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Sample records for cervical disc herniation

  1. Herniated Cervical Disc

    MedlinePlus

    ... center of the disc may start to lose water content, making the disc less effective as a cushion. As a disc deteriorates, the outer layer can also tear. This can allow displacement of the disc's center (called a herniated or ...

  2. Thalamic Pain Misdiagnosed as Cervical Disc Herniation.

    PubMed

    Lim, Tae Ha; Choi, Soo Il; Yoo, Jee In; Choi, Young Soon; Lim, Young Su; Sang, Bo Hyun; Bang, Yun Sic; Kim, Young Uk

    2016-04-01

    Thalamic pain is a primary cause of central post-stroke pain (CPSP). Clinical symptoms vary depending on the location of the infarction and frequently accompany several pain symptoms. Therefore, correct diagnosis and proper examination are not easy. We report a case of CPSP due to a left acute thalamic infarction with central disc protrusion at C5-6. A 45-year-old-male patient experiencing a tingling sensation in his right arm was referred to our pain clinic under the diagnosis of cervical disc herniation. This patient also complained of right cramp-like abdominal pain. After further evaluations, he was diagnosed with an acute thalamic infarction. Therefore detailed history taking should be performed and examiners should always be aware of other symptoms that could suggest a more dangerous disease.

  3. Percutaneous cervical nucleoplasty in the treatment of cervical disc herniation

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jian; Zhang, Zai-Heng

    2008-01-01

    Percutaneous disc decompression procedures have been performed in the past. Various percutaneous techniques such as percutaneous discectomy, laser discectomy, and nucleoplasty have been successful. Our prospective study was directly to evaluate the results of percutaneous cervical nucleoplasty (PCN) surgery for cervical disc herniation, and illustrate the effectiveness of PCN in symptomatic patients who had cervical herniated discs. From July of 2002 to June of 2005, 126 consecutive patients with contained cervical disc herniations have presented at the authors’ clinic and treated by PCN. The patients’ gender distribution for PCN was 65 male, 61 female. The age of patients ranged from 34 to 66 years (mean 51.9 ± 10.2 years). The levels of involvement were 21 cases at C3–4, 30 cases at C4–5, 40 cases at C5–6, and 35 cases at C6–7. The clinical outcomes, pain reduction and the segment stability were all recorded during this study. A clinical outcome was quantified by the Macnab standard and using VAS. The angular displacement (AD) ≥11° or horizontal displacement (HD) ≥3 mm was considered to be radiographically unstable. In the results of this study, puncture of the needle into the disc space was accurately performed under X-ray guidance in all cases. There was one case where the Perc-D Spine Wand had broken in the disc space during the procedure. The partial Perc-D Spine Wand, which had broken in the disc space could not be removed by the percutaneous cervical discectomy and thus remained there. There were no recurrent cases or complications in our series. Macnab standard results were excellent in 62 cases, good in 41 cases and fair in 23 cases. The rate of excellent and good was 83.73%. The VAS scores demonstrated statistically significant improvement in PCN at the 2-week, 1, 3, 6, and 12-month follow-up visits when compared to preoperational values (P < 0.01). There were no cases of instability following the PCN procedure. There was no

  4. Concomitance of fibromyalgia syndrome and cervical disc herniation

    PubMed Central

    Güler, Mustafa; Aydın, Teoman; Akgöl, Erdal; Taşpınar, Özgür

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] Fibromyalgia syndrome (FMS) and cervical disc herniation (CDH) are a common diseases commonly encountered in physical therapy clinics. There are also patients who have both of these diseases. In this study we aim to investigated whether FMS is a risk factor for cervical disc herniation and the frequency of their coincident occurrence. [Subjects and Methods] Thirty-five patients having a primary FMS diagnosis according to the American Rheumatism Association criteria are taken into consideration and a control group were the subjects of this study. The two groups were compared with respect to cervical disc hernia using cervical region MRI. [Results] The distribution of disc hernia of 6 fibromyalgia patients who had cervical discopathy was: 16.6% C2–3, 16.6% C5–6, 16.6% C6–7, 33.3% C4–5, C5–6 (two levels in two patients) and 16.6% C4–5, C5–6, C7–1 (three levels in one patient) . The herniation directions were given as: central in 5 levels, right paramedian in 1 level, and left paramedian disc hernia in 1 level. There were 4 cervical disk hernia in the control group. The herniation direction were central in two, right paramedian in one, and left paramedian in one patient. [Conclusion] In this study, the existence of cervical disc herniation in fibromyalgia patients was found to be not different from the normal population. PMID:25931731

  5. [Clinical application of percutaneous laser disc decompression in the treatment of cervical disc herniation].

    PubMed

    Li, Kangren; Qin, Hui; Chen, Jian

    2007-05-01

    To evaluate the clinical effect of percutaneous laser disc decompression (PLDD) in the treatment of cervical disc herniation. From March 2003 to December 2005, 47 patients with cervical disc herniation (96 cervical disc) were treated with PLDD. There were 25 males and 22 females with an average age of 56 years, ranging from 37 to 72 years. The lesion were located at the levels of C3,4 in 20 discs, C4,5 in 27 discs, C5,6 in 31 discs, C6,7 in 18 discs. The laser fiber was introduced into the center of the herniated disc space by percutaneous puncture from anterior neck surface under fluoroscopic guidance. Laser reduced the intra-disc pressure through the vaporization of disc nucleu. The adopted laser was semi-conducted with a wavelength of 810 nm. Each laser output power was 15 W with 1 s emission and 2 s interval. The total laser output power was decided depending on the degenerative degree of the disc and the reactive process of heat, ranging from 300 to 1 000 J. Of 47 patients, 42 were followed up for 3 to 31 months (mean 13 months). The clinical evaluation was classified as excellent in 18 cases (42.9%), good in 14 cases (33.3%), fair in 6 cases (14.3%) and poor in 4 cases (9.5%). The general response rate was 90.5%. The excellent and good rate was 76.2%. No complications occurred. PLDD can relieve the symptoms and signs of patients suffering from cervical disc herniation with less complication. The manipulation of PLDD is easy, safe and mini-invasive.

  6. Higher risk for cervical herniated intervertebral disc in physicians

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Cheng; Huang, Chien-Cheng; Hsu, Chien-Chin; Lin, Hung-Jung; Guo, How-Ran; Su, Shih-Bin; Wang, Jhi-Joung; Weng, Shih-Feng

    2016-01-01

    Abstract There is no study about cervical herniated intervertebral disc (cervical HIVD) in physicians in the literature; therefore, we conceived a retrospective nationwide, population-based cohort study to elucidate the topic. We identified 26,038 physicians, 33,057 non-physician healthcare providers (HCPs), and identical numbers of non-HCP references (i.e., general population). All cohorts matched a 1:1 ratio with age and gender, and each were chosen from the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database (NHIRD). We compared cervical HIVD risk among physicians, nonphysician HCPs, and non-HCP references and performed a follow-up between 2007 and 2011. We also made comparisons among physician specialists. Both physicians and nonphysician HCPs had higher cervical HIVD risk than non-HCP references (odds ratio [OR]: 1.356; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.162–1.582; OR: 1.383; 95% CI: 1.191–1.605, respectively). There was no significant difference of cervical HIVD risk between physicians and nonphysician HCPs. In the comparison among physician specialists, orthopedists had a higher cervical HIVD risk than other specialists, but the difference was not statistically significant (adjusted OR: 1.547; 95% CI: 0.782–3.061). Physicians are at higher cervical HIVD risk than the general population. Because unknown confounders could exist, further prospective studies are needed to identify possible causation. PMID:27741118

  7. Cervical disc herniation as a trigger for temporary cervical cord ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Acker, Güliz; Schneider, Ulf C.; Grozdanovic, Zarko; Vajkoczy, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Background Disc herniations are only reported in few case reports as a rare cause of acute spinal ischemia. A surgical treatment has not been described so far in these reports with analysis of diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging (DWI/MRI) before and after surgery. The aim of our study is to report a case of cervical spinal cord ischemia caused by cervical disc herniation and discuss the literature concerning diagnostic and treatment options. Methods A 72-year-old female patient developed an acute progressive tetraparesis with emphasis on the upper extremities. MRI showed a disc herniation at the cervical segment 5/6 (C5/6) with consecutive spinal canal stenosis and additional signs of spinal cord ischemia in T2-weighted imaging (T2WI) and DWI reaching from C3 to C5 level. With the MRI being highly suggestive for anterior spinal cord ischemia, we hypothesized that this might be caused by compression of the anterior spinal artery through the significant disc herniation. Therefore, we decided to perform an anterior discectomy and fusion at C5/6 level. Results Following surgery, the patient’s symptoms showed immediate regression with complete recovery after two months in correspondence with the normalization in the control MRI scan of cervical cord. Conclusions Assumedly our patient suffered from a partial anterior spinal artery syndrome, possibly caused by a disc herniation-related compression that was reversible following surgery. This was accompanied by a complete resolution of spinal cord signal abnormalities in T2WI and DWI. PMID:27683710

  8. Minimally Invasive Anterior Cervical Discectomy Without Fusion to Treat Cervical Disc Herniations in Patients with Previous Cervical Fusions.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, Robert E; Granville, Michelle; Berti, Aldo

    2017-04-03

    Adjacent level cervical disc disease and secondarily progressive disc space degeneration that develops years after previously successful anterior cervical fusion at one or more levels is a common, but potentially complex problem to manage. The patient is faced with the option of further open surgery which involves adding another level of disc removal with fusion, posterior decompression, and stabilization, or possibly replacing the degenerated disc with an artificial disc construct. These three cases demonstrate that some patients, especially after minor trauma, may have small herniated discs as the cause for their new symptoms rather than progressive segmental degeneration. Each patient became symptomatic after minor trauma three to six years after the original fusion and had no or minimal radiologic changes of narrowing of the disc or spur formation commonly seen in adjacent level disease, but rather had magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings typical of small herniated discs. After failing multiple months of conservative treatment they were offered surgery as an option. Subsequently, all three were successfully treated with minimal anterior discectomy without fusion. There are no reports in the literature of using minimal anterior cervical discectomy without fusion in previous fused patients. This report reviews the background of adjacent level cervical disease, the various biomechanical explanations for developing a new disc herniation rather than progressive segmental degeneration, and how anterior cervical discectomy without fusion can be an option in these patients.

  9. Brown-Sequard syndrome produced by calcified herniated cervical disc and posterior vertebral osteophyte: Case report

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Dawei; Wang, Guanjun; Clare, Morgan; Kuang, Zhengda

    2015-01-01

    Brown-Sequard syndrome (BSS) produced by cervical disc disorders has rarely been seen clinically and only 50 cases have been reported in English literatures. However, most of which have resulted from acute disc herniation. Here, we report a case of BSS produced by calcified herniated C4-C5 disc and posterior vertebral osteophyte, in which decompression through anterior approach was performed. This case revealed the potential of cervical spondylopathy leading to BSS in a chronic manner. Once the diagnosis is established, it is advisable to perform decompression as early as possible. PMID:27047233

  10. Management of Chronic Pain of Cervical Disc Herniation and Radiculitis with Fluoroscopic Cervical Interlaminar Epidural Injections

    PubMed Central

    Manchikanti, Laxmaiah; Cash, Kimberly A.; Pampati, Vidyasagar; Wargo, Bradley W.; Malla, Yogesh

    2012-01-01

    Study Design: A randomized, double-blind, active controlled trial. Objective: To evaluate the effectiveness of cervical interlaminar epidural injections of local anesthetic with or without steroids in the management of chronic neck pain and upper extremity pain in patients with disc herniation and radiculitis. Summary of Background Data: Epidural injections in managing chronic neck and upper extremity pain are commonly employed interventions. However, their long-term effectiveness, indications, and medical necessity, of their use and their role in various pathologies responsible for persistent neck and upper extremity pain continue to be debated, even though, neck and upper extremity pain secondary to disc herniation and radiculitis, is described as the common indication. There is also paucity of high quality literature. Methods: One-hundred twenty patients were randomly assigned to one of 2 groups: Group I patients received cervical interlaminar epidural injections of local anesthetic (lidocaine 0.5%, 5 mL); Group II patients received 0.5% lidocaine, 4 mL, mixed with 1 mL of nonparticulate betamethasone. Primary outcome measure was ≥ 50 improvement in pain and function. Outcome assessments included Numeric Rating Scale (NRS), Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), opioid intake, employment, and changes in weight. Results: Significant pain relief and functional status improvement (≥ 50%) was demonstrated in 72% of patients who received local anesthetic only and 68% who received local anesthetic and steroids. In the successful group of participants, significant improvement was illustrated in 77% in local anesthetic group and 82% in local anesthetic with steroid group. Conclusions: Cervical interlaminar epidural injections with or without steroids may provide significant improvement in pain and function for patients with cervical disc herniation and radiculitis. PMID:22859902

  11. One stage laminoplasty and posterior herniotomy for the treatment of myelopathy caused by cervical stenosis with cervical disc herniation

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Bin; Chen, Bohua; Ma, Xue-Xiao; Xi, Yong-Ming; Xiang, Hong-Fei; Hu, You-Gu; Zhang, Guoqing

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study was to introduce a method of one stage laminoplasty and posterior herniotomy for myelopathy caused by cervical stenosis with cervical disc herniation and to evaluate the clinical efficacy of this surgery. From 1999 to 2008, 18 patients with myelopathy caused by cervical stenosis with cervical disc herniation who underwent this procedure were included. The average age was 63 years (range 48-74 years), and the average follow-up period was 46 months (range 3-108 months). Neurologic status was evaluated using the JOA scoring system. Neurological symptoms improvement was seen in all patients after surgery. The average JOA score was 14.22±1.86 by final follow-up, which was higher than preoperative values (P<0.01), and the average improvement in neurological function was 76.63%. Neurologic examination showed that excellent results had been obtained by 10 patients, good results by 8 patients, with no fair or poor results. 2 patients developed cerebrospinal fluid leakage after surgery and recovered during the follow-up period. One patient with cervical disc herniation developed postoperative C5 palsy on the axle side on the third day after surgery. She completely recovered by 1 month after surgery. No other patients experienced postoperative neurologic complications. Complete anterior and posterior decompression of the spinal cord was achieved after surgery. We concluded that one stage laminoplasty and posterior herniotomy is an effective, reliable, and safe procedure for the treatment of myelopathy caused by cervical stenosis with cervical disc herniation. PMID:26309625

  12. Spontaneous Cervical Intradural Disc Herniation Associated with Ossification of Posterior Longitudinal Ligament

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Dachuan; Wang, Haifeng; Shen, Wun-Jer

    2014-01-01

    Intradural herniation of a cervical disc is rare; less than 35 cases have been reported to date. A 52-year-old man with preexisting ossification of posterior longitudinal ligament developed severe neck pain with Lt hemiparesis while asleep. Neurological exam was consistent with Brown-Séquard syndrome. Magnetic resonance images showed a C5-6 herniated disc that was adjacent to the ossified ligament and indenting the cord. The mass was surrounded by cerebrospinal fluid signal intensity margin, and caudally the ventral dura line appears divided into two, consistent with the “Y-sign” described by Sasaji et al. Cord edema were noted. Because of preexisting canal stenosis and spinal cord at risk, a laminoplasty was performed, followed by an anterior C6 corpectomy. Spot-weld type adhesions of the posterior longitudinal ligament to the dura was noted, along with a longitudinal tear in the dura. An intradural extra-arachnoid fragment of herniated disc was removed. Clinical exam at 6 months after surgery revealed normal muscle strength but persistent mild paresthesias. It is difficult to make a definite diagnosis of intradural herniation preoperatively; however, the clinical findings and radiographic signs mentioned above are suggestive and should alert the surgeon to look for an intradural fragment. PMID:25295205

  13. Plasma disc decompression for contained cervical disc herniation: a randomized, controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Nardi, Pier Vittorio

    2009-01-01

    Prospective case series studies have shown that plasma disc decompression (PDD) using the COBLATION SpineWand device (ArthroCare Corporation, Austin, TX) is effective for decompressing the disc nucleus in symptomatic contained cervical disc herniations. This prospective, randomized controlled clinical trial was conducted to evaluate the clinical outcomes of percutaneous PDD as compared to conservative care (CC) through 1 year. Patients (n = 115) had neck/arm pain >50 on the visual analog scale (VAS) pain scale and had failed at least 30 days of failed CC. Patients were randomly assigned to receive either PDD (n = 62) or CC (n = 58). Clinical outcome was determined by VAS pain score, neck disability index (NDI) score, and SF-36 health survey, collected at 6 weeks, 3 months, 6 months, and 1 year. The PDD group had significantly lower VAS pain scores at all follow-up time points (PDD vs. CC: 6 weeks, −46.87 ± 2.71 vs. −15.26 ± 1.97; 3 months, −53.16 ± 2.74 vs. −30.45 ± 2.59; 6 months, −56.22 ± 2.63 vs. −40.26 ± 2.56; 1 year, −65.73 ± 2.24 vs. −36.45 ± 2.86; GEE, P < 0.0001). PDD patients also had significant NDI score improvement over baseline when compared to CC patients at the 6 weeks (PDD vs. CC: −9.15 ± 1.06 vs. −4.61 ± 0.53, P < 0.0001) and 1 year (PDD vs. CC: −16.70 ± 0.29 vs. −12.40 ± 1.26, P = 0.005) follow-ups. PDD patients showed statistically significant improvement over baseline in SF-36 physical component summary scores when compared to CC patients at 6 weeks and 1 year (PDD vs. CC: 8.86 + 8.04 vs. 4.24 ± 3.79, P = 0.0004; 17.64 ± 10.37 vs. 10.50 ± 10.6, P = 0.0003, respectively). In patients who had neck/arm pain due to a contained cervical disc herniation, PDD was associated with significantly better clinical outcomes than a CC regimen. At 1 year, CC patients appeared to suffer a “relapse, showing signs of decline in most measurements, whereas PDD

  14. Cervical intervertebral disc herniation treatment via radiofrequency combined with low-dose collagenase injection into the disc interior using an anterior cervical approach

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhi-Jian; Zhu, Meng-Ye; Liu, Xiao-Jian; Zhang, Xue-Xue; Zhang, Da-Ying; Wei, Jian-Mei

    2016-01-01

    Abstract This study aimed to determine the therapeutic effect of radiofrequency combined with low-dose collagenase injected into the disc interior via an anterior cervical approach for cervical intervertebral disc herniation. Forty-three patients (26–62-year old; male/female ratio: 31/12) with cervical intervertebral disc herniation received radiofrequency combined with 60 to 100 U of collagenase, injected via an anterior cervical approach. The degree of nerve function was assessed using the current Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) scoring system at 3 and 12 months postoperation. A visual analogue scale (VAS) was used to evaluate the degree of pain preoperation and 7 days postoperation. The preoperative and 3 month postoperative protrusion areas were measured and compared via magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and picture archiving and communication systems (PACS). Compared with the preoperative pain scores, the 7-day postoperative pain was significantly reduced (P <0.01). The excellent and good rates of nerve function amelioration were 93.0% and 90.7% at 3 and 12 months postoperation, respectively, which was not significantly different. Twenty-seven cases exhibited a significantly reduced protrusion area (P <0.01) at 3 months postoperation. No serious side effects were noted. To our knowledge, this is the first study to demonstrate that the use of radiofrequency combined with low-dose collagenase injection into the disc interior via an anterior cervical approach is effective and safe for the treatment of cervical intervertebral disc herniation. PMID:27336892

  15. Operative and nonoperative treatment of cervical disc herniation in National Football League athletes.

    PubMed

    Meredith, Dennis S; Jones, Kristofer J; Barnes, Ronnie; Rodeo, Scott A; Cammisa, Frank P; Warren, Russell F

    2013-09-01

    Limited evidence exists to guide clinical decision making regarding cervical disc herniations in professional athletes playing for the National Football League (NFL) in the United States. To describe the presentation and treatment outcomes of cervical disc herniations in NFL athletes with a focus on safety and return to sport. Case series; Level of evidence, 4. The records of a single NFL team and its consulting physicians were reviewed from 2000 to 2011. Only athletes with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-proven disc herniation concordant with the reported symptoms were included. A total of 16 athletes met inclusion criteria. Linemen, linebackers, and defensive backs were the most represented positions (13/16 athletes; 81%). The most common presentation was radiculopathy after a single traumatic event (9/16 athletes; 56%). Three players had transient paresis. Three players underwent one-level anterior cervical discectomy and fusion. These 3 players had failed nonoperative therapy and had evidence of spinal cord compression with signal change on MRI, but only 1 returned to sport. Three players received epidural steroid injections, which provided transient symptomatic relief. Five players were treated nonoperatively and did not return to sport. Two of these 5 athletes had cord compression with signal change and retired rather than undergo surgery. The other 3 were cleared but were released by the team. Eight players were treated nonoperatively and returned to sport. Three of these 8 athletes had evidence of disc material abutting the cord without cord signal change but had a normal examination finding and returned to sport after resolution of their symptoms and repeat MRI that demonstrated no cord compression. Five of the 8 players had evidence of root compression and were treated symptomatically. There were no subsequent traumatic spinal cord injuries at a minimum of 1-year follow-up. Data regarding the treatment of this unique population are limited but suggest

  16. Cervical Intradural Disc Herniation Causing Progressive Quadriparesis After Spinal Manipulation Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Hwan-Seo; Oh, Young-Min; Eun, Jong-Pil

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Cervical intradural disc herniation (IDH) is an extremely rare condition, comprising only 0.27% of all disc herniations. Three percent of IDHs occur in the cervical, 5% in the thoracic, and over 92% in the lumbar spinal canal. There have been a total of 31 cervical IDHs reported in the literature. The pathogenesis and imaging characteristics of IDH are not fully understood. A preoperative diagnosis is key to facilitating prompt intradural exploration in patients with ambivalent findings, as well as in preventing reoperation. The purpose of reporting our case is to remind clinicians to consider the possibility of cervical IDH during spinal manipulation therapy in patient with chronic neck pain. The patient signed informed consent for publication of this case report and any accompanying image. The ethical approval of this study was waived by the ethics committee of Chonbuk National University Hospital, because this study was case report and the number of patients was <3. A 32-year-old man was transferred our emergency department with progressive quadriparesis. He had no history of trauma, but had received physical therapy with spinal manipulation for chronic neck pain over the course of a month. The day prior, he had noticed neck pain and tingling in the bilateral upper and lower extremities during the manipulation procedure. The following day, he presented with bilateral weakness of all 4 extremities, which rendered him unable to walk. Neurological examination demonstrated a positive Hoffmann sign and ankle clonus bilaterally, hypoesthesia below the C5 dermatome, 3/5 strength in the bilateral upper extremities, and 2/5 strength in the lower extremities. This motor weakness was progressive, and he further complained of voiding difficulty. Urgent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the cervical spine revealed large, central disc herniations at C4–C5 and C5–C6 that caused severe spinal cord compression and surrounding edema. We performed C4–C5–C6

  17. Evaluation of treatment effectiveness for the herniated cervical disc: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Gebremariam, Lukas; Koes, Bart W; Peul, Wilco C; Huisstede, Bionka M

    2012-01-15

    Systematic review. To assess the effectiveness of interventions for treating cervical disc herniation. Cervical disc herniation is 1 of the 23 specific disorders included in the CANS (Complaints of the Arm, Neck, and/or Shoulder) model. Treatment options range from conservative to surgical, but evidence for the effectiveness of these interventions is not yet well documented. The Cochrane Library, MEDLINE, EMBASE, PEDro, and CINAHL were searched for relevant systematic reviews and randomized clinical trials (RCTs) up to February 2009. Two reviewers independently selected relevant studies, assessed the methodological quality, and extracted data. Pooling of the data was not possible; thus, a best-evidence synthesis was used to summarize the results. Of the 11 RCTs included, 1 compared conservative with surgical intervention, and 10 compared various surgical interventions. No evidence was found for the effectiveness of conservative treatment (nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, cortisonics, and physical therapy) compared with percutaneous nucleoplasty. Moderate evidence was found for the effectiveness of anterior cervical discectomy with fusion (ACDF) using a titanium cage compared with ACDF using polymethyl methacrylate, and for BRYAN cervical disc (Medtronic Sofamor Danek, Memphis, TN) prostheses compared with ACDF using allograft bone and plating. No outcomes regarding adjacent-level disease were reported. There is conflicting evidence for the effectiveness of ACD compared with ACDF. Only limited or no evidence was found for the other surgical interventions. No evidence for effectiveness of conservative treatment compared with surgery was found. Although there is moderate evidence for the effectiveness of some surgical interventions, no unequivocal evidence for the superiority of 1 particular surgical treatment was found. Worldwide, most patients receive supplementary implants; however, cervical discectomy without graft may be preferred because of similar outcomes

  18. Cervical stability training with and without core stability training for patients with cervical disc herniation: A randomized, single-blind study.

    PubMed

    Buyukturan, B; Guclu-Gunduz, A; Buyukturan, O; Dadali, Y; Bilgin, S; Kurt, E E

    2017-11-01

    This study aims at evaluating and comparing the effects of cervical stability training to combined cervical and core stability training in patients with neck pain and cervical disc herniation. Fifty patients with neck pain and cervical disc herniation were included in the study, randomly divided into two groups as cervical stability and cervical-core stability. Training was applied three times a week in three phases, and lasted for a total duration of 8 weeks. Pain, activation and static endurance of deep cervical flexor muscles, static endurance of neck muscles, cross-sectional diameter of M. Longus Colli, static endurance of trunk muscles, disability and kinesiophobia were assessed. Pain, activation and static endurance of deep cervical flexors, static endurance of neck muscles, cross-sectional diameter of M. Longus Colli, static endurance of trunk muscles, disability and kinesiophobia improved in both groups following the training sessions (p < 0.05). Comparison of the effectiveness of these two training methods revealed that the cervical stability group produced a greater increase in the right transverse diameter of M. Longus Colli (p < 0.05). However, static endurance of trunk muscles and kinesiophobia displayed better improvement in the cervical-core stability group (p < 0.05). Cervical stability training provided benefit to patients with cervical disc herniation. The addition of core stability training did not provide any additional significant benefit. Further research is required to investigate the efficacy of combining other techniques with cervical stability training in patients with cervical disc herniation. Both cervical stability training and its combination with core stability training were significantly and similarly effective on neck pain and neck muscle endurance in patients with cervical disc herniation. © 2017 European Pain Federation - EFIC®.

  19. Cervical Radiculopathy Due to Disc Herniation with Adjacent Facet Hypertrophy: Case Report

    PubMed Central

    YAMAHATA, Hitoshi; YASUDA, Muneyoshi; AOYAMA, Tatsuro; OSUKA, Koji; ARITA, Kazunori; TAKAYASU, Masakazu

    2014-01-01

    We report a rare case of cervical radiculopathy associated with facet hypertrophy and disc herniation. The patient was a 38-year-old woman with sudden-onset left arm pain. As conservative therapy failed to alleviate her symptoms she was referred to us. On physical examination she manifested no neurological deficits except pain and dysesthesia in the left C7 territory. Computed tomography revealed hypertrophic ossified changes in the left T1 facet joint with encroachment on the spinal canal. Magnetic resonance imaging showed compression of the spinal cord at C6/7 by disc herniation at C6/7. Anterior cervical decompression and fusion by corpectomy (C7 corpectomy and C6/T1 fixation with a titanium cage) ameliorated her pain. Facet hypertrophy in a morphologically normal cervicothoracic spine is extremely rare and its etiology is unknown. We speculate the possibility that our patient harbored a congenital anomaly and that the morphologic changes were the consequence of an injury she sustained in a traffic accident. PMID:24477059

  20. Brachioradial pruritus in a patient with cervical disc herniation and Parsonage-Turner syndrome*

    PubMed Central

    Carvalho, Sandrina; Sanches, Madalena; Alves, Rosário; Selores, Manuela

    2015-01-01

    Brachioradial pruritus is a chronic sensory neuropathy of unknown etiology which affects the skin of the shoulders, arms and forearms on the insertion of the brachioradialis muscle. We describe the case of a 60-yearold woman recently diagnosed with multiple myeloma who refers paresis, severe pruritus and itching lesions on the right arm with 6 months of evolution. Investigation led to a diagnosis of Brachioradial pruritus consequent to the presence of cervical disc herniation and Parsonage-Turner syndrome. The patient started gabapentin 900mg/day with good control of itching. Corticosteroids and antihistamines are often ineffective in the treatment of BP. Gabapentin has been used with encouraging results. All patients with Brachioradial pruritus should be evaluated for cervical spine injuries. PMID:26131874

  1. Brachioradial pruritus in a patient with cervical disc herniation and Parsonage-Turner syndrome.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Sandrina; Sanches, Madalena; Alves, Rosário; Selores, Manuela

    2015-01-01

    Brachioradial pruritus is a chronic sensory neuropathy of unknown etiology which affects the skin of the shoulders, arms and forearms on the insertion of the brachioradialis muscle. We describe the case of a 60-year old woman recently diagnosed with multiple myeloma who refers paresis, severe pruritus and itching lesions on the right arm with 6 months of evolution. Investigation led to a diagnosis of Brachioradial pruritus consequent to the presence of cervical disc herniation and Parsonage-Turner syndrome. The patient started gabapentin 900 mg/day with good control of itching. Corticosteroids and antihistamines are often ineffective in the treatment of BP. Gabapentin has been used with encouraging results. All patients with Brachioradial pruritus should be evaluated for cervical spine injuries.

  2. Herniated Lumbar Disc

    MedlinePlus

    ... at and just below the waist. A herniated lumbar disc can press on the nerves in the spine and may cause pain, numbness, ... point injections do not help heal a herniated lumbar ... on and irritating the nerves, causing symptoms of pain and weakness. The most ...

  3. The impact of generalized joint laxity (GJL) on the posterior neck pain, cervical disc herniation, and cervical disc degeneration in the cervical spine.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sun-Mi; Oh, Su Chan; Yeom, Jin S; Shin, Ji-Hoon; Park, Sam-Guk; Shin, Duk-Seop; Ahn, Myun-Whan; Lee, Gun Woo

    2016-12-01

    Generalized joint laxity (GJL) can have a negative impact on lumbar spine pathology, including low back pain, disc degeneration, and disc herniation, but the relationship between GJL and cervical spine conditions remains unknown. To investigate the relationship between GJL and cervical spine conditions, including the prevalence of posterior neck pain (PNP), cervical disc herniation (CDH), and cervical disc degeneration (CDD), in a young, active population. Retrospective 1:2 matched cohort (case-control) study from prospectively collected data PATIENT SAMPLE: Of a total of 1853 individuals reviewed, 73 individuals with GJL (study group, gruop A) and 146 without GJL (control group, Group B) were included in the study according to a 1:2 case-control matched design for age, sex, and body mass index. The primary outcome measure was the prevalence and intensity of PNP at enrollment based on a visual analogue scale score for pain. The secondary outcome measures were (1) clinical outcomes as measured with the neck disability index (NDI) and 12-item short form health survey (SF-12) at enrollment, and (2) radiological outcomes of CDH and CDD at enrollment. We compared baseline data between groups. Descriptive statistical analyses were performed to compare the 2 groups in terms of the outcome measures. The prevalence and intensity of PNP were significantly greater in group A (patients with GJL) than in group B (patients without GJL) (prevalence: p=.02; intensity: p=.001). Clinical outcomes as measured with NDI and SF-12 did not differ significantly between groups. For radiologic outcomes, the prevalence of CDD was significantly greater in group A than in group B (p=.04), whereas the prevalence of CDH did not differ significantly between groups (p=.91). The current study revealed that GJL was closely related to the prevalence and intensity of PNP, suggesting that GJL may be a causative factor for PNP. In addition, GJL may contribute to the occurrence of CDD, but not CDH. Spine

  4. Hemifacial hyperhidrosis associated with ipsilateral/contralateral cervical disc herniation myelopathy. Functional considerations on how compression pattern determines the laterality.

    PubMed

    Iwase, Satoshi; Inukai, Yoko; Nishimura, Naoki; Sato, Maki; Sugenoya, Junichi

    2014-01-01

    Sweating is an important mechanism for ensuring constant thermoregulation, but hyperhidrosis may be disturbing. We present five cases of hemifacial hyperhidrosis as a compensatory response to an/hypohidrosis caused by cervical disc herniation. All the patients complained of hemifacial hyperhidrosis, without anisocoria or blepharoptosis. Sweat function testing and thermography confirmed hyperhidrosis of hemifacial and adjacent areas. Neck MRI showed cervical disc herniation. Three of the patients had lateral compression with welldemarcated hypohidrosis below the hyperhidrosis on the same side as the cervical lesion. The rest had paramedian compression with poorly demarcated hyperhidrosis and hypohidrosis on the contralateral side. Although MRI showed no intraspinal pathological signal intensity, lateral dural compression might influence the circulation to the sudomotor pathway, and paramedian compression might influence the ipsilateral sulcal artery, which perfuses the sympathetic descending pathway and the intermediolateral nucleus. Sweat function testing and thermography should be performed to determine the focus of the hemifacial hyperhidrosis, and the myelopathy should be investigated on both sides.

  5. Clinical Case Report of Expansive Laminoplasty for Cervical Myelopathy Due to Both Disc Herniation and Developmental Cervical Spinal Canal Stenosis in Older Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Hua; Sun, Yu; Zhang, Fengshan; Dang, Gengting; Liu, Zhongjun

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Reports on adolescent patients with cervical myelopathy who underwent anterior cervical discectomy and fusion are scarce. However, to our knowledge, no cases of expansive laminoplasty for cervical myelopathy associated with progressive neurological deficit after a series of conservative treatment, caused by both disc herniation and developmental cervical spinal canal stenosis, have been reported. From January 2006 to July 2012, we retrospectively studied 3 patients in late adolescence presenting with cervical myelopathy who underwent expansive unilateral open-door laminoplasty at our hospital. The outcomes after the surgery were evaluated according to the Japanese Orthopedic Association scores. Symptoms presented by these patients were due to both disc herniation and developmental cervical spinal canal stenosis. No major complications occurred after the surgical procedures. The median follow-up time was 66 months (range 36–112 months). The Japanese Orthopedic Association scores after surgery showed a significant increase. Long-term outcomes after surgery were satisfactory according to the evaluation criteria for the Japanese Orthopedic Association scores. However, the ranges of motion of the cervical spine decreased, especially the ranges of motion on flexion after surgery showed a significant decrease. Expansive laminoplasty is helpful for older adolescent patients with cervical myelopathy due to both disc herniation and developmental cervical spinal canal stenosis, presenting with progressive neurological deficit after long conservative treatment. PMID:26937923

  6. Disc herniations in the National Football League.

    PubMed

    Gray, Benjamin L; Buchowski, Jacob M; Bumpass, David B; Lehman, Ronald A; Mall, Nathan A; Matava, Matthew J

    2013-10-15

    Retrospective analysis of a prospectively collected database. To determine the overall incidence, location, and type of disc herniations in professional football players to target treatment issues and prevention. Disc herniations represent a common and debilitating injury to the professional athlete. The NFL's (National Football League's) Sports Injury Monitoring System is a surveillance database created to monitor the league for all injuries, including injuries to the cervical, thoracic, and lumbar spine. A retrospective analysis was performed on all disc herniations to the cervical, thoracic, and lumbar spine during a 12-season period (2000–2012) using the NFL's surveillance database. The primary data points included the location of the injury, player position, activity at time of injury, and playing time lost due to injury. During the 12 seasons, 275 disc herniations occurred in the spine. In regard to location, 76% occurred in the lumbar spine and most frequently affected the L5–S1 disc. The offensive linemen were most frequently injured. As expected, blocking was the activity that caused most injuries. Lumbar disc herniations rose in prevalence and had a mean loss of playing time of more than half the season (11 games). Thoracic disc herniations led to the largest mean number of days lost overall, whereas players with cervical disc herniations missed the most practices. Disc herniations represent a significant cause of morbidity in the NFL. Although much attention is placed on spinal cord injuries, preventive measures targeting the cervical, thoracic, and lumbar spine may help to reduce the overall incidence of these debilitating injuries. N/A

  7. Clinical Efficacy of Selective Focal Ablation by Navigable Percutaneous Disc Decompression Device in Patients With Cervical Herniated Nucleus Pulposus

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the clinical efficacy and safety following percutaneous disc decompression, using navigable disc decompression device for cervical herniated nucleus pulposus (HNP). Methods Twenty subjects diagnosed with cervical HNP and refractory to conservative management were enrolled for the study. The herniated discs were decompressed under fluoroscopic guidance, using radiofrequency ablation device with navigable wand. The sagittal and axial plain magnetic resonance images of the clinically significant herniated disc, decided the space between the herniated base and outline as the target area for ablation. Clinical outcome was determined by Numeric Rating Scale (NRS), Neck Disability Index (NDI), and Bodily Pain scale of Short Form-36 (SF-36 BP), assessed after 48 weeks. After the procedure, we structurally matched the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and C-arm images through bony markers. The wand position was defined as being ‘correct’ if the tip was placed within the target area of both AP and lateral views; if not, the position was stated as ‘incorrect’. Results The average NRS fell from 7 to 1 at 48 weeks post procedure (p<0.05). In addition, statistically significant improvement was noted in the NDI and SF-36BP (p<0.05). The location of the wand tip resulted in 16 correct and 4 incorrect placements. Post-48 weeks, 3 of the incorrect tip cases and 1 correct tip case showed unsuccessful outcomes. Conclusion The study demonstrated the promising results and safety of the procedure. Thus, focal plasma ablation of cervical HNP with navigable wand can be another effective treatment option. PMID:28289639

  8. Altered expression of metalloproteinase-2 and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-2 in cervical disc herniation patients.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, H M; Xu, G T; Wen, S F; Guo, Y Y; Huang, Q

    2016-04-26

    The aim of the current study was to examine matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-2 (TIMP-2) expression in patients with cervical disc herniation (CDH). A total of 127 specimens from CDH patients undergoing posterior spinal surgery were obtained for the case group, which was divided into three subgroups: lateral protrusion (N = 102), median protrusion (N = 18), and paramedian protrusion (N = 7). Another 55 specimens from subjects who had cervical spine trauma and underwent spinal canal decompression were obtained for the control group. Routine hematoxylin and eosin staining was performed for pathological diagnosis. Immunohistochemical (IHC) analysis was used to determine MMP-2 and TIMP-2 expression. Under light microscopy, MMP-2-positive cells presented brown-yellow or dark brown staining in the cell membrane or cytoplasm. MMP-2 expression in the case group was significantly higher than that in controls (P < 0.05). Furthermore, MMP-2 expression in the lateral and median protrusion groups was significantly higher compared to that in the paramedian protrusion group (both P < 0.05), while there was no apparent difference in MMP-2 expression between the lateral and median protrusion groups (P > 0.05). IHC results showed that TIMP-2 expression in cases was significantly lower than that in controls (P < 0.05). Spearman correlation analysis indicated that MMP- 2 was negatively correlated with TIMP-2 expression (r = -0.418, P < 0.001). In conclusion, MMP-2 expression increased, whereas TIMP- 2 expression decreased in CDH patients, suggesting that MMP-2 and TIMP-2 expression may contribute to CDH development.

  9. Morphological changes in disc herniation in the lower cervical spine: an ultrastructural study.

    PubMed

    Sitte, Ingrid; Kathrein, Anton; Pedross, Florian; Freund, Martin C; Pfaller, Kristian; Archer, Charles W

    2012-07-01

    The basis of disc degeneration is still unknown, but is believed to be a cell-mediated process. Apoptosis might play a major role in degenerative disc disease (DDD). The aim of this study was to correlate the viability of disc cells with the radiological degeneration grades (rDG) in disc herniation. Forty anterior IVD's (C4-C7) from 39 patients with DDD were studied histologically and ultrastructurally to quantify healthy, "balloon", chondroptotic, apoptotic and necrotic cells. Patients were classified to their rDG, as having either prolapse (P: DGII + III) and/or osteochondrosis (O: DGIV + V). Similar studies were undertaken on eight control discs. Cell death by necrosis (mean 35%) was common but differed not significantly in both groups. All patients with a disc prolapse DGII + III revealed balloon cells (iAF: mean 32%). All appeared alive and sometimes were hypertrophic. However, significantly less balloon cells were found in the O-Group. Control samples revealed no evidence of "balloon" cells in DGII and only a minor rate in DGIII. According to the different rDG, quantitative changes were obvious in healthy and "balloon" cells, but not for cell death. At the moment it can only be hypothesized if "balloon" cells are part of a repair strategy and/or cause of disc herniation.

  10. LUMBAR DISC HERNIATION

    PubMed Central

    Vialle, Luis Roberto; Vialle, Emiliano Neves; Suárez Henao, Juan Esteban; Giraldo, Gustavo

    2015-01-01

    Lumbar disc herniation is the most common diagnosis among the degenerative abnormalities of the lumbar spine (affecting 2 to 3% of the population), and is the principal cause of spinal surgery among the adult population. The typical clinical picture includes initial lumbalgia, followed by progressive sciatica. The natural history of disc herniation is one of rapid resolution of the symptoms (four to six weeks). The initial treatment should be conservative, managed through medication and physiotherapy, sometimes associated with percutaneous nerve root block. Surgical treatment is indicated if pain control is unsuccessful, if there is a motor deficit greater than grade 3, if there is radicular pain associated with foraminal stenosis, or if cauda equina syndrome is present. The latter represents a medical emergency. A refined surgical technique, with removal of the extruded fragment and preservation of the ligamentum flavum, resolves the sciatic symptoms and reduces the risk of recurrence over the long term. PMID:27019834

  11. Comparison of Clinical Efficacy Between Interlaminar and Transforaminal Epidural Injection in Patients With Axial Pain due to Cervical Disc Herniation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jung Hwan; Lee, Sang-Ho

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Transforaminal (TF) approach is preferred by physician to interlaminar (IL) approach because it can deliver injectates directly around nerve root and dorsal root ganglion, which is regarded as main pain sources. Axial neck pain is originated from sinuvertebral nerve located in ventral epidural spaces, which has been described to be related to central or paramedian disc herniation. It is very questionable that TF injection is also more effective than IL injection in the patients with axial neck or interscapular pain. This study was to evaluate clinical efficacy of cervical epidural injection in patients with axial pain due to cervical disc herniation and to compare the clinical outcomes between TF and IL approaches. Fifty-six and 52 patients who underwent IL and TF epidural injections, respectively, for axial neck/interscapular pain due to central or paramedian cervical disc herniation were included. Numeric Rating Scale (NRS) and Neck Disability Index (NDI) were compared between both groups at 2 and 8 weeks after treatment. Successful pain relief was defined if a 50% or more reduction of NRS score was achieved in comparison with pretreatment one. Successful functional improvement was defined if at least a 40% reduction of NDI was obtained. Overall, 79 (73.1%) and 57 (52.8%) among 108 patients showed successful pain relief at 2 and 8 weeks, respectively. Seventy-six (70.4%) and 52 (48.1%) had successful functional improvement at 2 and 8 weeks, respectively. The IL and TF groups showed no significant difference in proportion of successful results of NRS 2 weeks (73.2% vs 67.3%) and 8 weeks (48.2% vs 48.1%). Also, no significant difference was obtained in proportion of successful NDI between 2 groups at 2 weeks (75.0% vs 71.2%) and 8 weeks (53.6% vs 51.9%). Cervical epidural injection showed favorable results in 2 weeks and moderate results in 8 weeks in patients with axial pain due to cervical disc herniation. IL and TF showed no significant difference in

  12. Clinical and magnetic resonance imaging features of compressive cervical myelopathy with traumatic intervertebral disc herniation in cynomolgus macaque (Macaca fascicularis)

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Yun-Jung; Park, Hye-Jin; Sohn, Chul-Ho; Jung, Kyeong Cheon; Park, Seong Hoe

    2016-01-01

    Intervertebral disc herniation (IVDH) with nucleus pulposus extrusion, traumatic or not, is a devastating clinical condition accompanied by neurological problems. Here we report a cynomolgus macaque suffering from acute and progressive neurological dysfunction by a blunt trauma due to neck collar, an animal handling device. Tetraplegia, urinary incontinence, decreased proprioception, and imperception of pain were shown on physical and neurological examinations. MRI sagittal T2 weighted sequences revealed an extensive protrusion of disc material between C2 and C3 cervical vertebra, and this protrusion resulted in central stenosis of the spinal cord. Histopathologic findings showed a large number of inflammatory cells infiltrated at sites of spinal cord injury (SCI). This case is the first report of compressive cervical SCI caused by IVDH associated with blunt trauma. PMID:28053621

  13. Clinical and magnetic resonance imaging features of compressive cervical myelopathy with traumatic intervertebral disc herniation in cynomolgus macaque (Macaca fascicularis).

    PubMed

    Choi, Yun-Jung; Park, Hye-Jin; Sohn, Chul-Ho; Jung, Kyeong Cheon; Park, Seong Hoe; Lee, Jae-Il

    2016-12-01

    Intervertebral disc herniation (IVDH) with nucleus pulposus extrusion, traumatic or not, is a devastating clinical condition accompanied by neurological problems. Here we report a cynomolgus macaque suffering from acute and progressive neurological dysfunction by a blunt trauma due to neck collar, an animal handling device. Tetraplegia, urinary incontinence, decreased proprioception, and imperception of pain were shown on physical and neurological examinations. MRI sagittal T2 weighted sequences revealed an extensive protrusion of disc material between C2 and C3 cervical vertebra, and this protrusion resulted in central stenosis of the spinal cord. Histopathologic findings showed a large number of inflammatory cells infiltrated at sites of spinal cord injury (SCI). This case is the first report of compressive cervical SCI caused by IVDH associated with blunt trauma.

  14. Hemifacial hyperhidrosis associated with ipsilateral/contralateral cervical disc herniation myelopathy. Functional considerations on how compression pattern determines the laterality

    PubMed Central

    Iwase, Satoshi; Inukai, Yoko; Nishimura, Naoki; Sato, Maki; Sugenoya, Junichi

    2014-01-01

    Summary Sweating is an important mechanism for ensuring constant thermoregulation, but hyperhidrosis may be disturbing. We present five cases of hemifacial hyperhidrosis as a compensatory response to an/hypohidrosis caused by cervical disc herniation. All the patients complained of hemifacial hyperhidrosis, without anisocoria or blepharoptosis. Sweat function testing and thermography confirmed hyperhidrosis of hemifacial and adjacent areas. Neck MRI showed cervical disc herniation. Three of the patients had lateral compression with well-demarcated hypohidrosis below the hyperhidrosis on the same side as the cervical lesion. The rest had paramedian compression with poorly demarcated hyperhidrosis and hypohidrosis on the contralateral side. Although MRI showed no intraspinal pathological signal intensity, lateral dural compression might influence the circulation to the sudomotor pathway, and paramedian compression might influence the ipsilateral sulcal artery, which perfuses the sympathetic descending pathway and the intermediolateral nucleus. Sweat function testing and thermography should be performed to determine the focus of the hemifacial hyperhidrosis, and the myelopathy should be investigated on both sides. PMID:25014051

  15. The NEtherlands Cervical Kinematics (NECK) Trial. Cost-effectiveness of anterior cervical discectomy with or without interbody fusion and arthroplasty in the treatment of cervical disc herniation; a double-blind randomised multicenter study

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Patients with cervical radicular syndrome due to disc herniation refractory to conservative treatment are offered surgical treatment. Anterior cervical discectomy is the standard procedure, often in combination with interbody fusion. Accelerated adjacent disc degeneration is a known entity on the long term. Recently, cervical disc prostheses are developed to maintain motion and possibly reduce the incidence of adjacent disc degeneration. A comparative cost-effectiveness study focused on adjacent segment degeneration and functional outcome has not been performed yet. We present the design of the NECK trial, a randomised study on cost-effectiveness of anterior cervical discectomy with or without interbody fusion and arthroplasty in patients with cervical disc herniation. Methods/Design Patients (age 18-65 years) presenting with radicular signs due to single level cervical disc herniation lasting more than 8 weeks are included. Patients will be randomised into 3 groups: anterior discectomy only, anterior discectomy with interbody fusion, and anterior discectomy with disc prosthesis. The primary outcome measure is symptomatic adjacent disc degeneration at 2 and 5 years after surgery. Other outcome parameters will be the Neck Disability Index, perceived recovery, arm and neck pain, complications, re-operations, quality of life, job satisfaction, anxiety and depression assessment, medical consumption, absenteeism, and costs. The study is a randomised prospective multicenter trial, in which 3 surgical techniques are compared in a parallel group design. Patients and research nurses will be kept blinded of the allocated treatment for 2 years. The follow-up period is 5 years. Discussion Currently, anterior cervical discectomy with fusion is the golden standard in the surgical treatment of cervical disc herniation. Whether additional interbody fusion or disc prothesis is necessary and cost-effective will be determined by this trial. Trial Registration Netherlands

  16. Spontaneous cervical intradural disc herniation presenting with Brown-Séquard and Horner's syndrome: lesson learned from a very unique case.

    PubMed

    Baudracco, Irene; Grahovac, Gordan; Russo, Vittorio M

    2017-05-01

    Cervical spontaneous intradural disc herniation (IDH) is an extremely rare condition. We describe a unique case of a patient presenting with a Brown-Séquard syndrome (BSS) and Horner's syndrome (HS). This study aimed to report an unusual case of spontaneous cervical intradural disc herniation that presented with Horner's and Brown-Séquard syndrome (BSS) and discuss difficulties in preoperative diagnosis and treatment difficulties of intradural cervical disc. Notes and images review, and analysis of the relevant literature. A 45-year old female presented with acute Horner's syndrome and Brown-Séquard syndrome. The magnetic resonance imaging of cervical spine revealed C4-5 disc extrusion with cord compression. The patient underwent urgent decompression through an anterior cervical corpectomy and fusion. Patient fully recovered 6 months after disease onset. We would like to emphasize that prompt and anterior cervical decompression is the treatment of choice, as it directly address the problem and allows dura repair in spontaneous cervical disc herniation.

  17. Fluoroscopic cervical epidural injections in chronic axial or disc-related neck pain without disc herniation, facet joint pain, or radiculitis

    PubMed Central

    Manchikanti, Laxmaiah; Cash, Kimberly A; Pampati, Vidyasagar; Malla, Yogesh

    2012-01-01

    Background While chronic neck pain is a common problem in the adult population, with a typical 12-month prevalence of 30%–50%, there is a lack of consensus regarding its causes and treatment. Despite limited evidence, cervical epidural injections are one of the commonly performed nonsurgical interventions in the management of chronic neck pain. Methods A randomized, double-blind, active, controlled trial was conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of cervical interlaminar epidural injections of local anesthetic with or without steroids for the management of chronic neck pain with or without upper extremity pain in patients without disc herniation, radiculitis, or facet joint pain. Results One hundred and twenty patients without disc herniation or radiculitis and negative for facet joint pain by means of controlled diagnostic medial branch blocks were randomly assigned to one of two treatment groups, ie, injection of local anesthetic only (group 1) or local anesthetic mixed with nonparticulate betamethasone (group 2). The primary outcome of significant pain relief and improvement in functional status (≥50%) was demonstrated in 72% of group 1 and 68% of group 2. The overall average number of procedures per year was 3.6 in both groups with an average total relief per year of 37–39 weeks in the successful group over a period of 52 weeks. Conclusion Cervical interlaminar epidural injections of local anesthetic with or without steroids may be effective in patients with chronic function-limiting discogenic or axial pain. PMID:22826642

  18. An investigation of a cluster of cervical herniated discs among container truck drivers with occupational exposure to whole-body vibration.

    PubMed

    Lan, Fan-Yun; Liou, Yuh-Wehn; Huang, Kuo-Yuan; Guo, How-Ran; Wang, Jung-Der

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to determine if occupational exposure to whole-body vibration is associated with cervical intervertebral disc herniation among container truck drivers. We conducted a walk-through survey among container truck drivers and unexposed workers. We also measured the vibration hazard of the container truck over the driver's back and seat when the driver was loading a container and driving the loaded truck. Among the 38 workers interviewed, 32 were container truck drivers. Four of them reported cervical herniated discs, and all of these individuals were container truck drivers with a job tenure of greater than 10 years. Self-reported cervical herniated disc, nuchal pain, nocturia, arm/forearm weakness, arm/forearm numbness, and finger numbness were significantly more prevalent as the driver's duration of exposure increased (all p values of test for trend <0.05). The vibration of the truck during and after loading a container was considered the main cause of herniated disc. When a container truck was driven with a loaded container, both the vertical and horizontal vibrating acceleration over the seat and back sites exceeded the 8-hr exposure level based on the ISO 2631-1 criteria. The transient vibration dose values (VDVs) measured during misaligned or unsmooth loading operations were usually greater than the upper bounds of the health guidance caution zone for the 8-hr VDV. Our investigation disclosed a cluster of cervical intervertebral disc herniation that was associated with the vibration hazard during long-term container truck driving under full load and possibly aggravated by misaligned loading operations.

  19. Anterior cervical discectomy and fusion with titanium cages for simple or multilevel herniated discs and spur of the cervical spine: Report of 2 cases and experience in Bali

    PubMed Central

    Mahadewa Tjokorda, G. B.; Nyoman, Golden; Sri, Maliawan; Junichi, Mizuno

    2016-01-01

    This report presents two cases of cervicobrachialgia and radiculopathy due to multiple cervical herniated discs and spur formation that dealt with anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) using different titanium interbody cages. The description of the clinical presentation, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) appearances and management strategy are discussed. Both cases showed chronic neck pain and radiating pain from the shoulder to the arm. They had a history of blurry vision, cluster head ache, weakness, and numbness on the shoulder for 2 years. MRI revealed multiple herniated discs between C4-7 and accompanied by the spur formation leading to the narrowness of the spinal canal and its foramina bilaterally. ACDF were performed and complete decompression of the spinal canal and its foramina were carried out. Twin M-cages (Ammtec Inc.-Japan) were placed in the first case at C5-7 levels and single cage of Smith Robinson (SR) was placed in the second case at C5-6 levels. There were no more blurry vision, cluster headache, weakness, and numbness, immediately after surgery. To our knowledge, this is the first reported cases of ACDF, using twin M-cages and single SR cage in Indonesia, with improvement immediately after surgery. Cervical spondylosis can present with cervicobrachialgia and radiculopathy and surgical treatment produces good functional outcome. PMID:27695567

  20. Anterior cervical discectomy and fusion with titanium cages for simple or multilevel herniated discs and spur of the cervical spine: Report of 2 cases and experience in Bali.

    PubMed

    Mahadewa Tjokorda, G B; Nyoman, Golden; Sri, Maliawan; Junichi, Mizuno

    2016-01-01

    This report presents two cases of cervicobrachialgia and radiculopathy due to multiple cervical herniated discs and spur formation that dealt with anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) using different titanium interbody cages. The description of the clinical presentation, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) appearances and management strategy are discussed. Both cases showed chronic neck pain and radiating pain from the shoulder to the arm. They had a history of blurry vision, cluster head ache, weakness, and numbness on the shoulder for 2 years. MRI revealed multiple herniated discs between C4-7 and accompanied by the spur formation leading to the narrowness of the spinal canal and its foramina bilaterally. ACDF were performed and complete decompression of the spinal canal and its foramina were carried out. Twin M-cages (Ammtec Inc.-Japan) were placed in the first case at C5-7 levels and single cage of Smith Robinson (SR) was placed in the second case at C5-6 levels. There were no more blurry vision, cluster headache, weakness, and numbness, immediately after surgery. To our knowledge, this is the first reported cases of ACDF, using twin M-cages and single SR cage in Indonesia, with improvement immediately after surgery. Cervical spondylosis can present with cervicobrachialgia and radiculopathy and surgical treatment produces good functional outcome.

  1. Reliability of cervical radiculopathy, its congruence between patient history and medical imaging evidence of disc herniation and its role in surgical decision.

    PubMed

    Mostofi, Keyvan; Khouzani, Reza Karimi

    2016-10-01

    The incidence of cervical disc herniation is estimated about 5.5/100,000, and they lead to surgical intervention in 26 %. Cervical disc herniation causes radiculopathy, which defines by radicular pain and sensory deficit and maybe weakness following the path of the affected nerves. Classically, cervical radiculopathy is expected to follow its specific dermatome-C4, C5, C6, C7 and C8. We investigate patients who present with discrepancy between classical radiculopathy and imaging findings in the daily practice of our profession. We reviewed the medical records of 102 patients with cervical radiculopathy, caused by cervical disc herniation. All patients had surgery. We found an apparent discrepancy between clinical and radiological findings, patients complained of radiculopathy on one side, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan or CT scan finding on the other side in ten patients (10.2 %). We did not found any other abnormalities in preoperative and post-operative period. All patients underwent cervical diskectomy via anterior approach. Six weeks after surgery eight patients (80 %) recovered completely, and 3 months after all ten patients (100 %) had been relieved totally. The aim of this paper is review of this medical concept and management of radiculopathy in patients with this discrepancy. As far as we know, the subject has not yet been touched in this light in medical literature. The discrepancy between clinical radiculopathy and disc herniation level on MRI or on CT scan is not rare. Management of this discrepancy requires further investigation to avoid missing diagnosis and treatment failure.

  2. Does the Level of Cervical Disc Herniation Surgery Affect Performance-based Outcomes in National Football League Athletes?

    PubMed

    Mai, Harry T; Burgmeier, Robert J; Mitchell, Sean M; Hecht, Andrew C; Maroon, Joseph C; Nuber, Gordon W; Hsu, Wellington K

    2016-12-01

    Retrospective cohort study. The aim of this study was to determine whether the level of a cervical disc herniation (CDH) procedure will uniquely impact performance-based outcomes in elite athletes of the National Football League (NFL). Comparative assessments of postsurgical outcomes in NFL athletes with CDH at different levels are unknown. Further, the surgical decision-making for these types of injuries in professional football athletes remains controversial. NFL players with a CDH injury at a definitive cervical level were identified through a review of publicly available archives. Injuries were divided into upper- (C2-C4) and lower-level (C4-T1) CDH. The impact on player outcomes was determined by comparing return to play statistics and calculating a "Performance Score" for each player on the basis of pertinent statistical data, both before and after surgery. A total of 40 NFL athletes met inclusion criteria. In the upper-level group, 10 of 15 (66.6%) players successfully returned to play an average of 44.6 games over 2.6 years. The lower-level cohort had 18 of 25 (72%) players return to play with an average of 44.1 games over 3.1 years. There was no significant difference in the rate of return to play (P = 0.71). Postsurgical performance scores of the upper and lower-level groups were 1.47 vs. 0.69 respectively, with no significant difference between these groups (P = 0.06). Adjacent segment disease requiring reoperation occurred in 10% of anterior cervical discectomy and fusion patients. In 50% of foraminotomy patients, a subsequent fusion was required. A uniquely high percentage of upper-level disc herniations develop in NFL athletes, and although CDH injuries present career threatening implications, an upper-level CDH does not preclude a player from successfully returning to play at a competitive level. In fact, these athletes showed comparable postsurgical performance to those athletes who underwent CDH procedures at lower cervical levels. 4.

  3. Hybrid Corpectomy and Disc Arthroplasty for Cervical Spondylotic Myelopathy Caused by Ossification of Posterior Longitudinal Ligament and Disc Herniation.

    PubMed

    Chang, Huang-Chou; Tu, Tsung-Hsi; Chang, Hsuan-Kan; Wu, Jau-Ching; Fay, Li-Yu; Chang, Peng-Yuan; Wu, Ching-Lan; Huang, Wen-Cheng; Cheng, Henrich

    2016-11-01

    The combination of anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) and anterior cervical corpectomy and fusion (ACCF) has been demonstrated to be effective for multilevel cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM); however, the combination of ACCF and cervical disc arthroplasty (CDA) for 3-level CSM has never been addressed. Consecutive patients (>18 years of age) with CSM caused by segmental ossification of posterior longitudinal ligament (OPLL) and degenerative disc disease (DDD) were reviewed. Inclusion criteria were patients who underwent hybrid ACCF and CDA surgery for symptomatic 3-level CSM with OPLL and DDD. Medical and radiologic records were reviewed retrospectively. A total of 15 patients were analyzed with a mean follow-up of 18.1 ± 7.42 months. Every patient had hybrid surgery composed of 1-level ACCF (for segmental-type OPLL causing spinal stenosis) and 1-level CDA at the adjacent level (for DDD causing stenosis). All clinical outcomes, including visual analogue scale of neck and arm pain, Neck Disability Index, Japanese Orthopedic Association scores, and Nurick scores of myelopathy, demonstrated significant improvement at 12 months after surgery. All patients (100%) achieved arthrodesis for the ACCF (instrumented) and preserved mobility for CDA (preoperation 6.2 ± 3.81° vs. postoperation 7.0 ± 4.18°; P = 0.579). For patients with multilevel CSM caused by segmental OPLL and DDD, the hybrid surgery of ACCF and CDA demonstrated satisfactory clinical and radiologic outcomes. Moreover, although located next to each other, the instrumented ACCF construct and CDA still achieved solid arthrodesis and preserved mobility, respectively. Therefore, hybrid surgery may be a reasonable option for the management of CSM with OPLL. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Lumbar Epidural Varix Mimicking Disc Herniation

    PubMed Central

    Bursalı, Adem; Guvenal, Ahmet Burak; Yaman, Onur

    2016-01-01

    Lumbar radiculopathy is generally caused by such well-recognized entity as lumbar disc herniation in neurosurgical practice; however rare pathologies such as thrombosed epidural varix may mimic them by causing radicular symptoms. In this case report, we present a 26-year-old man with the complaint of back and right leg pain who was operated for right L4–5 disc herniation. The lesion interpreted as an extruded disc herniation preoperatively was found to be a thrombosed epidural varix compressing the nerve root preoperatively. The nerve root was decompressed by shrinking the lesion with bipolar thermocoagulation and excision. The patient's complaints disappeared in the postoperative period. Thrombosed lumbar epidural varices may mimic lumbar disc herniations both radiologically and clinically. Therefore, must be kept in mind in the differential diagnosis of lumbar disc herniations. Microsurgical techniques are mandatory for the treatment of these pathologies and decompression with thermocoagulation and excision is an efficient method. PMID:27446525

  5. Hybrid cervical disc arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Tu, Tsung-Hsi; Wu, Jau-Ching; Cheng, Henrich; Mummaneni, Praveen V

    2017-01-01

    For patients with multilevel cervical stenosis at nonadjacent segments, one of the traditional approaches has included a multilevel fusion of the abnormal segments as well as the intervening normal segment. In this video we demonstrate an alternative treatment plan with tailored use of a combination of anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) and cervical disc arthroplasty (CDA) with an intervening skipped level. The authors present the case of a 72-year-old woman with myeloradiculopathy and a large disc herniation with facet joint degeneration at C3-4 and bulging disc at C5-6. After nonoperative treatment failed, she underwent a single-level ACDF at C3-4 and single-level arthroplasty at C5-6, which successfully relieved her symptoms. No intervention was performed at the normal intervening C4-5 segment. By using ACDF combined with arthroplasty, the authors have avoided a 3-level fusion for this patient and maintained the range of motion of 2 disc levels. The video can be found here: https://youtu.be/OrxcPUBvqLk .

  6. Factors that influence recurrent lumbar disc herniation.

    PubMed

    Yaman, M E; Kazancı, A; Yaman, N D; Baş, F; Ayberk, G

    2017-06-01

    The most common cause of poor outcome following lumbar disc surgery is recurrent herniation. Recurrence has been noted in 5% to 15% of patients with surgically treated primary lumbar disc herniation. There have been many studies designed to determine the risk factors for recurrent lumbar disc herniation. In this study, we retrospectively analysed the influence of disc degeneration, endplate changes, surgical technique, and patient's clinical characteristics on recurrent lumbar disc herniation. Patients who underwent primary single-level L4-L5 lumbar discectomy and who were reoperated on for recurrent L4-L5 disc herniation were retrospectively reviewed. All these operations were performed between August 2004 and September 2009 at the Neurosurgery Department of Ataturk Education and Research Hospital in Ankara, Turkey. During the study period, 126 patients were reviewed, with 101 patients underwent primary single-level L4-L5 lumbar discectomy and 25 patients were reoperated on for recurrent L4-L5 disc herniation. Preoperative higher intervertebral disc height (P<0.001) and higher body mass index (P=0.042) might be risk factors for recurrence. Modic endplate changes were statistically significantly greater in the recurrent group than in the non-recurrent group (P=0.032). Our study suggests that patients who had recurrent lumbar disc herniation had preoperative higher disc height and higher body mass index. Modic endplate changes had a higher tendency for recurrence of lumbar disc herniation. Well-planned and well-conducted large-scale prospective cohort studies are needed to confirm this and enable convenient treatment modalities to prevent recurrent disc pathology.

  7. Symptoms of thoracolumbar junction disc herniation.

    PubMed

    Tokuhashi, Y; Matsuzaki, H; Uematsu, Y; Oda, H

    2001-11-15

    A retrospective clinical review of patients with thoracolumbar junction disc herniation. To evaluate the clinical features of thoracolumbar junction disc herniation and to prepare a chart for the level diagnosis in the neurologic findings and symptoms. Thoracolumbar junction disc herniations show a variety of signs and symptoms because of the complexity of the upper and lower neurons of the spinal cord, cauda equina, and nerve roots. Furthermore, much is still unknown about thoracolumbar junction disc herniations because of their rare frequency. The clinical features of 26 patients who had undergone operations for single disc herniations at T10-T11 through L2-L3 were investigated. Affected levels were as follows: 2 patients with disc herniation at T10-T11 disc, 4 patients at T11-T12, 3 patients at T12-L1, 6 patients at L1-L2, and 11 patients at L2-L3. The level of disc space of interest was confirmed with whole-spine plain roentgenograms. The caudal end of the cord was judged by magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomographic myelogram. Two patients with T10-T11 disc herniation showed moderate lower extremity weakness, increased patellar tendon reflex, and sensory disturbance of the entire lower extremities. Three of four patients with T11-T12 disc herniation experienced lower extremity weakness, and three patients had accentuated patellar tendon reflex. Sensory disturbance was observed in the anterolateral aspect of the thigh in one patient and on the entire leg in three patients. Bowel and bladder dysfunction was noted in three patients. In the T12-L1 disc herniation group (n = 3), muscle weakness and atrophy below the leg were advanced, and bowel and bladder dysfunction were also noted. Two of these three patients had bilateral drop foot, and one patient had unilateral drop foot; sensory disturbance was noted in the sole or foot and around the circumference of the anus, and the patellar tendon reflex and Achilles tendon reflex were absent. All six patients

  8. Herniated Cervical Disc

    MedlinePlus

    Toggle navigation CONDITIONS Low Back Pain Acute Low Back Pain Chronic Low Back Pain SI Joint Pain Other Scoliosis Back Pain and Emotional Distress Muscle Spasms Pinched Nerve Discitis Degenerative Conditions Bulge vs ...

  9. [Case-control study on Zero-profile implant for anterior cervical discectomy and fusion and conventional cage plate internal fixation for the treatment of single segmental cervical intervertebral disc herniation].

    PubMed

    Shao, Hai-yu; Zhang, Jun; Yang, Di; Chen, Jin-ping; Huang, Ya-zeng

    2016-06-01

    To compare clinical efficacy of Zero-profile implant for anterior cervical discectomy and fusion and conventional titanium plate with cage internal fixation for the treatment of single segmental cervical intervertebral disc herniation. From August 2011 to March 2014, clinical data of 139 patients with single cervical disc herniation treated with anterior cervical discectomy and interbody fusion with internal fixation were retrospectively analyzed. The patients were divided into two groups according to its operation method. There were 63 patients in group A which performed anterior discectomy and interbody fusion with Zero-profile;76 patients in group B which performed anterior cervical discectomy and cage plate internal fixation. JOA score and Odom functional rating between two groups were compared before and after operation. Videofluorographic swallowing study (VFSS) were used to evaluate thickness of prevertebral soft tissue. Bazaz dysphagia score were used to assess incidence of dysphagia. Postoperative AP X-ray and CT of cervical vertebra at 12 months were applied for evaluating bone graft fusion. Postoperative MRI was applied for evaluating the incidence of adjacent segment degeneration. Blood loss,operative time, preoperative and postoperative JOA score, Odom functional rating and VFSS score, Bazaz score, fusion rate between vertebral bodies and incidence of adjacent segment degeneration were compared between two groups. There were no statistical meaning between two groups in JOA score, Odom functional rating before and after operation (P > 0.05); and no significant meaning in VFSS score between two groups before operation (P > 0.05); There were no significant difference in operative time and blood loss. There was statistical meaning in VFSS, Bazaz dysphagia score at 2 days, and 6 months after operation (P < 0.05). All patients obtained bone union at 1 year after operation, and no obvious meaning in fusion rate (P > 0.05). Eight patients (12.7%) in group A

  10. Cervical disc hernia operations through posterior laminoforaminotomy

    PubMed Central

    Yolas, Coskun; Ozdemir, Nuriye Guzin; Okay, Hilmi Onder; Kanat, Ayhan; Senol, Mehmet; Atci, Ibrahim Burak; Yilmaz, Hakan; Coban, Mustafa Kemal; Yuksel, Mehmet Onur; Kahraman, Umit

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The most common used technique for posterolateral cervical disc herniations is anterior approach. However, posterior cervical laminotoforaminomy can provide excellent results in appropriately selected patients with foraminal stenosis in either soft disc prolapse or cervical spondylosis. The purpose of this study was to present the clinical outcomes following posterior laminoforaminotomy in patients with radiculopathy. Materials and Methods: We retrospectively evaluated 35 patients diagnosed with posterolateral cervical disc herniation and cervical spondylosis with foraminal stenosis causing radiculopathy operated by the posterior cervical keyhole laminoforaminotomy between the years 2010 and 2015. Results: The file records and the radiographic images of the 35 patients were assessed retrospectively. The mean age was 46.4 years (range: 34-66 years). Of the patients, 19 were males and 16 were females. In all of the patients, the neurologic deficit observed was radiculopathy. The posterolaterally localized disc herniations and the osteophytic structures were on the left side in 18 cases and on the right in 17 cases. In 10 of the patients, the disc level was at C5-6, in 18 at C6-7, in 2 at C3-4, in 2 at C4-5, in 1 at C7-T1, in 1 patient at both C5-6 and C6-7, and in 1 at both C4-5 and C5-6. In 14 of these 35 patients, both osteophytic structures and protruded disc herniation were present. Intervertebral foramen stenosis was present in all of the patients with osteophytes. Postoperatively, in 31 patients the complaints were relieved completely and four patients had complaints of neck pain and paresthesia radiating to the arm (the success of operation was 88.5%). On control examinations, there was no finding of instability or cervical kyphosis. Conclusion: Posterior cervical laminoforaminotomy is an alternative appropriate choice in both cervical soft disc herniations and cervical stenosis. PMID:27217655

  11. Propriospinal Myoclonus Induced by a Herniated Lumbar Intervertebral Disc at a Young Age: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Song, Kwan Su; Kim, Chang Hyun; Lee, Ho Kook

    2011-01-01

    The cause of propriospinal myoclonus (PSM) is idiopathic. Cervical trauma, ischemic myelopathy secondary to a spinal dural arteriovenous fistula, syringomyelia, Lyme neuroborreliosis, human immunodeficiency virus central nervous system infection, and cervical disc herniation can be the cause of PSM, but lumbar herniated intervertebral disc (HIVD) induced PSM has not been reported. We describe a patient who presented with PSM induced by HIVD and was treated with an epidural steroid injection using a transforaminal approach. PMID:26064150

  12. Disappearing large calcified thoracic disc herniation in a patient with thalassaemia.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Faiz U; Schallert, Erica; Bregy, Amade; Post, Judith D; Vanni, Steven

    2016-01-28

    Regression of herniated disc fragments with subsequent improvement in clinical symptoms has been reported in the lumbar and cervical spine. Such regressions in the thoracic spine are extremely rare. We report a case of a 38-year-old patient with thalassaemia who had regression of a large calcified herniated thoracic disc causing cord compression, with subsequent herniation of a second calcified disc at a different level and discuss the possible aetiopathogenesis. This is the first such case reported in the thalassaemia population. 2016 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  13. Lumbar Disc Herniation Presented with Contralateral Symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Pius; Ju, Chang Il; Kim, Hyeun Sung; Kim, Seok Won

    2017-01-01

    Objective This study aimed to unravel the putative mechanism underlying the neurologic deficits contralateral to the side with lumbar disc herniation (LDH) and to elucidate the treatment for this condition. Methods From January 2009 to June 2015, 8 patients with LDH with predominantly contralateral neurologic deficits underwent surgical treatment on the side with LDH with or without decompressing the symptomatic side. A retrospective review of charts and radiological records of these 8 patients was performed. The putative mechanisms underlying the associated contralateral neurological deficits, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), electromyography (EMG), and the adequate surgical approach are discussed here. Results MRI revealed a similar laterally skewed paramedian disc herniation, with the apex deviated from the symptomatic side rather than directly compressing the nerve root; this condition may generate a contralateral traction force. EMG revealed radiculopathies in both sides of 6 patients and in the herniated side of 2 patients. Based on EMG findings and the existence of suspicious lateral recess stenosis of the symptomatic side, 6 patients underwent bilateral decompression of nerve roots and 2 were subjected to a microscopic discectomy to treat the asymptomatic disc herniation. No specific conditions such as venous congestion, nerve root anomaly or epidural lipomatosis were observed, which may be considered the putative pathomechanism causing the contralateral neurological deficits. The symptoms resolved significantly after surgery. Conclusion The traction force generated on the contralateral side and lateral recess stenosis, rather than direct compression, may cause the contralateral neurologic deficits observed in LDH. PMID:28264243

  14. High-Definition Video Telescope-Assisted Ventral Slot Decompression Surgery for Cervical Intervertebral Disc Herniation in 30 Dogs.

    PubMed

    Rossetti, Diego; Ragetly, Guillaume R; Poncet, Cyrill M

    2016-10-01

    To describe the use of a video telescope operating monitor (VITOM™) for ventral slot decompression and to report its clinical applications using preoperative and postoperative computed tomography (CT) myelography. Prospective case series. Consecutive dogs presented with cervical intervertebral disc disease requiring surgical decompression (n = 30). Demographic data, preoperative neurological status, localization and lateralization of the compression, total operative time, surgical complications, ventral slot size and orientation, hospitalization time, and postoperative outcome were recorded. Preoperative and postoperative spinal cord area at the compression site and ratios of compressed to normal spinal cord area were calculated by CT myelography. French Bulldogs were the most common breed of dogs (n = 15; 50%) and neck pain was the most common neurological sign (n = 18; 60%). Postoperative CT myelography confirmed that spinal cord decompression, postoperative spinal cord area, and the ratios of compressed to normal spinal cord area improved significantly compared with preoperative measurements (P = .01). Sinus bleeding occurred in 20% of dogs. The mean ratios (± SD) of ventral slot length and width compared with vertebral body length and width were 0.21 ± 0.08 and 0.31 ± 0.07, respectively. The mean postoperative hospitalization time was 3.0 ± 0.6 days and all dogs showed clinical improvement and an excellent outcome. The VITOM™ ventral slot decompression technique was fast and easy to perform. It allowed a minimally invasive approach with a small ventral slot while improving spinal cord visualization. The results of this study support the use of the VITOM™ technique in spinal veterinary surgery. © Copyright 2016 by The American College of Veterinary Surgeons.

