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Sample records for cervical vertebrae

  1. Skeletal maturation evaluation using cervical vertebrae.

    PubMed

    Hassel, B; Farman, A G

    1995-01-01

    Lateral cephalometric and left hand-wrist radiographs from the Bolton-Brush Growth Center at Case Western Reserve University were reviewed a posteriori to develop a cervical vertebrae maturation index (CVMI). By using the lateral profiles of the second, third and fourth cervical vertebrae, it was possible to develop a reliable ranking of patients according to the potential for future adolescent growth potential.

  2. Predicting skeletal maturation using cervical vertebrae.

    PubMed

    Minars, Michael; Burch, James; Masella, Richard; Meister, Malcolm

    2003-10-01

    This study's objective was to familiarize the profession with determining skeletal maturation and skeletal age, and predicting growth potential by using cervical vertebrae images of lateral cephalograms. The investigation was done through repeated evaluations of 30 randomly selected, pretreatment lateral cepaholometric radiographs. The accuracy of determining skeletal age and growth potential with lateral cephalograms was found to be R=0.98 (highly accurate) by statistical analysis.

  3. Skeletal maturation determined by cervical vertebrae development.

    PubMed

    San Román, Paloma; Palma, Juan Carlos; Oteo, M Dolores; Nevado, Esther

    2002-06-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the validity of cervical vertebrae radiographic assessment to predict skeletal maturation. Left hand-wrist and lateral cephalometric radiographs of 958 Spanish children from 5 to 18 years of age were measured. On the left hand-wrist radiographs the classification of Grave and Brown was used to assess skeletal maturation. Cervical vertebrae maturation was evaluated with lateral cephalometric radiographs using the stages described by Lamparski and by Hassel and Farman. A new method to evaluate the cervical maturation by studying the changes in the concavity of the lower border, height, and shape of the vertebral body was created. Correlation coefficients were calculated to establish the relationship between skeletal maturation values obtained by the three classifications of vertebral and skeletal maturation measured at the wrist. All correlation values obtained were statistically significant (P < 0.001). The results suggest that this new method to determine skeletal maturation is very reliable. A simple method based on morphological characteristics of the cervical vertebral bodies to evaluate the maturation stage has been designed. In the population investigated, this method is as accurate as the Hassel and Farman classification and superior to the Lamparski classification. The morphological vertebral parameter best able to estimate the maturation is the concavity of the lower border of the body.

  4. [Observation of cervical vertebrae and estimation of their bone age].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Y; Wang, B

    1997-05-01

    There are two objectives in this study: the first is to estimate skeletal age by lateral cephalomatric roentgengram of cervical vertebrae instead of X-ray of handwrist, the second is to study the rules of cervical vertebrae's growth and development of children from Beijing. The Auto CAD 12.0 computer software was used in measuring lateral cephalomatric roentgengrams of cervical vertebrae of 280 children from Beijing aged 9-15. The shape of cervical vertebrae of children with that of adults on X-ray films was compared, and the growth and development of cervical vertebrae of 9-15 years old children from Beijing was observed. We found out that the rapid growth period of cervical vertebrae was 12-14 years old for girls and 14-15 years old for boys. During puberty, the change of vertebrae's shape has no difference between male and female. 42 female and 28 male teenagers from the 280 aged 9-13 years old were taken X-ray films of left handwrist. The comparison between the films and roentgengrams shows that the appearance of sesamoid of hand and the concavity of the second vertebrae body is at the same time, which means that the beginning of rapid growth period can be estimated by the lateral cephalometric roentgengrams of cervical vertebrae.

  5. Skeletal maturation analysis by morphological evaluation of the cervical vertebrae.

    PubMed

    Santos, Eduardo César Almada; Bertoz, Francisco Antônio; Arantes, Flávia de Moraes; Reis, Patrícia Maria Pizzo; de Bertoz, André Pinheiro Magalhães

    2006-01-01

    The determination of skeletal maturation by morphological evaluation of the cervical vertebrae was evaluated in a 100 cephalograms. The analysis showed that this method was reproducible for assessing the individual's growth curve.

  6. Homeotic transformation of cervical vertebrae in Hoxa-4 mutant mice.

    PubMed Central

    Horan, G S; Wu, K; Wolgemuth, D J; Behringer, R R

    1994-01-01

    Hoxa-4 (previously known as Hox-1.4) is a mouse homeobox-containing gene that is expressed in the presumptive hindbrain and spinal cord, prevertebrae, and other tissues during embryogenesis. To understand the role of Hoxa-4 during development, we generated Hoxa-4 mutant mice. Homozygous mutants were viable and fertile. Analysis of neonatal skeletons revealed the development of ribs on the seventh cervical vertebra at variable penetrance and expressivity. A low frequency of alterations in sternal morphogenesis was also observed. In addition, we analyzed the skeletons of transgenic mice that overexpress Hoxa-4 and found that the formation of the small rib anlagen that often develop on the seventh cervical vertebra was suppressed. Analysis of adult homozygous mutant skeletons revealed that the dorsal process normally associated with the second cervical vertebra was also found on the third cervical vertebra. These results demonstrate that Hoxa-4 plays a role in conferring positional information along the anteroposterior axis to specify the identity of the third and the seventh cervical vertebrae. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:7809093

  7. [Evaluation of cervical vertebrae for determination of skeletal age].

    PubMed

    Caltabiano, M; Leonardi, R; Zaborra, G

    1990-01-01

    The relationship among cervical vertebral maturation and skeletal, dental and chronological ages were assessed by the Authors in lateral cephalometric, hand and orthopantomographic x-rays on 72 italian young subjects from 10 to 15 years of age. Statistically significant correlations were found between cervical vertebral maturation and skeletal age both in males and females, while vertebrae age was correlated with dental and chronological ages only in the females.

  8. New approach to evaluate rotation of cervical vertebrae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahn, Matthias

    2001-07-01

    Functional deficits after whiplash injury can be analyzed with a quite novel radiologic method by examination of joint-blocks in C0/1 and C1/2. Thereto the movability of C0, C1 and C2 is determined with three spiral CT-scans of the patient's cervical spine. One series in neutral and one in maximal active lateral right and left rotation each. Previous methods were slice based and time consuming when manually evaluated. We propose a new approach to a computation of these angles in 3D. After a threshold segmentation of bone tissue, a rough 2D classification takes place for C0, C1 and C2 in each rotation series. The center of an axial rotation for each vertebra is gained from the approximation of its center of gravity. The rotation itself is estimated by a cross-correlation of the radial distance functions. From the previous rotation the results are taken to initialize a 3D matching algorithm based on the sum of squared differences in intensity. The optimal match of the vertebrae is computed by means of the multidimensional Powell minimization algorithm. The three translational and three rotational components build a six-dimensional search-space. The vertebrae detection and rotation computation is done fully automatic.

  9. Spheno-Occipital Synchondrosis Fusion Correlates with Cervical Vertebrae Maturation

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Pérez, María José; McNamara, James A.; Velasco-Torres, Miguel; Benavides, Erika; Galindo-Moreno, Pablo; Catena, Andrés

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the relationship between the closure stage of the spheno-occipital synchondrosis and the maturational stage of the cervical vertebrae (CVM) in growing and young adult subjects using cone beam computed tomography (CBCT). CBCT images with an extended field of view obtained from 315 participants (148 females and 167 males; mean age 15.6 ±7.3 years; range 6 to 23 years) were analyzed. The fusion status of the synchondrosis was determined using a five-stage scoring system; the vertebral maturational status was evaluated using a six-stage stratification (CVM method). Ordinal regression was used to study the ability of the synchondrosis stage to predict the vertebral maturation stage. Vertebrae and synchondrosis had a strong significant correlation (r = 0.89) that essential was similar for females (r = 0.88) and males (r = 0.89). CVM stage could be accurately predicted from synchondrosis stage by ordinal regression models. Prediction equations of the vertebral stage using synchondrosis stage, sex and biological age as predictors were developed. Thus this investigation demonstrated that the stage of spheno-occipital synchondrosis, as determined in CBCT images, is a reasonable indicator of growth maturation. PMID:27513752

  10. Assessment of skeletal maturation based on cervical vertebrae in CBCT.

    PubMed

    Shim, Jocelyne J; Heo, Giseon; Lagravère, Manuel O

    2012-12-01

    Diagnosis of skeletal age in adolescents helps orthodontists select and time treatments. Currently this is done using lateral cephalometric radiographs. This study evaluates the application of the conventional method in cone-beam computer tomographic (CBCT) images to bring forth assessment of skeletal maturation in three-dimensions. Ninety-eight lateral cephalometric radiographs and CBCT scans were collected from orthodontic patients between 11 to 17 years of age over an 18-month period. CBCT scans were examined in seven sagittal slices based on cervical vertebral maturation staging (CVMS). Collected CVMS values were compared with those from corresponding lateral cephalometric radiograph. CVMS measured from CBCT and lateral cephalometric radiographs were the same on average. However, they were not consistent with each other and scored interclass correlation coefficient of 0.155 in validity test. Interoperator reliability was weak (0.581). Adaptation of cervical vertebrae maturation staging in CBCT requires further clarifications or modifications to become consistent with lateral cephalometric examinations and to become a reliable method. Alternatively, a completely new method may be developed consisting of maturational indicators or landmarks unique to CBCT imaging.

  11. Skeletal maturation of the cervical vertebrae: association with various types of malocclusion.

    PubMed

    Armond, Mônica Costa; Generoso, Rodrigo; Falci, Saulo Gabriel Moreira; Ramos-Jorge, Maria Letícia; Marques, Leandro Silva

    2012-01-01

    The identification of the skeletal maturation stage of the cervical vertebrae has proven an important reference for orthodontic diagnosis. The aim of the present study was to determine the association between the skeletal maturation stage of the cervical vertebrae and types of malocclusion according to the age and gender of participants. A total of 361 individuals (168 males and 193 females) between 8 and 14 years of age were selected from a convenience sample. Malocclusions were diagnosed through study models using the Angle classification. Maturation stages of the cervical vertebrae were determined using the method proposed by Hassel and Farman. Statistical analysis involved the chi-square test (p £ 0.05) and multiple logistic regression (forward stepwise procedure). Significant differences were observed between the stage of skeletal maturation of the cervical vertebrae and gender at ages 11, 12 and 14 years. Males with Class II malocclusion were twice as likely to be in Stage 1 or 2 of cervical vertebra maturation than individuals with Class I malocclusion (OR = 2.1 [CI 95%, 1.33-3.18]). There were no differences between individuals with Class I and Class III malocclusions. The association between skeletal maturation of the cervical vertebrae and type of malocclusion was significant, suggesting a skeletal component in the determination of Class II malocclusions.

  12. Comparative evaluation of hand wrist radiographs with cervical vertebrae for skeletal maturation in 10-12 years old children.

    PubMed

    Kamal, M; Goyal, S

    2006-09-01

    A comparative evaluation of hand wrist and cervical vertebrae was done to know the validity of cervical vertebrae as maturity indicators. A sample of 50 subjects (25 females and 25 males) in the age group of 10-12 years were selected on criteria of normal occlusion and the result showed that cervical vertebrae can be used with the same confidence as hand wrist radiographs to evaluate skeletal maturity, thus avoiding the need for an additional radiograph.

  13. The distribution of cervical vertebrae anomalies among dental malocclusions

    PubMed Central

    Kamak, Hasan; Yildırım, Eren

    2015-01-01

    Aims: The aims of our study were to investigate the distribution of cervical vertebrae anomalies (CVAs) among dental Angle Class I, II, and III malocclusions in Turkish population and whether a correlation between CVA and dental malocclusion. Materials and Methods: The study was performed on lateral cephalometric radiographs which were taken at the Department of Orthodontics, Faculty of Dentistry, Kirikkale University. The final sample of 318 orthodontic patients was included in the study. Dental malocclusions were performed according to Angle classification. CVAs were categorized: (1) fusion and (2) posterior arch deficiency (PAD). The Chi-square test was used to the analysis of the potential differences among dental malocclusions. Results: The final sample of 318 patients was examined. CVA was observed in 42 individuals (of 26 [8.17%] had fusion and 16 [5.03%] had PAD), with a frequency of 13.2%. Of the 26 fusion defect, 8 (30.7%) had Angle Class I, 8 (30.7%) had Angle Class II, and 10 (38.4%) had Angle Class III malocclusion. Of the 16 PAD, 8 (50%) had Angle Class I, 8 (50%) had Angle Class II but no patients with Angle Class III malocclusion was observed. The distribution of dental malocclusions regarding CVA was not statistically significant (P = 0.076). Of these 42 individuals with CVA, 52.3% (15 fusions and 7 PAD) were females and 47.7% (11 fusions and 9 PAD) were males. Conclusion: In our study, the prevalence of fusion and PAD were found 8.1% and 5.0% in Turkish population, respectively. Besides, no statistically significant correlation between CVA and Angle Class I, II, and III malocclusions were found. Our findings support the studies showing no gender dimorphism. PMID:26692691

  14. Morphology of the cervical vertebrae in the fetal-neonatal human skeleton

    PubMed Central

    CASTELLANA, C.; KÓSA, F.

    1999-01-01

    The gross anatomical features of human cervical vertebrae during the fetal-neonatal period were investigated in order to develop morphological standards for the individual ossification centres for use in forensic and anthropological osteology. It was found that the morphology of the cervical vertebral arches and the centra cannot be used for the determination of fetal age although the dens of the axis displays some developmental differences which may be useful for the determination of fetal maturity. PMID:10227677

  15. Population-Stratified Analysis of Bone Mineral Density Distribution in Cervical and Lumbar Vertebrae of Chinese from Quantitative Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yong; Zhou, Zhuang; Wu, Cheng'ai; Zhao, Danhui; Wang, Chao; Cai, Wei; Wang, Ling; Duanmu, Yangyang; Zhang, Chenxin; Tian, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the bone mineral density (BMD) of cervical vertebrae in a population-stratified manner and correlate with that of the lumbar vertebrae. Materials and Methods Five hundred and ninety-eight healthy volunteers (254 males, 344 females), ranging from 20 to 64 years of age, were recruited for volumetric BMD (vBMD) measurements by quantitative computed tomography. Basic information (age, height, weight, waistline, and hipline), and vBMD of the cervical and lumbar vertebrae (C2–7 and L2–4) were recorded. Comparisons among sex, age groups and different levels of vertebrae were analyzed using analysis of variance. Linear regression was performed for relevance of different vertebral levels. Results The vBMD of cervical and lumbar vertebrae was higher in females than males in each age group. The vBMD of the cervical and lumbar vertebrae in males and the vBMD of lumbar vertebrae in females decreased with aging. In each age group, the vBMD of the cervical vertebrae was higher than that of the lumbar vertebrae with gradual decreases from C2 to C7 except for C3; moreover, the vBMD of C6 and C7 was significantly different from that of C2–5. Correlations of vBMD among different cervical vertebrae (females: r = 0.62–0.94; males: r = 0.63–0.94) and lumbar vertebrae (males: r = 0.93–0.98; females: r = 0.82–0.97) were statistically significant at each age group. Conclusion The present study provided normative data of cervical vertebrae in an age- and sex-stratified manner. Sex differences in vBMD prominently vary with age, which can be helpful to design a more comprehensive pre-operative surgical plan. PMID:27587947

  16. The mammalian cervical vertebrae blueprint depends on the T (brachyury) gene.

    PubMed

    Kromik, Andreas; Ulrich, Reiner; Kusenda, Marian; Tipold, Andrea; Stein, Veronika M; Hellige, Maren; Dziallas, Peter; Hadlich, Frieder; Widmann, Philipp; Goldammer, Tom; Baumgärtner, Wolfgang; Rehage, Jürgen; Segelke, Dierck; Weikard, Rosemarie; Kühn, Christa

    2015-03-01

    A key common feature all but three known mammalian genera is the strict seven cervical vertebrae blueprint, suggesting the involvement of strong conserving selection forces during mammalian radiation. This is further supported by reports indicating that children with cervical ribs die before they reach reproductive age. Hypotheses were put up, associating cervical ribs (homeotic transformations) to embryonal cancer (e.g., neuroblastoma) or ascribing the constraint in cervical vertebral count to the development of the mammalian diaphragm. Here, we describe a spontaneous mutation c.196A > G in the Bos taurus T gene (also known as brachyury) associated with a cervical vertebral homeotic transformation that violates the fundamental mammalian cervical blueprint, but does not preclude reproduction of the affected individual. Genome-wide mapping, haplotype tracking within a large pedigree, resequencing of target genome regions, and bioinformatic analyses unambiguously confirmed the mutant c.196G allele as causal for this previously unknown defect termed vertebral and spinal dysplasia (VSD) by providing evidence for the mutation event. The nonsynonymous VSD mutation is located within the highly conserved T box of the T gene, which plays a fundamental role in eumetazoan body organization and vertebral development. To our knowledge, VSD is the first unequivocally approved spontaneous mutation decreasing cervical vertebrae number in a large mammal. The spontaneous VSD mutation in the bovine T gene is the first in vivo evidence for the hypothesis that the T protein is directly involved in the maintenance of the mammalian seven-cervical vertebra blueprint. It therefore furthers our knowledge of the T-protein function and early mammalian notochord development.

  17. The Mammalian Cervical Vertebrae Blueprint Depends on the T (brachyury) Gene

    PubMed Central

    Kromik, Andreas; Ulrich, Reiner; Kusenda, Marian; Tipold, Andrea; Stein, Veronika M.; Hellige, Maren; Dziallas, Peter; Hadlich, Frieder; Widmann, Philipp; Goldammer, Tom; Baumgärtner, Wolfgang; Rehage, Jürgen; Segelke, Dierck; Weikard, Rosemarie; Kühn, Christa

    2015-01-01

    A key common feature of all but three known mammalian genera is the strict seven cervical vertebrae blueprint, suggesting the involvement of strong conserving selection forces during mammalian radiation. This is further supported by reports indicating that children with cervical ribs die before they reach reproductive age. Hypotheses were put up, associating cervical ribs (homeotic transformations) to embryonal cancer (e.g., neuroblastoma) or ascribing the constraint in cervical vertebral count to the development of the mammalian diaphragm. Here, we describe a spontaneous mutation c.196A > G in the Bos taurus T gene (also known as brachyury) associated with a cervical vertebral homeotic transformation that violates the fundamental mammalian cervical blueprint, but does not preclude reproduction of the affected individual. Genome-wide mapping, haplotype tracking within a large pedigree, resequencing of target genome regions, and bioinformatic analyses unambiguously confirmed the mutant c.196G allele as causal for this previously unknown defect termed vertebral and spinal dysplasia (VSD) by providing evidence for the mutation event. The nonsynonymous VSD mutation is located within the highly conserved T box of the T gene, which plays a fundamental role in eumetazoan body organization and vertebral development. To our knowledge, VSD is the first unequivocally approved spontaneous mutation decreasing cervical vertebrae number in a large mammal. The spontaneous VSD mutation in the bovine T gene is the first in vivo evidence for the hypothesis that the T protein is directly involved in the maintenance of the mammalian seven-cervical vertebra blueprint. It therefore furthers our knowledge of the T-protein function and early mammalian notochord development. PMID:25614605

  18. [Surgical treatment for third-grade fracture of the dens of the second cervical vertebra with transdental posterior subluxation].

    PubMed

    Dzukaev, D N; Dreval', O N; Sidorenko, V V; Siviakov, A A; Khoreva, N E

    2007-01-01

    The paper describes a case of successful treatment in a patient with third-grade fracture of the dens of the second cervical vertebra with transdental posterior subluxation. According to the treatment policy chosen, posterior upper cervical spine stabilization and anterior upper spinal cord decompression that was supplemented by anterior cervical spondylodesis were performed in the early period.

  19. Morphometric variations of the 7th cervical vertebrae of Zulu, White, and Colored South Africans.

    PubMed

    Kibii, Job M; Pan, Rualing; Tobias, Phillip V

    2010-05-01

    The 7th cervical vertebrae of 240 cadavers of South African Zulu, White, and Colored population groups were examined to determine morphometric variation. White and Colored females had statistically significant narrower cervical anteroposterior diameters than their male counterparts, whereas no statistically significant difference between sexes of the Zulu population group was observed in this variable. In addition, although Zulu and Colored females had statistically significant narrower cervical transverse diameters than their male counterparts, there was no statistically significant variation between South African white males and females in this respect. The findings indicate that sexual dimorphism is more apparent in the vertebral centrum, across the three population groups, where males had significantly larger dimensions in centrum anteroposterior diameter, height, and width than their female counterparts. The study further reveals that sexual dimorphism is more apparent when one compares aspects of the 7th cervical vertebra between sexes within the same population group. Overall, the dimensions of the various variates of the vertebra are substantially smaller in women than in men. The smaller dimensions, particularly of the centrum, may be the result of lower skeletal mass in women and render them more vulnerable to fractures resulting from compression forces.

  20. Comparative Evaluation of Prevalence of Upper Cervical Vertebrae Anomalies in Cleft Lip/Palate Patients: A Retrospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Datana, Sanjeev; Kumar, Prasanna; Kumar Roy, Supriya; Londhe, Sanjay

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT% Purpose: The patients with cleft lip and palate have a higher risk of cervical vertebrae anomalies than do patients in general population. The aim of present study was to determine the prevalence of various upper cervical spine anomalies in different type of clefts. Procedures: Lateral cephalograms of 128 patients (66 males, 62 females) with cleft lip and palate, and 125 (60 males, 65 females) non syndromic patients without cleft lip and palate were selected at random from archive. Cephalograms of the patients were traced and the diagnosis of any cervical vertebrae anomaly was noted. Anomalies were categorized as either: posterior arch deficiency or fusions. Main findings: Prevalence of cervical vertebrae anomalies in the c lef t group was 20. 3% while it was 6.4% in the control group. Further cervical vertebrae anomalies were 16.6% in the CPO group, 19.1% in the BCLP group, and 22.2% in the UCLP group. Conclusion: A higher prevalence of cervical vertebrae anomalies was observed in cleft lip and palate patients. The prevalenc e obser ved is 3 times more in clef t group than c ontrol group. How to cite this article: Datana S, Bhalla A, Kumar P, Roy SK, Londhe S. Comparative Evaluation of Prevalence of Upper Cervical Vertebrae Anomalies in Cleft Lip/Palate Patients: A Retrospective Study. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2014;7(3):168-171. PMID:25709295

  1. PHAEOHYPHOMYCOSIS ASSOCIATED WITH OSSIFICATION OF THE SKULL AND CERVICAL VERTEBRAE IN A SWELL SHARK (CEPHALOSCYLLIUM VENTRIOSUM).

    PubMed

    Erlacher-Reid, Claire D; Nollens, Hendrik H; Schmitt, Todd L; St Leger, Judy; Sunico, Sarena

    2016-12-01

    A female, captive bred, juvenile swell shark ( Cephaloscyllium ventriosum ) was observed swimming in tight circles and rolling. Radiographs and computed tomography of this individual revealed extensive cartilage mineralization of the skull and cranial cervical vertebrae compared with diagnostic images of clinically healthy conspecifics. Gross necropsy and histopathologic examination revealed ossification and fibrosis of the cartilaginous matrix of the skull and cervical vertebrae with deep invasion by a pigmented hyphal fungus. There was no growth on fungal culture, but fungal polymerase chain reaction identified a DNA sequence compatible with Exophiala sp. (99%). Radiographs and computed tomography were helpful to determine a prognosis and course of action for this individual. This case emphasizes the need to include fungal infections as a differential diagnosis when evaluating elasmobranchs with abnormal swimming behaviors and mineralization of the skeletal structures.

  2. A thorny question: the taxonomic identity of the Pirro Nord cervical vertebrae revisited.

    PubMed

    Alba, David M; Colombero, Simone; Delfino, Massimo; Martínez-Navarro, Bienvenido; Pavia, Marco; Rook, Lorenzo

    2014-11-01

    The past geographic distribution of the genus Theropithecus (Primates: Cercopithecidae) is mainly restricted to Africa. Outside that continent, the earliest reported records of this genus consist of a calcaneus of cf. Theropithecus sp. from 'Ubeidiya (Israel, 1.6-1.2 Ma [millions of years ago]), as well as three associated cervical vertebrae from Pirro Nord (Italy, 1.7-1.3 Ma) attributed to Theropithecus sp. The attribution of the Pirro Nord vertebrae to this genus has been disputed on morphometric grounds, although their assignment to a large-bodied cercopithecid has remained undisputed. Here we report unpublished cervical vertebral specimens with a similar morphology and, given their significance for the paleobiogeography of Theropithecus (purportedly representing its earliest European record), we re-evaluate their taxonomic attribution. In particular, we reconsider the possibility that they belong to another non-primate mammal recorded at this site. Based on both qualitative and metric morphological comparisons, we strongly favor an alternative attribution of the cervical vertebrae from Pirro Nord to the large porcupine Hystrix refossa, which is widely documented at the site by both dentognathic and other postcranial remains. We therefore conclude that the dispersal of Theropithecus out of Africa before ca. 1 Ma (when it is recorded by dental remains from Cueva Victoria, Spain) is currently based only on the calcaneus from 'Ubeidiya tentatively attributed to this genus.

  3. Osteoid osteoma of the first 2 cervical vertebrae. Report of 4 cases.

    PubMed

    Amirjamshidi, Abbas; Roozbeh, Hadi; Sharifi, Give; Abdoli, Ali; Abbassioun, Kazem

    2010-12-01

    Osteoid osteoma affects the spine in only 10% of cases. More than 50% of the spinal cases involve the lumbar and cervical vertebrae. Involvement of C-1 and C-2 vertebrae has previously been reported only very rarely in the published literature. The authors report 4 cases of upper cervical osteoid osteoma, 1 involving C-1 and the other 3 C-2, and they discuss different aspects of management in similar cases. The patients were 14, 17, 35, and 46 years old, and all presented with neck pain and various degrees of painful limitation of head rotation not ameliorated by ordinary analgesics. Radionuclide isotope bone scans, CT scanning, and MR imaging were helpful preoperative diagnostic modalities. The first attempt at eradication of the lesions failed in 2 cases and the lesions could be excised totally at a second approach. Postoperatively, the patients all became pain free and gained full range of neck motion. There has been no tumor recurrence and no sign of instability in short- to medium-term follow-up. Among the several etiologies mentioned for neck pain and torticollis, osteoid osteoma of the first 2 cervical vertebrae should be considered as a possible but rare cause. Even though different kinds of management have been mentioned for osteoid osteoma, resection of the lesion remains the best option for achieving a cure.

  4. Growth of the cervical vertebrae in girls from 8 to 17 years. A longitudinal study.

    PubMed

    Altan, Müge; Nebioğlu Dalci, Öykü; İseri, Haluk

    2012-06-01

    An important criterion of orthodontic diagnosis is the determination of the skeletal maturation stage. The cervical vertebral maturation (CVM) method is presented as an alternative to skeletal maturation determination. However, studies published to date concerning CVM have generally been cross-sectional. The aim of this investigation was to longitudinally evaluate growth and development with the CVM method. Lateral cephalometric radiographs of 41 girls, aged 9-16 years, collected between 1978 and 1984 were used to evaluate changes in C2, C3, and C4 dimensions. The mean values, standard deviations, maximum and minimum values of cervical vertebrae growth, and growth rate were calculated for every age and age interval. Cumulative growth increment was determined by summing annual mean values for each parameter. CVM stages were initially evaluated according to the method of Lamparski. The time differences between the following CVM stages were evaluated with a paired t-test. The total length increment was distinct for C2 but similar for C1, C3, and C4. Total length increments reached their maximum between CVM stages 2 and 3, except for C3. The total length increment of C3 reached its peak 1 year earlier. The height increments of the spinose processes of C2, C3, and C4 were similar. The results showed that height increments were greater than length increments, which was due to changes in the anatomical pattern. Vertical growth displayed a decreasing trend from the upper to the lower cervical vertebrae. Determination of skeletal maturation from dimensional measurements and anatomical changes of the cervical vertebrae will facilitate orthodontic evaluation by eliminating the need for hand-wrist films and, therefore, decrease the patient's exposure to radiation.

  5. Cervical vertebrae maturation index estimates on cone beam CT: 3D reconstructions vs sagittal sections

    PubMed Central

    Bonfim, Marco A E; Costa, André L F; Ximenez, Michel E L; Cotrim-Ferreira, Flávio A; Ferreira-Santos, Rívea I

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to evaluate the performance of CBCT three-dimensional (3D) reconstructions and sagittal sections for estimates of cervical vertebrae maturation index (CVMI). Methods: The sample consisted of 72 CBCT examinations from patients aged 8–16 years (45 females and 27 males) selected from the archives of two private clinics. Two calibrated observers (kappa scores: ≥0.901) interpreted the CBCT settings twice. Intra- and interobserver agreement for both imaging exhibition modes was analyzed by kappa statistics, which was also used to analyze the agreement between 3D reconstructions and sagittal sections. Correlations between cervical vertebrae maturation estimates and chronological age, as well as between the assessments by 3D reconstructions and sagittal sections, were analyzed using gamma Goodman–Kruskal coefficients (α = 0.05). Results: The kappa scores evidenced almost perfect agreement between the first and second assessments of the cervical vertebrae by 3D reconstructions (0.933–0.983) and sagittal sections (0.983–1.000). Similarly, the agreement between 3D reconstructions and sagittal sections was almost perfect (kappa index: 0.983). In most divergent cases, the difference between 3D reconstructions and sagittal sections was one stage of CVMI. Strongly positive correlations (>0.8, p < 0.001) were found not only between chronological age and CVMI but also between the estimates by 3D reconstructions and sagittal sections (p < 0.001). Conclusions: Although CBCT imaging must not be used exclusively for this purpose, it may be suitable for skeletal maturity assessments. PMID:26509559

  6. Sex determination using the second cervical vertebra--A test of the method.

    PubMed

    Marlow, Emily J; Pastor, Robert F

    2011-01-01

    Sex is one of the critical questions addressed when unidentified skeletal remains are discovered in forensic or archeological contexts. Continuous testing and re-evaluation of existing techniques is essential to improve accuracy and precision. The Wescott (J Forensic Sci 2000;45(2):462-6) method of sex determination from dimensions of the second cervical vertebra was blind-tested on 153 adult individuals from the Spitalfields documented collection of human skeletal remains held at the Natural History Museum, London. Significant sex differences were determined for all dimensions measured (independent two-sample t-test, p<0.05-0.001). The discriminant functions developed by Wescott were shown to have an overall accuracy of classification of 76.99%. Using stepwise discriminant analysis, a discriminant function based on the Spitalfields data correctly classified sex in 83.3% of individuals and was able to classify males and females with equal accuracy. Additional discriminant functions are presented for use in instances where preservation of the second cervical vertebra is poor.

  7. Morphological comparison of cervical vertebrae in adult females with different sagittal craniofacial patterns: A cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Alkan, Özer; Aydoğan, Cihan; Akkaya, Sevil

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Cervical vertebral maturation (CVM) methods have gained popularity to assess growth and development status for orthodontic patients. Although craniofacial and craniocervical structures are known to be associated, there is no evidence in the literature if this relation might negatively affect the accuracy of CVM assessments. Therefore, this study aimed to comparatively investigate the sizes of the 2nd, 3rd, and 4th cervical vertebrae in adult females (radius union stage of skeletal maturity) who have different sagittal skeletal patterns. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted, and 151 lateral cephalometric radiographs of adult female patients were assessed in the study. Patients were assigned to three groups according to ANB angle. Parameters including concavity depth at the lower border of the 2nd, 3rd, and 4th cervical vertebrae and base length, upper border length, body length, posterior height, anterior height, and body height of the 3rd and 4th cervical vertebrae bodies were measured. One-way analysis of variance was used for between-group comparisons. Results: No statistically significant differences were found between groups in terms of concavity depth at the lower borders of the 2nd, 3rd, and 4th cervical vertebrae (P > 0.05). Base length, upper border length, body length, posterior height, anterior height, and body height of the 3rd and 4th cervical vertebrae were also similar between groups (P > 0.05). Conclusions: The results of this study supports that sagittal craniofacial pattern has no effect on the accuracy of using the methods assessing CVM and calculating cervical vertebral age. PMID:27630474

  8. Morphometric analysis of the seventh cervical vertebra for pedicle screw insertion

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Wensheng; Guo, Liangbing; Bao, Heng; Wang, Limin

    2015-01-01

    Background: Anatomy of the pedicles of the seventh cervical vertebra (C7) at the cervicothoracic junction is different from other cervical vertebrae. Fixation of C7 is required during cervical vertebra and upper thoracic injuries in clinical practice. However, the typical pedicle screw insertion methods may have problems in clinical practice based on the anatomical features of C7. This study is to explore a new pedicle screw insertion technique for C7 and to provide anatomical and radiographic basis for clinical application. Materials and Methods: C7 vertebral specimens from six human cadavers were observed for the relative position between the posterior bony landmark and the pedicle projection. Computed tomography (CT) was performed for 30 patients with cervical spondylosis (26–61 years old, mean age was 42.3 years old). The CT scan data were processed by Mimics 8.1 software for associated parameter measurement. Appropriate screw entry points (Eps) and insertion angles were selected. A total of 12 pedicle screws were inserted and then observed. The six specimens were observed after inserting the screw using this method. The junction site of the middle 1/3 and outer 1/3 segment of line G [The junction between point A (the intersection point of the superior margin of the lamina of C7 and the medial margin of the superior articular process) and point B (the intersection point of the lateral margin of the inferior articular process and the transverse process)] was taken as the Ep. The screw insertion direction parallel horizontally to the upper terminal lamina of C7 and the sagittal angle was between 35° and 45°. Results: Gross and imaging observations revealed that pedicle projection was on the line (line G) between point A (the intersection point of the superior margin of the lamina of C7 and the medial margin of the superior articular process) and point B (the intersection point of the lateral margin of the inferior articular process and the transverse process

  9. Validity of the assessment method of skeletal maturation by cervical vertebrae: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Bittencourt, M A V; Paranhos, L R

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To perform a systematic review with meta-analysis to answer the question: is the cervical vertebrae maturation index (CVMI) effective to replace hand–wrist radiograph (gold standard) in determining the pubertal growth spurt in patients undergoing bone growth? Methods: A search in three databases was performed, in which studies were selected that compared one of the two main assessment methods for cervical vertebrae (Hassel B, Farman AG. Skeletal maturation evaluation using cervical vertebrae. Am J Orthod Dentofacial Orthop 1995; 107: 58–66, or Baccetti T, Franchi L, McNamara JA Jr. An improved version of the cervical vertebral maturation (CVM) method for the assessment of mandibular growth. Angle Orthod 2002; 72: 316–23) to a carpal assessment method. The main methodological data from each of the texts were collected and tabulated after. Later, the meta-analysis of the correlation coefficients obtained was performed. Results: 19 articles were selected from an initial 206 articles collected. Regardless of the method used, the results of the meta-analysis showed that every article selected presented a positive correlation between skeletal maturation assessment performed by cervical vertebrae and carpal methods, with discrepancy of values between genders indicating higher correlation for the female gender (0.925; 0.878) than for the male (0.879; 0.842). When the assessment was performed without gender separation, correlation was significant (0.592; 0.688) but lower in the cases when genders were separated. Conclusions: With the results of this meta-analysis, it is safe to affirm that both CVMIs used in the present study are reliable to replace the hand–wrist radiograph in predicting the pubertal growth spurt, considering that the highest values were found in female samples, especially in the method by Hassel and Farman. PMID:25521202

  10. An evaluation of the third cervical vertebra (C3) as a growth indicator in Black subjects.

    PubMed

    Seedat, A K; Forsberg, C D

    2005-05-01

    In orthodontics, evaluation of skeletal age and growth maturation is essential in diagnosis and treatment planning. The use of hand wrist radiographs perform this function adequately. However, it is not the only method, as the body of the third cervical vertebra (C3) also provides a similar information. It may be clearly discerned on the routine cephalogram, obviating additional radiation. This study sets out to present the various morphologic changes observed radiographically in the body of C3 at different age groups. The cephalograms of one hundred and sixty two patients (79 males and 83 females) were evaluated from the records at the Medunsa Orthodontic Department. The body of C3 was studied on each film according to the criteria set by Hassel & Farman. The results showed that radiographically, the body of C3 displayed morphological changes consistent with normal skeletal maturation that indicated the usefulness of this technique in clinical and research work. This method therefore shows promise as an alternative to hand wrist growth stage evaluation.

  11. Magnetic resonance imaging susceptibility artifacts in the cervical vertebrae and spinal cord related to monocortical screw-polymethylmethacrylate implants in canine cadavers.

    PubMed

    Jones, Brian G; Fosgate, Geoffrey T; Green, Eric M; Habing, Amy M; Hettlich, Bianca F

    2017-04-01

    OBJECTIVE To characterize and compare MRI susceptibility artifacts related to titanium and stainless steel monocortical screws in the cervical vertebrae and spinal cord of canine cadavers. SAMPLE 12 canine cadavers. PROCEDURES Cervical vertebrae (C4 and C5) were surgically stabilized with titanium or stainless steel monocortical screws and polymethylmethacrylate. Routine T1-weighted, T2-weighted, and short tau inversion recovery sequences were performed at 3.0 T. Magnetic susceptibility artifacts in 20 regions of interest (ROIs) across 4 contiguous vertebrae (C3 through C6) were scored by use of an established scoring system. RESULTS Artifact scores for stainless steel screws were significantly greater than scores for titanium screws at 18 of 20 ROIs. Artifact scores for titanium screws were significantly higher for spinal cord ROIs within the implanted vertebrae. Artifact scores for stainless steel screws at C3 were significantly less than at the other 3 cervical vertebrae. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Evaluation of routine MRI sequences obtained at 3.0 T revealed that susceptibility artifacts related to titanium monocortical screws were considered mild and should not hinder the overall clinical assessment of the cervical vertebrae and spinal cord. However, mild focal artifacts may obscure small portions of the spinal cord or intervertebral discs immediately adjacent to titanium screws. Severe artifacts related to stainless steel screws were more likely to result in routine MRI sequences being nondiagnostic; however, artifacts may be mitigated by implant positioning.

  12. [Characteristic of the fractures of the cervical, thoracic and lumbar vertebrae in the victims of a traffic accident found in the passenger compartment of a modern motor vehicle].

    PubMed

    Pigolkin, Yu I; Dubrovin, I A; Sedykh, E P; Mosoyan, A S

    2016-01-01

    The objective of the present work was to study peculiar features of the injuries to three spinal regions in the victims of a head-on car collision found in the passenger compartments of modern motor vehicles equipped with seat belts and other safety means. It was shown that most frequent fatal injuries to the driver include the fractures of the cervical, thoracic, and lumbar vertebrae. These injuries are much less frequent in the passengers occupying the front and the right back seats. The multilayer and multiple character of the fractures in different parts of the spinal column in the car drivers is attributable to more pronounced spine flexion and extension associated with injuries of this kind. The fractures of the lower cervical vertebrae in the front seat passengers occur more frequently than injuries of a different type whereas the passengers of the back seats most frequently experience fractures of the upper cervical vertebrae. The passengers of the left back seat less frequently suffer from injuries to the thoracic spine than from the fractures of the cervical and lumbar vertebrae. The passengers of the central back seat most frequently experience fractures of the thoracic part of the vertebral column and the passengers occupying the right back seat fractures of the lumbar vertebrae.

  13. Evaluation of mandibular length in subjects with Class I and Class II skeletal patterns using the cervical vertebrae maturation.

    PubMed

    Generoso, Rodrigo; Sadoco, Elaine Cristina; Armond, Mônica Costa; Gameiro, Gustavo Hauber

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the mandibular size in boys and girls with Class I and Class II skeletal patterns, taking into consideration the bone maturation stage, as defined by the cervical vertebrae maturation. One hundred and sixty cephalometric radiographs were obtained from subjects (aged between 7 and 12 years) with Class I or Class II skeletal patterns, according to the ANB angle and WITS appraisal. The Class I sample consisted of 80 subjects (40 boys, 40 girls). The Class II sample also consisted of 80 subjects (40 boys, 40 girls). On a cross-sectional basis, mandibular length (Co-Gn) was compared between groups and genders. The between-stages changes were also evaluated, with the cervical vertebrae analysis used for establishing the bone maturation stages at CS2, CS3, CS4 and CS5. The results were statistically analyzed by the Kruskal-Wallis test. The mandibular length differed between skeletal patterns only at the earlier stages of development. In the Class I pattern, the mandibular lengths of boys were greater than those of girls at stages CS2, CS4 and CS5, whereas in the Class II pattern, the mandibular lengths of boys were greater than those of girls at stages CS2, CS3 and CS4. The present results indicate a sexual dimorphism in the mandibular length at almost all stages of bone maturation, in exception of the CS5 stage in Class II.

  14. Comparative Evaluation of the Efficacy of Hand-Wrist and Cervical Vertebrae Radiography for the Determination of Skeletal Age

    PubMed Central

    Hoseini, Mohammadhashem; Zamaheni, Sara; Bashizadeh Fakhar, Hourieh; Akbari, Forough; Chalipa, Javad; Rahmati, Afsaneh

    2016-01-01

    Background Prediction of skeletal growth is necessary for growth modification and surgical orthodontic treatments and is usually done by assessing skeletal maturity indicators in hand-wrist radiographs. The use of growth stages of cervical vertebrae in lateral cephalograms has been suggested to avoid overexposure. Objectives This study seeks to assess the degree of agreement between hand-wrist and cervical vertebrae maturation stages for skeletal age determination and prediction of the peak growth spurt (PGS). Patients and Methods This cross-sectional study was conducted with 67 boys and 66 girls between 8 and 18 years of age, divided into 11 age groups; 266 hand-wrist radiographs and lateral cephalograms were obtained and analyzed. Hand-wrist maturation stages were evaluated according to the Grave and Brown, Bjork system (stages 1 - 9). The cervical vertebral maturation stage (CVMS) was determined on lateral cephalograms based on a system described by Baccetti et al. (CVMS 1-5). To apply the Cohen’s kappa index, the stages of growth were reduced to 5 intervals (A - E) to relate the 5 CVMS to the 9 stages of Bjork hand-wrist analysis. Results In all age groups, the skeletal maturity stages of the hand and wrist bones and the cervical vertebrae of the girls were ahead of the boys. Cohen’s kappa test revealed a low level of agreement between the two methods [Kappa (95% CI) = 0.312 (0.290 - 0.377)]; concordance was slightly higher in males (K = 0.33 for males versus 0.27 for females). Evaluation of concordance coefficients between the stages determined by the two methods indicated the highest concordance in 8- and 9-year-olds and the lowest in 12- and 14-year-olds. The level of agreement between the two methods was only acceptable in 8- and 9-year-olds of both genders and 10-year-old boys. The level of agreement between the two methods in other age groups was not acceptable. Conclusion The level of agreement between the two methods was low; thus, they cannot be

  15. Artificial disc and vertebra system: a novel motion preservation device for cervical spinal disease after vertebral corpectomy

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Jun; Lu, Meng; Lu, Teng; Liang, Baobao; Xu, Junkui; Qin, Jie; Cai, Xuan; Huang, Sihua; Wang, Dong; Li, Haopeng; He, Xijing

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the range of motion and stability of the human cadaveric cervical spine after the implantation of a novel artificial disc and vertebra system by comparing an intact group and a fusion group. METHODS: Biomechanical tests were conducted on 18 human cadaveric cervical specimens. The range of motion and the stability index range of motion were measured to study the function and stability of the artificial disc and vertebra system of the intact group compared with the fusion group. RESULTS: In all cases, the artificial disc and vertebra system maintained intervertebral motion and reestablished vertebral height at the operative level. After its implantation, there was no significant difference in the range of motion (ROM) of C3–7 in all directions in the non-fusion group compared with the intact group (p>0.05), but significant differences were detected in flexion, extension and axial rotation compared with the fusion group (p<0.05). The ROM of adjacent segments (C3−4, C6−7) of the non-fusion group decreased significantly in some directions compared with the fusion group (p<0.05). Significant differences in the C4-6 ROM in some directions were detected between the non-fusion group and the intact group. In the fusion group, the C4−6 ROM in all directions decreased significantly compared with the intact and non-fusion groups (p<0.01). The stability index ROM (SI-ROM) of some directions was negative in the non-fusion group, and a significant difference in SI-ROM was only found in the C4−6 segment of the non-fusion group compared with the fusion group. CONCLUSION: An artificial disc and vertebra system could restore vertebral height and preserve the dynamic function of the surgical area and could theoretically reduce the risk of adjacent segment degeneration compared with the anterior fusion procedure. However, our results should be considered with caution because of the low power of the study. The use of a larger sample should be considered

  16. DEFECTS IN CERVICAL VERTEBRAE IN BORIC ACID-EXPOSED RAT EMBRYOS ARE ASSOCIATED WITH ANTERIOR SHIFTS OF HOX GENE EXPRESSION DOMAINS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Defects in cervical vertebrae in boric acid-exposed rat embryos are associated with anterior shifts of hox gene expression domains

    Nathalie Wery,1 Michael G. Narotsky,2 Nathalie Pacico,1 Robert J. Kavlock,2 Jacques J. Picard,1 AND Francoise Gofflot,1*
    1Unit of Developme...

  17. The Cervical Spine of the American Barn Owl (Tyto furcata pratincola): I. Anatomy of the Vertebrae and Regionalization in Their S-Shaped Arrangement

    PubMed Central

    Krings, Markus; Nyakatura, John A.; Fischer, Martin S.; Wagner, Hermann

    2014-01-01

    Background Owls possess an extraordinary neck and head mobility. To understand this mobility it is necessary to have an anatomical description of cervical vertebrae with an emphasis on those criteria that are relevant for head positioning. No functional description specific to owls is available. Methodology/Principal findings X-ray films and micro-CT scans were recorded from American barn owls (Tyto furcata pratincola) and used to obtain three-dimensional head movements and three-dimensional models of the 14 cervical vertebrae (C1−C14). The diameter of the vertebral canal, the zygapophyseal protrusion, the distance between joint centers, and the pitching angle were quantified. Whereas the first two variables are purely osteological characteristics of single vertebrae, the latter two take into account interactions between vertebrae. These variables change in characteristic ways from cranial to caudal. The vertebral canal is wide in the cranial and caudal neck regions, but narrow in the middle, where both the zygapophyseal protrusion and the distance between joint centers are large. Pitching angles are more negative in the cranial and caudal neck regions than in the middle region. Cluster analysis suggested a complex regionalization. Whereas the borders (C1 and C13/C14) formed stable clusters, the other cervical vertebrae were sorted into 4 or 5 additional clusters. The borders of the clusters were influenced by the variables analyzed. Conclusions/Significance A statistical analysis was used to evaluate the regionalization of the cervical spine in the barn owl. While earlier measurements have shown that there appear to be three regions of flexibility of the neck, our indicators suggest 3–7 regions. These many regions allow a high degree of flexibility, potentially facilitating the large head turns that barn owls are able to make. The cervical vertebral series of other species should also be investigated using statistical criteria to further characterize

  18. PREVALENCE OF ANATOMICAL VARIATION OF THE SIXTH CERVICAL VERTEBRA AND ASSOCIATION WITH VERTEBRAL CANAL STENOSIS AND ARTICULAR PROCESS OSTEOARTHRITIS IN THE HORSE.

    PubMed

    DeRouen, Anthony; Spriet, Mathieu; Aleman, Monica

    2016-05-01

    The sixth cervical vertebra (C6) has unique morphology due to a ventral extension from the transverse process known as the ventral lamina. Little information was found regarding the prevalence and clinical relevance of morphologic variations. Aims of this observational, retrospective study were to characterize C6 morphologic variations in a large sample of horses. Cervical radiographic studies of 100 horses were retrieved. Data recorded were signalment, clinical history, morphology of the C6 ventral lamina, presence of articular process osteoarthritis, and presence of static vertebral canal stenosis. Morphologic variations were found in C6 vertebrae for 24/100 horses, with symmetric absence of the ventral lamina in nine horses and asymmetric absence in 15. Anomalous C6 vertebrae were more common in Warmbloods, with 19/55 Warmbloods in the population being affected (P = 0.006). No association was found with sex. There was no significant difference in the mean of the intravertebral sagittal ratios between horses with normal or anomalous C6 vertebrae; however there was a significantly greater proportion of horses with anomalous C6 vertebrae that had an intravertebral sagittal ratio of less than 0.5 at C6 (P = 0.047). There was no association between the morphology of C6 and articular process osteoarthritis. Anomalous C6 vertebrae in our population were associated with a higher likelihood of cervical pain (P = 0.013). Authors propose that morphologic variations in the C6 ventral laminae could be linked to other developmental abnormalities such as vertebral canal stenosis, might affect regional biomechanics and should therefore be considered clinically relevant in horses. Future, controlled prospective studies are needed to test this theory.

  19. Relevance of discrete traits in forensic anthropology: From the first cervical vertebra to the pelvic girdle.

    PubMed

    Verna, Emeline; Piercecchi-Marti, Marie-Dominique; Chaumoitre, Kathia; Adalian, Pascal

    2015-08-01

    In forensic anthropology, identification begins by determining the sex, age, ancestry and stature of the individuals. Asymptomatic variations present on the skeleton, known as discrete traits, can be useful to identify individuals, or at least contribute to complete their biological profile. We decided to focus our work on the upper part of the skeleton, from the first vertebra to the pelvic girdle, and we chose to present 8 discrete traits (spina bifida occulta, butterfly vertebra, supraclavicular nerve foramen, coracoclavicular joint, os acromiale, suprascapular foramen, manubrium foramen and pubic spine), because they show a frequency lower than 10%. We examined 502 anonymous CT scans from polytraumatized individuals, aged 15 to 65 years, in order to detect the selected discrete traits. Age and sex were known for each subject. Thin sections in the axial, coronal and sagittal planes and 3D volume rendering images were created and examined for the visualization of the selected discrete traits. Supraclavicular foramina were found only in males and only on the left clavicle. Coracoclavicular joints were observed only in males. The majority of individuals with a suprascapular foramen were older than 50 years of age. Pubic spines were observed mostly in females. Other traits did not present significant association with sex, age and laterality. No association between traits was highlighted. Better knowledge of human skeletal variations will help anthropologists come closer to a positive identification, especially if these variations are rare, therefore making them more discriminant.

  20. Monostotic fibrous dysplasia of the spine: report of a case involving a cervical vertebra.

    PubMed

    Proschek, D; Orler, R; Stauffer, E; Heini, P

    2007-02-01

    Monostotic fibrous dysplasia of the spine is a rare entity. Only 26 cases, of which 11 were located in the cervical spine, are to be found in the literature. We report a 56-year-old male patient with cervicobrachialgia of half year's duration. Radiographs showed a diffuse destruction of the vertebral body and the spinous process of C4. A biopsy of the spinous process confirmed histopathologically a fibrous dysplasia. Due to minor symptoms, no surgical treatment was performed or is planned unless in case of increasing pain, an acute instability or neurological symptoms.

  1. Brief communication: a proposed method for the assessment of pubertal stage in human skeletal remains using cervical vertebrae maturation.

    PubMed

    Shapland, Fiona; Lewis, Mary E

    2014-01-01

    The assessment of age-at-death in non-adult skeletal remains is under constant review. However, in many past societies an individual's physical maturation may have been more important in social terms than their exact age, particularly during the period of adolescence. In a recent article (Shapland and Lewis: Am J Phys Anthropol 151 (2013) 302-310) highlighted a set of dental and skeletal indicators that may be useful in mapping the progress of the pubertal growth spurt. This article presents a further skeletal indicator of adolescent development commonly used by modern clinicians: cervical vertebrae maturation (CVM). This method is applied to a collection of 594 adolescents from the medieval cemetery of St. Mary Spital, London. Analysis reveals a potential delay in ages of attainment of the later CVM stages compared with modern adolescents, presumably reflecting negative environmental conditions for growth and development. The data gathered on CVM is compared to other skeletal indicators of pubertal maturity and long bone growth from this site to ascertain the usefulness of this method on archaeological collections.

  2. Determining skeletal maturation stage using cervical vertebrae: evaluation of three diagnostic methods.

    PubMed

    Jaqueira, Luci Mara Fachardo; Armond, Monica Costa; Pereira, Luciano José; Alcântara, Carlos Eduardo Pinto de; Marques, Leandro Silva

    2010-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare the use of three cervical vertebral evaluation methods (Hassel-Farman, Baccetti et al., and Seedat-Forsberg) for determinating skeletal maturation stage in orthodontic patients. Twenty-three radiographs were randomly selected from a private orthodontic practice. Each radiograph was analyzed on three separate occasions by four evaluators (one radiologist and three orthodontists), who determined the skeletal maturation stage using the references established by each of the three methods. Intraevaluator and interevaluator comparisons were performed, and the degree of agreement was established using the weighted Kappa coefficient (95% CI). Good agreement (Kappa between 0.61 and 0.80) was observed between the determinations of most of the evaluators. The three methods demonstrated clinical applicability. However, the method proposed by Baccetti et al. achieved the best results, followed by the Hassel-Farman and the Seedat-Forsberg methods.

  3. [A case of advanced colon cancer with metastases to both para-aortic lymph nodes and cervical vertebrae effectively treated by TS-1 therapy].

    PubMed

    Ohnuma, Masaru; Uchiyama, Tetsuyuki; Abe, Tomoya; Nakagawa, Kei; Kamiyama, Yasuhiko; Watanabe, Mika; Moriya, Takuya; Ise, Hideo

    2006-04-01

    The patient was a 68-year-old woman who had cecal cancer with para-aortic lymph node metastases. Ileocecal resection was performed palliatively. Since metastasis to cervical vertebrae was detected after the operation, she received radiation therapy of 14 Gy to improve neck pain. Chemotherapy with TS-1 (80 mg/day) was started on an outpatient basis (4 weeks administration followed by a 2-week drug-free period). After 4 courses of this chemotherapy, metastases to both para-aortic lymph nodes and cervical vertebrae were remarkably reduced on CT and PET. Throughout the period of treatment, there was no adverse effect and this treatment has been maintained. In conclusion, this case seems significant from the viewpoint of achieving a partial response to TS-1 and maintaining a high quality of life. Moreover,we identified the presence of TS and DPD using an immunohistochemical staining technique. The primary tumor was positive for DPD stain test and negative for TS stain test. It was suggested that this cancer especially would respond to TS-1 chemotherapy.

  4. Comparison of three methods of calculation, experimental and monte carlo simulation in investigation of organ doses (thyroid, sternum, cervical vertebra) in radioiodine therapy.

    PubMed

    Shahbazi-Gahrouei, Daryoush; Ayat, Saba

    2012-07-01

    Radioiodine therapy is an effective method for treating thyroid cancer carcinoma, but it has some affects on normal tissues, hence dosimetry of vital organs is important to weigh the risks and benefits of this method. The aim of this study is to measure the absorbed doses of important organs by Monte Carlo N Particle (MCNP) simulation and comparing the results of different methods of dosimetry by performing a t-paired test. To calculate the absorbed dose of thyroid, sternum, and cervical vertebra using the MCNP code, *F8 tally was used. Organs were simulated by using a neck phantom and Medical Internal Radiation Dosimetry (MIRD) method. Finally, the results of MCNP, MIRD, and Thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) measurements were compared by SPSS software. The absorbed dose obtained by Monte Carlo simulations for 100, 150, and 175 mCi administered (131)I was found to be 388.0, 427.9, and 444.8 cGy for thyroid, 208.7, 230.1, and 239.3 cGy for sternum and 272.1, 299.9, and 312.1 cGy for cervical vertebra. The results of paired t-test were 0.24 for comparing TLD dosimetry and MIRD calculation, 0.80 for MCNP simulation and MIRD, and 0.19 for TLD and MCNP. The results showed no significant differences among three methods of Monte Carlo simulations, MIRD calculation and direct experimental dosimetry using TLD.

  5. Quantitative Gross and CT measurements of Cadaveric Cervical Vertebrae (C3 – C6) as Guidelines for the Lateral mass screw fixation

    PubMed Central

    Heinneman, Thomas E.; Conti, Mathew S.; Dossous, Paul-Michel F.; Dillon, David J.; Tsiouris, Apostolos J.; Pyo, Se Young; Mtui, Estomih P.; Härtl, Roger

    2016-01-01

    Background Lateral mass screw fixation is the treatment of choice for posterior cervical stabilization. Long or misdirected screws carry a risk of injury to spinal nerve roots or vertebral artery. This study was aimed to assess the gross anatomic and CT measurements of typical cervical vertebrae for the selection of lateral mass screws. Methods Dimensions of the articular pillars were measured on 1) Dry cervical vertebrae with Vernier calipers and 2) Multiplanar reformations of CT scans of the same vertebrae with Viewer software package. The data was statistically evaluated. Results The transverse diameter of the articular pillars with Vernier calipers varied from 6.0 to 15.4 mm (mean=10.5 mm ± 1.5) and on CT scans ranged from 8.2 – 16.1 mm (mean=11.6 mm ± 1.4). The antero-posterior diameter, an estimate of the screw length by Roy-Camille technique varied from 3.9 to 12.7 mm (mean=8.6 mm ± 1.6) by Vernier calipers and from 6.4 to 13.3 mm (mean=9.1 ± 1.2) on CT scans. The oblique AP diameter, an estimate of screw length by Magerl method varied from 10.8 to 20.3 mm (mean=14.9 mm ± 1.8) by Vernier calipers and from 11.4 to 19.3 mm (mean=14.5 mm ± 1.7) on CT. The CT measurements for height, transverse and AP diameter of the articular pillars were 0.5 - 1.0 mm larger than dimensions by Vernier calipers. No statistically significant difference was observed between the caliper and CT measurements for the oblique AP diameter. Conclusion CT measurements of the articular pillars may slightly overestimate the desired screw length selected by spine surgeons when compared to actual anatomy. Although means of the articular pillars correspond to the screw lengths used, substantial number of observations below 10 mm for Roy-Camille trajectory and below 14 mm for Magerl trajectory requires careful preoperative planning and intra-operative confirmation to avoid long/misdirected lateral mass screws.

  6. [Apical petrositis, osteomyelitis of the base of the skull bones and of the first cervical vertebra in a 5 year-old children following chicken pox].

    PubMed

    Bogomil'sky, M R; Polunin, M M; Zelikovich, E I; Soldatsky, Yu L; Burova, O V

    2016-01-01

    This publication was designed to describe a rare case of development of apicalpetrositis in a child presenting with acute otitis mediafollowing chicken pox experienced in the preceding period. We carried out the study with the use of computed tomography (CT) that demonstrated destruction of the temporal bone, bones of the base of the skull and of the first cervical vertebra. The treatment strategy chosen for the management of this condition that included antibiotic therapy and expectant observation proved justified and can be recommended as an algorithm of choice taking into consideration the difficulty of surgical approach to the apex of the petrous pyramid. However, this approach is associated with the high risk of disability arising from the potential injury to the craniocerebral nerves.

  7. Semi-longitudinal Study of the Mcnamara Cephalometric Triangle in Class II and Class III Subjects Grouped by Cervical Vertebrae Maturation Stage.

    PubMed

    Arriola-Guillén, Luis E; Fitzcarrald, Fernando D; Flores-Mir, Carlos

    2015-12-01

    The aim was to compare the McNamara cephalometric triangle values in untreated normodivergent Class II and Class III malocclusion subjects of Latin American origin grouped by cervical vertebrae maturation stage to an untreated Class I malocclusion normodivergent control group. The study was conducted on a sample of 610 pretreatment lateral cephalograms (250 male, 360 female), examined and grouped according to their anteroposterior skeletal relationship (Class I, II or III), cervical vertebrae maturation stage (Pre Pubertal Peak P1 = CS1 and CS2, Pubertal Peak P2= CS3 and CS4, and Post Pubertal Peak P3 = CS5 and CS6) and sex. Co-A, Co-Gn and ENA-Me were measured in each lateral cephalogram. ANOVA and Tukey HSD post-hoc tests were performed to determine differences between the groups. The results showed that in males, the greatest maxillary and mandibular dimensional increases occurred during the P3 stage (CS5 to CS6), while in females, they occurred in the P2 stage (CS3 to CS4). The Co-A and Co-Gn showed significant differences between the malocclusion classes (p<0.05). The maxillary lengths in Class II subjects and the mandibular lengths in Class III subjects were already higher at the beginning of the period evaluated (P1). A worsening trend for the Class II and III malocclusions was identified during the period evaluated. Finally, changes in the McNamara cephalometric triangle values were markedly different in the three normodivergent skeletal malocclusion classes. In these Latin American subjects the pubertal growth spurt occurred at different times with respect to the Caucasian and Asian norms.

  8. Duration of the peak of adolescent growth spurt in class i and ii malocclusion subjects using a cervical vertebrae maturation analysis.

    PubMed

    Salazar-Lazo, Rodrigo; Arriola-Guillén, Luis E; Flores-Mir, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the present work was to determine the duration of the adolescent peak growth spurt using cervical vertebral maturation analysis in class I and II malocclusion subjects. The study was conducted on a sample which consisted of 154 lateral cephalograms of children and adolescents aged 9-15 years (84 females and 70 males). The evaluation of skeletal maturation stage was performed using a visual morphological analysis of CS3 and CS4 cervical vertebrae. The sagittal skeletal relation was evaluated according to Steiner analysis. Descriptive statistics were used to summarize chronological age in each malocclusion group and for each CS3 and CS4 skeletal maturation stage. Due to a lack of normal distribution, comparisons of CS3 and CS4 age intervals on class I and II subjects were compared using the Mann-Whitney U test for independent samples. The results show that the mean duration of the adolescent peak growth spurt was 10 months between CS3 and CS4 stages in class I malocclusion subjects, whereas in class II malocclusion patients the duration was 6 months. This difference of 4 months was statistically significant (p<0.001). Finally, a clinically significant difference of 4 months in the duration of the adolescent peak growth spurt for class I and II malocclusion subjects was identified.

  9. A 20-year-old female with Hirayama disease complicated with dysplasia of the cervical vertebrae and degeneration of intervertebral discs

    PubMed Central

    Hashimoto, Masaya; Yoshioka, Masayuki; Sakimoto, Yoshihiro; Suzuki, Masahiko

    2012-01-01

    A 20-year-old female patient was presented with a 1-year history of progressive weakness of the left hand. Examination on admission showed atrophy of the muscles of the left forearm, cold paralysis and minipolymyoclonus. MR images of the cervical cord showed anterior transfer of the cervical cord on anterior flexion and cervical cord compression at the site of cervical kyphosis, confirming the diagnosis of Hirayama disease. Many features of the present case are unusual: the patient is a female (who are rarely afflicted by this disease), with cervical kyphosis and a history of exercise involving cervical vertebral loading, suggesting a potential involvement of the latter two factors in the disease onset. The findings suggest that cervical vertebral dysplasia and intervertebral disc degeneration may influence cervical kyphosis, and be involved in the onset of Hirayama disease. PMID:23144342

  10. Mechanical implications of pneumatic neck vertebrae in sauropod dinosaurs.

    PubMed

    Schwarz-Wings, Daniela; Meyer, Christian A; Frey, Eberhard; Manz-Steiner, Hans-Rudolf; Schumacher, Ralf

    2010-01-07

    The pre-sacral vertebrae of most sauropod dinosaurs were surrounded by interconnected, air-filled diverticula, penetrating into the bones and creating an intricate internal cavity system within the vertebrae. Computational finite-element models of two sauropod cervical vertebrae now demonstrate the mechanical reason for vertebral pneumaticity. The analyses show that the structure of the cervical vertebrae leads to an even distribution of all occurring stress fields along the vertebrae, concentrated mainly on their external surface and the vertebral laminae. The regions between vertebral laminae and the interior part of the vertebral body including thin bony struts and septa are mostly unloaded and pneumatic structures are positioned in these regions of minimal stress. The morphology of sauropod cervical vertebrae was influenced by strongly segmented axial neck muscles, which require only small attachment areas on each vertebra, and pneumatic epithelia that are able to resorb bone that is not mechanically loaded. The interaction of these soft tissues with the bony tissue of the vertebrae produced lightweight, air-filled vertebrae in which most stresses were borne by the external cortical bone. Cervical pneumaticity was therefore an important prerequisite for neck enlargement in sauropods. Thus, we expect that vertebral pneumaticity in other parts of the body to have a similar role in enabling gigantism.

