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Sample records for cervical epidural abscess

  1. Upper Cervical Epidural Abscess in a Patient With Parkinson Disease

    PubMed Central

    Al-Hourani, Khalid; Frost, Chelsea

    2015-01-01

    To our knowledge, there are no reports in the literature of patients with Parkinson disease (PD) developing upper cervical spine infections. Our objective is to present a case of upper cervical epidural abscess in a patient with PD and to review upper cervical spine infection. We present the patient’s presentation, physical examination, imaging findings, and management as well a review of the literature. A 66-year-old male with PD presented to the emergency department (ED) following referral by a neurologist for a presumed C2 fracture. The preceding history was 1 week of severe neck pain requiring a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which was initially interpreted as a C2 fracture. On admission from the ED, further review of the MRI appeared to show anterior prevertebral abscess and an epidural abscess. The patient’s neurological examination was at baseline. In the span of 2 days, the patient developed significant motor weakness. A repeat MRI demonstrated expansion of the epidural collection and spinal cord compression. Surgical management consisting of C1 and C2 laminectomy, irrigation, and debridement from anterior and posterior approaches was performed. Postoperatively, the patient did not recover any motor strength and elected to withdraw care and died. Spinal epidural abscess requires a high index of suspicion and needs prompt recognition to prevent neurological impairment. Upper cervical spine infections are rare but can lead to lethal consequences. PMID:26623170

  2. Upper Cervical Epidural Abscess in Clinical Practice: Diagnosis and Management

    PubMed Central

    Al-Hourani, Khalid; Al-Aref, Rami; Mesfin, Addisu

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Narrative review. Objective Upper cervical epidural abscess (UCEA) is a rare surgical emergency. Despite increasing incidence, uncertainty remains as to how it should initially be managed. Risk factors for UCEA include immunocompromised hosts, diabetes mellitus, and intravenous drug use. Our objective is to provide a comprehensive overview of the literature including the history, clinical manifestations, diagnosis, and management of UCEA. Methods Using PubMed, studies published prior to 2015 were analyzed. We used the keywords “Upper cervical epidural abscess,” “C1 osteomyelitis,” “C2 osteomyelitis,” “C1 epidural abscess,” “C2 epidural abscess.” We excluded cases with tuberculosis. Results The review addresses epidemiology, etiology, imaging, microbiology, and diagnosis of this condition. We also address the nonoperative and operative management options and the relative indications for each as reviewed in the literature. Conclusion A high index of suspicion is required to diagnose this rare condition with magnetic resonance imaging being the imaging modality of choice. There has been a shift toward surgical management of this condition in recent times, with favorable outcomes. PMID:27190742

  3. Epidural abscess

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001416.htm Epidural abscess To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. An epidural abscess is a collection of pus (infected material) between ...

  4. Reversal of tetraplegia in a patient with haematogenous cervical epidural abscess.

    PubMed

    Katonis, Pavlos; Souvatzis, Xenia; Tsavalas, Nikolaos; Alpantaki, Kalliopi

    2011-08-01

    Pyogenic haematogenous cervical epidural abscess complicated by tetraplegia is an uncommon entity, but its clinical importance overshadows its rarity. Predisposing risk factors for spinal epidural abscess include diabetes, intravenous drug abuse, liver disease, renal failure, malignancy, HIV, infection elsewhere, rheumatoid conditions, trauma and a number of spinal interventions. Lack of recovery and death are much more frequent when complete paralysis exists since more than 24 to 48 hours. Most authors combine decompressive laminectomy and antibiotics. Anterior decompression and needle aspiration are rarely used, the former more specifically in case of anterior abscess formation. A high index of suspicion along with reliance on gadolinium-enhanced MRI is essential to diagnose the pathology and institute appropriate treatment on an individual basis. The authors report on a diabetic male patient who developed a cervical epidural abscess with tetraplegia after dental extraction. He was treated within six hours by one stage anterior/posterior decompression and fusion, with complete recovery.

  5. Cervical Epidural Abscess in Haemodialysis Patients by Catheter Related Infection: Report of Two Cases

    PubMed Central

    Gezici, Ali Riza

    2010-01-01

    Despite advances in neuroimaging and neurosurgical treatment modalities, spinal epidural abscess remains a challenging problem. Early diagnosis is often difficult and treatment is always delayed. Spinal epidural abscess usually develops in patients with predisposing factors such as IV drug abuse, senillity, diabetes mellitus, spinal attempts, alcoholism, immunosuppression, liver diseases and catheterizations. It is rarely seen in cervical region. A successful treatment is only possible with early diagnosis and accurate surgical and medical treatment. Optimal management is unclear and morbidity and mortality are significant. We present two adult haemodialysis patients with end-stage renal insufficiency who developed cervical epidural abscess following central venous catheter placement. Early surgical intervention is mandatory in cases those have progressive neurological deficit and spinal deformity, and this is also increases the success rate of medical therapy. PMID:20052368

  6. Cervical Spondylitis and Epidural Abscess Caused by Brucellosis: a Case Report and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Reşorlu, Hatice; Saçar, Suzan; Inceer, Beşir Şahin; Akbal, Ayla; Gökmen, Ferhat; Zateri, Coskun; Savaş, Yilmaz

    2016-12-01

    Brucellosis is a zoonotic disease widely seen in endemic regions and that can lead to systemic involvement. The musculoskeletal system is frequently affected, and the disease can exhibit clinical involvements such as arthritis, spondylitis, spondylodiscitis, osteomyelitis, tenosynovitis and bursitis. Spondylitis and spondylodiscitis, common complications of brucellosis, predominantly affect the lumbar and thoracic vertebrae. Epidural abscess may occur as a rare complication of spondylitis. Spinal brucellosis and development of epidural abscess in the cervical region are rare. Development of epidural abscess affects the duration and success of treatment. Spinal brucellosis should be considered in patients presenting with fever and lower back-neck pain in endemic regions, and treatment must be initiated with early diagnosis in order to prevent potential complications.

  7. Cervical spondylodiscitis with epidural abscess after knife stab wounds to the neck: A case report.

    PubMed

    Voelker, Anna; von der Hoeh, Nicolas H; Gulow, Jens; Heyde, Christoph-Eckhard

    2015-08-01

    Cervical spondylodiscitis is usually caused by pyogenic infections, associated with retropharyngeal abscesses, or due to the swallowing of foreign bodies. No cases of cervical spondylodiscitis caused by a penetrating neck injury have been published in the literature. We describe a case of cervical spondylodiscitis after multiple knife stab wounds to the lateral soft tissue of the neck. Case report and review of the literature. A 54-year-old patient was brought to our clinic with destructive spondylodiscitis C3/4 with paravertebral and epidural abscesses. He had been involved in a fight and had suffered multiple stab wounds to his neck with a knife 1 month prior. The initial CT scan had revealed one deeper wound canal behind the sternocleidomastoid muscle on the left side without any injury to the vessels. The wound was cleaned and an antibiotic therapy with cefuroxime was given for 1 week. After an uneventful and complete healing of the wound the patient developed severe neck pain. Inflammatory laboratory parameters were elevated, and a MRI of the neck revealed a distinct spondylodiscitis C3/4 with paravertebral and epidural abscess formations. Surgery was performed and included debridement, abscess drainage, decompression of the spinal canal, fusion of the C3/4 segment using an autologous iliac crest bone graft and a plate osteosynthesis. A course of calculated antibiotic therapy was administered for 8 weeks. Normal laboratory parameters and no radiological signs of an ongoing inflammatory process were observed during follow-up examinations. The C3/4 segment was consolidated. Stab wound injuries to the neck not only bear the risk of injuries to the nerves, vessels and organs of the neck but also increase the risk of developing secondary spondylodiscitis. Specifically, cervical spondylodiscitis can result in distinct neurological symptoms, and surgical intervention should be performed in a timely manner. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Spontaneous spinal epidural abscess.

    PubMed

    Ellanti, P; Morris, S

    2011-10-01

    Spinal epidural abscess is an uncommon entity, the frequency of which is increasing. They occur spontaneously or as a complication of intervention. The classical triad of fever, back pain and neurological symptoms are not always present. High index of suspicion is key to diagnosis. Any delay in diagnosis and treatment can have significant neurological consequences. We present the case of a previously well man with a one month history of back pain resulting from an epidural abscess.

  9. Spinal epidural abscess.

    PubMed

    Miftode, E; Luca, V; Mihalache, D; Leca, D; Stefanidis, E; Anuţa, C; Sabadis, L

    2001-01-01

    In a retrospective study, 68 patients with Spinal Epidural Abscess (SEA) were reviewed. Of these, 66% had different predisposing factors such as staphylococcal skin infections, surgical procedures, rachicentesis, trauma, spondilodiscitis. Abscess had a lumbar region location in 53% of cases. Staphylococcus aureus was the most frequent etiological agent (81%). The overall rate of mortality in SEA patients was 13.2%.

  10. Diagnostic use of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of a cervical epidural abscess and spondylodiscitis in an infant – case report

    PubMed Central

    RAUS, IULIAN; TATAR, SIMONA; COROIU, ROXANA ELENA

    2015-01-01

    Epidural abscess in infancy is very rare and has non-specific features, requiring very careful attention and early diagnosis. We present a case of a 3-month-old girl in which the diagnosis of spontaneous cervical epidural abscess developed after an initial episode of acute enterocolitis and was subsequently identified at a later visit to the emergency department for right-upper extremity hypotonia. Endoscopy revealed slightly domed retro pharynx and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan showed cervical spondylodiscitis at the level of intervertebral disc C5–C6 with right-sided epidural abscess that compressed the spinal cord and right C6 nerve root, without extension into superior mediastinum. The systemic antibiotic treatment with meropenem and clindamycin solved the symptoms but the spondylodiscitis complicated with vertebral body fusion which can be symptomatic or not in the future and needs follow-up. Cervical spontaneous spondylodiscitis with abscess is very rare, especially in this age group. This case emphasizes the importance of investigating an upper extremity motor deficiency in infancy and diagnosing any potential spondylodiscitis complication. PMID:26733756

  11. Surgical management of cervical spinal epidural abscess caused by Brucella melitensis : report of two cases and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Ekici, Mehmet Ali; Ozbek, Zühtü; Gökoğlu, Abdülkerim; Menkü, Ahmet

    2012-06-01

    Spinal epidural abscess, if especially caused by Brucellosis is a very rare disease which is usually a consequence of spondylodiscitis. The spinal column can be affected at any joint; however, the lumbar spine is the most common region, especially at the level of the L4-5 and L5-S1. The frequency of spinal involvement usually seen at the lumbar, thoracic and cervical spine respectively. As an occupational disease in farmers, veterinaries, butchers, laboratory staff and shepherds, brucellosis can also occur by direct contact to animals and infected materials or ingestion of raw cheese, milk or unpasteurized milk products. In this study, we presented two cases with cervical spinal epidural abscess caused by brucella melitensis, which was successfully treated by surgical approach. Initial treatment was combined with antibiotic therapy after the surgery for 3 months.

  12. Aspergillus spinal epidural abscess

    SciTech Connect

    Byrd, B.F. III; Weiner, M.H.; McGee, Z.A.

    1982-12-17

    A spinal epidural abscess developed in a renal transplant recipient; results of a serum radioimmunoassay for Aspergillus antigen were positive. Laminectomy disclosed an abscess of the L4-5 interspace and L-5 vertebral body that contained hyphal forms and from which Aspergillus species was cultured. Serum Aspergillus antigen radioimmunoassay may be a valuable, specific early diagnostic test when systemic aspergillosis is a consideration in an immunosuppressed host.

  13. Spinal epidural abscess.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Katherine G

    2013-09-01

    Spinal epidural abscess is a rare bacterial infection located within the spinal canal. Early diagnosis and rapid treatment are important because of its potential to cause rapidly progressive spinal cord compression and irreversible paralysis. A staphylococcus bacterial infection is the cause in most cases. Treatment includes antibiotics and possible surgical drainage of the abscess. A favorable neurologic outcome correlates with the severity and duration of neurologic deficits before surgery and the timeliness of the chosen intervention. It is important for the critical care nurse to monitor the patient's neurologic status and provide appropriate interventions.

  14. Delayed Presentation of a Cervical Spinal Epidural Abscess of Dental Origin after a Fall in an Elderly Patient.

    PubMed

    Bodman, Alexa; Riordan, Margaret; Chin, Lawrence S

    2016-05-23

    Spinal epidural abscesses are an uncommon cause of spinal cord injury but, depending on the size and presence of neurological deficits, urgent neurosurgical intervention may be required. We present a unique case of a patient presenting with a spinal epidural collection several days after a fall. While a spinal epidural hematoma was suspected based on the patient's history and MRI findings, a spinal epidural abscess was found during surgery. The patient underwent laminectomy and instrumented fusion with successful treatment of her infection.

  15. Isolated subacute tuberculous spinal epidural abscess of the cervical spine: a brief report of a special case.

    PubMed

    Alg, Varinder S; Demetriades, Andreas K; Naik, Sunil; Gunasekera, Lal

    2009-06-01

    A tuberculous spinal epidural abscess is seen rarely as a late complication of Pott's disease or in immunocompromised patients. Such abscesses in isolation are rare indeed and very uncommon in the developed and developing world. We report a patient with an isolated subacute tuberculous spinal epidural abscess without disc or vertebral involvement and no primary focus or risk factors associated with the development of spinal tuberculosis.

  16. Abscess

    MedlinePlus

    ... liver abscess Anorectal abscess Bartholin abscess Brain abscess Epidural abscess Peritonsillar abscess Pyogenic liver abscess Skin abscess Spinal ... Anorectal abscess Bartholin cyst or abscess Brain abscess Epidural abscess Peritonsillar abscess Pyogenic liver abscess Skin abscess Spinal ...

  17. Spinal epidural abscess.

    PubMed

    Krishnamohan, Prashanth; Berger, Joseph R

    2014-11-01

    Spinal epidural abscess (SEA) remains a relatively infrequent diagnosis. Staphylococcus aureus is the most common organism identified, and the infectious source in SEA emanates from skin and soft tissue infections in about 20 % of instances. The thoracic spine is most often involved followed by the lumbar spine. The classic triad of fever, spinal pain, and neurological deficit is present in but a minority of patients. The appearance of neurological deficits with SEA has a significant impact on the prognosis; therefore, early diagnosis is imperative. Magnetic resonance imaging has permitted earlier diagnosis, although significant delays in diagnosis are common due to the nonspecific symptoms that frequently attend the disorder. Due to the rarity of this condition, there have been few randomized controlled trials to evaluate new treatment strategies, and most recommendations regarding treatment are based on case series studies often derived from the experiences at a single center.

  18. Delayed Presentation of a Cervical Spinal Epidural Abscess of Dental Origin after a Fall in an Elderly Patient

    PubMed Central

    Riordan, Margaret; Chin, Lawrence S.

    2016-01-01

    Spinal epidural abscesses are an uncommon cause of spinal cord injury but, depending on the size and presence of neurological deficits, urgent neurosurgical intervention may be required. We present a unique case of a patient presenting with a spinal epidural collection several days after a fall. While a spinal epidural hematoma was suspected based on the patient’s history and MRI findings, a spinal epidural abscess was found during surgery. The patient underwent laminectomy and instrumented fusion with successful treatment of her infection. PMID:27382529

  19. Cervical Meningomyelitis After Lumbar Epidural Steroid Injection

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Joon-Sung; Kim, Ji Yeon

    2015-01-01

    Epidural steroid injections (ESI) are a common treatment for back pain management. ESI-related complications have increased with the growing number of procedures. We report a case of cervical meningomyelitis followed by multiple lumbar ESI. A 60-year-old male with diabetes mellitus presented to our hospital with severe neck pain. He had a history of multiple lumbar injections from a local pain clinic. After admission, high fever and elevated inflammatory values were detected. L-spine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed hematoma in the S1 epidural space. Antibiotic treatment began under the diagnosis of a lumbar epidural abscess. Despite the treatment, he started to complain of weakness in both lower extremities. Three days later, the weakness progressed to both upper extremities. C-spine MRI revealed cervical leptomeningeal enhancement in the medulla oblongata and cervical spinal cord. Removal of the epidural abscess was performed, but there was no neurological improvement. PMID:26161360

  20. Spinal epidural abscess in brucellosis.

    PubMed

    Boyaci, Ahmet; Boyaci, Nurefsan; Tutoglu, Ahmet; Dokumaci, Dilek Sen

    2013-09-26

    Involvement of the skeletal system is a common complication of brucellosis. However, muscle involvement or paraspinal abscess formation are rare complications. Paraspinal abscess usually develops secondary to spondylitis. A case is reported here of a 33-year-old woman with symptoms of night sweats, fever and low back pain. Rose-Bengal test for brucellosis was positive and Brucella standard tube agglutination test was positive at a titre of 1/160. The diagnosis was made on MRI. The patient was treated with doxycycline and rifampin daily for 16 weeks. On day 14 of treatment, decline was observed in the patient's symptoms. In the presence of inflammatory lower back pain and fever, brucellosis should be considered particularly in the endemic areas. Furthermore, tuberculosis should be remembered in the differential diagnosis when a spinal epidural abscess is determined.

  1. Postlumbar puncture arachnoiditis mimicking epidural abscess

    PubMed Central

    Gürbüz, Mehmet Sabri; Erdoğan, Barıs; Yüksel, Mehmet Onur; Somay, Hakan

    2013-01-01

    Lumbar spinal arachnoiditis occurring after diagnostic lumbar puncture is a very rare condition. Arachnoiditis may also present with fever and elevated infection markers and may mimic epidural abscess, which is one of the well known infectious complications of lumbar puncture. We report the case of a 56-year-old man with lumbar spinal arachnoiditis occurring after diagnostic lumbar puncture who was operated on under a misdiagnosis of epidural abscess. In the intraoperative and postoperative microbiological and histopathological examination, no epidural abscess was detected. To our knowledge, this is the first case of a patient with postlumbar puncture arachnoiditis operated on under a misdiagnosis of epidural abscess reported in the literature. The authors suggest that arachnoiditis may mimic epidural abscess due to its clinical and radiological features and should be considered in the differential diagnosis of complications of lumbar puncture. PMID:24197809

  2. Spinal epidural abscess in a patient with piriformis pyomyositis

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Gerald S.; Abou-Al-Shaar, Hussam; Arnone, Gregory D.; Barks, Ashley L.; Hage, Ziad A.; Neckrysh, Sergey

    2016-01-01

    Background: Spinal epidural abscess resulting from piriformis pyomyositis is extremely rare. Such condition can result in serious morbidity and mortality if not addressed in a timely manner. Case Description: The authors describe the case of a 19-year-old male presenting with a 2-week history of fever, low back pain, and nuchal rigidity. When found to have radiographic evidence of a right piriformis pyomyositis, he was transferred to our institution for further evaluation. Because he demonstrated rapid deterioration, cervical, thoracic, and lumbar magnetic resonance imaging scans were emergently performed. They revealed an extensive posterior spinal epidural abscess causing symptomatic spinal cord compression extending from C2 to the sacrum. He underwent emergent decompression and abscess evacuation through a dorsal midline approach. Postoperatively, he markedly improved. Upon discharge, the patient regained 5/5 strength in both upper and lower extremities. Cultures from the epidural abscess grew methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus warranting a 6-week course of intravenous nafcillin. Conclusion: A 19-year-old male presented with a holospinal epidural abscess (C2 to sacrum) originating from piriformis pyomyositis. The multilevel cord abscess was emergently decompressed, leading to a marked restoration of neurological function. PMID:28028447

  3. Medicolegal cases for spinal epidural hematoma and spinal epidural abscess.

    PubMed

    French, Keisha L; Daniels, Eldra W; Ahn, Uri M; Ahn, Nicholas U

    2013-01-01

    Spinal epidural hematoma and spinal epidural abscess are rare surgical emergencies resulting in significant neurologic deficits. Making the diagnosis for spinal epidural hematoma and spinal epidural abscess can be challenging; however, a delay in recognition and treatment can be devastating. The objective of this retrospective analysis study was to identify risk factors for an adverse outcome for the provider. The LexisNexis Academic legal search database was used to identify a total of 19 cases of spinal epidural hematoma and spinal epidural abscess filed against medical providers. Outcome data on trial verdicts, age, sex, initial site of injury, time to consultation, time to appropriate imaging studies, time to surgery, and whether a rectal examination was performed or not were recorded. The results demonstrated a significant association between time to surgery more than 48 hours and an unfavorable verdict for the provider. The degree of permanent neurologic impairment did not appear to affect the verdicts. Fifty-eight percent of the cases did not present with an initial deficit, including loss of bowel or bladder control. All medical professionals must maintain a high level of suspicion and act quickly. Physicians who are able to identify early clinical features, appropriately image, and treat within a 48 hour time frame have demonstrated a more favorable medicolegal outcome compared with their counterparts in filed lawsuits for spinal epidural hematoma and spinal epidural abscess cases.

  4. Successful medical treatment of spinal epidural abscess.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Bo-Ren; Wang, Chih-Wei; Lin, Jung-Chung; Chang, Feng-Yee

    2008-04-01

    Spinal epidural abscess is a rare but potentially fatal disease. A 67-year-old female suffered fever and painful swelling of the right knee and lower leg for one week. Both synovial fluid and blood cultures yielded methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus. Low back pain developed and fever was sustained despite the administration of intravenous oxacillin. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the thoracolumbar spine revealed spinal epidural abscess from T12 to S1. Because of severe hypoalbuminemia and general anasarca and followed by exploratory laparotomy for massive duodenal bleeding, she did not receive surgical intervention for the spinal epidural abscess. After intravenous administration of oxacillin 2 g 4-hourly for 12 weeks, she recovered and follow-up MRI confirmed the efficacy of the medical treatment. She remained well at 1-year follow-up. In a patient with minimal neurological deficit or surgical contraindication, spinal epidural abscess can be successfully treated with a medical regimen.

  5. Cervical Facet Joint Infection and Associated Epidural Abscess with Streptococcus intermedius from a Dental Infection Origin A Case Report and Review.

    PubMed

    Kaye, Ian David; Protopsaltis, Themistocles S

    2016-09-01

    Pyogenic cervical facet joint infections are rare and such infections from a dental origin are even less common. Of these few cases, none have described infection with Streptococcus intermedius as the pathogen. A 65-year-old orthopaedic surgeon complained of fevers, right-sided radiating neck pain, stiffness, swelling, erythema, and right upper extremity weakness one month after he had broken a crown over his right mandibular premolar, a continued source of pain. Imaging of the cervical spine showed a right C4-C5 facet inflammatory arthropathy and a small epidural abscess that was cultured and initially treated with intravenous antibiotics. The oral maxillofacial surgery team performed an extraction of the infected, symptomatic tooth. For continued right upper extremity weakness, the patient underwent C4-C5 laminoforaminotomy and irrigation and debridement of the right C4-C5 facet joint. After 6 weeks of intravenous antibiotics, the patient's infectious and inflammatory markers had normalized. By 4 months, he had regained full strength at his upper extremity and a painless and full range of motion of his cervical spine.Pyogenic cervical facet joint infection is very rare and potentially dangerous. A high clinical suspicion and appropriate imaging, including magnetic resonance imaging, are important for correct diagnosis. Prompt medical and surgical treatment may avert complications, and although the patient presented made a complete recovery, patients may be left with neurological compromise.

  6. Rapidly Progressive Spontaneous Spinal Epidural Abscess.

    PubMed

    Aycan, Abdurrahman; Aktas, Ozgür Yusuf; Guzey, Feyza Karagoz; Tufan, Azmi; Isler, Cihan; Aycan, Nur; Gulsen, İsmail; Arslan, Harun

    2016-01-01

    Spinal epidural abscess (SEA) is a rare disease which is often rapidly progressive. Delayed diagnosis of SEA may lead to serious complications and the clinical findings of SEA are generally nonspecific. Paraspinal abscess should be considered in the presence of local low back tenderness, redness, and pain with fever, particularly in children. In case of delayed diagnosis and treatment, SEA may spread to the epidural space and may cause neurological deficits. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) remains the method of choice in the diagnosis of SEA. Treatment of SEA often consists of both medical and surgical therapy including drainage with percutaneous entry, corpectomy, and instrumentation.

  7. Rapidly Progressive Spontaneous Spinal Epidural Abscess

    PubMed Central

    Aktas, Ozgür Yusuf; Guzey, Feyza Karagoz; Tufan, Azmi; Isler, Cihan; Aycan, Nur; Gulsen, İsmail

    2016-01-01

    Spinal epidural abscess (SEA) is a rare disease which is often rapidly progressive. Delayed diagnosis of SEA may lead to serious complications and the clinical findings of SEA are generally nonspecific. Paraspinal abscess should be considered in the presence of local low back tenderness, redness, and pain with fever, particularly in children. In case of delayed diagnosis and treatment, SEA may spread to the epidural space and may cause neurological deficits. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) remains the method of choice in the diagnosis of SEA. Treatment of SEA often consists of both medical and surgical therapy including drainage with percutaneous entry, corpectomy, and instrumentation. PMID:27688918

  8. [Iliopsoas abscess accompanied by epidural abscess--a case report].

    PubMed

    Fukushige, Tetsushi; Sano, Tomomi; Yamada, Sinichi; Ueda, Sawako; Kano, Tatsuhiko

    2003-09-01

    A 55-year-old man was admitted to a hospital with pain of the low back as well as the left leg, and fever. He was suspected of suffering from the lumbar disc herniation because of the presence of Lasegue's sign on the first physical examination. Abdominal computed tomography, however, revealed the swelling of the left iliopsoas muscle. Iliopsoas abscess accompanied epidural abscess was confirmed by subsequent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Antibiotic therapy was started for the successive 8 days. The fever resolved, but the pain persisted. The abscess extending from the iliopsoas muscle to the epidural space was still seen on the MRI 20 days after the completion of the antibiotic therapy, and he still complained of the pain of his low back and left leg. Therefore, we conducted epidural puncture under fluoroscopic guidance. Approximately 3 ml of pus was aspirated from the epidural space. Then, his complains decreased remarkably. Iliopsoas abscess should be taken into account in case of a patient with pain on the low back and leg and also inflammatory signs such as fever and leucocytosis.

  9. Serratia marcescens spinal epidural abscess formation following acupuncture.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chih-Wei; Hsu, Shun-Neng; Liu, Jhih-Syuan; Hueng, Dueng-Yuan

    2014-01-01

    The formation of spinal epidural abscess following acupuncture is very rare. We herein report the case of a 54-year-old woman who presented with progressive low back pain and fever with a root sign. She underwent surgical decompression, with an immediate improvement of the low back pain. A culture of the epidural abscess grew Serratia marcescens. One year postoperatively, magnetic resonance imaging revealed the almost complete eradication of the abscess. This case is the first case of Serratia marcescens-associated spinal epidural abscess formation secondary to acupuncture. The characteristics of spinal epidural abscess that develop after acupuncture and how to prevent such complications are also discussed.

  10. Spinal epidural abscess following glossectomy and neck dissection: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Esther; Thorpe, Eric; Borrowdale, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Spinal epidural abscess is an uncommon but potentially life threatening entity that rarely occurs after otolaryngology procedures. Presentation of case We report a case of a diabetic patient who presented with a lumbar spinal epidural abscess eight days after head and neck oncologic surgery. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed an L4 spinal epidural abscess. Cultures from the spinal epidural abscess, blood, urine, and the previous neck incision grew Klebsiella pneumoniae. The patient recovered neurologic function after surgical decompression and drainage, long-term intravenous antibiotics, and physical therapy. Discussion The development of postoperative spinal epidural abscess is rare after otolaryngology procedures but has been reported in the cervical epidural space. To our knowledge, lumbar spinal epidural abscess has not yet been reported after head and neck oncologic surgery. Even more unique is the presence of the pathogen K. pneumoniae. Conclusion A high index of suspicion of this potential outcome is paramount as early recognition and intervention are keys to recovery of neurologic function. PMID:26799413

  11. Epidural Abscess Masquerading as Lateral Sinus Thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Brodner, David C.; Cutler, Jeff; Gianoli, Gerard J.; Amedee, Ronald G.

    2000-01-01

    Controversy regarding the use of anticoagulants, the evacuation of the sinus, or the use of medical treatment alone surrounds the treatment of lateral sinus thrombosis. Treatment of an epidural abscess associated with coalescent mastoiditis is much less controversial-drainage is usually recommended. The differing treatments of these complications mandate accurate diagnosis. The advent of more sophisticated radiological studies has facilitated diagnosis of these complications; however, tests are not infallible. We present three cases in which preoperative imaging demonstrates an epidural abscess mimicking lateral sinus thrombosis by compression of the vessel. A false-positive computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) study may lead to the wrong diagnosis and, consequently, improper treatment. In light of this possibility, we recommend surgical exploration in all such cases. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4 PMID:17171148

  12. Citrobocter kasori spinal epidural abscess: a rare occurrence.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Ashok; Jain, Pramod; Singh, Pritish; Divthane, Rupam; Badole, C M

    2013-01-01

    Pyogenic spinal epidural abscess Is an uncommon Infectious occurrence. Clinical prospects of pyogenic spinal epidural abscess are graver if not promptly diagnosed and treated appropriately. A case of spinal epidural abscess has been presented with sinus tract formation at L4-L5 level, of pyogenic aetiology that progressed to paraplegia over the course of the disease. MRI pointed towards an epidural abscess extending from T12 vertebral level to S1 vertebral level. Surgical decompression in the form of laminectomy and evacuation of pus was done and antibiotics were given according to culture and sensitivity. Histopathological analysis revealed the acute suppurative nature of the abscess. Citrobacter kasori was isolated on pus culture. Pyogenic epidural abscess with causative organism being Citrobacter kasori has least been documented.

  13. Minimally invasive treatment of multilevel spinal epidural abscess.

    PubMed

    Safavi-Abbasi, Sam; Maurer, Adrian J; Rabb, Craig H

    2013-01-01

    The use of minimally invasive tubular retractor microsurgery for treatment of multilevel spinal epidural abscess is described. This technique was used in 3 cases, and excellent results were achieved. The authors conclude that multilevel spinal epidural abscesses can be safely and effectively managed using microsurgery via a minimally invasive tubular retractor system.

  14. Extensive spinal epidural abscess as a complication of Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Smith, Chez; Kavar, Bhadrakant

    2010-01-01

    A spinal epidural abscess is a neurosurgical emergency. Successful treatment frequently requires decompression of the spinal canal in combination with intravenous antibiotics. We report a patient with Crohn's disease who developed an extensive spinal epidural abscess communicating with an intra-abdominal collection.

  15. Roseomonas spinal epidural abscess complicating instrumented posterior lumbar interbody fusion.

    PubMed

    Maraki, Sofia; Bantouna, Vasiliki; Lianoudakis, Efstratios; Stavrakakis, Ioannis; Scoulica, Efstathia

    2013-07-01

    The first case of a spinal epidural abscess caused by Roseomonas mucosa following instrumented posterior lumbar fusion is presented. Although rare, because of its highly resistant profile, Roseomonas species should be included in the differential diagnosis of epidural abscesses in both immunocompromised and immunocompetent hosts.

  16. Cervical epidural steroid injections and spinal cord injuries.

    PubMed

    Schreiber, Adam L; McDonald, Brian P; Kia, Farid; Fried, Guy W

    2016-10-01

    Cervical interlaminar and transforaminal epidural steroid injections have been increasingly performed as a medical interventional treatment for pain. This study aimed to examine if there was increasing proportion of cervical spinal cord injured acute rehabilitation hospital admissions related to cervical epidural injections because of increased use of the procedure. Additionally, this study aimed to determine risk factors that may have made these patients known higher risk premorbidly. A retrospective chart review was carried out. The sample was from a 2001 to 2008 spinal cord-related injuries admitted to Magee Rehabilitation (2,770). A total of 1,343 patients were classified as having acute spinal cord injuries (SCIs). Of these patients, seven cases of SCI occurred after cervical epidural injections. Chart data regarding characteristics of patients and proportion of SCI admissions to cervical epidural injections injuries were the outcome measures. Parameters analyzed included age, sex, American Spinal Injury Association Impairment Scale on admission, mechanism of injury, presenting symptoms, time of onset, and risk factors. Proportion of SCI admissions to cervical epidural injections injuries was also analyzed. From the years 2001 to 2008, there were seven admissions for such injury with no change in the proportion of SCIs from cervical epidural injections relative to all SCIs. All were incomplete and mechanisms included anterior cord infarction (1), intraparenchymal injection (1), epidural abscess (2), contusion (1), epidural hematoma (1), and unknown (1). Presenting symptoms included hypotension, respiratory distress, chest pain, upper limb numbness, paresthesias, weakness, and fever. Symptom onset ranged from minutes to 72 hours after injection. Although there is an increased use of interventional spine procedures to treat pain, this did not increase the proportion of cervical epidural-related SCI admissions. Additional research is needed to advocate reporting

  17. Salmonella Typhi Vertebral Osteomyelitis and Epidural Abscess

    PubMed Central

    Chua, Ying Ying; Chen, John L. T.

    2016-01-01

    Salmonella vertebral osteomyelitis is an uncommon complication of Salmonella infection. We report a case of a 57-year-old transgender male who presented with lower back pain for a period of one month following a fall. Physical examination only revealed tenderness over the lower back with no neurological deficits. MRI of the thoracic and lumbar spine revealed a spondylodiscitis at T10-T11 and T12-L1 and right posterior epidural collection at the T9-T10 level. He underwent decompression laminectomy with segmental instrumentation and fusion of T8 to L3 vertebrae. Intraoperatively, he was found to have acute-on-chronic osteomyelitis in T10 and T11, epidural abscess, and discitis in T12-L1. Tissue and wound culture grew Salmonella Typhi and with antibiotics susceptibility guidance he was treated with intravenous ceftriaxone for a period of six weeks. He recovered well with no neurological deficits. PMID:27034871

  18. [Case of spinal epidural abscess after continuous epidural block to manage the pain of herpes zoster].

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, Tatsuhito; Nakatani, Toshihiko; Narai, Yasuhiro; Sakakibara, Manabu; Hashimoto, Tatsuya; Saito, Youji

    2014-03-01

    A woman in her 90's received continuous epidural block for the pain of herpes zoster. Four days after epidural catheterization, she was found with cellutitis. Fourteen days after epidural catheterization, spinal epidural abscess was pointed out on MRI. Since there were no neurological symptoms, we performed conservative medical management with antibiotics. She recovered without sequela When the symptoms of cellutitis appeared after epidural block (even if there are neither neurological symptoms nor infectious signs), there is a possibility of progressing into spinal epidural abscess.

  19. Spinal epidural abscess presenting as intra-abdominal pathology: a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Bremer, Andrew A; Darouiche, Rabih O

    2004-01-01

    Spinal epidural abscess is a rare infectious disease. However, if left unrecognized and untreated, the clinical outcome of spinal epidural abscess can be devastating. Correctly diagnosing a spinal epidural abscess in a timely fashion is often difficult, particularly if the clinician does not actively consider the diagnosis. The most common presenting symptoms of spinal epidural abscess include backache, radicular pain, weakness, and sensory deficits. However, early in its course, spinal epidural abscess can also present with vague and nondescript manifestations. In this report, we describe a case of spinal epidural abscess presenting as abdominal pain, and review the literature describing other cases of spinal epidural abscess presenting as intra-abdominal pathology.

  20. Intramedullary Cervical Spinal Cord Abscess.

    PubMed

    Bakhsheshian, Joshua; Kim, Paul E; Attenello, Frank J

    2017-10-01

    Intramedullary spinal cord abscesses are rarely encountered in modern neurosurgical practice. Select patients are at high risk for developing an intramedullary spinal cord abscess, which can result in acute neurologic deficits. Patients with failed conservative management may benefit from early surgical intervention; however, the evidence is limited by level 3 studies. In this case presentation, the patient failed conservative management for a cervical intramedullary spinal cord abscess and developed acute neurologic deficits. The decision was made to perform an urgent cervical laminectomy and drainage to avoid any further decline that may have occurred with continued conservative management. Increased awareness of intramedullary spinal cord abscess is warranted for its clinical suspicion and emergent treatment in select circumstances. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Spinal epidural abscess treated with antibiotics alone.

    PubMed

    Pathak, Ashish; Singh, Poonam; Gehlot, Prateek; Dhaneria, Mamta

    2013-04-30

    Spinal epidural abscess (SEA) is a rare clinical condition among children. Most patients do not present with classical signs. A 13-year-old boy without any predisposing factors presented with paraparesis, bladder and bowel involvement. MRI spine demonstrated an SEA at the C7 and D1 levels on both sides of the midline with cord oedema at the C2-3 to C6 level with minimal marrow oedema in the C6 vertebral body. We treated the patient with antibiotics (ceftriaxone and vancomycin) alone. The patient showed excellent response with only minimal residual gait disturbance at the end of 6 weeks of antibiotic therapy. This is the first paediatric report of complete recovery of a patient at clinical stage 4 following antibiotic treatment alone from India. However, caution should be exercised to closely monitor the patient's recovery as any progression in the neurological state warrants surgery.

  2. [MRI appearance of lumbar epidural abscesses: report of three cases].

    PubMed

    Semlali, S; Fikri, M; Nassar, I; El Quessar, A; El Hassani, Mr; Chakir, N; Jiddane, M

    2004-03-01

    The authors report three cases of non-tuberculous epidural abscess. Presenting symptoms included lumbar back pain, muscle spasms, soft tIssue swelling, and neurological deficits in all three cases. MR imaging was helpful for diagnosis and showed involvement of perivertebral soft tissues and an epidural abscess of variable size. There was no significant involvement of intervertebral disks or vertebrae. Diagnosis was confirmed by bacteriologic exam. Clinical outcome was favourable with antibiotic treatment.

  3. Evaluation and management of spinal epidural abscess.

    PubMed

    DeFroda, Steven F; DePasse, J Mason; Eltorai, Adam E M; Daniels, Alan H; Palumbo, Mark A

    2016-02-01

    Spinal epidural abscess (SEA) is an uncommon and potentially catastrophic condition. SEA often presents a diagnostic challenge, as the "classic triad" of fever, spinal pain, and neurological deficit is evident in only a minority of patients. When diagnosis is delayed, irreversible neurological damage may ensue. To minimize morbidity, an appropriate level of suspicion and an understanding of the diagnostic evaluation are essential. Infection should be suspected in patients presenting with axial pain, fever, or elevated inflammatory markers. Although patients with no known risk factors can develop SEA, clinical concern should be heightened in the presence of diabetes, intravenous drug use, chronic renal failure, immunosuppressant therapy, or a recent invasive spine procedure. When the clinical profile is consistent with the diagnosis of SEA, gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging of the spinal column should be obtained on an emergent basis to delineate the location and neural compressive effect of the abscess. Rapid diagnosis allows for efficient treatment, which optimizes the potential for a positive outcome.

  4. Rapidly Progressive Gas-containing Lumbar Spinal Epidural Abscess

    PubMed Central

    Bang, Jin Hyuk

    2015-01-01

    Gas-containing (emphysematous) infections of the abdomen, pelvis, and extremities are well-known disease entities, which can potentially be life-threatening. They require aggressive medical and often surgical treatment. In the neurosurgical field, some cases of gas-containing brain abscess and subdural empyema have been reported. Sometimes they progress rapidly and even can cause fatal outcome. However, gas-containing spinal epidural abscess has been rarely reported and clinical course is unknown. We report on a case of rapidly progressive gas-containing lumbar spinal epidural abscess due to Enterococcus faecalis in a 72-year-old male patient with diabetes mellitus. PMID:26512268

  5. Rapidly Progressive Gas-containing Lumbar Spinal Epidural Abscess.

    PubMed

    Bang, Jin Hyuk; Cho, Keun-Tae

    2015-09-01

    Gas-containing (emphysematous) infections of the abdomen, pelvis, and extremities are well-known disease entities, which can potentially be life-threatening. They require aggressive medical and often surgical treatment. In the neurosurgical field, some cases of gas-containing brain abscess and subdural empyema have been reported. Sometimes they progress rapidly and even can cause fatal outcome. However, gas-containing spinal epidural abscess has been rarely reported and clinical course is unknown. We report on a case of rapidly progressive gas-containing lumbar spinal epidural abscess due to Enterococcus faecalis in a 72-year-old male patient with diabetes mellitus.

  6. Epidural infection: Is it really an abscess?

    PubMed Central

    Avilucea, Frank R.; Patel, Alpesh A.

    2012-01-01

    Background: We reviewed the literature regarding the pathogenesis, clinical presentation, diagnosis, and management of spinal epidural abscess (SEA). Methods: Utilizing PubMed, we performed a comprehensive review of the literature on SEAs. Results: SEA remains a difficult infectious process to diagnose. This is particularly true in the early stages, when patients remain neurologically intact, and before the classic triad of fever, back pain, and neurologic deficit develop. However, knowledge of risk factors, obtaining serologic markers, and employing magnetic resonance scans facilitate obtaining a prompt and accurate diagnosis. In patients without neurologic deficits, lone medical therapy may prove effective. Conclusions: More prevalent over the previous three decades, SEA remains a rare but deleterious infectious process requiring prompt identification and treatment. Historically, identification of SEA is often elusive, diagnosis is delayed, and clinicians contend that surgical debridement is the cornerstone of treatment. Early surgery leads to more favorable outcomes and preserves neurologic function, particularly in the early stages of disease when minimal or no neurologic deficits are present. The advent of improved imaging modalities, diagnostic techniques, and multidrug antimicrobial agents has enabled medical/spinal surgical consultants to more rapidly diagnose SEA and institute more effective early medical treatment (e.g., data suggest that lone medical therapy may prove effective in the early management of SEA). PMID:23248757

  7. Cervical epidural hematoma after chiropractic spinal manipulation.

    PubMed

    Heiner, Jason D

    2009-10-01

    Spinal epidural hematoma is a rare but potentially devastating complication of spinal manipulation therapy. This is a case report of a healthy pregnant female who presented to the emergency department with a cervical epidural hematoma resulting from chiropractic spinal manipulation therapy that responded to conservative treatment rather than the more common route of surgical management.

  8. Diabetes mellitus and spinal epidural abscess: clinical or surgical treatment?

    PubMed

    Felício, João S; Martins, Carlliane Lins P; Liberman, Bernardo

    2011-12-01

    Spinal epidural abscess (SEA) is an uncommon condition and its most important predisposing factor is diabetes mellitus. Although the treatment of choice is prompt surgical abscess evacuation, followed by antibiotic therapy, successful conservative treatment of SEA has been reported in some cases. We describe a SEA case in a 23-year old white woman with diabetes for 14 years, who was successfully treated only with antibiotics, and achieved full recovery at the fourth month of follow-up.

  9. Disseminated blastomycosis presenting as mastoiditis and epidural abscess.

    PubMed

    Makary, Chadia A; Roberts, Thomas D; Wetmore, Stephen J

    2014-01-01

    Blastomycosis is a systemic fungal infection that affects primarily the lungs. Head and neck involvement has been reported most commonly in the larynx as well as oral and nasal mucosa. Temporal bone involvement is extremely rare. We report a case of disseminated blastomycosis presenting as mastoiditis and epidural abscess. We discuss the importance of early diagnosis and prompt initiation of treatment for optimal outcome.

  10. Nocardia spinal epidural abscess: 14-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    West, Kristoffer R; Mason, Robert C; Sun, Mike

    2012-01-16

    This article describes an immunocompetent patient with a spinal abscess that developed from Nocardia asteroides. Nocardia is a rare etiology for spinal abscesses, especially in immunocompetent patients. Nocardia usually affects the lungs and brain of immunocompromised individuals. Few reports of Nocardia involving bones or the spine have been published.The patient had a history of chronic back pain and had several procedures to alleviate the pain. In August 1997, the patient had an epidural block and a subsequent infection that was treated with antibiotics. In October 1997, she developed increasing back pain greater than her baseline chronic low back pain. Additional presenting symptoms were fever, chills, and nausea. On admission, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed an epidural abscess. The patient underwent irrigation and debridement. Postoperatively, the patient was initially placed on broad-spectrum antibiotics. After 38 days, the culture was identified as N asteroides, and the patient was placed on appropriate antibiotics. The patient has been followed with MRI prior to the discovery of the abscess and annually since the abscess due to her baseline chronic low back pain. No residual abscess was discovered. Copyright 2012, SLACK Incorporated.

  11. Spinal epidural abscess: a rare complication of olecranon bursitis

    PubMed Central

    Evans, Rhys D.R.; Thaya, Moe; Chew, Ne Siang; Gibbons, Charles E.R.

    2009-01-01

    Spinal epidural abscess is a rare but potentially fatal condition if left untreated. We report the case of a 67-year old man who presented to the Accident and Emergency department complaining of acute onset of inter-scapular back pain, left leg weakness and loss of sensation in the left foot. On examination he was found to be pyrexial with long tract signs in the left lower leg. In addition he had a left sided olecranon bursitis of three weeks duration. Blood tests revealed raised inflammatory markers and a staphylococcal bacteremia. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) confirmed the diagnosis of spinal epidural abscess and he subsequently underwent a three level laminectomy with good resolution of his back pain and neurological symptoms. He has made a complete recovery with a prolonged course of intravenous antibiotics. PMID:21808663

  12. Lumbar spine osteomyelitis and epidural abscess formation secondary to acupuncture

    PubMed Central

    Godhania, Vinesh

    2016-01-01

    A 39-year-old male with no previous medical history presented with abdominal and low back pain. Based on clinical and radiological findings he was diagnosed with L1/L2 osteomyelitis and epidural abscess. Further history taking revealed recent use of acupuncture for treatment of mechanical back pain. The patient was treated conservatively with an extended course of antibiotics, monitored with repeat MRI scans and had a full recovery with no neurological deficit. This is the first reported case of epidural abscess formation and osteomyelitis after acupuncture in the UK. As acupuncture becomes more commonly used in western countries, it is important to be aware of this rare but serious complication. PMID:26976275

  13. Spinal epidural abscess: a rare complication of olecranon bursitis.

    PubMed

    Evans, Rhys D R; Thaya, Moe; Chew, Ne Siang; Gibbons, Charles E R

    2009-06-30

    Spinal epidural abscess is a rare but potentially fatal condition if left untreated. We report the case of a 67-year old man who presented to the Accident and Emergency department complaining of acute onset of inter-scapular back pain, left leg weakness and loss of sensation in the left foot. On examination he was found to be pyrexial with long tract signs in the left lower leg. In addition he had a left sided olecranon bursitis of three weeks duration. Blood tests revealed raised inflammatory markers and a staphylococcal bacteremia. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) confirmed the diagnosis of spinal epidural abscess and he subsequently underwent a three level laminectomy with good resolution of his back pain and neurological symptoms. He has made a complete recovery with a prolonged course of intravenous antibiotics.

  14. Spinal epidural abscess as a result of dissemination from gluteal abscess secondary to intramuscular analgesic injection.

    PubMed

    Sasani, Mehdi; Aydin, Ozlem; Aydin, Ahmet Levent; Oktenoglu, Tunc; Ozer, Ali Fahir; Ercelen, Omur

    2009-01-01

    Spinal epidural abscess is a collection of suppurative material that forms between the dura mater and the ligamentum flavum. If not recognized early and treated correctly, it can lead to life-threatening sepsis. Here we report the case of a female patient, 51 years of age, with difficulty walking and bilateral leg pain after having had degenerative discogenic pain for many years. The patient had occasionally received intramuscular non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug injections. The current report is that of an unusual case of epidural abscess that formed following multiple dose of intramuscular non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug over a 1-year period. Hematogenous or direct dissemination is the suspected cause. To prevent serious morbidity and mortality, early diagnosis is essential. Patients with localized back pain who are at risk for developing such epidural spinal abscesses should receive a magnetic resonance imaging scan with contrast enhancement without delay. The existence of predisposing factors such as intramuscular injections should be considered in the assessment of suspected spinal epidural abscess.

  15. Extensive spinal epidural abscess treated with "apical laminectomies" and irrigation of the epidural space: report of 2 cases.

    PubMed

    Abd-El-Barr, Muhammad M; Bi, Wenya Linda; Bahluyen, Biji; Rodriguez, Samuel T; Groff, Michael W; Chi, John H

    2015-03-01

    Spinal epidural abscess (SEA) is a rare but often devastating infection of the epidural space around the spinal cord. When an SEA is widespread, extensive decompression with laminectomy is often impossible, as it may subject the patient to very long operative times, extensive blood loss, and mechanical instability. A technique called "skip laminectomy" has been described in the literature, in which laminectomies are performed at the rostral and caudal ends of an abscess that spans 3-5 levels and a Fogarty catheter is used to mechanically drain the abscess, much like in an embolectomy. In this report of 2 patients, the authors present a modification of this technique, which they call "apical laminectomies" to allow for irrigation and drainage of an extensive SEA spanning the entire length of the vertebral column (C1-2 to L5-S1). Two patients presented with cervico-thoraco-lumbar SEA. Laminectomies were performed at the natural apices of the spine, namely, at the midcervical, midthoracic, and midlumbar spine levels. Next, a pediatric feeding tube was inserted in the epidural space from the thoracic laminectomies up toward the cervical laminectomy site and down toward the lumbar laminectomy site, and saline antibiotics were used to irrigate the SEA. Both patients underwent this procedure with no adverse effects. Their SEAs resolved both clinically and radiologically. Neither patient suffered from mechanical instability at 1 year after treatment. For patients who present with extensive SEAs, apical laminectomies seem to allow for surgical cure of the infectious burden and do not subject the patient to extended operating room time, an increased risk of blood loss, and the risk of mechanical instability.

  16. Thoracic spinal epidural abscess caused by Salmonella typhi.

    PubMed

    Abdullah, Saad Hamdan; Ata, Osama Abu; El-Adwan, Nael

    2008-03-01

    A 56-year-old man presented with a rare spinal epidural abscess manifesting as attacks of back pain associated with fever, weight loss, generalized weakness and fatigability, and constipation. He had multiple skin pustules in the last 4 months treated with oral amoxicillin. He had suffered diabetes mellitus for the last 5 years and was insulin dependent. Physical examination found slight paraparesis with sensory loss around the nipple and sphincteric urgency, and diabetic retinopathy. Magnetic resonance imaging showed edematous T2, T3, and T4 vertebral bodies, and narrow enhanced T3-4 disk space with a soft tissue enhanced mass mostly anterior to the spinal cord and indenting the cord. T3-4 costotransversectomy was performed to remove the extradural mass and evacuate the intradiscal material. Histological examination of the bone found osteomyelitis, and culture of the soft tissue showed Salmonella typhi sensitive to ceftriaxone and ciprofloxacin. Intravenous ceftriaxone administration was started, and the patient was discharged after 6 days in good condition. The outcome of spinal epidural abscess is devastating unless recognized and treated early. The present case of spinal epidural abscess in the thoracic spine caused by Salmonella typhi infection illustrates the importance of cultures to assess the drug sensitivity of the specific strain detected and adjusting the treatment accordingly.

  17. Long-term survival in a dog with meningoencephalitis and epidural abscessation due to Actinomyces species.

    PubMed

    Song, Rachel B; Vitullo, Carina A; da Costa, Ronaldo C; Daniels, Joshua B

    2015-07-01

    A 2-year-old, female spayed Golden Retriever dog was presented to The Ohio State University Veterinary Medical Center for evaluation of ataxia, cervical pain, 1 episode of acute collapse, dull mentation, and inappetence. Physical examination revealed an elevated temperature of 39.7°C and severe cervical pain. Blood work revealed a mature neutrophilia. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) analysis revealed nondegenerative neutrophilic pleocytosis with no infectious agents. A presumptive diagnosis of steroid-responsive meningitis-arteritis was made, and corticosteroid therapy was started. The patient improved initially but experienced a vestibular episode characterized by falling and vertical nystagmus. A magnetic resonance imaging of the brain revealed an epidural abscess in the cervical vertebral canal and diffuse meningeal enhancement in the brain and cranial cervical spine. Abscess drainage revealed degenerate neutrophils and several filamentous, branching organisms. Culture of the initial CSF using an enrichment broth revealed growth of a Gram-positive organism 5 days after fluid collection. The isolate was identified by partial 16S ribosomal DNA sequencing as Actinomyces spp. The patient was successfully treated with long-term antibiotics. Our study reports the long-term survival after medical treatment of bacterial meningoencephalitis and epidural abscessation due to Actinomyces sp. infection in a dog. Bacterial meningoencephalitis should be included as a differential diagnosis in patients with cervical pain and fever, even when a nondegenerative neutrophilic pleocytosis is found on CSF analysis. Culture of the CSF with use of an enrichment broth should be considered in all cases of neutrophilic pleocytosis to rule out infections of the central nervous system. © 2015 The Author(s).

  18. Spinal epidural abscess and meningitis following short-term epidural catheterisation for postoperative analgaesia.

    PubMed

    van Rappard, Juliaan R M; Tolenaar, Jip L; Smits, Anke B; Go, Peter M N Y H

    2015-08-20

    We present a case of a patient with a spinal epidural abscess (SEA) and meningitis following short-term epidural catheterisation for postoperative pain relief after a laparoscopic sigmoid resection. On the fifth postoperative day, 2 days after removal of the epidural catheter, the patient developed high fever, leucocytosis and elevated C reactive protein. Blood cultures showed a methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus infection. A photon emission tomography scan revealed increased activity of the spinal canal, suggesting S. aureus meningitis. A gadolinium-enhanced MRI showed a SEA that was localised at the epidural catheter insertion site. Conservative management with intravenous flucloxacillin was initiated, as no neurological deficits were seen. At last follow-up, 8 weeks postoperatively, the patient showed complete recovery.

  19. Spinal epidural abscess caused by bacteroides fragilis group after dilation and curettage for incomplete abortion.

    PubMed

    Ohyagi, Masaki; Ohkubo, Takuya; Taniyama, Takashi; Tomizawa, Shoji; Okawa, Atsushi; Yokota, Takanori; Mizusawa, Hidehiro

    2012-04-01

    Spinal epidural abscess (SEA) is a rare infection complicated in patients who have some risk factors such as injection-drug use, diabetes mellitus, and several illnesses. However, no case of SEA associated with abortion has been reported. Here we report a case of SEA in a 30-year-old woman after dilation and curettage for incomplete abortion. The diagnosis of SEA was done by MRI and pus was drained after the cervical discectomy. Bacteroides fragilis group was cultured from the aspirated pus sample. The patient responded to surgical drainage and antibiotics.

  20. A Case of Extensive Sacral Decubitus Ulcer Complicated by an Epidural Abscess

    PubMed Central

    Murata, Mai; Hiratsuka, Munehisa; Suzuki, Shigehiko

    2016-01-01

    Summary: We herein report a 62-year-old man with an extensive sacral decubitus ulcer complicated by an epidural abscess. An epidural abscess is a rare disease, but it should be considered in the differential diagnosis of a deep infection with decubitus. Moreover, the diagnosis may be late in such instances and should be carefully considered when a patient has paralysis. PMID:27536469

  1. Holocord spinal epidural abscess: Case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Xiang, H; Ma, X; Shen, N; Yue, B; Zhang, G; Chen, B

    2016-10-01

    Holocord spinal epidural abscess (SEA) is a rare condition. To our knowledge, five cases of SEA have been reported so far, and no consensus has been made on the treatment yet. In this article, we report a case of holocord SEA and review literature to further understanding of SEA. The advent of antibiotic treatment and the recognition of surgical debridement have been important in searching for alternatives to recovery, so the patient was treated surgically together with systemic antibiotics. The patient remained neurologically stable and continued to be clinically in good condition without any low back pain after 1 year. Surgical drainage, together with systemic antibiotics, is the main treatment choice for extensive SEAs. Although treatment should be considered that highlights the importance of examining the factors related to the health and condition of the patients and the anatomy and extent of the abscess, early surgical treatment associated with prolonged antibiotic treatment is necessary.

  2. Spinal epidural abscess successfully treated with percutaneous, computed tomography-guided, needle aspiration and parenteral antibiotic therapy: case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Lyu, Rong-Kuo; Chen, Chi-Jen; Tang, Lok-Ming; Chen, Sien-Tsong

    2002-08-01

    We describe a case of a posterior spinal epidural abscess that was successfully treated with percutaneous, computed tomography-guided, needle aspiration and parenteral antibiotic therapy. A 48-year-old man experienced acute pain in the paralumbar region for 1 week, followed by gait disturbance and micturition difficulty. Laboratory studies demonstrated leukocytosis and hyperglycemia. Blood cultures yielded Staphylococcus aureus. Magnetic resonance imaging scans of the thoracolumbar spine revealed a posterior spinal epidural abscess located between L2 and the lower cervical spine. The patient's low back pain persisted despite 10 days of antibiotic therapy. Therefore, percutaneous, computed tomography-guided, needle aspiration was performed. The low back pain was relieved dramatically and immediately after the procedure. The spinal epidural abscess completely resolved after 6 weeks of antibiotic treatment. Surgical decompression and antibiotic therapy are the treatments of choice for patients with spinal epidural abscesses. Selected patients may be treated nonsurgically. Rarely, percutaneous drainage of the abscess has been reported to be helpful. Our case suggests that percutaneous, computed tomography-guided, needle aspiration might be a rational alternative to surgical decompression for treatment of spinal epidural abscesses.

  3. Tropical pyomyositis of erector spinae complicated with spinal epidural abscess.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yun-Cong; Chen, Ching-Chang; Wei, Kuo-Chen; Chen, Jyi-Feng; Lee, Shih-Tseng; Liao, Cheng-Chih

    2015-01-01

    This is a retrospective case series. Tropical pyomyositis of erector spinae muscle (ESPM) is a rare muscular infection which may extend into the intraspinal canal to become spinal epidural abscess (ESPM-SEA). If left untreated, it may cause catatrophic spinal cord dysfunction and lead to irreversible paralysis. A series of eight such cases is presented, in order to provide proper surgical options and clarify the prognostic factors of the disease. Merely six sporadic case reports had been found in the literature. Surgical debridement and laminectomy to drain the intraspinal abscess combined with systemic antibiotics were the choice of treatment to treat the disease with good therapeutic effect. Inpatient charts of the patients were reviewed. The therapeutic effect and functional neurological recovery are correlated with the demographic characteristics of the patients, neurological deficits before drainage, and the different procedures of drainage. Old age, long ESPM-SEA (>6.5 vertebral segments), spinal cord dysfunction as well as complete paralysis before the interventional procedures are significantly correlated with poor functional neurological recovery (Sperman's coefficient correlation, all p<0.05). Pig-tail drainage of ESPM combined with adequate systemic antibiotics could cure if infection presents with lumbar radiculopathy only, but it failed to rescue the spinal cord dysfunction in two patients present with complete paralysis. Surgical drainage of ESPM with mini-laminotomy to drain ESPM-SEA combined with systemic antibiotics provided good functional recovery of patients, despite of prolonged pre-operative complete paralysis. Early drainage of the ESPM and related epidural abscess combined with systemic antibiotics can provide excellent therapeutic effect of ESPM-SEA. Open drainage with mini-laminotomy is superior to pig-tail drainage when spinal cord dysfunction occurred associated with ESPM-SEA. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Spontaneous spinal epidural abscess in a 21-month-old child.

    PubMed

    Harris, Tyler J; Seamon, Jason P

    2014-12-01

    Spontaneous epidural abscess formation is a rare finding in all populations and even more so in the pediatric population. Its rarity and varied presentations often lead to misdiagnosis. We present a pediatric case in which the diagnosis of spontaneous spinal epidural abscess was missed upon initial presentation and subsequently identified at a later visit to the emergency department. Literature suggests utilizing three simple physical exam findings that may improve the first visit diagnosis of spontaneous epidural abscesses in children. Findings of any two of the following signs should guide the clinician to consider SEA as a possibility prior to discharge: fever, back or neck pain, extremity weakness or inability to walk.

  5. Spinal epidural abscess in a young girl without risk factors.

    PubMed

    Mantadakis, Elpis; Birbilis, Theodosios; Michailidis, Lambros; Souftas, Vasileios; Chatzimichael, Athanassios

    2011-07-01

    Spinal epidural abscess (SEA) is a rare infection associated with well-established risk factors mainly in adults. We describe an 11-year-old girl without any known risk factors who presented with fever and localized spinal tenderness in the lumbar area and was diagnosed with spinal MRI as suffering from a posterior SEA extending between T11 and L4. She was successfully managed with sequential intravenous and oral antibiotics along with minimally invasive surgery without laminectomy. Methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus was the responsible pathogen isolated at surgery. Immediate institution of antibiotics, spinal MRI, and well-timed neurosurgical consultation are mandatory for a favorable outcome in cases of SEA in children.

  6. “Dry tap” during spinal anaesthesia turns out to be epidural abscess

    PubMed Central

    Sahu, Dinesh Kumar; Kaul, Vinca; Parampill, Reena

    2012-01-01

    We report a case of “dry tap” during spinal anaesthesia in a patient posted for incision and drainage of lower limb with cellulitis. When the patient was being given sub-arachnoid block (SAB) for regional anaesthesia, it turned out to be a case of pyogenic ilio-psoas abscess extended up to the paravertebral and epidural spaces. The causative organism was Staphylococcus aureus. This is probably the first case reported when epidural abscess is diagnosed during SAB. PMID:22923830

  7. Intramedullary cervical neurenteric cyst mimicking an abscess.

    PubMed

    Muzumdar, D; Bhatt, Y; Sheth, J

    2008-01-01

    We describe a cervical intramedullary neurenteric cyst in a 12-year-old male patient who presented with gradual onset and progressively worsening neck pain, spastic quadriparesis and impaired sensation in the C(2) dermatome. MR imaging revealed a well-defined peripherally enhancing cystic intramedullary lesion with a posteroinferior enhancing nodule at the C(2)-C(3) level mimicking an abscess. There was no evidence of spinal dysraphism. The lesion was completely resected through a posterior approach and the patient showed radical improvement in his symptomatology. At follow-up after 3 years, he was asymptomatic and the MR imaging showed no evidence of any residual or recurrent cyst. The case presented here is unique, since a spinal neurenteric cyst showing intense peripheral contrast enhancement mimicking an abscess is unusual. The radiological features, pathogenesis and surgical considerations in cervical intramedullary neurenteric cysts are discussed and the relevant literature is briefly reviewed.

  8. Cervical Epidural Depth: Correlation Between Cervical MRI Measurements of the Skin-to-Cervical Epidural Space and the Actual Needle Depth During Interlaminar Cervical Epidural Injections.

    PubMed

    Algrain, Haitham; Liu, Alison; Singh, Sarabdeep; Vu, To-Nhu; Cohen, Steven P

    2017-05-08

    The purpose of this study was to assess the correlation between skin-to-epidural space depth, as measured on cervical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and actual needle depth, as measured by Tuohy needle markings during cervical epidural steroid injections. We conducted a retrospective review of cervical MRI images to determine estimated depth from skin to epidural space. Of the 121 reviewed patients who underwent cervical epidural steroid injections, 81 met inclusion criteria and were retained for data analysis. At the C6-C7 level, the estimated needle depth according to MRI images was 6.03 ± 1.15 cm (mean ± SD) and the actual needle depth was 5.62 ± 0.77 cm. At the C7-T1 level, the estimated needle depth based on MRI images was 5.90 ± 1.05 cm and the actual needle depth was 5.73 ± 0.98 cm. At both C6-C7 and C7-T1, MRI depth ( P  <   0.009, P  <   0.001) and body mass index ( P  <   0.001, P  <   0.002) were significantly associated with actual depth. Estimates of needle depth made with MRI were consistently slightly deeper than the actual loss-of-resistance needle depth, indicating that the provider should employ caution when using MRI predictive depths. Information garnered from preprocedure MRIs can be used to improve the safety of cervical epidural steroid injection procedures.

  9. Treatment of holocord spinal epidural abscess via alternating side unilateral approach for bilateral laminectomy.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Roy; Yung, Brian H; Sedney, Cara; Miele, Vincent J

    2015-01-01

    To date, this is the first reported case of the surgical management of a holocord epidural abscess done through level-skipping laminectomies. It is also the first reported case of these laminectomies being performed via an alternating side unilateral approach for this condition. A 51-year-old patient presenting with progressive lower extremity weakness secondary to a spinal epidural abscess extending from C4 to S1. A minimally disruptive method of relieving the spinal cord compression via evacuation of the abscess was employed successfully. This report demonstrates the efficacy of level skipping laminectomies via a unilateral approach for holocord epidural abscesses (extending 20 vertebral levels). Performing the laminectomies via a unilateral approach as well as alternating the side of the approach minimized iatrogenic instability risk. Both strategies were designed to minimize incision size, tissue disruption, and the amount of muscular weakness/imbalance postoperatively.