  15. [Treatment of thoracic disc herniation. Case report].

    PubMed

    Picado-Baca, Mauricio Leonardo; Mireles-Cano, José Nicolás; León-Meza, Víctor Manuel; García-González, Oscar Guillermo; Ramos-Trujillo, Alejandro

    2016-01-01

    Herniated thoracic intervertebral disc is a rare cause of spinal cord compression. Its frequency varies from 0.15% to 1.7% of all disc herniations, and produces symptoms in 0.5% to 0.8%. Case 1. A 50-year-old woman, with pain and burning sensation in left hemithorax of four months of onset. It was treated as a herpetic syndrome, with no improvement. She was seen after thirteen days of exacerbation of clinical symptoms. The physical examination showed asymmetric paraparesis, lower left pelvic limb 1/5, and right pelvic limb 3/5¸ sensory level T8, with left Babinski positive. A thoracic disc herniation in space T8-T9 was diagnosed. A 55-year-old patient with a history of presenting pain in lumbar area of 5 years onset. She also had radicular pain that radiated to the right pelvic limb, with intensity 10/10 on a Visual Analogue Scale. Her physical examination showed muscle strength 5/5, with normal sensitivity in all dermatomes and tendon reflexes, and a positive right Babinski. Thoracic disc herniation T7-T8 level was diagnosed. Due to anatomical conditions that define this type of hernia, the extracavitary posterolateral approach should be the recommended surgical procedure when the simultaneously performed anterior decompression and fixation with posterior instrumentation are the treatments proposed. Despite the different anatomical structures of this special area, it was possible to obtain satisfactory results for both clinical cases. Copyright © 2015 Academia Mexicana de Cirugía A.C. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  16. Clinical and Radiological Findings of Nerve Root Herniation after Discectomy of Lumbar Disc Herniation

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Jun Seok; Pee, Yong Hun; Lee, Sang-Ho

    2012-01-01

    The authors report 2 cases of nerve root herniation after discectomy of a large lumbar disc herniation caused by an unrecognized dural tear. Patients complained of the abrupt onset of radiating pain after lumbar discectomy. Magnetic resonance imaging showed cerebrospinal fluid signal in the disc space and nerve root displacement into the disc space. Symptoms improved after the herniated nerve root was repositioned. Clinical symptoms and suggestive radiologic image findings are important for early diagnosis and treatment. PMID:22993682

  17. Lumbar herniated disc: spontaneous regression

    PubMed Central

    Yüksel, Kasım Zafer

    2017-01-01

    Background Low back pain is a frequent condition that results in substantial disability and causes admission of patients to neurosurgery clinics. To evaluate and present the therapeutic outcomes in lumbar disc hernia (LDH) patients treated by means of a conservative approach, consisting of bed rest and medical therapy. Methods This retrospective cohort was carried out in the neurosurgery departments of hospitals in Kahramanmaraş city and 23 patients diagnosed with LDH at the levels of L3−L4, L4−L5 or L5−S1 were enrolled. Results The average age was 38.4 ± 8.0 and the chief complaint was low back pain and sciatica radiating to one or both lower extremities. Conservative treatment was administered. Neurological examination findings, durations of treatment and intervals until symptomatic recovery were recorded. Laségue tests and neurosensory examination revealed that mild neurological deficits existed in 16 of our patients. Previously, 5 patients had received physiotherapy and 7 patients had been on medical treatment. The number of patients with LDH at the level of L3−L4, L4−L5, and L5−S1 were 1, 13, and 9, respectively. All patients reported that they had benefit from medical treatment and bed rest, and radiologic improvement was observed simultaneously on MRI scans. The average duration until symptomatic recovery and/or regression of LDH symptoms was 13.6 ± 5.4 months (range: 5−22). Conclusions It should be kept in mind that lumbar disc hernias could regress with medical treatment and rest without surgery, and there should be an awareness that these patients could recover radiologically. This condition must be taken into account during decision making for surgical intervention in LDH patients devoid of indications for emergent surgery. PMID:28119770

  18. Seniors Get Good Results from Herniated Disc Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_166668.html Seniors Get Good Results From Herniated Disc Surgery Age is ... the discs that cushions bones in the spine gets damaged, causing it to push forward. The result ...

  19. Risk Factors for Recurrent Lumbar Disc Herniation

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Weimin; Han, Zhiwei; Liu, Jiang; Yu, Lili; Yu, Xiuchun

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Recurrent lumbar disc herniation (rLDH) is a common complication following primary discectomy. This systematic review aimed to investigate the current evidence on risk factors for rLDH. Cohort or case-control studies addressing risk factors for rLDH were identified by search in Pubmed (Medline), Embase, Web of Science, and Cochrane library from inception to June 2015. Relevant results were pooled to give overall estimates if possible. Heterogeneity among studies was examined and publication bias was also assessed. A total of 17 studies were included in this systematic review. Risk factors that had significant relation with rLDH were smoking (OR 1.99, 95% CI 1.53–2.58), disc protrusion (OR 1.79, 95% CI 1.15–2.79), and diabetes (OR 1.19, 95% CI 1.06–1.32). Gender, BMI, occupational work, level, and side of herniation did not correlate with rLDH significantly. Based on current evidence, smoking, disc protrusion, and diabetes were predictors for rLDH. Patients with these risk factors should be paid more attention for prevention of recurrence after primary surgery. More evidence provided by high-quality observational studies is still needed to further investigate risk factors for rLDH. PMID:26765413

  20. Risk Factors for Recurrent Lumbar Disc Herniations

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The most common complication after lumbar discectomy is reherniation. As the first step in reducing the rate of recurrence, many studies have been conducted to find out the factors that may increase the reherniation risk. Some reported factors are age, sex, the type of lumbar disc herniation, the amount of fragments removed, smoking, alcohol consumption and the length of restricted activities. In this review, the factors studied thus far are summarized, excepting factors which cannot be chosen or changed, such as age or sex. Apart from the factors shown here, many other risk factors such as diabetes, family history, history of external injury, duration of illness and body mass index are considered. Few are agreed upon by all. The reason for the diverse opinions may be that many clinical and biomechanical variables are involved in the prognosis following operation. For the investigation of risk factors in recurrent lumbar disc herniation, large-scale multicenter prospective studies will be required in the future. PMID:24761206

  1. Cervical Deuk Laser Disc Repair®: A novel, full-endoscopic surgical technique for the treatment of symptomatic cervical disc disease

    PubMed Central

    Deukmedjian, Ara J.; Cianciabella, Augusto; Cutright, Jason; Deukmedjian, Arias

    2012-01-01

    Background: Cervical Deuk Laser Disc Repair® is a novel full-endoscopic, anterior cervical, trans-discal, motion preserving, laser assisted, nonfusion, outpatient surgical procedure to safely treat symptomatic cervical disc diseases including herniation, spondylosis, stenosis, and annular tears. Here we describe a new endoscopic approach to cervical disc disease that allows direct visualization of the posterior longitudinal ligament, posterior vertebral endplates, annulus, neuroforamina, and herniated disc fragments. All patients treated with Deuk Laser Disc Repair were also candidates for anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF). Methods: A total of 142 consecutive adult patients with symptomatic cervical disc disease underwent Deuk Laser Disc Repair during a 4-year period. This novel procedure incorporates a full-endoscopic selective partial decompressive discectomy, foraminoplasty, and posterior annular debridement. Postoperative complications and average volume of herniated disc fragments removed are reported. Results: All patients were successfully treated with cervical Deuk Laser Disc Repair. There were no postoperative complications. Average volume of herniated disc material removed was 0.09 ml. Conclusions: Potential benefits of Deuk Laser Disc Repair for symptomatic cervical disc disease include lower cost, smaller incision, nonfusion, preservation of segmental motion, outpatient, faster recovery, less postoperative analgesic use, fewer complications, no hardware failure, no pseudoarthrosis, no postoperative dysphagia, and no increased risk of adjacent segment disease as seen with fusion. PMID:23230523

  2. Spontaneous Regression of Herniated Lumbar Disc with New Disc Protrusion in the Adjacent Level

    PubMed Central

    Gürcan, Serkan

    2016-01-01

    Spontaneous regression of herniated lumbar discs was reported occasionally. The mechanisms proposed for regression of disc herniation are still incomplete. This paper describes and discusses a case of spontaneous regression of herniated lumbar discs with a new disc protrusion in the adjacent level. A 41-year-old man was admitted with radiating pain and numbness in the left lower extremity with a left posterolateral disc extrusion at L5-S1 level. He was admitted to hospital with low back pain due to disc herniation caudally immigrating at L4-5 level three years ago. He refused the surgical intervention that was offered and was treated conservatively at that time. He had no neurological deficit and a history of spontaneous regression of the extruded lumbar disc; so, a conservative therapy, including bed rest, physical therapy, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, and analgesics, was advised. In conclusion, herniated lumbar disc fragments may regress spontaneously. Reports are prone to advise conservative treatment for extruded or sequestrated lumbar disc herniations. However, these patients should be followed up closely; new herniation at adjacent/different level may occur. Furthermore, it is important to know which herniated disk should be removed and which should be treated conservatively, because disc herniation may cause serious complications as muscle weakness and cauda equine syndrome. PMID:27429818

  3. Tissue Engineering a Biological Repair Strategy for Lumbar Disc Herniation

    PubMed Central

    O'Connell, Grace D.; Leach, J. Kent; Klineberg, Eric O.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The intervertebral disc is a critical part of the intersegmental soft tissue of the spinal column, providing flexibility and mobility, while absorbing large complex loads. Spinal disease, including disc herniation and degeneration, may be a significant contributor to low back pain. Clinically, disc herniations are treated with both nonoperative and operative methods. Operative treatment for disc herniation includes removal of the herniated material when neural compression occurs. While this strategy may have short-term advantages over nonoperative methods, the remaining disc material is not addressed and surgery for mild degeneration may have limited long-term advantage over nonoperative methods. Furthermore, disc herniation and surgery significantly alter the mechanical function of the disc joint, which may contribute to progression of degeneration in surrounding tissues. We reviewed recent advances in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine strategies that may have a significant impact on disc herniation repair. Our review on tissue engineering strategies focuses on cell-based and inductive methods, each commonly combined with material-based approaches. An ideal clinically relevant biological repair strategy will significantly reduce pain and repair and restore flexibility and motion of the spine. PMID:26634189

  4. Missed lumbar disc herniations diagnosed with kinetic magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Zou, Jun; Yang, Huilin; Miyazaki, Masashi; Wei, Feng; Hong, Soon W; Yoon, Seung H; Morishita, Yuichiro; Wang, Jeffrey C

    2008-03-01

    A novel dynamic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system, kinetic MRI (kMRI), was used to study lumbar disc herniations. The objective of this study was to determine if adding flexion and extension MRI studies to the traditional neutral views would be beneficial in the diagnosis of lumbar disc herniations. Prior studies demonstrate that only 70% of patients with lumbar disc herniations based on physical examinations are confirmed by MRI studies. Recently, kMRI delivers the ability to scan patients in neutral, flexion, and extension positions, which may allow for improved diagnosis of this problem. Five hundred fifty-three patients underwent kMRI with assessment of the degree of disc bulge in neutral and flexion and extension. The images were analyzed using computer measurement technology to objectively quantify the amount of disc herniation. For patients with normal or <3 mm of disc bulge in neutral, 19.46% demonstrated an increase in herniation to >3 mm bulge in extension, and 15.29% demonstrated an increase to >3 mm bulge in flexion. For patients in the neutral view that had a baseline disc bulge of 3 to 5 mm, 13.28% had increased herniations to >5 mm in extension and 8.47% had increased herniations to >5 mm in flexion. For patients with a baseline disc bulge of 5 to 7 mm in neutral, 10.58% increased in extension and 5.78% increased in flexion. In addition, for patients with a baseline disc bulge of 7 to 9 mm in neutral, 9.09% increased in extension and 4.55% increased in flexion. A significant increase in the degree of lumbar disc herniation was found by examining flexion and extension views when compared with neutral views alone. kMRI views provide valuable added information, especially in situations where symptomatic radiculopathy is present without any abnormalities demonstrated on conventional MRI.

  5. Sacral Perineural Cyst Accompanying Disc Herniation

    PubMed Central

    Ju, Chang Il; Shin, Ho; Kim, Hyeun Sung

    2009-01-01

    Although most of sacral perineural cysts are asymptomatic, some may produce symptoms. Specific radicular pain may be due to distortion, compression, or stretching of nerve root by a space occupying cyst. We report a rare case of S1 radiculopathy caused by sacral perineural cyst accompanying disc herniation. The patient underwent a microscopic discectomy at L5-S1 level. However, the patient's symptoms did not improved. The hypesthesia persisted, as did the right leg pain. Cyst-subarachnoid shunt was set to decompress nerve root and to equalize the cerebrospinal fluid pressure between the cephalad thecal sac and cyst. Immediately after surgery, the patient had no leg pain. After 6 months, the patient still remained free of leg pain. PMID:19352483

  6. Immediate Postoperative Reversal of Disc Herniation Following Facetal Distraction-Fixation Surgery: Report of 4 Cases.

    PubMed

    Goel, Atul; Shah, Abhidha; Patni, Neeraj; Ramdasi, Raghvendra

    2016-10-01

    We report cases of 4 patients where Goel facet distraction surgery resulted in restoration of herniated disc back into the intervertebral disc space in the immediate postoperative period. Such a fate of herniated disc has not been recorded earlier. During the period 2010 to 2011, 4 patients with single level 'contained' herniated disc that extended to the posterior surface of adjoining vertebral bodies and resulted in severe cord and root compression were surgically treated. The posterior longitudinal ligament was essentially intact in all 4 cases. Surgery involved facetal distraction technique using Goel facet spacers as a standalone method of treatment. Immediate postoperative imaging showed nearly complete disappearance of the disc bulge, restoration of the cervical cord girth and distraction-fixation arthrodesis of the spinal segment. All patients had remarkable and sustained clinical improvement. At a 5-year follow-up, all 4 patients were well and showed no evidence of recurrent symptoms or recurrence of herniated disc-related imaging findings. The indications for facetal distraction surgery, its mechanisms of action and its suitability in the presented cases are discussed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. [Spontaneous regression from intervertebral disc herniation. Propos of a series of 37 cases].

    PubMed

    Martínez-Quiñones, J V; Aso-Escario, J; Consolini, F; Arregui-Calvo, R

    2010-04-01

    The intervertebral disc disease (IDD) is one of the most common muscle-skeletal disorders, causing both high work disability and elevated healthcare costs. There are two specific origins of disk disease that should be kept in mind: degenerative (DDD) and traumatic (TDD). Concerning the TDD, nowadays it has not been determined which patients could gradually improve and which ones will require surgery. Some studies indicate that about 85% of lumbar and 90% cervical acute disc herniation will get better in an average of 6 weeks. We conducted an observational, prospective study, over a group of 858 patients, with the following inclusion criteria: 1. MRI imaging indicating TDD, 2. No signs or symptoms requiring urgent surgical treatment (cauda equina syndrome, progressive or serious motor deficit or unbearable pain) and 3. Development of progressively spontaneous symptoms remission. All of the patients included in our study were treated in our Department of Neurosurgery from 2006 to 2007. Patients were tested for disc herniation regression with a second MRI study. A spontaneous regression of their hernia was appreciated as follow: 33 cases of lumbar hernia (29 male, 4 female), 3 cervical hernia (1 male, 2 female) and 1 dorsal hernia (male). Research about other reported series was done, and the different factors that could take place in disc spontaneous regression were analyzed: a) lodgement of the herniated disc back into the intervertebral space; b) disappearance of the herniated fragment due to dehydration and retraction mechanisms; c) gradual resorption of the herniated tissue by phagocytosis and enzymatic degradation induced by an inflammatory reaction that appeared as the disc (acting the extrusion itself as an foreign body) and, d) pulsion of cephaloarchidian liquid against the herniated portion. Disc herniation can regress, or even disappear, in a number of patients, rendering the radiological findings not to be taken as the only surgical indication criterium

  8. Epidural steroid injection for lumbar disc herniation in NFL athletes.

    PubMed

    Krych, Aaron J; Richman, Daniel; Drakos, Mark; Weiss, Leigh; Barnes, Ronnie; Cammisa, Frank; Warren, Russell F

    2012-02-01

    To our knowledge, there is no published information on the efficacy of epidural steroid injections for the treatment of lumbar disc herniation in an athletic population. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of epidural corticosteroid injection for treatment of lumbar disc herniation in a group of National Football League (NFL) players. We retrospectively reviewed the records of all NFL players who underwent an epidural steroid injection at our institution for incapacitating pain secondary to an acute lumbar disc herniation (confirmed on magnetic resonance imaging) from 2003 to 2010. Our primary outcome was success of the injection, defined as return to play. The secondary outcome of the study was to evaluate risk factors for failure of this treatment approach. Seventeen players had a total of 37 injections for 27 distinct lumbar disc herniation episodes from 2003 to 2010. The success rate of returning an athlete to play for a given episode of disc herniation was 89% (24 of 27 episodes) with an average loss of 2.8 practices (range = 0-12) and 0.6 games (range = 0-2) after the injection. Four players required a repeat injection for the same episode. Three of these four players ultimately failed conservative management and required surgical intervention. Risk factors for failing injection therapy included sequestration of the disc herniation on magnetic resonance imaging (P = 0.01) and weakness on physical examination (P = 0.002). There were no complications reported. In this highly selective group of professional athletes, our results suggest that epidural steroid injections are a safe and effective therapeutic option in the treatment of symptomatic lumbar disc herniation.

  9. Cervical Total Disc Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Basho, Rahul; Hood, Kenneth A.

    2012-01-01

    Symptomatic adjacent segment degeneration of the cervical spine remains problematic for patients and surgeons alike. Despite advances in surgical techniques and instrumentation, the solution remains elusive. Spurred by the success of total joint arthroplasty in hips and knees, surgeons and industry have turned to motion preservation devices in the cervical spine. By preserving motion at the diseased level, the hope is that adjacent segment degeneration can be prevented. Multiple cervical disc arthroplasty devices have come onto the market and completed Food and Drug Administration Investigational Device Exemption trials. Though some of the early results demonstrate equivalency of arthroplasty to fusion, compelling evidence of benefits in terms of symptomatic adjacent segment degeneration are lacking. In addition, non-industry-sponsored studies indicate that these devices are equivalent to fusion in terms of adjacent segment degeneration. Longer-term studies will eventually provide the definitive answer. PMID:24353955

  10. Transcorporeal approach for disc herniation at the C2-C3 level: a technical case report.

    PubMed

    Shim, Chan Shik; Jung, Tag-Geun; Lee, Sang-Ho

    2009-08-01

    The authors describe a less invasive approach for a disc herniation at the high cervical region. A 68-year-old female patient presented with posterior neck and shoulder pain, and tingling sensation and numbness in the left hand after she fell down stairs 2 months before presentation. On neurologic examination, the power of flexion and extension of the left elbow and grasping of the left hand was decreased. Hoffmann sign was positive in both hands. Magnetic resonance imaging showed a huge herniation of the C2-C3 disc compressing the left paramedian area of the spinal cord. After a routine surgical exposure for discectomy of the C3-C4 disc, a drill hole of about 5 mm diameter was made at the middle of the C3 vertebral body. The hole was extended cranioposteriorly to the superoposterior border of the C3 endplate. The posterior disc at the midline of the C2-C3 was removed first then the herniated disc completely removed. Postoperatively, the patient showed improvement of the neck and shoulder pain and numbness of the hand. At 7-month follow-up, she completely recovered from her neurologic symptoms. Compared with the other approaches to high cervical lesion, the current approach was straightforward and less invasive. If there is no need to stabilize the spinal motion segment, this transcorporeal approach can be a useful surgical option as it decreases the extent of tissue dissection of the submandibular retropharyngeal area that might increase the risk of neurovascular injury.

  11. Spontaneous Intracranial Hypotension Secondary to Lumbar Disc Herniation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyoung-Tae

    2010-01-01

    Spontaneous intracranial hypotension is often idiopathic. We report on a patient presenting with symptomatic intracranial hypotension and pain radiating to the right leg caused by a transdural lumbar disc herniation. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging of the brain revealed classic signs of intracranial hypotension, and an additional spinal MR confirmed a lumbar transdural herniated disc as the cause. The patient was treated with a partial hemilaminectomy and discectomy. We were able to find the source of cerebrospinal fluid leak, and packed it with epidural glue and gelfoam. Postoperatively, the patient's headache and log radiating pain resolved and there was no neurological deficit. Thus, in this case, lumbar disc herniation may have been a cause of spontaneous intracranial hypotension. PMID:20157378

  12. Herniated disk

    MedlinePlus

    ... the disk. This may place pressure on nearby nerves or the spinal cord. ... Lumbar radiculopathy; Cervical radiculopathy; Herniated ... LBP - herniated disk; Sciatica - herniated disk; Herniated disk

  13. Inciting events associated with lumbar disc herniation.

    PubMed

    Suri, Pradeep; Hunter, David J; Jouve, Cristin; Hartigan, Carol; Limke, Janet; Pena, Enrique; Swaim, Bryan; Li, Ling; Rainville, James

    2010-05-01

    No prior study has investigated the frequency of patient-identified inciting events in lumbar disc herniation (LDH) or their clinical significance. To examine the clinical frequency of patient-identified inciting events in LDH, and to identify associations between the presence of inciting events and the severity of the clinical presentation. Cross-sectional analysis of data from a cohort study with prospective recruitment, with retrospective data collection on inciting events. The setting was a hospital-based specialty spine clinic. One hundred fifty-four adults with lumbosacral radicular pain and LDH confirmed by magnetic resonance imaging. Self-report measures of disability measured by the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), the visual analog scale (VAS) for leg pain, and the VAS for back pain. Dependent variables included the presence of a patient-identified inciting event, which were categorized as spontaneous onset, nonlifting physical activity, heavy lifting (>35 lbs), light lifting (<35 lbs), nonexertional occurrence, or physical trauma. We examined the association of an inciting event, or a lifting-related event, with each outcome, first using univariate analyses, and second using multivariate modeling, accounting for important adjustment variables. Sixty-two percent of LDH did not have a specific patient-identified event associated with onset of symptoms. Nonlifting activities were the most common inciting event, comprising 26% of all LDH. Heavy lifting (6.5%), light lifting (2%), nonexertional occurrences (2%), and physical trauma (1.3%) accounted for relatively small proportions of all LDH. Patient-identified inciting events were not significantly associated with a more severe clinical presentation in crude analyses. Spontaneous LDH was significantly associated with higher baseline ODI scores in multivariate analysis, although the magnitude of this effect was small. There were no significant associations (p< or =.05) between the presence of a lifting

  14. Junctional disc herniation syndrome in post spinal fusion treated with endoscopic spine surgery.

    PubMed

    Chiu, John C; Clifford, Thomas; Princenthal, Robert; Shaw, Stephen

    2005-01-01

    Fusions of the cervical and lumbar spine are often followed within months or several years by protrusion of discs at the adjacent level or levels. Biomechanical alterations and mobility lost at the fused levels are thought to be transferring the stress to the adjacent segments or discs, which results in accelerated degeneration of the discs and causes disc protrusion. This post-spinal fusion "junctional disc herniation syndrome" (JDHS), or the post-spinal fusion "adjacent segment disease (ASD)" can occur from 15% to 52% of post-spinal fusion, in both superior and/or inferior adjacent levels. The ways in which endoscopic minimally invasive spinal discectomy procedure can be used to treat this JDHS and preserve spinal segmental motion are discussed herein. Also, case illustrations are presented.

  15. Can repeat injection provide clinical benefit in patients with cervical disc herniation and stenosis when the first epidural injection results only in partial response?

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jung Hwan; Lee, Sang-Ho

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Epidural steroid injection (ESI) is known to be an effective treatment for neck or radicular pain due to herniated intervertebral disc (HIVD) and spinal stenosis (SS). Although repeat ESI has generally been indicated to provide more pain relief in partial responders after single ESI, there has been little evidence supporting the usefulness of this procedure. The purpose of this study, therefore, was to determine whether repeat ESI at a prescribed interval of 2 to 3 weeks after the first injection would provide greater clinical benefit in patients with partial pain reduction than intermittent ESI performed only when pain was aggravated. One hundred eighty-four patients who underwent transforaminal ESI (TFESI) for treatment of axial neck and radicular arm pain due to HIVD or SS and could be followed up for 1 year were enrolled. We divided the patients into 2 groups. Group A (N = 108) comprised partial responders (numeric rating scale (NRS) ≥ 3 after the first injection) who underwent repeat injection at a prescribed interval of 2 to 3 weeks after the first injection. Group B (N = 76) comprised partial responders who did not receive repeat injection at the prescribed interval, but received intermittent injections only for aggravation of pain. Various clinical data were assessed, including total number of injections during 1 year, NRS duration of <3 during 1 year (NRS < 3 duration), and time interval until pain was increased to require additional injections after repeat injection in Group A, or after first injection in Group B (time to reinjection). Groups A and B were compared in terms of total population, HIVD, and SS. In the whole population, HIVD subgroup, and SS subgroup, patients in Group A required significantly fewer injections to obtain satisfactory pain relief during the 1-year follow-up period. Group A showed a significantly longer time to reinjection and longer NRS < 3 than Group B did. Repeat TFESI conducted at 2- to 3-week

  16. Treatment of lumbar disc herniation by percutaneous laser disc decompression (PLDD) and modified PLDD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chi, Xiao fei; Li, Hong zhi; Wu, Ru zhou; Sui, Yun xian

    2005-07-01

    Objective: To study the micro-invasive operative method and to compare the effect of treatment of PLDD and modified PLDD for Lumbar Disc Herniation. Method: Vaporized part of the nucleus pulposus in single or multiple point after acupuncture into lumbar disc, to reach the purpose of the decompression of the lumbar disc. Result: Among the 19 cases of the regular PLDD group, the excellent and good rate was 63.2%, and among the 40 cases of the modified PLDD group, the excellent and good rate was 82.5%. Conclusion: The modified PLDD has good effect on the treatment for lumbar disc herniation.

  17. Do Turkish patients with lumbar disc herniation know body mechanics?

    PubMed

    Topcu, Sacide Yildizeli

    2017-01-01

    Most common and important cause of the low back pain is lumbar disc herniation. Patients with lumbar disc herniation face with difficulties during daily activities due to the reduction of physical functions. In order to maintain daily activities without pain and discomfort, the patients should be informed about proper positions and body mechanics. The aim of the study was to determine the knowledge and the applications of the patients with lumbar disc herniation about body mechanics. This descriptive study was conducted with 75 patients with lumbar disc herniation in Edirne, Turkey. The population consisted of 75 patients who accepted to participate in the study. In the collection of data the questionnaire, which was developed according to literature by the researcher, was used. Descriptive statistics, student t-test, variance and correlation analysis were used for assessment of the data. The significance level was accepted at 0.05. It was found that 53.3% of the patients experienced awful/very severe pain. and there were some points that the patients have enough information about; mobilisation, standing, carrying the goods, leaning back while sitting, leaning somewhere while standing, getting support from the chair when standing up, avoiding sudden position changes, changing feet frequently while standing. It was detected that a statistical relation between educational level and knowledge about body mechanics exists. This study shows that individuals with lumbar disc herniation have not enough information about body mechanics and they experienced long-term severe pain. Nurses and other health care workers have important role in explaining the importance of body mechanics to the patients and should encourage them to use that in daily life.

  18. Disc herniations in astronauts: What causes them, and what does it tell us about herniation on earth?

    PubMed

    Belavy, Daniel L; Adams, Michael; Brisby, Helena; Cagnie, Barbara; Danneels, Lieven; Fairbank, Jeremy; Hargens, Alan R; Judex, Stefan; Scheuring, Richard A; Sovelius, Roope; Urban, Jill; van Dieën, Jaap H; Wilke, Hans-Joachim

    2016-01-01

    Recent work showed an increased risk of cervical and lumbar intervertebral disc (IVD) herniations in astronauts. The European Space Agency asked the authors to advise on the underlying pathophysiology of this increased risk, to identify predisposing factors and possible interventions and to suggest research priorities. The authors performed a narrative literature review of the possible mechanisms, and conducted a survey within the team to prioritize research and prevention approaches. Based on literature review the most likely cause for lumbar IVD herniations was concluded to be swelling of the IVD in the unloaded condition during spaceflight. For the cervical IVDs, the knowledge base is too limited to postulate a likely mechanism or recommend approaches for prevention. Basic research on the impact of (un)loading on the cervical IVD and translational research is needed. The highest priority prevention approach for the lumbar spine was post-flight care avoiding activities involving spinal flexion, followed by passive spinal loading in spaceflight and exercises to reduce IVD hyper-hydration post-flight.

  19. Herniation of the cervical disk in plastic surgeons.

    PubMed

    Tzeng, Yuan-Sheng; Chen, Shyi-Gen; Chen, Tim-Mo

    2012-12-01

    Herniations of the cervical disk in plastic surgeons are far more common in practice than the paucity of reported cases would indicate. A likely explanation may be the peculiar, nonergonomic positions that plastic surgeons must hold during surgery while wearing a headlight and loupes. From January 2003 to December 2006, at Tri-Service General Hospital, Taiwan, 4 plastic surgeons experienced herniations of the cervical disk. Magnetic resonance imaging study indicated there was disk herniation or bulging with spinal cord impingement. Two plastic surgeons received cervical diskectomy, corpectomy with strut reconstruction using titanium cages. These 2 surgeons were symptom-free 2 years after their operations. The other 2 plastic surgeons were under conservative physical therapy with persistent symptoms. The clinical evidence indicated that cervical disk herniation is an occupational hazard in plastic surgeons. To prevent prolonged hyperflexion and twisting of the neck, we proposed wearing a cervical brace during surgery for the plastic surgeons at Tri-Service-General Hospital since January 2008. No more plastic surgeons have experienced herniation of the cervical disk since then. The results indicated that wearing a cervical brace may be an effective measure to protect plastic surgeons from cervical disk disease.

  20. [L1-2 lumbar disc herniation: a case report].

    PubMed

    Monobe, T; Fujita, T; Nakaue, Y; Nishi, N

    1996-03-01

    A 49-year-old female presented a two-year history of pain in the right thigh and lower back. Neurological examination on admission demonstrated weakness of the right iliopsoas and quadriceps, hypesthesia on the right L1-2 dermatome. Radiological examination including myelography, CT myelography and discography disclosed an L1-2 herniated disc. Sagittal MRI also revealed an L1-2, an L4-5 and L5-S1 protruded disc. A posterior microdiscectomy (Love's method) was performed for the L1-2 disc. A controlateral protruded disc which compressed the L-2 nerve root was identified and partially removed. The postoperative myelography showed residual disc. The patient was free from pain and regained normal sensorimotor function. Love's posterior microdiscectomy has a disadvantage in that the operative field is limited. Careful surgical procedure was needed to avoid injury to nerve roots and the cauda equina in a tight L1-2 lumbar canal.

  1. Occupational risk factors for symptomatic lumbar disc herniation; a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Seidler, A; Bolm-Audorff, U; Siol, T; Henkel, N; Fuchs, C; Schug, H; Leheta, F; Marquardt, G; Schmitt, E; Ulrich, P T; Beck, W; Missalla, A; Elsner, G

    2003-11-01

    Previous studies mostly did not separate between symptomatic disc herniation combined with osteochondrosis/spondylosis of the lumbar spine and symptomatic disc herniation in radiographically normal intervertebral spaces. This may at least in part explain the differences in the observed risk patterns. To investigate the possible aetiological relevance of physical and psychosocial workload to lumbar disc herniation with and without concomitant osteochondrosis/spondylosis. A total of 267 cases with acute lumbar disc herniation (in two practices and four clinics) and 197 control subjects were studied. Data were gathered in a structured personal interview and analysed using logistic regression to control for age, region, nationality, and diseases affecting the lumbar spine. Cases without knowledge about osteochondrosis/spondylosis (n=42) were excluded from analysis. Risk factors were examined separately for those cases with (n=131) and without (n=94) radiographically diagnosed concomitant osteochondrosis or spondylosis. There was a statistically significant positive association between extreme forward bending and lumbar disc herniation with, as well as without concomitant osteochondrosis/spondylosis. There was a statistically significant relation between cumulative exposure to weight lifting or carrying and lumbar disc herniation with, but not without, concomitant osteochondrosis/spondylosis. Cases with disc herniation reported time pressure at work as well as psychic strain through contact with clients more frequently than control subjects. Further larger studies are needed to verify the concept of distinct aetiologies of lumbar disc herniation in relatively younger persons with otherwise normal discs and of disc herniation in relatively older persons with structurally damaged discs.

  2. Changes in disc herniation after CT-guided Percutaneous Laser Disc Decompression (PLDD): MR findings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brat, Hugues G.; Bouziane, Tarik; Lambert, Jean; Divano, Luisa

    2004-09-01

    The aim of Percutaneous Laser Disc Decompression (PLDD) is to vaporize a small portion of the nucleus pulposus. Clinical efficacy of this technique is largely proven. However, time-evolution of intervertebral disc and its hernia after PLDD is not known. This study analyses changes in disc herniation and its native intervertebral disc at a mean follow-up of 7.5 months after PLDD in asymptomatic patients. Main observations at MRI are appearance of a high signal on T2WI in the hernia in 59%, shrinking of the hernia in 66% and overall stability of disc height.

  3. Automatic diagnosis of lumbar disc herniation with shape and appearance features from MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alomari, Raja'S.; Corso, Jason J.; Chaudhary, Vipin; Dhillon, Gurmeet

    2010-03-01

    Intervertebral disc herniation is a major reason for lower back pain (LBP), which is the second most common neurological ailment in the United States. Automation of herniated disc diagnosis reduces the large burden on radiologists who have to diagnose hundreds of cases each day using clinical MRI. We present a method for automatic diagnosis of lumbar disc herniation using appearance and shape features. We jointly use the intensity signal for modeling the appearance of herniated disc and the active shape model for modeling the shape of herniated disc. We utilize a Gibbs distribution for classification of discs using appearance and shape features. We use 33 clinical MRI cases of the lumbar area for training and testing both appearance and shape models. We achieve over 91% accuracy in detection of herniation in a cross-validation experiment with specificity of 91% and sensitivity of 94%.

  4. Gas-containing disc herniations: dual nerve root compression at a single disc level.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Kyeong-Sik; Rathi, Nitesh Kumar; Shin, Myung-Hoon; Park, Chun-Kun

    2012-01-01

    A 72-year-old man presented with gas-containing disc herniations resulting in dual nerve root (exiting and traversing root) compression at the single level manifesting as lower back pain with the right anterolateral thigh and medial calf pain and no response to 4 weeks of conservative treatment. Physical examination revealed positive Lasegue's sign at 40°, but the patient had no evidence of neurological deficit. Magnetic resonance imaging showed two separate disc herniations, a posterocentral herniated disc that had migrated inferiorly at the L3-4 level and compressed the L4 traversing root, and another that had compressed the L3 exiting root in the extraforaminal area at the same level. Coronal computed tomography demonstrated the presence of gas in the spinal canal and extraforaminal area at the L3-4 level, and the vacuum phenomenon was also noted at the L3-4 intervertebral disc. Microscopic discectomy was performed using midline and paramedian approaches, and the presence of gas was confirmed by bubbles after pouring saline into the area intraoperatively. Histological examination revealed fibrous tissue. The patient was discharged with complete relief of pain. This is a rare case of symptomatic gas-containing disc herniations causing dual compression of exiting and traversing roots at a single disc level.

  5. Paraplegia by acute cervical disc protrusion after lumbar spine surgery.

    PubMed

    Chen, Sheng-Huan; Hui, Yu-Ling; Yu, Chong-Ming; Niu, Chi-Chien; Lui, Ping-Wing

    2005-04-01

    Non-traumatic paraplegia caused by herniation of the cervical intervertebral disc is an uncommon postoperative complication. A patient with claudication and radiculopathy was scheduled for lumbar laminectomy due to spinal stenosis. Postoperatively, numbness below T6 was found in his both legs of the patient. MRI showed a protruded intervertebral disc between C6 and C7. Despite urgent disectomy, the patient's lower extremities remained paralyzed without significant improvement for 3 months. Loss of muscle support during general anesthesia, excessive neck extension during endotracheal intubation and positioning, as well as bucking and agitation are believed as triggering factors for the protrusion of the cervical disc. We suggest that a complete history taking and physical examination be accomplished in patients scheduled for lumbar spine surgery in order to exclude coexisting cervical spine disorders. In addition, skillful endotracheal intubation and careful neck positioning are mandatory for patients receiving surgery in the prone position.

  6. Nontraumatic Acute Paraplegia Associated With Cervical Disk Herniation

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chao; Huang, Yue; Cai, Hong-Xin; Fan, Shun-Wu

    2010-01-01

    Background: Acute paraplegia is a true emergency. It is often the result of trauma but is rarely reported in association with cervical disk herniation in patients without antecedent injury. Methods: Case report. Findings: This 75-year-old man presented with acute paraplegia due to severe compression of the spinal cord by herniation of the C4-C5 cervical disk. He underwent emergency diskectomy and anterior fusion. Postoperatively, his neurologic functions improved gradually. Conclusions: Cervical disk herniation should be considered in the differential diagnosis of nontraumatic acute paraplegia. Pre-existing narrowed canal is an important predisposing factor and excessive neck movements are believed to be triggering factors. Immediate early decompressive surgery is recommended to avoid irreversible progression of neurologic deficit. PMID:21061902

  7. The probability of spontaneous regression of lumbar herniated disc: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Chun-Chieh; Chuang, Tai-Yuan; Chang, Kwang-Hwa; Wu, Chien-Hua; Lin, Po-Wei; Hsu, Wen-Yen

    2015-02-01

    To determine the probability of spontaneous disc regression among each type of lumbar herniated disc, using a systematic review. Medline, Cochrane Library, CINAHL, and Web of Science were searched using key words for relevant original articles published before March 2014. Articles were limited to those published in English and human studies. Articles had to: (1) include patients with lumbar disc herniation treated conservatively; (2) have at least two imaging evaluations of the lumbar spine; and (3) exclude patients with prior lumbar surgery, spinal infections, tumors, spondylolisthesis, or spinal stenosis. Two reviewers independently extracted study details and findings. Thirty-one studies met the inclusion criteria. Furthermore, if the classification of herniation matched the recommended classification of the combined Task Forces, the data were used for combined analysis of the probability of disc regression of each type. Nine studies were applicable for probability calculation. The rate of spontaneous regression was found to be 96% for disc sequestration, 70% for disc extrusion, 41% for disc protrusion, and 13% for disc bulging. The rate of complete resolution of disc herniation was 43% for sequestrated discs and 15% for extruded discs. Spontaneous regression of herniated disc tissue can occur, and can completely resolve after conservative treatment. Patients with disc extrusion and sequestration had a significantly higher possibility of having spontaneous regression than did those with bulging or protruding discs. Disc sequestration had a significantly higher rate of complete regression than did disc extrusion. © The Author(s) 2014.

  8. Adolescent lumbar disc herniation: Impact, diagnosis, and treatment.

    PubMed

    Karademir, Mustafa; Eser, Olcay; Karavelioglu, Ergün

    2017-01-01

    Symptomatic lumbar intervertebral disc herniation (LDH) is rare in children and adolescents. To date, the treatments available for child and adolescent LDH, and the effect of each treatment, have not been fully reviewed. The purpose of this retrospective study is to report the etiology, familial history, presenting symptoms, level of herniation, duration of symptoms, radiological findings, as well as treatment methods and outcome. We retrospectively reviewed medical records of all patients with inclusion criteria of being younger than 20 years. (10-19 years); we used magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to confirm lumbar disc herniations between 2013 and 2016. All patients were followed up for a minimum of 12 months and discharged if they remained almost asymptomatic for 6 months. All patients were treated conservatively and 6 patients they have progressive neurological deficit and persistent back pain, were treated with surgical procedures. The Visual Analogue Scale (VAS), as well as the Oswestry Disability Scale (ODS) and the modified Ashworth Scale (AS) were used to analyze physical examination findings both before and after treatment. To detect lumbar disc degeneration, we used the modified Pfirrmann grading system with MRI. All statistical analyses were performed with commercially available SPSS 15.0 software, while p ≤ 0.05 was considered statistically significant. A total of 70 cases with lumbar disc herniation have been treated. The mean age was 17.14 ± 2.15 years (range 9-19 years). The male to female ratio was 35:35. The mean duration of symptoms was 7.21 ± 1.69 months. The follow-up duration was 17.31 ± 4.17 months. The most common level was L4-5 in 38 (54%) patients and the second was L5-S1 in 24 (34%) patients. Subligamentous protruded discs were found in 42 (60%), extruded in 6 (9%), and disc bulge with intact annulus in 22 (31%) cases. VAS before treatment was 6.05 ± 0.83, while at 6 months after treatment it was 3.1 ± 0.6. However, at the first

  9. Bryan total disc arthroplasty: a replacement disc for cervical disc disease

    PubMed Central

    Wenger, Markus; Markwalder, Thomas-Marc

    2010-01-01

    Total disc arthroplasty is a new option in the treatment of cervical degenerative disc disease. Several types of cervical disc prostheses currently challenge the gold-standard discectomy and fusion procedures. This review describes the Bryan Cervical Disc System and presents the Bryan prosthesis, its indications, surgical technique, complications, and outcomes, as given in the literature. PMID:22915917

  10. Return to Sports After Cervical Total Disc Replacement.

    PubMed

    Reinke, Andreas; Behr, Michael; Preuss, Alexander; Villard, Jimmy; Meyer, Bernhard; Ringel, Florian

    2017-01-01

    Total disc replacement (TDR) is typically indicated in young patients with a cervical soft disc herniation. There are few data on the activity level of patients after cervical TDR, in particular from young patients who are expected to have a high activity level with frequent exercising. The expectation is that returning to active sports after cervical TDR is not restricted. Fifty patients were treated with a monosegmental cervical TDR at our department between May 2006 and March 2012. Clinical status and radiographic parameters were evaluated preoperatively and during follow-up. In addition, information was gathered regarding neck disability index, pain, a questionnaire concerning athletic aspects, and a modified Tegner activity score. The study design was a prospective case series. All patients were treated with the Prestige artificial cervical disc for a single-level soft disc herniation with radiculopathy. The average age was 40 years, and the mean follow-up period was 53 months (range, 26-96). The median neck disability index during follow-up was 5, and median visual analog scale for pain was 2. Two professional athletes, 20 semiprofessionals, 24 hobby athletes, and 5 patients with a very low activity level were treated. The median time to resumption of sporting activity was 4 weeks after surgery. All professionals and semiprofessionals recovered to their previous activity level. All of the 20 hobby athletes recovered to resume their sport participation. The modified Tegner preoperative score was 4 and the postoperative score was 3.5 (P = 0.806). We found that cervical TDR did not prohibit sporting activities. All patients recovered and were able to take part in their previous activities at an appropriate intensity level. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. [Functional status of patients after lumbar disc herniation surgery].

    PubMed

    Imamović, Maida Zonić; Hodzić, Mirsad; Duraković, Suada Kapidzić; Basić, Nedima Kapidzić; Cickusić, Amela; Imamović, Goran

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether early rehabilitation from the first postoperative day after lumbar disc herniation surgery improved functional status of patients compared to the rehabilitation that started 3 weeks after surgery. Oswestry index was used for functional status assessment before surgery and after rehabilitation in 60 patients divided in 2 groups, i.e., early and control group of rehabilitation strated 3 weeks after surgery, 30 in each. Oswestry index values before surgery and after rehabilitation in the early rehabilitation group were 78.4 +/- 17 and 19.6 +/- 9.9, respectively (p < 0.0001) and in the control group the values were 79 +/- 13 and 37 +/- 14, respectively (p < 0.0001). The difference of Oswestry index before operation and after rehabilitation in the early rehabilitation group was 58.7 +/- 18.9, and in the control group 41.6 +/- 13.2 (p = 0.0001). Onset of rehabilitation from the first post operative day lead to better functional recovery compared to delayed rehabilitation 3 weeks after lumbar disc herniation surgery.

  12. Treatment of symptomatic thoracic disc herniations with lateral interbody fusion.

    PubMed

    Malham, Gregory M; Parker, Rhiannon M

    2015-12-01

    Symptomatic thoracic herniated discs have historically been treated using open exposures (i.e., thoracotomy), posing a clinical challenge given the approach related morbidity. Lateral interbody fusion (LIF) is one modern minimally disruptive alternative to thoracotomy. The direct lateral technique for lumbar pathologies has seen a sharp increase in procedural numbers; however application of this technique in thoracic pathologies has not been widely reported. This study presents the results of three cases where LIF was used to treat symptomatic thoracic disc herniations. Indications for surgery included thoracic myelopathy, radiculopathy and discogenic pain. Patients were treated with LIF, without supplemental internal fixation, and followed for 24 months postoperatively. Average length of hospital stay was 5 days. One patient experienced mild persistent neuropathic thoracic pain, which was managed medically. At 3 months postoperative all patients had returned to work and by 12 months all patients were fused. From preoperative to 24-month follow-up there were mean improvements of 83.3% in visual analogue scale (VAS), 75.3% in Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), and 79.2% and 17.4% in SF-36 physical (PCS) and mental component scores (MCS), respectively. LIF is a viable minimally invasive alternative to conventional approaches in treating symptomatic thoracic pathology without an access surgeon, rib resection, or lung deflation.

  13. Treatment of symptomatic thoracic disc herniations with lateral interbody fusion

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Rhiannon M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Symptomatic thoracic herniated discs have historically been treated using open exposures (i.e., thoracotomy), posing a clinical challenge given the approach related morbidity. Lateral interbody fusion (LIF) is one modern minimally disruptive alternative to thoracotomy. The direct lateral technique for lumbar pathologies has seen a sharp increase in procedural numbers; however application of this technique in thoracic pathologies has not been widely reported. Methods This study presents the results of three cases where LIF was used to treat symptomatic thoracic disc herniations. Indications for surgery included thoracic myelopathy, radiculopathy and discogenic pain. Patients were treated with LIF, without supplemental internal fixation, and followed for 24 months postoperatively. Results: Average length of hospital stay was 5 days. One patient experienced mild persistent neuropathic thoracic pain, which was managed medically. At 3 months postoperative all patients had returned to work and by 12 months all patients were fused. From preoperative to 24-month follow-up there were mean improvements of 83.3% in visual analogue scale (VAS), 75.3% in Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), and 79.2% and 17.4% in SF-36 physical (PCS) and mental component scores (MCS), respectively. Conclusions LIF is a viable minimally invasive alternative to conventional approaches in treating symptomatic thoracic pathology without an access surgeon, rib resection, or lung deflation. PMID:27683683

  14. Occupational risk factors for symptomatic lumbar disc herniation; a case-control study

    PubMed Central

    Seidler, A; Bolm-Audorff, U; Siol, T; Henkel, N; Fuchs, C; Schug, H; Leheta, F; Marquardt, G; Schmitt, E; Ulrich, P; Beck, W; Missalla, A; Elsner, G

    2003-01-01

    Background: Previous studies mostly did not separate between symptomatic disc herniation combined with osteochondrosis/spondylosis of the lumbar spine and symptomatic disc herniation in radiographically normal intervertebral spaces. This may at least in part explain the differences in the observed risk patterns. Aims: To investigate the possible aetiological relevance of physical and psychosocial workload to lumbar disc herniation with and without concomitant osteochondrosis/spondylosis. Methods: A total of 267 cases with acute lumbar disc herniation (in two practices and four clinics) and 197 control subjects were studied. Data were gathered in a structured personal interview and analysed using logistic regression to control for age, region, nationality, and diseases affecting the lumbar spine. Cases without knowledge about osteochondrosis/spondylosis (n=42) were excluded from analysis. Risk factors were examined separately for those cases with (n=131) and without (n=94) radiographically diagnosed concomitant osteochondrosis or spondylosis. Results: There was a statistically significant positive association between extreme forward bending and lumbar disc herniation with, as well as without concomitant osteochondrosis/spondylosis. There was a statistically significant relation between cumulative exposure to weight lifting or carrying and lumbar disc herniation with, but not without, concomitant osteochondrosis/spondylosis. Cases with disc herniation reported time pressure at work as well as psychic strain through contact with clients more frequently than control subjects. Conclusions: Further larger studies are needed to verify the concept of distinct aetiologies of lumbar disc herniation in relatively younger persons with otherwise normal discs and of disc herniation in relatively older persons with structurally damaged discs. PMID:14573712

  15. Adolescent lumbar disc herniation in a Tae Kwon Do martial artist: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Kazemi, Mohsen

    1999-01-01

    Lumbar disc herniations are rare in children. The etiology and clinical picture may be different in children than in adults. Conservative management is the treatment of choice. Tae Kwon Do is a Korean martial art which is notorious for its high fast kicks. Tae Kwon Do will be an official Olympic sport in the year 2000. Low back pain is occasionally reported by Tae Kwon Do athletes but there are no reported cases in the literature on disc herniation in a Tae Kwon Do athlete. A case report is presented to illustrate clinical presentation, diagnosis, radiological assessment and conservative management of lumbar disc herniation in children. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2

  16. Biportal Endoscopic Spinal Surgery for Recurrent Lumbar Disc Herniations

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Je-Tea; Lee, Sang-Jin; Kim, Young-Sang; Jang, Han-Jin; Yoo, Bang

    2016-01-01

    The major problems of revision surgery for recurrent lumbar disc herniation (LDH) include limited visualization due to adhesion of scar tissue, restricted handling of neural structures in insufficient visual field, and consequent higher risk of a dura tear and nerve root injury. Therefore, clear differentiation of neural structures from scar tissue and adhesiolysis performed while preserving stability of the remnant facet joint would lower the risk of complications and unnecessary fusion surgery. Biportal endoscopic spine surgery has several merits including sufficient magnification with panoramic view under very high illumination and free handling of instruments normally impossible in open spine surgery. It is supposed to be a highly recommendable alternative technique that is safer and less destructive than the other surgical options for recurrent LDH. PMID:27583117

  17. Radiological analysis for thoracolumbar disc herniation in spinopelvic sagittal alignment

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tao; Ma, Lei; Yang, Da-Long; Wang, Hui; Zhang, Di; Zhang, Ying-Ze; Ding, Wen-Yuan

    2017-01-01

    Abstract A retrospective study aims to explore differences in spinopelvic sagittal alignment between thoracolumbar disc herniation (TLD) and lower lumbar disc herniation (LLD). A total of 185 patients included 26 with TLD and 129 with LLD and 30 asymptomatic volunteers in normal group (NG). Each individual took full spine X-ray to evaluate pelvic incidence (PI), pelvic tilt (PT), sacral slope (SS), lumbar lordosis (LL), thoracic kyphosis (TK), TK+LL+PI, TK/LL, and sacrum-femoral-pubic symphysis (SFP). The Roussouly classification was used to categorize all subjects according to their sagittal alignment. Spinopelvic parameters and Roussouly classification results were compared between groups. PI (51.0°), SS (30.5°), and LL (42.0°) in the TLD were significantly higher than those in the LLD (47°, 27°, 33°, respectively). However, TK (30.0°), TK/LL (0.75), and TK+LL+PI (40.0°) in the TLD were significantly lower than these in the LLD (33.0°, 1.07, 47.2°, respectively) and the similar trend between TLD and NG (34.3°, 0.93, 48.5°, respectively). But LL (42.0°) in the TLD was significantly higher than in the NG (35°). Roussouly types among 3 groups were marked differences. The LLD had a higher rate (59.7%) of type II lordosis (flat back), and the TLD had a higher rate (61.5%) of type III lordosis than other groups. This study implied that patients with TLD have higher LL, lower TK, TK/LL, and TK+LL+PI than LLD patients. We inferred that high LL combined with low TK may be the prospective factors of TLD. PMID:28383441

  18. Transition of a herniated lumbar disc to lumbar discal cyst: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Bansil, Rohit; Hirano, Yoshitaka; Sakuma, Hideo; Watanabe, Kazuo

    2016-01-01

    Background: Another rare cause of lower back pain with radiculopathy is the discal cyst. It is believed to arise from degeneration of a herniated disc, although many other theories of its origin have been proposed. Here, we report a patient with lower back pain/radiculopathy attributed originally to a herniated lumbar disc, which transformed within 6 months into a discal cyst. Case Description: A 42-year-old male had a magnetic resonance (MR) documented herniated lumbar disc at the L4-5 level. It was managed conservatively for 6 months, after which symptoms recurred and progressed. The follow-up MR study revealed a discal cyst at the L4-5 without residual herniated disc. Of interest, the cyst communicated with the L4-5 intervertebral disc, which was herniated under the posterior longitudinal ligament and the disc space. During surgery, the cyst was completely removed, and his symptoms/signs resolved. Conclusion: A discal cyst develops as pathological sequelae of a degenerated herniated disc. Although rare, these lesions must be considered among the differential diagnoses in young patients with radicular back pain. MR study clearly documents these lesions, and surgical excision of the cyst is the treatment of choice. PMID:27843689

  19. Coexistence of intervertebral disc herniation with intradural schwannoma in a lumbar segment: a case report.

    PubMed

    Pan, Jianjiang; Wang, Yue; Huang, Yazeng

    2016-04-18

    Lumbar intervertebral disc herniation and spinal tumor are major pathologies that may cause back pain and radiculopathy. Neurological symptoms resulting from disc herniation and intradural spinal tumor together, however, are very rare. We report a case of lumbar disc herniation which coexists with intradural schwannoma at the same spinal level in a 67-year-old man. The patient presented with persistent low back pain, sciatica, and weakness of the lower limbs. Contrast lumbar spine magnetic resonance (MR) imaging clearly delineated an intradural lesion and an extradural herniated disc at L3/4 level. Using a single posterior approach, both pathologies were addressed. Pathological studies confirmed the intradural lesion was schwannoma. The case report highlights a rare concomitance of two symptomatic pathologies in a lumbar spine, which deserves clinical attention. Complete history, careful physical examination, and investigative measures, such as contrast MR imaging, are helpful to establish throughout diagnoses.

  20. Deuk Laser Disc Repair® is a safe and effective treatment for symptomatic cervical disc disease

    PubMed Central

    Deukmedjian, Ara J.; Jason Cutright, S. T.; Augusto Cianciabella, PA-C; Deukmedjian, Arias

    2013-01-01

    Background: Deuk Laser Disc Repair® is a new full-endoscopic surgical procedure to repair symptomatic cervical disc disease. Methods: A prospective cohort of 66 consecutive patients underwent cervical Deuk Laser Disc Repair® for one (n = 21) or two adjacent (n = 45) symptomatic levels of cervical disc disease and were evaluated postoperatively for resolution of headache, neck pain, arm pain, and radicular symptoms. All patients were candidates for anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) or arthroplasty. The Mann–Whitney Wilcoxon test was used to calculate P values. Results: All patients (n = 66) had significant improvement in preoperative symptoms with an average symptom resolution of 94.6%. Fifty percent (n = 33) had 100% resolution of all preoperative cervicogenic symptoms. Only 4.5% (n = 3) had less than 80% resolution of preoperative symptoms. Visual analog scale (VAS) significantly improved from 8.7 preoperatively to 0.5 postoperatively (P < 0.001) for the cohort. Average operative and recovery times were 57 and 52 minutes, respectively. There were no perioperative complications. Recurrent disc herniation occurred in one patient (1.5%). Average postoperative follow-up was 94 days and no significant intergroup difference in outcomes was observed (P = 0.111) in patients with <90 days (n = 52) or >90 days (n = 14, mean 319 days) follow-up. No significant difference in outcomes was observed (P = 0.774) for patients undergoing one or two level Deuk Laser Disc Repair®. Patients diagnosed with postoperative cervical facet syndrome did significantly worse (P < 0.001). Conclusion: Deuk Laser Disc Repair® is a safe and effective alternative to ACDF or arthroplasty for the treatment of one or two adjacent symptomatic cervical disc herniations with an overall success rate of 94.6%. PMID:23776754

  1. Unusual chest wall pain caused by thoracic disc herniation in a professional baseball pitcher

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Kinshi; Yabuki, Shoji; Otani, Koji; Nikaido, Takuya; Otoshi, Ken-ichi; Watanabe, Kazuyuki; Kikuchi, Shin-ichi; Konno, Shin-ichi

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Symptomatic thoracic disc herniation is clinically rare. There are few cases of disc herniation of the thoracic spine in top athletes described in the literature. We herein present a rare case of chest wall pain due to thoracic disc herniation in a professional baseball pitcher. A 30-year-old, left-handed pitcher complained of left-sided chest wall pain in the region of his lower ribs during a game. Neurological examination revealed hypoesthesia of the left side of the chest at the level of the lower thoracic spine. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the thoracic spine showed a left-sided paramedian disc herniation at the T9-T10 level. The player was initially prescribed rest, administration of pregabalin (150 mg twice a day), and subsequent physical rehabilitation. He was able to resume full training and pitching without medication 6 months after the onset. A follow-up MRI of the thoracic spine showed a reduction in the size of the herniated disc compared to the initial findings. Though relatively rare, thoracic disc herniation should be considered in cases of chest wall pain in athletes. PMID:26983590

  2. Imbalanced Protein Expression Patterns of Anabolic, Catabolic, Anti-Catabolic and Inflammatory Cytokines in Degenerative Cervical Disc Cells: New Indications for Gene Therapeutic Treatments of Cervical Disc Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Mern, Demissew S.; Beierfuß, Anja; Fontana, Johann; Thomé, Claudius; Hegewald, Aldemar A.

    2014-01-01

    Degenerative disc disease (DDD) of the cervical spine is common after middle age and can cause loss of disc height with painful nerve impingement, bone and joint inflammation. Despite the clinical importance of these problems, in current publications the pathology of cervical disc degeneration has been studied merely from a morphologic view point using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), without addressing the issue of biological treatment approaches. So far a wide range of endogenously expressed bioactive factors in degenerative cervical disc cells has not yet been investigated, despite its importance for gene therapeutic approaches. Although degenerative lumbar disc cells have been targeted by different biological treatment approaches, the quantities of disc cells and the concentrations of gene therapeutic factors used in animal models differ extremely. These indicate lack of experimentally acquired data regarding disc cell proliferation and levels of target proteins. Therefore, we analysed proliferation and endogenous expression levels of anabolic, catabolic, ant-catabolic, inflammatory cytokines and matrix proteins of degenerative cervical disc cells in three-dimensional cultures. Preoperative MRI grading of cervical discs was used, then grade III and IV nucleus pulposus (NP) tissues were isolated from 15 patients, operated due to cervical disc herniation. NP cells were cultured for four weeks with low-glucose in collagen I scaffold. Their proliferation rates were analysed using 3-(4, 5-dimethylthiazolyl-2)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide. Their protein expression levels of 28 therapeutic targets were analysed using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. During progressive grades of degeneration NP cell proliferation rates were similar. Significantly decreased aggrecan and collagen II expressions (P<0.0001) were accompanied by accumulations of selective catabolic and inflammatory cytokines (disintegrin and metalloproteinase with thrombospondin motifs 4 and 5, matrix

  3. Imbalanced protein expression patterns of anabolic, catabolic, anti-catabolic and inflammatory cytokines in degenerative cervical disc cells: new indications for gene therapeutic treatments of cervical disc diseases.

    PubMed

    Mern, Demissew S; Beierfuβ, Anja; Fontana, Johann; Thomé, Claudius; Hegewald, Aldemar A

    2014-01-01

    Degenerative disc disease (DDD) of the cervical spine is common after middle age and can cause loss of disc height with painful nerve impingement, bone and joint inflammation. Despite the clinical importance of these problems, in current publications the pathology of cervical disc degeneration has been studied merely from a morphologic view point using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), without addressing the issue of biological treatment approaches. So far a wide range of endogenously expressed bioactive factors in degenerative cervical disc cells has not yet been investigated, despite its importance for gene therapeutic approaches. Although degenerative lumbar disc cells have been targeted by different biological treatment approaches, the quantities of disc cells and the concentrations of gene therapeutic factors used in animal models differ extremely. These indicate lack of experimentally acquired data regarding disc cell proliferation and levels of target proteins. Therefore, we analysed proliferation and endogenous expression levels of anabolic, catabolic, ant-catabolic, inflammatory cytokines and matrix proteins of degenerative cervical disc cells in three-dimensional cultures. Preoperative MRI grading of cervical discs was used, then grade III and IV nucleus pulposus (NP) tissues were isolated from 15 patients, operated due to cervical disc herniation. NP cells were cultured for four weeks with low-glucose in collagen I scaffold. Their proliferation rates were analysed using 3-(4, 5-dimethylthiazolyl-2)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide. Their protein expression levels of 28 therapeutic targets were analysed using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. During progressive grades of degeneration NP cell proliferation rates were similar. Significantly decreased aggrecan and collagen II expressions (P<0.0001) were accompanied by accumulations of selective catabolic and inflammatory cytokines (disintegrin and metalloproteinase with thrombospondin motifs 4 and 5, matrix

  4. Treatment of Recurrent Disc Herniation: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Ugiliweneza, Beatrice; Al-Khouja, Lutfi; Yang, Dongyan; Johnson, Patrick; Kim, Terrence; Boakye, Maxwell

    2016-01-01

    Intervertebral disc herniation is one of the most common causes of back and extremity pain. The most commonly used surgical treatment is lumbar discectomy. About 0.5-25% go on to develop recurrent disc herniation (rDH) after a successful first discectomy. Currently, there aren’t any guidelines to assist surgeons in determining which approach is most appropriate to treat rDH. A recent survey showed significant heterogeneity among surgeons regarding treatment options for rDH. It remains unclear which methods lead to better outcomes, as there are no comparative studies with a sufficient level of evidence. In this study, we aimed to perform a systematic review to compare treatment options for rDH and determine if one intervention provides better outcomes than the other; more specifically, whether outcome differences exist between discectomy alone and discectomy with fusion. We applied the PICOS (participants, intervention, comparison, outcome, study design) format to develop this systematic review through PubMed. Twenty-seven papers from 1978-2014 met our inclusion criteria and were included in the analysis. Nine papers reported outcomes after discectomy and seven of them showed good or excellent outcomes (70.60%-89%). Ten papers reported on minimally invasive discectomy. The percent change in visual analog scale (VAS) ranged from -50.77% to -86.57%, indicating an overall pain reduction. Four studies out of the ten reported good or excellent outcomes (81% to 90.2%). Three studies looked at posterolateral fusion. Three studies analyzed posterior lumbar interbody fusion. For one study, we found the VAS percentage change to be -46.02%. All reported good to excellent outcomes. Six studies evaluated the transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion. All reported improvement in pain. Four used VAS, and we found the percent change to be -54% to -86.5%. The other two used the Japanese Orthopedic Association (JOA) score, and we found the percent change to be 68.3% to 93.3%. We

  5. Experience in the treatment of thoracic herniated disc using image-guided thorascopy.

    PubMed

    Bordon, G; Burguet Girona, S

    Thoracoscopic micro-discectomy is a treatment option for thoracic disc disease that combines the advantages of the anterior approach and the benefits of a minimally invasive technique. Adding a navigation system provides many advantages to the usual technique, as it allows accurate marking of the lesion level, improvement in the surgical approach, and precise control of herniated disc resection and vertebral osteotomy. The navigation system also reduces the learning curve for thoracoscopic technique. We report our experience in the treatment of thoracic disc herniation with image-guided thoracoscopy.

  6. Reoperations Following Cervical Disc Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Skovrlj, Branko; Lee, Dong-Ho; Caridi, John Michael

    2015-01-01

    Cervical disc replacement (CDR) has emerged as an alternative surgical option to cervical arthrodesis. With increasing numbers of patients and longer follow-ups, complications related to the device and/or aging spine are growing, leaving us with a new challenge in the management and surgical revision of CDR. The purpose of this study is to review the current literature regarding reoperations following CDR and to discuss about the approaches and solutions for the current and future potential complications associated with CDR. The published rates of reoperation (mean, 1.0%; range, 0%-3.1%), revision (mean, 0.2%; range, 0%-0.5%), and removal (mean, 1.2%; range, 0%-1.9%) following CDR are low and comparable to the published rates of reoperation (mean, 1.7%; range; 0%-3.4%), revision (mean, 1.5%; range, 0%-4.7%), and removal (mean, 2.0%; range, 0%-3.4%) following cervical arthrodesis. The surgical interventions following CDR range from the repositioning to explantation followed by fusion or the reimplantation to posterior foraminotomy or fusion. Strict patient selection, careful preoperative radiographic review and surgical planning, as well as surgical technique may reduce adverse events and the need for future intervention. Minimal literature and no guidelines exist for the approaches and techniques in revision and for the removal of implants following CDR. Adherence to strict indications and precise surgical technique may reduce the number of reoperations, revisions, and removals following CDR. Long-term follow-up studies are needed, assessing the implant survivorship and its effect on the revision and removal rates. PMID:26097667

  7. Percutaneous Treatment of Herniated Lumbar Discs with Ozone: Investigation of the Mechanisms of Action.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Kieran; Elias, Gavin; Steppan, Jim; Boxley, Chett; Balagurunathan, Kuberan; Victor, Xylophone; Meaders, Thomas; Muto, Mario

    2016-08-01

    To elucidate the mechanism of action of intradiscal oxygen-ozone therapy for herniated intervertebral disc therapy. Ozone's mechanism of action was investigated using 3 approaches: mathematical models of intervertebral disc space to explore the relationship between disc pressure and volume; ozonolysis experiments using glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) from a Chinese hamster ovary cell line that were similar in composition to GAGs found in human nucleus pulposus; and experiments in which live Yucatan miniature pigs received various concentrations of percutaneous, image-guided intradiscal oxygen-ozone treatment and were examined (after sacrifice) with histology and semiquantitative analysis of disc cytokine concentrations. Engineering calculations support observations that a small (6%) disc volume reduction can result in considerable (9.84%) intradiscal pressure reduction. Porcine disc histology and Chinese hamster ovary GAG ozonolysis results showed that administered ozone reacted with and fragmented disc proteoglycans, reducing disc volume through disc dehydration. Cytokine analysis of porcine discs found that each of 4 cytokines measured (interleukin [IL]-1β, IL-6, IL-8, and tumor necrosis factor α) increased in concentration after 2 wt% ozone treatment. Oxygen-ozone therapy breaks down proteoglycan GAGs that maintain disc osmotic pressure, dehydrating the nucleus pulposus and reducing intervertebral disc volume. This is likely a primary mechanism by which ozone relieves nerve root compression and alleviates herniated disc-related pain. Additionally, 2 wt% ozone appears to interact with intradiscal cytokines, generating an antiinflammatory response that may contribute to symptom improvement. Copyright © 2016 SIR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Outcomes After Lumbar Disc Herniation in the National Basketball Association

    PubMed Central

    Minhas, Shobhit V.; Kester, Benjamin S.; Hsu, Wellington K.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Professional basketball players are at risk for lumbar disc herniation (LDH), yet the evidence guiding treatment after operative or nonoperative management of this condition in the National Basketball Association (NBA) is limited. Hypothesis: NBA players with LDH will have different performance outcomes based on treatment type. Study Design: Case-control study. Level of Evidence: Level 4. Methods: Athletes in the NBA with an LDH were identified through team injury reports, transaction records, and public sports archives. A 1:2 case-control study was performed in which LDH players and players without LDH were matched for player variables. Statistical analysis was employed to compare pre- and postindex season performance (games played and player efficiency rating [PER]) and career longevity between test subjects and controls in the operatively treated (OT) and nonoperatively treated (NOT) cohorts. Results: A total of 61 NBA players with LDH were included, of whom 34 underwent discectomy and 27 were managed nonoperatively. Return-to-play (RTP) rates did not differ between NOT and OT players (77.8% vs 79.4%). When compared with controls, OT players played significantly fewer games and had a lower PER than controls during the first postoperative season, but no difference was seen 2 and 3 years after surgery, with no difference in postoperative career length. In contrast, no difference in games played or PER was seen between NOT players and controls, although NOT players played significantly fewer postindex seasons. Conclusion: NBA players have a high RTP rate regardless of type of treatment for LDH; however, postindex performance differs between surgically and nonoperatively managed patients when compared with players without an LDH. However, further studies with a larger sample size are required for more definitive recommendations. Clinical Relevance: There is a high RTP rate after LDH in the NBA, although postindex performance may differ based on operative

  9. Outcomes After Lumbar Disc Herniation in the National Basketball Association.

    PubMed

    Minhas, Shobhit V; Kester, Benjamin S; Hsu, Wellington K

    2016-01-01

    Professional basketball players are at risk for lumbar disc herniation (LDH), yet the evidence guiding treatment after operative or nonoperative management of this condition in the National Basketball Association (NBA) is limited. NBA players with LDH will have different performance outcomes based on treatment type. Case-control study. Level 4. Athletes in the NBA with an LDH were identified through team injury reports, transaction records, and public sports archives. A 1:2 case-control study was performed in which LDH players and players without LDH were matched for player variables. Statistical analysis was employed to compare pre- and postindex season performance (games played and player efficiency rating [PER]) and career longevity between test subjects and controls in the operatively treated (OT) and nonoperatively treated (NOT) cohorts. A total of 61 NBA players with LDH were included, of whom 34 underwent discectomy and 27 were managed nonoperatively. Return-to-play (RTP) rates did not differ between NOT and OT players (77.8% vs. 79.4%). When compared with controls, OT players played significantly fewer games and had a lower PER than controls during the first postoperative season, but no difference was seen 2 and 3 years after surgery, with no difference in postoperative career length. In contrast, no difference in games played or PER was seen between NOT players and controls, although NOT players played significantly fewer postindex seasons. NBA players have a high RTP rate regardless of type of treatment for LDH; however, postindex performance differs between surgically and nonoperatively managed patients when compared with players without an LDH. However, further studies with a larger sample size are required for more definitive recommendations. There is a high RTP rate after LDH in the NBA, although postindex performance may differ based on operative versus nonoperative treatment. © 2015 The Author(s).

  10. Cervical disc arthroplasty: Pros and cons

    PubMed Central

    Moatz, Bradley; Tortolani, P. Justin

    2012-01-01

    Background: Cervical disc arthroplasty has emerged as a promising potential alternative to anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) in appropriately selected patients. Despite a history of excellent outcomes after ACDF, the question as to whether a fusion leads to adjacent segment degeneration remains unanswered. Numerous US investigational device exemption trials comparing cervical arthroplasty to fusion have been conducted to answer this question. Methods: This study reviews the current research regarding cervical athroplasty, and emphasizes both the pros and cons of arthroplasty as compared with ACDF. Results: Early clinical outcomes show that cervical arthroplasty is as effective as the standard ACDF. However, this new technology is also associated with an expanding list of novel complications. Conclusion: Although there is no definitive evidence that cervical disc replacement reduces the incidence of adjacent segment degeneration, it does show other advantages; for example, faster return to work, and reduced need for postoperative bracing. PMID:22905327

  11. Spinal Cord Herniation After Cervical Corpectomy with Cerebrospinal Fluid Leak: Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Guppy, Kern H; Silverthorn, James W

    2017-04-01

    Spinal cord herniation (SCH) is rare, is mostly idiopathic, and occurs predominantly in the thoracic spine. SCH is less common in the cervical spine and has been reported after posterior cervical spine surgery associated with the development of pseudomeningoceles. Two cases of SCH have been reported after anterior cervical corpectomies for ossified posterior longitudinal ligament with cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leaks. We report the third such case, but the first in a patient without ossified posterior longitudinal ligament (degenerative disc disease and pseudarthrosis). A 56-year-old woman presented with bilateral arm pain and weakness. She had undergone 3 previous anterior cervical spine surgeries at an outside medical center with the most recent 7 years ago with C5 and C6 corpectomies and fusion with a persistent CSF leak. Magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography myelography showed spinal cord herniation through the mesh cage at C6. The patient underwent a redo C5 and C6 corpectomy with untethering of the spinal cord. The patient was asymptomatic 2 years later. This is the first reported case of anterior cervical SCH in a patient without ossified posterior longitudinal ligament after multiple anterior cervical fusions including a cervical corpectomy for pseudarthrosis with a CSF leak. We hypothesize that persistent CSF leak causes a pressure gradient across the dura mater through the cage to the lower pressure in the retropharyngeal space, which led to herniation of the spinal cord into the anterior cage. We review the literature and discuss the treatment choices for anterior cervical SCH. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Management of calcified thoracic disc herniation using ultrasonic bone curette SONO-PET®: technical description.

    PubMed

    Landi, A; Marotta, N; Mancarella, C; Dugoni, D E; Delfini, R

    2011-09-01

    This paper describes the surgical management of a post-traumatic calcified thoracic disc herniation treated using ultrasonic bone curette SONO-PET®. The case described concerns a young man with a symptomatic calcified thoracic disc herniation, who underwent posterolateral approach and transversoarthropediculectomy. Patient underwent posterolateral approach with excellent postoperative results. Neurophysiological monitoring somato-sensory evoked potential (SSEP) and muscle motor evoked potentials (MMEP), inclination of 30° toward the unaffected side of the operating table, the use of Ultrasonic Bone-Curette SONO-PET® and proper reconstruction of the three floors of the back muscles allows the removal of the disc herniation safer and risk's free, and less invasive for the patient.

