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  1. [Anterior cervical spine hyperostosis--a rare cause of difficult intubation in emergency].

    PubMed

    Stefan, Monica; Ciupilan, Corina; Mella, Corina; Scutariu, M D

    2011-01-01

    DISH (Diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis) of cervical spine is a rare condition which causes dysphagia in 23% of cases and occasionally dyspnea. The authors report the case of a 74 years old male, known with progressive dysphagia and recurrent episodes of dysphonia and dyspnea, who suffered a sudden episode of respiratory distress that need finaly tracheotomy after ineffective attempts of orotracheal intubation. PMID:22276454

  2. Fractures of the cervical spine

    PubMed Central

    Marcon, Raphael Martus; Cristante, Alexandre Fogaça; Teixeira, William Jacobsen; Narasaki, Douglas Kenji; Oliveira, Reginaldo Perilo; de Barros Filho, Tarcísio Eloy Pessoa

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to review the literature on cervical spine fractures. METHODS: The literature on the diagnosis, classification, and treatment of lower and upper cervical fractures and dislocations was reviewed. RESULTS: Fractures of the cervical spine may be present in polytraumatized patients and should be suspected in patients complaining of neck pain. These fractures are more common in men approximately 30 years of age and are most often caused by automobile accidents. The cervical spine is divided into the upper cervical spine (occiput-C2) and the lower cervical spine (C3-C7), according to anatomical differences. Fractures in the upper cervical spine include fractures of the occipital condyle and the atlas, atlanto-axial dislocations, fractures of the odontoid process, and hangman's fractures in the C2 segment. These fractures are characterized based on specific classifications. In the lower cervical spine, fractures follow the same pattern as in other segments of the spine; currently, the most widely used classification is the SLIC (Subaxial Injury Classification), which predicts the prognosis of an injury based on morphology, the integrity of the disc-ligamentous complex, and the patient's neurological status. It is important to correctly classify the fracture to ensure appropriate treatment. Nerve or spinal cord injuries, pseudarthrosis or malunion, and postoperative infection are the main complications of cervical spine fractures. CONCLUSIONS: Fractures of the cervical spine are potentially serious and devastating if not properly treated. Achieving the correct diagnosis and classification of a lesion is the first step toward identifying the most appropriate treatment, which can be either surgical or conservative. PMID:24270959

  3. The degenerative cervical spine.

    PubMed

    Llopis, E; Belloch, E; León, J P; Higueras, V; Piquer, J

    2016-04-01

    Imaging techniques provide excellent anatomical images of the cervical spine. The choice to use one technique or another will depend on the clinical scenario and on the treatment options. Plain-film X-rays continue to be fundamental, because they make it possible to evaluate the alignment and bone changes; they are also useful for follow-up after treatment. The better contrast resolution provided by magnetic resonance imaging makes it possible to evaluate the soft tissues, including the intervertebral discs, ligaments, bone marrow, and spinal cord. The role of computed tomography in the study of degenerative disease has changed in recent years owing to its great spatial resolution and its capacity to depict osseous components. In this article, we will review the anatomy and biomechanical characteristics of the cervical spine, and then we provide a more detailed discussion of the degenerative diseases that can affect the cervical spine and their clinical management. PMID:26878769

  4. The degenerative cervical spine.

    PubMed

    Llopis, E; Belloch, E; León, J P; Higueras, V; Piquer, J

    2016-04-01

    Imaging techniques provide excellent anatomical images of the cervical spine. The choice to use one technique or another will depend on the clinical scenario and on the treatment options. Plain-film X-rays continue to be fundamental, because they make it possible to evaluate the alignment and bone changes; they are also useful for follow-up after treatment. The better contrast resolution provided by magnetic resonance imaging makes it possible to evaluate the soft tissues, including the intervertebral discs, ligaments, bone marrow, and spinal cord. The role of computed tomography in the study of degenerative disease has changed in recent years owing to its great spatial resolution and its capacity to depict osseous components. In this article, we will review the anatomy and biomechanical characteristics of the cervical spine, and then we provide a more detailed discussion of the degenerative diseases that can affect the cervical spine and their clinical management.

  5. Cervical spine trauma

    PubMed Central

    Torretti, Joel A; Sengupta, Dilip K

    2007-01-01

    Cervical spine trauma is a common problem with a wide range of severity from minor ligamentous injury to frank osteo-ligamentous instability with spinal cord injury. The emergent evaluation of patients at risk relies on standardized clinical and radiographic protocols to identify injuries; elucidate associated pathology; classify injuries; and predict instability, treatment and outcomes. The unique anatomy of each region of the cervical spine demands a review of each segment individually. This article examines both upper cervical spine injuries, as well as subaxial spine trauma. The purpose of this article is to provide a review of the broad topic of cervical spine trauma with reference to the classic literature, as well as to summarize all recently available literature on each topic. Identification of References for Inclusion: A Pubmed and Ovid search was performed for each topic in the review to identify recently published articles relevant to the review. In addition prior reviews and classic references were evaluated individually for inclusion of classic papers, classifications and previously unidentified references. PMID:21139776

  6. Cervical spine pain in the competitive athlete.

    PubMed

    Krabak, Brian J; Kanarek, Samantha L

    2011-08-01

    Cervical pain is a common complaint in both the well-conditioned athlete and the weekend warrior. Some injuries are mild in nature, responding to conservative treatment, including rest, medication, physical therapy, and time. However, more serious injuries, especially those involving the cervical spine, can have devastating consequences. Having a comprehensive understanding of the evaluation and management of cervical pain and cervical spine emergencies is crucial for physicians providing coverage for organized athletic events or for those who serve as team physicians. This article reviews the common causes of cervical spine pain in the competitive athlete.

  7. [Injury of upper cervical spine].

    PubMed

    Ryba, Luděk; Cienciala, Jan; Chaloupka, Richard; Repko, Martin; Vyskočil, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Injuries of the upper cervical spine represent 1/3 of all cervical spine injuries and approximately 40 % result by the death. Every level of the cervical spine can be injured - fractures of condyles of the occipital bone (CO), atlantooccipital dislocation (AOD), fractures of the Atlas (C1), atlantoaxial dislocation (AAD) and fractures of the axis (C2). Most of cases in younger patients are caused by high-energy trauma, while by elderly people, because of the osteoporosis, is needed much less energy and even simple falls can cause the injury of the cervical spine. That´s why the etiology of injuries can be different. In younger patients are caused mainly by car accidents, motorcycle and bicycle accidents and pedestrian crashes by car and in elderly populations are the main reason falls. The mechanism of the injury is axial force, hyperflexion, hyperextension, latero-flexion, rotation and combination of all. The basic diagnostic examination is X ray in AP, lateral and transoral projection. But in the most of cases is CT examination necessary and in the suspicion of the ligamentous injury and neurological deterioration must be MRI examination added. Every injury of the upper cervical spine has its own classification. Clinical symptoms can vary from the neck pain, restricted range of motion, antalgic position of the head, injury of the cranial nerves and different neurologic symptoms from the irritation of nerves to quadriplegia. A large percentage of deaths is at the time of the injury. Therapy is divided to conservative treatment, which is indicated in bone injuries with minimal dislocation. In more severe cases, with the dislocation and ligamentous injury, when is high chance of the instability, is indicated the surgical treatment. We can use anterior or posterior approach, make the osteosynthesis, stabilisation and fusion of the spine. Complex fractures and combination of different types of injuries are often present in this part of the spine. Correct and early

  8. [Cervical spine instability in the surgical patient].

    PubMed

    Barbeito, A; Guerri-Guttenberg, R A

    2014-03-01

    Many congenital and acquired diseases, including trauma, may result in cervical spine instability. Given that airway management is closely related to the movement of the cervical spine, it is important that the anesthesiologist has detailed knowledge of the anatomy, the mechanisms of cervical spine instability, and of the effects that the different airway maneuvers have on the cervical spine. We first review the normal anatomy and biomechanics of the cervical spine in the context of airway management and the concept of cervical spine instability. In the second part, we review the protocols for the management of cervical spine instability in trauma victims and some of the airway management options for these patients.

  9. Osteotomies in the Cervical Spine

    PubMed Central

    Nemani, Venu M.; Derman, Peter B.

    2016-01-01

    Rigid cervical deformities are difficult problems to treat. The goals of surgical treatment include deformity correction, achieving a rigid fusion, and performing a thorough neural decompression. In stiff and ankylosed cervical spines, osteotomies are required to restore sagittal and coronal balance. In this chapter, we describe the clinical and radiographic workup for patients with cervical deformities, and delineate the various factors that must be considered when planning surgical treatment. We also describe in detail the various types of cervical osteotomies, along with their surgical technique, advantages, and potential complications. PMID:26949476

  10. Cervical Spine Injuries in the Athlete.

    PubMed

    Schroeder, Gregory D; Vaccaro, Alexander R

    2016-09-01

    Cervical spine injuries are extremely common and range from relatively minor injuries, such as cervical muscle strains, to severe, life-threatening cervical fractures with spinal cord injuries. Although cervical spine injuries are most common in athletes who participate in contact and collision sports, such as American football and rugby, they also have been reported in athletes who participate in noncontact sports, such as baseball, gymnastics, and diving. Cervical spine injuries in athletes are not necessarily the result of substantial spine trauma; some athletes have chronic conditions, such as congenital stenosis, that increase their risk for a serious cervical spine injury after even minor trauma. Therefore, physicians who cover athletic events must have a thorough knowledge of cervical spine injures and the most appropriate ways in which they should be managed. Although cervical spine injuries can be career-ending injuries, athletes often are able to return to play after appropriate treatment if the potential for substantial re-injury is minimized.

  11. Cervical spine in Treacher Collins syndrome.

    PubMed

    Pun, Amy Hoi-Ying; Clark, Bruce Eric; David, David John; Anderson, Peter John

    2012-05-01

    Treacher Collins syndrome is a congenital syndrome with characteristic craniofacial malformations, which are well described in the literature. However, the presence of cervical spine dysmorphology in this syndrome has been minimally described. This study reviews cervical spine radiographs of 40 patients with Treacher Collins syndrome. In this sample, 7 of 40 patients displayed cervical spine anomalies, with 3 of these patients displaying multiple cervical spine anomalies. The patterns of spinal anomalies were variable, suggesting that the underlying genetic mutation has variable expressivity in cervical spine development as it does elsewhere in the craniofacial skeleton.

  12. Anterior Cervical Spine Surgery for Degenerative Disease: A Review

    PubMed Central

    SUGAWARA, Taku

    Anterior cervical spine surgery is an established surgical intervention for cervical degenerative disease and high success rate with excellent long-term outcomes have been reported. However, indications of surgical procedures for certain conditions are still controversial and severe complications to cause neurological dysfunction or deaths may occur. This review is focused mainly on five widely performed procedures by anterior approach for cervical degenerative disease; anterior cervical discectomy, anterior cervical discectomy and fusion, anterior cervical corpectomy and fusion, anterior cervical foraminotomy, and arthroplasty. Indications, procedures, outcomes, and complications of these surgeries are discussed. PMID:26119899

  13. Fatal Cervical Spine Injury From Diving Accident.

    PubMed

    Voland, Christelle; Vilarino, Raquel; Grabherr, Silke; Lobrinus, Johannes Alexander; Palmiere, Cristian

    2015-09-01

    Spinal cord injuries result after diving into shallow water, often after incautious jumps head first into water of unknown depth during recreational or sport activities. Mortality is generally due to upper cervical trauma. The authors present a case of a diving-related death in a young woman who underwent medicolegal investigations. The measured water depth at the supposed dive site was 1.40 m. Postmortem radiology and autopsy revealed fractures of the body and the posterior arch of the fifth cervical vertebra, a fracture of the right transverse process of the sixth cervical vertebra and hemorrhages involving the cervical paraspinal muscles. Neuropathology showed a posterior epidural hematoma involving the whole cervical region and a symmetric laceration of the spinal cord located at the fourth and fifth cervical vertebra level, surrounded by multiple petechial hemorrhages. Toxicology revealed the presence of ethanol in both blood and urine samples. The death was attributed to cervical spine fracture (C5-C6), spinal cord contusion, and subsequent drowning. This case highlights the usefulness of postmortem radiology, examination of the deep structures of the neck, toxicology, neuropathology, and a detailed research of signs of drowning to formulate appropriate hypotheses pertaining to the cause and mechanism of death.

  14. Complications of Anterior and Posterior Cervical Spine Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, Jason Pui Yin

    2016-01-01

    Cervical spine surgery performed for the correct indications yields good results. However, surgeons need to be mindful of the many possible pitfalls. Complications may occur starting from the anaesthestic procedure and patient positioning to dura exposure and instrumentation. This review examines specific complications related to anterior and posterior cervical spine surgery, discusses their causes and considers methods to prevent or treat them. In general, avoiding complications is best achieved with meticulous preoperative analysis of the pathology, good patient selection for a specific procedure and careful execution of the surgery. Cervical spine surgery is usually effective in treating most pathologies and only a reasonable complication rate exists. PMID:27114784

  15. Cervical Spine MRI in Abused Infants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feldman, Kenneth W.; And Others

    1997-01-01

    This study attempted to use cervical spine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to detect cord injury in 12 dead children with head injury from child abuse. Eighty percent of children autopsied had small cervical spine hemorrhages; MRI did not identify them and did not identify cord injury in any child studied, indicating that MRI scans are probably…

  16. Cervical Spine Injuries in the Athlete.

    PubMed

    Schroeder, Gregory D; Vaccaro, Alexander R

    2016-09-01

    Cervical spine injuries are extremely common and range from relatively minor injuries, such as cervical muscle strains, to severe, life-threatening cervical fractures with spinal cord injuries. Although cervical spine injuries are most common in athletes who participate in contact and collision sports, such as American football and rugby, they also have been reported in athletes who participate in noncontact sports, such as baseball, gymnastics, and diving. Cervical spine injuries in athletes are not necessarily the result of substantial spine trauma; some athletes have chronic conditions, such as congenital stenosis, that increase their risk for a serious cervical spine injury after even minor trauma. Therefore, physicians who cover athletic events must have a thorough knowledge of cervical spine injures and the most appropriate ways in which they should be managed. Although cervical spine injuries can be career-ending injuries, athletes often are able to return to play after appropriate treatment if the potential for substantial re-injury is minimized. PMID:27479833

  17. Avoiding and Managing Intraoperative Complications During Cervical Spine Surgery.

    PubMed

    Bible, Jesse; Rihn, Jeffrey A; Lim, Moe R; Brodke, Darrel S; Lee, Joon Y

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of intraoperative complications during cervical spine surgery is low; however, if they do occur, intraoperative complications have the potential to cause considerable morbidity and mortality. Spine surgeons should be familiar with methods to minimize intraoperative complications. If they do occur, surgeons must be prepared to immediately treat each potential complication to reduce any associated morbidity. PMID:27049196

  18. Avoiding and Managing Intraoperative Complications During Cervical Spine Surgery.

    PubMed

    Bible, Jesse E; Rihn, Jeffrey A; Lim, Moe R; Brodke, Darrel S; Lee, Joon Y

    2015-12-01

    The incidence of intraoperative complications in cervical spine surgery is low. However, when they do occur, such complications have the potential for causing considerable morbidity and mortality. Spine surgeons should be familiar with methods of minimizing such complications. Furthermore, if they do occur, surgeons must be prepared to immediately treat each potential complication to reduce any associated morbidity. PMID:26519429

  19. Non-rigid registration of cervical spine MRI volumes.

    PubMed

    Aktar, Mst Nargis; Alam, Md Jahangir; Pickering, Mark; Webb, Alexandra; Perriman, Diana

    2015-08-01

    Whiplash is the colloquial term for neck injuries caused by sudden extension of the cervical spine. Patients with chronic whiplash associated disorder (WAD) can experience neck pain for many years after the original injury. Researchers have found some evidence to suggest that chronic whiplash is related to the amount of intra-muscular fat in the cervical spine muscles. Hence, an important step towards developing a treatment for chronic WAD is a technique to accurately and efficiently measure the amount of intra-muscular fat in the muscles of the cervical spine. Our proposed technique for making this measurement is to automatically segment the cervical spine muscles using a fused volume created from multi-modal MRI volumes of the cervical spine. Multiple modes are required to enhance the boundaries between the different muscles to assist the following automatic segmentation process. However, before these multiple modes can be fused it is first necessary to accurately register these volumes. Hence, in this paper, we have proposed a new non-rigid multi-modal registration algorithm using the sum of conditional variance (SCV) with partial volume interpolation (PVI) similarity measure and Gauss-Newton (GN) optimization for the accurate registration of multi-modal cervical spine MRI volumes. The performance of the proposed approach is compared with the existing SCV based registration algorithm and the sum of the conditional squared deviation from the mode (SCSDM) method. The experimental results demonstrate that the proposed approach provides superior performance than the best existing approaches. PMID:26736677

  20. Traumatic cervical spine fractures in the adult.

    PubMed

    Copley, Phillip; Tilliridou, Vicky; Jamjoom, Aimun

    2016-09-01

    This article reviews fractures of the cervical spine, highlighting the pertinent goals of initial management, the indications for different imaging modalities and the different fracture patterns. Basic principles of management of these different fracture patterns are outlined. PMID:27640656

  1. Micromechanics of Minor Cervical Spine Injuries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niederer, Peter F.; Schmitt, Kai-Uwe; Muser, Markus H.; Walz, Felix H.

    Minor soft tissue injuries of the cervical spine are of increasing significance in public health. They may in particular be associated with long-term impairment. Such injuries are observed primarily in rear-end automobile collisions at low impact speeds and are attributed to a “whiplash”-type event. The question with respect to injury mechanisms of the cervical spine in cases of impacts of a low severity have raised controversial views in the past. Among proposed injury mechanisms, interactions between fluid and solid structures have been postulated: Viscous shear stresses or pressure gradients which arise in the deforming anatomical structures may have an adverse influence, e. g., on cellular membranes. In this communication, mathematical modeling approaches are presented which allow for a quantification of fluid/solid interactions under typical loading conditions of interest here. It is found, that the shear stresses caused by fluids and acting on accelerated surfaces of fluid-filled bodies depend largely on the size of the fluid space under consideration. Accelerations exhibit a stronger influence than their duration. It cannot be excluded that critical levels are reached even in a low speed impact scenario.

  2. Airway management in cervical spine injury

    PubMed Central

    Austin, Naola; Krishnamoorthy, Vijay; Dagal, Arman

    2014-01-01

    To minimize risk of spinal cord injury, airway management providers must understand the anatomic and functional relationship between the airway, cervical column, and spinal cord. Patients with known or suspected cervical spine injury may require emergent intubation for airway protection and ventilatory support or elective intubation for surgery with or without rigid neck stabilization (i.e., halo). To provide safe and efficient care in these patients, practitioners must identify high-risk patients, be comfortable with available methods of airway adjuncts, and know how airway maneuvers, neck stabilization, and positioning affect the cervical spine. This review discusses the risks and benefits of various airway management strategies as well as specific concerns that affect patients with known or suspected cervical spine injury. PMID:24741498

  3. Cervical spine injuries in rugby players.

    PubMed

    Sovio, O M; Van Peteghem, P K; Schweigel, J F

    1984-03-15

    Nine patients with serious cervical spine injuries that occurred while they were playing rugby were seen in a British Columbia acute spinal cord injury unit during the period 1975-82. All the injuries had occurred during the "scrum" or the "tackle". Two of the patients were rendered permanently quadriplegic, and one patient died. There is a need for a central registry that would record all cervical spine injuries in rugby players as well as for changes in the rules of the game. PMID:6697282

  4. Cervical spine immobilization in the elderly population

    PubMed Central

    Phan, Kevin; Mobbs, Ralph J.; Wilson, David; Ball, Jonathon

    2016-01-01

    Background Immobilization of the cervical spine is a cornerstone of spinal injury management. In the context of suspected cervical spine injury, patients are immobilized in a ‘neutral position’ based on the head and trunk resting on a flat surface. It is hypothesized that the increased thoracic kyphosis and loss of cervical lordosis seen in elderly patients may require alternative cervical immobilization, compared with the ‘neutral position’. Methods To investigate this, an audit of pan-scan CT performed on consecutive major trauma patients aged over 65 years was carried out over a 6-month period. Utilizing the pan-CT’s localizing scout film, a novel measurement, the ‘chin-brow horizontal’ angle was independently measured by a senior spine surgeon (RJM) and a neurosurgeon (PJR) with the gantry used as a horizontal zero- degree reference. The benefit of the ‘chin-brow horizontal’ angle in the trauma setting is it can be assessed from the bedside whilst the patient is immobilized against a flat surface. Results During the 6-month study period, 58 patients were identified (30 male, 28 female), with an average age of 77.6 years (minimum 65, maximum 97). Results showed that ‘chin-brow horizontal’ angles varied widely, between +15.8 degrees in flexion to −30.5 degrees in extension (mean −12.4 degrees in extension, standard deviation 9.31 degrees. The interobserver correlation was 0.997 (95% CI: 0.995–0.998). Conclusions These findings suggest that, due to degenerative changes commonly seen in elderly patients, the routine use of the ‘neutral position’ adopted for cervical spine immobilization may not be appropriate in this population. We suggest that consideration be taken in cervical spine immobilization, with patients assessed on an individual basis including the fracture morphology, to minimize the risk of fracture displacement and worsened neurological deficit.

  5. Pharyngocutaneous fistula after anterior cervical spine surgery

    PubMed Central

    Sansur, Charles A.; Early, Stephen; Reibel, James

    2009-01-01

    Pharyngocutaneous fistulae are rare complications of anterior spine surgery occurring in less than 0.1% of all anterior surgery cases. We report a case of a 19 year old female who sustained a C6 burst fracture with complete quadriplegia. She was treated urgently with a C6 corpectomy with anterior cage and plating followed by posterior cervical stabilization at another institution. Post operatively she developed a pharyngocutaneous fistula that failed to heal despite several attempts of closure and esophageal exclusion with a Jpeg tube. The patient was eventually successfully treated with a three-stage procedure consisting of firstly a posterior approach to reinforce the posterior stabilization of the cervical spine that was felt to be inadequate, secondly an anterior approach with removal of all the anterior instrumentation followed by iliac crest bone graft and thirdly a superior based sternocleidomastoid flap that was interposed between the esophagus and the anterior cervical spine. The patient's fistula healed successfully. However, yet asymptomatic, the anterior iliac crest bone graft resorbed almost completely at 16 months follow up. In light of this complication, we discuss the surgical options for the treatment of pharyngocutaneous fistulae and the closure of this fistula using a superiorly based sternocleidomastoid muscle flap. PMID:19330360

  6. [Accident analytics for structural traumas of the cervical spine].

    PubMed

    Hartwig, E; Elbel, M; Schultheiss, M; Kettler, A; Kinzl, L; Kramer, M

    2004-12-01

    The differentiation between degenerative syndromes of the cervical spine and post-traumatic symptoms requires accident analysis. Experiments with human subjects yield data only in the low-energy range, and there are still no accident analyses of structural traumas of the cervical spine. From 1 January 2000 to 30 April 2002, 15 patients with structural injuries to the cervical spine due to car accidents were treated in the Department of Trauma Surgery of the University of Ulm. In 11 of these cases, the DEKRA Ulm completed an appraisal of the accident process.With lateral impacts, structural injuries to the cervical spine can occur even at speeds of only ca 10 km/h. Injuries to the alar ligaments are produced by frontal collisions with substantial differences in speed. Data from accident analysis of structural injuries to the cervical spine must be taken into consideration in causality examinations of distortions of the cervical spine.

  7. Cervical spine trauma in children and adults: perioperative considerations.

    PubMed

    Vanderhave, Kelly L; Chiravuri, Srinivas; Caird, Michelle S; Farley, Frances A; Graziano, Gregory P; Hensinger, Robert N; Patel, Rakesh D

    2011-06-01

    A wide spectrum of cervical spine injuries, including stable and unstable injuries with and without neurologic compromise, account for a large percentage of emergency department visits. Effective treatment of the polytrauma patient with cervical spine injury requires knowledge of cervical spine anatomy and the pathophysiology of spinal cord injury, as well as techniques for cervical spine stabilization, intraoperative positioning, and airway management. The orthopaedic surgeon must oversee patient care and coordinate treatment with emergency department physicians and anesthesia services in both the acute and subacute settings. Children are particularly susceptible to substantial destabilizing cervical injuries and must be treated with a high degree of caution. The surgeon must understand the unique anatomic and biomechanical properties associated with the pediatric cervical spine as well as injury patterns and stabilization techniques specific to this patient population.

  8. Dysphagia associated with cervical spine and postural disorders.

    PubMed

    Papadopoulou, Soultana; Exarchakos, Georgios; Beris, Alexander; Ploumis, Avraam

    2013-12-01

    Difficulties with swallowing may be both persistent and life threatening for the majority of those who experience it irrespective of age, gender, and race. The purpose of this review is to define oropharyngeal dysphagia and describe its relationship to cervical spine disorders and postural disturbances due to either congenital or acquired disorders. The etiology and diagnosis of dysphagia are analyzed, focusing on cervical spine pathology associated with dysphagia as severe cervical spine disorders and postural disturbances largely have been held accountable for deglutition disorders. Scoliosis, kyphosis–lordosis, and osteophytes are the primary focus of this review in an attempt to elucidate the link between cervical spine disorders and dysphagia. It is important for physicians to be knowledgeable about what triggers oropharyngeal dysphagia in cases of cervical spine and postural disorders. Moreover, the optimum treatment for dysphagia, including the use of therapeutic maneuvers during deglutition, neck exercises, and surgical treatment, is discussed.

  9. Biomechanical response of the human cervical spine.

    PubMed

    Duma, Stefan M; Kemper, Andrew R; Porta, David J

    2008-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to characterize the biomechanical response of human cervical spine segments in dynamic axial compression. This was accomplished by performing dynamic axial compression tests on human cervical spine segments, C4-T1 and C6-T1, dissected from fresh frozen human male cadavers. The proximal and distal vertebral bodies were fixed to a load cell with a custom aluminum pot and subjected to dynamic compressive loading rates using a servo-hydraulic Material Testing System at a rate of 50 mm/s. The average force and moment at time of structural failure were found to be 3022 +/- 45 N and 46.1 +/-8.1 Nm, respectively, for C4-T1 segments and 6117 +/- 6639 N and 69.5 +/-6.8 Nm, respectively for C6-T1segments. The most severe injury as a result of this testing was compression fractures of the vertebral body. In addition, injuries to the intervertebral discs were only observed in specimens that sustained severe vertebral body fractures. This is consistent with the findings of previous researchers who have reported that intervertebral disc failures do not occur due to single acute loading events without associated severe boney fractures. PMID:19141905

  10. Traumatic extradural hematoma of the cervical spine.

    PubMed

    Garza-Mercado, R

    1989-03-01

    An example of a traumatic extradural hematoma of the cervical spine that occurred in a 32-year-old man who suffered from chronic ankylosing spondylitis is reported. Progressive sensory and motor deficit ensued some 3 hours after the patient fell from a standing position. The patient landed on his back, striking his head on the floor. After being helped up, he was able to walk unassisted to a nearby chair, where he sat down until his left lower extremity--and shortly afterwards, the right one--became numb and weak. On admission, the patient was found to have tetraparesis that was more pronounced in the lower extremities and associated with incomplete sensation to pinprick at level T7-T10. He also had painless distention of the urinary bladder. After a few hours, the weakness in his limbs increased and his sensory level rose to C5 bilaterally. A horizontal diastatic fracture across the vertebral body of C7 was discovered on plain x-ray films of the spine, and an extradural hematoma extending dorsally from C5 to T1 was revealed by emergency magnetic resonance imaging. After an emergency decompressive cervical laminectomy and removal of the clot, the patient rapidly regained complete neurological function, except with regard to both the urinary bladder and the rectum, which remained abnormal for almost 7 weeks after the operation.

  11. Severe neurologic manifestations from cervical spine instability in spondylo-megaepiphyseal-metaphyseal dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Simon, Marleen; Campos-Xavier, Ana Belinda; Mittaz-Crettol, Lauréane; Valadares, Eugenia Ribeiro; Carvalho, Daniel; Speck-Martins, Carlos Eduardo; Nampoothiri, Sheela; Alanay, Yasemin; Mihci, Ercan; van Bever, Yolande; Garcia-Segarra, Nuria; Cavalcanti, Denise; Mortier, Geert; Bonafé, Luisa; Superti-Furga, Andrea

    2012-08-15

    Spondylo-megaepiphyseal-metaphyseal dysplasia (SMMD; OMIM 613330) is a dysostosis/dysplasia caused by recessive mutations in the homeobox-containing gene, NKX3-2 (formerly known as BAPX1). Because of the rarity of the condition, its diagnostic features and natural course are not well known. We describe clinical and radiographic findings in six patients (five of which with homozygous mutations in the NKX3-2 gene) and highlight the unusual and severe changes in the cervical spine and the neurologic complications. In individuals with SMMD, the trunk and the neck are short, while the limbs, fingers and toes are disproportionately long. Radiographs show a severe ossification delay of the vertebral bodies with sagittal and coronal clefts, missing ossification of the pubic bones, large round "balloon-like" epiphyses of the long bones, and presence of multiple pseudoepiphyses at all metacarpals and phalanges. Reduced or absent ossification of the cervical vertebrae leads to cervical instability with anterior or posterior kinking of the cervical spine (swan neck-like deformity, kyknodysostosis). As a result of the cervical spine instability or deformation, five of six patients in our series suffered cervical cord injury that manifested clinically as limb spasticity. Although the number of individuals observed is small, the high incidence of cervical spine deformation in SMMD is unique among skeletal dysplasias. Early diagnosis of SMMD by recognition of the radiographic pattern might prevent of the neurologic complications via prophylactic cervical spine stabilization. PMID:22791571

  12. The 100 Most Influential Articles in Cervical Spine Surgery.

    PubMed

    Skovrlj, Branko; Steinberger, Jeremy; Guzman, Javier Z; Overley, Samuel C; Qureshi, Sheeraz A; Caridi, John M; Cho, Samuel K

    2016-02-01

    Study Design Literature review. Objective To identify and analyze the top 100 cited articles in cervical spine surgery. Methods The Thomson Reuters Web of Knowledge was searched for citations of all articles relevant to cervical spine surgery. The number of citations, authorship, year of publication, journal of publication, country of publication, and institution were recorded for each article. Results The most cited article was the classic from 1991 by Vernon and Mior that described the Neck Disability Index. The second most cited was Smith's 1958 article describing the anterior cervical diskectomy and fusion procedure. The third most cited article was Hilibrand's 1999 publication evaluating the incidence, prevalence, and radiographic progression of symptomatic adjacent segment disease following anterior cervical arthrodesis. The majority of the articles originated in the United States (65), and most were published in Spine (39). Most articles were published in the 1990s (34), and the three most common topics were cervical fusion (17), surgical complications (9), and biomechanics (9), respectively. Author Abumi had four articles in the top 100 list, and authors Goffin, Panjabi, and Hadley had three each. The Department of Orthopaedic Surgery at Hokkaido University in Sapporo, Japan, had five articles in the top 100 list. Conclusion This report identifies the top 100 articles in cervical spine surgery and acknowledges those individuals who have contributed the most to the advancement of the study of the cervical spine and the body of knowledge used to guide evidence-based clinical decision making in cervical spine surgery today.

  13. The Burden of Clostridium difficile after Cervical Spine Surgery.

    PubMed

    Guzman, Javier Z; Skovrlj, Branko; Rothenberg, Edward S; Lu, Young; McAnany, Steven; Cho, Samuel K; Hecht, Andrew C; Qureshi, Sheeraz A

    2016-06-01

    Study Design Retrospective database analysis. Objective The purpose of this study is to investigate incidence, comorbidities, and impact on health care resources of Clostridium difficile infection after cervical spine surgery. Methods A total of 1,602,130 cervical spine surgeries from the Nationwide Inpatient Sample database from 2002 to 2011 were included. Patients were included for study based on International Classification of Diseases Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification procedural codes for cervical spine surgery for degenerative spine diagnoses. Baseline patient characteristics were determined. Multivariable analyses assessed factors associated with increased incidence of C. difficile and risk of mortality. Results Incidence of C. difficile infection in postoperative cervical spine surgery hospitalizations is 0.08%, significantly increased since 2002 (p < 0.0001). The odds of postoperative C. difficile infection were significantly increased in patients with comorbidities such as congestive heart failure, renal failure, and perivascular disease. Circumferential cervical fusion (odds ratio [OR] = 2.93, p < 0.0001) increased the likelihood of developing C. difficile infection after degenerative cervical spine surgery. C. difficile infection after cervical spine surgery results in extended length of stay (p < 0.0001) and increased hospital costs (p < 0.0001). Mortality rate in patients who develop C. difficile after cervical spine surgery is nearly 8% versus 0.19% otherwise (p < 0.0001). Moreover, multivariate analysis revealed C. difficile to be a significant predictor of inpatient mortality (OR = 3.99, p < 0.0001). Conclusions C. difficile increases the risk of in-hospital mortality and costs approximately $6,830,695 per year to manage in patients undergoing elective cervical spine surgery. Patients with comorbidities such as renal failure or congestive heart failure have increased probability of developing infection

  14. The Burden of Clostridium difficile after Cervical Spine Surgery.

    PubMed

    Guzman, Javier Z; Skovrlj, Branko; Rothenberg, Edward S; Lu, Young; McAnany, Steven; Cho, Samuel K; Hecht, Andrew C; Qureshi, Sheeraz A

    2016-06-01

    Study Design Retrospective database analysis. Objective The purpose of this study is to investigate incidence, comorbidities, and impact on health care resources of Clostridium difficile infection after cervical spine surgery. Methods A total of 1,602,130 cervical spine surgeries from the Nationwide Inpatient Sample database from 2002 to 2011 were included. Patients were included for study based on International Classification of Diseases Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification procedural codes for cervical spine surgery for degenerative spine diagnoses. Baseline patient characteristics were determined. Multivariable analyses assessed factors associated with increased incidence of C. difficile and risk of mortality. Results Incidence of C. difficile infection in postoperative cervical spine surgery hospitalizations is 0.08%, significantly increased since 2002 (p < 0.0001). The odds of postoperative C. difficile infection were significantly increased in patients with comorbidities such as congestive heart failure, renal failure, and perivascular disease. Circumferential cervical fusion (odds ratio [OR] = 2.93, p < 0.0001) increased the likelihood of developing C. difficile infection after degenerative cervical spine surgery. C. difficile infection after cervical spine surgery results in extended length of stay (p < 0.0001) and increased hospital costs (p < 0.0001). Mortality rate in patients who develop C. difficile after cervical spine surgery is nearly 8% versus 0.19% otherwise (p < 0.0001). Moreover, multivariate analysis revealed C. difficile to be a significant predictor of inpatient mortality (OR = 3.99, p < 0.0001). Conclusions C. difficile increases the risk of in-hospital mortality and costs approximately $6,830,695 per year to manage in patients undergoing elective cervical spine surgery. Patients with comorbidities such as renal failure or congestive heart failure have increased probability of developing infection

  15. Cervical spine surgery in professional athletes: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Joaquim, Andrei F; Hsu, Wellington K; Patel, Alpesh A

    2016-04-01

    Cervical surgery is one of the most common surgical spinal procedures performed around the world. The authors performed a systematic review of the literature reporting the outcomes of cervical spine surgery in high-level athletes in order to better understand the nuances of cervical spine pathology in this population. A search of the MEDLINE database using the search terms "cervical spine" AND "surgery" AND "athletes" yielded 54 abstracts. After exclusion of publications that did not meet the criteria for inclusion, a total of 8 papers reporting the outcome of cervical spine surgery in professional or elite athletes treated for symptoms secondary to cervical spine pathology (focusing in degenerative conditions) remained for analysis. Five of these involved the management of cervical disc herniation, 3 were specifically about traumatic neurapraxia. The majority of the patients included in this review were American football players. Anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) was commonly performed in high-level athletes for the treatment of cervical disc herniation. Most of the studies suggested that return to play is safe for athletes who are asymptomatic after ACDF for cervical radiculopathy due to disc herniation. Surgical treatment may provide a higher rate of return to play for these athletes than nonsurgical treatment. Return to play after cervical spinal cord contusion may be possible in asymptomatic patients. Cervical cord signal changes on MRI may not be an absolute contraindication for return to play in neurologically intact patients, according to some authors. Cervical contusions secondary to cervical stenosis may be associated with a worse outcome and a higher recurrence rate than those those secondary to disc herniation. The evidence is low (Level IV) and individualized treatment must be recommended.

  16. Cervical spine surgery in professional athletes: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Joaquim, Andrei F; Hsu, Wellington K; Patel, Alpesh A

    2016-04-01

    Cervical surgery is one of the most common surgical spinal procedures performed around the world. The authors performed a systematic review of the literature reporting the outcomes of cervical spine surgery in high-level athletes in order to better understand the nuances of cervical spine pathology in this population. A search of the MEDLINE database using the search terms "cervical spine" AND "surgery" AND "athletes" yielded 54 abstracts. After exclusion of publications that did not meet the criteria for inclusion, a total of 8 papers reporting the outcome of cervical spine surgery in professional or elite athletes treated for symptoms secondary to cervical spine pathology (focusing in degenerative conditions) remained for analysis. Five of these involved the management of cervical disc herniation, 3 were specifically about traumatic neurapraxia. The majority of the patients included in this review were American football players. Anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) was commonly performed in high-level athletes for the treatment of cervical disc herniation. Most of the studies suggested that return to play is safe for athletes who are asymptomatic after ACDF for cervical radiculopathy due to disc herniation. Surgical treatment may provide a higher rate of return to play for these athletes than nonsurgical treatment. Return to play after cervical spinal cord contusion may be possible in asymptomatic patients. Cervical cord signal changes on MRI may not be an absolute contraindication for return to play in neurologically intact patients, according to some authors. Cervical contusions secondary to cervical stenosis may be associated with a worse outcome and a higher recurrence rate than those those secondary to disc herniation. The evidence is low (Level IV) and individualized treatment must be recommended. PMID:27032913

  17. Comparison of Cervical Spine Anatomy in Calves, Pigs and Humans

    PubMed Central

    Sheng, Sun-Ren; Xu, Hua-Zi; Wang, Yong-Li; Zhu, Qing-An; Mao, Fang-Min; Lin, Yan; Wang, Xiang-Yang

    2016-01-01

    Background Context Animals are commonly used to model the human spine for in vitro and in vivo experiments. Many studies have investigated similarities and differences between animals and humans in the lumbar and thoracic vertebrae. However, a quantitative anatomic comparison of calf, pig, and human cervical spines has not been reported. Purpose To compare fundamental structural similarities and differences in vertebral bodies from the cervical spines of commonly used experimental animal models and humans. Study Design Anatomical morphometric analysis was performed on cervical vertebra specimens harvested from humans and two common large animals (i.e., calves and pigs). Methods Multiple morphometric parameters were directly measured from cervical spine specimens of twelve pigs, twelve calves and twelve human adult cadavers. The following anatomical parameters were measured: vertebral body width (VBW), vertebral body depth (VBD), vertebral body height (VBH), spinal canal width (SCW), spinal canal depth (SCD), pedicle width (PW), pedicle depth (PD), pedicle inclination (PI), dens width (DW), dens depth (DD), total vertebral width (TVW), and total vertebral depth (TVD). Results The atlantoaxial (C1–2) joint in pigs is similar to that in humans and could serve as a human substitute. The pig cervical spine is highly similar to the human cervical spine, except for two large transverse processes in the anterior regions ofC4–C6. The width and depth of the calf odontoid process were larger than those in humans. VBW and VBD of calf cervical vertebrae were larger than those in humans, but the spinal canal was smaller. Calf C7 was relatively similar to human C7, thus, it may be a good substitute. Conclusion Pig cervical vertebrae were more suitable human substitutions than calf cervical vertebrae, especially with respect to C1, C2, and C7. The biomechanical properties of nerve vascular anatomy and various segment functions in pig and calf cervical vertebrae must be

  18. Cervical spine injuries in the pediatric and adolescent athlete.

    PubMed

    Herman, Martin J

    2006-01-01

    Injuries of the cervical spine in the pediatric and adolescent athlete are less common than other musculoskeletal injuries. Although many of these injuries are relatively minor, serious and potentially unstable or progressive spinal injury must be excluded. Important anatomic differences between the child younger than 10 years and older children and adolescents influence the types of injuries sustained and make assessment of the child's cervical spine sometimes difficult for practitioners accustomed to treating adolescent and adult athletes. Stable soft-tissue injuries of the cervical spine are the most common injuries that occur in all athletes. These injuries are responsive to symptomatic treatment and aggressive rehabilitation. Stingers are injuries of the brachial plexus and upper cervical roots that result from stretching or compressive forces associated with collision sports. Rapid return of sensory and motor dysfunction of a single upper extremity characterizes this entity; long-term disability is rare. Cervical cord neurapraxia (CCN) with transient quadriplegia is most commonly seen in football players. Most athletes fully recover. Cervical canal stenosis as defined by a Pavlov/Torg ratio of less than or equal to 0.8 is predictive of recurrent CCN. Young athletes sustain CCN secondary to hypermobility of the immature cervical spine. Return to play after these injuries is controversial. The athlete with Down syndrome and potential cervical hypermobility requires a careful cervical and neurologic evaluation prior to clearance for participation in sports. PMID:16958497

  19. Multiple subluxations and comminuted fracture of the cervical spine in a sheep.

    PubMed

    Lin, C-C; Chen, K-S; Lin, Y-L; Chan, J P-W

    2015-01-01

    A 5-month-old, 13.5 kg, female Corriedale sheep was referred to the Veterinary Medicine Teaching Hospital, with a history of traumatic injury of the cervical spine followed by non-ambulatoric tetraparesis that occurred 2 weeks before being admitted to the hospital. At admission, malalignment of the cervical spine with the cranial part of the neck deviating to the right was noted. Neurological examinations identified the absence of postural reactions in both forelimbs, mildly decreased spinal reflexes, and normal reaction to pain perception tests. Radiography revealed malalignment of the cervical vertebrae with subluxations at C1-C2 and C2-C3, and a comminuted fracture of the caudal aspect of C2. The sheep was euthanized due to a presumed poor prognosis. Necropsy and histopathological findings confirmed injuries of the cervical spine from C1 to C3, which were consistent with the clinical finding of tetraparesis in this case. This paper presents a rare case of multiple subluxations of the cervical spine caused by blunt force trauma in a young sheep. These results highlight the importance of an astute clinical diagnosis for such an acute cervical spine trauma and the need for prompt surgical correction for similar cases in the future. PMID:25626484

  20. Multiple subluxations and comminuted fracture of the cervical spine in a sheep.

    PubMed

    Lin, C-C; Chen, K-S; Lin, Y-L; Chan, J P-W

    2015-01-01

    A 5-month-old, 13.5 kg, female Corriedale sheep was referred to the Veterinary Medicine Teaching Hospital, with a history of traumatic injury of the cervical spine followed by non-ambulatoric tetraparesis that occurred 2 weeks before being admitted to the hospital. At admission, malalignment of the cervical spine with the cranial part of the neck deviating to the right was noted. Neurological examinations identified the absence of postural reactions in both forelimbs, mildly decreased spinal reflexes, and normal reaction to pain perception tests. Radiography revealed malalignment of the cervical vertebrae with subluxations at C1-C2 and C2-C3, and a comminuted fracture of the caudal aspect of C2. The sheep was euthanized due to a presumed poor prognosis. Necropsy and histopathological findings confirmed injuries of the cervical spine from C1 to C3, which were consistent with the clinical finding of tetraparesis in this case. This paper presents a rare case of multiple subluxations of the cervical spine caused by blunt force trauma in a young sheep. These results highlight the importance of an astute clinical diagnosis for such an acute cervical spine trauma and the need for prompt surgical correction for similar cases in the future.

  1. Improving visual estimates of cervical spine range of motion.

    PubMed

    Hirsch, Brandon P; Webb, Matthew L; Bohl, Daniel D; Fu, Michael; Buerba, Rafael A; Gruskay, Jordan A; Grauer, Jonathan N

    2014-11-01

    Cervical spine range of motion (ROM) is a common measure of cervical conditions, surgical outcomes, and functional impairment. Although ROM is routinely assessed by visual estimation in clinical practice, visual estimates have been shown to be unreliable and inaccurate. Reliable goniometers can be used for assessments, but the associated costs and logistics generally limit their clinical acceptance. To investigate whether training can improve visual estimates of cervical spine ROM, we asked attending surgeons, residents, and medical students at our institution to visually estimate the cervical spine ROM of healthy subjects before and after a training session. This training session included review of normal cervical spine ROM in 3 planes and demonstration of partial and full motion in 3 planes by multiple subjects. Estimates before, immediately after, and 1 month after this training session were compared to assess reliability and accuracy. Immediately after training, errors decreased by 11.9° (flexion-extension), 3.8° (lateral bending), and 2.9° (axial rotation). These improvements were statistically significant. One month after training, visual estimates remained improved, by 9.5°, 1.6°, and 3.1°, respectively, but were statistically significant only in flexion-extension. Although the accuracy of visual estimates can be improved, clinicians should be aware of the limitations of visual estimates of cervical spine ROM. Our study results support scrutiny of visual assessment of ROM as a criterion for diagnosing permanent impairment or disability. PMID:25379754

  2. Fatal Vertebral Artery Injury in Penetrating Cervical Spine Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Tannoury, Chadi; Degiacomo, Anthony

    2015-01-01

    Study Design. This case illustrates complications to a vertebral artery injury (VAI) resulting from penetrating cervical spine trauma. Objectives. To discuss the management of both VAI and cervical spine trauma after penetrating gunshot wound to the neck. Summary of Background Data. Vertebral artery injury following cervical spine trauma is infrequent, and a unilateral VAI often occurs without neurologic sequela. Nevertheless, devastating complications of stroke and death do occur. Methods. A gunshot wound to the neck resulted in a C6 vertebral body fracture and C5–C7 transverse foramina fractures. Neck CT angiogram identified a left vertebral artery occlusion. A cerebral angiography confirmed occlusion of the left extracranial vertebral artery and patency of the remaining cerebrovascular system. Following anterior cervical corpectomy and stabilization, brainstem infarction occurred and resulted in death. Results. A fatal outcome resulted from vertebral artery thrombus propagation with occlusion of the basilar artery triggering basilar ischemia and subsequent brainstem and cerebellar infarction. Conclusions. Vertebral artery injury secondary to cervical spine trauma can lead to potentially devastating neurologic sequela. Early surgical stabilization, along with anticoagulation therapy, contributes towards managing the combination of injuries. Unfortunately, despite efforts, a poor outcome is sometimes inevitable when cervical spine trauma is coupled with a VAI. PMID:26640731

  3. Outpatient surgery in the cervical spine: is it safe?

    PubMed

    Lee, Michael J; Kalfas, Iain; Holmer, Haley; Skelly, Andrea

    2014-10-01

    Study Design Systematic review. Study Rationale As the length of stay after cervical spine surgery has decreased substantially, the feasibility and safety of outpatient cervical spine surgery come into question. Although minimal length of stay is a targeted metric for quality and costs for medical centers, the safety of outpatient cervical spine surgery has not been clearly defined. Objective The objective of this article is to evaluate the safety of inpatient versus outpatient surgery in the cervical spine for adult patients with symptomatic or asymptomatic degenerative disc disease. Methods A systematic review of the literature was undertaken for articles published through February 19, 2014. Electronic databases and the bibliographies of key articles were searched to identify comparative studies evaluating the safety of inpatient versus outpatient surgery in the cervical spine. Spinal cord stimulation, spinal injections, and diagnostic procedures were excluded. Two independent reviewers assessed the strength of evidence using the Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development, and Evaluation (GRADE) system, and disagreements were resolved by consensus. Results Five studies that met the inclusion criteria were identified. One study reported low risk of hematoma (0% of outpatients and 1.6% of inpatients). Two studies reported on mortality and both reported no deaths in either group following surgery. Dysphagia risks ranged from 0 to 10% of outpatients and 1.6 to 5% of inpatients, and infection risks ranged from 0 to 1% of outpatients and 2 to 2.8% of inpatients. One study reported that no (0) outpatients were readmitted to the hospital due to a complication, compared with four inpatients (7%). The overall strength of evidence was insufficient for all safety outcomes examined. Conclusion Though the studies in our systematic review did not suggest an increased risk of complication with outpatient cervical spine surgery, the strength of evidence to

  4. The 100 Most Influential Articles in Cervical Spine Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Skovrlj, Branko; Steinberger, Jeremy; Guzman, Javier Z.; Overley, Samuel C.; Qureshi, Sheeraz A.; Caridi, John M.; Cho, Samuel K.

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Literature review. Objective To identify and analyze the top 100 cited articles in cervical spine surgery. Methods The Thomson Reuters Web of Knowledge was searched for citations of all articles relevant to cervical spine surgery. The number of citations, authorship, year of publication, journal of publication, country of publication, and institution were recorded for each article. Results The most cited article was the classic from 1991 by Vernon and Mior that described the Neck Disability Index. The second most cited was Smith's 1958 article describing the anterior cervical diskectomy and fusion procedure. The third most cited article was Hilibrand's 1999 publication evaluating the incidence, prevalence, and radiographic progression of symptomatic adjacent segment disease following anterior cervical arthrodesis. The majority of the articles originated in the United States (65), and most were published in Spine (39). Most articles were published in the 1990s (34), and the three most common topics were cervical fusion (17), surgical complications (9), and biomechanics (9), respectively. Author Abumi had four articles in the top 100 list, and authors Goffin, Panjabi, and Hadley had three each. The Department of Orthopaedic Surgery at Hokkaido University in Sapporo, Japan, had five articles in the top 100 list. Conclusion This report identifies the top 100 articles in cervical spine surgery and acknowledges those individuals who have contributed the most to the advancement of the study of the cervical spine and the body of knowledge used to guide evidence-based clinical decision making in cervical spine surgery today. PMID:26835204

  5. Cervical Spine Involvement in Mild Traumatic Brain Injury: A Review.

    PubMed

    Morin, Michael; Langevin, Pierre; Fait, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Background. There is a lack of scientific evidence in the literature on the involvement of the cervical spine in mTBI; however, its involvement is clinically accepted. Objective. This paper reviews evidence for the involvement of the cervical spine in mTBI symptoms, the mechanisms of injury, and the efficacy of therapy for cervical spine with concussion-related symptoms. Methods. A keyword search was conducted on PubMed, ICL, SportDiscus, PEDro, CINAHL, and Cochrane Library databases for articles published since 1990. The reference lists of articles meeting the criteria (original data articles, literature reviews, and clinical guidelines) were also searched in the same databases. Results. 4,854 records were screened and 43 articles were retained. Those articles were used to describe different subjects such as mTBI's signs and symptoms, mechanisms of injury, and treatments of the cervical spine. Conclusions. The hypothesis of cervical spine involvement in post-mTBI symptoms and in PCS (postconcussion syndrome) is supported by increasing evidence and is widely accepted clinically. For the management and treatment of mTBIs, few articles were available in the literature, and relevant studies showed interesting results about manual therapy and exercises as efficient tools for health care practitioners. PMID:27529079

  6. Neurological deterioration during intubation in cervical spine disorders

    PubMed Central

    Durga, Padmaja; Sahu, Barada Prasad

    2014-01-01

    Anaesthesiologists are often involved in the management of patients with cervical spine disorders. Airway management is often implicated in the deterioration of spinal cord function. Most evidence on neurological deterioration resulting from intubation is from case reports which suggest only association, but not causation. Most anaesthesiologists and surgeons probably believe that the risk of spinal cord injury (SCI) during intubation is largely due to mechanical compression produced by movement of the cervical spine. But it is questionable that the small and brief deformations produced during intubation can produce SCI. Difficult intubation, more frequently encountered in patients with cervical spine disorders, is likely to produce greater movement of spine. Several alternative intubation techniques are shown to improve ease and success, and reduce cervical spine movement but their role in limiting SCI is not studied. The current opinion is that most neurological injuries during anaesthesia are the result of prolonged deformation, impaired perfusion of the cord, or both. To prevent further neurological injury to the spinal cord and preserve spinal cord function, minimizing movement during intubation and positioning for surgery are essential. The features that diagnose laryngoscopy induced SCI are myelopathy present on recovery, short period of unconsciousness, autonomic disturbances following laryngoscopy, cranio-cervical junction disease or gross instability below C3. It is difficult to accept or refute the claim that neurological deterioration was induced by intubation. Hence, a record of adequate care at laryngoscopy and also perioperative period are important in the event of later medico-legal proceedings. PMID:25624530

  7. Cervical Spine Involvement in Mild Traumatic Brain Injury: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Morin, Michael; Langevin, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    Background. There is a lack of scientific evidence in the literature on the involvement of the cervical spine in mTBI; however, its involvement is clinically accepted. Objective. This paper reviews evidence for the involvement of the cervical spine in mTBI symptoms, the mechanisms of injury, and the efficacy of therapy for cervical spine with concussion-related symptoms. Methods. A keyword search was conducted on PubMed, ICL, SportDiscus, PEDro, CINAHL, and Cochrane Library databases for articles published since 1990. The reference lists of articles meeting the criteria (original data articles, literature reviews, and clinical guidelines) were also searched in the same databases. Results. 4,854 records were screened and 43 articles were retained. Those articles were used to describe different subjects such as mTBI's signs and symptoms, mechanisms of injury, and treatments of the cervical spine. Conclusions. The hypothesis of cervical spine involvement in post-mTBI symptoms and in PCS (postconcussion syndrome) is supported by increasing evidence and is widely accepted clinically. For the management and treatment of mTBIs, few articles were available in the literature, and relevant studies showed interesting results about manual therapy and exercises as efficient tools for health care practitioners. PMID:27529079

  8. Sensitivity of plain radiography for pediatric cervical spine injury.

    PubMed

    Cui, Li W; Probst, Marc A; Hoffman, Jerome R; Mower, William R

    2016-10-01

    Pediatric patients with suspected cervical spine injuries (CSI) often receive a computed tomography (CT) scan as an initial diagnostic imaging test. While sensitive, CT of the cervical spine carries significant radiation and risk of lethal malignant transformation later in life. Plain radiographs carry significantly less radiation and could serve as the preferred screening tool, provided they have a high functional sensitivity in detecting pediatric patients with CSI. We hypothesize that plain cervical spine radiographs can reliably detect pediatric patients with CSI and seek to quantify the functional sensitivity of plain radiography as compared to CT. We analyzed data from the NEXUS cervical spine study to assess the sensitivity of plain radiographs in the evaluation of CSI. We identified all pediatric patients who underwent plain radiographic imaging, and all pediatric patients found to have CSI. We then determined the sensitivity of plain radiographs in detecting pediatric patients with CSI. We identified 44 pediatric patients with CSI in the dataset with age ranging from 2 to 18 years old. Thirty-two of the 44 pediatric patients received cervical spine plain films as a part of their workup. Plain films were able to identify all 32 pediatric patients with CSI to yield a sensitivity of 100 % in detecting injury victims (95 % confidence interval 89.1-100.0 %). Plain radiography was highly sensitive for the identification of CSI in our cohort of pediatric patients and is useful as a screening tool in the evaluation of pediatric CSI. PMID:27321014

  9. Catastrophic Cervical Spine Injuries in Contact Sports

    PubMed Central

    Hutton, Michael James; McGuire, Robert A.; Dunn, Robert; Williams, Richard; Robertson, Peter; Twaddle, Bruce; Kiely, Patrick; Clarke, Andrew; Mazda, Keyvan; Davies, Paul; Pagarigan, Krystle T.; Dettori, Joseph R.

    2016-01-01

    Study Design Systematic review. Objectives To determine the incidence of catastrophic cervical spine injuries (CCSIs) among elite athletes participating in contact team sports and whether the incidence varies depending on the use of protective gear or by player position. Methods Electronic databases and reference lists of key articles published from January 1, 2000, to January 29, 2016, were searched. Results Fourteen studies were included that reported CCSI in rugby (n = 10), American football (n = 3), and Irish hurling (n = 1). Among Rugby Union players, incidence of CCSI was 4.1 per 100,000 player-hours. Among National Football League players, the CCSI rate was 0.6 per 100,000 player-exposures. At the collegiate level, the CCSI rate ranged from 1.1 to 4.7 per 100,000 player-years. Mixed populations of elite and recreational rugby players in four studies report a CCSI rate of 1.4 to 7.2 per 100,000 player-years. In this same population, the scrum accounted for 30 to 51% of total reported CCSIs in Rugby Union versus 0 to 4% in Rugby League. The tackle accounted for 29 to 39% of injuries in Rugby Union and 78 to 100% of injuries in Rugby League. Making a tackle was responsible for 29 to 80% of injuries in American football. Conclusion CCSIs are infrequent among elite athletes. There is insufficient evidence to determine the effect of protective gear (e.g., helmets, padding) on CCSI incidence. Scrum and tackle in rugby and tackling in American football account for the majority of CCSIs in each respective sport. PMID:27781193

  10. Magnetic resonance imaging atlas of the cervical spine musculature.

    PubMed

    Au, John; Perriman, Diana M; Pickering, Mark R; Buirski, Graham; Smith, Paul N; Webb, Alexandra L

    2016-07-01

    The anatomy of the cervical spine musculature visible on magnetic resonance (MR) images is poorly described in the literature. However, the correct identification of individual muscles is clinically important because certain conditions of the cervical spine, for example whiplash associated disorders, idiopathic neck pain, cervical nerve root avulsion and cervical spondylotic myelopathy, are associated with different morphological changes in specific muscles visible on MR images. Knowledge of the precise structure of different cervical spine muscles is crucial when comparisons with the contralateral side or with normal are required for accurate description of imaging pathology, management and assessment of treatment efficacy. However, learning the intricate arrangement of 27 muscles is challenging. A multi-level cross-sectional depiction combined with three-dimensional reconstructions could facilitate the understanding of this anatomically complex area. This paper presents a comprehensive series of labeled axial MR images from one individual and serves as a reference atlas of the cervical spine musculature to guide clinicians, researchers, and anatomists in the accurate identification of these muscles on MR imaging. Clin. Anat. 29:643-659, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27106787

  11. 78 FR 65451 - Agency Information Collection (Neck (Cervical Spine) Conditions Disability Benefits Questionnaire...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-31

    ... AFFAIRS Agency Information Collection (Neck (Cervical Spine) Conditions Disability Benefits Questionnaire...) Conditions Disability Benefits Questionnaire)'' in any correspondence. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT...- ] NEW (Neck (Cervical Spine) Conditions Disability Benefits Questionnaire).'' SUPPLEMENTARY...

  12. Posterior Fixation Techniques in the Subaxial Cervical Spine

    PubMed Central

    Ghori, Ahmer; Makanji, Heeren; Cha, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    This article reviews the historical context, indications, techniques, and complications of four posterior fixation techniques to stabilize the subaxial cervical spine. Specifically, posterior wiring, laminar screw fixation, lateral mass fixation, and pedicle screw fixation are among the common methods of operative fixation of the subaxial cervical spine. While wiring and laminar screw fixation are now rarely used, both lateral mass and pedicle screw fixation are technically challenging and present the risk of significant complications if performed incorrectly. With a sound understanding of anatomy and rigorous preoperative evaluation of bony structures, both lateral mass and pedicle screw fixation provide a safe and reliable method for subaxial cervical spine fixation. PMID:26594602

  13. Advances in the understanding of cervical spine deformity.

    PubMed

    Sharan, Alok D; Krystal, Jonathan D; Singla, Amit; Nassr, Ahmad; Kang, James D; Riew, K Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Cervical spine deformities pose substantial challenges for spine surgeons. The anatomy and biomechanics of the cervical spine play an important role in the decision-making process regarding treatment. The etiology of cervical deformities can be congenital, developmental, iatrogenic, degenerative, or inflammatory. Dropped head syndrome has been recently described but is poorly understood. Patients have variable presentations ranging from neck pain to an inability to maintain head position and neural compromise. Radiographic angles are important to monitor the deformity and plan the surgical correction. Treatment is focused on relieving pain, preventing and improving neurologic compromise, and improving overall spinal alignment and balance. The surgical approach and the level of fusion should be individualized on a case-by-case basis. The surgeon can greatly improve a patient's quality of life by understanding the nature of the patient's deformity and fully considering all treatment options. PMID:25745925

  14. Risk Factors for Vertebral Artery Injuries in Cervical Spine Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Dabke, Harshad V.

    2014-01-01

    Blunt cerebrovascular injuries (i.e. involvement of carotid and vertebral arteries) are increasingly being recognized in setting of cervical spine trauma/fractures and are associated with high incidence of stroke/morbidity and mortality. The incidence of vertebral artery injuries (VAI) is more common than previously thought and regular screening is seldom performed. However there exists no screening criteria and conflicting reports exists between spine and trauma literature. Many clinicians do not routinely screen/evaluate patients presenting with cervical spine trauma for potential VAI. This article provides a brief summary of existing evidence regarding the incidence of VAI in the background of cervical trauma/fractures. The type and fracture pattern that is associated with a high risk of VAI warranting mandatory screening/further work-up is discussed. A brief overview of diagnostic modalities and their respective sensitivity/specificity along with available treatment options is also summarized. PMID:25317310

  15. The role of the cervical spine in post-concussion syndrome.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Cameron M; Vernon, Howard; Leddy, John J; Baldwin, Bradley A

    2015-07-01

    While much is known regarding the pathophysiology surrounding concussion injuries in the acute phase, there is little evidence to support many of the theorized etiologies to post-concussion syndrome (PCS); the chronic phase of concussion occurring in ∼ 10-15% of concussed patients. This paper reviews the existing literature surrounding the numerous proposed theories of PCS and introduces another potential, and very treatable, cause of this chronic condition; cervical spine dysfunction due to concomitant whiplash-type injury. We also discuss a short case-series of five patients with diagnosed PCS having very favorable outcomes following various treatment and rehabilitative techniques aimed at restoring cervical spine function. PMID:26138797

  16. The role of the cervical spine in post-concussion syndrome.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Cameron M; Vernon, Howard; Leddy, John J; Baldwin, Bradley A

    2015-07-01

    While much is known regarding the pathophysiology surrounding concussion injuries in the acute phase, there is little evidence to support many of the theorized etiologies to post-concussion syndrome (PCS); the chronic phase of concussion occurring in ∼ 10-15% of concussed patients. This paper reviews the existing literature surrounding the numerous proposed theories of PCS and introduces another potential, and very treatable, cause of this chronic condition; cervical spine dysfunction due to concomitant whiplash-type injury. We also discuss a short case-series of five patients with diagnosed PCS having very favorable outcomes following various treatment and rehabilitative techniques aimed at restoring cervical spine function.

  17. Lateral Mass Fixation in the Subaxial Cervical Spine.

    PubMed

    Kurd, Mark F; Millhouse, Paul W; Schroeder, Gregory D; Kepler, Christopher K; Vaccaro, Alexander R

    2015-08-01

    The use of lateral mass screws and rods in the subaxial spine has become the standard method of fixation for posterior cervical spine fusions. Multiple techniques have been described for the placement of lateral mass screws, including the Magerl, the Anderson, and the An techniques. While these techniques are all slightly different, the overall goal is to obtain solid bony fixation while avoiding the neurovascular structures. The use of lateral mass screws has been shown to be a safe and effective technique for achieving a posterior cervical fusion.

  18. [Cervical spine instability: point of view of the anesthesiologist].

    PubMed

    Poveda Jaramillo, R; Paredes Sanín, P; Carvajal, H; Carrasquilla, R; Murillo Deluquez, M

    2014-01-01

    The experience in airway management permits the anesthesiologist to participate in cases of cervical spine instability in the operating room when the patient is subjected to surgical procedures, or in cases of difficulty to access or keep the airway open in emergencies. This article reviews the epidemiology, definition, etiology, diagnostic criteria, methods of approach to airway management, and current recommendations on handling cervical instability in different scenarios. There is no approach to the airway that ensures complete immobility of the cervical spine, but there are methods that are better adapted to specific contexts; at the end, the reader will be able to identify the virtues and defects of the various options that the anesthesiologists have to address the airway in cases of cervical instability. PMID:23787370

  19. [Cervical spine instability: point of view of the anesthesiologist].

    PubMed

    Poveda Jaramillo, R; Paredes Sanín, P; Carvajal, H; Carrasquilla, R; Murillo Deluquez, M

    2014-01-01

    The experience in airway management permits the anesthesiologist to participate in cases of cervical spine instability in the operating room when the patient is subjected to surgical procedures, or in cases of difficulty to access or keep the airway open in emergencies. This article reviews the epidemiology, definition, etiology, diagnostic criteria, methods of approach to airway management, and current recommendations on handling cervical instability in different scenarios. There is no approach to the airway that ensures complete immobility of the cervical spine, but there are methods that are better adapted to specific contexts; at the end, the reader will be able to identify the virtues and defects of the various options that the anesthesiologists have to address the airway in cases of cervical instability.

  20. A Female Ligamentous Cervical Spine Finite Element Model Validated for Physiological Loads.

    PubMed

    Östh, Jonas; Brolin, Karin; Svensson, Mats Y; Linder, Astrid

    2016-06-01

    Mathematical cervical spine models allow for studying of impact loading that can cause whiplash associated disorders (WAD). However, existing models only cover the male anthropometry, despite the female population being at a higher risk of sustaining WAD in automotive rear-end impacts. The aim of this study is to develop and validate a ligamentous cervical spine intended for biomechanical research on the effect of automotive impacts. A female model has the potential to aid the design of better protection systems as well as improve understanding of injury mechanisms causing WAD. A finite element (FE) mesh was created from surface data of the cervical vertebrae of a 26-year old female (stature 167 cm, weight 59 kg). Soft tissues were generated from the skeletal geometry and anatomical literature descriptions. Ligaments were modeled with nonlinear elastic orthotropic membrane elements, intervertebral disks as composites of nonlinear elastic bulk elements, and orthotropic anulus fibrosus fiber layers, while cortical and trabecular bones were modeled as isotropic plastic-elastic. The model has geometrical features representative of the female cervical spine-the largest average difference compared with published anthropometric female data was the vertebral body depth being 3.4% shorter for the model. The majority the cervical segments compare well with respect to biomechanical data at physiological loads, with the best match for flexion-extension loads and less biofidelity for axial rotation. An average female FE ligamentous cervical spine model was developed and validated with respect to physiological loading. In flexion-extension simulations with the developed female model and an existing average male cervical spine model, a greater range of motion (ROM) was found in the female model. PMID:26974520

  1. Anatomic Study of Anterior Transdiscal Axial Screw Fixation for Subaxial Cervical Spine Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Wei; Zheng, Minghui; Qu, Dongbin; Zou, Lin; Chen, Yongquan; Chen, Jianting; Zhu, Qingan

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Anterior transdiscal axial screw (ATAS) fixation is an alternative or supplement to the plate and screw constructs for the upper cervical spine injury. However, no existing literatures clarified the anatomic feasibility of this technique for subaxial cervical spine. Therefore, the objective of this study was to evaluate the anatomical feasibility and to establish guidelines for the use of the ATAS fixation for the subaxial cervical spine injury. Fifty normal cervical spines had radiographs to determine the proposed screw trajectory (the screw length and insertion angle) and the interbody graft-related parameters (the disc height and depth, and the distance between anterior vertebral margin and the screw) for all levels of the subaxial cervical spine. Following screw insertion in 8 preserved human cadaver specimens, surgical simulation and dissection verified the feasibility and safety of the ATAS fixation. Radiographic measurements showed the mean axial screw length and cephalic incline angle of all levels were 41.2 mm and 25.2°, respectively. The suitable depth of the interbody graft was >11.7 mm (the distance between anterior vertebral margin and the screw), but <17.1 mm (disc depth). Except the axial screw length, increase in all the measurements was seen with level up to C5–C6 segment. Simulated procedure in the preserved specimens demonstrated that ATAS fixation could be successfully performed at C2–C3, C3–C4, C4–C5, and C5–C6 levels, but impossible at C6–C7 due to the obstacle of the sternum. All screws were placed accurately. None of the screws penetrated into the spinal canal and caused fractures determined by dissecting the specimens. The anterior transdiscal axial screw fixation, as an alternative or supplementary instrumentation for subaxial cervical spine injuries, is feasible and safe with meticulous surgical planning. PMID:27495016

  2. Cervical spine manifestations in patients with inflammatory arthritides.

    PubMed

    Cha, Thomas D; An, Howard S

    2013-07-01

    The cervical spine can frequently become involved in patients with rheumatologic disorders, as a result of either the rheumatologic disease itself or age-associated degenerative processes that can also occur in the rest of the population. Awareness of the increased risk of cervical spine manifestations in patients with rheumatologic disorders enables early recognition and initiation of the appropriate treatment regimen. For example, patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) often have spinal instability which, if left untreated, can lead to neurological deficits. Biologic agents are effective in slowing the progression of the skeletal abnormality as well as for treating the RA, and this approach is often sufficient. However, early surgical intervention is recommended for patients with RA who develop neurologic deficits, as conservative approaches have limited effectiveness in this group. Spinal stability should be the primary surgical objective. For patients with ankylosing spondylitis, cervical spine surgery might be required either for fracture repair or to correct severe kyphosis. Understanding each condition's specific cervical spine manifestation and its natural history can help to clarify the appropriate indications for and timing of surgery to maximize patients' outcomes and limit complications. PMID:23528639

  3. Dimensional coordinate measurements: application in characterizing cervical spine motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Weilong; Li, Linan; Wang, Shibin; Wang, Zhiyong; Shi, Nianke; Xue, Yuan

    2014-06-01

    Cervical spine as a complicated part in the human body, the form of its movement is diverse. The movements of the segments of vertebrae are three-dimensional, and it is reflected in the changes of the angle between two joint and the displacement in different directions. Under normal conditions, cervical can flex, extend, lateral flex and rotate. For there is no relative motion between measuring marks fixed on one segment of cervical vertebra, the cervical vertebrae with three marked points can be seen as a body. Body's motion in space can be decomposed into translational movement and rotational movement around a base point .This study concerns the calculation of dimensional coordinate of the marked points pasted to the human body's cervical spine by an optical method. Afterward, these measures will allow the calculation of motion parameters for every spine segment. For this study, we choose a three-dimensional measurement method based on binocular stereo vision. The object with marked points is placed in front of the CCD camera. Through each shot, we will get there two parallax images taken from different cameras. According to the principle of binocular vision we can be realized three-dimensional measurements. Cameras are erected parallelly. This paper describes the layout of experimental system and a mathematical model to get the coordinates.

  4. Reconstitution of lost cervical spine function: management strategies

    PubMed Central

    Ernst, Arne; Niedeggen, Andreas

    2005-01-01

    The cervical spine (CS) is the most vulnerable part of the whole spine because it has least protection. This is due to its high mobility (few bone, but largely muscle and joint support) which is associated with a high injury risk. The anatomical characteristics are based on evolutionary biological reasons, i.e. humans had to be able to freely controlling the surrounding space with their eyes and to have permanent postural control by an upright position of the head. The cervical spine, its joint and the surrounding muscles are highly interconnected (e.g. direct neuronal projections into the brain stem, connections to the TMJ, Head's zones with projections to the skin surface). Moreover, the spinal pain memory store can lead to a variets of multi-facette clinical pictures. In addition to reversible disorders of the cervical spine, posttraumatic disorders play a major role. The therapy options available include physiotherapy, drug therapy and surgical measures. However, a multidisciplinary approach is most favourable. PMID:22073068

  5. The Neandertal vertebral column 1: the cervical spine.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Olivencia, Asier; Been, Ella; Arsuaga, Juan Luis; Stock, Jay T

    2013-06-01

    This paper provides a metric analysis of the Neandertal cervical spine in relation to modern human variation. All seven cervical vertebrae have been analysed. Metric data from eight Neandertal individuals are compared with a large sample of modern humans. The significance of morphometric differences is tested using both z-scores and two-tailed Wilcoxon signed rank tests. The results identify significant metric and morphological differences between Neandertals and modern humans in all seven cervical vertebrae. Neandertal vertebrae are mediolaterally wider and dorsoventrally longer than modern humans, due in part to longer and more horizontally oriented spinous processes. This suggests that Neandertal cervical morphology was more stable in both mid-sagittal and coronal planes. It is hypothesized that the differences in cranial size and shape in the Neandertal and modern human lineages from their Middle Pleistocene ancestors could account for some of the differences in the neck anatomy between these species. PMID:23541382

  6. Fractures of the articular processes of the cervical spine

    SciTech Connect

    Woodring, J.H.; Goldstein, S.J.

    1982-08-01

    Fractures of the articular processes occurred in 16 (20.8%) of 77 patients with cervical spine fractures as demonstrated by multidirectional tomography. Plain films demonstrated the fractures in only two patients. Acute cervical radiculopathy occurred in five of the patients with articular process fractures (superior process, two cases; inferior process, three cases). Persistent neck pain occurred in one other patient without radiculopathy. Three patients suffered spinal cord damage at the time of injury, which was not the result of the articular process fracture itself. In the other seven cases, no definite sequelae occurred. However, disruption of the facet joint may predispose to early degenerative joint disease and chronic pain; unilateral or bilateral facet dislocation was present in five patients. In patients with cervical trauma who develop cervical radiculopathy, tomography should be performed to evaluate the articular processes.

  7. [Cervical spine osteochondroma presenting with torticollis and hemiparesis].

