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Sample records for cervical disc disease

  1. Bryan total disc arthroplasty: a replacement disc for cervical disc disease

    PubMed Central

    Wenger, Markus; Markwalder, Thomas-Marc

    2010-01-01

    Total disc arthroplasty is a new option in the treatment of cervical degenerative disc disease. Several types of cervical disc prostheses currently challenge the gold-standard discectomy and fusion procedures. This review describes the Bryan Cervical Disc System and presents the Bryan prosthesis, its indications, surgical technique, complications, and outcomes, as given in the literature. PMID:22915917

  2. Fusion versus Bryan Cervical Disc in two-level cervical disc disease: a prospective, randomised study

    PubMed Central

    Nie, Lin; Zhang, Li; Hou, Yong

    2008-01-01

    In this prospective study, our aim was to compare the functional results and radiographic outcomes of fusion and Bryan Cervical Disc replacement in the treatment of two-level cervical disc disease. A total of 65 patients with two-level cervical disc disease were randomly assigned to two groups, those operated on with Bryan Cervical Disc replacement (31) and those operated on with anterior cervical fusion with an iliac crest autograft and plate (34). Clinical evaluation was carried out using the visual analogue scale (VAS), the Short Form 36 (SF-36) and the neck disability index (NDI) during a two year follow-up. Radiological evaluation sought evidence of range of motion, stability and subsidence of the prosthesis. Substantial reduction in NDI scores occurred in both groups, with greater percent improvement in the Bryan group (P = 0.023). The arm pain VAS score improvement was substantial in both groups. Bryan artificial cervical disc replacement seems reliable and safe in the treatment of patients with two-level cervical disc disease. PMID:18956190

  3. Discover cervical disc arthroplasty versus anterior cervical discectomy and fusion in symptomatic cervical disc diseases: A meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Shangguan, Lei; Ning, Guang-Zhi; Tang, Yu; Wang, Zhe; Luo, Zhuo-Jing; Zhou, Yue

    2017-01-01

    Objective Symptomatic cervical disc disease (SCDD) is a common degenerative disease, and Discover artificial cervical disc, a new-generation nonconstrained artificial disk, has been developed and performed gradually to treat it. We performed this meta-analysis to compare the efficacy and safety between Discover cervical disc arthroplasty (DCDA) and anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) for SCDD. Methods An exhaustive literature search of PubMed, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Library was conducted to identify randomized controlled trials that compared DCDA with ACDF for patients suffering SCDD. A random-effect model was used. Results were reported as standardized mean difference or risk ratio with 95% confidence interval. Results Of 33 articles identified, six studies were included. Compared with ACDF, DCDA demonstrated shorter operation time (P < 0.0001), and better range of motion (ROM) at the operative level (P < 0.00001). But no significant differences were observed in blood loss, neck disability index (NDI) scores, neck and arm pain scores, Japanese orthopaedic association (JOA) scores, secondary surgery procedures and adverse events (P > 0.05). Subgroup analyses did not demonstrated significant differences. Conclusion In conclusion, DCDA presented shorter operation time, and better ROM at the operative level. However, no significant differences were observed in blood loss, NDI scores, neck and arm pain scores, JOA scores, secondary surgery procedures and adverse events between the two groups. Additionally, more studies of high quality with mid- to long-term follow-up are required in future. PMID:28358860

  4. Cervical Deuk Laser Disc Repair®: A novel, full-endoscopic surgical technique for the treatment of symptomatic cervical disc disease

    PubMed Central

    Deukmedjian, Ara J.; Cianciabella, Augusto; Cutright, Jason; Deukmedjian, Arias

    2012-01-01

    Background: Cervical Deuk Laser Disc Repair® is a novel full-endoscopic, anterior cervical, trans-discal, motion preserving, laser assisted, nonfusion, outpatient surgical procedure to safely treat symptomatic cervical disc diseases including herniation, spondylosis, stenosis, and annular tears. Here we describe a new endoscopic approach to cervical disc disease that allows direct visualization of the posterior longitudinal ligament, posterior vertebral endplates, annulus, neuroforamina, and herniated disc fragments. All patients treated with Deuk Laser Disc Repair were also candidates for anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF). Methods: A total of 142 consecutive adult patients with symptomatic cervical disc disease underwent Deuk Laser Disc Repair during a 4-year period. This novel procedure incorporates a full-endoscopic selective partial decompressive discectomy, foraminoplasty, and posterior annular debridement. Postoperative complications and average volume of herniated disc fragments removed are reported. Results: All patients were successfully treated with cervical Deuk Laser Disc Repair. There were no postoperative complications. Average volume of herniated disc material removed was 0.09 ml. Conclusions: Potential benefits of Deuk Laser Disc Repair for symptomatic cervical disc disease include lower cost, smaller incision, nonfusion, preservation of segmental motion, outpatient, faster recovery, less postoperative analgesic use, fewer complications, no hardware failure, no pseudoarthrosis, no postoperative dysphagia, and no increased risk of adjacent segment disease as seen with fusion. PMID:23230523

  5. Hybrid Surgery Versus Anterior Cervical Discectomy and Fusion in Multilevel Cervical Disc Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jianfeng; Meng, Fanxin; Ding, Yan; Li, Jie; Han, Jian; Zhang, Xintao; Dong, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Abstract To investigate the outcomes and reliability of hybrid surgery (HS) versus anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) for the treatment of multilevel cervical spondylosis and disc diseases. Hybrid surgery, combining cervical disc arthroplasty (CDA) with fusion, is a novel treatment to multilevel cervical degenerated disc disease in recent years. However, the effect and reliability of HS are still unclear compared with ACDF. To investigate the studies of HS versus ACDF in patients with multilevel cervical disease, electronic databases (Medline, Embase, Pubmed, Cochrane library, and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials) were searched. Studies were included when they compared HS with ACDF and reported at least one of the following outcomes: functionality, neck pain, arm pain, cervical range of motion (ROM), quality of life, and incidence of complications. No language restrictions were used. Two authors independently assessed the methodological quality of included studies and extracted the relevant data. Seven clinical controlled trials were included in this study. Two trials were prospective and the other 5 were retrospective. The results of the meta-analysis indicated that HS achieved better recovery of NDI score (P = 0.038) and similar recovery of VAS score (P = 0.058) compared with ACDF at 2 years follow-up. Moreover, the total cervical ROM (C2–C7) after HS was preserved significantly more than the cervical ROM after ACDF (P = 0.000) at 2 years follow-up. Notably, the compensatory increase of the ROM of superior and inferior adjacent segments was significant in ACDF groups at 2-year follow-up (P < 0.01), compared with HS. The results demonstrate that HS provides equivalent outcomes and functional recovery for cervical disc diseases, and significantly better preservation of cervical ROM compared with ACDF in 2-year follow-up. This suggests the HS is an effective alternative invention for the treatment of multilevel cervical

  6. Imbalanced Protein Expression Patterns of Anabolic, Catabolic, Anti-Catabolic and Inflammatory Cytokines in Degenerative Cervical Disc Cells: New Indications for Gene Therapeutic Treatments of Cervical Disc Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Mern, Demissew S.; Beierfuß, Anja; Fontana, Johann; Thomé, Claudius; Hegewald, Aldemar A.

    2014-01-01

    Degenerative disc disease (DDD) of the cervical spine is common after middle age and can cause loss of disc height with painful nerve impingement, bone and joint inflammation. Despite the clinical importance of these problems, in current publications the pathology of cervical disc degeneration has been studied merely from a morphologic view point using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), without addressing the issue of biological treatment approaches. So far a wide range of endogenously expressed bioactive factors in degenerative cervical disc cells has not yet been investigated, despite its importance for gene therapeutic approaches. Although degenerative lumbar disc cells have been targeted by different biological treatment approaches, the quantities of disc cells and the concentrations of gene therapeutic factors used in animal models differ extremely. These indicate lack of experimentally acquired data regarding disc cell proliferation and levels of target proteins. Therefore, we analysed proliferation and endogenous expression levels of anabolic, catabolic, ant-catabolic, inflammatory cytokines and matrix proteins of degenerative cervical disc cells in three-dimensional cultures. Preoperative MRI grading of cervical discs was used, then grade III and IV nucleus pulposus (NP) tissues were isolated from 15 patients, operated due to cervical disc herniation. NP cells were cultured for four weeks with low-glucose in collagen I scaffold. Their proliferation rates were analysed using 3-(4, 5-dimethylthiazolyl-2)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide. Their protein expression levels of 28 therapeutic targets were analysed using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. During progressive grades of degeneration NP cell proliferation rates were similar. Significantly decreased aggrecan and collagen II expressions (P<0.0001) were accompanied by accumulations of selective catabolic and inflammatory cytokines (disintegrin and metalloproteinase with thrombospondin motifs 4 and 5, matrix

  7. Imbalanced protein expression patterns of anabolic, catabolic, anti-catabolic and inflammatory cytokines in degenerative cervical disc cells: new indications for gene therapeutic treatments of cervical disc diseases.

    PubMed

    Mern, Demissew S; Beierfuβ, Anja; Fontana, Johann; Thomé, Claudius; Hegewald, Aldemar A

    2014-01-01

    Degenerative disc disease (DDD) of the cervical spine is common after middle age and can cause loss of disc height with painful nerve impingement, bone and joint inflammation. Despite the clinical importance of these problems, in current publications the pathology of cervical disc degeneration has been studied merely from a morphologic view point using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), without addressing the issue of biological treatment approaches. So far a wide range of endogenously expressed bioactive factors in degenerative cervical disc cells has not yet been investigated, despite its importance for gene therapeutic approaches. Although degenerative lumbar disc cells have been targeted by different biological treatment approaches, the quantities of disc cells and the concentrations of gene therapeutic factors used in animal models differ extremely. These indicate lack of experimentally acquired data regarding disc cell proliferation and levels of target proteins. Therefore, we analysed proliferation and endogenous expression levels of anabolic, catabolic, ant-catabolic, inflammatory cytokines and matrix proteins of degenerative cervical disc cells in three-dimensional cultures. Preoperative MRI grading of cervical discs was used, then grade III and IV nucleus pulposus (NP) tissues were isolated from 15 patients, operated due to cervical disc herniation. NP cells were cultured for four weeks with low-glucose in collagen I scaffold. Their proliferation rates were analysed using 3-(4, 5-dimethylthiazolyl-2)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide. Their protein expression levels of 28 therapeutic targets were analysed using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. During progressive grades of degeneration NP cell proliferation rates were similar. Significantly decreased aggrecan and collagen II expressions (P<0.0001) were accompanied by accumulations of selective catabolic and inflammatory cytokines (disintegrin and metalloproteinase with thrombospondin motifs 4 and 5, matrix

  8. Deuk Laser Disc Repair® is a safe and effective treatment for symptomatic cervical disc disease

    PubMed Central

    Deukmedjian, Ara J.; Jason Cutright, S. T.; Augusto Cianciabella, PA-C; Deukmedjian, Arias

    2013-01-01

    Background: Deuk Laser Disc Repair® is a new full-endoscopic surgical procedure to repair symptomatic cervical disc disease. Methods: A prospective cohort of 66 consecutive patients underwent cervical Deuk Laser Disc Repair® for one (n = 21) or two adjacent (n = 45) symptomatic levels of cervical disc disease and were evaluated postoperatively for resolution of headache, neck pain, arm pain, and radicular symptoms. All patients were candidates for anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) or arthroplasty. The Mann–Whitney Wilcoxon test was used to calculate P values. Results: All patients (n = 66) had significant improvement in preoperative symptoms with an average symptom resolution of 94.6%. Fifty percent (n = 33) had 100% resolution of all preoperative cervicogenic symptoms. Only 4.5% (n = 3) had less than 80% resolution of preoperative symptoms. Visual analog scale (VAS) significantly improved from 8.7 preoperatively to 0.5 postoperatively (P < 0.001) for the cohort. Average operative and recovery times were 57 and 52 minutes, respectively. There were no perioperative complications. Recurrent disc herniation occurred in one patient (1.5%). Average postoperative follow-up was 94 days and no significant intergroup difference in outcomes was observed (P = 0.111) in patients with <90 days (n = 52) or >90 days (n = 14, mean 319 days) follow-up. No significant difference in outcomes was observed (P = 0.774) for patients undergoing one or two level Deuk Laser Disc Repair®. Patients diagnosed with postoperative cervical facet syndrome did significantly worse (P < 0.001). Conclusion: Deuk Laser Disc Repair® is a safe and effective alternative to ACDF or arthroplasty for the treatment of one or two adjacent symptomatic cervical disc herniations with an overall success rate of 94.6%. PMID:23776754

  9. Health state utility of patients with single-level cervical degenerative disc disease: comparison of anterior cervical discectomy and fusion with cervical disc arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Qureshi, Sheeraz; Goz, Vadim; McAnany, Steven; Cho, Samuel K; Hecht, Andrew C; Delamarter, Rick B; Fehlings, Michael G

    2014-05-01

    Cost-effectiveness analysis (CEA) of medical interventions has become increasingly relevant to the discussion of optimization of care. The use of utility scales in CEA permits a quantitative assessment of effectiveness of a given intervention. There are no published utility values for degenerative disc disease (DDD) of the cervical spine, anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF), or cervical disc replacement (CDR). The purpose of this study was to define health utility values for those health states. The 36-Item Short Form Health Survey data from the ProDisc-C investigational device exemption study were obtained for single-level DDD at baseline and 24 months postoperatively after ACDF or CDR procedures. Patients in the original study were randomized to either ACDF or CDR. Utilizing a commercially available Short Form-6 dimensions program, utility scores were calculated for each health state using a set of parametric preference weights obtained from a sample of the general population using the recognized valuation technique of standard gamble. The baseline health state utility (HSU) value for a patient with single-level DDD was 0.54 in both the ACDF and CDR groups. Postoperative changes in HSU values were seen in both intervention groups at 24 months. Cervical disc replacement had a HSU value of 0.72. Anterior cervical discectomy and fusion was found to have a postoperative utility state of 0.71. No statistically significant difference was found in the HSU for ACDF and CDR at 24 months of follow-up. This study represents the first calculated HSU value for a patient with single-level cervical DDD. Additionally, 2 common treatment interventions for this disease state were assessed. Both treatments were found to have significant impact on the HSU values. These values are integral to future CEA of ACDF and CDR.

  10. A Meta-Analysis Comparing the Results of Cervical Disc Arthroplasty with Anterior Cervical Discectomy and Fusion (ACDF) for the Treatment of Symptomatic Cervical Disc Disease

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Yu; Liu, Ming; Li, Tao; Huang, Fuguo; Tang, Tingting; Xiang, Zhou

    2013-01-01

    Background: Anterior cervical discectomy and fusion is a standard treatment for symptomatic cervical disc disease, but pseudarthrosis and accelerated adjacent-level disc degeneration may develop. Cervical disc arthroplasty was developed to preserve the kinematics of the functional spinal unit. Trials comparing arthroplasty with anterior cervical discectomy and fusion have shown unclear benefits in terms of clinical results, neck motion at the operated level, adverse events, and the need for secondary surgical procedures. Methods: Only randomized clinical trials were included in this meta-analysis, and the search strategy followed the requirements of the Cochrane Library Handbook. Two reviewers independently assessed the methodological quality of each included study and extracted the relevant data. Results: Twenty-seven randomized clinical trials were included; twelve studies were Level I and fifteen were Level II. The results of the meta-analysis indicated longer operative times, more blood loss, lower neck and arm pain scores reported on a visual analog scale, better neurological success, greater motion at the operated level, fewer secondary surgical procedures, and fewer such procedures that involved supplemental fixation or revision in the arthroplasty group compared with the anterior cervical discectomy and fusion group. These differences were significant (p < 0.05). The two groups had similar lengths of hospital stay, Neck Disability Index scores, and rates of adverse events, removals, and reoperations (p > 0.05). Conclusions: The meta-analysis revealed that anterior cervical discectomy and fusion was associated with shorter operative times and less blood loss compared with arthroplasty. Other outcomes after arthroplasty (length of hospital stay, clinical indices, range of motion at the operated level, adverse events, and secondary surgical procedures) were superior or equivalent to the outcomes after anterior cervical discectomy and fusion. Level of Evidence

  11. Artificial Discs for Lumbar and Cervical Degenerative Disc Disease –Update

    PubMed Central

    2006-01-01

    Executive Summary Objective To assess the safety and efficacy of artificial disc replacement (ADR) technology for degenerative disc disease (DDD). Clinical Need Degenerative disc disease is the term used to describe the deterioration of 1 or more intervertebral discs of the spine. The prevalence of DDD is roughly described in proportion to age such that 40% of people aged 40 years have DDD, increasing to 80% among those aged 80 years or older. Low back pain is a common symptom of lumbar DDD; neck and arm pain are common symptoms of cervical DDD. Nonsurgical treatments can be used to relieve pain and minimize disability associated with DDD. However, it is estimated that about 10% to 20% of people with lumbar DDD and up to 30% with cervical DDD will be unresponsive to nonsurgical treatments. In these cases, surgical treatment is considered. Spinal fusion (arthrodesis) is the process of fusing or joining 2 bones and is considered the surgical gold standard for DDD. Artificial disc replacement is the replacement of the degenerated intervertebral disc with an artificial disc in people with DDD of the lumbar or cervical spine that has been unresponsive to nonsurgical treatments for at least 6 months. Unlike spinal fusion, ADR preserves movement of the spine, which is thought to reduce or prevent the development of adjacent segment degeneration. Additionally, a bone graft is not required for ADR, and this alleviates complications, including bone graft donor site pain and pseudoarthrosis. It is estimated that about 5% of patients who require surgery for DDD will be candidates for ADR. Review Strategy The Medical Advisory Secretariat conducted a computerized search of the literature published between 2003 and September 2005 to answer the following questions: What is the effectiveness of ADR in people with DDD of the lumbar or cervical regions of the spine compared with spinal fusion surgery? Does an artificial disc reduce the incidence of adjacent segment degeneration (ASD

  12. Artificial discs for lumbar and cervical degenerative disc disease -update: an evidence-based analysis.

    PubMed

    2006-01-01

    To assess the safety and efficacy of artificial disc replacement (ADR) technology for degenerative disc disease (DDD). Degenerative disc disease is the term used to describe the deterioration of 1 or more intervertebral discs of the spine. The prevalence of DDD is roughly described in proportion to age such that 40% of people aged 40 years have DDD, increasing to 80% among those aged 80 years or older. Low back pain is a common symptom of lumbar DDD; neck and arm pain are common symptoms of cervical DDD. Nonsurgical treatments can be used to relieve pain and minimize disability associated with DDD. However, it is estimated that about 10% to 20% of people with lumbar DDD and up to 30% with cervical DDD will be unresponsive to nonsurgical treatments. In these cases, surgical treatment is considered. Spinal fusion (arthrodesis) is the process of fusing or joining 2 bones and is considered the surgical gold standard for DDD. Artificial disc replacement is the replacement of the degenerated intervertebral disc with an artificial disc in people with DDD of the lumbar or cervical spine that has been unresponsive to nonsurgical treatments for at least 6 months. Unlike spinal fusion, ADR preserves movement of the spine, which is thought to reduce or prevent the development of adjacent segment degeneration. Additionally, a bone graft is not required for ADR, and this alleviates complications, including bone graft donor site pain and pseudoarthrosis. It is estimated that about 5% of patients who require surgery for DDD will be candidates for ADR. The Medical Advisory Secretariat conducted a computerized search of the literature published between 2003 and September 2005 to answer the following questions: What is the effectiveness of ADR in people with DDD of the lumbar or cervical regions of the spine compared with spinal fusion surgery?Does an artificial disc reduce the incidence of adjacent segment degeneration (ASD) compared with spinal fusion?What is the rate of major

  13. Clinical and radiologic comparison of dynamic cervical implant arthroplasty and cervical total disc replacement for single-level cervical degenerative disc disease.

    PubMed

    Shichang, Liu; Yueming, Song; Limin, Liu; Lei, Wang; Zhongjie, Zhou; Chunguang, Zhou; Xi, Yang

    2016-05-01

    Anterior cervical discectomy and fusion, to date the most successful spine procedure for the surgical treatment of cervical radiculopathy, has limitations that have led to the development of non-fusion cervical procedures, such as cervical total disc replacement (TDR) and dynamic cervical implant (DCI) arthroplasty. We compared the clinical and radiological results of DCI and cervical TDR for the treatment of single-level cervical degenerative disc disease in Chinese patients. A retrospective review of 179 patients with cervical spondylotic myelopathy who underwent DCI or TDR between April 2010 and October 2012 was conducted, and 152 consecutive patients (67 patients single-level DCI and 85 single-level TDR) who completed at least 2years of follow-up were included. Clinical and radiological assessments were performed preoperatively and at 1week and 3, 6, 12, and 24months postoperatively. The most common operative level was C5/C6 (49.3%). The differences in blood loss, duration of surgery, and duration of hospitalization were not statistically significant. The Japanese Orthopaedic Association scale, Visual Analog Scale, Neck Disability Index, and Short Form-36 scores improved significantly after surgery in both the DCI and TDR groups (P<0.05), but the differences were not statistically significant at the final follow-up. The rate of occurrence of heterotopic ossification was 22.4% and 28.2% in the DCI and TDR groups, respectively. As an effective non-fusion technique, DCI is a more economical procedure. Further prospective, randomized studies with long-term follow-up periods are needed to determine the long-term effects.

  14. Cervical Total Disc Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Basho, Rahul; Hood, Kenneth A.

    2012-01-01

    Symptomatic adjacent segment degeneration of the cervical spine remains problematic for patients and surgeons alike. Despite advances in surgical techniques and instrumentation, the solution remains elusive. Spurred by the success of total joint arthroplasty in hips and knees, surgeons and industry have turned to motion preservation devices in the cervical spine. By preserving motion at the diseased level, the hope is that adjacent segment degeneration can be prevented. Multiple cervical disc arthroplasty devices have come onto the market and completed Food and Drug Administration Investigational Device Exemption trials. Though some of the early results demonstrate equivalency of arthroplasty to fusion, compelling evidence of benefits in terms of symptomatic adjacent segment degeneration are lacking. In addition, non-industry-sponsored studies indicate that these devices are equivalent to fusion in terms of adjacent segment degeneration. Longer-term studies will eventually provide the definitive answer. PMID:24353955

  15. Hybrid Surgery Versus Anterior Cervical Discectomy and Fusion in Multilevel Cervical Disc Diseases: A Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jianfeng; Meng, Fanxin; Ding, Yan; Li, Jie; Han, Jian; Zhang, Xintao; Dong, Wei

    2016-05-01

    To investigate the outcomes and reliability of hybrid surgery (HS) versus anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) for the treatment of multilevel cervical spondylosis and disc diseases.Hybrid surgery, combining cervical disc arthroplasty (CDA) with fusion, is a novel treatment to multilevel cervical degenerated disc disease in recent years. However, the effect and reliability of HS are still unclear compared with ACDF.To investigate the studies of HS versus ACDF in patients with multilevel cervical disease, electronic databases (Medline, Embase, Pubmed, Cochrane library, and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials) were searched. Studies were included when they compared HS with ACDF and reported at least one of the following outcomes: functionality, neck pain, arm pain, cervical range of motion (ROM), quality of life, and incidence of complications. No language restrictions were used. Two authors independently assessed the methodological quality of included studies and extracted the relevant data.Seven clinical controlled trials were included in this study. Two trials were prospective and the other 5 were retrospective. The results of the meta-analysis indicated that HS achieved better recovery of NDI score (P = 0.038) and similar recovery of VAS score (P = 0.058) compared with ACDF at 2 years follow-up. Moreover, the total cervical ROM (C2-C7) after HS was preserved significantly more than the cervical ROM after ACDF (P = 0.000) at 2 years follow-up. Notably, the compensatory increase of the ROM of superior and inferior adjacent segments was significant in ACDF groups at 2-year follow-up (P < 0.01), compared with HS.The results demonstrate that HS provides equivalent outcomes and functional recovery for cervical disc diseases, and significantly better preservation of cervical ROM compared with ACDF in 2-year follow-up. This suggests the HS is an effective alternative invention for the treatment of multilevel cervical spondylosis to

  16. Outcome of physiotherapy after surgery for cervical disc disease: a prospective randomised multi-centre trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Many patients with cervical disc disease require leave from work, due to long-lasting, complex symptoms, including chronic pain and reduced levels of physical and psychological function. Surgery on a few segmental levels might be expected to resolve disc-specific pain and reduce neurological deficits, but not the non-specific neck pain and the frequent illness. No study has investigated whether post-surgery physiotherapy might improve the outcome of surgery. The main purpose of this study was to evaluate whether a well-structured rehabilitation programme might add benefit to the customary post-surgical treatment for cervical disc disease, with respect to function, disability, work capability, and cost effectiveness. Methods/Design This study was designed as a prospective, randomised, controlled, multi-centre study. An independent, blinded investigator will compare two alternatives of rehabilitation. We will include 200 patients of working age, with cervical disc disease confirmed by clinical findings and symptoms of cervical nerve root compression. After providing informed consent, study participants will be randomised to one of two alternative physiotherapy regimes; (A) customary treatment (information and advice on a specialist clinic); or (B) customary treatment plus active physiotherapy. Physiotherapy will follow a standardised, structured programme of neck-specific exercises combined with a behavioural approach. All patients will be evaluated both clinically and subjectively (with questionnaires) before surgery and at 6 weeks, 3 months, 6 months, 12 months, and 24 months after surgery. The main outcome variable will be neck-specific disability. Cost-effectiveness will also be calculated. Discussion We anticipate that the results of this study will provide evidence to support physiotherapeutic rehabilitation applied after surgery for cervical radiculopathy due to cervical disc disease. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01547611

  17. Hybrid surgery of multilevel cervical degenerative disc disease : review of literature and clinical results.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang-Bok; Cho, Kyoung-Suok; Kim, Jong-Youn; Yoo, Do-Sung; Lee, Tae-Gyu; Huh, Pil-Woo

    2012-11-01

    In the present study, we evaluated the effect, safety and radiological outcomes of cervical hybrid surgery (cervical disc prosthesis replacement at one level, and interbody fusion at the other level) on the multilevel cervical degenerative disc disease (DDD). Fifty-one patients (mean age 46.7 years) with symptomatic multilevel cervical spondylosis were treated using hybrid surgery (HS). Clinical [neck disability index (NDI) and Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) score] and radiologic outcomes [range of motion (ROM) for cervical spine, adjacent segment and arthroplasty level] were evaluated at routine postoperative intervals of 1, 6, 12, 24 months. Review of other similar studies that examined the HS in multilevel cervical DDD was performed. Out of 51 patients, 41 patients received 2 level hybrid surgery and 10 patients received 3 level hybrid surgery. The NDI and VAS score were significantly decreased during the follow up periods (p<0.05). The cervical ROM was recovered at 6 and 12 month postoperatively and the mean ROM of inferior adjacent segment was significantly larger than that of superior adjacent segments after surgery. The ROM of the arthoplasty level was preserved well during the follow up periods. No surgical and device related complications were observed. Hybrid surgery is a safe and effective alternative to fusion for the management of multilevel cervical spondylosis.

  18. Hybrid Surgery of Multilevel Cervical Degenerative Disc Disease : Review of Literature and Clinical Results

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang-Bok; Kim, Jong-Youn; Yoo, Do-Sung; Lee, Tae-Gyu; Huh, Pil-Woo

    2012-01-01

    Objective In the present study, we evaluated the effect, safety and radiological outcomes of cervical hybrid surgery (cervical disc prosthesis replacement at one level, and interbody fusion at the other level) on the multilevel cervical degenerative disc disease (DDD). Methods Fifty-one patients (mean age 46.7 years) with symptomatic multilevel cervical spondylosis were treated using hybrid surgery (HS). Clinical [neck disability index (NDI) and Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) score] and radiologic outcomes [range of motion (ROM) for cervical spine, adjacent segment and arthroplasty level] were evaluated at routine postoperative intervals of 1, 6, 12, 24 months. Review of other similar studies that examined the HS in multilevel cervical DDD was performed. Results Out of 51 patients, 41 patients received 2 level hybrid surgery and 10 patients received 3 level hybrid surgery. The NDI and VAS score were significantly decreased during the follow up periods (p<0.05). The cervical ROM was recovered at 6 and 12 month postoperatively and the mean ROM of inferior adjacent segment was significantly larger than that of superior adjacent segments after surgery. The ROM of the arthoplasty level was preserved well during the follow up periods. No surgical and device related complications were observed. Conclusion Hybrid surgery is a safe and effective alternative to fusion for the management of multilevel cervical spondylosis. PMID:23323165

  19. Single-Level Degenerative Cervical Disc Disease and Driving Disability: Results from a Prospective, Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Michael P.; Mitchell, M. David; Hacker, Robert J.; Riew, K. Daniel; Sasso, Rick C.

    2013-01-01

    Study Design Post hoc analysis of prospective, randomized trial. Objective To investigate the disability associated with driving and single-level degenerative, cervical disc disease and to investigate the effect of surgery on driving disability. Methods Post hoc analysis of data obtained from three sites participating in a multicenter, randomized, controlled trial comparing cervical disc arthroplasty (TDA) with anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF). The driving subscale of the Neck Disability Index (NDI) was analyzed for all patients. A dichotomous severity score was created from the NDI. Statistical comparisons were made within and between groups. Results Two-year follow-up was available for 118/135 (87%) patients. One half of the study population (49.6%) reported moderate or severe preoperative driving difficulty. This disability associated with driving was similar among the two groups (ACDF: 2.5 ± 1.1, TDA: 2.6 ± 1.0, p = 0.646). The majority of patients showed improvement, with no or little driving disability, at the sixth postoperative week (ACDF: 75%, TDA: 90%, p = 0.073). At no follow-up point did a difference exist between groups according to the severity index. Conclusions Many patients suffering from radiculopathy or myelopathy from cervical disc disease are limited in their ability to operate an automobile. Following anterior cervical spine surgery, most patients are able to return to comfortable driving at 6 weeks. PMID:24436875

  20. Anterior surgical management of single-level cervical disc disease: a cost-effectiveness analysis.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Daniel J; Attiah, Mark A; Malhotra, Neil R; Burnett, Mark G; Stein, Sherman C

    2014-12-01

    Cost-effectiveness analysis with decision analysis and meta-analysis. To determine the relative cost-effectiveness of anterior cervical discectomy with fusion (with autograft, allograft, or spacers), anterior cervical discectomy without fusion (ACD), and cervical disc replacement (CDR) for the treatment of 1-level cervical disc disease. There is debate as to the optimal anterior surgical strategy to treat single-level cervical disc disease. Surgical strategies include 3 techniques of anterior cervical discectomy with fusion (autograft, allograft, or spacer-assisted fusion), ACD, and CDR. Several controlled trials have compared these treatments but have yielded mixed results. Decision analysis provides a structure for making a quantitative comparison of the costs and outcomes of each treatment. A literature search was performed and yielded 156 case series that fulfilled our search criteria describing nearly 17,000 cases. Data were abstracted from these publications and pooled meta-analytically to estimate the incidence of various outcomes, including index-level and adjacent-level reoperation. A decision analytic model calculated the expected costs in US dollars and outcomes in quality-adjusted life years for a typical adult patient with 1-level cervical radiculopathy subjected to each of the 5 approaches. At 5 years postoperatively, patients who had undergone ACD alone had significantly (P < 0.001) more quality-adjusted life years (4.885 ± 0.041) than those receiving other treatments. Patients with ACD also exhibited highly significant (P < 0.001) differences in costs, incurring the lowest societal costs ($16,558 ± $539). Follow-up data were inadequate for comparison beyond 5 years. The results of our decision analytic model indicate advantages for ACD, both in effectiveness and costs, over other strategies. Thus, ACD is a cost-effective alternative to anterior cervical discectomy with fusion and CDR in patients with single-level cervical disc disease. Definitive

  1. Hybrid surgery for multilevel cervical degenerative disc diseases: a systematic review of biomechanical and clinical evidence.

    PubMed

    Jia, Zhiwei; Mo, Zhongjun; Ding, Fan; He, Qing; Fan, Yubo; Ruan, Dike

    2014-08-01

    The optimal surgical technique for multilevel cervical degenerative disc diseases (DDD) remains controversial. Hybrid surgery (HS) incorporating anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) and cervical disc replacement (CDR) is increasingly performed for cervical DDD. This study aims to evaluate the biomechanical and clinical evidence available for HS and to provide a systematic review of current understanding of HS. This systematic review was undertaken by following the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses Statement. Multiple databases and online registers of clinical trials were searched up to February 2014. The biomechanical and clinical studies on HS for cervical DDD written in English were included. Two authors independently assessed methodological quality and extracted data. Fifteen studies including eight biomechanical studies and seven clinical studies were indentified. The biomechanical studies showed that HS was benefit to motion preservation of the operative levels and revealed less adverse effect on adjacent segments. All clinical studies demonstrated improvement in validated functional scores after HS. Segment motion and immobilization were achieved at the arthroplasty level and arthrodesis level, respectively. Postoperative assessments and complication rate were similar or in favor of HS when comparing with ACDF or CDR. However, the overall quality of evidence for HS was low to very low. There is a paucity of high quality evidence for HS. HS may be a safe and efficacious technique to benefit a select group of multilevel cervical DDD, which is needed to be confirmed by further prospective, randomized controlled trials.

  2. Effectiveness of cervical hemilaminectomy in canine Hansen Type I and Type II disc disease: a retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Schmied, Oliver; Golini, Lorenzo; Steffen, Frank

    2011-01-01

    Medical records of 41 dogs, including 15 small breed dogs (<15 kg) and 26 large breed dogs (>15 kg), with cervical intervertebral disc disease (IVDD) that underwent a hemilaminectomy were reviewed. Dogs were diagnosed using myelography, computed tomography/myelography, or MRI, and dogs were classified as having either Hansen Type I disc extrusion or Hansen Type II disc protrusion located ventrally, ventrolaterally, or laterally within the cervical spinal canal. The most common clinical presentation was ambulatory tetraparesis and/or lameness (44%). The most affected sites for cervical IVDD were between the sixth and seventh cervical vertebrae (C6-C7; 78% of Hansen Type II discs) and C2-C3 (86% of Hansen Type I discs). Treatment was effective in 88% of dogs. Five large breed dogs (12%) did not improve. In dogs with a Hansen Type I disc extrusion, clinical signs improved in 96% of the cases. In dogs with a Hansen Type II disc protrusion, an excellent and good outcome was seen in 47% and 32% of cases, respectively. Outcome was significantly better for small breed dogs and dogs with Hansen Type I disc disease compared with large breed dogs and dogs with Hansen Type II disc disease.

  3. Hybrid cervical disc arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Tu, Tsung-Hsi; Wu, Jau-Ching; Cheng, Henrich; Mummaneni, Praveen V

    2017-01-01

    For patients with multilevel cervical stenosis at nonadjacent segments, one of the traditional approaches has included a multilevel fusion of the abnormal segments as well as the intervening normal segment. In this video we demonstrate an alternative treatment plan with tailored use of a combination of anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) and cervical disc arthroplasty (CDA) with an intervening skipped level. The authors present the case of a 72-year-old woman with myeloradiculopathy and a large disc herniation with facet joint degeneration at C3-4 and bulging disc at C5-6. After nonoperative treatment failed, she underwent a single-level ACDF at C3-4 and single-level arthroplasty at C5-6, which successfully relieved her symptoms. No intervention was performed at the normal intervening C4-5 segment. By using ACDF combined with arthroplasty, the authors have avoided a 3-level fusion for this patient and maintained the range of motion of 2 disc levels. The video can be found here: https://youtu.be/OrxcPUBvqLk .

  4. Clinical and radiologic comparison of dynamic cervical implant arthroplasty versus anterior cervical discectomy and fusion for the treatment of cervical degenerative disc disease.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhonghai; Yu, Shunzhi; Zhao, Yantao; Hou, Shuxun; Fu, Qiang; Li, Fengning; Hou, Tiesheng; Zhong, Hongbin

    2014-06-01

    This study compared the clinical and radiological outcomes of dynamic cervical implant (DCI; Scient'x, Villers-Bretonneux, France) arthroplasty versus anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) for the treatment of cervical degenerative disc disease. This prospective cohort study enrolled patients with single-level cervical degenerative disc disease who underwent DCI arthroplasty or ACDF between September 2009 and June 2011. Patients were followed up for more than 2years. Clinical evaluation included the Medical Outcomes Study 36-Item Short Form Health Survey (SF-36), Neck Disability Index (NDI), Japan Orthopedic Association (JOA) score, and visual analog scale (VAS) scores for neck and arm pain. Radiological assessments included segmental range of motion (ROM), overall ROM (C2-C7), disc height (DHI), and changes in adjacent disc spaces. The VAS, SF-36, JOA, and NDI scores improved significantly after surgery in both the DCI and ACDF groups. The VAS, JOA, and SF-36 scores were not significantly different between the DCI and ACDF groups at the final follow-up. The segmental ROM at the treated level and overall ROM increased significantly after surgery in the DCI group, but the ROM in the adjacent cephalad and caudal segments did not change significantly. The mean DHI at the treated level was significantly restored after surgery in both groups. Five patients (12.8%) in the DCI group showed new signs of adjacent segment degeneration. These results indicate that DCI is an effective, reliable, and safe procedure for the treatment of cervical degenerative disc disease. However, there is no definitive evidence that DCI arthroplasty has better intermediate-term results than ACDF.

  5. Massage therapy for cervical degenerative disc disease: alleviating a pain in the neck?

    PubMed

    Avery, Rhonda-Marie

    2012-01-01

    A 66-year-old female client with cervical degenerative disc disease at lateral left facet joint C6/C7 was experiencing symptoms of chronic neck pain accompanied by limited cervical range of motion, as well as radicular left shoulder and arm pain. The objective of this case report was to describe the effect of therapeutic massage on the client's symptoms and impairments of cervical DDD. Therapeutic massage interventions included soft-tissue manipulation using petrissage and neuromuscular techniques, fascial work, facilitated stretching, joint play, hydrotherapy, education on self-stretching, and positive guidance about condition management. Assessment included pain-free cervical ROM and a subjective verbal pain scale. After several treatment sessions, client's symptoms had decreased and cervical ROM had improved moderately. There was also a decrease in reported pain and an increase in functional daily activities. Client showed a greater understanding of the physiologic barriers which degenerative changes may present. This client responded favorably to massage therapy as a treatment intervention for cervical DDD symptoms.

  6. Massage Therapy for Cervical Degenerative Disc Disease: Alleviating a Pain in the Neck?

    PubMed Central

    Avery, Rhonda-Marie

    2012-01-01

    Background: A 66-year-old female client with cervical degenerative disc disease at lateral left facet joint C6/C7 was experiencing symptoms of chronic neck pain accompanied by limited cervical range of motion, as well as radicular left shoulder and arm pain. The objective of this case report was to describe the effect of therapeutic massage on the client’s symptoms and impairments of cervical DDD. Methods: Therapeutic massage interventions included soft-tissue manipulation using petrissage and neuromuscular techniques, fascial work, facilitated stretching, joint play, hydrotherapy, education on self-stretching, and positive guidance about condition management. Assessment included pain-free cervical ROM and a subjective verbal pain scale. Results: After several treatment sessions, client’s symptoms had decreased and cervical ROM had improved moderately. There was also a decrease in reported pain and an increase in functional daily activities. Client showed a greater understanding of the physiologic barriers which degenerative changes may present. Conclusions: This client responded favorably to massage therapy as a treatment intervention for cervical DDD symptoms. PMID:23087777

  7. Depression, social factors, and pain perception before and after surgery for lumbar and cervical degenerative vertebral disc disease

    PubMed Central

    Jabłońska, Renata; Ślusarz, Robert; Królikowska, Agnieszka; Haor, Beata; Antczak, Anna; Szewczyk, Maria

    2017-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of psychosocial factors on pain levels and depression, before and after surgical treatment, in patients with degenerative lumbar and cervical vertebral disc disease. Patients and methods The study included 188 patients (98 women, 90 men) who were confirmed to have cervical or lumbar degenerative disc disease on magnetic resonance imaging, and who underwent a single microdiscectomy procedure, with no postoperative surgical complications. All patients completed two questionnaires before and after surgery – the Beck Depression Inventory scale (I–IV) and the Visual Analog Scale for pain (0–10). On hospital admission, all patients completed a social and demographic questionnaire. The first pain and depression questionnaire evaluations were performed on the day of hospital admission (n=188); the second on the day of hospital discharge, 7 days after surgery (n=188); and the third was 6 months after surgery (n=140). Results Patient ages ranged from 22 to 72 years, and 140 patients had lumbar disc disease (mean age, 42.7±10.99 years) and 44 had cervical disc disease (mean age, 48.9±7.85 years). Before surgery, symptoms of depression were present in 47.3% of the patients (11.7% cervical; 35.6% lumbar), at first postoperative evaluation in 25.1% of patients (7% cervical; 18.1% lumbar), and 6 months following surgery in 31.1% of patients (7.5% cervical; 23.6% lumbar). Patients with cervical disc disease who were unemployed had the highest incidence of depression before and after surgery (p=0.037). Patients with lumbar disc disease who had a primary level of education or work involving standing had the highest incidence of depression before and after surgery (p=0.368). Conclusion This study highlighted the association between social and demographic factors, pain perception, and depression that may persist despite surgical treatment for degenerative vertebral disc disease. PMID:28115868

  8. Cervical total disc replacement with the Mobi-C cervical artificial disc compared with anterior discectomy and fusion for treatment of 2-level symptomatic degenerative disc disease: a prospective, randomized, controlled multicenter clinical trial: clinical article.

    PubMed

    Davis, Reginald J; Kim, Kee D; Hisey, Michael S; Hoffman, Gregory A; Bae, Hyun W; Gaede, Steven E; Rashbaum, Ralph F; Nunley, Pierce Dalton; Peterson, Daniel L; Stokes, John K

    2013-11-01

    Cervical total disc replacement (TDR) is intended to treat neurological symptoms and neck pain associated with degeneration of intervertebral discs in the cervical spine. Anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) has been the standard treatment for these indications since the procedure was first developed in the 1950s. While TDR has been shown to be a safe and effective alternative to ACDF for treatment of patients with degenerative disc disease (DDD) at a single level of the cervical spine, few studies have focused on the safety and efficacy of TDR for treatment of 2 levels of the cervical spine. The primary objective of this study was to rigorously compare the Mobi-C cervical artificial disc to ACDF for treatment of cervical DDD at 2 contiguous levels of the cervical spine. This study was a prospective, randomized, US FDA investigational device exemption pivotal trial of the Mobi-C cervical artificial disc conducted at 24 centers in the US. The primary clinical outcome was a composite measure of study success at 24 months. The comparative control treatment was ACDF using allograft bone and an anterior plate. A total of 330 patients were enrolled, randomized, and received study surgery. All patients were diagnosed with intractable symptomatic cervical DDD at 2 contiguous levels of the cervical spine between C-3 and C-7. Patients were randomized in a 2:1 ratio (TDR patients to ACDF patients). A total of 225 patients received the Mobi-C TDR device and 105 patients received ACDF. At 24 months only 3.0% of patients were lost to follow-up. On average, patients in both groups showed significant improvements in Neck Disability Index (NDI) score, visual analog scale (VAS) neck pain score, and VAS arm pain score from preoperative baseline to each time point. However, the TDR patients experienced significantly greater improvement than ACDF patients in NDI score at all time points and significantly greater improvement in VAS neck pain score at 6 weeks, and at 3, 6, and

  9. Herniated Cervical Disc

    MedlinePlus

    ... center of the disc may start to lose water content, making the disc less effective as a cushion. As a disc deteriorates, the outer layer can also tear. This can allow displacement of the disc's center (called a herniated or ...

  10. Comparison of stand-alone polyetheretherketone cages and iliac crest autografts for the treatment of cervical degenerative disc diseases.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jian; Xia, Qing; Dong, Jian; Li, Xilei; Zhou, Xiaogang; Fang, Taolin; Lin, Hong

    2011-01-01

    Anterior cervical decompression and fusion (ACDF) is a widely accepted surgical procedure for the treatment of cervical degenerative disc diseases. This retrospective study was designed to analyze and compare the efficacy and outcomes of anterior cervical fusion using stand-alone polyetheretherketone (PEEK) cages and autogenous iliac crest grafts with the anterior cervical plating system. A total of 72 consecutive patients suffering from cervical degenerative disc diseases treated with ACDF from June 2005 to Dec 2008 were enrolled in the study. Patients in group A (40 patients, 64 segments) had anterior interbody fusion with stand-alone PEEK cages and patients in group B (32 patients, 51 segments) with autogenous iliac crest graft combined with anterior plate fixation. The operative time and intraoperative blood loss were recorded. Clinical outcomes were evaluated using the Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) scoring system; cervical lordosis, intervertebral height, and cervical fusion status were assessed on X-ray and computed tomography. The mean follow-up period was 17.3 months in the stand-alone cage group and 23.2 months in the autologous iliac crest graft group. The operative time and intraoperative blood loss in group A were much less than those in group B (p < 0.05). All the patients in both groups got complete interbody fusion. Postoperative JOA scores in both group A and group B were more than the preoperative ones with significant differences, and the improvement rate of JOA scores had no statistical differences between group A and group B. Postoperative cervical physiological curvature and intervertebral height in both groups were better than the preoperative ones with statistical significances. The stand-alone PEEK cage is a good substitute for fusion in patients with cervical disc disease; it can effectively restore the cervical physiological curvature and the intervertebral height, facilitate radiological follow-up, cause few complications, and

  11. Anxiety and depression affect pain drawings in cervical degenerative disc disease

    PubMed Central

    MacDowall, Anna; Robinson, Yohan; Skeppholm, Martin; Olerud, Claes

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Pain drawings have been frequently used in the preoperative evaluation of spine patients. Until now most investigations have focused on low back pain patients, even though pain drawings are used in neck pain patients as well. The aims of this study were to investigate the pain drawing and its association to preoperative demographics, psychological impairment, and pain intensity. Methods We carried out a post hoc analysis of a randomized controlled trial, comparing cervical disc replacement to fusion for radiculopathy related to degenerative disc disease. Preoperatively the patients completed a pain drawing, the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS), and a visual analogue scale (VAS). The pain drawing was evaluated according to four established methods, now modified for cervical conditions. Comparisons were made between the pain drawing and age, sex, smoking, and employment status as well as HADS and VAS. Results Included were 151 patients, mean age of 47 years, female/male: 78/73. Pain drawing results were not affected by age, sex, smoking, and employment status. Patients with non-neurogenic pain drawings according to the modified method by Ransford had higher points on HADS-anxiety, HADS-depression, and HADS-total. Patients with markings in the head region had higher score on HADS-depression. Markings in the neck and lower arm region were associated with high values of VAS-neck and VAS-arm. Conclusions Pain drawings were affected by both pain intensity and anxiety/depression in cervical spine patients. Therefore, the pain drawing can be a useful tool when interpreting the patients’ pain in correlation to psychological impairment and pain location. PMID:28503982

  12. Hybrid surgery versus anterior cervical discectomy and fusion for multilevel cervical degenerative disc diseases: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Tian, Peng; Fu, Xin; Li, Zhi-Jun; Sun, Xiao-Lei; Ma, Xin-Long

    2015-08-26

    The objective of this meta-analysis is to compare hybrid surgery (HS) and cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) for multilevel cervical degenerative disc diseases (DDD). Systematic searches of all published studies through March 2015 were identified from Cochrane Library, Medline, PubMed, Embase, ScienceDirect, CNKI, WANFANG DATA and CQVIP. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and non-RCTs involving HS and ACDF for multilevel DDD were included. All literature was searched and assessed by two independent reviewers according to the standard of Cochrane systematic review. Data of functional and radiological outcomes in two groups were pooled, which was then analyzed by RevMan 5.2 software. One RCT and four non-RCTs encompassing 160 patients met the inclusion criteria. Meta-analysis revealed significant differences in blood loss (p = 0.005), postoperative C2-C7 ROM (p = 0.002), ROM of superior adjacent segment (p < 0.00001) and ROM of inferior adjacent segment (p = 0.0007) between the HS group and the ACDF group. No significant differences were found regarding operation time (p = 0.75), postoperative VAS (p = 0.18) and complications (p = 0.73) between the groups. Hybrid surgery demonstrated excellent clinical efficacy and radiological results. Postoperative C2-C7 ROM was closer to the physiological status. No decrease in the ROM of the adjacent segment was noted in the hybrid surgery group.

  13. Occupational Impact of Multilevel Cervical Disease Treated With Hybrid Cervical Disc Arthroplasty in Active Duty Military Population.

    PubMed

    Cleveland, Andrew; Herzog, Josh; Caram, Pedro

    2016-01-01

    This article evaluates the techniques, results, and complications of hybrid cervical disc arthroplasty in a high-demand military population. Emphasis is on the occupational impact and return to duty outcomes. This article is a case series with prospective follow-up of 30 hybrid cervical disc arthroplasty patients from the authors' institution. Average follow-up was 16.1 months. Average patient age was 39.7 years. Noncommissioned officer was the most common military rank. Cervical disc arthroplasty at C5/6 with fusion at C6/7 was the most common procedure (21/30). All classifications of military occupational specialty were represented. A total of 24/30 (80%) patients returned to duty (RTD) and 24/24 (100%) of RTD patients reported relief (postoperative improvement) compared with 4/6 (66.7%) medical evaluation board patients. Average RTD time was 15.6 weeks. All RTD patients maintained their preoperative military occupational specialty. Hybrid cervical disc arthroplasty has the potential to provide relief and return military patients to preoperative active duty status.

  14. New Classification for Clinically Symptomatic Adjacent Segment Pathology in Cervical Disc Disease

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Clinical adjacent segment pathology (CASP) is common after cervical disc surgery. A critical examination of 320 patients operated for cervical disc prolapse revealed that CASP can also occur in patients with congenital and degenerative fusion of cervical spine. This has not been studied in depth and there is a need for a practically applicable classification of CASP. Purpose To develop a new classification scheme of CASP. Overview of Literature A review of the literature did not reveal a practically applicable classification incorporating the occurrence of CASP in congenital and degenerative fusion cases. Methods This was a retrospective analysis of 320 patients operated (509 disc spaces) on for cervical disc prolapse. Cases (n=316) were followed-up for 3-11 years. Random sampling of 220 patients with postoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in 165 cases was analyzed. Results Six symptomatic CASP cases required resurgery (1.9%), eight cases involved MRI proven CASP with axial neck pain only and 13 patients were asymptomatic with radiological adjacent segment pathology (RASP). The frequency rate was 8.5% (27/316). Four cases of congenital or degenerative fusion of vertebra developed CASP requiring surgery. CASP is classified as primary or secondary follows. Primary A1 was congenital fusion of vertebra and primary A2 was degenerative fusion of the vertebra. Secondary, which was after cervical disc surgery, comprised B1 (RASP in asymptomatic patients), B2 (CASP in patients with axial neck pain), and B3 (CASP with myeloradiculopathy). B3 was subdivided into single-level CASP (B3a) and multiple-level CASP (B3b). Conclusions Symptomatic CASP requiring resurgery is infrequent. CASP can occur in patients with congenital and degenerative fusion of the cervical spine. A new classification for CASP along with treatment strategy is proposed. Patients in Primary CASP and B3 CASP require resurgery while others require only observation. PMID:26712514

  15. New Classification for Clinically Symptomatic Adjacent Segment Pathology in Cervical Disc Disease.

    PubMed

    Uddanapalli, Srinivasan Sreeramulu

    2015-12-01

    Clinical adjacent segment pathology (CASP) is common after cervical disc surgery. A critical examination of 320 patients operated for cervical disc prolapse revealed that CASP can also occur in patients with congenital and degenerative fusion of cervical spine. This has not been studied in depth and there is a need for a practically applicable classification of CASP. To develop a new classification scheme of CASP. A review of the literature did not reveal a practically applicable classification incorporating the occurrence of CASP in congenital and degenerative fusion cases. This was a retrospective analysis of 320 patients operated (509 disc spaces) on for cervical disc prolapse. Cases (n=316) were followed-up for 3-11 years. Random sampling of 220 patients with postoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in 165 cases was analyzed. Six symptomatic CASP cases required resurgery (1.9%), eight cases involved MRI proven CASP with axial neck pain only and 13 patients were asymptomatic with radiological adjacent segment pathology (RASP). The frequency rate was 8.5% (27/316). Four cases of congenital or degenerative fusion of vertebra developed CASP requiring surgery. CASP is classified as primary or secondary follows. Primary A1 was congenital fusion of vertebra and primary A2 was degenerative fusion of the vertebra. Secondary, which was after cervical disc surgery, comprised B1 (RASP in asymptomatic patients), B2 (CASP in patients with axial neck pain), and B3 (CASP with myeloradiculopathy). B3 was subdivided into single-level CASP (B3a) and multiple-level CASP (B3b). Symptomatic CASP requiring resurgery is infrequent. CASP can occur in patients with congenital and degenerative fusion of the cervical spine. A new classification for CASP along with treatment strategy is proposed. Patients in Primary CASP and B3 CASP require resurgery while others require only observation.

  16. Hybrid surgery versus anterior cervical discectomy and fusion for multilevel cervical degenerative disc diseases: a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Peng; Fu, Xin; Li, Zhi-Jun; Sun, Xiao-Lei; Ma, Xin-Long

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this meta-analysis is to compare hybrid surgery (HS) and cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) for multilevel cervical degenerative disc diseases (DDD). Systematic searches of all published studies through March 2015 were identified from Cochrane Library, Medline, PubMed, Embase, ScienceDirect, CNKI, WANFANG DATA and CQVIP. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and non-RCTs involving HS and ACDF for multilevel DDD were included. All literature was searched and assessed by two independent reviewers according to the standard of Cochrane systematic review. Data of functional and radiological outcomes in two groups were pooled, which was then analyzed by RevMan 5.2 software. One RCT and four non-RCTs encompassing 160 patients met the inclusion criteria. Meta-analysis revealed significant differences in blood loss (p = 0.005), postoperative C2–C7 ROM (p = 0.002), ROM of superior adjacent segment (p < 0.00001) and ROM of inferior adjacent segment (p = 0.0007) between the HS group and the ACDF group. No significant differences were found regarding operation time (p = 0.75), postoperative VAS (p = 0.18) and complications (p = 0.73) between the groups. Hybrid surgery demonstrated excellent clinical efficacy and radiological results. Postoperative C2–C7 ROM was closer to the physiological status. No decrease in the ROM of the adjacent segment was noted in the hybrid surgery group. PMID:26307360

  17. Cost Utility Analysis of the Cervical Artificial Disc vs Fusion for the Treatment of 2-Level Symptomatic Degenerative Disc Disease: 5-Year Follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Zhuo; Nunley, Pierce; Stone, Marcus B.; Lee, Darrin; Kim, Kee D.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The cervical total disc replacement (cTDR) was developed to treat cervical degenerative disc disease while preserving motion. OBJECTIVE: Cost-effectiveness of this intervention was established by looking at 2-year follow-up, and this update reevaluates our analysis over 5 years. METHODS: Data were derived from a randomized trial of 330 patients. Data from the 12-Item Short Form Health Survey were transformed into utilities by using the SF-6D algorithm. Costs were calculated by extracting diagnosis-related group codes and then applying 2014 Medicare reimbursement rates. A Markov model evaluated quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) for both treatment groups. Univariate and multivariate sensitivity analyses were conducted to test the stability of the model. The model adopted both societal and health system perspectives and applied a 3% annual discount rate. RESULTS: The cTDR costs $1687 more than anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) over 5 years. In contrast, cTDR had $34 377 less productivity loss compared with ACDF. There was a significant difference in the return-to-work rate (81.6% compared with 65.4% for cTDR and ACDF, respectively; P = .029). From a societal perspective, the incremental cost-effective ratio (ICER) for cTDR was −$165 103 per QALY. From a health system perspective, the ICER for cTDR was $8518 per QALY. In the sensitivity analysis, the ICER for cTDR remained below the US willingness-to-pay threshold of $50 000 per QALY in all scenarios (−$225 816 per QALY to $22 071 per QALY). CONCLUSION: This study is the first to report the comparative cost-effectiveness of cTDR vs ACDF for 2-level degenerative disc disease at 5 years. The authors conclude that, because of the negative ICER, cTDR is the dominant modality. ABBREVIATIONS: ACDF, anterior cervical discectomy and fusion AWP, average wholesale price CE, cost-effectiveness CEA, cost-effectiveness analysis CPT, Current Procedural Terminology cTDR, cervical total disc

  18. A 20-year-old female with Hirayama disease complicated with dysplasia of the cervical vertebrae and degeneration of intervertebral discs

    PubMed Central

    Hashimoto, Masaya; Yoshioka, Masayuki; Sakimoto, Yoshihiro; Suzuki, Masahiko

    2012-01-01

    A 20-year-old female patient was presented with a 1-year history of progressive weakness of the left hand. Examination on admission showed atrophy of the muscles of the left forearm, cold paralysis and minipolymyoclonus. MR images of the cervical cord showed anterior transfer of the cervical cord on anterior flexion and cervical cord compression at the site of cervical kyphosis, confirming the diagnosis of Hirayama disease. Many features of the present case are unusual: the patient is a female (who are rarely afflicted by this disease), with cervical kyphosis and a history of exercise involving cervical vertebral loading, suggesting a potential involvement of the latter two factors in the disease onset. The findings suggest that cervical vertebral dysplasia and intervertebral disc degeneration may influence cervical kyphosis, and be involved in the onset of Hirayama disease. PMID:23144342

  19. Stand-alone cervical polyetheretherketone (PEEK) cage (cervios) for single to two-level degenerative disc disease.

    PubMed

    Iampreechakul, Prasert; Srisawat, Chaichan; Tirakotai, Wuttipong

    2011-02-01

    To study clinical and radiographic outcome of patients who underwent the Cervios cage-assisted anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) without plate fixation in single to two-level degenerative disc disease (DDD). Sixty-seven patients suffering from cervical DDD with various symptoms such as radiculopathy, myelopathy, or both were retrospectively evaluated. The cervical DDD was confirmed by plain radiographs and MR imaging The patients underwent radiographic evaluation to assess cervical lordosis, intervertebral height (IH), fusion, and subsidence. Clinical assessment was graded using a visual analog scale (VAS), Modified JOA (Japanese Orthopedic Association) score, Neck Disability Index (NDI). There were ninety two ACFD in two levels of operation. Single-level ACDF was performed in 42 patients and two-level in 25. The outcomes revealed the significant improvement of clinical outcome and restoration of cervical lordosis. The fusion rate was 97%, whereas subsidence occurred 7.61% but produced no symptom. There was no anterior or posterior migration of the cage. Complications included transient dysphagia in three patients and superficial wound infection in two patients. The present study indicates that one- to two-level stand alone Cervios cage-assisted interbody fusion without plate fixation provides improvement of clinical outcomes, restoration of lordosis and high fusion rate. However subsidence occurred in 7.61% but did not cause clinical symptoms and the patients had to use the cervical collar postoperatively.

  20. Comparative Analysis of Interbody Cages Versus Tricortical Graft with Anterior Plate Fixation for Anterior Cervical Discectomy and Fusion in Degenerative Cervical Disc Disease

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Pritish; Shekhawat, Vishal

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Multiple techniques and modalities of fixation are used in Anterior Cervical Discectomy and interbody Fusion (ACDF), each with some merit and demerit against others. Such pool of techniques reflects lack of a consensus method conducive to uniformly good results. Aim A prospective study was done to analyse safety and efficacy of tricortical autograft and anterior cervical plate (Group A) with cylindrical titanium cage filled with cancellous bone (Group B) in procedure of ACDF for single level degenerative cervical disc disease. Materials and Methods Twenty patients with degenerative cervical disc disease were included in study for ACDF. After a computer generated randomisation, ten patients (10 segments) were operated with anterior locking plating and tricortical iliac crest graft (Group A, Tricortical graft group), while ten patients(10 segments) were operated with standalone cylindrical titanium cages filled with cancellous bone harvested using minimally invasive methods (Group B, Cage group) from April 2012 to May 2015. Odoms’s criteria, visual pain analogue score and sequential plain radiographs were obtained to assess for clinic-radiological outcome. Results According to Odom’s system of functional assessment, 9 patients from each group (90%) experienced good to excellent functional recovery and 9 of 10 (90%) patients of each groups were satisfied with outcome. In both groups, relief in neck pain or arm pain was similar without any statistical difference as assessed by visual analogue score. Fusion was present in 10 of 10 (100%) patients in tricortical graft group and 10 of 10 (100%) in cage group at the end of 6 months. There was no implant related complications in cage group. Transient postoperative dysphagia was recorded in 3 patients (2 in Group A and 1 in group B), which resolved within 3 days. In tricortical graft group, graft collapse and partial extrusion was detected in one patient, which did not correspond with good results obtained

  1. Evolution of Muscles Dysfunction From Myofascial Pain Syndrome Through Cervical Disc-Root Conflict to Degenerative Spine Disease.

    PubMed

    Lisiński, Przemysław; Huber, Juliusz

    2017-02-01

    Comparative clinical and neurophysiological study in three groups of patients with general diagnosis of neck pain. To determine symptoms of muscles dysfunction in patients with myofascial pain syndrome, disc-root conflict, and degenerative changes at cervical spine. The explanation for cervical pain origin should be based on results from chosen clinical and neurophysiological studies in correlation with neuroimaging findings. Three subgroups of patients (N = 60 each) with certain symptoms were examined. Clinical evaluation included examination of pain intensity in VAS scale, muscle strength in Lovett scale, evaluation of reflexes, Spurling test, assessment of active trigger points (TRPs), and superficial sensory perception. Neurophysiological testing included surface electromyography at rest (rEMG) and during maximal contraction (mcEMG) as well as electroneurography (ENG). The greatest pain intensity with its decentralization phenomenon occurred in patients with disc-root conflict. Significant decrease of muscle strength was detected in trapezius muscle in myofascial pain syndrome subgroup. Weakness of abductor pollicis brevis muscle in patients with disc-root conflict differed them from patients with myofascial pain syndrome (P = 0.05). Patients with disc-root conflict and degenerative spine disease showed differences (P = 0.03) in reflexes evoked from triceps brachii. Positive Spurling symptom was most common (56.7%) in disc-root conflict subgroup. TRPs in trapezius muscle were found in all patients with myofascial pain syndrome. Results of rEMG amplitude measurements differed patients at P = 0.05. Only mcEMG recording from abductor pollicis brevis muscle allows for their clear cut differentiation. ENG studies showed abnormalities in patients with disc-root conflict and degenerative spine disease (P from 0.05 to 0.02). Positive correlation of VAS, TRPs, and rEMG as well as Lovett scores, mcEMG, and ENG results was found. Only applying several

  2. Clinical and Radiological Comparison of Femur and Fibular Allografts for the Treatment of Cervical Degenerative Disc Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Hyeong-Seok; Shim, Chan Shik; Lee, Sang-Ho

    2013-01-01

    Objective This consecutive retrospective study was designed to analyze and to compare the efficacy and outcomes of anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) using a fibular and femur allograft with anterior cervical plating. Methods A total of 88 consecutive patients suffering from cervical degenerative disc disease (DDD) who were treated with ACDF from September 2007 to August 2010 were enrolled in this study. Thirty-seven patients (58 segments) underwent anterior interbody fusion with a femur allograft, and 51 patients (64 segments) were treated with a fibular allograft. The mean follow-up period was 16.0 (range, 12-25) months in the femur group and 19.5 (range, 14-39) months in the fibular group. Cage fracture and breakage, subsidence rate, fusion rate, segmental angle and height and disc height were assessed by using radiography. Clinical outcomes were assessed using a visual analog scale and neck disability index. Results At 12 months postoperatively, cage fracture and breakage had occurred in 3.4% (2/58) and 7.4% (4/58) of the patients in the femur group, respectively, and 21.9% (14/64) and 31.3% (20/64) of the patients in the fibular group, respectively (p<0.05). Subsidence was noted in 43.1% (25/58) of the femur group and in 50.5% (32/64) of the fibular group. No difference in improvements in the clinical outcome between the two groups was observed. Conclusion The femur allograft showed good results in subsidence and radiologic parameters, and sustained the original cage shape more effectively than the fibular allograft. The present study suggests that the femur allograft may be a good choice as a fusion substitute for the treatment of cervical DDD. PMID:23439721

  3. Clinical and radiological comparison of femur and fibular allografts for the treatment of cervical degenerative disc diseases.

    PubMed

    Oh, Hyeong-Seok; Shim, Chan Shik; Kim, Jin-Sung; Lee, Sang-Ho

    2013-01-01

    This consecutive retrospective study was designed to analyze and to compare the efficacy and outcomes of anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) using a fibular and femur allograft with anterior cervical plating. A total of 88 consecutive patients suffering from cervical degenerative disc disease (DDD) who were treated with ACDF from September 2007 to August 2010 were enrolled in this study. Thirty-seven patients (58 segments) underwent anterior interbody fusion with a femur allograft, and 51 patients (64 segments) were treated with a fibular allograft. The mean follow-up period was 16.0 (range, 12-25) months in the femur group and 19.5 (range, 14-39) months in the fibular group. Cage fracture and breakage, subsidence rate, fusion rate, segmental angle and height and disc height were assessed by using radiography. Clinical outcomes were assessed using a visual analog scale and neck disability index. At 12 months postoperatively, cage fracture and breakage had occurred in 3.4% (2/58) and 7.4% (4/58) of the patients in the femur group, respectively, and 21.9% (14/64) and 31.3% (20/64) of the patients in the fibular group, respectively (p<0.05). Subsidence was noted in 43.1% (25/58) of the femur group and in 50.5% (32/64) of the fibular group. No difference in improvements in the clinical outcome between the two groups was observed. The femur allograft showed good results in subsidence and radiologic parameters, and sustained the original cage shape more effectively than the fibular allograft. The present study suggests that the femur allograft may be a good choice as a fusion substitute for the treatment of cervical DDD.

  4. Concomitance of fibromyalgia syndrome and cervical disc herniation

    PubMed Central

    Güler, Mustafa; Aydın, Teoman; Akgöl, Erdal; Taşpınar, Özgür

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] Fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS) and cervical disc herniation (CDH) are a common diseases commonly encountered in physical therapy clinics. There are also patients who have both of these diseases. In this study we aim to investigated whether FMS is a risk factor for cervical disc herniation and the frequency of their coincident occurrence. [Subjects and Methods] Thirty-five patients having a primary FMS diagnosis according to the American Rheumatism Association criteria are taken into consideration and a control group were the subjects of this study. The two groups were compared with respect to cervical disc hernia using cervical region MRI. [Results] The distribution of disc hernia of 6 fibromyalgia patients who had cervical discopathy was: 16.6% C2–3, 16.6% C5–6, 16.6% C6–7, 33.3% C4–5, C5–6 (two levels in two patients) and 16.6% C4–5, C5–6, C7–1 (three levels in one patient) . The herniation directions were given as: central in 5 levels, right paramedian in 1 level, and left paramedian disc hernia in 1 level. There were 4 cervical disk hernia in the control group. The herniation direction were central in two, right paramedian in one, and left paramedian in one patient. [Conclusion] In this study, the existence of cervical disc herniation in fibromyalgia patients was found to be not different from the normal population. PMID:25931731

  5. Five-year clinical results of cervical total disc replacement compared with anterior discectomy and fusion for treatment of 2-level symptomatic degenerative disc disease: a prospective, randomized, controlled, multicenter investigational device exemption clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Radcliff, Kris; Coric, Domagoj; Albert, Todd

    2016-08-01

    OBJECTIVE The purpose of this study was to report the outcome of a study of 2-level cervical total disc replacement (Mobi-C) versus anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF). Although the long-term outcome of single-level disc replacement has been extensively described, there have not been previous reports of the 5-year outcome of 2-level cervical disc replacement. METHODS This study reports the 5-year results of a prospective, randomized US FDA investigational device exemption (IDE) study conducted at 24 centers in patients with 2-level, contiguous, cervical spondylosis. Clinical outcomes at up to 60 months were evaluated, including validated outcome measures, incidence of reoperation, and adverse events. The complete study data and methodology were critically reviewed by 3 independent surgeon authors without affiliation with the IDE study or financial or institutional bias toward the study sponsor. RESULTS A total of 225 patients received the Mobi-C cervical total disc replacement device and 105 patients received ACDF. The Mobi-C and ACDF follow-up rates were 90.7% and 86.7%, respectively (p = 0.39), at 60 months. There was significant improvement in all outcome scores relative to baseline at all time points. The Mobi-C patients had significantly more improvement than ACDF patients in terms of Neck Disability Index score, SF-12 Physical Component Summary, and overall satisfaction with treatment at 60 months. The reoperation rate was significantly lower with Mobi-C (4%) versus ACDF (16%). There were no significant differences in the adverse event rate between groups. CONCLUSIONS Both cervical total disc replacement and ACDF significantly improved general and disease-specific measures compared with baseline. However, there was significantly greater improvement in general and disease-specific outcome measures and a lower rate of reoperation in the 2-level disc replacement patients versus ACDF control patients. Clinical trial registration no. NCT00389597

  6. Thalamic Pain Misdiagnosed as Cervical Disc Herniation.

    PubMed

    Lim, Tae Ha; Choi, Soo Il; Yoo, Jee In; Choi, Young Soon; Lim, Young Su; Sang, Bo Hyun; Bang, Yun Sic; Kim, Young Uk

    2016-04-01

    Thalamic pain is a primary cause of central post-stroke pain (CPSP). Clinical symptoms vary depending on the location of the infarction and frequently accompany several pain symptoms. Therefore, correct diagnosis and proper examination are not easy. We report a case of CPSP due to a left acute thalamic infarction with central disc protrusion at C5-6. A 45-year-old-male patient experiencing a tingling sensation in his right arm was referred to our pain clinic under the diagnosis of cervical disc herniation. This patient also complained of right cramp-like abdominal pain. After further evaluations, he was diagnosed with an acute thalamic infarction. Therefore detailed history taking should be performed and examiners should always be aware of other symptoms that could suggest a more dangerous disease.

  7. Reoperations Following Cervical Disc Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Skovrlj, Branko; Lee, Dong-Ho; Caridi, John Michael

    2015-01-01

    Cervical disc replacement (CDR) has emerged as an alternative surgical option to cervical arthrodesis. With increasing numbers of patients and longer follow-ups, complications related to the device and/or aging spine are growing, leaving us with a new challenge in the management and surgical revision of CDR. The purpose of this study is to review the current literature regarding reoperations following CDR and to discuss about the approaches and solutions for the current and future potential complications associated with CDR. The published rates of reoperation (mean, 1.0%; range, 0%-3.1%), revision (mean, 0.2%; range, 0%-0.5%), and removal (mean, 1.2%; range, 0%-1.9%) following CDR are low and comparable to the published rates of reoperation (mean, 1.7%; range; 0%-3.4%), revision (mean, 1.5%; range, 0%-4.7%), and removal (mean, 2.0%; range, 0%-3.4%) following cervical arthrodesis. The surgical interventions following CDR range from the repositioning to explantation followed by fusion or the reimplantation to posterior foraminotomy or fusion. Strict patient selection, careful preoperative radiographic review and surgical planning, as well as surgical technique may reduce adverse events and the need for future intervention. Minimal literature and no guidelines exist for the approaches and techniques in revision and for the removal of implants following CDR. Adherence to strict indications and precise surgical technique may reduce the number of reoperations, revisions, and removals following CDR. Long-term follow-up studies are needed, assessing the implant survivorship and its effect on the revision and removal rates. PMID:26097667

  8. Cervical disc hernia operations through posterior laminoforaminotomy

    PubMed Central

    Yolas, Coskun; Ozdemir, Nuriye Guzin; Okay, Hilmi Onder; Kanat, Ayhan; Senol, Mehmet; Atci, Ibrahim Burak; Yilmaz, Hakan; Coban, Mustafa Kemal; Yuksel, Mehmet Onur; Kahraman, Umit

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The most common used technique for posterolateral cervical disc herniations is anterior approach. However, posterior cervical laminotoforaminomy can provide excellent results in appropriately selected patients with foraminal stenosis in either soft disc prolapse or cervical spondylosis. The purpose of this study was to present the clinical outcomes following posterior laminoforaminotomy in patients with radiculopathy. Materials and Methods: We retrospectively evaluated 35 patients diagnosed with posterolateral cervical disc herniation and cervical spondylosis with foraminal stenosis causing radiculopathy operated by the posterior cervical keyhole laminoforaminotomy between the years 2010 and 2015. Results: The file records and the radiographic images of the 35 patients were assessed retrospectively. The mean age was 46.4 years (range: 34-66 years). Of the patients, 19 were males and 16 were females. In all of the patients, the neurologic deficit observed was radiculopathy. The posterolaterally localized disc herniations and the osteophytic structures were on the left side in 18 cases and on the right in 17 cases. In 10 of the patients, the disc level was at C5-6, in 18 at C6-7, in 2 at C3-4, in 2 at C4-5, in 1 at C7-T1, in 1 patient at both C5-6 and C6-7, and in 1 at both C4-5 and C5-6. In 14 of these 35 patients, both osteophytic structures and protruded disc herniation were present. Intervertebral foramen stenosis was present in all of the patients with osteophytes. Postoperatively, in 31 patients the complaints were relieved completely and four patients had complaints of neck pain and paresthesia radiating to the arm (the success of operation was 88.5%). On control examinations, there was no finding of instability or cervical kyphosis. Conclusion: Posterior cervical laminoforaminotomy is an alternative appropriate choice in both cervical soft disc herniations and cervical stenosis. PMID:27217655

  9. Minimally Invasive Anterior Cervical Discectomy Without Fusion to Treat Cervical Disc Herniations in Patients with Previous Cervical Fusions.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, Robert E; Granville, Michelle; Berti, Aldo

    2017-04-03

    Adjacent level cervical disc disease and secondarily progressive disc space degeneration that develops years after previously successful anterior cervical fusion at one or more levels is a common, but potentially complex problem to manage. The patient is faced with the option of further open surgery which involves adding another level of disc removal with fusion, posterior decompression, and stabilization, or possibly replacing the degenerated disc with an artificial disc construct. These three cases demonstrate that some patients, especially after minor trauma, may have small herniated discs as the cause for their new symptoms rather than progressive segmental degeneration. Each patient became symptomatic after minor trauma three to six years after the original fusion and had no or minimal radiologic changes of narrowing of the disc or spur formation commonly seen in adjacent level disease, but rather had magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings typical of small herniated discs. After failing multiple months of conservative treatment they were offered surgery as an option. Subsequently, all three were successfully treated with minimal anterior discectomy without fusion. There are no reports in the literature of using minimal anterior cervical discectomy without fusion in previous fused patients. This report reviews the background of adjacent level cervical disease, the various biomechanical explanations for developing a new disc herniation rather than progressive segmental degeneration, and how anterior cervical discectomy without fusion can be an option in these patients.