  13. Effect of ligamenta flava hypertrophy on lumbar disc herniation with contralateral symptoms and signs: a clinical and morphometric study

    PubMed Central

    Yildizhan, Ahmet; Atar, Elmas K.; Yaycioglu, Soner; Gocmen-Mas, Nuket; Yazici, Canan

    2010-01-01

    Introduction The purpose of this study was to determine whether ligamentum flavum hypertrophy among disc herniated patients causes contralateral pain symptoms. For this reason we measured the thickness of the ligament in disc herniated patients with ipsilateral or contralateral symptoms. Material and methods Two hundred disc herniated patients with ipsilateral symptoms as group I were compared with five disc herniated patients with only contralateral symptoms as group II. Ligamenta flava thicknesses and spinal canal diameters of both groups were measured on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with a micro-caliper. Results Both groups underwent surgery only on the disc herniated side. The total thicknesses of the ligamenta flava in group II was thicker than in group I. There was no spinal stenosis in either group and no significance difference between the groups. Statistically significant differences were found for both ipsilateral and contralateral thickness of the ligament flava in both groups. We also compared thickness of the ligamenta flava for each level of disc herniation in group I; ligamenta flava hypertrophy was more common at L3-L4 and L4-L5 levels of vertebrae in females. Conclusions Aetiology of contralateral sciatica among disc herniated patients may be related to hypertrophy of the ligamenta flava, especially on the opposite side. Surgical approaches of the disc herniated side alone may be sufficient for a good outcome. PMID:22371809

  14. IL-20 may contribute to the pathogenesis of human intervertebral disc herniation.

    PubMed

    Huang, Kuo-Yuan; Lin, Ruey-Mo; Chen, Wei-Yu; Lee, Chia-Lin; Yan, Jing-Jou; Chang, Ming-Shi

    2008-09-01

    The gene expression of interleukin (IL)-20 on human herniated intervertebral disc. OBJECTIVE.: To elucidate the role of novel cytokine IL-20 in the pathogenesis of human intervertebral disc (IVD) herniation. IL-20 is involved in inflammatory diseases such as psoriasis, atherosclerosis, and rheumatoid arthritis, etc. However, IL-20 is never reported to be associated with the pathogenesis of human disc herniation. Twenty consecutive patients who were diagnosed with IVD herniation and received open discectomy were included in this study. The retrieved disc material specimens and the isolated primarily cultured disc cells were immunohistochemically stained to detect the expression of IL-20 and its receptor subunits (IL-20R1, IL-20R2, and IL-22R1). Besides, to investigate the in vitro response of IL-20 on human herniated intervertebral disc, we analyzed the effects of IL-20 alone, in combination with IL-1beta, and IL-1beta alone on the gene expression and protein levels of various cytokines, chemokines, matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), etc. IL-20 and its receptors were detectable in human herniated disc tissues and isolated disc cells. In vitro, IL-1beta induced the expression of IL-20. Furthermore, IL-20 induced transcripts of IL-1beta, IL-6, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), MMP-3, and monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP-1) on primarily cultured human disc cells. IL-1beta induced transcripts of IL-1beta, IL-6, IL-8, VEGF, MMP3, and MCP-1. IL-20 combined with IL-1beta induced transcripts of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), IL-1beta, IL-6, IL-8, MMP-3, and MCP-1 to a level higher than those found in cells treated with IL-20 or IL-1beta alone.Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, analysis also showed that IL-20 combined with IL-1beta up-regulated the secretion of TNF-alpha, IL-6, IL-8, and MCP-1. IL-20 induces proinflammatory, chemotaxtic, and matrix degradative responses in IVD cells especially in combination with IL-1beta. Our study suggests that IL-20

  15. Complete cervical intervertebral disc extrusion with spinal cord injury in the absence of facet dislocation: a case report.

    PubMed

    Yue, James J; Lawrence, Brandon D; Sutton, Karen M; Strugar, John J; Haims, Andrew H

    2004-05-01

    Complete cervical disc complex extrusion, defined as the extrusion of both cartilaginous end-plates, the entire nucleus pulposus, and portions of the anulus fibrosus, is rare. A case of complete cervical disc complex extrusion with spinal cord injury in the absence of facet dislocation or subluxation in an obtunded patient is reported. To report an unusual presentation of spinal cord injury and the occurrence of complete traumatic cervical disc complex extrusion in the absence of facet dislocation and normal plain radiographic findings. Traumatic cervical disc herniation occurs in 54% to 80% of patients with facet dislocation. A report of complete extrusion of a cervical intervertebral disc complex (cartilaginous endplate, anulus, and nucleus pulposus) with spinal cord injury in the absence of dislocation has not been described, to the best of the authors' knowledge. A clinical and radiographic review of such a case of complete traumatic cervical disc complex herniation in the absence of dislocation was performed. Plain radiographic imaging did not show any injury. A nondisplaced fracture of the left inferior facet joint was evident on computed tomography. The diagnosis of C4-C5 intervertebral disc extrusion was made only after magnetic resonance imaging. The vacuum effect of complete disc extrusion created a "white-out" appearance to the disc space on the sagittal T2 magnetic resonance image. The patient underwent anterior cervical discectomy and fusion with additional posterior cervical fusion. He subsequently regained functional strength against gravity in two of four limbs. He remains completely paraparetic in the left upper extremity and partially paraparetic in the left lower extremity. The case report highlights the occurrence of complete traumatic cervical disc extrusion in the absence of facet dislocation with normal plain radiographic findings and consequent spinal cord injury, which can accompany such an injury.

  16. Economic value of treating lumbar disc herniation in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Falavigna, Asdrubal; Scheverin, Nicolas; Righesso, Orlando; Teles, Alisson R; Gullo, Maria Carolina; Cheng, Joseph S; Riew, K Daniel

    2016-04-01

    Lumbar discectomy is one of the most common surgical spine procedures. In order to understand the value of this surgical care, it is important to understand the costs to the health care system and patient for good results. The objective of this study was to evaluate for the first time the cost-effectiveness of spine surgery in Latin America for lumbar discectomy in terms of cost per quality-adjusted life year (QALY) gained for patients in Brazil. The authors performed a prospective cohort study involving 143 consecutive patients who underwent open discectomy for lumbar disc herniation (LDH). Patient-reported outcomes were assessed utilizing the SF-6D, which is derived from a 12-month variation of the SF-36. Direct medical costs included medical reimbursement, costs of hospital care, and overall resource consumption. Disability losses were considered indirect costs. A 4-year horizon with 3% discounting was applied to health-utilities estimates. Sensitivity analysis was performed by varying utility gain by 20%. The costs were expressed in Reais (R$) and US dollars ($), applying an exchange rate of 2.4:1 (the rate at the time of manuscript preparation). The direct and indirect costs of open lumbar discectomy were estimated at an average of R$3426.72 ($1427.80) and R$2027.67 ($844.86), respectively. The mean total cost of treatment was estimated at R$5454.40 ($2272.66) (SD R$2709.17 [$1128.82]). The SF-6D utility gain was 0.044 (95% CI 0.03197-0.05923, p = 0.017) at 12 months. The 4-year discounted QALY gain was 0.176928. The estimated cost-utility ratio was R$30,828.35 ($12,845.14) per QALY gained. The sensitivity analysis showed a range of R$25,690.29 ($10,714.28) to R$38,535.44 ($16,056.43) per QALY gained. The use of open lumbar discectomy to treat LDH is associated with a significant improvement in patient outcomes as measured by the SF-6D. Open lumbar discectomy performed in the Brazilian supplementary health care system provides a cost-utility ratio of R$30

  17. Outpatient, awake, ultra-minimally invasive endoscopic treatment of lumbar disc herniations.

    PubMed

    Jasper, Gabriele P; Francisco, Gina M; Telfeian, Albert

    2014-06-02

    Endoscopic discectomy is an ultra- minimally invasive outpatient surgical option for the treatment of lumbar herniated discs. The purpose of this study was to assess the benefit of tranforaminal versus interlaminar endoscopic discectomy in patients with single level Lumbar 5-Sacral 1(L5-S1) disc herniations and lumbar radiculopathy. After Institutional Review Board Approval, charts from 41 consecutive patients with complaints of lower back and radicular pain and an L5-S1 herniated disc who underwent an endoscopic procedure between 2007 and 2012 were reviewed. The transforaminal approach was used for patients with far lateral, foraminal, and paracentral disc herniations and the intralaminar approach was used for herniations that were more central. The average pain relief 1-year postoperatively was 75.9% for the transforaminal group and 75.3% for the interlaminar group, both excellent results as defined by MacNab. The average preoperative visual analogue scale (VAS) scores were 8.2 and 8.4 for the transforaminal and interlaminar groups respectively, indicated in our questionnaire as severe and constant pain. The average 1-year postoperative VAS scores were 1.7 and 2.1, indicated in our questionnaire as mild and intermittent pain. There were no complications in the series of patients treated. The 1-year follow-up data presented here for transforaminal and intralaminar approaches to L5-S1 disc herniations appears to indicate that either approach can be used as determined to best suit the pathology without sacrificing the probability of postoperative pain improvement.

  18. Discal cyst associated with myxoid change and apoptosis of herniated disc materials: a case report.

    PubMed

    Okada, Kyoji; Saito, Hajime; Nishida, Jun; Miyakoshi, Naohisa; Takahashi, Shu; Nagasawa, Hiroyuki; Suzuki, Norio; Chida, Shuichi

    2007-01-01

    Discal cyst is a lumbar intraspinal cyst communicating with intervertebral disc, and previously reported series described the wall of these cysts as consisting of dense fibrous connective tissue. We report a 29-year-old Japanese male with discal cyst showing unusual histological features. Clinical symptoms in the current case as well as imaging features including discography were similar to those previously reported.However, the wall of the cyst consisted of disc material with myxoid degeneration. In addition, apoptosis of chondrocytes was diffusely observed in the herniated disc material. The current case was considered a histological variant of discal cyst. Myxoid degeneration of herniated disc material with diffuse apoptotic change of chondrocytes was probably associated with the formation of discal cyst.

  19. Spontaneous intradural disc herniation with focal distension of the subarachnoid space in a dog.

    PubMed

    Barnoon, Itai; Chai, Orit; Srugo, Itai; Peeri, Dana; Konstantin, Lilach; Brenner, Ori; Shamir, Merav H

    2012-11-01

    Myelo-computed tomography of a paraparetic 14-year-old dog revealed subarachnoid distension with an intradural filling defect above the T13-L1 disc space. T12-L1 hemilaminectomy followed by durotomy allowed removal of a large piece of degenerated disc material that compressed the spinal parenchyma. Full return to function was achieved 10 days post-surgery. The distension was likely secondary to the intradural herniation, and is a rare and distinct finding.

  20. A predictive model for disability in patients with lumbar disc herniation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hsin-Ni; Tsai, Yun-Fang

    2013-03-01

    Lumbar disc herniation may influence patients' daily activities and social interactions; however, no predictive models of disability could be found for patients with lumbar disc herniation. We aimed to explore predictive factors for disability in patients with lumbar disc herniation. The sample included 216 patients recruited from the orthopedic outpatient clinics at a medical center in northern Taiwan. Data were collected on patients' pain, fatigue, depression, disability, and demographics. Hierarchical multiple regression analysis was used in model verification. Path analysis was used to investigate causal relationships between disability and other factors. In path analysis, the most influential factor affecting the disability level was the pain level (standardized regression coefficient, b = 0.746), followed by the fatigue level (b = 0.138) and depression level (b = 0.100). The depression level was directly affected by the fatigue level (b = 0.416) and the pain level (b = 0.367), the fatigue level was directly affected by the pain level (b = 0.538), and the pain level was directly affected by age (b = 0.140) and previous surgery (b = 0.260). We recommend that health-care providers regularly assess and treat pain and depression to reduce/prevent disability among patients with lumbar disc herniation, even among those who are apparently functioning well in the community.

  1. Percutaneous bipolar radiofrequency thermocoagulation for the treatment of lumbar disc herniation.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Zhenhua; Yan, Min; Dai, Yi; Qiu, Weidong; Deng, Shuo; Gu, Xinzhu

    2016-08-01

    Lumbar disc herniation is usually managed with conservative treatment or surgery. However, conservative therapy seldom yields good results, and surgery is associated with multiple complications. This study aimed to assess bipolar radiofrequency thermocoagulation for the treatment of lumbar disc herniation. A total of 168 patients with lumbar disc herniation suitable for radiofrequency thermocoagulation were enrolled and randomized to monopolar radiofrequency thermocoagulation (control group, n=84) or bipolar radiofrequency thermocoagulation (experimental group, n=84) treatment groups. Ablation sites were targeted under CT scan guidance, and consecutive radiofrequency therapy was used. One and two probes were used for monopolar and bipolar thermocoagulation, respectively. Thermocoagulation was achieved at 50°C, 60°C, and 70°C for 60s each, 80°C for 90s, and 92°C for 100s. Symptoms and complications were evaluated using the modified Macnab criteria and Visual Analog Scale at 7, 30, and 180days postoperatively. At 180days, a significantly higher efficacy rate was obtained in the experimental group compared with control patients (91.6% versus 79.7%, P<0.05). No severe complications were occurred in either group. Targeted ablation via bipolar radiofrequency thermocoagulation is efficient for lumbar disc herniation treatment, and should be further explored for broad clinical application. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Factors for Predicting Favorable Outcome of Percutaneous Epidural Adhesiolysis for Lumbar Disc Herniation

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Sang Ho; Lee, Jae Il; Cho, Hyun Seok; Shin, Jin Woo

    2017-01-01

    Background. Lower back pain is a common reason for disability and the most common cause is lumbar disc herniation. Percutaneous epidural adhesiolysis has been applied to relieve pain and increase the functional capacity of patients who present this condition. Objectives. In this study, we retrospectively evaluated the factors which predict the outcome of percutaneous epidural adhesiolysis in patients who were diagnosed with lumbar disc herniation. Methods. Electronic medical records of patients diagnosed with lumbar disc herniation who have received percutaneous epidural adhesiolysis treatment were reviewed. The primary outcome was the factors that were associated with substantial response of ≥4 points or ≥50% of pain relief in the numerical rating scale pain score 12 months after the treatment. Results. Multivariate logistic regression analysis demonstrated that the presence of high-intensity zone (HIZ) at magnetic resonance imaging was a predictor of substantial response to percutaneous epidural adhesiolysis for 12 months (P = 0.007). The presence of a condition involving the vertebral foramen was a predictor for unsuccessful response after 12 months (P = 0.02). Discussion and Conclusion. The presence of HIZ was a predictor of favorable long-term outcome after percutaneous epidural adhesiolysis for the treatment of lower back pain with radicular pain caused by lumbar disc herniation. PMID:28246488

  3. Sporting activity following discectomy for lumbar disc herniation.

    PubMed

    Dollinger, Verena; Obwegeser, Alois A; Gabl, Michael; Lackner, Peter; Koller, Michael; Galiano, Klaus

    2008-08-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate to what extent patients could resume physical activity following surgery for herniated lumbar disks. We analyzed a cohort of 1003 patients who underwent lumbar spine surgery within 1 year. Out of this cohort, 93 patients were selected according to our inclusion criteria (age 20-35 years, mediolateral single level disk herniation, no comorbidity at the lumbar spine, and treatment with conventional subtotal diskectomy). This group was evaluated after a minimum follow-up of 28 months in a telephone questionnaire; participants were questioned about pre- and postoperative physical activities. The questionnaire was answered by 67 patients. Twenty-six patients were lost to follow-up because they had relocated. The follow-up group had a mean age of 30 years. Five patients underwent a second procedure due to recurrent disk herniation. All patients showed a pain reduction. At follow-up, no patient needed constant pain medication. Eighty-two percent of the patients were pain free during practicing sports. Sixty-two patients performed some type of sport after surgery. Concerning the type and frequency of physical activities, no significant change between pre- and postoperative behavior occurred. The 5 patients with recurrent disk herniation did not behave differently. Single-level lumbar disk surgery does not limit or compromise sportive activity in young people.

  4. Surgical planning and Neurologic Outcome after anterior approach to remove a disc herniation at the C7-T1 Level in 19 patients.

    PubMed

    Falavigna, Asdrubal; Righesso, Orlando; Betemps, Alejandro; de Los Rios, Pablo Fernando Vela; Guimarães, Rangel; Ziegler, Marcus; de Souza, Olivia Egger; da Silva, Pedro Guarise; Riew, Daniel K

    2013-11-18

    Study Design. Retrospective cohort study.Objective. The purpose of this study was to report the neurological presentation, outcome and surgical planning in a series of patients with a symptomatic single level C7-T1 disc herniation who underwent anterior surgical discectomy and fusion.Summary of Background Data. Disc herniations at C7-T1 are uncommon and there are few large series in the literature describing anterior treatment of such herniations.Methods. We performed a retrospective study of patients who underwent surgery for a C7-T1 disc herniation and reviewed the medical records, operative reports, and imaging studies. The surgeons' view line was drawn and its relation to the manubrium and the great vessels was determined on T1 sagittal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The location of the herniated disc in the spinal canal was determined using a T2 axial MRI and classified as central, foraminal and central/foraminal. Loss of muscle strength was evaluated preoperatively and at the last follow-up according to the classification of the Medical Research Council (MRC). The disc space was approached anteriorly by a standard cervical supramanubrial Smith-Robinson approach.Results. We identified 19 patients who had undergone C7-T1 discectomy and fusion. The mean age of the sample was 54.26 (±8.65) years. There was a higher proportion of male patients (57.9%, 11/19). The clinical presentation was predominantly motor deficit in 15/19 cases (78.9%) in intrinsic hand muscles, and usually improved after surgery. The mean follow-up period was 27.05 (± 15.10) months. All the patients underwent an anterior cervical supramanubrial approach with microdiscectomy and fusion. Anterior cervical plate fixation was used in 9/19 cases (47.3%). In the rest of the cases, a stand-alone intervertebral device was placed.Conclusion. An anterior cervical supramanubrial approach was easily accomplished in all patients. Motor deficit was the most common surgical indication.

  5. Fusion versus Bryan Cervical Disc in two-level cervical disc disease: a prospective, randomised study

    PubMed Central

    Nie, Lin; Zhang, Li; Hou, Yong

    2008-01-01

    In this prospective study, our aim was to compare the functional results and radiographic outcomes of fusion and Bryan Cervical Disc replacement in the treatment of two-level cervical disc disease. A total of 65 patients with two-level cervical disc disease were randomly assigned to two groups, those operated on with Bryan Cervical Disc replacement (31) and those operated on with anterior cervical fusion with an iliac crest autograft and plate (34). Clinical evaluation was carried out using the visual analogue scale (VAS), the Short Form 36 (SF-36) and the neck disability index (NDI) during a two year follow-up. Radiological evaluation sought evidence of range of motion, stability and subsidence of the prosthesis. Substantial reduction in NDI scores occurred in both groups, with greater percent improvement in the Bryan group (P = 0.023). The arm pain VAS score improvement was substantial in both groups. Bryan artificial cervical disc replacement seems reliable and safe in the treatment of patients with two-level cervical disc disease. PMID:18956190

  6. The biomechanics of lumbar disc herniation and the effect of overload and instability.

    PubMed

    Wilder, D G; Pope, M H; Frymoyer, J W

    1988-01-01

    A multipart study has been performed to provide a mechanical explanation for the epidemiologic association between sitting in static (e.g., factory or office) or vibration (e.g., car or truck driving) environments and acute herniated lumbar discs. It was shown that a 1 h exposure to sitting environments caused significant changes in the mechanical properties of the lumbar intervertebral disc. During many of the latter tests, specimens were unstable (exhibited by a sudden, large flexion and/or lateral bend rotation response to an axially applied load). This showed that a motion segment in the lumbar spine could suddenly buckle and apply a tensile impact loading to the posterolateral region of the disc. We also demonstrated that a combined lateral bend, flexion, and axial rotation vibration loading could cause tracking tears proceeding from the nucleus through the posterolateral region of the anulus. It suggests that a mechanism for disc herniation is mechanical changes leading to instability of the motion segment. These experiments complete the argument that lumbar disc herniations can be a direct mechanical consequence of prolonged sitting in static or vibration environments.

  7. Lumbar disc herniation in a child with cystic fibrosis: case report.

    PubMed

    Alexiou, George A; Stefanaki, Kalliopi; Sfakianos, George; Prodromou, Neofytos

    2014-04-01

    We report a case of child with cystic fibrosis and lumbar disc herniation. An 8-year-old boy presented with low back pain that exacerbated on coughing, sitting, walking, or bending and diminished when lying down. The straight leg raising test was positive when the right leg was lifted at 60 degrees. Crossed leg raising test was negative. Lumbar MRI revealed a L5-S1central disc protrusion. Conservative treatment was not effective and the patient underwent surgery. Postoperatively the patient experienced regression of the pain. To the best of our knowledge this is the first reported case of lumbar disc herniation in a child with cystic fibrosis. Although this case might be coincidental, thorough investigation of back pain, which is frequent in patients with cystic fibrosis, should be performed.

  8. Intradural lumbar disc herniations: the role of MRI in preoperative diagnosis and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    D'Andrea, Giancarlo; Trillò, Giuseppe; Roperto, Raffaelino; Celli, Paolo; Orlando, Epimenio Ramundo; Ferrante, Luigi

    2004-04-01

    The goal of this article is to report our experience on intradural lumbar disc herniation, consider the causes of this pathology, and analyze it from clinical, diagnostic, and therapeutic perspectives with a particular emphasis on the role of MRI in preoperative diagnosis. We analyzed nine patients treated surgically for intradural lumbar disc hernia. All of them underwent surgery, and hemilaminectomy was performed. In six cases, the diagnosis of intradural herniation was definitive and, in the three remaining, it was confirmed at surgery. In five cases, CT (with no contrast medium) of the lumbar area revealed disc herniation, but none could it confirm its intradural location. Myelography was performed in two cases but also could not prove intradural extrusion. Magnetic resonance imaging study was used in four cases. In five, the postoperative outcome has been excellent. Patients 6 and 9 recovered anal function postoperatively; patient 6 suffered from occasional and mild micturition urgency. The three patients previously operated (1, 2, 7) showed good outcome. Presently, we believe that radiologic diagnosis of intradural herniation is possible in carefully selected patients, thanks to MRI with gadolinium.

  9. Anterior herniation of lumbar disc induces persistent visceral pain: discogenic visceral pain: discogenic visceral pain.

    PubMed

    Tang, Yuan-Zhang; Shannon, Moore-Langston; Lai, Guang-Hui; Li, Xuan-Ying; Li, Na; Ni, Jia-Xiang

    2013-01-01

    Visceral pain is a common cause for seeking medical attention. Afferent fibers innervating viscera project to the central nervous system via sympathetic nerves. The lumbar sympathetic nerve trunk lies in front of the lumbar spine. Thus, it is possible for patients to suffer visceral pain originating from sympathetic nerve irritation induced by anterior herniation of the lumbar disc. This study aimed to evaluate lumbar discogenic visceral pain and its treatment. Twelve consecutive patients with a median age of 56.4 years were enrolled for investigation between June 2012 and December 2012. These patients suffered from long-term abdominal pain unresponsive to current treatment options. Apart from obvious anterior herniation of the lumbar discs and high signal intensity anterior to the herniated disc on magnetic resonance imaging, no significant pathology was noted on gastroscopy, vascular ultrasound, or abdominal computed tomography (CT). To prove that their visceral pain originated from the anteriorly protruding disc, we evaluated whether pain was relieved by sympathetic block at the level of the anteriorly protruding disc. If the block was effective, CT-guided continuous lumbar sympathetic nerve block was finally performed. All patients were positive for pain relief by sympathetic block. Furthermore, the average Visual Analog Scale of visceral pain significantly improved after treatment in all patients (P < 0.05). Up to 11/12 patients had satisfactory pain relief at 1 week after discharge, 8/12 at 4 weeks, 7/12 at 8 weeks, 6/12 at 12 weeks, and 5/12 at 24 weeks. It is important to consider the possibility of discogenic visceral pain secondary to anterior herniation of the lumbar disc when forming a differential diagnosis for seemingly idiopathic abdominal pain. Continuous lumbar sympathetic nerve block is an effective and safe therapy for patients with discogenic visceral pain.

  10. Spontaneous regression of a huge subligamentous extruded disc herniation: short report of an illustrative case.

    PubMed

    Gezici, Ali Riza; Ergün, Rüçhan

    2009-10-01

    Herniated nucleus pulposus (HNP) is a common cause of radicular and low-back pain. Although some patients need surgical intervention because of prolonged intolerable leg pain, the majority heal with conservative treatment. Recently, with the advent of imaging diagnostic methods, there is an increasing interest in the phenomenon of spontaneous resorption of the HNP. We presented a case of lumbar HNP at the L4-L5 level in which clinical improvement was associated with a significant decrease in size of a huge subligamentous extruded disc herniation, documented on serial magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans.

  11. Diaphragm paralysis from cervical disc lesions.

    PubMed

    Cloward, R B

    1988-01-01

    An opera singer, who "made her living with her diaphragm", developed a post-traumatic unilateral radiculopathy due to cervical disc lesions, C3 to C6. During one year of severe neck and left arm pain she gradually lost the ability to sing difficult operatic passages which brought an end to her music career. Following a three level anterior cervical decompression and fusion, the neck and arm pain was immediately relieved. One week later her voice and singing ability returned to its full strength and power permitting her to resume her activities as a vocalist. The diagnosis of paresis of the left hemi-diaphragm as part of the cervical disc syndrome was implied by postoperative retrospective inference.

  12. Material Science in Cervical Total Disc Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Pham, Martin H.; Mehta, Vivek A.; Tuchman, Alexander; Hsieh, Patrick C.

    2015-01-01

    Current cervical total disc replacement (TDR) designs incorporate a variety of different biomaterials including polyethylene, stainless steel, titanium (Ti), and cobalt-chrome (CoCr). These materials are most important in their utilization as bearing surfaces which allow for articular motion at the disc space. Long-term biological effects of implanted materials include wear debris, host inflammatory immune reactions, and osteolysis resulting in implant failure. We review here the most common materials used in cervical TDR prosthetic devices, examine their bearing surfaces, describe the construction of the seven current cervical TDR devices that are approved for use in the United States, and discuss known adverse biological effects associated with long-term implantation of these materials. It is important to appreciate and understand the variety of biomaterials available in the design and construction of these prosthetics and the considerations which guide their implementation. PMID:26523281

  13. Material Science in Cervical Total Disc Replacement.

    PubMed

    Pham, Martin H; Mehta, Vivek A; Tuchman, Alexander; Hsieh, Patrick C

    2015-01-01

    Current cervical total disc replacement (TDR) designs incorporate a variety of different biomaterials including polyethylene, stainless steel, titanium (Ti), and cobalt-chrome (CoCr). These materials are most important in their utilization as bearing surfaces which allow for articular motion at the disc space. Long-term biological effects of implanted materials include wear debris, host inflammatory immune reactions, and osteolysis resulting in implant failure. We review here the most common materials used in cervical TDR prosthetic devices, examine their bearing surfaces, describe the construction of the seven current cervical TDR devices that are approved for use in the United States, and discuss known adverse biological effects associated with long-term implantation of these materials. It is important to appreciate and understand the variety of biomaterials available in the design and construction of these prosthetics and the considerations which guide their implementation.

  14. Nucleus pulposus cells derived IGF-1 and MCP-1 enhance osteoclastogenesis and vertebrae disruption in lumbar disc herniation

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Zhongjiao; Huang, Peng; Chong, Yanxue; George, Suraj K; Wen, Bingtao; Han, Na; Liu, Zhiqiang; Kang, Lixin; Lin, Nie

    2014-01-01

    Study design: Chronic strained lumbar disc herniation (LDH) cases were classified into bulging LDH, herniated LDH and prolapse LDH types according to imaging examination, and vertebrae disruptions were evaluated. Cytokines derived from the nucleus pulposus cells were detected, and their effects on osteoclastogenesis, as well as the mechanisms involved, were studied via an in vitro osteoclast differentiation system. Objective: To clarify the mechanisms of lumbar vertebrae resorption induced by lumbar herniation. Summary and background data: Chronic strained lumbar disc herniation induced vertebrae erosion exacerbates quality of patients’ life and clinical outcome. Although nucleus pulposus cells derived cytokines were reported to play an important role in this pathogenesis, the fundamental mechanisms underlying this process are still unclear. Methods: Chronic strained lumbar disc herniation patients were diagnosed with CT scan and T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging. RNA was extracted from 192 surgical specimens of the herniated lumbar disc and 29 surgical excisions of the lumbar disc from spinal injury patients. The expressions of osteoclastogenesis related cytokines and chemokines were examined using real time PCR. Monocytes were induced into osteoclast with M-CSF and RANKL in vitro, while the IGF-1 and MCP-1 were added into the differentiation procedure in order to evaluate the effects and explore the molecular mechanisms. Results: Vertebrae erosion had a positive relationship with lumbar disc herniation severity types. In all of the osteoclastogenesis related cytokines, the IGF-1 and MCP-1 were the most highly expressed in the nucleus pulposus cells. IGF-1 enhances activation of NF-kB signaling directly, but MCP-1 upregulated the expression of RANK, so that enhanced cellular sensitivity to RANKL resulted in increasing osteoclastogenesis and activity. Conclusion: Lumbar herniation induced overexpression of IGF-1 and MCP-1 in nucleus pulposus cells aggravated

  15. Surgical treatment of thoracic disc herniations using a modified transfacet approach

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xizhong; Liu, Xinyu; Zheng, Yanping

    2014-01-01

    Background: Ideal surgical treatment for thoracic disc herniation (TDH) is controversial due to variations in patient presentation, pathology, and possible surgical approach. Althougth discectomy may lead to improvements in neurologic function, it can be complicated by approach related morbidity. Various posterior surgical approaches have been developed to treate TDH, but the gold standard remains transthoracic decompression. Certain patients have comorbidities and herniation that are not optimally treated with an anterior approach. A transfacet pedicle approach was first described in 1995, but outcomes and complications have not been well described. The aim of this work was to evaluate the clinical effect and complications in a consecutive series of patients with symptomatic thoracic disc herniations undergoing thoracic discectomy using a modified transfacet approach. Materials and Methods: 33 patients with thoracic disc herniation were included in this study. Duration of the disease was from 12 days to 36 months, with less than 1 month in 13 patients. Of these, 15 patients were diagnosed with simple thoracic disc herniation, 6 were associated with ossified posterior longitudinal ligament, and 12 with ossified or hypertrophied yellow ligament. A total of 45 discs were involved. All the herniated discs and the ossified posterior longitudinal ligaments were excised using a modified transfacet approach. Laminectomy and replantation were performed for patients with ossified or hypertrophied yellow ligament. The screw–rod system was used on both sides in 14 patients and on one side in l9 patients. Results: 29 patients were followed up for an average of 37 months (range 12-63 months) and 4 patients were lost to followup. Evaluation was based on Epstein and Schwall criteria.5 15 were classified as excellent and 10 as good, accounting for 86.21% (25/29); 2 patients were classified as improved and 2 as poor. All the patients recovered neurologically after surgery. A

  16. Comparison of Discectomy versus Sequestrectomy in Lumbar Disc Herniation: A Meta-Analysis of Comparative Studies

    PubMed Central

    Ran, Jisheng; Hu, Yejun; Zheng, Zefeng; Zhu, Ting; Zheng, Huawei; Jing, Yibiao; Xu, Kan

    2015-01-01

    Background Lumbar disc removal is currently the standard treatment for lumbar disc herniation. No consensus has been achieved whether aggressive disc resection with curettage (discectomy) versus conservative removal of the offending disc fragment alone (sequestrectomy) provides better outcomes. This study aims to compare the reherniation rate and clinical outcomes between discectomy and sequestrectomy by literature review and a meta-analysis. Methods A systematic search of PubMed, Medline, Embase and the Cochrane Library was performed up to June 1, 2014. Outcomes of interest assessing the two techniques included demographic and clinical baseline characteristics, perioperative variables, complications, recurrent herniation rate and post-operative functional outcomes. Results Twelve eligible trials evaluating discectomy vs sequestrectomy were identified including one randomized controlled study, five prospective and six retrospective comparative studies. By contrast to discectomy, sequestrectomy was associated with significantly less operative time (p<0.001), lower visual analogue scale (VAS) for low back pain (p<0.05), less post-operative analgesic usage (p<0.05) and better patients’ satisfaction (p<0.05). Recurrent herniation rate, reoperation rate, intraoperative blood loss, hospitalization duration and VAS for sciatica were without significant difference. Conclusions According to our pooled data, sequestrectomy entails equivalent reherniation rate and complications compared with discectomy but maintains a lower incidence of recurrent low back pain and higher satisfactory rate. High-quality prospective randomized controlled trials are needed to firmly assess these two procedures. PMID:25815514

  17. [Case-control study of the risk factors of lumbar intervertebral disc herniation in 5 northern provinces of China].

    PubMed

    Sun, Zheng-ming; Ling, Ming; Chang, Yan-hai; Liu, Zong-zhi; Xu, Hong-hai; Gong, Li-qun; Liu, Jian; Zhang, Yin-gang

    2010-11-01

    To explore the risk factors of lumbar intervertebral disc herniation in the 5 northern provinces of China. A total of 2010 patients with established diagnosis of lumbar disc herniation by CT and/or MRI and 2170 control subjects without a history of low back pain or sciatica were randomly selected from the community population and hospitalized patients. The family history of lumbar disc herniation, occupations, smoking status, and occupational psychosocial factors were investigated. The positivity of family history of lumbar disc herniation was the highest risk factor (OR=3.551) followed by lumbar load (OR=2.132) and hard work (OR=1.763). Physical exercises (OR=0.435) were significantly related with the disease, and the OR of the type of bed was 0.364. A family history of lumbar disc herniation, lumbar load and hard work are the major risk factors for lumbar disc herniation, and physical exercises and sleeping not in soft bed might be a protective factor against the disease.

  18. A history of lumbar disc herniation from Hippocrates to the 1990s.

    PubMed

    Truumees, Eeric

    2015-06-01

    In ancient times, a supernatural understanding of the syndrome of lumbar radiculopathy often involved demonic forces vexing the individual with often crippling pain. The ancient Greeks and Egyptians began to take a more naturalistic view and, critically, suspected a relationship between lumbar spinal pathology and leg symptoms. Relatively little then changed for those with sciatica until the classic works by Cotugno and Kocher arrived in the late 18th century. Early lumbar canal explorations were performed in the late 1800s and early 1900s by MacEwen, Horsley, Krause, Taylor, Dandy, and Cushing, among others. In these cases, when compressive pathologies were found and removed, the lesions typically were (mis-)identified as enchondromas or osteochondritis dissecans. To better understand the history, learn more about the first treatments of lumbar disc herniation, and evaluate the impact of the early influences on modern spine practice, searches of PubMed and Embase were performed using the search terms discectomy, medical history, lumbar spine surgery, herniated disc, herniated nucleus pulposus, sciatica, and lumbar radiculopathy. Additional sources were identified from the reference lists of the reviewed papers. Many older and ancient sources including De Ischiade Nervosa are available in English translations and were used. When full texts were not available, English abstracts were used. The first true, intentional discectomy surgery was performed by Mixter and Barr in 1932. Early on, a transdural approach was favored. In 1938, Love described the intralaminar, extradural approach. His technique, although modified with improved lighting, magnification, and retractors, remains a staple approach to disc herniations today. Other modalities such as chymopapain have been investigated. Some remain a part of the therapeutic armamentarium, whereas others have disappeared. By the 1970s, CT scanning after myelography markedly improved the clinical evaluation of patients with

  19. Utility of Discography as a Preoperative Diagnostic Tool for Intradural Lumbar Disc Herniation

    PubMed Central

    Toyoda, Hiromitsu; Terai, Hidetomi; Dohzono, Sho; Hori, Yusuke; Nakamura, Hiroaki

    2016-01-01

    Preoperative definitive diagnosis of intradural lumbar disc herniation (ILDH) is difficult despite the availability of various neuroradiological investigative tools. We present a case of ILDH diagnosed preoperatively by discography and computed tomography-discography (disco-CT).The patient was a 63-year-old man with acute excruciating right leg pain. Discography and disco-CT demonstrated leakage of the contrast medium into the intradural space. Based on these findings, a right L5 nerve root disturbance caused by ILDH was diagnosed. A right L5 hemi-laminectomy and a dorsal durotomy were performed. The herniated disc was carefully dissected and then completely removed. Three months after surgery, the patient had fully recovered. This report highlights the importance of making a definitive diagnosis of ILDH preoperatively for better surgical planning and improved clinical outcomes. Furthermore, discography and disco-CT are both useful preoperative diagnostic tools for the diagnosis of ILDH. PMID:27559461

  20. Horner's syndrome secondary to intervertebral disc herniation at the level of T1-2.

    PubMed

    Spacey, Kate; Zaidan, Ammar; Dannawi, Zaher; Khazim, Rabi; Khazim, R; Dannawi, Zaher; Dannawi, Z

    2014-06-05

    A 54-year-old Caucasian woman presented with a 6 week history of periscapular pain and a T1 radiculopathy associated with Horner's syndrome. MRI of her cervicothoracic spine revealed an intervertebral disc herniation at the level of T1-2. During investigation she experienced some improvement in her symptoms and a conservative approach was pursued. At 6 months her pain and radiculopathy had resolved, and there was mild residual ptosis. 2014 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  1. The Impact of Epidural Steroid Injections on the Outcomes of Patients Treated for Lumbar Disc Herniation

    PubMed Central

    Radcliff, Kristen; Hilibrand, Alan; Lurie, Jon D.; Tosteson, Tor D.; Delasotta, Lawrence; Rihn, Jeffrey; Zhao, Wenyan; Vaccaro, Alexander; Albert, Todd J.; Weinstein, James N.

    2012-01-01

    Background: The Spine Patient Outcomes Research Trial (SPORT) is a prospective, multicenter study of operative versus nonoperative treatment of lumbar intervertebral disc herniation. It has been suggested that epidural steroid injections may help improve patient outcomes and lower the rate of crossover to surgical treatment. Methods: One hundred and fifty-four patients included in the intervertebral disc herniation arm of the SPORT who had received an epidural steroid injection during the first three months of the study and no injection prior to the study (the ESI group) were compared with 453 patients who had not received an injection during the first three months of the study or prior to the study (the No-ESI group). Results: There was a significant difference in the preference for surgery between groups (19% in the ESI group compared with 56% in the No-ESI group, p < 0.001). There was no difference in primary or secondary outcome measures at four years between the groups. A higher percentage of patients changed from surgical to nonsurgical treatment in the ESI group (41% versus 12% in the No-ESI, p < 0.001). Conclusions: Patients with lumbar disc herniation treated with epidural steroid injection had no improvement in short or long-term outcomes compared with patients who were not treated with epidural steroid injection. There was a higher prevalence of crossover to nonsurgical treatment among surgically assigned ESI-group patients, although this was confounded by the increased baseline desire to avoid surgery among patients in the ESI group. Given these data, we concluded that more studies are necessary to establish the value of epidural steroid injection for symptomatic lumbar intervertebral disc herniation. Level of Evidence: Therapeutic Level II. See Instructions for Authors for a complete description of levels of evidence. PMID:22739998

  2. Isokinetic muscle strength of the trunk and bilateral knees in young subjects with lumbar disc herniation.

    PubMed

    Ho, Cheng-Wen; Chen, Liang-Cheng; Hsu, Hsian-He; Chiang, Shang-Lin; Li, Min-Hui; Jiang, Shuu-Hai; Tsai, Kao-Chung

    2005-09-15

    Cross-sectional study comparing normal subjects and patients with lumbar disc herniation. To evaluate trunk and knee muscle strength in patients with L4-L5 and/or L5-S1 disc herniation. Numerous studies have shown that patients with low back pain have weaker trunk muscles. The strength of trunk and knee muscles has not been investigated simultaneously in patients with lumbar disc herniation. Forty-one controls and 2 patients were included. Isokinetic strength of the trunk and bilateral knees was tested on a calibrated isokinetic testing machine (Biodex System 3 Pro) regardless of the laterality of the radiculopathy. The testing was carrying out at two different velocities: 60 degrees and 120 degrees per second. Total trunk strength and knee strength were significantly lower in these patients (4.34 +/- 1.06 and 4.06 +/- 1.16 vs. 6.21 +/- 1.05 and 5.83 +/- 1.09 Nm/kg at 60 degrees and 120 degrees per second, respectively, P < 0.001). In patients with unilateral sciatica, there was no significant difference (P > 0.05) in unilateral knee strength between sciatica-involved and -uninvolved limbs (1.89 +/- 0.5, 1.08 +/- 0.45, 1.48 +/- 0.58, 0.93 +/- 0.41 vs. 1.68 +/- 0.45, 0.91 +/- 0.38, 1.41 +/- 0.48, 0.79 +/- 0.39 Nm/kg in sciatica-uninvolved vs. sciatica-involved limbs during extension and flexion at 60 degrees and 120 degrees per second, respectively). Total trunk strength was significantly correlated with total knee strength in both groups. In the patients with lumbar disc herniation, muscle strength of the trunk and knees was decreased to a similar extent. Weaker knee strength was found on either side of the lower extremity in the patients with unilateral sciatica, regardless of its location.

  3. The role of transforaminal percutaneous endoscopic discectomy in lumbar disc herniations

    PubMed Central

    Gotecha, Sarang; Ranade, Deepak; Patil, Sujay Vikhe; Chugh, Ashish; Kotecha, Megha; Sharma, Shrikant; Punia, Prashant

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To study 1)the efficacy of transforaminal percutaneous endoscopic lumbar discectomy in lumbar disc herniations.2) limitations and advantages of the surgical procedure. 3)morbidity and complications associated with the procedure. Materials and Methods: This study was carried out on 120 patients who had single level herniated disc Pre-operative assessment of VAS and MSS scoring systems were documented one day prior to surgery. Post operative results were determined by MacNab criteria and by modified Suezawa and Schreiber clinical scoring system (MSS score). Results: Maximum patients were in the age group of 31 to 40 years and 83.43% of the patients were males. 80% patients had lumbar disc herniation at L4-L5 level, The mean operative time of endoscopic discectomy was 52.28 minutes and the mean hospital stay was 2.1days.8 cases of L5-S I were abandoned due to high iliac bone and hence their disc could not be accessed. Out of 112 patients who underwent operation, 2 patients developed discitis and 1 was found to have dysesthesia. Also recurrent prolapsed intervertebral disc was seen in 6 cases The mean preoperative and 6 months follow-up VAS score was 8.4 and 1.89 respectively. Mean preoperative and 6 months follow-up Modified Suezawa And Schreiber Clinical Scoring System(MSS Score) was 3.47 and 7.92 respectively. MSS score showed excellent and good outcome in 82.12% patients and Modified Macnab Criteria showed excellent and good outcome in 89.3% patients at 6months follow-up. Conclusion: TPELD can be a reasonable alternative to conventional microscopic discectomy for the treatment of patients with LDH. We also conclude that TPELD is not an effective procedure for L5-S 1 disc and an open procedure should be opted for better outcomes. PMID:27891030

  4. Giant intrapelvic malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor mimicking disc herniation: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Peng; Chen, Cong; Xin, Xiaotang; Liu, Bo; Li, Wei; Yin, Dezhen; Mu, Weidong

    2016-01-01

    Giant intrapelvic malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors arising in the sciatic nerve in the pelvic cavity are a rare occurrence and their symptomatology is usually misdiagnosed as intervertebral disc herniation. We herein report the case of a 46-year old woman presenting with pain, hypesthesia and weakness of the left lower extremity due to a giant intrapelvic malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor of the sciatic nerve. Prior to being referred to our institution, the patient was misdiagnosed as a case of sciatica due to a lumbar disc herniation and underwent an operation unsuccessfully, as there was little symptomatic improvement 2 months after the surgery. A magnetic resonance imaging examination of the pelvic cavity revealed a tumor of the sciatic nerve. The mass was resected via the posterior approach and histopathological examination confirmed the diagnosis of malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumor. Intrapelvic malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors are an uncommon cause of sciatica and are commonly misdiagnosed as lumbar intervertebral disc herniation. Accurate diagnosis and complete surgical excision prior to metastasis are crucial for effective management of this condition. PMID:27900106

  5. Relationship between fear avoidance beliefs and burnout syndrome in patients with lumbar disc herniation.

    PubMed

    Taspinar, Ferruh; Taspinar, Betul; Ozkan, Yasemin; Afsar, Emrah; Gul, Canan; Durmaz, Elif Dilara

    2016-06-17

    Lumbar disc herniation leads to disability by restricting of patients' lives and reducing their quality of life. This situation causes a decrease in motivation of patients by triggering depressive mood. Therefore, the aim of the study was investigation of correlation between fear avoidance beliefs and burnout syndrome in patients with lumbar disc herniation. Totally forty-seven patients (24 male and 23 female patients) diagnosed lumbar disc herniation was included in this study. Maslach II Burnout Inventory (MBI) and Fear Avoidance Beliefs Questionnaire (FABQ) for determining of levels of burnout and fear avoidance level were used, respectively. It was observed that MBI and FABQ scores of the patients were 50.78 ± 10.07 and 36.61 ± 13.91, respectively. Moderate level correlation was found between FABQ and MBI total scores (r= 0.49, p= 0.00). Fear avoidance beliefs of patients with chronic back pain can affect level of burnout syndrome. Therefore, symptoms of burnout syndrome and fear avoidance beliefs of patients should be considered in evaluation and treatment process.

  6. The anatomical basis of sciatica secondary to herniated lumbar disc: a review.

    PubMed

    Spencer, D L

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this manuscript is to illustrate the key anatomical and biomechanical elements involved in the etiopathogenesis of sciatica, and to demonstrate how periradicular fibrosis contributes to the pathophysiology of recurrent post-operative sciatica. History, etiology, anatomy and diagnosis of herniated inter-vertebral disc are reviewed. The straight leg raising exam is a well accepted test in the diagnosis of lumbar disc herniation. In the post-operative patients, the results of the straight leg raising test are affected by the presence of scar and fibrosis around the lumbar root(s) involved. The mechanisms by which perineural fibrosis and adhesions change and compromise the neural dynamics and causes symptoms to recur in the post-operative patient are discussed. Due to its dramatic clinical relevance, prevention of periradicular fibrosis has high priority in the surgical management of herniated lumbar disc. Such a goal should be obtained by using a combination of appropriate indication to surgery, impeccable operative technique and the use of an effective anti-fibrotic agent.

  7. Spontaneous intradural disc herniation with focal distension of the subarachnoid space in a dog

    PubMed Central

    Barnoon, Itai; Chai, Orit; Srugo, Itai; Peeri, Dana; Konstantin, Lilach; Brenner, Ori; Shamir, Merav H.

    2012-01-01

    Myelo-computed tomography of a paraparetic 14-year-old dog revealed subarachnoid distension with an intradural filling defect above the T13–L1 disc space. T12–L1 hemilaminectomy followed by durotomy allowed removal of a large piece of degenerated disc material that compressed the spinal parenchyma. Full return to function was achieved 10 days post-surgery. The distension was likely secondary to the intradural herniation, and is a rare and distinct finding. PMID:23633713

  8. Increased Risk for Adhesive Capsulitis of the Shoulder following Cervical Disc Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Jiunn-Horng; Lin, Herng-Ching; Tsai, Ming-Chieh; Chung, Shiu-Dong

    2016-01-01

    Shoulder problems are common in patients with a cervical herniated intervertebral disc (HIVD). This study aimed to explore the incidence and risk of shoulder capsulitis/tendonitis following cervical HIVD surgery. We used data from the Taiwan “Longitudinal Health Insurance Database”. We identified all patients who were hospitalized with a diagnosis of displacement of a cervical HIVD and who underwent cervical surgery (n = 1625). We selected 8125 patients who received cervical HIVD conservative therapy only as the comparison group matched with study patients. We individually tracked these sampled patients for 6 months to identify all patients who received a diagnosis of shoulder tendonitis/capsulitis. We found that incidence rates of shoulder tendonitis/capsulitis during the 6-month follow-up period were 3.69 (95% CI: 2.49~5.27) per 100 person-years for the study group and 2.33 (95% CI: 1.89~2.86) per 100 person-years for the comparison group. Cox proportional hazard regressions showed that the adjusted hazard ratio for shoulder tendonitis/capsulitis among patients who underwent cervical disc surgery was 1.66 (95% CI = 1.09~2.53) when compared to comparison group. We concluded that patients who underwent surgery for a cervical HIVD had a significantly higher risk of developing shoulder capsulitis/tendonitis in 6 months follow-up compared to patients who received cervical HIVD conservative therapy only. PMID:27231090

  9. Combination of Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Electrophysiological Studies in Lumbar Disc Herniation.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Wenxiang; Wang, Jichao; Zhang, Wenchuan; Liu, Pengfei; Visocchi, Massimiliano; Li, Shi-Ting

    2017-01-01

    Objective We aimed to study the clinical value of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and electrophysiological studies in the diagnosis of lumbar disc herniation and in the evaluation of the therapeutic effect of discectomy. Methods In this study, 265 patients with LDH were treated with discectomy after assessment by the Japanese Orthopedic Association (JOA) score, MRI, and electrophysiological studies. All the patients were followed-up for 6 years. The effects of the operation were assessed by determining the angle between the nerve root canal and disc protrusion (AN value), the stenotic ratio of the spinal canal, the width of the lateral recess, motor conduction velocity (MCV), sensory conduction velocity (SCV), and nerve action potential (NAP) before and after operation. Results The AN value, stenotic ratio of the spinal canal, and the width of the lateral recess of protruding intervertebral discs showed significant differences from these values for the patients' unaffected intervertebral discs (P < 0.05). The MCV, SCV, and NAP of the affected limb showed significant differences from these values for the patients' unaffected limbs (P < 0.05). In all the patients the values for these indicators showed significant differences before and after operation (P < 0.05). Conclusion MRI and electrophysiological studies can be used in the diagnosis of lumbar disc herniation, and in the evaluation of the effect of surgery.

  10. Percutaneous Intradiscal Aspiration of a Lumbar Vacuum Disc Herniation: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Pak, Kevin I.; Hoffman, David C.; Herzog, Richard J.

    2010-01-01

    We report a case of an 83-year-old gentleman presenting with acute low back pain and radicular left lower extremity pain after golfing. A magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the lumbar spine revealed a low-signal-density lesion compressing the L5 nerve. A computed tomography scan was then ordered, confirming an extra-foraminal disc protrusion at the L5–S1 level, containing a focus of gas that was compressing the left L5 nerve root and communicating with the vacuum disc at L5–S1. After a failed left L5 transforaminal epidural steroid injection, the patient was brought back for a percutaneous intradiscal aspiration of the vacuum disc gas. This resulted in immediate relief for the patient. A follow-up MRI performed 2 months after the procedure found an approximate 25% reduction in the size of the vacuum disc herniation. Six months after the procedure, the patient remains free of radicular pain. This case report suggests that a percutaneous aspiration of gas from a vacuum disc herniation may assist in the treatment of radicular pain. PMID:22294964

  11. Does nuclear tissue infected with bacteria following disc herniations lead to Modic changes in the adjacent vertebrae?

    PubMed

    Albert, Hanne B; Lambert, Peter; Rollason, Jess; Sorensen, Joan Solgaard; Worthington, Tony; Pedersen, Mogens Bach; Nørgaard, Hanne Schack; Vernallis, Ann; Busch, Frederik; Manniche, Claus; Elliott, Tom

    2013-04-01

    To investigate the prevalence of infected herniated nucleus material in lumbar disc herniations and to determine if patients with an anaerobic infected disc are more likely to develop Modic change (MC) (bone oedema) in the adjacent vertebrae after the disc herniation. MCs (bone oedema) in vertebrae are observed in 6 % of the general population and in 35-40 % of people with low back pain. These changes are strongly associated with low back pain. There are probably a mechanical cause and an infective cause that causes MC. Several studies on nuclear tissue from herniated discs have demonstrated the presence of low virulent anaerobic microorganisms, predominantly Propionibacterium acnes, in 7-53 % of patients. At the time of a herniation these low virulent anaerobic bacteria may enter the disc and give rise to an insidious infection. Local inflammation in the adjacent bone may be a secondary effect due to cytokine and propionic acid production. Patients undergoing primary surgery at a single spinal level for lumbar disc herniation with an MRI-confirmed lumbar disc herniation, where the annular fibres were penetrated by visible nuclear tissue, had the nucleus material removed. Stringent antiseptic sterile protocols were followed. Sixty-one patients were included, mean age 46.4 years (SD 9.7), 27 % female. All patients were immunocompetent. No patient had received a previous epidural steroid injection or undergone previous back surgery. In total, microbiological cultures were positive in 28 (46 %) patients. Anaerobic cultures were positive in 26 (43 %) patients, and of these 4 (7 %) had dual microbial infections, containing both one aerobic and one anaerobic culture. No tissue specimens had more than two types of bacteria identified. Two (3 %) cultures only had aerobic bacteria isolated. In the discs with a nucleus with anaerobic bacteria, 80 % developed new MC in the vertebrae adjacent to the previous disc herniation. In contrast, none of those with aerobic bacteria and

  12. Pathogenesis of the discal cysts communicating with an adjacent herniated disc. Histological and ultrastructual studies of two cases.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Shigeru; Takeno, Kenichi; Uchida, Kenzo; Yayama, Takafumi; Nakajima, Hideaki; Miyazaki, Tsuyoshi; Guerrero, Alexander; Baba, Hisatoshi

    2010-03-01

    Discal cyst of the lumbar spine is a very rare cause of back pain and sciatica. We report two cases of discal cysts communicating with an adjacent herniated disc. From CT and MRI findings, they were diagnosed as having a discal cyst in the epidural space, which compressed the nerve root. After an adequate surgical field was obtained with a microscope and a Casper retractor, the discal cyst could be excised and satisfactory decompression of the adjacent nerve root was obtained. From histological and electron microscopic study, the presence of residual herniated tissues was confirmed in the cyst wall. Macrophages played an important role in the absorption of herniated tissue and the formation of the discal cyst. Hemorrhage in the cyst wall will make the serous hemorrhagic fluid-filled cystic structure in the absorbed spaces of the prolapsed disc. In this study, we confirmed that the discal cyst could have developed from the absorption process of a disc herniation.

  13. Dorsal Extradural Lumbar Disc Herniation Causing Cauda Equina Syndrome : A Case Report and Review of Literature

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang-Ho; Arbatti, Nikhil J.

    2010-01-01

    A 73-year-old male presented with a rare dorsally sequestrated lumbar disc herniation manifesting as severe radiating pain in both leg, progressively worsening weakness in both lower extremities, and urinary incontinence, suggesting cauda equina syndrome. Magnetic resonance imaging suggested the sequestrated disc fragment located in the extradural space at the L4-L5 level had surrounded and compressed the dural sac from the lateral to dorsal sides. A bilateral decompressive laminectomy was performed under an operating microscope. A large extruded disc was found to have migrated from the ventral aspect, around the thecal sac, and into the dorsal aspect, which compressed the sac to the right. After removal of the disc fragment, his sciatica was relieved and the patient felt strength of lower extremity improved. PMID:20379476

  14. A Rare Case of Progressive Palsy of the Lower Leg Caused by a Huge Lumbar Posterior Endplate Lesion after Recurrent Disc Herniation

    PubMed Central

    Higashino, Kosaku; Fumitake, Tezuka; Yamashita, Kazuta; Hayashi, Fumio; Sairyo, Koichi

    2016-01-01

    A lesion of the lumbar posterior endplate is sometimes identified in the spinal canal of children and adolescents; it causes symptoms similar to those of a herniated disc. However, the pathology of the endplate lesion and the pathology of the herniated disc are different. We present a rare case of a 23-year-old woman who developed progressive palsy of the lower leg caused by huge lumbar posterior endplate lesion after recurrent disc herniation. PMID:27648326

  15. Does local lavage influence functional recovery during lumber discectomy of disc herniation?

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Ru-Sen; Ren, Yi-Ming; Yuan, Jian-Jun; Cui, Zi-Jian; Wan, Jun; Fan, Bao-You; Lin, Wei; Zhou, Xian-Hu; Zhang, Xue-Li

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Lumbar disc herniation (LDH) is a common disease and lumbar discectomy is the most common surgical procedure carried out for patients with low back pain and leg symptoms. Although most researchers are focusing on the surgical techniques during operation, the aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of local intervertebral lavage during microdiscectomy. In this retrospective study, 410 patients were operated on by microdiscectomy for LDH during 2011 to 2014. Retrospectively, 213 of them (group A) accepted local intervertebral irrigation with saline water before wound closure and 197 patients (group B) only had their operative field irrigated with saline water. Systematic records of visual analog scores (VAS), Oswestry disability Index (ODI) questionnaire scale scores, use of analgesia, and hospital length of stay were done after hospitalization. The majority (80.49%) of the cases were diagnosed with lumber herniation at the levels of L4/5 and L5/S1. Fifty-one patients had herniations at 2 levels. There were significant decreases of VAS scores and ODI in both groups between preoperation and postoperation of different time points. VAS scores decreased more in group A than group B at early stage of postoperation follow-up. However, there were no statistically significant differences between 2 groups in using analgesia, VAS and ODI up to 1 month of follow-up. Microdiscectomy for LDH offers a marked improvement in back and radicular pain. Local irrigation of herniated lumber disc area could relief dick herniation-derived low back pain and leg radicular pain at early stage of post-operation. However, the pain relief of this intervention was not noticeable for a long period. PMID:27759631

  16. Comparison of 7 Surgical Interventions for Lumbar Disc Herniation: A Network Meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Feng, Fan; Xu, Qianqian; Yan, Feifei; Xie, Yuanlong; Deng, Zhouming; Hu, Chao; Zhu, Xiaobin; Cai, Lin

    2017-09-01

    The number of interventions on intervertebral discs rapidly increased and the treatment options for lumbar disc surgery quickly evolved. It is important that the safety and efficacy of all new innovative procedures be compared with currently accepted forms of treatment; however, the previous pairwise meta-analyses could not develop the hierarchy of these treatments. The purpose of the study is to perform a network meta-analysis to evaluate the clinical results of 7 surgical interventions for the treatment of lumbar disc herniation. Network meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials (RCTs) for multiple treatment comparisons of lumbar disc herniation. We performed a Bayesian-framework network meta-analysis of RCTs to compare 7 surgical interventions for people with lumbar disc herniation. The eligible RCTs were identified by searching Embase, Pubmed, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), and Google scholar. Data from 3 outcomes (success, complications, and reoperation rate) were independently extracted by 2 authors. A total of 29 RCTs including 3,146 participants were finally included into this article. Our meta-analysis provides hierarchies of these 7 interventions. For the success rate the rank probability (from best to worst): percutaneous endoscopic lumber discectomy (PELD) > standard open discectomy (SOD) > standard open microsurgical discectomy (SOMD) > chemonucleolysis (CN) > microendoscopic discectomy (MED) > percutaneous laser disc decompression (PLDD) > automated percutaneous lumber discectomy (APLD). For the complication rate the rank probability (from best to worst): PELD > SOMD > SOD > MED > PLDD > CN > APLD. For the reoperation rate the rank probability (from best to worst): SOMD > SOD > MED > PLDD > PELD > CN > APLD. The limitations of this network meta-analysis include the range of study populations and inconformity of the follow-up times and outcome measurements. This meta-analysis provides evidence that PELD might be the

  17. [Nerve root compression by gas containing lumbar disc herniation--case report].

    PubMed

    Yasuoka, Hiroki; Nemoto, Osamu; Kawaguchi, Masahisa; Naitou, Satoko; Yamamoto, Kouji; Ukegawa, You

    2009-06-01

    The radiographic appearance of gas collection in the intervertebral disc represents the so-called "vacuum phenomenon." Incidence of the vacuum phenomenon on plain radiographs is reported to be 1-20%, whereas gas-containing disc herniations are rarely observed. We present a case report involving a patient with L4/5 gas-containing disc herniation, which was demonstrated by CT and MRI scans and was also surgically documented. A 48-year-old man with no previous back trauma presented with a 14-day history of left leg pain. On neurologic examination, the straight leg raising test was positive at 60degrees. Leg muscle strength was weak on the extensor hallucis longus. Sensory disturbances and abnormalities in deep-tendon reflexes were not observed. Lumbar roentogenograms showed "vacuum phenomenon" at L2/3, L4/5 and the L5/S disc space. MRI indicated a herniated disc at L4/5 displacing the dural sac and a focal low intensity in the lesion. Administration of an epidural block relieved the patient's symptoms. Ten months later, the patient reported a gradual return of similar left leg pain. His symptoms did not respond to conservative management. Lumbar spine films indicated abnormalities identical to the original results. MRI showed an enlarged area of low intensity with compression of the left L5 nerve root. In addition to recurrent pain, discography with metrizamide injections confirmed the presence of intradiscal gas and compression of the left L5 nerve root. During surgery, a gray-bluish air mass compressing the L5 nerve root was identified. Manipulation of the mass resulted in rupture and the release of gas. The displaced nerve root immediately relaxed to its normal position. Seven months after the operation, the patient remains free of pain.

  18. Paraplegia caused by posture during MRI in a patient with cervical disk herniation.

    PubMed

    Kato, Yoshihiko; Nishida, Norihiro; Taguchi, Toshihiko

    2010-06-09

    A 48-year-old man presented with numbness in the lower left extremity of 4 months' duration. One month earlier, he presented to an orthopedic clinic and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed cervical disk herniation. Because the pain did not subside, he visited the clinic again and MRI was performed. His neck was slightly extended and fixed to the headrest of the MRI instrument. Because of the posture of his cervical spine, he suffered severe pain in the scapular region during the MRI. After 15 minutes the pain was unbearable and the MRI examination was aborted. As the patient tried to descend from the MRI table, he was unable to move his bilateral lower extremities. No muscle contraction was observed in his lower limbs. Following MRI with flexion posture of the cervical spine, he was diagnosed with paraplegia caused by cervical disk herniation. Emergency surgery consisting of anterior decompression and fusion was performed. The patient showed good neurological recovery. Three weeks postoperatively, the patient could walk without assistance and he was discharged. The extension posture of the cervical spine during MRI was considered to be the cause of acute paraplegia in this patient. Care should be taken with the posture of the cervical spine, when performing MRI in patients with cervical disk herniation. Extended posture of the cervical spine during MRI may lead to acute neurological deterioration. Copyright 2010, SLACK Incorporated.

  19. Spinal epidural arteriovenous hemangioma mimicking lumbar disc herniation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kyung Hyun; Song, Sang Woo; Lee, Soo Eon; Lee, Sang Hyung

    2012-10-01

    A spinal epidural hemangioma is rare. In this case, a 51 year-old female patient had low back pain and right thigh numbness. She was initially misdiagnosed as having a ruptured disc with possible sequestration of granulation tissue formation due to the limited number of spinal epidural hemangiomas and little-known radiological findings. Because there are no effective diagnostic tools to verify the hemangioma, more effort should be put into preoperative imaging tests to avoid misdiagnosis and poor decisions).

  20. Interlaminar discectomy in lumbar disc herniation: shorten postoperative return to work period in recruits undergoing military training.

    PubMed

    Celik, Haydar; Derincek, Alihan; Arslanoglu, Atilla

    2008-09-01

    The operative treatment of lumbar disc disease has long challenged spine surgeons. In this study, we aimed to show that recruits with lumbar disc herniation managed by the interlaminar approach could return to work after 6 weeks. Forty male recruits were included in this study and interlaminar discectomy was adequate in 40 cases. Early postoperative rehabilitation had a positive effect on early return to work. We believe that interlaminar lumbar discectomy is an effective technique for treating patients with herniated lumbar discs; with early postoperative rehabilitation, recruits can return to work 6 weeks after surgery.

  1. Posterior pelvic pain provocation test is negative in patients with lumbar herniated discs.

    PubMed

    Gutke, Annelie; Hansson, Eva Roos; Zetherström, Gunilla; Ostgaard, Hans Christian

    2009-07-01

    The classification of pelvic girdle pain can only be reached after lumbar causes have been excluded by a clinical examination. During clinical examination, the posterior pelvic pain provocation test is a well-established method for verifying pelvic girdle pain. However, a criticism of pelvic pain provocation tests is that they may have an effect on lumbar structures, thus yielding false-positive results. The posterior pelvic pain provocation test was performed with four groups of patients: patients with computed tomography-verified disc herniations (1) on the waiting list for surgery (14 women; 9 men); (2) 6 weeks after disc surgery (18 women, 12 men); (3) pregnant women seeking care for pelvic girdle pain (n = 25); and (4) women with persistent pelvic girdle pain after delivery (n = 32). The sensitivity of the posterior pelvic pain provocation test was 0.88 and the specificity was 0.89. The positive predictive value was 0.89 and the negative predictive value was 0.87. Analysis of only women showed similar results. In our study, the posterior pelvic pain provocation test was negative in patients with a well-defined lumbar diagnosis of lumbar disc herniation, both before and after disc surgery. Our results are an important step toward the more accurate classification of lumbopelvic pain.

  2. Sequencing and bioinformatics analysis of the differentially expressed genes in herniated discs with or without calcification

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Jia; Yu, Miao; Jiang, Liang; Wu, Fengliang; Liu, Xiaoguang

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to detect the differentially expressed genes between ossified herniated discs and herniated discs without ossification. In addition, we sought to identify a few candidate genes and pathways by using bioinformatics analysis. We analyzed 6 samples each of ossified herniated discs (experimental group) and herniated discs without ossification (control group). Purified mRNA and cDNA extracted from the samples were subjected to sequencing. The NOISeq method was used to statistically identify the differentially expressed genes (DEGs) between the 2 groups. An in-depth analysis using bioinformatics tools based on the DEGs was performed using Gene Ontology (GO) enrichment, Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathway enrichment, and protein-protein interaction network analysis. The top 6 DEGs were verified using reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR). A total of 132 DEGs was detected. A total of 129 genes in the ossified group were upregulated and 3 genes were found to be downregulated as compared to the control group. The top 3 cellular components in GO ontologies analysis were extracellular matrix components. GO functions were mainly related to the glycoprotein in the cell membrane and extracellular matrix. The GO process was related to completing response to stimulus, immune reflex and defense. The top 5 KEGG enrichment pathways were associated with infection and inflammation. Three of the top 20 DEGs [sclerostin (SOST), WNT inhibitory factor 1 (WIF1) and secreted frizzled related protein 4 (SFRP4)] were related to the inhibition of the Wnt pathway. The ossified discs exhibited a higher expression of the top 6 DEGs [SOST, joining chain of multimeric IgA and IgM (IGJ; also known as JCHAIN), defensin alpha 4 (DEFA4), SFRP4, proteinase 3 (PRTN3) and cathepsin G (CTSG)], with the associated P-values of 0.045, 0.000, 0.008, 0.010, 0.015 and 0.002, respectively, as calculated by the independent sample t

  3. [Study on risk factors and predictive model for lumbar intervertebral disc herniation in the rural population].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Si-yu; Huang, Peng; Huang, Xin; Chen, Ting; Zhao, Xin; Liang, Cui-min; Li, Lin-xiang; Tan, Hong-zhuan

    2009-11-01

    To explore the risk factors on the symptoms of lumbar intervertebral disc herniation so as to develop a predictive model for the disease. With a population-based case-control study, 303 of 50 123 residents were diagnosed as having lumbar intervertebral disc herniation symptoms. 152 cases and 167 healthy controls, matched by gender and age, were randomly chosen as case and control groups. Questionnaires were used to collect information on the exposure to risk factors and logistic predictive model was then established. Through non-conditional logistic regression analysis, data showed that the positive family history of lumbar vertebra disorder, lumbar treatment or surgery, mental stress, acute low back injury, permanent work pose, and body mass index >/= 23.0 kg/m(2) were the risk factors among residents from the countryside. The area under the receiver operator characteristic curve of logistic predictive model was 0.809. When 0.4 was set as the classification cutoff, the total predictive correct rate, sensitivity, and specificity were 74.0%, 73.7%, and 74.3% respectively. The occurrence of lumbar disk herniation can in countryside population was affected by multi-variables including genetic and environmental, and could be predicted with the logistic regression model established by our group. The positive predictive results could be used to alarm the patients and doctors for prevention and treatment of the disease.

  4. [Medical legal issues associated with the evaluation of herniated discs in seafarers to merchant ships].

    PubMed

    Onofri, E; Salesi, M; Massoni, F; Rosati, M V; Ricci, S

    2012-01-01

    "Seafarer" means person employed with any job on board a ship offshore, whether publicly or privately, excluding ships of war. Day by day a seafarer is forced to confront a reality in constant motion and live in environments that require awkward movements, and restricting the normal mobility of the person. In order to verify the frequency of herniated discs in this particular category of workers, given the recent introduction of INAIL tabulated diseases, a study was conducted on a sample of seafarers. Data analysis showed that 48.3% of the seafarers of the sample has herniated lumbar disc, and 34.5% of these duties in the deck, and 65.5% of the machine. The study of sample, varied as to age and task being performed, supports the assertion that the individual risk factors, especially age and obesity, are not strongly implicated in the genesis of disk herniation suffered by seafarers while the work factors (vibrations) play a more significant role in the onset of this disease. This consideration is part of a context, that of legal medical evaluation and in particular the causal relationship, which currently seems rather lacking in terms of literature and scientific production.

  5. The surgical treatment of far lateral lumbar disc herniation: 33 cases.

    PubMed

    Celikoglu, Erhan; Kiraz, Ilker; Is, Merih; Cecen, Aycicek; Ramazanoğlu, Ali

    2014-12-01

    Surgical approaches to far lateral disc herniation are challenging because of the anatomical limitations in the region. We describe an extraforaminal approach for far lateral lumbar disc herniation (FLLDH) in a group of patients and discuss the results in patients with far lateral disc protrusion or extrusion operated on by an approach to the extraforaminal region via an intertransverse route with median or paramedian incisions. The two methods are compared in terms of the pre- and postoperative visual analogue scale (VAS) pain scores, duration of the operation, amount of bleeding, and long-term functional recovery. In addition, data on age, incidence, radiological features and clinical signs and symptoms are compared with reported series. Between January 2006 and January 2011, 33 patients (18 females, 15 males; mean age, 51.2 years) underwent surgery for FLLDH. The majority of patients had herniation at disc levels L3-4 (12 patients) or L4-5 (15 patients). All patients were operated on via either median-paramuscular (20 patients, 61%) or paramedian-intermuscular (13 patients, 39%) approaches. Overall, the mean VAS score improved from 7.3 preoperatively to 2.8 in the short-term. Analyzing the long-term functional outcome of surgery according to the MacNab Criteria, the recovery was excellent, good, fair, and poor in 18, 11, 4, and 0 patients, respectively. The far-lateral approach for FLLDH is a safe, effective procedure that avoids the risk of secondary spinal instability. In treating FLLDH, the use of a long median incision together with an extraforaminal approach is safer and less invasive than a laminectomy together with a medial or total facetectomy.

  6. 3.0T MRI tractography of lumbar nerve roots in disc herniation.

    PubMed

    Chuanting, Li; Qingzheng, Wang; Wenfeng, Xiao; Yiyi, Hui; Bin, Zhao

    2014-10-01

    Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) with fiber tracking (FT) has found clinical applications in the evaluation of the central nervous system and has been extensively used to image white matter tract. The feasibility of FT of the lumbar nerve roots in disc herniation is unclear. To demonstrate the feasibility of FT in the lumbar nerve roots, and to assess potential differences in fractional anisotropy (FA) and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) of L4, L5, and S1 nerves between healthy disc and disc herniation. Twenty patients with unilateral sciatica related to posterolateral or foraminal disc herniation and 20 healthy volunteers were enrolled in our study. Anatomical fusion with the axial T2 sequences was used to estimate the relevance of reconstructions. DTI with tractography of the L4, L5, and S1 nerves was performed. Mean FA and ADC values were calculated from tractography images. Lumbosacral root compression sites could be clearly identified on the tractography images. There was no significant difference in FA or ADC between left and right nerve roots at the same level (P > 0.05) in healthy volunteers. The mean FA value of the compressed spinal nerve roots was significantly lower than that of FA of the contralateral nerve roots (P = 0.0001). ADC was significantly higher in compressed nerve roots than that in the contralateral nerve root (P = 0.0002). 3 T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) DTI and FT of the lumbosacral region nerve is possible. There are significant changes in FA and ADC values in the compressed L4, L5, and S1 nerves. © The Foundation Acta Radiologica 2013 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  7. [Results of percutaneous discectomy in the management of lumbar disc herniation].

    PubMed

    Lima-Ramírez, P G; Montiel-Jarquín, A J; Barragán-Hervella, R G; Sánchez-Durán, M A; Ochoa-Neri, A; Loria-Castellanos, J; Vázquez-Rodríguez, C; Villatoro-Martínez, A; Castillo-Pérez, J J

    2016-01-01

    Percutaneous discectomy is a disc decompression technique approved by the FDA that is useful to improve pain caused by a herniated disc. However, its practice is under discussion because the benefits of the technique are controversial. To describe the clinical course of patients with low lumbar disc herniation (L4-L5, L5-S1) treated by percutaneous surgery within one year of surgery and prove that it is a useful surgical option for the relief of symptoms caused by this pathological entity. Cohort study; the clinical course of 21 patients with lumbar disc herniation treated with percutaneous discectomy manually during March 2011-November 2013, is presented. The evaluation was made before surgery and at four, 30, 180 and 365 days after surgery by numerical pain scale (NPS), Oswestry (IDO) and MacNab criteria. We used nonparametric inferential statistics (Wilcoxon) for differences in proportions. n = 21, six (28.57%) men, 15 (71.42%) women; average age: 37.95, (14-56) ± 10.60 years; the most affected vertebral level was L4-L5 in 57.14% of the patients; the NPS preoperative average was 7.75 (5-9) ± 1.12; at 365 days: average 2.14 (0-7) ± 2.37. The IDO preoperative average was 37% (28-40%) ± 3.06, and at 365 days: 9.52% (0-40%) ± 13.92. The prognosis (IDO) in the presurgical was good to zero (0%) patients and in 15 (71.42%) at 365 days, regular in five (23.80%) and poor in one (4.78%) (p = 0.00, CI 95% 0.00 to 0.13, Wilcoxon); according to MacNab criteria, in 15 (71.42%) patients were excellent and good, poor in four (19.04%) and bad in two (9.52%) (p = 0.00). Percutaneous discectomy provides good results for the treatment of lumbar disc herniation (L4-L5, L5-S1) at 365 days after surgery.

  8. Spinal manipulation results in immediate H-reflex changes in patients with unilateral disc herniation.

    PubMed

    Floman, Y; Liram, N; Gilai, A N

    1997-01-01

    The aim of this clinical investigation was to determine whether the abnormal H-reflex complex present in patients with S1 nerve root compression due to lumbosacral disc herniation is improved by single-session lumbar manipulation. Twenty-four patients with unilateral disc herniation at the L5-S1 level underwent spinal H-reflex electro-physiological evaluation. This was carried out before and after single-session lumbar manipulation in the side-lying position. Eligibility criteria for inclusion in the study were: predominant sciatica, no motor or sphincteric involvement, unilateral disc herniation at the L5-S1 level on CT or MR imaging, age between 20 and 50 years. H-reflex responses were recorded bilaterally from the gastrosoleous muscle following stimulation of tibial sensory fibers in the popliteal fossa. H-reflex amplitude in millivolts (HR-A) and H-reflex latency in milliseconds (HR-L) were measured from the spinal reflex response. Pre- and post-manipulation measurements were compared between the affected side and the healthy side. Statistical evaluation was performed by the Wilcoxon matched-pairs test (SPSS). Thirteen patients displayed abnormal H-reflex parameters prior to lumbar manipulation, indicating an S1 nerve root lesion. The mean amplitude was found to be significantly lower on the side of disc herniation than on the normal, healthy side (P = 0.0037). Following manipulation, the abnormal HR-A increased significantly on the affected side while the normal HR-A on the healthy side remained unchanged (P = 0.0045). There was a significant difference between latencies on the affected side and those on the healthy side (P = 0.003). Following manipulation there was a trend toward decreased HR-L. However, this trend did not reach statistical significance (P = 0.3877). Eight patients displayed no H-reflex abnormalities before or after manipulation. Their respective HR-A and HR-L values did not change significantly following manipulation. Three additional

  9. Outcomes of single-level cervical disc arthroplasty versus anterior cervical discectomy and fusion.

    PubMed

    Tracey, Robert W; Kang, Daniel G; Cody, John P; Wagner, Scott C; Rosner, Michael K; Lehman, Ronald A

    2014-11-01

    Several studies have established the short-term safety and efficacy of cervical disc arthroplasty (CDA) as compared to anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF). However, few single-center comparative trials have been performed, and current studies do not contain large numbers of patients. We retrospectively reviewed all patients from a single military tertiary medical center between August 2008 to August 2012 who underwent single-level CDA or single-level ACDF and compared their clinical outcomes and complications. A total of 259 consecutive patients were included in the study, 171 patients in the CDA group with an average follow-up of 9.8 (±9.9)months and 88 patients in the ACDF group with an average follow-up of 11.8 (±9.6)months. Relief of pre-operative symptoms was 90.1% in the CDA group and 86.4% in the ACDF group with rates of return to full pre-operative activity of 93.0% and 88.6%, respectively. Patients who underwent CDA had a higher rate of persistent posterior neck pain (15.8% versus 12.5%), and patients who underwent ACDF were at risk for symptomatic pseudarthrosis at a rate of 3.4%. Reoperation rates were higher in the ACDF group (5.7% versus 3.5%). To our knowledge, this review is the largest, non-funded, comparison study between single-level CDA and single-level ACDF. This study demonstrates that CDA is a safe and reliable alternative to ACDF in the treatment of cervical radiculopathy and myelopathy resulting from spondylosis and acute disc herniation.