  11. Mechanical implications of pneumatic neck vertebrae in sauropod dinosaurs

    PubMed Central

    Schwarz-Wings, Daniela; Meyer, Christian A.; Frey, Eberhard; Manz-Steiner, Hans-Rudolf; Schumacher, Ralf

    2010-01-01

    The pre-sacral vertebrae of most sauropod dinosaurs were surrounded by interconnected, air-filled diverticula, penetrating into the bones and creating an intricate internal cavity system within the vertebrae. Computational finite-element models of two sauropod cervical vertebrae now demonstrate the mechanical reason for vertebral pneumaticity. The analyses show that the structure of the cervical vertebrae leads to an even distribution of all occurring stress fields along the vertebrae, concentrated mainly on their external surface and the vertebral laminae. The regions between vertebral laminae and the interior part of the vertebral body including thin bony struts and septa are mostly unloaded and pneumatic structures are positioned in these regions of minimal stress. The morphology of sauropod cervical vertebrae was influenced by strongly segmented axial neck muscles, which require only small attachment areas on each vertebra, and pneumatic epithelia that are able to resorb bone that is not mechanically loaded. The interaction of these soft tissues with the bony tissue of the vertebrae produced lightweight, air-filled vertebrae in which most stresses were borne by the external cortical bone. Cervical pneumaticity was therefore an important prerequisite for neck enlargement in sauropods. Thus, we expect that vertebral pneumaticity in other parts of the body to have a similar role in enabling gigantism. PMID:19801376

  12. Cervical Stenosis, Myelopathy and Radiculopathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... cervical spine refers to that portion of the spinal column that is within our neck. This portion of ... spinal nerves that travel through it. The cervical spinal column is made up of seven vertebrae and the ...

  13. Cervicitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... results from a sexually transmitted infection, such as chlamydia or gonorrhea. Cervicitis can develop from noninfectious causes, ... from common sexually transmitted infections (STIs), including gonorrhea, chlamydia, trichomoniasis and genital herpes. Allergic reactions. An allergy, ...

  14. Cervicitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... much growth of normal bacteria in the vagina (bacterial vaginosis) can also cause cervicitis. ... under a microscope (may show candidiasis , trichomoniasis , or bacterial vaginosis) Pap test Tests for gonorrhea or chlamydia Rarely, ...

  15. Ivory vertebra and systemic mastocytosis.

    PubMed

    Frenzel, Laurent; Suarez, Felipe; Chandesris, Marie-Olivia; Hermine, Olivier

    2012-05-01

    The ivory vertebra sign seen on a standard radiograph of the spine should prompt investigations for a cause, which is most likely to be a bone metastasis, a lymphoma, or Paget's disease of bone. A diagnosis of idiopathic ivory vertebra can be given if no cause is identified. We report an unusual case of ivory vertebra sign that was due to systemic mastocytosis and improved with specific treatment. Although osteoporosis is the most common bone abnormality in systemic mastocytosis, an isolated sclerotic or lytic lesion may be found. The ivory vertebra sign should not be considered idiopathic until tests are done for mastocytosis, particularly given the availability of effective treatments.

  16. Improving vertebra segmentation through joint vertebra-rib atlases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yinong; Yao, Jianhua; Roth, Holger R.; Burns, Joseph E.; Summers, Ronald M.

    2016-03-01

    Accurate spine segmentation allows for improved identification and quantitative characterization of abnormalities of the vertebra, such as vertebral fractures. However, in existing automated vertebra segmentation methods on computed tomography (CT) images, leakage into nearby bones such as ribs occurs due to the close proximity of these visibly intense structures in a 3D CT volume. To reduce this error, we propose the use of joint vertebra-rib atlases to improve the segmentation of vertebrae via multi-atlas joint label fusion. Segmentation was performed and evaluated on CTs containing 106 thoracic and lumbar vertebrae from 10 pathological and traumatic spine patients on an individual vertebra level basis. Vertebra atlases produced errors where the segmentation leaked into the ribs. The use of joint vertebra-rib atlases produced a statistically significant increase in the Dice coefficient from 92.5 +/- 3.1% to 93.8 +/- 2.1% for the left and right transverse processes and a decrease in the mean and max surface distance from 0.75 +/- 0.60mm and 8.63 +/- 4.44mm to 0.30 +/- 0.27mm and 3.65 +/- 2.87mm, respectively.

  17. Automated localization of vertebra landmarks in MRI images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pai, Akshay; Narasimhamurthy, Anand; Rao, V. S. Veeravasarapu; Vaidya, Vivek

    2011-03-01

    The identification of key landmark points in an MR spine image is an important step for tasks such as vertebra counting. In this paper, we propose a template matching based approach for automatic detection of two key landmark points, namely the second cervical vertebra (C2) and the sacrum from sagittal MR images. The approach is comprised of an approximate localization of vertebral column followed by matching with appropriate templates in order to detect/localize the landmarks. A straightforward extension of the work described here is an automated classification of spine section(s). It also serves as a useful building block for further automatic processing such as extraction of regions of interest for subsequent image processing and also in aiding the counting of vertebra.

  18. Vertebrae length and ultra-structure measurements of collagen fibrils and mineral content in the vertebrae of lordotic gilthead seabreams (Sparus aurata).

    PubMed

    Berillis, Panagiotis; Panagiotopoulos, Nikolaos; Boursiaki, Vaia; Karapanagiotidis, Ioannis T; Mente, Eleni

    2015-08-01

    Skeletal deformities of gilthead seabream (Sparus aurata) are a major factor affecting the production cost, the external morphology and survival and growth of the fish. Adult individuals of S. aurata were collected from a commercial fish farm in Greece and were divided into two groups: one with the presence of lordosis, a skeletal deformity, and one without any skeletal deformity. Fishes were X-rayed, and cervical, abdominal and caudal vertebrae lengths were measured. Vertebrae were taken from the site of the vertebral column where lordosis occurred. One part was decalcified and prepared for collagen examination with transmission electron microscopy, and the rest were incinerated, and the Ca and P contents were measured. The stoichiometries of the samples were obtained by EDS (Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy). The same procedure was followed for fish without skeletal deformities (vertebrae were taken from the middle region of the vertebral column). The decalcified vertebrae parts were examined with TEM, collagen micrographs were taken and the fibrils' periods and diameters were measured. There were no significant differences for both Ca and P or the collagen fibrils' periods between the two fish groups. The mean lengths of the cervical, abdominal and caudal vertebrae where lordosis occurred were similar to the lengths of the respective regions of the individuals without the skeletal deformity. The TEM examination showed a significantly smaller mean vertebrae collagen fibril diameter from the fishes with lordosis compared with those from the controls, revealing the significance of collagen to bone structure.

  19. Differential scaling patterns of vertebrae and the evolution of neck length in mammals.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Patrick; Amson, Eli; Fischer, Martin S

    2017-03-21

    Almost all mammals have seven vertebrae in their cervical spines. This consistency represents one of the most prominent examples of morphological stasis in vertebrae evolution. Hence, the requirements associated with evolutionary modifications of neck length have to be met with a fixed number of vertebrae. It has not been clear whether body size influences the overall length of the cervical spine and its inner organization (i.e., if the mammalian neck is subject to allometry). Here, we provide the first large scale analysis of the scaling patterns of the cervical spine and its constituting cervical vertebrae. Our findings reveal that the opposite allometric scaling of C1 and C2-C7 accommodate the increase of neck bending moment with body size. The internal organization of the neck skeleton exhibits surprisingly uniformity in the vast majority of mammals. Deviations from this general pattern only occur under extreme loading regimes associated with particular functional and allometric demands. Our results indicate that the main source of variation in the mammalian neck stems from the disparity of overall cervical spine length. The mammalian neck reveals how evolutionary disparity manifests itself in a structure that is otherwise highly restricted by meristic constraints. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  20. Comparative anatomy: all vertebrates do have vertebrae.

    PubMed

    Janvier, Philippe

    2011-09-13

    In contrast to lampreys and jawed vertebrates, hagfishes were thought to lack vertebrae. Now, long overlooked vertebral rudiments have been analysed in hagfish, suggesting that vertebrae existed in the last common ancestor of all vertebrates.

  1. Age estimation from stages of epiphyseal union in the presacral vertebrae.

    PubMed

    Cardoso, Hugo F V; Ríos, Luis

    2011-02-01

    The presacral vertebrae have various secondary centers of ossification, whose timing of fusion can be used for age estimation of human skeletal remains up to the middle to the latter third decade. However, detailed information about the age at which these secondary centers of ossification fuse has been lacking. In this study, the timing of epiphyseal union in presacral vertebrae was studied in a sample of modern Portuguese skeletons (57 females and 47 males) between the ages of 9 and 30, taken from the Lisbon documented skeletal collection. A detailed photographic record of these epiphyses and the age ranges for the different stages of epiphyseal union are provided. Partial union of epiphyses was observed from 11 to 27 years of age. In general, centers of ossification begin to fuse first in the cervical and lumbar vertebrae, followed by centers of ossification in the thoracic region. The first center of ossification to complete fusion is usually that of the mammillary process in lumbar vertebrae. This is usually followed by that of the transverse process, spinous transverse process, and annular ring, regardless of vertebra type. There were no statistically significant sex differences in timing of fusion, but there was a trend toward early maturation in females for some vertebra or epiphyses. Bilateral epiphyses did not show statistically significant differences in timing of fusion. This study offers information on timing of fusion of diverse epiphyseal locations useful for age estimation of complete or fragmented human skeletal remains.

  2. Development of Ultrasound to Measure In-vivo Dynamic Cervical Spine Intervertebral Disc Mechanics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-01-01

    images of IVDs and dynamic vertebral motion in-vivo during simulated tasks relevant to acute and chronic cervical spine injury and disease. A semi...of cervical vertebrae. Dynamic IVD displacements of vertebrae C4-5 measured by US were consistent with direct measurements. For motion frequencies...We developed a diagnostic system that applies dynamic cyclic loads to cervical spine over a range of programmable frequencies and amplitudes that

  3. A 73-Year-Old Male with Cervical Spine Osteomyelitis Presenting as Urosepsis.

    PubMed

    Kakarlapudi, H; Speirs, S; Lal, A P; Alaie, D; Petrillo, R; Ashraf, M B; Kolanuvada, B; Bhargava, M

    2015-01-01

    Vertebral osteomyelitis is a serious debilitating infection if not detected early. Involvement of cervical vertebrae is usually seen in the presence of specific risk factors. Urinary tract infection commonly spreads to the lumbar vertebrae. This is a case presentation of an elderly male who, in the absence of specific risk factors for cervical osteomyelitis, presented with symptoms of urinary tract infection and was found to have cervical spine osteomyelitis.

  4. A 73-Year-Old Male with Cervical Spine Osteomyelitis Presenting as Urosepsis

    PubMed Central

    Kakarlapudi, H.; Speirs, S.; Lal, A.P.; Alaie, D.; Petrillo, R.; Ashraf, M.B.; Kolanuvada, B.; Bhargava, M.

    2015-01-01

    Vertebral osteomyelitis is a serious debilitating infection if not detected early. Involvement of cervical vertebrae is usually seen in the presence of specific risk factors. Urinary tract infection commonly spreads to the lumbar vertebrae. This is a case presentation of an elderly male who, in the absence of specific risk factors for cervical osteomyelitis, presented with symptoms of urinary tract infection and was found to have cervical spine osteomyelitis. PMID:26715867

  5. Strontium mineralization of shark vertebrae.

    PubMed

    Raoult, Vincent; Peddemors, Victor M; Zahra, David; Howell, Nicholas; Howard, Daryl L; de Jonge, Martin D; Williamson, Jane E

    2016-07-18

    Determining the age of sharks using vertebral banding is a vital component of management, but the causes of banding are not fully understood. Traditional shark ageing is based on fish otolith ageing methods where growth bands are assumed to result from varied seasonal calcification rates. Here we investigate these assumptions by mapping elemental distribution within the growth bands of vertebrae from six species of sharks representing four different taxonomic orders using scanning x-ray fluorescence microscopy. Traditional visual growth bands, determined with light microscopy, were more closely correlated to strontium than calcium in all species tested. Elemental distributions suggest that vertebral strontium bands may be related to environmental variations in salinity. These results highlight the requirement for a better understanding of shark movements, and their influence on vertebral development, if confidence in age estimates is to be improved. Analysis of shark vertebrae using similar strontium-focused elemental techniques, once validated for a given species, may allow more successful estimations of age on individuals with few or no visible vertebral bands.

  6. Strontium mineralization of shark vertebrae

    PubMed Central

    Raoult, Vincent; Peddemors, Victor M.; Zahra, David; Howell, Nicholas; Howard, Daryl L.; de Jonge, Martin D.; Williamson, Jane E.

    2016-01-01

    Determining the age of sharks using vertebral banding is a vital component of management, but the causes of banding are not fully understood. Traditional shark ageing is based on fish otolith ageing methods where growth bands are assumed to result from varied seasonal calcification rates. Here we investigate these assumptions by mapping elemental distribution within the growth bands of vertebrae from six species of sharks representing four different taxonomic orders using scanning x-ray fluorescence microscopy. Traditional visual growth bands, determined with light microscopy, were more closely correlated to strontium than calcium in all species tested. Elemental distributions suggest that vertebral strontium bands may be related to environmental variations in salinity. These results highlight the requirement for a better understanding of shark movements, and their influence on vertebral development, if confidence in age estimates is to be improved. Analysis of shark vertebrae using similar strontium-focused elemental techniques, once validated for a given species, may allow more successful estimations of age on individuals with few or no visible vertebral bands. PMID:27424768

  7. Cervical cystic swelling in an adolescent: unusual association of a cervical mature teratoma with vertebral anomalies and a history of gastric duplication cyst.

    PubMed

    Hartog, Hermien; Dikkers, Freek G; Veldhuizen, Albert G; Coppes, Maarten H; Sleeboom, Christien; de Langen, Zacharias Jan

    2011-06-01

    A 14-year-old girl presented with a cervical cystic swelling in association with deformity of cervical vertebrae. As a child, she had been treated for gastric duplication. Pathologic examination of the resected cervical swelling revealed a mature teratoma. We discuss possible embryologic associations, which could explain the unusual combination of a mature teratoma with vertebral anomalies and gastric duplication.

  8. Treatment of Combined Spinal Deformity in Patient with Ollier Disease and Abnormal Vertebrae

    PubMed Central

    Ryabykh, S. О.; Gubin, A. V.; Prudnikova, О. G.; Kobyzev, А. Е.

    2012-01-01

    We report staged treatment of severe combined spinal deformity in an 11-year-old patient with Ollier disease and abnormal cervical vertebra. Combined scoliosis with systemic pathology and abnormal vertebrae is a rare condition and features atypical deformity location and rapid progression rate and frequently involves the rib cage and pelvis, disturbing the function of chest organs and skeleton. Progressive deformity resulted in cachexia and acute respiratory failure. A halo-pelvic distraction device assembled of Ilizarov components was employed for a staged surgical treatment performed for lifesaving indications. After vital functions stabilized, the scoliosis curve of the cervical spine was corrected and fixed with a hybrid system of transpedicular supporting points, connecting rods, and connectors that provided staged distraction during growth. The treatment showed good functional and cosmetic result. PMID:24436859

  9. A framework of vertebra segmentation using the active shape model-based approach.

    PubMed

    Benjelloun, Mohammed; Mahmoudi, Saïd; Lecron, Fabian

    2011-01-01

    We propose a medical image segmentation approach based on the Active Shape Model theory. We apply this method for cervical vertebra detection. The main advantage of this approach is the application of a statistical model created after a training stage. Thus, the knowledge and interaction of the domain expert intervene in this approach. Our application allows the use of two different models, that is, a global one (with several vertebrae) and a local one (with a single vertebra). Two modes of segmentation are also proposed: manual and semiautomatic. For the manual mode, only two points are selected by the user on a given image. The first point needs to be close to the lower anterior corner of the last vertebra and the second near the upper anterior corner of the first vertebra. These two points are required to initialize the segmentation process. We propose to use the Harris corner detector combined with three successive filters to carry out the semiautomatic process. The results obtained on a large set of X-ray images are very promising.

  10. The Natural History and Clinical Syndromes of Degenerative Cervical Spondylosis

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, John C.; Groarke, Patrick J.; Butler, Joseph S.; Poynton, Ashley R.; O'Byrne, John M.

    2012-01-01

    Cervical spondylosis is a broad term which describes the age related chronic disc degeneration, which can also affect the cervical vertebrae, the facet and other joints and their associated soft tissue supports. Evidence of spondylitic change is frequently found in many asymptomatic adults. Radiculopathy is a result of intervertebral foramina narrowing. Narrowing of the spinal canal can result in spinal cord compression, ultimately resulting in cervical spondylosis myelopathy. This review article examines the current literature in relation to the cervical spondylosis and describes the three clinical syndromes of axial neck pain, cervical radiculopathy and cervical myelopathy PMID:22162812

  11. The Neandertal vertebral column 1: the cervical spine.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Olivencia, Asier; Been, Ella; Arsuaga, Juan Luis; Stock, Jay T

    2013-06-01

    This paper provides a metric analysis of the Neandertal cervical spine in relation to modern human variation. All seven cervical vertebrae have been analysed. Metric data from eight Neandertal individuals are compared with a large sample of modern humans. The significance of morphometric differences is tested using both z-scores and two-tailed Wilcoxon signed rank tests. The results identify significant metric and morphological differences between Neandertals and modern humans in all seven cervical vertebrae. Neandertal vertebrae are mediolaterally wider and dorsoventrally longer than modern humans, due in part to longer and more horizontally oriented spinous processes. This suggests that Neandertal cervical morphology was more stable in both mid-sagittal and coronal planes. It is hypothesized that the differences in cranial size and shape in the Neandertal and modern human lineages from their Middle Pleistocene ancestors could account for some of the differences in the neck anatomy between these species.

  12. Shape regression for vertebra fracture quantification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lund, Michael Tillge; de Bruijne, Marleen; Tanko, Laszlo B.; Nielsen, Mads

    2005-04-01

    Accurate and reliable identification and quantification of vertebral fractures constitute a challenge both in clinical trials and in diagnosis of osteoporosis. Various efforts have been made to develop reliable, objective, and reproducible methods for assessing vertebral fractures, but at present there is no consensus concerning a universally accepted diagnostic definition of vertebral fractures. In this project we want to investigate whether or not it is possible to accurately reconstruct the shape of a normal vertebra, using a neighbouring vertebra as prior information. The reconstructed shape can then be used to develop a novel vertebra fracture measure, by comparing the segmented vertebra shape with its reconstructed normal shape. The vertebrae in lateral x-rays of the lumbar spine were manually annotated by a medical expert. With this dataset we built a shape model, with equidistant point distribution between the four corner points. Based on the shape model, a multiple linear regression model of a normal vertebra shape was developed for each dataset using leave-one-out cross-validation. The reconstructed shape was calculated for each dataset using these regression models. The average prediction error for the annotated shape was on average 3%.

  13. Vertebral artery injury in a patient with fractured C4 vertebra.

    PubMed

    Banić, Tihomir; Banić, Morana; Cvjetko, Ivan; Somun, Nenad; Bilić, Vide; Vidjak, Vinko; Pavić, Vladimir; Coc, Ivan; Kokić, Tomislav; Kejlal, Zvonko

    2014-09-01

    Vertebral artery injuries due to cervical spine trauma, although rarely described in the literature, are relatively common. While most of them will remain asymptomatic, a small percentage of patients may suffer life threatening complications. We report a case of the right vertebral artery injury in a patient with fracture of C4 vertebra, successfully treated with endovascular approach. A 78-year-old male patient was hospitalized for cervical spine injury caused by falling off the tractor. Radiological assessment revealed fracture of C4 vertebra with proximal two-thirds of C4 body dislocated five millimeters dorsally. Significant swelling of soft prevertebral tissues distally of C2 segment was also present. During emergency surgery using standard anterior approach for cervical spine, excessive bleeding started from the injured right vertebral artery. Bleeding was stopped by tamponade with oxidized regenerated cellulose sheet and C4-C5 anterior fixation; then partial reduction of displacement was done. Fifteen days later, after angiography, endovascular repair of the right vertebral artery was performed using percutaneous stent graft. Follow up computed tomography scan angiography showed valid stent patency without contrast extravasation. In cases of cervical spine trauma, surgeon should always be prepared to manage injury of vertebral artery. Bleeding can primarily be stopped by hemostatic packing, and definitive repair can be successfully achieved by endovascular approach using percutaneous stent graft.

  14. X-Ray Diagnosis of Cervical Migraine (Rentgenodiagnostica Sheinoi Migreni),

    DTIC Science & Technology

    In recent years, interest in diseases of the nervous system resulting from cervical osteochondrosis has increased markedly. The wide range of...frequently simulate severe disorders of the nervous system. These cerebral disorders have come to be called cervical migraine. (Bartschi-Rochaix). They...arise as a result of the pressure of osteophytes of the cervical vertebrae on the vertebral artery and the vertebral nerve which is entwined with it in

  15. A Dynamic Model of the Cervical Spine and Head

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-11-01

    neck associated with each motion segment and multiplying by a uniform density. Preliminary simulations have been made of Ox (frontal) and (lateral...Vertebral Column 18 Cervical Spine 23 Vertebrae 23 Ligaments of the Cervical Spine 31 Movement of the Cervical Spine 34 Muscles of the Neck 39 III...GEOMETRIC DATA 62 Vertebral Local and Global Data 62 Ligaments - Geometry 74 Geometry of Muscles 76 Inertial Properties of the Neck 80 APPENDIX B

  16. Vascularized fibular graft to replace resected cervical vertebral bodies. Case report.

    PubMed

    Freidberg, S R; Gumley, G J; Pfeifer, B A; Hybels, R L

    1989-08-01

    Use of a vascularized free fibular graft is described as a method of replacing excised cervical vertebrae when severe instability is present. The vascularized bone graft heals more rapidly and with greater strength than a nonvascularized autogenous graft.

  17. Dimensional accuracy of 3D printed vertebra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogden, Kent; Ordway, Nathaniel; Diallo, Dalanda; Tillapaugh-Fay, Gwen; Aslan, Can

    2014-03-01

    3D printer applications in the biomedical sciences and medical imaging are expanding and will have an increasing impact on the practice of medicine. Orthopedic and reconstructive surgery has been an obvious area for development of 3D printer applications as the segmentation of bony anatomy to generate printable models is relatively straightforward. There are important issues that should be addressed when using 3D printed models for applications that may affect patient care; in particular the dimensional accuracy of the printed parts needs to be high to avoid poor decisions being made prior to surgery or therapeutic procedures. In this work, the dimensional accuracy of 3D printed vertebral bodies derived from CT data for a cadaver spine is compared with direct measurements on the ex-vivo vertebra and with measurements made on the 3D rendered vertebra using commercial 3D image processing software. The vertebra was printed on a consumer grade 3D printer using an additive print process using PLA (polylactic acid) filament. Measurements were made for 15 different anatomic features of the vertebral body, including vertebral body height, endplate width and depth, pedicle height and width, and spinal canal width and depth, among others. It is shown that for the segmentation and printing process used, the results of measurements made on the 3D printed vertebral body are substantially the same as those produced by direct measurement on the vertebra and measurements made on the 3D rendered vertebra.

  18. The cervical spine of Australopithecus sediba.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Marc R; Williams, Scott A; Schmid, Peter; Churchill, Steven E; Berger, Lee R

    2017-03-01

    Cervical vertebrae are rare in the early hominin fossil record, presenting a challenge for understanding the evolution of the neck and head carriage in hominin evolution. Here, we examine the cervical vertebrae of Australopithecus sediba, which unlike other South African taxa is known from associated cervical vertebrae. The A. sediba cervical vertebrae exhibit human-like values for wedging, pedicle cross-sectional areas, and articular facet heights, indicating reduced ventral loading relative to African apes. These features combine with a pattern of vertebral body bone distribution and caudally progressive size expansion suggesting a mode of cervical lordosis, load mitigation, and head carriage similar to humans and distinct from the cantilevered mode of head carriage of the extant African great apes. Yet these derived features in A. sediba are accompanied by ape-like vertebral body and dorsal pillar sizes, articular facet orientation, and uncinate process morphology signaling reduced lateral and rotational coupled movements between vertebral elements and indicate a considerably stiffer neck than in humans. A primitively long and horizontally-oriented C7 spinous process is likely related to a prognathic viscerocranium, although the complimentary C3 spinous process is short, implying large moments emanating from scapular and shoulder elevators rather than large muscles of head stabilization. Cross-sectional spinous process shape and robust anterior tubercles similarly signal increased arm elevation consistent with climbing behavior in corroboration with arboreal signatures previously observed in the shoulder, arms, and hand of A. sediba. Spinal canal shape and size suggests that A. sediba lacked the cervical spinal cord enlargement of Homo that confers humans with enhanced motor control to the upper limbs. The cervical spine of A. sediba thus presents a mosaic of primitive and derived characters, with anatomical features relating to neck posture and head

  19. Automated vertebra identification in CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehm, Matthias; Klinder, Tobias; Kneser, Reinhard; Lorenz, Cristian

    2009-02-01

    In this paper, we describe and compare methods for automatically identifying individual vertebrae in arbitrary CT images. The identification is an essential precondition for a subsequent model-based segmentation, which is used in a wide field of orthopedic, neurological, and oncological applications, e.g., spinal biopsies or the insertion of pedicle screws. Since adjacent vertebrae show similar characteristics, an automated labeling of the spine column is a very challenging task, especially if no surrounding reference structures can be taken into account. Furthermore, vertebra identification is complicated due to the fact that many images are bounded to a very limited field of view and may contain only few vertebrae. We propose and evaluate two methods for automatically labeling the spine column by evaluating similarities between given models and vertebral objects. In one method, object boundary information is taken into account by applying a Generalized Hough Transform (GHT) for each vertebral object. In the other method, appearance models containing mean gray value information are registered to each vertebral object using cross and local correlation as similarity measures for the optimization function. The GHT is advantageous in terms of computational performance but cuts back concerning the identification rate. A correct labeling of the vertebral column has been successfully performed on 93% of the test set consisting of 63 disparate input images using rigid image registration with local correlation as similarity measure.

  20. Anthropological and radiographic comparison of vertebrae for identification of decomposed human remains.

    PubMed

    Mundorff, Amy Z; Vidoli, Giovanna; Melinek, Judy

    2006-09-01

    This case study demonstrates the importance of involving an anthropologist in forensic situations with decomposed remains. Anthropological consultation was used in conjunction with the comparison of antemortem and postmortem radiographs to establish positive identification of unknown, decomposed remains. The remains had no traditional identifying features such as fingerprints or dental. Through anthropological analysis, it was determined the decedent was male, between 20 and 23 years at time of death and c. 5'2'' tall. This information allowed for a presumptive identification and a request for antemortem radiographs. The missing person was identified comparing the spinous processes of the cervical and thoracic vertebrae between ante- and postmortem radiographs.

  1. Cervical Cerclage

    MedlinePlus

    ... or more second trimester pregnancy losses related to painless cervical dilation and in the absence of labor ... history-indicated cervical cerclage) Prior cerclage due to painless cervical dilation in the second trimester Upon physical ...

  2. Pediatric Upper Cervical Spine Giant Cell Tumor: Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Alfawareh, Mohammad D.; Shah, Irfanullah D.; Orief, Tamer I.; Halawani, Mohammad M.; Attia, Walid I.; Almusrea, Khaled N.

    2014-01-01

    Study Design Case report. Objective The purpose of this work is to report the case of a giant cell tumor involving the second cervical vertebra in a pediatric patient. Surgical management included a combined posterior and anterior cervical approach. There has been no recurrence in 2 years of follow-up. Case Report A 13-year-old girl presented with scoliosis with incidentally lytic lesion involving the second cervical vertebra. The radiologic investigations and biopsy result indicated a giant cell tumor of the bone. A combined posterior and anterior cervical approach was performed to resect the lesion, reconstruct the spine, and restore stability. Two years of follow-up revealed no recurrence of the lesion with stable reconstruction of the spine. Results The lesion was surgically managed for excision and spinal fusion by combining a posterior occipitocervical arthrodesis with an anterior retropharyngeal cervical approach. The final histopathology result confirmed a giant cell tumor of the bone. Conclusions Giant cell tumor involving the second cervical vertebra is uncommon; this tumor can be managed surgically by using a combined posterior and anterior cervical retropharyngeal approach. The presented case was unique in terms of the tumor location, patient age, and surgical management. PMID:26225290

  3. The cervical anatomy of Samotherium, an intermediate-necked giraffid

    PubMed Central

    Danowitz, Melinda; Domalski, Rebecca; Solounias, Nikos

    2015-01-01

    Giraffidae are represented by many extinct species. The only two extant taxa possess diametrically contrasting cervical morphology, as the okapi is short-necked and the giraffe is exceptionally long-necked. Samotherium major, known from the Late Miocene of Samos in Greece and other Eurasian localities, is a key extinct giraffid; it possesses cervical vertebrae that are intermediate in the evolutionary elongation of the neck. We describe detailed anatomical features of the cervicals of S. major, and compare these characteristics with the vertebrae of the two extant giraffid taxa. Based on qualitative morphological characters and a quantitative analysis of cervical dimensions, we find that the S. major neck is intermediate between that of the okapi and the giraffe. Specifically, the more cranial (C2–C3) vertebrae of S. major represent a mosaic of features shared either with the giraffe or with the okapi. The more caudal (C5–C7) S. major vertebrae, however, appear transitional between the two extant taxa, and hence are more unique. Notably, the C6 of S. major exhibits a partially excavated ventral lamina that is strong cranially but completely absent on the caudal half of the ventral vertebral body, features between those seen in the giraffe and the okapi. Comprehensive anatomical descriptions and measurements of the almost-complete cervical column reveal that S. major is a truly intermediate-necked giraffid. Reconstructions of the neck display our findings. PMID:26716010

  4. Identification and classification of spine vertebrae by automated methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, L. Rodney; Thoma, George R.

    2001-07-01

    We are currently working toward developing computer-assisted methods for the indexing of a collection of 17,000 digitized x-ray images by biomedical content. These images were collected as part of a nationwide health survey and form a research resource for osteoarthitis and bone morphometry. This task requires the development of algorithms to robustly analyze the x-ray contents for key landmarks, to segment the vertebral bodies, to accurately measure geometric features of the individual vertebrae and inter-vertebral areas, and to classify the spine anatomy into normal or abnormal classes for conditions of interest, including anterior osteophytes and disc space narrowing. Subtasks of this work have been created and divided among collaborators. In this paper, we provide a technical description of the overall task, report on progress made by collaborators, and provide the most recent results of our own research into obtaining first-order location of the spine region of interest by automated methods. We are currently concentrating on images of the cervical spine, but will expand the work to include the lumbar spine as well. Development of successful image processing techniques for computer-assisted indexing of medical image collections is expected to have a significant impact within the medical research and patient care systems.

  5. Evolution and function of anterior cervical vertebral fusion in tetrapods.

    PubMed

    VanBuren, Collin S; Evans, David C

    2017-02-01

    The evolution of vertebral fusion is a poorly understood phenomenon that results in the loss of mobility between sequential vertebrae. Non-pathological fusion of the anterior cervical vertebrae has evolved independently in numerous extant and extinct mammals and reptiles, suggesting that the formation of a 'syncervical' is an adaptation that arose to confer biomechanical advantage(s) in these lineages. We review syncervical anatomy and evolution in a broad phylogenetic context for the first time and provide a comprehensive summary of proposed adaptive hypotheses. The syncervical generally consists of two vertebrae (e.g. hornbills, porcupines, dolphins) but can include fusion of seven cervical vertebrae in some cetaceans. Based on the ecologies of taxa with this trait, cervical fusion most often occurs in fossorial and pelagic taxa. In fossorial taxa, the syncervical likely increases the out-lever force during head-lift digging. In cetaceans and ricochetal rodents, the syncervical may stabilize the head and neck during locomotion, although considerable variation exists in its composition without apparent variability in locomotion. Alternatively, the highly reduced cervical vertebral centra may require fusion to prevent mechanical failure of the vertebrae. In birds, the syncervical of hornbills may have evolved in response to their unique casque-butting behaviour, or due to increased head mass. The general correlation between ecological traits and the presence of a syncervical in extant taxa allows more accurate interpretation of extinct animals that also exhibit this unique trait. For example, syncervicals evolved independently in several groups of marine reptiles and may have functioned to stabilize the head at the craniocervical joint during pelagic locomotion, as in cetaceans. Overall, the origin and function of fused cervical vertebrae is poorly understood, emphasizing the need for future comparative biomechanical studies interpreted in an evolutionary context.

  6. Pediatric cervical spine: normal anatomy, variants, and trauma.

    PubMed

    Lustrin, Elizabeth Susan; Karakas, Sabiha Pinar; Ortiz, A Orlando; Cinnamon, Jay; Castillo, Mauricio; Vaheesan, Kirubahara; Brown, James H; Diamond, Alan S; Black, Karen; Singh, Sudha

    2003-01-01

    Emergency radiologic evaluation of the pediatric cervical spine can be challenging because of the confusing appearance of synchondroses, normal anatomic variants, and injuries that are unique to children. Cervical spine injuries in children are usually seen in the upper cervical region owing to the unique biomechanics and anatomy of the pediatric cervical spine. Knowledge of the normal embryologic development and anatomy of the cervical spine is important to avoid mistaking synchondroses for fractures in the setting of trauma. Familiarity with anatomic variants is also important for correct image interpretation. These variants include pseudosubluxation, absence of cervical lordosis, wedging of the C3 vertebra, widening of the predental space, prevertebral soft-tissue widening, intervertebral widening, and "pseudo-Jefferson fracture." In addition, familiarity with mechanisms of injury and appropriate imaging modalities will aid in the correct interpretation of radiologic images of the pediatric cervical spine.

  7. The role of allometry and posture in the evolution of the hominin subaxial cervical spine.

    PubMed

    Arlegi, Mikel; Gómez-Olivencia, Asier; Albessard, Lou; Martínez, Ignacio; Balzeau, Antoine; Arsuaga, Juan Luis; Been, Ella

    2017-03-01

    Cervical vertebrae not only protect the spinal cord but also are the insertion and origin points for muscles related to the movement of the head, upper limb, and trunk, among others, and are thus important elements in primate evolution. While previous work has been undertaken on the first two cervical vertebrae, there is a dearth of studies on the subaxial cervical spine in hominines. In this paper, we provide detailed morphological information on two important aspects of the subaxial cervical vertebrae (C3 - C7): mid-sagittal morphology and superior facet orientation. We studied large samples of African apes including modern humans and the most complete fossil hominin subaxial cervical vertebrae using both traditional and geometric morphometrics. There are significant differences between extant hominoids related to the relative length and orientation of the spinous process as well as to the orientation of the articular facets, which are related to size, locomotion, and neck posture. In fact, fossil hominins do not completely conform to any of the extant groups. Our assessment of mid-sagittal morphology and superior articular facet orientation shows that australopiths have more Homo-like upper subaxial cervical vertebrae coupled with more "primitive" lower cervical vertebrae. Based on these results, we hypothesize that those changes, maybe related to postural changes derived from bipedalism, did not affect the entire subaxial cervical spine at once. From a methodological point of view, the combination of traditional and geometric morphometric data provides a more integrative perspective of morphological change and evolution, which is certainly useful in human evolutionary studies.

  8. Ivory vertebra: imaging findings in different diagnoses.

    PubMed

    Braun, Richard Andreas; Milito, Carlos Felipe do Rego Barros; Goldman, Suzan Menasce; Fernandes, Eloy de Ávila

    2016-01-01

    Low back pain is often managed at all levels of healthcare. In general, diagnostic investigation begins with radiography of the lumbar spine. In addition to the most common findings, radiologists can identify increased density of a vertebral body, referred to as ivory vertebra. The objective of this study was to describe the main diseases that can present with this radiologic sign, such as Hodgkin lymphoma, Paget's disease, metastatic prostate cancer, breast cancer, and osteomyelitis. It is extremely important that radiologists be aware of this finding in order to inform the requesting physician of the possible etiologies, given that it can be the initial radiologic presentation for these diseases.

  9. The Cervical Osteology of Okapia johnstoni and Giraffa camelopardalis.

    PubMed

    Danowitz, Melinda; Solounias, Nikos

    2015-01-01

    Giraffidae is the only family of ruminants that is represented by two extant species; Okapia johnstoni and Giraffa camelopardalis. Of these taxa, O. johnstoni represents a typical short-necked ungulate, and G. camelopardalis exemplifies the most extreme cervical elongation seen in any ruminant. We utilize these two species to provide a comprehensive anatomic description of the cervical vertebrae. In addition, we compare the serial morphologic characteristics of the okapi and giraffe cervical vertebrae, and report on several osteologic differences seen between the two taxa. The giraffe neck appears to exhibit homogenization of C3-C7; the position of the dorsal tubercle, thickness of the cranial articular process, shape of the ventral vertebral body, and orientation of the ventral tubercle are constant throughout these vertebrae, whereas these features are serially variable in the okapi. We also report on several specializations of the giraffe C7, which we believe relates to an atypical cervico-thoracic junction, corresponding to the substantial neck lengthening. The morphologic differences exhibited between the okapi and giraffe cervical vertebrae have implications on the function of the necks relating to both fighting and feeding.

  10. Cervical Vertebral Body's Volume as a New Parameter for Predicting the Skeletal Maturation Stages

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Youn-Kyung; Kim, Jinmi; Maki, Koutaro; Ko, Ching-Chang

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to determine the correlation between the volumetric parameters derived from the images of the second, third, and fourth cervical vertebrae by using cone beam computed tomography with skeletal maturation stages and to propose a new formula for predicting skeletal maturation by using regression analysis. We obtained the estimation of skeletal maturation levels from hand-wrist radiographs and volume parameters derived from the second, third, and fourth cervical vertebrae bodies from 102 Japanese patients (54 women and 48 men, 5–18 years of age). We performed Pearson's correlation coefficient analysis and simple regression analysis. All volume parameters derived from the second, third, and fourth cervical vertebrae exhibited statistically significant correlations (P < 0.05). The simple regression model with the greatest R-square indicated the fourth-cervical-vertebra volume as an independent variable with a variance inflation factor less than ten. The explanation power was 81.76%. Volumetric parameters of cervical vertebrae using cone beam computed tomography are useful in regression models. The derived regression model has the potential for clinical application as it enables a simple and quantitative analysis to evaluate skeletal maturation level. PMID:27340668

  11. The vertebrae and ribs of Homo naledi.

    PubMed

    Williams, Scott A; García-Martínez, Daniel; Bastir, Markus; Meyer, Marc R; Nalla, Shahed; Hawks, John; Schmid, Peter; Churchill, Steven E; Berger, Lee R

    2017-03-01

    Hominin evolution featured shifts from a trunk shape suitable for climbing and housing a large gut to a trunk adapted to bipedalism and higher quality diets. Our knowledge regarding the tempo, mode, and context in which these derived traits evolved has been limited, based largely on a small-bodied Australopithecus partial skeleton (A.L. 288-1; "Lucy") and a juvenile Homo erectus skeleton (KNM-WT 15000; "Turkana Boy"). Two recent discoveries, of a large-bodied Australopithecus afarensis (KSD-VP-1/1) and two Australopithecus sediba partial skeletons (MH1 and MH2), have added to our understanding of thorax evolution; however, little is known about thorax morphology in early Homo. Here we describe hominin vertebrae, ribs, and sternal remains from the Dinaledi chamber of the Rising Star cave system attributed to Homo naledi. Although the remains are highly fragmented, the best-preserved specimens-two lower thoracic vertebrae and a lower rib-were found in association and belong to a small-bodied individual. A second lower rib may belong to this individual as well. All four of these individual elements are amongst the smallest known in the hominin fossil record. H. naledi is characterized by robust, relatively uncurved lower ribs and a relatively large spinal canal. We expect that the recovery of additional material from Rising Star Cave will clarify the nature of these traits and shed light on H. naledi functional morphology and phylogeny.

  12. Dynamic cortex stripping for vertebra evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stieger, James; Burns, Joseph E.; Yao, Jianhua; Summers, Ronald M.

    2015-03-01

    Vertebral cortex removal through cancellous bone reconstruction (CBR) algorithms on CT has been shown to enhance the detection rate of bone metastases by radiologists and reduce average reading time per case. Removal of the cortical bone provides an unobstructed view of the inside of vertebrae without any anomalous distractions. However, these algorithms rely on the assumption that the cortical bone of vertebrae can be removed without the identification of the endosteal cortical margin. We present a method for the identification of the endosteal cortical margin based on vertebral models and CT intensity information. First, triangular mesh models are created using the marching cubes algorithm. A search region is established along the normal of the surface and the image gradient is calculated at every point along the search region. The location with the greatest image gradient is selected as the corresponding point on the endosteal cortical margin. In order to analyze the strength of this method, ground truth and control models were also created. Our method was shown to have a significantly reduce the average error from 0.80 mm +/- 0.14 mm to 0.65 mm +/- 0.17 mm (p <0.0001) when compared to erosion. This method can potentially improve CBR algorithms, which improve visualization of cancellous bone lesions such as metastases, by more accurately identifying the inner wall of the vertebral cortex.

  13. Bilateral cervical ribs in a Dobermann Pinscher.

    PubMed

    Ricciardi, M; De Simone, A; Gernone, F; Giannuzzi, P

    2015-01-01

    An 11-year-old intact female Doberman Pinscher was presented with the complaint of non-ambulatory tetraparesis. Clinical and neurological examination revealed a caudal cervical spinal cord disfunction (C6-T2 spinal cord segments). Magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomographic (CT) findings of the cervical spine were consistent with caudal cervical spondylomyelopathy (CSM). During the diagnostic work-up for the cervical spine, bilateral bone anomalies involving the seventh cervical vertebra and the first ribs were found on radiographs and CT examination. The rib anomalies found in this dog appear similar to cervical ribs widely described in human medicine. In people, cervical ribs are associated with a high rate of stillbirth, early childhood cancer, and can cause the thoracic outlet syndrome, characterized by neurovascular compression at level of superior aperture of the chest. In dogs, only some sporadic anatomopathological descriptions of cervical ribs exist. In this report the radiographic and CT findings of these particular vertebral and rib anomalies along with their relationships with adjacent vasculature and musculature are shown intravitam in a dog. Specific radiographic and CT findings described in this report may help in reaching a presumptive diagnosis of this anomaly. Finally, their clinical and evolutionary significance are discussed.

  14. Vertebrae cancellous bone strength measurements by an osteopenetrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Logins, V.; Pontaga, I.; Saulgozis, J.

    1996-07-01

    The penetration strength of trabecular bone tissue of human lumbar vertebrae was determined in vitro by the osteopenetrometer. The tests were performed in the frontal, middle, and back third of the vertebra body lateral side, in the upper and lower terminal plates, and in the processus spinosus in three vertebrae of the age group 1 (19-25 years), four vertebrae of the group 2 (40-60 years), and four of the group 3 (61-75 years). The data obtained show that the penetration of strength of the human lumbar vertebrae diminishes with age nonuniformly: the most expressed decrease appears in the frontal and middle parts of the lateral side and in the processus spinosus, but very little change appears under the terminal plates. The significant correlation between the penetration strength in the processus spinosus and in the vertebrae body could be useful for diagnostics of the vertebra state in vivo. According to the measured penetration strength in the processus spinosus, it is possible to indirectly estimate its value in the vertebra body.

  15. A demineralized calf vertebra model as an alternative to classic osteoporotic vertebra models for pedicle screw pullout studies.

    PubMed

    Akbay, Atilla; Bozkurt, Gokhan; Ilgaz, Ozgur; Palaoglu, Selcuk; Akalan, Nejat; Benzel, Edward C

    2008-03-01

    Screws, clamps and other spinal instrumentation materials are tested using healthy animal and healthy human vertebrae, but the application of similar tests to an osteoporotic vertebra is generally neglected because of high costs and limited availability of high quality and consistent osteoporotic vertebrae. The objective of this study is to develop an in-vitro method to decrease the mineral content of an animal vertebra utilizing decalcifying chemical agents that alters the bone mineral density and some biomechanical properties to such an extent that they biomechanically mimic the osteoporotic spine. This study was performed on 24 fresh calf lumbar vertebrae. Twelve out of these 24 vertebrae were demineralized and the others served as control. A hole was opened in the pedicles of each vertebrae and the bone mineral density was measured. Each vertebra was then placed into a beher-glass filled with hydrochloric acid decalcifier solution. The decalcifier solution was introduced through the holes in the pedicles with an infusion pump. The vertebrae were then subjected to DEXA to measure post process BMD. Pedicle screws were introduced into both pedicles of each vertebrae and pullout testing was performed at a rate of 5 mm/min. The difference of BMD measurements between pre- and post-demineralizing process were also statistically significant (p < 0.001). The difference of pullout loads between pre- and post-demineralizing process were also statistically significant (p < 0.001). The acid demineralizing process may be useful for producing a vertebra that has some biomechanical properties that are consistent with osteopenia or osteoporosis in humans.

  16. Cervical Cap

    MedlinePlus

    ... check the cervical cap's position before sex. Squat, bear down, insert your finger into your vagina and ... two days. To remove the cervical cap, squat, bear down and rotate the cap. Relax your muscles ...

  17. Cervical polyps

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001494.htm Cervical polyps To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Cervical polyps are fingerlike growths on the lower part ...

  18. Cervical Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... the place where a baby grows during pregnancy. Cervical cancer is caused by a virus called HPV. ... for a long time, or have HIV infection. Cervical cancer may not cause any symptoms at first. ...

  19. Fracture and Viscoelastic Characteristics of the Human Cervical Spine,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-01-01

    were taken from the upper cervical region, one from the central (C3- C5 ) region, and three from the lower cervical spine . b . .- -9- A noninvasive...the seven vertebrae are designated C1 through C7 . The cervical spine consists of 7 FSU’s beginning with articulation between the head (occiput) and C1...then separated by dissection at the discs into three functional vertebral segments (FVS’s), either C2-C3-C4 and C5 - VON" C6- C7 segments or C3-C4- C5

  20. Dimensional coordinate measurements: application in characterizing cervical spine motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Weilong; Li, Linan; Wang, Shibin; Wang, Zhiyong; Shi, Nianke; Xue, Yuan

    2014-06-01

    Cervical spine as a complicated part in the human body, the form of its movement is diverse. The movements of the segments of vertebrae are three-dimensional, and it is reflected in the changes of the angle between two joint and the displacement in different directions. Under normal conditions, cervical can flex, extend, lateral flex and rotate. For there is no relative motion between measuring marks fixed on one segment of cervical vertebra, the cervical vertebrae with three marked points can be seen as a body. Body's motion in space can be decomposed into translational movement and rotational movement around a base point .This study concerns the calculation of dimensional coordinate of the marked points pasted to the human body's cervical spine by an optical method. Afterward, these measures will allow the calculation of motion parameters for every spine segment. For this study, we choose a three-dimensional measurement method based on binocular stereo vision. The object with marked points is placed in front of the CCD camera. Through each shot, we will get there two parallax images taken from different cameras. According to the principle of binocular vision we can be realized three-dimensional measurements. Cameras are erected parallelly. This paper describes the layout of experimental system and a mathematical model to get the coordinates.

  1. Detection and Labeling of Vertebrae in MR Images Using Deep Learning with Clinical Annotations as Training Data.

    PubMed

    Forsberg, Daniel; Sjöblom, Erik; Sunshine, Jeffrey L

    2017-01-12

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the potential of using clinically provided spine label annotations stored in a single institution image archive as training data for deep learning-based vertebral detection and labeling pipelines. Lumbar and cervical magnetic resonance imaging cases with annotated spine labels were identified and exported from an image archive. Two separate pipelines were configured and trained for lumbar and cervical cases respectively, using the same setup with convolutional neural networks for detection and parts-based graphical models to label the vertebrae. The detection sensitivity, precision and accuracy rates ranged between 99.1-99.8, 99.6-100, and 98.8-99.8% respectively, the average localization error ranges were 1.18-1.24 and 2.38-2.60 mm for cervical and lumbar cases respectively, and with a labeling accuracy of 96.0-97.0%. Failed labeling results typically involved failed S1 detections or missed vertebrae that were not fully visible on the image. These results show that clinically annotated image data from one image archive is sufficient to train a deep learning-based pipeline for accurate detection and labeling of MR images depicting the spine. Further, these results support using deep learning to assist radiologists in their work by providing highly accurate labels that only require rapid confirmation.

  2. Kinematic Magnetic Resonance Imaging Assessment of the Degenerative Cervical Spine: Changes after Anterior Decompression and Cage Fusion.

    PubMed

    Obradov, Marina; Bénard, Menno R; Janssen, Michiel M A; Anderson, Patricia G; Heesterbeek, Petra J C; Spruit, Maarten

    2016-11-01

    Study Design A prospective cohort study. Objective Decompression and fusion of cervical vertebrae is a combined procedure that has a high success rate in relieving radicular symptoms and stabilizing or improving cervical myelopathy. However, fusion may lead to increased motion of the adjacent vertebrae and cervical deformity. Both have been postulated to lead to adjacent segment pathology (ASP). Kinematic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been increasingly used to evaluate range of motion (ROM) of the cervical spine and ASP. Our objective was to measure ASP, cervical curvature, and ROM of individual segments of the cervical spine using kinematic MRI before and 24 months after monosegmental cage fusion. Methods Eighteen patients who had single-level interbody fusion were included. ROM (using kinematic MRI) and degeneration, spinal stenosis, and cervical curvature were measured preoperatively and 24 months postoperatively. Results Using kinematic MRI, segmental motion of the cervical segments was measured with a precision of less than 3 degrees. The cervical fusion did not affect the ROM of adjacent levels. However, pre- and postoperative ROM was higher at the levels immediately adjacent to the fusion level compared with those further away. In addition, at 24 months postoperatively, the number of cases with ASP was higher at the levels immediately adjacent to fusion level. Conclusions Using kinematic MRI, ROM after spinal fusion can be measured with high precision. Kinematic MRI can be used not only in clinical practice, but also to study intervention and its effect on postoperative biomechanics and ASP of cervical vertebrae.

  3. Cervical Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... cervical cancers are caused by the human papillomavirus (HPV). Cervical cancer is the easiest gynecological cancer to prevent with ... HPV on a woman's cervix. Certain types of HPV can lead to cervical cancer. Your doctor will swab the cervix for cells. ...

  4. Cervical characteristics of Noonan syndrome.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, Jun J; Yabunaka, Tomoe; Moriyama, Keiji

    2014-04-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES A short neck and low posterior hairline are characteristics of Noonan syndrome (NS) and are hallmarks of basilar invagination/impression. However, it is seldom that NS has been directly linked with this symptom. Thus, this study aimed to investigate basilar impression in NS subjects compared with control subjects and individuals exhibiting Turner Syndrome (TS). SUBJECTS/METHODS The degree of basilar impression and vertical positional differences of the third and fourth cervical vertebrae and hyoid bone in NS (n = 9, mean age: 12.1 years), TS (n = 9, mean age: 12.1 years), and control subjects (n = 9, mean age: 12.0 years) were investigated using lateral cephalometric radiographs. Differences between the three groups were compared using the Steel-Dwass test. Vertical positional differences in the anatomical structures within each group were compared using the Wilcoxon signed-rank test accompanied by a Bonferroni-Holm correction. RESULTS The distance by which the odontoid tip extended past McGregor's line in subjects with NS was significantly greater compared with TS and control subjects. The third and fourth cervical vertebrae were positioned significantly superiorly in subjects with NS compared with TS and control subjects and, in NS, were also significantly superior to the hyoid bone. There was no difference in the position of the hyoid bone itself between the groups. CONCLUSION/IMPLICATION These results suggest that basilar impression may be a frequently found symptom of NS.

  5. The role of zygapophysial joint orientation and uncinate processes in controlling motion in the cervical spine.

    PubMed Central

    Milne, N

    1991-01-01

    Five linear and 2 angular measurements on each of C3 to T1 in a sample of 67 human skeletons were used to examine 3 hypotheses about the function of uncinate processes and zygapophysial joints in the cervical vertebral column. The material was sexed and each vertebra was rated for pathological changes. The effects of gender and pathology on the measures was assessed. The upper 4 vertebrae studied had the largest disc-facet angles, supporting the view that the articular facet orientation is responsible for the greater intervertebral disc translation occurring during sagittal motion in the neck. These upper 4 vertebrae also have the largest uncinate processes, and this observation supports the hypothesis that uncinate processes function to guide and control the anteroposterior translation which occurs during sagittal motion. The 3rd hypothesis that uncinate processes function to facilitate axial rotation is not supported by the recorded interfacet angles which appear to promote axial rotation only in the lower 4 vertebrae. Two further hypothesis are suggested. First, that the interfacet angle is responsible for controlling how strictly lateral flexion and axial rotation are coupled in cervical motion segments. Second, the suggestion is made that the high frequency of pathological change seen at the disc margins of the middle cervical vertebrae may be a result of the unusual combination of disc-facet and interfacet angles permitting more degrees of freedom than the cervical intervertebral discs can withstand. Images Fig. 3 Fig. 6 PMID:1810926

  6. Instrumental fixation of the cervical spine with Ti-mesh prosthesis: a preliminary report.

    PubMed

    Kolasa, P; Boroński, K

    2000-06-30

    This article describes the surgical treatment of the fractured body of a cervical vertebra, using the Codman Ti-mesh prosthesis according to the Harms method. This male patient had suffered a multiple fracture of the C6 cervical body; he required decompression of the nerve elements of the vertebral canal by C6 corporectomy and C5-C7 intervertebral fixation. A Ti-mesh prosthesis was filled with bone fragments from the fractured vertebra. A Caspar plate manufactured by Codman was used for C5-C7 intervertebral fixation. The chief advantages of the method applied here include shortening the duration of surgery and providing good, quick fixation.

  7. Readability of cervical spine imaging: digital versus film/screen radiographs.

    PubMed

    Kreipke, D L; Silver, D I; Tarver, R D; Braunstein, E M

    1990-01-01

    In 109 trauma patients, both film/screen and digital lateral cervical spine radiographs were obtained. These films were compared for adequate visualization ("readability") of bone, soft tissue, and airway, and lowest visualized cervical vertebra. With viewbox alone, digital adequately demonstrated bone, soft tissue, and airway more often than film/screen. With a hotlight, there was no significant difference between digital and film/screen in adequately demonstrating bone, but for soft tissue and airway definition, digital was significantly better. There was less interobserver and intraobserver variation on digital than in film/screen. There was no significant difference in lowest vertebra identified.

  8. TAPPING PILOT HOLE: MECHANICAL ANALYSIS OF SHEEP VERTEBRA AND THE ARTIFICIAL BONE MODEL

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Patrícia; Rosa, Rodrigo César; Shimano, Antonio Carlos; de Paula, Francisco José Albuquerque; Volpon, José Batista; Defino, Helton Luiz Aparecido

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To determine the effect of pilot hole tapping, together with other variables such as pilot hole diameter, in relation to inner screw diameter and preparation method, on the insertion torque and pullout resistance of the screws used for anterior fixation of the cervical spine. Method: Twenty polyurethane test bodies and 30 thoracic vertebrae (T1-T5) were tested. Four holes were drilled into each test body: two of them with a diameter of 2.0 mm and two with a diameter of 2.5 mm. The holes were drilled using a bit or probe, according to the experimental group. Each experimental group was divided into two equal subgroups, with and without pilot hole tapping. In all, there were eight experimental groups: four using polyurethane specimens and four using sheep vertebrae. Cortical screws of 3.5 mm in outer diameter and 14 mm in length were inserted into the pilot holes. The insertion torque was measured during screw implantation and mechanical pullout tests were then performed using an Emic® universal testing machine, with the Tesc 3.13 software, load cells of 1000 N, force application rate of 0.2 mm/min, preloading of 5 N and accommodation time of 10 seconds. The property evaluated in the mechanical tests was the maximum pullout force. Results and Conclusion: Pilot hole tapping significantly decreased the insertion torque and pullout force of the screws in all the experimental groups. PMID:27022555

  9. Spondylolisthesis Accompanying Bilateral Pedicle Stress Fracture at Two Vertebrae

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyeun Sung; Lee, Won Tae

    2012-01-01

    There has been no report of bilateral pedicle stress fractures involving two vertebrae. The authors describe a unique case of spondylolisthesis accompanying a bilateral pedicle stress fracture involving two vertebrae. De novo development of spondylolisthesis at the L5-S1 vertebrae accompanying a bilateral pedicle stress fracture at L4 and L5 was observed in a 70-year-old woman. The patient's medical history was unremarkable and she did not have any predisposing factors except severe osteoporosis. Interbody fusion with bone cement augmented screw fixation was performed. Surgical treatment resulted in good pain management and improved functional recovery. PMID:22949973

  10. Preoperative Embolization of Cervical Spine Tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Vetter, Sylvia C.; Strecker, Ernst-Peter; Ackermann, Ludwig W.; Harms, Juergen

    1997-09-15

    Purpose: To assess the technical success rate, complications, and effect on intraoperative blood loss of preoperative transarterial embolization of cervical spine tumors. Methods: A retrospective analysis was performed on 38 patients with tumors of the cervical spine; 69 vertebrae were affected. Polyvinyl alcohol particles, coils, gelfoam particles, either alone or in combination, were used for preoperative tumor embolization. After embolization a total of 57 corporectomies with titanium basket implantation were performed. Results: In 36 of 38 patients, complete (n= 27) or partial (n= 9) embolization was achieved. In 23 patients one vertebral artery was completely occluded by coil placement, and in one patient the ipsilateral internal and external carotid arteries were occluded in addition. No neurological complications could be directly related to the embolization, but two postoperative brain stem infarctions occurred. The mean intraoperative blood loss was 2.4 L. Conclusion: Transarterial embolization of cervical spine tumors is a safe and effective procedure to facilitate extensive surgery.

  11. Quantitative Assessment of Cervical Vertebral Maturation Using Cone Beam Computed Tomography in Korean Girls

    PubMed Central

    Byun, Bo-Ram; Kim, Yong-Il; Maki, Koutaro; Son, Woo-Sung

    2015-01-01

    This study was aimed to examine the correlation between skeletal maturation status and parameters from the odontoid process/body of the second vertebra and the bodies of third and fourth cervical vertebrae and simultaneously build multiple regression models to be able to estimate skeletal maturation status in Korean girls. Hand-wrist radiographs and cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) images were obtained from 74 Korean girls (6–18 years of age). CBCT-generated cervical vertebral maturation (CVM) was used to demarcate the odontoid process and the body of the second cervical vertebra, based on the dentocentral synchondrosis. Correlation coefficient analysis and multiple linear regression analysis were used for each parameter of the cervical vertebrae (P < 0.05). Forty-seven of 64 parameters from CBCT-generated CVM (independent variables) exhibited statistically significant correlations (P < 0.05). The multiple regression model with the greatest R2 had six parameters (PH2/W2, UW2/W2, (OH+AH2)/LW2, UW3/LW3, D3, and H4/W4) as independent variables with a variance inflation factor (VIF) of <2. CBCT-generated CVM was able to include parameters from the second cervical vertebral body and odontoid process, respectively, for the multiple regression models. This suggests that quantitative analysis might be used to estimate skeletal maturation status. PMID:25878721

  12. Level Set Segmentation of Lumbar Vertebrae Using Appearance Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fritscher, Karl; Leber, Stefan; Schmölz, Werner; Schubert, Rainer

    For the planning of surgical interventions of the spine exact knowledge about 3D shape and the local bone quality of vertebrae are of great importance in order to estimate the anchorage strength of screws or implants. As a prerequisite for quantitative analysis a method for objective and therefore automated segmentation of vertebrae is needed. In this paper a framework for the automatic segmentation of vertebrae using 3D appearance models in a level set framework is presented. In this framework model information as well as gradient information and probabilities of pixel intensities at object edges in the unseen image are used. The method is tested on 29 lumbar vertebrae leading to accurate results, which can be useful for surgical planning and further analysis of the local bone quality.

  13. Cervical Angina

    PubMed Central

    Sussman, Walter I.; Makovitch, Steven A.; Merchant, Shabbir Hussain I.

    2015-01-01

    Cervical angina has been widely reported as a cause of chest pain but remains underrecognized. This series demonstrates the varied clinical presentation of patients with cervical angina, the delay in diagnosis, and the extensive cardiac examinations patients with this condition typically undergo prior to a definitive diagnosis. Recognition of this condition in patients with acute chest pain requires a high index of suspicion and an awareness of the common presenting features and clinical findings of cervical angina. PMID:25553225

  14. Sagittal alignment of the cervical spine after neck injury.

    PubMed

    Beltsios, Michail; Savvidou, Olga; Mitsiokapa, Evanthia A; Mavrogenis, Andreas F; Kaspiris, Angelos; Efstathopoulos, Nikolaos; Papagelopoulos, Panayiotis J

    2013-07-01

    The normal sagittal alignment of the cervical spine is lordotic and is affected by the posture of the head and neck. The question of whether loss of cervical lordosis is the result of muscle spasm after injury or a normal variation, and the clinical significance of such changes in sagittal profile of the cervical spine has been an issue of several studies. The purpose of this paper is to study the incidence of normal cervical lordosis and its changes after neck injury compared to the healthy population. We studied the lateral radiographs of the cervical spine of 60 patients with neck injury compared to 100 patients without a neck injury. Lateral radiographs were obtained in the standing or sitting position, and the curvature of the cervical spine was measured using the angle formed between the inferior end plates of the C2 and C7 vertebrae. In the patients without neck injury, lordotic and straight cervical spine sagittal alignment was observed in 36.5% each, double curvature in 17%, and kyphotic in 10%. In the patients with neck injury, lordotic sagittal alignment was observed in 36%, straight in 34%, double curvature in 26% and kyphotic in 4%. No significant difference between the two groups regarding all types of sagittal alignment of the cervical spine was found (p > 0.100). The alterations in normal cervical lordosis in patients with neck injury must be considered coincidental. These alterations should not be associated with muscle spasm caused by neck pain.

  15. The Effect of the Cervical Orthosis on Swallowing Physiology and Cervical Spine Motion During Swallowing.

    PubMed

    Mekata, Kojiro; Takigawa, Tomoyuki; Matsubayashi, Jun; Toda, Kazukiyo; Hasegawa, Yasuhiro; Ito, Yasuo

    2016-02-01

    Cervical orthosis is used to immobilize the neck in various disorders such as trauma and post-operation. However, it is still uncertain how cervical orthosis restricts the degree of movement of the cervical spine during swallowing and how they affect swallowing physiology. The purpose of this study was to evaluate these issues using the Philadelphia(®) Collar. We conducted videofluorography of swallowing in 39 healthy subjects (23 men, 16 women; mean age of 34.3 years) with and without cervical orthosis. To compare the two conditions regarding the cervical spine motion, we determined the angular and positional changes of the occipital bone (C0) and each cervical vertebra (C1-C7) from the oral phase to the pharyngeal phase. Similarly, to compare swallowing physiology, we assessed the start and end times and the durations of soft palate elevation, rapid hyoid anterosuperior movement, epiglottis inversion, closure of the laryngeal vestibule, and pharyngoesophageal segment (PES) opening. Finally, we compared the transit times of contrast agent in the two conditions. The respective extensions of C1, C2, and C3 were 0.31°, 0.07°, and 0.05° (mean) with cervical orthosis, and the respective flexions of C1, C2, and C3 were 0.98°, 1.42°, and 0.85° (mean) without. These results suggested that cervical orthosis restricted the flexion of C1-C3. Analysis of swallowing physiology revealed that the average durations of hyoid anterosuperior elevation, epiglottic inversion, and PES opening were prolonged by 0.09, 0.19, and 0.05 s, respectively. In conclusion, the cervical orthosis restricted the movement of the cervical spine during swallowing and changed swallowing physiology.