  10. Cervical disc arthroplasty: Pros and cons

    PubMed Central

    Moatz, Bradley; Tortolani, P. Justin

    2012-01-01

    Background: Cervical disc arthroplasty has emerged as a promising potential alternative to anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) in appropriately selected patients. Despite a history of excellent outcomes after ACDF, the question as to whether a fusion leads to adjacent segment degeneration remains unanswered. Numerous US investigational device exemption trials comparing cervical arthroplasty to fusion have been conducted to answer this question. Methods: This study reviews the current research regarding cervical athroplasty, and emphasizes both the pros and cons of arthroplasty as compared with ACDF. Results: Early clinical outcomes show that cervical arthroplasty is as effective as the standard ACDF. However, this new technology is also associated with an expanding list of novel complications. Conclusion: Although there is no definitive evidence that cervical disc replacement reduces the incidence of adjacent segment degeneration, it does show other advantages; for example, faster return to work, and reduced need for postoperative bracing. PMID:22905327

  11. Double-level cervical total disc replacement for adjacent segment disease: is it a useful treatment? Description of late onset heterotopic ossification and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Barbagallo, G M V; Certo, F; Visocchi, M; Sciacca, G; Albanese, V

    2014-01-01

    We report a rare case of double-level adjacent segment disease (ASD), occurring ten years later an anterior cervical discectomy (ACD) without fusion, treated by cervical arthroplasty, highlighting the outcome at long-term follow-up and focusing on heterotopic ossification. In 1995 a 25-year-old man satisfactorily underwent ACD at C4/C5. At that time MRI also showed signs of degenerative disc disease (DDD) at C3/C4 and C5/C6. Ten years later, a new MRI scan showed a large C3/C4 and a smaller C5/C6 soft disc hernia together with spondylotic changes at the level above and below the site of the first surgery. At C4/C5 imaging revealed a kyphotic stable "pseudoarthrosis" with anterior bridging osteophyte. The patient underwent double-level arthroplasty with ProDisc-C. Clinical and radiological outcome was satisfactory. 3 and 5 years after surgery, X-rays and CT scan documented the progressive development of heterotopic ossification, with gradual reduction of range of motion. A late onset heterotopic ossification can neutralize the theoretical advantages of cervical arthroplasty, which should be considered an effective surgical option only in selected cases. ACDF and restoration of normal lordosis can be a viable alternative in cervical revision surgery, as motion preservation can not be always mantained for a long time.

  12. Cage subsidence does not, but cervical lordosis improvement does affect the long-term results of anterior cervical fusion with stand-alone cage for degenerative cervical disc disease: a retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Wu, Wen-Jian; Jiang, Lei-Sheng; Liang, Yu; Dai, Li-Yang

    2012-07-01

    Clinical outcomes of the stand-alone cage have been encouraging when used in anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF), but concerns remain regarding its complications, especially cage subsidence. This retrospective study was undertaken to investigate the long-term radiological and clinical outcomes of the stand-alone titanium cage and to evaluate the incidence of cage subsidence in relation to the clinical outcome in the surgical treatment of degenerative cervical disc disease. A total of 57 consecutive patients (68 levels) who underwent ACDF using a titanium box cage for the treatment of cervical radiculopathy and/or myelopathy were reviewed for the radiological and clinical outcomes. They were followed for at least 5 years. Radiographs were obtained before and after surgery, 3 months postoperatively, and at the final follow-up to determine the presence of fusion and cage subsidence. The Cobb angle of C2-C7 and the vertebral bodies adjacent to the treated disc were measured to evaluate the cervical sagittal alignment and local lordosis. The disc height was measured as well. The clinical outcomes were evaluated using the Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) score for cervical myelopathy, before and after surgery, and at the final follow-up. The recovery rate of JOA score was also calculated. The Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) score of neck and radicular pain were evaluated as well. The fusion rate was 95.6% (65/68) 3 months after surgery. Successful bone fusion was achieved in all patients at the final follow-up. Cage subsidence occurred in 13 cages (19.1%) at 3-month follow-up; however, there was no relation between fusion and cage subsidence. Cervical and local lordosis improved after surgery, with the improvement preserved at the final follow-up. The preoperative disc height of both subsidence and non-subsidence patients was similar; however, postoperative posterior disc height (PDH) of subsidence group was significantly greater than of non-subsidence group

  13. Anterior Cervical Discectomy and Fusion Using a Double Cylindrical Cage versus an Anterior Cervical Plating System with Iliac Crest Autografts for the Treatment of Cervical Degenerative Disc Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Seong Joon

    2014-01-01

    Objective Anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) is often complicated by subsidence, pseudoarthrosis, kyphosis, and graft donor site morbidities. To decrease the occurrence of these complications, various types of cages have been developed. We designed this retrospective study to analyze and compare the efficacy and outcomes of ACDF using double cylindrical cages (DCC) (BK Medical, Seoul, Korea) versus an anterior cervical plating system with autogenous iliac crest grafts. Methods Forty-eight patients were treated with autograft and plating (plate group), and 48 with DCC group from October 2007 to October 2011. We analyzed construct length, cervical lordotic curvarture, the thickness of the prevertebral soft tissue, segmental instability, and clinical outcomes. Results There were no significant differences between the two groups with regard to the decrease in construct length or cervical lodortic curvature at the 3-, 6-, and 12-month follow-ups. The prevertebral soft tissue was thinner in the DCC group than the plate group immediately after surgery and at the 3-, 6-, and 12-month follow-ups. The difference in interspinous distance on flexion-extension was shorter in the plate group than the DCC group at the 3- and 6-month follow-ups. However, there was no significant difference in this distance between the two groups at the 12-month follow-up. Conclusion A double cylindrical cage is a good alternative for fusion in patients with cervical degenerative diseases; the surgical method is relatively simple, allows good synostosis, has less associated prevertebral soft tissue swelling, and complications associated with autografting can be avoided. PMID:24570812

  14. Is anterior cervical fusion with a porous tantalum implant a cost-effective method to treat cervical disc disease with radiculopathy?

    PubMed

    Fernández-Fairen, Mariano; Murcia, Antonio; Torres, Ana; Hernández-Vaquero, Daniel; Menzie, Ann M

    2012-09-15

    Retrospective cost-effectiveness analysis. To determine the relative cost-effectiveness of anterior cervical discectomy with fusion (ACDF) using a porous tantalum implant compared with autograft with plating, for single-level cervical disc disease with radiculopathy. ACDF with autograft as an interbody spacer is a generally accepted method to treat degenerated cervical discs with radiculopathy. Concerns about donor site morbidity and the structural characteristics of autograft stimulated investigations of alternative materials. Techniques may differ in their operative risks, complications, outcomes, and resource use. A retrospective review of clinical outcomes and total cost of illness for 5 years postsurgery was performed for 61 consecutive patients enrolled for this study. Twenty-eight patients were treated with single-level ACDF using either a stand-alone, porous tantalum implant, without graft inside the implant, and 33 patients received autograft and plating. A cost-effectiveness analysis comparing the 2 ACDF treatment methods was conducted. This article reports clinical assessments, quality adjusted life years gained, and an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio analysis. Patients in both cohorts reported improved clinical outcomes, including neck disability index, visual analogue scale, Short-Form 36, Odom's clinical assessment, and patient satisfaction at 5 years postindex surgery. The mean cost of illness for the study period, including preoperative through 5 years postoperative assessments, was 6806 per patient treated with tantalum and 10,143 per patient receiving autograft and plate. Quality-adjusted life years (QALY) gained were 9.41 and 7.14 for the tantalum and control cohorts, respectively. The cost per QALY for the tantalum group was 723 and 1420 for the control group. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of ACDF with a porous tantalum implant compared with ACDF with autograft and plate was -1473 per patient per year for the duration of this

  15. Cervical disc replacement - emerging equivalency to anterior cervical discectomy and fusion.

    PubMed

    Buckland, Aaron J; Baker, Joseph F; Roach, Ryan P; Spivak, Jeffrey M

    2016-06-01

    Cervical disc replacement has become an acceptable alternative to anterior cervical fusion for the surgical treatment of cervical spine spondylosis resulting in radiculopathy or myelopathy following anterior discectomy and decompression. This concise overview considers the current state of knowledge regarding the continued debate of the role of cervical disc replacement with an update in light of the latest clinical trial results. A literature review was performed identifying clinical trials pertaining to the use of cervical disc replacement compared to cervical discectomy and fusion. Single level disease and two level disease were considered. Outcome data from the major clinical trials was reviewed and salient points identified. With lengthier follow-up data becoming available, the equivalence of CDR in appropriately selected cases is becoming clear. This is chiefly manifested by reduced re-operation rates and reduced incidence of adjacent level disease in those treated with arthroplasty. Cervical disc replacement shows emerging equivalence in outcomes compared to the gold standard anterior cervical discectomy and fusion. Further longer term results are anticipated to confirm this trend.

  16. Early results and review of the literature of a novel hybrid surgical technique combining cervical arthrodesis and disc arthroplasty for treating multilevel degenerative disc disease: opposite or complementary techniques?

    PubMed Central

    Assietti, Roberto; Corbino, Leonardo; Olindo, Giuseppe; Foti, Pietro V.; Russo, Vittorio; Albanese, Vincenzo

    2009-01-01

    We report the clinical and radiological results on the safety and efficacy of an unusual surgical strategy coupling anterior cervical discectomy and fusion and total disc replacement in a single-stage procedure, in patients with symptomatic, multilevel cervical degenerative disc disease (DDD). The proposed hybrid, single-stage, fusion–nonfusion technique aims either at restoring or maintaining motion where appropriate or favouring bony fusion when indicated by degenerative changes. Twenty-four patients (mean age 46.7 years) with symptomatic, multilevel DDD, either soft disc hernia or different stage spondylosis per single level, with predominant anterior myeloradicular compression and absence of severe alterations of cervical spine sagittal alignment, have been operated using such hybrid technique. Fifteen patients underwent a two-level surgery, seven patients received a three-level surgery and two a four-level procedure, for a total of 59 implanted devices (27 disc prostheses and 32 cages). Follow-up ranged between 12 and 40 months (mean 23.8 months). In all but one patient clinical follow-up (neurological examination, Nurick scale, NDI, SF-36) demonstrated significant improvement; radiological evaluation showed functioning disc prostheses (total range of motion 3–15°) and fusion through cages. None of the patients needed revision surgery for persisting or recurring symptoms, procedure-related complications or devices dislocations. To the authors’ best knowledge, this is the first study with the longest available follow-up describing a different concept in the management of cervical multilevel DDD. Although larger series with longer follow-up are needed, in selected cases of symptomatic multilevel DDD, the proposed surgical strategy appears to be a safe and reliable application of combined arthroplasty and arthrodesis during a single surgical procedure. PMID:19415346

  17. Early results and review of the literature of a novel hybrid surgical technique combining cervical arthrodesis and disc arthroplasty for treating multilevel degenerative disc disease: opposite or complementary techniques?

    PubMed

    Barbagallo, Giuseppe M V; Assietti, Roberto; Corbino, Leonardo; Olindo, Giuseppe; Foti, Pietro V; Russo, Vittorio; Albanese, Vincenzo

    2009-06-01

    We report the clinical and radiological results on the safety and efficacy of an unusual surgical strategy coupling anterior cervical discectomy and fusion and total disc replacement in a single-stage procedure, in patients with symptomatic, multilevel cervical degenerative disc disease (DDD). The proposed hybrid, single-stage, fusion-nonfusion technique aims either at restoring or maintaining motion where appropriate or favouring bony fusion when indicated by degenerative changes. Twenty-four patients (mean age 46.7 years) with symptomatic, multilevel DDD, either soft disc hernia or different stage spondylosis per single level, with predominant anterior myeloradicular compression and absence of severe alterations of cervical spine sagittal alignment, have been operated using such hybrid technique. Fifteen patients underwent a two-level surgery, seven patients received a three-level surgery and two a four-level procedure, for a total of 59 implanted devices (27 disc prostheses and 32 cages). Follow-up ranged between 12 and 40 months (mean 23.8 months). In all but one patient clinical follow-up (neurological examination, Nurick scale, NDI, SF-36) demonstrated significant improvement; radiological evaluation showed functioning disc prostheses (total range of motion 3-15 degrees ) and fusion through cages. None of the patients needed revision surgery for persisting or recurring symptoms, procedure-related complications or devices dislocations. To the authors' best knowledge, this is the first study with the longest available follow-up describing a different concept in the management of cervical multilevel DDD. Although larger series with longer follow-up are needed, in selected cases of symptomatic multilevel DDD, the proposed surgical strategy appears to be a safe and reliable application of combined arthroplasty and arthrodesis during a single surgical procedure.

  18. Is cervical disc arthroplasty good for congenital cervical stenosis?

    PubMed

    Chang, Peng-Yuan; Chang, Hsuan-Kan; Wu, Jau-Ching; Huang, Wen-Cheng; Fay, Li-Yu; Tu, Tsung-Hsi; Wu, Ching-Lan; Cheng, Henrich

    2017-05-01

    OBJECTIVE Cervical disc arthroplasty (CDA) has been demonstrated to be as safe and effective as anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) in the management of 1- and 2-level degenerative disc disease (DDD). However, there has been a lack of data to address the fundamental discrepancy between the two surgeries (CDA vs ACDF), and preservation versus elimination of motion, in the management of cervical myelopathy associated with congenital cervical stenosis (CCS). Although younger patients tend to benefit more from motion preservation, it is uncertain if CCS caused by multilevel DDD can be treated safely with CDA. METHODS Consecutive patients who underwent 3-level anterior cervical discectomy were retrospectively reviewed. Inclusion criteria were age less than 50 years, CCS (Pavlov ratio ≤ 0.82), symptomatic myelopathy correlated with DDD, and stenosis limited to 3 levels of the subaxial cervical (C3-7) spine. Exclusion criteria were ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament, previous posterior decompression surgery (e.g., laminoplasty or laminectomy), osteoporosis, previous trauma, or other rheumatic diseases that might have caused the cervical myelopathy. All these patients who underwent 3-level discectomy were divided into 2 groups according to the strategies of management: preservation or elimination of motion (the hybrid-CDA group and the ACDF group). The hybrid-CDA group underwent 2-level CDA plus 1-level ACDF, whereas the ACDF group underwent 3-level ACDF. Clinical assessment was measured by the visual analog scales (VAS) for neck and arm pain, Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) scores, and Nurick grades. Radiographic outcomes were measured using dynamic radiographs for evaluation of range of motion (ROM). RESULTS Thirty-seven patients, with a mean (± SD) age of 44.57 ± 5.10 years, were included in the final analysis. There was a male predominance in this series (78.4%, 29 male patients), and the mean follow-up duration was 2.37 ± 1

  19. Artificial Cervical Disc Arthroplasty (ACDA): tips and tricks

    PubMed Central

    Khadivi, Masoud; Rahimi Movaghar, Vafa; Abdollahzade, Sina

    2012-01-01

    Abstract: Background: Anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) is currently treatment of choice for managing medical therapy refractory cervical degenerative disc disease. Numerous studies have demonstrated the effectiveness of ACDF; patients generally experience rapid recoveries, and dramatic improvement in their pain and quality of life. However, as several studies reported symptomatic adjacent segment disease attributed to fusions’ altered kinematics, cervical disc arthroplasty emerged as a new motion-sparing alternative to fusion. Fusion at one level increases motion at adjacent levels along with increased intradiscal pressures. This phenomenon can result in symptomatic adjacent level degeneration, which can necessitate reoperation at these levels. The era of cervical arthroplasty began in Europe in the late 1990s. In recent years, artificial cervical disc arthroplasty (ACDA) has been increasingly used by spine surgeons for degenerative cervical disc disease. There have been several reports of safety, efficacy and indications of ACDA. Cervical arthroplasty offers several theoretical advantages over anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) in the treatment of selected patients with medically refractory cervical radiculopathy. Preserving motion at the operated level, cervical TDR has the potential to decrease the occurrence of adjacent segment degeneration. There are a few studies on the efficacy and effectiveness of ACDA compared to cervical fusion. However, the true scenery of cervical arthroplasty yet to be identified. Objective: This study is intended to define patients' characteristics and outcomes of ACDA by a single surgeon in Iran. Methods: This retrospective study was performed in two general Hospitals in Tehran, Iran from 2005 To 2010. All patients were operated by one senior neurospine surgeon. One hundred fifty three patients were operated in this period. All patients signed the informed consent form prior to surgery. All patients

  20. Multi-center, Prospective, Randomized, Controlled Investigational Device Exemption Clinical Trial Comparing Mobi-C Cervical Artificial Disc to Anterior Discectomy and Fusion in the Treatment of Symptomatic Degenerative Disc Disease in the Cervical Spine

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Hyun W.; Davis, Reginald; Gaede, Steven; Hoffman, Greg; Kim, Kee; Nunley, Pierce D.; Peterson, Daniel; Rashbaum, Ralph; Stokes, John

    2014-01-01

    Background Anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) is the gold standard for treating symptomatic cervical disc degeneration. Cervical total disc replacements (TDRs) have emerged as an alternative for some patients. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the safety and effectiveness of a new TDR device compared with ACDF for treating single-level cervical disc degeneration. Methods This was a prospective, randomized, controlled, multicenter Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regulated Investigational Device Exemption (IDE) study. A total of 245 patients were treated (164 TDR: 81 ACDF). The primary outcome measure was overall success based on improvement in Neck Disability Index (NDI), no subsequent surgical interventions, and no adverse events (AEs) classified as major complications. Secondary outcome measures included SF-12, visual analog scale (VAS) assessing neck and arm pain, patient satisfaction, radiographic range of motion, and adjacent level degeneration. Patients were evaluated preoperatively and postoperatively at 6 weeks, 3, 6, 12, 18, and 24 months. The hypothesis was that the TDR success rate was non-inferior to ACDF at 24 months. Results Overall success rates were 73.6% for TDR and 65.3% for ACDF, confirming non-inferiority (p < 0.0025). TDR demonstrated earlier improvements with significant differences in NDI scores at 6 weeks and 3 months, and VAS neck pain and SF-12 PCS scores at 6 weeks (p<0.05). Operative level range of motion in the TDR group was maintained throughout follow-up. Radiographic evidence of inferior adjacent segment degeneration was significantly greater with ACDF at 12 and 24 months (p < 0.05). AE rates were similar. Conclusions Mobi-C TDR is a safe and effective treatment for single-level disc degeneration, producing outcomes similar to ACDF with less adjacent segment degeneration. Level of Evidence: Level I. Clinical relevance: This study adds to the literature supporting cervical TDR as a viable option to ACDF in

  1. MRI evaluation of spontaneous intervertebral disc degeneration in the alpaca cervical spine.

    PubMed

    Stolworthy, Dean K; Bowden, Anton E; Roeder, Beverly L; Robinson, Todd F; Holland, Jacob G; Christensen, S Loyd; Beatty, Amanda M; Bridgewater, Laura C; Eggett, Dennis L; Wendel, John D; Stieger-Vanegas, Susanne M; Taylor, Meredith D

    2015-12-01

    Animal models have historically provided an appropriate benchmark for understanding human pathology, treatment, and healing, but few animals are known to naturally develop intervertebral disc degeneration. The study of degenerative disc disease and its treatment would greatly benefit from a more comprehensive, and comparable animal model. Alpacas have recently been presented as a potential large animal model of intervertebral disc degeneration due to similarities in spinal posture, disc size, biomechanical flexibility, and natural disc pathology. This research further investigated alpacas by determining the prevalence of intervertebral disc degeneration among an aging alpaca population. Twenty healthy female alpacas comprised two age subgroups (5 young: 2-6 years; and 15 older: 10+ years) and were rated according to the Pfirrmann-grade for degeneration of the cervical intervertebral discs. Incidence rates of degeneration showed strong correlations with age and spinal level: younger alpacas were nearly immune to developing disc degeneration, and in older animals, disc degeneration had an increased incidence rate and severity at lower cervical levels. Advanced disc degeneration was present in at least one of the cervical intervertebral discs of 47% of the older alpacas, and it was most common at the two lowest cervical intervertebral discs. The prevalence of intervertebral disc degeneration encourages further investigation and application of the lower cervical spine of alpacas and similar camelids as a large animal model of intervertebral disc degeneration.

  2. Surgical and Functional Outcomes After Multilevel Cervical Fusion for Degenerative Disc Disease Compared With Fusion for Radiculopathy: A Study of Workers' Compensation Population.

    PubMed

    Faour, Mhamad; Anderson, Joshua T; Haas, Arnold R; Percy, Rick; Woods, Stephen T; Ahn, Uri M; Ahn, Nicholas U

    2017-05-01

    Retrospective cohort comparative study. To evaluate presurgical and surgical factors that affect return to work (RTW) status after multilevel cervical fusion, and to compare outcomes after multilevel cervical fusion for degenerative disc disease (DDD) versus radiculopathy. Cervical fusion provides more than 90% of symptomatic relief for radiculopathy and myelopathy. However, cervical fusion for DDD without radiculopathy is considered controversial. In addition, multilevel fusion is associated with poorer surgical outcomes with increased levels fused. Data of cervical comorbidities was collected from Ohio Bureau of Workers' Compensation for subjects with work-related injuries. The study population included subjects who underwent multilevel cervical fusion. Patients with radiculopathy or DDD were identified. Multivariate logistic regression was performed to identify factors that affect RTW status. Surgical and functional outcomes were compared between groups. Stable RTW status within 3 years after multilevel cervical fusion was negatively affected by: fusion for DDD, age > 55 years, preoperative opioid use, initial psychological evaluation before surgery, injury-to-surgery > 2 years and instrumentation.DDD group had lower rate of achieving stable RTW status (P= 0.0001) and RTW within 1 year of surgery (P= 0.0003) compared with radiculopathy group. DDD patients were less likely to have a stable RTW status [odds ratio, OR = 0.63 (0.50-0.79)] or RTW within 1 year after surgery [OR = 0.65 (0.52-0.82)].DDD group had higher rate of opioid use (P= 0.001), and higher rate of disability after surgery (P= 0.002). Multiple detriments affect stable RTW status after multilevel cervical fusion including DDD. DDD without radiculopathy was associated with lower RTW rates, less likelihood to return to work, higher disability, and higher opioid use after surgery. Multilevel cervical fusion for DDD may be counterproductive. Future studies should investigate further

  3. Optimal screw orientation for the fixation of cervical degenerative disc disease using nonlinear C3-T2 multi-level spinal models and neuro-genetic algorithms.

    PubMed

    Chang, Ting-Kuo; Hsu, Ching-Chi; Chen, Kuan-Ting

    2015-01-01

    Anterior cervical discectomy and fusion is a common surgical procedure performed to remove a degenerative or herniated disc in cervical spine. Unfortunately, clinical complications of anterior cervical plate (ACP) systems still occur, such as weak fixation stability and implant loosening. Previous researchers have attempted to ameliorate these complications by varying screw orientations, but the screw orientations are mainly determined according to the investigator's experiences. Thus, the aim of this study was to discover the optimal screw orientations of ACP systems to achieve acceptable fixation stability using finite element simulations and engineering algorithms. Three-dimensional finite element models of C3-T2 multi-level segments with an ACP system were first developed to analyze the fixation stability using ANSYS Workbench 14.5. Then, artificial neural networks were applied to create one objective function, and the optimal screw orientations of an ACP system were discovered by genetic algorithms. Finally, the numerical models and the optimization study were validated using biomechanical tests. The results showed that the optimal design of the ACP system had highest fixation stability compared with other ACP designs. The neuro-genetic algorithm has effectively reduced the time and effort required for discovering for the optimal screw orientations of an ACP system. The optimum screw orientation of the ACP system could be successfully discovered, and it revealed excellent fixation stability for the treatment of cervical degenerative disc disease. This study could directly provide the biomechanical rationale and surgical suggestion to orthopedic surgeons.

  4. [Influence of intraoperative cervical posture in single segmental cervical disc replacement on restoration of cervical curve in neutral position].

    PubMed

    Hong, Ying; Deng, Yuxiao; Liu, Hao; Gong, Renrong; An, Lingjing; Gong, Quan; Li, Tao; Song, Yueming

    2013-01-01

    To study the correlation between the cervical posture in the cervical disc replacement (CDR). Between January 2008 and August 2010, 51 and the cervical curve restoration in neutral position after surgery. patients underwent single segmental PRESTIGE LP replacement, and the clinical data were retrospectively analyzed. During the surgery, the patient was supinely placed and the lordosis of the cervical spine was mantained with a pillow placed beneath the neck. Of them, 28 were male and 23 were female, aged 30-64 years (mean, 45 years); 32 were diagnosed as having cervical spondylotic myelopathy, 7 having radiculopathy, and 12 having myelopathy and radiculopathy. The disease duration was 3-48 months (mean, 15 months). CDR was performed at C(4, 5) in 5 cases, at C(5, 6) in 42 cases, and at C(6, 7) in 4 cases. The Cobb angles of the cervical alignment, targeted functional spinal unit (FSU), and targeted disc were measured by sagittal X-ray film of the cervical spine in neutral position before and after surgery, as well as the intraoperative C-arm fluroscopy of the cervical spine. Linear correlation and regression were performed to analyze the relation between cervical Cobb angle difference at intraoperation and improvement of the Cobb angles at 3 months after operation. The cervical Cobb angles at intraoperation and 3 months after operation were larger than those at preoperation (P < 0.05). The difference of the Cobb angle between intra- and pre-operation was (6.72 +/- 9.13) degrees on cervical alignment, (2.10 +/- 5.12) degrees on targeted FSU, and (3.33 +/- 3.75) degrees on targeted disc. At 3 months after operation, the Cobb angle improvement of the cervical alignment, targeted FSU, and targeted disc was (6.30 +/- 7.28), (3.99 +/- 5.37), and (4.29 +/- 5.36) degrees, respectively. There was no significant difference in the Cobb angle improvement between the targeted FSU and the targeted disc (t = -4.391, P = 0.698), and between the targeted disc and the cervical

  5. Diaphragm paralysis from cervical disc lesions.

    PubMed

    Cloward, R B

    1988-01-01

    An opera singer, who "made her living with her diaphragm", developed a post-traumatic unilateral radiculopathy due to cervical disc lesions, C3 to C6. During one year of severe neck and left arm pain she gradually lost the ability to sing difficult operatic passages which brought an end to her music career. Following a three level anterior cervical decompression and fusion, the neck and arm pain was immediately relieved. One week later her voice and singing ability returned to its full strength and power permitting her to resume her activities as a vocalist. The diagnosis of paresis of the left hemi-diaphragm as part of the cervical disc syndrome was implied by postoperative retrospective inference.

  6. Material Science in Cervical Total Disc Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Pham, Martin H.; Mehta, Vivek A.; Tuchman, Alexander; Hsieh, Patrick C.

    2015-01-01

    Current cervical total disc replacement (TDR) designs incorporate a variety of different biomaterials including polyethylene, stainless steel, titanium (Ti), and cobalt-chrome (CoCr). These materials are most important in their utilization as bearing surfaces which allow for articular motion at the disc space. Long-term biological effects of implanted materials include wear debris, host inflammatory immune reactions, and osteolysis resulting in implant failure. We review here the most common materials used in cervical TDR prosthetic devices, examine their bearing surfaces, describe the construction of the seven current cervical TDR devices that are approved for use in the United States, and discuss known adverse biological effects associated with long-term implantation of these materials. It is important to appreciate and understand the variety of biomaterials available in the design and construction of these prosthetics and the considerations which guide their implementation. PMID:26523281

  7. Material Science in Cervical Total Disc Replacement.

    PubMed

    Pham, Martin H; Mehta, Vivek A; Tuchman, Alexander; Hsieh, Patrick C

    2015-01-01

    Current cervical total disc replacement (TDR) designs incorporate a variety of different biomaterials including polyethylene, stainless steel, titanium (Ti), and cobalt-chrome (CoCr). These materials are most important in their utilization as bearing surfaces which allow for articular motion at the disc space. Long-term biological effects of implanted materials include wear debris, host inflammatory immune reactions, and osteolysis resulting in implant failure. We review here the most common materials used in cervical TDR prosthetic devices, examine their bearing surfaces, describe the construction of the seven current cervical TDR devices that are approved for use in the United States, and discuss known adverse biological effects associated with long-term implantation of these materials. It is important to appreciate and understand the variety of biomaterials available in the design and construction of these prosthetics and the considerations which guide their implementation.

  8. Percutaneous cervical nucleoplasty in the treatment of cervical disc herniation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jian; Zhang, Zai-Heng

    2008-01-01

    Percutaneous disc decompression procedures have been performed in the past. Various percutaneous techniques such as percutaneous discectomy, laser discectomy, and nucleoplasty have been successful. Our prospective study was directly to evaluate the results of percutaneous cervical nucleoplasty (PCN) surgery for cervical disc herniation, and illustrate the effectiveness of PCN in symptomatic patients who had cervical herniated discs. From July of 2002 to June of 2005, 126 consecutive patients with contained cervical disc herniations have presented at the authors’ clinic and treated by PCN. The patients’ gender distribution for PCN was 65 male, 61 female. The age of patients ranged from 34 to 66 years (mean 51.9 ± 10.2 years). The levels of involvement were 21 cases at C3–4, 30 cases at C4–5, 40 cases at C5–6, and 35 cases at C6–7. The clinical outcomes, pain reduction and the segment stability were all recorded during this study. A clinical outcome was quantified by the Macnab standard and using VAS. The angular displacement (AD) ≥11° or horizontal displacement (HD) ≥3 mm was considered to be radiographically unstable. In the results of this study, puncture of the needle into the disc space was accurately performed under X-ray guidance in all cases. There was one case where the Perc-D Spine Wand had broken in the disc space during the procedure. The partial Perc-D Spine Wand, which had broken in the disc space could not be removed by the percutaneous cervical discectomy and thus remained there. There were no recurrent cases or complications in our series. Macnab standard results were excellent in 62 cases, good in 41 cases and fair in 23 cases. The rate of excellent and good was 83.73%. The VAS scores demonstrated statistically significant improvement in PCN at the 2-week, 1, 3, 6, and 12-month follow-up visits when compared to preoperational values (P < 0.01). There were no cases of instability following the PCN procedure. There was no

  9. Clinical and radiographic features of hybrid surgery for the treatment of skip-level cervical degenerative disc disease: A minimum 24-month follow-up.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ting-Kui; Wang, Bei-Yu; Cheng, Ding; Rong, Xin; Lou, Ji-Gang; Hong, Ying; Liu, Hao

    2017-02-25

    We describe the radiographic changes of IS and investigate the safety and feasibility of hybrid surgery (HS) coupling cervical disc arthroplasty (CDA) and anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) for the treatment of skip-level cervical degenerative disc disease (CDDD). Twenty-seven patients who received HS were retrospectively reviewed. Clinical evaluation based on the Japanese Orthopedic Association (JOA) and Neck Disability Index (NDI) and Visual Analog Scale (VAS) scores. Radiographic parameters included cervical alignment (CA), functional spine unite (FSU) angle of intermediated segment (IS), range of motion (ROM) and intervertebral disc height (IDH). Data regarding radiographic changes at IS were collected. The mean follow-up duration of 30.10months. Compared with preoperative value, JOA, NDI and VAS scores significantly improved after surgery (p<0.05). The CA was recovered significantly after surgery (p<0.05). There was no significant difference in the FSU angle and the IDH of IS between before and at 24months postoperatively (p>0.05). The ROM of IS significantly decreased at the first week after surgery (p<0.05), was similar to preoperative value at 3months postoperatively and significantly increased after 6months (p<0.05). Radiographic changes at IS were observed in 2 patients and Class II Heterotopic ossification (HO) was detected in 2 patients. HS is a safe and feasible alternative procedure for the treatment of skip-level CDDD. It preserved the IS intact and achieved satisfactory clinical and radiographic outcomes over a 24-month follow-up.

  10. Rate of adjacent segment disease in cervical disc arthroplasty versus single-level fusion: meta-analysis of prospective studies.

    PubMed

    Verma, Kushagra; Gandhi, Sapan D; Maltenfort, Mitchell; Albert, Todd J; Hilibrand, Alan S; Vaccaro, Alexander R; Radcliff, Kristin E

    2013-12-15

    Meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials. To compare the reported incidence of adjacent segment disease (ASD) requiring surgical intervention between anterior cervical decompression and fusion (ACDF) and total disc arthroplasty (TDA). The concern for ASD has led to the development of motion-preserving technologies such as TDA. To date, however, no known study has sought to compare the incidence of ASD between ACDF and TDA in major prospective studies. A systematic review of IDE and non-IDE trials was performed using PubMed and Cochrane libraries. These databases were thoroughly searched for prospective randomized studies comparing ACDF and TDR. Six studies met the inclusion criteria for a meta-analysis and were used to report an overall rate of ASD for both ACDF and TDA. Pooling data from 6 prospective studies, the overall sample size at baseline was 1586 (ACDF = 777, TDA = 809) and at the final follow-up was 1110 giving an overall follow-up of 70%. Patients after an ACDF had a lower rate of follow-up overall than those after TDR (ACDF: 67.3% vs. TDR: 72.6%, P= 0.01). Thirty-six patients required adjacent-level surgery after an ACDF at 2 to 5 years of follow-up (6.9%) compared with 30 patients after a TDA (5.1%). The corresponding reoperation rate for ASD was 2.4 ± 1.7% per year for ACDF versus 1.1 ± 1.5% per year for TDR. These differences were not statistically significant (P= 0.44). Using a Kaplan-Meier analysis and historical data, we expect 48 patients in the ACDF group and 55 patients in the TDR group to have symptomatic disease at an adjacent level. From a meta-analysis of prospective studies, there is no difference in the rate of ASD for ACDF versus TDA. We also report an overall lower rate of follow-up for patients with ACDF than for those with TDR. Future prospective studies should continue to focus on excellent patient follow-up and accurate assessment of patient symptoms that are attributable to an adjacent level as this has been an under

  11. A new zero-profile, stand-alone Fidji cervical cage for the treatment of the single and multilevel cervical degenerative disc disease.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhonghai; Wang, Huadong; Li, Li; Tang, Jiaguang; Ren, Dongfeng; Hou, Shuxun

    2017-07-01

    To investigate the clinical and radiological results of the new zero-profile, stand-alone Fidji cervical cage to treat single- and multiple-level cervical DDD, and evaluate the safety and efficiency. Between October 2011 and July 2014, 72 consecutive patients (41 males and 31 females; mean age 50.9years [range, 33-68years]) with cervical DDD who underwent surgery and were followed for more than 2years were enrolled in this study (mean 31.1months, range 24-47months). The study compared clinical outcomes, radiologic parameters and complication rates. The SF-36, VAS, NDI, and JOA scores of all patients were improved significantly after surgery at any time point. (all p<0.05). The C2-C7 Cobb angle and the disc height index (DHI) of all patients were improved significantly after surgery at any time point (all p<0.05). From 3months after surgery to final follow-up the DHI showed a significant reduction comparing 1week after surgery (all p<0.05). The fusion rates were 91.7% (66/72) and the radiologic mean fusion time was 9.9months. Radiological evidence of adjacent segment degeneration (ASD) was observed in 4/41 patients (9.8%). Postoperative complications included epidural hematoma, hoarseness, dysphagia, axial neck pain, and subsidence. The zero-profile, stand-alone Fidji cervical cage for ACDF can be considered an effective, reliable and safe alternative procedure in the treatment of cervical DDD. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Artificial disc and vertebra system: a novel motion preservation device for cervical spinal disease after vertebral corpectomy

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Jun; Lu, Meng; Lu, Teng; Liang, Baobao; Xu, Junkui; Qin, Jie; Cai, Xuan; Huang, Sihua; Wang, Dong; Li, Haopeng; He, Xijing

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the range of motion and stability of the human cadaveric cervical spine after the implantation of a novel artificial disc and vertebra system by comparing an intact group and a fusion group. METHODS: Biomechanical tests were conducted on 18 human cadaveric cervical specimens. The range of motion and the stability index range of motion were measured to study the function and stability of the artificial disc and vertebra system of the intact group compared with the fusion group. RESULTS: In all cases, the artificial disc and vertebra system maintained intervertebral motion and reestablished vertebral height at the operative level. After its implantation, there was no significant difference in the range of motion (ROM) of C3–7 in all directions in the non-fusion group compared with the intact group (p>0.05), but significant differences were detected in flexion, extension and axial rotation compared with the fusion group (p<0.05). The ROM of adjacent segments (C3−4, C6−7) of the non-fusion group decreased significantly in some directions compared with the fusion group (p<0.05). Significant differences in the C4-6 ROM in some directions were detected between the non-fusion group and the intact group. In the fusion group, the C4−6 ROM in all directions decreased significantly compared with the intact and non-fusion groups (p<0.01). The stability index ROM (SI-ROM) of some directions was negative in the non-fusion group, and a significant difference in SI-ROM was only found in the C4−6 segment of the non-fusion group compared with the fusion group. CONCLUSION: An artificial disc and vertebra system could restore vertebral height and preserve the dynamic function of the surgical area and could theoretically reduce the risk of adjacent segment degeneration compared with the anterior fusion procedure. However, our results should be considered with caution because of the low power of the study. The use of a larger sample should be considered

  13. A RCT comparing 7-year clinical outcomes of one level symptomatic cervical disc disease (SCDD) following ProDisc-C total disc arthroplasty (TDA) versus anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF).

    PubMed

    Loumeau, Thomas P; Darden, Bruce V; Kesman, Thomas J; Odum, Susan M; Van Doren, Bryce A; Laxer, Eric B; Murrey, Daniel B

    2016-07-01

    The objective of this trial was to compare the safety and efficacy of TDA using the ProDisc-C implant to ACDF in patients with single-level SCDD between C3 and C7. We report on the single-site results from a larger multicenter trial of 13 sites using an approved US Food and Drug Administration protocol (prospective, randomized controlled non-inferiority design). Patients were randomized one-to-one to either the ProDisc-C device or ACDF. All enrollees were evaluated pre- and post-operatively at regular intervals through month 84. Visual Analog Scale (VAS) for neck and arm pain/intensity, Neck Disability Index (NDI), Short-Form 36 (SF-36), and satisfaction were assessed. Twenty-two patients were randomized to each arm of the study. Nineteen additional patients received the ProDisc-C via continued access. NDI improved with the ProDisc-C more than with ACDF. Total range of motion was maintained with the ProDisc-C, but diminished with ACDF. Neck and arm pain improved more in the ProDisc-C than ACDF group. Patient satisfaction remained higher in the ProDisc-C group at 7 years. SF-36 scores were higher in the TDA group than ACDF group at 7 years; the difference was not clinically significant. Six additional operations (two at the same level; four at an adjacent level) were performed in the ACDF, but none in the ProDisc-C group. The ProDisc-C implant appears to be safe and effective for the treatment of SCDD. Patients with the implant retained motion at the involved segment and had a lower reoperation rate than those with an ACDF.

  14. Long-Term Follow-Up Radiologic and Clinical Evaluation of Cylindrical Cage for Anterior Interbody Fusion in Degenerative Cervical Disc Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Suhyeong; Yi, Hyeon-Joong; Bak, Koang Hum; Kim, Dong Won; Lee, Yoon Kyoung

    2012-01-01

    Objective Various procedures have been introduced for anterior interbody fusion in degenerative cervical disc disease including plate systems with autologous iliac bone, carbon cages, and cylindrical cages. However, except for plate systems, the long-term results of other methods have not been established. In the present study, we evaluated radiologic findings for cylindrical cervical cages over long-term follow up periods. Methods During 4 year period, radiologic findings of 138 patients who underwent anterior cervical fusion with cylindrical cage were evaluated at 6, 12, 24, and 36 postoperative months using plain radiographs. We investigated subsidence, osteophyte formation (anterior and posterior margin), cage direction change, kyphotic angle, and bone fusion on each radiograph. Results Among the 138 patients, a minimum of 36 month follow-up was achieved in 99 patients (mean follow-up : 38.61 months) with 115 levels. Mean disc height was 7.32 mm for preoperative evaluations, 9.00 for immediate postoperative evaluations, and 4.87 more than 36 months after surgery. Osteophytes were observed in 107 levels (93%) of the anterior portion and 48 levels (41%) of the posterior margin. The mean kyphotic angle was 9.87° in 35 levels showing cage directional change. There were several significant findings : 1) related subsidence [T-score (p=0.039) and anterior osteophyte (p=0.009)], 2) accompanying posterior osteophyte and outcome (p=0.05). Conclusion Cage subsidence and osteophyte formation were radiologically observed in most cases. Low T-scores may have led to subsidence and kyphosis during bone fusion although severe neurologic aggravation was not found, and therefore cylindrical cages should be used in selected cases. PMID:23091668

  15. Application of Cervical Arthroplasty With Bryan Cervical Disc: 10-Year Follow-up Results in China.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yanbin; Zhang, Yilong; Sun, Yu; Pan, Shengfa; Zhou, Feifei; Liu, Zhongjun

    2016-01-01

    Retrospective study. The aims of this study were to evaluate the radiographic and clinical outcomes of Bryan cervical disc arthroplasty at 10-year follow-up. Cervical arthroplasty is a new technique for treating degenerative cervical disease. Previous reports have shown that cervical arthroplasty with Bryan disc gained good clinical outcomes at 4- to 6-year follow-up. Clinical outcomes and dynamic x-ray examination were evaluated at baseline and at final follow-up. Thirty-three patients with complete clinical and radiographic data were included in this study. The mean follow-up period was 120.5 months (116-130 months). Twenty-five patients underwent single-level arthroplasty and 7 underwent arthroplasty at 2 levels. One patient underwent arthroplasty at 3 levels. Eight of the 33 patients presented with radiculopathy and 25 patients with myelopathy. The 42 levels of surgery included C3/4 (3 levels), C4/5 (7 levels), C5/6 (26 levels) and C6/7 (6 level). The mJOA score of the 25 patients with myelopathy was 11.8 at the baseline and 15.9 at the final follow-up. No patient suffered from adjacent segment disease. Two patients received revision surgeries at the index level for recurrent radiculopathy caused by osteophyte formation and heterotopic ossification. On x-ray examination, the range of motion at the operated level was 7.8 degree at the baseline and 4.7 degree at the final follow-up. Heterotopic ossification was observed in 29 (69.0%) levels and heterotopic ossification of Grade 4 was observed in 14 levels. Adjacent segment degeneration was observed in 30 (47.6%) levels. Cervical arthroplasty using Bryan cervical disc prosthesis resulted in fine clinical outcomes in this study. Heterotopic ossification was common after Bryan disc arthroplasty, which decreased the range of motion. 4.

  16. 75 FR 54345 - Determination of Regulatory Review Period for Purposes of Patent Extension; BRYAN CERVICAL DISC...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-07

    ... Patent Extension; BRYAN CERVICAL DISC SYSTEM AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice... CERVICAL DISC SYSTEM and is publishing this notice of that determination as required by law. FDA has made... device BRYAN CERVICAL DISC SYSTEM. BRYAN CERVICAL DISC SYSTEM is indicated in skeletally mature patients...

  17. [LOCATION CHANGE OF ROTATION CENTER AFTER SINGLE SEGMENTAL CERVICAL DISC REPLACEMENT WITH ProDisc-C].

    PubMed

    Lou, Jigang; Liu, Hao; Rong, Xin; Gong, Quan; Song, Yueming; Li, Tao

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of the single segmental cervical disc replacement with ProDisc-C, and to explore the location change of the flexion/extension center of rotation (COR) of the target level as well as its clinical significance. Between June 2010 and February 2012, 23 patients underwent single segmental cervical disc replacement with ProDisc-C, and the clinical data were retrospectively analyzed. Of 23 patients, 9 were male, and 14 were female with the age range from 27 to 65 years (mean, 45 years), and the disease duration ranged from 10 to 84 months (mean, 25 months). There were 15 patients with radiculopathy, 5 patients with myelopathy, and 3 patients with mixed cervical spondylosis. The involved segments were C4,5 in 5 cases, C5,6 in 14 cases, and C6,7 in 4 cases. Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) score and neck disability index (NDI) were adopted to evaluate the effectiveness. Preoperative and Postoperative radiographic parameters, such as cervical overall range of motion (ROM), target segmental ROM, the adjacent segmental ROM, and intervertebral height were compared. Besides, the location changes of the COR of the target level were further analyzed by the alteration of its coordinates (COR-X, COR-Y), and the relationships between the location changes of the COR and the effectiveness or the radiographic results were analyzed. All the operations were completed successfully; 1 case had hoarseness after operation, which disappeared at 3 months after operation. All cases were followed up 18.3 months on average (range, 6-36 months). There was no device migration, loosening, subsidence, or fracture at last follow-up. The JOA score increased significantly and the NDI score decreased significantly at last follow-up when compared with preoperative scores (P < 0.05). No difference was found in the cervical overall ROM, target segmental ROM, the adjacent segmental ROM, and the COR-Y of the target level between pre-operation and last follow-up (P > 0

  18. Return to Work Rates After Single-level Cervical Fusion for Degenerative Disc Disease Compared With Fusion for Radiculopathy in a Workers' Compensation Setting.

    PubMed

    Faour, Mhamad; Anderson, Joshua T; Haas, Arnold R; Percy, Rick; Woods, Stephen T; Ahn, Uri M; Ahn, Nicholas U

    2016-07-15

    A retrospective comparative cohort study. To compare return to work (RTW) rates for patients who underwent single-level cervical fusion for radiculopathy compared with fusion for degenerative disc disease (DDD) as an indication for surgery. Studies have shown that workers' compensation subjects have less favorable surgical and functional outcomes compared with the general population. Cervical decompression and fusion have provided great results with relieving radicular symptoms. Fusion for DDD, however, remains controversial. We retrospectively collected data of 21 169 subjects with cervical comorbidities who filed their claims for work-related injuries with Ohio Bureau of Workers' Compensation (BWC) between 1993 and 2011. The primary outcome was whether subjects met RTW criteria within 3-year follow-up after fusion. The secondary outcome measures and data on presurgical characteristics and secondary outcomes of each cohort were also collected. Successful RTW status was affected by a number of presurgical risk factors: DDD as an indication for surgery, age of more than 50 years, out of work for more than 6 months, psychological evaluation, opioid use, legal litigation, and permanent disability. The DDD group had lower rate of successful RTW status (50.9%) and was less likely to have a sustained RTW status (odds ratio = 0.61, 95% confidence interval: 0.48-0.79, P = 0.0001) compared with the radiculopathy group (successful RTW rate 62.9%). RTW rate within 1 year after surgery was lower in the DDD group (39.9%) compared with the radiculopathy group (53.1%; P = 0.0001). DDD patients were absent 112 days more on average after surgery compared with radiculopathy patients (P = 0.0003). Cervical fusion for DDD is associated with lower rate of successful RTW status when compared with fusion for radiculopathy in a worker's compensation setting. The decision to include surgical intervention in the management plan of cervical DDD should be approached with

  19. Durability of cervical disc arthroplasties and its influence factors

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chao; Zhang, Xiaolin; Ma, Xinlong

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background: The durability of cervical disc arthroplasties (CDA) may vary significantly because of different designs and implanting techniques of the devices. Nevertheless, the comparative durability remains unknown. Objectives: We aimed to assess the durability of CDAs in at least 2-year follow-up. We analyzed the classifications and causes of secondary surgical procedures, as well as the structural designs of the devices that might influence the durability. Methods: PubMed, Medline, Embase, and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials were searched from the inception of each database to September 2015 using the following Keywords: “cervical disc replacement” OR “cervical disc arthroplasty” AND “randomized controlled trial (RCT).” Publication language was restricted to English. The primary outcome was the rate of secondary surgical procedures following CDA or anterior cervical decompression and fusion (ACDF). Pairwise meta-analysis and a Bayesian network meta-analysis were carried out using Review Manager v5.3.5 and WinBUGS version 1.4.3, respectively. Quality of evidence was appraised by Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation methodology. Results: Twelve RCTs that met the eligibility criteria were included. Follow-up ranged from 2 years to 7 years. A total of 103 secondary surgical procedures were performed. The most frequent classification of secondary surgical procedures was reoperation (48/103) and removal (47/103). Revision (3/103) and supplementary fixation (2/103) were rare. Adjacent-level diseases were the most common cause of reoperations. The rates of secondary surgical procedures were significantly lower in Mobi-C, Prestige, Prodisc-C, Secure-C group than in ACDF group. No significant difference was detected between Bryan, PCM, Kineflex-C, Discover, and ACDF. Mobi-C, Secure-C, and Prodisc-C ranked the best, the second best, the third best, respectively. Conclusions: We concluded that Mobi-C, Secure

  20. Comparison of single-level cervical fusion and a metal-on-metal cervical disc replacement device.

    PubMed

    Riina, Joseph; Patel, Amisha; Dietz, John W; Hoskins, Jeffery S; Trammell, Terry R; Schwartz, David D

    2008-04-01

    Cervical fusion is the common treatment for cervical disc disease but can cause secondary disorders. The Prestige ST cervical disc prosthesis (Medtronic Sofamor Danek, Memphis, TN) was designed to preserve spinal motion to potentially limit the secondary disorders. In this article, we report 2-year results from a single-center study comparing use of this device with use of anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF). Nineteen patients were prospectively randomized to receive the device or to undergo ACDF. Twenty-four months after surgery, patients who received the device demonstrated improvement in neck pain, arm pain, and neurologic function. In our cohort, patients who underwent arthroplasty demonstrated greater improvement in neurologic function and neck pain than patients who underwent cervical discectomy and fusion.

  1. The Neck Disability Index (NDI) and its correlation with quality of life and mental health measures among patients with single-level cervical disc disease scheduled for surgery.

    PubMed

    Sundseth, J; Kolstad, F; Johnsen, L G; Pripp, A H; Nygaard, O P; Andresen, H; Fredriksli, O A; Myrseth, E; Züchner, M; Zwart, J A

    2015-10-01

    The Neck Disability Index (NDI) is widely used as a self-rated disability score in patients with cervical radiculopathy. The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether the NDI score correlated with other assessments of quality of life and mental health in a specific group of patients with single-level cervical disc disease and corresponding radiculopathy. One hundred thirty-six patients were included in a prospective, randomized controlled clinical multicenter study on one-level anterior cervical discectomy with arthroplasty (ACDA) versus one-level anterior cervical discectomy with fusion (ACDF). The preoperative data were obtained at hospital admission 1 to 3 days prior to surgery. The NDI score was used as the dependent variable and correlation as well as regression analyses were conducted to assess the relationship with the short form-36, EuroQol-5Dimension-3 level and Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale. The mean age at inclusion was 44.1 years (SD ±7.0, range 26-59 years), of which 46.3 % were male. Mean NDI score was 48.6 (SD = 12.3, minimum 30 and maximum 88). Simple linear regression analysis demonstrated a significant correlation between NDI and the EuroQol-5Dimension-3 level [R = -0.64, 95 % confidence interval (CI) -30.1- -19.8, p < 0.001] and to a lesser extent between NDI and the short form-36 physical component summary [R = -0.49, 95 % CI (-1.10- -0.58), p < 0.001] and the short form-36 mental component summary [R = -0.25, 95 % CI (-0.47- -0-09), p = 0.004]. Regarding NDI and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, a significant correlation for depression was found [R = 0.26, 95 % CI (0.21-1.73), p = 0.01]. Multiple linear regression analysis showed a statistically significant and the strongest correlation between NDI and the independent variables in the following order: EuroQol-5Dimension-3 level [R = -0.64, 95 % CI (-23.5- -7.9), p <0.001], short form-36 physical component summary [R = -0.41, 95

  2. Factors affecting the incidence of symptomatic adjacent-level disease in cervical spine after total disc arthroplasty: 2- to 4-year follow-up of 3 prospective randomized trials.

    PubMed

    Nunley, Pierce D; Jawahar, Ajay; Kerr, Eubulus J; Gordon, Charles J; Cavanaugh, David A; Birdsong, Elisa M; Stocks, Marolyn; Danielson, Guy

    2012-03-15

    Prospective randomized clinical trials. To compare the outcome data with respect to clinical success rates and incidence of adjacent level disease (ALD) in patients after total disc arthroplasty (TDA) or anterior cervical fusion (ACDF) for 1- and 2-level cervical disc disease. Previously published studies have provided evidence that ACDF procedure for cervical degenerative disc disease (DDD) may increase the stress on the nonoperated adjacent cervical segments, thus possibly increasing the risk of degeneration at these levels. The theoretical assumption that TDA may reduce the incidence of future ALD by preserving motion at the affected segments has, however, never been validated by clinical evidence. One hundred seventy patients with established symptomatic cervical disc disease at 1 or 2 levels participated in 3 prospective randomized clinical trials at 2 institutions. Participating subjects were randomized to receive TDA (treatment; n = 113) or ACDF (control; n = 57) by 6 independent investigating surgeons. Visual analogue pain scores (0-100), Neck Disability Index, neurological examination, and cervical spine radiographs were collected at enrollment and then 6 weeks and 3, 6, 12, 24, 36, and 48 months after surgery. Patients with persistent symptoms during the follow-up period were investigated for adjacent segment disease (ASD) with computed tomography/magnetic resonance imaging of the cervical spine, neurophysiology, and subsequent active interventions. At the median follow-up of 42 months (range: 28-54 months), 9 (14.3%) ACDF and 19 (16.8%) TDA patients developed and were actively treated for ASD. Osteopenia dust energy x-ray absorptiometry T scores of -1.5 to -2.4) (P = 0.04; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.007-0.223) and concurrent lumbar degenerative disease (P = 0.02; 95% CI: 0.003-0.196) significantly increased the risk of ASD. The risk of developing adjacent segment degeneration was equivalent at median 38 months after both ACDF and TDA procedures in

  3. Long-term Changes in Sagittal Alignment and its Clinical Implications After Cervical Interbody Fusion Cage Subsidence for Degenerative Cervical Disc Disease. A Prospective Study with Standalone Lordotic Tantalum Cages.

    PubMed

    Tomé-Bermejo, Félix; Morales-Valencia, Julián A; Moreno-Pérez, Javier; Marfil-Pérez, Juan; Díaz-Dominguez, Elena; Piñera, Angel R; Alvarez, Luis

    2016-07-14

    A retrospective, observational study of prospectively collected outcomes. To investigate the long-term clinical course of anterior cervical discectomy and fusion with interbody fusion cages (ACDF-IFC) with lordotic tantalum implants and to correlate the radiological findings with the clinical outcomes, with special emphasis in the significance and influence of implant subsidence. Cage subsidence is the most frequently reported complication after ACDF-IFC. However, most reports fail to correlate cage subsidence with lower fusion rates, or with unsatisfactory clinical results. Forty-one consecutive patients with symptomatic degenerative cervical disc disease with failure of conservative treatment. All patients underwent one/two-level ACDF-IFC with lordotic tantalum implants. Mean follow-up of was 4.91 years. Final follow-up fusion rate was 96.96% (32/33). Interspace height (IH) at the affected levels was significantly incremented after implant insertion, and despite a gradual loss in the height occurred over time, final follow-up IH was significantly higher than preoperatively (P<0.0001). Anterior-IH and posterior-IH lost 55.8% and 76.2% of the initially incremented height respectively, with a final increase of 72% in the AIH-PIH height differential. Implant subsidence (>3 mm) occurred in 11 disc spaces (26.82%). Pre and postop-IH was significantly higher in the subsidence patients, however, there was no difference in final follow-up IH (P>0.05). Patients with ≥3 years of follow-up (n=29) did not demonstrate further significant subsidence beyond the second year. Regarding C1-C7 lordosis, segmental Cobb angle, cervical Visual Analogue Scale and Neck Disability Index questionnaires, no difference between patients with or without final follow-up endplate subsidence was encountered. Until fusion occurs, tantalum cage settlement into the vertebral body is to be expected. Further subsidence could be the result of segmental adaptative changes. Graft subsidence did not

  4. [Clinical application of percutaneous laser disc decompression in the treatment of cervical disc herniation].

    PubMed

    Li, Kangren; Qin, Hui; Chen, Jian

    2007-05-01

    To evaluate the clinical effect of percutaneous laser disc decompression (PLDD) in the treatment of cervical disc herniation. From March 2003 to December 2005, 47 patients with cervical disc herniation (96 cervical disc) were treated with PLDD. There were 25 males and 22 females with an average age of 56 years, ranging from 37 to 72 years. The lesion were located at the levels of C3,4 in 20 discs, C4,5 in 27 discs, C5,6 in 31 discs, C6,7 in 18 discs. The laser fiber was introduced into the center of the herniated disc space by percutaneous puncture from anterior neck surface under fluoroscopic guidance. Laser reduced the intra-disc pressure through the vaporization of disc nucleu. The adopted laser was semi-conducted with a wavelength of 810 nm. Each laser output power was 15 W with 1 s emission and 2 s interval. The total laser output power was decided depending on the degenerative degree of the disc and the reactive process of heat, ranging from 300 to 1 000 J. Of 47 patients, 42 were followed up for 3 to 31 months (mean 13 months). The clinical evaluation was classified as excellent in 18 cases (42.9%), good in 14 cases (33.3%), fair in 6 cases (14.3%) and poor in 4 cases (9.5%). The general response rate was 90.5%. The excellent and good rate was 76.2%. No complications occurred. PLDD can relieve the symptoms and signs of patients suffering from cervical disc herniation with less complication. The manipulation of PLDD is easy, safe and mini-invasive.

  5. Long term preservation of motion with artificial cervical disc implants: A comparison between cervical disc replacement and rigid fusion with cage

    PubMed Central

    Cincu, Rafael; Lorente, Francisco de Asis; Gomez, Joaquin; Eiras, Jose; Agrawal, Amit

    2014-01-01

    Background: With the advancement of technologies there is more interest in the maintenance of the spine's biomechanical properties focusing on the preservation of the functional motion segment. In present article we describe our experience with 25 cases managed with artificial cervical discs with 28 Solis cage following cervical discectomy with a mean follow-up period of 7.5 year. Materials and Methods: All surgeries were performed by single surgeon from March 2004 to June 2005 with a follow-up till date. Patients with symptomatic single or multiple level diseases that had no prior cervical surgery were candidates for the study. Cohort demographics were comparable. Standardized clinical outcome measures and radiographic examinations were used at prescribed post-operative intervals to compare the treatment groups. Relief in radicular pain, cervical spine motion, and degenerative changes at follow-up were noted. Results: In a total 53 cases, the mean age in prosthesis group was 47 years (age range: 30-63 years) and mean age in cage group was 44 years (32-62 years). Mean hospital stay was 2.7 days in both the groups. At 4 weeks complete cervical movements could be achieved in 19 cases in artificial disc group. Maintenance of movement after 7.5 years was in 76% of these patients. Lordosis was maintained in all cases till date. There was no mortality or wound infection in our series. Conclusions: We conclude that artificial cervical disc could be an alternative to fixed spinal fusion as it represents the most physiological substitute of disc. However, there is need for further studies to support the use of artificial cervical disc prosthesis. PMID:25685218

  6. Traumatic Migration of the Bryan Cervical Disc Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Scott C; Kang, Daniel G; Helgeson, Melvin D

    2016-02-01

    Study Design Case study. Objective To describe a case of dislodgment and migration of the Bryan Cervical Disc (Medtronic Sofamor Danek, Memphis, Tennessee, United States) arthroplasty more than 6 months after implantation secondary to low-energy trauma. Methods The inpatient, outpatient, and radiographic medical records of a patient with traumatic migration of the Bryan Cervical Disc arthroplasty were reviewed. The authors have no relevant disclosures to report. Results A 36-year-old man with chronic left upper extremity radiculopathy underwent uncomplicated Bryan Cervical Disc arthroplasty at C5-C6, with complete resolution of his symptoms. Approximately 6 months after his index procedure, he sustained low-energy trauma to the posterior cervical spine, after being struck by a book falling from a shelf. The injury forced his neck into flexion, and though he did not have recurrence of his radiculopathy symptoms, radiographs demonstrated anterior migration of the arthroplasty device. He underwent revision to anterior cervical diskectomy and fusion. Conclusions Although extremely rare, it is imperative that surgeons consider the potential for failure of osseous integration in patients undergoing cervical disk arthroplasty, even beyond 3 to 6 months postoperatively. This concern is especially relevant to press-fit or milled devices like the Bryan Cervical Disc arthroplasty, which lack direct fixation into adjacent vertebral bodies. We are considering modification of our postoperative protocol to improve protection of the device after implantation, even beyond 3 months postoperatively.

  7. Traumatic Migration of the Bryan Cervical Disc Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Scott C.; Kang, Daniel G.; Helgeson, Melvin D.

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Case study. Objective To describe a case of dislodgment and migration of the Bryan Cervical Disc (Medtronic Sofamor Danek, Memphis, Tennessee, United States) arthroplasty more than 6 months after implantation secondary to low-energy trauma. Methods The inpatient, outpatient, and radiographic medical records of a patient with traumatic migration of the Bryan Cervical Disc arthroplasty were reviewed. The authors have no relevant disclosures to report. Results A 36-year-old man with chronic left upper extremity radiculopathy underwent uncomplicated Bryan Cervical Disc arthroplasty at C5–C6, with complete resolution of his symptoms. Approximately 6 months after his index procedure, he sustained low-energy trauma to the posterior cervical spine, after being struck by a book falling from a shelf. The injury forced his neck into flexion, and though he did not have recurrence of his radiculopathy symptoms, radiographs demonstrated anterior migration of the arthroplasty device. He underwent revision to anterior cervical diskectomy and fusion. Conclusions Although extremely rare, it is imperative that surgeons consider the potential for failure of osseous integration in patients undergoing cervical disk arthroplasty, even beyond 3 to 6 months postoperatively. This concern is especially relevant to press-fit or milled devices like the Bryan Cervical Disc arthroplasty, which lack direct fixation into adjacent vertebral bodies. We are considering modification of our postoperative protocol to improve protection of the device after implantation, even beyond 3 months postoperatively. PMID:26835211

  8. Two-level contiguous cervical disc disease treated with peek cages packed with demineralized bone matrix: results of 3-year follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Topuz, Kıvanç; Çolak, Ahmet; Şimşek, Hakan; Kutlay, Murat; Demircan, Mehmet Nusret; Velioğlu, Murat

    2009-01-01

    Interbody cages are widely used instruments for cervical fusion operations. Long-term follow-up studies are needed to clarify if these devices are dependable. In this prospective study, 79 patients (42 women and 37 men) with a mean age of 51 years operated between January 2000 and December 2005 for treatment of degenerative cervical disc disease and spondylosis associated with radiculopathy or myelopathy were evaluated. Patients underwent two-level contiguous anterior cervical discectomy and fusion operations with standard anterior Smith–Robinson approach. To achieve fusion PEEK cages packed with demineralized bone matrix mixed with autologous blood were used. Clinical outcome was evaluated with Odom’s criteria and results were evaluated as ‘excellent’, ‘good’, ‘fair’ and ‘poor’. Spinal curves, mobility and fusion status were assessed with anterior–posterior and lateral (neutral, flexion and extension) radiographs obtained before surgery and at 3, 12, 24 and 36 months postoperatively. The Ishihara curvature index (ICI) was used for spinal curve evaluation. Lateral dynamic (flexion and extension) radiographs at postoperative 12th month revealed the fusion status classified as 1A, 1B, 2A and 2B. The radiological outcomes were classified as ‘non-fusion’ when 2B healing was observed, and as ‘fusion’ when 1A, 1B or 2A healing was observed at the levels subjected to surgery. According to Odom’s criteria, clinical outcomes were classified as ‘excellent’ or ‘good’ in 69 patients (success rate: 87.3%). Eight patients were graded as ‘fair’ and two as ‘poor’. Preoperative mean ICI was 10.4 ± 3.72 and postoperative mean ICI was 10.1 ± 3.14. The difference was statistically insignificant (P > 0.05); therefore, preoperative lordosis was said to be preserved at final follow-up. Final fusion rate (Types 1A, 1B, and 2A) was 91.7% (145/158 levels). Radiological imaging showed no cage failure or dislodgement and reoperation

  9. Outcomes following cervical disc arthroplasty: a retrospective review.

    PubMed

    Cody, John P; Kang, Daniel G; Tracey, Robert W; Wagner, Scott C; Rosner, Michael K; Lehman, Ronald A

    2014-11-01

    Cervical disc arthroplasty has emerged as a viable technique for the treatment of cervical radiculopathy and myelopathy, with the proposed benefit of maintenance of segmental range of motion. There are relatively few, non-industry sponsored studies examining the outcomes and complications of cervical disc arthroplasty. Therefore, we set out to perform a single center evaluation of the outcomes and complications of cervical disc arthroplasty. We performed a retrospective review of all patients from a single military tertiary medical center undergoing cervical disc arthroplasty from August 2008 to August 2012. The clinical outcomes and complications associated with the procedure were evaluated. A total of 219 consecutive patients were included in the review, with an average follow-up of 11.2 (±11.0)months. Relief of pre-operative symptoms was noted in 88.7% of patients, and 92.2% of patients were able to return to full pre-operative activity. There was a low rate of complications related to the anterior cervical approach (3.2% with recurrent laryngeal nerve injury, 8.9% with dysphagia), with no device/implant related complications. Symptomatic cervical radiculopathy is a common problem in both the civilian and active duty military populations and can cause significant disability leading to loss of work and decreased operational readiness. There exist several surgical treatment options for appropriately indicated patients. Based on our findings, cervical disc arthroplasty is a safe and effective treatment for symptomatic cervical radiculopathy and myelopathy, with a low incidence of complications and high rate of symptom relief.

  10. Ranges of Cervical Intervertebral Disc Deformation during an In-Vivo Dynamic Flexion-Extension of the Neck.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yan; Mao, Haiqing; Li, Jing-Sheng; Tsai, Tsung-Yuan; Cheng, Liming; Wood, Kirkham B; Li, Guoan; Cha, Thomas D

    2017-03-23

    While abnormal loading is widely believed to cause cervical spine disc diseases, in-vivo cervical disc deformation during dynamic neck motion has not been well delineated. This study investigated the range of cervical disc deformation during an in-vivo functional flexion-extension of the neck. Ten asymptomatic human subjects were tested using a combined dual fluoroscopic imaging system and MRI based 3D modeling technique. Overall disc deformation was determined using the changes of the space geometry between upper and lower endplates of each intervertebral segment (C3/4, C4/5, C5/6 and C6/7). Five points (anterior, center, posterior, left and right) of each disc were analyzed to examine the disc deformation distributions. The data indicated that between the functional maximum flexion and extension of the neck, the anterior points of the discs experienced large changes of distraction/compression deformation and shear deformation. The higher level discs experienced higher ranges of disc deformation. No significant difference was found in deformation ranges at posterior points of all discs. The data indicated that the range of disc deformation is disc level dependent and the anterior region experienced larger changes of deformation than the center and posterior regions, except for the C6/7 disc. The data obtained from this study could serve as baseline knowledge for the understanding of the cervical spine disc biomechanics and for investigation of the biomechanical etiology of disc diseases. These data could also provide insights for development of motion preservation surgeries for cervical spine.

  11. Long Term Societal Costs of Anterior Discectomy and Fusion (ACDF) versus Cervical Disc Arthroplasty (CDA) for Treatment of Cervical Radiculopathy

    PubMed Central

    Ghori, Ahmer; Konopka, Joseph F.; Cha, Thomas D.; Bono, Christopher M.

    2016-01-01

    Background Current literature suggests that anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) and cervical disc arthroplasty (CDA) have comparable clinical outcomes for the treatment of cervical radiculopathy. Given similar outcomes, an understanding of differences in long-term societal costs can help guide resource utilization. The purpose of this study was to compare the relative long-term societal costs of anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) to cervical disc arthroplasty (CDA) for the treatment of single level cervical disc disease by considering upfront surgical costs, lost productivity, and risk of subsequent revision surgery. Methods We completed an economic and decision analysis using a Markov model to evaluate the long-term societal costs of ACDF and CDA in a theoretical cohort of 45-65 year old patients with single level cervical disc disease who have failed nonoperative treatment. Results The long-term societal costs for a 45-year old patient undergoing ACDF are $31,178 while long-term costs for CDA are $24,119. Long-term costs for CDA remain less expensive throughout the modeled age range of 45 to 65 years old. Sensitivity analysis demonstrated that CDA remains less expensive than ACDF as long as annual reoperation rate remains below 10.5% annually. Conclusions Based on current data, CDA has lower long-term societal costs than ACDF for patients 45-65 years old by a substantial margin. Given reported reoperation rates of 2.5% for CDA, it is the preferred treatment for cervical radiculopathy from an economic perspective. PMID:26913221

  12. Paraplegia by acute cervical disc protrusion after lumbar spine surgery.

    PubMed

    Chen, Sheng-Huan; Hui, Yu-Ling; Yu, Chong-Ming; Niu, Chi-Chien; Lui, Ping-Wing

    2005-04-01

    Non-traumatic paraplegia caused by herniation of the cervical intervertebral disc is an uncommon postoperative complication. A patient with claudication and radiculopathy was scheduled for lumbar laminectomy due to spinal stenosis. Postoperatively, numbness below T6 was found in his both legs of the patient. MRI showed a protruded intervertebral disc between C6 and C7. Despite urgent disectomy, the patient's lower extremities remained paralyzed without significant improvement for 3 months. Loss of muscle support during general anesthesia, excessive neck extension during endotracheal intubation and positioning, as well as bucking and agitation are believed as triggering factors for the protrusion of the cervical disc. We suggest that a complete history taking and physical examination be accomplished in patients scheduled for lumbar spine surgery in order to exclude coexisting cervical spine disorders. In addition, skillful endotracheal intubation and careful neck positioning are mandatory for patients receiving surgery in the prone position.

  13. Cervical disc arthroplasty with PRESTIGE LP disc versus anterior cervical discectomy and fusion: a prospective, multicenter investigational device exemption study.

    PubMed

    Gornet, Matthew F; Burkus, J Kenneth; Shaffrey, Mark E; Argires, Perry J; Nian, Hui; Harrell, Frank E

    2015-07-31

    OBJECT This study compared the safety and efficacy of treatment with the PRESTIGE LP cervical disc versus a historical control anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF). METHODS Prospectively collected PRESTIGE LP data from 20 investigational sites were compared with data from 265 historical control ACDF patients in the initial PRESTIGE Cervical Disc IDE study. The 280 investigational patients with single-level cervical disc disease with radiculopathy and/or myelopathy underwent arthroplasty with a low-profile artificial disc. Key safety/efficacy outcomes included Neck Disability Index (NDI), Neck and Arm Pain Numerical Rating Scale scores, 36-Item Short Form Health Survey (SF-36) score, work status, disc height, range of motion, adverse events (AEs), additional surgeries, and neurological status. Clinical and radiographic evaluations were completed preoperatively, intraoperatively, and at 1.5, 3, 6, 12, and 24 months postoperatively. Predefined Bayesian statistical methods with noninformative priors were used, along with the propensity score technique for controlling confounding factors. Analysis by independent statisticians confirmed initial statistical findings. RESULTS The investigational and control groups were mostly similar demographically. There was no significant difference in blood loss (51.0 ml [investigational] vs 57.1 ml [control]) or hospital stay (0.98 days [investigational] vs 0.95 days [control]). The investigational group had a significantly longer operative time (1.49 hours vs 1.38 hours); 95% Bayesian credible interval of the difference was 0.01-0.21 hours. Significant improvements versus preoperative in NDI, neck/arm pain, SF-36, and neurological status were achieved by 1.5 months in both groups and were sustained at 24 months. Patient follow-up at 24 months was 97.1% for the investigational group and 84.0% for the control group. The mean NDI score improvements versus preoperative exceeded 30 points in both groups at 12 and 24 months. SF

  14. Infections of cervical disc space after dental extractions

    PubMed Central

    Feigenbaum, J. A.; Stern, W. E.

    1974-01-01

    Two patients with infections of the cervical intervertebral disc space after dental procedures carried out by the same oral surgeon exhibited similar clinical courses and radiographic appearances. Both had bacteriological confirmation of infection by needle aspiration and were treated with appropriate antibiotics and bracing of the neck. The presumed aetiology and the possible pathogenesis are described. Evidence suggests that the two infections were the result of needle injection of a contaminated solution, the organisms of which haematogenously lodged in the intervertebral discs in the cervical region. Lymph drainage from the gums and teeth is suggested as a possible route of inoculation. Images PMID:4449000

  15. Fatigue responses of the human cervical spine intervertebral discs.

    PubMed

    Yoganandan, Narayan; Umale, Sagar; Stemper, Brain; Snyder, Bryan

    2017-05-01

    Numerous studies have been conducted since more than fifty years to understand the behavior of the human lumbar spine under fatigue loading. Applications have been largely driven by low back pain and human body vibration problems. The human neck also sustains fatigue loading in certain type of civilian occupational and military operational activities, and research is very limited in this area. Being a visco-elastic structure, it is important to determine the stress-relaxation properties of the human cervical spine intervertebral discs to enable accurate simulations of these structures in stress-analysis models. While finite element models have the ability to incorporate viscoelastic material definitions, data specific to the cervical spine are limited. The present study was conducted to determine these properties and understand the responses of the human lower cervical spine discs under large number of cyclic loads in the axial compression mode. Eight disc segments consisting of the adjacent vertebral bodies along with the longitudinal ligaments were subjected to compression, followed by 10,000 cycles of loading at 2 or 4Hz frequency by limiting the axial load to approximately 150 N, and subsequent to resting period, subjected to compression to extract the stress-relaxation properties using the quasi-linear viscoelastic (QLV) material model. The coefficients of the model and disc displacements as a function of cycles and loading frequency are presented. The disc responses demonstrated a plateauing effect after the first 2000 to 4000 cycles, which were highly nonlinear. The paper compares these responses with the "work hardening" phenomenon proposed in clinical literature for the lumbar spine to explain the fatigue behavior of the discs. The quantitative results in terms of QLV coefficients can serve as inputs to complex finite element models of the cervical spine to delineate the local and internal load-sharing responses of the disc segment. Published by Elsevier

  16. [Longterm results of cervical arthroplasty with disc prosthesis. A literature review].