    PubMed

    Castro-Castro, Julián; Rodiño-Padín, Jon; Touceda-Bravo, Alberto; Castro-Bouzas, Daniel; Pinzón-Millán, Alfonso

    2014-01-01

    Osteochondromas are slow-growing benign bone tumors that are located frequently in the long bones. Approximately 1-4% of them occur in the spine. Solitary spinal osteochondromas may produce a wide variety of symptoms depending on their location and relationship to associated structures. We report a case of a 74-year old woman who was admitted to our hospital with complaints of progressive left hemibody weakness and cervicalgia. Neurological examination disclosed mild left-sided hemiparesis and left torticollis. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging of the cervical spine revealed an expansive lesion affecting the left C3-C4 facet joint. The patient underwent a posterior C3 and C4 hemilaminectomy, complete excision of the lesion and instrumented posterior cervical fixation. Histological examination confirmed the diagnosis of osteochondroma. After surgery her symptoms improved progressively with no neurological sequels. PMID:24139102

  8. Head and cervical spine postures in complete denture wearers.

    PubMed

    Salonen, M A; Raustia, A M; Huggare, J

    1993-01-01

    Signs and symptoms in the stomatognathic system and head and cervical spine postures were evaluated in 10 edentulous patients prior to renewal of their dentures, as well as immediately and six months after insertion of new dentures. Natural head posture was recorded using the fluid-level method and measured from the roentgen cephalograms. It was shown that the variables duration of edentulousness and free-way space displayed positive correlations with the dysfunction symptoms. In addition, the patients who needed oral rehabilitation the most, who received the greatest reduction in their free-way space, were seen to have raised their heads more than average. There was also an inverse correlation between the reduction of clinical dysfunction index score and cervical spine postures.

  9. [Cervical spine osteochondroma presenting with torticollis and hemiparesis].

    PubMed

    Castro-Castro, Julián; Rodiño-Padín, Jon; Touceda-Bravo, Alberto; Castro-Bouzas, Daniel; Pinzón-Millán, Alfonso

    2014-01-01

    Osteochondromas are slow-growing benign bone tumors that are located frequently in the long bones. Approximately 1-4% of them occur in the spine. Solitary spinal osteochondromas may produce a wide variety of symptoms depending on their location and relationship to associated structures. We report a case of a 74-year old woman who was admitted to our hospital with complaints of progressive left hemibody weakness and cervicalgia. Neurological examination disclosed mild left-sided hemiparesis and left torticollis. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging of the cervical spine revealed an expansive lesion affecting the left C3-C4 facet joint. The patient underwent a posterior C3 and C4 hemilaminectomy, complete excision of the lesion and instrumented posterior cervical fixation. Histological examination confirmed the diagnosis of osteochondroma. After surgery her symptoms improved progressively with no neurological sequels.

  10. Head and cervical spine posture in behaving rats: implications for modeling human conditions involving the head and cervical spine.

    PubMed

    Griffin, C; Choong, W Y; Teh, W; Buxton, A J; Bolton, P S

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this study was to define the temporal and spatial (postural) characteristics of the head and cervical vertebral column (spine) of behaving rats in order to better understand their suitability as a model to study human conditions involving the head and neck. Time spent in each of four behavioral postures was determined from video tape recordings of rats (n = 10) in the absence and presence of an intruder rat. Plain film radiographic examination of a subset of these rats (n = 5) in each of these postures allowed measurement of head and cervical vertebral column positions adopted by the rats. When single they were quadruped or crouched most (∼80%) of the time and bipedal either supported or free standing for only ∼10% of the time. The introduction of an intruder significantly (P < 0.0001) reduced the proportion of time rats spent quadruped (median, from 71% to 47%) and bipedal free standing (median, from 2.9% to 0.4%). The cervical spine was orientated (median, 25-75 percentile) near vertical (18.8°, 4.2°-30.9°) when quadruped, crouched (15.4°, 7.6°-69.3°) and bipedal supported (10.5°, 4.8°-22.6°) but tended to be less vertical oriented when bipedal free standing (25.9°, 7.7°-39.3°). The range of head positions relative to the cervical spine was largest when crouched (73.4°) and smallest when erect free standing (17.7°). This study indicates that, like humans, rats have near vertical orientated cervical vertebral columns but, in contrast to humans, they displace their head in space by movements at both the cervico-thoracic junction and the cranio-cervical regions.

  11. Oropharyngeal Dysphagia after Anterior Cervical Spine Surgery: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Karen K.; Arnold, Paul M.

    2013-01-01

    Study Design Review. Objective Postoperative oropharyngeal dysphagia is one of the most common complications following anterior cervical spine surgery (ACSS). We review and summarize recent literature in order to provide a general overview of clinical signs and symptoms, assessment, incidence and natural history, pathophysiology, risk factors, treatment, prevention, and topics for future research. Methods A search of English literature regarding dysphagia following anterior cervical spine surgery was conducted using PubMed and Google Scholar. The search was focused on articles published since the last review on this topic was published in 2005. Results Patients who develop dysphagia after ACSS show significant alterations in swallowing biomechanics. Patient history, physical examination, X-ray, direct or indirect laryngoscopy, and videoradiographic swallow evaluation are considered the primary modalities for evaluating oropharyngeal dysphagia. There is no universally accepted objective instrument for assessing dysphagia after ACSS, but the most widely used instrument is the Bazaz Dysphagia Score. Because dysphagia is a subjective sensation, patient-reported instruments appear to be more clinically relevant and more effective in identifying dysfunction. The causes of oropharyngeal dysphagia after ACSS are multifactorial, involving neuronal, muscular, and mucosal structures. The condition is usually transient, most often beginning in the immediate postoperative period but sometimes beginning more than 1 month after surgery. The incidence of dysphagia within one week after ACSS varies from 1 to 79% in the literature. This wide variance can be attributed to variations in surgical techniques, extent of surgery, and size of the implant used, as well as variations in definitions and measurements of dysphagia, time intervals of postoperative evaluations, and relatively small sample sizes used in published studies. The factors most commonly associated with an

  12. Occurrence of cervical spine injuries during the rugby scrum.

    PubMed

    Wetzler, M J; Akpata, T; Laughlin, W; Levy, A S

    1998-01-01

    A retrospective study of cervical spine injuries that occurred during the rugby scrum in the United States was undertaken. In the U.S., from 1970 to 1996, 36 (58%) of the 62 documented injured players injured their cervical spines during the scrum. Thirty-five men (97%) and one woman (3%) were injured. Twenty-three of the injuries (64%) occurred when the opposing packs came together (engagement), and 13 (36%) occurred when the scrum collapsed. Twenty-eight (78%) hookers, seven (19%) props, and one (3%) second-row player were injured. Twenty (56%) hookers and three (8%) props were hurt during engagement. Eight hookers (22%), four props (11%), and one second-row player (3%) were injured when the scrum collapsed. Significantly more injuries occurred during engagement than during collapse, and hookers were injured significantly more than props. We conclude that in the rugby scrum in the U.S., the hooker suffers most of the cervical spine injuries (78% in this study) and this position is by far the most vulnerable. This study should be used to develop rugby law (rule) changes and educate players, coaches, and referees in United States rugby. PMID:9548109

  13. [Biomechanics of whiplash injuries of the cervical spine].

    PubMed

    Schmidt, G

    1989-07-01

    1. The whiplash injury of the cervical spine is a typical, but not very often observed injury of occupants of automotive vehicles involved in moderate collisions. 2. There still exist great uncertainties in the elaboration of expertises concerning the minor whiplash injury, so that the great part of the disturbances cannot be objectivated under a clinical point of view. And on the other hand, serious whiplash injuries often are superposed or veiled by secondary injuries. 3. Thus, the aim of the present paper was to point out injury mechanisms, to give a rough scaling of the whiplash severity under biomechanical aspects and finally to set these injury mechanisms in correlation to the following criteria of accident: a) vehicle velocity change (energy equivalent speed--EES); b) deformation of vehicles on the impact-exposed structure; c) loading of occupants by acceleration or deceleration. 4. The tolerance limit of the cervical spine generally decreases to a lower limit, if the cervical spine is changed in a pathological way, e.g. by preexisting diseases. 5. It is evident and important, that the difficult work of giving an expert's opinion on this field must be performed in an interdisciplinary collaboration of engineers for collision-analysis and physicians experienced in accident-traumatology. PMID:2669311

  14. Perioperative use of botulinum toxin for movement disorder-induced cervical spine disease.

    PubMed

    Adler, C H; Zimmerman, R S; Lyons, M K; Simeone, F; Brin, M F

    1996-01-01

    Patients with cervical dystonia or tics of the nuchal muscles can develop serious cervical spine disease. We report a series of four patients who received botulinum toxin injections to control their movement disorders prior to their required surgery. One patient with cervical tic-induced radiculomyelopathy required botulinum toxin injection postoperatively to facilitate stabilization of the cervical fusion. Two patients with torticollis-induced cervical radiculomyelopathy, and one patient with dystonia-induced C5 fracture, had botulinum toxin injected preoperatively to facilitate postoperative recovery. Botulinum toxin appears to be a useful adjunct in the treatment of cervical movement disorders prior to or following surgery for associated cervical spine disease.

  15. Effect of pillow height on the biomechanics of the head-neck complex: investigation of the cranio-cervical pressure and cervical spine alignment

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Hui; Zhou, Yan; Lin, Jin

    2016-01-01

    Background While appropriate pillow height is crucial to maintaining the quality of sleep and overall health, there are no universal, evidence-based guidelines for pillow design or selection. We aimed to evaluate the effect of pillow height on cranio-cervical pressure and cervical spine alignment. Methods Ten healthy subjects (five males) aged 26 ± 3.6 years were recruited. The average height, weight, and neck length were 167 ± 9.3 cm, 59.6 ± 11.9 kg, and 12.9 ± 1.2 cm respectively. The subjects lay on pillows of four different heights (H0, 110 mm; H1, 130 mm; H2, 150 mm; and H3, 170 mm). The cranio-cervical pressure distribution over the pillow was recorded; the peak and average pressures for each pillow height were compared by one-way ANOVA with repeated measures. Cervical spine alignment was studied using a finite element model constructed based on data from the Visible Human Project. The coordinate of the center of each cervical vertebra were predicted for each pillow height. Three spine alignment parameters (cervical angle, lordosis distance and kyphosis distance) were identified. Results The average cranial pressure at pillow height H3 was approximately 30% higher than that at H0, and significantly different from those at H1 and H2 (p < 0.05). The average cervical pressure at pillow height H0 was 65% lower than that at H3, and significantly different from those at H1 and H2 (p < 0.05). The peak cervical pressures at pillow heights H2 and H3 were significantly different from that at H0 (p < 0.05). With respect to cervical spine alignment, raising pillow height from H0 to H3 caused an increase of 66.4% and 25.1% in cervical angle and lordosis distance, respectively, and a reduction of 43.4% in kyphosis distance. Discussion Pillow height elevation significantly increased the average and peak pressures of the cranial and cervical regions, and increased the extension and lordosis of the cervical spine. The cranio-cervical pressures and cervical spine alignment

  16. Effect of pillow height on the biomechanics of the head-neck complex: investigation of the cranio-cervical pressure and cervical spine alignment

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Hui; Zhou, Yan; Lin, Jin

    2016-01-01

    Background While appropriate pillow height is crucial to maintaining the quality of sleep and overall health, there are no universal, evidence-based guidelines for pillow design or selection. We aimed to evaluate the effect of pillow height on cranio-cervical pressure and cervical spine alignment. Methods Ten healthy subjects (five males) aged 26 ± 3.6 years were recruited. The average height, weight, and neck length were 167 ± 9.3 cm, 59.6 ± 11.9 kg, and 12.9 ± 1.2 cm respectively. The subjects lay on pillows of four different heights (H0, 110 mm; H1, 130 mm; H2, 150 mm; and H3, 170 mm). The cranio-cervical pressure distribution over the pillow was recorded; the peak and average pressures for each pillow height were compared by one-way ANOVA with repeated measures. Cervical spine alignment was studied using a finite element model constructed based on data from the Visible Human Project. The coordinate of the center of each cervical vertebra were predicted for each pillow height. Three spine alignment parameters (cervical angle, lordosis distance and kyphosis distance) were identified. Results The average cranial pressure at pillow height H3 was approximately 30% higher than that at H0, and significantly different from those at H1 and H2 (p < 0.05). The average cervical pressure at pillow height H0 was 65% lower than that at H3, and significantly different from those at H1 and H2 (p < 0.05). The peak cervical pressures at pillow heights H2 and H3 were significantly different from that at H0 (p < 0.05). With respect to cervical spine alignment, raising pillow height from H0 to H3 caused an increase of 66.4% and 25.1% in cervical angle and lordosis distance, respectively, and a reduction of 43.4% in kyphosis distance. Discussion Pillow height elevation significantly increased the average and peak pressures of the cranial and cervical regions, and increased the extension and lordosis of the cervical spine. The cranio-cervical pressures and cervical spine alignment

  17. The transoral approach to the cervical spine.

    PubMed

    Morgan, S; Murphy, G

    1992-10-01

    The transoral surgical approach is useful for operating on structures at the base of the brain and the upper cervical spinal cord. For example, this route has been used for resecting spinal tumors and clipping vertebrobasilar aneurysms. In the past, this surgical approach was not advocated due to concerns about exposure and infection. However, the availability of the microscope, computed tomography, computed myelotomography, magnetic resonance imaging and intraoperative radiography as well as more effective techniques have improved the diagnosis of pathology of the craniovertebral junction and surgical performance. An understanding of the operative procedures involved with this approach assists the neuro-science nurse in preoperative teaching and anticipating potential postoperative complications. PMID:1402151

  18. EVALUATION OF THE CERVICAL SPINE AMONG PATIENTS WITH RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS

    PubMed Central

    Passos Cardoso, André Luiz; Da Silva, Nilzio Antonio; Daher, Sérgio; De Moraes, Frederico Barra; Do Carmo, Humberto Franco

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the prevalence of cervical spine abnormalities among patients with rheumatoid arthritis and correlate the imaging findings with the clinical state. Methods: A cross-sectional study on 35 patients was carried out at the School of Medicine of the Federal University of Goiás (UFG) in 2004. The following were evaluated: age, use of medications and the clinical picture of pain and neurological characteristics. The erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) and rheumatoid factor were tested, and radiographs of the cervical spine were produced in anteroposterior, lateral and dynamic views. To evaluate the influence of the variables on the emergence of instabilities, univariate and multivariate logistic regression tests were used (p < 0.05). Results: Among the 35 patients evaluated, 13 (37.1%) presented a stable cervical spine. Out of the 22 patients with instability, six presented more than one type. Atlantoaxial instability was found in 15 patients, with a mean anterior atlantodental distance of 3.40 mm in the neutral lateral radiographic view and 6.54 mm in the lateral view with flexion. Basilar invagination was found in five patients and subaxial subluxation in seven patients. Two thirds of the asymptomatic patients had instabilities. Bicipital hyperreflexia presented statistically significant correlations with atlantoaxial instability (p = 0.024) and subaxial instability (p = 0.01). Age at diagnosis correlated with subaxial instability (p = 0.02). Conclusions: The prevalence of cervical instability was 62.9 % (22/35). The most frequent instabilities were: atlantoaxial subluxation (42.9 %), subaxial subluxation (20%) and basilar invagination (14.3%). The correlation between instabilities and clinical signs and symptoms was poor. The patients with subaxial subluxation presented disease onset at a younger age. Dynamic radiography was important for diagnosing atlantoaxial subluxation. PMID:27022536

  19. Prevalence and Distribution of Ossified Lesions in the Whole Spine of Patients with Cervical Ossification of the Posterior Longitudinal Ligament A Multicenter Study (JOSL CT study).

    PubMed

    Hirai, Takashi; Yoshii, Toshitaka; Iwanami, Akio; Takeuchi, Kazuhiro; Mori, Kanji; Yamada, Tsuyoshi; Wada, Kanichiro; Koda, Masao; Matsuyama, Yukihiro; Takeshita, Katsushi; Abematsu, Masahiko; Haro, Hirotaka; Watanabe, Masahiko; Watanabe, Kei; Ozawa, Hiroshi; Kanno, Haruo; Imagama, Shiro; Fujibayashi, Shunsuke; Yamazaki, Masashi; Matsumoto, Morio; Nakamura, Masaya; Okawa, Atsushi; Kawaguchi, Yoshiharu

    2016-01-01

    Ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament (OPLL) can cause severe and irreversible paralysis in not only the cervical spine but also the thoracolumbar spine. To date, however, the prevalence and distribution of OPLL in the whole spine has not been precisely evaluated in patients with cervical OPLL. Therefore, we conducted a multi-center study to comprehensively evaluate the prevalence and distribution of OPLL using multi-detector computed tomography (CT) images in the whole spine and to analyze what factors predict the presence of ossified lesions in the thoracolumbar spine in patients who were diagnosed with cervical OPLL by plain X-ray. Three hundred and twenty-two patients with a diagnosis of cervical OPLL underwent CT imaging of the whole spine. The sum of the levels in which OPLL was present in the whole spine was defined as the OP-index and used to evaluate the extent of ossification. The distribution of OPLL in the whole spine was compared between male and female subjects. In addition, a multiple regression model was used to ascertain related factors that affected the OP-index. Among patients with cervical OPLL, women tended to have more ossified lesions in the thoracolumbar spine than did men. A multiple regression model revealed that the OP-index was significantly correlated with the cervical OP-index, sex (female), and body mass index. Furthermore, the prevalence of thoracolumbar OPLL in patients with a cervical OP-index ≥ 10 was 7.8 times greater than that in patients with a cervical OP-index ≤ 5. The results of this study reveal that the extent of OPLL in the whole spine is significantly associated with the extent of cervical OPLL, female sex, and obesity. PMID:27548354

  20. Prevalence and Distribution of Ossified Lesions in the Whole Spine of Patients with Cervical Ossification of the Posterior Longitudinal Ligament A Multicenter Study (JOSL CT study)

    PubMed Central

    Hirai, Takashi; Yoshii, Toshitaka; Iwanami, Akio; Takeuchi, Kazuhiro; Mori, Kanji; Yamada, Tsuyoshi; Wada, Kanichiro; Koda, Masao; Matsuyama, Yukihiro; Takeshita, Katsushi; Abematsu, Masahiko; Haro, Hirotaka; Watanabe, Masahiko; Watanabe, Kei; Ozawa, Hiroshi; Kanno, Haruo; Imagama, Shiro; Fujibayashi, Shunsuke; Yamazaki, Masashi; Matsumoto, Morio; Nakamura, Masaya; Okawa, Atsushi; Kawaguchi, Yoshiharu

    2016-01-01

    Ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament (OPLL) can cause severe and irreversible paralysis in not only the cervical spine but also the thoracolumbar spine. To date, however, the prevalence and distribution of OPLL in the whole spine has not been precisely evaluated in patients with cervical OPLL. Therefore, we conducted a multi-center study to comprehensively evaluate the prevalence and distribution of OPLL using multi-detector computed tomography (CT) images in the whole spine and to analyze what factors predict the presence of ossified lesions in the thoracolumbar spine in patients who were diagnosed with cervical OPLL by plain X-ray. Three hundred and twenty-two patients with a diagnosis of cervical OPLL underwent CT imaging of the whole spine. The sum of the levels in which OPLL was present in the whole spine was defined as the OP-index and used to evaluate the extent of ossification. The distribution of OPLL in the whole spine was compared between male and female subjects. In addition, a multiple regression model was used to ascertain related factors that affected the OP-index. Among patients with cervical OPLL, women tended to have more ossified lesions in the thoracolumbar spine than did men. A multiple regression model revealed that the OP-index was significantly correlated with the cervical OP-index, sex (female), and body mass index. Furthermore, the prevalence of thoracolumbar OPLL in patients with a cervical OP-index ≥ 10 was 7.8 times greater than that in patients with a cervical OP-index ≤ 5. The results of this study reveal that the extent of OPLL in the whole spine is significantly associated with the extent of cervical OPLL, female sex, and obesity. PMID:27548354

  1. Symptomatic intravertebral disc herniation (Schmorl's node) in the cervical spine.

    PubMed Central

    Lipson, S J; Fox, D A; Sosman, J L

    1985-01-01

    A case of a Schmorl's node in the cervical vertebra causing neck pain is reported. An inflammatory focus was found on histological examination of Schmorl's node indicating a possible mechanism of pain production. Images PMID:4083942

  2. Cervical spine abnormalities in institutionalized adults with Down's syndrome.

    PubMed

    MacLachlan, R A; Fidler, K E; Yeh, H; Hodgetts, P G; Pharand, G; Chau, M

    1993-06-01

    The prevalence of increased anterior atlanto-odontoid distance (AAOD), a risk factor for spinal cord compression, and degenerative disease of the cervical spine (DDCS) in a population of institutionalized adults with Down's syndrome (DS) was determined and compared with age- and sex-matched 'normals' presenting to a hospital emergency department. Radiographs of the cervical spines of 99 adults with DS and 198 'normals' were compared using a standardized rating scale. The prevalence of an AAOD of 3 mm or greater, the threshold of risk from the literature, was 8% for DS cases and 2% for controls (P < 0.01). The mean AAOD for DS cases was 2.0 +/- 1 mm and for controls 1.5 +/- 0.5 mm (P < 0.01). There was a negative correlation between AAOD and age of DS cases. The prevalence of any degree of DDCS among the DS cases was 64%, the controls 39% (P < 0.001); for moderate or severe DDCS the prevalence among DS cases was 45%, controls 12% (P < 0.001). The prevalence of DDCS increased with age in both groups, but the severity of DDCS was significantly increased with age in both groups, but the severity of DDCS was significantly greater for DS individuals in all age groups. The levels of the cervical spine affected ranged from C2 to C6; the most commonly affected level was C5-C6. While DS adults are at increased theoretical risk for spinal cord compression due to increased AAOD, its clinical significance would appear to be small and to decline with age.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  3. A Mathematical Model of the Cervical Spine Movement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toth-Tascau, Mirela; Pater, Flavius; Stoia, Dan Ioan; Menyhardt, Karoly; Rosu, Serban; Rusu, Lucian; Vigaru, Cosmina

    2011-09-01

    The general purpose of this study was to develop a valid and reliable laboratory tool to evaluate the cervical spine mobility in normal conditions. The paper proposes an approximation function to model the variation in time of movement angles and angular velocities. The measurements have been performed using a Zebris ultrasound-based measuring system in Motion Laboratory of the "Politehnica" University of Timisoara. The approximation functions were compared with the recorded data series and graphically plotted as both time and phase diagram representation.

  4. Dysphagia Secondary to Anterior Osteophytes of the Cervical Spine.

    PubMed

    Egerter, Alexander C; Kim, Eric S; Lee, Darrin J; Liu, Jonathan J; Cadena, Gilbert; Panchal, Ripul R; Kim, Kee D

    2015-10-01

    Study Design Retrospective case series. Objective Diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis (DISH) or Forestier disease involves hyperostosis of the spinal column. Hyperostosis involving the anterior margin of the cervical vertebrae can cause dysphonia, dyspnea, and/or dysphagia. However, the natural history pertaining to the risk factors remain unknown. We present the surgical management of two cases of dysphagia secondary to cervical hyperostosis and discuss the etiology and management of DISH based on the literature review. Methods This is a retrospective review of two patients with DISH and anterior cervical osteophytes. We reviewed the preoperative and postoperative images and clinical history. Results Two patients underwent anterior cervical osteophytectomies due to severe dysphagia. At more than a year follow-up, both patients noted improvement in swallowing as well as their associated pain. Conclusion The surgical removal of cervical osteophytes can be highly successful in treating dysphagia if refractory to prolonged conservative therapy. PMID:26430607

  5. A selected annotated bibliography of the core biomedical literature pertaining to stroke, cervical spine, manipulation and head/neck movement

    PubMed Central

    Gotlib, Allan C.; Thiel, Haymo

    1985-01-01

    This manuscript’s purpose was to establish a knowledge base of information related to stroke and the cervical spine vascular structures, from both historical and current perspectives. The scientific biomedical literatures both indexed (ie. Index Medicus, CRAC) and non-indexed literature systems were scanned and the pertinent manuscripts were annotated. Citation is by occurence in the literature so that historical trends may be viewed more easily. No analysis of the reference material is offered. Suggested however is that: 1. complications to cervical spine manipulation are being recognized and reported with increasing frequency, 2. a cause and effect relationship between stroke and cervical spine manipulation has not been established, 3. a screening mechanism that is valid, reliable and reasonable needs to be established.

  6. [Influence of manual therapy of cervical spine on typical trigeminal neuralgia: a case report].

    PubMed

    Grgić, Vjekoslav

    2010-01-01

    This article presents the case of a 43-year-old female patient with pain in the cervical spine area and a typical trigeminal neuralgia (TN; French name "tic douloureux") in the receptive field of the second and the third branches of the left trigeminal nerve. The patient came to our medical practice for a manual therapy of the cervical spine as the application of the standard therapy had not given her any pain reduction in the cervical spine area. As the result of the manual therapy of the cervical spine (nonspecific traction mobilization, specific or segmental mobilization, manipulation), not only a significant pain reduction in the cervical spine area occurred but also a complete cessation of TN. Before manual treatment, and in spite of antiepileptic drugs therapy and acupuncture, the patient had suffered from everyday typical TN attacks. The cessation of typical TN after manual therapy of cervical spine suggests a conclusion that the painful stimuli from the cervical spine structures can be manifested not only as atypical facial pain and/or a cervicogenic headache, but also as a typical TN (painful stimuli from the cervical spine structures-->trigeminocervical nuclei-->convergence of the painful stimuli-->referred pain in the receptive field of the trigeminal nerve-->typical or atypical TN and/or cervicogenic headache).

  7. Sensorimotor function of the cervical spine in healthy volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Artz, Neil J.; Adams, Michael A.; Dolan, Patricia

    2015-01-01

    Background Sensorimotor mechanisms are important for controlling head motion. However, relatively little is known about sensorimotor function in the cervical spine. This study investigated how age, gender and variations in the test conditions affect measures of position sense, movement sense and reflex activation in cervical muscles. Methods Forty healthy volunteers (19M/21F, aged 19–59 years) participated. Position sense was assessed by determining repositioning errors in upright and flexed neck postures during tests performed in 25%, 50% and 75% cervical flexion. Movement sense was assessed by detecting thresholds to passive flexion and extension at velocities between 1 and 25°s− 1. Reflexes were assessed by determining the latency and amplitude of reflex activation in trapezius and sternocleidomastoid muscles. Reliability was evaluated from intraclass correlation coefficients. Findings Mean repositioning errors ranged from 1.5° to 2.6°, were greater in flexed than upright postures (P = 0.006) and in people aged over 25 years (P = 0.05). Time to detect head motion decreased with increasing velocity (P < 0.001) and was lower during flexion than extension movements (P = 0.002). Reflexes demonstrated shorter latency (P < 0.001) and greater amplitude (P = 0.009) in trapezius compared to sternocleidomastoid, and became slower and weaker with age. None of the measures were influenced by gender. Reliability was good for movement sense measures, but was influenced by the test conditions when assessing position sense. Interpretation Increased repositioning errors and slower reflexes in older subjects suggest that sensorimotor function in the cervical spine becomes impaired with age. In position sense tests, reliability was influenced by the test conditions with mid-range flexion movements, performed in standing, providing the most reliable measurements. PMID:25686675

  8. Therapeutic effects of functional orthodontic appliances on cervical spine posture: a retrospective cephalometric study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Interactions between the cervical spine and the stomatognathic system have been discussed in literature. The present study was conducted to investigate whether, and to what extent, orthodontically induced mandibular advancement produces changes in cervical spine posture. Furthermore, possible appliance-specific effects should be distinguished. Material and methods The cephalograms of 64 patients with skeletal class II were analysed before and after mandibular advancement. Linear and angular cephalometric parameters were identified to define the position of the atlanto-occipital and atlantoaxial joints. The total example was divided into two subgroups (comprising 32 individuals each) according to the employed appliance: activator versus bite-jump appliance (BJA). Student's t-test and analysis of covariance were used for statistical analysis. Results Overall, a significant straightening of the cervical spine was observed during the treatment. This conclusion is based on changes of Chamberlain (p = 0.0055), CVT (p = 0.0003), OPT (p < 0.0001), Redlund-Johnell/Petersson (p < 0.0001), McGregor-mC2 (p = 0.0333) and AT-FH (p = 0.0445). Improvements in occipitoatlantal dislocation were also observed in the total sample. Appliance-specific changes were found in the activator subgroup for a number of linear parameters (Chamberlain, McGregor, CVT, OPT, Redlund-Johnell/Petersson). In contrast, only two linear parameters (OPT and Powers ratio) revealed statistically significant changes in the BJA subgroup. Conclusions During skeletal class II treatment the position of upper cervical spine changes. In the activator subgroup the observed effects were more pronounced than those in the BJA subgroup. Further studies including a control group comprised with non-treated class II patients are needed to assess whether these effects may be caused directly by the appliances irrespective of growth. PMID:24661951

  9. Anatomical and functional perspectives of the cervical spine: Part III: the “unstable” cervical spine

    PubMed Central

    McGregor, Marion

    1990-01-01

    In this, the last of the three part series on the anatomical and functional perspectives of the cervical spine, the clinical entity-instability-is addressed. A summative definition of instability, addressing both the clinical and radiographic issues, is presented based on current available literature. The etiology of instability is discussed as it pertains to three possible mechanisms: acute trauma, latent evidence of trauma and repetitive microtrauma. The anatomical, clinical and radiographic aspects in each of these meachanisms is discussed. A case report is presented to illustrate the salient features of this potentially disastrous condition. The conclusion emphasizes the importance of defineable limits in each of the presented definitions, calling for future research into the clinical and radiographic correlations of abnormal cervical motion. ImagesFigure 4Figure 5Figure 6

  10. Cervical Spondylotic Myelopathy due to the Ochronotic Arthropathy of the Cervical Spine

    PubMed Central

    Li, Nan; Yuan, Qiang; He, Da

    2016-01-01

    Ochronosis is a musculoskeletal manifestation of alkaptonuria, a rare hereditary metabolic disorder occurs due to the absence of homogentisic acid oxidase and leading to various systemic abnormalities related to deposition of homogentisic acid pigmentation (ochronotic pigmentation). The present case reports the clinical features, radiographic findings, treatments and results of a cervical spondylotic myelopathy woman patient due to the ochronotic arthropathy of the cervical spine. The patient aged 62 years was presented with gait disturbance and hand clumsiness. Physical examination, X-rays, computed tomography and lab results of the urine sample confirmed the presence of ochronosis with the involvement of the cervical spine. The patient underwent a modified cervical laminoplasty due to multi-segment spinal cord compression. The postoperative follow-up showed a good functional outcome with patient satisfaction. The present study concludes the conditions and important diagnostic and surgical aspects of a patient. It is necessary to identify the condition clinically and if cord compression is observed, appropriate surgical interventions needs to be instituted. PMID:26885289

  11. Epidemiology and Risk Factors of Cervical Spine Injury during Heating Season in the Patients with Cervical Trauma: A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Sidong; Ding, Wenyuan; Yang, Dalong; Gu, Tixin; Zhang, Feng; Zhang, Di; Sun, Yapeng; Ma, Lei; Song, Yanli

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to describe the epidemiology of cervical spine injury in the patients with cervical trauma and analyze its associated risk factors during the special heating season in North China. Methods This cross-sectional study investigated predictors for cervical spine injury in cervical trauma patients using retrospectively collected data of Hebei Provincial Orthopaedic Hospital from 11/2011 to 02/2012, and 11/2012 to 02/2013. Binary logistic regression analysis was used to determine risk factors for cervical fractures/dislocations or cord injury. Results A total of 106 patients were admitted into this study. Of all, 34 patients (32.1%) were treated from 11/2011 to 02/2012 and 72 patients (67.9%) from 11/2012 to 02/2013. The mean age was 41.9±13.3 years old; 85 patients (80.2%) were male and 82 (77.4%) from rural areas. Eighty patients (75.5%) were caused by fall including 45 (42.5%) by severe fall (>2 m). Sixty-five patients (61.3%) of all suffered injuries to other body regions and 32 (30.2%) got head injury. Thirty-one patients (29.2%) sustained cervical cord injury with cervical fractures/dislocations. Twenty-six (83.9%) of cervical cord injury patients were from rural areas and 24 (77.4%) of those resulted from fall including 15 (48.4%) from severe fall (>2 m). Logistic regression displayed that age (OR, 1.47; 95% CI, 1.05–2.07), head injury (OR, 5.63; 95% CI, 2.23–14.26), were risk factors for cervical cord injury and snowing (OR, 8.25; 95% CI, 2.26–30.15) was a risk factor for cervical spine injury due to severe fall (>2 m). Conclusions The elder male patients and patients with head trauma are high-risk population for cervical cord injury. As a seasonal factor, snowing during heating season is of note a risk factor for cervical spine injury resulting from severe fall (>2 m) in the patients with cervical trauma in North China. PMID:24223795

  12. Incidence of cervical spine injury in patients with gunshot wounds to the head.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, F R; Gonzalez, P; Beitler, A; Sterling-Scott, R; Fleming, A W

    1994-06-01

    Cervical spine immobilization is standard during the early stages of prehospital and hospital care of patients with blunt head injury. However, the need for cervical spine immobilization in patients with gunshot wounds to the head has not been addressed. To determine the incidence and types of cervical spine injury in this group, we retrospectively examined the records of 308 consecutive patients who had computed tomographic (CT) scans of the head to evaluate brain injury after gunshot wounds. Of the 266 patients with data adequate for review, 157 (59%) had a complete lateral x-ray film of the cervical spine. Of these 157, 105 had wounds limited to the calvaria, and none had cervical spine injury. Of 52 patients with complete lateral x-ray films and wounds not limited to the calvaria, 5 (10%) had cervical spine or spinal cord injury. Of the 192 patients who had CT-proven intracranial injury, 86 (45%) required immediate intubation before x-ray films were obtained, and 67 (35%) died. We conclude that cervical spine immobilization may not be required during endotracheal intubation of brain-injured gunshot victims with wounds limited to the calvaria.

  13. Rugby union injuries to the cervical spine and spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Quarrie, Kenneth L; Cantu, Robert C; Chalmers, David J

    2002-01-01

    Injuries to the cervical spine are among the most serious injuries occurring as a result of participation in rugby. Outcomes of such injuries range from complete recovery to death, depending on the degree of spinal cord damage sustained. Much information has been gained regarding the mechanisms and frequency of such injuries, from case reports and case series studies. The most commonly reported mechanism of injury has been hyperflexion of the cervical spine, resulting in fracture dislocation of C4-C5 or C5-C6. Tracking both the trends of incidence of spinal injuries, and the effectiveness of injury prevention initiatives has proved difficult because of a lack of properly conducted epidemiological studies. Within the constraints of the research published to date, it appears that hookers and props have been at disproportionate risk of cervical spine injury, predominantly because of injuries sustained during scrummaging. While the scrum was the phase of play most commonly associated with spinal injuries throughout the 1980s in most rugby playing countries, there has been a trend through the 1990s of an increasing proportion of spinal injuries occurring in the tackle situation. The majority of injuries have occurred early in the season, when grounds tend to be harder, and players are lacking both practice and physical conditioning for the physical contact phases of the sport. A number of injury prevention measures have been launched, including changes to the laws of the game regarding scrummaging, and education programmes aimed at enforcing safe techniques and eliminating illegal play. Calls for case-registers and effective epidemiological studies have been made by researchers and physicians in most countries where rugby is widespread, but it appears to be only recently that definite steps have been made towards this goal. Well-designed epidemiological studies will be able to provide more accurate information about potential risk factors for injury such as age, grade

  14. The cervical spine in patients with psoriatic arthritis: a clinical, radiological and immunogenetic study.

    PubMed Central

    Salvarani, C; Macchioni, P; Cremonesi, T; Mantovani, W; Battistel, B; Rossi, F; Capozzoli, N; Baricchi, R; Portioli, I

    1992-01-01

    The radiological changes of the cervical spine were evaluated in 57 patients with psoriatic arthritis and were correlated with clinical, radiological, and immunogenetic features of the disease. Forty patients (70%) showed radiological evidence of the cervical spine being affected by the disease. Two patterns of cervical spine abnormalities were noted. Fifteen patients (26%) had erosive and/or subluxing cervical rheumatoid like lesions; 25 patients (44%) had a more frequently reported pattern similar to ankylosing spondylitis. Although subaxial subluxations were the most frequently observed cervical abnormalities (53%) in the inflammatory subgroup, none of the patients studied had cord compression. Ankylosing cervical spine disease was the only form of axial involvement in nine (36%) of 25 patients with the ankylosing form of psoriatic arthritis. All of these patients had peripheral disease and were B27 negative. Predictors of cervical spine disease patterns were considered using clinical, demographic, and radiological features and HLA antigens. The results of a multivariate analysis showed that the best predictors of inflammatory cervical spine disease are the presence of HLA-B39 and HLA-DR4 antigens, radiocarpal erosions, and the absence of the HLA-DR5 antigen. PMID:1540041

  15. Maintenance of graft compression in the adult cervical spine.

    PubMed

    Bolger, Ciaran; Bourlion, Maurice; Leroy, Xavier; Petit, Dominique; Vanacker, Gerard; McEvoy, Linda; Nagaria, Jabir

    2006-08-01

    It is generally advised that the graft inserted in adult cervical spine should be pre-loaded with a compressive force or that the screws are inserted in a divergent orientation, in order to maximise compression and the chance of graft incorporation (Truumees et al. in Spine 28:1097-1102, 2003). However, there is little evidence that a compressive force is maintained once the force applicator has been removed, or that the divergent screws enhance compression. This study compared the maintenance of applied pre-load force, across cervical spine graft, between standard anterior plating technique with pre-load and divergent screws and a novel plate technique, which allows its application prior to removal of the force applicator. Six intact adult cadaveric human cervical spines were exposed by standard surgical technique. A Casper type distracter was inserted across the disc space of interest, the disc was removed. In 14 experiments, following the disc removal, an autologous iliac crest bone graft was inserted under distraction, together with a strain gauge pressure transducer. A resting output from the transducer was recorded. The voltage output has a linear relationship with compressive force. A standardised compressive force was applied across the graft through the "Casper type" distracter/compressor (7.5 kg, torque). The pre-load compressive force was measured using a torque drill. Then two different procedures were used in order to compare the final applied strain on the bone graft. In eight experiments (procedure 1), the "Casper type" distracter/compressor was removed and a standard anterior cervical plate with four divergent screws was inserted. In six experiments (procedure 2), a novel plate design was inserted prior to removal of the distracter/compressor, which is not possible with the standard plate design. A final compressive force across the graft was measured. For the standard plate construct (procedure 1), the applied compression force is significantly

  16. Effects of Lateral Mass Screw Rod Fixation to the Stability of Cervical Spine after Laminectomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosli, Ruwaida; Kashani, Jamal; Kadir, Mohammed Rafiq Abdul

    There are many cases of injury in the cervical spine due to degenerative disorder, trauma or instability. This condition may produce pressure on the spinal cord or on the nerve coming from the spine. The aim of this study was, to analyze the stabilization of the cervical spine after undergoing laminectomy via computational simulation. For that purpose, a three-dimensional finite element (FE) model for the multilevel cervical spine segment (C1-C7) was developed using computed tomography (CT) data. There are various decompression techniques that can be applied to overcome the injury. Usually, decompression procedures will create an unstable spine. Therefore, in these situations, the spine is often surgically restabilized by using fusion and instrumentation. In this study, a lateral mass screw-rod fixation was created to stabilize the cervical spine after laminectomy. Material properties of the titanium alloy were assigned on the implants. The requirements moments and boundary conditions were applied on simulated implanted bone. Result showed that the bone without implant has a higher flexion and extension angle in comparison to the bone with implant under applied 1Nm moment. The bone without implant has maximum stress distribution at the vertebrae and ligaments. However, the bone with implant has maximum stress distribution at the screws and rods. Overall, the lateral mass screw-rod fixation provides stability to the cervical spine after undergoing laminectomy.

  17. Endonasal access to the upper cervical spine, part one: radiographic morphometric analysis.

    PubMed

    Singh, Harminder; Grobelny, Bartosz T; Harrop, James; Rosen, Marc; Lober, Robert M; Evans, James

    2013-06-01

    Objectives To determine the anatomical relationships that may influence endonasal access to the upper cervical spine. Setting We retrospectively analyzed computed tomography of 100 patients at a single institution. Participants Participants included adults with imaging of the hard palate, clivus, and cervical spine without evidence of fracture, severe spondylosis, or previous instrumentation. Main Outcome Measures Morphometric analyses of hard palate length and both distance and angle between the hard palate and odontoid process were based on radiographic measurements. Descriptive zones were assigned to cervical spine levels, and endoscopic visualization was simulated with projected lines at 0, 30, and 45 degrees from the hard palate to the cervical spine. Results We found an inverse relationship between hard palate length and the lowest zone of the cervical spine potentially visualized by nasal endoscopy. The distance between the posterior tip of the hard palate and the odontoid tip, and the angle formed between the two, directly influenced the lowest possible cervical exposure. Conclusions Radiographic relationships between hard palate length, distance to the odontoid, and the angle formed between the two predict the limits of endonasal access to the cervical spine. These results are supported by cadaveric data in Part Two of this study.

  18. Endonasal Access to the Upper Cervical Spine, Part One: Radiographic Morphometric Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Harminder; Grobelny, Bartosz T.; Harrop, James; Rosen, Marc; Lober, Robert M.; Evans, James

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To determine the anatomical relationships that may influence endonasal access to the upper cervical spine. Setting We retrospectively analyzed computed tomography of 100 patients at a single institution. Participants Participants included adults with imaging of the hard palate, clivus, and cervical spine without evidence of fracture, severe spondylosis, or previous instrumentation. Main Outcome Measures Morphometric analyses of hard palate length and both distance and angle between the hard palate and odontoid process were based on radiographic measurements. Descriptive zones were assigned to cervical spine levels, and endoscopic visualization was simulated with projected lines at 0, 30, and 45 degrees from the hard palate to the cervical spine. Results We found an inverse relationship between hard palate length and the lowest zone of the cervical spine potentially visualized by nasal endoscopy. The distance between the posterior tip of the hard palate and the odontoid tip, and the angle formed between the two, directly influenced the lowest possible cervical exposure. Conclusions Radiographic relationships between hard palate length, distance to the odontoid, and the angle formed between the two predict the limits of endonasal access to the cervical spine. These results are supported by cadaveric data in Part Two of this study. PMID:24436909

  19. Multimodal intraoperative monitoring (MIOM) during cervical spine surgical procedures in 246 patients

    PubMed Central

    Sutter, Martin A.; Grob, Dieter; Jeszenszky, Dezsö; Porchet, François; Dvorak, Jiri

    2007-01-01

    A prospective study of 246 patients who received multimodal intraoperative monitoring during cervical spine surgery between March 2000 and December 2005. To determine the sensitivity and specificity of MIOM techniques used to monitor spinal cord and nerve root function during cervical spine surgery. It is appreciated that complication rate of cervical spine surgery is low, however, there is a significant risk of neurological injury. The combination of monitoring of ascending and descending pathways may provide more sensitive and specific results giving immediate feedback information and/or alert regarding any neurological changes during the operation to the surgeon. Intraoperative somatosensory spinal and cerebral evoked potentials combined with continuous EMG and motor-evoked potentials of the spinal cord and muscles were evaluated and compared with postoperative clinical neurological changes. A total of 246 consecutive patients with cervical pathologies, majority spinal stenosis due to degenerative changes of cervical spine were monitored by means of MIOM during the surgical procedure. About 232 patients presented true negative while 2 patients false negative responses. About ten patients presented true positive responses where neurological deficit after the operation was predicted and two patients presented false positive findings. The sensitivity of MIOM applied during cervical spine procedure (anterior and/or posterior) was 83.3% and specificity of 99.2%. MIOM is an effective method of monitoring the spinal cord functional integrity during cervical spine surgery and can help to reduce the risk of neurological deficit by alerting the surgeon when monitoring changes are observed. PMID:17610090

  20. Cervical Spine pain as a presenting complaint in metastatic pancreatic cancer: a case report.

    PubMed

    Rosenberg, Emily; Buchtel, Lindsey

    2016-01-01

    A 48 year-old female presented to her primary care physician with a two-month history of neck pain with negative cervical spine x-rays. During that office visit, the patient was noted to be tachycardic with EKG revealing ST depressions, which led to hospital admission. Acute coronary syndrome was ruled out, however, persistent neck pain warranted inpatient MRI of the cervical spine, which revealed a cervical spine lesion. Extensive investigation and biopsy ultimately confirmed stage IV pancreatic adenocarcinoma with metastases to the bone, liver, and likely lung. In the literature, the findings of a primary metastatic site being bone is rare with only a few case reports showing vertebral or sternal metastasis as the first clinical manifestation of pancreatic cancer. The uniqueness of this case lies in the only presenting complaint being cervical spine pain in the setting of extensive metastases to the liver, bone, and likely lung.

  1. 78 FR 36306 - Proposed Information Collection (Neck (Cervical Spine) Conditions Disability Benefits...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-17

    ... Questionnaire) Activity: Comment Request AGENCY: Veterans Benefits Administration, Department of Veterans... (Cervical Spine) Conditions Disability Benefits Questionnaire)'' in any correspondence. During the comment... Disability Benefits Questionnaire) Disability Benefits Questionnaire, VA Form 21-0960M-13. OMB Control...

  2. Cervical spine injury in children: a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Nebhani, Tahir; Bakkali, Hicham; Belyamani, Lahcen

    2015-01-01

    Traumatic injuries of the cervical spine are less common in children than in adults. But may be associated with significant disability and mortality. Pediatric victims of blunt trauma have mechanisms of injury, developmental and anatomic characteristics different than the adults. The purpose of this observation is to highlight the differences between the adult and pediatric cervical spine. We report below the case of spinal cord cut occurs to a very young girl after a motor vehicle accident. PMID:26161184

  3. Airway Preparation Techniques for the Cervical Spine-Injured Football Player

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Richard; Luchies, Carl; Bazuin, Doug; Farrell, Robert N.

    1995-01-01

    Athletic health care professionals have been concerned about how to optimize the emergency care the cervical spine-injured football player receives on the field. Much of the discussion has centered on how to best expose and prepare the airway for rescue breathing in the quickest and safest manner possible. This study compared the time required and the extraneous motion induced at the cervical spine during three traditional and one new airway exposure and preparation technique. Twelve subjects wearing football helmets and shoulder pads were exposed to multiple trials of airway exposure via face mask repositioning using a manual screwdriver, power screwdriver, and the Trainer's Angel cutting device. Subjects also underwent airway preparation using the pocket mask insertion technique. Cervical spine motion was measured in two dimensions using an optoelectronic motion analysis system. Time and qualitative assessment were obtained through videotape analysis. Significant differences were found between the techniques with respect to time and cervical spine motion. The pocket mask allowed quicker activation of rescue breathing than the other three traditional techniques. There was no significant difference in the amount of extraneous motion induced at the cervical spine between the pocket mask, manual screwdriver, and power screwdriver techniques. The Trainer's Angel induced significantly more motion than the other three techniques in each of the four motions measured. Changes in traditional protocols used to treat cervical spine-injured football players on the field are recommended based on these data. ImagesFig 1.Fig 2. PMID:16558339

  4. Cervical spine geometry in the automotive seated posture: variations with age, stature, and gender.

    PubMed

    Desantis Klinich, Kathleen; Ebert, Sheila M; Van Ee, Chris A; Flannagan, Carol A C; Prasad, Monica; Reed, Matthew P; Schneider, Lawrence W

    2004-11-01

    In the mid 1970s, UMTRI investigated the biomechanical properties of the head and neck using 180 "normal" adult subjects selected to fill eighteen subject groups based on age (young, mid-aged, older), gender, and stature (short, medium, and tall by gender). Lateral-view radiographs of the subjects' cervical spines and heads were taken with the subjects seated in a simulated automotive neutral posture, as well as with their necks in full-voluntary flexion and full-voluntary extension. Although the cervical spine and lower head geometry were previously measured manually and documented, new technologies have enabled computer digitization of the scanned x-ray images and a more comprehensive and detailed analysis of the variation in cervical spine and lower head geometry with subject age, stature, and gender. After scanning the radiographic images, 108 skeletal landmarks on the cervical vertebrae and 10 head landmarks were digitized. The resulting database of cervical spine and head geometry was used to study cervical spine curvature, vertebral dimensions, and head/neck orientation as functions of age, gender, and stature. The data were used to characterize neutral posture cervical spine curvatures using two methods: a curvature index and Bézier spline functions. Lateral-view vertebral dimensions were also calculated for each subject, and a cascading series of equations was developed to estimate vertebral size and shape for a selected age, stature, and gender. The orientation of the cervical spine was defined using a neck chord angle, where the neck chord was varied to use different anatomical landmarks and estimates of joint centers for the top and bottom of the neck chord. Results from the study have been incorporated into a MS-Access based software package that allows researchers and modelers to generate cervical spine geometries for occupants of a specified age, gender, and stature. The program allows selection of individual occupants from the database that meet

  5. Degenerative Cervical Myelopathy: A Spectrum of Related Disorders Affecting the Aging Spine.

    PubMed

    Tetreault, Lindsay; Goldstein, Christina L; Arnold, Paul; Harrop, James; Hilibrand, Alan; Nouri, Aria; Fehlings, Michael G

    2015-10-01

    Cervical spinal cord dysfunction can result from either traumatic or nontraumatic causes, including tumors, infections, and degenerative changes. In this article, we review the range of degenerative spinal disorders resulting in progressive cervical spinal cord compression and propose the adoption of a new term, degenerative cervical myelopathy (DCM). DCM comprises both osteoarthritic changes to the spine, including spondylosis, disk herniation, and facet arthropathy (collectively referred to as cervical spondylotic myelopathy), and ligamentous aberrations such as ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament and hypertrophy of the ligamentum flavum. This review summarizes current knowledge of the pathophysiology of DCM and describes the cascade of events that occur after compression of the spinal cord, including ischemia, destruction of the blood-spinal cord barrier, demyelination, and neuronal apoptosis. Important features of the diagnosis of DCM are discussed in detail, and relevant clinical and imaging findings are highlighted. Furthermore, this review outlines valuable assessment tools for evaluating functional status and quality of life in these patients and summarizes the advantages and disadvantages of each. Other topics of this review include epidemiology, the prevalence of degenerative changes in the asymptomatic population, the natural history and rates of progression, risk factors of diagnosis (clinical, imaging and genetic), and management strategies. PMID:26378358

  6. Degenerative Cervical Myelopathy: A Spectrum of Related Disorders Affecting the Aging Spine.

    PubMed

    Tetreault, Lindsay; Goldstein, Christina L; Arnold, Paul; Harrop, James; Hilibrand, Alan; Nouri, Aria; Fehlings, Michael G

    2015-10-01

    Cervical spinal cord dysfunction can result from either traumatic or nontraumatic causes, including tumors, infections, and degenerative changes. In this article, we review the range of degenerative spinal disorders resulting in progressive cervical spinal cord compression and propose the adoption of a new term, degenerative cervical myelopathy (DCM). DCM comprises both osteoarthritic changes to the spine, including spondylosis, disk herniation, and facet arthropathy (collectively referred to as cervical spondylotic myelopathy), and ligamentous aberrations such as ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament and hypertrophy of the ligamentum flavum. This review summarizes current knowledge of the pathophysiology of DCM and describes the cascade of events that occur after compression of the spinal cord, including ischemia, destruction of the blood-spinal cord barrier, demyelination, and neuronal apoptosis. Important features of the diagnosis of DCM are discussed in detail, and relevant clinical and imaging findings are highlighted. Furthermore, this review outlines valuable assessment tools for evaluating functional status and quality of life in these patients and summarizes the advantages and disadvantages of each. Other topics of this review include epidemiology, the prevalence of degenerative changes in the asymptomatic population, the natural history and rates of progression, risk factors of diagnosis (clinical, imaging and genetic), and management strategies.

  7. Misdiagnosing Absent Pedicle of Cervical Spine in the Acute Trauma Setting.

    PubMed

    Abduljabbar, Fahad H; Rossel, Felipe; Nooh, Anas; Jarzem, Peter

    2015-09-28

    Congenital absence of cervical spine pedicle can be easily misdiagnosed as facet dislocation on plain radiographs especially in the acute trauma setting. Additional imaging, including computed tomography (CT)-scan with careful interpretation is required in order to not misdiagnose cervical posterior arch malformation with subsequent inappropriate management. A 39-year-old patient presented to the emergency unit of our university hospital after being trampled by a cow over her back and head followed by loss of consciousness, retrograde amnesia and neck pain. Her initial cervical CT-scan showed possible C5-C6 dislocation, then, it became clear that her problem was a misdiagnosed congenital cervical abnormality. Patient was treated symptomatically without consequences. The congenital absence of a cervical pedicle is a very unusual condition that is easily misdiagnosed. Diagnosis can be accurately confirmed with a CT-scan of the cervical spine. Symptomatic conservative treatment will result in resolution of the symptoms. PMID:26605026

  8. Cervical epidural abscess caused by brucellosis.

    PubMed

    Lampropoulos, Christos; Kamposos, Panagiotis; Papaioannou, Ioanna; Niarou, Vasiliki

    2012-01-01

    A 70-year-old Greek lady presented with fever, arthralgias of knees, cervical and lumbar pain during the last month. On clinical examination the patient was found to have tenderness of the cervical and the lumbar spine with great motion restriction. The blood tests revealed high erythrocyte sedimentation rate and C-reactive protein, abnormal liver function tests and a positive rheumatoid factor. Serological test for Brucella was positive while cervical MRI revealed epidural abscess and spondylodiscitis. Conservative treatment with streptomycin (it was substituted by rifampicin after the third week) and doxycyclin for 4 months significantly improved her symptoms. The frequency as well as the diagnosis and management of this manifestation are discussed. PMID:23188848

  9. Variation in emergency department use of cervical spine radiography for alert, stable trauma patients

    PubMed Central

    Stiell, I G; Wells, G A; Vandemheen, K; Laupacis, A; Brison, R; Eisenhauer, M A; Greenberg, G H; MacPhail, I; McKnight, R D; Reardon, M; Verbeek, R; Worthington, J; Lesiuk, H

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To, assess the emergency department use of cervical spine radiography for alert, stable adult trauma patients in terms of utilization, yield for injury and variation in practices among hospitals and physicians. DESIGN: Retrospective survey of health records. SETTING: Emergency departments of 6 teaching and 2 community hospitals in Ontario and British Columbia. PATIENTS: Consecutive alert, stable adult trauma patients seen with potential cervical spine injury between July 1, 1994, and June 30, 1995. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Total number of eligible patients, referral for cervical spine radiography (overall, by hospital and by physician), presence of cervical spine injury, patient characteristics and hospitals associated with use of radiography. RESULTS: Of 6855 eligible patients, cervical spine radiography was ordered for 3979 (58.0%). Only 60 (0.9%) patients were found to have an acute cervical spine injury (fracture, dislocation or ligamentous instability); 98.5% of the radiographic films were negative for any significant abnormality. The demographic and clinical characteristics of the patients were similar across the 8 hospitals, and no cervical spine injuries were missed. Significant variation was found among the 8 hospitals in the rate of ordering radiography (p < 0.0001), from a low of 37.0% to a high of 72.5%. After possible differences in case severity and patient characteristics at each hospital were controlled for, logistic regression analysis revealed that 6 of the hospitals were significantly associated with the use of radiography. At 7 hospitals, there was significant variation in the rate of ordering radiography among the attending emergency physicians (p < 0.05), from a low of 15.6% to a high of 91.5%. CONCLUSIONS: Despite considerable variation among institutions and individual physicians in the ordering of cervical spine radiography for alert, stable trauma patients with similar characteristics, no cervical spine injuries were missed. The

  10. Degenerative Changes in the Cervical Spine Are More Common in Middle-Aged Individuals with Thalidomide Embryopathy than in Healthy Controls

    PubMed Central

    Ghassemi Jahani, Shadi A.; Danielsson, Aina; Ab-Fawaz, Rana; Hebelka, Hanna; Danielson, Barbro; Brisby, Helena

    2016-01-01

    Background Thalidomide was used as a sedative drug for pregnant women in the 1950–60:s and resulted in children born with thalidomide embryopathy (TE), including upper limb malformations. These may alter the motion pattern of the cervical spine by the use of head/shoulder and mouth grip. Aims To compare degenerative changes in the cervical spine in TE individuals with healthy controls (CTR). Methods and Procedures Twenty-seven middle-aged TE individuals and 27 age- and gender-matched CTR were examined by cervical spine MRI. The presence of malformations, disc herniation(s), osteophytes, nerve and medullary compression and the degree of disc degeneration (DD) were evaluated. Outcomes and Results Significantly higher degree of DD was seen in the TE group compared with the controls (p<0.001). Similar frequencies of disc herniation and disc space narrowing were observed in the two groups, but more foraminal narrowing was seen in the TE group (p = 0.002). DD was observed relatively frequently at all cervical levels in the TE group, however, mainly at the two lower levels in the CTR. Conclusions and Implications Middle-aged individuals with TE have a higher frequency of degenerative changes in the cervical spine than controls, possibly caused by an altered load on the cervical spine. PMID:27175919

  11. A 73-Year-Old Male with Cervical Spine Osteomyelitis Presenting as Urosepsis

    PubMed Central

    Kakarlapudi, H.; Speirs, S.; Lal, A.P.; Alaie, D.; Petrillo, R.; Ashraf, M.B.; Kolanuvada, B.; Bhargava, M.

    2015-01-01

    Vertebral osteomyelitis is a serious debilitating infection if not detected early. Involvement of cervical vertebrae is usually seen in the presence of specific risk factors. Urinary tract infection commonly spreads to the lumbar vertebrae. This is a case presentation of an elderly male who, in the absence of specific risk factors for cervical osteomyelitis, presented with symptoms of urinary tract infection and was found to have cervical spine osteomyelitis. PMID:26715867

  12. MRI morphometric characterisation of the paediatric cervical spine and spinal cord in children with MPS IVA (Morquio-Brailsford syndrome).

    PubMed

    Solanki, Guirish A; Lo, William B; Hendriksz, Christian J

    2013-03-01

    Nearly all children with MPS IVA develop skeletal deformities affecting the spine. At the atlanto-axial spine, odontoid hypoplasia occurs. GAG deposition around the dens, leads to peri-odontoid infiltration. Transverse/alar ligament incompetence causes instability. Atlanto-axial instability is associated with cord compression and myelopathy, leading to major morbidity and mortality. Intervention is often required. Does the presence of widened bullet shaped vertebra in platyspondily encroach on the spinal canal and cause spinal stenosis in MPS IVA? So far, there have been no standardised morphometric measurements of the paediatric MPS IVA cervical spine to evaluate whether there is pre-existing spinal stenosis predisposing to compressive myelopathy or whether this is purely an acquired process secondary to instability and compression. This study provides the first radiological quantitative analysis of the cervical spine and spinal cord in a series of affected children. MRI morphometry indicates that the MPS IVA spine is narrower at C1-2 level giving an inverted funnel shape. There is no evidence of a reduction in the Torg ratio (canal-body ratio) in the cervical spine. The spinal canal does not exceed 11 mm at any level, significantly smaller than normal historical cohorts (14 mm). The sagittal diameter and axial surface area of both spinal canal and cord are reduced. C1-2 level cord compression was evident in the canal-cord ratio but the Torg ratio was not predictive of cord compression. In MPS IVA the reduction in the space available for the cord (SAC) is multifactorial rather than due to congenital spinal stenosis.

  13. Mandible, maxilla and cervical spine--a functional unit?

    PubMed

    Kubein-Meesenburg, D; Thieme, K M; Weber, S; Fanghanel, J; Dumont, C; Spassov, A; Hahn, W; Ihlow, D; Nagerl, H

    2008-11-01

    The motion patterns of mandibular points were recorded in vivo in closed, free movements of the mandible parallel to the sagittal-vertical plane. The points ran along loops which were valued by their area and length. All points whose loops included the same area under regarding the sense of circulation formed a straight line. Lines belonging to different areas were parallel. When the absolute areas of the oops were plotted for particular points a hollow depression with two minima resulted. The point that showed the lowest minimum in the depression corresponded to the position of the neuromuscular mandibular axis of rotation. The points running along equal loop lengths formed elliptical lines with a minimum below the condyle. The lines of constant loop area and loop length were overlaid with lateral radiographs, to match the patterns of motion with anatomical structures. The mandibular axis of rotation lay mostly cranial anterior of the condyle whereas the point with the shortest path lay mainly below this axis point, inside the bony structures. The row of teeth in the maxilla was found to be located below the line of minimal loop lengths. The cervical spine was arranged along the depression of the minimal absolute areas. PMID:19075327

  14. Laminar screw fixation in the subaxial cervical spine: A report on three cases

    PubMed Central

    Tanabe, Hironori; Aota, Yoichi; Saito, Tomoyuki

    2016-01-01

    Although laminar screw fixation is often used at the C2 and C7 levels, only few previous case reports have presented the use of laminar screws at the C3-C6 levels. Here, we report a novel fixation method involving the use of practical laminar screws in the subaxial spine. We used laminar screws in the subaxial cervical spine in two cases to prevent vertebral artery injury and in one case to minimize exposure of the lamina. This laminar screw technique was successful in all three cases with adequate spinal rigidity, which was achieved without complications. The use of laminar screws in the subaxial cervical spine is a useful option for posterior fusion of the cervical spine. PMID:27795952

  15. National trends in outpatient surgical treatment of degenerative cervical spine disease.

    PubMed

    Baird, Evan O; Egorova, Natalia N; McAnany, Steven J; Qureshi, Sheeraz A; Hecht, Andrew C; Cho, Samuel K

    2014-08-01

    Study Design Retrospective population-based observational study. Objective To assess the growth of cervical spine surgery performed in an outpatient setting. Methods A retrospective study was conducted using the United States Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project's State Inpatient and Ambulatory Surgery Databases for California, New York, Florida, and Maryland from 2005 to 2009. Current Procedural Terminology, fourth revision (CPT-4) and International Classification of Diseases, ninth revision Clinical Modification (ICD-9-CM) codes were used to identify operations for degenerative cervical spine diseases in adults (age > 20 years). Disposition and complication rates were examined. Results There was an increase in cervical spine surgeries performed in an ambulatory setting during the study period. Anterior cervical diskectomy and fusion accounted for 68% of outpatient procedures; posterior decompression made up 21%. Younger patients predominantly underwent anterior fusion procedures, and patients in the eighth and ninth decades of life had more posterior decompressions. Charlson comorbidity index and complication rates were substantially lower for ambulatory cases when compared with inpatients. The majority (>99%) of patients were discharged home following ambulatory surgery. Conclusions Recently, the number of cervical spine surgeries has increased in general, and more of these procedures are being performed in an ambulatory setting. The majority (>99%) of patients are discharged home but the nature of analyzing administrative data limits accurate assessment of postoperative complications and thus patient safety. This increase in outpatient cervical spine surgery necessitates further discussion of its safety.

  16. Motion analysis study on sensitivity of finite element model of the cervical spine to geometry.

    PubMed

    Zafarparandeh, Iman; Erbulut, Deniz U; Ozer, Ali F

    2016-07-01

    Numerous finite element models of the cervical spine have been proposed, with exact geometry or with symmetric approximation in the geometry. However, few researches have investigated the sensitivity of predicted motion responses to the geometry of the cervical spine. The goal of this study was to evaluate the effect of symmetric assumption on the predicted motion by finite element model of the cervical spine. We developed two finite element models of the cervical spine C2-C7. One model was based on the exact geometry of the cervical spine (asymmetric model), whereas the other was symmetric (symmetric model) about the mid-sagittal plane. The predicted range of motion of both models-main and coupled motions-was compared with published experimental data for all motion planes under a full range of loads. The maximum differences between the asymmetric model and symmetric model predictions for the principal motion were 31%, 78%, and 126% for flexion-extension, right-left lateral bending, and right-left axial rotation, respectively. For flexion-extension and lateral bending, the minimum difference was 0%, whereas it was 2% for axial rotation. The maximum coupled motions predicted by the symmetric model were 1.5° axial rotation and 3.6° lateral bending, under applied lateral bending and axial rotation, respectively. Those coupled motions predicted by the asymmetric model were 1.6° axial rotation and 4° lateral bending, under applied lateral bending and axial rotation, respectively. In general, the predicted motion response of the cervical spine by the symmetric model was in the acceptable range and nonlinearity of the moment-rotation curve for the cervical spine was properly predicted.

  17. On the creation of a segmentation library for digitized cervical and lumbar spine radiographs.

    PubMed

    Gururajan, Arunkumar; Kamalakannan, Sridharan; Sari-Sarraf, Hamed; Shahriar, Muneem; Long, Rodney; Antani, Sameer

    2011-06-01

    In this paper, we address the issue of computer-assisted indexing in one specific case, i.e., for the 17,000 digitized images of the spine acquired during the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES). The crucial step in this process is to accurately segment the cervical and lumbar spine in the radiographic images. To that end, we have implemented a unique segmentation system that consists of a suite of spine-customized automatic and semi-automatic statistical shape segmentation algorithms. Using the aforementioned system, we have developed experiments to optimally generate a library of spine segmentations, which currently include 2000 cervical and 2000 lumbar spines. This work is expected to contribute toward the creation of a biomedical Content-Based Image Retrieval system that will allow retrieval of vertebral shapes by using query by image example or query by shape example.

  18. Comparison of risk factors for cervical spine, head, serious, and fatal injury in rollover crashes.

    PubMed

    Funk, James R; Cormier, Joseph M; Manoogian, Sarah J

    2012-03-01

    Previous epidemiological studies of rollover crashes have focused primarily on serious and fatal injuries in general, while rollover crash testing has focused almost exclusively on cervical spine injury. The purpose of this study was to examine and compare the risk factors for cervical spine, head, serious, and fatal injury in real world rollover crashes. Rollover crashes from 1995-2008 in the National Automotive Sampling System-Crashworthiness Data System (NASS-CDS) were investigated. A large data set of 6015 raw cases (2.5 million weighted) was generated. Nonparametric univariate analyses, univariate logistic regression, and multivariate logistic regression were conducted. Complete or partial ejection, a lack of seatbelt use, a greater number of roof inversions, and older occupant age significantly increased the risk of all types of injuries studied (p<0.05). Far side seating position increased the risk of fatal, head, and cervical spine injury (p<0.05), but not serious injury in general. Higher BMI was associated with an increased risk of fatal, serious, and cervical spine injury (p<0.05), but not head injury. Greater roof crush was associated with a higher rate of fatal and cervical spine injury (p<0.05). Vehicle type, occupant height, and occupant gender had inconsistent and generally non-significant effects on injury. This study demonstrates both common and unique risk factors for different types of injuries in rollover crashes. PMID:22269486

  19. In-vivo Kinematics of the Cervical Spine in Frontal Sled Tests

    PubMed Central

    Dehner, Christoph; Schick, Sylvia; Hell, Wolfram; Richter, Peter; Kraus, Michael; Kramer, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The description of cervical spine motion and the risk to sustain a cervical spine injury in traffic accidents is mainly based on rear-end collisions. The knowledge about frontal collisions is comparable low. Therefore the objective of this exploratory study was, to describe the in-vivo cervical spine motion and acceleration during simulated frontal sled collisions and to identify sequences of motion in which the risk of injury is increased. A frontal collision with a speed change of 10.2km/h was simulated in a sled test with ten volunteers. Cervical spine kinematics was assessed by the simultaneous analysis of the angular head motion and acceleration as well as the simultaneous analysis of the relative motion and acceleration between the head and the first thoracic vertebral body. The motion sequence was divided into five phases. The combination of peak values of the angular head acceleration to ventral and the relative horizontal head acceleration to dorsal between the time period of 90ms and 110ms (early flexion phase) included – potential injury generating – shear forces. Although a hyperflexion (late rebound phase) as injury pattern didn’t occur, dorsal soft tissue injuries due to eccentric muscle-sprain could not be ruled out completely. In conclusion the study showed under simulated test conditions that during the early flexion phase and the late rebound phase, acceleration and movement pattern occur that could lead to cervical spine injuries. PMID:23618481

  20. PAIN CHARACTERISTICS OF TEMPOROMANDIBULAR DISORDER – A PILOT STUDY IN PATIENTS WITH CERVICAL SPINE DYSFUNCTION

    PubMed Central

    Pedroni, Cristiane Rodrigues; de Oliveira, Anamaria Siriani; Bérzin, Fausto

    2006-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of the present pilot study was to describe pain complaints of TMD patients and cervical spine dysfunction. Methods: Fourteen women with myogenous TMD, cervical motion limitation and rotation of at least one of the three first cervical vertebrae evidenced by radiographic examination participated in this study. The multidimensional pain evaluation was accomplished by a Brazilian version of the McGill Pain Questionnaire. Results: The results showed that the most painful body site mentioned was cervical spine, followed by scapular region and temporomandibular joint. More than half of the volunteers reported temporal pain pattern as rhythmic, periodic and, or still, intermittent. The majority of the patients classified the pain intensity assessed at the moment of the evaluation as mild to discomforting. Absolute agreement was not observed among volunteers regarding word dimensions used to describe their pain, although a great number of patients chose the descriptor related to tension as the better expression to describe their painful complaint. Conclusion: Pain characteristics of TMD patients with cervical spine dysfunction showed cervical spine as a common painful region reported and words related to affective and emotional dimensions of pain perception can be used by these patients to qualify their pain complain. PMID:19089063

  1. Utility of flexion-extension radiography for the detection of ligamentous cervical spine injury and its current role in the clearance of the cervical spine.

    PubMed

    Oh, Jason Jaeseong; Asha, Stephen Edward

    2016-04-01

    Detecting the presence of injuries to the cervical spine is an important component of the initial assessment of patients sustaining blunt trauma. A small proportion of cervical spine injuries consists of ligamentous disruption. Accurate detection of ligamentous injury is essential as it may result in sequelae including radiculopathy, quadriplegia and death. Flexion-extension (FE) radiography has traditionally been utilised for the detection of ligamentous injury in patients who have been cleared of bony injury. There are controversies surrounding the use of FE for alert patients with neck pain. There are studies that call into question the diagnostic accuracy of FE, the high proportion of inadequate FE images due to muscle spasm and the adverse effects of prolonged cervical collar immobilisation while awaiting FE. Other literature indicates that FE provides no additional diagnostic information following a multi-detector helical computed tomography. This review evaluates the literature on the utility of FE for the detection of ligamentous injury and explores alternate strategies for clearing the cervical spine of ligamentous injury.

  2. CERVICAL SPINE SIGNS AND SYMPTOMS: PERPETUATING RATHER THAN PREDISPOSING FACTORS FOR TEMPOROMANDIBULAR DISORDERS IN WOMEN

    PubMed Central

    Bevilaqua-Grossi, Débora; Chaves, Thaís Cristina; de Oliveira, Anamaria Siriani

    2007-01-01

    Aim: The purpose of this study was to assess in a sample of female community cases the relationship between the increase of percentage of cervical signs and symptoms and the severity of temporomandibular disorders (TMD) and vice-versa. Material and Methods: One hundred women (aged 18-26 years) clinically diagnosed with TMD signs and symptoms and cervical spine disorders were randomly selected from a sample of college students. Results: 43% of the volunteers demonstrated the same severity for TMD and cervical spine disorders (CSD). The increase in TMD signs and symptoms was accompanied by increase in CSD severity, except for pain during palpation of posterior temporal muscle, more frequently observed in the severe CSD group. However, increase in pain during cervical extension, sounds during cervical lateral flexion, and tenderness to palpation of upper fibers of trapezius and suboccipital muscles were observed in association with the progression of TMD severity. Conclusion: The increase in cervical symptomatology seems to accompany TMD severity; nonetheless, the inverse was not verified. Such results suggest that cervical spine signs and symptoms could be better recognized as perpetuating rather than predisposing factors for TMD. PMID:19089141

  3. Detection of degenerative change in lateral projection cervical spine x-ray images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jebri, Beyrem; Phillips, Michael; Knapp, Karen; Appelboam, Andy; Reuben, Adam; Slabaugh, Greg

    2015-03-01

    Degenerative changes to the cervical spine can be accompanied by neck pain, which can result from narrowing of the intervertebral disc space and growth of osteophytes. In a lateral x-ray image of the cervical spine, degenerative changes are characterized by vertebral bodies that have indistinct boundaries and limited spacing between vertebrae. In this paper, we present a machine learning approach to detect and localize degenerative changes in lateral x-ray images of the cervical spine. Starting from a user-supplied set of points in the center of each vertebral body, we fit a central spline, from which a region of interest is extracted and image features are computed. A Random Forest classifier labels regions as degenerative change or normal. Leave-one-out cross-validation studies performed on a dataset of 103 patients demonstrates performance of above 95% accuracy.

  4. Length of the cervical spine as a factor in the etiology of cleft palate.

    PubMed

    Smahĕl, Z; Skvarilová, B

    1993-05-01

    The length of the cervical spine in a series of 206 adult males with cleft lip and/or palate and 50 normal controls was measured. The patients were divided into five subgroups according to the type and extent of the cleft. The shortening of the spine was most marked in bilateral cleft lip and palate patients (complete), less marked in unilateral cleft lip and palate patients, and was slight in isolated cleft palate patients. Complete isolated cleft palate and cleft lip was not associated with a shortening of the spine. A shortening of the cervical spine in less extensive types of isolated cleft palate was suggestive of the participation of the spine in their development, while in cleft lip and palate a simultaneous exposure to a teratogenic agent or any other developmental error during early stages of embryogenesis could explain the concomitant occurrence of spine anomalies. Patients with cleft lip and palate associated with a short spine also had a shorter mandibular ramus, which could be suggestive of simultaneous damage to both structures during morphogenesis. This relationship was not demonstrated in isolated cleft palate that developed in later stages of embryogenesis. In these cases a short spine itself could not have impaired the growth potential of the mandible, yet it could have mechanically induced the development of cleft palate. These observations are in agreement with the present state of knowledge on the development of orofacial clefts as shown in experimental animals.