  16. Cervical chondrosarcoma- rare malignancy: a case report.

    PubMed

    Merchant, Shuaib; Mohiyuddin, S M Azeem; Rudrappa, Satish; Deo, R P; A, Sagayaraj; Menon, Lakshmi R

    2014-12-01

    To highlight an uncommon bone malignancy, which presented to our institute, as a neck swelling in the supraclavicular region. A 30 year old man presented with history of swelling on the left side of neck since 1 year and numbness of left upper limb since 6 months. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Cervical spine & MR Angiography showed a 7.4 × 4.6 cm expansile lesion involving transverse process of C5-C7 vertebrae. As the tumour was found to be deep to the phrenic nerve & brachial plexus, a dual approach was used, anteriorly via neck incision and posteriorly via the spine. The tumour was resected & iliac crest grafted along with stabilization of the cervical spine. Patient is disease free and the cervical spine stabilized with normal movements at two and half years follow up. We need to consider tumour arising from the vertebra as a differential diagnosis for any deep seated hard neck swelling in the supraclavicular region. Even low grade malignancy of this region when resected en-bloc will have a good prognosis.

  17. Extraordinary incidence of cervical ribs indicates vulnerable condition in Late Pleistocene mammoths.

    PubMed

    Reumer, Jelle W F; Ten Broek, Clara M A; Galis, Frietson

    2014-01-01

    The number of cervical vertebrae in mammals is highly conserved at seven. We have shown that changes of this number are selected against due to a coupling with major congenital abnormalities (pleiotropic effects). Here we show that the incidence of abnormal cervical vertebral numbers in Late Pleistocene mammoths from the North Sea is high (33.3%) and approximately 10 times higher than that of extant elephants (3.6%). Abnormal numbers were due to the presence of large cervical ribs on the seventh vertebra, which we deduced from the presence of rib articulation facets on sixth (posterior side) and seventh (anterior side) cervical vertebrae. The incidence of abnormal cervical vertebral numbers in mammoths appears to be much higher than in other mammalian species, apart from exceptional sloths, manatees and dugongs and indicates a vulnerable condition. We argue that the increased incidence of cervical ribs in mammoths is probably caused by inbreeding and adverse conditions that impact early pregnancies in declining populations close to extinction in the Late Pleistocene.

  18. Extraordinary incidence of cervical ribs indicates vulnerable condition in Late Pleistocene mammoths

    PubMed Central

    Reumer, Jelle W.F.; ten Broek, Clara M.A.

    2014-01-01

    The number of cervical vertebrae in mammals is highly conserved at seven. We have shown that changes of this number are selected against due to a coupling with major congenital abnormalities (pleiotropic effects). Here we show that the incidence of abnormal cervical vertebral numbers in Late Pleistocene mammoths from the North Sea is high (33.3%) and approximately 10 times higher than that of extant elephants (3.6%). Abnormal numbers were due to the presence of large cervical ribs on the seventh vertebra, which we deduced from the presence of rib articulation facets on sixth (posterior side) and seventh (anterior side) cervical vertebrae. The incidence of abnormal cervical vertebral numbers in mammoths appears to be much higher than in other mammalian species, apart from exceptional sloths, manatees and dugongs and indicates a vulnerable condition. We argue that the increased incidence of cervical ribs in mammoths is probably caused by inbreeding and adverse conditions that impact early pregnancies in declining populations close to extinction in the Late Pleistocene. PMID:24711969

  19. Klippel-Feil syndrome associated with congenital cervical dislocation: report of an autopsy case.

    PubMed

    Shintaku, Masayuki; Wada, Kyosuke; Koyama, Takashi; Kohno, Hiroaki; Sakamoto, Takeshi; Hida, Shinya

    2013-01-01

    Klippel-Feil syndrome is an uncommon congenital anomaly that is characterized by abnormal fusion of the cervical vertebrae and occasionally accompanied by various anomalies of other bones and internal organs. We report the autopsy case of a 5-year-old girl with this syndrome ssociated with congenital cervical dislocation, with special reference to the pathological findings of the vertebral column and spinal cord. Principal anomalies of the cranio-spinal axis were as follows: partial defect of the clivus, scoliosis, hypoplasia of the whole cervical vertebrae, anterior dislocation of C7 with S-shaped deformity of the spinal canal, fusion of the spinous processes of the cervical and thoracic vertebrae, fusion of the vertebral bodies of C6 and C7 with collapse of C7, and spina bifida occulta of L5 and S1. In addition to these skeletal anomalies, subarachnoid vascular malformation in the medulla oblongata, a bronchogenic cyst in the posterior mediastinum, anomalous lobation of the lungs, and the mobile cecum were found at autopsy. The cervical cord showed an increase of the antero-posterior diameter, multifocal spongy changes of the white matter, and partial branching or duplication of the central canal. The brain showed features of anoxic encephalopathy. The partial defect of the clivus, C7 dislocation, and various lesions of the medulla oblongata and cervical cord were interpreted as integral components of, or lesions closely associated with, Klippel-Feil syndrome.

  20. Cervical pneumatocyst.

    PubMed

    Hoover, Jason M; Wenger, Doris E; Eckel, Laurence J; Krauss, William E

    2011-09-01

    The authors present the case of a 56-year-old right hand-dominant woman who was referred for chronic neck pain and a second opinion regarding a cervical lesion. The patient's pain was localized to the subaxial spine in the midline. She reported a subjective sense of intermittent left arm weakness manifesting as difficulty manipulating small objects with her hands and fingers. She also reported paresthesias and numbness in the left hand. Physical and neurological examinations demonstrated no abnormal findings except for a positive Tinel sign over the left median nerve at the wrist. Electromyography demonstrated bilateral carpal tunnel syndrome with no cervical radiculopathy. Cervical spine imaging demonstrated multilevel degenerative disc disease and a pneumatocyst of the C-5 vertebral body. The alignment of the cervical spine was normal. A review of the patient's cervical imaging studies obtained in 1995, 2007, 2008, and 2010 demonstrated that the pneumatocyst was not present in 1995 but was present in 2007. The lesion had not changed in appearance since 2007. At an outside institution, multilevel fusion of the cervical spine was recommended to treat the pneumatocyst prior to evaluation at the authors' institution. The authors, however, did not think that the pneumatocyst was the cause of the patient's neck pain, and cervical pneumatocysts typically have a benign course. As such, the authors recommended conservative management and repeated MR imaging in 6 months. Splinting was used to treat the patient's carpal tunnel syndrome.

  1. Automatic labeling and segmentation of vertebrae in CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasoulian, Abtin; Rohling, Robert N.; Abolmaesumi, Purang

    2014-03-01

    Labeling and segmentation of the spinal column from CT images is a pre-processing step for a range of image- guided interventions. State-of-the art techniques have focused either on image feature extraction or template matching for labeling of the vertebrae followed by segmentation of each vertebra. Recently, statistical multi- object models have been introduced to extract common statistical characteristics among several anatomies. In particular, we have created models for segmentation of the lumbar spine which are robust, accurate, and computationally tractable. In this paper, we reconstruct a statistical multi-vertebrae pose+shape model and utilize it in a novel framework for labeling and segmentation of the vertebra in a CT image. We validate our technique in terms of accuracy of the labeling and segmentation of CT images acquired from 56 subjects. The method correctly labels all vertebrae in 70% of patients and is only one level off for the remaining 30%. The mean distance error achieved for the segmentation is 2.1 +/- 0.7 mm.

  2. Automatic localization of vertebrae based on convolutional neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Wei; Yang, Feng; Mu, Wei; Yang, Caiyun; Yang, Xin; Tian, Jie

    2015-03-01

    Localization of the vertebrae is of importance in many medical applications. For example, the vertebrae can serve as the landmarks in image registration. They can also provide a reference coordinate system to facilitate the localization of other organs in the chest. In this paper, we propose a new vertebrae localization method using convolutional neural networks (CNN). The main advantage of the proposed method is the removal of hand-crafted features. We construct two training sets to train two CNNs that share the same architecture. One is used to distinguish the vertebrae from other tissues in the chest, and the other is aimed at detecting the centers of the vertebrae. The architecture contains two convolutional layers, both of which are followed by a max-pooling layer. Then the output feature vector from the maxpooling layer is fed into a multilayer perceptron (MLP) classifier which has one hidden layer. Experiments were performed on ten chest CT images. We used leave-one-out strategy to train and test the proposed method. Quantitative comparison between the predict centers and ground truth shows that our convolutional neural networks can achieve promising localization accuracy without hand-crafted features.

  3. An improved level set method for vertebra CT image segmentation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Clinical diagnosis and therapy for the lumbar disc herniation requires accurate vertebra segmentation. The complex anatomical structure and the degenerative deformations of the vertebrae makes its segmentation challenging. Methods An improved level set method, namely edge- and region-based level set method (ERBLS), is proposed for vertebra CT images segmentation. By considering the gradient information and local region characteristics of images, the proposed model can efficiently segment images with intensity inhomogeneity and blurry or discontinuous boundaries. To reduce the dependency on manual initialization in many active contour models and for an automatic segmentation, a simple initialization method for the level set function is built, which utilizes the Otsu threshold. In addition, the need of the costly re-initialization procedure is completely eliminated. Results Experimental results on both synthetic and real images demonstrated that the proposed ERBLS model is very robust and efficient. Compared with the well-known local binary fitting (LBF) model, our method is much more computationally efficient and much less sensitive to the initial contour. The proposed method has also applied to 56 patient data sets and produced very promising results. Conclusions An improved level set method suitable for vertebra CT images segmentation is proposed. It has the flexibility of segmenting the vertebra CT images with blurry or discontinuous edges, internal inhomogeneity and no need of re-initialization. PMID:23714300

  4. Cervical Cancer Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... cases of cervical cancer and the number of deaths due to cervical cancer since 1950. Cervical dysplasia ... for cervical cancer helps decrease the number of deaths from the disease. Regular screening of women between ...

  5. Cervical Stenosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Interest (Quiz) Breast Cancer (Video) Overview of the Female Reproductive System (News) Study: Plenty of IV Fluids May Make Childbirth Safer, Easier (News) Zejula Approved for Certain Female Cancers Additional Content Medical News Cervical Stenosis By S. ...

  6. Cervical Myomas

    MedlinePlus

    ... Interest (Quiz) Breast Cancer (Video) Overview of the Female Reproductive System (News) Study: Plenty of IV Fluids May Make Childbirth Safer, Easier (News) Zejula Approved for Certain Female Cancers Additional Content Medical News Cervical Myomas By S. ...

  7. Cervical Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pap test results are not normal. • Get the HPV vaccine. It protects against the types of HPV that ... for cervical cancer. To learn more about the HPV vaccine visit www. cdc. gov/ hpv . • D on’t ...

  8. Cervical dysplasia

    MedlinePlus

    ... by your provider. Make sure to get the HPV vaccine when it is offered to you. This vaccine ... Ask your provider about the HPV vaccine . Girls who receive this ... their chance of getting cervical cancer. You can reduce your ...

  9. Cervical cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... factors for cervical cancer include: Not getting the HPV vaccine Being economically disadvantaged Having a mother who took ... be prevented by doing the following: Get the HPV vaccine . The vaccine prevents most types of HPV infection ...

  10. Cervical spondylosis

    MedlinePlus

    Cervical osteoarthritis; Arthritis - neck; Neck arthritis; Chronic neck pain; Degenerative disk disease ... nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory medicines (NSAIDs) for long-term pain control. Opioids may be prescribed if the pain is severe ...

  11. Mechanisms of cervical spine injuries for non-fatal motorcycle road crash.

    PubMed

    Ooi, S S; Wong, S V; Radin Umar, R S; Azhar, A A; Yeap, J S; Megat Ahmad, M M H

    2004-06-01

    Cervical spine injuries such as subluxation and fracture dislocation have long been known to result in severe consequences, as well as the trauma management itself. The injury to the region has been identified as one of the major causes of death in Malaysian motorcyclists involved in road crashes, besides head and chest injuries (Pang, 1999). Despite this, cervical spine injury in motorcyclists is not a well-studied injury, unlike the whiplash injury in motorcar accidents. The present study is a retrospective study on the mechanisms of injury in cervical spine sustained by Malaysian motorcyclists, who were involved in road crash using an established mechanistic classification system. This will serve as an initial step to look at the cervical injuries pattern. The information obtained gives engineer ideas to facilitate design and safety features to reduce injuries. All cervical spine injured motorcyclists admitted to Hospital Kuala Lumpur between January 1, 2000 and December 31, 2001 were included in the present study. Based on the medical notes and radiological investigations (X-rays, CT and MRI scans), the mechanisms of injuries were formulated using the injury mechanics classification. The result shows that flexion of the cervical vertebrae is the most common vertebral kinematics in causing injury to motorcyclists. This indicates that the cervical vertebrae sustained a high-energy loading at flexion movement in road crash, and exceeded its tolerance level. The high frequency of injury at the C5 vertebra, C6 vertebra and C5-C6 intervertebral space are recorded. Classification based on the Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS) is made to give a view on injury severity, 9.1% of the study samples have been classified as AIS code 1, 51.5% with AIS 2 and 21.2% with AIS 3.

  12. Association between bicortical screw fixation at upper instrumented vertebra and risk for upper instrumented vertebra fracture.

    PubMed

    Park, Young-Seop; Hyun, Seung-Jae; Choi, Ho Yong; Kim, Ki-Jeong; Jahng, Tae-Ahn

    2017-03-03

    OBJECTIVE The aim of this study was to investigate the risk of upper instrumented vertebra (UIV) fractures associated with UIV screw fixation (unicortical vs bicortical) and polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) augmentation after adult spinal deformity surgery. METHODS A single-center, single-surgeon consecutive series of adult patients who underwent lumbar fusion for ≥ 4 levels (that is, the lower instrumented vertebra at the sacrum or pelvis and the UIV of the thoracolumbar spine [T9-L2]) were retrospectively reviewed. Age, sex, follow-up duration, sagittal UIV angle immediately postoperatively including several balance-related parameters (lumbar lordosis [LL], pelvic incidence, and sagittal vertical axis), bone mineral density, UIV screw fixation type, UIV PMMA augmentation, and UIV fracture were evaluated. Patients were divided into 3 groups: Group U, 15 patients with unicortical screw fixation at the UIV; Group P, 16 with bicortical screw fixation and PMMA augmentation at the UIV; and Group B, 21 with bicortical screw fixation without PMMA augmentation at the UIV. RESULTS The mean number of levels fused was 6.5 ± 2.5, 7.5 ± 2.5, and 6.5 ± 2.5; the median age was 50 ± 29, 72 ± 6, and 59 ± 24 years; and the mean follow-up was 31.5 ± 23.5, 13 ± 6, and 24 ± 17.5 months in Groups U, P, and B, respectively (p > 0.05). There were no significant differences in balance-related parameters (LL, sagittal vertical axis, pelvic incidence-LL, and so on) among the groups. UIV fracture rates in Groups U (0%), P (31.3%), and B (42.9%) increased in sequence by group (p = 0.006). UIV bicortical screw fixation increased the risk for UIV fracture (OR 5.39; p = 0.02). CONCLUSIONS Bicortical screw fixation at the UIV is a major risk factor for early UIV compression fracture, regardless of whether a thoracolumbosacral orthosis is used. To reduce the proximal junctional failure, unicortical screw fixation at the UIV is essential in adult spinal deformity correction surgery.

  13. Get Tested for Cervical Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Print This Topic En español Get Tested for Cervical Cancer Browse Sections The Basics Overview Cervical Cancer ... Cervical Cancer 1 of 5 sections The Basics: Cervical Cancer What is cervical cancer? Cervical cancer is ...

  14. Surgical management of high cervical disc prolapse associated with basilar invagination--two case reports.

    PubMed

    Goel, Atul; Phalke, Umesh; Cacciola, Francesco; Muzumdar, Dattatraya

    2004-03-01

    C3-4 cervical disc prolapse was associated with basilar invagination and short neck in a 21-year-old man and additionally with an extensive Klippel-Feil abnormality and fusion of multiple cervical vertebrae in a 32-year-old man. The transoral surgical route was adopted for cervical discectomy in the latter case and an additional odontoidectomy in the former case. Interbody plate and screw fixation was carried out in the patient with Klippel-Feil abnormality. Both the patients were relieved of symptoms and remained asymptomatic at follow up. Simultaneous fixation procedure is not mandatory after transoral surgery in patients with basilar invagination.

  15. Vertebral body pneumatocyst in the cervical spine and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Coşar, Murat; Eser, Olcay; Aslan, Adem; Korkmaz, Serhat; Boyaci, Gazi; Değirmenci, Bumin; Albayrak, Ramazan

    2008-04-01

    A pneumatocyst in the cervical spine is extremely rare and to our knowledge only a few reports have been published in the English literature. Although the etiology and natural course of vertebral body pneumatocyst is unclear, nitrogen gas accumulation is claimed. A 65-year-old-man was admitted to the emergency department with neck pain and numbness and incapacity in his both hands and fingers. The radiological images revealed a vertebral located pneumatocyst in the C4 cervical vertebra. In this report, we present a case of cervical pneumatocyst located in the C4 vertebral body. The clinical and radiological features and natural course of the pneumatocyst were evaluated.

  16. Bone density assessment for evaluation of gender differences in cervical vertebral maturation: A computed tomography study

    PubMed Central

    Usha, K.; Baskaranarayanan, Balashanmugam; Nagarajan, D.; Selvarani, R.; Vijjaykanth, M.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The cervical vertebral maturation (CVM) method is a vital tool for assessing the biological maturation of the orthodontic patient to evaluate the amount of mandibular bone growth left. Aim: To assess and visualize the cervical vertebral morphology (bone density) of orthodontic patients of the age group 9,16,27 years. Material and Methods: Twenty four subjects with age group of 9,16,27 who were randomly selected and subjected to 3d tomographic study to estimate the biological age of the orthodontic patients by analyzing c1 c2 and c3 vertebrae. Result: The results showed that bone density of males is lesser than females in 9 and 16 years, whereas they have more bone density than females in 27 years. Conclusion: The study provides qualitative method of assessing the biological age of the patient by using images of cervical vertebrae by three dimensional approach. Hence it can be useful for orthodontic diagnosis and treatment plan. PMID:27829750

  17. Automated identification of spinal cord and vertebras on sagittal MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Chuan; Chan, Heang-Ping; Dong, Qian; He, Bo; Wei, Jun; Hadjiiski, Lubomir M.; Couriel, Daniel

    2014-03-01

    We are developing an automated method for the identification of the spinal cord and the vertebras on spinal MR images, which is an essential step for computerized analysis of bone marrow diseases. The spinal cord segment was first enhanced by a newly developed hierarchical multiscale tubular (HMT) filter that utilizes the complementary hyper- and hypo- intensities in the T1-weighted (T1W) and STIR MRI sequences. An Expectation-Maximization (EM) analysis method was then applied to the enhanced tubular structures to extract candidates of the spinal cord. The spinal cord was finally identified by a maximum-likelihood registration method by analysis of the features extracted from the candidate objects in the two MRI sequences. Using the identified spinal cord as a reference, the vertebras were localized based on the intervertebral disc locations extracted by another HMT filter applied to the T1W images. In this study, 5 and 30 MRI scans from 35 patients who were diagnosed with multiple myeloma disease were collected retrospectively with IRB approval as training and test set, respectively. The vertebras manually outlined by a radiologist were used as reference standard. A total of 422 vertebras were marked in the 30 test cases. For the 30 test cases, 100% (30/30) of the spinal cords were correctly segmented with 4 false positives (FPs) mistakenly identified on the back muscles in 4 scans. A sensitivity of 95.0% (401/422) was achieved for the identification of vertebras, and 5 FPs were marked in 4 scans with an average FP rate of 0.17 FPs/scan.

  18. Computer Based Assessment of Cervical Vertebral Maturation Stages Using Digital Lateral Cephalograms

    PubMed Central

    Dzemidzic, Vildana; Sokic, Emir; Tiro, Alisa; Nakas, Enita

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This study was aimed to investigate the reliability of a computer application for assessment of the stages of cervical vertebra maturation in order to determine the stage of skeletal maturity. Material and methods: For this study, digital lateral cephalograms of 99 subjects (52 females and 47 males) were examined. The following selection criteria were used during the sample composition: age between 9 and 16 years, absence of anomalies of the vertebrae, good general health, no history of trauma at the cervical region. Subjects with lateral cephalograms of low quality were excluded from the study. For the purpose of this study a computer application Cephalometar HF V1 was developed. This application was used to mark the contours of the second, third and fourth cervical vertebrae on the digital lateral cephalograms, which enabled a computer to determine the stage of cervical vertebral maturation. The assessment of the stages of cervical vertebral maturation was carried out by an experienced orthodontist. The assessment was conducted according to the principles of the method proposed by authors Hassel and Farman. The degree of the agreement between the computer application and the researcher was analyzed using by statistical Cohen Kappa test. Results: The results of this study showed the agreement between the computer assessment and the researcher assessment of the cervical vertebral maturation stages, where the value of the Cohen Kappa coefficient was 0.985. Conclusion: The computer application Cephalometar HF V1 proved to be a reliable method for assessing the stages of cervical vertebral maturation. This program could help the orthodontists to identify the stage of cervical vertebral maturation when planning the orthodontic treatment for the patients with skeletal disharmonies. PMID:26862247

  19. Percutaneous Vertebroplasty Relieves Pain in Cervical Spine Metastases

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Li; Jia, Pu; Li, Jinjun; Chen, Hao; Dong, Yipeng; Feng, Fei; Yang, He; Chen, Mengmeng

    2017-01-01

    Percutaneous vertebroplasty (PVP) has been shown to release spinal pain and stabilize the vertebral body. PVP is suggested as an alternative treatment in spinal metastasis. Although cervical metastases is less prevalent than thoracic and lumbar spine, PVP procedure in cervical vertebrae remains technical challenging. We retrospectively analyzed the data from patients (n = 9) who underwent PVP using anterolateral approach to treat severe neck pain and restricted cervical mobility from metastatic disease. Patients were rated using modified Tokuhashi score and Tomita score before the procedure. Visual analog scale (VAS), neck disability index (NDI), analgesic use, and imaging (X-ray or CT) were evaluated before PVP and 3 days, 3 months, and 6 months after PVP. All patients were in late stage of cancer evaluated using modified Tokuhashi and Tomita score. The cement leakage rate was 63.6% (14 of the 22 vertebrae) with no severe complications. VAS, NDI, and analgesic use were significantly decreased 3 days after the procedure and remained at low level until 6 months of follow-up. Our result suggested PVP effectively released the pain from patients with cervical metastasis. The results warrant further clinical investigation. PMID:28239257

  20. Adjacent Segment Pathology after Anterior Cervical Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Jae Yoon; Park, Jong-Beom; Seo, Hyoung-Yeon

    2016-01-01

    Anterior cervical fusion has become a standard of care for numerous pathologic conditions of the cervical spine. However, subsequent development of clinically significant disc disease at levels adjacent to fused discs is a serious long-term complication of this procedure. As more patients live longer after surgery, it is foreseeable that adjacent segment pathology (ASP) will develop in increasing numbers of patients. Also, ASP has been studied more intensively with the recent popularity of motion preservation technologies like total disc arthroplasty. The true nature and scope of ASP remains poorly understood. The etiology of ASP is most likely multifactorial. Various factors including altered biomechanical stresses, surgical disruption of soft tissue and the natural history of cervical disc disease contribute to the development of ASP. General factors associated with disc degeneration including gender, age, smoking and sports may play a role in the development of ASP. Postoperative sagittal alignment and type of surgery are also considered potential causes of ASP. Therefore, a spine surgeon must be particularly careful to avoid unnecessary disruption of the musculoligamentous structures, reduced risk of direct injury to the disc during dissection and maintain a safe margin between the plate edge and adjacent vertebrae during anterior cervical fusion. PMID:27340541

  1. METHANOL EXPOSURE DURING GASTRULATION CAUSES HOLOPROSENCEPHALY, FACIAL DYSGENESIS AND CERVICAL VERTEBRAL MALFORMATIONS IN C57BL/6J MICE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exposure of pregnant CD-1 mice to methanol during the period of gastrulation results in exencephaly, cleft palate, and cervical vertebra malformations (Rogers and Mole, 1997, Teratology 55, 364). C57BL/6J mice are sensitive to the teratogenicity of ethanol; fetuses of this strai...

  2. Multirigid registration of MR and CT images of the cervical spine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Yangqiu; Haynor, David R.

    2004-05-01

    We present our work on fusion of MR and CT images of the cervical spine. To achieve the required registration accuracy of approximately 1mm, the spine is treated as a collection of rigid vertebrae, and a separate rigid body transformation applied to each (Hawkes). This in turn requires segmentation of the CT datasets into separate vertebral images, which is difficult because the narrow planes separating adjacent vertebrae are parallel to the axial plane of the CT scans. We solve this problem by evolving all the vertebral contours simultaneously using a level set method, and use contour competition to estimate the position of the vertebral edges when a clean separation between adjacent vertebrae is not seen. Contour competition is based in turn on the vertical scan principle: no part of a given vertebra is vertically below any part of an inferior vertebra. Once segmentation is complete, the individual rigid body transforms are then estimated using mutual information maximization, and the CT images of the vertebrae superimposed on the MR scans. The resultant fused images contain the bony detail of CT and the soft tissue discrimination of MR and appear to be diagnostically equivalent, or superior, to CT myelograms. A formal test of these conclusions is planned for the next phase of our work.

  3. Evaluation of biomechanical and histological features of vertebrae following vertebroplasty using hydroxyapatite blocks.

    PubMed

    Oshima, Masashi; Matsuzaki, Hiromi; Tokuhashi, Yasuaki; Okawa, Akihiro

    2010-02-01

    Vertebroplasty was performed using hydroxyapatite blocks to examine the course of compressive strength and histological features in a dog model. The vertebral fracture model was prepared by punching a hole in the center of the vertebra and at 4 sites around the vertebra (5 holes in total) from the front side of the vertebra using an air drill and hollowing the holes. Measurements were made on healthy vertebrae, vertebrae from the vertebral fracture model, vertebrae removed from animals immediately after vertebroplasty, vertebrae collected 1 and 2 months after vertebroplasty, and vertebrae untreated for 1 month after vertebral fracture. Histological examinations were also performed 1 and 2 weeks and 1 and 2 months after vertebroplasty with hydroxyapatite blocks. The strength of vertebrae in the fracture model immediately after vertebroplasty was significantly higher than that in the untreated fracture, and the strength of vertebrae 1 month after the procedure was equivalent to that of healthy vertebrae. Histologically, new bone formation was found around hydroxyapatite blocks 2 weeks after the procedure, and strong crosslinking between neighboring hydroxyapatite blocks was found after 1 month.These results suggest that hydroxyapatite blocks may be effective as filling material for vertebral fracture from both biomechanical and histological perspectives.

  4. Sex determination by discriminant function analysis of lumbar vertebrae.

    PubMed

    Ostrofsky, Kelly R; Churchill, Steven E

    2015-01-01

    Sex determination is critical for developing the biological profile of unidentified skeletal remains. When more commonly used elements (os coxa, cranium) for sexing are not available, methods utilizing other skeletal elements are needed. This study aims to assess the degree of sexual dimorphism of the lumbar vertebrae and develop discriminant functions for sex determination from them, using a sample of South African blacks from the Raymond A. Dart Collection (47 males, 51 females). Eleven variables at each lumbar level were subjected to univariate and multivariate discriminant function analyses. Univariate equations produced classification rates ranging from 57.7% to 83.5%, with the highest accuracies associated with dimensions of the vertebral body. Multivariate stepwise analysis generated classification rates ranging from 75.9% to 88.7%. These results are comparable to other methods for sexing the skeleton and indicate that measures of the lumbar vertebrae can be used as an effective tool for sex determination.

  5. Lumbosacral Transitional Vertebrae and Its Prevalence in the Australian Population

    PubMed Central

    French, Heath D.; Somasundaram, Arjuna J.; Schaefer, Nathan R.; Laherty, Richard W.

    2014-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective cohort study. Objective Lumbosacral transitional vertebrae (LSTV) are a common congenital anomaly, and they can be accurately identified on anteroposterior (AP) radiographs of the lumbosacral spine. This study attempts to determine the prevalence of this congenital anomaly and to increase awareness among all clinicians to reduce the risk of surgical and procedural errors in patients with LSTV. Methods A retrospective review of 5,941 AP and lateral lumbar radiographs was performed. Transitional vertebrae were identified and categorized under the Castellvi classification. Results The prevalence of LSTV in the study population was 9.9%. Lumbarized S1 and sacralized L5 were seen in 5.8 and 4.1% of patients, respectively. Conclusion LSTV are a common normal variant and can be a factor in spinal surgery at incorrect levels. It is essential that all clinicians are aware of this common congenital anomaly. PMID:25396103

  6. New software for cervical vertebral geometry assessment and its relationship to skeletal maturation—a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Cunha, A R; Júnior, G C; Fernandes, N; Campos, M J S; Costa, L F M; Vitral, R W F; Bolognese, A M

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: In the present study, we developed new software for quantitative analysis of cervical vertebrae maturation, and we evaluated its applicability through a multinomial logistic regression model (MLRM). Methods: Digitized images of the bodies of the second (C2), third (C3) and fourth (C4) cervical vertebrae were analysed in cephalometric radiographs of 236 subjects (116 boys and 120 girls) by using a software developed for digitized vertebrae analysis. The sample was initially distributed into 11 categories according to the Fishman's skeletal maturity indicators and were then grouped into four stages for quantitative cervical maturational changes (QCMC) analysis (QCMC I, II, III and IV). Seven variables of interest were measured and analysed to identify morphologic alterations of the vertebral bodies in each QCMC category. Results: Statistically significant differences (p < 0.05) were observed among all QCMC categories for the variables analysed. The MLRM used to calculate the probability that an individual belonged to each of the four cervical vertebrae maturation categories was constructed by taking into account gender, chronological age and four variables determined by digitized vertebrae analysis (Ang_C3, MP_C3, MP_C4 and SP_C4). The MLRM presented a predictability of 81.4%. The weighted κ test showed almost perfect agreement (κ = 0.832) between the categories defined initially by the method of Fishman and those allocated by the MLRM. Conclusions: Significant alterations in the morphologies of the C2, C3 and C4 vertebral bodies that were analysed through the digitized vertebrae analysis software occur during the different stages of skeletal maturation. The model that combines the four parameters measured on the vertebral bodies, the age and the gender showed an excellent prediction. PMID:24319125

  7. Compressive myelopathy of the cervical spine in Komodo dragons (Varanus komodoensis).

    PubMed

    Zimmerman, Dawn M; Douglass, Michael; Sutherland-Smith, Meg; Aguilar, Roberto; Schaftenaar, Willem; Shores, Andy

    2009-03-01

    Cervical subluxation and compressive myelopathy appears to be a cause of morbidity and mortality in captive Komodo dragons (Varanus komodoensis). Four cases of cervical subluxation resulting in nerve root compression or spinal cord compression were identified. Three were presumptively induced by trauma, and one had an unknown inciting cause. Two dragons exhibited signs of chronic instability. Cervical vertebrae affected included C1-C4. Clinical signs on presentation included ataxia, ambulatory paraparesis or tetraparesis to tetraplegia, depression to stupor, cervical scoliosis, and anorexia. Antemortem diagnosis of compression was only confirmed with magnetic resonance imaging or computed tomography. Treatment ranged from supportive care to attempted surgical decompression. All dragons died or were euthanatized, at 4 days to 12 mo postpresentation. Studies to define normal vertebral anatomy in the species are necessary to determine whether the pathology is linked to cervical malformation, resulting in ligament laxity, subsequent instability, and subluxation.

  8. A Review of Symptomatic Lumbosacral Transitional Vertebrae: Bertolotti's Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Jancuska, Jeffrey M.; Spivak, Jeffrey M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Lumbosacral transitional vertebrae (LSTV) are increasingly recognized as a common anatomical variant associated with altered patterns of degenerative spine changes. This review will focus on the clinical significance of LSTV, disruptions in normal spine biomechanics, imaging techniques, diagnosis, and treatment. Methods A Pubmed search using the specific key words “LSTV,” “lumbosacral transitional vertebrae,” and “Bertolotti's Syndrome” was performed. The resulting group of manuscripts from our search was evaluated. Results LSTV are associated with alterations in biomechanics and anatomy of spinal and paraspinal structures, which have important implications on surgical approaches and techniques. LSTV are often inaccurately detected and classified on standard AP radiographs and MRI. The use of whole-spine images as well as geometric relationships between the sacrum and lumbar vertebra increase accuracy. Uncertainty regarding the cause, clinical significance, and treatment of LSTV persists. Some authors suggest an association between LSTV types II and IV and low back pain. Pseudoarticulation between the transverse process and the sacrum creates a “false joint” susceptible to arthritic changes and osteophyte formation potentially leading to nerve root entrapment. The diagnosis of symptomatic LSTV is considered with appropriate patient history, imaging studies, and diagnostic injections. A positive radionuclide study along with a positive effect from a local injection helps distinguish the transitional vertebra as a significant pain source. Surgical resection is reserved for a subgroup of LSTV patients who fail conservative treatment and whose pain is definitively attributed to the anomalous pseudoarticulation. Conclusions Due to the common finding of low back pain and the wide prevalence of LSTV in the general population, it is essential to differentiate between symptoms originating from an anomalous psuedoarticulation from other potential

  9. RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN CRANIAL AND MANDIBULAR GROWTH AND THE STAGES OF MATURATION OF THE CERVICAL VERTEBRAE

    PubMed Central

    Damian, Melissa Feres; Cechinato, Fernando; Molina, Rafael Dagnese; Woitchunas, Fábio Eduardo

    2007-01-01

    Quantification of the expectation of craniofacial growth during the pubertal growth spurt (PGS) is helpful in orthodontic diagnosis and treatment planning. Thus, this study investigated whether the stages of the vertebral maturation index (VMI) would be valid for estimating cranial and mandibular growth during the initial stages of PGS, testing the null hypothesis that these structures do not demonstrate differential growth dependent on the maturation stage. A study population of 45 patients of both genders with 2 lateral cephalometric radiographs, taken at a 12-month interval, was selected from files. All patients should not have been previously submitted to orthodontic treatment and should be before or during the peak stage of PGS. The S-N and Co-Gn cephalometric measurements were traced on both radiographs of each patient, by computed cephalometric tracings, for evaluation of skull and mandible, respectively. The growth of these structures was established by the difference between the measurements obtained on both tracings. The VMI stage was also estimated on the radiographs, determining the position of patients on the PGS curve at two periods, baseline and after 12 months. Cephalometric tracings and VMI estimates were performed by two calibrated examiners. Descriptive statistics revealed that both cephalometric measurements increased during the study period, especially Co-Gn, which demonstrated (ANOVA and Tukey's test; 5% significance level), a statistically significant peak of development (p = 0.001), when the patient was in the VMI stage representing the PGS peak. It was concluded that the VMI stages were valid for the analysis of cranial growth and especially of mandibular growth at the initial stages of PGS, thus rejecting the null hypothesis. PMID:19089113

  10. Adaptive geodesic transform for segmentation of vertebrae on CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaonkar, Bilwaj; Shu, Liao; Hermosillo, Gerardo; Zhan, Yiqiang

    2014-03-01

    Vertebral segmentation is a critical first step in any quantitative evaluation of vertebral pathology using CT images. This is especially challenging because bone marrow tissue has the same intensity profile as the muscle surrounding the bone. Thus simple methods such as thresholding or adaptive k-means fail to accurately segment vertebrae. While several other algorithms such as level sets may be used for segmentation any algorithm that is clinically deployable has to work in under a few seconds. To address these dual challenges we present here, a new algorithm based on the geodesic distance transform that is capable of segmenting the spinal vertebrae in under one second. To achieve this we extend the theory of the geodesic distance transforms proposed in1 to incorporate high level anatomical knowledge through adaptive weighting of image gradients. Such knowledge may be provided by the user directly or may be automatically generated by another algorithm. We incorporate information 'learnt' using a previously published machine learning algorithm2 to segment the L1 to L5 vertebrae. While we present a particular application here, the adaptive geodesic transform is a generic concept which can be applied to segmentation of other organs as well.

  11. Cervical Cancer Stage IIIA

    MedlinePlus

    ... hyphen, e.g. -historical Searches are case-insensitive Cervical Cancer Stage IIIA Add to My Pictures View / ... 1275x1275 View Download Large: 2550x2550 View Download Title: Cervical Cancer Stage IIIA Description: Stage IIIA cervical cancer; ...

  12. Cervical Cancer Stage IIIB

    MedlinePlus

    ... hyphen, e.g. -historical Searches are case-insensitive Cervical Cancer Stage IIIB Add to My Pictures View / ... 1425x1326 View Download Large: 2850x2651 View Download Title: Cervical Cancer Stage IIIB Description: Stage IIIB cervical cancer; ...

  13. Cervical Cancer Stage IVB

    MedlinePlus

    ... hyphen, e.g. -historical Searches are case-insensitive Cervical Cancer Stage IVB Add to My Pictures View / ... 1200x1305 View Download Large: 2400x2610 View Download Title: Cervical Cancer Stage IVB Description: Stage IVB cervical cancer; ...

  14. Cervical Cancer Stage IVA

    MedlinePlus

    ... hyphen, e.g. -historical Searches are case-insensitive Cervical Cancer Stage IVA Add to My Pictures View / ... 1575x1200 View Download Large: 3150x2400 View Download Title: Cervical Cancer Stage IVA Description: Stage IVA cervical cancer; ...

  15. Cervical Spondylosis and Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Baogan; Pang, Xiaodong; Li, Duanming; Yang, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Cervical spondylosis and hypertension are all common diseases, but the relationship between them has never been studied. Patients with cervical spondylosis are often accompanied with vertigo. Anterior cervical discectomy and fusion is an effective method of treatment for cervical spondylosis with cervical vertigo that is unresponsive to conservative therapy. We report 2 patients of cervical spondylosis with concomitant cervical vertigo and hypertension who were treated successfully with anterior cervical discectomy and fusion. Stimulation of sympathetic nerve fibers in pathologically degenerative disc could produce sympathetic excitation, and induce a sympathetic reflex to cause cervical vertigo and hypertension. In addition, chronic neck pain could contribute to hypertension development through sympathetic arousal and failure of normal homeostatic pain regulatory mechanisms. Cervical spondylosis may be one of the causes of secondary hypertension. Early treatment for resolution of symptoms of cervical spondylosis may have a beneficial impact on cardiovascular disease risk in patients with cervical spondylosis. PMID:25761188

  16. Cervicitis associated with lateral cervical displacement.

    PubMed

    Gjoni, Indira; Muneyyirci-Delale, Ozgul

    2012-01-01

    Lateral cervical displacement has been recognized as a sign of endometriosis; however, other causes of the finding have not been explored. In our experience, patients without endometriosis are presenting with lateral cervical displacement, mainly towards the left of midline. The common finding in these cases is the presence of cervicitis leading us to hypothesize the role of cervicitis in causing lateral displacement of the cervix. Future research into this area will provide us with a stronger understanding of the role that lateral cervical displacement plays in the development of pelvic pathology and the development of cervical cancer.

  17. Cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Shepherd, John H

    2012-06-01

    Standard treatment for invasive cervical cancer involves either radical surgery or radiotherapy. Childbearing is therefore impossible after either of these treatments. A fertility-sparing option, however, by radical trachelectomy has been shown to be effective, provided that strict criteria for selection are followed. Fertility rates are high, whereas recurrence is low, indicating that a more conservative approach to dealing with early small cervical tumours is feasible. Careful preoperative assessment by magnetic resonance imaging scans allows accurate measurement of the tumour with precise definition to plan surgery. This will ensure an adequate clear margin by wide excision of the tumour excising the cervix by radical vaginal trachelectomy with surrounding para-cervical and upper vaginal tissues. An isthmic cerclage is inserted to provide competence at the level of the internal orifice. A primary vagino-isthmic anastomosis is conducted to restore continuity of the lower genital tract. Subsequent pregnancies require careful monitoring in view of the high risk of spontaneous premature rupture of the membranes. Delivery by classical caesarean section is necessary at the onset of labour or electively before term. Over 1100 such procedures have been carried out vaginally or abdominally, resulting in 240 live births. Radical vaginal trachelectomy with a laparoscopic pelvic-node dissection offers the least morbid and invasive route for surgery, provided that adequate surgical skills have been obtained.

  18. Cervical Laminoplasty for Multilevel Cervical Myelopathy

    PubMed Central

    Sayana, Murali Krishna; Jamil, Hassan; Poynton, Ashley

    2011-01-01

    Cervical spondylotic myelopathy can result from degenerative cervical spondylosis, herniated disk material, osteophytes, redundant ligamentum flavum, or ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament. Surgical intervention for multi-level myelopathy aims to decompress the spinal cord and maintain stability of the cervical spine. Laminoplasty was major surgical advancement as laminectomy resulted in kyphosis and unsatisfactory outcomes. Hirabayashi popularised the expansive open door laminoplasty which was later modified several surgeons. Laminoplasty has changed the way surgeons approach multilevel cervical spondylotic myelopathy. PMID:21991408

  19. Effects of cervical deep muscle strengthening in a neck pain: a patient with klippel-feil syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bae, Youngsook

    2014-12-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to identify the effects of cervical deep muscle strengthening (CDS) on neck pain in a patient with Klippel-Feil syndrome (KFS). [Subjects and Methods] The subjects was a 39 year-old woman with neck pain and KFS that included incomplete block vertebrae in the C2-3 segments and block vertebrae in the C6-7 segments. The subject performed an exercise program including cervical strengthening exercise (level 1) and CDS exercise (level 2) for 6 weeks. Neck pain intensity was measured using the visual analogue scale (VAS) and the pressure pain threshold (PPT). All measurements were obtained before and after the CDS exercise program. [Results] The VAS and PPT measurements decreased; range of motion in the cervical joint increased. [Conclusion] CDS exercises were effective interventions for reducing neck pain in a patient with Klippel-Feil syndrome.

  20. Effects of Cervical Deep Muscle Strengthening in a Neck Pain: A Patient with Klippel-Feil Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Youngsook

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to identify the effects of cervical deep muscle strengthening (CDS) on neck pain in a patient with Klippel-Feil syndrome (KFS). [Subjects and Methods] The subjects was a 39 year-old woman with neck pain and KFS that included incomplete block vertebrae in the C2–3 segments and block vertebrae in the C6–7 segments. The subject performed an exercise program including cervical strengthening exercise (level 1) and CDS exercise (level 2) for 6 weeks. Neck pain intensity was measured using the visual analogue scale (VAS) and the pressure pain threshold (PPT). All measurements were obtained before and after the CDS exercise program. [Results] The VAS and PPT measurements decreased; range of motion in the cervical joint increased. [Conclusion] CDS exercises were effective interventions for reducing neck pain in a patient with Klippel-Feil syndrome. PMID:25540517

  1. Spaceflight effects on biomechanical and biochemical properties of rat vertebrae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zernicke, R. F.; Vailas, A. C.; Grindeland, R. E.; Kaplansky, A.; Salem, G. J.; Martinez, D. A.

    1990-01-01

    The biomechanical and biochemical responses of lumbar vertebral bodies during a 12.5-day spaceflight (Cosmos 1887 biosatellite) were determined for rapidly growing rats (90-day-old, Czechoslovakian-Wistar). By use of age-matched vivarium controls (normal cage environment) and synchronous controls (simulated flight conditions), as well as a basal control group (killed before lift-off on the 1st day of flight), the combined influences of growth and space-flight could be examined. Centra of the sixth lumbar vertebrae (L6) were compressed to 50% strain at a fast strain rate while immersed in physiological buffer (37 degrees C). The body masses of vivarium and synchronous controls were significantly heavier than either the flight or basal controls. The flight group had an L6 vertebral body compressional stiffness that was 39% less than the vivarium controls, 47% less than the synchronous control, and 16% less than the basal controls. In addition, the average initial maximum load of the flight L6 was 22% less than vivarium controls and 18% less than the synchronous controls, whereas the linear compressional load of the flight group averaged 34% less than the vivarium and 25% less than the synchronous groups. The structural properties of the vertebrae from the 12.5-day-younger basal group closely resembled the flight vertebrae. Calcium, phosphorous, and hydroxyproline concentrations were not significantly different among the groups. Nevertheless, the lack of strength and stiffness development in spaceflight, coupled with a smaller proportion of mature hydroxypyridinoline cross-links, suggested that the 12.5 days of spaceflight slowed the maturation of trabecular bone in the vertebral bodies of rapidly growing rats.

  2. Assessment of Regional Bone Density in Fractured Vertebrae Using Quantitative Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Soliman, Hany A.G.; Mac-Thiong, Jean-Marc; Levasseur, Annie; Parent, Stefan

    2017-01-01

    Study Design Cohort study. Purpose The aim of this study is to propose and evaluate a new technique to assess bone mineral density of fractured vertebrae using quantitative computed tomography (QCT). Overview of Literature There is no available technique to estimate bone mineral density (BMD) at the fractured vertebra because of the alterations in bony structures at the fracture site. Methods Forty patients with isolated fracture from T10 to L2 were analyzed from the vertebrae above and below the fracture level. Apparent density (AD) was measured based on the relationship between QCT images attenuation coefficients and the density of calibration objects. AD of 8 independent regions of interest (ROI) within the vertebral body and 2 ROI within the pedicles of vertebrae above and below the fractured vertebra were measured. At the level of the fractured vertebra, AD was measured at the pedicles, which are typically intact. AD of the fractured vertebral body was linearly interpolated, based on the assumption that AD at the fractured vertebra is equivalent to the average AD measured in vertebrae adjacent to the fracture. Estimated and measured AD of the pedicles at the fractured level were compared to verify our assumption of linear interpolation from adjacent vertebrae. Results The difference between the measured and the interpolated density of the pedicles at the fractured vertebra was 0.006 and 0.003 g/cm3 for right and left pedicle respectively. The highest mean AD located at the pedicles and the lowest mean AD was found at the anterior ROI of the vertebral body. Significant negative correlation exist between age and AD of ROI in the vertebral body. Conclusions This study suggests that the proposed technique is adequate to estimate the AD of a fractured vertebra from the density of adjacent vertebrae. PMID:28243370

  3. Muscular Arrangement and Muscle Attachment Sites in the Cervical Region of the American Barn Owl (Tyto furcata pratincola)

    PubMed Central

    Boumans, Mark L. L. M.; Krings, Markus; Wagner, Hermann

    2015-01-01

    Owls have the largest head rotation capability amongst vertebrates. Anatomical knowledge of the cervical region is needed to understand the mechanics of these extreme head movements. While data on the morphology of the cervical vertebrae of the barn owl have been provided, this study is aimed to provide an extensive description of the muscle arrangement and the attachment sites of the muscles on the owl’s head-neck region. The major cervical muscles were identified by gross dissection of cadavers of the American barn owl (Tyto furcata pratincola), and their origin, courses, and insertion were traced. In the head-neck region nine superficial larger cervical muscles of the craniocervical, dorsal and ventral subsystems were selected for analysis, and the muscle attachment sites were illustrated in digital models of the skull and cervical vertebrae of the same species as well as visualised in a two-dimensional sketch. In addition, fibre orientation and lengths of the muscles and the nature (fleshy or tendinous) of the attachment sites were determined. Myological data from this study were combined with osteological data of the same species. This improved the anatomical description of the cervical region of this species. The myological description provided in this study is to our best knowledge the most detailed documentation of the cervical muscles in a strigiform species presented so far. Our results show useful information for researchers in the field of functional anatomy, biomechanical modelling and for evolutionary and comparative studies. PMID:26222908

  4. Muscular Arrangement and Muscle Attachment Sites in the Cervical Region of the American Barn Owl (Tyto furcata pratincola).

    PubMed

    Boumans, Mark L L M; Krings, Markus; Wagner, Hermann

    2015-01-01

    Owls have the largest head rotation capability amongst vertebrates. Anatomical knowledge of the cervical region is needed to understand the mechanics of these extreme head movements. While data on the morphology of the cervical vertebrae of the barn owl have been provided, this study is aimed to provide an extensive description of the muscle arrangement and the attachment sites of the muscles on the owl's head-neck region. The major cervical muscles were identified by gross dissection of cadavers of the American barn owl (Tyto furcata pratincola), and their origin, courses, and insertion were traced. In the head-neck region nine superficial larger cervical muscles of the craniocervical, dorsal and ventral subsystems were selected for analysis, and the muscle attachment sites were illustrated in digital models of the skull and cervical vertebrae of the same species as well as visualised in a two-dimensional sketch. In addition, fibre orientation and lengths of the muscles and the nature (fleshy or tendinous) of the attachment sites were determined. Myological data from this study were combined with osteological data of the same species. This improved the anatomical description of the cervical region of this species. The myological description provided in this study is to our best knowledge the most detailed documentation of the cervical muscles in a strigiform species presented so far. Our results show useful information for researchers in the field of functional anatomy, biomechanical modelling and for evolutionary and comparative studies.

  5. 3D/2D registration and segmentation of scoliotic vertebrae using statistical models.

    PubMed

    Benameur, Said; Mignotte, Max; Parent, Stefan; Labelle, Hubert; Skalli, Wafa; de Guise, Jacques

    2003-01-01

    We propose a new 3D/2D registration method for vertebrae of the scoliotic spine, using two conventional radiographic views (postero-anterior and lateral), and a priori global knowledge of the geometric structure of each vertebra. This geometric knowledge is efficiently captured by a statistical deformable template integrating a set of admissible deformations, expressed by the first modes of variation in Karhunen-Loeve expansion, of the pathological deformations observed on a representative scoliotic vertebra population. The proposed registration method consists of fitting the projections of this deformable template with the preliminary segmented contours of the corresponding vertebra on the two radiographic views. The 3D/2D registration problem is stated as the minimization of a cost function for each vertebra and solved with a gradient descent technique. Registration of the spine is then done vertebra by vertebra. The proposed method efficiently provides accurate 3D reconstruction of each scoliotic vertebra and, consequently, it also provides accurate knowledge of the 3D structure of the whole scoliotic spine. This registration method has been successfully tested on several biplanar radiographic images and validated on 57 scoliotic vertebrae. The validation results reported in this paper demonstrate that the proposed statistical scheme performs better than other conventional 3D reconstruction methods.

  6. Lordotic vertebrae in sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax L.) are adapted to increased loads.

    PubMed

    Kranenbarg, Sander; Waarsing, Jan H; Muller, Mees; Weinans, Harrie; van Leeuwen, Johan L

    2005-06-01

    Lordosis in fish is an abnormal ventral curvature of the vertebral column, accompanied by abnormal calcification of the afflicted vertebrae. Incidences of lordosis are a major problem in aquaculture and often correlate with increased swimming activity. To understand the biomechanical causes and consequences of lordosis, we mapped the morphological changes that occur in the vertebrae of European sea bass during their development from larva to juvenile. Our micro-CT analysis of lordotic and non-lordotic vertebrae revealed significant differences in their micro-architecture. Lordotic vertebrae have a larger bone volume, flattened dorsal zygapophyses and extra lateral ridges. They also have a larger second moment of area (both lateral and dorso-ventral) than non-lordotic vertebrae. This morphology suggests lordotic vertebrae to be adapted to an increased bending moment, caused by the axial musculature during increased swimming activity. We hypothesize the increase in swimming activity to have a two-fold effect in animals that become lordotic. The first effect is buckling failure of the axial skeleton due to an increased compressive load. The second effect is extra bone deposition as an adaptive response of the vertebrae at the cellular level, caused by an increased strain and strain rate in these vertebrae. Lordosis thus comprises both a buckling failure of the vertebral column and a molecular response that adapts the lordotic vertebrae to a new loading regime.

  7. New Classification for Clinically Symptomatic Adjacent Segment Pathology in Cervical Disc Disease

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Clinical adjacent segment pathology (CASP) is common after cervical disc surgery. A critical examination of 320 patients operated for cervical disc prolapse revealed that CASP can also occur in patients with congenital and degenerative fusion of cervical spine. This has not been studied in depth and there is a need for a practically applicable classification of CASP. Purpose To develop a new classification scheme of CASP. Overview of Literature A review of the literature did not reveal a practically applicable classification incorporating the occurrence of CASP in congenital and degenerative fusion cases. Methods This was a retrospective analysis of 320 patients operated (509 disc spaces) on for cervical disc prolapse. Cases (n=316) were followed-up for 3-11 years. Random sampling of 220 patients with postoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in 165 cases was analyzed. Results Six symptomatic CASP cases required resurgery (1.9%), eight cases involved MRI proven CASP with axial neck pain only and 13 patients were asymptomatic with radiological adjacent segment pathology (RASP). The frequency rate was 8.5% (27/316). Four cases of congenital or degenerative fusion of vertebra developed CASP requiring surgery. CASP is classified as primary or secondary follows. Primary A1 was congenital fusion of vertebra and primary A2 was degenerative fusion of the vertebra. Secondary, which was after cervical disc surgery, comprised B1 (RASP in asymptomatic patients), B2 (CASP in patients with axial neck pain), and B3 (CASP with myeloradiculopathy). B3 was subdivided into single-level CASP (B3a) and multiple-level CASP (B3b). Conclusions Symptomatic CASP requiring resurgery is infrequent. CASP can occur in patients with congenital and degenerative fusion of the cervical spine. A new classification for CASP along with treatment strategy is proposed. Patients in Primary CASP and B3 CASP require resurgery while others require only observation. PMID:26712514

  8. Ossified Ligamentum Longitudinale Anterius in Adult Human Dry Vertebrae

    PubMed Central

    Venumadhav, Nelluri; KS, Siddaraju

    2014-01-01

    Background: The ligamentum longitudinale anterius is a broad and strong band of fibrous tissue that runs along the anterior surfaces of the bodies of the vertebrae. Aim: The study was undertaken to evaluate the incidence of ossified ligamentum longitudinale anterius in adult dry human vertebra. Materials and Methods: This study was carried out on 95 sets of dry human vertebral columns irrespective of age and sex at Mayo Institute of Medical Sciences- Barabanki,-UP, Melaka Manipal Medical College-Manipal University and Department of Anatomy, KMCT Medical College, Manassery- Calicut, India. All the sets of vertebral columns were macroscopically inspected for the ossified ligamentum longitudinale anterius. Results: It was observed that out of 95 sets of vertebral columns, 27 (28.42%) vertebral columns showed ossification. Out of 27 vertebral columns, 17 (17.89%) vertebral columns showed segmental type of ossification, 2 (2.11%) vertebral columns showed continuous type of ossification and 8 (8.42%) vertebral columns showed mixed type of ossification at different vertebral level. Conclusion: Such type of ossification will affect the biomechanics of the spine and may result in stiff neck, low back pain, dysphagia, odynophagia, compression of the brachial plexus, aphonia, immobility or mucosal thickening of larynx. Hence, knowledge of such abnormalities should be kept in mind to minimise serious complications in any surgical intervention or investigative procedures in the region. PMID:25302180

  9. Intraosseous neurilemmoma of L2 vertebra--a case report.

    PubMed

    Gupta, S P; Agarwal, Anil

    2005-07-01

    Intraosseous neurilemmoma (schwannoma) is a rare bone tumor with incidence less than 0.2% of all primary bone tumors. It is a benign neoplasm arising from the schwann cells of the nerve sheath. When they occur, they are usually found in the mandible. This paper reports an unusual occurrence of intraosseous neurilemmoma in L2 vertebral body. This patient presented with complaints of backache and progressively increasing weakness in both lower limbs. Roetengenograms showed an osteolytic lesion of L2 vertebra localized in the left half of the body and pedicle. Computed tomograph revealed a large soft tissue component of the tumor mass with thecal sac compression. A computed tomograph assisted needle biopsy revealed the tumor to be neurilemmoma. Subsequently, during decompression, it was possible to shell out tumor from surrounding tissues. Remaining tumor was curettedfrom bone and the cavity packed with autograft. The recovery was uneventful with incorporation of graft. The aim of this article is to highlight intraosseous neurilemmoma as a possible differential diagnosis in bony tumors. Intraosseous neurilemmoma of lumbar vertebrae is an extremely rare occurrence and till date only four cases are reported in English literature.

  10. Cervical spinal chordoma with chondromatous component in a dog.

    PubMed

    Gruber, A; Kneissl, S; Vidoni, B; Url, A

    2008-09-01

    A 7-year-old male Belgian Shepherd dog was presented with sudden onset of lateral recumbency and tetraparesis. At the level of the third cervical vertebra, magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated an intrameningeal and intramedullary mass lesion. The animal was subsequently euthanatized. A necropsy revealed a semitranslucent solid mass infiltrating dorsal and ventral dura mater and the spinal cord. Histologic examination revealed a lobulated pleomorphic mass, mainly resembling undifferentiated cartilage interspersed by spindle-shaped and polygonal cells with highly vacuolated cytoplasm (physaliphorous cells). Immunohistochemistry of the tumor cells demonstrated dual expression of vimentin and cytokeratin. Based on the histologic and immunohistochemical results, the diagnosis of a chordoma with chondromatous component was made.

  11. Subaxial cervical and cervicothoracic fixation techniques--indications, techniques, and outcomes.

    PubMed

    Pelton, Miguel A; Schwartz, Joseph; Singh, Kern

    2012-01-01

    The subaxial and cervicothoracic junction is a relatively difficult area for spine surgeons to navigate. Because of different transitional stressors at the junction of the smaller cervical vertebrae and the larger thoracic segments, proximity to neurovascular structures, and complex anatomy, extreme care and precision must be assumed during fixation in these regions. Lateral mass screws, pedicle screws, and translaminar screws are currently the standard of choice in the subaxial cervical and upper thoracic spine. This article addresses the relevant surgical anatomy, pitfalls, and pearls associated with each of these fixation techniques.

  12. [Double traumatic cervical spine lesion (odontoid fracture and spinal cord injury) and Klippel-Feil syndrome].

    PubMed

    Graillon, T; Pech-Gourg, G; Adetchessi, T; Metellus, P; Dufour, H; Fuentes, S

    2012-12-01

    Klippel-Feil syndrome (KFS) is defined as a congenital fusion of at least two cervical vertebrae. Patients with KFS are known to be at high risk for spinal cord injury in case of cervical trauma even with weak kinetic. We report the case of a patient with C4-C5 and C6-C7 congenital fusion, harbouring C5-C6 post-traumatic spinal cord injury, associated with an odontoid fracture type 2 of Anderson and D'Alonzo classification following a motorbike accident.

  13. Gunshot-caused Facial Injury Combined with Lower Cervical Spine Injury: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Wang, J; Ye, C Y; Zhu, M Y; Yuan, J D; Ten, H L

    2014-08-01

    A 32-year old male patient was wounded by a pistol. As shown in computed tomography (CT) scanning images, there was comminuted fracture of the left mandible and the bullet was found in the left side behind the sixth cervical vertebra. After the patient was hospitalized, the debridement was done in the emergency room and the operation of open reduction and internal fixation for comminuted fracture of left mandible was performed successfully. Eighteen days later, the patient was taken to surgery for anterior cervical decompression and fusion with autogenous iliac bone grafting for the sixth cervical vertebra. Postoperative follow-up of the patient over two years indicated that the left biceps muscle strength was recovered to level 4. Gunshot wound to the face associated with injury of the low cervical spine has the possibility of survival. It is safe to treat facial wounds early in the patient's treatment course, even if the bullet remains in the cervical vertebral body and there is neurological function damage.

  14. Head size, weaponry, and cervical adaptation: Testing craniocervical evolutionary hypotheses in Ceratopsia.

    PubMed

    VanBuren, Collin S; Campione, Nicolás E; Evans, David C

    2015-07-01

    The anterior cervical vertebrae form the skeletal connection between the cranial and postcranial skeletons in higher tetrapods. As a result, the morphology of the atlas-axis complex is likely to be shaped by selection pressures acting on either the head or neck. The neoceratopsian (Reptilia:Dinosauria) syncervical represents one of the most highly modified atlas-axis regions in vertebrates, being formed by the complete coalescence of the three most anterior cervical vertebrae. In ceratopsids, the syncervical has been hypothesized to be an adaptation to support a massive skull, or to act as a buttress during intraspecific head-to-head combat. Here, we test these functional/adaptive hypotheses within a phylogenetic framework and critically examine the previously proposed methods for quantifying relative head size in the fossil record for the first time. Results indicate that neither the evolution of cranial weaponry nor large head size correlates with the origin of cervical fusion in ceratopsians, and we, therefore, reject both adaptive hypotheses for the origin of the syncervical. Anterior cervical fusion has evolved independently in a number of amniote clades, and further research on extant groups with this peculiar anatomy is needed to understand the evolutionary basis for cervical fusion in Neoceratopsia.

  15. Gunshot-caused Facial Injury Combined with Lower Cervical Spine Injury: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Wang, J; Ye, CY; Zhu, MY; Yuan, JD; Ten, HL

    2014-01-01

    A 32-year old male patient was wounded by a pistol. As shown in computed tomography (CT) scanning images, there was comminuted fracture of the left mandible and the bullet was found in the left side behind the sixth cervical vertebra. After the patient was hospitalized, the debridement was done in the emergency room and the operation of open reduction and internal fixation for comminuted fracture of left mandible was performed successfully. Eighteen days later, the patient was taken to surgery for anterior cervical decompression and fusion with autogenous iliac bone grafting for the sixth cervical vertebra. Postoperative follow-up of the patient over two years indicated that the left biceps muscle strength was recovered to level 4. Gunshot wound to the face associated with injury of the low cervical spine has the possibility of survival. It is safe to treat facial wounds early in the patient's treatment course, even if the bullet remains in the cervical vertebral body and there is neurological function damage. PMID:25429487

  16. Risks of Cervical Cancer Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... cases of cervical cancer and the number of deaths due to cervical cancer since 1950. Cervical dysplasia ... for cervical cancer helps decrease the number of deaths from the disease. Regular screening of women between ...

  17. Craniofacial and cervical morphology related to sagittal spinal posture in children and adolescents.

    PubMed

    Segatto, Emil; Segatto, Angyalka; Braunitzer, Gábor; Kirschneck, Christian; Fanghänel, Jochen; Danesh, Gholamreza; Lippold, Carsten

    2014-01-01

    Studies on the relationship between body posture and craniofacial parameters often focus on the cervical spine. Thus, less attention has been paid to the morphology of the vertebra C2 that serves as both a structural and functional link between the craniofacial area and the other part of the spine. The objective of this study was to assess the relation of craniofacial features to certain morphological and positional characteristics of the cervical vertebrae and the spine during growth. We determined body posture indices for 69 children and adolescents by means of a radiation-free method (rasterstereography). The morphological and positional analysis of the craniofacial area and the cervical vertebrae was based on standardized lateral X-ray cephalograms. Medium to strong correlations were found between body posture, C2 morphology, and craniofacial parameters. We found significant correlations between the C2 dens axis height and maxillary indices as well as between the C2 dens axis inclination and cephalometrical values of the mandibular area. Similarly the correlation between the C2 dens axis inclination and the postural index flèche cervicale was highly significant (P < 0.05, r = 0.333). These results suggest that morphological features of the odontoid process may serve as valuable predictive markers in interdisciplinary orthopedic-orthodontic diagnostics.

  18. Craniofacial and Cervical Morphology Related to Sagittal Spinal Posture in Children and Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Segatto, Angyalka; Braunitzer, Gábor

    2014-01-01

    Studies on the relationship between body posture and craniofacial parameters often focus on the cervical spine. Thus, less attention has been paid to the morphology of the vertebra C2 that serves as both a structural and functional link between the craniofacial area and the other part of the spine. The objective of this study was to assess the relation of craniofacial features to certain morphological and positional characteristics of the cervical vertebrae and the spine during growth. We determined body posture indices for 69 children and adolescents by means of a radiation-free method (rasterstereography). The morphological and positional analysis of the craniofacial area and the cervical vertebrae was based on standardized lateral X-ray cephalograms. Medium to strong correlations were found between body posture, C2 morphology, and craniofacial parameters. We found significant correlations between the C2 dens axis height and maxillary indices as well as between the C2 dens axis inclination and cephalometrical values of the mandibular area. Similarly the correlation between the C2 dens axis inclination and the postural index flèche cervicale was highly significant (P < 0.05, r = 0.333). These results suggest that morphological features of the odontoid process may serve as valuable predictive markers in interdisciplinary orthopedic-orthodontic diagnostics. PMID:25276804

  19. A study of vertebra number in pigs confirms the effect of vertnin and reveals additional QTL

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Formation of the vertebral column is a critical developmental stage in mammals that is strictly controlled in most species. The pig is quite unique as considerable variation exists in number of thoracic vertebra as well as number of lumbar vertebra. At least two genes have been identified that affec...