  10. Thoracic spinal epidural abscess caused by fishbone perforation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jian-Min; Wang, Zhi-Yong; Ni, Guo-Xin

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Rationale: Ingestion of a fishbone is a common cause of esophageal injury, but spinal epidural abscess (SEA) is a rare condition due to the esophageal penetration by a swallowed fishbone. Prompt diagnosis can be seldom made owing to incomplete patient history taking and difficulties in imaging evidence identification. Patient concerns: We describe the case of a 62-year-old woman who was stuck in her throat by a fishbone, and complained of back pain, paresis of the lower limbs and fever, successively. To our knowledge, this is the first case report that we know of thoracic SEA caused by fishbone perforation. Diagnoses: About 20 days after the onset of severe back pain, she was diagnosed with SEA based on the clinical presentation and imaging findings. Interventions: Antibiotic therapy and rehabilitation therapy were carried out afterwards. However, due to exacerbation of her condition, surgical intervention had to be taken eventually. Outcomes: It is quite unfortunate for this patient to have a poor prognosis due to a delayed diagnosis and an improper management. Lessons: A number of lessons can be learnt from this case. PMID:27930507

  11. Nonoperative Management of a Multi-Regional Epidural Abscess with Neurological Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez, Miguel; Berg, Andrew; Bhatia, Chandra

    2015-01-01

    Spinal epidural abscesses are uncommon, but their incidence is increasing. They represent a collection of purulent material in the epidural space and most commonly occur in the lumbar spine, where they remain localised. Abscesses that affect all three spinal levels (holospinal or multiregional abscesses) are extremely rare, with only a few cases published in the literature. Epidural abscesses are particularly high risk infections as progressive neurological dysfunction can occur rapidly; early diagnosis and treatment is therefore essential to avoid long term neurological complications and reduce potential mortality. Given the uncommon nature of this condition, the treatment remains controversial with no definitive guidance on conservative versus surgical management. The literature mostly recommends surgical decompression along with intravenous antibiotics in patients with neurological abnormalities. We describe a case of a 77-year-old patient presenting with a delayed diagnosis of a multi-regional epidural abscess with associated upper motor neurone signs. The patient was successfully treated nonoperatively with a course of antibiotics resulting in complete radiological resolution of the abscess and full neurological recovery. PMID:26512341

  12. Diabetic foot complicated by vertebral osteomyelitis and epidural abscess

    PubMed Central

    Trombetta, Maddalena; Imbriaco, Chiara; Rigolon, Riccardo; Mingolla, Lucia; Zamboni, Federica; Dal Molin, Francesca; Cioccoloni, Dario; Sanga, Viola; Bruti, Massimiliano; Brocco, Enrico; Conti, Michela; Ravenna, Giorgio; Perrone, Fabrizia; Stoico, Vincenzo; Bonora, Enzo

    2016-01-01

    Summary Vertebral osteomyelitis (or spondylodiscitis) is steadily increasing in Western countries and often results from hematogenous seeding, direct inoculation during spinal surgery, or contiguous spread from an infection in the adjacent soft tissue. We present the case of a 67-year-old white patient with type 2 diabetes who went to Hospital for high fever, back pain, and worsening of known infected ulcers in the left foot. Despite intravenous antibiotic treatment and surgical debridement of the foot infection, high fever and lower back pain continued. Bone biopsy and two consecutive blood cultures were positive for Staphylococcus aureus. A spinal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was performed, revealing serious osteomyelitis in L4 and L5 complicated by an epidural abscess. Contiguous or other distant focuses of infection were not identified. In this case, diabetic foot could be considered as a primary distant focus for vertebral osteomyelitis. Clinicians should consider vertebral osteomyelitis as a ‘possible’ diagnosis in patients with type 2 diabetes complicated by foot infection that is associated with fever and lower back pain. Learning points Vertebral osteomyelitis is increasing in Western countries, especially in patients with type 2 diabetes. The primary focus of infection is the genitourinary tract followed by skin, soft tissue, endocarditis, bursitis, septic arthritis, and intravascular access. Diabetic foot could be a rare primary focus of infection for vertebral osteomyelitis, and, however, vertebral osteomyelitis could be a serious, albeit rare, complication of diabetic foot. Clinicians should keep in mind the many potential complications of diabetic foot ulcerations and consider vertebral osteomyelitis as a “possible” diagnosis in patients with type 2 diabetes and foot ulcers associated with nonspecific symptoms such as lower back pain. Early diagnosis and correct management of vertebral osteomyelitis are crucial to improve clinical outcomes

  13. Pneumocephalus during cervical transforaminal epidural steroid injections: a case report.

    PubMed

    Kim, Won-Joong; Park, Hae-Gyun; Park, Yong-Hee; Shin, Mee-Ran; Koo, Gill-Hoi; Shin, Hwa-Yong

    2015-01-01

    A cervical transforaminal epidural injection of anesthetic and corticosteroids (CTFESI) is a frequently used procedure for cervical radiculopathy. Most cases of pneumocephalus after an epidural block occur when using an interlaminar approach with the loss-of-resistance technique. The authors present the first case of pneumocephalus after cervical transforaminal epidural injection of anesthetic and corticosteroids. A 64-yr-old woman with left C7 radiculopathy was undergoing C6-7 transforaminal epidural injection of anesthetic and corticosteroids. The epidural spread of contrast was checked by fluoroscope, and 5 mg of dexamethasone in 4 ml of 0.1875% ropivacaine was injected. She lost consciousness 5 mins after the procedure and regained awareness after manual ventilation. She subsequently complained of nausea and headache, and a computed tomography brain scan revealed pneumocephalus. After carefully assessing the fluoroscopic images, the authors believe that the needle may have punctured the dura mater of the nerve root sleeve, allowing air to enter the subdural space. Thus, fluoroscopic images should be carefully examined to reduce dural puncture when performing cervical transforaminal epidural injection of anesthetic and corticosteroids, and air should be completely removed from the needle, extension tube, and syringe.

  14. Adolescence spinal epidural abscess with neurological symptoms: case report, a lesson to be re-learnt.

    PubMed

    Sales, Jafar Ganjpour; Tabrizi, Ali; Elmi, Asghar; Soleimanpour, Jafar; Gavidel, Ehsan

    2013-02-01

    Epidural abscess of the spinal column is a rare condition that can be fatal if left untreated. It promptly progresses and can cause neurologic paralysis, urinary retention or cauda equina syndrome. Compromised immune system that occurs in patients with diabetes mellitus, AIDS, chronic renal failure, alcoholism, or cancer is a predisposing factor. It mostly occurs in adults. Here we would like to report a case of spontaneous pyogenic lumbar epidural abscess with neurological deficit diagnosed in a 15 year old boy. We treated this case successfully with surgical microscopic decompression and drainage.

  15. Paraspinal and Extensive Epidural Abscess: The Great Masqueraders of Abdominal Pain

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Andrew; Aung, Thu Thu; Shankar, Uday

    2015-01-01

    Paraspinal and epidural abscesses are rare conditions often diagnosed later in the disease process that can have significant morbidity and mortality. Predisposing risk factors include diabetes, human immunodeficiency virus, intravenous drug abuse, and previous history of spinal surgery or injection. They can threaten the spinal cord by compressive effect, leading to sensory motor deficits and ultimately paralysis and death. Diagnosis may be a challenge due to the delayed presentation of nonspecific back pain or radicular pain such as chest pain or abdominal pain. We present a rare case on a patient with periumbilical pain, constipation, and urinary retention who was ultimately diagnosed with a paraspinal abscess extending into the epidural space from T1 to S2. He underwent decompressive laminectomy with incision and drainage of the abscesses. The patient made an excellent recovery postoperatively, and repeat magnetic resonance imaging at six weeks showed resolution of the abscess. PMID:26770847

  16. [Drainage of the Frontal Sinus to Cure Epidural and Brain Abscesses Developed after Surgery via Anterior Interhemispheric Approach].

    PubMed

    Bando, Kazuhiko; Ebisutani, Daizo

    2015-08-01

    We report a woman whose anterior communicating artery (AcomA) aneurysm was clipped via an anterior interhemispheric approach when she was 49 years old. At the age of 51, she presented with a subcutaneous abscess and osteomyelitis, so the cranioplastic bone was removed. Six months later, she underwent cranioplasty using hydroxyapatite. Her subcutaneous abscess recurred and the epidural abscess and hydroxyapatite were removed 11 years later after the first operation. The patient underwent observation therapy for the next 4 years, as the dura was ossified. She presented with frontal swelling 15 years after aneurysmal clipping, and neither abscess puncture nor the administration of antibacterial drugs was curative. The patient also complained of chill, thirst, and tremor, and developed disorientation 25 days later. Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed extension of the epidural and subcutaneous abscesses to a frontal brain abscess. After consulting an otolaryngologist, we performed frontal drainage into the nasal cavity. After making a bicoronal skin incision, the subcutaneous, epidural, and intracapsular brain abscesses were removed while taking care not to damage the capsules. A silicone T-tube was placed in the bifrontal epidural cavity (previous frontal sinus), and its tip was inserted into the nasal cavity through the nasofrontal duct for abscess drainage. After 3 months, the tube was removed. A CT scan acquired 10 years later showed no brain abscess, perifocal edema, or epidural and subcutaneous abscesses.

  17. Late prevertebral abscess following anterior cervical plating: the missing screw.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Lage, J F; Felipe-Murcia, M; Martínez-Lage Azorín, L

    2007-04-01

    A 51-year-old man underwent a C5-C7 anterior decompression and fusion. Six years later the patient complained of dysphagia caused by displacement of the cervical plate. One week after the scheduled removal of the implanted material, the patient developed a painful cervical swelling and fever. His cervical radiographs showed that a screw was missing compared to previous studies. Computerized tomography showed a large prevertebral abscess anterior to C4-C7. He underwent emergency surgical drainage of the abscess that was followed by total recovery. This report is aimed at describing this unusual complication of cervical instrumentation and to briefly review its pathogenesis and management options.

  18. Thoracic osteomyelitis and epidural abscess formation due to cat scratch disease: case report.

    PubMed

    Dornbos, David; Morin, Jocelyn; Watson, Joshua R; Pindrik, Jonathan

    2016-12-01

    Osteomyelitis of the spine with associated spinal epidural abscess represents an uncommon entity in the pediatric population, requiring prompt evaluation and diagnosis to prevent neurological compromise. Cat scratch disease, caused by the pathogen Bartonella henselae, encompasses a wide spectrum of clinical presentations; however, an association with osteomyelitis and epidural abscess has been reported in only 4 other instances in the literature. The authors report a rare case of multifocal thoracic osteomyelitis with an epidural abscess in a patient with a biopsy-proven pathogen of cat scratch disease. A 5-year-old girl, who initially presented with vague constitutional symptoms, was diagnosed with cat scratch disease following biopsy of an inguinal lymph node. Despite appropriate antibiotics, she presented several weeks later with recurrent symptoms and back pain. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed 2 foci of osteomyelitis at T-8 and T-11 with an associated anterior epidural abscess from T-9 to T-12. Percutaneous image-guided vertebral biopsy revealed B. henselae by polymerase chain reaction analysis, and she was treated conservatively with doxycycline and rifampin with favorable clinical outcome.

  19. A Highly Rare Cause of Lumbar Spondylodiscitis with Epidural Abscess: Actinomyces israelii

    PubMed Central

    Kapmaz, Mahir; Gülşen, İsmail; Kış, Naciye; Başaran, Seniha; Öksüz, Lütfiye; Gürler, Nezahat

    2014-01-01

    Actinomyces species may lead to slowly progressive infection of almost any site once mucosal breakdown exists; hence, it has the name “great pretender.” Its diagnosis may be unthinkable unless proper cultures/histologies are taken. We describe a patient with lumbar spondylodiscitis and epidural abscess. This is an exceptional another disease by actinomycosis. PMID:25024855

  20. Spontaneous spinal epidural abscess presenting in a previously healthy young adult man.

    PubMed

    McDonald, Andrew M; Rollins, Jason L

    2013-01-01

    We report a case of spontaneous spinal epidural abscess (SEA) with initial chief complaint of shoulder pain and no appreciable neurologic symptoms. Since outcomes of SEA appear to be related to the degree of neurologic deficit at the time of intervention, we explore opportunities for earlier diagnosis.

  1. Percutaneous tapping for the treatment of sinusitis-related intracranial epidural abscess in children

    PubMed Central

    Miyabe, Rumi; Niida, Mami; Obonai, Toshio; Aoki, Nobuhiko; Okada, Takaharu

    2014-01-01

    A 13-year-old boy with medically intractable sinusitis-related intracranial epidural abscess in the frontal region was treated using percutaneous tapping. Drainage of pus measuring 7 ml yielded excellent postoperative course without cosmetic disadvantage on the forehead. Percutaneous tapping is considered to be the ideal treatment because of minimal invasiveness and cosmetic aspects of the wound. PMID:25624941

  2. Cervical epidural steroid injection for cervicobrachialgia.

    PubMed

    Stav, A; Ovadia, L; Sternberg, A; Kaadan, M; Weksler, N

    1993-08-01

    Fifty patients with chronic resistant cervicobrachialgia were randomly divided into two groups. Twenty-five patients (group A) were treated with cervical epidural steroid/lidocaine injections and 17 patients (group B) were treated with steroid/lidocaine injections into the posterior neck muscles. Another eight patients from group B were excluded from the study because they had started the process of litigation of insurance claims and their subjective analysis of pain relief might therefore not be trustworthy. One to three injections were administered at 2-week intervals according to the clinical response. All patients continued their various pre-study treatments: non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, non-opioid analgesics and physiotherapy. Pain relief was evaluated by the visual analogue scale 1 week after the last injection and then 1 year later. One week after the last injection we rated pain relief as very good and good in 76% of the patients in group A, as compared to 35.5% of the patients in group B. One year after the treatment 68% of the group A patients still had very good and good pain relief, whereas only 11.8% of group B patients reported this degree of pain relief. These differences were statistically significant. We failed to achieve significant improvement of tendon reflexes or of sensory loss in both groups, but the increase in the range of motion, the fraction of patients who were able to decrease their daily dose of analgesics, and recovery of the capacity for work were significantly better in group A. We encountered no complications in either group of patients.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  3. Continuous Cervical Epidural Analgesia in Metastatic Spinal Cord Compression

    PubMed Central

    Menon, Mahesh; Taha, Nafisa; Purohit, Navita; Kothari, Vatsal; Singh, Shweta

    2016-01-01

    Metastatic spinal cord compression is a devastating complication of cancer. Patients may often require high doses of opioids that may cause side effects, myoclonus being one such. A 63-year-old male suffering from malignant spinal cord compression was admitted to our institution. The primary team managed him conservatively with pharmacotherapy with no relief of pain, and he experienced myoclonus and sedation as adverse effects. A continuous cervical epidural catheter with local anesthetic infusion was inserted for 5 days to control his pain. This relieved his pain, which was sustained even after we removed the epidural catheter on day 5, for up to 64 days until the time of his death. Continuous cervical epidural local anesthetic infusions may help with refractory pain by deafferentation of noxious stimuli. Central neuraxial blocks may be a valuable rescue in selected patients. PMID:27803576

  4. Lower extremities and iliopsoas pyomyositis with concurrent septic arthritis and spinal epidural abscess in a diabetic patient.

    PubMed

    Vallianou, N; Gounari, P; Skourtis, A; Kougias, M; Sioula, E

    2013-10-01

    Pyomyositis is a rarely encountered infection among diabetics, which usually affects lower extremities. Herein, we present a case of lower extremities and iliopsoas pyomyositis with concurrent septic arthritis and spinal epidural abscess in a patient with poorly controlled diabetes mellitus.

  5. Severe Scapular Pain Following Unintentional Cervical Epidural Air Injection.

    PubMed

    Henthorn, Randall W; Murray, Kerra

    2016-03-01

    This a unique case of severe scapular pain following unintentional epidural space air injection during epidural steroid injection.A 70-year-old woman presented for a fluoroscopically guided C7-T1 interlaminar epidural steroid injection. Three injection attempts were made using the loss of resistance with air technique. On the first attempt the epidural space was entered, but contrast injection showed that the needle was intravenous. On the second attempt an equivocal loss of resistance with air was perceived and 5 mL of air was lost from the syringe. The needle was withdrawn and redirected, and upon the third needle passage the contrast injection showed appropriate epidural space filling up to the C4-5 level. Injection of betamethasone mixed in lidocaine was initially uneventful.However, 20 minutes post-injection the patient experienced sudden sharp and continuous pain along the medial edge of the scapula. After failing to respond to multiple intravascular analgesics, the patient was transferred to the emergency room. Her pain subsided completely following an intravenous diazepam injection. Cervical spine computerized tomography showed obvious air in the posterior epidural space from C4-5 to C6-7 as well as outside the spinal canal from (C4-T2). Having recovered fully, she was discharged the following morning. In reviewing the procedure, the equivocal loss of resistance on the second passage was actually a true loss of resistance to epidural space and air was unintentionally injected. Surprisingly, severe scapular pain resulted in a delayed manner after the steroid solution was injected. The authors theorize that unintentional prefilling of the epidural space with air prior to the injection of the subsequent steroid mixture added sufficient pressure to the epidural space to cause right-sided C4 nerve root stretching/entrapment and ensuing radicular pain to the right scapular border. The subsequent intravenous diazepam provided cervical muscle relaxation and

  6. Human skin flora as a potential source of epidural abscess.

    PubMed

    Sato, S; Sakuragi, T; Dan, K

    1996-12-01

    The mechanism of epidural infection associated with epidural block is not clearly understood. Resident organisms in skin specimens were studied after skin was prepared with disinfectants. Sixty-nine paired skin specimens were excised at incisional sites after skin disinfection with 10% povidone-iodine (10% PVP-I) or 0.5% chlorhexidine in 80% ethanol (0.5% CHE) from 60 patients having back surgery. One of the specimen pairs was placed in 10 ml brain-heart infusion broth and incubated in air at 37 degrees C for 96 h. The other specimen was sectioned at 3 microns and prepared with Gram's stain for examination with the microscope. Thirteen gram-positive staphylococcal species (Staphylococcus epidermidis, 69.2%; S. hyicus, 15.4%; and S. capitis, 15.4%) were isolated from cultures. The isolates were found in a significantly greater proportion of the skin specimens disinfected with 10% PVP-I than in those disinfected with 0.5% CHE (11 of 34 cultures [32.4%] vs. 2 of 35 cultures [5.7%]; P < 0.01). Many gram-positive cocci were observed with the microscope in 4 (11.8%) and 5 (14.3%) of 34 and 35 skin specimens disinfected with 10% PVP-I and 0.5% CHE, respectively. The cocci formed a dense colony in each follicle and in the stratum corneum. No organism was present in any of 17,584 sweat glands examined. In a large proportion of patients, isolation of viable organisms from excised skin specimens after disinfection with 10% PVP-I suggests that contamination of the epidural space by the skin flora may be a potential mechanism of epidural infection associated with epidural block.

  7. Cervical abscess and pharyngeal fistula in a horse.

    PubMed

    Scott, E A

    1975-04-15

    A weanling Quarter Horse filly developed ventral swelling of the lower cervical area after difficult passage of a stomach tube for deworming. Intermittent bilateral nasal discharge developed. Radiography revealed fluid and gas density dorsal to the trachea and esophagus. Surgical incision with drainage and debridement of the abscess and fistulous tract, facilitated by use of drains, led to complete recovery. Contrast medium injected after surgery demonstrated a communication between the abscess and the pharyngeal region.

  8. Spinal epidural abscess: common symptoms of an emergency condition. A case report.

    PubMed

    Rosc-Bereza, K; Arkuszewski, M; Ciach-Wysocka, E; Boczarska-Jedynak, M

    2013-08-01

    Spinal epidural abscess (SEA) is a severe pyogenic infection of the epidural space that leads to devastating neurological deficits and may be fatal. SEA is usually located in the thoracic and lumbar parts of the vertebral column and injures the spine by direct compression or local ischemia. Spinal injury may be prevented if surgical and medical interventions are implemented early. The diagnosis is difficult, because clinical symptoms are not specific and can mimic many benign conditions. The classical triad of symptoms includes back pain, fever and neurological deterioration. The gold standard in the diagnostic evaluation is magnetic resonance imaging with gadolinium enhancement, which determines the location and extent of the abscess. Increased awareness of the disease is essential for rapid recognition and immediate implementation of treatment. Here we describe the case of a 26-year-old woman with SEA with fever, back pain in the thoracic region and delayed symptoms of a transverse spinal cord injury.

  9. Incidence of intravascular penetration in transforaminal cervical epidural steroid injections.

    PubMed

    Furman, Michael B; Giovanniello, Michael T; O'Brien, Erin M

    2003-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN A prospective, observational, human, study was conducted. OBJECTIVES To evaluate the incidence of vascular penetration during fluoroscopically guided, contrast-enhanced transforaminal cervical epidural steroid injections, and to determine whether the observation of blood in the needle hub can be used to predict a vascular injection. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA Incorrectly placed intravascular cervical spinal injections result in medication flow systemically and not to the desired target. A recently published study demonstrates a high incidence of intravascular injections in transforaminal lumbosacral epidural injections. No studies so far have evaluated the incidence of vascular injections in transforaminal cervical epidural steroid injections, nor have they calculated the ability of observed blood in the needle hub to predict a vascular injection in the cervical spine.METHODS The incidence of fluoroscopically confirmed intravascular uptake of contrast was prospectively observed in 337 patients treated with cervical transforaminal epidural steroid injections. The ability of observed blood in the needle hub to predict intravascular injection was also investigated. For each subject, the injection level was chosen on the basis of the clinical scenario including history, physical examination, and review of imaging studies. Some patients had multilevel injections. Using fluoroscopic guidance, the authors placed a 25-gauge needle into the epidural space using a transforaminal approach according to accepted standard technique. Needle tip location was confirmed with biplanar imaging. The presence or absence of blood in the needle hub spontaneously ("flash") and after attempted aspiration by pulling back on the syringe's plunger was documented. Contrast then was injected under real-time fluoroscopy to determine whether the location of the needle tip was intravascular. The results were recorded in a prospective manner indicating the presence or absence of blood

  10. Errors in Diagnosis of Spinal Epidural Abscesses in the Era of Electronic Health Records.

    PubMed

    Bhise, Viraj; Meyer, Ashley N D; Singh, Hardeep; Wei, Li; Russo, Elise; Al-Mutairi, Aymer; Murphy, Daniel R

    2017-08-01

    With this study, we set out to identify missed opportunities in diagnosis of spinal epidural abscesses to outline areas for process improvement. Using a large national clinical data repository, we identified all patients with a new diagnosis of spinal epidural abscess in the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) during 2013. Two physicians independently conducted retrospective chart reviews on 250 randomly selected patients and evaluated their records for red flags (eg, unexplained weight loss, neurological deficits, and fever) 90 days prior to diagnosis. Diagnostic errors were defined as missed opportunities to evaluate red flags in a timely or appropriate manner. Reviewers gathered information about process breakdowns related to patient factors, the patient-provider encounter, test performance and interpretation, test follow-up and tracking, and the referral process. Reviewers also determined harm and time lag between red flags and definitive diagnoses. Of 250 patients, 119 had a new diagnosis of spinal epidural abscess, 66 (55.5%) of which experienced diagnostic error. Median time to diagnosis in error cases was 12 days, compared with 4 days in cases without error (P <.01). Red flags that were frequently not evaluated in error cases included unexplained fever (n = 57; 86.4%), focal neurological deficits with progressive or disabling symptoms (n = 54; 81.8%), and active infection (n = 54; 81.8%). Most errors involved breakdowns during the patient-provider encounter (n = 60; 90.1%), including failures in information gathering/integration, and were associated with temporary harm (n = 43; 65.2%). Despite wide availability of clinical data, errors in diagnosis of spinal epidural abscesses are common and involve inadequate history, physical examination, and test ordering. Solutions should include renewed attention to basic clinical skills. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. Spinal epidural abscess associated with infliximab treatment for psoriatic arthritis. Case report.

    PubMed

    Smith, Adam P; Musacchio, Michael J; O'Toole, John E

    2008-09-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-alpha inhibitors are used to treat numerous chronic inflammatory and rheumatological diseases, such as Crohn disease, rheumatoid arthritis, and psoriatic arthritis. Because the mechanism of these inhibitors is to decrease the body's inflammatory response, the primary complication of treatment is infection. The authors present the first case of a spinal epidural abscess in a patient receiving long-term infliximab therapy for severe psoriatic arthritis. Infliximab and its side-effect profile are discussed, along with other associated complications.

  12. Tubercular Spinal Epidural Abscess of the Lumbosacral Region without Osseous Involvement: Comparison of Spinal MRI and Pathological Findings of the Resected Tissue.

    PubMed

    Zhang, QingLong; Koga, Hisashi

    2016-01-01

    We herein present a case of tubercular spinal epidural abscess (SEA) without osseous involvement that mimicked an acute bacterial abscess. This case manifested quite unusual findings not only radiographically, but also clinically compared with previously reported cases of tubercular SEA.

  13. Spinal cord abscess

    MedlinePlus

    ... abscess usually occurs as a complication of an epidural abscess . Pus forms as a collection of: Destroyed tissue ... bone ( osteomyelitis ). The bone infection may cause an epidural abscess to form. This abscess gets larger and presses ...

  14. Two-tuohy needle and catheter technique for fluoroscopically guided percutaneous drainage of spinal epidural abscess: a case report.

    PubMed

    Perez-Toro, Marco R; Burton, Allen W; Hamid, Basem; Koyyalagunta, Dhanalakshmi

    2009-04-01

    The incidence of spinal epidural abscess has increased in the past decades. Traditionally, management was based on surgical decompression. More recent studies have shown conservative management has successful outcomes in selected patients. We present a case, in which an elderly woman presented with new onset radicular pain and mild leukocytosis more than a week after a complicated revision of an intrathecal catheter in place for management of chronic axial low back pain. Magentic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed a posterior epidural abscess from T12 to L2. Two Touhy needles were placed in the epidural space with fluoroscopic guidance for drainage of the abscess. A catheter was then advanced into the epidural space for irrigation with saline and an antibiotic solution. Intravenous antibiotics were continued for a total of 6 weeks. Radicular pain resolved immediately post-procedure. Serial MRIs also showed decreasing size of the abscess. Posterior spinal epidural abscesses may be successfully treated by way of the two Touhy needle and catheter technique for drainage and irrigation. This procedure should be reserved for patients that present with no neurological deficits or deemed nonsurgical candidates. Patients should continue on prolonged intravenous antibiotics and be monitored closely for clinical deterioration and undergo serial follow-up MRIs.

  15. Vertebral Osteomyelitis and Spinal Epidural Abscess: An Evidence-based Review.

    PubMed

    Boody, Barrett S; Jenkins, Tyler J; Maslak, Joseph; Hsu, Wellington K; Patel, Alpesh A

    2015-07-01

    Spinal infections have historically been associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Current treatment protocols have improved patient outcomes through prompt and accurate infection identification, medical treatment, and surgical interventions. Medical and surgical management, however, remains controversial because of a paucity of high-level evidence to guide decision making. Despite this, an awareness of presenting symptoms, pertinent risk factors, and common imaging findings are critical for treating spine infections. The purpose of this article is to review the recent literature and present the latest evidence-based recommendations for the most commonly encountered primary spinal infections: vertebral osteomyelitis and epidural abscess.

  16. Salmonella Enterica Serotype Enteritidis Vertebral Osteomyelitis and Epidural Abscess Complicated with Meningitis.

    PubMed

    Oki, Masayuki; Ueda, Akihiro; Tsuda, Ayumi; Yanagi, Hidetaka; Ozawa, Hideki; Takagi, Atsushi

    2016-09-20

    Infection with non-typhoidal Salmonella often results in a self-limited acute gastroenteritis. Extra-intestinal Salmonella infection is relatively rare and occurs predominantly in infants and adults with significant underlying conditions. We describe a 54-year-old Japanese man with a history of heavy alcohol consumption and daily contact with a dog, who developed bacteremia complicated by vertebral osteomyelitis, spinal epidural abscess, and meningitis, due to Salmonella enterica serotype Enteritidis. This case suggests that Salmonella should be considered as an etiologic pathogen in adult patients with perivertebral infection or meningitis.

  17. Nosocomial spondylodiskitis with epidural abscess and CSF fistula cured with quinupristin/dalfopristin and linezolid.

    PubMed

    Marroni, M; Tinca, M; Belfiori, B; Altobelli, G; Malincarne, L; Papili, R; Stagni, G

    2006-06-01

    Nosocomial infections after spinal surgery are relatively uncommon but potentially serious. The goal of diagnostic evaluation is to determine the extent of infection and identify the microorganism involved. Neuroimaging provides accurate information on correct topography, localization and propagation of the infection. Microbiological data are able to give aetiological causes. In this patient with severe, chronic polymicrobial spine infection with epidural abscess and CSF fistula due to multidrug-resistant organisms, the cure was achieved with long-term antimicrobial specific therapy with quinupristin-dalfopristin (50 days) and linezolid (100 days) with mild side effects. This positive result was due to combined medical and surgical treatment.

  18. Disseminated Cunninghamella bertholletiae infection with spinal epidural abscess in a kidney transplant patient: case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Navanukroh, O; Jitmuang, A; Chayakulkeeree, M; Ngamskulrungroj, P

    2014-08-01

    Cunninghamella bertholletiae is a rare cause of invasive mucormycosis. We report the case of a 42-year-old Thai woman who suffered from disseminated C. bertholletiae infection. The patient developed dry cough, sharp shooting pain in the left buttock referred to the left leg, and fever 1 month after undergoing deceased-donor kidney transplantation. Radiographic studies exhibited multiple pulmonary cavities, osteomyelitis of the sacral spine, epidural abscess along the lumbrosacral spine, and paravertebral soft tissue involvement. Surgical debridement of the epidural abscess concurrent with prolonged intravenous administration of amphotericin B resulted in a good outcome.

  19. Atypical presentation of osteomyelitis, discitis, epidural, and iliopsoas abscess in diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis (DISH) syndrome.

    PubMed

    Fish, David E; Middleton, Kimberley; Gluzman, Arie

    2008-11-01

    Spine infections are infrequent but important sources of back pain, posing significant risk of neurological sequelae. Risk factors include diabetes, recent trauma or instrumentation, and infection. Pathogens include Staphylococcus aureus and beta-hemolytic Streptococcus. A 67-yr-old man presented with lower back and hip pain of 2-mo duration without fever. Initial treatment and work-up revealed diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis. The patient did not improve with conservative care, and neurologic decline was recognized. Magnetic resonance imaging identified osteomyelitis, discitis, and epidural abscesses at the L4-L5 levels. Escherichia coli was identified, and antibiotic treatment with CT-guided drainage precluded the need for surgery. Spine infections and iliopsoas abscesses are conditions that can result in serious disability. Awareness of unusual diagnoses and atypical pain presentations in patients with chronic spine pathology, such as diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis syndrome, is important to recognize early to minimize neurological sequelae.

  20. Posterior Epidural Migration of Sequestrated Cervical Disc Fragment: Case Series

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Gopalan Senthil; Mahesha, Kanthila Bhat

    2011-01-01

    Study Design A retrospective study was undertaken to delineate the characteristics of non-traumatic sequestrated epidurally migrated cervical disc prolapse. Purpose To present first case series of eight such cases diagnosed preoperatively and to discuss their magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) characteristics and their management. Overview of Literature Non-traumatic spontaneous migration of the sequestrated disc fragment epidurally behind cervical vertebral body is rare. Only ten cases have been reported in literature. Methods Detailed clinico-radiological profiles of these 8 cases are presented. In six cases their clinical picture was suggestive of cervical myelopathy. MRI scan showed single level epidural migrated disc behind body of C4, C6, and C7 in six patients and two cases with multiple levels (C5-C6). In six cases, anterior corpectomy with excision of the disc was performed and the seventh patient underwent dorsal laminectomy. The eighth patient chose not to undergo surgery. Results T1 images of the MRI scan showed an isointense signal in all the 8 cases. T2 images revealed a varying intensity. In six cases who underwent anterior corpectomy, there was a rent in the posterior longitudinal ligament. Among those in two cases multiple disc fragments were seen. In the rest four cases, a single large fragment was observed. These patients improved after anterior corpectomy and disc excision. There was no improvement in the patient who had undergone dorsal laminectomy. The eighth patient who refused surgery progressively deteriorated. Conclusions We opine that MRI scan especially T1 images are useful in these cases. We prefer to treat these cases through anterior corpectomy with excision of the sequestrated disc which proved to result in excellent outcome. PMID:22164316

  1. Posterior epidural migration of sequestrated cervical disc fragment: case series.

    PubMed

    Srinivasan, Uddanapalli Sreeramulu; Kumar, Gopalan Senthil; Mahesha, Kanthila Bhat

    2011-12-01

    A retrospective study was undertaken to delineate the characteristics of non-traumatic sequestrated epidurally migrated cervical disc prolapse. To present first case series of eight such cases diagnosed preoperatively and to discuss their magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) characteristics and their management. Non-traumatic spontaneous migration of the sequestrated disc fragment epidurally behind cervical vertebral body is rare. Only ten cases have been reported in literature. Detailed clinico-radiological profiles of these 8 cases are presented. In six cases their clinical picture was suggestive of cervical myelopathy. MRI scan showed single level epidural migrated disc behind body of C4, C6, and C7 in six patients and two cases with multiple levels (C5-C6). In six cases, anterior corpectomy with excision of the disc was performed and the seventh patient underwent dorsal laminectomy. The eighth patient chose not to undergo surgery. T1 images of the MRI scan showed an isointense signal in all the 8 cases. T2 images revealed a varying intensity. In six cases who underwent anterior corpectomy, there was a rent in the posterior longitudinal ligament. Among those in two cases multiple disc fragments were seen. In the rest four cases, a single large fragment was observed. These patients improved after anterior corpectomy and disc excision. There was no improvement in the patient who had undergone dorsal laminectomy. The eighth patient who refused surgery progressively deteriorated. We opine that MRI scan especially T1 images are useful in these cases. We prefer to treat these cases through anterior corpectomy with excision of the sequestrated disc which proved to result in excellent outcome.

  2. Brain Abscess After Halo Fixation for the Cervical Spine.

    PubMed

    Lopes, Arthur; Andrade, Almir; Silva, Igor; Paiva, Wellingson; Brock, Roger; Teixeira, Manoel

    2017-08-01

    Halo fixation is one of the possible treatments for cervical spine fractures. However, improper use of these devices may lead to many complications, such as pin loosening, halo dislocation, pin site infection, and intradural penetration. We report the case of a 43-year-old man who first presented with a seizure and an altered level of consciousness 5 months after halo-vest placement for an odontoid fracture. Brain imaging showed a brain abscess, under the previous left parietal pin. The patient underwent abscess drainage and antibiotics were administered for 12 weeks. On hospital discharge, he presented with only mild impairments. Misapplication of halo fixation devices may lead to serious complications, including intracranial pin penetration and brain abscesses. Proper use of the recommended technique may decrease the risk for complications related to the procedure. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Proteus penneri isolated from the pus of a patient with epidural abscess.

    PubMed

    Li, Z; Wang, X; Bian, Z; Li, S; Zheng, H; Zhao, B; Chen, J

    1992-02-01

    P. mirabilis and P. vulgaris are the two wellknown species in the genus Proteus. P. myxofaciens and P. penneri are recent additions to the genus. We isolated P. penneri from the pus of a patient with suppurative otitis media and an epidural abscess. The characteristics of the organism, including morphology, staining, physiology and biochemistry, were studied. Clinical microbiological laboratories should suspect P. penneri in the case of as Proteus strain that is negative for indole, salicin and esculin, but otherwise resembles P. vulgaris. Proteus penneri, formerly known as Proteus vulgaris indole-negative or as Proteus vulgaris biogroup 1, was named by Hickman et al in 1932. Little information about human infection by this organism is available. In 1982, Hickman and co-workers studied 20 strain of P. penneri which were isolated from clinical specimens (urine, stool, etc.) in the USA. However, its clinical significance, until recently, was unknown. We isolated a strain of P. penneri from the pus of a patient with suppurative otitis media and an epidural abscess on June 10 and 15, 1989. This paper concerns the problems encountered in identifying this organism and its clinical significance.

  4. Paraplegia following cervical epidural catheterization using loss of resistance technique with air: a case report.

    PubMed

    Chae, Yun Jeong; Han, Kyung Ream; Park, Hyung Bae; Kim, Chan; Nam, Si Gweon

    2016-02-01

    We report a case of paraplegia without neurologic deficit of upper extremities following cervical epidural catheterization using air during the loss of resistance technique. A 41-year-old woman diagnosed with complex regional pain syndrome had upper and lower extremity pain. A thoracic epidural lead was inserted for a trial spinal cord stimulation for treating lower extremity pain and cervical epidural catheterization was performed for treating upper extremity pain. Rapidly progressive paraplegia developed six hours after cervical epidural catheterization. Spine CT revealed air entrapment in multiple thoracic intervertebral foraminal spaces and surrounding epidural space without obvious spinal cord compression before the decompressive operation, which disappeared one day after the decompressive operation. Her paraplegia symptoms were normalized immediately after the operation. The presumed cause of paraplegia was transient interruption of blood supply to the spinal cord through the segmental radiculomedullary arteries feeding the spinal cord at the thoracic level of the intervertebral foramen caused by the air.

  5. Medical and surgical management of spinal epidural abscess: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Arko, Leopold; Quach, Eric; Nguyen, Vincent; Chang, Daniel; Sukul, Vishad; Kim, Bong-Soo

    2014-08-01

    Spinal epidural abscess (SEA) is a rare condition that has previously been treated with urgent surgical decompression and antibiotics. Recent availability of MRI makes early diagnosis possible and allows for the nonoperative treatment of SEA in select patients. The first retrospective review of medically and surgically managed SEA was published in 1999, and since that time several other retrospective institutional reports have been published. This study reviews these published reports and compares pooled data with historical treatment data. A PubMed keyword and Boolean search using ("spinal epidural abscess" OR "spinal epidural abscesses" AND [management OR treatment]) returned 429 results. Filters for the English language and publications after 1999 were applied, as the first study comparing operative and nonoperative management was published that year. Articles comparing operative to nonoperative treatment strategies for SEA were identified, and the references were further reviewed for additional articles. Studies involving at least 10 adult patients (older than 18 years) were included. Case reports, studies reporting either medical or surgical management only, studies not reporting indications for conservative management, or studies examining SEA as a result of a specific pathogen were excluded. Twelve articles directly comparing surgical to nonsurgical management of SEA were obtained. These articles reported on a total of 1099 patients. The average age of treated patients was 57.24 years, and 62.5% of treated patients were male. The most common pathogens found in blood and wound cultures were Staphylococcus aureus (63.6%) and Streptococcus species (6.8%). The initial treatment was surgery in 59.7% of cases and medical therapy in 40.3%. This represented a significant increase in the proportion of medically managed patients in comparison with the historical control prior to 1999 (p < 0.05). Patients with no neurological deficits were significantly more likely to

  6. Management of Chronic Pain of Cervical Disc Herniation and Radiculitis with Fluoroscopic Cervical Interlaminar Epidural Injections

    PubMed Central

    Manchikanti, Laxmaiah; Cash, Kimberly A.; Pampati, Vidyasagar; Wargo, Bradley W.; Malla, Yogesh

    2012-01-01

    Study Design: A randomized, double-blind, active controlled trial. Objective: To evaluate the effectiveness of cervical interlaminar epidural injections of local anesthetic with or without steroids in the management of chronic neck pain and upper extremity pain in patients with disc herniation and radiculitis. Summary of Background Data: Epidural injections in managing chronic neck and upper extremity pain are commonly employed interventions. However, their long-term effectiveness, indications, and medical necessity, of their use and their role in various pathologies responsible for persistent neck and upper extremity pain continue to be debated, even though, neck and upper extremity pain secondary to disc herniation and radiculitis, is described as the common indication. There is also paucity of high quality literature. Methods: One-hundred twenty patients were randomly assigned to one of 2 groups: Group I patients received cervical interlaminar epidural injections of local anesthetic (lidocaine 0.5%, 5 mL); Group II patients received 0.5% lidocaine, 4 mL, mixed with 1 mL of nonparticulate betamethasone. Primary outcome measure was ≥ 50 improvement in pain and function. Outcome assessments included Numeric Rating Scale (NRS), Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), opioid intake, employment, and changes in weight. Results: Significant pain relief and functional status improvement (≥ 50%) was demonstrated in 72% of patients who received local anesthetic only and 68% who received local anesthetic and steroids. In the successful group of participants, significant improvement was illustrated in 77% in local anesthetic group and 82% in local anesthetic with steroid group. Conclusions: Cervical interlaminar epidural injections with or without steroids may provide significant improvement in pain and function for patients with cervical disc herniation and radiculitis. PMID:22859902

  7. Treatment of Spinal Epidural Abscess and Predisposing Factors of Motor Weakness: Experience with 48 Patients

    PubMed Central

    Ju, Min-Wook; Kwon, Hyon-Jo; Kim, Seon-Hwan; Koh, Hyeon-Song; Youm, Jin-Young; Song, Shi-Hun

    2015-01-01

    Objective Spinal epidural abscess (SEA) can be fatal if untreated, so early diagnosis and treatment are essential. We conducted a retrospective study to define its clinical features and evaluate the risk factors of motor weakness. Methods We retrospectively analyzed the medical records and images of patients with SEA who had been hospitalized in our institute from January 2005 to June 2012. Pyogenic SEA patients were categorized as patients without motor weakness (Group A) and with motor weakness (Group B). Abscess volume was measured using the Gamma-Plan program. Intervertebral foramen height and posterior disc height were measured to evaluate degree of spinal stenosis. Results Of 48 patients with pyogenic SEA, 33 (68%) were treated surgically, and 15 (32%) were treated with antibiotics. Eleven patients had weakness and abscess volume was unrelated to motor weakness. Old age, 'spare room' (abscess volume subtracted from spinal volume) and intervertebral foramen height and posterior disc height were statistically significant. Among the 48 patients, 43 (85%) had good outcome and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) was the only meaningful prognostic factor (p=0.014). The cut-off value of ESR was 112mm/h with 80% sensitivity and 79% specificity and had borderline significance (p=0.062). Conclusion SEA needs emergent diagnosis and treatment. Motor weakness is the most important factor in treatment decision. By careful image reading, early surgical treatment can be an option for selected patients with severe spinal stenosis for prevent motor weakness. Inflammatory markers, especially ESR, are valuable to identify worsening of SEA. PMID:26512265

  8. Spinal Epidural Abscess: A Review with Special Emphasis on Earlier Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Bond, Allison

    2016-01-01

    Spinal epidural abscess (SEA) is an uncommon but serious condition with significant morbidity and mortality. The prognosis of SEA is highly dependent on the timeliness of its diagnosis before neurological deficits develop. Unfortunately, often due to its nonspecific presentation, such as back pain, the diagnosis of SEA may be delayed in up to 75% of cases. Although many risk factors for SEA can be found in the published literature, their utility is limited by their frequent lack of objective evidence, numerousness, and absence in a significant proportion of cases. In this review, we call for a more discriminate evidence-based use of the term “risk factor” when discussing SEA and explore several approaches to its earlier diagnosis, including a simple algorithm based on its pathophysiology and serum C-reactive protein or erythrocyte sedimentation rate. PMID:28044125

  9. Klebsiella pneumoniae Spinal Epidural Abscess treated conservatively: case report and review.

    PubMed

    Araújo, Filipe; Ribeiro, Célia; Silva, Inês; Nero, Patrícia; Branco, Jaime C

    2012-01-01

    Spinal infections are rare but potentially life-threatening disorders. A high level of clinical suspicion is necessary for rapid diagnosis and treatment initiation. The treatment combines both antibiotics and surgical intervention in the vast majority of cases. The authors report the case of a 84-year old female patient with a three week history of persistent lumbar back pain radiating to both thighs following a lower respiratory tract infection. She had lumbar spine tenderness but no neurological compromise. Her inflammatory markers were elevated and lumbar spine magnetic resonance imaging revealed L4-L5 spondylodiscitis with spinal epidural abscess. Blood cultures isolated Klebsiella pneumoniae and, since she was neurologically stable, conservative treatment with two-week intravenous gentamicin and eight-week intravenous ceftriaxone was initiated with positive inpatient and outpatient evolution.

  10. Spinal Epidural Abscess: A Review with Special Emphasis on Earlier Diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Bond, Allison; Manian, Farrin A

    2016-01-01

    Spinal epidural abscess (SEA) is an uncommon but serious condition with significant morbidity and mortality. The prognosis of SEA is highly dependent on the timeliness of its diagnosis before neurological deficits develop. Unfortunately, often due to its nonspecific presentation, such as back pain, the diagnosis of SEA may be delayed in up to 75% of cases. Although many risk factors for SEA can be found in the published literature, their utility is limited by their frequent lack of objective evidence, numerousness, and absence in a significant proportion of cases. In this review, we call for a more discriminate evidence-based use of the term "risk factor" when discussing SEA and explore several approaches to its earlier diagnosis, including a simple algorithm based on its pathophysiology and serum C-reactive protein or erythrocyte sedimentation rate.

  11. Tubercular spinal epidural abscess involving the dorsal-lumbar-sacral region without osseous involvement.

    PubMed

    Arora, Sumit; Kumar, Ramesh

    2011-07-27

    Musculoskeletal tuberculosis is known for its ability to present in various forms and guises at different sites. Tubercular spinal epidural abscess (SEA) is an uncommon infectious entity. Its presence without associated osseous involvement may be considered an extremely rare scenario. We present a rare case of tubercular SEA in an immune-competent 35-year-old male patient. The patient presented with acute cauda equina syndrome and was shown to have multisegmental SEA extending from D5 to S2 vertebral level without any evidence of vertebral involvement on MRI. The patient made an uneventful recovery following surgical decompression and antitubercular chemotherapy. The diagnosis was confirmed by histopathological demonstration of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in drained pus. Such presentation of tubercular SEA has not been reported previously in the English language based medical literature to the best of our knowledge.

  12. Spinal epidural abscesses: risk factors, medical versus surgical management, a retrospective review of 128 cases.

    PubMed

    Patel, Amit R; Alton, Timothy B; Bransford, Richard J; Lee, Michael J; Bellabarba, Carlo B; Chapman, Jens R

    2014-02-01

    Spinal epidural abscess (SEA) is a rare, serious and increasingly frequent diagnosis. Ideal management (medical vs. surgical) remains controversial. The purpose of this study is to assess the impact of risk factors, organisms, location and extent of SEA on neurologic outcome after medical management or surgery in combination with medical management. Retrospective electronic medical record (EMR) review. We included 128 consecutive, spontaneous SEA from a single tertiary medical center, from January 2005 to September 11. There were 79 male and 49 female with a mean age of 52.9 years (range, 22-83). Patient demographics, presenting complaints, radiographic features, pre/post-treatment neurologic status (ASIA motor score [MS] 0-100), treatment (medical vs. surgical) and clinical follow-up were recorded. Neurologic status was determined before treatment and at last available clinical encounter. Imaging studies reviewed location/extent of pathology. Inclusion criteria were a diagnosis of a bacterial SEA based on radiographs and/or intraoperative findings, age greater than 18 years, and adequate EMR. Exclusion criteria were postinterventional infections, Pott's disease, isolated discitis/osteomyelitis, treatment initiated at an outside facility, and imaging suggestive of a SEA but negative intraoperative findings/cultures. The mean follow-up was 241 days. The presenting chief complaint was site-specific pain (100%), subjective fevers (50%), and weakness (47%). In this cohort, 54.7% had lumbar, 39.1% thoracic, 35.9% cervical, and 23.4% sacral involvement spanning an average of 3.85 disc levels. There were 36% ventral, 41% dorsal, and 23% circumferential infections. Risk factors included a history of IV drug abuse (39.1%), diabetes mellitus (21.9%), and no risk factors (22.7%). Pathogens were methicillin-sensitive Staphylococcus aureus (40%) and methicillin-resistance S aureus (30%). Location, SEA extent, and pathogen did not impact MS recovery. Fifty-one patients were

  13. Knotting of a Cervical Epidural Catheter in the Patient with Post-Herpetic Neuralgia: A Rare Complication

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jong Taek; Cho, Dong Woo; Lee, Young Bok

    2017-01-01

    Epidural block is achieved either by single injection of local anesthetic through an epidural needle or as a continuous block by infusion pump through an epidural catheter. Complications associated with epidural catheters include breakage, entrapment, and knotting. Knotting of epidural catheters is very rare, but knotting in lumbar epidural catheters has been reported in a number of studies, and most of these cases involved removal difficulty. We report a case in which we inserted a cervical epidural catheter in a patient who was experiencing severe post-herpetic neuralgia and then removed the knotted catheter without complications. PMID:28261560

  14. Cervical spontaneous epidural hematoma as a complication of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Mastronardi, L; Carletti, S; Frondizi, D; Spera, C; Maira, G

    1996-01-01

    Epidural hematoma is a rare cause of spinal cord compression, which usually provokes severe neurological deficits. It is presumed to originate from venous or, more probably, arterial bleeding. Thrombocytopenia and other disorders of coagulation may precipitate the onset of epidural hematoma and facilitate the evolution of the disease. We report the case of a patient suffering from a non-Hodgkin's lymphoma with severe thrombocytopenia during a MACOP-B schedule, who presented with a spontaneous cervical epidural hematoma. We discuss the etiopathological aspects, diagnosis, and treatment of this rare cause of acute cervical spinal cord compression.

  15. Primary pyogenic spinal epidural abscess: How late is too late and how bad is too bad? - A study on surgical outcome after delayed presentation.

    PubMed

    Avanali, Raghunath; Ranjan, Manish; Ramachandran, Sudheesh; Devi, Bhagavatula I; Narayanan, Vinayak

    2016-01-01

    Spinal epidural abscess is a rare clinical entity with considerable morbidity. Even with prompt diagnosis and treatment, many patients are left with persistent residual neurological deficits. The present study details the outcome in 23 patients of primary pyogenic spinal epidural abscess, addressing the outcome following late presentation at a neurological facility. At presentation only 2 patients had relatively preserved neurological status. Eleven patients were paraplegic. All the patients underwent laminectomy and evacuation of abscess. A good functional outcome was observed in almost half of the patients, and there was a significant reduction in the number of the patients with severe disability. Factors influencing the outcome are described in this study.

  16. [Iatrogenic cervical epidural hematoma: case report and review of the literature].

    PubMed

    Jusué-Torres, I; Ortega-Zufiria, J M; Tamarit-Degenhardt, M; Navarro Torres, R; López-Serrano, R; Riqué-Dormido, J; Aragonés-Cabrerizo, P; Gómez-Angulo, J C; Poveda-Nuñez, P; Jerez-Fernández, P; Del Pozo-García, J M

    2011-08-01

    Around 600 spinal epidural hematoma cases have been previously reported. Incidence of paraplegia after epidural anesthesia varies between 0,0005 and 0,02%. Several possible etiologies have been described in the literature, including surgery, trauma, anticoagulant therapy, arteriovenous malformations, pregnancy and lumbar puncture. Spinal and epidural anesthesic procedures represent the tenth most common cause. But in combination with anticoagulant therapy, the forementioned procedures increase its incidence until reaching the fifth most common etiological group. We report the case of an 80 year-old-man with a cervical epidural hematoma who had a good outcome with conservative management. 80 year-old-man that developed intense cervicalgia with lower limbs weakness showing complete paraplegia and arreflexia 2 hours after analgesic treatment with epidural cervical infiltration for cervicoartrosis. Cervical MRI showed epidural cervical hematoma between C4 and T1 levels. The patient is transferred to our facilities in order to perform surgery. But after showing fast recovery, medical conservative management was elected. After one month, the patient's condition has improved showing no neurological deficits and complete resorption is seen in MRI. Nowadays, trend is to perform surgery in patients with spinal hematoma and significant neurological deterioration during the first hours. However, good neurological outcomes can be achieved with conservative management, in well selected patients with non progressive, incomplete and partial deficits. Presently, we can not predict which is the best treatment for each case.

  17. Abscess

    MedlinePlus

    An abscess is a pocket of pus. You can get an abscess almost anywhere in your body. When an area ... parasites and swallowed objects can all lead to abscesses. Skin abscesses are easy to detect. They are ...

  18. Abscess

    MedlinePlus

    ... Loss Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Abscess KidsHealth > For Teens > Abscess A A A What's ... and suddenly it's Pus City. What Is an Abscess? An abscess is an area of infected tissue ...

  19. Spinal epidural abscess with a rapid course in young healthy infantry recruits with multiple skin lacerations.

    PubMed

    Honig, Asaf; Or, Omer; Barzilay, Yair; Fraifeld, Shifra; Pikkel, Yoav Y; Eliahou, Ruth; Cohen, José E; Itshayek, Eyal

    2016-09-01

    In recent years, there has been high prevalence of Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) infection among soldiers in the Israeli military, with devastating sequelae in several cases. Emergency department physicians have developed a high level of suspicion for spinal epidural abscess (SEA) in patients presenting known risk factors; however, SEA is a particularly elusive diagnosis in young healthy adults with no history of drug abuse. We review three cases of SEA secondary to methicillin-sensitive S. aureus (MSSA) infection in young healthy soldiers without known risk factors. We retrospectively reviewed clinical files of soldiers treated at our Medical Center from 2004-2015 to identify patients diagnosed with SEA. Those aged less than 30years with no history of intravenous drug use, spine surgery or spine trauma were included in the study. Three young army recruits met the inclusion criteria. These young men developed SEA through extension of MSSA infection to proximal skin and soft tissue from impetigo secondary to skin scratches sustained during "basic" training. All presented with mild nuchal rigidity and severe persistent unremitting lancinating radicular pain. Although healthy at baseline, they had a severe, rapidly progressive course. Following urgent surgery, two patients recovered after rehabilitation; one remained with paraparesis at late follow-up. Neurological deficits and systemic evidence of S. aureus infection progressed rapidly in these young healthy SEA patients with no history of drug abuse, emphasizing the critical role of timely MRI, diagnosis, and surgery. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Spinal epidural abscess in hemodialysis patients: a case series and review.

    PubMed

    Wong, San S; Daka, Smitha; Pastewski, Andrew; Kyaw, Win; Chapnick, Edward; Sepkowitz, Douglas

    2011-06-01

    Spinal epidural abscess (SEA) is a rare but potentially devastating condition. We noticed an increase in the number of cases of SEA, with the majority in hemodialysis (HD) patients. This prompted a retrospective chart review of all cases of SEA admitted from 2000 to 2005 and a literature search of similar cases. We identified 19 SEA cases treated at Long Island College Hospital during this 6-year period, of which six were on HD: four were dialyzed via catheter, one via arteriovenous fistula, and in one the method of dialysis was not documented. Four patients had bacteremia with Staphylococcus aureus. Four patients presented with paresis or paralysis; only one improved. The mortality rate was 33% (2/6). We found 30 other cases of SEA in patients on HD from the literature. These 36 HD cases were compared with 85 SEA cases that were not on HD (13 from our study and 72 described in two large case series). The mortality rate was noted to be much higher in HD patients (23% [6/26] versus 7% [6/85]). Neurologic deficit at presentation was noted in 47% (17/36) of HD patients versus 69% (59/85) of non-HD patients, but neurologic improvement was higher in non-HD patients (71% [42/59] versus 29% [5/17]). This is the largest literature review of SEA in patients on HD. When compared with non-HD patients, HD patients had a higher mortality rate and were less likely to improve neurologically.

  1. Spinal epidural abscess: aetiology, predisponent factors and clinical outcomes in a 4-year prospective study.

    PubMed

    Zimmerer, Stephan M E; Conen, Anna; Müller, Andreas A; Sailer, Martin; Taub, Ethan; Flückiger, Ursula; Schwenzer-Zimmerer, Katja C

    2011-12-01

    Spinal epidural abscess (SEA) is a rare, but serious, condition with multiple causes. We prospectively studied the aetiology, predisposing factors, and clinical outcomes of SEA in all patients with SEA treated in our hospital's neurosurgical service from 2004 to 2008. For each patient, we recorded the medical history, comorbidities, focus of infection, pathogen(s), and outcome. The 36 patients (19 women and 17 men) ranged in age from 34 to 80 years old (mean 57; median 56). The SEA was primary (i.e., due to haematogenous spread) in 16 patients (44%); it was secondary to elective spinal procedures, either injections or surgery, in 20 patients (56%). The duration of follow-up was 12-60 months (mean 36; median 37.5). The most common pathogen, Staphylococcus aureus, was found in 18 patients (50%). Patients with primary SEA had different underlying diseases and a wider range of pathogens than those with secondary SEA. Only five patients (14%) had no major comorbidity; 16 of the 20 patients with secondary SEA (44% of the overall group) had undergone spinal surgery before developing the SEA; the treatment of the SEA involved multiple surgical operations in all 16 of these patients, and spinal instrumentation in 5 (14%); 22 patients (61% of the overall group) recovered fully.

  2. Pediatric spinal epidural abscess: a 9-year institutional review and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Hawkins, Melody; Bolton, Michael

    2013-12-01

    Spinal epidural abscess (SEA) is a rare condition that requires prompt diagnosis and initiation of treatment for optimal outcome. Treatment generally consists of surgical intervention and systemic antibiotics. We present 1 of the largest cohorts of nontuberculous pediatric SEA in the English literature, emphasizing the outcomes of conservative (ie, nonoperative) management. We retrospectively identified 9 pediatric patients (≤18 years of age) with SEAs at Our Lady of the Lake Children's Hospital from 2002 to 2011. Cases were reviewed for demographic, clinical, diagnostic, and treatment characteristics and outcomes. The diagnosis of SEA was made by MRI in all cases, and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) was the only identified pathogen, isolated via blood culture in 6 of 9 patients. Although every patient received systemic antibiotics, only 2 had neurosurgical intervention. Four of the 7 patients treated conservatively received computed tomography-guided needle drainage. All patients recovered without significant sequelae. SEA is a potentially fatal illness that necessitates a heightened clinical awareness for diagnosis and treatment. Although official recommendations regarding management in pediatrics are lacking, treatment has generally been surgical decompression and drainage in combination with antibiotics; recent reports have suggested that antibiotic therapy alone may be successful in select patient populations. Although the adult literature has suggested that such management can be trialed in specific situations, only a handful of cases in the pediatric literature have reported this nonoperative approach. We present one of the largest reviews in support of successfully treating SEA with nonsurgical therapy.

  3. First confirmed case of spondylodiscitis with epidural abscess caused by Parvimonas micra.

    PubMed

    Endo, Shiro; Nemoto, Tadanobu; Yano, Hisakazu; Kakuta, Risako; Kanamori, Hajime; Inomata, Shinya; Ishibashi, Noriomi; Aoyagi, Tetsuji; Hatta, Masumitsu; Gu, Yoshiaki; Kitagawa, Miho; Kaku, Mitsuo

    2015-11-01

    Parvimonas micra was renamed species as within Gram-positive anaerobic cocci and rarely causes severe infections in healthy people. We report the first confirmed case of spondylodiscitis with epidural abscess caused by P. micra in a healthy women. The patient has a pain in low back and anterior left thigh. Magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography detected the affected lesion at the L2 and L3 vertebral bodies. All isolates from the surgical and needle biopsy specimens were identified as P. micra by 16S rRNA and MALDI-TOF. In this case, P. micra showed high sensitivity to antimicrobial therapy. She was successfully treated with debridement and sulbactam/ampicillin, followed by oral metronidazole for a total of 10 weeks. The causative microorganisms of spondylodiscitis are not often identified, especially anaerobic bacteria tend to be underestimated. On the other hand, antimicrobial therapy for spondylodiscitis is usually prolonged. Accordingly, we emphasize the importance of performing accurate identification including anaerobic bacteria.

  4. Low yield of ED magnetic resonance imaging for suspected epidural abscess.

    PubMed

    El Sayed, Mazen; Witting, Michael D

    2011-11-01

    The aim of this study was to estimate the yield of emergency department (ED) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in detecting spinal epidural abscess (SEA) and to identify clinical factors predicting positive MRI results. We examined a cohort of patients who underwent MRI to rule out SEA, followed by a nested case-control comparison of those with positive results and a sample with negative results. A positive result was defined as osteomyelitis, discitis, or SEA. Predictor variables included temperature, presenting complaint, drug abuse status, history of SEA or back surgery, midline back tenderness, neurologic deficit, MRI level, mean white blood cell count, erythrocyte sedimentation rate, and C-reactive protein level. Fourteen of the 120 available MRIs were excluded; 7 (6.6%) of the remaining 106 were positive. Temperature was 1.1°C higher in cases than controls (95% CI, 0.6-1.7). Emergency department MRI for suspected SEA has a low yield. Clinical guidelines are needed to improve efficiency. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Doxorubicin-induced dilated cardiomyopathy for modified radical mastectomy: A case managed under cervical epidural anaesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Anuj; Kishore, Kamal

    2013-01-01

    Doxorubicin (Dox) is an antineoplastic agent used in a wide variety of malignancies. Its use is limited because of a cumulative, dose-dependent irreversible cardiomyopathy. We report a case of Dox induced cardiomyopathy, posted for modified radical mastectomy. The patient had poor LV function along with moderate pulmonary hypertension. Regional anaesthesia was planned as the risk associated with general anaesthesia was more. A cervical epidural was placed and a block adequate for surgery could be achived. The haemodynamic parameters as measured by esophageal doppler showed a stable trend. The surgery could be managed well under cervical epidural and also provided a good postoperative pain relief. PMID:23825820

  6. What are we waiting for? An argument for early surgery for spinal epidural abscesses

    PubMed Central

    Epstein, Nancy E.

    2015-01-01

    Background: In the article: Timing and prognosis of surgery for spinal epidural abscess (SEA): A review, Epstein raises one major point; it is imperative that spinal surgeons “take back decision-making” from our medical cohorts and reinstitute early surgery (<24 h) to better treat SEAs. Methods: Spine surgeons recognize the clinical triad (e.g., fever [50%], spinal pain [92–100%], and neurological deficits [47%]) for establishing the diagnosis of an SEA. We also appreciate the multiple major risk factors for developing SEA; diabetes (15–30%), elevated white blood cell count (>12.5), high C-reactive protein (>115), positive blood cultures, radiographic cord compression, and significant neurological deficits (e.g., 19–45%). Results: Recognizing these risk factors should prompt early open surgery (<24 h from the onset of a neurological deficit). Open surgery better defines the correct/multiple organisms present, and immediately provides adequate/thorough neurological decompression (with fusion if unstable). Although minimally invasive surgery may suffice in select cases, too often it provides insufficient biopsy/culture/irrigation/decompression. Most critically, nonsurgical options result in unacceptably high failure rates (e.g., 41-42.5-75% requiring delayed surgery), while risking permanent paralysis (up to 22%), and death (up to 25%). Conclusion: As spine surgeons, we need to “take back decision-making” from our medical cohorts and advocate for early surgery to achieve better outcomes for our patients. Why should anyone accept the >41-42.5 to up to the 75% failure rate that accompanies the nonsurgical treatment of SEA, much less the >25% mortality rate? PMID:26605113

  7. Timing and prognosis of surgery for spinal epidural abscess: A review

    PubMed Central

    Epstein, Nancy E.

    2015-01-01

    Background: The nonsurgical versus surgical management of spinal epidural abscesses (SEAs) remains controversial. Even with the best preoperative screening for multiple risk factors, high nonoperative failure rates are attended by considerable morbidity (e.g., irreversible paralysis) and mortality. Therefore, the focus remains on early surgery. Methods: Most papers promote early recognition of the clinical triad (e.g., fever [50%], spinal pain [92–100%], and neurological deficits [47%]) for SEA. They also identify SEA-related risk factors for choosing nonsurgical versus surgical approaches; advanced age (>65 or 80), diabetes (15–30%), cancer, intravenous drug abuse (25%), smoking (23%), elevated white blood cell count (>12.5), high C-reactive protein >115, positive blood cultures, magnetic resonance imaging/computed tomographic documented cord compression, and significant neurological deficits (e.g., 19–45%). Results: Surgical options include: decompressions, open versus minimally invasive biopsy/culture/irrigation, or fusions. Up to 75% of SEA involve the thoracolumbar spine, and 50% are located ventrally. Wound cultures are positive in up to 78.8% of cases and are often (60%) correlated with positive blood cultures. The most typical offending organism is methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus, followed by methicillin sensitive S. aureus. Unfortunately, the failure rates for nonoperative treatment of SEA remain high (e.g., 41–42.5%), contributing to significant morbidity (22% risk of permanent paralysis), and mortality (3–25%). Conclusion: The vast majority of studies advocated early surgery to achieve better outcomes for treating SEA; this avoids high failure rates (41–42.5%) for nonoperative therapy, and limits morbidity/mortality rates. PMID:26605109

  8. A Case on Streptococcal Pneumonia Associated with Leptomeningitis, Osteomyelitis and Epidural Abscess in a Patient with AIDS

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Jae Woong; Kim, Joo Seok; Ryu, Il Hwan; Choi, Ji Wook; Kim, Min Gyu; Na, Young Min; Yun, Hyeon Jeong

    2014-01-01

    Patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) are at higher risks of bacterial pneumonia than the general population, and the pathogen is the most commonly involved Streptococcus pneumoniae. We hereby report a case of pneumococcal pneumonia associated with leptomeningitis, osteomyelitis and epidural abscess in a patient with AIDS. He is being successfully treated with ampicillin/sulbactam and clindamycin. And because the pneumococcal infection is usually associated with morbidity and mortality rates in the setting of AIDS, we should consider for pneumococcal vaccinations among the AIDS populations. PMID:24624217

  9. Cervical epidural steroid injections for the treatment of cervical spinal (neck) pain.

    PubMed

    Candido, Kenneth D; Knezevic, Nebojsa 'nick'

    2013-02-01

    Cervical epidural steroid injections (CESI) are an accepted treatment for neck pain with a radicular component, and may be accomplished by using either transforaminal (CTFESI) or interlaminar (CILESI) approaches. CESIs are routinely performed using real-time fluoroscopic-guidance in conjunction with the injection of water soluble, iodine-based contrast media to enhance visualization of intravascular injections. Digital subtraction angiography (DSA) imaging is an adjuvant to fluoroscopic methods for visualizing blood vessels while performing spinal injections. However, as with any neuraxial procedure, various complications associated with CESIs have been reported. Complications are directly associated with the technical procedures of CESIs. Particulate steroids may have a prolonged duration of action but non-particulate steroids are safer for CESIs. Blunt-beveled needles are less likely than sharp-beveled needles to penetrate blood vessels to cause bleeding complications during CTFESI procedures. Small doses of local anesthetics appear to be safe and assist in identifying intravascular injections previously overlooked by conventional techniques.

  10. Spontaneous cervical epidural hematomas with acute hemiparesis should be considered a contraindication for intravenous thrombolysis: a case report with a literature review of 50 cases.

    PubMed

    Ito, Hirotaka; Takai, Keisuke; Taniguchi, Makoto

    2014-01-01

    We herein report the case of a 63-year-old woman with an acute spontaneous cervical epidural hematoma who presented with acute hemiparesis and was successfully managed with surgery. Based on a literature review of 50 cases of spontaneous cervical epidural hematomas, we concluded that the relatively high frequency of hemiparesis (12 of 50 cases, 24%) is the result of the fact that epidural hematomas are predominantly distributed dorsolaterally in the region of the mid and lower cervical spine, leading to unilateral cervical cord compression. Clinicians should keep in mind that acute hemiparesis can be caused by spontaneous cervical epidural hematomas for which intravenous thrombolysis is contraindicated.

  11. Holocord spinal epidural abscess in a pregnant patient presenting as premature labour: a rare presentation of an unusual diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Burton, Kirsteen R; Wang, Xi; Dhanoa, Deljit

    2014-07-01

    Spinal epidural abscess (SEA) is a rare clinical entity. It is less common when the entire epidural space is involved, known as a holocord or panspinal SEA, and it is even less common in a pregnant patient. We report a case of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus holocord SEA in a 30-year-old female at approximately 22 weeks' gestational age who presented with lumbar pain and pelvic pressure and the urge to bear down. Magnetic resonance imaging of the spine demonstrated extensive SEA and meningitis from the foramen magnum to the lumbar spine that was treated both medically and surgically. The incidence of, clinical presentation of, and risk factors for developing SEA are discussed. If untreated, expanding SEAs produce sensory symptoms and signs, motor dysfunction, and, eventually, paralysis and death. The medical and surgical management of SEA is also discussed. SEA can have an insidious and atypical presentation despite extensive involvement of the epidural space. Therefore, the diagnosis of SEA should always be considered in patients who present to the emergency department with back pain.

  12. Holospinal epidural abscess of the spinal axis: two illustrative cases with review of treatment strategies and surgical techniques.

    PubMed

    Smith, Gabriel A; Kochar, Arshneel S; Manjila, Sunil; Onwuzulike, Kaine; Geertman, Robert T; Anderson, James S; Steinmetz, Michael P

    2014-08-01

    Despite the increasing prevalence of spinal infections, the subcategory of holospinal epidural abscesses (HEAs) is extremely infrequent and requires unique management. Panspinal imaging (preferably MRI), modern aggressive antibiotic therapy, and prompt surgical intervention remain the standard of care for all spinal axis infections including HEAs; however, the surgical decision making on timing and extent of the procedure still remain ill defined for HEAs. Decompression including skip laminectomies or laminoplasties is described, with varied clinical outcomes. In this review the authors present the illustrative cases of 2 patients with HEAs who were treated using skip laminectomies and epidural catheter irrigation techniques. The discussion highlights different management strategies including the role of conservative (nonsurgical) management in these lesions, especially with an already identified pathogen and the absence of mass effect on MRI or significant neurological defects. Among fewer than 25 case reports of HEA published in the past 25 years, the most important aspect in deciding a role for surgery is the neurological examination. Nearly 20% were treated successfully with medical therapy alone if neurologically intact. None of the reported cases had an associated cranial infection with HEA, because the dural adhesion around the foramen magnum prevented rostral spread of infection. Traditionally a posterior approach to the epidural space with irrigation is performed, unless an extensive focal ventral collection is causing cord compression. Surgical intervention for HEA should be an adjuvant treatment strategy for all acutely deteriorating patients, whereas aspiration of other infected sites like a psoas abscess can determine an infective pathogen, and appropriate antibiotic treatment may avoid surgical intervention in the neurologically intact patient.

