 ubiquitination and degradation and enhanced its activity, leading to cell-cycle progression and tumor growth. Both c-ABL and PLK1 were overexpressed in cervical carcinoma. Notably, PLK1 tyrosine phosphorylation correlated with patient survival in cervical cancer. In a murine xenograft model of human cervical cancer, combination treatment with c-ABL and PLK1 inhibitors yielded additive effects on tumor growth inhibition. Our findings highlight the c-ABL-PLK1 axis as a novel prognostic marker and treatment target for human cervical cancers. Cancer Res; 77(5); 1142-54. ©2016 AACR.

  14. Advances in diagnosis and treatment of metastatic cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Li, Haoran; Wu, Xiaohua; Cheng, Xi

    2016-07-01

    Cervical cancer is one of the most common cancers in women worldwide. The outcome of patients with metastatic cervical cancer is poor. We reviewed the relevant literature concerning the treatment and diagnosis of metastatic cervical cancer. There are two types of metastasis related to different treatments and survival rates: hematogenous metastasis and lymphatic metastasis. Patients with hematogenous metastasis have a higher risk of death than those with lymphatic metastasis. In terms of diagnosis, fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) and PET-computed tomography are effective tools for the evaluation of distant metastasis. Concurrent chemoradiotherapy and subsequent chemotherapy are well-tolerated and efficient for lymphatic metastasis. As for lung metastasis, chemotherapy and/or surgery are valuable treatments for resistant, recurrent metastatic cervical cancer and chemoradiotherapy may be the optimal choice for stage IVB cervical cancer. Chemotherapy and bone irradiation are promising for bone metastasis. A better survival is achieved with multimodal therapy. Craniotomy or stereotactic radiosurgery is an optimal choice combined with radiotherapy for solitary brain metastases. Chemotherapy and palliative brain radiation may be considered for multiple brain metastases and other organ metastases.

  15. Advances in diagnosis and treatment of metastatic cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Cervical cancer is one of the most common cancers in women worldwide. The outcome of patients with metastatic cervical cancer is poor. We reviewed the relevant literature concerning the treatment and diagnosis of metastatic cervical cancer. There are two types of metastasis related to different treatments and survival rates: hematogenous metastasis and lymphatic metastasis. Patients with hematogenous metastasis have a higher risk of death than those with lymphatic metastasis. In terms of diagnosis, fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose positron emission tomography (FDG-PET) and PET-computed tomography are effective tools for the evaluation of distant metastasis. Concurrent chemoradiotherapy and subsequent chemotherapy are well-tolerated and efficient for lymphatic metastasis. As for lung metastasis, chemotherapy and/or surgery are valuable treatments for resistant, recurrent metastatic cervical cancer and chemoradiotherapy may be the optimal choice for stage IVB cervical cancer. Chemotherapy and bone irradiation are promising for bone metastasis. A better survival is achieved with multimodal therapy. Craniotomy or stereotactic radiosurgery is an optimal choice combined with radiotherapy for solitary brain metastases. Chemotherapy and palliative brain radiation may be considered for multiple brain metastases and other organ metastases. PMID:27171673

  16. Clinicopathological Features of Cervical Esophageal Cancer: Retrospective Analysis of 63 Consecutive Patients Who Underwent Surgical Resection.

    PubMed

    Saeki, Hiroshi; Tsutsumi, Satoshi; Yukaya, Takafumi; Tajiri, Hirotada; Tsutsumi, Ryosuke; Nishimura, Sho; Nakaji, Yu; Kudou, Kensuke; Akiyama, Shingo; Kasagi, Yuta; Nakashima, Yuichiro; Sugiyama, Masahiko; Sonoda, Hideto; Ohgaki, Kippei; Oki, Eiji; Yasumatsu, Ryuji; Nakashima, Torahiko; Morita, Masaru; Maehara, Yoshihiko

    2017-01-01

    The objectives of this retrospective study were to elucidate the clinicopathological features and recent surgical results of cervical esophageal cancer. Cervical esophageal cancer has been reported to have a dismal prognosis. Accurate knowledge of the clinical characteristics of cervical esophageal cancer is warranted to establish appropriate therapeutic strategies. The clinicopathological features and treatment results of 63 consecutive patients with cervical esophageal cancer (Ce group) who underwent surgical resection from 1980 to 2013 were analyzed and compared with 977 patients with thoracic or abdominal esophageal cancer (T/A group) who underwent surgical resection during that time. Among the patients who received curative resection, the 5-year overall and disease-specific survival rates of the Ce patients were significantly better than those of the T/A patients (overall: 77.3% vs 46.5%, respectively, P = 0.0067; disease-specific: 81.9% vs 55.8%, respectively, P = 0.0135). Although total pharyngo-laryngo-esophagectomy procedures were less frequently performed in the recent period, the rate of curative surgical procedures was markedly higher in the recent period (2000-1013) than that in the early period (1980-1999) (44.4% vs 88.9%, P = 0.0001). The 5-year overall survival rate in the recent period (71.5%) was significantly better than that in the early period (40.7%, P = 0.0342). Curative resection for cervical esophageal cancer contributes to favorable outcomes compared with other esophageal cancers. Recent surgical results for cervical esophageal cancer have improved, and include an increased rate of curative resection and decreased rate of extensive surgery.

  17. Novel missense mutation in FHIT gene: interpreting the effect in HPV-mediated cervical cancer in Indian women.

    PubMed

    Neyaz, Md Kausar; Hussain, Showket; Hassan, Md Imtaiyaz; Das, Bhudev C; Husain, Syed Akhtar; Bharadwaj, Mausumi

    2010-02-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is considered to be a major etiological factor but is not sufficient for the development of cervical cancer. Other host factors including altered tumor suppressor gene activities might contribute to the carcinogenic process. Fragile Histidine Triad (FHIT) has been shown to play a pivotal role in carcinogenesis. Therefore, we made an attempt to find out point mutation of FHIT gene in HPV mediated cervical cancer in Indian women. 112 cases of cervical carcinoma tissue biopsies and 38 cervical scrapes samples of normal cytology were employed for this study. Herein, we report a novel mutation identified at nucleotide position 655, at codon 98 from CAT --> CGT with ultimate replacement of amino acid Histidine by Arginine in cervical cancer cases. Molecular modeling was performed to predict the effect of this mutation in disease pathology. We predict that this change, His to Arg substitution in substrate-binding domain may generate catalytically inactive protein with loss of tumor suppressor activity.

  18. miR-196a targets netrin 4 and regulates cell proliferation and migration of cervical cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Jie; Zheng, Fangxia; Yu, Gang; Yin, Yanhua; Lu, Qingyang

    2013-11-01

    Highlights: •miR-196a was overexpressed in cervical cancer tissue compared to normal tissue. •miR-196a expression elevated proliferation and migration of cervical cancer cells. •miR-196a inhibited NTN4 expression by binding 3′-UTR region of NTN4 mRNA. •NTN4 inversely correlated with miR-196a expression in cervical tissue and cell line. •NTN4 expression was low in cervical cancer tissue compared to normal tissue. -- Abstract: Recent research has uncovered tumor-suppressive and oncogenic potential of miR-196a in various tumors. However, the expression and mechanism of its function in cervical cancer remains unclear. In this study, we assess relative expression of miR-196a in cervical premalignant lesions, cervical cancer tissues, and four cancer cell lines using quantitative real-time PCR. CaSki and HeLa cells were treated with miR-196a inhibitors, mimics, or pCDNA/miR-196a to investigate the role of miR-196a in cancer cell proliferation and migration. We demonstrated that miR-196a was overexpressed in cervical intraepithelial neoplasia 2–3 and cervical cancer tissue. Moreover, its expression contributes to the proliferation and migration of cervical cancer cells, whereas inhibiting its expression led to a reduction in proliferation and migration. Five candidate targets of miR-196a chosen by computational prediction and Cervical Cancer Gene Database search were measured for their mRNA in both miR-196a-overexpressing and -depleted cancer cells. Only netrin 4 (NTN4) expression displayed an inverse association with miR-196a. Fluorescent reporter assays revealed that miR-196a inhibited NTN4 expression by targeting one binding site in the 3′-untranslated region (3′-UTR) of NTN4 mRNA. Furthermore, qPCR and Western blot assays verified NTN4 expression was downregulated in cervical cancer tissues compared to normal controls, and in vivo mRNA level of NTN4 inversely correlated with miR-196a expression. In summary, our findings provide new insights about the

  19. Design The Cervical Cancer Detector Use The Artificial Neural Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Intan Af'idah, Dwi; Didik Widianto, Eko; Setyawan, Budi

    2013-06-01

    Cancer is one of the contagious diseases that become a public health issue, both in the world and in Indonesia. In the world, 12% of all deaths caused by cancer and is the second killer after cardiovascular disease. Early detection using the IVA is a practical and inexpensive (only requiring acetic acid). However, the accuracy of the method is quite low, as it can not detect the stage of the cancer. While other methods have a better sensitivity than the IVA method, is a method of PAP smear. However, this method is relatively expensive, and requires an experienced pathologist-cytologist. According to the case above, Considered important to make the cancer cervics detector that is used to detect the abnormality and cervical cancer stage and consists of a digital microscope, as well as a computer application based on artificial neural network. The use of cervical cancer detector software and hardware are integrated each other. After the specifications met, the steps to design the cervical cancer detection are: Modifying a conventional microscope by adding a lens, image recording, and the lights, Programming the tools, designing computer applications, Programming features abnormality detection and staging of cancer.

  20. Physical Activity and Cervical Cancer Testing among American Indian Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muus, Kyle J.; Baker-Demaray, Twyla B.; Bogart, T. Andy; Duncan, Glen E.; Jacobsen, Clemma; Buchwald, Dedra S.; Henderson, Jeffrey A.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Studies have shown that women who engage in high levels of physical activity have higher rates of cancer screening, including Papanicalaou (Pap) tests. Because American Indian (AI) women are at high risk for cervical cancer morbidity and mortality, we examined Pap screening prevalence and assessed whether physical activity was associated…

  1. Physical Activity and Cervical Cancer Testing among American Indian Women

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muus, Kyle J.; Baker-Demaray, Twyla B.; Bogart, T. Andy; Duncan, Glen E.; Jacobsen, Clemma; Buchwald, Dedra S.; Henderson, Jeffrey A.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Studies have shown that women who engage in high levels of physical activity have higher rates of cancer screening, including Papanicalaou (Pap) tests. Because American Indian (AI) women are at high risk for cervical cancer morbidity and mortality, we examined Pap screening prevalence and assessed whether physical activity was associated…

  2. Cervical Microbiome and Cytokine Profile at Various Stages of Cervical Cancer: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Bahena-Román, Margarita; Téllez-Sosa, Juan; Martínez-Barnetche, Jesús; Cortina-Ceballos, Bernardo; López-Estrada, Guillermina; Delgado-Romero, Karina; Burguete-García, Ana I.; Cantú, David; García-Carrancá, Alejandro; Madrid-Marina, Vicente

    2016-01-01

    Cervical cancer (CC) is caused by high-risk human papillomavirus persistence due to the immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment mediated by cytokines. Vaginal microbiota determines the presence of certain cytokines locally. We assessed the association between cervical microbiota diversity and the histopathological diagnosis of each stage of CC, and we evaluated mRNA cervical expression levels of IL-4, IL-6, IL-10, TGF-β1, TNF-α and IFN-γ across the histopathological diagnosis and specific bacterial clusters. We determined the cervical microbiota by high throughput sequencing of 16S rDNA amplicons and classified it in community state types (CST). Mean difference analyses between alpha-diversity and histopathological diagnosis were carried out, as well as a β-diversity analysis within the histological diagnosis. Cervical cytokine mRNA expression was analyzed across the CSTs and the histopathological diagnoses. We found a significant difference in microbiota's diversity in NCL-HPV negative women vs those with squamous intraepithelial lesions (SIL) and CC(p = 0.006, p = 0.036).When β-diversity was evaluated, the CC samples showed the highest variation within groups (p<0.0006) and the largest distance compared to NCL-HPV negative ones (p<0.00001). The predominant bacteria in women with normal cytology were L. crispatus and L. iners, whereas for SIL, it was Sneathia spp. and for CC, Fusobacterium spp. We found higher median cervical levels of IL-4 and TGF-β1 mRNA in the CST dominated by Fusobacterium spp. These results suggest that the cervical microbiota may be implicated in cervical cancer pathology. Further cohort studies are needed to validate these findings. PMID:27115350

  3. Epidemiological Investigation and Risk Factors for Cervical Lesions: Cervical Cancer Screening Among Women in Rural Areas of Henan Province China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qingwei; Xie, Wenyan; Wang, Feng; Li, Rong Hong; Cui, Lina; Wang, Huifen; Fu, Xiuhong; Song, Jiayu

    2016-06-01

    BACKGROUND This cross-sectional study aimed to investigate the prevalence of cervical lesions and evaluate risk factors for cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) among women taking part in cervical cancer screening in rural areas of Henan province, China. MATERIAL AND METHODS Cervical cancer screening using the ThinPrep cytologic test (TCT) and gynecologic exam was conducted on 1315 women age 20-68 years in rural areas of Henan province, China. Colposcopy and biopsies were carried out for histopathologic diagnosis when indicated. Univariate and multivariate logistic regressions were performed to evaluate risk factors associated with cervical lesions. RESULTS Among 1315 women screened, CIN prevalence detected by histopathology was 1.22% (0.38% of CIN 1, 0.76% of CIN 2, and 0.08% of CIN 3). Cervical cancer prevalence was 2.66%. Multivariate analysis confirmed risk factors for cervical lesions included older age (the 21-40 age group vs. the 41-66 age group, OR=0.13, 95% CI: 0.03~0.57), postmenopause (OR=0.11, 95% CI: 0.03~0.45), cervical inflammation (OR=0.06, 95% CI: 0.01~0.31), and smoking (OR=6.78, 95% CI: 1.20~38.23). CONCLUSIONS Older age (41-66 years), presence of HPV infection, postmenopause, cervical inflammation, and smoking are strong risk factors for cervical lesions among women in rural areas of Henan province, China. Particular efforts should be made to provide cervical cancer screening for these women.