  5. Percutaneous anterolateral balloon kyphoplasty for metastatic lytic lesions of the cervical spine.

    PubMed

    Lykomitros, Vasilis; Anagnostidis, Kleovoulos S; Alzeer, Ziad; Kapetanos, George A

    2010-11-01

    The purpose of our report is to describe a new application of kyphoplasty, the percutaneous anterolateral balloon kyphoplasty that we performed in two cases of metastatic osteolytic lesions in cervical spine. The first patient, aged 48 years, with primary malignancy in lungs had two metastatic lesions in C2 and C6 vertebrae. Patient's complaints were about pain and restriction of movements (due to the pain) in the cervical spine. The second patient, aged 70 years, with primary malignancy in stomach, had multiple metastatic lesions in thoracolumbar spine and C3, C4 and C5 vertebrae without neurological symptoms. The main symptoms were from cervical spine with severe pain even in bed rest and systematic use of opiate-base analgesic. The preoperative status was evaluated with X-rays, CT scan, MRI scan and with Karnofsky score and visual analogue pain (VAS) scale. Both patients underwent percutaneous anterolateral balloon kyphoplasty via the anterolateral approach in cervical spine under general anaesthesia. No clinical complications occurred during or after the procedure. Both patients experienced pain relief immediately after balloon kyphoplasty and during the following days. The stiffness also resolved rapidly and cervical collars were removed. VAS score significantly improved from 85 and 95 preoperatively to 30 in both patients. Karnofsky score showed also improvement from 40 and 30 preoperatively to 80 and 70, respectively, at the final follow-up (7 months after the procedure). Fluoroscopy-guided percutaneous anterolateral balloon kyphoplasty proved to be safe and effective minimally invasive procedure for metastatic osteolytic lesions of the cervical spine, reducing pain and avoiding vertebral collapse. Experience and attention are necessary in order to avoid complications.

  6. A systematic review of the use of expandable cages in the cervical spine.

    PubMed

    Elder, Benjamin D; Lo, Sheng-Fu; Kosztowski, Thomas A; Goodwin, C Rory; Lina, Ioan A; Locke, John E; Witham, Timothy F

    2016-01-01

    Expandable vertebral body replacement cages (VBRs) have been widely used for reconstruction of the thoracolumbar spine following corpectomy. However, their use in the cervical spine is less common, and currently, no expandable cages on the market are cleared or approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for use in the cervical spine. The objective of this study was to perform a systematic review on the use of expandable cages in the treatment of cervical spine pathology with a focus on fusion rates, deformity correction, complications, and indications. A comprehensive Medline search was performed, and 24 applicable articles were identified and included in this review. The advantages of expandable cages include greater ease of implantation with less risk of damage to the end plate, less intraoperative manipulation of the device, and potentially greater control over lordosis. They may be particularly advantageous in cases with poor bone quality, such as patients with osteoporosis or metastatic tumors that have been radiated. However, there is a potential risk of overdistraction, which is increased in the cervical spine, their minimum height limits their use in cases with collapsed vertebra, and the amount of hardware in the expansion mechanism may limit the surface area available for fusion. The use of expandable VBRs are a valuable tool in the armamentarium for reconstruction of the anterior column of the cervical spine with an acceptable safety profile. Although expandable cervical cages are clearly beneficial in certain clinical situations, widespread use following all corpectomies is not justified due to their significantly greater cost compared to structural bone grafts or non-expandable VBRs, which can be utilized to achieve similar clinical outcomes. PMID:26212700

  7. Tertiary Syphilis in the Cervical Spine: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Salem, K. M. I.; Majeed, H.; Bommireddy, R.; Klezl, Z.

    2012-01-01

    As the prevalence of syphilis rises, an increase in tertiary syphilis with spinal involvement is predicted. We report what we believe to be the first case of compressive cervical spine syphilitic gummata, with central cord compression signs. We also review the relevant literature to date. The diagnosis of syphilis in the spine relies on the physician to be aware of it as part of the differential diagnosis. Treponemal laboratory tests are an important aid in establishing a diagnosis. PMID:24436850

  8. [Combined surgical and physical treatment in traumatic painful syndromes of the cervical spine].

    PubMed

    Stachowski, B; Kaczmarek, J; Nosek, A; Kocur, L

    1976-01-01

    Clinical observations suggest the need for changing therapeutic management to a more active one in cases of cervical spine injury with damage to the spinal cord and nerve roots or brachial plexus. In 248 patients with these injuries treated initially conservatively the incidence of cervicobrachial pain was analysed. Neuralgic pains were present in 31.5% of cases, causalgic pains in 2.4% and sympathalgic pains in 2%. Conservative treatment conducted in these patients (89 cases) during many months after trauma had no effect on return of mobility. Long-term application of physioterapy prevented only temporarily the development of trophic changes and only partially relieved pains. Only surgical decompression of the spinal cord or spinal nerves with stabilization of damaged vertebrae caused disappearance of painful syndromes and improvement in the motor activity of the extremities. These observations show that early surgical intervention for decompression of the spinal cord, roots or brachial plexus should be advocated in these cases.

  9. A prospective study of the radiological changes in the cervical spine in early rheumatoid disease.

    PubMed Central

    Winfield, J; Cooke, D; Brook, A S; Corbett, M

    1981-01-01

    The cervical spine radiographs of 100 patients with early rheumatoid disease were studied annually, on a prospective basis, for a mean follow-up period of 7 years 2 months. Atlantoaxial subluxation developed in 12 patients. The subluxation was more frequent in females, more severe in patients with progressive, seropositive, erosive rheumatoid disease, and more marked in patients treated with oral corticosteroids. Subaxial subluxation, affecting upper cervical disc levels, occurred in a further 20 patients. Three patients developed vertical subluxation. The mobility of the cervical spine affects the degree of subluxation achieved, and when assessing serial films for subluxation it may be necessary to measure the cervical spine flexion before deciding whether subluxation has progressed or not. Over 80% of the patients with subluxation developed the first evidence of subluxation within 2 years of disease onset. Subluxation in the cervical spine is not, therefore, a late complication of rheumatoid disease. During the follow-up period none of the patients developed neurological signs. PMID:7224682

  10. Case Series of an Intraoral Balancing Appliance Therapy on Subjective Symptom Severity and Cervical Spine Alignment

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Young Jun; Lee, Joo Kang; Jung, Soo Chang; Lee, Hwang-woo; Yin, Chang Shik; Lee, Young Jin

    2013-01-01

    Objective. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of a holistic intraoral appliance (OA) on cervical spine alignment and subjective symptom severity. Design. An observational study on case series with holistic OA therapy. Setting. An outpatient clinic for holistic temporomandibular joint (TMJ) therapy under the supervision of the Pain Center, CHA Biomedical center, CHA University. Subjects. Ambulatory patients presenting with diverse chief complaints in the holistic TMJ clinic. Main Measures. Any immediate change in the curvature of cervical spine and the degree of atlantoaxial rotation was investigated in the images of simple X-ray and computed tomography of cervical spine with or without OA. Changes of subjective symptom severity were also analyzed for the holistic OA therapy cases. Results. A total of 59 cases were reviewed. Alignment of upper cervical spine rotation showed an immediate improvement (P < 0.001). Changes of subjective symptom severity also showed significant improvement (P < 0.05). Conclusion. These cases revealed rudimentary clinical evidence that holistic OA therapy may be related to an alleviated symptom severity and an improved cervical spinal alignment. These results show that further researches may warrant for the holistic TMJ therapy. PMID:23935655

  11. Esophageal perforation after anterior cervical spine surgery: a systematic review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Halani, Sameer H; Baum, Griffin R; Riley, Jonathan P; Pradilla, Gustavo; Refai, Daniel; Rodts, Gerald E; Ahmad, Faiz U

    2016-09-01

    OBJECTIVE Esophageal perforation is a rare but well-known complication of anterior cervical spine surgery. The authors performed a systematic review of the literature to evaluate symptomatology, direct causes, repair methods, and associated complications of esophageal injury. METHODS A PubMed search that adhered to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines included relevant clinical studies and case reports (articles written in the English language that included humans as subjects) that reported patients who underwent anterior spinal surgery and sustained some form of esophageal perforation. Available data on clinical presentation, the surgical procedure performed, outcome measures, and other individual variables were abstracted from 1980 through 2015. RESULTS The PubMed search yielded 65 articles with 153 patients (mean age 44.7 years; range 14-85 years) who underwent anterior spinal surgery and sustained esophageal perforation, either during surgery or in a delayed fashion. The most common indications for initial anterior cervical spine surgery in these cases were vertebral fracture/dislocation (n = 77), spondylotic myelopathy (n = 15), and nucleus pulposus herniation (n = 10). The most commonly involved spinal levels were C5-6 (n = 51) and C6-7 (n = 39). The most common presenting symptoms included dysphagia (n =63), fever (n = 24), neck swelling (n = 23), and wound leakage (n = 18). The etiology of esophageal perforation included hardware failure (n = 31), hardware erosion (n = 23), and intraoperative injury (n = 14). The imaging modalities used to identify the esophageal perforations included modified contrast dye swallow studies, CT, endoscopy, plain radiography, and MRI. Esophageal repair was most commonly achieved using a modified muscle flap, as well as with primary closure. Outcomes measured in the literature were often defined by the time to oral intake following esophageal repair. Complications included

  12. Current status of bone graft options for anterior interbody fusion of the cervical and lumbar spine.

    PubMed

    Chau, Anthony Minh Tien; Xu, Lileane Liang; Wong, Johnny Ho-Yin; Mobbs, Ralph Jasper

    2014-01-01

    Anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) and anterior lumbar interbody fusion (ALIF) are common surgical procedures for degenerative disc disease of the cervical and lumbar spine. Over the years, many bone graft options have been developed and investigated aimed at complimenting or substituting autograft bone, the traditional fusion substrate. Here, we summarise the historical context, biological basis and current best evidence for these bone graft options in ACDF and ALIF. PMID:23743981

  13. Direct injury to the cervical spine of a child by a lap-shoulder belt resulting in quadriplegia: case report.

    PubMed

    Lynch, J M; Meza, M P; Pollack, I F; Adelson, P D

    1996-10-01

    Most pediatric cervical spine injuries from seat-belt restraints result from hyperflexion of the neck without direct injury to the spine from the restraining device. We report what we believe to be the first case of direct injury to the cervical spine by the shoulder component of a lap-shoulder seat belt. This resulted in quadriplegia. The mechanism of injury and recommendations to obviate such injuries are discussed.

  14. Anterior decompression, fusion and plating in cervical spine injury: Early experience in Abuja, Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Ogungbo, Biodun

    2011-01-01

    Background: We present a review of the results of the current surgical management of acute cervical spine injuries in the Federal Capital Territory, Abuja, Nigeria. This is the first detailed retrospective study on the surgical management of patients with cervical spine injuries from Nigeria. Methods: The medical reports of patients with traumatic cervical spine and spinal cord injuries undergoing surgery from 1 August 2009 till 30 August 2010 were reviewed. Management and early results of outcome were ascertained and detailed consecutively in a prospective Microsoft Office Access® database (Microsoft Group of Companies). Frankel grading was used for pre- and immediate post-operative evaluation (within 48 hours). The Barthel index (BI) was used to classify patients as dependent or independent at follow-up. Results: Twenty consecutive patients presented with acute cervical spine and spinal cord injuries since August 2009. Twenty anterior cervical spine decompression and fixation with an iliac graft and an anterior cervical plate (ACDF) were performed in 18 patients. All operations were performed with general anaesthesia using standard techniques but without a microscope or a high speed drill. Of the 18 patients who were operated, 4 patients died within a short period following surgical intervention. Seven patients have made a full recovery and seven remain fully dependent. Only two of the dependent quadriplegic patients have become reintegrated back into the society. Conclusion: The management of spinal cord injuries in Abuja is evolving. The operations were performed adequately with much limited complement of equipment. Poor intensive care therapy is a major challenge and improvements in this area of care will likely lead to better patient outcomes. PMID:22140641

  15. Cervical spine involvement in patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis - MRI follow-up study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background To describe MRI and clinical findings in patients with juvenile idiopathic arthritis with cervical spine involvement at onset and follow-up under therapy. Methods 13 patients with signs of cervical spine involvement in juvenile idiopathic arthritis with a median disease duration of 1.7 years were included in the study. Clinical records and MR images were retrospectively analyzed according to symptoms and findings concerning the cervical spine. Results At the onset of cervical spine involvement all patients showed limited range of motion, whereas only 5 of them complained of pain. In MR images joint hyperintensity, contrast enhancement, malalignment, ankylosis, erosion and narrowing of the spinal canal at cranio-cervical junction were found at 28, 32, 15, 2, 2 and 3 sites in 12 (93%), 13 (100%), 8 (62%), 2 (15%), 2 and 3 (20%) patients respectively. 3 of the 5 patients with pain (60%) showed ankylosis, erosions or narrowing of the spinal canal at cranio-cervical junction on MRI. At follow-up - after a median disease duration of cervical spine arthritis of 2.1 years and a variable duration of treatment with methotrexate (all patients) and biological agents (12 patients) - joint hyperintensity, enhancement and malalignment decreased to 15, 19 and 6 sites in 10 (77%), 11 (85%) and 3 (20%) patients respectively whereas ankylosis, erosion and narrowing of the spinal canal at cranio-cervical junction increased to 7, 6 and 4 sites in 3 (20%), 4 (31%) and 4 patients respectively. Pain was no longer reported, but 9 of 13 (69%) patients still had a limited range of motion with 6 of them (46%) showing skeletal changes on MRI. Conclusions This first MRI based follow-up study shows that cervical spine arthritis can follow a severe disease course in juvenile arthritis. While malalignments and inflammation sites decreased osseous changes with erosions, ankylosis, and narrowing of the spinal canal increased under treatment despite only minor subjective complaints

  16. Primary leptomeningeal melanoma of the cervical spine mimicking a meningioma-a case report.

    PubMed

    Marx, Sascha; Fleck, Steffen K; Manwaring, Jotham; Vogelgesang, Silke; Langner, Soenke; Schroeder, Henry W S

    2014-08-01

    Background and Importance Primary leptomeningeal melanoma (PLM) is highly malignant and exceedingly rare. Due to its rarity, diagnostic and treatment paradigms have been slow to evolve. We report the first case of a PLM that mimics a cervical spine meningioma and then discuss the current clinical, radiologic, and pathologic diagnostic methodologies as well as expected outcomes related to this disease. Clinical Presentation A 54-year-old woman presented a dural-based extramedullary solid mass ventral to the C2-C3 spinal cord causing spinal cord compression without cord signal changes, characteristic of meningioma. Intraoperative microscopic inspection revealed numerous black spots littering the surface of the dura; the tumor itself was yellow in appearance and had a soft consistency. Pathologic analysis of the specimen revealed a malignant melanin-containing tumor. No primary site was found, so a diagnosis of primary leptomeningeal melanoma was made, and the patient subsequently received interferon therapy. To date (2 years postoperatively), no local or systemic recurrence of the tumor has been identified. Conclusion As with most rare tumors, case reports constitute the vast majority of references to PLM. Only an increased awareness and an extensive report of each individual case can help diagnose and clarify the nature of PLM. Clinicians need to be aware of such malignant conditions when diagnosing benign tumoral lesions of the spine such as meningiomas.

  17. Controlled Laboratory Comparison Study of Motion With Football Equipment in a Destabilized Cervical Spine

    PubMed Central

    Prasarn, Mark L.; Horodyski, MaryBeth; DiPaola, Matthew J.; DiPaola, Christian P.; Del Rossi, Gianluca; Conrad, Bryan P.; Rechtine, Glenn R.

    2015-01-01

    Background Numerous studies have shown that there are better alternatives to log rolling patients with unstable spinal injuries, although this method is still commonly used for placing patients onto a spine board. No previous studies have examined transfer maneuvers involving an injured football player with equipment in place onto a spine board. Purpose To test 3 different transfer maneuvers of an injured football player onto a spine board to determine which method most effectively minimizes spinal motion in an injured cervical spine model. Study Design Controlled laboratory study. Methods Five whole, lightly embalmed cadavers were fitted with shoulder pads and helmets and tested both before and after global instability was surgically created at C5-C6. An electromagnetic motion analysis device was used to assess the amount of angular and linear motion with sensors placed above and below the injured segment during transfer. Spine-boarding techniques evaluated were the log roll, the lift and slide, and the 8-person lift. Results The 8-person lift technique resulted in the least amount of angular and linear motion for all planes tested as compared with the lift-and-slide and log-roll techniques. This reached statistical significance for lateral bending (P = .031) and medial-lateral translation (P = .030) when compared with the log-roll maneuver. The lift-and-slide technique was significantly more effective at reducing motion than the log roll for axial rotation (P = .029) and lateral bending (P = .006). Conclusion The log roll resulted in the most motion at an unstable cervical injury as compared with the other 2 spine-boarding techniques examined. The 8-person lift and lift-and-slide techniques may both be more effective than the log roll at reducing unwanted cervical spine motion when spine boarding an injured football player. Reduction of such motion is critical in the prevention of iatrogenic injury. PMID:26535397

  18. Pseudarthrosis of the Cervical Spine: Risk Factors, Diagnosis and Management

    PubMed Central

    Leven, Dante

    2016-01-01

    Cervical myelopathy and radiculopathy are common pathologies that often improve with spinal decompression and fusion. Postoperative complications include pseudarthrosis, which can be challenging to diagnose and manage. We reviewed the literature with regard to risk factors, diagnosis, controversies, and management of cervical pseudarthrosis. PMID:27559462

  19. Is radiography justified for the evaluation of patients presenting with cervical spine trauma?

    SciTech Connect

    Theocharopoulos, Nicholas; Chatzakis, Georgios; Damilakis, John

    2009-10-15

    Conventional radiography has been for decades the standard method of evaluation for cervical spine trauma patients. However, currently available helical multidetector CT scanners allow multiplanar reconstruction of images, leading to increased diagnostic accuracy. The purpose of this study was to determine the relative benefit/risk ratio between cervical spine CT and cervical spine radiography and between cervical spine CT and cervical spine radiography, followed by CT as an adjunct for positive findings. A decision analysis model for the determination of the optimum imaging technique was developed. The sensitivity and specificity of CT and radiography were obtained by dedicated meta-analysis. Lifetime attributable risk of mortal cancer from CT and radiography was calculated using updated organ-specific risk coefficients and organ-absorbed doses. Patient organ doses from radiography were calculated using Monte Carlo techniques, simulated exposures performed on an anthropomorphic phantom, and thermoluminescence dosimetry. A prospective patient study was performed regarding helical CT scans of the cervical spine. Patient doses were calculated based on the dose-length-product values and Monte Carlo-based CT dosimetry software program. Three groups of patient risk for cervical spine fracture were incorporated in the decision model on the basis of hypothetical trauma mechanism and clinical findings. Radiation effects were assessed separately for males and females for four age groups (20, 40, 60, and 80 yr old). Effective dose from radiography amounts to 0.050 mSv and from a typical CT scan to 3.8 mSv. The use of CT in a hypothetical cohort of 10{sup 6} patients prevents approximately 130 incidents of paralysis in the low risk group (a priori fracture probability of 0.5%), 500 in the moderate risk group (a priori fracture probability of 2%), and 5100 in the high risk group (a priori fracture probability of 20%). The expense of this CT-based prevention is 15-32 additional

  20. [First guidelines of Croatian interest group in diagnosing and treating pain conditions of cervical and thoracic spine using minimally invasive procedures].

    PubMed

    Houra, Karlo; Ledić, Darko; Kvesić, Dražen; Perović, Darko; Radoš, Ivan; Kapural, Leonardo

    2014-01-01

    Pain syndromes originating from cervical and thoracic spine remain to be a major public health problem. Medical expenses in general and surgical procedures associated with overall care for the neck and thoracic pain are high and growing. Furthermore, these two chronic pain conditions are also leading causes for missed workdays. Chronic pain syndromes originating from cervical spine are most commonly caused by degenerative changes of the facet joints. Cervi- cobrachial syndrome is most commonly caused by herniated discs. Diagnostic controlled blocks, performed in order to identify, the source of pain, often predetermine patient for further therapeutic minimally invasive interventions. If the chronic pain syndromes of the cervical and thoracic spine are caused by degenerative facet joints, patient can be offered neuroablative procedures using radiofrequency. In patients suffering from chronic cervical and thoracic pain caused by painful intervertebral disc minimally invasive intradiscal decompression procedures can be performed. In cases where the neck pain and radicular pain are caused by the central and foraminal spinal stenosis patients are advised epidural steroid injections. The purpose of above advised procedures, using steroids, local anesthetics and RF current, is to relieve patients' pain, allow optimal physical therapy, and improved functional capacity, consequently providing a better quality of life.

  1. Helmet use and cervical spine injury: a review of motorcycle, moped, and bicycle accidents at a level 1 trauma center.

    PubMed

    Hooten, Kristopher G; Murad, Gregory J A

    2014-08-01

    Helmet use in two-wheeled vehicle accidents is widely reported to decrease the rates of death and traumatic brain injury. Previous reports suggest that there exists a trade off with helmet use consisting of an increased risk of cervical spine injuries. Recently, a review of a national trauma database demonstrated the opposite, with reduction in cervical spinal cord injuries in motorcycle crashes (MCC). In 2000, the State of Florida repealed its mandatory helmet law to make helmet use optional for individuals older than 21 with $10,000 of health insurance coverage. To better ascertain the risks of cervical spine injury with non-helmet use in all two-wheeled vehicles, we analyzed the University of Florida level one trauma center experience. We reviewed the Traumatic injury database over a five-year period (January 1, 2005, to July 1, 2010) for all patients involved in two-wheeled vehicle accidents. Patients were stratified according to vehicle type (motorcycle, scooter, and bicycle), helmet use, and the presence or absence of a cervical spine injury. Outcomes were compared for injury severity, cervical spine injury, cervical spinal cord injury, and presence of cervical spine injuries requiring surgery. Population means were compared using paired t-test. A total of 1331 patients were identified: 995 involved in motorcycle accidents, 87 involved in low-powered scooter accidents, and 249 involved in bicycle accidents. Helmet use was variable between each group. One hundred thirty-five total cervical spine injuries were identified. No evidence was found to suggest an increased risk of cervical spine injury or increased severity of cervical spine injury with helmet use. This fact, in combination with our previous findings, suggest that the law's age and insurance exemption should be revoked and a universal helmet law be reinstated in the state of Florida. PMID:24661125

  2. Manipulative practice in the cervical spine: a survey of IFOMPT member countries

    PubMed Central

    Carlesso, Lisa; Rivett, Darren

    2011-01-01

    The International Federation of Orthopaedic Manipulative Physical Therapists (IFOMPT) aims to achieve worldwide promotion of excellence and unity in clinical and academic standards for manual and musculoskeletal physical therapists. To this end, IFOMPT has sponsored several conference panel sessions and a survey of Member Organizations (MOs) and Registered Interest Groups (RIGs) regarding current cervical spine manipulation and pre-manipulative screening practice in each country. The purpose of this study was to determine common elements of cervical spine manipulative practice and pre-manipulative screening between countries. In late 2007, a questionnaire investigating recommended pre-manipulative screening protocol/guideline use, informed consent regarding risks, screening procedures, and treatment/manipulation technique was sent to all twenty MOs and five RIGs. The response rate was 88%. The main findings of the survey included: 77% of respondent organizations use pre-manipulative guidelines, with Australian guidelines the most frequently adopted internationally (36%); recommendations concerning the provision of information about the possibility of serious adverse events is not standard practice in all countries (50%); positional tests for vertebrobasilar insufficiency are used by all respondent organizations; craniovertebral ligament testing is sometimes taught as a pre-manipulative screening tool (36%); the use of upper cervical spine manipulation has declined in some countries (41%); and of the respondent organizations that continue to teach upper cervical manipulation, most (70%) minimize the rotation component. The findings of this research will inform an IFOMPT international standard for screening the cervical region prior to orthopaedic manual therapy intervention. The development of an IFOMPT endorsed document will be of assistance to manual therapy clinicians worldwide in safely managing disorders of the cervical spine. PMID:22547915

  3. Positive Outcome After a Small-Caliber Gunshot Fracture of the Upper Cervical Spine without Neurovascular Damage

    PubMed Central

    Walter, Thula; Schwabe, Philipp; Schaser, Klaus-Dieter; Maurer, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Gunshot wounds to the cervical spine most frequently concur with serious injuries to the spinal cord and cervical vessels and often have a fatal outcome. Case Report We describe the case of a 35-year-old male with a complex fracture of the C2 vertebra body and a mandibular fracture after a penetration gunshot to the cervical spine. Computed tomography (CT) at admission revealed the exact extent of the fractures and the small caliber bullet lodged next to the C2 vertebra. In this rare and extremely lucky case no collateral vascular or neurological damage was detected. Eighteen months after surgical bullet removal and posterior C1–C3 fusion complete bone healing of the C2 vertebra was achieved and there were no secondary neurovascular deficits. Conclusions Immediate surgical C1–C3 fixation resulted in an excellent outcome without secondary neurovascular deficits in this rare case of traumatic complex C2 vertebral fracture caused by a gunshot injury. PMID:27081417

  4. Bootstrap prediction bands for cervical spine intervertebral kinematics during in vivo three-dimensional head movements.

    PubMed

    Anderst, William J

    2015-05-01

    There is substantial inter-subject variability in intervertebral range of motion (ROM) in the cervical spine. This makes it difficult to define "normal" ROM, and to assess the effects of age, injury, and surgical procedures on spine kinematics. The objective of this study was to define normal intervertebral kinematics in the cervical spine during dynamic functional loading. Twenty-nine participants performed dynamic flexion\\extension, axial rotation, and lateral bending while biplane radiographs were collected at 30 images/s. Vertebral motion was tracked with sub-millimeter accuracy using a validated volumetric model-based tracking process that matched subject-specific CT-based bone models to the radiographs. Gaussian point-by-point and bootstrap techniques were used to determine 90% prediction bands for the intervertebral kinematic curves at 1% intervals of each movement cycle. Cross validation was performed to estimate the true achieved coverage for each method. For a targeted coverage of 90%, the estimated true coverage using bootstrap prediction bands averaged 86±5%, while the estimated true coverage using Gaussian point-by-point intervals averaged 56±10% over all movements and all motion segments. Bootstrap prediction bands are recommended as the standard for evaluating full ROM cervical spine kinematic curves. The data presented here can be used to identify abnormal motion in patients presenting with neck pain, to drive computational models, and to assess the biofidelity of in vitro loading paradigms.

  5. Extensive cervical spine and foregut anomaly in ‘serpentine syndrome’

    PubMed Central

    Dargan, D.; McMorrow, A.; Bourke, T.W.; McCallion, W.A.; Verner, A.M.; Lyons, J.; McConnell, R.S.; Lundy, C.T.; Eames, N.W.A.

    2013-01-01

    INTRODUCTION We report an extremely rare and challenging combination of congenital anomalies. Only five similar cases have been described in the English language medical literature to date. PRESENTATION OF CASE A male infant was born at 30+5 weeks gestation by emergency caesarian section. Cervical spine rachischisis, shortened oesophagus, intrathoracic stomach, atretic duodenum and absent spleen were noted, in addition to respiratory insufficiency. Gastrointestinal re-anastomosis, particularly oesophageal lengthening, was not feasible at the initial thoracotomy. Surgical stabilization of the cervical spine was unlikely to be successful until two years of age. Asplenia predisposed the infant to sepsis from encapsulated organisms, and recurrent respiratory infections occurred. DISCUSSION A close relationship exists between the upper gastrointestinal tract and cervical spine during embryonic development. An embryonic aberration at this level could account for all the deformities present in this infant. Tethering of the embryonic cervical oesophagus to the somites in the first trimester, preventing foregut elongation, and producing ischaemia at the coeliac axis, is suggested as the aetiology. CONCLUSION This case presented a challenge to the multi-disciplinary team involved in his management and prompted extensive consultation with international experts. After considerable counseling of the parents, care was directed towards palliation. PMID:23567544

  6. Visuo-proprioceptive interactions in degenerative cervical spine diseases requiring surgery.

    PubMed

    Freppel, S; Bisdorff, A; Colnat-Coulbois, S; Ceyte, H; Cian, C; Gauchard, G; Auque, J; Perrin, P

    2013-01-01

    Cervical proprioception plays a key role in postural control, but its specific contribution is controversial. Postural impairment was shown in whiplash injuries without demonstrating the sole involvement of the cervical spine. The consequences of degenerative cervical spine diseases are underreported in posture-related scientific literature in spite of their high prevalence. No report has focused on the two different mechanisms underlying cervicobrachial pain: herniated discs and spondylosis. This study aimed to evaluate postural control of two groups of patients with degenerative cervical spine diseases with or without optokinetic stimulation before and after surgical treatment. Seventeen patients with radiculopathy were recruited and divided into two groups according to the spondylotic or discal origin of the nerve compression. All patients and a control population of 31 healthy individuals underwent a static posturographic test with 12 recordings; the first four recordings with the head in 0° position: eyes closed, eyes open without optokinetic stimulation, with clockwise and counter clockwise optokinetic stimulations. These four sensorial situations were repeated with the head rotated 30° to the left and to the right. Patients repeated these 12 recordings 6weeks postoperatively. None of the patients reported vertigo or balance disorders before or after surgery. Prior to surgery, in the eyes closed condition, the herniated disc group was more stable than the spondylosis group. After surgery, the contribution of visual input to postural control in a dynamic visual environment was reduced in both cervical spine diseases whereas in a stable visual environment visual contribution was reduced only in the spondylosis group. The relative importance of visual and proprioceptive inputs to postural control varies according to the type of pathology and surgery tends to reduce visual contribution mostly in the spondylosis group.

  7. Current Trends in the Use of Patient-Reported Outcome Instruments in Degenerative Cervical Spine Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Ueda, Haruki; Cutler, Holt S.; Guzman, Javier Z.; Cho, Samuel K.

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Bibliometric analysis. Objective To determine trends, frequency, and distribution of patient-reported outcome instruments (PROIs) in degenerative cervical spine surgery literature over the past decade. Methods A search was conducted via PubMed from 2004 to 2013 on five journals (The Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery, The Bone and Joint Journal, The Spine Journal, European Spine Journal, and Spine), which were chosen based on their impact factors and authors' consensus. All abstracts were screened and articles addressing degenerative cervical spine surgery using PROIs were included. Articles were then analyzed for publication date, study design, journal, level of evidence, and PROI trends. Prevalence of PROIs and level of evidence of included articles were analyzed. Results From 19,736 articles published, 241 articles fulfilled our study criteria. Overall, 53 distinct PROIs appeared. The top seven most frequently used PROIs were: Japanese Orthopaedic Association score (104 studies), visual analog scale for pain (100), Neck Disability Index (72), Short Form-36 (38), Nurick score (25), Odom criteria (21), and Oswestry Disability Index (15). Only 11 PROIs were used in 5 or more articles. Thirty-three of the PROIs were appeared in only 1 article. Among the included articles, 16% were of level 1 evidence and 32% were of level 4 evidence. Conclusion Numerous PROIs are currently used in degenerative cervical spine surgery. A consensus on which instruments to use for a given diagnosis or procedure is lacking and may be necessary for better communication and comparison, as well as for the accumulation and analysis of vast clinical data across multiple studies. PMID:27099815

  8. THE RIDDELLTM RIPKORD SYSTEM FOR SHOULDER PAD REMOVAL IN A CERVICAL SPINE INJURED ATHLETE: A PARADIGM SHIFT

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Danny; Hoogenboom, Barb

    2011-01-01

    Since the inception of the term Sports Medicine Athletic Trainers, Sports Physical Therapists, Paramedics, and Emergency Room Physicians have faced a number of challenges when it comes to providing care to an equipment laden athlete suspected of having a cervical spine or serious head injury. The same equipment that is designed to protect the player may significantly impede the medical team when it comes to diagnosing and treating cervical spine and head injuries. Incorrectly removing the helmet and shoulder pads from a football player with a cervical spine injury, may lead to unwanted motion of the cervical spine during removal. It is the purpose of this article to review the current concepts relating to equipment removal and to introduce a novel system for quick and easy removal of football shoulder pads called the Riddell™RipKord system. PMID:21712941

  9. The riddell ripkord system for shoulder pad removal in a cervical spine injured athlete: a paradigm shift.

    PubMed

    Kordecki, Michael; Smith, Danny; Hoogenboom, Barb

    2011-06-01

    Since the inception of the term Sports Medicine Athletic Trainers, Sports Physical Therapists, Paramedics, and Emergency Room Physicians have faced a number of challenges when it comes to providing care to an equipment laden athlete suspected of having a cervical spine or serious head injury. The same equipment that is designed to protect the player may significantly impede the medical team when it comes to diagnosing and treating cervical spine and head injuries. Incorrectly removing the helmet and shoulder pads from a football player with a cervical spine injury, may lead to unwanted motion of the cervical spine during removal. It is the purpose of this article to review the current concepts relating to equipment removal and to introduce a novel system for quick and easy removal of football shoulder pads called the Riddell™RipKord system.

  10. [Reflex dystrophy following so-called whiplash injury of the cervical spine].

    PubMed

    Bühring, M

    1984-01-01

    In bad cases of whiplash injury of the cervical spine the post-accidental course is complicated by pain, vegetative dysfunctional syndromes and by psychic and psychiatric disorders over many years. There is no satisfactory concept to understand the pathophysiology of these processes. The paper deals with the possibility of a reflex dystrophy. Sympathetic reflex dystrophy syndromes are seen principally in patients with joint, tendon or vascular lesions. In case of whiplash injury, it would concern the cervical spine itself as well as visceral organs including the central nervous system. For the CNS the lymphostatic encephalopathy is a well defined entity. Above all, a reflex dystrophy develops on the basis of a special personality structure. In case of psychic and psychiatric complaints after whiplash injury patients with a so called Sudeck-personality should not be suspected to aggravate; in contrast, especially in these patients complications by reflex dystrophy are credible. Consequences for the assessment and for rehabilitation are discussed. PMID:6475217

  11. Infantile tumoral calcinosis of the cervical spine presenting as torticollis.

    PubMed

    Ashraf, Ali; Diehn, Felix E; Luetmer, Patrick H; Lane, John I; Fritchie, Karen; Larson, A Noelle

    2016-01-01

    The computed tomography (CT) and MRI findings of infantile tumoral calcinosis and the utility of image-guided biopsy are demonstrated. A 5-month old presented with torticollis and a calcified cervical spinal mass. The radiologic appearance suggested a malignant neoplasm, prompting CT-guided biopsy, which diagnosed tumoral calcinosis. We hope to increase awareness of this entity and describe image-guided biopsy as a way to avoid morbidity associated with open biopsy.

  12. Identification of a relationship between cervical spine function and rotational movement control.

    PubMed

    Hage, R; Ancenay, E

    2009-11-01

    The cervical spine's stabilising function is generated by three interacting systems: an active system (the muscles), a passive system (capsules, intervertebral disks and ligaments) and a neutral system (the nervous system). Functional impairment induced by alteration of one or several systems can disturb movement control. Thus, a decrease in the quality of movement control could be directly linked to the cervical spine's state of impairment. The aim of the present study was to assess the relationship between cervical spine status (measured using a validated questionnaire) and the control of low-amplitude neck movements. Our starting hypothesis was that the more precise the movement, the faster it would be. We devised a test in which a sequence of rotational movements of the neck (to the left and to the right, alternately) was timed while monitoring the targeting of a laser beam (fixed to the right side of a pair of spectacles) on photodetectors placed directly in front of the subject and 30 degrees to the left and to the right of the body line. The test was performed using a system called the "Didren laser". Fifty-six subjects (of varying ages and both genders, classified as "disabled" or "healthy" according to the Neck Disability Index [NDI] questionnaire score) performed the test. Our results showed that: the score differed from one individual to another but was reproducible for a given subject; the score was age- and gender-independent; the highest scores (i.e. the slowest rotations) were generally produced by individuals classified as "disabled" in terms of the NDI questionnaire score. Our results led us to conclude that there is a relationship between functional disorders of the cervical spine and low-amplitude rotational movement control, although we were unable to define the exact nature of this relationship. PMID:19783494

  13. Pathological burst fracture in the cervical spine with negative red flags: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Cox, Jocelyn; DeGraauw, Chris; Klein, Erik

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To report on a case of a pathological burst fracture in the cervical spine where typical core red flag tests failed to identify a significant lesion, and to remind chiropractors to be vigilant in the recognition of subtle signs and symptoms of disease processes. Clinical Features: A 61-year-old man presented to a chiropractic clinic with neck pain that began earlier that morning. After a physical exam that was relatively unremarkable, imaging identified a burst fracture in the cervical spine. Intervention & Outcomes: The patient was sent by ambulance to the hospital where he was diagnosed with multiple myeloma. No medical intervention was performed on the fracture. Summary: The patient’s initial physical examination was largely unremarkable, with an absence of clinical red flags. The screening tools were non-diagnostic. Pain with traction and the sudden onset of symptoms prompted further investigation with plain film imaging of the cervical spine. This identified a pathological burst fracture in the C4 vertebrae. PMID:27069270

  14. A Study to Analyses Pattern and Treatment of Upper Cervical Spine Injuries Experience From Developing World

    PubMed Central

    Kamal, Younis; Khan, Hayat Ahmad; Gani, Naseemul; Gupta, Anil; Singh, Dara; Gul, Snobar

    2015-01-01

    Background: The literature regarding the different patterns of upper cervical spine injuries, their appropriate management, and management development of such injuries is scarce in the world. Objectives: The current study aimed to present the experience regarding the high velocity trauma of upper cervical spine injuries. Patients and Methods: Thirty patients (22 males, 8 females) with upper cervical spine injuries were treated and followed-up for an average of 24 months. The corresponding data were analyzed with respect to various types of injuries and different treatment modalities used to treat such patients keeping the basic healthcare facilities in view. Results: The clinical as well as radiological outcomes of the treatment of such injuries were mostly achievable with minimum facilities in India, with only few complications. Conclusions: Managing such patients needs a proper transport facility, proper care during transport, appropriate evaluation in the hospital and prompt conservative or operative treatment. Treatment is usually safe and effective by well trained professionals with good clinical and radiological outcomes. PMID:26543839

  15. Rugby injuries to the cervical spine and spinal cord: a 10-year review.

    PubMed

    Scher, A T

    1998-01-01

    A 10-year review (1987-1996) of injuries sustained to the spine and spinal cord in rugby players with resultant paralysis has been undertaken. This article reviews that the incidence of serious rugby spine and spinal cord injuries in South Africa has increased over the 10-year period reviewed, despite stringent new rules instituted in an attempt to decrease the incidence of these injuries. The mechanisms of injury, as previously reported, remain the same as well as the phases of game responsible for injury of the tight scrum, tackle, rucks, and mauls. Two new observations are reported: the first is related to the occurrence of spinal cord concussion with transient paralysis, and the second is related to the increased incidence of osteoarthritis of the cervical spine in rugby players. PMID:9475983

  16. Random Positional Variation Among the Skull, Mandible, and Cervical Spine With Treatment Progression During Head-and-Neck Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Ahn, Peter H. Ahn, Andrew I.; Lee, C. Joe; Shen Jin; Miller, Ekeni; Lukaj, Alex; Milan, Elissa; Yaparpalvi, Ravindra; Kalnicki, Shalom; Garg, Madhur K.

    2009-02-01

    Purpose: With 54{sup o} of freedom from the skull to mandible to C7, ensuring adequate immobilization for head-and-neck radiotherapy (RT) is complex. We quantify variations in skull, mandible, and cervical spine movement between RT sessions. Methods and Materials: Twenty-three sequential head-and-neck RT patients underwent serial computed tomography. Patients underwent planned rescanning at 11, 22, and 33 fractions for a total of 93 scans. Coordinates of multiple bony elements of the skull, mandible, and cervical spine were used to calculate rotational and translational changes of bony anatomy compared with the original planning scan. Results: Mean translational and rotational variations on rescanning were negligible, but showed a wide range. Changes in scoliosis and lordosis of the cervical spine between fractions showed similar variability. There was no correlation between positional variation and fraction number and no strong correlation with weight loss or skin separation. Semi-independent rotational and translation movement of the skull in relation to the lower cervical spine was shown. Positioning variability measured by means of vector displacement was largest in the mandible and lower cervical spine. Conclusions: Although only small overall variations in position between head-and-neck RT sessions exist on average, there is significant random variation in patient positioning of the skull, mandible, and cervical spine elements. Such variation is accentuated in the mandible and lower cervical spine. These random semirigid variations in positioning of the skull and spine point to a need for improved immobilization and/or confirmation of patient positioning in RT of the head and neck.

  17. Gender dependent cervical spine anatomical differences in size-matched volunteers - biomed 2009.

    PubMed

    Stemper, Brian D; Derosia, John J; Yogananan, Narayan; Pintar, Frank A; Shender, Barry S; Paskoff, Glenn R

    2009-01-01

    The objective was to examine significant differences in the bony structure of cervical spine vertebrae based on gender and spinal level that may influence injury risk in women following automotive rear impact. Male and female subjects were recruited for a separate study and data from two subsets were selected for inclusion in this study. Subjects were size-matched based on sitting height (17 males, 11 females) and head circumference (9 males, 18 females). Axial CT scans were obtained of the cervical spine from the C1 through C6. Bony boundaries of cervical vertebrae were defined using image-analysis software and biomechanically-relevant dimensions were derived at spinal levels C2 through C6. Six of seven vertebral dimensions were significantly dependent upon gender and spinal level in both subgroups. Male vertebrae had larger dimensions for each metric. Depth dimensions were greatest at caudal and cranial extents, whereas width dimensions were smallest at C2 and increased caudally. Greater linear and areal dimensions in size-matched male subjects indicates a more stable cervical spinal column that may be more capable of resisting inertial loading of the head-neck complex during automotive rear impacts. Although the explanation for greater injury susceptibility in females is likely multi-factorial, including differences in spinal material properties, soft tissue tolerance thresholds, occupant-seatback orientation, and neck muscle size/orientations, the present study has identified significant differences in cervical spine anatomical dimensions that may contribute to greater rates of whiplash injury in that population. PMID:19369755

  18. Discal cysts of the cervical spine in two dogs

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Byung-Jae; Jung, Yechan; Park, Sangjun

    2015-01-01

    Discal cysts, which lie directly over intervertebral discs, are rare. Two old dogs with tetraparesis were referred to our facility. In both animals, magnetic resonance imaging revealed intraspinal extradural cystic mass lesions that were dorsal to degenerative intervertebral discs at the C3-C4 level. These lesions had low signal intensity on T1-weighted images, and high signal intensity on T2-weighted images. A ventral slot approach was used to perform surgical decompression, after which the symptoms improved remarkably. Discal cysts should be included in the differential diagnosis of dogs with cervical pain and tetraparesis. One effective treatment for discal cysts is surgical intervention. PMID:26040615

  19. Mobilization and Manipulation of the Cervical Spine in Patients with Cervicogenic Headache: Any Scientific Evidence?

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Jodan D.; Arnold, Stephen; Tetley, Kylie; Voight, Kiel; Frank, Rachael Anne

    2016-01-01

    Cervical mobilization and manipulation are frequently used to treat patients diagnosed with cervicogenic headache (CEH); however, there is conflicting evidence on the efficacy of these manual therapy techniques. The purpose of this review is to investigate the effects of cervical mobilization and manipulation on pain intensity and headache frequency, compared to traditional physical therapy interventions in patients diagnosed with CEH. A total of 66 relevant studies were originally identified through a review of the literature, and the 25 most suitable articles were fully evaluated via a careful review of the text. Ultimately, 10 studies met the inclusion criteria: (1) randomized controlled trial (RCT) or open RCT; the study contained at least two separate groups of subjects that were randomly assigned either to a cervical spine mobilization or manipulation or a group that served as a comparison; (2) subjects must have had a diagnosis of CEH; (3) the treatment group received either spinal mobilization or spinal manipulation, while the control group received another physical therapy intervention or placebo control; and (4) the study included headache pain and frequency as outcome measurements. Seven of the 10 studies had statistically significant findings that subjects who received mobilization or manipulation interventions experienced improved outcomes or reported fewer symptoms than control subjects. These results suggest that mobilization or manipulation of the cervical spine may be beneficial for individuals who suffer from CEH, although heterogeneity of the studies makes it difficult to generalize the findings. PMID:27047446

  20. Minimally invasive central corpectomy for ossified posterior longitudinal ligament in the cervical spine.

    PubMed

    Hirano, Yoshitaka; Mizuno, Junichi; Nakagawa, Hiroshi; Itoh, Yasunobu; Kubota, Keiichi; Watanabe, Sadayoshi; Matsuoka, Hidenori; Numazawa, Shinichi; Tomii, Masato; Watanabe, Kazuo

    2011-01-01

    Minimally invasive central corpectomy (MICC) for cervical segmental ossified posterior longitudinal ligament (OPLL) is described. The procedure of MICC includes upper- or lower-half central corpectomy of the involved cervical spine, transdiscal decompression of the adjacent disc level, dissection and partial removal of the OPLL, removal of the OPLL behind the vertebral body via these windows, and fusion with cylindrical titanium cages. Anterior plate fixation is not necessary. From January 2008 to December 2009 we surgically treated three patients with cervical OPLL by MICC. All three patients showed remarkable improvement of their symptoms within a few days after the operation. No neurological or radiological complication was observed during that period. MICC is beneficial in avoiding complete corpectomy and long fusion, usage of an anterior plate, and usage of a large external orthosis. MICC also reduces the risk of postoperative esophageal perforation due to a screw backing out of the plate. PMID:20888772

  1. Positional Magnetic Resonance Imaging for People With Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome or Suspected Craniovertebral or Cervical Spine Abnormalities: An Evidence-Based Analysis

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) is an inherited disorder affecting the connective tissue. EDS can manifest with symptoms attributable to the spine or craniovertebral junction (CVJ). In addition to EDS, numerous congenital, developmental, or acquired disorders can increase ligamentous laxity in the CVJ and cervical spine. Resulting abnormalities can lead to morbidity and serious neurologic complications. Appropriate imaging and diagnosis is needed to determine patient management and need for complex surgery. Some spinal abnormalities cause symptoms or are more pronounced while patients sit, stand, or perform specific movements. Positional magnetic resonance imaging (pMRI) allows imaging of the spine or CVJ with patients in upright, weight-bearing positions and can be combined with dynamic maneuvers, such as flexion, extension, or rotation. Imaging in these positions could allow diagnosticians to better detect spinal or CVJ abnormalities than recumbent MRI or even a combination of other available imaging modalities might allow. Objectives To determine the diagnostic impact and clinical utility of pMRI for the assessment of (a) craniovertebral or spinal abnormalities among people with EDS and (b) major craniovertebral or cervical spine abnormalities among symptomatic people. Data Sources A literature search was performed using Ovid MEDLINE, Ovid MEDLINE In-Process and Other Non-Indexed Citations, Ovid Embase, and EBM Reviews, for studies published from January 1, 1998, to September 28, 2014. Review Methods Studies comparing pMRI to recumbent MRI or other available imaging modalities for diagnosis and management of spinal or CVJ abnormalities were reviewed. All studies of spinal or CVJ imaging in people with EDS were included as well as studies among people with suspected major CVJ or cervical spine abnormalities (cervical or craniovertebral spine instability, basilar invagination, cranial settling, cervical stenosis, spinal cord compression, Chiari

  2. Short communication: Traits unique to genus Homo within primates at the cervical spine (C2-C7).

    PubMed

    Rios, Luis; Muñoz, Alexandra; Cardoso, Hugo; Pastor, Francisco

    2014-05-01

    From a comparative study of 222 human and 261 nonhuman primates complete cervical spines, two bony variants associated to the course of the vertebral artery are proposed as unique to genus Homo within primates. First, the opening of the foramen transversarium at C2, a trait present at low frequency in humans (3 to 5.6%). Second, the presence of a bipartite foramen transversarium in the cervical segment C3-C6, a trait that can be observed fully formed in human fetal skeletons, with a clear frequency pattern along the cervical spine (C3>C4>C5>C6spines studied, practically absent in Strepsirrhini, at low frequency in Platyrrhini, and generalized in Catarrhini. These findings, together with previous data regarding absence and presence of foramina at C1, indicate a pattern of gain and loss of foramina in the transverse process of the cervical vertebrae for genus Homo. The test of a possible explanation of these differences as associated to anatomical changes of the cervical spine due to erect posture and bipedal locomotion needs further research in the morphology and function of the primate cervical spine.

  3. Cervical Necrotizing Fasciitis Caused by Dental Extraction

    PubMed Central

    Figueiredo, Eugênia; Álvares, Pâmella; Silva, Luciano; Silva, Leorik; Caubi, Antônio; Silveira, Marcia; Sobral, Ana Paula

    2016-01-01

    Cervical necrotizing fasciitis is an unusual infection characterized by necrosis of the subcutaneous tissue and fascial layers. Risk factors for the development of necrotizing fasciitis include diabetes mellitus, chronic renal disease, peripheral vascular disease, malnutrition, advanced age, obesity, alcohol abuse, intravenous drug use, surgery, and ischemic ulcers. This report presents a case of necrotizing fasciitis in the cervical area caused by dental extraction in a 73-year-old woman. Cervical necrotizing fasciitis in geriatric patient is rare, and even when establishing the diagnosis and having it timely treated, the patient can suffer irreversible damage or even death. Clinical manifestations in the head and neck usually have an acute onset characterized by severe pain, swelling, redness, erythema, presence of necrotic tissue, and in severe cases obstruction of the upper airways. Therefore, the presentation of this clinical case can serve as guidance to dentists as a precaution to maintain an aseptic chain and be aware of the clinical condition of older patients and the systemic conditions that may increase the risk of infections. PMID:27375905

  4. Cervical Necrotizing Fasciitis Caused by Dental Extraction.

    PubMed

    Arruda, José Alcides; Figueiredo, Eugênia; Álvares, Pâmella; Silva, Luciano; Silva, Leorik; Caubi, Antônio; Silveira, Marcia; Sobral, Ana Paula

    2016-01-01

    Cervical necrotizing fasciitis is an unusual infection characterized by necrosis of the subcutaneous tissue and fascial layers. Risk factors for the development of necrotizing fasciitis include diabetes mellitus, chronic renal disease, peripheral vascular disease, malnutrition, advanced age, obesity, alcohol abuse, intravenous drug use, surgery, and ischemic ulcers. This report presents a case of necrotizing fasciitis in the cervical area caused by dental extraction in a 73-year-old woman. Cervical necrotizing fasciitis in geriatric patient is rare, and even when establishing the diagnosis and having it timely treated, the patient can suffer irreversible damage or even death. Clinical manifestations in the head and neck usually have an acute onset characterized by severe pain, swelling, redness, erythema, presence of necrotic tissue, and in severe cases obstruction of the upper airways. Therefore, the presentation of this clinical case can serve as guidance to dentists as a precaution to maintain an aseptic chain and be aware of the clinical condition of older patients and the systemic conditions that may increase the risk of infections. PMID:27375905

  5. Minimally invasive posterior cervical microforaminotomy in the lower cervical spine and C-T junction assisted by O-arm-based navigation.

    PubMed

    Del Curto, David; Kim, Jin-Sung; Lee, Sang-Ho

    2013-01-01

    Navigated posterior cervical microforaminotomy (PCM) is a promising minimally invasive technique for treating radiculopathy caused by lateral disc herniations and foraminal stenosis. Between December 2009 and October 2010, 14 patients with unilateral foraminal disc herniations or foraminal stenosis at the C6-7 or C7-T1 level underwent PCM assisted by O-arm navigation using the METRx tubular retractor. The main symptoms were radicular arm pain with no significant neck pain. Successful relief of radicular pain was achieved in all 14 patients. Two of the patients were lost during follow-up, and three had to undergo further decompression due to remnant foraminal stenosis being discovered on intraoperative O-arm images. There were no cases of instability or recurrence, and the only complication observed was a dural tear in one patient, which was adequately treated with fibrin glue and bed rest. The duration of symptoms was 4.5 months on average. The mean operation time was 136 minutes, with the additional time required for the image guided surgery assisted by O-arm-based navigation being approximately 28 minutes on average. There were no other complications during the surgical procedure or in the immediate postoperative period. Posterior cervical microforaminotomy assisted by O-arm-based navigation is a safe, effective and minimally invasive procedure for the treatment of lateral disc herniations and foraminal stenosis of the lower cervical spine and C-T junction, offering the possibility of an accurate decompression with a reduced risk of segmental instability.

  6. Ear trauma caused by a yucca plant leaf spine.

    PubMed

    Talmi, Yoav P; Wolf, Michael; Migirov, Lela; Kronenberg, Jona

    2009-06-01

    Three uncommon cases of ear trauma caused by a yucca plant leaf spine are presented. One patient presented with tympanic perforation and the second with mixed hearing loss after spontaneous closure. The third patient probably had a perilymphatic fistula with subsequent labyrinthitis and hearing loss. Although the yucca is a ubiquitous plant, to the best of our knowledge, such incidents have not been previously reported.

  7. MRI evaluation of spontaneous intervertebral disc degeneration in the alpaca cervical spine.

    PubMed

    Stolworthy, Dean K; Bowden, Anton E; Roeder, Beverly L; Robinson, Todd F; Holland, Jacob G; Christensen, S Loyd; Beatty, Amanda M; Bridgewater, Laura C; Eggett, Dennis L; Wendel, John D; Stieger-Vanegas, Susanne M; Taylor, Meredith D

    2015-12-01

    Animal models have historically provided an appropriate benchmark for understanding human pathology, treatment, and healing, but few animals are known to naturally develop intervertebral disc degeneration. The study of degenerative disc disease and its treatment would greatly benefit from a more comprehensive, and comparable animal model. Alpacas have recently been presented as a potential large animal model of intervertebral disc degeneration due to similarities in spinal posture, disc size, biomechanical flexibility, and natural disc pathology. This research further investigated alpacas by determining the prevalence of intervertebral disc degeneration among an aging alpaca population. Twenty healthy female alpacas comprised two age subgroups (5 young: 2-6 years; and 15 older: 10+ years) and were rated according to the Pfirrmann-grade for degeneration of the cervical intervertebral discs. Incidence rates of degeneration showed strong correlations with age and spinal level: younger alpacas were nearly immune to developing disc degeneration, and in older animals, disc degeneration had an increased incidence rate and severity at lower cervical levels. Advanced disc degeneration was present in at least one of the cervical intervertebral discs of 47% of the older alpacas, and it was most common at the two lowest cervical intervertebral discs. The prevalence of intervertebral disc degeneration encourages further investigation and application of the lower cervical spine of alpacas and similar camelids as a large animal model of intervertebral disc degeneration.

  8. Segmentation and feature extraction of cervical spine x-ray images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, L. Rodney; Thoma, George R.

    1999-05-01

    As part of an R&D project in mixed text/image database design, the National Library of Medicine has archived a collection of 17,000 digitized x-ray images of the cervical and lumbar spine which were collected as part of the second National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES II). To make this image data available and usable to a wide audience, we are investigating techniques for indexing the image content by automated or semi-automated means. Indexing of the images by features of interest to researchers in spine disease and structure requires effective segmentation of the vertebral anatomy. This paper describes work in progress toward this segmentation of the cervical spine images into anatomical components of interest, including anatomical landmarks for vertebral location, and segmentation and identification of individual vertebrae. Our work includes developing a reliable method for automatically fixing an anatomy-based coordinate system in the images, and work to adaptively threshold the images, using methods previously applied by researchers in cardioangiography. We describe the motivation for our work and present our current results in both areas.

  9. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Cervical, Thoracic, and Lumbar Spine in Children: Spinal Incidental Findings in Pediatric Patients

    PubMed Central

    Ramadorai, Uma E.; Hire, Justin M.; DeVine, John G.

    2014-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective case series. Objective To determine the rate of spinal incidental findings on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the cervical, thoracic, and lumbar spine in the pediatric population. Methods We reviewed MRI imaging of the neuraxial spine in patients less than 18 years of age and documented abnormal spinal findings. We then reviewed the charts of these patients to determine the reason for ordering the study. Those who presented with pain were considered symptomatic. Those who had no presenting complaint were considered asymptomatic. The data were analyzed to break down the rate of spinal incidental findings in the cervical, thoracic, and lumbar spine, respectively. Results Thirty-one of the 99 MRIs had positive findings, with the most common being disk protrusion (51.6%). Spinal incidental findings were most common in the lumbar spine (9.4%) versus the cervical spine (8%) or thoracic spine (4.7%). In this group, Schmorl nodes and disk protrusion were the two most common findings (37.5% each). Other spinal incidental findings included a vertebral hemangioma and a Tarlov cyst. In the thoracic spine, the only spinal incidental finding was a central disk protrusion without spinal cord or nerve root compression. Conclusion MRI is a useful modality in the pediatric patient with scoliosis or complaints of pain, but the provider should remain cognizant of the potential for spinal incidental findings. PMID:25396102

  10. Magnetic resonance imaging of the cervical, thoracic, and lumbar spine in children: spinal incidental findings in pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Ramadorai, Uma E; Hire, Justin M; DeVine, John G

    2014-12-01

    Study Design Retrospective case series. Objective To determine the rate of spinal incidental findings on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the cervical, thoracic, and lumbar spine in the pediatric population. Methods We reviewed MRI imaging of the neuraxial spine in patients less than 18 years of age and documented abnormal spinal findings. We then reviewed the charts of these patients to determine the reason for ordering the study. Those who presented with pain were considered symptomatic. Those who had no presenting complaint were considered asymptomatic. The data were analyzed to break down the rate of spinal incidental findings in the cervical, thoracic, and lumbar spine, respectively. Results Thirty-one of the 99 MRIs had positive findings, with the most common being disk protrusion (51.6%). Spinal incidental findings were most common in the lumbar spine (9.4%) versus the cervical spine (8%) or thoracic spine (4.7%). In this group, Schmorl nodes and disk protrusion were the two most common findings (37.5% each). Other spinal incidental findings included a vertebral hemangioma and a Tarlov cyst. In the thoracic spine, the only spinal incidental finding was a central disk protrusion without spinal cord or nerve root compression. Conclusion MRI is a useful modality in the pediatric patient with scoliosis or complaints of pain, but the provider should remain cognizant of the potential for spinal incidental findings. PMID:25396102

  11. Coexistence of neurofibroma and meningioma at exactly the same level of the cervical spine.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kai-Yuan; Wu, Jau-Ching; Lin, Shih-Cheih; Huang, Wen-Cheng; Cheng, Henrich

    2014-11-01

    We report a case of the coexistence of different spinal tumors at the same level of the cervical spine, without neurofibromatosis (NF), which was successfully treated with surgery. A 72-year-old female presented with right upper-limb clumsiness and weakness. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed an intradural, extramedullary tumor mass at the right C3-4 level with extradural extension into the intervertebral foramen. The extradural tumor was removed, and the pathology showed neurofibroma. After incision of the dura, the intradural tumor was removed, and was identified as meningioma in the pathological report. The patient did not meet the criteria of NF. Coexistence of neurofibroma and meningioma at exactly the same level of the spine without NF is extremely rare. Exploration of the intradural space may be necessary after resection of an extradural tumor if the surgical finding does not correlate well with the preoperative images.

  12. Three-dimensional intervertebral kinematics in the healthy young adult cervical spine during dynamic functional loading.

    PubMed

    Anderst, William J; Donaldson, William F; Lee, Joon Y; Kang, James D

    2015-05-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the intervertebral kinematics of the young, healthy cervical spine during dynamic, three-dimensional, functional loading. Intervertebral motion was characterized by the range of motion (ROM) and the helical axis of motion (HAM). Biplane radiographs of the cervical spine were collected at 30 images/s as 29 participants (20-35 yr) performed dynamic flexion\\extension, axial rotation, and lateral bending. Vertebral motion (C1-T1 in flexion\\extension, C3-T1 in lateral bending and axial rotation) was tracked with sub-millimeter accuracy using a validated volumetric model-based tracking process that matched subject-specific CT-based bone models to the radiographs. Flexion\\extension ROM was smallest at the C2-C3 motion segment (12.7±2.6°) and largest at the C5-C6 motion segment (19.7±3.7°). During head lateral bending and axial rotation, the intervertebral bending ROM was greater than the rotation ROM at every motion segment. The HAM demonstrated differences among motion segments and among movements. During flexion\\extension, the helical axis of motion was directed nearly perpendicular to the sagittal plane for the C2-C3 through C7-T1 motion segments. During lateral bending, the angle between the HAM and the transverse plane progressively increased from the C6-C7 motion segment (approximately ±22°) to the C3-C4 motion segment (approximately ±40°). During axial rotation, the angle between the transverse plane and the HAM was approximately ±42° at the C3-C4 through C5-C6 motion segments, and approximately ±32° at the C6-C7 motion segment. This study provides valuable reference data for evaluating the effects of age, degeneration, and surgical procedures on cervical spine kinematics during three-dimensional dynamic functional loading.

  13. Exposure of emergency medicine personnel to ionizing radiation during cervical spine radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Singer, C.M.; Baraff, L.J.; Benedict, S.H.; Weiss, E.L.; Singer, B.D.

    1989-08-01

    We studied the potential hazard of ionizing radiation exposure to health care workers who routinely stabilize the necks of trauma patients during cervical spine radiography. A clinical trauma model was developed using an Alderson RANDO Phantom artificial torso to simulate an actual patient. A radiation monitor was placed where a health care worker's fingers, hands, arms, and thyroid gland would be, and standard cervical spine radiographs were taken. The exposures to the finger positions then were repeated with the monitor inside a 0.5 mm lead-equivalent glove. The mean exposure to the finger for a single cross-table lateral radiograph was 174.5 mrem. The use of leaded gloves reduced this exposure to 0.3 mrem (a 99.9% reduction). For a single series of lateral, anteroposterior, odontoid, and swimmer's views, the total mean measured unprotected exposure to the finger of the hand positioned nearest the radiographic tube was 681 mrem and the exposure to the finger of the opposite hand was 230 mrem. If these simulated exposures are indicative of actual patient situations, a health care worker who holds the head of a trauma patient four times each week with unshielded hands would receive more than twice the maximum allowable annual occupational radiation exposure to the extremities recommended by the National Council of Radiation Protection and Measurements. We conclude that health care workers who routinely stabilize the necks of trauma patients during cervical spine radiography may incur a radiation exposure risk and that 0.5-mm lead-equivalent gloves provide an effective barrier to ionizing radiation.

  14. Radiographic characteristics of the hand and cervical spine in fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva.

    PubMed

    Mishima, Kenichi; Kitoh, Hiroshi; Haga, Nobuhiko; Nakashima, Yasuharu; Kamizono, Junji; Katagiri, Takenobu; Susami, Takafumi; Matsushita, Masaki; Ishiguro, Naoki

    2014-05-01

    Fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva (FOP) is a disabling heritable disorder of connective tissue characterized by progressive heterotopic ossification in various extraskeletal sites. Early correct diagnosis of FOP is important to prevent additional iatrogenic harm or trauma. Congenital malformation of the great toes is a well-known diagnostic clue, but some patients show normal-appearing great toes. The thumb shortening and cervical spine abnormalities are other skeletal features often observed in FOP. This study aimed to address the quantitative assessment of these features in a cohort of patients with FOP, which potentially helps early diagnosis of FOP. Radiographs of the hand and cervical spine were retrospectively analyzed from a total of 18 FOP patients (9 males and 9 females) with an average age of 13.9 years (range 0.7-39.3 years). The elevated ratio of the second metacarpal bone to the distal phalanx of the thumb (> +1SD) was a consistent finding irrespective of the patient's age and gender. Infant FOP patients, in addition, exhibited an extremely high ratio of the second metacarpal bone to the first metacarpal bone (> +3SD). The height/depth ratio of the C5 vertebra increased in patients over 4 years of age (> +2SD). Additionally, the ratio of (height+depth) of the C5 spinous process to the C5 vertebral depth was markedly elevated in young patients (> +2SD). We quantitatively demonstrated the hand and cervical spine characteristics of FOP. These findings, which can be seen from early infancy, could be useful for early diagnosis of FOP even in patients without great toe abnormalities.

  15. [Pharyngo-esophageal risk of surgery of the cervical spine using an anterior approach].

    PubMed

    Crampette, L; Mondain, M; Guerrier, B; Fuentes, J M; Segnarbieux, F

    1989-01-01

    The authors report six cases of pharyngo-oesophageal damage associated with fractures of the cervical spine treated by osteo-synthesis via the anterior route. These complications, not previously described, may have life threatening (especially mediastinitis) and functional consequences. They discuss the relative responsibility of: the initial trauma, which should be better defined by an initial endoscopic assessment. the surgical approach, the principles of which and its dangers and preventive aspects are discussed, early or late fixation failure justifying careful surveillance of the osteosynthesis material and in certain cases its systematic removal.

  16. Vertebroplasty and kyphoplasty for cervical spine metastases: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    De la Garza-Ramos, Rafael; Benvenutti-Regato, Mario

    2016-01-01

    Background Vertebroplasty (VP) and kyphoplasty (KP) are two minimally invasive techniques used to relieve pain and restore stability in metastatic spinal disease. However, most of these procedures are performed in the thoracolumbar spine, and there is limited data on outcomes after VP/KP for cervical metastases. The purpose of this article is to evaluate the safety and efficacy of VP and KP for treating pain in patients with cervical spine metastases. Methods A systematic review of the literature was conducted using the PubMed and Medline databases. Only studies that reported five or more patients treated with VP/KP in the cervical spine were included. Levels of evidence and grades of recommendation were established based on the Oxford Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine guidelines. Data was pooled to perform a meta-analysis for pain relief and complication rates. Results Six studies (all level 4 studies) met the inclusion criteria, representing 120 patients undergoing VP/KP at 135 vertebrae; the most common addressed level was C2 in 83 cases. The average volume of injected cement was 2.5 ± 0.5 milliliters at each vertebra. There were 22 asymptomatic cement leaks (16%; 95% CI, 9.8% - 22.2%) most commonly occurring in the paraspinal soft tissue. There were 5 complications (4%; 95% CI, 0.5% - 7.5%): 3 cases of mild odynophagia, 1 case of occipital neuralgia secondary to leak, and 1 case of stroke secondary to cement embolism. Pain relief was achieved in 89% of cases (range: 80 - 100%). The calculated average pain score decreased significantly from 7.6 ± 0.9 before surgery to 1.9 ± 0.8 at last evaluation (p=0.006). Conclusion Although the calculated complication rate after VP/KP in the cervical spine is low (4%) and the reported pain relief rate is approximately 89%, there is lack of high-quality evidence supporting this. Future randomized controlled trials are needed. PMID:26913227

  17. Giant cell tumor of the upper cervical spine: transmandibular-translingual access. Clinical case.

    PubMed

    Cappuccio, M; Bandiera, S; Gasbarrini, A; De Iure, F; Barbanti Bròdano, G; Scimeca, G B; Presutti, L; Cocchi, R; Boriani, S

    2004-01-01

    The authors describe the clinical case of a patient aged 18 years affected with giant cell tumor (GCT) at C3 who came to the surgical unit of Orthopaedics and Traumatology at the Ospedale Maggiore in Bologna after being treated by surgery elsewhere. Particular attention is paid to surgical access by means of median transmandibuloglossotomy used in order to obtain a sufficiently wide surgical field that can adequately expose the vertebral segment affected by neoplastic disease. In particular, possible complications that may be observed postsurgery can be compared to other surgical approaches to the upper cervical spine and above all that there are no permanent clinical sequelae.

  18. Effect of loading rate on the compressive mechanics of the immature baboon cervical spine.

    PubMed

    Elias, Paul Z; Nuckley, David J; Ching, Randal P

    2006-02-01

    Thirty-four cervical spine segments were harvested from 12 juvenile male baboons and compressed to failure at displacement rates of 5, 50, 500, or 5000 mm/s. Compressive stiffness, failure load, and failure displacement were measured for comparison across loading rate groups. Stiffness showed a significant concomitant increase with loading rate, increasing by 62% between rates of 5 and 5000 mm/s. Failure load also demonstrated an increasing relationship with loading rate, while displacement at failure showed no rate dependence. These data may help in the development of improved pediatric automotive safety standards and more biofidelic physical and computational models.

  19. Sudden onset odontoid fracture caused by cervical instability in hypotonic cerebral palsy.

    PubMed

    Shiohama, Tadashi; Fujii, Katsunori; Kitazawa, Katsuhiko; Takahashi, Akiko; Maemoto, Tatsuo; Honda, Akihito

    2013-11-01

    Fractures of the upper cervical spine rarely occur but carry a high rate of mortality and neurological disabilities in children. Although odontoid fractures are commonly caused by high-impact injuries, cerebral palsy children with cervical instability have a risk of developing spinal fractures even from mild trauma. We herein present the first case of an odontoid fracture in a 4-year-old boy with cerebral palsy. He exhibited prominent cervical instability due to hypotonic cerebral palsy from infancy. He suddenly developed acute respiratory failure, which subsequently required mechanical ventilation. Neuroimaging clearly revealed a type-III odontoid fracture accompanied by anterior displacement with compression of the cervical spinal cord. Bone mineral density was prominently decreased probably due to his long-term bedridden status and poor nutritional condition. We subsequently performed posterior internal fixation surgically using an onlay bone graft, resulting in a dramatic improvement in his respiratory failure. To our knowledge, this is the first report of an odontoid fracture caused by cervical instability in hypotonic cerebral palsy. Since cervical instability and decreased bone mineral density are frequently associated with cerebral palsy, odontoid fractures should be cautiously examined in cases of sudden onset respiratory failure and aggravated weakness, especially in hypotonic cerebral palsy patients.

  20. Cervical Spine Immobilization in Sports Related Injuries: Review of Current Guidelines and a Case Study of an Injured Athlete

    PubMed Central

    Bhamra, JS; Morar, Y; Khan, WS; Deep, K; Hammer, A

    2012-01-01

    Cervical spine immobilization is an essential component of the ATLS® system. Inadequate training in the management of trauma calls and failure of early recognition can have disastrous consequences. Pre-hospital personnel are routinely involved more in the assessment and stabilization of patients in comparison to other health care professionals. This case study and review highlights the importance of early recognition, assessment and correct stabilization of cervical spine injuries both in the field and during the initial assessment in hospital. Inadequate assessment, immobilization and lack of standard guidelines on the management of suspected cervical spine trauma can result in secondary injury. Regular assessment and training of pre-hospital and medical personnel is essential to the proper management of these potentially devastating injuries. PMID:23248726

  1. Neglected dislocation in sub-axial cervical spine: Case series and a suggested treatment protocol

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Sudhir Kumar; Aggarwal, Rishi Anil; Bhosale, Sunil Krishna; Nemade, Pradip Sharad

    2016-01-01

    Context: Approaches suggested for treatment of neglected dislocations in the subaxial cervical spine (SACS) include only anterior approach (a), only posterior approach (b), posterior-anterior approach, posterior-anterior-posterior approach, and anterior-posterior-anterior-posterior approach. No protocol is suggested in literature to guide surgeons treating neglected dislocations. Aim: To describe a protocol for the treatment of neglected dislocation in the SACS. Settings and Designs: Retrospective case series and review of literature. Materials and Methods: Six consecutive patients of neglected dislocation (presenting to us more than 3 weeks following trauma) of the SACS were operated as per the protocol suggested in this paper. A retrospective review of the occupational therapy reports, patient records, and radiographs was performed. Only cases with time lapse of more than 3 weeks between the time of injury and initial management have been included in the review. Results: Closed reduction (CR) was achieved in three patients following cervical traction and these were managed by anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF). Open reduction via posterior approach and soft tissue release was required to achieve reduction in two patients. Following reduction posterior instrumented fusion was done in them. One patient with preoperative neurological deficit needed a facetectomy to achieve reduction. Following short-segment fixation, ACDF was also performed in this patient. None of the patients deteriorated neurologically following surgery. Fusion was achieved in all patients. Conclusions: Preoperative and intraoperative traction have a role in the management of neglected dislocations in the cervical spine. If CR is achieved the patient may be managed by ACDF. If CR is not achieved, posterior soft tissue release may be done to achieve reduction and partial facetectomy must be reserved for cases in which reduction is not achieved after soft tissue release. A treatment

  2. Probabilistic design analysis of the influence of material property on the human cervical spine.

    PubMed

    Ng, Hong Wan; Teo, Ee Chon

    2004-04-01

    Studies reported previously in the literature have described the importance of material variation on the cervical responses and have examined some effects by varying the material properties, but there is no systematic approach using statistical methods to understand the influence of material variation on a cervical spine model under a full range of loading conditions, especially under compression and anterior and posterior shear. A probabilistic design system based on Monte Carlo simulation methods using Latin hypercube sampling techniques is used to analyze the material sensitivity of a C4-C6 cervical spine model involving 13 uncertain input parameters on the biomechanical responses and disc annulus stresses under compression, anterior shear, posterior shear, flexion, extension, lateral bending, and axial rotation. The loading types and range of values were as follows: compression, 0-1 mm; anterior shear, 0-2 mm; posterior shear, 0-3.5 mm; flexion, extension, lateral bending, and axial rotation. 0-1.8 Nm with 73.6-N preload. For each case, the load-deflection and key stress values at various spinal components were captured after each load step. The model was also validated under the same conditions. The minimum and maximum predicted responses were within the range of the experimental data. Ignoring compression loading, the combined effects on the biomechanical responses of the cervical ligaments under the remaining loads are enormous. Their total impacts are almost equal to or slightly less than the influence of disc annulus. Results show that the fiber mechanical properties did not have a significant effect on the compressive stiffness. This study reveals important features that help us identify the critical input parameters and enable us to reduce the development time of a patient-specific biomechanical model. PMID:15260096

  3. Surgical management of multilevel cervical spinal stenosis and spinal cord injury complicated by cervical spine fracture

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background There are few reports regarding surgical management of multilevel cervical spinal stenosis with spinal cord injury. Our purpose is to evaluate the safety and feasibility of open-door expansive laminoplasty in combination with transpedicular screw fixation for the treatment of multilevel cervical spinal stenosis and spinal cord injury in the trauma population. Methods This was a retrospective study of 21 patients who had multilevel cervical spinal stenosis and spinal cord injury with unstable fracture. An open-door expansive posterior laminoplasty combined with transpedicular screw fixation was performed under persistent intraoperative skull traction. Outcome measures included postoperative improvement in Japanese Orthopedic Association (JOA) score and incidence of complications. Results The average operation time was 190 min, with an average blood loss of 437 ml. A total of 120 transpedicular screws were implanted into the cervical vertebrae between vertebral C3 and C7, including 20 into C3, 34 into C4, 36 into C5, 20 into C6, and 10 into C7. The mean preoperative JOA score was 3.67 ± 0.53. The patients were followed for an average of 17.5 months, and the average JOA score improved to 8.17 ± 1.59, significantly higher than the preoperative score (t = 1.798, P < 0.05), with an average improvement of 44.7 ± 11.7%. Postoperative complications in four patients included cerebrospinal fluid leakage, delayed wound healing, pulmonary infection, and urinary system infection. All four patients were responsive to antibiotic treatment; one died from respiratory failure 3 months postoperatively. Conclusions The open-door expansive laminoplasty combined with posterior transpedicular screw fixation is feasible for treating multilevel cervical spinal stenosis and spinal cord injury complicated by unstable fracture. Its advantages include minimum surgical trauma, less intraoperative blood loss, and satisfactory stable supportive effect for

  4. MR and CT image fusion of the cervical spine: a noninvasive alternative to CT-myelography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Yangqiu; Mirza, Sohail K.; Jarvik, Jeffrey G.; Heagerty, Patrick J.; Haynor, David R.