  10. Inequality in leg length is important for the understanding of the pathophysiology of lumbar disc herniation

    PubMed Central

    Balik, Mehmet Sabri; Kanat, Ayhan; Erkut, Adem; Ozdemir, Bulent; Batcik, Osman Ersagun

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Inequality in leg length may lead to to abnormal transmission of load across the endplates and degeneration lumbar spine and the disc space. There has been no study focusing on lumbar disc herniation (LDH) and leg length discrepancy. This subject was investigated in this study. Materials and Methods: Consecutive adult patients with leg length discrepancy and low back pain (LBP) admitted to our department were respectivelly studied. Results: A total number of 39 subjects (31 women and eight men) with leg length discrepancy and LBP and 43 (25 females and 18 males) patients with LBP as a control group were tested. Occurrence of disc herniation is statistically different between patients with hip dysplasia and control groups (P < 0.05). Conclusion: The results of this study showed a statistically significant association between leg length discrepancy and occurrence of LDH. The changes of spine anatomy with leg length discrepancy in hip dysplastic patients are of importance in understanding the nature of LDH. PMID:27217654

  11. A Novel Approach to the Surgical Treatment of Lumbar Disc Herniations: Indications of Simple Discectomy and Posterior Transpedicular Dynamic Stabilization Based on Carragee Classification

    PubMed Central

    Ozer, A. F.; Keskin, F.; Oktenoglu, T.; Suzer, T.; Ataker, Y.; Gomleksiz, C.; Sasani, M.

    2013-01-01

    Surgery of lumbar disc herniation is still a problem since Mixter and Barr. Main trouble is dissatisfaction after the operation. Today there is a debate on surgical or conservative treatment despite spending great effort to provide patients with satisfaction. The main problem is segmental instability, and the minimally invasive approach via microscope or endoscope is not necessarily appropriate solution for all cases. Microsurgery or endoscopy would be appropriate for the treatment of Carragee type I and type III herniations. On the other hand in Carragee type II and type IV herniations that are prone to develop recurrent disc herniation and segmental instability, the minimal invasive techniques might be insufficient to achieve satisfactory results. The posterior transpedicular dynamic stabilization method might be a good solution to prevent or diminish the recurrent disc herniation and development of segmental instability. In this study we present our experience in the surgical treatment of disc herniations. PMID:23653862

  12. Treatment of Contained Herniated Lumbar Discs With Ozone and Corticosteroid: A Pilot Clinical Study.

    PubMed

    Murphy, Kieran; Muto, Mario; Steppan, Jim; Meaders, Thomas; Boxley, Chett

    2015-11-01

    The primary objective of this pilot study was to compare pain and function scores from patients before and after an ozone injection in combination with steroids and bupivacaine to treat herniated discs. A secondary objective was to correct some of the methodological weaknesses of some previously published ozone studies. Fifty patients were enrolled; 1-3 mL of 2 wt% ozone in 98 wt% oxygen was delivered into the nucleus pulposus, and 7-9 mL into the adjacent paravertebral tissues. The oxygen/ozone treatment was followed by a periganglionic injection of corticosteroid and bupivacaine. All patients were evaluated 1 month after the treatment to quantify improvement in pain and function, and to monitor for potential adverse events. Forty-four patients had intradiscal injections and were included in the analysis. After 1 treatment, 75.0% showed significant improvement in pain based on the visual analog scale (improvement >1.8), 72.7% showed significant improvement in function based on the Oswestry disability index (improvement >15%), and 79.5% showed improvement based on the modified MacNab criteria. There were no adverse events associated with the treatment. Patients showed significant improvement in pain and function after receiving ozone injections in combination with steroids and bupivacaine for the treatment of herniated discs. Because of the lack of a control group and short follow-up times, conclusions about the safety and efficacy of ozone injections for the treatment of herniated discs are not warranted. However, the results provide sufficient evidence that the risk and expense of an additional randomized controlled study is merited. Copyright © 2015 Canadian Association of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Psychometric evaluation of a decision quality instrument for treatment of lumbar herniated disc.

    PubMed

    Sepucha, Karen R; Feibelmann, Sandra; Abdu, William A; Clay, Catharine F; Cosenza, Carol; Kearing, Stephen; Levin, Carrie A; Atlas, Steven J

    2012-08-15

    Retrospective and prospective patient surveys and a physician survey using a sample from American Medical Association master file. To evaluate the performance of a new instrument designed to measure the quality of decisions about treatment of herniated disc. There is growing consensus on the importance of engaging and informing patients to improve the quality of significant medical decisions, yet there are no instruments currently available to measure decision quality. The herniated disc-decision quality instrument (HD-DQI) was developed with input from clinical experts, survey research experts, and patients. The HD-DQI produces 2 scores each scaled to 0% to 100%, with higher scores indicating better quality: (1) a total knowledge score and (2) a concordance score (indicating the percentage of patients who received treatments that matched their goals). We examined hypotheses relating to the acceptability, feasibility, validity, and reliability of the instrument, using data from 3 samples. The HD-DQI survey was feasible to implement and acceptable to patients, with good response rates and low missing data. The knowledge score discriminated between patients who had seen a decision aid or no decision aid (55% vs. 38%, P < 0.001) and between providers and patients (73% vs. 46%, P < 0.001). The knowledge score also had good retest reliability (intraclass correlation coefficient = 0.85). Most patients (78%) received treatments that matched their goals. Patients who received treatments that matched their goals were less likely to regret the decision than those who did not (13% vs. 39%, P = 0.004). The HD-DQI met several criteria for high-quality patient-reported survey instruments. It can be used to determine the quality of decisions for treatment of herniated disc. More work is needed to examine acceptability for use as part of routine patient care.

  14. Radiological analysis of upper lumbar disc herniation and spinopelvic sagittal alignment.

    PubMed

    Bae, Junseok; Lee, Sang-Ho; Shin, Sang-Ha; Seo, Jin Suk; Kim, Kyeong Hwan; Jang, Jee-Soo

    2016-05-01

    A retrospective cross-sectional study was designed to explore the role of spinopelvic sagittal alignment in upper lumbar disc herniation (ULD) development. A total of 207 consecutive patients who underwent surgery for single-level lumbar disc herniation [24 with ULD and 183 with lower lumbar disc herniation (LLD)] and 40 asymptomatic volunteers were enrolled. Full-length radiographs of the spine were taken to evaluate pelvic incidence (PI), sacral slope (SS), pelvic tilt (PT), thoracic kyphosis (TK), lumbar lordosis (LL), and sagittal vertical axis (SVA). The Roussouly classification was utilized to categorize all subjects according to their sagittal alignment. Spinopelvic parameters and Roussouly classification results were compared between groups. There were significant differences in PI, SS, PT, LL, and SVA between the ULD, LLD, and control groups. PI in the ULD (40.9°) was significantly lower than in the LLD and control groups (48.8° and 47.6°, respectively). LL was significantly lower in the ULD than in the LLD (-32.4° and -40°, respectively). There were significant differences between the three groups in Roussouly types. The LLD had a significantly higher proportion (62.6 %) of type 2 lordosis (flat back), and the ULD had a higher proportion (33.3 %) of type 1 lordosis than the other groups. This study demonstrated the importance of PI and lumbar curvature in the pathogenesis of ULD. The higher prevalence of short LL and long TK with low PI in the ULD group implies that an increased mechanical stress at this level may be one of the risk factors of ULD.

  15. Surgical versus conservative treatment for lumbar disc herniation: a prospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Gugliotta, Marinella; da Costa, Bruno R; Dabis, Essam; Theiler, Robert; Jüni, Peter; Reichenbach, Stephan; Landolt, Hans; Hasler, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Evidence comparing the effectiveness of surgical and conservative treatment of symptomatic lumbar disc herniation is controversial. We sought to compare short-term and long-term effectiveness of surgical and conservative treatment in sciatica symptom severity and quality of life in patients with lumbar disc herniation in a routine clinical setting. Methods A prospective cohort study of a routine clinical practice registry consisting of 370 patients. Outcome measures were the North American Spine Society questionnaire and the 36-Item Short-Form Health Survey to assess patient-reported back pain, physical function, neurogenic symptoms and quality of life. Primary outcomes were back pain at 6 and 12 weeks. Standard open discectomy was assessed versus conservative interventions at 6, 12, 52 and 104 weeks. We filled in missing outcome variable values with multiple imputation, accounted for repeated measures within patients with mixed-effects models and adjusted baseline group differences in relevant prognostic indicators by inverse probability of treatment weighting. Results Surgical treatment patients reported less back pain at 6 weeks than those receiving conservative therapy (−0.97; 95% CI −1.89 to −0.09), were more likely to report ≥50% decrease in back pain symptoms from baseline to 6 weeks (48% vs 17%, risk difference: 0.34; 95% CI 0.16 to 0.47) and reported less physical function disability at 52 weeks (−3.7; 95% CI −7.4 to −0.1). The other assessments showed minimal between-group differences with CIs, including the null effect. Conclusions Compared with conservative therapy, surgical treatment provided faster relief from back pain symptoms in patients with lumbar disc herniation, but did not show a benefit over conservative treatment in midterm and long-term follow-up. PMID:28003290

  16. [Observation on the therapeutic effect of lumbar disc herniation treated with different acupuncture therapies].

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan-Ling

    2013-07-01

    To observe the differences in the clinical therapeutic effects on lumbar disc herniation among warm needling therapy, electroacupuncture therapy and common acupuncture therapy. One hundred and thirty-six cases of lumbar disc herniation were randomized into a warm needling group (46 cases), an electroacupuncture group (45 cases) and a common acupuncture group (45 cases). The points were the same in the three groups. The main points were Shiqizhui (EX-B 8), Yaoyangguan (GV 3), Huantiao (GB 30), Yanglingquan (GB 34), Jiaji (EX-B 2) (corresponding tender points). In the warm manipulation group, the warm and dredging manipulation was adopted. In the electroacupuncture group, G6805- II electric acupuncture apparatus was attached. In the common acupuncture group, only common needling therapy was applied without any specific manipulation supplemented. In all of the three groups, the treatment was given once every two days, 10 treatments made one session. After one session of treatment, the comprehensive assessment score of the chief symptoms and physical signs, VAS score and the clinical efficacy were compared among the three groups. The score of the chief symptoms and physical signs and VAS score after treatment were all reduced as compared with those before treatment in all of the three groups, indicating the statistically significant differences (P < 0.05). All of the three therapies could relieve the chief symptoms and physical signs of lumbar disc herniation. After treatment, the total effective rate was 89.1% (41/46) in the warm manipulation group, 88.9% (40/50) in the electroacupuncture group and 71.1% (32/45) in the common acupuncture group. The efficacies were not different apparently between the warm manipulation group and the electroacupuncture group (P > 0.05). The efficacies in the warm manipulation group and the electroacupuncture group were all superior to the common acupuncture group (P < 0.05). The efficacies of the warm and dredging manipulation and the

  17. Extreme lateral lumbar disc herniation in a 12-year child: case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Sheng-Dan; Jiang, Lei-Sheng; Dai, Li-Yang

    2010-07-01

    Extreme lateral lumbar disc herniations (ELLDHs) occur more frequently among elderly patients, with a peak incidence in the sixth decade, and are rarely found in children. The patient presented is a 12-year-old boy with a 3-month history of right-sided leg pain. Computerized tomography and magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated an extreme lateral disc herniation on the right at L4-L5 with compression of the L4 nerve root. He subsequently underwent removal of extreme lateral herniated disc through an intertransverse approach under general anesthesia. At 11-month follow-up, the patient maintained resolution of preoperative symptoms and a neurological examination revealed no sensory or motor deficit. Surgical intervention may be indicated for patients with ELLDHs that fail with conservative treatment.

  18. Spinal cord herniation following cervical meningioma excision: a rare clinical entity and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Aiyer, Siddharth N; Shetty, Ajoy Prasad; Kanna, Rishi; Maheswaran, Anupama; Rajasekaran, S

    2016-05-01

    Spinal cord herniation following surgery is an extremely uncommon clinical condition with very few reports in published literature. This condition usually occurs as a spontaneous idiopathic phenomenon often in the thoracic spine or following a scenario of post traumatic spinal cord/nerve root injury. Rarely has it been reported following spinal cord tumor surgery. To document a case of cervical spinal cord herniation as a late onset complication following spinal cord tumor surgery with an atypical presentation of monoparesis. Case report. We describe the clinical presentation, operative procedure, post operative outcome and review of literature of this rare clinical condition. A 57-year-old man presented with right upper limb monoparesis due to a spinal cord herniation 6 years after a cervical intradural meningioma excision. The patients underwent surgery to reduce the herniation and duroplasty with subsequent complete resolution of symptoms. Spinal cord herniation must be considered as differential diagnosis in scenarios of spinal cord tumor excision presenting with late onset neurological deficit. These cases may present as paraparesis, Brown-sequard syndrome and rarely as in our case as monoparesis.

  19. Effectiveness of percutaneous laser disc decompression versus conventional open discectomy in the treatment of lumbar disc herniation; design of a prospective randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Brouwer, Patrick A; Peul, Wilco C; Brand, Ronald; Arts, Mark P; Koes, Bart W; Berg, Annette A van den; van Buchem, Mark A

    2009-01-01

    Background The usual surgical treatment of refractory sciatica caused by lumbar disc herniation, is open discectomy. Minimally invasive procedures, including percutaneous therapies under local anesthesia, are increasingly gaining attention. One of these treatments is Percutaneous Laser Disc Decompression (PLDD). This treatment can be carried out in an outpatient setting and swift recovery and return to daily routine are suggested. Thus far, no randomized trial into cost-effectiveness of PLDD versus standard surgical procedure has been performed. We present the design of a randomized controlled trial, studying the cost-effectiveness of PLDD versus conventional open discectomy in patients with sciatica from lumbar disc herniation. Methods/design The study is a randomized prospective multi-center trial, in which two treatment strategies are compared in a parallel group design. Patients (age 18–70 years) visiting the neurosurgery department of the participating hospitals, are considered for inclusion in the trial when sciatica due to lumbar disc herniation has lasted more than 8 weeks. Patients with disc herniation smaller than 1/3 of the spinal canal diameter, without concomitant lateral recess stenosis or sequestration, are eligible for participation, and are randomized into one of two treatment arms; either Percutaneous Laser Disc Decompression or conventional discectomy. The functional outcome of the patient, as assessed by the Roland Disability Questionnaire for Sciatica at 8 weeks and 1 year after treatment, is the primary outcome measure. The secondary outcome parameters are recovery as perceived by the patient, leg and back pain, incidence of re-intervention, complications, quality of life, medical consumption, absence of work and secondary costs. Discussion Open discectomy is still considered to be the golden standard in the surgical treatment of lumbar disc herniation. Whether Percutaneous Laser Disc Decompression has at least as much efficacy as the

  20. A case of an 18-year-old male rugby union forward with a C5/C6 central disc herniation.

    PubMed

    Broughton, Henare Renata

    2009-01-01

    The patient was an 18-year-old front row forward rugby player who had a history of episodic neck pain for over 2 years following playing games of rugby. The initial event of April 2005 for which the symptoms manifested was a scrum collapse; he continued playing until a front-on tackle occurred when the symptoms dictated that he leave the field and be taken to the local hospital. A diagnosis of a cervical sprain was made and conservative management ensued. During the selections held on January 2008, a medical assessment was made and an MRI found that he had a central disc herniation at C5/C6. He was referred to a spinal orthopaedic surgeon for further treatment. The risks to cervical spinal injuries are illustrated in this case, in a scrum and in the tackle. The prevention of such an injury is discussed.

  1. A case of an 18-year-old male rugby union forward with a C5/C6 central disc herniation

    PubMed Central

    Broughton, Henare Renata

    2009-01-01

    The patient was an 18-year-old front row forward rugby player who had a history of episodic neck pain for over 2 years following playing games of rugby. The initial event of April 2005 for which the symptoms manifested was a scrum collapse; he continued playing until a front-on tackle occurred when the symptoms dictated that he leave the field and be taken to the local hospital. A diagnosis of a cervical sprain was made and conservative management ensued. During the selections held on January 2008, a medical assessment was made and an MRI found that he had a central disc herniation at C5/C6. He was referred to a spinal orthopaedic surgeon for further treatment. The risks to cervical spinal injuries are illustrated in this case, in a scrum and in the tackle. The prevention of such an injury is discussed. PMID:21686741

  2. Co-existence of L5-S1 disc herniation and conus medullaris ependymoma

    PubMed Central

    Minoğlu, Mustafa; Akkol, İsmail; Özdemir, Nail; Yıldırım, Levent

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION The lumbar disc herniations are seen very common than spinal ependymomas in the neurosurgery polyclinic routine. PRESENTATION OF CASE In our case, both pathologies were seen at the most frequently located levels compatible with the literature. Aim of this case report is, to remind once more that, different pathologies can be found at the same time in a single patient; differential diagnosis must be done very carefully. DISCUSSION The routine Computed Tomography (CT) imaging for low back pain can not show the conus medullaris pathology. Spinal tumors or other similar pathologies should be kept in mind for differential diagnosis. A good medical history and a good physical examination must be completed before the final diagnosis. CONCLUSION Viewing of spinal canal with Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) will be useful for the patients who we intend to do disc surgery. PMID:25460457

  3. Lumbar disc herniation and cauda equina syndrome following spinal manipulative therapy: a review of six court decisions in Canada.

    PubMed

    Boucher, Pierre; Robidoux, Sébastien

    2014-02-01

    The purpose of this review is to expand practitioners' knowledge on areas of liability when treating low back pain patients. Six cases where chiropractors in Canada were sued for allegedly causing or aggravating lumbar disc herniation after spinal manipulative therapy were retrieved using the CANLII search database. The case series involves 4 men and 2 women with an average age of 37.3 years (range, 31-48 years). Trial courts' decisions were rendered between 2000 and 2011. This study highlights the following conclusions from Canadian courts: 1) informed consent is an ongoing process that cannot be entirely delegated to office personnel; 2) when the patient's history reveals risk factors for lumbar disc herniation the chiropractor has the duty to rule out disc pathology as an etiology for the symptoms presented by the patients before beginning anything but conservative palliative treatment; 3) lumbar disc herniation may be triggered by spinal manipulative therapy on vertebral segments distant from the involved herniated disc such as the thoracic spine.

  4. Effect of Expectations on Treatment Outcome for Lumbar Intervertebral Disc Herniation.

    PubMed

    Lurie, Jon D; Henderson, Eric R; McDonough, Christine M; Berven, Sigurd H; Scherer, Emily A; Tosteson, Tor D; Tosteson, Anna N A; Hu, Serena S; Weinstein, James N

    2016-05-01

    Secondary analysis of randomized and nonrandomized prospective cohorts. To examine the effect of patient treatment expectations on treatment outcomes for patients with intervertebral disc herniation. Patient expectations about treatment effectiveness may have important relationships with clinical outcomes. Subgroup and reanalysis of the Spine Patient Outcomes Research Trial, a randomized trial and comprehensive cohort study enrolling patients between March 2000 and November 2004 from 13 multidisciplinary spine clinics in 11 US states. Overall, 501 randomized and 744 observational patients (1244 total) who were surgical candidates with radiculopathy and imaging confirmed lumbar intervertebral disc herniation were enrolled. The primary study compared surgical discectomy to usual nonoperative care; this subgroup analysis reassessed outcomes on the basis of treatment expectations at baseline. Expectations about symptomatic and functional improvement for both surgery and nonoperative care were assessed on 5-point scales (1="No Chance (0%)" to 5="Certain (100%)"). Outcomes were assessed using longitudinal regression models analyzed by treatment received. Among 1244 IDH SPORT participants, 1168 provided data on both outcomes and baseline expectations and were included in the current analysis: 467 from the randomized and 701 from the observational cohort. Low expectations of outcomes with surgery predicted poorer outcome regardless of treatment. High expectations of outcomes with nonoperative care predicted better nonoperative outcomes but did not affect surgical results. These differences were of similar magnitude to the difference in outcomes between surgery and nonoperative care. High expectations of treatment benefit had clinically significant positive associations with outcomes. 2.

  5. Sequence variant at 8q24.21 associates with sciatica caused by lumbar disc herniation

    PubMed Central

    Bjornsdottir, Gyda; Benonisdottir, Stefania; Sveinbjornsson, Gardar; Styrkarsdottir, Unnur; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Walters, G. Bragi; Bjornsson, Aron; Olafsson, Ingvar H.; Ulfarsson, Elfar; Vikingsson, Arnor; Hansdottir, Ragnheidur; Karlsson, Karl O.; Rafnar, Thorunn; Jonsdottir, Ingileif; Frigge, Michael L.; Kong, Augustine; Oddsson, Asmundur; Masson, Gisli; Magnusson, Olafur T.; Gudbjartsson, Tomas; Stefansson, Hreinn; Sulem, Patrick; Gudbjartsson, Daniel; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Thorgeirsson, Thorgeir E.; Stefansson, Kari

    2017-01-01

    Lumbar disc herniation (LDH) is common and often debilitating. Microdiscectomy of herniated lumbar discs (LDHsurg) is performed on the most severe cases to resolve the resulting sciatica. Here we perform a genome-wide association study on 4,748 LDHsurg cases and 282,590 population controls and discover 37 highly correlated markers associating with LDHsurg at 8q24.21 (between CCDC26 and GSDMC), represented by rs6651255[C] (OR=0.81; P=5.6 × 10−12) with a stronger effect among younger patients than older. As rs6651255[C] also associates with height, we performed a Mendelian randomization analysis using height polygenic risk scores as instruments to estimate the effect of height on LDHsurg risk, and found that the marker's association with LDHsurg is much greater than predicted by its effect on height. In light of presented findings, we speculate that the effect of rs6651255 on LDHsurg is driven by susceptibility to developing severe and persistent sciatica upon LDH. PMID:28223688

  6. Pathological mechanism of lumbar disc herniation resulting in neurogenic muscle hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Walcott, Brian P; Nahed, Brian V; Redjal, Navid; Stein, Thor D; Kahle, Kristopher T; Coumans, Jean-Valery

    2011-12-01

    We present a 33-year-old man with 5-year history of low back pain who presented with an enlarging right calf. The patient underwent an extensive workup including biopsy without diagnosis. The patient's examination was significant for diminished pinprick sensation in the right L5/S1 dermatome. Reflexes were absent in the right ankle. The circumference of the right calf (58 cm) was twice that of the left. MRI revealed a herniated lumbar disc at the L5/S1 level. He then underwent a L5/S1 microdiscectomy. Following this surgery, the patient noted complete resolution of all sensory deficits in his lower extremity. His calf circumference had decreased by 5 cm at 4 months and by a total of 8 cm at his 2-year post-operative visit. Histological examination of the affected muscle demonstrated severe grouped atrophy of both type I and type II fibers. There was also evidence of compensatory fiber hypertrophy as well as fiber splitting. We concluded that the patient suffered from a herniated lumbar disc causing radiculopathy with calf hypertrophy (neurogenic hypertrophy). To our knowledge this is the first report of both grouped atrophy and compensatory hypertrophy of both muscle fiber types seen in this phenomenon.

  7. Sacroiliac joint dysfunction in patients with imaging-proven lumbar disc herniation.

    PubMed

    Galm, R; Fröhling, M; Rittmeister, M; Schmitt, E

    1998-01-01

    A dysfunction of a joint is defined as a reversible functional restriction of motion presenting with hypomobility according to manual medicine terminology. The aim of our study was to evaluate the frequency and significance of sacroiliac joint (SIJ) dysfunction in patients with low back pain and sciatica and imaging-proven disc herniation. We examined the SIJs of 150 patients with low back pain and sciatica; all of these patients had herniated lumbar disks, but none of them had sensory or motor losses. Forty-six patients, hereinafter referred to as group A, were diagnosed with dysfunction of the SIJ. The remaining 104 patients, hereinafter referred to as group B, had no SIJ dysfunction. Dysfunctions were resolved with mobilizing and manipulative techniques of manual medicine. Regardless of SIJ findings, all patients received intensive physiotherapy throughout a 3-week hospitalisation. At the 3 weeks follow-up, 34 patients of group A (73.9%) reported an improvement of lumbar and ischiadic pain, 5 patients were pain free. Improvement was recorded in 57 of the group B patients (54.8%); however, nobody in group B was free of symptoms. We conclude that in the presence of lumbar and ischiadic symptoms our presented data suggest consideration of SIJ dysfunction, requiring manual medicine examination and, in the presence of SIJ dysfunction, appropriate therapy, regardless of intervertebral disc pathomorphology. This could avoid wrong indications for nucleotomy.

  8. The implantation of non-cell-based materials to prevent the recurrent disc herniation: an in vivo porcine model using quantitative discomanometry examination

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yao-Hung; Kuo, Tzong-Fu

    2007-01-01

    Recurrent disc herniation is frequently observed due to leakage of nucleus pulposus through injured anulus fibrosus. There is no effective treatment to prevent recurrent disc herniation yet. In this study, we proposed to implant non-cell-based materials into the porcine disc to stimulate the growth of fibrous tissue and thereby increase the disc functional integrity. The disc herniation was simulated by anular punctures using the spinal needles. Four clinically used implantation materials, i.e., gelfoam, platinum coil, bone cement and tissue glue, were delivered into the discs via percutaneous spinal needles. Two months after the surgery, the swine were killed. The degree of disc integrity of intact, naturally healed and implanted discs, was examined by quantitative discomanometry apparatus. We found the disc injury could not recover after 2 months of healing, and the disc implantation affected the degree of disc integrity. The disc integrity of gelfoam-implanted discs was better than that of coil-, bone cement-, and glue-implanted discs. The implantation of non-cell-based material was proved to be a potentially clinically applicable method to recover the integrity of injured discs and to prevent recurrent disc herniation. PMID:17252217

  9. Physical examination for lumbar radiculopathy due to disc herniation in patients with low-back pain.

    PubMed

    van der Windt, Daniëlle Awm; Simons, Emmanuel; Riphagen, Ingrid I; Ammendolia, Carlo; Verhagen, Arianne P; Laslett, Mark; Devillé, Walter; Deyo, Rick A; Bouter, Lex M; de Vet, Henrica Cw; Aertgeerts, Bert

    2010-02-17

    Low-back pain with leg pain (sciatica) may be caused by a herniated intervertebral disc exerting pressure on the nerve root. Most patients will respond to conservative treatment, but in carefully selected patients, surgical discectomy may provide faster relief of symptoms. Primary care clinicians use patient history and physical examination to evaluate the likelihood of disc herniation and select patients for further imaging and possible surgery. (1) To assess the performance of tests performed during physical examination (alone or in combination) to identify radiculopathy due to lower lumbar disc herniation in patients with low-back pain and sciatica;(2) To assess the influence of sources of heterogeneity on diagnostic performance. We searched electronic databases for primary studies: PubMed (includes MEDLINE), EMBASE, and CINAHL, and (systematic) reviews: PubMed and Medion (all from earliest until 30 April 2008), and checked references of retrieved articles. We considered studies if they compared the results of tests performed during physical examination on patients with back pain with those of diagnostic imaging (MRI, CT, myelography) or findings at surgery. Two review authors assessed the quality of each publication with the QUADAS tool, and extracted details on patient and study design characteristics, index tests and reference standard, and the diagnostic two-by-two table. We presented information on sensitivities and specificities with 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) for all aspects of physical examination. Pooled estimates of sensitivity and specificity were computed for subsets of studies showing sufficient clinical and statistical homogeneity. We included 16 cohort studies (median N = 126, range 71 to 2504) and three case control studies (38 to100 cases). Only one study was carried out in a primary care population. When used in isolation, diagnostic performance of most physical tests (scoliosis, paresis or muscle weakness, muscle wasting, impaired

  10. Molecular profile of major growth factors in lumbar intervertebral disc herniation: Correlation with patient clinical and epidemiological characteristics.

    PubMed

    Tsarouhas, Alexandros; Soufla, Giannoula; Tsarouhas, Konstantinos; Katonis, Pavlos; Pasku, Dritan; Vakis, Antonis; Tsatsakis, Aristides M; Spandidos, Demetrios A

    2017-04-01

    The involvement of growth factors (GFs) in the pathogenesis of lumbar intervertebral disc (ID) herniation and the spontaneous resorption of herniated ID fragments remains only partially elucidated. A simultaneous assessment of the transcript levels of numerous GFs and their association with clinical and epidemiological profiles of human ID herniation would provide valuable insight into the biology and clinical course of the disease. In the present study, we examined simultaneously the transcript levels of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), transforming growth factor β1 (TGF‑β1), basic fibroblast growth factor 2 (bFGF2), platelet derived growth factor (PDGF) isoforms and receptors, epidermal growth factor (EGF) and insulin growth factor‑1 (IGF‑1) in herniated and control ID specimens and investigated their correlation with the clinicopathological profiles of patients suffering from symptomatic lumbar ID herniation. GF mRNA expression levels were determined by RT-qPCR in 63 surgical specimens from lumbar herniated discs and 10 control ID specimens. Multiple positive correlations were observed between the transcript levels of the GFs examined in the ID herniation group. VEGF mRNA expression was significantly increased in the protruding compared with the extruded discs. Intense and acute pain significantly upregulated the PDGF transcript levels. Significant negative correlations were observed between the patient body mass index and the transcript levels of VEGF and PDGF receptors. Our findings support the hypothesis of the involvement of GFs in the natural history of ID herniation. GFs synergistically act in herniated IDs. Increased VEGF expression possibly induces the neovascularization process in the earliest stages of ID herniation. PDGF‑C and ‑D play a role in the acute phase of radiculopathy in a metabolic response for tissue healing. A molecular effect, in addition to the biomechanical effect of obesity in the

  11. 75 FR 54345 - Determination of Regulatory Review Period for Purposes of Patent Extension; BRYAN CERVICAL DISC...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-07

    ... Patent Extension; BRYAN CERVICAL DISC SYSTEM AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice... CERVICAL DISC SYSTEM and is publishing this notice of that determination as required by law. FDA has made... device BRYAN CERVICAL DISC SYSTEM. BRYAN CERVICAL DISC SYSTEM is indicated in skeletally mature patients...

  12. Imaging of Spinal Cord Injury: Acute Cervical Spinal Cord Injury, Cervical Spondylotic Myelopathy, and Cord Herniation.

    PubMed

    Talekar, Kiran; Poplawski, Michael; Hegde, Rahul; Cox, Mougnyan; Flanders, Adam

    2016-10-01

    We review the pathophysiology and imaging findings of acute traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI), cervical spondylotic myelopathy, and briefly review the much less common cord herniation as a unique cause of myelopathy. Acute traumatic SCI is devastating to the patient and the costs to society are staggering. There are currently no "cures" for SCI and the only accepted pharmacologic treatment regimen for traumatic SCI is currently being questioned. Evaluation and prognostication of SCI is a demanding area with significant deficiencies, including lack of biomarkers. Accurate classification of SCI is heavily dependent on a good clinical examination, the results of which can vary substantially based upon the patient׳s condition or comorbidities and the skills of the examiner. Moreover, the full extent of a patients׳ neurologic injury may not become apparent for days after injury; by then, therapeutic response may be limited. Although magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the best imaging modality for the evaluation of spinal cord parenchyma, conventional MR techniques do not appear to differentiate edema from axonal injury. Recently, it is proposed that in addition to characterizing the anatomic extent of injury, metrics derived from conventional MRI and diffusion tensor imaging, in conjunction with the neurological examination, can serve as a reliable objective biomarker for determination of the extent of neurologic injury and early identification of patients who would benefit from treatment. Cervical spondylosis is a common disorder affecting predominantly the elderly with a potential to narrow the spinal canal and thereby impinge or compress upon the neural elements leading to cervical spondylotic myelopathy and radiculopathy. It is the commonest nontraumatic cause of spinal cord disorder in adults. Imaging plays an important role in grading the severity of spondylosis and detecting cord abnormalities suggesting myelopathy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights

  13. Is cervical disc arthroplasty good for congenital cervical stenosis?

    PubMed

    Chang, Peng-Yuan; Chang, Hsuan-Kan; Wu, Jau-Ching; Huang, Wen-Cheng; Fay, Li-Yu; Tu, Tsung-Hsi; Wu, Ching-Lan; Cheng, Henrich

    2017-05-01

    OBJECTIVE Cervical disc arthroplasty (CDA) has been demonstrated to be as safe and effective as anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) in the management of 1- and 2-level degenerative disc disease (DDD). However, there has been a lack of data to address the fundamental discrepancy between the two surgeries (CDA vs ACDF), and preservation versus elimination of motion, in the management of cervical myelopathy associated with congenital cervical stenosis (CCS). Although younger patients tend to benefit more from motion preservation, it is uncertain if CCS caused by multilevel DDD can be treated safely with CDA. METHODS Consecutive patients who underwent 3-level anterior cervical discectomy were retrospectively reviewed. Inclusion criteria were age less than 50 years, CCS (Pavlov ratio ≤ 0.82), symptomatic myelopathy correlated with DDD, and stenosis limited to 3 levels of the subaxial cervical (C3-7) spine. Exclusion criteria were ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament, previous posterior decompression surgery (e.g., laminoplasty or laminectomy), osteoporosis, previous trauma, or other rheumatic diseases that might have caused the cervical myelopathy. All these patients who underwent 3-level discectomy were divided into 2 groups according to the strategies of management: preservation or elimination of motion (the hybrid-CDA group and the ACDF group). The hybrid-CDA group underwent 2-level CDA plus 1-level ACDF, whereas the ACDF group underwent 3-level ACDF. Clinical assessment was measured by the visual analog scales (VAS) for neck and arm pain, Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) scores, and Nurick grades. Radiographic outcomes were measured using dynamic radiographs for evaluation of range of motion (ROM). RESULTS Thirty-seven patients, with a mean (± SD) age of 44.57 ± 5.10 years, were included in the final analysis. There was a male predominance in this series (78.4%, 29 male patients), and the mean follow-up duration was 2.37 ± 1

  14. Percutaneous Endoscopic Lumbar Discectomy for L5-S1 Disc Herniation: Consideration of the Relation between the Iliac Crest and L5-S1 Disc.

    PubMed

    Choi, Kyung Chul; Park, Choon-Keun

    2016-02-01

    Percutaneous transforaminal techniques for the treatment of lumbar disc herniation have markedly evolved. Percutaneous endoscopic lumbar discectomy (PELD) for L5-S1 disc herniation is regarded as challenging due to the unique anatomy of the iliac crest, large facet joint, and inclinatory disc space. Among these, the iliac crest is considered a major obstacle. There are no studies regarding the height of the iliac crest and their appropriate procedures in PELD. This study discusses PELD for L5-S1 disc herniation and the appropriate approach according to the height of iliac crest. Retrospective evaluation. 100 consecutive patients underwent PELD via the transforaminal route for L5-S1 disc herniation by a single surgeon. The study was divided into 2 groups: the foraminoplasty group requiring foraminal widening to access the herniated disc and the non-foraminoplasty group treated by conventional posterolateral access. Radiological parameters such as iliac height, the relative position of the iliac crest to the landmarks of the L5-S1 level, iliosacral angle and foraminal height, and disc location were considered. Clinical outcomes were assessed by the Visual Analogue Scale (VAS, 0 - 10) for back and leg pain, the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI, 0 - 100%), and the modified MacNab criteria. The overall VAS scores for back and leg pain decreased from 6.0 to 2.3 and from 7.5 to 1.7. The mean ODI (%) improved from 54.0 to 11.6. Using modified MacNab criteria, a good outcome was 92%. Foraminoplasty was required in 19 patients. Iliac crest height was significantly higher in the foraminoplasty group than the non-foraminoplasty group (37.7 mm vs 30.1 mm, P < 0.001). In the foraminoplasty group, the iliac crest is above the mid L5 pedicle on lateral radiography in all cases. There were no significant differences in foraminal height, foraminal width, iliosacral angle, or disc height between the 2 groups. In addition, there were no differences in clinical outcome between the 2

  15. Affective, anxiety, and substance-related disorders in patients undergoing herniated disc surgery.

    PubMed

    Zieger, Margrit; Luppa, Melanie; Matschinger, Herbert; Meisel, Hans J; Günther, Lutz; Meixensberger, Jürgen; Toussaint, René; Angermeyer, Matthias C; König, Hans-Helmut; Riedel-Heller, Steffi G

    2011-11-01

    At present only a small number of studies have investigated psychiatric comorbidity in disc surgery patients. Objectives of this study are (1) to examine the prevalence rate of comorbid affective, anxiety, and substance-related disorders in nucleotomy patients in comparison to the German general population and (2) to investigate associations between psychiatric comorbidity and socio-demographic and illness-related characteristics. The study refers to 349 consecutive disc surgery patients (response rate 87%) between the age of 18 and 55 years. The final study sample consists of 239 lumbar and 66 cervical nucleotomy patients. Face-to-face interviews were conducted approximately 3.45 days (SD 3.170) after disc surgery, during hospital stay. Psychiatric comorbidity was assessed by means of the Composite International Diagnostic Interview (CIDI-DIA-X). The corresponding data of the German general population were derived from the German National Health Interview and Examination Survey (GHS). 12-Month prevalence rates of any affective, anxiety or substance-related disorders range between 33.7% in cervical and 23.5% in lumbar disc surgery patients. Four-week prevalence rates of any affective, anxiety or substance disorder vary between 13.2% in cervical and 14.0% in lumbar nucleotomy patients. Disc surgery patients suffer more often from affective disorders and illicit substance abuse than the general population. Significant associations were found between psychiatric comorbidity and gender, as well as pain intensity. Disc surgery patients show a higher risk to suffer from mental disorders than the general population. The assessment of psychiatric distress and the assistance by mental health professionals should be considered during hospital and rehabilitation treatment.

  16. Treatment of contained lumbar disc herniations using radiofrequency assisted micro-tubular decompression and nucleotomy: four year prospective study results

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Patients with radiculopathy caused by contained disc herniations are less likely to have good outcomes following discectomy surgery than patients with disc herniations that are not contained. The author presents his 4-year results from a prospective trial regarding the efficacy and safety of a tubular transforaminal radiofrequency-assisted manual decompression and annulus modulation of contained disc herniations in 58 patients. Methods Fifty-eight patients with lumbar radiculopathy due to a contained disc herniation were enrolled in a prospective clinical study. Visual analog scores (VAS) for back pain and leg pain, quality of life assessment, Macnab criteria, and SF-12 were collected from patients before treatment, at 2-years and 4-years post-treatment. Results At 4 years, results were obtained from 47 (81%) of patients. Compared to mean pre- treatment assessments, mean 4-year VAS for back pain improved from 8.6 to 2.3 points, and mean VAS for leg pain improved from 7.8 to 2.3. Eighty-three percent of respondents reported that they were “satisfied” or “very satisifed” with their quality of life at 4-years as per SF-12. At 4 years, recurrence was noted in 3 (6.4%) of respondents and no complications were reported. Conclusions The 2-year and 4-year study results are nearly identical, suggesting durable benefit out to 4 years. These results also suggest that in carefully selected patients with sustained contained disc herniations who have failed conservative treatments, manual decompression combined with radiofrequency-assisted decompression and annulus modulation are very likely to have good outcomes 4 years post-treatment. PMID:25694932

  17. Stepwise illustration of teeth-fixation semi-constrained cervical disc arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chih-Chang; Wu, Jau-Ching; Chang, Peng-Yuan; Yeh, Mei-Yin; Kuo, Yi-Hsuan; Fay, Li-Yu; Tu, Tsung-Hsi; Huang, Wen-Cheng; Cheng, Henrich

    2017-01-01

    There are many kinds of artificial discs available for cervical disc arthroplasty (CDA), with various designs of fixation and articulation mechanisms. Each of these designs has different features and theoretically fits most optimally in selected types of patients. However, there has been insufficient literature to guide individualized selection among these CDA devices. Since CDA aims to restore the joint function rather than arthrodesis, tailor-made size, shape, and mechanical properties should be taken into account for each candidate's target disc. Despite several large-scale prospective randomized control trials that have demonstrated the effectiveness and durability of CDA for up to 8 years, none of them involved more than one kind of artificial disc. In this video the authors present detailed steps and technical aspects of the newly introduced ProDisc-C Vivo (DePuy Synthes Spine), which has the same ball-and-socket design for controlled, predictable motion as the ProDisc-C. The newly derived teeth fixation provides high primary stability and multilevel capability by avoidance of previous keel-related limitations and complications (e.g., split vertebral fracture). Please note that the ProDisc-C Vivo is currently not available on the US market. The authors present the case of a 53-year-old woman who had symptoms of both radiculopathy and myelopathy caused by a large, calcified disc herniation at C4-5. There was no improvement after 4 months of medical treatment and rehabilitation. A single-level CDA was successfully performed with the ProDisc-C Vivo, and her symptoms were completely ameliorated afterward. The follow-up images demonstrated preservation of motion at the indexed level. The video can be found here: https://youtu.be/4DSES1xgvQU .

  18. The Association Between Modic Changes of Lumbar Endplates and Spontaneous Absorption of Herniated Intervertebral Discs.

    PubMed

    Ding, Lingzhi; Teng, Xiao; Fan, Shunwu; Zhao, Fengdong

    2015-04-01

    Herniated disc (HD) is one of the most common causes of lower back pain. Treatment for HD includes conservative therapy and surgical intervention. Following conservative treatment, spontaneous absorption of HD occurs in some patients. To assess whether modic changes are associated with spontaneous absorption of HD, 85 patients with or without modic changes were followed up after 6 months of conservative treatment. As result, we found modic changes of lumbar endplates are associated with poor absorption of HD after conservative treatment. In addition, patients with modic changes exhibit significantly increased cartilage content and decreased neovascularization and macrophage infiltration in HD tissues, all of which are known to impair spontaneous absorption of herniated tissues. At molecular level, modic changes are associated with decreased expression of matrix metalloproteinase-3 gene, which is a key matrix-degrading enzyme for tissue absorption. Our study established a strong association between modic changes of lumbar endplates and spontaneous absorption of lumbar HD, which provided a potential novel method for prediction of spontaneous absorption.

  19. Discover cervical disc arthroplasty versus anterior cervical discectomy and fusion in symptomatic cervical disc diseases: A meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Shangguan, Lei; Ning, Guang-Zhi; Tang, Yu; Wang, Zhe; Luo, Zhuo-Jing; Zhou, Yue

    2017-01-01

    Objective Symptomatic cervical disc disease (SCDD) is a common degenerative disease, and Discover artificial cervical disc, a new-generation nonconstrained artificial disk, has been developed and performed gradually to treat it. We performed this meta-analysis to compare the efficacy and safety between Discover cervical disc arthroplasty (DCDA) and anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) for SCDD. Methods An exhaustive literature search of PubMed, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Library was conducted to identify randomized controlled trials that compared DCDA with ACDF for patients suffering SCDD. A random-effect model was used. Results were reported as standardized mean difference or risk ratio with 95% confidence interval. Results Of 33 articles identified, six studies were included. Compared with ACDF, DCDA demonstrated shorter operation time (P < 0.0001), and better range of motion (ROM) at the operative level (P < 0.00001). But no significant differences were observed in blood loss, neck disability index (NDI) scores, neck and arm pain scores, Japanese orthopaedic association (JOA) scores, secondary surgery procedures and adverse events (P > 0.05). Subgroup analyses did not demonstrated significant differences. Conclusion In conclusion, DCDA presented shorter operation time, and better ROM at the operative level. However, no significant differences were observed in blood loss, NDI scores, neck and arm pain scores, JOA scores, secondary surgery procedures and adverse events between the two groups. Additionally, more studies of high quality with mid- to long-term follow-up are required in future. PMID:28358860

  20. Ten Important Tips in Treating a Patient with Lumbar Disc Herniation

    PubMed Central

    Hejrati, Hamid; Ariamanesh, Shahrara

    2016-01-01

    Lumbar disc herniation is a common spinal disorder that usually responds favorably to conservative treatment. In a small percentage of the patients, surgical decompression is necessary. Even though lumbar discectomy constitutes the most common and easiest spine surgery globally, adverse or even catastrophic events can occur. Appropriate patient selection and effective neural decompression constitute the most important points for better surgical outcomes and avoidance of unpleasant complications. Other important tips include timely performance of magnetic resonance imaging, correct interpretation of scan data, preoperative detection of underlying instability, exclusion of non-discogenic sciatica, determination of the main cause of clinical pathology, avoidance of the wrong side or level, and being sure that the more detailed procedure does not necessarily mean the more effective procedure. PMID:27790328

  1. Thoracic disc herniation: An unusual complication after prone positioning in spinal surgery

    PubMed Central

    Ebrahim, Mohammed Zahier; Vlok, Adriaan J.

    2016-01-01

    Neurological complications of the prone position have been well documented. Post-operative paraplegia and neurological deterioration unrelated to the site of surgery after proning in spinal surgery is a rare but potentially devastating complication. We describe the case of a 47 year old female who underwent an L4/5 discectomy and posterior instrumented fusion. A few hours after surgery she developed bilateral lower limb weakness with a T11 sensory level. Post-operative MRI revealed an acute disc herniation at the T11/12 level with associated spinal cord compression. This was not present on the pre-operative imaging. A subsequent T11/12 discectomy and instrumented fusion was performed and the patient's motor and sensory function returned to normal. PMID:28377853

  2. Psoas Compartment Blockade in a Laterally Herniated Disc Compressing the Psoas Muscle -A Case Report-

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hye Young; Park, Jin Woo; Moon, Jee Youn; Shin, Jae Hyuck; Park, Sang Hyun

    2012-01-01

    A psoas compartment block has been used to provide anesthesia for orthopedic surgical procedures and analgesia for post-operative pain. Currently, this block is advocated for relieving pain in the lower extremity and pelvic area resulting from various origins. We report a case of a 69-year-old male patient who had gait abnormality with posterior pelvic and hip pain, which were both aggravated by hip extension. From the magnetic resonance image, the patient was found to have a laterally herniated intervertebral disc at the L2/3 level, which compressed the right psoas muscle. This was thought to be the origin of the pain, so a psoas compartment block was performed using 0.25% chirocaine with triamcinolone 5mg, and the pain in both the pelvis and hip were relieved. PMID:22514781

  3. Patient preferences and expectations for care: determinants in patients with lumbar intervertebral disc herniation.

    PubMed

    Lurie, Jon D; Berven, Sigurd H; Gibson-Chambers, Jennifer; Tosteson, Tor; Tosteson, Anna; Hu, Serena S; Weinstein, James N

    2008-11-15

    Prospective observational cohort. To describe the baseline characteristics of patients with a diagnosis of intervertebral disc herniation who had different treatment preferences and the relationship of specific expectations with those preferences. Data were gathered from the observational cohort of the Spine Patient Outcomes Research Trial (SPORT). Patients in the observational cohort met eligibility requirements identical to those of the randomized cohort, but declined randomization, receiving instead the treatment of their choice. Baseline preference and expectation data were acquired at the time of enrollment of the patient, before exposure to the informed consent process. Univariate analyses were performed using a t test for continuous variables and chi for categorical variables. Multivariate analyses were also performed with ANCOVA for continuous variables and logistic regression for categorical variables. Multiple logistic regression models were developed in a forward stepwise fashion using blocks of variables. More patients preferred operative care: 67% preferred surgery, 28% preferred nonoperative treatment, and 6% were unsure; 53% of those preferring surgery stated a definite preference, whereas only 18% of those preferring nonoperative care had a definite preference. Patients preferring surgery were younger, had lower levels of education, and higher levels of unemployment/disability. This group also reported higher pain, worse physical and mental functioning, more back pain related disability, a longer duration of symptoms, and more opiate use. Gender, race, comorbidities, and use of other therapies did not differ significantly across preference groups. Patients' expectations regarding improvement with nonoperative care was the strongest predictor of preference. Patient expectations, particularly regarding the benefit of nonoperative treatment, are the primary determinant of surgery preference among patients with lumbar intervertebral disc herniation

  4. Radiological analysis for thoracolumbar disc herniation in spinopelvic sagittal alignment: A retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tao; Ma, Lei; Yang, Da-Long; Wang, Hui; Zhang, Di; Zhang, Ying-Ze; Ding, Wen-Yuan

    2017-04-01

    A retrospective study aims to explore differences in spinopelvic sagittal alignment between thoracolumbar disc herniation (TLD) and lower lumbar disc herniation (LLD).A total of 185 patients included 26 with TLD and 129 with LLD and 30 asymptomatic volunteers in normal group (NG). Each individual took full spine X-ray to evaluate pelvic incidence (PI), pelvic tilt (PT), sacral slope (SS), lumbar lordosis (LL), thoracic kyphosis (TK), TK+LL+PI, TK/LL, and sacrum-femoral-pubic symphysis (SFP). The Roussouly classification was used to categorize all subjects according to their sagittal alignment. Spinopelvic parameters and Roussouly classification results were compared between groups.PI (51.0°), SS (30.5°), and LL (42.0°) in the TLD were significantly higher than those in the LLD (47°, 27°, 33°, respectively). However, TK (30.0°), TK/LL (0.75), and TK+LL+PI (40.0°) in the TLD were significantly lower than these in the LLD (33.0°, 1.07, 47.2°, respectively) and the similar trend between TLD and NG (34.3°, 0.93, 48.5°, respectively). But LL (42.0°) in the TLD was significantly higher than in the NG (35°). Roussouly types among 3 groups were marked differences. The LLD had a higher rate (59.7%) of type II lordosis (flat back), and the TLD had a higher rate (61.5%) of type III lordosis than other groups.This study implied that patients with TLD have higher LL, lower TK, TK/LL, and TK+LL+PI than LLD patients. We inferred that high LL combined with low TK may be the prospective factors of TLD.

  5. The Effect of Expectations on Treatment Outcome for Lumbar Intervertebral Disc Herniation

    PubMed Central

    Lurie, Jon D.; Henderson, Eric R.; McDonough, Christine M.; Berven, Sigurd H.; Scherer, Emily A.; Tosteson, Tor D.; Tosteson, Anna N. A.; Hu, Serena S.; Weinstein, James N.

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Secondary analysis of randomized and non-randomized prospective cohorts. Objective To examine the effect of patient treatment expectations on treatment outcomes for patients with intervertebral disc herniation. Summary of Background Data Patient expectations about treatment effectiveness may have important relationships with clinical outcomes. Methods Sub-group and re-analysis of the Spine Patient Outcomes Research Trial, a randomized trial and comprehensive cohort study enrolling patients between March 2000 and November 2004 from 13 multidisciplinary spine clinics in 11 US states. Overall 501 randomized and 744 observational patients (1244 total) who were surgical candidates with radiculopathy and imaging confirmed lumbar intervertebral disc herniation were enrolled. The primary study compared surgical discectomy to usual non-operative care; this sub-group analysis reassessed outcomes based on treatment expectations at baseline. Expectations about symptomatic and functional improvement for both surgery and non-operative care were assessed on 5-point scales (1="No Chance (0%)" to 5="Certain (100%)"). Outcomes were assessed using longitudinal regression models analyzed by treatment received. Results Among 1244 IDH SPORT participants, 1168 provided data on both outcomes and baseline expectations and were included in the current analysis: 467 from the randomized and 701 from the observational cohort. Low expectations of outcomes with surgery predicted poorer outcome regardless of treatment. High expectations of outcomes with non-operative care predicted better non-operative outcomes but did not affect surgical results. These differences were of similar magnitude to the difference in outcomes between surgery and non-operative care. Conclusions High expectations of treatment benefit had clinically significant positive associations with outcomes. PMID:26641853

  6. Lumbar disc herniation in the Spine Patient Outcomes Research Trial: does educational attainment impact outcome?

    PubMed

    Olson, Patrick R; Lurie, Jon D; Frymoyer, John; Walsh, Thomas; Zhao, Wenyan; Morgan, Tamara S; Abdu, William A; Weinstein, James N

    2011-12-15

    Randomized trial with concurrent observational cohort. A total of 1171 patients were divided into subgroups by educational attainment: high school or less, some college, and college degree or above. To assess the influence of education level on outcomes for treatment of lumbar disc herniation. Educational attainment has been demonstrated to have an inverse relationship with pain perception, comorbidities, and mortality. The Spine Patient Outcomes Research Trial enrolled surgical candidates (imaging-confirmed disc herniation with at least 6 weeks of persistent signs and symptoms of radiculopathy) from 13 multidisciplinary spine clinics in 11 US states. Treatments were standard open discectomy versus nonoperative treatment. Outcomes were changes from baseline for 36-Item Short Form Health Survey (SF-36), bodily pain (BP), and physical function (PF) scales and the modified Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) at 6 weeks, 3 months, 6 months, and yearly through 4 years. Substantial improvement was seen in all patient cohorts. Surgical outcomes did not differ by level of education. For nonoperative outcomes, however, higher levels of education were associated with significantly greater overall improvement over 4 years in BP (P = 0.007), PF (P = 0.001), and ODI (P = 0.003). At 4 years a "dose-response" type relationship was shown for BP (high school or less = 25.5, some college = 31, and college graduate or above = 36.3, P = 0.004) and results were similar for PF and ODI. The success of nonoperative treatment in the more educated cohort resulted in an attenuation of the relative benefit of surgery. Patients with higher educational attainment demonstrated significantly greater improvement with nonoperative treatment while educational attainment was not associated with surgical outcomes.

  7. The surgery and early postoperative radicular pain in cases with multifocal lumbar disc herniation

    PubMed Central

    Ulutaş, Murat; Çınar, Kadir; Seçer, Mehmet

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Persistence of postoperative radicular pain after surgery for multifocal disc herniation (MFDH) is a clinical problem. This study aims to evaluate the effects of a combined treatment approach compared with unilateral stabilization on early postoperative radicular pain in patients with MFDH. Age, sex, level of operation, clinical findings, and radicular pain visual analogue scale (VAS) scores before surgery in the early postoperative period and at 3 months after surgery were retrospectively reviewed for 20 cases of multifocal lumbar disc herniation. The combined approach (translaminar and far lateral) was used for 13 cases. Seven cases underwent transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) and unilateral transpedicular stabilization following total facetectomy. The mean age of the sample was 49.4 ± 10.1 years and the female-to-male ratio was 8:12. The mean VAS scores for radicular pain in cases treated with the combined approach were 8.2, 4.07, and 2.3 in the preoperative and early postoperative periods and 3 months after surgery, respectively. The mean score for radicular pain improved by 50.4% in the early postoperative period and by 72% in the late postoperative period. The mean VAS scores for radicular pain in cases who underwent TLIF and unilateral stabilization after facetectomy were 8.4, 2.1, and 1.4 in the preoperative and early postoperative periods and 3 months after surgery, respectively. The mean VAS score for radicular pain improved by 75% in the early postoperative period and by 83.3% in the late postoperative period. The combined approach is an effective alternative in cases with MFDH. TLIF and unilateral segmental stabilization provide substantial decompression and eliminate mechanical compression by conserving the height of the intervertebral foramen in the event that sufficient decompression is unable to obtain. We suggest that elimination of chemical mediators, particularly those causing pain in the dorsal ganglion, contributes to

  8. The surgery and early postoperative radicular pain in cases with multifocal lumbar disc herniation.

    PubMed

    Ulutaş, Murat; Çınar, Kadir; Seçer, Mehmet

    2017-03-01

    Persistence of postoperative radicular pain after surgery for multifocal disc herniation (MFDH) is a clinical problem. This study aims to evaluate the effects of a combined treatment approach compared with unilateral stabilization on early postoperative radicular pain in patients with MFDH.Age, sex, level of operation, clinical findings, and radicular pain visual analogue scale (VAS) scores before surgery in the early postoperative period and at 3 months after surgery were retrospectively reviewed for 20 cases of multifocal lumbar disc herniation. The combined approach (translaminar and far lateral) was used for 13 cases. Seven cases underwent transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) and unilateral transpedicular stabilization following total facetectomy.The mean age of the sample was 49.4 ± 10.1 years and the female-to-male ratio was 8:12. The mean VAS scores for radicular pain in cases treated with the combined approach were 8.2, 4.07, and 2.3 in the preoperative and early postoperative periods and 3 months after surgery, respectively. The mean score for radicular pain improved by 50.4% in the early postoperative period and by 72% in the late postoperative period. The mean VAS scores for radicular pain in cases who underwent TLIF and unilateral stabilization after facetectomy were 8.4, 2.1, and 1.4 in the preoperative and early postoperative periods and 3 months after surgery, respectively. The mean VAS score for radicular pain improved by 75% in the early postoperative period and by 83.3% in the late postoperative period.The combined approach is an effective alternative in cases with MFDH. TLIF and unilateral segmental stabilization provide substantial decompression and eliminate mechanical compression by conserving the height of the intervertebral foramen in the event that sufficient decompression is unable to obtain. We suggest that elimination of chemical mediators, particularly those causing pain in the dorsal ganglion, contributes to the absence

  9. Heterotopic ossification associated with myelopathy following cervical disc prosthesis implantation.

    PubMed

    Wenger, Markus; Markwalder, Thomas-Marc

    2016-04-01

    This case report presents a 37-year-old man with clinical signs of myelopathy almost 9 years after implantation of a Bryan disc prosthesis (Medtronic Sofamor Danek, Memphis, TN, USA) for C5/C6 soft disc herniation. As demonstrated on MRI and CT scan, spinal cord compression was caused by bony spurs due to heterotopic ossification posterior to the still moving prosthesis. The device, as well as the ectopic bone deposits, had to be removed because of myelopathy and its imminent aggravation. Conversion to anterior spondylodesis was performed.

  10. Percutaneous pedicle screw and rod fixation with TLIF in a series of 14 patients with recurrent lumbar disc herniation.

    PubMed

    Niesche, Marco; Juratli, Tareq A; Sitoci, Kerim-Hakan; Neidel, Julia; Daubner, Dirk; Schackert, Gabriele; Leimert, Mario

    2014-09-01

    To determine if minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) using the Medtronic Sextant system is a reliable surgical treatment option in patients with recurrent lumbar disc herniation, compared with the traditional open procedure. Clinical and radiographic data were retrospectively collected from a total of 33 patients who underwent single level lumbar fusion between 2007 and 2010. 14 underwent minimally invasive TLIF using the Sextant system, and the other 19 patients underwent the open procedure. All patients suffered from at least first recurrent lumbar disc herniation, and additionally from disc degeneration associated with erosive chondrosis Modic grade I-II due to previous surgical, non-instrumental interventions. Median operation time in the minimally invasive group was 140 min (95-190); average X-ray exposure time: 2.35 min (1.5-3.5); median postoperative resting time in hospital: 5 days (3-7). Postoperative pain relief and mobility improvement were documented with the visual analogue scale (6.9-3.0) and the Oswestry Disability Index (6.8-2.4). All patients benefited from surgery at follow up. These data were on many terms significantly superior compared with data of patients in the open surgery group. Percutaneous minimally invasive TLIF technique with the Medtronic Sextant system is a gentle, tissue protecting and safe alternative procedure for lumbar fusion in patients with recurrent lumbar disc herniation and erosive chondrosis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Biomechanical analysis of press-extension technique on degenerative lumbar with disc herniation and staggered facet joint.

    PubMed

    Du, Hong-Gen; Liao, Sheng-Hui; Jiang, Zhong; Huang, Huan-Ming; Ning, Xi-Tao; Jiang, Neng-Yi; Pei, Jian-Wei; Huang, Qin; Wei, Hui

    2016-05-01

    This study investigates the effect of a new Chinese massage technique named "press-extension" on degenerative lumbar with disc herniation and facet joint dislocation, and provides a biomechanical explanation of this massage technique. Self-developed biomechanical software was used to establish a normal L1-S1 lumbar 3D FE model, which integrated the spine CT and MRI data-based anatomical structure. Then graphic technique is utilized to build a degenerative lumbar FE model with disc herniation and facet joint dislocation. According to the actual press-extension experiments, mechanic parameters are collected to set boundary condition for FE analysis. The result demonstrated that press-extension techniques bring the annuli fibrosi obvious induction effect, making the central nucleus pulposus forward close, increasing the pressure in front part. Study concludes that finite element modelling for lumbar spine is suitable for the analysis of press-extension technique impact on lumbar intervertebral disc biomechanics, to provide the basis for the disease mechanism of intervertebral disc herniation using press-extension technique.

  12. Traumatic Migration of the Bryan Cervical Disc Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Wagner, Scott C; Kang, Daniel G; Helgeson, Melvin D

    2016-02-01

    Study Design Case study. Objective To describe a case of dislodgment and migration of the Bryan Cervical Disc (Medtronic Sofamor Danek, Memphis, Tennessee, United States) arthroplasty more than 6 months after implantation secondary to low-energy trauma. Methods The inpatient, outpatient, and radiographic medical records of a patient with traumatic migration of the Bryan Cervical Disc arthroplasty were reviewed. The authors have no relevant disclosures to report. Results A 36-year-old man with chronic left upper extremity radiculopathy underwent uncomplicated Bryan Cervical Disc arthroplasty at C5-C6, with complete resolution of his symptoms. Approximately 6 months after his index procedure, he sustained low-energy trauma to the posterior cervical spine, after being struck by a book falling from a shelf. The injury forced his neck into flexion, and though he did not have recurrence of his radiculopathy symptoms, radiographs demonstrated anterior migration of the arthroplasty device. He underwent revision to anterior cervical diskectomy and fusion. Conclusions Although extremely rare, it is imperative that surgeons consider the potential for failure of osseous integration in patients undergoing cervical disk arthroplasty, even beyond 3 to 6 months postoperatively. This concern is especially relevant to press-fit or milled devices like the Bryan Cervical Disc arthroplasty, which lack direct fixation into adjacent vertebral bodies. We are considering modification of our postoperative protocol to improve protection of the device after implantation, even beyond 3 months postoperatively.

  13. Traumatic Migration of the Bryan Cervical Disc Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, Scott C.; Kang, Daniel G.; Helgeson, Melvin D.

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Case study. Objective To describe a case of dislodgment and migration of the Bryan Cervical Disc (Medtronic Sofamor Danek, Memphis, Tennessee, United States) arthroplasty more than 6 months after implantation secondary to low-energy trauma. Methods The inpatient, outpatient, and radiographic medical records of a patient with traumatic migration of the Bryan Cervical Disc arthroplasty were reviewed. The authors have no relevant disclosures to report. Results A 36-year-old man with chronic left upper extremity radiculopathy underwent uncomplicated Bryan Cervical Disc arthroplasty at C5–C6, with complete resolution of his symptoms. Approximately 6 months after his index procedure, he sustained low-energy trauma to the posterior cervical spine, after being struck by a book falling from a shelf. The injury forced his neck into flexion, and though he did not have recurrence of his radiculopathy symptoms, radiographs demonstrated anterior migration of the arthroplasty device. He underwent revision to anterior cervical diskectomy and fusion. Conclusions Although extremely rare, it is imperative that surgeons consider the potential for failure of osseous integration in patients undergoing cervical disk arthroplasty, even beyond 3 to 6 months postoperatively. This concern is especially relevant to press-fit or milled devices like the Bryan Cervical Disc arthroplasty, which lack direct fixation into adjacent vertebral bodies. We are considering modification of our postoperative protocol to improve protection of the device after implantation, even beyond 3 months postoperatively. PMID:26835211

  14. Outcomes following cervical disc arthroplasty: a retrospective review.

    PubMed

    Cody, John P; Kang, Daniel G; Tracey, Robert W; Wagner, Scott C; Rosner, Michael K; Lehman, Ronald A

    2014-11-01

    Cervical disc arthroplasty has emerged as a viable technique for the treatment of cervical radiculopathy and myelopathy, with the proposed benefit of maintenance of segmental range of motion. There are relatively few, non-industry sponsored studies examining the outcomes and complications of cervical disc arthroplasty. Therefore, we set out to perform a single center evaluation of the outcomes and complications of cervical disc arthroplasty. We performed a retrospective review of all patients from a single military tertiary medical center undergoing cervical disc arthroplasty from August 2008 to August 2012. The clinical outcomes and complications associated with the procedure were evaluated. A total of 219 consecutive patients were included in the review, with an average follow-up of 11.2 (±11.0)months. Relief of pre-operative symptoms was noted in 88.7% of patients, and 92.2% of patients were able to return to full pre-operative activity. There was a low rate of complications related to the anterior cervical approach (3.2% with recurrent laryngeal nerve injury, 8.9% with dysphagia), with no device/implant related complications. Symptomatic cervical radiculopathy is a common problem in both the civilian and active duty military populations and can cause significant disability leading to loss of work and decreased operational readiness. There exist several surgical treatment options for appropriately indicated patients. Based on our findings, cervical disc arthroplasty is a safe and effective treatment for symptomatic cervical radiculopathy and myelopathy, with a low incidence of complications and high rate of symptom relief.

  15. Characteristics of Lumbar Disc Herniation With Exacerbation of Presentation Due to Spinal Manipulative Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Sheng-Li; Liu, Yan-Xi; Yuan, Guo-Lian; Zhang, Ji; Yan, Hong-Wei

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this article was to delineate the characteristics of lumbar disc herniation (LDH) in patients with exacerbation of symptoms caused by spinal manipulative therapy (SMT). The main emphasis should be on the prevention of this condition by identifying relevant risk factors. Detailed clinico-radiological profiles of a total number of 10 LDH patients with exacerbation of presentation after SMT were reviewed. All the patients underwent neurological and magnetic resonance imaging examinations. Laminectomy and discectomy were performed, and follow-up was carried out in all patients. The duration of symptoms in the patients before SMT was 4–15 years. After the therapy, an acute exacerbation of back and radicular pain was observed within 24 h. Magnetic resonance imaging showed that L4–L5 was the most frequently affected level observed (7 patients), and each patient had a large disc fragment in the spinal canal. The disc fragments were classified into 3 types according to their localizations. The time internal between the exacerbation of presentation and surgery was 23.1 days. No perioperative complications were noted. All the patients were relieved of radicular pain a few days after surgery. During postoperative follow-up, all patients regained the ability to walk; one patient received catheterization for 1 month and another for 6 months. Eight patients reported a complete resolution of presentation and the rest 2 patients were significantly improved. SMT should be prohibited in some LDH patients to prevent neurological damages, in whom there are 5 possible risk factors. Surgical results for these patients are encouraging. PMID:25816037

  16. Operative management of lumbar disc herniation : the evolution of knowledge and surgical techniques in the last century.

    PubMed

    Postacchini, F; Postacchini, R

    2011-01-01

    Removal of a herniated disc with the use of the operative microscope was first performed by Yasargil (Adv Neurosurg. 4:81-2, 1977) in 1977. However, it began to be used more and more only in the late 1980s (McCulloch JA (1989) Principles of microsurgery for lumbar disc disease. Raven Press, New York). In the 1990s, many spinal surgeons abandoned conventional discectomy with naked-eye to pass to the routine practice of microdiscectomy. The merits of this technique are that it allows every type of disc herniation to be excised through a short approach to skin, fascia and muscles as well as a limited laminoarthrectomy. For these reasons, it has been, and still is, considered the "gold standard" of surgical treatment for lumbar disc herniation, and the method used by the vast majority of spinal surgeons. In the 1990s, the advent of MRI and the progressive increase in definition of this modality of imaging, as well as histopathologic and immunochemical studies of disc tissue and the analysis of the results of conservative treatments have considerably contributed to the knowledge of the natural evolution of a herniated disc. It was shown that disc herniation may decrease in size or disappear in a few weeks or months. Since the second half of the 1990s there has been a revival of percutaneous procedures. Some of these are similar to the percutaneous automated nucleotomy; other methods are represented by intradiscal injection of a mixture of "oxygen-ozone" (Alexandre A, Buric J, Paradiso R. et al. (2001) Intradiscal injection of oxygen ozone for the treatment of lumbar disc herniations: result at 5 years. 12th World Congress of Neurosurgery; 284-7), or laserdiscectomy performed under CT scan (Menchetti PPM. (2006) Laser Med Sci. 4:25-7). The really emerging procedure is that using an endoscope inserted into the disc through the intervertebral foramen to visualize the herniation and remove it manually using thin pituitary rongeurs, a radiofrequency probe or both (Chiu JC

  17. Structural brain alterations in patients with lumbar disc herniation: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Luchtmann, Michael; Steinecke, Yvonne; Baecke, Sebastian; Lützkendorf, Ralf; Bernarding, Johannes; Kohl, Jana; Jöllenbeck, Boris; Tempelmann, Claus; Ragert, Patrick; Firsching, Raimund

    2014-01-01

    Chronic pain is one of the most common health complaints in industrial nations. For example, chronic low back pain (cLBP) disables millions of people across the world and generates a tremendous economic burden. While previous studies provided evidence of widespread functional as well as structural brain alterations in chronic pain, little is known about cortical changes in patients suffering from lumbar disc herniation. We investigated morphometric alterations of the gray and white matter of the brain in patients suffering from LDH. The volumes of the gray and white matter of 12 LDH patients were determined in a prospective study and compared to the volumes of healthy controls to distinguish local differences. High-resolution MRI brain images of all participants were performed using a 3 Tesla MRI scanner. Voxel-based morphometry was used to investigate local differences in gray and white matter volume between patients suffering from LDH and healthy controls. LDH patients showed significantly reduced gray matter volume in the right anterolateral prefrontal cortex, the right temporal lobe, the left premotor cortex, the right caudate nucleus, and the right cerebellum as compared to healthy controls. Increased gray matter volume, however, was found in the right dorsal anterior cingulate cortex, the left precuneal cortex, the left fusiform gyrus, and the right brainstem. Additionally, small subcortical decreases of the white matter were found adjacent to the left prefrontal cortex, the right premotor cortex and in the anterior limb of the left internal capsule. We conclude that the lumbar disk herniation can lead to specific local alterations of the gray and white matter in the human brain. The investigation of LDH-induced brain alterations could provide further insight into the underlying nature of the chronification processes and could possibly identify prognostic factors that may improve the conservative as well as the operative treatment of the LDH.

  18. SPORT: Do outcomes vary across centers for surgery for lumbar disc herniation?

    PubMed Central

    Desai, Atman; Bekelis, Kimon; Ball, Perry A.; Lurie, Jon; Mirza, Sohail K.; Tosteson, Tor D.; Zhao, Wenyan; Weinstein, James N.

    2014-01-01

    Background Lumbar discectomy is the most common procedure performed in spine surgery. Different centers performing this procedure may have different outcomes. Objective To determine whether the choice of academic spine center in which surgery is performed affects outcome after lumbar discectomy. Methods Spine Patient Outcomes Research Trial (SPORT) cohort participants with a confirmed diagnosis of intervertebral disc herniation (IDH) undergoing standard first-time open discectomy were followed from baseline at 6 weeks, and 3, 6, 12 months and yearly thereafter, at 13 spine clinics in 11 US states. Patient data were retrospectively reviewed. As of August 2009, the mean (SD) follow-up among all analyzed IDH patients was 41.3 (14.6) months. The median (range) follow-up time among all analyzed IDH patients was 47.4 (1.3, 95.3) months. Enrollment began in March 2000 and ended in November 2004. Results 792 patients underwent first-time lumbar discectomy. Significant differences were found amongst centers with regard to patient age and race, and in baseline levels of disability and treatment preferences. There were no significant differences among the study centers in other patient characteristics (e.g., sex, body mass index, the prevalence of smoking, diabetes or hypertension), or disease characteristics (herniation level or type). Some short-term outcomes varied significantly among centers, including operative duration and blood loss, the incidence of durotomy and the length of hospital stay. Unadjusted reoperation rates also varied across centers. There were no differences among the various centers in incidence of nerve root injury, post-operative mortality, SF-36 scores of body pain or physical function, or Oswestry Disability Index at 4 years. Conclusions Although mean operative blood loss, risk of durotomy and length of hospital stay vary across academic centers performing lumbar discectomy, there appears to be no difference in long-term functional outcomes. The

  19. Transforaminal epidural steroid injections followed by mechanical diagnosis and therapy to prevent surgery for lumbar disc herniation.

    PubMed

    van Helvoirt, Hans; Apeldoorn, Adri T; Ostelo, Raymond W; Knol, Dirk L; Arts, Mark P; Kamper, Steven J; van Tulder, Maurits W

    2014-07-01

    Prospective cohort study. To report the clinical course of patients with MRI-confirmed lumbar disc herniation-related radicular noncentralizing pain who received transforaminal epidural steroid injections (TESIs) and mechanical diagnosis and therapy (MDT). Noncentralizing symptoms in patients with lumbar disc herniation are associated with poor outcome. Commonly used treatments for these patients include TESIs and MDT. No study has evaluated the outcome of combining both strategies. Consecutive candidates for herniated lumbar disc surgery with noncentralizing chronic pain were eligible. Patients received TESIs followed by MDT. The primary outcomes were pain severity in the leg, disability (Roland-Morris Disability Questionnaire for Sciatica), and global perceived effect (GPE). Outcomes were measured at baseline, discharge, and 12 months. Linear mixed-models and McNemar's tests were used to analyze outcome data. Sixty-nine patients receive TESIs. After TESIs, symptoms were resolved completely in 11 patients (16%). In these patients, symptom resolution was maintained at 12 months. A second subgroup of 32 patients (46%) reported significantly less pain after TESIs and showed centralization with MDT reassessment (significant reductions in leg pain and disability [P < 0.001]) and a satisfaction rate of 90% at 12 months. A third subgroup of 11 patients (16%) reported significantly less pain after TESIs but still showed noncentralization with MDT reassessment (significant reductions in leg pain and disability [P < 0.05] and a satisfaction rate of 50% at 12 months). A fourth subgroup of 15 patients (22%) did not respond on TESIs and received an operative intervention. The results indicate that a course of TESIs followed by MDT may be able to avoid surgery in a substantial proportion of candidates for herniated lumbar disc surgery. Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Microstructural changes in compressed nerve roots treated by percutaneous transforaminal endoscopic discectomy in patients with lumbar disc herniation

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Weifei; Liang, Jie; Chen, Ying; Chen, Aihua; Wu, Bin; Yang, Zong

    2016-01-01

    Abstract To investigate the microstructural changes in compressed nerves using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) of herniated disc treated with percutaneous transforaminal endoscopic discectomy. Diffusion tensor imaging has been widely used to visualize peripheral nerves, and the microstructure of compressed nerve roots can be assessed using DTI. However, the microstructural changes after surgery are not well-understood in patients with lumbar disc herniation. Thirty-four consecutive patients with foraminal disc herniation affecting unilateral sacral 1 (S1) nerve roots were enrolled in this study. DTI with tractography was performed on S1 nerve roots before and after surgery. The mean fractional anisotropy (FA) and apparent diffusion coefficient values were calculated from tractography images. In compressed nerve roots, the FA value before surgery was significantly lower than that after surgery (P = 0.000). A significant difference in FA values was found between the compressed and normal sides before surgery (P = 0.000). However, no significant difference was found between the compressed and normal sides after surgery (P = 0.057). A significant difference in apparent diffusion coefficient values was found before and after surgery at the compressed side (P = 0.023). However, no significant difference was found between the compressed and normal sides after surgery (P = 0.203). We show that the diffusion parameters of compressed nerve roots were not significantly different before and after percutaneous transforaminal endoscopic discectomy, indicating that the microstructure of the nerve root recovered after surgery. PMID:27749591

  1. Intraregional differences of perioperative management strategy for lumbar disc herniation: is the Devil really in the details?