  4. Beliefs about cervical cancer screening among Turkish married women.

    PubMed

    Esin, Melek Nihal; Bulduk, Serap; Ardic, Aysun

    2011-09-01

    Cervical cancer can be prevented by having a Pap test aiming for early screening. This study was planned to determine the beliefs of women about cervical cancer and the influencing factors. The cross-sectional study was conducted in Sarıyer, one of the most densely populated districts of Istanbul, which is the most crowded city in Turkey. This study sample included 300 women receiving training at public education centers. The data for the study were collected with "HBM-based scale" developed by Bryd et al. upon the basis of health belief model. The mean of the women's ages was determined as 33.9 ± 10.6. Considering the beliefs of the women who haven't had a Pap test about cervical cancer, it was determined that 75.7% of the women participating in the survey thought "I am not at risk for cervical cancer". Logistic regression analysis was carried out in order to find out the most decisive variable among the reasons for not having a Pap test, and it was determined that the factors stated as "I don't know where I could go if I wanted a Pap test" was a four times factor. This study demonstrated that the main determinant factor affecting CCS behaviors of married women is beliefs. It is considered that the results from this study could be basic data for cervical cancer early screening and educational programs.

  5. HER2 as a novel therapeutic target for cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Ensel; Choi, Jung-Joo; Jung, Kyungsoo; Song, Ji-Young; Ahn, Suzie E.; Kim, Byoung-Gie; Bae, Duk-Soo; Park, Woong-Yang

    2015-01-01

    Surgery and radiation are the current standard treatments for cervical cancer. However, there is no effective therapy for metastatic or recurrent cases, necessitating the identification of therapeutic targets. In order to create preclinical models for screening potential therapeutic targets, we established 14 patient-derived xenograft (PDX) models of cervical cancers using subrenal implantation methods. Serially passaged PDX tumors retained the histopathologic and genomic features of the original tumors. Among the 9 molecularly profiled cervical cancer patient samples, a HER2-amplified tumor was detected by array comparative genomic hybridization and targeted next-generation sequencing. We confirmed HER2 overexpression in the tumor and serially passaged PDX. Co-administration of trastuzumab and lapatinib in the HER2-overexpressed PDX significantly inhibited tumor growth compared to the control. Thus, we established histopathologically and genomically homologous PDX models of cervical cancer using subrenal implantation. Furthermore, we propose HER2 inhibitor-based therapy for HER2-amplified cervical cancer refractory to conventional therapy. PMID:26435481

  6. HPV-based cervical cancer screening- facts, fiction, and misperceptions.

    PubMed

    Wentzensen, Nicolas; Arbyn, Marc

    2017-05-01

    Several randomized trials have demonstrated that HPV-based cervical cancer screening is more effective than cytology-based screening. A pooled analysis of long-term follow-up data from these trials has shown reduced cervical cancer mortality in women screened with HPV compared to cytology. As a consequence, many health systems are currently transitioning to HPV-based screening programs. However, there are several controversies that influence whether and how HPV-based cervical cancer screening is implemented in different settings. Here, we discuss the most important controversies surrounding cervical cancer screening using primary HPV testing in light of published data from clinical trials and large observational studies. Overall, there is strong and uniform evidence for the efficacy of HPV-based screening, and little evidence for the usefulness of adding cytology to primary screening. However, there is currently limited data on optimal triage strategies for HPV-positive women, a critical component of an HPV-based screening program. There will likely be multiple choices for integrated screening programs and implementation may differ depending on risk perception, healthcare funds, assay costs, and available infrastructure, among other factors, in different settings. A particular challenge is the integration of screening and vaccination programs, since increasingly vaccinated populations will have a continuous decrease of cervical cancer risk. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  7. Neuropraxia of the cervical spinal cord following cervical spinal cord trauma: a report of five patients.

    PubMed

    Bernsen, H J; Koetsveld, A; Frenken, C W; van Norel, G J

    2000-06-01

    Neuropraxia of the cervical spinal cord is a rare condition which is almost exclusively reported in American football players following cervical hyperextension or hyperflexion trauma. In this entity-neurological symptoms of both arms and legs for a period of up to 15 minutes are observed with complete recovery. We report the characteristics of five patients not involved in contact sport activities with a neuropraxia of the spinal cord following cervical trauma. In four of the five patients, this syndrome was associated with a cervical canal stenosis. Surgical decompression was performed in two patients with progressive neurological symptoms after an initial period of recovery. The cases illustrates that although neuropraxia of the spinal cord is usually seen in athletes, also other persons may be at risk for developing this condition, especially when a preexisting spinal stenosis is present. Patients who experienced neuropraxia of the spinal cord should thus be evaluated carefully for the presence of cervical spinal cord abnormalities.

  8. microRNA-328 inhibits cervical cancer cell proliferation and tumorigenesis by targeting TCF7L2.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xuan; Xia, Ying

    2016-06-24

    microRNAs (miRNAs) play a vital role in tumor development and progression. In this study, we aimed to determine the expression and biological roles of miR-328 in cervical cancer and identify its direct target gene. Our data showed that miR-328 was significantly downregulated in human cervical cancer tissues and cells. Re-expression of miR-328 inhibited cervical cancer cell proliferation and colony formation in vitro and suppressed the growth of xenograft tumors in vivo. Bioinformatic analysis predicted TCF7L2 (an essential effector of canonical Wnt signaling) as a target gene of miR-328, which was confirmed by luciferase reporter assays. Enforced expression of miR-328 led to a decline in the expression of endogenous TCF7L2 in cervical cancer cells. In cervical cancer tissues, TCF7L2 protein levels were negatively correlated with miR-328 expression levels (r = -0.462, P = 0.017). Small interfering RNA-mediated knockdown of TCF7L2 significantly impaired the proliferation and colony formation of cervical cancer cells. Ectopic expression of a miRNA-resistant form of TCF7L2 significantly reversed the growth suppressive effects of miR-328 on cervical cancer cells, which was accompanied by induction of cyclin D1 expression. Taken together, our results provide first evidence for the growth suppressive activity of miR-328 in cervical cancer, which is largely ascribed to downregulation of TCF7L2. Restoration of miR-328 may have therapeutic potential in cervical cancer.

  9. Cytotoxic effect and induction of apoptosis in human cervical cancer cells by Antrodia camphorata.

    PubMed

    Yang, Pei-Yu; Hu, Dan-Ning; Liu, Fu-Shing

    2013-01-01

    Antrodia camphorata is a Chinese herb indigenous to Taiwan. Previous reports demonstrated that it could induce apoptosis in some cancer cells. The purpose of this study was to investigate the apoptotic effect of the crude extract of A. camphorata in cervical cancer cells. Two human cervical cancer cell lines, HeLa and C-33A, were treated with extract of A. camphorata (10-1000 μg/mL). We found that A. camphorata extract was cytotoxic to both cervical cancer cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner as examined by MTT assay. Treatment with A. camphorata extract at 400 μg/mL induced a 2.3- and 4.4-fold increase in oligonucleosome formation from the cleaved chromosomal DNA in HeLa and C-33A cells, respectively. A. camphorata extract also activated caspase-3, -8, and -9 activities and increased the cytosolic level of cytochrome c in both cell lines as the dosage increased. Furthermore, A. camphorata extract increased expressions of Bak, Bad and Bim, while decreasing expressions of Bcl-2 and Bcl-xL of the Bcl-2 family proteins in HeLa and C-33A cells. The expression of IAP proteins, XIAP and survivin, was also decreased in both cervical cancer cells after treatment with A. camphorata. Our in vitro study suggests that A. camphorata is cytotoxic to cervical cancer cells through both extrinsic and intrinsic apoptotic mechanisms. It could be used as a novel phytotherapeutic agent or auxiliary therapy in the treatment of cervical cancer.

  10. HPV in genital cancers (at the exception of cervical cancer) and anal cancers.

    PubMed

    de Sanjosé, Silvia; Bruni, Laia; Alemany, Laia

    2014-12-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection has been firmly established as a central and necessary cause of invasive cervical cancer and it has been etiologically linked to other anogenital (vulva, vagina, anus and penis) and head and neck cancers, particularly oropharyngeal. Although being rare, the incidence of some of these cancers in some countries has increased in the last decades. HPV-related anogenital tumors share many risk factors with cervical cancer. The HPV aetiological contribution differs in each anatomical location reflecting differences in the natural history and viral tissue tropism. The highest prevalence of HPV DNA in cancers other than cervix has been described for anal, followed by vagina, penile and vulvar cancers. HPV16 has been described as the most common type detected in all cancer sites with different contributions being the highest in anal carcinoma (around 80% of HPV DNA positive anal cancers) and the lowest in vaginal cancers with a contribution similar to that found in cervical cancers (around 60%). Current HPV vaccines have already demonstrated their efficacy in preventing anogenital pre-neoplastic lesions caused by vaccine HPV types. HPV-based prevention tools like HPV vaccination and to a lesser extend screening (e.g. for anal cancer) can be useful measures for reducing the burden of these anogenital cancers. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Prostitution, condom use, and invasive squamous cell cervical cancer in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Thomas, D B; Ray, R M; Pardthaisong, T; Chutivongse, S; Koetsawang, S; Silpisornkosol, S; Virutamasen, P; Christopherson, W M; Melnick, J L; Meirik, O; Farley, T M; Riotton, G

    1996-04-15

    Cervical cancer is probably caused by a sexually transmitted agent. A case-control study was conducted in three hospitals in Thailand to investigate further the role of male sexual behavior, particularly regarding sexual contacts with prostitutes, in the development of this disease. Data were obtained from interviews with 225 married women with invasive squamous cell cervical carcinoma and 791 hospitalized controls, all of whom reported having only one sexual partner, and from interviews with their husbands. Risk of cervical cancer was strongly related to the women's husbands having visited prostitutes without using a condom when the husbands were less than 30 years old. A strong increasing trend in risk in relation to decreasing frequency of the husbands' condom use with prostitutes was observed, and a weaker increasing trend in risk with husbands' estimated lifetime total number of visits to prostitutes was found. The average latent period between the women's likely initial exposure to a sexually transmitted oncogenic agent and her diagnosis of invasive cervical cancer was about a quarter of a century. Regular use of condoms by customers of prostitutes could reduce the number of invasive cervical cancer cases in the general population of Thailand by at least one fourth.

  12. HPV testing for cervical cancer screening appears more cost-effective than Papanicolau cytology in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Flores, Yvonne N; Bishai, David M; Lorincz, Attila; Shah, Keerti V; Lazcano-Ponce, Eduardo; Hernández, Mauricio; Granados-García, Víctor; Pérez, Ruth; Salmerón, Jorge

    2011-02-01

    To determine the incremental costs and effects of different HPV testing strategies, when compared to Papanicolau cytology (Pap), for cervical cancer screening in Mexico. A cost-effectiveness analysis (CEA) examined the specific costs and health outcomes associated with (1) no screening; (2) only the Pap test; (3) only self-administered HPV; (4) only clinician administered HPV; and (5) clinician administered HPV plus the Pap test. The costs of self- and clinician-HPV testing, as well as with the Pap test, were identified and quantified. Costs were reported in 2008 US dollars. The health outcome associated with these screening strategies was defined as the number of high-grade cervical intraepithelial neoplasia or cervical cancer cases detected. This CEA was performed using the perspective of the Mexican Institute of Social Security (IMSS) in Morelos, Mexico. Screening women between the ages of 30-80 for cervical cancer using clinical-HPV testing or the combination of clinical-HPV testing, and the Pap is always more cost-effective than using the Pap test alone. This CEA indicates that HPV testing could be a cost-effective screening alternative for a large health delivery organization such as IMSS. These results may help policy-makers implement HPV testing as part of the IMSS cervical cancer screening program.

  13. HPV testing for cervical cancer screening appears more cost-effective than Papanicolau cytology in Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Bishai, David M.; Lőrincz, Attila; Shah, Keerti V.; Lazcano-Ponce, Eduardo; Hernández, Mauricio; Granados-García, Víctor; Pérez, Ruth; Salmerón, Jorge

    2010-01-01

    Objective To determine the incremental costs and effects of different HPV testing strategies, when compared to Papanicolau cytology (Pap), for cervical cancer screening in Mexico. Methods A cost-effectiveness analysis (CEA) examined the specific costs and health outcomes associated with (1) no screening; (2) only the Pap test; (3) only self-administered HPV; (4) only clinician administered HPV; and (5) clinician administered HPV plus the Pap test. The costs of self- and clinician-HPV testing, as well as with the Pap test, were identified and quantified. Costs were reported in 2008 US dollars. The health outcome associated with these screening strategies was defined as the number of high-grade cervical intraepithelial neoplasia or cervical cancer cases detected. This CEA was performed using the perspective of the Mexican Institute of Social Security (IMSS) in Morelos, Mexico. Results Screening women between the ages of 30–80 for cervical cancer using clinical-HPV testing or the combination of clinical-HPV testing, and the Pap is always more cost-effective than using the Pap test alone. Conclusions This CEA indicates that HPV testing could be a cost-effective screening alternative for a large health delivery organization such as IMSS. These results may help policy-makers implement HPV testing as part of the IMSS cervical cancer screening program. PMID:21170578

  14. Ethnic Disparities in Cervical Cancer Survival Among Texas Women

    PubMed Central

    DeSimone, Christopher P.; Eggleston, Katherine S.; White, Arica L.; Williams, Melanie