  13. The indications and timing for operative management of spinal epidural abscess: literature review and treatment algorithm.

    PubMed

    Tuchman, Alexander; Pham, Martin; Hsieh, Patrick C

    2014-08-01

    Delayed or inappropriate treatment of spinal epidural abscess (SEA) can lead to serious morbidity or death. It is a rare event with significant variation in its causes, anatomical locations, and rate of progression. Traditionally the treatment of choice has involved emergency surgical evacuation and a prolonged course of antibiotics tailored to the offending pathogen. Recent publications have advocated antibiotic treatment without surgical decompression in select patient populations. Clearly defining those patients who can be safely treated in this manner remains in evolution. The authors review the current literature concerning the treatment and outcome of SEA to make recommendations concerning what population can be safely triaged to nonoperative management and the optimal timing of surgery. A PubMed database search was performed using a combination of search terms and Medical Subject Headings, to identify clinical studies reporting on the treatment and outcome of SEA. The literature review revealed 28 original case series containing at least 30 patients and reporting on treatment and outcome. All cohorts were deemed Class III evidence, and in all but two the data were obtained retrospectively. Based on the conclusions of these studies along with selected smaller studies and review articles, the authors present an evidence-based algorithm for selecting patients who may be safe candidates for nonoperative management. Patients who are unable to undergo an operation, have a complete spinal cord injury more than 48 hours with low clinical or radiographic concern for an ascending lesion, or who are neurologically stable and lack risk factors for failure of medical management may be initially treated with antibiotics alone and close clinical monitoring. If initial medical management is to be undertaken the patient should be made aware that delayed neurological deterioration may not fully resolve even after prompt surgical treatment. Patients deemed good surgical

  14. Osteomyelitis, discitis, epidural and psoas abscess secondary to Salmonella enterica in a man with diabetes mellitus and newly diagnosed α-thalassaemia trait.

    PubMed

    Farrar, Helen; Abbey, Aoife; Patel, Vinod; Nair, Rajiv

    2015-01-21

    We report the case of a 65-year-old man with type 2 diabetes mellitus and α-thalassaemia trait. Investigations for relapsing and remitting fever found vertebral osteomyelitis, discitis and epidural and psoas abscess secondary to Salmonella enterica. 2015 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  15. Abscess of the cervical spine secondary to injection site infection in a heifer.

    PubMed

    Braun, Ueli; Gerspach, Christian; Kühn, Karolin; Bünter, Julia; Hilbe, Monika

    2017-01-31

    Abscesses in the neck region can result from infection associated with injection of drugs into the neck muscles. To our knowledge, there have been no reports of osteomyelitis of the cervical vertebra and spinal cord compression secondary to an abscess in the neck. This case report describes the findings in a 9.5-month-old heifer with an abscess of the cervical spine secondary to injection site infection. The main clinical findings were swelling on the left side of the neck, proprioceptive deficits in all limbs and generalised ataxia. The ultrasonographic examination of the swelling showed an abscess. Radiographs showed a well-defined lytic lesion in 5th cervical vertebra (C5). Postmortem examination revealed an intramuscular encapsulated abscess on the left side of the neck at the level of C5. The abscess had invaded the vertebral canal and caused marked compression of the spinal cord. Injection technique is critical for the prevention of problems such as those described in this report. Sterile hypodermic needles must be used, and the volume of drug per injection site limited to 10-15 ml in young cattle.

  16. Development of Epidural and Paraspinal Abscesses after Insufficient Evaluation and Treatment of Acute Pyelonephritis Caused by Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Koo, Hyang Mo; Lee, Woo Joo; Choi, Jin Hwan; Choi, Mi Nyong; Park, Sang Young; Kim, Woo Jung; Son, Seung Yeon

    2016-01-01

    Diagnoses of pyelonephritis caused by Staphylococcus aureus should be accompanied by investigations of concomitant bladder obstruction and metastatic infections, especially to the spine or heart. Complicated pyelonephritis due to S. aureus requires more than 2 weeks of antibiotics, which is the typically recommended treatment duration for pyelonephritis. We describe a patient who was diagnosed with complicated epidural and paraspinal abscesses after insufficient evaluation and treatment of acute pyelonephritis due to S. aureus. A 62-year-old man with type 2 diabetes was admitted with fever, increased urinary frequency, and left flank pain. He was diagnosed with acute pyelonephritis caused by S. aureus. His fever and flank pain subsided after 3 days of intravenous antibiotics. Evaluation of bladder obstruction and metastatic infection were not performed, as he declined further evaluation. The patient was discharged with oral antibiotics and was requested to attend weekly appointments but was lost to follow-up. One month later, the patient presented at the outpatient clinic with similar symptoms. Computed tomography showed recurrent pyelonephritis and a distended bladder. His flank pain persisted despite administration of an opioid agent. Therefore, magnetic resonance imaging was performed, revealing epidural and paraspinal abscesses. Ultrasound-guided aspiration of the paraspinal muscle layer was performed, and blood and percutaneous aspirated fluid cultures revealed S. aureus growth. The pattern of antimicrobial sensitivity was identical to that at his first admission. Following more than 4 weeks of antibiotics, magnetic resonance imaging showed the abscesses had decreased in size. The patient was discharged without neurologic sequelae and was provided with oral antibiotics. PMID:27688864

  17. Breast adenocarcinoma metastatic to epidural cervical spine meningioma: case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Aghi, Manish; Kiehl, Tim-Rasmus; Brisman, Jonathan L

    2005-11-01

    While several cases of cancer metastatic to cranial meningiomas have been reported, metastasis to spinal meningioma has been reported only once, and a mechanism for such metastases has not been investigated. We report a case of breast carcinoma metastatic to an epidural cervical meningioma, summarize the literature on metastases to central nervous system meningiomas, and suggest a possible mechanism. Our patient, a 55-year-old woman, presented with difficulty walking, back pain, and quadriparesis. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed an enhancing C3-4 epidural lesion and an L4 compression fracture. Because of concern that the fracture and epidural lesion might represent metastases, we performed a metastatic work-up, which revealed a right breast mass. The patient underwent C3-C4 laminectomies and an epidural lesion was encountered. Intraoperative frozen section revealed mixed meningioma and breast adenocarcinoma. A gross total resection was achieved and the patient subsequently received spinal irradiation and hormonal therapy. Whereas a literature review revealed numerous reports of metastases to cranial meningiomas, this represents only the second reported case of such pathology in the spine. Mechanisms of this unusual process likely include meningiomas' vascularity, meningiomas' slow growth providing nutrient availability, and perhaps, as suggested by our analysis, E-cadherin expression by both meningiomas and breast cancer. Metastasis to meningioma must be considered in an epidural spinal lesion in all patients with a known malignancy, with surgical aggressiveness tailored to the intraoperative pathologic diagnosis.

  18. Predicting early epidurals: association of maternal, labor, and neonatal characteristics with epidural analgesia initiation at a cervical dilation of 3 cm or less.

    PubMed

    Moore, Albert R; Shan, William Li Pi; Hatzakorzian, Roupen

    2013-01-01

    Retrospective studies have associated early epidural analgesia with cesarean delivery, but prospective studies do not demonstrate a causal relationship. This suggests that there are other variables associated with early epidural analgesia that increase the risk of cesarean delivery. This study was undertaken to determine the characteristics associated with early epidural analgesia initiation. Information about women delivering at 37 weeks or greater gestation with epidural analgesia, who were not scheduled for cesarean delivery, was extracted from the McGill Obstetric and Neonatal Database. Patients were grouped into those who received epidural analgesia at a cervical dilation of ≤3 cm and >3 cm. Univariable and multivariable logistic regression was used to determine the maternal, neonatal, and labor characteristics that increased the risk of inclusion in the early epidural group. Of the 13,119 patients analyzed, multivariable regression demonstrated odds ratios (OR) of 2.568, 5.915 and 10.410 for oxytocin augmentation, induction, and dinoprostone induction of labor (P < 0.001). Increasing parity decreased the odds of early epidural analgesia (OR 0.780, P < 0.001), while spontaneous rupture of membranes (OR 1.490) and rupture of membranes before labor commenced (OR 1.288) were also associated with early epidural analgesia (P < 0.001). Increasing maternal weight (OR 1.049, P = 0.002) and decreasing neonatal weight (OR 0.943, P < 0.001) were associated with increasing risk of early epidural analgesia. Labor augmentation and induction, nulliparity, rupture of membranes spontaneously and before labor starts, increasing maternal weight, and decreasing neonatal weight are associated with early epidural analgesia. Many of these variables are also associated with cesarean delivery.

  19. [Diagnosis and management for the non-traumatic epidural sequestered cervical disc extrusion].

    PubMed

    Yang, Min; Ding, Guo-Zheng; Xu, Zhu-Jun

    2013-06-01

    To explore the clinical characteristics and management of non-traumatic epidural sequestered cervical disc extrusion. From January 2002 to July 2011, the clinical data of 10 patients with non-traumatic epidural sequestered cervical disc extrusion were treated by anterior cervical mostly vertebraectomy and nucleus pulposus removal after decompression and internal fixation through longitudinal ligament resection. Of them,there were 6 males and 4 females with an average age of 48.2 years old (ranged from 42 to 65), the course of disease ranged from 1 month to 4 years (mean, 15 months). All patients manifested numbness and weakness of four limbs, unstable walking and sphincter of oddi dysfunction. Preoperative MRI showed segmental cervical spinal cord compression. JOA scoring criteria was applied to evaluate preoperative and follow-up neurologic function. Ten patients were followed up, and the duration ranged from 15 to 32 months, with an average of 21 months. No complications related to opreation occurred. Preoperative MRI showed nucelus puplposus sequestered longitudinal ligament were on equal signal on T1-weighted and corresponding pathological,while it showed equal and high signal on T2-weighted. JOA score were increased from 7.20 +/- 1.55 preoperative to 13.60 +/- 1.90 postoperative (t = -11.8, P < 0.001), and excellent in 3 cases, good in 6 cases and moderate in 1 case. Anterior cervical mostly vertebraectomy and nucleus pulposus removal after decompression and internal fixation through longitudinal ligament resection after early diagnosis is the key to success of treating non-traumatic epidural sequestered cervical disc extrusion.

  20. [Retropharyngeal abscess with cervical discitis and vertebral osteomyelitis caused by Escherichia coli in a patient with liver cirrhosis].

    PubMed

    Sakaguchi, Ayu; Ishimaru, Naoto; Ohnishi, Hisashi; Kawamoto, Megumi; Takagi, Asuka; Yoshimura, Sho; Kinami, Saori; Sakamoto, Susumu

    2017-06-01

    We describe the case of a 67-year-old male with liver cirrhosis who presented with fever and neck pain. Magnetic resonance imaging of the spine detected cervical vertebral osteomyelitis, and enhanced CT of the neck and spine revealed retropharyngeal abscess. The patient was treated with empirical antimicrobial therapy and surgical drainage due to significant airway involvement. Escherichia coli was cultured from the blood and pus in inferior cervical vertebrae which was a rare pathogen. Haematogenous spread may have resulted in cervical vertebral osteomyelitis and retropharyngeal abscess. With high mortality rates, early diagnosis of retropharyngeal abscess is required to avoid debilitating complications such as airway obstruction.

  1. Delayed Brain Edema and Swelling following Craniectomy for Evacuation of an Epidural Abscess that Improved by Cranioplasty: Case Report.

    PubMed

    Sugii, Narushi; Matsuda, Masahide; Sekine, Tomokazu; Matsumura, Hideaki; Yamamoto, Tetsuya; Matsumura, Akira

    2017-07-01

    We report a unique case of delayed brain swelling following craniectomy that improved rapidly after cranioplasty, and discuss the potential mechanism underlying this delayed and reversible brain swelling. A 22-year-old woman developed surgical site infection after removal of a convexity meningioma. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed an epidural abscess around the surgical site. Subsequently, the abscess was evacuated, and the bone flap was removed. Later, brain edema around the skull defect emerged and progressed gradually, despite resolution of the infection. The edematous brain developed focal swelling outward through the bone defect without ventricle dilatation. Because we suspected that the edema and swelling were caused by the state of the bone defect, we performed a cranioplasty 10 weeks after the bone flap removal, and brain edema improved rapidly. We hypothesized that the brain edema was initially caused by surgical stress and inflammation, followed by compression of cortical veins between the dural edge and brain tissue, leading to disruption of venous return and exacerbation of brain edema. When delayed focal brain edema and external swelling progress gradually after bone flap removal, after excluding other pathological conditions, cranioplasty should be considered to improve cortical venous congestion caused by postsurgical adhesion.

  2. Pediatric spinal epidural abscess in an immunocompetent host without risk factors: Case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Vergori, Alessandra; Cerase, Alfonso; Migliorini, Lucia; Pluchino, Maria Grazia; Oliveri, Giuseppe; Arrigucci, Umberto; De Luca, Andrea; Montagnani, Francesca

    2015-01-01

    Spinal epidural abscesses (SEAs) are unusual bacterial infections, with possible devastating neurologic sequelae. Despite abundance of case series in adults, reports in children are scanty. We describe a spontaneous SEA due to methicillin susceptible Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) in a previously healthy 15-year old male, and we perform a literature review regarding management of pediatric SEAs without risk factors, from 2001 to 2014. We found a total of 12 cases (8 males, average age 9.6 years). Clinical presentation was mainly fever, back pain and elevation of inflammation markers. All cases were initially misdiagnosed. Lumbar puncture was performed in 36% of patients. Etiological diagnosis was obtained in 8 cases. MSSA was isolated in 4 patients, methicillin-resistant S. aureus in 1 patient, and S. aureus with unknown susceptibility patterns in 2 cases. The average of therapy duration was 6 weeks. Patients' spine was always evaluated by gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging; most abscesses were localized at thoracic and lumbar area, without osteomyelitis. In 8 cases, laminectomy and/or abscess drainage were performed in association with medical therapy; 3 cases were successfully treated with antimicrobial therapy only; no data were available in one case. A good outcome was obtained in all patients, except a reported residual headache and paraspinal pain lasting for 3 years. The rarity and the possible differential diagnosis can lead to underestimate SEA occurrence in children without risk factors. It seems therefore essential to maintain a high attention to pediatric SEAs. A prompt diagnosis and adequate therapy are essential prognostic factors for remission.

  3. Pediatric spinal epidural abscess in an immunocompetent host without risk factors: Case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Vergori, Alessandra; Cerase, Alfonso; Migliorini, Lucia; Pluchino, Maria Grazia; Oliveri, Giuseppe; Arrigucci, Umberto; De Luca, Andrea; Montagnani, Francesca

    2015-01-01

    Spinal epidural abscesses (SEAs) are unusual bacterial infections, with possible devastating neurologic sequelae. Despite abundance of case series in adults, reports in children are scanty. We describe a spontaneous SEA due to methicillin susceptible Staphylococcus aureus (MSSA) in a previously healthy 15-year old male, and we perform a literature review regarding management of pediatric SEAs without risk factors, from 2001 to 2014. We found a total of 12 cases (8 males, average age 9.6 years). Clinical presentation was mainly fever, back pain and elevation of inflammation markers. All cases were initially misdiagnosed. Lumbar puncture was performed in 36% of patients. Etiological diagnosis was obtained in 8 cases. MSSA was isolated in 4 patients, methicillin-resistant S. aureus in 1 patient, and S. aureus with unknown susceptibility patterns in 2 cases. The average of therapy duration was 6 weeks. Patients’ spine was always evaluated by gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging; most abscesses were localized at thoracic and lumbar area, without osteomyelitis. In 8 cases, laminectomy and/or abscess drainage were performed in association with medical therapy; 3 cases were successfully treated with antimicrobial therapy only; no data were available in one case. A good outcome was obtained in all patients, except a reported residual headache and paraspinal pain lasting for 3 years. The rarity and the possible differential diagnosis can lead to underestimate SEA occurrence in children without risk factors. It seems therefore essential to maintain a high attention to pediatric SEAs. A prompt diagnosis and adequate therapy are essential prognostic factors for remission. PMID:26793474

  4. Fluoroscopically guided extraforaminal cervical nerve root blocks: analysis of epidural flow of the injectate with respect to needle tip position.

    PubMed

    Shipley, Kyle; Riew, K Daniel; Gilula, Louis A

    2014-02-01

    Study Design Retrospective evaluation of consecutively performed fluoroscopically guided cervical nerve root blocks. Objective To describe the incidence of injectate central epidural flow with respect to needle tip position during fluoroscopically guided extraforaminal cervical nerve root blocks (ECNRBs). Methods Between February 19, 2003 and June 11, 2003, 132 consecutive fluoroscopically guided ECNRBs performed with contrast media in the final injected material (injectate) were reviewed on 95 patients with average of 1.3 injections per patient. Fluoroscopic spot images documenting the procedure were obtained as part of standard quality assurance. An independent observer not directly involved in the procedures retrospectively reviewed the images, and the data were placed into a database. Image review was performed to determine optimal needle tip positioning for injectate epidural flow. Results Central epidural injectate flow was obtained in only 28.9% of injections with the needle tip lateral to midline of the lateral mass (zone 2). 83.8% of injectate went into epidural space when the needle tip was medial to midline of the lateral mass (zone 3). 100% of injectate flowed epidurally when the needle tip was medial to or at the medial cortex of the lateral mass (zone 4). There was no statistically significant difference with regards to central epidural flow and the needle tip position on lateral view. Conclusion To ensure central epidural flow with ECNRBs one must be prepared to pass the needle tip medial to midplane of the lateral mass or to medial cortex of the lateral mass. Approximately 16% of ECNRBs with needle tip medial to midline of the lateral mass did not flow into epidural space. One cannot claim a nerve block is an epidural block unless epidural flow of injectate is observed.

  5. Abscess

    MedlinePlus

    ... En Español Making a Change – Your Personal Plan Hot Topics Am I in a Healthy Relationship? Who ... compress by wetting a washcloth with warm — not hot — water and placing it over the abscess for ...

  6. Cervical Interlaminar Epidural Steroid Injection for Unilateral Cervical Radiculopathy: Comparison of Midline and Paramedian Approaches for Efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Ji Young; Yoon, Young Cheol; Lee, Jongseok

    2015-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to compare the clinical outcomes of the cervical interlaminar epidural steroid injection (CIESI) for unilateral radiculopathy by the midline or paramedian approaches and to determine the prognostic factors of CIESI. Materials and Methods We retrospectively analyzed 182 patients who underwent CIESI from January 2009 to December 2012. Inclusion criteria were no previous spinal steroid injection, presence of a cross-sectional image, and presence of follow-up records. Exclusion criteria were patients with bilateral cervical radiculopathy and/or dominant cervical axial pain, combined peripheral neuropathy, and previous cervical spine surgery. Short-term clinical outcomes were evaluated at the first follow-up after CIESI. We compared the clinical outcomes between the midline and paramedian approaches. Possible prognostic factors for the outcome, such as age, gender, duration of radiculopathy, and cause of radiculopathy were also analyzed. Results Cervical interlaminar epidural steroid injections were effective in 124 of 182 patients (68.1%) at the first follow-up. There was no significant difference in the clinical outcomes of CIESI, between midline (69.6%) and paramedian (63.7%) approaches (p = 0.723). Cause of radiculopathy was the only significant factor affecting the efficacy of CIESI. Patients with disc herniation had significantly better results than patients with neural foraminal stenosis (82.9% vs. 56.0%) (p < 0.001). Conclusion There is no significant difference in treatment efficacy between the midline and paramedian approaches in CIESI, for unilateral radiculopathy. The cause of the radiculopathy is significantly associated with the treatment efficacy; patients with disc herniation experience better pain relief than those with neural foraminal stenosis. PMID:25995690

  7. The potential contributing effect of ketorolac and fluoxetine to a spinal epidural hematoma following a cervical interlaminar epidural steroid injection: a case report and narrative review.

    PubMed

    Chien, George C Chang; McCormick, Zack; Araujo, Marco; Candido, Kenneth D

    2014-01-01

    Cervical interlaminar epidural steroid injections (ESIs) are commonly performed as one part of a multi-modal analgesic regimen in the management of upper extremity radicular pain. Spinal epidural hematoma (SEH) is a rare complication with a reported incidence ranging from 1.38 in 10,000 to 1 in 190,000 epidurals. Current American Society of Regional Anesthesia (ASRA), American Society of Interventional Pain Physicians (ASIPP), and the International Spine Intervention Society (ISIS) recommendations are that non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) do not need to be withheld prior to epidural anesthesia. We report a case wherein intramuscular ketorolac and oral fluoxetine contributed to a SEH and tetraplegia following a cervical interlaminar (ESI). A 66 year-old woman with chronic renal insufficiency and neck pain radiating into her right upper extremity presented for evaluation and was deemed an appropriate CESI candidate. Cervical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed multi-level neuroforaminal stenosis and degenerative intervertebral discs. Utilizing a loss of resistance to saline technique, an 18-gauge Tuohy-type needle entered the epidural space at C6-7. After negative aspiration, 4 mL of saline with 80 mg of methyl-prednisolone was injected. Immediately thereafter, the patient reported significant spasmodic-type localized neck pain with no neurologic status changes. A decision was made to administer 30 mg intramuscular ketorolac as treatment for the spasmodic-type pain. En route home, she developed a sudden onset of acute tetraplegia. She was brought to the emergency department for evaluation including platelet and coagulation studies which were normal. MRI demonstrated an epidural hematoma extending from C5 to T7. She underwent a bilateral C5-T6 laminectomy with epidural hematoma evacuation and was discharged to an acute inpatient rehabilitation hospital. Chronic renal insufficiency, spinal stenosis, female gender, and increasing age have been

  8. Late prevertebral abscess with sinus following anterior cervical corpectomy and fusion.

    PubMed

    Bhise, Swapnil D; Mathesul, Ambarish A; Deokate, Pravin; Chandanwale, Ajay S; Bartakke, Girish D

    2015-01-01

    Anterior cervical discectomy/corpectomy and fusion is performed in degenerative, traumatic and neoplastic etiologies of the cervical spine. This procedure is highly successful and associated with fewer complications. The rates of early and late postoperative infection have been reported to be between 0.1% and 1.6%, the late infections are being very rare. We report a rare case of a 30-year-old HIV negative, non-diabetic male who developed a late prevertebral cervical abscess with discharging sinus over posterior triangle of neck 3 years after an anterior cervical C6 corpectomy with fibular grafting and buttress screw fixation performed elsewhere for traumatic fracture C6 vertebra. The abscess was drained using radical neck dissection approach with complete excision of sinus track and removal of the infected implant. On culture, the organism was found to be beta-hemolytic streptococci, for which appropriate antibiotics were administered postoperatively. The sinus tract completely healed in 3 months time. Late infection as a complication of anterior cervical spine surgeries is rare and is associated with esophageal perforation, implant migration, seeding of the deep prevertebral space with oropharyngeal flora, or from surgical site/bacteremia or with Zenker's diverticulum. Few cases have been reported till date, but none have presented with a sinus tract. We present a case of delayed prevertebral abscess after cervical spine instrumentation that followed abnormal path causing sinus track to be developed in the site (the posterior triangle of the neck) other than previous incision site. Exploring both triangles of the neck using radical neck dissection approach was essential for complete excision of sinus track, removal of screw and debridement.

  9. [Cervical abscess by Streptococcus anginosus-milleri after foreign body ingestion and suspicion of esophageal perforation].

    PubMed

    Pino Rivero, V; Trinidad Ramos, G; González Palomino, A; Pantoja Hernández, C G; Mogollón Cano-Cortés, T; Carrasco Claver, F; Guerra Camacho, M; Blasco Huelva, A

    2006-01-01

    We report a case of cervical abscess after the ingestion of foreign body (chicken bone) secondary to probable esophageal perforation that it was sent to us with suspicion of mediastinal complication. The girl, 17 years-old, nothing else to arrive our hospitalary center required entrance in ICU due to her severe clinical process: High fever, intense neck-thoracic pain, laterocervical diffuse and progressive left inflammation and bad general state. The CT showed the presence of a well defined abscess and abundant aerial component that dissected the cervical muscles that made necessary to perform drainage verifying intraoperatively no mediastinal involvement. The culture of the purulent collection revealed Streptococcus anginosus/milleri resistant to clindamicine but sensible to penicilina and derivatives. We exposed a serie of considerations at respect of such microorganism and its clinical signification.

  10. High cervical epidural neurostimulation for post-traumatic headache management.

    PubMed

    Elahi, Foad; Reddy, Chandan

    2014-01-01

    Headache following head injuries has been reported for centuries. The majority of post-traumatic headache (PTH) patients will report resolution of their complaints within a few months from the time of the initial injury. PTHs can contribute to disability, lost productivity, and health care costs. In this article we discuss a 40-year-old male with a history of motor vehicle accident and basal skull fracture. The patient had no headache history prior to the accident. He presented with more than 3 years persistent daily headache. The patient described constant throbbing and stabbing quality headaches predominantly on the left hemicranium with constant facial pain. He denies having aura, nausea, or vomiting, but reported occasional neck tightness. An extensive workup was carried out under the direction of the patient's primary neurologist. Secondary to persistent intractable pain, the patient was referred to the pain clinic for further evaluation. As his headaches were resistant to all trialed strategies, we decided to turn our therapeutic focus toward electrical neuromodulation along with continuing multimodal medications and multidisciplinary approach. During 7 days of high cervical dorsal column electrical nerve stimulation trial, he reported almost 90% pain reduction and significant improvement on his quality of life. On 12 months follow-up after he underwent a permanent implant of high cervical dorsal column electrical nerve stimulation, he reported the same level of pain reduction along with 100% satisfaction rate. To the best of our knowledge, there have been no publications to date concerning the application of high cervical nerve stimulation for PTH.

  11. Congenital dilation of the cervical epidural venous plexus: neuroradiology and endovenous management.

    PubMed

    Rodiek, S O; Schmidhuber, H; Lumenta, C B

    1999-06-01

    We report a case of a 15-year-old girl suffering from cervicobrachialgia who was admitted to our service due to an enlarged neural foramen suspicious for a neurinoma. The cervical phlebography, however, revealed a space-occupying dilated epidural vein with increased blood supply from the suboccipital venous plexus. Lesions like this are absolutely rare, presumably of congenital origin and have not been described before. The lesion was treated by feeder occlusion applying platinum coils and enbucrilate via the internal jugular vein.

  12. Upper-limb muscle responses to epidural, subdural and intraspinal stimulation of the cervical spinal cord

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharpe, Abigail N.; Jackson, Andrew

    2014-02-01

    Objective. Electrical stimulation of the spinal cord has potential applications following spinal cord injury for reanimating paralysed limbs and promoting neuroplastic changes that may facilitate motor rehabilitation. Here we systematically compare the efficacy, selectivity and frequency-dependence of different stimulation methods in the cervical enlargement of anaesthetized monkeys. Approach. Stimulating electrodes were positioned at multiple epidural and subdural sites on both dorsal and ventral surfaces, as well as at different depths within the spinal cord. Motor responses were recorded from arm, forearm and hand muscles. Main results. Stimulation efficacy increased from dorsal to ventral stimulation sites, with the exception of ventral epidural electrodes which had the highest recruitment thresholds. Compared to epidural and intraspinal methods, responses to subdural stimulation were more selective but also more similar between adjacent sites. Trains of stimuli delivered to ventral sites elicited consistent responses at all frequencies whereas from dorsal sites we observed a mixture of short-latency facilitation and long-latency suppression. Finally, paired stimuli delivered to dorsal surface and intraspinal sites exhibited symmetric facilitatory interactions at interstimulus intervals between 2-5 ms whereas on the ventral side interactions tended to be suppressive for near-simultaneous stimuli. Significance. We interpret these results in the context of differential activation of afferent and efferent roots and intraspinal circuit elements. In particular, we propose that distinct direct and indirect actions of spinal cord stimulation on motoneurons may be advantageous for different applications, and this should be taken into consideration when designing neuroprostheses for upper-limb function.

  13. [Vertebral osteomyelitis associated with epidural block].

    PubMed

    Carrillo Esper, R; Cruz-Bautista, I

    2001-01-01

    Infectious complications after epidural anesthesia are infrequent and the most common are epidural and subdural abscess. We report one rare case of vertebral osteomyelitus associated with an epidural catheter and review the literature.

  14. Cervical CT scan-guided epidural blood patches for spontaneous intracranial hypotension.

    PubMed

    Maingard, Julian; Giles, Lauren; Marriott, Mark; Phal, Pramit M

    2015-12-01

    We describe two patients with spontaneous intracranial hypotension (SIH), presenting with postural headache due to C1-C2 cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leak. Both patients were refractory to lumbar epidural blood patching (EBP), and subsequently underwent successful CT scan-guided cervical EBP. SIH affects approximately 1 in 50,000 patients, with females more frequently affected. Its associated features are variable, and as such, misdiagnosis is common. Therefore, imaging plays an important role in the diagnostic workup of SIH and can include MRI of the brain and spine, CT myelogram, and radionuclide cisternography. In patients with an established diagnosis and confirmed CSF leak, symptoms will usually resolve with conservative management. However, in a select subgroup of patients, the symptoms are refractory to medical management and require more invasive therapies. In patients with cervical leaks, EBP in the cervical region is an effective management approach, either in close proximity to, or directly targeting a dural defect. CT scan-guided cervical EBP is an effective treatment approach in refractory SIH, and should be considered in those patients who are refractory to conservative management.

  15. Foreign body ingestion: rare cause of cervical abscess.

    PubMed

    Costa, Liliana; Larangeiro, João; Pinto Moura, Carla; Santos, Margarida

    2014-01-01

    IntroduçÉo: A ingestÉo de corpo estranho é um motivo frequente de recurso à urgência hospitalar. As complicações graves, embora raras, incluem perfuraçÉo faringo-esofágica, fistula aorto-esofágica e infecçÉo cervical profunda.Material e Métodos: Foram analisados, retrospectivamente, os casos de ingestÉo de corpo estranho com internamento num hospital terciário, entre 1989 e 2011. Seleccionaram-se os casos complicados por abcesso cervical profundo, descrevendo-se a semiótica, resultados de meios complementares de diagnóstico, terapêutica efectuada e evoluçÉo clínica.Resultados: Dos 1679 casos, 319 referentes a crianças e 1360 a adultos, reportam-se dois casos (0,12%): uma criança, 13 meses, com abcesso retrofaríngeo após ingestÉo de osso de frango e um adulto, 41 anos, com abcesso parafaríngeo após ingestÉo de espinha de peixe. As complicações manifestaram-se quatro e três dias após remoçÉo do corpo estranho, respectivamente. Em ambos foram efectuadas Tomografias Computorizadas cervicais com contraste e drenagem cirúrgica dos abcessos; a criança foi ainda submetida a esofagoscopia rígida para remoçÉo de corpo estranho residual e encerramento da perfuraçÉo esofágica associada.DiscussÉo: Os abcessos cervicais sÉo uma complicaçÉo possível da ingestÉo de corpo estranho e constituem um desafio diagnóstico, principalmente em idade pediátrica. A manipulaçÉo esofágica prévia por fibroscopia poderá ser considerada um factor de risco. A imagiologia (Tomografia Computorizada cervical com contraste ou Resson'ncia Magnética Cervical) foi essencial para o diagnóstico e o planeamento cirúrgico.ConclusÉo: Embora raros, perante a história recente de ingestÉo/remoçÉo de corpo estranho esofágico e a presença de sintomas compatíveis, os abcessos cervicais devem ser tidos em consideraçÉo, dado o potencial de morbilidade e mortalidade na ausência de uma abordagem terapêutica adequada.

  16. Cervical Epidural Hematoma after Chiropractic Spinal Manipulation Therapy in a Patient with an Undiagnosed Cervical Spinal Arteriovenous Malformation

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Meng; Barber, Sean M; Moisi, Marc; Powell, Suzanne; Rivera, Andreana; Rose, James

    2015-01-01

    Spinal epidural hematoma (SEH) occurring after chiropractic spinal manipulation therapy (CSMT) is a rare clinical phenomenon. Our case is unique because the patient had an undiagnosed cervical spinal arteriovenous malformation (AVM) discovered on pathological analysis of the evacuated hematoma. Although the spinal manipulation likely contributed to the rupture of the AVM, there was no radiographic evidence of the use of excessive force, which was seen in another reported case. As such, patients with a known AVM who have not undergone surgical intervention should be cautioned against symptomatic treatment with CSMT, even if performed properly. Regardless of etiology, SEH is a surgical emergency and its favorable neurological recovery correlates inversely with time to surgical evacuation. PMID:26430581

  17. Incidence and risk factors for failed medical management of spinal epidural abscess: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Stratton, Alexandra; Gustafson, Karla; Thomas, Kenneth; James, Matthew T

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Spinal epidural abscess (SEA) is a life-threatening infection. It is uncertain whether medical versus surgical treatment is the ideal initial approach for neurologically intact patients with SEA. Recent evidence demonstrates that initial medical management is increasingly common; however, patients who ultimately require surgery after failed medical management may have a worse prognosis than those whose treatment was initially surgical. The primary objective of this study was to establish the current incidence of failed medical management for SEA. The secondary aim was to identify risk factors associated with the failure of medical management. METHODS The authors conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis by searching electronic databases (MEDLINE, Embase, CINAHL, and PubMed), recent conference proceedings, and reference lists of relevant articles. Studies that reported original data on consecutive adult patients with SEA treated medically were eligible for inclusion. RESULTS Twelve studies met the inclusion criteria, which included a total of 489 medically treated patients with SEA. Agreement on articles for study inclusion was very high between the reviewers (kappa 0.86). In a meta-analysis, the overall pooled risk of failed medical management was 29.3% (95% CI 21.4%-37.2%) and when medical to surgical crossover was used to define failure the rate was 26.3% (95% CI 13.0%-39.7%). Only 6 studies provided data for analysis by intended treatment, with a pooled estimate of 35.1% (95% CI 15.7%-54.4%) of failed medical management. Two studies reported predictors of the failure of medical management. CONCLUSIONS Although the incidence of failed medical management of SEA was relatively common in published reports, estimates were highly heterogeneous between studies, thus introducing uncertainty about the frequency of this risk. A consensus definition of failure is required to facilitate comparison of failure rates across studies.

  18. Spinal Epidural Abscess in Adults: A 10-Year Clinical Experience at a Tertiary Care Academic Medical Center.

    PubMed

    Artenstein, Andrew W; Friderici, Jennifer; Holers, Adam; Lewis, Deirdre; Fitzgerald, Jan; Visintainer, Paul

    2016-10-01

    Background.  Delayed recognition of spinal epidural abscess (SEA) contributes to poor outcomes from this highly morbid and potentially lethal infection. We performed a case-control study in a regional, high-volume, tertiary care, academic medical center over the years 2005-2015 to assess the potential changing epidemiology, clinical and laboratory manifestations, and course of this disorder and to identify factors that might lead to early identification of SEA. Methods.  Diagnostic billing codes consistent with SEA were used to identify inpatient admissions for abstraction. Subjects were categorized as cases or controls based on the results of spinal imaging studies. Characteristics were compared using Fisher's exact or Kruskal-Wallis tests. All P values were 2-sided with a critical threshold of <.05. Results.  We identified 162 cases and 88 controls during the study period. The incidence of SEA increased from 2.5 to 8.0 per 10 000 admissions, a 3.3-fold change from 2005 to 2015 (P < .001 for the linear trend). Compared with controls, cases were significantly more likely to have experienced at least 1 previous healthcare visit or received antimicrobials within 30 days of admission; to have comorbidities of injection drug use, alcohol abuse, or obesity; and to manifest fever or rigors. Cases were also more likely to harbor coinfection at a noncontiguous site. When available, inflammatory markers were noted to be markedly elevated in cases. Focal neurologic deficits were seen with similar frequencies in both groups. Conclusions.  Based on our analysis, it appears that selected factors noted at the time of clinical presentation may facilitate early recognition of SEA.

  19. Spinal Epidural Abscess in Adults: A 10-Year Clinical Experience at a Tertiary Care Academic Medical Center

    PubMed Central

    Artenstein, Andrew W.; Friderici, Jennifer; Holers, Adam; Lewis, Deirdre; Fitzgerald, Jan; Visintainer, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Background. Delayed recognition of spinal epidural abscess (SEA) contributes to poor outcomes from this highly morbid and potentially lethal infection. We performed a case-control study in a regional, high-volume, tertiary care, academic medical center over the years 2005–2015 to assess the potential changing epidemiology, clinical and laboratory manifestations, and course of this disorder and to identify factors that might lead to early identification of SEA. Methods. Diagnostic billing codes consistent with SEA were used to identify inpatient admissions for abstraction. Subjects were categorized as cases or controls based on the results of spinal imaging studies. Characteristics were compared using Fisher's exact or Kruskal-Wallis tests. All P values were 2-sided with a critical threshold of <.05. Results. We identified 162 cases and 88 controls during the study period. The incidence of SEA increased from 2.5 to 8.0 per 10 000 admissions, a 3.3-fold change from 2005 to 2015 (P < .001 for the linear trend). Compared with controls, cases were significantly more likely to have experienced at least 1 previous healthcare visit or received antimicrobials within 30 days of admission; to have comorbidities of injection drug use, alcohol abuse, or obesity; and to manifest fever or rigors. Cases were also more likely to harbor coinfection at a noncontiguous site. When available, inflammatory markers were noted to be markedly elevated in cases. Focal neurologic deficits were seen with similar frequencies in both groups. Conclusions. Based on our analysis, it appears that selected factors noted at the time of clinical presentation may facilitate early recognition of SEA. PMID:28018923

  20. The morphology and clinical significance of the dorsal meningovertebra ligaments in the cervical epidural space.

    PubMed

    Shi, Benchao; Zheng, Xuefeng; Min, Shaoxiong; Zhou, Zhilai; Ding, Zihai; Jin, Anmin

    2014-11-01

    The dural sac is anchored within the vertebral canal by connective tissue called meningovertebral ligaments in the epidural space. During flavectomy and laminectomy, inadvertent disruption of the dorsal meningovertebral ligaments may lead to dura laceration and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leaks. All the described dorsal meningovertebral ligaments were located in the lumbar region. A rare study is available about dorsal meningovertebral ligaments of the cervical spinal dura to the adjacent vertebrae. To identify and describe the dorsal meningovertebral ligaments at each cervical level and discuss their clinical significance. A dissection-based study of 22 embalmed cadavers. The anatomy was studied in 22 whole cervical cadavers (11 females, 11 males), prepared with formaldehyde, whose ages at the time of death ranged from 55 to 78 years. The vertebral canal was divided to expose the dural sac and the spinal nerve roots. At all levels of the cervical vertebra, the morphology, quantity, origin, insertion, and spatial orientation of the dorsal meningovertebral ligaments were determined and the length, width or diameter, and thickness of the ligaments were measured with vernier calipers. The dorsal meningovertebral ligaments in the cervical region anchored the posterior dural sac to the ligamentum flavum or laminae. The number of attachment points on the ligamentum flavum was relatively larger than that on the lamina, and the occurrence rate of dorsal meningovertebral ligaments was 100% at C1-C2 and C4--C5. The thickest ligaments were observed at the C1 and C2 vertebrae. The length of the ligaments varied from 1.50 to 35.22 mm, and the orientation of the ligaments mostly was craniocaudal. The morphology of the dorsal meningovertebral ligaments was divided into four types: strip type, cord type, grid type, and thin slice type. In the cervical spine, the dorsal meningovertebral ligaments exist between the posterior dural sac and the ligamentum flavum or lamina. The dorsal

  1. Spontaneous Cervical Epidural Hematoma Presenting as Brown-Sequard Syndrome Following Repetitive Korean Traditional Deep Bows

    PubMed Central

    Seon, Hyo-Jeong; Song, Min-Keun; Han, Jae-Young; Choi, In-Sung

    2013-01-01

    Spontaneous cervical epidural hematoma (SCEH) is an uncommon cause of acute nontraumatic myelopathy. SCEH presenting as Brown-Sequard syndrome is extremely rare. A 65-year-old man had motor weakness in the left extremities right after his mother's funeral. He received thrombolytic therapy under the impression of acute cerebral infarction at a local hospital. However, motor weakness of the left extremities became aggravated without mental change. After being transferred to our hospital, he showed motor weakness in the left extremities with diminished pain sensation in the right extremities. Diagnosis of SCEH was made by cervical magnetic resonance imaging. He underwent left C3 to C5 hemilaminectomy with hematoma removal. It is important for physicians to be aware that SCEH can be considered as one of the differential diagnoses of hemiplegia, since early diagnosis and management can influence the neurological outcome. We think that increased venous pressure owing to repetitive Korean traditional deep bows may be the cause of SCEH in this case. PMID:23526134

  2. Draft Genome Sequence of Empedobacter (Formerly Wautersiella) falsenii comb. nov. Wf282, a Strain Isolated from a Cervical Neck Abscess

    PubMed Central

    Traglia, German Matías; Dixon, Chelsea; Chiem, Kevin; Almuzara, Marisa; Barberis, Claudia; Montaña, Sabrina; Merino, Cindy; Mussi, María Alejandra; Tolmasky, Marcelo E.; Iriarte, Andres; Vay, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Empedobacter (formerly Wautersiella) falsenii comb. nov. strain Wf282 was isolated from a cervical neck abscess sample from an 18-year-old female patient. The isolate was resistant to many antibiotics, including meropenem and colistin. The total DNA from the multidrug-resistant E. falsenii comb. nov. Wf282 clinical isolate was sequenced. PMID:25838490

  3. Cervical spinal cord injection of epidural corticosteroids; comprehensive longitudinal study including multiparametric MRI

    PubMed Central

    Cohen-Adad, Julien; Buchbinder, Bradley; Oaklander, Anne Louise

    2012-01-01

    Despite widespread use, the efficacy of epidural corticosteroid injections (ESI) for osteoarthritis-associated neck or radicular pain remains uncertain, so even rare serious complications enter into discussions about use. However various factors impede investigation and publication of serious adverse events. To that end, we developed new magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) techniques for spinal cord white-matter quantification and employed best-available physiological tests to characterize a cervical spinal cord lesion caused by inadvertent intramedullary injection of Depo-Medrol. A 29-year-old woman with mild cervical osteoarthritis had 2 years of headache and neck pain (concussion and whiplash) after two minor motor-vehicle accidents. During C5–6 ESI, she developed new left-sided motor and sensory symptoms and MRI demonstrated a new left dorsal spinal cord cavity. Mild left-sided motor and sensory symptoms have persisted for more than 2 years, during which time we performed serial neurological examinations, standard electrodiagnostics, somatosensory evoked potentials, and transcranial measurement of corticospinal central motor conduction time (CMCT). We used 3 tesla MRI with a 32-channel coil developed for high-resolution cervical spinal cord structural imaging, diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and magnetization transfer (MT). T2*-weighted signal, DTI and MT metrics showed delayed spread of the lesion across four vertebral levels rostrally, consistent with Wallerian degeneration within the ascending left dorsal columns. However only CMCT metrics detected objective correlates of her left hemiparesis and bilateral hyperreflexia. DTI and MT metrics may better distinguish between post-traumatic demyelination and axonal degeneration than conventional MRI. These tests should be considered to better characterize similar spinal cord injuries. PMID:22964435

  4. Spinal Cord Infarction after Cervical Transforaminal Epidural Steroid Injection: Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Jangsup; Kwon, Hyung-Min

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Transforaminal epidural steroid injection (TFESI) is a widely used nonsurgical procedure in the treatment of patients with radiculopathy. It is efficacious in relieving pain, but a number of complications are being reported. Recently, increasing frequency of major complications, such as spinal cord infarction and cerebral infarction, has been reported with the use of a particulate steroid within fluoroscopic-guided procedures. Methods We report a 49-year-old man with a history of chronic cervical radiculopathy, who experienced a devastating complication after TFESI. Results After 2 min of regular TFESI, the patient abruptly experienced muscle weakness in both upper extremities and within 5 min the patient became quadriplegic. Despite active rehabilitation, the patient remained bed-ridden 4 years after the catastrophic event. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of spinal cord infarction that occurred after TFESI in Korea. Conclusion Considering the risk of dreadful complications, which appear in an unpredictable manner, TFESI with fluoroscopic guidance should be done only with a nonparticulate steroid. PMID:28203184

  5. Cooccurrence of Metastatic Papillary Thyroid Carcinoma and Salmonella Induced Neck Abscess in a Cervical Lymph Node

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jae-Myung; Jung, Eun Jung; Song, Eun Jin; Kim, Dong Chul; Jeong, Chi-Young; Ju, Young-Tae; Lee, Young-Joon; Hong, Soon-Chan; Choi, Sang-Kyung; Ha, Woo-Song

    2017-01-01

    Cervical lymph node metastasis is common in patients with papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC). Salmonella species are rarely reported as causative agents in focal infections of the head and neck. The cooccurrence of lymph node metastasis from PTC and a bacterial infection is rare. This report describes a 76-year-old woman with a cervical lymph node metastasis from PTC and Salmonella infection of the same lymph node. The patient presented with painful swelling in her left lateral neck region for 15 days, and neck ultrasonography and computed tomography showed a cystic mass along left levels II–IV. The cystic mass was suspected of being a metastatic lymph node; modified radical neck dissection was performed. Histopathological examination confirmed the presence of PTC in the resected node and laboratory examination of the combined abscess cavity confirmed the presence of Salmonella Typhi. Following antibiotic sensitivity testing of the cultured Salmonella Typhi, she was treated with proper antibiotics. Cystic lesions in lymph nodes with metastatic cancer may indicate the presence of cooccurring bacterial infection. Thus, culturing of specimen can be option to make accurate diagnosis and to provide proper postoperative management. PMID:28261270

  6. Comparison of Clinical Efficacy Between Interlaminar and Transforaminal Epidural Injection in Patients With Axial Pain due to Cervical Disc Herniation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jung Hwan; Lee, Sang-Ho

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Transforaminal (TF) approach is preferred by physician to interlaminar (IL) approach because it can deliver injectates directly around nerve root and dorsal root ganglion, which is regarded as main pain sources. Axial neck pain is originated from sinuvertebral nerve located in ventral epidural spaces, which has been described to be related to central or paramedian disc herniation. It is very questionable that TF injection is also more effective than IL injection in the patients with axial neck or interscapular pain. This study was to evaluate clinical efficacy of cervical epidural injection in patients with axial pain due to cervical disc herniation and to compare the clinical outcomes between TF and IL approaches. Fifty-six and 52 patients who underwent IL and TF epidural injections, respectively, for axial neck/interscapular pain due to central or paramedian cervical disc herniation were included. Numeric Rating Scale (NRS) and Neck Disability Index (NDI) were compared between both groups at 2 and 8 weeks after treatment. Successful pain relief was defined if a 50% or more reduction of NRS score was achieved in comparison with pretreatment one. Successful functional improvement was defined if at least a 40% reduction of NDI was obtained. Overall, 79 (73.1%) and 57 (52.8%) among 108 patients showed successful pain relief at 2 and 8 weeks, respectively. Seventy-six (70.4%) and 52 (48.1%) had successful functional improvement at 2 and 8 weeks, respectively. The IL and TF groups showed no significant difference in proportion of successful results of NRS 2 weeks (73.2% vs 67.3%) and 8 weeks (48.2% vs 48.1%). Also, no significant difference was obtained in proportion of successful NDI between 2 groups at 2 weeks (75.0% vs 71.2%) and 8 weeks (53.6% vs 51.9%). Cervical epidural injection showed favorable results in 2 weeks and moderate results in 8 weeks in patients with axial pain due to cervical disc herniation. IL and TF showed no significant difference in

  7. Incidence of Inadvertent Dural Puncture During CT Fluoroscopy-Guided Interlaminar Epidural Corticosteroid Injections in the Cervical Spine: An Analysis of 974 Cases.

    PubMed

    Amrhein, T J; Parivash, S N; Gray, L; Kranz, P G

    2017-09-01

    The objective of this study is to determine the rate of inadvertent dural puncture during CT fluoroscopy-guided cervical interlaminar epidural corticosteroid injection. In addition, in a subanalysis, we aim to assess the rate of inadvertent dural puncture superior to C5-C6 occurring during interlaminar epidural corticosteroid injection using CT fluoroscopy guidance because such injections are not performed using conventional fluoroscopy. Images obtained from consecutive CT fluoroscopy-guided cervical interlaminar epidural corticosteroid injections conducted from November 2009 to November 2015 were reviewed. The following information was recorded: the presence of inadvertent dural puncture, the level of the cervical interlaminar space, approach laterality (left or right), anteroposterior spinal canal diameter, and the presence of a trainee. Two-tailed Fisher exact tests were used for assessment of categoric variables, and t tests were used for continuous variables. A total of 974 cervical interlaminar epidural corticosteroid injections were identified in 728 patients. Inadvertent dural punctures were identified in association with 1.4% (14/974) of these injections; all punctures were recognized during the procedure. Needle placements were performed at every cervical level (C1-C2 through C7-T1). The highest rate of dural puncture (2.8%) occurred at C5-C6. No dural punctures occurred superior to C5-C6 (16.6% of cases). The complication rate was 0.4%. Only greater anteroposterior spinal canal diameter was associated with increased dural puncture rates (p = 0.049). CT fluoroscopy-guided cervical interlaminar epidural corticosteroid injections were performed at all levels throughout the cervical spine. A very low complication rate and a minimal rate of inadvertent dural puncture were noted, similar to previously reported rates for conventional fluoroscopy-guided injections limited to the lower cervical spine only.

  8. Do the gaps in the ligamentum flavum in the cervical spine translate into dural punctures? An analysis of 4,396 fluoroscopic interlaminar epidural injections.

    PubMed

    Manchikanti, Laxmaiah; Malla, Yogesh; Cash, Kimberly A; Pampati, Vidyasagar

    2015-01-01

    Cervical interlaminar epidural injections are performed frequently in managing chronic neck and upper extremity pain, although less commonly than lumbar interlaminar epidural injections. Recently, the US Food and Drug Administration warnings and safeguards to prevent neurologic complications. These were developed by the Multi-Society Pain Workgroup have taken center stage for all types of epidural injections, including cervical interlaminar epidural injections. The recommendations of safeguards to prevent neurologic complications after epidural steroid injections include that cervical interlaminar epidural injections must be performed utilizing fluoroscopy with anteroposterior, lateral, or oblique views with injection of contrast medium and that entry be limited to the C7-T1 epidural space or occasionally the C6-C7 with requirements for magnetic resonance imaging assessment of the epidural space. To assess the incidence of dural puncture associated with fluoroscopically directed cervical interlaminar epidural injections. A retrospective assessment of patients undergoing cervical interlaminar epidural injections from January 2013 through February 2015. A private interventional pain management practice; a specialty referral center in the United States. The data were collected for 4,396 consecutive cervical interlaminar epidural injections performed from January 2013 through February 2015. The procedures were all performed under fluoroscopic visualization under posteroanterior view with contrast medium injection with lateral view confirmation when indicated. The procedures were performed by one of 2 physicians; the dural puncture and subsequent postoperative complications with level of epidural entry were determined. The outcome was assessment of dural puncture. A review of multiple manuscripts showed that defects in the ligamentum flavum may extend to as much as 100% of the population. However, it also has been shown that among the levels with a gap, the location of

  9. Spinal Myoclonus Developed during Cervical Epidural Drug Infusion in Postherpetic Neuralgia Patient

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Younghoon; Baek, Sung Uk

    2011-01-01

    Postherpetic neuralgia is the most frequent complication of herpes zoster. Treatment of this neuropathic pain syndrome is difficult and often disappointing. Although postherpetic neuralgia is generally a self-limited condition, it can last indefinitely. Continuous epidural blockade for patients with acute zoster can shorten the duration of treatment. However, continuous epidural block has some complications such as infection, dural puncture, and total spinal and nerve damages. We report a case of myoclonus during continuous epidural block with ropivacaine, morphine, and ketamine in an acute zoster patient. PMID:21935497

  10. Spinal Myoclonus Developed during Cervical Epidural Drug Infusion in Postherpetic Neuralgia Patient.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Younghoon; Baek, Sung Uk; Yeo, Jin Seok

    2011-09-01

    Postherpetic neuralgia is the most frequent complication of herpes zoster. Treatment of this neuropathic pain syndrome is difficult and often disappointing. Although postherpetic neuralgia is generally a self-limited condition, it can last indefinitely. Continuous epidural blockade for patients with acute zoster can shorten the duration of treatment. However, continuous epidural block has some complications such as infection, dural puncture, and total spinal and nerve damages. We report a case of myoclonus during continuous epidural block with ropivacaine, morphine, and ketamine in an acute zoster patient.

  11. [Combined spinal and epidural anesthesia for cesarean delivery in a patient with a cervical fracture at C2].

    PubMed

    Mochidome, Mariko; Sakamoto, Akiyuki; Tanaka, Hidenori; Sugiyama, Daisuke; Kawamata, Mikito

    2013-04-01

    There are only a few reports on cesarean section in a patient with cervical fracture without spinal cord injury (SCI). Such patients have high risks for deterioration of SCI following general or regional anesthesia. Here, we present a patient with a fracture of C2 vertebra who underwent cesarean section safely under combined spinal and epidural anesthesia(CSEA). A 30-year-old woman had a fracture of the C2 cervical vertebra (Hangman's fracture) due to a traffic accident at 34 weeks of gestation. Conservative immobilization of the head and neck was done with a neck collar (Philadelphia brace) in order to prevent subsequent SCI after the spine injury. Pre-viability amniorrhexis was seen at 37 weeks' gestation, and an emergency cesarean section was scheduled under combined epidural and spinal anesthesia (CSEA). Her neck and head were carefully fixed before, during and after surgery in order to prevent subsequent SCI. As a result, cesarean section under CSEA was successfully performed in the patient without any deterioration of the spine and/or SCI.

  12. Optimal volume of injectate for fluoroscopy-guided cervical interlaminar epidural injection in patients with neck and upper extremity pain

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jun Young; Kim, Doo Hwan; Lee, Kunhee; Choi, Seong-Soo; Leem, Jeong-Gil

    2016-01-01

    Abstract There is no study of optimal volume of contrast medium to use in cervical interlaminar epidural injections (CIEIs) for appropriate spread to target lesions. To determine optimal volume of contrast medium to use in CIEIs. We analyzed the records of 80 patients who had undergone CIEIs. Patients were divided into 3 groups according to the amount of contrast: 3, 4.5, and 6 mL. The spread of medium to the target level was analyzed. Numerical rating scale data were also analyzed. The dye had spread to a point above the target level in 15 (78.9%), 22 (84.6%), and 32 (91.4%) patients in groups 1 to 3, respectively. The dye reached both sides in 14 (73.7%), 18 (69.2%), and 23 (65.7%) patients, and reached the ventral epidural space in 15 (78.9%), 22 (84.6%), and 30 (85.7%) patients, respectively. There were no significant differences of contrast spread among the groups. There were no significant differences in the numerical rating scale scores among the groups during the 3 months. When performing CIEIs, 3 mL medication is sufficient volume for the treatment of neck and upper-extremity pain induced by lower cervical degenerative disease. PMID:27787378

  13. Retropharyngeal abscess with secondary osteomyelitis and epidural abscess: proposed pathophysiological mechanism of an underrecognized complication of unstable craniocervical injuries: case report.

    PubMed

    Goulart, Carlos R; Mattei, Tobias A; Fiore, Mariano E; Thoman, William J; Mendel, Ehud

    2016-01-01

    Because of the proximity of the oropharynx (a naturally contaminated region) to the spinal structures of the craniocervical junction, it is possible that small mucosal lacerations in the oropharynx caused by unstable traumatic craniocervical injuries may become contaminated and lead to secondary infection and osteomyelitis. In this report, the authors describe the case of a previously healthy and immunocompetent patient who developed a large retropharyngeal abscess with spinal osteomyelitis after a high-energy craniocervical injury. This unusual report of osteomyelitis with a delayed presentation after a high-energy traumatic injury of the craniocervical junction highlights the possibility of direct injury to a specific area in the oropharyngeal mucosa adjacent to the osteoligamentous structures of the craniocervical junction, an overall underrecognized complication of unstable craniocervical injuries.

  14. Acute Cervical Epidural Hematoma, Screw Pullout, and Esophageal Perforation After Anterior Cervical Corpectomy Surgery: Report of a Case

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ye; Zhu, Qing-San; Liu, Jing-Chen; Wu, Yun-Tao

    2015-01-01

    To report a series of complications related to anterior cervical surgery in the same patient. There have been many reports of complications related to anterior cervical surgeries. These include cervical hematoma, instrumentation extrusion, or esophageal injury after anterior cervical decompression. However, there have been no reports of all these complications occurring in 1 patient. This is our report of a patient who experienced all 3 of these complications. The patient was a 73-year-old man suffering from cervical spondylotic myelopathy who was treated with C5 anterior cervical corpectomy and fusion with titanium mesh and bone graft. The patient successively experienced cervical hematoma, screw pullout, and esophageal perforation, and was treated accordingly. Although the patient suffered a series of complications after anterior cervical corpectomy, all the complications were treated successfully. It serves as a caution that a first complication such as hematoma in anterior cervical corpectomy with fusion should be given enough attention to prevent further complications. PMID:25692439

  15. An unusual presentation of autonomic dysreflexia in a patient with cold abscess of cervical spine for anterolateral decompression

    PubMed Central

    Sarangi, Susmita; Taneja, Dipali; Saxena, Bhavna

    2016-01-01

    A young female having complaints of quadriparesis along with bladder and bowel involvement, diagnosed to have osseous destruction of C4, C6, C7, T2 vertebral bodies with pre- and para-vertebral abscess, was taken up for anterolateral decompression and fusion of cervical spine. She presented with anxiety, agitation, sweating and headache and was in hypertensive crisis which was refractory to antihypertensives, anxiolytics and analgesics but showed a reasonable response to intravenous dexmedetomidine and finally responded dramatically to rectal evacuation. Autonomic dysreflexia was suspected with stimulus arising from distended rectum as all other causes of hypertension were ruled out. PMID:28003699

  16. A Case of Subclavian Artery Aneurysm with History of Ischemic Heart Disease Operated Under Cervical Epidural Anesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Rath, Amrita; Abhinay, J.; Loha, Sandeep; Singh, Atul Kumar

    2017-01-01

    Subclavian artery aneurysm is usually operated under general anesthesia (GA), but in specific situations, it can also be conducted under regional anesthesia (RA) such as cervical epidural anesthesia (CEA). A 48-year-old male presented with chief complaint of progressive swelling in the right side of the neck for the past 3 months following trauma. He was diagnosed as subclavian artery aneurysm, and surgical intervention was advised. He had previous history of angina 4 months back for which tablet aspirin 75 mg and tablet clopidogrel 75 mg once daily was prescribed. Cardiological evaluation revealed of an ejection fraction of around 30% with mild left ventricular hypokinesia and grade 2 diastolic dysfunction. Due to the poor cardiac functional status of the patient, RA with CEA was planned. The risk with GA in cases with a history of myocardial ischemia is more than RA, hence, it is better to use CEA which is equally efficacious in such high-risk cases. PMID:28298800

  17. Longitudinal extensive transverse myelitis with cervical epidural haematoma following dengue virus infection.

    PubMed

    Fong, Choong Yi; Hlaing, Chaw Su; Tay, Chee Geap; Kadir, Khairul Azmi Abdul; Goh, Khean Jin; Ong, Lai Choo

    2016-05-01

    Longitudinal extensive transverse myelitis associated with dengue infection is rare with no reported paediatric cases. We report a 12-year-old girl who presented with flaccid quadriplegia 8 days after onset of acute dengue fever. MRI spine showed T2 hyperintensity associated with epidural hematoma at C3-C6 level of the spinal cord. Transcranial magnetic brain stimulation revealed absent motor evoked potentials bilaterally. We also summarise and compare the reported cases of transverse myelitis associated with dengue infection. Immunomodulatory treatment was given which included pulse methylprednisolone, intravenous immunoglobulin and plasmapharesis. Six months post-admission, there was a good (near-complete) clinical recovery with the repeat MRI showing mild residual hyperintensity at C4 level and complete resolution of epidural haematoma. This is the first reported paediatric case of longitudinal extensive transverse myelitis following dengue infection. It is also the first to illustrate that in patients with concomitant epidural haematoma a good outcome is possible despite not having surgical decompression. Clinicians should be aware of parainfectious dengue-related longitudinal extensive transverse myelitis in children and consider prompt immunomodulatory treatment. Copyright © 2016 European Paediatric Neurology Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Effect of reduced z-axis scan coverage on diagnostic performance and radiation dose of neck computed tomography in patients with suspected cervical abscess.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Jakob; Maurer, Michael; Ketelsen, Dominik; Notohamiprodjo, Mike; Zinsser, Dominik; Wichmann, Julian L; Nikolaou, Konstantin; Bamberg, Fabian; Othman, Ahmed E

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the effect of reduced z-axis scan coverage on diagnostic performance and radiation dose of neck CT in patients with suspected cervical abscess. Fifty-one patients with suspected cervical abscess were included and underwent contrast-enhanced neck CT on a 2nd or 3rd generation dual-source CT system. Image acquisition ranged from the aortic arch to the upper roof of the frontal sinuses (CTstd). Subsequently, series with reduced z-axis coverage (CTred) were reconstructed starting at the aortic arch up to the orbital floor. CTstd and CTred were independently assessed by two radiologists for the presence/absence of cervical abscesses and for incidental and alternative findings. In addition, diagnostic accuracy for the depiction of the cervical abscesses was calculated for both readers. Furthermore, DLP (dose-length-product), effective dose (ED) and organ doses were calculated and compared for CTred and CTstd, using a commercially available dose management platform. A total of 41 abscesses and 3 incidental/alternative findings were identified in CTstd. All abscesses and incidental/alternative findings could also be detected on CTred resulting in a sensitivity and specificity of 1.0 for both readers. DLP, ED and organ doses of the brain, the eye lenses, the red bone marrow and the salivary glands of CTred were significantly lower than for CTstd (p<0.001). Reducing z-axis coverage of neck CT allows for a significant reduction of effective dose and organ doses at similar diagnostic performance as compared to CTstd.

  19. Two-Year Follow-Up Results of Fluoroscopic Cervical Epidural Injections in Chronic Axial or Discogenic Neck Pain: A Randomized, Double-Blind, Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Manchikanti, Laxmaiah; Cash, Kimberly A.; Pampati, Vidyasagar; Malla, Yogesh

    2014-01-01

    Study Design: A randomized, double-blind, active-controlled trial. Objective: To assess the effectiveness of cervical interlaminar epidural injections of local anesthetic with or without steroids for the management of axial or discogenic pain in patients without disc herniation, radiculitis, or facet joint pain. Summary of Background Data: Cervical discogenic pain without disc herniation is a common cause of suffering and disability in the adult population. Once conservative management has failed and facet joint pain has been excluded, cervical epidural injections may be considered as a management tool. Despite a paucity of evidence, cervical epidural injections are one of the most commonly performed nonsurgical interventions in the management of chronic axial or disc-related neck pain. Methods: One hundred and twenty patients without disc herniation or radiculitis and negative for facet joint pain as determined by means of controlled diagnostic medial branch blocks were randomly assigned to one of the 2 treatment groups. Group I patients received cervical interlaminar epidural injections of local anesthetic (lidocaine 0.5%, 5 mL), whereas Group II patients received 0.5% lidocaine, 4 mL, mixed with 1 mL or 6 mg of nonparticulate betamethasone. The primary outcome measure was ≥ 50% improvement in pain and function. Outcome assessments included numeric rating scale (NRS), Neck Disability Index (NDI), opioid intake, employment, and changes in weight. Results: Significant pain relief and functional improvement (≥ 50%) was present at the end of 2 years in 73% of patients receiving local anesthetic only and 70% receiving local anesthetic with steroids. In the successful group of patients, however, defined as consistent relief with 2 initial injections of at least 3 weeks, significant improvement was illustrated in 78% in the local anesthetic group and 75% in the local anesthetic with steroid group at the end of 2 years. The results reported at the one-year follow

  20. Fluoroscopic cervical epidural injections in chronic axial or disc-related neck pain without disc herniation, facet joint pain, or radiculitis

    PubMed Central

    Manchikanti, Laxmaiah; Cash, Kimberly A; Pampati, Vidyasagar; Malla, Yogesh

    2012-01-01

    Background While chronic neck pain is a common problem in the adult population, with a typical 12-month prevalence of 30%–50%, there is a lack of consensus regarding its causes and treatment. Despite limited evidence, cervical epidural injections are one of the commonly performed nonsurgical interventions in the management of chronic neck pain. Methods A randomized, double-blind, active, controlled trial was conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of cervical interlaminar epidural injections of local anesthetic with or without steroids for the management of chronic neck pain with or without upper extremity pain in patients without disc herniation, radiculitis, or facet joint pain. Results One hundred and twenty patients without disc herniation or radiculitis and negative for facet joint pain by means of controlled diagnostic medial branch blocks were randomly assigned to one of two treatment groups, ie, injection of local anesthetic only (group 1) or local anesthetic mixed with nonparticulate betamethasone (group 2). The primary outcome of significant pain relief and improvement in functional status (≥50%) was demonstrated in 72% of group 1 and 68% of group 2. The overall average number of procedures per year was 3.6 in both groups with an average total relief per year of 37–39 weeks in the successful group over a period of 52 weeks. Conclusion Cervical interlaminar epidural injections of local anesthetic with or without steroids may be effective in patients with chronic function-limiting discogenic or axial pain. PMID:22826642

  1. A Rare Case of Transverse Sinus Venous Thrombosis Simulating Postdural Puncture Headache After Cervical Epidural Injection.

    PubMed

    Guirguis, Maged; Jusino, Eduardo; Tolba, Reda; Samuel, Samuel

    2016-08-01

    Postdural puncture headache (PDPH) is a feared complication related to epidural steroid injections. We report a unique case in which all subjective and objective findings indicated the diagnosis of PDPH. However, the patient failed appropriate conservative and interventional management. Therapeutic failure prompted further investigation to establish the correct diagnosis of cerebral venous sinus thrombosis. Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis is a rare, difficult to diagnose, but potentially lethal disorder with nonspecific and variable clinical presentations, including headache and focal neurological deficits. Performing magnetic resonance imaging and magnetic resonance venogram should be considered early, especially in patients who fail to respond to standard interventions for PDPH.