    2005-04-01

    CT-Myelography (CTM) is routinely used for planning surgery for degenerative disease of the spine, but its invasive nature, significant potential morbidity, and high costs make a noninvasive substitute desirable. We report our work on evaluating CT and MR image fusion as an alternative to CTM. Because the spine is only piecewise rigid, a multi-rigid approach to the registration of spinal CT and MR images was developed (SPIE 2004), in which the spine on CT images is first segmented into separate vertebrae, each of which is then rigidly registered with the corresponding vertebra on MR images. The results are then blended to obtain fusion images. Since they contain information from both modalities, we hypothesized that fusion images would be equivalent to CTM. To test this we selected 34 patients who had undergone MRI and CTM for degenerative disease of the cervical spine, and used the multi-rigid approach to produce fused images. A clinical vignette for each patient was created and presented along with either CT/MR fusion images or CTM images. A group of spine surgeons are asked to formulate detailed surgical plans based on each set of images, and the surgical plans are compared. A similar study assessing diagnostic agreement is being performed with neuroradiologists, who also assess the accuracy of registration. Our work to date has demonstrated the feasibility of segmentation and multi-rigid fusion in clinical cases and the acceptability of the questionnaire to physicians. Preliminary analysis of one surgeon's and one neuroradiologist"s evaluation has been performed.

  5. Three-dimensional analysis of the cervical spine kinematics: effect of age and gender in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Lansade, Céline; Laporte, Sébastien; Thoreux, Patricia; Rousseau, Marc-Antoine; Skalli, Wafa; Lavaste, François

    2009-12-15

    STUDY DESIGN.: A three-dimensional (3D) analysis of the cervical spine kinematics in vivo about a large asymptomatic database in order to evaluate the impact of age and gender on the neck's performances. OBJECTIVE.: To investigate the effect of age and gender on kinematical parameters of the cervical spine, specifically quantitative parameters concerning coupled movements and proprioception, using the infra-red POLARIS measurement system. SUMMARY OF BACKGROUND DATA.: Cervical spine kinematics has been investigated in vivo by numerous authors using various devices. However, few is known about the influence of gender and age on the 3D cervical biomechanics, specifically regarding coupled movements and proprioceptive abilities. METHODS.: A total of 140 asymptomatic volunteers (70 men and 70 women) aged 20 to 93 years old were enrolled. The noninvasive infrared system Polaris was used to quantify the 3D range of motion (ROM) of cervical spine and to evaluate proprioceptive abilities. For validating the protocol in terms of reproducibility, 12 volunteers were tested 3 times by 2 independent operators. RESULTS.: The standard error of measurement for the maximal ROM in the 3 space planes was 5%. Gender had no significant influence on the 3D cervical ROM, except for the "70-79 years old" group. Age had a significant influence on all main movements showing 0.55 degrees to 0.79 degrees magnitude decrease per decade. Age and gender had no significant influence on coupled movements. "Head-to-Target" proprioception was significantly affected by the age only in the horizontal plane. CONCLUSION.: A data base for cervical ROM, pattern of motion, and proprioceptive capability was established in population of 140 healthy subjects of various age and gender. Significant age-related decrease in ROM and proprioceptive abilities were observed in this study. Coupled movements did not vary with gender or age; however, their role in the cervical performance increased with age since main

  6. Functional anatomy of the spine.

    PubMed

    Bogduk, Nikolai

    2016-01-01

    Among other important features of the functional anatomy of the spine, described in this chapter, is the remarkable difference between the design and function of the cervical spine and that of the lumbar spine. In the cervical spine, the atlas serves to transmit the load of the head to the typical cervical vertebrae. The axis adapts the suboccipital region to the typical cervical spine. In cervical intervertebrtal discs the anulus fibrosus is not circumferential but is crescentic, and serves as an interosseous ligament in the saddle joint between vertebral bodies. Cervical vertebrae rotate and translate in the sagittal plane, and rotate in the manner of an inverted cone, across an oblique coronal plane. The cervical zygapophysial joints are the most common source of chronic neck pain. By contrast, lumbar discs are well designed to sustain compression loads, but rely on posterior elements to limit axial rotation. Internal disc disruption is the most common basis for chronic low-back pain. Spinal muscles are arranged systematically in prevertebral and postvertebral groups. The intrinsic elements of the spine are innervated by the dorsal rami of the spinal nerves, and by the sinuvertebral nerves. Little modern research has been conducted into the structure of the thoracic spine, or the causes of thoracic spinal pain.

  7. A Clinical Model for the Diagnosis and Management of Patients with Cervical Spine Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Donald R.

    2004-01-01

    Background: Disorders of the cervical spine are common and often disabling. The etiology of these disorders is often multifactorial and a comprehensive approach to both diagnosis and management is essential to successful resolution. Objective: This article provides an overview of a clinical model of the diagnosis and management of patients with disorders related to the cervical spine. This model is based in part on the scientific literature, clinical experience, and communication with other practitioners over the course of the past 20 years. Discussion: The clinical model presented here involves taking a systematic approach to diagnosis, and management. The diagnostic process is one that asks three essential questions. The answers to these questions then guides the management process, allowing the physician to apply specific methods that address the many factors that can be involved in each individual patient. This clinical model allows the physician to individualize the management strategy while utilizing principles that can be applied to all patients. At times, the management strategy must be multidisciplinary, and cooperation with other physicians and therapists is often necessary for effective patient care. This model is currently being used by the author in practice, as well as forming the basis upon which further research can be conducted to refine or, if necessary, abandon any of its aspects, as the evidence dictates. It is the purpose of this paper to present this clinical model and the clinical and scientific evidence, or lack thereof, of its components. PMID:17987214

  8. Loading of Cervical Spine when Head is Rotated

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaibani, Saami J.

    2005-03-01

    The neck is more susceptible to injury during an insult in the forward direction if the head is not initially facing straight ahead. (A typical example of this is when a vehicle occupant is checking traffic to the right or left at an intersection before proceeding.) However, the ability to characterize this behavior has not progressed much beyond the qualitative because practical constraints limit testing with conventional physical surrogates. This shortfall is tackled in this study by employing a model validated elsewhere to represent a range of real-world events with the power of great specificity for parameters of importance. Of primary concern is the variation in head angle, which can now be investigated across a wide spectrum of values that was not possible with previous approaches. The quantitative results computed here provide an extraordinarily high level of detail and they show how the potential for injury can change from low to significant within a matter of degrees. This explains why a seemingly harmless impact can cause trauma in some cases when none would otherwise be expected.

  9. Iso-C3D navigation assisted pedicle screw placement in deformities of the cervical and thoracic spine

    PubMed Central

    Rajan, Vinod V; Kamath, Vijay; Shetty, Ajoy Prasad; Rajasekaran, S

    2010-01-01

    Background: Pedicle screw instrumentation of the deformed cervical and thoracic spine is challenging to even the most experienced surgeon and associated with increased incidence of screw misplacement. Iso-C3D based navigation has been reported to improve the accuracy of pedicle screw placement, however, there are very few studies assessing its efficacy in the presence of deformity. We conducted a study to evaluate the accuracy of Iso-C3D based navigation in pedicle screw fixation in the deformed cervical and thoracic spine. Materials and Methods: We inserted 98 cervical pedicle screws (18 patients) and 242 thoracic pedicle screws (17 patients) using Iso-C3D based navigation for deformities of spine due to scoliosis, ankylosing spondylitis, post traumatic and degenerative disorders. Two independent observers determined and graded the accuracy of screw placement from postoperative computed tomography (CT) scans. Results: Postoperative CT scans of the cervical spine showed 90.8% perfectly placed screws with 7 (7%) grade I pedicle breaches, 2 (2%) grade II pedicle breaches and one anterior cortex penetration (< 2mm). Five lateral pedicle breaches violated the vertebral artery foramen and three medial pedicle breaches penetrated the spinal canal; however, no patient had any neurovascular complications. In the thoracic spine there were 92.2% perfectly placed screws with only six (2%) grade II pedicle breaches, eight (3%) grade I pedicle breaches and five screws (2%) penetrating the anterior or lateral cortex. No neuro-vascular complications were encountered. Conclusion: Iso-C3D based navigation improves the accuracy of pedicle screw placement in deformities of the cervical and thoracic spine. The low incidence of pedicle breach implies increased safety for the patient. PMID:20419003

  10. Influence of varying compressive loading methods on physiologic motion patterns in the cervical spine.

    PubMed

    Bell, Kevin M; Yan, Yiguo; Debski, Richard E; Sowa, Gwendolyn A; Kang, James D; Tashman, Scott

    2016-01-25

    The human cervical spine supports substantial compressive load in-vivo arising from muscle forces and the weight of the head. However, the traditional in-vitro testing methods rarely include compressive loads, especially in investigations of multi-segment cervical spine constructs. Various methods of modeling physiologic loading have been reported in the literature including axial forces produced with inclined loading plates, eccentric axial force application, follower load, as well as attempts to individually apply/model muscle forces in-vitro. The importance of proper compressive loading to recreate the segmental motion patterns exhibited in-vivo has been highlighted in previous studies. However, appropriate methods of representing the weight of head and muscle loading are currently unknown. Therefore, a systematic comparison of standard pure moment with no compressive loading versus published and novel compressive loading techniques (follower load - FL, axial load - AL, and combined load - CL) was performed. The present study is unique in that a direct comparison to continuous cervical kinematics over the entire extension to flexion motion path was possible through an ongoing intra-institutional collaboration. The pure moment testing protocol without compression or with the application of follower load was not able to replicate the typical in-vivo segmental motion patterns throughout the entire motion path. Axial load or a combination of axial and follower load was necessary to mimic the in-vivo segmental contributions at the extremes of the extension-flexion motion path. It is hypothesized that dynamically altering the compressive loading throughout the motion path is necessary to mimic the segmental contribution patterns exhibited in-vivo. PMID:26708967

  11. Palliative Surgery in Treating Painful Metastases of the Upper Cervical Spine

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xinghuo; Ye, Zhewei; Pu, Feifei; Chen, Songfeng; Wang, Baichuan; Zhang, Zhicai; Yang, Cao; Yang, Shuhua; Shao, Zengwu

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Increased incidence of upper cervical metastases and higher life expectancy resulted in higher operative rates in patients. The purpose of this study was to explore the methods and the clinical outcomes of palliative surgery for cervical spinal metastases. A systematic review of a 15-case series of upper cervical metastases treated with palliative surgery was performed. All cases underwent palliative surgery, including anterior tumor resection and internal fixation in 3 cases, posterior tumor resection and internal fixation in 10 cases, and combined anterior and posterior tumor resection and internal fixation in 2 cases. Patients were followed-up clinically and radiologically after the operation, and visual analog scale (VAS) and activities of daily living scores were calculated. In addition, a literature review was performed and patients with upper cervical spine metastases were analyzed. The mean follow-up period was 12.5 months (range, 3–26 months) in this consecutive case series. The pain was substantially relieved in 93.3% (14/15) of the patients after the operation. The VAS and Japanese Orthopedic Association scores showed improved clinical outcomes, from 7.86 ± 1.72 and 11.13 ± 2.19 preoperatively to 2.13 ± 1.40 and 14.26 ± 3.03 postoperatively, respectively. The mean survival time was 9.5 months (range, 5–26 months). Dural tear occurred in 1 patient. Wound infections, instrumentation failure, and postoperative death were not observed. Among our cases and other cases reported in the literature, 72% of the patients were treated with simple anterior or posterior operation, and only 12% of the patients (3/25) underwent complex combined anterior and posterior operation. Metastatic upper cervical spine disease is not a rare occurrence. Balancing the perspective of patients on palliative surgery concerning the clinical benefits of operation versus its operative risks can assist the decision for surgery. PMID:27149472

  12. Narrative review of the in vivo mechanics of the cervical spine after anterior arthrodesis as revealed by dynamic biplane radiography.

    PubMed

    Anderst, William

    2016-01-01

    Arthrodesis is the standard of care for numerous pathologic conditions of the cervical spine and is performed over 150,000 times annually in the United States. The primary long-term concern after this surgery is adjacent segment disease (ASD), defined as new clinical symptoms adjacent to a previous fusion. The incidence of adjacent segment disease is approximately 3% per year, meaning that within 10 years of the initial surgery, approximately 25% of cervical arthrodesis patients require a second procedure to address symptomatic adjacent segment degeneration. Despite the high incidence of ASD, until recently, there was little data available to characterize in vivo adjacent segment mechanics during dynamic motion. This manuscript reviews recent advances in our knowledge of adjacent segment mechanics after cervical arthrodesis that have been facilitated by the use of dynamic biplane radiography. The primary observations from these studies are that current in vitro test paradigms often fail to replicate in vivo spine mechanics before and after arthrodesis, that intervertebral mechanics vary among cervical motion segments, and that joint arthrokinematics (i.e., the interactions between adjacent vertebrae) are superior to traditional kinematics measurements for identifying altered adjacent segment mechanics after arthrodesis. Future research challenges are identified, including improving the biofidelity of in vitro tests, determining the natural history of in vivo spine mechanics, conducting prospective longitudinal studies on adjacent segment kinematics and arthrokinematics after single and multiple-level arthrodesis, and creating subject-specific computational models to accurately estimate muscle forces and tissue loading in the spine during dynamic activities.

  13. Solitary osteochondroma of the thoracic spine causing myelopathy.

    PubMed

    Song, K-J; Lee, K-B

    2007-06-01

    We evaluate the clinical presentation and radiographic findings of a patient with solitary osteochondroma and compressive myelopathy and review the relevant English-language medical literature. The involvement of the spine with a solitary osteochondroma is rare. The addition of the current case to those already reported makes a total of 51 published cases of solitary vertebral osteochondromas with spinal cord compression. The clinical history, computed tomogram, magnetic resonance image, and plain radiograms were reviewed. A review of the literature was also done. The patient gradually improved and symptoms stopped progressing after surgical removal of the lesion. Magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography are useful for evaluating the size and extent of a spinal osteochondroma causing spinal cord compression. PMID:17638163

  14. A review of functional outcome measures for cervical spine disorders: literature review

    PubMed Central

    Bussières, André

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to assess the reliability, validity and usefulness of three outcome measures: cervical ranges of motion, sagittal neck muscle strength and presence or absence of the flexion relaxation phenomenon (FRP) in the neck. The literature search included the Index Medicus and computerized database of MEDLINE for relevant material. Articles were selected if they contained primary data on neck range of motion, sagittal muscle strength and FRP. The results of 59 articles and 2 textbooks were analyzed. Normative values of cervical ROM have been reported in healthy subjects ranging in age from 18 to 74 years. The extent of degrees of motion lost per year did not differ between male or female subjects, but females started with higher degrees of active range of motion, which they maintained throughout life. Instrumented methods of recording muscle strength have included strain gauge dynamometers and modified sphygmomanometers. Parameters such as gender, age and stature were also observed to have important effects on muscle strength. The ratio of extension to flexion maximum isometric peak force has been estimated to range between 1.40-1.70 in normal subjects. Therefore, the extensor muscles of the neck are approximately 40% stronger then the neck flexor muscles. Evidence suggested that neck pain sufferers have weaker neck flexors than normal subjects. The FRP refers to the absence of myoelectrical activity in extensor muscles upon full forward flexion and has been documented in the cervical spine of asymptomatic subjects. In conclusion, inclinometric methods used for measurements of cervical range of motion were found to be safe, effective and reliable. The Cervical Range of Motion Device appeared to be well suited for clinical practice. The ratio of cervical extension-flexion maximum isometric voluntary contraction has been determined in asymptomatic subjects. The presence of the FRP in the neck has also been observed in normals. Future study is

  15. The biomechanical and functional relationship between temporomandibular dysfunction and cervical spine pain.

    PubMed

    Walczyńska-Dragon, Karolina; Baron, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of TMD on spinal pain and to check whether TMD therapy helps to cure spinal pain. The total number of 44 evaluated patients underwent physical examination of masticatory motor system, including an evaluation of TMJ function with a Zebris JMA device and an analysis of the cervical spine motion using a Zebris MCS device. Patients from the treated (tested) group, who were diagnosed with TMD, were treated with an occlusal splint. Subsequent examinations were planned 3 weeks and 3 months after the treatment. The results show that there is a close correlation between TMD and spinal pain. The results of the tests performed 3 months after the beginning of occlusal splint therapy show a significant improvement in TMJ function as well as a reduction in spinal pain, as general motor parameters of spinal movements improved.

  16. The role of C2-C7 and O-C2 angle in the development of dysphagia after cervical spine surgery.

    PubMed

    Tian, Wei; Yu, Jie

    2013-06-01

    Dysphagia is a known complication of cervical surgery and may be prolonged or occasionally serious. A previous study showed that dysphagia after occipitocervical fusion was caused by oropharyngeal stenosis resulting from O-C2 (upper cervical lordosis) fixation in a flexed position. However, there have been few reports analyzing the association between the C2-C7 angle (middle-lower cervical lordosis) and postoperative dysphagia. The aim of this study was to analyze the relationship between cervical lordosis and the development of dysphagia after anterior and posterior cervical spine surgery (AC and PC). Three hundred fifty-four patients were reviewed in this retrospective clinical study, including 172 patients who underwent the AC procedure and 182 patients who had the PC procedure between June 2007 and May 2010. The presence and duration of postoperative dysphagia were recorded via face-to-face questioning or telephone interview performed at least 1 year after the procedure. Plain cervical radiographs before and after surgery were collected. The O-C2 angle and the C2-C7 angle were measured. Changes in the O-C2 angle and the C2-C7 angle were defined as dO-C2 angle = postoperative O-C2 angle - preoperative O-C2 angle and dC2-C7 angle = postoperative C2-C7 angle - preoperative C2-C7 angle. The association between postoperative dysphagia with dO-C2 angle and dC2-C7 angle was studied. Results showed that 12.8 % of AC and 9.4 % of PC patients reported dysphagia after cervical surgery. The dC2-C7 angle has considerable impact on postoperative dysphagia. When the dC2-C7 angle is greater than 5°, the chance of developing postoperative dysphagia is significantly greater. The dO-C2 angle, age, gender, BMI, operative time, blood loss, procedure type, revision surgery, most cephalic operative level, and number of operative levels did not significantly influence the incidence of postoperative dysphagia. No relationship was found between the dC2-C7 angle and the degree of

  17. Conversion paralysis after cervical spine arthroplasty: a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Boudissa, M; Castelain, J E; Boissière, L; Mariey, R; Pointillart, V; Vital, J M

    2015-09-01

    We report a case of conversion paralysis after cervical spine arthroplasty performed in a 45-year-old woman to treat cervico-brachial neuralgia due to a left-sided C6-C7 disc herniation. Upon awakening from the anaesthesia, she had left hemiplegia sparing the face, with normal sensory function. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the brain ruled out a stroke. MRI of the spinal cord showed artefacts from the cobalt-chrome prosthesis that precluded confident elimination of mechanical spinal cord compression. Surgery performed on the same day to substitute a cage for the prosthesis ruled out spinal cord compression, while eliminating the source of MRI artefacts. Findings were normal from follow-up MRI scans 1 and 15days later, as well as from neurophysiological testing (electromyogram and motor evoked potentials). The deficit resolved fully within the next 4days. A psychological assessment revealed emotional distress related to an ongoing divorce. The most likely diagnosis was conversion paralysis. Surgeons should be aware that conversion disorder might develop after a procedure on the spine, although the risk of litigation requires re-operation. Familiarity with specific MRI sequences that minimise artefacts can be valuable. A preoperative psychological assessment might improve the detection of patients at high risk for conversion disorder.

  18. Multirigid registration of MR and CT images of the cervical spine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Yangqiu; Haynor, David R.

    2004-05-01

    We present our work on fusion of MR and CT images of the cervical spine. To achieve the required registration accuracy of approximately 1mm, the spine is treated as a collection of rigid vertebrae, and a separate rigid body transformation applied to each (Hawkes). This in turn requires segmentation of the CT datasets into separate vertebral images, which is difficult because the narrow planes separating adjacent vertebrae are parallel to the axial plane of the CT scans. We solve this problem by evolving all the vertebral contours simultaneously using a level set method, and use contour competition to estimate the position of the vertebral edges when a clean separation between adjacent vertebrae is not seen. Contour competition is based in turn on the vertical scan principle: no part of a given vertebra is vertically below any part of an inferior vertebra. Once segmentation is complete, the individual rigid body transforms are then estimated using mutual information maximization, and the CT images of the vertebrae superimposed on the MR scans. The resultant fused images contain the bony detail of CT and the soft tissue discrimination of MR and appear to be diagnostically equivalent, or superior, to CT myelograms. A formal test of these conclusions is planned for the next phase of our work.

  19. Evaluation of cervical spine fracture in the elderly: can we trust our physical examination?

    PubMed

    Goode, Terral; Young, Andrew; Wilson, Sean P; Katzen, Judith; Wolfe, Luke G; Duane, Therese M

    2014-02-01

    The purpose of this trial was to compare National Emergency X-Radiography Utilization Study (NEXUS) criteria (NC) with computed tomography (CT) as the gold standard to evaluate cervical spine (C-spine) fractures in elderly blunt trauma patients. We prospectively compared adult blunt trauma patients 65 years or older (E) with younger than 65 years (NE), evaluating the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), and negative predictive value (NPV) of NC compared with CT in these two cohorts. A total of 2785 blunt trauma patients were included of whom 320 were E (average age, 75 years) and 2465 were NE (average age, 36 years). Incidence of C-spine fracture was 12.8 per cent (E) versus 7.4 per cent (NE) (P = 0.002). Age was an independent predictor of fracture (P = 0.01). NC had a sensitivity of 65.9 per cent in E and PPV of 19.3 per cent in E (P = 0.001) versus a sensitivity of 84.2 per cent in NE and PPV of 10.6 per cent (P < 0.0001). The specificity was 59.5 per cent for E versus 42.6 per cent for NE (NPV, 92.2% E vs 97.1% NE). This study suggests that NEXUS criteria are not an appropriate assessment tool when applied to severe blunt trauma patients, particularly in the elderly population who had more missed injures than their younger counterparts. CT should be used in all blunt trauma patients regardless of whether they meet NEXUS criteria.

  20. Inertial sensor real-time feedback enhances the learning of cervical spine manipulation: a prospective study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Cervical Spinal Manipulation (CSM) is considered a high-level skill of the central nervous system because it requires bimanual coordinated rhythmical movements therefore necessitating training to achieve proficiency. The objective of the present study was to investigate the effect of real-time feedback on the performance of CSM. Methods Six postgraduate physiotherapy students attending a training workshop on Cervical Spine Manipulation Technique (CSMT) using inertial sensor derived real-time feedback participated in this study. The key variables were pre-manipulative position, angular displacement of the thrust and angular velocity of the thrust. Differences between variables before and after training were investigated using t-tests. Results There were no significant differences after training for the pre-manipulative position (rotation p = 0.549; side bending p = 0.312) or for thrust displacement (rotation p = 0.247; side bending p = 0.314). Thrust angular velocity demonstrated a significant difference following training for rotation (pre-training mean (sd) 48.9°/s (35.1); post-training mean (sd) 96.9°/s (53.9); p = 0.027) but not for side bending (p = 0.521). Conclusion Real-time feedback using an inertial sensor may be valuable in the development of specific manipulative skill. Future studies investigating manipulation could consider a randomized controlled trial using inertial sensor real time feedback compared to traditional training. PMID:24942483

  1. Age-Related Changes Between the Level of Velopharyngeal Closure and the Cervical Spine.

    PubMed

    Mason, Kazlin N; Perry, Jamie L; Riski, John E; Fang, Xiangming

    2016-03-01

    The primary focus of this study was to assess age-related changes in the vertical distance of the estimated level of velopharyngeal closure in relation to a prominent landmark of the cervical spine: the anterior tubercle of cervical vertebra 1 (C1). Midsagittal anatomic magnetic resonance images were examined across 51 participants with normal head and neck anatomy between 4 and 17 years of age. Results indicate that age is a strong predictor (P = 0.002) of the vertical distance between the level of velopharyngeal closure relative to C1. Specifically, as age increases, the vertical distance between the palatal plane and C1 becomes greater resulting in the level of velopharyngeal closure being located higher above C1 (range 4.88-10.55 mm). Results of this study provide insights into the clinical usefulness of using C1 as a surgical landmark for placement of pharyngoplasties in children with repaired cleft palate and persistent hypernasal speech. Clinical implications and future directions are discussed.

  2. Manual therapy for the cervical spine and reported adverse effects: a survey of Irish manipulative physiotherapists.

    PubMed

    Sweeney, Aoife; Doody, Catherine

    2010-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the use of manipulation and mobilisation by the Chartered Physiotherapists (CMPT) in Manipulative Therapy Ireland and to describe adverse effects associated with the use of these techniques. A 44 item postal survey was sent to all 259 members of the CPMT (response rate 49%, n=127). All 127 respondents used non-High Velocity Thrust Techniques (HVTT) and 27% (n=34) used HVTT. Nine percent (n=12) used HVTT on the upper cervical spine. Twenty six percent (n=33) reported an adverse effect in the previous 2 years. The adverse effects were associated with the use of HVTT (4%, n=5), non-HVTT (20%, n=26) and cervical traction (2%, n=2). The most serious adverse effects were associated with non-HVTT and included 1 drop attack, 1 fainting episode and 1 Transient Ischemic Attack (TIA) 4 days post treatment. Fifty three percent (n=18) of HVTT users and 40% (n=44) of non-HVTT users reported carrying out a vertebrobasilar insufficiency (VBI) assessment. The study shows that VBI assessment may not detect every patient at risk of adverse effects. Large scale studies to investigate the risk of serious adverse reactions are needed. A system of reporting adverse effects on a routine basis could be considered.

  3. Role of Diffusion Tensor MR Imaging in Degenerative Cervical Spine Disease: a Review of the Literature.

    PubMed

    Banaszek, A; Bladowska, J; Podgórski, P; Sąsiadek, M J

    2016-09-01

    In the article we review the current role of diffusion tensor imaging (DTI), a modern magnetic resonance (MR) technique, in the diagnosis and the management of cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM), the most serious complication of degenerative cervical spine disease (DCSD). The pathogenesis of DCSD is presented first with an emphasis placed on the pathological processes leading to myelopathy development. An understanding of the pathophysiological background of DCSD is necessary for appropriate interpretation of MR images, both plain and DTI. Conventional MRI is currently the imaging modality of choice in DCSD and provides useful information concerning the extent of spondylotic changes and degree of central spinal canal stenosis; however its capability in myelopathy detection is limited. DTI is a state of the art imaging method which recently has emerged in spinal cord investigations and has the potential to detect microscopic alterations which are beyond the capability of plain MRI. In the article we present the physical principles underlying DTI which determine its sensitivity, followed by an overview of technical aspects of DTI acquisition with a special consideration of spinal cord imaging. Finally, the scientific reports concerning DTI utility in DSCD are also reviewed. DTI detects spinal cord injury in the course of DCSD earlier than any other method and could be useful in predicting surgical outcomes in CMS patients, however technical and methodology improvement as well as standardization of acquisition protocols and postprocessing methods among the imaging centers are needed before its implementation in clinical practice.

  4. Methodological quality and outcomes of studies addressing manual cervical spine examinations: a review.

    PubMed

    Hollerwöger, Dieter

    2006-05-01

    The aims of this review were, first to rate the methodological quality of studies which investigate the reliability of manual tests for cervical spine dysfunctions by applying a new quality assessment tool; secondly to compare the outcomes of these studies. The literature search included databases of CINAHL, MEDLINE, AMED, AMI, and SPORT DISCUS, the Cochrane Library, the Physiotherapy Evidence Database (PEDro), the National Library of Medicine (PubMed), Factiva, the EBSCOT HOST Research Database, online journal databases of ELSEVIER Science periodicals, LIPPINCOTT WILLIAMS & WILKINS, ELSEVIER Science @ Direct, THIEME ONLINE, and BLACKWELL SYNERGY. The application of the Quality Assessment of Diagnostic Accuracy Studies tool (QUADAS) to the 15 studies which met the inclusion criteria showed methodological weaknesses such as not considering an independent reference standard, or a representative study population. The studies demonstrated methodological strength in describing selection criteria and in interpreting results. The studies' outcomes make the claim to be able to detect segmental cervical dysfunction based on a manual assessment only questionable. Further improvements in quality, uniform study designs, and a valid reference standard would be necessary in order to obtain more reliable data in the future.

  5. Surgical Management of Cervical Spinal Epidural Abscess Caused by Brucella Melitensis : Report of Two Cases and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Özbek, Zühtü; Gökoğlu, Abdülkerim; Menkü, Ahmet

    2012-01-01

    Spinal epidural abscess, if especially caused by Brucellosis is a very rare disease which is usually a consequence of spondylodiscitis. The spinal column can be affected at any joint; however, the lumbar spine is the most common region, especially at the level of the L4-5 and L5-S1. The frequency of spinal involvement usually seen at the lumbar, thoracic and cervical spine respectively. As an occupational disease in farmers, veterinaries, butchers, laboratory staff and shepherds, brucellosis can also occur by direct contact to animals and infected materials or ingestion of raw cheese, milk or unpasteurized milk products. In this study, we presented two cases with cervical spinal epidural abscess caused by brucella melitensis, which was successfully treated by surgical approach. Initial treatment was combined with antibiotic therapy after the surgery for 3 months. PMID:22949972

  6. A game of two discs: a case of non-contiguous and occult cervical spine injury in a rugby player

    PubMed Central

    O'Sullivan, Michael D.; Piggot, Robert; Jaddan, Mutaz; McCabe, John P.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this case report was to highlight the application of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in elucidating serious and occult injuries in a single case of hyperflextion injury of a patient cervical spine (C-Spine). A chart and radiology review was performed to establish the sequence of care and how the results of imaging studies influenced the clinical management in this trauma case. Plain radiographs and computed tomography (CT) imaging modalities of the C-Spine revealed bilateral C4/C5 facetal subluxation with no obvious fractures; however, the MR imaging of the C-Spine revealed a non-contiguous and occult injury to C6/C7 disc with a posterior annular tear and associated disc extrusion. This altered the operative intervention that was initially planned. MR imaging proved an invaluable diagnostic addition in this particular case of cervical trauma in a rugby player following a hyperflextion injury, by revealing a serious non-contiguous and occult injury of the C-Spine. PMID:26980714

  7. The Occupancy of the Components in the Cervical Spine and Their Changes with Extension and Flexion

    PubMed Central

    Sayıt, Emrah; Aghdasi, Bayan; Daubs, Michael D.; Wang, Jeffrey C.

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective case series. Objectives The kinematics of the cervical spine has been investigated by many researchers. However, the occupancy of the disk bulges, spinal cord, ligamentum flavum, and the rest of the canal as well as the changes of these structures with motion have not yet been investigated. The goal of this study is to investigate these dynamic changes. Methods The kinetic magnetic resonance images of 248 patients (124 men and 124 women) were evaluated, and the occupancy of each structure for each cervical level at neutral, flexion, and extension were calculated. Results Whole canal anteroposterior (AP) diameters showed significant differences between neutral-extension and flexion-extension at the C4–C5 and C5–C6 levels (p < 0.05). The mean disk bulges showed significant differences between neutral-flexion and flexion-extension at the C4–C5, C5–C6, C6–C7, and C7–T1 levels (p < 0.01). The mean spinal canal AP diameter showed significant differences between flexion-extension and neutral-extension at the C3–C4, C4–C5, C5–C6, and C6–C7 levels (p < 0.05). There were significant differences between neutral-flexion at the C4–C5, C5–C6, and C6–C7 levels (p < 0.05). The mean thickness of the ligamentum flavum showed significant differences between flexion-extension at the C3–C4, C4–C5, C5–C6, and C6–C7 levels (p < 0.001). There were significant differences between neutral-extension at the C3–C4 and C5–C6 levels (p < 0.05). There were significant differences between neutral-flexion at the C5–C6 and C6–C7 levels (p < 0.05). The mean thickness of the spinal cord showed significant differences between neutral-flexion at the C2–C3 and C3–C4 levels (p < 0.05). There were significant differences between flexion-extension at the C3–C4 and C4–C5 levels (p < 0.01). The rest of the canal showed significant differences between neutral-extension and flexion

  8. The Occupancy of the Components in the Cervical Spine and Their Changes with Extension and Flexion.

    PubMed

    Sayıt, Emrah; Aghdasi, Bayan; Daubs, Michael D; Wang, Jeffrey C

    2015-10-01

    Study Design Retrospective case series. Objectives The kinematics of the cervical spine has been investigated by many researchers. However, the occupancy of the disk bulges, spinal cord, ligamentum flavum, and the rest of the canal as well as the changes of these structures with motion have not yet been investigated. The goal of this study is to investigate these dynamic changes. Methods The kinetic magnetic resonance images of 248 patients (124 men and 124 women) were evaluated, and the occupancy of each structure for each cervical level at neutral, flexion, and extension were calculated. Results Whole canal anteroposterior (AP) diameters showed significant differences between neutral-extension and flexion-extension at the C4-C5 and C5-C6 levels (p < 0.05). The mean disk bulges showed significant differences between neutral-flexion and flexion-extension at the C4-C5, C5-C6, C6-C7, and C7-T1 levels (p < 0.01). The mean spinal canal AP diameter showed significant differences between flexion-extension and neutral-extension at the C3-C4, C4-C5, C5-C6, and C6-C7 levels (p < 0.05). There were significant differences between neutral-flexion at the C4-C5, C5-C6, and C6-C7 levels (p < 0.05). The mean thickness of the ligamentum flavum showed significant differences between flexion-extension at the C3-C4, C4-C5, C5-C6, and C6-C7 levels (p < 0.001). There were significant differences between neutral-extension at the C3-C4 and C5-C6 levels (p < 0.05). There were significant differences between neutral-flexion at the C5-C6 and C6-C7 levels (p < 0.05). The mean thickness of the spinal cord showed significant differences between neutral-flexion at the C2-C3 and C3-C4 levels (p < 0.05). There were significant differences between flexion-extension at the C3-C4 and C4-C5 levels (p < 0.01). The rest of the canal showed significant differences between neutral-extension and flexion-extension at the C3-C4, C4-C5, C5-C6, and C6-C7 levels (p

  9. Minimum 2-year outcome of cervical laminoplasty with deep extensor muscle-preserving approach: impact on cervical spine function and quality of life

    PubMed Central

    Abumi, Kuniyoshi; Ito, Manabu; Sudo, Hideki; Takahata, Masahiko; Ohshima, Shigeki; Hojo, Yoshihiro; Minami, Akio

    2009-01-01

    In this retrospective cohort study, two surgical methods of conventional open-door laminoplasty and deep extensor muscle-preserving laminoplasty were allocated for the treatment of cervical myelopathy, and were specifically compared in terms of axial pain, cervical spine function, and quality of life (QOL) with a minimum follow-up period of 2 years. Eighty-four patients were divided into two groups and received either a conventional open-door laminoplasty (CL group) or laminoplasty using a deep extensor muscle-preserving approach (MP group). The latter approach was performed by preserving multifidus and semispinalis cervicis attachments followed by open-door laminoplasty and re-suture of the bisected spinous processes at each decompression level. The average follow-up period was 38 months (25–53 months). The preoperative and follow-up evaluations included the original Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) score, the new tentative JOA score including cervical spine function and QOL, and the visual analogue scale (VAS) of axial pain. Radiological analyses included cervical lordosis and flexion–extension range of motion (flex–ext ROM) (C2–7), and deep extensor muscle areas on MR axial images. The JOA recovery rates were statistically equivalent between two groups. The MP group demonstrated a statistically superior cervical spine function (84% vs 63%) and QOL (61% vs 45%) when compared to the CL group at final follow-up (P < 0.05). The average VAS scores at final follow-up were 2.3 and 4.9 in MP and CL groups (P < 0.05). The cervical lordosis and flex–ext ROM were statistically equivalent. The percent deep muscle area on MRI demonstrated a significant atrophy in CL group compared to that in MP group (56% vs 88%; P < 0.01). Laminoplasty employing the deep extensor muscle-preserving approach appeared to be effective in reducing the axial pain and deep muscle atrophy as well as improving cervical spine function and QOL when compared to conventional open

  10. Dexmedetomidine provides optimum conditions during awake fiberoptic intubation in simulated cervical spine injury patients

    PubMed Central

    Chopra, Pooja; Dixit, Madhu Bala; Dang, Aashish; Gupta, Vibhuti

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: We undertook this study to assess if a small-dose of dexmedetomidine (DEX) for conscious sedation during awake fiberoptic intubation (AFOI) in simulated cervical spine injury (CSI) patients provides optimum conditions and fulfills the need of postintubation neurological examination required in such patients. The aim was to assess the efficacy of DEX on arousability and patient's comfort during AFOI in simulated CSI patients. Material and Methods: In this prospective, randomized double-blind study, 100 American Society of Anesthesiologists Grade I-II patients aged between 18 and 65 years scheduled for elective surgery under general anesthesia underwent AFOI under conscious sedation with DEX. After locally anesthetizing the airway and applying a cervical collar, patients either received DEX 1 μg/kg over 10 min followed by 0.7 μg/kg/h maintenance infusion or normal saline in the same dose and rate during AFOI. Targeted sedation (Ramsay sedation score [RSS] ≥2) during AFOI was maintained with midazolam [MDZ] in both groups. Statistical Analysis was performed using unpaired Student's t-test, Chi-square test, Mann-Whitney test and Wilcoxon-w test. Results: The total number of patients requiring MDZ and the mean dose of MDZ required to achieve targeted sedation (RSS ≥2) was significantly less in DEX group compared to the placebo group (P < 0.001). Similarly, patient satisfaction score, heart rate, systolic, diastolic and mean arterial pressure and respiratory parameters were significantly better in DEX group (P < 0.001). Postintubation arousability in the two groups was comparable (P = 0.29). Conclusions: Dexmedetomidine provides optimum sedation without compromising airway or hemodynamic instability with better patient tolerance and satisfaction for AFOI. It also preserves patient arousability for the postintubation neurological assessment. PMID:27006542

  11. Quantification of Pediatric Cervical Growth: Anatomical Changes in the Sub-Axial Spine

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jung Jae; Hong, Jae Taek; Kim, Jong Tae

    2015-01-01

    Objective In order to provide normal values of the pediatric sub-axial cervical spinal canal and vertebral body growth pattern using computed tomographic scans, a total of 318 patients less than 10 years old were included. Methods The growth of the vertebral body and canal space was investigated using four different age groups. The Torg ratio (TR) was calculated and all patients were classified into a low TR group and a high TR group according to a cutoff value of 1.0. To account for spinal curvature, the C3-7 angle was measured. Results Very little axial expansion and growth in height were observed (2.9 mm and 3.4 mm, respectively), and the spinal canal increments (1.8 mm) were much smaller than the dimensions of the vertebral body. The mean TR values were 1.03±0.14 at the C3 vertebral level, 1.02±0.13 at C4, 1.05±0.13 at C5, 1.04±0.13 at C6, and 1.02±0.12 at C7 in all patients. The mean sub-axial angle (C3-7) was 7.9±10.6° (range: -17-47°). Conclusion The upper sub-axial spinal canal continuously increased in size compared to the lower sub-axial spine after 8 years of age. Considerable decrements in the TR was found after late childhood compared to younger ages. Generally, there were no significant differences between boys and girls in vertical length of the cervical vertebrae. However, the axial dimension of the vertebral body and the spinal canal space varied according to gender. PMID:25810858

  12. Risks associated with magnetic resonance imaging and cervical collar in comatose, blunt trauma patients with negative comprehensive cervical spine computed tomography and no apparent spinal deficit

    PubMed Central

    Dunham, C Michael; Brocker, Brian P; Collier, B David; Gemmel, David J

    2008-01-01

    Introduction In blunt trauma, comatose patients (Glasgow Coma Scale score 3 to 8) with a negative comprehensive cervical spine (CS) computed tomography assessment and no apparent spinal deficit, CS clearance strategies (magnetic resonance imaging [MRI] and prolonged cervical collar use) are controversial. Methods We conducted a literature review to delineate risks for coma, CS instability, prolonged cervical collar use, and CS MRI. Results Based on our search of the literature, the numbers of functional survivor patients among those who had sustained blunt trauma were as follows: 350 per 1,000 comatose unstable patients (increased intracranial pressure [ICP], hypotension, hypoxia, or early ventilator-associated pneumonia); 150 per 1,000 comatose high-risk patients (age > 45 years or Glasgow Coma Scale score 3 to 5); and 600 per 1,000 comatose stable patients (not unstable or high risk). Risk probabilities for adverse events among unstable, high-risk, and stable patients were as follows: 2.5% for CS instability; 26.2% for increased intensive care unit complications with prolonged cervical collar use; 9.3% to 14.6% for secondary brain injury with MRI transportation; and 20.6% for aspiration during MRI scanning (supine position). Additional risk probabilities for adverse events among unstable patients were as follows: 35.8% for increased ICP with cervical collar; and 72.1% for increased ICP during MRI scan (supine position). Conclusion Blunt trauma coma functional survivor (independent living) rates are alarming. When a comprehensive CS computed tomography evaluation is negative and there is no apparent spinal deficit, CS instability is unlikely (2.5%). Secondary brain injury from the cervical collar or MRI is more probable than CS instability and jeopardizes cerebral recovery. Brain injury severity, probability of CS instability, cervical collar risk, and MRI risk assessments are essential when deciding whether CS MRI is appropriate and for determining the timing of

  13. Three-dimensional change in the cervical spine in a cross-legged sitting position after a time lapse.

    PubMed

    Jung, Seo-Young; Choi, Bo-Ram

    2016-05-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate the kinematic changes of the cervical spine during cross-legged sitting. [Subjects and Methods] In total, 19 healthy participants were recruited from among healthy students of Silla University. Each participant sat cross-legged with the right leg over the left and gazed at a target presented at 45° below the horizontal line of sight or at an object placed directly ahead, at 90° relative to horizontal for 10 minutes. [Results] With the 45° downward gaze, there was no significant difference in cervical angle between the 0-5-min and 5-10-min time periods. However, the angle in the sagittal plane increased with time, while the frontal and transverse plane angles decreased. With the 90° forward gaze, there was no significant difference in cervical angle between the 0-5-min and 5-10-min time periods. However, the frontal plane angle increased as time elapsed, while the sagittal and transverse plane angles increased between 0 and 5 min and decreased between 5 and 10 min. [Conclusion] Our results suggest that prolonged cross-legged sitting could produce malalignment of the cervical spine in three planes of motion. PMID:27313392

  14. Can a Specific Neck Strengthening Program Decrease Cervical Spine Injuries in a Men's Professional Rugby Union Team? A Retrospective Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Naish, Robert; Burnett, Angus; Burrows, Sally; Andrews, Warren; Appleby, Brendyn

    2013-01-01

    Cervical spine injuries in Rugby Union are a concerning issue at all levels of the game. The primary aim of this retrospective analysis conducted in a professional Rugby Union squad was to determine whether a 26-week isometric neck strengthening intervention program (13-week strengthening phase and 13-week maintenance phase) was effective in reducing the number and severity of cervical spine injuries. The secondary aim was to determine whether at week five, where the program had been the similar for all players, there was increased isometric neck strength. All 27 players who were common to both the 2007-2008 and 2008-2009 seasons were included in this analysis and data was extracted from a Sports Medicine/Sports Science database which included the squad's injury records. Primary outcome variables included; the number of cervical spine injuries and the severity of these injuries as determined by the total number of days lost from training and competition. Secondary outcome variables included isometric neck strength in flexion, extension and left and right lateral flexion. Using non-parametric statistical methods, no significant differences were evident for the total number of cervical spine injuries (n = 8 in 2007-2008, n = 6 in 2008-2009) or time loss due to these injuries (100 days in 2007-2008, 40 days in 2008-2009). However, a significant (p = 0.03) reduction in the number of match injuries was evident from 2007-2008 (n = 11) to 2008-09 (n = 2). Non-significant increases in isometric neck strength were found in all directions examined. A significant reduction in the number of match injuries was evident in this study. However, no other significant changes to primary outcome variables were achieved. Further, no significant increases in isometric neck strength were found in this well-trained group of professional athletes. Key Points While many authors have proposed that neck strengthening could be an effective strategy in preventing cervical spine injuries in

  15. Aspect-Oriented Visualization of the Health Status: An Example in Treatment of Cervical Spine Defect.

    PubMed

    Deng, Yihan; Denecke, Kerstin

    2016-01-01

    Clinical data is often captured in unstructured texts and scattered in different health information systems. This complicates the aggregation of information in the process of clinical decision making. However, having a quick overview and an efficient representation of relevant aspects of a patient's health status are crucial for this process. While accessing patient data and perusing clinical documents, relevant details need to be discovered quickly. In this paper, we introduce an approach to visualize relevant information from clinical documents by tag clouds. The conventional tag clouds visualize the content of a document using the terms they are containing shown in different sizes with the size calculated based on the term frequency. Important facts and diagnostic results with low occurrence in a text may be ignored by this naïve method. In this paper, we therefore adapt the conventional tag clouds by information extraction and a guidelines-based classification schema, so that the clinical concerns can be visualized more correctly. The aspects are extracted according to a classification schema developed by clinical experts. We evaluate the approach on a set of radiology reports for cervical spine treatment.

  16. Aspect-Oriented Visualization of the Health Status: An Example in Treatment of Cervical Spine Defect.

    PubMed

    Deng, Yihan; Denecke, Kerstin

    2016-01-01

    Clinical data is often captured in unstructured texts and scattered in different health information systems. This complicates the aggregation of information in the process of clinical decision making. However, having a quick overview and an efficient representation of relevant aspects of a patient's health status are crucial for this process. While accessing patient data and perusing clinical documents, relevant details need to be discovered quickly. In this paper, we introduce an approach to visualize relevant information from clinical documents by tag clouds. The conventional tag clouds visualize the content of a document using the terms they are containing shown in different sizes with the size calculated based on the term frequency. Important facts and diagnostic results with low occurrence in a text may be ignored by this naïve method. In this paper, we therefore adapt the conventional tag clouds by information extraction and a guidelines-based classification schema, so that the clinical concerns can be visualized more correctly. The aspects are extracted according to a classification schema developed by clinical experts. We evaluate the approach on a set of radiology reports for cervical spine treatment. PMID:27577333

  17. Do inertial sensors represent a viable method to reliably measure cervical spine range of motion?

    PubMed

    Theobald, Peter S; Jones, Michael D; Williams, Jonathan M

    2012-02-01

    A rise in neck pain cases has initiated an exponential interest in the assessment and treatment of cervical spine range of motion (CROM). Experimental limitations, however, have been reported as therapists strive to collect continuous, dynamic data to aid prognosis. This technical report seeks to explore the viability of using inertial sensors to reliably assess CROM. In recognition of the need for secure skin-sensor attachment, four combinations of sensor pairings were established and investigated based upon four clinically identifiable surface landmarks. Twelve participants were recruited and asked to perform three specific movement cycles in each plane (i.e. flexion-extension; rotation; lateral bending). The reliability of the peak CROM, and the movement pattern, recorded in each of the three movement cycles was statistically analysed using the intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC) and coefficient of multiple correlations (CMC). It was determined that the most reliable positions of the orientation sensors, with one adhered to the forehead and the other representing T4, enables data to be recorded with a reliability that is comparable to other CROM measuring techniques. Subsequently, it is concluded that inertial sensors represent a viable method to assess CROM. PMID:21784696

  18. Hyperextension soft tissue injuries of the cervical spine--a review.

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, G

    1996-01-01

    While a full understanding of continuing symptoms following a soft tissue hyperextension injury of the cervical spine remains elusive, recent research has shown that the explanation may lie with occult lesions beyond the musculoskeletal structures of the neck. The balance of the roles of injury, psychological factors, and the effects of litigation has shifted towards the former. However this injury would be unique if the latter two played only a minor role in determining recovery. It seems likely that among the large numbers of patients presenting with symptoms after hyperextension soft tissue injuries, a proportion will have occult bone, joint, or intervertebral disc lesions. Improvements in medical imaging techniques may allow better definition of these specific injuries and the development of more appropriate treatment. The search for a central nervous system lesion in humans continues and until this is demonstrated, many will dispute the existence of an organic brain syndrome. Evidence for significant injury to the temporomandibular joints, ear, and ophthalmic system has been found and this may be amenable to specialist intervention. While there is little evidence for effective treatments of the established injury, reduction in related disability appears most likely to be achieved by prevention. Improvements in automobile design, with particular reference to head restraints, could limit the cost to society of this common and disabling injury. PMID:8821214

  19. Cervical Intradural Disc Herniation Causing Progressive Quadriparesis After Spinal Manipulation Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Hwan-Seo; Oh, Young-Min; Eun, Jong-Pil

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Cervical intradural disc herniation (IDH) is an extremely rare condition, comprising only 0.27% of all disc herniations. Three percent of IDHs occur in the cervical, 5% in the thoracic, and over 92% in the lumbar spinal canal. There have been a total of 31 cervical IDHs reported in the literature. The pathogenesis and imaging characteristics of IDH are not fully understood. A preoperative diagnosis is key to facilitating prompt intradural exploration in patients with ambivalent findings, as well as in preventing reoperation. The purpose of reporting our case is to remind clinicians to consider the possibility of cervical IDH during spinal manipulation therapy in patient with chronic neck pain. The patient signed informed consent for publication of this case report and any accompanying image. The ethical approval of this study was waived by the ethics committee of Chonbuk National University Hospital, because this study was case report and the number of patients was <3. A 32-year-old man was transferred our emergency department with progressive quadriparesis. He had no history of trauma, but had received physical therapy with spinal manipulation for chronic neck pain over the course of a month. The day prior, he had noticed neck pain and tingling in the bilateral upper and lower extremities during the manipulation procedure. The following day, he presented with bilateral weakness of all 4 extremities, which rendered him unable to walk. Neurological examination demonstrated a positive Hoffmann sign and ankle clonus bilaterally, hypoesthesia below the C5 dermatome, 3/5 strength in the bilateral upper extremities, and 2/5 strength in the lower extremities. This motor weakness was progressive, and he further complained of voiding difficulty. Urgent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the cervical spine revealed large, central disc herniations at C4–C5 and C5–C6 that caused severe spinal cord compression and surrounding edema. We performed C4–C5–C6

  20. Changes of contour of the spine caused by load carrying.

    PubMed

    Vacheron, J J; Poumarat, G; Chandezon, R; Vanneuville, G

    1999-01-01

    The development of new leisure activities such as walking has spread the use of the backpack as a means of carrying loads. The aim of this work was to present a way of defining the movements imposed on the trunk by this type of load carrying. A 20 kg load situated at the thoracic level (T9) of the trunk, was placed in a backpack (2.5 kg). The 12 subjects were average mountain guides of Auvergne region, intermediate level and complete beginners. External markers were glued to the projecting contours of the spinous processes of the C7, T7, T12, L3 and S1 vertebrae, the shin and the external occipital tuberosity (EOT). Using a Vicon 140 3-D system we measured the effective mobility of the different spinal segments in the sagittal plane during one step. For every subject, we noticed a significant decrease of the effective inter-segmental mobility (EISM) between S1-L3-T12 (p < .01) while backpacking a 22.5 kg load. A decrease of EISM also appeared at the next level between L3-T12-T7 (p < .05). An increase of the EISM between T7-C7-EOT was noted (p < .05). We supposed that strength loss of the back muscles and/or angular oscillations of the trunk could be a common cause of symptoms during backpacking. The subjects using this type of load carrying have to adopt an adequate position of the lumbar, dorsal and cervical vertebrae. PMID:10399210

  1. The effect of multi-level laminoplasty and laminectomy on the biomechanics of the cervical spine: a finite element study.

    PubMed

    Kode, Swathi; Kallemeyn, Nicole A; Smucker, Joseph D; Fredericks, Douglas C; Grosland, Nicole M

    2014-01-01

    Laminectomy has been regarded as a standard treatment for multi-level cervical stenosis. Concern for complications such as kyphosis has limited the indication of multi-level laminectomy; hence it is often augmented with an instrumented fusion. Laminoplasty has emerged as a motion preserving alternative. The purpose of this study was to compare the multidirectional flexibility of the cervical spine in response to a plate-only open door laminoplasty, double door laminoplasty, and laminectomy using a computational model. A validated three-dimensional finite element model of a specimen-specific intact cervical spine (C2-T1) was modified to simulate each surgical procedure at levels C3-C6. An additional goal of this work was to compare the instrumented computational model to our multi-specimen experimental findings to ensure similar trends in response to the surgical procedures. Model predictions indicate that mobility was retained following open and double door laminoplasty with a 5.4% and 20% increase in flexion, respectively, compared to the intact state. Laminectomy resulted in 57% increase in flexion as compared to the intact state, creating a concern for eventual kyphosis--a known risk/complication of multi-level laminectomy in the absence of fusion. Increased disc stresses were observed at the altered and adjacent segments post-laminectomy in flexion. PMID:25328475

  2. Cervical Myelopathy Caused by Injections into the Neck

    PubMed Central

    Ralph, Jeffrey W.; Layzer, Robert B.

    2015-01-01

    Three cases of longitudinally extensive cervical myelopathies temporally associated with neck injections are presented. The spinal cord injury was similar radiographically, despite a number of different needle approaches and substances injected. In recent years, there have been reports of an acute cervical myelopathy immediately following an injection procedure in the neck. Various explanations have been offered for this unfortunate complication, including (1) direct injection into the cord leading to traumatic injury, (2) injection of particulate matter into the arterial supply of the cord causing microvascular embolism and spinal cord infarction, and (3) intraneural injection of the chemical with centripetal spread of the injectant from the nerve trunk to the substance of the cord. The merits of each of these 3 mechanisms in explaining these cases are discussed. Albeit rare, acute cervical myelopathy should be considered a potential complication from any deep injection of chemicals into the neck. PMID:26425248

  3. Estimated Probability of a Cervical Spine Injury During an ISS Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brooker, John E.; Weaver, Aaron S.; Myers, Jerry G.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: The Integrated Medical Model (IMM) utilizes historical data, cohort data, and external simulations as input factors to provide estimates of crew health, resource utilization and mission outcomes. The Cervical Spine Injury Module (CSIM) is an external simulation designed to provide the IMM with parameter estimates for 1) a probability distribution function (PDF) of the incidence rate, 2) the mean incidence rate, and 3) the standard deviation associated with the mean resulting from injury/trauma of the neck. Methods: An injury mechanism based on an idealized low-velocity blunt impact to the superior posterior thorax of an ISS crewmember was used as the simulated mission environment. As a result of this impact, the cervical spine is inertially loaded from the mass of the head producing an extension-flexion motion deforming the soft tissues of the neck. A multibody biomechanical model was developed to estimate the kinematic and dynamic response of the head-neck system from a prescribed acceleration profile. Logistic regression was performed on a dataset containing AIS1 soft tissue neck injuries from rear-end automobile collisions with published Neck Injury Criterion values producing an injury transfer function (ITF). An injury event scenario (IES) was constructed such that crew 1 is moving through a primary or standard translation path transferring large volume equipment impacting stationary crew 2. The incidence rate for this IES was estimated from in-flight data and used to calculate the probability of occurrence. The uncertainty in the model input factors were estimated from representative datasets and expressed in terms of probability distributions. A Monte Carlo Method utilizing simple random sampling was employed to propagate both aleatory and epistemic uncertain factors. Scatterplots and partial correlation coefficients (PCC) were generated to determine input factor sensitivity. CSIM was developed in the SimMechanics/Simulink environment with a

  4. Operative stabilization of the remaining mobile segment in ankylosed cervical spine in systemic onset - juvenile idiopathic arthritis: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Suhodolčan, Lovro; Mihelak, Marko; Brecelj, Janez; Vengust, Rok

    2016-01-01

    We describe a case of a 19-year-old young man with oligoarthritis type of juvenile idiopathic arthritis, who presented with several month duration of lower neck pain and progressive muscular weakness of all four limbs. X-rays of the cervical spine demonstrated spontaneous apophyseal joint fusion from the occipital condyle to C6 and from C7 to Th2 with marked instability between C6 and C7. Surgical intervention began with anterolateral approach to the cervical spine performing decompression, insertion of cage and anterior vertebral plate and screws, followed by posterior approach and fixation. Care was taken to restore sagittal balance. The condition was successfully operatively managed with multisegmental, both column fixation and fusion, resulting in pain cessation and resolution of myelopathy. Postoperatively, minor swallowing difficulties were noted, which ceased after three days. Patient was able to move around in a wheelchair on the sixth postoperative day. Stiff neck collar was advised for three months postoperatively with neck pain slowly decreasing in the course of first postoperative month. On the follow-up visit six months after the surgery patient exhibited no signs of spastic tetraparesis, X-rays of the cervical spine revealed solid bony fusion at single mobile segment C6-C7. He was able to gaze horizontally while sitting in a wheelchair. Signs of myelopathy with stiff neck and single movable segment raised concerns about intubation, but were successfully managed using awake fiber-optic intubation. Avoidance of tracheostomy enabled us to perform an anterolateral approach without increasing the risk of wound infection. Regarding surgical procedure, the same principles are obeyed as in management of fracture in ankylosing spondylitis or Mb. Forestrier. PMID:27458558

  5. Operative stabilization of the remaining mobile segment in ankylosed cervical spine in systemic onset - juvenile idiopathic arthritis: A case report.

    PubMed

    Suhodolčan, Lovro; Mihelak, Marko; Brecelj, Janez; Vengust, Rok

    2016-07-18

    We describe a case of a 19-year-old young man with oligoarthritis type of juvenile idiopathic arthritis, who presented with several month duration of lower neck pain and progressive muscular weakness of all four limbs. X-rays of the cervical spine demonstrated spontaneous apophyseal joint fusion from the occipital condyle to C6 and from C7 to Th2 with marked instability between C6 and C7. Surgical intervention began with anterolateral approach to the cervical spine performing decompression, insertion of cage and anterior vertebral plate and screws, followed by posterior approach and fixation. Care was taken to restore sagittal balance. The condition was successfully operatively managed with multisegmental, both column fixation and fusion, resulting in pain cessation and resolution of myelopathy. Postoperatively, minor swallowing difficulties were noted, which ceased after three days. Patient was able to move around in a wheelchair on the sixth postoperative day. Stiff neck collar was advised for three months postoperatively with neck pain slowly decreasing in the course of first postoperative month. On the follow-up visit six months after the surgery patient exhibited no signs of spastic tetraparesis, X-rays of the cervical spine revealed solid bony fusion at single mobile segment C6-C7. He was able to gaze horizontally while sitting in a wheelchair. Signs of myelopathy with stiff neck and single movable segment raised concerns about intubation, but were successfully managed using awake fiber-optic intubation. Avoidance of tracheostomy enabled us to perform an anterolateral approach without increasing the risk of wound infection. Regarding surgical procedure, the same principles are obeyed as in management of fracture in ankylosing spondylitis or Mb. Forestrier. PMID:27458558

  6. A study of cervical spine kinematics and joint capsule strain in rear impacts using a human FE model.

    PubMed

    Kitagawa, Yuichi; Yasuki, Tsuyoshi; Hasegawa, Junji

    2006-11-01

    Many efforts have been made to understand the mechanism of whiplash injury. Recently, the cervical facet joint capsules have been focused on as a potential site of injury. An experimental approach has been taken to analyze the vertebral motion and to estimate joint capsule stretch that was thought to be a potential cause of pain. The purpose of this study is to analyze the kinematics of the cervical facet joint using a human FE model in order to better understand the injury mechanism. The Total Human Model for Safety (THUMS) was used to visually analyze the local and global kinematics of the spine. Soft tissues in the neck were newly modeled and introduced into THUMS for estimating the loading level in rear impacts. The model was first validated against human test data in the literature by comparing vertebrae motion as well as head and neck responses. Joint capsule strain was estimated from a maximum principal strain output from the elements representing the capsule tissues. A rear-end collision was then simulated using THUMS and a prototype seat model, assuming a delta-V of 25 km/h. The trajectory of the vertebrae was analyzed in a local coordinate system defined along the joint surface. Strain growth in the joint capsules was explained, as related to contact events between the occupant and the seat. A new seat concept was proposed to help lessen the loading level to the neck soft tissues. The foam material of the seat back was softened, the initial gap behind the head was reduced and the head restraint was stiffened for firm support. The lower seat back frame was also reinforced to withstand the impact severity at the given delta-V. Another rear impact simulation was conducted using the new seat concept model to examine the effectiveness of the new concept. The joint capsule strain was found to be relatively lower with the new seat concept. The study also discusses the influence of seat parameters to the vertebral motion and the resultant strain in the joint

  7. Magnetic resonance imaging of the cervical spine: technical and clinical observations

    SciTech Connect

    Modic, M.T.; Weinstein, M.A.; Pavlicek, W.; Boumphrey, F.; Starnes, D.; Duchesneau, P.M.

    1983-12-01

    Seventy-two patients were examined to determine the clinical potential for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the spine. MRI using different pulse sequences was compared with plain radiography, high-resolution computed tomography, and myelography. There were 35 normal patients; pathologic conditions studied included canal stenosis, herniated disk, metastatic tumor, neurofibroma, trauma, Chiari malformation, syringomyelia, arteriovenous malformation, and rheumatoid arthritis. MRI provided sharply defined anatomic delineation and tissue characterization. It was diagnostic in syringomyelia and Chiari malformation and was useful in the evaluation of trauma and spinal canal block from any cause. MRI was sensitive to degenerative disk disease and infection. The spin-echo technique, with three pulse sequence variations, seems very promising. A short echo time (TE) produces the best signal-to-noise ratio and spatial resolution. Lengthening the TE enhances differentiation of various tissues by their signal intensity, whil the combined increase of TE and recovery time (TR) produces selective enhancement of the cerebrospinal fluid signal intensity.

  8. A randomised cross-over trial comparing the McGrath(®) Series 5 videolaryngoscope with the Macintosh laryngoscope in patients with cervical spine immobilisation.

    PubMed

    Foulds, L T; McGuire, B E; Shippey, B J

    2016-04-01

    We compared the performance of the McGrath® Series 5 videolaryngoscope with the Macintosh laryngoscope in 49 patients without suspected cervical spine pathology, whose cervical spine was immobilised using a semi-rigid collar. The primary outcome was the view obtained at laryngoscopy. Secondary outcomes included time to tracheal intubation, rates of successful intubation and incidence of complications. In all patients, the view was better (92%) or the same (8%) in the McGrath group versus the Macintosh group (p < 0.01). There were no failed intubations in the McGrath group and seven (28%) in the Macintosh group (p < 0.02). There was no statistical difference in time taken to intubate or incidence of complications. We conclude that the McGrath® Series 5 is a superior laryngoscope when cervical spine immobilisation is maintained during tracheal intubation.

  9. Morphometric evaluation of the uncinate process and its importance in surgical approaches to the cervical spine: a cadaveric study

    PubMed Central

    Güvençer, Mustafa; Naderi, Sait; Men, Süleyman; Sayhan, Salih; Tetik, Süleyman

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION The uncinate process (UP) has an important role because of its relationship with the vertebral artery and spinal roots. Degenerative diseases cause osteophyte formation on the UP, leading to radiculopathy, myelopathy and vertebral vascular insufficiency, which may require surgical management. This study aimed to evaluate the morphometry of this region to shed light on the anatomy of the UP. METHODS Morphometric data was obtained from 13 male formaldehyde-fixed cadavers. Direct measurements were obtained using a metal caliper. Computed tomography (CT) morphometry was performed with the cadavers in the supine position. RESULTS Direct cadaveric measurements showed that the height of the UP increased from C3 (5.8 ± 1.0 mm) to C7 (6.6 ± 0.5 mm). On CT, the corresponding measurements were 5.9 ± 1.2 mm at C3 and 6.9 ± 0.6 mm at C7. The distance between the left and right apex of the UP from C3 to C7 also increased on both direct cadaveric and CT measurements (C3: 20.8 ± 1.0 mm and C7: 28.1 ± 2.4 mm vs. C3: 23.7 ± 3.4 mm and C7: 29.0 ± 3.0 mm, respectively). On CT, the distance between the UP and superior articular process at the C3 to C7 levels were 9.8 ± 1.7 mm, 7.9 ± 1.8 mm, 7.9 ± 1.6 mm, 7.8 ± 1.3 mm and 8.2 ± 1.7 mm, respectively. CONCLUSION Direct cadaveric and CT measurements of the UP are useful for preoperative evaluation of the cervical spine and may lead to better surgical outcomes. PMID:26778467

  10. Recurrent laryngeal edema imitating angioedema caused by dislocated screw after anterior spine surgery.

    PubMed

    Wójtowicz, Piotr; Szafarowski, Tomasz; Migacz, Ewa; Krzeski, Antoni

    2015-01-01

    The anterior cervical spine surgery is a common procedure to stabilize vertebrae damaged by various diseases. The plates and screws are usually used in the spine fixation. This kind of instrumentation may detach from the bones which is a rare but well-known complication. A 77-year-old male presented to the otorhinolaryngology department with throat pain, choking, and dysphagia. At first the angioedema was diagnosed and he was treated conservatively. The endoscopy revealed laryngeal edema, being more defined on the right side with right vocal fold paresis. CT scans showed the stabilizing plate with two screws attached tightly and the back-out of the third screw toward soft tissue of the neck. In the meantime, his condition deteriorated and he needed tracheotomy. In few days the surgical removal of the dislocated screw was performed successfully. Although two-month follow-up reported no obstruction of the larynx, the vocal folds paresis with gradual functional improvement was observed. Long-term complication of anterior spine surgery sometimes may suggest laryngeal angioedema at first. If the conservative treatment is ineffective and there is a history of anterior spine surgery, the clinicians should consider the displacement of the plate or screws in differential diagnosis. PMID:25755901

  11. The use of botulinum toxin in the treatment of the consequences of bruxism on cervical spine musculature.

    PubMed

    Finiels, P J; Batifol, D

    2014-03-01

    Hypertonia and hyperactivity of masticatory muscles are involved in pain and contractions of the cervical spine musculature, but their pathophysiology remains nonetheless unknown and its treatment far to be codified. In this study, 8 patients, showing disabling posterior neck muscle contractures linked with bruxism were prospectively treated and followed for an average 15 months period, after having received Injections of botulinum toxin A essentially in masticatory muscles. Injections were made every 3 months, varying from 10 to 100 U Botox* by muscles, without administrating more than 300 U Botox* in the same patient. The angle of cervical lordosis were calculated on lateral sitting radiographs in neutral position, good results being considered to be achieved in the case of a 2 point diminution of VAS score as well as at least a 5° positive gain in the curve. 7 patients out of 8 showed a real improvement in their symptoms after an average of 3 injections, showing a decrease of 4.5 points on the VAS score and an average increment of 15° in cervical lordosis. Although the follow-up period of patients was relatively short and the sample quite small, the general impression, confirmed by the patients' experience, seems to suggest a potential place for the use of botulinum toxin amongst the array of treatments which can be offered in certain selected cases which associate bruxism and posterior cervical contractions.

  12. Altered spinal kinematics and muscle recruitment pattern of the cervical and thoracic spine in people with chronic neck pain during functional task.

    PubMed

    Tsang, Sharon M H; Szeto, Grace P Y; Lee, Raymond Y W

    2014-02-01

    Knowledge on the spinal kinematics and muscle activation of the cervical and thoracic spine during functional task would add to our understanding of the performance and interplay of these spinal regions during dynamic condition. The purpose of this study was to examine the influence of chronic neck pain on the three-dimensional kinematics and muscle recruitment pattern of the cervical and thoracic spine during an overhead reaching task involving a light weight transfer by the upper limb. Synchronized measurements of the three-dimensional spinal kinematics and electromyographic activities of cervical and thoracic spine were acquired in thirty individuals with chronic neck pain and thirty age- and gender-matched asymptomatic controls. Neck pain group showed a significantly decreased cervical velocity and acceleration while performing the task. They also displayed with a predominantly prolonged coactivation of cervical and thoracic muscles throughout the task cycle. The current findings highlighted the importance to examine differential kinematic variables of the spine which are associated with changes in the muscle recruitment in people with chronic neck pain. The results also provide an insight to the appropriate clinical intervention to promote the recovery of the functional disability commonly reported in patients with neck pain disorders.

  13. Cervical Spine Motion During Football Equipment-Removal Protocols: A Challenge to the All-or-Nothing Endeavor

    PubMed Central

    Jacobson, Bradley; Cendoma, Michael; Gdovin, Jacob; Cooney, Kevin; Bruening, Dustin

    2014-01-01

    Context The National Athletic Trainers' Association position statement on acute management of the cervical spine-injured athlete recommended the all-or-nothing endeavor, which involves removing or not removing both helmet and shoulder pads, from equipment-laden American football and ice hockey athletes. However, in supporting research, investigators have not considered alternative protocols. Objective To measure cervical spine movement (head relative to sternum) produced when certified athletic trainers (ATs) use the all-or-nothing endeavor and to compare these findings with the movement produced using an alternative pack-and-fill protocol, which involves packing the area under and around the cervical neck and head with rolled towels. Design Crossover study. Setting Movement analysis laboratory. Patients or Other Participants Eight male collegiate football players (age = 21.4 ± 1.4 years; height = 1.87 ± 0.02 m; mass = 103.6 ± 12.5 kg). Intervention(s) Four ATs removed equipment under 4 conditions: removal of helmet only followed by placing the head on the ground (H), removal of the helmet only followed by pack-and-fill (HP), removal of the helmet and shoulder pads followed by placing the head on the ground (HS), and removal of the helmet and shoulder pads followed by pack-and-fill (HSP). Motion capture was used to track the movement of the head with respect to the sternum during equipment removal. Main Outcome Measure(s) We measured head movement relative to sternum movement (translations and rotations). We used 4 × 4 analyses of variance with repeated measures to compare discrete motion variables (changes in position and total excursions) among protocols and ATs. Results Protocol HP resulted in a 0.1 ± 0.6 cm rise in head position compared with a 1.4 ± 0.3 cm drop with protocol HS (P < .001). Protocol HP produced 4.9° less total angular excursion (P < .001) and 2.1 cm less total vertical excursion (P < .001) than protocol HS. Conclusions The pack

  14. The Intubating Laryngeal Mask Airway Allows Tracheal Intubation When the Cervical Spine Is Immobilized by a Rigid Collar

    PubMed Central

    Komatsu, Ryu; Nagata, Osamu; Kamata, Kotoe; Yamagata, Katsuyuki; Sessler, Daniel I.; Ozaki, Makoto

    2005-01-01

    Summary An intubating laryngeal mask airway (ILMA) facilitates tracheal intubation with the neck in neutral position, which is similar to the neck position maintained by a rigid cervical collar. However, a cervical collar virtually obliterates neck movement, even the small movements that normally facilitate airway insertion. We therefore tested the hypothesis that the ILMA facilitates tracheal intubation even in patients wearing a rigid cervical collar. In 50 cervical spine surgery patients with a rigid Philadelphia collar in place and 50 general surgery patients under general anaesthesia, we performed blind tracheal intubation via an ILMA. The time required for intubation, intubation success rate, and numbers and type of adjusting manoeuvres employed were recorded. Inter-incisor distance was significantly smaller (4.1 [0.8] cm vs. 4.6 [0.7] cm, mean [SD], P<0.01) and Mallampati scores were significantly greater (P<0.001) in the collared patients. ILMA insertion took longer (30 [25] vs. 22 [6] seconds), more patients required 2 insertion attempts (15 vs. 3; P<0.005), and ventilation adequacy with ILMA was worse (P<0.05) in collared patients. However, there were no significant differences between the collared and control patients in terms of total time required for intubation (60 [41] vs. 50 [30] seconds), number of intubation attempts, overall intubation success rate (96 vs. 98%), or the incidence of intubation complications. Blind intubation through an ILMA is thus a reasonable strategy for controlling the airway in patients who are immobilized with a rigid cervical collar, especially when urgency precludes a fiberoptic approach. PMID:15321932

  15. Value of intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring to reduce neurological complications in patients undergoing anterior cervical spine procedures for cervical spondylotic myelopathy.