    PubMed Central

    Bongetta, Daniele; Poli, Jacopo C.; Verlotta, Mariarosaria; Pugliese, Raffaelino; Gaetani, Paolo

    2017-01-01

    Background This study intends to evaluate whether regional common habits or differences in case-volume between surgeons are significative variables in the perioperative management of patients undergoing surgery for lumbar disc herniation. Methods An e-mail survey was sent to all neurosurgeons working in Lombardy, Italy's most populated region. The survey consisted of 17 questions about the perioperative management of lumbar disc herniation. Results Forty-seven percent (47%) out of 206 Lombard neurosurgeons answered the survey. Although in some respects there is clear evidence in current literature on which is the best practice to adopt for an optimal management strategy, we noticed substantial differences between respondents, not only between hospitals but also between surgeons from the same hospital. Still, no differences were evident in a high vs low case-volume comparison. Conclusion We identified no regional clusterization as for practical principles in the perioperative management of lumbar disc herniation and neither was case-volume a significative variable. Other causes may be relevant in the variability between the perioperative management and the outcomes achieved by different specialists. PMID:28377859

  2. Far lateral microdiscectomy: a minimally-invasive surgical technique for the treatment of far lateral lumbar disc herniation

    PubMed Central

    Phan, Kevin; Dunn, Alexander E.; Rao, Prashanth J.

    2016-01-01

    Lumbar disc herniation arises when the annulus fibrosus of the vertebral disc fails, thus allowing displacement of the nucleus pulposus and other tissue. The term far lateral is used variably in the literature and usually refers to an extraforaminal displacement in the peridiscal zone peripheral to the sagittal plane of the most lateral part of the pedicle at the same level. Non-surgical treatments of far lateral disc herniation include physical therapy, anti-inflammatory medication, and corticosteroid injections. Where these conservative measures fail, surgical intervention may be required. Several surgical techniques for the treatment of far lateral herniations have been investigated, including total or medial facetectomy, laminectomy, hemilaminectomy, approaches through the pars interarticularis, and lateral approaches between the transverse processes via the intertransverse muscle and ligament. We present our far lateral microdiscectomy technique which involves accessing the nerve root lateral to the foramen through a small paramedian incision and use of an operating microscope. Far lateral microdiscectomy offers the prospect of better long-term results than other surgical techniques because of less extensive muscle dissection and preservation of the integrity of the facet joint. PMID:27683697

  3. Prevalence of Lumbar Disc Herniation in Adolescent Males in Seoul, Korea: Prevalence of Adolescent LDH in Seoul, Korea

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Do-Keun; Oh, Chang Hyun; Lee, Myoung Seok; Park, Hyung-chun; Park, Chong Oon

    2011-01-01

    Objective The authors surveyed the prevalence and the clinical character of lumbar disc herniation (LDH) in Korean male adolescents, and the usefulness of current conscription criteria. Methods The data of 39,673 nineteen-year-old males that underwent a conscription examination at the Seoul Regional Korean Military Manpower Administration (MMA) from October 2010 to May 2011 were investigated. For those diagnosed as having lumbar disc herniation, prevalences, subject characteristics, herniation severities, levels of herniation, and modified Korean Oswestry low back pain disability scores by MMA physical grade were evaluated. The analysis was performed using medical certificates, medical records, medical images, and electromyographic and radiologic findings. Results The prevalence of adolescent LDH was 0.60%(237 of the 39,673 study subjects), and the prevalence of serious adolescent LDH with thecal sac compression or significant discogenic spinal stenosis was 0.28%(110 of the 39,673 study subjects). Of the 237 adolescent LDH cases, 105 (44.3%) were of single level LDH and 132 (55.7%) were of multiple level LDH, and the L4-5 level was the most severely and frequently affected. Oswestry back pain disability scores increased with herniation severity (p<0.01), and were well correlated with MMA grade. Conclusions In this large cohort of 19-year-old Korean males, the prevalence of adolescent LDH was 0.60% and the prevalence of serious adolescent LDH, which requires management, was relatively high at 0.28%. MMA physical grade was confirmed to be a useful measure of the disability caused by LDH. PMID:26064143

  4. Artificial Cervical Disc Arthroplasty (ACDA): tips and tricks

    PubMed Central

    Khadivi, Masoud; Rahimi Movaghar, Vafa; Abdollahzade, Sina

    2012-01-01

    Abstract: Background: Anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) is currently treatment of choice for managing medical therapy refractory cervical degenerative disc disease. Numerous studies have demonstrated the effectiveness of ACDF; patients generally experience rapid recoveries, and dramatic improvement in their pain and quality of life. However, as several studies reported symptomatic adjacent segment disease attributed to fusions’ altered kinematics, cervical disc arthroplasty emerged as a new motion-sparing alternative to fusion. Fusion at one level increases motion at adjacent levels along with increased intradiscal pressures. This phenomenon can result in symptomatic adjacent level degeneration, which can necessitate reoperation at these levels. The era of cervical arthroplasty began in Europe in the late 1990s. In recent years, artificial cervical disc arthroplasty (ACDA) has been increasingly used by spine surgeons for degenerative cervical disc disease. There have been several reports of safety, efficacy and indications of ACDA. Cervical arthroplasty offers several theoretical advantages over anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) in the treatment of selected patients with medically refractory cervical radiculopathy. Preserving motion at the operated level, cervical TDR has the potential to decrease the occurrence of adjacent segment degeneration. There are a few studies on the efficacy and effectiveness of ACDA compared to cervical fusion. However, the true scenery of cervical arthroplasty yet to be identified. Objective: This study is intended to define patients' characteristics and outcomes of ACDA by a single surgeon in Iran. Methods: This retrospective study was performed in two general Hospitals in Tehran, Iran from 2005 To 2010. All patients were operated by one senior neurospine surgeon. One hundred fifty three patients were operated in this period. All patients signed the informed consent form prior to surgery. All patients

  5. Hypovitaminosis D and Cervical Disk Herniation among Adults Undergoing Spine Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Stoker, Geoffrey E.; Buchowski, Jacob M.; Chen, Christopher T.; Kim, Han Jo; Park, Moon Soo; Riew, K. Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Study Design Single-center, retrospective study. Objective Suboptimal concentrations of vitamin D have been linked to hip and knee osteoarthritis in large, population-based cohort studies. We sought to examine the association of vitamin D levels with intervertebral disk disease. Methods From January 2010 through May 2011, 91 consecutive, eligible adult spine surgery patients who had undergone cervical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and preoperative serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D (s25D) measurement were retrospectively included. MRI was read for C2–T1 disk herniation and degeneration (grades I to V). Logistic regressions were performed. Results Compared with the 384 disks of nondeficient patients, 162 disks of vitamin D-deficient (< 20 ng/mL) patients were more frequently herniated (40% versus 27%, p = 0.004); deficiency was not predictive of individual disk grade (unadjusted odds ratio [uOR] = 0.98, p = 0.817). On regression analysis, deficiency was associated with increased number of herniations per patient (uOR = 2.17, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.22 to 3.87, p = 0.009; adjusted odds ratio [aOR] = 2.12, 95% CI = 1.11 to 4.03, p = 0.023). When disks were analyzed individually, and levels (e.g., C5 to C6), additionally controlled for, deficiency correlated with greater likelihood of herniation per disk (uOR = 1.81, 95% CI = 1.22 to 2.66, p = 0.003; aOR = 2.06, 95% CI = 1.25 to 3.41, p = 0.005). Conclusion Among adults undergoing spine surgery at our institution, vitamin D deficiency was associated with cervical disk herniation. Considering the current epidemics of vitamin D insufficiency and neck pain, further investigation is warranted, as these data were retrospectively collected and subject to sampling bias. PMID:24436874

  6. Infections of cervical disc space after dental extractions

    PubMed Central

    Feigenbaum, J. A.; Stern, W. E.

    1974-01-01

    Two patients with infections of the cervical intervertebral disc space after dental procedures carried out by the same oral surgeon exhibited similar clinical courses and radiographic appearances. Both had bacteriological confirmation of infection by needle aspiration and were treated with appropriate antibiotics and bracing of the neck. The presumed aetiology and the possible pathogenesis are described. Evidence suggests that the two infections were the result of needle injection of a contaminated solution, the organisms of which haematogenously lodged in the intervertebral discs in the cervical region. Lymph drainage from the gums and teeth is suggested as a possible route of inoculation. Images PMID:4449000

  7. A PHASED REHABILITATION PROTOCOL FOR ATHLETES WITH LUMBAR INTERVERTEBRAL DISC HERNIATION

    PubMed Central

    VanGelder, Leonard H.; Vaughn, Daniel W.

    2013-01-01

    Conservative non-surgical management of a herniated lumbar intervertebral disc (HLD) in athletes is a complex task due to the dramatic forces imparted on the spine during sport participation. The demands placed upon the athlete during rehabilitation and return to sport are unique not only from a sport specific perspective, but also regarding return to the sport strength and conditioning programs utilized for sport preparation. Many prescriptions fail to address postural and motor control faults specific to athletic development, which may prevent full return to sport after suffering a HLD or predispose the athlete to future exacerbations of a HLD. Strength exercises involving squatting, deadlifting, and Olympic power lifts are large components of the typical athlete's conditioning program, therefore some progressions are provided to address potential underlying problems in the athlete's technique that may have contributed to their HLD in the first place. The purpose of this clinical commentary is to propose a framework for rehabilitation that is built around the phases of healing of the disc. Phase I: Non-Rotational/Non-Flexion Phase (Acute Inflammatory Phase), Phase II: Counter rotation/Flexion Phase (Repair Phase), Phase III: Rotational Phase/Power development (Remodeling Phase), and Phase IV: Full return to sport. This clinical commentary provides a theoretical basis for these phases based on available literature as well as reviewing many popular current practice trends in the management of an HLD. The authors recognize the limits of any general exercise rehabilitation recommendation with regard to return to sport, as well as any general strength and conditioning program. It is vital that an individual assessment and prescription is made for every athlete which reviews and addresses movement in all planes of motion under all necessary extrinsic and intrinsic demands to that athlete. Level of Evidence: 5 PMID:24175134

  8. Histopathological Analysis of Ligamentum Flavum in Lumbar Spinal Stenosis and Disc Herniation

    PubMed Central

    Yüksel, Kasım Zafer

    2017-01-01

    Study Design Histopathological analyses were performed in ligamentum flavum (LF) hypertrophy patients with lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS) and lumbar disc herniation (LDH). Purpose The aim of the present study was to evaluate histopathological changes in LF patients with LSS and LDH. Overview of Literature LSS is the most common spinal disorder in elderly patients. This condition causes lower back and leg pain and paresis, and occurs as a result of degenerative changes in the lumbar spine, including bulging of the intervertebral discs, bony proliferation of the facet joints, and LF thickening; among these, LF thickening is considered a major contributor to the development of LSS. Methods A total of 71 patients operated with the surgical indications of LSS and LDH were included. LF samples were obtained from 31 patients who underwent decompressive laminectomy for symptomatic degenerative LSS (stenotic group) and from 40 patients who underwent lumbar discectomy for LDH (discectomy group). LF materials were examined histopathologically, and other specimens were examined for collagen content, elastic fiber number and array, and presence of calcification. Results The stenotic and discectomy groups did not differ with regard to mean collagen concentration or mean elastic fiber number (p=0.430 and p=0.457, respectively). Mean elastic fiber alignment was 2.36±0.99 in the stenotic group and 1.38±0.54 in the discectomy group (p<0.001). Mean calcification was 0.39±0.50 in the stenotic group, whereas calcification was not detected (0.00±0.00) in the discectomy group; a statistically significant difference was detected (p<0.001) between groups. Conclusions LF hypertrophy in spinal stenosis may occur as a result of elastic fiber misalignment along with the development of calcification over time. Further studies determining the pathogenesis of LSS are needed. PMID:28243372

  9. Facet tropism: possible role in the pathology of lumbar disc herniation in adolescents.

    PubMed

    Wang, Honggang; Zhou, Yue

    2016-07-01

    OBJECTIVE The role of facet tropism (FT) in lumbar disc herniation (LDH) is ambiguous. The present study aimed to investigate the association between FT and LDH in adolescents. METHODS This study included 65 adolescents with LDH with 1- or 2-level LDH, or both. Facet angles were measured with MRI. FT was defined as asymmetry of 10° between the left and right side. The same levels of 30 healthy persons who had no lumbar lesions were used as controls. Statistical analysis was performed using the chi-square test. RESULTS FT was identified in 16 of 39 patients with LDH in L4-5 and in 3 of 30 controls (p = 0.006, OR 6.261, 95% CI 1.619-24.217). It was also identified in 12 of 27 patients with LDH in L5-S1 and in 4 of 30 controls (p = 0.017, OR 5.200, 95% CI 1.420-19.039). One patient had LDH in both L4-5 and L5-S1. CONCLUSIONS FT is associated with LDH in both L4-5 and L5-S1 levels in adolescents.

  10. Thoracic Infectious Spondylitis After Surgical Treatments of Herniated Lumbar Intervertebral Disc

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jin-Hyun; Kang, Jung-Il; Kim, Min Jeong; Lee, Jongmin; Lee, In-Sik; Jung, Heeyoune

    2013-01-01

    The postoperative infectious spondylitis has been reported to occur among every 1% to 12%. It is difficult to early diagnose in some cases. If the diagnosis is delayed, it can be a life-threatening condition. We report a 32-year-old male patient with postoperative infectious spondylitis. He had surgical treatments for traumatic intervertebral disc herniations in L3-4 and L4-5. Three weeks after surgery, he complained for fever and paraplegia. Cervicothoracic magnetic resonance imaging showed the collapsed T2 and T3 vertebral body with changes of bone marrow signal intensity. Moreover, it showed anterior and posterior epidural masses causing spinal cord compressions which suggested infectious spondylitis. After the use of antibiotics and surgical decompressions T2-T3, his general conditions were improved and muscle power of lower extremities began to be gradually restored. However, we could not identify the exact organisms that may be the cause of infectious spondylitis. It could be important that the infectious spondylitis, which is presented away from the primary operative level, should be observed in patients with fevers of unknown origin and paraplegia. PMID:24236263

  11. The Factors That Affect Improvement of Neurogenic Bladder by Severe Lumbar Disc Herniation in Operation

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Joon Bok; Kim, Do Keun; Kim, Ji-Yong

    2016-01-01

    Objective This study analyzed retrospectively the bladder function of patients after early surgery for cauda equina syndrome (CES) performed within 24 or 48 hours, or after 48 hours of the onset of autonomic symptoms. Methods We retrospectively reviewed the clinical data of 31 patients after decompression surgery for lumbar disc herniation (LDH) who had been diagnosed with CES between January 2001 and December 2014 at Inha University Hospital. The following factors were assessed to evaluate the influence of time to surgery: bladder function, rectal incontinence, sexual dysfunction, LDH level, and degree of spinal canal compression. Results After decompression, the outcome group was categorized into normal bladder function and abnormal bladder function. The patients operated on within 48 hours showed an improved postoperative outcome. Among 16 patients operated on within 48 hours, 13 (81%) recovered normal bladder function. In contrast, among 15 patients with decompression after 48 hours, 6 (40%) recovered normal bladder function. Among 21 patients with mild bladder dysfunction at admission, 16 (76%) recovered normal bladder function after decompression. Conclusion Our study suggests that patients who have decompression surgery within 48 hours of the onset of bladder dysfunction, improve their chances of recovering bladder function than those who have a late operation (>48 hours). Also, patients with mild bladder dysfunction are more likely to recover bladder function after decompression, than patients with severe bladder dysfunction. PMID:27799991

  12. Clinical usefulness of electrodiagnostic study to predict surgical outcomes in lumbosacral disc herniation or spinal stenosis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jung Hwan; Lee, Sang-Ho

    2015-10-01

    Although surgeries have been performed for the treatment of lumbar disc herniation (LDH) or lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS), not all patients who undergo surgery are satisfied with the outcome. Electrodiagnostic study (EDX) can assess the physiological functions of nerve roots with higher specificity and relate better with clinical manifestations. The purpose of this study was to examine how EDX can predict surgical outcomes in patients with LDH and LSS and to compare the predicted values of EDX with other clinical factors and MRI findings. Patients diagnosed with LDH or LSS without neurological deficits, who underwent EDX before lumbar surgery, were selected and analyzed. Patients were divided into groups of successful and unsuccessful surgical outcomes according to a modified MacNab classification. We obtained pre-operative clinical data, radiological results, and EDX results. Using EDX, radiculopathy was found in 236 patients (52.7%) in the study population. Radiculopathy on EDX was significantly related only to unsuccessful surgical outcomes. The association of spondylolisthesis showed the trends towards unsuccessful surgical outcome, despite statistical insignificance. EDX detected functional abnormalities of nerve roots that did not show clinical manifestation and did not appear compressed on MRI. These abnormalities are important predictive factors for surgical outcomes in patients with LDH or LSS. Therefore, pre-operative EDX is a clinically useful method to predict surgical prognosis.

  13. Dysuria due to discospondylitis and intervertebral disc herniation in a male alpaca (Vicugna pacos).

    PubMed

    Sickinger, Marlene; Hirz, Manuela; Schmidt, Martin J; Reinacher, Manfred

    2016-05-31

    Dysuria in camelids is usually associated with the presence of lower urinary tract disease such as urolithiasis. As another differential diagnosis, urine retention may be caused by neurological disturbances resulting from infections of the spinal cord, discospondylitis or trauma. A 2.5-year-old male Huacaya alpaca (Vicugna pacos) presented with dysuria due to damage of the lumbosacral intumescence of the spinal cord. On presentation the alpaca was recumbent. Clinical examination revealed abdominal pain, oliguria, leucopenia with neutrophilia, and slightly elevated creatinine kinase. Ultrasonography of the abdomen showed an irregularly shaped, dilated urinary bladder with hyperechoic serosa. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed discospondylitis of the fourth and fifth lumbar vertebrae and herniation of the intervertebral disc between these vertebrae and the spinal cord. Postmortem examination confirmed severe chronic purulent discospondylitis with ventral spondylosis and narrowing of the spinal canal. Urolithiasis could not be verified. Although rare, diseases of the spinal cord should be considered as a differential diagnosis for impaired micturition in camelids.

  14. Scoliosis may increase the risk of recurrence of lumbar disc herniation after microdiscectomy.

    PubMed

    Chang, Hsuan-Kan; Chang, Huang-Chou; Wu, Jau-Ching; Tu, Tsung-Hsi; Fay, Li-Yu; Chang, Peng-Yuan; Wu, Ching-Lan; Huang, Wen-Cheng; Cheng, Henrich

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this paper was to investigate the risk of recurrence of lumbar disc herniation (LDH) in patients with scoliosis who underwent microdiscectomy. A series of consecutive patients who underwent microdiscectomy for LDH was retrospectively reviewed. The inclusion criteria were young adults younger than 40 years who received microdiscectomy for symptomatic 1-level LDH. An exclusion criterion was any previous spinal surgery, including fusion or correction of scoliosis. The patients were divided into 2 groups: those with scoliosis and those without scoliosis. The demographic data in the 2 groups were similar. All medical records and clinical and radiological evaluations were reviewed. A total of 58 patients who underwent 1-level microdiscectomy for LDH were analyzed. During the mean follow-up of 24.6 months, 6 patients (10.3%) experienced a recurrence of LDH with variable symptoms. The recurrence rate was significantly higher among the scoliosis group than the nonscoliosis group (33.3% vs. 2.3%, p = 0.001). Furthermore, the recurrence-free interval in the scoliosis group was short. Young adults (< 40 years) with uncorrected scoliosis are at higher risk of recurrent LDH after microdiscectomy.

  15. Three-year postoperative outcomes between MIS and conventional TLIF in1-segment lumbar disc herniation.

    PubMed

    Lv, You; Chen, Jingyang; Chen, Jinchuan; Wu, Yuling; Chen, Xiangyang; Liu, Yi; Chu, Zhaoming; Sheng, Luxin; Qin, Rujie; Chen, Ming

    2017-06-01

    The aim of this study is to assess the long-term clinical and radiological outcomes between minimally invasive (MIS) and conventional transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (TLIF) in treating one-segment lumbar disc herniation (LDH). One-hundred and six patients treated by MIS-TLIF (50 cases) or conventional TLIF (56 cases) were included. Perioperative results were evaluated. Clinical outcomes were compared preoperatively and postoperatively. Radiologic parameters were based on a comparison of preoperative and three-year postoperative lumbar lordosis, segmental lordosis, sacral slope, the cross-sectional area of the paraspinal muscle and fusion rates. MIS TILF had significantly less blood, shorter operation time, mean return to work time and lower intramuscular pressure compared with the conventional group during the operation. VAS scores for lower back pain and ODI in MIS-TLIF were significantly decreased. The mean cross-sectional area of the paraspinal muscle was significantly decreased after surgery in the conventional TLIF group and no significant intragroup differences were established in the MIS-TLIF group. No significant differences were found in fusion rate, lumbar lordosis, segmental lordosis and sacral slope. Both MIS and conventional TLIF were beneficial for patients with LDH. However, MIS-TLIF manifests a great improvement in perioperative outcomes, low back pain, disability and preventing paraspinal muscle atrophy during the follow-up period observation.

  16. Efficacy of Transforaminal Endoscopic Spine System (TESSYS) Technique in Treating Lumbar Disc Herniation.

    PubMed

    Pan, Zhimin; Ha, Yoon; Yi, Seong; Cao, Kai

    2016-02-18

    BACKGROUND To compare efficacy and safety of percutaneous transforaminal endoscopic spine system (TESSYS) and traditional fenestration discectomy (FD) in treatment of lumbar disc herniation (LDH). MATERIAL AND METHODS A total of 106 LDH patients were divided into TESSYS group (n=48) and FD group (n=58). Visual analogue scale (VAS), Oswestry disability index (ODI), Japanese Orthopedic Association (JOA), and modified MacNab criteria were used for efficacy evaluation. Post-operative responses were compared by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) based on detection of serum IL-6, CRP, and CPK levels. RESULTS In the TESSYS group, compared with the FD group, we observed, shorter incision length, less blood loss, shorter hospital stay, lower hospitalization cost, shorter recovery time, lower complication rate (all P<0.001), and lower VAS scores of lumbago and skelalgia at 3 days and 1, 3, and 6 months postoperatively (all P<0.05). At 24 and 48 h postoperatively, CRP level was remarkably higher in the FD group compared to the TESSYS group (P<0.001). Further, comparison of IL-6 levels at 6, 12, 24, and 48 h postoperatively revealed significantly higher levels in the FD group than in the FESSYS group (all P<0.001). CONCLUSIONS TESSYS had clinical advantages over FD and entails less trauma and quicker postoperative recovery, suggesting that TESSYS is well tolerated by patients and is a better approach than FD in surgical treatment of LDH.

  17. The outcome of lumbar disc herniation surgery is worse in old adults than in young adults

    PubMed Central

    Strömqvist, Fredrik; Strömqvist, Björn; Jönsson, Bo; Karlsson, Magnus K

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose The outcome of surgical treatment of lumbar disc herniation (LDH) has been thoroughly evaluated in middle-aged patients, but less so in elderly patients. Patients and methods With validated patient-reported outcome measures (PROMs) and using SweSpine (the national Swedish Spine Surgery Register), we analyzed the preoperative clinical status of LDH patients and the 1-year postoperative outcome of LDH surgery performed over the period 2000–2012. We included 1,250 elderly patients (≥ 65 years of age) and 12,840 young and middle-aged patients (aged 20–64). Results Generally speaking, elderly patients were referred for LDH surgery with worse PROM scores than young and middle-aged patients, they improved less by surgery, they experienced more complications, they had inferior 1-year postoperative PROM scores, and they were less satisfied with the outcome (with all differences being statistically significant). Interpretation Elderly patients appear to have a worse postoperative outcome after LDH surgery than young and middle-aged patients, they are referred to surgery with inferior clinical status, and they improve less after the surgery. PMID:27391663

  18. [ZHENG's gold hook fishing acupuncture for lumbar disc herniation: a clinical observation].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Bowen; Zhang, Xinghua; Sun, Runjie; Qin, Xiaoguang

    2016-04-01

    To compare the clinical efficacy differences between Zheng's gold hook, fishing acupuncture and electroacupuncture (EA) for lumbar disc herniation (LDH). Sixty patients of LDH were randomly allocated to a gold hook fishing acupuncture group and an EA group, 30 cases in each one. Lumbar Jiaji (EX-1 B 2), Yaoyangguan (GV 3), Shenshu (BL 23), Dachangshu (BL 25), Guanyuanshu (BL 26) and ashi points were selected in the gold hook fishing acupuncture group; after the needles were inserted, the manipulation of gold hook fishing acupuncture was applied at tendon junction points and ashi points. The identical acupoints were selected in the EA group and patients were treated with EA. The treatment was both given once a day; ten days of treatment were taken as one session, and totally 3 sessions were given. The clinical effective rate, visual analogue scale (VAS), low back pain score and Oswestry disability index (ODI) were used for efficacy evaluation. The effective rate was 93.3% (28/30) in the gold hook fishing acupuncture group, which was superior to 86.7% (26/30) in the EA group (P < 0.05). The VAS, low back pain score and ODI were both significantly improved after treatment (all P < 0.05), which were more significant in the gold hook fishing acupuncture group (all P < 0.05). ZHENG's gold hook fishing acupuncture could effectively improve the symptoms and sings of LDH, reduce the disability index and improve the quality of life, which is superior to EA.

  19. Brain herniation

    MedlinePlus

    ... herniation; Uncal herniation; Subfalcine herniation; Tonsillar herniation; Herniation - brain ... Brain herniation occurs when something inside the skull produces pressure that moves brain tissues. This is most ...

  20. Cervical disc replacement - emerging equivalency to anterior cervical discectomy and fusion.

    PubMed

    Buckland, Aaron J; Baker, Joseph F; Roach, Ryan P; Spivak, Jeffrey M

    2016-06-01

    Cervical disc replacement has become an acceptable alternative to anterior cervical fusion for the surgical treatment of cervical spine spondylosis resulting in radiculopathy or myelopathy following anterior discectomy and decompression. This concise overview considers the current state of knowledge regarding the continued debate of the role of cervical disc replacement with an update in light of the latest clinical trial results. A literature review was performed identifying clinical trials pertaining to the use of cervical disc replacement compared to cervical discectomy and fusion. Single level disease and two level disease were considered. Outcome data from the major clinical trials was reviewed and salient points identified. With lengthier follow-up data becoming available, the equivalence of CDR in appropriately selected cases is becoming clear. This is chiefly manifested by reduced re-operation rates and reduced incidence of adjacent level disease in those treated with arthroplasty. Cervical disc replacement shows emerging equivalence in outcomes compared to the gold standard anterior cervical discectomy and fusion. Further longer term results are anticipated to confirm this trend.

  1. Fatigue responses of the human cervical spine intervertebral discs.

    PubMed

    Yoganandan, Narayan; Umale, Sagar; Stemper, Brain; Snyder, Bryan

    2017-05-01

    Numerous studies have been conducted since more than fifty years to understand the behavior of the human lumbar spine under fatigue loading. Applications have been largely driven by low back pain and human body vibration problems. The human neck also sustains fatigue loading in certain type of civilian occupational and military operational activities, and research is very limited in this area. Being a visco-elastic structure, it is important to determine the stress-relaxation properties of the human cervical spine intervertebral discs to enable accurate simulations of these structures in stress-analysis models. While finite element models have the ability to incorporate viscoelastic material definitions, data specific to the cervical spine are limited. The present study was conducted to determine these properties and understand the responses of the human lower cervical spine discs under large number of cyclic loads in the axial compression mode. Eight disc segments consisting of the adjacent vertebral bodies along with the longitudinal ligaments were subjected to compression, followed by 10,000 cycles of loading at 2 or 4Hz frequency by limiting the axial load to approximately 150 N, and subsequent to resting period, subjected to compression to extract the stress-relaxation properties using the quasi-linear viscoelastic (QLV) material model. The coefficients of the model and disc displacements as a function of cycles and loading frequency are presented. The disc responses demonstrated a plateauing effect after the first 2000 to 4000 cycles, which were highly nonlinear. The paper compares these responses with the "work hardening" phenomenon proposed in clinical literature for the lumbar spine to explain the fatigue behavior of the discs. The quantitative results in terms of QLV coefficients can serve as inputs to complex finite element models of the cervical spine to delineate the local and internal load-sharing responses of the disc segment. Published by Elsevier

  2. Minimally invasive surgical procedures for the treatment of lumbar disc herniation

    PubMed Central

    Lühmann, Dagmar; Burkhardt-Hammer, Tatjana; Borowski, Cathleen; Raspe, Heiner

    2005-01-01

    Introduction In up to 30% of patients undergoing lumbar disc surgery for herniated or protruded discs outcomes are judged unfavourable. Over the last decades this problem has stimulated the development of a number of minimally-invasive operative procedures. The aim is to relieve pressure from compromised nerve roots by mechanically removing, dissolving or evaporating disc material while leaving bony structures and surrounding tissues as intact as possible. In Germany, there is hardly any utilisation data for these new procedures – data files from the statutory health insurances demonstrate that about 5% of all lumbar disc surgeries are performed using minimally-invasive techniques. Their real proportion is thought to be much higher because many procedures are offered by private hospitals and surgeries and are paid by private health insurers or patients themselves. So far no comprehensive assessment comparing efficacy, safety, effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of minimally-invasive lumbar disc surgery to standard procedures (microdiscectomy, open discectomy) which could serve as a basis for coverage decisions, has been published in Germany. Objective Against this background the aim of the following assessment is: Based on published scientific literature assess safety, efficacy and effectiveness of minimally-invasive lumbar disc surgery compared to standard procedures. To identify and critically appraise studies comparing costs and cost-effectiveness of minimally-invasive procedures to that of standard procedures. If necessary identify research and evaluation needs and point out regulative needs within the German health care system. The assessment focusses on procedures that are used in elective lumbar disc surgery as alternative treatment options to microdiscectomy or open discectomy. Chemonucleolysis, percutaneous manual discectomy, automated percutaneous lumbar discectomy, laserdiscectomy and endoscopic procedures accessing the disc by a posterolateral or

  3. Comparison of cervical disc arthroplasty with anterior cervical discectomy and fusion for the treatment of cervical spondylotic myelopathy.

    PubMed

    Ding, Chen; Hong, Ying; Liu, Hao; Shi, Rui; Song, Yueming; Li, Tao

    2013-06-01

    The clinical outcome of cervical disc arthroplasty for cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM) is still controversial. The authors retrospectively compared the intermediate term clinical outcome of cervical disc arthroplasty and traditional anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF). Seventy-six cases of single-level CSM with a minimum follow-up of two years were retrospectively analyzed. Thirty-seven patients underwent single-level cervical disc arthroplasty (Bryan disc: 12 cases; Prestige LP disc: 25 cases), while the other 39 patients underwent single-level ACDF. Significant improvement in SF-36 physical/ mental component scores and NDI score was found in both groups (p < 0.05); however, the arthroplasty group had significantly greater score improvement at each follow-up time point (p < 0.05). The JOA score and Nurick grade improved significantly at each time point in both groups (p < 0.05), but there were no significant differences between the groups (p > 0.05). The range of motion (surgical level and C2C7) remained unchanged in the arthroplasty group (p > 0.05), whereas it decreased significantly in the ACDF group (p < 0.05). The arthroplasty group had a lower incidence of complications than the ACDF group. The intermediate outcomes of cervical disc arthroplasty compared favourably to those of ACDF. Arthroplasty avoids complications from spinal fusion by preserving mobility.

  4. Use of Temporary Implantable Biomaterials to Reduce Leg Pain and Back Pain in Patients with Sciatica and Lumbar Disc Herniation

    PubMed Central

    diZerega, Gere S.; Traylor, Melissa M.; Alphonso, Lisa S.; Falcone, Samuel J.

    2010-01-01

    The principle etiology of leg pain (sciatica) from lumbar disc herniation is mechanical compression of the nerve root. Sciatica is reduced by decompression of the herniated disc, i.e., removing mechanical compression of the nerve root. Decompression surgery typically reduces sciatica more than lumbar back pain (LBP). Decompression surgery reduces mechanical compression of the nerve root. However, decompression surgery does not directly reduce sensitization of the sensory nerves in the epidural space and disc. In addition, sensory nerves in the annulus fibrosus and epidural space are not protected from topical interaction with pain mediators induced by decompression surgery. The secondary etiology of sciatica from lumbar disc herniation is sensitization of the nerve root. Sensitization of the nerve root results from a) mechanical compression, b) exposure to cellular pain mediators, and/or c) exposure to biochemical pain mediators. Although decompression surgery reduces nerve root compression, sensory nerve sensitization often persists. These observations are consistent with continued exposure of tissue in the epidural space, including the nerve root, to increased cellular and biochemical pain mediators following surgery. A potential contributor to lumbar back pain (LBP) is stimulation of sensory nerves in the annulus fibrosus by a) cellular pain mediators and/or b) biochemical pain mediators that accompany annular tears or disruption. Sensory fibers located in the outer one-third of the annulus fibrosus increase in number and depth as a result of disc herniation. The nucleus pulposus is comprised of material that can produce an autoimmune stimulation of the sensory nerves located in the annulus and epidural space leading to LBP. The sensory nerves of the annulus fibrosus and epidural space may be sensitized by topical exposure to cellular and biochemical pain mediators induced by lumbar surgery. Annulotomy or annular rupture allows the nucleus pulposus topical

  5. [Influence of intraoperative cervical posture in single segmental cervical disc replacement on restoration of cervical curve in neutral position].

    PubMed

    Hong, Ying; Deng, Yuxiao; Liu, Hao; Gong, Renrong; An, Lingjing; Gong, Quan; Li, Tao; Song, Yueming

    2013-01-01

    To study the correlation between the cervical posture in the cervical disc replacement (CDR). Between January 2008 and August 2010, 51 and the cervical curve restoration in neutral position after surgery. patients underwent single segmental PRESTIGE LP replacement, and the clinical data were retrospectively analyzed. During the surgery, the patient was supinely placed and the lordosis of the cervical spine was mantained with a pillow placed beneath the neck. Of them, 28 were male and 23 were female, aged 30-64 years (mean, 45 years); 32 were diagnosed as having cervical spondylotic myelopathy, 7 having radiculopathy, and 12 having myelopathy and radiculopathy. The disease duration was 3-48 months (mean, 15 months). CDR was performed at C(4, 5) in 5 cases, at C(5, 6) in 42 cases, and at C(6, 7) in 4 cases. The Cobb angles of the cervical alignment, targeted functional spinal unit (FSU), and targeted disc were measured by sagittal X-ray film of the cervical spine in neutral position before and after surgery, as well as the intraoperative C-arm fluroscopy of the cervical spine. Linear correlation and regression were performed to analyze the relation between cervical Cobb angle difference at intraoperation and improvement of the Cobb angles at 3 months after operation. The cervical Cobb angles at intraoperation and 3 months after operation were larger than those at preoperation (P < 0.05). The difference of the Cobb angle between intra- and pre-operation was (6.72 +/- 9.13) degrees on cervical alignment, (2.10 +/- 5.12) degrees on targeted FSU, and (3.33 +/- 3.75) degrees on targeted disc. At 3 months after operation, the Cobb angle improvement of the cervical alignment, targeted FSU, and targeted disc was (6.30 +/- 7.28), (3.99 +/- 5.37), and (4.29 +/- 5.36) degrees, respectively. There was no significant difference in the Cobb angle improvement between the targeted FSU and the targeted disc (t = -4.391, P = 0.698), and between the targeted disc and the cervical

  6. Nuclear factor-kappa B decoy suppresses nerve injury and improves mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia in a rat lumbar disc herniation model

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Munetaka; Inoue, Gen; Gemba, Takefumi; Watanabe, Tomoko; Ito, Toshinori; Koshi, Takana; Yamauchi, Kazuyo; Yamashita, Masaomi; Orita, Sumihisa; Eguchi, Yawara; Ochiai, Nobuyasu; Kishida, Shunji; Takaso, Masashi; Aoki, Yasuchika; Takahashi, Kazuhisa

    2009-01-01

    Nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) is a gene transcriptional regulator of inflammatory cytokines. We investigated the transduction efficiency of NF-κB decoy to dorsal root ganglion (DRG), as well as the decrease in nerve injury, mechanical allodynia, and thermal hyperalgesia in a rat lumbar disc herniation model. Forty rats were used in this study. NF-κB decoy–fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) was injected intrathecally at the L5 level in five rats, and its transduction efficiency into DRG measured. In another 30 rats, mechanical pressure was placed on the DRG at the L5 level and nucleus pulposus harvested from the rat coccygeal disc was transplanted on the DRG. Rats were classified into three groups of ten animals each: a herniation + decoy group, a herniation + oligo group, and a herniation only group. For behavioral testing, mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia were evaluated. In 15 of the herniation rats, their left L5 DRGs were resected, and the expression of activating transcription factor 3 (ATF-3) and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) was evaluated immunohistochemically compared to five controls. The total transduction efficiency of NF-κB decoy–FITC in DRG neurons was 10.8% in vivo. The expression of CGRP and ATF-3 was significantly lower in the herniation + decoy group than in the other herniation groups. Mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia were significantly suppressed in the herniation + decoy group. NF-κB decoy was transduced into DRGs in vivo. NF-κB decoy may be useful as a target for clarifying the mechanism of sciatica caused by lumbar disc herniation. PMID:19308465

  7. Nuclear factor-kappa B decoy suppresses nerve injury and improves mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia in a rat lumbar disc herniation model.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Munetaka; Inoue, Gen; Gemba, Takefumi; Watanabe, Tomoko; Ito, Toshinori; Koshi, Takana; Yamauchi, Kazuyo; Yamashita, Masaomi; Orita, Sumihisa; Eguchi, Yawara; Ochiai, Nobuyasu; Kishida, Shunji; Takaso, Masashi; Aoki, Yasuchika; Takahashi, Kazuhisa; Ohtori, Seiji

    2009-07-01

    Nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-kappaB) is a gene transcriptional regulator of inflammatory cytokines. We investigated the transduction efficiency of NF-kappaB decoy to dorsal root ganglion (DRG), as well as the decrease in nerve injury, mechanical allodynia, and thermal hyperalgesia in a rat lumbar disc herniation model. Forty rats were used in this study. NF-kappaB decoy-fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) was injected intrathecally at the L5 level in five rats, and its transduction efficiency into DRG measured. In another 30 rats, mechanical pressure was placed on the DRG at the L5 level and nucleus pulposus harvested from the rat coccygeal disc was transplanted on the DRG. Rats were classified into three groups of ten animals each: a herniation + decoy group, a herniation + oligo group, and a herniation only group. For behavioral testing, mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia were evaluated. In 15 of the herniation rats, their left L5 DRGs were resected, and the expression of activating transcription factor 3 (ATF-3) and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) was evaluated immunohistochemically compared to five controls. The total transduction efficiency of NF-kappaB decoy-FITC in DRG neurons was 10.8% in vivo. The expression of CGRP and ATF-3 was significantly lower in the herniation + decoy group than in the other herniation groups. Mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia were significantly suppressed in the herniation + decoy group. NF-kappaB decoy was transduced into DRGs in vivo. NF-kappaB decoy may be useful as a target for clarifying the mechanism of sciatica caused by lumbar disc herniation.

  8. Posterior Epidural Migration of Sequestrated Cervical Disc Fragment: Case Series

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Gopalan Senthil; Mahesha, Kanthila Bhat

    2011-01-01

    Study Design A retrospective study was undertaken to delineate the characteristics of non-traumatic sequestrated epidurally migrated cervical disc prolapse. Purpose To present first case series of eight such cases diagnosed preoperatively and to discuss their magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) characteristics and their management. Overview of Literature Non-traumatic spontaneous migration of the sequestrated disc fragment epidurally behind cervical vertebral body is rare. Only ten cases have been reported in literature. Methods Detailed clinico-radiological profiles of these 8 cases are presented. In six cases their clinical picture was suggestive of cervical myelopathy. MRI scan showed single level epidural migrated disc behind body of C4, C6, and C7 in six patients and two cases with multiple levels (C5-C6). In six cases, anterior corpectomy with excision of the disc was performed and the seventh patient underwent dorsal laminectomy. The eighth patient chose not to undergo surgery. Results T1 images of the MRI scan showed an isointense signal in all the 8 cases. T2 images revealed a varying intensity. In six cases who underwent anterior corpectomy, there was a rent in the posterior longitudinal ligament. Among those in two cases multiple disc fragments were seen. In the rest four cases, a single large fragment was observed. These patients improved after anterior corpectomy and disc excision. There was no improvement in the patient who had undergone dorsal laminectomy. The eighth patient who refused surgery progressively deteriorated. Conclusions We opine that MRI scan especially T1 images are useful in these cases. We prefer to treat these cases through anterior corpectomy with excision of the sequestrated disc which proved to result in excellent outcome. PMID:22164316

  9. Posterior epidural migration of sequestrated cervical disc fragment: case series.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, Uddanapalli Sreeramulu; Kumar, Gopalan Senthil; Mahesha, Kanthila Bhat

    2011-12-01

    A retrospective study was undertaken to delineate the characteristics of non-traumatic sequestrated epidurally migrated cervical disc prolapse. To present first case series of eight such cases diagnosed preoperatively and to discuss their magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) characteristics and their management. Non-traumatic spontaneous migration of the sequestrated disc fragment epidurally behind cervical vertebral body is rare. Only ten cases have been reported in literature. Detailed clinico-radiological profiles of these 8 cases are presented. In six cases their clinical picture was suggestive of cervical myelopathy. MRI scan showed single level epidural migrated disc behind body of C4, C6, and C7 in six patients and two cases with multiple levels (C5-C6). In six cases, anterior corpectomy with excision of the disc was performed and the seventh patient underwent dorsal laminectomy. The eighth patient chose not to undergo surgery. T1 images of the MRI scan showed an isointense signal in all the 8 cases. T2 images revealed a varying intensity. In six cases who underwent anterior corpectomy, there was a rent in the posterior longitudinal ligament. Among those in two cases multiple disc fragments were seen. In the rest four cases, a single large fragment was observed. These patients improved after anterior corpectomy and disc excision. There was no improvement in the patient who had undergone dorsal laminectomy. The eighth patient who refused surgery progressively deteriorated. We opine that MRI scan especially T1 images are useful in these cases. We prefer to treat these cases through anterior corpectomy with excision of the sequestrated disc which proved to result in excellent outcome.

  10. Chiropractic spinal manipulation and the risk for acute lumbar disc herniation: a belief elicitation study.

    PubMed

    Hincapié, Cesar A; Cassidy, J David; Côté, Pierre; Rampersaud, Y Raja; Jadad, Alejandro R; Tomlinson, George A

    2017-09-18

    Chiropractic spinal manipulation treatment (SMT) is common for back pain and has been reported to increase the risk for lumbar disc herniation (LDH), but there is no high quality evidence about this. In the absence of good evidence, clinicians can have knowledge and beliefs about the risk. Our purpose was to determine clinicians' beliefs regarding the risk for acute LDH associated with chiropractic SMT. Using a belief elicitation design, 47 clinicians (16 chiropractors, 15 family physicians and 16 spine surgeons) that treat patients with back pain from primary and tertiary care practices were interviewed. Participants' elicited incidence estimates of acute LDH among a hypothetical group of patients with acute low back pain treated with and without chiropractic SMT, were used to derive the probability distribution for the relative risk (RR) for acute LDH associated with chiropractic SMT. Chiropractors expressed the most optimistic belief (median RR 0.56; IQR 0.39-1.03); family physicians expressed a neutral belief (median RR 0.97; IQR 0.64-1.21); and spine surgeons expressed a slightly more pessimistic belief (median RR 1.07; IQR 0.95-1.29). Clinicians with the most optimistic views believed that chiropractic SMT reduces the incidence of acute LDH by about 60% (median RR 0.42; IQR 0.29-0.53). Those with the most pessimistic views believed that chiropractic SMT increases the incidence of acute LDH by about 30% (median RR 1.29; IQR 1.11-1.59). Clinicians' beliefs about the risk for acute LDH associated with chiropractic SMT varied systematically across professions, in spite of a lack of scientific evidence to inform these beliefs. These probability distributions can serve as prior probabilities in future Bayesian analyses of this relationship.

  11. Correlative analyses of isolated upper lumbar disc herniation and adjacent wedge-shaped vertebrae

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jia-Xin; Yang, Si-Dong; Wang, Bao-Lin; Yang, Da-Long; Ding, Wen-Yuan; Shen, Yong

    2015-01-01

    Background: Upper lumbar disc herniation (ULDH) is easy to be misdiagnosed due to its special anatomical and atypical clinical features. Few studies have identified the relationship between ULDH and adjacent wedge-shaped vertebrae (WSV). Hypothesis: WSV may have some indicative relations withULDH. Patients and methods: Between January 2003 and October 2013, 47 patients (27 males and 20 females; mean age, 41.2 years) with single-level ULDH (as study group) and 47 sex- and age-matched healthy volunteers (as control group) were studied by radiograph. The two groups were compared with respect to age, sexual proportion, body mass index (BMI), kyphotic angle, and the proportion of WSV. Also, correlative analyses were conducted in the study group to investigate the relation between the kyphotic angle of target vertebrae and other factors including age, BMI, Cobb angle, JOA score and bone mineral density (BMD). Results: The average kyphotic angle in the study group was 11° (4°-22°), while the average kyphotic angle in the control group was 2° (0°-7°). Obviously, the mean kyphotic angle in the study group was statistically larger than that in the control group (t=13.797, P<0.001). The proportion of WSV in the study group was significantly larger than that in the control group (x2=36.380, P<0.0001). The correlations between kyphotic angles and other items (i.e., age, BMI, BMD, Cobb angle and JOA score) in the study group and the control group were low or uncorrelated. Conclusions: WSV are indicatively associated with adjacent ULDH. Thus, ULDH should be alerted when WSV are first found in radiograph and accompanied by clinical symptoms. PMID:25785106

  12. Improvement of sensory function after sequestrectomy for lumbar disc herniation: a prospective clinical study using quantitative sensory testing.

    PubMed

    Tschugg, Anja; Lener, Sara; Hartmann, Sebastian; Neururer, Sabrina; Wildauer, Matthias; Thomé, Claudius; Löscher, Wolfgang N

    2016-11-01

    Previous studies have investigated sensory recovery in patients with lumbar disc herniation using rather subjective methods. There have been no reports on changes of sensory function in patients suffering from a preoperative sensory deficit using quantitative sensory testing (QST). The aims of this prospective study were (1) to assess the recovery of preoperative sensory dysfunction after lumbar sequestrectomy and (2) to quantify the strength of relationship between a sensory deficit and the patient's quality of life. We applied the QST protocol of the German Research Network on Neuropathic Pain (DFNS) in fifty-two patients with a single lumbar disc herniation confirmed on MRI treated by lumbar sequestrectomy. Further evaluation included a detailed medical history, a physical examination, numeric rating scale for leg, EQ-5D questionnaire, and thermometer. Disc surgery resulted in a significant reduction of leg pain and a significant gain of quality of life. Thermal, mechanical, and vibration perception thresholds showed an obvious side-to-side difference preoperatively (p < 0.005). An early recovery of mechanical and vibration perception thresholds was detected, whereas cold perception needed more than 6 months to recover (p < 0.05). Quality of life was independent from perception thresholds, but correlated significantly with pain reduction. Our data clearly show that there is a subjective and quantifiable improvement in sensory dysfunction postoperatively. The current data suggest that a sensory dysfunction does not influence a patient's quality of life.

  13. Early neuromuscular customized training after surgery for lumbar disc herniation: a prospective controlled study

    PubMed Central

    Strömqvist, Björn

    2006-01-01

    A prospective and controlled study of training after surgery for lumbar disc herniation (LDH). The objective was to determine the effect of early neuromuscular customized training after LDH surgery. No consensus exists on the type and timing of physical rehabilitation after LDH surgery. Patients aged 15–50 years, disc prolapse at L4–L5 or L5–S1. Before surgery, at 6 weeks, 4, and 12 months postoperatively, the following evaluations were performed: low back pain and leg pain estimated on a visual analog scale, disability according to the Roland–Morris questionnaire (RMQ) and disability rating index (DRI). Clinical examination, including the SLR test, was performed using a single blind method. Consumption of analgesics was registered. Twenty-five patients started neuromuscular customized training 2 weeks after surgery (early training group=ETG). Thirty-one patients formed a control group (CG) and started traditional training after 6 weeks. There was no significant difference in pain and disability between the two training groups before surgery. Median preoperative leg pain was 63 mm in ETG and 70 mm in the CG. Preoperative median disability according to RMQ was 14 in the ETG and 14.5 in the CG. Disability according to DRI (33/56 patients) was 5.3 in the ETG vs. 4.6 in the CG. At 6 weeks, 4 months, and 12 months, pain was significantly reduced in both groups, to the same extent. Disability scores were lower in the ETG at all follow-ups, and after 12 months, the difference was significant (RMQ P=.034, DRI P=.015). The results of the present study show early neuromuscular customized training to have a superior effect on disability, with a significant difference compared to traditional training at a follow-up 12 months after surgery. No adverse effects of the early training were seen. A prospective, randomized study with a larger patient sample is warranted to ultimately demonstrate that early training as described is beneficial for patients undergoing LDH

  14. Clinical diagnosis of upper lumbar disc herniation: Pain and/or numbness distribution are more useful for appropriate level diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Kido, Tadato; Okuyama, Koichiro; Chiba, Mitsuho; Sasaki, Hiroshi; Seki, Nobutoshi; Kamo, Keiji; Miyakoshi, Naohisa; Shimada, Yoichi

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of this study is to disclose the characteristic symptoms and signs in L2, L3 and L4 nerve root disturbance. Fifty eight patients who underwent lateral herniotomy were analyzed. Breakdowns are 15 patients with L2/3 lateral disc herniation (group A), 20 patients with L3/4 lateral disc herniation (group B), and 23 patients with L4/5 lateral disc herniation (group C). The following items were examined: 1) localization of the subjective pain and numbness, 2) objective neurological findings, including deep tendon reflex, manual muscle strength (MMT), straight leg raising test (SLRT) and femoral nerve stretch test (FNST). In group A, subjective pain and/or numbness was present in the thigh aspect, proximal to the knee joint in all patients. In group B, 80% of the patients had subjective pain and/or numbness in the medial site of the knee joint. In group C, the subjective pain and/or numbness was localized in various aspects of the lower extremity. Weakness in the iliopsoas, the femoral quadriceps, and the anterior tibial muscle were observed in 60-95%, 27-70%, 0-43% of three groups, respectively. Depression or absence of the patella tendon reflex was present in 27-100% of three groups. SLRT and FNST were positive in 13-87% and 91-95% of three groups. Symptomatic levels of nerve root disturbance in the upper lumbar spine could not be accurately identified by objective neurological findings alone. Pain and/or numbness localized in the thigh area proximal to the knee joint is a specific sign of L2 nerve root disturbance. Either subjective pain or numbness in the medial knee joint aspect is another key sign which strongly suggests L3 nerve root disturbance. Copyright © 2016 The Japanese Orthopaedic Association. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Fluoroscopic caudal epidural injections in managing chronic axial low back pain without disc herniation, radiculitis, or facet joint pain

    PubMed Central

    Manchikanti, Laxmaiah; Cash, Kimberly A; McManus, Carla D; Pampati, Vidyasagar

    2012-01-01

    Background Chronic low back pain without disc herniation is common. Various modalities of treatments are utilized in managing this condition, including epidural injections. However, there is continued debate on the effectiveness, indications, and medical necessity of any treatment modality utilized for managing axial or discogenic pain, including epidural injections. Methods A randomized, double-blind, actively controlled trial was conducted. The objective was to evaluate the ability to assess the effectiveness of caudal epidural injections of local anesthetic with or without steroids for managing chronic low back pain not caused by disc herniation, radiculitis, facet joints, or sacroiliac joints. A total of 120 patients were randomized to two groups; one group did not receive steroids (group 1) and the other group did (group 2). There were 60 patients in each group. The primary outcome measure was at least 50% improvement in Numeric Rating Scale and Oswestry Disability Index. Secondary outcome measures were employment status and opioid intake. These measures were assessed at 3, 6, 12, 18, and 24 months after treatment. Results Significant pain relief and functional status improvement (primary outcome) defined as a 50% or more reduction in scores from baseline, were observed in 54% of patients in group 1 and 60% of patients in group 2 at 24 months. In contrast, 84% of patients in group 1 and 73% in group 2 saw significant pain relief and functional status improvement in the successful groups at 24 months. Conclusion Caudal epidural injections of local anesthetic with or without steroids are effective in patients with chronic axial low back pain of discogenic origin without facet joint pain, disc herniation, and/or radiculitis. PMID:23091395

  16. Incidence of Low Back Pain After Lumbar Discectomy for Herniated Disc and Its Effect on Patient-reported Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Parker, Scott L; Mendenhall, Stephen K; Godil, Saniya S; Sivasubramanian, Priya; Cahill, Kevin; Ziewacz, John; McGirt, Matthew J

    2015-06-01

    Long-term postdiscectomy degenerative disc disease and low back pain is a well-recognized disorder; however, its patient-centered characterization and quantification are lacking. We performed a systematic literature review and prospective longitudinal study to determine the frequency of recurrent back pain after discectomy and quantify its effect on patient-reported outcomes (PROs). A MEDLINE search was performed to identify studies reporting on the frequency of recurrent back pain, same-level recurrent disc herniation, and reoperation after primary lumbar discectomy. After excluding studies that did not report the percentage of patients with persistent back or leg pain more than 6 months after discectomy or did not report the rate of same level recurrent herniation, 90 studies, which in aggregate had evaluated 21,180 patients, were included in the systematic review portion of this study. For the longitudinal study, all patients undergoing primary lumbar discectomy between October 2010 and March 2013 were enrolled into our prospective spine registry. One hundred fifteen patients were more than 12 months out from surgery, 103 (90%) of whom were available for 1-year outcomes assessment. PROs were prospectively assessed at baseline, 3 months, 1 year, and 2 years. The threshold of deterioration used to classify recurrent back pain was the minimum clinically important difference in back pain (Numeric Rating Scale Back Pain [NRS-BP]) or Disability (Oswestry Disability Index [ODI]), which were 2.5 of 10 points and 20 of 100 points, respectively. The proportion of patients reporting short-term (6-24 months) and long-term (> 24 months) recurrent back pain ranged from 3% to 34% and 5% to 36%, respectively. The 2-year incidence of recurrent disc herniation ranged from 0% to 23% and the frequency of reoperation ranged from 0% to 13%. At 1-year and 2-year followup, 22% and 26% patients reported worsening of low back pain (NRS: 5.3 ± 2.5 versus 2.7 ± 2.8, p < 0

  17. Translaminar Microendoscopic Herniotomy for Cranially Migrated Lumbar Disc Herniations Encroaching on the Exiting Nerve Root in the Preforaminal and Foraminal Zones

    PubMed Central

    Tono, Osamu; Senba, Hideyuki; Kitamura, Takahiro; Komiya, Norihiro; Oga, Masayoshi; Shidahara, Satoshi

    2013-01-01

    Study Design Case series. Purpose The aim of this study was to describe translaminar microendoscopic herniotomy (TL-MEH) for cranially migrated lumbar disc herniations encroaching on the exiting nerve root in the preforaminal and foraminal zones and to report preliminary results of the procedure. Overview of Literature Conventional interlaminar approaches for preforaminal and foraminal lumbar disc herniations result in extensive removal of the lamina and facet joint to remove disc fragments safely. More destructive approaches increase the risk of postoperative segmental instability. Methods TL-MEH is a minimally invasive procedure for herniotomy via the translaminar approach using a microendoscopic technique. TL-MEH was performed in seven patients with a cranially migrated lumbar disc herniation encroaching on the exiting nerve root. The disc fragments were located in the preforaminal zone in four patients, and in the preforaminal and foraminal zones in three. Results All patients experienced immediate relief from symptoms after surgery and satisfactory results at the final follow-up. Surgical complications, such as a dural tear, nerve injury, and surgical site infection, were not investigated. Conclusions TL-MEH seemed to be an effective and safe alternative minimally invasive surgical option for patients with a cranially migrated lumbar disc herniation encroaching the exiting nerve root in the preforaminal and foraminal zones. PMID:24066214

  18. Cost-effectiveness of microendoscopic discectomy versus conventional open discectomy in the treatment of lumbar disc herniation: a prospective randomised controlled trial [ISRCTN51857546

    PubMed Central

    Arts, Mark P; Peul, Wilco C; Brand, Ronald; Koes, Bart W; Thomeer, Ralph TWM

    2006-01-01

    Background Open discectomy is the standard surgical procedure in the treatment of patients with long-lasting sciatica caused by lumbar disc herniation. Minimally invasive approaches such as microendoscopic discectomy have gained attention in recent years. Reduced tissue trauma allows early ambulation, short hospital stay and quick resumption of daily activities. A comparative cost-effectiveness study has not been performed yet. We present the design of a randomised controlled trial on cost-effectiveness of microendoscopic discectomy versus conventional open discectomy in patients with lumbar disc herniation. Methods/Design Patients (age 18–70 years) presenting with sciatica due to lumbar disc herniation lasting more than 6–8 weeks are included. Patients with disc herniation larger than 1/3 of the spinal canal diameter, or disc herniation less than 1/3 of the spinal canal diameter with concomitant lateral recess stenosis or sequestration, are eliglible for participation. Randomisation into microendoscopic discectomy or conventional unilateral transflaval discectomy will take place in the operating room after induction of anesthesia. The length of skin incision is equal in both groups. The primary outcome measure is the functional assessment of the patient, measured by the Roland Disability Questionnaire for Sciatica, at 8 weeks and 1 year after surgery. We will also evaluate several other outcome parameters, including perceived recovery, leg and back pain, incidence of re-operations, complications, serum creatine kinase, quality of life, medical consumption, absenteeism and costs. The study is a randomised prospective multi-institutional trial, in which two surgical techniques are compared in a parallel group design. Patients and research nurses are kept blinded of the allocated treatment during the follow-up period of 2 years. Discussion Currently, open discectomy is the golden standard in the surgical treatment of lumbar disc herniation. Whether

  19. 1995 Volvo Award in clinical sciences. The diagnostic accuracy of magnetic resonance imaging, work perception, and psychosocial factors in identifying symptomatic disc herniations.

    PubMed

    Boos, N; Rieder, R; Schade, V; Spratt, K F; Semmer, N; Aebi, M

    1995-12-15

    This was a prospective study of patients (study group) with symptomatic disc herniations and asymptomatic volunteers (control group) matched for age, sex, and work-related risk factors. To determine the prevalence of disc herniation in a matched group of asymptomatic volunteers and to access the diagnostic accuracy of magnetic resonance imaging, work perception, and psychosocial factors in identifying symptomatic disc herniations. Disc herniations have been reported to occur in 20-36% of asymptomatic volunteers. A valid comparison of asymptomatic individuals and patients with disc herniations has not been performed. Forty-six patients with low back pain and sciatica severe enough to require a discectomy were compared with 46 age-, sex-, and risk factor-matched (heavy lifting, twisting and bending, vibration, and sedentary activity) asymptomatic volunteers. Both groups had a complete clinical and magnetic resonance imaging examination and completed a questionnaire to assess differences in the psychosocial and work perception profiles. The prevalence and the severity of morphologic alterations (disc herniation, disc degeneration, and neural compromise) was analyzed by tow independent radiologists in a blinded fashion. Differences between both groups regarding MRI findings, work perception (occupational mental stress, intensity of concentration, job satisfaction, and job-related resignation) and psychosocial factors (anxiety, depression, self-control, social support, and marital status) were compared using multivariate techniques. Stepwise discriminating analysis was used to identify the best discriminating variables within the magnetic resonance image, work perception, and psychosocial categories in terms of the diagnostic accuracy to predict group membership (study [pain] or control [no pain] group). Matched controls had significantly more risk factors than a group of normal individuals. The present study has presented evidence that an age-, gender-, and

  20. [Traumatic cervical disc prolapse with severe neurological impact].

    PubMed

    Knudsen, Roland; Gundtoft, Per

    2014-12-15

    A 51-year-old male drove into a ditch on his scooter. Immediately after the trauma the patient complained of neck pain and decreased ability to feel and move his extremities. An initial trauma computed tomography (CT) of the columna showed normal conditions. Because the patient had neurological deficiencies, magnetic resonance imaging of the columna was performed 12 days later, and a disc prolapse at the C3/C4 level with spinal cord compression was visible. Despite decompression the patient did not recover. Traumatic cervical disc prolapse is a rare and positionally dangerous condition, which can be present despite a CT showing normal conditions.

  1. Hybrid Surgery Versus Anterior Cervical Discectomy and Fusion in Multilevel Cervical Disc Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jianfeng; Meng, Fanxin; Ding, Yan; Li, Jie; Han, Jian; Zhang, Xintao; Dong, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Abstract To investigate the outcomes and reliability of hybrid surgery (HS) versus anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) for the treatment of multilevel cervical spondylosis and disc diseases. Hybrid surgery, combining cervical disc arthroplasty (CDA) with fusion, is a novel treatment to multilevel cervical degenerated disc disease in recent years. However, the effect and reliability of HS are still unclear compared with ACDF. To investigate the studies of HS versus ACDF in patients with multilevel cervical disease, electronic databases (Medline, Embase, Pubmed, Cochrane library, and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials) were searched. Studies were included when they compared HS with ACDF and reported at least one of the following outcomes: functionality, neck pain, arm pain, cervical range of motion (ROM), quality of life, and incidence of complications. No language restrictions were used. Two authors independently assessed the methodological quality of included studies and extracted the relevant data. Seven clinical controlled trials were included in this study. Two trials were prospective and the other 5 were retrospective. The results of the meta-analysis indicated that HS achieved better recovery of NDI score (P = 0.038) and similar recovery of VAS score (P = 0.058) compared with ACDF at 2 years follow-up. Moreover, the total cervical ROM (C2–C7) after HS was preserved significantly more than the cervical ROM after ACDF (P = 0.000) at 2 years follow-up. Notably, the compensatory increase of the ROM of superior and inferior adjacent segments was significant in ACDF groups at 2-year follow-up (P < 0.01), compared with HS. The results demonstrate that HS provides equivalent outcomes and functional recovery for cervical disc diseases, and significantly better preservation of cervical ROM compared with ACDF in 2-year follow-up. This suggests the HS is an effective alternative invention for the treatment of multilevel cervical

  2. The cauda equina syndrome in pregnant woman with a massive disc herniation.

    PubMed

    Antón Capitán, B; Malillos Torán, M

    Low back pain during pregnancy is a common cause of medical consultation. Although back pain is very common, the incidence of low back pain secondary to lumbar disk herniation in pregnancy is low (1: 10,000). Cauda equina syndrome from lumbar disk herniation is a serious complication. The delay in diagnosis and treatment can be a cause of chronic disability secondary to neurological sequelae. Numerous cases of disk herniation in pregnancy have been reported, however the association of a cauda equina syndrome as a result of disk herniation is rare. A case is presented of cauda equina syndrome in a pregnant woman at 12-week gestation. Copyright © 2015 SECOT. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  3. Minimally invasive discectomy versus microdiscectomy/open discectomy for symptomatic lumbar disc herniation.

    PubMed

    Rasouli, Mohammad R; Rahimi-Movaghar, Vafa; Shokraneh, Farhad; Moradi-Lakeh, Maziar; Chou, Roger

    2014-09-04

    Microdiscectomy or open discectomy (MD/OD) are the standard procedures for symptomatic lumbar disc herniation and they involve removal of the portion of the intervertebral disc compressing the nerve root or spinal cord (or both) with or without the aid of a headlight loupe or microscope magnification. Potential advantages of newer minimally invasive discectomy (MID) procedures over standard MD/OD include less blood loss, less postoperative pain, shorter hospitalisation and earlier return to work. To compare the benefits and harms of MID versus MD/OD for management of lumbar intervertebral discopathy. We searched the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (November 2013), MEDLINE (1946 to November 2013) and EMBASE (1974 to November 2013) and applied no language restrictions. We also contacted experts in the field for additional studies and reviewed reference lists of relevant studies. We selected randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and quasi-randomised controlled trials (QRCTs) that compared MD/OD with a MID (percutaneous endoscopic interlaminar or transforaminal lumbar discectomy, transmuscular tubular microdiscectomy and automated percutaneous lumbar discectomy) for treatment of adults with lumbar radiculopathy secondary to discopathy. We evaluated the following primary outcomes: pain related to sciatica or low back pain (LBP) as measured by a visual analogue scale, sciatic specific outcomes such as neurological deficit of lower extremity or bowel/urinary incontinence and functional outcomes (including daily activity or return to work). We also evaluated the following secondary outcomes: complications of surgery, duration of hospital stay, postoperative opioid use, quality of life and overall participant satisfaction. Two authors checked data abstractions and articles for inclusion. We resolved discrepancies by consensus. We used standard methodological procedures expected by The Cochrane Collaboration. We used pre-developed forms to extract data

  4. What were the advantages of microendoscopic discectomy for lumbar disc herniation comparing with open discectomy: a meta-analysis?

    PubMed

    Mu, Xiaoping; Wei, Jianxun; Li, Peifeng

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the safety and efficacy of micro-endoscopic discectomy (MED) and open discectomy (OD) for lubmar disc herniation (LDH). Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) comparing MED with OD for LDH were searched comprehensively in PubMed, EMBASE, the Cochrane Library. Relevant studies retrieved, data extracted and the quality of included studies were independently performed by two authors. RevMan software (Version 5.2.0) was used to analyse and synthesis relevant data of the included studies. Nine RCTs involving 774 patients were obtained and reported the relevant outcome measures. Compared with OD group, there were significant difference in the general operation indicators including operation time, blood loss, site of incision, hospital stay and time of return to work, biochemical indexes including C-reactive protein (CRP) and interleukin-6 (IL-6) in MED group. Meanwhile, there were no difference in effective rate, complication including total complications, dural leaks occurred and recurrence of the disc herniation, compared MED group with OD group. MED had slighter trauma, milder blood loss and shorter healing time than OD. The results demonstrated MED has great efficacy and safety comparable to OD. So we think that MED can be used routinely for LDH patients, especially the patients of old and intolerable major surgery. Meanwhile, it is necessary for surgeon to master indication and contraindication of MED and improve the operative technique.

  5. Randomized clinical trial comparing lumbar percutaneous hydrodiscectomy with lumbar open microdiscectomy for the treatment of lumbar disc protrusions and herniations

    PubMed Central

    Cristante, Alexandre Fogaça; Rocha, Ivan Diasda; Marcon, Raphael Martus; de Barros Filho, Tarcísio Eloy Pessoa

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Hydrodiscectomy is a new technique used for percutaneous spinal discectomy that employs a high-intensity stream of water for herniated disc ablation and tissue aspiration. No previous clinical study has examined the effects of percutaneous hydrodiscectomy. The aim of this study is to evaluate the outcomes of hydrodiscectomy compared to open microdiscectomy regarding pain, function, satisfaction, complications and recurrence rates. METHODS: In this randomized clinical trial, patients referred to our tertiary hospital for lumbar back pain were recruited and included in the study if they had disc protrusion or small herniation in only one level, without neurological deficits and with no resolution after six weeks of conservative treatment. One group underwent open microdiscectomy, and the other group underwent percutaneous microdiscectomy via hydrosurgery. Function was evaluated using the Oswestry Disability Index and pain was assessed using a visual analog scale. Evaluations were performed preoperatively, and then during the first week and at one, three, six and twelve months postoperatively. Personal satisfaction was verified. Clinicaltrials.gov: NCT01367860. RESULTS: During the study period, 20 patients were included in each arm and 39 completed one-year of follow-up (one patient died of unrelated causes). Both groups exhibited equal improvement on the visual analog scale and Oswestry evaluations after treatment, without any significant differences. The improvement in the lumbar visual analog scale score was not significant in the hydrodiscectomy group (p=0.138). The rates of infection, pain, recurrence and satisfaction were similar between the two groups. CONCLUSION: Percutaneous hydrodiscectomy was demonstrated to be as effective as open microdiscectomy for reducing pain. The rates of complications and recurrence of herniation were similar between groups. Patient satisfaction with the treatment was also similar between groups. PMID:27276397

  6. Effects of a cervical disc prosthesis on segmental and cervical spine alignment.

    PubMed

    Pickett, Gwynedd E; Mitsis, Demytra K; Sekhon, Lali H; Sears, William R; Duggal, Neil

    2004-09-15

    Cervical arthroplasty offers the promise of maintaining motion of the functional spinal unit (FSU) after anterior cervical discectomy. The impact of cervical arthroplasty on sagittal alignment of the FSU needs to be addressed, together with its effect on overall sagittal balance of the cervical spine. The authors prospectively reviewed radiographic and clinical outcomes in 14 patients who received the Bryan Cervical Disc prosthesis (Medtronic Sofamor Danek, Memphis, TN), for whom early (< 6 months) and late (6-24 months) follow-up data were available. Static and dynamic radiographs were measured by hand and computer to determine the angles formed by the endplates of the natural disc preoperatively, those formed by the shells of the implanted prosthesis, the angle of the FSU, and the C2-7 Cobb angle. The range of motion (ROM) was also determined radiographically, whereas clinical outcomes were assessed using the Neck Disability Index (NDI), and Short Form-36 (SF-36) questionnaires. The ROM was preserved following surgery, with a mean preoperative sagittal rotation angle of 8.96 degrees , which was not significantly different from the late postoperative value of 8.25 degrees . When compared with the preoperative disc space angle, the shell endplate angle in the neutral position became kyphotic in the early and late postoperative periods (mean change -3.8 degrees in the late follow-up period; p = 0.0035). The FSU angles also became significantly more kyphotic postoperatively, with a mean change of -6 degrees (p = 0.0006). The Cobb angles varied widely preoperatively and did not change significantly after surgery. There was no statistical correlation between the NDI and SF-36 outcomes and cervical kyphosis. Cervical arthroplasty preserves motion of the FSU. Both the endplate angle of the treated disc space and the angle of the FSU became kyphotic after insertion of the Bryan prosthesis. The overall sagittal balance of the cervical spine, however, was preserved.

  7. Current practice of cervical disc arthroplasty: a survey among 383 AOSpine International members.

    PubMed

    Chin-See-Chong, Timothy C; Gadjradj, Pravesh S; Boelen, Robert J; Harhangi, Biswadjiet S

    2017-02-01

    OBJECTIVE The use of cervical disc arthroplasty (CDA) in spinal practice is controversial. This may be explained by the lack of studies with a large sample size and long-term outcomes. With this survey the authors aimed to evaluate the opinions of spine surgeons on the use of CDA in the current treatment of cervical disc herniation (CDH). METHODS A web-based survey was sent to all members of AOSpine International by email using SurveyMonkey on July 18, 2016. A single reminder was sent on August 18, 2016. Questions included geographic location; specialty; associated practice model; number of discectomies performed annually; the use of CDA, anterior cervical discectomy (ACD), and anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF); and the expectations for clinical outcomes of these procedures. RESULTS A total of 383 questionnaires were analyzed. Almost all practitioners (97.9%) were male, with a mean of 15.0 ± 9.7 years of clinical experience. The majority of responders were orthopedic surgeons (54.6%). 84.3% performed ACDF as the standard technique for CDH. 47.8% of the surgeons occasionally used CDA, whereas 7.3% used CDA as standard approach for CDH. The most common arthroplasty device used was the ProDisc-C. Low evidence for benefits and higher costs were the most important reasons for not offering CDA. The risk of adjacent-level disease was considered smaller for CDA as compared with ACDF. However, ACDF was expected to have the highest effectiveness on arm pain (87.5%), followed by CDA (77.9%), while ACD had the least (12.6%). CONCLUSIONS In this survey, CDA was not considered to be the routine procedure to treat CDH. Reported benefits included the reduced risk of adjacent-level disease and preservation of motion of the neck. Lack of enough evidence on its effectiveness as well as higher costs were considered to be disadvantages of CDA. More research should be conducted on the implementation impact of CDA and the cost-effectiveness from society's perspective.

  8. Transdural herniated lumbar disc disease with muscle patch for closure of durotomy - A Brief review of literature.

    PubMed

    Huliyappa, Harsha A; Singh, Rakesh Kumar; Singh, Sunil Kumar; Jaiswal, Manish; Jaiswal, Somil; Srivastava, Chhitij; Ojha, Balkrishna; Chandra, Anil; Chhabra, Satnam

    Intradural migration of disc (IDMD) is a rare clinical entity accounting for 0.27-0.33% of all herniated disc diseases. Flimsy or dense adhesion between the ventral dural surface and the opposing posterior longitudinal ligament (PLL) is the principal pathology for intradural migrated disc. The most commonly affected lumbar segments are L4-5 (55%), L3-4 (16%), L5-S1 (10%) and less commonly L2L3 and L1L2. No imaging feature is characteristic and the management protocol of durotomy via an endoscopic method is unclear. An L5S1 disc disease was operated by endoscopic method. Difficulty in separating the dural sac from PLL, dense adhesions prompting sharp dissection at this location and a calcified disc are the earliest evidence of intradural migration. MRI features of an intradural location are loss of continuity of posterior longitudinal ligament, beak-like appearance also known as "Hawk-beak sign", peripheral enhancement around an intradural disc, fluid-filled intradural cyst. Magnification either by Microscope or Endoscope is of importance when dissecting the intradural disc so as to avoid the nerve root injury. Liberal use of fibrin glue and augmentation with muscle patch was performed. Ambulated by 48h and discharged by 5th day. Two and 9 months follow up showed no evidence of pseudomeningocoele. Autologous muscle patch with fibrin glue for dural rent closure is a simple and effective method which can be performed by endoscopic or minimally invasive approaches. Suturing the dura, being a tedious and cumbersome procedure can be avoided. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o.