  2. High frequency epidural stimulation across the respiratory cycle evokes phrenic short-term potentiation after incomplete cervical spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Rothi, Elisa J; Streeter, Kristi A; Hanna, Marie H; Stamas, Anna C; Reier, Paul J; Baekey, David M; Fuller, David D

    2017-06-14

    C2 spinal hemilesion (C2Hx) paralyzes the ipsilateral diaphragm, but recovery is possible through activation of "crossed spinal" synaptic inputs to ipsilateral phrenic motoneurons. We tested the hypothesis that high frequency epidural stimulation (HF-ES) would potentiate ipsilateral phrenic output after subacute and chronic C2Hx. HF-ES (300 Hz) was applied to the ventrolateral C4 or T2 spinal cord ipsilateral to C2Hx in anesthetized and mechanically ventilated adult rats. Stimulus duration was 60-sec and currents ranged from 100-1000 µA. Bilateral phrenic nerve activity and ipsilateral hypoglossal nerve activity were recorded before and after HF-ES. Higher T2 stimulus currents potentiated ipsilateral phasic inspiratory activity at both 2- and 12-wks post-C2Hx, while higher stimulus currents delivered at C4 potentiated ipsilateral phasic phrenic activity only at 12-wks (P=0.028). Meanwhile, tonic output in the ipsilateral phrenic nerve reached 500% of baseline values at the high currents with no difference between 2- and 12-wks. HF-ES did not trigger inspiratory burst frequency changes. Similar responses occurred following T2 HF-ES. Increases in contralateral phrenic and XII nerve output were induced by C4 and T2 HF-ES at higher currents, but the relative magnitude of these changes was small compared to the ipsilateral phrenic response. We conclude that following incomplete cervical SCI, HF-ES of the ventrolateral mid-cervical or thoracic spinal cord can potentiate efferent phrenic motor output with little impact on inspiratory burst frequency. However, the substantial increases in tonic output indicate that the uninterrupted 60-sec stimulation paradigm used here is unlikely to be useful for respiratory muscle activation after spinal injury. Copyright © 2016, Journal of Neurophysiology.

  3. Posttraumatic Stress Disorder After High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy for Cervical Cancer With 2 Fractions in 1 Application Under Spinal/Epidural Anesthesia: Incidence and Risk Factors

    SciTech Connect

    Kirchheiner, Kathrin; Czajka-Pepl, Agnieszka; Scharbert, Gisela; Wetzel, Léonore; Sturdza, Alina; Dörr, Wolfgang; Pötter, Richard

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To investigate the psychological consequences of high-dose-rate brachytherapy with 2 fractions in 1 application under spinal/epidural anesthesia in the treatment of locally advanced cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: In 50 patients with locally advanced cervical cancer, validated questionnaires were used for prospective assessment of acute and posttraumatic stress disorder (ASD/PTSD) (Impact of Event Scale–Revision), anxiety/depression (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale), quality of life (European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer Quality of Life Questionnaire Core 30/Cervical Cancer 24), physical functioning (World Health Organization performance status), and pain (visual analogue scale), before and during treatment and 1 week and 3 months after treatment. Qualitative interviews were recorded in open format for content analysis. Results: Symptoms of ASD occurred in 30% of patients 1 week after treatment; and of PTSD in 41% 3 months after treatment in association with this specific brachytherapy procedure. Pretreatment predictive variables explain 82% of the variance of PTSD symptoms. Helpful experiences were the support of the treatment team, psychological support, and a positive attitude. Stressful factors were pain, organizational problems during treatment, and immobility between brachytherapy fractions. Conclusions: The specific brachytherapy procedure, as performed in the investigated mono-institutional setting with 2 fractions in 1 application under spinal/epidural anesthesia, bears a considerable risk of traumatization. The source of stress seems to be not the brachytherapy application itself but the maintenance of the applicator under epidural anesthesia in the time between fractions. Patients at risk may be identified before treatment, to offer targeted psycho-social support. The patients' open reports regarding helpful experiences are an encouraging feedback for the treatment team; the reported stressful factors

  4. Primary spinal epidural B-lymphoblastic lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Nambiar, Rakul K.; Prabhakaran, Pranab K.; Mathew, Sherin P.

    2017-01-01

    Extranodal lymphomas constitute 20% to 30% of all non-Hodgkin's lymphomas. The common sites involved are skin, stomach, brain, and small intestine. Epidural localization is a rare site for lymphomas, accounting for 10% of spinal epidural tumors. Lymphomas occurring primarily in the epidural space without other previously detected lymphomatous foci (i.e., primary spinal epidural lymphomas) represent an even rarer entity. We report a case of primary spinal epidural B-lymphoblastic lymphoma. The patient presented with paraparesis, and a spinal epidural lesion was diagnosed. Considering the rapidity of symptom onset, the possibility of epidural abscess was considered, and he underwent partial laminectomy with decompression of the lesion. Histopathology and immunohistochemistry were diagnostic of B-lymphoblastic lymphoma. The present case is the first report in the literature of B-lymphoblastic lymphoma presenting as a spinal epidural lesion. PMID:28127138

  5. Cervical epidural analgesia in current anaesthesia practice: systematic review of its clinical utility and rationale, and technical considerations.

    PubMed

    Shanthanna, H; Mendis, N; Goel, A

    2016-02-01

    Cervical epidural analgesia (CEA) is an analgesic technique, potentially useful for surgeries involving the upper body. Despite the inherent technical risks and systemic changes, it has been used for various surgeries. There have been no previously published systematic reviews aimed at assessing its clinical utility. This systematic review was performed to explore the perioperative benefits of CEA. The review was also aimed at identifying the rationale of its use, reported surgical indications and the method of use. We performed a literature search involving PubMed and Embase databases, to identify studies using CEA for surgical indications. Out of 467 potentially relevant articles, 73 articles were selected. Two independent investigators extracted data involving 5 randomized controlled trials, 17 observational comparative trials, and 51 case reports (series). The outcomes studied in most comparative studies were on effects of local anaesthetics and other agents, systemic effects, and feasibility of CEA. In one randomized controlled study, CEA was observed to decrease the resting pain scores after pharyngo-laryngeal surgeries. In a retrospective study, CEA was shown to decrease the cancer recurrence after pharyngeal-hypopharyngeal surgeries. The limited evidence, small studies, and the chosen outcomes do not allow for any specific recommendations based on the relative benefit or harm of CEA. Considering the potential for significant harm, in the face of better alternatives, its use must have a strong rationale mostly supported by unique patient and surgical demands. Future studies must aim to assess analgesic comparator effectiveness for clinically relevant outcomes. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Journal of Anaesthesia. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. Case report of an epidural cervical Onchocerca lupi infection in a 13-year-old boy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Tsinsue; Moon, Karam; deMello, Daphne E; Feiz-Erfan, Iman; Theodore, Nicholas; Bhardwaj, Ratan D

    2015-08-01

    A 13-year-old boy presented with fever and neck pain and stiffness, which was initially misdiagnosed as culture-negative meningitis. Magnetic resonance images of the brain and cervical spine demonstrated what appeared to be an intradural extramedullary mass at the C1-3 level, resulting in moderate cord compression, and a Chiari Type I malformation. The patient underwent a suboccipital craniectomy and a C1-3 laminectomy with intradural exploration for excisional biopsy and resection. The lesion containing the parasite was extradural, extending laterally through the C2-3 foramina. Inflammatory tissue secondary to Onchocerca lupi infection was identified, and treatment with steroids and doxycycline was initiated. At the 6-month follow-up, the patient remained asymptomatic, with MR images demonstrating a significant reduction in lesional size. However, 10 weeks postoperatively, the infection recurred, necessitating a second operation. The patient was treated with an additional course of doxycycline and is currently maintained on ivermectin therapy. This is the second reported case of cervical O. lupi infection in a human. In the authors' experience, oral doxycycline alone was insufficient in controlling the disease, and the addition of ivermectin therapy was necessary.

  7. Skin abscess

    MedlinePlus

    Abscess - skin; Cutaneous abscess; Subcutaneous abscess; MRSA - abscess; Staph infection - abscess ... have methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) or another staph infection, follow instructions for self-care at home.

  8. Pneumococcal Vertebral Osteomyelitis after Epidural Injection: A Rare Event

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Tamara M; Chitturi, Chandrika; Lange, Michael; Suh, Jin S; Slim, Jihad

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae vertebral infections have rarely been reported. Herein, we report a case of pneumococcal vertebral osteomyelitis with paraspinal and epidural abscesses as well as concomitant bacteremia following epidural injection. This will be the second case in the literature reporting pneumococcal vertebral osteomyelitis related to epidural manipulation. PMID:27621563

  9. Reliability and Accuracy of MRI Laminar Angle Measurements to Determine Intra-Procedural Contralateral Oblique View Angle for Cervical or Thoracic Interlaminar Epidural Steroid Injections.

    PubMed

    Levi, David S; Horn, Scott; Collado, Alexandra

    2016-09-01

    Contralateral oblique (CLO) angle view has been a useful addition to standard views in fluoroscopically guided interlaminar epidural injections. Determination of the appropriate CLO angle is paramount in the usefulness of this technique. Using MRI laminar angle measurements as a pre-procedural guide for the intra-procedural fluoroscopic CLO angle has been proposed. The purpose of this study was to help determine if using axial MRI laminar measurements prior to a cervical or thoracic epidural steroid injection would be useful in predicting the appropriate fluoroscopic CLO angle. A retrospective review was performed for patients who underwent cervical or thoracic interlaminar injections. In the performance of interlaminar injections, the authors had routinely determined the true fluoroscopic contra-lateral oblique angle after epidural access was confirmed, for use during any potential future injections. The fluoroscopic CLO angle measurements were obtained from a chart review and compared blindly to each patient's MRI axial laminar angle measurements. 34 injections were included. Inter-rater reliability comparing the two authors' MRI angle measurements was considered fair, ICC = 0.395. Accuracy was only 57% comparing MRI laminar angle measurements to within five degrees of the true fluoroscopic CLO angle as determined during the injection procedure. Accuracy by ICC showed only fair agreement, 0.47 and 0.22, for the two authors. The findings of this study indicate fair inter-rater reliability in manual measurements of laminar angle on axial MRI images. MRI laminar angle measurements do not appear to be highly accurate in determining the appropriate fluoroscopic CLO angle. © 2016 American Academy of Pain Medicine. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Brain abscess

    MedlinePlus

    ... with certain heart disorders, may receive antibiotics before dental or other procedures to help reduce the risk of infection. Alternative Names Abscess - brain; Cerebral abscess; CNS abscess Patient Instructions Brain surgery - discharge Images Amebic brain abscess ...

  11. Nonoperative Management of Cervical Radiculopathy.

    PubMed

    Childress, Marc A; Becker, Blair A

    2016-05-01

    Cervical radiculopathy describes pain in one or both of the upper extremities, often in the setting of neck pain, secondary to compression or irritation of nerve roots in the cervical spine. It can be accompanied by motor, sensory, or reflex deficits and is most prevalent in persons 50 to 54 years of age. Cervical radiculopathy most often stems from degenerative disease in the cervical spine. The most common examination findings are painful neck movements and muscle spasm. Diminished deep tendon reflexes, particularly of the triceps, are the most common neurologic finding. The Spurling test, shoulder abduction test, and upper limb tension test can be used to confirm the diagnosis. Imaging is not required unless there is a history of trauma, persistent symptoms, or red flags for malignancy, myelopathy, or abscess. Electrodiagnostic testing is not needed if the diagnosis is clear, but has clinical utility when peripheral neuropathy of the upper extremity is a likely alternate diagnosis. Patients should be reassured that most cases will resolve regardless of the type of treatment. Nonoperative treatment includes physical therapy involving strengthening, stretching, and potentially traction, as well as nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, muscle relaxants, and massage. Epidural steroid injections may be helpful but have higher risks of serious complications. In patients with red flag symptoms or persistent symptoms after four to six weeks of treatment, magnetic resonance imaging can identify pathology amenable to epidural steroid injections or surgery.

  12. Antibacterial activity of epidural infusions.

    PubMed

    Coghlan, M W; Davies, M J; Hoyt, C; Joyce, L; Kilner, R; Waters, M J

    2009-01-01

    The incidence of epidural abscess following epidural catheterisation appears to be increasing, being recently reported as one in 1000 among surgical patients. This study was designed to investigate the antibacterial activity of various local anaesthetics and additives, used in epidural infusions, against a range of micro-organisms associated with epidural abscess. The aim was to determine which, if any, epidural infusion solution has the greatest antibacterial activity. Bupivacaine, ropivacaine and levobupivacaine crystals were dissolved and added to Mueller-Hinton Agar in concentrations of 0.06%, 0.125%, 0.2%, 0.25%, 0.5% and 1%. Fentanyl, adrenaline and clonidine were also mixed with agar in isolation and in combination with the local anaesthetics. Using a reference agar dilution method, the minimum inhibitory concentrations were determined for a range of bacteria. Bupivacaine showed antibacterial activity against Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus faecalis and Escherichia coli with minimum inhibitory concentrations between 0.125% and 0.25%. It did not inhibit the growth of Pseudomonas aeruginosa at any of the concentrations tested. Levobupivacaine and ropivacaine showed no activity against Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus faecalis and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, even at the highest concentrations tested, and minimal activity against Escherichia coli (minimum inhibitory concentrations 0.5% and 1% respectively). The presence of fentanyl, adrenaline and clonidine had no additional effect on the antibacterial activity of any of the local anaesthetic agents. The low concentrations of local anaesthetic usually used in epidural infusions have minimal antibacterial activity. While the clinical implications of this in vitro study are not known, consideration should be given to increasing the concentration of bupivacaine in an epidural infusion or to administering a daily bolus of 0.25% bupivacaine to reduce the risk of epidural bacterial growth.

  13. [Brucellar spinal abscess. Case report

    PubMed

    Cecchini, L.; Coari, G.; Iagnocco, A.; Valesini, G.

    2001-01-01

    Brucellosis is a zoonosis commonly present in many areas of the world; in some Mediterranean countries it is endemic. The disease is usually transmitted to humans by ingestion of contaminated food; rarely it may be transmitted either by direct penetration through skin lesions or conjunctival mucosa or even by inhalation of aerosols. The disease may be asymptomatic, but in some occasions acute or chronic symptoms are present. Among localised forms of the disease spinal involvement is rare but it should be suspected in many Mediterranean areas where brucellosis is endemic. In particular, the extension of the brucellar abscess within the epidural space with contemporaneous muscular involvement is unusual. The authors report a case of a patient with multiple spinal brucellar abscesses of exceptional dimensions, extending in the epidural space and within paravertebral and psoas muscles and causing compression of the lumbar nerve roots. The exact localisation and extension of the abscess have been accurately defined by MRI.

  14. Our experience in the diagnosis of spinal epidural abscess with the use of new diagnostic methods--computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Aleksić-Shihabi, Anka; Dubravica, Ivica; Celić, Sandra; Bilić, Blansa; Knezević, Vlatko

    2009-06-01

    A 69-year-old woman, a diabetic, presented to emergency unit for severe back pain that occurred three weeks of her having sustained a fall and blow in the back. Upon admission, she developed elevated body temperature, urinary retention and severe paraparesis of lower extremities. Laboratory testing showed increased levels of erythrocyte sedimentation rate (93 mm/h), leukocyte count (18.3 x 10(3)/ mL), C-reactive protein (246.5 mg/L) and liver enzymes, and abundant bacteria in urine sediment. Penicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus was isolated in blood culture. Antibiotic therapy according to the antibiotic sensitivity report was introduced. Magnetic resonance of thoracic spine revealed epidural liquid collection compressing the spinal medulla from Th2 to Th7. The patient was transferred to neurosurgery for posterior laminectomy and decompression, along with antibiotic therapy. Microbiology confirmed Staphylococcus aureus in the intraoperative tissue specimen. The patient was discharged from the hospital with mild paraparesis and continuing antibiotic therapy recommended.

  15. Cervical spine fracture in a patient with ankylosing spondylitis causing a C2-T9 spinal epidural hematoma- Treatment resulted in a rapid and complete recovery from tetraplegia: Case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Wong, Albert Sii Hieng; Yu, Denis Hee Youg

    2015-01-01

    Full recovery from tetraplegia is uncommon in cervical spine injury. This has not being reported for cervical spine fracture in a patient with ankylosing spondylitis causing spinal epidural hematoma. We report on a case of cervical spine fracture in a patient with ankylosing spondylitis who came with tetraplegia. He underwent a two stage fixation and fusion. He had a complete recovery. Two hours after the operation he regained full strength in all the limbs while in the Intensive Care Unit. He went back to full employment. There are only two other reports in the literature where patients with ankylosing spondylitis and extradural hematoma who underwent treatment within 12 h and recovered completely from tetraparesis and paraplegia respectively. Patient with ankylosing spondylitis has a higher incidence of spinal fracture and extradural hematoma. Good outcome can be achieved by early diagnosis and treatment. This can ensure not only a stable spine, but also a rapid and complete recovery in a tetraplegic patient.

  16. Brain abscess: Current management

    PubMed Central

    Alvis Miranda, Hernando; Castellar-Leones, Sandra Milena; Elzain, Mohammed Awad; Moscote-Salazar, Luis Rafael

    2013-01-01

    Brain abscess (BA) is defined as a focal infection within the brain parenchyma, which starts as a localized area of cerebritis, which is subsequently converted into a collection of pus within a well-vascularized capsule. BA must be differentiated from parameningeal infections, including epidural abscess and subdural empyema. The BA is a challenge for the neurosurgeon because it is needed good clinical, pharmacological, and surgical skills for providing good clinical outcomes and prognosis to BA patients. Considered an infrequent brain infection, BA could be a devastator entity that easily left the patient into dead. The aim of this work is to review the current concepts regarding epidemiology, pathophysiology, etiology, clinical presentation, diagnosis, and management of BA. PMID:24174804

  17. Pancreatic abscess

    MedlinePlus

    ... high. Possible Complications Complications may include: Multiple abscesses Sepsis When to Contact a Medical Professional Call your ... 2016:chap 144. Read More Abscess Pancreatic pseudocyst Sepsis Review Date 10/27/2015 Updated by: Subodh ...

  18. Cervical abscesses due to co-infection with Burkholderia pseudomallei, Salmonella enterica serovar Stanley and Mycobacterium tuberculosis in a patient with diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Sulaiman, Helmi; Ponnampalavanar, Sasheela; Mun, Kein Seong; Italiano, Claire M

    2013-11-09

    Infections due to Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Burkholderia pseudomallei and non-typhoidal Salmonella cause significant morbidity and mortality throughout the world. These intracellular pathogens share some common predisposing factors and clinical features. Co-infection with two of these organisms has been reported previously but, to our knowledge, this is the first time that infection with all three has been reported in one person. In September 2010, a 58-year-old diabetic Malaysian male presented with fever and a fluctuant mass on the right side of his neck. B. pseudomallei was isolated from an aspirate of this lesion and there was radiological evidence of disseminated infection in the liver and spleen. The recurrence of clinical symptoms over ensuing months prompted further aspiration and biopsy of a cervical abscess and underlying lymph nodes. Salmonella enterica serovar Stanley and then M. tuberculosis were identified from these specimens by culture and molecular methods. The patient responded to targeted medical management of each of these infections. In endemic settings, a high index of suspicion and adequate tissue sampling are imperative in identifying these pathogenic organisms. Diabetes was identified as a predisposing factor in this case while our understanding of other potential risk factors is evolving.

  19. MRI of spinal epidural lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Mascalchi, M; Torselli, P; Falaschi, F; Dal Pozzo, G

    1995-05-01

    We reviewed the MRI features in eight patients with spinal epidural lymphoma (clinically primary in 4 patients); one patient had multiple lesions. The cervical spine was involved in one patient, the thoracolumbar spine in 5 and the sacrum in two. Mean longitudinal extension of the epidural lesion was 2.6 vertebral segments. The tumours were homogeneously isointense with the spinal cord on T1-weighted images and isointense or hyperintense on proton-density and T2-weighted images. The spinal cord was compressed in four patients but showed signal changes in only one. In five patients the lesions communicated through the intervertebral foramina with paravertebral soft tissue masses. In all but one of the patients diffuse signal changes in the vertebral body marrow consistent with osteolytic or osteoblastic changes were identified adjacent to or at distance from the epidural lesion. Vertebral collapse was observed in two patients.

  20. Effect of Cervical Interlaminar Epidural Steroid Injection: Analysis According to the Neck Pain Patterns and MRI Findings

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Ji Won; Lim, Hyung Woo; Lee, Jin Young; Lee, Won Il; Lee, Eun Kyung; Chang, Choo Hoon; Yang, Jae Young

    2016-01-01

    Background It is widely accepted that cervical interlaminar steroid injection (CIESI) is more effective in treating radicular pain than axial neck pain, but without direct comparison. And the differences of effect after CIESI according to MRI findings are inconsistent. In this retrospective study, we evaluated the therapeutic response of CIESI according to pain sites, durations, MRI findings, and other predictive factors altogether, unlike previous studies, which evaluated them separately. Methods The medical records of 128 patients who received fluoroscopy guided CIESI were analyzed. We evaluated the therapeutic response (more than a 50% reduction on the visual analog scale [VAS] by their second visit) after CIESI by (1) pain site; neck pain without radicular pain/radicular pain with or without neck pain, (2) pain duration; acute/chronic (more than 6 month), and (3) findings of MRI; herniated intervertebral disc (HIVD)/spinal stenosis, respectively and altogether. Results Eighty-eight patients (68%) responded to CIESI, and there were no significant differences in demographic data, initial VAS score, or laboratory findings. And there were no significant differences in the response rate relating to pain site, pain duration, or MRI findings, respectively. In additional analysis, acute radicular pain with HIVD patients showed significantly better response than chronic neck pain with spinal stenosis (P = 0.04). Conclusions We cannot find any sole predictive factor of therapeutic response to the CIESI. But the patients having acute radicular pain with HIVD showed the best response, and those having other chronic neck pain showed the worst response to CIESI. PMID:27103964

  1. Incidence of epidural catheter-associated infections after continuous epidural analgesia in children.

    PubMed

    Sethna, Navil F; Clendenin, David; Athiraman, Umeshkumar; Solodiuk, Jean; Rodriguez, Diana P; Zurakowski, David

    2010-07-01

    Clinical observation suggests that the number of serious epidural catheter-associated infections have increased recently in children. This increase is likely attributed to an increase in reporting and in frequency of epidural analgesia usage. Estimates of infection rates are difficult to determine primarily because of insufficient study of large pediatric populations. In this retrospective study, the authors investigated the incidence of epidural catheter-associated soft tissue and epidural infections after use of continuous epidural analgesia spanning 17 yr. A total of 10,653 epidural catheters were used in 7,792 children. The majority of catheters, 10,437 (98%), were placed for the management of postoperative pain, and 216 (2%) were placed for the management of chronic pain. The authors identified 13 cases of infections (nine cellulitis, two paravertebral musculature infections, one epidural inflammation, and one epidural abscess) between 3 and 11 days after catheter insertion. The incidence of infection was significantly higher in patients treated for chronic pain (7 of 216 = 3.2%) compared with postoperative pain (6 of 10,437 = 0.06%; P < 0.0001). Surgical drainage of subcutaneous pus was performed in three patients, and medical therapy was administered in the remainder of patients; all patients recovered without sequelae. Although rare, epidural catheter-associated infections remain a serious concern in high-risk children who may benefit the most from epidural analgesia. The findings of the authors support the low rate of epidural infection previously reported despite growing concerns of serious infections in children. These findings highlight the importance of vigilance to early diagnostic indicators of infection and provide practitioners and families with incidence data to guide informed medical decision-making.

  2. Varicella Infection Complicated by Group A Beta-Hemolytic Streptococcal Retropharyngeal Abscess

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Christine M.; Huntley, Colin

    2016-01-01

    An unimmunized 19-month-old child presented with a retropharyngeal abscess and coincident varicella infection. The abscess resolved with operative drainage. This is the first published report of this connection, although varicella is known to be associated with abscesses in general. Practitioners should be aware that cervical abscesses may complicate varicella infections. PMID:27651967

  3. Pancreatic abscesses.

    PubMed

    Shi, E C; Yeo, B W; Ham, J M

    1984-09-01

    This paper presents the clinical features and problems in the management of 34 patients with pancreatic abscesses. In the majority of patients the abscesses developed following an attack of pancreatitis due to alcohol or gallstones. The abscesses were usually multilocular, and often had spread widely in the retroperitoneal space. Invasion into surrounding viscera or the peritoneal cavity occurred in 12 instances, and eight patients developed major bleeding into the abscess cavity. Obstructive complications (affecting bowel, common bile duct and large veins) occurred in eight patients. Twelve of the 34 patients (35 per cent) died, most deaths being due to failure to control sepsis (seven patients) or to massive bleeding from the abscess cavity (three patients). The mortality of this condition is likely to remain high, but may be reduced by better drainage techniques at the initial exploration. The importance of the infra-mesocolic approach for drainage is emphasized.

  4. Epidural Injections for Spinal Pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Epidural Injections An epidural injection provides temporary or prolonged relief ... limitations of Epidural Injection? What is an Epidural Injection? An epidural injection is an injection of medication ...

  5. [Characteristics and distribution of normal human epidural fat].

    PubMed

    Reina, M A; Pulido, P; Castedo, J; Villanueva, M C; López, A; Sola, R G

    2006-01-01

    Epidural fat provides sufficient cushion for the pulsatile movements of the dural sac, protects nerve structures, facilitates the movement of the dural sac over the periosteum of the spinal column during flexion and extension, and forms a pharmacologic reservoir of lipophilic substances. We review epidural fat and related structures, including their development during the fetal period when the epidural space is filled by undifferentiated loose, areolar mesenchymal tissue that surrounds the dural sac. In the adult, epidural fat has a continuous distribution and follows a certain metameric pattern. It is located mainly on the dorsal side of the epidural space, where it is organized in triangular capsules joined to the midline of the ligamentum flavum by a vascular pedicle. We consider the distribution of epidural fat in the axial and sagittal planes; its presence in the anterior, lateral and posterior epidural space; its presence in the cervical, thoracic and lumbar portions of the spinal column; and its characteristics and variations according to differing body habits and sex. Finally, we speculate on the possible anesthetic implications of epidural fat in terms of the pharmacokinetics of drugs injected into the epidural space and the tasks of locating the epidural space and inserting an epidural catheter during anesthetic procedures.

  6. Brain abscess.

    PubMed

    Slazinski, Tess

    2013-09-01

    A brain abscess is defined as a localized collection of pus within the parenchyma of the brain or meninges. Brain abscesses are a complication of ear, sinus, and/or dental infections. Although they may occur in many brain locations, the most common sites are frontal and temporal lobes. Modern neuroimaging and laboratory analysis have led to prompt diagnosis and have decreased the mortality rates from brain abscess. Critical care nurses have a vital role in performing accurate neurologic assessments, timely administration of antibiotics, and management of fever. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Anorectal abscess

    MedlinePlus

    ... an anal fissure Sexually transmitted infection (STD) Trauma Deep rectal abscesses may be caused by intestinal disorders ... drains the pus. If the pus collection is deep, you may need to stay in the hospital ...

  8. Subareolar abscess

    MedlinePlus

    Your health care provider will perform a breast exam. Sometimes an ultrasound or other imaging test of the breast is recommended. A blood count and a culture of the abscess, if drained, may be ordered.

  9. Splenic abscesses.

    PubMed

    Al-Hajjar, Nadim; Graur, Florin; Hassan, Aboul B; Molnár, Geza

    2002-03-01

    Splenic abscesses are rare entities (autopsy incidence between 0.14-0.7%). The most frequent etiology is the septic emboli seeding from bacterial endocarditis (about 20% of cases) or other septic foci (typhoid fever, malaria, urinary tract infections, osteomielitis, otitis). The treatment of splenic abscesses was until recently splenectomy with antibiotherapy. The actual trends are more conservative (mini invasive or non-invasive) because the immunologic role of the spleen has been better understood over the last year

  10. Experience with symptomatic spinal epidural cysts.

    PubMed

    Freidberg, S R; Fellows, T; Thomas, C B; Mancall, A C

    1994-06-01

    Epidural cysts, either synovial or ganglion, are an unusual cause of epidural compressive syndromes. We report a series of 26 patients with cysts, including 1 cervical, 2 thoracic, and 23 lumbar. Complaints at the time of admission and findings were similar to those associated with other epidural lesions at the same locations. The surgical technique is similar to that for other spinal lesions, with a wide exposure to enable a clear view of the cyst and surrounding structures, and is governed by imaging studies. Patients with cervical and thoracic lumbar cysts were free of symptoms and signs postoperatively. Of the 23 patients with lumbar cysts, 15 were free of symptoms after an operation, 7 had symptomatic improvement but had some pain and neurological findings, and 1 patient had no improvement. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging permit accurate preoperative evaluation.

  11. Epidural steroid warning controversy still dogging FDA.

    PubMed

    Manchikanti, Laxmaiah; Candido, Kenneth D; Singh, Vijay; Gharibo, Christopher G; Boswell, Mark V; Benyamin, Ramsin M; Falco, Frank J E; Grider, Jay S; Diwan, Sudhir; Hirsch, Joshua A

    2014-01-01

    On April 23, 2014, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) issued a letter of warning that injection of corticosteroids into the epidural space of the spine may result in rare, but serious adverse events, including "loss of vision, stroke, paralysis, and death." The advisory also advocated that patients should discuss the benefits and risks of epidural corticosteroid injections with their health care professionals, along with the benefits and risks associated with other possible treatments. In addition, the FDA stated that the effectiveness and safety of the corticosteroids for epidural use have not been established, and the FDA has not approved corticosteroids for such use. To raise awareness of the risks of epidural corticosteroid injections in the medical community, the FDA's Safe Use Initiative convened a panel of experts including pain management experts to help define the techniques for such injections with the aim of reducing preventable harm. The panel was unable to reach an agreement on 20 proposed items related to technical aspects of performing epidural injections. Subsequently, the FDA issued the above referenced warning and a notice that a panel will be convened in November 2014. This review assesses the inaccuracies of the warning and critically analyzes the available literature. The literature has been assessed in reference to alternate techniques and an understanding of the risk factors when performing transforaminal epidural injections in the cervical, thoracic, and lumbar regions, ultimately resulting in improved safety. The results of this review show the efficacy of epidural injections, with or without steroids, in a multitude of spinal ailments utilizing caudal, cervical, thoracic, and lumbar interlaminar approaches as well as lumbar transforaminal epidural injections . The evidence also shows the superiority of steroids in managing lumbar disc herniation utilizing caudal and lumbar interlaminar approaches without any significant difference as

  12. Genome Sequence of the Human Abscess Isolate Streptococcus intermedius BA1.

    PubMed

    Planet, Paul J; Rampersaud, Ryan; Hymes, Saul R; Whittier, Susan; Della-Latta, Phyllis A; Narechania, Apurva; Daugherty, Sean C; Santana-Cruz, Ivette; Desalle, Robert; Ravel, Jacques; Ratner, Adam J

    2013-01-01

    Streptococcus intermedius is a human pathogen with a propensity for abscess formation. We report a high-quality draft genome sequence of S. intermedius strain BA1, an isolate from a human epidural abscess. This sequence provides insight into the biology of S. intermedius and will aid investigations of pathogenicity.

  13. Genome Sequence of the Human Abscess Isolate Streptococcus intermedius BA1

    PubMed Central

    Planet, Paul J.; Rampersaud, Ryan; Hymes, Saul R.; Whittier, Susan; Della-Latta, Phyllis A.; Narechania, Apurva; Daugherty, Sean C.; Santana-Cruz, Ivette; DeSalle, Robert; Ravel, Jacques

    2013-01-01

    Streptococcus intermedius is a human pathogen with a propensity for abscess formation. We report a high-quality draft genome sequence of S. intermedius strain BA1, an isolate from a human epidural abscess. This sequence provides insight into the biology of S. intermedius and will aid investigations of pathogenicity. PMID:23405291

  14. Cervicitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... growth of normal bacteria in the vagina (bacterial vaginosis) can also cause cervicitis. ... a microscope (may show candidiasis , trichomoniasis , or bacterial vaginosis) Pap test Tests for gonorrhea or chlamydia Rarely, ...

  15. Emergency surgery for epidural abcess secondary to sacral fistula after laparoscopic proctectomy

    PubMed Central

    Zeitoun, Jeremie; Menahem, Benjamin; Fohlen, Audrey; Lebreton, Gil; Lubrano, Jean; Alves, Arnaud

    2016-01-01

    A 61-year-old man presented via the emergency department with a few days history of abdominal and colic occlusion symptoms. He presented signs of sepsis, midline lumbar spine tenderness and reduced hip flexion. Computer tomography of the abdomen and pelvis showed a presacral collection contiguous with the posterior part of the colo-rectal anastomosis, and MRI lumbar spine revealed abscess invation into the epidural space. He underwent a laparotomy with washout of the presacral abscess and a colostomy with a prolonged course of intravenous antibiotic therapy. At 3 weeks after initial presentation he had made a full clinical recovery with progressive radiological resolution of the epidural abscess. The objective of the case report is to highlight a unique and clinically significant complication of a rare post-operative complication after rectal surgery and to briefly discuss other intra-abdominal sources of epidural abscess. PMID:27421299

  16. Pyogenic Intradural Abscess of Lumbar Spine: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Cheon, Jeong-Eun; Chung, You-Nam; Park, Sung Bae

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of spinal intradural abscess which shows serial changes on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Well-encapsulated, rim-enhancing lesion with mass effect was visualized at ventral side of lumbar spinal canal on 17 days after initial negative MRI, which was thought to be epidural abscess. It was revealed to be intradural in location on operation and successfully treated by drainage and antibiotics. Follow-up MRI showed resolution of abscess. Clinical significance and pathogenesis of this case was briefly discussed. PMID:27169060

  17. [Splenic abscess].

    PubMed

    Troncoso, P; Geni, R; Llanos, O

    1989-06-01

    Splenic abscess is an uncommon condition associated with a high mortality. In most cases an hematogenous focus can be identified. Early diagnosis is essential for recovery. CT scan and ultrasound tomography are the best diagnostic tools. The latter was used to establish the diagnosis in 2 patients who were successfully treated by surgery.

  18. Brain abscess.

    PubMed

    Sáez-Llorens, Xavier; Nieto-Guevara, Javier

    2013-01-01

    Brain abscess is a serious and life-threatening disease among children despite advances in diagnosis and management. Changes in the epidemiology of predisposing conditions for brain abscess are associated with changes in the patient population and causative organisms. Though still a potentially fatal infection, there have been recent improvements in diagnosis, treatment, and outcome. Although mortality appears to be decreasing, a significant percentage of children continue to have residual neurological deficits, including epilepsy, permanent motor or sensory dysfunction, visual field defects, and personality change. Some children also require placement of a ventriculoperitoneal shunt. The most common origin of microbial infection in children remains direct or indirect cranial infection arising from the middle ear, paranasal sinuses, or teeth. No prospective clinical trials have compared the various surgical and medical treatment strategies available to guide the management of cerebral abscesses in children. Most surgical and medical treatment guidelines are based on populations consisting primarily of adult patients. The use of corticosteroids for treatment of brain abscess is controversial. Anticonvulsants are recommended in children who have developed seizures potentially to prevent further episodes. Duration of anticonvulsant therapy should be individualized and guided by electroencephalographic (EEG) study in the follow-up phase of disease. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Cervicitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... uterine lining and the fallopian tubes, resulting in pelvic inflammatory disease (PID), an infection of the female reproductive organs that can cause fertility problems if left untreated. Cervicitis can also ... incidentally during a routine pelvic exam and Pap test and may not require ...

  20. Epidural Steroid Injections

    MedlinePlus

    ... slipped vertebrae’, also known as spondylolisthesis). The epidural space is a fat filled ‘sleeve’ that surrounds the ... spinal cord. Steroids (‘cortisone’) placed into the epidural space have a very potent anti-inflammatory action that ...

  1. Pituitary abscess.

    PubMed

    Al Salman, Jameela Mohammed; Al Agha, Rawan Al Muataz Billa; Helmy, Mohamed

    2017-06-08

    Pituitary abscess is an uncommon pituitary lesion. Its clinical diagnosis can be difficult to distinguish from other pituitary lesions. This pathology is characterised by vague symptoms of headaches, generalised tiredness and hypopituitarism manifestations. A history of recent meningitis, paranasal sinusitis or head surgery can be a suggestive of the source of infection.A 20-year-old man was admitted to neurosurgery department with complain of headache, fatigue, polyuria, polydipsia, blurred vision and sexual dysfunction. MRI of the head revealed a suprasellar mass that was centrally hyperintense lesion on T2-weighted images with peripheral hypointensity and isointense centrally on T1 images with peripheral hyperintensity images. Treatment of this lesion pituitary abscess was surgical drainage of the pituitary area through a trans-sphenoidal approach and broad spectrum antibiotic therapy with ceftriaxone, metronidazole and vancomycin for 6 weeks. The patient continues to have pituitary insufficiency and treated with oral hydrocortisone.Although pituitary abscess is a rare condition, it should always be kept in mind when evaluating a patient with hypopituitarism. After the diagnosis, the surgery and antibiotics should be commenced rapidly. The outcome is usually good with proper treatment. © BMJ Publishing Group Ltd (unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  2. Pyogenic liver abscess

    MedlinePlus

    Liver abscess; Bacterial liver abscess ... There are many possible causes of liver abscesses, including: Abdominal infection, such as appendicitis , diverticulitis , or a perforated bowel Infection in the blood Infection of the bile draining tubes ...

  3. Amebic liver abscess

    MedlinePlus

    Hepatic amebiasis; Extraintestinal amebiasis; Abscess - amebic liver ... Amebic liver abscess is caused by Entamoeba histolytica. This parasite causes amebiasis , an intestinal infection that is also called ...

  4. Does intrapartum epidural analgesia affect nulliparous labor and postpartum urinary incontinence?

    PubMed

    Liang, Ching-Chung; Wong, Shu-Yam; Chang, Yao-Lung; Tsay, Pei-Kwei; Chang, Shuenn-Dhy; Lo, Liang-Ming

    2007-01-01

    The effect of epidural analgesia on nulliparous labor and delivery remains controversial. In addition, pregnancy and delivery have long been considered risk factors in the genesis of stress urinary incontinence (SUI). We sought to determine the effect of epidural analgesia and timing of administration on labor course and postpartum SUI. Five hundred and eighty three nulliparous women were admitted for vaginal delivery at > or = 36 gestational weeks. We compared various obstetric parameters and SUI, at puerperium and 3 months postpartum, among patients who had epidural and non-epidural analgesia, and among those who had early (cervical dilatation < 3 cm) and late (cervical dilatation > or = 3 cm) epidural analgesia. When compared with the non-epidural analgesia group (n = 319), the group that received epidural analgesia (n = 264) had significant prolongation of the first and second stages of labor, and higher likelihood for instrumental and cesarean delivery but similar incidence of severe vaginal laceration and postpartum SUI. Except for the first stage of labor, early administration of epidural analgesia did not result in a significant influence on obstetric parameters or an increased incidence of postpartum SUI. Our findings showed that epidural analgesia is associated with an increased risk of prolonged labor, and instrumental and cesarean delivery but is not related to increased postpartum SUI. Regarding the impact of the timing of epidural analgesia given in the labor course, the first stage of labor appeared to last longer when analgesia was administered early rather than late.

  5. Retropharyngeal abscess.

    PubMed Central

    Coulthard, M; Isaacs, D

    1991-01-01

    Of 31 children with retropharyngeal abscess treated at this hospital between 1954 and 1990, 17 (55%) were 12 months old or less and 10 (32%) less than 6 months. Three of these 10 children were neonates, only one of whom had a predisposing congenital lesion. Fourteen children (45%) had a preceding upper respiratory illness and four (13%) had a prior history of pharyngeal trauma or ingestion of a foreign body. In children less than 1 year old the clinical presentation was usually classical with fever, neck swelling, stridor, and pharyngeal swelling. Significantly fewer children over 1 year had neck swelling and no child over 3 years old had stridor. A lateral radiograph of the neck, when performed, had a sensitivity of 88% in diagnosis. Bacteria isolated included pure growths of Staphylococcus aureus (25%), klebsiella species (13%), group A streptococcus (8%), and a mixture of Gram negative and anaerobic organisms (38%). There were two deaths. In six cases (24%) the abscess recurred necessitating further surgical drainage. Images Figure 2 PMID:1953008

  6. CT of pituitary abscess

    SciTech Connect

    Fong, T.C.; Johns, R.D.; Long, M.; Myles, S.T.

    1985-06-01

    Pituitary abscess is a rare condition, with only 50 cases reported in the literature. Of those, 29 cases were well documented for analysis. Preoperative diagnosis of pituitary abscess is difficult. The computed tomographic (CT) appearance of pituitary abscess was first described in 1983; the abscess was depicted by axial images with coronal reconstruction. The authors recently encountered a case of pituitary abscess documented by direct coronal CT of the sella turcica.

  7. [Acute mastoiditis with retroauricular abscess - a report of two cases].

    PubMed

    Misiak, Andrzej

    2016-12-22

    Otogenic complications may occur as a result of both acute and chronic otitis media. The purpose of the diagnostic process and treatment of patients with otogenic complications is to identify and eliminate focal points of the infection. Due to general application of antibiotics, these complications are rarely observed. Retroauricular abscess may be the first symptom associated with the development of acute mastoiditis in patients with communication disturbances. Intravenous antibiotics and surgery have been successfully used for treatment in the two described cases. First case: 9 years old girl suffering from hydrocephalus, mental retardation. Retroauricular abscess occured as a result of the left ear acute otitis media. Second case: 17 years old girl with multiple congenital defects, mental retardation. Four surgery because of epidural abscess, meningitis, external auditory canal atresia, granulation and cholesteatoma during two years. Retroauricular abscess occured in the course of the right ear chronic otitis media.

  8. Transient Horner's syndrome following thoracic epidural anesthesia for mastectomy: a prospective observational study.

    PubMed

    Park, Sun Young; Chun, Hea Rim; Kim, Mun Gyu; Lee, Se Jin; Kim, Sang Ho; Ok, Si Young; Cho, Ana

    2015-03-01

    Transient Horner's syndrome is an uncommon complication of epidural anesthesia, though its exact incidence in thoracic epidural anesthesia is not clear. Therefore, this study prospectively evaluated the incidence of Horner's syndrome after thoracic epidural anesthesia for mastectomy. Patients scheduled for mastectomy, with or without breast reconstruction, were enrolled in this prospective observational study from September 2010 to December 2013. Intraoperative thoracic epidural anesthesia was established using 0.375% or 0.5% ropivacaine 15 mL with thoracic epidural analgesia continued postoperatively with a continuous infusion of 0.15% ropivacaine 2 mL·hr(-1) with fentanyl 8 μg·hr(-1). Signs of Horner's syndrome (miosis, ptosis, and hyperemia) were assessed at one and two hours as well as one, two, and three days postoperatively. Thoracic epidural anesthesia was successful in 439 patients, with six (1.4%) of these patients acquiring Horner's syndrome. All signs of Horner's syndrome resolved gradually within 180 min of discontinuing the epidural infusion. In one patient with Horner's syndrome, a radiographic contrast injection confirmed that the drug had spread to the cervical epidural level. The incidence of Horner's syndrome following thoracic epidural anesthesia and continuous thoracic epidural analgesia for mastectomy was 1.4%. The mechanism was consistent with cephalic spread of the epidural local anesthetic. This trial was registered at: Clinicaltrials.gov, number: NCT02130739.

  9. Can repeat injection provide clinical benefit in patients with cervical disc herniation and stenosis when the first epidural injection results only in partial response?

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jung Hwan; Lee, Sang-Ho

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Epidural steroid injection (ESI) is known to be an effective treatment for neck or radicular pain due to herniated intervertebral disc (HIVD) and spinal stenosis (SS). Although repeat ESI has generally been indicated to provide more pain relief in partial responders after single ESI, there has been little evidence supporting the usefulness of this procedure. The purpose of this study, therefore, was to determine whether repeat ESI at a prescribed interval of 2 to 3 weeks after the first injection would provide greater clinical benefit in patients with partial pain reduction than intermittent ESI performed only when pain was aggravated. One hundred eighty-four patients who underwent transforaminal ESI (TFESI) for treatment of axial neck and radicular arm pain due to HIVD or SS and could be followed up for 1 year were enrolled. We divided the patients into 2 groups. Group A (N = 108) comprised partial responders (numeric rating scale (NRS) ≥ 3 after the first injection) who underwent repeat injection at a prescribed interval of 2 to 3 weeks after the first injection. Group B (N = 76) comprised partial responders who did not receive repeat injection at the prescribed interval, but received intermittent injections only for aggravation of pain. Various clinical data were assessed, including total number of injections during 1 year, NRS duration of <3 during 1 year (NRS < 3 duration), and time interval until pain was increased to require additional injections after repeat injection in Group A, or after first injection in Group B (time to reinjection). Groups A and B were compared in terms of total population, HIVD, and SS. In the whole population, HIVD subgroup, and SS subgroup, patients in Group A required significantly fewer injections to obtain satisfactory pain relief during the 1-year follow-up period. Group A showed a significantly longer time to reinjection and longer NRS < 3 than Group B did. Repeat TFESI conducted at 2- to 3-week

  10. The Importance of Surgery as Part of Multimodal Therapy in Rapid Progressive Primary Extraosseous Ewing Sarcoma of the Cervical Intra- and Epidural Space

    PubMed Central

    Bostelmann, Richard; Leimert, Mario; Steiger, Hans Jakob; Gierga, Kristin; Petridis, Athanasios K.

    2016-01-01

    Primary extraosseous Ewing sarcomas (EESs) are an extremely rare pathological entity. Less than 32 cases have been reported in the literature. Here we report an uncommon case with very rapid progression in the cervical region with extra- and intradural involvement. We present a thorough review of the literature and discuss possible treatment modalities. The Medline database was searched using the search terms: Ewing sarcoma, extraosseus tumour, treatment, management, cervical spine. A previously healthy 29-year-old man complained of right-sided radiculopathy (C7). Magnetic resonance imaging showed an enhancing foraminal, sandglass shaped neurinoma-like lesion. Surgery revealed an intraand extra-dural lesion, which was histologically diagnosed as Ewing sarcoma. Despite gross total resection, there was a massive symptomatic tumor recurrence within 6 weeks. A second gross total resection was realized. The patient was treated according to the EURO E.W.I.N.G.-Protocol (VIDE) and recovered very well (progression-free interval during therapy). Several decompressive re-surgeries were realized with adjuvant radio-chemotherapy. At the last follow-up (17 months after initial surgery) the patient was in remission with a good quality of live. This case is to illustrate that despite extensive therapeutic efforts, the progression-free survival in case of primary EES may be very short. To maintain neurological function and good quality of live as long as possible, a multimodal strategy seems to be adequate. Like in the present case this implies several surgeries and adjuvant chemo-and radiotherapy. Whether this improves overall survival remains unclear. PMID:28176976

  11. A randomized trial of dural puncture epidural technique compared with the standard epidural technique for labor analgesia.

    PubMed

    Cappiello, Eric; O'Rourke, Nollag; Segal, Scott; Tsen, Lawrence C

    2008-11-01

    We designed this prospective, double-blind, randomized study to examine whether a dural puncture without intrathecal drug administration immediately before epidural drug administration would improve labor analgesia when compared to a traditional epidural technique without prior dural puncture. Eighty nulliparous parturients with cervical dilation less than 5 cm were randomly assigned to receive a standardized epidural technique, with or without a single dural puncture with a 25-gauge (G) Whitacre spinal needle. After successful placement of the needle(s) and the epidural catheter, 12 mL of bupivacaine 2.5 mg/mL was administered through the epidural catheter and a patient-controlled epidural infusion of bupivacaine 1.25 mg/mL + fentanyl 2 mug/mL was initiated. The presence of sacral analgesia (S1) and pain scores were compared between groups. In demographically similar groups, parturients with prior dural puncture had more frequent blockade of the S1 dermatome (absolute risk difference [95% confidence interval] 22% [6-39]), more frequent visual analog scale scores <10/100 at 20 min (absolute risk difference 20% [1-38]), and reduced one-sided analgesia (absolute risk difference [95% CI] 17% [2-330]). The highest median sensory level (T10) was no different between groups. Dural puncture with a 25-G spinal needle immediately before the initiation of epidural analgesia improves the sacral spread, onset, and bilateral pain relief produced by analgesic concentrations of bupivacaine with fentanyl in laboring nulliparous patients.

  12. Pyogenic and non-pyogenic spinal infections: emphasis on diffusion-weighted imaging for the detection of abscesses and pus collections

    PubMed Central

    Kim, J; Capizzano, A A; Kirby, P; Kademian, J; Sato, Y

    2014-01-01

    The incidence of spinal infections has increased in the past two decades, owing to the increasing number of elderly patients, immunocompromised conditions, spinal surgery and instrumentation, vascular access and intravenous drug use. Conventional MRI is the gold standard for diagnostic imaging; however, there are still a significant number of misdiagnosed cases. Diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) with a b-value of 1000 and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) maps provide early and accurate detection of abscess and pus collection. Pyogenic infections are classified into four types of extension based on MRI and DWI findings: (1) epidural/paraspinal abscess with spondylodiscitis, (2) epidural/paraspinal abscess with facet joint infection, (3) epidural/paraspinal abscess without concomitant spondylodiscitis or facet joint infection and (4) intradural abscess (subdural abscess, purulent meningitis and spinal cord abscess). DWI easily detects abscesses and demonstrates the extension, multiplicity and remote disseminated infection. DWI is often a key image in the differential diagnosis. Important differential diagnoses include epidural, subdural or subarachnoid haemorrhage, cerebrospinal fluid leak, disc herniation, synovial cyst, granulation tissue, intra- or extradural tumour and post-surgical fluid collections. DWI and the ADC values are affected by susceptibility artefacts, incomplete fat suppression and volume-averaging artefacts. Recognition of artefacts is essential when interpreting DWI of spinal and paraspinal infections. DWI is not only useful for the diagnosis but also for the treatment planning of pyogenic and non-pyogenic spinal infections. PMID:24999081

  13. [Epidemiology of complications of obstetrical epidural analgesia].

    PubMed

    Palot, M; Visseaux, H; Botmans, C; Pire, J C

    1994-01-01

    Epidural analgesia (EA) is the best technique to obtain pain relief during labour. But the needle, the catheter and the local anaesthetics (LA) are 3 reasons to cause maternal complications. In France we do not know the exact number of EA performed every year and it is very difficult to appreciate the incidence of maternal complications. Therefore, it is necessary to know it and try to reduce the incidence of some of them. Maternal complications after EA are classically: 1. caused by catheter or needle: massive subarachnoid injection, toxic intravenous injection with convulsions and/or cardiac arrest; 2. secondary to infectious problems: meningitis or epidural abscess; 3. due to LA with the very rare anaphylactoid reactions; 4. due to prolonged neurologic complications with epidural and subdural haematomas, subarachnoid cysts or arachnoiditis. These complications are rare: 1/4,700 in the largest series of literature, involving more than 500,000 EA. In France, we tried to quantify maternal complications among nearly 300,000 EA performed over a period of 5 years. The overall incidence of serious complications was 1/4,005 EA. The most frequent are accidental dural puncture (1/156), massive subarachnoid injections (1/8,010) and convulsions (1/9,011). The incidence of these 3 complications must be reduced by better training, material or attention during bolus injection of LA.

  14. Abscess - abdomen or pelvis

    MedlinePlus

    ... infected fluid and pus located inside the belly (abdominal cavity). This type of abscess can be located near ... abdominal abscesses: Abdominal x-ray Ultrasound of the abdomen and pelvis CT scan of the abdomen and ...

  15. Renal and perirenal abscesses

    SciTech Connect

    Patterson, J.E.; Andriole, V.T.

    1987-12-01

    Our knowledge of the spectrum of renal abscesses has increased as a result of more sensitive radiologic techniques. The classification of intrarenal abscess now includes acute focal bacterial nephritis and acute multifocal bacterial nephritis, as well as the previously recognized renal cortical abscess, renal corticomedullary abscess, and xanthogranulomatous pyelonephritis. In general, the clinical presentation of these entities does not differentiate them; various radiographic studies can distinguish them, however. The intrarenal abscess is usually treated successfully with antibiotic therapy alone. Antistaphylococcal therapy is indicated for the renal cortical abscess, whereas therapy directed against the common gram-negative uropathogens is indicated for most of the other entities. The perinephric abscess is often an elusive diagnosis, has a more serious prognosis, and is more difficult to treat. Drainage of the abscess and sometimes partial or complete nephrectomy are required for resolution. 73 references.

  16. Peritonsillar Abscess (For Teens)

    MedlinePlus

    ... mouth clean. But sometimes a peritonsillar abscess is beyond your control. If you think you have an abscess, call your doctor right away. ... ON THIS TOPIC Tonsils and Tonsillectomies Tonsillitis ...

  17. [Prostatic abscesses. A review].

    PubMed

    Rabii, R; Rais, H; Joual, A; el Mrini, M; Benjelloun, S

    1999-01-01

    We review the literature to the diagnosis and therapeutic aspect of prostatic abscess. The prostatic abscess having become an uncommon disease. The diagnosis of prostatic abscess has been nearly made by transrectal ultrasound and computed tomography scan. The best diagnostic method is considered to be the transrectal ultrasound. The choice therapy was intravenous antibiotic, and drainage by ultrasound guided transperineal percutaneous puncture.

  18. Outcome and complications of epidural analgesia in patients with chronic cancer pain.

    PubMed

    Smitt, P S; Tsafka, A; Teng-van de Zande, F; van der Holt, R; Elswijk-de Vries, I; Elfrink, E; van den Bent, M J; Vecht, C J

    1998-11-01

    Some cancer patients require invasive techniques for control of chronic cancer pain. Many patients have benefited from local administration of opioids and anesthetics through an epidural catheter. However, epidural abscess and meningitis are side effects of epidural catheters that have serious morbidity and mortality. In a retrospective study, the charts of all patients who received an epidural catheter for the management of chronic cancer pain in a 3-year period (1993-1996) were reviewed. Patients with nervous system infections were identified and pertinent clinical, radiologic (magnetic resonance imaging), and bacteriologic data were analyzed. Ninety-one patients received 137 epidural catheters for a total of 4326 catheter days. All but four patients had died at the time of the final analysis. The median survival after placement of the first epidural catheter was 38 days (range, 1 day--> 1000 days). Seventy-two patients received a percutaneous port whereas 19 patients were treated with an implanted subcutaneous port. Adequate pain relief was obtained in 76% of the 58 patients with nociceptive pain and in 73% of 33 patients with neuropathic pain. All neuropathic pain was associated with active tumor and could be classified as nociceptive nerve pain. Technical complications and superficial infections occurred in as many as 43% of patients. Deep infections occurred in 12 patients, 11 of whom had a spinal epidural abscess. Deep infection is a frequent complication of epidural analgesia and is associated with a high morbidity and mortality. Only cancer patients with a short life expectancy (< or =3 months) should be treated with epidural analgesia.

  19. A prospective evaluation of complications of 10,000 fluoroscopically directed epidural injections.

    PubMed

    Manchikanti, Laxmaiah; Malla, Yogesh; Wargo, Bradley W; Cash, Kimberly A; Pampati, Vidyasagar; Fellows, Bert

    2012-01-01

    Among the multiple modalities of treatments available in managing chronic spinal pain, including surgery and multiple interventional techniques, epidural injections by various routes, such as interlaminar epidural injections, caudal epidural injections, transforaminal epidural injections, and percutaneous adhesiolysis are common. Even though the complications of fluoroscopically directed epidural injections are fewer than blind epidural injections, and have better effectiveness, multiple complications have been reported in scattered case reports, with only minor complications in randomized or non-randomized studies and systematic reviews. Thus, prospective studies with large patient series are essential to determine the types and incidences of complications. A prospective, non-randomized study of patients undergoing interventional techniques from May 2008 to December 2009. A private interventional pain management practice, a specialty referral center in the United States. To assess the complication rate of fluoroscopically directed epidural injections. This study was carried out over a period of 20 months and included over 10,000 procedures: 39% caudal epidurals, 23% cervical interlaminar epidurals, 14% lumbar interlaminar epidurals, 13% lumbar transforaminal epidurals, 8% percutaneous adhesiolysis, and 3% thoracic interlaminar epidural procedures. All of the interventions were performed under fluoroscopic guidance in an ambulatory surgery center by one of 3 physicians. The complications encountered during the procedure and postoperatively were prospectively evaluated. Measurable outcomes employed were intravascular entry of the needle, profuse bleeding, local hematoma, bruising, dural puncture and headache, nerve root or spinal cord irritation with resultant injury, infectious complications, vasovagal reactions, and facial flushing. Intravascular entry was higher for adhesiolysis (11.6%) and lumbar transforaminal (7.9%) procedures compared to other epidurals which

  20. 4. Cervical radicular pain.

    PubMed

    Van Zundert, Jan; Huntoon, Marc; Patijn, Jacob; Lataster, Arno; Mekhail, Nagy; van Kleef, Maarten

    2010-01-01

    Cervical radicular pain is defined as pain perceived as arising in the arm caused by irritation of a cervical spinal nerve or its roots. Approximately 1 person in 1,000 suffers from cervical radicular pain. In the absence of a gold standard, the diagnosis is based on a combination of history, clinical examination, and (potentially) complementary examination. Medical imaging may show abnormalities, but those findings may not correlate with the patient's pain. Electrophysiologic testing may be requested when nerve damage is suspected but will not provide quantitative/qualitative information about the pain. The presumed causative level may be confirmed by means of selective diagnostic blocks. Conservative treatment typically consists of medication and physical therapy. There are no studies assessing the effectiveness of different types of medication specifically in patients suffering cervical radicular pain. Cochrane reviews did not find sufficient proof of efficacy for either education or cervical traction. When conservative treatment fails, interventional treatment may be considered. For subacute cervical radicular pain, the available evidence on efficacy and safety supports a recommendation (2B+) of interlaminar cervical epidural corticosteroid administration. A recent negative randomized controlled trial of transforaminal cervical epidural corticosteroid administration, coupled with an increasing number of reports of serious adverse events, warrants a negative recommendation (2B-). Pulsed radiofrequency treatment adjacent to the cervical dorsal root ganglion is a recommended treatment for chronic cervical radicular pain (1B+). When its effect is insufficient or of short duration, conventional radiofrequency treatment is recommended (2B+). In selected patients with cervical radicular pain, refractory to other treatment options, spinal cord stimulation may be considered. This treatment should be performed in specialized centers, preferentially study related.

  1. Undiagnosed amebic brain abscess.

    PubMed

    Viriyavejakul, Parnpen; Riganti, Mario

    2009-11-01

    We report a case of amebic brain abscess due to Entamoeba histolytica. The patient was a 31-year-old man who presented with amebic liver abscess. His clinical course deteriorated in spite of proper drainage and treatment. He developed delirium, lethargy and then expired. With a history of heroin addiction, withdrawal syndrome from heroin was suspected. At autopsy, amebic abscesses were detected in the liver, large intestine, meninges and brain. A 19 cm amebic liver abscess was found in the right lobe of the liver. A 4 cm amebic brain abscess was found in the right occipital lobe. Microscopically, the tissue sections from the affected organs were confirmed to have degenerated E. histolytica trophozoites. Involvement of the brain in amebic liver abscess should be suspected in patients with neurological signs and symptoms.

  2. Early versus late initiation of epidural analgesia in labor: does it increase the risk of cesarean section? A randomized trial.

    PubMed

    Ohel, Gonen; Gonen, Roni; Vaida, Sonia; Barak, Shlomi; Gaitini, Luis

    2006-03-01

    To determine whether early initiation of epidural analgesia in nulliparous women affects the rate of cesarean sections and other obstetric outcome measures. A randomized trial in which 449 at term nulliparous women in early labor, at less than 3 cm of cervical dilatation, were assigned to either immediate initiation of epidural analgesia at first request (221 women), or delay of epidural until the cervix dilated to at least 4 cm (228 women). At initiation of the epidural the mean cervical dilatation was 2.4 cm in the early epidural group and 4.6 cm in the late group (P < 0.0001). The rates of cesarean section were not significantly different between the groups--13% and 11% in the early and late groups, respectively (P = 0.77). The mean duration from randomization to full dilatation was significantly shorter in the early compared to the late epidural group--5.9 hours and 6.6 hours respectively (P = 0.04). When questioned after delivery regarding their next labor, the women indicated a preference for early epidural. Initiation of epidural analgesia in early labor, following the first request for epidural, did not result in increased cesarean deliveries, instrumental vaginal deliveries, and other adverse effects; furthermore, it was associated with shorter duration of the first stage of labor and was clearly preferred by the women.

  3. Cold subcutaneous abscesses.

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, R.; Stephens, L.; Kelly, A. P.

    1990-01-01

    Cold abscesses are defined as having no associated erythema, heat, or tenderness. They may be present in immunodeficiency disorders, deep mycoses, and other infectious diseases. As there is a dearth information on this subject in the dermatology, surgery, and infectious disease literature, we present a case of cold abscesses secondary to coccidioidomycosis and discuss the possible role of humoral immunity, cell-mediated immunity, prostaglandins, T cells, and other mediators in cold abscess pathogenesis. In addition, therapeutic guidelines for abscesses are reviewed. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:2280425

  4. Informed consent for epidural analgesia in labour: a survey of Irish practice.

    PubMed

    Hegarty, A; Omer, W; Harmon, D

    2014-06-01

    Currently, we do not have a national standard regarding epidural consent in Ireland. The aim of this survey was to assess practice in obstetric units in Ireland with regard to obtaining informed consent prior to epidural insertion, and whether the risks discussed with women are being documented. A postal survey of anaesthetists in Irish obstetric units was performed in January 2012 to assess practice regarding obtaining informed consent prior to epidural insertion, and documentation of the risks discussed. The response rate was 16/18 (88%). There was major variation both in which risks are discussed with women in labour and what risks are quoted. The most frequently quoted risks were headache--15/16 (93.8% of the respondents), partially/not working epidural--15/16 (93.8%), drop in blood pressure--14/16 (87.5%) and temporary backache/local tenderness--12/16 (75%). The more serious risks were not discussed as frequently: permanent nerve damage--8/16 (50%), paralysis--8/16 (50%), epidural abscess/haematoma--6/16 (37.5%), meningitis--3/16 (18.7%). The vast majority of respondents supported introduction of a national standardised information leaflet, detailing all the benefits and risks of epidural analgesia, to be shown to all women before consenting to epidural insertion.

  5. The dynamics of epidural and opioid analgesia during labour.

    PubMed

    Zondag, Dirkje C; Gross, Mechthild M; Grylka-Baeschlin, Susanne; Poat, Angela; Petersen, Antje

    2016-11-01

    To investigate the association of analgesia, opioids or epidural, or the combination of both with labour duration and spontaneous birth in nulliparous women. A secondary data analysis of an existing cohort study was performed and included nulliparous women (n = 2074). Durations of total labour and first and second labour stage were calculated with Kaplan-Meier estimation for the four different study groups: no analgesia (n = 620), opioid analgesia (n = 743), epidural analgesia (n = 482), and combined application (n = 229). Labour duration was compared by Cox regression while adjusting for confounders and censoring for operative births. Logistic regression was used to investigate the association between the administration of different types of analgesia and mode of birth. Most women in the combined application group were first to receive opioid analgesia. Women with no analgesia had the shortest duration of labour (log rank p < 0.001) and highest chance of a spontaneous birth (p < 0.001). If analgesia was administered, women with opioids had a shorter first stage (p = 0.018), compared to women with epidural (p < 0.001) or women with combined application (p < 0.001). Women with opioids had an increased chance to reach full cervical dilatation (p = 0.006). Women with epidural analgesia (p < 0.001) and women with combined application (p < 0.001) had a prolonged second stage and decreased chance of spontaneous birth compared to women without analgesia. Women with opioids had a prolonged first stage, but increased chance to reach full cervical dilatation. Women with epidural analgesia and women with both opioid and epidural analgesia had a prolonged first and second stage and a decreased chance of a spontaneous birth.

  6. A risk/benefit analysis of spinal manipulation therapy for relief of lumbar or cervical pain.

    PubMed

    Powell, F C; Hanigan, W C; Olivero, W C

    1993-07-01

    Approximately 12 million Americans undergo spinal manipulation therapy (SMT) every year. Renewed interest in this method requires an analysis of its reported risks and possible benefits. This review describes two patients with spinal cord injuries associated with SMT and establishes the risk/benefit ratios for patients with lumbar or cervical pain. The first case is a man who underwent SMT for recurrent sciatica 4 years after chemonucleolysis. During therapy, he developed bilateral sciatica with urinary hesitancy. After self-referral, myelography demonstrated a total block; he underwent urgent discectomy with an excellent result 3 months after surgery. The second patient with an indwelling Broviac catheter and a history of lumbar osteomyelitis underwent SMT for neck pain. Therapy continued for 3 weeks despite the development of severe quadriparesis. After self-referral, he underwent an urgent anterior cervical decompression and removal of necrotic bone and an epidural abscess with partial neurological recovery. An analysis of these cases and 138 cases reported in the literature demonstrates six risk factors associated with complications of SMT. These include misdiagnosis, failure to recognize the onset or progression of neurological signs or symptoms, improper technique, SMT performed in the presence of a coagulation disorder or herniated nucleus pulposus, and manipulation of the cervical spine. Clinical trials of SMT have been summarized in several recent articles.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  7. Anal abscess and fistula.

    PubMed

    Sneider, Erica B; Maykel, Justin A

    2013-12-01

    Benign anorectal diseases, such as anal abscesses and fistula, are commonly seen by primary care physicians, gastroenterologists, emergency physicians, general surgeons, and colorectal surgeons. It is important to have a thorough understanding of the complexity of these 2 disease processes so as to provide appropriate and timely treatment. We review the pathophysiology, presentation, diagnosis, and treatment options for both anal abscesses and fistulas.