    PubMed

    Fransen, P; Schils, F

    2014-01-01

    Cervical arthroplasty has now been performed for over 10 years. Despite the large number of implanted artificial discs, the quality of the published studies is weak, and very few report a follow up exceeding two years. We reviewed the literature on cervical total disc replacement, focusing on publications reporting a follow-up of more than two years. The selection of patients, the type of implant and the surgical technique seem to influence greatly the quality of the clinical and radiological results. The occurrence of heterotopic ossifications around the implant seems to be the rule rather than the exception. Wear debris are likely to be observed in the vicinity of the prosthesis. Most long term studies also report a progressive decrease in the range of motion of the prosthesis, although without influence on the clinical evolution. It seems reasonable to say that cervical disc prosthesis is not inferior to discectomy and fusion, and that these implants allow a short term preservation of cervical mobility, but the efficacy in preventing adjacent segment disease or a favourable costleffectiveness ratio have yet to be demonstrated. A more widespread use of cervical disc prosthesis can only be suggested when these questions have been answered by long term follow-up studies.

  17. Correlation between T2∗ (T2 star) relaxation time and cervical intervertebral disc degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Minghua; Guo, Yong; Ye, Qiong; Chen, Lei; Zhou, Kai; Wang, Qingjun; Shao, Lixin; Shi, Qinglei; Chen, Chun

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Purpose: To demonstrate the potential benefits of T2∗ relaxation time of intervertebral discs (IVDs) regarding the detection and grading of degenerative disc disease using 3.0-T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in a clinical setting. Materials and Methods: Cervical sagittal T2-weighted, T2∗ relaxation MRI was performed at 3.0-T in 61 subjects, covering discs C2–3 to C6–7. All discs were morphologically assessed based on the Pfirrmann grade, and regions of interests (ROIs) were drawn over the T2∗ mapping. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was performed among grades to determine the cut-off values. Results: Cervical intervertebral discs (IVDs) of patients were commonly determined to be at Pfirrmann grades III to V. The nucleus pulposus (NP) values did not differ significantly between sexes at the same anatomic level (P > 0.05). In the NP, the T2∗ values tended to decrease with increasing grade (P < 0.000), and a significant difference was found in the T2 values between grades I to V (P < 0.05). T2∗ values based on disc degeneration level classification were as follows: grade I (>30 milliseconds), grade II (24.55–29.99 milliseconds), grade III (21.65–24.54 milliseconds), grade IV (18.35–21.64 milliseconds), and grade V (<18.34 milliseconds). Conclusion: Our standardized method of region-specific quantitative T2∗ relaxation time evaluation seems capable of characterizing different degrees of disc degeneration quantitatively. The T2∗ values obtained in these cervical IVDs may serve as baseline values for future T2∗ measurements in both healthy and degenerated cervical discs. PMID:27893652

  18. Utilization trends of cervical artificial disc replacement during the FDA investigational device exemption clinical trials compared to anterior cervical fusion.

    PubMed

    Qureshi, Sheeraz A; Koehler, Steven M; Lu, Young; Cho, Samuel; Hecht, Andrew C

    2013-12-01

    While anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) is the gold standard surgical treatment for cervical disc disease, concerns regarding adjacent segment degeneration lead to the development of cervical disc arthroplasty (CDA). This study compares the utilization trends of CDA versus ACDF during the period of the Food and Drug Administration Investigational Device Exemption clinical trials from 2004 to 2007. The Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project Nationwide Inpatient Sample database was used to identify CDA and ACDF procedures performed in the USA between 2004 and 2007. The prevalence of CDA and ACDF procedures was estimated and stratified by age, sex, diagnosis, census region, payor class, and hospital characteristics. The average length of hospital stay, total charges, and costs were also estimated. The number of CDA surgeries significantly increased annually from 2004 to 2007 and mostly took place at urban non-teaching hospitals. There were no regional differences between CDA and ACDF utilization. There was no difference between sex or admission type between CDA and ACDF patients. ACDF patients were older and had more diabetes, hypertension, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. CDA patients were more likely to be discharged home and had shorter hospital stays but had a higher rate of deep venous thrombosis than ACDF patients. Significantly more CDA patients had private insurance while more ACDF patients had Medicare. The average cost was higher for ACDF than CDA. While ACDF dominated surgical intervention for cervical disc disease during the trial period, CDA utilization increased at a significantly greater rate suggesting rapid early adoption.

  19. A 6-DOF parallel bone-grinding robot for cervical disc replacement surgery.

    PubMed

    Tian, Heqiang; Wang, Chenchen; Dang, Xiaoqing; Sun, Lining

    2017-05-24

    Artificial cervical disc replacement surgery has become an effective and main treatment method for cervical disease, which has become a more common and serious problem for people with sedentary work. To improve cervical disc replacement surgery significantly, a 6-DOF parallel bone-grinding robot is developed for cervical bone-grinding by image navigation and surgical plan. The bone-grinding robot including mechanical design and low level control is designed. The bone-grinding robot navigation is realized by optical positioning with spatial registration coordinate system defined. And a parametric robot bone-grinding plan and high level control have been developed for plane grinding for cervical top endplate and tail endplate grinding by a cylindrical grinding drill and spherical grinding for two articular surfaces of bones by a ball grinding drill. Finally, the surgical flow for a robot-assisted cervical disc replacement surgery procedure is present. The final experiments results verified the key technologies and performance of the robot-assisted surgery system concept excellently, which points out a promising clinical application with higher operability. Finally, study innovations, study limitations, and future works of this present study are discussed, and conclusions of this paper are also summarized further. This bone-grinding robot is still in the initial stage, and there are many problems to be solved from a clinical point of view. Moreover, the technique is promising and can give a good support for surgeons in future clinical work.

  20. Comparison of cervical disc arthroplasty with anterior cervical discectomy and fusion for the treatment of cervical spondylotic myelopathy.

    PubMed

    Ding, Chen; Hong, Ying; Liu, Hao; Shi, Rui; Song, Yueming; Li, Tao

    2013-06-01

    The clinical outcome of cervical disc arthroplasty for cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM) is still controversial. The authors retrospectively compared the intermediate term clinical outcome of cervical disc arthroplasty and traditional anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF). Seventy-six cases of single-level CSM with a minimum follow-up of two years were retrospectively analyzed. Thirty-seven patients underwent single-level cervical disc arthroplasty (Bryan disc: 12 cases; Prestige LP disc: 25 cases), while the other 39 patients underwent single-level ACDF. Significant improvement in SF-36 physical/ mental component scores and NDI score was found in both groups (p < 0.05); however, the arthroplasty group had significantly greater score improvement at each follow-up time point (p < 0.05). The JOA score and Nurick grade improved significantly at each time point in both groups (p < 0.05), but there were no significant differences between the groups (p > 0.05). The range of motion (surgical level and C2C7) remained unchanged in the arthroplasty group (p > 0.05), whereas it decreased significantly in the ACDF group (p < 0.05). The arthroplasty group had a lower incidence of complications than the ACDF group. The intermediate outcomes of cervical disc arthroplasty compared favourably to those of ACDF. Arthroplasty avoids complications from spinal fusion by preserving mobility.

  1. Return to Sports After Cervical Total Disc Replacement.

    PubMed

    Reinke, Andreas; Behr, Michael; Preuss, Alexander; Villard, Jimmy; Meyer, Bernhard; Ringel, Florian

    2017-01-01

    Total disc replacement (TDR) is typically indicated in young patients with a cervical soft disc herniation. There are few data on the activity level of patients after cervical TDR, in particular from young patients who are expected to have a high activity level with frequent exercising. The expectation is that returning to active sports after cervical TDR is not restricted. Fifty patients were treated with a monosegmental cervical TDR at our department between May 2006 and March 2012. Clinical status and radiographic parameters were evaluated preoperatively and during follow-up. In addition, information was gathered regarding neck disability index, pain, a questionnaire concerning athletic aspects, and a modified Tegner activity score. The study design was a prospective case series. All patients were treated with the Prestige artificial cervical disc for a single-level soft disc herniation with radiculopathy. The average age was 40 years, and the mean follow-up period was 53 months (range, 26-96). The median neck disability index during follow-up was 5, and median visual analog scale for pain was 2. Two professional athletes, 20 semiprofessionals, 24 hobby athletes, and 5 patients with a very low activity level were treated. The median time to resumption of sporting activity was 4 weeks after surgery. All professionals and semiprofessionals recovered to their previous activity level. All of the 20 hobby athletes recovered to resume their sport participation. The modified Tegner preoperative score was 4 and the postoperative score was 3.5 (P = 0.806). We found that cervical TDR did not prohibit sporting activities. All patients recovered and were able to take part in their previous activities at an appropriate intensity level. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Posterior Epidural Migration of Sequestrated Cervical Disc Fragment: Case Series

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Gopalan Senthil; Mahesha, Kanthila Bhat

    2011-01-01

    Study Design A retrospective study was undertaken to delineate the characteristics of non-traumatic sequestrated epidurally migrated cervical disc prolapse. Purpose To present first case series of eight such cases diagnosed preoperatively and to discuss their magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) characteristics and their management. Overview of Literature Non-traumatic spontaneous migration of the sequestrated disc fragment epidurally behind cervical vertebral body is rare. Only ten cases have been reported in literature. Methods Detailed clinico-radiological profiles of these 8 cases are presented. In six cases their clinical picture was suggestive of cervical myelopathy. MRI scan showed single level epidural migrated disc behind body of C4, C6, and C7 in six patients and two cases with multiple levels (C5-C6). In six cases, anterior corpectomy with excision of the disc was performed and the seventh patient underwent dorsal laminectomy. The eighth patient chose not to undergo surgery. Results T1 images of the MRI scan showed an isointense signal in all the 8 cases. T2 images revealed a varying intensity. In six cases who underwent anterior corpectomy, there was a rent in the posterior longitudinal ligament. Among those in two cases multiple disc fragments were seen. In the rest four cases, a single large fragment was observed. These patients improved after anterior corpectomy and disc excision. There was no improvement in the patient who had undergone dorsal laminectomy. The eighth patient who refused surgery progressively deteriorated. Conclusions We opine that MRI scan especially T1 images are useful in these cases. We prefer to treat these cases through anterior corpectomy with excision of the sequestrated disc which proved to result in excellent outcome. PMID:22164316

  3. Posterior epidural migration of sequestrated cervical disc fragment: case series.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, Uddanapalli Sreeramulu; Kumar, Gopalan Senthil; Mahesha, Kanthila Bhat

    2011-12-01

    A retrospective study was undertaken to delineate the characteristics of non-traumatic sequestrated epidurally migrated cervical disc prolapse. To present first case series of eight such cases diagnosed preoperatively and to discuss their magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) characteristics and their management. Non-traumatic spontaneous migration of the sequestrated disc fragment epidurally behind cervical vertebral body is rare. Only ten cases have been reported in literature. Detailed clinico-radiological profiles of these 8 cases are presented. In six cases their clinical picture was suggestive of cervical myelopathy. MRI scan showed single level epidural migrated disc behind body of C4, C6, and C7 in six patients and two cases with multiple levels (C5-C6). In six cases, anterior corpectomy with excision of the disc was performed and the seventh patient underwent dorsal laminectomy. The eighth patient chose not to undergo surgery. T1 images of the MRI scan showed an isointense signal in all the 8 cases. T2 images revealed a varying intensity. In six cases who underwent anterior corpectomy, there was a rent in the posterior longitudinal ligament. Among those in two cases multiple disc fragments were seen. In the rest four cases, a single large fragment was observed. These patients improved after anterior corpectomy and disc excision. There was no improvement in the patient who had undergone dorsal laminectomy. The eighth patient who refused surgery progressively deteriorated. We opine that MRI scan especially T1 images are useful in these cases. We prefer to treat these cases through anterior corpectomy with excision of the sequestrated disc which proved to result in excellent outcome.

  4. Cervical Total Disc Replacement is Superior to Anterior Cervical Decompression and Fusion: A Meta-Analysis of Prospective Randomized Controlled Trials

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yujie; Liang, Chengzhen; Tao, Yiqing; Zhou, Xiaopeng; Li, Hao; Li, Fangcai; Chen, Qixin

    2015-01-01

    Background Despite being considered the standard surgical procedure for symptomatic cervical disc disease, anterior cervical decompression and fusion invariably accelerates adjacent segment degeneration. Cervical total disc replacement is a motion-preserving procedure developed as a substitute to fusion. Whether cervical total disc replacement is superior to fusion remains unclear. Methods We comprehensively searched PubMed, EMBASE, Medline, and the Cochrane Library in accordance with the inclusion criteria to identify possible studies. The retrieved results were last updated on December 12, 2014. We classified the studies as short-term and midterm follow-up. Results Nineteen randomized controlled trials involving 4516 cases were identified. Compared with anterior cervical decompression and fusion, cervical total disc replacement had better functional outcomes (neck disability index [NDI], NDI success, neurological success, neck pain scores reported on a numerical rating scale [NRS], visual analog scales scores and overall success), greater segmental motion at the index level, fewer adverse events and fewer secondary surgical procedures at the index and adjacent levels in short-term follow-up (P < 0.05). With midterm follow-up, the cervical total disc replacement group indicated superiority in the NDI, neurological success, pain assessment (NRS), and secondary surgical procedures at the index level (P < 0.05). The Short Form 36 (SF-36) and segmental motion at the adjacent level in the short-term follow-up showed no significant difference between the two procedures, as did the secondary surgical procedure rates at the adjacent level with midterm follow-up (P > 0.05). Conclusions Cervical total disc replacement presented favorable functional outcomes, fewer adverse events, and fewer secondary surgical procedures. The efficacy and safety of cervical total disc replacement are superior to those of fusion. Longer-term, multicenter studies are required for a better

  5. Radiographic Comparison of Four Anterior Fusion Methods in Two Level Cervical Disc Diseases : Autograft Plate Fixation versus Cage Plate Fixation versus Stand-Alone Cage Fusion versus Corpectomy and Plate Fixation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Min-Ki; Jeon, Kwang-Mo; Kim, Tae-Sung

    2012-01-01

    Objective To evaluate radiographic results of anterior fusion methods in two-level cervical disc disease : tricortical autograft and plate fixation (ACDF-AP), cage and plate fixation (ACDF-CP), stand-alone cage (ACDF-CA), and corpectomy and plate fixation (ACCF). Methods The numbers of patients were 70 with a minimum 6 month follow-up (ACDF-AP : 12, ACDF-CP : 27, ACDF-CA : 15, and ACCF : 16). Dynamic simple X-ray and computed tomography were evaluated preoperatively, postoperatively, 6 month, and at the final follow-up. The fusion and subsidence rates at the final were determined, and global cervical lordosis (GCL), cervical range of motion, fused segment angle (FSA), and fused segment height (FSH) were analyzed. Results Nonunion was observed in 4 (25%) patients with ACDF-CA, 1 (8%) patient with ACDF-AP, 1 (4%) patient with ACDF-CP. The number of loss of FSH (%) more than 3 mm were 2 patients (16%) in ACDF-AP, 3 patients (11%) in ACDF-CP, 5 patients (33%) in ACDF-CA, and 3 patients (20%) in ACCF. The GCL was decreased with ACDF-CA and increased with others. The FSA was increased with ACDF-AP, ACDF-CP, and ACCF, but ACDF-CA was decreased. At the final follow-up, the FSH was slightly decreased in ACDF-CP, ACDF-AP, and ACCF, but ACDF-CA was more decreased. Graft related complication were minimal. Screw loosening, plate fracture, cage subsidence and migration were not identified. Conclusion ACDF-CP demonstrated a higher fusion rate and less minimal FSH loss than the other fusions in two-level cervical disc disease. The ACDF-AP and ACCF methods had a better outcome than the ACDF-CA with respect to GCL, FSA, and FSH. PMID:22639708

  6. [Traumatic cervical disc prolapse with severe neurological impact].

    PubMed

    Knudsen, Roland; Gundtoft, Per

    2014-12-15

    A 51-year-old male drove into a ditch on his scooter. Immediately after the trauma the patient complained of neck pain and decreased ability to feel and move his extremities. An initial trauma computed tomography (CT) of the columna showed normal conditions. Because the patient had neurological deficiencies, magnetic resonance imaging of the columna was performed 12 days later, and a disc prolapse at the C3/C4 level with spinal cord compression was visible. Despite decompression the patient did not recover. Traumatic cervical disc prolapse is a rare and positionally dangerous condition, which can be present despite a CT showing normal conditions.

  7. Cervical Disc Arthroplasty with Prestige LP Disc Versus Anterior Cervical Discectomy and Fusion: Seven-Year Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Burkus, J. Kenneth; Shaffrey, Mark E.; Nian, Hui; Harrell, Frank E.

    2016-01-01

    Background Cervical disc arthroplasty (CDA) has emerged as an alternative to anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) for the treatment of cervical pathologies. Studies are on-going to assess the long term outcomes of CDA. This study assessed the safety and efficacy of the Prestige® LP Disc at 84-months follow up. Methods Prospective data from 280 CDA patients with single-level cervical disc disease with radiculopathy or myelopathy were compared with 265 historical control ACDF patients. Clinical and radiographic follow up was completed pre-operatively, intraoperatively, and at intervals up to 84 months. Results Follow-up rate was 75.9% for CDA and 70.0% for ACDF patients. Statistical improvements (p < 0.001) in Neck Disability Index (NDI), neck/arm pain, and SF-36 were achieved by 1.5 months in both groups and maintained through 84 months. At 84 months, 86.1% of CDA versus 80.1% of ACDF patients achieved NDI success, (≥15-point improvement over baseline). Mean NDI score improvements exceeded 30 points in both groups. SF-36 PCS/MCS mean improvements were 13.1±11.9/8.2±12.3 points for CDA and 10.7±11.8/8.3±13.6 points for ACDF. Neurological success was 92.8% for CDA and 79.7% for ACDF patients. The rate of Overall Success was 74.9% for CDA and 63.2% for ACDF. At 84 months, 17.5% of CDA and 16.6% of ACDF patients had a possibly implant- or implant-surgical procedure-related adverse event. Eighteen (6.4%) CDA and 29 (10.9%) ACDF patients had a second surgery at the index level. In CDA patients, mean angular motion at the target level was maintained at 24 (7.5°) and 84 (6.9°) months. Bridging bone was reported in 5.9%/9.5%/10.2%/13.0% of CDA patients at 24/36/60/84 months. Change in mean preoperative angulation of the adjacent segment above/below the index level was1.06±4.39/1.25±4.06 for CDA and (-0.23)±5.37/1.25±5.07 for ACDF patients. At 84 months, 90.9% of CDA and 85.6% of ACDF patients were satisfied with the results of their treatment

  8. Cervical Disc Arthroplasty with Prestige LP Disc Versus Anterior Cervical Discectomy and Fusion: Seven-Year Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Gornet, Matthew F; Burkus, J Kenneth; Shaffrey, Mark E; Nian, Hui; Harrell, Frank E

    2016-01-01

    Cervical disc arthroplasty (CDA) has emerged as an alternative to anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) for the treatment of cervical pathologies. Studies are on-going to assess the long term outcomes of CDA. This study assessed the safety and efficacy of the Prestige(®) LP Disc at 84-months follow up. Prospective data from 280 CDA patients with single-level cervical disc disease with radiculopathy or myelopathy were compared with 265 historical control ACDF patients. Clinical and radiographic follow up was completed pre-operatively, intraoperatively, and at intervals up to 84 months. Follow-up rate was 75.9% for CDA and 70.0% for ACDF patients. Statistical improvements (p < 0.001) in Neck Disability Index (NDI), neck/arm pain, and SF-36 were achieved by 1.5 months in both groups and maintained through 84 months. At 84 months, 86.1% of CDA versus 80.1% of ACDF patients achieved NDI success, (≥15-point improvement over baseline). Mean NDI score improvements exceeded 30 points in both groups. SF-36 PCS/MCS mean improvements were 13.1±11.9/8.2±12.3 points for CDA and 10.7±11.8/8.3±13.6 points for ACDF. Neurological success was 92.8% for CDA and 79.7% for ACDF patients. The rate of Overall Success was 74.9% for CDA and 63.2% for ACDF. At 84 months, 17.5% of CDA and 16.6% of ACDF patients had a possibly implant- or implant-surgical procedure-related adverse event. Eighteen (6.4%) CDA and 29 (10.9%) ACDF patients had a second surgery at the index level. In CDA patients, mean angular motion at the target level was maintained at 24 (7.5°) and 84 (6.9°) months. Bridging bone was reported in 5.9%/9.5%/10.2%/13.0% of CDA patients at 24/36/60/84 months. Change in mean preoperative angulation of the adjacent segment above/below the index level was1.06±4.39/1.25±4.06 for CDA and (-0.23)±5.37/1.25±5.07 for ACDF patients. At 84 months, 90.9% of CDA and 85.6% of ACDF patients were satisfied with the results of their treatment. Prestige LP maintained

  9. Higher risk for cervical herniated intervertebral disc in physicians

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Cheng; Huang, Chien-Cheng; Hsu, Chien-Chin; Lin, Hung-Jung; Guo, How-Ran; Su, Shih-Bin; Wang, Jhi-Joung; Weng, Shih-Feng

    2016-01-01

    Abstract There is no study about cervical herniated intervertebral disc (cervical HIVD) in physicians in the literature; therefore, we conceived a retrospective nationwide, population-based cohort study to elucidate the topic. We identified 26,038 physicians, 33,057 non-physician healthcare providers (HCPs), and identical numbers of non-HCP references (i.e., general population). All cohorts matched a 1:1 ratio with age and gender, and each were chosen from the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database (NHIRD). We compared cervical HIVD risk among physicians, nonphysician HCPs, and non-HCP references and performed a follow-up between 2007 and 2011. We also made comparisons among physician specialists. Both physicians and nonphysician HCPs had higher cervical HIVD risk than non-HCP references (odds ratio [OR]: 1.356; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.162–1.582; OR: 1.383; 95% CI: 1.191–1.605, respectively). There was no significant difference of cervical HIVD risk between physicians and nonphysician HCPs. In the comparison among physician specialists, orthopedists had a higher cervical HIVD risk than other specialists, but the difference was not statistically significant (adjusted OR: 1.547; 95% CI: 0.782–3.061). Physicians are at higher cervical HIVD risk than the general population. Because unknown confounders could exist, further prospective studies are needed to identify possible causation. PMID:27741118

  10. Assessment of Magnetic Resonance Imaging Artifact Following Cervical Total Disc Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Fayyazi, Amir H.; Taormina, Jennifer; Svach, David; Stein, Jeff

    2015-01-01

    Background Cervical disc arthroplasty has become a technique for the treatment of cervical degenerative disc disease. Clinically, the need to accurately assess the neural elements at the operative and adjacent levels is critical postoperatively. The purpose of this study was to quantitatively and qualitatively measure the amount of MRI artifact produced by various cervical total disc replacements. Methods T1 and T2-weighted turbo spin-echo MRI sequences were collected on the cervical spine (C2-T1) of a 68 year-old unembalmed male cadaver. A discectomy was performed at C5-6, followed by successive implantation of six different total disc replacements. The scans were quantitatively evaluated by three of the authors. The volume of artifact was measured using image analysis software. Qualitative analysis of the adjacent and index neural elements was performed. Results The artifact in the T2 weighted images was noted to be 58.6±7.3 cm3 for Prestige ST, 14.2±1.3 cm3 for ProDisc-C, 7.5±0.8 cm3 for Discover, 8.0±0.3 cm3 for Prestige LP, 6.6±0.7 cm3 for Bryan, and 7.3±0.6 cm3 for ProDisc-C titanium prototype. Acceptable intraobserver and excellent interobsever correlation was demonstrated using Pearson Correlation and Concordance Correlation Coefficient analysis. The adjacent and implanted level neural elements (spinal cord and neuroforamina) were easily visualized on the T2 weighted images after the implantation of titanium devices (ProDisc-C titanium prototype, Discover, Prestige LP and Bryan). After implantation of a cobalt chrome implant (ProDisc-C), the adjacent level neural elements were easily visualized but the implanted level could not be fully visualized due to distortion of the images. The quality of the distortion was least favorable after the implantation of the stainless steel implant (Prestige ST), where neither the adjacent nor the index level could be fully visualized. Conclusion The volume of the artifact seen following cervical total disc

  11. Effects of a cervical disc prosthesis on segmental and cervical spine alignment.

    PubMed

    Pickett, Gwynedd E; Mitsis, Demytra K; Sekhon, Lali H; Sears, William R; Duggal, Neil

    2004-09-15

    Cervical arthroplasty offers the promise of maintaining motion of the functional spinal unit (FSU) after anterior cervical discectomy. The impact of cervical arthroplasty on sagittal alignment of the FSU needs to be addressed, together with its effect on overall sagittal balance of the cervical spine. The authors prospectively reviewed radiographic and clinical outcomes in 14 patients who received the Bryan Cervical Disc prosthesis (Medtronic Sofamor Danek, Memphis, TN), for whom early (< 6 months) and late (6-24 months) follow-up data were available. Static and dynamic radiographs were measured by hand and computer to determine the angles formed by the endplates of the natural disc preoperatively, those formed by the shells of the implanted prosthesis, the angle of the FSU, and the C2-7 Cobb angle. The range of motion (ROM) was also determined radiographically, whereas clinical outcomes were assessed using the Neck Disability Index (NDI), and Short Form-36 (SF-36) questionnaires. The ROM was preserved following surgery, with a mean preoperative sagittal rotation angle of 8.96 degrees , which was not significantly different from the late postoperative value of 8.25 degrees . When compared with the preoperative disc space angle, the shell endplate angle in the neutral position became kyphotic in the early and late postoperative periods (mean change -3.8 degrees in the late follow-up period; p = 0.0035). The FSU angles also became significantly more kyphotic postoperatively, with a mean change of -6 degrees (p = 0.0006). The Cobb angles varied widely preoperatively and did not change significantly after surgery. There was no statistical correlation between the NDI and SF-36 outcomes and cervical kyphosis. Cervical arthroplasty preserves motion of the FSU. Both the endplate angle of the treated disc space and the angle of the FSU became kyphotic after insertion of the Bryan prosthesis. The overall sagittal balance of the cervical spine, however, was preserved.

  12. Total Disc Arthroplasty and Anterior Cervical Discectomy and Fusion in Cervical Spine: Competitive or Complimentary? Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Jawahar, Ajay; Nunley, Pierce

    2012-01-01

    Anterior cervical discectomy and arthrodesis has come to represent standard of care for patients with persistent radicular and/or myelopathic symptoms that have failed to improve with conservative treatments. One potential complication of the procedure is the accelerated degeneration of the vertebrae and the intervertebral discs adjacent to the level fused and the effects of fusion on those levels. The concern that fusion may be a contributing factor to accelerated adjacent segment degeneration led to increased interest in cervical disc replacement after anterior decompressive surgery. Several studies analyzing the short-term outcomes of the disc replacement procedure have been published since then, and the pros and cons of both procedures continue to remain a topic of debate among the scientific community. The analysis of published literature and our own experience has convinced us that the overall longer-term clinical outcomes after anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) and total disc replacement (TDR) in the general patient population are not significantly different in terms of symptomatic improvement, neurological improvement, and restoration to better quality of life. Age of the patients and number of affected levels may impact the outcomes and hence determine the choice of optimum procedure. To definitely compare the incidence of adjacent segment disease after these procedures, multi-institutional studies with predetermined and unanimously agreed upon clinical and radiological criteria should be undertaken and the results analyzed in an unbiased fashion. Until that time, it is reasonable to assume that ACDF as well as cervical TDR are both safe and effective procedures that may have outcome benefits in specific patient subgroups based upon demographics and clinical/radiological parameters at the time of surgery. PMID:24353966

  13. Regression of anterior disc-osteophyte complex following cervical laminectomy and fusion for cervical spondylotic myelopathy

    PubMed Central

    Ashana, Adedayo O.; Cohen, Jeremiah R.; Evans, Brandon; Holly, Langston T.

    2014-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective case control study Objective To investigate whether posterior cervical laminectomy and fusion modifies the natural course of anterior disc-osteophyte complex in patients with multilevel CSM Summary of Background Data Dorsal migration of the spinal cord is the main purported mechanism of spinal cord decompression following cervical laminectomy and fusion but other potential mechanisms have received scant attention in the literature. This study was conducted to investigate whether cervical laminectomy and fusion affects the size of anterior disc osteophyte complex. Methods The medical records and radiographical imaging of 44 patients that underwent cervical laminectomy and fusion for CSM between 2006 and 2013 were analyzed. The size of the anterior disc osteophyte complex was measured pre and postoperatively on MR images taken at an interval of > 3 months apart. A control group consisted of 20 non-operatively treated advanced cervical spondylosis patients. Patients in the control met the same inclusion and exclusion criteria and also had sequential MRI taken at an interval of > 3 months apart. Results The nonoperative and operative groups were statistically similar in the pertinent patient demographics and characteristics including gender, age, time to second MRI, size of anterior disc-osteophyte complex on baseline MRI, mean number of levels affected, and percentage of patients with T2 signal change. As expected the mJOA scores were significantly lower in the operative versus nonoperative cohort (13.6 vs. 16.5, P<0.01). A significant decrease in the size of anterior disc osteophyte was observed in the operative group postoperatively (P<0.01). In comparison, there was no statistically significant change in the size of the anterior disc osteophyte complex in the control group (P > 0.05). The magnitude of the change in disc size between the two groups was statistically significant (P <0.01). Conclusion The findings of this study suggest that

  14. The Mobi-C cervical disc for one-level and two-level cervical disc replacement: a review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Alvin, Matthew D; Mroz, Thomas E

    2014-01-01

    Background Cervical disc arthroplasty (CDA) is a novel motion-preserving procedure that is an alternative to fusion. The Mobi-C disc prosthesis, one of many Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved devices for CDA, is the only FDA-approved prosthesis for two-level CDA. Hence, it may allow for improved outcomes compared with multilevel fusion procedures. Purpose To critically assess the available literature on CDA with the Mobi-C prosthesis, with a focus on two-level CDA. Methods All clinical articles involving the Mobi-C disc prosthesis for CDA through September 1, 2014 were identified on Medline. Any paper that presented Mobi-C CDA clinical results was included. Study design, sample size, length of follow-up, use of statistical analysis, quality of life outcome scores, conflict of interest, and complications were recorded. Results Fifteen studies were included that investigated Mobi-C CDA, only one of which was a level Ib randomized control trial. All studies included showed non-inferiority of one-level Mobi-C CDA to one-level anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF). Only one study analyzed outcomes of one-level versus two-level Mobi-C CDA, and only one study analyzed two-level Mobi-C CDA versus two-level ACDF. In comparison with other cervical disc prostheses, the Mobi-C prosthesis is associated with higher rates of heterotopic ossification (HO). Studies with conflicts of interest reported lower rates of HO. Adjacent segment degeneration or disease, along with other complications, were not assessed in most studies. Conclusion One-level Mobi-C CDA is non-inferior, but not superior, to one-level ACDF for patients with cervical degenerative disc disease. The Mobi-C CDA procedure is associated with high rates of HO. Two-level Mobi-C CDA may be superior to two-level ACDF. However, insufficient evidence exists, thereby mandating a need for unbiased, well-designed prospective studies with well-defined outcomes in the future. PMID:25473319

  15. Evaluation of treatment effectiveness for the herniated cervical disc: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Gebremariam, Lukas; Koes, Bart W; Peul, Wilco C; Huisstede, Bionka M

    2012-01-15

    Systematic review. To assess the effectiveness of interventions for treating cervical disc herniation. Cervical disc herniation is 1 of the 23 specific disorders included in the CANS (Complaints of the Arm, Neck, and/or Shoulder) model. Treatment options range from conservative to surgical, but evidence for the effectiveness of these interventions is not yet well documented. The Cochrane Library, MEDLINE, EMBASE, PEDro, and CINAHL were searched for relevant systematic reviews and randomized clinical trials (RCTs) up to February 2009. Two reviewers independently selected relevant studies, assessed the methodological quality, and extracted data. Pooling of the data was not possible; thus, a best-evidence synthesis was used to summarize the results. Of the 11 RCTs included, 1 compared conservative with surgical intervention, and 10 compared various surgical interventions. No evidence was found for the effectiveness of conservative treatment (nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, cortisonics, and physical therapy) compared with percutaneous nucleoplasty. Moderate evidence was found for the effectiveness of anterior cervical discectomy with fusion (ACDF) using a titanium cage compared with ACDF using polymethyl methacrylate, and for BRYAN cervical disc (Medtronic Sofamor Danek, Memphis, TN) prostheses compared with ACDF using allograft bone and plating. No outcomes regarding adjacent-level disease were reported. There is conflicting evidence for the effectiveness of ACD compared with ACDF. Only limited or no evidence was found for the other surgical interventions. No evidence for effectiveness of conservative treatment compared with surgery was found. Although there is moderate evidence for the effectiveness of some surgical interventions, no unequivocal evidence for the superiority of 1 particular surgical treatment was found. Worldwide, most patients receive supplementary implants; however, cervical discectomy without graft may be preferred because of similar outcomes

  16. [Diagnosis and management for the non-traumatic epidural sequestered cervical disc extrusion].

    PubMed

    Yang, Min; Ding, Guo-Zheng; Xu, Zhu-Jun

    2013-06-01

    To explore the clinical characteristics and management of non-traumatic epidural sequestered cervical disc extrusion. From January 2002 to July 2011, the clinical data of 10 patients with non-traumatic epidural sequestered cervical disc extrusion were treated by anterior cervical mostly vertebraectomy and nucleus pulposus removal after decompression and internal fixation through longitudinal ligament resection. Of them,there were 6 males and 4 females with an average age of 48.2 years old (ranged from 42 to 65), the course of disease ranged from 1 month to 4 years (mean, 15 months). All patients manifested numbness and weakness of four limbs, unstable walking and sphincter of oddi dysfunction. Preoperative MRI showed segmental cervical spinal cord compression. JOA scoring criteria was applied to evaluate preoperative and follow-up neurologic function. Ten patients were followed up, and the duration ranged from 15 to 32 months, with an average of 21 months. No complications related to opreation occurred. Preoperative MRI showed nucelus puplposus sequestered longitudinal ligament were on equal signal on T1-weighted and corresponding pathological,while it showed equal and high signal on T2-weighted. JOA score were increased from 7.20 +/- 1.55 preoperative to 13.60 +/- 1.90 postoperative (t = -11.8, P < 0.001), and excellent in 3 cases, good in 6 cases and moderate in 1 case. Anterior cervical mostly vertebraectomy and nucleus pulposus removal after decompression and internal fixation through longitudinal ligament resection after early diagnosis is the key to success of treating non-traumatic epidural sequestered cervical disc extrusion.

  17. Cervical disc herniation as a trigger for temporary cervical cord ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Acker, Güliz; Schneider, Ulf C.; Grozdanovic, Zarko; Vajkoczy, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Background Disc herniations are only reported in few case reports as a rare cause of acute spinal ischemia. A surgical treatment has not been described so far in these reports with analysis of diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DWI/MRI) before and after surgery. The aim of our study is to report a case of cervical spinal cord ischemia caused by cervical disc herniation and discuss the literature concerning diagnostic and treatment options. Methods A 72-year-old female patient developed an acute progressive tetraparesis with emphasis on the upper extremities. MRI showed a disc herniation at the cervical segment 5/6 (C5/6) with consecutive spinal canal stenosis and additional signs of spinal cord ischemia in T2-weighted imaging (T2WI) and DWI reaching from C3 to C5 level. With the MRI being highly suggestive for anterior spinal cord ischemia, we hypothesized that this might be caused by compression of the anterior spinal artery through the significant disc herniation. Therefore, we decided to perform an anterior discectomy and fusion at C5/6 level. Results Following surgery, the patient’s symptoms showed immediate regression with complete recovery after two months in correspondence with the normalization in the control MRI scan of cervical cord. Conclusions Assumedly our patient suffered from a partial anterior spinal artery syndrome, possibly caused by a disc herniation-related compression that was reversible following surgery. This was accompanied by a complete resolution of spinal cord signal abnormalities in T2WI and DWI. PMID:27683710

  18. Surgical technique for revision surgery of cervical artificial disc replacements.

    PubMed

    Onken, Julia; Meyer, Bernhard; Vajkoczy, Peter

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Cervical artificial disc replacement (C-ADR) is a widely used procedure with low risk at implantation. Few cases have been reported about the surgical techniques of C-ADR revision. The authors describe their surgical experience with the explantation of a Galileo C-ADR. METHODS Revision surgery was performed in a 58-year-old patient. Patient positioning and surgical opening techniques were performed as appropriate for anterior cervical decompression. RESULTS Revision surgery via the initial anterior approach was successful following an atraumatic removal of the implant. Fusion of the C5-6 segment was performed without complications. CONCLUSIONS In general, the authors observed recurrent nerve palsy and malpositioning of the revised implant in C-ADR revision surgery. Problems with implant removal did not occur because the fusion rate was low due to the short time between initial surgery and C-ADR revision surgery. The video can be found here: https://youtu.be/32CUEDquinc .

  19. Cervical disc replacement surgery: indications, technique, and technical pearls.

    PubMed

    Leven, Dante; Meaike, Joshua; Radcliff, Kris; Qureshi, Sheeraz

    2017-06-01

    Cervical disc replacement (CDR) is a surgical option for appropriately indicated patients, and high success rates have been reported in the literature. Complications and failures are often associated with patient indications or technical variables, and the goal of this review is to assist surgeons in understanding these factors. Several investigations have been published in the last 5 years supporting the use of CDR in specific patient populations. CDR has been shown to be comparable or favorable to anterior cervical discectomy and fusion in several meta-analyses and mid-term follow-up studies. CDR was developed as a technique to preserve motion following a decompression procedure while minimizing several of the complications associated with fusion and posterior cervical spine procedures. Though success with cervical fusion and posterior foraminotomy has been well documented in the literature, high rates of mid- and long-term complications have been clearly established. CDR has also been associated with several complications and challenges with regard to surgical technique, though improvements in implant design have lead to an increase in utilization. Several devices currently exist and vary in terms of material, design, and outcomes. This review paper discusses indications, surgical technique, and technical pearls and reviews the CDR devices currently available.

  20. Hybrid Corpectomy and Disc Arthroplasty for Cervical Spondylotic Myelopathy Caused by Ossification of Posterior Longitudinal Ligament and Disc Herniation.

    PubMed

    Chang, Huang-Chou; Tu, Tsung-Hsi; Chang, Hsuan-Kan; Wu, Jau-Ching; Fay, Li-Yu; Chang, Peng-Yuan; Wu, Ching-Lan; Huang, Wen-Cheng; Cheng, Henrich

    2016-11-01

    The combination of anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) and anterior cervical corpectomy and fusion (ACCF) has been demonstrated to be effective for multilevel cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM); however, the combination of ACCF and cervical disc arthroplasty (CDA) for 3-level CSM has never been addressed. Consecutive patients (>18 years of age) with CSM caused by segmental ossification of posterior longitudinal ligament (OPLL) and degenerative disc disease (DDD) were reviewed. Inclusion criteria were patients who underwent hybrid ACCF and CDA surgery for symptomatic 3-level CSM with OPLL and DDD. Medical and radiologic records were reviewed retrospectively. A total of 15 patients were analyzed with a mean follow-up of 18.1 ± 7.42 months. Every patient had hybrid surgery composed of 1-level ACCF (for segmental-type OPLL causing spinal stenosis) and 1-level CDA at the adjacent level (for DDD causing stenosis). All clinical outcomes, including visual analogue scale of neck and arm pain, Neck Disability Index, Japanese Orthopedic Association scores, and Nurick scores of myelopathy, demonstrated significant improvement at 12 months after surgery. All patients (100%) achieved arthrodesis for the ACCF (instrumented) and preserved mobility for CDA (preoperation 6.2 ± 3.81° vs. postoperation 7.0 ± 4.18°; P = 0.579). For patients with multilevel CSM caused by segmental OPLL and DDD, the hybrid surgery of ACCF and CDA demonstrated satisfactory clinical and radiologic outcomes. Moreover, although located next to each other, the instrumented ACCF construct and CDA still achieved solid arthrodesis and preserved mobility, respectively. Therefore, hybrid surgery may be a reasonable option for the management of CSM with OPLL. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Structural and Ultrastructural Analysis of the Cervical Discs of Young and Elderly Humans.

    PubMed

    Fontes, Ricardo Braganca de Vasconcellos; Baptista, Josemberg Silva; Rabbani, Said Rahnamaye; Traynelis, Vincent C; Liberti, Edson Aparecido

    2015-01-01

    Several studies describing the ultrastructure and extracellular matrix (ECM) of intervertebral discs (IVDs) involve animal models and specimens obtained from symptomatic individuals during surgery for degenerative disease or scoliosis, which may not necessarily correlate to changes secondary to normal aging in humans. These changes may also be segment-specific based on different load patterns throughout life. Our objective was to describe the ECM and collagen profile of cervical IVDs in young (G1 - <35 years) and elderly (G2 - >65 years) presumably-asymptomatic individuals. Thirty cervical discs per group were obtained during autopsies of presumably-asymptomatic individuals. IVDs were analyzed with MRI, a morphological grading scale, light microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and immunohistochemistry (IHC) for collagen types I, II, III, IV, V, VI, IX and X. Macroscopic degenerative features such as loss of annulus-nucleus distinction and fissures were found in both groups and significantly more severe in G2 as expected. MRI could not detect all morphological changes when compared even with simple morphological inspection. The loose fibrocartilaginous G1 matrix was replaced by a denser ECM in G2 with predominantly cartilaginous characteristics, chondrocyte clusters and absent elastic fibers. SEM demonstrated persistence of an identifiable nucleus and Sharpey-type insertion of cervical annulus fibers even in highly-degenerated G2 specimens. All collagen types were detected in every disc sector except for collagen X, with the largest area stained by collagens II and IV. Collagen detection was significantly decreased in G2: although significant intradiscal differences were rare, changes may occur faster or earlier in the posterior annulus. These results demonstrate an extensive modification of the ECM with maintenance of basic ultrastructural features despite severe macroscopic degeneration. Collagen analysis supports there is not a "pathologic" collagen type

  2. The kinematics of anterior cervical discectomy and fusion versus artificial cervical disc: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Rabin, Doron; Pickett, Gwynedd E; Bisnaire, Lynn; Duggal, Neil

    2007-09-01

    Anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) for the management of cervical spondylosis may contribute to further degenerative changes at adjacent levels secondary to abnormal spinal motion. Insertion of a Bryan Cervical Disc (AD) (Medtronic Sofamor Danek, Memphis, TN) may prevent this accelerated degeneration. This retrospective study compares the in vivo x-ray cervical spine kinematics in patients with ACDF and AD. Ten patients with single-level AD were matched to 10 patients with single-level ACDF based on age and sex. Lateral neutral, flexion and extension cervical x-rays were obtained preoperatively and at regular intervals up to 24 months postoperatively. Kinematic parameters, including range of motion, anteroposterior translation, and disc height, were assessed for all cervical functional spinal units using quantitative motion analysis software. Changes in these parameters were compared between matched patients from both groups using paired Student's t tests. The range of motion at the operated level was greater in the AD group compared with the ACDF group at early (6.9 versus 0.89 degrees, P < 0.01) and late (8.4 versus 0.53 degrees, P < 0.01) follow-up evaluations. Translation was greater at the operated level in patients with AD at late follow-up (6.8 versus 0.8%, P < 0.03) evaluation. No significant between-group kinematic differences were seen at adjacent levels. Patients with AD and those with ACDF demonstrated similar in vivo adjacent level kinematics within the first 24 months after anterior cervical decompression.

  3. Outcomes Evaluation of Zero-Profile Devices Compared to Stand-Alone PEEK Cages for the Treatment of Three- and Four-Level Cervical Disc Disease

    PubMed Central

    Paschel, Erin; Mashaly, Hazem; Sabry, Hatem; Jalalod'din, Hasan; Saoud, Khaled

    2016-01-01

    Background: Anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) is a well-accepted treatment option for patients with cervical spine disease. Three- and four-level discectomies are known to be associated with a higher complication rate and lower fusion rate than single-level surgery. This study was performed to evaluate and compare zero-profile fixation and stand-alone PEEK cages for three- and four-level ACDF. Methods: Two cohorts of patients who underwent ACDF for the treatment of three- and four-level disease were compared. Thirty-three patients underwent implantation of zero-profile devices that included titanium screw fixation (Group A). Thirty-five patients underwent implantation of stand-alone PEEK cages without any form of screw fixation (Group B). Results: In Group A, twenty-seven patients underwent a three-level and six patients a four-level ACDF, with a total of 105 levels. In Group B, thirty patients underwent a three-level and five patients underwent a four-level ACDF, with a total number of 110 levels. In Group A, the mean preoperative visual analog scale score (VAS) for arm pain was 6.4 (range 3-8), and the mean postoperative VAS for arm pain decreased to 2.5 (range 1-7). In group B, the mean preoperative VAS of arm pain was 7.1 (range 3-10), and the mean postoperative VAS of arm pain decreased to 2 (range 0-4). In Group A, four patients (12%) developed dysphagia, and in Group B, three patients (9%) developed dysphagia.  Conclusions: This study found zero-profile instrumentation and PEEK cages to be both safe and effective for patients who underwent three- and four-level ACDF, comparable to reported series using plate devices. Rates of dysphagia for the cohort were much lower than reports using plate devices. Zero-profile segmental fixation devices and PEEK cages may be considered as viable alternatives over plate fixation for patients requiring multi-level anterior cervical fusion surgery. PMID:27738574

  4. Correlation between T2* (T2 star) relaxation time and cervical intervertebral disc degeneration: An observational study.

    PubMed

    Huang, Minghua; Guo, Yong; Ye, Qiong; Chen, Lei; Zhou, Kai; Wang, Qingjun; Shao, Lixin; Shi, Qinglei; Chen, Chun

    2016-11-01

    To demonstrate the potential benefits of T2 relaxation time of intervertebral discs (IVDs) regarding the detection and grading of degenerative disc disease using 3.0-T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in a clinical setting. Cervical sagittal T2-weighted, T2 relaxation MRI was performed at 3.0-T in 61 subjects, covering discs C2-3 to C6-7. All discs were morphologically assessed based on the Pfirrmann grade, and regions of interests (ROIs) were drawn over the T2 mapping. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was performed among grades to determine the cut-off values. Cervical intervertebral discs (IVDs) of patients were commonly determined to be at Pfirrmann grades III to V. The nucleus pulposus (NP) values did not differ significantly between sexes at the same anatomic level (P > 0.05). In the NP, the T2 values tended to decrease with increasing grade (P < 0.000), and a significant difference was found in the T2 values between grades I to V (P < 0.05). T2 values based on disc degeneration level classification were as follows: grade I (>30 milliseconds), grade II (24.55-29.99 milliseconds), grade III (21.65-24.54 milliseconds), grade IV (18.35-21.64 milliseconds), and grade V (<18.34 milliseconds). Our standardized method of region-specific quantitative T2 relaxation time evaluation seems capable of characterizing different degrees of disc degeneration quantitatively. The T2 values obtained in these cervical IVDs may serve as baseline values for future T2 measurements in both healthy and degenerated cervical discs.

  5. Cervical intervertebral disc herniation treatment via radiofrequency combined with low-dose collagenase injection into the disc interior using an anterior cervical approach

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhi-Jian; Zhu, Meng-Ye; Liu, Xiao-Jian; Zhang, Xue-Xue; Zhang, Da-Ying; Wei, Jian-Mei

    2016-01-01

    Abstract This study aimed to determine the therapeutic effect of radiofrequency combined with low-dose collagenase injected into the disc interior via an anterior cervical approach for cervical intervertebral disc herniation. Forty-three patients (26–62-year old; male/female ratio: 31/12) with cervical intervertebral disc herniation received radiofrequency combined with 60 to 100 U of collagenase, injected via an anterior cervical approach. The degree of nerve function was assessed using the current Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) scoring system at 3 and 12 months postoperation. A visual analogue scale (VAS) was used to evaluate the degree of pain preoperation and 7 days postoperation. The preoperative and 3 month postoperative protrusion areas were measured and compared via magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and picture archiving and communication systems (PACS). Compared with the preoperative pain scores, the 7-day postoperative pain was significantly reduced (P <0.01). The excellent and good rates of nerve function amelioration were 93.0% and 90.7% at 3 and 12 months postoperation, respectively, which was not significantly different. Twenty-seven cases exhibited a significantly reduced protrusion area (P <0.01) at 3 months postoperation. No serious side effects were noted. To our knowledge, this is the first study to demonstrate that the use of radiofrequency combined with low-dose collagenase injection into the disc interior via an anterior cervical approach is effective and safe for the treatment of cervical intervertebral disc herniation. PMID:27336892

  6. Comparison of the more than 5-year clinical outcomes of cervical disc arthroplasty versus anterior cervical discectomy and fusion

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Min-Min; Chen, Chun-Hui; Lin, Zhong-Ke; Wang, Xiang-Yang; Huang, Qi-Shan; Chi, Yong-Long; Wu, Ai-Min

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) was almost the “golden standard” technique in treatment of symptomatic cervical degenerative disc disease, however, it cause motion loss of the indexed level, increase the intradiscal pressure and motion of the adjacent levels, and may accelerate the degeneration of adjacent level. Cervical disc arthroplasty (CDA) was designed to preserve the motion of index level, avoid the over-activity of adjacent levels and reduce the degeneration of adjacent disc levels, the process of degeneration of adjacent level is very slowly, long term follow up studies should be conducted, this study aim to compare the more than 5 years’ long-term clinical outcomes and safety between CDA and ACDF. Methods: A systematic review and meta-analysis that will be performed according to the PRISMA (Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses). The electric database of Medline, Embase, and Cochrane library will be systematic search. A standard data form will be used to extract the data of included studies. We will assess the studies according to the Cochrane Handbook for Systematic Reviews of Interventions, and perform analysis in software STATA 12.0. Fixed-effects models will be used for homogeneity data, while random-effects will be used for heterogeneity data. The overall effect sizes will be determined as weighted mean difference (WMD) for continuous outcomes and Relative risk (RR) for dichotomous outcomes. Results: The results of study will be disseminated via both international conference and peer-review journal. Conclusion: The conclusion of our study will provide the long-term and updated evidence of clinical outcomes and safety between CDA and ACDF, and help surgeon to change better surgical technique for patients. PMID:28002345

  7. Management of Chronic Pain of Cervical Disc Herniation and Radiculitis with Fluoroscopic Cervical Interlaminar Epidural Injections

    PubMed Central

    Manchikanti, Laxmaiah; Cash, Kimberly A.; Pampati, Vidyasagar; Wargo, Bradley W.; Malla, Yogesh

    2012-01-01

    Study Design: A randomized, double-blind, active controlled trial. Objective: To evaluate the effectiveness of cervical interlaminar epidural injections of local anesthetic with or without steroids in the management of chronic neck pain and upper extremity pain in patients with disc herniation and radiculitis. Summary of Background Data: Epidural injections in managing chronic neck and upper extremity pain are commonly employed interventions. However, their long-term effectiveness, indications, and medical necessity, of their use and their role in various pathologies responsible for persistent neck and upper extremity pain continue to be debated, even though, neck and upper extremity pain secondary to disc herniation and radiculitis, is described as the common indication. There is also paucity of high quality literature. Methods: One-hundred twenty patients were randomly assigned to one of 2 groups: Group I patients received cervical interlaminar epidural injections of local anesthetic (lidocaine 0.5%, 5 mL); Group II patients received 0.5% lidocaine, 4 mL, mixed with 1 mL of nonparticulate betamethasone. Primary outcome measure was ≥ 50 improvement in pain and function. Outcome assessments included Numeric Rating Scale (NRS), Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), opioid intake, employment, and changes in weight. Results: Significant pain relief and functional status improvement (≥ 50%) was demonstrated in 72% of patients who received local anesthetic only and 68% who received local anesthetic and steroids. In the successful group of participants, significant improvement was illustrated in 77% in local anesthetic group and 82% in local anesthetic with steroid group. Conclusions: Cervical interlaminar epidural injections with or without steroids may provide significant improvement in pain and function for patients with cervical disc herniation and radiculitis. PMID:22859902

  8. A comparison of the shock-absorbing properties of cervical disc prosthesis bearing materials

    PubMed Central

    Dahl, Michael C.; Jacobsen, Stephen; Metcalf, Newton; Sasso, Rick; Ching, Randal P.

    2011-01-01

    Background Data Cervical arthroplasty offers theoretical advantages over traditional spinal fusion, including elimination of adjacent segment disease and elimination of the risk of pseudoarthrosis formation. Initial studies of cervical arthroplasty have shown promising results, however, the ideal design characteristics for disc replacement constructs have not been determined. The current study seeks to quantify the differences in the shock absorption characteristics of three commonly used materials in cervical disc arthroplasty. Methods Three different nucleus materials, polyurethane (PU), polyethylene (PE) and a titanium-alloy (Ti) were tested in a humidity- and temperature-controlled chamber. Ten of each nucleus type underwent three separate mechanical testing protocols to measure 1) dynamic stiffness, 2) quasi-static stiffness, 3) energy absorption, and 4) energy dissipation. The results were compared using analysis of variance. Results PU had the lowest mean dynamic stiffness (435 ± 13 N/mm, P < .0001) and highest energy absorption (19.4 ± 0.1 N/mm, P < .0001) of all three nucleus materials tested. PU was found to have significantly higher energy dissipation (viscous damping ratio 0.017 ± 0,001, P < .0001) than the PE or TI nuclei. PU had the lowest quasi-static stiffness (598 ± 23 N/mm, P < .0001) of the nucleus materials tested. A biphasic response curve was observed for all of the PU nuclei tests. Conclusions Polyurethane absorbs and dissipates more energy and is less stiff than either polyethylene or titanium. Level of Evidence Basic Science/Biomechanical Study. Clinical Relevance This study characterizes important differences in biomechanical properties of materials that are currently being used for different cervical disc prostheses. PMID:25802668

  9. The impact of generalized joint laxity (GJL) on the posterior neck pain, cervical disc herniation, and cervical disc degeneration in the cervical spine.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sun-Mi; Oh, Su Chan; Yeom, Jin S; Shin, Ji-Hoon; Park, Sam-Guk; Shin, Duk-Seop; Ahn, Myun-Whan; Lee, Gun Woo

    2016-12-01

    Generalized joint laxity (GJL) can have a negative impact on lumbar spine pathology, including low back pain, disc degeneration, and disc herniation, but the relationship between GJL and cervical spine conditions remains unknown. To investigate the relationship between GJL and cervical spine conditions, including the prevalence of posterior neck pain (PNP), cervical disc herniation (CDH), and cervical disc degeneration (CDD), in a young, active population. Retrospective 1:2 matched cohort (case-control) study from prospectively collected data PATIENT SAMPLE: Of a total of 1853 individuals reviewed, 73 individuals with GJL (study group, gruop A) and 146 without GJL (control group, Group B) were included in the study according to a 1:2 case-control matched design for age, sex, and body mass index. The primary outcome measure was the prevalence and intensity of PNP at enrollment based on a visual analogue scale score for pain. The secondary outcome measures were (1) clinical outcomes as measured with the neck disability index (NDI) and 12-item short form health survey (SF-12) at enrollment, and (2) radiological outcomes of CDH and CDD at enrollment. We compared baseline data between groups. Descriptive statistical analyses were performed to compare the 2 groups in terms of the outcome measures. The prevalence and intensity of PNP were significantly greater in group A (patients with GJL) than in group B (patients without GJL) (prevalence: p=.02; intensity: p=.001). Clinical outcomes as measured with NDI and SF-12 did not differ significantly between groups. For radiologic outcomes, the prevalence of CDD was significantly greater in group A than in group B (p=.04), whereas the prevalence of CDH did not differ significantly between groups (p=.91). The current study revealed that GJL was closely related to the prevalence and intensity of PNP, suggesting that GJL may be a causative factor for PNP. In addition, GJL may contribute to the occurrence of CDD, but not CDH. Spine

  10. Subsequent surgery rates after cervical total disc replacement using a Mobi-C Cervical Disc Prosthesis versus anterior cervical discectomy and fusion: a prospective randomized clinical trial with 5-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Robert J; Davis, Reginald J; Hoffman, Gregory A; Bae, Hyun W; Hisey, Michael S; Kim, Kee D; Gaede, Steven E; Nunley, Pierce Dalton

    2016-05-01

    OBJECTIVE Cervical total disc replacement (TDR) has been shown in a number of prospective clinical studies to be a viable treatment alternative to anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) for the treatment of symptomatic degenerative disc disease. In addition to preserving motion, evidence suggests that cervical TDR may result in a lower incidence of subsequent surgical intervention than treatment with fusion. The goal of this study was to evaluate subsequent surgery rates up to 5 years in patients treated with TDR or ACDF at 1 or 2 contiguous levels between C-3 and C-7. METHODS This was a prospective, multicenter, randomized, unblinded clinical trial. Patients with symptomatic degenerative disc disease were enrolled to receive 1- or 2-level treatment with either TDR as the investigational device or ACDF as the control treatment. There were 260 patients in the 1-level study (179 TDR and 81 ACDF patients) and 339 patients in the 2-level study (234 TDR and 105 ACDF patients). RESULTS At 5 years, the occurrence of subsequent surgical intervention was significantly higher among ACDF patients for 1-level (TDR, 4.5% [8/179]; ACDF, 17.3% [14/81]; p = 0.0012) and 2-level (TDR, 7.3% [17/234]; ACDF, 21.0% [22/105], p = 0.0007) treatment. The TDR group demonstrated significantly fewer index- and adjacent-level subsequent surgeries in both the 1- and 2-level cohorts. CONCLUSIONS Five-year results showed treatment with cervical TDR to result in a significantly lower rate of subsequent surgical intervention than treatment with ACDF for both 1 and 2 levels of treatment. Clinical trial registration no.: NCT00389597 ( clinicaltrials.gov ).

  11. [Polish nomenclature of lumbar disc disease].

    PubMed

    Radło, Paweł; Smetkowski, Andrzej; Tesiorowski, Maciej

    2014-01-01

    Lumbar disc herniation is one of the most common damage of musculoskeletal system. The incidence of pain of lumbosacral spine is estimated approximately on 60-90% in general population, whereas the incidence of disc herniation in patients experiencing low back pain is about 91%. Despite the high incidence and uncomplicated pathogenesis of disc disease there is a problem with the nomenclature. In the vast majority of cases, the naming confusion stems from ignorance of the etiology of low back pain. Different terminologies: morphological, topographical, Radiological and Clinical are used interchangeably. In addition, diagnosis is presented in a variety of languages: Polish, English and Latin. Moreover, the medical and traditional language are used alternately. The authors found in Polish literature more, than 20 terms to describe lumbar disc herniation. All of these terms in the meaning of the authors are used to determine one pathology--mechanical damage to the intervertebral disc and moving the disc material beyond the anatomical area.

  12. Biomechanics of Hybrid Anterior Cervical Fusion and Artificial Disc Replacement in 3-Level Constructs: An In Vitro Investigation

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Zhenhua; Fogel, Guy R.; Pu, Ting; Gu, Hongsheng; Liu, Weiqiang

    2015-01-01

    Background The ideal surgical approach for cervical disk disease remains controversial, especially for multilevel cervical disease. The purpose of this study was to investigate the biomechanics of the cervical spine after 3-level hybrid surgery compared with 3-level anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF). Material/Methods Eighteen human cadaveric spines (C2-T1) were evaluated under displacement-input protocol. After intact testing, a simulated hybrid construct or fusion construct was created between C3 to C6 and tested in the following 3 conditions: 3-level disc plate disc (3DPD), 3-level plate disc plate (3PDP), and 3-level plate (3P). Results Compared to intact, almost 65~80% of motion was successfully restricted at C3-C6 fusion levels (p<0.05). 3DPD construct resulted in slight increase at the 3 instrumented levels (p>0.05). 3PDP construct resulted in significant decrease of ROM at C3-C6 levels less than 3P (p<0.05). Both 3DPD and 3PDP caused significant reduction of ROM at the arthrodesis level and produced motion increase at the arthroplasty level. For adjacent levels, 3P resulted in markedly increased contribution of both upper and lower adjacent levels (p<0.05). Significant motion increases lower than 3P were only noted at partly adjacent levels in some conditions for 3DPD and 3PDP (p<0.05). Conclusions ACDF eliminated motion within the construct and greatly increased adjacent motion. Artificial cervical disc replacement normalized motion of its segment and adjacent segments. While hybrid conditions failed to restore normal motion within the construct, they significantly normalized motion in adjacent segments compared with the 3-level ACDF condition. The artificial disc in 3-level constructs has biomechanical advantages compared to fusion in normalizing motion. PMID:26529430

  13. Degenerative Cervical Disc Disease: Long-term Changes in Sagittal Alignment and Their Clinical Implications After Cervical Interbody Fusion Cage Subsidence: A Prospective Study With Standalone Lordotic Tantalum Cages.

    PubMed

    Tomé-Bermejo, Félix; Morales-Valencia, Julián A; Moreno-Pérez, Javier; Marfil-Pérez, Juan; Díaz-Dominguez, Elena; Piñera, Angel R; Alvarez, Luis

    2017-06-01

    A retrospective, observational study of prospectively collected outcomes. To investigate the long-term clinical course of anterior cervical discectomy and fusion with interbody fusion cages (ACDF-IFC) with lordotic tantalum implants and to correlate the radiologic findings with the clinical outcomes, with special emphasis on the significance and the influence of implant subsidence. Cage subsidence is the most frequently reported complication after ACDF-IFC. However, most reports fail to correlate cage subsidence with lower fusion rates or with unsatisfactory clinical results. Forty-one consecutive patients with symptomatic degenerative cervical disk disease with failure of conservative treatment were included. All patients underwent 1-/2-level ACDF-IFC with lordotic tantalum implants. The mean follow-up was 4.91 years. The final follow-up fusion rate was 96.96% (32/33). The interspace height (IH) at the affected levels was significantly incremented after implant insertion, and despite a gradual loss in the height over time, the final follow-up IH was significantly higher than that measured preoperatively (P<0.0001). Anterior IH and posterior IH lost 55.8% and 76.2% of the initially incremented height, respectively, with a final increase of 72% in the AIH-PIH height differential. Implant subsidence (>3 mm) occurred in 11 disk spaces (26.82%). Preoperative and postoperative IH were significantly higher in subsidence patients; however, there was no difference in the final follow-up IH (P>0.05). Patients with ≥3 years of follow-up (n=29) did not demonstrate further significant subsidence beyond the second year. Regarding C1-C7 lordosis, the segmental Cobb angle, the cervical Visual Analogue Scale, and Neck Disability Index questionnaires, no difference between patients with or without final follow-up endplate subsidence was encountered. Until fusion occurs, tantalum cage settlement into the vertebral body is to be expected. Further subsidence could be the result of

  14. Spontaneous cervical intradural disc herniation presenting with Brown-Séquard and Horner's syndrome: lesson learned from a very unique case.

    PubMed

    Baudracco, Irene; Grahovac, Gordan; Russo, Vittorio M

    2017-05-01

    Cervical spontaneous intradural disc herniation (IDH) is an extremely rare condition. We describe a unique case of a patient presenting with a Brown-Séquard syndrome (BSS) and Horner's syndrome (HS). This study aimed to report an unusual case of spontaneous cervical intradural disc herniation that presented with Horner's and Brown-Séquard syndrome (BSS) and discuss difficulties in preoperative diagnosis and treatment difficulties of intradural cervical disc. Notes and images review, and analysis of the relevant literature. A 45-year old female presented with acute Horner's syndrome and Brown-Séquard syndrome. The magnetic resonance imaging of cervical spine revealed C4-5 disc extrusion with cord compression. The patient underwent urgent decompression through an anterior cervical corpectomy and fusion. Patient fully recovered 6 months after disease onset. We would like to emphasize that prompt and anterior cervical decompression is the treatment of choice, as it directly address the problem and allows dura repair in spontaneous cervical disc herniation.

  15. The effect of posterior decompressive procedures on segmental range of motion after cervical total disc arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Brody, Michael J; Patel, Alpesh A; Ghanayem, Alexander J; Wojewnik, Bartosz; Carandang, Gerard; Havey, Robert M; Voronov, Leonard I; Vastardis, Georgios; Potluri, Tejaswy; Patwardhan, Avinash G

    2014-09-01

    We quantified the segmental biomechanics of a cervical total disc replacement (TDR) before and after progressive posterior decompression. We hypothesized that posterior decompressive procedures would not significantly increase range of motion (ROM) at the index TDR level. To quantify the kinematics of a cervical total disc replacement (TDR) before and after posterior cervical decompression. A reported yet unaddressed issue is the potential for the development of same-segment disease after implantation of a cervical TDR and the implications of same-segment posterior decompression on TDR mechanics. Eight human cadaveric cervical spines C3-C7 were tested in flexion-extension, lateral bending, and axial rotation while intact, after C5-C6 TDR, C5-C6 unilateral foraminotomy, C5-C6 bilateral foraminotomies, and after C5 laminectomy in combination with the bilateral foraminotomies. Moment versus angular motion curves were obtained for each testing step, and the load-displacement data were analyzed to determine the range of angular motion for each step. Unilateral foraminotomy did not result in a statistically significant increase in flexion-extension ROM, and did not increase the ROM to a degree greater than normal. Although bilateral foraminotomies did increase flexion-extension ROM, motion remained within a physiological range. A full laminectomy added to the bilateral foraminotomies significantly increased ROM and was also associated with distortion of the load-displacement curves. With respect to segmental biomechanics as demonstrated, we think that for same-segment disease, a unilateral foraminotomy can be performed safely. However, the impact of in vivo conditions was not accounted for in this model, and it is possible that cyclical loading and other physiological stresses on such a construct may affect the behavior and lifespan of the implant in a way that cannot be predicted by a biomechanical study. Bilateral foraminotomies would require close observation and

  16. Congenital posterior atlas defect associated with anterior rachischisis and early cervical degenerative disc disease: a case study and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Pasku, Dritan; Katonis, Pavlos; Karantanas, Apostolos; Hadjipavlou, Alexander

    2007-04-01

    A rare case of a wide congenital atlas defect is reported. A 25 year-old woman was admitted after complaints of radicular pain in the right arm. Radiographs incidentally revealed aplasia of the posterior arch of the atlas together with anterior rachischisis. A review of the literature is presented and a possible association with early disc degeneration is discussed.

  17. Genetics Home Reference: intervertebral disc disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... link) National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke: Low Back Pain Fact Sheet Educational Resources (8 links) American Association ... MalaCards: intervertebral disc disease Merck Manual Consumer Version: Low Back Pain Merck Manual Consumer Version: Neck Pain The Children's ...

  18. Location change of center of rotation after single-level cervical total disc replacement with ProDisc-C.

    PubMed

    Lou, Jigang; Li, Huibo; Rong, Xin; Wu, Wenjie; Liu, Hao

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies reported that the location of the center of rotation (COR) at instrumented level after cervical total disc replacement (TDR) deviated from its preoperative location. However, currently, it is unknown whether the deviated COR is linked to the range of motion (ROM) at instrumented level. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinical outcomes after cervical TDR with ProDisc-C (Synthes, West Chester, PA, USA), as well as investigate the location change of COR at instrumented level and its clinical significance. A total of 23 patients who underwent single-level cervical TDR with ProDisc-C were included. Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) score and Neck Disability Index (NDI) were used to assess clinical outcomes. Radiographic parameters such as cervical ROM, instrumented segmental ROM, adjacent segmental ROM, and intervertebral height were analyzed. Additionally, the location change of COR at instrumented level and its clinical significance were further analyzed by the alteration of its coordinates (COR-X, COR-Y). JOA scores increased significantly, while NDI scores decreased at final follow-up. No differences were found in cervical global ROM, instrumented segmental ROM, adjacent segmental ROM, and COR-Y at instrumented level between preoperative and final follow-up measurements (p>0.05); however, intervertebral height and COR-X increased significantly (p<0.05). Cervical global ROM, instrumented segmental ROM, and adjacent segmental ROM could be effectively maintained, and intervertebral height was increased after TDR with ProDisc-C. The location of COR at instrumented level shifted forward after cervical TDR.

  19. Outcomes of single-level cervical disc arthroplasty versus anterior cervical discectomy and fusion.

    PubMed

    Tracey, Robert W; Kang, Daniel G; Cody, John P; Wagner, Scott C; Rosner, Michael K; Lehman, Ronald A

    2014-11-01

    Several studies have established the short-term safety and efficacy of cervical disc arthroplasty (CDA) as compared to anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF). However, few single-center comparative trials have been performed, and current studies do not contain large numbers of patients. We retrospectively reviewed all patients from a single military tertiary medical center between August 2008 to August 2012 who underwent single-level CDA or single-level ACDF and compared their clinical outcomes and complications. A total of 259 consecutive patients were included in the study, 171 patients in the CDA group with an average follow-up of 9.8 (±9.9)months and 88 patients in the ACDF group with an average follow-up of 11.8 (±9.6)months. Relief of pre-operative symptoms was 90.1% in the CDA group and 86.4% in the ACDF group with rates of return to full pre-operative activity of 93.0% and 88.6%, respectively. Patients who underwent CDA had a higher rate of persistent posterior neck pain (15.8% versus 12.5%), and patients who underwent ACDF were at risk for symptomatic pseudarthrosis at a rate of 3.4%. Reoperation rates were higher in the ACDF group (5.7% versus 3.5%). To our knowledge, this review is the largest, non-funded, comparison study between single-level CDA and single-level ACDF. This study demonstrates that CDA is a safe and reliable alternative to ACDF in the treatment of cervical radiculopathy and myelopathy resulting from spondylosis and acute disc herniation.

  20. Brown-Sequard syndrome produced by calcified herniated cervical disc and posterior vertebral osteophyte: Case report

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Dawei; Wang, Guanjun; Clare, Morgan; Kuang, Zhengda

    2015-01-01

    Brown-Sequard syndrome (BSS) produced by cervical disc disorders has rarely been seen clinically and only 50 cases have been reported in English literatures. However, most of which have resulted from acute disc herniation. Here, we report a case of BSS produced by calcified herniated C4-C5 disc and posterior vertebral osteophyte, in which decompression through anterior approach was performed. This case revealed the potential of cervical spondylopathy leading to BSS in a chronic manner. Once the diagnosis is established, it is advisable to perform decompression as early as possible. PMID:27047233

  1. Cement plug technique for the management of disc-associated cervical spondylopathy in 52 Dobermann Pinscher dogs.

    PubMed

    McKee, W Malcolm; Pink, Jonathan J; Gemmill, Toby J

    2016-05-18

    To report the radiographic and clinical outcome of an intervertebral bone cement plug technique for the management of disc-associated cervical spondylopathy in Dobermann Pinscher dogs. Retrospective study of 52 Dobermann Pinscher dogs. A variable degree of cement plug subsidence with loss of vertebral distraction was evident in all dogs (n = 40) that were radiographed >6 weeks postoperatively. In no case was there definitive evidence of vertebral body fusion. Eight dogs had a sudden deterioration in neurological status, cervical hyperaesthesia, or both between three days and 12 weeks following surgery that was considered to be implant-associated; six of these dogs were euthanatized. Following surgery, 43/52 dogs were considered to be neurologically normal or to have improved, however, nine of 43 subsequently deteriorated due to adjacent segment disease. At the long-term follow-up, 34 dogs were considered to be neurologically normal or to have improved. Twenty-nine dogs were dead by the end of the study period. Intervertebral bone cement plug surgery results in an initial improvement in clinical signs in the majority of Dobermann Pinschers with disc-associated cervical spondylopathy. However, it fails to maintain vertebral distraction or achieve vertebral body fusion, and is associated with acute implant complications, additional cervical disc protrusions or mortality in a significant proportion of cases.

  2. Current practice of cervical disc arthroplasty: a survey among 383 AOSpine International members.

    PubMed

    Chin-See-Chong, Timothy C; Gadjradj, Pravesh S; Boelen, Robert J; Harhangi, Biswadjiet S

    2017-02-01

    OBJECTIVE The use of cervical disc arthroplasty (CDA) in spinal practice is controversial. This may be explained by the lack of studies with a large sample size and long-term outcomes. With this survey the authors aimed to evaluate the opinions of spine surgeons on the use of CDA in the current treatment of cervical disc herniation (CDH). METHODS A web-based survey was sent to all members of AOSpine International by email using SurveyMonkey on July 18, 2016. A single reminder was sent on August 18, 2016. Questions included geographic location; specialty; associated practice model; number of discectomies performed annually; the use of CDA, anterior cervical discectomy (ACD), and anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF); and the expectations for clinical outcomes of these procedures. RESULTS A total of 383 questionnaires were analyzed. Almost all practitioners (97.9%) were male, with a mean of 15.0 ± 9.7 years of clinical experience. The majority of responders were orthopedic surgeons (54.6%). 84.3% performed ACDF as the standard technique for CDH. 47.8% of the surgeons occasionally used CDA, whereas 7.3% used CDA as standard approach for CDH. The most common arthroplasty device used was the ProDisc-C. Low evidence for benefits and higher costs were the most important reasons for not offering CDA. The risk of adjacent-level disease was considered smaller for CDA as compared with ACDF. However, ACDF was expected to have the highest effectiveness on arm pain (87.5%), followed by CDA (77.9%), while ACD had the least (12.6%). CONCLUSIONS In this survey, CDA was not considered to be the routine procedure to treat CDH. Reported benefits included the reduced risk of adjacent-level disease and preservation of motion of the neck. Lack of enough evidence on its effectiveness as well as higher costs were considered to be disadvantages of CDA. More research should be conducted on the implementation impact of CDA and the cost-effectiveness from society's perspective.