  20. 3D CT spine data segmentation and analysis of vertebrae bone lesions.

    PubMed

    Peter, R; Malinsky, M; Ourednicek, P; Jan, J

    2013-01-01

    A method is presented aiming at detecting and classifying bone lesions in 3D CT data of human spine, via Bayesian approach utilizing Markov random fields. A developed algorithm for necessary segmentation of individual possibly heavily distorted vertebrae based on 3D intensity modeling of vertebra types is presented as well.

  1. Trabecular mineral contents of lumbar vertebra in patients with osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, S; Okumura, H; Yamamuro, T

    1990-01-01

    The trabecular mineral contents (TMCs) of the third lumbar vertebra in normal subjects and patients with spinal osteoporosis and with femoral neck fracture were measured by quantitative computed tomography (QCT) using a reference phantom. The present paper describes these results. The TMCs in patients with spinal osteoporosis and with femoral neck fracture were significantly lower than those in normal subjects. When evaluated in terms of the ratio to the mean trabecular mineral content (mTMC) in normal subjects of the same decade groups, it was assumed that there should be a threshold value of vertebral compression fracture, and that value was approximately 50% of the mTMC in normal subjects. A correlation was noted between the data of the QCT method and those of the microdensitometric method in the groups with vertebral compression fracture and with femoral neck fracture, but not in the group without vertebral fracture.

  2. A Framework for Automated Spine and Vertebrae Interpolation-Based Detection and Model-Based Segmentation.

    PubMed

    Korez, Robert; Ibragimov, Bulat; Likar, Boštjan; Pernuš, Franjo; Vrtovec, Tomaž

    2015-08-01

    Automated and semi-automated detection and segmentation of spinal and vertebral structures from computed tomography (CT) images is a challenging task due to a relatively high degree of anatomical complexity, presence of unclear boundaries and articulation of vertebrae with each other, as well as due to insufficient image spatial resolution, partial volume effects, presence of image artifacts, intensity variations and low signal-to-noise ratio. In this paper, we describe a novel framework for automated spine and vertebrae detection and segmentation from 3-D CT images. A novel optimization technique based on interpolation theory is applied to detect the location of the whole spine in the 3-D image and, using the obtained location of the whole spine, to further detect the location of individual vertebrae within the spinal column. The obtained vertebra detection results represent a robust and accurate initialization for the subsequent segmentation of individual vertebrae, which is performed by an improved shape-constrained deformable model approach. The framework was evaluated on two publicly available CT spine image databases of 50 lumbar and 170 thoracolumbar vertebrae. Quantitative comparison against corresponding reference vertebra segmentations yielded an overall mean centroid-to-centroid distance of 1.1 mm and Dice coefficient of 83.6% for vertebra detection, and an overall mean symmetric surface distance of 0.3 mm and Dice coefficient of 94.6% for vertebra segmentation. The results indicate that by applying the proposed automated detection and segmentation framework, vertebrae can be successfully detected and accurately segmented in 3-D from CT spine images.

  3. Missed upper cervical spine fracture: clinical and radiological considerations

    PubMed Central

    Hadida, Camille; Lemire, Joe J

    1997-01-01

    Objective: This report presents a case of missed upper cervical spine fracture following a motor vehicle accident and illustrates various clinical and radiographic considerations necessary in the evaluation of post traumatic cervical spine injuries. Specific clinical signs and symptoms, as well as radiographic clues should prompt the astute clinician to suspect a fracture even when plain film radiographs have been reported as normal. Clinical features: A 44-year-old male was referred for an orthopaedic consultation for assessment of headaches following a high speed head-on motor vehicle accident eleven weeks prior to his presentation. Cervical spine radiographs taken at an emergency ward the day of the collision were reported as essentially normal. Subsequent radiographs taken eleven weeks later revealed a fracture through the body of axis with anterior displacement of atlas. A review of the initial radiographs clearly demonstrated signs suggesting an upper cervical fracture. Intervention and outcome: Initially the patient was prescribed a soft collar which he wore daily until an orthopaedic consultation eleven weeks later. Fifteen weeks following trauma, the patient was considered for surgical intervention, due to persistent headaches associated with the development of neurological signs suggestive of early onset of cervical myelopathy. Conclusion: Cervical spine fractures can have disastrous consequences if not detected early. A thorough clinical and radiological evaluation is essential in any patient presenting with a history of neck or head trauma. Repeated plain film radiographs are imperative in the event of inadequate visualization of the cervical vertebrae. When in doubt, further imaging studies such as computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging are required to rule out a fracture. ImagesFigure 1AFigure 1BFigure 2Figure 3

  4. Prevent Cervical Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Links Inside Knowledge Campaign What CDC Is Doing Research AMIGAS Fighting Cervical Cancer Worldwide Stay Informed ... Prevent Cervical Cancer with the Right Test at the Right Time Screening tests can find abnormal cells so they ...

  5. Cervical spondylosis (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Cervical spondylosis is a disorder that results from abnormal growth of the bones of the neck and ... Progressive neck pain is a key indication of cervical spondylosis. It may be the only symptom in ...

  6. Cervical dysplasia - slideshow

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/presentations/100080.htm Cervical dysplasia - series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing ... A.M. Editorial team. Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Cervical Cancer Cervix Disorders A.D.A.M., Inc. ...

  7. Cervical Dystonia (Spasmodic Torticollis)

    MedlinePlus

    Cervical dystonia Overview By Mayo Clinic Staff Cervical dystonia, also called spasmodic torticollis, is a painful condition in which your neck muscles contract involuntarily, causing your head to twist or turn ...

  8. Veliparib, Topotecan Hydrochloride, and Filgrastim or Pegfilgrastim in Treating Patients With Persistent or Recurrent Cervical Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-12-07

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Cervical Small Cell Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Cervical Carcinoma; Stage III Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer; Stage IVB Cervical Cancer

  9. Frozen storage increases the ultimate compressive load of porcine vertebrae.

    PubMed

    Callaghan, J P; McGill, S M

    1995-09-01

    The use of freezing as a method of storage is commonplace in mechanical testing of biological tissues. The effects of freezing on tissues that comprise spinal segments have been examined separately, but little work has been done on intact specimens. We examined the effect of freezing on the structural properties of porcine cervical spines. The intact cervical spines of seven pigs (a total of 14 specimens--seven of C2-C4 and seven of C5-C7) were stored frozen (-20 degrees C) for 1 month. The ultimate compressive load, displacement, stiffness, and energy absorbed were obtained using a monotonic compressive load applied at 3,000 N/sec. The structural properties were compared with those of another 14 porcine cervical specimens (control group, matched for age and weight) that were tested in a fresh state. The frozen storage of the vertebral specimens significantly increased the ultimate compressive load (24%) and energy absorbed to failure (33%). The stiffness and displacement at failure were not affected. We concluded that the use of freezing as a storage medium should be of concern when the resulting measures are used to quantify the ultimate compressive load of the spinal motion segments.

  10. Chronic Neck Pain: Making the Connection Between Capsular Ligament Laxity and Cervical Instability

    PubMed Central

    Steilen, Danielle; Hauser, Ross; Woldin, Barbara; Sawyer, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    The use of conventional modalities for chronic neck pain remains debatable, primarily because most treatments have had limited success. We conducted a review of the literature published up to December 2013 on the diagnostic and treatment modalities of disorders related to chronic neck pain and concluded that, despite providing temporary relief of symptoms, these treatments do not address the specific problems of healing and are not likely to offer long-term cures. The objectives of this narrative review are to provide an overview of chronic neck pain as it relates to cervical instability, to describe the anatomical features of the cervical spine and the impact of capsular ligament laxity, to discuss the disorders causing chronic neck pain and their current treatments, and lastly, to present prolotherapy as a viable treatment option that heals injured ligaments, restores stability to the spine, and resolves chronic neck pain. The capsular ligaments are the main stabilizing structures of the facet joints in the cervical spine and have been implicated as a major source of chronic neck pain. Chronic neck pain often reflects a state of instability in the cervical spine and is a symptom common to a number of conditions described herein, including disc herniation, cervical spondylosis, whiplash injury and whiplash associated disorder, postconcussion syndrome, vertebrobasilar insufficiency, and Barré-Liéou syndrome. When the capsular ligaments are injured, they become elongated and exhibit laxity, which causes excessive movement of the cervical vertebrae. In the upper cervical spine (C0-C2), this can cause a number of other symptoms including, but not limited to, nerve irritation and vertebrobasilar insufficiency with associated vertigo, tinnitus, dizziness, facial pain, arm pain, and migraine headaches. In the lower cervical spine (C3-C7), this can cause muscle spasms, crepitation, and/or paresthesia in addition to chronic neck pain. In either case, the presence of

  11. Chronic neck pain: making the connection between capsular ligament laxity and cervical instability.

    PubMed

    Steilen, Danielle; Hauser, Ross; Woldin, Barbara; Sawyer, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    The use of conventional modalities for chronic neck pain remains debatable, primarily because most treatments have had limited success. We conducted a review of the literature published up to December 2013 on the diagnostic and treatment modalities of disorders related to chronic neck pain and concluded that, despite providing temporary relief of symptoms, these treatments do not address the specific problems of healing and are not likely to offer long-term cures. The objectives of this narrative review are to provide an overview of chronic neck pain as it relates to cervical instability, to describe the anatomical features of the cervical spine and the impact of capsular ligament laxity, to discuss the disorders causing chronic neck pain and their current treatments, and lastly, to present prolotherapy as a viable treatment option that heals injured ligaments, restores stability to the spine, and resolves chronic neck pain. The capsular ligaments are the main stabilizing structures of the facet joints in the cervical spine and have been implicated as a major source of chronic neck pain. Chronic neck pain often reflects a state of instability in the cervical spine and is a symptom common to a number of conditions described herein, including disc herniation, cervical spondylosis, whiplash injury and whiplash associated disorder, postconcussion syndrome, vertebrobasilar insufficiency, and Barré-Liéou syndrome. When the capsular ligaments are injured, they become elongated and exhibit laxity, which causes excessive movement of the cervical vertebrae. In the upper cervical spine (C0-C2), this can cause a number of other symptoms including, but not limited to, nerve irritation and vertebrobasilar insufficiency with associated vertigo, tinnitus, dizziness, facial pain, arm pain, and migraine headaches. In the lower cervical spine (C3-C7), this can cause muscle spasms, crepitation, and/or paresthesia in addition to chronic neck pain. In either case, the presence of

  12. Mechanical evaluation by patient-specific finite element analyses demonstrates therapeutic effects for osteoporotic vertebrae.

    PubMed

    Tawara, Daisuke; Sakamoto, Jiro; Murakami, Hideki; Kawahara, Norio; Oda, Juhachi; Tomita, Katsuro

    2010-01-01

    Osteoporosis can lead to bone compressive fractures in the lower lumbar vertebrae. In order to assess the recovery of vertebral strength during drug treatment for osteoporosis, it is necessary not only to measure the bone mass but also to perform patient-specific mechanical analyses, since the strength of osteoporotic vertebrae is strongly dependent on patient-specific factors, such as bone shape and bone density distribution in cancellous bone, which are related to stress distribution in the vertebrae. In the present study, patient-specific general (not voxel) finite element analyses of osteoporotic vertebrae during drug treatment were performed over time. We compared changes in bone density and compressive principal strain distribution in a relative manner using models for the first lumbar vertebra based on computer tomography images of four patients at three time points (before therapy, and after 6 and 12 months of therapy). The patient-specific mechanical analyses indicated that increases in bone density and decreases in compressive principal strain were significant in some osteoporotic vertebrae. The data suggested that the vertebrae were strengthened structurally and the drug treatment was effective in preventing compression fractures. The effectiveness of patient-specific mechanical analyses for providing useful and important information for the prognosis of osteoporosis is demonstrated.

  13. [The forensic medical evaluation of the injuries to the cervical spine in the driver and the front-seat passenger of a modern motor vehicle after the frontal crash].

    PubMed

    Pigolkin, I; Dubrovin, A; Sedykh, E p; Mosoyan

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to elucidate the specific features of the lesions of the cervical spine in the driver and the front-seat passenger of a modern car after the frontal crash. We made use of the archival materials of forensic medical expertises concerning the traffic accidents carried out in the city of Moscow during the period from 2005 to 2012. The study was focused on the analysis of the character of the fractures of cervical vertebrae in the drivers (n = 55) and the front-seat passengers (n = 85) of a modern motor vehicle involved in a traffic accident. It was shown that the drivers most frequently suffer bending-extension fractures of the cervical vertebrae, with the II-IV vertebrae being especially frequently subject to multiple fractures resulting in the damage to the anterior support column, sometimes to both the anterior and posterior columns, and much rarer to the posterior column. The front-seat passengers also suffer bending-extension fractures. The IV-VI vertebrae are most frequently affected in them with isolated damages to either the anterior or the posterior support column of the neck vertebrae.

  14. Radiotherapy in Ewing tumors of the vertebrae: Treatment results and local relapse analysis of the Chess 81/86 and EICESS 92 trials

    SciTech Connect

    Schuck, Andreas . E-mail: schuck@uni-muenster.de; Ahrens, Susanne; Schorlemer, Ines von; Kuhlen, Michaela; Paulussen, Michael; Hunold, Andrea; Gosheger, Georg; Winkelmann, Winfried; Dunst, Juergen; Willich, Normann; Juergens, Heribert

    2005-12-01

    Purpose: Treatment results in patients with Ewing tumors of the vertebrae enrolled in the Cooperative Ewing's Sarcoma Study (CESS) 81, 86, and the European Intergroup Cooperative Ewing's Sarcoma Study (EICESS) 92 trials were analyzed with special emphasis on radiation-associated factors. Patients and Methods: A retrospective analysis was performed on 116 patients with primary tumors of the cervical, thoracic, or lumbar vertebrae treated between 1981 and 1999. Furthermore, a relapse analysis was done on those patients who underwent radiotherapy and subsequently had a local recurrence. Results: A total of 64.6% of the patients received definitive radiotherapy; 27.5% of patients had surgery and radiotherapy. Only 4 patients (3.4%) underwent definitive surgery. Twenty-seven patients presented with metastases at diagnosis. 22.4% of the total group developed a local relapse. Among the subgroup with definitive radiotherapy, local recurrence was seen in 17 of 75 patients (22.6%). Event-free survival and survival at 5 years were 47% and 58%, respectively. Of the 14 evaluable patients with a local relapse after radiotherapy, 13 were in-field. No correlation between radiation dose and local control could be found. Conclusion: Surgery with wide resection margins is rarely possible. The results after definitive radiotherapy in vertebral tumors are comparable to those of other tumor sites when definitive radiotherapy is given. Nearly all local relapses after radiotherapy are in-field.

  15. Lumbosacral transitional vertebra and thoracic limb malformations in a Chihuahua puppy.

    PubMed

    Schultz, V A; Watson, A G

    1995-01-01

    A three-month-old, male Chihuahua puppy with congenital absence of the distal 40% of the right thoracic limb was examined. The limb ended as a short, rounded, skin-covered stump. Radiography revealed a 40% shortened humerus tapered to a blunt end without its distal extremity. Dissection of the left thoracic limb identified luxation of the elbow joint and absence of the fourth digital pad. Alizarin-red staining and clearing demonstrated syndactylous fourth and fifth digits in the left thoracic limb and an anomalous eighth lumbar vertebra. This additional vertebra was unilaterally sacralized and constituted a lumbosacral transitional vertebra.

  16. Quantitative evaluation of cervical cord compression by computed tomographic myelography in Thoroughbred foals

    PubMed Central

    YAMADA, Kazutaka; SATO, Fumio; HADA, Tetsuro; HORIUCHI, Noriyuki; IKEDA, Hiroki; NISHIHARA, Kahori; SASAKI, Naoki; KOBAYASHI, Yoshiyasu; NAMBO, Yasuo

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Five Thoroughbred foals (age, 8–33 weeks; median age, 31 weeks; weight, 122–270 kg; median weight, 249 kg) exhibiting ataxia with suspected cervical myelopathy (n=4) and limb malformation (n=1) were subjected to computed tomographic (CT) myelography. The areas of the subarachnoid space and cervical cord were measured on transverse CT images. The area of the cervical cord was divided by the area of subarachnoid space, and stenosis ratios were quantitatively evaluated and compared on the basis of histopathological examination. The sites with a ratio above 52.8% could have been primary lesion sites in the histopathological examination, although one site with a ratio of 54.1% was not a primary lesion site. Therefore, in this study, a ratio between 52.8–54.1% was suggested to be borderline for physical compression that damages the cervical cord. All the cervical vertebrae could not be scanned in three of the five cases. Therefore, CT myelography is not a suitable method for locating the site of compression, but it should be used for quantitative evaluation of cervical stenosis diagnosed by conventional myelography. In conclusion, the stenosis ratios determined using CT myelography could be applicable for detecting primary lesion sites in the cervical cord. PMID:27974873

  17. ADXS11-001 High Dose HPV+ Cervical Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-17

    Effects of Immunotherapy; Metastatic/Recurrent Cervical Cancer; Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Cell Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Cervical Small Cell Carcinoma; Stage III Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer; Stage IVB Cervical Cancer

  18. Vaccines against cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Jansen, Kathrin U

    2004-11-01

    Cervical cancer and precancerous lesions of the genital tract are a major threat to women's health worldwide. Although the introduction of screening tests to detect cervical cancer and its precursor lesions has reduced overall cervical cancer rates in the developed world, the approach was largely unsuccessful for developing countries, primarily due to a lack of appropriate infrastructures and high costs. Annually, 470,000 cervical cancer cases are diagnosed worldwide, of which 80% occur in developing countries. Despite advances in treatment of cervical cancer, approximately half of the women afflicted with the disease will die. Over 20 years of dedicated research has provided conclusive evidence that a subset of human papillomaviruses are the aetiological agents for cervical cancer. Finding a viral origin for this disease provided the basis to fight cervical cancer using prophylactic or therapeutic vaccination. Both vaccine approaches are reviewed here, with an emphasis on recent clinical data.

  19. Intradiscal Pressure Changes during Manual Cervical Distraction: A Cadaveric Study

    PubMed Central

    Gudavalli, M. R.; Potluri, T.; Carandang, G.; Havey, R. M.; Voronov, L. I.; Cox, J. M.; Rowell, R. M.; Kruse, R. A.; Joachim, G. C.; Patwardhan, A. G.; Henderson, C. N. R.; Goertz, C.

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to measure intradiscal pressure (IDP) changes in the lower cervical spine during a manual cervical distraction (MCD) procedure. Incisions were made anteriorly, and pressure transducers were inserted into each nucleus at lower cervical discs. Four skilled doctors of chiropractic (DCs) performed MCD procedure on nine specimens in prone position with contacts at C5 or at C6 vertebrae with the headpiece in different positions. IDP changes, traction forces, and manually applied posterior-to-anterior forces were analyzed using descriptive statistics. IDP decreases were observed during MCD procedure at all lower cervical levels C4-C5, C5-C6, and C6-C7. The mean IDP decreases were as high as 168.7 KPa. Mean traction forces were as high as 119.2 N. Posterior-to-anterior forces applied during manual traction were as high as 82.6 N. Intraclinician reliability for IDP decrease was high for all four DCs. While two DCs had high intraclinician reliability for applied traction force, the other two DCs demonstrated only moderate reliability. IDP decreases were greatest during moving flexion and traction. They were progressevely less pronouced with neutral traction, fixed flexion and traction, and generalized traction. PMID:24023587

  20. Intradiscal Pressure Changes during Manual Cervical Distraction: A Cadaveric Study.

    PubMed

    Gudavalli, M R; Potluri, T; Carandang, G; Havey, R M; Voronov, L I; Cox, J M; Rowell, R M; Kruse, R A; Joachim, G C; Patwardhan, A G; Henderson, C N R; Goertz, C

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to measure intradiscal pressure (IDP) changes in the lower cervical spine during a manual cervical distraction (MCD) procedure. Incisions were made anteriorly, and pressure transducers were inserted into each nucleus at lower cervical discs. Four skilled doctors of chiropractic (DCs) performed MCD procedure on nine specimens in prone position with contacts at C5 or at C6 vertebrae with the headpiece in different positions. IDP changes, traction forces, and manually applied posterior-to-anterior forces were analyzed using descriptive statistics. IDP decreases were observed during MCD procedure at all lower cervical levels C4-C5, C5-C6, and C6-C7. The mean IDP decreases were as high as 168.7 KPa. Mean traction forces were as high as 119.2 N. Posterior-to-anterior forces applied during manual traction were as high as 82.6 N. Intraclinician reliability for IDP decrease was high for all four DCs. While two DCs had high intraclinician reliability for applied traction force, the other two DCs demonstrated only moderate reliability. IDP decreases were greatest during moving flexion and traction. They were progressevely less pronouced with neutral traction, fixed flexion and traction, and generalized traction.

  1. [Preliminary application of the fusion cage of biomimetic n-HA/PA66 composites in anterior cervical intervertebral fusion].

    PubMed

    Ou, Yunsheng; Jiang, Dianming; Quan, Zhengxue; An, Hong; Tang, Ke; Li, Jia; Shen, Changhuan

    2010-04-01

    This study was aimed to evaluate the preliminary efficacy and the safety of the fusion cage made of biomimetic nano-hydroxyapatite and polyamide 66 (n-HA/PA66) composites for the structural reconstruction and the restoration of height of vertebral body in the case of cervical spondylosis by anterior surgical procedures. 52 patients with cervical spondylosis, received the therapy by discectomy with or without vertebrae resection and decompression, and the fusion cage of n-HA/PA66 vertebra implant with bone chip, and titanium plate system was fixed. All cases were followed up for 6 to 25 months. All the patients' preoperative symptoms subsided without any serious complication, and no patient complained of lasting soreness. No effusion or flare was found, and no recurrence happened in the follow-up. The preoperative JOA score was 10.4, and post-operative JOA score 15.7. The X-ray films of all cases demonstrated successful fusion with good curvature and height, and there was no sinking or collapse. The stability was satisfactory; the reconstructive height of vertebra was maintained. No complications such as infection and screw broken came into being. The fusion cage of the biomimetic n-HA/PA66 composites can effectively restore the height and structure of vertebra. It may have the potential for use as a satisfactory prosthestic vertebral body replacement.

  2. Cervical pedicle screw fixation in traumatic cervical subluxation after laminectomy using the pedicle axis view technique under fluoroscopy.

    PubMed

    Machino, Masaaki; Yukawa, Yasutsugu; Ito, Keigo; Nakashima, Hiroaki; Kanbara, Shunsuke; Morita, Daigo; Kato, Fumihiko

    2012-10-10

    Cervical pedicle screw (CPS) fixation has recently been performed in patients in need of cervical reconstruction. We report the case of a 50-year-old man who was operated for traumatic cervical vertebra subluxation using CPS fixation, in whom laminectomy had been performed in the past. We performed CPS fixation using the pedicle axis view technique under fluoroscopy. The four pedicle screws were accurately inserted within the pedicles without perforating the bone cortex of the pedicles. A navigation system is useful for cervical spine surgery because it enables a surgeon to perform relatively safe and accurate surgery during transpedicular screw fixation. However, attachment of the stereotactic reference arc to the spinous process is impossible, and the application of a navigation system is limited in cases in which laminectomy has been performed in the past. We have been using the pedicle axis view technique under fluoroscopy and have found that if we take care of the entry point accurately, we can safely insert the pedicle screw in cases with fewer landmarks.

  3. Study of the influence of degenerative intervertebral disc changes on the deformation behavior of the cervical spine segment in flexion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolmakova, Tatyana V.

    2016-11-01

    The paper describes the model of the cervical spine segment (C3-C4) and the calculation results of the deformation behavior of the segment under degenerative changes of the intervertebral disc. The segment model was built based on the experimental literature data taking into account the presence of the cortical and cancellous bone tissue of vertebral bodies. The calculation results show that degenerative changes of the intervertebral disc cause the immobility of the C3 vertebra at flexion.

  4. Atlanto-axial approach for cervical myelography in a Thoroughbred horse with complete fusion of the atlanto-occipital bones

    PubMed Central

    Aleman, Monica; Dimock, Abigail N.; Wisner, Erik R.; Prutton, Jamie W.; Madigan, John E.

    2014-01-01

    A 2-year-old Thoroughbred gelding with clinical signs localized to the first 6 spinal cord segments (C1 to C6) had complete fusion of the atlanto-occipital bones which precluded performing a routine myelogram. An ultrasound-assisted myelogram at the intervertebral space between the atlas and axis was successfully done and identified a marked extradural compressive myelopathy at the level of the atlas and axis, and axis and third cervical vertebrae. PMID:25392550

  5. Effect of pillow height on the biomechanics of the head-neck complex: investigation of the cranio-cervical pressure and cervical spine alignment

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Hui; Zhou, Yan; Lin, Jin

    2016-01-01

    Background While appropriate pillow height is crucial to maintaining the quality of sleep and overall health, there are no universal, evidence-based guidelines for pillow design or selection. We aimed to evaluate the effect of pillow height on cranio-cervical pressure and cervical spine alignment. Methods Ten healthy subjects (five males) aged 26 ± 3.6 years were recruited. The average height, weight, and neck length were 167 ± 9.3 cm, 59.6 ± 11.9 kg, and 12.9 ± 1.2 cm respectively. The subjects lay on pillows of four different heights (H0, 110 mm; H1, 130 mm; H2, 150 mm; and H3, 170 mm). The cranio-cervical pressure distribution over the pillow was recorded; the peak and average pressures for each pillow height were compared by one-way ANOVA with repeated measures. Cervical spine alignment was studied using a finite element model constructed based on data from the Visible Human Project. The coordinate of the center of each cervical vertebra were predicted for each pillow height. Three spine alignment parameters (cervical angle, lordosis distance and kyphosis distance) were identified. Results The average cranial pressure at pillow height H3 was approximately 30% higher than that at H0, and significantly different from those at H1 and H2 (p < 0.05). The average cervical pressure at pillow height H0 was 65% lower than that at H3, and significantly different from those at H1 and H2 (p < 0.05). The peak cervical pressures at pillow heights H2 and H3 were significantly different from that at H0 (p < 0.05). With respect to cervical spine alignment, raising pillow height from H0 to H3 caused an increase of 66.4% and 25.1% in cervical angle and lordosis distance, respectively, and a reduction of 43.4% in kyphosis distance. Discussion Pillow height elevation significantly increased the average and peak pressures of the cranial and cervical regions, and increased the extension and lordosis of the cervical spine. The cranio-cervical pressures and cervical spine alignment

  6. The early origin of vertebral anomalies, as illustrated by a 'butterfly vertebra'.

    PubMed Central

    Müller, F; O'Rahilly, R; Benson, D R

    1986-01-01

    An anomalous (butterfly) eleventh thoracic vertebra in a fetus of 63 mm greatest length is described and graphic reconstructions (together with normal controls) are provided. The cartilaginous hemicentra are separated by disc-like material. Cartilaginous bars to adjacent vertebrae are present. The neural arch is complete. The notochord is not duplicated. Only one comparable case in the embryonic period has been described previously. After a discussion of cleft vertebrae in the human and in experimental animals, a developmental timetable of the appearance of several vertebral anomalies is provided. The sensitive period for butterfly vertebrae, depending on the mode of origin, seems to be 3-6 postovulatory weeks. More severe anomalies, such as the split notochord syndrome, appear earlier. It is concluded that most of the vertebral anomalies discussed arise during the embryonic period proper, although the timing of a few, such as spina bifida occulta, extends into the early fetal period. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 3 Fig. 5 PMID:3693103

  7. A statistical multi-vertebrae shape+pose model for segmentation of CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasoulian, Abtin; Rohling, Robert N.; Abolmaesumi, Purang

    2013-03-01

    Segmentation of the spinal column from CT images is a pre-processing step for a range of image guided interventions. Current techniques focus on identification and separate segmentation of each vertebra. Recently, statistical multi-object shape models have been introduced to extract common statistical characteristics between several anatomies. These models are also used for segmentation purposes and are shown to be robust, accurate, and computationally tractable. In this paper, we reconstruct a statistical multi-vertebrae shape+pose model and propose a novel technique to register such a model to CT images. We validate our technique in terms of accuracy of the multi-vertebrae segmentation of CT images acquired from 16 subjects. The mean distance error achieved for all vertebrae is 1.17 mm with standard deviation of 0.38 mm.

  8. Cervical Klippel-Feil syndrome predisposing an elderly African man to central cord myelopathy following minor trauma.

    PubMed

    Adeleye, A Olufemi; Akinyemi, R Olusola

    2010-09-01

    An otherwise-healthy, active 83-year-old Nigerian man developed reversible central cord myelopathy from a mild fall on a level surface. Cervical spine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed C5, 6, and 7 block vertebrae and marked disc extrusions only at the immediately adjoining upper and lower non-fused segments of the cervical spine. There was no spinal canal stenosis otherwise. We think that the unique presentation of this case of Klippel-Feil syndrome further supports the impression that following fusion (congenital or acquired) of one segment of the spinal column, hypermobility of the non-fused adjoining segments may strongly predispose to more disc extrusions.

  9. Feasibility of C2 Vertebra Screws Placement in Patient With Occipitalization of Atlas: A Tomographic Study.

    PubMed

    Ji, Wei; Liu, Xiang; Huang, Wenhan; Huang, Zucheng; Li, Xueshi; Chen, Jianting; Wu, Zenghui; Zhu, Qingan

    2015-09-01

    Occipitalization of atlas (OA) is a congenital disease with the possibility of anomalous bony anatomies and the C2 pedicle screw insertion is technically challenging. However, there are no existing literatures clarified the dimensions and angulations of the C2 pedicles, lamina and lateral masses for screw insertion in patients with OA. Therefore, the aim of this study was to assess the morphometric features of C2 for screw placement in OA to guide the use of surgical screws. Measurements of the OA patients on the computer tomography (CT) images including lamina angle, length and thickness, pedicle angle, length and thickness, and lateral mass thickness and length of the axis vertebra. The OA patients data were compared with age and gender matched cohort of randomly selected patients in a control group without OA. The picture archiving and communication system was used for all patients who had received cervical CT scanning between January 2001 and January 2015. Measurements were performed independently by 2 experienced observers who reviewed the CT scans and recorded the patients with OA. Statistical analysis was performed at a level of significance P < 0.05. A total of 73 patients (29 males and 44 females) were eligible to be included in the OA group. In most of the measurements the pathological cohort had significantly smaller values compared to the control group (P < 0.05). In the OA group, only 45% of the pedicles and 88% of the lamina had thicknesses bigger than 3.5 mm. Both groups had all pedicle and lamina lengths bigger than 12 mm. Regarding the length of the lateral mass, no value was bigger than 12 mm in the OA group, whereas 40% of the values in the control group were bigger than 12 mm. The average pedicle and laminar angles were 37° and 49° in the patients with OA, respectively. The variable anatomy in patients with OA needs to be taken into account when performing spinal stabilization as the C2 bony architectures are significantly

  10. Feasibility of C2 Vertebra Screws Placement in Patient With Occipitalization of Atlas

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Wei; Liu, Xiang; Huang, Wenhan; Huang, Zucheng; Li, Xueshi; Chen, Jianting; Wu, Zenghui; Zhu, Qingan

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Occipitalization of atlas (OA) is a congenital disease with the possibility of anomalous bony anatomies and the C2 pedicle screw insertion is technically challenging. However, there are no existing literatures clarified the dimensions and angulations of the C2 pedicles, lamina and lateral masses for screw insertion in patients with OA. Therefore, the aim of this study was to assess the morphometric features of C2 for screw placement in OA to guide the use of surgical screws. Measurements of the OA patients on the computer tomography (CT) images including lamina angle, length and thickness, pedicle angle, length and thickness, and lateral mass thickness and length of the axis vertebra. The OA patients data were compared with age and gender matched cohort of randomly selected patients in a control group without OA. The picture archiving and communication system was used for all patients who had received cervical CT scanning between January 2001 and January 2015. Measurements were performed independently by 2 experienced observers who reviewed the CT scans and recorded the patients with OA. Statistical analysis was performed at a level of significance P < 0.05. A total of 73 patients (29 males and 44 females) were eligible to be included in the OA group. In most of the measurements the pathological cohort had significantly smaller values compared to the control group (P < 0.05). In the OA group, only 45% of the pedicles and 88% of the lamina had thicknesses bigger than 3.5 mm. Both groups had all pedicle and lamina lengths bigger than 12 mm. Regarding the length of the lateral mass, no value was bigger than 12 mm in the OA group, whereas 40% of the values in the control group were bigger than 12 mm. The average pedicle and laminar angles were 37° and 49° in the patients with OA, respectively. The variable anatomy in patients with OA needs to be taken into account when performing spinal stabilization as the C2 bony architectures are

  11. Detection of degenerative change in lateral projection cervical spine x-ray images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jebri, Beyrem; Phillips, Michael; Knapp, Karen; Appelboam, Andy; Reuben, Adam; Slabaugh, Greg

    2015-03-01

    Degenerative changes to the cervical spine can be accompanied by neck pain, which can result from narrowing of the intervertebral disc space and growth of osteophytes. In a lateral x-ray image of the cervical spine, degenerative changes are characterized by vertebral bodies that have indistinct boundaries and limited spacing between vertebrae. In this paper, we present a machine learning approach to detect and localize degenerative changes in lateral x-ray images of the cervical spine. Starting from a user-supplied set of points in the center of each vertebral body, we fit a central spline, from which a region of interest is extracted and image features are computed. A Random Forest classifier labels regions as degenerative change or normal. Leave-one-out cross-validation studies performed on a dataset of 103 patients demonstrates performance of above 95% accuracy.

  12. Bone Lose of the Ancient Mediterranean lumbar vertebrae : Iasos, 6th century ad.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaya, Serdar; Solmaz, Ilker; Ilıca, A. Turan; Karaçalıoğlu, Özgür; Damla Yılmaz, Nalan; Başoğlu, Okşan; Kılıc, Selim; Izci, Yusuf

    Evaluation of bone mineral density (BMD) of the ancient peoples has received great interest by anthropologists. The aims of this study are to investigate the lumbar vertebrae of the Iasos people during the Byzantine period, in order to determine the prevalence of bone loss and to interpret dietary conditions of ancient Mediterranean populations. Lumbar vertebrae belonging to twenty eight skeletons of the 6th c AD were analyzed by radiographs and dual energy X-ray absorptiometry. The BMD values for each biologic sex and age group were compared. The correlation between the BMD and radiological features was also analyzed. The mean BMD was 0.940 g/cm2. BMD was decreased by aging in both sexes, but it was not significant. Osteopenia was found in 11 (39%) and osteoporosis in 4 (14.3%) out 28 vertebrae. The BMD was normal in 13 (46%) out of 28 vertebrae. Osteopenia was present in 7 (38%) of 18 male vertebrae and 4 (40%) of 10 female vertebrae. The spine score was high in the male group and there was a strong positive correlation between the BMD and spine score for both sexes. This study revealed that the BMD decreased by aging and that osteopenia was a problem in both sexes of the Iasos people during the 6th c AD. There was no correlation between the BMD and radiological features for age groups and biological sexes.

  13. Effect of simvastatin on osteogenesis of the lumbar vertebrae in ovariectomized rats

    PubMed Central

    Long, Teng; Tang, Tingting; Hao, Yongqiang; Zhu, Zhenan; Shao, Litian; Liu, Ming

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess the role of simvastatin on osteoporosis of the vertebrae by examining the effect of simvastatin on the osteogenesis of the lumbar vertebra in ovariectomized (OVX) rats. A total of 60 6-month-old female Sprague Dawley rats were divided into one sham group and five ovariectomized groups, consisting of four simvastatin groups and one control group. Four dosages of simvastatin (5, 10, 20 and 40 mg/kg/d) were administered by gavage for three months. L4 vertebrae were examined by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA) and peripheral quantitative computed tomography (pQCT) to determine the mineral apposition rate (MAR). L5 vertebrae were examined using a compression biomechanical test. Although the measurements from DEXA, pQCT and MAR, and the biomechanical parameters in the OVX + simvastatin rats were higher than those for the OVX + vehicle group, no significant differences were detected. Therefore, simvastatin may not improve osteogenesis of the lumbar vertebra in OVX rats or prevent osteoporosis of the spinal vertebrae. PMID:28105128

  14. Automatic lumbar vertebra segmentation from clinical CT for wedge compression fracture diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Subarna; Alomari, Raja'S.; Chaudhary, Vipin; Dhillon, Gurmeet

    2011-03-01

    Lumbar vertebral fractures vary greatly in types and causes and usually result from severe trauma or pathological conditions such as osteoporosis. Lumbar wedge compression fractures are amongst the most common ones where the vertebra is severely compressed forming a wedge shape and causing pain and pressure on the nerve roots and the spine. Since vertebral segmentation is the first step in any automated diagnosis task, we present a fully automated method for robustly localizing and segmenting the vertebrae for preparation of vertebral fracture diagnosis. Our segmentation method consists of five main steps towards the CAD(Computer-Aided Diagnosis) system: 1) Localization of the intervertebral discs. 2) Localization of the vertebral skeleton. 3) Segmentation of the individual vertebra. 4) Detection of the vertebrae center line and 5) Detection of the vertebrae major boundary points. Our segmentation results are promising with an average error of 1.5mm (modified Hausdorff distance metric) on 50 clinical CT cases i.e. a total of 250 lumbar vertebrae. We also present promising preliminary results for automatic wedge compression fracture diagnosis on 15 cases, 7 of which have one or more vertebral compression fracture, and obtain an accuracy of 97.33%.

  15. Correlation between cervical vertebral maturation and chronological age in a group of Iranian females

    PubMed Central

    Safavi, Seyed Mohammadreza; Beikaii, Hanie; Hassanizadeh, Raheleh; Younessian, Farnaz; Baghban, Alireza Akbarzadeh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Correlation between chronological age at different stages of cervical vertebral maturation (CVM) is important in clinical orthodontic practice. The objective of this study was to evaluate the correlation between CVM stage and chronological age in a group of Iranian female patients. Materials and Methods: This study was conducted on 196 digital lateral cephalometry of female patients with the age ranged 9-14 years. The CVM stage was determined with two calibrated examiners, using the method developed by Baccetti and its correlation with mean chronological age was assessed by the Spearman rank-order. The intra and inter-agreements were evaluated by weighted Kappa statistics in overall diagnosis of stages, in addition to determination of presence or absent of concavities at the lower border of second, third and fourth cervical vertebrae and the shapes of the third and fourth vertebrae. P < 0.05 was considered as significant. Results: The correlation coefficient between CVM stages and chronological age was relatively low (r = 0.62). The least amount of inter-observer agreement was determined to be at the clinical decision of the shape of the fourth vertebra. Conclusion: Regarding the low reported correlation, the concomitant usage of other skeletal indicators seems necessary for precise determination of physiological age of the patients. PMID:26604958

  16. Large interarcuate spaces in the cervical vertebral column of the tyrolean mountain sheep.

    PubMed

    Turkof, E; Jurasch, N; Grassberger, M; Schwendenwein, S; Habib, D; Knolle, E; Losert, U

    2003-02-01

    Large interarcual spaces have been described between the arcus vertebrae C5/C6 and C6/C7 in the cervical vertebral column of Nubian goats. This aperture enables direct access to spinal cord and rootlets without the need to perform a hemilaminectomy. The present study was performed in order to determine whether these large interarcual spaces can also be found in the vertebral column of the Tyrolean mountain sheep, as this small ruminant, which is anatomically very similar to the Nubian goat, is frequently used for experimental purposes at the Surgical University Clinic in Austria. The carcasses of 10 sheep (six females, four males; range of age: 2.5-6 years, range of weight: 52-89 kg) were dissected and the vertebral column was exposed. All 10 sheep showed elliptic openings between the fourth cervical and the first thoracal vertebrae. Three sheep had additional openings between the first and the second thoracal vertebrae. All openings were covered solitarily by the ligamentum flavum and under this ligamentum lay the spinal cord without any further osseous or ligamentous protection. These findings are not mentioned in the common textbooks of veterinary anatomy and deserve attention, as they can be a step forward towards non-traumatic experimental surgery on the spinal cord.

  17. Signs and Symptoms of Cervical Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Detection, Diagnosis, and Staging Signs and Symptoms of Cervical Cancer Women with early cervical cancers and pre- ... Ask Your Doctor About Cervical Cancer? More In Cervical Cancer About Cervical Cancer Causes, Risk Factors, and ...

  18. Cervical cancer - screening and prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... cancer screening; Dysplasia - cervical cancer screening; Cervical cancer - HPV vaccine ... A vaccine is available to protect against the HPV types that cause most cervical cancer in women. The vaccine is: Given as a series of 2 shots. ...

  19. Sexual Dimorphism in Newborn Vertebrae and its Potential Implications

    PubMed Central

    Ponrartana, Skorn; Aggabao, Patricia C.; Dharmavaram, Naga L.; Fisher, Carissa L.; Friedlich, Philippe; Epi, MS; Devaskar, Sherin U.; Gilsanz, Vicente

    2015-01-01

    Objective To examine whether the sex-related differences in vertebral cross-sectional area (CSA) found in children and at the timing of peak bone mass – a major determinant of osteoporosis and future fracture risk – are also present at birth. Study design Vertebral CSA, vertebral height, and intervertebral disc height were measured using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in 70 healthy full-term newborns (35 male and 35 female). Additionally, measures of the length and CSA of the humerus, musculature, and adiposity were obtained. Results Weight, body length, and head and waist circumferences did not significantly differ between sexes (all P’s ≥ 0.06). Compared with newborn boys, girls had significantly smaller vertebral cross-sectional dimensions; 1.47 ± 0.11 vs. 1.31 ± 0.12; P < 0.0001. Multiple linear regression analysis indicated that sex was a predictor of vertebral CSA independent of gestational age, birth weight, and body length. In contrast, sexes were monomorphic with regard to vertebral height, intervertebral disc height, and spinal length (all P’s ≥ 0.11). There were also no sex differences in the length or cross-sectional dimensions of the humerus or in measures of musculature and adiposity (all P’s ≥ 0.10). Conclusions Factors related to sex influence fetal development of the axial skeleton. The smaller vertebral CSA in females is associated with greater flexibility of the spine that could represent the human adaptation to fetal load. Unfortunately, it also imparts a mechanical disadvantage that increases stress within the vertebrae for all physical activities and the susceptibility for fragility fractures later in life. PMID:26028289

  20. Subaxial cervical pedicle screw insertion with newly defined entry point and trajectory: accuracy evaluation in cadavers.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xiujun; Chaudhari, Rahul; Wu, Chunhui; Mehbod, Amir A; Transfeldt, Ensor E

    2010-01-01

    Successful placement of cervical pedicle screws requires accurate identification of both entry point and trajectory. However, literature has not provided consistent recommendations regarding the direction of pedicle screw insertion and entry point location. The objective of this study was to define a guideline regarding the optimal entry point and trajectory in placing subaxial cervical pedicle screws and to evaluate the screw accuracy in cadaver cervical spines. The guideline for entry point and trajectory for each vertebra was established based on the recently published morphometric data. Six fresh frozen cervical spines (C3-C7) were used. There were two men and four women. After posterior exposure, the entry point was determined and the cortical bone of the entry point was removed using a 2-mm burr. Pilot holes were created with a cervical probe based on the guideline using fluoroscopy. After tapping, 3.5-mm screws with appropriate length were inserted. After screw insertion, every vertebra was dissected and inspected for pedicle breach. The pedicle width, height, pedicle transverse angulation and actual screw insertion angle were measured. A total of 60 pedicle screws were inserted. No statistical difference in pedicle width and height was found between the left and right sides for each level. The overall accuracy of pedicle screws was 83.3%. The remaining 13.3% screws had noncritical breach, and 3.3% had critical breach. The critical breach was not caused by the guideline. There was no statistical difference between the pedicle transverse angulation and the actual screw trajectory created using the guideline. There was statistical difference in pedicle width between the breach and non-breach screws. In conclusion, high success rate of subaxial cervical pedicle screw placement can be achieved using the recently proposed operative guideline and oblique views of fluoroscopy. However, careful preoperative planning and good surgical skills are still required to

  1. Traumatic Spondylolisthesis of the Axis Vertebra in Adults.

    PubMed

    Schleicher, Philipp; Scholz, Matti; Pingel, Andreas; Kandziora, Frank

    2015-08-01

    Study Design Narrative review. Objective To elucidate the current concepts in diagnosis and treatment of traumatic spondylolisthesis of the axis. Methods Literature review using PubMed, Google Scholar, and Cochrane databases. Results The traumatic spondylolisthesis of the axis accounts to 5% of all cervical spine injuries and is defined by a bilateral separation of the C2 vertebral body from the neural arch. The precise location of the fracture line may vary widely. For understanding the pathobiomechanics, the involvement of the C2-C3 disk is essential. Although its synonym "hangman's fracture" suggests an extension moment as primary injury mechanism, flexion moments are also proven to cause such fracture morphology. The axial force vector (distraction versus compression) is thought to have a significant effect on the neurologic involvement. The most widely accepted classifications, according to Effendi and modified by Levine, regard the displacement of the C2 vertebral body and possible locking of the facet joints. For decisions on conservative versus surgical therapy, a definitive statement about the stability is essential. The stability is determined by involvement of the C2-C3 disk and longitudinal ligaments, which frequently cannot be assessed by X-ray or computed tomography alone. The assessment of this soft tissue injury therefore requires additional imaging either by magnetic resonance imaging to display the disk and longitudinal ligaments or dynamic fluoroscopy to assess functional behavior of the C2-C3 motion segment. If stability is proven, an immobilization of the cervical spine in a semirigid cervical collar is sufficient. Unstable lesions require surgical stabilization. The standard procedure is an anterior C2-C3 diskectomy and fusion, because of the lower morbidity of the anterior approach and the motion preservation between C1 and C2. In rare cases (irreducible locked facet joints, the necessity of decompression of the vertebral artery

  2. Morphological variation of the thoracolumbar vertebrae in Macropodidae and its functional relevance.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xinmin; Milne, Nick; O'Higgins, Paul

    2005-11-01

    The present study was designed to investigate how the form of the marsupial thoracolumbar vertebrae varies to cope with the particular demands of diverse loading and locomotor behaviors. The vertebral columns of 10 species of Macropodidae, with various body masses and modes of locomotion, together with two other arboreal marsupials, koala and cuscus, were selected. Seventy-four three-dimensional landmark coordinates were acquired on each of the 10 last presacral vertebrae of the 70 vertebral columns. The interspecific variations of the third lumbar vertebra (L3, which approximates the mean) and the transitional patterns of the thoracolumbar segments were examined using the combined approach of generalized Procrustes analysis (GPA) and principal components analysis (PCA). The results of analyses of an individual vertebra (L3) and of the transitional patterns indicate significant interspecific differences. In the L3 study the first PC shows allometric shape variation, while the second PC seems to relate to adaptation for terrestrial versus arboreal locomotion. When the L3 vertebrae of the common spotted cuscus and koala are included for comparison, the vertebra of the tree kangaroo occupies an intermediate position between the hopping kangaroo and these arboreal marsupials. The L3 vertebrae in the arboreal marsupials possess a distinct dorsoventrally expanded vertebral body, and perpendicularly orientated spinous and transverse processes. The results of the present study suggest that vertebral shape in the kangaroo and wallaroos provides a structural adaptation to hopping through a relatively enlarged loading area and powerful lever system. In contrast, the small-sized bettongs (or rat kangaroos) have a relatively flexible column and elongated levers for the action of back muscles that extend and laterally flex the spine. The complex pattern of vertebral shape transition in the last 10 presacral vertebrae was examined using PCAs that compare between species

  3. Quantitative skeletal evaluation based on cervical vertebral maturation: a longitudinal study of adolescents with normal occlusion.

    PubMed

    Chen, L; Liu, J; Xu, T; Long, X; Lin, J

    2010-07-01

    The study aims were to investigate the correlation between vertebral shape and hand-wrist maturation and to select characteristic parameters of C2-C5 (the second to fifth cervical vertebrae) for cervical vertebral maturation determination by mixed longitudinal data. 87 adolescents (32 males, 55 females) aged 8-18 years with normal occlusion were studied. Sequential lateral cephalograms and hand-wrist radiographs were taken annually for 6 consecutive years. Lateral cephalograms were divided into 11 maturation groups according to Fishman Skeletal Maturity Indicators (SMI). 62 morphological measurements of C2-C5 at 11 different developmental stages (SMI1-11) were measured and analysed. Locally weighted scatterplot smoothing, correlation coefficient analysis and variable cluster analysis were used for statistical analysis. Of the 62 cervical vertebral parameters, 44 were positively correlated with SMI, 6 were negatively correlated and 12 were not correlated. The correlation coefficients between cervical vertebral parameters and SMI were relatively high. Characteristic parameters for quantitative analysis of cervical vertebral maturation were selected. In summary, cervical vertebral maturation could be used reliably to evaluate the skeletal stage instead of the hand-wrist radiographic method. Selected characteristic parameters offered a simple and objective reference for the assessment of skeletal maturity and timing of orthognathic surgery.

  4. Multiple subluxations and comminuted fracture of the cervical spine in a sheep.

    PubMed

    Lin, C-C; Chen, K-S; Lin, Y-L; Chan, J P-W

    2015-01-01

    A 5-month-old, 13.5 kg, female Corriedale sheep was referred to the Veterinary Medicine Teaching Hospital, with a history of traumatic injury of the cervical spine followed by non-ambulatoric tetraparesis that occurred 2 weeks before being admitted to the hospital. At admission, malalignment of the cervical spine with the cranial part of the neck deviating to the right was noted. Neurological examinations identified the absence of postural reactions in both forelimbs, mildly decreased spinal reflexes, and normal reaction to pain perception tests. Radiography revealed malalignment of the cervical vertebrae with subluxations at C1-C2 and C2-C3, and a comminuted fracture of the caudal aspect of C2. The sheep was euthanized due to a presumed poor prognosis. Necropsy and histopathological findings confirmed injuries of the cervical spine from C1 to C3, which were consistent with the clinical finding of tetraparesis in this case. This paper presents a rare case of multiple subluxations of the cervical spine caused by blunt force trauma in a young sheep. These results highlight the importance of an astute clinical diagnosis for such an acute cervical spine trauma and the need for prompt surgical correction for similar cases in the future.

  5. Cervical vertebral injuries associated with the ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament: Imaging features

    PubMed Central

    Ehara, Shigeru

    2017-01-01

    Background Spinal injuries associated with ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament (OPLL) have been characterized. However, the imaging features of traumatic cervical spine fractures in patients with OPLL have not been assessed adequately. Purpose To characterize the patterns of traumatic cervical spine fractures associated with different types of OPLL. Material and Methods We retrospectively analyzed the patterns of fractures resulting from cervical spine injury in patients with OPLL of different types and assessed the fracture patterns in patients with ankylosed segments. Results Twenty-six patients (23 men, 3 women; median age, 67.0 years; age range, 43–87 years) were included. Fall from a height <3 m was the most common trauma. Contiguous type OPLL was seen in 11 patients (42%), segmental type in 11 (42%), and mixed type in four (15%). Four of the contiguous OPLL and one of the mixed OPLL patients had ankylosed segments. The incidence of cervical fractures was 69% (16/26): seven (64%) in contiguous OPLL, five (46%) in segmental OPLL, and in all four patients with mixed OPLL. Unilateral interfacetal fracture-dislocation was most common (4/16); the others were bilateral interfacetal fracture-dislocation, fractures through the ankylosed segment, transdiscal fractures, isolated facet fractures, and compression fractures. Cervical fractures were exclusively observed in the C4 to C7, except in one case occurred at the C2 level. Conclusion Interfacetal fracture-dislocation in the lower cervical vertebrae constitutes the most common injury resulting from minor trauma. PMID:28321332

  6. PAIN CHARACTERISTICS OF TEMPOROMANDIBULAR DISORDER – A PILOT STUDY IN PATIENTS WITH CERVICAL SPINE DYSFUNCTION

    PubMed Central

    Pedroni, Cristiane Rodrigues; de Oliveira, Anamaria Siriani; Bérzin, Fausto

    2006-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of the present pilot study was to describe pain complaints of TMD patients and cervical spine dysfunction. Methods: Fourteen women with myogenous TMD, cervical motion limitation and rotation of at least one of the three first cervical vertebrae evidenced by radiographic examination participated in this study. The multidimensional pain evaluation was accomplished by a Brazilian version of the McGill Pain Questionnaire. Results: The results showed that the most painful body site mentioned was cervical spine, followed by scapular region and temporomandibular joint. More than half of the volunteers reported temporal pain pattern as rhythmic, periodic and, or still, intermittent. The majority of the patients classified the pain intensity assessed at the moment of the evaluation as mild to discomforting. Absolute agreement was not observed among volunteers regarding word dimensions used to describe their pain, although a great number of patients chose the descriptor related to tension as the better expression to describe their painful complaint. Conclusion: Pain characteristics of TMD patients with cervical spine dysfunction showed cervical spine as a common painful region reported and words related to affective and emotional dimensions of pain perception can be used by these patients to qualify their pain complain. PMID:19089063

  7. Bevacizumab, Radiation Therapy, and Cisplatin in Treating Patients With Previously Untreated Locally Advanced Cervical Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-09-22

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Cell Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage III Cervical Cancer

  8. A biomechanical study of two different pedicle screw methods for fixation in osteoporotic and nonosteoporotic vertebrae.

    PubMed

    Higashino, Kosaku; Kim, Jin Hwan; Horton, William C; Hutton, William C

    2012-01-01

    In reconstruction of the osteoporotic spine, patients often show poor outcome because of pedicle screw failure. This study used osteoporotic and nonosteoporotic vertebrae to determine the difference in fixation strength between pedicle screws inserted straight forward and pedicle screws inserted in an upward trajectory toward the superior end plate (i.e., end-plate screws). There is some evidence to suggest that end-plate screws have a strength advantage. The particular focus was on osteoporotic vertebrae. Thirty-three vertebrae (T10-L2) were harvested. The bone mineral density (BMD) was measured: 15 vertebrae were greater than 0.8 g/cm(2) and designated as nonosteoporotic (average BMD 1.146 ± 0.186 g/cm(2)) and 18 vertebrae were designated as osteoporotic (average BMD 0.643 ± 0.088 g/cm(2)). On one pedicle the screw was inserted straight forward and on the other pedicle the screw was inserted as an end-plate screw. The torque of insertion was measured (Proto 6106 torque screwdriver). Using an MTS Mini Bionix, two types of mechanical testing were carried out on each pedicle: (a) cephalocaudad toggling was first carried out to simulate some physiological type loading: 500 cycles at 0.3 Hz, at ±50 N; and (b) then each pedicle screw was pulled out at a displacement rate of 12.5 cm/min.There was no difference in pullout force between the pedicle screws inserted straight forward and the pedicle screws inserted as end-plate screws. This result applies whether the vertebrae were osteoporotic or nonosteoporotic. For both the straight-forward screws and the end-plate screws, a statistically significant correlation was observed between torque of insertion and pullout force. The results of this experiment indicate that pedicle screws inserted as end-plate screws do not provide a strength advantage over pedicle screws inserted straight forward, whether the vertebrae are osteoporotic or not.

  9. Adaptive bone formation in acellular vertebrae of sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax L.).

    PubMed

    Kranenbarg, Sander; van Cleynenbreugel, Tim; Schipper, Henk; van Leeuwen, Johan

    2005-09-01

    Mammalian bone is an active tissue in which osteoblasts and osteoclasts balance bone mass. This process of adaptive modelling and remodelling is probably regulated by strain-sensing osteocytes. Bone of advanced teleosts is acellular yet, despite the lack of osteocytes, it is capable of an adaptive response to physical stimuli. Strenuous exercise is known to induce lordosis. Lordosis is a ventrad curvature of the vertebral column, and the affected vertebrae show an increase in bone formation. The effects of lordosis on the strain distribution in sea bass (Dicentrarchus labrax L.) vertebrae are assessed using finite element modelling. The response of the local tissue is analyzed spatially and ontogenetically in terms of bone volume. Lordotic vertebrae show a significantly increased strain energy due to the increased load compared with normal vertebrae when loaded in compression. High strain regions are found in the vertebral centrum and parasagittal ridges. The increase in strain energy is attenuated by a change in architecture due to the increased bone formation. The increased bone formation is seen mainly at the articular surfaces of the vertebrae, although some extra bone is formed in the vertebral centrum. Regions in which the highest strains are found do not spatially correlate with regions in which the most extensive bone apposition occurs in lordotic vertebrae of sea bass. Mammalian-like strain-regulated bone modelling is probably not the guiding mechanism in adaptive bone modelling of acellular sea bass vertebrae. Chondroidal ossification is found at the articular surfaces where it mediates a rapid adaptive response, potentially attenuating high stresses on the dorsal zygapophyses.

  10. Elastic Anisotropy of Trabecular Bone in the Elderly Human Vertebra

    PubMed Central

    Unnikrishnan, Ginu U.; Gallagher, John A.; Hussein, Amira I.; Barest, Glenn D.; Morgan, Elise F.

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge of the nature of the elastic symmetry of trabecular bone is fundamental to the study of bone adaptation and failure. Previous studies have classified human vertebral trabecular bone as orthotropic or transversely isotropic but have typically obtained samples from only selected regions of the centrum. In this study, the elastic symmetry of human vertebral trabecular bone was characterized using microfinite element (μFE) analyses performed on 1019 cubic regions of side length equal to 5 mm, obtained via thorough sampling of the centrums of 18 human L1 vertebrae (age = 81.17 ± 7.7 yr; eight males and ten females). An optimization procedure was used to find the closest orthotropic representation of the resulting stiffness tensor for each cube. The orthotropic elastic constants and orientation of the principal elastic axes were then recorded for each cube and were compared to the constants predicted from Cowin's fabric-based constitutive model (Cowin, 1985, “The Relationship Between the Elasticity Tensor and the Fabric Tensor,” Mech. Mater., 4(2), pp. 137–147.) and the orientation of the principal axes of the fabric tensor, respectively. Deviations from orthotropy were quantified by the “orthotropic error” (van Rietbergen et al., 1996, “Direct Mechanics Assessment of Elastic Symmetries and Properties of Trabecular Bone Architecture,” J. Biomech., 29(12), pp. 1653–1657), and deviations from transverse isotropy were determined by statistical comparison of the secondary and tertiary elastic moduli. The orthotropic error was greater than 50% for nearly half of the cubes, and the secondary and tertiary moduli differed from one another (p < 0.0001). Both the orthotropic error and the difference between secondary and tertiary moduli decreased with increasing bone volume fraction (BV/TV; p ≤ 0.007). Considering only the cubes with an orthotropic error less than 50%, only moderate correlations were observed between the fabric

  11. Cervical Cancer Stage IB

    MedlinePlus

    ... hyphen, e.g. -historical Searches are case-insensitive Cervical Cancer Stage IB Add to My Pictures View / ... 1613x1200 View Download Large: 3225x2400 View Download Title: Cervical Cancer Stage IB Description: Stage IB1 and IB2 ...

  12. Cervical Cancer Stage IA

    MedlinePlus

    ... hyphen, e.g. -historical Searches are case-insensitive Cervical Cancer Stage IA Add to My Pictures View / ... 1500x1200 View Download Large: 3000x2400 View Download Title: Cervical Cancer Stage IA Description: Stage IA1 and IA2 ...

  13. Gradual Height Decrease of Augmented Vertebrae after Vertebroplasty at the Thoracolumbar Junction

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Han San; Kim, Hyun Gon; Park, Kwan Ho

    2016-01-01

    Objective Vertebroplasty is an effective treatment for vertebral compression fracture, but may progress gradual vertebral height decrease in spite of vertebroplasty. Gradual vertebral height decrease also may induce aggravation of kyphotic change without severe pain. The purpose of this study was to evaluate risk factors for gradual vertebral height decrease in the absence of recurrent severe back pain. Methods A retrospective analysis was performed on 44 patients who were diagnosed with a first osteoporotic compression fracture at a single level at the thoracolumbar junction. All patients were taken vertebroplasty. Possible risk factors for gradual vertebral height decrease, such as sex, age, bone mineral density, body mass index, level of compression fracture, volume of injected cement, cement leakage into disc space, and air clefts within fractured vertebrae, were analyzed. Results Gradual vertebral height decrease of augmented vertebrae occurred commonly when more than 4 cc of injected cement was used, and when air clefts within fractured vertebrae were seen on admission. In addition, the sagittal Cobb angle more commonly increased during the follow-up period in such cases. Conclusion Injection of more than 4 cc of cement during vertebroplasty and air cleft within fractured vertebrae on admission induced gradual vertebral height decrease in augmented vertebrae. Thus, longer follow-up will be needed in such cases, even when patients do not complain of recurrent severe back pain. PMID:27182497

  14. Lumbar spine segmentation using a statistical multi-vertebrae anatomical shape+pose model.

    PubMed

    Rasoulian, Abtin; Rohling, Robert; Abolmaesumi, Purang

    2013-10-01

    Segmentation of the spinal column from computed tomography (CT) images is a preprocessing step for a range of image-guided interventions. One intervention that would benefit from accurate segmentation is spinal needle injection. Previous spinal segmentation techniques have primarily focused on identification and separate segmentation of each vertebra. Recently, statistical multi-object shape models have been introduced to extract common statistical characteristics between several anatomies. These models can be used for segmentation purposes because they are robust, accurate, and computationally tractable. In this paper, we develop a statistical multi-vertebrae shape+pose model and propose a novel registration-based technique to segment the CT images of spine. The multi-vertebrae statistical model captures the variations in shape and pose simultaneously, which reduces the number of registration parameters. We validate our technique in terms of accuracy and robustness of multi-vertebrae segmentation of CT images acquired from lumbar vertebrae of 32 subjects. The mean error of the proposed technique is below 2 mm, which is sufficient for many spinal needle injection procedures, such as facet joint injections.

  15. Reassessment of spiny dogfish Squalus acanthias age and growth using vertebrae and dorsal-fin spines.

    PubMed

    Bubley, W J; Kneebone, J; Sulikowski, J A; Tsang, P C W

    2012-04-01

    Male and female spiny dogfish Squalus acanthias were collected in the western North Atlantic Ocean in the Gulf of Maine between July 2006 and June 2009. Squalus acanthias ranged from 25 to 102 cm stretch total length and were caught during all months of the year except January. Age estimates derived from banding patterns visible in both the vertebrae and second dorsal-fin spines were compared. Vertebral growth increments were visualized using a modified histological staining technique, which was verified as appropriate for obtaining age estimates. Marginal increment analysis of vertebrae verified the increment periodicity, suggesting annual band deposition. Based on increased precision and accuracy of age estimates, as well as more biologically realistic parameters generated in growth models, the current study found that vertebrae provided a more reliable and accurate means of estimating age in S. acanthias than the second dorsal-fin spine. Age estimates obtained from vertebrae ranged from <1 year-old to 17 years for male and 24 years for female S. acanthias. The two-parameter von Bertalanffy growth model fit to vertebrae-derived age estimates produced parameters of L∞ = 94·23 cm and k = 0·11 for males and L∞ = 100·76 cm and k = 0·12 for females. While these growth parameters differed from those previously reported for S. acanthias in the western North Atlantic Ocean, the causes of such differences were beyond the scope of the current study and remain to be determined.