  8. Entamoeba histolytica brain abscess.

    PubMed

    Petri, William A; Haque, Rashidul

    2013-01-01

    Brain abscess due to Entamoeba histolytica is most commonly seen in a small percentage of patients who also have an amebic liver abscess. The typical patient is a young man who after treatment for liver abscess with apparent improvement develops symptoms and signs of central nervous system involvement. The average age of the patient is 30 years, and common presentations include headache, vomiting, and altered mental status. Signs of amebic brain abscess include most commonly meningeal signs, facial nerve (VII) palsy, motor paralysis, and seizure. Most patients have abnormal cerebrospinal fluid although there is no special or characteristic abnormality. Diagnosis is by serology and PCR of brain abscess aspirate or CSF and treatment is with metronidazole. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Neck abscess: 79 cases

    PubMed Central

    Bulgurcu, Suphi; Arslan, Ilker Burak; Demirhan, Erhan; Kozcu, Sureyya Hikmet; Cukurova, Ibrahim

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Neck abscess is a disease that might cause mortality and severe morbidity, if it is not treated urgently. In our study, patients with diagnosis of neck abscess in our clinic were analyzed retrospectively and presented in the light of the literature. METHODS: In our clinic, age distribution, source of infection, systemic disease, imaging methods that were used in diagnosis, preferred anaesthesia during drainage, abscess sites, culture results of abscess material, complications during treatment procedure, any antibiotherapy before admission and duration of hospitalization of 79 cases with neck abscess who were treated in the hospital between January 2008 and January 2015 were assessed. RESULTS: Cases in our study were aged between 1–79 (mean 28.3) years and 43 of them were female and 36 were male patients. Systemic diseases were determined in 19 of the cases. The most common systemic disease was diabetes mellitus. Abscesses were localized mostly at peritonsillar region and 13 of the cases were operated when abscess were in multipl localizations. In 74 of the cases, drainage was performed under local anaesthesia and in 5 cases under general anaesthesia. Four of these 5 cases, abscesses were localized within retropharyngeal region and 1 of them had multiple abscesses at various regions. Staphylococcus aereus was the most detected microorganism based on culture results. Three adult cases were followed up in the intensive care unit because of development of mediastinitis. One of these 3 cases exited because of sepsis. Hospitalization periods of 79 cases ranged between 2–21 days (mean 7.64 days). Hospitalization period of 19 cases with systemic diseases were 9.47 days (p<0.05) and statistically which were statistically significantly longer when compared with those without any systemic disease. CONCLUSION: Neck abscess must be diagnosed early and treated with surgical drainage and parenteral therapy because it might cause severe complications. PMID:28058371

  10. A spinal epidural hematoma with symptoms mimicking cerebral stroke.

    PubMed

    Shima, Hiroshi; Yasuda, Muneyoshi; Nomura, Motohiro; Mori, Kentaro; Miyashita, Katsuyoshi; Tamase, Akira; Kitamura, Yoshihisa; Osuka, Koji; Takayasu, Masakazu

    2012-02-01

    A spontaneous cervical epidural hematoma (SCEH) is a rare condition, which usually requires urgent treatment. However, unusual manifestations, such as hemiparesis, may lead to a misdiagnosis. We herein report a case of SCEH that presented with pure motor hemiparesis to discuss the appropriate and prompt diagnosis and treatment of such cases. An 84-year-old female was brought to our emergency department complaining of nuchal pain, followed by right hemiparesis. A contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) scan of the neck demonstrated a spinal epidural hematoma right posterolateral to the spinal cord, extending from C2 to C3. She was managed conservatively and her symptoms improved significantly. The authors emphasize that cervical spinal lesions should be considered in the differential diagnosis for patients with acute onset of hemiparesis, when they are associated with neck pain. Even though magnetic resonance imaging is the gold standard, a CT scan is also useful for quick screening for SCEH.

  11. Bacterial Brain Abscess

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Kevin

    2014-01-01

    Significant advances in the diagnosis and management of bacterial brain abscess over the past several decades have improved the expected outcome of a disease once regarded as invariably fatal. Despite this, intraparenchymal abscess continues to present a serious and potentially life-threatening condition. Brain abscess may result from traumatic brain injury, prior neurosurgical procedure, contiguous spread from a local source, or hematogenous spread of a systemic infection. In a significant proportion of cases, an etiology cannot be identified. Clinical presentation is highly variable and routine laboratory testing lacks sensitivity. As such, a high degree of clinical suspicion is necessary for prompt diagnosis and intervention. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging offer a timely and sensitive method of assessing for abscess. Appearance of abscess on routine imaging lacks specificity and will not spare biopsy in cases where the clinical context does not unequivocally indicate infectious etiology. Current work with advanced imaging modalities may yield more accurate methods of differentiation of mass lesions in the brain. Management of abscess demands a multimodal approach. Surgical intervention and medical therapy are necessary in most cases. Prognosis of brain abscess has improved significantly in the recent decades although close follow-up is required, given the potential for long-term sequelae and a risk of recurrence. PMID:25360205

  12. Psoas abscess secondary to haematoma after a fall causing multiple osteoporotic fractures.

    PubMed

    Whitehouse, Kathrin; Horne, Simon; Gay, David

    2012-09-07

    A 78-year-old woman presented 28 days after a low-impact fall, where she sustained a right pubic ramus fracture, with increasing left hip pain and fever. Her blood results showed a high white cell count and deranged urea and electrolytes. An MRI revealed multiple osteoporotic fractures and bilateral gluteal abscesses with left iliopsoas abscess, which had likely formed in a haematoma of a sacral fracture. She received a long course of intravenous antibiotics and CT-guided drainage of the abscesses. She developed symptoms of cauda equina, but no evidence of epidural extension of the abscess was found at operation. She required neurorehabilitation. This case highlights the complications of pelvic osteoporotic fractures, and high associated morbidity and mortality in the elderly population.

  13. Bacterial Infection in Deep Paraspinal Muscles in a Parturient Following Epidural Analgesia

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Xuhong; Song, Jiefu; Liang, Qingyuan; Qin, Jibin

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Bacterial infection related to epidural catheterizations could occur. In general, the incidence of postoperative infection at the insertion site is very low. Paucity literatures are reported for paraspinal muscle infection after epidural analgesia in parturient. We report a case of paraspinal muscle infection shortly after epidural analgesia in a parturient, who was subjected to because of threatened preterm labor. Epidural morphine was administered for 2 days for childbirth pain control. She began to have constant low-back pain and fever on postpartum Day 2. Magnetic resonance image revealed a broad area of subcutaneous edema with a continuum along the catheter trajectory deep to the paraspinal muscles. A catheter-related bacterial infection was suspected. The surgical debridement and drainage was required combined with intravenous antibiotics on postpartum Day 3. She was soon cured uncomplicatedly. Epidural analgesia is effective to control labor pain and, in general, it is safe. However, the sequelae of complicated infection may be underestimated. A literature search yielded 7 other cases of catheter-related epidural abscess or soft tissue infection. Vigilance for these infections, especially in postpartum patients with backache, is needed. Moreover, early detection and proper treatment of infectious signs at postanesthetic visit are very important. PMID:26683923

  14. Anorectal abscess during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Koyama, Shinsuke; Hirota, Masaki; Kobayashi, Masaki; Tanaka, Yusuke; Kubota, Satoshi; Nakamura, Ryo; Isobe, Masanori; Shiki, Yasuhiko

    2014-02-01

    Anorectal symptoms and complaints caused by hemorrhoids or anal fissures are common during pregnancy. It is known that one-third of pregnant women complain of anal pain in the third trimester. Anal pain may be caused by a wide spectrum of conditions, but if it begins gradually and becomes excruciating within a few days it may indicate anorectal abscess. We experienced a case of anorectal abscess during pregnancy which was diagnosed by magnetic resonance imaging and treated by incision and seton drainage at 36 weeks of gestation, followed by a normal spontaneous delivery at 38 weeks of gestation. To our knowledge, this is the first case report of anorectal abscess during pregnancy in the English-language published work. The clinical course of our case and clinical considerations of anorectal abscesses are discussed.

  15. Peritonsillar Abscess (For Teens)

    MedlinePlus

    ... doctors use antibiotics to treat tonsillitis. Tooth and gum disease can increase the chances of a peritonsillar abscess ... Tonsillitis Strep Throat How Can I Quit Smoking? Gum Disease Stop Smoking: Your Personal Plan Mouth and Teeth ...

  16. Abscess in the Lungs

    MedlinePlus

    ... a sample of sputum and try to grow (culture) the organism causing the abscess, but this test ... obtain samples of lung secretions or tissue for culture if, for example, Antibiotics seem ineffective Obstruction of ...

  17. Legionella micdadei Brain Abscess

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Edward; Macyk-Davey, Andrea; Henry, Monica; Nilsson, Jan-Erik; Miedzinski, Lil

    2013-01-01

    We describe an immunocompromised patient who developed a large frontal brain abscess caused by Legionella micdadei. This is, to our knowledge, a rare case of culture-proven Legionella central nervous system infection. PMID:23224082

  18. Tonsillar Cellulitis and Abscess

    MedlinePlus

    ... to Pneumococcal Vaccine Additional Content Medical News Tonsillar Cellulitis and Tonsillar Abscess By Clarence T. Sasaki, MD, ... Vocal Cord Contact Ulcers Vocal Cord Paralysis Tonsillar cellulitis is a bacterial infection of the tissues around ...

  19. Percutaneous hepatic abscess drainage: do multiple abscesses or multiloculated abscesses preclude drainage or affect outcome?

    PubMed

    Liu, Chang-Hsien; Gervais, Debra A; Hahn, Peter F; Arellano, Ronald S; Uppot, Raul N; Mueller, Peter R

    2009-08-01

    To compare the effectiveness of percutaneous abscess drainage in patients with pyogenic liver abscesses of the following types: single, single multiloculated, multiple, and multiple multiloculated. One hundred nine patients with 149 liver abscesses who underwent percutaneous drainage during an 11-year period were divided into a single abscess group and a multiple abscess group. Of the 109 patients, 54 had multiloculated abscesses and were divided into single and multiple multiloculated abscess groups. Technical success was defined as the ability to place the catheter within the abscess cavity and clinical success was defined as improvement in the patient's symptoms. Clinical findings, management strategy, complication rate, and success rate were analyzed. Technical success rates were 96% (82 of 85) for a single abscess and 96% (23 of 24) for multiple abscesses (P = 1.0). Clinical success was achieved in 74 of 85 patients (87%) with a single abscess and 22 of 24 patients (92%) with multiple abscesses (P = .729). Technical success rates were 94% (32 of 34) for a single multiloculated abscess and 95% (19 of 20) for multiple multiloculated abscesses (P = 1.0). Clinical success was achieved in 30 of 34 patients (88%) with a single multiloculated abscess and 18 of 20 patients (90%) with multiple multiloculated abscesses (P = 1). No significant difference in hospital stay was seen between single and multiple abscess groups (P = .373) or between single multiloculated and multiple multiloculated abscess groups (P = .180). There were no major complications or mortality related to the procedure. Percutaneous drainage is a safe and effective procedure in the treatment of pyogenic liver abscess, regardless of abscess complexity and/or multiplicity.

  20. Central corneal abscess.

    PubMed

    van Bijsterveld, O P

    1976-05-01

    Central corneal abscess developed in the experimental animal after inoculation of biologically active staphylococcal strains in a paracentral epithelial lesion of the cornea. These abscesses did not ulcerate, developed only with high inocula, occurred more frequently in immunized rabbits. A serpiginous type of ulceration did not develop at the site of the initial epithelial lesion nor at any other place in the cornea. Histologically, the lesions consisted of densely packed polymorphonuclear leukocytes between the corneal lamellae.

  1. Magnetic resonance imaging in a spinal abscess model. Preliminary report.

    PubMed

    Runge, V M; Williams, N M; Lee, C; Timoney, J F

    1998-04-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) scan technique and lesion detectability were evaluated using a newly developed spinal abscess model in the New Zealand White rabbit. To create the lesion, an epidural needle was inserted under fluoroscopic guidance in the lumbar region and advanced to penetrate the ligamentum flavum. Next, polyethylene tubing was fed through the needle into the epidural space. A mixed suspension of Staphylococcus aureus (Cowan I) and blue polystyrene microspheres then was injected. Lesions were evaluated by MR imaging in four animals at multiple time points (3, 6, and 9 days). Imaging was performed at 1.5 tesla using a surface coil. Precontrast T2-and T1-weighted scans were first obtained. The T1-weighted scans were acquired both with and without fat saturation, and were repeated after intravenous contrast administration. The contrast agent used was gadoteridol (gadolinium HP-DO3A or ProHance) at a dose of 0.3 mmol/kg. On prospective film review, postcontrast scans proved superior for lesion detection. A spinal abscess could be identified postcontrast in all cases, irrespective of the use of fat saturation. The next best imaging technique for lesion detection was the T2-weighted scan, with 5 of 8 lesions noted thereon. Visualization of lesion margins proved to be a primary factor in prospective lesion identification. Region of interest image analysis demonstrated the postcontrast scans to be superior to all precontrast scan techniques for conspicuity of the interface between the abscess and the compressed spinal cord, with these results statistically significant. The lesions were characterized histologically by infiltrates of heterophils into the meninges and outer spinal cord with accompanying mild hemorrhage, fibrin exudation, and bacterial colonies. The lesions in three animals were confirmed to be in the epidural space, with the lesion in one animal in the subdural space. The current animal model was developed to study spine infection and, specifically

  2. Early versus late epidural analgesia and risk of instrumental delivery in nulliparous women: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Wassen, M M L H; Zuijlen, J; Roumen, F J M E; Smits, L J M; Marcus, M A; Nijhuis, J G

    2011-05-01

    Review of the literature regarding the relation between the timing of epidural analgesia and the rate of caesarean or instrumental vaginal deliveries. Pubmed, Embase and the Cochrane Library were searched for articles published until 31 July 2010. Studies were selected in which the effects of early latent phase (defined as a cervical dilatation of 3 cm or less) epidural analgesia (including combined-spinal epidural) and late active phase epidural analgesia on the mode of delivery in nulliparous women at 36 weeks of gestation or more were evaluated. Data extraction was completed by using a data-extraction form. Risk ratio and its 95% confidence intervals were calculated for caesarean delivery and instrumental vaginal delivery. Pooled data were calculated. The search retrieved 20 relevant articles, of which six fulfilled the selection criteria of inclusion. These six studies reported on 15,399 nulliparous women in spontaneous or induced labour with a request for analgesia. Risk of caesarean delivery (pooled risk ratio 1.02, 95% CI 0.96-1.08) or instrumental vaginal delivery (pooled risk ratio 0.96, 95% CI 0.89-1.05) was not significantly different between groups. This systematic review showed no increased risk of caesarean delivery or instrumental vaginal delivery for women receiving early epidural analgesia at cervical dilatation of 3 m or less in comparison with late epidural analgesia. © 2011 The Authors BJOG An International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology © 2011 RCOG.

  3. [Acute periproctal abscesses].

    PubMed

    Slauf, P; Antoš, F; Marx, J

    2014-04-01

    Periproctal inflammations related to the anus are characterized by the rapid spread of the infection to the surrounding tissue, which is determined by the anatomical characteristics and infectious agents. Inflammation, which starts as a phlegmon, quickly forms boundaries and an abscess develops in most cases. Up to 80-90% of anorectal abscesses develop according to the crypto-glandular theory on the basis of infection of the anal glands, spilling into the Morgagni crypts in the anal canal. Up to two-thirds of such abscesses are associated with the emergence of anorectal fistulas. Anorectal abscesses can be divided into marginal and subcutaneous perianal abscesses, submucosal, intersphincteric, ischiorectal and supralevator abscesses. Their diagnosis is based on thorough physical examination, sometimes also with the help of imaging methods such as computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging and endoanal ultrasound. What is decisive for the successful treatment of anorectal abscessess is their early and adequate surgical drainage. Adjuvant antibiotic therapy is necessary only when the overall signs of sepsis are present and for patients with a comorbidity such as diabetes, valvular heart disease, or immunodeficiency.

  4. Epidural Hematoma in Lacrosse.

    PubMed

    Rimel, R W; Nelson, W E; Persing, J A; Jane, J A

    1983-03-01

    In brief: Several hours after being hit by a lacrosse stick in the left temporoparietal area slightly anterior to the ear, a lacrosse player was found unresponsive and wrapped in a blanket in his dormitory room. He had not lost consciousness during the game, sat out only five minutes, and completed the game. His Glasgow Coma Scale score was 12 of a possible 15. A CT scan showed an epidural hematoma and a skull fracture. He underwent an immediate left temporoparietal craniotomy and evacuation of the epidural hematoma. He recovered fully and requested permission to return to play six months after the injury. The authors think that an improved lacrosse helmet design would help prevent this type of injury.

  5. Women's perception of the onset of labour and epidural analgesia: a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Antje; Penz, Sarah M; Gross, Mechthild M

    2013-04-01

    childbearing women and their midwives differ in their diagnoses of the onset of labour. The symptoms women use to describe the onset of labour are associated with the process of labour. Perinatal factors and women's attitudes may be associated with the administration of epidural analgesia. Our study aimed to assess the correlation between women's perception of the onset of labour and the frequency and timing of epidural analgesia during labour. prospective cohort study. 41 maternity units in Lower Saxony, Germany. 549 nulliparae (as defined in the "Methods" section) and 490 multiparae giving birth between April and October 2005. Women were included after 34 completed weeks of gestation with a singleton in vertex presentation and planned vaginal birth. the association between women's symptoms at the onset of labour and the administration of epidural analgesia - frequency, timing in relation to onset of labour and cervical dilatation - was assessed. The analysis was performed by Kaplan-Meiers estimation, logistic regression and Cox regression. a total of 174 nulliparae and 49 multiparae received epidural analgesia during labour. Nulliparae received it at a median time of 5.47hrs (range: 0.25-51.17hrs) after onset of labour, at a median cervical dilatation of 3.3cm (range: 1.0-10.0cm). In multiparae, epidural analgesia was applied at a median time of 3.79hrs (range: 0.42-28.55hrs) after onset of labour; the median cervical dilatation was 3.0cm (range: 1.0-8.0cm). Women who were admitted with advanced cervical dilatation received epidural analgesia less often. Women who defined their onset of labour earlier than it was diagnosed by their midwives received epidural analgesia earlier. Gastrointestinal symptoms and irregular pain at the onset of labour were associated with later administration of epidural analgesia. Induction of labour was associated with a reduced interval from the onset of labour to epidural analgesia. women's self-diagnosis of the onset of labour and

  6. Spinal Subdural Abscess Following Laminectomy for Symptomatic Stenosis: A Report of 2 Cases and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Ramos, Alexander D.; Rolston, John D.; Gauger, Grant E.; Larson, Paul S.

    2016-01-01

    Case series Patient: Male, 87 • Male, 62 Final Diagnosis: Spinal subdural abscess Symptoms: Fever • pain • weakness Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Laminectomy • durotomy • drainage • debridement Specialty: Neurosurgery Objective: Rare disease Background: Spinal subdural abscesses, also known as empyemas, are rare infectious lesions, the exact incidence of which is unknown. Presentation is typically dramatic, with back pain, fever, motor, and sensory deficits. Rapid identification and surgical intervention with laminectomy, durotomy, and washout provides the best outcomes. While hematogenous spread of an extra-spinal infection is the most common cause of this condition, a significant number of cases result from iatrogenic mechanisms, including lumbar punctures, epidural injections, and surgery. Case Report: Here we present 2 cases: 1) an 87-year-old man with type 2 diabetes, schizophrenia, mild cognitive impairment, and symptomatic lumbar spinal stenosis and 2) a 62-year-old man with a prior L3–4 spinal fusion with symptomatic lumbar spinal stenosis. In both cases, patients underwent laminectomy for spinal stenosis and developed epidural abscess. Following successful drainage of the epidural abscess, they continued to be symptomatic, and repeat imaging revealed the presence of a subdural abscess that was subsequently evacuated. Case 1 had significant improvement with residual lower-extremity weakness, while Case 2 made a complete neurological recovery. Conclusions: These cases illustrate patients at increased risk for developing this rare spinal infection, and demonstrate that rapid recognition and surgical treatment is key to cure and recovery. Review of the literature highlights pertinent risk factors and demonstrates nearly one-third of reported cases have an iatrogenic etiology. The cases presented here demonstrate that a subdural process should be suspected in any patient with intractable pain following treatment of an epidural abscess. PMID

  7. [Low back pain and headache during immediate postpartum. Role of obstetrical epidural analgesia].

    PubMed

    Palot, P; Jolly, D H; Visseaux, H; Botmans, C; Abdi, M; Gabriel, R; Pire, J C

    1995-01-01

    The rate of low back pain and headache following parturition seems to be higher in patients delivered under epidural analgesia. The aim of this study, performed in the immediate postpartum (up to 3rd day) and including 200 patients delivered vaginally, was to assess the incidence and the risk factors of low back pain and headache. A total of 31.5% of them complained of low back pain (LBP+) after parturition. They were significantly younger than those without low back pain (LBP-) (p < 0.03) and have had significantly more often epidural analgesia (p < 0.05). However, there were no statistically significant differences concerning weight, weight gain, parity, duration of labour and duration of epidural analgesia. The LBP+ patients complained significantly more often of cervical (p < 0.04) and low back pain (p < 0.02) during pregnancy, than the LBP-. In the immediate postpartum period, cervical and dorsal pain as well as headache occurred significantly more often in LBP+ than in LBP+ (p < 0.001). The intensity of low back pain during pregnancy (p < 0.006). Risk factors for postpartum LBP were epidural analgesia (OR = odds ratio = 6.59), LBP (OR = 6.50) and cervical pain (OR = 2.75) during pregnancy. The influence of epidural analgesia is questionable, as there was no difference between duration of labour and duration of epidural analgesia, if used, between the two groups. Patients for whom epidural analgesia was required are probably more susceptible to pain during pregnancy. Patients who suffered from postpartum headache (PPHDA+) were comparable to those who did not (PPDHA-).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  8. Extradural frontal abscess complicating nasal septal abscess in a child.

    PubMed

    Thomson, C J; Berkowitz, R G

    1998-10-02

    Nasal septal abscess (NSA) is an uncommon sequel to minor nasal trauma. Abscess extension beyond the nasal cavity is rarely documented. A case of a 10-year-old boy who presented with a NSA associated with a large extradural frontal abscess is presented and indications for CT scanning in the workup of pediatric patients with NSA is discussed.

  9. Tularaemia presenting as parapharyngeal abscess: case presentation.

    PubMed

    Koc, S; Gürbüzler, L; Yaman, H; Eyibilen, A; Salman, N; Ekici, A

    2012-05-01

    We report an extremely rare case of the oropharyngeal form of tularaemia, causing a parapharyngeal abscess. A 48-year-old woman presented with fever, sore throat, breathing difficulty and a right-sided neck swelling. This mass had previously been treated with penicillin without response, and had already been surgically drained once in another hospital. On physical examination, the tonsils were exudative and hypertrophic and the pharynx was hyperaemic. A fluctuant, 4 × 4 cm mass was seen on endoscopic examination, originating from the left parapharyngeal area and protruding towards the pyriform sinus, and partly obstructing the airway. Microagglutination test antibody titres for Francisella tularensis were positive (1/1280). The patient healed completely after definitive drainage of the abscess and antimicrobial therapy for 14 days (streptomycin, 2 × 1 g intramuscularly). Tularaemia should be considered in the differential diagnosis of patients presenting with tonsillopharyngitis, cervical lymphadenitis and parapharyngeal abscess who do not respond to treatment with penicillin, even if they do not live in an endemic region.

  10. Brucellar spondylodiscitis: comparison of patients with and without abscesses.

    PubMed

    Kaptan, Figen; Gulduren, Hakki Mustafa; Sarsilmaz, Aysegul; Sucu, Hasan Kamil; Ural, Serap; Vardar, Ilknur; Coskun, Nejat Ali

    2013-04-01

    Brucellosis is an important cause of spondylodiscitis in endemic areas. Brucellar spondylodiscitis is a serious complication because of its association with abscess formation. Prospective studies comparing patients with and without abscesses are lacking. The objective of this study was to determine the frequency and demographic, clinical, laboratory, and radiological features of brucellar spondylodiscitis and to compare patients with and without abscesses regarding treatment and outcome. Out of 135 consecutive patients with brucellosis, 31 patients with spondylodiscitis were recruited for the study. Patients were grouped according to magnetic resonance imaging findings. The frequency of spondylodiscitis was 23.0 %. Sites of involvement were lumbar (58.1 %), lumbosacral (22.6 %), cervical (9.7 %), thoracolumbar (6.5 %), and thoracic (3.2 %). Abscesses occurred in 19 (61.3 %) patients and were associated with low hemoglobin levels. Medical treatment included a combination of streptomycin (for the first 3 weeks), doxycycline, and rifampin. The total duration of treatment was 12-39 (mean 17.0 ± 8.5 SD) weeks. By 12 weeks of treatment, evidence of clinical improvement (67 vs. 28 %) and radiological regression (92 vs. 50 %) was significantly greater in patients without abscesses. The duration of treatment was longer if an abscess was present. Two female patients with abscesses required surgical intervention. Both patients presented with high fever, neurologic deficit, and high Brucella standard tube agglutination test titers. Each patient should be evaluated individually, based on clinical findings, laboratory data, and radiological results, when undergoing treatment for brucellar spondylodiscitis. If abscesses are found, a longer course of treatment and even surgical intervention may be needed.

  11. Anaerobic brain abscess

    PubMed Central

    Sudhaharan, Sukanya; Chavali, Padmasri

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Brain abscess remains a potentially fatal central nervous system (CNS) disease, especially in developing countries. Anaerobic abscess is difficult to diagnose because of cumbersome procedures associated with the isolation of anaerobes. Materials and Methods: This is a hospital-based retrospective microbiological analysis of 430 brain abscess materials (purulent aspirates and/or tissue), for anaerobic organisms, that were received between 1987–2014, by the Microbiology Laboratory in our Institute. Results: Culture showed growth of bacteria 116/430 (27%) of the cases of which anaerobes were isolated in 48/116 (41.1%) of the cases. Peptostreptococcus (51.4 %), was the predominant organism isolated in four cases followed by Bacteroides and Peptococcus species. Conclusion: Early diagnosis and detection of these organisms would help in the appropriate management of these patients. PMID:27307977

  12. EPIDURAL ANALGESIA IN LABOR - CONTROVERSIES.

    PubMed

    Bilić, Nada; Djaković, Ivka; Kličan-Jaić, Katarina; Rudman, Senka Sabolović; Ivanec, Željko

    2015-09-01

    Labor pain is one of the most severe pains. Labor is a complex and individual process with varying maternal requesting analgesia. Labor analgesia must be safe and accompanied by minimal amount of unwanted consequences for both the mother and the child, as well as for the delivery procedure. Epidural analgesia is the treatment that best meets these demands. According to the American Congress of Obstetrics and Gynecology and American Society of Anesthesiologists, mother's demand is a reason enough for the introduction of epidural analgesia in labor, providing that no contraindications exist. The application of analgesics should not cease at the end of the second stage of labor, but it is recommended that lower concentration analgesics be then applied. Based on the latest studies, it can be claimed that epidural analgesia can be applied during the major part of the first and second stage of labor. According to previous investigations, there is no definitive conclusion about the incidence of instrumental delivery, duration of second stage of labor, time of epidural analgesia initiation, and long term outcomes for the newborn. Cooperation of obstetric and anesthesiology personnel, as well as appropriate technical equipment significantly decrease the need of instrumental completion of a delivery, as well as other complications encountered in the application of epidural analgesia. Our hospital offers 24/7 epidural analgesia service. The majority of pregnant women in our hospital were aware of the advantages of epidural analgesia for labor, however, only a small proportion of them used it, mainly because of inadequate level of information.

  13. [Inadvertent epidural infusion of paracetamol].

    PubMed

    Charco Roca, L M; Ortiz Sánchez, V E; del Pino Moreno, A L

    2014-10-01

    A 45-year-old woman was accidentally administered an epidural infusion of paracetamol instead of levobupivacaine for postoperative pain therapy during the postoperative period of abdominal hysterectomy under general anesthesia combined with epidural analgesia. The patient had no neurological symptoms at any time, although a slight tendency to arterial hypotension that did not require treatment was observed. No rescue analgesia was necessary until 8h after the start of epidural infusion. The incidence of these types of errors is probably underestimated, although there are several cases reported with various drugs.

  14. [Epidural emphysema complicating bronchial asthma].

    PubMed

    Rouetbi, N; Ben Saad, A; Joobeur, S; Skhiri, N; Cheikh Mhamed, S; Mribah, H; El Kamel, A

    2012-12-01

    Epidural emphysema is an exceptional complication of bronchial asthma, revealed by an incidental finding in chest tomography. We report a case of a 21-year-old man admitted with asthma attack complicated by subcutaneous and mediastinal emphysema. Chest tomography confirmed the mediastinal emphysema and also revealed the epidural emphysema within the vertebral canal. Neurological examination was negative. The patient showed complete recovery 10days after the onset of symptoms. The epidural emphysema is a rare complication during asthma attacks. The benignity of this complication should not require a systematic chest tomography.

  15. Percutaneous Abscess Drainage

    MedlinePlus

    ... the local anesthetic is injected. Most of the sensation is at the skin incision site which is numbed using local anesthetic. ... open surgical drainage. Risks Any procedure where the skin is penetrated ... organ may be damaged by percutaneous abscess drainage. Occasionally ...

  16. Pyogenic liver abscess

    PubMed Central

    Webb, Gwilym James; Chapman, Thomas Patrick; Cadman, Philip John; Gorard, David Angelo

    2014-01-01

    Pyogenic liver abscess has a variable clinical presentation. Its management requires input from several disciplines and is often coordinated by a gastroenterologist. This review examines demographics, clinical presentation, aetiology, diagnosis and prognosis; a suggested management approach, including antibiotic selection, radiological intervention and indications for surgery, is offered from a physician's perspective. PMID:28839753

  17. Epidural analgesia in the latent phase of labor and the risk of cesarean delivery: a five-year randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Wang, FuZhou; Shen, XiaoFeng; Guo, XiRong; Peng, YuZhu; Gu, XiaoQi

    2009-10-01

    The optimal timing of epidural analgesia has been a controversial issue, and how early women can benefit from epidural analgesia is still debated. The objective of this trial was to test the hypothesis that patient-controlled epidural analgesia given at cervical dilation of 1.0 cm or more does not increase the risk of prolonged labor or Cesarean delivery. After institutional review board approval and patient consent, 12,793 nulliparous patients requesting neuraxial analgesia were enrolled and randomized to an early epidural (cervical dilation at least 1.0 cm) or delayed epidural (cervical dilation at least 4.0 cm) group. A 15-ml epidural analgesic mixture consisting of 0.125% (1.25 mg/ml) ropivacaine plus 0.3 microg/ml sufentanil was given in a single bolus, followed by patient-controlled pump with a 10-ml bolus without background infusion. Repeatable meperidine (25 mg) was prescribed as being the rescue analgesic to patients in the delayed epidural group. The primary outcome was the rate of Cesarean section. The median diameters of cervical dilation were 1.6 cm and 5.1 cm in the early and delayed epidural groups, respectively (P < 0.0001). The duration of labor from analgesia request to vaginal delivery was equal in both groups (11.3 +/- 4.5 h for early epidural and 11.8 +/- 4.9 h for delayed epidural group women, P = 0.90). No statistically significant difference in the rate of Cesarean section was observed between the two groups on the intention-to-treat analysis (23.2% vs. 22.8% in the early and delayed epidural groups, respectively; P = 0.51). Epidural analgesia in the latent phase of labor at cervical dilation of 1.0 cm or more does not prolong the progression of labor and does not increase the rate of Cesarean in nulliparous women compared with the delayed analgesia at the cervical dilation of 4.0 cm or more.

  18. Spinal Subdural Abscess Following Laminectomy for Symptomatic Stenosis: A Report of 2 Cases and Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Alexander D; Rolston, John D; Gauger, Grant E; Larson, Paul S

    2016-07-12

    BACKGROUND Spinal subdural abscesses, also known as empyemas, are rare infectious lesions, the exact incidence of which is unknown. Presentation is typically dramatic, with back pain, fever, motor, and sensory deficits. Rapid identification and surgical intervention with laminectomy, durotomy, and washout provides the best outcomes. While hematogenous spread of an extra-spinal infection is the most common cause of this condition, a significant number of cases result from iatrogenic mechanisms, including lumbar punctures, epidural injections, and surgery. CASE REPORT Here we present 2 cases: 1) an 87-year-old man with type 2 diabetes, schizophrenia, mild cognitive impairment, and symptomatic lumbar spinal stenosis and 2) a 62-year-old man with a prior L3-4 spinal fusion with symptomatic lumbar spinal stenosis. In both cases, patients underwent laminectomy for spinal stenosis and developed epidural abscess. Following successful drainage of the epidural abscess, they continued to be symptomatic, and repeat imaging revealed the presence of a subdural abscess that was subsequently evacuated. Case 1 had significant improvement with residual lower-extremity weakness, while Case 2 made a complete neurological recovery. CONCLUSIONS These cases illustrate patients at increased risk for developing this rare spinal infection, and demonstrate that rapid recognition and surgical treatment is key to cure and recovery. Review of the literature highlights pertinent risk factors and demonstrates nearly one-third of reported cases have an iatrogenic etiology. The cases presented here demonstrate that a subdural process should be suspected in any patient with intractable pain following treatment of an epidural abscess.

  19. Large Retropharyngeal Abscesses in an Immunocompetent Adult Patient with Disseminated Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Amaya-Tapia, Gerardo; Rodríguez-Toledo, Arturo; Aguilar-Benavides, Sergio; Aguirre-Avalos, Guadalupe

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Male, 46 Final Diagnosis: Generalized tuberculous lymphadenitis with retropharyngeal abscesses and disseminated tuberculosis Symptoms: Lymphadenopathy • dysphagia • weight loss Medication: — Clinical Procedure: — Specialty: Infectious Diseases Objective: Unusual clinical course Background: The retropharyngeal abscess is a rare presentation of head and neck tuberculosis. The pathogenesis of the abscess formation in the retropharyngeal space in the adult is controversial. Case Report: We report a case of large retropharyngeal abscesses in a 46-year-old man with disseminated tuberculosis. The patient had severe progressive dysphagia, weight loss, and a slowly enlarging bilateral cervical mass during a period of three months. His posterior pharynx wall was bulging and red, and both tonsils were enlarged and congested. The neck had an abscess of 5 cm in diameter that was firm, tender, and warm along the left sternocleidomastoid muscle. Palpable bilateral lymphadenitis was detected in the submandibular, cervical, axillary, and inguinal regions. A computed tomographic (CT) scan of the neck revealed large bilobulated retropharyngeal abscesses. A liver ultrasound showed multiple hypoechoic lesions. A Ziehl-Neelsen smear for acid-fast bacilli was positive from different abscess samples, and mycobacterial cultures subsequently yielded Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Antituberculous therapy was begun and the retropharyngeal abscesses were aspirated by external incision with complete drainage and relief of symptoms. Conclusions: Large retropharyngeal abscess is a rare entity in which Mycobacterium tuberculosis etiology should be considered, especially in endemic countries, and the diagnosis may be difficult because symptoms and signs are influenced by abscess size and time of onset, or if the etiology is not suspected. PMID:27680292

  20. [Chronic epidural haematoma mimicking meningioma].

    PubMed

    Beculić, Hakija; Skomorac, Rasim; Jusić, Aldin; Mekić-Abazović, Alma; Bajtarević, Alma

    2011-02-01

    The study presents a rare case of organised chronic epidural haematoma that imitated a meningioma. A patient was admitted to the Department of Neurology of the Cantonal Hospital Zenica due to loss of consciousness and right hemiparesis. Non-contrast Computed Tomography (CT) scan had shown an expansive intracranial process in the left parietal region which was radiologically diagnosed as a meningioma. During the operation a linear skull fracture and organised chronic epidural haematoma were found.

  1. Carotid Sheath Abscess Caused by a Tooth Decay Infection on the Opposite Side

    PubMed Central

    Tuncturk, F. Ruya; Uzun, Lokman; Kalcioglu, M. Tayyar; Egilmez, Oguz Kadir; Timurlenk, Emine; Erguven, Muferet

    2015-01-01

    Deep neck infections are mortal diseases that need emergency treatment. It can occur at any age but usually in pediatric ages. In this report, a left cervical carotid space abscess of a pediatric patient was discussed. It was interesting that the only origin of the left carotid sheath abscess was right inferior first molar tooth decay. Right neck spaces were all clean. Patient had no immunosupression and also there were no congenital masses such as branchial cleft cysts, foreign bodies, or masses suspicious for malignancies in cervical ultrasound and MRI. We discussed this rare condition under the light of the literature. PMID:25878916

  2. Carotid sheath abscess caused by a tooth decay infection on the opposite side.

    PubMed

    Tuncturk, F Ruya; Uzun, Lokman; Kalcioglu, M Tayyar; Egilmez, Oguz Kadir; Timurlenk, Emine; Erguven, Muferet

    2015-01-01

    Deep neck infections are mortal diseases that need emergency treatment. It can occur at any age but usually in pediatric ages. In this report, a left cervical carotid space abscess of a pediatric patient was discussed. It was interesting that the only origin of the left carotid sheath abscess was right inferior first molar tooth decay. Right neck spaces were all clean. Patient had no immunosupression and also there were no congenital masses such as branchial cleft cysts, foreign bodies, or masses suspicious for malignancies in cervical ultrasound and MRI. We discussed this rare condition under the light of the literature.

  3. Epidural Volume Extension During Combined Spinal-Epidural Labor Analgesia Does Not Increase Sensory Block.

    PubMed

    Zaphiratos, Valerie; George, Ronald B; Macaulay, Bruce; Bolleddula, Prasad; McKeen, Dolores M

    2016-09-01

    Combined spinal-epidural (CSE) analgesia is widely used for delivering labor analgesia. Epidural volume extension (EVE) involves the injection of fluid into the epidural space compressing the dural sac, causing cephalad shift of the cerebral spinal fluid. Our hypothesis was that EVE with 10 mL normal saline during CSE would increase the sensory block height at 15 minutes after intrathecal injection. We expected EVE to decrease pain scores, decrease analgesia onset time, and decrease motor block compared with performing CSE without EVE (NEVE). We randomly assigned 60 healthy term laboring nulliparous parturients with cervical dilation <5 cm to receive CSE either with EVE of 10 mL normal saline through the Tuohy needle before catheter insertion or CSE NEVE. Intrathecal analgesia consisted of 2 mg plain bupivacaine and 10 μg fentanyl (1 mL total). A blinded researcher assessed sensory dermatome level, analgesia, and motor blockade at regular intervals for 30 minutes. The primary outcome measure was the median peak sensory dermatome level at 15 minutes. Fifty-four parturients were analyzed. There was no significant difference in peak sensory dermatome levels at 15 minutes (median difference, 1 dermatome level; 95% confidence interval of median difference, 0 to 2; P = 0.22) and 30 minutes (median difference, 0 dermatome level; 95% confidence interval, -2 to 2; P = 0.76). There was no difference in the time to peak dermatome, minimum pain score, or the time to minimum pain score between groups. We found no significant difference between groups with regard to sensory dermatome level or pain scores when using EVE compared with NEVE. Our study demonstrates that addition of EVE does not offer superior analgesia when using a CSE technique for parturients requesting labor analgesia.

  4. Traumatic spinal epidural hematoma in a 1-year-old boy.

    PubMed

    Tarbé de Saint Hardouin, A-L; Grévent, D; Sainte-Rose, C; Angoulvant, F; Chéron, G

    2016-07-01

    Traumatic spinal epidural hematoma is uncommon in children, making rapid diagnosis difficult. In this report, we present a case of traumatic cervical epidural hematoma in a 1-year-old boy, diagnosed with computed tomography scanning and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Management was conservative and the lesion regressed spontaneously. The presentation in childhood is often nonspecific. MRI is the imaging modality of choice for diagnosing these lesions. Conservative treatment has to be considered in cases with a benign clinical course and provided that the patient is followed up neurologically with repeated MRI. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. Risk factors for failed conversion of labor epidural analgesia to cesarean delivery anesthesia: a systematic review and meta-analysis of observational trials.

    PubMed

    Bauer, M E; Kountanis, J A; Tsen, L C; Greenfield, M L; Mhyre, J M

    2012-10-01

    This systematic review and meta-analysis evaluates evidence for seven risk factors associated with failed conversion of labor epidural analgesia to cesarean delivery anesthesia. Online scientific literature databases were searched using a strategy which identified observational trials, published between January 1979 and May 2011, which evaluated risk factors for failed conversion of epidural analgesia to anesthesia or documented a failure rate resulting in general anesthesia. 1450 trials were screened, and 13 trials were included for review (n=8628). Three factors increase the risk for failed conversion: an increasing number of clinician-administered boluses during labor (OR=3.2, 95% CI 1.8-5.5), greater urgency for cesarean delivery (OR=40.4, 95% CI 8.8-186), and a non-obstetric anesthesiologist providing care (OR=4.6, 95% CI 1.8-11.5). Insufficient evidence is available to support combined spinal-epidural versus standard epidural techniques, duration of epidural analgesia, cervical dilation at the time of epidural placement, and body mass index or weight as risk factors for failed epidural conversion. The risk of failed conversion of labor epidural analgesia to anesthesia is increased with an increasing number of boluses administered during labor, an enhanced urgency for cesarean delivery, and care being provided by a non-obstetric anesthesiologist. Further high-quality studies are needed to evaluate the many potential risk factors associated with failed conversion of labor epidural analgesia to anesthesia for cesarean delivery. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. The role of percutaneous transhepatic abscess drainage for liver abscess.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, T; Shimizu, S; Morisaki, T; Sugitani, A; Nakatsuka, A; Mizumoto, K; Yamaguchi, K; Chijiiwa, K; Tanaka, M

    1999-01-01

    To evaluate the efficacy of percutaneous transhepatic abscess drainage (PTAD) as an initial choice of treatment for liver abscess, the medical records of 28 patients with liver abscess were retrospectively analyzed. The patients were predominantly men (23 of 28) with a mean age of 59 years (range, 19-86 years). Their chief complaints were fever (86%), right hypochondralgia (32%), and jaundice (11%). Fifteen of the 28 patients (54%) had hepatobiliary and pancreatic carcinoma, and 31% had postoperative liver abscess. PTAD was performed in 23 patients and surgical drainage in 5. The overall success rate for PTAD was 83%. The success rate for PTAD for patients with multiple abscesses was 83% (5 of 6), compared with a success rate of 82% (14 of 17) for patients with solitary abscess. The prognostic factors for survival were cancer and sepsis and the mortality rate for patients with cancer was 40% (6 of 15) while the mortality rate for patients with sepsis was 56% (5 of 9). As a complication of drainage, 1 patient (4%) in the PTAD group had pleural abscess due to the transpleural puncture. Our findings support the use of PTAD as the primary treatment for liver abscess, as it is safe and effective irrespective of the number of abscesses and the patient's condition.

  7. Hematogenous Pasteurella multocida brain abscess

    SciTech Connect

    Wallace, M.; Lipsky, B.A.

    1985-10-01

    A case of hematogenously acquired brain abscess caused by Pasteurella multocida is described. CT scans of the head revealed the lesions in a 67 year old man with mild alcoholic liver disease and severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Ultrasound examinations of the abdomen and chest and an echocardiogram failed to reveal a source for the abscess. On autopsy examination three encapsulated brain abscesses were found. 34 references, 2 figures, 1 table.

  8. Spontaneous spinal epidural hematoma presenting as paraplegia after cardiac surgery.

    PubMed

    Kin, Hajime; Mukaida, Masayuki; Koizumi, Junichi; Kamada, Takeshi; Mitsunaga, Yoshino; Iwase, Tomoyuki; Ikai, Akio; Okabayashi, Hitoshi

    2016-03-01

    An 86-year-old woman was scheduled to undergo aortic valve replacement and coronary artery bypass graft. On postoperative day 3, she developed sudden-onset neck pain followed by weakness in the right arm. Her symptoms worsened with time, and she developed paraplegia. At 60 h after the first complaint, spontaneous spinal epidural hematoma (SSEH) from C2 to C6 with spinal cord compression was diagnosed from a magnetic resonance image of the cervical region. We decided on conservative therapy because operative recovery was impossible. Delayed diagnosis led to grievous results in the present case. When neurological abnormalities follow neck or back pain after open heart surgery, SSEH must be considered in the differential diagnosis. Further, if it is suspected, early cervical computed tomography/magnetic resonance imaging and surgery should be considered.

  9. Fluoroscopy guided transforaminal epidural anesthesia in ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Channabasappa, S M; Dharmappa, S; Pandurangi, R

    2016-01-01

    A 48-year-old male patient with a long-standing history of ankylosing spondylitis (AS) presented for ureteroscopic stone removal. On preoperative assessment, tracheal intubation was likely to be difficult due to decreased cervical spine mobility. Traditional neuraxial block was impossible due to the fusion of vertebral bodies. AS patients present the most serious array of intubation, which is secondary to decrease in cervical spine mobility and possible temporomandibular joint disease. Management of a case of AS can be very challenging when the airway and the central neuraxial blockade, both are difficult. Fluoroscopic assisted central neuraxial blockade may lead to predictable success in AS. We present a case report with severe AS where conventional techniques failed and C-arm assisted helped in successful epidural anesthesia for ureteroscopic stone removal.

  10. Amebic abscess of urachal remnants.

    PubMed

    Catanzaro, D; Mirk, P; Carbone, A; Macis, G; Danza, F M

    2001-06-01

    We report a rare case of amebic abscess of the urachus, mimicking an urachal neoplasm: no previous reports of amebic infection of the urachus were found in the literature. The challenges of the differential diagnosis between urachal abscess and carcinomas based both on clinical and radiological data are discussed.

  11. Intracranial abscess in Ectopia Cordis.

    PubMed

    Merola, Joseph; Tipper, Geoffrey Adrian; Hussain, Zakier; Balakrishnan, Venkataraman; Gan, Peter

    2014-08-25

    We present a case of intracranial abscess in a young female with Ectopia Cordis, an exceptionally rare cardiac condition. The neurosurgical implication is the predisposition to intracranial abscess formation. A heightened awareness of this association will aid diagnosis in similar clinical scenarios.

  12. Recent Advances in Epidural Analgesia

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, Maria; George, John E.; Seif, John; Farag, Ehab

    2012-01-01

    Neuraxial anesthesia is a term that denotes all forms of central blocks, involving the spinal, epidural, and caudal spaces. Epidural anesthesia is a versatile technique widely used in anesthetic practice. Its potential to decrease postoperative morbidity and mortality has been demonstrated by numerous studies. To maximize its perioperative benefits while minimizing potential adverse outcomes, the knowledge of factors affecting successful block placement is essential. This paper will provide an overview of the pertinent anatomical, pharmacological, immunological, and technical aspects of epidural anesthesia in both adult and pediatric populations and will discuss the recent advances, the related rare but potentially devastating complications, and the current recommendations for the use of anticoagulants in the setting of neuraxial block placement. PMID:22174708

  13. Dental abscess: A microbiological review

    PubMed Central

    Shweta; Prakash, S Krishna

    2013-01-01

    Dental abscess is a frequently occurring infectious process known to the health practice. The fate of the infection depends on the virulence of the bacteria, host resistance factors, and regional anatomy. Serious consequences arising from the spread of a dental abscess lead to significant morbidity and mortality. Acute dental abscess is polymicrobial, comprising of strict anaerobes, such as anaerobic cocci, Prevotella, Fusobacterium species, and facultative anaerobes, such as viridans group streptococci and the Streptococcus anginosus group. Numerous novel, uncultivable and fastidious organisms have been identified as potential pathogens with the use of non-culture techniques. The majority of localized dental abscesses respond to surgical treatment while the use of antimicrobials is limited to severe spreading infections. There is a need for good-quality clinical trials of sufficient size to identify the ideal treatment. The microbiology of the acute dentoalveolar abscess and its treatment in the light of improved culture and diagnostic methods are reviewed. PMID:24348613

  14. Large, spontaneous spinal subdural–epidural hematoma after epidural anesthesia for caesarean section: Conservative management with excellent outcome

    PubMed Central

    Siasios, Ioannis D.; Vakharia, Kunal; Gibbons, Kevin J.; Dimopoulos, Vassilios G.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Iatrogenic or spontaneous spinal hematomas are rarely seen and present with multiple symptoms that can be difficult to localize. Most spontaneous spinal hematomas are multifactorial, and the pathophysiology is varied. Here, we present a case of a scattered, multicomponent, combined subdural and epidural spinal hematoma that was managed conservatively. Case Description: A 38-year-old woman came to the emergency department (ED) complaining of severe neck and back pain. She had undergone a caesarean section under epidural anesthesia 4 days prior to her arrival in the ED. She was placed on heparin and then warfarin to treat a pulmonary embolism that was diagnosed immediately postpartum. Her neurological examination at presentation demonstrated solely the existence of clonus in the lower extremities and localized cervical and low thoracic pain. In the ED, the patient's international normalized ratio was only mildly elevated. Spinal magnetic resonance imaging revealed a large thoracolumbar subdural hematoma with some epidural components in the upper thoracic spine levels. Spinal cord edema was also noted at the T6-T7 vertebral level. The patient was admitted to the neurosurgical intensive care unit for close surveillance and reversal of her coagulopathy. She was treated conservatively with pain medication, fresh frozen plasma, and vitamin K. She was discharged off of warfarin without any neurological deficit. Conclusions: Conservative management of spinal hematomas secondary to induced coagulopathies can be effective. This case suggests that, in the face of neuroimaging findings of significant edema and epidural blood, the clinical examination should dictate the management, especially in such complicated patients. PMID:27843682

  15. Combined spinal-epidural versus epidural analgesia in labour.

    PubMed

    Simmons, Scott W; Taghizadeh, Neda; Dennis, Alicia T; Hughes, Damien; Cyna, Allan M

    2012-10-17

    Traditional epidural techniques have been associated with prolonged labour, use of oxytocin augmentation and increased incidence of instrumental vaginal delivery. The combined spinal-epidural (CSE) technique has been introduced in an attempt to reduce these adverse effects. CSE is believed to improve maternal mobility during labour and provide more rapid onset of analgesia than epidural analgesia, which could contribute to increased maternal satisfaction. To assess the relative effects of CSE versus epidural analgesia during labour. We searched the Cochrane Pregnancy and Childbirth Group's Trials Register (28 September 2011) and reference lists of retrieved studies. We updated the search on 30 June 2012 and added the results to the awaiting classification section. All published randomised controlled trials (RCTs) involving a comparison of CSE with epidural analgesia initiated for women in the first stage of labour. Cluster-randomised trials were considered for inclusion. Quasi RCTs and cross-over trials were not considered for inclusion in this review. Three review authors independently assessed the trials identified from the searches for inclusion, assessed trial quality and extracted the data. Data were checked for accuracy. Twenty-seven trials involving 3274 women met our inclusion criteria. Twenty-six outcomes in two sets of comparisons involving CSE versus traditional epidurals and CSE versus low-dose epidural techniques were analysed.Of the CSE versus traditional epidural analyses five outcomes showed a significant difference. CSE was more favourable in relation to speed of onset of analgesia from time of injection (mean difference (MD) -2.87 minutes; 95% confidence interval (CI) -5.07 to -0.67; two trials, 129 women); the need for rescue analgesia (risk ratio (RR) 0.31; 95% CI 0.14 to 0.70; one trial, 42 women); urinary retention (RR 0.86; 95% CI 0.79 to 0.95; one trial, 704 women); and rate of instrumental delivery (RR 0.81; 95% CI 0.67 to 0.97; six trials

  16. Engaging Cervical Spinal Cord Networks to Reenable Volitional Control of Hand Function in Tetraplegic Patients.

    PubMed

    Lu, Daniel C; Edgerton, V Reggie; Modaber, Morteza; AuYong, Nicholas; Morikawa, Erika; Zdunowski, Sharon; Sarino, Melanie E; Sarrafzadeh, Majid; Nuwer, Marc R; Roy, Roland R; Gerasimenko, Yury

    2016-11-01

    Paralysis of the upper limbs from spinal cord injury results in an enormous loss of independence in an individual's daily life. Meaningful improvement in hand function is rare after 1 year of tetraparesis. Therapeutic developments that result in even modest gains in hand volitional function will significantly affect the quality of life for patients afflicted with high cervical injury. The ability to neuromodulate the lumbosacral spinal circuitry via epidural stimulation in regaining postural function and volitional control of the legs has been recently shown. A key question is whether a similar neuromodulatory strategy can be used to improve volitional motor control of the upper limbs, that is, performance of motor tasks considered to be less "automatic" than posture and locomotion. In this study, the effects of cervical epidural stimulation on hand function are characterized in subjects with chronic cervical cord injury. Herein we show that epidural stimulation can be applied to the chronic injured human cervical spinal cord to promote volitional hand function. Two subjects implanted with a cervical epidural electrode array demonstrated improved hand strength (approximately 3-fold) and volitional hand control in the presence of epidural stimulation. The present data are sufficient to suggest that hand motor function in individuals with chronic tetraplegia can be improved with cervical cord neuromodulation and thus should be comprehensively explored as a possible clinical intervention. © The Author(s) 2016.

  17. [Clinical analysis of nasogenic brain abscess].

    PubMed

    Yu, Huanxin; Liu, Gang

    2014-03-01

    To investigate the clinical features of nasogenic brain abscess. Four patients with nasogenic brain abscess diagnosed in Tianjin huanhu hospital between June 2007 and January 2013 were reported and the relevant literatures reviewed. All four patients were frontal abscess, however, the pathogeny of frontal abscess were different. These four patients were treated by different methods and followed up from 12-28 months, no recurrence was found. All four patients were cured. The clinical manifestation of nasogenic brain abscess was hiding and was easy to misdiagnosis. Enhanced MRI is the key of the diagnosis. According to the pathogeny of brain abscess, it was important to cure nasogenic brain abscess with different ways.

  18. [Hyperthermia after obstetrical epidural anesthesia].

    PubMed

    Mercier, F J; Benhamou, D

    1994-01-01

    Unlike epidural anaesthesia for general surgery or caesarean section, épidural analgesia for labour leads to maternal hyperthermia. Its recent demonstration is probably related to the multiple influencing factors: site of measurement, ambient temperature, previous labour duration and dilatation at the time of epidural puncture, and occurrence of shivering. During the first 2 to 5 hours of epidural analgesia, there is a weak--if any--thermic increase. Then, when labour is prolonged (mostly primiparae) a linear increase occurs with time, at a mean rate of 1 degree C per 7 hours. The pathophysiology remains hypothetical: heat loss (sweating and hyperventilation) would be reduced during epidural analgesia and therefore surpassed by the important labour-induced heat production. This hyperthermia has been correlated with foetal tachycardia but never with any infectious process. A potential deleterious effect is still debated and may lead to propose an active cooling for the mother. This hyperthermia must also be recognized to avoid an inadequate obstetrical attitude (antibiotics, extractions).

  19. Pyogenic Brain Abscess in Thailand

    PubMed Central

    Wiwanitkit, Somsri; Wiwanitkit, Viroj

    2012-01-01

    Pyogenic brain abscess is important in neurology. This infectious disease is fatal and the management is usually complicated. Here, the authors review and discuss the clinical aspects of pyogenic brain abscess found in the earlier reports from a tropical setting in Thailand. The literature review was compiled through standard reference database searching and the derived publications were further extracted to obtain clinical data. The main clinical characteristics of pyogenic brain abscess in this setting were similar to others. However, there are some specific characteristics on the nature of tropical setting. PMID:22754873

  20. Fishbone-associated actinomycosis of the anterior cervical space: a diagnostic dilemma.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang Kwon; Kim, Mi Jeong; Kwon, Sun Young

    2010-01-01

    We report the imaging and pathologic findings of fishbone-associated actinomycosis of the anterior cervical space in a 57-year-old man, misdiagnosed preoperatively as a malignancy originating from thyroglossal duct cyst. CT revealed an enhancing mass containing a small abscess pocket and two sharp linear calcifications within it, which infiltrated into the strap muscle. Pathologic examination demonstrated two fishbones within the actinomycotic abscess. Fishbone-associated actinomycosis should be considered when a cervical mass contains sharp linear calcifications.

  1. Catheter failure rates and time course with epidural versus combined spinal-epidural analgesia in labor.

    PubMed

    Groden, J; Gonzalez-Fiol, A; Aaronson, J; Sachs, A; Smiley, R

    2016-05-01

    The combined spinal-epidural technique for labor analgesia has several advantages over the traditional epidural technique, including faster onset, greater maternal satisfaction, and decreased need for physician boluses. Proponents of the epidural technique criticize the combined spinal-epidural technique, arguing that the epidural catheter remains untested and thus may not be reliable if needed for surgical intervention. We compared failure rates and time of failure between techniques in our tertiary-care academic practice. Data regarding failed catheters were collected from October 2012 to September 2014 as part of our Quality Assurance program. Failed catheters were defined as any catheter replaced after it was considered to be properly placed and then determined to be intravascular, one sided or resulting in poor maternal analgesia or anesthesia. A total of 5487 analgesics were performed (3980 combined spinal-epidural; 1507 epidural). Eighty-five combined spinal-epidural catheters (2.1%) and 59 epidural catheters (3.9%) were replaced during labor (P<0.001). Mean time to replacement was 512±422min and 354±300min for the combined spinal-epidural (n=80) and epidural (n=57) groups, respectively (P=0.02). Median time to replacement was 398 [IQR 131-578] min and 281 [IQR 186-767] min for combined spinal-epidural and epidural groups, respectively (P<0.0001). We were able to demonstrate that catheters placed using a combined spinal-epidural technique were less likely to fail during labor and that the time to detection of a failed catheter was significantly longer in the combined spinal-epidural group. Our findings validate the combined spinal-epidural technique as reliable for labor analgesia and tend to refute the theory of the untested catheter. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. [Prostatic abscess: diagnosis and treatment].

    PubMed

    Franco, A; Menéndez, V; Luque, M P; Ribal, M J; Mallafre, J M; Alcover, J; Vilana, R; Carretero, P

    1996-02-01

    Prostatic abscesses are an infrequent pathology, probably due to a better and early management of prostatic infections. Predisposing factors in this pathology are diabetes mellitus, urethral catheterism or manipulation, and immunodepressed states like AIDS. Nowadays, ultrasonography is an excellent diagnostic method of this pathology, and serves as a guidance of directed drainage. We present five cases in which the size of the abscess was determining in relation to the therapeutic attitude. Abscesses of less than 2 cm, measured by transrectal ultrasonography, can be evacuated by directed puncture, followed by antibiotic treatment. When the diameter of the abscess is greater than 2 cm, we realize a perineal drainage with a catheter placed with transrectal ultrasonography. Currently, TUR and other methods seems to be overcome.

  3. Cerebral abscess of odontogenic origin.

    PubMed

    Mylonas, Anastassios I; Tzerbos, Fotios H; Mihalaki, Maria; Rologis, Dimitrios; Boutsikakis, Iossif

    2007-01-01

    Cerebral abscess is a rare but serious and life-threatening infection. Dental infections have occasionally been reported as the source of bacteria for such an abcess. A 54-year-old man was admitted with a right hemiparesis and epileptic fits. After clinical, laboratory and imaging examination, the diagnosis of a cerebral abscess of the left parietal lobe was made. The intraoral clinical examination as well as a panoramic radiograph confirmed the presence of generalized periodontal disease, multiple dental caries, and periapical pathology. The treatment included: (i) Immediate administration of high-dose intravenous antibiotics and (ii) surgical procedures consisting of craniotomy and resection of the abscess cavity first, and secondly removal of the periodontal, decayed and periapically involved teeth of the patient, in an effort to eradicate all the possible septic foci, presuming the cerebral abscess to be of odontogenic infection. The patient made an uneventful recovery, and 29 months postoperatively he had completely recovered from the hemiparesis.

  4. Novel Peritonsillar Abscess Task Simulator.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Steven R; Chang, C W David

    2014-07-01

    The management of peritonsillar abscesses is a skill developed early in residency training. Although drainage is not technically complicated, the procedure is intimidating to the neophyte. Task simulators have become increasingly common to provide training opportunities in a controlled environment. The authors designed a peritonsillar abscess simulator using a latex moulage of the oral cavity and other common materials. Twelve medical professionals of various levels of experience were instructed to expose, anesthetize, aspirate, and drain the simulated abscess. After completion, a questionnaire was completed by each volunteer. Initial impressions were positive that the model adequately replicated the tasks requisite for abscess drainage and was suitable as an instructional device. The initial construct cost was approximately 10 dollars, with disposables costing roughly 25 cents. Further research is under way to formally assess the simulator for face, content, and construct validity. © American Academy of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery Foundation 2014.

  5. Bacterial Infection in Deep Paraspinal Muscles in a Parturient Following Epidural Analgesia: A Case Report and Literature Review: A CARE-Compliant Article.

    PubMed

    Xue, Xuhong; Song, Jiefu; Liang, Qingyuan; Qin, Jibin

    2015-12-01

    Bacterial infection related to epidural catheterizations could occur. In general, the incidence of postoperative infection at the insertion site is very low. Paucity literatures are reported for paraspinal muscle infection after epidural analgesia in parturient. We report a case of paraspinal muscle infection shortly after epidural analgesia in a parturient, who was subjected to because of threatened preterm labor. Epidural morphine was administered for 2 days for childbirth pain control. She began to have constant low-back pain and fever on postpartum Day 2. Magnetic resonance image revealed a broad area of subcutaneous edema with a continuum along the catheter trajectory deep to the paraspinal muscles. A catheter-related bacterial infection was suspected. The surgical debridement and drainage was required combined with intravenous antibiotics on postpartum Day 3. She was soon cured uncomplicatedly. Epidural analgesia is effective to control labor pain and, in general, it is safe. However, the sequelae of complicated infection may be underestimated. A literature search yielded 7 other cases of catheter-related epidural abscess or soft tissue infection. Vigilance for these infections, especially in postpartum patients with backache, is needed. Moreover, early detection and proper treatment of infectious signs at postanesthetic visit are very important.

  6. Systemic infection and splenic abscess

    PubMed Central

    Guileyardo, Joseph

    2017-01-01

    Splenic abscess is a rare complication of systemic infection, sometimes associated with infective endocarditis. Due to its rarity and nonspecific symptoms, diagnosis is difficult. Antibiotic therapy alone is usually unsuccessful, and definitive treatment requires splenectomy, although percutaneous ultrasound-guided drainage has been successful in some patients. Abdominal computed tomography scans and ultrasound evaluation are usually diagnostic. We present two patients with treatment-resistant sepsis who were found at autopsy to have splenic abscess.

  7. Pathogenesis of Staphylococcus aureus abscesses.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Scott D; Malachowa, Natalia; DeLeo, Frank R

    2015-06-01

    Staphylococcus aureus causes many types of human infections and syndromes-most notably skin and soft tissue infections. Abscesses are a frequent manifestation of S. aureus skin and soft tissue infections and are formed, in part, to contain the nidus of infection. Polymorphonuclear leukocytes (neutrophils) are the primary cellular host defense against S. aureus infections and a major component of S. aureus abscesses. These host cells contain and produce many antimicrobial agents that are effective at killing bacteria, but can also cause non-specific damage to host tissues and contribute to the formation of abscesses. By comparison, S. aureus produces several molecules that also contribute to the formation of abscesses. Such molecules include those that recruit neutrophils, cause host cell lysis, and are involved in the formation of the fibrin capsule surrounding the abscess. Herein, we review our current knowledge of the mechanisms and processes underlying the formation of S. aureus abscesses, including the involvement of polymorphonuclear leukocytes, and provide a brief overview of therapeutic approaches.

  8. Paraplegia After Thoracic Epidural Steroid Injection.

    PubMed

    Loomba, Vivek; Kaveeshvar, Hirsh; Dwivedi, Samvid

    2016-09-01

    Epidural steroid injections are a common procedure performed by pain physicians. The American Society of Regional Anesthesia along with several other groups recently provided guidelines for performing epidural injections in the setting of anticoagulants. We present a case of a patient who developed an epidural hematoma and subsequent paraplegia despite strict adherence to these guidelines. Although new guidelines serve to direct practice, risks of devastating neurologic complications remain as evidenced by our case.

  9. [Maintaining epidural anesthesia by the midwife].

    PubMed

    Dörfling, C; Nolte, A G

    1990-12-01

    Epidural anaesthesia as a method of pain relief during labour has lately become very popular. Statistics show that in some labour units up to 70 per cent of all patients undergo epidural anaesthesia. The popularity of this method can be attributed to its effectiveness in relieving pain during labour. The anaesthetist commences an epidural block by introducing an epidural catheter into the epidural space. The anaesthetist administers the test dose and the first therapeutic dose. Within a short duration of time (10 to 20 minutes) the patient can already experience the numbing effect of the anaesthetic. This anaesthetic loses its numbing effect within two to three hours and effective pain relief can only be achieved by administering a further dose of local anaesthetic via the epidural catheter. This procedure can be repeated between three to six times during the average duration of labour. Alternatively, a continuous epidural infusion procedure can be used. The last method, however, sometimes requires the administration of additional epidural "top-ups". There are some risks in administering additional "top-up" dosages. The possibility exists of the anaesthetic causing a spinal block as a result of being administered into the spinal fluid. The "top-up" can also cause convulsions if administered intravenously. In some units it is expected of the midwife to maintain epidural anaesthesia on prescription by the doctor. These side-effects can, however, also occur when the patient is being treated by medical personnel with ample experience and knowledge. It is expected of some midwives to maintain an epidural block on prescription by the anaesthetist. If the midwife lacks the necessary knowledge of epidural anaesthetic and its maintenance, she might unintentionally administer the local anaesthetic into the spinal fluid or intravascularly. This might cause a threat to the mother's and baby's lives. This research covers the maintenance of epidural anaesthesia as carried out by

  10. Comparison of descending volleys evoked by transcranial and epidural motor cortex stimulation in a conscious patient with bulbar pain.

    PubMed

    Di Lazzaro, V; Oliviero, A; Pilato, F; Saturno, E; Dileone, M; Meglio, M; Cioni, B; Papacci, F; Tonali, P A; Rothwell, J C

    2004-04-01

    To compare the pattern of activation of motor cortex produced by transcranial magnetic stimulation and epidural electrical stimulation. The spinal volleys evoked by transcranial magnetic stimulation and epidural electrical stimulation over the cerebral motor cortex were recorded from an electrode inserted into the cervical epidural space of one conscious subject who also had a cortical epidural electrode over the motor area. The volleys were termed D- and I-waves according to their latency. Magnetic stimulation was performed with a figure-of-eight coil and the induced current flowed either in a postero-anterior (PA) or in latero-medial (LM) direction. At active motor threshold intensity LM magnetic stimulation evoked a D wave whereas PA stimulation evoked an I(1) wave with later I waves being recruited at increasing stimulus intensities. Electrical epidural stimulation evoked both a D wave and I waves. However, the D wave evoked by electrical epidural stimulation had a longer latency than the LM D wave, suggesting either a more proximal site of activation of the pyramidal axon or activation of slightly faster conducting set of corticospinal fibres by LM stimulation. The I3 wave evoked by electrical epidural stimulation also had a longer latency than the PA I3-wave Epidural stimulation of the motor cortex can produce repetitive excitation of corticospinal neurones. The order of recruitment of the volleys, and the latency of the D and I3 waves may be slightly different to that seen after transcranial magnetic stimulation. Our findings suggest that there may be subtle differences in the populations of neurones activated by the two forms of stimulation.

  11. Horner's syndrome with epidural anaesthesia.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Rowena; Chatterjee, Jayanta; Edmonds, Keith

    2010-08-23

    A 29-year-old woman, primigravida, had labour induced for post-maturity following an uncomplicated antenatal course. She requested an epidural prior to commencement of syntocinon. This was administered in the sitting position without complication. The midwife noted drooping of the right eyelid of the patient 6.5 h following insertion of the epidural. Blood pressure and CTG remained reassuring. The obstetric anaesthetist reviewed the labouring woman and noted a right-sided ptosis as well as the right cheek being flushed and dry. There was no motor block and sensation in T1/T2/S3/S4 was intact. Horner's syndrome was diagnosed and anaesthetic review was recommended prior to further top-ups. The patient progressed well in the second stage of labour and did not require further top-ups and gave birth to a healthy male infant. Horner's syndrome resolved within 4 h following delivery and the postpartum period was uncomplicated.