  9. Correlation of end plate shape on MRI and disc degeneration in surgically treated patients with degenerative disc disease and herniated nucleus pulposus.

    PubMed

    Pappou, Ioannis P; Cammisa, Frank P; Girardi, Federico P

    2007-01-01

    The sagittal profile of the lumbar end plates on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has not been investigated in patients with degenerative disc disease (DDD) or herniated nucleus pulposus (HNP). To examine the shape of the end plates in patients treated surgically for a) low back pain or b) radiculopathy with HNP. Furthermore, to investigate the correlation between end plate shape and disc degeneration on the one, and end plate shape and symptoms on the other. Retrospective review of charts and radiographs. The charts, operative reports, preoperative lateral plain radiographs, and MRI scans of 178 patients (85 with low back pain and 93 with HNP) were reviewed. End plate shape was determined on midsagittal MRI cuts, disc degeneration was graded on T2 sequences, and disc height was measured on lateral plain radiographs from L1 to S1 in all patients. Student t-test and chi(2) test were used to detect significant differences and associations. Flat and irregular levels were most common in the lower lumbar spine. The L5/S1 segment was flat in most cases, due to a flat sacral end plate. In DDD patients, disc degeneration on MRI and plain radiographs worsened from concave to flat, to irregular levels. In HNP patients, MRI demonstrated concave levels to be less degenerated, whereas no difference was detected between flat and irregular levels. Disc height of irregular levels was well preserved in HNP patients. Comparing the two groups, flat levels were more degenerated on MRI in HNP patients. Despite similar degrees of degeneration on MRI, concave and irregular levels in DDD patients had lower disc heights. A higher frequency of symptoms was found in flat and irregular levels for both patient groups. The sagittal profile of end plates in the lumbar spine was described for patients with DDD on the one and HNP on the other. A higher association with symptoms was observed for flat and irregular levels in both patient groups. In DDD patients, disck degeneration on both MRI and

  10. The Effect of Lumbar Disc Herniation on Musculoskeletal Loadings in the Spinal Region During Level Walking and Stair Climbing

    PubMed Central

    Kuai, Shengzheng; Liao, Zhenhua; Zhou, Wenyu; Guan, Xinyu; Ji, Run; Zhang, Rui; Guo, Daiqi; Liu, Weiqiang

    2017-01-01

    Background People with low back pain (LBP) alter their motion patterns during level walking and stair climbing due to pain or fear. However, the alternations of load sharing during the two activities are largely unknown. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of LBP caused by lumbar disc herniation (LDH) on the muscle activities of 17 main trunk muscle groups and the intradiscal forces acting on the five lumbar discs. Material/Methods Twenty-six healthy adults and seven LDH patients were recruited to perform level walking and stair climbing in the Gait Analysis Laboratory. Eight optical markers were placed on the bony landmarks of the spinous process and pelvis, and the coordinates of these markers were captured during the two activities using motion capture system. The coordinates of the captured markers were applied to developed musculoskeletal model to calculate the kinetic variables. Results LDH patients demonstrated higher muscle activities in most trunk muscle groups during both level walking and stair climbing. There were decreases in anteroposterior shear forces on the discs in the pathological region and increases in the compressive forces on all the lumbar discs during level walking. The symmetry of mediolateral shear forces was worse in LDH patients than healthy adults during stair climbing. Conclusions LDH patients exhibited different kinetic alternations during level walking and stair climbing. However, both adaptive strategies added extra burdens to the trunk system and further increased the risk for development of LDH. PMID:28796755

  11. [The assessment of the impact of rehabilitation on the pain intensity level in patients with herniated nucleus pulposus of the intervertebral disc].

    PubMed

    Koszela, Kamil; Krukowska, Sylwia; Woldańska-Okońska, Marta

    2017-05-23

    Back pain may be caused by many factors. In many cases it is difficult to unambiguously determine a cause of the pathology, which can involve various structures in the spine. In this paper we will discuss the symptoms associated with the degenerative changes of the intervertebral disc, which involve, among others, its bulging, dislocation and pressure on the surrounding structures. These problems require an adequate clinical and imaging diagnostics in order to implement an appropriate treatment. In the first place, it should be based on the conservative methods (such as: pharmacotherapy, rehabilitation and lifestyle changes). Only in the absence of improvement it is recommended to consider a surgical treatment. The aim of the study is to assess the impact of rehabilitation on the pain intensity level in patients with herniated nucleus pulposus of the intervertebral disc. The study was performed in 46 patients (age range: 19-85), including 26 women and 20 men. On the basis of imaging, all patients showed the presence of a slipped disc with disc herniation. The patients were treated conservatively. For pain assessment was used the The Laitinen Modified Questionnaire Indicators of Pain and The Visual- Analogue Scale. The results were statistically analyzed. The results clearly demonstrate the analgesic efficacy of specialized rehabilitation in the spinal pain syndrome in a discopathy with a spinal disc herniation of an intervertebral disc. The rehabilitation of patients with a back pain due to the presence of herniated nucleus pulposus has a significant analgesic effect. In the case of a presence of the herniated nucleus pulposus, the rehabilitation should be considered in a first place. If no improvement, a possible surgery should be considered. An important element of a conservative treatment is an effective rehabilitation, which is of vital economic importance, because a therapy including surgery usually requires subsequent rehabilitation and is much more expensive.

  12. MRI evaluation of spontaneous intervertebral disc degeneration in the alpaca cervical spine.

    PubMed

    Stolworthy, Dean K; Bowden, Anton E; Roeder, Beverly L; Robinson, Todd F; Holland, Jacob G; Christensen, S Loyd; Beatty, Amanda M; Bridgewater, Laura C; Eggett, Dennis L; Wendel, John D; Stieger-Vanegas, Susanne M; Taylor, Meredith D

    2015-12-01

    Animal models have historically provided an appropriate benchmark for understanding human pathology, treatment, and healing, but few animals are known to naturally develop intervertebral disc degeneration. The study of degenerative disc disease and its treatment would greatly benefit from a more comprehensive, and comparable animal model. Alpacas have recently been presented as a potential large animal model of intervertebral disc degeneration due to similarities in spinal posture, disc size, biomechanical flexibility, and natural disc pathology. This research further investigated alpacas by determining the prevalence of intervertebral disc degeneration among an aging alpaca population. Twenty healthy female alpacas comprised two age subgroups (5 young: 2-6 years; and 15 older: 10+ years) and were rated according to the Pfirrmann-grade for degeneration of the cervical intervertebral discs. Incidence rates of degeneration showed strong correlations with age and spinal level: younger alpacas were nearly immune to developing disc degeneration, and in older animals, disc degeneration had an increased incidence rate and severity at lower cervical levels. Advanced disc degeneration was present in at least one of the cervical intervertebral discs of 47% of the older alpacas, and it was most common at the two lowest cervical intervertebral discs. The prevalence of intervertebral disc degeneration encourages further investigation and application of the lower cervical spine of alpacas and similar camelids as a large animal model of intervertebral disc degeneration.

  13. Regression of anterior disc-osteophyte complex following cervical laminectomy and fusion for cervical spondylotic myelopathy

    PubMed Central

    Ashana, Adedayo O.; Cohen, Jeremiah R.; Evans, Brandon; Holly, Langston T.

    2014-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective case control study Objective To investigate whether posterior cervical laminectomy and fusion modifies the natural course of anterior disc-osteophyte complex in patients with multilevel CSM Summary of Background Data Dorsal migration of the spinal cord is the main purported mechanism of spinal cord decompression following cervical laminectomy and fusion but other potential mechanisms have received scant attention in the literature. This study was conducted to investigate whether cervical laminectomy and fusion affects the size of anterior disc osteophyte complex. Methods The medical records and radiographical imaging of 44 patients that underwent cervical laminectomy and fusion for CSM between 2006 and 2013 were analyzed. The size of the anterior disc osteophyte complex was measured pre and postoperatively on MR images taken at an interval of > 3 months apart. A control group consisted of 20 non-operatively treated advanced cervical spondylosis patients. Patients in the control met the same inclusion and exclusion criteria and also had sequential MRI taken at an interval of > 3 months apart. Results The nonoperative and operative groups were statistically similar in the pertinent patient demographics and characteristics including gender, age, time to second MRI, size of anterior disc-osteophyte complex on baseline MRI, mean number of levels affected, and percentage of patients with T2 signal change. As expected the mJOA scores were significantly lower in the operative versus nonoperative cohort (13.6 vs. 16.5, P<0.01). A significant decrease in the size of anterior disc osteophyte was observed in the operative group postoperatively (P<0.01). In comparison, there was no statistically significant change in the size of the anterior disc osteophyte complex in the control group (P > 0.05). The magnitude of the change in disc size between the two groups was statistically significant (P <0.01). Conclusion The findings of this study suggest that

  14. [LOCATION CHANGE OF ROTATION CENTER AFTER SINGLE SEGMENTAL CERVICAL DISC REPLACEMENT WITH ProDisc-C].

    PubMed

    Lou, Jigang; Liu, Hao; Rong, Xin; Gong, Quan; Song, Yueming; Li, Tao

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of the single segmental cervical disc replacement with ProDisc-C, and to explore the location change of the flexion/extension center of rotation (COR) of the target level as well as its clinical significance. Between June 2010 and February 2012, 23 patients underwent single segmental cervical disc replacement with ProDisc-C, and the clinical data were retrospectively analyzed. Of 23 patients, 9 were male, and 14 were female with the age range from 27 to 65 years (mean, 45 years), and the disease duration ranged from 10 to 84 months (mean, 25 months). There were 15 patients with radiculopathy, 5 patients with myelopathy, and 3 patients with mixed cervical spondylosis. The involved segments were C4,5 in 5 cases, C5,6 in 14 cases, and C6,7 in 4 cases. Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) score and neck disability index (NDI) were adopted to evaluate the effectiveness. Preoperative and Postoperative radiographic parameters, such as cervical overall range of motion (ROM), target segmental ROM, the adjacent segmental ROM, and intervertebral height were compared. Besides, the location changes of the COR of the target level were further analyzed by the alteration of its coordinates (COR-X, COR-Y), and the relationships between the location changes of the COR and the effectiveness or the radiographic results were analyzed. All the operations were completed successfully; 1 case had hoarseness after operation, which disappeared at 3 months after operation. All cases were followed up 18.3 months on average (range, 6-36 months). There was no device migration, loosening, subsidence, or fracture at last follow-up. The JOA score increased significantly and the NDI score decreased significantly at last follow-up when compared with preoperative scores (P < 0.05). No difference was found in the cervical overall ROM, target segmental ROM, the adjacent segmental ROM, and the COR-Y of the target level between pre-operation and last follow-up (P > 0

  15. Application of Cervical Arthroplasty With Bryan Cervical Disc: 10-Year Follow-up Results in China.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yanbin; Zhang, Yilong; Sun, Yu; Pan, Shengfa; Zhou, Feifei; Liu, Zhongjun

    2016-01-01

    Retrospective study. The aims of this study were to evaluate the radiographic and clinical outcomes of Bryan cervical disc arthroplasty at 10-year follow-up. Cervical arthroplasty is a new technique for treating degenerative cervical disease. Previous reports have shown that cervical arthroplasty with Bryan disc gained good clinical outcomes at 4- to 6-year follow-up. Clinical outcomes and dynamic x-ray examination were evaluated at baseline and at final follow-up. Thirty-three patients with complete clinical and radiographic data were included in this study. The mean follow-up period was 120.5 months (116-130 months). Twenty-five patients underwent single-level arthroplasty and 7 underwent arthroplasty at 2 levels. One patient underwent arthroplasty at 3 levels. Eight of the 33 patients presented with radiculopathy and 25 patients with myelopathy. The 42 levels of surgery included C3/4 (3 levels), C4/5 (7 levels), C5/6 (26 levels) and C6/7 (6 level). The mJOA score of the 25 patients with myelopathy was 11.8 at the baseline and 15.9 at the final follow-up. No patient suffered from adjacent segment disease. Two patients received revision surgeries at the index level for recurrent radiculopathy caused by osteophyte formation and heterotopic ossification. On x-ray examination, the range of motion at the operated level was 7.8 degree at the baseline and 4.7 degree at the final follow-up. Heterotopic ossification was observed in 29 (69.0%) levels and heterotopic ossification of Grade 4 was observed in 14 levels. Adjacent segment degeneration was observed in 30 (47.6%) levels. Cervical arthroplasty using Bryan cervical disc prosthesis resulted in fine clinical outcomes in this study. Heterotopic ossification was common after Bryan disc arthroplasty, which decreased the range of motion. 4.

  16. Long-Term Outcomes of Patients with Lumbar Disc Herniation Treated with Percutaneous Discectomy: Comparative Study with Microendoscopic Discectomy

    SciTech Connect

    Liu Wengui; Wu Xiaotao; Guo Jinhe; Zhuang Suyang; Teng Gaojun

    2010-08-15

    We assessed the long-term outcomes of patients with lumbar disc herniation treated with percutaneous lumbar discectomy (PLD) or microendoscopic discectomy (MED). A retrospective study was performed in consecutive patients with lumbar disc herniation treated with PLD (n = 129) or MED (n = 101) in a single hospital from January 2000 to March 2002. All patients were followed up with MacNab criteria and self-evaluation questionnaires comprising the Oswestry Disability Index and Medical Outcomes Study 36-Item Short-Form Health Survey. Several statistical methods were used for analyses of the data, and a p value of <0.05 was considered to be statistically significant. A total of 104 patients (80.62%) with PLD and 82 patients (81.19%) with MED were eligible for analyses, with a mean follow-up period of 6.64 {+-} 0.67 years and 6.42 {+-} 0.51 years, respectively. There were no significant differences between the two groups in age, number of lesions, major symptoms and physical signs, and radiological findings. According to the MacNab criteria, 75.96% in the PLD group and 84.15% in the MED group achieved excellent or good results, respectively, this was statistically significant (p = 0.0402). With the Oswestry Disability Index questionnaires, the average scores and minimal disability, respectively, were 6.97 and 71.15% in the PLD group and 4.89 and 79.27% in the MED group. Total average scores of Medical Outcomes Study 36-Item Short-Form Health Survey were 75.88 vs. 81.86 in PLD group vs. MED group (p = 0.0582). The cost and length of hospitalization were higher or longer in MED group, a statistically significant difference (both p < 0.0001). Long-term complications were observed in two patients (2.44%) in the MED group, no such complications were observed in the PLD group. Both PLD and MED show an acceptable long-term efficacy for treatment of lumbar disc herniation. Compared with MED patients, long-term satisfaction is slightly lower in the PLD patients; complications

  17. Transforaminal epidural steroid injections influence Mechanical Diagnosis and Therapy (MDT) pain response classification in candidates for lumbar herniated disc surgery.

    PubMed

    van Helvoirt, Hans; Apeldoorn, Adri T; Knol, Dirk L; Arts, Mark P; Kamper, Steven J; van Tulder, Maurits W; Ostelo, Raymond W

    2016-04-27

    Prospective cohort study. Although lumbar radiculopathy is regarded as a specific diagnosis, the most effective treatment strategy is unclear. Commonly used treatments include transforaminal epidural steroid injections (TESIs) and Mechanical Diagnosis & Therapy (MDT), but no studies have investigated the effectiveness of this combination. MDT differentiates pain centralization (C) from non-centralization (NC), which indicates good vs. poor prognostic validity respectively. The main aims were 1) to determine changes in Mechanical Diagnosis and Therapy (MDT) pain response classifications after transforaminal epidural steroid injections (TESIs) in candidates for lumbar herniated disc surgery and 2) to evaluate differences in short and long term outcomes for patients with different pain response classifications. Candidates for lumbar herniated disc surgery were assessed with a MDT protocol and their pain response classified as centralizing or peripheralizing. For this study,only patients were eligible who showed a peripheralizing pain response at intake. All patients then received TESIs and were reassessed and classified using the MDT protocol, into groups according to pain response (resolved, centralizing, peripheralizing with less pain and peripheralising with severe pain). After receiving targeted treatment based on pain response after TESIs, ranging from advice, MDT or surgery, follow-up assessments were completed at discharge and at 12 months. The primary outcomes were disability (Roland-Morris Disability Questionnaire [RMDQ] for Sciatica), pain severity in leg (visual analogue scale [VAS], 0-100) and global perceived effect (GPE). Linear mixed-models were used to determine between-groups differences in outcome. A total of 77 patients with lumbar disc herniation and peripheralizing symptoms were included. Patients received an average of 2 (SD 0.7) TESIs. After TESIs, 17 patients (22%) were classified as peripheralizing with continuing severe pain.These patients

  18. Durability of cervical disc arthroplasties and its influence factors

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Chao; Zhang, Xiaolin; Ma, Xinlong

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background: The durability of cervical disc arthroplasties (CDA) may vary significantly because of different designs and implanting techniques of the devices. Nevertheless, the comparative durability remains unknown. Objectives: We aimed to assess the durability of CDAs in at least 2-year follow-up. We analyzed the classifications and causes of secondary surgical procedures, as well as the structural designs of the devices that might influence the durability. Methods: PubMed, Medline, Embase, and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials were searched from the inception of each database to September 2015 using the following Keywords: “cervical disc replacement” OR “cervical disc arthroplasty” AND “randomized controlled trial (RCT).” Publication language was restricted to English. The primary outcome was the rate of secondary surgical procedures following CDA or anterior cervical decompression and fusion (ACDF). Pairwise meta-analysis and a Bayesian network meta-analysis were carried out using Review Manager v5.3.5 and WinBUGS version 1.4.3, respectively. Quality of evidence was appraised by Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation methodology. Results: Twelve RCTs that met the eligibility criteria were included. Follow-up ranged from 2 years to 7 years. A total of 103 secondary surgical procedures were performed. The most frequent classification of secondary surgical procedures was reoperation (48/103) and removal (47/103). Revision (3/103) and supplementary fixation (2/103) were rare. Adjacent-level diseases were the most common cause of reoperations. The rates of secondary surgical procedures were significantly lower in Mobi-C, Prestige, Prodisc-C, Secure-C group than in ACDF group. No significant difference was detected between Bryan, PCM, Kineflex-C, Discover, and ACDF. Mobi-C, Secure-C, and Prodisc-C ranked the best, the second best, the third best, respectively. Conclusions: We concluded that Mobi-C, Secure

  19. Interleukin 6 (IL-6) and IL-10 Promoter Region Polymorphisms Are Associated with Risk of Lumbar Disc Herniation in a Northern Chinese Han Population.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xiangye; Chen, Feng; Zhao, Jing; Wang, Dezhang; Jing, Shenfeng; Li, Hongmei; Meng, Chunyang

    2017-01-01

    This study assessed the association of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the proinflammatory cytokines interleukin 6 (IL-6) and IL-10 with the risk of lumbar disc herniation in a Chinese Han population. We collected blood samples from 267 patients with lumbar disc herniation (case group) and 300 normals (control group) and performed analyses of the IL-6 572C/G and 174G/C SNPs as well as the IL-10 592A/C and 1082G/A SNPs using TaqMan technology. The frequencies of the IL-6-572 GG, GC, and CC genotypes were 5.99%, 42.3%, and 51.6%, respectively, in the case group, and 1.6%, 24%, and 64.3%, respectively, in the control group. Thus, the relative risk of the IL-6-572 G genotype (GG plus GC) was 1.69-fold higher for developing lumbar disc herniation compared to the CC genotype (95% confidence interval: 1.16-2.39, p < 0.01). The risks associated with the IL-6-572 CG and GG genotypes were 1.55- and 4.48-fold higher, respectively, versus the CC genotype for developing lumbar disc herniation (p < 0.01). The IL-10-1082 AG genotype was significantly higher in the case group (26.22%) versus the control group (11.67%); whereas the AA genotype was lower in the case group (73.78%) versus the control group (88.33%; p < 0.05). The IL-10-1082 G allele frequency was significantly higher in the case group (13.11%) versus the control group (5.83%; p < 0.05). This study demonstrates that genetic variants in the promoter regions of the IL-6 and IL-10 genes are associated with lumbar disc herniation risk in this Northern Chinese Han population.

  20. Thoracic disc herniation and acute myelopathy: clinical presentation, neuroimaging findings, surgical considerations, and outcome.

    PubMed

    Cornips, Erwin M J; Janssen, Marcus L F; Beuls, Emile A M

    2011-04-01

    Thoracic disc herniations (TDHs) may occasionally present with an acute myelopathy, defined as a variable degree of motor, sensory, and sphincter disturbances developing in less than 24 hours, and resulting in a Frankel Grade C or worse. Confronted with such a patient, the surgeon has to decide whether to perform an emergency operation and whether to use an anterior or posterior approach. The authors analyze their own experience and the pertinent literature, focusing on clinical presentation, imaging findings, surgical timing, technique, and outcome. Among 250 patients who underwent surgery for symptomatic TDH, 209 had at least 1 year of follow-up at the time of writing, including 8 patients who presented with an acute myelopathy. They were surgically treated using standard thoracoscopic microdiscectomy, careful blood pressure monitoring, and intravenous methylprednisolone. The authors analyzed pre- and postoperative neuroimaging, and Frankel scores preoperatively, at discharge, and 1 year postoperatively. Although 5 patients had multiple TDHs, the symptomatic TDH was invariably situated between T9-10 and T11-12. Seven TDHs were giant, 6 were calcified, 6 were accompanied by myelomalacia, and 4 were accompanied by segmental stenosis. Although sudden dorsalgia was the initial symptom in 6, a precipitating event was noted in only 1. All patients had severe neurological deficits by the time they underwent surgery. Frankel grades improved from B to D in 2 patients, from C to E in 4, and from C to D and B to E in 1 patient each. All patients regained continence and ambulation. Transient complications were CSF leak (in 2 patients), and intraoperative blood loss greater than 1000 ml, reversible ischemic neurological deficit, and subileus (in 1 patient each). Approximately 4% of TDHs present with an acute myelopathy. They are often situated between T9-10 and T11-12, large or giant, and even calcified. They almost invariably cause important cord compression (sometimes

  1. Urinary 3-hydroxypropyl mercapturic acid (3-HPMA) concentrations in dogs with acute spinal cord injury due to intervertebral disc herniation.

    PubMed

    Sangster, A M; Zheng, L; Bentley, R T; Shi, R; Packer, R A

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate urinary 3-hydroxypropyl mercapturic acid (3-HPMA), a metabolite of acrolein, as a novel biomarker in acute spinal cord injury (ASCI) due to intervertebral disc herniation in dogs. Urine from 10 client-owned dogs with ASCI collected at presentation and 10 control dogs was analyzed for 3-HPMA. The median urinary 3-HPMA concentration in ASCI dogs was significantly higher than in control dogs, but was not correlated with the severity of ASCI. The median urinary 3-HPMA concentration in intact dogs was higher than in neutered dogs. Higher urinary 3-HPMA concentrations in dogs after ASCI support a role for acrolein, a cytotoxic by-product of lipid peroxidation, in canine ASCI. Urinary 3-HPMA could be used as a biomarker in future clinical trials to measure the effect of therapeutic intervention of reducing acrolein after ASCI. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  2. Surgical technique for revision surgery of cervical artificial disc replacements.

    PubMed

    Onken, Julia; Meyer, Bernhard; Vajkoczy, Peter

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Cervical artificial disc replacement (C-ADR) is a widely used procedure with low risk at implantation. Few cases have been reported about the surgical techniques of C-ADR revision. The authors describe their surgical experience with the explantation of a Galileo C-ADR. METHODS Revision surgery was performed in a 58-year-old patient. Patient positioning and surgical opening techniques were performed as appropriate for anterior cervical decompression. RESULTS Revision surgery via the initial anterior approach was successful following an atraumatic removal of the implant. Fusion of the C5-6 segment was performed without complications. CONCLUSIONS In general, the authors observed recurrent nerve palsy and malpositioning of the revised implant in C-ADR revision surgery. Problems with implant removal did not occur because the fusion rate was low due to the short time between initial surgery and C-ADR revision surgery. The video can be found here: https://youtu.be/32CUEDquinc .

  3. Health state utility of patients with single-level cervical degenerative disc disease: comparison of anterior cervical discectomy and fusion with cervical disc arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Qureshi, Sheeraz; Goz, Vadim; McAnany, Steven; Cho, Samuel K; Hecht, Andrew C; Delamarter, Rick B; Fehlings, Michael G

    2014-05-01

    Cost-effectiveness analysis (CEA) of medical interventions has become increasingly relevant to the discussion of optimization of care. The use of utility scales in CEA permits a quantitative assessment of effectiveness of a given intervention. There are no published utility values for degenerative disc disease (DDD) of the cervical spine, anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF), or cervical disc replacement (CDR). The purpose of this study was to define health utility values for those health states. The 36-Item Short Form Health Survey data from the ProDisc-C investigational device exemption study were obtained for single-level DDD at baseline and 24 months postoperatively after ACDF or CDR procedures. Patients in the original study were randomized to either ACDF or CDR. Utilizing a commercially available Short Form-6 dimensions program, utility scores were calculated for each health state using a set of parametric preference weights obtained from a sample of the general population using the recognized valuation technique of standard gamble. The baseline health state utility (HSU) value for a patient with single-level DDD was 0.54 in both the ACDF and CDR groups. Postoperative changes in HSU values were seen in both intervention groups at 24 months. Cervical disc replacement had a HSU value of 0.72. Anterior cervical discectomy and fusion was found to have a postoperative utility state of 0.71. No statistically significant difference was found in the HSU for ACDF and CDR at 24 months of follow-up. This study represents the first calculated HSU value for a patient with single-level cervical DDD. Additionally, 2 common treatment interventions for this disease state were assessed. Both treatments were found to have significant impact on the HSU values. These values are integral to future CEA of ACDF and CDR.

  4. Cervical disc replacement surgery: indications, technique, and technical pearls.

    PubMed

    Leven, Dante; Meaike, Joshua; Radcliff, Kris; Qureshi, Sheeraz

    2017-06-01

    Cervical disc replacement (CDR) is a surgical option for appropriately indicated patients, and high success rates have been reported in the literature. Complications and failures are often associated with patient indications or technical variables, and the goal of this review is to assist surgeons in understanding these factors. Several investigations have been published in the last 5 years supporting the use of CDR in specific patient populations. CDR has been shown to be comparable or favorable to anterior cervical discectomy and fusion in several meta-analyses and mid-term follow-up studies. CDR was developed as a technique to preserve motion following a decompression procedure while minimizing several of the complications associated with fusion and posterior cervical spine procedures. Though success with cervical fusion and posterior foraminotomy has been well documented in the literature, high rates of mid- and long-term complications have been clearly established. CDR has also been associated with several complications and challenges with regard to surgical technique, though improvements in implant design have lead to an increase in utilization. Several devices currently exist and vary in terms of material, design, and outcomes. This review paper discusses indications, surgical technique, and technical pearls and reviews the CDR devices currently available.

  5. Chronic visceral pain secondary to ventral disc herniation: Development of visceral complex regional pain syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lauretti, Gabriela Rocha; de Oliveira, Raquel

    2015-01-01

    When an organ disease is ruled out as the origin of pelvic pain, the superior hypogastric plexus (SHP) injury and consequent dysfunction could be the mechanism of visceral chronic pain perpetuation. As much as a dorsal discus herniation may harm the dorsal or ventral roots, a ventral discus herniation at L4-L5 or L5-S1 may result in direct physical trauma to the SHP, maintaining chronic visceral pain mediated by sympathetic dysfunction, conceivably also afferent fibers dysfunction. We propose that similarly to nociceptive somatic dysfunction named complex regional pain syndrome, the maintained sympathetic pelvic pain secondary to straight physical damage to the SHP characterize in fact the same disease, but in nociceptive visceral tissue, named visceral complex regional pain syndrome, a concept constructed based on the International Association for the Study of Pain criteria (1994).

  6. Sciatica caused by disc herniation: Why is Chymopapain Chemonucleolysis denied to our patients?

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background This study was undertaken to assess the long term outcome on the quality of life of patients with sciatica following treatment with chemonucleolysis, and to assess the complications. Methods This is a retrospective review carried out in a consecutive group of patients suffering from sciatica treated by chemonucleolysis. Patients were followed up by questionnaires to obtain Macnab score; satisfaction, SF 36, and case note review for complications and repeat spinal surgery. Results Six hundred and five patients (56% males, 44% females) treated over a ten year period from 1991 to 2000 were followed up. Average age was 47 years (range 17 - 88 years). The duration of symptoms prior to treatment averaged 10 months (range 1 - 20 months) and the herniation was confirmed by Myelogram (7%), CT Scan (34%), or MRI (59%). There were 578 single level and 27 double levels treated. Eighty five percent of herniations were typical single level, and 15% were atypical that is: patients with dominant back pain with sciatica, recurrent herniations following surgery at the same level, recurrent herniations at another level following chemonucleolysis, double levels treated patients with mainly neurological deficits and one cauda equina syndrome. Average follow up was 62 months (range 12 - 123) with a 78% satisfaction rate, with a 14% surgical intervention rate made up of 9% decompression, 1% repeat chemonucleolysis at another level and 4% fusion rate. SF-36 scores generally correlated with age and sex on scores for the normal local population. Conclusions This is a retrospective study and showed that chemonucleolysis was effective with a high satisfaction rate. It restores quality of life close to that expected in the population, and is safe with no complications related to the procedure. It is a cost effective daycase procedure with a lasting result. PMID:28377858

  7. A Meta-Analysis Comparing the Results of Cervical Disc Arthroplasty with Anterior Cervical Discectomy and Fusion (ACDF) for the Treatment of Symptomatic Cervical Disc Disease

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Yu; Liu, Ming; Li, Tao; Huang, Fuguo; Tang, Tingting; Xiang, Zhou

    2013-01-01

    Background: Anterior cervical discectomy and fusion is a standard treatment for symptomatic cervical disc disease, but pseudarthrosis and accelerated adjacent-level disc degeneration may develop. Cervical disc arthroplasty was developed to preserve the kinematics of the functional spinal unit. Trials comparing arthroplasty with anterior cervical discectomy and fusion have shown unclear benefits in terms of clinical results, neck motion at the operated level, adverse events, and the need for secondary surgical procedures. Methods: Only randomized clinical trials were included in this meta-analysis, and the search strategy followed the requirements of the Cochrane Library Handbook. Two reviewers independently assessed the methodological quality of each included study and extracted the relevant data. Results: Twenty-seven randomized clinical trials were included; twelve studies were Level I and fifteen were Level II. The results of the meta-analysis indicated longer operative times, more blood loss, lower neck and arm pain scores reported on a visual analog scale, better neurological success, greater motion at the operated level, fewer secondary surgical procedures, and fewer such procedures that involved supplemental fixation or revision in the arthroplasty group compared with the anterior cervical discectomy and fusion group. These differences were significant (p < 0.05). The two groups had similar lengths of hospital stay, Neck Disability Index scores, and rates of adverse events, removals, and reoperations (p > 0.05). Conclusions: The meta-analysis revealed that anterior cervical discectomy and fusion was associated with shorter operative times and less blood loss compared with arthroplasty. Other outcomes after arthroplasty (length of hospital stay, clinical indices, range of motion at the operated level, adverse events, and secondary surgical procedures) were superior or equivalent to the outcomes after anterior cervical discectomy and fusion. Level of Evidence

  8. Prevalence and Geographic Distribution of Herniated Intervertebral Disc in Korean 19-Year-Old Male from 2008 to 2009: A Study Based on Korean Conscription -National and Geographic Prevalence of Herniated Intervertebral Disc in Korean 19YO Male-

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang Hun; Oh, Chang Hyun; Park, Hyeong-chun; Park, Chong Oon

    2013-01-01

    Purpose This study was to determine the prevalence of herniated intervertebral disc (HIVD) among Korean 19-year-old male in a large national sample and to compare the prevalence across geographic regions based on the data of conscription. Materials and Methods We analyzed the conscription data of 615508 cases who were 19-year-old male, given an examination for conscription at nationwide Korean Military Manpower Administration from January 2008 to December 2009. Prevalence was determined by dividing the number of cases by the number of persons enrolled for 2 years. The analyses included of a cross-tabulations and nonparametric chi-square to compare the prevalence according to geographic region, disc severity, and conscription year. Results The prevalence of HIVD among 19-year-old male was 0.47%. Seoul had the highest prevalence of HIVD (total HIVD was 0.60%, and severe HIVD was 0.44%). The prevalence of HIVD was lower in Jeollabuk-do and Jeollanam-do (total HIVD was 0.25-0.27%, and severe HIVD was 0.16-0.17%). Annual prevalence of HIVD was slightly decreased in 2009, but geographic distribution annually was not different. Conclusion In Korean 19-year-old male, the national prevalence of adolescent HIVD was 0.60%, but different geographic distribution was observed. It is quite possible that secondary contributing factor(s) interfere with the different geographic prevalence of HIVD. PMID:23918557

  9. Prevalence and geographic distribution of herniated intervertebral disc in Korean 19-year-old male from 2008 to 2009: a study based on Korean conscription -national and geographic prevalence of herniated intervertebral disc in Korean 19YO male-.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang Hun; Oh, Chang Hyun; Yoon, Seung Hwan; Park, Hyeong-chun; Park, Chong Oon

    2013-09-01

    This study was to determine the prevalence of herniated intervertebral disc (HIVD) among Korean 19-year-old male in a large national sample and to compare the prevalence across geographic regions based on the data of conscription. We analyzed the conscription data of 615508 cases who were 19-year-old male, given an examination for conscription at nationwide Korean Military Manpower Administration from January 2008 to December 2009. Prevalence was determined by dividing the number of cases by the number of persons enrolled for 2 years. The analyses included of a cross-tabulations and nonparametric chi-square to compare the prevalence according to geographic region, disc severity, and conscription year. The prevalence of HIVD among 19-year-old male was 0.47%. Seoul had the highest prevalence of HIVD (total HIVD was 0.60%, and severe HIVD was 0.44%). The prevalence of HIVD was lower in Jeollabuk- do and Jeollanam-do (total HIVD was 0.25-0.27%, and severe HIVD was 0.16-0.17%). Annual prevalence of HIVD was slightly decreased in 2009, but geographic distribution annually was not different. In Korean 19-year-old male, the national prevalence of adolescent HIVD was 0.60%, but different geographic distribution was observed. It is quite possible that secondary contributing factor(s) interfere with the different geographic prevalence of HIVD.

  10. MRI DWI/ADC signal predicts shrinkage of lumbar disc herniation after O2-O3 discolysis.

    PubMed

    Perri, Marco; Grattacaso, Giuseppe; Di Tunno, Valeria; Marsecano, Claudia; Di Cesare, Ernesto; Splendiani, Alessandra; Gallucci, Massimo

    2015-04-01

    Evaluate the discal morpho-structural changes as a predictive sign in the clinical outcome after ozone therapy in lumbar disc herniation using the T2-shine through effect in diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI). One hundred and fifty-four patients suffering from lumbosciatica (89 men and 65 women; age range, 23-62 years) were included, previous MR study performed with FSE-T2 and T2-fat, SE-T1 and DWI sequences, and were randomly assigned to two groups. Seventy-seven patients (control group) underwent conservative treatment with intraforaminal injection of steroid and anaesthetic. The remaining 77 patients (study group) underwent the same treatment with the addition of oxygen-ozone (O2-O3). During the following six months, a MRI follow-up with the same sequences was performed. An intervertebral disc volumetric analysis (IDVA), DWI signal score and post treatment clinical outcome evaluation were performed for an assessment of hernia reduction. χ² test, Student's t test and analysis of covariance were used for comparison of variables. In the study group, 58 of 77 patients had a successful outcome (responders). In the responders group, DWI T2-shine through effect was present during MRI follow-up and in particular in 53 of 77 patients in six months of follow-up (p < 0.05). Moreover, in the same group a statistically significant disc shrinkage was shown by IDVA in sixth months of follow-up (p < 0.05). T2-shine through effect in DWI is present before morphological disc reduction and moreover could be considered as a predictive sign of response to oxygen-ozone treatment. © The Author(s) 2015 Reprints and permissions: sagepub.co.uk/journalsPermissions.nav.

  11. MRI DWI/ADC signal predicts shrinkage of lumbar disc herniation after O2–O3 discolysis

    PubMed Central

    Perri, Marco; Grattacaso, Giuseppe; Di Tunno, Valeria; Marsecano, Claudia; Di Cesare, Ernesto; Gallucci, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Evaluate the discal morpho-structural changes as a predictive sign in the clinical outcome after ozone therapy in lumbar disc herniation using the T2–shine through effect in diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI). Method One hundred and fifty-four patients suffering from lumbosciatica (89 men and 65 women; age range, 23–62 years) were included, previous MR study performed with FSE-T2 and T2-fat, SE-T1 and DWI sequences, and were randomly assigned to two groups. Seventy-seven patients (control group) underwent conservative treatment with intraforaminal injection of steroid and anaesthetic. The remaining 77 patients (study group) underwent the same treatment with the addition of oxygen–ozone (O2–O3). During the following six months, a MRI follow-up with the same sequences was performed. An intervertebral disc volumetric analysis (IDVA), DWI signal score and post treatment clinical outcome evaluation were performed for an assessment of hernia reduction. χ2 test, Student's t test and analysis of covariance were used for comparison of variables. Results In the study group, 58 of 77 patients had a successful outcome (responders). In the responders group, DWI T2–shine through effect was present during MRI follow-up and in particular in 53 of 77 patients in six months of follow-up (p < 0.05). Moreover, in the same group a statistically significant disc shrinkage was shown by IDVA in sixth months of follow-up (p < 0.05). Conclusions T2–shine through effect in DWI is present before morphological disc reduction and moreover could be considered as a predictive sign of response to oxygen–ozone treatment. PMID:25923680

  12. Comparative Analysis between Total Disc Replacement and Posterior Foraminotomy for Posterolateral Soft Disc Herniation with Unilateral Radiculopathy : Clinical and Biomechanical Results of a Minimum 5 Years Follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyoung-Tae; Cho, Dae-Chul; Sung, Joo-Kyung; Kim, Young-Baeg; Kim, Du Hwan

    2017-01-01

    Objective To compare the clinical outcomes and biomechanical effects of total disc replacement (TDR) and posterior cervical foraminotomy (PCF) and to propose relative inclusion criteria. Methods Thirty-five patients who underwent surgery between 2006 and 2008 were included. All patients had single-level disease and only radiculopathy. The overall sagittal balance and angle and height of a functional segmental unit (FSU; upper and lower vertebral body of the operative lesion) were assessed by preoperative and follow-up radiographs. C2–7 range of motion (ROM), FSU, and the adjacent segment were also checked. Results The clinical outcome of TDR (group A) was tended to be superior to that of PCF (group B) without statistical significance. In the group A, preoperative and postoperative upper adjacent segment level motion values were 8.6±2.3 and 8.4±2.0, and lower level motion values were 8.4±2.2 and 8.3±1.9. Preoperative and postoperative FSU heights were 37.0±2.1 and 37.1±1.8. In the group B, upper level adjacent segment motion values were 8.1±2.6 and 8.2±2.8, and lower level motion values were 6.5±3.3 and 6.3±3.1. FSU heights were 37.1±2.0 and 36.2±1.8. The postoperative FSU motion and height changes were significant (p<0.05). The patient’s satisfaction rates for surgery were 88.2% in group A and 88.8% in group B. Conclusion TDR and PCF have favorable outcomes in patients with unilateral soft disc herniation. However, patients have different biomechanical backgrounds, so the patient’s biomechanical characteristics and economic status should be understood and treated using the optimal procedure. PMID:28061490

  13. [The intervertebral vacuum phenomenon as a computed-tomographic finding in the dog and its significance as an indicator for surgical treatment of vertebral disc herniations].

    PubMed

    Söffler, C; Karpenstein, H; Kramer, M

    2014-04-16

    The intervertebral vacuum phenomenon (VP) in the dog describes an accumulation of gas in the intervertebral disc space. It occurs primarily after vaporization of solute gases in the extracellular fluids in fissures of degenerative vertebral discs but can also arise following a sudden fall in pressure, for example, after a vertebral disc herniation. VPs are detectable using radiography, computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Intervertebral VP occurrence is an indication for vertebral disc herniation. The aim of this study was to determine the frequency and localization of the VP in intervertebral disc spaces of dogs and further to correlate the incidence of intervertebral VP with vertebral disc herniation indicative for surgical treatment. We evaluated CT-studies of the vertebral column of dogs presented at the clinic between January 2007 and June 2012 (n = 693). In total, 529 cases fulfilled the inclusion criterion of a CT-study of the vertebral column from the first thoracic vertebra to the first sacral vertebra in the soft tissue and bone windows. The evaluation included an inter-observer comparison between observers with and without practical experience. Observers with and without practical experience identified intervertebral VP in 5.7% and 6.8% of the dogs, respectively, with a mean age of 7.7 ± 2.9 years and 7.3 ± 3.1 years, respectively. More male than female dogs were affected. In total, 66.7% and 63.9% of the dogs with VP, respectively, received surgical treatment of the vertebral column. The surgical site correlated with the location of the intervertebral VP in 55.0% and 65.2% of cases, respectively. Although intervertebral VP can indicate vertebral disc degeneration and herniation, it should not be considered a unique identifier. Localization for surgery should be based on clinical symptoms and CT- and/or MRI-findings showing vertebral disc herniation or compression of the spinal cord. Practical experience is unnecessary to

  14. The kinematics of anterior cervical discectomy and fusion versus artificial cervical disc: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Rabin, Doron; Pickett, Gwynedd E; Bisnaire, Lynn; Duggal, Neil

    2007-09-01

    Anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) for the management of cervical spondylosis may contribute to further degenerative changes at adjacent levels secondary to abnormal spinal motion. Insertion of a Bryan Cervical Disc (AD) (Medtronic Sofamor Danek, Memphis, TN) may prevent this accelerated degeneration. This retrospective study compares the in vivo x-ray cervical spine kinematics in patients with ACDF and AD. Ten patients with single-level AD were matched to 10 patients with single-level ACDF based on age and sex. Lateral neutral, flexion and extension cervical x-rays were obtained preoperatively and at regular intervals up to 24 months postoperatively. Kinematic parameters, including range of motion, anteroposterior translation, and disc height, were assessed for all cervical functional spinal units using quantitative motion analysis software. Changes in these parameters were compared between matched patients from both groups using paired Student's t tests. The range of motion at the operated level was greater in the AD group compared with the ACDF group at early (6.9 versus 0.89 degrees, P < 0.01) and late (8.4 versus 0.53 degrees, P < 0.01) follow-up evaluations. Translation was greater at the operated level in patients with AD at late follow-up (6.8 versus 0.8%, P < 0.03) evaluation. No significant between-group kinematic differences were seen at adjacent levels. Patients with AD and those with ACDF demonstrated similar in vivo adjacent level kinematics within the first 24 months after anterior cervical decompression.

  15. Clinical and radiologic comparison of dynamic cervical implant arthroplasty and cervical total disc replacement for single-level cervical degenerative disc disease.

    PubMed

    Shichang, Liu; Yueming, Song; Limin, Liu; Lei, Wang; Zhongjie, Zhou; Chunguang, Zhou; Xi, Yang

    2016-05-01

    Anterior cervical discectomy and fusion, to date the most successful spine procedure for the surgical treatment of cervical radiculopathy, has limitations that have led to the development of non-fusion cervical procedures, such as cervical total disc replacement (TDR) and dynamic cervical implant (DCI) arthroplasty. We compared the clinical and radiological results of DCI and cervical TDR for the treatment of single-level cervical degenerative disc disease in Chinese patients. A retrospective review of 179 patients with cervical spondylotic myelopathy who underwent DCI or TDR between April 2010 and October 2012 was conducted, and 152 consecutive patients (67 patients single-level DCI and 85 single-level TDR) who completed at least 2years of follow-up were included. Clinical and radiological assessments were performed preoperatively and at 1week and 3, 6, 12, and 24months postoperatively. The most common operative level was C5/C6 (49.3%). The differences in blood loss, duration of surgery, and duration of hospitalization were not statistically significant. The Japanese Orthopaedic Association scale, Visual Analog Scale, Neck Disability Index, and Short Form-36 scores improved significantly after surgery in both the DCI and TDR groups (P<0.05), but the differences were not statistically significant at the final follow-up. The rate of occurrence of heterotopic ossification was 22.4% and 28.2% in the DCI and TDR groups, respectively. As an effective non-fusion technique, DCI is a more economical procedure. Further prospective, randomized studies with long-term follow-up periods are needed to determine the long-term effects.

  16. Lumbar Disc Herniation Causing Cauda Equina Syndrome in a Paediatric Patient. A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Irshad, Mohamad; Ahmad, Khurshid; Malla, Hilal Ahmad

    2016-08-30

    Lumbar disc disease occurs mainly in the adult population. A disc prolapse in the paediatric population is very rare. Cauda equine syndrome resulting from compression of the cauda equina is a rare syndrome and is one of the few spinal surgical emergencies. Here we present a 13-year-old boy with pain in the lumbar region radiating bilaterally to the lower limbs, with asymmetrical weakness of lower the limbs, perianal hypoaesthesia and urinary retention. MRI of lumbar spine confirmed disc protrusion at the L3-L4 level with severe spinal canal stenosis. Patient was treated with microdiscectomy at the L3-L4 level. Postoperatively, his neurological deficit disappeared gradually. Although very rare, lumbar disc prolapse in the paediatric age group can lead to cauda equina syndrome. Early diagnosis and treatment can prevent life-long disability.

  17. Effects of segmental traction therapy on lumbar disc herniation in patients with acute low back pain measured by magnetic resonance imaging: A single arm clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Karimi, Noureddin; Akbarov, Parvin; Rahnama, Leila

    2017-01-01

    Low Back Pain (LBP) is considered as one of the most frequent disorders, which about 80% of adults experience in their lives. Lumbar disc herniation (LDH) is a cause for acute LBP. Among conservative treatments, traction is frequently used by clinicians to manage LBP resulting from LDH. However, there is still a lack of consensus about its efficacy. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of segmental traction therapy on lumbar discs herniation, pain, lumbar range of motion (ROM), and back extensor muscles endurance in patients with acute LBP induced by LDH. Fifteen patients with acute LBP diagnosed by LDH participated in the present study. Participants undertook 15 sessions of segmental traction therapy along with conventional physiotherapy, 5 times a week for 3 weeks. Lumbar herniated mass size was measured before and after the treatment protocol using magnetic resonance imaging. Furthermore, pain, lumbar ROM and back muscle endurance were evaluated before and after the procedure using clinical outcome measures. Following the treatment protocol, herniated mass size and patients' pain were reduced significantly. In addition, lumbar flexion ROM showed a significant improvement. However, no significant change was observed for back extensor muscle endurance after the treatment procedure. The result of the present study showed segmental traction therapy might play an important role in the treatment of acute LBP stimulated by LDH.

  18. Cervical disc arthroplasty with PRESTIGE LP disc versus anterior cervical discectomy and fusion: a prospective, multicenter investigational device exemption study.

    PubMed

    Gornet, Matthew F; Burkus, J Kenneth; Shaffrey, Mark E; Argires, Perry J; Nian, Hui; Harrell, Frank E

    2015-07-31

    OBJECT This study compared the safety and efficacy of treatment with the PRESTIGE LP cervical disc versus a historical control anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF). METHODS Prospectively collected PRESTIGE LP data from 20 investigational sites were compared with data from 265 historical control ACDF patients in the initial PRESTIGE Cervical Disc IDE study. The 280 investigational patients with single-level cervical disc disease with radiculopathy and/or myelopathy underwent arthroplasty with a low-profile artificial disc. Key safety/efficacy outcomes included Neck Disability Index (NDI), Neck and Arm Pain Numerical Rating Scale scores, 36-Item Short Form Health Survey (SF-36) score, work status, disc height, range of motion, adverse events (AEs), additional surgeries, and neurological status. Clinical and radiographic evaluations were completed preoperatively, intraoperatively, and at 1.5, 3, 6, 12, and 24 months postoperatively. Predefined Bayesian statistical methods with noninformative priors were used, along with the propensity score technique for controlling confounding factors. Analysis by independent statisticians confirmed initial statistical findings. RESULTS The investigational and control groups were mostly similar demographically. There was no significant difference in blood loss (51.0 ml [investigational] vs 57.1 ml [control]) or hospital stay (0.98 days [investigational] vs 0.95 days [control]). The investigational group had a significantly longer operative time (1.49 hours vs 1.38 hours); 95% Bayesian credible interval of the difference was 0.01-0.21 hours. Significant improvements versus preoperative in NDI, neck/arm pain, SF-36, and neurological status were achieved by 1.5 months in both groups and were sustained at 24 months. Patient follow-up at 24 months was 97.1% for the investigational group and 84.0% for the control group. The mean NDI score improvements versus preoperative exceeded 30 points in both groups at 12 and 24 months. SF

  19. Correlation of 1.5 Tesla Magnetic Resonance Imaging with Clinical and Intraoperative Findings for Lumbar Disc Herniation

    PubMed Central

    Bhave, Arvind; Patil, Sanjay

    2016-01-01

    Study Design A single-center prospective study. Purpose A magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan is undeniably the gold standard for the diagnosis of a lumbar disc prolapse. Unfortunately it shares a strong association with incidental findings. In this study, we aimed to determine the extent to which a 1.5 Tesla MRI correlates with the clinical features and intraoperative findings in cases of lumbar disc prolapse. Overview of Literature Few studies have correlated MRI with clinical findings, and none have extended this correlation to intraoperative findings. Methods Over a 2-year period, 50 consecutive patients with lumbar disc herniation requiring discectomy were studied. The MRI findings we observed consisted of the prolapse level, type, position, migration, high-intensity zones (HIZ), lateral recess, and foraminal stenosis. A logistic regression analysis was performed to determine the significance for the various MRI findings. Finally, the MRI observations were confirmed with intraoperative findings and inferences were drawn. Results MRI scan sensitivity and specificity for determining surgically significant levels was 100% and 94.94%, respectively. Straight leg raising test was positive in 74% of patients, with 85%, 43%, and 75% for paracentral, central, and foraminal levels, respectively. A foraminal compromise was the only MRI parameter to share a significant association with neurological deficits. Patients with a HIZ on the MRI had a significant increase in back pain and 63% exhibited identifiable annular tears intraoperatively. The intraoperative anatomical findings correlated extensively with the MRI findings. Conclusions MRI findings strongly correlate with intraoperative features and can serve as a useful tool when planning surgery due to the accurate depiction of the morphometric features. However, the decision for surgery should be made only when detailed clinical findings in conjunction with MRI findings allow for an accurate identification of the

  20. Motor control exercise for symptomatic lumbar disc herniation: protocol for a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Pourahmadi, Mohammad Reza; Taghipour, Morteza; Ebrahimi Takamjani, Ismail; Sanjari, Mohammad Ali; Mohseni-Bandpei, Mohammad Ali; Keshtkar, Abbas Ali

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Lumbar disc herniation (LDH) is a common condition in adults and can impose a heavy burden on both the individual and society. It is defined as displacement of disc components beyond the intervertebral disc space. Various conservative treatments have been recommended for the treatment of LDH and physical therapy plays a major role in the management of patients. Therapeutic exercise is effective for relieving pain and improving function in individuals with symptomatic LDH. The aim of this systematic review is to evaluate the effectiveness of motor control exercise (MCE) for symptomatic LDH. Methods and analysis We will include all clinical trial studies with a concurrent control group which evaluated the effect of MCEs in patients with symptomatic LDH. We will search PubMed, SCOPUS, PEDro, SPORTDiscus, CINAHL, CENTRAL and EMBASE with no restriction of language. Primary outcomes of this systematic review are pain intensity and functional disability and secondary outcomes are functional tests, muscle thickness, quality of life, return to work, muscle endurance and adverse events. Study selection and data extraction will be performed by two independent reviewers. The assessment of risk of bias will be implemented using the PEDro scale. Publication bias will be assessed by funnel plots, Begg's and Egger's tests. Heterogeneity will be evaluated using the I2 statistic and the χ2 test. In addition, subgroup analyses will be conducted for population and the secondary outcomes. All meta-analyses will be performed using Stata V.12 software. Ethics and dissemination No ethical concerns are predicted. The systematic review findings will be published in a peer-reviewed journal and will also be presented at national/international academic and clinical conferences. Trial registration number CRD42016038166. PMID:27678542

  1. Lumbar disc herniation: Is there an association between histological and magnetic resonance imaging findings?

    PubMed Central

    Majeed, Shiju A; Seshadrinath, N Arun Kumar; Binoy, Kavitha Ravi; Raji, Laila

    2016-01-01

    Background: Although validated radiological scoring systems and histological scoring system of surgically removed degenerated disc are used in assessment of progression of intervertebral disc degeneration, there have not been many studies that integrate these two aspects of assessments. The data available in this respect are very limited. This clinical study was designed to find the correlation between quantitative radiological score (Pfirmann grading system and Modic changes [MC]) and quantitative histological degeneration score (HDS). Materials and Methods: A cohort of 77 patients (45 males, 32 females; mean age of 38 years [range 18–58 years]) who presented with complaints of discogenic pain or radiculopathy at single level were assessed radiologically. They were graded according to the radiological pattern. The surgically excised disc specimen was graded according to HDS. The degree of radiological changes were correlated with the degree of histological changes. Results: Though the overall HDS (0–15) did not show statistically significant correlation with Pfirmann grading system, there were positive association found between mucoid degeneration, chondrocyte proliferation with the Pfirmann grading and mucoid degeneration, which were statistically significant. Female sex also had a higher association with instability pattern. Conclusion: The study shows that the Pfirmann grading system, MCs and HDS can reliably be used as scoring systems for assessing lumbar disc degeneration. The radiological assessment can be used as a noninvasive tool to assess the probable change in content rather than the microstructure of a disc undergoing degeneration. PMID:27293282

  2. Differences between 1- and 2-level cervical arthroplasty: more heterotopic ossification in 2-level disc replacement: Clinical article.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jau-Ching; Huang, Wen-Cheng; Tsai, Hsiao-Wen; Ko, Chin-Chu; Fay, Li-Yu; Tu, Tsung-Hsi; Wu, Ching-Lan; Cheng, Henrich

    2012-06-01

    The most currently accepted indication for cervical arthroplasty is 1- or 2-level degenerative disc disease (DDD) refractory to medical treatment. However, the randomized and controlled clinical trials by the US FDA investigational device exemption studies only compared cervical arthroplasty with anterior cervical discectomy and fusion for 1-level disease. Theoretically, 2-level cervical spondylosis usually implicates more advanced degeneration, whereas the 1-level DDD can be caused by merely a soft-disc herniation. This study aimed to investigate the differences between 1- and 2-level cervical arthroplasty. The authors analyzed data obtained in 87 consecutive patients who underwent 1- or 2-level cervical arthroplasty with Bryan disc. The patients were divided into the 1-level and the 2-level treatment groups. Clinical outcomes were measured using the visual analog scale (VAS) for the neck and arm pain and the Neck Disability Index (NDI), with a minimum follow-up of 30 months. Radiographic outcomes were evaluated on both radiographs and CT scans. The study analyzed 98 levels of Bryan cervical arthroplasty in 70 patients (80.5%) who completed the evaluations in a mean follow-up period of 46.21 ± 9.85 months. There were 22 females (31.4%) and 48 males (68.6%), whose mean age was 46.57 ± 10.07 years at the time of surgery. The 1-level group had 42 patients (60.0%), while the 2-level group had 28 patients (40.0%). Patients in the 1-level group were younger than those in the 2-level group (mean 45.00 vs 48.93 years, p = 0.111 [not significant]). Proportional sex compositions and perioperative prescription of nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drugs were also similar in both groups (p = 0.227 and p = 1.000). The 2-level group had significantly greater EBL during surgery than the 1-level group (220.80 vs 111.89 ml, p = 0.024). Heterotopic ossification was identified more frequently in the 2-level group than the 1-level group (75.0% vs 40.5%, p = 0.009). Although most of the

  3. Artificial Discs for Lumbar and Cervical Degenerative Disc Disease –Update

    PubMed Central

    2006-01-01

    Executive Summary Objective To assess the safety and efficacy of artificial disc replacement (ADR) technology for degenerative disc disease (DDD). Clinical Need Degenerative disc disease is the term used to describe the deterioration of 1 or more intervertebral discs of the spine. The prevalence of DDD is roughly described in proportion to age such that 40% of people aged 40 years have DDD, increasing to 80% among those aged 80 years or older. Low back pain is a common symptom of lumbar DDD; neck and arm pain are common symptoms of cervical DDD. Nonsurgical treatments can be used to relieve pain and minimize disability associated with DDD. However, it is estimated that about 10% to 20% of people with lumbar DDD and up to 30% with cervical DDD will be unresponsive to nonsurgical treatments. In these cases, surgical treatment is considered. Spinal fusion (arthrodesis) is the process of fusing or joining 2 bones and is considered the surgical gold standard for DDD. Artificial disc replacement is the replacement of the degenerated intervertebral disc with an artificial disc in people with DDD of the lumbar or cervical spine that has been unresponsive to nonsurgical treatments for at least 6 months. Unlike spinal fusion, ADR preserves movement of the spine, which is thought to reduce or prevent the development of adjacent segment degeneration. Additionally, a bone graft is not required for ADR, and this alleviates complications, including bone graft donor site pain and pseudoarthrosis. It is estimated that about 5% of patients who require surgery for DDD will be candidates for ADR. Review Strategy The Medical Advisory Secretariat conducted a computerized search of the literature published between 2003 and September 2005 to answer the following questions: What is the effectiveness of ADR in people with DDD of the lumbar or cervical regions of the spine compared with spinal fusion surgery? Does an artificial disc reduce the incidence of adjacent segment degeneration (ASD

  4. Artificial discs for lumbar and cervical degenerative disc disease -update: an evidence-based analysis.

    PubMed

    2006-01-01

    To assess the safety and efficacy of artificial disc replacement (ADR) technology for degenerative disc disease (DDD). Degenerative disc disease is the term used to describe the deterioration of 1 or more intervertebral discs of the spine. The prevalence of DDD is roughly described in proportion to age such that 40% of people aged 40 years have DDD, increasing to 80% among those aged 80 years or older. Low back pain is a common symptom of lumbar DDD; neck and arm pain are common symptoms of cervical DDD. Nonsurgical treatments can be used to relieve pain and minimize disability associated with DDD. However, it is estimated that about 10% to 20% of people with lumbar DDD and up to 30% with cervical DDD will be unresponsive to nonsurgical treatments. In these cases, surgical treatment is considered. Spinal fusion (arthrodesis) is the process of fusing or joining 2 bones and is considered the surgical gold standard for DDD. Artificial disc replacement is the replacement of the degenerated intervertebral disc with an artificial disc in people with DDD of the lumbar or cervical spine that has been unresponsive to nonsurgical treatments for at least 6 months. Unlike spinal fusion, ADR preserves movement of the spine, which is thought to reduce or prevent the development of adjacent segment degeneration. Additionally, a bone graft is not required for ADR, and this alleviates complications, including bone graft donor site pain and pseudoarthrosis. It is estimated that about 5% of patients who require surgery for DDD will be candidates for ADR. The Medical Advisory Secretariat conducted a computerized search of the literature published between 2003 and September 2005 to answer the following questions: What is the effectiveness of ADR in people with DDD of the lumbar or cervical regions of the spine compared with spinal fusion surgery?Does an artificial disc reduce the incidence of adjacent segment degeneration (ASD) compared with spinal fusion?What is the rate of major

  5. Does local lavage influence functional recovery during lumber discectomy of disc herniation?: One year's systematic follow-up of 410 patients.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Ru-Sen; Ren, Yi-Ming; Yuan, Jian-Jun; Cui, Zi-Jian; Wan, Jun; Fan, Bao-You; Lin, Wei; Zhou, Xian-Hu; Zhang, Xue-Li

    2016-10-01

    Lumbar disc herniation (LDH) is a common disease and lumbar discectomy is the most common surgical procedure carried out for patients with low back pain and leg symptoms. Although most researchers are focusing on the surgical techniques during operation, the aim of this study is to evaluate the effect of local intervertebral lavage during microdiscectomy.In this retrospective study, 410 patients were operated on by microdiscectomy for LDH during 2011 to 2014. Retrospectively, 213 of them (group A) accepted local intervertebral irrigation with saline water before wound closure and 197 patients (group B) only had their operative field irrigated with saline water. Systematic records of visual analog scores (VAS), Oswestry disability Index (ODI) questionnaire scale scores, use of analgesia, and hospital length of stay were done after hospitalization.The majority (80.49%) of the cases were diagnosed with lumber herniation at the levels of L4/5 and L5/S1. Fifty-one patients had herniations at 2 levels. There were significant decreases of VAS scores and ODI in both groups between preoperation and postoperation of different time points. VAS scores decreased more in group A than group B at early stage of postoperation follow-up. However, there were no statistically significant differences between 2 groups in using analgesia, VAS and ODI up to 1 month of follow-up.Microdiscectomy for LDH offers a marked improvement in back and radicular pain. Local irrigation of herniated lumber disc area could relief dick herniation-derived low back pain and leg radicular pain at early stage of post-operation. However, the pain relief of this intervention was not noticeable for a long period.

  6. L5-S1 Achromobacter xylosoxidans infection secondary to oxygen-ozone therapy for the treatment of lumbosacral disc herniation: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Fort, Nicholas M; Aichmair, Alexander; Miller, Andy O; Girardi, Federico P

    2014-03-15

    Case report and literature review. To present a unique case of Achromobacter xylosoxidans infection secondary to oxygen-ozone therapy for the treatment of L5-S1 disc herniation. Oxygen-ozone therapy is a minimally invasive technique for the treatment of lumbar disc herniations, with unproven efficacy and few reported complications. Achromobacter xylosoxidans is an opportunistic pathogen that inhabits aquatic environments and is a rare cause of osteomyelitis. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of A. xylosoxidans spondylodiscitis in the lumbar spine and the third report of spinal infection after intradiscal oxygen-ozone chemonucleolysis in the English literature. The medical records, operative reports, and radiographical imaging studies of a single patient were retrospectively reviewed. A 29-year-old female patient who previously underwent oxygen-ozone therapy for L5-S1 disc herniation presented to our institution with a 5-month history of intractable back and leg pain. The patient's laboratory studies were within normal limits and did not indicate signs of an active infection. Her physical examination revealed globally decreased muscle strength (4/5) and hyperesthesia in the lower extremities. Magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography revealed severe disc degeneration and vertebral body endplate changes at L5-S1, in addition to paravertebral soft tissue swelling consistent with a previous infection. Given the severity of symptoms, the patient underwent anterior lumbar interbody fusion and posterior segmental instrumentation at L5-S1. Histopathological evaluation of the disc material confirmed the diagnosis of chronic osteomyelitis and septic discitis at L5-S1. Intraoperative cultures grew A. xylosoxidans and Propionibacterium acnes. The patient had prompt improvement in her level of pain and was discharged on a 6-week course of piperacillin-tazobactam without complication. This first report of A. xylosoxidans vertebral infection

  7. The prognostic value of cerebrospinal fluid characteristics in dogs without deep pain perception due to thoracolumbar disc herniation.

    PubMed

    Chamisha, Y; Aroch, I; Kuzi, S; Srugo, I; Bdolah-Abram, T; Chai, O; Christopher, M M; Merbl, Y; Rothwell, K; Shamir, M H

    2015-06-01

    Providing a pre-operative prognosis for dogs presented with absent deep pain perception (DPP) is extremely challenging, as the overall recovery rates widely vary. This study assesses the possible correlation between the severity of spinal cord injury and CSF cytology in 31 paraplegic dogs presented with absent DPP due to acute thoracolumbar intervertebral disc herniation (TL-IVDH). All dogs underwent surgical decompression immediately following diagnosis. CSF TNCC, macrophage percentage and macrophage to monocyte (MΦ:M) ratio were significantly higher in dogs that failed to regain DPP within 10 days post-operatively and in dogs that failed to regain ambulation at the end of the study period (P< 0.05). MΦ:M of 0.73 and higher corresponded to a sensitivity of 54% and specificity of 100% for prediction of a negative long-term outcome. CSF TNCC, macrophage percentage and MΦ:M ratio effectively predicted regaining DPP and the long-term outcome in dogs that lost DPP due to acute TL-IVDH. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  8. [Lumbar disc herniation: Natural history, role of physical examination, timing of surgery, treatment options and conflicts of interests].

    PubMed

    Delgado-López, Pedro David; Rodríguez-Salazar, Antonio; Martín-Alonso, Javier; Martín-Velasco, Vicente

    Indication for surgery in lumbar disc herniation (LDH) varies widely depending on the geographical area. A literature review is presented on the natural history, role of physical examination, timing of surgery, evidence-based treatment, and conflicts of interests in LDH. Surgery is shown to provide significant faster relief of pain compared to conservative therapy, although the effect fades after a year. There is no treatment modality better than the rest in terms of pain control and neurological recovery, nor is there a surgical technique clearly superior to simple discectomy. The lack of sound scientific evidence on the surgical indication may contribute to its great geographical variability. Since LDH has a favourable natural history, neuroimaging and surgery should not be considered until after a 6-week period. It is necessary to specify and respect the surgical indications for LDH, avoiding conflicts of interests. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Neurocirugía. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  9. Integrative TCM Conservative Therapy for Low Back Pain due to Lumbar Disc Herniation: A Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Wei An; Huang, Shi Rong; Guo, Kai; Sun, Wu Quan; Xi, Xiao Bing; Zhang, Ming Cai; Kong, Ling Jun; Lu, Hua; Zhan, Hong Sheng; Cheng, Ying Wu

    2013-01-01

    Low back pain due to lumbar disc herniation (LDH) is very common in clinic. This randomized controlled trial was designed to investigate the effects of integrative TCM conservative therapy for low back pain due to LDH. A total of 408 patients with low back pain due to LDH were randomly assigned to an experimental group with integrative TCM therapy and a control group with normal conservative treatment by the ratio of 3 : 1. The primary outcome was the pain by the visual analogue scale (VAS). The secondary outcome was the low back functional activities by Chinese Short Form Oswestry Disability Index (C-SFODI). Immediately after treatment, patients in the experimental group experienced significant improvements in VAS and C-SFODI compared with the control group (between-group difference in mean change from baseline, −16.62 points, P < 0.001 in VAS; −15.55 points, P < 0.001 in C-SFODI). The difference remained at one-month followup, but it is only significant in C-SFODI at six-month followup (−7.68 points, P < 0.001). No serious adverse events were observed. These findings suggest that integrative TCM therapy may be a beneficial complementary and alternative therapy for patients with low back pain due to LDH. PMID:23864883

  10. Integrative TCM Conservative Therapy for Low Back Pain due to Lumbar Disc Herniation: A Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Wei An; Huang, Shi Rong; Guo, Kai; Sun, Wu Quan; Xi, Xiao Bing; Zhang, Ming Cai; Kong, Ling Jun; Lu, Hua; Zhan, Hong Sheng; Cheng, Ying Wu

    2013-01-01

    Low back pain due to lumbar disc herniation (LDH) is very common in clinic. This randomized controlled trial was designed to investigate the effects of integrative TCM conservative therapy for low back pain due to LDH. A total of 408 patients with low back pain due to LDH were randomly assigned to an experimental group with integrative TCM therapy and a control group with normal conservative treatment by the ratio of 3 : 1. The primary outcome was the pain by the visual analogue scale (VAS). The secondary outcome was the low back functional activities by Chinese Short Form Oswestry Disability Index (C-SFODI). Immediately after treatment, patients in the experimental group experienced significant improvements in VAS and C-SFODI compared with the control group (between-group difference in mean change from baseline, -16.62 points, P < 0.001 in VAS; -15.55 points, P < 0.001 in C-SFODI). The difference remained at one-month followup, but it is only significant in C-SFODI at six-month followup (-7.68 points, P < 0.001). No serious adverse events were observed. These findings suggest that integrative TCM therapy may be a beneficial complementary and alternative therapy for patients with low back pain due to LDH.

  11. Comparative analysis of the influence of Fructus Ligustri Lucidi on a rat lumbar disc herniation model.

    PubMed

    Han, Ya-Xin; Liang, Dong; Han, Xiao-Rui; Liang, De-Yong

    2015-07-01

    Lumbar disc herniation (LDH) is a term used for a group of conditions, including back pain, femoral nerve pain and sciatica. Currently available treatments and surgical options are insufficient for patients with LDH. Fructus Ligustri Lucidi (FLL) is a herb that is used for treating age-associated diseases. The results of the present study suggested that FLL may be used for treatment of patients with LDH. In the present study, matrix metalloproteinase-1, -3, -8 and -9 (MMP-1, -3, -8 and -9) protein and mRNA expression downregulation was observed in patients with LDH according to western blotting and reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction. By contrast, upregulation of interleukin-2 (IL-2), IL-6, IL-8 and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) expression was observed in patients with LDH, according to an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Mechanical allodynia was observed in rats with LDH not treated with FLL; however, not in FLL‑treated rats. IL-2, IL-6, IL-8 and TNF-α expression levels in the serum from untreated rats were significantly higher than that of the FLL‑treated rat models. Protein expression levels of MMPs in FLL-treated rats were lower than those in untreated rats. However, the mechanisms underlying the association between FLL and protein expression levels require further investigation.

  12. Lumbar disc herniations: the predictive value of the Health Attribution Test (HAT) and the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI).

    PubMed

    Herron, L D; Turner, J A; Weiner, P

    1988-01-01

    Ninety-one patients who were treated for lumbar disc herniation with chymopapain chemonucleolysis were evaluated preoperatively by means of the Health Attribution Test (HAT) and the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI). There were 54 good, 10 fair, and 27 poor results after chemo-nucleolysis. Nineteen patients subsequently underwent lumbar laminectomy and discectomy and the ultimate outcome for the entire series including these laminectomy patients was 66 good, 10 fair, and 15 poor results. The fair/poor chemonucleolysis outcome patients scored significantly lower than did the good outcome patients on the HAT Powerful Others and significantly higher on the Chance scale. Patients with fair or poor outcomes after chemonucleolysis only scored significantly higher on the Hypochondriasis, Hysteria, Psychopathic Deviate, Paranoia, and Hypomania scales in preoperative MMPI testing. Good versus fair/poor ultimate outcome patients differed significantly on preoperative MMPI Hypochondriasis, Hysteria, Psychopathic Deviate, Paranoia, Psychasthenia, Schizophrenia, Hypomania, and Social Introversion scales. These groups also differed significantly on preoperative HAT Internal and Chance scales. Further analyses found the MMPI to be a slightly better predictor of chemonucleolysis outcome and much better predictor of ultimate outcome than the HAT.

  13. Optimal screw orientation for the fixation of cervical degenerative disc disease using nonlinear C3-T2 multi-level spinal models and neuro-genetic algorithms.

    PubMed

    Chang, Ting-Kuo; Hsu, Ching-Chi; Chen, Kuan-Ting

    2015-01-01

    Anterior cervical discectomy and fusion is a common surgical procedure performed to remove a degenerative or herniated disc in cervical spine. Unfortunately, clinical complications of anterior cervical plate (ACP) systems still occur, such as weak fixation stability and implant loosening. Previous researchers have attempted to ameliorate these complications by varying screw orientations, but the screw orientations are mainly determined according to the investigator's experiences. Thus, the aim of this study was to discover the optimal screw orientations of ACP systems to achieve acceptable fixation stability using finite element simulations and engineering algorithms. Three-dimensional finite element models of C3-T2 multi-level segments with an ACP system were first developed to analyze the fixation stability using ANSYS Workbench 14.5. Then, artificial neural networks were applied to create one objective function, and the optimal screw orientations of an ACP system were discovered by genetic algorithms. Finally, the numerical models and the optimization study were validated using biomechanical tests. The results showed that the optimal design of the ACP system had highest fixation stability compared with other ACP designs. The neuro-genetic algorithm has effectively reduced the time and effort required for discovering for the optimal screw orientations of an ACP system. The optimum screw orientation of the ACP system could be successfully discovered, and it revealed excellent fixation stability for the treatment of cervical degenerative disc disease. This study could directly provide the biomechanical rationale and surgical suggestion to orthopedic surgeons.

  14. Cost Utility Analysis of Lumbar Interlaminar Epidural Injections in the Treatment of Lumbar Disc Herniation, Central Spinal Stenosis, and Axial or Discogenic Low Back Pain.

    PubMed

    Manchikanti, Laxmaiah; Pampati, Vidyasagar; Benyamin, Ramsin M; Hirsch, Joshua A

    2017-05-01

    Cost utility or cost effective analysis continues to take center stage in the United States for defining and measuring the value of treatments in interventional pain management. Appropriate cost utility analysis has been performed for caudal epidural injections, percutaneous adhesiolysis, and spinal cord stimulation. However, the literature pertaining to lumbar interlaminar epidural injections is lacking, specifically in reference to cost utility analysis derived from randomized controlled trials (RCTs) with a pragmatic approach in a practical setting. To assess the cost utility of lumbar interlaminar epidural injections in managing chronic low back and/or lower extremity pain secondary to lumbar disc herniation, spinal stenosis, and axial or discogenic low back pain. Analysis based on 3 previously published randomized trials of effectiveness of lumbar interlaminar epidural injections assessing their role in disc herniation, spinal stenosis, and axial or discogenic pain. A contemporary, private, specialty referral interventional pain management center in the United States. Cost utility of lumbar interlaminar epidural injections with or without steroids in managing lumbar disc herniation, central spinal stenosis, and discogenic or axial low back pain was conducted with data derived from 3 RCTs that included a 2-year follow-up, with inclusion of 360 patients. The primary outcome was significant improvement defined as at least a 50% in pain reduction and disability status. Direct payment data from 2016 was utilized for assessment of procedural costs. Overall costs, including drug costs, were determined by multiplication of direct procedural payment data by a factor of 1.4 to accommodate for indirect payments respectively for disc herniation, spinal stenosis, discogenic pain. The results of 3 RCTs showed direct cost utility for one year of quality-adjusted life year (QALY) of $2,050.87 for disc herniation, $2,112.25 for axial or discogenic pain without disc herniation

  15. Cervical artificial disc replacement versus fusion in the cervical spine: a systematic review comparing long-term follow-up results from two FDA trials

    PubMed Central

    Mummaneni, Praveen V.; Amin, Beejal Y.; Wu, Jau-Ching; Brodt, Erika D.; Dettori, Joseph R.; Sasso, Rick C.