    PubMed

    Thirumala, Parthasarathy D; Muralidharan, Aditya; Loke, Yoon K; Habeych, Miguel; Crammond, Donald; Balzer, Jeffrey

    2016-03-01

    The primary aim of this study was to conduct a systematic review of reports of patients with cervical spondylotic myelopathy and to assess the value of intraoperative monitoring (IOM), including somatosensory evoked potentials, transcranial motor evoked potentials and electromyography, in anterior cervical procedures. A search was conducted to collect a small database of relevant papers using key words describing disorders and procedures of interest. The database was then shortlisted using selection criteria and data was extracted to identify complications as a result of anterior cervical procedures for cervical spondylotic myelopathy and outcome analysis on a continuous scale. In the 22 studies that matched the screening criteria, only two involved the use of IOM. The average sample size was 173 patients. In procedures done without IOM a mean change in Japanese Orthopaedic Association score of 3.94 points and Nurick score by 1.20 points (both less severe post-operatively) was observed. Within our sub-group analysis, worsening myelopathy and/or quadriplegia was seen in 2.71% of patients for studies without IOM and 0.91% of patients for studies with IOM. Variations persist in the existing literature in the evaluation of complications associated with anterior cervical spinal procedures. Based on the review of published studies, sufficient evidence does not exist to make recommendations regarding the use of different IOM modalities to reduce neurological complications during anterior cervical procedures. However, future studies with objective measures of neurological deficits using a specific IOM modality may establish it as an effective and reliable indicator of injury during such surgeries. PMID:26677786

  16. A biomechanical analysis of decompression and reconstruction methods in the cervical spine. Emphasis on a carbon-fiber-composite cage.

    PubMed

    Shono, Y; McAfee, P C; Cunningham, B W; Brantigan, J W

    1993-11-01

    Biomechanical analysis of three different patterns of instability--that created by fifth and sixth cervical anterior discectomy, that created by one-level (fifth cervical) anterior corpectomy, and that created by two-level (fourth and fifth cervical) corpectomy--was performed in eighteen calf spines. Three types of anterior reconstruction--anterior iliac strut bone-grafting, use of an anterior carbon-fiber-composite cage packed with cancellous bone graft, as well as use of polymethylmethacrylate anteriorly--were cyclically tested in axial compression, torsion, and flexion-extension. Each of these types of reconstruction was also tested with supplemental posterior wire stabilization (the triple-wire technique of Bohlman). Regardless of the type of anterior instability, the carbon-fiber-reinforced cage packed with cancellous bone graft was more rigid than the iliac bone graft alone. The cage resulted in good stiffness in the axial compression and rotation tests and was the most rigid construct in the flexion-extension tests. The superior aspect of the polymethylmethacrylate constructs loosened at the bone-cement interface in eight of the twelve specimens during flexion-extension testing. The addition of the supplemental posterior wiring to the anterior constructs provided additional rigidity in flexion-extension testing.

  17. Accuracy of positioning the cervical spine for radiation therapy and the relationship to GTV, CTV and PTV.

    PubMed

    Kippenes, Hege; Gavin, Patrick R; Sande, Ronald D; Rogers, Dennis; Sweet, Vaughn

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate the accuracy and precision of a rigid positioning device for repositioning the cervical spine accurately and precisely during conformal radiation therapy of dogs. Fifteen purpose bred research dogs in a radiation therapy study were included. The dogs were positioned using a head holder and a deflatable pillow attached to the treatment table. Port films were reviewed retrospectively, and repositioning precision was recorded by measurements in three orthogonal planes of the head, 2nd cervical vertebra and 1st thoracic spinous process. Mean treatment position was compared to the planning position for a measurement of systematic set-up error. Mean interfraction position variation of the 2nd cervical vertebra was 0.2, 0.1 and 0.2 cm for the ventrodorsal, caudocranial and laterolateral directions respectively, and the average systematic set up error was 0.2, 0.1 and 0.2 cm for the ventrodorsal, caudocranial and laterolateral directions respectively. Knowledge of the magnitude of reposition errors should be included when determining the margins around the tumor. PMID:14703256

  18. A rare cause of dysphagia: compression of the esophagus by an anterior cervical osteophyte due to ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Albayrak, Ilknur; Bağcacı, Sinan; Sallı, Ali; Kucuksen, Sami; Uğurlu, Hatice

    2013-09-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is a chronic inflammatory rheumatological disease affecting the axial skeleton with various extra-articular complications. Dysphagia due to a giant anterior osteophyte of the cervical spine in AS is extremely rare. We present a 48-year-old male with AS suffering from progressive dysphagia to soft foods and liquids. Esophagography showed an anterior osteophyte at C5-C6 resulting in esophageal compression. The patient refused surgical resection of the osteophyte and received conservative therapy. However, after 6 months there was no improvement in dysphagia. This case illustrates that a large cervical osteophyte may be the cause of dysphagia in patients with AS and should be included in the diagnostic workup in early stages of the disease.

  19. Dystrophic calcinosis with both a huge calcified mass in the cervical spine and calcification in the chest wall in a patient with rheumatoid overlap syndrome.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Tadashi; Hirakawa, Kei; Takaoka, Hirokazu; Iyama, Ken-Ichi

    2016-05-01

    Dystrophic calcinosis in soft tissue occurs in damaged or devitalized tissues in the presence of normal calcium and phosphorous metabolism. It is often noted in subcutaneous tissues in patients with collagen vascular diseases and may involve a relatively localized area or be widespread. A 74-year-old Japanese woman with an overlap of rheumatoid arthritis, Sjögren's syndrome, and systemic sclerosis developed a huge tumor-like mass at the atlanto-axial vertebral joint region that caused severe cervical pain and difficulty in activities of daily living. She also had subcutaneous dystrophic calcification in the soft tissue of the chest wall. Calcinosis associated with systemic sclerosis is a well-recognized phenomenon, but a destructive paraspinal tumor in the cervical spine associated with overlap syndrome is extremely unique. Because calcinosis in spinal locations can be complicated by neurological involvement, patients with progressive symptoms may require surgical intervention. Surgical resection and biological therapy improved this patient's life and activities of daily living. Calcinosis is common in the conditions reviewed here, and different agents have been used for treatment. However, calcinosis management is poorly organized and lacks an accepted classification, systematic studies, and clinical therapeutic trials. The association of calcinosis and collagen vascular diseases is clinically and etiologically important. Although a combination of calcinosis and rheumatoid overlap syndrome is rare, various collagen vascular diseases may occur simultaneously. A perceptive diagnostic approach toward these diseases is critical, and early diagnosis and treatment are needed to prevent dystrophic calcinosis.

  20. HPV types and cofactors causing cervical cancer in Peru.

    PubMed

    Santos, C; Muñoz, N; Klug, S; Almonte, M; Guerrero, I; Alvarez, M; Velarde, C; Galdos, O; Castillo, M; Walboomers, J; Meijer, C; Caceres, E

    2001-09-28

    We conducted a hospital-based case-control study in Peru of 198 women with histologically confirmed cervical cancer (173 squamous cell carcinomas and 25 cases of adenocarcinoma/adenosquamous carcinoma) and 196 control women. Information on risk factors was obtained by personal interview. Using PCR-based assays on exfoliated cervical cells and biopsy specimens, HPV DNA was detected in 95.3% of women with squamous cell carcinoma and in 92.0% of women with adenocarcinoma/adenosquamous carcinoma compared with 17.7% in control women. The age-adjusted odds ratio was 116.0 (95% Cl = 48.6-276.0) for squamous cell carcinoma and 51.4 (95% Cl = 11.4-232.0) for adenocarcinoma/adenosquamous carcinoma. The commonest types in women with cervical cancer were HPV 16, 18, 31, 52 and 35. The association with the various HPV types was equally strong for the two most common types (HPV 16 and 18) as for the other less common types. In addition to HPV, long-term use of oral contraceptives and smoking were associated with an increased risk. HPV is the main cause of both squamous cell carcinoma and adenocarcinoma in Peruvian women. PMID:11592767

  1. Cervical and thoracic spine injury from interactions with vehicle roofs in pure rollover crashes.

    PubMed

    Bambach, M R; Grzebieta, R H; McIntosh, A S; Mattos, G A

    2013-01-01

    Around one third of serious injuries sustained by belted, non-ejected occupants in pure rollover crashes occur to the spine. Dynamic rollover crash test methodologies have been established in Australia and the United States, with the aims of understanding injury potential in rollovers and establishing the basis of an occupant rollover protection crashworthiness test protocol that could be adopted by consumer new car assessment programmes and government regulators internationally. However, for any proposed test protocol to be effective in reducing the high trauma burden resulting from rollover crashes, appropriate anthropomorphic devices that replicate real-world injury mechanisms and biomechanical loads are required. To date, consensus regarding the combination of anthropomorphic device and neck injury criteria for rollover crash tests has not been reached. The aim of the present study is to provide new information pertaining to the nature and mechanisms of spine injury in pure rollover crashes, and to assist in the assessment of spine injury potential in rollover crash tests. Real-world spine injury cases that resulted from pure rollover crashes in the United States between 2000 and 2009 are identified, and compared with cadaver experiments under vertical load by other authors. The analysis is restricted to contained, restrained occupants that were injured from contact with the vehicle roof structure during a pure rollover, and the role of roof intrusion in creating potential for spine injury is assessed. Recommendations for assessing the potential for spine injury in rollover occupant protection crash test protocols are made. PMID:23149322

  2. Thoracic spine sports-related injuries.

    PubMed

    Menzer, Heather; Gill, G Keith; Paterson, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Although sports-related injuries to the thoracic spine are relatively uncommon, they are among the most feared due to the potential for catastrophic neurologic injury. The increased biomechanical support of the thoracic spine makes injuries in this region particularly rare compared with the cervical and lumbar spine. As a result, thoracic spine injuries can be missed easily, difficult to diagnose, and problematic to treat. Recognition of mechanism and awareness of injury patterns help physicians determine a diagnosis and create an index of suspicion for unstable thoracic spine injuries. Aggressive full-contact sports receive the most attention for spinal injury; however several sports with repetitive loading of the spine can cause severe injuries, including rowing, gymnastics, and golf. The goal of this article was to provide an overview of the unique anatomic and biomechanical features of the thoracic spine and to discuss some of the more common thoracic injuries that can affect athletes. PMID:25574880

  3. Surgical management of giant multilevel aneurysmal bone cyst of cervical spine in a 10-year-old boy: case report with review of literature

    PubMed Central

    Gurjar, Hitesh Kumar; Sarkari, Avijit; Chandra, P. Sarat

    2012-01-01

    Background: Aneurysmal bone cysts are rare occurrences in the cervical spine. Surgical treatment in pediatric patients is a challenge. Complete tumor resection offers the best chance for cure. Description: Diagnosis and surgical management of an expansile aneurysmal bone cyst of the cervical spine involving all three spinal columns in a 10-year-old boy. Results: Surgical treatment included tumor excision and circumferential fusion, and produced no neurological or vascular sequelae. This approach minimizes the risk of recurrence and the possibility of postoperative spinal instability. Conclusion: Spinal instability is preferably addressed with reconstruction and stabilization. Cervical aneurismal bone cyst lesions are ideally treated with complete resection to minimize the chance of recurrence. In pediatric cases, defects created by resection should be corrected by fusion to minimize the risk of postoperative instability and growth abnormality. PMID:23526912

  4. Impact of morphine use in reducing the need for CT scan in patients with cervical spine trauma: a double blinded randomized clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Sharifi, Mohammad Davood; Doloo, Hamid Zamani Moghadam; Hashemian, Amir Masoud; Tourghabe, Javad Tootian; Kakhki, Behrang Rezvani; Teimoori, Sasan Johari; Chokan, Niaz Mohammad Jafari; Noroozi, Hamid Reza

    2016-01-01

    Background Cervical spine trauma occurs mostly among young males due to falls and car accidents. The CT scan technology is replacing radiography in many medical clinics as it is very capable in detecting subtle cervical spine injuries. However, the use of CT scan for routine screening in patients with cervical spine trauma remains controversial due to its radiation risks and relatively high cost. Objective The focus of this research was on using morphine in patients with cervical spine trauma. The objective was to determine the ability of morphine to reduce the number of patients in need of CT scans. Methods This double-blinded randomized clinical trial study was conducted from April 2014 to March 2015 in Hasheminejad Hospital in Mashhad, Iran. We enrolled 67 patients with cervical spine trauma and normal radiography in the study. They were divided randomly into two groups (groups A and B), where group A received intravenous morphine, and group B received a placebo. We measured the pain scores in both groups before giving the medication and 10 minutes afterwards using a visual analog scale (VAS). Results As a result of receiving morphine, the patients in group A had significantly lower pain than group B (p-value < 0.001). The average pain score in group A was reduced by 43% versus 23% in group B. However, the most pain reduction was in those in group A with a normal CT scan. The pain score of these patients dropped by 52%. Conclusions The findings of this study suggest that patients with a normal radiography may be discharged with a cervical collar without a need for a CT scan if morphine reduces their pain. This is because the pain in these patients stem from the muscles and non-bony structures in the cervical spine area. Clinical trial registration: The trial was registered at the Iranian Registry of Clinical Trials (http://www.irct.ir) with the IRCT ID: IRCT2013100214872N1 Funding The authors received no financial support for the research or for the publication

  5. Can emergency nurses use the Canadian cervical spine rule to reduce unnecessary patient immobilisation?

    PubMed

    Miller, Phil; Coffey, Frank; Reid, Anne-Marie; Stevenson, Keith

    2006-07-01

    The Canadian c-spine rule (CCR) allows safe, reproducible use of radiography in alert, stable patients with potential c-spine injury in the emergency setting [Stiell, I., Clement, C., McKnight, R., Brison, R., Schull, M., Lowe, B., Worthington, J., Eisenhauer, M., Cass, D., Greenberg, G., MacPhail, I., Dreyer, J., Lee, J., Bandiera, G., Reardon, M., Holroyd, B., Lesiuk, H., G. Wells, 2003. The Canadian c-spine rule versus the nexus low-risk criteria in patients with trauma. The New England journal of medicine 349 (26), 2510-2518; Stiell, I., Wells, G., Vandemheen, K., Clement, C., 2001. The Canadian c-spine rule for radiography in alert and stable trauma patients. JAMA 286 (15), 1841]. This paper reports on a study of emergency nurses' ability to identify patients requiring immobilisation using the CCR. Emergency department triage nurses (N = 112) were trained in the use of the CCR and then asked to use the tool over the following 14 months in the assessment of 460 patients who presented with potential c-spine injury. Trained medical staff repeated 55% of the clinical assessments independently using the rule. The level of agreement between nurse and medical judgement was calculated. The inter-rater reliability using the kappa statistic was 0.6 (95% CI 0.50-0.62 N = 254) indicating a 'good' level of agreement. The majority of nurses indicated they were comfortable using the rule. The results suggest that UK emergency department nurses were able to use the Canadian c-spine rule to successfully guide selective immobilisation. A 25% reduction in immobilisation rates would have been achieved if the rule had been followed. Further studies are needed to test the reduction in levels of immobilisation that could be achieved in clinical practice.

  6. Cervical Myelopathy Caused by Intracranial Dural Arteriovenous Fistula

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Won Young; Kim, Jin Bum; Nam, Taek Kyun; Kim, Young Baeg

    2016-01-01

    Intracranial dural arteriovenous fistula (dAVF) usually results in various problems in the brain. But it can be presented as a myelopathy, which may make early diagnosis and management to be difficult. We recently experienced a case of cervical myelopathy caused by intracranial dAVF. A 60-year-old man presented with a 3-year history of gait disturbance due to a progressive weakness of both legs. Neurological examination revealed spastic paraparesis (grade IV) and Babinski sign on both sides. Magnetic resonance imaging showed serpentine vascular signal voids at C2-T1 on T2-weighted image with increased signal intensity and swelling of spinal cord at C1-C4. We performed a brain computed tomography angiography and found intracranial dAVF with multiple arteriovenous shunts. Venous drainages were noted at tentorial veins and cervical perimedullary veins. After Onyx embolization, the patient showed gradual improvement in motor power and gait disturbance. The venous drainage pattern is a well-known prognostic factor of dAVF. In our case, the intracranial dAVF drained to spinal perimedullary vein, which seemed to result in the ischemic myelopathy. Although it is rare condition, it sometimes can cause serious complications. Therefore, we should keep in mind the possibility of intracranial dAVF when a patient presents myelopathy. PMID:27437016

  7. Cervical Myelopathy Caused by Intracranial Dural Arteriovenous Fistula.

    PubMed

    Kim, Won Young; Kim, Jin Bum; Nam, Taek Kyun; Kim, Young Baeg; Park, Seung Won

    2016-06-01

    Intracranial dural arteriovenous fistula (dAVF) usually results in various problems in the brain. But it can be presented as a myelopathy, which may make early diagnosis and management to be difficult. We recently experienced a case of cervical myelopathy caused by intracranial dAVF. A 60-year-old man presented with a 3-year history of gait disturbance due to a progressive weakness of both legs. Neurological examination revealed spastic paraparesis (grade IV) and Babinski sign on both sides. Magnetic resonance imaging showed serpentine vascular signal voids at C2-T1 on T2-weighted image with increased signal intensity and swelling of spinal cord at C1-C4. We performed a brain computed tomography angiography and found intracranial dAVF with multiple arteriovenous shunts. Venous drainages were noted at tentorial veins and cervical perimedullary veins. After Onyx embolization, the patient showed gradual improvement in motor power and gait disturbance. The venous drainage pattern is a well-known prognostic factor of dAVF. In our case, the intracranial dAVF drained to spinal perimedullary vein, which seemed to result in the ischemic myelopathy. Although it is rare condition, it sometimes can cause serious complications. Therefore, we should keep in mind the possibility of intracranial dAVF when a patient presents myelopathy. PMID:27437016

  8. Effects of the height of shoe heels on muscle activation of cervical and lumbar spine in healthy women

    PubMed Central

    Park, Kisu; Kim, Young; Chung, Yijung; Hwang, Sujin

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of different height of high heels on muscle activation of the paraspinalis cervicis and erector spinae in healthy young women. [Subjects and Methods] Thirteen healthy women were recruited in this study. To examine the effects of different heights of heels on muscle activation, the paraspinalis cervicis (cervical spine) and erector spinae (lumbar spine) were measured at the time of heel strike and toe off during gait on three different conditions (barefoot, 4 cm high heels, and 10 cm high heels). There are no previous trials or reports that have evaluated this approach in patients with chronic neck pain. [Results] A significant increase in muscle activation of the paraspinalis cervicis and erector spinae at heel strike and toe off (except that of the paraspinalis cervicis at toe off in healthy subjects) was observed in the under 10 cm high heel condition as, compared to that with barefoot condition, in all the subjects. [Conclusion] The height of the high heels affects to the activation demand of the paraspinalis cervicis and erector spinae in patients with neck pain. PMID:27134392

  9. The pain drawing as an instrument for identifying cervical spine nerve involvement in chronic whiplash-associated disorders

    PubMed Central

    Bernhoff, Gabriella; Landén Ludvigsson, Maria; Peterson, Gunnel; Bertilson, Bo Christer; Elf, Madeleine; Peolsson, Anneli

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aim of the study was to investigate the psychometric properties of a standardized assessment of pain drawing with regard to clinical signs of cervical spine nerve root involvement. Design This cross-sectional study included data collected in a randomized controlled study. Patients: Two hundred and sixteen patients with chronic (≥6 months) whiplash-associated disorders, grade 2 or 3, were included in this study. Methods The validity, sensitivity, and specificity of a standardized pain drawing assessment for determining nerve root involvement were analyzed, compared to the clinical assessment. In addition, we analyzed the interrater reliability with 50 pain drawings. Results Agreement was poor between the standardized pain drawing assessment and the clinical assessment (kappa =0.11, 95% CI: −0.03 to 0.20). Sensitivity was high (93%), but specificity was low (19%). Interrater reliability was good (kappa =0.64, 95% CI: 0.53 to 0.76). Conclusion: The standardized pain drawing assessment of nerve root involvement in chronic whiplash-associated disorders was not in agreement with the clinical assessment. Further research is warranted to optimize the utilization of a pain/discomfort drawing as a supportive instrument for identifying nerve involvement in cervical spinal injuries. PMID:27358576

  10. Semi-automatic delineation of the spino-laminar junction curve on lateral x-ray radiographs of the cervical spine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narang, Benjamin; Phillips, Michael; Knapp, Karen; Appelboam, Andy; Reuben, Adam; Slabaugh, Greg

    2015-03-01

    Assessment of the cervical spine using x-ray radiography is an important task when providing emergency room care to trauma patients suspected of a cervical spine injury. In routine clinical practice, a physician will inspect the alignment of the cervical spine vertebrae by mentally tracing three alignment curves along the anterior and posterior sides of the cervical vertebral bodies, as well as one along the spinolaminar junction. In this paper, we propose an algorithm to semi-automatically delineate the spinolaminar junction curve, given a single reference point and the corners of each vertebral body. From the reference point, our method extracts a region of interest, and performs template matching using normalized cross-correlation to find matching regions along the spinolaminar junction. Matching points are then fit to a third order spline, producing an interpolating curve. Experimental results demonstrate promising results, on average producing a modified Hausdorff distance of 1.8 mm, validated on a dataset consisting of 29 patients including those with degenerative change, retrolisthesis, and fracture.

  11. Cervical neuro-muscular syndrome: discovery of a new disease group caused by abnormalities in the cervical muscles.

    PubMed

    Matsui, Takayoshi; Ii, Kunio; Hojo, Shuntaro; Sano, Keiji

    2012-01-01

    Our previous study of whiplash injury found that abnormalities in the cervical muscles cause autonomic dystonia. Further research has found that abnormalities in the cervical muscles cause headache, chronic fatigue syndrome, vertigo, and dizziness. We named this group of diseases cervical neuro-muscular syndrome. Patients treated within a 2-year period from April 1, 2002 to March 31, 2004 reported good outcomes in 83.8% for headache, 88.4% for vertigo and dizziness, 84.5% for chronic fatigue syndrome, 88.0% for autonomic dystonia, and 83.7% for whiplash-associated disorder. A large number of outpatients present with general malaise, including many general physical complaints without identifiable cause. We propose that treatment of the cervical muscle is effective for general malaise.

  12. Cervical Intradural Disc Herniation Causing Progressive Quadriparesis After Spinal Manipulation Therapy: A Case Report and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hwan-Seo; Oh, Young-Min; Eun, Jong-Pil

    2016-02-01

    Cervical intradural disc herniation (IDH) is an extremely rare condition, comprising only 0.27% of all disc herniations. Three percent of IDHs occur in the cervical, 5% in the thoracic, and over 92% in the lumbar spinal canal. There have been a total of 31 cervical IDHs reported in the literature. The pathogenesis and imaging characteristics of IDH are not fully understood. A preoperative diagnosis is key to facilitating prompt intradural exploration in patients with ambivalent findings, as well as in preventing reoperation. The purpose of reporting our case is to remind clinicians to consider the possibility of cervical IDH during spinal manipulation therapy in patient with chronic neck pain.The patient signed informed consent for publication of this case report and any accompanying image. The ethical approval of this study was waived by the ethics committee of Chonbuk National University Hospital, because this study was case report and the number of patients was <3.A 32-year-old man was transferred our emergency department with progressive quadriparesis. He had no history of trauma, but had received physical therapy with spinal manipulation for chronic neck pain over the course of a month. The day prior, he had noticed neck pain and tingling in the bilateral upper and lower extremities during the manipulation procedure. The following day, he presented with bilateral weakness of all 4 extremities, which rendered him unable to walk. Neurological examination demonstrated a positive Hoffmann sign and ankle clonus bilaterally, hypoesthesia below the C5 dermatome, 3/5 strength in the bilateral upper extremities, and 2/5 strength in the lower extremities. This motor weakness was progressive, and he further complained of voiding difficulty.Urgent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the cervical spine revealed large, central disc herniations at C4-C5 and C5-C6 that caused severe spinal cord compression and surrounding edema. We performed C4-C5-C6 anterior cervical

  13. Cervical spine segmental vertebral motion in healthy volunteers feigning restriction of neck flexion and extension.

    PubMed

    Puglisi, Filadelfio; Strimpakos, Nikolaos; Papathanasiou, Matthildi; Kapreli, Eleni; Bonelli, Aurelio; Sgambetterra, Sergio; Ferrari, Robert

    2007-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to obtain comparative data concerning the percentage contribution of segmental cervical vertebral motion to the cervical range of motion (ROM) in healthy volunteers under two conditions: (1) normal, voluntary neck flexion and extension and (2) feigned restriction of neck flexion and extension. Each healthy subject's angular motion over forward cervical flexion and extension was measured first by X-ray analysis during normal, voluntary motion. Then the subjects were asked to pretend that they had a 50% restricted neck range due to pain or stiffness and thus to move in both flexion and extension only as far as about 50% of their normal range. A total of 26 healthy subjects (ten males and sixteen females, age 28.7+/-7.7 years) participated. The total angular motion from C2 to C7 was normal in the unrestricted condition and was significantly reduced in the feigned restriction condition (p<0.001). The percentage contribution of each of the functional units C2-C3 to C6-C7 to this rotation was different between the normal unrestricted and the feigned restricted conditions. In the feigned restricted neck flexion and extension, a shift occurred in the pattern of how each segment contributes to the total angular range. A greater percentage contribution was made by C2-C3 and C3-C4 than under normal conditions (P<0.01), and the percentage contribution to total rotation made by C6-C7 became much less under the feigned restricted movements than under normal, unrestricted neck range (p<0.001). Thus, simulated or feigned restricted neck ROM affects the percentage contribution of the functional units C2-C3 to C6-C7 by showing a higher percentage contribution of the upper cervical segments and less contribution to the angular rotation by the lowest cervical segment. Feigners of restricted neck range thus produce a pattern different from nonfeigning subjects.

  14. The Biomechanics of Cervical Spondylosis

    PubMed Central

    Ferrara, Lisa A.

    2012-01-01

    Aging is the major risk factor that contributes to the onset of cervical spondylosis. Several acute and chronic symptoms can occur that start with neck pain and may progress into cervical radiculopathy. Eventually, the degenerative cascade causes desiccation of the intervertebral disc resulting in height loss along the ventral margin of the cervical spine. This causes ventral angulation and eventual loss of lordosis, with compression of the neural and vascular structures. The altered posture of the cervical spine will progress into kyphosis and continue if the load balance and lordosis is not restored. The content of this paper will address the physiological and biomechanical pathways leading to cervical spondylosis and the biomechanical principles related to the surgical correction and treatment of kyphotic progression. PMID:22400120

  15. The biomechanics of cervical spondylosis.

    PubMed

    Ferrara, Lisa A

    2012-01-01

    Aging is the major risk factor that contributes to the onset of cervical spondylosis. Several acute and chronic symptoms can occur that start with neck pain and may progress into cervical radiculopathy. Eventually, the degenerative cascade causes desiccation of the intervertebral disc resulting in height loss along the ventral margin of the cervical spine. This causes ventral angulation and eventual loss of lordosis, with compression of the neural and vascular structures. The altered posture of the cervical spine will progress into kyphosis and continue if the load balance and lordosis is not restored. The content of this paper will address the physiological and biomechanical pathways leading to cervical spondylosis and the biomechanical principles related to the surgical correction and treatment of kyphotic progression. PMID:22400120

  16. Cervical Disc Herniation Causing Brown-Séquard's Syndrome: A Case Report and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Rustagi, Tarush; Badve, Siddharth; Maniar, Hemil; Parekh, Aseem N

    2011-01-01

    Brown-Séquard's syndrome (BSS) is caused by hemisection or hemicompression of the cord leading to ipsilateral motor deficit and contralateral sensory loss. Cervical disc herniation has been reported to be a rare cause of Brown-Séquard's syndrome. We describe a rare case of multilevel cervical disc herniation presenting as BSS. The condition was confirmed by MRI scan. Cervical corpectomy, decompression, and fusion gave a satisfying result. Pertinent literature has been reviewed.

  17. Cervical Disc Herniation Causing Brown-Séquard's Syndrome: A Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Rustagi, Tarush; Badve, Siddharth; Maniar, Hemil; Parekh, Aseem N.

    2011-01-01

    Brown-Séquard's syndrome (BSS) is caused by hemisection or hemicompression of the cord leading to ipsilateral motor deficit and contralateral sensory loss. Cervical disc herniation has been reported to be a rare cause of Brown-Séquard's syndrome. We describe a rare case of multilevel cervical disc herniation presenting as BSS. The condition was confirmed by MRI scan. Cervical corpectomy, decompression, and fusion gave a satisfying result. Pertinent literature has been reviewed. PMID:23259105

  18. In vivo three-dimensional intervertebral kinematics of the subaxial cervical spine during seated axial rotation and lateral bending via a fluoroscopy-to-CT registration approach.

    PubMed

    Lin, Cheng-Chung; Lu, Tung-Wu; Wang, Ting-Ming; Hsu, Chao-Yu; Hsu, Shih-Jung; Shih, Ting-Fang

    2014-10-17

    Accurate measurement of the coupled intervertebral motions is helpful for understanding the etiology and diagnosis of relevant diseases, and for assessing the subsequent treatment. No study has reported the in vivo, dynamic and three-dimensional (3D) intervertebral motion of the cervical spine during active axial rotation (AR) and lateral bending (LB) in the sitting position. The current study fills the gap by measuring the coupled intervertebral motions of the subaxial cervical spine in ten asymptomatic young adults in an upright sitting position during active head LB and AR using a volumetric model-based 2D-to-3D registration method via biplane fluoroscopy. Subject-specific models of the individual vertebrae were derived from each subject's CT data and were registered to the fluoroscopic images for determining the 3D poses of the subaxial vertebrae that were used to obtain the intervertebral kinematics. The averaged ranges of motion to one side (ROM) during AR at C3/C4, C4/C5, C5/C6, and C6/C7 were 4.2°, 4.6°, 3.0° and 1.3°, respectively. The corresponding values were 6.4°, 5.2°, 6.1° and 6.1° during LB. Intervertebral LB (ILB) played an important role in both AR and LB tasks of the cervical spine, experiencing greater ROM than intervertebral AR (IAR) (ratio of coupled motion (IAR/ILB): 0.23-0.75 in LB, 0.34-0.95 in AR). Compared to the AR task, the ranges of ILB during the LB task were significantly greater at C5/6 (p=0.008) and C6/7 (p=0.001) but the range of IAR was significantly smaller at C4/5 (p=0.02), leading to significantly smaller ratios of coupled motions at C4/5 (p=0.0013), C5/6 (p<0.001) and C6/7 (p=0.0037). The observed coupling characteristics of the intervertebral kinematics were different from those in previous studies under discrete static conditions in a supine position without weight-bearing, suggesting that the testing conditions likely affect the kinematics of the subaxial cervical spine. While C1 and C2 were not included owing to

  19. Maintaining endotracheal tube cuff pressure at 20 mm Hg to prevent dysphagia after anterior cervical spine surgery; protocol of a double-blind randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In anterior cervical spine surgery a retractor is obligatory to approach the spine. Previous studies showed an increase of endotracheal tube cuff pressure after placement of a retractor. It is known that high endotracheal tube cuff pressure increases the incidence of postoperative dysphagia, hoarseness, and sore throat. However, until now no evidence supports the fact whether adjusting the endotracheal tube cuff pressure during anterior cervical spine surgery will prevent this comorbidity. We present the design of a randomized controlled trial to determine whether adjusting endotracheal tube cuff pressure after placement of a retractor during anterior cervical spine surgery will prevent postoperative dysphagia. Methods/design 177 patients (aged 18–90 years) scheduled for anterior cervical spine surgery on 1 or more levels will be included. After intubation, endotracheal tube cuff pressure is manually inflated to 20 mm Hg in all patients. Patients will be randomized into two groups. In the control group endotracheal tube cuff pressure is not adjusted after retractor placement. In the intervention group endotracheal tube cuff pressure after retractor placement is maintained at 20 mm Hg and air is withdrawn when cuff pressure exceeds 20 mm Hg. Endotracheal tube cuff pressure is measured after intubation, before and after placement and removal of the retractor. Again air is inflated if cuff pressure sets below 20 mmHg after removal of the retractor. The primary outcome measure is postoperative dysphagia. Other outcome measures are postoperative hoarseness, postoperative sore throat, degree of dysphagia, length of hospital stay, and pneumonia. The study is a single centre double blind randomized trial in which patients and research nurses will be kept blinded for the allocated treatment during the follow-up period of 2 months. Discussion Postoperative dysphagia occurs frequently after anterior cervical spine surgery. This may be related to high

  20. Dumbbell lymphoma of the cervical spine in a child. Case report.

    PubMed

    Gezen, F; Akay, K M; Tayfun, C; Günhan, O; Bedük, A; Seber, N

    1998-12-01

    Primary or secondary spinal involvement of lymphoma is a rarely reported entity. An eleven-year-old girl with primary cervical dumbbell non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) was presented. We could not found any such growth pattern of primary or secondary NHL'S in the literature. For this reason, we reviewed shortly pertinent literature and discussed the pathophysiologic, diagnostic and prognostic features of the lesion with treatment modalities. PMID:10404753

  1. Airway obstruction caused by rapid enlargement of cervical lymphangioma in a five-month-old boy.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Junji; Taga, Takashi; Kishimoto, Takuma; Ohta, Motoki; Tagawa, Kouji; Kunitsu, Tomoaki; Yamane, Tetsunobu; Tsujita, Yasuyuki; Kubota, Yoshihiro; Eguchi, Yutaka

    2016-09-01

    Cervical lymphangioma can cause airway obstruction secondary to enlargement following infection. Physicians should be aware that the airway obstruction can progress rapidly when patients with cervical lymphangioma have respiratory symptoms. Sclerotherapy for lymphangioma can cause both transient swelling and airway obstruction; thus, prophylactic and elective tracheostomy should be considered. PMID:27648270

  2. Design of a mechanism to simulate the quasi-static moment-deflection behaviour of the osteoligamentous structure of the C3-C4 cervical spine segment in the flexion-extension and lateral bending directions.

    PubMed

    Chen, Samuel; Arsenault, Marc; Moglo, Kodjo

    2012-11-01

    The human neck is susceptible to traumatic injuries due to impacts as well as chronic injuries caused by loads such as those attributed to the wearing of heavy headgear. To facilitate the analysis of the loads that cause injuries to the cervical spine, it is possible to replicate the human neck's behaviour with mechanical devices. The goal of this work is to lay the foundation for the eventual development of a novel mechanism used to simulate the behaviour of the cervical spine during laboratory experiments. The research presented herein focuses on the design of a mechanism capable of reproducing the non-linear relationships between moments applied to the C3 vertebra and its corresponding rotations with respect to the C4 vertebra. The geometrical and mechanical properties of the mechanism are optimized based on the ability of the latter to replicate the load-deflection profile of the osteoligamentous structure of the C3-C4 vertebral pair in the flexion-extension and lateral bending directions. The results show that the proposed design concept is capable of faithfully replicating the non-linear behaviour of the motion segment within acceptable tolerances.

  3. A methodological approach for the biomechanical cause analysis of golf-related lumbar spine injuries.

    PubMed

    Sim, Taeyong; Jang, Dong-Jin; Oh, Euichaul

    2014-01-01

    A new methodological approach employing mechanical work (MW) determination and relative portion of its elemental analysis was applied to investigate the biomechanical causes of golf-related lumbar spine injuries. Kinematic and kinetic parameters at the lumbar and lower limb joints were measured during downswing in 18 golfers. The MW at the lumbar joint (LJ) was smaller than at the right hip but larger than the MWs at other joints. The contribution of joint angular velocity (JAV) to MW was much greater than that of net muscle moment (NMM) at the LJ, whereas the contribution of NMM to MW was greater rather than or similar to that of JAV at other joints. Thus, the contribution of JAV to MW is likely more critical in terms of the probability of golf-related injury than that of NMM. The MW-based golf-related injury index (MWGII), proposed as the ratio of the contribution of JAV to MW to that of NMM, at the LJ (1.55) was significantly greater than those at other joints ( < 1.05). This generally corresponds to the most frequent occurrence of golf-related injuries around the lumbar spine. Therefore, both MW and MWGII should be considered when investigating the biomechanical causes of lumbar spine injuries.

  4. Increased spasticity from a fracture in the baclofen catheter caused by Charcot spine: case report.

    PubMed

    Ravindra, Vijay M; Ray, Wilson Z; Sayama, Christina M; Dailey, Andrew T

    2015-04-01

    In patients with Charcot spine, a loss of normal feedback response from the insensate spine results in spinal neuropathy. Increasing deformity, which can manifest as sitting imbalance, crepitus, or increased back pain, can result. We present the case of a patient with a high-thoracic spinal cord injury (SCI) who subsequently developed a Charcot joint at the T10-11 level that resulted in a dramatic increase in previously controlled spasticity after fracture of an existing baclofen catheter. The 68-year-old man with T4 paraplegia presented with increasing baclofen requirements and radiographic evidence of fracture of the intrathecal baclofen catheter with an associated Charcot joint with extensive bony destruction. The neuropathic spinal arthropathy caused mechanical baclofen catheter malfunction and resulting increased spasticity. The patient was found to have transected both his spinal cord and the baclofen catheter. Treatment consisted of removal of the catheter and stabilization with long-segment instrumentation and fusion from T6 to L2. Follow-up radiographs obtained a year and a half after surgery showed no evidence of hardware failure or significant malalignment. The patient has experienced resolution of symptoms and does not require oral or intrathecal baclofen. This is the only reported case of a Charcot spine causing intrathecal catheter fracture, leading to increased spasticity. This noteworthy case suggests that late spinal instability should be considered in the setting of SCI and increased spasticity.

  5. Recessive ACTA1 variant causes congenital muscular dystrophy with rigid spine.

    PubMed

    O'Grady, Gina L; Best, Heather A; Oates, Emily C; Kaur, Simranpreet; Charlton, Amanda; Brammah, Susan; Punetha, Jaya; Kesari, Akanchha; North, Kathryn N; Ilkovski, Biljana; Hoffman, Eric P; Clarke, Nigel F

    2015-06-01

    Variants in ACTA1, which encodes α-skeletal actin, cause several congenital myopathies, most commonly nemaline myopathy. Autosomal recessive variants comprise approximately 10% of ACTA1 myopathy. All recessive variants reported to date have resulted in loss of skeletal α-actin expression from muscle and severe weakness from birth. Targeted next-generation sequencing in two brothers with congenital muscular dystrophy with rigid spine revealed homozygous missense variants in ACTA1. Skeletal α-actin expression was preserved in these patients. This report expands the clinical and histological phenotype of ACTA1 disease to include congenital muscular dystrophy with rigid spine and dystrophic features on muscle biopsy. This represents a new class of recessive ACTA1 variants, which do not abolish protein expression. PMID:25182138

  6. A Biomechanical Comparison of Intralaminar C7 Screw Constructs with and without Offset Connector Used for C6-7 Cervical Spine Immobilization : A Finite Element Study

    PubMed Central

    Qasim, Muhammad; Natarajan, Raghu N.; An, Howard S.

    2013-01-01

    Objective The offset connector can allow medial and lateral variability and facilitate intralaminar screw incorporation into the construct. The aim of this study was to compare the biomechanical characteristics of C7 intralaminar screw constructs with and without offset connector using a three dimensional finite element model of a C6-7 cervical spine segment. Methods Finite element models representing C7 intralaminar screw constructs with and without the offset connector were developed. Range of motion (ROM) and maximum von Mises stresses in the vertebra for the two techniques were compared under pure moments in flexion, extension, lateral bending and axial rotation. Results ROM for intralaminar screw construct with offset connector was less than the construct without the offset connector in the three principal directions. The maximum von Misses stress was observed in the C7 vertebra around the pedicle in both constructs. Maximum von Mises stress in the construct without offset connector was found to be 12-30% higher than the corresponding stresses in the construct with offset connector in the three principal directions. Conclusion This study demonstrated that the intralaminar screw fixation with offset connector is better than the construct without offset connector in terms of biomechanical stability. Construct with the offset connector reduces the ROM of C6-7 segment more significantly compared to the construct without the offset connector and causes lower stresses around the C7 pedicle-vertebral body complex. PMID:24003366

  7. Hyperthyroidism caused by a toxic intrathoracic goiter with a normal-sized cervical thyroid gland

    SciTech Connect

    Prakash, R.; Lakshmipathi, N.; Jena, A.; Behari, V.; Chopra, M.K.

    1986-09-01

    The rare presentation of hyperthyroidism caused by an intrathoracic goiter with a normal-sized cervical thyroid gland is described. The toxic intrathoracic goiter demonstrated avid uptake of (/sup 131/I) and (99mTc)pertechnetate, with comparatively faint isotopic accumulation seen in the cervical thyroid. A chest roentgenogram and radioisotope scan should be mandatory in cases of hyperthyroidism having no cervical thyroid enlargement to explore the possibility of a toxic intrathoracic goiter.

  8. Three-dimensional assessment of the intervertebral kinematics after Mobi-C total disc replacement at the cervical spine in vivo using the EOS stereoradiography system

    PubMed Central

    Rousseau, Marc-Antoine; Laporte, Sébastien; Dufour, Thierry; Steib, Jean-Paul; Lazennec, Jean-Yves; Skalli, Wafa

    2011-01-01

    Background Because 3-dimensional computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging analysis of the spinal architecture is done with the patient in the supine position, stereoradiography may be more clinically relevant for the measurement of the relative displacements of the cervical vertebrae in vivo in the upright position. The innovative EOS stereoradiography system was used for measuring the relative angular displacements of the cervical vertebrae in a limited population to determine its feasibility. The precision and accuracy of the method were investigated. Methods In 9 patients with 16 Mobi-C prostheses (LDR Medical, Troyes, France) and 12 healthy subjects, EOS stereoradiography of the lower cervical spine (C3-7) was performed in the neutral upright position of the neck, flexion, extension, left and right lateral bending, and left and right axial rotation. The angular displacements were measured from the neutral position to every other posture. The random error was studied in terms of reproducibility. In addition, an in vitro protocol was performed in 6 specimens to investigate accuracy. Results The reproducibility and the accuracy variables varied similarly between 1.2° and 3.2° depending on the axis and direction of rotation under consideration. The Mobi-C group showed less mobility than the control group, whereas the pattern of coupling was similar. Conclusions Overall, the feasibility of dynamic EOS stereoradiography was shown. The prosthesis replicates the pattern of motion of the normal cervical spine. PMID:25802670

  9. Posterior cervical spine arthrodesis with laminar screws: a report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Nakanishi, Kazuo; Tanaka, Masato; Sugimoto, Yoshihisa; Ozaki, Toshifumi

    2007-04-01

    We performed fixation using laminar screws in 2 patients in whom lateral mass screws, pedicle screws or transarticular screws could not be inserted. One was a 56-year-old woman who had anterior atlantoaxial subluxation (AAS). When a guide wire was inserted using an imaging guide, the hole bled massively. We thought the re-insertion of a guide wire or screw would thus increase the risk of vascular injury, so we used laminar screws. The other case was an 18-year-old man who had a hangman fracture. Preoperative magnetic resonance angiography showed occlusion of the left vertebral artery. A laminar screw was inserted into the patent side (i.e., the right side of C2). Cervical pedicle screws are the most biomechanically stable screws. However, their use carries a high risk of neurovascular complications during screw insertion, because the cervical pedicle is small and is adjacent laterally to the vertebral artery, medially to the spinal cord, and vertically to the nerve roots. Lateral mass screws are also reported to involve a risk of neurovascular injuries. The laminar screw method was thus thought to be useful, since arterial injuries could thus be avoided and it could also be used as a salvage modality for the previous misinsertion. PMID:17471313

  10. Osteochondroma Arising from Anterior Inferior Iliac Spine as a Cause of Snapping Hip

    PubMed Central

    Rhyu, Kee Hyung; Cho, Kye-Youl; Cho, Young Joo; Lee, Chung Seok; Han, Chung Soo

    2016-01-01

    Snapping hip syndrome is a relatively common problem that can be easily managed with conservative treatment. This syndrome can be divided into external, internal and intra-articular types. Internal snapping hip syndrome is the rarest amongst these and its etiology is not well understood. We report a unique case of osteochondroma arising from the anterior inferior iliac spine (AIIS), which caused the internal snapping hip syndrome with hip pain and restriction of activity. This rare case of snapping hip syndrome from the AIIS was treated surgically and the symptoms completely disappeared after excision of the tumor. PMID:26929811

  11. Cervical Lymphadenitis Caused by Group D Non-typhoidal Salmonella Associated with Concomitant Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Seungjin; Cho, Sun Young; Kim, Jungok; Chung, Doo Ryeon; Peck, Kyong Ran; Song, Jae-Hoon; Park, Kyung Sun; Lee, Nam Yong; Kim, Seok Jin

    2013-01-01

    Non-typhoidal Salmonella species are important foodborne pathogens that can cause gastroenteritis, bacteremia, and subsequent focal infections. Non-typhoidal salmonellosis is problematic, particularly in immunocompromised hosts. Any anatomical site can be affected by this pathogen via hematogenous seeding and may develop local infections. However, cervical lymphadenitis caused by non-typhoidal Salmonella species is rarely reported. Herein, we have reported a case of cervical lymphadenitis caused by group D non-typhoidal Salmonella associated with lymphoma. PMID:24265973

  12. Intraneuronal APP and extracellular Aβ independently cause dendritic spine pathology in transgenic mouse models of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Zou, Chengyu; Montagna, Elena; Shi, Yuan; Peters, Finn; Blazquez-Llorca, Lidia; Shi, Song; Filser, Severin; Dorostkar, Mario M; Herms, Jochen

    2015-06-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is thought to be caused by accumulation of amyloid-β protein (Aβ), which is a cleavage product of amyloid precursor protein (APP). Transgenic mice overexpressing APP have been used to recapitulate amyloid-β pathology. Among them, APP23 and APPswe/PS1deltaE9 (deltaE9) mice are extensively studied. APP23 mice express APP with Swedish mutation and develop amyloid plaques late in their life, while cognitive deficits are observed in young age. In contrast, deltaE9 mice with mutant APP and mutant presenilin-1 develop amyloid plaques early but show typical cognitive deficits in old age. To unveil the reasons for different progressions of cognitive decline in these commonly used mouse models, we analyzed the number and turnover of dendritic spines as important structural correlates for learning and memory. Chronic in vivo two-photon imaging in apical tufts of layer V pyramidal neurons revealed a decreased spine density in 4-5-month-old APP23 mice. In age-matched deltaE9 mice, in contrast, spine loss was only observed on cortical dendrites that were in close proximity to amyloid plaques. In both cases, the reduced spine density was caused by decreased spine formation. Interestingly, the patterns of alterations in spine morphology differed between these two transgenic mouse models. Moreover, in APP23 mice, APP was found to accumulate intracellularly and its content was inversely correlated with the absolute spine density and the relative number of mushroom spines. Collectively, our results suggest that different pathological mechanisms, namely an intracellular accumulation of APP or extracellular amyloid plaques, may lead to spine abnormalities in young adult APP23 and deltaE9 mice, respectively. These distinct features, which may represent very different mechanisms of synaptic failure in AD, have to be taken into consideration when translating results from animal studies to the human disease. PMID:25862638

  13. Can intraoperative neurophysiologic monitoring during cervical spine decompression predict post-operative segmental C5 palsy?

    PubMed Central

    Blaskiewicz, Donald J.; Ramirez, Bertha; Zhang, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Background C5 nerve root palsy is a known complication after cervical laminectomy or laminoplasty, characterized by weakness of the deltoid and bicep brachii muscles. The efficacy of intraoperative monitoring of these muscles is currently unclear. In the current prospective study, intraoperative monitoring through somatosensory (SSEPs), motor (TcMEPs) evoked potentials and real-time electromyography activity (EMG) were analyzed for their ability to detect or prevent deltoid muscle weakness after surgery. Methods One hundred consecutive patients undergoing laminectomy/laminoplasty with or without fusion were enrolled. Intraoperative SSEPs, TcMEPs and EMGs from each patient were studied and analyzed. Results Intraoperative EMG activity of the C5 nerve root was detected in 34 cases, 10 of which demonstrated a sustained and repetitive EMG activity lasting 5 or more minutes. Paresis of the unilateral deltoid muscle developed in 5 patients, all from the group with sustained C5 EMG activity. None of the patients with weakness of deltoid muscle after surgery demonstrated any abnormal change in TcMEP or SSEP. Conclusions Real-time EMG recordings were sensitive to C5 nerve root irritation, whilst SSEPs and TcMEPs were not. Sustained EMG activity of the C5 nerve root during surgery is a possible warning sign of irritation or injury to the nerve. PMID:27757428

  14. Comparison of intubation times using a manikin with an immobilized cervical spine: Macintosh laryngoscope vs. GlideScope vs. fiberoptic bronchoscope

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Jung-In; Ha, Sang Ook; Koo, Min Seok; Kwon, Miyoung; Kim, Jieun; Jeon, Jin; Park, So Hee; Shim, Sangwoo; Chang, Youjin; Park, Taejin

    2015-01-01

    Objective Airway management in patients with suspected cervical spine injury is classified as a “difficult airway.” The best device for managing difficult airways is not known. Therefore, we conducted an intubation study simulating patients with cervical spine injury using three devices: a conventional Macintosh laryngoscope, a video laryngoscope (GlideScope), and a fiberoptic bronchoscope (MAF-TM). Success rates, intubation time, and complication rates were compared. Methods Nine physician experts in airway management participated in this study. Cervical immobilization was used to simulate a difficult airway. Each participant performed intubation using airway devices in a randomly chosen order. We measured the time to vocal cord visualization, time to endotracheal tube insertion, and total tracheal intubation time. Success rates and dental injury rates were compared between devices. Results Total tracheal intubation time using the Macintosh laryngoscope, GlideScope, and fiberoptic bronchoscope was 13.3 (range, 11.1 to 20.1), 14.9 (range, 12.7 to 22.3), and 19.4 seconds (range, 14.1 to 32.5), respectively. Total tracheal intubation time differed significantly among the devices (P=0.009). Success rates for the Macintosh laryngoscope, GlideScope, and fiberoptic bronchoscope were 98%, 96%, and 100%, respectively, and dental injury rates were 5%, 19%, and 0%, respectively. Conclusion The fiberoptic bronchoscope required longer intubation times than the other devices. However, this device had the best success rate with the least incidence of dental injury. PMID:27752604

  15. The Qualification of Outcome after Cervical Spine Surgery by Patients Compared to the Neck Disability Index

    PubMed Central

    Donk, Roland; Verbeek, Andre; Verhagen, Wim; Groenewoud, Hans; Hosman, Allard

    2016-01-01

    Objective The Neck Disability Index (NDI) is a patient self-assessed outcome measurement tool to assess disability, and that is frequently used to evaluate the effects of the treatment of neck-related problems. In individualized medicine it is mandatory that patients can interpret data in order to choose a treatment. A change of NDI or an absolute NDI is generally meaningless to a patient. Therefore, a correlation between the qualification of the clinical situation rated by the patient and the NDI score was evaluated. Methods Patients who completed an NDI after anterior surgery because of symptomatic single level degenerative cervical disc disease were asked one month after completion of the NDI to qualify their clinical situation of a 5-item Likert scale varying from excellent to bad. Since a clear distinction between the categories was not possible based on the total NDI score, a ROC-curve was built, and the AUC computed in order to estimate best dichotomization in qualification of the clinical situation. The best corresponding cut-off point for the NDI total score was found by studying sensitivity and specificity for all possible cut-off points. Results 102 patients were included. The highest AUC was obtained by dichotomizing the qualification into a group with good outcome and less-good outcome. The highest sensitivity and specificity for the dichotomized qualification as good outcome corresponded to a NDI ≤ 7. Sensitivity was 81.08% and specificity was 78.57%. Conclusion This is the first study that correlated the qualification of the situation by the patients themselves and NDI. An NDI ≤ 7 corresponded to a good outcome according to the patients. This is valuable information to inform patients in their decision for any treatment. PMID:27551964

  16. Iliac crest autograft versus alternative constructs for anterior cervical spine surgery: Pros, cons, and costs

    PubMed Central

    Epstein, Nancy E.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Grafting choices available for performing anterior cervical diskectomy/fusion (ACDF) procedures have become a major concern for spinal surgeons, and their institutions. The “gold standard”, iliac crest autograft, may still be the best and least expensive grafting option; it deserves to be reassessed along with the pros, cons, and costs for alternative grafts/spacers. Methods: Although single or multilevel ACDF have utilized iliac crest autograft for decades, the implant industry now offers multiple alternative grafting and spacer devices; (allografts, cages, polyether-etherketone (PEEK) amongst others). While most studies have focused on fusion rates and clinical outcomes following ACDF, few have analyzed the “value-added” of these various constructs (e.g. safety/efficacy, risks/complications, costs). Results: The majority of studies document 95%-100% fusion rates when iliac crest autograft is utilized to perform single level ACDF (X-ray or CT confirmed at 6-12 postoperative months). Although many allograft studies similarly quote 90%-100% fusion rates (X-ray alone confirmed at 6-12 postoperative months), a recent “post hoc analysis of data from a prospective multicenter trial” (Riew KD et. al., CSRS Abstract Dec. 2011; unpublished) revealed a much higher delayed fusion rate using allografts at one year 55.7%, 2 years 87%, and four years 92%. Conclusion: Iliac crest autograft utilized for single or multilevel ACDF is associated with the highest fusion, lowest complication rates, and significantly lower costs compared with allograft, cages, PEEK, or other grafts. As spinal surgeons and institutions become more cost conscious, we will have to account for the “value added” of these increasingly expensive graft constructs. PMID:22905321

  17. Melanotic schwannoma of the cervical spine progressing with pulmonary metastasis: case report.

    PubMed

    Faria, Mário Henrique Girão; Dória-Netto, Ricardo Henrique; Osugue, Gustavo Jun; Queiroz, Luciano de Souza; Chaddad-Neto, Feres Eduardo

    2013-01-01

    Melanotic schwannoma (MS) is an unusual variant of nerve sheath neoplasm. Only 10% of these tumors will undergo malignant degeneration, with exceedingly rare reported metastasis. We present a 32-year-old woman with a 6-month history of cervical pain and left arm progressive weakness. Neurological examination showed a left upper limb radicular pain, with pyramidal syndrome at C5 level. The magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) study highlighted an intradural extramedullary heterogeneous mass along the spinal cord at the C4-C5 level, slightly hyperintense with T1 and hypointense with T2-weighted sequences, invading the left neural foramen. The patient underwent C3-C5 laminectomy with total resection of a black tumor. In the postoperative period, a patent deficit of shoulder abduction ensued related to the nervous section. Microscopically, compactly fascicles of spindle-shaped cells with pleomorphic and hypercromatic nuclei, dark brown intracellular pigments, as well as some mitotic figures were seen. Immunohistochemical stains for S-100, Human Melanoma Black-45 (HMB-45), and vimentin were positive, with Ki-67 Labelling Index (LI) of 15% compatible with MS. Six months after radiotherapy she presents local recurrence and lung metastatic dissemination of the MS. She underwent left pulmonary segmentectomy, followed by chemotherapy and radiosurgery. The patient developed a febrile neutropenia and worsening of general status, and died after 3 months due to respiratory complications. MS are rare tumors with potential for local recurrence and distal metastasis. Complete surgical resection remains as the treatment of choice, once the uncommon cases with malignant progression shows low response to chemo and radiotherapy. PMID:24077273

  18. Assessing Incidence and Risk Factors of Cervical Spine Injury in Blunt Trauma Patients Using the National Trauma Data Bank.

    PubMed

    Young, Andrew J; Wolfe, Luke; Tinkoff, Glenn; Duane, Therese M

    2015-09-01

    Despite the potentially devastating impact of missed cervical spine injuries (CI), there continues to be a large disparity in how institutions attempt to make the diagnosis. To better streamline the approach among institutions, understanding incidence and risk factors across the country is paramount. We evaluated the incidence and risk factors of CI using the National Trauma Databank for 2008 and 2009. We performed a retrospective review of the National Trauma Databank for 2008 and 2009 comparing patients with and without CI. We then performed subset analysis separating injury by patients with and without fracture and ligamentous injury. There were a total of 591,138 patients included with a 6.2 per cent incidence of CI. Regression found that age, Injury Severity Score, alcohol intoxication, and specific mechanisms of motor vehicle crash (MVC), motorcycle crash (MCC), fall, pedestrian stuck, and bicycle were independent risk factors for overall injury (P < 0.0001). Patients with CI had longer intensive care unit (8.5 12.5 vs 5.1 7.7) and hospital lengths of stay (days) (9.6 14.2 vs 5.3 8.1) and higher mortality (1.2 per cent vs 0.3%), compared with those without injury (P < 0.0001). There were 33,276 patient with only fractures for an incidence of 5.6 per cent and 1875 patients with ligamentous injury. Just over 6 per cent of patients suffer some form of CI after blunt trauma with the majority being fractures. Higher Injury Severity Score and MVC were consistent risk factors in both groups. This information will assist in devising an algorithm for clearance that can be used nationally allowing for more consistency among trauma providers. PMID:26350665

  19. Comparison of Hybrid Constructs with 2-Level Artificial Disc Replacement and 2-Level Anterior Cervical Discectomy and Fusion for Surgical Reconstruction of the Cervical Spine: A Kinematic Study in Whole Cadavers

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Baoge; Zeng, Zheng; Van Hoof, Tom; Kalala, Jean Pierre; Liu, Zhenyu; Wu, Bingxuan

    2015-01-01

    Background Multi-level cervical degeneration of the spine is a common clinical pathology that is often repaired by anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF). The aim of this study was to investigate the kinematics of the cervical spine after hybrid surgery compared with 2-level ACDF. Material/Methods Five freshly frozen, unembalmed whole human cadavers were used including 3 males and 2 females with a mean age of 51±8 years. After evaluating the intact spine for range of motion (ROM), sagittal alignment and instantaneous center of rotation (ICR), each cadaver underwent 4 consecutive surgeries: 2-level artificial disc replacement (ADR) from C4 to C6 (ADR surgery); 2-level ACDF from C4 to C6 (ACDF surgery); hybrid C4–5 ACDF and C5–6 ADR (ACDF+ADR surgery); and hybrid C4–5 ADR and C5–6 ACDF (ADR+ACDF surgery). The ROM and ICR of adjacent intact segments (C3–4; C6–7), and whole sagittal alignment were revaluated. Results Two-level ACDF resulted in increased ROM at C3–4 and C6–7 compared with intact spine. ROM was significantly different to intact spine using ACDF surgery at C3–C4 and C6–C7 and ROM was increased with ACDF+ADR surgery at C6–C7 (all P<0.05). No improvement in sagittal alignment was observed with any approach. The localization of the ICR shifted upwards and anteriorly at C3–C4 after reconstruction. ICR changes at C3–C4 were greatest for ADR+ACDF surgery and were significantly different to ACDF surgery (P<0.05), but not between ADR surgery and ACDF+ADR surgery. At C6–C7, the ICR was more posterior and superior than in the intact condition. The greatest change in ICR was observed in ACDF surgery at the C6–C7 level, significantly different from the other groups (P<0.05). Conclusions For 2-level reconstruction, hybrid surgery and ADR did not alter ROM and minimally changed ICR at the adjacent-level. The type of surgery had a significant impact on the ICR location. This suggests that hybrid surgery may be a viable option for 2

  20. Stent-Graft Repair of a Large Cervical Internal Carotid Artery Pseudoaneurysm Causing Dysphagia

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, Vivek Niranjan, Khandelwal; Rawat, Lokesh; Gupta, A. K.

    2009-05-15

    Pseudoaneurysms of the cervical internal carotid artery (ICA) are rare and most frequently result from trauma, infection, or sometimes spontaneously. They have the potential to cause life-threatening hemorrhage; thus, their immediate management is necessary. Endovascular treatment by stent graft placement in the affected artery appears to be a safe and effective treatment option. We present a case of a child who presented with neck swelling and dysphagia caused by a ruptured cervical ICA pseudoaneurysm which was managed by stent graft placement.

  1. Symptomatic Anterior Cervical Osteophyte Causing Dysphagia: Case Report, Imaging, and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Sung, Kwang; Tharin, Suzanne

    2016-01-01

    Anterior cervical osteophytes are found in 20-30% of elderly patients. Rarely, severe osteophytes can cause dysphagia, dysphonia, and dyspnea. Here, we illustrate a case of severe dysphagia caused by a large post-traumatic osteophyte with oropharyngeal swallow study showing a significant mass effect on the pharynx and resolution following osteophytectomy. We also review the literature regarding the etiology, diagnosis, and treatment of symptomatic anterior cervical osteophytes.  PMID:27004150

  2. SU-E-I-51: Use of Blade Sequences in Cervical Spine MR Imaging for Eliminating Motion, Truncation and Flow Artifacts

    SciTech Connect

    Mavroidis, P; Lavdas, E; Kostopoulos, S; Ninos, C; Strikou, A; Glotsos, D; Vlachopoulou, A; Oikonomou, G; Economopoulos, N; Roka, V; Sakkas, G; Tsagkalis, A; Batsikas, G; Statkahis, S; Papanikolaou, N

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To assess the efficacy of the BLADE technique to eliminate motion, truncation, flow and other artifacts in Cervical Spine MRI compared to the conventional technique. To study the ability of the examined sequences to reduce the indetention and wrap artifacts, which have been reported in BLADE sagittal sequences. Methods: Forty consecutive subjects, who had been routinely scanned for cervical spine examination using four different image acquisition techniques, were analyzed. More specifically, the following pairs of sequences were compared: a) T2 TSE SAG vs. T2 TSE SAG BLADE and b) T2 TIRM SAG vs. T2 TIRM SAG BLADE. A quantitative analysis was performed using the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) and relative contrast (ReCon) measures. A qualitative analysis was also performed by two radiologists, who graded seven image characteristics on a 5-point scale (0:non-visualization; 1:poor; 2:average; 3:good; 4:excellent). The observers also evaluated the presence of image artifacts (motion, truncation, flow, indentation). Results: Based on the findings of the quantitative analysis, the ReCON values of the CSF (cerebrospinal fluid)/SC (spinal cord) between TIRM SAG and TIRM SAG BLADE were found to present statistical significant differences (p<0.001). Regarding motion and truncation artifacts, the T2 TSE SAG BLADE was superior compared to the T2 TSE SAG and the T2 TIRM SAG BLADE was superior compared to the T2 TIRM SAG. Regarding flow artifacts, T2 TIRM SAG BLADE eliminated more artifacts compared to the T2 TIRM SAG. Conclusion: The use of BLADE sequences in cervical spine MR examinations appears to be capable of potentially eliminating motion, pulsatile flow and trancation artifacts. Furthermore, BLADE sequences are proposed to be used in the standard examination protocols based on the fact that a significantly improved image quality could be achieved.

  3. Immediate effects of lower cervical spine manipulation on handgrip strength and free-throw accuracy of asymptomatic basketball players: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Humphries, Kelley M.; Ward, John; Coats, Jesse; Nobert, Jeannique; Amonette, William; Dyess, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this pilot study was to collect preliminary information for a study to determine the immediate effects of a single unilateral chiropractic manipulation to the lower cervical spine on handgrip strength and free-throw accuracy in asymptomatic male recreational basketball players. Methods For this study, 24 asymptomatic male recreational right-handed basketball players (age = 26.3 ± 9.2 years, height = 1.81 ± 0.07 m, body mass = 82.6 ± 10.4 kg [mean ± SD]) underwent baseline dominant handgrip isometric strength and free-throw accuracy testing in an indoor basketball court. They were then equally randomized to receive either (1) diversified left lower cervical spine chiropractic manipulative therapy (CMT) at C5/C6 or (2) placebo CMT at C5/C6 using an Activator adjusting instrument on zero force setting. Participants then underwent posttesting of isometric handgrip strength and free-throw accuracy. A paired-samples t test was used to make within-group pre to post comparisons and between-group pre to post comparisons. Results No statistically significant difference was shown between either of the 2 basketball performance variables measured in either group. Isometric handgrip strength marginally improved by 0.7 kg (mean) in the CMT group (P = .710). Free-throw accuracy increased by 13.2% in the CMT group (P = .058). The placebo CMT group performed the same or more poorly during their second test session. Conclusions The results of this preliminary study showed that a single lower cervical spine manipulation did not significantly impact basketball performance for this group of healthy asymptomatic participants. A slight increase in free-throw percentage was seen, which deserves further investigation. This pilot study demonstrates that a larger study to evaluate if CMT affects handgrip strength and free-throw accuracy is feasible. PMID:24396315

  4. Botulinum toxin type A combined with cervical spine manual therapy for masseteric hypertrophy in a patient with Alzheimer-type dementia: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Villafañe, Jorge H.; Fernandez-de-las-Peñas, Cesar; Pillastrini, Paolo

    2012-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this case study is to present the findings of combining botulinum toxin type A (BoNT-A) and cervical spine manual therapy to address masseter muscle spasticity in a patient with Alzheimer-type dementia. Case Report A 78-year-old woman with bilateral spasticity of the masseteric regions for 2 years was referred for physiotherapy. She had trismus and bruxism, and could neither close nor open her mouth normally; thus, she was unable to be fed orally in a normal manner. Intervention and Outcome The patient underwent combined treatment with BoNT-A and cervical spine manual therapy. A medical physician (neurologist) performed the BoNT-A injections into 2 points at the center of the lower third of the masseter muscle. A physical therapist performed manual therapy interventions targeted at the cervical spine. Manual therapy started the day after the BoNT-A injection and continued for 5 sessions per week for a total period of 2 weeks. Clinical outcomes were measured including spasticity (Modified Ashworth Scale), functionality (Barthel Index), and jaw opening. Outcomes were conducted at baseline, 2 weeks after treatment, and at 2-month follow-up session after finishing the treatment. The patient improved in all of the outcomes at the end of treatment, and these results were maintained during the follow-up. After treatment, the patient was able to feed with minimal caregiver dependency because oral feeding was possible. Conclusion The patient in this study responded positively to a combination of BoNT-A and manual therapy, resulting in decreased masseter muscles spasticity and improved trismus and bruxism. PMID:23843761

  5. Clinical decision-making in the management of cervical spine derangement: a case study survey using a patient vignette

    PubMed Central

    Hahn, Tracy; Kelly, Christina; Murphy, Erin; Whissel, Paul; Brown, Michael; Schenk, Ron

    2014-01-01

    Background: Neck pain is one of the most common, potentially disabling, and costly musculoskeletal conditions seen in outpatient physical therapy (PT). Clinical decision-making involves referral or the selection of intervention based on the results of the PT examination. Despite evidence that suggests that treatment based classification is most efficacious, it is hypothesized that examination and intervention may be heavily influenced by post-graduate training experiences. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to analyze which tests, measures, and interventions are most commonly selected by physical therapists (PTs) holding a credential from the McKenzie Institute and those holding the McKenzie credential plus the credential of Fellow of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Manual Physical Therapy (FAAOMPT). Their responses were based on a simulated case vignette involving a patient with a presentation of cervical spine disk derangement. Methods: A survey administered through Survey Monkey was sent to 714 members of the McKenzie Institute who are certified or hold a diploma in mechanical diagnosis and therapy (MDT) or these credentials with the addition of Fellowship credentialing (MDT+FAAOMPT). Of the 714 surveyed PTs, 83 completed the survey for a response rate of 11.6%. As the PTs were given further information regarding the patient, they were asked to progress through a clinical decision-making process by indicating their sequence of examination techniques, and then indicating which interventions would be performed based on the results of the examination. Results: A descriptive analysis was conducted to determine the most common sequences chosen by the PTs based on their training. To perform the analysis, only respondents who completed the survey were included: clinicians with MDT credentials, (n = 77), and clinicians with both the MDT and FAAOMPT credentials (MDT+FAAOMPT), (n = 6). Initially, the most common examination chosen regardless of credential

  6. Cine phase-contrast MRI measurement of CSF flow in the cervical spine: a pilot study in patients with spinal cord injury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Negahdar, MJ; Shakeri, M.; McDowell, E.; Wells, J.; Vitaz, T.; Harkema, S.; Amini, A.

    2011-03-01

    MRI velocimetry (also known as phase-contrast MRI) is a powerful tool for quantification of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) flow in various regions of the brain and craniospinal junction and has been accepted as a diagnostic tool to assist with the diagnosis of certain conditions such as hydrocephalus and chiari malformations. Cerebrospinal fluid is continually produced in the ventricles of the brain, flows through the ventricular system and then out and around the brain and spinal cord and is reabsorbed over the convexity of the brain. Any disease process which either impedes the normal pattern of flow or restricts the area where flow occurs can change the pattern of these waveforms with the direction and velocity of flow being determined by the pressure transmitted from the pulsation of the heart and circulation of blood within the central nervous system. Therefore, we hypothesized that phase-contrast MRI could eventually be used as a diagnostic aid in determining the degree of spinal cord compression following injury to the cervical or thoracic spine. In this study, we examined CSF flow in 3 normal subjects and 2 subjects with non-acute injuries in the cervical spine using Cine phasecontrast MRI. CSF flow analysis was performed using an in-house developed software. The flow waveform was calculated in both normal subjects (n=3) as well as subjects with spinal cord injury in the cervical spine (n=2). The bulk flow at C2 was measured to be 0.30 +/- 0.05 cc, at 5 cm distal to C2, it was 0.19+/- 0.07 cc, and at 10 cm distal to C2, it was 0.17+/- 0.05 cc. These results were in good agreement with previously published results. In patients with spinal cord injury, at the site of injury in the cervical spine, bulk flow was found to be 0.08 +/- 0.12 cc, at 5 cm proximal to the site of injury it was found to be 0.18 +/- 0.07 cc, and at 5 cm distal to the site of injury, it was found to be 0.12 +/- 0.01 cc.

  7. Are 20 human papillomavirus types causing cervical cancer?

    PubMed

    Arbyn, Marc; Tommasino, Massimo; Depuydt, Christophe; Dillner, Joakim

    2014-12-01

    In 2012, the International Agency for Research on Cancer concluded that there was consistent and sufficient epidemiological, experimental and mechanistic evidence of carcinogenicity to humans for 12 HPV types (HPV16, HPV18, HPV31, HPV33, HPV35, HPV39, HPV45, HPV51, HPV52, HPV56, HPV58 and HPV59) for cervical cancer. Therefore, these types were considered as 1A carcinogens. They all belong to the family of the α-Papillomaviridae, in particular to the species α5 (HPV51), α6 (HPV56), α7 (HPV18, HPV39, HPV45, HPV59) and α9 (HPV16, HPV31, HPV33, HPV35, HPV52, HPV58). Less evidence is available for a thirteenth type (HPV68, α7), which is classified as a 2A carcinogen (probably carcinogenic). Moreover, seven other phylogenetically related types (HPV26, HPV53, HPV66, HPV67, HPV68, HPV70 and HPV73) were identified as single HPV infections in certain rare cases of cervical cancer and were considered possibly carcinogenic (2B carcinogens). Recently, Halec et al [7] demonstrated that the molecular signature of HPV-induced carcinogenesis (presence of type-specific spliced E6*| mRNA; increased expression of p16; and decreased expression of cyclin D1, p53 and Rb) was similar in cervical cancers containing single infections with one of the eight afore-mentioned 2A or 2B carcinogens to those in cancers with single infections with group 1 carcinogens. Ninety six percent of cervical cancers are attributable to one of the 13 most common HPV types (groups 1 and 2A). Including the additional seven HPV types (group 2B) added 2.6%, to reach a total of 98.7% of all HPV-positive cervical cancers. From recently updated meta-analyses, it was shown that HPV68, HPV26, HPV66, HPV67, HPV73 and HPV82 were significantly more common in cancer cases than in women with normal cervical cytology, suggesting that for these HPV types, an upgrading of the carcinogen classification could be considered. However, there is no need to include them in HPV screening tests or vaccines, given their rarity in

  8. New Erwinia-like organism causing cervical lymphadenitis.

    PubMed

    Shin, Sang Yop; Lee, Mi Young; Song, Jae-Hoon; Ko, Kwan Soo

    2008-09-01

    The first case of cervical lymphadenitis due to infection by a new Erwinia-like organism is reported. The organism was identified initially as Pantoea sp. by a Vitek 2-based assessment but was finally identified as a member of the genus Erwinia by 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis. The isolate displayed 98.9% 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity to that of E. tasmaniensis and showed phenotypic characteristics that were different from other Erwinia species.