  16. Postoperative Increase in Occiput–C2 Angle Negatively Impacts Subaxial Lordosis after Occipito–Upper Cervical Posterior Fusion Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Inada, Taigo; Furuya, Takeo; Kamiya, Koshiro; Ota, Mitsutoshi; Maki, Satoshi; Suzuki, Takane; Takahashi, Kazuhisa; Yamazaki, Masashi; Aramomi, Masaaki; Mannoji, Chikato

    2016-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective case series. Purpose To elucidate the impact of postoperative occiput–C2 (O–C2) angle change on subaxial cervical alignment. Overview of Literature In the case of occipito–upper cervical fixation surgery, it is recommended that the O–C2 angle should be set larger than the preoperative value postoperatively. Methods The present study included 17 patients who underwent occipito–upper cervical spine (above C4) posterior fixation surgery for atlantoaxial subluxation of various etiologies. Plain lateral cervical radiographs in a neutral position at standing were obtained and the O–C2 angle and subaxial lordosis angle (the angle between the endplates of the lowest instrumented vertebra (LIV) and C7 vertebrae) were measured preoperatively and postoperatively soon after surgery and ambulation and at the final follow-up visit. Results There was a significant negative correlation between the average postoperative alteration of O–C2 angle (DO–C2) and the average postoperative alteration of subaxial lordosis angle (Dsubaxial lordosis angle) (r=–0.47, p=0.03). Conclusions There was a negative correlation between DO–C2 and Dsubaxial lordosis angles. This suggests that decrease of mid-to lower-cervical lordosis acts as a compensatory mechanism for lordotic correction between the occiput and C2. In occipito-cervical fusion surgery, care must be taken to avoid excessive O–C2 angle correction because it might induce mid-to-lower cervical compensatory decrease of lordosis. PMID:27559456

  17. Cervical osteophytes: a rare cause of obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Eyigor, Hulya; Selcuk, Omer Tarik; Osma, Ustun; Koca, Rahime; Yilmaz, Mustafa Deniz

    2012-09-01

    Uncertain etiology of cervical osteophytes, in particular emerging in geriatric population, is a rare skeletal system disease. Often, the cases are asymptomatic and may lead to symptoms such as dysphagia, cough, dyspnea, and dysphonia. We present a patient who had anterior osteophytes causing symptoms of severe obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), and literature on etiology of OSA has been reviewed. A 57-year-old male patient with complaints of snoring and cessation of breathing during sleep was referred to the ear nose throat clinic. Cervical radiograph and computed tomography showed the osteophytes in the anterior of the vertebral corpus at the level C1-2. In addition, bridging osteophyte was observed between C6 and C7 vertebrae. The patient's neck circumference was 41 cm, body mass index was 29 kg/m2, Epworth Sleepiness Scale score was 11, and apnea hypopnea index was 62. Surgery was recommended, but the patient refused. Continuous positive airway pressure titration was applied with 12.6 cm H2O pressure; apnea control was attained with an AHI of 2.7. One of the rare causes of OSA, a case of cervical vertebral osteophyte, was presented, and we would like to draw attention to the importance of ear nose throat examination in the diagnosis of OSA.

  18. Tethering of the vertebral artery in the congenital arcuate foramen of the atlas vertebra: a possible cause of vertebral artery dissection in children.

    PubMed

    Cushing, K E; Ramesh, V; Gardner-Medwin, D; Todd, N V; Gholkar, A; Baxter, P; Griffiths, P D

    2001-07-01

    Twelve children with vertebrobasilar artery stroke are reported (seven males, five females; aged 6 months to 15 years). Patient 1 showed an arcuate foramen in the posterior arch of the atlas, an anatomical variant occurring in 3 to 15% of the population. It was hypothesized that the presence of the arcuate foramen might cause tethering of the vertebral artery and lead to its dissection by repetitive trauma. Lateral plain films of the cervical spine in cases of posterior circulation stroke were taken. Eight of 11 patients showed aberrant arcuate foramina. Of the remaining three patients, one had normal cervical spine X-rays, one had an absent right posterior arch of the atlas following previous surgery for a cervical meningocele, and one patient had incomplete ossification of the vertebrae. Seven of the nine patients with arcuate foramina had vertebral angiograms. In all cases this showed the vertebral artery passing through the arcuate foramen before entering the brain and an appearance consistent with arterial dissection and occlusion at the same site below the foramen. Most documented cases of posterior circulation stroke in children follow trauma, which may be minimal or repetitive, with thrombotic occlusion of the artery at C1-C2 level. The association with an arcuate foramen and its possible causative role in the genesis of posterior circulation stroke in children has not been previously recognized. There may be a causal association between the presence of an arcuate foramen, tethering of the vertebral artery in the foramen, and dissection from repetitive trauma with movement of the neck.

  19. Heterogeneous computing for vertebra detection and segmentation in x-ray images.

    PubMed

    Lecron, Fabian; Mahmoudi, Sidi Ahmed; Benjelloun, Mohammed; Mahmoudi, Saïd; Manneback, Pierre

    2011-01-01

    The context of this work is related to the vertebra segmentation. The method we propose is based on the active shape model (ASM). An original approach taking advantage of the edge polygonal approximation was developed to locate the vertebra positions in a X-ray image. Despite the fact that segmentation results show good efficiency, the time is a key variable that has always to be optimized in a medical context. Therefore, we present how vertebra extraction can efficiently be performed in exploiting the full computing power of parallel (GPU) and heterogeneous (multi-CPU/multi-GPU) architectures. We propose a parallel hybrid implementation of the most intensive steps enabling to boost performance. Experimentations have been conducted using a set of high-resolution X-ray medical images, showing a global speedup ranging from 3 to 22, by comparison with the CPU implementation. Data transfer times between CPU and GPU memories were included in the execution times of our proposed implementation.

  20. Small leucine-rich proteoglycans in the vertebrae of Atlantic salmon Salmo salar.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Mona E; Ytteborg, Elisabeth; Kohler, Achim; Baeverfjord, Grete; Enersen, Grethe; Ruyter, Bente; Takle, Harald; Hannesson, Kirsten O

    2013-09-24

    We analysed the distribution and expression of the small leucine-rich proteoglycans (SLRPs) decorin, biglycan and lumican in vertebral columns of Atlantic salmon Salmo salar L. with and without radiographically detectable deformities. Vertebral deformities are a reoccurring problem in salmon and other intensively farmed species, and an understanding of the components involved in the pathologic development of the vertebrae is important in order to find adequate solutions to this problem. Using immunohistology and light microscopy, we found that in non-deformed vertebrae biglycan, lumican and decorin were all expressed in osteoblasts at the vertebral growth zones and at the ossification front of the chondrocytic arches. Hence, the SLRPs are expressed in regions where intramembranous and endochondral ossification take place. In addition, mRNA expression of biglycan, decorin and lumican was demonstrated in a primary osteoblast culture established from Atlantic salmon, supporting the in vivo findings. Transcription of the SLRPs increased during differentiation of the osteoblasts in vitro and where lumican mRNA expression increased later in the differentiation compared with decorin and biglycan. Intriguingly, in vertebral fusions, biglycan, decorin and lumican protein expression was extended to trans-differentiating cells at the border between arch centra and osteoblast growth zones. In addition, mRNA expression of biglycan, decorin and lumican differed between non-deformed and fused vertebrae, as shown by quantitative PCR (qPCR). Western blotting revealed an additional band of biglycan in fused vertebrae which had a higher molecular weight than in non-deformed vertebrae. Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy revealed more spectral focality in the endplates of vertebral fusions and significantly more non-reducible collagen crosslinks compared with non-deformed vertebrae, thus identifying differences in bone structure.

  1. Limbus Vertebra Presenting with Inflammatory Low Back Pain: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Özdemir, Tayfun; Öz, Hande Ece

    2016-01-01

    Limbus vertebra is a condition characterized by marginal interosseous herniation of the nucleus pulposus, and causes non specific symptoms like low back pain, back pain, muscle spasms and radiculopathy. It is frequently confused with vertebral fracture, infection, schmorl nodule or tumour because it has not a spesific symptom. It usually causes mechanical low back pain rather than inflammatory low back pain. We reported a patient presented with inflammatory low back pain and diagnosed with anterior limbus vertebra because it is rare and the patient has atypical clinical presentation. PMID:27134989

  2. Limbus Vertebra Presenting with Inflammatory Low Back Pain: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Tuna, Serpil; Özdemir, Tayfun; Öz, Hande Ece

    2016-03-01

    Limbus vertebra is a condition characterized by marginal interosseous herniation of the nucleus pulposus, and causes non specific symptoms like low back pain, back pain, muscle spasms and radiculopathy. It is frequently confused with vertebral fracture, infection, schmorl nodule or tumour because it has not a spesific symptom. It usually causes mechanical low back pain rather than inflammatory low back pain. We reported a patient presented with inflammatory low back pain and diagnosed with anterior limbus vertebra because it is rare and the patient has atypical clinical presentation.

  3. The demands of professional opera singing on cranio-cervical posture.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Gillian; Skinner, Margot

    2009-04-01

    Difficulty with singing is a rare but important complication following cervical spine surgery but there is little objective information regarding the cervical and head postural changes taking place during singing. The aim of this study was to identify postural changes in the cranio-cervical region associated with the demands of voice production in professional opera singing. The two Roentgen-cephalograms, one of which are taken whilst performing a specified singing task were taken from 18 professional opera students, 12 females (mean age 20.86 +/- 3.07 years) and six males (18.66 +/- 1.36 years). A paired t test compared mean cranio-cervical postural and pharyngeal/hyoid variables between the two registrations (P = 0.05). The association between the cranio-cervical postural variables and the pharyngeal/hyoid region in each registration position was examined using Spearman's rank correlation coefficient. In singing, the position of the atlas with respect to the true vertical (P < 0.001), the axis (P < 0.001) and the C4 vertebra both with respect to the horizontal (P < 0.001), and the axis with respect to the cranium (P < 0.001), were all significantly different to those at rest. Of the cranio-cervical postural variables in the singing registration, the angles measuring positional change of the atlas and C4 relative to the true horizontal were shown be significantly related to an increased pharyngeal airway space at the C3 level (P < 0.01). An appreciation of the requirement for the cervical spine to undergo postural change during professional opera singing has relevance to the potential impact on voice quality in professional opera singers should they undergo cervical spine surgery.

  4. [Isolated anterior cervical hypertrichosis].

    PubMed

    Monteagudo, B; Cabanillas, M; de las Heras, C; Cacharrón, J M

    2009-01-01

    Anterior cervical hypertrichosis was described by Trattner and coworkers in 1991. It consists of a of hair at the anterior cervical level just above the laryngeal prominence. To date, only 28 cases of anterior cervical hypertrichosis have been reported. Although it is normally an isolated finding, it may be associated with mental retardation, hallux valgus, retinal disorders, other hair disorders, facial dysmorphism, or sensory and motor peripheral neuropathy. We report the case of a 27-year-old woman who presented with this condition as an isolated finding.

  5. Upper cervical spinal cord gunshot injury without bone destruction☆☆☆

    PubMed Central

    Seçer, Mehmet; Ulutaş, Murat; Yayla, Erdal; Çınar, Kadir

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION This report describes a rare case of the gunshot injury of the spine and spinal cord. PRESENTATION OF CASE A rare case of the bullet lodged intra-durally in the upper cervical region without damaging the vertebrae or the spinal cord. The bullet was removed as microneurosurgical and duraplasty was performed. DISCUSSION Surgical management of the gunshot wounds of the spine and spinal cord is not widely advocated and controversial. CONCLUSION Advances in microneurosurgical instrumentation and microscopic techniques may open up a new era of surgical treatment of spinal cord gunshot wounds. PMID:24566426

  6. Sprengel deformity and Klippel-Feil syndrome leading to cervical myelopathy presentation in old age.

    PubMed

    Mirhosseini, Seyyed Ahmad; Mirhosseini, Seyyed Mohammad Mahdy; Bidaki, Reza; Boshrabadi, Ahmad Pourrashidi

    2013-06-01

    Klippel-Feil syndrome is a rare condition characterized by the congenital fusion of two of the seventh cervical vertebrae. A 50-year-old woman presented with a 2-year history of neck pain and ataxia for 1 year. She had not urinary incontinence. She was referred to a neurosurgeon by a neurologist because of her progressive gait ataxia. Risk for brachial plexus injury because of compression or stretching by the clavicle accelerate with age. Therefore, the surgical approach of adults' patients with Sprengel's deformity can intend suitable surgical conclusions.

  7. Developmental steps of the human cervical spine: parameters for evaluation of skeletal maturation stages.

    PubMed

    dos Santos, Marcos Fabio Henriques; de Lima, Rodrigo Lopes; De-Ary-Pires, Bernardo; Pires-Neto, Mário Ary; de Ary-Pires, Ricardo

    2010-06-01

    The central objective of this investigation was to focus on the development of the cervical spine observed by lateral cephalometric radiological images of children and adolescents (6-16 years old). A sample of 26 individuals (12 girls and 14 boys) was classified according to stages of cervical spine maturation in two subcategories: group I (initiation phase) and group II (acceleration phase). The morphology of the cervical spine was assessed by lateral cephalometric radiographs obtained in accordance with an innovative method for establishing a standardized head posture. A total of 29 linear variables and 5 angular variables were used to clarify the dimensions of the cervical vertebrae. The results suggest that a few measurements can be used as parameters of vertebral maturation both for males and females. The aforementioned measurements include the inferior depth of C2-C4, the inferior depth of C5, the anterior height of C4-C5, and the posterior height of C5. We propose original morphological parameters that may prove remarkably useful in the determination of bone maturational stages of the cervical spine in children and adolescents.

  8. Anatomical transformation in mammals: developmental origin of aberrant cervical anatomy in tree sloths.

    PubMed

    Buchholtz, Emily A; Stepien, Courtney C

    2009-01-01

    Mammalian cervical count has been fixed at seven for more than 200 million years. The rare exceptions to this evolutionary constraint have intrigued anatomists since the time of Cuvier, but the developmental processes that generate them are unknown. Here we evaluate competing hypotheses for the evolutionary origin of cervical variants in Bradypus and Choloepus, tree sloths that have broken the seven cervical vertebrae barrier independently and in opposite directions. Transitional and mediolaterally disjunct anatomy characterizes the cervicothoracic vertebral boundary in each genus, although polarities are reversed. The thoracolumbar, lumbosacral, and sacrocaudal boundaries are also disrupted, and are more extreme in individuals with more extreme cervical counts. Hypotheses of homologous, homeotic, meristic, or associational transformations of traditional vertebral column anatomy are not supported by these data. We identify global homeotic repatterning of abaxial relative to primaxial mesodermal derivatives as the origin of the anomalous cervical counts of tree sloths. This interpretation emphasizes the strong resistance of the "rule of seven" to evolutionary change, as morphological stasis has been maintained primaxially coincident with the generation of a functionally longer (Bradypus) or shorter (Choloepus) neck.

  9. Effects of Lateral Mass Screw Rod Fixation to the Stability of Cervical Spine after Laminectomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosli, Ruwaida; Kashani, Jamal; Kadir, Mohammed Rafiq Abdul

    There are many cases of injury in the cervical spine due to degenerative disorder, trauma or instability. This condition may produce pressure on the spinal cord or on the nerve coming from the spine. The aim of this study was, to analyze the stabilization of the cervical spine after undergoing laminectomy via computational simulation. For that purpose, a three-dimensional finite element (FE) model for the multilevel cervical spine segment (C1-C7) was developed using computed tomography (CT) data. There are various decompression techniques that can be applied to overcome the injury. Usually, decompression procedures will create an unstable spine. Therefore, in these situations, the spine is often surgically restabilized by using fusion and instrumentation. In this study, a lateral mass screw-rod fixation was created to stabilize the cervical spine after laminectomy. Material properties of the titanium alloy were assigned on the implants. The requirements moments and boundary conditions were applied on simulated implanted bone. Result showed that the bone without implant has a higher flexion and extension angle in comparison to the bone with implant under applied 1Nm moment. The bone without implant has maximum stress distribution at the vertebrae and ligaments. However, the bone with implant has maximum stress distribution at the screws and rods. Overall, the lateral mass screw-rod fixation provides stability to the cervical spine after undergoing laminectomy.

  10. Cervical spondylotic radiculo-myelopathy in patients with athetoid-dystonic cerebral palsy: clinical evaluation and surgical treatment.

    PubMed Central

    Hirose, G; Kadoya, S

    1984-01-01

    The acute onset of symptoms of severe cervical radiculo-myelopathy in four patients with athetoid-dystonic cerebral palsy is reported. Neurological and radiological examination showed that the spondylotic changes of the cervical spine were responsible for new neurological deficits leading to the patients being bedridden. Dystonic-athetoid neck movements may cause excessive axial neck rotation as well as flexion and extension movements of the spine. These repetitive exaggerated movements may result in early degenerative changes of the vertebrae which may enhance the radiculo-myelopathy. The four patients were treated with an anterior discectomy with interbody fusion. They were bedridden pre-operatively but all have since been able to walk with or without a cane. It is concluded that early anterior decompression with interbody fusion is a treatment of choice for cervical spondylotic radiculo-myelopathy in association with athetoid cerebral palsy. Images PMID:6470718

  11. Cervical Radiculopathy (Pinched Nerve)

    MedlinePlus

    ... help relieve pain, strengthen neck muscles, and improve range of motion. In some cases, traction can be used to ... Learn more about surgery for radiculopathy online at Cervical ... a wide range of musculoskeletal conditions and injuries. All articles are ...

  12. [Cervical pregnancy. Three cases].

    PubMed

    Plascencia Moncayo, Norberto; Hernández, María de la Paz; Guadarrama Sánchez, Rafael; Guerra Becerra, Leticia; Salmón Vélez, J Fernando G; Galván Aguilera, Alejandro

    2008-12-01

    We describe cervical pregnancy concept and its rareness. Its frequency is one in 2,550 to 98,000 intrauterine pregnancies. Predisposing factors are related with endometrial damage due to uterine curettages and previous cesarian section. Clinical picture was nonspecific and diagnosis was based in endovaginal ultrasonography. It can cause massive bleeding and put life in risk. During 2007 we attend 829 intrauterine pregnancies at Hospital San José de Querétaro: 11 tubal, and 3 cervical, this represents an extraordinarily high frequency of cervical pregnancy. Here we report three cases of cervical pregnancies treated with total hysterectomy, two as urgency and one elective. We remark early diagnosis importance to perform conservative treatment and maintain reproductive function.

  13. Immunotherapy for Cervical Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    In an early phase NCI clinical trial, two patients with metastatic cervical cancer had a complete disappearance of their tumors after receiving treatment with a form of immunotherapy called adoptive cell transfer.

  14. Cervical Cancer Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... cervical cancer in women aged 30–65 years. Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV): A virus that attacks certain cells of the body’s immune system and causes acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). Human Papillomavirus ( ...

  15. Sexually Transmitted Cervicitis

    PubMed Central

    Romanowski, Barbara

    1989-01-01

    Cervical infections with Neisseria gonorrhoeae, Chlamydia trachomatis, and Herpes simplex virus are some of the most common sexually transmitted infections. They are often asymptomatic, and therefore the patient is at risk of developing complications, such as pelvic inflammatory disease. It is important to recognize cervicitis, investigate it appropriately, and provide early treatment. Sexual partners must also be located and offered therapy to prevent re-infection in the index patient. PMID:21248969

  16. Automatic lumbar vertebrae detection based on feature fusion deep learning for partial occluded C-arm X-ray images.

    PubMed

    Li, Yang; Liang, Wei; Zhang, Yinlong; An, Haibo; Tan, Jindong; Yang Li; Wei Liang; Yinlong Zhang; Haibo An; Jindong Tan; Li, Yang; Liang, Wei; Tan, Jindong; Zhang, Yinlong; An, Haibo

    2016-08-01

    Automatic and accurate lumbar vertebrae detection is an essential step of image-guided minimally invasive spine surgery (IG-MISS). However, traditional methods still require human intervention due to the similarity of vertebrae, abnormal pathological conditions and uncertain imaging angle. In this paper, we present a novel convolutional neural network (CNN) model to automatically detect lumbar vertebrae for C-arm X-ray images. Training data is augmented by DRR and automatic segmentation of ROI is able to reduce the computational complexity. Furthermore, a feature fusion deep learning (FFDL) model is introduced to combine two types of features of lumbar vertebrae X-ray images, which uses sobel kernel and Gabor kernel to obtain the contour and texture of lumbar vertebrae, respectively. Comprehensive qualitative and quantitative experiments demonstrate that our proposed model performs more accurate in abnormal cases with pathologies and surgical implants in multi-angle views.

  17. Posterior arch bifocal fracture of the atlas vertebra: a variant of Jefferson fracture.

    PubMed

    Abuamara, S; Dacher, J N; Lechevallier, J

    2001-07-01

    Fracture of the atlas vertebra is rare in children. We report two paediatric cases of bifocal pedicular fracture of the posterior arch of C1. Evaluation was performed by nonenhanced computed tomography scan, which successively confirmed both diagnosis and healing. In both cases, nonoperative management was successful.

  18. Andreas Vesalius on the anatomy and function of the lower thoracic vertebrae.

    PubMed

    Biesbrouck, Maurits; Vanden Berghe, Alex

    2016-04-01

    Some remarkable statements made by Andreas Vesalius (1514-1564) in his principal work De Humani Corporis Fabrica (1543) about the anatomy and function of the lower thoracic vertebrae are discussed in the light of information from the literature. Their accuracy is evaluated on the basis of several pieces of anatomical evidence and clinical cases.

  19. Lumbosacral transitional vertebrae in dogs: classification, prevalence, and association with sacroiliac morphology.

    PubMed

    Damur-Djuric, Natascha; Steffen, Frank; Hässig, Michael; Morgan, Joe P; Flückiger, Mark A

    2006-01-01

    The prevalence of lumbosacral transitional vertebrae (LTV) was determined by reviewing the pelvic radiographs of 4000 medium- and large-breed dogs of 144 breeds routinely screened for canine hip dysplasia. An LTV was seen in 138 (3.5%) dogs. The prevalence was higher in German Shepherd dogs and Greater Swiss Mountain dogs than in the other breeds, suggesting a genetic predisposition. There was no gender predisposition. The transverse processes of the LTV were divided into three types based on their morphological characteristics: lumbar type or type 1; intermediate type or type 2; and sacral type or type 3. In a symmetric LTV, both transverse processes are of the same type, while in an asymmetric LTV they are not. The frequency of occurrence of symmetric and asymmetric LTV was similar. In symmetric LTV, intermediate-type transverse processes predominated. Most of the asymmetric LTV had an intermediate-type transverse process combined with a lumbar or sacral type, respectively. Highly asymmetric LTV were often angled relative to the adjacent vertebrae. We hypothesize that an LTV is not the result of transformation of a lumbar into a sacral vertebra or vice versa, but rather is an autonomous intermediate type of vertebra. It occurs when the point of contact of the pelvis with the vertebral column is slightly cranial or caudal to its normal position. The resulting formative stimulus on the vertebral ossification centers, sagittally still separated, causes the various morphologies seen in LTV including the asymmetric variations.

  20. A study of vertebra number in pigs confirms the association of vertnin and reveals additional QTL

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Formation of the vertebral column is a critical developmental stage in mammals. The strict control of this process has resulted in little variation in number of vertebrae across mammalian species and no variation within most mammalian species. The pig is quite unique as considerable vari...

  1. Fast scale-invariant lateral lumbar vertebrae detection and segmentation in X-ray images.

    PubMed

    Sa, Ruhan; Owens, William; Wiegand, Raymond; Chaudhary, Vipin; Sa, Ruhan; Owens, William; Wiegand, Raymond; Chaudhary, Vipin; Owens, William; Sa, Ruhan; Wiegand, Raymond; Chaudhary, Vipin

    2016-08-01

    Fully automatic localization of lumbar vertebrae from clinical X-ray images is very challenging due to the variation of X-ray quality, scale, contrast, number of visible vertebrae, etc. To overcome these challenges, we present a novel framework, where we accelerate a scale-invariant object detection method using Support Vector Machines (SVM) trained on Histogram of Oriented Gradients (HOG) features and segmenting a fine vertebra contour using Gradient Vector Flow (GVF) based snake model. Support Vector Machines trained on HOG features are now an object detection standard in many perception fields and have demonstrated good performance on medical images as well. However, the computational complexity and lack of robustness brought by rescaling the original images have prevented its applicability. The proposed multistage detection framework uses lower-level detection result to determine the rescaling regions to reduce the region of interest, thereby decreasing the execution time. We further refine the detection result by segmenting the contour of vertebra using GVF snake, where we use edge detection techniques to increase the robustness of the GVF snake. Finally, we experimentally demonstrate the effectiveness of this framework using a large set of clinical X-ray images.

  2. What Are the Key Statistics about Cervical Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cervical Cancer What Are the Key Statistics About Cervical Cancer? The American Cancer Society's estimates for cervical ... in Cervical Cancer Research and Treatment? More In Cervical Cancer About Cervical Cancer Causes, Risk Factors, and ...

  3. Atezolizumab and Bevacizumab in Treating Patients With Recurrent, Persistent, or Metastatic Cervical Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-08

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma, Not Otherwise Specified; Recurrent Cervical Carcinoma; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer; Stage IVB Cervical Cancer

  4. Total Disc Arthroplasty and Anterior Cervical Discectomy and Fusion in Cervical Spine: Competitive or Complimentary? Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Jawahar, Ajay; Nunley, Pierce

    2012-01-01

    Anterior cervical discectomy and arthrodesis has come to represent standard of care for patients with persistent radicular and/or myelopathic symptoms that have failed to improve with conservative treatments. One potential complication of the procedure is the accelerated degeneration of the vertebrae and the intervertebral discs adjacent to the level fused and the effects of fusion on those levels. The concern that fusion may be a contributing factor to accelerated adjacent segment degeneration led to increased interest in cervical disc replacement after anterior decompressive surgery. Several studies analyzing the short-term outcomes of the disc replacement procedure have been published since then, and the pros and cons of both procedures continue to remain a topic of debate among the scientific community. The analysis of published literature and our own experience has convinced us that the overall longer-term clinical outcomes after anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) and total disc replacement (TDR) in the general patient population are not significantly different in terms of symptomatic improvement, neurological improvement, and restoration to better quality of life. Age of the patients and number of affected levels may impact the outcomes and hence determine the choice of optimum procedure. To definitely compare the incidence of adjacent segment disease after these procedures, multi-institutional studies with predetermined and unanimously agreed upon clinical and radiological criteria should be undertaken and the results analyzed in an unbiased fashion. Until that time, it is reasonable to assume that ACDF as well as cervical TDR are both safe and effective procedures that may have outcome benefits in specific patient subgroups based upon demographics and clinical/radiological parameters at the time of surgery. PMID:24353966

  5. Long-term results of anterior cervical corpectomy and fusion with nano-hydroxyapatite/polyamide 66 strut for cervical spondylotic myelopathy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yuan; Deng, Xu; Jiang, Dianming; Luo, Xiaoji; Tang, Ke; Zhao, Zenghui; Zhong, Weiyang; Lei, Tao; Quan, Zhengxue

    2016-05-01

    To assess the long-term clinical and radiographic outcomes of anterior cervical corpectomy and fusion (ACCF) with a neotype nano-hydroxyapatite/polyamide 66 (n-HA/PA66) strut in the treatment of cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM). Fifty patients with CSM who underwent 1- or 2-level ACCF with n-HA/PA66 struts were retrospectively investigated. With a mean follow-up of 79.6 months, the overall mean JOA score, VAS and cervical alignment were improved significantly. At last follow-up, the fusion rate was 98%, and the subsidence rate of the n-HA/PA66 strut was 8%. The “radiolucent gap” at the interface between the n-HA/PA66 strut and the vertebra was further noted to evaluate the osteoconductivity and osseointegration of the strut, and the incidence of it was 62% at the last follow-up. Three patients suffered symptomatic adjacent segment degeneration (ASD). No significant difference was detected in the outcomes between 1- and 2-level corpectomy at follow-ups. In conclusion, the satisfactory outcomes in this study indicated that the n-HA/PA66 strut was an effective graft for cervical reconstruction. Moreover, the osteoconductivity and osseointegration of the strut is still need to be optimized for future clinical application owing to the notably presence of “radiolucent gap” in present study.

  6. Long-term results of anterior cervical corpectomy and fusion with nano-hydroxyapatite/polyamide 66 strut for cervical spondylotic myelopathy

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yuan; Deng, Xu; Jiang, Dianming; Luo, Xiaoji; Tang, Ke; Zhao, Zenghui; Zhong, Weiyang; Lei, Tao; Quan, Zhengxue

    2016-01-01

    To assess the long-term clinical and radiographic outcomes of anterior cervical corpectomy and fusion (ACCF) with a neotype nano-hydroxyapatite/polyamide 66 (n-HA/PA66) strut in the treatment of cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM). Fifty patients with CSM who underwent 1- or 2-level ACCF with n-HA/PA66 struts were retrospectively investigated. With a mean follow-up of 79.6 months, the overall mean JOA score, VAS and cervical alignment were improved significantly. At last follow-up, the fusion rate was 98%, and the subsidence rate of the n-HA/PA66 strut was 8%. The “radiolucent gap” at the interface between the n-HA/PA66 strut and the vertebra was further noted to evaluate the osteoconductivity and osseointegration of the strut, and the incidence of it was 62% at the last follow-up. Three patients suffered symptomatic adjacent segment degeneration (ASD). No significant difference was detected in the outcomes between 1- and 2-level corpectomy at follow-ups. In conclusion, the satisfactory outcomes in this study indicated that the n-HA/PA66 strut was an effective graft for cervical reconstruction. Moreover, the osteoconductivity and osseointegration of the strut is still need to be optimized for future clinical application owing to the notably presence of “radiolucent gap” in present study. PMID:27225189

  7. Short communication: Traits unique to genus Homo within primates at the cervical spine (C2-C7).

    PubMed

    Rios, Luis; Muñoz, Alexandra; Cardoso, Hugo; Pastor, Francisco

    2014-05-01

    From a comparative study of 222 human and 261 nonhuman primates complete cervical spines, two bony variants associated to the course of the vertebral artery are proposed as unique to genus Homo within primates. First, the opening of the foramen transversarium at C2, a trait present at low frequency in humans (3 to 5.6%). Second, the presence of a bipartite foramen transversarium in the cervical segment C3-C6, a trait that can be observed fully formed in human fetal skeletons, with a clear frequency pattern along the cervical spine (C3>C4>C5>C6cervical vertebrae for genus Homo. The test of a possible explanation of these differences as associated to anatomical changes of the cervical spine due to erect posture and bipedal locomotion needs further research in the morphology and function of the primate cervical spine.

  8. Cervical perineural cyst masquerading as a cervical spinal tumor.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Vijay P; Zanwar, Atul; Karande, Anuradha; Agrawal, Amit

    2014-04-01

    Tarlov (perineural) cysts of the nerve roots are common and usually incidental findings during magnetic resonance imaging of the lumbosacral spine. There are only a few case reports where cervical symptomatic perineural cysts have been described in the literature. We report such a case where a high cervical perineural cyst was masquerading as a cervical spinal tumor.

  9. Cervical Perineural Cyst Masquerading as a Cervical Spinal Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Vijay P; Zanwar, Atul; Karande, Anuradha

    2014-01-01

    Tarlov (perineural) cysts of the nerve roots are common and usually incidental findings during magnetic resonance imaging of the lumbosacral spine. There are only a few case reports where cervical symptomatic perineural cysts have been described in the literature. We report such a case where a high cervical perineural cyst was masquerading as a cervical spinal tumor. PMID:24761204

  10. Morphological study of subaxial cervical pedicles by using three-dimensional computed tomography reconstruction image.

    PubMed

    Wasinpongwanich, Kanthika; Paholpak, Permsak; Tuamsuk, Panya; Sirichativapee, Winai; Wisanuyotin, Taweechok; Kosuwon, Weerachai; Jeeravipoolvarn, Polasak

    2014-01-01

    Malpositioning of cervical screws risks neurovascular injury. A cervical screw fixation system can provide proper rigidity, alignment correction, and high rates of fusion afforded by high pullout biomechanical strength. The objective is to assess the dimensions and axis of the C3-C7 cervical pedicles. A 1-mm slice thickness computed tomography (CT) scan of the cervical spine of 30 patients (15 males, 15 females) were analyzed and reconstructed in three-dimensions using Mimics(®) 10.01 software. We measured pedicle axis length (PAL), pedicle and lateral mass length (PL-LM), pedicle length (PL), outer pedicle width (OPW), and pedicle transverse angle (PTA) from the axial image and outer pedicle height (OPH) and pedicle sagittal angle (PSA) from the sagittal image. The OPH and OPW at all subaxial cervical spines were suitable for insertion of 3.5 mm cervical pedicle screws. PSA was directed cranially at C3 to C5 (13.84, 7.09, and 2.71) and directed caudally at C6 and C7 (-4.55, -6.94). PTA was greatest at C5 and smallest at C7. The respective difference between the left and right side for nearly all parameters was not statistically significant (except for C6 PL and C7 OPH). Females had a significantly smaller OPH and OPW than males at nearly all levels. The PTA was not significantly different between the sexes. Cervical pedicle screw fixation in the Thai population can be safely performed and guidelines for insertion at each vertebra documented. Appropriate preoperative planning is necessary to achieve safe and accurate placement of the screws.

  11. Impact of over distraction on occurrence of axial symptom after anterior cervical discectomy and fusion

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Jiayue; Zhang, Xin; Zhang, Di; Ding, Wenyuan; Shen, Yong; Zhang, Wei; Du, Mengzhen

    2015-01-01

    Objective: A retrospective review was undertaken to evaluate the impact of over distraction on cervical axial symptoms (AS) after anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF). Methods: The retrospective review included 421 patients who underwent ACDF for one or two segments. Of these, 78 patients for whom complete follow-up data were available were selected for inclusion in the analysis. X-rays of the cervical vertebra were performed immediately after the surgery, 3 months postsurgery, and at a final follow up (6-24 months). According to the presence/absence of AS, the patients were divided into a symptom group (Group S) and a nonsymptom group (Group N). The ratio of intervertebral height change, change in the overall cervical curvature, change in the local curvature of the surgical segment, cervical total range of motion (ROM), and Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) recovery rate were compared and analyzed. A linear regression analysis of the ratio of intervertebral height change and the symptom and severity of the AS according to the Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) was carried out. Results: The total incidence of AS was 33.97%. C5 nerve root palsy occurred in one case in Group S after the surgery. The neurologic symptoms of both groups were significantly alleviated after the surgery. The ratio of intervertebral height change in Group S was significantly higher than that in Group N at the last follow-up (P < 0.05). However, the changes in the overall cervical curvature, local curvature of the surgical segment, cervical ROM, and JOA recovery rates were not statistically significant (P > 0.05). In Group S, 37% of the patients had symptoms that occurred in the chest area, and the ratio of intervertebral height change was significantly positively correlated with the VAS score of the AS (r = 0.893). Conclusions: The occurrence of postoperative AS will significantly increase if the ratio of intervertebral height change of the surgical segment after ACDF is over 10

  12. Orofacial manual therapy improves cervical movement impairment associated with headache and features of temporomandibular dysfunction: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    von Piekartz, Harry; Hall, Toby

    2013-08-01

    There is evidence that temporomandibular disorder (TMD) may be a contributing factor to cervicogenic headache (CGH), in part because of the influence of dysfunction of the temporomandibular joint on the cervical spine. The purpose of this randomized controlled trial was to determine whether orofacial treatment in addition to cervical manual therapy, was more effective than cervical manual therapy alone on measures of cervical movement impairment in patients with features of CGH and signs of TMD. In this study, 43 patients (27 women) with headache for more than 3-months and with some features of CGH and signs of TMD were randomly assigned to receive either cervical manual therapy (usual care) or orofacial manual therapy to address TMD in addition to usual care. Subjects were assessed at baseline, after 6 treatment sessions (3-months), and at 6-months follow-up. 38 subjects (25 female) completed all analysis at 6-months follow-up. The outcome criteria were: cervical range of movement (including the C1-2 flexion-rotation test) and manual examination of the upper 3 cervical vertebra. The group that received orofacial treatment in addition to usual care showed significant reduction in all aspects of cervical impairment after the treatment period. These improvements persisted to the 6-month follow-up, but were not observed in the usual care group at any point. These observations together with previous reports indicate that manual therapists should look for features of TMD when examining patients with headache, particularly if treatment fails when directed to the cervical spine.

  13. Spinal surgery -- cervical - series (image)

    MedlinePlus

    The cervical spinal column is made up of vertebral bodies which protect the spinal cord. ... spinal nerves, trauma, and narrowing (stenosis) of the spinal column around the spinal cord. Symptoms of cervical spine ...

  14. Sensitivity, Reliability and Accuracy of the Instant Center of Rotation Calculation in the Cervical Spine During In Vivo Dynamic Flexion-Extension

    PubMed Central

    Baillargeon, Emma

    2013-01-01

    The instant center of rotation (ICR) has been proposed as an alternative to range of motion (ROM) for evaluating the quality, rather than the quantity, of cervical spine movement. The purpose of the present study was to assess the sensitivity, reliability and accuracy of cervical spine ICR path calculations obtained during dynamic in vivo movement. The reliability and sensitivity of in vivo cervical spine ICR calculations were assessed by evaluating the effects of movement direction (flexion versus extension), rotation step size, filter frequency, and motion tracking error. The accuracy of the ICR path calculations was assessed through a simulation experiment that replicated in vivo movement of cervical vertebrae. The in vivo assessment included 20 asymptomatic subjects who performed continuous head flexion-extension movements while biplane radiographs were collected at 30 frames/s. In vivo motion of C2 through C7 cervical vertebrae was tracked with sub-millimeter accuracy using a volumetric model-based tracking technique. The finite helical axis method was used to determine ICRs between each pair of adjacent vertebra. The in vivo results indicate ICR path is not different during the flexion movement and the extension movement. In vivo, the path of the ICR can reliably be characterized within 0.5 mm in the SI and 1.0 mm in the AP direction. The inter-subject variability in ICR location averaged ±1.2 mm in the SI direction and ±2.2 mm in the AP direction. The computational experiment estimated the in vivo accuracy in ICR location was between 1.1 mm and 3.1 mm. PMID:23317757

  15. Cervical Spinal Motion During Intubation.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-01-01

    Ten fresh human cadavers were intubated while recording cervical motion using a cinefluoroscopic technique. Segmental cervical motion from the...performed using no external stabilization, Gardner-Wells traction and manual in-line cervical immobilization. The data are currently being analyzed. A...paper entitled Segmental cervical spine motion during orotracheal intubation of the intact and injured spine with and without external stabilization was published in the Journal of Neurosurgery.

  16. Data Analysis in Cervical Trauma

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-04-01

    The cervical spine in lateral view is discussed and a method based on digital statistical analysis is used to reproduce quantitative data of the... cervical lordosis. (2) Marked straightening of the cervical spine. (3) Segmental straightening with reversal of the curve. Part II discusses the use of...the digital analysis to determine the displacement in subjects that have sustained ligamentous injuries of the cervical spine following whiplash injury.

  17. Vertebrae in compression: Mechanical behavior of arches and centra in the gray smooth-hound shark (Mustelus californicus).

    PubMed

    Porter, Marianne E; Long, John H

    2010-03-01

    In swimming sharks, vertebrae are subjected, in part, to compressive loads as axial muscles contract. We currently have no information about which vertebral elements, centra, arch cartilages, or both, actually bear compressive loads in cartilaginous vertebrae. To address this issue, the goal of this experiment was to determine the load-bearing ability of arch and centrum cartilages in compression, to determine the material properties of shark vertebrae, and to document fracture patterns in the centra with and without the arches. Intact vertebrae and vertebrae with the arch cartilages experimentally removed (centra alone) were subjected to compressive loading to failure at a single strain rate. The maximum compressive forces sustained by the vertebrae and the centra are statistically indistinguishable. Thus we conclude that under these testing conditions the arch does not bear appreciable loads. Independent evidence for this conclusion comes from the fact that vertebrae fail in compression at the centra, and not at the arches. Overall, the results of these mechanical tests suggest that the neural arches are not the primary load-bearing structure during axial compression.

  18. Cervical ectopic pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Samal, Sunil Kumar; Rathod, Setu

    2015-01-01

    Cervical pregnancy is a rare type of ectopic pregnancy and it represents <1% of all ectopic pregnancies. Early diagnosis and medical management with systemic or local administration of methotrexate is the treatment of choice. If the pregnancy is disturbed, it may lead to massive hemorrhage, which may require hysterectomy to save the patient. We report three cases of cervical pregnancy managed successfully with different approaches of management. Our first case, 28 years old G3P2L2 with previous two lower segment cesarean sections, presented with bleeding per vaginum following 6 weeks of amenorrhea. Clinical examination followed by transvaginal ultrasound confirmed the diagnosis of cervical pregnancy. Total abdominal hysterectomy was done in view of intractable bleeding to save the patient. The second case, a 26-year-old second gravida with previous normal vaginal delivery presented with pain abdomen and single episode of spotting per vaginum following 7 weeks of amenorrhea. Transvaginal ultrasound revealed empty endometrial cavity, closed internal os with gestational sac containing live fetus of 7 weeks gestational age in cervical canal and she was treated with intra-amniotic potassium chloride followed by systemic methotrexate. Follow up with serum beta human chorionic gonadotropin level revealed successful outcome. Our third case, a 27-year-old primigravida with history of infertility treatment admitted with complaints of bleeding per vaginum for 1 day following 8 weeks amenorrhea. She was diagnosed as cervical pregnancy by clinical examination, confirmed by transvaginal ultrasonography and subsequently managed by dilation and curettage with intracervical Foleys' ballon tamponade.

  19. Pull-out strength of cemented solid versus fenestrated pedicle screws in osteoporotic vertebrae

    PubMed Central

    Leichtle, C. I.; Rothstock, S.; Happel, J.; Walter, F.; Shiozawa, T.; Leichtle, U. G.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Cement augmentation of pedicle screws could be used to improve screw stability, especially in osteoporotic vertebrae. However, little is known concerning the influence of different screw types and amount of cement applied. Therefore, the aim of this biomechanical in vitro study was to evaluate the effect of cement augmentation on the screw pull-out force in osteoporotic vertebrae, comparing different pedicle screws (solid and fenestrated) and cement volumes (0 mL, 1 mL or 3 mL). Materials and Methods A total of 54 osteoporotic human cadaver thoracic and lumbar vertebrae were instrumented with pedicle screws (uncemented, solid cemented or fenestrated cemented) and augmented with high-viscosity PMMA cement (0 mL, 1 mL or 3 mL). The insertion torque and bone mineral density were determined. Radiographs and CT scans were undertaken to evaluate cement distribution and cement leakage. Pull-out testing was performed with a material testing machine to measure failure load and stiffness. The paired t-test was used to compare the two screws within each vertebra. Results Mean failure load was significantly greater for fenestrated cemented screws (+622 N; p ⩽ 0.001) and solid cemented screws (+460 N; p ⩽ 0.001) than for uncemented screws. There was no significant difference between the solid and fenestrated cemented screws (p = 0.5). In the lower thoracic vertebrae, 1 mL cement was enough to significantly increase failure load, while 3 mL led to further significant improvement in the upper thoracic, lower thoracic and lumbar regions. Conclusion Conventional, solid pedicle screws augmented with high-viscosity cement provided comparable screw stability in pull-out testing to that of sophisticated and more expensive fenestrated screws. In terms of cement volume, we recommend the use of at least 1 mL in the thoracic and 3 mL in the lumbar spine. Cite this article: C. I. Leichtle, A. Lorenz, S. Rothstock, J. Happel, F. Walter, T. Shiozawa, U. G. Leichtle. Pull

  20. The degenerative cervical spine.

    PubMed

    Llopis, E; Belloch, E; León, J P; Higueras, V; Piquer, J

    2016-04-01

    Imaging techniques provide excellent anatomical images of the cervical spine. The choice to use one technique or another will depend on the clinical scenario and on the treatment options. Plain-film X-rays continue to be fundamental, because they make it possible to evaluate the alignment and bone changes; they are also useful for follow-up after treatment. The better contrast resolution provided by magnetic resonance imaging makes it possible to evaluate the soft tissues, including the intervertebral discs, ligaments, bone marrow, and spinal cord. The role of computed tomography in the study of degenerative disease has changed in recent years owing to its great spatial resolution and its capacity to depict osseous components. In this article, we will review the anatomy and biomechanical characteristics of the cervical spine, and then we provide a more detailed discussion of the degenerative diseases that can affect the cervical spine and their clinical management.

  1. Cervical Total Disc Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Basho, Rahul; Hood, Kenneth A.

    2012-01-01

    Symptomatic adjacent segment degeneration of the cervical spine remains problematic for patients and surgeons alike. Despite advances in surgical techniques and instrumentation, the solution remains elusive. Spurred by the success of total joint arthroplasty in hips and knees, surgeons and industry have turned to motion preservation devices in the cervical spine. By preserving motion at the diseased level, the hope is that adjacent segment degeneration can be prevented. Multiple cervical disc arthroplasty devices have come onto the market and completed Food and Drug Administration Investigational Device Exemption trials. Though some of the early results demonstrate equivalency of arthroplasty to fusion, compelling evidence of benefits in terms of symptomatic adjacent segment degeneration are lacking. In addition, non-industry-sponsored studies indicate that these devices are equivalent to fusion in terms of adjacent segment degeneration. Longer-term studies will eventually provide the definitive answer. PMID:24353955

  2. EVALUATION OF TERMINAL VERTEBRAL PLATE ON CERVICAL SPINE AT DIFFERENT AGE GROUPS AND ITS CORRELATION WITH INTERVERTEBRAL DISC THICKNESS

    PubMed Central

    Luiz Vieira, Juliano Silveira; da Silva Herrero, Carlos Fernando Pereira; Porto, Maximiliano Aguiar; Nogueira Barbosa, Marcello Henrique; Garcia, Sérgio Britto; Zambelli Ramalho, Leandra Náira; Aparecido Defino, Helton Luiz

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate, by means of histomorphometry, terminal vertebral plate thickness, intervertebral disc thickness and its correlation on different age groups, seeking to identify its correlation. Methods: C4-C5 and C5-C6 cervical segments removed from human cadavers of both genders were assessed and divided into five groups of 10-year age intervals, from 21 years old. TVP and intervertebral disc thickness evaluation was made by means of histomorphometry of histological slides stained with hematoxylin and eosyn. Lower C4 TVP, upper C5 TVP, and upper C6 TVP de were compared between each other and to the interposed intervertebral disc thickness between relevant TVP. Results: The thickness of terminal vertebral plates adjacent to the same ID did not show statistic differences. However, the comparison of upper and lower vertebral plates thickness on the same cervical vertebra (C5), showed statistical difference on all age groups studied. We found a statistical correlation coefficient above 80% between terminal vertebral plate and adjacent intervertebral disc, with a proportional thickness reduction of both structures on the different cervical levels studied, and also on the different age groups assessed. Conclusion: Terminal vertebral plate shows a morphologic correlation with the intervertebral disc next to it, and does not show correlation with the terminal vertebral plate on the same vertebra. PMID:26998448

  3. Leiomyosarcoma metastatic to the cervical spine causing a C6 compression fracture: A case report

    PubMed Central

    SUN, ZHENZHONG; WANG, HENG; YANG, HUILIN; JIANG, WEIMIN

    2014-01-01

    Leiomyosarcoma is a rare malignant tumor derived from smooth muscle cells, which commonly metastasizes to the lungs, liver, kidney, brain and skin. The current study presents the case of a 42-year-old male who presented with progressive neck pain and numbness of the left arm. Spinal computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging revealed osteolytic lesions of numerous vertebrae (C2, C3, C4, C5, C6, C7, T1 and T2). With regard to the C6 vertebra, total destruction of the vertebral body resulted in vertebral collapse and subsequent spinal cord compression. The patient underwent an anterior C6 corpectomy, reconstruction with a mesh cage filled with polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) and open PMMA infusion to C5 and C7. The surgical procedure significantly alleviated the symptoms and obtained a reliable reconstruction. The clinical follow-up examination at 13 months was uneventful with the exception of mild numbness of the left hand since the surgery. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of leiomyosarcoma recurrence presenting in the cervical spine, and the present study provides insight into the use of a surgical technique that has rarely been used in the cervical spine. PMID:24959258

  4. Changes in Bone Mineral Density in Uterine Cervical Cancer Patients After Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Okonogi, Noriyuki; Saitoh, Jun-ichi; Suzuki, Yoshiyuki Noda, Shin-ei; Ohno, Tatsuya; Oike, Takahiro; Ohkubo, Yu; Ando, Ken; Sato, Hiro; Nakano, Takashi

    2013-12-01

    Purpose: To prospectively investigate the changes in bone mineral density (BMD) after pelvic radiation therapy in patients with uterine cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: Of 52 cervical cancer patients who received pelvic RT in our university hospital between 2009 and 2011, 46 patients without recurrence and who were followed up for more than 12 months were included in the study. The BMD of the irradiated region and nonirradiated regions, serum estradiol, tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase-5b, and N-terminal cross-linking telopeptide of collagen 1 were measured before, at 3 months after, and at 12 months after RT. The patient cohort was divided into 2 groups according to estradiol level before RT, and the groups were defined as postmenopausal (<40 pg/mL) and premenopausal (≥40 pg/mL). Results: The mean BMDs within the irradiation field (lumbar vertebra 5) in the postmenopausal and the premenopausal groups were 0.825 and 0.910 g/cm{sup 2} before RT and 0.746 and 0.841 g/cm{sup 2} 12 months after RT, respectively. Significant decreases were observed in both groups (P<.05 and P<.01, respectively). In addition, in the premenopausal group the mean BMDs of the nonirradiated regions at thoracic vertebrae 9-12 and lumbar vertebrae 2-4 were 0.753 and 0.958 g/cm{sup 2} before RT and were significantly decreased to 0.706 and 0.921 g/cm{sup 2} 12 months after RT (P<.01 and P<.05, respectively). Estradiol significantly decreased 3 months after RT, whereas tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase-5b and N-terminal cross-linking telopeptide of collagen 1 continued to increase over time in the premenopausal group. Conclusions: A decrease in BMD in the irradiated region after RT was observed within 1 year, regardless of menopausal status. Furthermore, in premenopausal patients, pelvic RT caused a decrease in systemic BMD.

  5. Grade 4 spondylolisthesis of the L5 vertebra associated with dural ectasia in neurofibromatosis.

    PubMed

    Modi, H N; Srinivasalu, S; Suh, S W; Yang, J H

    2009-08-01

    Spondylolisthesis associated with neurofibromatosis is rare, and only 12 cases have been reported so far. However, only one report of grade 4 spondylolisthesis with neurofibromatosis has been reported in the literature. A 15-year-old boy with neurofibromatosis was admitted for back pain and neurological claudication. Radiograph showed grade 4 spondylolisthesis of the L5 vertebra with scalloping of the L4-L5 vertebrae. L4-L5 laminectomy, reduction, L3-S1 posterior instrumentation and fusion were performed. The reduction of the spondylisthesis was done entirely from the posterior approach using pedicle screws. Radiography at four months showed a broken S1 screw with a loss of reduction. The patient was re-operated on, to provide additional stability with pelvic fixation. He was pain-free with a good fusion at the two-year follow-up. Adequate posterior stabilisation with fusion gives good results in grade 4 spondylolisthesis associated with neurofibromatosis and dural ectasia.

  6. Differentiating between Traumatic Pathology and Congenital Variant: A Case Report of Butterfly Vertebra

    PubMed Central

    Karargyris, Orestis; Morassi, Lampros-Guiseppe; Stathopoulos, Ioannis P.; Chatziioannou, Sofia N.; Pneumaticos, Spyros G.

    2015-01-01

    Butterfly vertebra is a rare congenital malformation of the spine, which is usually reported in the literature as an isolated finding. We describe a 40-year-old woman that presented to our emergency department with back pain and sciatica. Initial radiological evaluation revealed an incidental finding of a L4 butterfly vertebra in the anteroposterior and lateral view radiographs. The patient presented with no neurological deficit. This rare congenital anomaly is usually asymptomatic, and awareness of its non-traumatic nature is critical in order to establish a correct diagnosis. Further evaluation of the patient is necessary to exclude pathologic fracture, infection, or associated vertebral anomalies and syndromes, such as Alagille, Jarcho-Levin, Crouzon, and Pfeiffer syndromes. Furthermore, in the emergency setting, awareness of this entity is needed so that a correct diagnosis can be established. PMID:26330967

  7. Lower Extremity Radicular Pain Caused by Entrapped Sigmoid Colon Between L5 and S1 Vertebrae

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Sanghyung; Park, Noh Kyoung; Cho, Kyoung Jin; Baek, Jung Hyun; Lim, Jeong-Wook; Choi, Dongjin

    2015-01-01

    Intestinal entrapment between two vertebral bodies is very rare. In all previous cases, it occurred by major trauma. However, the bowel entrapment between two vertebral bodies without trauma has never been reported, not to mention as the cause of lower extremity radicular pain. We describe the case of an 82-year-old female patient with right lower extremity radicular pain without recent trauma history. The patient was diagnosed sigmoid colon entrapment between the L5 and S1 vertebrae by lumbar spinal computerized tomography and magnetic resonance imaging, and showed improvement in radicular pain after manual reduction of interpositioned colon during surgery. Intestinal entrapment between two vertebrae without trauma is caused by degenerative and vacuum changes of the intervertebral disc combined with the anterior longitudinal ligament injury. PMID:26619145

  8. The spinal cord supports of vertebrae in the crown-group salamanders (Caudata, Urodela).

    PubMed

    Skutschas, Pavel P; Baleeva, Nataly V

    2012-09-01

    The development of spinal cord supports (bony thickenings which extend into the vertebral canal of vertebrae) in primitive (Salamandrella keyserlingii) and derived (Lissotriton vulgaris) salamanders were described. The spinal cord supports develop as the protuberances of periostal bone of the neural arches in the anteroproximal part of the septal collagenous fibers which connect a transverse myoseptum with the notochord and spinal cord, in the septal bundle inside the vertebral canal. Spinal cord supports were also found in some teleostean (Salmo salar, Oncorhynchus mykiss) and dipnoan (Protopterus sp.) fishes. The absence of the spinal cord supports in vertebrates with cartilaginous vertebrae (lampreys, chondrichthyan, and chondrostean fishes) corresponds to the fact that the spinal cord supports are bone structures. The absence of the spinal cord supports in frogs correlates with the lack of the well developed septal bundles inside the vertebral canal. The spinal cord supports are, presumably, a synapomorphic character for salamanders which originated independently of those observed in teleostean and dipnoan fishes.

  9. Cisplatin and Radiation Therapy With or Without Tirapazamine in Treating Patients With Cervical Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-06-18

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Cell Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage III Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer

  10. Heterogeneity of bone mineral density and fatigue failure of human vertebrae.

    PubMed

    Yeni, Yener N; Poisson, Laila M; Flynn, Michael J

    2013-04-26

    There is increasing interest in using the heterogeneity of tissue properties in a bone for predicting its fracture risk. Heterogeneity of volumetric bone mineral density (BMD) as measured from quantitative computed tomography (QCT) is of particular interest as these measurements are clinically feasible. Previous examinations of the relationship between the BMD heterogeneity and the mechanical behavior of human vertebrae only considered quasistatic strength and were with limited number of samples. McCubbrey et al. (1995) studied the value of regional BMDs for predicting vertebral fatigue life, determined from short-cycle tests at force levels scaled with the estimated strength of the vertebra, but the focus of that work was in best predictor subsets without a specific focus on the heterogeneity of BMD or the positive vs negative direction of the relationships. The previous analysis also did not take into account the censored nature of the fatigue life data. As such, whether BMD heterogeneity is positively or negatively associated with fatigue life and whether this is independent of the average or minimum BMD are not clear. In the present work, we revisited the McCubbrey data for a preliminary examination of the relationship between BMD heterogeneity and fatigue life using survival analysis. The analysis suggests that BMD heterogeneity measured as the intra-vertebral standard deviation of BMDs in a vertebra is negatively associated with short cycle (high-amplitude) fatigue life independent of the average BMD. The results motivate further studies on the role of BMD heterogeneity in fatigue failure and clinical fracture risk of human vertebrae.

  11. Digital Anatomical Measurement for Anterolateral Fixation of Middle and Lower Thoracic Vertebrae

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiaohe; En, He; Zhang, Yunfeng; Gao, Shang; Li, Guimin; Guo, Yu; Wang, Xin; Wang, Haiyan; Cai, Yongqiang; Wang, Zhiqiang; Li, Zhijun; Li, Cunbao; Zhao, Feifei

    2016-01-01

    Background The key to its successful application is to determine the best entry point for the vertebral screw(s). This study aimed to provide a reference for clinical anterolateral fixation through digital measurement of computed tomography (CT) data to identify relevant anatomical positions in the middle and lower thoracic vertebrae (T4–T12) of 30 adults. Material/Methods We performed digital measurement of anatomical positions in the middle and lower thoracic vertebrae (T4–T12) of 30 adults. Abbreviations: Left height of vertebral body, LHV; Right height of vertebral body, RHV; Anterior height of vertebral body, AHV; Middle height of vertebral body, MHV; Posterior height of vertebral body, PHV; Superior sagittal diameter of vertebral body, SSDV; Superior transverse diameter of vertebral body, STDV; inferior sagittal diameter of vertebral body, ISDV; Inferior transverse diameter of vertebral body, ITDV; (1) Left (right) height of vertebral body, [L(R)HV]; Anterior (middle, posterior) height of vertebral body [A(M,P)HV]; Superior (inferior) sagittal diameter of vertebral body, [S(I)SDV]; Superior (inferior) transverse diameter of vertebral body, [S(I)TDV]. Results The transverse diameters of vertebral bodies were always larger than the sagittal diameter for 3~4 mm. The distance between 2 vertebrae (interval of 1 vertebra) range were (52–56) mm for T4–T7 and (44–48) mm for T8–T12, and the surgeons could collate these data to choose a suitable stick length. Conclusions Bone graft should prune into laterigrade cuboid, it can recover A-P and bilateral physiological functions load, and the height of the vertebral body increased from T4 to T12. PMID:27997524

  12. Asymmetric lumbosacral transitional vertebra and subsequent disc protrusion in a cocker spaniel.

    PubMed

    Archer, Rebecca; Sissener, Thomas; Connery, Neil; Spotswood, Tim

    2010-03-01

    A 10-year-old cocker spaniel bitch presented with severe lumbosacral pain and acute onset left pelvic limb lameness. A diagnosis of asymmetric lumbosacral transitional vertebra with disc protrusion at L6-L7 was made by computed tomography. The cauda equina and left L6 nerve root were surgically decompressed with a dorsal laminectomy and lateral foraminotomy, which led to rapid resolution of the clinical signs.

  13. Fat4-Dchs1 signalling controls cell proliferation in developing vertebrae

    PubMed Central

    Kuta, Anna; Mao, Yaopan; Martin, Tina; Ferreira de Sousa, Catia; Whiting, Danielle; Zakaria, Sana; Crespo-Enriquez, Ivan; Evans, Philippa; Balczerski, Bartosz; Mankoo, Baljinder; Irvine, Kenneth D.

    2016-01-01

    The protocadherins Fat4 and Dchs1 act as a receptor-ligand pair to regulate many developmental processes in mice and humans, including development of the vertebrae. Based on conservation of function between Drosophila and mammals, Fat4-Dchs1 signalling has been proposed to regulate planar cell polarity (PCP) and activity of the Hippo effectors Yap and Taz, which regulate cell proliferation, survival and differentiation. There is strong evidence for Fat regulation of PCP in mammals but the link with the Hippo pathway is unclear. In Fat4−/− and Dchs1−/− mice, many vertebrae are split along the midline and fused across the anterior-posterior axis, suggesting that these defects might arise due to altered cell polarity and/or changes in cell proliferation/differentiation. We show that the somite and sclerotome are specified appropriately, the transcriptional network that drives early chondrogenesis is intact, and that cell polarity within the sclerotome is unperturbed. We find that the key defect in Fat4 and Dchs1 mutant mice is decreased proliferation in the early sclerotome. This results in fewer chondrogenic cells within the developing vertebral body, which fail to condense appropriately along the midline. Analysis of Fat4;Yap and Fat4;Taz double mutants, and expression of their transcriptional target Ctgf, indicates that Fat4-Dchs1 regulates vertebral development independently of Yap and Taz. Thus, we have identified a new pathway crucial for the development of the vertebrae and our data indicate that novel mechanisms of Fat4-Dchs1 signalling have evolved to control cell proliferation within the developing vertebrae. PMID:27381226

  14. SUV measurement of normal vertebrae using SPECT/CT with Tc-99m methylene diphosphonate

    PubMed Central

    Kaneta, Tomohiro; Ogawa, Matsuyoshi; Daisaki, Hiromitsu; Nawata, Shintaro; Yoshida, Keisuke; Inoue, Tomio

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to perform quantitative measurement based on the standardized uptake value (SUV) of the uptake of Tc-99m methylene diphosphonate (MDP) in the normal vertebrae using a single photon emission tomography (SPECT)/computed tomography (CT) scanner. A retrospective study of patients with cancer or joint disorders was performed. We acquired data for a group of 29 patients (8 women and 21 men; mean age, 68.2 ± 6.7 years; age range, 44-87 years) undergoing bone SPECT/CT scans with Tc-99m MDP between September and October 2015. Various SUVs were calculated based on body-weight, lean-body-weight (lbw), Japanese lean-body-weight (jlbw) and Japanese bone-mineral-content (jbmc). SUVs of normal vertebrae showed a wide range of values. Among these, the maximum body-weight based SUV showed the lowest coefficient of variation. The SUVs also showed relatively small intra-subject variability. In addition, all SUVs showed moderate and significant correlation with height. Moreover, lbw-, jlbw-, and jbmc-based SUVs of men were significantly higher than those of women. In conclusions, SUVs of normal vertebrae showed a relatively large inter-individual variability and small intra-individual variability. As a quantitative imaging biomarker, SUVs might require standardization with adequate reference data for the same subject to minimize variability. PMID:27766184

  15. Mechanical properties of sand tiger shark (Carcharias taurus) vertebrae in relation to spinal deformity.

    PubMed

    Huber, Daniel R; Neveu, Danielle E; Stinson, Charlotte M; Anderson, Paul A; Berzins, Ilze K

    2013-11-15

    Approximately 35% of sand tiger sharks (Carcharias taurus) in public aquaria exhibit spinal deformities ranging from compressed vertebrae and loss of intervertebral space to dislocated spines with vertebral degeneration and massive spondylosis caused by excessive mineralization both within vertebrae and outside the notochordal sheath. To identify the mechanical basis of these deformities, vertebral centra from affected (N=12) and non-affected (N=9) C. taurus were subjected to axial compression tests on an MTS 858 Bionix material testing system, after which mineral content was determined. Vertebral centra from affected sharks had significantly lower mineral content and material behavior in nearly all variables characterizing elasticity, plasticity and failure. These mechanical deficiencies are correlated with size at capture, capture method, vitamin C and zinc deficiency, aquarium size and swimming behavior in public aquaria. Non-affected C. taurus had greater stiffness and toughness even though these properties are generally incompatible in mineralized structures, suggesting that the biphasic (mineralized, unmineralized phases) nature of chondrichthyan vertebrae yields material behavior not otherwise observed in vertebrate skeletons. However, vertebral centra from non-affected sharks had lower mineral content (33%), stiffness (167 MPa), yield strain (14%) and ultimate strength (16 MPa) than other species of sharks and bony vertebrates, indicating that biomechanical precautions must be taken in the husbandry of this species.

  16. Level set based vertebra segmentation for the evaluation of Ankylosing Spondylitis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Sovira; Yao, Jianhua; Ward, Michael M.; Yao, Lawrence; Summers, Ronald M.

    2006-03-01

    Ankylosing Spondylitis is a disease of the vertebra where abnormal bone structures (syndesmophytes) grow at intervertebral disk spaces. Because this growth is so slow as to be undetectable on plain radiographs taken over years, it is necessary to resort to computerized techniques to complement qualitative human judgment with precise quantitative measures on 3-D CT images. Very fine segmentation of the vertebral body is required to capture the small structures caused by the pathology. We propose a segmentation algorithm based on a cascade of three level set stages and requiring no training or prior knowledge. First, the noise inside the vertebral body that often blocks the proper evolution of level set surfaces is attenuated by a sigmoid function whose parameters are determined automatically. The 1st level set (geodesic active contour) is designed to roughly segment the interior of the vertebra despite often highly inhomogeneous and even discontinuous boundaries. The result is used as an initial contour for the 2nd level set (Laplacian level set) that closely captures the inner boundary of the cortical bone. The last level set (reversed Laplacian level set) segments the outer boundary of the cortical bone and also corrects small flaws of the previous stage. We carried out extensive tests on 30 vertebrae (5 from each of 6 patients). Two medical experts scored the results at intervertebral disk spaces focusing on end plates and syndesmophytes. Only two minor segmentation errors at vertebral end plates were reported and two syndesmophytes were considered slightly under-segmented.