  3. Clinical and radiographic analysis of cervical disc arthroplasty compared with allograft fusion: a randomized controlled clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Mummaneni, Praveen V; Burkus, J Kenneth; Haid, Regis W; Traynelis, Vincent C; Zdeblick, Thomas A

    2007-03-01

    The authors report the results of a prospective randomized multicenter study in which the results of cervical disc arthroplasty were compared with anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) in patients treated for symptomatic single-level cervical degenerative disc disease (DDD). Five hundred forty-one patients with single-level cervical DDD and radiculopathy were enrolled at 32 sites and randomly assigned to one of two treatment groups: 276 patients in the investigational group underwent anterior cervical discectomy and decompression and arthroplasty with the PRESTIGE ST Cervical Disc System (Medtronic Sofamor Danek); 265 patients in the control group underwent decompressive ACDF. Eighty percent of the arthroplasty-treated patients (223 of 276) and 75% of the control patients (198 of 265) completed clinical and radiographic follow-up examinations at routine intervals for 2 years after surgery. Analysis of all currently available postoperative 12- and 24-month data indicated a two-point greater improvement in the neck disability index score in the investigational group than the control group. The arthroplasty group also had a statistically significant higher rate of neurological success (p = 0.005) as well as a lower rate of secondary revision surgeries (p = 0.0277) and supplemental fixation (p = 0.0031). The mean improvement in the 36-Item Short Form Health Survey Physical Component Summary scores was greater in the investigational group at 12 and 24 months, as was relief of neck pain. The patients in the investigational group returned to work 16 days sooner than those in the control group, and the rate of adjacent-segment reoperation was significantly lower in the investigational group as well (p = 0.0492, log-rank test). The cervical disc implant maintained segmental sagittal angular motion averaging more than 7 degrees. In the investigational group, there were no cases of implant failure or migration. The PRESTIGE ST Cervical Disc System maintained

  4. Plasma disc decompression for contained cervical disc herniation: a randomized, controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Nardi, Pier Vittorio

    2009-01-01

    Prospective case series studies have shown that plasma disc decompression (PDD) using the COBLATION SpineWand device (ArthroCare Corporation, Austin, TX) is effective for decompressing the disc nucleus in symptomatic contained cervical disc herniations. This prospective, randomized controlled clinical trial was conducted to evaluate the clinical outcomes of percutaneous PDD as compared to conservative care (CC) through 1 year. Patients (n = 115) had neck/arm pain >50 on the visual analog scale (VAS) pain scale and had failed at least 30 days of failed CC. Patients were randomly assigned to receive either PDD (n = 62) or CC (n = 58). Clinical outcome was determined by VAS pain score, neck disability index (NDI) score, and SF-36 health survey, collected at 6 weeks, 3 months, 6 months, and 1 year. The PDD group had significantly lower VAS pain scores at all follow-up time points (PDD vs. CC: 6 weeks, −46.87 ± 2.71 vs. −15.26 ± 1.97; 3 months, −53.16 ± 2.74 vs. −30.45 ± 2.59; 6 months, −56.22 ± 2.63 vs. −40.26 ± 2.56; 1 year, −65.73 ± 2.24 vs. −36.45 ± 2.86; GEE, P < 0.0001). PDD patients also had significant NDI score improvement over baseline when compared to CC patients at the 6 weeks (PDD vs. CC: −9.15 ± 1.06 vs. −4.61 ± 0.53, P < 0.0001) and 1 year (PDD vs. CC: −16.70 ± 0.29 vs. −12.40 ± 1.26, P = 0.005) follow-ups. PDD patients showed statistically significant improvement over baseline in SF-36 physical component summary scores when compared to CC patients at 6 weeks and 1 year (PDD vs. CC: 8.86 + 8.04 vs. 4.24 ± 3.79, P = 0.0004; 17.64 ± 10.37 vs. 10.50 ± 10.6, P = 0.0003, respectively). In patients who had neck/arm pain due to a contained cervical disc herniation, PDD was associated with significantly better clinical outcomes than a CC regimen. At 1 year, CC patients appeared to suffer a “relapse, showing signs of decline in most measurements, whereas PDD

  5. Effects of a cervical disc prosthesis on maintaining sagittal alignment of the functional spinal unit and overall sagittal balance of the cervical spine.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seok Woo; Shin, Jae Hyuk; Arbatin, Jose Joefrey; Park, Moon Soo; Chung, Yung Khee; McAfee, Paul C

    2008-01-01

    The object of this study is to review the early clinical results and radiographic outcomes following insertion of the Bryan Cervical Disc Prosthesis (Medtronic Sofamor Danek, Memphis, TN), together with its effect on maintaining sagittal alignment of the functional spinal unit (FSU) and overall sagittal balance of the cervical spine for the treatment of single-level or two-level symptomatic disc disease. Forty-seven patients with symptomatic single or two-level cervical disc disease who received the Bryan Cervical Artificial Disc were reviewed prospectively. A total of 55 Bryan disc were placed in 47 patients. A single-level procedure was performed in 39 patients and a two-level procedure in the other eight. Radiographic and clinical assessments were made preoperatively and at 1.5, 3, 6, 9, 12, and 18 and up to 33 months postoperatively. Mean follow-up duration was 24 months, ranging from 13 to 33 months. Periods were categorized as early follow up (1.5-3 months) and late follow up (6-33 months). The visual analogue scale (VAS), neck disability index(NDI), Odom's criteria were used to assess pain and clinical outcomes. Static and dynamic radiographs were measured by hand and computer to determine the range of motion (ROM), the angle of the functional segmental unit (FSU), and the overall cervical alignment (C2-7 Cobb angle). With all of these data, we evaluated the change of the preoperative lordosis (or kyphosis) of the FSU and Overall sagittal balance of the cervical spine during the follow-up period. There was a statistically significant improvement in the VAS score from 7.0 +/- 2.6 to 2.0 +/- 1.5 (paired-t test, P = 0.000), and in the NDI from 21.5 +/- 5.5 to 4.5 +/- 3.9 (paired-t test P = 0.000). All of the patients were satisfied with the surgical results by Odom's criteria. The postoperative ROM of the implanted level was preserved without significant difference from preoperative ROM of the operated level. Only 36% of patients with a preoperative lordotic

  6. Cervical intervertebral disc calcification combined with ossification of posterior longitudinal ligament in an-11-year old girl: case report and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guoqiang; Kang, Yijun; Chen, Fei; Wang, Bing

    2016-02-01

    To present the clinical feature, radiographic characteristic, treatment and prognosis of an 11 years old girl with cervical intervertebral disc calcification combined with ossification of posterior longitudinal ligament(OPLL). Calcification is the degeneration of intervertebral disc, mostly occurs in the cervical segment. The pediatric cervical intervertebral disc calcification associated with OPLL is very rare. The etiology and treatment guidelines of this complex are poorly known. An 11 years old girl experienced neck pain for 3 months,aggravated for half a month. Neurological examination revealed the limitation of cervical spine motion and numbness of the upper left extremity. The spine radiograph, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging confirmed the diagnosis of cervical intervertebral disc calcification accompanied with OPLL. Conservative intervention was performed, followed up with an observation for 6 months. On admission, the spine radiograph and computed tomography found the calcified intervertebral disc of C5/6 and ossified posterior longitudinal ligament at C5/6,C6 level, leading to spinal canal stenosis and spine cord compression. After a two-week in-hospital conservative treatment, the patient's neurologic symptoms were relieved. Two months later, the computed tomography confirmed the calcification of C5/6 intervertebral disc and ossified mass decreased significantly, spinal stenosis subsided. Six months later, the patient felt no discomfort, the computed tomography showed the ossified mass completely disappeared, only a small calcification remained at C5/6 intervertebral disc. Intervertebral disc calcification associated with OPLL is extremely rare in children. In this case, OPLL is a temporary condition highly related to the disease process of Intervertebral disc calcification. The patient has a satisfactory recovery after non-surgical intervention. Conservative treatment is a prospective choice.

  7. Reliable Magnetic Resonance Imaging Based Grading System for Cervical Intervertebral Disc Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Antonia F.; Kang, James D.; Lee, Joon Y.

    2016-01-01

    Study Design Observational. Purpose To develop a simple and comprehensive grading system for cervical discs that precisely, consistently and meaningfully presents radiologic and morphologic data. Overview of Literature The Thompson grading system is commonly used to classify the severity of degenerative lumbar discs on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Inherent differences in the morphological and physiological characteristics of cervical discs have hindered development of precise classification systems. Other grading systems have been developed for degenerating cervical discs, but their versatility and feasibility in the clinical setting is suboptimal. Methods MRIs of 46 human cervical discs were de-identified and displayed in PowerPoint format. Each slide depicted a single disc with a normal (grade 0) disc displayed in the top right corner for reference. The presentation was given to 25 physicians comprising attending spine surgeons, spine fellows, orthopaedic residents, and two attending musculoskeletal radiologists. The grading system included Grade 0 (normal height compared to C2–3, mid cleft still visible), grade 1 (dark disc, normal height), grade 2 (collapsed disc, few osteophytes), and grade 3 (collapsed disc, many osteophytes). The ease of use of the system was gauged in the participants and the interobserver reliability was calculated. Results The intraclass correlation coefficient for interobserver reliability was 0.87, and 0.94 for intraobserver reliability, indicating excellent reliability. Ninety-five percent and 85 percent of the clinicians judged the grading system to be clinically feasible and useful in daily practice, respectively. Conclusions The grading system is easy to use, has excellent reliability, and can be used for precise and consistent clinician communication. PMID:26949461

  8. Impact of T1 slope on surgical and adjacent segment degeneration after Bryan cervical disc arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Yang, Peng; Li, Yongqian; Li, Jia; Shen, Yong

    2017-01-01

    This retrospective study investigated an association between preoperative T1 slope and surgical and adjacent segment degeneration (SASD) after Bryan cervical disc arthroplasty (BCDA) in patients with cervical degenerative disc disease. Based on preoperative standing lateral radiographs, 90 patients were classified according to T1 slope that was higher or lower than the 50th percentile (high T1 or low T1, 28 and 62 patients, respectively). Patients were also classified as SASD or non-SASD (38 and 52 patients, respectively) determined by radiographs at final follow-up. Visual analog scale (VAS) and Neck Disability Index (NDI) scores for neck and arm pain were noted, and changes in the sagittal alignment of the cervical spine (SACS), functional spinal unit (FSU) angle, and FSU range of motion (ROM) were also noted. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were performed to determine the risk factors for SASD. The overall rate of SASD was 42.2% (38/90). The SACS, FSU angle, FSU ROM, and SASD rates of the high T1 and low T1 slope groups were significantly different at the last follow-up. The NDI and VAS scores of the high T1 slope group were significantly greater than those of the low T1 slope. The multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that high T1 slope and endplate coverage discrepancy (ie, residual space behind the prosthesis) were significant risk factors for SASD after BCDA. High T1 slope and endplate coverage discrepancy were associated with SASD after BCDA. Patients with a high preoperative T1 slope have a smaller FSU angle and more neck pain after BCDA.

  9. Total Disc Replacement in Lumbar Degenerative Disc Diseases

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    More than 10 years have passed since lumbar total disc replacement (LTDR) was introduced for the first time to the world market for the surgical management of lumbar degenerative disc disease (DDD). It seems like the right time to sum up the relevant results in order to understand where LTDR stands on now, and is heading forward to. The pathogenesis of DDD has been currently settled, but diagnosis and managements are still controversial. Fusion is recognized as golden standard of surgical managements but has various kinds of shortcomings. Lately, LTDR has been expected to replace fusion surgery. A great deal of LTDR reports has come out. Among them, more than 5-year follow-up prospective randomized controlled studies including USA IDE trials were expected to elucidate whether for LTDR to have therapeutic benefit compared to fusion. The results of these studies revealed that LTDR was not inferior to fusion. Most of clinical studies dealing with LTDR revealed that there was no strong evidence for preventive effect of LTDR against symptomatic degenerative changes of adjacent segment disease. LTDR does not have shortcomings associated with fusion. However, it has a potentiality of the new complications to occur, which surgeons have never experienced in fusion surgeries. Consequently, longer follow-up should be necessary as yet to confirm the maintenance of improved surgical outcome and to observe any very late complications. LTDR still may get a chance to establish itself as a substitute of fusion both nominally and virtually if it eases the concerns listed above. PMID:26713139

  10. Chiari malformation, cervical disc prolapse and syringomyelia--always think twice.

    PubMed

    Ball, Jonathon R; Little, Nicholas S

    2008-04-01

    We present the case of a 36-year-old man with neck pain and parasthesia of both upper limbs. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated a cervical disc protrusion with spinal cord compression, a Chiari I malformation and cervical syringomyelia. On clinical grounds it was suspected that the cervical stenosis was the symptomatic pathology and an anterior cervical decompression was performed, followed by arthroplasty. Post-operative imaging demonstrated adequate canal decompression, preserved cervical mobility and near-complete resolution of the syrinx. Syringomyelia has a multitude of causes and synchronous pathology can occur. Cervical spondylosis is infrequently associated with syringomyelia. Chiari I malformations are increasingly incidentally detected and asymptomatic. This first report of arthroplasty for cervical spondylosis associated with syringomyelia adds to the growing body of experience with this new technology.

  11. Comparison of in vivo and simulator-retrieved metal-on-metal cervical disc replacements

    PubMed Central

    Kurtz, Steven M.; Ciccarelli, Lauren; Harper, Megan L.; Siskey, Ryan; Shorez, Jacob; Chan, Frank W.

    2012-01-01

    Background Cervical disc arthroplasty is regarded as a promising treatment for myelopathy and radiculopathy as an alternative to cervical spine fusion. On the basis of 2-year clinical data for the PRESTIGE® Cervical Disc (Medtronic, Memphis, Tennessee), the Food and Drug Administration recommended conditional approval in September 2006 and final approval in July 2007; however, relatively little is known about its wear and damage modes in vivo. The main objective was to analyze the tribological findings of the PRESTIGE® Cervical Disc. This study characterized the in vivo wear patterns of retrieved cervical discs and tested the hypothesis that the total disc replacements exhibited similar surface morphology and wear patterns in vitro as in vivo. Methods Ten explanted total disc replacements (PRESTIGE®, PRESTIGE® I, and PRESTIGE® II) from 10 patients retrieved after a mean of 1.8 years (range, 0.3–4.1 years) were analyzed. Wear testing included coupled lateral bending ( ±4.7°) and axial rotation ( ±3.8°) with a 49 N axial load for 5 million cycles followed by 10 million cycles of flexion-extension ( ±9.7°) with 148 N. Implant surfaces were characterized by the use of white-light interferometry, scanning electron microscopy, and energy dispersive spectroscopy. Results The explants generally exhibited a slightly discolored, elliptic wear region of varying dimension centered in the bearing center, with the long axis oriented in the medial-lateral direction. Abrasive wear was the dominant in vivo wear mechanism, with microscopic scratches generally oriented in the medial-lateral direction. Wear testing resulted in severe abrasive wear in a curvilinear fashion oriented primarily in the medial-lateral direction. All retrievals showed evidence of an abrasive wear mechanism. Conclusions This study documented important similarity between the wear mechanisms of components tested in vitro and explanted PRESTIGE® Cervical Discs; however, the severity of wear was

  12. Clinical and radiographic outcomes of cervical disc replacement with a new prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Miao, Jinhao; Yu, Fengbin; Shen, Ye; He, Naya; Kuang, Yong; Wang, Xinwei; Chen, Deyu

    2014-06-01

    Anterior cervical discectomy and interbody fusion was a classical treatment for cervical degenerative disc disease (CDDD). However, the rigid fusion also leads to a reduction in normal cervical spine motion and to increased biomechanical stress at adjacent levels, which in turn accelerates degenerative changes of the discs at these levels. Cervical disc replacement (CDR) is a new technology with the aim of addressing the limitations of fusion procession and preserving motion at the treated level. Discover prosthesis (DePuy Spine, Raynham, MA, USA) is a new type artificial disc and there are few reports about it. The purpose of this study was to analyze the primary clinical and radiographic outcomes of CDR with Discover prosthesis to treat mono- or bi-segment CDDD in a Chinese population. The study design was prospective and single-center clinical trial of the Discover prosthesis in the treatment of patients with mono- or bi-segment CDDD. Seventy-nine patients with 102 Discover prosthesis arthroplasty performed (56 mono-segment and 23 bi-segment) were evaluated. Clinical outcomes based on Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA), visual analog scale (VAS) pain score, and Odom's scale and radiographic outcomes including the anterior disc heights (ADH), posterior disc heights (PDH), range of motion, and performance of heterotopic ossification (HO) of the operative segment were assessed. Clinical and radiographic follow-up was performed. Preoperative and postoperative ADH, PDH, and range of motion were measured from lateral and flexion-extension radiographs. The paired t test was used to assess the difference of clinical and radiographic outcomes before and after operation. The performance of HO was observed by two independent MD. The mean follow-up time for all the patients was 31.6 months, ranging from 24 to 43 months. Mean preoperative JOA score was 9.5, and VAS overall pain score was 7.2. At 2-, 6-, 12-, and 24-month follow-up, the mean JOA score was 14.1, 14.7, 15

  13. One stage laminoplasty and posterior herniotomy for the treatment of myelopathy caused by cervical stenosis with cervical disc herniation

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Bin; Chen, Bohua; Ma, Xue-Xiao; Xi, Yong-Ming; Xiang, Hong-Fei; Hu, You-Gu; Zhang, Guoqing

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to introduce a method of one stage laminoplasty and posterior herniotomy for myelopathy caused by cervical stenosis with cervical disc herniation and to evaluate the clinical efficacy of this surgery. From 1999 to 2008, 18 patients with myelopathy caused by cervical stenosis with cervical disc herniation who underwent this procedure were included. The average age was 63 years (range 48-74 years), and the average follow-up period was 46 months (range 3-108 months). Neurologic status was evaluated using the JOA scoring system. Neurological symptoms improvement was seen in all patients after surgery. The average JOA score was 14.22±1.86 by final follow-up, which was higher than preoperative values (P<0.01), and the average improvement in neurological function was 76.63%. Neurologic examination showed that excellent results had been obtained by 10 patients, good results by 8 patients, with no fair or poor results. 2 patients developed cerebrospinal fluid leakage after surgery and recovered during the follow-up period. One patient with cervical disc herniation developed postoperative C5 palsy on the axle side on the third day after surgery. She completely recovered by 1 month after surgery. No other patients experienced postoperative neurologic complications. Complete anterior and posterior decompression of the spinal cord was achieved after surgery. We concluded that one stage laminoplasty and posterior herniotomy is an effective, reliable, and safe procedure for the treatment of myelopathy caused by cervical stenosis with cervical disc herniation. PMID:26309625

  14. [Standardized terminology for disc disease].

    PubMed

    Sánchez Pérez, M; Gil Sierra, A; Sánchez Martín, A; Gallego Gómez, P; Pereira Boo, D

    2012-01-01

    This article reviews the terminology used to describe morphological alterations in the intervertebral discs. Radiologists must be able to communicate information about the type, location, and severity of these alterations to medical and surgical clinicians. It is crucial to use simple, standard, and unified terminology to ensure comprehension not only among radiologists but also with professionals from the different specialties for whom the radiology reports are written (fundamentally traumatologists and neurosurgeons). This terminology will help ensure a more accurate diagnosis and better patient management.

  15. Comparison between single- and multi-level patients: clinical and radiological outcomes 2 years after cervical disc replacement.

    PubMed

    Huppert, J; Beaurain, J; Steib, J P; Bernard, P; Dufour, T; Hovorka, I; Stecken, J; Dam-Hieu, P; Fuentes, J M; Vital, J M; Vila, T; Aubourg, L

    2011-09-01

    In cervical multi-level degenerative pathology, considering the morbidity of the extensive fusion techniques, some authors advocate for the multilevel disc replacement. This study compared the safety and efficacy of disc replacement with an unconstrained prosthesis in multi- versus single-level patients. A total of 231 patients with cervical degenerative disc disease (DDD) who were treated with cervical disc replacement and completed their 24 months follow-up were analyzed prospectively: 175 were treated at one level, 56 at 2 levels or more. Comparison between both groups was based on usual clinical and radiological outcomes [Neck Disability Index (NDI), Visual Analog Scale (VAS), Range of Motion, satisfaction]. Safety assessments, including complication and subsequent surgeries, were also documented and compared. Mean NDI and VAS scores for neck and arm pain were improved in both groups similarly. Improvement of mobility at treated segments was also similar. Nevertheless, in the multi-level group, analgesic use was significantly higher and occurrence of Heterotopic Ossification significantly lower than in the single-level group. Subject satisfaction was nearly equal, as 94.2% of single-level group patients would undergo the surgery again versus 94.5% in the multi-level group. The overall success rate did not differ significantly. Multi-level DDD is a challenging indication in the cervical spine. This study showed no major significant clinical difference between the two groups. We need further studies to know more about the impact of multi-level arthroplasty, especially on the adjacent segments, but these results demonstrate initial safety and effectiveness in this patient sample.

  16. Prospective, Randomized Comparison of One-level Mobi-C Cervical Total Disc Replacement vs. Anterior Cervical Discectomy and Fusion: Results at 5-year Follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Zigler, Jack E.; Jackson, Robert; Nunley, Pierce D.; Bae, Hyun W.; Kim, Kee D.; Ohnmeiss, Donna D.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction There is increasing interest in the role of cervical total disc replacement (TDR) as an alternative to anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF). Multiple prospective randomized studies with minimum 2 year follow-up have shown TDR to be at least as safe and effective as ACDF in treating symptomatic degenerative disc disease at a single level. The purpose of this study was to compare outcomes of cervical TDR using the Mobi-C® with ACDF at 5-year follow-up. Methods This prospective, randomized, controlled trial was conducted as a Food and Drug Administration regulated Investigational Device Exemption trial across 23 centers with 245 patients randomized (2:1) to receive TDR with Mobi-C® Cervical Disc Prosthesis or ACDF with anterior plate and allograft. Outcome assessments included a composite overall success score, Neck Disability Index (NDI), visual analog scales (VAS) assessing neck and arm pain, Short Form-12 (SF-12) health survey, patient satisfaction, major complications, subsequent surgery, segmental range of motion, and adjacent segment degeneration. Results The 60-month follow-up rate was 85.5% for the TDR group and 78.9% for the ACDF group. The composite overall success was 61.9% with TDR vs. 52.2% with ACDF, demonstrating statistical non-inferiority. Improvements in NDI, VAS neck and arm pain, and SF-12 scores were similar between groups and were maintained from earlier follow-up through 60 months. There was no significant difference between TDR and ACDF in adverse events or major complications. Range of motion was maintained with TDR through 60 months. Device-related subsequent surgeries (TDR: 3.0%, ACDF: 11.1%, p<0.02) and adjacent segment degeneration at the superior level (TDR: 37.1%, ACDF: 54.7%, p<0.03) were significantly lower for TDR patients. Conclusions Five-year results demonstrate the safety and efficacy of TDR with the Mobi-C as a viable alternative to ACDF with the potential advantage of lower rates of reoperation and

  17. Qualitative and quantitative assessment of degeneration of cervical intervertebral discs and facet joints.

    PubMed

    Walraevens, Joris; Liu, Baoge; Meersschaert, Joke; Demaerel, Philippe; Delye, Hans; Depreitere, Bart; Vander Sloten, Jos; Goffin, Jan

    2009-03-01

    Degeneration of intervertebral discs and facet joints is one of the most frequently encountered spinal disorders. In order to describe and quantify degeneration and evaluate a possible relationship between degeneration and biomechanical parameters, e.g., the intervertebral range of motion and intradiscal pressure, a scoring system for degeneration is mandatory. However, few scoring systems for the assessment of degeneration of the cervical spine exist. Therefore, two separate objective scoring systems to qualitatively and quantitatively assess the degree of cervical intervertebral disc and facet joint degeneration were developed and validated. The scoring system for cervical disc degeneration consists of three variables which are individually scored on neutral lateral radiographs: "height loss" (0-4 points), "anterior osteophytes" (0-3 points) and "endplate sclerosis" (0-2 points). The scoring system for facet joint degeneration consists of four variables which are individually scored on neutral computed tomography scans: "hypertrophy" (0-2 points), "osteophytes" (0-1 point), "irregularity" on the articular surface (0-1 point) and "joint space narrowing" (0-1 point). Each variable contributes with varying importance to the overall degeneration score (max 9 points for the scoring system of cervical disc degeneration and max 5 points for facet joint degeneration). Degeneration of 20 discs and facet joints of 20 patients was blindly assessed by four raters: two neurosurgeons (one senior and one junior) and two radiologists (one senior and one junior), firstly based on first subjective impression and secondly using the scoring systems. Measurement errors and inter- and intra-rater agreement were determined. The measurement error of the scoring system for cervical disc degeneration was 11.1 versus 17.9% of the subjective impression results. This scoring system showed excellent intra-rater agreement (ICC = 0.86, 0.75-0.93) and excellent inter-rater agreement (ICC = 0

  18. Increased Risk for Adhesive Capsulitis of the Shoulder following Cervical Disc Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Jiunn-Horng; Lin, Herng-Ching; Tsai, Ming-Chieh; Chung, Shiu-Dong

    2016-01-01

    Shoulder problems are common in patients with a cervical herniated intervertebral disc (HIVD). This study aimed to explore the incidence and risk of shoulder capsulitis/tendonitis following cervical HIVD surgery. We used data from the Taiwan “Longitudinal Health Insurance Database”. We identified all patients who were hospitalized with a diagnosis of displacement of a cervical HIVD and who underwent cervical surgery (n = 1625). We selected 8125 patients who received cervical HIVD conservative therapy only as the comparison group matched with study patients. We individually tracked these sampled patients for 6 months to identify all patients who received a diagnosis of shoulder tendonitis/capsulitis. We found that incidence rates of shoulder tendonitis/capsulitis during the 6-month follow-up period were 3.69 (95% CI: 2.49~5.27) per 100 person-years for the study group and 2.33 (95% CI: 1.89~2.86) per 100 person-years for the comparison group. Cox proportional hazard regressions showed that the adjusted hazard ratio for shoulder tendonitis/capsulitis among patients who underwent cervical disc surgery was 1.66 (95% CI = 1.09~2.53) when compared to comparison group. We concluded that patients who underwent surgery for a cervical HIVD had a significantly higher risk of developing shoulder capsulitis/tendonitis in 6 months follow-up compared to patients who received cervical HIVD conservative therapy only. PMID:27231090

  19. Cervical stability training with and without core stability training for patients with cervical disc herniation: A randomized, single-blind study.

    PubMed

    Buyukturan, B; Guclu-Gunduz, A; Buyukturan, O; Dadali, Y; Bilgin, S; Kurt, E E

    2017-11-01

    This study aims at evaluating and comparing the effects of cervical stability training to combined cervical and core stability training in patients with neck pain and cervical disc herniation. Fifty patients with neck pain and cervical disc herniation were included in the study, randomly divided into two groups as cervical stability and cervical-core stability. Training was applied three times a week in three phases, and lasted for a total duration of 8 weeks. Pain, activation and static endurance of deep cervical flexor muscles, static endurance of neck muscles, cross-sectional diameter of M. Longus Colli, static endurance of trunk muscles, disability and kinesiophobia were assessed. Pain, activation and static endurance of deep cervical flexors, static endurance of neck muscles, cross-sectional diameter of M. Longus Colli, static endurance of trunk muscles, disability and kinesiophobia improved in both groups following the training sessions (p < 0.05). Comparison of the effectiveness of these two training methods revealed that the cervical stability group produced a greater increase in the right transverse diameter of M. Longus Colli (p < 0.05). However, static endurance of trunk muscles and kinesiophobia displayed better improvement in the cervical-core stability group (p < 0.05). Cervical stability training provided benefit to patients with cervical disc herniation. The addition of core stability training did not provide any additional significant benefit. Further research is required to investigate the efficacy of combining other techniques with cervical stability training in patients with cervical disc herniation. Both cervical stability training and its combination with core stability training were significantly and similarly effective on neck pain and neck muscle endurance in patients with cervical disc herniation. © 2017 European Pain Federation - EFIC®.

  20. Arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathy: a disease of intercalated discs.

    PubMed

    Calore, Martina; Lorenzon, Alessandra; De Bortoli, Marzia; Poloni, Giulia; Rampazzo, Alessandra

    2015-06-01

    Arrhythmogenic cardiomyopathy (ACM) is an acquired progressive disease having an age-related penetrance and showing clinical manifestations usually during adolescence and young adulthood. It is characterized clinically by a high incidence of severe ventricular tachyarrhythmias and sudden cardiac death and pathologically by degeneration of ventricular cardiomyocytes with replacement by fibro-fatty tissue. Whereas, in the past, the disease was considered to involve only the right ventricle, more recent clinical studies have established that the left ventricle is frequently involved. ACM is an inherited disease in up to 50% of cases, with predominantly an autosomal dominant pattern of transmission, although recessive inheritance has also been described. Since most of the pathogenic mutations have been identified in genes encoding desmosomal proteins, ACM is currently defined as a disease of desmosomes. However, on the basis of the most recent description of the intercalated disc organization and of the identification of a novel ACM gene encoding for an area composita protein, ACM can be considered as a disease of the intercalated disc, rather than only as a desmosomal disease. Despite increasing knowledge of the genetic basis of ACM, we are just beginning to understand early molecular events leading to cardiomyocyte degeneration, fibrosis and fibro-fatty substitution. This review summarizes recent advances in our comprehension of the link between the molecular genetics and pathogenesis of ACM and of the novel role of cardiac intercalated discs.

  1. Surgical management of high cervical disc prolapse associated with basilar invagination--two case reports.

    PubMed

    Goel, Atul; Phalke, Umesh; Cacciola, Francesco; Muzumdar, Dattatraya

    2004-03-01

    C3-4 cervical disc prolapse was associated with basilar invagination and short neck in a 21-year-old man and additionally with an extensive Klippel-Feil abnormality and fusion of multiple cervical vertebrae in a 32-year-old man. The transoral surgical route was adopted for cervical discectomy in the latter case and an additional odontoidectomy in the former case. Interbody plate and screw fixation was carried out in the patient with Klippel-Feil abnormality. Both the patients were relieved of symptoms and remained asymptomatic at follow up. Simultaneous fixation procedure is not mandatory after transoral surgery in patients with basilar invagination.

  2. Complete cervical intervertebral disc extrusion with spinal cord injury in the absence of facet dislocation: a case report.

    PubMed

    Yue, James J; Lawrence, Brandon D; Sutton, Karen M; Strugar, John J; Haims, Andrew H

    2004-05-01

    Complete cervical disc complex extrusion, defined as the extrusion of both cartilaginous end-plates, the entire nucleus pulposus, and portions of the anulus fibrosus, is rare. A case of complete cervical disc complex extrusion with spinal cord injury in the absence of facet dislocation or subluxation in an obtunded patient is reported. To report an unusual presentation of spinal cord injury and the occurrence of complete traumatic cervical disc complex extrusion in the absence of facet dislocation and normal plain radiographic findings. Traumatic cervical disc herniation occurs in 54% to 80% of patients with facet dislocation. A report of complete extrusion of a cervical intervertebral disc complex (cartilaginous endplate, anulus, and nucleus pulposus) with spinal cord injury in the absence of dislocation has not been described, to the best of the authors' knowledge. A clinical and radiographic review of such a case of complete traumatic cervical disc complex herniation in the absence of dislocation was performed. Plain radiographic imaging did not show any injury. A nondisplaced fracture of the left inferior facet joint was evident on computed tomography. The diagnosis of C4-C5 intervertebral disc extrusion was made only after magnetic resonance imaging. The vacuum effect of complete disc extrusion created a "white-out" appearance to the disc space on the sagittal T2 magnetic resonance image. The patient underwent anterior cervical discectomy and fusion with additional posterior cervical fusion. He subsequently regained functional strength against gravity in two of four limbs. He remains completely paraparetic in the left upper extremity and partially paraparetic in the left lower extremity. The case report highlights the occurrence of complete traumatic cervical disc extrusion in the absence of facet dislocation with normal plain radiographic findings and consequent spinal cord injury, which can accompany such an injury.

  3. A case of cervical metastases in a patient with preexisting cervical disc replacement and fusion after 2-year symptom-free interval: when do we need interdisciplinary diagnostics?

    PubMed

    Melloh, Markus; Barz, Thomas

    2012-08-01

    Recurrent cervical symptoms frequently occur after cervical disc replacement and fusion. To date, no algorithm for the diagnostic assessment of these symptoms has been established. We present a case report and review of the literature to illustrate the need for interdisciplinary diagnostics in recurrent cervicobrachialgia without pathological cervical imaging. The hospital chart, medical history, physical examination, and imaging of a single patient were reviewed. A 53-year-old man with preexisting cervical disc replacement and fusion presented with a new episode of cervicobrachialgia after a 2-year symptom-free interval. Cervical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed no pathological findings. Six months later the patient reported increasing symptoms including numbness and weakness of the right arm. Repeated cervical MRI and thoracic computed tomography revealed cervical metastases with intraspinal tumor growth and an underlying extensive small cell bronchial carcinoma. In recurrent cervicobrachialgia, without pathological cervical imaging, interdisciplinary diagnostics are needed. Basic diagnostic tests may assist to exclude severe non-vertebrogenic pathologies.

  4. Differences between 1- and 2-level cervical arthroplasty: more heterotopic ossification in 2-level disc replacement: Clinical article.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jau-Ching; Huang, Wen-Cheng; Tsai, Hsiao-Wen; Ko, Chin-Chu; Fay, Li-Yu; Tu, Tsung-Hsi; Wu, Ching-Lan; Cheng, Henrich

    2012-06-01

    The most currently accepted indication for cervical arthroplasty is 1- or 2-level degenerative disc disease (DDD) refractory to medical treatment. However, the randomized and controlled clinical trials by the US FDA investigational device exemption studies only compared cervical arthroplasty with anterior cervical discectomy and fusion for 1-level disease. Theoretically, 2-level cervical spondylosis usually implicates more advanced degeneration, whereas the 1-level DDD can be caused by merely a soft-disc herniation. This study aimed to investigate the differences between 1- and 2-level cervical arthroplasty. The authors analyzed data obtained in 87 consecutive patients who underwent 1- or 2-level cervical arthroplasty with Bryan disc. The patients were divided into the 1-level and the 2-level treatment groups. Clinical outcomes were measured using the visual analog scale (VAS) for the neck and arm pain and the Neck Disability Index (NDI), with a minimum follow-up of 30 months. Radiographic outcomes were evaluated on both radiographs and CT scans. The study analyzed 98 levels of Bryan cervical arthroplasty in 70 patients (80.5%) who completed the evaluations in a mean follow-up period of 46.21 ± 9.85 months. There were 22 females (31.4%) and 48 males (68.6%), whose mean age was 46.57 ± 10.07 years at the time of surgery. The 1-level group had 42 patients (60.0%), while the 2-level group had 28 patients (40.0%). Patients in the 1-level group were younger than those in the 2-level group (mean 45.00 vs 48.93 years, p = 0.111 [not significant]). Proportional sex compositions and perioperative prescription of nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs were also similar in both groups (p = 0.227 and p = 1.000). The 2-level group had significantly greater EBL during surgery than the 1-level group (220.80 vs 111.89 ml, p = 0.024). Heterotopic ossification was identified more frequently in the 2-level group than the 1-level group (75.0% vs 40.5%, p = 0.009). Although most of the

  5. A Prospective Study of the Functional Outcome of Anterior Cervical Discectomy With Fusion in Single Level Degenerative Cervical Disc Prolapse

    PubMed Central

    Kamani, Mayur M; Shetty, Vikram; Rai, H. Ravindranath; Hegde, Deepak

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Cervical spondylotic myelo-radiculopathy is a form of spinal cord dysfunction syndrome and usually accompanies age related degeneration of the spine. Aim To determine the functional outcome of anterior cervical discectomy with fusion and plating in single level degenerative cervical disc prolapse. Materials and Methods A total of 20 patients diagnosed with degenerative single level cervical disc prolapse who presented to the Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Justice KS Hegde Charitable Hospital, Mangalore from the period of November 2012 to May 2014 were enrolled in the study. Complete clinical and radiological evaluation of the patients was done. A trial of conservative management was tried in all these patients for a period of two months. They were taken up for surgery only when conservative management had failed. Scoring of neck function before the surgery was done as per the Modified Japanese Orthopaedic Association (MJOA) score. All patients underwent anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) with tricortical iliac crest bone grafting. Fixation was performed with titanium locking cervical plates. All patients were reviewed at 6 weeks and 6 months postoperatively. Assessment of neck function was done as per the MJOA scoring during all the reviews. Radiographic assessment was also done during all the reviews. The complications noted were documented. The statistical analysis was done using percentages; the arithmetic mean was calculated using SPSS software (version 16.0). Results Amongst the 20 patients included in the study, 1 patient died postoperatively due to oesophageal rupture. of the remaining 19 patients reviewed and followed up, all of them had improvement of symptoms and were reported to be in the ‘mild category’ as per the MJOA score. One patient developed dysphonia, in the immediate postoperative period due to recurrent laryngeal nerve palsy which recovered in a period of three months postoperative. Conclusion Single level

  6. An evaluation of information on the internet about a new device: the cervical artificial disc replacement.

    PubMed

    Qureshi, Sheeraz A; Koehler, Steven M; Lin, James D; Bird, Justin; Garcia, Ryan M; Hecht, Andrew C

    2012-05-01

    Cross-sectional survey. The objective of this study was to investigate the authorship, content, and quality of information available to the public on the Internet pertaining to the cervical artificial disc replacement device. The Internet is widely used by patients as an educational tool for health care information. In addition, the Internet is used as a medium for direct-to-consumer marketing. Increasing interest in cervical artificial disc replacement has led to the emergence of numerous Web sites offering information about this procedure. It is thought that patients can be influenced by information found on the Internet. A cross section of Web sites accessible to the general public was surveyed. Three commonly used search engines were used to locate 150 (50/search engine) Web sites providing information about the cervical artificial disc replacement. Each Web site was evaluated with regard to authorship and content. Fifty-three percent of the Web sites reviewed were authorized by a private physician group, 4% by an academic physician group, 13% by industry, 16% were news reports, and 14% were not otherwise categorized. Sixty-five percent of Web sites offered a mechanism for direct contact and 19% provided clear patient eligibility criteria. Benefits were expressed in 80% of Web sites, whereas associated risks were described in 35% or less. European experiences were noted in 17% of Web sites, whereas only 9% of Web sites detailed the current US experience. CONCLUSION.: The results of this study demonstrate that much of the content of the Internet-derived information pertaining to the cervical artificial disc replacement is for marketing purposes and may not represent unbiased information. Until we can confirm the content on a Web site to be accurate, patients should be cautioned when using the Internet as a source for health care information related to cervical disc replacement.

  7. Cervical Disc Deformation During Flexion–Extension in Asymptomatic Controls and Single-Level Arthrodesis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Anderst, William; Donaldson, William; Lee, Joon; Kang, James

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize cervical disc deformation in asymptomatic subjects and single-level arthrodesis patients during in vivo functional motion. A validated model-based tracking technique determined vertebral motion from biplane radiographs collected during dynamic flexion–extension. Level-dependent differences in disc compression–distraction and shear deformation were identified within the anterior and posterior annulus (PA) and the nucleus of 20 asymptomatic subjects and 15 arthrodesis patients using a mixed-model statistical analysis. In asymptomatic subjects, disc compression and shear deformation per degree of flexion–extension progressively decreased from C23 to C67. The anterior and PA experienced compression–distraction deformation of up to 20%, while the nucleus region was compressed between 0% (C67) and 12% (C23). Peak shear deformation ranged from 16% (at C67) to 33% (at C45). In the C5–C6 arthrodesis group, C45 discs were significantly less compressed than in the control group in all disc regions (all p ≤ 0.026). In the C6–C7 arthrodesis group, C56 discs were significantly less compressed than the control group in the nucleus (p = 0.023) and PA (p = 0.014), but not the anterior annulus (AA; p = 0.137). These results indicate in vivo disc deformation is level-dependent, and single-level anterior arthrodesis alters the compression–distraction deformation in the disc immediately superior to the arthrodesis. PMID:23861160

  8. Initial clinical experience with a next-generation artificial disc for the treatment of symptomatic degenerative cervical radiculopathy.

    PubMed

    Reyes-Sanchez, Alejandro; Miramontes, Victor; Olivarez, Luis M Rosales; Aquirre, Armando Alpizar; Quiroz, Alfredo Ortega; Zarate-Kalfopulos, Baron

    2010-01-01

    A feasibility trial was conducted to evaluate the initial safety and clinical use of a next-generation artificial cervical disc (M6-C artificial cervical disc; Spinal Kinetics, Sunnyvale, CA) for the treatment of patients with symptomatic degenerative cervical radiculopathy. A standardized battery of validated outcome measures was utilized to assess condition-specific functional impairment, pain severity, and quality of life. Thirty-six consecutive patients were implanted with the M6-C disc and complete clinical and radiographic outcomes for 25 patients (mean age, 44.5 ± 10.1 years) with radiographically-confirmed cervical disc disease and symptomatic radiculopathy unresponsive to conservative medical management are included in this report. All patients had disc-osteophyte complex causing neural compression and were treated with discectomy and artificial cervical disc replacement at either single level (n = 12) or 2-levels (n = 13). Functional impairment was evaluated using the Neck Disability Index (NDI). Evaluation of arm and neck pain severity utilized a standard 11-point numeric scale, and health-related quality of life was evaluated with the SF-36 Health Survey. Quantitative radiographic assessments of intervertebral motion were performed using specialized motion analysis software, QMA (Quantitative Motion Analysis; Medical Metrics, Houston, TX). All outcome measures were evaluated pre-treatment and at 6 weeks, 3, 6, 12, and 24 months. The mean NDI score improved from 51.6 ± 11.3% pre-treatment to 27.9 ± 16.9% at 24 months, representing an approximate 46% improvement (P <.0001). The mean arm pain score improved from 6.9 ± 2.5 pre-treatment to 3.9 ± 3.1 at 24 months (43%, P =.0006). The mean neck pain score improved from 7.8 ± 2.0 pre-treatment to 3.8 ± 3.0 at 24 months (51%, P <.0001). The mean PCS score of the SF-36 improved from 34.8 ± 7.8 pre-treatment to 43.8 ± 9.3 by 24 months (26%, P =.0006). Subgroup analyses found that patients treated at

  9. Initial clinical experience with a next-generation artificial disc for the treatment of symptomatic degenerative cervical radiculopathy

    PubMed Central

    Reyes-Sanchez, Alejandro; Miramontes, Victor; Olivarez, Luis M. Rosales; Aquirre, Armando Alpizar; Quiroz, Alfredo Ortega; Zarate-Kalfopulos, Baron

    2010-01-01

    Background A feasibility trial was conducted to evaluate the initial safety and clinical use of a next-generation artificial cervical disc (M6-C artificial cervical disc; Spinal Kinetics, Sunnyvale, CA) for the treatment of patients with symptomatic degenerative cervical radiculopathy. A standardized battery of validated outcome measures was utilized to assess condition-specific functional impairment, pain severity, and quality of life. Methods Thirty-six consecutive patients were implanted with the M6-C disc and complete clinical and radiographic outcomes for 25 patients (mean age, 44.5 ± 10.1 years) with radiographically-confirmed cervical disc disease and symptomatic radiculopathy unresponsive to conservative medical management are included in this report. All patients had disc-osteophyte complex causing neural compression and were treated with discectomy and artificial cervical disc replacement at either single level (n = 12) or 2-levels (n = 13). Functional impairment was evaluated using the Neck Disability Index (NDI). Evaluation of arm and neck pain severity utilized a standard 11-point numeric scale, and health-related quality of life was evaluated with the SF-36 Health Survey. Quantitative radiographic assessments of intervertebral motion were performed using specialized motion analysis software, QMA (Quantitative Motion Analysis; Medical Metrics, Houston, TX). All outcome measures were evaluated pre-treatment and at 6 weeks, 3, 6, 12, and 24 months. Results The mean NDI score improved from 51.6 ± 11.3% pre-treatment to 27.9 ± 16.9% at 24 months, representing an approximate 46% improvement (P <.0001). The mean arm pain score improved from 6.9 ± 2.5 pre-treatment to 3.9 ± 3.1 at 24 months (43%, P =.0006). The mean neck pain score improved from 7.8 ± 2.0 pre-treatment to 3.8 ± 3.0 at 24 months (51%, P <.0001). The mean PCS score of the SF-36 improved from 34.8 ± 7.8 pre-treatment to 43.8 ± 9.3 by 24 months (26%, P =.0006). Subgroup analyses found

  10. Heterotopic ossification associated with myelopathy following cervical disc prosthesis implantation.

    PubMed

    Wenger, Markus; Markwalder, Thomas-Marc

    2016-04-01

    This case report presents a 37-year-old man with clinical signs of myelopathy almost 9 years after implantation of a Bryan disc prosthesis (Medtronic Sofamor Danek, Memphis, TN, USA) for C5/C6 soft disc herniation. As demonstrated on MRI and CT scan, spinal cord compression was caused by bony spurs due to heterotopic ossification posterior to the still moving prosthesis. The device, as well as the ectopic bone deposits, had to be removed because of myelopathy and its imminent aggravation. Conversion to anterior spondylodesis was performed.

  11. The Role of Posterior Longitudinal Ligament in Cervical Disc Replacement: An Ovine Cadaveric Biomechanical Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Cheng-Cheng; Hao, Ding-Jun; Ma, Yu-Li; Huang, Da-Geng; Li, Hou-Kun; Feng, Hang; Hou, Qian

    2016-01-01

    Background Cervical disc replacement (CDR) has been widely used to restore and maintain mobility and function of the treated and adjacent motion segments. Posterior longitudinal ligament (PLL) resection has been shown to be efficient in anterior cervical decompression and fusion. However, less is known about the biomechanical effect of PLL removal versus preservation in cervical disc arthroplasty. Material/Methods Three motion segments of 24 ovine cervical spines (C2–C5) were evaluated in a robotic spine system with axial compressive loads of 50 N. These cervical spines were divided in three groups according to the following conditions: (1) intact spine, (2) C3/C4 CDR with the Prestige LP prosthesis and PLL preservation, and (3) C3/C4 CDR with the Prestige LP prosthesis and PLL removal. The ranges of motion (ROMs) were recorded and analyzed in each group. Results The C3/C4 ROM in group 3 (CDR with PLL removed) increased significantly in flexion-extension and axial rotation compared with group 1 (intact spine). Moreover, in flexion-extension, the mean total ROM was significantly larger in group 3 than in group 1. All the ROM observed in group 2 (CDR with PLL preserved) did not significantly differ from the ROM observed in group 1. Conclusions Compared with intact spines, CDR with PLL removal partly increased ROM. Moreover, the ROM in CDR with PLL preservation did not significantly differ from the ROM observed in intact spines. The PLL appears to contribute to the balance and stability of the cervical spine and should thus be preserved in cervical disc replacement provided that the posterior longitudinal ligament is not degenerative and the compression can be removed without PLL takedown. PMID:27243444

  12. Cervical degenerative disease: systematic review of economic analyses.

    PubMed

    Alvin, Matthew D; Qureshi, Sheeraz; Klineberg, Eric; Riew, K Daniel; Fischer, Dena J; Norvell, Daniel C; Mroz, Thomas E

    2014-10-15

    Systematic review. To perform an evidence-based synthesis of the literature assessing the cost-effectiveness of surgery for patients with symptomatic cervical degenerative disc disease (DDD). Cervical DDD is a common cause of clinical syndromes such as neck pain, cervical radiculopathy, and myelopathy. The appropriate surgical intervention(s) for a given problem is controversial, especially with regard to quality-of-life outcomes, complications, and costs. Although there have been many studies comparing outcomes and complications, relatively few have compared costs and, more importantly, cost-effectiveness of the interventions. We conducted a systematic search in PubMed/MEDLINE, EMBASE, the Cochrane Collaboration Library, the Cost-Effectiveness Analysis registry database, and the National Health Service Economic Evaluation Database for full economic evaluations published through January 16, 2014. Identification of full economic evaluations that were explicitly designed to evaluate and synthesize the costs and consequences of surgical procedures or surgical intervention with nonsurgical management in patients with cervical DDD were considered for inclusion, based on 4 key questions. Five studies were included, each specific to 1 or more of our focus questions. Two studies suggested that cervical disc replacement may be more cost-effective compared with anterior cervical discectomy and fusion. Two studies comparing anterior with posterior surgical procedures for cervical spondylotic myelopathy suggested that anterior surgery was more cost-effective than posterior surgery. One study suggested that posterior cervical foraminotomy had a greater net economic benefit than anterior cervical discectomy and fusion in a military population with unilateral cervical radiculopathy. No studies assessed the cost-effectiveness of surgical intervention compared with nonoperative treatment of cervical myelopathy or radiculopathy, although it is acknowledged that existing studies

  13. A new cervical artificial disc prosthesis based on physiological curvature of end plate: a finite element analysis.

    PubMed

    Yu, Cheng-Cheng; Liu, Peng; Huang, Da-Geng; Jiang, Yong-Hong; Feng, Hang; Hao, Ding-Jun

    2016-11-01

    The study aimed to build a new cervical artificial disc C3-C7 segment prosthesis, and perform a biomechanical comparison between the new prosthesis and the Prestige LP prosthesis using a three-dimensional non-linear finite element (FE) model. The study compared the biomechanical differences between the new cervical artificial disc prosthesis based on the physiological curvature of the end plate and the Prestige LP prosthesis after artificial disc replacement. There has been no prior research on artificial disc prostheses based on the physiological curvature of the end plate; studies of biomechanical changes after cervical disc arthroplasty (CDR) are few. An FE model of the C3-C7 segments was developed and validated. A new cervical artificial disc prosthesis based on the physiological curvature of the end plate and the Prestige LP prosthesis were integrated at the C5-C6 segment into the validated FE model. All models were subjected to a follower load of 73.6 N and a 1 Nm in flexion-extension, lateral bending, and axial torsion. The segmental range of motion (ROM) and stress on the prostheses were analyzed. The ROM in most segments after CDR with new cervical artificial disc prosthesis was more similar to that of the normal cervical spine than the Prestige LP prosthesis. However, there was no significant difference between the two prostheses. The stress on the new artificial disc was significantly less than that in the Prestige LP prosthesis. There was no significant difference in ROM in all segments after CDR for the two prostheses. The stress on the new cervical artificial disc prosthesis based on the physiological curvature of the end plate was significantly less than that in the Prestige LP prosthesis. The new artificial disc prosthesis is feasible and effective, and can reduce the implant-bone interface stress on the end plate, which may be one of the causes of prosthesis subsidence. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Durability of cervical disc arthroplasties and its influence factors: A systematic review and a network meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chao; Zhang, Xiaolin; Ma, Xinlong

    2017-02-01

    The durability of cervical disc arthroplasties (CDA) may vary significantly because of different designs and implanting techniques of the devices. Nevertheless, the comparative durability remains unknown. We aimed to assess the durability of CDAs in at least 2-year follow-up. We analyzed the classifications and causes of secondary surgical procedures, as well as the structural designs of the devices that might influence the durability. PubMed, Medline, Embase, and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials were searched from the inception of each database to September 2015 using the following Keywords: "cervical disc replacement" OR "cervical disc arthroplasty" AND "randomized controlled trial (RCT)." Publication language was restricted to English. The primary outcome was the rate of secondary surgical procedures following CDA or anterior cervical decompression and fusion (ACDF). Pairwise meta-analysis and a Bayesian network meta-analysis were carried out using Review Manager v5.3.5 and WinBUGS version 1.4.3, respectively. Quality of evidence was appraised by Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation methodology. Twelve RCTs that met the eligibility criteria were included. Follow-up ranged from 2 years to 7 years. A total of 103 secondary surgical procedures were performed. The most frequent classification of secondary surgical procedures was reoperation (48/103) and removal (47/103). Revision (3/103) and supplementary fixation (2/103) were rare. Adjacent-level diseases were the most common cause of reoperations. The rates of secondary surgical procedures were significantly lower in Mobi-C, Prestige, Prodisc-C, Secure-C group than in ACDF group. No significant difference was detected between Bryan, PCM, Kineflex-C, Discover, and ACDF. Mobi-C, Secure-C, and Prodisc-C ranked the best, the second best, the third best, respectively. We concluded that Mobi-C, Secure-C, and Prodisc-C were more durable than ACDF. Precise selection of device

  15. PEEK (Polyether-ether-ketone) Based Cervical Total Disc Arthroplasty: Contact Stress and Lubrication Analysis.

    PubMed

    Xin, H; Shepherd, Det; Dearn, Kd

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a theoretical analysis of the maximum contact stress and the lubrication regimes for PEEK (Polyether-ether-ketone) based self-mating cervical total disc arthroplasty. The NuNec(®) cervical disc arthroplasty system was chosen as the study object, which was then analytically modelled as a ball on socket joint. A non-adhesion Hertzian contact model and elastohydrodynamic lubrication theory were used to predict the maximum contact stress and the minimum film thickness, respectively. The peak contact stress and the minimum film thickness between the bearing surfaces were then determined, as the radial clearance or lubricant was varied. The obtained results show that under 150 N loading, the peak contact stress was in the range 5.9 - 32.1 MPa, well below the yield and fatigue strength of PEEK; the calculated minimum film thickness ranged from 0 to 0.042 µm and the corresponding lambda ratio range was from 0 to 0.052. This indicates that the PEEK based cervical disc arthroplasty will operate under a boundary lubrication regime, within the natural angular velocity range of the cervical spine.

  16. PEEK (Polyether-ether-ketone) Based Cervical Total Disc Arthroplasty: Contact Stress and Lubrication Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Xin, H; Shepherd, DET; Dearn, KD

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a theoretical analysis of the maximum contact stress and the lubrication regimes for PEEK (Polyether-ether-ketone) based self-mating cervical total disc arthroplasty. The NuNec® cervical disc arthroplasty system was chosen as the study object, which was then analytically modelled as a ball on socket joint. A non-adhesion Hertzian contact model and elastohydrodynamic lubrication theory were used to predict the maximum contact stress and the minimum film thickness, respectively. The peak contact stress and the minimum film thickness between the bearing surfaces were then determined, as the radial clearance or lubricant was varied. The obtained results show that under 150 N loading, the peak contact stress was in the range 5.9 – 32.1 MPa, well below the yield and fatigue strength of PEEK; the calculated minimum film thickness ranged from 0 to 0.042 µm and the corresponding lambda ratio range was from 0 to 0.052. This indicates that the PEEK based cervical disc arthroplasty will operate under a boundary lubrication regime, within the natural angular velocity range of the cervical spine. PMID:22670159

  17. Cervical disc arthroplasty: do conflicts of interest influence the outcome of clinical studies?

    PubMed

    Narain, Ankur S; Hijji, Fady Y; Yom, Kelly H; Kudaravalli, Krishna T; Singh, Kern

    2017-07-01

    Cervical disc arthroplasty (CDA) is an emerging technique for the treatment of cervical degenerative disease. Multiple studies have investigated the outcomes of CDA, particularly in comparison with cervical arthrodesis techniques such as anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF). As many entities have financial interests in CDA implants, it is imperative to consider the influence of conflicts of interest on the results of studies investigating the efficacy of CDA. This study aimed to determine if there is an association between the presence of conflicts of interest among study authors and the reported outcome of studies involving CDA. This is a systematic review of clinical CDA publications until October 2016. The outcome measures are presence of conflicts of interest, level of evidence, and outcome for all included studies. PubMed and MEDLINE databases were searched for articles presenting clinical, radiographic, and cost outcomes of CDA. Data extracted from each article included title, authors, publication year, level of evidence, prosthesis type, number of operative levels, presence of conflicts of interest, and outcome. Conflicts of interest were determined by the presence of any conflicts for any author within manuscript disclosure sections or through Open Payments reporting. Outcomes of each study were graded as either favorable, unfavorable, or equivocal. The presence of conflicts of interest was tested for an association with the level of evidence and study outcome using Pearson chi-square analysis, Fisher exact test, or logistic regression for categorical variables. The authors report no conflicts of interest directly related to this work, and have not received any funds in support of this work. A total of 98 articles were included in this analysis. In total, 44.9% (44) of articles had the presence of a conflict of interest, whereas 55.1% (54) of articles did not. Conflicted studies were more likely to present level I evidence and less likely to

  18. [Biomechanical research on morphometric changes in adjacent inferior cervical intervertebral foramen after artificial disc replacement].

    PubMed

    Wang, Bin; Zhang, Zhigang; Li, Kanghua

    2007-10-01

    To explore changes in the height and width of the cervical intervertebral foramina of C6.7 before and after the C5.6 discetomy, the replacement or the anterior intervertebral fusion so as to provide the theoretical basis for the clinical practice. Eleven fresh cervical spinal specimens were obtained from young adult cadavers. The specimens of C5.6 were divided into the integrity group, the discectomy group, the artificial disc replacement group, and the intervertebral fusion group. The range of variety (ROV) of the C6.7 intervertebral foramen dimensions (height, width) before and after the loading tests (0.75, 1.50 Nm) were measured in the 4 groups. The C6.7 intervetebral foramen height and width increased significantly during flexion (P < 0.01) but decreased significantly during extension (P < 0.01). There was a significant difference between the two test conditions in each of the 4 groups (P < 0.01). However, in the two test conditions there was no significant difference in ROV of the C6,7 intervetebral foramen height and width during flexion and extension between the integrity group, the discectomy, and the artificial disc replacement group (P > 0.05), but a significant difference in the above changes existed in the intervertebral fusion group when compared with the other 3 groups (P < 0.05). In the same group and under the same conditions, the ROV of the C6.7 intervetebral foramen height and width was significantly different in the two test conditions (P < 0.01). The results have indicated that artificial disc replacement can meet the requirements of the normal cervical vitodynamics. The adjacent inferior cervical intervetebral foramen increases during flexion but decreases during extension. The intervertebral fusion is probably one of the causes for the cervical degeneration or the accelerated degeneration and for the cervical spondylotic radiculopathy and the brachial plexus compression.

  19. Prolonged upright posture induces degenerative changes in intervertebral discs of rat cervical spine.

    PubMed

    Liang, Qian-Qian; Cui, Xue-Jun; Xi, Zhi-Jie; Bian, Qin; Hou, Wei; Zhao, Yong-Jian; Shi, Qi; Wang, Yong-Jun

    2011-01-01

    An in vivo study of the cervical intervertebral discs (IVDs) response to upright posture was performed using an amputated bipedal rat model. To investigate the effects of upright posture on IVDs of rat cervical spine. The distinct arrangement of human neck muscle from that of cat and rhesus indicated that in the evolution process, upright posture might have affected cervical spine of human ancestors. However, the effects of upright posture on cervical spine have not been assessed. Forty-one-month-old rats were randomly divided into 5-month-control, 5-month-surgery, 7-month-control, and 7-month surgery group (n = 10 per group). Both forelimbs of 2 surgery group rats were amputated, and those rats were then induced to be upright in the custom-made cages. Two control group rats were kept in regular cages. These rats were respectively killed at the fifth and seventh month after surgery and the IVD samples of lumbar spine were harvested for histologic and immunohistochemical studies. Total RNA isolated from these samples were used for real-time polymerase chain reaction of type II collagen (Col2a1), type X collagen, matrix metalloproteinase 13 (MMP-13), MMP-3, aggre-can, and aggrecanase-2 (ADAMTS-5). Upright posture affects histologic changes of the cervical IVDs such as fissures of anulus fibrosus and decreased height of disc, decreased protein level of Col2a1 at nucleus pulposus and anulus fibrosus, up-regulated MMP-13, MMP-3, ADAMTS-5, and type X collagen mRNA expression, and downregulated mRNA expression of Col2a1 and aggrecan. Upright stance accelerates cervical disc degeneration in rats.

  20. Stepwise illustration of teeth-fixation semi-constrained cervical disc arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chih-Chang; Wu, Jau-Ching; Chang, Peng-Yuan; Yeh, Mei-Yin; Kuo, Yi-Hsuan; Fay, Li-Yu; Tu, Tsung-Hsi; Huang, Wen-Cheng; Cheng, Henrich

    2017-01-01

    There are many kinds of artificial discs available for cervical disc arthroplasty (CDA), with various designs of fixation and articulation mechanisms. Each of these designs has different features and theoretically fits most optimally in selected types of patients. However, there has been insufficient literature to guide individualized selection among these CDA devices. Since CDA aims to restore the joint function rather than arthrodesis, tailor-made size, shape, and mechanical properties should be taken into account for each candidate's target disc. Despite several large-scale prospective randomized control trials that have demonstrated the effectiveness and durability of CDA for up to 8 years, none of them involved more than one kind of artificial disc. In this video the authors present detailed steps and technical aspects of the newly introduced ProDisc-C Vivo (DePuy Synthes Spine), which has the same ball-and-socket design for controlled, predictable motion as the ProDisc-C. The newly derived teeth fixation provides high primary stability and multilevel capability by avoidance of previous keel-related limitations and complications (e.g., split vertebral fracture). Please note that the ProDisc-C Vivo is currently not available on the US market. The authors present the case of a 53-year-old woman who had symptoms of both radiculopathy and myelopathy caused by a large, calcified disc herniation at C4-5. There was no improvement after 4 months of medical treatment and rehabilitation. A single-level CDA was successfully performed with the ProDisc-C Vivo, and her symptoms were completely ameliorated afterward. The follow-up images demonstrated preservation of motion at the indexed level. The video can be found here: https://youtu.be/4DSES1xgvQU .

  1. Comparison of the intervertebral disc spaces between axial and anterior lean cervical traction

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Chin-Teng; Tsai, Sen-Wei; Chen, Chun-Jung; Wu, Ting-Chung; Wang, David; Lan, Haw-Chang H.

    2009-01-01

    The insufficient investigations on the changes of spinal structures during traction prevent further exploring the possible therapeutic mechanism of cervical traction. A blind randomized crossover-design study was conducted to quantitatively compare the intervertebral disc spaces between axial and anterior lean cervical traction in sitting position. A total of 96 radiographic images from the baseline measurements, axial and anterior lean tractions in 32 asymptomatic subjects were digitized for further analysis. The intra- and inter-examiner reliabilities for measuring the intervertebral disc spaces were in good ranges (ICCs = 0.928–0.942). With the application of anterior lean traction, the statistical increases were detected both in anterior and in posterior disc spaces compared to the baseline (0.29 mm and 0.24 mm; both P < 0.01) and axial traction (0.16 mm and 0.35 mm; both P < 0.01). The greater intervertebral disc spaces obtained during anterior lean traction might be associated with the more even distribution of traction forces over the anterior and posterior neck structures. The neck extension moment through mandible that generally occurred in the axial traction could be counteracted by the downward force of head weight during anterior lean traction. This study quantitatively demonstrated that anterior lean traction in sitting position provided more intervertebral disc space enlargements in both anterior and posterior aspects than axial traction did. These findings may serve as a therapeutic reference when cervical traction is suggested. PMID:19533177

  2. Clinical Case Report of Expansive Laminoplasty for Cervical Myelopathy Due to Both Disc Herniation and Developmental Cervical Spinal Canal Stenosis in Older Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Hua; Sun, Yu; Zhang, Fengshan; Dang, Gengting; Liu, Zhongjun

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Reports on adolescent patients with cervical myelopathy who underwent anterior cervical discectomy and fusion are scarce. However, to our knowledge, no cases of expansive laminoplasty for cervical myelopathy associated with progressive neurological deficit after a series of conservative treatment, caused by both disc herniation and developmental cervical spinal canal stenosis, have been reported. From January 2006 to July 2012, we retrospectively studied 3 patients in late adolescence presenting with cervical myelopathy who underwent expansive unilateral open-door laminoplasty at our hospital. The outcomes after the surgery were evaluated according to the Japanese Orthopedic Association scores. Symptoms presented by these patients were due to both disc herniation and developmental cervical spinal canal stenosis. No major complications occurred after the surgical procedures. The median follow-up time was 66 months (range 36–112 months). The Japanese Orthopedic Association scores after surgery showed a significant increase. Long-term outcomes after surgery were satisfactory according to the evaluation criteria for the Japanese Orthopedic Association scores. However, the ranges of motion of the cervical spine decreased, especially the ranges of motion on flexion after surgery showed a significant decrease. Expansive laminoplasty is helpful for older adolescent patients with cervical myelopathy due to both disc herniation and developmental cervical spinal canal stenosis, presenting with progressive neurological deficit after long conservative treatment. PMID:26937923

  3. Methodology to Calibrate Disc Degeneration in the Cervical Spine During Cyclic Fatigue Loading.

    PubMed

    Masoudi, Aidin; Fama, Daniel; Yoganandan, Narayan; Snyder, Brian

    2015-01-01

    Prolonged exposure to vibrational working conditions can cause neck, back, and shoulder pain. Mechanical degradation of soft tissues resulting from this type of fatigue was experimentally shown to contribute to endplate and compression fractures. However, effects of repetitive subfailure loading on intervertebral disc (IVD) behavior have not been well defined. This manuscript describes a methodology to experimentally characterize changes in cervical spine IVD material properties under fatigue. Bone-disc-bone spinal units with intact ligaments obtained from human cervical spines were obtained and a lack of bony or soft tissue degeneration was confirmed using X-ray and MRI scans. Cranial and caudal specimen extents were fixed in PMMA to facilitate attachment to testing devices. Baseline response was quantified using flexion/extension pure moment protocols. Specimens were immersed in a 34-deg-C saline bath and allowed to acclimate for one hour. A stress-relaxation test was then performed and viscoelasticity quantified using a quasi linear viscoelastic (QLV) material model. Fatigue testing was performed for up to 50,000 cycles with intermittent viscoelasticity, pure moment testing, and imaging scans performed to quantify cycle-dependent changes in disc properties. Preliminary results demonstrated progressive changes in viscoelasticity and bending response of cervical spine segments with increasing number of load cycles. This procedure will be used to quantify degradation of the IVD under repetitive compressive loads, focusing on effects of loading magnitude and frequency.

  4. Cost-effectiveness analysis: comparing single-level cervical disc replacement and single-level anterior cervical discectomy and fusion: clinical article.

    PubMed

    Qureshi, Sheeraz A; McAnany, Steven; Goz, Vadim; Koehler, Steven M; Hecht, Andrew C

    2013-11-01

    In recent years, there has been increased interest in the use of cervical disc replacement (CDR) as an alternative to anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF). While ACDF is a proven intervention for patients with myelopathy or radiculopathy, it does have inherent limitations. Cervical disc replacement was designed to preserve motion, avoid the limitations of fusion, and theoretically allow for a quicker return to activity. A number of recently published systematic reviews and randomized controlled trials have demonstrated positive clinical results for CDR, but no studies have revealed which of the 2 treatment strategies is more cost-effective. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of CDR and ACDF by using the power of decision analysis. Additionally, the authors aimed to identify the most critical factors affecting procedural cost and effectiveness and to define thresholds for durability and function to focus and guide future research. The authors created a surgical decision model for the treatment of single-level cervical disc disease with associated radiculopathy. The literature was reviewed to identify possible outcomes and their likelihood following CDR and ACDF. Health state utility factors were determined from the literature and assigned to each possible outcome, and procedural effectiveness was expressed in units of quality-adjusted life years (QALYs). Using ICD-9 procedure codes and data from the Nationwide Inpatient Sample, the authors calculated the median cost of hospitalization by multiplying hospital charges by the hospital-specific cost-to-charge ratio. Gross physician costs were determined from the mean Medicare reimbursement for each current procedural terminology (CPT) code. Uncertainty as regards both cost and effectiveness numbers was assessed using sensitivity analysis. In the reference case, the model assumed a 20-year duration for the CDR prosthesis. Cervical disc replacement led to higher average QALYs gained

  5. Development of Ultrasound to Measure In-vivo Dynamic Cervical Spine Intervertebral Disc Mechanics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-01-01

    images of IVDs and dynamic vertebral motion in-vivo during simulated tasks relevant to acute and chronic cervical spine injury and disease. A semi...of cervical vertebrae. Dynamic IVD displacements of vertebrae C4-5 measured by US were consistent with direct measurements. For motion frequencies...We developed a diagnostic system that applies dynamic cyclic loads to cervical spine over a range of programmable frequencies and amplitudes that

  6. Lumbar Disc Degenerative Disease: Disc Degeneration Symptoms and Magnetic Resonance Image Findings

    PubMed Central

    Saleem, Shafaq; Rehmani, Muhammad Asim Khan; Raees, Aisha; Alvi, Arsalan Ahmad; Ashraf, Junaid

    2013-01-01

    Study Design Cross sectional and observational. Purpose To evaluate the different aspects of lumbar disc degenerative disc disease and relate them with magnetic resonance image (MRI) findings and symptoms. Overview of Literature Lumbar disc degenerative disease has now been proven as the most common cause of low back pain throughout the world. It may present as disc herniation, lumbar spinal stenosis, facet joint arthropathy or any combination. Presenting symptoms of lumbar disc degeneration are lower back pain and sciatica which may be aggravated by standing, walking, bending, straining and coughing. Methods This study was conducted from January 2012 to June 2012. Study was conducted on the diagnosed patients of lumbar disc degeneration. Diagnostic criteria were based upon abnormal findings in MRI. Patients with prior back surgery, spine fractures, sacroiliac arthritis, metabolic bone disease, spinal infection, rheumatoid arthritis, active malignancy, and pregnancy were excluded. Results During the targeted months, 163 patients of lumbar disc degeneration with mean age of 43.92±11.76 years, came into Neurosurgery department. Disc degeneration was most commonly present at the level of L4/L5 105 (64.4%).Commonest types of disc degeneration were disc herniation 109 (66.9%) and lumbar spinal stenosis 37 (22.7%). Spondylolisthesis was commonly present at L5/S1 10 (6.1%) and associated mostly with lumbar spinal stenosis 7 (18.9%). Conclusions Results reported the frequent occurrence of lumbar disc degenerative disease in advance age. Research efforts should endeavor to reduce risk factors and improve the quality of life. PMID:24353850

  7. How Does Lumbar Degenerative Disc Disease Affect the Disc Deformation at the Cephalic Levels In Vivo?

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shaobai; Xia, Qun; Passias, Peter; Li, Weishi; Wood, Kirkham; Li, Guoan

    2013-01-01

    Study Design Case-control study. Objective . To evaluate the effect of lumbar degenerative disc disease (DDD) on the disc deformation at the adjacent level and at the level one above the adjacent level during end ranges of lumbar motion. Summary of Background Data It has been reported that in patients with DDD, the intervertebral discs adjacent to the diseased levels have a greater tendency to degenerate. Although altered biomechanics have been suggested to be the causative factors, few data have been reported on the deformation characteristics of the adjacent discs in patients with DDD. Methods Ten symptomatic patients with discogenic low back pain between L4 and S1 and with healthy discs at the cephalic segments were involved. Eight healthy subjects recruited in our previous studies were used as a reference comparison. The in vivo kinematics of L3–L4 (the cephalic adjacent level to the degenerated discs) and L2–L3 (the level one above the adjacent level) lumbar discs of both groups were obtained using a combined magnetic resonance imaging and dual fluoroscopic imaging technique at functional postures. Deformation characteristics, in terms of areas of minimal deformation (defined as less than 5%), deformations at the center of the discs, and maximum tensile and shear deformations, were compared between the two groups at the two disc levels. Results In the patients with DDD, there were significantly smaller areas of minimal disc deformation at L3–L4 and L2–L3 than the healthy subjects (18% compared with 45% of the total disc area, on average). Both L2–L3 and L3–L4 discs underwent larger tensile and shear deformations in all postures than the healthy subjects. The maximum tensile deformations were higher by up to 23% (of the local disc height in standing) and the maximum shear deformations were higher by approximately 25% to 40% (of the local disc height in standing) compared with those of the healthy subjects. Conclusion Both the discs of the adjacent

  8. The NEtherlands Cervical Kinematics (NECK) Trial. Cost-effectiveness of anterior cervical discectomy with or without interbody fusion and arthroplasty in the treatment of cervical disc herniation; a double-blind randomised multicenter study

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Patients with cervical radicular syndrome due to disc herniation refractory to conservative treatment are offered surgical treatment. Anterior cervical discectomy is the standard procedure, often in combination with interbody fusion. Accelerated adjacent disc degeneration is a known entity on the long term. Recently, cervical disc prostheses are developed to maintain motion and possibly reduce the incidence of adjacent disc degeneration. A comparative cost-effectiveness study focused on adjacent segment degeneration and functional outcome has not been performed yet. We present the design of the NECK trial, a randomised study on cost-effectiveness of anterior cervical discectomy with or without interbody fusion and arthroplasty in patients with cervical disc herniation. Methods/Design Patients (age 18-65 years) presenting with radicular signs due to single level cervical disc herniation lasting more than 8 weeks are included. Patients will be randomised into 3 groups: anterior discectomy only, anterior discectomy with interbody fusion, and anterior discectomy with disc prosthesis. The primary outcome measure is symptomatic adjacent disc degeneration at 2 and 5 years after surgery. Other outcome parameters will be the Neck Disability Index, perceived recovery, arm and neck pain, complications, re-operations, quality of life, job satisfaction, anxiety and depression assessment, medical consumption, absenteeism, and costs. The study is a randomised prospective multicenter trial, in which 3 surgical techniques are compared in a parallel group design. Patients and research nurses will be kept blinded of the allocated treatment for 2 years. The follow-up period is 5 years. Discussion Currently, anterior cervical discectomy with fusion is the golden standard in the surgical treatment of cervical disc herniation. Whether additional interbody fusion or disc prothesis is necessary and cost-effective will be determined by this trial. Trial Registration Netherlands

  9. Cervical Intradural Disc Herniation Causing Progressive Quadriparesis After Spinal Manipulation Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Hwan-Seo; Oh, Young-Min; Eun, Jong-Pil

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Cervical intradural disc herniation (IDH) is an extremely rare condition, comprising only 0.27% of all disc herniations. Three percent of IDHs occur in the cervical, 5% in the thoracic, and over 92% in the lumbar spinal canal. There have been a total of 31 cervical IDHs reported in the literature. The pathogenesis and imaging characteristics of IDH are not fully understood. A preoperative diagnosis is key to facilitating prompt intradural exploration in patients with ambivalent findings, as well as in preventing reoperation. The purpose of reporting our case is to remind clinicians to consider the possibility of cervical IDH during spinal manipulation therapy in patient with chronic neck pain. The patient signed informed consent for publication of this case report and any accompanying image. The ethical approval of this study was waived by the ethics committee of Chonbuk National University Hospital, because this study was case report and the number of patients was <3. A 32-year-old man was transferred our emergency department with progressive quadriparesis. He had no history of trauma, but had received physical therapy with spinal manipulation for chronic neck pain over the course of a month. The day prior, he had noticed neck pain and tingling in the bilateral upper and lower extremities during the manipulation procedure. The following day, he presented with bilateral weakness of all 4 extremities, which rendered him unable to walk. Neurological examination demonstrated a positive Hoffmann sign and ankle clonus bilaterally, hypoesthesia below the C5 dermatome, 3/5 strength in the bilateral upper extremities, and 2/5 strength in the lower extremities. This motor weakness was progressive, and he further complained of voiding difficulty. Urgent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the cervical spine revealed large, central disc herniations at C4–C5 and C5–C6 that caused severe spinal cord compression and surrounding edema. We performed C4–C5–C6

  10. Effects of Ge Gen Decoction on PGE2 content and COX activity in the degenarated cervical intervertebral discs of rats.

    PubMed

    Jun, Zhou; Fang, Suping; Huo, Hairu; Qi, Yun; Guo, Shuying; Jiang, Tingliang; Shi, Qi

    2005-09-01

    After the rat model of cervical spondylosis was developed for 6 months, the PGE2 content and COX activity in the cervical intervertebral discs were determined respectively by radioimmunoassay and catalytic activity assay. The results indicated that the PGE2 content and COX activity in the model rat increased significantly, and that Ge Gen Decoction could down-regulate the PGE2 content and inhibit COX activity. This is possibly one of the mechanisms of Ge Gen Decoction for treating cervical spondylosis.