  9. [Comparative roentgenographical study on the incidence of ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament and other degenerative changes of the cervical spine among Japanese, Koreans, Americans and Germans (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Izawa, K

    1980-05-01

    Ossification of the posterior longitudinal liagment (OPLL) of the cervical spine which causes narrowing of the spinal canal has been reported to occur in about three percent of adult Japanese, whereas only sporadical cases have been reported outside Japan. Whether this indicates a real ethnic difference of the disease incidence or simply reflects a difference of attention toward this disease has been one of the questions raised by many workers. In order to clarify this, the author reviewed a large number of roentgenograms of the cervical spine in Japan (Juntendo University Hospital), Korea (Sebrance Hospital and Hanko Sacred Heart Hospital), the United States (Mayo Clinic and Dr. Cloward's Office in Hawaii), and West Germany (Mainz University Hospital). The rate of appearance of OPLL was compared between these ethnic groups. In addition to this, the rate of appearance of calcification of the nuchal ligament and other degenerative changes of the cervical spine such as osteophyte formation and narrowing of the intervertebral disc space was also studied and statistically analysed. Results 1. OPLL: The author found OPLL in 143 out of 6,994 (2.06%) Japanese individuals above 20 years of age. The incidence was lower in Koreans being 0.95%. This was much more pronounced and significant in the United States (Mayo Clinic) and in Germany, where only a few cases were found (Table 6). However, it is interesting to note that six cases found at Dr. Cloward's office in Hawaii included two Japanese. The author concludes that the incidence of OPLL is significantly higher in Japanese than in Caucasians, although the reason for this still remains to be studied. 2. Calcification of the nuchal ligament: This calcification (Barsony) was found in 10.2% among Japanese and in 11.3% among Koreans, whereas in 6.1% among Americans and in 4.5% among GErmans (Table 13). The author proposes that this significantly higher incidence of this calcification among Japanese and Koreans may have

  10. Biomechanical stability of a bioabsorbable self-retaining polylactic acid/nano-sized β-tricalcium phosphate cervical spine interbody fusion device in single-level anterior cervical discectomy and fusion sheep models

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Lu; Duan, Ping-Guo; Li, Xi-Lei; Yuan, Feng-Lai; Zhao, Ming-Dong; Che, Wu; Wang, Hui-Ren; Dong, Jian

    2012-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to investigate the biomechanical stability provided by a novel, polylactic acid/nano-sized, β-tricalcium phosphate, bioabsorbable, self-retaining cervical fusion cage (BCFC). Methods Quasistatic nonconstraining torques (maximum 1.5 NM) induced flexion, extension, lateral bending (±1.5 NM), and axial rotation (±1.5 NM) on 32 sheep cervical spines (C2–C5). The motion segment C3–C4 was first tested intact; the following groups were tested after complete discectomy: autologous tricortical iliac crest bone graft, Medtronic–Wego polyetheretherketone (PEEK) cage, Solis PEEK cage, and BCFC. The autologous bone graft group was tested with an anterior plate. The mean range of motion (ROM) was calculated from the load-displacement curves. Results BCFC significantly decreased ROM in lateral bending and axial rotation compared to other implants, and no significant difference in ROM between two types of PEEK cages and BCFC could be observed in flexion and extension. Anterior cervical plate (ACP) significantly decreased ROM in flexion and extension, but no significant difference in ROM between BCFC and bone graft plus ACP could be determined in lateral bending and axial rotation. Conclusion The BCFC device showed better stability to autologous tricortical iliac crest bone graft and PEEK cages in single-level anterior cervical discectomy and fusion models and thus may be a potential alternative to the current PEEK cages. PMID:23226018

  11. Weakness of the neck extensors, possible causes and relation to adolescent idiopathic cervical kyphosis.

    PubMed

    Xiaolong, Shen; Xuhui, Zhou; Jian, Chen; Ye, Tian; Wen, Yuan

    2011-09-01

    Cervical kyphosis may be congenital, or occur as a result of laminectomy, post-traumatic deformity, infection, neuromuscular disorders such as muscular dystrophies, motor neuron disorders such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, tumor, and inflammation such as ankylosing spondylitis. Furthermore, adolescent idiopathic cervical kyphosis was defined as cervical kyphotic deformity of adolescent patient without any cause such as those previously described. As no standard values for "cervical kyphosis" could be found in the literature, many reported studies only report a subjective classification, "kyphotic, straight or lordotic". But this method had proven to be unreliable. Grob et al. defined "straight" for the global curvature as +4° to -4°, and lordotic and kyphotic as <-4° and >+4°, respectively. The etiology and pathogenesis of adolescent idiopathic cervical kyphosis remain little understood. Weakness of the neck extensors can result in "dropped head syndrome", a rare disorder characterized by weakness of neck extensor muscles causing an inability to extend the neck and resulting in a chin-on-chest deformity. The purpose of this paper is to propose a possible mechanical cause leading to the kyphotic deformity. We hypothesize that weakness of the neck extensors could be the initiating factor for adolescent idiopathic cervical kyphosis.

  12. Comparison of the C-MAC(®) and GlideScope(®) videolaryngoscopes in patients with cervical spine disorders and immobilisation.

    PubMed

    Brück, S; Trautner, H; Wolff, A; Hain, J; Mols, G; Pakos, P; Roewer, N; Lange, M

    2015-02-01

    In-line stabilisation of the neck can increase the difficulty of tracheal intubation with direct laryngoscopy. We randomly assigned 56 patients with cervical spine pathology scheduled for elective surgery to tracheal intubation using either the C-MAC(®) (n = 26) or GlideScope(®) (n = 30), when the head and neck were stabilised in-line. There was no significant difference in the median (IQR [range]) intubation times between the C-MAC (19 (14-35 [9-90]) s and the GlideScope (23, (15-32 [8-65]) s. The first-attempt failure rate for the C-MAC was 42% (95% CI 23-63%) compared with 7% (95% CI 1-22%) for the GlideScope, p = 0.002. The laryngeal view was excellent and comparable with both devices, with the C-MAC requiring significantly more attempts and optimising manoeuvers (11 vs 5, respectively, p = 0.04). There were no significant differences in postoperative complaints e.g. sore throat, hoarseness and dysphagia. Both devices provided an excellent glottic view in patients with cervical spine immobilisation, but tracheal intubation was more often successful on the first attempt with the GlideScope.

  13. The Cervical Spine of the American Barn Owl (Tyto furcata pratincola): I. Anatomy of the Vertebrae and Regionalization in Their S-Shaped Arrangement

    PubMed Central

    Krings, Markus; Nyakatura, John A.; Fischer, Martin S.; Wagner, Hermann

    2014-01-01

    Background Owls possess an extraordinary neck and head mobility. To understand this mobility it is necessary to have an anatomical description of cervical vertebrae with an emphasis on those criteria that are relevant for head positioning. No functional description specific to owls is available. Methodology/Principal findings X-ray films and micro-CT scans were recorded from American barn owls (Tyto furcata pratincola) and used to obtain three-dimensional head movements and three-dimensional models of the 14 cervical vertebrae (C1−C14). The diameter of the vertebral canal, the zygapophyseal protrusion, the distance between joint centers, and the pitching angle were quantified. Whereas the first two variables are purely osteological characteristics of single vertebrae, the latter two take into account interactions between vertebrae. These variables change in characteristic ways from cranial to caudal. The vertebral canal is wide in the cranial and caudal neck regions, but narrow in the middle, where both the zygapophyseal protrusion and the distance between joint centers are large. Pitching angles are more negative in the cranial and caudal neck regions than in the middle region. Cluster analysis suggested a complex regionalization. Whereas the borders (C1 and C13/C14) formed stable clusters, the other cervical vertebrae were sorted into 4 or 5 additional clusters. The borders of the clusters were influenced by the variables analyzed. Conclusions/Significance A statistical analysis was used to evaluate the regionalization of the cervical spine in the barn owl. While earlier measurements have shown that there appear to be three regions of flexibility of the neck, our indicators suggest 3–7 regions. These many regions allow a high degree of flexibility, potentially facilitating the large head turns that barn owls are able to make. The cervical vertebral series of other species should also be investigated using statistical criteria to further characterize

  14. Foreign body ingestion: rare cause of cervical abscess.

    PubMed

    Costa, Liliana; Larangeiro, João; Pinto Moura, Carla; Santos, Margarida

    2014-01-01

    IntroduçÉo: A ingestÉo de corpo estranho é um motivo frequente de recurso à urgência hospitalar. As complicações graves, embora raras, incluem perfuraçÉo faringo-esofágica, fistula aorto-esofágica e infecçÉo cervical profunda.Material e Métodos: Foram analisados, retrospectivamente, os casos de ingestÉo de corpo estranho com internamento num hospital terciário, entre 1989 e 2011. Seleccionaram-se os casos complicados por abcesso cervical profundo, descrevendo-se a semiótica, resultados de meios complementares de diagnóstico, terapêutica efectuada e evoluçÉo clínica.Resultados: Dos 1679 casos, 319 referentes a crianças e 1360 a adultos, reportam-se dois casos (0,12%): uma criança, 13 meses, com abcesso retrofaríngeo após ingestÉo de osso de frango e um adulto, 41 anos, com abcesso parafaríngeo após ingestÉo de espinha de peixe. As complicações manifestaram-se quatro e três dias após remoçÉo do corpo estranho, respectivamente. Em ambos foram efectuadas Tomografias Computorizadas cervicais com contraste e drenagem cirúrgica dos abcessos; a criança foi ainda submetida a esofagoscopia rígida para remoçÉo de corpo estranho residual e encerramento da perfuraçÉo esofágica associada.DiscussÉo: Os abcessos cervicais sÉo uma complicaçÉo possível da ingestÉo de corpo estranho e constituem um desafio diagnóstico, principalmente em idade pediátrica. A manipulaçÉo esofágica prévia por fibroscopia poderá ser considerada um factor de risco. A imagiologia (Tomografia Computorizada cervical com contraste ou Resson'ncia Magnética Cervical) foi essencial para o diagnóstico e o planeamento cirúrgico.ConclusÉo: Embora raros, perante a história recente de ingestÉo/remoçÉo de corpo estranho esofágico e a presença de sintomas compatíveis, os abcessos cervicais devem ser tidos em consideraçÉo, dado o potencial de morbilidade e mortalidade na ausência de uma abordagem terapêutica adequada.

  15. Unusual cause of neck pain: septic arthritis of a cervical facet.

    PubMed

    Jones, Jaime L; Ernst, Amy A

    2012-11-01

    Neck pain is a common cause for presentation to an emergency department. Most causes are benign and often secondary to arthritis or injuries. We present a case of septic cervical facet arthritis, a very rare cause of neck pain. The clinical presentation of septic cervical facet arthritis includes fever, neck pain that is often unilateral that is worse with movement, nerve root symptoms, and radiation of pain to the shoulder. Consequences may be severe and include joint destruction and infection progression. Symptoms may be indolent, and a high index of suspicion is necessary to make this diagnosis.

  16. The Effect of the PEEK Cage on the Cervical Lordosis in Patients Undergoing Anterior Cervical Discectomy

    PubMed Central

    Gulsen, Salih

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Loss of cervical lordosis is a significant factor in the development of degeneration of the spine with aging. This degenerative changings of the cervical spine would cause pressure effect on the cervical root and/or medulla spinalis. AIM: Our goal is to understand the effect of the PEEK cage on cervical lordosis in the early postoperative period. Also, to interpret the effects of one- level, two- level, three-level and four- level disc pathologies on cervical lordosis. MATERIAL AND METHODS: We retrospectively investigated our archive, and we selected thirty-four patients undergoing anterior cervical discectomy and fusion with PEEK cage filled with demineralized bone matrix (ACDFP). RESULTS: We determined that ACDFP provides improvement in the cervical lordosis angle in both groups. Also, we found statistically significant difference between group 1 and 2 regarding causes of radiculomyelopathy statistically. CONCLUSION: We achieved better cervical lordotic angles at the postoperative period by implanting one-level, two-level, three-level or four-level PEEK cage filled with demineralized bone matrix. Also, the causes of cervical root and or medulla spinalis impingement were different in group1 and 2. While extruded cervical disc impingement was the first pathology in group 1, osteophyte formation was the first pathology in group 2. PMID:27275224

  17. A Case Report of Locked-in Syndrome Due to Bilateral Vertebral Artery Dissection After Cervical Spine Manipulation Treated by Arterial Embolectomy

    PubMed Central

    Ke, Jiang-Qiong; Yin, Bo; Fu, Fang-Wang; Shao, Sheng-Min; Lin, Yan; Dong, Qi-Qiang; Wang, Xiao-Tong; Zheng, Guo-Qing

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Cervical spine manipulation (CSM) is a commonly spinal manipulative therapies for the relief of cervical spine-related conditions worldwide, but its use remains controversial. CSM may carry the potential for serious neurovascular complications, primarily due to vertebral artery dissection (VAD) and subsequent vertebrobasilar stroke. Here, we reported a rare case of locked-in syndrome (LIS) due to bilaterial VAD after CSM treated by arterial embolectomy. A 36-year-old right-handed man was admitted to our hospital with numbness and weakness of limbs after treating with CSM for neck for half an hour. Gradually, although the patient remained conscious, he could not speak but could communicate with the surrounding by blinking or moving his eyes, and turned to complete quadriplegia, complete facial and bulbar palsy, dyspnea at 4 hours after admission. He was diagnosed with LIS. Then, the patient was received cervical and brain computed tomography angiography that showed bilateral VAD. Aortocranial digital subtraction angiography showed vertebrobasilar thrombosis, blocking left vertebral artery, and stenosis of right vertebral artery. The patient was treated by using emergency arterial embolectomy and followed by antiplatelet therapy and supportive therapy in the intensive care unit and a general ward. Twenty-seven days later, the patient's physical function gradually improved and discharged but still left neurological deficit with muscle strength grade 3/5 and hyperreflexia of limbs. Our findings suggested that CSM might have potential severe side-effect like LIS due to bilaterial VAD, and arterial embolectomy is an important treatment choice. The practitioner must be aware of this complication and should give the patients informed consent to CSM, although not all stroke cases temporally related to SCM have pre-existing craniocervical artery dissection. PMID:26844510

  18. Cervical spine CT scan

    MedlinePlus

    ... type of contrast given into a vein contains iodine. If a person with an iodine allergy is given this type of contrast, nausea ... steroids before the test. The kidneys help remove iodine out of the body. People with kidney disease ...

  19. Ecological causes of morphological evolution in the three-spined stickleback

    PubMed Central

    Spence, Rowena; Wootton, Robert J; Barber, Iain; Przybylski, Mirosław; Smith, Carl

    2013-01-01

    The central assumption of evolutionary theory is that natural selection drives the adaptation of populations to local environmental conditions, resulting in the evolution of adaptive phenotypes. The three-spined stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus) displays remarkable phenotypic variation, offering an unusually tractable model for understanding the ecological mechanisms underpinning adaptive evolutionary change. Using populations on North Uist, Scotland we investigated the role of predation pressure and calcium limitation on the adaptive evolution of stickleback morphology and behavior. Dissolved calcium was a significant predictor of plate and spine morph, while predator abundance was not. Stickleback latency to emerge from a refuge varied with morph, with populations with highly reduced plates and spines and high predation risk less bold. Our findings support strong directional selection in three-spined stickleback evolution, driven by multiple selective agents. PMID:23789080

  20. Occipital Condyle Fracture with Accompanying Meningeal Spinal Cysts as a result of Cervical Spine Injury in 15-Year-Old Girl.

    PubMed

    Wiktor, Łukasz; Tomaszewski, Ryszard

    2015-01-01

    The occipital condyle fracture is rare injury of the craniocervical junction. Meningeal spinal cysts are rare tumors of the spinal cord. Depending on location, these lesions may be classified as extradural and subdural, but extradural spinal cysts are more common. We present the case of a 15-year-old girl who suffered from avulsion occipital condyle fracture treated with use of "halo-vest" system. We established that clinical effect after completed treatment is very good. Control MRI evaluation was performed 12 months after removal of "halo-vest" traction, and clinically silent extradural meningeal spinal cysts were detected at the ventral side of the spinal cord in the cervical segment of the spine. Due to clinically silent course of the disease, we decided to use the conservative treatment. The patient remains under control of our department. PMID:26543656

  1. [Fractures and dislocations of the cervical spine caused by hanging (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Saternus, K S; Messler, H; Palm, W

    1978-09-28

    In comparison to the pattern of lesions of the soft tissue of the neck and the CVC in case of suicidal hanging 17 postmortal fracture-dislocations of the neck are investigated. It could be demonstrated that on principle in case of hanging the dens-fracture can occur. With respect to the hangman's fracture (Wood-Jones) a differentiation into 3 types is proposed.

  2. Does human papillomavirus cause cervical cancer? The state of the epidemiological evidence.

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz, N.; Bosch, X.; Kaldor, J. M.

    1988-01-01

    The human papillomavirus has emerged over the past decade as the leading candidate to be the sexually transmitted aetiological factor in cervical cancer. Although it appears that papillomavirus types 16 and 18 are associated with a higher risk of advanced cervical neoplasia, most of the evidence comes from studies which do not satisfy basic epidemiological requirements, and are therefore difficult to interpret. The most significant problems are the small sample size, potentially biased selection of study subjects, the difficulties in cytologically distinguishing precancerous lesions from papilloma infection of the cervix, the unknown specificity and sensitivity of the various hybridisation methods for determining papillomavirus infection status, and the statistical analyses and presentation of results. On the basis of the existing studies, one is forced to conclude that, while experimental data suggest an oncogenic potential for HPV, the epidemiological evidence implicating it as a cause of cervical neoplasia is still rather limited. PMID:2831924

  3. Effects on the maxilla and cranial base caused by cervical headgear: A longitudinal study

    PubMed Central

    Iglesias-Conde, Carmen; Lorenzo-Pernía, José; Iglesias-Linares, Alejandro; Mendoza-Mendoza, Asunción; Solano-Reina, Enrique

    2012-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study is to test the possible orthopedic effects of cervical headgear on the cranial base and maxilla. Study design: a sample consisting of 79 subjects with skeletal class II malocclusion was divided into two groups. The experimental group was made up of 41 patients all treated with cervical headgear. The control group included a total of 38 non-treated patients. Each one of these groups was then subdivided according to age into one of three groups: prepubescent, pubescent or post-pubescent. Cephalometric parameters were compared in both groups in order to measure the cranial base angle and the vertical and sagittal position of the maxilla. Additionally, cephalometric superimpositions taken at the beginning and end of the study were compared. Results: results revealed significant differences in the cranial base angle and in the SNA angle (p<0.05). However, no differences were observed in the variables that measure the maxillomandibular relationship. While no changes were noted in the palatal plane slope, a flattening of the cranial base was found caused by the cervical headgear, in addition to a retrusion of point A that does not mean there was a reduction in the maxillomandibular relationship. Conclusions: cervical headgear treatment induces cephalometric flattening of the cranial base and a decrease of the SNA angle. Key words:Orthodontics, cervical headgear, class II treatment, cephalometry, superimposition. PMID:22322499

  4. Inter-operator Reliability of Magnetic Resonance Image-Based Computational Fluid Dynamics Prediction of Cerebrospinal Fluid Motion in the Cervical Spine.

    PubMed

    Martin, Bryn A; Yiallourou, Theresia I; Pahlavian, Soroush Heidari; Thyagaraj, Suraj; Bunck, Alexander C; Loth, Francis; Sheffer, Daniel B; Kröger, Jan Robert; Stergiopulos, Nikolaos

    2016-05-01

    For the first time, inter-operator dependence of MRI based computational fluid dynamics (CFD) modeling of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) in the cervical spinal subarachnoid space (SSS) is evaluated. In vivo MRI flow measurements and anatomy MRI images were obtained at the cervico-medullary junction of a healthy subject and a Chiari I malformation patient. 3D anatomies of the SSS were reconstructed by manual segmentation by four independent operators for both cases. CFD results were compared at nine axial locations along the SSS in terms of hydrodynamic and geometric parameters. Intraclass correlation (ICC) assessed the inter-operator agreement for each parameter over the axial locations and coefficient of variance (CV) compared the percentage of variance for each parameter between the operators. Greater operator dependence was found for the patient (0.19 < ICC < 0.99) near the craniovertebral junction compared to the healthy subject (ICC > 0.78). For the healthy subject, hydraulic diameter and Womersley number had the least variance (CV = ~2%). For the patient, peak diastolic velocity and Reynolds number had the smallest variance (CV = ~3%). These results show a high degree of inter-operator reliability for MRI-based CFD simulations of CSF flow in the cervical spine for healthy subjects and a lower degree of reliability for patients with Type I Chiari malformation.

  5. Postural responses without versus with acute external cervical spine fixation: a comparative study in healthy subjects and patients with acute unilateral vestibular loss.

    PubMed

    Bohne, Silvia; Heine, Sabrina; Volk, G Fabian; Stadler, Joachim; Guntinas-Lichius, Orlando

    2013-01-01

    Using a diagnostic prospective cohort single center study design, the influence of a cervical collar on standing balance during dynamic postural perturbations in healthy adults and patients with acute unilateral vestibular dysfunction was measured in 31 healthy subjects and 27 patients with acute unilateral vestibular loss. The main outcome measures were completed standard protocols on the Sensory Organization Test (SOT) and Motor Control Test (MCT) of the NeuroCom Equitest(®) computerized posturography platform measured without and with acute cervical fixation, respectively. Paired t test showed no significant difference during the six conditions of neither the SOT scores nor analyzing the SOT strategies or during the MCT between the non-fixed and fixed neck in healthy subjects and in the patients (all p > 0.05). Older healthy subjects showed decreased SOT scores but equal MCT results. The age effect was more dominant in the patients when wearing the collar. Gender had no influence whether in healthy individuals nor in patients. In almost all conditions of the SOT but only in some MCT subtests patients had significantly lower scores than healthy subjects without collar and with collar (all p < 0.05). In conclusion, the SOT but only some subtest of the MCT could clearly distinguish between healthy adults and patient with acute unilateral vestibular loss. Equilibrium scores did not change significantly when the cervical spine was fixed with a collar. Acute fixation of the neck with a collar seems not to affect standing balance, even not when vestibular, visual and/or somatosensory input are also reduced. PMID:22237759

  6. Mutations in CIZ1 cause adult-onset primary cervical dystonia

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Jianfeng; Uitti, Ryan J.; Zhao, Yu; Vemula, Satya R.; Perlmutter, Joel S.; Wszolek, Zbigniew K.; Maraganore, Demetrius M.; Auburger, Georg; Leube, Barbara; Lehnhoff, Katja; LeDoux, Mark S.

    2012-01-01

    Objective Primary dystonia is usually of adult onset, can be familial, and frequently involves the cervical musculature. Our goal was to identify the causal mutation in a family with adult-onset, primary cervical dystonia. Methods Linkage and haplotype analyses were combined with solution-based whole-exome capture and massively parallel sequencing in a large Caucasian pedigree with adult-onset, primary cervical dystonia to identify a cosegregating mutation. High-throughput screening and Sanger sequencing were completed in 308 Caucasians with familial or sporadic adult-onset cervical dystonia and matching controls for sequence variants in this mutant gene. Results Exome sequencing led to the identification of an exonic splicing enhancer mutation in Exon 7 of CIZ1 (c.790A>G, p.S264G) which encodes CIZ1, Cip1-interacting zinc finger protein 1. CIZ1 is a p21Cip1/Waf1-interacting zinc finger protein expressed in brain and involved in DNA synthesis and cell-cycle control. Using a minigene assay, we showed that c.790A>G altered CIZ1 splicing patterns. The p.S264G mutation also altered the nuclear localization of CIZ1. Screening in subjects with adult-onset cervical dystonia identified two additional CIZ1 missense mutations (p.P47S and p.R672M). Interpretation Mutations in CIZ1 may cause adult-onset, primary cervical dystonia, possibly by precipitating neurodevelopmental abnormalities that manifest in adults and/or G1/S cell-cycle dysregulation in the mature central nervous system. PMID:22447717

  7. Anterior cervical discectomy and fusion with titanium cages for simple or multilevel herniated discs and spur of the cervical spine: Report of 2 cases and experience in Bali

    PubMed Central

    Mahadewa Tjokorda, G. B.; Nyoman, Golden; Sri, Maliawan; Junichi, Mizuno

    2016-01-01

    This report presents two cases of cervicobrachialgia and radiculopathy due to multiple cervical herniated discs and spur formation that dealt with anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) using different titanium interbody cages. The description of the clinical presentation, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) appearances and management strategy are discussed. Both cases showed chronic neck pain and radiating pain from the shoulder to the arm. They had a history of blurry vision, cluster head ache, weakness, and numbness on the shoulder for 2 years. MRI revealed multiple herniated discs between C4-7 and accompanied by the spur formation leading to the narrowness of the spinal canal and its foramina bilaterally. ACDF were performed and complete decompression of the spinal canal and its foramina were carried out. Twin M-cages (Ammtec Inc.-Japan) were placed in the first case at C5-7 levels and single cage of Smith Robinson (SR) was placed in the second case at C5-6 levels. There were no more blurry vision, cluster headache, weakness, and numbness, immediately after surgery. To our knowledge, this is the first reported cases of ACDF, using twin M-cages and single SR cage in Indonesia, with improvement immediately after surgery. Cervical spondylosis can present with cervicobrachialgia and radiculopathy and surgical treatment produces good functional outcome.

  8. Anterior cervical discectomy and fusion with titanium cages for simple or multilevel herniated discs and spur of the cervical spine: Report of 2 cases and experience in Bali

    PubMed Central

    Mahadewa Tjokorda, G. B.; Nyoman, Golden; Sri, Maliawan; Junichi, Mizuno

    2016-01-01

    This report presents two cases of cervicobrachialgia and radiculopathy due to multiple cervical herniated discs and spur formation that dealt with anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) using different titanium interbody cages. The description of the clinical presentation, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) appearances and management strategy are discussed. Both cases showed chronic neck pain and radiating pain from the shoulder to the arm. They had a history of blurry vision, cluster head ache, weakness, and numbness on the shoulder for 2 years. MRI revealed multiple herniated discs between C4-7 and accompanied by the spur formation leading to the narrowness of the spinal canal and its foramina bilaterally. ACDF were performed and complete decompression of the spinal canal and its foramina were carried out. Twin M-cages (Ammtec Inc.-Japan) were placed in the first case at C5-7 levels and single cage of Smith Robinson (SR) was placed in the second case at C5-6 levels. There were no more blurry vision, cluster headache, weakness, and numbness, immediately after surgery. To our knowledge, this is the first reported cases of ACDF, using twin M-cages and single SR cage in Indonesia, with improvement immediately after surgery. Cervical spondylosis can present with cervicobrachialgia and radiculopathy and surgical treatment produces good functional outcome. PMID:27695567

  9. Rare causes of scoliosis and spine deformity: experience and particular features

    PubMed Central

    Soultanis, Konstantinos C; Payatakes, Alexandros H; Chouliaras, Vasilios T; Mandellos, Georgios C; Pyrovolou, Nikolaos E; Pliarchopoulou, Fani M; Soucacos, Panayotis N

    2007-01-01

    Background Spine deformity can be idiopathic (more than 80% of cases), neuromuscular, congenital or neurofibromatosis-related. However, there are many disorders that may also be involved. We present our experience treating patients with scoliosis or other spine deformities related to rare clinical entities. Methods A retrospective study of the records of a school-screening study in North-West Greece was performed, covering a 10-year period (1992–2002). The records were searched for patients with deformities related to rare disorders. These patients were reviewed as regards to characteristics of underlying disorder and spine deformity, treatment and results, complications, intraoperative and anaesthesiologic difficulties particular to each case. Results In 13 cases, the spine deformity presented in relation to rare disorders. The underlying disorder was rare neurological disease in 2 cases (Rett syndrome, progressive hemidystonia), muscular disorders (facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy, arthrogryposis) in 2 patients, osteogenesis imperfecta in 2 cases, Marfan syndrome, osteopetrosis tarda, spondyloepiphyseal dysplasia congenita, cleidocranial dysplasia and Noonan syndrome in 1 case each. In 2 cases scoliosis was related to other congenital anomalies (phocomelia, blindness). Nine of these patients were surgically treated. Surgery was avoided in 3 patients. Conclusion This study illustrates the fact that different disorders are related with curves with different characteristics, different accompanying problems and possible complications. Investigation and understanding of the underlying pathology is an essential part of the clinical evaluation and preoperative work-up, as clinical experience at any specific center is limited. PMID:17956633

  10. Soft tissue artifact evaluation of the cervical spine in motion patterns of flexion and lateral bending: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jiajia; Lui, Zhongwen; Qian, Zhihui; Ren, Luquan

    2016-01-01

    Background. Soft tissue artifact (STA) is increasingly becoming a focus of research as the skin marker method is widely employed in motion capture technique. At present, medical imaging methods provide reliable ways to investigate the cervical STA. Among these approaches, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a highly preferred tool because of its low radiation. Methods. In the study, the 3D spatial location of vertebral landmarks and corresponding skin markers of the spinous processes of the second (C2), fifth (C5), and sixth (C6) cervical levels during flexion and lateral bending were investigated. A series of static postures were scanned using MRI. Skin deformation was obtained by the Mimics software. Results. Results shows that during flexion, the maximum skin deformation occurs at C6, in the superior-inferior (Z) direction. Upon lateral bending, the maximum skin displacement occurs at C2 level, in the left-right (Y) direction. The result presents variability of soft tissue in the terms of direction and magnitude, which is consistent with the prevailing opinion. Discussion. The results testified variability of cervical STA. Future studies involving large ranges of subject classification, such as age, sex, height, gravity, and etc. should be performed to completely verify the existing hypothesis on human cervical skin deformation.

  11. Soft tissue artifact evaluation of the cervical spine in motion patterns of flexion and lateral bending: a preliminary study

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jiajia; Lui, Zhongwen; Ren, Luquan

    2016-01-01

    Background. Soft tissue artifact (STA) is increasingly becoming a focus of research as the skin marker method is widely employed in motion capture technique. At present, medical imaging methods provide reliable ways to investigate the cervical STA. Among these approaches, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a highly preferred tool because of its low radiation. Methods. In the study, the 3D spatial location of vertebral landmarks and corresponding skin markers of the spinous processes of the second (C2), fifth (C5), and sixth (C6) cervical levels during flexion and lateral bending were investigated. A series of static postures were scanned using MRI. Skin deformation was obtained by the Mimics software. Results. Results shows that during flexion, the maximum skin deformation occurs at C6, in the superior–inferior (Z) direction. Upon lateral bending, the maximum skin displacement occurs at C2 level, in the left–right (Y) direction. The result presents variability of soft tissue in the terms of direction and magnitude, which is consistent with the prevailing opinion. Discussion. The results testified variability of cervical STA. Future studies involving large ranges of subject classification, such as age, sex, height, gravity, and etc. should be performed to completely verify the existing hypothesis on human cervical skin deformation. PMID:27069821

  12. Cervical Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... the place where a baby grows during pregnancy. Cervical cancer is caused by a virus called HPV. The ... for a long time, or have HIV infection. Cervical cancer may not cause any symptoms at first. Later, ...

  13. Intrathoracic toxic thyroid nodule causing hyperthyroidism with a multinodular normal functional cervical thyroid gland.

    PubMed

    Serim, Burcu Dirlik; Korkmaz, Ulku; Can, Unal; Altun, Gulay Durmus

    2016-01-01

    Radionuclide scintigraphy with I-131 and Tc-99m pertechnetate ((99)mTc04) has been widely used in detecting toxic nodules. Intrathoracic goiter usually presents as an anterior mediastinal mass. Mostly the connection between intrathoracic mass and the cervical thyroid gland is clearly and easily identified occurring as a result of inferior extension of thyroid tissue in the neck, which is called as secondary intrathoracic goiter. Completely separated, aberrant or in other words primary intrathoracic goiters arise as a result of abnormal embryologic migration of ectopic thyroid closely associated with aortic sac and descend into the mediastinum. Intrathoracic goiters are generally nontoxic nodules existing with mass effect without causing hyperthyroidism. However, mostly reported cases had enlarged thyroid glands in the neck. This report demonstrates the usefulness of I-131 and (99)mTc04 scintigraphy for detecting intrathoracic goiter causing hyperthyroidism with a normal functioned cervical thyroid gland.

  14. Intrathoracic toxic thyroid nodule causing hyperthyroidism with a multinodular normal functional cervical thyroid gland

    PubMed Central

    Serim, Burcu Dirlik; Korkmaz, Ulku; Can, Unal; Altun, Gulay Durmus

    2016-01-01

    Radionuclide scintigraphy with I-131 and Tc-99m pertechnetate (99mTc04) has been widely used in detecting toxic nodules. Intrathoracic goiter usually presents as an anterior mediastinal mass. Mostly the connection between intrathoracic mass and the cervical thyroid gland is clearly and easily identified occurring as a result of inferior extension of thyroid tissue in the neck, which is called as secondary intrathoracic goiter. Completely separated, aberrant or in other words primary intrathoracic goiters arise as a result of abnormal embryologic migration of ectopic thyroid closely associated with aortic sac and descend into the mediastinum. Intrathoracic goiters are generally nontoxic nodules existing with mass effect without causing hyperthyroidism. However, mostly reported cases had enlarged thyroid glands in the neck. This report demonstrates the usefulness of I-131 and 99mTc04 scintigraphy for detecting intrathoracic goiter causing hyperthyroidism with a normal functioned cervical thyroid gland. PMID:27385899

  15. Intrathoracic toxic thyroid nodule causing hyperthyroidism with a multinodular normal functional cervical thyroid gland.

    PubMed

    Serim, Burcu Dirlik; Korkmaz, Ulku; Can, Unal; Altun, Gulay Durmus

    2016-01-01

    Radionuclide scintigraphy with I-131 and Tc-99m pertechnetate ((99)mTc04) has been widely used in detecting toxic nodules. Intrathoracic goiter usually presents as an anterior mediastinal mass. Mostly the connection between intrathoracic mass and the cervical thyroid gland is clearly and easily identified occurring as a result of inferior extension of thyroid tissue in the neck, which is called as secondary intrathoracic goiter. Completely separated, aberrant or in other words primary intrathoracic goiters arise as a result of abnormal embryologic migration of ectopic thyroid closely associated with aortic sac and descend into the mediastinum. Intrathoracic goiters are generally nontoxic nodules existing with mass effect without causing hyperthyroidism. However, mostly reported cases had enlarged thyroid glands in the neck. This report demonstrates the usefulness of I-131 and (99)mTc04 scintigraphy for detecting intrathoracic goiter causing hyperthyroidism with a normal functioned cervical thyroid gland. PMID:27385899

  16. Bilateral cervical ribs in a Dobermann Pinscher.

    PubMed

    Ricciardi, M; De Simone, A; Gernone, F; Giannuzzi, P

    2015-01-01

    An 11-year-old intact female Doberman Pinscher was presented with the complaint of non-ambulatory tetraparesis. Clinical and neurological examination revealed a caudal cervical spinal cord disfunction (C6-T2 spinal cord segments). Magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomographic (CT) findings of the cervical spine were consistent with caudal cervical spondylomyelopathy (CSM). During the diagnostic work-up for the cervical spine, bilateral bone anomalies involving the seventh cervical vertebra and the first ribs were found on radiographs and CT examination. The rib anomalies found in this dog appear similar to cervical ribs widely described in human medicine. In people, cervical ribs are associated with a high rate of stillbirth, early childhood cancer, and can cause the thoracic outlet syndrome, characterized by neurovascular compression at level of superior aperture of the chest. In dogs, only some sporadic anatomopathological descriptions of cervical ribs exist. In this report the radiographic and CT findings of these particular vertebral and rib anomalies along with their relationships with adjacent vasculature and musculature are shown intravitam in a dog. Specific radiographic and CT findings described in this report may help in reaching a presumptive diagnosis of this anomaly. Finally, their clinical and evolutionary significance are discussed.

  17. What you need to know about ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament to optimize cervical spine surgery: A review

    PubMed Central

    Epstein, Nancy E.

    2014-01-01

    What are the risks, benefits, alternatives, and pitfalls for operating on cervical ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament (OPLL)? To successfully diagnose OPLL, it is important to obtain Magnetic Resonance Images (MR). These studies, particularly the T2 weighted images, provide the best soft-tissue documentation of cord/root compression and intrinsic cord abnormalities (e.g. edema vs. myelomalacia) on sagittal, axial, and coronal views. Obtaining Computed Tomographic (CT) scans is also critical as they best demonstrate early OPLL, or hypertrophied posterior longitudinal ligament (HPLL: hypo-isodense with punctate ossification) or classic (frankly ossified) OPLL (hyperdense). Furthermore, CT scans reveal the “single layer” and “double layer” signs indicative of OPLL penetrating the dura. Documenting the full extent of OPLL with both MR and CT dictates whether anterior, posterior, or circumferential surgery is warranted. An adequate cervical lordosis allows for posterior cervical approaches (e.g. lamionplasty, laminectomy/fusion), which may facilitate addressing multiple levels while avoiding the risks of anterior procedures. However, without lordosis and with significant kyphosis, anterior surgery may be indicated. Rarely, this requires single/multilevel anterior cervical diskectomy/fusion (ACDF), as this approach typically fails to address retrovertebral OPLL; single or multilevel corpectomies are usually warranted. In short, successful OPLL surgery relies on careful patient selection (e.g. assess comorbidities), accurate MR/CT documentation of OPLL, and limiting the pros, cons, and complications of these complex procedures by choosing the optimal surgical approach. Performing OPLL surgery requires stringent anesthetic (awake intubation/positioning) and also the following intraoperative monitoring protocols: Somatosensory evoked potentials (SSEP), motor evoked potentials (MEP), and electromyography (EMG). PMID:24843819

  18. Non-ejection cervical spine fracture due to defensive aerial combat maneuvering in an RF-4C: a case report.

    PubMed

    Schall, D G

    1983-12-01

    An unusual case report is presented describing an incident in which an RF-4C instructor pilot fractured three cervical vertebrae after impacting the rear canopy top during a negative G defensive maneuver. The pilot subsequently developed an incomplete tetraparesis later in flight and the aircraft had to be recovered by the front seat pilot. No similar cases have ever been reported to the USAF Safety Center or described in the aviation literature. PMID:6661124

  19. EVALUATION OF TERMINAL VERTEBRAL PLATE ON CERVICAL SPINE AT DIFFERENT AGE GROUPS AND ITS CORRELATION WITH INTERVERTEBRAL DISC THICKNESS

    PubMed Central

    Luiz Vieira, Juliano Silveira; da Silva Herrero, Carlos Fernando Pereira; Porto, Maximiliano Aguiar; Nogueira Barbosa, Marcello Henrique; Garcia, Sérgio Britto; Zambelli Ramalho, Leandra Náira; Aparecido Defino, Helton Luiz

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate, by means of histomorphometry, terminal vertebral plate thickness, intervertebral disc thickness and its correlation on different age groups, seeking to identify its correlation. Methods: C4-C5 and C5-C6 cervical segments removed from human cadavers of both genders were assessed and divided into five groups of 10-year age intervals, from 21 years old. TVP and intervertebral disc thickness evaluation was made by means of histomorphometry of histological slides stained with hematoxylin and eosyn. Lower C4 TVP, upper C5 TVP, and upper C6 TVP de were compared between each other and to the interposed intervertebral disc thickness between relevant TVP. Results: The thickness of terminal vertebral plates adjacent to the same ID did not show statistic differences. However, the comparison of upper and lower vertebral plates thickness on the same cervical vertebra (C5), showed statistical difference on all age groups studied. We found a statistical correlation coefficient above 80% between terminal vertebral plate and adjacent intervertebral disc, with a proportional thickness reduction of both structures on the different cervical levels studied, and also on the different age groups assessed. Conclusion: Terminal vertebral plate shows a morphologic correlation with the intervertebral disc next to it, and does not show correlation with the terminal vertebral plate on the same vertebra. PMID:26998448

  20. Spinal surgery -- cervical - series (image)

    MedlinePlus

    The cervical spinal column is made up of vertebral bodies which protect the spinal cord. ... spinal nerves, trauma, and narrowing (stenosis) of the spinal column around the spinal cord. Symptoms of cervical spine ...

  1. A Biomechanical Comparison of Three Different Posterior Fixation Constructs Used for C6–C7 Cervical Spine Immobilization: A Finite Element Study

    PubMed Central

    HONG, Jae Taek; QASIM, Muhammad; ESPINOZA ORÍAS, Alejandro A.; NATARAJAN, Raghu N.; AN, Howard S.

    2014-01-01

    The intralaminar screw construct has been recently introduced in C6–C7 fixation. The aim of the study is to compare the stability afforded by three different C7 posterior fixation techniques using a three-dimensional finite element model of a C6–C7 cervical spine motion segment. Finite element models representing three different cervical anchor types (C7 intralaminar screw, C7 lateral mass screw, and C7 pedicle screw) were developed. Range of motion (ROM) and maximum von Mises stresses in the vertebra for the three screw techniques were compared under pure moments in flexion, extension, lateral bending, and axial rotation. ROM for pedicle screw construct was less than the lateral mass screw construct and intralaminar screw construct in the three principal directions. The maximum von Misses stress was observed in the C7 vertebra around the pedicle in all the three screw constructs. Maximum von Mises stress in pedicle screw construct was less than the lateral mass screw construct and intralaminar screw construct in all loading modes. This study demonstrated that the pedicle screw fixation is the strongest instrumentation method for C6–C7 fixation. Pedicle screw fixation resulted in least stresses around the C7 pedicle-vertebral body complex. However, if pedicle fixation is not favorable, the laminar screw can be a better option compared to the lateral mass screw because the stress around the pedicle-vertebral body complex and ROM predicted for laminar screw construct was smaller than those of lateral mass screw construct. PMID:24418790

  2. The influence of fixed sagittal plane centers of rotation on motion segment mechanics and range of motion in the cervical spine.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Brian P; Zufelt, Nephi A; Sander, Elizabeth J; DiAngelo, Denis J

    2013-04-26

    The center of rotation (CoR) has become an increasingly used metric for biomechanical evaluation of spinal joints however traditional methods of determination remain prone to high degrees of uncertainty. The objective was to use a novel robotic testing protocol to investigate the effects of placement of fixed CoRs in the cervical spine. Human cadaveric C4-C5 (n=3) and C6-C7 (n=5) motion segment units (MSU) were rotated in flexion-extension to limits of 2.5 N m bending or 225 N resultant force about three points in a disc plane (A1, C1, P1) located at 25%, 50% and 75% along the length of the midline of the intervertebral disc respectively in the sagittal view, and three points (A2, C2, P2) in a sub-adjacent plane 5mm below the disc plane. Significant differences in range of rotation occurred between CoRs within the same plane but not between the same points in different planes (e.g. A1-A2). In flexion and extension axial forces at posterior points of rotation (P1, P2) were significantly different from those at anterior and central points. Shear forces were significantly different between points within the same plane except for the disc plane in extension, and between the same points in different planes in flexion and extension. The results indicate that the native cervical MSU is highly sensitive to the CoR location in terms of mechanics and range of motion, and that the CoR location likely varies between flexion and extension. The methodology developed has potential for application towards investigation of optimal CoR locations and in-vitro evaluations of the effects of implantable instrumentation.

  3. The Effect of Various Types of Motorcycle Helmets on Cervical Spine Injury in Head Injury Patients: A Multicenter Study in Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Mau-Roung; Chu, Shu-Fen; Tsai, Shin-Han; Bai, Chyi-Huey; Chiu, Wen-Ta

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. The relationship between cervical spine injury (CSI) and helmet in head injury (HI) patients following motorcycle crashes is crucial. Controversy still exists; therefore we evaluated the effect of various types of helmets on CSI in HI patients following motorcycle crashes and researched the mechanism of this effect. Patients and Methods. A total of 5225 patients of motorcycle crashes between 2000 and 2009 were extracted from the Head Injury Registry in Taiwan. These patients were divided into case and control groups according to the presence of concomitant CSI. Helmet use and types were separately compared between the two groups and the odds ratio of CSI was obtained by using multiple logistic regression analysis. Results. We observed that 173 (3.3%) of the HI patients were associated with CSI. The HI patients using a helmet (odds ratio (OR) = 0.31, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.19−0.49), full-coverage helmet (0.19, 0.10−0.36), and partial-coverage helmet (0.35, 0.21−0.56) exhibited a significantly decreased rate of CSI compared with those without a helmet. Conclusion. Wearing full-coverage and partial-coverage helmets significantly reduced the risk of CSI among HI patients following motorcycle crashes. This effect may be due to the smooth surface and hard padding materials of helmet. PMID:25705663

  4. A pilot evaluation of an educational program that offers visualizations of cervical spine injuries: medical students' self-efficacy increases by training.

    PubMed

    Hedman, Leif; Fahlstedt, Madelen; Schlickum, Marcus; Möller, Hans; von Holst, Hans; Felländer-Tsai, Li

    2014-01-01

    In this pilot study, a new method for visualization through imaging and simulation (VIS-Ed) for teaching diagnosis and treatment of cervical spine trauma was formatively evaluated. The aims were to examine if medical students' self-efficacy would change by training using VIS-Ed, and if so these changes were related to how they evaluated the session, and the user interface (UI) of this program. Using a one-group, pre-post course test design 43 Swedish medical students (4th year, 17 males, 26 females) practiced in groups of three participants. Overall the practice and the UI were considered as positive experiences. They judged VIS-Ed as a good interactive scenario-based educational tool. All students' self-efficacy increased significantly by training (p < 0.001). Spearman's rank correlation tests revealed that increased self-efficacy was only associated with: how the session was compared to as expected (p < 0.007). Students' self-efficacy increased significantly by training, but replication studies should determine if this training effect is gender-related.

  5. A case report of rod migration into cerebellum through foramen magnum after lateral mass fixation of cervical spine.

    PubMed

    Kiran, Belsare; Sharma, Ayush; Prashant, Gedam; Parekh, Aseem

    2016-04-01

    We report on a rare case of connecting rod migration into the posterior cranial fossa after posterior cervical decompression and lateral mass screw fixation. A 55-year-old male patient who was operated on for ossification of posterior longitudinal ligament complained of sudden-onset giddiness followed by loss of consciousness one and half year following surgery. CT scan showed migration of left-sided connecting rod into the right cerebellum through foramen magnum. The patient was operated on for rod removal but he sustained a cardiorespiratory arrest and died on the eighth postoperative day. Autopsy confirmed damage to the right cerebellum due to rod migration. The clinician should be aware that superior rod migration is a rare but potentially disastrous complication. Regular follow-up with radiological evaluation should be done to look for implant loosening, migration, and non-union even in asymptomatic patients. The implant should be subsequently removed after it has served its purpose. PMID:26748502

  6. Long-term randomised comparison between a carbon fibre cage and the Cloward procedure in the cervical spine.

    PubMed

    Peolsson, Anneli; Vavruch, Ludek; Hedlund, Rune

    2007-02-01

    A prospective randomised study. To compare the long-term outcome of anterior cervical decompression and fusion (ACDF) with a cervical intervertebral fusion cage (CIFC) and the Cloward procedure (CP). We have previously shown that the 2 year outcome of ACDF with the CIFC is the same as for the CP. The fusion rate in CIFC group was, however, only 55%, compared to 85% in CP group. The long-term outcome of CIFC is poorly documented. Ninety-five patients with at least 6 months duration of neck pain and radicular arm pain were randomly allocated for ACDF with the CIFC or the CP. Radiographs were obtained at 2 years. Questionnaires about pain, disability (Neck Disability Index, NDI), distress, quality of life and global outcome were obtained from 83 patients (87%) (43 CIFC, 40 CP) at a mean follow-up time of 6 years (range 56-94 months). There were no significant differences in any outcome variable between the two treatments. For both CP and CIFC the pain intensity improved (P<0.0001) whereas the NDI was unchanged at long-term follow-up compared to preoperatively. In the CIFC group patients with a healed fusion had significantly less mean pain (24 mm) and NDI (26%) than patients with pseudarthrosis (42 and 41, respectively). Furthermore, the mean pain and NDI reported by CIFC patients with a healed fusion was significantly less than in healed CP patients (37 and 38, respectively). The long-term outcome is the same for the CIFC and the CP, with similar improvements of pain but with considerable remaining functional disability. However, in the subgroup of patients with healed CIFC the outcome was clearly better than for the non-healed CIFC group, and also clearly better than for the healed CP group. Thus, if the healing problem associated with the CIFC can be solved the results indicate that a better outcome can be expected with the cage than with the CP.

  7. The Impact of Spinal Cord Nerve Roots and Denticulate Ligaments on Cerebrospinal Fluid Dynamics in the Cervical Spine

    PubMed Central

    Heidari Pahlavian, Soroush; Yiallourou, Theresia; Tubbs, R. Shane; Bunck, Alexander C.; Loth, Francis; Goodin, Mark; Raisee, Mehrdad; Martin, Bryn A.

    2014-01-01

    Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) dynamics in the spinal subarachnoid space (SSS) have been thought to play an important pathophysiological role in syringomyelia, Chiari I malformation (CM), and a role in intrathecal drug delivery. Yet, the impact that fine anatomical structures, including nerve roots and denticulate ligaments (NRDL), have on SSS CSF dynamics is not clear. In the present study we assessed the impact of NRDL on CSF dynamics in the cervical SSS. The 3D geometry of the cervical SSS was reconstructed based on manual segmentation of MRI images of a healthy volunteer and a patient with CM. Idealized NRDL were designed and added to each of the geometries based on in vivo measurments in the literature and confirmation by a neuroanatomist. CFD simulations were performed for the healthy and patient case with and without NRDL included. Our results showed that the NRDL had an important impact on CSF dynamics in terms of velocity field and flow patterns. However, pressure distribution was not altered greatly although the NRDL cases required a larger pressure gradient to maintain the same flow. Also, the NRDL did not alter CSF dynamics to a great degree in the SSS from the foramen magnum to the C1 level for the healthy subject and CM patient with mild tonsillar herniation (∼6 mm). Overall, the NRDL increased fluid mixing phenomena and resulted in a more complex flow field. Comparison of the streamlines of CSF flow revealed that the presence of NRDL lead to the formation of vortical structures and remarkably increased the local mixing of the CSF throughout the SSS. PMID:24710111

  8. Hemidystonia secondary to cervical demyelinating lesions.

    PubMed

    Yücesan, C; Tuncel, D; Akbostanci, M C; Yücemen, N; Mutluer, N

    2000-09-01

    Hemidystonia is usually associated with a structural lesion in the contralateral basal ganglia. We report a patient with definite multiple sclerosis, according to Poser's criteria, presenting with an acute-onset sustained left hemidystonia. Cranial T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed several hyperintense lesions in the centri semiovali and in the periventricular area without basal ganglia involvement. Moreover cervical spinal cord T2-weighted MRI showed two hyperintense lesions in the left posterolateral spine at C2 and C3, and one lesion in the right posterolateral spine at C4 levels. The hemidystonia improved completely after daily treatment with 1000 mg of methylprednisolone, and cervical MRI was performed after the improvement which showed that the lesions had become smaller and less intense. Finally we consider that the hemidystonia may be caused by the cervical spinal cord lesions of multiple sclerosis. PMID:11054144

  9. [Intramedullary Abscess of the Cervical Spinal Cord Caused by Advanced Periodontitis:Case Report].

    PubMed

    Sugawara, Atsushi; Ishigaki, Daiya; Isu, Toyohiko; Ogasawara, Kuniaki

    2016-08-01

    We describe the case of a 60-year-old man with an intramedullary abscess of the cervical spinal cord caused by advanced periodontitis. He suddenly developed severe neck pain and rapidly progressive palsy of the left upper arm. T2-weighted sagittal magnetic resonance imaging(MRI)revealed a hyperintense area extending from C1 to C6. Gadolinium-enhanced T1-weighted MRI showed a ring-enhanced lesion at the C3-4 level that was hyperintense on diffusion-weighted MRI. The patient underwent drainage of the abscess through laminectomy. Cultures of the abscess contents revealed Fusobacterium nucleatum and Peptostreptococcus micros. Antibiotics administered to the patient to treat the infection with these anaerobic bacteria improved the neurological deficit eight weeks after surgery. The patient was also diagnosed with advanced periodontitis due to Fusobacterium nucleatum that might have caused the intramedullary abscess of the cervical spinal cord. PMID:27506846

  10. Simultaneous Three-Dimensional Analysis of Cervical Spine Kinematics in the Axial and Sagittal Views during a Simulated Frontal Impact: Differences between Tensed and Relaxed States

    PubMed Central

    Sakane, Masataka; Ejima, Susumu; Ito, Daisuke; Nishino, Tomofumi; Kitajima, Sou; Yamazaki, Masashi

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Prospective experimental study on humans. Purpose To determine whether postural differences during a low-speed impact are observed in the sagittal and axial views, particularly in a relaxed state. Overview of Literature: Three-dimensional motion capture systems have been used to analyze posture and head-neck-torso kinematics in humans during a simulated low-speed impact, yet little research has focused on the axial view. Since a seatbelt asymmetrically stabilizes a drivers right shoulder and left lower waist into the seat, it potentially creates movement in the axial view. Methods Three healthy adult men participated in the experimental series, which used a low-speed sled system. The acceleration pulse created a full sine shape with a maximum acceleration of 8.0 m/s2 at 500 ms, during which the kinematics were evaluated in relaxed and tensed states. The three-dimensional motion capture system used eight markers to record and analyze body movement and head-neck-torso kinematics in the sagittal and axial views during the low-speed impact. Head and trunk rotation angles were also calculated. Results Larger movements were observed in the relaxed than in the tensed state in the sagittal view. The cervical and thoracic spine flexed and extended, respectively, in the relaxed state. In the axial view, larger movements were also observed in the relaxed state than in the tensed state, and the left shoulder rotated. Conclusions During simulated frontal impact, the rotation angle between the head and trunk was significantly larger in the relaxed state. Therefore, we recommend also observing movement in the axial view during impact tests. PMID:26713119

  11. Permanent endovascular balloon occlusion of the vertebral artery as an adjunct to the surgical resection of selected cervical spine tumors: A single center experience

    PubMed Central

    Elwell, Vivien; Choi, David; Robertson, Fergus

    2015-01-01

    Background and purpose Complete surgical resection of cervical spine tumors is often challenging when there is tumor encasement of major neck vessels. Pre-operative endovascular sacrifice of the major vessels can facilitate safe tumor resection. The use of transarterial detachable coils has been described in this setting, but it can be time-consuming and costly to occlude a patent parent vessel using this method. Our aim was to evaluate the safety and effectiveness of our endovascular detachable balloon occlusion technique, performed without prior balloon test occlusion in the pre-operative management of these tumors. Methods We retrospectively reviewed 18 consecutive patients undergoing pre-operative unilateral permanent endovascular balloon occlusion of tumor-encased vertebral arteries in our institution. Procedure-related ischemic or thromboembolic complication was defined as focal neurologic deficit attributable to the endovascular occlusion which occurs before subsequent surgical resection. Results Successful pre-operative endovascular vertebral artery sacrifice using detachable balloons was achieved in 100% (n = 18) of cases without prior balloon test occlusion. Procedural complication rate was 5.6% as one patient developed transient focal neurology secondary to a delayed cerebellar infarct at home on day 11 and subsequently made a full recovery. There were no cases of distal balloon migration. Complete macroscopic resection of tumor as reported by the operating surgeon was achieved in 89% of cases. Conclusion Pre-operative endovascular sacrifice of the vertebral artery using detachable balloons and without prior balloon test occlusion is a safe procedure with low complication rates and good surgeon reported rates of total resection. PMID:26092437

  12. Degenerative cervical myelopathy.

    PubMed

    Kato, So; Fehlings, Michael

    2016-09-01

    Cervical myelopathy is the most common cause of acquired spinal cord compromise. The concept of degenerative cervical myelopathy (DCM), defined as symptomatic myelopathy associated with degenerative arthropathic changes in the spine axis, is being introduced. Given its progressive nature, treatment options have to be chosen in a timely manner. Surgical options include anterior discectomy and fusion (ACDF), anterior corpectomy and fusion (ACCF), arthroplasty (in highly select cases), posterior laminectomy with/without fusion, and laminoplasty. Indications for each should be carefully considered in individual patients. Riluzole, a sodium-glutamate antagonist, is a promising option to optimize neurologic outcomes post-surgery and is being examined in the CSM-Protect Randomized Controlled Trial. Preoperative risk assessment is mandatory for prognostication. Sagittal alignment is known to play an important role to optimize surgical outcome. Guidelines for optimal management of DCM are in process. In principle, all but the mildest cases of DCM should be offered surgery for optimal outcome. PMID:27250040

  13. Reduction of the pectoral spine and girdle in domesticated Channel catfish is likely caused by changes in selection pressure.

    PubMed

    Fine, Michael L; Lahiri, Shweta; Sullivan, Amanda D H; Mayo, Mark; Newton, Scott H; Sismour, Edward N

    2014-07-01

    Locked pectoral spines of the Channel Catfish Ictalurus punctatus more than double the fish's width and complicate ingestion by gape-limited predators. The spine mates with the pectoral girdle, a robust structure that anchors the spine. This study demonstrates that both spine and girdle exhibit negative allometric growth and that pectoral spines and girdles are lighter in domesticated than in wild Channel Catfish. This finding could be explained by changes in selection pressure for spine growth during domestication or by an epigenetic effect in which exposure to predators in wild fish stimulates pectoral growth. We tested the epigenetic hypothesis by exposing domesticated Channel Catfish fingerlings to Largemouth Bass Micropterus salmoides predators for 13 weeks. Spines and girdles grow isometrically in the fingerlings, and regression analysis indicates no difference in proportional pectoral growth between control and predator-exposed fish. Therefore a change in selection pressure likely accounts for smaller pectoral growth in domesticated Channel Catfish. Decreasing spine growth in older fish suggests anti-predator functions are most important in smaller fish. Additionally, growth of the appendicular and axial skeleton is controlled differentially, and mechanical properties of the spine and not just its length are an important component of this defensive adaptation.

  14. Reduction of the pectoral spine and girdle in domesticated Channel catfish is likely caused by changes in selection pressure.

    PubMed

    Fine, Michael L; Lahiri, Shweta; Sullivan, Amanda D H; Mayo, Mark; Newton, Scott H; Sismour, Edward N

    2014-07-01

    Locked pectoral spines of the Channel Catfish Ictalurus punctatus more than double the fish's width and complicate ingestion by gape-limited predators. The spine mates with the pectoral girdle, a robust structure that anchors the spine. This study demonstrates that both spine and girdle exhibit negative allometric growth and that pectoral spines and girdles are lighter in domesticated than in wild Channel Catfish. This finding could be explained by changes in selection pressure for spine growth during domestication or by an epigenetic effect in which exposure to predators in wild fish stimulates pectoral growth. We tested the epigenetic hypothesis by exposing domesticated Channel Catfish fingerlings to Largemouth Bass Micropterus salmoides predators for 13 weeks. Spines and girdles grow isometrically in the fingerlings, and regression analysis indicates no difference in proportional pectoral growth between control and predator-exposed fish. Therefore a change in selection pressure likely accounts for smaller pectoral growth in domesticated Channel Catfish. Decreasing spine growth in older fish suggests anti-predator functions are most important in smaller fish. Additionally, growth of the appendicular and axial skeleton is controlled differentially, and mechanical properties of the spine and not just its length are an important component of this defensive adaptation. PMID:24673385

  15. The need to immobilise the cervical spine during cardiopulmonary resuscitation and electric shock administration in out-of-hospital cardiac arrest.

    PubMed

    Desroziers, Milene; Mole, Sophie; Jost, Daniel; Tourtier, Jean-Pierre

    2016-06-13

    In cases of out-of hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA), falling to the ground can cause brain and neck trauma to the patient. We present a case of a man in his mid-60s who suffered from an OHCA resulting in a violent collapse. The patient received immediate cardiopulmonary resuscitation, but his spine was immobilised only after a large frontal haematoma was found. The resuscitation efforts resulted in return of spontaneous circulation and discharge from hospital. After this, doctors performed angioplasty, followed by a cardiopulmonary bypass. Later, CT scan examination reported a displaced and unstable fracture of the 6th vertebra without bone marrow involvement. The patient underwent a second operation. 40 days later, he was able to return home without sequela. This case shows the importance of analysing the circumstances of a fall, considering the possibility of two concomitant diagnoses and prioritising investigations and treatment.

  16. Chronic Neck Pain: Making the Connection Between Capsular Ligament Laxity and Cervical Instability

    PubMed Central

    Steilen, Danielle; Hauser, Ross; Woldin, Barbara; Sawyer, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    The use of conventional modalities for chronic neck pain remains debatable, primarily because most treatments have had limited success. We conducted a review of the literature published up to December 2013 on the diagnostic and treatment modalities of disorders related to chronic neck pain and concluded that, despite providing temporary relief of symptoms, these treatments do not address the specific problems of healing and are not likely to offer long-term cures. The objectives of this narrative review are to provide an overview of chronic neck pain as it relates to cervical instability, to describe the anatomical features of the cervical spine and the impact of capsular ligament laxity, to discuss the disorders causing chronic neck pain and their current treatments, and lastly, to present prolotherapy as a viable treatment option that heals injured ligaments, restores stability to the spine, and resolves chronic neck pain. The capsular ligaments are the main stabilizing structures of the facet joints in the cervical spine and have been implicated as a major source of chronic neck pain. Chronic neck pain often reflects a state of instability in the cervical spine and is a symptom common to a number of conditions described herein, including disc herniation, cervical spondylosis, whiplash injury and whiplash associated disorder, postconcussion syndrome, vertebrobasilar insufficiency, and Barré-Liéou syndrome. When the capsular ligaments are injured, they become elongated and exhibit laxity, which causes excessive movement of the cervical vertebrae. In the upper cervical spine (C0-C2), this can cause a number of other symptoms including, but not limited to, nerve irritation and vertebrobasilar insufficiency with associated vertigo, tinnitus, dizziness, facial pain, arm pain, and migraine headaches. In the lower cervical spine (C3-C7), this can cause muscle spasms, crepitation, and/or paresthesia in addition to chronic neck pain. In either case, the presence of

  17. Diagnostic Accuracy of Computer-Aided Assessment of Intranodal Vascularity in Distinguishing Different Causes of Cervical Lymphadenopathy.

    PubMed

    Ying, Michael; Cheng, Sammy C H; Ahuja, Anil T

    2016-08-01

    Ultrasound is useful in assessing cervical lymphadenopathy. Advancement of computer science technology allows accurate and reliable assessment of medical images. The aim of the study described here was to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of computer-aided assessment of the intranodal vascularity index (VI) in differentiating the various common causes of cervical lymphadenopathy. Power Doppler sonograms of 347 patients (155 with metastasis, 23 with lymphoma, 44 with tuberculous lymphadenitis, 125 reactive) with palpable cervical lymph nodes were reviewed. Ultrasound images of cervical nodes were evaluated, and the intranodal VI was quantified using a customized computer program. The diagnostic accuracy of using the intranodal VI to distinguish different disease groups was evaluated and compared. Metastatic and lymphomatous lymph nodes tend to be more vascular than tuberculous and reactive lymph nodes. The intranodal VI had the highest diagnostic accuracy in distinguishing metastatic and tuberculous nodes with a sensitivity of 80%, specificity of 73%, positive predictive value of 91%, negative predictive value of 51% and overall accuracy of 68% when a cutoff VI of 22% was used. Computer-aided assessment provides an objective and quantitative way to evaluate intranodal vascularity. The intranodal VI is a useful parameter in distinguishing certain causes of cervical lymphadenopathy and is particularly useful in differentiating metastatic and tuberculous lymph nodes. However, it has limited value in distinguishing lymphomatous nodes from metastatic and reactive nodes.

  18. Unique paleopathology in a pre-Columbian mummy remnant from Southern Peru--severe cervical rotation trauma with subluxation of the axis as cause of death.

    PubMed

    Sokiranski, Roman; Pirsig, Wolfgang; Richter, Hans-Peter; Lösch, Sandra; Struck, Ulrich; Nerlich, Andreas G

    2011-03-01

    We describe the multidisciplinary findings in a pre-Columbian mummy head from Southern Peru (Cahuachi, Nazca civilisation, radiocarbon dating between 120 and 750 AD) of a mature male individual (40-60 years) with the first two vertebrae attached in pathological position. Accordingly, the atlanto-axial transition (C1/C2) was significantly rotated and dislocated at 38° angle associated with a bulging brownish mass that considerably reduced the spinal canal by circa 60%. Using surface microscopy, endoscopy, high-resolution multi-slice computer tomography, paleohistology and immunohistochemistry, we identified an extensive epidural hematoma of the upper cervical spinal canal-extending into the skull cavity-obviously due to a rupture of the left vertebral artery at its transition between atlas and skull base. There were no signs of fractures of the skull or vertebrae. Histological and immunohistochemical examinations clearly identified dura, brain residues and densely packed corpuscular elements that proved to represent fresh epidural hematoma. Subsequent biochemical analysis provided no evidence for pre-mortal cocaine consumption. Stable isotope analysis, however, revealed significant and repeated changes in the nutrition during his last 9 months, suggesting high mobility. Finally, the significant narrowing of the rotational atlanto-axial dislocation and the epidural hematoma probably caused compression of the spinal cord and the medulla oblongata with subsequent respiratory arrest. In conclusion, we suggest that the man died within a short period of time (probably few minutes) in an upright position with the head rotated rapidly to the right side. In paleopathologic literature, trauma to the upper cervical spine has as yet only very rarely been described, and dislocation of the vertebral bodies has not been presented.

  19. Attributing oncogenic human papillomavirus genotypes to high-grade cervical neoplasia: which type causes the lesion?

    PubMed

    van der Marel, Jacolien; Berkhof, Johannes; Ordi, Jaume; Torné, Aureli; Del Pino, Marta; van Baars, Romy; Schiffman, Mark; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Jenkins, David; Quint, Wim G V

    2015-04-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is found in most women with high-grade cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) 2/3 in cervical cytology and biopsies. Multiple high-risk HPV (hrHPV) genotypes are present in 15% to 50% of cytology samples. We have shown by laser-capture microscopy (LCM)-polymerase chain reaction (PCR) that each lesion is associated with a single hrHPV type. Attribution of hrHPV types to CIN2/3 is important to understand the oncogenic role of different types and the limitations of cytologic typing. We studied hrHPV genotypes in 257 women with histologic CIN2/3 referred on the basis of abnormal cytology. HPV typing was done on cytology and CIN2/3 biopsies. If the whole-tissue section of the biopsy was positive for multiple hrHPV types, LCM-PCR was performed. We found 181 (70%) single and 71 (28%) multiple hrHPV infections in cytology, with 5 (2%) cases HPV-positive only on whole-tissue section PCR. Of cases with multiple cytologic hrHPV infections, 47/71 (66%) showed a single type in CIN2/3 lesions. In total, in 232 of 257 (90%) women with CIN2/3, a single hrHPV type caused CIN2/3. One was nonattributable on the LCM level. The remaining 24 women had 2 or more contiguous or separated lesions, each associated with a single hrHPV infection. The probability of HPV16 being present in CIN2/3, if detected in cytology, was 0.96 (95% confidence interval=0.90-0.98). LCM-PCR confirms that only 9% of histologic CIN2/3 is associated with multiple hrHPV types, much less than cytology would indicate, and each lesion was associated with a single hrHPV infection.

  20. MR imaging and cervical fixation devices: evaluation of ferromagnetism, heating, and artifacts at 1.5 Tesla.

    PubMed

    Shellock, F G

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess ferromagnetism, heating, and artifacts for cervical fixation devices exposed to a 1.5 T MR system. Cervical fixation devices (three halos, one tong and two halo vests) were evaluated for compatibility with MR procedures. Ferromagnetism was determined using a previously described technique. Heating was evaluated by measuring temperatures at various positions on the cervical fixation devices while applied to a volunteer subject before and during the use of various pulse sequences, including an magnetization transfer contrast (MTC) sequence. Artifacts associated with routine clinical MR imaging of the cervical spine were qualitatively evaluated with the cervical fixation devices applied to a volunteer subject. None of the devices displayed attraction to the magnetic field. The temperature changes were +/-1.5 degrees C in each instance. The MTC pulse sequence produced a sensation of "heating" the skull pins that may have been caused by vibration of the cervical fixation device. The MR images of the cervical spine were obtained without apparent artifacts using each routine, clinical pulse sequence. The lack of ferromagnetism, negligible heating, and capability of obtaining diagnostically acceptable studies of the cervical spine indicate that MR imaging performed at 1.5 T or less may be conducted safely in patients with each of the cervical fixation devices tested using conventional pulse sequences. PMID:9071001

  1. [The forensic medical evaluation of the injuries to the cervical spine in the driver and the front-seat passenger of a modern motor vehicle after the frontal crash].

    PubMed

    Pigolkin, I; Dubrovin, A; Sedykh, E p; Mosoyan

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to elucidate the specific features of the lesions of the cervical spine in the driver and the front-seat passenger of a modern car after the frontal crash. We made use of the archival materials of forensic medical expertises concerning the traffic accidents carried out in the city of Moscow during the period from 2005 to 2012. The study was focused on the analysis of the character of the fractures of cervical vertebrae in the drivers (n = 55) and the front-seat passengers (n = 85) of a modern motor vehicle involved in a traffic accident. It was shown that the drivers most frequently suffer bending-extension fractures of the cervical vertebrae, with the II-IV vertebrae being especially frequently subject to multiple fractures resulting in the damage to the anterior support column, sometimes to both the anterior and posterior columns, and much rarer to the posterior column. The front-seat passengers also suffer bending-extension fractures. The IV-VI vertebrae are most frequently affected in them with isolated damages to either the anterior or the posterior support column of the neck vertebrae. PMID:26856055

  2. [The forensic medical evaluation of the injuries to the cervical spine in the driver and the front-seat passenger of a modern motor vehicle after the frontal crash].

    PubMed

    Pigolkin, I; Dubrovin, A; Sedykh, E p; Mosoyan

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to elucidate the specific features of the lesions of the cervical spine in the driver and the front-seat passenger of a modern car after the frontal crash. We made use of the archival materials of forensic medical expertises concerning the traffic accidents carried out in the city of Moscow during the period from 2005 to 2012. The study was focused on the analysis of the character of the fractures of cervical vertebrae in the drivers (n = 55) and the front-seat passengers (n = 85) of a modern motor vehicle involved in a traffic accident. It was shown that the drivers most frequently suffer bending-extension fractures of the cervical vertebrae, with the II-IV vertebrae being especially frequently subject to multiple fractures resulting in the damage to the anterior support column, sometimes to both the anterior and posterior columns, and much rarer to the posterior column. The front-seat passengers also suffer bending-extension fractures. The IV-VI vertebrae are most frequently affected in them with isolated damages to either the anterior or the posterior support column of the neck vertebrae.

  3. Post laminoplasty cervical kyphosis—Case report

    PubMed Central

    Dugoni, D.E.; Mancarella, C.; Landi, A.; Tarantino, R.; Ruggeri, A.G.; Delfini, R.

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Cervical kyphosis is a progressive cervical sagittal plane deformity that may cause a reduction in the ability to look horizontally, breathing and swallowing difficulties, sense of thoracic oppression and social isolation. Moreover, cervical kyphosis can cause myelopathy due to a direct compression by osteo-articular structures on the spinal cord or to a transitory ischaemic injury. The treatment of choice is surgery. The goals of surgery are: nervous structures decompression, cervical and global sagittal balance correction and vertebral stabilization and fusion. PRESENTATION OF CASE In October 2008 a 35 years old woman underwent surgical removal of a cervical-bulbar ependymoma with C1–C5 laminectomy and a C2–C5 laminoplasty. Five months after surgery, the patient developed a kyphotic posture, with intense neck and scapular girdle pain. The patients had a flexible cervical kyphosis. Therefore, we decided to perform an anterior surgical approach. We performed a corpectomy C4–C5 in order to achieve the anterior decompression; we placed a titanium expansion mesh. DISCUSSION Cervical kyphosis can be flexible or fixed. Some authors have reported the use of anterior surgery only for flexible cervical kyphosis as discectomy and corpectomy. This approach is useful for anterior column load sharing however it is not required for deformity correction. CONCLUSION The anterior approach is a good surgical option in flexible cervical kyphosis. It is of primary importance the sagittal alignment of the cervical spine in order to decompress the nervous structures and to guarantee a long-term stability. PMID:25462050

  4. Facial nerve paralysis after cervical traction.

    PubMed

    So, Edmund Cheung

    2010-10-01

    Cervical traction is a frequently used treatment in rehabilitation clinics for cervical spine problems. This modality works, in principle, by decompressing the spinal cord or its nerve roots by applying traction on the cervical spine through a harness placed over the mandible (Olivero et al., Neurosurg Focus 2002;12:ECP1). Previous reports on treatment complications include lumbar radicular discomfort, muscle injury, neck soreness, and posttraction pain (LaBan et al., Arch Phys Med Rehabil 1992;73:295-6; Lee et al., J Biomech Eng 1996;118:597-600). Here, we report the first case of unilateral facial nerve paralysis developed after 4 wks of intermittent cervical traction therapy. Nerve conduction velocity examination revealed a peripheral-type facial nerve paralysis. Symptoms of facial nerve paralysis subsided after prednisolone treatment and suspension of traction therapy. It is suspected that a misplaced or an overstrained harness may have been the cause of facial nerve paralysis in this patient. Possible causes were (1) direct compression by the harness on the right facial nerve near its exit through the stylomastoid foramen; (2) compression of the right external carotid artery by the harness, causing transient ischemic injury at the geniculate ganglion; or (3) coincidental herpes zoster virus infection or idiopathic Bell's palsy involving the facial nerve.

  5. Tumors of the spine

    PubMed Central

    Ciftdemir, Mert; Kaya, Murat; Selcuk, Esref; Yalniz, Erol

    2016-01-01

    Spine tumors comprise a small percentage of reasons for back pain and other symptoms originating in the spine. The majority of the tumors involving the spinal column are metastases of visceral organ cancers which are mostly seen in older patients. Primary musculoskeletal system sarcomas involving the spinal column are rare. Benign tumors and tumor-like lesions of the musculoskeletal system are mostly seen in young patients and often cause instability and canal compromise. Optimal diagnosis and treatment of spine tumors require a multidisciplinary approach and thorough knowledge of both spine surgery and musculoskeletal tumor surgery. Either primary or metastatic tumors involving the spine are demanding problems in terms of diagnosis and treatment. Spinal instability and neurological compromise are the main and critical problems in patients with tumors of the spinal column. In the past, only a few treatment options aiming short-term control were available for treatment of primary and metastatic spine tumors. Spine surgeons adapted their approach for spine tumors according to orthopaedic oncologic principles in the last 20 years. Advances in imaging, surgical techniques and implant technology resulted in better diagnosis and surgical treatment options, especially for primary tumors. Also, modern chemotherapy drugs and regimens with new radiotherapy and radiosurgery options caused moderate to long-term local and systemic control for even primary sarcomas involving the spinal column. PMID:26925382

  6. Anterior Herniation of Partially Calcified and Degenerated Cervical Disc Causing Dysphagia.

    PubMed

    Ozdol, Cagatay; Turk, Cezmi Cagri; Yildirim, Ali Erdem; Dalgic, Ali

    2015-08-01

    We report a rare case of anterior cervical disc herniation associated with dysphagia. A 32-year-old man presented with complaints of dysphagia and concomitant pain in the right arm resistant to conservative therapy. On physical examination with respect to the muscle strength, the right shoulder abduction and flexion of the forearm were 3/5. Lateral X-ray revealed calcified osteophytes at the anterior C4-5 level. Magnetic resonance imaging showed soft disc herniation involving the right C6 root at the C5-6 level and anterior herniation of the C4-5 cervical disc. Anterior discectomies for C4-5 and C5-6 levels stabilized and ameliorated the dysphagia and pain. Cervical disc herniation usually presents with radicular findings. However, dysphagia may be an uncommon presentation. Anterior cervical disc herniation should be considered in a patient presenting with dysphagia. PMID:26240723

  7. Single-cell genetic expression of mutant GABAA receptors causing Human genetic epilepsy alters dendritic spine and GABAergic bouton formation in a mutation-specific manner

    PubMed Central

    Lachance-Touchette, Pamela; Choudhury, Mayukh; Stoica, Ana; Di Cristo, Graziella; Cossette, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    Mutations in genes encoding for GABAA receptor subunits is a well-established cause of genetic generalized epilepsy. GABA neurotransmission is implicated in several developmental processes including neurite outgrowth and synapse formation. Alteration in excitatory/inhibitory synaptic activities plays a critical role in epilepsy, thus here we investigated whether mutations in α1 subunit of GABAA receptor may affect dendritic spine and GABAergic bouton formation. In particular, we examined the effects of three mutations of the GABRA1 gene (D219N, A322D and K353delins18X) that were found in a cohort of French Canadian families with genetic generalized epilepsy. We used a novel single-cell genetic approach, by preparing cortical organotypic cultures from GABRA1flox/flox mice and simultaneously inactivating endogenous GABRA1 and transfecting mutant α1 subunits in single glutamatergic pyramidal cells and basket GABAergic interneurons by biolistic transfection. We found that GABRA1−/− GABAergic cells showed reduced innervation field, which was rescued by co-expressing α1-A322D and α1-WT but not α1-D219N. We further found that the expression of the most severe GABRA1 missense mutation (α1-A322D) induced a striking increase of spine density in pyramidal cells along with an increase in the number of mushroom-like spines. In addition, α1-A322D expression in GABAergic cells slightly increased perisomatic bouton density, whereas other mutations did not alter bouton formation. All together, these results suggest that the effects of different GABAAR mutations on GABAergic bouton and dendritic spine formation are specific to the mutation and cannot be always explained by a simple loss-of-function gene model. The use of single cell genetic manipulation in organotypic cultures may provide a better understanding of the specific and distinct neural circuit alterations caused by different GABAA receptor subunit mutations and will help define the pathophysiology of genetic

  8. [Factors of prognosis in cervical spondylotic myelopathy: a review].