  17. Screening for Cervical Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... causes cervical cancer. To learn more about these tests and what happens during them, visit the Web sites listed at the end of this fact ... evidence about the benefits and harms of the test. The grades are explained in the box at ... Web site to read the full recommendation statement on ...

  18. Cervical Neoplasia Probe Control

    SciTech Connect

    Vargo, Timothy D.

    1997-01-24

    This software, which consists of a main executive and several subroutines, performs control of the optics, image acquisition, and Digital Signal Processing (DSP) of this image, of an optical based medical instrument that performs fluoresence detection of precancerous lesions (neoplasia) of the human cervix. The hardware portion of this medical instrument is known by the same name Cervical Neoplasia Probe (CNP)

  19. Cervical ectopic pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Samal, Sunil Kumar; Rathod, Setu

    2015-01-01

    Cervical pregnancy is a rare type of ectopic pregnancy and it represents <1% of all ectopic pregnancies. Early diagnosis and medical management with systemic or local administration of methotrexate is the treatment of choice. If the pregnancy is disturbed, it may lead to massive hemorrhage, which may require hysterectomy to save the patient. We report three cases of cervical pregnancy managed successfully with different approaches of management. Our first case, 28 years old G3P2L2 with previous two lower segment cesarean sections, presented with bleeding per vaginum following 6 weeks of amenorrhea. Clinical examination followed by transvaginal ultrasound confirmed the diagnosis of cervical pregnancy. Total abdominal hysterectomy was done in view of intractable bleeding to save the patient. The second case, a 26-year-old second gravida with previous normal vaginal delivery presented with pain abdomen and single episode of spotting per vaginum following 7 weeks of amenorrhea. Transvaginal ultrasound revealed empty endometrial cavity, closed internal os with gestational sac containing live fetus of 7 weeks gestational age in cervical canal and she was treated with intra-amniotic potassium chloride followed by systemic methotrexate. Follow up with serum beta human chorionic gonadotropin level revealed successful outcome. Our third case, a 27-year-old primigravida with history of infertility treatment admitted with complaints of bleeding per vaginum for 1 day following 8 weeks amenorrhea. She was diagnosed as cervical pregnancy by clinical examination, confirmed by transvaginal ultrasonography and subsequently managed by dilation and curettage with intracervical Foleys’ ballon tamponade. PMID:25810679

  20. Late prevertebral abscess with sinus following anterior cervical corpectomy and fusion.

    PubMed

    Bhise, Swapnil D; Mathesul, Ambarish A; Deokate, Pravin; Chandanwale, Ajay S; Bartakke, Girish D

    2015-01-01

    Anterior cervical discectomy/corpectomy and fusion is performed in degenerative, traumatic and neoplastic etiologies of the cervical spine. This procedure is highly successful and associated with fewer complications. The rates of early and late postoperative infection have been reported to be between 0.1% and 1.6%, the late infections are being very rare. We report a rare case of a 30-year-old HIV negative, non-diabetic male who developed a late prevertebral cervical abscess with discharging sinus over posterior triangle of neck 3 years after an anterior cervical C6 corpectomy with fibular grafting and buttress screw fixation performed elsewhere for traumatic fracture C6 vertebra. The abscess was drained using radical neck dissection approach with complete excision of sinus track and removal of the infected implant. On culture, the organism was found to be beta-hemolytic streptococci, for which appropriate antibiotics were administered postoperatively. The sinus tract completely healed in 3 months time. Late infection as a complication of anterior cervical spine surgeries is rare and is associated with esophageal perforation, implant migration, seeding of the deep prevertebral space with oropharyngeal flora, or from surgical site/bacteremia or with Zenker's diverticulum. Few cases have been reported till date, but none have presented with a sinus tract. We present a case of delayed prevertebral abscess after cervical spine instrumentation that followed abnormal path causing sinus track to be developed in the site (the posterior triangle of the neck) other than previous incision site. Exploring both triangles of the neck using radical neck dissection approach was essential for complete excision of sinus track, removal of screw and debridement.

  1. Cervical spine annulus vacuum.

    PubMed

    Bohrer, S P; Chen, Y M

    1988-01-01

    Thirty-eight annulus vacuums in 27 patients were analyzed with regard to location, configuration, and associated vertebral abnormalities such as degenerative changes, absent and compressed anterosuperior vertebral body corners, and annulus calcification. It is concluded that most annulus vacuums are a degenerative phenomenon at the attachment of the annulus to bone. These vacuums may be associated with other degenerative changes such as osteophytes and annulus calcification. Vacuums have a strong association with compressed anterosuperior corners. These deformed corners are thought to be early osteophytes and may be related to previous trauma, a vertebra with an absent corner, and/or normal motion. Small annulus vacuums adjacent to vertebral corners with a normal appearance are more likely to result from acute trauma.

  2. Current insights and controversies in the pathogenesis and diagnosis of disc-associated cervical spondylomyelopathy in dogs.

    PubMed

    De Decker, S; da Costa, R C; Volk, H A; Van Ham, L M L

    2012-11-24

    Disc-associated cervical spondylomyelopathy (DA-CSM) is the most common cause of cervical spondylomyelopathy in dogs. In this condition, progressive caudal cervical spinal cord compression is typically caused by protrusion of one or more intervertebral discs. This disc-associated compression is sometimes seen in combination with mild vertebral abnormalities and dorsal compression resulting from ligamentum flavum hypertrophy. The intervertebral disc space between the sixth (C6) and seventh (C7) cervical vertebrae is most commonly affected. Although several large breed dogs can be affected, the adult to older dobermann is overrepresented. Clinical signs vary from cervical hyperaesthesia to tetraplegia. Dogs can present with a chronic progressive or an acute onset of clinical signs. Many aspects of this multifactorial neurological syndrome are not completely understood and are the subject of controversy and debate. Although several factors have been proposed, the underlying pathology and aetiology remain unknown. Recently, new insights have been gained in the pathogenesis, diagnosis and treatment of this challenging neurological syndrome. This review outlines current controversies and new developments concerning the pathogenesis and diagnosis of DA-CSM.

  3. Cetuximab, Cisplatin, and Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients With Stage IB, Stage II, Stage III, or Stage IVA Cervical Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-12-29

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Cervical Small Cell Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage III Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer

  4. Cisplatin and Radiation Therapy Followed by Paclitaxel and Carboplatin in Treating Patients With Stage IB-IVA Cervical Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-16

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Stage IB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIB Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer

  5. Total spondylectomy of C2 and circumferential reconstruction via combined anterior and posterior approach to cervical spine for axis tumor surgery.

    PubMed

    Wu, Wei; Li, Feng; Fang, Zhong; Xiong, Wei; Guan, Han-feng; Xiao, Jun; Guo, Feng-jin; Chen, An-min

    2013-02-01

    As a result of the complex anatomy in upper cervical spine, the operative treatment of axis neoplasms is always complicated. Although the procedure for the second cervical vertebra (C2) surgery had been described previously in diverse approaches and reconstruction forms, each has its own limitations and restrictions that usually result in less satisfactory conclusions. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the operation efficacy for axis tumors by using a combined anterior (retropharyngeal) cervical and posterior approach in achieving total resection of C2 and circumferential reconstruction. Eight consecutive C2 tumor patients with mean age of 47.6 years in our institute sequentially underwent vertebra resection and fixation through aforementioned approach from Jan. 2006 to Dec. 2010. No surgical mortality or severe morbidity occurred in our group. In terms of complications, 2 cases developed transient difficulty in swallowing liquids (one of them experienced dysphonia) and 1 developed cerebrospinal fluid leakage (CSFL) that was resolved later. During a mean follow-up period of 31.9 months, the visual analogue scale (VAS) and Japanese orthopedic association (JOA) score revealed that the pain level and neurological function in all patients were improved postoperatively, and there was no evidence of fixation failure and local recurrence. It is concluded that the anterior cervical retropharyngeal approach permits a visible exposure to facilitate the C2 vertebra resection and perform an effective anterior reconstruction at the same time. The custom-made mesh cage applied in our cases can be acted as a firm and convenient implant in circumferential fixation.

  6. High Prevalence of Cervical Deformity and Instability Requires Surveillance in Loeys-Dietz Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Fuhrhop, Sara K.; McElroy, Mark J.; Dietz, Harry C.; MacCarrick, Gretchen L.; Sponseller, Paul D.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Loeys-Dietz syndrome is a connective tissue disorder characterized by vascular, craniofacial, and musculoskeletal malformation. Our goal was to report the manifestations, surgical treatment, and complications in the cervical spine in patients with Loeys-Dietz syndrome. Methods: We reviewed the clinical and cervical spine imaging data of eighty patients with Loeys-Dietz syndrome who were seen at our institution from January 2005 through January 2014. Their mean age at presentation was 17.3 years (range, three months to seventy-five years). We tested associations with use of the Fisher exact test (type of TGF-βR [transforming growth factor-beta receptor] mutation and cervical abnormalities) and the Student t test (age at presentation and type of TGF-βR mutation) (significance, p = 0.05). Results: Vertebral anomalies and cervical instability were common; we found no significant association of TGF-βR-type with cervical abnormalities or age at presentation. Twenty-eight patients had atlas defects (anterior and/or posterior arch defects or hypoplasia), fifty-three had axis malformations (elongation, apex-anterior dens angulation, or spondylolysis), and twelve had focal kyphosis. Ten patients had hypoplastic subaxial vertebrae, leading to focal kyphosis (eight) and subaxial instability (nine). Eight patients had atlantoaxial instability. Of the thirteen patients with cervical instability, nine were treated surgically: fusion (eight patients) and halo application (one) (mean age, four years; range, three months to twelve years). Postoperative complications (seven patients) were pseudarthrosis, failure of fixation, junctional kyphosis or instability, and development of occipital-cervical instability. Conclusions: Cervical midline defects (most often C1-C3) are common in Loeys-Dietz syndrome. Patients have a high prevalence of cervical instability, particularly a pattern of instability at C2-C3 associated with C3 vertebral body hypoplasia and C2-C3 focal

  7. Os Odontoideum: Rare Cervical Lesion

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-11-01

    the articulation between C1 and the os odontoideum on flexion imaging. The remainder of his cervical vertebral bodies had normal alignment with no...appears normal. Figure 3. Flexion view of plain cervical spine. This image shows abnormal translation of the articulation between C1 and the C2 os...worldwide. Peer Reviewed Title: Os Odontoideum: Rare Cervical Lesion Journal Issue: Western Journal of Emergency Medicine, 12(4) Author: Robson

  8. Chronic Pseudomonas aeruginosa cervical osteomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    Meher, Sujeet Kumar; Jain, Harsh; Tripathy, Laxmi Narayan; Basu, Sunandan

    2016-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a rare cause of osteomyelitis of the cervical spine and is usually seen in the background of intravenous drug use and immunocompromised state. Very few cases of osteomyelitis of the cervical spine caused by pseudomonas aeruginosa have been reported in otherwise healthy patients. This is a case presentation of a young female, who in the absence of known risk factors for cervical osteomyelitis presented with progressively worsening neurological signs and symptoms. PMID:27891039

  9. [Primary cervical cancer screening].

    PubMed

    Vargas-Hernández, Víctor Manuel; Vargas-Aguilar, Víctor Manuel; Tovar-Rodríguez, José María

    2015-01-01

    Cervico-uterine cancer screening with cytology decrease incidence by more than 50%. The cause of this cancer is the human papilloma virus high risk, and requires a sensitive test to provide sufficient sensitivity and specificity for early detection and greater interval period when the results are negative. The test of the human papilloma virus high risk, is effective and safe because of its excellent sensitivity, negative predictive value and optimal reproducibility, especially when combined with liquid-based cytology or biomarkers with viral load, with higher sensitivity and specificity, by reducing false positives for the detection of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 2 or greater injury, with excellent clinical benefits to cervical cancer screening and related infection of human papilloma virus diseases, is currently the best test for early detection infection of human papillomavirus and the risk of carcinogenesis.

  10. Osteotomies in the Cervical Spine

    PubMed Central

    Nemani, Venu M.; Derman, Peter B.

    2016-01-01

    Rigid cervical deformities are difficult problems to treat. The goals of surgical treatment include deformity correction, achieving a rigid fusion, and performing a thorough neural decompression. In stiff and ankylosed cervical spines, osteotomies are required to restore sagittal and coronal balance. In this chapter, we describe the clinical and radiographic workup for patients with cervical deformities, and delineate the various factors that must be considered when planning surgical treatment. We also describe in detail the various types of cervical osteotomies, along with their surgical technique, advantages, and potential complications. PMID:26949476

  11. Cervical split: A pseudofracture

    SciTech Connect

    Goldberg, R.P.; Vine, H.S.; Sacks, B.A.; Ellison, H.P.

    1982-01-01

    A horizontal lucent line projecting over a cervical vertebral body on lateral radiographs and simulating a fracture is described. This pseudofracture line results from the lucency between contiguous proliferative osteophytes at the uncinate process/vertebral articulation. Associated disc space narrowing was seen in all of our eleven cases. The origin of this pseudofracture line, cases illustrating this phenomenon, and additional projections helpful for clarification are presented.

  12. Preinduction cervical ripening.

    PubMed

    Thiery, M

    1983-01-01

    This work reviews the evolution of cervical ripening procedures and discusses the most effective current techniques. Current knowledge of the process of spontaneous ripening of the cervix is briefly assessed, but the review concentrates on methodological aspects and the clinical results of preinduction cervical ripening. The historical development of mechanical and pharmacologic ripening procedures is examined, including enzymes, oxytocin, relaxin, corticosteriods, estrogens administered parenterally or locally, and prostaglandins (PGs) administered intravenously, orally, locally, and intravaginally. 3 effective procedures for preinduction cervical ripening are identified and described in greater detail: the catheter technique and local and vaginal administration of PGs. The extraamniotic catheter technique is simple, effective, and safe and is recommended for patients with not totally unripe cervixes and for whom PGs are unavailable or contraindicated. Single-dose extraamniotic instillation of PGE2 in Tylose gel was found to be highly effective for priming the unfavorable cervix before conventional labor induction. In some patients the procedure induces labor. The technique is easy to use, well accepted by the woman, and safe when applied appropriately to carefully selected patients. PGF2alpha gel has been less thoroughly studied. Electronic monitoring at the ripening stage is recommended for patients at risk, and even in low-risk cases much larger series will require study before conclusions can be reached about safety. Injection of PG gel into the cervical canal is less invasive than extraamniotic instillation, but no definite conclusions about its safety are possible due to small series and dissimilar clinical protocols. Pericervical administration of PGE2 and PGF2 alpha and intracervical and intraamniotic tablets of PGE2 are briefly assessed. Adoption of the intravaginal route has been a major step in the development of ripening techniques. 3 types of media

  13. Hybrid cervical disc arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Tu, Tsung-Hsi; Wu, Jau-Ching; Cheng, Henrich; Mummaneni, Praveen V

    2017-01-01

    For patients with multilevel cervical stenosis at nonadjacent segments, one of the traditional approaches has included a multilevel fusion of the abnormal segments as well as the intervening normal segment. In this video we demonstrate an alternative treatment plan with tailored use of a combination of anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) and cervical disc arthroplasty (CDA) with an intervening skipped level. The authors present the case of a 72-year-old woman with myeloradiculopathy and a large disc herniation with facet joint degeneration at C3-4 and bulging disc at C5-6. After nonoperative treatment failed, she underwent a single-level ACDF at C3-4 and single-level arthroplasty at C5-6, which successfully relieved her symptoms. No intervention was performed at the normal intervening C4-5 segment. By using ACDF combined with arthroplasty, the authors have avoided a 3-level fusion for this patient and maintained the range of motion of 2 disc levels. The video can be found here: https://youtu.be/OrxcPUBvqLk .

  14. Radiation Therapy and Cisplatin With or Without Epoetin Alfa in Treating Patients With Cervical Cancer and Anemia

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-12-29

    Anemia; Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Drug Toxicity; Radiation Toxicity; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage III Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer

  15. Clinical and magnetic resonance imaging features of compressive cervical myelopathy with traumatic intervertebral disc herniation in cynomolgus macaque (Macaca fascicularis)

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Yun-Jung; Park, Hye-Jin; Sohn, Chul-Ho; Jung, Kyeong Cheon; Park, Seong Hoe

    2016-01-01

    Intervertebral disc herniation (IVDH) with nucleus pulposus extrusion, traumatic or not, is a devastating clinical condition accompanied by neurological problems. Here we report a cynomolgus macaque suffering from acute and progressive neurological dysfunction by a blunt trauma due to neck collar, an animal handling device. Tetraplegia, urinary incontinence, decreased proprioception, and imperception of pain were shown on physical and neurological examinations. MRI sagittal T2 weighted sequences revealed an extensive protrusion of disc material between C2 and C3 cervical vertebra, and this protrusion resulted in central stenosis of the spinal cord. Histopathologic findings showed a large number of inflammatory cells infiltrated at sites of spinal cord injury (SCI). This case is the first report of compressive cervical SCI caused by IVDH associated with blunt trauma. PMID:28053621

  16. Clinical and magnetic resonance imaging features of compressive cervical myelopathy with traumatic intervertebral disc herniation in cynomolgus macaque (Macaca fascicularis).

    PubMed

    Choi, Yun-Jung; Park, Hye-Jin; Sohn, Chul-Ho; Jung, Kyeong Cheon; Park, Seong Hoe; Lee, Jae-Il

    2016-12-01

    Intervertebral disc herniation (IVDH) with nucleus pulposus extrusion, traumatic or not, is a devastating clinical condition accompanied by neurological problems. Here we report a cynomolgus macaque suffering from acute and progressive neurological dysfunction by a blunt trauma due to neck collar, an animal handling device. Tetraplegia, urinary incontinence, decreased proprioception, and imperception of pain were shown on physical and neurological examinations. MRI sagittal T2 weighted sequences revealed an extensive protrusion of disc material between C2 and C3 cervical vertebra, and this protrusion resulted in central stenosis of the spinal cord. Histopathologic findings showed a large number of inflammatory cells infiltrated at sites of spinal cord injury (SCI). This case is the first report of compressive cervical SCI caused by IVDH associated with blunt trauma.

  17. [Research advances of three-dimension printing technology in vertebrae and intervertebral disc tissue engineering].

    PubMed

    Yang, Zechuan; Li, Chunde; Sun, Haolin

    2016-03-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) printing technology is characterized by "inside-out" stack manufacturing. Compared with conventional technologies, 3D printing has the advantage of personalization and precision. Therefore, the shape and internal structure of the scaffolds made by 3D printing technology are highly biomimetic. Besides, 3D bioprinting can precisely deposit the biomaterials, seeding cells and cytokines at the same time, which is a breakthrough in printing technique and material science. With the development of 3D printing, it will make great contributions to the reconstruction of vertebrae and intervertebral disc in the future.

  18. Failure of articular process (zygaphophyseal) joint development as a cause of vertebral fusion (blocked vertebrae).

    PubMed Central

    Chandraraj, S

    1987-01-01

    Examination of congenitally fused (blocked) vertebrae in this study suggests that non-development of the joint between articular facets results in fusion of the vertebral arches which in turn leads to secondary fusion of the bodies and hypoplasia of the intervertebral discs. The presence of independent pedicles and transverse processes do not favour the concept that such an abnormality is the result of non-segmentation of the sclerotome. The condition is probably linked to a defect of an inductor substance which influences normal morphogenesis of the vertebral arch in the embryonic period. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 PMID:3429327

  19. Retropharyngeal abscess in a young child due to ingestion of eel vertebrae.

    PubMed

    Hon, Kam Lun; Chu, Winnie C; Sung, John K K

    2010-06-01

    Foreign body ingestion was immediately suspected at the emergency department when a 14-month-old boy presented with fever, refusal to eat, and history of choking after consumption of congee with minced fish meat the day before. Two eel vertebrae were subsequently retrieved from the piriform fossa. This case is reported to discuss the importance of obtaining the relevant history of foreign body ingestion and high index of suspicion in very young children. Parents must be educated about the risk of feeding infant and young children with bone-containing foods.

  20. Cervical vertebral column morphology in patients with obstructive sleep apnoea assessed using lateral cephalograms and cone beam CT. A comparative study

    PubMed Central

    Sonnesen, L; Jensen, KE; Petersson, AR; Petri, N; Berg, S; Svanholt, P

    2013-01-01

    Objectives: Few studies have described morphological deviations in obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) patients on two-dimensional (2D) lateral cephalograms, and the reliability of 2D radiographs has been discussed. The objective is to describe the morphology of the cervical vertebral column on cone beam CT (CBCT) in adult patients with OSA and to compare 2D lateral cephalograms with three-dimensional (3D) CBCT images. Methods: For all 57 OSA patients, the cervical vertebral column morphology was evaluated on lateral cephalograms and CBCT images and compared according to fusion anomalies and posterior arch deficiency. Results: The CBCT assessment showed that 21.1% had fusion anomalies of the cervical column, i.e. fusion between two cervical vertebrae (10.5%), block fusions (8.8%) or occipitalization (1.8%). Posterior arch deficiency occurred in 14% as partial cleft of C1 and in 3.5% in combination with block fusions. The agreement between the occurrence of morphological deviations in the cervical vertebral column between lateral cephalograms and CBCT images showed good agreement (κ = 0.64). Conclusions: Prevalence and pattern in the cervical column morphology have now been confirmed on CBCT. The occurrence of morphological deviations in the cervical vertebral column showed good agreement between lateral cephalograms and CBCT images. This indicates that 2D lateral cephalograms (already available after indication in connection with, e.g. treatment planning) are sufficient for identifying morphological deviations in the cervical vertebral column. For a more accurate diagnosis and location of the deviations, CBCT is required. New 3D methods will suggest a need for new detailed characterization and division of deviations in cervical vertebral column morphology. PMID:23503808

  1. Cervical Cancer Working Group report.

    PubMed

    Konno, Ryo; Sagae, Satoru; Yoshikawa, Hiroyuki; Basu, Partha Sarathi; Hanley, Sharon J B; Tan, Jeffrey H J; Shin, Hai-Rim

    2010-09-01

    Disease burden of cervical cancer in Asia was summarized. Human papillomavirus 16 is the most oncogenic human papillomavirus type. Korea's national cervical cancer screening program targets women aged 30 or over, with coverage of almost 80%. Japan has a long history (50 years) of cervical cancer screening, and cytological screening programs have reduced the incidence/mortality of cervical cancer by 70%. But, recent cervical cancer screening coverage is ∼24%. Modeling suggested that vaccination of all 12-year-old girls would reduce cervical cancer cases by 73% in Japan. India has no cervical cancer screening program, as well as a serious lack of awareness in the general population, medical professionals and policy-makers. A realistic, affordable approach would be a low-volume, once-in-a-lifetime human papillomavirus-based screening program. In Australia, the national cervical cancer program has been very successful in reducing the incidence and mortality of cervical cancer. Australia was the first country to implement free, national human papillomavirus immunization (April 2007), expected to reduce human papillomavirus 16 infections by 56% in 2010 and 92% in 2050. A comparison of the UK and Japan was demonstrated that in the UK, cervical cancer screening and human papillomavirus vaccination uptakes are high because the government provides adequate education/funding. The Japanese government needs to put more emphasis on women's health and preventative medicine. Our conclusion and recommendations are that heightened public awareness of cervical cancer prevention, focusing on screening and vaccination will lead to improved survival and a better quality of life.

  2. Torticollis secondary to posterior fossa and cervical spinal cord tumors: report of five cases and literature review.

    PubMed

    Kumandaş, Sefer; Per, Hüseyin; Gümüş, Hakan; Tucer, Bülent; Yikilmaz, Ali; Kontaş, Olgun; Coşkun, Abdülhakim; Kurtsoy, Ali

    2006-10-01

    Torticollis is either congenital or acquired in childhood. Acquired torticollis is not a diagnosis but rather a sign of an underlying disorder. The causes of acquired torticollis include ligamentous, muscular, osseous, ocular, psychiatric, and neurologic disorders and may be a symptom of significant abnormalities of the spinal cord and brain, such as spinal syrinx or central nervous system neoplasia. Torticollis is rarely considered to be an initial clinical presentation of posterior fossa and cervical spinal cord tumors. We report five cases of pediatric tumors with torticollis at the onset: an astrocytoma originating from the medulla oblongata, another presumptive astrocytoma of the spinal cord located between C1 and C6 cervical vertebrae (not operated), an ependymoma located throughout the whole cervical spinal cord extending into the bulbomedullary junction, an astrocytoma originating from the bulbus and extending into the posterior fossa, and another case of a eosinophilic granuloma located extradurally through the anterior and posterior portions of the vertebral bodies from C3 to C7 producing the collapse of the sixth cervical vertebra. All five cases were seen in children, aged between 3 and 12 years. All these cases reflect the misinterpretation of this neurological sign and the lack of association with the possibility of spinal or posterior fossa tumor. This delay in the diagnosis of these diseases led to progressive neurological deterioration and to the increase in the tumor size, which made surgical intervention difficult and the prognosis unfavorable. Although torticollis secondary to tumors is rarely seen, it is necessary to be kept in mind in the differential diagnosis.

  3. Automatic construction of patient-specific finite-element mesh of the spine from IVDs and vertebra segmentations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro-Mateos, Isaac; Pozo, Jose M.; Lazary, Aron; Frangi, Alejandro F.

    2016-03-01

    Computational medicine aims at developing patient-specific models to help physicians in the diagnosis and treatment selection for patients. The spine, and other skeletal structures, is an articulated object, composed of rigid bones (vertebrae) and non-rigid parts (intervertebral discs (IVD), ligaments and muscles). These components are usually extracted from different image modalities, involving patient repositioning. In the case of the spine, these models require the segmentation of IVDs from MR and vertebrae from CT. In the literature, there exists a vast selection of segmentations methods, but there is a lack of approaches to align the vertebrae and IVDs. This paper presents a method to create patient-specific finite element meshes for biomechanical simulations, integrating rigid and non-rigid parts of articulated objects. First, the different parts are aligned in a complete surface model. Vertebrae extracted from CT are rigidly repositioned in between the IVDs, initially using the IVDs location and then refining the alignment using the MR image with a rigid active shape model algorithm. Finally, a mesh morphing algorithm, based on B-splines, is employed to map a template finite-element (volumetric) mesh to the patient-specific surface mesh. This morphing reduces possible misalignments and guarantees the convexity of the model elements. Results show that the accuracy of the method to align vertebrae into MR, together with IVDs, is similar to that of the human observers. Thus, this method is a step forward towards the automation of patient-specific finite element models for biomechanical simulations.

  4. MRI and PET Imaging in Predicting Treatment Response in Patients With Stage IB-IVA Cervical Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-02-08

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma, Not Otherwise Specified; Cervical Undifferentiated Carcinoma; Recurrent Cervical Carcinoma; Stage IB2 Cervical Cancer; Stage II Cervical Cancer; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage III Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIB Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer

  5. Cervical vertebral motions and biomechanical responses to direct loading of human head.

    PubMed

    Ono, Koshiro; Kaneoka, Koji; Hattori, Shinichiro; Ujihashi, Sadayuki; Takhounts, Eric G; Haffner, Mark P; Eppinger, Rolf H

    2003-06-01

    There is little known data characterizing the biomechanical responses of the human head and neck under direct head loading conditions. However, the evaluation of the appropriateness of current crash test dummy head-neck systems is easily accomplished. Such an effort, using experimental means, generates and provides characterizations of human head-neck response to several direct head loading conditions. Low-level impact loads were applied to the head and face of volunteers and dummies. The resultant forces and moments at the occipital condyle were calculated. For the volunteers, activation of the neck musculature was determined using electromyography (EMG). In addition, cervical vertebral motions of the volunteers have been taken by means of X-ray cineradiography. The Ethics Committee of Tsukuba University approved the protocol of the experiments in advance. External force of about 210 N was applied to the head and face of five volunteers with an average age of 25 for the duration of 100 msec or so, via a strap at one of four locations in various directions: (1) an upward load applied to the chin, (2) a rearward load applied to the chin without facial mask, (3) a rearward load applied to the chin with the facial mask, and (4) a rearward load applied to the forehead. The same impact force as those for the human volunteers was also applied to HY-III, THOR, and BioRID. We found that cervical vertebral motions differ markedly according to the difference in impact loading condition. Some particular characteristics are also found, such as the flexion or extension of the upper cervical vertebrae (C0, C1, and C2) or middle cervical vertebrae (C3-C4), showing that the modes of cervical vertebral motions are markedly different among the different loading conditions. We also found that the biofidelity of dummies to neck response characteristics of the volunteers at the low-level impact loads is in the order of BioRID, THOR, and HY-III. It is relevant in this regard that the

  6. [Anterior cervical hypertrichosis: case report].

    PubMed

    Orozco-Gutiérrez, Mario H; Sánchez-Corona, José; García-Ortiz, José E; Castañeda-Cisneros, Gema; Dávalos-Rodríguez, Nory O; Corona-Rivera, Jorge R; García-Cruz, Diana

    2016-10-01

    The non-syndromic anterior cervical hypertrichosis (OMIM N° 600457) is a genetic disorder characterized by a patch of hair at the level of the laryngeal prominence. We present a 12-year-old boy with anterior cervical hypertrichosis and mild generalized hypertrichosis. He has no neurological, ophthalmological or skeletal anomalies. The clinical follow up is 10 years.

  7. Cervical carcinoma: an experimental approach.

    PubMed

    Cowan, M E; Skinner, G R

    1988-01-01

    A mouse model system was used to investigate the preventive efficacy of a subunit herpes simplex virus (HSV) vaccine on the development of HSV induced cervical carcinoma. Ten groups of mice were vaccinated before receiving repeated intravaginal exposure to HSV-type 2 inactivated by ultraviolet irradiation. At 20 months postvaccination, neutralizing antibody activity to herpes simplex viruses was detected in the sera of the mice which had received the highest vaccine dose. Although three experimental mice and one control mouse developed cervical tumours and five mice developed preinvasive malignant changes, 87% of cervices were of normal or koilocytotic appearance on histological examination. There was therefore no evidence from this study that repeated exposure of mouse cervices to inactivated HSV-2 induced a significant incidence of preinvasive or invasive cervical carcinoma.

  8. Jack-of-all-trades master of all? Snake vertebrae have a generalist inner organization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houssaye, Alexandra; Boistel, Renaud; Böhme, Wolfgang; Herrel, Anthony

    2013-11-01

    Snakes are a very speciose group of squamates that adapted to various habitats and ecological niches. Their ecological diversity is of particular interest and functional demands associated with their various styles of locomotion are expected to result in anatomical specializations. In order to explore the potential adaptation of snakes to their environment we here analyze variation in vertebral structure at the microanatomical level in species with different locomotor adaptations. Vertebrae, being a major element of the snake body, are expected to display adaptations to the physical constraints associated with the different locomotor modes and environments. Our results revealed a rather homogenous vertebral microanatomy in contrast to what has been observed for other squamates and amniotes more generally. We here suggest that the near-absence of microanatomical specializations in snake vertebrae might be correlated to their rather homogeneous overall morphology and reduced range of morphological diversity, as compared to lizards. Thus, snakes appear to retain a generalist inner morphology that allows them to move efficiently in different environments. Only a few ecologically highly specialized taxa appear to display some microanatomical specializations that remain to be studied in greater detail.

  9. Osteoporosis affects both post-yield microdamage accumulation and plasticity degradation in vertebra of ovariectomized rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Siwei; Niu, Guodong; Dong, Neil X.; Wang, Xiaodu; Liu, Zhongjun; Song, Chunli; Leng, Huijie

    2017-03-01

    Estrogen withdrawal in postmenopausal women increases bone loss and bone fragility in the vertebra. Bone loss with osteoporosis not only reduces bone mineral density (BMD), but actually alters bone quality, which can be comprehensively represented by bone post-yield behaviors. This study aimed to provide some information as to how osteoporosis induced by estrogen depletion could influence the evolution of post-yield microdamage accumulation and plastic deformation in vertebral bodies. This study also tried to reveal the part of the mechanisms of how estrogen deficiency-induced osteoporosis would increase the bone fracture risk. A rat bilateral ovariectomy (OVX) model was used to induce osteoporosis. Progressive cyclic compression loading was developed for vertebra testing to elucidate the post-yield behaviors. BMD, bone volume fraction, stiffness degradation, and plastic deformation evolution were compared among rats raised for 5 weeks (ovx5w and sham5w groups) and 35 weeks (ovx35w and sham35w groups) after sham surgery and OVX. The results showed that a higher bone loss in vertebral bodies corresponded to lower stiffness and higher plastic deformation. Thus, osteoporosis could increase the vertebral fracture risk probably through microdamage accumulation and plastic deforming degradation.

  10. A fast, accurate, and reliable reconstruction method of the lumbar spine vertebrae using positional MRI.

    PubMed

    Simons, Craig J; Cobb, Loren; Davidson, Bradley S

    2014-04-01

    In vivo measurement of lumbar spine configuration is useful for constructing quantitative biomechanical models. Positional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) accommodates a larger range of movement in most joints than conventional MRI and does not require a supine position. However, this is achieved at the expense of image resolution and contrast. As a result, quantitative research using positional MRI has required long reconstruction times and is sensitive to incorrectly identifying the vertebral boundary due to low contrast between bone and surrounding tissue in the images. We present a semi-automated method used to obtain digitized reconstructions of lumbar vertebrae in any posture of interest. This method combines a high-resolution reference scan with a low-resolution postural scan to provide a detailed and accurate representation of the vertebrae in the posture of interest. Compared to a criterion standard, translational reconstruction error ranged from 0.7 to 1.6 mm and rotational reconstruction error ranged from 0.3 to 2.6°. Intraclass correlation coefficients indicated high interrater reliability for measurements within the imaging plane (ICC 0.97-0.99). Computational efficiency indicates that this method may be used to compile data sets large enough to account for population variance, and potentially expand the use of positional MRI as a quantitative biomechanics research tool.

  11. Vitamin K deficiency inhibits mineralization and enhances deformity in vertebrae of haddock (Melanogrammus aeglefinus L.).

    PubMed

    Roy, Prabir K; Lall, Santosh P

    2007-10-01

    Vitamin K has been known to regulate bone formation through osteocalcin synthesis by osteoblasts, which is important for mineralization and bone structure. The mechanism underlying the relationship of vitamin K with the changes of microanatomy is not fully understood, and our goal is to test whether bone deformities develop in association with vitamin K deficiency. Fish were fed a semi-purified diet containing either devoid (0.00 mg/kg diet) or adequate (40.0 mg/kg diet supplemented but 20.8 mg/kg analyzed) levels of vitamin K (menadione sodium bisulphite) for 20 weeks. At the end of 8 and 20 weeks, fish were subjected to gross examination and X-ray, and mineral content of the vertebrae was measured. The vertebrae were also subjected to histological, histomorphometric and enzyme histochemical examinations to determine the bone formation and resorption. Vitamin K deficiency primarily decreased bone mineralization and subsequently a decrease in bone mass thus resulted in an increased susceptibility to bone deformity. The occurrence of bone deformities coincided with an increased amount of osteoid tissue and decreased bone mineral content. Number of osteoblasts and osteoclasts were not affected by dietary vitamin K. In conclusion, vitamin K deficiency can impair bone mineralization and enhances bone deformities.

  12. Effect of chromium on vertebrae, femur and calvaria of adult male rats.

    PubMed

    Sankaramanivel, S; Jeyapriya, R; Hemalatha, D; Djody, S; Arunakaran, J; Srinivasan, N

    2006-06-01

    Alloys of chromium have a long history of success in the surgical treatment of many orthopaedic defects. Nonetheless, prostheses loosening are commonly found around arthoplasties due to corrosion of metals. On this basis, it is hypothesized that chromium accumulation interferes with remodeling of bone. The present study aims to analyse the toxic effects of chromium on bone phosphatases in various regions of the bone in rats. Rats were treated with chromium intraperitoneally (0.5 mg/kg) in the form of potassium dichromate for 5 days. The accumulation of chromium is approximately 5.2-fold in the vertebrae, 8.9-fold in the femur and 8.7-fold in the calvaria, when compared to control. Chromium administration significantly reduced the activity of enzymes, eg, alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP). The study revealed a significant increase in the concentration of calcium, altered bone formation rate and bone morphology in the femur, vertebrae and calvaria. The interesting findings of the current study suggest altered bone turnover.

  13. Remodelling of bone and bones: growth of normal and transplanted caudal vertebrae.

    PubMed Central

    Feik, S A; Storey, E

    1983-01-01

    Changes in the rate of growth, shape and structure of the 8th, 16th and 22nd caudal vertebrae of 4 and 24-27 days old Sprague-Dawley rats were studied in situ and in three different non-functional transplantation sites for 12 weeks. With increasing size, maturity and age the three vertebrae showed progressively decreasing growth, changes in shape and structural abnormalities. The smallest anlages grew faster and matured sooner than normal, so that their length equalled that of controls. Central endochondral necrosis in older bones was associated with decreased longitudinal growth but in some younger ones, despite a perforation of the cartilage and herniation of the nucleus pulposus into the marrow cavity of the shaft, growth proceeded at near normal rates. The free ends of older, larger transplants grew faster than the abutting ends joined by joint connective tissue, indicating that central necrosis of cartilage resulted from impaired nutrient diffusion. The results suggest that the cartilage model may possess an inherent capacity to produce a certain limited amount of bone tissue which may be distributed either in the form of long and thin or short and inwaisted bones, depending on the balance of forces between interstitial cartilage expansion and the restraining ensheathing periosteal-perichondrial tissues. This basic form may be modified further by functional forces. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 4 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 Fig. 8 Fig. 10 Fig. 11 Fig. 12 Fig. 9 PMID:6339456

  14. Fractures of the cervical spine

    PubMed Central

    Marcon, Raphael Martus; Cristante, Alexandre Fogaça; Teixeira, William Jacobsen; Narasaki, Douglas Kenji; Oliveira, Reginaldo Perilo; de Barros Filho, Tarcísio Eloy Pessoa

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to review the literature on cervical spine fractures. METHODS: The literature on the diagnosis, classification, and treatment of lower and upper cervical fractures and dislocations was reviewed. RESULTS: Fractures of the cervical spine may be present in polytraumatized patients and should be suspected in patients complaining of neck pain. These fractures are more common in men approximately 30 years of age and are most often caused by automobile accidents. The cervical spine is divided into the upper cervical spine (occiput-C2) and the lower cervical spine (C3-C7), according to anatomical differences. Fractures in the upper cervical spine include fractures of the occipital condyle and the atlas, atlanto-axial dislocations, fractures of the odontoid process, and hangman's fractures in the C2 segment. These fractures are characterized based on specific classifications. In the lower cervical spine, fractures follow the same pattern as in other segments of the spine; currently, the most widely used classification is the SLIC (Subaxial Injury Classification), which predicts the prognosis of an injury based on morphology, the integrity of the disc-ligamentous complex, and the patient's neurological status. It is important to correctly classify the fracture to ensure appropriate treatment. Nerve or spinal cord injuries, pseudarthrosis or malunion, and postoperative infection are the main complications of cervical spine fractures. CONCLUSIONS: Fractures of the cervical spine are potentially serious and devastating if not properly treated. Achieving the correct diagnosis and classification of a lesion is the first step toward identifying the most appropriate treatment, which can be either surgical or conservative. PMID:24270959

  15. The cervical cap.

    PubMed

    1988-10-07

    The US Food and Drug Administration has approved marketing of the Prentif cavity-rim cervical cap. This contraceptive device is being distributed in the US and Canada by Cervical Cap Ltd, Los Gatos, California. The Prentif cap is available in 4 sizes: 22, 25, 28, and 31 mm inside diameter, with a length of 1 1/4-1 1/2 inches. In a multicenter trial involving 522 diaphragm users and 581 cap users followed for 2 years, the cap was 82.6% effective and the diaphragm was 83.3% effective in preventing pregnancy. When pregnancies attributable to user failure were excluded, these rates were increased to 93.6% for the cap and 95.4% for the diaphragm. 4% of cap users compared with only 1.7% of diaphragm users in this study developed abnormal Pap smears after 3 months of use; in addition, a higher proportion of cap users became infected with Gardnerella vaginalis and Monilia. Theoretical hazards include toxic shock syndrome and endometriosis due to backflow of menstrual fluids. Cap users are advised to undergo a Pap test after 3 months of use and discontinue cap use if the results are abnormal. The cap should not be used during menstruation. Although the cap can be left in place for up to 48 hours, its position should be checked before and after each episode of intercourse. The cervical cap requires less spermicide than the diaphragm and is not as messy. In addition, it can be left in the vagina twice as long as the diaphragm, without additional spermicide. Since the cap is smaller than the diaphragm and does not cover the vaginal wall, some women find intercourse more pleasurable with this device.

  16. [Combined spinal and epidural anesthesia for cesarean delivery in a patient with a cervical fracture at C2].

    PubMed

    Mochidome, Mariko; Sakamoto, Akiyuki; Tanaka, Hidenori; Sugiyama, Daisuke; Kawamata, Mikito

    2013-04-01

    There are only a few reports on cesarean section in a patient with cervical fracture without spinal cord injury (SCI). Such patients have high risks for deterioration of SCI following general or regional anesthesia. Here, we present a patient with a fracture of C2 vertebra who underwent cesarean section safely under combined spinal and epidural anesthesia(CSEA). A 30-year-old woman had a fracture of the C2 cervical vertebra (Hangman's fracture) due to a traffic accident at 34 weeks of gestation. Conservative immobilization of the head and neck was done with a neck collar (Philadelphia brace) in order to prevent subsequent SCI after the spine injury. Pre-viability amniorrhexis was seen at 37 weeks' gestation, and an emergency cesarean section was scheduled under combined epidural and spinal anesthesia (CSEA). Her neck and head were carefully fixed before, during and after surgery in order to prevent subsequent SCI. As a result, cesarean section under CSEA was successfully performed in the patient without any deterioration of the spine and/or SCI.

  17. Osteoradionecrosis of the subaxial cervical spine following treatment for head and neck carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Khorsandi, A S; Mourad, W F; Urken, M L; Persky, M S; Lazarus, C L; Jacobson, A S

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To study MRI and positron emission tomography (PET)/CT imaging of osteoradionecrosis (ORN) of the subaxial cervical spine, a serious long-term complication of radiation therapy (RT) for head and neck cancers that can lead to pain, vertebral instability, myelopathy and cord compression. Methods: This is a single-institution retrospective review of patients diagnosed and treated for ORN of the subaxial cervical spine following surgery and radiation for head and neck cancer. Results: We report PET/CT imaging and MRI for four patients, each with extensive treatment for recurrent head and neck cancer. Osteomyelitis (OM) and discitis are the end-stage manifestations of ORN of the subaxial spine. Conclusion: ORN of the subaxial spine has variable imaging appearance and needs to be differentiated from recurrent or metastatic disease. Surgical violation of the posterior pharyngeal wall on top of the compromised vasculature in patients treated heavily with RT may pre-dispose the subaxial cervical vertebrae to ORN, with possible resultant OM and discitis. MRI and PET/CT imaging are complimentary in this setting. PET/CT images may be misinterpreted in view of the history of head and neck cancer. MRI should be utilized for definitive diagnosis of OM and discitis in view of its imaging specificity. Advances in knowledge: We identify the end-stage manifestation of ORN in the sub-axial spine on PET/CT and MRI to facilitate its correct diagnosis. PMID:25375626

  18. Pathological burst fracture in the cervical spine with negative red flags: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Cox, Jocelyn; DeGraauw, Chris; Klein, Erik

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To report on a case of a pathological burst fracture in the cervical spine where typical core red flag tests failed to identify a significant lesion, and to remind chiropractors to be vigilant in the recognition of subtle signs and symptoms of disease processes. Clinical Features: A 61-year-old man presented to a chiropractic clinic with neck pain that began earlier that morning. After a physical exam that was relatively unremarkable, imaging identified a burst fracture in the cervical spine. Intervention & Outcomes: The patient was sent by ambulance to the hospital where he was diagnosed with multiple myeloma. No medical intervention was performed on the fracture. Summary: The patient’s initial physical examination was largely unremarkable, with an absence of clinical red flags. The screening tools were non-diagnostic. Pain with traction and the sudden onset of symptoms prompted further investigation with plain film imaging of the cervical spine. This identified a pathological burst fracture in the C4 vertebrae. PMID:27069270

  19. X-Ray Exam: Cervical Spine

    MedlinePlus

    ... to 2-Year-Old X-Ray Exam: Cervical Spine KidsHealth > For Parents > X-Ray Exam: Cervical Spine A A A What's in this article? What ... Radiografía: columna cervical What It Is A cervical spine X-ray is a safe and painless test ...

  20. [Subcutaneous cervical emphysema secondary to tooth extraction].

    PubMed

    Calvo Boizas, E; Sancipriano Hernández, J A; Rincón Esteban, L; Diego Pérez, C; Santiago Andrés, J; Hermosa Finamor, P; Gómez Toranzo, F

    1997-01-01

    Cervical emphysema is rare and its diagnosis involves the ENT specialist. A case of cervical subcutaneous emphysema secondary to lower molar extraction is reported. The patient had no signs or symptoms other than cervical emphysema. Simple radiography and CT are recommended for early diagnosis. The etiopathogenic mechanisms of subcutaneous cervical emphysema are reviewed. Recent literature contains few cases of dental origin.

  1. X-Ray Exam: Cervical Spine

    MedlinePlus

    ... to 2-Year-Old X-Ray Exam: Cervical Spine KidsHealth > For Parents > X-Ray Exam: Cervical Spine Print A A A What's in this article? ... Radiografía: columna cervical What It Is A cervical spine X-ray is a safe and painless test ...

  2. Risk factors for recollapse of the augmented vertebrae after percutaneous vertebroplasty for osteoporotic vertebral fractures with intravertebral vacuum cleft

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Weibo; Liang, De; Yao, Zhensong; Qiu, Ting; Ye, Linqiang; Huang, Xuecheng; Jiang, Xiaobing

    2017-01-01

    Abstract To determine risk factors related to recollapse of the augmented vertebrae after percutaneous vertebroplasty (PVP) for osteoporotic vertebral compression fractures (OVCFs) with intravertebral vacuum cleft (IVC). Fifty-two patients treated with PVP for single OVCFs with the IVC were retrospectively reviewed. The follow-up period was at least 2 years. Vertebral height loss ≥15% or kyphotic angle ≥10° at the final follow-up in relation to the immediately postoperative values were adopted as a definition of recollapse of the augmented vertebrae. Correlation analysis and multiple logistic regression analyses were performed to elucidate the related clinical or radiological factors for recollapse of the augmented vertebrae including age, gender, bone mineral density, preoperative fracture severity, locations of IVC sign, distribution patterns of polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA), reduction rate, and reduction angle. Assuming the increase of height loss more than 15% as a criterion of recollapse, only cleft filling pattern of PMMA in the IVC area was a significant risk factor for recollapse of the augmented vertebrae (P < 0.01). Assuming ≥10° progression of kyphotic angle as a criterion, cleft filling pattern of PMMA and higher values of reduction angle was as 2 significant risk factors for recollapse of the augmented vertebrae (P < 0.01). No significant difference was found in other clinical and radiological factors (P > 0.05). Cleft filling pattern of PMMA and higher values of reduction angle may play an important role in inducing recollapse of the augmented vertebrae after PVP for OVCFs with the IVC. Careful observation of patients with these conditions is necessary to prevent deterioration of their clinical course. PMID:28079799

  3. Automatic localization of target vertebrae in spine surgery using fast CT-to-fluoroscopy (3D-2D) image registration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otake, Y.; Schafer, S.; Stayman, J. W.; Zbijewski, W.; Kleinszig, G.; Graumann, R.; Khanna, A. J.; Siewerdsen, J. H.

    2012-02-01

    Localization of target vertebrae is an essential step in minimally invasive spine surgery, with conventional methods relying on "level counting" - i.e., manual counting of vertebrae under fluoroscopy starting from readily identifiable anatomy (e.g., the sacrum). The approach requires an undesirable level of radiation, time, and is prone to counting errors due to the similar appearance of vertebrae in projection images; wrong-level surgery occurs in 1 of every ~3000 cases. This paper proposes a method to automatically localize target vertebrae in x-ray projections using 3D-2D registration between preoperative CT (in which vertebrae are preoperatively labeled) and intraoperative fluoroscopy. The registration uses an intensity-based approach with a gradient-based similarity metric and the CMA-ES algorithm for optimization. Digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRRs) and a robust similarity metric are computed on GPU to accelerate the process. Evaluation in clinical CT data included 5,000 PA and LAT projections randomly perturbed to simulate human variability in setup of mobile intraoperative C-arm. The method demonstrated 100% success for PA view (projection error: 0.42mm) and 99.8% success for LAT view (projection error: 0.37mm). Initial implementation on GPU provided automatic target localization within about 3 sec, with further improvement underway via multi-GPU. The ability to automatically label vertebrae in fluoroscopy promises to streamline surgical workflow, improve patient safety, and reduce wrong-site surgeries, especially in large patients for whom manual methods are time consuming and error prone.

  4. Risk factors for recollapse of the augmented vertebrae after percutaneous vertebroplasty for osteoporotic vertebral fractures with intravertebral vacuum cleft.

    PubMed

    Yu, Weibo; Liang, De; Yao, Zhensong; Qiu, Ting; Ye, Linqiang; Huang, Xuecheng; Jiang, Xiaobing

    2017-01-01

    To determine risk factors related to recollapse of the augmented vertebrae after percutaneous vertebroplasty (PVP) for osteoporotic vertebral compression fractures (OVCFs) with intravertebral vacuum cleft (IVC).Fifty-two patients treated with PVP for single OVCFs with the IVC were retrospectively reviewed. The follow-up period was at least 2 years. Vertebral height loss ≥15% or kyphotic angle ≥10° at the final follow-up in relation to the immediately postoperative values were adopted as a definition of recollapse of the augmented vertebrae. Correlation analysis and multiple logistic regression analyses were performed to elucidate the related clinical or radiological factors for recollapse of the augmented vertebrae including age, gender, bone mineral density, preoperative fracture severity, locations of IVC sign, distribution patterns of polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA), reduction rate, and reduction angle.Assuming the increase of height loss more than 15% as a criterion of recollapse, only cleft filling pattern of PMMA in the IVC area was a significant risk factor for recollapse of the augmented vertebrae (P < 0.01). Assuming ≥10° progression of kyphotic angle as a criterion, cleft filling pattern of PMMA and higher values of reduction angle was as 2 significant risk factors for recollapse of the augmented vertebrae (P < 0.01). No significant difference was found in other clinical and radiological factors (P > 0.05).Cleft filling pattern of PMMA and higher values of reduction angle may play an important role in inducing recollapse of the augmented vertebrae after PVP for OVCFs with the IVC. Careful observation of patients with these conditions is necessary to prevent deterioration of their clinical course.

  5. [Cervical spine instability in the surgical patient].

    PubMed

    Barbeito, A; Guerri-Guttenberg, R A

    2014-03-01

    Many congenital and acquired diseases, including trauma, may result in cervical spine instability. Given that airway management is closely related to the movement of the cervical spine, it is important that the anesthesiologist has detailed knowledge of the anatomy, the mechanisms of cervical spine instability, and of the effects that the different airway maneuvers have on the cervical spine. We first review the normal anatomy and biomechanics of the cervical spine in the context of airway management and the concept of cervical spine instability. In the second part, we review the protocols for the management of cervical spine instability in trauma victims and some of the airway management options for these patients.

  6. Prophylactic vertebroplasty procedure applied with a resorbable bone cement can decrease the fracture risk of sandwich vertebrae: long-term evaluation of clinical outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Pu; Tang, Hai; Chen, Hao; Bao, Li; Feng, Fei; Yang, He; Li, Jinjun

    2017-01-01

    A sandwich vertebra is formed after multiple osteoporotic vertebral fractures treated by percutaneous vertebroplasty, which has a risk of developing new fractures. The purpose of our study was to (i) investigate the occurrence of new fractures in sandwich vertebra after cement augmentation procedures and to (ii) evaluate the clinical outcomes after prophylactic vertebral reinforcement applied with resorbable bone cement. From June 2011 to 2014, we analysed 55 patients with at least one sandwich vertebrae and treated with percutaneous vertebroplasty. Eighteen patients were treated by prophylactic vertebroplasty with a resorbable bone cement to strengthen the sandwich vertebrae as the prevention group. The others were the non-prevention group. All patients were examined by spinal radiographs within 1 day, 6 months, 12 months, 24 months and thereafter. The incidence of sandwich vertebra is 8.25% (55/667) in our study. Most sandwich vertebrae (69.01%, 49/71) are distributed in the thoracic–lumbar junction. There are 24 sandwich vertebrae (18 patients) and 47 sandwich vertebrae (37 patients) in either prevention group or non-prevention group, respectively. No significant difference is found between age, sex, body mass index, bone mineral density, cement disk leakage, sandwich vertebrae distribution or Cobb angle in the two groups. In the follow-up, 8 out of 37 (21.6%) patients (with eight sandwich vertebrae) developed new fractures in non-prevention’ group, whereas no new fractures were detected in the prevention group. Neither Cobb angle nor vertebral compression rate showed significant change in the prevention group during the follow-up. However, in the non-prevention group, we found that Cobb angle increased and vertebral height lost significantly (P < 0.05). Prophylactic vertebroplasty procedure applied with resorbable bone cement could decrease the rate of new fractures of sandwich vertebrae. PMID:28149529

  7. Investigation of the osteitis deformans phases in snake vertebrae by double-pulse laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Galiová, M; Kaiser, J; Novotný, K; Ivanov, M; Nývltová Fisáková, M; Mancini, L; Tromba, G; Vaculovic, T; Liska, M; Kanický, V

    2010-09-01

    Double-pulse laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (DP-LIBS) was optimized for microspatial analyses of fossil and recent snake vertebrae. As complimentary techniques, solution analysis by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry and synchrotron radiation X-ray microtomography was utilized in order to determine the overall concentration of the selected elements in the samples and to visualize nondestructively the fossil sample microstructure, respectively. Elemental mapping of pathological bony tissue by DP-LIBS has been proven as a powerful tool for considering the osteitis deformans phases in fossil vertebrae.

  8. Narrative review of the in vivo mechanics of the cervical spine after anterior arthrodesis as revealed by dynamic biplane radiography.

    PubMed

    Anderst, William

    2016-01-01

    Arthrodesis is the standard of care for numerous pathologic conditions of the cervical spine and is performed over 150,000 times annually in the United States. The primary long-term concern after this surgery is adjacent segment disease (ASD), defined as new clinical symptoms adjacent to a previous fusion. The incidence of adjacent segment disease is approximately 3% per year, meaning that within 10 years of the initial surgery, approximately 25% of cervical arthrodesis patients require a second procedure to address symptomatic adjacent segment degeneration. Despite the high incidence of ASD, until recently, there was little data available to characterize in vivo adjacent segment mechanics during dynamic motion. This manuscript reviews recent advances in our knowledge of adjacent segment mechanics after cervical arthrodesis that have been facilitated by the use of dynamic biplane radiography. The primary observations from these studies are that current in vitro test paradigms often fail to replicate in vivo spine mechanics before and after arthrodesis, that intervertebral mechanics vary among cervical motion segments, and that joint arthrokinematics (i.e., the interactions between adjacent vertebrae) are superior to traditional kinematics measurements for identifying altered adjacent segment mechanics after arthrodesis. Future research challenges are identified, including improving the biofidelity of in vitro tests, determining the natural history of in vivo spine mechanics, conducting prospective longitudinal studies on adjacent segment kinematics and arthrokinematics after single and multiple-level arthrodesis, and creating subject-specific computational models to accurately estimate muscle forces and tissue loading in the spine during dynamic activities.

  9. Effectiveness of cervical hemilaminectomy in canine Hansen Type I and Type II disc disease: a retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Schmied, Oliver; Golini, Lorenzo; Steffen, Frank

    2011-01-01

    Medical records of 41 dogs, including 15 small breed dogs (<15 kg) and 26 large breed dogs (>15 kg), with cervical intervertebral disc disease (IVDD) that underwent a hemilaminectomy were reviewed. Dogs were diagnosed using myelography, computed tomography/myelography, or MRI, and dogs were classified as having either Hansen Type I disc extrusion or Hansen Type II disc protrusion located ventrally, ventrolaterally, or laterally within the cervical spinal canal. The most common clinical presentation was ambulatory tetraparesis and/or lameness (44%). The most affected sites for cervical IVDD were between the sixth and seventh cervical vertebrae (C6-C7; 78% of Hansen Type II discs) and C2-C3 (86% of Hansen Type I discs). Treatment was effective in 88% of dogs. Five large breed dogs (12%) did not improve. In dogs with a Hansen Type I disc extrusion, clinical signs improved in 96% of the cases. In dogs with a Hansen Type II disc protrusion, an excellent and good outcome was seen in 47% and 32% of cases, respectively. Outcome was significantly better for small breed dogs and dogs with Hansen Type I disc disease compared with large breed dogs and dogs with Hansen Type II disc disease.

  10. Cervical extravasation of bevacizumab.

    PubMed

    Dréanic, Johann; Coriat, Romain; Mir, Olivier; Perkins, Géraldine; Boudou-Rouquette, Pascaline; Brezault, Catherine; Dhooge, Marion; Goldwasser, François; Chaussade, Stanislas

    2013-04-01

    Monoclonal antibodies such as bevacizumab are widely used in medical oncology, either alone or in combination with chemotherapy. No specific recommendations on the management of monoclonal antibodies extravasation exist. Incidence rates vary considerably. Estimates of 0.5-6% have been reported in the literature. Also, patient-associated and procedure-associated risk factors of extravasation are multiple, such as bolus injections or poorly implanted central venous access. We report on an 86-year-old woman with colon cancer with liver metastasis who was treated with 5-fluorouracil, folinic acid, and bevacizumab. Extravasation occurred during chemotherapy infusion because of a catheter migration of the port outside of the superior vena cava, causing cervical pain without skin modifications. Diagnosis was confirmed with the appearance of clinical right cervical tumefaction and cervicothoracic computed tomography scan indicated a perijugular hypodense collection, corresponding to the extravasation. Conservative management was proposed. The patient recovered within 3 weeks from all symptoms. Physicians should be aware that in cases of bevacizumab extravasation, a nonsurgical approach might be effective.

  11. C2-fractures: part I. Quantitative morphology of the C2 vertebra is a prerequisite for the radiographic assessment of posttraumatic C2-alignment and the investigation of clinical outcomes.

    PubMed

    Koller, Heiko; Acosta, Frank; Tauber, Mark; Komarek, Elisabeth; Fox, Michael; Moursy, Mido; Hitzl, Wolfgang; Resch, Herbert

    2009-07-01

    Pertinent literature exists concerning indications, techniques, complications of treatment, and risk factors for nonunion in axis and odontoid fractures; however, there are scarce data regarding the incidence and definition of malunion in these fractures. As a prerequisite for the study of anatomical alignment following surgical and nonsurgical treatment of C2-fractures, an understanding of normal C2 anatomy is essential. Therefore, the authors intended to evaluate morphometrical dimensions of the C2 vertebra. The purpose was to provide normalized quantitative data to enable assessment of malalignment following the treatment of C2-fractures within a classification system. Using digitized cervical spine lateral and transoral odontoid radiographs of 100 consecutive patients without any evidence of traumatic or neoplastic disorders, the authors performed measurements on distinct anatomical structures and investigated morphometrical dimensions of the normal axis vertebra. The incidence of atlantoaxial arthritis was also evaluated. In addition, with the assessment of twenty arbitrarily chosen sets of radiographs by three different observers we calculated the interobserver reliability in terms of intraclass correlation coefficients for each parameter. With calculation of SD and 95% confidence limits, pathological cut-offs were reconstructed from measurements performed resembling non-physiological and pathological limits. Distinct parameters were selected to form a new classification system for radiographical follow-up that focuses on the quantitative C1-2 vertebral alignment. The measurement process resulted in 2,400 data points. Distinct morphometrical parameters, such as a quantitative characterization of the sagittal atlantoaxial congruency, the lateral mass inclination and the type of degenerative changes at the atlantoaxial joint could be demonstrated to be valuable and reliably used within a proposed classification for C2-malunions following C2-fractures. The

  12. Construction and Accuracy Assessment of Patient-Specific Biocompatible Drill Template for Cervical Anterior Transpedicular Screw (ATPS) Insertion: An In Vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Xiangxue; Zhao, Weidong; Tang, Lei; Li, Jianyi; Ouyang, Jun

    2013-01-01

    Background With the properties of three-column fixation and anterior-approach-only procedure, anterior transpedicular screw (ATPS) is ideal for severe multilevel traumatic cervical instabilities. However, the accurate insertion of ATPS remains challenging. Here we constructed a patient-specific biocompatible drill template and evaluated its accuracy in assisting ATPS insertion. Methods After ethical approval, 24 formalin-preserved cervical vertebrae (C2–C7) were CT scanned. 3D reconstruction models of cervical vertebra were obtained with 2-mm-diameter virtual pin tracts at the central pedicles. The 3D models were used for rapid prototyping (RP) printing. A 2-mm-diameter Kirschner wire was then inserted into the pin tract of the RP model before polymethylmethacrylate was used to construct the patient-specific biocompatible drill template. After removal of the anterior soft tissue, a 2-mm-diameter Kirschner wire was inserted into the cervical pedicle with the assistance of drill template. Cadaveric cervical spines with pin tracts were subsequently scanned using the same CT scanner. A 3D reconstruction was performed of the scanned spines to get 3D models of the vertebrae containing the actual pin tracts. The deviations were calculated between 3D models with virtual and actual pin tracts at the middle point of the cervical pedicle. 3D models of 3.5 mm-diameter screws were used in simulated insertion to grade the screw positions. Findings The patient-specific biocompatible drill template was constructed to assist ATPS insertion successfully. There were no significant differences between medial/lateral deviations (P = 0.797) or between superior/inferior deviations (P = 0.741). The absolute deviation values were 0.82±0.75 mm and 1.10±0.96 mm in axial and sagittal planes, respectively. In the simulated insertion, the screws in non-critical position were 44/48 (91.7%). Conclusions The patient-specific drill template is biocompatible, easy-to-apply and accurate

  13. Dysphagia due to cervical osteophytes.

    PubMed

    Khan, Mohammad Saeed; Bansal, Meghana; Agarwal, Abhishek

    2012-05-01

    Cervical bony outgrowths or osteophytes are common and usually asymptomatic. In some cases, they may be associated with dysphagia, dysphonia, dyspnea and pulmonary aspiration. The most common causes of cervical osteophytes are osteoarthritis, ankylosing spondylitis and ankylosing hyperostosis or Diffuse Idiopathic Spinal Hyperostosis (DISH), also known as Forestier's Disease. Other causes are hypoparathyroidism, trauma, acromegaly, ochronosis and flourosis. However, while dysphagia due to osteophytes is reported in the setting of DISH, it is very rare with osteoarthritis. We report a case of a patient who developed dysphagia due to anterior cervical osteophytes in the setting of osteoarthritis.

  14. Cervical Spondylitis and Epidural Abscess Caused by Brucellosis: a Case Report and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Reşorlu, Hatice; Saçar, Suzan; Inceer, Beşir Şahin; Akbal, Ayla; Gökmen, Ferhat; Zateri, Coskun; Savaş, Yilmaz

    2016-12-01

    Brucellosis is a zoonotic disease widely seen in endemic regions and that can lead to systemic involvement. The musculoskeletal system is frequently affected, and the disease can exhibit clinical involvements such as arthritis, spondylitis, spondylodiscitis, osteomyelitis, tenosynovitis and bursitis. Spondylitis and spondylodiscitis, common complications of brucellosis, predominantly affect the lumbar and thoracic vertebrae. Epidural abscess may occur as a rare complication of spondylitis. Spinal brucellosis and development of epidural abscess in the cervical region are rare. Development of epidural abscess affects the duration and success of treatment. Spinal brucellosis should be considered in patients presenting with fever and lower back-neck pain in endemic regions, and treatment must be initiated with early diagnosis in order to prevent potential complications.