  11. Human papilloma virus and cervical preinvasive disease

    PubMed Central

    Bari, M; Iancu, G; Popa, F

    2009-01-01

    Cervical cancer lesions represent a major threat to the health of the women worldwide. Human Papillomavirus (HPV) is responsible for 99.7% of cervical cancer cases, the infectious etiology giving the possibility of preventing cervical cancer by vaccination. The most aggressive HPV types are 16 and 18, which cause about 70% of cases of invasive cancer. The vaccination is recommended to the girls aged 11–12. The diagnosis and the treatment of cervical preinvasive disease allow the doctor to prevent the development of the invasive disease. PMID:20108750

  12. Does location of rotation center in artificial disc affect cervical biomechanics?

    PubMed

    Mo, Zhongjun; Zhao, Yanbin; Du, Chengfei; Sun, Yu; Zhang, Ming; Fan, Yubo

    2015-04-15

    A 3-dimensional finite element investigation. To compare the biomechanical performances of different rotation centers (RCs) in the prevalent artificial cervical discs. Various configurations are applied in artificial discs. Design parameters may influence the biomechanics of implanted spine. The RC is a primary variation in the popular artificial discs. Implantation of 5 prostheses was simulated at C5-C6 on the basis of a validated finite element cervical model (C3-C7). The prostheses included ball-in-socket design with a fixed RC located on the inferior endplate (BS-FI) and on the superior endplate (BS-FS), with a mobile RC at the inferior endplate (BS-MI), dual articulation with a mobile RC between the endplates (DA-M), and sliding articulation with various RCs (SA-V). The spinal motions in flexion and extension served as a displacement loading at the C3 vertebrae. Total disc replacements reduced extension moment. The ball-in-socket designs required less flexion moment, whereas the flexion stiffness of the spines with DA-M and SA-V was similar to that of the healthy model. The contributions of the implanted level to the global motions increased in the total disc replacements, except in the SA-V and DA-M models (in flexion). Ball-in-socket designs produced severe stress distributions in facet cartilage, whereas DA-M and SA-V produced more severe stress distribution on the bone-implant interface. Cervical stability was extremely affected in extension and partially affected in flexion by total disc replacement. With the prostheses with mobile RC, cervical curvature was readjusted under a low follower load. The SA-V and BS-FS designs exhibited better performances in the entire segmental stiffness and in the stability of the operative level than the BS-MI and BS-FI designs in flexion. The 5 designs demonstrated varying advantages relative to the stress distribution in the facet cartilages and on the bone-implant interface. 5.

  13. Operative and nonoperative treatment of cervical disc herniation in National Football League athletes.

    PubMed

    Meredith, Dennis S; Jones, Kristofer J; Barnes, Ronnie; Rodeo, Scott A; Cammisa, Frank P; Warren, Russell F

    2013-09-01

    Limited evidence exists to guide clinical decision making regarding cervical disc herniations in professional athletes playing for the National Football League (NFL) in the United States. To describe the presentation and treatment outcomes of cervical disc herniations in NFL athletes with a focus on safety and return to sport. Case series; Level of evidence, 4. The records of a single NFL team and its consulting physicians were reviewed from 2000 to 2011. Only athletes with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-proven disc herniation concordant with the reported symptoms were included. A total of 16 athletes met inclusion criteria. Linemen, linebackers, and defensive backs were the most represented positions (13/16 athletes; 81%). The most common presentation was radiculopathy after a single traumatic event (9/16 athletes; 56%). Three players had transient paresis. Three players underwent one-level anterior cervical discectomy and fusion. These 3 players had failed nonoperative therapy and had evidence of spinal cord compression with signal change on MRI, but only 1 returned to sport. Three players received epidural steroid injections, which provided transient symptomatic relief. Five players were treated nonoperatively and did not return to sport. Two of these 5 athletes had cord compression with signal change and retired rather than undergo surgery. The other 3 were cleared but were released by the team. Eight players were treated nonoperatively and returned to sport. Three of these 8 athletes had evidence of disc material abutting the cord without cord signal change but had a normal examination finding and returned to sport after resolution of their symptoms and repeat MRI that demonstrated no cord compression. Five of the 8 players had evidence of root compression and were treated symptomatically. There were no subsequent traumatic spinal cord injuries at a minimum of 1-year follow-up. Data regarding the treatment of this unique population are limited but suggest

  14. Total disc arthroplasty does not affect the incidence of adjacent segment degeneration in cervical spine: results of 93 patients in three prospective randomized clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Jawahar, Ajay; Cavanaugh, David A; Kerr, Eubulus J; Birdsong, Elisa M; Nunley, Pierce D

    2010-12-01

    Advancements in the philosophy of "motion preservation" have led to the use of total disc arthroplasty (TDA) as an alternative to fusion for degenerative disc disease (DDD) in the cervical spine. A commonly proposed theory is that TDA could reduce the incidence of adjacent segment disease. All the published clinical studies for TDA discuss the "equal efficacy" results of different investigational device exemption (IDE) trials between TDA and anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) but have not addressed the issue of adjacent segment disease. To present the comparison of outcome data with respect to clinical success rates, symptom-free period, and incidence of adjacent segment disease in 93 patients with one- and two-level cervical DDD treated with TDA or ACDF in three different Food and Drug Administration (FDA) investigational trials. Prospective, randomized, FDA IDE trials. Ninety-three patients with established symptomatic one-or two-level cervical disc disease who failed to respond to conservative treatment were randomized to receive TDA (59) or ACDF (34) as part of clinical trials involving three different artificial discs at our institution. Subjects were blind to the assigned group until after the surgery. Visual analog pain score (VAS), Neck Disability Index, and cervical spine radiographs were collected at 6 weeks and at 3, 6, 12, 24, 36, and 48 months after surgery. Success of the index surgery was assessed based on outcome measures at the seven data points. Success was defined as reduction by more than 30 points in both VAS and Neck Disability Index, absence of neurological deficits, and no further intervention at the index level. Adjacent segment disease was established by radiology, neurophysiology, and subsequent interventions administered to the patients. At median follow-up of 37 months (range, 24-49 months), 64 (25 ACDF and 39 TDA) patients satisfied the criteria for clinical success. Neck Disability Index was a better predictor of outcome

  15. Operative Management of Lumbar Degenerative Disc Disease.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yu Chao; Zotti, Mario Giuseppe Tedesco; Osti, Orso Lorenzo

    2016-08-01

    Lumbar degenerative disc disease is extremely common. Current evidence supports surgery in carefully selected patients who have failed non-operative treatment and do not exhibit any substantial psychosocial overlay. Fusion surgery employing the correct grafting and stabilization techniques has long-term results demonstrating successful clinical outcomes. However, the best approach for fusion remains debatable. There is some evidence supporting the more complex, technically demanding and higher risk interbody fusion techniques for the younger, active patients or patients with a higher risk of non-union. Lumbar disc arthroplasty and hybrid techniques are still relatively novel procedures despite promising short-term and mid-term outcomes. Long-term studies demonstrating superiority over fusion are required before these techniques may be recommended to replace fusion as the gold standard. Novel stem cell approaches combined with tissue engineering therapies continue to be developed in expectation of improving clinical outcomes. Results with appropriate follow-up are not yet available to indicate if such techniques are safe, cost-effective and reliable in the long-term.

  16. Operative Management of Lumbar Degenerative Disc Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yu Chao; Osti, Orso Lorenzo

    2016-01-01

    Lumbar degenerative disc disease is extremely common. Current evidence supports surgery in carefully selected patients who have failed non-operative treatment and do not exhibit any substantial psychosocial overlay. Fusion surgery employing the correct grafting and stabilization techniques has long-term results demonstrating successful clinical outcomes. However, the best approach for fusion remains debatable. There is some evidence supporting the more complex, technically demanding and higher risk interbody fusion techniques for the younger, active patients or patients with a higher risk of non-union. Lumbar disc arthroplasty and hybrid techniques are still relatively novel procedures despite promising short-term and mid-term outcomes. Long-term studies demonstrating superiority over fusion are required before these techniques may be recommended to replace fusion as the gold standard. Novel stem cell approaches combined with tissue engineering therapies continue to be developed in expectation of improving clinical outcomes. Results with appropriate follow-up are not yet available to indicate if such techniques are safe, cost-effective and reliable in the long-term. PMID:27559465

  17. Cervical artificial disc replacement versus fusion in the cervical spine: a systematic review comparing long-term follow-up results from two FDA trials

    PubMed Central

    Mummaneni, Praveen V.; Amin, Beejal Y.; Wu, Jau-Ching; Brodt, Erika D.; Dettori, Joseph R.; Sasso, Rick C.

    2012-01-01

    Study design: Systematic review. Clinical question: Does single-level unconstrained, semiconstrained, or fully constrained cervical artificial disc replacement (C-ADR) improve health outcomes compared with single-level anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) in the long-term? Methods: A systematic review was undertaken for articles published up to October 2011. Electronic databases and reference lists of key articles were searched to identify US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) studies reporting long-term (≥ 48 months) follow-up results of C-ADR compared with ACDF. Non-FDA trials and FDA trials reporting outcomes at short-term or mid-term follow-up periods were excluded. Two independent reviewers assessed the strength of evidence using the GRADE criteria and disagreements were resolved by consensus. Results: Two FDA trials reporting outcomes following C-ADR (Bryan disc, Prestige disc) versus ACDF at follow-up periods of 48 months and 60 months were found (follow-up rates are 68.7% [318/463] and 50.1% [271/541], respectively). Patients in the C-ADR group showed a higher rate of overall success, greater improvements in Neck Disability Index, neck and arm pain scores, and SF-36 PhysicalComponent Scores at long-term follow-up compared with those in the ACDF group. The rate of adjacent segment disease was less in the C-ADR group versus the ACDF group at 60 months (2.9% vs 4.9%). Normal segmental motion was maintained in the C-ADR group. Furthermore, rates of revision and supplemental fixation surgical procedures were lower in the arthroplasty group. Conclusions: C-ADR is a viable treatment option for cervical herniated disc/spondylosis with radiculopathy resulting in improved clinical outcomes, maintenance of normal segmental motion, and low rates of subsequent surgical procedures at 4 to 5 years follow-up. More studies with long-term follow-up are warranted. PMID:23236315

  18. Development of Ultrasound to Measure In-Vivo Dynamic Cervical Spine Intervertebral Disc Mechanics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-01-01

    and aging. To reduce the risk of cervical spine disease , there is a need to measure the effect by helmet, equipment and seating. However, in-vivo...to slightly diseased specimen, were selected. The posterior elements and facets of the segment were removed as per the protocol explained in the...dynamic vertebral motion in-vivo during simulated tasks relevant to acute and chronic cervical spine injury and disease . Software was developed to

  19. Role of Intraoperative Disc Contrast Injection in Determining the Segment Responsible for Cervical Spinal Cord Injury without Radiographic Abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ji-dong; Xia, Qun

    2015-08-01

    To determine the features of discs in spinal cord injury without radiographic abnormality (SCIWORA) by intraoperative disc contrast injection (IODCI) and to subsequently treat the responsible discs operatively. From January 2007 to December 2011, 16 adult cases of cervical SCIWORA were enrolled in this study. The average preoperative Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) score was 9.1 ± 1.8. Although preoperative imaging showed no obvious fracture or dislocation, spinal cord compression was evident in all cases. High spinal cord signals on MRI T2WI and cervical disc degeneration were present in all cases and swollen soft tissue anterior to the cervical spine in nine cases. All patients underwent anterior cervical surgeries for spinal cord compression, IODCI being performed after exposure of suspicious discs. Patients with only one ruptured disc underwent anterior cervical discectomy and fusion; those with more complex injuries underwent anterior cervical corpectomy and fusion with fixation of the ruptured segment. JOA scores, X-rays and CT scans were checked at specified intervals over an average of 24.4 months. Of 32 discs suspected preoperatively of being injured, 19 were identified as ruptured by IODCI. Anterior annulus fibrosus rupture was proved in 11 patients whereas the anterior longitudinal ligament was intact in all. JOA scores at 2 weeks, 3 months and last follow-up postoperatively were 13.3 ± 1.5, 14.5 ± 1.6 and 15.1 ± 1.5 respectively. The recovery rates were 53.2%, 68.3% and 75.9%, respectively. IODCI helps to determine the segment responsible for cervical SCIWORA. © 2015 Chinese Orthopaedic Association and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  20. Cervical disc arthroplasty with the Prestige LP disc versus anterior cervical discectomy and fusion, at 2 levels: results of a prospective, multicenter randomized controlled clinical trial at 24 months.

    PubMed

    Gornet, Matthew F; Lanman, Todd H; Burkus, J Kenneth; Hodges, Scott D; McConnell, Jeffrey R; Dryer, Randall F; Copay, Anne G; Nian, Hui; Harrell, Frank E

    2017-06-01

    OBJECTIVE The authors compared the efficacy and safety of arthroplasty using the Prestige LP cervical disc with those of anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) for the treatment of degenerative disc disease (DDD) at 2 adjacent levels. METHODS Patients from 30 investigational sites were randomized to 1 of 2 groups: investigational patients (209) underwent arthroplasty using a Prestige LP artificial disc, and control patients (188) underwent ACDF with a cortical ring allograft and anterior cervical plate. Patients were evaluated preoperatively, intraoperatively, and at 1.5, 3, 6, 12, and 24 months postoperatively. Efficacy and safety outcomes were measured according to the Neck Disability Index (NDI), Numeric Rating Scales for neck and arm pain, 36-Item Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36), gait abnormality, disc height, range of motion (investigational) or fusion (control), adverse events (AEs), additional surgeries, and neurological status. Treatment was considered an overall success when all 4 of the following criteria were met: 1) NDI score improvement of ≥ 15 points over the preoperative score, 2) maintenance or improvement in neurological status compared with preoperatively, 3) no serious AE caused by the implant or by the implant and surgical procedure, and 4) no additional surgery (supplemental fixation, revision, or nonelective implant removal). Independent statisticians performed Bayesian statistical analyses. RESULTS The 24-month rates of overall success were 81.4% for the investigational group and 69.4% for the control group. The posterior mean for overall success in the investigational group exceeded that in the control group by 0.112 (95% highest posterior density interval = 0.023 to 0.201) with a posterior probability of 1 for noninferiority and 0.993 for superiority, demonstrating the superiority of the investigational group for overall success. Noninferiority of the investigational group was demonstrated for all individual components of overall

  1. Cervical total disc replacement exhibits similar stiffness to intact cervical functional spinal units tested on a dynamic pendulum testing system.

    PubMed

    Esmende, Sean M; Daniels, Alan H; Paller, David J; Koruprolu, Sarath; Palumbo, Mark A; Crisco, Joseph J

    2015-01-01

    The pendulum testing system is capable of applying physiologic compressive loads without constraining the motion of functional spinal units (FSUs). The number of cycles to equilibrium observed under pendulum testing is a measure of the energy absorbed by the FSU. To examine the dynamic bending stiffness and energy absorption of the cervical spine, with and without implanted cervical total disc replacement (TDR) under simulated physiologic motion. A biomechanical cadaver investigation. Nine unembalmed, frozen human cervical FSUs from levels C3-C4 and C5-C6 were tested on the pendulum system with axial compressive loads of 25, 50, and 100 N before and after TDR implantation. Testing in flexion, extension, and lateral bending began by rotating the pendulum to 5°, resulting in unconstrained oscillatory motion. The number of rotations to equilibrium was recorded and the bending stiffness (Newton-meter/°) was calculated and compared for each testing mode. In flexion/extension, with increasing compressive loading from 25 to 100 N, the average number of cycles to equilibrium for the intact FSUs increased from 6.6 to 19.1, compared with 4.1 to 12.7 after TDR implantation (p<.05 for loads of 50 and 100 N). In flexion, with increasing compressive loading from 25 to 100 N, the bending stiffness of the intact FSUs increased from 0.27 to 0.59 Nm/°, compared with 0.21 to 0.57 Nm/° after TDR implantation. No significant differences were found in stiffness between the intact FSU and the TDR in flexion/extension and lateral bending at any load (p<.05). Cervical FSUs with implanted TDR were found to have similar stiffness, but had greater energy absorption than intact FSUs during cyclic loading with an unconstrained pendulum system. These results provide further insight into the biomechanical behavior of cervical TDR under approximated physiologic loading conditions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Mixed reality simulation of rasping procedure in artificial cervical disc replacement (ACDR) surgery.

    PubMed

    Halic, Tansel; Kockara, Sinan; Bayrak, Coskun; Rowe, Richard

    2010-10-07

    Until quite recently spinal disorder problems in the U.S. have been operated by fusing cervical vertebrae instead of replacement of the cervical disc with an artificial disc. Cervical disc replacement is a recently approved procedure in the U.S. It is one of the most challenging surgical procedures in the medical field due to the deficiencies in available diagnostic tools and insufficient number of surgical practices For physicians and surgical instrument developers, it is critical to understand how to successfully deploy the new artificial disc replacement systems. Without proper understanding and practice of the deployment procedure, it is possible to injure the vertebral body. Mixed reality (MR) and virtual reality (VR) surgical simulators are becoming an indispensable part of physicians' training, since they offer a risk free training environment. In this study, MR simulation framework and intricacies involved in the development of a MR simulator for the rasping procedure in artificial cervical disc replacement (ACDR) surgery are investigated. The major components that make up the MR surgical simulator with motion tracking system are addressed. A mixed reality surgical simulator that targets rasping procedure in the artificial cervical disc replacement surgery with a VICON motion tracking system was developed. There were several challenges in the development of MR surgical simulator. First, the assembly of different hardware components for surgical simulation development that involves knowledge and application of interdisciplinary fields such as signal processing, computer vision and graphics, along with the design and placements of sensors etc . Second challenge was the creation of a physically correct model of the rasping procedure in order to attain critical forces. This challenge was handled with finite element modeling. The third challenge was minimization of error in mapping movements of an actor in real model to a virtual model in a process called

  3. Mixed reality simulation of rasping procedure in artificial cervical disc replacement (ACDR) surgery

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Until quite recently spinal disorder problems in the U.S. have been operated by fusing cervical vertebrae instead of replacement of the cervical disc with an artificial disc. Cervical disc replacement is a recently approved procedure in the U.S. It is one of the most challenging surgical procedures in the medical field due to the deficiencies in available diagnostic tools and insufficient number of surgical practices For physicians and surgical instrument developers, it is critical to understand how to successfully deploy the new artificial disc replacement systems. Without proper understanding and practice of the deployment procedure, it is possible to injure the vertebral body. Mixed reality (MR) and virtual reality (VR) surgical simulators are becoming an indispensable part of physicians’ training, since they offer a risk free training environment. In this study, MR simulation framework and intricacies involved in the development of a MR simulator for the rasping procedure in artificial cervical disc replacement (ACDR) surgery are investigated. The major components that make up the MR surgical simulator with motion tracking system are addressed. Findings A mixed reality surgical simulator that targets rasping procedure in the artificial cervical disc replacement surgery with a VICON motion tracking system was developed. There were several challenges in the development of MR surgical simulator. First, the assembly of different hardware components for surgical simulation development that involves knowledge and application of interdisciplinary fields such as signal processing, computer vision and graphics, along with the design and placements of sensors etc . Second challenge was the creation of a physically correct model of the rasping procedure in order to attain critical forces. This challenge was handled with finite element modeling. The third challenge was minimization of error in mapping movements of an actor in real model to a virtual model in a

  4. Kinematics of cervical segments C5/C6 in axial rotation before and after total disc arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Wachowski, Martin Michael; Weiland, Jan; Wagner, Markus; Gezzi, Riccardo; Kubein-Meesenburg, Dietmar; Nägerl, Hans

    2017-04-04

    The kinematical properties of C5/C6 segments in axial rotation are evaluated before and after total disc arthroplasty (TDA) with PRESTIGE(®)-and BRYAN(®) Cervical Disc (Medtronic) under flexion/extension as parameters and compared with those of C3/C4. Eight human segments were stimulated by triangularly varying, axially directed torque (T z(t)) under compressing static axial preloads. Using a 6D-measuring device with high resolution, the response of segmental motion was characterized by the instantaneous helical axis (IHA). The position, direction, and migration path length of the IHA were measured before and after TDA (parameter: position of the axially directed preload). The periodic torque T z(t) generated IHA migrations whereupon the IHA direction was constantly rotated to the dorsal by ≈15.5°. After TDA, the IHA0 (neutral positions) were significantly shifted to the dorsal (PRESTIGE(®): 4.3 mm, BRYAN(®): 7.0 mm) just as the points of balance of the entire IHA migration paths. Due to the configuration of the vertebral joints and their interaction with the intervertebral disc, the IHA migrates during the axial rotation within a distinct domain of each C5/C6-segment. Implantation of the PRESTIGE(®) and BRYAN(®) prostheses significantly alters these kinematical properties by dorsal displacements of the domains. Statistically TDA of C3/C4 and of C5/C6 are not correlated. Under axial rotation of the cervical spine, additional lateral and/or ventral/dorsal displacements are produced by TDA. Consequently, adjacent level disease (ALD) may be mechanically stimulated.

  5. Cervical intervertebral foraminal disc extrusion in dogs: clinical presentation, MRI characteristics and outcome after medical management.

    PubMed

    Bersan, E; McConnell, F; Trevail, R; Behr, S; De Decker, S; Volk, H A; Smith, P M; Gonçalves, R

    2015-06-06

    The aim of the present study was to retrospectively evaluate the clinical signs, MRI characteristics, interobserver agreement and outcome after medical treatment in dogs affected by cervical intervertebral foraminal disc extrusion (CIFDE). The medical records of three referral institutions were searched for dogs diagnosed with CIFDE between 2010 and 2012. Thirteen dogs were identified with CIFDE; affected dogs often had a normal neurological examination, with cervical hyperaesthesia and lameness as the most common clinical signs. On MRI, sagittal images showed no evidence of compression of the spinal cord; CIFDE could be identified only on transverse sections in all cases. An excellent interobserver agreement was found in the localisation of the affected intervertebral disc space, and a substantial agreement was found on the detection of CIFDE versus foraminal stenosis caused by overgrowing articular processes. All but two dogs recovered completely, and they were considered free of clinical signs without analgesia within a median of 7.5 weeks (range: 2-20) after medical management was started. The remaining two dogs were surgically treated followed by complete recovery. In view of our findings, the importance of a thorough MRI investigation in dogs presenting with cervical hyperaesthesia as the sole clinical sign should be highlighted. British Veterinary Association.

  6. The change of adjacent segment after cervical disc arthroplasty compared with anterior cervical discectomy and fusion: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Dong, Liang; Xu, Zhengwei; Chen, Xiujin; Wang, Dongqi; Li, Dichen; Liu, Tuanjing; Hao, Dingjun

    2017-10-01

    Many meta-analyses have been performed to study the efficacy of cervical disc arthroplasty (CDA) compared with anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF); however, there are few data referring to adjacent segment within these meta-analyses, or investigators are unable to arrive at the same conclusion in the few meta-analyses about adjacent segment. With the increased concerns surrounding adjacent segment degeneration (ASDeg) and adjacent segment disease (ASDis) after anterior cervical surgery, it is necessary to perform a comprehensive meta-analysis to analyze adjacent segment parameters. To perform a comprehensive meta-analysis to elaborate adjacent segment motion, degeneration, disease, and reoperation of CDA compared with ACDF. Meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs). PubMed, Embase, and Cochrane Library were searched for RCTs comparing CDA and ACDF before May 2016. The analysis parameters included follow-up time, operative segments, adjacent segment motion, ASDeg, ASDis, and adjacent segment reoperation. The risk of bias scale was used to assess the papers. Subgroup analysis and sensitivity analysis were used to analyze the reason for high heterogeneity. Twenty-nine RCTs fulfilled the inclusion criteria. Compared with ACDF, the rate of adjacent segment reoperation in the CDA group was significantly lower (p<.01), and the advantage of that group in reducing adjacent segment reoperation increases with increasing follow-up time by subgroup analysis. There was no statistically significant difference in ASDeg between CDA and ACDF within the 24-month follow-up period; however, the rate of ASDeg in CDA was significantly lower than that of ACDF with the increase in follow-up time (p<.01). There was no statistically significant difference in ASDis between CDA and ACDF (p>.05). Cervical disc arthroplasty provided a lower adjacent segment range of motion (ROM) than did ACDF, but the difference was not statistically significant. Compared with ACDF, the

  7. Assessment of adjacent-segment disease in patients treated with cervical fusion or arthroplasty: a prospective 2-year study.

    PubMed

    Robertson, James T; Papadopoulos, Stephen M; Traynelis, Vincent C

    2005-12-01

    The authors compared the incidence of radiologically documented changes and symptomatic adjacent-level cervical disc disease after single-level discectomy and subsequent cervical fusion or arthroplasty in two independent prospective clinical studies. The patients were treated with the Affinity Anterior Cervical Cage System or the Bryan Artificial Cervical Disc. In each study the patients were required to undergo serial cervical radiography preoperatively and 24 months postoperatively, as well as serial clinical evaluations including documentation of adverse events, neurological status, and results of the 36-item Short Form Health Survey. All serial radiographs were reviewed prior to evaluating the clinical symptoms for development of increasing or new adjacent degenerative disc disease (DDD). Subsequently, the clinical data were analyzed. For various reasons of exclusion, the cases analyzed in the Bryan disc-treated cohort consisted of 74 patients and in the Affinity system-treated cohort there were 158 patients. New anterior osteophyte formation or enlargement, increased narrowing of an interspace, new DDD, and calcification of the anterior longitudinal ligament were the radiological findings indicative of adjacent-level disease. Fusion was associated with a significant increase in x-ray film-based changes of adjacent-disc disease (p = 0.009, odds ratio [OR] 2.44). In the cage fusion series, the incidence of symptomatic adjacent-level DDD was statistically greater than that in the group treated with the artificial disc (p = 0.018), and the patients required a statistically greater number of medical treatments related to episodic symptoms of neck, shoulder, and arm pain attributed to new disc disease (p = 0.001, OR 35.8). In comparing these prospective studies the authors demonstrated that maintaining motion rather than fusion will prevent symptomatic adjacent-disc disease and will decrease adjacent-level radiological indicators of disease at a 24-month

  8. Morphological changes in disc herniation in the lower cervical spine: an ultrastructural study.

    PubMed

    Sitte, Ingrid; Kathrein, Anton; Pedross, Florian; Freund, Martin C; Pfaller, Kristian; Archer, Charles W

    2012-07-01

    The basis of disc degeneration is still unknown, but is believed to be a cell-mediated process. Apoptosis might play a major role in degenerative disc disease (DDD). The aim of this study was to correlate the viability of disc cells with the radiological degeneration grades (rDG) in disc herniation. Forty anterior IVD's (C4-C7) from 39 patients with DDD were studied histologically and ultrastructurally to quantify healthy, "balloon", chondroptotic, apoptotic and necrotic cells. Patients were classified to their rDG, as having either prolapse (P: DGII + III) and/or osteochondrosis (O: DGIV + V). Similar studies were undertaken on eight control discs. Cell death by necrosis (mean 35%) was common but differed not significantly in both groups. All patients with a disc prolapse DGII + III revealed balloon cells (iAF: mean 32%). All appeared alive and sometimes were hypertrophic. However, significantly less balloon cells were found in the O-Group. Control samples revealed no evidence of "balloon" cells in DGII and only a minor rate in DGIII. According to the different rDG, quantitative changes were obvious in healthy and "balloon" cells, but not for cell death. At the moment it can only be hypothesized if "balloon" cells are part of a repair strategy and/or cause of disc herniation.

  9. Prognosis of intervertebral disc loss from diagnosis of degenerative disc disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, S.; Lin, A.; Tay, K.; Romano, W.; Osman, Said

    2015-03-01

    Degenerative Disc Disease (DDD) is one of the most common causes of low back pain, and is a major factor in limiting the quality of life of an individual usually as they enter older stages of life, the disc degeneration reduces the shock absorption available which in turn causes pain. Disc loss is one of the central processes in the pathogenesis of DDD. In this study, we investigated whether the image texture features quantified from magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) could be appropriate markers for diagnosis of DDD and prognosis of inter-vertebral disc loss. The main objective is to use simple image based biomarkers to perform prognosis of spinal diseases using non-invasive procedures. Our results from 65 subjects proved the higher success rates of the combination marker compared to the individual markers and in the future, we will extend the study to other spine regions to allow prognosis and diagnosis of DDD for a wider region.

  10. Total disc replacement in the cervical spine: a systematic review evaluating long-term safety

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Paul A.; Hashimoto, Robin

    2012-01-01

    Study design: Systematic review. Clinical questions: What are the rates and causes of subsequent surgeries? What is the long-term complication rates following cervical artificial disc replacement (C-ADR)? How do these rates change over time? Methods: A systematic review was undertaken for articles published up to October 2011. Electronic databases and reference lists of key articles were searched to identify comparative and non-comparative studies reporting long-term (≥ 48 months) complications of C-ADR. Two independent reviewers assessed the strength of evidence using the GRADE criteria and disagreements were resolved by consensus. Results: Two RCTs reporting outcomes following C-ADR (Bryan disc, Prestige disc) versus anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) at follow-ups of 4 to 5 years were found; five case series reporting outcomes following C-ADR at follow-ups of 4 to 8 years were identified. Secondary surgery rates were similar or slightly lower following C-ADR compared with fusion at 4 to 5 years postoperatively. In one small subset of an RCT, rates of adjacent disc heterotopic ossification were lower in C-ADR patients than in those treated with fusion. Rates of other adverse events were similar between treatment groups. Conclusions: There is low evidence on the long-term safety outcomes following C-ADR. Additional comparative studies with follow-up of at least 4 years are needed to fully understand the long-term safety outcomes of C-ADR compared with fusion. PMID:23236309

  11. Brachioradial pruritus in a patient with cervical disc herniation and Parsonage-Turner syndrome*

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho, Sandrina; Sanches, Madalena; Alves, Rosário; Selores, Manuela

    2015-01-01

    Brachioradial pruritus is a chronic sensory neuropathy of unknown etiology which affects the skin of the shoulders, arms and forearms on the insertion of the brachioradialis muscle. We describe the case of a 60-yearold woman recently diagnosed with multiple myeloma who refers paresis, severe pruritus and itching lesions on the right arm with 6 months of evolution. Investigation led to a diagnosis of Brachioradial pruritus consequent to the presence of cervical disc herniation and Parsonage-Turner syndrome. The patient started gabapentin 900mg/day with good control of itching. Corticosteroids and antihistamines are often ineffective in the treatment of BP. Gabapentin has been used with encouraging results. All patients with Brachioradial pruritus should be evaluated for cervical spine injuries. PMID:26131874

  12. Brachioradial pruritus in a patient with cervical disc herniation and Parsonage-Turner syndrome.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Sandrina; Sanches, Madalena; Alves, Rosário; Selores, Manuela

    2015-01-01

    Brachioradial pruritus is a chronic sensory neuropathy of unknown etiology which affects the skin of the shoulders, arms and forearms on the insertion of the brachioradialis muscle. We describe the case of a 60-year old woman recently diagnosed with multiple myeloma who refers paresis, severe pruritus and itching lesions on the right arm with 6 months of evolution. Investigation led to a diagnosis of Brachioradial pruritus consequent to the presence of cervical disc herniation and Parsonage-Turner syndrome. The patient started gabapentin 900 mg/day with good control of itching. Corticosteroids and antihistamines are often ineffective in the treatment of BP. Gabapentin has been used with encouraging results. All patients with Brachioradial pruritus should be evaluated for cervical spine injuries.

  13. A case of cervical metastases in a patient with preexisting cervical disc replacement and fusion after 2-year symptom-free interval: when do we need interdisciplinary diagnostics?

    PubMed Central

    Melloh, Markus; Barz, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Recurrent cervical symptoms frequently occur after cervical disc replacement and fusion. To date, no algorithm for the diagnostic assessment of these symptoms has been established. We present a case report and review of the literature to illustrate the need for interdisciplinary diagnostics in recurrent cervicobrachialgia without pathological cervical imaging. The hospital chart, medical history, physical examination, and imaging of a single patient were reviewed. A 53-year-old man with preexisting cervical disc replacement and fusion presented with a new episode of cervicobrachialgia after a 2-year symptom-free interval. Cervical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed no pathological findings. Six months later the patient reported increasing symptoms including numbness and weakness of the right arm. Repeated cervical MRI and thoracic computed tomography revealed cervical metastases with intraspinal tumor growth and an underlying extensive small cell bronchial carcinoma. In recurrent cervicobrachialgia, without pathological cervical imaging, interdisciplinary diagnostics are needed. Basic diagnostic tests may assist to exclude severe non-vertebrogenic pathologies. PMID:23526906

  14. Artificial total disc replacement versus fusion for the cervical spine: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Winkler, Roman; Mad, Philipp

    2010-01-01

    Cervical total disc replacement (CTDR) has been increasingly used as an alternative to fusion surgery in patients with pain or neurological symptoms in the cervical spine who do not respond to non-surgical treatment. A systematic literature review has been conducted to evaluate whether CTDR is more efficacious and safer than fusion or non-surgical treatment. Published evidence up to date is summarised qualitatively according to the GRADE methodology. After 2 years of follow-up, studies demonstrated statistically significant non-inferiority of CTDR versus fusion with respect to the composite outcome ‘overall success’. Single patient relevant endpoints such as pain, disability or quality of life improved in both groups with no superiority of CTDR. Both technologies showed similar complication rates. No evidence is available for the comparison between CTDR and non-surgical treatment. In the long run improvement of health outcomes seems to be similar in CTDR and fusion, however, the study quality is often severely limited. After both interventions, many patients still face problems. A difficulty per se is the correct diagnosis and indication for surgical interventions in the cervical spine. CTDR is no better than fusion in alleviating symptoms related to disc degeneration in the cervical spine. In the context of limited resources, a net cost comparison may be sensible. So far, CTDR is not recommended for routine use. As many trials are ongoing, re-evaluation at a later date will be required. Future research needs to address the relative effectiveness between CTDR and conservative treatment. PMID:20936484

  15. Scalene myofascial pain syndrome mimicking cervical disc prolapse: a report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Abd Jalil, Nizar; Awang, Mohammad Saufi; Omar, Mahamarowi

    2010-01-01

    Scalene myofascial pain syndrome is a regional pain syndrome wherein pain originates over the neck area and radiates down to the arm. This condition may present as primary or secondary to underlying cervical pathology. Although scalene myofascial pain syndrome is a well known medical entity, it is often misdiagnosed as being some other neck pain associated with radiculopathy, such as cervical disc prolapse, cervical spinal stenosis and thoracic outlet syndrome. Because scalene myofascial pain syndrome mimics cervical radiculopathy, this condition often leads to mismanagement, which can, in turn, result in persistent pain and suffering. In the worst-case scenarios, patients may be subjected to unjustifiable surgical intervention. Because the clinical findings in scalene myofascial pain syndrome are "pathognomonic", clinicians should be aware of ways to recognize this disorder and be able to differentiate it from other conditions that present with neck pain and rediculopathy. We present two cases of unilateral scalene myofascial pain syndrome that significantly impaired the patients' functioning and quality of life. This case report serves to create awareness about the existence of the syndrome and to highlight the potential morbidity due to clinical misdiagnosis.

  16. Cervical Spondylosis and Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Baogan; Pang, Xiaodong; Li, Duanming; Yang, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Cervical spondylosis and hypertension are all common diseases, but the relationship between them has never been studied. Patients with cervical spondylosis are often accompanied with vertigo. Anterior cervical discectomy and fusion is an effective method of treatment for cervical spondylosis with cervical vertigo that is unresponsive to conservative therapy. We report 2 patients of cervical spondylosis with concomitant cervical vertigo and hypertension who were treated successfully with anterior cervical discectomy and fusion. Stimulation of sympathetic nerve fibers in pathologically degenerative disc could produce sympathetic excitation, and induce a sympathetic reflex to cause cervical vertigo and hypertension. In addition, chronic neck pain could contribute to hypertension development through sympathetic arousal and failure of normal homeostatic pain regulatory mechanisms. Cervical spondylosis may be one of the causes of secondary hypertension. Early treatment for resolution of symptoms of cervical spondylosis may have a beneficial impact on cardiovascular disease risk in patients with cervical spondylosis. PMID:25761188

  17. Study of the influence of degenerative intervertebral disc changes on the deformation behavior of the cervical spine segment in flexion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolmakova, Tatyana V.

    2016-11-01

    The paper describes the model of the cervical spine segment (C3-C4) and the calculation results of the deformation behavior of the segment under degenerative changes of the intervertebral disc. The segment model was built based on the experimental literature data taking into account the presence of the cortical and cancellous bone tissue of vertebral bodies. The calculation results show that degenerative changes of the intervertebral disc cause the immobility of the C3 vertebra at flexion.

  18. Current insights and controversies in the pathogenesis and diagnosis of disc-associated cervical spondylomyelopathy in dogs.

    PubMed

    De Decker, S; da Costa, R C; Volk, H A; Van Ham, L M L

    2012-11-24

    Disc-associated cervical spondylomyelopathy (DA-CSM) is the most common cause of cervical spondylomyelopathy in dogs. In this condition, progressive caudal cervical spinal cord compression is typically caused by protrusion of one or more intervertebral discs. This disc-associated compression is sometimes seen in combination with mild vertebral abnormalities and dorsal compression resulting from ligamentum flavum hypertrophy. The intervertebral disc space between the sixth (C6) and seventh (C7) cervical vertebrae is most commonly affected. Although several large breed dogs can be affected, the adult to older dobermann is overrepresented. Clinical signs vary from cervical hyperaesthesia to tetraplegia. Dogs can present with a chronic progressive or an acute onset of clinical signs. Many aspects of this multifactorial neurological syndrome are not completely understood and are the subject of controversy and debate. Although several factors have been proposed, the underlying pathology and aetiology remain unknown. Recently, new insights have been gained in the pathogenesis, diagnosis and treatment of this challenging neurological syndrome. This review outlines current controversies and new developments concerning the pathogenesis and diagnosis of DA-CSM.

  19. Cervical Radiculopathy Due to Disc Herniation with Adjacent Facet Hypertrophy: Case Report

    PubMed Central

    YAMAHATA, Hitoshi; YASUDA, Muneyoshi; AOYAMA, Tatsuro; OSUKA, Koji; ARITA, Kazunori; TAKAYASU, Masakazu

    2014-01-01

    We report a rare case of cervical radiculopathy associated with facet hypertrophy and disc herniation. The patient was a 38-year-old woman with sudden-onset left arm pain. As conservative therapy failed to alleviate her symptoms she was referred to us. On physical examination she manifested no neurological deficits except pain and dysesthesia in the left C7 territory. Computed tomography revealed hypertrophic ossified changes in the left T1 facet joint with encroachment on the spinal canal. Magnetic resonance imaging showed compression of the spinal cord at C6/7 by disc herniation at C6/7. Anterior cervical decompression and fusion by corpectomy (C7 corpectomy and C6/T1 fixation with a titanium cage) ameliorated her pain. Facet hypertrophy in a morphologically normal cervicothoracic spine is extremely rare and its etiology is unknown. We speculate the possibility that our patient harbored a congenital anomaly and that the morphologic changes were the consequence of an injury she sustained in a traffic accident. PMID:24477059

  20. Does the Level of Cervical Disc Herniation Surgery Affect Performance-based Outcomes in National Football League Athletes?

    PubMed

    Mai, Harry T; Burgmeier, Robert J; Mitchell, Sean M; Hecht, Andrew C; Maroon, Joseph C; Nuber, Gordon W; Hsu, Wellington K

    2016-12-01

    Retrospective cohort study. The aim of this study was to determine whether the level of a cervical disc herniation (CDH) procedure will uniquely impact performance-based outcomes in elite athletes of the National Football League (NFL). Comparative assessments of postsurgical outcomes in NFL athletes with CDH at different levels are unknown. Further, the surgical decision-making for these types of injuries in professional football athletes remains controversial. NFL players with a CDH injury at a definitive cervical level were identified through a review of publicly available archives. Injuries were divided into upper- (C2-C4) and lower-level (C4-T1) CDH. The impact on player outcomes was determined by comparing return to play statistics and calculating a "Performance Score" for each player on the basis of pertinent statistical data, both before and after surgery. A total of 40 NFL athletes met inclusion criteria. In the upper-level group, 10 of 15 (66.6%) players successfully returned to play an average of 44.6 games over 2.6 years. The lower-level cohort had 18 of 25 (72%) players return to play with an average of 44.1 games over 3.1 years. There was no significant difference in the rate of return to play (P = 0.71). Postsurgical performance scores of the upper and lower-level groups were 1.47 vs. 0.69 respectively, with no significant difference between these groups (P = 0.06). Adjacent segment disease requiring reoperation occurred in 10% of anterior cervical discectomy and fusion patients. In 50% of foraminotomy patients, a subsequent fusion was required. A uniquely high percentage of upper-level disc herniations develop in NFL athletes, and although CDH injuries present career threatening implications, an upper-level CDH does not preclude a player from successfully returning to play at a competitive level. In fact, these athletes showed comparable postsurgical performance to those athletes who underwent CDH procedures at lower cervical levels. 4.

  1. Spontaneous Cervical Intradural Disc Herniation Associated with Ossification of Posterior Longitudinal Ligament

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Dachuan; Wang, Haifeng; Shen, Wun-Jer

    2014-01-01

    Intradural herniation of a cervical disc is rare; less than 35 cases have been reported to date. A 52-year-old man with preexisting ossification of posterior longitudinal ligament developed severe neck pain with Lt hemiparesis while asleep. Neurological exam was consistent with Brown-Séquard syndrome. Magnetic resonance images showed a C5-6 herniated disc that was adjacent to the ossified ligament and indenting the cord. The mass was surrounded by cerebrospinal fluid signal intensity margin, and caudally the ventral dura line appears divided into two, consistent with the “Y-sign” described by Sasaji et al. Cord edema were noted. Because of preexisting canal stenosis and spinal cord at risk, a laminoplasty was performed, followed by an anterior C6 corpectomy. Spot-weld type adhesions of the posterior longitudinal ligament to the dura was noted, along with a longitudinal tear in the dura. An intradural extra-arachnoid fragment of herniated disc was removed. Clinical exam at 6 months after surgery revealed normal muscle strength but persistent mild paresthesias. It is difficult to make a definite diagnosis of intradural herniation preoperatively; however, the clinical findings and radiographic signs mentioned above are suggestive and should alert the surgeon to look for an intradural fragment. PMID:25295205

  2. Cervical disc arthroplasty for the treatment of spondylotic myelopathy and radiculopathy.

    PubMed

    Khong, Peter; Bogduk, Nikolai; Ghahreman, Ali; Davies, Mark

    2013-10-01

    The concept of cervical disc arthroplasty (CDA) for the anterior treatment of cervical pathology has existed for approximately half a decade. In this time, multiple devices have been developed for this purpose, with the ultimate aim to provide an alternative to fusion. Fifty-five patients with cervical spondylotic radiculopathy and myelopathy underwent CDA over a 5 year period. Data was collected on 46 patients, which included Visual Analogue Scale scores for neck pain and arm pain, Neck Disability Index scores, Short Form-36 v2 (SF-36) and Nurick grades for myelopathy patients. Preoperative data and data obtained at the latest clinical follow-up (median 48 months, range, 10-76 months) were analysed to assess the intermediate term efficacy of the procedure. In patients with radiculopathy, arm pain improved by 88% (p<0.001). In those presenting with myelopathy, the Nurick grades improved from a median of 1 to 0 (p<0.001). In both groups of patients, improvements in pain and neurologic deficit were accompanied by significant improvements in multiple domains of the SF-36. Using a composite system which considered neck pain, arm pain, function and myelopathy, we arrived at an overall success rate of 73%. We concluded that CDA is an effective intervention for improving neurologic deficit, arm pain and local neck symptoms that translated into improvements in physical and social functioning in the intermediate term.

  3. Is Two-Level Cervical Disc Replacement More Cost-Effective than Anterior Cervical Discectomy and Fusion at 7 Years?

    PubMed

    Merrill, Robert K; McAnany, Steven J; Albert, Todd J; Qureshi, Sheeraz A

    2017-08-14

    Cost-effectiveness analysis. Investigate the 7-year cost-effectiveness of two-level cervical disc replacement (CDR) and anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF). CDR and ACDF are both effective treatment strategies for managing degenerative conditions of the cervical spine. CDR has been shown to be a more-cost effective intervention in the short term, but the long-term cost-effectiveness has not been established. We analyzed 7-year follow-up data from the two-level Medtronic Prestige LP investigational device exemption study. Short-form 36 (SF-36) data were converted into health utility scores using the SF-6D algorithm. Costs were based on direct costs from the payer perspective, and effectiveness was measured as quality adjusted life years (QALYs). The willingness to pay (WTP) threshold was set to $50,000/QALY. A probabilistic sensitivity analysis was conducted via Monte Carlo simulation. Two-level CDR had a 7-year cost of $176,654.19, generated 4.65 QALYs, and had a cost-effectiveness ratio of $37,993.53/QALY. Two-level ACDF had a 7-year cost of $158,373.48, generated 4.44 QALYs, and had a cost-effectiveness ratio of $35,635.72. CDR was associated with an incremental cost of $18,280.71 and an incremental effectiveness of 0.21 QALYs, resulting in an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) of $89,021.04, above the WTP threshold. Our Monte Carlo simulation demonstrated CDR would be chosen 46% of the time based on 10,000 simulations. Two-level CDR and ACDF are both cost-effective procedures at 7-year follow-up for treating degenerative conditions of the cervical spine. Based on an ICER of $89,021.04/QALY, we cannot conclude which treatment is the more cost-effective option at 7-years. CDR would be chosen 46% of the time based on 10,000 iterations of our Monte Carlo probabilistic sensitivity analysis. 3.

  4. EVALUATION OF TERMINAL VERTEBRAL PLATE ON CERVICAL SPINE AT DIFFERENT AGE GROUPS AND ITS CORRELATION WITH INTERVERTEBRAL DISC THICKNESS

    PubMed Central

    Luiz Vieira, Juliano Silveira; da Silva Herrero, Carlos Fernando Pereira; Porto, Maximiliano Aguiar; Nogueira Barbosa, Marcello Henrique; Garcia, Sérgio Britto; Zambelli Ramalho, Leandra Náira; Aparecido Defino, Helton Luiz

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate, by means of histomorphometry, terminal vertebral plate thickness, intervertebral disc thickness and its correlation on different age groups, seeking to identify its correlation. Methods: C4-C5 and C5-C6 cervical segments removed from human cadavers of both genders were assessed and divided into five groups of 10-year age intervals, from 21 years old. TVP and intervertebral disc thickness evaluation was made by means of histomorphometry of histological slides stained with hematoxylin and eosyn. Lower C4 TVP, upper C5 TVP, and upper C6 TVP de were compared between each other and to the interposed intervertebral disc thickness between relevant TVP. Results: The thickness of terminal vertebral plates adjacent to the same ID did not show statistic differences. However, the comparison of upper and lower vertebral plates thickness on the same cervical vertebra (C5), showed statistical difference on all age groups studied. We found a statistical correlation coefficient above 80% between terminal vertebral plate and adjacent intervertebral disc, with a proportional thickness reduction of both structures on the different cervical levels studied, and also on the different age groups assessed. Conclusion: Terminal vertebral plate shows a morphologic correlation with the intervertebral disc next to it, and does not show correlation with the terminal vertebral plate on the same vertebra. PMID:26998448

  5. Dysphagia, short-term outcomes, and cost of care after anterior cervical disc surgery.

    PubMed

    Starmer, Heather M; Riley, Lee H; Hillel, Alexander T; Akst, Lee M; Best, Simon R A; Gourin, Christine G

    2014-02-01

    Dysphonia and dysphagia are common complications of anterior cervical discectomy (ACD). We sought to determine the relationship between dysphagia and in-hospital mortality, complications, speech therapy/dysphagia training, length of hospitalization, and costs associated with ACD. Discharge data from the Nationwide Inpatient Sample for 1,649,871 patients who underwent ACD of fewer than four vertebrae for benign acquired disease between 2001 and 2010 were analyzed using cross-tabulations and multivariate regression modeling. Dysphagia was reported in 32,922 cases (2.0 %). Speech therapy/dysphagia training was reported in less than 0.1 % of all cases and in only 0.2 % of patients with dysphagia. Dysphagia was significantly associated with age ≥65 years (OR = 1.5 [95 % CI 1.4-1.7], P < 0.001), advanced comorbidity (OR = 2.3 [2.0-2.6], P < 0.001), revision surgery (OR = 2.7 [2.3-3.1], P < 0.001), disc prosthesis placement (OR = 1.5 [1.0-2.0], P = 0.029), and vocal cord paralysis (OR = 11.6 [8.3-16.1], P < 0.001). Dysphagia was a significant predictor of aspiration pneumonia (OR = 8.6 [6.7-10.9], P < 0.001), tracheostomy (OR = 2.3 [1.6-3.3], P < 0.001), gastrostomy (OR = 30.9 [25.3-37.8], P < 0.001), and speech therapy/dysphagia training (OR = 32.0 [15.4-66.4], P < 0.001). Aspiration pneumonia was significantly associated with in-hospital mortality (OR = 15.9 [11.0-23.1], P < 0.001). Dysphagia, vocal cord paralysis, and aspiration pneumonia were significant predictors of increased length of hospitalization and hospital-related costs, with aspiration pneumonia having the single largest impact on length of hospitalization and costs. Dysphagia is significantly associated with increased morbidity, length of hospitalization, and hospital-related costs in ACD patients. Despite the known risk of dysphagia in ACD patients and an established role for the speech-language pathologist in dysphagia management, speech-language pathology

  6. Hemifacial hyperhidrosis associated with ipsilateral/contralateral cervical disc herniation myelopathy. Functional considerations on how compression pattern determines the laterality.

    PubMed

    Iwase, Satoshi; Inukai, Yoko; Nishimura, Naoki; Sato, Maki; Sugenoya, Junichi

    2014-01-01

    Sweating is an important mechanism for ensuring constant thermoregulation, but hyperhidrosis may be disturbing. We present five cases of hemifacial hyperhidrosis as a compensatory response to an/hypohidrosis caused by cervical disc herniation. All the patients complained of hemifacial hyperhidrosis, without anisocoria or blepharoptosis. Sweat function testing and thermography confirmed hyperhidrosis of hemifacial and adjacent areas. Neck MRI showed cervical disc herniation. Three of the patients had lateral compression with welldemarcated hypohidrosis below the hyperhidrosis on the same side as the cervical lesion. The rest had paramedian compression with poorly demarcated hyperhidrosis and hypohidrosis on the contralateral side. Although MRI showed no intraspinal pathological signal intensity, lateral dural compression might influence the circulation to the sudomotor pathway, and paramedian compression might influence the ipsilateral sulcal artery, which perfuses the sympathetic descending pathway and the intermediolateral nucleus. Sweat function testing and thermography should be performed to determine the focus of the hemifacial hyperhidrosis, and the myelopathy should be investigated on both sides.

  7. Anterior Cervical Spine Surgery for Degenerative Disease: A Review

    PubMed Central

    SUGAWARA, Taku

    Anterior cervical spine surgery is an established surgical intervention for cervical degenerative disease and high success rate with excellent long-term outcomes have been reported. However, indications of surgical procedures for certain conditions are still controversial and severe complications to cause neurological dysfunction or deaths may occur. This review is focused mainly on five widely performed procedures by anterior approach for cervical degenerative disease; anterior cervical discectomy, anterior cervical discectomy and fusion, anterior cervical corpectomy and fusion, anterior cervical foraminotomy, and arthroplasty. Indications, procedures, outcomes, and complications of these surgeries are discussed. PMID:26119899

  8. Cost-utility analysis modeling at 2-year follow-up for cervical disc arthroplasty versus anterior cervical discectomy and fusion: A single-center contribution to the randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Warren, Daniel; Andres, Tate; Hoelscher, Christian; Ricart-Hoffiz, Pedro; Bendo, John; Goldstein, Jeffrey

    2013-01-01

    Background Patients with cervical disc herniations resulting in radiculopathy or myelopathy from single level disease have traditionally been treated with Anterior Cervical Discectomy and Fusion (ACDF), yet Cervical Disc Arthroplasty (CDA) is a new alternative. Expert suggestion of reduced adjacent segment degeneration is a promising future result of CDA. A cost-utility analysis of these procedures with long-term follow-up has not been previously reported. Methods We reviewed single institution prospective data from a randomized trial comparing single-level ACDF and CDA in cervical disc disease. Both Medicare reimbursement schedules and actual hospital cost data for peri-operative care were separately reviewed and analyzed to estimate the cost of treatment of each patient. QALYs were calculated at 1 and 2 years based on NDI and SF-36 outcome scores, and incremental cost effectiveness ratio (ICER) analysis was performed to determine relative cost-effectiveness. Results Patients of both groups showed improvement in NDI and SF-36 outcome scores. Medicare reimbursement rates to the hospital were $11,747 and $10,015 for ACDF and CDA, respectively; these figures rose to $16,162 and $13,171 when including physician and anesthesiologist reimbursement. The estimated actual cost to the hospital of ACDF averaged $16,108, while CDA averaged $16,004 (p = 0.97); when including estimated physicians fees, total hospital costs came to $19,811 and $18,440, respectively. The cost/QALY analyses therefore varied widely with these discrepancies in cost values. The ICERs of ACDF vs CDA with Medicare reimbursements were $18,593 (NDI) and $19,940 (SF-36), while ICERs based on actual total hospital cost were $13,710 (NDI) and $9,140 (SF-36). Conclusions We confirm the efficacy of ACDF and CDA in the treatment of cervical disc disease, as our results suggest similar clinical outcomes at one and two year follow-up. The ICER suggests that the non-significant added benefit via ACDF comes at a

  9. Cervical artificial disc replacement versus fusion in the cervical spine: a systematic review comparing multilevel versus single-level surgery

    PubMed Central

    Kepler, Christopher K.; Brodt, Erika D.; Dettori, Joseph R.; Albert, Todd J.

    2012-01-01

    Study design: Systematic review. Clinical questions: What is the effectiveness of multilevel cervical artificial disc replacement (C-ADR) compared with multilevel fusion with respect to pain and functional outcomes, and are the two procedures comparable in terms of safety? What is the effectiveness of multilevel C-ADR compared with single-level C-ADR with respect to pain and functional outcomes, and are the two procedures comparable in terms of safety? Methods: A systematic review was undertaken for articles published up to October 2011. Electronic databases and reference lists of key articles were searched to identify studies comparing multilevel C-ADR with multilevel anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) or comparing multilevel C-ADR with single-level C-ADR. Studies which compared these procedures in the lumbar or thoracic spine or that reported alignment outcomes only were excluded. Two independent reviewers assessed the strength of evidence using the GRADE criteria and disagreements were resolved by consensus. Results: Two studies compared multilevel C-ADR with multilevel ACDF. While both reported improved Neck Disability Index (NDI) and Short-Form 36 (SF-36) scores after C-ADR compared with ACDF, only one study reported statistically significant results. Seven studies compared single-level C-ADR with multilevel C-ADR. Results were similar in terms of overall success, NDI and SF-36 scores, and patient satisfaction. There is discrepant information regarding rates of heterotopic ossification; dysphagia rate may be higher in multilevel C-ADR. Conclusions: The literature suggests that outcomes are at least similar for multilevel C-ADR and ACDF and may favor C-ADR. Future studies are necessary before firm recommendations can be made favoring one treatment strategy. Multilevel C-ADR seems to have similar results to single-level C-ADR but may have higher rates of heterotopic ossification and dysphagia. PMID:23236310

  10. Cervical artificial disc replacement versus fusion in the cervical spine: a systematic review comparing multilevel versus single-level surgery.

    PubMed

    Kepler, Christopher K; Brodt, Erika D; Dettori, Joseph R; Albert, Todd J

    2012-02-01

     Systematic review.Clinical questions: What is the effectiveness of multilevel cervical artificial disc replacement (C-ADR) compared with multilevel fusion with respect to pain and functional outcomes, and are the two procedures comparable in terms of safety? What is the effectiveness of multilevel C-ADR compared with single-level C-ADR with respect to pain and functional outcomes, and are the two procedures comparable in terms of safety?  A systematic review was undertaken for articles published up to October 2011. Electronic databases and reference lists of key articles were searched to identify studies comparing multilevel C-ADR with multilevel anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) or comparing multilevel C-ADR with single-level C-ADR. Studies which compared these procedures in the lumbar or thoracic spine or that reported alignment outcomes only were excluded. Two independent reviewers assessed the strength of evidence using the GRADE criteria and disagreements were resolved by consensus.  Two studies compared multilevel C-ADR with multilevel ACDF. While both reported improved Neck Disability Index (NDI) and Short-Form 36 (SF-36) scores after C-ADR compared with ACDF, only one study reported statistically significant results. Seven studies compared single-level C-ADR with multilevel C-ADR. RESULTS were similar in terms of overall success, NDI and SF-36 scores, and patient satisfaction. There is discrepant information regarding rates of heterotopic ossification; dysphagia rate may be higher in multilevel C-ADR.  The literature suggests that outcomes are at least similar for multilevel C-ADR and ACDF and may favor C-ADR. Future studies are necessary before firm recommendations can be made favoring one treatment strategy. Multilevel C-ADR seems to have similar results to single-level C-ADR but may have higher rates of heterotopic ossification and dysphagia.

  11. Degenerative diseases of the cervical spine: comparison of a multiecho data image combination sequence with a magnetisation transfer saturation pulse and cervical myelography and CT.

    PubMed

    Dorenbeck, U; Schreyer, A G; Schlaier, J; Held, P; Feuerbach, S; Seitz, J

    2004-04-01

    Assessing degenerative disease in the cervical spine remains a challenge. There is much controversy about imaging the cervical spine using MRI. Our aim in this prospective study was to compare a T2*-weighted 2D spoiled gradient-echo multiecho sequence (MEDIC) with a magnetisation transfer saturation pulse with cervical myelography and postmyelographic CT. Using an assessment scale we looked at the vertebral bodies, intervertebral discs, neural foramina, anterior and posterior nerve roots, grey matter, ligamentaflava, oedema in the spinal cord and stenosis of the spinal canal. We also evaluated postmyelography CT and the MEDIC sequence for assessing narrowing of the neural foramina in a cadaver cervical spine. We examined 67 disc levels in 18 patients, showing 18 disc prolapses and 21 osteophytes narrowing the spinal canal or the neural foramina. All MRI studies showed these abnormalities findings equally well. Postmyelography CT was significantly better for showing the bony structures and the anterior and posterior nerve roots. The MEDIC sequence provided excellent demonstration of soft-tissue structures such as the intervertebral disc and ligamentum flavum. No statistical differences between the imaging modalities were found in the assessment of narrowing of the neural foramina or the extent of spinal stenosis. The cadaver measurements showed no overestimation of abnormalities using the MEDIC sequence.

  12. Adjacent segment degeneration following ProDisc-C total disc replacement (TDR) and anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF): does surgeon bias effect radiographic interpretation?

    PubMed

    Laxer, Eric B; Brigham, Craig D; Darden, Bruce V; Bradley Segebarth, P; Alden Milam, R; Rhyne, Alfred L; Odum, Susan M; Spector, Leo R

    2017-04-01

    Many investigators have reported the financial conflicts of interest (COI), which could result in potential bias in the reporting of outcomes for patients undergoing total disc replacement (TDR) rather than anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF). This bias may be subconsciously introduced by the investigator in a non-blinded radiographic review. The purpose of this study was to determine if bias was present when a group of spine specialists rated adjacent segment degeneration (ASD) following cervical TDR or ACDF. Potential bias in the assessment of ASD was evaluated through the reviews of cervical radiographs (pre- and 6 years post-operative) from patients participating in the ProDisc-C FDA trial (ProDisc-C IDE #G030059). The index level was blinded on all radiographs during the first review, but unblinded in the second. Five reviewers (a radiologist, two non-TDR surgeons, and two TDR surgeons), two of whom had a COI with the ProDisc-C trial sponsor, assessed ASD on a three point scale: yes, no, or unable to assess. Intra- and inter-rater reliabilities between all raters were assessed by the Kappa statistic. The intra-rater reliability between reviews was substantial, indicating little to no bias in assessing ASD development/progression. The Kappa statistics were 0.580 and 0.644 for the TDR surgeons (p < 0.0001), 0.718 and 0.572 for the non-TDR surgeons (p < 0.0001), and 0.642 for the radiologist (p < 0.0001). Inter-rater reliability for the blinded review ranged from 0.316 to 0.607 (p < 0.0001) and from 0.221 to 0.644 (p < 0.0001) for the unblinded review. The knowledge of the surgical procedure performed did not bias the assessment of ASD.

  13. A Broken Drill-bit Fragment Causing Severe Radiating Pain after Cervical Total Disc Replacement: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chong-Suh; Chung, Sung-Soo; Park, Jae-Chul; Shin, Seong-Kee; Park, Yong-Serk; Kang, Kyung-Chung

    2011-06-01

    This is a case report of a 38-year-old man with severe radiating pain on upper extremity after cervical total disc replacement (TDR). We faced an unusual complication that has not been reported yet. He underwent cervical TDR for left central disc protrusion on C5-6. After the surgery, preoperative symptom disappeared. However, at postoperative 1 year, he complained severe right-sided radiating pain that had a sudden onset. On postoperative X-ray, a metal fragment which seemed like a broken drill bit was shown within the spinal canal. To remove that, right-sided anterior microforaminotomy on C5-6 was performed and the metal fragment was removed successfully. After that, anterior fusion was done because the motion of the artificial disc was minimal and the removed structure seemed to attenuate stability during cervical motion. The operation resulted in prompt symptomatic relief. During cervical TDR, particular attention should be paid to the procedures that require using drill-bits.

  14. Fluoroscopic cervical epidural injections in chronic axial or disc-related neck pain without disc herniation, facet joint pain, or radiculitis

    PubMed Central

    Manchikanti, Laxmaiah; Cash, Kimberly A; Pampati, Vidyasagar; Malla, Yogesh

    2012-01-01

    Background While chronic neck pain is a common problem in the adult population, with a typical 12-month prevalence of 30%–50%, there is a lack of consensus regarding its causes and treatment. Despite limited evidence, cervical epidural injections are one of the commonly performed nonsurgical interventions in the management of chronic neck pain. Methods A randomized, double-blind, active, controlled trial was conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of cervical interlaminar epidural injections of local anesthetic with or without steroids for the management of chronic neck pain with or without upper extremity pain in patients without disc herniation, radiculitis, or facet joint pain. Results One hundred and twenty patients without disc herniation or radiculitis and negative for facet joint pain by means of controlled diagnostic medial branch blocks were randomly assigned to one of two treatment groups, ie, injection of local anesthetic only (group 1) or local anesthetic mixed with nonparticulate betamethasone (group 2). The primary outcome of significant pain relief and improvement in functional status (≥50%) was demonstrated in 72% of group 1 and 68% of group 2. The overall average number of procedures per year was 3.6 in both groups with an average total relief per year of 37–39 weeks in the successful group over a period of 52 weeks. Conclusion Cervical interlaminar epidural injections of local anesthetic with or without steroids may be effective in patients with chronic function-limiting discogenic or axial pain. PMID:22826642

  15. Carotid artery disease following external cervical irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Elerding, S.C.; Fernandez, R.N.; Grotta, J.C.; Lindberg, R.D.; Causay, L.C.; McMurtrey, M.J.

    1981-11-01

    A retrospective study of 910 patients surviving at least five years after cervical irradiation for Hodgkin's disease, non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, or primary head and neck neoplasms showed the incidence of stroke following cervical irradiation was 63 of 910 patients (6.3%) during a mean period of observation of nine years. This represents a trend toward an increased risk for this population over the expected incidence of 38 strokes for a matched population observed over the same period of time (p = 0.39). A prospective study of 118 similar patients currently living five years after cervical radiotherapy was performed to determine the incidence of carotid artery disease occurring as a consequence of neck irradiation. Abnormal carotid phonoangiograms (CPA) were found in 25% of the patients and abnormal oculoplethysmographs (OPG) were found in 17%. These studies represent significant carotid lesions that are not expected in such a population. It is concluded that the carotid stenoses demonstrated are most likely a consequence of prior irradiation. Patients that are five-year survivors of cervical irradiation should have noninvasive vascular laboratory studies performed as part of their routine follow-up examinations in order to detect these carotid lesions while they are occult.

  16. Carotid artery disease following external cervical irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Elerding, S.C.; Fernandez, R.N.; Grotta, J.C.; Lindberg, R.D.; Causay, L.C.; McMurtrey, M.J.

    1981-01-01

    A retrospective study of 910 patients surviving at least five years after cervical irradiation for Hodgkin's disease, non-Hodgkin's lymphoma, or primary head an neck neoplasms showed the incidence of stroke following cervical irradiation was 63 of 910 patients (6.3%) during a mean period of observation of nine years. This represents a trend toward an increased risk for this population observed over the same period of time (p . 0.39). A prospective study of 118 similar patients currently living five years after cervical radiotherapy was performed to determine the incidence of carotid artery disease occurring as a consequence of neck irradiation. Abnormal carotid phonangiograms (CPA) were found in 25% of the patients and abnormal oculoplethysmographs (OPG) were found in 17%. These studies represent significant carotid lesions that are not expected in such a population. It is concluded that the carotid stenoses demonstrated are most likely a consequence of prior irradiation. Patients that are five-year survivors of cervical irradiation should have noninvasive vascular laboratory studies performed as part of their routine follow-up examinations in order to detect these carotid lesions while they are occult.

  17. Clinical and magnetic resonance imaging features of compressive cervical myelopathy with traumatic intervertebral disc herniation in cynomolgus macaque (Macaca fascicularis)

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Yun-Jung; Park, Hye-Jin; Sohn, Chul-Ho; Jung, Kyeong Cheon; Park, Seong Hoe

    2016-01-01

    Intervertebral disc herniation (IVDH) with nucleus pulposus extrusion, traumatic or not, is a devastating clinical condition accompanied by neurological problems. Here we report a cynomolgus macaque suffering from acute and progressive neurological dysfunction by a blunt trauma due to neck collar, an animal handling device. Tetraplegia, urinary incontinence, decreased proprioception, and imperception of pain were shown on physical and neurological examinations. MRI sagittal T2 weighted sequences revealed an extensive protrusion of disc material between C2 and C3 cervical vertebra, and this protrusion resulted in central stenosis of the spinal cord. Histopathologic findings showed a large number of inflammatory cells infiltrated at sites of spinal cord injury (SCI). This case is the first report of compressive cervical SCI caused by IVDH associated with blunt trauma. PMID:28053621

  18. Clinical and magnetic resonance imaging features of compressive cervical myelopathy with traumatic intervertebral disc herniation in cynomolgus macaque (Macaca fascicularis).

    PubMed

    Choi, Yun-Jung; Park, Hye-Jin; Sohn, Chul-Ho; Jung, Kyeong Cheon; Park, Seong Hoe; Lee, Jae-Il

    2016-12-01

    Intervertebral disc herniation (IVDH) with nucleus pulposus extrusion, traumatic or not, is a devastating clinical condition accompanied by neurological problems. Here we report a cynomolgus macaque suffering from acute and progressive neurological dysfunction by a blunt trauma due to neck collar, an animal handling device. Tetraplegia, urinary incontinence, decreased proprioception, and imperception of pain were shown on physical and neurological examinations. MRI sagittal T2 weighted sequences revealed an extensive protrusion of disc material between C2 and C3 cervical vertebra, and this protrusion resulted in central stenosis of the spinal cord. Histopathologic findings showed a large number of inflammatory cells infiltrated at sites of spinal cord injury (SCI). This case is the first report of compressive cervical SCI caused by IVDH associated with blunt trauma.

  19. Cervical disc arthroplasty compared with fusion in a workers' compensation population.

    PubMed

    Steinmetz, Michael P; Patel, Rakesh; Traynelis, Vincent; Resnick, Daniel K; Anderson, Paul A

    2008-10-01

    Patients with cervical radiculopathy and/or myelopathy are often treated with anterior cervical discectomy and fusion. Cervical arthroplasty has recently been advocated as an alternative treatment. Theoretically, arthroplasty should permit early return to activity and protect against adjacent segment disease. Early mobilization and return to activity may, theoretically, reduce cost to the workers' compensation program. A subgroup analysis of workers' compensation patients from the randomized controlled trials comparing Prestige ST and Bryan (Medtronic Sofamor Danek, Memphis, TN) cervical arthroplasty to fusion was performed. Primary outcome measures were work status, time to return to work, and neck disability. Secondary outcome measures were neck and arm pain and Medical Outcomes Study Short-Form 36-Item Health Survey score. One thousand four patients were enrolled in the studies, 93 of whom were workers' compensation patients. At 6 weeks and 3 months, significantly more patients in the arthroplasty group were working compared with the fusion group. At 6 months and later, there was no significant difference in return-to-work rates. Overall, patients returned to work at a median of 101 days after arthroplasty, compared with 222 days after anterior cervical discectomy and fusion. This difference was not significant when controlling for sex, study, and preoperative work status. At all time points, the Neck Disability Index was consistently lower in the arthroplasty group compared with the fusion group; however, the difference was not significant at 24 months. There was no statistically significant difference in secondary outcomes, neurological events, or pain-related events. In this workers' compensation cohort, it was observed that a greater number of patients in the arthroplasty group returned to work at 6 weeks and 3 months after surgery. A trend toward an earlier return to work was also seen, although this was not statistically significant when controlling for

  20. Comparison of the more than 5-year clinical outcomes of cervical disc arthroplasty versus anterior cervical discectomy and fusion: A protocol for a systematic review and meta-analysis of prospective randomized controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Shao, Min-Min; Chen, Chun-Hui; Lin, Zhong-Ke; Wang, Xiang-Yang; Huang, Qi-Shan; Chi, Yong-Long; Wu, Ai-Min

    2016-12-01

    Anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) was almost the "golden standard" technique in treatment of symptomatic cervical degenerative disc disease, however, it cause motion loss of the indexed level, increase the intradiscal pressure and motion of the adjacent levels, and may accelerate the degeneration of adjacent level. Cervical disc arthroplasty (CDA) was designed to preserve the motion of index level, avoid the over-activity of adjacent levels and reduce the degeneration of adjacent disc levels, the process of degeneration of adjacent level is very slowly, long term follow up studies should be conducted, this study aim to compare the more than 5 years' long-term clinical outcomes and safety between CDA and ACDF. A systematic review and meta-analysis that will be performed according to the PRISMA (Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses). The electric database of Medline, Embase, and Cochrane library will be systematic search. A standard data form will be used to extract the data of included studies. We will assess the studies according to the Cochrane Handbook for Systematic Reviews of Interventions, and perform analysis in software STATA 12.0. Fixed-effects models will be used for homogeneity data, while random-effects will be used for heterogeneity data. The overall effect sizes will be determined as weighted mean difference (WMD) for continuous outcomes and Relative risk (RR) for dichotomous outcomes. The results of study will be disseminated via both international conference and peer-review journal. The conclusion of our study will provide the long-term and updated evidence of clinical outcomes and safety between CDA and ACDF, and help surgeon to change better surgical technique for patients.

  1. Differences between C3-4 and other subaxial levels of cervical disc arthroplasty: more heterotopic ossification at the 5-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Chang, Peng-Yuan; Chang, Hsuan-Kan; Wu, Jau-Ching; Huang, Wen-Cheng; Fay, Li-Yu; Tu, Tsung-Hsi; Wu, Ching-Lan; Cheng, Henrich

    2016-05-01

    OBJECTIVE Several large-scale clinical trials demonstrate the efficacy of 1- and 2-level cervical disc arthroplasty (CDA) for degenerative disc disease (DDD) in the subaxial cervical spine, while other studies reveal that during physiological neck flexion, the C4-5 and C5-6 discs account for more motion than the C3-4 level, causing more DDD. This study aimed to compare the results of CDA at different levels. METHODS After a review of the medical records, 94 consecutive patients who underwent single-level CDA were divided into the C3-4 and non-C3-4 CDA groups (i.e., those including C4-5, C5-6, and C6-7). Clinical outcomes were measured using the visual analog scale for neck and arm pain and by the Japanese Orthopaedic Association scores. Postoperative range of motion (ROM) and heterotopic ossification (HO) were determined by radiography and CT, respectively. RESULTS Eighty-eight patients (93.6%; mean age 45.62 ± 10.91 years), including 41 (46.6%) female patients, underwent a mean follow-up of 4.90 ± 1.13 years. There were 11 patients in the C3-4 CDA group and 77 in the non-C3-4 CDA group. Both groups had significantly improved clinical outcomes at each time point after the surgery. The mean preoperative (7.75° vs 7.03°; p = 0.58) and postoperative (8.18° vs 8.45°; p = 0.59) ROMs were similar in both groups. The C3-4 CDA group had significantly greater prevalence (90.9% vs 58.44%; p = 0.02) and higher severity grades (2.27 ± 0.3 vs 0.97 ± 0.99; p = 0.0001) of HO. CONCLUSIONS Although CDA at C3-4 was infrequent, the improved clinical outcomes of CDA were similar at C3-4 to that in the other subaxial levels of the cervical spine at the approximately 5-year follow-ups. In this Asian population, who had a propensity to have ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament, there was more HO formation in patients who received CDA at the C3-4 level than in other subaxial levels of the cervical spine. While the type of artificial discs could have confounded the

  2. Altered expression of metalloproteinase-2 and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-2 in cervical disc herniation patients.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, H M; Xu, G T; Wen, S F; Guo, Y Y; Huang, Q

    2016-04-26

    The aim of the current study was to examine matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-2 (TIMP-2) expression in patients with cervical disc herniation (CDH). A total of 127 specimens from CDH patients undergoing posterior spinal surgery were obtained for the case group, which was divided into three subgroups: lateral protrusion (N = 102), median protrusion (N = 18), and paramedian protrusion (N = 7). Another 55 specimens from subjects who had cervical spine trauma and underwent spinal canal decompression were obtained for the control group. Routine hematoxylin and eosin staining was performed for pathological diagnosis. Immunohistochemical (IHC) analysis was used to determine MMP-2 and TIMP-2 expression. Under light microscopy, MMP-2-positive cells presented brown-yellow or dark brown staining in the cell membrane or cytoplasm. MMP-2 expression in the case group was significantly higher than that in controls (P < 0.05). Furthermore, MMP-2 expression in the lateral and median protrusion groups was significantly higher compared to that in the paramedian protrusion group (both P < 0.05), while there was no apparent difference in MMP-2 expression between the lateral and median protrusion groups (P > 0.05). IHC results showed that TIMP-2 expression in cases was significantly lower than that in controls (P < 0.05). Spearman correlation analysis indicated that MMP- 2 was negatively correlated with TIMP-2 expression (r = -0.418, P < 0.001). In conclusion, MMP-2 expression increased, whereas TIMP- 2 expression decreased in CDH patients, suggesting that MMP-2 and TIMP-2 expression may contribute to CDH development.