  12. Continuous compared with intermittent epidural infusion on progress of labor and patient satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Salim, Raed; Nachum, Zohar; Moscovici, Roland; Lavee, Michal; Shalev, Eliezer

    2005-08-01

    To compare continuous with intermittent epidural infusion on the duration of labor and patients' satisfaction in nulliparous women. Nulliparous women who requested epidural analgesia during labor were randomly allocated to receive either a continuous infusion of 0.125% bupivacaine with 2 microg/mL fentanyl at a rate of 8 mL/h (group A) or intermittent bolus of 10 mL of 0.25% bupivacaine on demand (group B). Controls were nulliparous women who did not receive epidural analgesia (group C). Included were singleton term pregnancies with cervical dilatation between 2 cm and 5 cm. A comparison was made between the groups regarding the duration of the active phase and the second stage of labor and patients' satisfaction. Secondary outcomes investigated were the mode of delivery, analgesia-related complications, and intrapartum and postpartum complications. Cord pH and Apgar score measured neonatal outcome. Sixty-three parturients were randomly assigned to receive continuous infusion, and 64 received intermittent bolus infusion. Sixty-three patients served as controls. Mean duration of the active phase and the second stage of labor were not statistically different between groups A and B. Each technique produced comparable analgesia, achieving equivalent maternal satisfaction, with no apparent complications. The active phase of labor was prolonged by an average of 60 minutes and the 2nd stage by an average of 36 minutes regardless of the type of epidural compared with controls. The mode of delivery and maternal and neonatal outcome were not significantly different among the 3 groups. This study provides evidence that both continuous and intermittent epidural infusion produce comparable analgesia achieving equivalent maternal satisfaction with no difference regarding the duration of labor between them. Although patients receiving epidural analgesia experienced longer labors compared with controls, both mothers and neonates were unharmed.

  13. Is epidural analgesia a risk factor for occiput posterior or transverse positions during labour?

    PubMed

    Le Ray, Camille; Carayol, Marion; Jaquemin, Sébastien; Mignon, Alexandre; Cabrol, Dominique; Goffinet, François

    2005-11-01

    The aim of this study was to assess whether the station of the fetal head at epidural placement is associated with the risk of malposition during labour. Retrospective study (covering a 3-month period) of patients in labour with singleton cephalic term fetuses and epidural placement before 5 cm of dilatation. We studied the following risk factors for malposition: station and cervical dilatation at epidural placement, induction of labour, parity and macrosomia. Malposition, defined as all occiput posterior and occiput transverse positions, was assessed at 5 cm of dilatation because of our policy of systematic manual rotation for malpositions. The study included 398 patients, 200 of whom had malpositions diagnosed at 5 cm of dilatation. In both the univariate and multivariate analyses, station at epidural placement was the only risk factor significantly associated with this malposition (adjusted OR: 2.49, 95% CI 1.47-4.24). None of the other factors studied was significantly associated with malposition: nulliparity (OR 1.45, 95% CI 0.96-2.20), macrosomia (OR 0.75, 95% CI 0.37-1.50), induction of labour (OR 0.84, 95% CI 0.49-1.45), or dilatation less than 3 cm at epidural administration (OR 1.16, 95% CI 0.59-2.30). Only three infants of the 365 delivered vaginally (0.8%) were born in occiput posterior positions. Epidural placement when the fetal head is still "high" is associated with an increased rate of occiput posterior and transverse malpositions during labour.

  14. Epidural optogenetics for controlled analgesia

    PubMed Central

    Bonin, Robert P; Wang, Feng; Desrochers-Couture, Mireille; Ga¸secka, Alicja; Boulanger, Marie-Eve; Côté, Daniel C

    2016-01-01

    Background Optogenetic tools enable cell selective and temporally precise control of neuronal activity; yet, difficulties in delivering sufficient light to the spinal cord of freely behaving animals have hampered the use of spinal optogenetic approaches to produce analgesia. We describe an epidural optic fiber designed for chronic spinal optogenetics that enables the precise delivery of light at multiple wavelengths to the spinal cord dorsal horn and sensory afferents. Results The epidural delivery of light enabled the optogenetic modulation of nociceptive processes at the spinal level. The acute and repeated activation of channelrhodopsin-2 expressing nociceptive afferents produced robust nocifensive behavior and mechanical sensitization in freely behaving mice, respectively. The optogenetic inhibition of GABAergic interneurons in the spinal cord dorsal horn through the activation of archaerhodopsin also produced a transient, but selective induction of mechanical hypersensitivity. Finally, we demonstrate the capacity of optogenetics to produce analgesia in freely behaving mice through the inhibition of nociceptive afferents via archaerhodopsin. Conclusion Epidural optogenetics provides a robust and powerful solution for activation of both excitatory and inhibitory opsins in sensory processing pathways. Our results demonstrate the potential of spinal optogenetics to modulate sensory behavior and produce analgesia in freely behaving animals. PMID:27030718

  15. Expectant fathers and labor epidurals.

    PubMed

    Chapman, L L

    2000-01-01

    A qualitative research study was conducted to describe and explain expectant father's experiences during labor when their partners receive labor epidurals. Grounded theory. Seventeen couples were interviewed using a semi-structured interview format. Two major concepts were identified: "Losing Her" and "She's Back." The men reported that these were the two critical points at which the epidural affected their experience. The theory, "Cruising through Labor," explained the fathers' experiences. Childbirth preparation classes that describe and explain women's responses to the increasing pain of labor contractions, the exhaustion of labor, and the effect of epidural analgesia could possibly assist men in preparing for the changes they will witness in their partners during the labor experience. Knowing that these changes are normal responses to the effects of labor might reduce men's levels of anxiety, frustration, and sense of helplessness. The labor nurse is a major support to the expectant fathers. Labor nurses who remain in the room during this phase, explain what is happening, and include the expectant father in their nursing care provide the best support.

  16. Epidural optogenetics for controlled analgesia.

    PubMed

    Bonin, Robert P; Wang, Feng; Desrochers-Couture, Mireille; Ga Secka, Alicja; Boulanger, Marie-Eve; Côté, Daniel C; De Koninck, Yves

    2016-01-01

    Optogenetic tools enable cell selective and temporally precise control of neuronal activity; yet, difficulties in delivering sufficient light to the spinal cord of freely behaving animals have hampered the use of spinal optogenetic approaches to produce analgesia. We describe an epidural optic fiber designed for chronic spinal optogenetics that enables the precise delivery of light at multiple wavelengths to the spinal cord dorsal horn and sensory afferents. The epidural delivery of light enabled the optogenetic modulation of nociceptive processes at the spinal level. The acute and repeated activation of channelrhodopsin-2 expressing nociceptive afferents produced robust nocifensive behavior and mechanical sensitization in freely behaving mice, respectively. The optogenetic inhibition of GABAergic interneurons in the spinal cord dorsal horn through the activation of archaerhodopsin also produced a transient, but selective induction of mechanical hypersensitivity. Finally, we demonstrate the capacity of optogenetics to produce analgesia in freely behaving mice through the inhibition of nociceptive afferents via archaerhodopsin. Epidural optogenetics provides a robust and powerful solution for activation of both excitatory and inhibitory opsins in sensory processing pathways. Our results demonstrate the potential of spinal optogenetics to modulate sensory behavior and produce analgesia in freely behaving animals. © The Author(s) 2016.

  17. A 51-year-old man with intramedullary spinal cord abscess having a patent foramen ovale.

    PubMed

    Higuchi, Kanako; Ishihara, Hiroyuki; Okuda, Shiho; Kanda, Fumio

    2011-05-10

    The authors report a case of a 51-year-old man with intramedullary spinal cord abscess (ISCA) having a patent foramen ovale (PFO). He developed fever and tetraplegia after a recent dental treatment. MRI showed ISCA with longitudinal swelling from the upper cervical to the lumbar spinal cord. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) analysis indicated bacterial meningitis, and the culture of CSF revealed Streptococcus viridans. Transoesophageal echocardiography revealed the existence of a PFO. We suspected another possibility other than systemic bacteraemia, that paradoxical bacteric embolisation through PFO after the dental treatment caused ISCA. While several reports of brain abscess with PFO are available, this is the first report of ISCA with PFO.

  18. [Amoebic liver abscess: echographic aspects].

    PubMed

    Niang, H E; Ka, M M; Badiane, M; Ba, A; Konde, L; Lamouche, P

    1994-01-01

    Amoebic liver abscess is the most frequent location of the extra-intestine amibiasis with an epidemio-endemic repartition in our areas. We are reporting in this study the main echographic patterns that can be found. 117 documents were collected and studied between 1982 and 1988 in the main hospitals of Dakar (SENEGAL). Most of the patients were young, the range of age being between 25 and 55 years old and 83% of them, were male. The diagnosis of the amoebic liver abscess was evocated on the basis of the following clinical and biological symptoms: 54.38% of painful haetomegaly, 42.10% of pleuro-pulmonary and digestive signs, 3.50% of long lasting isolated fever, non specific biological sign of inflammation, 74.57% of positive hemaglutination test. An echographic test was performed before the anti-parasitic treatment with an echotomograph PHILIPS SDR 1500 in real time using a probe of 3 MHZ. The amoebic abscess of liver was detected by the echography in all cases. The unique abscess (83.10%) was the most frequent form. It was localized in the right liver (64%) and had an heterogeneous echostructure (55.70%). The hypo-echogeneous form (36.50%) was the earlier stage of the collecting abscess. The liquid form (07.80%) was observed in the latter stages of the disease. Some difficulties to determine the amoebic abscess may appear when primitive liver cancer or pyogensus abscess are present. In these cases it is necessary to analyse the liquid of ponction to be affirmative.

  19. Cervical Spondylosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... al. Cervical spondylotic myelopathy. In: Textbook of the Cervical Spine. Philadelphia, Pa.: Saunders Elsevier; 2015. https://www.clinicalkey. ... Evaluation of the patient with neck pain and cervical spine disorders. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed March ...

  20. Consent for labour epidural analgesia: an observational study in a single institution.

    PubMed

    Trumble, J; Lee, J; Slater, P M; Sellors, J; Cyna, A M

    2015-05-01

    There is a wide range of practice amongst obstetric anaesthetists when obtaining consent for women requesting labour epidural analgesia. This is the first prospective observational study recording the number and types of risks mentioned and whether the risk was quantified. Statements of benefits and alternatives to the procedure were also noted. Fourteen anaesthetists, each consulting a single patient, were recorded during the process of obtaining consent and inserting the epidural. The most commonly mentioned risks (median 7) were headache/dural puncture, failure/difficulty with insertion, nerve damage, bleeding/haematoma and infection/epidural abscess. There was no difference between consultants and trainees, although consultants showed greater variance. It was uncommon for anaesthetists to state a benefit (21%) or mention an alternative option (21%), but there was usually a quantitative statement of risk (71%). Data showed a deviation from the Australian and New Zealand College of Anaesthetists guidelines and these findings may encourage anaesthetists to reflect on their own practice and guide future research.

  1. Phellinus tropicalis Abscesses in a Patient with Chronic Granulomatous Disease

    PubMed Central

    Ramesh, Manish; Resnick, Elena; Hui, Yiqun; Maglione, Paul J.; Mehta, Harshna; Kattan, Jacob; Bouvier, Nicole M.; LaBombardi, Vincent; Victor, Tanya R.; Chaturvedi, Sudha

    2014-01-01

    Chronic Granulomatous Disease (CGD), caused by genetic defects in components of the phagocyte NADPH oxidase pathway, leads to recurrent life-threatening bacterial and invasive fungal infections. While a number of unique pathogens have been associated with this disease, the causative organisms may be difficult to identify. Here, we present a 24 year old male with known X-linked CGD who concurrently developed a cervical abscess and an abscess in the subcutaneous tissues of the right hip, both of which were surgically drained. Cultures failed to identify any organisms. He was treated empirically with ertapenem but the hip abscess recurred at the original site and in contiguous dependent areas in the posterior thigh and knee. A filamentous organism was observed microscopically, initially considered a contaminant, but on culture yielded a mold growth, identified as Phellinus tropicalis (synonym: Inonotus tropicalis) based on phenotypic and molecular methods. This is the third case report of human infection with P. tropicalis, all in subjects with CGD. The patient was treated with voriconazole with resolution of his symptoms. PMID:24310980

  2. An emboligenic pulmonary abscess leading to ischemic stroke and secondary brain abscess.

    PubMed

    Albrecht, Philipp; Stettner, Mark; Husseini, Leila; Macht, Stephan; Jander, Sebastian; Mackenzie, Colin; Oesterlee, Ulrike; Slotty, Philipp; Methner, Axel; Hartung, Hans-Peter; Aktas, Orhan

    2012-11-05

    Ischemic stroke by septic embolism occurs primarily in the context of infective endocarditis or in patients with a right-to-left shunt and formation of a secondary cerebral abscess is a rare event. Erosion of pulmonary veins by a pulmonary abscess can lead to transcardiac septic embolism but to our knowledge no case of septic embolic ischemic stroke from a pulmonary abscess with secondary transformation into a brain abscess has been reported to date. We report the case of a patient with a pulmonary abscess causing a septic embolic cerebral infarction which then transformed into a cerebral abscess. After antibiotic therapy and drainage of the abscess the patient could be rehabilitated and presented an impressive improvement of symptoms. Septic embolism should be considered as cause of ischemic stroke in patients with pulmonary abscess and can be followed by formation of a secondary cerebral abscess. Early antibiotic treatment and repeated cranial CT-scans for detection of a secondary abscess should be performed.

  3. Chronic epidural hematoma with rapid ossification.

    PubMed

    Chang, Jong Hee; Choi, Jae Young; Chang, Jin Woo; Park, Yong Gou; Kim, Tai Seung; Chung, Sang Sup

    2002-12-01

    The authors present a rare case of ossified chronic epidural hematoma. A 13-year-old female patient presented with an ossified chronic epidural hematoma. She had sustained a head injury about 10 weeks previously and had received conservative care for a delayed-onset epidural hematoma at a local hospital. Ossification was identified about 4 weeks after the head injury and then progressed rapidly. A chronic epidural hematoma with a thick collagenous capsule and newly formed bone was removed 73 days after the head injury. An epidural hematoma with mild symptoms can be treated conservatively. When, however, the hematoma is observed not to be naturally absorbed during serial follow-up examinations, surgical removal must be considered, even if the patient's condition is good, because this entity carries the risk of bone calcification and ossification.

  4. [A Case of Spinal Epidural Hematoma Presenting with Transient Hemiplegia].

    PubMed

    Komai, Takanori; Nakashima, Kazuya; Tominaga, Takashi; Nogaki, Hidekazu

    2016-04-01

    We report a rare case of a patient with spinal epidural hematoma who presented with transient hemiplegia. A 90-year-old man awakened from sleep due to sudden neck pain. Fifteen minutes later, the man experienced progressively worsening weakness in his left hand, and was transported in an ambulance to our hospital. At the hospital, he presented with hemiplegia, and we suspected intracranial disease. Therefore, we performed magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), which revealed no intracranial lesions. Shortly after the MRI, the patient showed no signs of hemiplegia. However, since the severe neck pain persisted, we performed cervical MRI, which showed a high-intensity area at the C2-C5 level, predominantly on the left side. Despite recovery from hemiplegia, we performed a laminectomy of C3-C5 with evacuation of a hematoma at the C2-C6 level. After the surgery, the patient had no neck pain.

  5. Epidural Analgesia for Labor: Continuous Infusion Versus Programmed Intermittent Bolus.

    PubMed

    Onuoha, Onyi C

    2017-03-01

    Despite the traditional practice to maintain labor analgesia with a combination of continuous epidural infusion and patient-controlled epidural analgesia using an automated epidural pump; compelling data now shows that bolus injection through the epidural catheter may result in better distribution of anesthetic solution in the epidural space. The programmed intermittent epidural bolus technique is proposed as a better maintenance mode and may represent a more effective mode of maintaining epidural analgesia for labor, especially prolonged labor. Additional prospective and adequately powered studies are needed to confirm findings and determine the optimal combination of volume, rate, time, and drug concentration. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Primary psoas muscle abscess in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Swanson, Amy; Lau, Kenneth K; Korman, Tony M; Kornman, Tony; Wallace, Euan M; Polyakov, Alex

    2008-12-01

    Primary iliacus-psoas muscle abscess formation is very uncommon during pregnancy. We present a case of a primary iliacus-psoas muscle abscess in pregnancy causing back pain with delayed diagnosis and treatment. Understanding the clinical presentation of iliacus-psoas muscle abscess helps with considering it in the differential diagnosis of back pain during pregnancy.

  7. Comparison of Epidural Butorphanol with Neostigmine and Epidural Sufentanyl with Neostigmine for First Stage of Labor Analgesia: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Chaurasia, Manoj; Saxena, Ashok Kumar; Chilkoti, Geetanjali T.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Epidural administration of neostigmine appears to be safe in the obstetric population. Recently, few studies have concluded 10 μg sufentanil to be an effective adjuvant with epidural neostigmine in providing labor analgesia. However, no study has evaluated the analgesic effect of epidural butorphanol with neostigmine for the same. Materials and Methods: The parturients were randomly allocated to one of the three study groups - Group A (n = 30) received butorphanol 1 mg and neostigmine 7 μg/kg. Group B (n = 30) received sufentanil 10 μg and neostigmine 7 μg/kg. Group C (n = 30) received neostigmine 7 μg/kg and 0.9% normal saline. Maternal hemodynamic parameters and fetal heart rate (FHR) were continuously monitored. The level of sensory and motor block, and visual analog scale (VAS) pain score were recorded at designated time points. In addition, the total duration of analgesia, duration of labor, mode of delivery, and any maternal or fetal adverse effects were also recorded. Statistical Analysis Used: A one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) with post hoc Tukey's test was used to compare mean value among the three groups for age, height, weight, gestational age, and cervical dilatation. Repeated measure ANOVA was used to compare mean difference among the time points and also the trend among the various time points for hemodynamic parameters, VAS pain score, and FHR. For inter-group comparison among the groups, post hoc Tukey test was used. Results: There was a statistically significant longer effect of analgesic drug in Group B with respect to Group A and C (P < 0.001); however, the parturient in Group C had minimum duration of analgesia. Epidural neostigmine combined with sufentanil produces effective analgesia in early labor (VAS <30 within 10 min in 63.3% of parturient and within 15 min in 83.3% parturient) with average duration of 111.67 ± 24.51 min without motor block or other side effect in mother and fetus. No significant effect was observed

  8. Comparison of Epidural Butorphanol with Neostigmine and Epidural Sufentanyl with Neostigmine for First Stage of Labor Analgesia: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Chaurasia, Manoj; Saxena, Ashok Kumar; Chilkoti, Geetanjali T

    2017-01-01

    Epidural administration of neostigmine appears to be safe in the obstetric population. Recently, few studies have concluded 10 μg sufentanil to be an effective adjuvant with epidural neostigmine in providing labor analgesia. However, no study has evaluated the analgesic effect of epidural butorphanol with neostigmine for the same. The parturients were randomly allocated to one of the three study groups - Group A (n = 30) received butorphanol 1 mg and neostigmine 7 μg/kg. Group B (n = 30) received sufentanil 10 μg and neostigmine 7 μg/kg. Group C (n = 30) received neostigmine 7 μg/kg and 0.9% normal saline. Maternal hemodynamic parameters and fetal heart rate (FHR) were continuously monitored. The level of sensory and motor block, and visual analog scale (VAS) pain score were recorded at designated time points. In addition, the total duration of analgesia, duration of labor, mode of delivery, and any maternal or fetal adverse effects were also recorded. A one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) with post hoc Tukey's test was used to compare mean value among the three groups for age, height, weight, gestational age, and cervical dilatation. Repeated measure ANOVA was used to compare mean difference among the time points and also the trend among the various time points for hemodynamic parameters, VAS pain score, and FHR. For inter-group comparison among the groups, post hoc Tukey test was used. There was a statistically significant longer effect of analgesic drug in Group B with respect to Group A and C (P < 0.001); however, the parturient in Group C had minimum duration of analgesia. Epidural neostigmine combined with sufentanil produces effective analgesia in early labor (VAS <30 within 10 min in 63.3% of parturient and within 15 min in 83.3% parturient) with average duration of 111.67 ± 24.51 min without motor block or other side effect in mother and fetus. No significant effect was observed in the duration of labor and mode of delivery in-between the two groups

  9. [Psoas abscess. Etiology and treatment].

    PubMed

    Tonus, C; Kasparek, S; Nier, H

    2002-10-01

    Psoas abscess is in general a syndrome with low incidence. In the following, two cases are presented which describe the etiology, diagnosis, and treatment of primary and secondary retroperitoneal manifestations. The article mainly focuses on the different respective surgical procedures. Because of its rareness, an overview of further cases discussed in the literature is provided.

  10. [Prognostic study of liver abscess].

    PubMed

    Nouira, Ramzi; Bedoui, Riadh; Miaadi, Naoufel; Guesmi, Fethi; Ben Achour, Jamel; Hani, Mohamed; Daghfous, Mounir; Ben Osman, Samia; Zoghlami, Ayoub; Najah, Nabil

    2003-04-01

    The objective of this work is to study factors of prognostic of mortality of abscesses of the liver. We have treated between 1990 and 2000 in our service, 38 patient for abscess of the liver. The symptoms are dominated by the pain of the right hypochondria (37 cases) and the fever (34 cases). An unique abscess has been recovered in 25 cases. Some multiple localizations have been observed in 12 cases. 21 patients have been operated. The bacteriological study at all patients revealed the presence of germ in 27 cases. In 6 cases, there were two germs. It was a bacillus negative gram in 26 cases and a cocci positive gram in 7 cases. Six complications have been observed at the operated patients. In 5 cases, it was a septic shock having leads to the death. After survey univariate and multivariate the only factor of bad prognostic recovered is the septic shock. The aetiology was identified in only 9 cases; it was abscess cholangiotis.

  11. AMEBIC ABSCESS OF THE LIVER

    PubMed Central

    Struve, Edgar E.

    1950-01-01

    In a review of the records in 50 cases of amebic abscess of the liver observed in the Canal Zone between 1920 and 1945 the following features were noted: Incidence was preponderantly in males and highest in persons between the ages of 20 and 40. None of the patients was under 21 years of age. There was a great variety of complaints at the time of admission to hospital. The most common was pain in the right upper quadrant of the abdomen. Demonstration of either elevated or fixed diaphragm by x-ray film and fluoroscopic examination was useful in diagnosis in a number of cases, but absence of such findings did not rule out abscess of the liver. In some cases there was history of previous dysentery with blood in the stools. One or another of three operative procedures was used for drainage of abscesses in 39 patients. Of the 39, six died; in five of the six, multiple abscesses were present. Emetine hydrochloride was given to all patients. PMID:15426995

  12. Hepatic mucormycosis with abscess formation.

    PubMed

    Su, Henry; Thompson, George R; Cohen, Stuart H

    2012-06-01

    We describe a case of hepatic mucormycosis with abscess, an uncommon presentation of mucormycetes infection. Our patient was initially treated with transcutaneous pigtail catheter placement, liposomal amphotericin B, and micafungin without improvement. The patient subsequently improved after hepatic segmentectomy and hemidiaphragm resection. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Good penetration of moxifloxacin into human abscesses.

    PubMed

    Sauermann, Robert; Karch, Rudolf; Kjellsson, Maria C; Feurstein, Thomas; Püspök, Andreas; Langenberger, Herbert; Böhmdorfer, Michaela; Jäger, Walter; Zeitlinger, Markus

    2012-01-01

    Abscesses are often treated with antibiotics in addition to incision or when incision is unfeasible, but accurate information about antibiotic abscess penetration in humans is missing. This study aimed at evaluating the penetration of moxifloxacin into human abscesses. After administration of a single dose of 400 mg moxifloxacin, drug concentrations were measured in 10 differently located abscesses at incision, and in plasma over 8 h. At incision performed 0.9-4.8 h after administration, moxifloxacin concentrations in abscesses ranged from ≤0.01 to 9.2 mg/l (1.9 ± 3.4 mg/l), indicating pronounced drug accumulation in some abscesses. The degree of abscess penetration could not be explained by covariates like the ratio of surface area to volume or pH of abscesses, or by moxifloxacin plasma concentrations. Concluding, moxifloxacin was detectable in most abscesses and may be a useful antibiotic for this indication. However, antibiotic abscess penetration was highly variable and unpredictable, suggesting surgical abscess incision whenever possible.

  14. Observational study of changes in epidural pressure and elastance during epidural blood patch in obstetric patients.

    PubMed

    Pratt, S D; Kaczka, D W; Hess, P E

    2014-05-01

    During an epidural blood patch, we inject blood until the patient describes mild back pressure, often leading to injection of more than 20 mL of blood. We undertook this study to measure the epidural pressures generated during an epidural blood patch and to identify the impact of volume on epidural elastance in obstetric patients. This study was performed in postpartum patients who presented for an epidural blood patch with symptoms consistent with a postdural puncture headache. After identification of the epidural space using loss of resistance to air or saline, we measured static epidural pressure after each 5-mL injection of blood. Models were then fitted to the data and the epidural elastance and compliance calculated. Eighteen blood patches were performed on 17 patients. The mean final volume injected was 18.9±7.8 mL [range 6-38 mL]. The mean final pressure generated was 13.1±13.4 mmHg [range 2-56 mmHg]. A curvilinear relationship existed between volume injected and pressure, which was described by two models: (1) pressure=0.0254×(mL injected)(2)+0.0297 mL, or (2) pressure=0.0679×mL(1.742). The value for r2 was approximately 0.57 for both models. We found no correlation between the final pressure generated and the success of the epidural blood patch. We found a curvilinear relationship between the volume of blood injected during an epidural blood patch and the pressure generated in the epidural space. However, there was a large variation in both the volume of blood and the epidural pressure generated. The clinical importance of this finding is not known. A larger study would be required to demonstrate whether pressure is a predictor of success. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Dorsal spinal epidural cavernous hemangioma.

    PubMed

    Sanghvi, Darshana; Munshi, Mihir; Kulkarni, Bijal; Kumar, Abhaya

    2010-07-01

    A 61-year-old female patient presented with diffuse pain in the dorsal region of the back of 3 months duration. The magnetic resonance imaging showed an extramedullary, extradural space occupative lesion on the right side of the spinal canal from D5 to D7 vertebral levels. The mass was well marginated and there was no bone involvement. Compression of the adjacent thecal sac was observed, with displacement to the left side. Radiological differential diagnosis included nerve sheath tumor and meningioma. The patient underwent D6 hemilaminectomy under general anesthesia. Intraoperatively, the tumor was purely extradural in location with mild extension into the right foramina. No attachment to the nerves or dura was found. Total excision of the extradural compressing mass was possible as there were preserved planes all around. Histopathology revealed cavernous hemangioma. As illustrated in our case, purely epidural hemangiomas, although uncommon, ought to be considered in the differential diagnosis of spinal epidural soft tissue masses. Findings that may help to differentiate this lesion from the ubiquitous disk prolapse, more common meningiomas and nerve sheath tumors are its ovoid shape, uniform T2 hyperintense signal and lack of anatomic connection with the neighboring intervertebral disk or the exiting nerve root. Entirely extradural lesions with no bone involvement are rare and represent about 12% of all intraspinal hemangiomas.

  16. Dorsal spinal epidural cavernous hemangioma

    PubMed Central

    Sanghvi, Darshana; Munshi, Mihir; Kulkarni, Bijal; Kumar, Abhaya

    2010-01-01

    A 61-year-old female patient presented with diffuse pain in the dorsal region of the back of 3 months duration. The magnetic resonance imaging showed an extramedullary, extradural space occupative lesion on the right side of the spinal canal from D5 to D7 vertebral levels. The mass was well marginated and there was no bone involvement. Compression of the adjacent thecal sac was observed, with displacement to the left side. Radiological differential diagnosis included nerve sheath tumor and meningioma. The patient underwent D6 hemilaminectomy under general anesthesia. Intraoperatively, the tumor was purely extradural in location with mild extension into the right foramina. No attachment to the nerves or dura was found. Total excision of the extradural compressing mass was possible as there were preserved planes all around. Histopathology revealed cavernous hemangioma. As illustrated in our case, purely epidural hemangiomas, although uncommon, ought to be considered in the differential diagnosis of spinal epidural soft tissue masses. Findings that may help to differentiate this lesion from the ubiquitous disk prolapse, more common meningiomas and nerve sheath tumors are its ovoid shape, uniform T2 hyperintense signal and lack of anatomic connection with the neighboring intervertebral disk or the exiting nerve root. Entirely extradural lesions with no bone involvement are rare and represent about 12% of all intraspinal hemangiomas. PMID:21572634

  17. [Epidural stimulation in arteritic patients].

    PubMed

    Herreros, J

    1989-10-01

    We are presenting the results of a multicenter retrospective study including 203 patients with arterial disease of the lower extremities, treated with epidural stimulation. The indications were: stage III or IV ischemia of the Leriche-Fontaine classification, arteriosclerosis or diabetic arteriopathy and untractable pain, or presence of necrosis as in Buerger's disease, Raynaud's phenomenon, frost-bite, Sudeck's disease and ergotamin poisoning. 47 p. cent of the patients had undergone a sympathectomy. The evolution was excellent in 47 p. cent of arteriosclerosis and/or diabetes cases, 100 p. cent of cases of Buerger's disease, 78 p. cent of cases of Raynaud's disease, and good in 33 p. cent of patients with arteriosclerosis and 12 p. cent of cases of Raynaud's disease. The plethysmography curves were improved and there was a statistically significant increase of the transcutaneous PO2 as well as of the isotopic results of muscular and cutaneous perfusion with 201TL and 125I antipyrin. These results demonstrate the capabilities of epidural stimulation in the treatment of arterial diseases of the extremities.

  18. Epidural blood patch and acute varicella.

    PubMed

    Martin, David P; Bergman, Bradley D; Berger, Ines H

    2004-12-01

    We present the case of a 38-yr-old woman who required an epidural blood patch in the context of acute varicella (chickenpox). The unique risks in this case include the possible triggering of central nervous system complications after the introduction of viremic blood into the epidural or intrathecal space. However, the risk was believed to be acceptable because the patient was receiving antiviral coverage. She enjoyed complete relief of her headache but experienced transient back and leg pain. Leptomeningeal irritation caused by acute varicella infection may put patients at increased risk for pain after epidural blood patch.

  19. Epidural analgesia improves postoperative nitrogen balance.

    PubMed Central

    Brandt, M R; Fernades, A; Mordhorst, R; Kehlet, H

    1978-01-01

    Postoperative nitrogen balance was monitored in twelve patients undergoing hysterectomy under either epidural analgesia or general anaesthesia. The mean cumulative five-day nitrogen losses were significantly lower after epidural analgesia than after general anaesthesia. Nitrogen sparing presumably results from inhibiting the stress-induced release of catabolic hormones, since epidural analgesia abolished postoperative hyperglycaemia and increase in plasma cortisol concentrations. No adverse effects of inhibiting the stress response were observed. Neurogenic stimuli thus play a crucial part in the catabolic response to surgery. Inhibiting the endocrine metabolic response to trauma by neurogenic blockade may reduce the morbidity precipitated in high-risk patients by the catabolic response to surgery. PMID:638618

  20. Diagnosis and results of different treatment regimens in patients with spinal abscesses.

    PubMed

    Lange, M; Tiecks, F; Schielke, E; Yousry, T; Haberl, R; Oeckler, R

    1993-01-01

    Bacterial abscesses involving the spinal canal are associated with a high morbidity and mortality. Most frequently, these lesions are found in the epidural, rarely in the subdural space. In this report, our clinical material consists of a series of 16 patients treated during the last seven years. The clinical presentation included local neurological signs (back pain, para-/tetraparesis, bladder dysfunction), disturbances of consciousness (ranging from drowsiness to deep coma) and general inflammatory signs (meningism, fever). All patients presented with risk factors (septic foci, chronic diseases, and iatrogenic causes). Laboratory investigations revealed typically pathological blood sedimentation rate, leucocytosis and CSF-pleocytosis. Radiologically, the diagnosis was confirmed by myelography, CT and preferably MRI. The abscesses were located epidurally in 14 and subdurally in 2 cases. The surgical treatment included laminectomy, or multiple flavectomies in extensive lesions. Drainage systems (either simple silicon outflow drains or suction-/irrigation systems) were installed in all cases, as well as antibiotic treatment. Results of treatment: Following an observation period of 0.5-6 years, we found complete recovery in six (38%) cases, six (38%) others were mildly disabled and four (25%) patients died. Focussing on the results of the two different drainage systems, we found a statistically significant superiority of the inflow-/outflow system. Complications included mandatory re-exploration, post-inflammatory hydrocephalus, syringomyelia, spinal instability, surgical treatment of peripheral septic foci and therapy resistant septicaemia. In conclusion, we propose that spinal epi- or subdural abscesses require surgical evacuation, using a suction-/irrigation drainage system, as well as antibiotic and intensive care treatment.

  1. Observational study of changes in epidural pressure and elastance during epidural blood patch in obstetric patients

    PubMed Central

    Pratt, S.D.; Kaczka, D.W.; Hess, PE

    2014-01-01

    Background During an epidural blood patch, we inject blood until the patient describes mild back pressure, often leading to injection of more than 20 mL of blood. We undertook this study to measure the epidural pressures generated during an epidural blood patch and to identify the impact of volume on epidural elastance in obstetric patients. Methods This study was performed in postpartum patients who presented for an epidural blood patch with symptoms consistent with a postdural puncture headache. After identification of the epidural space using loss of resistance to air or saline, we measured static epidural pressure after each 5-mL injection of blood. Models were then fitted to the data and the epidural elastance and compliance calculated. Results Eighteen blood patches were performed on 17 patients. The mean final volume injected was 18.9 ± 7.8 mL [range 6 to 38 mL]. The mean final pressure generated was 13.1 ± 13.4 mmHg [range 2 to 56 mmHg]. A curvilinear relationship existed between volume injected and pressure, which was described by two models: (1) pressure = 0.0254 × (mL injected)2 + 0.0297 × mL, or (2) pressure = 0.0679 × mL1.742. The value for r2 was approximately 0.57 for both models. We found no correlation between the final pressure generated and the success of the EBP. Conclusions We found a curvilinear relationship between the volume of blood injected during an epidural blood patch and the pressure generated in the epidural space. However, there was a large variation in both the volume of blood and the epidural pressure generated. The clinical importance of this finding is not known. A larger study would be required to demonstrate whether pressure is a predictor of success. PMID:24631062

  2. Electrical neuromodulation of the cervical spinal cord facilitates forelimb skilled function recovery in spinal cord injured rats.

    PubMed

    Alam, Monzurul; Garcia-Alias, Guillermo; Jin, Benita; Keyes, Jonathan; Zhong, Hui; Roy, Roland R; Gerasimenko, Yury; Lu, Daniel C; Edgerton, V Reggie

    2017-05-01

    Enabling motor control by epidural electrical stimulation of the spinal cord is a promising therapeutic technique for the recovery of motor function after a spinal cord injury (SCI). Although epidural electrical stimulation has resulted in improvement in hindlimb motor function, it is unknown whether it has any therapeutic benefit for improving forelimb fine motor function after a cervical SCI. We tested whether trains of pulses delivered at spinal cord segments C6 and C8 would facilitate the recovery of forelimb fine motor control after a cervical SCI in rats. Rats were trained to reach and grasp sugar pellets. Immediately after a dorsal funiculus crush at C4, the rats showed significant deficits in forelimb fine motor control. The rats were tested to reach and grasp with and without cervical epidural stimulation for 10weeks post-injury. To determine the best stimulation parameters to activate the cervical spinal networks involved in forelimb motor function, monopolar and bipolar currents were delivered at varying frequencies (20, 40, and 60Hz) concomitant with the reaching and grasping task. We found that cervical epidural stimulation increased reaching and grasping success rates compared to the no stimulation condition. Bipolar stimulation (C6- C8+ and C6+ C8-) produced the largest spinal motor-evoked potentials (sMEPs) and resulted in higher reaching and grasping success rates compared with monopolar stimulation (C6- Ref+ and C8- Ref+). Forelimb performance was similar when tested at stimulation frequencies of 20, 40, and 60Hz. We also found that the EMG activity in most forelimb muscles as well as the co-activation between flexor and extensor muscles increased post-injury. With epidural stimulation, however, this trend was reversed indicating that cervical epidural spinal cord stimulation has therapeutic potential for rehabilitation after a cervical SCI. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Epidural Analgesia in the Postoperative Period

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-10-01

    an unwanted side effect of surgery, and is associated with many postoperative complications. This descriptive study was conducted to determine which...surgical patients experienced the most analgesia with the fewest side effects when receiving epidural analgesia in the postoperative period. A...hospital. A description of the patients age, gender, type of surgery, type of epidural medication, side effects , incidence of breakthrough pain, and

  4. Iliopsoas abscess masquerading as 'sciatica'.

    PubMed

    Shields, D W; Robinson, Patrick G

    2012-12-20

    A 35-year-old woman of Indian origin presented with a 5-month history of lower back pain, radiating down the back of her right leg in distribution of the sciatic nerve. Referral was made to the spinal clinic querying sciatica, but a deterioration in her symptoms developed, and the patient presented to the Accident and Emergency department. She was significantly tender at right sacroiliac joint and had positive psoas sign. The MRI scan showed a large iliopsoas abscess causing bony destruction, and extended culture was positive for mycobacterium tuberculosis. The patient was initially diagnosed with sciatica yet had a positive psoas sign and a painful sacrum. It is important that primary physicians are aware of the relations the iliopsoas muscle and the potential effect an abscess can have here. A sinister underlying cause of a patient's sciatic distribution of pain should be excluded before accepting a diagnosis of mechanical back pain.

  5. Brain abscess of odontogenic origin.

    PubMed

    Antunes, Antonio Azoubel; de Santana Santos, Thiago; de Carvalho, Ricardo Wathson Feitosa; Avelar, Rafael Linard; Pereira, Carlos Umberto; Pereira, José Carlos

    2011-11-01

    Brain abscess is a rare and threatening infection, which is in a suppuration area, caused either by trauma, neurosurgical complication, or by a secondary infection of dental origin complication. The infectious process spread from the start focus can occur in 2 ways: hematogenous or by contiguity. The treatment should ideally be based on the etiological factor excision, combined with drainage and antibiotics as adjuvant; this philosophy is not observed in the reports described in the 1960s, 1970s, and 1980s. This study's goal was to report a case of brain abscess consequent of an odontogenic outbreak, where an adequate treatment was set up, but it was already in advanced stages and had as a result the lethal outcome. Complications from the odontogenic infections have a low incidence, but should never be disregarded, because they can lead to death, as described in this manuscript.

  6. Retroperitoneal abscesses in seven dogs.

    PubMed

    Marvel, Sarah J; MacPhail, Catriona M

    2013-01-01

    Retroperitoneal abscesses, although uncommon, are clinically important. Medical records of seven dogs with naturally occurring retroperitoneal infections from 1999 to 2011 were reviewed to document historical, examination, clinicopathologic, imaging, and surgical findings; etiologic agents; and outcome. Middle-aged sporting dogs were most commonly affected. Dogs were febrile with evidence of either abdominal or lumbar pain. Although traditional radiography can aid in diagnosis, ultrasound appeared to be a more sensitive indicator of disease within the retroperitoneal space. Numerous bacteria were isolated from the abscesses, with anaerobic and facultative anaerobic bacteria being the most commonly isolated. Etiology was largely unknown, but migrating plant material was often suspected. Resolution of the infection required surgical intervention as well as prolonged antibiotic therapy. Although recurrence is possible, outcome can be favorable with no long-term sequela.

  7. Cervical polyps

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001494.htm Cervical polyps To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Cervical polyps are fingerlike growths on the lower part ...

  8. Cervical Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... the place where a baby grows during pregnancy. Cervical cancer is caused by a virus called HPV. ... for a long time, or have HIV infection. Cervical cancer may not cause any symptoms at first. ...

  9. Intermittent epidural TOP-UPS vs. patient control epidural analgesia during labor.

    PubMed

    Marijic, Vlatka; Bukovic, Damir; Mihaljevic, Slobodan; Oreskovic, Slavko; Persec, Jasminka; Zupic, Tomislav; Juras, Josip; Milinovic, Darko

    2013-12-01

    Pain during labor and delivery is often very unpleasant and stressful for the parturients. Patient controlled epidural analgesia (PCEA) has been found to be both safe and effective, providing optimal pain relief and allowing women to participate in their own analgesia). Compared to other epidural techniques, intermittent epidural top-ups and continuous epidural analgesia (CEA), PCEA uses diluted local anesthetic solutions with less motor block and less unscheduled clinician interventions. The purpose of our study was to compare intermittent bolus epidural top-ups and PCEA in labor. Sixty ASA I patients who requested epidural analgesia for labor and had written consent were included in the study. 30 patients in the first group received intermittent bolus epidural top-ups, while patients in the second group received PCEA. We evaluated duration of labor, maternal sense of pain using VAS scale and maternal satisfaction during fetal descent in both groups. We found that the duration of labor was significantly shorter and maternal sense of pain was lower in the PCEA group than in the group receiving epidural bolus top-ups. There were no differences between groups in maternal satisfaction during fetal descent.

  10. Changing etiology of iliopsoas abscess.

    PubMed

    Walsh, T R; Reilly, J R; Hanley, E; Webster, M; Peitzman, A; Steed, D L

    1992-04-01

    Over a 5-year period, iliopsoas abscesses were found in 11 patients. Although the most common underlying condition was Crohn's disease (3 of 11 patients), 5 abscesses resulted from hematogenous spread from a distant site. Each of these five patients was elderly, severely malnourished, or had an underlying chronic disease. Fever was a presenting sign in 8 of 11 patients, whereas all 4 patients who presented with back pain had nontuberculous lumbar osteomyelitis or disk space infections. No patient presented with the classic triad of fever, back pain, and anterior thigh or groin pain. Computed tomographic (CT) scans accurately established the clinical diagnosis in 10 of 11 patients. Two of the patients died. One patient was an intravenous drug abuser, whereas the other patient was being treated with steroids for systemic lupus erythematosus. Elderly patients, diabetics, and patients with chronic disease are susceptible to this kind of occult infection and may present with minimal clinical findings. Aggressive diagnosis using CT scanning and treatment with resection of involved bowel, complete drainage of the abscess, and prolonged antibiotics are required to salvage these patients.

  11. Cervical Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... cervical cancers are caused by the human papillomavirus (HPV). Cervical cancer is the easiest gynecological cancer to prevent with ... HPV on a woman's cervix. Certain types of HPV can lead to cervical cancer. Your doctor will swab the cervix for cells. ...

  12. Symptomatic Spinal Epidural Lipomatosis After a Single Local Epidural Steroid Injection

    SciTech Connect

    Tok, Chung Hong Kaur, Shaleen; Gangi, Afshin

    2011-02-15

    Spinal epidural lipomatosis is a rare disorder that can manifest with progressive neurological deficits. It is characterized by abnormal accumulation of unencapsulated epidural fat commonly associated with the administration of exogenous steroids associated with a variety of systemic diseases, endocrinopathies, and Cushing syndrome (Fogel et al. Spine J 5:202-211, 2005). Occasionally, spinal epidural lipomatosis may occur in patients not exposed to steroids or in patients with endocrinopathies, primarily in obese individuals (Fogel et al. Spine J 5:202-211, 2005). However, spinal lumbar epidural lipomatosis resulting from local steroid injection has rarely been reported. We report the case of a 45-year-old diabetic man with claudication that was probably due to symptomatic lumbar spinal lipomatosis resulting from a single local epidural steroid injection.

  13. Pituitary abscess after autologous bone marrow transplantation.

    PubMed

    Leff, R S; Martino, R L; Pollock, W J; Knight, W A

    1989-05-01

    The first case of pituitary abscess arising in a patient during recovery from autologous bone marrow transplantation is reported. A 31-year-old man with a 9 month history of T-cell lymphoma died suddenly more than 60 days after successful treatment with high-dose cyclophosphamide, total body irradiation, and autologous bone marrow infusion. Autopsy revealed a pituitary abscess associated with clinically silent sphenoid sinusitis. Unique aspects of this case are presented and clinical and pathologic features of pituitary abscess are reviewed. Although rare, pituitary abscess may complicate recovery from bone marrow transplantation.

  14. Pyogenic brain abscess, a 15 year survey.

    PubMed

    Helweg-Larsen, Jannik; Astradsson, Arnar; Richhall, Humeira; Erdal, Jesper; Laursen, Alex; Brennum, Jannick

    2012-11-30

    Brain abscess is a potentially fatal disease. This study assesses clinical aspects of brain abscess in a large hospital cohort. Retrospective review of adult patients with pyogenic brain abscess at Rigshospitalet University Hospital, Denmark between 1994 and 2009. Prognostic factors associated with Glasgow Outcome Score (GOS) (death, severe disability or vegetative state) were assessed by logistic regression. 102 patients were included. On admission, only 20% of patients had a triad of fever, headache and nausea, 39% had no fever, 26% had normal CRP and 49% had no leucocytosis. Median delay from symptom onset to antibiotic treatment was 7 days (range 0-97 days). Source of infection was contiguous in 36%, haematogenous in 28%, surgical or traumatic in 9% and unknown in 27% of cases. Abscess location did not accurately predict the portal of entry. 67% were treated by burr hole aspiration, 20% by craniotomy and 13% by antibiotics alone. Median duration of antibiotic treatment was 62 days. No cases of recurrent abscess were observed. At discharge 23% had GOS ≤3. The 1-, 3- and 12-month mortality was 11%, 17% and 19%. Adverse outcome was associated with a low GCS at admission, presence of comorbidities and intraventricular rupture of abscess. The clinical signs of brain abscess are unspecific, many patients presented without clear signs of infection and diagnosis and treatment were often delayed. Decreased GCS, presence of comorbidities and intraventricular rupture of brain abscess were associated with poor outcome. Brain abscess remains associated with considerable morbidity and mortality.

  15. Vesicoovarian Fistula on an Endometriosis Abscessed Cyst

    PubMed Central

    Tran, C.; Even, M.; Carbonnel, M.; Preaux, F.; Isnard, F.; Rault, A.; Rouanne, M.; Ayoubi, J. M.

    2014-01-01

    We report the case of a patient who developed a vesicoovarian fistula on an endometriosis abscessed cyst. The patient presented with an advanced endometriosis stage IV complicated with a right ovarian abscessed cyst of 10 cm. A first coelioscopy with cystectomy was realized. After surgery, a voiding cystography highlighted a fistula between the ovarian abscess and the bladder. A second surgery by median laparotomy was realized with the resection of the right ovarian abscess and the resection of vesical fistula. PMID:25152819

  16. Laparoscopic Drainage of Pyogenic Liver Abscess

    PubMed Central

    Aydin, Cemalettin; Piskin, Turgut; Sumer, Fatih; Barut, Bora

    2010-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Pyogenic liver abscesses are mainly treated by percutaneous aspiration or drainage under antibiotic cover. If interventional radiology fails, surgical drainage becomes necessary. Recently, we performed laparoscopic liver abscess drainage successfully, and we aimed to focus on the topic in light of a systematic review of the literature. Methods: A 22-year-old man was admitted with a 4.5-cm multiloculated abscess in the left lobe of the liver. The abscess did not resolve with antibiotic-alone therapy. Percutaneous aspiration was unsuccessful due to viscous and multiloculated contents. Percutaneous catheter placement was not amenable. Laparoscopic abscess drainage was preferred over open abscess drainage. We used 3 trocars, operation time was 40 minutes, and blood loss was minimal. In the mean time, we searched PubMed using the key words [(liver OR hepatic) abscess*] AND [laparoscop* OR (minimal* AND invasiv*)]. Results: Postoperative recovery of the patient was uneventful, and the patient was asymptomatic after 3 months of follow-up. In the literature search, we found 53 liver abscesses (51 pyogenic and 2 amebic) that were treated by laparoscopy. Mean success rate was 90.5% (range, 85% to 100%) and conversion rate was zero. Conclusion: Treatment of liver abscess is mainly percutaneous drainage. Laparoscopic drainage should be selected as an alternative before open drainage when other modalities have failed. PMID:21333200

  17. Pyogenic brain abscess, a 15 year survey

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Brain abscess is a potentially fatal disease. This study assesses clinical aspects of brain abscess in a large hospital cohort. Methods Retrospective review of adult patients with pyogenic brain abscess at Rigshospitalet University Hospital, Denmark between 1994 and 2009. Prognostic factors associated with Glasgow Outcome Score (GOS) (death, severe disability or vegetative state) were assessed by logistic regression. Results 102 patients were included. On admission, only 20% of patients had a triad of fever, headache and nausea, 39% had no fever, 26% had normal CRP and 49% had no leucocytosis. Median delay from symptom onset to antibiotic treatment was 7 days (range 0–97 days). Source of infection was contiguous in 36%, haematogenous in 28%, surgical or traumatic in 9% and unknown in 27% of cases. Abscess location did not accurately predict the portal of entry. 67% were treated by burr hole aspiration, 20% by craniotomy and 13% by antibiotics alone. Median duration of antibiotic treatment was 62 days. No cases of recurrent abscess were observed. At discharge 23% had GOS ≤3. The 1-, 3- and 12-month mortality was 11%, 17% and 19%. Adverse outcome was associated with a low GCS at admission, presence of comorbidities and intraventricular rupture of abscess. Conclusions The clinical signs of brain abscess are unspecific, many patients presented without clear signs of infection and diagnosis and treatment were often delayed. Decreased GCS, presence of comorbidities and intraventricular rupture of brain abscess were associated with poor outcome. Brain abscess remains associated with considerable morbidity and mortality. PMID:23193986

  18. Evolution in management of otogenic brain abscess.

    PubMed

    Szyfter, Witold; Kruk-Zagajewska, Aleksandra; Borucki, Lukasz; Bartochowska, Anna

    2012-04-01

    To present the therapeutic results related with treating 103 patients with cerebral abscesses of otogenic origin during 3 various time frames (1953-1977, 1978-1989, and 1990-2011). A total of 103 patients with cerebral abscess of otogenic origin. Diagnostics and treatment. Analysis of mortality rates, abscess location and its basis, coexisting complications, neurological condition at admittance, bacteriological tests, and presentation of the results of abscess treatment with the use of neuronavigation. Mortality rates dropped systematically from the initial value of 35% observed between 1953 and 1977, to 14% between 1978 and 1989, and finally reached 3% between 1990 and 2011. Abscesses were mainly located within the temporal lobe. They predominantly resulted from chronic inflammation of the middle ear. A wide panel of complications was associated with them. Strong concurrence between results of cultures taken from the ear and the abscess was noted. Cerebral abscesses remain one of the most severe complications related with inflammation of the middle ear. Both the operative methods and the postoperative care evolved (introduction of surgical microscope, new generation of antibiotics), the preoperative diagnostics facilitating the diagnosis and localization of the abscess progressed; nonetheless, the principles underlying the operative treatment remained unchanged. Neuronavigation constitutes a very important and supportive element in the management of otogenic brain abscesses.

  19. Complications of halo fixation of the cervical spine.

    PubMed

    Hayes, Victor M; Silber, Jeff S; Siddiqi, Farhan N; Kondrachov, Dmitriy; Lipetz, Jason S; Lonner, Baron

    2005-06-01

    Halo fixators play an integral role in stabilizing the cervical spine. They are most widely used after upper cervical to midcervical spine fractures and dislocations and as a supplement to various surgical fixation techniques. Compared with supine cervical traction techniques, halo fixators allow early patient mobilization and shorten hospital stays. The incidence of halo-fixator complications remains high. Minor complications include pin loosening, localized infection, periorbital edema, superficial pressure sores, and unsightly scars. Major complications include pin penetration, osteomyelitis, subdural abscess, nerve palsies, fracture overdistraction, and persistent instability. Many of these potential complications can be avoided with proper pin placement and meticulous pin care.

  20. How does the neck flexion affect the cervical MRI features of Hirayama disease?

    PubMed

    Hou, Chao; Han, Hongbin; Yang, Xiaohong; Xu, Xiaojuan; Gao, Hui; Fan, Dongsheng; Fu, Yu; Sun, Yu; Liu, Bo

    2012-10-01

    Although flexion cervical MRI has been recommended for the diagnosis of Hirayama disease (HD), no study focused on the MR features at different neck flexion angles. Moreover, no uniform flexion angle has been confirmed in clinical practice. The purpose of this study is to quantitatively investigate the MRI typical signs of HD patients in different neck flexion degree and gives a suggestion to the MR scanning. Cervical MRI in neutral and different flexion positions (cervical flexion angle 20°, 25°, 30°, 35°, and 40°) were performed in 45 HD patients. Three MRI features including anterior shifting of the posterior wall of the cervical dural canal (ASD), widening of cervical epidural space, and epidural flow voids (EFV) at each flexed position were summarized. To evaluate ASD quantitatively, the widest cervical epidural space with the maximum sagittal diameters (d) and cervical canal sagittal diameter (D) at the same level were measured. The d/D values at different angles were calculated and compared. ASD was demonstrated in 34 out of 45 cases (75.6%) at 20° and in all cases (100%) at other 4 angles (χ (2) = 25.728, P < 0.05). Significant difference was demonstrated for the appearance rate of EFV (mean 72.8%) among different angles (χ (2) = 11.373, P = 0.021). The peak mean d/D value was found at 35°. Neck flexion angles have effects on ASD, widening of cervical epidural space and EFV. 25° is recommended as the least effective diagnostic flexion angle for MRI diagnosis of HD, and 35° may be the best one.

  1. Difficulty in the removal of epidural catheter for labor analgesia.

    PubMed

    Hajnour, Mohamed S; Khokhar, Rashid Saeed; Ejaz, Abdul Aziz Ahmed; Al Zahrani, Tariq; Kanchi, Naveed Uddin

    2017-01-01

    For labor pain management epidural analgesia is a popular and an effective method. Difficult removal of epidural catheters occasionally occurs, and several maneuvers have been recommended. The purpose of this article is to raise awareness of the problem of retained epidural catheter fragments and identify the potential impact of complications.

  2. Difficulty in the removal of epidural catheter for labor analgesia

    PubMed Central

    Hajnour, Mohamed S.; Khokhar, Rashid Saeed; Ejaz, Abdul Aziz Ahmed; Al Zahrani, Tariq; Kanchi, Naveed Uddin

    2017-01-01

    For labor pain management epidural analgesia is a popular and an effective method. Difficult removal of epidural catheters occasionally occurs, and several maneuvers have been recommended. The purpose of this article is to raise awareness of the problem of retained epidural catheter fragments and identify the potential impact of complications. PMID:28217071

  3. [Right sensory-motor syndrome as the presentation of a spontaneous cervico-thoracic epidural hematoma].

    PubMed

    Castro, M; Egido, J A; Saldaña, C; Andrés, M T

    1998-10-01

    A spontaneous cervical epidural hematoma is an infrequent cause of cord compression. The commonest clinical presentations are with paraparesia and tetraparesia. Transient hemiparesia is very rare and a sensory-motor syndrome is exceptional. A 38 year old man had sudden onset of spontaneous interscapular vertebral pain with bilateral root radiation. A few minutes later he started to have weakness and sensory loss in his right limbs. On clinical examination there was pain on pressure over the spinal apophyses of the T4 and T5 vertebrae, hemiparesia and hemi-hypoalgesia of the right limbs. After ten hours this had all returned to normal. MRI of the cord showed an epidural hematoma extending from C6 to T2. Coagulation studies and spinal arteriography were normal. The sensory motor syndrome is an unusual form of presentation of a spontaneous cervico-thoracic epidural hematoma. Root pain is a symptom of great value for orientation of a syndrome which would otherwise seem to be of central origin. The explanation for this clinical findings may be compression of both lateral cord pathways due to their particular blood distribution. Regarding therapeutic approach, this should be conservative, with close observation to see whether it will resolve spontaneously in a short period of time.

  4. Iatrogenic Cushing Syndrome Secondary to Ritonavir-Epidural Triamcinolone Interaction: An Illustrative Case and Review

    PubMed Central

    Berg, Melody L.

    2014-01-01

    HIV positive patients on ritonavir-containing antiretroviral therapy (ART) can develop iatrogenic Cushing syndrome (IACS) and adrenal insufficiency as a result of drug-drug interactions with inhaled or intranasal glucocorticoid therapy. Reports related to epidural triamcinolone injections are relatively uncommon but increasingly reported. We describe a 48-year-old woman with immunologically and virologically well-controlled HIV on ritonavir-based ART, who developed headache, dizziness, and candida and herpes simplex virus (HSV) ulcerative esophagitis 7 days after receiving an epidural triamcinolone injection for cervical radicular pain. Iatrogenic Cushing syndrome and relative adrenal insufficiency were suspected and proven. The patient's ART was changed to a non-HIV protease inhibitor- (PI-) containing program, her symptoms improved, and she did not require hydrocortisone replacement. In this paper, we review the literature on IACS and relative secondary adrenal insufficiency from epidural triamcinolone injections in HIV patients on ritonavir-containing ART regimens. A high index of clinical suspicion is needed for diagnosis. Prevention of drug-drug interactions by taking a thorough medication history for patients on ritonavir-containing ART regimens before prescribing any form of corticosteroid is crucial and effective and sustained interdisciplinary communication in the care of such patients. PMID:24895495

  5. Epidural cortical stimulation and aphasia therapy

    PubMed Central

    Cherney, Leora R.; Harvey, Richard L.; Babbitt, Edna M.; Hurwitz, Rosalind; Kaye, Rosalind C.; Lee, Jaime B.; Small, Steven. L.

    2013-01-01

    Background There are several methods of delivering cortical brain stimulation to modulate cortical excitability and interest in their application as an adjuvant strategy in aphasia rehabilitation after stroke is growing. Epidural cortical stimulation, although more invasive than other methods, permits high frequency stimulation of high spatial specificity to targeted neuronal populations. Aims First, we review evidence supporting the use of epidural cortical stimulation for upper limb recovery after focal cortical injury in both animal models and human stroke survivors. These data provide the empirical and theoretical platform underlying the use of epidural cortical stimulation in aphasia. Second, we summarize evidence for the application of epidural cortical stimulation in aphasia. We describe the procedures and primary outcomes of a safety and feasibility study (Cherney, Erickson & Small, 2010), and provide previously unpublished data regarding secondary behavioral outcomes from that study. Main Contribution In a controlled study comparing epidural cortical stimulation plus language treatment (CS/LT) to language treatment alone (LT), eight stroke survivors with nonfluent aphasia received intensive language therapy for 6 weeks. Four of these participants also underwent surgical implantation of an epidural stimulation device which was activated only during therapy sessions. Behavioral data were collected before treatment, immediately after treatment, and at 6 and 12 weeks following the end of treatment. The effect size for the primary outcome measure, the Western Aphasia Battery Aphasia Quotient, was benchmarked as moderate from baseline to immediately post-treatment, and large from baseline to the 12-week follow-up. Similarly, effect sizes obtained at the 12-week follow-up for the Boston Naming Test, the Communicative Effectiveness Index, and for correct information units on a picture description task were greater than those obtained immediately post treatment

  6. Elective cesarean hysterectomy for treatment of cervical neoplasia. An update.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, M S; Roberts, W S; Fiorica, J V; Angel, J L; Finan, M A; Cavanagh, D

    1993-03-01

    From January 1, 1979, to March 31, 1991, 37 patients underwent elective cesarean hysterectomy for early cervical neoplasia. Thirty-four patients had cervical intraepithelial neoplasia III, and three patients had stage IA-1 squamous cell carcinoma of the cervix. Twenty-eight were primary cesarean sections; nine had obstetric indications. The mean operative time was 128 minutes; mean estimated blood loss was 1,400 mL. One patient experienced an intraoperative hemorrhage (3,500 mL). There were no other recognized intraoperative complications. Four significant postoperative complications included a vaginal cuff abscess, a wound dehiscence and pelvic abscess, one patient with febrile morbidity and an ileus and ligation with partial transection of a ureter. Patients were discharged on a mean of postoperative day 5.7. Although significant complications occurred, we believe that the noncompliant nature of our patient population justifies elective cesarean hysterectomy for treatment of cervical neoplasia.

  7. Unusual Spinal Epidural Lipomatosis and Lumbosacral Instability

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz Picazo, David; Ramírez Villaescusa, José

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Epidural lipomatosis is most frequently observed in patients on chronic steroid treatment. Only a few idiopathic epidural lipomatosis cases have been described. Material and Methods. 64-year-old male patient presented with low back pain and left leg pain. Later, the patient experienced neurogenic claudication and radicular pain in the left leg without urinary dysfunction. Plain radiography and magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated an abnormal fat tissue overgrowth in the epidural space with compression of the dural sac, degenerative disc disease at L4-L5 level, and instability at L5-S1. Endocrinopathic diseases and chronic steroid therapy were excluded. If conservative treatment failed, surgical treatment can be indicated. Results. After surgery, there was a gradual improvement in symptoms and signs, and six months later the patient returned to daily activities and was neurologically normal. Conclusion. In the absence of common causes of neurogenic claudication, epidural lipomatosis should be considered. The standard test for the diagnosis of epidural lipomatosis is magnetic resonance (MR). At first, conservative treatment must be considered; weight loss and the suspension of prior corticosteroid therapy are indicated. In the presence of neurological impairment, the operative treatment of wide surgical decompression must be performed soon after diagnosis. PMID:27069704

  8. Influence of epidural dexamethasone on maternal temperature and serum cytokine concentration after labor epidural analgesia.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li-Zhong; Hu, Xiao-Xia; Liu, Xia; Qian, Ping; Ge, Jia-Mei; Tang, Bei-Lei

    2011-04-01

    To evaluate the effects of epidural dexamethasone on maternal temperature and serum cytokine levels after labor epidural analgesia. Sixty healthy term nulliparas in spontaneous labor were randomized to receive epidural analgesia alone using bupivacaine 0.125% and fentanyl 1 μg/mL (group I) or epidural analgesia combined with dexamethasone 0.2mg/mL (group II) (n=30 per group). Maternal tympanic temperature was measured before epidural analgesia and hourly thereafter until delivery. Maternal and cord venous blood were sampled for analysis of interleukin-6 (IL-6), tumor necrosis factor-α, and interleukin-10 levels. There was no difference in the incidence of intrapartum fever (38 °C or more) between the 2 groups (3/30 versus 1/30, P=0.612). The mean maternal temperature increased with time in group I, with the elevation reaching statistical significance at 4 hours post analgesia and at delivery compared with baseline (P=0.012 and P=0.043, respectively). A similar trend was observed with maternal serum IL-6 levels in group I. In group II, maternal temperature and IL-6 levels did not differ from baseline at any time point during labor. Epidural dexamethasone alleviates maternal temperature elevation after epidural analgesia. This effect can be attributed to the decrease in IL-6 levels. Copyright © 2011 International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Assessment: use of epidural steroid injections to treat radicular lumbosacral pain: report of the Therapeutics and Technology Assessment Subcommittee of the American Academy of Neurology.

    PubMed

    Armon, Carmel; Argoff, Charles E; Samuels, Jeffrey; Backonja, Misha-Miroslav

    2007-03-06

    Based on the available evidence, the Therapeutics and Technology Assessment subcommittee concluded that 1) epidural steroid injections may result in some improvement in radicular lumbosacral pain when assessed between 2 and 6 weeks following the injection, compared to control treatments (Level C, Class I-III evidence). The average magnitude of effect is small and generalizability of the observation is limited by the small number of studies, highly selected patient populations, few techniques and doses, and variable comparison treatments; 2) in general, epidural steroid injection for radicular lumbosacral pain does not impact average impairment of function, need for surgery, or provide long-term pain relief beyond 3 months. Their routine use for these indications is not recommended (Level B, Class I-III evidence); 3) there is insufficient evidence to make any recommendation for the use of epidural steroid injections to treat radicular cervical pain (Level U).

  10. Brucellar spondylodiscitis with rapidly progressive spinal epidural abscess showing cauda equina syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hu, Tan; Wu, Ji; Zheng, Chao; Wu, Di

    2016-01-01

    Early diagnosis of Brucellosis is often difficult in the patient with only single non-specific symptom because of its rarity. We report a patient with Brucellar spondylodiscitis, in which the low back pain was the only symptom and the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed not radiographic features about infection at initial stage. He was misdiagnosed as a lumbar disc herniation for inappropriate treatment in a long time. The delay in diagnosis and correct treatment led to rapid progression of the disease and severe complications. The patient was treated successfully with triple-antibiotic and surgical intervention in the end. Brucellar spondylodiscitis should always be suspended in the differential diagnosis specially when the patient comes from an endemic area or has consumed dairy products from animals in such an area and comprehensive examination should be done for the patent to rule out some important diseases like Brucellosis with sufficient reasons.

  11. Brucellar spondylodiscitis with rapidly progressive spinal epidural abscess showing cauda equina syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Tan; Wu, Ji; Zheng, Chao; Wu, Di

    2016-01-01

    Early diagnosis of Brucellosis is often difficult in the patient with only single non-specific symptom because of its rarity. We report a patient with Brucellar spondylodiscitis, in which the low back pain was the only symptom and the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed not radiographic features about infection at initial stage. He was misdiagnosed as a lumbar disc herniation for inappropriate treatment in a long time. The delay in diagnosis and correct treatment led to rapid progression of the disease and severe complications. The patient was treated successfully with triple-antibiotic and surgical intervention in the end. Brucellar spondylodiscitis should always be suspended in the differential diagnosis specially when the patient comes from an endemic area or has consumed dairy products from animals in such an area and comprehensive examination should be done for the patent to rule out some important diseases like Brucellosis with sufficient reasons. PMID:28053732

  12. Pharyngoesophageal perforation 3 years after anterior cervical spine surgery: a rare case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Yin, Dan-Hui; Yang, Xin-Ming; Huang, Qi; Yang, Mi; Tang, Qin-Lai; Wang, Shu-Hui; Wang, Shuang; Liu, Jia-Jia; Yang, Tao; Li, Shi-Sheng

    2015-08-01

    Pharyngoesophageal perforation after anterior cervical spine surgery is rare and the delayed cases were more rarely reported but potentially life-threatening. We report a case of pharyngoesophageal perforation 3 years after anterior cervical spine surgery. The patient presented with dysphagia, fever, left cervical mass and developing dyspnea 3 years after cervical spine surgery for trauma. After careful examinations, he underwent an emergency tracheostomy, neck exploration, hardware removal, abscess drainage and infected tissue debridement. 14 days after surgery, CT of the neck with oral contrast demonstrated no contrast extravasation from the esophagus. Upon review of literature, only 14 cases of pharyngoesophageal perforation more than 1 year after anterior cervical spine surgery were found. We discussed possible etiology, diagnosis and management and concluded that in cases of dysphagia, dyspnea, cervical pain, swelling and edema of the cervical area even long time after anterior cervical spine surgery, potential pharyngoesophageal damage should be considered.