    2012-01-01

    Study design: Systematic review. Clinical question: Does single-level unconstrained, semiconstrained, or fully constrained cervical artificial disc replacement (C-ADR) improve health outcomes compared with single-level anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) in the long-term? Methods: A systematic review was undertaken for articles published up to October 2011. Electronic databases and reference lists of key articles were searched to identify US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) studies reporting long-term (≥ 48 months) follow-up results of C-ADR compared with ACDF. Non-FDA trials and FDA trials reporting outcomes at short-term or mid-term follow-up periods were excluded. Two independent reviewers assessed the strength of evidence using the GRADE criteria and disagreements were resolved by consensus. Results: Two FDA trials reporting outcomes following C-ADR (Bryan disc, Prestige disc) versus ACDF at follow-up periods of 48 months and 60 months were found (follow-up rates are 68.7% [318/463] and 50.1% [271/541], respectively). Patients in the C-ADR group showed a higher rate of overall success, greater improvements in Neck Disability Index, neck and arm pain scores, and SF-36 PhysicalComponent Scores at long-term follow-up compared with those in the ACDF group. The rate of adjacent segment disease was less in the C-ADR group versus the ACDF group at 60 months (2.9% vs 4.9%). Normal segmental motion was maintained in the C-ADR group. Furthermore, rates of revision and supplemental fixation surgical procedures were lower in the arthroplasty group. Conclusions: C-ADR is a viable treatment option for cervical herniated disc/spondylosis with radiculopathy resulting in improved clinical outcomes, maintenance of normal segmental motion, and low rates of subsequent surgical procedures at 4 to 5 years follow-up. More studies with long-term follow-up are warranted. PMID:23236315

  16. Assessing the Effect of Spaceflight on the Propensity for Astronauts to Develop Disc Herniation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feiveson, A.; Mendez, C.; Somers, J.

    2015-01-01

    A previous study reported that the instantaneous risk of developing a Herniated Nucleus Pulposus (HNP) was higher in astronauts who had flown at least one mission, as compared with those in the corps who had not yet flown. However, the study only analyzed time to HNP after the first mission (if any) and did not account for the possible effects of multiple missions. While many HNPs occurred well into astronauts' careers or in somecases years after retirement, the higher incidence of HNPs relatively soon after completion of space missions appears to indicate that spaceflight may lead to an increased risk of HNP. In addition, when an HNP occurs after spaceflight, is it related to previous spaceflight exposure? The purpose of this study was to investigate whether multiple missions, sex, age, vehicle landing dynamics, and flight duration affect the risk of developing an HNP usinga competing risks model. The outcome of the study will inform the Human System Risk Board assessment of back pain, inform the risk of injury due to dynamic loads, and update the previous dataset, which contained events up to December 31, 2006.

  17. Effects of acupuncture, core-stability exercises, and treadmill walking exercises in treating a patient with postsurgical lumbar disc herniation: a clinical case report.

    PubMed

    Ganiyu, Sokunbi Oluwaleke; Gujba, Kachalla Fatimah

    2015-02-01

    The objective of this study is to investigate the effects of acupuncture, core-stability exercises, and treadmill 12-minute walking exercises in treating patients with postsurgical lumbar disc herniation. A 34-year-old woman with a history lumbar disc prolapse who had undergone lumbar disc surgery on two different occasions was treated using acupuncture, core-stability exercises, and treadmill walking exercises three times per week for 12 weeks. The outcome measures used in this study were pain intensity, spinal range of movement, and general health. After 12 weeks of treatment, the patient had made improvement in terms of pain, which was reduced from 9/10 to 1/10. In a similar vein, the patient's general health showed improvement of >100% after 12 weeks of treatment. Pre-treatment scores of spinal flexion and left-side flexion, which measured 20 cm and 12 cm, respectively, increased to 25 cm and 16 cm after 12 weeks of treatment. This study showed that acupuncture, core-stability exercises, and treadmill walking exercises were useful in relieving pain, increasing spinal range of movement, and improving the health of a patient with postsurgical lumbar disc herniation. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  18. Preoperative estimation of disc herniation recurrence after microdiscectomy: predictive value of a multivariate model based on radiographic parameters.

    PubMed

    Belykh, Evgenii; Krutko, Alexander V; Baykov, Evgenii S; Giers, Morgan B; Preul, Mark C; Byvaltsev, Vadim A

    2017-03-01

    Recurrence of lumbar disc herniation (rLDH) is one of the unfavorable outcomes after microdiscectomy. Prediction of the patient population with increased risk of rLDH is important because patients may benefit from preventive measures or other surgical options. The study assessed preoperative factors associated with rLDH after microdiscectomy and created a mathematical model for estimation of chances for rLDH. This is a retrospective case-control study. The study includes patients who underwent microdiscectomy for LDH. Lumbar disc herniation recurrence was determined using magnetic resonance imaging. The study included 350 patients with LDH and a minimum of 3 years of follow-up. Patients underwent microdiscectomy for LDH at the L4-L5 and L5-S1 levels from 2008 to 2012. Patients were divided into two groups to identify predictors of recurrence: those who developed rLDH (n=50) within 3 years and those who did not develop rLDH (n=300) within the same follow-up period. Multivariate analysis was performed using patient baseline clinical and radiography data. Non-linear, multivariate, logistic regression analysis was used to build a predictive model. Recurrence of LDH occurred within 1 to 48 months after microdiscectomy. Preoperatively, patients who developed rLDH were smokers (70% vs. 27%, p<.01; odds ratio [OR]=6.31, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 3.27-12.16) and had higher body mass index (29.0±6.1 vs. 27.0±4.3, p=.03; OR=1.09 per 0.01 unit change). Radiological parameters that were associated with rLDH were higher disc height index (0.35±0.007 vs. 0.26±0.002, p<.001), higher segmental range of motion (9.8±0.28° vs. 7.6±0.11°, p<.001; OR=0.53 per 0.01 unit change), and lower central angle of lumbar lordosis (33.4±0.81° vs. 47.1±0.47°, p<.001; OR=0.53 per 0.01 unit change). Additionally, Pfirrmann grade 3 (OR=16.62, 95% CI: 8.10-34.11), protrusion type of LDH (OR=5.90, 95% CI: 3.06-11.36), and Grogan sclerosis grades 3 and 4 (OR=4.81, 95% CI: 2.50-9.22) were

  19. Comparison of single-level cervical fusion and a metal-on-metal cervical disc replacement device.

    PubMed

    Riina, Joseph; Patel, Amisha; Dietz, John W; Hoskins, Jeffery S; Trammell, Terry R; Schwartz, David D

    2008-04-01

    Cervical fusion is the common treatment for cervical disc disease but can cause secondary disorders. The Prestige ST cervical disc prosthesis (Medtronic Sofamor Danek, Memphis, TN) was designed to preserve spinal motion to potentially limit the secondary disorders. In this article, we report 2-year results from a single-center study comparing use of this device with use of anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF). Nineteen patients were prospectively randomized to receive the device or to undergo ACDF. Twenty-four months after surgery, patients who received the device demonstrated improvement in neck pain, arm pain, and neurologic function. In our cohort, patients who underwent arthroplasty demonstrated greater improvement in neurologic function and neck pain than patients who underwent cervical discectomy and fusion.

  20. Long term preservation of motion with artificial cervical disc implants: A comparison between cervical disc replacement and rigid fusion with cage

    PubMed Central

    Cincu, Rafael; Lorente, Francisco de Asis; Gomez, Joaquin; Eiras, Jose; Agrawal, Amit

    2014-01-01

    Background: With the advancement of technologies there is more interest in the maintenance of the spine's biomechanical properties focusing on the preservation of the functional motion segment. In present article we describe our experience with 25 cases managed with artificial cervical discs with 28 Solis cage following cervical discectomy with a mean follow-up period of 7.5 year. Materials and Methods: All surgeries were performed by single surgeon from March 2004 to June 2005 with a follow-up till date. Patients with symptomatic single or multiple level diseases that had no prior cervical surgery were candidates for the study. Cohort demographics were comparable. Standardized clinical outcome measures and radiographic examinations were used at prescribed post-operative intervals to compare the treatment groups. Relief in radicular pain, cervical spine motion, and degenerative changes at follow-up were noted. Results: In a total 53 cases, the mean age in prosthesis group was 47 years (age range: 30-63 years) and mean age in cage group was 44 years (32-62 years). Mean hospital stay was 2.7 days in both the groups. At 4 weeks complete cervical movements could be achieved in 19 cases in artificial disc group. Maintenance of movement after 7.5 years was in 76% of these patients. Lordosis was maintained in all cases till date. There was no mortality or wound infection in our series. Conclusions: We conclude that artificial cervical disc could be an alternative to fixed spinal fusion as it represents the most physiological substitute of disc. However, there is need for further studies to support the use of artificial cervical disc prosthesis. PMID:25685218

  1. Cervical Disc Arthroplasty with Prestige LP Disc Versus Anterior Cervical Discectomy and Fusion: Seven-Year Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Burkus, J. Kenneth; Shaffrey, Mark E.; Nian, Hui; Harrell, Frank E.

    2016-01-01

    Background Cervical disc arthroplasty (CDA) has emerged as an alternative to anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) for the treatment of cervical pathologies. Studies are on-going to assess the long term outcomes of CDA. This study assessed the safety and efficacy of the Prestige® LP Disc at 84-months follow up. Methods Prospective data from 280 CDA patients with single-level cervical disc disease with radiculopathy or myelopathy were compared with 265 historical control ACDF patients. Clinical and radiographic follow up was completed pre-operatively, intraoperatively, and at intervals up to 84 months. Results Follow-up rate was 75.9% for CDA and 70.0% for ACDF patients. Statistical improvements (p < 0.001) in Neck Disability Index (NDI), neck/arm pain, and SF-36 were achieved by 1.5 months in both groups and maintained through 84 months. At 84 months, 86.1% of CDA versus 80.1% of ACDF patients achieved NDI success, (≥15-point improvement over baseline). Mean NDI score improvements exceeded 30 points in both groups. SF-36 PCS/MCS mean improvements were 13.1±11.9/8.2±12.3 points for CDA and 10.7±11.8/8.3±13.6 points for ACDF. Neurological success was 92.8% for CDA and 79.7% for ACDF patients. The rate of Overall Success was 74.9% for CDA and 63.2% for ACDF. At 84 months, 17.5% of CDA and 16.6% of ACDF patients had a possibly implant- or implant-surgical procedure-related adverse event. Eighteen (6.4%) CDA and 29 (10.9%) ACDF patients had a second surgery at the index level. In CDA patients, mean angular motion at the target level was maintained at 24 (7.5°) and 84 (6.9°) months. Bridging bone was reported in 5.9%/9.5%/10.2%/13.0% of CDA patients at 24/36/60/84 months. Change in mean preoperative angulation of the adjacent segment above/below the index level was1.06±4.39/1.25±4.06 for CDA and (-0.23)±5.37/1.25±5.07 for ACDF patients. At 84 months, 90.9% of CDA and 85.6% of ACDF patients were satisfied with the results of their treatment

  2. Cervical Disc Arthroplasty with Prestige LP Disc Versus Anterior Cervical Discectomy and Fusion: Seven-Year Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Gornet, Matthew F; Burkus, J Kenneth; Shaffrey, Mark E; Nian, Hui; Harrell, Frank E

    2016-01-01

    Cervical disc arthroplasty (CDA) has emerged as an alternative to anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) for the treatment of cervical pathologies. Studies are on-going to assess the long term outcomes of CDA. This study assessed the safety and efficacy of the Prestige(®) LP Disc at 84-months follow up. Prospective data from 280 CDA patients with single-level cervical disc disease with radiculopathy or myelopathy were compared with 265 historical control ACDF patients. Clinical and radiographic follow up was completed pre-operatively, intraoperatively, and at intervals up to 84 months. Follow-up rate was 75.9% for CDA and 70.0% for ACDF patients. Statistical improvements (p < 0.001) in Neck Disability Index (NDI), neck/arm pain, and SF-36 were achieved by 1.5 months in both groups and maintained through 84 months. At 84 months, 86.1% of CDA versus 80.1% of ACDF patients achieved NDI success, (≥15-point improvement over baseline). Mean NDI score improvements exceeded 30 points in both groups. SF-36 PCS/MCS mean improvements were 13.1±11.9/8.2±12.3 points for CDA and 10.7±11.8/8.3±13.6 points for ACDF. Neurological success was 92.8% for CDA and 79.7% for ACDF patients. The rate of Overall Success was 74.9% for CDA and 63.2% for ACDF. At 84 months, 17.5% of CDA and 16.6% of ACDF patients had a possibly implant- or implant-surgical procedure-related adverse event. Eighteen (6.4%) CDA and 29 (10.9%) ACDF patients had a second surgery at the index level. In CDA patients, mean angular motion at the target level was maintained at 24 (7.5°) and 84 (6.9°) months. Bridging bone was reported in 5.9%/9.5%/10.2%/13.0% of CDA patients at 24/36/60/84 months. Change in mean preoperative angulation of the adjacent segment above/below the index level was1.06±4.39/1.25±4.06 for CDA and (-0.23)±5.37/1.25±5.07 for ACDF patients. At 84 months, 90.9% of CDA and 85.6% of ACDF patients were satisfied with the results of their treatment. Prestige LP maintained

  3. Lumbar discal cyst with spontaneous regression and subsequent occurrence of lumbar disc herniation.

    PubMed

    Takeshima, Yasuhiro; Takahashi, Toshiyuki; Hanakita, Junya; Watanabe, Mizuki; Kitahama, Yoshihiro; Kuraishi, Keita; Uesaka, Toshio; Minami, Manabu; Nakase, Hiroyuki

    2011-01-01

    A 39-year-old man presented with an extremely rare discal cyst at the L3-4 level manifesting as a left L4 radiculopathy. Two months after onset, he suffered right L4 radiculopathy with new lumbar disc protrusion. Five months after medical treatment, the patient's symptoms improved, and the discal cyst showed complete regression on magnetic resonance imaging. Most cases of discal cyst are surgically treated, with only two previous cases of spontaneous regression. The present case suggests clinical and radiological recovery of symptomatic lumbar discal cyst can be obtained by only conservative therapy.

  4. Location change of center of rotation after single-level cervical total disc replacement with ProDisc-C.

    PubMed

    Lou, Jigang; Li, Huibo; Rong, Xin; Wu, Wenjie; Liu, Hao

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies reported that the location of the center of rotation (COR) at instrumented level after cervical total disc replacement (TDR) deviated from its preoperative location. However, currently, it is unknown whether the deviated COR is linked to the range of motion (ROM) at instrumented level. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the clinical outcomes after cervical TDR with ProDisc-C (Synthes, West Chester, PA, USA), as well as investigate the location change of COR at instrumented level and its clinical significance. A total of 23 patients who underwent single-level cervical TDR with ProDisc-C were included. Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) score and Neck Disability Index (NDI) were used to assess clinical outcomes. Radiographic parameters such as cervical ROM, instrumented segmental ROM, adjacent segmental ROM, and intervertebral height were analyzed. Additionally, the location change of COR at instrumented level and its clinical significance were further analyzed by the alteration of its coordinates (COR-X, COR-Y). JOA scores increased significantly, while NDI scores decreased at final follow-up. No differences were found in cervical global ROM, instrumented segmental ROM, adjacent segmental ROM, and COR-Y at instrumented level between preoperative and final follow-up measurements (p>0.05); however, intervertebral height and COR-X increased significantly (p<0.05). Cervical global ROM, instrumented segmental ROM, and adjacent segmental ROM could be effectively maintained, and intervertebral height was increased after TDR with ProDisc-C. The location of COR at instrumented level shifted forward after cervical TDR.

  5. Hybrid Surgery Versus Anterior Cervical Discectomy and Fusion in Multilevel Cervical Disc Diseases: A Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jianfeng; Meng, Fanxin; Ding, Yan; Li, Jie; Han, Jian; Zhang, Xintao; Dong, Wei

    2016-05-01

    To investigate the outcomes and reliability of hybrid surgery (HS) versus anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) for the treatment of multilevel cervical spondylosis and disc diseases.Hybrid surgery, combining cervical disc arthroplasty (CDA) with fusion, is a novel treatment to multilevel cervical degenerated disc disease in recent years. However, the effect and reliability of HS are still unclear compared with ACDF.To investigate the studies of HS versus ACDF in patients with multilevel cervical disease, electronic databases (Medline, Embase, Pubmed, Cochrane library, and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials) were searched. Studies were included when they compared HS with ACDF and reported at least one of the following outcomes: functionality, neck pain, arm pain, cervical range of motion (ROM), quality of life, and incidence of complications. No language restrictions were used. Two authors independently assessed the methodological quality of included studies and extracted the relevant data.Seven clinical controlled trials were included in this study. Two trials were prospective and the other 5 were retrospective. The results of the meta-analysis indicated that HS achieved better recovery of NDI score (P = 0.038) and similar recovery of VAS score (P = 0.058) compared with ACDF at 2 years follow-up. Moreover, the total cervical ROM (C2-C7) after HS was preserved significantly more than the cervical ROM after ACDF (P = 0.000) at 2 years follow-up. Notably, the compensatory increase of the ROM of superior and inferior adjacent segments was significant in ACDF groups at 2-year follow-up (P < 0.01), compared with HS.The results demonstrate that HS provides equivalent outcomes and functional recovery for cervical disc diseases, and significantly better preservation of cervical ROM compared with ACDF in 2-year follow-up. This suggests the HS is an effective alternative invention for the treatment of multilevel cervical spondylosis to

  6. Cut-Off Value for Pain Sensitivity Questionnaire in Predicting Surgical Success in Patients with Lumbar Disc Herniation

    PubMed Central

    Azimi, Parisa; Benzel, Edward C.

    2016-01-01

    Various factors related to predict surgical success were studied; however, a standard cut-off point for the Pain Sensitivity Questionnaire (PSQ) measure has not yet been established for a favorable surgical outcome for lumbar disc herniation (LDH). This study was to find the optimal cut-off point on the PSQ to distinguish surgical success in patients with LDH. A total of 154 patients with LDH consecutively referred to our clinic were enrolled into this prospective study between February 2011 and January 2014. All participants completed the PSQ. Patients completed the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) score before surgery, and at 2 years after surgery. Surgical success was defined as a 13-point improvement from the baseline ODI scores. The cut-off value for PSQ was determined by the receiver-operating characteristic curve (ROC). The mean age of patients was 49.3±9.6 years, and there were 80 women. The mean time for follow-up assessment was 31±5 months (range 24–35). Post-surgical success was 79.9% (n = 123) at 2 years follow up. The mean score for the total PSQ, PSQ-minor, and PSQ-moderate were 6.0 (SD = 1.6), 5.4 (SD = 1.9) and 6.5 (SD = 1.7), respectively. Total PSQ score was also significantly correlated with the total scores of the ODI. The optimal total PSQ cut-off point was determined as > 5.2 to predict surgical success in LDH patients, with 80.0% sensitivity and 75.6% specificity (AUC-0.814, 95% CI 0.703–0.926). This study showed that the PSQ could be considered a parameter for predicting surgical success in patients with LDH, and can be useful in clinical practice. PMID:27494617

  7. Gender differences in patients scheduled for lumbar disc herniation surgery: a National Register Study including 15,631 operations.

    PubMed

    Strömqvist, Fredrik; Strömqvist, Björn; Jönsson, Bo; Karlsson, Magnus K

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have shown gender differences in preoperative status and outcome of spine surgery. This study explores whether gender differences in preoperative demographics exist in patients scheduled for lumbar disc herniation (LDH) surgery. This study includes the preoperative data of the 15,631 patients operated for LDH between years 2000 and 2010, registered in the national Swedish spine register (SweSpine). We analysed preoperative gender differences in age, smoking habits, walking distance, consumption of analgesics, back and leg pain (Visual Analogue Scale; VAS), quality of life (EuroQol; EQ 5D and Short Form-36 Questionnaire; SF-36) and disability (Oswestry Disability Index; ODI). 44 % of the patients were women (mean age 45 ± 13) and 56 % men (mean age 44 ± 13). More women than men were smokers (26 versus 21 %, p < 0.001). Women also reported inferior walking ability (less than 100 metre walking ability 37 vs 30 %; p < 0.001), consumed more analgesics (92 versus 84 %; p < 0.001), reported higher level of pain (mean difference VAS leg 6 (95 % CI 5-7)), had inferior health-related quality of life (mean difference EQ 5D 0.07 (95 % CI 0.05-0.08)) and had higher disability (mean difference ODI 6 (95 % CI 5-6)). Women scheduled for LDH surgery report inferior clinical status than men scheduled for the same operation. We have in the literature found no evidence-based data that support such a difference, and the reason for the discrepancy is unclear.

  8. The impact of workers' compensation on outcomes of surgical and nonoperative therapy for patients with a lumbar disc herniation: SPORT.

    PubMed

    Atlas, Steven J; Tosteson, Tor D; Blood, Emily A; Skinner, Jonathan S; Pransky, Glenn S; Weinstein, James N

    2010-01-01

    Prospective randomized and observational cohorts. To compare outcomes of patients with and without workers' compensation who had surgical and nonoperative treatment for a lumbar intervertebral disc herniation (IDH). Few studies have examined the association between worker's compensation and outcomes of surgical and nonoperative treatment. Patients with at least 6 weeks of sciatica and a lumbar IDH were enrolled in either a randomized trial or observational cohort at 13 US spine centers. Patients were categorized as workers' compensation or nonworkers' compensation based on baseline disability compensation and work status. Treatment was usual nonoperative care or surgical discectomy. Outcomes included pain, functional impairment, satisfaction and work/disability status at 6 weeks, 3, 6, 12, and 24 months. Combining randomized and observational cohorts, 113 patients with workers' compensation and 811 patients without were followed for 2 years. There were significant improvements in pain, function, and satisfaction with both surgical and nonoperative treatment in both groups. In the nonworkers' compensation group, there was a clinically and statistically significant advantage for surgery at 3 months that remained significant at 2 years. However, in the workers' compensation group, the benefit of surgery diminished with time; at 2 years no significant advantage was seen for surgery in any outcome (treatment difference for SF-36 bodily pain [-5.9; 95% CI: -16.7-4.9] and physical function [5.0; 95% CI: -4.9-15]). Surgical treatment was not associated with better work or disability outcomes in either group. Patients with a lumbar IDH improved substantially with both surgical and nonoperative treatment. However, there was no added benefit associated with surgical treatment for patients with workers' compensation at 2 years while those in the nonworkers' compensation group had significantly greater improvement with surgical treatment.

  9. A functional polymorphism in COL11A1, which encodes the alpha 1 chain of type XI collagen, is associated with susceptibility to lumbar disc herniation.

    PubMed

    Mio, Futoshi; Chiba, Kazuhiro; Hirose, Yuichiro; Kawaguchi, Yoshiharu; Mikami, Yasuo; Oya, Takeshi; Mori, Masaki; Kamata, Michihiro; Matsumoto, Morio; Ozaki, Kouichi; Tanaka, Toshihiro; Takahashi, Atsushi; Kubo, Toshikazu; Kimura, Tomoatsu; Toyama, Yoshiaki; Ikegawa, Shiro

    2007-12-01

    Lumbar disc herniation (LDH), degeneration and herniation of the nucleus pulposus of the intervertebral disc (IVD) of the lumbar spine, is one of the most common musculoskeletal diseases. Its etiology and pathogenesis, however, remain unclear. Type XI collagen is important for cartilage collagen formation and for organization of the extracellular matrix. We identified an association between one of the type XI collagen genes, COL11A1, and LDH in Japanese populations. COL11A1, which encodes the alpha 1 chain of type XI collagen, was highly expressed in IVD, but its expression was decreased in the IVD of patients with LDH. The expression level was inversely correlated with the severity of disc degeneration. A single-nucleotide polymorphism (c.4603C-->T [rs1676486]) had the most significant association with LDH (P=3.3 x 10(-6)), and the transcript containing the disease-associated allele was decreased because of its decreased stability. These observations indicate that type XI collagen is critical for IVD metabolism and that its decrease is related to LDH.

  10. The Effect of GCSB-5 a New Herbal Medicine on Changes in Pain Behavior and Neuroglial Activation in a Rat Model of Lumbar Disc Herniation

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Hee Kyung; Kim, So-Yeon; Choi, Mi Jung; Baek, Seung Ok; Kwak, Sang Gyu

    2016-01-01

    Objective Lumbar disc herniation can induce sciatica by mechanical compression and/or chemical irritation. The aim of this study was to compare the effects of GCSB-5 (Shinbaro®) and NSAIDs on pain-related behavior and on the expressions of microglia, astrocytes, CGRP, TRPV1, IL-6, and CX3CL1 in a rat model of lumbar disc herniation. Methods 112 male Sprague-Dawley rats underwent implantation of nucleus pulposus to a dorsal root ganglion (DRG). Rats were divided into five groups as follows; a saline group (the vehicle control group) (n=27), a 10 mg/kg aceclofenac group (the aceclofenac group) (n=22), and 100, 300 or 600 mg/kg GCSB-5 groups (the GCSB-5 100, 300, or 600 groups) (n=21 for each group). Rats were tested for mechanical allodynia at 3 days after surgery and at 1 day, 3 days, 7 days, 14 days, 21 days, 28 days, 35 days, 42 days, 49 days, and 56 days after treatment commencement. Immunohistochemical staining of microglia (Iba1), astrocytes (GFAP), CGRP, and TRPV1, and PCR for IL-6 and CX3CL1 were performed on spinal dorsal horns and DRGs at 56 days after medication commencement. Results After 56 days of GCSB-5 300 administration, mechanical withdrawal thresholds were significantly increased (p<0.05), and immunohisto-chemical expressions of Iba1, GFAP, CGRP, and TRPV1 were reduced than other groups, but this difference was not statistically significant. Conclusion These results indicate GCSB-5 reduces mechanical allodynia and downregulates neuroglial activity and the expressions of CGRP and TRPV1 in the spinal segments of a rat model of lumbar disc herniation. PMID:26962414

  11. Changes in the Expressions of Iba1 and Calcitonin Gene-Related Peptide in Adjacent Lumbar Spinal Segments after Lumbar Disc Herniation in a Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Lumbar disc herniation is commonly encountered in clinical practice and can induce sciatica due to mechanical and/or chemical irritation and the release of proinflammatory cytokines. However, symptoms are not confined to the affected spinal cord segment. The purpose of this study was to determine whether multisegmental molecular changes exist between adjacent lumbar spinal segments using a rat model of lumbar disc herniation. Twenty-nine male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned to either a sham-operated group (n=10) or a nucleus pulposus (NP)-exposed group (n=19). Rats in the NP-exposed group were further subdivided into a significant pain subgroup (n=12) and a no significant pain subgroup (n=7) using mechanical pain thresholds determined von Frey filaments. Immunohistochemical stainings of microglia (ionized calcium-binding adapter molecule 1; Iba1), astrocytes (glial fibrillary acidic protein; GFAP), calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), and transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) was performed in spinal dorsal horns and dorsal root ganglions (DRGs) at 10 days after surgery. It was found immunoreactivity for Iba1-positive microglia was higher in the L5 (P=0.004) dorsal horn and in the ipsilateral L4 (P=0.009), L6 (P=0.002), and S1 (P=0.002) dorsal horns in the NP-exposed group than in the sham-operated group. The expression of CGRP was also significantly higher in ipsilateral L3, L4, L6, and S1 segments and in L5 DRGs at 10 days after surgery in the NP-exposed group than in the sham-operated group (P<0.001). Our results indicate that lumbar disc herniation upregulates microglial activity and CGRP expression in many adjacent and ipsilateral lumbar spinal segments. PMID:26713069

  12. Clinical efficacy of lumbar interbody fusion using a channel system combined with ozone therapy for the treatment of central-type L3-L4 lumbar disc herniation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yu; Sun, Hong; Qin, Shuzhen

    2017-01-01

    The clinical efficacy of minimally invasive lumbar interbody fusion via the intervertebral foramen combined with ozone (O3) therapy for the treatment of L3-L4 central-type lumbar disc herniation was explored. We recruited patients with sciatica who attended our hospital between July 2013 and October 2015 and underwent lumbar X-ray (anteroposterior and lateral view), lumbar flexion-extension radiographs, computed tomography, and magnetic resonance imaging after admission. Seventy-four patients with central-type lumbar disc herniation but no other complications were randomly selected and divided into the observation and control groups. The observation group comprised 37 patients treated with lumbar fusion using a channel system combined with O3 therapy, whereas the control group comprised 37 patients treated with lumbar fusion alone. The effects of the two therapies were evaluated using visual analog scale, Japanese Orthopaedic Association, and MacNab scores. There was no significant difference in scores between the two groups before surgery (P>0.05). The scores of the observation group after treatment were significantly lower than those before surgery and those of the control group (P<0.05). One patient in the observation group experienced no obvious improvement in symptoms after surgery, and two patients in the control group experienced postoperative recurrence; these three patients subsequently underwent laminectomy combined with planted bone fusion and internal fixation. There was no significant difference in total efficacy rates between the two groups (P>0.05). Lumbar fusion using a channel system combined with O3 therapy for the treatment of L3-L4 central-type lumbar disc herniation is safe and effective. It has the advantages of reduced trauma, fewer complications, and rapid pain relief, and it promotes the recovery of lumbar function. Strict mastery of the surgical indications is key to the success of the procedure; however, it is worth expanding its use in

  13. Changes in the Expressions of Iba1 and Calcitonin Gene-Related Peptide in Adjacent Lumbar Spinal Segments after Lumbar Disc Herniation in a Rat Model.

    PubMed

    Cho, Hee Kyung; Ahn, Sang Ho; Kim, So-Yeon; Choi, Mi-Jung; Hwang, Se Jin; Cho, Yun Woo

    2015-12-01

    Lumbar disc herniation is commonly encountered in clinical practice and can induce sciatica due to mechanical and/or chemical irritation and the release of proinflammatory cytokines. However, symptoms are not confined to the affected spinal cord segment. The purpose of this study was to determine whether multisegmental molecular changes exist between adjacent lumbar spinal segments using a rat model of lumbar disc herniation. Twenty-nine male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned to either a sham-operated group (n=10) or a nucleus pulposus (NP)-exposed group (n=19). Rats in the NP-exposed group were further subdivided into a significant pain subgroup (n=12) and a no significant pain subgroup (n=7) using mechanical pain thresholds determined von Frey filaments. Immunohistochemical stainings of microglia (ionized calcium-binding adapter molecule 1; Iba1), astrocytes (glial fibrillary acidic protein; GFAP), calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), and transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) was performed in spinal dorsal horns and dorsal root ganglions (DRGs) at 10 days after surgery. It was found immunoreactivity for Iba1-positive microglia was higher in the L5 (P=0.004) dorsal horn and in the ipsilateral L4 (P=0.009), L6 (P=0.002), and S1 (P=0.002) dorsal horns in the NP-exposed group than in the sham-operated group. The expression of CGRP was also significantly higher in ipsilateral L3, L4, L6, and S1 segments and in L5 DRGs at 10 days after surgery in the NP-exposed group than in the sham-operated group (P<0.001). Our results indicate that lumbar disc herniation upregulates microglial activity and CGRP expression in many adjacent and ipsilateral lumbar spinal segments.

  14. Long Term Societal Costs of Anterior Discectomy and Fusion (ACDF) versus Cervical Disc Arthroplasty (CDA) for Treatment of Cervical Radiculopathy

    PubMed Central

    Ghori, Ahmer; Konopka, Joseph F.; Cha, Thomas D.; Bono, Christopher M.

    2016-01-01

    Background Current literature suggests that anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) and cervical disc arthroplasty (CDA) have comparable clinical outcomes for the treatment of cervical radiculopathy. Given similar outcomes, an understanding of differences in long-term societal costs can help guide resource utilization. The purpose of this study was to compare the relative long-term societal costs of anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) to cervical disc arthroplasty (CDA) for the treatment of single level cervical disc disease by considering upfront surgical costs, lost productivity, and risk of subsequent revision surgery. Methods We completed an economic and decision analysis using a Markov model to evaluate the long-term societal costs of ACDF and CDA in a theoretical cohort of 45-65 year old patients with single level cervical disc disease who have failed nonoperative treatment. Results The long-term societal costs for a 45-year old patient undergoing ACDF are $31,178 while long-term costs for CDA are $24,119. Long-term costs for CDA remain less expensive throughout the modeled age range of 45 to 65 years old. Sensitivity analysis demonstrated that CDA remains less expensive than ACDF as long as annual reoperation rate remains below 10.5% annually. Conclusions Based on current data, CDA has lower long-term societal costs than ACDF for patients 45-65 years old by a substantial margin. Given reported reoperation rates of 2.5% for CDA, it is the preferred treatment for cervical radiculopathy from an economic perspective. PMID:26913221

  15. Pre- and postoperative evaluation of patients with lumbosacral disc herniation by neurophysiological and clinical assessment.

    PubMed

    Wojtysiak, Magdalena; Huber, Juliusz; Wiertel-Krawczuk, Agnieszka; Szymankiewicz-Szukała, Agnieszka; Moskal, Jakub; Janicki, Jacek

    2014-10-01

    The application of complex neurophysiological examination including motor evoked potentials (MEP) for pre- and postoperative evaluation of patients experiencing acute sciatica. The assessment of sensitivity and specificity of needle electromyography, MEP, and H-reflex examinations. The comparative analysis of preoperative and postoperative neurophysiological examination. In spite of the fact that complex neurophysiological diagnostic tools seem to be important for interpretation of incompatible results of neuroimaging and clinical examination, especially in the patients qualified for surgical treatment, their application has never been completely analyzed and documented. Pre- and postoperative electromyography, electroneurography, F-waves, H-reflex, and MEP examination were performed in 23 patients with confirmed disc-root conflict at lumbosacral spine. Clinical evaluation included examination of sensory perception for L5-S1 dermatomes, muscles strength with Lovett's scale, deep tendon reflexes, pain intensity with visual analogue scale, and straight leg raising test. Sensitivity of electromyography at rest and MEP examination for evaluation of L5-S1 roots injury was 22% to 63% and 31% to 56% whereas specificity was 71% to 83% and 57% to 86%, respectively. H-reflex sensitivity and specificity for evaluation of S1 root injury were 56% and 67%, respectively. A significant improvement of root latency parameter in postoperative MEP studies as compared with preoperative was recorded for L5 (P = 0.039) and S1 root's levels (P = 0.05). The analysis of the results from neurophysiological tests together with neuroimaging and clinical examination allow for a precise preoperative indication of the lumbosacral roots injury and accurate postoperative evaluation of patients experiencing sciatica. 3.

  16. Reliable Magnetic Resonance Imaging Based Grading System for Cervical Intervertebral Disc Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Antonia F.; Kang, James D.; Lee, Joon Y.

    2016-01-01

    Study Design Observational. Purpose To develop a simple and comprehensive grading system for cervical discs that precisely, consistently and meaningfully presents radiologic and morphologic data. Overview of Literature The Thompson grading system is commonly used to classify the severity of degenerative lumbar discs on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Inherent differences in the morphological and physiological characteristics of cervical discs have hindered development of precise classification systems. Other grading systems have been developed for degenerating cervical discs, but their versatility and feasibility in the clinical setting is suboptimal. Methods MRIs of 46 human cervical discs were de-identified and displayed in PowerPoint format. Each slide depicted a single disc with a normal (grade 0) disc displayed in the top right corner for reference. The presentation was given to 25 physicians comprising attending spine surgeons, spine fellows, orthopaedic residents, and two attending musculoskeletal radiologists. The grading system included Grade 0 (normal height compared to C2–3, mid cleft still visible), grade 1 (dark disc, normal height), grade 2 (collapsed disc, few osteophytes), and grade 3 (collapsed disc, many osteophytes). The ease of use of the system was gauged in the participants and the interobserver reliability was calculated. Results The intraclass correlation coefficient for interobserver reliability was 0.87, and 0.94 for intraobserver reliability, indicating excellent reliability. Ninety-five percent and 85 percent of the clinicians judged the grading system to be clinically feasible and useful in daily practice, respectively. Conclusions The grading system is easy to use, has excellent reliability, and can be used for precise and consistent clinician communication. PMID:26949461

  17. Minimal invasive anterolateral transthoracic transpleural approach: a novel technique for thoracic disc herniation. A review of the literature, description of a new surgical technique and experience with first 12 consecutive patients.

    PubMed

    Deviren, Vedat; Kuelling, Fabrice A; Poulter, Greg; Pekmezci, Murat

    2011-07-01

    A retrospective review of a case series. To describe a novel surgical technique for a minimally disruptive lateral transthoracic transpleural approach to treat thoracic disc herniations. Thoracic disc herniation is a relatively uncommon spinal condition, and surgical treatment is indicated for patients with myelopathy or radiculopathy that failed to respond to conservative therapy. Presently there is no consensus about the best approach to address thoracic disc herniations. Using the novel retractor system (MaXcess), the authors describe a novel minimally disruptive approach that allows the surgeons to perform a standard anterior discectomy and fusion with instrumentation while minimizing approach-related morbidity. A series of 12 patients with single-level thoracic disc herniations who underwent anterior spinal cord decompression followed by instrumented fusion through a novel retractor system is being reported. Demographic and radiographic data, perioperative complications, and clinical outcomes were reviewed. Twelve patients were enrolled with an average age of 51 years (range, 23 to 67 y). The average follow-up was 28 months (range, 12 to 33 mo). The average length of hospital stay was 5 days (range, 2 to 12 d). The average preoperative visual analog scale pain score was 9 (range, 7 to 10), which later decreased to 3 (range, 0 to 5) at final follow-up. All patients with myelopathy and/or sphincter dysfunction had significant improvement of their symptoms. One patient had pleural effusion and 1 patient had intercostal neuralgia. Anterior decompression using a transthoracic transpleural approach provides excellent exposure and allows consistent decompression of thoracic disc herniations. This study demonstrated that a new minimally invasive, transthoracic transpleural decompression technique can be safely performed for single-level thoracic disc herniations. The early results showed that this technique allows less dissection, along with the advantages of

  18. Chiari malformation, cervical disc prolapse and syringomyelia--always think twice.

    PubMed

    Ball, Jonathon R; Little, Nicholas S

    2008-04-01

    We present the case of a 36-year-old man with neck pain and parasthesia of both upper limbs. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated a cervical disc protrusion with spinal cord compression, a Chiari I malformation and cervical syringomyelia. On clinical grounds it was suspected that the cervical stenosis was the symptomatic pathology and an anterior cervical decompression was performed, followed by arthroplasty. Post-operative imaging demonstrated adequate canal decompression, preserved cervical mobility and near-complete resolution of the syrinx. Syringomyelia has a multitude of causes and synchronous pathology can occur. Cervical spondylosis is infrequently associated with syringomyelia. Chiari I malformations are increasingly incidentally detected and asymptomatic. This first report of arthroplasty for cervical spondylosis associated with syringomyelia adds to the growing body of experience with this new technology.

  19. Comparison of in vivo and simulator-retrieved metal-on-metal cervical disc replacements

    PubMed Central

    Kurtz, Steven M.; Ciccarelli, Lauren; Harper, Megan L.; Siskey, Ryan; Shorez, Jacob; Chan, Frank W.

    2012-01-01

    Background Cervical disc arthroplasty is regarded as a promising treatment for myelopathy and radiculopathy as an alternative to cervical spine fusion. On the basis of 2-year clinical data for the PRESTIGE® Cervical Disc (Medtronic, Memphis, Tennessee), the Food and Drug Administration recommended conditional approval in September 2006 and final approval in July 2007; however, relatively little is known about its wear and damage modes in vivo. The main objective was to analyze the tribological findings of the PRESTIGE® Cervical Disc. This study characterized the in vivo wear patterns of retrieved cervical discs and tested the hypothesis that the total disc replacements exhibited similar surface morphology and wear patterns in vitro as in vivo. Methods Ten explanted total disc replacements (PRESTIGE®, PRESTIGE® I, and PRESTIGE® II) from 10 patients retrieved after a mean of 1.8 years (range, 0.3–4.1 years) were analyzed. Wear testing included coupled lateral bending ( ±4.7°) and axial rotation ( ±3.8°) with a 49 N axial load for 5 million cycles followed by 10 million cycles of flexion-extension ( ±9.7°) with 148 N. Implant surfaces were characterized by the use of white-light interferometry, scanning electron microscopy, and energy dispersive spectroscopy. Results The explants generally exhibited a slightly discolored, elliptic wear region of varying dimension centered in the bearing center, with the long axis oriented in the medial-lateral direction. Abrasive wear was the dominant in vivo wear mechanism, with microscopic scratches generally oriented in the medial-lateral direction. Wear testing resulted in severe abrasive wear in a curvilinear fashion oriented primarily in the medial-lateral direction. All retrievals showed evidence of an abrasive wear mechanism. Conclusions This study documented important similarity between the wear mechanisms of components tested in vitro and explanted PRESTIGE® Cervical Discs; however, the severity of wear was

  20. Occupational Impact of Multilevel Cervical Disease Treated With Hybrid Cervical Disc Arthroplasty in Active Duty Military Population.

    PubMed

    Cleveland, Andrew; Herzog, Josh; Caram, Pedro

    2016-01-01

    This article evaluates the techniques, results, and complications of hybrid cervical disc arthroplasty in a high-demand military population. Emphasis is on the occupational impact and return to duty outcomes. This article is a case series with prospective follow-up of 30 hybrid cervical disc arthroplasty patients from the authors' institution. Average follow-up was 16.1 months. Average patient age was 39.7 years. Noncommissioned officer was the most common military rank. Cervical disc arthroplasty at C5/6 with fusion at C6/7 was the most common procedure (21/30). All classifications of military occupational specialty were represented. A total of 24/30 (80%) patients returned to duty (RTD) and 24/24 (100%) of RTD patients reported relief (postoperative improvement) compared with 4/6 (66.7%) medical evaluation board patients. Average RTD time was 15.6 weeks. All RTD patients maintained their preoperative military occupational specialty. Hybrid cervical disc arthroplasty has the potential to provide relief and return military patients to preoperative active duty status.

  1. Three-Years Outcome of Microdiscectomy via Paramedian Approach for Lumbar Foraminal or Extraforaminal Disc Herniations in Elderly Patients over 65 Years Old

    PubMed Central

    Yeo, Chang Gi; Kim, Sang Woo; Ko, Sam Kyu; Woo, Byung Kil; Song, Kwang Chul

    2016-01-01

    Objective Lumbar foraminal or extraforaminal disc herniations (FEFDH) have unusual clinical features and higher incidence in elderly patients compared to usual intraspinal canal disc herniations. We evaluated the efficacy of microdiscectomy via paramedian approach for lumbar FEFDH in elderly patients over the age of 65. Methods Retrospective study was performed in 68 patients over the age of 65 (23 male and 45 female patients; 71.46±3.87 years) who underwent microdiscectomy via paramedian approach for unilateral lumbar FEFDH causing sciatica. The radiological factors including degree of slippage, presence of instability, disc height, and degree of disc degeneration; pain and functional status by the means of visual analogue scale score, Oswestry Disability Index score, and Macnab classification were analyzed preoperatively and during the postoperative follow-up period of 3 years to evaluate the efficacy of the surgical treatment. Results Pain and functional status improved according to short- and long-term follow-up evaluations after surgery. Radiological changes following surgery, which can be understood as structural deteriorations and deformations, did not represent patient condition. Nine patients underwent additional surgery due to sustained or recurring leg pain of aggravation of back pain, and fusion surgery was required for 3 patients. Degree of preoperative slippage was the only statistically significant factor related to additional surgery (p<0.05). Conclusion Microdiscectomy via paramedian approach for FEFDH may be a good surgical alternative in elderly patients. Radiological changes after surgery did not show a concordance with patients' actual functional status. The excessive preoperative slippage tended to lead to unfavorable result after surgery and was associated with additional surgery. PMID:27799988

  2. Clinical findings and electrodiagnostic testing in 108 consecutive cases of lumbosacral radiculopathy due to herniated disc.

    PubMed

    Mondelli, M; Aretini, A; Arrigucci, U; Ginanneschi, F; Greco, G; Sicurelli, F

    2013-10-01

    This prospective study aim to examine whether clinical findings and electrodiagnostic testing (EDX) in patients with lumbosacral monoradiculopathy due to herniated disc (HD) differ as a function of root involvement level (L5 vs. S1) and HD zone (paramedian vs. intraforaminal). All patients with L4, L5 or S1 monoradiculopathy were prospectively enrolled at four electromyography (EMG) labs over a 2-year period. The diagnosis was based on a congruence between patient history and MRI evidence of HD. We compared the sensitivities of clinical findings and EDX with respect to both root involvement level and HD zone. Multivariate logistic regression was performed in order to verify the association between abnormal EMG, clinical, and neuroradiological findings. One hundred and eight patients (mean age 47.7 years, 55% men) were consecutively enrolled. Sensory loss in the painful dermatome was the most frequent finding at physical examination (56% of cases). EMG was abnormal in at least one muscle supplied by femoral and sciatic nerves in 45 cases (42%). Inclusion of paraspinal muscles increased sensitivity to only 49% and that of proximal muscles was useless. Motor and sensory neurography was seldom abnormal. The most frequent motor neurographic abnormalities were a delay of F-wave minimum latency and decrease in the compound muscle action potential amplitude from extensor digitorum brevis and abductor hallucis in L5 and S1 radiculopathies, respectively. Sensory neurography was usually normal, the amplitude of sensory nerve action potential was seldom reduced when HD injured dorsal root ganglion or postganglionic root fibres. Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that EMG abnormalities could be predicted by myotomal muscular weakness, abnormal deep reflexes, and paraesthesiae. The only clinical and electrophysiological differences with respect to root involvement level concerned deep reflexes and motor neurography of deep peroneal and tibial nerves. Only some EDX

  3. The effect of age on result of straight leg raising test in patients suffering lumbar disc herniation and sciatica.

    PubMed

    Tabesh, Homayoun; Tabesh, Ariyan; Fakharian, Esmaeil; Fazel, Mohammadreza; Abrishamkar, Saeid

    2015-02-01

    Ninety percent of all people sometimes during their lives experience low back pain, and 30-40% develops radicular leg pain with the sciatica characteristics. Although for clinical diagnosis of lumbar disc herniation (LDH) straight leg raising (SLR) test in 85-90% of cases indicates LDH, but in our practice with LDH patients this test is frequently negative despite radicular leg pain due to LDH. Hence, we decided to evaluate this test in LDH in different age groups. All patients with leg pain referring to neurosurgery clinic were enrolled. Those with a history of pain other than sciatica excluded and SLR test and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the lumbosacral spine performed. The patients with negative MRI findings excluded and finally 269 patients with true sciatica and positive MRI were included. SLR tests were performed for different age groups. Of 269 patients, 167 were male. The age range was 16-80 years. The most involved levels were L5-S1 (47%) and L4-L5 (42%), respectively. The rate of positive SLR result, which was 100%, 87% and 82% for 10-19, 20-29 and 30-39 years age group respectively. With an increment of age, the rate of positive test regularly declined. The chance of positive SLR in men is 1.3 times the women (odds ratio [OR] 2.4; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.265-4.557; P = 0.007). Increasing the age has suppression effect in positivity of SLR so that for each 1-year the chance of SLR become 0.27 times less to become positive and this is also statically meaningful (OR = 0.271;95% CI = 0.188-0.391; P,0.001). The chance of positive SLR for patients under 60 is 5.4 folds more than patients above 60 years old (OR = 5.4; 95% CI = 4-8.3; P, 0.001). Age, sex (male), and disk level had statistically the effect on SLR positive test.

  4. Comparing clinical outcomes of repeat discectomy versus fusion for recurrent disc herniation utilizing the N(2)QOD.

    PubMed

    Guan, Jian; Ravindra, Vijay M; Schmidt, Meic H; Dailey, Andrew T; Hood, Robert S; Bisson, Erica F

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Recurrent lumbar disc herniation (RLDH) is a significant cause of morbidity in patients undergoing lumbar discectomy and has been reported to occur in up to 18% of cases. While repeat discectomy is often successful in treating these patients, concern over repeat RLDH may lead surgeons to advocate instrumented fusion even in the absence of instability. The authors' goal was to compare clinical outcomes for patients undergoing repeat discectomy versus instrumented fusion for RLDH. METHODS The authors used the National Neurosurgery Quality and Outcomes Database (N(2)QOD) to assess outcomes of patients who underwent repeat discectomy versus instrumented fusion at a single institution from 2012 to 2015. Primary outcomes included Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) score, visual analog scale (VAS) score, and quality-adjusted life year (QALY) measures. Secondary outcomes included hospital length of stay, discharge status, and hospital charges. RESULTS The authors identified 25 repeat discectomy and 12 instrumented fusion patients with 3- and 12-month follow-up records. The groups had similar ODI and VAS scores and QALY measurements at 3 and 12 months. Patients in the instrumented fusion group had significantly longer hospitalizations (3.7 days vs 1.0 days, p < 0.001) and operative times (229.6 minutes vs 82.7 minutes, p < 0.001). They were also more likely to be female (p = 0.020) and to be discharged to inpatient rehabilitation instead of home (p = 0.036). Hospital charges for the instrumented fusion group were also significantly higher ($54,458.29 vs $11,567.05, p < 0.001). Rates of reoperation were higher in the repeat discectomy group (12% vs 0%), but the difference was not statistically significant (p = 0.211). CONCLUSIONS Repeat discectomy and instrumented fusion result in similar clinical outcomes at short-term follow-up. Patients undergoing repeat discectomy had significantly shorter operative times and length of stay, and they incurred dramatically lower

  5. [Comparative study on function and surface electromyograpgy in patients of lumbar disc herniation treated with acupunctrue and moxibustion].

    PubMed

    Yang, Dong-Lan; Zhou, Wen-Qiang; Li, Jian; Ruan, Chuan-Liang; Zhang, Yong-Shu; Wang, Ze-Xiong

    2014-04-01

    To compare the differences in the clinical function and lumbar and abdominal myodynamia in patiants of lumbar disc herniation treated with moxibustion at Dazhui (GV 14) and Guanyuan (CV 4) and acupuncture. Forty cases were randomized into a moxibustion group and an acupuncture group, 20 cases in each group. In the moxibustion group, the warm moxibustion was applied alternatively at Dazhui (GV 14) and Guanyuan (CV 4) once every other day, 1 h each time, once every day. In the acupuncture group, acupuncture was applied to the corresponding acupoints based on the affected lumbar vertebras, such as Jiaji (EX-B 2), Shens-hu (BL 23), Dachangshu (BL 25) and Huantiao (GB 30), etc. , once evey day 30 min each time. The treatment for 3 weeks was taken as one session in each group. Totally, one session treatment was required. Surface electromyography (SEMG) of bilateral paraspinal muscle and rectus muscle, and JOA score of low back pain were observed in the two groups. (1) JOA score: the score of subjective symptoms, score of activity of daily living (ADL) and total score were improved obviously as compared with those before treatment in the two groups (P<0.01, P<0.05). The results of subjective symptoms score, score of ADL and total score in the acupuncture group were superior to those in the moxibustion group after treatment (6.95+/-0.94 vs 5.50 +/-0.89,10. 90+/-1.86 vs 8.90+/- 1. 92,22.50 +/- 2.82 vs 19.35 +/- 2. 70, all P<0. 05). (2) SEMG comparison: root-mean-square value (RMS) was all reduced in SEMG of the anteflexion, rear protraction, orthostatism, bilateral bending and neck and leg rear flexion for strengthening lumbar muscle as compared with those before treatment in the two groups (P< 0.05, P<0. 01). RMS of the anteflexion and bilateral bending in the acupunture group were reduced much obviously as compared with the moxibustion group. In terms of sitting position anteflexion, rear protraction, orthostatism, bilateral bending and neck and leg rear flexion for

  6. Hyperexcitability in Spinal WDR Neurons following Experimental Disc Herniation Is Associated with Upregulation of Fractalkine and Its Receptor in Nucleus Pulposus and the Dorsal Root Ganglion

    PubMed Central

    Moen, Aurora; Haugen, Fred; Gjerstad, Johannes

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Lumbar radicular pain following intervertebral disc herniation may be associated with a local inflammatory response induced by nucleus pulposus (NP) cells. Methods. In anaesthetized Lewis rats, extracellular single unit recordings of wide dynamic range (WDR) neurons in the dorsal horn and qPCR were used to explore the effect of NP application onto the dorsal nerve roots (L3–L5). Results. A clear increase in C-fiber response was observed following NP conditioning. In the NP tissue, the expression of interleukin-1β (IL-1β), colony stimulating factor 1 (Csf1), fractalkine (CX3CL1), and the fractalkine receptor CX3CR1 was increased. Minocycline, an inhibitor of microglial activation, inhibited the increase in neuronal activity and attenuated the increase in IL-1β, Csf1, CX3L1, and CX3CR1 expression in NP tissue. In addition, the results demonstrated an increase in the expression of TNF, CX3CL1, and CX3CR1 in the dorsal root ganglions (DRGs). Conclusion. Hyperexcitability in the pain pathways and the local inflammation after disc herniation may involve upregulation of CX3CL1 signaling in both the NP and the DRG. PMID:28116212

  7. Cervical spine surgery in professional athletes: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Joaquim, Andrei F; Hsu, Wellington K; Patel, Alpesh A

    2016-04-01

    Cervical surgery is one of the most common surgical spinal procedures performed around the world. The authors performed a systematic review of the literature reporting the outcomes of cervical spine surgery in high-level athletes in order to better understand the nuances of cervical spine pathology in this population. A search of the MEDLINE database using the search terms "cervical spine" AND "surgery" AND "athletes" yielded 54 abstracts. After exclusion of publications that did not meet the criteria for inclusion, a total of 8 papers reporting the outcome of cervical spine surgery in professional or elite athletes treated for symptoms secondary to cervical spine pathology (focusing in degenerative conditions) remained for analysis. Five of these involved the management of cervical disc herniation, 3 were specifically about traumatic neurapraxia. The majority of the patients included in this review were American football players. Anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) was commonly performed in high-level athletes for the treatment of cervical disc herniation. Most of the studies suggested that return to play is safe for athletes who are asymptomatic after ACDF for cervical radiculopathy due to disc herniation. Surgical treatment may provide a higher rate of return to play for these athletes than nonsurgical treatment. Return to play after cervical spinal cord contusion may be possible in asymptomatic patients. Cervical cord signal changes on MRI may not be an absolute contraindication for return to play in neurologically intact patients, according to some authors. Cervical contusions secondary to cervical stenosis may be associated with a worse outcome and a higher recurrence rate than those those secondary to disc herniation. The evidence is low (Level IV) and individualized treatment must be recommended.

  8. Correlation between T2∗ (T2 star) relaxation time and cervical intervertebral disc degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Minghua; Guo, Yong; Ye, Qiong; Chen, Lei; Zhou, Kai; Wang, Qingjun; Shao, Lixin; Shi, Qinglei; Chen, Chun

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Purpose: To demonstrate the potential benefits of T2∗ relaxation time of intervertebral discs (IVDs) regarding the detection and grading of degenerative disc disease using 3.0-T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in a clinical setting. Materials and Methods: Cervical sagittal T2-weighted, T2∗ relaxation MRI was performed at 3.0-T in 61 subjects, covering discs C2–3 to C6–7. All discs were morphologically assessed based on the Pfirrmann grade, and regions of interests (ROIs) were drawn over the T2∗ mapping. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was performed among grades to determine the cut-off values. Results: Cervical intervertebral discs (IVDs) of patients were commonly determined to be at Pfirrmann grades III to V. The nucleus pulposus (NP) values did not differ significantly between sexes at the same anatomic level (P > 0.05). In the NP, the T2∗ values tended to decrease with increasing grade (P < 0.000), and a significant difference was found in the T2 values between grades I to V (P < 0.05). T2∗ values based on disc degeneration level classification were as follows: grade I (>30 milliseconds), grade II (24.55–29.99 milliseconds), grade III (21.65–24.54 milliseconds), grade IV (18.35–21.64 milliseconds), and grade V (<18.34 milliseconds). Conclusion: Our standardized method of region-specific quantitative T2∗ relaxation time evaluation seems capable of characterizing different degrees of disc degeneration quantitatively. The T2∗ values obtained in these cervical IVDs may serve as baseline values for future T2∗ measurements in both healthy and degenerated cervical discs. PMID:27893652

  9. Qualitative and quantitative assessment of degeneration of cervical intervertebral discs and facet joints.

    PubMed

    Walraevens, Joris; Liu, Baoge; Meersschaert, Joke; Demaerel, Philippe; Delye, Hans; Depreitere, Bart; Vander Sloten, Jos; Goffin, Jan

    2009-03-01

    Degeneration of intervertebral discs and facet joints is one of the most frequently encountered spinal disorders. In order to describe and quantify degeneration and evaluate a possible relationship between degeneration and biomechanical parameters, e.g., the intervertebral range of motion and intradiscal pressure, a scoring system for degeneration is mandatory. However, few scoring systems for the assessment of degeneration of the cervical spine exist. Therefore, two separate objective scoring systems to qualitatively and quantitatively assess the degree of cervical intervertebral disc and facet joint degeneration were developed and validated. The scoring system for cervical disc degeneration consists of three variables which are individually scored on neutral lateral radiographs: "height loss" (0-4 points), "anterior osteophytes" (0-3 points) and "endplate sclerosis" (0-2 points). The scoring system for facet joint degeneration consists of four variables which are individually scored on neutral computed tomography scans: "hypertrophy" (0-2 points), "osteophytes" (0-1 point), "irregularity" on the articular surface (0-1 point) and "joint space narrowing" (0-1 point). Each variable contributes with varying importance to the overall degeneration score (max 9 points for the scoring system of cervical disc degeneration and max 5 points for facet joint degeneration). Degeneration of 20 discs and facet joints of 20 patients was blindly assessed by four raters: two neurosurgeons (one senior and one junior) and two radiologists (one senior and one junior), firstly based on first subjective impression and secondly using the scoring systems. Measurement errors and inter- and intra-rater agreement were determined. The measurement error of the scoring system for cervical disc degeneration was 11.1 versus 17.9% of the subjective impression results. This scoring system showed excellent intra-rater agreement (ICC = 0.86, 0.75-0.93) and excellent inter-rater agreement (ICC = 0

  10. [Longterm results of cervical arthroplasty with disc prosthesis. A literature review].

    PubMed

    Fransen, P; Schils, F

    2014-01-01

    Cervical arthroplasty has now been performed for over 10 years. Despite the large number of implanted artificial discs, the quality of the published studies is weak, and very few report a follow up exceeding two years. We reviewed the literature on cervical total disc replacement, focusing on publications reporting a follow-up of more than two years. The selection of patients, the type of implant and the surgical technique seem to influence greatly the quality of the clinical and radiological results. The occurrence of heterotopic ossifications around the implant seems to be the rule rather than the exception. Wear debris are likely to be observed in the vicinity of the prosthesis. Most long term studies also report a progressive decrease in the range of motion of the prosthesis, although without influence on the clinical evolution. It seems reasonable to say that cervical disc prosthesis is not inferior to discectomy and fusion, and that these implants allow a short term preservation of cervical mobility, but the efficacy in preventing adjacent segment disease or a favourable costleffectiveness ratio have yet to be demonstrated. A more widespread use of cervical disc prosthesis can only be suggested when these questions have been answered by long term follow-up studies.

  11. Hybrid surgery of multilevel cervical degenerative disc disease : review of literature and clinical results.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang-Bok; Cho, Kyoung-Suok; Kim, Jong-Youn; Yoo, Do-Sung; Lee, Tae-Gyu; Huh, Pil-Woo

    2012-11-01

    In the present study, we evaluated the effect, safety and radiological outcomes of cervical hybrid surgery (cervical disc prosthesis replacement at one level, and interbody fusion at the other level) on the multilevel cervical degenerative disc disease (DDD). Fifty-one patients (mean age 46.7 years) with symptomatic multilevel cervical spondylosis were treated using hybrid surgery (HS). Clinical [neck disability index (NDI) and Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) score] and radiologic outcomes [range of motion (ROM) for cervical spine, adjacent segment and arthroplasty level] were evaluated at routine postoperative intervals of 1, 6, 12, 24 months. Review of other similar studies that examined the HS in multilevel cervical DDD was performed. Out of 51 patients, 41 patients received 2 level hybrid surgery and 10 patients received 3 level hybrid surgery. The NDI and VAS score were significantly decreased during the follow up periods (p<0.05). The cervical ROM was recovered at 6 and 12 month postoperatively and the mean ROM of inferior adjacent segment was significantly larger than that of superior adjacent segments after surgery. The ROM of the arthoplasty level was preserved well during the follow up periods. No surgical and device related complications were observed. Hybrid surgery is a safe and effective alternative to fusion for the management of multilevel cervical spondylosis.

  12. Hybrid Surgery of Multilevel Cervical Degenerative Disc Disease : Review of Literature and Clinical Results

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sang-Bok; Kim, Jong-Youn; Yoo, Do-Sung; Lee, Tae-Gyu; Huh, Pil-Woo

    2012-01-01

    Objective In the present study, we evaluated the effect, safety and radiological outcomes of cervical hybrid surgery (cervical disc prosthesis replacement at one level, and interbody fusion at the other level) on the multilevel cervical degenerative disc disease (DDD). Methods Fifty-one patients (mean age 46.7 years) with symptomatic multilevel cervical spondylosis were treated using hybrid surgery (HS). Clinical [neck disability index (NDI) and Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) score] and radiologic outcomes [range of motion (ROM) for cervical spine, adjacent segment and arthroplasty level] were evaluated at routine postoperative intervals of 1, 6, 12, 24 months. Review of other similar studies that examined the HS in multilevel cervical DDD was performed. Results Out of 51 patients, 41 patients received 2 level hybrid surgery and 10 patients received 3 level hybrid surgery. The NDI and VAS score were significantly decreased during the follow up periods (p<0.05). The cervical ROM was recovered at 6 and 12 month postoperatively and the mean ROM of inferior adjacent segment was significantly larger than that of superior adjacent segments after surgery. The ROM of the arthoplasty level was preserved well during the follow up periods. No surgical and device related complications were observed. Conclusion Hybrid surgery is a safe and effective alternative to fusion for the management of multilevel cervical spondylosis. PMID:23323165

  13. A 6-DOF parallel bone-grinding robot for cervical disc replacement surgery.

    PubMed

    Tian, Heqiang; Wang, Chenchen; Dang, Xiaoqing; Sun, Lining

    2017-05-24

    Artificial cervical disc replacement surgery has become an effective and main treatment method for cervical disease, which has become a more common and serious problem for people with sedentary work. To improve cervical disc replacement surgery significantly, a 6-DOF parallel bone-grinding robot is developed for cervical bone-grinding by image navigation and surgical plan. The bone-grinding robot including mechanical design and low level control is designed. The bone-grinding robot navigation is realized by optical positioning with spatial registration coordinate system defined. And a parametric robot bone-grinding plan and high level control have been developed for plane grinding for cervical top endplate and tail endplate grinding by a cylindrical grinding drill and spherical grinding for two articular surfaces of bones by a ball grinding drill. Finally, the surgical flow for a robot-assisted cervical disc replacement surgery procedure is present. The final experiments results verified the key technologies and performance of the robot-assisted surgery system concept excellently, which points out a promising clinical application with higher operability. Finally, study innovations, study limitations, and future works of this present study are discussed, and conclusions of this paper are also summarized further. This bone-grinding robot is still in the initial stage, and there are many problems to be solved from a clinical point of view. Moreover, the technique is promising and can give a good support for surgeons in future clinical work.

  14. Utilization trends of cervical artificial disc replacement during the FDA investigational device exemption clinical trials compared to anterior cervical fusion.

    PubMed

    Qureshi, Sheeraz A; Koehler, Steven M; Lu, Young; Cho, Samuel; Hecht, Andrew C

    2013-12-01

    While anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) is the gold standard surgical treatment for cervical disc disease, concerns regarding adjacent segment degeneration lead to the development of cervical disc arthroplasty (CDA). This study compares the utilization trends of CDA versus ACDF during the period of the Food and Drug Administration Investigational Device Exemption clinical trials from 2004 to 2007. The Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project Nationwide Inpatient Sample database was used to identify CDA and ACDF procedures performed in the USA between 2004 and 2007. The prevalence of CDA and ACDF procedures was estimated and stratified by age, sex, diagnosis, census region, payor class, and hospital characteristics. The average length of hospital stay, total charges, and costs were also estimated. The number of CDA surgeries significantly increased annually from 2004 to 2007 and mostly took place at urban non-teaching hospitals. There were no regional differences between CDA and ACDF utilization. There was no difference between sex or admission type between CDA and ACDF patients. ACDF patients were older and had more diabetes, hypertension, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. CDA patients were more likely to be discharged home and had shorter hospital stays but had a higher rate of deep venous thrombosis than ACDF patients. Significantly more CDA patients had private insurance while more ACDF patients had Medicare. The average cost was higher for ACDF than CDA. While ACDF dominated surgical intervention for cervical disc disease during the trial period, CDA utilization increased at a significantly greater rate suggesting rapid early adoption.

  15. Herniated Lumbar Disc

    MedlinePlus

    ... Manipulation may provide short-term relief from nonspecific low back pain, but should be avoided in most cases of ... your main symptom is leg pain (rather than low back pain), you can expect good results from surgery. Before ...

  16. Outcome of physiotherapy after surgery for cervical disc disease: a prospective randomised multi-centre trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Many patients with cervical disc disease require leave from work, due to long-lasting, complex symptoms, including chronic pain and reduced levels of physical and psychological function. Surgery on a few segmental levels might be expected to resolve disc-specific pain and reduce neurological deficits, but not the non-specific neck pain and the frequent illness. No study has investigated whether post-surgery physiotherapy might improve the outcome of surgery. The main purpose of this study was to evaluate whether a well-structured rehabilitation programme might add benefit to the customary post-surgical treatment for cervical disc disease, with respect to function, disability, work capability, and cost effectiveness. Methods/Design This study was designed as a prospective, randomised, controlled, multi-centre study. An independent, blinded investigator will compare two alternatives of rehabilitation. We will include 200 patients of working age, with cervical disc disease confirmed by clinical findings and symptoms of cervical nerve root compression. After providing informed consent, study participants will be randomised to one of two alternative physiotherapy regimes; (A) customary treatment (information and advice on a specialist clinic); or (B) customary treatment plus active physiotherapy. Physiotherapy will follow a standardised, structured programme of neck-specific exercises combined with a behavioural approach. All patients will be evaluated both clinically and subjectively (with questionnaires) before surgery and at 6 weeks, 3 months, 6 months, 12 months, and 24 months after surgery. The main outcome variable will be neck-specific disability. Cost-effectiveness will also be calculated. Discussion We anticipate that the results of this study will provide evidence to support physiotherapeutic rehabilitation applied after surgery for cervical radiculopathy due to cervical disc disease. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01547611

  17. New Classification for Clinically Symptomatic Adjacent Segment Pathology in Cervical Disc Disease

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Clinical adjacent segment pathology (CASP) is common after cervical disc surgery. A critical examination of 320 patients operated for cervical disc prolapse revealed that CASP can also occur in patients with congenital and degenerative fusion of cervical spine. This has not been studied in depth and there is a need for a practically applicable classification of CASP. Purpose To develop a new classification scheme of CASP. Overview of Literature A review of the literature did not reveal a practically applicable classification incorporating the occurrence of CASP in congenital and degenerative fusion cases. Methods This was a retrospective analysis of 320 patients operated (509 disc spaces) on for cervical disc prolapse. Cases (n=316) were followed-up for 3-11 years. Random sampling of 220 patients with postoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in 165 cases was analyzed. Results Six symptomatic CASP cases required resurgery (1.9%), eight cases involved MRI proven CASP with axial neck pain only and 13 patients were asymptomatic with radiological adjacent segment pathology (RASP). The frequency rate was 8.5% (27/316). Four cases of congenital or degenerative fusion of vertebra developed CASP requiring surgery. CASP is classified as primary or secondary follows. Primary A1 was congenital fusion of vertebra and primary A2 was degenerative fusion of the vertebra. Secondary, which was after cervical disc surgery, comprised B1 (RASP in asymptomatic patients), B2 (CASP in patients with axial neck pain), and B3 (CASP with myeloradiculopathy). B3 was subdivided into single-level CASP (B3a) and multiple-level CASP (B3b). Conclusions Symptomatic CASP requiring resurgery is infrequent. CASP can occur in patients with congenital and degenerative fusion of the cervical spine. A new classification for CASP along with treatment strategy is proposed. Patients in Primary CASP and B3 CASP require resurgery while others require only observation. PMID:26712514

  18. New Classification for Clinically Symptomatic Adjacent Segment Pathology in Cervical Disc Disease.

    PubMed

    Uddanapalli, Srinivasan Sreeramulu

    2015-12-01

    Clinical adjacent segment pathology (CASP) is common after cervical disc surgery. A critical examination of 320 patients operated for cervical disc prolapse revealed that CASP can also occur in patients with congenital and degenerative fusion of cervical spine. This has not been studied in depth and there is a need for a practically applicable classification of CASP. To develop a new classification scheme of CASP. A review of the literature did not reveal a practically applicable classification incorporating the occurrence of CASP in congenital and degenerative fusion cases. This was a retrospective analysis of 320 patients operated (509 disc spaces) on for cervical disc prolapse. Cases (n=316) were followed-up for 3-11 years. Random sampling of 220 patients with postoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in 165 cases was analyzed. Six symptomatic CASP cases required resurgery (1.9%), eight cases involved MRI proven CASP with axial neck pain only and 13 patients were asymptomatic with radiological adjacent segment pathology (RASP). The frequency rate was 8.5% (27/316). Four cases of congenital or degenerative fusion of vertebra developed CASP requiring surgery. CASP is classified as primary or secondary follows. Primary A1 was congenital fusion of vertebra and primary A2 was degenerative fusion of the vertebra. Secondary, which was after cervical disc surgery, comprised B1 (RASP in asymptomatic patients), B2 (CASP in patients with axial neck pain), and B3 (CASP with myeloradiculopathy). B3 was subdivided into single-level CASP (B3a) and multiple-level CASP (B3b). Symptomatic CASP requiring resurgery is infrequent. CASP can occur in patients with congenital and degenerative fusion of the cervical spine. A new classification for CASP along with treatment strategy is proposed. Patients in Primary CASP and B3 CASP require resurgery while others require only observation.

  19. Surgical management of high cervical disc prolapse associated with basilar invagination--two case reports.

    PubMed

    Goel, Atul; Phalke, Umesh; Cacciola, Francesco; Muzumdar, Dattatraya

    2004-03-01

    C3-4 cervical disc prolapse was associated with basilar invagination and short neck in a 21-year-old man and additionally with an extensive Klippel-Feil abnormality and fusion of multiple cervical vertebrae in a 32-year-old man. The transoral surgical route was adopted for cervical discectomy in the latter case and an additional odontoidectomy in the former case. Interbody plate and screw fixation was carried out in the patient with Klippel-Feil abnormality. Both the patients were relieved of symptoms and remained asymptomatic at follow up. Simultaneous fixation procedure is not mandatory after transoral surgery in patients with basilar invagination.

  20. Ranges of Cervical Intervertebral Disc Deformation during an In-Vivo Dynamic Flexion-Extension of the Neck.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yan; Mao, Haiqing; Li, Jing-Sheng; Tsai, Tsung-Yuan; Cheng, Liming; Wood, Kirkham B; Li, Guoan; Cha, Thomas D

    2017-03-23

    While abnormal loading is widely believed to cause cervical spine disc diseases, in-vivo cervical disc deformation during dynamic neck motion has not been well delineated. This study investigated the range of cervical disc deformation during an in-vivo functional flexion-extension of the neck. Ten asymptomatic human subjects were tested using a combined dual fluoroscopic imaging system and MRI based 3D modeling technique. Overall disc deformation was determined using the changes of the space geometry between upper and lower endplates of each intervertebral segment (C3/4, C4/5, C5/6 and C6/7). Five points (anterior, center, posterior, left and right) of each disc were analyzed to examine the disc deformation distributions. The data indicated that between the functional maximum flexion and extension of the neck, the anterior points of the discs experienced large changes of distraction/compression deformation and shear deformation. The higher level discs experienced higher ranges of disc deformation. No significant difference was found in deformation ranges at posterior points of all discs. The data indicated that the range of disc deformation is disc level dependent and the anterior region experienced larger changes of deformation than the center and posterior regions, except for the C6/7 disc. The data obtained from this study could serve as baseline knowledge for the understanding of the cervical spine disc biomechanics and for investigation of the biomechanical etiology of disc diseases. These data could also provide insights for development of motion preservation surgeries for cervical spine.

  1. A case of cervical metastases in a patient with preexisting cervical disc replacement and fusion after 2-year symptom-free interval: when do we need interdisciplinary diagnostics?

    PubMed

    Melloh, Markus; Barz, Thomas

    2012-08-01

    Recurrent cervical symptoms frequently occur after cervical disc replacement and fusion. To date, no algorithm for the diagnostic assessment of these symptoms has been established. We present a case report and review of the literature to illustrate the need for interdisciplinary diagnostics in recurrent cervicobrachialgia without pathological cervical imaging. The hospital chart, medical history, physical examination, and imaging of a single patient were reviewed. A 53-year-old man with preexisting cervical disc replacement and fusion presented with a new episode of cervicobrachialgia after a 2-year symptom-free interval. Cervical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed no pathological findings. Six months later the patient reported increasing symptoms including numbness and weakness of the right arm. Repeated cervical MRI and thoracic computed tomography revealed cervical metastases with intraspinal tumor growth and an underlying extensive small cell bronchial carcinoma. In recurrent cervicobrachialgia, without pathological cervical imaging, interdisciplinary diagnostics are needed. Basic diagnostic tests may assist to exclude severe non-vertebrogenic pathologies.

  2. [A feasibility research of minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (MIS-TLIF) using hybrid internal fixation for recurrent lumbar disc herniation].

    PubMed

    Mao, Ke-ya; Wang, Yan; Xiao, Song-hua; Zhang, Yong-gang; Liu, Bao-wei; Wang, Zheng; Zhang, Xi-Feng; Cui, Geng; Zhang, Xue-song; Li, Peng; Mao, Ke-zheng

    2013-08-01

    To investigate the feasibility of minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion (MIS-TLIF) using hybrid internal fixation of pedicle screws and a translaminar facet screw for recurrent lumbar disc herniation. From January 2010 to December 2011, 16 recurrent lumbar disc herniation patients, 10 male and 6 female patients with an average age of 45 years (35-68 years) were treated with unilateral incision MIS-TLIF through working channel. After decompression, interbody fusion and fixation using unilateral pedicle screws, a translaminar facet screw was inserted from the same incision through spinous process and laminar to the other side facet joint. The results of perioperative parameters, radiographic images and clinical outcomes were assessed. The repeated measure analysis of variance was applied in the scores of visual analogue scale (VAS) and Oswestry disablity index (ODI). All patients MIS-TLIF were accomplished under working channel including decompression, interbody fusion and hybrid fixation without any neural complication. The average operative time was (148 ± 75) minutes, the average operative blood loss was (186 ± 226) ml, the average postoperative ambulation time was (32 ± 15) hours, and the average hospitalization time was (6 ± 4) days. The average length of incision was (29 ± 4) mm, and the average length of translaminar facets screw was (52 ± 6) mm. The mean follow-up was 16.5 months with a range of 12-24 months. The postoperative X-ray and CT images showed good position of the hybrid internal fixation, and all facets screws penetrate through facets joint. The significant improvement could be found in back pain VAS, leg pain VAS and ODI scores between preoperative 1 day and postoperative follow-up at all time-points (back pain VAS:F = 52.845, P = 0.000;leg pain VAS:F = 113.480, P = 0.000;ODI:F = 36.665, P = 0.000). Recurrent lumbar disc herniation could be treated with MIS-TLIF using hybrid fixation through unilateral incision, and the

  3. Single-Level Degenerative Cervical Disc Disease and Driving Disability: Results from a Prospective, Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Michael P.; Mitchell, M. David; Hacker, Robert J.; Riew, K. Daniel; Sasso, Rick C.