  3. Persistent axial neck pain after cervical disc arthroplasty: a radiographic analysis.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Scott C; Formby, Peter M; Kang, Daniel G; Van Blarcum, Gregory S; Cody, John P; Tracey, Robert W; Lehman, Ronald A

    2016-07-01

    There is very little literature examining optimal radiographic parameters for placement of cervical disc arthroplasty (CDA), nor is there substantial evidence evaluating the relationship between persistent postoperative neck pain and radiographic outcomes. We set out to perform a single-center evaluation of the radiographic outcomes, including associated complications, of CDA. This is a retrospective review. Two hundred eighty-five consecutive patients undergoing CDA were included in the review. The outcome measures were radiological parameters (preoperative facet arthrosis, disc height, CDA placement in sagittal and coronal planes, heterotopic ossification [HO] formation, etc.) and patient outcomes (persistent pain, recurrent pain, new-onset pain, etc.). We performed a retrospective review of all patients from a single military tertiary medical center from August 2008 to August 2012 undergoing CDA. Preoperative, immediate postoperative, and final follow-up films were evaluated. The clinical outcomes and complications associated with the procedure were also examined. The average radiographic follow-up was 13.5 months and the rate of persistent axial neck pain was 17.2%. For patients with persistent neck pain, the rate of HO formation per level studied was 22.6%, whereas the rate was significantly lower for patients without neck pain (11.7%, p=.03). There was no significant association between the severity of HO and the presence of neck pain. Patients with a preoperative diagnosis of cervicalgia, compared to those without cervicalgia, were significantly more likely to experience continued neck pain postoperatively (28.6% vs. 13.1%, p=.01). There were no differences in preoperative facet arthrosis, pre- or postoperative disc height, segmental range of motion, or placement of the device relative to the posterior edge of the vertebral body.However, patients with implants more centered between the uncovertebral joints were more likely to experience posterior neck pain

  4. In vitro biomechanical comparison after fixed- and mobile-core artificial cervical disc replacement versus fusion.

    PubMed

    Lou, Jigang; Li, Yuanchao; Wang, Beiyu; Meng, Yang; Wu, Tingkui; Liu, Hao

    2017-10-01

    In vitro biomechanical analysis after cervical disc replacement (CDR) with a novel artificial disc prosthesis (mobile core) was conducted and compared with the intact model, simulated fusion, and CDR with a fixed-core prosthesis. The purpose of this experimental study was to analyze the biomechanical changes after CDR with a novel prosthesis and the differences between fixed- and mobile-core prostheses.Six human cadaveric C2-C7 specimens were biomechanically tested sequentially in 4 different spinal models: intact specimens, simulated fusion, CDR with a fixed-core prosthesis (Discover, DePuy), and CDR with a mobile-core prosthesis (Pretic-I, Trauson). Moments up to 2 Nm with a 75 N follower load were applied in flexion-extension, left and right lateral bending, and left and right axial rotation. The total range of motion (ROM), segmental ROM, and adjacent intradiscal pressure (IDP) were calculated and analyzed in 4 different spinal models, as well as the differences between 2 disc prostheses.Compared with the intact specimens, the total ROM, segmental ROM, and IDP at the adjacent segments showed no significant difference after arthroplasty. Moreover, CDR with a mobile-core prosthesis presented a little higher values of target segment (C5/6) and total ROM than CDR with a fixed-core prosthesis (P > .05). Besides, the difference in IDP at C4/5 after CDR with 2 prostheses was without statistical significance in all the directions of motion. However, the IDP at C6/7 after CDR with a mobile-core prosthesis was lower than CDR with a fixed-core prosthesis in flexion, extension, and lateral bending, with significant difference (P < .05), but not under axial rotation.CDR with a novel prosthesis was effective to maintain the ROM at the target segment and did not affect the ROM and IDP at the adjacent segments. Moreover, CDR with a mobile-core prosthesis presented a little higher values of target segment and total ROM, but lower IDP at the inferior adjacent segment

  5. 3 Tesla Kinematic MRI of the Cervical Spine for Evaluation of Adjacent Level Disease after Monosegmental Anterior Cervical Discectomy and Arthroplasty: Results of 2-Year Follow-up".

    PubMed

    Fleck, Steffen; Langner, Soenke; Rosenstengel, Christian; Kessler, Rebecca; Matthes, Marc; Müller, Jan-Uwe; Langner, Inga; Marx, Sascha; Schroeder, Henry W S

    2016-05-23

    We prospectively evaluated adjacent disc levels after cervical discectomy and arthroplasty (ACDA) using kinematic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and plain functional radiographs. Anterior cervical discectomy and arthroplasty (ACDA) is an established treatment for degenerative cervical disc disease. The objective of this study was to evaluate the use of kinematic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for assessing the range of motion (ROM) before and after ACDA compared to plain functional radiographs and to evaluate adjacent degenerative disc disease (aDDD) at mid-term follow-up. Twenty patients (12 females, 8 males; median age 45.6 ± 6.9 years) treated by ACDA (BryanDisc®, Medtronic, Minneapolis, USA) underwent plain functional radiography and kinematic MRI of the cervical spine at 3T before and 6 and 24 months after surgery. A sagittal T2-weighted (T2w) 2D turbo spin echo (TSE) sequence and a 3D T2w dataset with secondary axial reconstruction were acquired. Signal intensity of all nonoperated discs was measured in regions of interest (ROI). Disc heights adjacent to the operated segment were measured. Range of motion (ROM) was evaluated and compared to plain functional radiographs. Clinical outcome was evaluated using the visual analog scale (VAS) for head, neck and radicular pain, and the neck disability index (NDI). Mean ROM of the cervical spine on functional plain radiographs was 21.25 ± 8.19, 22.29 ± 4.82 and 26.0 ± 6.9 degrees preoperatively and at 6-month and 24-month follow-up, respectively. Mean ROM at MRI was 27.1 ± 6.78, 29.45 ± 9.51 and 31.95 ± 9.58 degrees, respectively. There was good correlation between both techniques. Follow-up examinations demonstrated no signs of progressive degenerative disc disease of adjacent levels. All patients had clinical improvement up to 24 months after surgery. After ACDA, kinematic MRI allows evaluation of the ROM with excellent correlation to plain functional radiographs. Mid

  6. Comparison of 2 Zero-Profile Implants in the Treatment of Single-Level Cervical Spondylotic Myelopathy: A Preliminary Clinical Study of Cervical Disc Arthroplasty versus Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Li-Li; Liu, Zu-De; Yuan, Wen

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Cervical disc arthroplasty (CDA) with Discover prosthesis or anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) with Zero-P cage has been widely used in the treatment of cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM). However, little is known about the comparison of the 2 zero-profile implants in the treatment of single-level CSM. The aim was to compare the clinical outcomes and radiographic parameters of CDA with Discover prosthesis and ACDF with Zero-P cage for the treatment of single-level CSM. Methods A total of 128 consecutive patients who underwent 1-level CDA with Discover prosthesis or ACDF with Zero-P cage for single-level CSM between September 2009 and December 2012 were included in this study. Clinical outcomes were evaluated using the Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) score and Neck Disability Index (NDI). For radiographic assessment, the overall sagittal alignment (OSA), functional spinal unit (FSU) angle, and range of motion (ROM) at the index and adjacent levels were measured before and after surgery. Additionally, the complications were also recorded. Results Both treatments significantly improved all clinical parameters (P < 0.05), without statistically relevant differences between the 2 groups. The OSA and FSU angle increased significantly in both groups (P <0.05). Compared with Zero-P group, ROMs at the index levels were well maintained in the Discover group (P < 0.05). However, there were no statistical differences in the ROMs of adjacent levels between the 2 groups (P > 0.05). Besides, no significant differences existed in dysphagia, subsidence, or adjacent disc degeneration between the 2 groups (P > 0.05). However, significant differences occurred in prosthesis migration in CDA group. Conclusions The results of this study showed that clinical outcomes and radiographic parameters were satisfactory and comparable with the 2 techniques. However, more attention to prosthesis migration of artificial cervical disc should be paid in the

  7. Total disc replacement surgery for symptomatic degenerative lumbar disc disease: a systematic review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    van den Eerenbeemt, Karin D.; van Royen, Barend J.; Peul, Wilco C.; van Tulder, Maurits W.

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study is to evaluate the effectiveness and safety of total disc replacement surgery compared with spinal fusion in patients with symptomatic lumbar disc degeneration. Low back pain (LBP), a major health problem in Western countries, can be caused by a variety of pathologies, one of which is degenerative disc disease (DDD). When conservative treatment fails, surgery might be considered. For a long time, lumbar fusion has been the “gold standard” of surgical treatment for DDD. Total disc replacement (TDR) has increased in popularity as an alternative for lumbar fusion. A comprehensive systematic literature search was performed up to October 2008. Two reviewers independently checked all retrieved titles and abstracts, and relevant full text articles for inclusion. Two reviewers independently assessed the risk of bias of included studies and extracted relevant data and outcomes. Three randomized controlled trials and 16 prospective cohort studies were identified. In all three trials, the total disc replacement was compared with lumbar fusion techniques. The Charité trial (designed as a non-inferiority trail) was considered to have a low risk of bias for the 2-year follow up, but a high risk of bias for the 5-year follow up. The Charité artificial disc was non-inferior to the BAK® Interbody Fusion System on a composite outcome of “clinical success” (57.1 vs. 46.5%, for the 2-year follow up; 57.8 vs. 51.2% for the 5-year follow up). There were no statistically significant differences in mean pain and physical function scores. The Prodisc artificial disc (also designed as a non-inferiority trail) was found to be statistically significant more effective when compared with the lumbar circumferential fusion on the composite outcome of “clinical success” (53.4 vs. 40.8%), but the risk of bias of this study was high. Moreover, there were no statistically significant differences in mean pain and physical function scores. The Flexicore trial

  8. Thirty-day readmission and reoperation rates after single-level anterior cervical discectomy and fusion versus those after cervical disc replacement.

    PubMed

    Bhashyam, Niketh; De la Garza Ramos, Rafael; Nakhla, Jonathan; Nasser, Rani; Jada, Ajit; Purvis, Taylor E; Sciubba, Daniel M; Kinon, Merritt D; Yassari, Reza

    2017-02-01

    OBJECTIVE The goal of this study was to compare 30-day readmission and reoperation rates after single-level anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) versus those after cervical disc replacement (CDR). METHODS The authors used the 2013-2014 American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program database. Included were adult patients who underwent first-time single-level ACDF or CDR for cervical spondylosis or disc herniation. Primary outcome measures were readmission and/or reoperation within 30 days of the original surgery. Logistic regression analysis was used to assess the independent effect of the procedure (ACDF or CDR) on outcome, and results are presented as odds ratios with 95% confidence intervals. RESULTS A total of 6077 patients met the inclusion criteria; 5590 (92.0%) patients underwent single-level ACDF, and 487 (8.0%) patients underwent CDR. The readmission rates were 2.6% for ACDF and 0.4% for CDR (p = 0.003). When stratified according to age groups, only patients between the ages of 41 and 60 years who underwent ACDF had a significantly higher readmission rate than those who underwent CDR (2.5% vs 0.7%, respectively; p = 0.028). After controlling for patient age, sex, body mass index, smoking status, history of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), diabetes, hypertension, steroid use, and American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) class, patients who underwent CDR were significantly less likely to undergo readmission within 30 days than patients who underwent ACDF (OR 0.23 [95% CI 0.06-0.95]; p = 0.041). Patients with a history of COPD (OR 1.97 [95% CI 1.08-3.57]; p = 0.026) or hypertension (OR 1.62 [95% CI 1.10-2.38]; p = 0.013) and those at ASA Class IV (OR 14.6 [95% CI 1.69-125.75]; p = 0.015) were significantly more likely to require readmission within 30 days. The reoperation rates were 1.2% for ACDF and 0.4% for CDR (p = 0.086), and multivariate analysis revealed that CDR was not associated with lower odds of

  9. The Effect of Workers' Compensation Status on Outcomes of Cervical Disc Arthroplasty: A Prospective, Comparative, Observational Study.

    PubMed

    Gornet, Matthew F; Schranck, Francine W; Copay, Anne G; Kopjar, Branko

    2016-01-20

    Receiving Workers' Compensation benefits has been associated with inferior outcomes after lumbar fusion. The purpose of our study was to compare the outcomes of cervical disc arthroplasty between patients receiving and those not receiving Workers' Compensation. Patient-reported outcomes, reoperations, complications, and return-to-work status were analyzed at one year after surgery in an observational cohort of consecutive patients who underwent single-level or multilevel cervical disc arthroplasty for symptomatic cervical disc conditions, including radiculopathy or discogenic pain with or without radiculopathy, exclusive of myelopathy. Of the 189 patients who underwent cervical disc arthroplasty, 144 received Workers' Compensation and forty-five did not. The mean scores on all patient-reported measures improved significantly from preoperative baseline to one year after surgery (p < 0.001), and the improvement in patient-reported outcomes did not differ significantly between the Workers' Compensation and the non-Workers' Compensation group (respectively, 22.7 compared with 25.0 for the Neck Disability Index; 8.3 compared with 9.6 for the Short Form (SF)-36 physical component summary; 7.9 compared with 9.6 for the SF-36 mental component summary; 3.5 compared with 3.7 for neck pain; and 2.6 compared with 2.8 for arm pain). The two groups also did not differ significantly in the rate of reoperations (7.6% for those receiving Workers' Compensation compared with 13.3% for those not receiving Workers' Compensation) and complications (2.8% compared with 4.4%, respectively). At one year after surgery, the proportion of patients who had returned to work was comparable (77.7% in the Workers' Compensation group and 79.4% in the non-Workers' Compensation group); however, the patients receiving Workers' Compensation had significantly more days off before returning to work (a mean of 145.2 compared with 61.9 days; p = 0.001). After cervical disc arthroplasty, patients receiving

  10. How to choose when implants of adjacent height both fit the disc space properly in single-level cervical artificial disc replacement.

    PubMed

    Rong, Xin; Lou, Jigang; Li, Huibo; Meng, Yang; Liu, Hao

    2017-07-01

    In cervical artificial disc replacement (C-ADR), sometimes we encountered with such cases that implants of adjacent height both fit the target disc space properly. No study was available discussing the choice of implant height and the clinical outcomes under such circumstance. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of different implant heights on the clinical outcomes and radiographic results when the implants of adjacent height both fit the disc space properly. This retrospective study included 34 patients underwent single-level C-ADR at the C5-C6 level at our institution. In these 34 patients, implant with either 5 mm height or 6 mm height fit the surgical level properly without overstretching the disc space or the facet joint space. Clinical outcomes were evaluated using the Japanese Orthopedic Association score, visual analog scale (VAS), and Neck Disability Index. Radiographic assessments were conducted on static and dynamic radiographs for the determination of the disc space height, intersegmental range of motion (ROM), and the ROM of the functional spinal unit (FSU) at the surgical level. The baseline information of the patients, such as age, gender, weight, follow-up time, and diagnosis, was similar between the 2 groups (P > .05). Postoperative mean VAS in group B was significantly lower than that in group A (2.1 ± 0.7 vs. 2.7 ± 1.0, P < .05). The mean VAS decrease in group B was significantly larger than that in group A (5.3 ± 0.8 vs. 4.6 ± 1.1, P < .05). Significant difference was found in the postoperative disc height of the surgical segment between the 2 groups (6.4 ± 0.4 mm vs. 7.5 ± 0.5 mm, P < .05). No significant differences were noted in the intersegmental ROM and ROM of the FSU between the 2 groups both before the surgery and at the last follow-up (P > .05). No hypermobility or instability was observed in these patients. Our results suggested that when implants of adjacent

  11. Anterior cervical discectomy and fusion with titanium cages for simple or multilevel herniated discs and spur of the cervical spine: Report of 2 cases and experience in Bali

    PubMed Central

    Mahadewa Tjokorda, G. B.; Nyoman, Golden; Sri, Maliawan; Junichi, Mizuno

    2016-01-01

    This report presents two cases of cervicobrachialgia and radiculopathy due to multiple cervical herniated discs and spur formation that dealt with anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) using different titanium interbody cages. The description of the clinical presentation, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) appearances and management strategy are discussed. Both cases showed chronic neck pain and radiating pain from the shoulder to the arm. They had a history of blurry vision, cluster head ache, weakness, and numbness on the shoulder for 2 years. MRI revealed multiple herniated discs between C4-7 and accompanied by the spur formation leading to the narrowness of the spinal canal and its foramina bilaterally. ACDF were performed and complete decompression of the spinal canal and its foramina were carried out. Twin M-cages (Ammtec Inc.-Japan) were placed in the first case at C5-7 levels and single cage of Smith Robinson (SR) was placed in the second case at C5-6 levels. There were no more blurry vision, cluster headache, weakness, and numbness, immediately after surgery. To our knowledge, this is the first reported cases of ACDF, using twin M-cages and single SR cage in Indonesia, with improvement immediately after surgery. Cervical spondylosis can present with cervicobrachialgia and radiculopathy and surgical treatment produces good functional outcome. PMID:27695567

  12. Anterior cervical discectomy and fusion with titanium cages for simple or multilevel herniated discs and spur of the cervical spine: Report of 2 cases and experience in Bali.

    PubMed

    Mahadewa Tjokorda, G B; Nyoman, Golden; Sri, Maliawan; Junichi, Mizuno

    2016-01-01

    This report presents two cases of cervicobrachialgia and radiculopathy due to multiple cervical herniated discs and spur formation that dealt with anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) using different titanium interbody cages. The description of the clinical presentation, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) appearances and management strategy are discussed. Both cases showed chronic neck pain and radiating pain from the shoulder to the arm. They had a history of blurry vision, cluster head ache, weakness, and numbness on the shoulder for 2 years. MRI revealed multiple herniated discs between C4-7 and accompanied by the spur formation leading to the narrowness of the spinal canal and its foramina bilaterally. ACDF were performed and complete decompression of the spinal canal and its foramina were carried out. Twin M-cages (Ammtec Inc.-Japan) were placed in the first case at C5-7 levels and single cage of Smith Robinson (SR) was placed in the second case at C5-6 levels. There were no more blurry vision, cluster headache, weakness, and numbness, immediately after surgery. To our knowledge, this is the first reported cases of ACDF, using twin M-cages and single SR cage in Indonesia, with improvement immediately after surgery. Cervical spondylosis can present with cervicobrachialgia and radiculopathy and surgical treatment produces good functional outcome.

  13. Clinical Efficacy of Selective Focal Ablation by Navigable Percutaneous Disc Decompression Device in Patients With Cervical Herniated Nucleus Pulposus

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the clinical efficacy and safety following percutaneous disc decompression, using navigable disc decompression device for cervical herniated nucleus pulposus (HNP). Methods Twenty subjects diagnosed with cervical HNP and refractory to conservative management were enrolled for the study. The herniated discs were decompressed under fluoroscopic guidance, using radiofrequency ablation device with navigable wand. The sagittal and axial plain magnetic resonance images of the clinically significant herniated disc, decided the space between the herniated base and outline as the target area for ablation. Clinical outcome was determined by Numeric Rating Scale (NRS), Neck Disability Index (NDI), and Bodily Pain scale of Short Form-36 (SF-36 BP), assessed after 48 weeks. After the procedure, we structurally matched the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and C-arm images through bony markers. The wand position was defined as being ‘correct’ if the tip was placed within the target area of both AP and lateral views; if not, the position was stated as ‘incorrect’. Results The average NRS fell from 7 to 1 at 48 weeks post procedure (p<0.05). In addition, statistically significant improvement was noted in the NDI and SF-36BP (p<0.05). The location of the wand tip resulted in 16 correct and 4 incorrect placements. Post-48 weeks, 3 of the incorrect tip cases and 1 correct tip case showed unsuccessful outcomes. Conclusion The study demonstrated the promising results and safety of the procedure. Thus, focal plasma ablation of cervical HNP with navigable wand can be another effective treatment option. PMID:28289639

  14. Vertebral degenerative disc disease severity evaluation using random forest classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munoz, Hector E.; Yao, Jianhua; Burns, Joseph E.; Pham, Yasuyuki; Stieger, James; Summers, Ronald M.

    2014-03-01

    Degenerative disc disease (DDD) develops in the spine as vertebral discs degenerate and osseous excrescences or outgrowths naturally form to restabilize unstable segments of the spine. These osseous excrescences, or osteophytes, may progress or stabilize in size as the spine reaches a new equilibrium point. We have previously created a CAD system that detects DDD. This paper presents a new system to determine the severity of DDD of individual vertebral levels. This will be useful to monitor the progress of developing DDD, as rapid growth may indicate that there is a greater stabilization problem that should be addressed. The existing DDD CAD system extracts the spine from CT images and segments the cortical shell of individual levels with a dual-surface model. The cortical shell is unwrapped, and is analyzed to detect the hyperdense regions of DDD. Three radiologists scored the severity of DDD of each disc space of 46 CT scans. Radiologists' scores and features generated from CAD detections were used to train a random forest classifier. The classifier then assessed the severity of DDD at each vertebral disc level. The agreement between the computer severity score and the average radiologist's score had a quadratic weighted Cohen's kappa of 0.64.

  15. Radiography and biomechanics of sixth and seventh cervical vertebrae segments after disc fenestration and after insertion of an intervertebral body spacer. A canine cadaveric study.

    PubMed

    Moissonnier, P; Desquilbet, L; Fitzpatrick, D; Bernard, F

    2014-01-01

    To study the radiographic characteristics and the biomechanical properties of the sixth and seventh cervical (C6-C7) vertebral motion unit (VMU) with an intact disc, after disc fenestration, and after placement of an intervertebral body spacer (IVBS). Six cadaveric C6-C7 VMU were retrieved from six Greyhound cadavers. Each VMU was loaded at 3 Nm of torque sequentially in flexion, extension, and in right and left lateral bending. The range-of-motion (ROM) was measured with a Zebris 3D® system. The intervertebral disc cross-sectional area was measured on lateral and ventro-dorsal radiographs. Biomechanical testing and radiographic measurements were performed with an intact disc, after disc fenestration, and after IVBS placement. Data were reported as mean±SD. The intervertebral disc cross-sectional area was significantly decreased after disc fenestration and increased after IVBS placement, but remained significantly smaller than the area of intact disc in some of the tested conditions. The ROM with an intact disc, after disc fenestration and after IVBS placement, in flexion were 11.5°±1.0, 15.2°±2.3, and 10.9°±4.7, respectively, and in extension were 15.6°±3.7, 24.7°±6.2, 21.9°±4.0, respectively. There was a significant increase in extension ROM after disc fenestration. Intervertebral body spacer placement significantly decreased ROM in flexion but ROM in extension was not different from disc fenestration. No significant changes in lateral bending ROM were detected. The use of an IVBS reduced disc space collapse but did not restore stability of the VMU to normal values in extension after cervical disc fenestration.

  16. Biomechanical Analysis of a Novel Prosthesis Based on the Physiological Curvature of Endplate for Cervical Disc Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Cheng-Cheng; Hao, Ding-Jun; Huang, Da-Geng; Qian, Li-Xiong; Feng, Hang; Li, Hou-Kun; Zhao, Song-Chuan

    2016-01-01

    Study Design Biomechanical analysis of a novel prosthesis based on the physiological curvature of endplate was performed. Objective To compare the biomechanical differences between a novel prosthesis based on the physiological curvature of the endplate and the Prestige LP prosthesis after cervical disc replacement (CDR). Summary of Background Data Artificial disc prostheses have been widely used to preserve the physiological function of treated and adjacent motion segments in CDR, while most of those present a flat surface instead of an arcuate surface which approximately similar to anatomic structures in vivo. We first reported a well-designed artificial disc prosthesis based on the physiological curvature of the endplate. Methods Three motion segments of 24 ovine cervical spines (C2-5) were evaluated in a robotic spine system with axial compressive loads of 50N. Testing conditions were as follows: 1) intact, 2) C3–4 CDR with artificial disc prosthesis based on the physiological curvature of the endplate, and 3) C3–4 CDR with the Prestige LP prosthesis. The range of motion (ROM) and the pressures on the inferior surface of the two prostheses were recorded and analyzed. Results As compared to the intact state, the ROM of all three segments had no significant difference in the replacement group. Additionally, there was no significant difference in ROM between the two prostheses. The mean pressure on the novel prosthesis was significantly less than the Prestige LP prosthesis. Conclusion ROM in 3 groups (intact group, CDR group with novel prosthesis and CDR group with Prestige LP) showed no significant difference. The mean pressure on the inferior surface of the novel prosthesis was significantly lower than the Prestige LP prosthesis. Therefore, the novel artificial disc prosthesis is feasible and effective, and can reduce the implant-bone interface pressure on the endplate, which may be one possible reason of prosthesis subsidence. PMID:27355319

  17. Biomechanical Analysis of a Novel Prosthesis Based on the Physiological Curvature of Endplate for Cervical Disc Replacement.

    PubMed

    Yu, Cheng-Cheng; Hao, Ding-Jun; Huang, Da-Geng; Qian, Li-Xiong; Feng, Hang; Li, Hou-Kun; Zhao, Song-Chuan

    2016-01-01

    Biomechanical analysis of a novel prosthesis based on the physiological curvature of endplate was performed. To compare the biomechanical differences between a novel prosthesis based on the physiological curvature of the endplate and the Prestige LP prosthesis after cervical disc replacement (CDR). Artificial disc prostheses have been widely used to preserve the physiological function of treated and adjacent motion segments in CDR, while most of those present a flat surface instead of an arcuate surface which approximately similar to anatomic structures in vivo. We first reported a well-designed artificial disc prosthesis based on the physiological curvature of the endplate. Three motion segments of 24 ovine cervical spines (C2-5) were evaluated in a robotic spine system with axial compressive loads of 50N. Testing conditions were as follows: 1) intact, 2) C3-4 CDR with artificial disc prosthesis based on the physiological curvature of the endplate, and 3) C3-4 CDR with the Prestige LP prosthesis. The range of motion (ROM) and the pressures on the inferior surface of the two prostheses were recorded and analyzed. As compared to the intact state, the ROM of all three segments had no significant difference in the replacement group. Additionally, there was no significant difference in ROM between the two prostheses. The mean pressure on the novel prosthesis was significantly less than the Prestige LP prosthesis. ROM in 3 groups (intact group, CDR group with novel prosthesis and CDR group with Prestige LP) showed no significant difference. The mean pressure on the inferior surface of the novel prosthesis was significantly lower than the Prestige LP prosthesis. Therefore, the novel artificial disc prosthesis is feasible and effective, and can reduce the implant-bone interface pressure on the endplate, which may be one possible reason of prosthesis subsidence.

  18. 3-Tesla Kinematic MRI of the Cervical Spine for Evaluation of Adjacent Level Disease After Monosegmental Anterior Cervical Discectomy and Arthroplasty: Results of 2-Year Follow-Up.

    PubMed

    Fleck, Steffen K; Langner, Soenke; Rosenstengel, Christian; Kessler, Rebecca; Matthes, Marc; Müller, Jan-Uwe; Langner, Inga; Marx, Sascha; Schroeder, Henry W S

    2017-02-15

    We prospectively evaluated adjacent disc levels after anterior cervical discectomy and arthroplasty (ACDA) using kinematic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and plain functional radiographs. ACDA is an established treatment for degenerative cervical disc disease. The objective of this study was to evaluate the use of kinematic MRI for assessing the range of motion (ROM) before and after ACDA compared with plain functional radiographs and to evaluate adjacent degenerative disc disease (aDDD) at mid-term follow-up. Twenty patients (12 females, 8 males; median age 45.6 ± 6.9 yrs) treated by ACDA (BryanDisc; Medtronic, MN) underwent plain functional radiography and kinematic MRI of the cervical spine at 3 T before and 6 and 24 months after surgery. A sagittal T2-weighted (T2w) 2D turbo spin echo (TSE) sequence and a 3D T2w dataset with secondary axial reconstruction were acquired. Signal intensity of all nonoperated discs was measured in regions of interest (ROI). Disc heights adjacent to the operated segment were measured. ROM was evaluated and compared with plain functional radiographs. Clinical outcome was evaluated using the visual analog scale (VAS) for head, neck and radicular pain, and the neck disability index (NDI). Mean ROM of the cervical spine on functional plain radiographs was 21.25 ± 8.19°, 22.29 ± 4.82°, and 26.0 ± 6.9° preoperatively and at 6-month and 24-month follow-up, respectively. Mean ROM at MRI was 27.1 ± 6.78°, 29.45 ± 9.51°, and 31.95 ± 9.58°, respectively. There was a good correlation between both techniques. Follow-up examinations demonstrated no signs of progressive degenerative disc disease of adjacent levels. All patients had clinical improvement up to 24 months after surgery. After ACDA, kinematic MRI allows evaluation of the ROM with excellent correlation to plain functional radiographs. Mid-term follow-up after ACDA is without evidence of progressive DDD of adjacent segments. 3.

  19. Comparison of Clinical Efficacy Between Interlaminar and Transforaminal Epidural Injection in Patients With Axial Pain due to Cervical Disc Herniation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jung Hwan; Lee, Sang-Ho

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Transforaminal (TF) approach is preferred by physician to interlaminar (IL) approach because it can deliver injectates directly around nerve root and dorsal root ganglion, which is regarded as main pain sources. Axial neck pain is originated from sinuvertebral nerve located in ventral epidural spaces, which has been described to be related to central or paramedian disc herniation. It is very questionable that TF injection is also more effective than IL injection in the patients with axial neck or interscapular pain. This study was to evaluate clinical efficacy of cervical epidural injection in patients with axial pain due to cervical disc herniation and to compare the clinical outcomes between TF and IL approaches. Fifty-six and 52 patients who underwent IL and TF epidural injections, respectively, for axial neck/interscapular pain due to central or paramedian cervical disc herniation were included. Numeric Rating Scale (NRS) and Neck Disability Index (NDI) were compared between both groups at 2 and 8 weeks after treatment. Successful pain relief was defined if a 50% or more reduction of NRS score was achieved in comparison with pretreatment one. Successful functional improvement was defined if at least a 40% reduction of NDI was obtained. Overall, 79 (73.1%) and 57 (52.8%) among 108 patients showed successful pain relief at 2 and 8 weeks, respectively. Seventy-six (70.4%) and 52 (48.1%) had successful functional improvement at 2 and 8 weeks, respectively. The IL and TF groups showed no significant difference in proportion of successful results of NRS 2 weeks (73.2% vs 67.3%) and 8 weeks (48.2% vs 48.1%). Also, no significant difference was obtained in proportion of successful NDI between 2 groups at 2 weeks (75.0% vs 71.2%) and 8 weeks (53.6% vs 51.9%). Cervical epidural injection showed favorable results in 2 weeks and moderate results in 8 weeks in patients with axial pain due to cervical disc herniation. IL and TF showed no significant difference in

  20. Minimum 4-year outcomes of cervical total disc arthroplasty versus fusion: a meta-analysis based on prospective randomized controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ai-Min; Xu, Hui; Mullinix, Kenneth Paul; Jin, Hai-Ming; Huang, Zhe-Yu; Lv, Qing-Bo; Wang, Sheng; Xu, Hua-Zi; Chi, Yong-Long

    2015-04-01

    The prevalence of cervical disc disease is high, and the traditional surgical method of anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) carries with it the disadvantages of motion loss at the operated level, and accelerated adjacent level disc degeneration. Preliminary results of the efficacy and reoperative rate comparing TDA versus ACDF have been reported; however, the long-term outcomes of TDA versus ACDF still remain a topic of debate. This review was prepared following the standard procedures set forth by the Cochrane Collaboration organization, and preferred reporting items for systematic reviews and meta-analyses (PRISMA). The only studies included were randomized controlled trials with a minimum of 4 years of follow-up data. The meta-analysis included the neck disability index (NDI), visual analog scale (VAS) of neck and arm pain, SF-36 physical component scores (SF-36 PCS), over success, neurological success, work status, implant-related complications, and secondary surgery events. Four randomized controlled trials meet the inclusion criteria. The long-term improvement of NDI, VAS of neck and arm pain, SF-36 PCS, over success, and neurological success favored the TDA group. The TDA group also had a lower incidence of secondary surgery for both the index level (RR: 0.45 [0.28, 0.72]) and adjacent level (RR: 0.53 [0.33, 0.88]). In this meta-analysis of 4 included RCTs with a minimum 4 years of follow-ups, total disc arthroplasty showed improvements over ACDF as measured by the NDI, VAS of neck and arm pain, and SF-36 PCS.

  1. Hemifacial hyperhidrosis associated with ipsilateral/contralateral cervical disc herniation myelopathy. Functional considerations on how compression pattern determines the laterality

    PubMed Central

    Iwase, Satoshi; Inukai, Yoko; Nishimura, Naoki; Sato, Maki; Sugenoya, Junichi

    2014-01-01

    Summary Sweating is an important mechanism for ensuring constant thermoregulation, but hyperhidrosis may be disturbing. We present five cases of hemifacial hyperhidrosis as a compensatory response to an/hypohidrosis caused by cervical disc herniation. All the patients complained of hemifacial hyperhidrosis, without anisocoria or blepharoptosis. Sweat function testing and thermography confirmed hyperhidrosis of hemifacial and adjacent areas. Neck MRI showed cervical disc herniation. Three of the patients had lateral compression with well-demarcated hypohidrosis below the hyperhidrosis on the same side as the cervical lesion. The rest had paramedian compression with poorly demarcated hyperhidrosis and hypohidrosis on the contralateral side. Although MRI showed no intraspinal pathological signal intensity, lateral dural compression might influence the circulation to the sudomotor pathway, and paramedian compression might influence the ipsilateral sulcal artery, which perfuses the sympathetic descending pathway and the intermediolateral nucleus. Sweat function testing and thermography should be performed to determine the focus of the hemifacial hyperhidrosis, and the myelopathy should be investigated on both sides. PMID:25014051

  2. Cervical anterior hybrid technique with bi-level Bryan artificial disc replacement and adjacent segment fusion for cervical myelopathy over three consecutive segments.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jiang; Xu, Lin; Jia, Yu-Song; Sun, Qi; Li, Jin-Yu; Zheng, Chen-Ying; Bai, Chun-Xiao; Yu, Qin-Sheng

    2016-05-01

    This study aimed to assess the preliminary clinical efficacy and feasibility of the hybrid technique for multilevel cervical myelopathy. Considering the many shortcomings of traditional treatment methods for multilevel cervical degenerative myelopathy, hybrid surgery (bi-level Bryan artificial disc [Medtronic Sofamor Danek, Memphis, TN, USA] replacement and anterior cervical discectomy and fusion) should be considered. Between March 2006 and November 2012, 108 patients (68 men and 40 women, average age 45years) underwent hybrid surgery. Based on the Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) score, Neck Disability Index (NDI), and Odom's criteria, the clinical symptoms and neurological function before and after surgery were evaluated. Mean surgery duration was 90minutes, with average blood loss of 30mL. Mean follow-up duration was 36months. At the final follow-up, the mean JOA (± standard deviation) scores were significantly higher compared with preoperative values (15.08±1.47 versus 9.18±1.22; P<0.01); meanwhile, NDI values were markedly decreased (12.32±1.03 versus 42.68±1.83; P<0.01). Using Odom's criteria, the clinical outcomes were rated as excellent (76 patients), good (22 patients), fair (six patients), and poor (four patients). These findings indicate that the hybrid method provides an effective treatment for cervical myelopathy over three consecutive segments, ensuring a good clinical outcome. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. High-Definition Video Telescope-Assisted Ventral Slot Decompression Surgery for Cervical Intervertebral Disc Herniation in 30 Dogs.

    PubMed

    Rossetti, Diego; Ragetly, Guillaume R; Poncet, Cyrill M

    2016-10-01

    To describe the use of a video telescope operating monitor (VITOM™) for ventral slot decompression and to report its clinical applications using preoperative and postoperative computed tomography (CT) myelography. Prospective case series. Consecutive dogs presented with cervical intervertebral disc disease requiring surgical decompression (n = 30). Demographic data, preoperative neurological status, localization and lateralization of the compression, total operative time, surgical complications, ventral slot size and orientation, hospitalization time, and postoperative outcome were recorded. Preoperative and postoperative spinal cord area at the compression site and ratios of compressed to normal spinal cord area were calculated by CT myelography. French Bulldogs were the most common breed of dogs (n = 15; 50%) and neck pain was the most common neurological sign (n = 18; 60%). Postoperative CT myelography confirmed that spinal cord decompression, postoperative spinal cord area, and the ratios of compressed to normal spinal cord area improved significantly compared with preoperative measurements (P = .01). Sinus bleeding occurred in 20% of dogs. The mean ratios (± SD) of ventral slot length and width compared with vertebral body length and width were 0.21 ± 0.08 and 0.31 ± 0.07, respectively. The mean postoperative hospitalization time was 3.0 ± 0.6 days and all dogs showed clinical improvement and an excellent outcome. The VITOM™ ventral slot decompression technique was fast and easy to perform. It allowed a minimally invasive approach with a small ventral slot while improving spinal cord visualization. The results of this study support the use of the VITOM™ technique in spinal veterinary surgery. © Copyright 2016 by The American College of Veterinary Surgeons.

  4. Hybrid Strategy of Two-Level Cervical Artificial Disc and Intervertebral Cage: Biomechanical Effects on Tissues and Implants.

    PubMed

    Chung, Tzu-Tsao; Hueng, Dueng-Yuan; Lin, Shang-Chih

    2015-11-01

    This numerical study aimed to evaluate tissue and implant responses to the hybrid surgery (HS) of cervical artificial disc replacement (C-ADR) and anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF).Four hybrid strategies of two-level C-ADR and ACDF were compared in terms of adjacent segment degeneration (ASD) and implant failure.The rotary C-ADR and semirigid ACDF have been extensively used in the multilevel treatment of cervical instability and degeneration, but the constrained mobility at the ACDF segments can induce postoperative ASD problems. Hybrid surgery of C-ADR and ACDF has been an alternative to provide the optimal tradeoff between surgical cost and ASD problems. The biomechanical effects of hybrid strategies warrant thorough investigation for the two-level instrumentation.Based on computed tomography imaging, a nonlinear C2-C7 model was developed and validated by cadaveric and numerical data. Four strategies of inserting the C-ADR and ACDF into the C4-C6 segments were systematically arranged as PP (2 peek cages), AA (2 artificial discs), PA, and AP. The biomechanical behavior of these 4 strategies was evaluated in terms of motion and stresses of discs, facet forces, stresses of C-ADR and ACDF, and C-ADR motion.The constrained mobility of the ACDF segment worsened the kinematic and mechanical demands of the adjacent segments and artificial discs. The C-ADR articulation provided higher mobility than the replaced disc of the intact construct, making it an effective buffer to accommodate the compensated mobility and load from the ACDF segment. Consequently, the ASD progression of the AA construct was most restricted, followed by the PA, AP, and PP construct.The PA strategy is a tradeoff to preserve mobility and reduce cost. The C-ADR of the PA construct preserves the mobility of the C5/C6 segment and shares the transferred motion and loads of the fused C4/C5 segment. The PA construct shows optimal biomechanical results for minimizing ASD and implant failure

  5. Cervical lymph node diseases in children

    PubMed Central

    Lang, Stephan; Kansy, Benjamin

    2014-01-01

    The lymph nodes are an essential part of the body’s immune system and as such are affected in many infectious, autoimmune, metabolic and malignant diseases. The cervical lymph nodes are particularly important because they are the first drainage stations for key points of contact with the outside world (mouth/throat/nose/eyes/ears/respiratory system) – a critical aspect especially among children – and can represent an early clinical sign in their exposed position on a child’s slim neck. Involvement of the lymph nodes in multiple conditions is accompanied by a correspondingly large number of available diagnostic procedures. In the interests of time, patient wellbeing and cost, a careful choice of these must be made to permit appropriate treatment. The basis of diagnostic decisions is a detailed anamnesis and clinical examination. Sonography also plays an important role in differential diagnosis of lymph node swelling in children and is useful in answering one of the critical diagnostic questions: is there a suspicion of malignancy? If so, full dissection of the most conspicuous lymph node may be necessary to obtain histological confirmation. Diagnosis and treatment of childhood cervical lymph node disorders present the attending pediatric and ENT physicians with some particular challenges. The spectrum of differential diagnoses and the varying degrees of clinical relevance – from banal infections to malignant diseases – demand a clear and considered approach to the child’s individual clinical presentation. Such an approach is described in the following paper. PMID:25587368

  6. Acupuncture treatment for feline multifocal intervertebral disc disease.

    PubMed

    Choi, Keum Hwa; Hill, Sara A

    2009-08-01

    A 14-year-old male neutered domestic shorthair cat was admitted to the Veterinary Medical Center, University of Minnesota for evaluation of severe hind limb ataxia, atrophy and paresis. Diagnosis based on physical examination, neurological assessment and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was multifocal intervertebral disc disease (IVDD) with dorsal disc protrusion throughout the thoracic and cranial lumbar spine. The Oriental Medicine (OM) diagnosis (pattern identification) was painful obstruction (Bi) syndrome caused by phlegm-heat accumulation with blood stagnation in the spine. High dose prednisolone therapy (1.25mg/kg PO, once daily) initially did not show any significant improvement in clinical signs. The cat was then treated with several modes of acupuncture treatment including dry needle acupuncture, electro-acupuncture and scalp acupuncture along with Tui-Na (hand manipulation in OM) and physical therapy. Significant improvements in mobility, proprioception and spinal posture were noticed and the cat was able to rise, walk and run 4 months after starting acupuncture treatments. This is the first case report of feline IVDD with multiple sites of disc compression which was successfully treated with several modes of acupuncture treatment.

  7. Axial load-dependent cervical spinal alterations during simulated upright posture: a comparison of healthy controls and patients with cervical degenerative disease.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Shinji; Hesselink, John R; Garfin, Steven R; Kawaji, Yoichi; Hasegawa, Kazuhiro; Hargens, Alan R

    2005-02-01

    The objectives of this study were to simulate the upright loading condition in the cervical spine by applying a new compression device during supine posture and to assess intervertebral angles and cross-sectional areas of the spinal cord and dural tube before and during axial compression. A magnetic resonance (MR) imaging-compatible device was developed to create axial compression with the patient in the supine position. Lateral radiographs were obtained in upright and supine positions with an axial load of 0% (supine) and by applying a cervical compression device at 7, 10, and 13% of body weight (BW) in 18 control individuals and seven symptomatic patients with cervical degenerative disc disease (DDD). Additionally, cervical MR images acquired in 17 controls and 12 patients were compared before and during an axial load of 8.4% BW in terms of anteroposterior diameter and cross-sectional area of the dural sac. The supine intervertebral angles with loads of 0, 7, 10, and 13% of the individuals' BW relative to upright posture were -8.1+/-1.3, -2.3+/-1.4, 1.3+/-1.9, and 2.8+/-2 degrees, respectively. Subsequent axial force was interpolated as 8.9% of BW to simulate upright cervical spine alignment. Under an axial loading similar to that created by the upright posture, the dural sac narrowed at the C5-6 interspace in asymptomatic individuals and at the C6-7 interspace in patients with cervical DDD. This cervical compression device may be a useful tool to simulate upright cervical spinal alignment. The results of this study help in understanding the pathophysiology of symptoms related to cervical degenerative disorders in upright posture.

  8. Posterior atlantoaxial ‘facetal’ instability associated with cervical spondylotic disease

    PubMed Central

    Goel, Atul

    2015-01-01

    Aim: The association of single or multiple level cervical spondylotic disease with atlantoaxial instability is assessed. The implications of identifying and treating atlantoaxial instability in such an association are highlighted. Materials and Methods: The analysis is based on an experience with 11 patients treated during the period June 2013-June 2014. All patients had single or multilevel cervical spondylotic disease. The spinal canal compromise and evidence of cord compression was evident on imaging in the cervical subaxial spine and was related to disc bulges and osteophytic bars. There was no or relatively insignificant compression of the cervicomedullary cord by the odontoid process. There was no evidence of odontoid process-related instability on dynamic imaging. Apart from presence of features of cervical spondylosis, investigations and surgical exploration and direct manual handling of the facets revealed evidence of Type B (posterior) atlantoaxial ‘facetal’ instability in all patients. Our 5-point clinical grading system and Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) scores were used to monitor the patients both before and after surgery and at follow-up. Surgery involved both at lantoaxial and subaxial cervical fixation. During the average period of follow-up of 9 months (5-17 months), all patients showed remarkable and gratifying neurological recovery. Conclusion: We conclude that atlantoaxial facetal instability can be ‘frequently’ associated with cervical spondylosis and needs surgical stabilization. Our surgical outcome analysis suggests that missing or ignoring the presence of atlantoaxial facetal instability can be an important cause of suboptimal result or failure of surgery for cervical spondylotic myelopathy. PMID:25972708

  9. Factors affecting reoperations after anterior cervical discectomy and fusion within and outside of a Federal Drug Administration investigational device exemption cervical disc replacement trial.

    PubMed

    Singh, Kern; Phillips, Frank M; Park, Dan K; Pelton, Miguel A; An, Howard S; Goldberg, Edward J

    2012-05-01

    The excellent clinical results of five US Federal Drug Administration (FDA) trials approved for cervical total disc replacement (TDR) (Prestige [Medtronic Sofamor Danek, Memphis, TN, USA], Bryan [Medtronic Sofamor Danek], ProDisc-C [Synthes, West Chester, PA, USA], Kineflex|C [SpinalMotion, Mountain View, CA, USA], and Mobi-C [LDR Spine, Austin, TX, USA]) have recently been published. In these prospective randomized studies, superiority or equivalency of TDR was claimed, citing an 8.7% (23/265), 9.5% (21/221), 8.5% (9/106), 12.2% (14/115), and 6.2% (5/81) (mean = 9.02%) rate of additional related cervical surgical procedures within 2 years in control anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) patients, respectively, compared with 1.8% (5/276), 5.8% (14/242), 1.9% (2/103), 11% (15/136), and 1.2% (2/164) (mean = 4.34%) in patients receiving the cervical TDR. The rate of reoperation within 2 years after ACDF seems unusually high. To assess the rate of and specific indications for early reoperation after ACDF in a cohort of patients receiving the ACDF as part of their customary care. These results are contrasted with similar patients receiving ACDF as the control arm of five FDA investigational device exemption (IDE) studies. Multisurgeon retrospective clinical series from a single institution. One hundred seventy-six patients with spondylotic radiculopathy or myelopathy underwent ACDF by three surgeons between 2001 and 2005 as part of their clinical practices. All patients had at least 2 years of follow-up with final follow-up within 6 months of completion of this study. Cervical reoperation rates at 2-year follow-up and at 3.5-year follow-up. Review of medical records and telephone conversations were completed to determine the number of patients who had undergone a revision cervical procedure. At final follow-up, complete data were available for 159 ACDF patients. Of the 48 patients who underwent single-level ACDF and met criteria for inclusion in the IDE studies

  10. Four-year results of a prospective single-arm study on 200 semi-constrained total cervical disc prostheses: clinical and radiographic outcome.

    PubMed

    Meisel, Hans-Jörg; Jurák, Lubomír; Antinheimo, Jussi; Arregui, Ricardo; Bruchmann, Bernhard; Čabraja, Mario; Caroli, Fabrizio; Kroppenstedt, Stefan; Kryl, Jan; Pohjola, Juha; Shackleford, Ian; Sola, Steffen; Stosberg, Peter; Stulik, Jan; Woiciechowsky, Christian; Suchomel, Petr

    2016-11-01

    OBJECTIVE Recent studies have described encouraging outcomes after cervical total disc replacement (cTDR), but there are also critical debates regarding the long-term effects of heterotopic ossification (HO) and the prevalence of adjacent-level degeneration. The aim in this paper was to provide 4-year clinical and radiographic outcome results on the activ C disc prosthesis. METHODS A total of 200 subjects underwent single-level activ C (Aesculap AG) implantation between C-3 and C-7 for the treatment of symptomatic degenerative disc disease. Clinical and radiographic assessments were performed preoperatively, intraoperatively, at discharge, and again at 6 weeks, 6 months, 1 year, 2 years, and 4 years. Radiographic evaluations were done by an independent core laboratory using a specific software for quantitative motion analysis. RESULTS Neck Disability Index (NDI) and visual analog scale (VAS) score for neck and arm pain decreased significantly from baseline to the 4-year follow-up. The mean improvement for NDI was 20, for VAS severity and frequency of neck pain 26.4 and 28, and for VAS severity and frequency of arm pain 30.7 and 35.1, respectively. The neurological situation improved for the majority of patients (86.4%); 76.1% of cases were asymptomatic. Subsequent surgical interventions were reported in 7% of the cases, including device removals in 3%. In 2.5% a subsidence greater than 3 mm was recorded; 1 of these cases also had a migration greater than 3 mm. No device displacement, expulsion, disassembly, loose or fractured device, osteolysis, or facet joint degeneration at the index level was observed. Segmental lordotic alignment changed from -2.4° preoperatively to -6.2° at 4 years, and postoperative height was maintained during the follow-up. Advanced HO (Grade III and IV) was present in 27.1% of the cases; 82.4% showed segmental mobility. A progression of radiographic adjacent-segment degeneration occurred in 28.2%, but only 4.5% required surgical

  11. A game of two discs: a case of non-contiguous and occult cervical spine injury in a rugby player

    PubMed Central

    O'Sullivan, Michael D.; Piggot, Robert; Jaddan, Mutaz; McCabe, John P.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this case report was to highlight the application of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in elucidating serious and occult injuries in a single case of hyperflextion injury of a patient cervical spine (C-Spine). A chart and radiology review was performed to establish the sequence of care and how the results of imaging studies influenced the clinical management in this trauma case. Plain radiographs and computed tomography (CT) imaging modalities of the C-Spine revealed bilateral C4/C5 facetal subluxation with no obvious fractures; however, the MR imaging of the C-Spine revealed a non-contiguous and occult injury to C6/C7 disc with a posterior annular tear and associated disc extrusion. This altered the operative intervention that was initially planned. MR imaging proved an invaluable diagnostic addition in this particular case of cervical trauma in a rugby player following a hyperflextion injury, by revealing a serious non-contiguous and occult injury of the C-Spine. PMID:26980714

  12. Biomechanics of a Fixed–Center of Rotation Cervical Intervertebral Disc Prosthesis

    PubMed Central

    Crawford, Neil R.; Baek, Seungwon; Sawa, Anna G.U.; Safavi-Abbasi, Sam; Sonntag, Volker K.H.; Duggal, Neil

    2012-01-01

    Background Past in vitro experiments studying artificial discs have focused on range of motion. It is also important to understand how artificial discs affect other biomechanical parameters, especially alterations to kinematics. The purpose of this in vitro investigation was to quantify how disc replacement with a ball-and-socket disc arthroplasty device (ProDisc-C; Synthes, West Chester, Pennsylvania) alters biomechanics of the spine relative to the normal condition (positive control) and simulated fusion (negative control). Methods Specimens were tested in multiple planes by use of pure moments under load control and again in displacement control during flexion-extension with a constant 70-N compressive follower load. Optical markers measured 3-dimensional vertebral motion, and a strain gauge array measured C4-5 facet loads. Results Range of motion and lax zone after disc replacement were not significantly different from normal values except during lateral bending, whereas plating significantly reduced motion in all loading modes (P < .002). Plating but not disc replacement shifted the location of the axis of rotation anteriorly relative to the intact condition (P < 0.01). Coupled axial rotation per degree of lateral bending was 25% ± 48% greater than normal after artificial disc replacement (P = .05) but 37% ± 38% less than normal after plating (P = .002). Coupled lateral bending per degree of axial rotation was 37% ± 21% less than normal after disc replacement (P < .001) and 41% ± 36% less than normal after plating (P = .001). Facet loads did not change significantly relative to normal after anterior plating or arthroplasty, except that facet loads were decreased during flexion in both conditions (P < .03). Conclusions In all parameters studied, deviations from normal biomechanics were less substantial after artificial disc placement than after anterior plating. PMID:25694869

  13. The biomechanical impact of facet tropism on the intervertebral disc and facet joints in the cervical spine.

    PubMed

    Rong, Xin; Wang, Beiyu; Ding, Chen; Deng, Yuxiao; Chen, Hua; Meng, Yang; Yan, Weijie; Liu, Hao

    2017-07-13

    Facet tropism is defined as the angular difference between the left and the right facet orientation. Facet tropism was suggested to be associated with the disc degeneration and facet degeneration in the lumbar spine. However, little is known about the relationship between facet tropism and pathologic changes in the cervical spine and the mechanism behind. This study was conducted to investigate the biomechanical impact of facet tropism on the intervertebral disc and facet joints. A finite element analysis study. The computed tomography (CT) scans of a 28-year-old male volunteer was used to construct the finite element model. First, a symmetrical cervical model from C2 to C7 was constructed. The facet orientations at each level were simulated using the data from our previously published study. Second, the facet orientations at the C5-C6 level were altered to simulate facet tropism with respect to the sagittal plane. The angular difference of the moderate facet tropism model was set to be 7 degrees, whereas the severe facet tropism model was set to be 14 degrees. The inferior of the C7 vertebra was fixed. A 75 N follower loading was applied to simulate the weight of the head. A 1.0 N⋅m moments was applied on the odontoid process of the C2 to simulate flexion, extension, lateral bending, and axial rotation. The intradiscal pressure (IDP) at the C5-C6 level of the severe facet tropism model increased by 49.02%, 57.14%, 39.06%, and 30.67%, under flexion, extension, lateral bending, and axial rotation moments, in comparison with the symmetrical model. The contact force of the severe facet tropism model increased by 35.64%, 31.74%, 79.26%, and 59.47% from the symmetrical model under flexion, extension, lateral bending, and axial rotation, respectively. Facet tropism with respect to the sagittal plane at the C5-C6 level increased the IDP and facet contact force under flexion, extension, lateral bending, and axial rotation. The results suggested that facet tropism might

  14. Long-term clinical and radiographic outcomes of the Prestige LP artificial cervical disc replacement at 2 levels: results from a prospective randomized controlled clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Lanman, Todd H; Burkus, J Kenneth; Dryer, Randall G; Gornet, Matthew F; McConnell, Jeffrey; Hodges, Scott D

    2017-07-01

    OBJECTIVE The aim of this study was to assess long-term clinical safety and effectiveness in patients undergoing anterior cervical surgery using the Prestige LP artificial disc replacement (ADR) prosthesis to treat degenerative cervical spine disease at 2 adjacent levels compared with anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF). METHODS A prospective, randomized, controlled, multicenter FDA-approved clinical trial was conducted at 30 US centers, comparing the low-profile titanium ceramic composite-based Prestige LP ADR (n = 209) at 2 levels with ACDF (n = 188). Clinical and radiographic evaluations were completed preoperatively, intraoperatively, and at regular postoperative intervals to 84 months. The primary end point was overall success, a composite variable that included key safety and efficacy considerations. RESULTS At 84 months, the Prestige LP ADR demonstrated statistical superiority over fusion for overall success (observed rate 78.6% vs 62.7%; posterior probability of superiority [PPS] = 99.8%), Neck Disability Index success (87.0% vs 75.6%; PPS = 99.3%), and neurological success (91.6% vs 82.1%; PPS = 99.0%). All other study effectiveness measures were at least noninferior for ADR compared with ACDF. There was no statistically significant difference in the overall rate of implant-related or implant/surgical procedure-related adverse events up to 84 months (26.6% and 27.7%, respectively). However, the Prestige LP group had fewer serious (Grade 3 or 4) implant- or implant/surgical procedure-related adverse events (3.2% vs 7.2%, log hazard ratio [LHR] and 95% Bayesian credible interval [95% BCI] -1.19 [-2.29 to -0.15]). Patients in the Prestige LP group also underwent statistically significantly fewer second surgical procedures at the index levels (4.2%) than the fusion group (14.7%) (LHR -1.29 [95% BCI -2.12 to -0.46]). Angular range of motion at superior- and inferior-treated levels on average was maintained in the Prestige LP ADR group to 84 months

  15. The psychiatric disease risk factors DISC1 and TNIK interact to regulate synapse composition and function

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Q; Charych, EI; Pulito, VL; Lee, JB; Graziane, NM; Crozier, RA; Revilla-Sanchez, R; Kelly, MP; Dunlop, AJ; Murdoch, H; Taylor, N; Xie, Y; Pausch, M; Hayashi-Takagi, A; Ishizuka, K; Seshadri, S; Bates, B; Kariya, K; Sawa, A; Weinberg, RJ; Moss, SJ; Houslay, MD; Yan, Z; Brandon, NJ

    2011-01-01

    Disrupted in schizophrenia 1 (DISC1), a genetic risk factor for multiple serious psychiatric diseases including schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and autism, is a key regulator of multiple neuronal functions linked to both normal development and disease processes. As these diseases are thought to share a common deficit in synaptic function and architecture, we have analyzed the role of DISC1 using an approach that focuses on understanding the protein– protein interactions of DISC1 specifically at synapses. We identify the Traf2 and Nck-interacting kinase (TNIK), an emerging risk factor itself for disease, as a key synaptic partner for DISC1, and provide evidence that the DISC1–TNIK interaction regulates synaptic composition and activity by stabilizing the levels of key postsynaptic density proteins. Understanding the novel DISC1–TNIK interaction is likely to provide insights into the etiology and underlying synaptic deficits found in major psychiatric diseases. PMID:20838393

  16. Anterior Migration After Bryan Cervical Disc Arthroplasty: The Relationship Between Hyperlordosis and its Impact on Clinical Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Lei, Tao; Tong, Tong; Miao, Dechao; Gao, Xianda; Xu, Jiaxin; Zhang, Di; Shen, Yong

    2017-05-01

    Various modifications have been tested to prevent kyphosis after Bryan cervical disc arthroplasty (CDA). However, the migration of Bryan prostheses has not been systematically studied. This study investigated the cause of anterior migration (AM) and assessed the effect of AM on clinical and radiographic outcomes. We retrospectively reviewed 46 consecutive patients who underwent modified Bryan CDA between August 2006 and December 2010. We measured functional spinal unit, angle of operative disc space, range of motion, and sagittal alignment of cervical spine preoperatively, postoperatively, and at the final follow-up, and compared these values between the AM and non-AM groups. Clinical outcome was evaluated by scores for Japanese Orthopaedic Association, Neck Disability Index, and visual analog scale. AM occurred in 9/46 (19.6%) patients. Clinical outcomes in both groups were significantly improved compared with the preoperative scores (P < 0.05). However, the postoperative and final follow-up angle of operative disc space was more lordotic and the postoperative functional spinal unit significantly higher in patients in the AM group compared with the non-AM group (P < 0.05). At the final follow-up, patients with AM had significantly higher Neck Disability Index and neck visual analog scale scores (P < 0.05), partially restricted range of motion (4.9° vs. 7.4°; P < 0.05), and adjacent segment degeneration at 6 vertebral levels (46.2%). The intermediate clinical outcomes for patients treated with modified Bryan CDA were satisfactory; however, overcorrection of segmental lordosis may lead to AM of the prosthesis, which could restrict patient range of motion and cause postoperative neck pain. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Cervicitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... uterine lining and the fallopian tubes, resulting in pelvic inflammatory disease (PID), an infection of the female reproductive organs that can cause fertility problems if left untreated. Cervicitis can also ... incidentally during a routine pelvic exam and Pap test and may not require ...

  18. Comparison between cervical total disc replacement and anterior cervical discectomy and fusion of 1 to 2 levels from 2002 to 2009.

    PubMed

    Nandyala, Sreeharsha V; Marquez-Lara, Alejandro; Fineberg, Steven J; Singh, Kern

    2014-01-01

    Retrospective database analysis. To compare the perioperative patient characteristics, early postoperative outcomes, and costs between anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) and cervical total disc replacement (TDR) in the United States. Cervical TDR and ACDF are indicated to treat symptomatic cervical degenerative pathology. The epidemiology, complication rates, and the cost differences between the 2 surgical approaches are not well characterized. Data from the Nationwide Inpatient Sample of the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project was queried from 2002 to 2009. Patients undergoing cervical TDR or ACDF of 1 to 2 levels were identified. Patient demographics, comorbidities, length of stay, costs, and the in-hospital complications were assessed. SPSS (version 20) was used for statistical analysis with χ test for categorical data and independent-samples t test for continuous data. A value of P ≤ 0.001 denoted statistical significance. Multinomial regression analysis was used to identify the independent risk for complications in the TDR cohort compared with the ACDF cohort. There were 141,230 ACDF cases of 1 to 2 levels and 1830 cervical TDR cases identified in the Nationwide Inpatient Sample database. The ACDF cohort was older and demonstrated a greater comorbidity burden than the TDR group (P < 0.001). The ACDF-treated patients demonstrated a significantly greater length of stay than the TDR group (P < 0.001). In contrast, there were no significant differences in the incidence of postoperative complications, mortality, or hospital costs between the surgical cohorts. Multinomial regression did not demonstrate significant differences in the risk for postoperative complications between the surgical techniques. The ACDF cohort was significantly older and demonstrated a greater comorbidity burden that likely contributed to the greater length of stay when than the TDR cohort. Both cohorts demonstrated comparable incidences of early postoperative complications

  19. Cell transplantation in lumbar spine disc degeneration disease.

    PubMed

    Hohaus, C; Ganey, T M; Minkus, Y; Meisel, H J

    2008-12-01

    Low back pain is an extremely common symptom, affecting nearly three-quarters of the population sometime in their life. Given that disc herniation is thought to be an extension of progressive disc degeneration that attends the normal aging process, seeking an effective therapy that staves off disc degeneration has been considered a logical attempt to reduce back pain. The most apparent cellular and biochemical changes attributable to degeneration include a decrease in cell density in the disc that is accompanied by a reduction in synthesis of cartilage-specific extracellular matrix components. With this in mind, one therapeutic strategy would be to replace, regenerate, or augment the intervertebral disc cell population, with a goal of correcting matrix insufficiencies and restoring normal segment biomechanics. Biological restoration through the use of autologous disc chondrocyte transplantation offers a potential to achieve functional integration of disc metabolism and mechanics. We designed an animal study using the dog as our model to investigate this hypothesis by transplantation of autologous disc-derived chondrocytes into degenerated intervertebral discs. As a result we demonstrated that disc cells remained viable after transplantation; transplanted disc cells produced an extracellular matrix that contained components similar to normal intervertebral disc tissue; a statistically significant correlation between transplanting cells and retention of disc height could displayed. Following these results the Euro Disc Randomized Trial was initiated to embrace a representative patient group with persistent symptoms that had not responded to conservative treatment where an indication for surgical treatment was given. In the interim analyses we evaluated that patients who received autologous disc cell transplantation had greater pain reduction at 2 years compared with patients who did not receive cells following their discectomy surgery and discs in patients that

  20. The use of self-mating PEEK as an alternative bearing material for cervical disc arthroplasty: a comparison of different simulator inputs and tribological environments.

    PubMed

    Brown, Tim; Bao, Qi-Bin

    2012-06-01

    The hypothesis for this study was that the simulated wear behavior of a hydroxyapatite coated, self-mating PEEK cervical disc arthroplasty device would be dependent on the simulated testing environment. Five groups of devices were evaluated under suggested ASTM and ISO load and motion profiles. The groups utilized different testing frequencies and protein content of simulator fluid, in addition to assessing the potential for third body wear. The average wear rates were determined using linear regression analysis with a generalized estimating equation. Significant differences between groups were determined using the Wald's test. The simulated wear behavior was shown to be highly dependent on the testing environment, where protein content more than decreasing the cyclic loading frequency resulted in increased wear, but was not dependent on the suggested load and motion profiles. It was demonstrated that a self-mating PEEK cervical disc arthroplasty device has wear rates that are similar to existing material combinations for cervical disc arthroplasty. This study showed that at a time when data from retrieval analyses is deficient, it is important to test the wear resistance of cervical disc arthroplasty devices under various conditions. Long-term clinical results and ongoing implant retrievals are required for validation between clinical performance and simulator inputs.

  1. Viscoelastic finite element analysis of the cervical intervertebral discs in conjunction with a multi-body dynamic model of the human head and neck.

    PubMed

    Esat, V; Acar, M

    2009-02-01

    This article presents the effects of the frontal and rear-end impact loadings on the cervical spine components by using a multi-body dynamic model of the head and neck, and a viscoelastic finite element (FE) model of the six cervical intervertebral discs. A three-dimensional multi-body model of the human head and neck is used to simulate 15 g frontal and 8.5 g rear-end impacts. The load history at each intervertebral joint from the predictions of the multi-body model is used as dynamic loading boundary conditions for the FE model of the intervertebral discs. The results from the multi-body model simulations, such as the intervertebral disc loadings in the form of compressive, tensile, and shear forces and moments, and from the FE analysis such as the von Mises stresses in the intervertebral discs are analysed. This study shows that the proposed approach that uses dynamic loading conditions from the multi-body model as input to the FE model has the potential to investigate the kinetics and the kinematics of the cervical spine and its components together with the biomechanical response of the intervertebral discs under the complex dynamic loading history.

  2. Quality of systematic reviews: an example of studies comparing artificial disc replacement with fusion in the cervical spine.

    PubMed

    Tashani, Osama A; El-Tumi, Hanan; Aneiba, Khaled

    2015-01-01

    Cervical artificial disc replacement (C-ADR) is now an alternative to anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF). Many studies have evaluated the efficacy of C-ADR compared with ACDF. This led to a series of systematic reviews and meta-analyses to evaluate the evidence of the superiority of one intervention against the other. The aim of the study presented here was to evaluate the quality of these reviews and meta-analyses. Medline via Ovid, Embase, and Cochrane Library were searched using the keywords: (total disk replacement, prosthesis, implantation, discectomy, and arthroplasty) AND (cervical vertebrae, cervical spine, and spine) AND (systematic reviews, reviews, and meta-analysis). Screening and data extraction were conducted by two reviewers independently. Two reviewers then assessed the quality of the selected reviews and meta-analysis using 11-item AMSTAR score which is a validated measurement tool to assess the methodological quality of systematic reviews. Screening of full reports of 46 relevant abstracts resulted in the selection of 15 systematic reviews and/or meta-analyses as eligible for this study. The two reviewers' inter-rater agreement level was high as indicated by kappa of >0.72. The AMSTAR score of the reviews ranged from 3 to 11. Only one study (a Cochrane review) scored 100% (AMSTAR 11). Five studies scored below (AMSTAR 5) indicating low-quality reviews. The most significant drawbacks of reviews of a score below 5 were not using an extensive search strategy, failure to use the scientific quality of the included studies appropriately in formulating a conclusion, not assessing publication bias, and not reporting the excluded studies. With a significant exception of a Cochrane review, the methodological quality of systematic reviews evaluating the evidence of C-ADR versus ACDF has to be improved.

  3. Segment-specific association between cervical pillar hyperplasia (CPH) and degenerative joint disease (DJD)

    PubMed Central

    Stupar, Maja; Peterson, Cynthia K

    2006-01-01

    Background Cervical pillar hyperplasia (CPH) is a recently described phenomenon of unknown etiology and clinical significance. Global assessment of pillar hyperplasia of the cervical spine as a unit has not shown a relationship with degenerative joint disease, but a more sensible explanation of the architectural influence of CPH on cervical spine biomechanics may be segment-specific. Objective The objective of this study was to determine the level of association between degenerative joint disease (DJD) and cervical pillar hyperplasia (CPH) in an age- and gender-matched sample on a [cervical spine] by-level basis. Research Methods Two-hundred and forty radiographs were collected from subjects ranging in age between 40 and 69 years. The two primary outcome measures used in the study were the segmental presence/absence of cervical pillar hyperplasia from C3 to C6, and segment-specific presence/absence of degenerative joint disease from C1 to C7. Contingency Coefficients, at the 5% level of significance, at each level, were used to determine the strength of the association between CPH and DJD. Odds Ratios (OR) with their 95% Confidence Intervals (95% CI) were also calculated at each level to assess the strength of the association. Results Our study suggests that an approximately two-to-one odds, or a weak-to-moderate correlation, exists at C4 and C5 CPH and adjacent level degenerative disc disease (DDD); with the strongest (overall) associations demonstrated between C4 CPH and C4–5 DDD and between C5 CPH and C5–6 DDD. Age-stratified results demonstrated a similar pattern of association, even reaching the initially hypothesized OR ≥ 5.0 (95% CI > 1.0) or "moderately-strong correlation of C ≥ .4 (p ≤ .05)" in some age categories, including the 40–44, 50–59, and 60–64 years of age subgroups; these ORs were as follows: OR = 5.5 (95% CI 1.39–21.59); OR = 6.7 (95% CI 1.65–27.34); and OR = 5.3 (95% CI 1.35–21.14), respectively. Conclusion Our results

  4. Segment-specific association between cervical pillar hyperplasia (CPH) and degenerative joint disease (DJD).

    PubMed

    Stupar, Maja; Peterson, Cynthia K

    2006-09-13

    Cervical pillar hyperplasia (CPH) is a recently described phenomenon of unknown etiology and clinical significance. Global assessment of pillar hyperplasia of the cervical spine as a unit has not shown a relationship with degenerative joint disease, but a more sensible explanation of the architectural influence of CPH on cervical spine biomechanics may be segment-specific. The objective of this study was to determine the level of association between degenerative joint disease (DJD) and cervical pillar hyperplasia (CPH) in an age- and gender-matched sample on a [cervical spine] by-level basis. Two-hundred and forty radiographs were collected from subjects ranging in age between 40 and 69 years. The two primary outcome measures used in the study were the segmental presence/absence of cervical pillar hyperplasia from C3 to C6, and segment-specific presence/absence of degenerative joint disease from C1 to C7. Contingency Coefficients, at the 5% level of significance, at each level, were used to determine the strength of the association between CPH and DJD. Odds Ratios (OR) with their 95% Confidence Intervals (95% CI) were also calculated at each level to assess the strength of the association. Our study suggests that an approximately two-to-one odds, or a weak-to-moderate correlation, exists at C4 and C5 CPH and adjacent level degenerative disc disease (DDD); with the strongest (overall) associations demonstrated between C4 CPH and C4-5 DDD and between C5 CPH and C5-6 DDD. Age-stratified results demonstrated a similar pattern of association, even reaching the initially hypothesized OR >or= 5.0 (95% CI > 1.0) or "moderately-strong correlation of C >or= .4 (p

  5. Reliability of cervical radiculopathy, its congruence between patient history and medical imaging evidence of disc herniation and its role in surgical decision.

    PubMed

    Mostofi, Keyvan; Khouzani, Reza Karimi

    2016-10-01

    The incidence of cervical disc herniation is estimated about 5.5/100,000, and they lead to surgical intervention in 26 %. Cervical disc herniation causes radiculopathy, which defines by radicular pain and sensory deficit and maybe weakness following the path of the affected nerves. Classically, cervical radiculopathy is expected to follow its specific dermatome-C4, C5, C6, C7 and C8. We investigate patients who present with discrepancy between classical radiculopathy and imaging findings in the daily practice of our profession. We reviewed the medical records of 102 patients with cervical radiculopathy, caused by cervical disc herniation. All patients had surgery. We found an apparent discrepancy between clinical and radiological findings, patients complained of radiculopathy on one side, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan or CT scan finding on the other side in ten patients (10.2 %). We did not found any other abnormalities in preoperative and post-operative period. All patients underwent cervical diskectomy via anterior approach. Six weeks after surgery eight patients (80 %) recovered completely, and 3 months after all ten patients (100 %) had been relieved totally. The aim of this paper is review of this medical concept and management of radiculopathy in patients with this discrepancy. As far as we know, the subject has not yet been touched in this light in medical literature. The discrepancy between clinical radiculopathy and disc herniation level on MRI or on CT scan is not rare. Management of this discrepancy requires further investigation to avoid missing diagnosis and treatment failure.

  6. Commentary: Reoperation for adjacent level disease in the cervical spine: not a simple end point.

    PubMed

    Ghogawala, Zoher

    2012-05-01

    Singh K, Phillips FM, Park DK, et al. Factors affecting reoperations after anterior cervical discectomy and fusion within and outside of a Federal Drug Administration investigational device exemption cervical disc replacement trial. Spine J 2012;12:372-8 (in this issue). Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Surgical treatment of cervical disc protrusion causing intracranial hypotension following chiropractic manipulation.

    PubMed

    Wilson, David; Steel, Timothy; Sutton, Ian

    2015-09-01

    We describe a woman with intracranial hypotension provoked by a combination of calcified disc protrusion and chiropractic manipulation who required surgical intervention for definitive treatment. Intracranial hypotension is a rare but increasingly well recognized cause of orthostatic headache that arises due to spinal cerebrospinal fluid leakage from meningeal diverticula or dural perforations.

  8. Cervical pneumatocyst.

    PubMed

    Hoover, Jason M; Wenger, Doris E; Eckel, Laurence J; Krauss, William E

    2011-09-01

    The authors present the case of a 56-year-old right hand-dominant woman who was referred for chronic neck pain and a second opinion regarding a cervical lesion. The patient's pain was localized to the subaxial spine in the midline. She reported a subjective sense of intermittent left arm weakness manifesting as difficulty manipulating small objects with her hands and fingers. She also reported paresthesias and numbness in the left hand. Physical and neurological examinations demonstrated no abnormal findings except for a positive Tinel sign over the left median nerve at the wrist. Electromyography demonstrated bilateral carpal tunnel syndrome with no cervical radiculopathy. Cervical spine imaging demonstrated multilevel degenerative disc disease and a pneumatocyst of the C-5 vertebral body. The alignment of the cervical spine was normal. A review of the patient's cervical imaging studies obtained in 1995, 2007, 2008, and 2010 demonstrated that the pneumatocyst was not present in 1995 but was present in 2007. The lesion had not changed in appearance since 2007. At an outside institution, multilevel fusion of the cervical spine was recommended to treat the pneumatocyst prior to evaluation at the authors' institution. The authors, however, did not think that the pneumatocyst was the cause of the patient's neck pain, and cervical pneumatocysts typically have a benign course. As such, the authors recommended conservative management and repeated MR imaging in 6 months. Splinting was used to treat the patient's carpal tunnel syndrome.

  9. An investigation of a cluster of cervical herniated discs among container truck drivers with occupational exposure to whole-body vibration.