  13. Spontaneous Intracranial Hypotension Treated with a Targeted CT-Guided Epidural Blood Patch

    PubMed Central

    Correia, Inês; Marques, Inês Brás; Ferreira, Rogério; Cordeiro, Miguel; Sousa, Lívia

    2016-01-01

    Spontaneous intracranial hypotension (SIH) is an important cause of new daily persistent headache. It is thought to be due to spontaneous spinal cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leaks, which probably have a multifactorial etiology. The classic manifestation of SIH is an orthostatic headache, but other neurological symptoms may be present. An epidural blood patch is thought to be the most effective treatment, but a blind infusion may be ineffective. We describe the case of a young man who developed an acute severe headache, with pain worsening when assuming an upright posture and relief gained with recumbency. No history of previous headache, recent cranial or cervical trauma, or invasive procedures was reported. Magnetic resonance imaging showed pachymeningeal enhancement and other features consistent with SIH and pointed towards a cervical CSF leak site. After failure of conservative treatment, a targeted computer tomography-guided EBP was performed, with complete recovery. PMID:26981128

  14. Psoas abscess in an immunocompetent host.

    PubMed

    Mannino, Courtney M; Salhab, Mohammed; Schmidhofer, Sarah; Pop-Vicas, Aurora

    2014-08-01

    We present a case of iliopsoas abscess in an immunocompetent patient. She experienced three weeks of worsening right hip pain, which was initially misdiagnosed as degenerative joint disease. This led to admission to the Intensive Care Unit for severe sepsis. The patient improved with intravenous antibiotics and percutaneous abscess drainage.

  15. A lingual abscess caused by Streptococcus intermedius.

    PubMed

    Harrington, Amanda T; Hsia, Jennifer C; Mendez, Eduardo; Clarridge, Jill E

    2012-04-01

    Lingual abscesses are rare. We describe a case in a healthy female with no recent history of trauma. The organism recovered by culture of drainage material collected prior to antibiotic treatment was Streptococcus intermedius, an organism recognized as flora of the oropharynx and associated with abscess formation. The isolate was resistant to clindamycin, which was the antibiotic therapy that the patient received.

  16. Paediatric Iliopsoas abscess: A case report.

    PubMed

    Elliott, Carla

    2013-11-01

    Introduction: Iliopsoas abscess is an uncommon condition in the paediatric population. The clinical presentation is variable and may be confused with other conditions such as septic arthritis, osteomyelitis and appendicular abscess. A suspicion of iliopsoas abscess requires a prompt diagnosis so that rapid management and treatment can be undertaken. Discussion: This case describes the presence of an iliopsoas abscess in a paediatric patient presenting to the emergency department within a rural community. Due to the variability in clinical presentation imaging studies are necessary to distinguish an iliopsoas abscess from other inflammatory processes. Ultrasound is often the modality of choice. Imaging guided percutaneous drainage and/or aspiration and the administration of intravenous antibiotics are minimally invasive modern techniques providing a safe treatment options in the presence of an iliopsoas abscess. Conclusion: Iliopsoas abscess is an uncommon condition in the paediatric population. Due to the variability in clinical presentation, imaging, and in particular, ultrasound play a vital role in the diagnosis of cases with a high suspicion of abscess formation. Accurate diagnosis leads to a rapid treatment plan, avoiding further insult.

  17. Microbiology and treatment of acute apical abscesses.

    PubMed

    Siqueira, José F; Rôças, Isabela N

    2013-04-01

    Acute apical abscess is the most common form of dental abscess and is caused by infection of the root canal of the tooth. It is usually localized intraorally, but in some cases the apical abscess may spread and result in severe complications or even mortality. The reasons why dental root canal infections can become symptomatic and evolve to severe spreading and sometimes life-threatening abscesses remain elusive. Studies using culture and advanced molecular microbiology methods for microbial identification in apical abscesses have demonstrated a multispecies community conspicuously dominated by anaerobic bacteria. Species/phylotypes commonly found in these infections belong to the genera Fusobacterium, Parvimonas, Prevotella, Porphyromonas, Dialister, Streptococcus, and Treponema. Advances in DNA sequencing technologies and computational biology have substantially enhanced the knowledge of the microbiota associated with acute apical abscesses and shed some light on the etiopathogeny of this disease. Species richness and abundance and the resulting network of interactions among community members may affect the collective pathogenicity and contribute to the development of acute infections. Disease modifiers, including transient or permanent host-related factors, may also influence the development and severity of acute abscesses. This review focuses on the current evidence about the etiology and treatment of acute apical abscesses and how the process is influenced by host-related factors and proposes future directions in research, diagnosis, and therapeutic approaches to deal with this disease.

  18. Unusual complication of dental extraction: lingual abscess.

    PubMed

    Varghese, Lalee; Agarwal, Pratibha; Rupa, Vedantam

    2013-01-01

    Acute lingual swelling is a potentially life threatening clinical condition which is encountered very rarely, the differential diagnosis of which includes hemorrhage, infarction, abscess, tumor and edema. Herein we report a case of lingual abscess that presented with acute tongue swelling and respiratory distress after extraction of lower two incisor teeth.

  19. Liver Abscess: Increasing Occurrence in Premature Newborns

    PubMed Central

    Bosnalı, Oktav; Moralıoğlu, Serdar; Pektaş, Osman

    2013-01-01

    Neonatal liver abscess is a very rare condition associated with high morbidity and mortality rates. There seems to be an increasing trend of this rare condition amongst the newborns admitted to neonatal intensive care units. We report a case of liver abscess in a premature newborn and briefly review the literature and discuss its management. PMID:26023443

  20. Video-assisted hepatic abscess debridement

    PubMed Central

    Klink, Christian D; Binnebösel, Marcel; Schmeding, Maximilian; van Dam, Ronald M; Dejong, Cornelis H; Junge, Karsten; Neumann, Ulf P

    2015-01-01

    Background Pyogenic liver abscesses are currently treated by either percutaneous computer tomography (CT)-guided drainage or by laparoscopic and a conventional liver resection when conservative treatment fails but may be associated with substantial morbidity and mortality. Methods A minimally invasive technique involving debridement of right liver abscesses was employed using a minimally invasive video-assisted hepatic abscess debridement (VAHD) after unsuccessful percutaneous CT-guided drainage. Clinical data, complication rates and outcomes of patients were recorded retrospectively. Results Between 2011 and 2014, VAHD was performed on 10 patients at two centres with no observed recurrence of a liver abscess. The median age of the patients was 57 years (range 42–78) with a median pre-operative size of a liver abscess of 78 mm (range 40–115). The median operation time was 47 min (range 23–75), and the median postoperative hospital stay was 9 days (range 7–69). One patient developed a subcutaneous abscess that required further surgery. No patient died, and there were no major complications related to the VAHD. Conclusions Video-assisted hepatic abscess debridement is a feasible technique that shows promising results for the treatment of a recurrent right liver abscess. PMID:26096195

  1. Video-assisted hepatic abscess debridement.

    PubMed

    Klink, Christian D; Binnebösel, Marcel; Schmeding, Maximilian; van Dam, Ronald M; Dejong, Cornelis H; Junge, Karsten; Neumann, Ulf P

    2015-08-01

    Pyogenic liver abscesses are currently treated by either percutaneous computer tomography (CT)-guided drainage or by laparoscopic and a conventional liver resection when conservative treatment fails but may be associated with substantial morbidity and mortality. A minimally invasive technique involving debridement of right liver abscesses was employed using a minimally invasive video-assisted hepatic abscess debridement (VAHD) after unsuccessful percutaneous CT-guided drainage. Clinical data, complication rates and outcomes of patients were recorded retrospectively. Between 2011 and 2014, VAHD was performed on 10 patients at two centres with no observed recurrence of a liver abscess. The median age of the patients was 57 years (range 42-78) with a median pre-operative size of a liver abscess of 78 mm (range 40-115). The median operation time was 47 min (range 23-75), and the median postoperative hospital stay was 9 days (range 7-69). One patient developed a subcutaneous abscess that required further surgery. No patient died, and there were no major complications related to the VAHD. Video-assisted hepatic abscess debridement is a feasible technique that shows promising results for the treatment of a recurrent right liver abscess. © 2015 International Hepato-Pancreato-Biliary Association.

  2. Microbiology and Treatment of Acute Apical Abscesses

    PubMed Central

    Rôças, Isabela N.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Acute apical abscess is the most common form of dental abscess and is caused by infection of the root canal of the tooth. It is usually localized intraorally, but in some cases the apical abscess may spread and result in severe complications or even mortality. The reasons why dental root canal infections can become symptomatic and evolve to severe spreading and sometimes life-threatening abscesses remain elusive. Studies using culture and advanced molecular microbiology methods for microbial identification in apical abscesses have demonstrated a multispecies community conspicuously dominated by anaerobic bacteria. Species/phylotypes commonly found in these infections belong to the genera Fusobacterium, Parvimonas, Prevotella, Porphyromonas, Dialister, Streptococcus, and Treponema. Advances in DNA sequencing technologies and computational biology have substantially enhanced the knowledge of the microbiota associated with acute apical abscesses and shed some light on the etiopathogeny of this disease. Species richness and abundance and the resulting network of interactions among community members may affect the collective pathogenicity and contribute to the development of acute infections. Disease modifiers, including transient or permanent host-related factors, may also influence the development and severity of acute abscesses. This review focuses on the current evidence about the etiology and treatment of acute apical abscesses and how the process is influenced by host-related factors and proposes future directions in research, diagnosis, and therapeutic approaches to deal with this disease. PMID:23554416

  3. The microbiology of the acute dental abscess.

    PubMed

    Robertson, D; Smith, A J

    2009-02-01

    The acute dental abscess is frequently underestimated in terms of its morbidity and mortality. The risk of potential serious consequences arising from the spread of a dental abscess is still relevant today with many hospital admissions for dental sepsis. The acute dental abscess is usually polymicrobial comprising facultative anaerobes, such as viridans group streptococci and the Streptococcus anginosus group, with predominantly strict anaerobes, such as anaerobic cocci, Prevotella and Fusobacterium species. The use of non-culture techniques has expanded our insight into the microbial diversity of the causative agents, identifying such organisms as Treponema species and anaerobic Gram-positive rods such as Bulleidia extructa, Cryptobacterium curtum and Mogibacterium timidum. Despite some reports of increasing antimicrobial resistance in isolates from acute dental infection, the vast majority of localized dental abscesses respond to surgical treatment, with antimicrobials limited to spreading and severe infections. The microbiology and treatment of the acute localized abscess and severe spreading odontogenic infections are reviewed.

  4. Lumbar Epidural Varix Mimicking Disc Herniation

    PubMed Central

    Bursalı, Adem; Guvenal, Ahmet Burak; Yaman, Onur

    2016-01-01

    Lumbar radiculopathy is generally caused by such well-recognized entity as lumbar disc herniation in neurosurgical practice; however rare pathologies such as thrombosed epidural varix may mimic them by causing radicular symptoms. In this case report, we present a 26-year-old man with the complaint of back and right leg pain who was operated for right L4–5 disc herniation. The lesion interpreted as an extruded disc herniation preoperatively was found to be a thrombosed epidural varix compressing the nerve root preoperatively. The nerve root was decompressed by shrinking the lesion with bipolar thermocoagulation and excision. The patient's complaints disappeared in the postoperative period. Thrombosed lumbar epidural varices may mimic lumbar disc herniations both radiologically and clinically. Therefore, must be kept in mind in the differential diagnosis of lumbar disc herniations. Microsurgical techniques are mandatory for the treatment of these pathologies and decompression with thermocoagulation and excision is an efficient method. PMID:27446525

  5. Sciatica caused by lumbar epidural gas.

    PubMed

    Belfquih, Hatim; El Mostarchid, Brahim; Akhaddar, Ali; gazzaz, Miloudi; Boucetta, Mohammed

    2014-01-01

    Gas production as a part of disc degeneration can occur but rarely causes nerve compression syndromes. The clinical features are similar to those of common sciatica. CT is very useful in the detection of epidural gas accumulation and nerve root compression. We report a case of symptomatic epidural gas accumulation originating from vacuum phenomenon in the intervertebral disc, causing lumbo-sacral radiculopathy. A 45-year-old woman suffered from sciatica for 9 months. The condition worsened in recent days. Computed tomography (CT) demonstrated intradiscal vacuum phenomenon, and accumulation of gas in the lumbar epidural space compressing the dural sac and S1 nerve root. After evacuation of the gas, her pain resolved without recurrence.

  6. Spontaneous epidural hematoma due to cervico-thoracic angiolipoma.

    PubMed

    Eap, C; Bannwarth, M; Jazeron, J-F; Kleber, J-C; Theret, É; Duntze, J; Litre, C-F

    2015-12-01

    Epidural angiolipomas are uncommon benign tumors of the spine. Their clinical presentation is usually a progressive spinal cord compression. We report the case of a 22-year-old patient who presented with an acute paraparesis and a spontaneous epidural hematoma, which revealed a epidural angiolipoma which extended from C7 to T3. The patient underwent a C7-T3 laminectomy, in emergency, with evacuation of the hematoma and extradural complete resection of a fibrous epidural tumor bleeding. The postoperative course was favorable with regression of neurological symptoms. Epidural angiolipomas can be revealed by spontaneous intratumoral hemorrhage without traumatism. The standard treatment is total removal by surgery.

  7. Liver Abscess Formation Following Transarterial Chemoembolization

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Wei-Fu; Lu, Dong; He, Yu-Sheng; Xiao, Jing-Kun; Zhou, Chun-Ze; Cheng, De-Lei

    2016-01-01

    Abstract To investigate the clinical features, risk factors, and bacterial spectrum of liver abscess following transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) and evaluate the therapeutic effect of percutaneous catheter drainage (PCD) on the abscesses. A retrospective review of patient charts was performed in 3613 patients who suffered from liver malignancies (2832 patients with hepatocellular carcinoma and 781 with metastatic hepatic tumor) and had undergone 11,054 TACE procedures from January 2005 to October 2013. Liver abscesses were found in 21 patients. PCD was performed in all abscess patients. The clinical features, risk factors, and bacterial spectrum of liver abscess following TACE were investigated and the therapeutic effect of PCD was evaluated. The incidence of liver abscess was 0.58% per patient and 0.19% per procedure. Approximately 57.1% of the patients had a medical history of bilioenteric anastomosis or biliary stent implantation. On computed tomography scans, the abscesses appeared as low-attenuation lesions and high-density iodinate oil scattered in the abscesses. The ultrasound showed the well defined, heterogeneously hypoechoic lesions. Positive microbiological isolates were obtained in all pus cultures and in 47.6% of blood cultures. The most common bacterium was Escherichia coli (52.4%). Twenty patients (95.2%) were cured from abscesses by using PCD, and 1 died of sepsis. Patients with predisposing factors are prone to an increased risk of liver abscess following TACE. Bacterial culture and antibiotic sensitivity tests on pus and blood help on the antibiotics selection. PCD combined with aggressive antibiotics can be recommended as the first-line therapeutic regimen. PMID:27124055

  8. Acute spinal epidural hematoma and cranial interdural hematoma due to a rupture of a posterior communicating artery aneurysm: case report.

    PubMed

    Bartoli, Andrea; Kotowski, Marc; Pereira, Vitor Mendes; Schaller, Karl

    2011-10-01

    We describe an unusual presentation of a ruptured aneurysm of the posterior communicating artery with an acute intracranial hematoma between the dural layers associated with an acute spinal epidural hematoma descending to L1. A 35-year-old woman presented 3 hours after ictus with a postcoital headache, neck stiffness, and bilateral abducens cranial nerve palsy. No other neurological deficits were present. Clinically, she had a subarachnoid hemorrhage World Federation of Neurosurgical Societies grade 1. CT scan demonstrates an acute subdural hematoma, extending from the right parasellar region, around the clivus, tentorium, and falx. Angio-CT showed a posterior communicating artery aneurysm and an anterior communicating artery aneurysm and an extension of the hematoma to the cervical spine. This justified a spinal and cerebral MRI that confirmed an extension of the hematoma to the epidural space at the cervical, thoracic, and lumbar levels. Three-dimensional digital subtraction angiography confirmed aneurysms on the right posterior communicating artery and on the anterior communicating artery. Both aneurysms were completely occluded by coiling. With reference to the concept of the cranial subdural compartment described in studies conducted using an electron microscope, this group of hematomas was classified as interdural. Ruptured aneurysm of the posterior communicating artery may cause cranial acute interdural hematoma with a typical subarachnoid hemorrhage clinical presentation, and it rarely can extend to spinal epidural space.

  9. Paraplegia after epidural-general anesthesia in a Morquio patient with moderate thoracic spinal stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Krane, Elliot J.; Tomatsu, Shunji; Theroux, Mary C.; Lee, Roland R.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose We describe an instance in which complete paraplegia was evident immediately postoperatively after apparently uneventful lumbar epidural-general anesthesia in a patient with Morquio Type A syndrome (Morquio A) with moderate thoracic spinal stenosis. Clinical features A 16-yr-old male with Morquio A received lumbar epidural-general anesthesia for bilateral distal femoral osteotomies. Preoperative imaging had revealed a stable cervical spine and moderate thoracic spinal stenosis with a mild degree of spinal cord compression. Systolic blood pressure (BP) was maintained within 20% of the pre-anesthetic baseline value. The patient sustained a severe thoracic spinal cord infarction. The epidural anesthetic contributed to considerable delay in the recognition of the diagnosis of paraplegia. Conclusion This experience leads us to suggest that, in patients with Morquio A, it may be prudent to avoid the use of epidural anesthesia without very firm indication, to support BP at or near baseline levels in the presence of even moderate spinal stenosis, and to avoid flexion or extension of the spinal column in intraoperative positioning. If the spinal cord/column status is unknown or if the patient is known to have any degree of spinal stenosis, we suggest that the same rigorous BP support practices that are typically applied in other patients with severe spinal stenosis, especially stenosis with myelomalacia, should apply to patients with Morquio A and that spinal cord neurophysiological monitoring should be employed. In the event that cord imaging is not available, e.g., emergency procedures, it would be prudent to assume the presence of spinal stenosis. PMID:25323122

  10. Primary spinal epidural cavernous hemangioma: clinical features and surgical outcome in 14 cases.

    PubMed

    Li, Teng-Yu; Xu, Yu-Lun; Yang, Jun; Wang, James; Wang, Gui-Huai

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the clinical characteristics, imaging features, differential diagnosis, treatment options, and prognosis for primary spinal epidural cavernous hemangiomas. Fourteen patients with pathologically diagnosed non-vertebral origin cavernous hemangiomas who had undergone surgery at Beijing Tiantan Hospital between 2003 and 2012 were identified in the hospital's database. The patients' clinical data, imaging characteristics, surgical treatment, and postoperative follow-up were analyzed retrospectively. There were 9 males and 5 females with an average age of 51.64 years. The primary epidural cavernous hemangiomas were located in the cervical spine (2 cases), cervicothoracic junction (2 cases), thoracic spine (8 cases), thoracolumbar junction (1 case), and lumbar spine (1 case). Hemorrhage was confirmed in 4 cases during surgery. Preoperatively 5 lesions were misdiagnosed as schwannoma, 1 was misdiagnosed as a meningioma, and 1 was misdiagnosed as an arachnoid cyst. Preoperative hemorrhages were identified in 2 cases. Three patients had recurrent cavernous hemangiomas. The initial presenting symptoms were local pain in 5 cases, radiculopathy in 6 cases, and myelopathy in 3 cases. Upon admission, 1 patient had radicular symptoms and 13 had myelopathic symptoms. The average symptom duration was 18 months. All patients underwent surgery; complete resection was achieved in 8 cases, subtotal resection in 4 cases, and partial resection in 2 cases. Postoperative follow-up was completed in 10 cases (average follow-up 34 months); 1 patient died, 5 patients showed clinical improvement, and 4 patients remained neurologically unchanged. Total surgical removal of spine epidural cavernous hemangiomas with a chronic course is the optimum treatment and carries a good prognosis. Secondary surgery for recurrent epidural cavernous hemangioma is technically more challenging. In patients with profound myelopathy from acute hemorrhage, even prompt surgical

  11. [Thyroid abscess revealing Graves-Basedow disease: about a case and review of the literature].

    PubMed

    Chenguir, Meriem; Souldi, Hajar; Loufad, Fatima Zahra; Rouadi, Sami; Abada, Reda; Roubal, Mohamed; Mahtar, Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    Thyroid abscess is a very rare clinical entity. It accounts for 0.1% of the surgical pathologies of the thyroid gland. The anatomical and physiological characteristics of the gland give it resistance to pathogens. Streptococcal and Staphylococcal are the most common. Tuberculosis is rarely reported in the literature. The occurrence of infection associated with toxic goiter is exceptional. The authors report a rare case of a 22-year-old young patient with thyroid abscess revealing a toxic goitre. He presented to our otorhinolaryngology emergency unit with anterior cervical swelling, slightly lateralized to the left, moving on swallowing, associated with hemoptysis, signs of thyroid dysfunction, fever, night sweats. Cervical CT scan showed a mass occupying the left lobe of the thyroid gland, with fluid content, measuring 2 cm and with purulent fluid collected via fine needle aspiration biopsy. Cytobacteriological examination showed Staphylococcus with positive BK test. Patient underwent chest radiograph showing right apical pulmonary alveolar. Cytobacteriological examination of sputum isolated Koch bacillus. Thyroid biological assessment was in favor of Graves-Basedow disease. The management was medical and included parenteral triple antibiotic, anti-bacillary and anti-thyroid synthesis therapy with good evolution. The diagnosis of tuberculosis should be suspected in patients with thyroid abscess formation associated with an unclear clinical picture. This is most often caused by hematogenous spread from another primary infection, particularly a pulmonary infection. The treatment is based on antibacillary drugs sometimes associated with surgery.

  12. Cervical Angina

    PubMed Central

    Sussman, Walter I.; Makovitch, Steven A.; Merchant, Shabbir Hussain I.

    2015-01-01

    Cervical angina has been widely reported as a cause of chest pain but remains underrecognized. This series demonstrates the varied clinical presentation of patients with cervical angina, the delay in diagnosis, and the extensive cardiac examinations patients with this condition typically undergo prior to a definitive diagnosis. Recognition of this condition in patients with acute chest pain requires a high index of suspicion and an awareness of the common presenting features and clinical findings of cervical angina. PMID:25553225

  13. Epidural analgesia for labor: Current techniques

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Marcos; Halpern, Stephen H

    2010-01-01

    Epidural analgesia is an extremely effective and popular treatment for labor pain. In this review, we trace the history of the use of epidural analgesia and its refinements. We then outline the goals of treatment and methods used to attain those goals. The use of low concentrations of local anesthetics, combined with lipid-soluble opioids, does not impede the progress of labor or depress the newborn. The incidence of side effects is low. Maintenance of analgesia that allows patient control enhances patient satisfaction. PMID:23144567

  14. Obstetric epidurals and chronic adhesive arachnoiditis.

    PubMed

    Rice, I; Wee, M Y K; Thomson, K

    2004-01-01

    It has been suggested that obstetric epidurals lead to chronic adhesive arachnoiditis (CAA). CAA is a nebulous disease entity with much confusion over its symptomatology. This review outlines the pathological, clinical, and radiological features of the disease. The proposed diagnostic criteria for CAA are: back pain that increases on exertion, with or without leg pain; neurological abnormality on examination; and characteristic MRI findings. Using these criteria, there is evidence to show that epidural or subarachnoid placement of some contrast media, preservatives and possibly vasoconstrictors, may lead to CAA. No evidence was found that the preservative-free, low concentration bupivacaine with opioid mixtures or plain bupivacaine currently used in labour lead to CAA.

  15. An emboligenic pulmonary abscess leading to ischemic stroke and secondary brain abscess

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Ischemic stroke by septic embolism occurs primarily in the context of infective endocarditis or in patients with a right-to-left shunt and formation of a secondary cerebral abscess is a rare event. Erosion of pulmonary veins by a pulmonary abscess can lead to transcardiac septic embolism but to our knowledge no case of septic embolic ischemic stroke from a pulmonary abscess with secondary transformation into a brain abscess has been reported to date. Case presentation We report the case of a patient with a pulmonary abscess causing a septic embolic cerebral infarction which then transformed into a cerebral abscess. After antibiotic therapy and drainage of the abscess the patient could be rehabilitated and presented an impressive improvement of symptoms. Conclusion Septic embolism should be considered as cause of ischemic stroke in patients with pulmonary abscess and can be followed by formation of a secondary cerebral abscess. Early antibiotic treatment and repeated cranial CT-scans for detection of a secondary abscess should be performed. PMID:23121862

  16. Prediction by computerised tomography of distance from skin to epidural space during thoracic epidural insertion.

    PubMed

    Carnie, J; Boden, J; Gao Smith, F

    2002-07-01

    In this single group observational study on 29 patients, we describe a technique that predicts the depth of the epidural space, calculated from the routine pre-operative chest computerised tomography (CT) scan using Pythagorean triangle trigonometry. We also compared the CT-derived depth of the epidural space with the actual depth of needle insertion. The CT-derived and the actual depths of the epidural space were highly correlated (r = 0.88, R2 = 0.78, p < 0.0001). The mean (95% CI) difference between CT-derived and actual depths was 0.26 (0.03-0.49) cm. Thus, the CT-derived depth tends to be greater than the actual depth by between 0.03 and 0.49 cm. There were no associations between either the CT-derived or the actual depth of the epidural space and age, weight, height or body mass index.

  17. Ruptured hepatic abscess mimicking perforated viscus.

    PubMed

    Lai, Yen-Chun; Su, Yu-Jang; Chang, Wen-Han

    2008-11-01

    In the majority of pneumoperitoneum cases we diagnose perforated viscus. We present herein a case of ruptured hepatic abscess mimicking perforated viscus. A 40-year-old man presented to the emergency room with fever and right upper quadrant abdominal pain. The fever had been on/off for a period of 1 month. On physical examination, diffuse abdominal pain with rebounding tenderness was noted. Blood tests showed leukocytosis with left shift, hyperglycemia, and elevated liver function tests. A chest X-ray showed a subdiaphragmatic region air-fluid level, indicating a hepatic abscess. Pneumoperitoneum was also seen. Owing to the status of peritonitis, computed tomography (CT) of the abdomen was performed and revealed an air-containing liver abscess in the right lobe of the liver. Perforation of a hollow organ was also suspected because of the pneumoperitoneum. An emergent laparotomy was immediately performed for the suspicion of a hollow organ perforation. No perforation of the hollow viscus was found. The ruptured hepatic abscess was attributed to the pneumoperitoneum. A blood culture grew Klebsiella pneumoniae four days later, and the same organism was also found in a surgical specimen culture of the abscess. For a ruptured hepatic abscess, surgical intervention with draining of the abscess and cleaning of the abdominal cavity are essential to save patient lives.

  18. Epidural volume extension in combined spinal epidural anaesthesia for elective caesarean section: a randomised controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Loubert, C; O'Brien, P J; Fernando, R; Walton, N; Philip, S; Addei, T; Columb, M O; Hallworth, S

    2011-05-01

    We investigated the effect of epidural volume extension on spinal blockade in pregnant women undergoing elective caesarean section with a combined spinal-epidural technique. We randomly allocated 90 healthy subjects to three groups to receive spinal hyperbaric bupivacaine 7.5 mg (group B7.5), spinal hyperbaric bupivacaine 7.5 mg immediately followed by epidural volume extension with saline 5 ml (group B7.5-EVE) or spinal hyperbaric bupivacaine 10 mg without epidural volume extension (group B10). We evaluated the height of the block every 5 min for 15 min following the spinal injection. The overall sensory block level increased with time (p < 0.001), regardless of the group studied, and there were significantly fewer failures of block in the group B10 compared with both B7.5 and B7.5-EVE groups (p = 0.001). In conclusion, we could not demonstrate a benefit in using epidural volume extension with 5 ml saline as part of a combined spinal epidural technique in term parturients undergoing elective caesarean section. © 2011 The Authors. Anaesthesia © 2011 The Association of Anaesthetists of Great Britain and Ireland.

  19. Infratemporal fossa abscess: a diagnostic dilemma.

    PubMed

    Kamath, M Panduranga; Bhojwani, Kiran M; Mahale, Ajit; Meyyappan, Hari; Abhijit, Kumar

    2009-05-01

    An abscess in the infratemporal fossa is a rare complication of dental extraction. Although it is a recognized entity, only a handful of cases have been reported in the literature. We describe a case of abscess in the infratemporal fossa of a 55-year-old woman with noninsulin-dependent (type 2) diabetes who presented with left-sided facial pain and marked trismus. The abscess was managed successfully with external drainage. We have made an attempt to comprehensively review the literature on this rare condition, with special emphasis on its anatomic complexity and varied clinical presentation, and we provide a detailed discussion of the diagnosis and management of this condition.

  20. [Maternal postures and epidural analgesia during labour].

    PubMed

    Ducloy-Bouthors, A-S; De Gasquet, B; Davette, M; Cuisse, M

    2006-06-01

    The evolution of birth is of interest for obstetricians and midwives. Postures with asymmetric stretching and balance, kneeling, or sitting have been claimed to be able to help foetal head rotation. Although walking during labour have no influence on the outcome of labour, hip-flexed postures enlarging the pelvic diameter are yet evaluated to improve the obstetric course of labour. In a prospective randomised study including 93 parturients, we compared the supine 30 degrees lateral tilt (control group) to three hip-flexed postures: sitting (S), right hip-flexed left lateral position (L) and left hip-flexed right lateral position (R). Epidural analgesia with 12 ml ropivacaine 0.1% and sufentanil 0.5 microg/ml was administered over a period of six minutes. The total epidural spread was 15+/-0.3 dermatomes and the upper level of thermo-analgesic blockade reached T7-T8 (T5 to T10) in each group. There were no differences between groups for the left and right total spread and upper level of epidural blockade, for the time to maximal block and pain relief. There was no motor block and no maternal or foetal side effects. We conclude that, for the three hip-flexed postures tested, position does not influence local anesthetic spread or symmetry of analgesia after induction of obstetric epidural anaesthesia.

  1. Pneumocephalus and seizures following epidural steroid injection.

    PubMed

    Sorber, Joseph; Levy, David; Schwartz, Adam

    2017-09-18

    We describe a patient with pneumocephalus following an epidural steroid injection (ESI) who presented with altered mental status, headache, focal neurologic findings and seizures. Pneumocephalus has rarely been described following ESI. A 34-year-old female presented with an altered level of consciousness worsening over approximately 18h following an ESI for lumbar back pain. She had associated headache, right-sided facial twitching and right upper extremity weakness. A brain CT scan revealed pneumocephalus in the right lateral ventricle and quadrigeminal plate cistern. While in the emergency department she experienced a self-limited generalized seizure. She was admitted and her symptoms persisted. Seven days following admission she was discharged to a rehabilitation facility, but her arm weakness persisted for greater than a month before resolving. Epidural anesthesia relies on the localization of the epidural space. The manual loss of resistance technique is widely used to identify the epidural space. The incidence of adverse effects is unknown. Case reports noting complications associated with this technique have been reported; rarely including pneumocephalus. Complications from the pneumocephalus are even less commonly reported. Though rare following an ESI and generally self-limited without complication, pneumocephalus should be considered in the differential diagnosis when evaluating a patient with neurologic deficits after instrumentation. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  2. Epidural Analgesia in the Postoperative Period

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-10-01

    violations. VI ABSTRACT Postoperative pain is an unwanted side effect of surgery, and is associated with many postoperative complications...This descriptive study was conducted to determine which surgical patients experienced the most analgesia with the fewest side effects when...epidural medication, side effects , incidence of breakthrough pain, and treatments were recorded and cross-tabulated. The following surgical categories

  3. Programmed intermittent epidural bolus versus continuous epidural infusion for labor analgesia: the effects on maternal motor function and labor outcome. A randomized double-blind study in nulliparous women.

    PubMed

    Capogna, Giorgio; Camorcia, Michela; Stirparo, Silvia; Farcomeni, Alessio

    2011-10-01

    Programmed intermittent epidural anesthetic bolus (PIEB) technique may result in reduced total local anesthetic consumption, fewer manual boluses, and greater patient satisfaction compared with continuous epidural infusion (CEI). In this randomized, double-blind study, we compared the incidence of motor block and labor outcome in women who received PIEB or CEI for maintenance of labor analgesia. The primary outcome variable was maternal motor function and the secondary outcome was mode of delivery. Nulliparous, term women with spontaneous labor and cervical dilation <4 cm were eligible to participate in the study. Epidural analgesia was initiated and maintained with a solution of levobupivacaine 0.0625% with sufentanil 0.5 μg/mL. After an initial epidural loading dose of 20 mL, patients were randomly assigned to receive PIEB (10 mL every hour beginning 60 minutes after the initial dose) or CEI (10 mL/h, beginning immediately after the initial dose) for the maintenance of analgesia. Patient-controlled epidural analgesia (PCEA) using a second infusion pump with levobupivacaine 0.125% was used to treat breakthrough pain. The degree of motor block was assessed in both lower extremities using the modified Bromage score at regular intervals throughout labor; the end point was any motor block in either limb. We also evaluated PCEA bolus doses and total analgesic solution consumption. We studied 145 subjects (PIEB = 75; CEI = 70). Motor block was reported in 37% in the CEI group and in 2.7% in the PIEB group (P < 0.001; odds ratio = 21.2; 95% CI: 4.9-129.3); it occurred earlier (P = 0.008) (hazard ratio = 7.8; 95% CI: 1.9-30.8; P = 0.003) and was more frequent at full cervical dilation in the CEI group (P < 0.001). The incidence of instrumental delivery was 20% for the CEI group and 7% for the PIEB group (P = 0.03). Total levobupivacaine consumption, number of patients requiring additional PCEA boluses, and mean number of PCEA boluses per patient were lower in the PIEB

  4. Plasmacytoma masquerading as an abscess.

    PubMed

    Nanda, Kanwar Deep Singh; Bhargava, Deepak; Sharma, Bhudev; Dave, Aparna

    2012-08-01

    Plasma cell neoplasia is a lymphoid neoplastic proliferation of B cells and has been classified as multiple myeloma, solitary plasmacytoma, and extramedullary plasmacytoma. Extramedullary plasmacytoma is defined as neoplastic proliferation of plasma cells in the soft tissue. Extramedullary plasmacytoma of the head and neck is very uncommon tumors, representing approximately 0.4% of all head and neck malignancies; amongst them, plasmacytoma of the maxilla is extremely rare. We present a case of a 70-year-old male with swelling on the right middle third of the face, mimicking an abscess, but proven to be extramedullary plasmacytoma. This report discusses the clinical, radiographic, histological, and immunohistochemical features of extramedullary plasmacytoma. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  5. A New Less Invasive Technique for Multiple-Level Spontaneous Spinal Epidural Hematomas: Wash-and-Go Technique.

    PubMed

    Tanriverdi, Osman; Gungor, Abuzer; Coban, Mustafa Kemal; Okay, Onder; Kamaci, Umit

    2017-03-01

    Aim Spinal epidural hematomas are rare entity in neurosurgery practice. Most of them are spontaneous due to anticoagulant therapy and called spontaneous spinal epidural hematomas (SSEHs). Laminectomy or hemilaminectomy for affected levels is still the first choice in the operative treatment of an SSEH. We describe a new less invasive surgical technique, performing single-level laminectomy and washing with 0.9% sodium chloride through a thin soft catheter for a 12-level thoracic-cervical SSEH in a patient under anticoagulant therapy. Patient and Operative Technique A 55-year-old woman was brought to the emergency department with a rapid onset of pain in her upper back and both legs with weakness of her lower extremities. An urgent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the whole spine showed a SEH. During the operation, after T2 laminectomy, a thin soft catheter was epidurally placed under the T1 lamina and gently pushed forward rostrally. Then continuous saline irrigation was utilized and aspiration made via the catheter to wash out the hematoma. Drainage of blood was observed. The procedure was performed for 15 minutes. Then the catheter was epidurally placed under the T3 lamina, and the procedure for the hematoma in the lower segment was repeated. Decompression of spinal cord and nerve roots was observed. Result Postoperative early MRI of the thoracic-cervical spine showed gross total evacuation of the SEH. Accordingly, the patient's muscle strength improved. Conclusion Although multiple laminectomy or hemilaminectomy for affected levels to evacuate the hematoma and decompress the spinal cord is the main choice of surgical treatment, single-level laminectomy and irrigation plus aspiration via a thin soft catheter can be performed successfully with good results in SSEH.

  6. Splenic abscess and multiple brain abscesses caused by Streptococcus intermedius in a young healthy man.

    PubMed

    Maliyil, Jepsin; Caire, William; Nair, Rajasree; Bridges, Debbie

    2011-07-01

    We report a case of splenic abscess with multiple brain abscesses caused by Streptococcus intermedius in a healthy young man without any identifiable risk factors, which resolved with percutaneous drainage and antibiotics. Streptococcus intermedius, a member of the Streptococcus anginosus group, is a common commensal organism of the oral cavity and gastrointestinal tract, and it is a known cause of deep-seated infections. Suppurative infections caused by Streptococcus anginosus group are sometimes associated with bacteremia, but hematogenous spread of infection from an occult source leading to concurrent splenic abscess and multiple brain abscesses has never been previously reported in a healthy young individual.

  7. Analysis and evaluation of the effectiveness of epidural analgesia and its relationship with eutocic or dystocic delivery.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Migallón, V; Sánchez, E; Raynard, M; Miranda, A; Borràs, R M

    Numerous studies have demonstrated the difference in the verbal rating scale with regard to obstructed labour and induced labour, so that obstructed labour and foetal macrosomia have been related to a greater sensation of pain during labour, particularly in the first stage. Even the epidural analgesia is linked to the need for instrumented or caesarean section due to foetal obstruction. The goal of the study is to analyze and evaluate the effectiveness of epidural analgesia in normal versus obstructed labour. One hundred and eighty pregnant women were included in an observational, analytical, longitudinal and prospective study, that was performed in the Obstetrics Department of the Hospital Universitario Dexeus. All the nulliparous or multiparous over 36 weeks of pregnancy, after 3cm of cervical dilatation in spontaneous or induced labor were included. All the patients were given epidural analgesia according to protocol. The basic descriptive methods were used for the univariate statistical analysis of the sample and the Mann-Whitney U test was used for the comparison of means between both groups. The correlations between variables were studied by means of the Spearman coefficient of correlation. The differences regarded as statistically significant are those whose P<.05. In our population there were no statistically significant differences in the effectiveness of epidural analgesia in normal versus obstructed labour. Patients who got epidural analgesia and had obstructed labors have the same degree of verbal rating scale as patients that do not had obstructed labors (P>.05). Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Anestesiología, Reanimación y Terapéutica del Dolor. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  8. [Clinical use of spinal or epidural steroids].

    PubMed

    Marinangeli, F; Ciccozzi, A; Donatelli, F; Paladini, A; Varrassi, G

    2002-01-01

    Steroids, drugs with potent antiinflammatory properties on the damaged nervous roots, have been especially used as adjuvants of local anesthetics, by spinal route, in the treatments of low-back pain. Spinal route was chosen to obtain a higher local concentration of drug, with few systemic side effects and to improve drug's action mechanism. Steroids seem to interact with GABA receptors and thus control neural excitability through a stabilising effect on membranes, modification of nervous conduction and membrane hyperpolarization, in supraspinal and spinal site. Epidural steroids are especially used in the treatment of low back pain due to irritation of nervous roots. They have been administered alone or in association with local anesthetics and/or saline solution. Slow release formulations have been generally used (methylprednisolone acetate, and triamcinolone diacetate). Other indications of epidural steroids are: postoperative hemilaminectomy pain, prevention of post herpetic neuralgia, degenerative ostheoartrithis. Intra-thecal steroids have been frequently used in the treatment of lumbar radiculopathy due to discopathy, as an alternative treatment when epidural administration is ineffective. Positive results have been obtained with methylprednisolone acetate, alone or in association with local anesthetics. Complications related to intraspinal steroids injections are due to execution of the block and side effects of drugs. Complications associated with intrathecal steroids are more frequent and severe than epidural injections and include: adhesive arachnoiditis, aseptic meningitis, cauda equina syndrome. Steroidal toxicity seems to be related to the polyethylenic glycole vehicle. Anyway, slow release formulations contain less concentrated polyethylenic glycole. The epidural administration, a correct dilution of steroid with local anesthetics solution and/or saline solution, and a limited number of injections (no more than three) allows a significant reduction of

  9. [Pyogenic sacroiliitis complicated by iliopsoas muscle abscess].

    PubMed

    Gabrielli, Giovanni B; Stanzial, Anna Maria; Cassini, Marco; Corrocher, Roberto

    2004-03-01

    Both pyogenic sacroiliitis and iliopsoas muscle abscess are uncommon infectious entities, and their coexinstence has been reported in very few patients. We present here the case of a woman who developed a large iliopsoas abscess as a consequence of a pyogenic sacroiliitis, initially misdiagnosed as a common sciatica and treated with corticosteroids. The patient was cured by the surgical drainage of the abscess and a long-lasting antibiotic treatment. We discuss diagnostic difficulties linked to the two infectious entities, their possible pathogenic connections, the role of imaging procedures, and therapeutic options. We conclude that pyogenic sacroiliitis and the potential evolution to an iliopsoas abscess must be taken into consideration in the differential diagnosis of lower back pain, especially if fever is a concomitant sign.

  10. Pyogenic liver abscess caused by Gemella morbillorum.

    PubMed

    Borro, Paolo; Sumberaz, Alessandro; Testino, Gianni

    2014-01-01

    Even though Gemella morbillorum infection (GMI) is rare in humans, it may nevertheless, cause endocarditis, meningitis, brain abscess, pleural empyema, nephritis, mediastinitis, and--occasionally--liver abscess. We are describing the case of a 64-years-old Caucasian male admitted with fever and abdominal pain. Laboratory parameters revealed inflammation signs, and instrumental examinations showed the presence of diverticula in the ascending colon. Abdominal ultrasound (US) and computer tomography (CT) showed two focal lesions in the right liver lobe. One had the characteristics of a simple cyst; the second was hypoechoic with a low density area, possibly containing necrotic material. US-guided needle biopsy was found negative for neoplastic cells, showing purulent infiltrate. Pus culture was found positive for GMI. Systemic antibiotic therapy coupled with repeated US-guided needle aspiration, induced the resolution of the hepatic abscess. Few cases have been reported of hepatic abscess caused by GMI in immunocompetent non-cirrhotic subjects.

  11. Amebic Abscess of the Liver: Surgical Aspects

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Jesse E.; Doty, Jeff; Wittenstein, George J.; DenBesten, Lawrence

    1982-01-01

    During the past five years, ten documented cases of hepatic amebic abscess have required surgical intervention at Olive View Hospital, Van Nuys, California. Three of the patients underwent laparotomy when an hepatic abscess ruptured into the peritoneal cavity, and two required surgical intervention when an abscess invaded adjacent organs. Another abscess continued to enlarge despite metronidazole therapy and still another became superinfected with bacteria. In the remaining three patients, surgical procedure would have been avoided if the correct diagnosis had been made. In fact, the preoperative diagnosis in five cases was acute appendicitis. All patients survived. The incidence of Entamoeba histolytica infestation is increasing in our community. Although most patients rapidly improve with metronidazole therapy, surgical complications do arise and diagnoses are missed. This series of cases emphasizes the need for surgeons working in Southern California to familiarize themselves with the clinical features, complications and appropriate surgical treatment of amebiasis. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2. PMID:7064468

  12. Orbital Plasmacytoma Mimicking an Orbital Abscess.

    PubMed

    Russell, David J; Seiff, Stuart R

    An 83-year-old male with a 15-month history of multiple myeloma presented with acute onset of swelling, redness, and pain around his right eye. CT scan was consistent with an orbital abscess. The patient was taken to the operating room for drainage of the orbital abscess. Abnormal tissue was encountered intraoperatively so biopsies were taken. His cultures grew only one colony of coagulase-negative Staphylococcus aureus. The histopathology from the biopsies showed a CD-138 positive plasma cell neoplasia consistent with a plasmacytoma. Plasmacytomas have been reported to present as orbital cellulitis and as abscesses in other locations in the body, but to our knowledge, this is the first case of a plasmacytoma presenting as an orbital abscess.

  13. Brain abscesses during Proteus vulgaris bacteremia.

    PubMed

    Bloch, Jennifer; Lemaire, Xavier; Legout, Laurence; Ferriby, Didier; Yazdanpanah, Yazdan; Senneville, Eric

    2011-08-01

    Proteus vulgaris is only rarely the cause of multiple septic metastases. We describe multiple brain abscesses due to P. vulgaris in an immunocompetent patient successfully treated by antibiotic therapy and colonectomy.

  14. Pancreatic abscess secondary to Alcaligenes faecalis.

    PubMed

    Ashwath, Mahi Lakshmi; Katner, Harold P

    2005-01-01

    We report a patient with pancreatic abscesses and necrosis secondary to Alcaligenes faecalis infection. He initially presented with alcohol-induced acute pancreatitis. Twenty days after the initial presentation, he re-presented with increasing pain and was found to have pancreatic necrosis and abscesses. Treatment was initiated with meropenem. Because of persistent fevers, computed tomography-guided drainage was performed. The fluid grew A faecalis resistant to meropenem and the patient continued to be febrile. He recovered only after adequate surgical intervention and appropriate antibiotic coverage. Although this is the first case of A faecalis reported to cause pancreatic abscess, we believe selection of this organism occurred because surgical drainage was delayed while the patient was on the recommended treatment with meropenem. This case emphasizes the need for early surgical drainage of pancreatic abscesses to avoid the selection of such resistant pathogens.

  15. [Latex agglutination test in amebic liver abscess].

    PubMed

    Gómez Maganda y Silva, T; García Carrizosa, R; Torres Valadez, F; Ortiz Ramírez, E; Villaseñor de la Parra, C; Flores González, A; Gómez García, E

    1978-01-01

    Amebic hepatic abscesses are one of the most frequent and serious complications of intestinal amibiasis. Although many methods exists with which the diagnosis can be made, frequently problems do arise. Serologic reactions play an important role in the diagnosis of amebic hepatic abscess. Among the most useful of the serological tests, is that which evaluates agglutination with latex particles. Latex agglutination was positive in 98.5% of 200 cases of proved amebic hepatic abscess. The pros and cons of the utility of this test compared with other serological tests are discussed. It is concluded that or the especialist as well as the general practicioner latex agglutination can be extremely useful in the diagnosis of amebic hepatic abscess.

  16. Fatal thalamic abscess secondary to dental infection.

    PubMed

    Basyuni, Shadi; Sharma, Valmiki; Santhanam, Vijay; Ferro, Ashley

    2015-12-17

    We present the case of poor neurological recovery and subsequent death secondary to a thalamic abscess in a 53-year-old man. This patient initially presented with sudden dysarthria and left hemiparesis while driving. Neuroimaging showed a multilobular abscess involving the right thalamus with oedema extending to the basal ganglionic region and brainstem. The source of the abscess was initially unknown and it required draining multiple times while the different causes were being explored. The patient's neurological state along with intubation made for a difficult and inconclusive oral examination. It was only after neuroimaging included tooth-bearing areas that it became evident that this patient had extensive periodontal disease with multiple areas of periapical radiolucencies. The patient underwent complete dental clearance alongside repeated drainage of the abscess. Despite initial postoperative improvement, the patient never recovered from the neurological damage and died 3 weeks later.

  17. Antibiotics Improve Treatment of Skin Abscesses

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Human Services. More Health News on Antibiotics Skin Conditions Recent Health News Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Abscess Antibiotics Skin Conditions About MedlinePlus Site Map FAQs Customer Support ...

  18. Hepatic hydatid cyst presenting as cutaneous abscess.

    PubMed

    Islam, M N; Khan, N A; Haque, S S; Hossain, M; Ahad, M A

    2012-01-01

    Hydatidosis is a parasitic zoonotic echinococcal infection that affects both humans and other mammals. These diseases are common worldwide but particularly common in sheep and cattle farming regions. Anaphylaxis mediated by IgE is a serious complication of surgery or trauma which necessitates more aware of its clinical features, diagnosis and management. It is important to make a preoperative diagnosis based on the typical image findings, so that particular precaution can be taken not to rupture the lesion. A woman presented with a right upper quadrant cutaneous abscess. USG reveals multiple cystic lesions in the liver arranged in cartwheel appearance, CT disclosed a cystic lesions having daughter cysts, marginal calcifications, marginal enhancement and contiguous abdominal wall abscess, which led to a diagnosis of complicated hepatic hydatid cysts with abdominal wall abscess formation. FNAC showed scolices surrounded by chronic inflammatory cells. Abdominal wall abscess may be a presentation of hydatid liver disease.

  19. Combined spinal-epidural analgesia for labor pain: best timing of epidural infusion following spinal dose.

    PubMed

    Okutomi, Toshiyuki; Saito, Miwako; Mochizuki, Junko; Kuczkowski, Krzysztof M

    2009-03-01

    The combined spinal-epidural analgesia (CSEA) technique for labor pain has attained wide spread popularity in obstetric anesthesia. The onset of analgesia is rapid and reliable, and maternal satisfaction is very high. However, the best timing of an epidural infusion following the spinal dose and its effect on the total local anesthetics consumption has not been well determined. A total of 144 consenting healthy nulliparous parturients whose labor was induced and who labored under regional analgesia were enrolled in this study. Following induction of the CSEA with intrathecal injection of bupivacaine, 2.5 mg and fentanyl, 25 microg, the patients were randomized into one of four groups to receive a subsequent continuous epidural infusion [E (3), E (30), E (60) and E (90)], depending on the timing of the initiation of epidural infusion of 0.1% ropivacaine, 0.0002% fentanyl and 1:500,000 epinephrine at the rate of 10 ml/h. In study Groups E (3), E (30), E (60) and E (90), epidural infusion was initiated 3, 30, 60 and 90 min, respectively following spinal induction dose. Patients requesting additional labor analgesia were given an epidural bolus (8 ml) of ropivacaine, 0.2%. The number of parturients requesting additional boluses of ropivacaine and the total dose of ropivacaine required for labor analgesia were registered. The numbers of patients who required additional boluses of ropivacaine in Group E (3) and Group E (30) were significantly less than those in Group E (60) and Group E (90). The total dose of ropivacaine required for labor pain in Group E (3) and Group E (30) was insignificantly smaller than the total dose required in Group E (60) and Group E (90). Our results suggest that the best timing of epidural infusion following spinal dose was within 30 min of spinal induction dose.

  20. [The efficacy and safety of continuous epidural analgesia versus intradural-epidural analgesia during labor].

    PubMed

    Gómez, P; Echevarría, M; Calderón, J; Caba, F; Martínez, A; Rodríguez, R

    2001-05-01

    To determine the efficacy and safety of intradural-epidural analgesia in comparison with continuous epidural analgesia during labor and childbirth. Forty-two women whose labor began spontaneously were enrolled and distributed randomly in two groups. The intradural-epidural analgesia group (IEA, n = 21) received 25 microgram of intradural fentanyl with 2.5 mg of isobaric bupivacaine with adrenalin, after which analgesia was maintained with epidural administration of one 8 mL bolus of 0.125% bupivacaine, followed by perfusion of a balanced concentration at a rate of 8 ml/h. Patients in the continuous epidural analgesia group (CEA, n = 21) were given 8 ml of 0.25% bupivacaine with adrenalin; the epidural perfusion of 0.125% bupivacaine and 1 microgram/ml of fentanyl was started at the same rate as in the IEA group. We recorded pain as assessed on a visual analog scale, extension of sensory and motor block, maternal hemodynamic constants, number of boluses of bupivacaine used, total doses of bupivacaine and oxytocin, instruments needed for childbirth, and side effects (pruritus, nausea and vomiting). Analgesic efficacy during the first 30 minutes was greater in the IEA group. The total dose of bupivacaine, required top-up boluses, and the extension of sensory block at 30 minutes, one hour and two hours were also significantly less in the IEA group. The incidence of pruritus was higher in the IEA group. No significant differences were observed for other variables. Intradural-epidural analgesia provides effective analgesia for labor, with rapid onset, reduced extension of sensory block, lower total doses of local anesthetics and few side effects.

  1. Cervical pneumatocyst.

    PubMed

    Hoover, Jason M; Wenger, Doris E; Eckel, Laurence J; Krauss, William E

    2011-09-01

    The authors present the case of a 56-year-old right hand-dominant woman who was referred for chronic neck pain and a second opinion regarding a cervical lesion. The patient's pain was localized to the subaxial spine in the midline. She reported a subjective sense of intermittent left arm weakness manifesting as difficulty manipulating small objects with her hands and fingers. She also reported paresthesias and numbness in the left hand. Physical and neurological examinations demonstrated no abnormal findings except for a positive Tinel sign over the left median nerve at the wrist. Electromyography demonstrated bilateral carpal tunnel syndrome with no cervical radiculopathy. Cervical spine imaging demonstrated multilevel degenerative disc disease and a pneumatocyst of the C-5 vertebral body. The alignment of the cervical spine was normal. A review of the patient's cervical imaging studies obtained in 1995, 2007, 2008, and 2010 demonstrated that the pneumatocyst was not present in 1995 but was present in 2007. The lesion had not changed in appearance since 2007. At an outside institution, multilevel fusion of the cervical spine was recommended to treat the pneumatocyst prior to evaluation at the authors' institution. The authors, however, did not think that the pneumatocyst was the cause of the patient's neck pain, and cervical pneumatocysts typically have a benign course. As such, the authors recommended conservative management and repeated MR imaging in 6 months. Splinting was used to treat the patient's carpal tunnel syndrome.

  2. Abscess and empyema caused by Legionella micdadei.

    PubMed Central

    Halberstam, M; Isenberg, H D; Hilton, E

    1992-01-01

    Legionella micdadei is the second most common species implicated in the occurrence of Legionella pneumonia (D. J. Bremer, Semin. Respir. Infect. 4:190-205, 1987). Although there has been a reported lung abscess caused by dual infection (L. micdadei and L. pneumophila), there are no known cases of L. micdadei as the only causative organism. We report a case of a patient with a lung abscess from which L. micdadei was the sole organism isolated. PMID:1537927

  3. [Splenic abscess: etiology, diagnosis and possible therapeutics].

    PubMed

    Burnier, C; Ribordy-Baudat, V; Lamy, O

    2007-10-31

    We report the case of a 28-year-old intravenous drug abuser under quadritherapy for stage C3 AIDS and with past history of infectious endocarditis. He was admitted with a diminished general condition, weight loss, progressive unbearable abdominal pain and vomiting, without fever. An inflammatory syndrome is noted and imaging reveals a voluminous splenic abscess. Conservative treatment is initiated with repetitive drainages and intravenous antibiotics. Aetiologies, diagnosis and possible therapeutics of splenic abscesses are discussed.

  4. Acute Abdomen Caused by Brucellar Hepatic Abscess.

    PubMed

    Koca, Yavuz Savas; Barut, Ibrahim; Koca, Tugba; Kaya, Onur; Aktas, Recep Aykut

    2016-01-01

    Brucellosis, a zoonosis that is common worldwide, is endemic in many countries, primarily those of the Mediterranean region (including Turkey). Human brucellosis is a systemic infection with a wide clinical spectrum. Although hepatic involvement is very common during the course of chronic brucellosis, hepatic abscess is a very rare complication of Brucella spp. infection. We present a case of hepatic abscess caused by Brucella melitensis, which resembled the clinical presentation of surgical acute abdomen. © The American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.

  5. Acute Abdomen Caused by Brucellar Hepatic Abscess

    PubMed Central

    Koca, Yavuz Savas; Barut, Ibrahim; Koca, Tugba; Kaya, Onur; Aktas, Recep Aykut

    2016-01-01

    Brucellosis, a zoonosis that is common worldwide, is endemic in many countries, primarily those of the Mediterranean region (including Turkey). Human brucellosis is a systemic infection with a wide clinical spectrum. Although hepatic involvement is very common during the course of chronic brucellosis, hepatic abscess is a very rare complication of Brucella spp. infection. We present a case of hepatic abscess caused by Brucella melitensis, which resembled the clinical presentation of surgical acute abdomen. PMID:26526924

  6. Pseudotumoral hepatic tuberculosis with pericardial abscess.

    PubMed

    Mutreja, Deepti; Nangia, Rattan; Mishra, Pratibha

    2010-01-01

    We report the postmortem findings in a 28-year-old immunocompetent male patient, a rare case of tuberculous liver abscesses with concomitant pericardial abscess in the absence of pleuropulmonary or splenic involvement, who continued to be a diagnostic dilemma. This case report illustrates the difficulty in reaching the correct diagnosis in case of hepatic masses, which are most often confused with carcinoma of the liver, primary or metastatic and, hence, have been aptly referred to as pseudotumoral hepatic tuberculosis in the past.

  7. Bacillus cereus causing intratumoral brain abscess.

    PubMed

    Saigal, Karnika; Gautam, Vikas; Singh, Gagandeep; Ray, Pallab

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of intratumoral brain abscess due to Bacillus cereus in an adult male patient, which was managed successfully with excision of lesion and piperacillin-tazobactam for the duration of 5 weeks. To the best of our knowledge, this is a first case report of B. cereus infection leading to intratumoral brain abscess in a patient with a history of steroid administration by the intravenous route.

  8. Abdominal wall abscess secondary to spontaneous rupture of pyogenic liver abscess.

    PubMed

    Zizzo, Maurizio; Zaghi, Claudia; Manenti, Antonio; Luppi, Davide; Ugoletti, Lara; Bonilauri, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    Pyogenic liver abscess is a rare cause of hospitalization, related to a mortality rate ranging between 15% and 19%. Treatment of choice is represented by image-guided percutaneous drainage in combination with antibiotic therapy but, in some selected cases, surgical treatment is necessary. In extremely rare cases, spontaneous rupture of liver abscess may occur, free in the peritoneal cavity or in neighboring organs, an event which is generally considered a surgical emergency. A 95-years-old woman was hospitalized with fever, upper abdominal pain, mild dyspepsia and massive swelling of the anterior abdominal wall. Computed tomography revealed an oval mass located in the abdominal wall of 12cm×14cm×7cm, in continuity with an abscess of the left hepatic lobe. Because Proteus mirabilis was detected in both the liver abscess and the abdominal wall abscess, the patient was diagnosed with a ruptured pyogenic liver abscess. After spontaneous drainage to the exterior of the hepato-parietal abscess, she was successfully treated with antibiotics alone. Pyogenic liver abscess is a serious and life-threatening illness. Abscess rupture might occur. Many authors consider this complication a surgical emergency, but the site of abscess rupture changes the clinical history of the disease: in case of free rupture into the peritoneum, emergency surgery is mandatory, while a rupture localized in neighboring tissues or organs can be successfully treated by a combination of systemic antibiotics and fine needle aspiration and/or percutaneous drainage of the abscess. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  9. Scrotal abscess: Varied etiology, associations, and management

    PubMed Central

    Ramareddy, Raghu S.; Alladi, Anand

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To report a series of scrotal abscess, a rare problem, their etiology, and management. Materials and Methods: A retrospective study of children who presented with scrotal abscess between January 2010 and March 2015, analyzed with respect to clinical features, pathophysiology of spread and management. Results: Eight infants and a 3-year-old phenotypically male child presented with scrotal abscess as a result of abdominal pathologies which included mixed gonadal dysgenesis (MGD) [1]; three anorectal malformations with ectopic ureter [1], urethral stricture [1], and neurogenic bladder [1]; meconium peritonitis with meconium periorchitis [2], ileal atresia [1], and intra-abdominal abscess [1]; posturethroplasty for Y urethral duplication with metal stenosis [1] and idiopathic pyocele [1]. Transmission of the organism had varied routes include fallopian tube [1], urethra ejaculatory reflux [4], hematogenous [2], and the patent process of vaginalis [2]. Two of the nine required extensive evaluation for further management. Treating the predisposing pathology resolved scrotal abscesses in eight of nine patients, one of whom, required vasectomy additionally. Idiopathic pyocele responded to needle aspiration and antibiotics. Conclusion: Scrotal abscess needs a high index of suspicion for predisposing pathology, especially in infants. Laparoscopy is safe and effective in the management of the MGD and ectopic ureter. PMID:27695207

  10. The effect of bupivacaine with fentanyl temperature on initiation and maintenance of labor epidural analgesia: a randomized controlled study.

    PubMed

    Sviggum, H P; Yacoubian, S; Liu, X; Tsen, L C

    2015-02-01

    Labor epidural analgesia is highly effective, but can be limited by slow onset and incomplete blockade. The administration of warmed, compared to room temperature, bupivacaine has resulted in more rapid onset epidural anesthesia. We hypothesized that the administration of bupivacaine with fentanyl at 37°C versus 20°C would result in improved initial and ongoing labor epidural analgesia. In this prospective, randomized, doubled blinded study, 54 nulliparous, laboring women were randomized to receive epidural bupivacaine 0.125% with fentanyl 2 μg/mL (20 mL initial and 6 mL hourly boluses) at either 37°C or 20°C. Pain verbal rating scores (VRS), sensory level, oral temperature, and side effects were assessed after epidural loading (time 0), at 5, 10, 15, 20, 30, 60 min, and at hourly intervals. The primary outcome was the time to achieve initial satisfactory analgesia (VRS ⩽3). Secondary outcomes included ongoing quality of sensory blockade, body temperature and shivering. There were no differences between groups in patient demographics, initial pain scores, cervical dilatation, body temperature or mode of delivery. Epidural bupivacaine at 37°C resulted in shorter mean (±SD) analgesic onset time (9.2±4.7 vs. 16.0±10.5 min, P=0.005) and improved analgesia for the first 15 min after initial bolus (P=0.001-0.03). Although patient temperature increased during the study (P<0.01), there were no differences between the groups (P=0.09). Six (24%) and 10 (40%) patients experienced shivering in the 37°C and 20°C groups, respectively (P=0.23). The administration of epidural 0.125% bupivacaine with fentanyl 2μg/mL at 37°C versus 20°C resulted in more rapid onset and improved labor analgesia for the first 15 min. There was no evidence of improved ongoing labor analgesia or differences in side effects between groups. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Effects of epidural anaesthesia on intestinal oxygenation in pigs.

    PubMed

    Vagts, D A; Iber, T; Szabo, B; Haberstroh, J; Reising, K; Puccini, M; Geiger, K; Nöldge-Schomburg, G F E

    2003-02-01

    Perioperative intestinal hypoperfusion is a major contributing factor leading to organ dysfunction. It can be caused by stress as a result of surgical manipulation or hypoxia. Additionally, anaesthesia can affect intestinal oxygenation. This animal study was designed to assess the effects of reduced regional sympathetic nervous activity induced by thoracic epidural anaesthesia on intestinal oxygenation. After ethical approval, 16 anaesthetized and acutely instrumented pigs were randomly assigned to two groups (epidural anaesthesia alone vs epidural anaesthesia plus volume loading). The epidural anaesthesia aimed for a T5-T12 block. Measurements were at baseline and after 1 and 2 h. Epidural anaesthesia was associated with a decrease in mean arterial blood pressure and pronounced mesenteric vasodilatation. Mesenteric blood flow did not change. Intestinal oxygen uptake, mucosal tissue oxygen partial pressure and tissue carbon dioxide partial pressure remained unchanged. Despite marked systemic hypotension, epidural anaesthesia did not affect intestinal oxygenation. There was no benefit obtained from volume loading.

  12. Chronic adhesive arachnoiditis after repeat epidural blood patch.

    PubMed

    Carlswärd, C; Darvish, B; Tunelli, J; Irestedt, L

    2015-08-01

    Epidural blood patching is an effective treatment for postdural puncture headache but has potential risks. Arachnoiditis is a very rare disabling condition and few cases have been described following an epidural blood patch. We present a case of chronic adhesive arachnoiditis in a parturient treated with a repeat epidural blood patch. A healthy 29-year-old woman had an accidental dural puncture following epidural insertion during labour. Initial treatment of postdural puncture headache with an epidural blood patch was ineffective and was therefore repeated. She gradually developed severe neurological symptoms consistent with arachnoiditis confirmed with magnetic resonance imaging. Despite intensive multimodal treatment with analgesics and physiotherapy, her neurological condition remains unresolved two years later. This serious but rare complication should encourage caution when treating parturients with postdural puncture headache with a repeat epidural blood patch.

  13. Determinants of death in patients with intraabdominal abscess.

    PubMed

    Fry, D E; Garrison, R N; Heitsch, R C; Calhoun, K; Polk, H C

    1980-10-01

    To better define determinants of death in patients with intraabdominal abscess, 143 patients from a 5-year hospital experience were reviewed. Abscesses were most commonly results of trauma, spontaneous gastrointestinal perforations, and technical errors. Clinical presentation of abscess was quite variable as were criteria to justify reoperation for drainage. Abscesses occurred most commonly in the subphrenic space, pelvis, or subhepatic space. Complete abdominal exploration was employed most frequently for drainage. Those factors that were associated with a fatal outcome were: organ failure (P < 0.001), lesser sac abscess (P < 0.001), positive blood culture (P < 0.01), recurrent and/or persistent abscess (P < 0.01), multiple abscesses (P pE 0.01), age > 50 years (P < 0.03), and subhepatic abscess (P < 0.03). These data suggest that deaths from abdominal abscess are consequences of ineffective surgical drainage and failure of host defense mechanisms.

  14. Management and visualization of a kinked epidural catheter

    PubMed Central

    Aslanidis, T; Fileli, A; Pyrgos, P

    2010-01-01

    A lumbar epidural catheter inserted in a 29-year-old woman for labor analgesia. The catheter failed to provide adequate analgesia. Moreover, after labor, it proved difficult to be removed. After computer tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance impedance (MRI) examination the course of the catheter was visible, the entrapped catheter was dislodged intact, revealing a kinking near its distal tip. Kinking of an epidural catheter leading to entrapment is an unusual complication of epidural catheterization. PMID:21311644

  15. [Spinal cord compression by tumor with onset following epidural catheterization].

    PubMed

    Ruiz Garés, T; Mateo, J M; Longás Valién, J; Aisa Hernández, G; Cía Blasco, P; Cuartero Lobera, J

    2008-02-01

    We report the case of a 16-year-old boy with a pelvic tumor who developed signs of spinal cord compression following placement of a lumbar epidural catheter to obtain a percutaneous biopsy. The fact that a catheter had been inserted led us to suspect epidural hematoma as a complication, but surgery revealed that the pelvic tumor had spread to the lumbar epidural space and was causing motor blockade of both legs.

  16. Retrosternal abscess after trigger point injections in a pregnant woman: a case report.

    PubMed

    Usman, Faisal; Bajwa, Abubakr; Shujaat, Adil; Cury, James

    2011-08-23

    Although retrosternal abscess is a well known complication of sternotomy and intravenous drug abuse, to date it has not been described as a consequence of trigger point injections. There are reported cases of serious complications as a result of this procedure including epidural abscess, necrotizing fasciitis, osteomyelitis and gas gangrene. A 37-year-old African-American woman, who was 20 weeks pregnant, presented to our emergency room with complaints of progressively worsening chest pain and shortness of breath over the course of the last two months. She was undergoing trigger point injections at multiple different sites including the sternoclavicular joint for chest pain and dystonia. Two years previously she had developed a left-sided pneumothorax as a result of this procedure, requiring chest tube placement and subsequent pleurodesis. Her vital signs in our emergency room were normal except for resting tachycardia, with a pulse of 100 beats per minute. A physical examination revealed swelling and tenderness of the sternal notch with tenderness to palpation over the left sternoclavicular joint. Laboratory data was significant for a white blood count of 13.3 × 109/L with 82% granulocytes. A chest radiograph revealed left basilar scarring with blunting of the left costophrenic angle. A computed tomography angiogram showed a 4.7 cm abscess in the retrosternal region behind the manubrium with associated sclerosis and cortical irregularity of the manubrium and left clavicle. Trigger point injection is generally considered very safe. However, there are reported cases of serious complications as a result of this procedure. A computed tomography scan of the chest should strongly be considered in the evaluation of chest pain and shortness of breath of unclear etiology in patients with even a remote history of trigger point injections.