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Objective The aim of this work was to determine whether minority women are more likely to die of cervical cancer. A population-based cohort study was performed using Texas Cancer Registry (TCR) data from 1998 to 2002. Methods A total of 5,166 women with cervical cancer were identified during 1998–2002 through the TCR. Measures of socioeconomic status (SES) and urbanization were created using census block group-level data. Multilevel logistic regression was used to calculate the odds of dying from cervical cancer by race, and Cox proportional hazards modeling was used for cervical cancer-specific survival analysis. Results After adjusting for age, SES, urbanization, stage, cell type, and treatment, Hispanic women were significantly less likely than non-Hispanic White women to die from cervical cancer (adjusted hazard ratio [aHR] = 0.69; 95% CI [confidence interval] = 0.59–0.80), whereas Black women were more likely to die (aHR = 1.26; 95% CI = 1.06–1.50). Black and Hispanic women were more likely to be diagnosed at a later stage than White women. Black women were significantly less likely to receive surgery among those diagnosed with localized disease (p = 0.001) relative to both White and Hispanic women. Conclusions Relative to non-Hispanic White women, Black women were more likely to die of cervical cancer while Hispanic women were less likely to die; these survival differences were not explained by SES, urbanization, age, cell type, stage at diagnosis, or treatment. PMID:19788363

  15. Human papillomavirus testing for primary cervical cancer screening.

    PubMed

    Grce, Magdalena; Davies, Philip

    2008-09-01

    Cervical cancer is the second most common cancer in women worldwide and the seventh most common cause of cancer deaths in women in Europe. Today, we know how to prevent almost every case of this disease; organized cervical cancer screening based on the Papanicolaou or Pap smear has been proven to prevent 80% of cervical cancer deaths, while new technologies for the detection of the human papillomavirus (HPV) or the prevention of HPV infection offer the potential to make even more progress in the battle against this disease. Testing for carcinogenic or high-risk HPV types is gaining acceptance for the triage of women with borderline cytology and for follow-up after treatment of high-grade cervical lesions. Now, a number of large-scale randomized controlled trials have shown that HPV testing as a primary screening test can detect approximately 50% more high-grade lesions than the Pap test, albeit with a lower specificity if all HPV-positive women are followed up. However, alternative screening algorithms in which HPV-positive women are triaged with cytology have been shown to have equivalent specificity to the Pap test without compromising the increased sensitivity. Further advantages of HPV testing come from the fact that it is an objective and automatable test with a dichotomous result. These attributes can yield cost savings through reductions in staff numbers and simplification of quality control procedures while reducing turnaround times. In countries seeking to improve cervical cancer prevention, the implementation of HPV testing as the primary screening test with cytology for the triage of HPV-positive women is an option that should be fully evaluated. This review summarizes the recent advances in HPV testing in cervical cancer prevention.

  16. Quantitative DNA Methylation Analysis of Candidate Genes in Cervical Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Siegel, Erin M.; Riggs, Bridget M.; Delmas, Amber L.; Koch, Abby; Hakam, Ardeshir; Brown, Kevin D.

    2015-01-01

    Aberrant DNA methylation has been observed in cervical cancer; however, most studies have used non-quantitative approaches to measure DNA methylation. The objective of this study was to quantify methylation within a select panel of genes previously identified as targets for epigenetic silencing in cervical cancer and to identify genes with elevated methylation that can distinguish cancer from normal cervical tissues. We identified 49 women with invasive squamous cell cancer of the cervix and 22 women with normal cytology specimens. Bisulfite-modified genomic DNA was amplified and quantitative pyrosequencing completed for 10 genes (APC, CCNA, CDH1, CDH13, WIF1, TIMP3, DAPK1, RARB, FHIT, and SLIT2). A Methylation Index was calculated as the mean percent methylation across all CpG sites analyzed per gene (~4-9 CpG site) per sequence. A binary cut-point was defined at >15% methylation. Sensitivity, specificity and area under ROC curve (AUC) of methylation in individual genes or a panel was examined. The median methylation index was significantly higher in cases compared to controls in 8 genes, whereas there was no difference in median methylation for 2 genes. Compared to HPV and age, the combination of DNA methylation level of DAPK1, SLIT2, WIF1 and RARB with HPV and age significantly improved the AUC from 0.79 to 0.99 (95% CI: 0.97–1.00, p-value = 0.003). Pyrosequencing analysis confirmed that several genes are common targets for aberrant methylation in cervical cancer and DNA methylation level of four genes appears to increase specificity to identify cancer compared to HPV detection alone. Alterations in DNA methylation of specific genes in cervical cancers, such as DAPK1, RARB, WIF1, and SLIT2, may also occur early in cervical carcinogenesis and should be evaluated. PMID:25826459

  17. Acute Cervical Epidural Hematoma, Screw Pullout, and Esophageal Perforation After Anterior Cervical Corpectomy Surgery: Report of a Case

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ye; Zhu, Qing-San; Liu, Jing-Chen; Wu, Yun-Tao

    2015-01-01

    To report a series of complications related to anterior cervical surgery in the same patient. There have been many reports of complications related to anterior cervical surgeries. These include cervical hematoma, instrumentation extrusion, or esophageal injury after anterior cervical decompression. However, there have been no reports of all these complications occurring in 1 patient. This is our report of a patient who experienced all 3 of these complications. The patient was a 73-year-old man suffering from cervical spondylotic myelopathy who was treated with C5 anterior cervical corpectomy and fusion with titanium mesh and bone graft. The patient successively experienced cervical hematoma, screw pullout, and esophageal perforation, and was treated accordingly. Although the patient suffered a series of complications after anterior cervical corpectomy, all the complications were treated successfully. It serves as a caution that a first complication such as hematoma in anterior cervical corpectomy with fusion should be given enough attention to prevent further complications. PMID:25692439

  18. Kaempferia parviflora Extract Exhibits Anti-cancer Activity against HeLa Cervical Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Potikanond, Saranyapin; Sookkhee, Siriwoot; Na Takuathung, Mingkwan; Mungkornasawakul, Pitchaya; Wikan, Nitwara; Smith, Duncan R.; Nimlamool, Wutigri

    2017-01-01

    Kaempferia parviflora (KP) has been traditionally used as a folk remedy to treat several diseases including cancer, and several studies have reported cytotoxic activities of extracts of KP against a number of different cancer cell lines. However, many aspects of the molecular mechanism of action of KP remain unclear. In particular, the ability of KP to regulate cancer cell growth and survival signaling is still largely unexplored. The current study aimed to investigate the effects of KP on cell viability, cell migration, cell invasion, cell apoptosis, and on signaling pathways related to growth and survival of cervical cancer cells, HeLa. We discovered that KP reduced HeLa cell viability in a concentration-dependent manner. The potent cytotoxicity of KP against HeLa cells was associated with a dose-dependent induction of apoptotic cell death as determined by flow cytometry and observation of nuclear fragmentation. Moreover, KP-induced cell apoptosis was likely to be mediated through the intrinsic apoptosis pathway since caspase 9 and caspase 7, but not BID, were shown to be activated after KP exposure. Based on the observation that KP induced apoptosis in HeLa cell, we further investigated the effects of KP at non-cytotoxic concentrations on suppressing signal transduction pathways relevant to cell growth and survival. We found that KP suppressed the MAPK and PI3K/AKT signaling pathways in cells activated with EGF, as observed by a significant decrease in phosphorylation of ERK1/2, Elk1, PI3K, and AKT. The data suggest that KP interferes with the growth and survival of HeLa cells. Consistent with the inhibitory effect on EGF-stimulated signaling, KP potently suppressed the migration of HeLa cells. Concomitantly, KP was demonstrated to markedly inhibit HeLa cell invasion. The ability of KP in suppressing the migration and invasion of HeLa cells was associated with the suppression of matrix metalloproteinase-2 production. These data strongly suggest that KP may slow

  19. Kaempferia parviflora Extract Exhibits Anti-cancer Activity against HeLa Cervical Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Potikanond, Saranyapin; Sookkhee, Siriwoot; Na Takuathung, Mingkwan; Mungkornasawakul, Pitchaya; Wikan, Nitwara; Smith, Duncan R; Nimlamool, Wutigri

    2017-01-01

    Kaempferia parviflora (KP) has been traditionally used as a folk remedy to treat several diseases including cancer, and several studies have reported cytotoxic activities of extracts of KP against a number of different cancer cell lines. However, many aspects of the molecular mechanism of action of KP remain unclear. In particular, the ability of KP to regulate cancer cell growth and survival signaling is still largely unexplored. The current study aimed to investigate the effects of KP on cell viability, cell migration, cell invasion, cell apoptosis, and on signaling pathways related to growth and survival of cervical cancer cells, HeLa. We discovered that KP reduced HeLa cell viability in a concentration-dependent manner. The potent cytotoxicity of KP against HeLa cells was associated with a dose-dependent induction of apoptotic cell death as determined by flow cytometry and observation of nuclear fragmentation. Moreover, KP-induced cell apoptosis was likely to be mediated through the intrinsic apoptosis pathway since caspase 9 and caspase 7, but not BID, were shown to be activated after KP exposure. Based on the observation that KP induced apoptosis in HeLa cell, we further investigated the effects of KP at non-cytotoxic concentrations on suppressing signal transduction pathways relevant to cell growth and survival. We found that KP suppressed the MAPK and PI3K/AKT signaling pathways in cells activated with EGF, as observed by a significant decrease in phosphorylation of ERK1/2, Elk1, PI3K, and AKT. The data suggest that KP interferes with the growth and survival of HeLa cells. Consistent with the inhibitory effect on EGF-stimulated signaling, KP potently suppressed the migration of HeLa cells. Concomitantly, KP was demonstrated to markedly inhibit HeLa cell invasion. The ability of KP in suppressing the migration and invasion of HeLa cells was associated with the suppression of matrix metalloproteinase-2 production. These data strongly suggest that KP may slow

  20. Development of protocol for the management of cervical cancer symptoms in resource-constrained developing countries.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Ramaiah Vinay; Bhasker, Suman

    2015-02-01

    Cervical cancer is the commonest malignancy of women in economically emerging countries. Patients have distressing symptoms from presentation through follow-up or end of life. Cervical cancer imposes significant burden on health care system due to distressing symptoms and associated loss of quality-adjusted life years (QALY). Multitude of drugs and surgical measures in various combinations can relieve these distressing symptoms and various clinical conditions. The protocols and guidelines for alleviation or relief of symptoms by general pharmacological and surgical measures form an important policy subject in planning cervical cancer management program. These protocol and guidelines are based on the mechanism of action of drugs, extrapolation from management of similar symptoms, and clinical situations arising out of other non-cancerous conditions and experience of health care professionals. Therefore, rigorous evaluation of effectiveness of supportive health care services in developing countries is the need of hour. However, evaluation of such protocol and guidelines are not feasible in emerging economies due to resource constraint. Industrialized affluent nations are also not able to implement and further support care guidelines despite its recognition as an integral part of multidisciplinary management of cancer. Aforementioned factors have created blind spot zone of management purview of cervical cancer. Hence, we attempt to develop protocol for management of adverse events of cervical cancer. Symptoms' and medical conditions' management guidelines evolved on the basis of empirical clinical practice in community and premier oncology centers in resource-constrained developing countries has been presented in this short report. This report should not be an end in itself but has to attract attention of policy-makers, academicians, researchers, and practitioners toward advancing supportive care needs of cancer patients in low- and middle-income countries (LMIC).

  1. 77 FR 66469 - Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection and Control Advisory Committee (BCCEDCAC)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-05

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection and... meeting of the aforementioned committee: Name: Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection and Control..., regarding the early detection and control of breast and cervical cancer. The committee makes...

  2. 76 FR 30723 - Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection and Control Advisory Committee (BCCEDCAC)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-26

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection and... for breast and cervical cancer screening; updates on the National Breast and Cervical Cancer Early... Health and Human Services, and the Director, CDC, regarding the early detection and control of breast...

  3. Cervical Cancer Screening Interventions for U.S. Latinas: A Systematic Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corcoran, Jacqueline; Dattalo, Patrick; Crowley, Meghan

    2012-01-01

    The high cervical cancer mortality rate among Latinas compared with other ethnic groups in the United States is of major concern. Latina women are almost twice as likely to die from cervical cancer as non-Hispanic white women. To improve Latina cervical cancer screening rates, interventions have been developed and tested. This systematic review…

  4. College Students' Knowledge of the Connection between HPV and Cervical Cancer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Applegate, Trent E.; Jones, Iesha K.

    2002-01-01

    Investigated college students' knowledge of the relationship between human papillomavirus (HPV) and cervical cancer. Few students knew what HPV was. Most of the females who had been screened knew that a Pap smear could detect HPV and cervical cancer. Over half of the students did not realize the link between HPV and cervical cancer. Students…

  5. College Students' Knowledge of the Connection between HPV and Cervical Cancer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Applegate, Trent E.; Jones, Iesha K.

    2002-01-01

    Investigated college students' knowledge of the relationship between human papillomavirus (HPV) and cervical cancer. Few students knew what HPV was. Most of the females who had been screened knew that a Pap smear could detect HPV and cervical cancer. Over half of the students did not realize the link between HPV and cervical cancer. Students…

  6. Cervical Cancer Screening Interventions for U.S. Latinas: A Systematic Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Corcoran, Jacqueline; Dattalo, Patrick; Crowley, Meghan

    2012-01-01

    The high cervical cancer mortality rate among Latinas compared with other ethnic groups in the United States is of major concern. Latina women are almost twice as likely to die from cervical cancer as non-Hispanic white women. To improve Latina cervical cancer screening rates, interventions have been developed and tested. This systematic review…

  7. Long Non-Coding RNA PVT1 Facilitates Cervical Cancer Progression Via Negative Regulating of miR-424.

    PubMed

    Gao, Ya-Li; Zhao, Zi-Shen; Zhang, Ming-Yun; Han, Li-Jie; Dong, Yu-Jin; Xu, Bo

    2017-03-08

    Emerging evidence suggests that the long non-coding RNA (lncRNA) plasmacytoma variant translocation 1 gene (PVT1) is involved in pathogenesis of cervical cancer. However, the potential mechanism is rarely reported. Our study found that PVT1 was up-regulated in cervical cancer tissue and cell lines. After transfecting PVT1 siRNA, the proliferation, migration and invasion of cervical cancer cells were markedly decreased. MiRNA expression profiles demonstrate that miR-424 was markedly down-regulated in cervical cancer tissue. Bioinformatics analysis revealed that miR-424 was potentially targeted by PVT1, which was confirmed by dual-luciferase reporter assay. Pearson's correlation analysis showed that PVT1 expression was negatively related to miR-424 expression in glioma cancer tissues. Finally, miR-424 lower-expression could recover the tumor-suppressive effects of PVT1 knockdown in cervical cancer cell lines. Our results reveal the tumor-promoting role of PVT1, acting as competing endogenous RNA (ceRNA) or a molecular sponge in negatively modulating miR-424, which might provide a novel therapeutic target for cervical cancer.