    PubMed

    Tang, Yong; Jia, Zhi-wei; Wu, Jian-hong; Wang, De-li; Ruan, Di-ke

    2016-03-01

    Cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM) is a common cause of spinal cord dysfunction clinical disease. Surgery is the main therapeutic tool for CSM. However, there are obvious differences in clinical functional recovery after operation. For the past few years, the influence factors of prognosis in cervical spondylosis myelopathic has been widely concerned. Age, nerve function, course of desease, imaging findings,surgical method and related factors became the investigative point for prognosis of cervical spondylotic myelopathy. Present viewpoint showed that the older patient, preoperative worse nerve function, longer the course of disease would result in worse outcomes. Imaging examination maybe can indicate the prognosis, but the correlation is unclear. Selection of surgical method and approach should be based on the principles of sufficient decompression, stabilize the alignment of the cervical spine, keeping backward extension of cervical spine, maintain effective decompression, preventing complications. Therefore, the treatment of cervical spondylotic myelopathy should be on the basis of pathogenic condition and imaging examination at early stage and a suitable usrgical procedure should be performed to obtain a better prognosis. PMID:27149790

  9. [Cervical thymic cysts are a rare cause of neck masses in children and adolescents].

    PubMed

    Jørgensen, Rasmus Langelund; Larsen, Stine Rosenkilde; Bay, Mette; Godballe, Christian

    2014-10-01

    Cervical thymic cysts are rare benign unilateral lesions of the neck most often diagnosed in male children less than ten years of age. To date, less than 200 cases have been described. We report a case with a typical presentation in an 8-year-old boy. To our knowledge this is the first reported case in Denmark for almost three decades. Cervical thymic cysts represent a clinical challenge as no diagnostic non-invasive test or imaging is available. The cyst was successfully removed by surgical excision and a final histological diagnosis obtained. PMID:25331660

  10. Adjacent Segment Pathology after Anterior Cervical Fusion.

    PubMed

    Chung, Jae Yoon; Park, Jong-Beom; Seo, Hyoung-Yeon; Kim, Sung Kyu

    2016-06-01

    Anterior cervical fusion has become a standard of care for numerous pathologic conditions of the cervical spine. However, subsequent development of clinically significant disc disease at levels adjacent to fused discs is a serious long-term complication of this procedure. As more patients live longer after surgery, it is foreseeable that adjacent segment pathology (ASP) will develop in increasing numbers of patients. Also, ASP has been studied more intensively with the recent popularity of motion preservation technologies like total disc arthroplasty. The true nature and scope of ASP remains poorly understood. The etiology of ASP is most likely multifactorial. Various factors including altered biomechanical stresses, surgical disruption of soft tissue and the natural history of cervical disc disease contribute to the development of ASP. General factors associated with disc degeneration including gender, age, smoking and sports may play a role in the development of ASP. Postoperative sagittal alignment and type of surgery are also considered potential causes of ASP. Therefore, a spine surgeon must be particularly careful to avoid unnecessary disruption of the musculoligamentous structures, reduced risk of direct injury to the disc during dissection and maintain a safe margin between the plate edge and adjacent vertebrae during anterior cervical fusion.

  11. Adjacent Segment Pathology after Anterior Cervical Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Jae Yoon; Park, Jong-Beom; Seo, Hyoung-Yeon

    2016-01-01

    Anterior cervical fusion has become a standard of care for numerous pathologic conditions of the cervical spine. However, subsequent development of clinically significant disc disease at levels adjacent to fused discs is a serious long-term complication of this procedure. As more patients live longer after surgery, it is foreseeable that adjacent segment pathology (ASP) will develop in increasing numbers of patients. Also, ASP has been studied more intensively with the recent popularity of motion preservation technologies like total disc arthroplasty. The true nature and scope of ASP remains poorly understood. The etiology of ASP is most likely multifactorial. Various factors including altered biomechanical stresses, surgical disruption of soft tissue and the natural history of cervical disc disease contribute to the development of ASP. General factors associated with disc degeneration including gender, age, smoking and sports may play a role in the development of ASP. Postoperative sagittal alignment and type of surgery are also considered potential causes of ASP. Therefore, a spine surgeon must be particularly careful to avoid unnecessary disruption of the musculoligamentous structures, reduced risk of direct injury to the disc during dissection and maintain a safe margin between the plate edge and adjacent vertebrae during anterior cervical fusion. PMID:27340541

  12. Cervical polyps

    MedlinePlus

    Vaginal bleeding - polyps ... The exact cause of cervical polyps is not known. They may occur with: An abnormal response to increased levels of the female hormone estrogen Chronic inflammation Clogged ...

  13. Just a drop of cement: a case of cervical spine bone aneurysmal cyst successfully treated by percutaneous injection of a small amount of polymethyl-methacrylate cement.

    PubMed

    Fahed, Robert; Clarençon, Frédéric; Riouallon, Guillaume; Cormier, Evelyne; Bonaccorsi, Raphael; Pascal-Mousselard, Hugues; Chiras, Jacques

    2016-01-01

    Aneurysmal bone cyst (ABC) is a benign hemorrhagic tumor, commonly revealed by local pain. The best treatment for this lesion is still controversial. We report the case of a patient with chronic neck pain revealing an ABC of the third cervical vertebra. After percutaneous injection of a small amount of polymethyl-methacrylate bone cement, the patient experienced significant clinical and radiological improvement.

  14. Cervical spondylosis. An update.

    PubMed Central

    McCormack, B M; Weinstein, P R

    1996-01-01

    Cervical spondylosis is caused by degenerative disc disease and usually produces intermittent neck pain in middle-aged and elderly patients. This pain usually responds to activity modification, neck immobilization, isometric exercises, and medication. Neurologic symptoms occur infrequently, usually in patients with congenital spinal stenosis. For these patients, magnetic resonance imaging is the preferred initial diagnostic study. Because involvement of neurologic structures on imaging studies may be asymptomatic, consultation with a neurologist is advised to rule out other neurologic diseases. In most cases of spondylotic radiculopathy, the results of conservative treatment are so favorable that surgical intervention is not considered unless pain persists or unless there is progressive neurologic deficit. If indicated, a surgical procedure may be done through the anterior or posterior cervical spine; results are gratifying, with long-term improvement in 70% to 80% of patients. Cervical spondylotic myelopathy is the most serious and disabling condition of this disease. Because many patients have nonprogressive minor impairment, neck immobilization is a reasonable treatment in patients presenting with minor neurologic findings or in whom an operation is contraindicated. This simple remedy will result in improvement in 30% to 50% of patients. Surgical intervention is indicated for patients presenting with severe or progressive neurologic deficits. Anterior cervical approaches are generally preferred, although there are still indications for laminectomy. Surgical results are modest, with good initial results expected in about 70% of patients. Functional outcome noticeably declines with long-term follow-up, which raises the question of whether, and how much, surgical treatment affects the natural course of the disease. Prospective randomized studies are needed to answer these questions. Images Figure 1. Figure 2. Figure 3. PMID:8855684

  15. Curcumin causes DNA damage and affects associated protein expression in HeLa human cervical cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Shang, Hung-Sheng; Chang, Chuan-Hsun; Chou, Yu-Ru; Yeh, Ming-Yang; Au, Man-Kuan; Lu, Hsu-Feng; Chu, Yung-Lin; Chou, Hsiao-Min; Chou, Hsiu-Chen; Shih, Yung-Luen; Chung, Jing-Gung

    2016-10-01

    Cervical cancer is one of the most common cancers in women worldwide and it is a prominent cause of cancer mortality. Curcumin is one of the major compounds from Turmeric and has been shown to induce cytotoxic cell death in human cervical cancer cells. However, there is no study to show curcumin induced DNA damage action via the effect on the DNA damage and repair protein in cervical cancer cells in detail. In this study, we investigated whether or not curcumin induced cell death via DNA damage, chromatin condensation in human cervical cancer HeLa cells by using comet assay and DAPI staining, respectively, we found that curcumin induced cell death through the induction of DNA damage, and chromatin condensation. Western blotting and confocal laser microscopy examination were used to examine the effects of curcumin on protein expression associated with DNA damage, repair and translocation of proteins. We found that curcumin at 13 µM increased the protein levels associated with DNA damage and repair, such as O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase, early-onset breast cancer 1 (BRCA1), mediator of DNA damage checkpoint 1, p-p53 and p-H2A.XSer140 in HeLa cells. Results from confocal laser systems microscopy indicated that curcumin increased the translocation of p-p53 and p-H2A.XSer140 from cytosol to nuclei in HeLa cells. In conclusion, curcumin induced cell death in HeLa cells via induction of DNA damage, and chromatin condensation in vitro. PMID:27499229

  16. Curcumin causes DNA damage and affects associated protein expression in HeLa human cervical cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Shang, Hung-Sheng; Chang, Chuan-Hsun; Chou, Yu-Ru; Yeh, Ming-Yang; Au, Man-Kuan; Lu, Hsu-Feng; Chu, Yung-Lin; Chou, Hsiao-Min; Chou, Hsiu-Chen; Shih, Yung-Luen; Chung, Jing-Gung

    2016-10-01

    Cervical cancer is one of the most common cancers in women worldwide and it is a prominent cause of cancer mortality. Curcumin is one of the major compounds from Turmeric and has been shown to induce cytotoxic cell death in human cervical cancer cells. However, there is no study to show curcumin induced DNA damage action via the effect on the DNA damage and repair protein in cervical cancer cells in detail. In this study, we investigated whether or not curcumin induced cell death via DNA damage, chromatin condensation in human cervical cancer HeLa cells by using comet assay and DAPI staining, respectively, we found that curcumin induced cell death through the induction of DNA damage, and chromatin condensation. Western blotting and confocal laser microscopy examination were used to examine the effects of curcumin on protein expression associated with DNA damage, repair and translocation of proteins. We found that curcumin at 13 µM increased the protein levels associated with DNA damage and repair, such as O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransferase, early-onset breast cancer 1 (BRCA1), mediator of DNA damage checkpoint 1, p-p53 and p-H2A.XSer140 in HeLa cells. Results from confocal laser systems microscopy indicated that curcumin increased the translocation of p-p53 and p-H2A.XSer140 from cytosol to nuclei in HeLa cells. In conclusion, curcumin induced cell death in HeLa cells via induction of DNA damage, and chromatin condensation in vitro.

  17. Cervical cancer - screening and prevention

    MedlinePlus

    Cancer cervix - screening; HPV - cervical cancer screening; Dysplasia - cervical cancer screening ... Almost all cervical cancers are caused by HPV (human papilloma virus). HPV is a common virus that spreads through sexual contact. Certain types ...

  18. Multiple noncontiguous spine fractures.

    PubMed

    Henderson, R L; Reid, D C; Saboe, L A

    1991-02-01

    The data from a prospective study of 508 spine injuries were reviewed to determine the incidence of multiple noncontiguous spine fractures. All patients were examined at admission and at 1 and 2 years postinjury. This series identified 77 (15.2%) multilevel fractures. Motor vehicle accidents were the primary cause of these fractures. The incidence of neurologic injury was not significantly different between multiple noncontiguous and single fractures. Failure to use seat belts and ejection from the vehicle were the main factors associated with multiple noncontiguous spine injuries. Seven major fracture patterns were identified, which accounted for 60% of these injuries. The prognosis for multilevel spine fractures was not significantly worse that that for single-level injuries. PMID:2011766

  19. Acute cervical spinal cord injury secondary to air bag deployment without proper use of lap or shoulder harnesses.

    PubMed

    Hart, R A; Mayberry, J C; Herzberg, A M

    2000-02-01

    The authors present a case report of a patient with cervical central spinal cord syndrome caused by a hyperextension injury after a motor vehicle collision in which the air bag deployed in the absence of shoulder or lap belt harnesses. The potential for cervical spine and spinal cord hyperextension injuries in passengers positioned in front of air bags without proper use of shoulder or lap belt harnesses is discussed. Cervical central spinal cord quadriplegia occurred with cervical spondylosis and kyphosis that was managed by early three-level cervical corpectomy in a 58-year-old patient. Early improvement in the patient's neurological status occurred but was incomplete at the time of this report. Cervical hyperextension injuries are possible in passengers positioned in the front seat of cars with air bags when shoulder or lap belt harnesses are not used properly. Previous biomechanical studies have documented the potential for these types of injuries.

  20. Ultrasound Imaging of Spine: State of the Art and Utility for Space Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sargsyan, Ashot E.; Bouffard, Antonio J.; Garcia, Kathleen; Hamilton, Douglas R.; Van Holsbeeck, Marnix; Ebert, Douglas J. W.; Dulchavsky, Scott A.

    2010-01-01

    Introduction: Ultrasound imaging (sonography) has been increasingly used for both primary diagnosis and monitoring of musculoskeletal injury, including fractures. In certain injuries, sonography has been shown to equal or surpass Magnetic Resonance Imaging in accuracy. Long-term exposure to reduced gravity may be expected to cause physiological and anatomical changes of the musculoskeletal system, which are not fully described or understood. In a limited-resource environment like space flight, sonography will likely remain the only imaging modality; therefore, further attention to its potential is warranted, including its ability to image anatomical deviations as well as irregularities of vertebrae and the spinal column. Methods: A thorough review of literature was conducted on the subject. A multipurpose ultrasound system was used to identify specific vertebrae, intervertebral disks, and other structures of the cervical spine in healthy volunteers, selected to represent various age, gender, and Body Mass Index (BMI) groups. Sonographic views were sought that would parallel radiographic views and signs used in the diagnosis of cervical spine injuries. Results: While using widely accepted radiographic signs of cervical spine injury, this sonographic protocol development effort resulted in successful identification of scanning planes and imaging protocols that could serve as alternatives for radiography. Some of these views are also applicable to diagnosing degenerative disk and bone disease, and other non-traumatic spine pathology. Strong, preliminary correlation has been demonstrated in a number of clinical cases between sonography and other imaging modalities. Conclusion: In the absence of radiography, sonography can be used to diagnose or rule out certain common types of cervical spine conditions including injury. Clinical validation of the findings appears to be realistic and would facilitate establishment of new sonographic protocols for special environments

  1. Osteoporosis and Your Spine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Movement › Osteoporosis and Your Spine Osteoporosis and Your Spine Your spine is made up of small bones ... called kyphosis. Kyphosis and Bone Breaks in the Spine The bones in the spine are called vertebrae. ...

  2. Multi-center, Prospective, Randomized, Controlled Investigational Device Exemption Clinical Trial Comparing Mobi-C Cervical Artificial Disc to Anterior Discectomy and Fusion in the Treatment of Symptomatic Degenerative Disc Disease in the Cervical Spine

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Hyun W.; Davis, Reginald; Gaede, Steven; Hoffman, Greg; Kim, Kee; Nunley, Pierce D.; Peterson, Daniel; Rashbaum, Ralph; Stokes, John

    2014-01-01

    Background Anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) is the gold standard for treating symptomatic cervical disc degeneration. Cervical total disc replacements (TDRs) have emerged as an alternative for some patients. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the safety and effectiveness of a new TDR device compared with ACDF for treating single-level cervical disc degeneration. Methods This was a prospective, randomized, controlled, multicenter Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regulated Investigational Device Exemption (IDE) study. A total of 245 patients were treated (164 TDR: 81 ACDF). The primary outcome measure was overall success based on improvement in Neck Disability Index (NDI), no subsequent surgical interventions, and no adverse events (AEs) classified as major complications. Secondary outcome measures included SF-12, visual analog scale (VAS) assessing neck and arm pain, patient satisfaction, radiographic range of motion, and adjacent level degeneration. Patients were evaluated preoperatively and postoperatively at 6 weeks, 3, 6, 12, 18, and 24 months. The hypothesis was that the TDR success rate was non-inferior to ACDF at 24 months. Results Overall success rates were 73.6% for TDR and 65.3% for ACDF, confirming non-inferiority (p < 0.0025). TDR demonstrated earlier improvements with significant differences in NDI scores at 6 weeks and 3 months, and VAS neck pain and SF-12 PCS scores at 6 weeks (p<0.05). Operative level range of motion in the TDR group was maintained throughout follow-up. Radiographic evidence of inferior adjacent segment degeneration was significantly greater with ACDF at 12 and 24 months (p < 0.05). AE rates were similar. Conclusions Mobi-C TDR is a safe and effective treatment for single-level disc degeneration, producing outcomes similar to ACDF with less adjacent segment degeneration. Level of Evidence: Level I. Clinical relevance: This study adds to the literature supporting cervical TDR as a viable option to ACDF in

  3. Kyphosis one level above the cervical disc disease: is the kyphosis cause or effect?

    PubMed

    Ozer, Ercan; Yücesoy, Kemal; Yurtsever, Cem; Seçil, Mustafa

    2007-02-01

    If present, kyphotic angulation is generally at the level of the cervical disc disease (CDD) in the neck, but sometimes occurs at one level above the CDD. We name this situation as kyphosis one level above (KOLA). KOLA CDD has not been studied previously. In this study, we present 18 patients who had KOLA among 147 patients operated for CDD over a 5-year period. Seven of these 18 patients also received surgery for their KOLA. As new, surgical treatment of kyphotic level was performed with plating and without bony fusion in 5 patients. Clinical outcomes (according to Odom's criteria) and kyphotic corrections of KOLA patients receiving and not receiving surgery for their kyphosis during were compared. The 7 KOLA patients having surgery to correct the kyphosis had a mean 20.14+/-3.13 degrees correction in their kyphosis (from mean 12.85 to -7.28 degrees), whereas the 11 patients undergoing surgery only for CDD showed only a mean 3.00+/-2.52 degrees correction (from mean 7.45 to 4.45 degrees). When kyphotic corrections were compared, statistically significant difference was found between 2 groups (P<0.01). Clinical outcome scores showed a trend towards improvement in the patients operated upon for kyphosis correction. KOLA may be a factor in the development of cervical disc herniation and spondylosis, and should be treated if more than 11 degrees. In cervical region, upper adjacent level disease may be an extension of KOLA. Larger studies can further define the relationship between KOLA and CDD, and indications for surgical correction of KOLA. PMID:17285046

  4. Association of miR-146a, miR-149, miR-196a2, and miR-499 Polymorphisms with Ossification of the Posterior Longitudinal Ligament of the Cervical Spine

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Young Joo; Kumar, Hemant; Sohn, Seil; Min, Hyoung Sik; Lee, Jang Bo; Kuh, Sung Uk; Kim, Keung Nyun; Kim, Jung Oh; Kim, Ok Joon; Ropper, Alexander E.; Kim, Nam Keun; Han, In Bo

    2016-01-01

    Background Ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament (OPLL) of the spine is considered a multifactorial and polygenic disease. We aimed to investigate the association between four single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of pre-miRNAs [miR-146aC>G (rs2910164), miR-149T>C (rs2292832), miR-196a2T>C (rs11614913), and miR-499A>G (rs3746444)] and the risk of cervical OPLL in the Korean population. Methods The genotypic frequencies of these four SNPs were analyzed in 207 OPLL patients and 200 controls by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) assay. Findings For four SNPs in pre-miRNAs, no significant differences were found between OPLL patients and controls. However, subgroup analysis based on OPLL subgroup (continuous: continuous type plus mixed type, segmental: segmental and localized type) showed that miR-499GG genotype was associated with an increased risk of segmental type OPLL (adjusted odds ratio = 4.314 with 95% confidence interval: 1.109–16.78). In addition, some allele combinations (C-T-T-G, G-T-T-A, and G-T-C-G of miR-146a/-149/-196a2/-499) and combined genotypes (miR-149TC/miR-196a2TT) were associated with increased OPLL risk, whereas the G-T-T-G and G-C-C-G allele combinations were associated with decreased OPLL risk. Conclusion The results indicate that GG genotype of miR-499 is associated with significantly higher risks of OPLL in the segmental OPLL group. The miR-146a/-149/-196a2/-499 allele combinations may be a genetic risk factor for cervical OPLL in the Korean population. PMID:27454313

  5. Langerhans' cell histiocytosis involving posterior elements of the dorsal spine: An unusual cause of extradural spinal mass in an adult.

    PubMed

    Tyagi, Devendra K; Balasubramaniam, Srikant; Savant, Hemant V

    2011-07-01

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH) is a clonal proliferation of Langerhans cells occurring as an isolated lesion or as part of a systemic proliferation. It is commoner in children younger than 10 years of age with sparing of the posterior elements in more than 95% of cases. We describe a case of LCH in an adult female presenting with paraplegia. MRI revealed a well-defined extradural contrast enhancing mass at D2-D4 vertebral level involving the posterior elements of spine. D2-5 laminectomy with excision of lesion was performed which lead to marked improvement of patients neurological status. Histopathology was suggestive of eosinophilic granuloma. We describe the case, discuss its uniqueness and review the literature on this rare tumor presentation.

  6. Clinical Case Report of Expansive Laminoplasty for Cervical Myelopathy Due to Both Disc Herniation and Developmental Cervical Spinal Canal Stenosis in Older Adolescents.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Hua; Sun, Yu; Zhang, Fengshan; Dang, Gengting; Liu, Zhongjun

    2016-02-01

    Reports on adolescent patients with cervical myelopathy who underwent anterior cervical discectomy and fusion are scarce. However, to our knowledge, no cases of expansive laminoplasty for cervical myelopathy associated with progressive neurological deficit after a series of conservative treatment, caused by both disc herniation and developmental cervical spinal canal stenosis, have been reported.From January 2006 to July 2012, we retrospectively studied 3 patients in late adolescence presenting with cervical myelopathy who underwent expansive unilateral open-door laminoplasty at our hospital. The outcomes after the surgery were evaluated according to the Japanese Orthopedic Association scores.Symptoms presented by these patients were due to both disc herniation and developmental cervical spinal canal stenosis. No major complications occurred after the surgical procedures. The median follow-up time was 66 months (range 36-112 months). The Japanese Orthopedic Association scores after surgery showed a significant increase. Long-term outcomes after surgery were satisfactory according to the evaluation criteria for the Japanese Orthopedic Association scores. However, the ranges of motion of the cervical spine decreased, especially the ranges of motion on flexion after surgery showed a significant decrease.Expansive laminoplasty is helpful for older adolescent patients with cervical myelopathy due to both disc herniation and developmental cervical spinal canal stenosis, presenting with progressive neurological deficit after long conservative treatment. PMID:26937923

  7. Clinical Case Report of Expansive Laminoplasty for Cervical Myelopathy Due to Both Disc Herniation and Developmental Cervical Spinal Canal Stenosis in Older Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Hua; Sun, Yu; Zhang, Fengshan; Dang, Gengting; Liu, Zhongjun

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Reports on adolescent patients with cervical myelopathy who underwent anterior cervical discectomy and fusion are scarce. However, to our knowledge, no cases of expansive laminoplasty for cervical myelopathy associated with progressive neurological deficit after a series of conservative treatment, caused by both disc herniation and developmental cervical spinal canal stenosis, have been reported. From January 2006 to July 2012, we retrospectively studied 3 patients in late adolescence presenting with cervical myelopathy who underwent expansive unilateral open-door laminoplasty at our hospital. The outcomes after the surgery were evaluated according to the Japanese Orthopedic Association scores. Symptoms presented by these patients were due to both disc herniation and developmental cervical spinal canal stenosis. No major complications occurred after the surgical procedures. The median follow-up time was 66 months (range 36–112 months). The Japanese Orthopedic Association scores after surgery showed a significant increase. Long-term outcomes after surgery were satisfactory according to the evaluation criteria for the Japanese Orthopedic Association scores. However, the ranges of motion of the cervical spine decreased, especially the ranges of motion on flexion after surgery showed a significant decrease. Expansive laminoplasty is helpful for older adolescent patients with cervical myelopathy due to both disc herniation and developmental cervical spinal canal stenosis, presenting with progressive neurological deficit after long conservative treatment. PMID:26937923

  8. The Relationship between Neck Pain and Cervical Alignment in Young Female Nursing Staff

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jang-Hun; Kim, Joo Han; Kim, Jong-Hyun; Kwon, Taek-Hyun; Park, Yoon-Kwan

    2015-01-01

    Objective Degenerative changes in the cervical spine are commonly accompanied by cervical kyphosis which can cause neck pain. This study examined the relationship between neck pain and cervical alignment. Methods A total of 323 female nursing staff from our hospital were enrolled. Sagittal radiographs of the cervical spine, Body Mass Index (BMI), Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) measures of neck and arm pain, Neck Disability Index (NDI) and the Short Form (36) Health Survey (SF-36 scores) were obtained and reviewed retrospectively. Global lordosis (GL) of the cervical spine was measured on radiograph images. Correlations between GL and questionnaire scores were investigated using the following three methods : 1) correlation between GL and questionnaire scores among the entire sample; 2) subgroup analysis of patients with "kyphosis (KYP) : GL scores<0" vs. those with "lordosis (LOR) : GL scores>0" on questionnaire measures; and 3) subgroup analysis of patients with pain vs. those without pain, on GL and questionnaire measures. Results There was no significant correlation between GL and any questionnaire measure. There was a significant difference between the mean GLs of the KYP and LOR groups, but there were no group differences in BMI, age or any questionnaire measures. There was no difference between the pain (n=92) and pain-free (n=231) groups in age, BMI or GL, but there were differences in neck, and arm pain, and physical function and NDI scores. Conclusions Our data suggest that kyphotic deformity was not associated with neck pain. PMID:26539266

  9. Trauma: Conventional radiologic study in spine injury

    SciTech Connect

    Dosch, J.

    1985-01-01

    This book includes a discussion of the anatomy of the spinal cord and descriptions of methods for tailored radiologic investigation of spine trauma. Most of the text is devoted to the analysis and classification of spinal injury by radiologic signs and mode of injury. The author addresses injury to the entire spine but emphasizes the cervical spine. Plain radiography and conventional tomography are the only imaging methods discussed. The author stresses the active role of the attending radiologist in directing every phase of the x-ray study. Many subtle variations in patient positioning plus beam direction and angulation are described.

  10. Dorsal spine osteoblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Bhargava, Pranshu; Singh, Rahul; Garg, Bharat B.

    2016-01-01

    Benign osteoblastoma is a rare primary neoplasm comprising less than 1% of primary bone tumors.[1] We report a case of a 20-year-old female patient presenting with progressive paraparesis over one year and back pain over the dorsal spine gradually increasing in severity over a year. Computerised tomomography (CT) of the spine revealed a well-defined 3.5 × 3.0 cm mass heterodense expansile bony lesion arising from the lamina of the D12 vertebra, having lytic and sclerotic component and causing compromise of the bony spinal canal. D12 laminectomy and total excision of the tumor was done. PMID:27057242

  11. The Degenerative Spine.

    PubMed

    Clarençon, Frédéric; Law-Ye, Bruno; Bienvenot, Peggy; Cormier, Évelyne; Chiras, Jacques

    2016-08-01

    Degenerative disease of the spine is a leading cause of back pain and radiculopathy, and is a frequent indication for spine MR imaging. Disc degeneration, disc protrusion/herniation, discarhtrosis, spinal canal stenosis, and facet joint arthrosis, as well as interspinous processes arthrosis, may require an MR imaging workup. This review presents the MR imaging patterns of these diseases and describes the benefit of the MR imaging in these indications compared with the other imaging modalities like plain radiographs or computed tomography scan. PMID:27417397

  12. Assessment of spine pain presence in children and young persons studying in ballet schools.

    PubMed

    Wójcik, Małgorzata; Siatkowski, Idzi

    2015-04-01

    [Purpose] Spine disorders affect various sections of the spine and have a variety of causes. Most pain occurs in the lumbo-sacral and cervical regions. Dance is associated with exercise. High levels of physical activity predispose to back pain occurrence. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects were 237 ballet learners; 80 children (primary school level), mean age 11.24±0.77, mean of years of training ballet 2.14±0.74; 93 students (junior high school level), mean age 14.01±0.84, mean of years of learning ballet 4.64±1.24; 64 students (high school) mean age 17.01±0.77, mean of years of learning ballet 7.47±1.54. Numeric rating scale was used to determine spine pain. [Results] Feelings of pain were analyzed on the basis of "now" and "before" between levels education by using point statistics and statistical tests to compare groups. "Now" exhibited weaker back pain feelings than "before" at all the education levels. There were statistically significant differences in pain feeling for "before" (at any time of learning) and "now" (the day of survey). [Conclusion] All patients reported pain "before" and "now" in cervical, thoracic and lumbar spine. At all levels of education there were statistically significant differences in feelings of pain between "before" and "now". PMID:25995566

  13. Assessment of spine pain presence in children and young persons studying in ballet schools

    PubMed Central

    Wójcik, Małgorzata; Siatkowski, Idzi

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] Spine disorders affect various sections of the spine and have a variety of causes. Most pain occurs in the lumbo-sacral and cervical regions. Dance is associated with exercise. High levels of physical activity predispose to back pain occurrence. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects were 237 ballet learners; 80 children (primary school level), mean age 11.24±0.77, mean of years of training ballet 2.14±0.74; 93 students (junior high school level), mean age 14.01±0.84, mean of years of learning ballet 4.64±1.24; 64 students (high school) mean age 17.01±0.77, mean of years of learning ballet 7.47±1.54. Numeric rating scale was used to determine spine pain. [Results] Feelings of pain were analyzed on the basis of “now” and “before” between levels education by using point statistics and statistical tests to compare groups. “Now” exhibited weaker back pain feelings than “before” at all the education levels. There were statistically significant differences in pain feeling for “before” (at any time of learning) and “now” (the day of survey). [Conclusion] All patients reported pain “before” and “now” in cervical, thoracic and lumbar spine. At all levels of education there were statistically significant differences in feelings of pain between “before” and “now”. PMID:25995566

  14. Cervical Spondylotic Myelopathy Secondary to Dropped Head Syndrome: Report of a Case and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Soufiani, Housain F.; Rahimizadeh, Saghayegh

    2016-01-01

    The dropped head syndrome (DHS) is a disabling condition caused by severe weakness of the neck extensor muscles causing progressive reducible kyphosis of the cervical spine and the inability to hold the head up. Weakness can occur in isolation or in association with a generalized neuromuscular disorder. Isolated cases are owed to the late onset of noninflammatory myopathy designated as INEM, where persistent chin to chest deformity may gradually cause or aggravate preexisting degenerative changes of the cervical spine and ultimately result in myelopathy. In review of the literature, we could find only 5 cases, with no unique guidelines to address the management of these two concomitant pathologies. Herein, a 69-year-old man who had developed cervical myelopathy 2 years after being affected by isolated dropped head syndrome is presented. Chin to chest deformity and cervical myelopathy were managed through three-level anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) combined with decompressive cervical laminectomy and stabilization with C2 to C7 pedicle screw-rod construct. At 4-month follow-up, despite recovery in patient's neurological status, flexion deformity reappeared with recurrence of dropped head due to C7 pedicle screws pull-out. However, this was successfully managed with extension of the construct to the upper thoracic levels. PMID:27034870

  15. Mycobacteria causing human cervical lymphadenitis in pastoral communities in the Karamoja region of Uganda.

    PubMed

    Oloya, J; Opuda-Asibo, J; Kazwala, R; Demelash, A B; Skjerve, E; Lund, A; Johansen, T B; Djonne, B

    2008-05-01

    Mycobacteria from lymph node biopsies of patients with cervical lymphadenitis reporting for tuberculosis treatment in Matany and Moroto Hospitals in the transhumant areas of Karamoja, Uganda were isolated and characterized. The AccuProbe culture identification kits for Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTC), M. avium complex (MAC) and M. avium were used to identify the isolates. Spoligotyping, IS901 PCR and IS1311 and IS1245 restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) were used to characterize the isolates. Of the 43 biopsies, ten M. avium, seven M. tuberculosis, three M. bovis, and two M. intracellulare were isolated. Two isolates could not be identified with AccuProbe and from 19 samples no mycobacteria could be isolated. Three isolates with the Beijing spoligotype were identified from the seven M. tuberculosis isolates. The spoligopatterns of the M. bovis isolates had previously been detected in cattle in Uganda. Isolation of members of the MAC group reflects the complex interaction between the transhumant communities, water sources and their cattle. None of the M. avium isolates harboured IS901, and all showed several bands on IS1311 and IS1245 RFLP, in accordance with M. avium subsp. hominissuis. Composite dendrograms of IS1311 and IS1245 RFLP showed that the isolates were similar and identical patterns were found. The isolation of M. bovis confirms the human infection with zoonotic mycobacteria in areas where consumption of raw milk and meat is routine. Isolation of environmental mycobacteria also confirms their increasing role in human disease and the occupational risk of infection in the transhumant ecosystem in the absence of safe drinking water and environmental contamination.

  16. Syringomyelia associated with cervical spondylosis: A rare condition

    PubMed Central

    Landi, Alessandro; Nigro, Lorenzo; Marotta, Nicola; Mancarella, Cristina; Donnarumma, Pasquale; Delfini, Roberto

    2013-01-01

    Spinal spondylosis is an extremely common condition that has only rarely been described as a cause of syringomyelia. We describe a case of syringomyelia associated with cervical spondylosis admitted at our division and treated by our institute. It is the case of a 66-year-old woman. At our observation she was affected by moderate-severe spastic tetraparesis. T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed an hyperintense signal within spinal cord from C3 to T1 with a more sharply defined process in the inferior cervical spinal cord. At the same level bulging discs, facets and ligamenta flava hypertrophy determined a compression towards subarachnoid space and spinal cord. Spinal cord compression was more evident in hyperextension rather than flexion. A 4-level laminectomy and subsequent posterior stabilization with intra-articular screws was executed. At 3-mo follow up there was a regression of tetraparesis but motor deficits of the lower limbs residuated. At the same follow up postoperative MRI was executed. It suggested enlargement of the syrinx. Perhaps hyperintensity within spinal cord appeared “bounded” from C3 to C7 with clearer margins. At the level of surgical decompression, subarachnoid space and spinal cord enlargement were also evident. A review of the literature was executed using PubMed database. The objective of the research was to find an etiopathological theory able to relate syringomyelia with cervical spondylosis. Only 6 articles have been found. At the origin of syringomyelia the mechanisms of compression and instability are proposed. Perhaps other studies assert the importance of subarachnoid space regard cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) dynamic. We postulate that cervical spine instability may be the cause of multiple microtrauma towards spinal cord and consequently may damage spinal cord parenchyma generating myelomalacia and consequently syrinx. Otherwise the hemorrhage within spinal cord central canal can cause an obstruction of CSF outflow

  17. Syringomyelia associated with cervical spondylosis: A rare condition.

    PubMed

    Landi, Alessandro; Nigro, Lorenzo; Marotta, Nicola; Mancarella, Cristina; Donnarumma, Pasquale; Delfini, Roberto

    2013-06-16

    Spinal spondylosis is an extremely common condition that has only rarely been described as a cause of syringomyelia. We describe a case of syringomyelia associated with cervical spondylosis admitted at our division and treated by our institute. It is the case of a 66-year-old woman. At our observation she was affected by moderate-severe spastic tetraparesis. T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed an hyperintense signal within spinal cord from C3 to T1 with a more sharply defined process in the inferior cervical spinal cord. At the same level bulging discs, facets and ligamenta flava hypertrophy determined a compression towards subarachnoid space and spinal cord. Spinal cord compression was more evident in hyperextension rather than flexion. A 4-level laminectomy and subsequent posterior stabilization with intra-articular screws was executed. At 3-mo follow up there was a regression of tetraparesis but motor deficits of the lower limbs residuated. At the same follow up postoperative MRI was executed. It suggested enlargement of the syrinx. Perhaps hyperintensity within spinal cord appeared "bounded" from C3 to C7 with clearer margins. At the level of surgical decompression, subarachnoid space and spinal cord enlargement were also evident. A review of the literature was executed using PubMed database. The objective of the research was to find an etiopathological theory able to relate syringomyelia with cervical spondylosis. Only 6 articles have been found. At the origin of syringomyelia the mechanisms of compression and instability are proposed. Perhaps other studies assert the importance of subarachnoid space regard cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) dynamic. We postulate that cervical spine instability may be the cause of multiple microtrauma towards spinal cord and consequently may damage spinal cord parenchyma generating myelomalacia and consequently syrinx. Otherwise the hemorrhage within spinal cord central canal can cause an obstruction of CSF outflow

  18. Pediatric lymphedema caused by diffuse cervical lymphadenopathy: A case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Gitomer, Sarah A; Giannoni, Carla M; Cañadas, Karina T

    2016-08-01

    Pediatric head and neck lymphedema is rare and there have not been any reported cases in children. Here we discuss severe, diffuse head and neck lymphedema in a child caused by compression of the internal jugular veins by lymphadenopathy from Kawasaki's disease. With steroid and intravenous immunoglobulin treatment, the lymphadenopathy improved and facial edema slowly resolved. In review of the literature, complications of head and neck lymphedema including airway obstruction and blindness are discussed. This case highlights the importance of the pediatric otolaryngologist considering lymphedema as a cause for facial swelling and monitoring for complications of lymphedema. PMID:27368445

  19. Pediatric lymphedema caused by diffuse cervical lymphadenopathy: A case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Gitomer, Sarah A; Giannoni, Carla M; Cañadas, Karina T

    2016-08-01

    Pediatric head and neck lymphedema is rare and there have not been any reported cases in children. Here we discuss severe, diffuse head and neck lymphedema in a child caused by compression of the internal jugular veins by lymphadenopathy from Kawasaki's disease. With steroid and intravenous immunoglobulin treatment, the lymphadenopathy improved and facial edema slowly resolved. In review of the literature, complications of head and neck lymphedema including airway obstruction and blindness are discussed. This case highlights the importance of the pediatric otolaryngologist considering lymphedema as a cause for facial swelling and monitoring for complications of lymphedema.

  20. Cervical cord injury after massage.

    PubMed

    Lee, Tzu-Han; Chiu, Jan-Wei; Chan, Rai-Chi

    2011-10-01

    We present the case of a 47-yr-old gentleman with cervical cord injury after he received massage in the neck area. Magnetic resonance imaging of the cervical spine showed a herniation of the nucleus pulposus and compressive myelopathy. The patient required surgical intervention and rehabilitation. Despite 6 mos of rehabilitation, residual hand dysfunction and minor ambulation problems persisted. Although massage has many benefits, this case reminds us that there is potential danger in performing neck massage. PMID:21862908

  1. Image-guided Spine Stabilization for Traumatic or Osteoporotic Spine Injury: Radiological Accuracy and Neurological Outcome

    PubMed Central

    SHIMOKAWA, Nobuyuki; ABE, Junya; SATOH, Hidetoshi; ARIMA, Hironori; TAKAMI, Toshihiro

    2016-01-01

    Significant progress has been made in image-guided surgery (IGS) over the last few decades. IGS can be effectively applied to spinal instrumentation surgery. In the present study, we focused our attention on the feasibility and safety of image-guided spine stabilization for traumatic or osteoporotic spine injury. The IGS spine fixation with or without minimally invasive surgery (MIS) techniques such as percutaneous screw placement, balloon kyphoplasty (BKP), or vertebroplasty (VP) were accomplished in 80 patients with traumatic or osteoprotic spine injury between 2007 and 2015. The injured vertebral levels included the following: cervical spine, 41; thoracic spine, 22; and lumbar spine, 17. Neurological condition before and after surgery was assessed using the American Spinal Injury Association Impairment Scale (AIS). A total of 419 pedicle, lateral mass, or laminar screws were placed, and 399 screws (95.2%) were found to be placed correctly based on postoperative computed tomography scan. Although 20 screws (4.8%) were found to be unexpectedly placed incorrectly, no neural or vascular complications closely associated with screw placement were encountered. Neurological outcomes appeared to be acceptable or successful based on AIS. The IGS is a promising technique that can improve the accuracy of screw placement and reduce potential injury to critical neurovascular structures. The integration of MIS and IGS has proved feasible and safe in the treatment of traumatic or osteoporotic spine injury, although a thorough knowledge of surgical anatomy, spine biomechanics, and basic technique remain the most essential aspects for a successful surgery. PMID:27063144

  2. [Cervical radiculopathy].

    PubMed

    Kuijper, B

    2014-10-01

    Cervical radiculopathy is a common cause of pain in the arm. It is caused by nerve root compression in the neck, as a consequence of a herniated disc, or spondyliotic foraminal stenosis. It causes severe pain, especially during the first few weeks, and paraesthesias in the forearm and hand. Patients also suffer from neck pain and loss of strength in the relevant arm. The arm pain can be exacerbated by certain movements of the head; these should be avoided as much as possible. Diagnosis can be made on the basis of history and physical examination. The pain generally disappears without active patient treatment. A semi-rigid cervical collar is recommended to accelerate pain relief. In cases of persistent pain, surgery will be considered. In such cases an MRI should be performed to show the cause and level of nerve root compression. PMID:26185991

  3. [Cervical radiculopathy].

    PubMed

    Kuijper, B

    2014-10-01

    Cervical radiculopathy is a common cause of pain in the arm. It is caused by nerve root compression in the neck, as a consequence of a herniated disc, or spondyliotic foraminal stenosis. It causes severe pain, especially during the first few weeks, and paraesthesias in the forearm and hand. Patients also suffer from neck pain and loss of strength in the relevant arm. The arm pain can be exacerbated by certain movements of the head; these should be avoided as much as possible. Diagnosis can be made on the basis of history and physical examination. The pain generally disappears without active patient treatment. A semi-rigid cervical collar is recommended to accelerate pain relief. In cases of persistent pain, surgery will be considered. In such cases an MRI should be performed to show the cause and level of nerve root compression.

  4. Epidemiological and Clinical Features of Cervical Column and Cord Injuries; A 2-Year Experience from a Large Trauma Center in Southern Iran

    PubMed Central

    Kamravan, Hamid Reza; Haghnegahdar, Ali; Paydar, Shahram; Khalife, Mohamad; Sedighi, Mahsa; Ghaffarpasand, Fariborz

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To describe the epidemiological characteristics of patients with cervical spine injury admitted to Rajaee hospital, Shiraz, Iran. Methods: This cross-sectional study includes all patients admitted with impression of cervical column injury with or without cervical cord injury from October 2009 to March 2012 to our level I trauma center in Shiraz. We recorded the patients’ characteristics including age, sex, marital status, mechanism of injury, level of injury, concomitant injury, treatment(non-operative or operative) and clinical outcome. The data were described and compared with the international literature. Results: Among 261 patients referred with impression of spinal cord injury, the diagnosis of spinal column injury (with or without spine cord injury) was confirmed in 206 patients. The mean age of patients was 37.2±15.9 years with Male/Female ratio of 3:1. Car turn-over  and car-collisions were the leading causes of injury. The most common spine fracture was C6 vertebra involving 60 (29.1%) patients. Fracture of upper and lower extremities were the most concomitant fractures observed in 31(15.1%) patients. Open surgery was performed in 65(31.6%).Mortality rate was 7.3% (15 patients).Patients with brain, lung and cord injuries had increased risk of death, among 15 deaths,9 patients had brain injury, 5 individuals had lung injury and 10 patients suffered from cord injury. Conclusion: Cervical spine injuries mostly affect young males, and comprise 206 (10%) cases out of 2100 spine injuries in our country. Preventive measures should be taken to reduce cervical spine injuries especially in young age group. PMID:27162861

  5. Sisyphi Spine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    26 June 2006 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a spine of material exposed in the Sisyphi Planum region of Mars. Gullies can be seen on the deeply-shadowed ridge slope. Mass movement (landsliding) has contributed to the erosion of this ridge and the creation of the apron of talus that surrounds it.

    Location near: 70.7oS, 357.0oW Image width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: upper left Season: Southern Summer

  6. The importance of evaluating all seven cervical vertebrae in the trauma patient: a case report.

    PubMed

    Iş, Merih; Karataş, Ayşe; Akyüz, Fevzullah; Gezen, Ferruh

    2007-04-01

    The cervical spine is injured in approximately 3% of major trauma patients and 10% of patients with serious head injury. We present a patient in whom an unstable cervical spine, without neurological deficit, resulting from a traffic accident was misdiagnosed as normal in the emergency room. Although cervical spine pain or tenderness and neurological deficit have a sensitivity of 93% for cervical spine injury, asymptomatic patients or patients with mild symptoms can have spine injury. All trauma patients with a complaint of mild neck pain require a standard three-view radiological evaluation of the cervical spine demonstrating all seven vertebrae and the top of first thoracic vertebra even if their neurologic examination is normal.

  7. [Efficacy of Stent-Assisted Coil Embolization for a Dissecting Aneurysm of the Cervical Internal Carotid Artery Caused by a Systemic Vascular Disease: A Case Report].

    PubMed

    Takamiya, Soichiro; Osanai, Toshiya; Ushikoshi, Satoshi; Kurisu, Kota; Shimoda, Yusuke; Ito, Yasuhiro; Ishi, Yukitomo; Hokari, Masaaki; Nakayama, Naoki; Kazumata, Ken; Abumiya, Takeo; Shichinohe, Hideo; Houkin, Kiyohiro

    2016-01-01

    Systemic vascular diseases such as fibromuscular dysplasia, Ehlers-Danlos syndrome, Marfan syndrome, and Behçet's disease are known to cause spontaneous dissecting aneurysms of the cervical internal carotid artery. These diseases are generally associated with vascular fragility; therefore, invasive treatments are avoided in many cases of dissecting aneurysms, and a conservative approach is used for the primary disease. Surgical or intravascular treatment may be chosen when aneurysms are progressive or are associated with a high risk of hemorrhage; however, there is no consensus on which treatment is better. We report a case of a dissecting aneurysm of the cervical internal carotid artery in a patient with suspected Behçet's disease, which was treated using stent-assisted coil embolization. A man in his 40's, with suspected Behçet's disease, presented with an enlarged dissecting aneurysm of the right cervical internal carotid artery. The lesion was present for approximately 10 years. We performed stent-assisted coil embolization for the lesion. Post-surgery, no aneurysms were detected with carotid artery echography. Our case report suggests that stent-assisted coil embolization is a promising treatment for dissecting aneurysms of the cervical internal carotid artery. In addition, the procedure demonstrates the utility of carotid artery echograms for examining recanalization after stent-assisted coil embolization. PMID:26771095

  8. The aetiology behind torticollis and variable spine defects in patients with Müllerian duct/renal aplasia-cervicothoracic somite dysplasia syndrome: 3D CT scan analysis.

    PubMed

    Al Kaissi, Ali; Ganger, Rudolf; Hofstaetter, Jochen G; Klaushofer, Klaus; Grill, Franz

    2011-10-01

    The aim of the article is fourfold; firstly, to detect the aetiology of torticollis in patients with Müllerian duct/renal aplasia-cervicothoracic somite dysplasia syndrome; secondly, spine pathology in Müllerian duct/renal aplasia-cervicothoracic somite dysplasia syndrome varies considerably from one patient to another and there are remarkable differences in severity and localization; thirdly, mismanagement of congenital spine pathology is a frequent cause of morbid/fatal outcome; and fourthly, the application of prophylactic surgical treatment to balance the growth of the spine at an early stage is mandatory. Reformatted CT scans helped in exploring the craniocervical and the entire spine in these patients. The reason behind torticollis ranged between aplasia of the posterior arch of the atlas, assimilation of the atlas and extensive fusion of the lower cervical vertebrae (bilateral failure of segmentation) in four patients; in one patient, in addition to the hypoplastic posterior arch of the atlas, we observed ossification of the anterior and the posterior longitudinal spinal ligaments giving rise to a block vertebrae-like suggestive of early senile ankylosing vertebral hyperostosis (Forestier disease). Scoliosis at different spine levels was attributable to variable spine defects. Pelvic ultrasound showed the classical renal agenesis in four patients; whereas in one patient, the MRI showed pelvic cake kidney (renal fused ectopia) associated with ovarian, uterine and vaginal abnormalities. This is the first exploratory study on the craniocervical and the entire spine in a group of patients with MURCS association.

  9. Methods for evaluating cervical range of motion in trauma settings.

    PubMed

    Voss, Sarah; Page, Michael; Benger, Jonathan

    2012-08-02

    Immobilisation of the cervical spine is a common procedure following traumatic injury. This is often precautionary as the actual incidence of spinal injury is low. Nonetheless, stabilisation of the head and neck is an important part of pre-hospital care due to the catastrophic damage that may follow if further unrestricted movement occurs in the presence of an unstable spinal injury. Currently available collars are limited by the potential for inadequate immobilisation and complications caused by pressure on the patient's skin, restricted airway access and compression of the jugular vein. Alternative approaches to cervical spine immobilisation are being considered, and the investigation of these new methods requires a standardised approach to the evaluation of neck movement. This review summarises the research methods and scientific technology that have been used to assess and measure cervical range of motion, and which are likely to underpin future research in this field. A systematic search of international literature was conducted to evaluate the methodologies used to assess the extremes of movement that can be achieved in six domains. 34 papers were included in the review. These studies used a range of methodologies, but study quality was generally low. Laboratory investigations and biomechanical studies have gradually given way to methods that more accurately reflect the real-life situations in which cervical spine immobilisation occurs. Latterly, new approaches using virtual reality and simulation have been developed. Coupled with modern electromagnetic tracking technology this has considerable potential for effective application in future research. However, use of these technologies in real life settings can be problematic and more research is needed.

  10. Magnetic resonance imaging assessment of degenerative cervical myelopathy: a review of structural changes and measurement techniques.

    PubMed

    Nouri, Aria; Martin, Allan R; Mikulis, David; Fehlings, Michael G

    2016-06-01

    Degenerative cervical myelopathy encompasses a spectrum of age-related structural changes of the cervical spine that result in static and dynamic injury to the spinal cord and collectively represent the most common cause of myelopathy in adults. Although cervical myelopathy is determined clinically, the diagnosis requires confirmation via imaging, and MRI is the preferred modality. Because of the heterogeneity of the condition and evolution of MRI technology, multiple techniques have been developed over the years in an attempt to quantify the degree of baseline severity and potential for neurological recovery. In this review, these techniques are categorized anatomically into those that focus on bone, ligaments, discs, and the spinal cord. In addition, measurements for the cervical spine canal size and sagittal alignment are also described briefly. These tools have resulted collectively in the identification of numerous useful parameters. However, the development of multiple techniques for assessing the same feature, such as cord compression, has also resulted in a number of challenges, including introducing ambiguity in terms of which methods to use and hindering effective comparisons of analysis in the literature. In addition, newer techniques that use advanced MRI are emerging and providing exciting new tools for assessing the spinal cord in patients with degenerative cervical myelopathy.

  11. Magnetic resonance imaging assessment of degenerative cervical myelopathy: a review of structural changes and measurement techniques.

    PubMed

    Nouri, Aria; Martin, Allan R; Mikulis, David; Fehlings, Michael G

    2016-06-01

    Degenerative cervical myelopathy encompasses a spectrum of age-related structural changes of the cervical spine that result in static and dynamic injury to the spinal cord and collectively represent the most common cause of myelopathy in adults. Although cervical myelopathy is determined clinically, the diagnosis requires confirmation via imaging, and MRI is the preferred modality. Because of the heterogeneity of the condition and evolution of MRI technology, multiple techniques have been developed over the years in an attempt to quantify the degree of baseline severity and potential for neurological recovery. In this review, these techniques are categorized anatomically into those that focus on bone, ligaments, discs, and the spinal cord. In addition, measurements for the cervical spine canal size and sagittal alignment are also described briefly. These tools have resulted collectively in the identification of numerous useful parameters. However, the development of multiple techniques for assessing the same feature, such as cord compression, has also resulted in a number of challenges, including introducing ambiguity in terms of which methods to use and hindering effective comparisons of analysis in the literature. In addition, newer techniques that use advanced MRI are emerging and providing exciting new tools for assessing the spinal cord in patients with degenerative cervical myelopathy. PMID:27246488

  12. Late prevertebral abscess with sinus following anterior cervical corpectomy and fusion

    PubMed Central

    Bhise, Swapnil D.; Mathesul, Ambarish A.; Deokate, Pravin; Chandanwale, Ajay S.; Bartakke, Girish D.

    2015-01-01

    Anterior cervical discectomy/corpectomy and fusion is performed in degenerative, traumatic and neoplastic etiologies of the cervical spine. This procedure is highly successful and associated with fewer complications. The rates of early and late postoperative infection have been reported to be between 0.1% and 1.6%, the late infections are being very rare. We report a rare case of a 30-year-old HIV negative, non-diabetic male who developed a late prevertebral cervical abscess with discharging sinus over posterior triangle of neck 3 years after an anterior cervical C6 corpectomy with fibular grafting and buttress screw fixation performed elsewhere for traumatic fracture C6 vertebra. The abscess was drained using radical neck dissection approach with complete excision of sinus track and removal of the infected implant. On culture, the organism was found to be beta-hemolytic streptococci, for which appropriate antibiotics were administered postoperatively. The sinus tract completely healed in 3 months time. Late infection as a complication of anterior cervical spine surgeries is rare and is associated with esophageal perforation, implant migration, seeding of the deep prevertebral space with oropharyngeal flora, or from surgical site/bacteremia or with Zenker's diverticulum. Few cases have been reported till date, but none have presented with a sinus tract. We present a case of delayed prevertebral abscess after cervical spine instrumentation that followed abnormal path causing sinus track to be developed in the site (the posterior triangle of the neck) other than previous incision site. Exploring both triangles of the neck using radical neck dissection approach was essential for complete excision of sinus track, removal of screw and debridement. PMID:26396628

  13. Paraplegia following cervical epidural catheterization using loss of resistance technique with air: a case report.

    PubMed

    Chae, Yun Jeong; Han, Kyung Ream; Park, Hyung Bae; Kim, Chan; Nam, Si Gweon

    2016-02-01

    We report a case of paraplegia without neurologic deficit of upper extremities following cervical epidural catheterization using air during the loss of resistance technique. A 41-year-old woman diagnosed with complex regional pain syndrome had upper and lower extremity pain. A thoracic epidural lead was inserted for a trial spinal cord stimulation for treating lower extremity pain and cervical epidural catheterization was performed for treating upper extremity pain. Rapidly progressive paraplegia developed six hours after cervical epidural catheterization. Spine CT revealed air entrapment in multiple thoracic intervertebral foraminal spaces and surrounding epidural space without obvious spinal cord compression before the decompressive operation, which disappeared one day after the decompressive operation. Her paraplegia symptoms were normalized immediately after the operation. The presumed cause of paraplegia was transient interruption of blood supply to the spinal cord through the segmental radiculomedullary arteries feeding the spinal cord at the thoracic level of the intervertebral foramen caused by the air.

  14. Management of wounds in a loggerhead sea turtle (Caretta caretta) caused by traumatic bycatch injury from the spines of a spotted eagle ray (Aetobatus narinari).

    PubMed

    Bezjian, Marisa; Wellehan, James F X; Walsh, Michael T; Anderson, Eric; Jacobson, Elliott

    2014-06-01

    A subadult female loggerhead sea turtle (Caretta caretta) was caught in a trawl net off the west coast of Florida with a spotted eagle ray (Aetobatus narinari) spine lodged in the left stifle. Surgical removal of the spine was performed and antibiotic treatment was initiated. Four weeks later, endoscopy revealed a second spine entering an intestinal lumen. The fistulous tract of the left prefemoral fossa was surgically excised and the intestinal perforation was repaired. Dehiscence occurred and a vacuum-assisted closure (VAC) system was used on the wound for approximately 18 days to help reduce infection and increase the rate of healing. The left stifle wound was treated to heal by second intention. The turtle remained in rehabilitation for 19 mo before being released off the west coast of Florida. This case describes stingray envenomation injuries as a complex and potentially life-threatening bycatch effect to sea turtles caught in trawl nets. PMID:25000714

  15. Computed Tomography (CT) - Spine

    MedlinePlus

    ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Computed Tomography (CT) - Spine Computed tomography (CT) of the spine is a diagnostic imaging ... Spine? What is CT Scanning of the Spine? Computed tomography, more commonly known as a CT or CAT ...

  16. The spine in sport and veteran military parachutists

    PubMed Central

    Murray-Leslie, C. F.; Lintott, D. J.; Wright, V.

    1977-01-01

    Spinal injuries and symptoms were studied in 109 ex-military parachutists and 112 sport (free fall) parachutists by means of postal questionnaires. 46 ex-military parachutists aged 50 years or over had a radiological examination of the lumbar spine and 58 sport parachutists had a radiological examination of the cervical spine as part of the survey. A history of back pain was significantly (P<0.01) associated with body weight in sport parachutists but not with the number of descents or with the subject's age. In the older ex-military group neither age, weight, nor the number of descents was significantly associated with backache. Of those ex-military parachutists x-rayed, 10 (21·7%) were found to have vertebral body fractures (most frequently at D12), and 8 of these were unaware of these lesions. Vertebral fractures caused no disability and did not permanently curtail parachuting activities in either the sport or ex-military group. Of the ex-military parachutists x-rayed, 84·7% had lumbar disc degeneration of all grades of severity, 17·4% had moderate changes, and 10·8% had severe changes. The frequency of moderate and severe disc degeneration was significantly related to age but not to body weight or to the number of descents. Spondylolysis was found in 2 subjects (4·3%) and spondylolisthesis unassociated with spondylolysis in 4 (8·7%). Spondylolisthesis was always associated with a history of back pain. A low prevalence of radiological cervical intervertebral disc degeneration of all grades of severity of 8·7% was found among the free fall parachutists (mean age 33 years). 2 cases of cervical vertebral body fracture were seen, one related to a parachute landing injury and the other to a parachute opening injury. This study does not implicate parachuting as a cause of intervertebral disc degeneration, either cervical or lumbar, nor as a cause of spondylolysis or spondylolisthesis. Serious long-term disability from pain appears to be uncommon among

  17. Cervical Exercise: The Backbone of Spine Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... backward and downward. Hold for 10 seconds and work up to 30 seconds. Perform one set of 5 repetitions, twice a day. You may add some resistance by stretching a towel or an elastic band across your chest while ...

  18. X-Ray Exam: Cervical Spine

    MedlinePlus

    ... KidsHealth in the Classroom What Other Parents Are Reading Upsetting News Reports? What to Say Vaccines: Which ... For older kids, be sure to explain the importance of keeping still while the X-ray is ...

  19. Pathogenesis, Diagnosis, and Treatment of Cervical Vertigo.

    PubMed

    Li, Yongchao; Peng, Baogan

    2015-01-01

    Cervical vertigo is characterized by vertigo from the cervical spine. However, whether cervical vertigo is an independent entity still remains controversial. In this narrative review, we outline the basic science and clinical evidence for cervical vertigo according to the current literature. So far, there are 4 different hypotheses explaining the vertigo of a cervical origin, including proprioceptive cervical vertigo, Barré-Lieou syndrome, rotational vertebral artery vertigo, and migraine-associated cervicogenic vertigo. Proprioceptive cervical vertigo and rotational vertebral artery vertigo have survived with time. Barré-Lieou syndrome once was discredited, but it has been resurrected recently by increased scientific evidence. Diagnosis depends mostly on patients' subjective feelings, lacking positive signs, specific laboratory examinations and clinical trials, and often relies on limited clinical experiences of clinicians. Neurological, vestibular, and psychosomatic disorders must first be excluded before the dizziness and unsteadiness in cervical pain syndromes can be attributed to a cervical origin. Treatment for cervical vertigo is challenging. Manual therapy is recommended for treatment of proprioceptive cervical vertigo. Anterior cervical surgery and percutaneous laser disc decompression are effective for the cervical spondylosis patients accompanied with Barré-Liéou syndrome. As to rotational vertebral artery vertigo, a rare entity, when the exact area of the arterial compression is identified through appropriate tests such as magnetic resonance angiography (MRA), computed tomography angiography (CTA) or digital subtraction angiography (DSA) decompressive surgery should be the chosen treatment.

  20. METHANOL EXPOSURE DURING GASTRULATION CAUSES HOLOPROSENCEPHALY, FACIAL DYSGENESIS AND CERVICAL VERTEBRAL MALFORMATIONS IN C57BL/6J MICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exposure of pregnant CD-1 mice to methanol during the period of gastrulation results in exencephaly, cleft palate, and cervical vertebra malformations (Rogers and Mole, 1997, Teratology 55, 364). C57BL/6J mice are sensitive to the teratogenicity of ethanol; fetuses of this strai...

  1. A Broken Drill-bit Fragment Causing Severe Radiating Pain after Cervical Total Disc Replacement: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chong-Suh; Chung, Sung-Soo; Park, Jae-Chul; Shin, Seong-Kee; Park, Yong-Serk

    2011-01-01

    This is a case report of a 38-year-old man with severe radiating pain on upper extremity after cervical total disc replacement (TDR). We faced an unusual complication that has not been reported yet. He underwent cervical TDR for left central disc protrusion on C5-6. After the surgery, preoperative symptom disappeared. However, at postoperative 1 year, he complained severe right-sided radiating pain that had a sudden onset. On postoperative X-ray, a metal fragment which seemed like a broken drill bit was shown within the spinal canal. To remove that, right-sided anterior microforaminotomy on C5-6 was performed and the metal fragment was removed successfully. After that, anterior fusion was done because the motion of the artificial disc was minimal and the removed structure seemed to attenuate stability during cervical motion. The operation resulted in prompt symptomatic relief. During cervical TDR, particular attention should be paid to the procedures that require using drill-bits. PMID:21629488

  2. A Broken Drill-bit Fragment Causing Severe Radiating Pain after Cervical Total Disc Replacement: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chong-Suh; Chung, Sung-Soo; Park, Jae-Chul; Shin, Seong-Kee; Park, Yong-Serk; Kang, Kyung-Chung

    2011-06-01

    This is a case report of a 38-year-old man with severe radiating pain on upper extremity after cervical total disc replacement (TDR). We faced an unusual complication that has not been reported yet. He underwent cervical TDR for left central disc protrusion on C5-6. After the surgery, preoperative symptom disappeared. However, at postoperative 1 year, he complained severe right-sided radiating pain that had a sudden onset. On postoperative X-ray, a metal fragment which seemed like a broken drill bit was shown within the spinal canal. To remove that, right-sided anterior microforaminotomy on C5-6 was performed and the metal fragment was removed successfully. After that, anterior fusion was done because the motion of the artificial disc was minimal and the removed structure seemed to attenuate stability during cervical motion. The operation resulted in prompt symptomatic relief. During cervical TDR, particular attention should be paid to the procedures that require using drill-bits. PMID:21629488

  3. Preventing cervical cancer globally.

    PubMed

    Schmeler, Kathleen M

    2012-11-01

    Cervical cancer is one of the leading causes of cancer and cancer-related deaths among women worldwide. More than 85% of cases and deaths occur in the developing world where the availability of effective screening is limited. In this issue of the journal, Pierce and colleagues (beginning on page 1273) describe a novel technique using a high-resolution microendoscope (HRME) to diagnose cervical dysplasia. This perspective reviews the limitations of existing cervical cancer screening methods currently in use in low-resource settings and the potential for HRME imaging to contribute to cervical cancer prevention in the developing world.

  4. Cervical Laminoplasty

    MedlinePlus

    ... Treatments for Spinal Pain Surgical Options Anterior Cervical Fusion Artificial Disc Replacement Bone Graft Alternatives Bone Morphogenetic ... Discectomy Percutaneous Vertebral Augmentation Posterior Cervical Foraminotomy Spinal Fusion ... Medicine Cervical Laminoplasty What is ...

  5. The use of rigid internal fixation in the surgical management of cervical spondylosis.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Brian K; Vaccaro, Alexander R; Grauer, Jonathan N; Beiner, John M

    2007-01-01

    In the surgical management of cervical spondylosis, the application of rigid internal fixation can enhance the immediate stability of the cervical spine. The sophistication of such internal fixation systems and the indications for their use are continuously evolving. A sound understanding of regional anatomy, biomechanics, and kinematics within the cervical spine is essential for the safe and effective application of internal fixation. Numerous options currently exist for anterior cervical plating systems; some lock the screws to the plate rigidly (constrained), whereas others allow for some rotational or translational motion between the screw and plate (semiconstrained). The role of anterior fixation in single and multilevel fusions is still the subject of some controversy. Long anterior cervical reconstructions may require additional posterior fixation to reliably promote fusion. Rigid fixation in the posterior cervical spine can be achieved with lateral mass screws or pedicle screws. Although lateral mass screws provide excellent fixation within the subaxial cervical spine, the regional anatomy of C2 and C7 often make it difficult to place such screws, and pedicle screws at these levels are advocated. Pedicle screws achieve fixation into both the anterior and posterior column and are arguably the most stable form of rigid internal fixation within the cervical spine. Familiarity with these internal fixation techniques can be an extremely valuable tool for the spine surgeon managing these degenerative disorders of the cervical spine.

  6. The optimized acupuncture treatment for neck pain caused by cervical spondylosis: a study protocol of a multicentre randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Neck pain is one of the chief symptoms of cervical spondylosis (CS). Acupuncture is a well-accepted and widely used complementary therapy for the management of neck pain caused by CS. In this paper, we present a randomized controlled trial protocol evaluating the use of acupuncture for CS neck pain, comparing the effects of the optimized acupuncture therapy in real practice compared with sham and shallow acupuncture. Methods/Design This trial uses a multicentre, parallel-group, randomized, sham acupuncture and shallow acupuncture, controlled single-blind design. Nine hospitals are involved as trial centres. 945 patients who meet inclusion criteria are randomly assigned to receive optimized acupuncture therapy, sham acupuncture or shallow acupuncture by a computerized central randomization system. The interventions past for 4 weeks with eight to ten treatments in total. The group allocations and interventions are concealed to patients and statisticians. The Northwick Park Neck Pain Questionnaire (NPQ) is used as the primary outcome measure, and the McGill Pain Questionnaire (MPQ) and The Short Form (36) Health Survey (SF-36) are applied as secondary outcome measures. The evaluation is performed at baseline, at the end of the intervention, and at the end of the first month and the third month during follow-up. The statistical analyses will include baseline data comparison and repeated measures of analysis of variance (ANOVA) for primary and secondary outcomes of group and time differences. Adverse events (AEs) will be reported if they occur. Discussion This trial is a multicentre randomized control trial (RCT) on the efficacy of acupuncture for CS neck pain and has a large sample size and central randomization in China. It will strictly follow the CONSORT statement and STRICTA extension guideline to report high-quality study results. By setting the control groups as sham and shallow acupuncture, this study attempts to reveal the effects of real acupuncture

  7. [Suspected amyotrophic lateral sclerosis? Don't forget diagnostic imaging of the spine].

    PubMed

    Opstelten, F W; Boon, A J

    2001-03-17

    Two patients, men aged 35 and 72 years, had progressive muscle weakness, lower motor neuron signs in all extremities and upper motor neuron signs in the legs. There were no major sensory signs on examination. The clinical picture very much resembled amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), although there were never brain stem signs. Myelopathy and polyradiculopathies caused by a tandem cervical and lumbar spinal stenosis explained the clinical picture. Cervical MRI and lumbar CT confirmed this diagnosis. Laminectomy was done, after which both patients remained with unchanged symptoms. Tandem spinal stenosis should be part of the differential diagnosis of ALS. Imaging of the spine is necessary to confirm this diagnosis, and in the absence of bulbar signs always necessary prior to the diagnosis of ALS.

  8. Cervical vertebral actinomycosis mimicking malignancy in a paediatric patient.

    PubMed

    Prajapati, Shyam; Yoon, Daniel J; Benitez, Carlos L; Buyuk, Arzu

    2016-01-01

    Actinomyces spp are found in the flora of the oral cavity and vagina and may cause infection with abscess formation and draining sinuses. Cervicofacial manifestations of actinomycosis involve head and neck soft tissue, however, spread to the cervical spine is rare. We report a case of an 8-year-old boy, presenting with neck pain for 1 month and denying a history of trauma or procedures. Radiography revealed an ulceration of the posterior oropharyngeal mucosa with a defect extending to the C1-C2 vertebra, mimicking a neoplastic process. The patient underwent laryngoscopy and multiple biopsies were taken from the ulcer and bone, showing severe osteomyelitis and intraosseous filamentous organisms, morphologically consistent with Actinomyces spp. The boy received long-term antibiotics with response to treatment. Actinomycosis has rarely been reported in the cervical vertebrae of paediatric patients. This should be considered as a differential diagnosis for such a presentation as prompt antibiotic treatment may be lifesaving. PMID:27033296

  9. Self-healing photo-neuropathy and cervical spinal arthrosis in four sisters with brachioradial pruritus

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    The cause of brachioradial pruritus (a localized itching on the arms or shoulders) is controversial. The role of sun and cervical spine disease has been discussed. This is a report on four sisters suffering from brachioradial pruritus recurring every summer. The sisters spent much time outdoors and exposed themselves extensively to the sun. They also had occupations requiring heavy lifting. Cervical radiographs indicated arthrosis. The density of sensory nerve fibers in the skin biopsies from the itchy skin of the arms, visualized by antibodies against a pan-neuronal marker, protein gene product 9.5, was reduced compared with biopsies from the same skin region during the symptom-free period in the winter. This data exemplifies that brachioradial pruritus is a self healing photoneuropathy occurring in middle aged adults predisposed by cervical arthrosis. PMID:19919691

  10. Case of streptococcal toxic shock syndrome caused by rapidly progressive group A hemolytic streptococcal infection during postoperative chemotherapy for cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Nogami, Yuya; Tsuji, Kousuke; Banno, Kouji; Umene, Kiyoko; Katakura, Satomi; Kisu, Iori; Tominaga, Eiichiro; Aoki, Daisuke

    2014-01-01

    Streptococcal toxic shock syndrome (STSS) is a severe infectious disease caused by group A hemolytic streptococcus (Streptococcus pyogenes). This condition is a serious disease that involves rapidly progressive septic shock. We experienced a case of STSS caused by primary peritonitis during treatment with paclitaxel and cisplatin (TP therapy) as postoperative chemotherapy for cervical cancer. STSS mostly develops after extremity pain, but initial influenza-like symptoms of fever, chill, myalgia and gastrointestinal symptoms may also occur. TP therapy is used to treat many cancers, including gynecological cancer, but may cause adverse reactions of neuropathy and nephrotoxicity and sometimes fever, arthralgia, myalgia, abdominal pain and general malaise. The case reported here indicates that development of STSS can be delayed after chemotherapy and that primary STSS symptoms may be overlooked because they may be viewed as adverse reactions to chemotherapy. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a case of STSS during chemotherapy. PMID:23937219

  11. Cervical Cancer Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... cervical cancer in women aged 30–65 years. Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV): A virus that attacks certain cells of the body’s immune system and causes acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). Human Papillomavirus ( ...

  12. Lumbar spine chordoma

    PubMed Central

    Hatem, M.A.

    2015-01-01

    Chordoma is a rare tumor arising from notochord remnants in the spine. It is slow-growing, which makes it difficult to diagnose and difficult to follow up after treatment. Typically, it occurs in the base of the skull and sacrococcygeal spine; it rarely occurs in other parts of the spine. CT-guided biopsy of a suspicious mass enabled diagnosis of lumbar spine chordoma. PMID:27186250

  13. Cervical Syndrome – the Effectiveness of Physical Therapy Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Kasumovic, Mersija; Gorcevic, Emir; Gorcevic, Semir; Osmanovic, Jasna

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Introduction: The cervical syndrome refers to a set of disorders caused by the changes in the cervical spine and the soft-tissue surrounding it, with pain as the predominant symptom. Sore neck has been a common problem among a large section of today`s population. The factors contributing to this issue include the modern lifestyle, prolonged sitting and incorrect, fixed or constrained working postures. The root of these difficulties is found in the mechanical disorders of the cervical spine structures, poor body posture and jerky body movements. In the Scandinavian countries neck pain is considered to be a public health problem. Methods: The study evaluated 25 patients with an established diagnosis of cervical syndrome. The research was conducted at the PI Institute of Occupational and Sports Medicine of Zenica–Doboj Canton. Each patient received twenty physical therapy treatment sessions. Results and conclusions: The study included 25 patients suffering from the cervical syndrome. The statistical analysis of gender distribution indicated that 36% of the patients were male, while 64% were female. The mean age of study participants was 46.76±4,23. The patients ranged in age from 39 to 54 years, with no statistically significant difference in the mean age of male and female patients, p=0.691. Analysing the types of occupational activities performed by the patients, the study found a positive relation between neck pain and prolonged sitting at work. The patients who performed office work made up 76% of the total number. Each method of physical therapy applied in the treatment of neck pain patients proved useful. However, the combination of electrotherapy, kinesiotherapy and manual massage proved to be most effective. Conclusion: The cervical syndrome is a common medical condition primarily affecting adult population, with prevalence being higher among women and office workers. The condition places a considerable socioeconomic burden on the afflicted

  14. Vertebral Arteriovenous Fistula Presenting as Cervical Myelopathy: A Rapid Recovery with Balloon Embolization

    SciTech Connect

    Modi, Manish; Bapuraj, J. Rajiv; Lal, Anupam; Prabhakar, S.; Khandelwal, N.