  15. Use of isotopic analysis of vertebrae in reconstructing ontogenetic feeding ecology in white sharks.

    PubMed

    Estrada, James A; Rice, Aaron N; Natanson, Lisa J; Skomal, Gregory B

    2006-04-01

    We conducted stable 13C and 15N analysis on white shark vertebrae and demonstrated that incremental analysis of isotopes along the radius of a vertebral centrum produces a chronological record of dietary information, allowing for reconstruction of an individual's trophic history. Isotopic data showed significant enrichments in 15N with increasing sampling distance from the centrum center, indicating a correlation between body size and trophic level. Additionally, isotopic values verified two distinct ontogenetic trophic shifts in the white shark: one following parturition, marking a dietary switch from yolk to fish; and one at a total length of >341 cm, representing a known diet shift from fish to marine mammals. Retrospective trophic-level reconstruction using vertebral tissue will have broad applications in future studies on the ecology of threatened, endangered, or extinct species to determine life-long feeding patterns, which would be impossible through other methods.

  16. Chordoma of the thoracic vertebrae in a Bengal tiger (Panthera tigris tigris)

    PubMed Central

    KURAMOCHI, Mizuki; IZAWA, Takeshi; HORI, Mayuka; KUSUDA, Kayo; SHIMIZU, Junichiro; ISERI, Toshie; AKIYOSHI, Hideo; OHASHI, Fumihito; KUWAMURA, Mitsuru; YAMATE, Jyoji

    2015-01-01

    A 19-year-old female Bengal tiger (Panthera tigris tigris) was presented with hind limb weakness, ataxia and respiratory distress. Computed tomography revealed a mass between the left side of the T7 vertebra and the base of the left 7th rib. The tiger then died, and necropsy was performed. Grossly, the vertebral mass was 6 × 5.7 × 3 cm, and invaded the adjacent vertebral bone and compressed the T7 spinal cord. Histologically, the mass was composed of large, clear, vacuolated and polygonal cells with osteochondral matrix. Cellular and nuclear atypia were moderate. The vacuolated cells stained positively for cytokeratin and vimentin and negatively for S-100. Based on these findings, the present case was diagnosed as a vertebral chordoma; the first report in a tiger. PMID:25766770

  17. Automatic device for measuring biomechanical properties of cadaveric lumbar vertebrae of the human spine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartoněk, Luděk.; Janák, Vladislav; Keprt, Jiří

    2016-12-01

    A new special second-generation computer-controlled device has been developed for measuring biomechanical characteristics of the lower part of the spine vertebras L1-L5 [1]. During straining and measurement of the rigidity of the sample as a whole it is also necessary to observe the movement of individual parts of the sample and to measure their mechanical resistances. The measurement of displacement and rotation of individual parts of the studied model was evaluated by optical methods based on the principle of moiré interferometry and fast Fourier transform [2]. During this device development and its verification the lumbar samples were replaced with a system of wooden rollers with system discrete rubber pads. The new computer-controlled device containing four stepper motors, four strain gauges and two CCD cameras.

  18. Chordoma of the thoracic vertebrae in a Bengal tiger (Panthera tigris tigris).

    PubMed

    Kuramochi, Mizuki; Izawa, Takeshi; Hori, Mayuka; Kusuda, Kayo; Shimizu, Junichiro; Iseri, Toshie; Akiyoshi, Hideo; Ohashi, Fumihito; Kuwamura, Mitsuru; Yamate, Jyoji

    2015-07-01

    A 19-year-old female Bengal tiger (Panthera tigris tigris) was presented with hind limb weakness, ataxia and respiratory distress. Computed tomography revealed a mass between the left side of the T7 vertebra and the base of the left 7th rib. The tiger then died, and necropsy was performed. Grossly, the vertebral mass was 6 × 5.7 × 3 cm, and invaded the adjacent vertebral bone and compressed the T7 spinal cord. Histologically, the mass was composed of large, clear, vacuolated and polygonal cells with osteochondral matrix. Cellular and nuclear atypia were moderate. The vacuolated cells stained positively for cytokeratin and vimentin and negatively for S-100. Based on these findings, the present case was diagnosed as a vertebral chordoma; the first report in a tiger.

  19. Costal process of the first sacral vertebra: sexual dimorphism and obstetrical adaptation.

    PubMed

    Tague, Robert G

    2007-03-01

    The human sacrum is sexually dimorphic, with males being larger than females in most dimensions. Previous studies, though, suggest that females may have a longer costal process of the first sacral vertebra (S1) than males. However, these studies neither quantified nor tested statistically the costal process of S1. This study compares S1 with the five lumbar vertebrae (L1 to L5) for a number of metric dimensions, including costal process length. Four issues are addressed, the: 1) hypothesis that females have a longer costal process of S1 than males; 2)hypothesis that homologous structures (i.e., costal processes of L1 to S1) differ in their direction of sexual dimorphism; 3) importance of the costal process of S1 to the obstetrical capacity of the pelvis; and 4) evolution of sexual dimorphism in costal process length of S1. One hundred ninety-seven individuals, including males and females of American blacks and whites, from the Hamann-Todd and Terry Collections were studied. Results show that males are significantly larger than females for most vertebral measurements, except that females have a significantly longer costal process of S1 than males. Costal process length of S1 is positively correlated with the transverse diameter and circumference of the pelvic inlet. The magnitude of sexual dimorphism in costal process length of S1 ranks this measure among the most highly dimorphic of the pelvis. Compared with the humans in this study, australopithecines have a relatively long costal process of S1, but their broad sacrum was not associated with obstetrical imperatives.

  20. Correlative analyses of isolated upper lumbar disc herniation and adjacent wedge-shaped vertebrae

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jia-Xin; Yang, Si-Dong; Wang, Bao-Lin; Yang, Da-Long; Ding, Wen-Yuan; Shen, Yong

    2015-01-01

    Background: Upper lumbar disc herniation (ULDH) is easy to be misdiagnosed due to its special anatomical and atypical clinical features. Few studies have identified the relationship between ULDH and adjacent wedge-shaped vertebrae (WSV). Hypothesis: WSV may have some indicative relations withULDH. Patients and methods: Between January 2003 and October 2013, 47 patients (27 males and 20 females; mean age, 41.2 years) with single-level ULDH (as study group) and 47 sex- and age-matched healthy volunteers (as control group) were studied by radiograph. The two groups were compared with respect to age, sexual proportion, body mass index (BMI), kyphotic angle, and the proportion of WSV. Also, correlative analyses were conducted in the study group to investigate the relation between the kyphotic angle of target vertebrae and other factors including age, BMI, Cobb angle, JOA score and bone mineral density (BMD). Results: The average kyphotic angle in the study group was 11° (4°-22°), while the average kyphotic angle in the control group was 2° (0°-7°). Obviously, the mean kyphotic angle in the study group was statistically larger than that in the control group (t=13.797, P<0.001). The proportion of WSV in the study group was significantly larger than that in the control group (x2=36.380, P<0.0001). The correlations between kyphotic angles and other items (i.e., age, BMI, BMD, Cobb angle and JOA score) in the study group and the control group were low or uncorrelated. Conclusions: WSV are indicatively associated with adjacent ULDH. Thus, ULDH should be alerted when WSV are first found in radiograph and accompanied by clinical symptoms. PMID:25785106

  1. Influences of Newly Formed Woven Bone on Tissue Stresses in Rat Caudal Vertebrae Subjected to Mechanical Loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurata, Kosaku; Higaki, Hidehiko; Miura, Hiromasa; Mawatari, Taro; Murakami, Teruo; Iwamoto, Yukihide

    Bone tissue stresses in mechanically loaded vertebrae were computationally investigated in order to reveal the influences of adaptive remodeling/modeling on stress distribution. Morphological alteration of the rat fifth caudal vertebrae was periodically and non-invasively measured with a microcomputed tomography (micro-CT). Von Mises stresses were calculated by using a finite element analysis (FEA) together with rigid-body spring models based on the consecutive micro-CT images. Median cross-sectional area periodically increased in the loaded rats depending on the duration of stimuli, which was caused by periosteal woven bone formation. FEA including the newly formed bone demonstrated that the loaded vertebrae showed the lower stress levels compared with non-loaded one. Averaged stress of the offset-loaded rat was markedly symmetry between ventral and dorsal sides under offset loading condition, while that of the non-loaded rat indicated asymmetry. Stress analyses suggested that the loaded vertebrae would adapt to the daily mechanical loading by depositing and calcifying woven bone over periosteum.

  2. Age and growth of endangered smalltooth sawfish (Pristis pectinata) verified with LA-ICP-MS analysis of vertebrae.

    PubMed

    Scharer, Rachel M; Patterson, William F; Carlson, John K; Poulakis, Gregg R

    2012-01-01

    Endangered smalltooth sawfish (Pristis pectinata) were opportunistically sampled in south Florida and aged by counting opaque bands in sectioned vertebrae (n=15). Small sample size precluded traditional age verification, but fish collected in spring and summer had translucent vertebrae margins, while fish collected in winter had opaque margins. Trends in Sr:Ca measured across vertebrae with laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry corresponded well to annual salinity trends observed in sawfish estuarine nursery habitats in south Florida, thus serve as a chemical marker verifying annual formation of opaque bands. Based on that finding and assumptions about mean birth date and timing of opaque band formation, estimated age ranged from 0.4 y for a 0.60 m total length (TL) male to 14.0 y for a 4.35 m TL female. Von Bertalanffy growth parameters computed from size at age data were 4.48 m for L(∞), 0.219 y(-1)for k, and -0.81 y for t(0). Results of this study have important implications for sawfish conservation as well as for inferring habitat residency of euryhaline elasmobranchs via chemical analysis of vertebrae.

  3. Age and Growth of Endangered Smalltooth Sawfish (Pristis pectinata) Verified with LA-ICP-MS Analysis of Vertebrae

    PubMed Central

    Scharer, Rachel M.; Patterson III, William F.; Carlson, John K.; Poulakis, Gregg R.

    2012-01-01

    Endangered smalltooth sawfish (Pristis pectinata) were opportunistically sampled in south Florida and aged by counting opaque bands in sectioned vertebrae (n = 15). Small sample size precluded traditional age verification, but fish collected in spring and summer had translucent vertebrae margins, while fish collected in winter had opaque margins. Trends in Sr:Ca measured across vertebrae with laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry corresponded well to annual salinity trends observed in sawfish estuarine nursery habitats in south Florida, thus serve as a chemical marker verifying annual formation of opaque bands. Based on that finding and assumptions about mean birth date and timing of opaque band formation, estimated age ranged from 0.4 y for a 0.60 m total length (TL) male to 14.0 y for a 4.35 m TL female. Von Bertalanffy growth parameters computed from size at age data were 4.48 m for L∞, 0.219 y−1for k, and −0.81 y for t0. Results of this study have important implications for sawfish conservation as well as for inferring habitat residency of euryhaline elasmobranchs via chemical analysis of vertebrae. PMID:23082225

  4. Glycoprotein and Glycan in Tissue and Blood Samples of Patients With Stage IB-IVA Cervical Cancer Undergoing Surgery to Remove Pelvic and Abdominal Lymph Nodes

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-26

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Cervical Small Cell Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma, Not Otherwise Specified; Stage IB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage III Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer

  5. Airway management for cervical spine surgery.

    PubMed

    Farag, Ehab

    2016-03-01

    Cervical spine surgery is one of the most commonly performed spine surgeries in the United States, and 90% of the cases are related to degenerative cervical spine disease (the rest to cervical spine trauma and/or instability). The airway management for cervical spine surgery represents a crucial step in the anesthetic management to avoid injury to the cervical cord. The crux for upper airway management for cervical spine surgery is maintaining the neck in a neutral position with minimal neck movement during endotracheal intubation. Therefore, the conventional direct laryngoscopy (DL) can be unsuitable for securing the upper airway in cervical spine surgery, especially in cases of cervical spine instability and myelopathy. This review discusses the most recent evidence-based facts of the main advantages and limitations of different techniques available for upper airway management for cervical spine surgery.

  6. Cervical Dysplasia: Is It Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... showed cervical dysplasia. What does that mean? Is it cancer? Answers from Shannon K. Laughlin-Tommaso, M. ... the abnormal cells. Dysplasia could go away on its own or, rarely, it could develop into cancer. ...

  7. Advocating for cervical cancer prevention.

    PubMed

    Sherris, J; Agurto, I; Arrossi, S; Dzuba, I; Gaffikin, L; Herdman, C; Limpaphayom, K; Luciani, S

    2005-05-01

    Cervical cancer is a significant health problem among women in developing countries. Contributing to the cervical cancer health burden in many countries is a lack of understanding and political will to address the problem. Broad-based advocacy efforts that draw on research and program findings from developing-country settings are key to gaining program and policy support, as are cost-effectiveness analyses based on these findings. The Alliance for Cervical Cancer Prevention (ACCP) has undertaken advocacy efforts at the international, regional, national, and local levels to raise awareness and understanding of the problem (and workable solutions), galvanize funders and governments to take action, and engage local stakeholders in ensuring program success. ACCP experience demonstrates the role that evidence-based advocacy efforts play in the ultimate success of cervical cancer prevention programs, particularly when new screening and treatment approaches-and, ultimately, radically new approaches such as a human papillomavirus vaccine-are available.

  8. Cervical spine injuries in football.

    PubMed

    Breslow, M J; Rosen, J E

    2000-01-01

    The game of football, as it is played today, poses serious risk of injury for players of all ages. Injury may occur to any structure of the spinal column, including its bony, ligamentous and soft tissue components. The majority of cervical spine injuries occurring in football are self limited, and a full recovery can be expected. While these injuries are relatively uncommon, cervical spine injuries represent a significant proportion of athletic injuries that can produce permanent disability. The low incidence of cervical spine injuries has lead to a lack of emergency management experience of on-site medical staff. This paper will review the numerous injuries sustained by the cervical spine in football players and provide insights into prevention and guidelines for return to play.

  9. Cervical Vagal Schwannoma: Anesthetic Concerns

    PubMed Central

    Saini, Suman; Sabharwal, Nikki; Agrawal, Nidhi; Singh, Bhupender

    2017-01-01

    Schwannomas arising from cervical vagus nerve is an extremely rare benign neoplasm. The majority of patients present with insidiously growing lateral neck mass without neurological deficit. We report a case of symptomatic cervical vagal nerve schwannoma in a 32-year-old female. Complete surgical resection is the treatment of choice. However, anesthetic management of these tumors can be challenging. We describe here the complications experienced during the management of the patient.

  10. [Pregnancy and invasive cervical cancer].

    PubMed

    Kornovski, Ia; Gorchev, G; Trendafilova

    2008-01-01

    A case of 27-year old woman with spinocellular cervical cancer stage IB1 (FIGO) associated with pregnancy (36 g.w.) was reported. Authors performed cesarean radical hysterectomy with pelvic lymphadenectomy and transposition of the ovaries. The review of the literature revealed an algorithm and and practical recommendations in terms of management of cervical cancer during pregnancy, depending on the stage of the pregnancy and the tumor.

  11. Stochastic predictors from the DXA scans of human lumbar vertebrae are correlated with the microarchitecture parameters of trabecular bone.

    PubMed

    Dong, Xuanliang Neil; Pinninti, Rajeshwar; Tvinnereim, Amy; Lowe, Timothy; Di Paolo, David; Shirvaikar, Mukul

    2015-09-18

    The purpose of this study was to provide a novel stochastic assessment of inhomogeneous distribution of bone mineral density (BMD) from the Dual-energy X-ray Absorptiometry (DXA) scans of human lumbar vertebrae and identify the stochastic predictors that were correlated with the microarchitecture parameters of trabecular bone. Eighteen human lumbar vertebrae with intact posterior elements from 5 cadaveric spines were scanned in the posterior-anterior projection using a Hologic densitometer. The BMD map of human vertebrae was obtained from the raw data of DXA scans by directly operating on the transmission measurements of low- and high-energy X-ray beams. Stochastic predictors were calculated by fitting theoretical models onto the experimental variogram of the BMD map, rather than grayscale images, from DXA scans. In addition, microarchitecture parameters of trabecular bone were measured from the 3D images of human vertebrae acquired using a Micro-CT scanner. Significant correlations were observed between stochastic predictors and microarchitecture parameters. The sill variance, representing the standard deviation of the BMD map to some extent, had significantly positive correlations with bone volume, trabecular thickness, trabecular number and connectivity density. The sill variance was also negatively associated with bone surface to volume ratio and trabecular separation. This study demonstrates that the stochastic assessment of the inhomogeneous distribution of BMD from DXA scans of human lumbar vertebrae can reveal microarchitecture information of trabecular bone. However, future studies are needed to examine the potential of stochastic predictors from routine clinical DXA scans in providing bone fragility information complementary to BMD.

  12. Three-dimensional analysis of sexual dimorphism in human thoracic vertebrae: implications for the respiratory system and spine morphology.

    PubMed

    Bastir, Markus; Higuero, Antonio; Ríos, Luís; García Martínez, Daniel

    2014-12-01

    Sexual dimorphism is important for intraspecific variation and well studied in the human skeleton. In the thoracic part of the spine sexual dimorphism is expected for differences in the respiratory system related to body mass, lung capacity, and energetics, and in the reproductive system for adaptations to pregnancy (lower spine lordosis, posture). However, little is known about sexual dimorphism in this anatomical region. We use three-dimensional (3D)-geometric morphometrics to test hypotheses on sexual dimorphism in the first 10 thoracic vertebrae (T1-T10). Forty-six 3D-landmarks were measured on vertebrae of 24 adult females and males of known age and sex. Results confirm that male vertebrae are consistently larger than female ones. Males show more dorsally oriented transverse processes and relatively larger vertebral bodies in upper and lower thoracic vertebrae. Sexual dimorphism in lower thoracic vertebrae affects the orientation of the spinous processes, which is more horizontal in females but more caudal in males. Such regional pattering of sexual dimorphism emerges also from principal component analyses reflecting a complex interaction between the effects of sex and serial position on shape variation. Greater dorsal orientation of male transverse processes reorients the ribs and could lead to greater radial thorax diameters. This fits with greater male respiratory capacities, but may indicate also greater invagination of the male spine within the thorax. Horizontal orientation of the spinous processes in females could allow for a greater thoraco-lumbar lordosis during pregnancy, but more comparative research is necessary to test these hypotheses.

  13. Compressed vertebrae in Atlantic salmon Salmo salar: evidence for metaplastic chondrogenesis as a skeletogenic response late in ontogeny.

    PubMed

    Witten, P Eckhard; Gil-Martens, Laura; Hall, Brian K; Huysseune, Ann; Obach, Alex

    2005-05-20

    Anterior/posterior (a/p) compression of the vertebral column, referred to as 'short tails', is a recurring event in farmed Atlantic salmon. Like other skeletal deformities, the problem usually becomes evident in a late life phase, too late for preventive measures, making it difficult to understand the aetiology of the disease. We use structural, radiological, histological, and mineral analyses to study 'short tail' adult salmon and to demonstrate that the study of adult fish can provide important insights into earlier developmental processes. 'Short tails' display a/p compressed vertebrae throughout the spine, except for the first post-cranial vertebrae. The vertebral number is unaltered, but the intervertebral space is reduced and the vertebrae are shorter. Compressed vertebrae are characterized by an unchanged central part, altered vertebral end plates (straight instead of funnel-shaped), an atypical inward bending of the vertebral edges, and structural alterations in the intervertebral tissue. The spongiosa is unaffected. The growth zones of adjacent vertebrae fuse and blend towards the intervertebral space into chondrogenic tissue. This tissue produces different types of cartilage, replacing the notochord. The correspondence in location of intervertebral cartilage and deformed vertebral end plates, and the clearly delimited, unaltered, central vertebral parts suggest that the a/p compression of vertebral bodies is a late developmental disorder that may be related to a metaplastic shift of osteogenic tissue into chondrogenic tissue in the vertebral growth zone. Given the lack of evidence for infections, metabolic disorders and/or genetic disorders, we propose that an altered mechanical load could have caused the transformation of the bone growth zones and the concomitant replacement of the intervertebral (notochord) tissue by cartilaginous tissues in the 'short tails' studied here. This hypothesis is supported by the role that notochord cells are known to play

  14. Cervical total disk replacement: complications and avoidance.

    PubMed

    Salari, Behnam; McAfee, Paul C

    2012-01-01

    Anterior cervical diskectomy and fusion for neurologic deficits, radicular arm pain, and neck pain refractory to conservative management are successful. The approach and procedure were first described in 1955 and have become the anterior cervical standard of care for orthopedic surgeons and neurosurgeons. Advancements and innovations have addressed disease processes of the cervical spine with motion-preserving technology. The possibility of obtaining anterior cervical decompression while maintaining adjacent segment motion led to the advent of cervical total disk replacement. The Food and Drug Administration has approved 3 cervical devices with other investigational device exemption trials under way.

  15. Predicting mandibular growth increment on the basis of cervical vertebral dimensions in Iranian girls

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The purpose of this longitudinal study was to establish an equation to predict incremental mandibular length on the basis of the analysis of the cervical vertebrae on a single cephalometric radiograph and to compare the predictive accuracy with the method by Mito et al. Methods Data consist of a group of 33 Iranian girls, 9 to 11 years old with two lateral cephalometric radiographs taken at a 24-month interval. For each individual, on the lateral cephalometric radiographs, points and lines for the description of the morphologic characteristics of the third and fourth cervical vertebral bodies were traced and measured. The real mandibular length increment (MLI) in this period was determined by the difference between the second (24 months) and first (baseline) radiographs: MLI = Ar-Pog (second) − Ar-Pog (first). An equation was determined to calculate mandibular length increments on the basis of the measurements in the third and fourth cervical vertebral bodies. The predictive accuracy was assessed using multiple regression analysis. Results The adjusted R2 for this equation was 54.9% which is a reliable value for evaluating prediction accuracy .The average error between the predicted increment and the actual increment was 0.149 mm for our method and 5.87 mm for the method by Mito et al. Discussion There are two items that contributed to easier and better prediction accuracy in our equation: (1) higher R2 and (2) fewer independent variables. In our subjects, the prediction accuracy was lower when using Mito et al.'s method, which could be due to genetic and environmental factors and selected age range. Conclusion These results indicate that cervical vertebral measurements, obtained in lateral cephalograms, are able to predict properly the mandibular growth potential. PMID:24326181

  16. In Vivo Cervical Facet Joint Capsule Deformation During Flexion-Extension

    PubMed Central

    Anderst, William J; Lee, Joon Y; Kang, James D

    2014-01-01

    Study Design Non-randomized controlled cohort. Objective To characterize subaxial cervical facet joint kinematics and facet joint capsule (FJC) deformation during in vivo, dynamic flexion-extension. To assess the effect of single-level anterior arthrodesis on adjacent segment FJC deformation. Summary of Background Data The cervical facet joint has been identified as the most common source of neck pain and it is thought to play a role in chronic neck pain related to whiplash injury. Our current knowledge of cervical facet joint kinematics is based on cadaveric mechanical testing. Methods 14 asymptomatic controls and 9 C5-C6 arthrodesis patients performed full range of motion (ROM) flexion-extension while biplane radiographs were collected at 30 Hz. A volumetric model-based tracking process determined 3D vertebral position with sub-millimeter accuracy. FJC fibers were modeled and grouped into anterior, lateral, posterior-lateral, posterior, and posterior-medial regions. FJC fiber deformations (total, shear and compression-distraction) relative to the static position were determined for each cervical motion segment (C2-C3 through C6-C7) during flexion-extension. Results No significant differences in the rate of fiber deformation in flexion were identified among motion segments (p = .159), however, significant differences were observed among fiber regions (p < .001). Significant differences in the rate of fiber deformation in extension were identified among motion segments (p < .001) and among fiber regions (p = .001). The rate of FJC deformation in extension adjacent to the arthrodesis was 45% less than in corresponding motion segments in control subjects (p = .001). Conclusion In control subjects, facet joint capsule deformations are significantly different among vertebral levels and capsule regions when vertebrae are in an extended orientation. In a flexed orientation, FJC deformations are only different among capsule regions. Single-level anterior arthrodesis is

  17. Disabling injuries of the cervical spine in Argentine rugby over the last 20 years

    PubMed Central

    Secin, F. P.; Poggi, E. J.; Luzuriaga, F.; Laffaye, H. A.

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the incidence and risk factors of disabling injuries to the cervical spine in rugby in Argentina. METHODS: A retrospective review of all cases reported to the Medical Committee of the Argentine Rugby Union (UAR) and Rugby Amistad Foundation was carried out including a follow up by phone. Cumulative binomial distribution, chi 2 test, Fisher test, and comparison of proportions were used to analyse relative incidence and risk of injury by position and by phase of play (Epi Info 6, Version 6.04a). RESULTS: Eighteen cases of disabling injury to the cervical spine were recorded from 1977 to 1997 (0.9 cases per year). The forwards (14 cases) were more prone to disabling injury of the cervical spine than the backs (four cases) (p = 0.03). Hookers (9/18) were at highest risk of injury (p < 0.01). The most frequent cervical injuries occurred at the 4th, 5th, and 6th vertebrae. Seventeen of the injuries occurred during match play. Set scrums were responsible for most of the injuries (11/18) but this was not statistically significant (p = 0.44). The mean age of the injured players was 22. Tetraplegia was initially found in all cases. Physical rehabilitation has been limited to the proximal muscles of the upper limbs, except for two cases of complete recovery. One death, on the seventh day after injury, was reported. CONCLUSIONS: The forwards suffered a higher number of injuries than the backs and this difference was statistically significant. The chance of injury for hookers was statistically higher than for the rest of the players and it was particularly linked to scrummaging. However, the number of injuries incurred in scrums was not statistically different from the number incurred in other phases of play. 


 PMID:10027055

  18. Enhanced Precision of the New Hologic Horizon Model Compared With the Old Discovery Model Is Less Evident When Fewer Vertebrae Are Included in the Analysis.

    PubMed

    McNamara, Elizabeth A; Kilim, Holly P; Malabanan, Alan O; Whittaker, LaTarsha G; Rosen, Harold N

    2016-07-12

    The International Society for Clinical Densitometry guidelines recommend using locally derived precision data for spine bone mineral densities (BMDs), but do not specify whether data derived from L1-L4 spines correctly reflect the precision for spines reporting fewer than 4 vertebrae. Our experience suggested that the decrease in precision with successively fewer vertebrae is progressive as more vertebrae are excluded and that the precision for the newer Horizon Hologic model might be better than that for the previous model, and we sought to quantify. Precision studies were performed on Hologic densitometers by acquiring spine BMD in fast array mode twice on 30 patients, according to International Society for Clinical Densitometry guidelines. This was done 10 different times on various Discovery densitometers, and once on a Horizon densitometer. When 1 vertebral body was excluded from analysis, there was no significant deterioration in precision. When 2 vertebrae were excluded, there was a nonsignificant trend to poorer precision, and when 3 vertebrae were excluded, there was significantly worse precision. When 3 or 4 vertebrae were reported, the precision of the spine BMD measurement was significantly better on the Hologic Horizon than on the Discovery, but the difference in precision between densitometers narrowed and was no longer significant when 1 or 2 vertebrae were reported. The results suggest that (1) the measurement of in vivo spine BMD on the new Hologic Horizon densitometer is significantly more precise than on the older Discovery model; (2) the difference in precision between the Horizon and Discovery models decreases as fewer vertebrae are included; (3) the measurement of spine BMD is less precise as more vertebrae are excluded, but still quite reasonable even when only 1 vertebral body is included; and (4) when 3 vertebrae are reported, L1-L4 precision data can reasonably be used to report significance of changes in BMD. When 1 or 2 vertebrae are

  19. Pathogenesis, Diagnosis, and Treatment of Cervical Vertigo.

    PubMed

    Li, Yongchao; Peng, Baogan

    2015-01-01

    Cervical vertigo is characterized by vertigo from the cervical spine. However, whether cervical vertigo is an independent entity still remains controversial. In this narrative review, we outline the basic science and clinical evidence for cervical vertigo according to the current literature. So far, there are 4 different hypotheses explaining the vertigo of a cervical origin, including proprioceptive cervical vertigo, Barré-Lieou syndrome, rotational vertebral artery vertigo, and migraine-associated cervicogenic vertigo. Proprioceptive cervical vertigo and rotational vertebral artery vertigo have survived with time. Barré-Lieou syndrome once was discredited, but it has been resurrected recently by increased scientific evidence. Diagnosis depends mostly on patients' subjective feelings, lacking positive signs, specific laboratory examinations and clinical trials, and often relies on limited clinical experiences of clinicians. Neurological, vestibular, and psychosomatic disorders must first be excluded before the dizziness and unsteadiness in cervical pain syndromes can be attributed to a cervical origin. Treatment for cervical vertigo is challenging. Manual therapy is recommended for treatment of proprioceptive cervical vertigo. Anterior cervical surgery and percutaneous laser disc decompression are effective for the cervical spondylosis patients accompanied with Barré-Liéou syndrome. As to rotational vertebral artery vertigo, a rare entity, when the exact area of the arterial compression is identified through appropriate tests such as magnetic resonance angiography (MRA), computed tomography angiography (CTA) or digital subtraction angiography (DSA) decompressive surgery should be the chosen treatment.

  20. Analysis of digitized cervical images to detect cervical neoplasia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferris, Daron G.

    2004-05-01

    Cervical cancer is the second most common malignancy in women worldwide. If diagnosed in the premalignant stage, cure is invariably assured. Although the Papanicolaou (Pap) smear has significantly reduced the incidence of cervical cancer where implemented, the test is only moderately sensitive, highly subjective and skilled-labor intensive. Newer optical screening tests (cervicography, direct visual inspection and speculoscopy), including fluorescent and reflective spectroscopy, are fraught with certain weaknesses. Yet, the integration of optical probes for the detection and discrimination of cervical neoplasia with automated image analysis methods may provide an effective screening tool for early detection of cervical cancer, particularly in resource poor nations. Investigative studies are needed to validate the potential for automated classification and recognition algorithms. By applying image analysis techniques for registration, segmentation, pattern recognition, and classification, cervical neoplasia may be reliably discriminated from normal epithelium. The National Cancer Institute (NCI), in cooperation with the National Library of Medicine (NLM), has embarked on a program to begin this and other similar investigative studies.

  1. Age- and sex-related regional compressive strength characteristics of human lumbar vertebrae in osteoporosis

    PubMed Central

    Kurutz, Márta; Donáth, Judit; Gálos, Miklós; Varga, Péter; Fornet, Béla

    2008-01-01

    Objective To obtain the compressive load bearing and energy absorption capacity of lumbar vertebrae of osteoporotic elderly for the everyday medical praxis in terms of the simple diagnostic data, like computed tomography (CT), densitometry, age, and sex. Methods Compressive test of 54 osteoporotic cadaver vertebrae L1 and L2, 16 males and 38 females (age range 43–93, mean age 71.6 ± 13.3 years, mean bone mineral density (BMD) 0.377 ± 0.089 g/cm2, mean T-score −5.57 ± 0.79, Z-score −4.05 ± 0.77) was investigated. Based on the load-displacement diagrams and the measured geometrical parameters of vertebral bodies, proportional, ultimate and yield stresses and strains, Young’s modulus, ductility and energy absorption capacity were determined. Three vertebral regions were distinguished: superior, central and inferior regions, but certain parameters were calculated for the upper/ lower intermediate layers, as well. Cross-sectional areas, and certain bone tissue parameters were determined by image analysis of CT pictures of vertebrae. Sex- and age-related decline functions and trends of strength characteristics were determined. Results Size-corrected failure load was 15%–25% smaller in women, proportional and ultimate stresses were about 30%–35% smaller for women in any region, and 20%–25% higher in central regions for both sexes. Young’s moduli were about 30% smaller in women in any region, and 20%–25% smaller in the central region for both sexes. Small strains were higher in males, large strains were higher in females, namely, proportional strains were about 25% larger in men, yield and ultimate strains were quasi equal for sexes, break strains were 10% higher in women. Ultimate energy absorption capacity was 10%–20% higher in men; the final ductile energy absorption capacity was quasi equal for sexes in all levels. Age-dependence was stronger for men, mainly in central regions (ultimate load, male: r = −0.66, p < 0.01, female: r = −0.52, p

  2. Preventing Cervical Cancer with HPV Vaccines

    Cancer.gov

    Cervical cancer can be prevented with HPV vaccines. NCI-supported researchers helped establish HPV as a cause of cervical cancer. They also helped create the first HPV vaccines, were involved in the vaccine trials, and contribute to ongoing studies.

  3. Internet-Based Cervical Cytology Screening System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-04-01

    telecytology, cytopathology, telemedicine, cancer screening, health care information systems, cervical cancer 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF......approaches to cervical cancer screening possible. In addition, advances in information technology have facilitated the Internet transmission and archival

  4. Cervical Spinal Motion During Orotracheal Intubation.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-01-01

    Sixteen fresh human cadavers were intubated while recording cervical motion using a cine fluoroscopic technique. Segmental cervical motion from the...intubation was performed using no external stabilization, Gardner-Wells traction and manual in-line cervical immobilization. The cadaveric spine motion...immobilization reduced motion at the destabilize C4-5 level. Four patients without significant cervical pathology and normal motion of flexion

  5. Cervical cancer screening.

    PubMed Central

    Katz, A.

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To review the role of family physicians in screening for cancer of the cervix, to review the evidence for screening, in particular, frequency and technique for screening, and to review the reasons cervical cancer has not been prevented and the role of family physicians in addressing these failures. QUALITY OF EVIDENCE: The value of screening has been established with level II evidence. Many of the unresolved issues are not supported either way by good evidence; level II and III evidence predominates. MAIN FINDINGS: In Canada, 1350 women were predicted to be diagnosed with cancer of the cervix in 1996. Most of these women had not been screened. Minority, rural, low-income, and older women face important barriers to screening. Family physicians have a role in reaching out to these women to provide effective health care, including cancer screening. When cancer screening is performed, it should conform to recommended techniques with appropriate follow up of abnormal test results. CONCLUSIONS: Family physicians have an important role in preventing cancer of the cervix. Efforts should be concentrated on encouraging a greater proportion of eligible women to be screened. Criteria are suggested for effective screening. PMID:9721422

  6. Human Papillomavirus and Cervical Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Burd, Eileen M.

    2003-01-01

    Of the many types of human papillomavirus (HPV), more than 30 infect the genital tract. The association between certain oncogenic (high-risk) strains of HPV and cervical cancer is well established. Although HPV is essential to the transformation of cervical epithelial cells, it is not sufficient, and a variety of cofactors and molecular events influence whether cervical cancer will develop. Early detection and treatment of precancerous lesions can prevent progression to cervical cancer. Identification of precancerous lesions has been primarily by cytologic screening of cervical cells. Cellular abnormalities, however, may be missed or may not be sufficiently distinct, and a portion of patients with borderline or mildly dyskaryotic cytomorphology will have higher-grade disease identified by subsequent colposcopy and biopsy. Sensitive and specific molecular techniques that detect HPV DNA and distinguish high-risk HPV types from low-risk HPV types have been introduced as an adjunct to cytology. Earlier detection of high-risk HPV types may improve triage, treatment, and follow-up in infected patients. Currently, the clearest role for HPV DNA testing is to improve diagnostic accuracy and limit unnecessary colposcopy in patients with borderline or mildly abnormal cytologic test results. PMID:12525422

  7. Cervical vertebral bone age in girls.

    PubMed

    Mito, Toshinori; Sato, Koshi; Mitani, Hideo

    2002-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to establish cervical vertebral bone age as a new index for objectively evaluating skeletal maturation on cephalometric radiographs. Using cephalometric radiographs of 176 girls (ages 7.0-14.9 years), we measured cervical vertebral bodies and determined a regression formula to obtain cervical vertebral bone age. Next, using cephalometric and hand-wrist radiographs of another 66 girls (ages 8.0-13.9 years), we determined the correlation between cervical vertebral bone age and bone age using the Tanner-Whitehouse 2 method. The following results were obtained: (1) a regression formula was determined to obtain cervical vertebral bone age based on ratios of measurements in the third and fourth cervical vertebral bodies; (2) the correlation coefficient for the relationship between cervical vertebral bone age and bone age (0.869) was significantly (P <.05) higher than that for the relationship between cervical vertebral bone age and chronological age (0.705); and (3) the difference (absolute value) between the cervical vertebral bone age and bone age (0.75 years) was significantly (P <.001) smaller than that between cervical vertebral bone age and chronological age (1.17 years). These results suggest that cervical vertebral bone age reflects skeletal maturity because it approximates bone age, which is considered to be the most reliable method for evaluating skeletal maturation. Using cervical vertebral bone age, it might be possible to evaluate maturity in a detailed and objective manner on cephalometric radiographs.

  8. Internet-Based Cervical Cytology Screening Program

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-04-01

    cancer is theoretically completely preventable by effective screening using cervical cytology methods (the Pap test). The process of preparing and...preparation and computerized primary screening make automated approaches to cervical cancer screening possible. In addition, advances in information technology... cervical cancer screening results - completed f) Adapt commercial software (Wellogic) to integrate screening results reporting with medical decision

  9. 21 CFR 884.5250 - Cervical cap.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cervical cap. 884.5250 Section 884.5250 Food and... OBSTETRICAL AND GYNECOLOGICAL DEVICES Obstetrical and Gynecological Therapeutic Devices § 884.5250 Cervical cap. (a) Identification. A cervical cap is a flexible cuplike receptacle that fits over the cervix...

  10. 21 CFR 884.3200 - Cervical drain.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cervical drain. 884.3200 Section 884.3200 Food and... OBSTETRICAL AND GYNECOLOGICAL DEVICES Obstetrical and Gynecological Prosthetic Devices § 884.3200 Cervical drain. (a) Identification. A cervical drain is a device designed to provide an exit channel for...

  11. Use of Cervical Pessary in the Management of Cervical Insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Timofeev, Julia

    2016-06-01

    Prevention of spontaneous preterm birth is an important public health priority. Pessary may be a potential therapy in cases of cervical insufficiency, in singleton and multiple gestations. Availability of transvaginal sonography for accurate assessment of cervical length is allowing for the tailoring of therapy to a more specific subset of patients who may benefit from this treatment. Pessary therapy is attractive given the favorable side effect profile, low cost, and ease of placement and removal. Large randomized trials are ongoing to validate initial favorable findings.

  12. Validation of a Non-Invasive Technique to Precisely Measure In Vivo Three-Dimensional Cervical Spine Movement

    PubMed Central

    Anderst, William J; Baillargeon, Emma; Donaldson, William F; Lee, Joon Y; Kang, James D

    2011-01-01

    Study Design In vivo validation during functional loading. Objective To determine the accuracy and repeatability of a model-based tracking technique that combines subject-specific CT models and high-speed biplane X-ray images to measure three-dimensional (3D) in vivo cervical spine motion. Summary of Background Data Accurate 3D spine motion is difficult to obtain in vivo during physiological loading due to the inability to directly attach measurement equipment to individual vertebrae. Previous measurement systems were limited by two-dimensional (2D) results and/or their need for manual identification of anatomical landmarks, precipitating unreliable and inaccurate results. All previous techniques lack the ability to capture true 3D motion during dynamic functional loading. Methods Three subjects had 1.0 mm diameter tantalum beads implanted into their fused and adjacent vertebrae during ACDF surgery. High resolution CT scans were obtained following surgery and used to create subject-specific 3D models of each cervical vertebra. Biplane X-rays were collected at 30 frames per second while the subjects performed flexion/extension and axial rotation movements six months after surgery. Individual bone motion, intervertebral kinematics, and arthrokinematics derived from dynamic RSA served as a gold standard to evaluate the accuracy of the model-based tracking technique. Results Individual bones were tracked with an average precision of 0.19 mm and 0.33 mm in non-fused and fused bones, respectively. Precision in measuring 3D joint kinematics in fused and adjacent segments averaged 0.4 mm for translations and 1.1° for rotations, while anterior and posterior disc height above and below the fusion were measured with a precision ranging between 0.2 mm and 0.4 mm. The variability in 3D joint kinematics associated with tracking the same trial repeatedly was 0.02 mm in translation and 0.06° in rotation. Conclusions 3D cervical spine motion can be precisely measured in vivo with

  13. Quantitative plutonium microdistribution in bone tissue of vertebra from a Mayak worker.

    PubMed

    Lyovkina, Yekaterina V; Miller, Scott C; Romanov, Sergey A; Krahenbuhl, Melinda P; Belosokhov, Maxim V

    2010-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to obtain quantitative data on plutonium microdistribution in different structural elements of human bone tissue for local dose assessment and dosimetric models validation. A sample of the thoracic vertebra was obtained from a former Mayak worker with a rather high plutonium burden. Additional information was obtained on occupational and exposure history, medical history, and measured plutonium content in organs. Plutonium was detected in bone sections from its fission tracks in polycarbonate film using neutron-induced autoradiography. Quantitative analysis of randomly selected microscopic fields on one of the autoradiographs was performed. Data included fission fragment tracks in different bone tissue and surface areas. Quantitative information on plutonium microdistribution in human bone tissue was obtained for the first time. From these data, the quantitative relationships of plutonium decays in bone volume to decays on bone surface in cortical and trabecular fractions were defined as 2.0 and 0.4, correspondingly. The measured quantitative relationship of decays in bone volume to decays on bone surface does not coincide with recommended models for the cortical bone fraction by the International Commission on Radiological Protection. Biokinetic model parameters of extrapulmonary compartments might need to be adjusted after expansion of the data set on quantitative plutonium microdistribution in other bone types in humans as well as other cases with different exposure patterns and types of plutonium.

  14. Rapid Progression of Solitary Plasmacytoma to Multiple Myeloma in Lumbar Vertebra

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jin Seo; Kang, Suk Hyung; Choi, Hyuk Jai

    2013-01-01

    The prognosis of solitary plasmacytoma varies greatly, with some patients recovering after surgical removal or local fractional radiation therapy, and others progressing to multiple myeloma years later. Primary detection of progression to multiple myeloma is important in the treatment of solitary plasmacytoma. There have been several analyses of the risk factors involved in the early progression to multiple myeloma. We describe one case of solitary plasmacytoma of the lumbar vertebra that was treated with surgical decompression with stabilization and additional radiotherapy. The patient had no factors associated with rapid progression to multiple myeloma such as age, size, immunologic results, pathological findings, and serum free light chain ratio at the time of diagnosis. However, his condition progressed to multiple myeloma less than two months after the initial diagnosis of solitary plasmacytoma. We suggest that surgeons should be vigilant in watching for rapid progression to multiple myeloma even in case that the patient with solitary plasmacytoma has no risk factors for rapid progression to multiple myeloma. PMID:24379952

  15. Transitional Vertebra and Spina Bifida Occulta Related with Chronic Low Back Pain in a Young Patient

    PubMed Central

    Habib, Maham; Babar, Sumbal; Kundi, Asif K; Assad, Salman; Sheikh, Amjad

    2016-01-01

    Bertolotti’s syndrome (BS) must be considered as a differential diagnosis in a young patient presenting with low back pain (LBP). We present a case of a 26-year-old male complaining of mild chronic LBP for six years, radiating to his left thigh for the past six months. He has been taking non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) with skeletal muscle relaxants for pain relief. The X-ray and computed tomography (CT) imagings showed congenital enlargement of the left transverse process of the fifth lumbar (L5) vertebra forming pseudo-articulation with the sacrum and unilateral pars interarticularis defect at the L4 level on the left side, respectively. He has managed with gabapentin 100 mg three times a day for his neuropathic left leg pain. On follow-up, the patient reported that his pain has improved with gabapentin and it decreased from 8/10 to 4/10 on the visual analogue scale. PMID:27904817

  16. Micro-CT Imaging of Rat Bone and Lumber Vertebra using Synchrotron Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Rao, Donepudi V.; Cesareo, Roberto; Brunetti, Antonio; Akatsuka, Takao; Yuasa, Tetsyua; Takeda, Tohoru; Tromba, Giuliana; Gigante, Giovanni E.

    2009-03-10

    Micro-tomographic imaging with a spatial resolution on the micrometer scale offers owes a high potential to perform certain types of measurements that were not feasible with other techniques or conventional laboratory methods. The synchrotron X-ray source gives substantial advantages because of its high brilliance and continuous X-ray spectrum. Based on this, visualized the microstructure of rat bone and lumber vertebra was visualized using 20, 25 and 30 keV synchrotron X-rays. We utilized the data which was acquired at different energies for multi-model imaging and to estimate the Ca/P ratio. Up to now there has been no research carried out using these images for the estimation of the calcium content, with synchrotron X-rays. The results are based on the analysis of images and gray values obtained at different energies. We introduce this new method in order to measure the calcium content by means of high resolution synchrotron micro-CT.

  17. Micro-CT Imaging of Rat Bone and Lumber Vertebra using Synchrotron Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Donepudi V.; Cesareo, Roberto; Brunetti, Antonio; Akatsuka, Takao; Yuasa, Tetsyua; Takeda, Tohoru; Tromba, Giuliana; Gigante, Giovanni E.

    2009-03-01

    Micro-tomographic imaging with a spatial resolution on the micrometer scale offers owes a high potential to perform certain types of measurements that were not feasible with other techniques or conventional laboratory methods. The synchrotron X-ray source gives substantial advantages because of its high brilliance and continuous X-ray spectrum. Based on this, visualized the microstructure of rat bone and lumber vertebra was visualized using 20, 25 and 30 keV synchrotron X-rays. We utilized the data which was acquired at different energies for multi-model imaging and to estimate the Ca/P ratio. Up to now there has been no research carried out using these images for the estimation of the calcium content, with synchrotron X-rays. The results are based on the analysis of images and gray values obtained at different energies. We introduce this new method in order to measure the calcium content by means of high resolution synchrotron micro-CT.

  18. Morphometrical dimensions of the sheep thoracolumbar vertebrae as seen on digitised CT images

    PubMed Central

    Berner, Dagmar; Jülke, Henriette; Hohaus, Christian; Brehm, Walter; Gerlach, Kerstin

    2013-01-01

    The sheep spine is widely used as a model for preclinical research in human medicine to test new spinal implants and surgical procedures. Therefore, precise morphometric data are needed. The present study aimed to provide computed tomographic (CT) morphometry of sheep thoracolumbar spine. Five adult normal Merino sheep were included in this study. Sheep were anaesthetised and positioned in sternal recumbency. Subsequently, transverse and sagittal images were obtained using a multi-detector-row helical CT scanner. Measurements of the vertebral bodies, pedicles, intervertebral disc and transverse processes were performed with dedicated software. Vertebral bodies and the spinal canal were wider than they were deep, most obviously in the lumbar vertebrae. The intervertebral discs were as much as 57.4% thicker in the lumbar than in the thoracic spine. The pedicles were higher and longer than they were wide over the entire thoracolumbar spine. In conclusion, the generated data can serve as a CT reference for the ovine thoracolumbar spine and may be helpful in using sheep spine as a model for human spinal research. PMID:24106508

  19. Vertebrae localization in pathological spine CT via dense classification from sparse annotations.

    PubMed

    Glocker, Ben; Zikic, Darko; Konukoglu, Ender; Haynor, David R; Criminisi, Antonio

    2013-01-01

    Accurate localization and identification of vertebrae in spinal imaging is crucial for the clinical tasks of diagnosis, surgical planning, and post-operative assessment. The main difficulties for automatic methods arise from the frequent presence of abnormal spine curvature, small field of view, and image artifacts caused by surgical implants. Many previous methods rely on parametric models of appearance and shape whose performance can substantially degrade for pathological cases. We propose a robust localization and identification algorithm which builds upon supervised classification forests and avoids an explicit parametric model of appearance. We overcome the tedious requirement for dense annotations by a semi-automatic labeling strategy. Sparse centroid annotations are transformed into dense probabilistic labels which capture the inherent identification uncertainty. Using the dense labels, we learn a discriminative centroid classifier based on local and contextual intensity features which is robust to typical characteristics of spinal pathologies and image artifacts. Extensive evaluation is performed on a challenging dataset of 224 spine CT scans of patients with varying pathologies including high-grade scoliosis, kyphosis, and presence of surgical implants. Additionally, we test our method on a heterogeneous dataset of another 200, mostly abdominal, CTs. Quantitative evaluation is carried out with respect to localization errors and identification rates, and compared to a recently proposed method. Our approach is efficient and outperforms state-of-the-art on pathological cases.

  20. Automated spine and vertebrae detection in CT images using object-based image analysis.

    PubMed

    Schwier, M; Chitiboi, T; Hülnhagen, T; Hahn, H K

    2013-09-01

    Although computer assistance has become common in medical practice, some of the most challenging tasks that remain unsolved are in the area of automatic detection and recognition. The human visual perception is in general far superior to computer vision algorithms. Object-based image analysis is a relatively new approach that aims to lift image analysis from a pixel-based processing to a semantic region-based processing of images. It allows effective integration of reasoning processes and contextual concepts into the recognition method. In this paper, we present an approach that applies object-based image analysis to the task of detecting the spine in computed tomography images. A spine detection would be of great benefit in several contexts, from the automatic labeling of vertebrae to the assessment of spinal pathologies. We show with our approach how region-based features, contextual information and domain knowledge, especially concerning the typical shape and structure of the spine and its components, can be used effectively in the analysis process. The results of our approach are promising with a detection rate for vertebral bodies of 96% and a precision of 99%. We also gain a good two-dimensional segmentation of the spine along the more central slices and a coarse three-dimensional segmentation.

  1. Direct visualization of regions with lowered bone mineral density in dual-energy CT images of vertebrae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wesarg, Stefan; Erdt, Marius; Kafchitsas, Konstantinos; Khan, M. Fawad

    2011-03-01

    Dual-energy CT allows for a better material differentiation than conventional CT. For the purpose of osteoporosis diagnosis, a detection of regions with lowered bone mineral density (BMD) is of high clinical interest. Based on an existing biophysical model of the trabecular bone in vertebrae a new method for directly highlighting those low density regions in the image data has been developed. For this, we combine image data acquired at 80 kV and 140 kV with information about the BMD range in different vertebrae and derive a method for computing a color enhanced image which clearly indicates low density regions. An evaluation of our method which compares it with a quantitative method for BMD assessment shows a very good correspondence between both methods. The strength of our method lies in its simplicity and speed.

  2. Determination of 3D location and rotation of lumbar vertebrae in CT images by symmetry-based auto-registration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vrtovec, Tomaž; Likar, Boštjan; Pernuš, Franjo

    2007-03-01

    Quantitative measurement of vertebral rotation is important in surgical planning, analysis of surgical results, and monitoring of the progression of spinal deformities. However, many established and newly developed techniques for measuring axial vertebral rotation do not exploit three-dimensional (3D) information, which may result in virtual axial rotation because of the sagittal and coronal rotation of vertebrae. We propose a novel automatic approach to the measurement of the location and rotation of vertebrae in 3D without prior volume reformation, identification of appropriate cross-sections or aid by statistical models. The vertebra under investigation is encompassed by a mask in the form of an elliptical cylinder in 3D, defined by its center of rotation and the rotation angles. We exploit the natural symmetry of the vertebral body, vertebral column and vertebral canal by dividing the vertebral mask by its mid-axial, mid-sagittal and mid-coronal plane, so that the obtained volume pairs contain symmetrical parts of the observed anatomy. Mirror volume pairs are then simultaneously registered to each other by robust rigid auto-registration, using the weighted sum of absolute differences between the intensities of the corresponding volume pairs as the similarity measure. The method was evaluated on 50 lumbar vertebrae from normal and scoliotic computed tomography (CT) spinal scans, showing relatively large capture ranges and distinctive maxima at the correct locations and rotation angles. The proposed method may aid the measurement of the dimensions of vertebral pedicles, foraminae and canal, and may be a valuable tool for clinical evaluation of the spinal deformities in 3D.

  3. Nucleus pulposus cells derived IGF-1 and MCP-1 enhance osteoclastogenesis and vertebrae disruption in lumbar disc herniation

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Zhongjiao; Huang, Peng; Chong, Yanxue; George, Suraj K; Wen, Bingtao; Han, Na; Liu, Zhiqiang; Kang, Lixin; Lin, Nie

    2014-01-01

    Study design: Chronic strained lumbar disc herniation (LDH) cases were classified into bulging LDH, herniated LDH and prolapse LDH types according to imaging examination, and vertebrae disruptions were evaluated. Cytokines derived from the nucleus pulposus cells were detected, and their effects on osteoclastogenesis, as well as the mechanisms involved, were studied via an in vitro osteoclast differentiation system. Objective: To clarify the mechanisms of lumbar vertebrae resorption induced by lumbar herniation. Summary and background data: Chronic strained lumbar disc herniation induced vertebrae erosion exacerbates quality of patients’ life and clinical outcome. Although nucleus pulposus cells derived cytokines were reported to play an important role in this pathogenesis, the fundamental mechanisms underlying this process are still unclear. Methods: Chronic strained lumbar disc herniation patients were diagnosed with CT scan and T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging. RNA was extracted from 192 surgical specimens of the herniated lumbar disc and 29 surgical excisions of the lumbar disc from spinal injury patients. The expressions of osteoclastogenesis related cytokines and chemokines were examined using real time PCR. Monocytes were induced into osteoclast with M-CSF and RANKL in vitro, while the IGF-1 and MCP-1 were added into the differentiation procedure in order to evaluate the effects and explore the molecular mechanisms. Results: Vertebrae erosion had a positive relationship with lumbar disc herniation severity types. In all of the osteoclastogenesis related cytokines, the IGF-1 and MCP-1 were the most highly expressed in the nucleus pulposus cells. IGF-1 enhances activation of NF-kB signaling directly, but MCP-1 upregulated the expression of RANK, so that enhanced cellular sensitivity to RANKL resulted in increasing osteoclastogenesis and activity. Conclusion: Lumbar herniation induced overexpression of IGF-1 and MCP-1 in nucleus pulposus cells aggravated

  4. Age-Related Changes Between the Level of Velopharyngeal Closure and the Cervical Spine.

    PubMed

    Mason, Kazlin N; Perry, Jamie L; Riski, John E; Fang, Xiangming

    2016-03-01

    The primary focus of this study was to assess age-related changes in the vertical distance of the estimated level of velopharyngeal closure in relation to a prominent landmark of the cervical spine: the anterior tubercle of cervical vertebra 1 (C1). Midsagittal anatomic magnetic resonance images were examined across 51 participants with normal head and neck anatomy between 4 and 17 years of age. Results indicate that age is a strong predictor (P = 0.002) of the vertical distance between the level of velopharyngeal closure relative to C1. Specifically, as age increases, the vertical distance between the palatal plane and C1 becomes greater resulting in the level of velopharyngeal closure being located higher above C1 (range 4.88-10.55 mm). Results of this study provide insights into the clinical usefulness of using C1 as a surgical landmark for placement of pharyngoplasties in children with repaired cleft palate and persistent hypernasal speech. Clinical implications and future directions are discussed.

  5. Segmentation and feature extraction of cervical spine x-ray images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, L. Rodney; Thoma, George R.

    1999-05-01

    As part of an R&D project in mixed text/image database design, the National Library of Medicine has archived a collection of 17,000 digitized x-ray images of the cervical and lumbar spine which were collected as part of the second National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES II). To make this image data available and usable to a wide audience, we are investigating techniques for indexing the image content by automated or semi-automated means. Indexing of the images by features of interest to researchers in spine disease and structure requires effective segmentation of the vertebral anatomy. This paper describes work in progress toward this segmentation of the cervical spine images into anatomical components of interest, including anatomical landmarks for vertebral location, and segmentation and identification of individual vertebrae. Our work includes developing a reliable method for automatically fixing an anatomy-based coordinate system in the images, and work to adaptively threshold the images, using methods previously applied by researchers in cardioangiography. We describe the motivation for our work and present our current results in both areas.

  6. Somatosensory evoked potentials following nerve and segmental stimulation do not confirm cervical radiculopathy with sensory deficit.

    PubMed Central

    Schmid, U D; Hess, C W; Ludin, H P

    1988-01-01

    Twenty eight patients with unilateral cervical radiculopathy were studied by somatosensory evoked potentials (SEPs) from nerve stimulation at the wrist and from skin stimulation at the first, third or fifth finger depending on the root involved. In order to evaluate the reliability of various "radicular SEP patterns" as described in the literature, absolute latencies and side-to-side differences of the brachial plexus component from the supraclavicular fossa (N9), the medullary component (N13) from the cervical vertebra Cv7, and the primary cortical component (N20, P25) were assessed. Side-to-side differences of the amplitudes of N20/P25 and of the conduction times across the intervertebral fossa (interval N9-N13) were analysed. After nerve stimulation, 68% of the patients had false negative findings on the symptomatic, while 36% had positive findings on the asymptomatic side. After segmental stimulation, 72% of the patients had false negative findings on the symptomatic, while 22% had positive findings on the asymptomatic side. It is concluded that SEPs following nerve and segmental stimulation do not reliably confirm clear-cut already established diagnoses of unilateral radiculopathy with sensory and motor deficit. Therefore, they will not be helpful in the electrophysiological investigation of cervicobrachialgias of unknown origin. PMID:2831303

  7. Age related changes between the level of velopharyngeal closure and the cervical spine

    PubMed Central

    Mason, Kazlin N.; Perry, Jamie L.; Riski, John E.; Fang, Xiangming

    2015-01-01

    The primary focus of this study was to assess age related changes in the vertical distance of the estimated level of velopharyngeal closure in relation to a prominent landmark of the cervical spine: the anterior tubercle of cervical vertebrae one (C1). Midsagittal anatomical magnetic resonance images (MRI) were examined across 51 participants with normal head and neck anatomy between 4 and 17 years of age. Results indicate that age is a strong predictor (p = 0.002) of the vertical distance between the level of velopharyngeal closure relative to C1. Specifically, as age increases, the vertical distance between the palatal plane and C1 becomes greater resulting in the level of velopharyngeal closure being located higher above C1 (range 4.88mm to 10.55mm). Results of this study provide insights into the clinical usefulness of using C1 as a surgical landmark for placement of pharyngoplasties in children with repaired cleft palate and persistent hypernasal speech. Clinical implications and future directions are discussed. PMID:26963301

  8. No Carious Cervical Lesions: Abfraction

    PubMed Central

    Shetty, Sumanth M; Shetty, Rashmi G; Mattigatti, Sudha; Managoli, Noopur A; Rairam, Surabhi G; Patil, Ashwini M

    2013-01-01

    Abfraction or Theory of Abfraction is a theory explaining the non-carious cervical lesions (NCCL). It suggests that they are caused by flexural forces, usually from cyclic loading; the enamel, especially at the cementoenamel junction (CEJ), undergoes this pattern of destruction by separating the enamel rods. Clinical aspect importance of these ineart lesions are at most important to be detected for early intervention and treatment modalities as options during the progression of the disease. How to cite this article: Shetty SM, Shetty RG, Mattigatti S, Managoli NA, Rairam SG, Patil AM. No Carious Cervical Lesions: Abfraction. J Int Oral Health 2013; 5(5):142-5. PMID:24324319

  9. No carious cervical lesions: abfraction.

    PubMed

    Shetty, Sumanth M; Shetty, Rashmi G; Mattigatti, Sudha; Managoli, Noopur A; Rairam, Surabhi G; Patil, Ashwini M

    2013-10-01

    Abfraction or Theory of Abfraction is a theory explaining the non-carious cervical lesions (NCCL). It suggests that they are caused by flexural forces, usually from cyclic loading; the enamel, especially at the cementoenamel junction (CEJ), undergoes this pattern of destruction by separating the enamel rods. Clinical aspect importance of these ineart lesions are at most important to be detected for early intervention and treatment modalities as options during the progression of the disease. How to cite this article: Shetty SM, Shetty RG, Mattigatti S, Managoli NA, Rairam SG, Patil AM. No Carious Cervical Lesions: Abfraction. J Int Oral Health 2013; 5(5):142-5.

  10. Differential gene expression of bgp and mgp in trabecular and compact bone of Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L.) vertebrae.

    PubMed

    Krossøy, Christel; Ornsrud, Robin; Wargelius, Anna

    2009-12-01

    The tissue-specific gene expression of the vitamin K-dependent proteins bone gamma-carboxyglutamate-protein (BGP) and matrix gamma-carboxyglutamate-protein (MGP) in Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar L.) was investigated. In previous studies, BGP, the most abundant non-collagenous protein of bone, was almost exclusively associated with bone, whereas the non-structural protein MGP has a more widespread tissue distribution. In-situ hybridization of juvenile Atlantic salmon ( approximately 40 g, fresh water) vertebrae demonstrated expression of bgp and mgp mRNA in osteoblasts lining the trabecular bone, whereas no staining was observed in the compact bone. By separating the trabecular and compact bone of both juvenile ( approximately 40 g, fresh water) and adult ( approximately 1000 g, sea water) Atlantic salmon, we observed that the two vertebral bone compartments displayed different levels of bgp, whereas no such differences were seen for mgp. Measurements of the mineral content and Ca/P molar ratio in adult salmon revealed no significant differences between trabecular and compact bone. In conclusion, the osteoblasts covering the salmon vertebrae have unique gene expression patterns and levels of bgp and mgp. Further, the study confirms the presence of mRNA from the vitamin K-dependent proteins BGP and MGP in the vertebrae, fin and gills of Atlantic salmon.

  11. Double Balloon Cervical Ripening Catheter for Control of Massive Hemorrhage in a Cervical Ectopic Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Zambrano, Nabila; Reilly, James; Moretti, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Cervical pregnancy can be complicated by perfuse vaginal bleeding. Mechanical compression directed at tamponing the cervical vessels can control hemostasis. There are several types of balloon catheters that have been described for cervical compression. However use of a double balloon catheter is a novel approach for cervical tamponade, as one balloon is positioned below the external cervical os and the second balloon is situated above in the internal cervical os. This compresses the cervix from internal os to external os between the two balloons, forming a “cervical sandwich.” We describe this method of cervical tamponade using a silicone double balloon cervical ripening catheter that rapidly controlled hemorrhage in a patient that failed conservative management with methotrexate. PMID:28261511

  12. Double Balloon Cervical Ripening Catheter for Control of Massive Hemorrhage in a Cervical Ectopic Pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Zambrano, Nabila; Reilly, James; Moretti, Michael; Lakhi, Nisha

    2017-01-01

    Cervical pregnancy can be complicated by perfuse vaginal bleeding. Mechanical compression directed at tamponing the cervical vessels can control hemostasis. There are several types of balloon catheters that have been described for cervical compression. However use of a double balloon catheter is a novel approach for cervical tamponade, as one balloon is positioned below the external cervical os and the second balloon is situated above in the internal cervical os. This compresses the cervix from internal os to external os between the two balloons, forming a "cervical sandwich." We describe this method of cervical tamponade using a silicone double balloon cervical ripening catheter that rapidly controlled hemorrhage in a patient that failed conservative management with methotrexate.

  13. Biomarker discovery for neuroendocrine cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Lin, Li-Hsun; Chang, Shing-Jyh; Hu, Ren-Yu; Lin, Meng-Wei; Lin, Szu-Ting; Huang, Shun-Hong; Lyu, Ping-Chiang; Chou, Hsiu-Chuan; Lai, Zih-Yin; Chuang, Yung-Jen; Chan, Hong-Lin

    2014-07-01

    Neuroendocrine cervical cancer is an aggressive but rare form of cervical cancer. The majority of neuroendocrine cervical cancer patients present with advanced-stage diseases. However, the limited numbers of neuroendocrine tumor markers are insufficient for clinical purposes. Thus, we used a proteomic approach combining lysine labeling 2D-DIGE and MALDI-TOF MS to investigate the biomarkers for neuroendocrine cervical cancer. By analyzing the global proteome alteration between the neuroendocrine cervical cancer line (HM-1) and non-neuroendocrine cervical cancer lines (CaSki cells, ME-180 cells, and Hela cells), we identified 82 proteins exhibiting marked changes between HM-1 and CaSki cells, and between ME-180 and Hela cells. Several proteins involved in protein folding, cytoskeleton, transcription control, signal transduction, glycolysis, and redox regulation exhibited significant changes in abundance. Proteomic and immunoblot analyses indicated respective 49.88-fold and 25-fold increased levels of transgelin in HM-1 cells compared with that in other non-neuroendocrine cervical cancer cell lines, implying that transgelin is a biomarker for neuroendocrine cervical cancer. In summary, we used a comprehensive neuroendocrine/non-neuroendocrine cervical cancer model based proteomic approach for identifying neuroendocrine cervical cancer markers, which might contribute to the prognosis and diagnosis of neuroendocrine cervical cancer.