  8. Is cervical cancer a risk factor for colorectal neoplasia? Prevalence of colorectal adenoma in Korean patients with cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yun Jung; Kim, Eun Soo; Lee, Jeong Eun; Park, Woo Young; Kwon, Jee Suk; Park, Kyung Sik; Cho, Kwang Bum; Jang, Byoung Kuk; Chung, Woo Jin; Hwang, Jae Seok; Park, Joon Cheol

    2011-01-01

    The relationship between colorectal neoplasia and cervical cancer has not been evaluated. This study aimed to assess the prevalence of colorectal adenoma in patients with cervical cancer and compare it with that of control subjects. Between January 2005 and December 2009, the medical records of patients diagnosed with cervical cancer were retrospectively reviewed. Patients undergoing sigmoidoscopy or colonoscopy for the preoperative evaluation of the colon were enrolled in this study. Age-matched female healthy subjects who underwent colonoscopy for screening purposes were included as control subjects. We compared demographic and clinicopathological characteristics between the groups. Overall, 285 patients with cervical cancer and 284 healthy subjects were included (age, 56.93±11.92 vs. 56.10±9.31 years). The mean body weight, body mass index (BMI), the incidence of diabetes mellitus and impaired fasting glucose were not statistically different between the 2 groups. The prevalence of colorectal adenoma was not different between the patient and control groups, regardless of examination extent. Multivariate analysis showed that age and BMI were significant independent risk factors for colorectal adenomatous polyps (age, p<0.001; BMI, p=0.002). There might not be any significant association between cervical cancer and colorectal adenomatous polyps.

  9. Knowledge of cervical cancer and screening among women in east-central England.

    PubMed

    Philips, Z; Avis, M; Whynes, D K

    2005-01-01

    This study assesses the extent and accuracy of women's knowledge of cervical cancer, risk factors, and the efficacy of the national screening program. Data were obtained from a questionnaire survey of randomly selected women eligible for screening, drawn from a population in east-central England. The majority of women in the sample overestimated the current incidence of cervical cancer, both absolutely and relative to other cancers. Perceiving incidence to be high was associated with reporting worries about the disease. With respect to the screening process, 78.3% believe that the smear abnormality rate is higher than it actually is, and only 7.6% correctly appreciate that the abnormality rate is highest at younger ages. With respect to performance, 16.3% believed the smear test to be completely accurate, and more than half overestimated the likely number of cancer cases prevented by screening. While certain cervical cancer risk factors were correctly assigned by the majority of women, undue emphasis was placed on genetic influence, while the risks posed by human papillomavirus infection were unfamiliar to almost half of the sample. We conclude that women typically possess only a partial picture of risk factors and overestimate both the incidence of cervical cancer and the efficacy of screening.

  10. Increase in cervical cancer mortality in Spain, 1951-1991

    PubMed Central

    Llorca, J.; Prieto, M. D.; Delgado-Rodriguez, M.

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The trend in cervical cancer mortality in Spain from 1951 to 1991 is examined. METHODS: Analysis of national mortality statistics calculating age standardised mortality rates and an age-period cohort analysis. A fit to the Gompertz function was made to estimate the influence of the environmental factors on the mortality rates evolution. MAIN RESULTS: The age standardised mortality rate in Spain is lower than in other developed countries (USA or Estonia) and equal to Norwegian and Finland rates; but whereas in these countries the trend is to decrease, the Spanish rate has increased during this period, because of a cohort effect. A misclassification bias could be responsible for the trend in women aged 40 and older but the increasing trend in younger women could not be interpreted as espurious. The Gompertzian analysis suggests an increase in environmental factors causing cervical cancer. CONCLUSIONS: Cervical cancer mortality rates are increasing in Spain because of environmental factors.   PMID:10492733

  11. The epidemiology of hypopharynx and cervical esophagus cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bertesteanu, SVG; Mirea, D; Grigore, R; Ionescu, D; Popescu, B

    2010-01-01

    At the beginning of the 21st century hypopharynx and cervical esophagus cancer represents a major issue for all countries of the world. The epidemiology of the hypopharynx and cervical esophagus cancer deals with the spread of the disease in human population in regards to sex, age, profession, time and space, as well as risk factors that contribute to these phenomena. The main goal is to investigate the causes and the factors involved in the development of the tumors at the pharyngo–esophageal junction, knowledge that contributes to latest therapeutic assessment through interdisciplinary collaboration (E.N.T. surgeon, general surgeon, radiation oncologist, chemotherapist, nutritionist). The epidemiology of the hypopharynx and cervical esophagus cancer includes three major areas of interest: descriptive (the study of the spread in mass population), analytical (the study of causal risk factors on the disease) and experimental (that verifies by experiments on animals the prior identified hypothesis). PMID:21254737

  12. Young women's perspectives on cervical cancer prevention in Appalachian Kentucky.

    PubMed

    Head, Katharine J; Cohen, Elisia L

    2012-04-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination coupled with routine Papanicolaou (Pap) tests can prevent pervasive HPV infections causing cervical cancer. However, both HPV vaccination rates and Pap testing rates in Appalachian Kentucky are lower among all age groups than the rest of the United States. We recruited 19 young women residing in Appalachian Kentucky from university-based and rural clinical settings for group and individual interviews. After considering an integrated behavioral framework, we illustrate these women's perspectives by detailing five themes, including (a) experiential beliefs pose barriers to performing behaviors, (b) three vaccine doses complicate vaccination intention, (c) women have misunderstandings about HPV and the HPV vaccination function, (d) normative influences cue action (and inaction), and (e) specific environmental and contextual barriers exist to performing cervical cancer prevention behaviors in Appalachian Kentucky. These findings related to cervical cancer prevention in Appalachian Kentucky have implications for health-message design and clinical practice.

  13. Cervical cancer screening in Malaysia: Are targeted interventions necessary?

    PubMed

    Dunn, Richard A; Tan, Andrew K G

    2010-09-01

    This study examines the determinants of Papanicolaou Smear Test (PST) screening for cervical cancer among women in Malaysia. Attention is focused on the reasons different population subgroups give for non-screening. We find that Indian women are the least likely to have had a PST and also the least likely to know the reasons why one is screened. Malay women are less likely than Chinese women to have received a PST and are more likely to report embarrassment as the reason for not being tested. Urban women are less likely than rural women to have been tested and more likely to state lack of time as the reason. These results suggest targeted interventions may be necessary to increase screening rates in Malaysia.

  14. Low Proteolytic Clipping of Histone H3 in Cervical Cancer.

    PubMed

    Sandoval-Basilio, Jorge; Serafín-Higuera, Nicolás; Reyes-Hernandez, Octavio D; Serafín-Higuera, Idanya; Leija-Montoya, Gabriela; Blanco-Morales, Magali; Sierra-Martínez, Monica; Ramos-Mondragon, Roberto; García, Silvia; López-Hernández, Luz Berenice; Yocupicio-Monroy, Martha; Alcaraz-Estrada, Sofia L

    2016-01-01

    Chromatin in cervical cancer (CC) undergoes chemical and structural changes that alter the expression pattern of genes. Recently, a potential mechanism, which regulates gene expression at transcriptional levels is the proteolytic clipping of histone H3. However, until now this process in CC has not been reported. Using HeLa cells as a model of CC and human samples from patients with CC, we identify that the H3 cleavage was lower in CC compared with control tissue. Additionally, the histone H3 clipping was performed by serine and aspartyl proteases in HeLa cells. These results suggest that histone H3 clipping operates as part of post-translational modification system in CC.

  15. Low Proteolytic Clipping of Histone H3 in Cervical Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sandoval-Basilio, Jorge; Serafín-Higuera, Nicolás; Reyes-Hernandez, Octavio D.; Serafín-Higuera, Idanya; Leija-Montoya, Gabriela; Blanco-Morales, Magali; Sierra-Martínez, Monica; Ramos-Mondragon, Roberto; García, Silvia; López-Hernández, Luz Berenice; Yocupicio-Monroy, Martha; Alcaraz-Estrada, Sofia L.

    2016-01-01

    Chromatin in cervical cancer (CC) undergoes chemical and structural changes that alter the expression pattern of genes. Recently, a potential mechanism, which regulates gene expression at transcriptional levels is the proteolytic clipping of histone H3. However, until now this process in CC has not been reported. Using HeLa cells as a model of CC and human samples from patients with CC, we identify that the H3 cleavage was lower in CC compared with control tissue. Additionally, the histone H3 clipping was performed by serine and aspartyl proteases in HeLa cells. These results suggest that histone H3 clipping operates as part of post-translational modification system in CC. PMID:27698925

  16. Human papillomavirus and invasive cervical cancer in Brazil.

    PubMed Central

    Eluf-Neto, J.; Booth, M.; Muñoz, N.; Bosch, F. X.; Meijer, C. J.; Walboomers, J. M.

    1994-01-01

    A hospital-based case-control study was undertaken to examine the role of human papillomavirus (HPV) in the development of invasive cervical cancer in Brazil. The study included 199 histologically confirmed incident cases and 225 age-frequency-matched controls selected from a wide range of diagnostic categories. A polymerase chain reaction technique was used to detect HPV DNA in cervical specimens collected with spatula and brush. HPV DNA was detected in 84% of the cases compared with 17% of controls. Grouping HPV types 16, 18, 31 and 33, 66% of the cases were positive compared with only 6% of the controls. In addition to HPV, number of sexual partners, early age at first intercourse, parity and duration of oral contraceptive use were significantly associated with an increased risk of cervical cancer. A history of previous Papanicolaou smears was significantly associated with a decreased risk. After adjustment, only presence of HPV DNA, parity and history of previous smears remained as independent risk factors. The adjusted odds ratios of cervical cancer associated with HPV 16, 18, 31, and 33 was 69.7 (95% confidence interval 28.7-169.6) and with unidentified types was 12.0 (5.1-28.5). The very high risks found in this study further implicate this virus in the aetiology of cervical cancer. PMID:8286192

  17. Innovations in the treatment of invasive cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Stehman, Frederick B; Rose, Peter G; Greer, Benjamin E; Roy, Michel; Plante, Marie; Penalver, Manuel; Jhingran, Anuja; Eifel, Patricia; Montz, Fredrick; Wharton, J Taylor

    2003-11-01

    Invasive cervical cancer is characterized by basement membrane-invading lesions capable of metastasizing through the lymphatic and vascular systems. Treatment methods were reviewed by panelists at the Second International Conference on Cervical Cancer (Houston, TX, April 11-14, 2002), and new opportunities for translational research were discussed. Reviews encompassed hysterectomy with or without lymph node dissection or cervical conization in cases with microinvasion and radical trachelectomy with or without lymph node dissection as fertility-sparing surgery. Chemoradiation is used to treat advanced cervical malignancies, and the risks and benefits of radiotherapy are significant. Pelvic exenteration is used to treat certain types of recurrences. Use of the Miami pouch for continent urinary diversion was highlighted. Gynecologic oncologists expect novel in vivo imaging techniques currently being developed to help guide therapy choices within the next decade. The most significant research priorities are large group-randomized trials involving fertility-sparing procedures and the management of microinvasive carcinoma (MICA); better identification of candidates for chemoradiation; and the development of innovative approaches to exenteration. Improving diagnostic technologies, refining the criteria by which therapies are chosen, and preserving fertility remain challenges in selecting the most appropriate treatment for invasive cervical cancer. Research advances in both diagnosis and treatment are expected to improve therapy and outcomes. Copyright 2003 American Cancer Society.

  18. Cervical cancer: is herpes simplex virus type II a cofactor?

    PubMed Central

    Jones, C

    1995-01-01

    In many ways, cervical cancer behaves as a sexually transmitted disease. The major risk factors are multiple sexual partners and early onset of sexual activity. Although high-risk types of human papillomaviruses (HPV) play an important role in the development of nearly all cases of cervical cancer, other sexually transmitted infectious agents may be cofactors. Herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) is transmitted primarily by sexual contact and therefore has been implicated as a risk factor. Several independent studies suggest that HSV-2 infections correlate with a higher than normal incidence of cervical cancer. In contrast, other epidemiological studies have concluded that infection with HSV-2 is not a major risk factor. Two separate transforming domains have been identified within the HSV-2 genome, but continued viral gene expression apparently is not necessary for neoplastic transformation. HSV infections lead to unscheduled cellular DNA synthesis, chromosomal amplifications, and mutations. These observations suggest that HSV-2 is not a typical DNA tumor virus. It is hypothesized that persistent or abortive infections induce permanent genetic alterations that interfere with differentiation of cervical epithelium and subsequently induce abnormal proliferation. Thus, HSV-2 may be a cofactor in some but not all cases of cervical cancer. PMID:8665469

  19. Breaking the DNA damage response to improve cervical cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Wieringa, Hylke W; van der Zee, Ate G J; de Vries, Elisabeth G E; van Vugt, Marcel A T M

    2016-01-01

    Every year, cervical cancer affects ∼500,000 women worldwide, and ∼275,000 patients die of this disease. The addition of platin-based chemotherapy to primary radiotherapy has increased 5-year survival of advanced-stage cervical cancer patients, which is, however, still only 66%. One of the factors thought to contribute to treatment failure is the ability of tumor cells to repair chemoradiotherapy-induced DNA damage. Therefore, sensitization of tumor cells for chemoradiotherapy via inhibition of the DNA damage response (DDR) as a novel strategy to improve therapy effect, is currently studied pre-clinically as well as in the clinic. Almost invariably, cervical carcinogenesis involves infection with the human papillomavirus (HPV), which inactivates part of the DNA damage response. This HPV-mediated partial inactivation of the DDR presents therapeutic targeting of the residual DDR as an interesting approach to achieve chemoradio-sensitization for cervical cancer. How the DDR can be most efficiently targeted, however, remains unclear. The fact that cisplatin and radiotherapy activate multiple signaling axes within the DDR further complicates a rational choice of therapeutic targets within the DDR. In this review, we provide an overview of the current preclinical and clinical knowledge about targeting the DDR in cervical cancer.