    2013-01-01

    Study Design Post hoc analysis of prospective, randomized trial. Objective To investigate the disability associated with driving and single-level degenerative, cervical disc disease and to investigate the effect of surgery on driving disability. Methods Post hoc analysis of data obtained from three sites participating in a multicenter, randomized, controlled trial comparing cervical disc arthroplasty (TDA) with anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF). The driving subscale of the Neck Disability Index (NDI) was analyzed for all patients. A dichotomous severity score was created from the NDI. Statistical comparisons were made within and between groups. Results Two-year follow-up was available for 118/135 (87%) patients. One half of the study population (49.6%) reported moderate or severe preoperative driving difficulty. This disability associated with driving was similar among the two groups (ACDF: 2.5 ± 1.1, TDA: 2.6 ± 1.0, p = 0.646). The majority of patients showed improvement, with no or little driving disability, at the sixth postoperative week (ACDF: 75%, TDA: 90%, p = 0.073). At no follow-up point did a difference exist between groups according to the severity index. Conclusions Many patients suffering from radiculopathy or myelopathy from cervical disc disease are limited in their ability to operate an automobile. Following anterior cervical spine surgery, most patients are able to return to comfortable driving at 6 weeks. PMID:24436875

  4. Assessment of Magnetic Resonance Imaging Artifact Following Cervical Total Disc Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Fayyazi, Amir H.; Taormina, Jennifer; Svach, David; Stein, Jeff

    2015-01-01

    Background Cervical disc arthroplasty has become a technique for the treatment of cervical degenerative disc disease. Clinically, the need to accurately assess the neural elements at the operative and adjacent levels is critical postoperatively. The purpose of this study was to quantitatively and qualitatively measure the amount of MRI artifact produced by various cervical total disc replacements. Methods T1 and T2-weighted turbo spin-echo MRI sequences were collected on the cervical spine (C2-T1) of a 68 year-old unembalmed male cadaver. A discectomy was performed at C5-6, followed by successive implantation of six different total disc replacements. The scans were quantitatively evaluated by three of the authors. The volume of artifact was measured using image analysis software. Qualitative analysis of the adjacent and index neural elements was performed. Results The artifact in the T2 weighted images was noted to be 58.6±7.3 cm3 for Prestige ST, 14.2±1.3 cm3 for ProDisc-C, 7.5±0.8 cm3 for Discover, 8.0±0.3 cm3 for Prestige LP, 6.6±0.7 cm3 for Bryan, and 7.3±0.6 cm3 for ProDisc-C titanium prototype. Acceptable intraobserver and excellent interobsever correlation was demonstrated using Pearson Correlation and Concordance Correlation Coefficient analysis. The adjacent and implanted level neural elements (spinal cord and neuroforamina) were easily visualized on the T2 weighted images after the implantation of titanium devices (ProDisc-C titanium prototype, Discover, Prestige LP and Bryan). After implantation of a cobalt chrome implant (ProDisc-C), the adjacent level neural elements were easily visualized but the implanted level could not be fully visualized due to distortion of the images. The quality of the distortion was least favorable after the implantation of the stainless steel implant (Prestige ST), where neither the adjacent nor the index level could be fully visualized. Conclusion The volume of the artifact seen following cervical total disc

  5. Cost-utility analysis modeling at 2-year follow-up for cervical disc arthroplasty versus anterior cervical discectomy and fusion: A single-center contribution to the randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Warren, Daniel; Andres, Tate; Hoelscher, Christian; Ricart-Hoffiz, Pedro; Bendo, John; Goldstein, Jeffrey

    2013-01-01

    Background Patients with cervical disc herniations resulting in radiculopathy or myelopathy from single level disease have traditionally been treated with Anterior Cervical Discectomy and Fusion (ACDF), yet Cervical Disc Arthroplasty (CDA) is a new alternative. Expert suggestion of reduced adjacent segment degeneration is a promising future result of CDA. A cost-utility analysis of these procedures with long-term follow-up has not been previously reported. Methods We reviewed single institution prospective data from a randomized trial comparing single-level ACDF and CDA in cervical disc disease. Both Medicare reimbursement schedules and actual hospital cost data for peri-operative care were separately reviewed and analyzed to estimate the cost of treatment of each patient. QALYs were calculated at 1 and 2 years based on NDI and SF-36 outcome scores, and incremental cost effectiveness ratio (ICER) analysis was performed to determine relative cost-effectiveness. Results Patients of both groups showed improvement in NDI and SF-36 outcome scores. Medicare reimbursement rates to the hospital were $11,747 and $10,015 for ACDF and CDA, respectively; these figures rose to $16,162 and $13,171 when including physician and anesthesiologist reimbursement. The estimated actual cost to the hospital of ACDF averaged $16,108, while CDA averaged $16,004 (p = 0.97); when including estimated physicians fees, total hospital costs came to $19,811 and $18,440, respectively. The cost/QALY analyses therefore varied widely with these discrepancies in cost values. The ICERs of ACDF vs CDA with Medicare reimbursements were $18,593 (NDI) and $19,940 (SF-36), while ICERs based on actual total hospital cost were $13,710 (NDI) and $9,140 (SF-36). Conclusions We confirm the efficacy of ACDF and CDA in the treatment of cervical disc disease, as our results suggest similar clinical outcomes at one and two year follow-up. The ICER suggests that the non-significant added benefit via ACDF comes at a

  6. A Prospective Study of the Functional Outcome of Anterior Cervical Discectomy With Fusion in Single Level Degenerative Cervical Disc Prolapse

    PubMed Central

    Kamani, Mayur M; Shetty, Vikram; Rai, H. Ravindranath; Hegde, Deepak

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Cervical spondylotic myelo-radiculopathy is a form of spinal cord dysfunction syndrome and usually accompanies age related degeneration of the spine. Aim To determine the functional outcome of anterior cervical discectomy with fusion and plating in single level degenerative cervical disc prolapse. Materials and Methods A total of 20 patients diagnosed with degenerative single level cervical disc prolapse who presented to the Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Justice KS Hegde Charitable Hospital, Mangalore from the period of November 2012 to May 2014 were enrolled in the study. Complete clinical and radiological evaluation of the patients was done. A trial of conservative management was tried in all these patients for a period of two months. They were taken up for surgery only when conservative management had failed. Scoring of neck function before the surgery was done as per the Modified Japanese Orthopaedic Association (MJOA) score. All patients underwent anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) with tricortical iliac crest bone grafting. Fixation was performed with titanium locking cervical plates. All patients were reviewed at 6 weeks and 6 months postoperatively. Assessment of neck function was done as per the MJOA scoring during all the reviews. Radiographic assessment was also done during all the reviews. The complications noted were documented. The statistical analysis was done using percentages; the arithmetic mean was calculated using SPSS software (version 16.0). Results Amongst the 20 patients included in the study, 1 patient died postoperatively due to oesophageal rupture. of the remaining 19 patients reviewed and followed up, all of them had improvement of symptoms and were reported to be in the ‘mild category’ as per the MJOA score. One patient developed dysphonia, in the immediate postoperative period due to recurrent laryngeal nerve palsy which recovered in a period of three months postoperative. Conclusion Single level

  7. An evaluation of information on the internet about a new device: the cervical artificial disc replacement.

    PubMed

    Qureshi, Sheeraz A; Koehler, Steven M; Lin, James D; Bird, Justin; Garcia, Ryan M; Hecht, Andrew C

    2012-05-01

    Cross-sectional survey. The objective of this study was to investigate the authorship, content, and quality of information available to the public on the Internet pertaining to the cervical artificial disc replacement device. The Internet is widely used by patients as an educational tool for health care information. In addition, the Internet is used as a medium for direct-to-consumer marketing. Increasing interest in cervical artificial disc replacement has led to the emergence of numerous Web sites offering information about this procedure. It is thought that patients can be influenced by information found on the Internet. A cross section of Web sites accessible to the general public was surveyed. Three commonly used search engines were used to locate 150 (50/search engine) Web sites providing information about the cervical artificial disc replacement. Each Web site was evaluated with regard to authorship and content. Fifty-three percent of the Web sites reviewed were authorized by a private physician group, 4% by an academic physician group, 13% by industry, 16% were news reports, and 14% were not otherwise categorized. Sixty-five percent of Web sites offered a mechanism for direct contact and 19% provided clear patient eligibility criteria. Benefits were expressed in 80% of Web sites, whereas associated risks were described in 35% or less. European experiences were noted in 17% of Web sites, whereas only 9% of Web sites detailed the current US experience. CONCLUSION.: The results of this study demonstrate that much of the content of the Internet-derived information pertaining to the cervical artificial disc replacement is for marketing purposes and may not represent unbiased information. Until we can confirm the content on a Web site to be accurate, patients should be cautioned when using the Internet as a source for health care information related to cervical disc replacement.

  8. Total Disc Arthroplasty and Anterior Cervical Discectomy and Fusion in Cervical Spine: Competitive or Complimentary? Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Jawahar, Ajay; Nunley, Pierce

    2012-01-01

    Anterior cervical discectomy and arthrodesis has come to represent standard of care for patients with persistent radicular and/or myelopathic symptoms that have failed to improve with conservative treatments. One potential complication of the procedure is the accelerated degeneration of the vertebrae and the intervertebral discs adjacent to the level fused and the effects of fusion on those levels. The concern that fusion may be a contributing factor to accelerated adjacent segment degeneration led to increased interest in cervical disc replacement after anterior decompressive surgery. Several studies analyzing the short-term outcomes of the disc replacement procedure have been published since then, and the pros and cons of both procedures continue to remain a topic of debate among the scientific community. The analysis of published literature and our own experience has convinced us that the overall longer-term clinical outcomes after anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) and total disc replacement (TDR) in the general patient population are not significantly different in terms of symptomatic improvement, neurological improvement, and restoration to better quality of life. Age of the patients and number of affected levels may impact the outcomes and hence determine the choice of optimum procedure. To definitely compare the incidence of adjacent segment disease after these procedures, multi-institutional studies with predetermined and unanimously agreed upon clinical and radiological criteria should be undertaken and the results analyzed in an unbiased fashion. Until that time, it is reasonable to assume that ACDF as well as cervical TDR are both safe and effective procedures that may have outcome benefits in specific patient subgroups based upon demographics and clinical/radiological parameters at the time of surgery. PMID:24353966

  9. Cervical Disc Deformation During Flexion–Extension in Asymptomatic Controls and Single-Level Arthrodesis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Anderst, William; Donaldson, William; Lee, Joon; Kang, James

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize cervical disc deformation in asymptomatic subjects and single-level arthrodesis patients during in vivo functional motion. A validated model-based tracking technique determined vertebral motion from biplane radiographs collected during dynamic flexion–extension. Level-dependent differences in disc compression–distraction and shear deformation were identified within the anterior and posterior annulus (PA) and the nucleus of 20 asymptomatic subjects and 15 arthrodesis patients using a mixed-model statistical analysis. In asymptomatic subjects, disc compression and shear deformation per degree of flexion–extension progressively decreased from C23 to C67. The anterior and PA experienced compression–distraction deformation of up to 20%, while the nucleus region was compressed between 0% (C67) and 12% (C23). Peak shear deformation ranged from 16% (at C67) to 33% (at C45). In the C5–C6 arthrodesis group, C45 discs were significantly less compressed than in the control group in all disc regions (all p ≤ 0.026). In the C6–C7 arthrodesis group, C56 discs were significantly less compressed than the control group in the nucleus (p = 0.023) and PA (p = 0.014), but not the anterior annulus (AA; p = 0.137). These results indicate in vivo disc deformation is level-dependent, and single-level anterior arthrodesis alters the compression–distraction deformation in the disc immediately superior to the arthrodesis. PMID:23861160

  10. The Effects of Stretching with Lumbar Traction on VAS and Oswestry Scales of Patients with Lumbar 4–5 Herniated Intervertebral Disc

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Hae-sun; Yoo, Won-gyu

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] This study investigated the effect of stretching with lumbar traction on VAS and Oswestry scale scores of lumbar 4–5 herniated intervertebral disc (HIVD) patients. [Subjects] We recruited 20 lumbar 4–5 HIVD patients. [Methods] We performed stretching with lumbar traction for lumbar 4–5 HIVD patients during 4 weeks. The VAS and Oswestry scales were measured before and 4 weeks after the intervention. [Results] The results showed a significant decrease in VAS scale scores for stretching with lumbar traction in lumbar 4–5 HIVD patients, from 18±1.29 to 2.1±1.35. The Oswestry scale scores also decreased significantly, from 20.35±2.01 to 3.5±2.84, after stretching with lumbar traction. [Conclusion] Thus, we suggest stretching with lumbar traction for lumbar 4–5 HIVD patients. PMID:25140094

  11. The influence of obesity on the outcome of treatment of lumbar disc herniation: analysis of the Spine Patient Outcomes Research Trial (SPORT).

    PubMed

    Rihn, Jeffrey A; Kurd, Mark; Hilibrand, Alan S; Lurie, Jon; Zhao, Wenyan; Albert, Todd; Weinstein, James

    2013-01-02

    Questions remain as to the effect that obesity has on patients managed for symptomatic lumbar disc herniation. The purpose of this study was to determine if obesity affects outcomes following the treatment of symptomatic lumbar disc herniation. An as-treated analysis was performed on patients enrolled in the Spine Patient Outcomes Research Trial for the treatment of lumbar disc herniation. A comparison was made between patients with a body mass index of <30 kg/m² (nonobese) (n = 854) and those with a body mass index of ≥30 kg/m² (obese) (n = 336). Baseline patient demographic and clinical characteristics were documented. Primary and secondary outcomes were measured at baseline and at regular follow-up time intervals up to four years. The difference in improvement from baseline between operative and nonoperative treatment was determined at each follow-up period for both groups. At the time of the four-year follow-up evaluation, improvements over baseline in primary outcome measures were significantly less for obese patients as compared with nonobese patients in both the operative treatment group (Short Form-36 physical function, 37.3 compared with 47.7 points [p < 0.001], Short Form-36 bodily pain, 44.2 compared with 50.0 points [p = 0.005], and Oswestry Disability Index, -33.7 compared with -40.1 points [p < 0.001]) and the nonoperative treatment group (Short Form-36 physical function, 23.1 compared with 32.0 points [p < 0.001] and Oswestry Disability Index, -21.4 compared with -26.1 points [p < 0.001]). The one exception was that the change from baseline in terms of the Short Form-36 bodily pain score was statistically similar for obese and nonobese patients in the nonoperative treatment group (30.9 compared with 33.4 points [p = 0.39]). At the time of the four-year follow-up evaluation, when compared with nonobese patients who had been managed operatively, obese patients who had been managed operatively had significantly less improvement in the Sciatica

  12. Clinical and radiologic comparison of dynamic cervical implant arthroplasty versus anterior cervical discectomy and fusion for the treatment of cervical degenerative disc disease.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhonghai; Yu, Shunzhi; Zhao, Yantao; Hou, Shuxun; Fu, Qiang; Li, Fengning; Hou, Tiesheng; Zhong, Hongbin

    2014-06-01

    This study compared the clinical and radiological outcomes of dynamic cervical implant (DCI; Scient'x, Villers-Bretonneux, France) arthroplasty versus anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) for the treatment of cervical degenerative disc disease. This prospective cohort study enrolled patients with single-level cervical degenerative disc disease who underwent DCI arthroplasty or ACDF between September 2009 and June 2011. Patients were followed up for more than 2years. Clinical evaluation included the Medical Outcomes Study 36-Item Short Form Health Survey (SF-36), Neck Disability Index (NDI), Japan Orthopedic Association (JOA) score, and visual analog scale (VAS) scores for neck and arm pain. Radiological assessments included segmental range of motion (ROM), overall ROM (C2-C7), disc height (DHI), and changes in adjacent disc spaces. The VAS, SF-36, JOA, and NDI scores improved significantly after surgery in both the DCI and ACDF groups. The VAS, JOA, and SF-36 scores were not significantly different between the DCI and ACDF groups at the final follow-up. The segmental ROM at the treated level and overall ROM increased significantly after surgery in the DCI group, but the ROM in the adjacent cephalad and caudal segments did not change significantly. The mean DHI at the treated level was significantly restored after surgery in both groups. Five patients (12.8%) in the DCI group showed new signs of adjacent segment degeneration. These results indicate that DCI is an effective, reliable, and safe procedure for the treatment of cervical degenerative disc disease. However, there is no definitive evidence that DCI arthroplasty has better intermediate-term results than ACDF.

  13. Cervical total disc replacement with the Mobi-C cervical artificial disc compared with anterior discectomy and fusion for treatment of 2-level symptomatic degenerative disc disease: a prospective, randomized, controlled multicenter clinical trial: clinical article.

    PubMed

    Davis, Reginald J; Kim, Kee D; Hisey, Michael S; Hoffman, Gregory A; Bae, Hyun W; Gaede, Steven E; Rashbaum, Ralph F; Nunley, Pierce Dalton; Peterson, Daniel L; Stokes, John K

    2013-11-01

    Cervical total disc replacement (TDR) is intended to treat neurological symptoms and neck pain associated with degeneration of intervertebral discs in the cervical spine. Anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) has been the standard treatment for these indications since the procedure was first developed in the 1950s. While TDR has been shown to be a safe and effective alternative to ACDF for treatment of patients with degenerative disc disease (DDD) at a single level of the cervical spine, few studies have focused on the safety and efficacy of TDR for treatment of 2 levels of the cervical spine. The primary objective of this study was to rigorously compare the Mobi-C cervical artificial disc to ACDF for treatment of cervical DDD at 2 contiguous levels of the cervical spine. This study was a prospective, randomized, US FDA investigational device exemption pivotal trial of the Mobi-C cervical artificial disc conducted at 24 centers in the US. The primary clinical outcome was a composite measure of study success at 24 months. The comparative control treatment was ACDF using allograft bone and an anterior plate. A total of 330 patients were enrolled, randomized, and received study surgery. All patients were diagnosed with intractable symptomatic cervical DDD at 2 contiguous levels of the cervical spine between C-3 and C-7. Patients were randomized in a 2:1 ratio (TDR patients to ACDF patients). A total of 225 patients received the Mobi-C TDR device and 105 patients received ACDF. At 24 months only 3.0% of patients were lost to follow-up. On average, patients in both groups showed significant improvements in Neck Disability Index (NDI) score, visual analog scale (VAS) neck pain score, and VAS arm pain score from preoperative baseline to each time point. However, the TDR patients experienced significantly greater improvement than ACDF patients in NDI score at all time points and significantly greater improvement in VAS neck pain score at 6 weeks, and at 3, 6, and

  14. [Assessment of the correlation between histological degeneration and radiological and clinical parameters in a series of patients who underwent lumbar disc herniation surgery].

    PubMed

    Munarriz, Pablo M; Paredes, Igor; Alén, José F; Castaño-Leon, Ana M; Cepeda, Santiago; Hernandez-Lain, Aurelio; Lagares, Alfonso

    2017-09-26

    The use of histological degeneration scores in surgically-treated herniated lumbar discs is not common in clinical practice and its use has been primarily restricted to research. The objective of this study is to evaluate if there is an association between a higher grade of histological degeneration when compared with clinical or radiological parameters. Retrospective consecutive analysis of 122 patients who underwent single-segment lumbar disc herniation surgery. Clinical information was available on all patients, while the histological study and preoperative magnetic resonance imaging were also retrieved for 75 patients. Clinical variables included age, duration of symptoms, neurological deficits, or affected deep tendon reflex. The preoperative magnetic resonance imaging was evaluated using Modic and Pfirrmann scores for the affected segment by 2 independent observers. Histological degeneration was evaluated using Weiler's score; the presence of inflammatory infiltrates and neovascularization, not included in the score, were also studied. Correlation and chi-square tests were used to assess the association between histological variables and clinical or radiological variables. Interobserver agreement was also evaluated for the MRI variables using weighted kappa. No statistically significant correlation was found between histological variables (histological degeneration score, inflammatory infiltrates or neovascularization) and clinical or radiological variables. Interobserver agreement for radiological scores resulted in a kappa of 0.79 for the Pfirrmann scale and 0.65 for the Modic scale, both statistically significant. In our series of patients, we could not demonstrate any correlation between the degree of histological degeneration or the presence of inflammatory infiltrates when compared with radiological degeneration scales or clinical variables such as the patient's age or duration of symptoms. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Neurocirug

  15. Are Transitional Vertebra and Spina Bifida Occulta Related with Lumbar Disc Herniation and Clinical Parameters in Young Patients with Chronic Low Back Pain?

    PubMed Central

    Kurt, Emine Eda; Turkyilmaz, Aysegul Kuçukali; Dadali, Yeliz; Erdem, Hatice Rana; Tuncay, Figen

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Lumbosacral transitional vertebra (LSTV) and spina bifida occulta (SBO) are widespread within the lumbosacral spine. Their connection to lumbar disc herniation (LDH) and/or lower back pain has been debated in the current literature; however, there is no consensus. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the relationship between the frequency of LSTV and SBO with that of LDH among young patients with chronic lower back pain. Study Design: Cross-sectional. Materials and Methods: A total of 1094 patients with lower back pain, aged between 20 and 40 years, with lower back pain history persisting for longer than 12 weeks were studied. All the patients in the study were evaluated with standard pelvic radiographs and lumbar vertebra magnetic resonance imaging. The severity of pain was measured using the visual analog scale, and the effect of lower back pain on daily life activities was measured using the Oswestry disability index. The patients were separated into two groups: Group 1 consisted of patients without LDH, and Group 2 consisted of patients with LDH. Additionally, these two groups were separated into three subgroups: Non-LSTV-SBO, LSTV, and SBO. Results: It was determined that LSTV frequency was significantly higher (p=0.004) in the lumbar disc herniation group 2. In addition, the existence of LSTV increased the risk of lower back pain (p<0.001, p<0.001) and disability (p<0.001, p<0.001) in young patients with and without LDH or not. However, the presence of SBO did not increase lower back pain (p=0.251, p=0.200) and disability (p=0.134, p=0.161) in both groups. Conclusion: A relationship was detected between the frequency of LDH and LSTV in young patients with chronic lower back pain between the ages of 20 and 40 years. Also, the presence of LSTV was found to increase the risk of lower back pain and disability. PMID:28149141

  16. Are Transitional Vertebra and Spina Bifida Occulta Related with Lumbar Disc Herniation and Clinical Parameters in Young Patients with Chronic Low Back Pain?

    PubMed

    Kurt, Emine Eda; Turkyilmaz, Aysegul Kuçukali; Dadali, Yeliz; Erdem, Hatice Rana; Tuncay, Figen

    2016-10-01

    Lumbosacral transitional vertebra (LSTV) and spina bifida occulta (SBO) are widespread within the lumbosacral spine. Their connection to lumbar disc herniation (LDH) and/or lower back pain has been debated in the current literature; however, there is no consensus. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the relationship between the frequency of LSTV and SBO with that of LDH among young patients with chronic lower back pain. Cross-sectional. A total of 1094 patients with lower back pain, aged between 20 and 40 years, with lower back pain history persisting for longer than 12 weeks were studied. All the patients in the study were evaluated with standard pelvic radiographs and lumbar vertebra magnetic resonance imaging. The severity of pain was measured using the visual analog scale, and the effect of lower back pain on daily life activities was measured using the Oswestry disability index. The patients were separated into two groups: Group 1 consisted of patients without LDH, and Group 2 consisted of patients with LDH. Additionally, these two groups were separated into three subgroups: Non-LSTV-SBO, LSTV, and SBO. It was determined that LSTV frequency was significantly higher (p=0.004) in the lumbar disc herniation group 2. In addition, the existence of LSTV increased the risk of lower back pain (p<0.001, p<0.001) and disability (p<0.001, p<0.001) in young patients with and without LDH or not. However, the presence of SBO did not increase lower back pain (p=0.251, p=0.200) and disability (p=0.134, p=0.161) in both groups. A relationship was detected between the frequency of LDH and LSTV in young patients with chronic lower back pain between the ages of 20 and 40 years. Also, the presence of LSTV was found to increase the risk of lower back pain and disability.

  17. Surgical management of recurrent disc herniations with microdiscectomy and long-term results on life quality: Detailed analysis of 70 cases

    PubMed Central

    Albayrak, Serdal; Ozturk, Sait; Durdag, Emre; Ayden, Ömer

    2016-01-01

    Background: Aim of this paper is to recall the surgical technique used in the recurrent lumbar disc herniations (LDHs) and to share our experiences. Materials and Methods: Out of series of 1115 patients who underwent operations for LDH between 2006 and 2013, 70 patients underwent re-operations, which were included in this study. During surgery, lateral decompression performed over the medial facet joint to the superior facet joint border was seen after widening the laminectomy defect, and microdiscectomy was performed. The demographic findings of the patients, their complaints in admission to hospital, the level of operation, the condition of dural injury, the first admission in the prospective analysis, and their quality of life were evaluated through the Oswestry scoring during their postoperative 1st, 3rd, 6th-month and 1st, 3rd, 5th and 7th-year follow-up. In the statical analysis, Friedman test was performed for the comparison of the Oswestry scores and Siegel Castellan test was used for the paired nonparametrical data. A P < 0.05 was considered statistically significant. Results: Considering the Oswestry Index during the follow-ups, the values in the postoperative early period and follow-ups were seen to be significantly lower than those at the time of admission to hospital (P < 0.05). None of the patients, who re-operated by microdiscectomy, presented with iatrogenic instability in 7 years follow-up period. Conclusion: Microdiscectomy performed through a proper technique in the re-operation of recurrent disc herniations eases complaints and improves the quality of life. Long-term follow-ups are required for more accurate results. PMID:26933352

  18. The DQB1 *03:02 HLA haplotype is associated with increased risk of chronic pain after inguinal hernia surgery and lumbar disc herniation.

    PubMed

    Dominguez, Cecilia A; Kalliomäki, Maija; Gunnarsson, Ulf; Moen, Aurora; Sandblom, Gabriel; Kockum, Ingrid; Lavant, Ewa; Olsson, Tomas; Nyberg, Fred; Rygh, Lars Jørgen; Røe, Cecilie; Gjerstad, Johannes; Gordh, Torsten; Piehl, Fredrik

    2013-03-01

    Neuropathic pain conditions are common after nerve injuries and are suggested to be regulated in part by genetic factors. We have previously demonstrated a strong genetic influence of the rat major histocompatibility complex on development of neuropathic pain behavior after peripheral nerve injury. In order to study if the corresponding human leukocyte antigen complex (HLA) also influences susceptibility to pain, we performed an association study in patients that had undergone surgery for inguinal hernia (n=189). One group had developed a chronic pain state following the surgical procedure, while the control group had undergone the same type of operation, without any persistent pain. HLA DRB1genotyping revealed a significantly increased proportion of patients in the pain group carrying DRB1*04 compared to patients in the pain-free group. Additional typing of the DQB1 gene further strengthened the association; carriers of the DQB1*03:02 allele together with DRB1*04 displayed an increased risk of postsurgery pain with an odds risk of 3.16 (1.61-6.22) compared to noncarriers. This finding was subsequently replicated in the clinical material of patients with lumbar disc herniation (n=258), where carriers of the DQB1*03:02 allele displayed a slower recovery and increased pain. In conclusion, we here for the first time demonstrate that there is an HLA-dependent risk of developing pain after surgery or lumbar disc herniation; mediated by the DRB1*04 - DQB1*03:02 haplotype. Further experimental and clinical studies are needed to fine-map the HLA effect and to address underlying mechanisms.

  19. Does the Occupational Activity Level Affect the Quality of Life of Patients Treated with Epidural Steroid Injections for Lumbar Disc Herniations?

    PubMed Central

    Pai, Sudhir

    2012-01-01

    Study Design Prospective cohort study. Purpose To determine whether there was any change in the quality of life of patients in sedentary/non sedentary occupations treated with epidural steroid injection for lumbar disc herniations using the 8 components of the SF 36 questionnaire.Overview of Literature: No previously done similar study published. Overview of Literature No previously done similar study published. Methods Ninety patients comprising sedentary and non sedentary occupations with lumbar disc herniations on magnetic resonance imaging who were treated with epidural steroid injection at St. John's Hospital Bangalore who met the Spinal Outcomes Research Trial eligibility criteria from April 2009 to May 2010. Results Of the 90 patients evaluated 44 were of Sedentary and 46 were of non sedentary activity levels, At 6 months primary outcomes physical functioning (p = 0.573, in difference between sedentary and non sedentary, improvement p = 0.001) energy/fatigue (difference between the two p = 0.917, improvement p = 0.001), emotional well being (difference p = 0.912, improvement, p = 0.001), social functioning (difference p = 0.523, improvement p = 0.232), pain (difference p = 0.535, improvement p = 0.001), general health (difference p = 0.738, improvement p < 0.001). Conclusions There was a statistically significant improvement in patients of both the sedentary and non sedentary groups p < 0.001 in all components of the SF36 in both sedentary and non sedentary patients except social functioning where the improvement was not statistically significant, and there was no significant difference between non sedentary and sedentary populations over time. PMID:22708017

  20. Does the occupational activity level affect the quality of life of patients treated with epidural steroid injections for lumbar disc herniations?

    PubMed

    Mhaskar, Vikram Arun; Pai, Sudhir

    2012-06-01

    Prospective cohort study. To determine whether there was any change in the quality of life of patients in sedentary/non sedentary occupations treated with epidural steroid injection for lumbar disc herniations using the 8 components of the SF 36 questionnaire.Overview of Literature: No previously done similar study published. No previously done similar study published. Ninety patients comprising sedentary and non sedentary occupations with lumbar disc herniations on magnetic resonance imaging who were treated with epidural steroid injection at St. John's Hospital Bangalore who met the Spinal Outcomes Research Trial eligibility criteria from April 2009 to May 2010. Of the 90 patients evaluated 44 were of Sedentary and 46 were of non sedentary activity levels, At 6 months primary outcomes physical functioning (p = 0.573, in difference between sedentary and non sedentary, improvement p = 0.001) energy/fatigue (difference between the two p = 0.917, improvement p = 0.001), emotional well being (difference p = 0.912, improvement, p = 0.001), social functioning (difference p = 0.523, improvement p = 0.232), pain (difference p = 0.535, improvement p = 0.001), general health (difference p = 0.738, improvement p < 0.001). There was a statistically significant improvement in patients of both the sedentary and non sedentary groups p < 0.001 in all components of the SF36 in both sedentary and non sedentary patients except social functioning where the improvement was not statistically significant, and there was no significant difference between non sedentary and sedentary populations over time.

  1. [Interspinous spacers and disc herniation. Geomorphometric and clinical study of 71 cases treated by L4-L5 microdiscectomy associated to spacer placement].

    PubMed

    Aso Escario, José; Aso Vizán, Alberto; Martínez Quiñones, José Vicente; Consolini, Fabian; Martín Gallego, Álvaro; Arregui Calvo, Ricardo

    2015-01-01

    A controversial indication of interspinous spacers is their use as a complement to discectomy. At the present time, there is no solid clinical evidence of effectiveness of that association, which might result from variability in spacer positioning, restricting its correct biomechanical actions. In this study our goal was to identify and analyse the variability in the placement of an interspinous spacer, and to investigate its relationship with the clinical results. We performed a retrospective study on X-ray films from 71 patients suffering from disc herniation in L4-L5 who underwent surgery in our hospital, consisting of: microdiscectomy and biomed interspinous spacer implantation. The geomorphometric techniques used to analyse the data were procrustes superimposition and principal components analysis. We compared the clinical results (using the Herron and Turner scale), segmental lordosis and surgical distraction with the geomorphometric parameters. Significant morphological variability was found in the implant position showing cephalo-caudal translation and clockwise-counterclockwise rotations. This variability did not correlate with clinical results. A relationship with anatomical features (lordosis) and additional surgical distraction was identified. A different morphology of implant-segment configuration was identified in cases with recurrence of disc herniation. Geometric morphometrics allowed identifying high variability in the final placement of interspinous spacers. Nevertheless, it seems not to be related to the clinical outcome, depending rather on the degree of lordosis and distraction. Some differences in segment-implant morphology were identified in cases with recurrences. To assess the effectiveness of spacers, larger studies including morphological and clinical variables are required. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Neurocirugía. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  2. The Mobi-C cervical disc for one-level and two-level cervical disc replacement: a review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Alvin, Matthew D; Mroz, Thomas E

    2014-01-01

    Background Cervical disc arthroplasty (CDA) is a novel motion-preserving procedure that is an alternative to fusion. The Mobi-C disc prosthesis, one of many Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved devices for CDA, is the only FDA-approved prosthesis for two-level CDA. Hence, it may allow for improved outcomes compared with multilevel fusion procedures. Purpose To critically assess the available literature on CDA with the Mobi-C prosthesis, with a focus on two-level CDA. Methods All clinical articles involving the Mobi-C disc prosthesis for CDA through September 1, 2014 were identified on Medline. Any paper that presented Mobi-C CDA clinical results was included. Study design, sample size, length of follow-up, use of statistical analysis, quality of life outcome scores, conflict of interest, and complications were recorded. Results Fifteen studies were included that investigated Mobi-C CDA, only one of which was a level Ib randomized control trial. All studies included showed non-inferiority of one-level Mobi-C CDA to one-level anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF). Only one study analyzed outcomes of one-level versus two-level Mobi-C CDA, and only one study analyzed two-level Mobi-C CDA versus two-level ACDF. In comparison with other cervical disc prostheses, the Mobi-C prosthesis is associated with higher rates of heterotopic ossification (HO). Studies with conflicts of interest reported lower rates of HO. Adjacent segment degeneration or disease, along with other complications, were not assessed in most studies. Conclusion One-level Mobi-C CDA is non-inferior, but not superior, to one-level ACDF for patients with cervical degenerative disc disease. The Mobi-C CDA procedure is associated with high rates of HO. Two-level Mobi-C CDA may be superior to two-level ACDF. However, insufficient evidence exists, thereby mandating a need for unbiased, well-designed prospective studies with well-defined outcomes in the future. PMID:25473319

  3. Hybrid surgery for multilevel cervical degenerative disc diseases: a systematic review of biomechanical and clinical evidence.

    PubMed

    Jia, Zhiwei; Mo, Zhongjun; Ding, Fan; He, Qing; Fan, Yubo; Ruan, Dike

    2014-08-01

    The optimal surgical technique for multilevel cervical degenerative disc diseases (DDD) remains controversial. Hybrid surgery (HS) incorporating anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) and cervical disc replacement (CDR) is increasingly performed for cervical DDD. This study aims to evaluate the biomechanical and clinical evidence available for HS and to provide a systematic review of current understanding of HS. This systematic review was undertaken by following the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses Statement. Multiple databases and online registers of clinical trials were searched up to February 2014. The biomechanical and clinical studies on HS for cervical DDD written in English were included. Two authors independently assessed methodological quality and extracted data. Fifteen studies including eight biomechanical studies and seven clinical studies were indentified. The biomechanical studies showed that HS was benefit to motion preservation of the operative levels and revealed less adverse effect on adjacent segments. All clinical studies demonstrated improvement in validated functional scores after HS. Segment motion and immobilization were achieved at the arthroplasty level and arthrodesis level, respectively. Postoperative assessments and complication rate were similar or in favor of HS when comparing with ACDF or CDR. However, the overall quality of evidence for HS was low to very low. There is a paucity of high quality evidence for HS. HS may be a safe and efficacious technique to benefit a select group of multilevel cervical DDD, which is needed to be confirmed by further prospective, randomized controlled trials.

  4. The Role of Posterior Longitudinal Ligament in Cervical Disc Replacement: An Ovine Cadaveric Biomechanical Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Cheng-Cheng; Hao, Ding-Jun; Ma, Yu-Li; Huang, Da-Geng; Li, Hou-Kun; Feng, Hang; Hou, Qian

    2016-01-01

    Background Cervical disc replacement (CDR) has been widely used to restore and maintain mobility and function of the treated and adjacent motion segments. Posterior longitudinal ligament (PLL) resection has been shown to be efficient in anterior cervical decompression and fusion. However, less is known about the biomechanical effect of PLL removal versus preservation in cervical disc arthroplasty. Material/Methods Three motion segments of 24 ovine cervical spines (C2–C5) were evaluated in a robotic spine system with axial compressive loads of 50 N. These cervical spines were divided in three groups according to the following conditions: (1) intact spine, (2) C3/C4 CDR with the Prestige LP prosthesis and PLL preservation, and (3) C3/C4 CDR with the Prestige LP prosthesis and PLL removal. The ranges of motion (ROMs) were recorded and analyzed in each group. Results The C3/C4 ROM in group 3 (CDR with PLL removed) increased significantly in flexion-extension and axial rotation compared with group 1 (intact spine). Moreover, in flexion-extension, the mean total ROM was significantly larger in group 3 than in group 1. All the ROM observed in group 2 (CDR with PLL preserved) did not significantly differ from the ROM observed in group 1. Conclusions Compared with intact spines, CDR with PLL removal partly increased ROM. Moreover, the ROM in CDR with PLL preservation did not significantly differ from the ROM observed in intact spines. The PLL appears to contribute to the balance and stability of the cervical spine and should thus be preserved in cervical disc replacement provided that the posterior longitudinal ligament is not degenerative and the compression can be removed without PLL takedown. PMID:27243444

  5. Anterior discectomy without fusion for treatment of cervical lateral soft disc extrusion: a follow-up of 120 cases.

    PubMed

    Grisoli, F; Graziani, N; Fabrizi, A P; Peragut, J C; Vincentelli, F; Diaz-Vasquez, P

    1989-06-01

    One hundred and twenty patients with soft lateral disc herniation underwent surgery by anterior microsurgical discectomy and routine ablation of the posterior longitudinal ligament between 1976 and 1986. The study excluded patients with hard discs and soft disc extrusion with medullary symptoms. In our series 76.6% of patients were men. In 64% of the patients no causative factor was found. All of the patients presented with cervicobrachialgia; 53% also had a motor deficit. In 91.7% a single disc was involved. The last 40 cases were evaluated by computed tomography alone. In 51.5% an extruded disc was found. No permanent postoperative complication was encountered. All patients returned to their previous activities. Fifty patients underwent follow-up radiological evaluation at 1 and 5 years after the intervention and vertebral fusion was observed in 70% of these.

  6. A new cervical artificial disc prosthesis based on physiological curvature of end plate: a finite element analysis.

    PubMed

    Yu, Cheng-Cheng; Liu, Peng; Huang, Da-Geng; Jiang, Yong-Hong; Feng, Hang; Hao, Ding-Jun

    2016-11-01

    The study aimed to build a new cervical artificial disc C3-C7 segment prosthesis, and perform a biomechanical comparison between the new prosthesis and the Prestige LP prosthesis using a three-dimensional non-linear finite element (FE) model. The study compared the biomechanical differences between the new cervical artificial disc prosthesis based on the physiological curvature of the end plate and the Prestige LP prosthesis after artificial disc replacement. There has been no prior research on artificial disc prostheses based on the physiological curvature of the end plate; studies of biomechanical changes after cervical disc arthroplasty (CDR) are few. An FE model of the C3-C7 segments was developed and validated. A new cervical artificial disc prosthesis based on the physiological curvature of the end plate and the Prestige LP prosthesis were integrated at the C5-C6 segment into the validated FE model. All models were subjected to a follower load of 73.6 N and a 1 Nm in flexion-extension, lateral bending, and axial torsion. The segmental range of motion (ROM) and stress on the prostheses were analyzed. The ROM in most segments after CDR with new cervical artificial disc prosthesis was more similar to that of the normal cervical spine than the Prestige LP prosthesis. However, there was no significant difference between the two prostheses. The stress on the new artificial disc was significantly less than that in the Prestige LP prosthesis. There was no significant difference in ROM in all segments after CDR for the two prostheses. The stress on the new cervical artificial disc prosthesis based on the physiological curvature of the end plate was significantly less than that in the Prestige LP prosthesis. The new artificial disc prosthesis is feasible and effective, and can reduce the implant-bone interface stress on the end plate, which may be one of the causes of prosthesis subsidence. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Anterior surgical management of single-level cervical disc disease: a cost-effectiveness analysis.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Daniel J; Attiah, Mark A; Malhotra, Neil R; Burnett, Mark G; Stein, Sherman C

    2014-12-01

    Cost-effectiveness analysis with decision analysis and meta-analysis. To determine the relative cost-effectiveness of anterior cervical discectomy with fusion (with autograft, allograft, or spacers), anterior cervical discectomy without fusion (ACD), and cervical disc replacement (CDR) for the treatment of 1-level cervical disc disease. There is debate as to the optimal anterior surgical strategy to treat single-level cervical disc disease. Surgical strategies include 3 techniques of anterior cervical discectomy with fusion (autograft, allograft, or spacer-assisted fusion), ACD, and CDR. Several controlled trials have compared these treatments but have yielded mixed results. Decision analysis provides a structure for making a quantitative comparison of the costs and outcomes of each treatment. A literature search was performed and yielded 156 case series that fulfilled our search criteria describing nearly 17,000 cases. Data were abstracted from these publications and pooled meta-analytically to estimate the incidence of various outcomes, including index-level and adjacent-level reoperation. A decision analytic model calculated the expected costs in US dollars and outcomes in quality-adjusted life years for a typical adult patient with 1-level cervical radiculopathy subjected to each of the 5 approaches. At 5 years postoperatively, patients who had undergone ACD alone had significantly (P < 0.001) more quality-adjusted life years (4.885 ± 0.041) than those receiving other treatments. Patients with ACD also exhibited highly significant (P < 0.001) differences in costs, incurring the lowest societal costs ($16,558 ± $539). Follow-up data were inadequate for comparison beyond 5 years. The results of our decision analytic model indicate advantages for ACD, both in effectiveness and costs, over other strategies. Thus, ACD is a cost-effective alternative to anterior cervical discectomy with fusion and CDR in patients with single-level cervical disc disease. Definitive

  8. PEEK (Polyether-ether-ketone) Based Cervical Total Disc Arthroplasty: Contact Stress and Lubrication Analysis.

    PubMed

    Xin, H; Shepherd, Det; Dearn, Kd

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a theoretical analysis of the maximum contact stress and the lubrication regimes for PEEK (Polyether-ether-ketone) based self-mating cervical total disc arthroplasty. The NuNec(®) cervical disc arthroplasty system was chosen as the study object, which was then analytically modelled as a ball on socket joint. A non-adhesion Hertzian contact model and elastohydrodynamic lubrication theory were used to predict the maximum contact stress and the minimum film thickness, respectively. The peak contact stress and the minimum film thickness between the bearing surfaces were then determined, as the radial clearance or lubricant was varied. The obtained results show that under 150 N loading, the peak contact stress was in the range 5.9 - 32.1 MPa, well below the yield and fatigue strength of PEEK; the calculated minimum film thickness ranged from 0 to 0.042 µm and the corresponding lambda ratio range was from 0 to 0.052. This indicates that the PEEK based cervical disc arthroplasty will operate under a boundary lubrication regime, within the natural angular velocity range of the cervical spine.

  9. PEEK (Polyether-ether-ketone) Based Cervical Total Disc Arthroplasty: Contact Stress and Lubrication Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Xin, H; Shepherd, DET; Dearn, KD

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a theoretical analysis of the maximum contact stress and the lubrication regimes for PEEK (Polyether-ether-ketone) based self-mating cervical total disc arthroplasty. The NuNec® cervical disc arthroplasty system was chosen as the study object, which was then analytically modelled as a ball on socket joint. A non-adhesion Hertzian contact model and elastohydrodynamic lubrication theory were used to predict the maximum contact stress and the minimum film thickness, respectively. The peak contact stress and the minimum film thickness between the bearing surfaces were then determined, as the radial clearance or lubricant was varied. The obtained results show that under 150 N loading, the peak contact stress was in the range 5.9 – 32.1 MPa, well below the yield and fatigue strength of PEEK; the calculated minimum film thickness ranged from 0 to 0.042 µm and the corresponding lambda ratio range was from 0 to 0.052. This indicates that the PEEK based cervical disc arthroplasty will operate under a boundary lubrication regime, within the natural angular velocity range of the cervical spine. PMID:22670159

  10. Cervical Total Disc Replacement is Superior to Anterior Cervical Decompression and Fusion: A Meta-Analysis of Prospective Randomized Controlled Trials

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yujie; Liang, Chengzhen; Tao, Yiqing; Zhou, Xiaopeng; Li, Hao; Li, Fangcai; Chen, Qixin

    2015-01-01

    Background Despite being considered the standard surgical procedure for symptomatic cervical disc disease, anterior cervical decompression and fusion invariably accelerates adjacent segment degeneration. Cervical total disc replacement is a motion-preserving procedure developed as a substitute to fusion. Whether cervical total disc replacement is superior to fusion remains unclear. Methods We comprehensively searched PubMed, EMBASE, Medline, and the Cochrane Library in accordance with the inclusion criteria to identify possible studies. The retrieved results were last updated on December 12, 2014. We classified the studies as short-term and midterm follow-up. Results Nineteen randomized controlled trials involving 4516 cases were identified. Compared with anterior cervical decompression and fusion, cervical total disc replacement had better functional outcomes (neck disability index [NDI], NDI success, neurological success, neck pain scores reported on a numerical rating scale [NRS], visual analog scales scores and overall success), greater segmental motion at the index level, fewer adverse events and fewer secondary surgical procedures at the index and adjacent levels in short-term follow-up (P < 0.05). With midterm follow-up, the cervical total disc replacement group indicated superiority in the NDI, neurological success, pain assessment (NRS), and secondary surgical procedures at the index level (P < 0.05). The Short Form 36 (SF-36) and segmental motion at the adjacent level in the short-term follow-up showed no significant difference between the two procedures, as did the secondary surgical procedure rates at the adjacent level with midterm follow-up (P > 0.05). Conclusions Cervical total disc replacement presented favorable functional outcomes, fewer adverse events, and fewer secondary surgical procedures. The efficacy and safety of cervical total disc replacement are superior to those of fusion. Longer-term, multicenter studies are required for a better

  11. Effectiveness of cervical hemilaminectomy in canine Hansen Type I and Type II disc disease: a retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Schmied, Oliver; Golini, Lorenzo; Steffen, Frank

    2011-01-01

    Medical records of 41 dogs, including 15 small breed dogs (<15 kg) and 26 large breed dogs (>15 kg), with cervical intervertebral disc disease (IVDD) that underwent a hemilaminectomy were reviewed. Dogs were diagnosed using myelography, computed tomography/myelography, or MRI, and dogs were classified as having either Hansen Type I disc extrusion or Hansen Type II disc protrusion located ventrally, ventrolaterally, or laterally within the cervical spinal canal. The most common clinical presentation was ambulatory tetraparesis and/or lameness (44%). The most affected sites for cervical IVDD were between the sixth and seventh cervical vertebrae (C6-C7; 78% of Hansen Type II discs) and C2-C3 (86% of Hansen Type I discs). Treatment was effective in 88% of dogs. Five large breed dogs (12%) did not improve. In dogs with a Hansen Type I disc extrusion, clinical signs improved in 96% of the cases. In dogs with a Hansen Type II disc protrusion, an excellent and good outcome was seen in 47% and 32% of cases, respectively. Outcome was significantly better for small breed dogs and dogs with Hansen Type I disc disease compared with large breed dogs and dogs with Hansen Type II disc disease.

  12. [Biomechanical research on morphometric changes in adjacent inferior cervical intervertebral foramen after artificial disc replacement].

    PubMed

    Wang, Bin; Zhang, Zhigang; Li, Kanghua

    2007-10-01

    To explore changes in the height and width of the cervical intervertebral foramina of C6.7 before and after the C5.6 discetomy, the replacement or the anterior intervertebral fusion so as to provide the theoretical basis for the clinical practice. Eleven fresh cervical spinal specimens were obtained from young adult cadavers. The specimens of C5.6 were divided into the integrity group, the discectomy group, the artificial disc replacement group, and the intervertebral fusion group. The range of variety (ROV) of the C6.7 intervertebral foramen dimensions (height, width) before and after the loading tests (0.75, 1.50 Nm) were measured in the 4 groups. The C6.7 intervetebral foramen height and width increased significantly during flexion (P < 0.01) but decreased significantly during extension (P < 0.01). There was a significant difference between the two test conditions in each of the 4 groups (P < 0.01). However, in the two test conditions there was no significant difference in ROV of the C6,7 intervetebral foramen height and width during flexion and extension between the integrity group, the discectomy, and the artificial disc replacement group (P > 0.05), but a significant difference in the above changes existed in the intervertebral fusion group when compared with the other 3 groups (P < 0.05). In the same group and under the same conditions, the ROV of the C6.7 intervetebral foramen height and width was significantly different in the two test conditions (P < 0.01). The results have indicated that artificial disc replacement can meet the requirements of the normal cervical vitodynamics. The adjacent inferior cervical intervetebral foramen increases during flexion but decreases during extension. The intervertebral fusion is probably one of the causes for the cervical degeneration or the accelerated degeneration and for the cervical spondylotic radiculopathy and the brachial plexus compression.

  13. [Diagnosis and management for the non-traumatic epidural sequestered cervical disc extrusion].

    PubMed

    Yang, Min; Ding, Guo-Zheng; Xu, Zhu-Jun

    2013-06-01

    To explore the clinical characteristics and management of non-traumatic epidural sequestered cervical disc extrusion. From January 2002 to July 2011, the clinical data of 10 patients with non-traumatic epidural sequestered cervical disc extrusion were treated by anterior cervical mostly vertebraectomy and nucleus pulposus removal after decompression and internal fixation through longitudinal ligament resection. Of them,there were 6 males and 4 females with an average age of 48.2 years old (ranged from 42 to 65), the course of disease ranged from 1 month to 4 years (mean, 15 months). All patients manifested numbness and weakness of four limbs, unstable walking and sphincter of oddi dysfunction. Preoperative MRI showed segmental cervical spinal cord compression. JOA scoring criteria was applied to evaluate preoperative and follow-up neurologic function. Ten patients were followed up, and the duration ranged from 15 to 32 months, with an average of 21 months. No complications related to opreation occurred. Preoperative MRI showed nucelus puplposus sequestered longitudinal ligament were on equal signal on T1-weighted and corresponding pathological,while it showed equal and high signal on T2-weighted. JOA score were increased from 7.20 +/- 1.55 preoperative to 13.60 +/- 1.90 postoperative (t = -11.8, P < 0.001), and excellent in 3 cases, good in 6 cases and moderate in 1 case. Anterior cervical mostly vertebraectomy and nucleus pulposus removal after decompression and internal fixation through longitudinal ligament resection after early diagnosis is the key to success of treating non-traumatic epidural sequestered cervical disc extrusion.

  14. Prolonged upright posture induces degenerative changes in intervertebral discs of rat cervical spine.

    PubMed

    Liang, Qian-Qian; Cui, Xue-Jun; Xi, Zhi-Jie; Bian, Qin; Hou, Wei; Zhao, Yong-Jian; Shi, Qi; Wang, Yong-Jun

    2011-01-01

    An in vivo study of the cervical intervertebral discs (IVDs) response to upright posture was performed using an amputated bipedal rat model. To investigate the effects of upright posture on IVDs of rat cervical spine. The distinct arrangement of human neck muscle from that of cat and rhesus indicated that in the evolution process, upright posture might have affected cervical spine of human ancestors. However, the effects of upright posture on cervical spine have not been assessed. Forty-one-month-old rats were randomly divided into 5-month-control, 5-month-surgery, 7-month-control, and 7-month surgery group (n = 10 per group). Both forelimbs of 2 surgery group rats were amputated, and those rats were then induced to be upright in the custom-made cages. Two control group rats were kept in regular cages. These rats were respectively killed at the fifth and seventh month after surgery and the IVD samples of lumbar spine were harvested for histologic and immunohistochemical studies. Total RNA isolated from these samples were used for real-time polymerase chain reaction of type II collagen (Col2a1), type X collagen, matrix metalloproteinase 13 (MMP-13), MMP-3, aggre-can, and aggrecanase-2 (ADAMTS-5). Upright posture affects histologic changes of the cervical IVDs such as fissures of anulus fibrosus and decreased height of disc, decreased protein level of Col2a1 at nucleus pulposus and anulus fibrosus, up-regulated MMP-13, MMP-3, ADAMTS-5, and type X collagen mRNA expression, and downregulated mRNA expression of Col2a1 and aggrecan. Upright stance accelerates cervical disc degeneration in rats.

  15. The Strategy and Early Clinical Outcome of Percutaneous Full-Endoscopic Interlaminar or Extraforaminal Approach for Treatment of Lumbar Disc Herniation

    PubMed Central

    Ao, Jun; Cao, Guangru; Qin, Jianpu; Cai, Yuqiang

    2016-01-01

    Objective is to analyze the surgical strategy, safety, and clinical results of percutaneous full-endoscopic discectomy through interlaminar or extraforaminal puncture technique for LDH. Preoperative CT and MRI were analyzed, which were based on the main location of the herniated disc and its relationship with compressed nerve root. Sixty-two patients satisfied the inclusion criteria during the period from August 2012 to March 2014. We use percutaneous full-endoscopic discectomy through different puncture technique to remove the protrusive NP for LDH. Sixty patients completed the full-endoscopic operation successfully. Their removed disc tissue volume ranged from 1.5 mL to 3.8 mL each time. Postoperative ODI and VAS of low back and sciatica pain were significantly decreased in each time point compared to preoperative ones. No nerve root injury, infection, and other complications occurred. The other two patients were shifted to open surgery. No secondary surgery was required and 91.6% of excellent-to-good ratio was achieved on the basis of Macnab criteria at postoperative 12 months. Acquired benefits are fewer complications, rapid recovery, complete NP removal, effective nerve root decompression, and satisfactory cosmetic effect as well. This is a safe, effective, and rational minimally invasive spine-surgical technology with excellent clinical outcome. PMID:27648445

  16. Comparison of the intervertebral disc spaces between axial and anterior lean cervical traction

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Chin-Teng; Tsai, Sen-Wei; Chen, Chun-Jung; Wu, Ting-Chung; Wang, David; Lan, Haw-Chang H.

    2009-01-01

    The insufficient investigations on the changes of spinal structures during traction prevent further exploring the possible therapeutic mechanism of cervical traction. A blind randomized crossover-design study was conducted to quantitatively compare the intervertebral disc spaces between axial and anterior lean cervical traction in sitting position. A total of 96 radiographic images from the baseline measurements, axial and anterior lean tractions in 32 asymptomatic subjects were digitized for further analysis. The intra- and inter-examiner reliabilities for measuring the intervertebral disc spaces were in good ranges (ICCs = 0.928–0.942). With the application of anterior lean traction, the statistical increases were detected both in anterior and in posterior disc spaces compared to the baseline (0.29 mm and 0.24 mm; both P < 0.01) and axial traction (0.16 mm and 0.35 mm; both P < 0.01). The greater intervertebral disc spaces obtained during anterior lean traction might be associated with the more even distribution of traction forces over the anterior and posterior neck structures. The neck extension moment through mandible that generally occurred in the axial traction could be counteracted by the downward force of head weight during anterior lean traction. This study quantitatively demonstrated that anterior lean traction in sitting position provided more intervertebral disc space enlargements in both anterior and posterior aspects than axial traction did. These findings may serve as a therapeutic reference when cervical traction is suggested. PMID:19533177

  17. Structural and Ultrastructural Analysis of the Cervical Discs of Young and Elderly Humans.

    PubMed

    Fontes, Ricardo Braganca de Vasconcellos; Baptista, Josemberg Silva; Rabbani, Said Rahnamaye; Traynelis, Vincent C; Liberti, Edson Aparecido

    2015-01-01

    Several studies describing the ultrastructure and extracellular matrix (ECM) of intervertebral discs (IVDs) involve animal models and specimens obtained from symptomatic individuals during surgery for degenerative disease or scoliosis, which may not necessarily correlate to changes secondary to normal aging in humans. These changes may also be segment-specific based on different load patterns throughout life. Our objective was to describe the ECM and collagen profile of cervical IVDs in young (G1 - <35 years) and elderly (G2 - >65 years) presumably-asymptomatic individuals. Thirty cervical discs per group were obtained during autopsies of presumably-asymptomatic individuals. IVDs were analyzed with MRI, a morphological grading scale, light microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and immunohistochemistry (IHC) for collagen types I, II, III, IV, V, VI, IX and X. Macroscopic degenerative features such as loss of annulus-nucleus distinction and fissures were found in both groups and significantly more severe in G2 as expected. MRI could not detect all morphological changes when compared even with simple morphological inspection. The loose fibrocartilaginous G1 matrix was replaced by a denser ECM in G2 with predominantly cartilaginous characteristics, chondrocyte clusters and absent elastic fibers. SEM demonstrated persistence of an identifiable nucleus and Sharpey-type insertion of cervical annulus fibers even in highly-degenerated G2 specimens. All collagen types were detected in every disc sector except for collagen X, with the largest area stained by collagens II and IV. Collagen detection was significantly decreased in G2: although significant intradiscal differences were rare, changes may occur faster or earlier in the posterior annulus. These results demonstrate an extensive modification of the ECM with maintenance of basic ultrastructural features despite severe macroscopic degeneration. Collagen analysis supports there is not a "pathologic" collagen type

  18. Herniated Disk

    MedlinePlus

    ... to pain if the back is stressed. A herniated disk is a disk that ruptures. This allows the ... or back pain. Your doctor will diagnose a herniated disk with a physical exam and, sometimes, imaging tests. ...

  19. Methodology to Calibrate Disc Degeneration in the Cervical Spine During Cyclic Fatigue Loading.

    PubMed

    Masoudi, Aidin; Fama, Daniel; Yoganandan, Narayan; Snyder, Brian

    2015-01-01

    Prolonged exposure to vibrational working conditions can cause neck, back, and shoulder pain. Mechanical degradation of soft tissues resulting from this type of fatigue was experimentally shown to contribute to endplate and compression fractures. However, effects of repetitive subfailure loading on intervertebral disc (IVD) behavior have not been well defined. This manuscript describes a methodology to experimentally characterize changes in cervical spine IVD material properties under fatigue. Bone-disc-bone spinal units with intact ligaments obtained from human cervical spines were obtained and a lack of bony or soft tissue degeneration was confirmed using X-ray and MRI scans. Cranial and caudal specimen extents were fixed in PMMA to facilitate attachment to testing devices. Baseline response was quantified using flexion/extension pure moment protocols. Specimens were immersed in a 34-deg-C saline bath and allowed to acclimate for one hour. A stress-relaxation test was then performed and viscoelasticity quantified using a quasi linear viscoelastic (QLV) material model. Fatigue testing was performed for up to 50,000 cycles with intermittent viscoelasticity, pure moment testing, and imaging scans performed to quantify cycle-dependent changes in disc properties. Preliminary results demonstrated progressive changes in viscoelasticity and bending response of cervical spine segments with increasing number of load cycles. This procedure will be used to quantify degradation of the IVD under repetitive compressive loads, focusing on effects of loading magnitude and frequency.

  20. Comparison of the more than 5-year clinical outcomes of cervical disc arthroplasty versus anterior cervical discectomy and fusion

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Min-Min; Chen, Chun-Hui; Lin, Zhong-Ke; Wang, Xiang-Yang; Huang, Qi-Shan; Chi, Yong-Long; Wu, Ai-Min

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) was almost the “golden standard” technique in treatment of symptomatic cervical degenerative disc disease, however, it cause motion loss of the indexed level, increase the intradiscal pressure and motion of the adjacent levels, and may accelerate the degeneration of adjacent level. Cervical disc arthroplasty (CDA) was designed to preserve the motion of index level, avoid the over-activity of adjacent levels and reduce the degeneration of adjacent disc levels, the process of degeneration of adjacent level is very slowly, long term follow up studies should be conducted, this study aim to compare the more than 5 years’ long-term clinical outcomes and safety between CDA and ACDF. Methods: A systematic review and meta-analysis that will be performed according to the PRISMA (Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses). The electric database of Medline, Embase, and Cochrane library will be systematic search. A standard data form will be used to extract the data of included studies. We will assess the studies according to the Cochrane Handbook for Systematic Reviews of Interventions, and perform analysis in software STATA 12.0. Fixed-effects models will be used for homogeneity data, while random-effects will be used for heterogeneity data. The overall effect sizes will be determined as weighted mean difference (WMD) for continuous outcomes and Relative risk (RR) for dichotomous outcomes. Results: The results of study will be disseminated via both international conference and peer-review journal. Conclusion: The conclusion of our study will provide the long-term and updated evidence of clinical outcomes and safety between CDA and ACDF, and help surgeon to change better surgical technique for patients. PMID:28002345

  1. Thirty-day readmission and reoperation rates after single-level anterior cervical discectomy and fusion versus those after cervical disc replacement.

    PubMed

    Bhashyam, Niketh; De la Garza Ramos, Rafael; Nakhla, Jonathan; Nasser, Rani; Jada, Ajit; Purvis, Taylor E; Sciubba, Daniel M; Kinon, Merritt D; Yassari, Reza

    2017-02-01

    OBJECTIVE The goal of this study was to compare 30-day readmission and reoperation rates after single-level anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) versus those after cervical disc replacement (CDR). METHODS The authors used the 2013-2014 American College of Surgeons National Surgical Quality Improvement Program database. Included were adult patients who underwent first-time single-level ACDF or CDR for cervical spondylosis or disc herniation. Primary outcome measures were readmission and/or reoperation within 30 days of the original surgery. Logistic regression analysis was used to assess the independent effect of the procedure (ACDF or CDR) on outcome, and results are presented as odds ratios with 95% confidence intervals. RESULTS A total of 6077 patients met the inclusion criteria; 5590 (92.0%) patients underwent single-level ACDF, and 487 (8.0%) patients underwent CDR. The readmission rates were 2.6% for ACDF and 0.4% for CDR (p = 0.003). When stratified according to age groups, only patients between the ages of 41 and 60 years who underwent ACDF had a significantly higher readmission rate than those who underwent CDR (2.5% vs 0.7%, respectively; p = 0.028). After controlling for patient age, sex, body mass index, smoking status, history of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), diabetes, hypertension, steroid use, and American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) class, patients who underwent CDR were significantly less likely to undergo readmission within 30 days than patients who underwent ACDF (OR 0.23 [95% CI 0.06-0.95]; p = 0.041). Patients with a history of COPD (OR 1.97 [95% CI 1.08-3.57]; p = 0.026) or hypertension (OR 1.62 [95% CI 1.10-2.38]; p = 0.013) and those at ASA Class IV (OR 14.6 [95% CI 1.69-125.75]; p = 0.015) were significantly more likely to require readmission within 30 days. The reoperation rates were 1.2% for ACDF and 0.4% for CDR (p = 0.086), and multivariate analysis revealed that CDR was not associated with lower odds of

  2. Massage therapy for cervical degenerative disc disease: alleviating a pain in the neck?

    PubMed

    Avery, Rhonda-Marie

    2012-01-01

    A 66-year-old female client with cervical degenerative disc disease at lateral left facet joint C6/C7 was experiencing symptoms of chronic neck pain accompanied by limited cervical range of motion, as well as radicular left shoulder and arm pain. The objective of this case report was to describe the effect of therapeutic massage on the client's symptoms and impairments of cervical DDD. Therapeutic massage interventions included soft-tissue manipulation using petrissage and neuromuscular techniques, fascial work, facilitated stretching, joint play, hydrotherapy, education on self-stretching, and positive guidance about condition management. Assessment included pain-free cervical ROM and a subjective verbal pain scale. After several treatment sessions, client's symptoms had decreased and cervical ROM had improved moderately. There was also a decrease in reported pain and an increase in functional daily activities. Client showed a greater understanding of the physiologic barriers which degenerative changes may present. This client responded favorably to massage therapy as a treatment intervention for cervical DDD symptoms.

  3. Massage Therapy for Cervical Degenerative Disc Disease: Alleviating a Pain in the Neck?

    PubMed Central

    Avery, Rhonda-Marie

    2012-01-01

    Background: A 66-year-old female client with cervical degenerative disc disease at lateral left facet joint C6/C7 was experiencing symptoms of chronic neck pain accompanied by limited cervical range of motion, as well as radicular left shoulder and arm pain. The objective of this case report was to describe the effect of therapeutic massage on the client’s symptoms and impairments of cervical DDD. Methods: Therapeutic massage interventions included soft-tissue manipulation using petrissage and neuromuscular techniques, fascial work, facilitated stretching, joint play, hydrotherapy, education on self-stretching, and positive guidance about condition management. Assessment included pain-free cervical ROM and a subjective verbal pain scale. Results: After several treatment sessions, client’s symptoms had decreased and cervical ROM had improved moderately. There was also a decrease in reported pain and an increase in functional daily activities. Client showed a greater understanding of the physiologic barriers which degenerative changes may present. Conclusions: This client responded favorably to massage therapy as a treatment intervention for cervical DDD symptoms. PMID:23087777

  4. Effects of Ge Gen Decoction on PGE2 content and COX activity in the degenarated cervical intervertebral discs of rats.

    PubMed

    Jun, Zhou; Fang, Suping; Huo, Hairu; Qi, Yun; Guo, Shuying; Jiang, Tingliang; Shi, Qi

    2005-09-01

    After the rat model of cervical spondylosis was developed for 6 months, the PGE2 content and COX activity in the cervical intervertebral discs were determined respectively by radioimmunoassay and catalytic activity assay. The results indicated that the PGE2 content and COX activity in the model rat increased significantly, and that Ge Gen Decoction could down-regulate the PGE2 content and inhibit COX activity. This is possibly one of the mechanisms of Ge Gen Decoction for treating cervical spondylosis.

  5. Does location of rotation center in artificial disc affect cervical biomechanics?

    PubMed

    Mo, Zhongjun; Zhao, Yanbin; Du, Chengfei; Sun, Yu; Zhang, Ming; Fan, Yubo

    2015-04-15

    A 3-dimensional finite element investigation. To compare the biomechanical performances of different rotation centers (RCs) in the prevalent artificial cervical discs. Various configurations are applied in artificial discs. Design parameters may influence the biomechanics of implanted spine. The RC is a primary variation in the popular artificial discs. Implantation of 5 prostheses was simulated at C5-C6 on the basis of a validated finite element cervical model (C3-C7). The prostheses included ball-in-socket design with a fixed RC located on the inferior endplate (BS-FI) and on the superior endplate (BS-FS), with a mobile RC at the inferior endplate (BS-MI), dual articulation with a mobile RC between the endplates (DA-M), and sliding articulation with various RCs (SA-V). The spinal motions in flexion and extension served as a displacement loading at the C3 vertebrae. Total disc replacements reduced extension moment. The ball-in-socket designs required less flexion moment, whereas the flexion stiffness of the spines with DA-M and SA-V was similar to that of the healthy model. The contributions of the implanted level to the global motions increased in the total disc replacements, except in the SA-V and DA-M models (in flexion). Ball-in-socket designs produced severe stress distributions in facet cartilage, whereas DA-M and SA-V produced more severe stress distribution on the bone-implant interface. Cervical stability was extremely affected in extension and partially affected in flexion by total disc replacement. With the prostheses with mobile RC, cervical curvature was readjusted under a low follower load. The SA-V and BS-FS designs exhibited better performances in the entire segmental stiffness and in the stability of the operative level than the BS-MI and BS-FI designs in flexion. The 5 designs demonstrated varying advantages relative to the stress distribution in the facet cartilages and on the bone-implant interface. 5.

  6. Activation of the RAGE/STAT3 Pathway in the Dorsal Root Ganglion Contributes to the Persistent Pain Hypersensitivity Induced by Lumbar Disc Herniation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xin-Sheng; Li, Xiao; Luo, Hai-Jie; Huang, Zhu-Xi; Liu, Cui-Cui; Wan, Qing; Xu, Shu-Wei; Wu, Shao-Ling; Ke, Song-Jian; Ma, Chao

    2017-07-01

    Clinically, chronic low back pain and sciatica associated with lumbar disc herniation (LDH) is a common musculoskeletal disorder. Due to the unawareness of detailed mechanisms, it is difficult to get an effective therapy. The aim of the present study was to identify the role of the RAGE/STAT3 pathway in the dorsal root ganglion (DRG) on the formation and development of persistent pain hypersensitivity induced by LDH. Controlled animal study. University laboratory. After LDH induced by implantation of autologous nucleus pulposus (NP, harvested from animal tail) on the left L5 nerve root was established, mechanical thresholds and electrophysiological tests were conducted at relevant time points during an observation period of 28 days. Protein levels and localization of RAGE and p-STAT3 were performed by using Western blotting and immunohistochemistry, respectively. LDH induced persistent pain hypersensitivity, increased excitability of DRG neurons, and upregulated the expression of RAGE and p-STAT3 in the DRG. Consecutive injection of both RAGE antagonist FPS-ZM1 (i.t.) and STAT3 activity inhibitor S3I-201 (i.t.) inhibited the enhanced excitability of DRG neurons and mechanical allodynia induced by NP implantation. Furthermore, local knockdown of STAT3 by intrathecal injection of AAV-Cre-GFP into STAT3flox/flox mice markedly alleviated NP implantation-induced mechanical allodynia in mice. Importantly, the expression of p-STAT3 was colocalized with that of RAGE in the DRG and inhibition of RAGE with FPS-ZM1 prevented NP implantation-induced STAT3 activation. More underlying mechanism(s) of the role of the RAGE/STAT3 pathway on the formation and development of persistent pain hypersensitivity induced by LDH will be needed to be explored in future research. These findings suggest activation of the RAGE/STAT3 pathway plays a critical role in persistent pain induced by LDH, and this pathway may represent novel therapeutic targets for the treatment of LDH

  7. Transarticular laser discal fragmentectomy. A new minimally invasive surgical approach for challenging disc herniations in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Bonaldi, Giuseppe; Brembilla, Carlo; Foresti, Camillo; Cianfoni, Alessandro

    2014-10-31

    This report describes two elderly patients with large disc fragments extruded into lumbar radicular recesses not treatable by any conventional conservative, minimally invasive or surgical approach. Direct access to the disc fragments was obtained crossing the articular zygapophyseal cavity instead of the interlaminar space and spinal canal, using a small needle through which a laser fibre was inserted to deliver energy for tissue ablation. The procedures obtained regression of both symptoms and the bulk of the fragments at early and late clinical and MR follow-ups.

  8. Two-year comprehensive medical management of degenerative lumbar spine disease (lumbar spondylolisthesis, stenosis, or disc herniation): a value analysis of cost, pain, disability, and quality of life: clinical article.

    PubMed

    Parker, Scott L; Godil, Saniya S; Mendenhall, Stephen K; Zuckerman, Scott L; Shau, David N; McGirt, Matthew J

    2014-08-01

    Current health care reform calls for a reduction of procedures and treatments that are less effective, more costly, and of little value (high cost/low quality). The authors assessed the 2-year cost and effectiveness of comprehensive medical management for lumbar spondylolisthesis, stenosis, and herniation by utilizing a prospective single-center multidisciplinary spine center registry in a real-world practice setting. Analysis was performed on a prospective longitudinal quality of life spine registry. Patients with lumbar spondylolisthesis (n = 50), stenosis (n = 50), and disc herniation (n = 50) who had symptoms persisting after 6 weeks of medical management and who were eligible for surgical treatment were entered into a prospective registry after deciding on nonsurgical treatment. In all cases, comprehensive medical management included spinal steroid injections, physical therapy, muscle relaxants, antiinflammatory medication, and narcotic oral agents. Two-year patient-reported outcomes, back-related medical resource utilization, and occupational work-day losses were prospectively collected and used to calculate Medicare fee-based direct and indirect costs from the payer and societal perspectives. The maximum health gain associated with medical management was defined as the improvement in pain, disability, and quality of life experienced after 2 years of medical treatment or at the time a patient decided to cross over to surgery. The maximum health gain in back pain, leg pain, disability, quality of life, depression, and general health state did not achieve statistical significance by 2 years of medical management, except for pain and disability in patients with disc herniation and back pain in patients with lumbar stenosis. Eighteen patients (36%) with spondylolisthesis, 11 (22%) with stenosis, and 17 (34%) with disc herniation eventually required surgical management due to lack of improvement. The 2-year improvement did not achieve a minimum clinically

  9. Depression, social factors, and pain perception before and after surgery for lumbar and cervical degenerative vertebral disc disease

    PubMed Central

    Jabłońska, Renata; Ślusarz, Robert; Królikowska, Agnieszka; Haor, Beata; Antczak, Anna; Szewczyk, Maria

    2017-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of psychosocial factors on pain levels and depression, before and after surgical treatment, in patients with degenerative lumbar and cervical vertebral disc disease. Patients and methods The study included 188 patients (98 women, 90 men) who were confirmed to have cervical or lumbar degenerative disc disease on magnetic resonance imaging, and who underwent a single microdiscectomy procedure, with no postoperative surgical complications. All patients completed two questionnaires before and after surgery – the Beck Depression Inventory scale (I–IV) and the Visual Analog Scale for pain (0–10). On hospital admission, all patients completed a social and demographic questionnaire. The first pain and depression questionnaire evaluations were performed on the day of hospital admission (n=188); the second on the day of hospital discharge, 7 days after surgery (n=188); and the third was 6 months after surgery (n=140). Results Patient ages ranged from 22 to 72 years, and 140 patients had lumbar disc disease (mean age, 42.7±10.99 years) and 44 had cervical disc disease (mean age, 48.9±7.85 years). Before surgery, symptoms of depression were present in 47.3% of the patients (11.7% cervical; 35.6% lumbar), at first postoperative evaluation in 25.1% of patients (7% cervical; 18.1% lumbar), and 6 months following surgery in 31.1% of patients (7.5% cervical; 23.6% lumbar). Patients with cervical disc disease who were unemployed had the highest incidence of depression before and after surgery (p=0.037). Patients with lumbar disc disease who had a primary level of education or work involving standing had the highest incidence of depression before and after surgery (p=0.368). Conclusion This study highlighted the association between social and demographic factors, pain perception, and depression that may persist despite surgical treatment for degenerative vertebral disc disease. PMID:28115868

  10. Role of Intraoperative Disc Contrast Injection in Determining the Segment Responsible for Cervical Spinal Cord Injury without Radiographic Abnormalities.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ji-dong; Xia, Qun

    2015-08-01

    To determine the features of discs in spinal cord injury without radiographic abnormality (SCIWORA) by intraoperative disc contrast injection (IODCI) and to subsequently treat the responsible discs operatively. From January 2007 to December 2011, 16 adult cases of cervical SCIWORA were enrolled in this study. The average preoperative Japanese Orthopaedic As