    PubMed

    Lan, Fan-Yun; Liou, Yuh-Wehn; Huang, Kuo-Yuan; Guo, How-Ran; Wang, Jung-Der

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to determine if occupational exposure to whole-body vibration is associated with cervical intervertebral disc herniation among container truck drivers. We conducted a walk-through survey among container truck drivers and unexposed workers. We also measured the vibration hazard of the container truck over the driver's back and seat when the driver was loading a container and driving the loaded truck. Among the 38 workers interviewed, 32 were container truck drivers. Four of them reported cervical herniated discs, and all of these individuals were container truck drivers with a job tenure of greater than 10 years. Self-reported cervical herniated disc, nuchal pain, nocturia, arm/forearm weakness, arm/forearm numbness, and finger numbness were significantly more prevalent as the driver's duration of exposure increased (all p values of test for trend <0.05). The vibration of the truck during and after loading a container was considered the main cause of herniated disc. When a container truck was driven with a loaded container, both the vertical and horizontal vibrating acceleration over the seat and back sites exceeded the 8-hr exposure level based on the ISO 2631-1 criteria. The transient vibration dose values (VDVs) measured during misaligned or unsmooth loading operations were usually greater than the upper bounds of the health guidance caution zone for the 8-hr VDV. Our investigation disclosed a cluster of cervical intervertebral disc herniation that was associated with the vibration hazard during long-term container truck driving under full load and possibly aggravated by misaligned loading operations.

  10. [Cervical hydatid disease with retropharyngeal involvement: a case report].

    PubMed

    Semlali, S; Nassar, I; Cissé, A; El-Gueddari, F Z; Imani, F

    2004-01-01

    Hydatid disease involves the bones in 0.5 to 2% of cases, with 44% of these cases at the level of the spine. The cervical spine is a rare location, with a risk of spinal cord compression and recurrences. The Authors report a case of a young male admitted for progressive quadriplegia secondary to cervical spine hydatidosis, extending towards the retropharynx that was evaluated by CT and MRI.

  11. High cervical C3-4 'disc' compression associated with basilar invagination.

    PubMed

    Goel, Atul

    2008-01-01

    A 20-year-old male had torticollis and short neck since birth. He presented with symptom of progressive quadriparesis over a two-year period. Investigations revealed basilar invagination with marked rotation in the craniovertebral region and relatively large C3-4 region osteophytes. Serial MRI over two years showed persistent signal opposite C3-4 disc space suggestive of cord compression. Although the cord was humped over the odontoid process, there was no clear radiological evidence that the cord was compromised at this level. During surgery, instability was identified only at the craniovertebral region and not at the level of C3-4. Distraction of the lateral masses of atlas and axis and fixation using interarticular spacers and bone graft and direct screw implantation in the lateral mass of the atlas and pars of the axis resulted in reduction of the basilar invagination and of atlantoaxial dislocation. The patient had marked clinical recovery, despite the fact that no direct procedure was done for C3-4 disc decompression. The case suggests that C3-4 disc changes could be secondary to primary instability at the craniovertebral junction.

  12. Molecular diagnostic assays for cervical neoplasia: emerging markers for the detection of high-grade cervical disease.

    PubMed

    Malinowski, Douglas P

    2005-04-01

    The accurate detection and diagnosis of cervical carcinoma and its malignant precursors (collectively referred to as high-grade cervical disease) represents one of the current challenges in clinical medicine and cytopathology. The advent of molecular diagnostics and the use of whole-genome profiling using DNA microarrays promises to yield improved understanding of the disease process with the subsequent development of more accurate diagnostic procedures based upon these discoveries. Recent reports describing a variety of experimental approaches have identified a series of candidate genes that are overexpressed in cervical carcinoma. In this article, representative examples of these markers and the resulting translational research will be reviewed within the context of improved cervical disease detection. An emerging class of markers, the minichromosome maintenance protein family of DNA licensing factors (MCM-2, MCM-6, MCM-7), shows promise for the specific detection of high-grade cervical disease using simple antibody-based immunochemistry formats. These proteins are overexpressed in cervical disease as a result of infection by oncogenic strains of human papillomavirus (HPV) and subsequent uncontrolled activation of gene transcription and aberrant S-phase induction, mediated through the E2F transcription factor pathway. This behavior appears to be a hallmark of high-grade cervical disease and provides the link between oncogenic HPV infections and the molecular behavior of cervical neoplasia (CN). The use of these molecular descriptors of CN in simple immunochemistry formats compatible with conventional cytology preparations is anticipated to improve the screening and detection of cervical disease within the healthcare system.

  13. Physico-chemical characteristics of ZnO nanoparticles-based discs and toxic effect on human cervical cancer HeLa cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sirelkhatim, Amna; Mahmud, Shahrom; Seeni, Azman; Kaus, Noor Haida Mohd.; Sendi, Rabab

    2014-10-01

    In this study, we investigated physico-chemical properties of zinc oxide nanoparticles (ZnO NPs)-based discs and their toxicity on human cervical cancer HeLa cell lines. ZnO NPs (80 nm) were produced by the conventional ceramic processing method. FESEM analysis indicated dominant structure of nanorods with dimensions 100-500 nm in length, and 20-100 nm in diameter. The high content of ZnO nanorods in the discs probably played significant role in toxicity towards HeLa cells. Structural defects (oxygen vacancies and zinc/oxygen interstitials) were revealed by PL spectra peaks at 370-376 nm and 519-533 nm for the ZnO discs. The structural, optical and electrical properties of prepared sample have influenced the toxicological effects of ZnO discs towards HeLa cell lines via the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), internalization, membrane damage, and eventually cell death. The larger surface to volume area of the ZnO nanorods, combined with defects, stimulated enhanced toxicity via ROS generation hydrogen peroxide, hydroxyl radicals, and superoxide anion. The preliminary results confirmed the ZnO-disc toxicity on HeLa cells was significantly associated with the unique physicochemical properties of ZnO NPs and to our knowledge, this is the first cellular study for treatment of HeLa cells with ZnO discs made from 80 nm ZnO particles.

  14. Selection of the appropriate surgical approach for intervertebral disc disease.

    PubMed

    Bitetto, W V; Brown, N O

    1989-01-01

    In no other area of veterinary surgery is the selection and performance of the appropriate surgical approach more important than neurosurgery. An adequate, atraumatic, and anatomically sound exposure is an important part of the battle in most orthopaedic procedures and is an even more important consideration when related to neurosurgery. The delicate and often unforgiving nature of the tissue involved dictates that careful planning and attention to detail become high priority concerns for the veterinary neurosurgeon. Most veterinarians recommend surgery for dogs with severe impairment, recurrent disease, and progressively deteriorating neurologic signs. Difficulties remain in the timing of surgery and in the choice of what surgical approach is most appropriate for the neurologically impaired dog in question. Surgical approaches in the cervical region include ventral and dorsal. In the thoracolumbar spine, either dorsal or dorsolateral approaches are used. In the lumbosacral region, a dorsal approach is preferred. The objective of this chapter will be to compare and contrast each of these approaches and to guide the reader in the selection of the appropriate approach for each patient.

  15. Cervical spinal cord stimulation with 5-column paddle lead in Raynaud's disease.

    PubMed

    Issa, Mohammed A; Kim, Chong H

    2012-01-01

    To report a case of Raynaud disease and its successful treatment with spinal cord stimulation utilizing the newly designed five-column Penta lead paddle. Specific electrode design, programming characteristics, and surgical technique are also discussed in this case. Case Report. University pain management center. A 65-year-old man with Raynaud disease presented with neck and upper extremity pain. The patient also had herniation and spondylosis of the lumbar spine and intervertebral disc disease of the cervical spine. An examination revealed venous changes, chronic ulceration, and digit discoloration in upper and lower extremities. Conservative management and pharmacological treatment were ineffective. Sympathetic block produced significant but limited improvement. Treatment with spinal cord stimulation was tried after a successful 7-day trial. Initial stimulation of the cervical spine with two octapolar leads at the C2 level produced greater than 75% pain improvement. However, the patient lost coverage shortly after discharge due to lead migration which could not be regained with reprogramming. A revision with Penta lead paddles produced sustainable and significant paresthesia coverage. A case report. We report the successful application of spinal cord stimulation utilizing a five-column paddle lead in an individual with severe refractory Raynaud disease.

  16. Analysis of genetic copy number changes in cervical disease progression

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Cervical dysplasia and tumorigenesis have been linked with numerous chromosomal aberrations. The goal of this study was to evaluate 35 genomic regions associated with cervical disease and to select those which were found to have the highest frequency of aberration for use as probes in fluorescent in-situ hybridization. Methods The frequency of gains and losses using fluorescence in-situ hybridization were assessed in these 35 regions on 30 paraffin-embedded cervical biopsy specimens. Based on this assessment, 6 candidate fluorescently labeled probes (8q24, Xp22, 20q13, 3p14, 3q26, CEP15) were selected for additional testing on a set of 106 cervical biopsy specimens diagnosed as Normal, CIN1, CIN2, CIN3, and SCC. The data were analyzed on the basis of signal mean, % change of signal mean between histological categories, and % positivity. Results The study revealed that the chromosomal regions with the highest frequency of copy number gains and highest combined sensitivity and specificity in high-grade cervical disease were 8q24 and 3q26. The cytological application of these two probes was then evaluated on 118 ThinPrep™ samples diagnosed as Normal, ASCUS, LSIL, HSIL and Cancer to determine utility as a tool for less invasive screening. Using gains of either 8q24 or 3q26 as a positivity criterion yielded specificity (Normal +LSIL+ASCUS) of 81.0% and sensitivity (HSIL+Cancer) of 92.3% based on a threshold of 4 positive cells. Conclusions The application of a FISH assay comprised of chromosomal probes 8q24 and 3q26 to cervical cytology specimens confirms the positive correlation between increasing dysplasia and copy gains and shows promise as a marker in cervical disease progression. PMID:20712890

  17. Caudal cervical disc protrusion in a Bengal tiger (Panthera tigris tigris).

    PubMed

    Lambrechts, N E; Berry, W L

    2000-09-01

    A young adult male white Bengal tiger (Panthera tigris tigris) presented with hindlimb ataxia. Cervical and lumbar myelography revealed a compressive lesion of the cord at C(6-7). Corticosteroid therapy and confinement failed to provide lasting remission of signs. A modified, inverted cone ventral slot decompression was used to remove the fibrous material causing cord compression at C(6-7). Temporary Horner's syndrome and laryngeal paresis developed postsurgically because of excessive tissue retraction. The animal recovered normal ambulatory function 6 wk after surgery.

  18. Changes in cervical range of motion and sagittal alignment in early and late phases after total disc replacement: radiographic follow-up exceeding 2 years.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Poong-Gi; Kim, Keung Nyun; Moon, Sung Whan; Kim, Keun Su

    2009-12-01

    This was a retrospective clinical study in which the follow-up period exceeded 2 years. The authors investigated the time course of radiographic changes in the cervical range of motion (ROM) and sagittal alignment after cervical total disc replacement involving the ProDisc-C artificial disc. Eighteen patients who underwent C5-6 total disc replacement were followed for an average of 27 months. Cervical neutral and flexion-extension lateral radiographs were obtained before and at 1 and 3 months after surgery for early-phase observations and at the last follow-up for late-phase observation. Segmental ROM values in the treated, superior, and inferior adjacent segments were measured. For whole-neck motion, C2-7 ROM was also measured. The percentage contributions of ROM at functional and adjacent segments to whole-neck motion were calculated. For evaluating sagittal alignment, C2-7 and C5-6 Cobb angles were measured. All data from ProDisc-C arthroplasty were compared with the results obtained in 22 patients who underwent C5-6 interbody fusion in which a Solis cage was used and who were followed for an average of 25 months. In the ProDisc-C group, C2-7 and C5-6 ROM significantly decreased in the early phase after surgery and returned to preoperative levels in the late phase. Both superior and inferior adjacent segments showed significantly decreased ROM in the acute phase after surgery and returned to the preoperative values in the late phase. In terms of contributions to whole-neck motion, the ROM of the functional and adjacent segments did not change significantly compared with the preoperative ROM. In the cage group, C2-7 ROM was also significantly decreased in the early phase after surgery and returned to preoperative levels at the late phase. Both superior and inferior adjacent segments exhibited significantly increased ROM and percentage contributions to whole-neck motion in the early and late phases. Sagittal alignment of the whole cervical spine became

  19. Clinical outcome of lumbar total disc replacement using ProDisc-L in degenerative disc disease: minimum 5-year follow-up results at a single institute.

    PubMed

    Park, Chun-Kun; Ryu, Kyeong-Sik; Lee, Ki-Yeol; Lee, Hong-Jae

    2012-04-15

    A retrospective clinical data analysis. To determine the therapeutic effectiveness of lumbar total disc replacement (TDR) using ProDisc-L (Synthes Spine, West Chester, PA) in the patients with degenerative disc diseases (DDD) with a minimum follow-up of 5 years. Early successful clinical results of lumbar TDR have been reported. However, few reports have published its therapeutic effectiveness in the long term. The patients were examined preoperatively and at 3 months, 1 year, 2 years, and more than 5 years postoperatively, and assessed using visual analog scale (VAS), Oswestry disability index (ODI), physical health component summary (PCS) of the 36-Item Short Form Health Survey questionnaire, and sporting activity scale scores. At last follow-up visits, two additional questions were asked: satisfaction with surgery and willingness to undergo the same treatment. Finally, clinical success was assessed using the Food and Drug Administration definition. Thirty-five patients were included in the study. The mean follow-up period was 72 months (6 years). Postoperatively, all outcome measure scores (VAS, mean ODI, PCS, and sports activity scores) immediately improved and these improvements were maintained at last follow-up visits with statistical significance. However, outcome score improvements were observed to be slightly, though significantly, lower at last follow-up visits than at 1 or 2 years postoperatively. Eighty-eight percent of patients were "satisfied" or "somewhat satisfied" with treatment and 60% were prepared to undergo the same treatment again. Twenty-five patients (71.4%) achieved clinical success. This study reveals that lumbar TDR using ProDisc-L is a safe and effective treatment for chronic back pain caused by lumbar DDD as assessed at more than 5 years postoperatively. Nevertheless, outcome scores were slightly, though significantly lower at last follow-up visits than at 1 and 2 years postoperatively. A longer-term follow-up study is warranted.

  20. [Case-control study on Zero-profile implant for anterior cervical discectomy and fusion and conventional cage plate internal fixation for the treatment of single segmental cervical intervertebral disc herniation].

    PubMed

    Shao, Hai-yu; Zhang, Jun; Yang, Di; Chen, Jin-ping; Huang, Ya-zeng

    2016-06-01

    To compare clinical efficacy of Zero-profile implant for anterior cervical discectomy and fusion and conventional titanium plate with cage internal fixation for the treatment of single segmental cervical intervertebral disc herniation. From August 2011 to March 2014, clinical data of 139 patients with single cervical disc herniation treated with anterior cervical discectomy and interbody fusion with internal fixation were retrospectively analyzed. The patients were divided into two groups according to its operation method. There were 63 patients in group A which performed anterior discectomy and interbody fusion with Zero-profile;76 patients in group B which performed anterior cervical discectomy and cage plate internal fixation. JOA score and Odom functional rating between two groups were compared before and after operation. Videofluorographic swallowing study (VFSS) were used to evaluate thickness of prevertebral soft tissue. Bazaz dysphagia score were used to assess incidence of dysphagia. Postoperative AP X-ray and CT of cervical vertebra at 12 months were applied for evaluating bone graft fusion. Postoperative MRI was applied for evaluating the incidence of adjacent segment degeneration. Blood loss,operative time, preoperative and postoperative JOA score, Odom functional rating and VFSS score, Bazaz score, fusion rate between vertebral bodies and incidence of adjacent segment degeneration were compared between two groups. There were no statistical meaning between two groups in JOA score, Odom functional rating before and after operation (P > 0.05); and no significant meaning in VFSS score between two groups before operation (P > 0.05); There were no significant difference in operative time and blood loss. There was statistical meaning in VFSS, Bazaz dysphagia score at 2 days, and 6 months after operation (P < 0.05). All patients obtained bone union at 1 year after operation, and no obvious meaning in fusion rate (P > 0.05). Eight patients (12.7%) in group A

  1. Mid-term efficacy and safety of cervical disc arthroplasty versus fusion in cervical spondylosis: A systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Guo-Sheng; Zhang, Qiao; Quan, Zheng-Xue

    2017-01-01

    Anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) and cervical disc arthroplasty (CDA) are the most commonly used procedures in cervical spondylosis. However, only a few published studies exist in the literature comparing these two operation types, particularly its mid-term efficacy and safety. Furthermore, in those studies, even large sample trials, when compared, have elicited controversial results, making it inconvenient for clinicians to refer to them. The aim of the present study was to clarify the advantages and shortcomings of the two procedures. Articles indexed in the PubMed, Web of Science, Cochrane Library, EMBASE, China Biological Medicine and China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI) databases, as of March 2016, that met our criteria were searched. A total of 18 trials involving 3,040 patients were included in our final analysis. The most important results drawn from the present analysis were as follows: Insignificant differences were identified in the blood loss [weighted mean difference (WMD)=6.23; 95% confidence intervals (CI), −0.85 to 13.32; P=0.08], surgical time [standardized mean difference (SMD)=0.40; 95% CI, −0.01 to 0.82; P=0.06], the time of hospital stay (SMD=0.05; 95% CI, −0.28 to 0.37; P=0.77) and the total complications rate [odds ratio (OR)=0.86; 95% CI, 0.66 to 1.131; P=0.28] on a comparison of the two operation methods. By contrast, comparing CDA with ACDF, the CDA had higher Short Form survey (SF-36) scores (WMD=1.65; 95% CI, 0.61 to 2.69; P=0.002), a larger range of motion in the operation level (SMD=6.53; 95% CI, 3.89 to 9.17; P<0.0001), a higher rate of neurological improvement following the operation (OR=1.80; 95% CI, 1.29 to 2.52; P=0.0006), a lower Visual Analog Scale (VAS) score of neck pain (WMD= 0.16; 95% CI, −0.28 to 0.05; P=0.006) and arm pain (WMD= 0.12; 95% CI, −0.24 to −0.01; P=0.04). In addition, in the mid-term following the surgery, CDA had a lower Neck Disability Index (NDI; SMD=0.18; 95% CI, −0

  2. Mid-term efficacy and safety of cervical disc arthroplasty versus fusion in cervical spondylosis: A systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Guo-Sheng; Zhang, Qiao; Quan, Zheng-Xue

    2017-02-01

    Anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) and cervical disc arthroplasty (CDA) are the most commonly used procedures in cervical spondylosis. However, only a few published studies exist in the literature comparing these two operation types, particularly its mid-term efficacy and safety. Furthermore, in those studies, even large sample trials, when compared, have elicited controversial results, making it inconvenient for clinicians to refer to them. The aim of the present study was to clarify the advantages and shortcomings of the two procedures. Articles indexed in the PubMed, Web of Science, Cochrane Library, EMBASE, China Biological Medicine and China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI) databases, as of March 2016, that met our criteria were searched. A total of 18 trials involving 3,040 patients were included in our final analysis. The most important results drawn from the present analysis were as follows: Insignificant differences were identified in the blood loss [weighted mean difference (WMD)=6.23; 95% confidence intervals (CI), -0.85 to 13.32; P=0.08], surgical time [standardized mean difference (SMD)=0.40; 95% CI, -0.01 to 0.82; P=0.06], the time of hospital stay (SMD=0.05; 95% CI, -0.28 to 0.37; P=0.77) and the total complications rate [odds ratio (OR)=0.86; 95% CI, 0.66 to 1.131; P=0.28] on a comparison of the two operation methods. By contrast, comparing CDA with ACDF, the CDA had higher Short Form survey (SF-36) scores (WMD=1.65; 95% CI, 0.61 to 2.69; P=0.002), a larger range of motion in the operation level (SMD=6.53; 95% CI, 3.89 to 9.17; P<0.0001), a higher rate of neurological improvement following the operation (OR=1.80; 95% CI, 1.29 to 2.52; P=0.0006), a lower Visual Analog Scale (VAS) score of neck pain (WMD= 0.16; 95% CI, -0.28 to 0.05; P=0.006) and arm pain (WMD= 0.12; 95% CI, -0.24 to -0.01; P=0.04). In addition, in the mid-term following the surgery, CDA had a lower Neck Disability Index (NDI; SMD=0.18; 95% CI, -0.28 to -0.07; P=0

  3. Topographic optic disc analysis by Heidelberg retinal tomography in ocular Behcet's disease.

    PubMed

    Berker, Nilufer; Elgin, Ufuk; Ozdal, Pinar; Batman, Aygen; Soykan, Emel; Ozkan, Seyhan S

    2007-09-01

    To compare the topographic characteristics of the optic discs in patients with severe and mild ocular Behçet's disease by using Heidelberg retinal tomographaphy (HRT). This prospective study included 47 eyes of 47 patients with ocular BD who were being followed-up at the Uveitis Clinic of the Ankara Ulucanlar Eye Research Hospital, Ankara, Turkey. The patients were divided into two groups. Group 1 consisted of 21 eyes with mild uveitis, and group 2 consisted of 26 eyes with severe uveitis. All patients underwent topographic optic disc analysis by HRT II, and the quantitative optic disc parameters of both groups were compared by non-parametric Mann-Whitney U test. The mean cup volume, rim volume, cup area, disc area and cup depth in group 1 were found to be statistically significantly greater than those in group 2 (p<0.0001, p = 0.03, p = 0.021, p = 0.01 and p = 0.017, respectively), while the difference between the mean cup-to-disc ratios in group 1 and group 2 were found to be statistically insignificant (p = 0.148). A relationship was found between the severity of ocular BD and optic disc topography determined by HRT. In eyes with smaller optic discs, uveitis was observed to have a more severe course with more frequent relapses than those with larger discs.

  4. Topographic optic disc analysis by Heidelberg retinal tomography in ocular Behçet's disease

    PubMed Central

    Berker, Nilufer; Elgin, Ufuk; Ozdal, Pinar; Batman, Aygen; Soykan, Emel; Ozkan, Seyhan S

    2007-01-01

    Aim To compare the topographic characteristics of the optic discs in patients with severe and mild ocular Behçet's disease by using Heidelberg retinal tomographaphy (HRT). Methods This prospective study included 47 eyes of 47 patients with ocular BD who were being followed‐up at the Uveitis Clinic of the Ankara Ulucanlar Eye Research Hospital, Ankara, Turkey. The patients were divided into two groups. Group 1 consisted of 21 eyes with mild uveitis, and group 2 consisted of 26 eyes with severe uveitis. All patients underwent topographic optic disc analysis by HRT II, and the quantitative optic disc parameters of both groups were compared by non‐parametric Mann‐Whitney U test. Results The mean cup volume, rim volume, cup area, disc area and cup depth in group 1 were found to be statistically significantly greater than those in group 2 (p<0.0001, p = 0.03, p = 0.021, p = 0.01 and p = 0.017, respectively), while the difference between the mean cup‐to‐disc ratios in group 1 and group 2 were found to be statistically insignificant (p = 0.148). Conclusion A relationship was found between the severity of ocular BD and optic disc topography determined by HRT. In eyes with smaller optic discs, uveitis was observed to have a more severe course with more frequent relapses than those with larger discs. PMID:17475703

  5. Advancing the cellular and molecular therapy for intervertebral disc disease.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Daisuke; Grad, Sibylle

    2015-04-01

    The healthy intervertebral disc (IVD) fulfils the essential function of load absorption, while maintaining multi-axial flexibility of the spine. The interrelated tissues of the IVD, the annulus fibrosus, the nucleus pulposus, and the cartilaginous endplate, are characterised by their specific niche, implying avascularity, hypoxia, acidic environment, low nutrition, and low cellularity. Anabolic and catabolic factors balance a slow physiological turnover of extracellular matrix synthesis and breakdown. Deviations in mechanical load, nutrient supply, cellular activity, matrix composition and metabolism may initiate a cascade ultimately leading to tissue dehydration, fibrosis, nerve and vessel ingrowth, disc height loss and disc herniation. Spinal instability, inflammation and neural sensitisation are sources of back pain, a worldwide leading burden that is challenging to cure. In this review, advances in cell and molecular therapy, including mobilisation and activation of endogenous progenitor cells, progenitor cell homing, and targeted delivery of cells, genes, or bioactive factors are discussed.

  6. Lumbosacral Sagittal Alignment in Association to Intervertebral Disc Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Maleki, Farid; Meybodi, Ali Tayebi; Mahdavi, Ali; Saberi, Hooshang

    2014-01-01

    Study Design A cross-sectional case-control study was designed to compare the sagittal alignment of lumbosacral regions in two groups of patients suffering from low back pain, one with intervertebral disc pathologies and one without. Purpose To evaluate the correlation between lumbosacral sagittal alignment and disc degeneration. Overview of Literature Changes in lumbar lordosis and pelvic parameters in degenerative disc lesions have been assessed in few studies. Overall, patients with discopathy were shown to have lower lumbar lordosis and more vertical sacral profiles. Methods From patients with intractable low back pain undergoing lumbosacral magnetic resonance imaging, 50 subjects with disc degeneration and 50 controls with normal scans were consecutively enrolled. A method was defined with anterior tangent-lines going through anterior bodies of L1 and S1 to measure global lumbosacral angle, incorporating both lumbar lordosis and sacral slope. Global lumbosacral angle using the proposed method and lumbar lordosis using Cobb's method were measured in both groups. Results Lumbar lordosis based on Cobb's method was lower in group with discopathy (20°-67°; mean, 40.48°±9.89°) than control group (30°-62°; mean, 44.96°±7.68°), although it was not statistically significant. The proposed global lumbosacral angle in subject group (53°-103°; mean, 76.5°±11.018°) was less than control group (52°-101°; mean, 80.18°±9.95°), with the difference being statistically significant (p=0.002). Conclusions Patients with intervertebral disc lesions seem to have more straightened lumbosacral profiles, but it has not been proven which comes first: disc degeneration or changes in sagittal alignment. Finding an answer to this dilemma demands more comprehensive long-term prospective studies. PMID:25558325

  7. DISC1 and Huntington's Disease – Overlapping Pathways of Vulnerability to Neurological Disorder?

    PubMed Central

    Boxall, Ruth; Porteous, David J.; Thomson, Pippa A.

    2011-01-01

    We re-annotated the interacting partners of the neuronal scaffold protein DISC1 using a knowledge-based approach that incorporated recent protein interaction data and published literature to. This revealed two highly connected networks. These networks feature cellular function and maintenance, and cell signaling. Of potentially greatest interest was the novel finding of a high degree of connectivity between the DISC1 scaffold protein, linked to psychiatric illness, and huntingtin, the protein which is mutated in Huntington's disease. The potential link between DISC1, huntingtin and their interacting partners may open new areas of research into the effects of pathway dysregulation in severe neurological disorders. PMID:21298101

  8. Gankyrin Is Frequently Overexpressed in Cervical High Grade Disease and Is Associated with Cervical Carcinogenesis and Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Wenyan; Dong, Yu; Yang, Yongbin; Liu, Zhiqiang; Feng, Youji; Ma, Ding; Zhang, Zhenbo; Wu, Sufang

    2014-01-01

    Our previous studies have showed that Gankyrin expression is correlated with a malignant phenotype in endometrial carcinoma. Here, we investigated the possible role of Gankyrin in cervical disease. The increasing protein level of Gankyrin was observed in high-grade cervical intraepithelial neoplasia and carcinoma compared with benign cervical tissues and low-grade cervical intraepithelial neoplasia. In para-carcinoma tissues, it was found interestingly that there was no lymph node metastasis when nuclei Gankyrin was positively expressed, but lymph node metastasis rate was 30% (6/20) when nuclei Gankyrin was negatively expressed. In vitro, the transfection of Gankyrin resulted in markedly up-regulating of Vimentin, β-catenin and Twist2, as well as down-regulating of E-cadherin in cervical carcinoma cells. Our results suggested that Gankyrin may be functional in cervical carcinogenesis and metastasis. PMID:24751719

  9. Disc replacement using Pro-Disc C versus fusion: a prospective randomised and controlled radiographic and clinical study

    PubMed Central

    Ahlhelm, F.; Pitzen, T.; Steudel, W. I.; Jung, J.; Shariat, K.; Steimer, O.; Bachelier, F.; Pape, D.

    2006-01-01

    Anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) may be considered to be the gold standard for treatment of symptomatic degenerative disc disease within the cervical spine. However, fusion of the segment may result in progressive degeneration of the adjacent segments. Therefore, dynamic stabilization procedures have been introduced. Among these, artificial disc replacement by disc prosthesis seems to be promising. However, to be so, segmental motion must be preserved. This, again, is very difficult to judge and has not yet been proven. The aim of the current study was to first analyse the segmental motion following artificial disc replacement using a disc prosthesis. A second aim was to compare both segmental motion as well as clinical result to the current gold standard (ACDF). This is a prospective controlled study. Twenty-five patients with cervical disc herniation were enrolled and assigned to either study group (receiving a disc prosthesis) or control group (receiving ACDF, using a cage with bone graft and an anterior plate.) Radiostereometric analysis was used to quantify intervertebral motion immediately as well as 3, 6, 12 and 24 weeks postoperatively. Further, clinical results were judged using visual analogue scale and neuro-examination. Cervical spine segmental motion decreased over time in the presence of disc prosthesis or ACDF. However, the loss of segmental motion is significantly higher in the ACDF group, when looked at 3, 6, 12 and 24 weeks after surgery. We observed significant pain reduction in neck and arm postoperatively, without significant difference between both groups (P > 0.05). Cervical spine disc prosthesis preserves cervical spine segmental motion within the first 6 months after surgery. The clinical results are the same when compared to the early results following ACDF. PMID:17106665

  10. Aggregation of scaffolding protein DISC1 dysregulates phosphodiesterase 4 in Huntington's disease.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Motomasa; Ishizuka, Koko; Nekooki-Machida, Yoko; Endo, Ryo; Takashima, Noriko; Sasaki, Hideyuki; Komi, Yusuke; Gathercole, Amy; Huston, Elaine; Ishii, Kazuhiro; Hui, Kelvin Kai-Wan; Kurosawa, Masaru; Kim, Sun-Hong; Nukina, Nobuyuki; Takimoto, Eiki; Houslay, Miles D; Sawa, Akira

    2017-04-03

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a polyglutamine (polyQ) disease caused by aberrant expansion of the polyQ tract in Huntingtin (HTT). While motor impairment mediated by polyQ-expanded HTT has been intensively studied, molecular mechanisms for nonmotor symptoms in HD, such as psychiatric manifestations, remain elusive. Here we have demonstrated that HTT forms a ternary protein complex with the scaffolding protein DISC1 and cAMP-degrading phosphodiesterase 4 (PDE4) to regulate PDE4 activity. We observed pathological cross-seeding between DISC1 and mutant HTT aggregates in the brains of HD patients as well as in a murine model that recapitulates the polyQ pathology of HD (R6/2 mice). In R6/2 mice, consequent reductions in soluble DISC1 led to dysregulation of DISC1-PDE4 complexes, aberrantly increasing the activity of PDE4. Importantly, exogenous expression of a modified DISC1, which binds to PDE4 but not mutant HTT, normalized PDE4 activity and ameliorated anhedonia in the R6/2 mice. We propose that cross-seeding of mutant HTT and DISC1 and the resultant changes in PDE4 activity may underlie the pathology of a specific subset of mental manifestations of HD, which may provide an insight into molecular signaling in mental illness in general.

  11. Magnetic resonance imaging evaluation after implantation of a titanium cervical disc prosthesis: a comparison of 1.5 and 3 Tesla magnet strength.

    PubMed

    Sundseth, Jarle; Jacobsen, Eva A; Kolstad, Frode; Nygaard, Oystein P; Zwart, John A; Hol, Per K

    2013-10-01

    Cervical disc prostheses induce significant amount of artifact in magnetic resonance imaging which may complicate radiologic follow-up after surgery. The purpose of this study was to investigate as to what extent the artifact, induced by the frequently used Discover(®) cervical disc prosthesis, impedes interpretation of the MR images at operated and adjacent levels in 1.5 and 3 Tesla MR. Ten subsequent patients were investigated in both 1.5 and 3 Tesla MR with standard image sequences one year following anterior cervical discectomy with arthroplasty. Two neuroradiologists evaluated the images by consensus. Emphasis was made on signal changes in medulla at all levels and visualization of root canals at operated and adjacent levels. A "blur artifact ratio" was calculated and defined as the height of the artifact on T1 sagittal images related to the operated level. The artifacts induced in 1.5 and 3 Tesla MR were of entirely different character and evaluation of the spinal cord at operated level was impossible in both magnets. Artifacts also made the root canals difficult to assess at operated level and more pronounced in the 3 Tesla MR. At the adjacent levels however, the spinal cord and root canals were completely visualized in all patients. The "blur artifact" induced at operated level was also more pronounced in the 3 Tesla MR. The artifact induced by the Discover(®) titanium disc prosthesis in both 1.5 and 3 Tesla MR, makes interpretation of the spinal cord impossible and visualization of the root canals difficult at operated level. Adjusting the MR sequences to produce the least amount of artifact is important.

  12. Upper Cervical Epidural Abscess in a Patient With Parkinson Disease

    PubMed Central

    Al-Hourani, Khalid; Frost, Chelsea

    2015-01-01

    To our knowledge, there are no reports in the literature of patients with Parkinson disease (PD) developing upper cervical spine infections. Our objective is to present a case of upper cervical epidural abscess in a patient with PD and to review upper cervical spine infection. We present the patient’s presentation, physical examination, imaging findings, and management as well a review of the literature. A 66-year-old male with PD presented to the emergency department (ED) following referral by a neurologist for a presumed C2 fracture. The preceding history was 1 week of severe neck pain requiring a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which was initially interpreted as a C2 fracture. On admission from the ED, further review of the MRI appeared to show anterior prevertebral abscess and an epidural abscess. The patient’s neurological examination was at baseline. In the span of 2 days, the patient developed significant motor weakness. A repeat MRI demonstrated expansion of the epidural collection and spinal cord compression. Surgical management consisting of C1 and C2 laminectomy, irrigation, and debridement from anterior and posterior approaches was performed. Postoperatively, the patient did not recover any motor strength and elected to withdraw care and died. Spinal epidural abscess requires a high index of suspicion and needs prompt recognition to prevent neurological impairment. Upper cervical spine infections are rare but can lead to lethal consequences. PMID:26623170

  13. Internal carotid artery dissection after anterior cervical disc replacement: first case report and literature review of vascular complications of the approach.

    PubMed

    Loret, Jean-Edouard; Francois, Patrick; Papagiannaki, Chrysanthi; Cottier, Jean-Philippe; Terrier, Louis-Marie; Zemmoura, Ilyess

    2013-07-01

    We report the case of a 41-year-old woman who underwent cervical total disc replacement at C4C5 and C5C6 levels and fusion at C6C7 level through an anterior right-side approach. After anesthesia recovery, the patient presented left hemiparesia and facial palsy due to large right hemispheric stroke. Diffusion-weighted magnetic resonance imaging was performed as soon as the patient developed neurologic symptoms of stroke and revealed a right internal carotid artery dissection. Digital substraction angiography, endovascular stenting, angioplasty and thrombectomy were performed. Six months after treatment, clinical examination showed mild left-arm spasticity. To the best of our knowledge, only two cases of internal carotid artery stroke without dissection or thrombosis are reported. In conclusion, although vascular complications are rare after anterior cervical spine procedure, internal carotid artery dissection can occur. Suspected risk factors are prolonged retraction of the carotid artery and neck extension.

  14. Artificial Disc Replacement

    MedlinePlus

    ... also disc replacements designed for use in the cervical spine (the neck). These devices have only been used ... of your spine increases the risk of significant injury during this type of spinal surgery. Back pain ...

  15. Distal Junctional Disease after Occipitothoracic Fusion for Rheumatoid Cervical Disorders: Correlation with Cervical Spine Sagittal Alignment

    PubMed Central

    Tanouchi, Tetsu; Shimizu, Takachika; Fueki, Keisuke; Ino, Masatake; Toda, Naofumi; Manabe, Nodoka; Itoh, Kanako

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective radiographic study. Objective We have performed occipitothoracic (OT) fusion for severe rheumatoid cervical disorders since 1991. In our previous study, we reported that the distal junctional disease occurred in patients with fusion of O–T4 or longer due to increased mechanical stress. The present study further evaluated the association between the distal junctional disease and the cervical spine sagittal alignment. Methods Among 60 consecutive OT fusion cases between 1991 and 2010, 24 patients who underwent O–T5 fusion were enrolled in this study. The patients were grouped based on whether they developed postoperative distal junctional disease (group F) or not (group N). We measured pre- and postoperative O–C2, C2–C7, and O–C7 angles and evaluated the association between these values and the occurrence of distal junctional disease. Results Seven (29%) of 24 patients developed adjacent-level vertebral fractures as distal junctional disease. In group F, the mean pre- and postoperative O–C2, C2–C7, and O–C7 angles were 12.1 and 16.8, 7.2 and 11.2, and 19.4 and 27.9 degrees, respectively. In group N, the mean pre- and postoperative O–C2, C2–C7, and O–C7 angles were 15.9 and 15.0, 4.9 and 5.8, and 21.0 and 20.9 degrees, respectively. There were no significant differences between the two groups. The difference in the O–C7 angle (postoperative angle − preoperative angle) in group F was significantly larger than that in group N (p = 0.04). Conclusion Excessive correction of the O–C7 angle (hyperlordotic alignment) is likely to cause postoperative distal junctional disease following the OT fusion. PMID:26430590

  16. Anterior discectomy without fusion for treatment of cervical lateral soft disc extrusion: a follow-up of 120 cases.

    PubMed

    Grisoli, F; Graziani, N; Fabrizi, A P; Peragut, J C; Vincentelli, F; Diaz-Vasquez, P

    1989-06-01

    One hundred and twenty patients with soft lateral disc herniation underwent surgery by anterior microsurgical discectomy and routine ablation of the posterior longitudinal ligament between 1976 and 1986. The study excluded patients with hard discs and soft disc extrusion with medullary symptoms. In our series 76.6% of patients were men. In 64% of the patients no causative factor was found. All of the patients presented with cervicobrachialgia; 53% also had a motor deficit. In 91.7% a single disc was involved. The last 40 cases were evaluated by computed tomography alone. In 51.5% an extruded disc was found. No permanent postoperative complication was encountered. All patients returned to their previous activities. Fifty patients underwent follow-up radiological evaluation at 1 and 5 years after the intervention and vertebral fusion was observed in 70% of these.

  17. Adjacent Segment Pathology after Anterior Cervical Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Jae Yoon; Park, Jong-Beom; Seo, Hyoung-Yeon

    2016-01-01

    Anterior cervical fusion has become a standard of care for numerous pathologic conditions of the cervical spine. However, subsequent development of clinically significant disc disease at levels adjacent to fused discs is a serious long-term complication of this procedure. As more patients live longer after surgery, it is foreseeable that adjacent segment pathology (ASP) will develop in increasing numbers of patients. Also, ASP has been studied more intensively with the recent popularity of motion preservation technologies like total disc arthroplasty. The true nature and scope of ASP remains poorly understood. The etiology of ASP is most likely multifactorial. Various factors including altered biomechanical stresses, surgical disruption of soft tissue and the natural history of cervical disc disease contribute to the development of ASP. General factors associated with disc degeneration including gender, age, smoking and sports may play a role in the development of ASP. Postoperative sagittal alignment and type of surgery are also considered potential causes of ASP. Therefore, a spine surgeon must be particularly careful to avoid unnecessary disruption of the musculoligamentous structures, reduced risk of direct injury to the disc during dissection and maintain a safe margin between the plate edge and adjacent vertebrae during anterior cervical fusion. PMID:27340541

  18. Cervicitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... growth of normal bacteria in the vagina (bacterial vaginosis) can also cause cervicitis. ... a microscope (may show candidiasis , trichomoniasis , or bacterial vaginosis) Pap test Tests for gonorrhea or chlamydia Rarely, ...

  19. Effect of posterior subsidence on cervical alignment after anterior cervical corpectomy and reconstruction using titanium mesh cages in degenerative cervical disease.

    PubMed

    Jang, Jae-Won; Lee, Jung-Kil; Lee, Jung-Heon; Hur, Hyuk; Kim, Tae-Wan; Kim, Soo-Han

    2014-10-01

    Subsidence after anterior cervical reconstruction using a titanium mesh cage (TMC) has been a matter of debate. The authors investigated and analyzed subsidence and its effect on clinical and radiologic parameters after cervical reconstruction using a TMC for degenerative cervical disease. Thirty consecutive patients with degenerative cervical spine disorders underwent anterior cervical corpectomy followed by reconstruction with TMC. Twenty-four patients underwent a single-level corpectomy, and six patients underwent a two-level corpectomy. Clinical outcomes were assessed using a Visual Analogue Scale (VAS), the Japanese Orthopedic Association (JOA) score and the Neck Disability Index (NDI). Fusion status, anterior and posterior subsidence of the TMC, segmental angle (SA) and cervical sagittal angle (CSA) were assessed by lateral and flexion-extension radiographs of the neck. The mean follow-up period was 27.6 months (range, 24 to 49 months). The VAS, NDI and JOA scores were all significantly improved at the last follow-up. No instances of radiolucency or motion-related pseudoarthrosis were detected on radiographic analysis, yielding a fusion rate of 100%. Subsidence occurred in 28 of 30 patients (93.3%). The average anterior subsidence of the cage was 1.4 ± 0.9 mm, and the average posterior subsidence was 2.9 ± 1.2 mm. The SA and CSA at the final follow-up were significantly increased toward a lordotic angle. Anterior cervical reconstruction using TMC and plating in patients with cervical degenerative disease provides good clinical and radiologic outcomes. Cage subsidence occurred frequently, especially at the posterior part of the cage. Despite the prominent posterior subsidence of the TMC, SA and CSA were improved on final follow-up radiographs, suggesting that posterior subsidence may contribute to cervical lordosis.

  20. Herniated Cervical Disc

    MedlinePlus

    Toggle navigation CONDITIONS Low Back Pain Acute Low Back Pain Chronic Low Back Pain SI Joint Pain Other Scoliosis Back Pain and Emotional Distress Muscle Spasms Pinched Nerve Discitis Degenerative Conditions Bulge vs ...

  1. Management of adjacent segment disease after cervical spinal fusion.

    PubMed

    Kepler, Christopher K; Hilibrand, Alan S

    2012-01-01

    Adjacent segment disease (ASD) was described after long-term follow-up of patients treated with cervical fusion. The term describes new-onset radiculopathy or myelopathy referable to a motion segment adjacent to previous arthrodesis and often attributed to alterations in the biomechanical environment after fusion. Evidence suggests that ASD affects between 2% and 3% of patients per year. Although prevention of ASD was one major impetus behind the development of motion-sparing surgery, the literature does not yet clearly distinguish a difference in the rate of ASD between fusion and disk replacement. Surgical techniques during index surgery may reduce the rate of ASD.

  2. Cervical neuro-muscular syndrome: discovery of a new disease group caused by abnormalities in the cervical muscles.

    PubMed

    Matsui, Takayoshi; Ii, Kunio; Hojo, Shuntaro; Sano, Keiji

    2012-01-01

    Our previous study of whiplash injury found that abnormalities in the cervical muscles cause autonomic dystonia. Further research has found that abnormalities in the cervical muscles cause headache, chronic fatigue syndrome, vertigo, and dizziness. We named this group of diseases cervical neuro-muscular syndrome. Patients treated within a 2-year period from April 1, 2002 to March 31, 2004 reported good outcomes in 83.8% for headache, 88.4% for vertigo and dizziness, 84.5% for chronic fatigue syndrome, 88.0% for autonomic dystonia, and 83.7% for whiplash-associated disorder. A large number of outpatients present with general malaise, including many general physical complaints without identifiable cause. We propose that treatment of the cervical muscle is effective for general malaise.

  3. End Plate Disproportion and Degenerative Disc Disease: A Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Poureisa, Masoud; Daghighi, Mohammad Hossein; Mesbahi, Sepideh; Hagigi, Amir

    2014-01-01

    Study Design Case-control. Purpose To determine whether a disproportion between two neighboring vertebral end plates is associated with degenerative disc disease. Overview of Literature Recently, it has been suggested that disproportion of the end plates of two adjacent vertebrae may increase the risk of disc herniation. Methods Magnetic resonance (MR) images (n=160) with evidence of grades I-II lumbar degenerative disc disease (modified Pfirrmann's classification) and normal MR images of the lumbar region (n=160) were reviewed. On midsagittal sections, the difference of anteroposterior diameter of upper and lower end plates neighboring a degenerated (in the case group) or normal (in the control group) intervertebral disc was calculated (difference of end plates [DEP]). Results Mean DEP was significantly higher in the case group at the L5-S1 level (2.73±0.23 mm vs. 2.21±0.12 mm, p=0.03). Differences were not statistically significant at L1-L2 (1.31±0.13 mm in the cases vs. 1.28±0.08 mm in the controls, p=0.78), L2-L3 (1.45±0.12 mm in the cases vs. 1.37±0.08 mm in the controls, p=0.58), L3-L4 (1.52±0.13 mm in the cases vs. 1.49±0.10 mm in the controls, p=0.88), and L4-L5 (2.15±0.21 mm in the cases vs. 2.04±0.20 mm in the controls, p=0.31) levels. The difference at the L5-S1 level did not remain significant after adjusting for body mass index (BMI), which was significantly higher in the patients. Conclusions End plate disproportion may be a significant, BMI-dependent risk factor for lumbar degenerative disc disease. PMID:25187856

  4. Intervertebral Fusion with Mobile Microendoscopic Discectomy for Lumbar Degenerative Disc Disease.

    PubMed

    Xu, Bao-Shan; Liu, Yue; Xu, Hai-Wei; Yang, Qiang; Ma, Xin-Long; Hu, Yong-Cheng

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this article is to introduce a technique for lumbar intervertebral fusion that incorporates mobile microendoscopic discectomy (MMED) for lumbar degenerative disc disease. Minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion is frequently performed to treat degenerative diseases of the lumbar spine; however, the scope of such surgery and vision is limited by what the naked eye can see through the expanding channel system. To expand the visual scope and reduce trauma, we perform lumbar intervertebral fusion with the aid of a MMED system that provides a wide field through freely tilting the surgical instrument and canals. We believe that this technique is a good option for treating lumbar degenerative disc disease that requires lumbar intervertebral fusion. © 2016 Chinese Orthopaedic Association and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  5. Total disc replacement versus fusion for lumbar degenerative disc disease: a systematic review of overlapping meta-analyses.

    PubMed

    Ding, Fan; Jia, Zhiwei; Zhao, Zhigang; Xie, Lin; Gao, Xinfeng; Ma, Dezhang; Liu, Ming

    2017-03-01

    Although many meta-analyses have been performed to compare total disc replacement (TDR) and fusion for treating lumbar degenerative disc disease (LDDD), their findings are inconsistent. This study aimed to conduct a systematic review of overlapping meta-analyses comparing TDR with fusion for treating LDDD, to assist decision makers in selection among conflicting meta-analyses, and to provide treatment recommendations based on the best available evidence. This study was conducted following the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analysis (PRISMA) statement. Multiple databases were comprehensively searched for meta-analyses comparing TDR with fusion for treating LDDD. Meta-analyses only comprising randomised controlled trials (RCTs) were included. Two authors independently assessed meta-analysis quality and extracted data. The Jadad decision algorithm was used to ascertain which meta-analyses represented the best evidence. A total of five meta-analyses were included. All these studies only included RCTs were determined as Level-II evidence. The scores of Assessment of Multiple Systematic Reviews (AMSTAR) ranged from 6 to 9 (median 7). A high-quality Cochrane review was chosen according to the Jadad algorithm. This best available evidence found that statistical significances were observed between TDR and fusion for LDDD regarding disability, pain relief, and pain in the short term, but it was not over clinically important differences. The prevent effects on adjacent segment and facet joint degeneration, as the primary goal of adopting TDR stated by the manufacturers, were not appropriately evaluated. There is discord in results from meta-analyses that assessed TDR and fusion for LDDD. According to this systematic review of overlapping meta-analyses comparing TDR and fusion for LDDD, the current best available evidence suggests that TDR may be an effective technique for the treatment of selected patients with LDDD, and is at least equal to lumbar

  6. Past, present, and future of cervical arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Hyun Oh, Chang; Hwan Yoon, Seung

    2013-01-01

    Cervical arthroplasty was developed in an attempt to maintain cervical motion and potentially to avoid or minimize adjacent-segment degeneration. If cervical arthroplasty is successful, the long-term results of surgery for cervical disc disease should improve. However, problems associated with cervical arthroplasty have been reported: these include kyphosis, heterotopic ossification-induced motion limitation, no motion preservation even at the index level, and a higher revision rate in a limited number of cases compared with anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF). In addition, for degenerative cervical disc disorders, the risk of developing adjacent segment degeneration more than 2 years after surgery is reportedly similar for ACDF and cervical arthroplasty. Cervical disc arthroplasty is an emerging motion-sparing technology and is currently undergoing evaluation in many countries as an alternative to arthrodesis for the treatment of cervical radiculopathy and myelopathy. The decision whether to use arthrodesis or arthroplasty is a difficult one. The achievement of good prosthetic performance demands exacting implantation techniques to ensure correct placement. This fact underlines the increasing importance of special instrumentation and surgical skills that involve an understanding of prosthetic lubrication, wear, and biologic effects and familiarity with currently available information regarding kinematics, basic science, testing, and early clinical results. Fortunately, a number of devices are at the late preclinical study stage or at the early clinical trial stage, and results in many cases are promising. In the near future, it is likely that new designs will be produced to replace spinal discs totally or partially in a pathologic entity-specific manner.

  7. Electromagnetic fields in the treatment of chronic lower back pain in patients with degenerative disc disease

    PubMed Central

    Arneja, Amarjit S; Kotowich, Alan; Staley, Doug; Summers, Randy; Tappia, Paramjit S

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To examine the effects of low-amplitude, low frequency electromagnetic field therapy (EMF) therapy in patients with persistent chronic lower back pain associated with degenerative disc disease. Design: Double-blind, randomized and placebo controlled. Intervention: EMF using a medical device resonator; control group underwent same procedures, except the device was turned off. Outcome measures: Pain reduction and mobility. Results: Improvements in overall physical health, social functioning and reduction in bodily pain were observed in the EMF group. The pain relief rating scale showed a higher level of pain relief at the target area in the EMF group. An increase in left lateral mobility was seen only in the EMF group. Conclusion: EMF treatment may be of benefit to patients with chronic nonresponsive lower back pain associated with degenerative disc disease. PMID:28031951

  8. Optic Disc and Retinal Nerve Fibre Layer Changes in Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Cetin, Ebru N.; Bir, Levent S.; Sarac, Gülden; Yaldızkaya, Filiz; Yaylalı, Volkan

    2013-01-01

    Abstract This study was conducted to assess optic nerve and peripapillary retinal nerve fibre layer (RNFL) changes in patients with idiopathic Parkinson’s disease (PD) and its correlation with disease duration and severity. Optic nerve parameters and RNFL thickness were measured in 24 PD patients and 25 age–gender-matched controls by Heidelberg Retinal Tomography II (Heidelberg Engineering, Dossenheim, Germany). Patients with visual acuity below 20/25 were excluded. The mean RNFL in the temporal sector was significantly thinner in the study group than the control group (p = 0.020). Additionally, disease severity and duration negatively correlated with optic disc parameters in some sectors. PMID:28163751

  9. Correlation of end plate shape on MRI and disc degeneration in surgically treated patients with degenerative disc disease and herniated nucleus pulposus.

    PubMed

    Pappou, Ioannis P; Cammisa, Frank P; Girardi, Federico P

    2007-01-01

    The sagittal profile of the lumbar end plates on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has not been investigated in patients with degenerative disc disease (DDD) or herniated nucleus pulposus (HNP). To examine the shape of the end plates in patients treated surgically for a) low back pain or b) radiculopathy with HNP. Furthermore, to investigate the correlation between end plate shape and disc degeneration on the one, and end plate shape and symptoms on the other. Retrospective review of charts and radiographs. The charts, operative reports, preoperative lateral plain radiographs, and MRI scans of 178 patients (85 with low back pain and 93 with HNP) were reviewed. End plate shape was determined on midsagittal MRI cuts, disc degeneration was graded on T2 sequences, and disc height was measured on lateral plain radiographs from L1 to S1 in all patients. Student t-test and chi(2) test were used to detect significant differences and associations. Flat and irregular levels were most common in the lower lumbar spine. The L5/S1 segment was flat in most cases, due to a flat sacral end plate. In DDD patients, disc degeneration on MRI and plain radiographs worsened from concave to flat, to irregular levels. In HNP patients, MRI demonstrated concave levels to be less degenerated, whereas no difference was detected between flat and irregular levels. Disc height of irregular levels was well preserved in HNP patients. Comparing the two groups, flat levels were more degenerated on MRI in HNP patients. Despite similar degrees of degeneration on MRI, concave and irregular levels in DDD patients had lower disc heights. A higher frequency of symptoms was found in flat and irregular levels for both patient groups. The sagittal profile of end plates in the lumbar spine was described for patients with DDD on the one and HNP on the other. A higher association with symptoms was observed for flat and irregular levels in both patient groups. In DDD patients, disck degeneration on both MRI and

  10. Wear studies on ZrO2-filled PEEK as coating bearing materials for artificial cervical discs of Ti6Al4V.

    PubMed

    Song, Jian; Liu, Yuhong; Liao, Zhenhua; Wang, Song; Tyagi, Rajnesh; Liu, Weiqiang

    2016-12-01

    Polyetheretherketone (PEEK) and its composite coatings are believed to be the potential candidates' bio-implant materials. However, these coatings have not yet been used on the surface of titanium-based orthopedics and joint products and very few investigations on the tribological characteristics could be found in the published literature till date. In this study, the wettabilities, composition and micro-hardness were characterized using contact angle measurement, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and hardness tester. The tribological tests were conducted using a ball-on-disc contact pair under 25% newborn calf serum (NCS) lubricated condition. For comparison, bare Ti6Al4V was studied. The obtained results revealed that those PEEK/ZrO2 composite coatings could improve the tribological properties of Ti6Al4V significantly. Adhesive wear and mild abrasive wear might be the dominant wear and failure mechanisms for PEEK/ZrO2 composite coatings in NCS lubricated condition. After comprehensive evaluation in the present study, 5wt.% ZrO2 nanoparticles filled PEEK coating displayed the optimum tribological characteristics and could be taken as a potential candidate for the bearing material of artificial cervical disc.

  11. Total disc arthroplasty versus anterior cervical interbody fusion: use of the Spine Tango registry to supplement the evidence from randomized control trials.

    PubMed

    Staub, Lukas P; Ryser, Christoph; Röder, Christoph; Mannion, Anne F; Jarvik, Jeffrey G; Aebi, Max; Aghayev, Emin

    2016-02-01

    Several randomized controlled trials (RCTs) have compared patient outcomes of anterior (cervical) interbody fusion (AIF) with those of total disc arthroplasty (TDA). Because RCTs have known limitations with regard to their external validity, the comparative effectiveness of the two therapies in daily practice remains unknown. This study aimed to compare patient-reported outcomes after TDA versus AIF based on data from an international spine registry. A retrospective analysis of registry data was carried out. Inclusion criteria were degenerative disc or disc herniation of the cervical spine treated by single-level TDA or AIF, no previous surgery, and a Core Outcome Measures Index (COMI) completed at baseline and at least 3 months' follow-up. Overall, 987 patients were identified. Neck and arm pain relief and COMI score improvement were the outcome measures. Three separate analyses were performed to compare TDA and AIF surgical outcomes: (1) mimicking an RCT setting, with admission criteria typical of those in published RCTs, a 1:1 matched analysis was carried out in 739 patients; (2) an analysis was performed on 248 patients outside the classic RCT spectrum, that is, with one or more typical RCT exclusion criteria; (3) a subgroup analysis of all patients with additional follow-up longer than 2 years (n=149). Matching resulted in 190 pairs with an average follow-up of 17 months that had no residual significant differences for any patient characteristics. Small but statistically significant differences in outcome were observed in favor of TDA, which are potentially clinically relevant. Subgroup analyses of atypical patients and of patients with longer-term follow-up showed no significant differences in outcome between the treatments. The results of this observational study were in accordance with those of the published RCTs, suggesting substantial pain reduction both after AIF and TDA, with slightly greater benefit after arthroplasty. The analysis of atypical patients

  12. Degenerative Disc Disease, Active Component, U.S. Armed Forces, 2001-2011

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-05-01

    related ICD-9-CM codes 723.0 Spinal stenosis , cervical 724.00, 724.01, 724.02, 724.09 Spinal stenosis ,other 723.1 Cervicalgia 724.2 Lumbago 724.3...that 87 percent of all those evacuated for musculoskeletal disease/injury – and 86 percent of those evacuated for “ spinal pain” – did not return to

  13. [Cervicogenic dysphagia: swallowing difficulties caused by functional and organic disorders of the cervical spine].

    PubMed

    Grgić, Vjekoslav

    2013-01-01

    Cervical spine disorders which can cause swallowing difficulties (cervicogenic dysphagia; CD) are: chronic multisegmental/MS dysfunction (dysfunction=functional blockade) of the facet joints, changes in physiological curvature of the cervical spine, degenerative changes (anterior osteophytes, anterior disc herniation, osteochondrosis, osteoarthritis), inflammatory rheumatic diseases, diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis, injuries, conditions after anterior cervical spine surgery, congenital malformations and tumors. According to our clinical observations, degenerative changes in the cervical discs and facet joints and chronic MS dysfunction of the cervical spine facet joints are disorders which can cause swallowing difficulties. However, these disorders have not been recognized enough as the causes of dysphagia and they are not even mentioned in differential diagnosis. Because of the close anatomical relationship of cervical spine with the pharynx and cervical part of esophagus, the consequences of the degenerative changes in the cervical discs and facet joints and chronic MS dysfunction of the cervical spine facet joints such as the changes in the physiological curvature of the cervical spine, changes in elasticity and contractility in the neck muscles and decreased mobility of the cervical spine, adversely affect the dimensions of the pharynx and cervical part of esophagus, that is, swallowing capacity which can result in dysphagia. Degenerative changes in the cervical discs and facet joints are common additional cause of dysphagia in elderly people with disorders of the central control of swallowing (stroke, Parkinson's disease, senile dementia etc). The most important therapeutic options in patients with CD are: medicamentous therapy, physical therapy, manual therapy, kinesiotherapy and surgical treatment. The aim of the conservative therapy in patients with CD is to improve the swallowing capacity (for example, soft tissue techniques, stretching of the

  14. Bilateral Neuroretinitis in Cat Scratch Disease with Exudative, Obliterative Vasculitis in the Optic Disc.

    PubMed

    Tagawa, Yoshiaki; Suzuki, Yasuo; Sakaguchi, Takatoshi; Endoh, Hiroki; Yokoi, Masahiko; Kase, Manabu

    2014-01-01

    A 29-year-old fisherman exhibited optic disc oedema and peripapillary retinal detachment in the right eye, whereas in the left eye, optic atrophy and intraretinal exudates were already observed on first examination. About 6 months earlier, he noticed blurred vision of the left eye but took no medication. Visual acuity was 0.4 OD and 0.01 OS. Perimetry showed a large lower-half field defect with sparing 10° central field in the right eye and a large central scotoma in the left eye. Fluorescein angiography showed existence of arteriole or capillary nonperfusion and hyperpermeability of surrounding capillaries. Since serological examinations showed positive Bartonella immunoglobulin G (IgG) and other causes of neuroretinitis (NR) were excluded, NR in the present case was caused by cat scratch disease (CSD). Optic atrophy appeared 2 weeks after onset. Optical coherence tomography 13 weeks after onset revealed severe loss of retinal nerve fibre layer (RNFL) superior and nasal to the optic disc in both eyes and temporal in the left eye. Visual acuity of the right eye improved to 1.2 by the treatment, whereas visual field defects were persistent. CSD-NR in the present case developed abrupt appearance of optic atrophy with severe RNFL loss in the right eye, which was elicited by exudative, obliterative vasculitis in the superficial layer of the optic disc.

  15. Comparison of the incidence of patient-reported post-operative dysphagia between ACDF with a traditional anterior plate and artificial cervical disc replacement.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yi; Ma, Litai; Liu, Hao; Liu, Yilian; Hong, Ying; Wang, Beiyu; Ding, Chen; Deng, Yuxiao; Song, Yueming; Liu, Limin

    2016-09-01

    Compared with anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF), cervical disc replacement (CDR) has provided satisfactory clinical results. The incidence of post-operative dysphagia between ACDF with a traditional anterior plate and CDR remains controversial. Considering the limited studies and knowledge in this area, a retrospective study focusing on post-operative dysphagia was conducted. The Bazaz grading system was used to assess the severity of dysphagia at post-operative intervals including 1 week, 1 month, 3 months, 6 months, 12 months and 24 months respectively. The Chi-square test, Student t-test, Mann-Whitney U tests and Ordinal Logistic regression were used for data analysis when appropriate. Statistical significance was accepted at a probability value of <0.05. Two hundred and thirty-one patients in the CDR group and one hundred and fifty-eight patients in Plate group were included in this study. The total incidences of dysphagia in the CDR and plate group were 36.58% and 60.43% at one week, 29.27% and 38.85% at one month, 21.95% and 31.65% at three months, 6.83% and 17.99% at six months, 5.85% and 14.39% at 12 months, and 4.39% and 10.07% at the final follow-up respectively (All P<0.05, Mann-Whitney U test). Ordinal Logistic regression analysis showed that female patients, two-level surgery, C4/5 surgery, and anterior cervical plating were significant risk factors for post-operative dysphagia (all P<0.05). Comparing ACDF with a plate, CDR with a Prestige LP can significantly reduce both transient and persistent post-operative dysphagia. Female patients, two-level surgery, C4/5 surgery and anterior cervical plating were associated with a higher incidence of dysphagia. Future prospective, randomized, controlled studies are needed to further validate these findings. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Adjacent Segment Disease in a Patient With Klippel-Feil Syndrome and Radiculopathy: Surgical Treatment With Two-Level Disc Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Reyes-Sánchez, Alejandro; Rosales-Olivares, Luis Miguel

    2007-01-01

    Klippel-Feil syndrome (KFS) is a complex congenital condition characterized by improper segmentation of cervical motion segments that could contribute to undesirable adjacent segment degeneration. KFS patients have a strong tendency to present with disease in the adjacent segments. When this condition is present, anterior decompression followed by total disc replacement can be performed safely and can lead to good clinical results. This treatment has theoretical advantages compared with anterior decompression and fusion. Comparative studies and long-term follow-up are needed. Complications associated with fusion include loss of a motion segment, disc height loss, subsidence of the graft, progressive degenerative changes at the adjacent level, graft-related complications, and graft-site complications. Such new technologies as motion preservation spine arthroplasty represent attempts to avoid these complications. Here we present a case report of a 62-year-old female patient with type I congenital fusion at the C5–6 level, with a history of neck pain and right radiculopathy at C5–7. X-rays and MRI show evidence of adjacent segment degeneration at levels above and below congenital fusion. The patient's preoperative visual analog score (VAS) for neck pain was 7 out of a possible 10, her score for right upper extremity pain was 8 out of 10, and her Neck Disability Index (NDI) was 32%. Surgical treatment consisted of anterior decompression and total disc replacement at both levels. At 1-year follow-up, the patient's VAS for neck pain was 2 out of 10, her VAS score for right upper extremity pain was 1 of 10, and her NDI was 9%. PMID:25802590

  17. Adjacent segment disease in a patient with klippel-feil syndrome and radiculopathy: surgical treatment with two-level disc replacement.

    PubMed

    Reyes-Sánchez, Alejandro; Zárate-Kalfópulos, Barón; Rosales-Olivares, Luis Miguel

    2007-01-01

    Klippel-Feil syndrome (KFS) is a complex congenital condition characterized by improper segmentation of cervical motion segments that could contribute to undesirable adjacent segment degeneration. KFS patients have a strong tendency to present with disease in the adjacent segments. When this condition is present, anterior decompression followed by total disc replacement can be performed safely and can lead to good clinical results. This treatment has theoretical advantages compared with anterior decompression and fusion. Comparative studies and long-term follow-up are needed. Complications associated with fusion include loss of a motion segment, disc height loss, subsidence of the graft, progressive degenerative changes at the adjacent level, graft-related complications, and graft-site complications. Such new technologies as motion preservation spine arthroplasty represent attempts to avoid these complications. Here we present a case report of a 62-year-old female patient with type I congenital fusion at the C5-6 level, with a history of neck pain and right radiculopathy at C5-7. X-rays and MRI show evidence of adjacent segment degeneration at levels above and below congenital fusion. The patient's preoperative visual analog score (VAS) for neck pain was 7 out of a possible 10, her score for right upper extremity pain was 8 out of 10, and her Neck Disability Index (NDI) was 32%. Surgical treatment consisted of anterior decompression and total disc replacement at both levels. At 1-year follow-up, the patient's VAS for neck pain was 2 out of 10, her VAS score for right upper extremity pain was 1 of 10, and her NDI was 9%.

  18. The cervical smear pattern in patients with chronic pelvic inflammatory disease.

    PubMed

    Abdul, M A; Shittu, S O; Randawa, J A; Shehu, M S

    2009-09-01

    Cancer of the cervix is the commonest malignancy of the genital tract in Nigeria. In an atmosphere of opportunistic screening due to lack of a national screening programme, studies are needed to determine patients at risk of premalignant lesions of the cervix. To determine cervical smear pattern in patients with chronic pelvic inflammatory disease and investigate the potential of chronic pelvic inflammatory disease as a risk factor to cervical dysplasia. Case-control study. Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Ahmadu Bello University Teaching Hospital Zaria, Nigeria. Three hundred and sixty-nine premenopausal women attending the gynaecologic and family planning clinics of Ahmadu Bello University Teaching Hospital Zaria, Nigeria from January to December 2000. Of the 369 women that had cervical cytology by Pap smear, 163 (44%) had chronic pelvic inflammatory disease (cases) while 206 (56%) were non chronic PID patients (control). There was no statistical significance in the mean age between the two groups. The mean age at first coitus and marriage of all the women were 17.92.7 years and 18.5 3.4 years respectively. There were 52 dysplastic smears encountered, giving a prevalence rate of 140/1,000 or 14% for Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia. There were higher cases of dysplasia in the chronic PID group than in the control and this differences was statistically significant (p<0.05). Other risk factors to dysplasia identified include high parity (>4) and age of first coitus less than 20 years. Only 10% of all the women screened were aware of both cervical cancer and Pap smear. Women with chronic pelvic inflammatory disease are probably at higher risk of developing cervical dysplasia than women without chronic pelvic inflammatory disease. Cervical cancer screening programmes should be intensified in chronic pelvic inflammatory disease patients. However, further studies are needed in our setting to verify the association between pelvic inflammatory disease and

  19. Efficacy of glucosamine, chondroitin, and methylsulfonylmethane for spinal degenerative joint disease and degenerative disc disease: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Stuber, Kent; Sajko, Sandy; Kristmanson, Kevyn

    2011-01-01

    Background: Nutritional supplements are commonly used for a variety of musculoskeletal conditions, including knee and hip degenerative joint disease. Although these supplements are occasionally recommended for patients with degenerative disc disease and spinal degenerative joint disease, the evidence supporting this use is unknown. Objective: To systematically search and assess the quality of the literature on the use of glucosamine, chondroitin sulfate, and methylsulfonylmethane for the treatment of spinal osteoarthritis / degenerative joint disease, and degenerative disc disease. Data Sources: The Index of Chiropractic Literature, AMED, Medline, and CINAHL were searched for randomized controlled trials in English from 1984 to July 2009. Data Extraction and Synthesis: Data from studies meeting the inclusion criteria was extracted and reviewed by three reviewers. The Jadad scale was used to assess study quality. No attempts were made at meta-analysis due to variation in study design. Results: Two articles met the inclusion criteria. One study was found to have good quality but reported negative results for the supplemented group compared with placebo, the other study had low quality but reported significant positive results for the supplemented group when compared with a no intervention control group. Conclusion: There was little literature found to support the use of common nutritional supplements for spinal degeneration, making it difficult to determine whether clinicians should recommend them. PMID:21403782

  20. Reoperation Rates After Anterior Cervical Discectomy and Fusion for Cervical Spondylotic Radiculopathy and Myelopathy: A National Population-based Study.

    PubMed

    Park, Moon Soo; Ju, Young-Su; Moon, Seong-Hwan; Kim, Tae-Hwan; Oh, Jae Keun; Makhni, Melvin C; Riew, K Daniel

    2016-10-15

    National population-based cohort study. To compare the reoperation rates between cervical spondylotic radiculopathy and myelopathy in a national population of patients. There is an inherently low incidence of reoperation after surgery for cervical degenerative disease. Therefore, it is difficult to sufficiently power studies to detect differences between reoperation rates of different cervical diagnoses. National population-based databases provide large, longitudinally followed cohorts that may help overcome this challenge. We used the Korean Health Insurance Review and Assessment Service national database to select our study population. We included patients with the diagnosis of cervical spondylotic radiculopathy or myelopathy who underwent anterior cervical discectomy and fusion from January 2009 to June 2014. We separated patients into two groups based on diagnosis codes: cervical spondylotic radiculopathy or cervical spondylotic myelopathy. Age, sex, presence of diabetes, osteoporosis, associated comorbidities, number of operated cervical disc levels, and hospital types were considered potential confounding factors. The overall reoperation rate was 2.45%. The reoperation rate was significantly higher in patients with cervical spondylotic myelopathy than in patients with cervical radiculopathy (myelopathy: P = 0.0293, hazard ratio = 1.433, 95% confidence interval 1.037-1.981). Male sex, presence of diabetes or associated comorbidities, and hospital type were noted to be risk factors for reoperation. The reoperation rate after anterior cervical discectomy and fusion was higher for cervical spondylotic myelopathy than for cervical spondylotic radiculopathy in a national population of patients. 3.

  1. Cervical and ocular vestibular evoked myogenic potentials in Behcet's disease.

    PubMed

    Bayram, Ali; Doğan, Murat; Koç, Ali; Kalkan, Mehmet; Akçadağ, Alper; Özcan, İbrahim

    2015-01-01

    To investigate vestibular evoked myogenic potentials combined with audiologic status in Behcet's disease (BD) and to compare the results with normal healthy subjects. Cervical vestibular evoked myogenic potential (cVEMP) test, ocular vestibular evoked myogenic potential (oVEMP) test, Dix-Hallpike test, conventional pure tone audiometry (cPTA) and high frequency audiometry (HFA), and 226 and 1000Hz tympanometry were performed to each subject of the study. Cranial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with contrast enhancement was also performed to evaluate the central nervous system (CNS) in patients with BD. VEMP parameters including the mean peak latencies of p13-n23 and n10-p15, AR values and thresholds were not statistically different both in cVEMP and oVEMP between the BD and control groups. Except for 250Hz, mean audiological thresholds were significantly higher in the BD group. Five of the 20 patients had pathological cranial MRI findings that may be compatible with central nervous system involvement. To our knowledge, the present study is the first report investigating oVEMP and cVEMP responses combined with MRI findings in patients with BD. The presence of high frequency hearing loss is a common finding in BD and HFA may help early detection of hearing loss in patients with BD when combined with cPTA. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Adjacent Segment Disease in the Cervical and Lumbar Spine.

    PubMed

    Tobert, Daniel G; Antoci, Valentin; Patel, Shaun P; Saadat, Ehsan; Bono, Christopher M

    2017-04-01

    Adjacent segment disease (ASD) is disappointing long-term outcome for both the patient and clinician. In contrast to adjacent segment degeneration, which is a common radiographic finding, ASD is less common. The incidence of ASD in both the cervical and lumbar spine is between 2% and 4% per year, and ASD is a significant contributor to reoperation rates after spinal arthrodesis. The etiology of ASD is multifactorial, stemming from existing spondylosis at adjacent levels, predisposed risk to degenerative changes, and altered biomechanical forces near a previous fusion site. Numerous studies have sought to identify both patient and surgical risk factors for ASD, but a consistent, sole predictor has yet to be found. Spinal arthroplasty techniques seek to preserve physiological biomechanics, thereby minimizing the risk of ASD, and long-term clinical outcome studies will help quantify its efficacy. Treatment strategies for ASD are initially nonoperative, provided a progressive neurological deficit is not present. The spine surgeon is afforded many surgical strategies once operative treatment is elected. The goal of this manuscript is to consider the etiologies of ASD, review its manifestations, and offer an approach to treatment.

  3. Congenital stenosis and adjacent segment disease in the cervical spine.

    PubMed

    Eubanks, Jason David; Belding, Jon; Schnaser, Erik; Rowan, Andrew; Moffitt, Gable; Weaver, John; Reich, Michael S; Bechtel, Chris; Xie, Ke; Gande, Abhiram; Hohl, Justin; Braly, Brett; Hilibrand, Alan; Kang, James D

    2013-10-01

    Symptomatic adjacent segment disease (ASD) after anterior cervical fusion (ACF) is reported in 25% of patients at 10 years postoperatively. Debate continues as to whether this degeneration is due to the natural history of the disk or the changed biomechanics after ACF. This study explored whether congenital stenosis predisposes patients to an increased incidence of ASD after ACF. A retrospective review of 635 patients with myelopathy or radiculopathy was performed; 364 patients had complete records for review. Patients underwent 1- to 5-level ACF (94 one-level, 145 two-level, 79 three-level, 45 four-level, and 1 five-level). Radiographs were evaluated for bony congenital stenosis using validated parameters, and ASD was measured according to Hilibrand's criteria and correlated with symptomatic ASD. Congenital stenosis was found in 21.7% of patients and radiographic ASD in 33.5%, with a significant association between these parameters. However, symptomatic ASD occurred in 11.8% of patients; no association between congenital stenosis and symptomatic ASD or myelopathy and ASD was found. Clinical results demonstrated excellent or good Robinson scores in 86.2% of patients and Odom scores in 87% of patients. Despite mostly excellent to good outcomes, symptomatic ASD is common after ACF. Although congenital stenosis appears to increase the incidence of radiographic ASD, it does not appear to predict symptomatic ASD.