  20. Prevalence and risk factors for cervical cancer and pre-cancerous lesions in Rwanda.

    PubMed

    Makuza, Jean Damascène; Nsanzimana, Sabin; Muhimpundu, Marie Aimee; Pace, Lydia Eleanor; Ntaganira, Joseph; Riedel, David James

    2015-01-01

    Cervical cancer prevalence in Rwanda has not been well-described. Visual inspection with acetic acid or Lugol solution has been shown to be effective for cervical cancer screening in low resource settings. The aim of the study is to understand the prevalence and risk factors for cervical cancer and pre- cancerous lesions among Rwandan women between 30 and 50 old undergoing screening. This cross-sectional analytical study was done in 3 districts of Rwanda from October 2010 to June 2013. Women aged 30 to 50 years screened for cervical cancer by trained doctors, nurses and midwives. Prevalence of pre-cancerous and cancerous cervical lesions was determined. Bivariate and multivariate logistic regressions were used to assess risk factors associated with cervical cancer. The prevalence of pre-cancer and invasive cervical cancer was 5.9% (95% CI 4.5, 7.5) and 1.7% (95% CI 0.9, 2.5), respectively. Risk factors associated with cervical cancer in multivariate analysis included initiation of sexual activity at less than 20 years (OR=1.75; 95% CI=(1.01, 3.03); being unmarried (single, divorced and widowed) (OR=3.29; 95% CI=( 1.26, 8.60)); Older age of participants (OR= 0.52; 95% CI= (0.28, 0.97)), older age at the first pregnancy (OR=2.10; 95% CI=(1.20, 3.67) and higher number of children born (OR=0.42; 95%CI =(0.23, 0.76)) were protective. Cervical cancer continues to be a public health problem in Rwanda, but screening using VIA is practical and feasible even in rural settings.

  1. Prevalence and risk factors for cervical cancer and pre-cancerous lesions in Rwanda

    PubMed Central

    Makuza, Jean Damascène; Nsanzimana, Sabin; Muhimpundu, Marie Aimee; Pace, Lydia Eleanor; Ntaganira, Joseph; Riedel, David James

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Cervical cancer prevalence in Rwanda has not been well-described. Visual inspection with acetic acid or Lugol solution has been shown to be effective for cervical cancer screening in low resource settings. The aim of the study is to understand the prevalence and risk factors for cervical cancer and pre- cancerous lesions among Rwandan women between 30 and 50 old undergoing screening. Methods This cross-sectional analytical study was done in 3 districts of Rwanda from October 2010 to June 2013. Women aged 30 to 50 years screened for cervical cancer by trained doctors, nurses and midwives. Prevalence of pre-cancerous and cancerous cervical lesions was determined. Bivariate and multivariate logistic regressions were used to assess risk factors associated with cervical cancer. Results The prevalence of pre-cancer and invasive cervical cancer was 5.9% (95% CI 4.5, 7.5) and 1.7% (95% CI 0.9, 2.5), respectively. Risk factors associated with cervical cancer in multivariate analysis included initiation of sexual activity at less than 20 years (OR=1.75; 95% CI=(1.01, 3.03); being unmarried (single, divorced and widowed) (OR=3.29; 95% CI=( 1.26, 8.60)); Older age of participants (OR= 0.52; 95% CI= (0.28, 0.97)), older age at the first pregnancy (OR=2.10; 95% CI=(1.20, 3.67) and higher number of children born (OR=0.42; 95%CI =(0.23, 0.76)) were protective. Conclusion Cervical cancer continues to be a public health problem in Rwanda, but screening using VIA is practical and feasible even in rural settings. PMID:26664527

  2. Rotating-shield brachytherapy for cervical cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Wenjun; Kim, Yusung; Wu, Xiaodong; Song, Qi; Liu, Yunlong; Bhatia, Sudershan K.; Sun, Wenqing; Flynn, Ryan T.

    2013-06-01

    In this treatment planning study, the potential benefits of a rotating shield brachytherapy (RSBT) technique based on a partially-shielded electronic brachytherapy source were assessed for treating cervical cancer. Conventional intracavitary brachytherapy (ICBT), intracavitary plus supplementary interstitial (IS+ICBT), and RSBT treatment plans for azimuthal emission angles of 180° (RSBT-180) and 45° (RSBT-45) were generated for five patients. For each patient, high-risk clinical target volume (HR-CTV) equivalent dose in 2 Gy fractions (EQD2) (α/β = 10 Gy) was escalated until bladder, rectum, or sigmoid colon tolerance EQD2 values were reached. External beam radiotherapy dose (1.8 Gy × 25) was accounted for, and brachytherapy was assumed to have been delivered in 5 fractions. IS+ICBT provided a greater HR-CTV D90 (minimum EQD2 to the hottest 90%) than ICBT. D90 was greater for RSBT-45 than IS+ICBT for all five patients, and greater for RSBT-180 than IS+ICBT for two patients. When the RSBT-45/180 plan with the lowest HR-CTV D90 that was greater than the D90 the ICBT or IS+ICBT plan was selected, the average (range) of D90 increases for RSBT over ICBT and IS+ICBT were 16.2 (6.3-27.2)and 8.5 (0.03-20.16) Gy, respectively. The average (range) treatment time increase per fraction of RSBT was 34.56 (3.68-70.41) min over ICBT and 34.59 (3.57-70.13) min over IS+ICBT. RSBT can increase D90 over ICBT and IS+ICBT without compromising organ-at-risk sparing. The D90 and treatment time improvements from RSBT depend on the patient and shield emission angle.

  3. Cervical cancer screening among women aged 18-30 years - United States, 2000-2010.

    PubMed

    2013-01-04

    Screening women for cervical cancer can save lives. However, among young women, cervical cancer is relatively rare, and too-frequent screening can lead to high costs and adverse events associated with overtreatment. Before 2012, cervical cancer screening guidelines of the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG), American Cancer Society (ACS), and U.S. Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) differed on age to start and how often to get screened for cervical cancer. In 2012, however, all three organizations recommended that 1) screening by Papanicolau (Pap) test should not be used for women aged <21 years, regardless of initiation of sexual activity, and 2) a screening interval of 3 years should be maintained for women aged 21-30 years. ACS and ACOG explicitly recommend against yearly screening. To assess trends in Pap testing before the new guidelines were introduced, CDC analyzed 2000-2010 data from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) for women aged 18-30 years. CDC found that, among women aged 18-21 years, the percentage reporting never having been screened increased from 26.3% in 2000 to 47.5% in 2010, and the proportion reporting having had a Pap test in the past 12 months decreased from 65.0% to 41.5%. Among those aged 22-30 years, the proportion reporting having had a Pap test within the preceding 12 months decreased from 78.1% to 67.0%. These findings showed that Pap testing practices for young women have been moving toward the latest guidelines. However, the data also showed a concerning trend: among women aged 22-30 years, who should be screened every 3 years, the proportion who reported never having had a Pap test increased from 6.6% to 9.0%. More effort is needed to promote acceptance of the latest evidence-based recommendations so that all women receive the maximal benefits of cervical cancer screening.

  4. Brain metastasis in patients with uterine cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Jong Ha; Yoo, Heon Jong; Lim, Myong Cheol; Seo, Sang-Soo; Kang, Sokbom; Kim, Joo-Young; Park, Sang-Yoon

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the features of patients with brain metastasis from cervical cancer. The medical records of patients with cervical cancer between February 2001 and June 2011 were reviewed retrospectively. Clinical characteristics, symptoms, treatment and survival in patients with brain metastasis were analyzed.   Eleven patients with brain metastasis from cervical cancer were identified, representing an incidence of brain metastasis in the study population of 0.45%. Median patient age at initial diagnosis of cervical cancer was 50 years (range 33-75 years). Non-squamous cell carcinoma was diagnosed in six (54.5%) of the 11 patients, with small cell carcinoma diagnosed in two patients. Ten of the 11 patients had lung-related metastasis at presentation; eight patients had lung metastasis, one had mediastinal lymph node metastasis, and one had pleural metastasis. The median interval from diagnosis of cervical cancer to identification of brain metastasis was 15.4 months (range 3.4-83.3 months). Nine patients presented with neurologic symptoms, such as headache, nausea, vomiting, seizure and extremity weakness. Initially, six patients received whole brain radiotherapy: three patients received chemotherapy; one underwent surgery; and one patient refused treatment. The median survival time after diagnosis of the brain metastases was 5.9 months (range 0.7-19 months). The prognosis after diagnosis of the brain metastasis in patients with uterine cervical cancer is poor. The small cell type and lung metastasis seem to be related with brain metastasis and may be regarded as risk factors. © 2012 The Authors. Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology Research © 2012 Japan Society of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  5. Immunosuppression in cervical cancer with special reference to arginase activity.

    PubMed

    Bedoya, Astrid M; Tate, David J; Baena, Armando; Córdoba, Carlos M; Borrero, Mauricio; Pareja, René; Rojas, Fredy; Patterson, John R; Herrero, Rolando; Zea, Arnold H; Sanchez, Gloria I

    2014-10-01

    Cervical cancer is characterized by an immunosuppressive microenvironment and a Th2-type cytokine profile. Expression of arginase (ASE), the enzyme that converts L-arginine into L-ornithine and urea, is stimulated by Th2-type cytokines. To assess the association of ASE activity and L-Arg metabolism products with cervical cancer. Sera of 87 and 41 women with histologically confirmed by colposcopy-directed biopsy SCC and CIN3 respectively and 79 with normal cytology or Low-Grade Squamous Intraepithelial Lesion (LSIL), were evaluated. Cytokines were measured using Milliplex Human cytokine/chemokine kit. Arginase (ASE) activity was determined using an enzymatic assay. Levels of L-arginine, L-ornithine, putrescine and spermine were determined by HPLC. Significantly higher levels of ASE activity were observed in women with CIN3 (age-adjusted OR: 24.3; 95%CI: 3.82-155) and SCC (AOR: 9.8; 95%CI: 2.34-40.8). As expected, possibly due to high levels of ASE activity, higher levels of l-Arg were negatively associated with CIN3 (AOR: 0.03; 95%CI: 0.004-0.19) and SSC (AOR: 0.06; 95%CI: 0.02-0.24). Consistent with the role of ASE in the conversion of L-arginine to L-ornithine and polyamine production therefrom, women with cervical cancer had higher levels of spermine and putrescine. A correlation analysis revealed a significant albeit weak relationship between high levels of IL-10 and high levels of ASE (Pearson r=0.32, p-value=0.003) in women with cervical cancer. This study indicates that ASE activity and L-Arg degradation mechanisms of immunosuppression are present in cervical cancer. The results foster research in the design of possible strategies to inhibit ASE activity for therapy of cervical cancer. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Production lost due to cervical cancer in Poland in 2012.

    PubMed

    Dubas-Jakóbczyk, Katarzyna; Kocot, Ewa; Seweryn, Michał; Koperny, Magdalena

    Poland has one of the highest cervical cancer mortality rates in Europe. It is related to the problem of late diagnosis and low attendance rate in screening programs. The objective of the study has been to assess the annual production loss due to the cervical cancer morbidity and mortality in Poland in 2012. The outcomes have been to provide comprehensive information on cervical cancer's influence on population's ability to work and its overall economic burden for the society. The study has also provided the methodological framework for disease-related production losses in Polish settings. The human capital method was used. The production losses were calculated in both monetary and quantitative terms (working days lost) due to 4 following reasons: 1) temporary disability to work, 2) permanent disability, 3) informal care, and 4) mortality. Cervical cancer resulted in approx. 702 964 working days lost in 2012 due to absence at work for both patients and care givers and a total number of 957 678 working days lost due to patients' mortality. The total value of production lost was assessed at 111.4 million euros. More than 66% of this value was attributed to women's mortality. The calculation of production lost due to cervical cancer burden provides strong evidence to support adequate health promotion and disease prevention actions. Actions promoting cervical cancer screening should be intensified including workplace health promotion activities. Med Pr 2016;67(3):289-299. This work is available in Open Access model and licensed under a CC BY-NC 3.0 PL license.

  7. [Human papilloma virus and cervical cancer. An historical review on the development of research on cancer of the cervix uteri in Venezuela].

    PubMed

    García-Tamayo, Jorge; Molina, Julia; Blasco-Olaetxea, Eduardo

    2010-06-01

    The history on the relationship of VPH infection and cervical cancer was examined. Findings were initially reported in Maracaibo(1971), later in Mexico(1973) and thereafter several studies on the ultrastructure and immunohistochemistry of VPH infection and its role on cervical cancer were described. The ultrastructural findings of viral particles of HPV and their proteins, as well as their role in the incorporation of the viral genome to the human cervical cells were also described. Glycoproteins on the surface of cervical cells were reviewed and their importance on HPV infection was related to p16, blood group antigens and early genetic changes in the cell cycle with loss of heterozigocity, all of which, stimulated by the high risk HPV infection lead to cervical cancer.

  8. [Remodeling of angiogenesis and lymphangiogenesis in cervical cancer development].