    2010-12-15

    A 24-year-old male presented with progressive cervical myelopathy of 2 months' duration. Magnetic resonance imaging of the cervical spine and angiography revealed a large arteriovenous fistula arising from the left vertebral artery. The present case highlights the clinical features and dramatic recovery following endovascular balloon occlusion of a giant cervical arteriovenous fistula.

  15. Cervical Interlaminar Epidural Steroid Injection for Unilateral Cervical Radiculopathy: Comparison of Midline and Paramedian Approaches for Efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Ji Young; Yoon, Young Cheol; Lee, Jongseok

    2015-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to compare the clinical outcomes of the cervical interlaminar epidural steroid injection (CIESI) for unilateral radiculopathy by the midline or paramedian approaches and to determine the prognostic factors of CIESI. Materials and Methods We retrospectively analyzed 182 patients who underwent CIESI from January 2009 to December 2012. Inclusion criteria were no previous spinal steroid injection, presence of a cross-sectional image, and presence of follow-up records. Exclusion criteria were patients with bilateral cervical radiculopathy and/or dominant cervical axial pain, combined peripheral neuropathy, and previous cervical spine surgery. Short-term clinical outcomes were evaluated at the first follow-up after CIESI. We compared the clinical outcomes between the midline and paramedian approaches. Possible prognostic factors for the outcome, such as age, gender, duration of radiculopathy, and cause of radiculopathy were also analyzed. Results Cervical interlaminar epidural steroid injections were effective in 124 of 182 patients (68.1%) at the first follow-up. There was no significant difference in the clinical outcomes of CIESI, between midline (69.6%) and paramedian (63.7%) approaches (p = 0.723). Cause of radiculopathy was the only significant factor affecting the efficacy of CIESI. Patients with disc herniation had significantly better results than patients with neural foraminal stenosis (82.9% vs. 56.0%) (p < 0.001). Conclusion There is no significant difference in treatment efficacy between the midline and paramedian approaches in CIESI, for unilateral radiculopathy. The cause of the radiculopathy is significantly associated with the treatment efficacy; patients with disc herniation experience better pain relief than those with neural foraminal stenosis. PMID:25995690

  16. Ratfish (Chimaera) spine injuries in fishermen.

    PubMed

    Hayes, A J; Sim, A J W

    2011-08-01

    An occupational hazard peculiar to fishermen, is an injury from a sharp fish spine. Such spines can cause envenomation injury, infectious sequelae or trauma to anatomical structures. The management of two fishermen with penetrating ratfish (Chimaera) spine injuries to the lower limb is described. Both were managed by removal of the spine under general anaesthesia. In the second patient, the spine was embedded adjacent to the left femoral artery, highlighting the potential for major haemorrhage and supporting the use of surgical wound exploration when important structures may be involved. Herein, we describe the first report in English of Chimaera spine injury. In addition, we surveyed nine northeast Atlantic deep-sea fishermen to gain information on exposure to, and injuries from, this type of fish. The most commonly identified species was Chimaera monstrosa. Five fishermen reported injuries to their feet or hands from Chimaera spines and two had sought medical attention. The evidence indicates that deep-sea trawler fishermen of the northeast Atlantic frequently encounter Chimaera species and can suffer dangerous penetrating wounds from its dorsal spine.

  17. National Athletic Trainers' Association Position Statement: Acute Management of the Cervical Spine–Injured Athlete

    PubMed Central

    Swartz, Erik E; Boden, Barry P; Courson, Ronald W; Decoster, Laura C; Horodyski, MaryBeth; Norkus, Susan A; Rehberg, Robb S; Waninger, Kevin N

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To provide certified athletic trainers, team physicians, emergency responders, and other health care professionals with recommendations on how to best manage a catastrophic cervical spine injury in the athlete. Background: The relative incidence of catastrophic cervical spine injury in sports is low compared with other injuries. However, cervical spine injuries necessitate delicate and precise management, often involving the combined efforts of a variety of health care providers. The outcome of a catastrophic cervical spine injury depends on the efficiency of this management process and the timeliness of transfer to a controlled environment for diagnosis and treatment. Recommendations: Recommendations are based on current evidence pertaining to prevention strategies to reduce the incidence of cervical spine injuries in sport; emergency planning and preparation to increase management efficiency; maintaining or creating neutral alignment in the cervical spine; accessing and maintaining the airway; stabilizing and transferring the athlete with a suspected cervical spine injury; managing the athlete participating in an equipment-laden sport, such as football, hockey, or lacrosse; and considerations in the emergency department. PMID:19478836

  18. [Therapy of cervical rheumatoid arthritis].

    PubMed

    Kothe, R; Wiesner, L; Rüther, W

    2004-08-01

    The rheumatoid involvement of the cervical spine can be divided into three phases. In the early stage of the disease there is an isolated atlantoaxial subluxation (AAS), followed by vertical instability and subaxial instability. If patients show clear symptoms of cervical myelopathy, which can occur during any stage of the disease, the progression cannot be stopped by conservative treatment, which is of great importance at the beginning of the cervical manifestation. Patient education, physiotherapy and immobilization with a stiff collar can significantly reduce pain. Early and effective DMARD therapy can have a positive effect on the natural history of the disease. In case of progressive instability, cervical myelopathy or severe pain operative treatment is indicated. If there is an isolated AAS, fusion can be restricted to the C1/C2 segment. The Magerl transarticular screw fixation is the preferred technique for stabilization. If there is evidence for vertical instability or severe destruction of the C0/C1 joints, occipital cervical fusion has to be performed. Durin the preoperative planning it is necessary to look for signs of subaxial instability. If this is the case, fusion should include the entire cervical spine. Transoral decompression may be necessary when there is persistent anterior compression of the myelon, typically seen in fixed AAS. Non-ambulatory myelopathic patients are more likely to develop severe surgical complications. Therefore, it is important to avoid the development of severe cervical instability by early surgical intervention. The right timing for surgery is still a matter of controversy. Future prospective randomized trials should address this topic to improve the treatment concept for the rheumatoid patient.

  19. Recurrence of cervical myelopathy secondary to a strut graft fracture 20 years after anterior decompression and fusion: a case report.

    PubMed

    Kida, Kazunobu; Takaya, Shogo; Tadokoro, Nobuaki; Kumon, Masashi; Kiyasu, Katsuhito; Kato, Tomonari; Takemasa, Ryuichi; Ikeuchi, Masahiko; Tani, Toshikazu

    2015-08-01

    This study reports on a 70-year-old man with recurrent cervical myelopathy 20 years after anterior decompression and fusion of C4-7 using a free vascularised strut graft. The recurrent myelopathy was secondary to a kyphotic deformity of a fractured graft and residual ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament with stenosis at C3/4. Intraoperative spinal cord-evoked potentials indicated that spinal cord traction secondary to progressive kyphosis of the cervical spine after the graft fracture was the cause. The patient underwent laminoplasty at C3 and laminectomy at C4 to decompress the stenosis at C3/4 as well as posterior cervical spinal fusion at C3-7 with pedicle screws and a lateral mass screw and a bone graft to prevent further progression of the kyphosis. At postoperative 18 months, the patient's Japanese Orthopaedic Association score had improved to 14 from 8, and he could walk without support. PMID:26321562

  20. Spine injuries in dancers.

    PubMed

    Gottschlich, Laura M; Young, Craig C

    2011-01-01

    Care of a dancer calls for a unique balance between athlete and artist. The physician must familiarize himself or herself with dance terminology, common moves, correct technique, and dancer's mentality. The goal is to work intimately with the dancer to care for the injury and, if possible, continue to participate in portions of dance class to limit anxiety and increase compliance to treatment. The spine is the second most injured area of the body in dancers, and many issues stem from poor technique and muscle imbalance. This often leads to hyperlordosis, spondylolysis, spondylolisthesis, lumbar facet sprain, discogenic back pain, and muscle spasm and piriformis syndrome. This article reviews these causes of low back pain with a focus on dance-related presentation and treatment issues.

  1. Preventing Cervical Cancer with HPV Vaccines

    Cancer.gov

    Cervical cancer can be prevented with HPV vaccines. NCI-supported researchers helped establish HPV as a cause of cervical cancer. They also helped create the first HPV vaccines, were involved in the vaccine trials, and contribute to ongoing studies.

  2. [Cervical hygroma in the calf as an absolute cause of dystocia. An unusual malformation possibly of hereditary genesis in Braunvieh x Brown-Swiss breeds].

    PubMed

    Wanke, R; Distl, O; Schmidt, P; Hermanns, W

    1990-01-01

    Large cervical lymphocytes causing dystocia were observed in two Braunvieh x Brown-Swiss calves. The cysts were located on both sides of the neck and contained aqueous liquid. One of the animals was necropsied. The volumetric capacity of the cysts was 11 and 4 liters respectively. The hygroma are supposed to be the result of an interruption in the development of the lymphatic system resulting in the persistence of embryonic lymph sacs. Hypoplasia of the diaphragm, the pericardium and the mediastinum, and malformations of internal organs and the skeletal system were additional pathological findings. The lymphocysts and the other morphological anomalies, except those which may be explained as a consequence of cyst development are considered to be combined accidentally. Analysis of the pedigrees indicates that the lymphocysts may represent a hereditary malformation.

  3. Cactus spine injuries.

    PubMed

    Lindsey, D; Lindsey, W E

    1988-07-01

    Cactus spines produce injuries whose clinical significance is loosely in inverse proportion to the dimensions of the spine. Long and medium spines of saguaro and barrel cacti seldom result in embedded fragments, but when they do they are difficult to locate and remove. Other medium spines, those of prickly pear and cholla, are a nuisance but they can be removed readily by traction, as can the smaller spines (glochids) of the prickly pear. The very small spines (also glochids) of the polka dot or bunny's ear cactus (Opuntia microdasys) and the beavertail cactus (Opuntia basilaris) offer the most frustrating problem of all, but can be peeled off with a dried film of a professional facial gel. PMID:3390256

  4. Cervical spondylosis and hypertension: a clinical study of 2 cases.

    PubMed

    Peng, Baogan; Pang, Xiaodong; Li, Duanming; Yang, Hong

    2015-03-01

    Cervical spondylosis and hypertension are all common diseases, but the relationship between them has never been studied. Patients with cervical spondylosis are often accompanied with vertigo. Anterior cervical discectomy and fusion is an effective method of treatment for cervical spondylosis with cervical vertigo that is unresponsive to conservative therapy. We report 2 patients of cervical spondylosis with concomitant cervical vertigo and hypertension who were treated successfully with anterior cervical discectomy and fusion. Stimulation of sympathetic nerve fibers in pathologically degenerative disc could produce sympathetic excitation, and induce a sympathetic reflex to cause cervical vertigo and hypertension. In addition, chronic neck pain could contribute to hypertension development through sympathetic arousal and failure of normal homeostatic pain regulatory mechanisms. Cervical spondylosis may be one of the causes of secondary hypertension. Early treatment for resolution of symptoms of cervical spondylosis may have a beneficial impact on cardiovascular disease risk in patients with cervical spondylosis. PMID:25761188

  5. Programmed management of acute cervical cord trauma.

    PubMed

    White, R J; Bryk, J P; Yashon, D; Albin, M S; Demian, Y K

    Results in ten patients admitted with the diagnosis of complete traumatic quadriplegia and with fracture-dislocation of the cervical spine are reviewed. Emphasis is placed on aggressive emergency surgical treatment of these lesions such as tracheostomy, laminectomy and cord cooling, incorporated into a detailed protocol of overall management.

  6. Nonoperative Management of Cervical Radiculopathy.

    PubMed

    Childress, Marc A; Becker, Blair A

    2016-05-01

    Cervical radiculopathy describes pain in one or both of the upper extremities, often in the setting of neck pain, secondary to compression or irritation of nerve roots in the cervical spine. It can be accompanied by motor, sensory, or reflex deficits and is most prevalent in persons 50 to 54 years of age. Cervical radiculopathy most often stems from degenerative disease in the cervical spine. The most common examination findings are painful neck movements and muscle spasm. Diminished deep tendon reflexes, particularly of the triceps, are the most common neurologic finding. The Spurling test, shoulder abduction test, and upper limb tension test can be used to confirm the diagnosis. Imaging is not required unless there is a history of trauma, persistent symptoms, or red flags for malignancy, myelopathy, or abscess. Electrodiagnostic testing is not needed if the diagnosis is clear, but has clinical utility when peripheral neuropathy of the upper extremity is a likely alternate diagnosis. Patients should be reassured that most cases will resolve regardless of the type of treatment. Nonoperative treatment includes physical therapy involving strengthening, stretching, and potentially traction, as well as nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, muscle relaxants, and massage. Epidural steroid injections may be helpful but have higher risks of serious complications. In patients with red flag symptoms or persistent symptoms after four to six weeks of treatment, magnetic resonance imaging can identify pathology amenable to epidural steroid injections or surgery. PMID:27175952

  7. Evaluation and management of 2 ferocactus spines in the orbit.

    PubMed

    Russell, David J; Kim, Tim I; Kubis, Kenneth

    2013-01-01

    A 49-year-old woman, who had fallen face first in a cactus 1 week earlier, presented with a small, mobile, noninflamed subcutaneous nodule at the rim of her right lateral orbit with no other functional deficits. A CT scan was obtained, which revealed a 4-cm intraorbital tubular-shaped foreign body resembling a large cactus spine. A second preoperative CT scan, obtained for an intraoperative guidance system, demonstrated a second cactus spine, which was initially not seen on the first CT scan. Both spines were removed surgically without complication. The authors discuss factors that can cause diagnosis delay, review the radiographic features of cactus spines, and discuss the often times benign clinical course of retained cactus spine foreign bodies. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first case report of cactus spines in the orbit. Health-care professionals should have a low threshold for imaging in cases of traumatic injuries involving cactus spines.

  8. Thoracic spine x-ray

    MedlinePlus

    Vertebral radiography; X-ray - spine; Thoracic x-ray; Spine x-ray; Thoracic spine films; Back films ... care provider's office. You will lie on the x-ray table in different positions. If the x-ray ...

  9. Facet joint disturbance induced by miniscrews in plated cervical laminoplasty

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hua; Li, Huibo; Wang, Beiyu; Li, Tao; Gong, Quan; Song, Yueming; Liu, Hao

    2016-01-01

    Abstract A retrospective cohort study. Plated cervical laminoplasty is an increasingly common technique. A unique facet joint disturbance induced by lateral mass miniscrews penetrating articular surface was noticed. Facet joints are important to maintain cervical spine stability and kinetic balance. Whether this facet joint disturbance could affect clinical and radiologic results is still unknown. The objective of this study is to investigate the clinical and radiologic outcomes of patients with facet joints disturbance induced by miniscrews in plated cervical laminoplasty. A total of 105 patients who underwent cervical laminoplasty with miniplate fixation between May 2010 and February 2014 were comprised. Postoperative CT images were used to identify whether facet joints destroyed by miniscrews. According to facet joints destroyed number, all the patients were divided into: group A (none facet joint destroyed), group B (1–2 facet joints destroyed), and group C (≥3 facet joints destroyed). Clinical data (JOA, VAS, and NDI scores), radiologic data (anteroposterior diameter and Palov ratio), and complications (axial symptoms and C5 palsy) were evaluated and compared among the groups. There were 38, 40, and 27 patients in group A, B, and C, respectively. The overall facet joints destroyed rate was 30.7%. All groups gained significant JOA and NDI scores improvement postoperatively. The preoperative JOA, VAS, NDI scores, and postoperative JOA scores did not differ significantly among the groups. The group C recorded significant higher postoperative VAS scores than group A (P = 0.002) and B (P = 0.014) and had significant higher postoperative NDI scores than group A (P = 0.002). The pre- and postoperative radiologic data were not significant different among the groups. The group C had a significant higher axial symptoms incidence than group A (12/27 vs 8/38, P = 0.041). Facet joints disturbance caused by miniscrews in plated cervical laminoplasty may not influence

  10. The measurement of tissue interface pressures and changes in jugular venous parameters associated with cervical immobilisation devices: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Sparke, Alison; Voss, Sarah; Benger, Jonathan

    2013-12-03

    Cervical immobilisation is commonly applied following trauma, particularly blunt head injury, but current methods of immobilisation are associated with significant complications. Semi-rigid disposable cervical collars are known to cause pressure ulcers, and impede effective airway management. These collars may also exacerbate a head injury by increasing intracranial pressure as a result of external compression of the jugular veins. There is a clear imperative to find ways of effectively immobilising the cervical spine whilst minimising complications, and any assessment of existing or new devices should include a standardized approach to the measurement of tissue interface pressures and their effect on jugular venous drainage from the brain. This systematic review summarises the research methods and technologies that have been used to measure tissue interface pressure and assess the jugular vein in the context of cervical immobilisation devices. 27 papers were included and assessed for quality. Laboratory investigations and biomechanical studies have gradually given way to methods that more accurately reflect clinical care. There are numerous accounts of skin ulceration associated with cervical collars, but no standardised approach to measuring tissue interface pressure. It is therefore difficult to compare studies and devices, but a pressure of less than 30 mmHg appears desirable. Cervical collars have been shown to have a compressive effect on the jugular veins, but it is not yet certain that this is the cause of the increased intracranial pressure observed in association with cervical collar use. This is the first review of its type. It will help guide further research in this area of trauma care, and the development and testing of new cervical immobilisation devices.

  11. Cervical Meningomyelitis After Lumbar Epidural Steroid Injection

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Joon-Sung; Kim, Ji Yeon

    2015-01-01

    Epidural steroid injections (ESI) are a common treatment for back pain management. ESI-related complications have increased with the growing number of procedures. We report a case of cervical meningomyelitis followed by multiple lumbar ESI. A 60-year-old male with diabetes mellitus presented to our hospital with severe neck pain. He had a history of multiple lumbar injections from a local pain clinic. After admission, high fever and elevated inflammatory values were detected. L-spine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed hematoma in the S1 epidural space. Antibiotic treatment began under the diagnosis of a lumbar epidural abscess. Despite the treatment, he started to complain of weakness in both lower extremities. Three days later, the weakness progressed to both upper extremities. C-spine MRI revealed cervical leptomeningeal enhancement in the medulla oblongata and cervical spinal cord. Removal of the epidural abscess was performed, but there was no neurological improvement. PMID:26161360

  12. The ageing spine

    SciTech Connect

    Hukins, D.W.L. Nelson, M.A.

    1987-01-01

    This book contain 15 selections. Some of the titles are: Effects of age on the appearance of magnetic resonance images of the spine; Potential for image analysis in quantitative magnetic resonance imaging of the aging spine; Potential of x-ray diffraction computed tomography for discriminating between normal and osteoporotic bone; and Spinal fusion in the elderly.

  13. Airway management of patients with traumatic brain injury/C-spine injury.

    PubMed

    Jung, Jin Yong

    2015-06-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is usually combined with cervical spine (C-spine) injury. The possibility of C-spine injury is always considered when performing endotracheal intubation in these patients. Rapid sequence intubation is recommended with adequate sedative or analgesics and a muscle relaxant to prevent an increase in intracranial pressure during intubation in TBI patients. Normocapnia and mild hyperoxemia should be maintained to prevent secondary brain injury. The manual-in-line-stabilization (MILS) technique effectively lessens C-spine movement during intubation. However, the MILS technique can reduce mouth opening and lead to a poor laryngoscopic view. The newly introduced video laryngoscope can manage these problems. The AirWay Scope® (AWS) and AirTraq laryngoscope decreased the extension movement of C-spines at the occiput-C1 and C2-C4 levels, improving intubation conditions and shortening the time to complete tracheal intubation compared with a direct laryngoscope. The Glidescope® also decreased cervical movement in the C2-C5 levels during intubation and improved vocal cord visualization, but a longer duration was required to complete intubation compared with other devices. A lightwand also reduced cervical motion across all segments. A fiberoptic bronchoscope-guided nasal intubation is the best method to reduce cervical movement, but a skilled operator is required. In conclusion, a video laryngoscope assists airway management in TBI patients with C-spine injury.

  14. Airway management of patients with traumatic brain injury/C-spine injury

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is usually combined with cervical spine (C-spine) injury. The possibility of C-spine injury is always considered when performing endotracheal intubation in these patients. Rapid sequence intubation is recommended with adequate sedative or analgesics and a muscle relaxant to prevent an increase in intracranial pressure during intubation in TBI patients. Normocapnia and mild hyperoxemia should be maintained to prevent secondary brain injury. The manual-in-line-stabilization (MILS) technique effectively lessens C-spine movement during intubation. However, the MILS technique can reduce mouth opening and lead to a poor laryngoscopic view. The newly introduced video laryngoscope can manage these problems. The AirWay Scope® (AWS) and AirTraq laryngoscope decreased the extension movement of C-spines at the occiput-C1 and C2-C4 levels, improving intubation conditions and shortening the time to complete tracheal intubation compared with a direct laryngoscope. The Glidescope® also decreased cervical movement in the C2-C5 levels during intubation and improved vocal cord visualization, but a longer duration was required to complete intubation compared with other devices. A lightwand also reduced cervical motion across all segments. A fiberoptic bronchoscope-guided nasal intubation is the best method to reduce cervical movement, but a skilled operator is required. In conclusion, a video laryngoscope assists airway management in TBI patients with C-spine injury. PMID:26045922

  15. Percutaneous cervical nucleoplasty in the treatment of cervical disc herniation.

    PubMed

    Li, Jian; Yan, Deng-lu; Zhang, Zai-Heng

    2008-12-01

    Percutaneous disc decompression procedures have been performed in the past. Various percutaneous techniques such as percutaneous discectomy, laser discectomy, and nucleoplasty have been successful. Our prospective study was directly to evaluate the results of percutaneous cervical nucleoplasty (PCN) surgery for cervical disc herniation, and illustrate the effectiveness of PCN in symptomatic patients who had cervical herniated discs. From July of 2002 to June of 2005, 126 consecutive patients with contained cervical disc herniations have presented at the authors' clinic and treated by PCN. The patients' gender distribution for PCN was 65 male, 61 female. The age of patients ranged from 34 to 66 years (mean 51.9 +/- 10.2 years). The levels of involvement were 21 cases at C3-4, 30 cases at C4-5, 40 cases at C5-6, and 35 cases at C6-7. The clinical outcomes, pain reduction and the segment stability were all recorded during this study. A clinical outcome was quantified by the Macnab standard and using VAS. The angular displacement (AD) > or =11 degrees or horizontal displacement (HD) > or =3 mm was considered to be radiographically unstable. In the results of this study, puncture of the needle into the disc space was accurately performed under X-ray guidance in all cases. There was one case where the Perc-D Spine Wand had broken in the disc space during the procedure. The partial Perc-D Spine Wand, which had broken in the disc space could not be removed by the percutaneous cervical discectomy and thus remained there. There were no recurrent cases or complications in our series. Macnab standard results were excellent in 62 cases, good in 41 cases and fair in 23 cases. The rate of excellent and good was 83.73%. The VAS scores demonstrated statistically significant improvement in PCN at the 2-week, 1, 3, 6, and 12-month follow-up visits when compared to preoperational values (P < 0.01). There were no cases of instability following the PCN procedure. There was no

  16. Tuberculosis of spine

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Vinod; Patgaonkar, P. R.; Nagariya, S. P.

    2010-01-01

    Tuberculosis of the spine is one of the most common spine pathology in India. Over last 4 decades a lot has changed in the diagnosis, medical treatment and surgical procedures to treat this disorder. Further developments in diagnosis using molecular genetic techniques, more effective antibiotics and more aggressive surgical protocols have become essential with emergence of multidrug resistant TB. Surgical procedures such as single stage anterior and posterior stabilization, extrapleral dorsal spine anterior stabilization and endoscopic thoracoscopic surgeries have reduced the mortality and morbidity of the surgical procedures. is rapidly progressing. It is a challenge to treat MDR-TB Spine with late onset paraplegia and progressive deformity. Physicians must treat tuberculosis of spine on the basis of Culture and sensitivity. PMID:21572628

  17. Dendritic spine dysgenesis in Rett syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xin; Miller, Eric C.; Pozzo-Miller, Lucas

    2014-01-01

    Spines are small cytoplasmic extensions of dendrites that form the postsynaptic compartment of the majority of excitatory synapses in the mammalian brain. Alterations in the numerical density, size, and shape of dendritic spines have been correlated with neuronal dysfunction in several neurological and neurodevelopmental disorders associated with intellectual disability, including Rett syndrome (RTT). RTT is a progressive neurodevelopmental disorder associated with intellectual disability that is caused by loss of function mutations in the transcriptional regulator methyl CpG-binding protein 2 (MECP2). Here, we review the evidence demonstrating that principal neurons in RTT individuals and Mecp2-based experimental models exhibit alterations in the number and morphology of dendritic spines. We also discuss the exciting possibility that signaling pathways downstream of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), which is transcriptionally regulated by MeCP2, offer promising therapeutic options for modulating dendritic spine development and plasticity in RTT and other MECP2-associated neurodevelopmental disorders. PMID:25309341

  18. Intermittent hypoxia induces functional recovery following cervical spinal injury

    PubMed Central

    Vinit, Stéphane; Lovett-Barr, Mary Rachael; Mitchell, Gordon S.

    2009-01-01

    Respiratory-related complications are the leading cause of death in spinal cord injury (SCI) patients. Few effective SCI treatments are available after therapeutic interventions are performed in the period shortly after injury (e.g. spine stabilization and prevention of further spinal damage). In this review we explore the capacity to harness endogenous spinal plasticity induced by intermittent hypoxia to optimize function of surviving (spared) neural pathways associated with breathing. Two primary questions are addressed: 1) does intermittent hypoxia induce plasticity in spinal synaptic pathways to respiratory motor neurons following experimental SCI? and 2) can this plasticity improve respiratory function? In normal rats, intermittent hypoxia induces serotonin-dependent plasticity in spinal pathways to respiratory motor neurons. Early experiments suggest that intermittent hypoxia also enhances respiratory motor output in experimental models of cervical SCI, (cervical hemisection) and that the capacity to induce functional recovery is greater with longer durations post-injury. Available evidence suggests that intermittent hypoxia-induced spinal plasticity has considerable therapeutic potential to treat respiratory insufficiency following chronic cervical spinal injury. PMID:19651247

  19. Posterior atlantoaxial ‘facetal’ instability associated with cervical spondylotic disease

    PubMed Central

    Goel, Atul

    2015-01-01

    Aim: The association of single or multiple level cervical spondylotic disease with atlantoaxial instability is assessed. The implications of identifying and treating atlantoaxial instability in such an association are highlighted. Materials and Methods: The analysis is based on an experience with 11 patients treated during the period June 2013-June 2014. All patients had single or multilevel cervical spondylotic disease. The spinal canal compromise and evidence of cord compression was evident on imaging in the cervical subaxial spine and was related to disc bulges and osteophytic bars. There was no or relatively insignificant compression of the cervicomedullary cord by the odontoid process. There was no evidence of odontoid process-related instability on dynamic imaging. Apart from presence of features of cervical spondylosis, investigations and surgical exploration and direct manual handling of the facets revealed evidence of Type B (posterior) atlantoaxial ‘facetal’ instability in all patients. Our 5-point clinical grading system and Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) scores were used to monitor the patients both before and after surgery and at follow-up. Surgery involved both at lantoaxial and subaxial cervical fixation. During the average period of follow-up of 9 months (5-17 months), all patients showed remarkable and gratifying neurological recovery. Conclusion: We conclude that atlantoaxial facetal instability can be ‘frequently’ associated with cervical spondylosis and needs surgical stabilization. Our surgical outcome analysis suggests that missing or ignoring the presence of atlantoaxial facetal instability can be an important cause of suboptimal result or failure of surgery for cervical spondylotic myelopathy. PMID:25972708

  20. Flexitouch® Home Maintenance Therapy or Standard Home Maintenance Therapy in Treating Patients With Lower-Extremity Lymphedema Caused by Treatment for Cervical Cancer, Vulvar Cancer, or Endometrial Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-12-29

    Lymphedema; Stage 0 Cervical Cancer; Stage 0 Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage 0 Vulvar Cancer; Stage I Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage I Vulvar Cancer; Stage IA Cervical Cancer; Stage IB Cervical Cancer; Stage II Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage II Vulvar Cancer; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage III Cervical Cancer; Stage III Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage III Vulvar Cancer; Stage IV Uterine Corpus Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer; Stage IVB Cervical Cancer; Stage IVB Vulvar Cancer

  1. Cervical radiculopathy.

    PubMed

    Iyer, Sravisht; Kim, Han Jo

    2016-09-01

    Cervical radiculopathy is a common clinical scenario. Patients with radiculopathy typically present with neck pain, arm pain, or both. We review the epidemiology of cervical radiculopathy and discuss the diagnosis of this condition. This includes an overview of the pertinent findings on the patient history and physical examination. We also discuss relevant clinical syndromes that must be considered in the differential diagnosis including peripheral nerve entrapment syndromes and shoulder pathology. The natural history of cervical radiculopathy is reviewed and options for management are discussed. These options include conservative management, non-operative modalities such as physical therapy, steroid injections, and operative intervention. While the exact indications for surgical intervention have not yet been elucidated, we provide an overview of the available literature regarding indications and discuss the timing of intervention. The surgical outcomes of anterior cervical decompression and fusion (ACDF), cervical disc arthroplasty (CDA), and posterior cervical foraminotomy (PCF) are discussed. PMID:27250042

  2. Degenerative pathological irritations to cervical PLL may play a role in presenting sympathetic symptoms.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhanchao; Wang, Xinwei; Yuan, Wen; Jiang, Dongjie

    2011-11-01

    The mechanism of cervical vertigo remains unknown. Stimulation of arterial vertebralis caused by osteophyte of the Luschka joint or segmental instability of the cervical spine was considered to be a potential factor contributing to it. Years of studies found that the ischemia of the vertebral artery is not directly correlated with the clinical symptoms of vertigo, and can not be used to explain cervical vertigo as a sole reason. As proven by clinical practical experience, the routine anterior cervical decompression and fusion (ACDF) procedure, in which the degenerative disc and posterior longitudinal ligament (PLL) were often removed, shows positive results for elimination of the sympathetic symptoms. In this article, we hypothesize that: (1) there are sympathetic nerve postganglionic fibers distributed in the PLL or discs; (2) pathological changes secondary to degeneration of the intervertebral disc may cause irritation of sympathetic nerve fibers in PLL or discs, leading to sympathetic symptoms via certain pathways; (3) removal of the PLL or stabilization of the segment which decreases the irritation to PLL will help to eliminate the sympathetic symptoms.

  3. Cervical cerclage.

    PubMed

    Suhag, Anju; Berghella, Vincenzo

    2014-09-01

    Cervical cerclage is an obstetric procedure performed for prevention of prematurity. Cerclage was first introduced by Drs Shirodkar and McDonald in the mid-1950s for women with repeated second trimester losses and cervical changes in current pregnancy. Currently, cerclage placement is based on 3 common indications in singleton gestations, including history-indicated (prior multiple early preterm births or second trimester losses), ultrasound-indicated (cervical length <25 mm before 24-wk gestational age in women with prior spontaneous preterm birth) and physical examination-indicated (cervical dilation on manual or physical examination before 24 wk).

  4. Balantidium coli: an unrecognized cause of vertebral osteomyelitis and myelopathy.

    PubMed

    Dhawan, Shashi; Jain, Deepali; Mehta, Veer Singh

    2013-03-01

    Balantidium coli is a ciliated protozoan parasite that primarily infects primates and pigs. It is the largest protozoan to infect humans and is a well-known cause of diarrhea and dysentery. Extraintestinal disease is uncommon, and extraintestinal spread to the peritoneal cavity, appendix, genitourinary tract, and lung has rarely been reported. The authors describe a case of vertebral osteomyelitis with secondary cervical cord compression caused by B. coli. The patient was a 60-year-old immunocompetent man presenting with quadriplegia of short duration. Magnetic resonance imaging of the cervical spine showed extradural and prevertebral abscess at the C3-4 level. Drainage of the abscess, C3-4 discectomy, and iliac bone grafting were performed. Histologically B. coli was confirmed in an abscess sample. To the best of the authors' knowledge, involvement of bone by B. coli has never been reported, and this case is the first documented instance of cervical cord compression due to B. coli osteomyelitis of the spine in the literature. PMID:23259539

  5. BIOTECHNOLOGIES AND BIOMATERIALS IN SPINE SURGERY.

    PubMed

    Vadala', G; Russo, F; Ambrosio, L; Di Martino, A; Papalia, R; Denaro, V

    2015-01-01

    Over the past few decades, spine disorders have become a major health concern and the number of spinal surgical procedures has been rising significantly. Several biotechnologies and biomaterials are often used in spine surgery to increase the effectiveness of the treatment. In the degenerative spine, when conservative treatment is ineffective the most recommended surgical procedure is decompression followed by spinal fusion. Success rates of spine fusion extensively rely on bone grafts peculiar properties. Autograft has been considered the gold standard to achieve a solid fusion but current research is focused on the development of new biomaterials. Osteoporosis is the main cause of vertebral compression fractures that are significantly associated with pain and disability, especially in the aging population. Vertebral augmentation is a minimally invasive approach in which cement is injected into the vertebral body to stabilize the fracture. New cements are being developed in the clinical scenario with reabsorbable properties and biomechanical features more similar to the native bone. The development of disc regeneration strategies such as nucleus pulposus restoration and annulus fibrosus repair may represent a minimally invasive procedure towards regeneration rather than fusion. Therefore, biomaterials and tissue engineering are fields of growing interest among both surgeons and manufacturing companies, with a major involvement in spine surgery. This review discusses current and novel biotechnologies and biomaterial used in spine surgery employing fusion, augmentation and regeneration.

  6. Paradoxical signaling regulates structural plasticity in dendritic spines.

    PubMed

    Rangamani, Padmini; Levy, Michael G; Khan, Shahid; Oster, George

    2016-09-01

    Transient spine enlargement (3- to 5-min timescale) is an important event associated with the structural plasticity of dendritic spines. Many of the molecular mechanisms associated with transient spine enlargement have been identified experimentally. Here, we use a systems biology approach to construct a mathematical model of biochemical signaling and actin-mediated transient spine expansion in response to calcium influx caused by NMDA receptor activation. We have identified that a key feature of this signaling network is the paradoxical signaling loop. Paradoxical components act bifunctionally in signaling networks, and their role is to control both the activation and the inhibition of a desired response function (protein activity or spine volume). Using ordinary differential equation (ODE)-based modeling, we show that the dynamics of different regulators of transient spine expansion, including calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII), RhoA, and Cdc42, and the spine volume can be described using paradoxical signaling loops. Our model is able to capture the experimentally observed dynamics of transient spine volume. Furthermore, we show that actin remodeling events provide a robustness to spine volume dynamics. We also generate experimentally testable predictions about the role of different components and parameters of the network on spine dynamics. PMID:27551076

  7. Risk of cervical injuries in mixed martial arts

    PubMed Central

    Kochhar, T; Back, D; Mann, B; Skinner, J

    2005-01-01

    Background: Mixed martial arts have rapidly succeeded boxing as the world's most popular full contact sport, and the incidence of injury is recognised to be high. Objective: To assess qualitatively and quantitatively the potential risk for participants to sustain cervical spine and associated soft tissue injuries. Methods: Four commonly performed manoeuvres with possible risks to the cervical spine were analysed with respect to their kinematics, and biomechanical models were constructed. Results: Motion analysis of two manoeuvres revealed strong correlations with rear end motor vehicle impact injuries, and kinematics of the remaining two suggested a strong risk of injury. Mathematical models of the biomechanics showed that the forces involved are of the same order as those involved in whiplash injuries and of the same magnitude as compression injuries of the cervical spine. Conclusions: This study shows that there is a significant risk of whiplash injuries in this sport, and there are no safety regulations to address these concerns. PMID:15976168

  8. Cervical Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... dysplasia of the cervix, vagina, or vulva • A family history of cervical cancer •Smoking •Certain sexually transmitted infections , such as chlamydia • ... to treat your cancer, you still need cervical cancer screening. Cells are taken from the upper vagina ... smallest units of a structure in the body; the building blocks for all ...

  9. The postsurgical spine.

    PubMed

    Santos Armentia, E; Prada González, R; Silva Priegue, N

    2016-04-01

    Failed back surgery syndrome is the persistence or reappearance of pain after surgery on the spine. This term encompasses both mechanical and nonmechanical causes. Imaging techniques are essential in postoperative follow-up and in the evaluation of potential complications responsible for failed back surgery syndrome. This review aims to familiarize radiologists with normal postoperative changes and to help them identify the pathological imaging findings that reflect failed back surgery syndrome. To interpret the imaging findings, it is necessary to know the type of surgery performed in each case and the time elapsed since the intervention. In techniques used to fuse the vertebrae, it is essential to evaluate the degree of bone fusion, the material used (both its position and its integrity), the bone over which it lies, the interface between the implant and bone, and the vertebral segments that are adjacent to metal implants. In decompressive techniques it is important to know what changes can be expected after the intervention and to be able to distinguish them from peridural fibrosis and the recurrence of a hernia. It is also crucial to know the imaging findings for postoperative infections. Other complications are also reviewed, including arachnoiditis, postoperative fluid collections, and changes in the soft tissues adjacent to the surgical site. PMID:26767541

  10. The postsurgical spine.

    PubMed

    Santos Armentia, E; Prada González, R; Silva Priegue, N

    2016-04-01

    Failed back surgery syndrome is the persistence or reappearance of pain after surgery on the spine. This term encompasses both mechanical and nonmechanical causes. Imaging techniques are essential in postoperative follow-up and in the evaluation of potential complications responsible for failed back surgery syndrome. This review aims to familiarize radiologists with normal postoperative changes and to help them identify the pathological imaging findings that reflect failed back surgery syndrome. To interpret the imaging findings, it is necessary to know the type of surgery performed in each case and the time elapsed since the intervention. In techniques used to fuse the vertebrae, it is essential to evaluate the degree of bone fusion, the material used (both its position and its integrity), the bone over which it lies, the interface between the implant and bone, and the vertebral segments that are adjacent to metal implants. In decompressive techniques it is important to know what changes can be expected after the intervention and to be able to distinguish them from peridural fibrosis and the recurrence of a hernia. It is also crucial to know the imaging findings for postoperative infections. Other complications are also reviewed, including arachnoiditis, postoperative fluid collections, and changes in the soft tissues adjacent to the surgical site.

  11. North American Spine Society

    MedlinePlus

    ... top spine care professionals from around the world starts here. Become a Member Now. Spinal injections and stimulation techniques. Didactics, hands-on training and discussions. Register Now A new way for patients to search, filter, and make ...

  12. Surgical Treatment of Aneurysmal Bone Cysts of the Spine

    PubMed Central

    Mesfin, Addisu; McCarthy, Edward F.; Kebaish, Khaled M.

    2012-01-01

    Objective Our goal was to document the presentation, location, diagnostic modalities, preoperative embolization status, treatment, histology, complications, and recurrence rates for aneurysmal bone cysts of the mobile spine. Methods We reviewed our institution's database to identify patients diagnosed with aneurysmal bone cysts of the mobile spine (excluding the sacrum) from 1995 through 2006. Of those 17 patients, three were treated elsewhere and 14 underwent surgical treatment at our institution. Of those 14 patients, the nine (mean age at presentation, 17.2 years; range, 5‥32 years) with at least 2 years of follow-up (average, 49.6 months; range, 24‥88 months) formed our study group. For those nine patients, we tabulated the presentation, location, diagnostic modalities, preoperative embolization status, treatment, histology, complications, and recurrence rates. Results Pain was the presenting symptom in all nine patients. The lesion most commonly occurred in the cervical spine (five); two occurred in the lumbar spine, and two occurred in the thoracic spine. Patients underwent resection and combined anterior and posterior spinal arthrodesis (six) or resection and posterior spinal arthrodesis (three). There were four complications: one iliac crest donor site infection, one incidental durotomy, and two neurologic defcits. We noted two recurrences (both within 3 months). Conclusions Aneurysmal bone cysts of the spine can be successfully treated with surgical resection and instrumentation. PMID:23576920

  13. PEEK cages as a potential alternative in the treatment of cervical spondylodiscitis: a preliminary report on a patient series

    PubMed Central

    Walter, Jan; Kuhn, Susanne Antje; Reichart, Rupert; Kalff, Rolf

    2010-01-01

    The surgical management of cervical spondylodiscitis consists of the resection of the affected disc, the decompression of the cervical spinal cord, followed by the stabilization using an autologous bone graft or a titanium implant combined with a ventral plate fixation. Until now, there were no studies about the practicability and putative safety of PEEK cages in cervical spine infection. Now, we present the history of five patients suffering from neurological deficits and septicemia caused by mono- or bisegmental pyogenic cervical discitis and intraspinal abscess without severe bone destruction. Patients were treated surgically by discectomy, decompression, and ventral spondylodesis. The disc was replaced by a PEEK cage without additional fixation. Progressive bony fusion and complete regression of the inflammatory changes was demonstrated 7–8 months later by a computer assisted tomography and contrast enhanced magnetic resonance imaging, respectively. The vertebral alignment changed minimally; the cages developed only a slight average subsidence. The clinical symptoms improved in all patients significantly. Neck pain or instability was never observed. Nevertheless, prospective investigations of a larger patient series are mandatory. We suppose that the use of PEEK cages represents a potential and safe alternative in the treatment of cervical spondylodiscitis in selected patients. PMID:20069319

  14. Cervical spondylitis and spinal abscess due to Actinomyces meyeri.

    PubMed

    Duvignaud, Alexandre; Ribeiro, Emmanuel; Moynet, Daniel; Longy-Boursier, Maïté; Malvy, Denis

    2014-01-01

    Human actinomycosis with involvement of the spine is a rare condition although it has been first described a long time ago. It is probably underrecognized since its clinical presentation is often misleading and accurate bacteriological diagnosis is challenging. We herein report a rare case of cervical actinomycosis with paravertebral abscess and spondylitis imputed to an infection by Actinomyces meyeri in a 52-year-old immunocompetent Caucasian man. A. meyeri should be considered as a potential cause for subacute or chronic spondylitis, even in immunocompetent subjects. Modern diagnostic tools such as Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption-Ionization Time of Flight mass spectrometry and 16S rRNA sequencing are efficient for accurate microbiological identification.

  15. Acquired cervical spinal arachnoid diverticulum in a cat.

    PubMed

    Adams, R J; Garosi, L; Matiasek, K; Lowrie, M

    2015-04-01

    A one-year-old, female entire, domestic, shorthair cat presented with acute onset non-ambulatory tetraparesis. Magnetic resonance imaging was consistent with a C3-C4 acute non-compressive nucleus pulposus extrusion and the cat was treated conservatively. The cat was able to walk after 10 days and was normal 2 months after presentation. The cat was referred five and a half years later for investigation of an insidious onset 3-month history of ataxia and tetraparesis. Magnetic resonance imaging of the cervical spine was repeated, demonstrating a spinal arachnoid diverticulum at C3 causing marked focal compression of the spinal cord. This was treated surgically with hemilaminectomy and durectomy. The cat improved uneventfully and was discharged 12 days later.

  16. Urgent endarterectomy using pretreatment with free radical scavenger, edaravone, and early clamping of the parent arteries for cervical carotid artery stenosis with crescendo transient ischemic attacks caused by mobile thrombus and hemodynamic cerebral ischemia. Case report.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Masakazu; Ogasawara, Kuniaki; Inoue, Takashi; Saito, Hideo; Komoribayashi, Nobukazu; Suga, Yasunori; Ogawa, Akira

    2007-03-01

    A 68-year-old man with left cervical internal carotid artery stenosis suffered crescendo transient ischemic attacks caused by mobile thrombus detected by carotid echography and secondary impairment of cerebral hemodynamic reserve demonstrated by positron emission tomography. Urgent carotid endarterectomy (CEA) was performed following pretreatment with edaravone and early clamping of the carotid arteries without intraluminal shunting. The postoperative course was uneventful, and postoperative magnetic resonance imaging and single-photon emission computed tomography revealed no new cerebral ischemic lesions and no findings of cerebral hyperperfusion, respectively. The risks associated with CEA are higher for patients with evolving stroke or crescendo transient ischemic attacks than that for patients with stable disease. This case demonstrates that urgent endarterectomy for cervical carotid artery stenosis with crescendo transient ischemic attacks caused by mobile thrombi and hemodynamic cerebral ischemia can be successfully performed following pretreatment with edaravone and early clamping of the carotid arteries.

  17. Dural tears in spine surgery.

    PubMed

    Espiritu, Michael T; Rhyne, Alfred; Darden, Bruce V

    2010-09-01

    Dural tears are among the most commonly seen complications in spine surgery. Most studies in the literature indicate that long-term outcomes are not negatively affected, provided that the tears are diagnosed early and managed appropriately. Direct suture repair remains the preferred method for the management of durotomy caused by or found during surgery. However, recent literature reports encouraging results with sutureless repair. Understanding dural anatomy, dural healing, and cerebrospinal fluid dynamics is helpful in choosing among the available management options for dural tear.

  18. The Role of Posterior Longitudinal Ligament in Cervical Disc Replacement: An Ovine Cadaveric Biomechanical Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Cheng-Cheng; Hao, Ding-Jun; Ma, Yu-Li; Huang, Da-Geng; Li, Hou-Kun; Feng, Hang; Hou, Qian

    2016-01-01

    Background Cervical disc replacement (CDR) has been widely used to restore and maintain mobility and function of the treated and adjacent motion segments. Posterior longitudinal ligament (PLL) resection has been shown to be efficient in anterior cervical decompression and fusion. However, less is known about the biomechanical effect of PLL removal versus preservation in cervical disc arthroplasty. Material/Methods Three motion segments of 24 ovine cervical spines (C2–C5) were evaluated in a robotic spine system with axial compressive loads of 50 N. These cervical spines were divided in three groups according to the following conditions: (1) intact spine, (2) C3/C4 CDR with the Prestige LP prosthesis and PLL preservation, and (3) C3/C4 CDR with the Prestige LP prosthesis and PLL removal. The ranges of motion (ROMs) were recorded and analyzed in each group. Results The C3/C4 ROM in group 3 (CDR with PLL removed) increased significantly in flexion-extension and axial rotation compared with group 1 (intact spine). Moreover, in flexion-extension, the mean total ROM was significantly larger in group 3 than in group 1. All the ROM observed in group 2 (CDR with PLL preserved) did not significantly differ from the ROM observed in group 1. Conclusions Compared with intact spines, CDR with PLL removal partly increased ROM. Moreover, the ROM in CDR with PLL preservation did not significantly differ from the ROM observed in intact spines. The PLL appears to contribute to the balance and stability of the cervical spine and should thus be preserved in cervical disc replacement provided that the posterior longitudinal ligament is not degenerative and the compression can be removed without PLL takedown. PMID:27243444

  19. The Role of Posterior Longitudinal Ligament in Cervical Disc Replacement: An Ovine Cadaveric Biomechanical Analysis.

    PubMed

    Yu, Cheng-Cheng; Hao, Ding-Jun; Ma, Yu-Li; Huang, Da-Geng; Li, Hou-Kun; Feng, Hang; Hou, Qian

    2016-05-31

    BACKGROUND Cervical disc replacement (CDR) has been widely used to restore and maintain mobility and function of the treated and adjacent motion segments. Posterior longitudinal ligament (PLL) resection has been shown to be efficient in anterior cervical decompression and fusion. However, less is known about the biomechanical effect of PLL removal versus preservation in cervical disc arthroplasty. MATERIAL AND METHODS Three motion segments of 24 ovine cervical spines (C2-C5) were evaluated in a robotic spine system with axial compressive loads of 50 N. These cervical spines were divided in three groups according to the following conditions: (1) intact spine, (2) C3/C4 CDR with the Prestige LP prosthesis and PLL preservation, and (3) C3/C4 CDR with the Prestige LP prosthesis and PLL removal. The ranges of motion (ROMs) were recorded and analyzed in each group. RESULTS The C3/C4 ROM in group 3 (CDR with PLL removed) increased significantly in flexion-extension and axial rotation compared with group 1 (intact spine). Moreover, in flexion-extension, the mean total ROM was significantly larger in group 3 than in group 1. All the ROM observed in group 2 (CDR with PLL preserved) did not significantly differ from the ROM observed in group 1. CONCLUSIONS Compared with intact spines, CDR with PLL removal partly increased ROM. Moreover, the ROM in CDR with PLL preservation did not significantly differ from the ROM observed in intact spines. The PLL appears to contribute to the balance and stability of the cervical spine and should thus be preserved in cervical disc replacement provided that the posterior longitudinal ligament is not degenerative and the compression can be removed without PLL takedown.

  20. Cervical nucleolysis: indications, technique, results. 190 patients.

    PubMed

    Krause, D; Drape, J L; Jambon, F; de Souza-Lima, A; Tongio, J; Maitrot, D; Orenstein, D; Giannetti, A; Boyer, P; Srour, R

    1993-03-01

    For many years now percutaneous techniques have proved effective in the curative treatment of lumbar disc herniation, mostly in young subjects. This technique, however, is seldom indicated, let alone performed, in the cervical spine for a variety of reasons: a) the neck contains several closely arranged structures such as the vasculo-nervous bundles, the airway-digestive tract and the cervical spine around the spinal cord; b) the disc is approached by the anterior route, in contrast with the lumbo-sacral spine where the approach is posterolateral; c) the manufacturers insist on restrictions in the use of chymopapain in view of the potential risk of spinal cord damage, either by possible breaks in the meninges of by accidental diffusion of the enzyme into perimedullary epidural structures which support a particularly developed venous plexus; d) legal protection may be denied to operators who perform cervical chemonucleolysis, since the product has not yet been officially authorized, in France and perhaps elsewhere*, for treatment of cervical disc herniation. Several years of experience in the practice of cervical nucleolysis have convinced the authors that this method is remarkably effective and can be used in the treatment of cervicobrachial neuralgia (CBN) occurring in young subjects. Radiculalgia is essentially due to a disc fragment being positioned within the vertebral canal or a foramen, thereby compressing the nerve roots. During several years microsurgery of the disc has been effective in the treatment of refractory radiculalgia, and to compete with this procedure familiar to neurosurgeons cervical nucleolysis must convincingly demonstrate that its therapeutic value is at least as good as that of surgery. Finally, the vast majority of cervical disc herniations is made up of free disc fragments located within the meshes of the posterior longitudinal ligament of the spine (transligamentous fragment). Cervical nucleolysis was introduced in France by Bonafe and

  1. [Cervical cerclage].

    PubMed

    Akladios, C Y; Sananes, N; Gaudineau, A; Boudier, E; Langer, B

    2015-10-01

    Cervical cerclage aims to strengthen not only the mechanical properties of the cervix, but also its immunological and anti-infectious functions. The demonstration of a strong interrelation between cervical insufficiency as well as decreased cervical length at endo-vaginal ultrasonography and infection has changed the indications cerclage. Actually we can distinguish three indications for cerclage: prophylactic, for obstetrical history; therapeutic, for shortened cervical length at ultrasonography in patients at risk and; emergency cerclage in case of threatening cervix at physical examination. The McDonald's technique is the most recommended. In case of failure, it is proposed to realize cerclage at a higher level on the cervix either by vaginal or abdominal route. PMID:26144289

  2. Cervical Cap

    MedlinePlus

    ... and remove the cap. How Much Does It Cost? A cervical cap costs about $70 and should be replaced every year. In addition, there is also the cost of the doctor's visit. Many health insurance plans ...

  3. Cervical spondylosis

    MedlinePlus

    Cervical osteoarthritis; Arthritis - neck; Neck arthritis; Chronic neck pain; Degenerative disk disease ... pain using stretches. The therapist will teach you exercises that make your neck muscles stronger. The therapist ...

  4. Routine use of recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 in posterior fusions of the pediatric spine and incidence of cancer.

    PubMed

    Sayama, Christina; Willsey, Matthew; Chintagumpala, Murali; Brayton, Alison; Briceño, Valentina; Ryan, Sheila L; Luerssen, Thomas G; Hwang, Steven W; Jea, Andrew

    2015-07-01

    OBJECT The aim of this study was to determine the safety of recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (rhBMP-2) use in posterior instrumented fusions in the pediatric population, focusing on cancer risk. In a previous study, the authors reported the short-term (mean follow-up of 11 months) safety and efficacy of rhBMP-2 in the pediatric age group. The present study reports their results with a minimum of 24 months' follow-up. METHODS The authors retrospectively reviewed 57 consecutive cases involving pediatric patients who underwent posterior occiptocervical, cervical, thoracic, lumbar, or lumbosacral spine fusion from October 1, 2007, to June 30, 2011, at Texas Children's Hospital. Seven cases were excluded from further analysis because of loss to follow-up. Three patients died during the follow-up period and were placed in a separate cohort. RESULTS The patients' average age at the time of surgery was 11 years, 4 months (range 9 months to 20 years). The mean duration of follow-up was 48.4 months (range 24-70 months). Cancer status was determined at the most recent encounter with the patient and/or caretaker(s) in person, or in telephone follow-up. Twenty-four or more months after administration of rhBMP-2, there were no cases of new malignancy, degeneration, or metastasis of existing tumors. The cause of death of the patients who died during the study period was not related to BMP or to the development, degeneration, or metastasis of cancer. CONCLUSIONS Despite the large number of adult studies reporting increased cancer risk associated with BMP use, the authors' outcomes with rhBMP-2 in the pediatric population suggest that it is a safe adjunct to posterior spine fusions of the occipitocervical, cervical, thoracic, lumbar, and lumbosacral spine. There were no new cases of cancer, or degeneration or metastasis of existing malignancies in this series.

  5. Cervical Ligamentum Flavum Hematoma: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Haghnegahdar, Ali; Sedighi, Mahsa; Rahmanian, Abdolkarim; Baghban, Fahim

    2016-02-01

    Study Design Case report. Objective To report the first case of ligamentum flavum hematoma after cervical spine instrumentation 11 years after the index surgery. Methods After performing bilateral C3 and C4 laminectomy, we observed a dark greenish discoloration over the ligamentum flavum, which was opened. We evacuated 15 mL of subacute hematoma. Results The first ligamentum flavum hematoma of the cervical spine that occurred after spinal instrumentation with sublaminar hooks. Conclusion Ligamentum flavum hematoma might happen even after a long delay (in our case, 11 years) from spinal instrumentation (sublaminar hooks). In symptomatic patients, evacuation is the treatment of choice. In cases of instrument adhesion to the surrounding intracanal tissues, removal should be done meticulously after performing a complete release.

  6. Cervical Ligamentum Flavum Hematoma: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Haghnegahdar, Ali; Sedighi, Mahsa; Rahmanian, Abdolkarim; Baghban, Fahim

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Case report. Objective To report the first case of ligamentum flavum hematoma after cervical spine instrumentation 11 years after the index surgery. Methods After performing bilateral C3 and C4 laminectomy, we observed a dark greenish discoloration over the ligamentum flavum, which was opened. We evacuated 15 mL of subacute hematoma. Results The first ligamentum flavum hematoma of the cervical spine that occurred after spinal instrumentation with sublaminar hooks. Conclusion Ligamentum flavum hematoma might happen even after a long delay (in our case, 11 years) from spinal instrumentation (sublaminar hooks). In symptomatic patients, evacuation is the treatment of choice. In cases of instrument adhesion to the surrounding intracanal tissues, removal should be done meticulously after performing a complete release. PMID:26835213

  7. Ultrastructure of Dendritic Spines: Correlation Between Synaptic and Spine Morphologies

    PubMed Central

    Arellano, Jon I.; Benavides-Piccione, Ruth; DeFelipe, Javier; Yuste, Rafael

    2007-01-01

    Dendritic spines are critical elements of cortical circuits, since they establish most excitatory synapses. Recent studies have reported correlations between morphological and functional parameters of spines. Specifically, the spine head volume is correlated with the area of the postsynaptic density (PSD), the number of postsynaptic receptors and the ready-releasable pool of transmitter, whereas the length of the spine neck is proportional to the degree of biochemical and electrical isolation of the spine from its parent dendrite. Therefore, the morphology of a spine could determine its synaptic strength and learning rules. To better understand the natural variability of neocortical spine morphologies, we used a combination of gold-toned Golgi impregnations and serial thin-section electron microscopy and performed three-dimensional reconstructions of spines from layer 2/3 pyramidal cells from mouse visual cortex. We characterized the structure and synaptic features of 144 completed reconstructed spines, and analyzed their morphologies according to their positions. For all morphological parameters analyzed, spines exhibited a continuum of variability, without clearly distinguishable subtypes of spines or clear dependence of their morphologies on their distance to the soma. On average, the spine head volume was correlated strongly with PSD area and weakly with neck diameter, but not with neck length. The large morphological diversity suggests an equally large variability of synaptic strength and learning rules. PMID:18982124

  8. Baastrup's disease in the pediatric spine

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Suryapratap

    2016-01-01

    Baastrup's disease is an uncommon entity in the elderly spine and it is very rare in the pediatric age group. There are only few case reports in the literature containing Baastrup's disease in pediatric spine. Baastrup's disease is also known as kissing spine because the posterior spinous processes touch or “kiss” one another, characterized by enlarged posterior spinous projections with normal neuroforamina and normal spinal disk height. There are various pathological and etiological hypotheses behind Baastrup's disease. Backache is one of the most common causes of morbidity in these patients and but sometimes patient can be asymptomatic with or without swelling on the back. Here, we present a case of 10-year-old female child with silent swelling on low back region diagnose as Baastrup's disease.

  9. Baastrup's disease in the pediatric spine

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Suryapratap

    2016-01-01

    Baastrup's disease is an uncommon entity in the elderly spine and it is very rare in the pediatric age group. There are only few case reports in the literature containing Baastrup's disease in pediatric spine. Baastrup's disease is also known as kissing spine because the posterior spinous processes touch or “kiss” one another, characterized by enlarged posterior spinous projections with normal neuroforamina and normal spinal disk height. There are various pathological and etiological hypotheses behind Baastrup's disease. Backache is one of the most common causes of morbidity in these patients and but sometimes patient can be asymptomatic with or without swelling on the back. Here, we present a case of 10-year-old female child with silent swelling on low back region diagnose as Baastrup's disease. PMID:27695557

  10. Vertebroplasty for Spine Fracture Pain

    MedlinePlus

    MENU Return to Web version Vertebroplasty for Spine Fracture Pain Vertebroplasty for Spine Fracture Pain More than 40 million people in the United States have osteoporosis (a decrease in the amount ...

  11. Low-dose chemonucleolysis combined with percutaneous nucleotomy in herniated cervical disks.

    PubMed

    Hoogland, T; Scheckenbach, C

    1995-06-01

    The combination of low-dose chemonucleolysis with 500 IU chymopapain followed by an automated percutaneous nucleotomy of the cervical spine is a new procedure. A follow-up of at least 1 year of the first 22 patients showed in 19 patients good or excellent results. In one patient a fair result was obtained, and in two patients the symptoms were unchanged; one of these patients subsequently underwent diskectomy and anterior cervical spine fusion. Preoperatively, all patients showed a clear cervical disk herniation with predominantly radicular pain. The procedure has been performed so far in approximately 100 patients. No intra- or postoperative complications have been noted. PMID:7670215

  12. Anaplastic extramedullary cervical ependymoma with leptomeningeal metastasis.

    PubMed

    Pomeraniec, I J; Dallapiazza, R F; Sumner, H M; Lopes, M B; Shaffrey, C I; Smith, J S

    2015-12-01

    We present a rare extramedullary ependymoma with diffuse spinal metastatic disease, and review the previous reports of extramedullary spinal ependymomas. Ependymomas are the most common intramedullary spinal cord tumor in adults. These tumors rarely present as extramedullary masses. We treated a 23-year-old man with a history of progressive neck, shoulder and arm pain, with sensory and motor symptoms in the C7 dermatome. MRI of the cervical spine demonstrated a ventral contrast-enhancing lesion with evidence of enhancement along the dura and spinal cord of the upper cervical spine, thoracic spine, and cauda equina. He underwent a tumor debulking procedure without complications. Following surgery, he received craniospinal radiation to treat the remaining tumor and diffuse leptomeningeal disease. The final pathology of the tumor revealed that is was a World Health Organization Grade III anaplastic ependymoma. At the 1 year follow-up, the patient had stable imaging and had returned to his preoperative functional status. Of the 19 reported patients with primary intradural, extramedullary spinal ependymomas, two had extradural components and seven had anaplastic grades. Only one tumor with an anaplastic grade resulted in metastatic disease, but without spinal recurrence. To our knowledge, this is the first report of an intradural, extramedullary spinal ependymoma with an anaplastic grade, presenting with concomitant diffuse, nodular leptomeningeal metastasis involving the upper cervical spine, thoracic spine, conus medullaris, and cauda equina. Similar to the treatment of intramedullary ependymomas with metastasis, this patient underwent an aggressive debulking procedure followed by radiation therapy to the entire neuroaxis. PMID:26601808

  13. Cervical spinal cord injury--a public catastrophe.

    PubMed

    Roye, W P; Dunn, E L; Moody, J A

    1988-08-01

    Cervical spine cord injuries continue to be a major cause of death and disability for trauma victims. Motor vehicle trauma results in 500 to 650 quadriplegic patients per year. Most of the patients are cared for at Level I trauma centers which may not have a dedicated rehabilitation facility. Long-term rehabilitation, nursing care, and financial support remain difficult areas in the overall management of these injuries. Seventy-one cervical spine fracture patients were admitted to this medical center over a 2-year period. Twenty-two patients had a neurologic injury, 15 quadriplegic patients, and seven with incomplete deficits. Vehicular trauma was the etiology in 14 injuries; gunshot wounds in five; falls in three. Twelve of these 22 patients had associated injuries, including chest and abdominal trauma. Prolonged stays in the intensive care unit were common (avg. = 13.5 days). Bronchoscopy (8/22 patients) and aggressive pulmonary care were constantly needed. Six patients died in the intensive care unit. The average hospital stay of the survivors was 45 days. Three of the 16 surviving patients were ventilator dependent at the time of discharge. Ten patients were discharged to a rehabilitation center, one to a nursing home, and five went home (one on a ventilator). The total hospital charges were $1,250,000. No financial resources were available for five of the 16 surviving patients. Four patients had resources which covered less than 50% of the total charges. Average hospital charges for survivors were $50,370. Maximum reimbursement using all outlier days under DRG 5 would be $12,385. The financial support of initial hospitalization, rehabilitation, and nursing care for these quadriplegic patients is a serious national health care issue. PMID:3137366

  14. Injuries of the spine sustained during rugby.

    PubMed

    Silver, J R; Gill, S

    1988-05-01

    In 1984 JR Silver reported on 63 patients who had sustained serious injuries of their cervical spine as a result of games of rugby between the years 1952 and 1982. In this paper his results have been brought up to date. A further 19 players who were treated personally are reported, sustaining their injuries between 1983 and 1987. The mechanism of injury was still blows to the head or the head being driven into the ground. Seven injuries occurred in the scrums all were front row forwards. One was injured when the players charged, two players were inexperienced and the other cases all followed a collapse of the scrum after which the second rows continued to push. Five players were injured while tackling, six players were injured in a ruck and maul situation--in each case they were pushed to the ground while stooping to pick up the ball, other players piled on top of them (one player broke from the scrum and he endeavoured to retrieve a low ball and then fell striking his head). Further research was carried out by circularising all the spinal units in the United Kingdom to obtain the overall figures. It has been found that there has been a reduction in the number of injuries from ten in 1983 to five in 1986/7, presumably from a change in the laws. In order to determine whether a further change in the laws was necessary or whether the existing laws were adequate, research was carried out by video recording several games of rugby and analysing the games later in slow motion and determining how injuries occurred. Most of the injuries in these small number of games occurred in the ruck and maul situation. It was concluded that the majority of such injuries were not due to bad luck but were caused by irresponsible actions. The laws were still being broken and not being enforced. The existing laws were adequate since there has been a reduction in the number of injuries overall, particularly at first class and schoolboy levels, but were not enforced at junior levels

  15. Spine Conditioning Program

    MedlinePlus

    ... which exercises will best help you meet your rehabilitation goals. Strength: Strengthening the muscles that support your spine will help keep your back and upper body stable. Keeping these muscles strong can relieve back pain and prevent further injury. Flexibility: Stretching the muscles ...

  16. Neuroimaging of spine tumors.

    PubMed

    Pinter, Nandor K; Pfiffner, Thomas J; Mechtler, Laszlo L

    2016-01-01

    Intramedullary, intradural/extramedullary, and extradural spine tumors comprise a wide range of neoplasms with an even wider range of clinical symptoms and prognostic features. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), commonly used to evaluate the spine in patients presenting with pain, can further characterize lesions that may be encountered on other imaging studies, such as bone scintigraphy or computed tomography (CT). The advantage of the MRI is its multiplane capabilities, superior contrast agent resolution, and flexible protocols that play an important role in assessing tumor location, extent in directing biopsy, in planning proper therapy, and in evaluating therapeutic results. A multimodality approach can be used to fully characterize the lesion and the combination of information obtained from the different modalities usually narrows the diagnostic possibilities significantly. The diagnosis of spinal tumors is based on patient age, topographic features of the tumor, and lesion pattern, as seen at CT and MRI. The shift to high-end imaging incorporating diffusion-weighted imaging, diffusion tensor imaging, magnetic resonance spectroscopy, whole-body short tau inversion recovery, positron emission tomography, intraoperative and high-field MRI as part of the mainstream clinical imaging protocol has provided neurologists, neuro-oncologists, and neurosurgeons a window of opportunity to assess the biologic behavior of spine neoplasms. This chapter reviews neuroimaging of spine tumors, primary and secondary, discussing routine and newer modalities that can reduce the significant morbidity associated with these neoplasms. PMID:27430436

  17. Spontaneous regression of cervical disc herniation: a case report.

    PubMed

    Han, Seong Rok; Choi, Chan Young

    2014-12-01

    Spontaneous regression of cervical disc herniation is a rare, and such reports are few. A 39 year-old woman complained of severe neck pain associated with tingling and numbness of right upper extremity. The MRI of the cervical spine revealed a posterior disc extrusion at the C4-C5 level in the right para-central location. The patient was treated with conservative management without any surgical treatment. The patient's symptoms were significant improvement. After two years later, we performed follow-up cervical MRI that revealed significant spontaneous regression of the C4-C5 intervertebral disc extrusion. PMID:25620984

  18. Patients Immobilized with a Long Spine Board Rarely Have Unstable Thoracolumbar Injuries.

    PubMed

    Clemency, Brian M; Bart, Joseph A; Malhotra, Abhigyan; Klun, Taylor; Campanella, Veronica; Lindstrom, Heather A

    2016-01-01

    Most Emergency Medical Services (EMS) protocols require spine immobilization with both a cervical collar and long spine board for patients with suspected spine injuries. The goal of this research was to determine the prevalence of unstable thoracolumbar spine injuries among patients receiving prehospital spine immobilization: a 4-year retrospective review of adult subjects who received prehospital spine immobilization and were transported to a trauma center. Prehospital and hospital records were linked. Data was reviewed to determine if spine imaging was ordered, whether acute thoracolumbar fractures, dislocations, or subluxations were present. Thoracolumbar injuries were classified as unstable if operative repair was performed. Prehospital spine immobilization was documented on 5,593 unique adult subjects transported to the study hospital. A total of 5,423 (97.0%) prehospital records were successfully linked to hospital records. The subjects were 60.2% male, with a mean age of 40.6 (SD = 17.5) years old. An total of 5,286 (97.4%) subjects had sustained blunt trauma. Hospital providers ordered imaging to rule out spine injury in 2,782 (51.3%) cases. An acute thoracolumbar fracture, dislocation, or subluxation was present in 233 (4.3%) cases. An unstable injury was present in 29 (0.5%) cases. No unstable injuries were found among the 951 subjects who were immobilized following ground level falls. Hospital providers ordered at least one spine x-ray or CT in most patients, and a thoracolumbar imaging in half of all patients immobilized. Only 0.5% of patients who received prehospital spine immobilization had an unstable thoracolumbar spine injury.

  19. Patients Immobilized with a Long Spine Board Rarely Have Unstable Thoracolumbar Injuries.

    PubMed

    Clemency, Brian M; Bart, Joseph A; Malhotra, Abhigyan; Klun, Taylor; Campanella, Veronica; Lindstrom, Heather A

    2016-01-01

    Most Emergency Medical Services (EMS) protocols require spine immobilization with both a cervical collar and long spine board for patients with suspected spine injuries. The goal of this research was to determine the prevalence of unstable thoracolumbar spine injuries among patients receiving prehospital spine immobilization: a 4-year retrospective review of adult subjects who received prehospital spine immobilization and were transported to a trauma center. Prehospital and hospital records were linked. Data was reviewed to determine if spine imaging was ordered, whether acute thoracolumbar fractures, dislocations, or subluxations were present. Thoracolumbar injuries were classified as unstable if operative repair was performed. Prehospital spine immobilization was documented on 5,593 unique adult subjects transported to the study hospital. A total of 5,423 (97.0%) prehospital records were successfully linked to hospital records. The subjects were 60.2% male, with a mean age of 40.6 (SD = 17.5) years old. An total of 5,286 (97.4%) subjects had sustained blunt trauma. Hospital providers ordered imaging to rule out spine injury in 2,782 (51.3%) cases. An acute thoracolumbar fracture, dislocation, or subluxation was present in 233 (4.3%) cases. An unstable injury was present in 29 (0.5%) cases. No unstable injuries were found among the 951 subjects who were immobilized following ground level falls. Hospital providers ordered at least one spine x-ray or CT in most patients, and a thoracolumbar imaging in half of all patients immobilized. Only 0.5% of patients who received prehospital spine immobilization had an unstable thoracolumbar spine injury. PMID:27002350

  20. Nativity disparities in late-stage diagnosis and cause-specific survival among Hispanic women with invasive cervical cancer: An analysis of Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results data

    PubMed Central

    Montealegre, Jane R.; Zhou, Renke; Amirian, E. Susan; Follen, Michele; Scheurer, Michael E.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose While cervical cancer screening and risk behaviors have been found to vary among U.S.- and foreign-born Hispanic women, many cancer epidemiology studies have conceptualized Hispanics as a homogenous group. Here we examine differences in cervical cancer stage at diagnosis and survival among Hispanic women by nativity. Methods We use data from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) program, 1998–2008. Nativity was based on place of birth and was categorized as U.S.- versus foreign-born. Distant and regional tumors were classified as late-stage, while local tumors were classified as early-stage. Results Forty seven percent of cases of invasive cervical cancer among Hispanics were diagnosed at a late stage and over half of invasive cervical cancer cases were among foreign-born women. Foreign-born Hispanic women were significantly more likely than U.S.-born Hispanics to have late-stage diagnosis, after adjusting for age at diagnosis and tumor histology (adjusted odds ration= 1.09, p-value = 0.003). There was heterogeneity in the association between nativity and survival by stage at diagnosis. Among cases with early-stage diagnosis, survival was poorer among foreign-born versus U.S.-born Hispanics after adjusting for age at diagnosis, histology, and cancer-directed therapy (adjusted HR = 1.31, p-value = 0.030). However, among cases with late-stage diagnosis, survival was better among foreign--born Hispanics (adjusted HR = 0.81, p-value < 0.001). Conclusions We hypothesize that nativity differences in survival may be indicative of diverse risk, screening, and treatment profiles. Given such differences, it may be inappropriate to aggregate Hispanics as a single group for cervical cancer research. PMID:23934001

  1. Relationship of Specific Bacteria in the Cervical and Vaginal Microbiotas with Cervicitis

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, Sujatha; Fiedler, Tina L.; Morgan, Martin T.; Balkus, Jennifer E.; McClelland, R. Scott; Fredricks, David N.; Marrazzo, Jeanne M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Cervicitis is an inflammatory condition of the cervix associated with upper genital tract infection and reproductive complications. Although cervicitis can be caused by several known pathogens, the etiology frequently remains obscure. Here we investigate vaginal bacteria associated with bacterial vaginosis as potential causes of cervicitis. Methods Associations between vaginal bacteria and cervicitis were assessed in a retrospective case control study of women attending a Seattle STD clinic. Individual bacterial species were detected using two molecular methods: quantitative PCR (qPCR) and broad range 16S rRNA gene PCR with pyrosequencing. The primary finding from this initial study was evaluated using qPCR in a second cohort of Kenyan women. Results The presence of Mageeibacillus indolicus, formerly BVAB3, in the cervix was associated with cervicitis, while the presence of Lactobacillus jensenii was inversely associated. Quantities of these bacteria did not differ between cervicitis cases and controls, though in a model inclusive of presence and abundance, M. indolicus remained significantly associated with cervicitis after adjustment for other cervicitis-causing pathogens. M. indolicus was not associated with cervicitis in our study of Kenyan women, possibly due to differences in the clinical definition of cervicitis. Conclusions Colonization of the endocervix with M. indolicus may contribute to the clinical manifestations of cervicitis, but further study is needed to determine whether this finding is repeatable and applicable to diverse groups of women. Colonization of the cervix with L. jensenii could be a marker of health, perhaps reducing infla