  4. Biological Treatment Approaches for Degenerative Disc Disease: A Review of Clinical Trials and Future Directions

    PubMed Central

    Moriguchi, Yu; Hussain, Ibrahim; Bonssar, Lawrence; Härtl, Roger

    2016-01-01

    Biologic-based treatment strategies for musculoskeletal diseases have gained traction over the past 20 years as alternatives to invasive, costly, and complicated surgical interventions. Spinal degenerative disc disease (DDD) is among the anatomic areas being investigated among this group, notably due to its high incidence and functional debilitation. In this review, we report the literature encompassing the use of biologic-based therapies for DDD. Articles published between January 1995 and November 2015 were reviewed, with a subset meeting the primary and secondary inclusion criteria of clinical trial results that could be sub-classified into bimolecular, cell-based, or gene therapies, as well as studies investigating the utility of allogeneic and tissue-engineered intervertebral discs. Ongoing clinical trials that have not yet published results are also mentioned to present the current state of the field. This exciting area has demonstrated positive and encouraging results across multiple strategies; thus, future bimolecular and regenerative techniques and understanding will likely lead to an increase in the number of human clinical trials assessing these therapies. PMID:28018762

  5. Anterior cervical discectomy with fusion in patients with cervical disc degeneration: a prospective outcome study of 258 patients (181 fused with autologous bone graft and 77 fused with a PEEK cage)

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Anterior cervical discectomy with fusion (ACDF) is challenging with respect to both patient selection and choice of surgical procedure. The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinical outcome of ACDF, with respect to both patient selection and choice of surgical procedure: fusion with an autologous iliac crest graft (AICG) versus fusion with an artificial cage made of polyetheretherketone (PEEK). Methods This was a non-randomized prospective single-center outcome study of 258 patients who underwent ACDF for cervical disc degeneration (CDD). Fusion was attained with either tricortical AICG or PEEK cages without additional anterior plating, with treatment selected at surgeon's discretion. Radicular pain, neck-pain, headache and patient satisfaction with the treatment were scored using the visual analogue scale (VAS). Results The median age was 47.5 (28.3-82.8) years, and 44% of patients were female. 59% had single-level ACDF, 40% had two level ACDF and 1% had three-level ACDF. Of the patients, 181 were fused with AICG and 77 with a PEEK-cage. After surgery, the patients showed a significant reduction in radicular pain (ΔVAS = 3.05), neck pain (ΔVAS = 2.30) and headache (ΔVAS = 0.55). Six months after surgery, 48% of patients had returned to work: however 24% were still receiving workers' compensation. Using univariate and multivariate analyses we found that high preoperative pain intensity was significantly associated with a decrease in pain intensity after surgery, for all three pain categories. There were no significant correlations between pain relief and the following patient characteristics: fusion method (AICG or PEEK-cage), sex, age, number of levels fused, disc level fused, previous neck surgery (except for neck pain), previous neck trauma, or preoperative symptom duration. Two hundred out of the 256 (78%) patients evaluated the surgical result as successful. Only 27/256 (11%) classified the surgical result as a failure. Patient satisfaction

  6. Prevalence and breed predisposition for thoracolumbar intervertebral disc disease in cats.

    PubMed

    De Decker, Steven; Warner, Anne-Sophie; Volk, Holger A

    2017-04-01

    Objectives The objective was to evaluate the prevalence and possible breed predilections for thoracolumbar intervertebral disc disease (IVDD) in cats. Methods Medical records and imaging studies of cats diagnosed with thoracolumbar IVDD between January 2008 and August 2014 were retrospectively reviewed and compared with the general hospital population. The association between type of IVDD (ie, intervertebral disc extrusion [IVDE] or intervertebral disc protrusion [IVDP]) and breed, age, sex, and duration and severity of clinical signs was also evaluated. Results Of 12,900 cats presented during the study period, 31 (0.24%) were diagnosed with IVDD, including 17 purebred and 14 non-purebred cats. Of all presented purebred cats, 0.52% were diagnosed with thoracolumbar IVDD. More specifically, 1.29% of all British Shorthairs and 1.83% of all presented Persians were diagnosed with IVDD. Compared with the general hospital population, purebred cats ( P = 0.0001), British Shorthairs ( P <0.0001) and Persians ( P = 0.0006) were significantly overrepresented with thoracolumbar IVDD. Affected purebred cats were younger than affected non-purebred cats ( P = 0.02). Of 31 cats with IVDD, 19 were diagnosed with IVDE and 12 with IVDP. Cats with IVDE had a significantly shorter duration of clinical signs ( P = 0.0002) and demonstrated more severe neurological deficits ( P = 0.04) than cats with IVDP. Conclusions and relevance Although thoracolumbar IVDD is an uncommon condition in cats, purebred cats, British Shorthairs and Persians, were overrepresented. It is currently unclear if this represents a true breed predisposition or a higher likelihood of owners of purebred cats seeking referral for advanced diagnostic imaging procedures.

  7. Cervical cancer in sub-Saharan Africa: a preventable noncommunicable disease.

    PubMed

    Mboumba Bouassa, Ralph-Sydney; Prazuck, Thierry; Lethu, Thérèse; Jenabian, Mohammad-Ali; Meye, Jean-François; Bélec, Laurent

    2017-06-01

    Infections caused by high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) are responsible for 7.7% of cancers in developing countries, mainly cervical cancer. This disease is steadily increasing in sub-Saharan Africa, with more than 75,000 new cases and 50,000 deaths yearly, further increased by HIV infection. Areas covered: The current status of cervical cancer associated with HPV in sub-Saharan Africa has been systematically revised. The main issues discussed here are related to the public health burden of cervical cancer in sub-Saharan Africa and predictions for the coming decades, including molecular epidemiology and determinants of HPV infection in Africa, and promising prevention measures currently being evaluated in Africa. Expert commentary: By the year 2030, cervical cancer will kill more than 443,000 women yearly worldwide, most of them in sub-Saharan Africa. The increase in the incidence of cervical cancer in Africa could counteract the progress made by African women in reducing maternal mortality and longevity. Nevertheless, cervical cancer is a potentially preventable noncommunicable disease, and intervention strategies to eliminate cervical cancer as a public health concern should be urgently implemented.

  8. Molecular Therapy for Degenerative Disc Disease: Clues from Secretome Analysis of the Notochordal Cell-Rich Nucleus Pulposus

    PubMed Central

    Matta, Ajay; Karim, M. Zia; Isenman, David E.; Erwin, W. Mark

    2017-01-01

    Degenerative disc disease (DDD) is associated with spinal pain often leading to long-term disability. However, the non-chondrodystrophic canine intervertebral disc is protected from the development of DDD, ostensibly due to its retention of notochordal cells (NC) in the nucleus pulposus (NP). In this study, we hypothesized that secretome analysis of the NC-rich NP will lead to the identification of key proteins that delay the onset of DDD. Using mass-spectrometry, we identified 303 proteins including components of TGFβ- and Wnt-signaling, anti-angiogeneic factors and proteins that inhibit axonal ingrowth in the bioactive fractions of serum free, notochordal cell derived conditioned medium (NCCM). Ingenuity Pathway Analysis revealed TGFβ1 and CTGF as major hubs in protein interaction networks. In vitro treatment with TGFβ1 and CTGF promoted the synthesis of healthy extra-cellular matrix proteins, increased cell proliferation and reduced cell death in human degenerative disc NP cells. A single intra-discal injection of recombinant TGFβ1 and CTGF proteins in a pre-clinical rat-tail disc injury model restored the NC and stem cell rich NP. In conclusion, we demonstrate the potential of TGFβ1 and CTGF to mitigate the progression of disc degeneration and the potential use of these molecules in a molecular therapy to treat the degenerative disc. PMID:28358123

  9. Adjacent-level arthroplasty following cervical fusion.

    PubMed

    Rajakumar, Deshpande V; Hari, Akshay; Krishna, Murali; Konar, Subhas; Sharma, Ankit

    2017-02-01

    OBJECTIVE Adjacent-level disc degeneration following cervical fusion has been well reported. This condition poses a major treatment dilemma when it becomes symptomatic. The potential application of cervical arthroplasty to preserve motion in the affected segment is not well documented, with few studies in the literature. The authors present their initial experience of analyzing clinical and radiological results in such patients who were treated with arthroplasty for new or persistent arm and/or neck symptoms related to neural compression due to adjacent-segment disease after anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF). METHODS During a 5-year period, 11 patients who had undergone ACDF anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) and subsequently developed recurrent neck or arm pain related to adjacent-level cervical disc disease were treated with cervical arthroplasty at the authors' institution. A total of 15 devices were implanted (range of treated levels per patient: 1-3). Clinical evaluation was performed both before and after surgery, using a visual analog scale (VAS) for pain and the Neck Disability Index (NDI). Radiological outcomes were analyzed using pre- and postoperative flexion/extension lateral radiographs measuring Cobb angle (overall C2-7 sagittal alignment), functional spinal unit (FSU) angle, and range of motion (ROM). RESULTS There were no major perioperative complications or device-related failures. Statistically significant results, obtained in all cases, were reflected by an improvement in VAS scores for neck/arm pain and NDI scores for neck pain. Radiologically, statistically significant increases in the overall lordosis (as measured by Cobb angle) and ROM at the treated disc level were observed. Three patients were lost to follow-up within the first year after arthroplasty. In the remaining 8 cases, the duration of follow-up ranged from 1 to 3 years. None of these 8 patients required surgery for the same vertebral level during the follow

  10. Transdural herniated lumbar disc disease with muscle patch for closure of durotomy - A Brief review of literature.

    PubMed

    Huliyappa, Harsha A; Singh, Rakesh Kumar; Singh, Sunil Kumar; Jaiswal, Manish; Jaiswal, Somil; Srivastava, Chhitij; Ojha, Balkrishna; Chandra, Anil; Chhabra, Satnam

    Intradural migration of disc (IDMD) is a rare clinical entity accounting for 0.27-0.33% of all herniated disc diseases. Flimsy or dense adhesion between the ventral dural surface and the opposing posterior longitudinal ligament (PLL) is the principal pathology for intradural migrated disc. The most commonly affected lumbar segments are L4-5 (55%), L3-4 (16%), L5-S1 (10%) and less commonly L2L3 and L1L2. No imaging feature is characteristic and the management protocol of durotomy via an endoscopic method is unclear. An L5S1 disc disease was operated by endoscopic method. Difficulty in separating the dural sac from PLL, dense adhesions prompting sharp dissection at this location and a calcified disc are the earliest evidence of intradural migration. MRI features of an intradural location are loss of continuity of posterior longitudinal ligament, beak-like appearance also known as "Hawk-beak sign", peripheral enhancement around an intradural disc, fluid-filled intradural cyst. Magnification either by Microscope or Endoscope is of importance when dissecting the intradural disc so as to avoid the nerve root injury. Liberal use of fibrin glue and augmentation with muscle patch was performed. Ambulated by 48h and discharged by 5th day. Two and 9 months follow up showed no evidence of pseudomeningocoele. Autologous muscle patch with fibrin glue for dural rent closure is a simple and effective method which can be performed by endoscopic or minimally invasive approaches. Suturing the dura, being a tedious and cumbersome procedure can be avoided. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o.

  11. Association between nutritional status and Modic classification in degenerative disc disease.

    PubMed

    Seyithanoglu, Hakan; Aydin, Teoman; Taşpınar, Ozgur; Camli, Adil; Kiziltan, Huriye; Eris, Ali Hikmet; Hocaoglu, Ilknur Turk; Ozder, Aclan; Denizli, Ebru; Kepekci, Muge; Keskin, Yasar; Mutluer, Ahmet Serdar

    2016-04-01

    [Purpose] This study was conducted to examine the association between Modic classification and the eating habits in patients with degenerative disc disease (DDD) and to determine the influence of nutrition on disease severity. [Subjects and Methods] Sixty patients with DDD visiting a low back pain outpatient clinic were enrolled. Through face-to-face interviews, they completed questionnaires regarding their demographics, disease activity, smoking and alcohol use, concomitant diseases, disease duration, and nutritional status.Exclusion criteria were age <20 years or >65 years, other comorbidities, missing MRI data, and inability to speak Turkish. [Results] Forty patients were finally included in the study. The frequency with which they consumed water, salt, fast food, eggs, milk, yogurt, cheese, whole wheat bread, white bread, butter, and margarine was recorded. A weak negative correlation was observed between the Modic types and fish and egg consumption. [Conclusion] Modic changes, which indicate the severity of DDD, seem to be correlated to patients' dietary habits. However, studies with comparison groups and larger samples are needed to confirm our promising results before any cause-and-effect relationship can be proposed.

  12. Association between nutritional status and Modic classification in degenerative disc disease

    PubMed Central

    Seyithanoglu, Hakan; Aydin, Teoman; Taşpınar, Ozgur; Camli, Adil; Kiziltan, Huriye; Eris, Ali Hikmet; Hocaoglu, Ilknur Turk; Ozder, Aclan; Denizli, Ebru; Kepekci, Muge; Keskin, Yasar; Mutluer, Ahmet Serdar

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study was conducted to examine the association between Modic classification and the eating habits in patients with degenerative disc disease (DDD) and to determine the influence of nutrition on disease severity. [Subjects and Methods] Sixty patients with DDD visiting a low back pain outpatient clinic were enrolled. Through face-to-face interviews, they completed questionnaires regarding their demographics, disease activity, smoking and alcohol use, concomitant diseases, disease duration, and nutritional status.Exclusion criteria were age <20 years or >65 years, other comorbidities, missing MRI data, and inability to speak Turkish. [Results] Forty patients were finally included in the study. The frequency with which they consumed water, salt, fast food, eggs, milk, yogurt, cheese, whole wheat bread, white bread, butter, and margarine was recorded. A weak negative correlation was observed between the Modic types and fish and egg consumption. [Conclusion] Modic changes, which indicate the severity of DDD, seem to be correlated to patients’ dietary habits. However, studies with comparison groups and larger samples are needed to confirm our promising results before any cause-and-effect relationship can be proposed. PMID:27190462

  13. [MRI in flexed and extended positions for the diagnosis of cervical myelopathy in Hirayama's disease].

    PubMed

    Ibáñez Sanz, L; de Vega, V Martínez; Arranz, J Carrascoso; Moreno, E Alvarez

    2009-01-01

    We report the case of a young man who presented with atrophy of the musculature of the right forearm and hand. The clinician suspected cervical myelopathy in Hirayama's disease on the basis of the findings at electromyography and recommended an MRI examination in both flexed and neutral position. The typical imaging findings for cervical myelopathy in Hirayama's disease were observed and the diagnosis was confirmed. The key findings for Hirayama's disease consist of asymmetrical medullary atrophy with involvement of the anterior horns, dorsal detachment of the dura mater, and dilatation of the epidural venous plexus.

  14. ISSLS PRIZE IN CLINICAL SCIENCE 2017: Is infection the possible initiator of disc disease? An insight from proteomic analysis.

    PubMed

    Rajasekaran, S; Tangavel, Chitraa; Aiyer, Siddharth N; Nayagam, Sharon Miracle; Raveendran, M; Demonte, Naveen Luke; Subbaiah, Pramela; Kanna, Rishi; Shetty, Ajoy Prasad; Dharmalingam, K

    2017-05-01

    as a possible initiator of disc disease. These results can lead to a paradigm shift in our understanding and management of disc disorders.

  15. Spontaneous lumbar intervertebral disc protrusion in cats: literature review and case presentations.

    PubMed

    Kathmann, I; Cizinauskas, S; Rytz, U; Lang, J; Jaggy, A

    2000-12-01

    Reports on intervertebral disc disease in cats are rare in the veterinary literature. It has been postulated that intervertebral disc protrusion is a frequent finding during necropsy in cats, without having any clinical relevance (King and Smith 1958, King & Smith 1960a, King & Smith 1960b). However, a total of six cases with disc protrusions and clinically significant neurological deficits have been reported over the past decade. (Heavner 1971, Seim & Nafe 1981, Gilmore 1983, Littlewood et al 1984, Sparkes & Skerry 1990, Bagley et al 1995). As in dogs, there are also two types of intervertebral disc disease in cats: Hansen's type I (extrusion), and type II (herniation). Cervical spinal cord involvement was more commonly recognised in cats than the lumbar or the thoraco lumbar area. Cats over 15 years were mainly affected (King & Smith 1958, King & Smith 1960a, King & Smith 1960b). We describe two cats with lumbar intervertebral disc protrusions. Emphasis is placed on differential diagnoses, treatment and follow-up.

  16. Polyacrylamide gel disc electrophoresis of alkaline phosphatase isoenzymes in bone and liver disease.

    PubMed Central

    Warnes, T W; Hine, P; Kay, G

    1976-01-01

    Acrylamide gel disc electrophoresis provides a reliable and reasonably rapid method of differentiating the raised serum alkaline phosphatase (AP) of bone origin from that of liver origin. The technique has been placed for the first time on a semiquantitative basis. Measurement of both band width and band position effectively distinguishes the bone from the liver isoenzyme, but band width provides superior discrimination. An origin band was seen in none of the normal subjects and in only 7% of patients with bone disease but was present in 78% of patients with liver disease, a highly significant increase. Fifty percent of normal individuals had a small-intestinal band in serum taken two hours after a meal, as did 35% of patients with liver disease, but the incidence of intestinal bands in bone disease was only 11%, significantly less than in the other two groups. The genetic control of small-intestinal AP in serum has been confirmed, but it has been demonstrated that the decrease of intestinal AP in bone disorders is not genetically determined. Images PMID:977779

  17. National Trends in Outpatient Surgical Treatment of Degenerative Cervical Spine Disease

    PubMed Central

    Baird, Evan O.; Egorova, Natalia N.; McAnany, Steven J.; Qureshi, Sheeraz A.; Hecht, Andrew C.; Cho, Samuel K.

    2014-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective population-based observational study. Objective To assess the growth of cervical spine surgery performed in an outpatient setting. Methods A retrospective study was conducted using the United States Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project's State Inpatient and Ambulatory Surgery Databases for California, New York, Florida, and Maryland from 2005 to 2009. Current Procedural Terminology, fourth revision (CPT-4) and International Classification of Diseases, ninth revision Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM) codes were used to identify operations for degenerative cervical spine diseases in adults (age > 20 years). Disposition and complication rates were examined. Results There was an increase in cervical spine surgeries performed in an ambulatory setting during the study period. Anterior cervical diskectomy and fusion accounted for 68% of outpatient procedures; posterior decompression made up 21%. Younger patients predominantly underwent anterior fusion procedures, and patients in the eighth and ninth decades of life had more posterior decompressions. Charlson comorbidity index and complication rates were substantially lower for ambulatory cases when compared with inpatients. The majority (>99%) of patients were discharged home following ambulatory surgery. Conclusions Recently, the number of cervical spine surgeries has increased in general, and more of these procedures are being performed in an ambulatory setting. The majority (>99%) of patients are discharged home but the nature of analyzing administrative data limits accurate assessment of postoperative complications and thus patient safety. This increase in outpatient cervical spine surgery necessitates further discussion of its safety. PMID:25083354

  18. Female Sexual Dysfunction in Women with Non-Malignant Cervical Diseases: A Study from an Urban Chinese Sample

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Aixia; Lei, Yu; Yang, Bin; Li, Ping; Pan, Lianjun

    2015-01-01

    Non-malignant cervical diseases are common causes of disease among women worldwide. Although many studies have focused on sexual function in women with cervical cancer, little is known about the prevalence of female sexual dysfunction and its risk factors in women with non-malignant cervical diseases. The present study aims to assess sexual function in Chinese women with non-malignant cervical diseases and to identify potential risk factors for these diseases. A cross-sectional hospital-based survey was conducted in Nanjing, China. The Chinese version of the Female Sexual Function Index (CVFSFI) was used to evaluate sexual function. Three hundred three women who had been diagnosed with at least one non-malignant cervical disease and 293 healthy women were recruited from Nanjing Maternity and Child Health Hospital of Nanjing Medical University. We found that women with non-malignant cervical diseases had a significantly higher prevalence of female sexual dysfunction (FSD) (51.8% vs. 34.8%), low desire (43.2% vs. 26.3%), arousal disorder (41.6% vs. 28.3%), and lubrication disorder (51.2% vs. 36.9%) compared with the control group. Cervicitis and cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) were found to be independent risk factors for FSD. Our study indicates that women with cervicitis and CIN are at a high risk for FSD and deserve focused initial and follow-up management. PMID:26473480

  19. Retrospective study of the clinical effects of acupuncture on cervical neurological diseases in dogs

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ching Ming; Chang, Fang Chia

    2016-01-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate new acupuncture protocols for the clinical treatment of cervical spinal cord diseases in 19 dogs. Three treatment options containing Jing-jiaji (cervical jiaji) were developed to treat neck pain, hemiparesis, and tetraparesis depending on the severity. The interval between the neurological disease onset and treatment (duration of signs), time to improvement after treatment, and recovery time were compared in dogs by body weight, age, and dry needle acupuncture (AP) with or without electro-AP (EAP). The duration of signs was longer in dogs weighing greater than 10 kg than in those weighing less than 10 kg (p < 0.05). Improvement and recovery times did not vary by body weight. Additionally, improvement and recovery times did not vary by age. The improvement and recovery times were longer in the AP+EAP group than the AP group (p < 0.05). Acupuncture with Jing-jiaji was effective in cervical spinal cord diseases in different sized dogs and in middle-aged and senior dogs. This report standardized AP treatment containing Jing-jiaji for canine cervical problems and evaluated its effects. The newly standardized AP methodology offers clinical practitioners an effective way to improve the outcomes of cervical neurological diseases in dogs. PMID:26645331

  20. Perianesthetic morbidity and mortality in dogs undergoing cervical and thoracolumbar spinal surgery.

    PubMed

    Posner, Lysa P; Mariani, Christopher L; Swanson, Cliff; Asakawa, Makoto; Campbell, Nigel; King, Adam S

    2014-03-01

    To evaluate and compare perioperative morbidity and mortality in dogs undergoing cervical and thoracolumbar spinal surgery. Prospective case series. 157 dogs undergoing cervical or thoracolumbar spinal surgery. Data were collected sequentially on canine cases presented from the Neurology Section of the North Carolina State University Veterinary Teaching Hospital for anesthesia and surgery for cervical spinal cord disease. Simultaneously, data were collected on all thoracolumbar spinal surgery cases during the same time period. Data included signalment, drugs administered, surgical approach, disease process, cardiac arrhythmias during anesthesia, and outcome. Data were collected from 164 surgical events in 157 dogs. There were 52 cervical approaches; four dorsal and 48 ventral. All thoracolumbar surgeries were approached dorsolaterally. Four dogs 4/52 (7.6%) undergoing a cervical approach did not survive to discharge. Two dogs (2/8; 25%) underwent atlanto-axial (AA) stabilization and suffered cardiovascular arrest and two dogs (2/38; 5.2%) undergoing cervical ventral slot procedures were euthanized following anesthesia and surgery due to signs of aspiration pneumonia. All dogs undergoing thoracolumbar surgery survived until discharge (112/112). Mortality in dogs undergoing cervical spinal surgery was greater compared with dogs undergoing thoracolumbar spinal surgery (p = 0.009), however, in dogs undergoing decompressive disc surgery, intraoperative death rates were not different between dogs undergoing a cervical compared with thoracolumbar approaches (p = 0.32) nor was there a significant difference in overall mortality (p = 0.07). Overall, dogs undergoing cervical spinal surgery were less likely to survive until discharge compared with dogs undergoing thoracolumbar spinal surgery. Mortality in dogs undergoing cervical intervertebral disc decompression surgery was no different than for dogs undergoing thoracolumbar intervertebral disc decompression surgery. However

  1. Notalgia paresthetica associated with cervical spinal stenosis and cervicothoracic disk disease at C4 through C7.

    PubMed

    Alai, Nili N; Skinner, Harry B; Nabili, Siamak T; Jeffes, Edward; Shahrokni, Seyed; Saemi, Arash M

    2010-02-01

    Notalgia paresthetica (NP) is a common refractory, sensory, neuropathic syndrome with the hallmark symptom of localized pruritus of the unilateral infrascapular back. It generally is a chronic noncurable condition with periodic remissions and exacerbations. While the dermatologic syndrome may be multifactorial in etiology, a possible association with underlying cervical spine disease should be evaluated for proper treatment. Collaborative multispecialty evaluation by dermatology, radiology, orthopedic surgery, and neurology may be indicated for primary management of this condition. First-line therapy for NP with associated cervical disease may include nondermatologic noninvasive treatments such as spinal manipulation, physical therapy, massage, cervical traction, cervical muscle strengthening, and oral nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and muscle relaxants. Notalgia paresthetica may in fact be a cutaneous sign of an underlying degenerative cervical spine disease. We report a case of a patient with cervical spinal stenosis that corresponded directly with the clinical findings of NP.

  2. [Risk of cervical cancer and precancerous diseases in the oral HPV carriers].

    PubMed

    He, Yi-feng; Zhang, Mei-ying; Feng, Ling-da; Yin, Yi-hua; Zhang, Rong; Di, Wen

    2013-08-01

    To evaluate the risk of the occurrence of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) and invasive cervical cancer in the oral HPV carriers through a population-based investigation in Shanghai. A total of 1200 cases of outpatients who attended the annual cervical examination and 50 preoperational cases of inpatients with CINIII or invasive cervical cancer were enrolled from three clinical centers in Shanghai. The oral HPV infection was determined by real-time PCR. In 1200-case cross-sectional study, the incidence rate of CIN was compared between the oral HPV positive and negative cohort. In 1250-case case-control study, the positive rate of oral HPV DNA test was compared among normal control group, CINI-III, and invasive cancer case groups, and all odds ratio (OR) values were calculated, respectively. The HPV transmission-related demographic and behavioral characters of the oral HPV carriers were also analyzed. The oral HPV carriers accounted for 5.9% (71/1200) of the investigated outpatients. The oral HPV DNA positive rates were gradually increased with the cervical disease grades, which were 5.8% (68/1182, normal), 2/13 (CIN I), 1/5 (CINII), 31.4% (11/35, CINIII) and 5/15 (invasive cancer). In cross-sectional cohort studies, the relative risks (RR) of CINI,II were 2.9 and 4.0 for oral HPV carriers, respectively. In case-control study, the OR values for CINI-III and invasive cervical cancer were 3.1(95%CI: 1.6-10.1), 4.2(95%CI: 1.7-28.4), 7.1(95%CI: 4.8-19.8) and 10.1(95%CI: 3.2-32.1), respectively. The oral sex and multi-sexual partner were two major risk factors for the oral and cervical HPV co-infection, HPV-related cervical cancer and precancerous diseases according to behavioral analysis. There are complicated transmission pathways between oral and cervical HPV. Oral HPV carriers should be intensively followed up and their oral HPV infection and HPV-related cervical diseases should be treated together.

  3. How does the neck flexion affect the cervical MRI features of Hirayama disease?

    PubMed

    Hou, Chao; Han, Hongbin; Yang, Xiaohong; Xu, Xiaojuan; Gao, Hui; Fan, Dongsheng; Fu, Yu; Sun, Yu; Liu, Bo

    2012-10-01

    Although flexion cervical MRI has been recommended for the diagnosis of Hirayama disease (HD), no study focused on the MR features at different neck flexion angles. Moreover, no uniform flexion angle has been confirmed in clinical practice. The purpose of this study is to quantitatively investigate the MRI typical signs of HD patients in different neck flexion degree and gives a suggestion to the MR scanning. Cervical MRI in neutral and different flexion positions (cervical flexion angle 20°, 25°, 30°, 35°, and 40°) were performed in 45 HD patients. Three MRI features including anterior shifting of the posterior wall of the cervical dural canal (ASD), widening of cervical epidural space, and epidural flow voids (EFV) at each flexed position were summarized. To evaluate ASD quantitatively, the widest cervical epidural space with the maximum sagittal diameters (d) and cervical canal sagittal diameter (D) at the same level were measured. The d/D values at different angles were calculated and compared. ASD was demonstrated in 34 out of 45 cases (75.6%) at 20° and in all cases (100%) at other 4 angles (χ (2) = 25.728, P < 0.05). Significant difference was demonstrated for the appearance rate of EFV (mean 72.8%) among different angles (χ (2) = 11.373, P = 0.021). The peak mean d/D value was found at 35°. Neck flexion angles have effects on ASD, widening of cervical epidural space and EFV. 25° is recommended as the least effective diagnostic flexion angle for MRI diagnosis of HD, and 35° may be the best one.

  4. Infrared imaging of normal and diseased cervical tissue sections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, Bayden R.; Bambery, Keith R.; Miller, Lisa M.; Quinn, Michael; Chiriboga, Luis; Diem, Max; McNaughton, Don

    2005-02-01

    Synchrotron FTIR maps, focal plane array and linear array images recorded of 4 μm cervical biopsy sections from the surface epithelium and glandular endometrium are compared in terms of spatial resolution and applicability to the clinical environment. Synchrotron FTIR maps using a 10 μm aperture appear to provide a better spatial resolution capable of discerning single nuclei in the tissue matrix. Unsupervised hierarchical cluster analysis performed on the synchrotron, focal plane array and linear array data in the 1700-1400 cm-1 region show very similar clusters and mean-extracted spectra, demonstrating the robustness of FTIR microscopy and UHCA in the analysis of tissue sections. Maps recorded with the focal plane array using a conventional globar source take one-fortieth of the time but the spatial resolution precludes true single cell analysis in the tissue matrix. The high spatial resolution achieved with the synchrotron shows potential as a gold standard for FTIR diagnosis of cervical samples.

  5. Immunotherapy for human papillomavirus-associated disease and cervical cancer: review of clinical and translational research.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sung Jong; Yang, Andrew; Wu, T C; Hung, Chien Fu

    2016-09-01

    Cervical cancer is the fourth most lethal women's cancer worldwide. Current treatments against cervical cancer include surgery, radiotherapy, chemotherapy, and anti-angiogenic agents. However, despite the various treatments utilized for the treatment of cervical cancer, its disease burden remains a global issue. Persistent infection of human papillomavirus (HPV) has been identified as an essential step of pathogenesis of cervical cancer and many other cancers, and nation-wide HPV screening as well as preventative HPV vaccination program have been introduced globally. However, even though the commercially available prophylactic HPV vaccines, Gardasil (Merck) and Cervarix (GlaxoSmithKline), are effective in blocking the entry of HPV into the epithelium of cervix through generation of HPV-specific neutralizing antibodies, they cannot eliminate the pre-existing HPV infection. For these reason, other immunotherapeutic options against HPV-associated diseases, including therapeutic vaccines, have been continuously explored. Therapeutic HPV vaccines enhance cell-mediated immunity targeting HPV E6 and E7 antigens by modulating primarily dendritic cells and cytotoxic T lymphocyte. Our review will cover various therapeutic vaccines in development for the treatment of HPV-associated lesions and cancers. Furthermore, we will discuss the potential of immune checkpoint inhibitors that have recently been adopted and tested for their treatment efficacy against HPV-induced cervical cancer.

  6. Immunotherapy for human papillomavirus-associated disease and cervical cancer: review of clinical and translational research

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Cervical cancer is the fourth most lethal women's cancer worldwide. Current treatments against cervical cancer include surgery, radiotherapy, chemotherapy, and anti-angiogenic agents. However, despite the various treatments utilized for the treatment of cervical cancer, its disease burden remains a global issue. Persistent infection of human papillomavirus (HPV) has been identified as an essential step of pathogenesis of cervical cancer and many other cancers, and nation-wide HPV screening as well as preventative HPV vaccination program have been introduced globally. However, even though the commercially available prophylactic HPV vaccines, Gardasil (Merck) and Cervarix (GlaxoSmithKline), are effective in blocking the entry of HPV into the epithelium of cervix through generation of HPV-specific neutralizing antibodies, they cannot eliminate the pre-existing HPV infection. For these reason, other immunotherapeutic options against HPV-associated diseases, including therapeutic vaccines, have been continuously explored. Therapeutic HPV vaccines enhance cell-mediated immunity targeting HPV E6 and E7 antigens by modulating primarily dendritic cells and cytotoxic T lymphocyte. Our review will cover various therapeutic vaccines in development for the treatment of HPV-associated lesions and cancers. Furthermore, we will discuss the potential of immune checkpoint inhibitors that have recently been adopted and tested for their treatment efficacy against HPV-induced cervical cancer. PMID:27329199

  7. Junctional disc herniation syndrome in post spinal fusion treated with endoscopic spine surgery.

    PubMed

    Chiu, John C; Clifford, Thomas; Princenthal, Robert; Shaw, Stephen

    2005-01-01

    Fusions of the cervical and lumbar spine are often followed within months or several years by protrusion of discs at the adjacent level or levels. Biomechanical alterations and mobility lost at the fused levels are thought to be transferring the stress to the adjacent segments or discs, which results in accelerated degeneration of the discs and causes disc protrusion. This post-spinal fusion "junctional disc herniation syndrome" (JDHS), or the post-spinal fusion "adjacent segment disease (ASD)" can occur from 15% to 52% of post-spinal fusion, in both superior and/or inferior adjacent levels. The ways in which endoscopic minimally invasive spinal discectomy procedure can be used to treat this JDHS and preserve spinal segmental motion are discussed herein. Also, case illustrations are presented.

  8. [Cervical flexion F-waves in the patients with Hirayama diseases].

    PubMed

    Zheng, Chaojun; Lyu, Feizhou; Ma, Xiaosheng; Xia, Xinlei; Jin, Xiang; Yin, Jun; Jiang, Jianyuan; Zhu, Yu

    2015-02-01

    To identify whether there is significant changes between the cervical neutral F-waves and cervical flexion F-waves in the patients with Hirayama disease. This study was performed on 25 normal subjects and 22 male patients with identified Hirayama disease (age: 15 to 44 years; height: 165 to 183 cm; duration: 6 to 240 months) between May 2010 and March 2014. Both cervical flexion F-wave (cervical flexion 45 °, 30 minutes) and conventional F-waves to median nerve stimulation and to ulnar nerve stimulation were performed in all subjects bilaterally. were analyzed by t-test or Fisher exact probability. In the normal subjects, all measurements of the bilateral F-waves didn't have any difference between the cervical flexion position and the cervical neutral position. On the cervical neutral position, the persistence (t = 5.209, P = 0.000), average latencies (t = 4.731, P = 0.022) and minimal latencies (t = 23.843, P = 0.006) of ulnar F-wave on the symptomatic heavier side from the patients with identified Hirayama disease were significantly lower or longer than those from the normal subjects, and the repeat F-waves were found in 3 patients (13.6%). On the symptomatic lighter side, the ulnar F-waves only had lower persistence (t = 22.306, P = 0.001) along with 5 repeat F-waves. Only lower persistence were found in the median F-wave on the both side (higher side t = 23.696, P = 0.000; lighter side t = 23.998, P = 0.000), along with 5 (22.7%) repeat F-waves on the symptomatic heavier side and 6 (27.3%) ones on the symptomatic lighter side. After cervical flexion maintaining 30 minutes, the increased maximal amplitudes (t = -2.552, P = 0.019), average amplitudes (t = -3.322, P = 0.003), duration (t = -3.323, P = 0.00), persistence (t = -2.604, P = 0.017) and frequency of repeat F-waves (9/22, 41%) (P = 0.044) were found on the symptomatic heavier side of ulnar F-wave, and 5 of 10 absent ulnar F-wave on the cervical neutral position were also recover. The median F-wave on

  9. Segmental kinematics and adjacent level degeneration following disc replacement versus fusion: RCT with three years of follow-up.

    PubMed

    Nabhan, A; Steudel, W I; Nabhan, Ah; Pape, D; Ishak, B

    2007-01-01

    Prospective, randomized and controlled clinical and radiological study. The aim of this study was to assess the segmental kinematics and clinical outcome of disc replacement with ProDisc C versus anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) for monosegmental disease 3 years after surgery. Anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF), including plate fixation, is an accepted technique for treatment of symptomatic degenerative disc disease (DDD). However, various studies could show that fusion of a relative mobile spinal segment leads to heightens of stresses on the discs below and above fusion, which is manifested as adjacent level degeneration. Intervertebral disc replacement has been attempted to restore intervertebral disc height and to maintain segmental motion, which may be thought to avoid the accelerated degeneration to the adjacent level. In earlier studies, we could show that ProDisc C could maintain segmental motion for 1 year after surgery. 49 patients with cervical disc herniation underwent arthroplasty of a single level using ProDisc C disc prosthesis or received fusion using a cage and anterior titanium plate fixation. Clinical outcome was assessed using the visual analogue scale (VAS) and the neck disability index (NDI). Radiostereometry was performed immediately postoperative and then after 1, 2, and 3 years after surgery to quantify the segmental kinematics. The range of motion of the treated segment with prosthesis remained unchanged 3 years after surgery in comparison to the 1-year result. The prosthesis shows a significant segmental motion in contrast to the fusion group at each RSA examination time (p < 0.05). After both procedures, a significant pain reduction in neck and arm was observed, without significant differences between both groups. During the course of the 3 years follow-up, no patients of the prosthesis group required further surgical intervention.

  10. Calcification in the ovine intervertebral disc: a model of hydroxyapatite deposition disease

    PubMed Central

    Burkhardt, D.; Taylor, T. K. F.; Dillon, C. T.; Read, R.; Cake, M.; Little, C. B.

    2009-01-01

    The study design included a multidisciplinary examination of the mineral phase of ovine intervertebral disc calcifications. The objective of the study was to investigate the mineral phase and its mechanisms of formation/association with degeneration in a naturally occurring animal model of disc calcification. The aetiology of dystrophic disc calcification in adult humans is unknown, but occurs as a well-described clinical disorder with hydroxyapatite as the single mineral phase. Comparable but age-related pathology in the sheep could serve as a model for the human disorder. Lumbar intervertebral discs (n = 134) of adult sheep of age 6 years (n = 4), 8 years (n = 12) and 11 years (n = 2) were evaluated using radiography, morphology, scanning and transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, X-ray powder diffraction, histology, immunohistology and proteoglycan analysis. Half of the 6-year, 84% of the 8-year and 86% of the 11-year-old discs had calcific deposits. These were not well delineated by plain radiography. They were either: (a) punctate deposits in the outer annulus, (b) diffuse deposits in the transitional zone or inner annulus fibrosus with occasional deposits in the nucleus, or (c) large deposits in the transitional zone extending variably into the nucleus. Their maximal incidence was in the lower lumbar discs (L4/5–L6/7) with no calcification seen in the lumbosacral or lower thoracic discs. All deposits were hydroxyapatite with large crystallite sizes (800–1,300 Å) compared to cortical bone (300–600 Å). No type X-collagen, osteopontin or osteonectin were detected in calcific deposits, although positive staining for bone sialoprotein was evident. Calcified discs had less proteoglycan of smaller hydrodynamic size than non-calcified discs. Disc calcification in ageing sheep is due to hydroxyapatite deposition. The variable, but large, crystal size and lack of protein markers indicate that this does not occur by

  11. Quantitative morphometric study of the subaxial cervical vertebrae end plate.

    PubMed

    Feng, Hang; Fang, Xiangyi; Huang, Dageng; Yu, Chengcheng; Zhao, Songchuan; Hao, Dingjun

    2017-02-01

    Cervical disc arthroplasty has been gradually adopted as an alternative for the treatment of cervical degenerative disease. However, there is a large discrepancy between footprints of currently available cervical disc prostheses and anatomic dimensions of cervical end plates. This study aimed to accurately and comprehensively quantify the three-dimensional (3D) anatomic morphology of the cervical vertebral end plate and provide a theoretical basis for designing appropriate disc prostheses. Moreover, we introduced a novel geometric and mechanical model for 3D reconstruction techniques of the cervical end plate. A descriptive study of the geometry of the middle and lower cervical vertebral end plates in cadaveric spines was carried out. A total of 138 cervical vertebral end plates were digitized using an optical 3D range scanning system, and then each end plate was reconstructed using the digitized image. For each end plate, the morphologic characteristics of six surface curves and the end plate concavity depth were symmetrically chosen and depicted. The cranial end plates (relative to the disc) were concave and the caudal end plates were relatively flat at all disc levels, with mean concavity depths of 2.04 and 0.69 mm, respectively. For the caudal end plates, the end plate concavity apex was most often (81.42%) located in the posterior portion, whereas in the cranial end plates, the distribution was relatively even. For the sagittal curves, the foremost point and the rearmost point on the middle curve had a more forward position than those in the left curve and the right curve. Regarding the frontal plane curves, the length of the middle curve was longer than that of the anterior curve and posterior curve. For the cranial end plate, the maximal mean depth was the middle curve, whereas for the caudal end plate, the maximum depth was the posterior curve. There is marked morphologic asymmetry, in that the cranial end plate is more concave than the corresponding

  12. Cervical flexion myelopathy in a patient showing apparent long tract signs: a severe form of Hirayama disease.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Kenji; Ono, Kenjiro; Okamoto, Yoshiyuki; Murakami, Hideki; Yamada, Masahito

    2011-05-01

    We describe an 18-year-old male with cervical flexion myelopathy with Hirayama disease-like features who showed apparent long tract signs. He first experienced insidious-onset hand muscle weakness and atrophy at the age of 15. Subsequently, he developed sensory disturbance in his lower limb. Neurological examination revealed atrophy and weakness in the right hand and forearm, pyramidal signs in the right lower extremity, and disturbance of superficial sensation in the lower left half of the body. Cervical magnetic resonance images and computed tomographic myelography revealed anterior displacement with compression of the cervical cord in flexion that was more apparent in the right side. The right side of the cervical cord showed severe atrophy. The mechanisms of myelopathy in our patient appeared to be same as that of "tight dural canal in flexion," which has been reported to be the mechanism of juvenile muscular atrophy of the unilateral upper extremity (Hirayama disease). Patients with Hirayama disease generally show minimal sensory signs and no pyramidal signs. An autopsy case of Hirayama disease revealed confined necrosis of the cervical anterior horn without obvious changes in the white matter. Our patient's disease progression suggests that cervical flexion myelopathy patients with severe cervical cord compression in flexion may develop extensive cervical cord injury beyond the anterior horn.

  13. Clinical outcome of monosegmental total disc replacement for lumbar disc disease with ball-and-socket prosthesis (Maverick): prospective study with four-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Van de Kelft, Erik; Verguts, Leo

    2012-01-01

    Arthrodesis is considered to be the reference treatment for degenerative disc disease (DDD), if the symptoms are refractory to conservative management. The drawback of arthrodesis is, besides a percentage of non-union, the reduced mobility that might generate an increased load and risk for degeneration of the adjacent levels. Total disc replacement (TDR) implants may overcome this problem. The long-term clinical effect and radiographic evaluation of motion preservation after implantation, however, have been subject to several nonconclusive studies. This study evaluated the long-term clinical and radiographic results and the safety of TDR with the Maverick prosthesis for surgical treatment of monosegmental DDD. TDR was performed in 50 consecutive patients with monosegmental DDD using the Maverick device. Patients were followed prospectively for disability, quality of life, pain intensity and frequency, as well as working status and return to sports, during 48 months. Motion preservation was assessed on neutral and dynamic radiographs at 48 months. The disability, pain intensity and frequency, and quality of life improved significantly at the 6-week follow-up, which was maintained over the full 48 months following Maverick implantation. Preoperatively, 80% of the patients stopped working and 86% halted sports activities. Four years after surgery, 85% of patients were again working and 79% took up their normal sports activities. Radiographic assessment showed that motion at the index level is maintained 48 months after TDR. No major complications were encountered. In this study, TDR with the Maverick prosthesis at one lumbar segment reduced pain and disability and improved quality of life as well as the general condition. Motion was preserved at the operated level, 48 months after surgery. The long-term effect on adjacent levels needs further follow-up. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Leprotic cervical spondylodiscitis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Tae Hoon; Shin, Jun Jae; Chae, Gue Tae

    2010-01-01

    Leprosy is a chronic infectious disease caused by the Mycobacterium leprae that leads to leprotic neuropathy involving the peripheral nerve and several characteristic skin lesions. Skeletal involvement can occur in peripheral joints, such as the wrist and the ankle. However, there is no report of an axial leprotic lesion involving the spine or paraspinal soft tissue. The authors report the first case of a leprotic cervical lesion involving the axial skeletal system. A 48-year-old male presented with neck pain and severe pain in the right suprascapular area and left arm. Preoperative MRI of the cervical spine revealed signal changes in the prevertebral soft tissue at the level of the C3, 4, 5 vertebral bodies. There were a lower signal intensity on T1-weighted image and high signal intensity on T2WI of the bone marrow at the level of the C5 and C6 vertebral bodies, and a C5/6 segmental ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament. There were herniated cervical disc on the left C5/6 with C6 root and the right side of C6/7 with a C7 root compression. He was previously diagnosed with leprosy when he was 14 years old and received treatment intermittently over the course of 7 years. But patient did not disclose his past history. Surgical intervention was conducted using an anterior cervical approach. An incision was made in the anterior longitudinal ligament at C5/6, and a pinkish gray friable gelatinous material was observed on the C5/6 disc and on the anterior lower one-third surface of the C5 vertebral body. Specimens were obtained and subjected to pathological evaluation and microbiological culture. After C5/6 and C6/7 discectomies, nerve root decompression and autologous iliac bone grafting were performed at the C5/6 and C6/7 levels. The C5–6–7 vertebrae were fixed with an Atlantis® cervical locking plate and a screw system. The pathological report indicated chronic inflammation with heavy plasma cell infiltration on the specimen. We sent the specimens

  15. Guidelines for screening and treatment of cervical disease in the adolescent.

    PubMed

    Guido, Richard

    2004-10-01

    The last decade has seen a significant increase in our knowledge of HPV infection and its natural history. The advent of liquid-based cytology and HPV testing has changed the way we approach patients with abnormal Pap tests. The objective is to summarize some of the key evidence that lead to the American Society for Colposcopy and Cervical Pathology (ASCCP) guidelines for the management of abnormal cytology and histology and the American Cancer Society (ACS) cervical cancer screening guideline as they pertain to adolescents. The critical publications responsible for the recent ASCCP guidelines as well as the ACS recommendations for cervical cancer screening were reviewed. Sexually active adolescents are frequently infected by HPV. The natural history of these infections is one with a high rate of resolution. The typical HPV infection will resolve in approximately one year. The ACS has recommended that Pap test screening begin at 21, or 3 years after the onset of sexual activity. The ASCCP guidelines for the management of CIN 1 conclude that observation is the preferred therapy. These recommendations reflect our improved understanding of the natural history of HPV infection. Adolescents frequently experience transient HPV infections. As our understanding of the natural history of these infections has improved major national organizations have changed the recommendations for the screening of cervical disease and treatment of low-grade cervical abnormalities. The health care community servicing adolescents should incorporate these recommendations into daily practice.

  16. Cost analysis of Human Papillomavirus-related cervical diseases and genital warts in Swaziland

    PubMed Central

    Sartorius, Benn; Dlamini, Xolisile; Östensson, Ellinor

    2017-01-01

    Background Human papillomavirus (HPV) has proven to be the cause of several severe clinical conditions on the cervix, vulva, vagina, anus, oropharynx and penis. Several studies have assessed the costs of cervical lesions, cervical cancer (CC), and genital warts. However, few have been done in Africa and none in Swaziland. Cost analysis is critical in providing useful information for economic evaluations to guide policymakers concerned with the allocation of resources in order to reduce the disease burden. Materials and methods A prevalence-based cost of illness (COI) methodology was used to investigate the economic burden of HPV-related diseases. We used a top-down approach for the cost associated with hospital care and a bottom-up approach to estimate the cost associated with outpatient and primary care. The current study was conducted from a provider perspective since the state bears the majority of the costs of screening and treatment in Swaziland. All identifiable direct medical costs were considered for cervical lesions, cervical cancer and genital warts, which were primary diagnoses during 2015. A mix of bottom up micro-costing ingredients approach and top-down approaches was used to collect data on costs. All costs were computed at the price level of 2015 and converted to dollars ($). Results The total annual estimated direct medical cost associated with screening, managing and treating cervical lesions, CC and genital warts in Swaziland was $16 million. The largest cost in the analysis was estimated for treatment of high-grade cervical lesions and cervical cancer representing 80% of the total cost ($12.6 million). Costs for screening only represented 5% of the total cost ($0.9 million). Treatment of genital warts represented 6% of the total cost ($1million). Conclusion According to the cost estimations in this study, the economic burden of HPV-related cervical diseases and genital warts represents a major public health issue in Swaziland. Prevention of HPV

  17. One decade follow up after nucleoplasty in the management of degenerative disc disease causing low back pain and radiculopathy

    PubMed Central

    Cincu, Rafael; Lorente, Francisco de Asis; Gomez, Joaquin; Eiras, Jose; Agrawal, Amit

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Nucleoplasty is a minimally invasive procedure that is developed to treat patients with symptomatic, but contained disc herniations or bulging discs. The purpose of this study was to evaluate a decade follow-up of coblation nucleoplasty treatment for protruded lumbar intervertebral disc. Methods: In this retrospective study there a total 50 patients who underwent intradiscal coblation therapy for symptomatic, but contained lumbar degenerative disc disease were included. Relief of low back pain, leg pain and numbness after the operation were assessed by visual analog pain scale (VAS). Function of lower limb and daily living of patients were evaluated by the Oswestry disability index (ODI) and subjective global rating of overall satisfaction were recorded and analyzed. Results: There were 27 male and 23 female with followup mean follow up of 115 months (range 105–130 months) with a mean age was 52 years (range 26–74 years). Analgesic consumption was reduced or stopped in 90% of these cases after 1 year. At 24 months follow up VAS was four points and ODI was 7.2. In three patients, we repeated the cool ablation after 36 months, at L3–4 level in two cases. Ten patients continue to be asymptomatic after 114 months of intervention. There were no complications with the procedure including nerve root injury, discitis or allergic reactions. Conclusions: Nucleoplasty may provide intermittent relief in contained disc herniation without significant complications and minimal morbidity. In accordance with the literature the evidence for intradiscal coablation therapy is moderate in managing chronic discogenic low back pain; nucleoplasty appears to be safe and effective. PMID:25767571

  18. The degenerative cervical spine.

    PubMed

    Llopis, E; Belloch, E; León, J P; Higueras, V; Piquer, J

    2016-04-01

    Imaging techniques provide excellent anatomical images of the cervical spine. The choice to use one technique or another will depend on the clinical scenario and on the treatment options. Plain-film X-rays continue to be fundamental, because they make it possible to evaluate the alignment and bone changes; they are also useful for follow-up after treatment. The better contrast resolution provided by magnetic resonance imaging makes it possible to evaluate the soft tissues, including the intervertebral discs, ligaments, bone marrow, and spinal cord. The role of computed tomography in the study of degenerative disease has changed in recent years owing to its great spatial resolution and its capacity to depict osseous components. In this article, we will review the anatomy and biomechanical characteristics of the cervical spine, and then we provide a more detailed discussion of the degenerative diseases that can affect the cervical spine and their clinical management. Copyright © 2015 SERAM. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  19. Nonsurgical Management of Cervical Cancer: Locally Advanced, Recurrent, and Metastatic Disease, Survivorship, and Beyond

    PubMed Central

    Mackay, Helen J.; Wenzel, Lari; Mileshkin, Linda

    2016-01-01

    Overview Despite the declining incidence of cervical cancer as a result of the introduction of screening programs, globally it remains a leading cause of cancer-related death in women. Outcomes for patients who are diagnosed with anything but early-stage disease remain poor. Here we examine emerging strategies to improve the treatment of locally advanced disease. We discuss emerging biologic data, which are informing our investigation of new therapeutic interventions in persistent, recurrent, and metastatic cervical cancer. We recognize the importance of interventions to improve quality of life and to prevent long-term sequelae in women undergoing treatment. Finally, and perhaps most importantly, we recognize the need for global collaboration and advocacy to improve the outcome for all women at risk of and diagnosed with this disease. PMID:25993189

  20. Total disc replacement.

    PubMed

    Vital, J-M; Boissière, L

    2014-02-01

    Total disc replacement (TDR) (partial disc replacement will not be described) has been used in the lumbar spine since the 1980s, and more recently in the cervical spine. Although the biomechanical concepts are the same and both are inserted through an anterior approach, lumbar TDR is conventionally indicated for chronic low back pain, whereas cervical TDR is used for soft discal hernia resulting in cervicobrachial neuralgia. The insertion technique must be rigorous, with precise centering in the disc space, taking account of vascular anatomy, which is more complex in the lumbar region, particularly proximally to L5-S1. All of the numerous studies, including prospective randomized comparative trials, have demonstrated non-inferiority to fusion, or even short-term superiority regarding speed of improvement. The main implant-related complication is bridging heterotopic ossification with resulting loss of range of motion and increased rates of adjacent segment degeneration, although with an incidence lower than after arthrodesis. A sufficiently long follow-up, which has not yet been reached, will be necessary to establish definitively an advantage for TDR, particularly in the cervical spine. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. A Korean Case of Juvenile Muscular Atrophy of Distal Upper Extremity (Hirayama Disease) with Dynamic Cervical Cord Compression

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Ohyun; Lee, Kwang-Woo

    2004-01-01

    We present a Korean case of Hirayama disease with its typical neuroradiological findings of forward displacement of cervical dural sac and compression of the lower cervical cord during neck flexion. A 15-yr-old boy was presented with a one-year history of progressive weakness and atrophy affecting bilateral hands and forearms. The electrodiagnostic findings were compatible with the lesion of the anterior horn cells at the C7, C8, and T1 spinal segments. With neck flexion, cervical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed the anterior shifting of the lower cervical dural sac resulting in the cord compression of those segments. Presumably, this disease might have been prevalent in Korea frequently under the diagnosis of "benign focal amyotrophy". In this regard, we discuss the clinical importance of cervical MRI with neck flexion and anticipate the increasing reports of the case substantiated by its characteristic radiological features. PMID:15483361

  2. Diagnosing Discogenic Low Back Pain Associated with Degenerative Disc Disease Using a Medical Interview.

    PubMed

    Tonosu, Juichi; Inanami, Hirohiko; Oka, Hiroyuki; Katsuhira, Junji; Takano, Yuichi; Koga, Hisashi; Yuzawa, Yohei; Shiboi, Ryutaro; Oshima, Yasushi; Baba, Satoshi; Tanaka, Sakae; Matsudaira, Ko

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the usefulness of our original five questions in a medical interview for diagnosing discogenic low back pain (LBP), and to establish a support tool for diagnosing discogenic LBP. The degenerative disc disease (DDD) group (n = 42) comprised patients diagnosed with discogenic LBP associated with DDD, on the basis of magnetic resonance imaging findings and response to analgesic discography (discoblock). The control group (n = 30) comprised patients with LBP due to a reason other than DDD. We selected patients from those who had been diagnosed with lumbar spinal stenosis and had undergone decompression surgery without fusion. Of them, those whose postoperative LBP was significantly decreased were included in the control group. We asked patients in both groups whether they experienced LBP after sitting too long, while standing after sitting too long, squirming in a chair after sitting too long, while washing one's face, and in the standing position with flexion. We analyzed the usefulness of our five questions for diagnosing discogenic LBP, and performed receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis to develop a diagnostic support tool. There were no significant differences in baseline characteristics, except age, between the groups. There were significant differences between the groups for all five questions. In the age-adjusted analyses, the odds ratios of LBP after sitting too long, while standing after sitting too long, squirming in a chair after sitting too long, while washing one's face, and in standing position with flexion were 10.5, 8.5, 4.0, 10.8, and 11.8, respectively. The integer scores were 11, 9, 4, 11, and 12, respectively, and the sum of the points of the five scores ranged from 0 to 47. Results of the ROC analysis were as follows: cut-off value, 31 points; area under the curve, 0.92302; sensitivity, 100%; and specificity, 71.4%. All five questions were useful for diagnosing discogenic LBP. We established the scoring system as a

  3. Thoracolumbar partial lateral corpectomy for the treatment of chronic intervertebral disc disease in 107 dogs.

    PubMed

    Ferrand, François-Xavier; Moissonnier, Pierre; Filleur, Aurélie; Cachon, Thibaut; Fau, Didier; Viguier, Eric; Carozzo, Claude

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this retrospective study was to assess short-and medium-term outcomes in dogs with chronic ventral thoracolumbar intervertebral disc disease (IVDD) treated by thoracolumbar partial lateral corpectomy (TLPLC). Dogs surgically treated for chronic ventral IVDD by TLPLC were included. For each dog, neurological status evolution and complications were reported. Factors that could have influenced neurological recovery were statistically tested. A total of 107 dogs were included in the study. Before surgery, 67.3 % of the dogs were able to walk, 24.3 % were grade 3, and 8.4 % were grade 4. The median hospitalization time was 3 days, and 82.2 % of the dogs were able to walk at discharge. The medium-term neurological grade was reached at a median time of 2 months. At the medium-term follow-up (median 12 months), 74.3 % of the dogs were neurologically improved, 22.9 % were stable, and 2.8 % were worsened. A total of 91.4 % of dogs were ambulatory, with 58.6 % of dogs having a normal gait. Preoperative neurological grade was significantly associated with the neurological status 24 h after the surgery and at discharge. Dogs with a higher preoperative neurological grade had a better chance of improving but lower odds of walking at 24 h after the surgery and at discharge compared with dogs with a lower preoperative grade. Spinal compression recurrence at the same surgical site was confirmed in 8 cases. Even if TLPLC leads to several intra and postoperative complications, this technique is a viable surgical option to treat chronic ventral IVDD.

  4. Injectable and oral contraception and the incidence and progression of cervical disease in HIV-infected women in South Africa

    PubMed Central

    Westreich, Daniel; Jamal, Naiomi; Smith, Jennifer S.; Schulze, Doreen; Williams, Sophie; Michelow, Pam; Levin, Simon; Firnhaber, Cynthia

    2014-01-01

    Background Few data exist regarding the effect of hormonal contraception (HC) on incidence and progression of cervical disease (e.g., cervical dysplasia, squamous intraepithelial lesions, cervical intraepithelial neoplasia) in HIV-infected African women. Study Design We conducted an observational study of HIV-seropositive women in Johannesburg, South Africa. The effect of individual HC types on the incidence and progression of cervical disease was determined using Poisson regression to obtain adjusted incidence rate ratios (IRR). Results We evaluated 594 HIV-infected women, with median follow-up time of 445 days; 75 of these women were receiving some form of hormonal contraception (largely DMPA, NET-EN, or COCs) at baseline. Risks of incidence and progression of cervical disease were similar comparing women not receiving HCs to women receiving DMPA, NET-EN, or COCs both individually by HC-type and considering all HC together. Conclusions There was no statistically significant effect of particular HC methods or of HC use in general on rates of incidence or progression of cervical disease in this study. These results should reassure us that use of HC is unlikely to substantially increase risks of cervical disease among HIV-positive women. PMID:24485095

  5. Lack of Relationship Between Occupational Workload and Microscopic Alterations in Lumbar Intervertebral Disc Disease

    PubMed Central

    Huschak, Gerald; Holzhausen, Hans-Jürgen; Beier, Andre; Meisel, Hans Jörg; Hoell, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Objectives : The study investigated the impact of occupational workloads on disc surgery specimens. We report the relationship between workload and histological features. Methods : Specimens were collected prospectively from patients suffering from lumbar disc prolapse (n=90) or spinal osteochondrosis (n=19). Histomorphology and occupational workload data and histomorphological features were evaluated. Occupational data were collected in a structured, standardized patient interview assessing lifting and carrying loads. In this way the exposure was assessed for each test subject's entire working life up to surgery. Results : There was no association between cumulative workload and histological patterns. In a subgroup of patients with a workload period of 12 months prior to surgery a relevant formation of chondrocyte clusters (p=0.055) was apparent. Chondrocyte cluster formation was found in 83% (n=74) of the prolapse patients and in 58% (n=11) of the osteochondrosis patients (p=0.02). Fibrocyte mediated scar formation was found in 55% of the prolapse patients and in 45% of the spinal stenosis patients. Chondrocyte clusters and their de novo collagen matrix did not integrate biomechanically sufficient with collagen fibers of the disc. Disintegration of clusters from disc matrix and formation of intra-discal sequesters were observed. Conclusion : Matrix degeneration was common but displayed no relationship to occupational workload or other histological features. Scar formation was observed in every second specimen. Regenerative chondrocyte cluster proliferation was a common feature in disc specimens and tended to be associated in patients with a workload one year before surgery. PMID:25136392

  6. Extensive cervical lymphadenitis mimicking bacterial adenitis as the first presentation of Kawasaki disease

    PubMed Central

    Rossi, Felipe de Souza; da Silva, Marco Felipe Castro; Kozu, Kátia Tomie; Camargo, Luís Fernando Aranha; Rossi, Flávia Feijó Panico; Silva, Clovis Artur; Campos, Lúcia Maria de Arruda

    2015-01-01

    Cervical adenitis >1.5cm in diameter is the less frequently observed criteria in patients with Kawasaki disease and it is usually found in association with other symptoms during the acute phase. Moreover, the finding of fever and lymphadenitis with intense local signs of inflammation and phlegmon is rarely seen as the initial manifestation of Kawasaki disease. We report the case of a 7-year-old boy who had cervical lymphadenitis with adjacent cellulitis and phlegmon mimicking bacterial adenitis as the first presentation of Kawasaki disease. The patient had fever, cervical lymphadenitis with adjacent cellulitis, and severe headache. Cefadroxil was prescribed based on the clinical diagnosis of bacterial adenitis. Because he remained febrile and phlogistic signs worsened, after 1 day of hospitalization, antibiotics were administrated intravenously (ceftriaxone and oxacillin). The computed tomography of the neck showed primary infectious/inflammatory process. On the fourth day, the patient had dry and scaly lips, and treatment with oxacillin was replaced by clindamycin because the patient was still febrile. On the ninth day, he presented non-exudative bilateral conjunctival injection. On the tenth day of febrile disease, a rash appeared on his trunk, hands and feet. Patient’s symptoms resolved after intravenous administration of immunoglobulin (2g/kg/dose), and he was discharged 2 days later. On the 14th day, the patient had lamellar desquamation of fingers. Kawasaki disease should be considered as a differential diagnosis in children with febrile cervical lymphadenitis unresponsive to empiric antibiotics even if they have adjacent cellulitis and phlegmon. PMID:26132362

  7. [360 degrees instrumentation for cervical instability due to metastatic bone disease. Case report].

    PubMed

    Vargas-Jasso, J E; Clara-Altamirano, M A; Reyes-Soto, G; Cuéllar-Hubbe, M; Mejía-Pérez, J A

    2016-01-01

    The spine is the most common site for bone metastases; being the breast, prostate and lung cancer which have most affected. The thoracic spine is involved in 70% of cases, followed by the lumbar and cervical region. This is a 59 years old female diagnosed with breast adenocarcinoma and metastatic bone disease in cervical spine C2, C3 level and instability of that segment because of a compression fracture of C3 greater than 80% without invasion of the spinal canal, she begins with paresthesias of upper limbs. A 360º instrumentation was performed in two stages. After the surgical procedure the patient were without neck pain and a good neurological status. Metastatic bone disease causes significant damage to the spine sometimes create instability proper instrumentation is needed to improve the functional status and prognosis of these lesions.

  8. Cervical Cancer Screening in a Sexually Transmitted Disease Clinic: Screening Adoption Experiences From a Midwestern Clinic

    PubMed Central

    Sayegh, M. Aaron; Davis, Alissa; Arno, Janet N.; Zimet, Gregory D.; LeMonte, Ann M.; Williams, James A.; Barclay, Lynn; Van Der Pol, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. We examined whether a sexually transmitted disease (STD) clinic could reach women who had not received a Papanicolau (Pap) test in the past 3 years. We also explored staff attitudes and implementation of cervical cancer screening. Methods. Women (n = 123) aged 30 to 50 years were offered cervical cancer screening in an Indiana STD clinic. We measured effectiveness by the patients' self-reported last Pap test. We explored adoption of screening through focus groups with 34 staff members by documenting their attitudes about cervical cancer screening and screening strategy adaptation. We also documented recruitment and screening implementation. Results. Almost half (47.9%) of participants reported a last Pap test 3 or more years previously; 30% had reported a last Pap more than 5 years ago, and 11.4% had a high-risk test outcome that required referral to colposcopy. Staff supported screening because of mission alignment and perceived patient benefit. Screening adaptations included eligibility, results provision, and follow-up. Conclusions. Cervical cancer screening was possible and potentially beneficial in STD clinics. Future effectiveness-implementation studies should expand to include all female patients, and should examine the degree to which adaptation of selected adoption frameworks is feasible. PMID:25689199

  9. Cervical cancer screening in a sexually transmitted disease clinic: screening adoption experiences from a midwestern clinic.

    PubMed

    Meyerson, Beth E; Sayegh, M Aaron; Davis, Alissa; Arno, Janet N; Zimet, Gregory D; LeMonte, Ann M; Williams, James A; Barclay, Lynn; Van Der Pol, Barbara

    2015-04-01

    We examined whether a sexually transmitted disease (STD) clinic could reach women who had not received a Papanicolau (Pap) test in the past 3 years. We also explored staff attitudes and implementation of cervical cancer screening. Women (n = 123) aged 30 to 50 years were offered cervical cancer screening in an Indiana STD clinic. We measured effectiveness by the patients' self-reported last Pap test. We explored adoption of screening through focus groups with 34 staff members by documenting their attitudes about cervical cancer screening and screening strategy adaptation. We also documented recruitment and screening implementation. Almost half (47.9%) of participants reported a last Pap test 3 or more years previously; 30% had reported a last Pap more than 5 years ago, and 11.4% had a high-risk test outcome that required referral to colposcopy. Staff supported screening because of mission alignment and perceived patient benefit. Screening adaptations included eligibility, results provision, and follow-up. Cervical cancer screening was possible and potentially beneficial in STD clinics. Future effectiveness-implementation studies should expand to include all female patients, and should examine the degree to which adaptation of selected adoption frameworks is feasible.

  10. Propionibacterium acnes, Coagulase-Negative Staphylococcus, and the “Biofilm-like” Intervertebral Disc

    PubMed Central

    Coscia, Michael F.; Denys, Gerald A.; Wack, Matthew F.

    2016-01-01

    Study Design. Patients scheduled for spinal surgery were screened prospectively for a microbial presence associated with intervertebral disc specimens. Inclusion was limited to patients requiring surgery for any of five conditions: study patients with cervical spine intervertebral herniation (IVH), lumbar spine IVH, lumbar spine discogenic pain, and control patients with idiopathic scoliosis/Scheurermann's kyphosis or trauma/neuromuscular deformity. Exclusion criteria included ongoing systemic infection, abnormal pre-operative white cell counts, documented or suspected spinal infection, or previous surgery to the involved disc. Objective. The aim of this study was to test for an association between the presence of a bacterial entity in operated discs and a diagnosis of pathologic disc disease. Summary of Background Data. An association has been described between microbial colonization and progressive intervertebral disc degeneration in 36 herniation patients undergoing microdiscectomies. A total of 19 patients had positive cultures on long-term incubation, with Propionibacterium acnes present in 84% of discs. Materials and Methods. Discs were harvested during surgery, using strict sterile technique. Each disc was divided, with half the sample sealed in a sterile, commercially prepared anaerobic culture transport container, and half fixed in formalin. Live specimens were cultured for bacteria at a university-affiliated laboratory in a blinded fashion. Fixed pathologic specimens were gram-stained and read by a board-certified pathologist. Results. A total of 169 intervertebral discs from 87 patients were evaluated (46 males, 41 females). Positive cultures were noted in 76 of 169 discs (45%), with 34 discs positive for P. acnes and 30 discs positive for Staphylococcus. No pathologic evidence was seen of microorganisms, acute or chronic inflammation, or infection. Pooling the IVH and discogenic pain patients and contrasting them with control patients showed a

  11. Human papillomavirus type 16 long control region and E6 variants stratified by cervical disease stage

    PubMed Central

    Marongiu, Luigi; Godi, Anna; Parry, John V.; Beddows, Simon

    2014-01-01

    Objective Certain intra-type variants of HPV16 have been shown to be associated with an increased risk of developing high grade cervical disease, but their potential association is confounded by apparent geographic and phylogenetic lineage dependency. The objective of this study was to evaluate the relationship between HPV16 sequence variants and cervical disease stage in monospecific infection samples from a single lineage (European, EUR) in England. Methods One hundred and twelve women singly infected with HPV16 and displaying normal and abnormal cytology grades were selected. An 1187 bp fragment encompassing the entire LCR and a portion of the E6 open reading frame was sequenced to identify intra-type variants. Intra-type diversity was estimated using Shannon entropy. Results Almost all samples (110/112; 98%) were assigned to the EUR lineage, one sample was classified as European-Asian (EAS) and another African (Afr1a). The mean pairwise distance of the EUR sequences in this study was low (0.29%; 95%CI 0.13–0.45%) but there were nevertheless several sites in the LCR (n = 5) and E6 (n = 2) that exhibited a high degree of entropy. None of these sites, however, including the T350G non-synonymous (L83V) substitution in E6, alone or in combination, were found to be associated with cervical disease stage. Conclusions Despite using single infection samples and samples from a single variant lineage, intra-type variants of HPV16 were not differentially associated with cervical disease. Monitoring intra-lineage, site-specific variants, such as T350G, is unlikely to be of diagnostic value. PMID:24823962

  12. A prospective comparison study of fast T1 weighted fluid attenuation inversion recovery and T1 weighted turbo spin echo sequence at 3 T in degenerative disease of the cervical spine

    PubMed Central

    Bydder, G M

    2014-01-01

    Objective: This study compared T1 fluid attenuation inversion recovery (FLAIR) and T1 turbo spin echo (TSE) sequences for evaluation of cervical spine degenerative disease at 3 T. Methods: 72 patients (44 males and 28 females; mean age of 39 years; age range, 27–75 years) with suspected cervical spine degenerative disease were prospectively evaluated. Sagittal images of the spine were obtained using T1 FLAIR and T1 TSE sequences. Two experienced neuroradiologists compared the sequences qualitatively and quantitatively. Results: On qualitative evaluation, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) nulling and contrast at cord–CSF, disc–CSF and disc–cord interfaces were significantly higher on fast T1 FLAIR images than on T1 TSE images (p < 0.001). No significant difference was seen between the sequences in evaluation of neural foramina and bone–disc interface. On quantitative evaluation, the signal-to-noise ratios of cord and CSF on fast T1 FLAIR images were significantly higher than those on T1 TSE images (p < 0.05). Contrast-to-noise ratios (CNRs) of cord to CSF on T1 FLAIR images were significantly higher than those of T1 TSE images (p < 0.05). CNRs of bone to disc for T1 weighted TSE images were significantly higher than those of T1 FLAIR images (p < 0.05). Conclusion: At 3 T, T1 FLAIR imaging is superior to T1 TSE for evaluating cervical spine degenerative disease, owing to higher cord–CSF, disc–cord and disc–CSF contrast. However, intrinsic cord contrast is low on T1 FLAIR images. Advances in knowledge: T1 FLAIR is more promising and sensitive than T1 TSE for evaluation of degenerative spondyloarthropathy and may provide a foundation for development of MR protocols for early detection of degenerative and neoplastic diseases. PMID:25010068

  13. Lumbar Facet Joint Motion in Patients with Degenerative Disc Disease at Affected and Adjacent Levels

    PubMed Central

    Li, Weishi; Wang, Shaobai; Xia, Qun; Passias, Peter; Kozanek, Michal; Wood, Kirkham; Li, Guoan

    2013-01-01

    Study Design Controlled laboratory study. Objective To evaluate the effect of lumbar degenerative disc diseases (DDDs) on motion of the facet joints during functional weight-bearing activities. Summary of Background Data It has been suggested that DDD adversely affects the biomechanical behavior of the facet joints. Altered facet joint motion, in turn, has been thought to associate with various types of lumbar spine pathology including facet degeneration, neural impingement, and DDD progression. However, to date, no data have been reported on the motion patterns of the lumbar facet joint in DDD patients. Methods Ten symptomatic patients of DDD at L4–S1 were studied. Each participant underwent magnetic resonance images to obtain three-dimensional models of the lumbar vertebrae (L2–S1) and dual fluoroscopic imaging during three characteristic trunk motions: left-right torsion, left-right bending, and flexion-extension. In vivo positions of the vertebrae were reproduced by matching the three-dimensional models of the vertebrae to their outlines on the fluoroscopic images. The kinematics of the facet joints and the ranges of motion (ROMs) were compared with a group of healthy participants reported in a previous study. Results In facet joints of the DDD patients, there was no predominant axis of rotation and no difference in ROMs was found between the different levels. During left-right torsion, the ROMs were similar between the DDD patients and the healthy participants. During left-right bending, the rotation around mediolateral axis at L4–L5, in the DDD patients, was significantly larger than that of the healthy participants. During flexion-extension, the rotations around anterioposterior axis at L4–L5 and around craniocaudal axis at the adjacent level (L3–L4), in the DDD patients, were also significantly larger, whereas the rotation around mediolateral axis at both L2–L3 and L3–L4 levels in the DDD patients were significantly smaller than those of the

  14. The timed up and go test for lumbar degenerative disc disease.

    PubMed

    Gautschi, Oliver P; Corniola, Marco V; Joswig, Holger; Smoll, Nicolas R; Chau, Ivan; Jucker, Dario; Stienen, Martin N

    2015-12-01

    We report on the use and performance of an objective measure of functional impairment, the timed up and go (TUG) test, in clinical practice for patients with lumbar degenerative disc disease (DDD). We illustrate nine representative patients with lumbar DDD, who were selected from an ongoing prospective study, to report our clinical experience with the TUG test. In addition, a preliminary sample of 30 non-selected consecutive patients is presented. The following parameters were assessed preoperatively, and 3 days and 6 weeks postoperatively: back and leg pain using the visual analogue scale (VAS); functional impairment using the Oswestry disability index (ODI) and Roland-Morris disability index (RMDI); health-related quality of life using the EuroQol 5D (EQ5D) and Short-Form 12 (SF-12). The TUG test results improved by 2.6 and 5.4s after 3 days and 6 weeks compared to the baseline assessment. The mean VAS for back and leg pain decreased by 2.3 and 5.3, respectively, after 3 days, and by 2.7 and 4.6 after 6 weeks. The mean RMDI and ODI decreased by 3.4 and 23.3, respectively, after 3 days, and by 7.0 and 28.0 after 6 weeks. The mean EQ5D increased by 0.38 after 3 days and 0.358 after 6 weeks. The mean SF-12 mental component scale decreased by 0.2 after 3 days and increased by 5.6 after 6 weeks, whereas the mean SF-12 physical component scale increased by 6.4 after 3 days and by 9.8 after 6 weeks. The TUG test proved to be a useful, easy to use tool that could add a new, objective dimension to the armamentarium of clinical tests for the diagnosis and management of DDD. From our preliminary experience, we conclude that the TUG test accurately reflects a patient's objective functional impairment before and after surgery. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Validation of the baseline severity strat