    PubMed

    Kurmyshkina, O V; Belova, L L; Kovchur, P I; Volkova, T O

    2015-01-01

    Ability to stimulate angiogenesis/lymphangiogenesis is recognized as an inherent feature of cancer cells providing necessary conditions for their growth and dissemination. "Angiogenic switch" is one of the earliest consequences of malignant transformation that encompasses a great number of genes and triggers a complex set of signaling cascades in endothelial cells. The processes of tumor microvasculature development are closely connected to the steps of carcinogenesis (from benign lesions to invasive forms) and occur through multiple deviations from the norm. Analysis of expression of proangiogenic factors at successive steps of cervical cancer development (intraepithelial neoplasia, cancer in situ, microinvasive, and invasive cancer) enables to reconstruct the regulatory mechanisms of (lymph-)angiogenesis and to discriminate the most important components. This review presents detailed analysis of literature data on expression of the key regulators of angiogenesis in cervical intraepithelial neoplasia and cervical cancer. Their possible involvement in molecular mechanisms of neoplastic transformation of epithelial cells, as well as invasion and tumor metastasis is discussed. Correlation between expression of proangiogenic molecular factors and various clinicopathological parameters is considered, the potential of their use in molecular diagnostics and targeted therapy of cervical cancer is reviewed. Particular attention is paid to relatively poorly studied regulators of lymphangiogenesis and "non-VEGF dependent", or alternative, angiogenic pathways that constitute the prospect of future research in the field.

  9. Representations of vaginal symptoms in cervical cancer survivors.

    PubMed

    Tornatta, Jennifer M; Carpenter, Janet S; Schilder, Jeanne; Cardenes, Higinia R

    2009-01-01

    No research has investigated patients' representations of the vaginal symptoms commonly experienced after cervical cancer treatment. Leventhal's Self-regulation or Common Sense Model was used to explore these representations and their relationships with quality of life after cervical cancer. Women posttreatment for cervical cancer (n = 26) from a Midwest cancer center provided information on symptom representations for their 3 most bothersome symptoms and also completed a quality-of-life scale. Women perceived vaginal symptoms as mild to moderate overall but rated approximately one-third of 11 different symptoms as severe. Symptoms identified most frequently as the most bothersome were painful intercourse (23%), decrease in sexual desire (15%), and vaginal dryness (12%). On average, symptoms were mildly distressing and acute, had a minimal effect on life, and were associated with an indeterminate degree of perceived control. Cause was attributed equally to treatment and to the cancer. Quality of life was below normed data, to a degree consistent with a minimally important difference for total well-being scores and physical, emotional, and functional well-being. Emotional and consequence representations were significantly related to quality of life. Understanding and altering symptom representations may improve quality of life for women treated for cervical cancer.

  10. Case-control study of oestrogen replacement therapy and risk of cervical cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Parazzini, F.; La Vecchia, C.; Negri, E.; Franceschi, S.; Moroni, S.; Chatenoud, L.; Bolis, G.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine the relation between use of oestrogen replacement therapy and risk of cervical cancer. DESIGN: Case-control study. SETTING: Northern Italy. SUBJECTS: 645 women aged 40-75 years with cervical cancer admitted between 1981 and 1993 to university and general hospitals. The control group consisted of 749 women aged 40-75 years admitted to the same hospitals with acute conditions judged to be unrelated to any of the known or suspected risk factors for cervical cancer. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Use of oestrogen replacement therapy and risk of cervical cancer. RESULTS: 40 cases versus 86 controls had ever used oestrogens, and the corresponding multivariate odds ratio was 0.5 (95% confidence interval 0.3 to 0.8). The odds ratios of cervical cancer decreased with duration of use, being 0.6 (0.4 to 1.1) for less than 12 months' use and 0.5 (0.2 to 1.0) for use for 12 months or more compared with never users. The protection tended to be somewhat stronger for women reporting first oestrogen use before age 50. The odds ratio was 0.9 (0.5 to 1.7) for women who had taken oestrogens within the past 10 years and 0.4 (0.2 to 0.7) for those who had taken them 10 or more years ago. CONCLUSION: These findings suggest that exogenous oestrogens do not increase the risk of cervical cancer and may decrease the risk. PMID:9240046

  11. The acceptability of vaginal smear self-collection for screening for cervical cancer: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Braz, Natalia Serrano Doratioto Faria; Lorenzi, Noely Paula Cristina; Sorpreso, Isabel Cristina Esposito; de Aguiar, Lana Maria; Baracat, Edmund Chada; Soares, José Maria

    2017-01-01

    Cervical cancer is a major cause of death in adult women. However, many women do not undergo cervical cancer screening for the following reasons: fear, shame, physical limitations, cultural or religious considerations and lack of access to health care services. Self-collected vaginal smears maybe an alternative means of including more women in cervical cancer screening programs. The objective of this systematic review was to evaluate the acceptability of vaginal smear self-collection for cervical cancer screening. We selected articles from PubMed, the Cochrane Library and Embase that were published between January 1995 and April 2016. Studies written in English, French, Italian, Portuguese or Spanish that involved women between 18 and 69 years of age who had engaged in sexual intercourse were included in this review. The review was performed in accordance with the PRISMA (Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses) statement. Nineteen studies were ultimately evaluated in this review. Most of the included studies (n=17) demonstrated that the self-collection method exhibited outstanding acceptability among women with respect to cervical cancer screening, and only two studies indicated that self-collection exhibited low acceptability among women in this context. The acceptability of self-collection was determined subjectively (without standardized questionnaires) in 10 studies (53%) and via structured and validated questionnaires in the remaining studies. The results of our review suggest that the self-collection method is well-accepted and may therefore encourage greater participation in cervical cancer screening programs. However, additional studies are required to verify these results. PMID:28355365

  12. Roles of plant extracts and constituents in cervical cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Kma, Lakhan

    2013-01-01

    Cervical cancer is a major health problem worldwide and is the most frequent cause of cancer in women in India. Early detection and affordable drugs with clinical efficacy have to go hand-in-hand in order to comprehensibly address this serious health challenge. Plant-based drugs with potent anticancer effects should add to the efforts to find a cheap drug with limited clinical side effects. Keeping this very purpose in mind, an attempt has been made in this review to explore the potential of plant extracts or constituents known to exhibit antitumorigenic activity or exert cytotoxic effect in human cervical carcinoma cells. Alkaloids such as those isolated from C. vincetoxicum and T. Tanakae, naucleaorals A and B, isolated from the roots of N. orientalis, (6aR)-normecambroline, isolated from the bark of N. dealbata appear promising in different human cervical carcinoma cells with the IC50 of 4.0-8 μg/mL. However, other compounds such as rhinacanthone and neolignans isolated from different plants are not far behind and kill cervical cancer cells at a very low concentrations. Among plant extracts or its constituents that enhance the effect of known anticancer drugs, noni, derived from the plant M. citrifolia perhaps is the best candidate. The cytotoxic potency and apoptotic index of cisplatin was found to significantly enhanced in combination with noni in different human cervical carcinoma cells and it therefore holds significance as promising herbal-based anticancer agent. However, efficacy needs to be further investigated in various cervical cell lines and more importantly, in in vivo cervical cancer models for possible use as an alternative and safe anticancer drug.

  13. Cervical Cancer Screening and Prevention in 78 Sexually Transmitted Disease Clinics-United States, 2014-2015.

    PubMed

    McGinnis, Emily; Meyerson, Beth E; Meites, Elissa; Saraiya, Mona; Griesse, Rebecca; Snoek, Emily; Haderxhanaj, Laura; Markowitz, Lauri E; Smith, William

    2017-10-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) infections cause approximately 30,700 cancers annually among US men and women, cervical cancer being the most common. Human papillomavirus vaccination is recommended routinely for US girls and boys at age 11 to 12 years, and for those not previously vaccinated, through age 26 and 21 years for women and men, respectively. Our objective was to assess current cervical cancer screening and HPV vaccination practices among sexually transmitted disease (STD) clinics in the United States. We surveyed a geographically diverse convenience sample of US STD clinics identified by members of the National Coalition of STD Directors within 65 state, territorial, and local jurisdictions. An online multiple-choice survey about clinical services was administered to clinic directors or designees during October 2014 to February 2015. Survey respondents included 78 clinics from 46 states and territories. Of these clinics, 31 (39.7%) offered both cervical cancer screening and HPV vaccination, 6 (7.7%) offered cervical cancer screening only, 21 (26.9%) offered HPV vaccination only, and 20 (25.6%) offered neither cervical cancer prevention service. Among those not offering the service, the most commonly reported barrier to cervical cancer screening was time constraints (25/41, 61.0%); for HPV vaccination it was reimbursement (11/26, 42.3%). By early 2015, in a geographically diverse group of 78 STD clinics, 39.7% provided nationally recommended HPV vaccination and cervical cancer screening, whereas 25.6% provided neither. Further research could identify strategies for STD clinics to reduce HPV-associated cancers by increasing provision of HPV vaccination and cervical cancer screening services, particularly among medically underserved populations.

  14. Vaginal Enterobius vermicularis diagnosed on liquid-based cytology during papanicolaou test cervical cancer screening: A report of two cases and a review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Chun-Yi; Junod, Rachel; Jacot-Guillarmod, Martine; Beniere, Charles; Ziadi, Sonia; Bongiovanni, Massimo

    2017-09-14

    Enterobiasis is one of the most common human parasitic infections. It is considered an intestinal parasite, but cases of extra-intestinal affections exist, notably infections of the female genital tract. Enterobius vermicularis (EV) eggs (or ova) have been found in the cervical smears of two patients in our institute during the last 16 years. No gynaecological or gastrointestinal symptoms were reported, and there was no known intestinal infection in these two cases. A review of the available literature revealed rare cases of vaginal enterobiasis, with a wide range of clinical presentations, many patients being asymptomatic. The diagnosis may sometimes be difficult, mainly because of the lack of clinical suspicion. However, cytological identification of EV in cervico-vaginal smears is important, especially when considering the risk of ascending infections of the genital tract associated with severe complications. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Cervical Cancer Screening in a Sexually Transmitted Disease Clinic: Screening Adoption Experiences From a Midwestern Clinic

    PubMed Central

    Sayegh, M. Aaron; Davis, Alissa; Arno, Janet N.; Zimet, Gregory D.; LeMonte, Ann M.; Williams, James A.; Barclay, Lynn; Van Der Pol, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. We examined whether a sexually transmitted disease (STD) clinic could reach women who had not received a Papanicolau (Pap) test in the past 3 years. We also explored staff attitudes and implementation of cervical cancer screening. Methods. Women (n = 123) aged 30 to 50 years were offered cervical cancer screening in an Indiana STD clinic. We measured effectiveness by the patients' self-reported last Pap test. We explored adoption of screening through focus groups with 34 staff members by documenting their attitudes about cervical cancer screening and screening strategy adaptation. We also documented recruitment and screening implementation. Results. Almost half (47.9%) of participants reported a last Pap test 3 or more years previously; 30% had reported a last Pap more than 5 years ago, and 11.4% had a high-risk test outcome that required referral to colposcopy. Staff supported screening because of mission alignment and perceived patient benefit. Screening adaptations included eligibility, results provision, and follow-up. Conclusions. Cervical cancer screening was possible and potentially beneficial in STD clinics. Future effectiveness-implementation studies should expand to include all female patients, and should examine the degree to which adaptation of selected adoption frameworks is feasible. PMID:25689199

  16. Cervical cancer screening in a sexually transmitted disease clinic: screening adoption experiences from a midwestern clinic.

    PubMed

    Meyerson, Beth E; Sayegh, M Aaron; Davis, Alissa; Arno, Janet N; Zimet, Gregory D; LeMonte, Ann M; Williams, James A; Barclay, Lynn; Van Der Pol, Barbara

    2015-04-01

    We examined whether a sexually transmitted disease (STD) clinic could reach women who had not received a Papanicolau (Pap) test in the past 3 years. We also explored staff attitudes and implementation of cervical cancer screening. Women (n = 123) aged 30 to 50 years were offered cervical cancer screening in an Indiana STD clinic. We measured effectiveness by the patients' self-reported last Pap test. We explored adoption of screening through focus groups with 34 staff members by documenting their attitudes about cervical cancer screening and screening strategy adaptation. We also documented recruitment and screening implementation. Almost half (47.9%) of participants reported a last Pap test 3 or more years previously; 30% had reported a last Pap more than 5 years ago, and 11.4% had a high-risk test outcome that required referral to colposcopy. Staff supported screening because of mission alignment and perceived patient benefit. Screening adaptations included eligibility, results provision, and follow-up. Cervical cancer screening was possible and potentially beneficial in STD clinics. Future effectiveness-implementation studies should expand to include all female patients, and should examine the degree to which adaptation of selected adoption frameworks is feasible.

  17. A Gompertzian model with random effects to cervical cancer growth

    SciTech Connect

    Mazlan, Mazma Syahidatul Ayuni; Rosli, Norhayati

    2015-05-15

    In this paper, a Gompertzian model with random effects is introduced to describe the cervical cancer growth. The parameters values of the mathematical model are estimated via maximum likehood estimation. We apply 4-stage Runge-Kutta (SRK4) for solving the stochastic model numerically. The efficiency of mathematical model is measured by comparing the simulated result and the clinical data of the cervical cancer growth. Low values of root mean-square error (RMSE) of Gompertzian model with random effect indicate good fits.

  18. Brachytherapy in the treatment of cervical cancer: a review

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Robyn; Kamrava, Mitchell

    2014-01-01

    Dramatic advances have been made in brachytherapy for cervical cancer. Radiation treatment planning has evolved from two-dimensional to three-dimensional, incorporating magnetic resonance imaging and/or computed tomography into the treatment paradigm. This allows for better delineation and coverage of the tumor, as well as improved avoidance of surrounding organs. Consequently, advanced brachytherapy can achieve very high rates of local control with a reduction in morbidity, compared with historic approaches. This review provides an overview of state-of-the-art gynecologic brachytherapy, with a focus on recent advances and their implications for women with cervical cancer. PMID:24920937

  19. Gompertzian stochastic model with delay effect to cervical cancer growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazlan, Mazma Syahidatul Ayuni binti; Rosli, Norhayati binti; Bahar, Arifah

    2015-02-01

    In this paper, a Gompertzian stochastic model with time delay is introduced to describe the cervical cancer growth. The parameters values of the mathematical model are estimated via Levenberg-Marquardt optimization method of non-linear least squares. We apply Milstein scheme for solving the stochastic model numerically. The efficiency of mathematical model is measured by comparing the simulated result and the clinical data of cervical cancer growth. Low values of Mean-Square Error (MSE) of Gompertzian stochastic model with delay effect indicate good fits.