  17. Effect of combined spinal-epidural analgesia versus epidural analgesia on labor and delivery duration.

    PubMed

    Pascual-Ramirez, Javier; Haya, Javier; Pérez-López, Faustino R; Gil-Trujillo, Silvia; Garrido-Esteban, Rosa A; Bernal, Ginés

    2011-09-01

    To determine whether combined spinal-epidural analgesia (CSEA) can decrease the known epidural effect of lengthening delivery. Between April and May 2010, 144 women undergoing childbirth in hospital with epidural pain relief were randomized to receive either low-dose epidural analgesia (LEA) or CSEA. The spinal component included 2.5mg of bupivacaine, 25 μg of fentanyl, and 200 μg of morphine. The epidural component of the CSEA procedure was started once pain returned. The primary outcome was total labor duration measured from the time of initiation of labor analgesia to delivery. The difference in duration between LEA (n=72) and CSEA (n=72) was 5 minutes for labor (P=0.82), 2 minutes for delivery (P=0.60), and 7 minutes for total labor duration (P=0.75). The combined group used less levobupivacaine (P<0.001) and had lower sensory blockade at the dermatomal level (P=0.037). Women in the CSEA group had a higher incidence of pruritus (P=0.002) and lightheadedness (P=0.02) during labor; and a higher incidence of pruritus (P=0.002), nausea-vomiting (P=0.026), and drowsiness (P=0.003) in the postpartum period. As compared with LEA, CSEA did not shorten the duration of labor length; however, it did reduce levobupivacaine consumption and motor weakness. Copyright © 2011 International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Hepatic abscess: Diagnosis and management.

    PubMed

    Lardière-Deguelte, S; Ragot, E; Amroun, K; Piardi, T; Dokmak, S; Bruno, O; Appere, F; Sibert, A; Hoeffel, C; Sommacale, D; Kianmanesh, R

    2015-09-01

    Microbial contamination of the liver parenchyma leading to hepatic abscess (HA) can occur via the bile ducts or vessels (arterial or portal) or directly, by contiguity. Infection is usually bacterial, sometimes parasitic, or very rarely fungal. In the Western world, bacterial (pyogenic) HA is most prevalent; the mortality is high approaching 15%, due mostly to patient debilitation and persistence of the underlying cause. In South-East Asia and Africa, amebic infection is the most frequent cause. The etiologies of HA are multiple including lithiasic biliary disease (cholecystitis, cholangitis), intra-abdominal collections (appendicitis, sigmoid diverticulitis, Crohn's disease), and bile duct ischemia secondary to pancreatoduodenectomy, liver transplantation, interventional techniques (radio-frequency ablation, intra-arterial chemo-embolization), and/or liver trauma. More rarely, HA occurs in the wake of septicemia either on healthy or preexisting liver diseases (biliary cysts, hydatid cyst, cystic or necrotic metastases). The incidence of HA secondary to Klebsiella pneumoniae is increasing and can give rise to other distant septic metastases. The diagnosis of HA depends mainly on imaging (sonography and/or CT scan), with confirmation by needle aspiration for bacteriology studies. The therapeutic strategy consists of bactericidal antibiotics, adapted to the germs, sometimes in combination with percutaneous or surgical drainage, and control of the primary source. The presence of bile in the aspirate or drainage fluid attests to communication with the biliary tree and calls for biliary MRI looking for obstruction. When faced with HA, the attending physician should seek advice from a multi-specialty team including an interventional radiologist, a hepatobiliary surgeon and an infectious disease specialist. This should help to determine the origin and mechanisms responsible for the abscess, and to then propose the best appropriate treatment. The presence of chronic

  19. Cervical cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... therapy: Uses light to burn abnormal tissue A hysterectomy (surgery to remove the uterus but not the ... for more advanced cervical cancer may include: Radical hysterectomy, which removes the uterus and much of the ...

  20. Cervical Cap

    MedlinePlus

    ... and remove the cap. How Much Does It Cost? A cervical cap costs about $70 and should be replaced every year. In addition, there is also the cost of the doctor's visit. Many health insurance plans ...

  1. Cervical Stenosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Dictionary Also of Interest (Quiz) Overview of the Female Reproductive System (Video) Cervical Dysplasia (News) Antiperspirant Use Seems Safe ... version Also of Interest Test your knowledge The female reproductive system consists of the external and internal genital organs. ...

  2. Cervical Myomas

    MedlinePlus

    ... Dictionary Also of Interest (Quiz) Overview of the Female Reproductive System (Video) Cervical Dysplasia (News) Antiperspirant Use Seems Safe ... version Also of Interest Test your knowledge The female reproductive system consists of the external and internal genital organs. ...

  3. Cervical Cap

    MedlinePlus

    ... Staff The cervical cap is a birth control (contraceptive) device that prevents sperm from entering the uterus. ... more times a week, you've had previous contraceptive failure with vaginal barrier methods or you're ...

  4. Cervical dysplasia

    MedlinePlus

    ... by your provider. Make sure to get the HPV vaccine when it is offered to you. This vaccine ... Ask your provider about the HPV vaccine . Girls who receive this ... their chance of getting cervical cancer. You can reduce your ...

  5. Cervical spondylosis

    MedlinePlus

    Cervical osteoarthritis; Arthritis - neck; Neck arthritis; Chronic neck pain; Degenerative disk disease ... nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory medicines (NSAIDs) for long-term pain control. Opioids may be prescribed if the pain is severe ...

  6. Cervical Cerclage

    MedlinePlus

    ... cerclage). Typically, the stitches are removed at around week 37 of pregnancy. Your health care provider might ... prior spontaneous premature birth at less than 34 weeks, and, upon ultrasound exam, a short cervical length ( ...

  7. [Septic shock associated with pyogenic liver abscess rescued with percutaneous transhepatic abscess drainage].

    PubMed

    Mizuno, Ju; Tsujikawa, Tetsuya; Wakuta, Akiko; Matsuki, Michiko; Morita, Tsubasa; Gouda, Yoshinori

    2003-01-01

    We report a case of septic shock associated with pyogenic liver abscess rescued with percutaneous transhepatic abscess drainage (PTAD). A 70-year-old male patient was admitted to our outpatient department of internal medicine with general fatigue, dullness of bilateral shoulders and extremities, appetite loss, weight loss, headache, and vertigo. Laboratory tests showed severe inflammatory indications, anemia, and high values of hepatobiliary enzymes and blood sugar. Abdominal ultrasonography and enhanced CT showed a pyogenic liver abscess of 10 cm in diameter at S 6-7 in the right hepatic lobe. The patient's condition deteriorated suddenly that night. From the results of abdominal ultrasonography and enhanced CT, we made diagnosis of septic shock associated with pyogenic liver abscess. Emergency abdominal ultrasound-guided PTAD was performed under local anesthetic. Postoperatively, the antibiotic was infused daily through a PTAD tube into the liver abscess space. He recovered and his laboratory tests improved gradually. On abdominal ultrasonography and enhanced CT, the liver abscess disappeared by 19th postoperative day, and PTAD tube was removed. There was no complication during PTAD treatment. We conclude that patients in septic shock should undergo further examinations immediately and treatment of the infected tissue should be started as soon as possible. PTAD may be an additional effective procedure for pyogenic liver abscess in septic shock. Furthermore, local antibiotic lavage through a PTAD tube into the liver abscess space may be an important supplementary method in the management of the illness.

  8. Lab in a needle for epidural space identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carotenuto, B.; Micco, A.; Ricciardi, A.; Amorizzo, E.; Mercieri, M.; Cutolo, A.; Cusano, A.

    2016-05-01

    This work relies on the development of a sensorized medical needle with an all-optical guidance (Lab in a Needle) system for epidural space identification. The device is based on the judicious integration of a Fiber Bragg grating sensor inside the lumen of an epidural needle to discriminate between different types of tissue and thus providing continuous and real time measurements of the pressure experienced by the needle tip during its advancement. Experiments carried out on an epidural training phantom demonstrate the validity of our approach for the correct and effective identification of the epidural space.

  9. Imaging in spinal posterior epidural space lesions: A pictorial essay

    PubMed Central

    Gala, Foram B; Aswani, Yashant

    2016-01-01

    Spinal epidural space is a real anatomic space located outside the dura mater and within the spinal canal extending from foramen magnum to sacrum. Important contents of this space are epidural fat, spinal nerves, epidural veins and arteries. Due to close proximity of posterior epidural space to spinal cord and spinal nerves, the lesions present with symptoms of radiculopathy and/or myelopathy. In this pictorial essay, detailed anatomy of the posterior epidural space, pathologies affecting it along with imaging pearls to accurately diagnose them are discussed. Various pathologies affecting the posterior epidural space either arising from the space itself or occurring secondary to vertebral/intervertebral disc pathologies. Primary spinal bone tumors affecting the posterior epidural space have been excluded. The etiological spectrum affecting the posterior epidural space ranges from degenerative, infective, neoplastic - benign or malignant to miscellaneous pathologies. MRI is the modality of choice in evaluation of these lesions with CT scan mainly helpful in detecting calcification. Due to its excellent soft tissue contrast, Magnetic Resonance Imaging is extremely useful in assessing the pathologies of posterior epidural space, to know their entire extent, characterize them and along with clinical history and laboratory data, arrive at a specific diagnosis and guide the referring clinician. It is important to diagnose these lesions early so as to prevent permanent neurological complication. PMID:27857455

  10. Imaging in spinal posterior epidural space lesions: A pictorial essay.

    PubMed

    Gala, Foram B; Aswani, Yashant

    2016-01-01

    Spinal epidural space is a real anatomic space located outside the dura mater and within the spinal canal extending from foramen magnum to sacrum. Important contents of this space are epidural fat, spinal nerves, epidural veins and arteries. Due to close proximity of posterior epidural space to spinal cord and spinal nerves, the lesions present with symptoms of radiculopathy and/or myelopathy. In this pictorial essay, detailed anatomy of the posterior epidural space, pathologies affecting it along with imaging pearls to accurately diagnose them are discussed. Various pathologies affecting the posterior epidural space either arising from the space itself or occurring secondary to vertebral/intervertebral disc pathologies. Primary spinal bone tumors affecting the posterior epidural space have been excluded. The etiological spectrum affecting the posterior epidural space ranges from degenerative, infective, neoplastic - benign or malignant to miscellaneous pathologies. MRI is the modality of choice in evaluation of these lesions with CT scan mainly helpful in detecting calcification. Due to its excellent soft tissue contrast, Magnetic Resonance Imaging is extremely useful in assessing the pathologies of posterior epidural space, to know their entire extent, characterize them and along with clinical history and laboratory data, arrive at a specific diagnosis and guide the referring clinician. It is important to diagnose these lesions early so as to prevent permanent neurological complication.

  11. Myelopathy with syringomyelia following thoracic epidural anaesthesia.

    PubMed

    Aldrete, J A; Ferrari, H

    2004-02-01

    Under general anaesthesia and muscle relaxation, a thoracic epidural catheter was inserted at the T8-T9 level in a 7-year-old boy scheduled to have a Nissen fundoplication to provide postoperative analgesia. After 4 ml of lignocaine 1.5% was injected through the catheter, hypotension resulted. Fifty-five minutes later 5 ml of bupivacaine 0.25% produced the same effect. In the recovery room a similar injection resulted in lower blood pressure and temporary apnoea. Sensory and motor deficits were noted the next day and four days later magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated spinal cord syringomyelia extending from T5 to T10. Four years later, dysaesthesia from T6 to T10 weakness of the left lower extremity and bladder and bowel dysfunction persist. The risks of inserting thoracic epidural catheters in patients under general anaesthesia and muscle relaxation are discussed, emphasising the possibility of spinal cord injury with disastrous consequences.

  12. Hepatocellular carcinoma metastases to the epidural space.

    PubMed

    Somerset, Hilary; Witt, J Peter; Kleinschmidt-Demasters, Bette K

    2009-12-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is relatively uncommon in the United States, although hepatitis C, one of the known risk factors for disease, is currently showing burgeoning growth in the country. Hence, it is possible that the incidence of HCC also will increase. Clinicians and pathologists in the United States are relatively unfamiliar with the patterns of metastatic spread for HCC. We report 2 US-native patients with cirrhosis and HCC who developed epidural space metastasis, a pattern of disease spread seen infrequently, even in endemic areas. Diagnostic testing was delayed in both patients because of the lowered suspicion for metastasis and the fact that neither patient had recognized metastatic spread to more common sites, such as lung or lymph nodes. New-onset neck or back pain-especially with symptoms of paresthesia, radiculopathy, or cord compression-in the setting of HCC warrants prompt investigation for metastases to the spine and epidural space.

  13. Imported amoebic liver abscess in France.

    PubMed

    Cordel, Hugues; Prendki, Virginie; Madec, Yoann; Houze, Sandrine; Paris, Luc; Bourée, Patrice; Caumes, Eric; Matheron, Sophie; Bouchaud, Olivier

    2013-01-01

    Worldwide, amoebic liver abscess (ALA) can be found in individuals in non-endemic areas, especially in foreign-born travelers. We performed a retrospective analysis of ALA in patients admitted to French hospitals between 2002 and 2006. We compared imported ALA cases in European and foreign-born patients and assessed the factors associated with abscess size using a logistic regression model. We investigated 90 ALA cases. Patient median age was 41. The male:female ratio was 3.5:1. We were able to determine the origin for 75 patients: 38 were European-born and 37 foreign-born. With respect to clinical characteristics, no significant difference was observed between European and foreign-born patients except a longer lag time between the return to France after traveling abroad and the onset of symptoms for foreign-born. Factors associated with an abscess size of more than 69 mm were being male (OR = 11.25, p<0.01), aged more than 41 years old (OR = 3.63, p = 0.02) and being an immigrant (OR = 11.56, p = 0.03). Percutaneous aspiration was not based on initial abscess size but was carried out significantly more often on patients who were admitted to surgical units (OR = 10, p<0.01). The median time to abscess disappearance for 24 ALA was 7.5 months. In this study on imported ALA was one of the largest worldwide in terms of the number of cases included males, older patients and foreign-born patients presented with larger abscesses, suggesting that hormonal and immunological factors may be involved in ALA physiopathology. The long lag time before developing ALA after returning to a non-endemic area must be highlighted to clinicians so that they will consider Entamoeba histolytica as a possible pathogen of liver abscesses more often.

  14. Rathke cleft cyst masquerading as pituitary abscess

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Chengxian; Bao, Xinjie; Liu, Xiaohai; Deng, Kan; Feng, Ming; Yao, Yong; Wang, Renzhi

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background: Rathke cleft cyst (RCC) is a rare cystic sellar entity, which is usually small in size and asymptomatic in most patients. RCC presenting panhypopituitarism and a cystic lesion with rim enhancement on magnetic resonance imaging is extremely rare. Therefore, it is easy to be misdiagnosed as pituitary abscess because of the similar clinical manifestations and neuroimaging changes. Case summary: We report a rare case of RCC masquerading as pituitary abscess clinically and radiologically with no evidence of central nervous system infection. The patient was initially suspected to be diagnosed with pituitary abscess, which was denied by the histopathological findings of RCC with no intraoperative drainage of abscess. We present an uncommon case of RCC masquerading as pituitary abscess in a 62-year-old Chinese male patient. The patient was admitted to Peking Union Medical College Hospital complaining of severe frontal pulsatile headache, visual acuity deficit, polyuria, polydipsia, and slight disturbance of consciousness. The biochemical and endocrinological examinations revealed severe hyponatremia and panhypopituitarism. Magnetic resonance imaging showed a sellar lesion with the apparent cystic change and rim enhancement. Accordingly, pituitary abscess was misdiagnosed at the beginning. The patient received hormone replacement therapy and underwent a trans-sphenoidal surgery. The surgical findings were uneventful. The histopathological examinations showed no infiltration of inflammatory cells or pus, and proved the lesion to be RCC. Conclusion: Through this rare case, we aim to emphasize that the differential diagnosis of sellar lesions requires constant vigilance and that RCC may lead to clinical and radiological changes similar with pituitary abscess. PMID:28272259

  15. Evidence of Archaeal Methanogens in Brain Abscess.

    PubMed

    Drancourt, Michel; Nkamga, Vanessa Demonfort; Lakhe, Ndèye Aïssatou; Régis, Jean-Marie; Dufour, Henry; Fournier, Pierre-Edouard; Bechah, Yassina; Scheld, W Michael; Raoult, Didier

    2017-04-01

    Methanogens are antibiotic-resistant anaerobic archaea which escape routine detection in clinical microbiology. We hypothesized that methanogens may participate as part of the anaerobic community causing brain abscess. Methanogens were investigated in one index sample by specific PCR-sequencing and culture. The pathogenesis of a methanogen isolate was assessed in a mouse model of brain abscess. Archaea-specific qPCR and metagenomics were used to detect specific archaeal sequences in brain abscess samples and controls. In one index sample, routine culture found Porphyromonas endodontalis and Streptococcus intermedius, and specific culture found Methanobrevibacter oralis susceptible to metronidazole and fusidic acid. Archaea-targeted PCR-sequencing and metagenomics confirmed M. oralis along with 14 bacteria, including S. intermedius. Archaea-specific qPCR yielded archaea in 8/18 brain abscess specimens and 1/27 controls (P <0.003), and metagenomics yielded archaea, mostly methanogens, in 28/32 brain abscess samples, and no archaea in 71 negative controls (P<10-6). Infection of mice brains yielded no mortality in 14 controls and death in 17/22 M. oralis-inoculated mice (P < 10-6), 32/95 S. intermedius-inoculated mice (P < 10-6) and 75/104 mice inoculated with M. oralis mixed with S. intermedius (P < 10-6) seven days post-inoculation. Methanogens form part of the anaerobic community responsible for brain abscess, and M. oralis may participate in the pathogenicity of this deadly infection. In mice, a synergistic effect of M. oralis and S. intermedius was observed. Antibiotic treatment of brain abscess should contain anti-archaeal compounds such as imidazole derivatives in most cases.

  16. Epidural analgesia and anticoagulant therapy. Experience with one thousand cases of continuous epidurals.

    PubMed

    Odoom, J A; Sih, I L

    1983-03-01

    One thousand lumbar epidural blocks in 950 patients undergoing vascular surgery are reported. All patients were receiving oral anticoagulants pre-operatively. Mean thrombotest (TT) was 19.3% (normal range 70-130%). During surgery intravascular heparin was administered. At the end of surgery, the kaolin cephalin clotting time (KCCT) was 68 (+/- 0.8) seconds (normal range 35-60 seconds), and partial thromboplastin time (PTT) was 536 (77.9%, normal control of 100%). Despite the anticoagulant therapy, no side effects were observed in any patient which could be related to haemorrhage or haematoma formation in the epidural space. It is concluded that, provided adequate precautions are taken, epidural analgesia can be safely used in patients receiving anticoagulant therapy.

  17. Ectopic extramedullary hematopoiesis: evaluation and treatment of a rare and benign paraspinal/epidural tumor.

    PubMed

    Mattei, Tobias A; Higgins, Michael; Joseph, Flynn; Mendel, Ehud

    2013-03-01

    Ectopic extramedullary hematopoiesis (EMH), defined as the formation of blood cells outside the bone marrow, usually occurs in a scenario of chronic anemia when, even after conversion of the bony yellow marrow to red marrow, the body is still unable to meet the demand for red blood cells. Ectopic extramedullary hematopoiesis most commonly occurs in the liver and spleen but may, in fact, occur almost anywhere in the body. Although previous reports have documented EMH presenting as paraspinal masses, such lesions have almost always been associated with a predisposing hematological disorder such as hemolytic anemia, myelofibrosis or myelodysplastic syndromes, thalassemia, polycythemia vera, leukemia, or lymphoma. The authors of this report describe the first reported instance of EMH in a patient presenting with a symptomatic epidural and paraspinal cervical lesion arising from the posterior spinal elements and no known predisposing hematological disease. Initial radiographs revealed a bony lesion arising posteriorly from the C2-3 laminae and spinous processes. Subsequent imaging suggested the diagnosis, which was confirmed by CT-guided biopsy, peripheral blood smears, and bone marrow aspirate. Despite epidural compression and slight displacement of the cervical cord and thecal sac, the patient's symptoms were limited to pain and diminished cervical range of motion. Therefore, surgery was deferred in favor of nonsurgical therapy. Several alternative modalities for the treatment of EMH have been suggested in the literature, including cytotoxic agents and radiotherapy. The authors opted for an approach utilizing directed low-dose radiotherapy of a total of 25 Gy divided in 2.5-Gy fractions. At the 3-month follow-up, the patient continued to be asymptomatic, and MRI demonstrated a significant reduction in the dimensions of the lesion. Extramedullary hematopoiesis with spinal cord compression in the absence of a preexisting hematological disorder has not been described in

  18. [Spinal epidural angiolipoma: a case report].

    PubMed

    Dufrenot, Leïla; Pelé, Eric; Cursolle, Jean-Christophe; Coindre, Jean-Michel; Lepreux, Sébastien

    2010-02-01

    Spinal epidural angiolipoma is a rare tumor revealed by a slowly progressive paraplegia. We reported a case of a 44-year-old female and point out the peculiar pattern of this lesion characterized by the prominence of the vascular component over the lipomatous component. Recognition of this entity is important because this is a benign and curable cause of paraplegia. Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. Comparison of continuous epidural infusion and programmed intermittent epidural bolus in labor analgesia

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yunan; Li, Qiang; Liu, Jinlu; Yang, Ruimin; Liu, Jingchen

    2016-01-01

    Background This study aims to investigate differences between continuous epidural infusion (CEI) and programmed intermittent epidural bolus (IEB) analgesia for the Chinese parturients undergoing spontaneous delivery and to approach their safety to parturients and neonates. Methods Two hundred healthy American Society of Anesthesiologists class I or II, term (≥37 weeks’ gestation), nulliparous women who requested analgesia for labor were recruited. Epidural analgesia was initiated with a solution of 0.15% ropivacaine 10 mL and maintained with 0.1% ropivacaine mixed with sufentanil 0.3 μg/mL by CEI at a rate of 5 mL/h combined with a patient-controlled epidural analgesia (PCEA) bolus of 5 mL of ropivacaine sufentanil mixture or IEB of 5 mL of ropivacaine sufentanil mixture combined with a PCEA bolus of 5 mL of ropivacaine sufentanil mixture. The lockout interval was 20 minutes in each arm between the CEI and the IEB group. After 20 minutes of first dosage, visual analog scale (VAS) score was obtained every 60 minutes. The maternal and fetal outcome and total consumption of analgesic solution were compared. Results There was no difference in demographic characteristics, duration of first and second stages, delivery methods, sensory block, fetal Apgar scores, and the maternal outcomes between the CEI and IEB groups. There was a significant difference in VAS scores and epidural ropivacaine total consumption between the two groups (IEB vs CEI: 51.27±9.61 vs 70.44±12.78 mg, P<0.01). Conclusion The use of programmed IEB mixed with PCEA improved labor analgesia compared to CEI mixed with PCEA, which could act as maintenance mode for epidural labor analgesia. PMID:27471390

  20. Epidural analgesia in cattle, buffalo, and camels.

    PubMed

    Ismail, Zuhair Bani

    2016-12-01

    Epidural analgesia is commonly used in large animals. It is an easy, cheap, and effective technique used to prevent or control pain during surgeries involving the tail, anus, vulva, perineum, caudal udder, scrotum, and upper hind limbs. The objectives of this article were to comprehensively review and summarize all scientific data available in the literature on new techniques and drugs or drug combinations used for epidural anesthesia in cattle, camel, and buffalo. Only articles published between 2006 and 2016 were included in the review. The most common sites for epidural administration in cattle, camels, and buffalos were the sacrococcygeal intervertebral space (S5-Co1) and first intercoccygeal intervertebral space (Co1-Co2). The most frequently used drugs and dosages were lidocaine (0.22-0.5 mg/kg), bupivacaine (0.125 mg/kg), ropivacaine (0.11 mg/kg), xylazine (0.05 mg/kg), medetomidine (15 µg/kg), romifidine (30-50 µg/kg), ketamine (0.3-2.5 mg/kg), tramadol (1 mg/kg), and neostigmine (10 µg/kg), and the clinical applications, clinical effects, recommendations, and side effects were discussed.

  1. Epidural labour analgesia using Bupivacaine and Clonidine

    PubMed Central

    Syal, K; Dogra, RK; Ohri, A; Chauhan, G; Goel, A

    2011-01-01

    Background: To compare the effects of addition of Clonidine (60 μg) to Epidural Bupivacaine (0.125%) for labour analgesia, with regard to duration of analgesia, duration of labour, ambulation, incidence of instrumentation and caesarean section, foetal outcome, patient satisfaction and side effects. Patients & Methods: On demand, epidural labour analgesia was given to 50 nulliparous healthy term parturients (cephalic presentation), divided in two groups randomly. Group I received bupivacaine (0.125%) alone, whereas Group II received bupivacaine (0.125%) along with Clonidine (60 μg). 10 ml of 0.125% bupivacaine was injected as first dose and further doses titrated with patient relief (Numerical Rating Scale <3). Top ups were given whenever Numerical Rating Scale went above 5. Results: There was statistically significant prolongation of duration of analgesia in Group II, with no difference in duration of labour, ambulation, incidence of instrumentation and caesarean section or foetal outcome. Also clonidine gave dose sparing effect to bupivacaine and there was better patient satisfaction without any significant side effects in Group II. Conclusion: Clonidine is a useful adjunct to bupivacaine for epidural labour analgesia and can be considered as alternative to opioids. PMID:21804714

  2. Epidural analgesia in cattle, buffalo, and camels

    PubMed Central

    Ismail, Zuhair Bani

    2016-01-01

    Epidural analgesia is commonly used in large animals. It is an easy, cheap, and effective technique used to prevent or control pain during surgeries involving the tail, anus, vulva, perineum, caudal udder, scrotum, and upper hind limbs. The objectives of this article were to comprehensively review and summarize all scientific data available in the literature on new techniques and drugs or drug combinations used for epidural anesthesia in cattle, camel, and buffalo. Only articles published between 2006 and 2016 were included in the review. The most common sites for epidural administration in cattle, camels, and buffalos were the sacrococcygeal intervertebral space (S5-Co1) and first intercoccygeal intervertebral space (Co1-Co2). The most frequently used drugs and dosages were lidocaine (0.22-0.5 mg/kg), bupivacaine (0.125 mg/kg), ropivacaine (0.11 mg/kg), xylazine (0.05 mg/kg), medetomidine (15 µg/kg), romifidine (30-50 µg/kg), ketamine (0.3-2.5 mg/kg), tramadol (1 mg/kg), and neostigmine (10 µg/kg), and the clinical applications, clinical effects, recommendations, and side effects were discussed. PMID:28096620

  3. Get Tested for Cervical Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Print This Topic En español Get Tested for Cervical Cancer Browse Sections The Basics Overview Cervical Cancer ... Cervical Cancer 1 of 5 sections The Basics: Cervical Cancer What is cervical cancer? Cervical cancer is ...

  4. EFFECT OF EPIDURAL ANALGESIA ON LABOR AND ITS OUTCOMES.

    PubMed

    Anwar, Sadia; Anwar, Muhannad Waseem; Ahmad, Sajjad

    2015-01-01

    Epidural analgesia is an effective and popular way to relieve labour pain but it may interfere with normal mechanism of labour. The objective of this study was to evaluate the outcome of labour in women with effective epidural analgesia in terms of duration of labour, mode of delivery and neonatal outcome. This was a quasi-experimental study conducted in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Shaikh Zayed Federal Postgraduate Medical Institute and Hospital, Lahore. One hundred pregnant women were selected by non-probability convenient sampling method. Subjects were divided into two groups of. 50 each as per convenience. Patients of any gravidity at term from 37-41 weeks were included in the sample. Epidural analgesia was applied to group B and distilled water to group A at the lumber region and the progress of labour, mode of delivery and effects on Apgar scores of neonates were evaluated. Out of hundred patients, 77 had normal duration of second stage while 23 had prolonged second stage. Among them, 18 patients (36%) were in epidural group and 5 patients (10%) in non-epidural group, while 4 patients (8%) in epidural group developed intra-partum complications; whereas among non-epidural group had such complications. 65 patients had spontaneous vaginal delivery while 35 patients had instrumental delivery. Among them 29 patients (58%) were in epidural group while only 6 patients (12%) were in non-epidural group. Babies born had Apgar score 5/10 (21.8%), 6/10 (59.4%) and 7/10 (17.8%) at 1 minute and 8/10 (74.3%) and 9/10 (24.8%) at 5 minutes in both groups and none of them needed bag and mask resuscitation. Epidural analgesia does prolong the duration of second stage of labour and increases the instrumental delivery rate. Neonatal outcome is satisfactory while only a few intra-partum complications are found with epidural analgesia.

  5. An evaluation of epidural analgesia following circumferential belt lipectomy.

    PubMed

    Michaud, André-Paul; Rosenquist, Richard W; Cram, Albert E; Aly, Al S

    2007-08-01

    Belt lipectomy combines traditional abdominoplasty with a circumferential excision of skin and fat, with resultant buttock and lateral thigh lifts. Because of the extensive nature of the procedure, postoperative pain management can be difficult. Epidural analgesia has been shown to be efficacious in treating postoperative pain. This study compares the postoperative use of epidural analgesia with more traditional pain management regimens in a large series of belt lipectomy patients. Charts of 62 belt lipectomy patients were examined retrospectively. Postoperative pain control regimen, pain scores, total amount of opioids administered, and side effects encountered were recorded. Twenty-seven patients had traditional pain control regimens, opioids on demand, and pain control pumps. Thirty-five patients received epidural analgesia as their primary mode of postoperative pain control. Pain scores and total nonepidural opioids used were lower in the epidural analgesia group on postoperative days 0 and 1 compared with the nonepidural group. The two groups converged on postoperative days 2 through 5, sharing similar pain scores and opioid use after discontinuation of epidural analgesia. The incidence of side effects was similar in the two groups, with the exception of pruritus, which was much more prominent in the epidural group. Eight of the 35 epidural patients (23 percent) experienced transient and minor complications associated with epidural therapy; several resolved spontaneously, whereas the balance resolved with cessation or modification of the epidural infusion. Epidural analgesia is more effective than traditional pain control methods in reducing immediate postoperative pain in belt lipectomy patients. On the basis of these findings, epidural analgesia should also be considered for postoperative pain management in other truncal procedures.

  6. Percutaneous drainage of enteric-related abscesses.

    PubMed

    Fulcher, A S; Turner, M A

    1996-12-01

    Percutaneous drainage is a routinely performed radiologic procedure used in the management of abdominal abscesses. This technique has become the preferred method of treatment for most abdominal and pelvic abscesses, specifically those of enteric origin related to surgical procedures, appendicitis, diverticulitis, and Crohn disease. The well-documented safety and therapeutic efficacy of percutaneous abscess drainage (PAD) lead to the acceptance of this procedure as the primary means of managing abdominal abscesses, obviating the need for surgery in many instances. PAD may provide definitive therapy or may serve as a temporizing measure before delayed surgical treatment. Although PAD was originally reserved for treatment of unilocular, relatively superficial fluid collections, the role of PAD has evolved such that it is now used to manage complex multilocular fluid collections and abscesses that lie deep within the abdomen or pelvis. Although the standard transabdominal approach is preferred, a variety of approaches, including transgastric, transrectal, transvaginal, and transgluteal, may be used. PAD is performed using CT or sonographic guidance.

  7. INFLAMMATORY INDEX AND TREATMENT OF BRAIN ABSCESS

    PubMed Central

    OYAMA, HIROFUMI; KITO, AKIRA; MAKI, HIDEKI; HATTORI, KENICHI; NODA, TOMOYUKI; WADA, KENTARO

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT This study retrospectively analyzed 12 patients with brain abscesses. Half of the patients were diagnosed inaccurately in the initial stage, and 7.2 days were required to achieve the final diagnosis of brain abscess. The patients presented only with a moderately elevated leukocyte count, serum CRP levels, or body temperatures during the initial stage. These markers changed, first with an increase in the leukocyte count, followed by the CRP and body temperature. The degree of elevation tended to be less prominent, and the time for each inflammatory index to reach its maximum value tended to be longer in the patients without ventriculitis than in those with it. The causative organisms of a brain abscess were detected in 10 cases. The primary causative organisms from dental caries were Streptococcus viridians or milleri, and Fusobacterium nucleatum. Nocardia sp. or farcinica were common when the abscess was found in other regions. The primary causative organisms of unrecognized sources of infection were Streptococcus milleri and Prolionibacterium sp. Nocardia is resistant to many antibiotics. However, carbapenem, tetracycline and quinolone were effective for Nocardia as well as many other kinds of bacteria. In summary, the brain abscesses presented with only mildly elevated inflammatory markers of body temperature, leukocyte and CRP. These inflammatory markers were less obvious in the patients without ventriculitis and/or meningitis. The source of infection tended to suggest some specific primary causative organism. It was reasonable to initiate therapy with carbapenem. PMID:23092104

  8. Clinicopathological analysis of liver abscess in Japan.

    PubMed

    Okano, Hiroshi; Shiraki, Katsuya; Inoue, Hidekazu; Kawakita, Tomoyuki; Yamamoto, Norihiko; Deguchi, Masatoshi; Sugimoto, Kazushi; Sakai, Takahisa; Ohmori, Shigeru; Murata, Kazumoto; Nakano, Takeshi

    2002-11-01

    Currently, pyogenic liver abscess is not frequent, but it is a severe infectious disease. However a strategy for the effective treatment of liver abscess is not established. We analyzed 75 cases of liver abscess over an eight year period and evaluated their prognosis, any associated underlying disease, or the effect of percutaneous transhepatic abscess drainage (PTAD). For all 75 cases, laboratory data were analyzed and imaging studies were performed. Next, PTAD and antibiotic administration were started on these cases as first choice treatments. These treatments were continued until the laboratory data of the patient were restored to within the normal range. Those cases that were PTAD non-effective or required operation for underlying diseases, underwent operations. Of the total 75 cases, 63 survived after treatment and 12 cases died. Bacteria were detected in 50 cases and Klebsiella pneumoniae was detected in 31 of these 50 cases, but 25 out of 75 cases were negative. The biliary system was the main route of infection. PTAD was effective, especially in cases that were complicated with disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) or acute renal failure (ARF). PTAD is an effective treatment for liver abscess, it is especially useful in the restoration of severe general conditions as indicated by this study.

  9. Experience with Splenic Abscess from Southern India

    PubMed Central

    Deme, Swaroopa; Mohan, KNKJ; Adiraju, Krishna Prasad; Modugu, Nageswar Rao; Chandra, Naval; Narendra, AMVR; Yadati, Sathyanarayana Raju

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Splenic abscess is a rare entity with potentially life threatening complications. Sparse recent published data are available documenting the aetiological profile and management of patients with splenic abscess from India. Aim To study the clinical profile of splenic abscess. Materials and Methods We retrospectively collected data from case records of admitted patients with splenic abscesses, to Nizam’s Institute of Medical Sciences and Hospital which is a multispecialty, tertiary care referral hospital over a period of 15 months (from March 2014 to May 2015) and parameters studied were age, sex, symptoms, signs, risk factors, investigations like Ultrasound, CT scan, blood & microbiological culture, treatment and outcome. Results Most common presenting symptom was fever (90%). Mean age was 33.5 years. Five patients (55%) had risk factors like HIV, leukaemia and diabetes. From pus culture Escherichia coli was the most common organism (22%) grown. Staphylococcus saureus, Enterococcus faecium were seen in one each, blood culture grown Cryptococcus neoformans, Pseudomonas aeroginosa in one each, Plasmodium falciparum was seen on peripheral smear in one. Three were empirically treated as disseminated koch’s. Another was treated as possible infective endocarditis. All were given antimicrobials, five (55%) were treated with antimicrobials alone, three (33%) with PCD (Per Cutaneous Drainage) and one (11%) with sub-total splenectomy. All patients recovered. Conclusion With early diagnosis and increased use of ultrasound guided procedures like aspiration or drainage, spleenectomy can be avoided. Optimal treatment for splenic abscess is yet to be defined and customized to each patient. PMID:27891372

  10. Actinomyces meyeri brain abscess following dental extraction

    PubMed Central

    Clancy, U; Ronayne, A; Prentice, M B; Jackson, A

    2015-01-01

    We describe the rare occurrence of an Actinomyces meyeri cerebral abscess in a 55-year-old woman following a dental extraction. This patient presented with a 2-day history of hemisensory loss, hyper-reflexia and retro-orbital headache, 7 days following a dental extraction for apical peridonitis. Neuroimaging showed a large left parietal abscess with surrounding empyema. The patient underwent craniotomy and drainage of the abscess. A. meyeri was cultured. Actinomycosis is a rare cause of cerebral abscess. The A. meyeri subtype is particularly rare, accounting for less than 1% of specimens. This case describes an unusually brief course of the disease, which is usually insidious. Parietal lobe involvement is unusual as cerebral abscesses usually have a predilection for the frontal and temporal regions of the brain. Although there are no randomised trials to guide therapy, current consensus is to use a prolonged course of intravenous antibiotics, followed by 6–12 months of oral therapy. PMID:25870213

  11. Actinomyces meyeri brain abscess following dental extraction.

    PubMed

    Clancy, U; Ronayne, A; Prentice, M B; Jackson, A

    2015-04-13

    We describe the rare occurrence of an Actinomyces meyeri cerebral abscess in a 55-year-old woman following a dental extraction. This patient presented with a 2-day history of hemisensory loss, hyper-reflexia and retro-orbital headache, 7 days following a dental extraction for apical peridonitis. Neuroimaging showed a large left parietal abscess with surrounding empyema. The patient underwent craniotomy and drainage of the abscess. A. meyeri was cultured. Actinomycosis is a rare cause of cerebral abscess. The A. meyeri subtype is particularly rare, accounting for less than 1% of specimens. This case describes an unusually brief course of the disease, which is usually insidious. Parietal lobe involvement is unusual as cerebral abscesses usually have a predilection for the frontal and temporal regions of the brain. Although there are no randomised trials to guide therapy, current consensus is to use a prolonged course of intravenous antibiotics, followed by 6-12 months of oral therapy. 2015 BMJ Publishing Group Ltd.

  12. Anterior cervical corpectomy and fusion for blastomycosis causing destruction of C6 vertebra: a case report.

    PubMed

    Patel, Kushal R; Szczodry, Michal; Neckrysh, Sergey; Siemionow, Krzysztof

    2015-11-25

    We describe a patient who had cervical spine osteomyelitis caused by Blastomyces dermatitidis that resulted in cord compression and cervical spine instability. A 25-year-old Hispanic woman presented with fever, sweats, neck pain, and an enlarging neck mass with purulent discharge after sustaining a C6 vertebral body fracture. Magnetic resonance imaging confirmed C6 vertebral osteomyelitis, demonstrated by vertebral body destruction, cervical spine instability, prevertebral abscess, and spinal cord compression. She underwent C6 anterior cervical corpectomy and fusion, with fungal cultures confirming Blastomyces dermatitidis. Anterior cervical corpectomy and fusion successful debrided, decompressed, and restored cervical spine stability in a patient with vertebral osteomyelitis caused by Blastomyces dermatitidis. The patient was subsequently treated with a 1-year course of itraconazole and had no recurrence of infection 4 years postoperatively.

  13. Ultrasound-guided Greater Auricular Nerve Block for Emergency Department Ear Laceration and Ear Abscess Drainage.

    PubMed

    Flores, Stefan; Herring, Andrew A

    2016-04-01

    Adequate emergency department (ED) anesthesia for painful ear conditions, such as ear lacerations or ear abscesses, can be challenging. Much of the sensory innervation of the ear is supplied from the anterior and posterior branches of the greater auricular nerve (GAN). The GAN is a branch of the superficial cervical plexus, which arises from the C2/C3 spinal roots. The GAN innervation includes most of the helix, antihelix, the lobule, and the skin over the mastoid process and parotid gland. Anesthesia of the GAN is commonly performed in emergency medicine as part of a landmark-based ear "ring" block. Recently, a selective ultrasound-guided GAN block has been described. We report the first cases of ultrasound-guided greater auricular nerve block (UGANB) successfully performed in the ED as the sole procedural anesthesia for both an ear laceration and abscess drainage. In addition, we review the relevant anatomy and technical details of the procedure. WHY SHOULD AN EMERGENCY PHYSICIAN BE AWARE OF THIS?: Our cases suggest that UGANB is a potentially effective nerve block for ED management of acute ear pain related to procedures involving the tail of the helix and the lobule, such as ear lacerations or ear abscess incision and drainage. Advantages include real-time visualization of the GAN that may increase block success and the decreased volume of local anesthetic required for a block. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Primary tubercular abscess of the breast--an unusual entity.

    PubMed

    Gupta, R; Singal, R P; Gupta, A; Singal, S; Shahi, S R; Singal, R

    2012-02-22

    Primary breast tuberculosis manifested as abscess is a rare entity. We are reporting a case of primary breast tuberculosis, which presented as breast abscess. Abscess was drained and tissue sent for histopathology. To our surprise, diagnosis came as breast tuberculosis. Aspiration cytology was not done, as it is not a routine test for abscess cases. Patient was put on anti- tubercular drugs. In the follow-up of 6 months, she was asymptomatic and advised to continue medicine.

  15. An unusual presentation of a nasal septal abscess.

    PubMed

    Cuddihy, P J; Srinivasan, V

    1998-08-01

    Nasal septal abscess is a rare complication of septal haematoma. Nasal obstruction and, less frequently, pain are the usual presenting features. We report a case of a nasal septal abscess in a 21-year-old female patient who developed a naso-oral fistula. To our knowledge this is the first report of such an unusual presentation of a septal abscess. The aetiology, pathogenesis and management of septal abscesses are discussed.

  16. Cervical insufficiency and cervical cerclage.

    PubMed

    Brown, Richard; Gagnon, Robert; Delisle, Marie-France

    2013-12-01

    The purpose of this guideline is to provide a framework that clinicians can use to determine which women are at greatest risk of having cervical insufficiency and in which set of circumstances a cerclage is of potential value. Published literature was retrieved through searches of PubMed or MEDLINE, CINAHL, and The Cochrane Library in 2012 using appropriate controlled vocabulary (e.g., uterine cervical incompetence) and key words (e.g., cervical insufficiency, cerclage, Shirodkar, cerclage, MacDonald, cerclage, abdominal, cervical length, mid-trimester pregnancy loss). Results were restricted to systematic reviews, randomized control trials/controlled clinical trials, and observational studies. There were no date or language restrictions. Searches were updated on a regular basis and incorporated in the guideline to January 2011. Grey (unpublished) literature was identified through searching the websites of health technology assessment and health technology-related agencies, clinical practice guideline collections, clinical trial registries, and national and international medical specialty societies. The quality of evidence in this document was rated using the criteria described in the Report of the Canadian Task Force on Preventive Health Care (Table). Recommendations 1. Women who are pregnant or planning pregnancy should be evaluated for risk factors for cervical insufficiency. A thorough medical history at initial evaluation may alert clinicians to risk factors in a first or index pregnancy. (III-B) 2. Detailed evaluation of risk factors should be undertaken in women following a mid-trimester pregnancy loss or early premature delivery, or in cases where such complications have occurred in a preceding pregnancy. (III-B) 3. In women with a history of cervical insufficiency, urinalysis for culture and sensitivity and vaginal cultures for bacterial vaginosis should be taken at the first obstetric visit and any infections so found should be treated. (I-A) 4. Women

  17. Use of epidural analgesia in post-operative pain management.

    PubMed

    Weetman, Carole; Allison, Wendy

    This article provides an overview of the use of epidural infusion analgesia in the management of patients with post-operative pain. Epidural analgesia is an effective method for relieving pain and has minimal side effects. However, life-threatening complications can occur and nurses need to be able to identify these and provide safe care for patients.

  18. Accidental catheterization of epidural venous plexus: tomographic analysis.

    PubMed

    Souza, Mariano Paiva; Magalhães, Edno; de Farias Cascudo, Elialba; Jogaib, Marco Antonio Dias; da Silva, Marcelo Carneiro

    2016-01-01

    Inadvertent venous catheterizations occur in approximately 9% of lumbar epidural anesthetic procedures with catheter placement and, if not promptly recognized, can result in fatal consequences. The objective of this report is to describe a case of accidental catheterization of epidural venous plexus and its recording by computed tomography with contrast injection through the catheter. A female patient in her sixties, physical status II (ASA), underwent conventional cholecystectomy under balanced general anesthesia and an epidural with catheter for postoperative analgesia. During surgery, there was clinical suspicion of accidental catheterization of epidural venous plexus because of blood backflow through the catheter, confirmed by the administration of a test dose through the catheter. After the surgery, a CT scan was obtained after contrast injection through the catheter. Contrast was observed all the way from the skin to the azygos vein, passing through anterior and posterior epidural venous plexuses and intervertebral vein. It is possible to identify the actual placement of the epidural catheter, as well as to register an accidental catheterization of the epidural venous plexus, using computed tomography with contrast injection through the epidural catheter. Copyright © 2014 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  19. [Accidental catheterization of epidural venous plexus: tomographic analysis].

    PubMed

    Souza, Mariano Paiva; Magalhães, Edno; Cascudo, Elialba de Farias; Jogaib, Marco Antonio Dias; Silva, Marcelo Carneiro da

    2016-01-01

    Inadvertent venous catheterizations occur in approximately 9% of lumbar epidural anesthetic procedures with catheter placement and, if not promptly recognized, can result in fatal consequences. The objective of this report is to describe a case of accidental catheterization of epidural venous plexus and its recording by computed tomography with contrast injection through the catheter. A female patient in her sixties, physical status II (ASA), underwent conventional cholecystectomy under balanced general anesthesia and an epidural with catheter for postoperative analgesia. During surgery, there was clinical suspicion of accidental catheterization of epidural venous plexus because of blood backflow through the catheter, confirmed by the administration of a test dose through the catheter. After the surgery, a CT scan was obtained after contrast injection through the catheter. Contrast was observed all the way from the skin to the azygos vein, passing through anterior and posterior epidural venous plexuses and intervertebral vein. It is possible to identify the actual placement of the epidural catheter, as well as to register an accidental catheterization of the epidural venous plexus, using computed tomography with contrast injection through the epidural catheter. Copyright © 2014 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  20. Epidural technique for postoperative pain: gold standard no more?

    PubMed

    Rawal, Narinder

    2012-01-01

    Epidural analgesia is a well-established technique that has commonly been regarded as the gold standard in postoperative pain management. However, newer, evidence-based outcome data show that the benefits of epidural analgesia are not as significant as previously believed. There are some benefits in a decrease in the incidence of cardiovascular and pulmonary complications, but these benefits are probably limited to high-risk patients undergoing major abdominal or thoracic surgery who receive thoracic epidural analgesia with local anaesthetic drugs only. There is increasing evidence that less invasive regional analgesic techniques are as effective as epidural analgesia. These include paravertebral block for thoracotomy, femoral block for total hip and knee arthroplasty, wound catheter infusions for cesarean delivery, and local infiltration analgesia techniques for lower limb joint arthroplasty. Wound infiltration techniques and their modifications are simple and safe alternatives for a variety of other surgical procedures. Although pain relief associated with epidural analgesia can be outstanding, clinicians expect more from this invasive, high-cost, labour-intensive technique. The number of indications for the use of epidural analgesia seems to be decreasing for a variety of reasons. The decision about whether to continue using epidural techniques should be guided by regular institutional audits and careful risk-benefit assessment rather than by tradition. For routine postoperative analgesia, epidural analgesia may no longer be considered the gold standard.

  1. Subdural Hematoma Associated With Labor Epidural Analgesia: A Case Series.

    PubMed

    Lim, Grace; Zorn, Jamie M; Dong, Yuanxu J; DeRenzo, Joseph S; Waters, Jonathan H

    2016-01-01

    This report aimed to describe the characteristics and impact of subdural hematoma (SDH) after labor epidural analgesia. Eleven obstetric patients had SDHs associated with the use of labor epidural analgesia over 7 years at a tertiary care hospital. Ten of 11 patients had signs consistent with postdural puncture headache before the diagnosis of SDH. Five patients (45%) had a recognized unintentional dural puncture, 1 (9%) had a combined spinal-epidural with a 24-gauge needle, and 5 (45%) had no recognized dural puncture. For 10 of the 11 cases, SDH was diagnosed at a mean of 4.1 days (range, 1-7 days) after performance of labor epidural analgesia; one case was diagnosed at 25 days. Ten (91%) of 11 cases had a second hospital stay for a mean of 2.8 days (range, 2-4 days) for observation, without further requirement for neurosurgical intervention. One case (9%) had decompressive hemicraniectomy after becoming unresponsive. The observed rate of labor epidural analgesia-associated SDH was 0.026% (11 in 42,969, approximately 1:3900), and the rate of SDH was 1.1% (5 in 437, approximately 1:87) if a recognized dural puncture occurred during epidural catheter placement. Subdural hematoma after labor epidural anesthesia is rare but potentially more common than historically estimated. Cases of postdural puncture headache after labor epidural anesthesia should be monitored closely for severe neurologic signs and symptoms that could herald SDH.

  2. Practical tips for modified dorsolumbar epidural anesthesia in cattle

    PubMed Central

    Yamagishi, Norio; Oboshi, Kenji; Sasaki, Naoki; Yamada, Haruo

    2006-01-01

    Segmental dorsolumbar epidural anesthesia has been considered difficult to perform. The purpose of this study was to determine whether or not it is difficult for beginners to learn how to do modified dorsolumbar epidural anesthesia of cattle. Thirty cattle were divided into two groups, young (n = 8) and adult (n = 22), according to their age and body weight, and 0.12% new methylene blue (NMB) was injected into the first interlumbar (L1-L2) epidural space by four fifth-year veterinary school students who had never performed this method. After a 1 hour lecture on the modified dorsolumbar epidural anesthesia procedure which included basic anatomy and skills, each student successfully performed the procedure. In the young group, the NMB solution was distributed between the periosteum and the epidural fat (BPF) in one half and between the epidural fat and the dura mater (BFD) in the other half of the cattle. In about 60% (13/22) of the adult group, the NMB solution distributed as BFD type. This study showed that the modified dorsolumbar epidural anesthesia procedure is easy for beginners to perform if they overcome their fear about the deeper insertion of the epidural needle with basic anatomical knowledge and a little experience. PMID:16434853

  3. Caudal Epidural Block: An Updated Review of Anatomy and Techniques

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Caudal epidural block is a commonly used technique for surgical anesthesia in children and chronic pain management in adults. It is performed by inserting a needle through the sacral hiatus to gain entrance into the sacral epidural space. Using conventional blind technique, the failure rate of caudal epidural block in adults is high even in experienced hands. This high failure rate could be attributed to anatomic variations that make locating sacral hiatus difficult. With the advent of fluoroscopy and ultrasound in guiding needle placement, the success rate of caudal epidural block has been markedly improved. Although fluoroscopy is still considered the gold standard when performing caudal epidural injection, ultrasonography has been demonstrated to be highly effective in accurately guiding the needle entering the caudal epidural space and produce comparative treatment outcome as fluoroscopy. Except intravascular and intrathecal injection, ultrasonography could be as effective as fluoroscopy in preventing complications during caudal epidural injection. The relevant anatomy and techniques in performing the caudal epidural block will be briefly reviewed in this article. PMID:28337460

  4. [Surgical treatment of a solitary hepatic abscess].

    PubMed

    Boĭko, V V; Tishchenko, A M; Gusak, I V; Maloshtan, A A; Skoryĭ, D I; Smachilo, R M

    2013-06-01

    Retrospective analysis of the treatment results of 120 patients, suffering solitary hepatic abscess (SHA), was conducted. The sanation methods, in accordance to technology, the treatment impact intensity and aggressiveness, may be divided on three lines: aspirational, draining and resectional. The method of sanation is selected on the background of morphological peculiarities of abscess--its sizes, by presence of sequesters, divisioning septs, dense rigid capsule, grade of periprocess. Surgical access is determined by the abscess localization, the patient's state severity, instrumental equipment of the clinic. Differentiated approach, taking into account genesis, sizes, localization and stage of its formation, constitutes a background of successful treatment of SHA. In totally formatted acute SHA, as a rule, the methods of choice are aspirational and aspiration-draining methods of sanation under ultrasonographic control or laparoscopy. In the presence of chronic SHA or suppurated parasitic hepatic cyst it is mandatory to select the resectional methods.

  5. Tongue abscess induced by embedded remnant fishbone.

    PubMed

    Chen, Pai-L; Chiang, C-W; Shiao, C-C

    2015-12-01

    The authors reported a 56-year-old man with progressive pain over left bottom of oral cavity involving tongue for 3 days. He had a puncture history of tongue by fishbone, which was immediately removed 3 weeks ago. The subsequent contrast-enhanced computed tomography scan of neck disclosed an abscess formation with a faint linear radiopaque material inside, consisting with remnant fishbone retention. The patient was treated conservatively with intravenous antibiotics, followed by an uneventful course during subsequent follow-up for more than 9 months until now. Tongue abscess is a rare but potentially life threatening clinical entity. Foreign body puncture-related tongue abscess should be listed as a differential diagnosis in cases with acute tongue swelling.

  6. Tongue abscess induced by embedded remnant fishbone.

    PubMed

    Chen, Pai-Lien; Chiang, Ching-Wen; Shiao, Chih-Chung

    2015-07-22

    The authors reported a 56-year-old man with progressive pain over left bottom of oral cavity involving tongue for 3 days. He had a puncture history of tongue by fishbone, which was immediately removed 3 weeks ago. The subsequent contrast-enhanced computed tomography scan of neck disclosed an abscess formation with a faint linear radiopaque material inside, consisting with remnant fishbone retention. The patient was treated conservatively with intravenous antibiotics, followed by an uneventful course during subsequent follow-up for more than 9 months until now. Tongue abscess is a rare but potentially life threatening clinical entity. Foreign body puncture-related tongue abscess should be listed as a differential diagnosis in cases with acute tongue swelling.

  7. Brain abscess from a peritonsillar abscess in an immunocompetent child: a case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Sankararaman, Senthilkumar; Riel-Romero, Rosario Maria S; Gonzalez-Toledo, Eduardo

    2012-12-01

    A brain abscess is uncommon but potentially lethal. Common predisposing risk factors include congenital cyanotic heart disease, immunocompromised status, and the presence of septic foci. We describe a left frontal brain abscess accompanied by fever, headache, and weight loss for a 3-month period. The presumptive source of the brain abscess involved a left peritonsillar abscess. To the best of our knowledge, one similar case was reported in the literature in 1929. The specific signs of peritonsillar abscess in our patient included trismus, decreased phonation, and a muffled voice. The peritonsillar abscess was not clinically diagnosed, but incidentally detected on lower axial sections of cranial magnetic resonance imaging. Fever and trismus improved after surgical drainage of the peritonsillar abscess. The cerebral abscess was conservatively treated with intravenous antibiotics. The patient developed hydrocephalus as a sequela to the involvement of the basal meninges. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Delayed intramedullary abscess in operated case of spinal lipoma

    PubMed Central

    Bhaisora, Kamlesh Singh; Godbole, Chaitanya; Das, Kuntal Kanti; Mehrotra, Anant; Jayesh, Shardhara; Sahu, Rabi Narayan; Behari, Sanjay; Srivastava, Arun Kumar; Jaiswal, Awadhesh Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Intramedullary abscess is a rare condition with high rate of mortality and morbidity. We are presenting a case of delayed intramedullary abscess in an operated case of spinal lipoma, after 2 years of primary surgery. To best of our knowledge this only second case of intramedullary abscess in a case of spinal lipoma without dermal sinus. PMID:27857795

  9. 9 CFR 311.14 - Abrasions, bruises, abscesses, pus, etc.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Abrasions, bruises, abscesses, pus... PARTS § 311.14 Abrasions, bruises, abscesses, pus, etc. All slight, well-limited abrasions on the tongue... a carcass which is badly bruised or which is affected by an abscess, or a suppurating sore shall...

  10. Peritonsillar Abscess: Complication of Acute Tonsillitis or Weber's Glands Infection?

    PubMed

    Klug, Tejs Ehlers; Rusan, Maria; Fuursted, Kurt; Ovesen, Therese

    2016-08-01

    To review the literature concerning the 2 primary hypotheses put forth to explain the pathogenesis of peritonsillar abscess: "the acute tonsillitis hypothesis" (peritonsillar abscess is a complication of acute tonsillitis) and "the Weber gland hypothesis" (peritonsillar abscess is an infection of Weber's glands). PubMed, EMBASE. Data supporting or negating one hypothesis or the other were elicited from the literature. Several findings support the acute tonsillitis hypothesis. First, the 2 main pathogens in peritonsillar abscess have been recovered from pus aspirates and bilateral tonsillar tissues with high concordance rates, suggesting that both tonsils are infected in patients with peritonsillar abscess. Second, studies report signs of acute tonsillitis in the days prior to and at the time of peritonsillar abscess. Third, antibiotic treatment reduces the risk of abscess development in patients with acute tonsillitis. However, some findings suggest involvement of the Weber's glands in peritonsillar abscess pathogenesis. First, high amylase levels have been found in peritonsillar pus. Second, the majority of peritonsillar abscesses are located at the superior tonsillar pole in proximity of the Weber's glands. We propose a unified hypothesis whereby bacteria initially infect the tonsillar mucosa and spread via the salivary duct system to the peritonsillar space, where an abscess is formed. Our findings support the rationale for antibiotic treatment of patients with severe acute tonsillitis to reduce the risk of abscess development. Improved understanding of peritonsillar abscess pathogenesis is important for the development of efficient prevention strategies. © American Academy of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery Foundation 2016.

  11. [Spontaneous epidural hematoma after open heart surgery: case report].

    PubMed

    Anegawa, S; Hayashi, T; Furukawa, Y; Nagashima, T; Kumate, M

    1999-11-01

    Acute epidural hematoma not associated with head injury is rarely encountered and is known as spontaneous epidural hematoma. To our knowledge, only five cases with epidural hematoma after open-heart surgery have been published. Pathogenesis and preventive measures have not yet been determined. We report a case of such spontaneous epidural hematoma and consider the possible pathogenesis. A 12-year-old female received a radical operation for severe subaortic stenosis. The intraoperative course was uneventful except for massive hemorrhage which was adequately controlled. Postoperatively, she was moved to the CCU still not having aroused from anesthesia. Eleven hours later, it was found that her pupils were fixed and dilated. CT scan demonstrated a huge bifrontal epidural hematoma with disappearance of the basal cistern. Even though immediate emergency evacuation was performed, the patient died of acute brain swelling four days after the operation.

  12. Effects of 4% Icodextrin on Experimental Spinal Epidural Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Karanci, Turker; Kelten, Bilal; Karaoglan, Alper; Cinar, Nilgun; Midi, Ahmet; Antar, Veysel; Akdemir, Hidayet; Kara, Zeynep

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this experimental study was to investigate whether spinal epidural 4% glucose polymer solution is effective in the prevention of postoperative fibrosis. Twenty eight adult Wistar albino rats were randomly divided into two equal groups, including treatment and control. Both groups underwent L1 vertebral total laminectomy to expose the dura. Topical treatment group received 4% icodextrin. Four weeks later, epidural fibrosis was examined in both groups histologically, biochemically and macroscopically. Topical use of 4% icodextrin prevented significantly epidural fibrosis following the laminectomy operation. Topical 4% icodextrin application inhibits postoperative epidural fibrosis with various mechanisms and prevents adhesions by playing barrier role between tissue surfaces through flotation. Our study is first to present evidence of experimental epidural fibrosis prevention with 4% icodextrin.

  13. Acute onset headache complicating labor epidural caused by intrapartum pneumocephalus.

    PubMed

    Smarkusky, Loren; DeCarvalho, Helena; Bermudez, Ady; González-Quintero, Víctor Hugo

    2006-09-01

    Epidural placement for obstetric anesthesia is a common procedure. Pneumocephalus, the introduction of air into the cranial cavity after epidural placement, is a rare complication encountered when air is used for identification of the epidural space. A 42-year-old primipara undergoing epidural placement reported sudden onset of severe headache with associated neurologic symptoms and nuchal rigidity. Emergent CT scan revealed pneumocephalus. With conservative management, her symptoms resolved with interval resumption of the air collection evidenced on interval CT. Acute onset headache after epidural placement can present with impressive neurologic signs and symptoms. Prompt identification of the cause of this pathology is of vital importance to delineate pneumocephalus from potentially treatable or life-threatening disorders.

  14. Spontaneous spinal epidural hematoma with hemiparesis mimicking acute cerebral infarction: Two case reports

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, Hiroaki; Miki, Takanori; Miyaji, Yuki; Minami, Hiroaki; Masuda, Atsushi; Tominaga, Shogo; Yoshida, Yasuhisa; Yamaura, Ikuya; Matsumoto, Shigeo; Natsume, Shigeatsu; Yoshida, Kozo

    2012-01-01

    Context Acute hemiparesis is a common initial presentation of ischemic stroke. Although hemiparesis due to spontaneous spinal epidural hematoma (SSEH) is an uncommon symptom, a few cases have been reported and misdiagnosed as cerebral infarction. Design Case reports of SSEH with acute hemiparesis. Findings In these two cases, acute stroke was suspected initially and administration of intravenous alteplase therapy was considered. In one case, the presentation was neck pain and in the other case, it was Lhermitte's sign; brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and magnetic resonance angiography were negative for signs of ischemic infarction, hemorrhage, or arterial dissection. Cervical MRI was performed and demonstrated SSEH. Conclusion Clinicians who perform intravenous thrombolytic treatment with alteplase need to be aware of this possible contraindication. PMID:22925753

  15. [The anal fistula disease and abscess].

    PubMed

    Strittmatter, Bernhard

    2004-01-01

    There are two forms of anal fistulas arising from its pathogenesis: the acute stage is the abscess, whereas the chronic stage is the fistula in ano. The classification of the fistula in ano is named after Parks. Pathogenesis and classification are explained. For complete cure, every abscess needs precise examination to be able to show the course and shape of the fistula. The surgical procedure depends on the fistula tract. Most fistulas can be operated by means of a fistulotomy or fistulectomy. Recovery depends on locating the total fistula tract.

  16. [Psoas abscess caused by Staphylococcus lugdunensis].

    PubMed

    Tamargo Delpón, María; Demelo-Rodríguez, Pablo; Cano Ballesteros, Juan Carlos; Vela de la Cruz, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus lugdunensis is a coagulase-negative staphylococcus of growing importance and atypical behavior. The infections caused by this microorganism are becoming more frequent, having a broader spectrum. Psoas abscesses caused by this germ are rare, with few cases reported in the literature. In this work, we present a case of a psoas abscess caused by S. lugdunensis in a patient suffering from diabetes mellitus and rheumatoid arthritis, which was treated with intravenous cloxacillin with a good outcome. Copyright © 2016 Asociación Argentina de Microbiología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  17. Acute abdomen caused by brucellar hepatic abscess.

    PubMed

    Ibis, Cem; Sezer, Atakan; Batman, Ali K; Baydar, Serkan; Eker, Alper; Unlu, Ercument; Kuloglu, Figen; Cakir, Bilge; Coskun, Irfan

    2007-10-01

    Brucellosis is a zoonotic infection that is transmitted from animals to humans by ingestion of infected food products, direct contact with an infected animal, or aerosol inhalation. The disease is endemic in many countries, including the Mediterranean basin, the Middle East, India, Mexico, Central and South America and, central and southwest Asia. Human brucellosis is a systemic infection with a wide clinical spectrum. Although hepatic involvement is very common during the course of chronic brucellosis, hepatic abscess is a very rare complication of Brucella infection. We present a case of hepatic abscess caused by Brucella, which resembled the clinical presentation of surgical acute abdomen.

  18. Rectus sheath abscess after laparoscopic appendicectomy

    PubMed Central

    Golash, Vishwanath

    2007-01-01

    Port site wound infection, abdominal wall hematoma and intraabdominal abscess formation has been reported after laparoscopic appendicectomy. We describe here a rectus sheath abscess which occurred three weeks after the laparoscopic appendicectomy. It was most likely the result of secondary infection of the rectus sheath hematoma due to bleeding into the rectus sheath from damage to the inferior epigastric arteries or a direct tear of the rectus muscle. As far as we are aware this complication has not been reported after laparoscopic appendicectomy. PMID:21124654

  19. Orbital abscess from an odontogenic infection.

    PubMed

    Kim, Il-Kyu; Kim, Ju-Rok; Jang, Keum-Soo; Moon, Yeon-Sung; Park, Sun-Won

    2007-01-01

    An orbital abscess is a rare but serious complication of an odontogenic infection, which can lead to loss of vision or worse. This paper presents a case of orbital abscess secondary to an infection from the upper molar teeth, which extended to the retobulbar and posterosuperior region of the orbit, close to the superior orbital fissure. The infection spreaded to the pterygopalatine and infratemporal fossa and then to the orbit via the inferior orbital fissure. This paper reviews the clinical presentation, differential diagnosis, route of spread, value of serial CT scanning, treatment and possible complications.

  20. Asymptomatic Stenosis in the Cervical and Thoracic Spines of Patients with Symptomatic Lumbar Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Park, Moon Soo; Moon, Seong-Hwan; Kim, Tae-Hwan; Oh, Jae Keun; Lyu, Ho Dong; Lee, Jae-Hoo; Riew, K. Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective study. Objective Studies on age-related degenerative changes causing concurrent stenoses in the cervical, thoracic, and lumbar spines (triple stenosis) are rare in the literature. Our objectives were to determine: (1) the incidence of asymptomatic radiologic cervical and thoracic stenosis in elderly patients with symptomatic lumbar stenosis, (2) the incidence of concurrent radiologic spinal stenosis in the cervical and thoracic spines, and (3) the radiologic features of cervical stenosis that might predict concurrent thoracic stenosis. Methods Whole-spine T2 sagittal magnetic resonance images of patients older than 80 and diagnosed with lumbar spinal stenosis between January 2003 and January 2012 were evaluated retrospectively. We included patients with asymptomatic spondylotic cervical and thoracic stenosis. We measured the anteroposterior diameters of the vertebral body, bony spinal canal, and spinal cord, along with the Pavlov ratio and anterior or posterior epidural stenosis at the level of the disk for each cervical and thoracic level. We compared the radiologic parameters between the subgroups of cervical stenosis with and without thoracic stenosis. Results Among the 460 patients with lumbar stenosis, 110 (23.9%) had concurrent radiologic cervical stenosis and 112 (24.3%) had concurrent radiologic thoracic stenosis. Fifty-six patients (12.1%) had combined radiologic cervical and thoracic stenosis in addition to their symptomatic lumbar stenosis (triple stenosis). Anterior epidural stenosis at C7–T1 was associated with a high prevalence of thoracic stenosis. Conclusions It appears that asymptomatic radiologic cervical and thoracic stenosis is common in elderly patients with symptomatic lumbar stenosis. PMID:26430589