  20. A Gompertzian model with random effects to cervical cancer growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazlan, Mazma Syahidatul Ayuni; Rosli, Norhayati

    2015-05-01

    In this paper, a Gompertzian model with random effects is introduced to describe the cervical cancer growth. The parameters values of the mathematical model are estimated via maximum likehood estimation. We apply 4-stage Runge-Kutta (SRK4) for solving the stochastic model numerically. The efficiency of mathematical model is measured by comparing the simulated result and the clinical data of the cervical cancer growth. Low values of root mean-square error (RMSE) of Gompertzian model with random effect indicate good fits.

  1. Burden of cervical cancer and role of screening in India

    PubMed Central

    Bobdey, Saurabh; Sathwara, Jignasa; Jain, Aanchal; Balasubramaniam, Ganesh

    2016-01-01

    Background: Cervical cancer is a major cause of cancer mortality in women and more than a quarter of its global burden is contributed by developing countries. In India, in spite of alarmingly high figures, there is no nationwide government-sponsored screening program. This study was conducted to assess the burden of cervical cancer in India and review the performance characteristics of available cervical cancer screening tools, so as to provide evidence-based recommendations for application of most practically suited screening test to be used in resource-poor field settings. Materials and Methods: MEDLINE and Web of Science electronic database were searched from January 1990 to December 2015, using the keywords such as “cervical cancer”, “screening”, “early detection”, “cervical cytology” and “visual inspection”, and their corresponding MeSH terms in combination with Boolean operators “OR, AND.” Two authors independently selected studies that are published in English and conducted in India. A total of 11 studies were found to be relevant and eligible to be included in the present study. Results: In India, cervical cancer contributes to approximately 6–29% of all cancers in women. The age-adjusted incidence rate of cervical cancer varies widely among registries; highest is 23.07/100,000 in Mizoram state and the lowest is 4.91/100,000 in Dibrugarh district. The pooled estimates of sensitivity and specificity of visual inspection with acetic acid (VIA), magnified VIA, visual inspection with Lugol's iodine (VILI), cytology (Pap smear), and human papillomavirus DNA were found to be 67.65% and 84.32%, 65.36% and 85.76%, 78.27% and 87.10%, 62.11% and 93.51%, and 77.81% and 91.54%, respectively. Conclusions: In developing countries because of lack of necessary infrastructure and quality control, high-quality cytology screening may not be feasible for wide-scale implementation. Hence, cervical cancer screening program based on visual screening test

  2. Gompertzian stochastic model with delay effect to cervical cancer growth

    SciTech Connect

    Mazlan, Mazma Syahidatul Ayuni binti; Rosli, Norhayati binti; Bahar, Arifah

    2015-02-03

    In this paper, a Gompertzian stochastic model with time delay is introduced to describe the cervical cancer growth. The parameters values of the mathematical model are estimated via Levenberg-Marquardt optimization method of non-linear least squares. We apply Milstein scheme for solving the stochastic model numerically. The efficiency of mathematical model is measured by comparing the simulated result and the clinical data of cervical cancer growth. Low values of Mean-Square Error (MSE) of Gompertzian stochastic model with delay effect indicate good fits.

  3. Health literacy and meeting breast and cervical cancer screening guidelines among Asians and whites in California.

    PubMed

    Sentell, Tetine; Braun, Kathryn L; Davis, James; Davis, Terry

    2015-01-01

    Empirical evidence regarding cancer screening and health literacy is mixed. Cancer is the leading cause of death in Asian Americans, yet screening rates are notably low. Using a population-based sample, we determined if health literacy: (1) was associated with breast and cervical cancer screening, and (2) helped to explain Asian cancer screening disparities. We analyzed the 2007 California Health Interview Survey for Asian (Japanese, Chinese, Filipino, Korean, Vietnamese, other Asian) and white women within age groups relevant to US Preventive Services Task Force (USPSTF) screening guidelines: cervical: ages 21-65 (n = 15,210) and breast: ages 50-74 (n = 11,163). Multilevel logistic regression models predicted meeting USPSTF screening guidelines both with and without self-reported health literacy controlling for individual-level and contextual-level factors. Low health literacy significantly (p < 0.05) predicted lower cancer screening in final models for both cancer types. In unadjusted models, Asians were significantly less likely than whites to receive both screening types and significantly more likely to report low health literacy. However, in multivariable models, the addition of the low health literacy variable did not diminish Asian vs. white cancer screening disparities. Self-reported health literacy predicted cervical and breast cancer screening, but was not able to explain Asian cancer screening disparities. We provide new evidence to support a relationship between health literacy and cancer screening. Health literacy is likely a useful focus for interventions to improve cancer screening and ultimately reduce the burden of cancer. To specifically reduce Asian cancer disparities, additional areas of focus should be considered.

  4. Cervical cancer screening: A never-ending developing program

    PubMed Central

    Comparetto, Ciro; Borruto, Franco

    2015-01-01

    With the term “oncological screening”, we define the overall performances made to detect early onset of tumors. These tests are conducted on a population that does not have any signs or symptoms related to a neoplasm. The whole population above a certain age, only one sex, only subjects with a high risk of developing cancer due to genetic, professional, discretionary reasons may be involved. Screening campaigns should be associated, when risk factors that can be avoided are known, with campaigns for the prevention of cancer by means of suitable behavior. The goal of cancer screening cannot however be limited to the diagnosis of a greater number of neoplasms. Screening will be useful only if it leads to a reduction in overall mortality or at least in mortality related to the tumor. Screening should then allow the diagnosis of the disease at a stage when there is a possibility of healing, possibility that is instead difficult when the disease is diagnosed at the appearance of signs or symptoms. This is the reason why not all campaigns of cancer screening have the same effectiveness. In Italy, every year there are about 150000 deaths due to cancer. Some of these tumors can be cured with a very high percentage of success if diagnosed in time. Cervical cancer can be diagnosed with non-invasive tests. The screening test used all over the world is Papanicolaou (Pap) test. This test may be carried out over the entire healthy population potentially exposed to the risk of contracting cancer. Public health has begun the screening campaigns in the hope of saving many of the approximately 270000 new cases of cancer reported each year. Screening is done following protocols that guarantee quality at the national level: these protocols are subject to change over time to reflect new realities or to correct any errors in the system. A simplified sketch of a possible route of cancer screening is as follows: (1) after selecting the target population, for example all women between

  5. Cucurbitacin D exhibits potent anti-cancer activity in cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sikander, Mohammed; Hafeez, Bilal Bin; Malik, Shabnam; Alsayari, Abdulrhman; Halaweish, Fathi T.; Yallapu, Murali M.; Chauhan, Subhash C.; Jaggi, Meena

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we for the first time, investigated the potential anti-cancer effects of a novel analogue of cucurbitacin (Cucurbitacin D) against cervical cancer in vitro and in vivo. Cucurbitacin D inhibited viability and growth of cervical cancer cells (CaSki and SiHa) in a dose-dependent manner. IC50 of Cucurbitacin D was recorded at 400 nM and 250 nM in CaSki and SiHa cells, respectively. Induction of apoptosis was observed in Cucurbitacin D treated cervical cancer cells as measured by enhanced Annexin V staining and cleavage in PARP protein. Cucurbitacin D treatment of cervical cancer cells arrested the cell cycle in G1/S phase, inhibited constitutive expression of E6, Cyclin D1, CDK4, pRb, and Rb and induced the protein levels of p21 and p27. Cucurbitacin D also inhibited phosphorylation of STAT3 at Ser727 and Tyr705 residues as well as its downstream target genes c-Myc, and MMP9. Cucurbitacin D enhanced the expression of tumor suppressor microRNAs (miR-145, miRNA-143, and miRNA34a) in cervical cancer cells. Cucurbitacin D treatment (1 mg/kg body weight) effectively inhibited growth of cervical cancer cells derived orthotopic xenograft tumors in athymic nude mice. These results demonstrate the potential therapeutic efficacy of Cucurbitacin D against cervical cancer. PMID:27824155

  6. Mild obesity, physical activity, calorie intake, and the risks of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia and cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae Kwan; So, Kyeong A; Piyathilake, Chandrika J; Kim, Mi Kyung

    2013-01-01

    We investigated whether obesity, physical activity, and calorie intake are associated with the risks of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) and cervical cancer. We enrolled 1125 women (age, 18-65 years) into a human papillomavirus cohort study established from 2006 to 2012. Multinomial logistic regression models were used to estimate crude and multivariate odds ratios (ORs) and the corresponding 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs), and to assess whether body mass index (BMI), height, weight, total calorie intake, and physical activity were associated with the risks of CIN and cervical cancer. Cervical cancer risk was positively associated with BMI and inversely associated with physical activity. When compared with women with a normal BMI (18.5-23 kg/m(2)), the multivariate ORs (95% CIs) for those overweight (23-25 kg/m(2)) and mild obesity (≥25 kg/m(2)) were 1.25 (0.79-2.00) and 1.70 (1.10-2.63), respectively. When compared with women with the lowest tertile of physical activity (<38.5 MET-hours/week), the ORs (95% CIs) for cervical cancer were 0.95 (0.61-1.48) and 0.61 (0.38-0.98) for women with medium physical activity (38.5-71.9 MET-hours/week) and those with high physical activity (72 MET-hours/week), respectively (p for linear trend  = 0.03). The CIN2/3 risk was inversely associated with physical activity after adjustment for confounders. Compared with women with low physical activity (< 38.5 MET-hours/week), the ORs (95% CIs) for CIN2/3 were 0.64 (0.40-1.01) and 0.58 (0.36-0.93) for the medium and high physical activity groups, respectively (p for linear trend  = 0.02). Total calorie intake was not statistically associated with the risks of CIN and cervical cancer after adjustment for confounders. Our results indicate that in addition to screening for and treatment of CIN, recommendations on the maintenance of an appropriate BMI with an emphasis on physical activity could be an important preventive strategy against the development of cervical

  7. Mild Obesity, Physical Activity, Calorie Intake, and the Risks of Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia and Cervical Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jae Kwan; So, Kyeong A.; Piyathilake, Chandrika J.; Kim, Mi Kyung

    2013-01-01

    Objective We investigated whether obesity, physical activity, and calorie intake are associated with the risks of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) and cervical cancer. Methods We enrolled 1125 women (age, 18–65 years) into a human papillomavirus cohort study established from 2006 to 2012. Multinomial logistic regression models were used to estimate crude and multivariate odds ratios (ORs) and the corresponding 95% confidence intervals (95% CIs), and to assess whether body mass index (BMI), height, weight, total calorie intake, and physical activity were associated with the risks of CIN and cervical cancer. Results Cervical cancer risk was positively associated with BMI and inversely associated with physical activity. When compared with women with a normal BMI (18.5–23 kg/m2), the multivariate ORs (95% CIs) for those overweight (23–25 kg/m2) and mild obesity (≥25 kg/m2) were 1.25 (0.79–2.00) and 1.70 (1.10–2.63), respectively. When compared with women with the lowest tertile of physical activity (<38.5 MET-hours/week), the ORs (95% CIs) for cervical cancer were 0.95 (0.61–1.48) and 0.61 (0.38–0.98) for women with medium physical activity (38.5–71.9 MET-hours/week) and those with high physical activity (72 MET-hours/week), respectively (p for linear trend  = 0.03). The CIN2/3 risk was inversely associated with physical activity after adjustment for confounders. Compared with women with low physical activity (< 38.5 MET-hours/week), the ORs (95% CIs) for CIN2/3 were 0.64 (0.40–1.01) and 0.58 (0.36–0.93) for the medium and high physical activity groups, respectively (p for linear trend  = 0.02). Total calorie intake was not statistically associated with the risks of CIN and cervical cancer after adjustment for confounders. Conclusion Our results indicate that in addition to screening for and treatment of CIN, recommendations on the maintenance of an appropriate BMI with an emphasis on physical activity could be an important

  8. Knowledge and Awareness of Cervical Cancer among HIV-Infected Women in Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Brooks, Mohamad I.; Salvador-Davila, Graciela; Lonsako, Shumet; Kassahun, Konjit; Ansel, Jodi; Osakwe, Chidude; Weldegebreal, Teklu; Ahmed, Ismael; Asnake, Mengistu; Blumenthal, Paul D.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Cervical cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer death among Ethiopian women. Low awareness of cervical cancer, in combination with low health care seeking behavior, is a key challenge for cervical cancer prevention. This study assessed the knowledge of cervical cancer among HIV-infected women in Ethiopia. Methods. A facility-based cross-sectional survey was conducted from August to September 2012 among HIV-infected women between 21 and 49 years of age. Basic descriptive statistics were performed using SPSS. Results. A total of 432 HIV-infected women participated in this study. About 71% of participants had ever heard of cervical cancer. Among women who had ever heard of cervical cancer, 49% did not know the cause while 74% were able to identify at least one risk factor for cervical cancer. Only 33% of women were able to correctly address when women should seek care and 33% identified at least one treatment option for cervical cancer. Conclusion. This study revealed that knowledge about cervical cancer was generally low, in particular for health care seeking behavior and treatment of cervical cancer. Health awareness programs should be strengthened at both community and health facility levels with emphasis highlighting the causes, risk factors, care seeking behaviors, and treatment options for cervical cancer. PMID:27867397

  9. Cervical cancer screening in adolescents: an evidence-based internet education program for practice improvement among advanced practice nurses.

    PubMed

    Choma, Kim; McKeever, Amy E

    2015-02-01

    The literature reports great variation in the knowledge levels and application of the recent changes of cervical cancer screening guidelines into clinical practice. Evidence-based screening guidelines for the prevention and early detection of cervical cancer offers healthcare providers the opportunity to improve practice patterns among female adolescents by decreasing psychological distress as well as reducing healthcare costs and morbidities associated with over-screening. The purpose of this pilot intervention study was to determine the effects of a Web-based continuing education unit (CEU) program on advanced practice nurses' (APNs) knowledge of current cervical cancer screening evidence-based recommendations and their application in practice. This paper presents a process improvement project as an example of a way to disseminate updated evidence-based practice guidelines among busy healthcare providers. This Web-based CEU program was developed, piloted, and evaluated specifically for APNs. The program addressed their knowledge level of cervical cancer and its relationship with high-risk human papillomavirus. It also addressed the new cervical cancer screening guidelines and the application of those guidelines into clinical practice. Results of the study indicated that knowledge gaps exist among APNs about cervical cancer screening in adolescents. However, when provided with a CEU educational intervention, APNs' knowledge levels increased and their self-reported clinical practice behaviors changed in accordance with the new cervical cancer screening guidelines. Providing convenient and readily accessible up-to-date electronic content that provides CEU enhances the adoption of clinical practice guidelines, thereby decreasing the potential of the morbidities associated with over-screening for cervical cancer in adolescents and young women. © 2014 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  10. Cervical cancer: cytological cervical screening in Iceland and implications of HPV vaccines.

    PubMed

    Sigurdsson, K

    2010-08-01

    This paper reviews the Icelandic experience regarding the age-specific effectiveness, optimal targeted age range and intervals in cervical cancer screening and the screening implications of the HPV16/18 vaccines. The background material is based on data from a screening programme with centralized records dating back to 1964, as well as from population-based studies on the distribution of oncogenic HPV types in cancer and histologically verified CIN2-3 lesions and from the Icelandic arm of the Future II trial with Gardasil. The findings confirm significant increased rates in the screened population of CIN2-3, stage IA (microinvasive) cancer since 1979, mainly in the age group 20-34 years. These lesions start to accumulate within 3 years of a normal smear. Studies on the distribution of HPV types indicate that the marketed vaccines could lower the incidence of cancer and CIN2-3 by about 67% and 53%, respectively, after taking into account reported cross-protection. About 65% of women below 25 years of age had lesions related to the non-vaccine types and after the last normal smear these cases accumulated at the same frequency as cases with vaccine-included types. Cases with combined vaccine and non-vaccine types accumulated at a slower rate. We conclude that screening should continue to start at age 20 years, with invitations at 2-year intervals up to age 39 years and thereafter at 4-year intervals up to age 65-69 years. Current data support the conclusion that the optimal age for catch-up HPV vaccination should be considered in the context of sexual practices and the data do not support changes in the lower age limit or screening intervals for the vaccinated women.

  11. CD38 is highly expressed and affects the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway in cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Liao, Shan; Xiao, Songshu; Zhu, Guangchao; Zheng, Danwei; He, Junyu; Pei, Zhen; Li, Guiyuan; Zhou, Yanhong

    2014-12-01

    Cervical cancer is the second most common cancer and the fifth most deadly malignancy in females worldwide, affecting 500,000 individuals each year. It is the leading cause of cancer mortality among women in developing countries. Dysregulated activation of genes, such as CD44, SOX9 and SKP2, plays a role in cervical cancer. CD38 is known to be involved in activities typical of cell surface receptors, such as signaling for activation and proliferation events and heterotypic cell adhesion. CD38 contributes to disease progression and relapse in certain tumors, such as acute myeloid and chronic lymphocytic leukemia. To the best of our knowledge, there is currently no report on the relationship between CD38 and cervical cancer. Using qPCR, immunohistochemistry, and western blot analysis, the expression levels of CD38 were investigated and found to be upregulated in cervical cancer. CD38 was correlated with dysregulation of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt signaling pathway in cervical cancer tissues in vitro. At the same time, CD38 overexpression affected the expression of PI3K, Akt, MDM2 and p53 in vivo. The results of the present study suggested that CD38 is highly expressed in cervical carcinoma tissues and play an important role in dysregulation of the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway.

  12. MicroRNA-138 inhibits proliferation, migration and invasion through targeting hTERT in cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Na; Fei, Dan; Zong, Shan; Zhang, Mingyue; Yue, Ying

    2016-01-01

    A growing body of evidence suggests that microRNA-138 (miR-138) functions as a tumor suppressor, and is involved in tumor initiation, development and metastasis in certain types of human cancers. However, the function and underlying molecular mechanism of miR-138 in cervical cancer remains unclear. Therefore, the purpose of the present study was to investigate the clinical significance of miR-138 expression in cervical cancer, and to evaluate its role and underlying mechanisms in cervical cancer. The present study indicated that miR-138 expression was significantly downregulated in cervical cancer tissues and cell lines, and that the low miR-138 expression was negatively associated with advanced FIGO stage and lymph node metastasis (P<0.01). Functional analyses indicated that the overexpression of miR-138 in cervical cancer cells inhibited cell proliferation, migration and invasion, induced cell apoptosis in vitro, and suppressed tumor growth in a nude mice model. Luciferase reporter assays confirmed that human telomerase reverse transcriptase was a novel target gene of miR-138. The findings of the present study suggested that miR-138 could be a potential candidate for cervical cancer therapeutics. PMID:27900047

  13. Antigen-specific immunotherapy of cervical and ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Chien-fu; Wu, TC; Monie, Archana; Roden, Richard

    2009-01-01

    Summary We contrast the efforts to treat ovarian cancer and cervical cancer through vaccination because of their different pathobiology. A plethora of approaches have been developed for therapeutic vaccination against cancer, many of which target defined tumor-associated antigens (TAAs). Persistent infection with oncogenic human papillomavirus (HPV) types is necessary cause of cervical cancer. Furthermore, cervical cancer patients frequently mount both humoral and T cell immune responses to the HPV E6 and E7 oncoproteins, whose expression is required for the transformed phenotype. Numerous vaccine studies target these viral TAAs, including recent trials that may enhance clearance of pre-malignant disease. By contrast little is known about the etiology of epithelial ovarian cancer. Although it is clear that p53 mutation or loss is a critical early event in the development of epithelial ovarian cancer, no precursor lesion has been described for the most common serous histotype, and even the location of its origin is debated. These issues have complicated the selection of appropriate ovarian TAAs and the design of vaccines. Here we focus on mesothelin as a promising ovarian TAA because it is overexpressed and immunogenic at high frequency in patients, is displayed on the cell surface and potentially contributes to ovarian cancer biology. PMID:18363994

  14. Cervical cancer: incidence and survival in migrants within Spain.

    PubMed Central

    Borràs, J M; Sánchez, V; Moreno, V; Izquierdo, A; Viladiu, P

    1995-01-01

    STUDY OBJECTIVE--This study examined the incidence of cervical cancer and survival rates according to migrant experience of women from different regions of Spain to Girona, Catalonia (Spain). DESIGN--Using data from the population based cancer registry of Girona for the period 1980-89, crude and age adjusted incidence rates were calculated for local-born and first generation migrants from other Spanish regions. The age standardised rate ratio (SRR) was calculated and Cox's regression model was used to adjust survival according to migrant status for age and stage at diagnosis. MAIN RESULTS--The incidence of cervical cancer was significantly higher in first generation Spanish migrants compared with locally born women (SRR: 2.02; 95% CI 1.40:2.92). The stage at diagnosis was more advanced among migrants. Survival probability was significantly associated with stage at diagnosis, but age and region of birth were not. CONCLUSIONS--Migrants from the southern Spanish regions show a twofold excess in the incidence of cervical cancer compared with the Girona-born female population. Cases of cervical cancer in migrants are diagnosed at a more advanced stage and as a consequence have a poorer prognosis. PMID:7798043

  15. NHERF1 Enhances Cisplatin Sensitivity in Human Cervical Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Tao, Tao; Yang, Xiaomei; Qin, Qiong; Shi, Wen; Wang, Qiqi; Yang, Ying; He, Junqi

    2017-01-01

    Cervical cancer is one of the most common female malignancies, and cisplatin-based chemotherapy is routinely utilized in locally advanced cervical cancer patients. However, resistance has been the major limitation. In this study, we found that Na+/H+ Exchanger Regulatory Factor 1 (NHERF1) was downregulated in cisplatin-resistant cells. Analysis based on a cervical cancer dataset from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) showed association of NHERF1 expression with disease-free survival of patients received cisplatin treatment. NHERF1 overexpression inhibited proliferation and enhanced apoptosis in cisplatin-resistant HeLa cells, whereas NHERF1 knockdown had inverse effects. While parental HeLa cells were more resistant to cisplatin after NHERF1 knockdown, NHERF1 overexpression in CaSki cells promoted cisplatin sensitivity. Overexpression and knockdown studies also showed that NHERF1 significantly inhibited AKT and extracellular signal–regulated kinase (ERK) signaling pathways in cisplatin-resistant cells. Taken together, our results provide the first evidence that NHERF1 can sensitize cisplatin-refractory cervical cancer cells. This study may help to increase understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying cisplatin resistance in tumors. PMID:28085111

  16. MicroRNA-744 inhibited cervical cancer growth and progression through apoptosis induction by regulating Bcl-2.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiao-Fang; Liu, Yun

    2016-07-01

    Growing evidence suggests that microRNA plays an essential role in the development and metastasis of many tumor progressions, including cervical cancer. Aberrant miR-744 expression has been indicated in many growth of tumor, the mechanism of miR-744 inhibits both the proliferation and metastatic ability for cervical cancer remains unclear. Accumulating evidences reported that Bcl-2 signal pathway plays an important role in the cellular process, such as apoptosis, cell growth and proliferation. The goal of this study was to identify miR-744 that could inhibit the growth, migration, invasion, proliferation and metastasis of gastric cancer through targeting Bcl-2 expression. Real-time PCR (RT-qPCR) was used to quantify miR-744 expression in vitro and vivo experiments. The biological functions of miR-744 were determined via cell proliferation. Our study indicated that miR-744 targeted on Bcl-2, which leads to the inactivation of apoptosis signaling and the cell proliferation of cervical cancer cells, ameliorating cervical cancer growth and progression. In addition, both up-regulation of miR-744 and down-regulation of Bcl-2 could stimulate Caspase-3 expression, promoting apoptosis of cervical cancer cells. Therefore, our research revealed the mechanistic links between miR-744 and Bcl-2 in the pathogenesis of cervical cancer through modulation of Caspase-3, leading to the inhibition of cervical cancer cell growth. And targeting miR-744 could be served as a novel strategy for future cervical cancer therapy clinically.

  17. Barriers and facilitators to cervical cancer screening among Pakistani and Somali immigrant women in Oslo: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Gele, Abdi A; Qureshi, Samera A; Kour, Prabhjot; Kumar, Bernadette; Diaz, Esperanza

    2017-01-01

    Norway has a low incidence and mortality rate of cervical cancer, which is mainly due to the high participation rate of women in cervical cancer screening. However, the attendance of cervical cancer screening was reported to be low among immigrant women. For this reason, we conducted a qualitative study to obtain better insight into perceived barriers and challenges to cervical cancer screening among Somali and Pakistani women in the Oslo region. A convenient sample of 35 (18 Pakistani, 17 Somali) women were recruited for the study in collaboration with Somali and Pakistani community partners. Focus group discussions were used to explore barriers and facilitators to cervical cancer screening, whereas the Ecological Model was used as the framework for the study. The study found three levels of barriers to cervical cancer screening. The individual level included a lack of understanding of the benefits of the screening. The sociocultural level included the stigma attached to the disease and the belief that women who are unmarried are sexually inactive. The system-related level included a lack of trust toward the health care system. Based on the study results, and using a common denominator approach for the immigrant groups included, the study recommends three communication strategies with the potential to improve women's participation in cervical cancer screening: 1) in-person communication and information material at health centers; 2) verbal communication with women through seminars and workshops to educate them about their risk of cancer and the importance of screening and 3) the initiation of better recall through SMS and letters written in native languages. Finally, an intervention study that compares the aforementioned strategies and proves their effectiveness in increasing immigrant women's participation in cervical cancer screening is recommended.

  18. Cervical cancer in north-eastern Libya: 2000-2008.

    PubMed

    Ben Khaial, F; Bodalal, Z; Elramli, A; Elkhwsky, F; Eltaguri, A; Bendardaf, R

    2014-08-01

    Libya is a country with a low population, listed under the EMRO. Using registers and patient records from a major primary oncology clinic, data was gathered from Libyan cervical cancer patients and various parameters were studied across 9 years. Out of 4,090 female cancer cases during the study period, 1.8% were cervical cancer (n = 74). The average age of presentation was 53 years, with most of the cases (60%, n = 44) being premenopausal. Approximately 65% (n = 48) of cervical cancer patients are diagnosed at later stages (i.e. stages III and IV). The majority of these cases are squamous cell carcinoma (83.8%, n = 62), while 16.2% (n = 12) were found to be adenocarcinoma. Patients with squamous cell carcinoma presented at later stages more often than those with adenocarcinoma. Human papilloma virus was strongly implicated in cervical cancer, with 94% (n = 63) of those who were tested being positive for HPV-16 (82.5%, n = 52) and HPV-18 (12.7%, n = 8). Diagnosis was most frequently made through biopsy (97.3%, n = 72) as opposed to Pap smears (2.7%, n = 2). Most Libyan patients were put through chemotherapy (75%, n = 55) and triple therapy (surgery with combined chemotherapy and radiotherapy) was the most common (38%, n = 28) modality of treatment. Comparisons were made between Libya and other nations, either in the developed world or neighbouring countries. The major problem of cervical cancer in Libya is delayed presentation and hence, all the recommendations focus on increased awareness for the populace, implementation of a national cancer control plan and a national screening programme.

  19. The burden of chronic ureteral stenting in cervical cancer survivors

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Yunhua; Jarosek, Stephanie; Elliott, Sean P.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose Ureteral obstruction in cervical cancer occurs in up to 11% of patients, many of whom undergo ureteral stenting. Our aim was to describe the patient burden of chronic ureteral stenting in a population-based cohort by detailing two objectives: (1) the frequency of repeat procedures for ureteral obstruction; and, (2) the frequency of urina