  14. A Novel Patient-Specific Drill Guide Template for Pedicle Screw Insertion into the Subaxial Cervical Spine Utilizing Stereolithographic Modelling: An In Vitro Study

    PubMed Central

    Delgado, Giorgio De Guzman; Grozman, Samuel Arsenio Munoz

    2017-01-01

    Study Design Cadaveric study. Purpose The purpose of this study was to assess the accuracy and feasibility of cervical pedicle screw (CPS) insertion into the subaxial cervical spine placed using a patient-specific drill guide template constructed from a stereolithographic model. Overview of Literature CPS fixation is an invaluable tool for posterior cervical fixation because of its biomechanical advantages. The major drawback is its narrow corridor that allows very little clearance for neural and vascular injuries. Methods Fifty subaxial pedicles of the cervical vertebrae from five cadavers were scanned into thin slices using computed tomography (CT). Digital imaging and communications in medicine images of the cadaver spine were digitally processed and printed to scale as a three-dimensional (3D) model. Drill guide templates were manually moulded over the 3D-printed models incorporating pins inserted in the pedicles. The drill guide templates were used for precise placement of the drill holes in the pedicles of cadaveric specimens for pedicle screw fixation. Results The instrumented cadaveric spines were subjected to CT to assess the accuracy of our pedicle placement by an external observer. Our patient-specific drill guide template had an accuracy of 94%. Conclusions The use of a patient-specific drill guide constructed using stereolithography improved the accuracy of CPS placement in a cadaveric model. PMID:28243363

  15. Semi-automatic delineation of the spino-laminar junction curve on lateral x-ray radiographs of the cervical spine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Narang, Benjamin; Phillips, Michael; Knapp, Karen; Appelboam, Andy; Reuben, Adam; Slabaugh, Greg

    2015-03-01

    Assessment of the cervical spine using x-ray radiography is an important task when providing emergency room care to trauma patients suspected of a cervical spine injury. In routine clinical practice, a physician will inspect the alignment of the cervical spine vertebrae by mentally tracing three alignment curves along the anterior and posterior sides of the cervical vertebral bodies, as well as one along the spinolaminar junction. In this paper, we propose an algorithm to semi-automatically delineate the spinolaminar junction curve, given a single reference point and the corners of each vertebral body. From the reference point, our method extracts a region of interest, and performs template matching using normalized cross-correlation to find matching regions along the spinolaminar junction. Matching points are then fit to a third order spline, producing an interpolating curve. Experimental results demonstrate promising results, on average producing a modified Hausdorff distance of 1.8 mm, validated on a dataset consisting of 29 patients including those with degenerative change, retrolisthesis, and fracture.

  16. Is the use of the cervical vertebrae maturation method justified to determine skeletal age? A comparison of radiation dose of two strategies for skeletal age estimation.

    PubMed

    Patcas, Raphael; Signorelli, Luca; Peltomäki, Timo; Schätzle, Marc

    2013-10-01

    The aim of this study was to assess effective doses of a lateral cephalogram radiograph with and without thyroid shield and compare the differences with the radiation dose of a hand-wrist radiograph. Thermoluminescent dosimeters were placed at 19 different sites in the head and neck of a tissue-equivalent human skull (RANDO phantom). Analogue lateral cephalograms with and without thyroid shield (67 kV, 250 mA, 10 mAs) and hand-wrist radiographs (40 kV, 250 mA, 10 mAs) were obtained. The effective doses were calculated using the 2007 International Commission on Radiological Protection recommendations. The effective dose for conventional lateral cephalogram without a thyroid shield was 5.03 microsieverts (µSv). By applying a thyroid shield to the RANDO phantom, a remarkable dose reduction of 1.73 µSv could be achieved. The effective dose of a conventional hand-wrist radiograph was calculated to be 0.16 µSv. Adding the effective dose of the hand-wrist radiograph to the effective dose of the lateral cephalogram with thyroid shield resulted in a cumulative effective dose of 3.46 µSv. Without thyroid shield, the effective dose of a lateral cephalogram was approximately 1.5-fold increased than the cumulative effective dose of a hand-wrist radiograph and a lateral cephalogram with thyroid shield. Thyroid is an organ that is very sensitive to radiation exposure. Its shielding will significantly reduce the effective dose. An additional hand-wrist radiograph, involving no vulnerable tissues, however, causes very little radiation risk. In accordance with the ALARA (As Low As Reasonably Achievable) principle, if an evaluation of skeletal age is indicated, an additional hand-wrist radiograph seems much more justifiable than removing the thyroid shield.

  17. ‘Abnormal’ cervical imaging?: Cervical pneumatocysts – A case report of a cervical spine pneumatocyst

    PubMed Central

    Renshaw, Hanna; Patel, Amit; Boctor, Daniel Sherif Zakaria Matta; Hakmi, Mohamed Atef

    2015-01-01

    To our knowledge there are only 15 reported cases of pneumatocysts in the cervical spine, but awareness of their existence should help the clinician when diagnosing abnormalities in radiological images. When faced with intravertebral gas, in addition to considering more sinister causes, one should consider the differentials including pneumatocysts. Despite our relative lack of understanding of these benign lesions the knowledge that they can change over time should prevent unnecessary testing or treating. We present a patient who fell down stairs and was found to have cervical intravertebral gas, on computed tomography imaging, with the typical appearance of a pneumatocyst. PMID:26719615

  18. A new material mapping procedure for quantitative computed tomography-based, continuum finite element analyses of the vertebra.

    PubMed

    Unnikrishnan, Ginu U; Morgan, Elise F

    2011-07-01

    Inaccuracies in the estimation of material properties and errors in the assignment of these properties into finite element models limit the reliability, accuracy, and precision of quantitative computed tomography (QCT)-based finite element analyses of the vertebra. In this work, a new mesh-independent, material mapping procedure was developed to improve the quality of predictions of vertebral mechanical behavior from QCT-based finite element models. In this procedure, an intermediate step, called the material block model, was introduced to determine the distribution of material properties based on bone mineral density, and these properties were then mapped onto the finite element mesh. A sensitivity study was first conducted on a calibration phantom to understand the influence of the size of the material blocks on the computed bone mineral density. It was observed that varying the material block size produced only marginal changes in the predictions of mineral density. Finite element (FE) analyses were then conducted on a square column-shaped region of the vertebra and also on the entire vertebra in order to study the effect of material block size on the FE-derived outcomes. The predicted values of stiffness for the column and the vertebra decreased with decreasing block size. When these results were compared to those of a mesh convergence analysis, it was found that the influence of element size on vertebral stiffness was less than that of the material block size. This mapping procedure allows the material properties in a finite element study to be determined based on the block size required for an accurate representation of the material field, while the size of the finite elements can be selected independently and based on the required numerical accuracy of the finite element solution. The mesh-independent, material mapping procedure developed in this study could be particularly helpful in improving the accuracy of finite element analyses of vertebroplasty and

  19. Automatic Localization of Target Vertebrae in Spine Surgery: Clinical Evaluation of the LevelCheck Registration Algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Lo, Sheng-fu L.; Otake, Yoshito; Puvanesarajah, Varun; Wang, Adam S.; Uneri, Ali; De Silva, Tharindu; Vogt, Sebastian; Kleinszig, Gerhard; Elder, Benjamin D; Goodwin, C. Rory; Kosztowski, Thomas A.; Liauw, Jason A.; Groves, Mari; Bydon, Ali; Sciubba, Daniel M.; Witham, Timothy F.; Wolinsky, Jean-Paul; Aygun, Nafi; Gokaslan, Ziya L.; Siewerdsen, Jeffrey H.

    2015-01-01

    Study Design A 3D-2D image registration algorithm, “LevelCheck,” was used to automatically label vertebrae in intraoperative mobile radiographs obtained during spine surgery. Accuracy, computation time, and potential failure modes were evaluated in a retrospective study of 20 patients. Objective To measurethe performance of the LevelCheck algorithm using clinical images acquired during spine surgery. Summary of Background Data In spine surgery, the potential for wrong level surgery is significant due to the difficulty of localizing target vertebrae based solely on visual impression, palpation, and fluoroscopy. To remedy this difficulty and reduce the risk of wrong-level surgery, our team introduced a program (dubbed LevelCheck) to automatically localize target vertebrae in mobile radiographs using robust 3D-2D image registration to preoperative CT. Methods Twenty consecutive patients undergoing thoracolumbar spine surgery, for whom both a preoperative CT scan and an intraoperative mobile radiograph were available, were retrospectively analyzed. A board-certified neuroradiologist determined the “true” vertebra levels in each radiograph. Registration of the preoperative CT to the intraoperative radiographwere calculated via LevelCheck, and projection distance errors were analyzed. Five hundred random initializations were performed for eachpatient, andalgorithm settings (viz., the number of robust multi-starts, ranging 50 to 200) were varied to evaluate the tradeoff between registration error and computation time. Failure mode analysis was performed by individually analyzing unsuccessful registrations (>5 mm distance error) observed with 50 multi-starts. Results At 200 robust multi-starts (computation time of ∼26 seconds), the registration accuracy was 100% across all 10,000 trials. As the number of multi-starts (and computation time) decreased, the registration remained fairly robust, down to 99.3% registration accuracy at 50 multi-starts (computation time

  20. Mixed reality simulation of rasping procedure in artificial cervical disc replacement (ACDR) surgery

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Until quite recently spinal disorder problems in the U.S. have been operated by fusing cervical vertebrae instead of replacement of the cervical disc with an artificial disc. Cervical disc replacement is a recently approved procedure in the U.S. It is one of the most challenging surgical procedures in the medical field due to the deficiencies in available diagnostic tools and insufficient number of surgical practices For physicians and surgical instrument developers, it is critical to understand how to successfully deploy the new artificial disc replacement systems. Without proper understanding and practice of the deployment procedure, it is possible to injure the vertebral body. Mixed reality (MR) and virtual reality (VR) surgical simulators are becoming an indispensable part of physicians’ training, since they offer a risk free training environment. In this study, MR simulation framework and intricacies involved in the development of a MR simulator for the rasping procedure in artificial cervical disc replacement (ACDR) surgery are investigated. The major components that make up the MR surgical simulator with motion tracking system are addressed. Findings A mixed reality surgical simulator that targets rasping procedure in the artificial cervical disc replacement surgery with a VICON motion tracking system was developed. There were several challenges in the development of MR surgical simulator. First, the assembly of different hardware components for surgical simulation development that involves knowledge and application of interdisciplinary fields such as signal processing, computer vision and graphics, along with the design and placements of sensors etc . Second challenge was the creation of a physically correct model of the rasping procedure in order to attain critical forces. This challenge was handled with finite element modeling. The third challenge was minimization of error in mapping movements of an actor in real model to a virtual model in a

  1. Nonoperative Management of Cervical Radiculopathy.

    PubMed

    Childress, Marc A; Becker, Blair A

    2016-05-01

    Cervical radiculopathy describes pain in one or both of the upper extremities, often in the setting of neck pain, secondary to compression or irritation of nerve roots in the cervical spine. It can be accompanied by motor, sensory, or reflex deficits and is most prevalent in persons 50 to 54 years of age. Cervical radiculopathy most often stems from degenerative disease in the cervical spine. The most common examination findings are painful neck movements and muscle spasm. Diminished deep tendon reflexes, particularly of the triceps, are the most common neurologic finding. The Spurling test, shoulder abduction test, and upper limb tension test can be used to confirm the diagnosis. Imaging is not required unless there is a history of trauma, persistent symptoms, or red flags for malignancy, myelopathy, or abscess. Electrodiagnostic testing is not needed if the diagnosis is clear, but has clinical utility when peripheral neuropathy of the upper extremity is a likely alternate diagnosis. Patients should be reassured that most cases will resolve regardless of the type of treatment. Nonoperative treatment includes physical therapy involving strengthening, stretching, and potentially traction, as well as nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, muscle relaxants, and massage. Epidural steroid injections may be helpful but have higher risks of serious complications. In patients with red flag symptoms or persistent symptoms after four to six weeks of treatment, magnetic resonance imaging can identify pathology amenable to epidural steroid injections or surgery.

  2. Cervical Cancer Risk Prediction Models

    Cancer.gov

    Developing statistical models that estimate the probability of developing cervical cancer over a defined period of time will help clinicians identify individuals at higher risk of specific cancers, allowing for earlier or more frequent screening and counseling of behavioral changes to decrease risk.

  3. CNP. Cervical Neoplasia Probe Control

    SciTech Connect

    Vargo, T.

    1995-05-17

    This software, which consists of a main executive and several subroutines, performs control of the optics, image acquisition, and Digital Signal Processing (DSP) of this image, of an optical based medical instrument that performs fluoresence detection of precancerous lesions (neoplasia) of the human cervix. The hardware portion of this medical instrument is known by the same name Cervical Neoplasia Probe (CNP)

  4. Drugs Approved for Cervical Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for cervical cancer. The list includes generic names, brand names, and common drug combinations, which are shown in capital letters. The drug names link to NCI's Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  5. [Disphagia secondary to cervical osteophytes].

    PubMed

    Torres Muros, B; Serrano, J A; Meschian Coretti, S

    2006-01-01

    Disphagia is a common cause of medical query in the ENT field, in which could be involved a variety of medical reason. One of those is the extrinsic compression of the digestive tract due to a tumoral process, or as the case we report, secundary to a large osteophyte at the anterior side of the cervical spine, after a surgical intervention in this area.

  6. Genetic events in cervical carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Sarkar, S.; Tai, C.C.; Mowatt, J.

    1994-09-01

    Cervical carcinoma is the fifth most common cancer world-wide and the second major cause of cancer related death in women. Recent studies have suggested that chromosome 10, particularly the short arm, may be significant in the pathogenesis of the disease. The relationship has not, however, been investigated directly in cervical tumor material. We analyzed 21 paired blood and tumor samples from patients with cervical carcinoma for allele loss on chromosome 10. Ten polymorphic loci spanning the length of chromosome 10 were used including 4 RFLPs and 4 microsatellite markers. Tumor samples were carefully dissected to remove the majority of contaminating normal tissue. Twenty of the 21 pairs were heterozygous for at least one locus. Loss of heterozygosity for one or more chromosome 10 loci was observed in 5 out of the 20 informative cases (25%). One sample showed the apparent loss of an entire copy of chromosome 10. In 3 cases allele loss was confined to loci on the short arm of chromosome 10. We are currently using further markers mapped to chromosome 10p to define the shortest consistent region of allele loss. We suggest that this region may contain one or more tumor suppressor genes involved in the development and/or progression of cervical carcinoma.

  7. Cervical cancer in Latin America.

    PubMed

    Eluf-Neto, J; Nascimento, C M

    2001-04-01

    Cervical cancer is a common cause of morbidity and mortality in developing countries. In Latin America, the incidence rates in several cities are among the highest worldwide, probably due to a high frequency of risk factors and/or a low screening coverage for cervical cancer. Epidemiologic studies conducted in Latin America (and some in the Caribbean), that have investigated the main risk factors for the disease, as well as screening coverage by Papanicolaou (Pap) smear, were reviewed. The prevalence of human papillomavirus (HPV) infection among women with negative Pap smears does not seem to explain the risk observed in Latin American countries. Results of some studies have suggested that reproductive factors and male sexual behavior might be responsible, at least partially, for the high occurrence of cervical cancer in Latin America. Concerning cytology screening, many women have a smear taken regularly (some every year). However, a significant proportion of women, probably those with a high risk of cancer of the cervix, have never had a Pap test. To reduce cervical cancer in these countries, screening programs in Latin America should have a wider coverage, especially reaching those women at higher risk. Semin Oncol 28:188-197.

  8. Nanomechanical clues from morphologically normal cervical squamous cells could improve cervical cancer screening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geng, Li; Feng, Jiantao; Sun, Quanmei; Liu, Jing; Hua, Wenda; Li, Jing; Ao, Zhuo; You, Ke; Guo, Yanli; Liao, Fulong; Zhang, Youyi; Guo, Hongyan; Han, Jinsong; Xiong, Guangwu; Zhang, Lufang; Han, Dong

    2015-09-01

    Applying an atomic force microscope, we performed a nanomechanical analysis of morphologically normal cervical squamous cells (MNSCs) which are commonly used in cervical screening. Results showed that nanomechanical parameters of MNSCs correlate well with cervical malignancy, and may have potential in cancer screening to provide early diagnosis.Applying an atomic force microscope, we performed a nanomechanical analysis of morphologically normal cervical squamous cells (MNSCs) which are commonly used in cervical screening. Results showed that nanomechanical parameters of MNSCs correlate well with cervical malignancy, and may have potential in cancer screening to provide early diagnosis. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr03662c

  9. 21 CFR 884.4260 - Hygroscopic Laminaria cervical dilator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Hygroscopic Laminaria cervical dilator. 884.4260... Devices § 884.4260 Hygroscopic Laminaria cervical dilator. (a) Identification. A hygroscopic Laminaria cervical dilator is a device designed to dilate (stretch open) the cervical os by cervical insertion of...

  10. Spinal Deformity in Aged Zebrafish Is Accompanied by Degenerative Changes to Their Vertebrae that Resemble Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Hayes, Anthony J.; Reynolds, Scott; Nowell, Mari A.; Meakin, Lee B.; Habicher, Judith; Ledin, Johan; Bashford, Andrew; Caterson, Bruce; Hammond, Chrissy L.

    2013-01-01

    Age-related degenerative changes within the vertebral column are a significant cause of morbidity with considerable socio-economic impact worldwide. An improved understanding of these changes through the development of experimental models may lead to improvements in existing clinical treatment options. The zebrafish is a well-established model for the study of skeletogenesis with significant potential in gerontological research. With advancing age, zebrafish frequently develop gross deformities of their vertebral column, previously ascribed to reduced trunk muscle tone. In this study, we assess degenerative changes specifically within the bone and cartilage of the vertebral column of zebrafish at 1, 2 and 3-years of age. We show increased frequency and severity of spinal deformities/curvatures with age. Underlying the most severe phenotypes are partial or complete vertebral dislocations and focal thickening of the vertebral bone at the joint margins. MicroCT examination demonstrates small defects, fractures and morphological evidence suggestive of bone erosion and remodeling (i.e. osteophytes) within the vertebrae during aging, but no significant change in bone density. Light and electron microscopic examination reveal striking age-related changes in cell morphology, suggestive of chondroptosis, and tissue remodelling of the vertebral cartilage, particularly within the pericellular micro-environment. Glycosaminoglycan analysis of the vertebral column by HPLC demonstrates a consistent, age-related increase in the yield of total chondroitin sulfate disaccharide, but no change in sulfation pattern, supported by immunohistochemical analysis. Immunohistochemistry strongly identifies all three chondroitin/dermatan sulphate isoforms (C-0-S, C-4-S/DS and C-6-S) within the vertebral cartilage, particularly within the pericellular micro-environment. In contrast, keratan sulfate immunolocalises specifically with the notochordal tissue of the intervertebral disc, and its

  11. Anterior Limbus Vertebra and Intervertebral Disk Degeneration in Japanese Collegiate Gymnasts

    PubMed Central

    Koyama, Koji; Nakazato, Koichi; Min, Seok-Ki; Gushiken, Koji; Hatakeda, Yoshiaki; Seo, Kyoko; Hiranuma, Kenji

    2013-01-01

    Background: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies have shown that gymnasts have a high prevalence of radiological abnormalities, such as intervertebral disk degeneration (IDD) and anterior limbus vertebra (ALV). These 2 abnormalities may coexist at the same spinal level. However, the relationship between IDD and ALV remains unclear. Hypothesis: A significant relationship exists between IDD and ALV in Japanese collegiate gymnasts. Study Design: Case-control study. Methods: A total of 104 Japanese collegiate gymnasts (70 men and 34 women; age, 19.7 ± 1.0 years) with 11.8 ± 3.6 years of sporting experience participated. T1- and T2-weighted MRIs were used to evaluate ALV and IDD. Results: The prevalence among the gymnasts of IDD and ALV was 40.4% (42/104) and 20.2% (21/104), respectively. The prevalence of IDD was significantly higher in gymnasts with ALV than those without ALV, as determined using the chi-square test. Logistic regression analysis demonstrated a significant association between IDD and ALV (adjusted odds ratio [OR], 6.60; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.14-20.35). IDD was further grouped by whether it was present in the upper lumbar region (L1-2, L2-3, and L3-4 disks) or in the lower lumbar region (L4-5 and L5-S1 disks). Upper IDD had a greater association with ALV (adjusted OR, 33.17; 95% CI, 7.09-155.25) than did lower IDD (adjusted OR, 6.71; 95% CI, 1.57-28.73). Conclusion: In Japanese collegiate gymnasts, ALV is a predictor of IDD, especially in the upper lumbar region. Clinical Relevance: Information regarding ALV is important to prevent IDD in Japanese collegiate gymnasts. PMID:26535240

  12. Early Trabecular Development in Human Vertebrae: Overproduction, Constructive Regression, and Refinement

    PubMed Central

    Acquaah, Frank; Robson Brown, Katharine A.; Ahmed, Farah; Jeffery, Nathan; Abel, Richard L.

    2015-01-01

    Early bone development may have a significant impact upon bone health in adulthood. Bone mineral density (BMD) and bone mass are important determinants of adult bone strength. However, several studies have shown that BMD and bone mass decrease after birth. If early development is important for strength, why does this reduction occur? To investigate this, more data characterizing gestational, infant, and childhood bone development are needed in order to compare with adults. The aim of this study is to document early vertebral trabecular bone development, a key fragility fracture site, and infer whether this period is important for adult bone mass and structure. A series of 120 vertebrae aged between 6 months gestation and 2.5 years were visualized using microcomputed tomography. Spherical volumes of interest were defined, thresholded, and measured using 3D bone analysis software (BoneJ, Quant3D). The findings showed that gestation was characterized by increasing bone volume fraction whilst infancy was defined by significant bone loss (≈2/3rds) and the appearance of a highly anisotropic trabecular structure with a predominantly inferior–superior direction. Childhood development progressed via selective thickening of some trabeculae and the loss of others; maintaining bone volume whilst creating a more anisotropic structure. Overall, the pattern of vertebral development is one of gestational overproduction followed by infant “sculpting” of bone tissue during the first year of life (perhaps in order to regulate mineral homeostasis or to adapt to loading environment) and then subsequent refinement during early childhood. Comparison of early bone developmental data in this study with adult bone volume values taken from the literature shows that the loss in bone mass that occurs during the first year of life is never fully recovered. Early development could therefore be important for developing bone strength, but through structural changes in trabecular

  13. On the relationship between stature and anthropometric measurements of lumbar vertebrae.

    PubMed

    Klein, Anke; Nagel, Katrin; Gührs, Julian; Poodendaen, Chanasorn; Püschel, Klaus; Morlock, Michael M; Huber, Gerd

    2015-12-01

    Stature estimation is important for identifying human remains. Analysis of body parts has become an important forensic tool during global operations in the context of cases in which human remains have been dismembered, mutilated or decomposed. However, unless almost the full skeleton or at least a long bone of the lower limb is available, accuracy is still limited to approximate body height. Especially with respect to single vertebral measurements, only a rough prediction is possible. Due to their complex geometry, vertebral measurements are possible at various locations. Nine locations have been considered in this study. Regression equations for stature estimation using lumbar vertebral geometry from computed tomography scans have been evaluated to identify the measurement which gives the most reliable body height estimation. The study group comprised a representative sample of a German metropolitan male population (42 autopsied individuals). Comparing the influence of various vertebral geometry measurements with body height resulted in a coefficient of correlation (R) of 0.19-0.53 and a 95% confidence interval (CI) of ± 11.6 up to ± 13.1cm. The largest correlation with a single vertebral measurement was achieved with the central height of the vertebral body of L2 as predictor; the standard error (SE) of the estimate was 5.9 cm. Using models from CT scans appeared superior to current invasive procedures that use direct measurements of the vertebral body, in terms of reproducibility and time efficiency. For fragmented non-skeletonized human bodies, height prediction based on an all-virtual model of the vertebrae is possible. However, the regression coefficient may be similar to classic caliper measurements that prove easier if skeletonized bones are available.

  14. Spinal deformity in aged zebrafish is accompanied by degenerative changes to their vertebrae that resemble osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Hayes, Anthony J; Reynolds, Scott; Nowell, Mari A; Meakin, Lee B; Habicher, Judith; Ledin, Johan; Bashford, Andrew; Caterson, Bruce; Hammond, Chrissy L

    2013-01-01

    Age-related degenerative changes within the vertebral column are a significant cause of morbidity with considerable socio-economic impact worldwide. An improved understanding of these changes through the development of experimental models may lead to improvements in existing clinical treatment options. The zebrafish is a well-established model for the study of skeletogenesis with significant potential in gerontological research. With advancing age, zebrafish frequently develop gross deformities of their vertebral column, previously ascribed to reduced trunk muscle tone. In this study, we assess degenerative changes specifically within the bone and cartilage of the vertebral column of zebrafish at 1, 2 and 3-years of age. We show increased frequency and severity of spinal deformities/curvatures with age. Underlying the most severe phenotypes are partial or complete vertebral dislocations and focal thickening of the vertebral bone at the joint margins. MicroCT examination demonstrates small defects, fractures and morphological evidence suggestive of bone erosion and remodeling (i.e. osteophytes) within the vertebrae during aging, but no significant change in bone density. Light and electron microscopic examination reveal striking age-related changes in cell morphology, suggestive of chondroptosis, and tissue remodelling of the vertebral cartilage, particularly within the pericellular micro-environment. Glycosaminoglycan analysis of the vertebral column by HPLC demonstrates a consistent, age-related increase in the yield of total chondroitin sulfate disaccharide, but no change in sulfation pattern, supported by immunohistochemical analysis. Immunohistochemistry strongly identifies all three chondroitin/dermatan sulphate isoforms (C-0-S, C-4-S/DS and C-6-S) within the vertebral cartilage, particularly within the pericellular micro-environment. In contrast, keratan sulfate immunolocalises specifically with the notochordal tissue of the intervertebral disc, and its

  15. Comparison between Radiological and Clinical Outcomes of Laminoplasties with Titanium Miniplates for Cervical Myelopathy

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jong-Hwa; Lee, Ho-Jin; Shin, Byung-Kon

    2016-01-01

    Background Laminoplasty is a surgical procedure frequently performed for cervical myelopathy. We investigated correlations between changes in the anteroposterior diameter (APD) of the spinal canal, spinal canal area (SCA), and laminar angle (LA) and clinical outcomes of laminoplasty. Methods Of the 204 cervical myelopathy patients who underwent laminoplasty from July 2010 to May 2015, 49 patients who were evaluated with pre- and postoperative computed tomography of the cervical vertebrae were included. The average age of the patients was 60.4 years (range, 31 to 82 years), and the average duration of follow-up was 31.6 months (range, 9 to 68 months). Changes in the APD and SCA were measured at the middle of the vertebral body. Changes in LA were measured where both pedicles were clearly visible. Clinical outcomes were assessed using the Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) score and visual analog scale score for pain preoperatively (1 day before surgery) and postoperatively (last outpatient visit) and examining postoperative complications. Results The APD showed an average of 54.7% increase from 11.5 to 17.8 mm. The SCA showed an average of 57.7% increase from 225.9 to 356.3 mm2. The LA increased from 34.2° preoperatively to 71.9° postoperatively. The JOA score increased from an average of 9.1 preoperatively to 13.4 postoperatively. Three patients were found to have hinge fractures during surgery. Postoperative complications, including two cases of C5 palsy, were recorded. The correlation coefficient between the LA change and JOA score improvement was −0.449 (p < 0.05). Patients with a < 33° (25%) increase in the LA showed the most significant clinical improvement. Conclusions Patients with a < 33° (25%) change in the LA after laminoplasty with a titanium miniplate showed the most significant clinical improvement. Thus, LA changes can be useful in predicting the clinical outcome of laminoplasty. PMID:27904722

  16. Vertebral stress of a cervical spine model under dynamic load.

    PubMed

    Sadegh, A M; Tchako, A

    2000-01-01

    The objective of this study is to develop cervical spine models that predict the stresses in each vertebra by taking account of the biodynamic characteristics of the neck. The loads and the moments at the head point (Occipital Condyle) used for the models were determined by the rigid body dynamic response of the head due to G-z acceleration. The experimental data used were collected from the biodynamic responses of human volunteers during an acceleration in the z direction on the drop tower facility at Armstrong Laboratory at Wright Patterson Air Force Base (WPAFB). Three finite element models were developed: an elastic local model, viscoelastic local model and complete viscoelastic model. I-DEAS software was used to create the solid models, the loadings and the boundary conditions. Then, ABAQUS finite element software was employed to solve the models, and thus the stresses on each vertebral level were determined. Beam elements with different properties were employed to simulate the ligaments, articular facets and muscles. The complete viscoelastic model was subjected to 11 cases of loadings ranging from 8 G-z to 20 G-z accelerations. The von Mises and Maximum Principal stress fields, which are good indicators of bone failure, were calculated for all the cases. The results indicated that the maximum stress in all cases increased as the magnitude of the acceleration increased. The stresses in the 10 to 12 G-z cases were comfortably below the injury threshold level. The majority of the maximum stresses occurred in C6 and C4 regions.

  17. Cervical compensatory alignment changes following correction of adult thoracic deformity: a multicenter experience in 57 patients with a 2-year follow-up.

    PubMed

    Oh, Taemin; Scheer, Justin K; Eastlack, Robert; Smith, Justin S; Lafage, Virginie; Protopsaltis, Themistocles S; Klineberg, Eric; Passias, Peter G; Deviren, Vedat; Hostin, Richard; Gupta, Munish; Bess, Shay; Schwab, Frank; Shaffrey, Christopher I; Ames, Christopher P

    2015-06-01

    OBJECT Alignment changes in the cervical spine that occur following surgical correction for thoracic deformity remain poorly understood. The purpose of this study was to evaluate such changes in a cohort of adults with thoracic deformity treated surgically. METHODS The authors conducted a multicenter retrospective analysis of consecutive patients with thoracic deformity. Inclusion criteria for this study were as follows: corrective osteotomy for thoracic deformity, upper-most instrumented vertebra (UIV) between T-1 and T-4, lower-most instrumented vertebra (LIV) at or above L-5 (LIV ≥ L-5) or at the ilium (LIV-ilium), and a minimum radiographic follow-up of 2 years. Sagittal radiographic parameters were assessed preoperatively as well as at 3 months and 2 years postoperatively, including the C-7 sagittal vertical axis (SVA), C2-7 cervical lordosis (CL), C2-7 SVA, T-1 slope (T1S), T1S minus CL (T1S-CL), T2-12 thoracic kyphosis (TK), apical TK, lumbar lordosis (LL), pelvic incidence (PI), PI-LL, pelvic tilt (PT), and sacral slope (SS). RESULTS Fifty-seven patients with a mean age of 49.1 ± 14.6 years met the study inclusion criteria. The preoperative prevalence of increased CL (CL > 15°) was 48.9%. Both 3-month and 2-year apical TK improved from baseline (p < 0.05, statistically significant). At the 2-year follow-up, only the C2-7 SVA increased significantly from baseline (p = 0.01), whereas LL decreased from baseline (p < 0.01). The prevalence of increased CL was 35.3% at 3 months and 47.8% at 2 years, which did not represent a significant change. Postoperative cervical alignment changes were not significantly different from preoperative values regardless of the LIV (LIV ≥ L-5 or LIV-ilium, p > 0.05 for both). In a subset of patients with a maximum TK ≥ 60° (35 patients) and 3-column osteotomy (38 patients), no significant postoperative cervical changes were seen. CONCLUSION Increased CL is common in adult spinal deformity patients with thoracic deformities

  18. Is cervical disc arthroplasty good for congenital cervical stenosis?

    PubMed

    Chang, Peng-Yuan; Chang, Hsuan-Kan; Wu, Jau-Ching; Huang, Wen-Cheng; Fay, Li-Yu; Tu, Tsung-Hsi; Wu, Ching-Lan; Cheng, Henrich

    2017-03-10

    OBJECTIVE Cervical disc arthroplasty (CDA) has been demonstrated to be as safe and effective as anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) in the management of 1- and 2-level degenerative disc disease (DDD). However, there has been a lack of data to address the fundamental discrepancy between the two surgeries (CDA vs ACDF), and preservation versus elimination of motion, in the management of cervical myelopathy associated with congenital cervical stenosis (CCS). Although younger patients tend to benefit more from motion preservation, it is uncertain if CCS caused by multilevel DDD can be treated safely with CDA. METHODS Consecutive patients who underwent 3-level anterior cervical discectomy were retrospectively reviewed. Inclusion criteria were age less than 50 years, CCS (Pavlov ratio ≤ 0.82), symptomatic myelopathy correlated with DDD, and stenosis limited to 3 levels of the subaxial cervical (C3-7) spine. Exclusion criteria were ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament, previous posterior decompression surgery (e.g., laminoplasty or laminectomy), osteoporosis, previous trauma, or other rheumatic diseases that might have caused the cervical myelopathy. All these patients who underwent 3-level discectomy were divided into 2 groups according to the strategies of management: preservation or elimination of motion (the hybrid-CDA group and the ACDF group). The hybrid-CDA group underwent 2-level CDA plus 1-level ACDF, whereas the ACDF group underwent 3-level ACDF. Clinical assessment was measured by the visual analog scales (VAS) for neck and arm pain, Japanese Orthopaedic Association (JOA) scores, and Nurick grades. Radiographic outcomes were measured using dynamic radiographs for evaluation of range of motion (ROM). RESULTS Thirty-seven patients, with a mean (± SD) age of 44.57 ± 5.10 years, were included in the final analysis. There was a male predominance in this series (78.4%, 29 male patients), and the mean follow-up duration was 2.37 ± 1

  19. [Injury of upper cervical spine].

    PubMed

    Ryba, Luděk; Cienciala, Jan; Chaloupka, Richard; Repko, Martin; Vyskočil, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Injuries of the upper cervical spine represent 1/3 of all cervical spine injuries and approximately 40 % result by the death. Every level of the cervical spine can be injured - fractures of condyles of the occipital bone (CO), atlantooccipital dislocation (AOD), fractures of the Atlas (C1), atlantoaxial dislocation (AAD) and fractures of the axis (C2). Most of cases in younger patients are caused by high-energy trauma, while by elderly people, because of the osteoporosis, is needed much less energy and even simple falls can cause the injury of the cervical spine. That´s why the etiology of injuries can be different. In younger patients are caused mainly by car accidents, motorcycle and bicycle accidents and pedestrian crashes by car and in elderly populations are the main reason falls. The mechanism of the injury is axial force, hyperflexion, hyperextension, latero-flexion, rotation and combination of all. The basic diagnostic examination is X ray in AP, lateral and transoral projection. But in the most of cases is CT examination necessary and in the suspicion of the ligamentous injury and neurological deterioration must be MRI examination added. Every injury of the upper cervical spine has its own classification. Clinical symptoms can vary from the neck pain, restricted range of motion, antalgic position of the head, injury of the cranial nerves and different neurologic symptoms from the irritation of nerves to quadriplegia. A large percentage of deaths is at the time of the injury. Therapy is divided to conservative treatment, which is indicated in bone injuries with minimal dislocation. In more severe cases, with the dislocation and ligamentous injury, when is high chance of the instability, is indicated the surgical treatment. We can use anterior or posterior approach, make the osteosynthesis, stabilisation and fusion of the spine. Complex fractures and combination of different types of injuries are often present in this part of the spine. Correct and early

  20. Cervical disc arthroplasty: Pros and cons

    PubMed Central

    Moatz, Bradley; Tortolani, P. Justin

    2012-01-01

    Background: Cervical disc arthroplasty has emerged as a promising potential alternative to anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) in appropriately selected patients. Despite a history of excellent outcomes after ACDF, the question as to whether a fusion leads to adjacent segment degeneration remains unanswered. Numerous US investigational device exemption trials comparing cervical arthroplasty to fusion have been conducted to answer this question. Methods: This study reviews the current research regarding cervical athroplasty, and emphasizes both the pros and cons of arthroplasty as compared with ACDF. Results: Early clinical outcomes show that cervical arthroplasty is as effective as the standard ACDF. However, this new technology is also associated with an expanding list of novel complications. Conclusion: Although there is no definitive evidence that cervical disc replacement reduces the incidence of adjacent segment degeneration, it does show other advantages; for example, faster return to work, and reduced need for postoperative bracing. PMID:22905327

  1. Metric and morphological study of the upper cervical spine from the Sima de los Huesos site (Sierra de Atapuerca, Burgos, Spain).

    PubMed

    Gómez-Olivencia, Asier; Carretero, José Miguel; Arsuaga, Juan Luis; Rodríguez-García, Laura; García-González, Rebeca; Martínez, Ignacio

    2007-07-01

    In this article, the upper cervical spine remains recovered from the Sima de los Huesos (SH) middle Pleistocene site in the Sierra de Atapuerca (Burgos, Spain) are described and analyzed. To date, this site has yielded more than 5000 human fossils belonging to a minimum of 28 individuals of the species Homo heidelbergensis. At least eleven individuals are represented by the upper cervical (C1 and C2) specimens: six adults and five subadults, one of which could represent an adolescent individual. The most complete adult vertebrae (three atlases and three axes) are described, measured, and compared with other fossil hominins and modern humans. These six specimens are associated with one another and represent three individuals. In addition, one of these sets of cervical vertebrae is associated with Cranium 5 (Individual XXI) from the site. The metric analysis demonstrates that the Sima de los Huesos atlases and axes are metrically more similar to Neandertals than to our modern human comparative sample. The SH atlases share with Neandertals a sagittally elongated canal. The most remarkable feature of the SH (and Neandertal) axes is that they are craniocaudally low and mediolaterally wide compared to our modern male sample. Morphologically, the SH sample shares with Neandertals a higher frequency of caudally projected anterior atlas arch, which could reflect greater development of the longus colli muscle. In other features, such as the frequency of weakly developed tubercles for the attachment of the transverse ligament of the atlas, the Sima de los Huesos fossils show intermediate frequencies between our modern comparative samples and the Neandertals, which could represent the primitive condition. Our results are consistent with the previous phylogenetic interpretation of H. heidelbergensis as an exclusively European species, ancestral only to H. neanderthalensis.

  2. Quality of systematic reviews: an example of studies comparing artificial disc replacement with fusion in the cervical spine.

    PubMed

    Tashani, Osama A; El-Tumi, Hanan; Aneiba, Khaled

    2015-01-01

    Cervical artificial disc replacement (C-ADR) is now an alternative to anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF). Many studies have evaluated the efficacy of C-ADR compared with ACDF. This led to a series of systematic reviews and meta-analyses to evaluate the evidence of the superiority of one intervention against the other. The aim of the study presented here was to evaluate the quality of these reviews and meta-analyses. Medline via Ovid, Embase, and Cochrane Library were searched using the keywords: (total disk replacement, prosthesis, implantation, discectomy, and arthroplasty) AND (cervical vertebrae, cervical spine, and spine) AND (systematic reviews, reviews, and meta-analysis). Screening and data extraction were conducted by two reviewers independently. Two reviewers then assessed the quality of the selected reviews and meta-analysis using 11-item AMSTAR score which is a validated measurement tool to assess the methodological quality of systematic reviews. Screening of full reports of 46 relevant abstracts resulted in the selection of 15 systematic reviews and/or meta-analyses as eligible for this study. The two reviewers' inter-rater agreement level was high as indicated by kappa of >0.72. The AMSTAR score of the reviews ranged from 3 to 11. Only one study (a Cochrane review) scored 100% (AMSTAR 11). Five studies scored below (AMSTAR 5) indicating low-quality reviews. The most significant drawbacks of reviews of a score below 5 were not using an extensive search strategy, failure to use the scientific quality of the included studies appropriately in formulating a conclusion, not assessing publication bias, and not reporting the excluded studies. With a significant exception of a Cochrane review, the methodological quality of systematic reviews evaluating the evidence of C-ADR versus ACDF has to be improved.

  3. Cervical vertebral fusion with anterior meningocele

    PubMed Central

    Chavredakis, Emmanuel; Carter, David; Bhojak, Manesh; Jenkinson, Michael D; Clark, Simon R

    2015-01-01

    We present the first described case of cervical vertebral fusion associated with anterior meningocele and syringomyelia. A 45-year-old woman presented with minor trauma, and plain cervical spine radiographs highlighted a congenital deformity of the cervical vertebral bodies. She had a normal neurological examination; however, further imaging revealed a meningocele and syringomyelia. This case highlights the importance of thorough imaging investigation when presented with a congenital deformity in order to detect and prevent development of degenerative spinal cord pathologies. PMID:25923673

  4. Internet-Based Cervical Cytology Screening Program

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-04-01

    Appendices……………………………………………………………………………14 Introduction Cervical cancer is theoretically completely preventable by effective...approaches to cervical cancer screening possible. In addition, advances in information technology have facilitated the Internet transmission and archival...to allow secure, automated reporting of cervical cancer screening results - completed f) Adapt commercial software (Wellogic) to integrate

  5. Internet-Based Cervical Cancer Screening Program

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-05-01

    AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH-04-C-0083 TITLE: Internet-Based Cervical Cancer Screening...DEC 2007 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Internet-Based Cervical Cancer Screening Program 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-04-C-0083 5c...care information systems, cervical cancer 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT 18. NUMBER OF PAGES 19a. NAME OF

  6. Phenotypic integration among trabecular and cortical bone traits establishes mechanical functionality of inbred mouse vertebrae.

    PubMed

    Tommasini, Steven M; Hu, Bin; Nadeau, Joseph H; Jepsen, Karl J

    2009-04-01

    Conventional approaches to identifying quantitative trait loci (QTLs) regulating bone mass and fragility are limited because they examine cortical and trabecular traits independently. Prior work examining long bones from young adult mice and humans indicated that skeletal traits are functionally related and that compensatory interactions among morphological and compositional traits are critical for establishing mechanical function. However, it is not known whether trait covariation (i.e., phenotypic integration) also is important for establishing mechanical function in more complex, corticocancellous structures. Covariation among trabecular, cortical, and compositional bone traits was examined in the context of mechanical functionality for L(4) vertebral bodies across a panel of 16-wk-old female AXB/BXA recombinant inbred (RI) mouse strains. The unique pattern of randomization of the A/J and C57BL/6J (B6) genome among the RI panel provides a powerful tool that can be used to measure the tendency for different traits to covary and to study the biology of complex traits. We tested the hypothesis that genetic variants affecting vertebral size and mass are buffered by changes in the relative amounts of cortical and trabecular bone and overall mineralization. Despite inheriting random sets of A/J and B6 genomes, the RI strains inherited nonrandom sets of cortical and trabecular bone traits. Path analysis, which is a multivariate analysis that shows how multiple traits covary simultaneously when confounding variables like body size are taken into consideration, showed that RI strains that tended to have smaller vertebrae relative to body size achieved mechanical functionality by increasing mineralization and the relative amounts of cortical and trabecular bone. The interdependence among corticocancellous traits in the vertebral body indicated that variation in trabecular bone traits among inbred mouse strains, which is often thought to arise from genetic factors, is also

  7. The concentration of forming and resorption markers in menopausal period women with osteoartrosis changes at spinal vertebrae.

    PubMed

    Stanosz, Małgorzata; Myśliwiec, Leszek; Stanosz, Stanisław

    2006-12-29

    Introduction Osteoartrosis is a genetically determined disease, which develops on multisystem diseases, spreads on joint cartilage, overcartilage bone and soft structure of the joint. The aim of the work is to evaluate the relationship between mineral density of spinal vertebrae and the concentration of basic progesterone and progesterone after a test with metoklopramid.. Material and methods. The research was based on 50 women, aged 50,7+/-4,4 , in an early physiological postmenopausal period, divided into two groups, the control and the exam group, depending on mineral density of spinal vertebrae. The concentration of estradiol, estron, prolaktyn, prolaxtic/MCP, osteocalcyn, prokolagen, alkali bone fhosphatase, total calcium and ionic calcium in serum and pirydynolin, dezoksypirydynolin and total calcium in urine were tested. Statistic analysis was made by means of statistic packet Statistica Pl version 5 of StatSoft company. Results. In women with osteoartrosis, the concentration of estradiol, alkali bone fhosphatase, pirydynolin and dezoksypirydynolin significantly decreased, the concentration of basic prolaktyn and prolactin after a test with metoklopramid significantly increased, and the concentration of estron, prokolagen, osteocalcyn, total calcium and ionic calcium in urine and serum insignificantly decreased. Conclusion 1.The decrease of bone metabolism markers in women with osteoartrosis may contribute to handicap of osteoblasts and osteoklasts function. 2. Dopaminergic treatment should be used in women with osteoatrisis syndrome who have frequent hyperprolactynic problems 3. Lack of correlation between the mineral density of spinal vertebrae and the concentration of pirydynolin and dezoksypirydynolin in women with osteoartrosis suggest that resorption disease is not the main pathogenic factor of osteoartrosis diseases.

  8. MR and CT image fusion of the cervical spine: a noninvasive alternative to CT-myelography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Yangqiu; Mirza, Sohail K.; Jarvik, Jeffrey G.; Heagerty, Patrick J.; Haynor, David R.

    2005-04-01

    CT-Myelography (CTM) is routinely used for planning surgery for degenerative disease of the spine, but its invasive nature, significant potential morbidity, and high costs make a noninvasive substitute desirable. We report our work on evaluating CT and MR image fusion as an alternative to CTM. Because the spine is only piecewise rigid, a multi-rigid approach to the registration of spinal CT and MR images was developed (SPIE 2004), in which the spine on CT images is first segmented into separate vertebrae, each of which is then rigidly registered with the corresponding vertebra on MR images. The results are then blended to obtain fusion images. Since they contain information from both modalities, we hypothesized that fusion images would be equivalent to CTM. To test this we selected 34 patients who had undergone MRI and CTM for degenerative disease of the cervical spine, and used the multi-rigid approach to produce fused images. A clinical vignette for each patient was created and presented along with either CT/MR fusion images or CTM images. A group of spine surgeons are asked to formulate detailed surgical plans based on each set of images, and the surgical plans are compared. A similar study assessing diagnostic agreement is being performed with neuroradiologists, who also assess the accuracy of registration. Our work to date has demonstrated the feasibility of segmentation and multi-rigid fusion in clinical cases and the acceptability of the questionnaire to physicians. Preliminary analysis of one surgeon's and one neuroradiologist"s evaluation has been performed.

  9. Early Versus Late Tracheostomy for Patients with High and Low Cervical Spinal Cord Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Guirgis, Akram H.; Menon, Venugopal K.; Suri, Neelam; Chatterjee, Nilay; Attallah, Emil; Saad, Maged Y.; Elshaer, Shereen

    2016-01-01

    Objectives This study aimed to evaluate the effects of early versus late tracheostomies among patients with cervical spinal cord injuries (CSCIs). Methods This retrospective study included 69 adult CSCI patients who underwent bedside percutaneous tracheostomies at the Intensive Care Unit of Khoula Hospital, Muscat, Oman, between January 2011 and October 2015. The tracheostomy was considered early if the procedure took place within one week of the CSCI. The impact of an early tracheostomy on patient outcomes was analysed in terms of duration of mechanical ventilation and intensive care unit (ICU) stay among patients with high (C1–C2 vertebrae) and low (C3–C7 vertebrae) CSCIs. Ventilator dependence, bradycardia episodes and surgical intervention outcomes were also examined. Results Patients with a high CSCI who underwent an early tracheostomy spent significantly fewer days on mechanical ventilation compared to those who underwent a late tracheostomy (9.3 ± 7.2 days versus 13.7 ± 3.2 days; P = 0.041). Low CSCI patients who received an early tracheostomy also experienced significantly fewer days on mechanical ventilation compared to those undergoing a late tracheostomy (12.1 ± 10.4 days versus 25.2 ± 17.7 days; P = 0.035). Moreover, ICU mortality was significantly lower for high CSCI patients who underwent an early tracheostomy (P = 0.015). However, there was no association between length of ICU stay and either type of CSCI or timing of the tracheostomy procedure. Conclusion An early tracheostomy is beneficial in reducing the duration of mechanical ventilation among patients with CSCIs, irrespective of the level of injury. PMID:28003892

  10. Working capacity and cervical dystonia.

    PubMed

    Martikainen, Kirsti K; Luukkaala, Tiina H; Marttila, Reijo J

    2010-03-01

    The objective of this questionnaire study was to assess the effect of cervical dystonia on patients' working capacity. Of the 303 working-aged members of the Finnish Dystonia Association (N = 433) who participated in the study 247 (82%) had cervical dystonia. Their median age was 50 years, the median duration of CD symptoms was 12.3 years. Most (78%) subjects were on botulinum toxin treatment. Ninety-seven (39%) had retired because of CD at a median age of 48 years; 96 (39%) of the subjects were working: 87 full-time and 9 part-time. The remaining participants were on sick leave, unemployed, studying or retired of other reasons. Retirement occurred more than ten years earlier compared with the general Finnish population. All possibilities to help CD patients to continue longer in work should be considered early.

  11. [Inequalities in cervical screening practices].

    PubMed

    Döbrőssy, Lajos; Kovács, Attila; Budai, András

    2015-06-14

    Theoretically, the cytology-based cervical screening is capable of early detection of precancerous epithelial lesions of cervix uteri and its cancer, and of early referral to treatment. In this way, screening can inmprove the quality of life of the patients and reduce mortality from the target disease. Unfortunately, this often remains unexploited, because there might be inequalities on both "supply" and "demand" side of screening. In addition to the geopolitical situation of a country, inequalities might result from differences in the health care systems, and heavy access to the screening services. On the other hand, the socioeconomic status, the health-conciousness of the target population, and their knowledge and information of the benefits and potential harms of screening examination might have a bearing on the acceptance or refusal of the offered screening. Efforts need to be made to increase the uptake of cervical screening programmes.

  12. Schwannomatosis of Cervical Vagus Nerve

    PubMed Central

    Sasi, M. P.

    2016-01-01

    Cervical vagal schwannoma is a rare entity among lesions presenting as a neck mass. They are usually slow-growing benign lesions closely associated with the vagus nerve. They are usually solitary and asymptomatic. Multiple schwannomas occurring in patients without neurofibromatosis (NF) are rare and have recently been referred to as schwannomatosis. Here, we present a case of a neck mass that had imaging features suggestive of vagal schwannoma and was operated upon. Intraoperatively, it was discovered to be a case of multiple vagal cervical schwannoma, all directly related to the right vagus nerve, and could be resected from the nerve in toto preserving the function of the vagus nerve. Final HPR confirmed our pre-op suspicion of vagal schwannomatosis. PMID:27807496

  13. Studying the Physical Function and Quality of Life Before and After Surgery in Patients With Stage I Cervical Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-26

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma, Not Otherwise Specified; Lymphedema; Sexual Dysfunction and Infertility; Stage IA1 Cervical Cancer; Stage IA2 Cervical Cancer; Stage IB1 Cervical Cancer

  14. Cervical angina caused by atlantoaxial instability.

    PubMed

    Ito, Yoshiyuki; Tanaka, Nobuhiro; Fujimoto, Yoshinori; Yasunaga, Yuji; Ishida, Osamu; Ochi, Mitsuo

    2004-10-01

    Cervical angina is defined as a paroxysmal precordialgia that resembles true cardiac angina caused by cervical spondylosis. Cervical angina most commonly results from compression of the C7 ventral root. We present here a case of cervical angina caused by atlantoaxial instability. This case had marked atlantoaxial instability but no flexibility of the middle to lower levels of the cervical spine. Although there was mild C7 root compression on the radiologic findings, the chest pain was induced by neck motion, and the precordialgia disappeared after posterior atlantoaxial fusion without C7 root decompression. Therefore, we diagnosed this case as cervical angina caused by spinal cord compression at the C1-C2 level. It was speculated that a perturbation of the sympathetic nervous system or a hypofunction of the pain suppression pathway in the posterior horn of the spinal cord caused the pectoralgia. Although cervical angina is a rare disease, physicians should be aware of it; if there are no abnormal findings on cardiac examinations for angina pectoris, they should examine the cervical spine. Cervical angina due to atlantoaxial instability is one of the differential diagnoses of precordialgia.

  15. Nanotechnology in the management of cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jiezhong; Gu, Wenyi; Yang, Lei; Chen, Chen; Shao, Renfu; Xu, Kewei; Xu, Zhi Ping

    2015-03-01

    Cervical cancer is a major disease with high mortality. All cervical cancers are caused by infection with human papillomaviruses (HPV). Although preventive vaccines for cervical cancer are successful, treatment of cervical cancer is far less satisfactory because of multidrug resistance and side effects. In this review, we summarize the recent application of nanotechnology to the diagnosis and treatment of cervical cancer as well as the development of HPV vaccines. Early detection of cervical cancer enables tumours to be efficiently removed by surgical procedures, leading to increased survival rate. The current method of detecting cervical cancer by Pap smear can only achieve 50% sensitivity, whereas nanotechnology has been used to detect HPVs with greatly improved sensitivity. In cervical cancer treatment, nanotechnology has been used for the delivery of anticancer drugs to increase treatment efficacy and decrease side effects. Nanodelivery of HPV preventive and therapeutic vaccines has also been investigated to increase vaccine efficacy. Overall, these developments suggest that nanoparticle-based vaccine may become the most effective way to prevent and treat cervical cancer, assisted or combined with some other nanotechnology-based therapy.

  16. Human papilloma virus and cervical preinvasive disease

    PubMed Central

    Bari, M; Iancu, G; Popa, F

    2009-01-01

    Cervical cancer lesions represent a major threat to the health of the women worldwide. Human Papillomavirus (HPV) is responsible for 99.7% of cervical cancer cases, the infectious etiology giving the possibility of preventing cervical cancer by vaccination. The most aggressive HPV types are 16 and 18, which cause about 70% of cases of invasive cancer. The vaccination is recommended to the girls aged 11–12. The diagnosis and the treatment of cervical preinvasive disease allow the doctor to prevent the development of the invasive disease. PMID:20108750

  17. Surgery for cervical intraepithelial neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Martin-Hirsch, Pierre PL; Paraskevaidis, Evangelos; Bryant, Andrew; Dickinson, Heather O; Keep, Sarah L

    2014-01-01

    Background Cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) is the most common pre-malignant lesion. Atypical squamous changes occur in the transformation zone of the cervix with mild, moderate or severe changes described by their depth (CIN 1, 2 or 3). Cervical intraepithelial neoplasia is treated by local ablation or lower morbidity excision techniques. Choice of treatment depends on the grade and extent of the disease. Objectives To assess the effectiveness and safety of alternative surgical treatments for CIN. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Gynaecological Cancer Group Trials Register, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) (The Cochrane Library), MEDLINE and EMBASE (up to April 2009). We also searched registers of clinical trials, abstracts of scientific meetings and reference lists of included studies. Selection criteria Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of alternative surgical treatments in women with cervical intraepithelial neoplasia. Data collection and analysis Two review authors independently abstracted data and assessed risks of bias. Risk ratios that compared residual disease after the follow-up examination and adverse events in women who received one of either laser ablation, laser conisation, large loop excision of the transformation zone (LLETZ), knife conisation or cryotherapy were pooled in random-effects model meta-analyses. Main results Twenty-nine trials were included. Seven surgical techniques were tested in various comparisons. No significant differences in treatment failures were demonstrated in terms of persistent disease after treatment. Large loop excision of the transformation zone appeared to provide the most reliable specimens for histology with the least morbidity. Morbidity was lower than with laser conisation, although the trials did not provide data for every outcome measure. There were not enough data to assess the effect on morbidity when compared with laser ablation. Authors’ conclusions The evidence

  18. Survival from Cervical Necrotizing Fasciitis

    PubMed Central

    Gausepohl, Jeniffer S.; Wagner, Jonathan G.

    2015-01-01

    Cervical necrotizing fasciitis (CNF) is an uncommon, yet clinically significant infection that rapidly progresses to involve the deep neck spaces. Early recognition and aggressive surgical intervention and debridement are important, as this disease is associated with a high morbidity and mortality. In this report, we present a case of CNF and descending mediastinitis from a non-odontogenic source in a patient presenting with neck swelling and odynophagia. PMID:25671035

  19. Effect of specimen-specific anisotropic material properties in quantitative computed tomography-based finite element analysis of the vertebra.

    PubMed

    Unnikrishnan, Ginu U; Barest, Glenn D; Berry, David B; Hussein, Amira I; Morgan, Elise F

    2013-10-01

    Intra- and inter-specimen variations in trabecular anisotropy are often ignored in quantitative computed tomography (QCT)-based finite element (FE) models of the vertebra. The material properties are typically estimated solely from local variations in bone mineral density (BMD), and a fixed representation of elastic anisotropy ("generic anisotropy") is assumed. This study evaluated the effect of incorporating specimen-specific, trabecular anisotropy on QCT-based FE predictions of vertebral stiffness and deformation patterns. Orthotropic material properties estimated from microcomputed tomography data ("specimen-specific anisotropy"), were assigned to a large, columnar region of the L1 centrum (n = 12), and generic-anisotropic material properties were assigned to the remainder of the vertebral body. Results were compared to FE analyses in which generic-anisotropic properties were used throughout. FE analyses were also performed on only the columnar regions. For the columnar regions, the axial stiffnesses obtained from the two categories of material properties were uncorrelated with each other (p = 0.604), and the distributions of minimum principal strain were distinctly different (p ≤ 0.022). In contrast, for the whole vertebral bodies in both axial and flexural loading, the stiffnesses obtained using the two categories of material properties were highly correlated (R2 > 0.82, p < 0.001) with, and were no different (p > 0.359) from, each other. Only moderate variations in strain distributions were observed between the two categories of material properties. The contrasting results for the columns versus vertebrae indicate a large contribution of the peripheral regions of the vertebral body to the mechanical behavior of this bone. In companion analyses on the effect of the degree of anisotropy (DA), the axial stiffnesses of the trabecular column (p < 0.001) and vertebra (p = 0.007) increased with increasing DA. These findings

  20. Cervical accelerometry in preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Eric W; Vice, Frank L; Bosma, James F; Gewolb, Ira H

    2002-09-01

    The objective of this study was to develop a method to use digital signal processing (DSP) technology to describe quantitatively and statistically swallow-associated sounds in preterm infants and to use this method to analyze changes as infants mature. Twelve recordings of accelerometric and physiological data on bottle-feeding preterm infants between 32 and 39 weeks' postmenstrual age (PMA) were analyzed. Cervical auscultation was performed using an accelerometer attached over the larynx. Acoustic data were recorded and graphically displayed using DSP software. Initial discrete sounds (IDSs) were identified and used to construct an average waveform from which a 'variance index' (VI) was calculated for each infant. The shape of the IDS waveforms became progressively more uniform with advancing PMA, as indicated by a significant inverse correlation between VI and PMA (r=0.739; p=0.006). DSP technology facilitated the development of a new method to quantitatively analyze feeding in preterm infants. This method provides an elegant tool to track maturation of infant feeding and assessing feeding readiness. This technique makes the interpretation of cervical auscultation data less subjective by replacing the verbal description of the sounds of feeding with quantitative numeric values. It is anticipated that this method can be automated to facilitate further the analysis of cervical accelerometry data.

  1. [Cervical cancer prevention: an update].

    PubMed

    Irico, G; Escobar, H; Marinelli, B

    2005-01-01

    It has been seen an increase of the cervical cancer and of intraepithelial cancer in the last years. The most important risk factors for cervical cancer are sexual conduct, early of sexual relationships, number of partners, cigarettes, oral anticonceptive, pregnancy, immunosuppression, sexually transmitted illness. And an important role of the Human Papilloma Virus. The HPV has been classified in 3 groups; low risk, the most frequents are 11 and 6, middle risk, tipe 31, 33 and 35, and high risk, 16 and 18, that have frequent association with cervical cancer and with high grade intraepithelial lesions. The cervicovaginal citology is still the most accurate diagnosis method to detect SIL or CIN and invasive cancer in early stages, it is discussed the periodicity and group of women to whom the method must point. There are different options depending if it is a SIL of low or high grade or and cancer. With the possibility of doing follow up or treatment, such as. LLETZ, Laser, Criotraphy, cone and interferon for the preneoplastic lesions. The achievement of a vaccine for HPV could have a significant impact on these pathology.

  2. Amyotrophic cervical myelopathy in adolescence.

    PubMed Central

    Toma, S; Shiozawa, Z

    1995-01-01

    The clinical and radiological features in seven patients who had asymmetric muscular atrophy of the hand and forearm when young are reported and a new hypothesis for its aetiology is proposed. Investigation of body growth curves (a surrogate for velocity of arm growth) showed close relation between (a) the age when the body height increased most rapidly and the onset age of this disorder, and (b) the age when the rapid body growth period ended and the age when symptom progression ceased. Cervical radiological evidence is provided showing asymmetric anterior cord atrophy, disappearance of slackness of dorsal roots in neck extension, and anterior and lateral displacement of the lower cervical cord against the posterior aspects of the vertebral bodies during neck flexion. These results suggest that disproportionate shortening of the dorsal roots is further accentuated during the juvenile growth spurt, which determines the onset and self limited course of the condition, and that repeated neck flexion causes micro-trauma and relative ischaemia of anterior horn cells, which finally results in atrophy of the muscles innervated by motoneurons with long axons. Predisposing anatomical factors are a straight neck due to lack of physiological cervical lordosis and the presence of foreshortened dorsal roots. Images PMID:7823068

  3. Loading simulation of lumbar spine vertebrae during a compression test using the finite elements method and trabecular bone strength properties, determined by means of nanoindentations.

    PubMed

    Bouzakis, K D; Mitsi, S; Michailidis, N; Mirisidis, I; Mesomeris, G; Maliaris, G; Korlos, A; Kapetanos, G; Antonarakos, P; Anagnostidis, K

    2004-06-01

    The mechanical strength properties of lumbar spine vertebrae are of great importance in a wide range of applications. Herein, through nanoindentations and appropriate evaluation of the corresponding results, trabecular bone struts stress-strain characteristics can be determined. In the frame of the present paper, an L2 fresh cadaveric vertebra, from which posterior elements were removed, was subjected to compression. With the aid of developed finite elements method based algorithms, the cortical shell and the cancellous core bulk elasticity moduli and stresses were determined, whereas the tested vertebra geometrical model used in these algorithms was considered as having a compound structure, consisting of the cancellous bone surrounded by the cortical shell. Moreover nanoindentations were conducted and an appropriate evaluation method of the obtained results was applied to extract stress-strain curves of individual lumbar spine vertebra trabecular bone struts. These data were used in the mathematical description of the vertebrae compression test. The vertebral cancellous bone structure was simulated by a beam elements network, possessing an equivalent porosity and different stiffnesses in vertical and horizontal direction. Thus, the measured course of the compression load versus the occurring specimen deformation was verified.

  4. Anterior cervical discectomy with arthroplasty versus anterior cervical discectomy and fusion for cervical spondylosis.

    PubMed

    Li, Gao-Ling; Hu, Jian-Zhong; Lu, Hong-Bin; Qu, Jin; Guo, Li-Yun; Zai, Feng-Lei

    2015-03-01

    This meta-analysis aims to estimate the benefits and drawbacks associated with anterior cervical discectomy with arthroplasty (ACDA) versus anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) for cervical spondylosis. Of 3651 identified citations, 10 randomised controlled studies involving 2380 participants were included. Moderate quality evidence supports that patients in the ACDA group had: (1) a higher Neck Disability Index (NDI) success rate at 3 month (relative risk [RR]=0.85, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.78 to 0.93, p=0.0002) and 2 year follow-up (RR=0.95, 95%CI 0.91 to 1.00, p=0.04); (2) greater neurological success at 2 year follow-up (RR=0.95, 95%CI 0.92 to 0.98); and (3) were more likely to be employed within 6 weeks after surgery (RR=0.80 95%CI 0.66 to 0.96). In summary, the current evidence indicates that ACDA is associated with a higher NDI success rate in the short and long-term as well as a higher neurological success rate. Patients who undergo ACDA may also have a greater likelihood of being employed in the short-term. However, all of the evidence reviewed is of moderate or low quality and the clinical significance often marginal or unclear. Additional data are needed to compare the benefits and limitations of ACDA and ACDF.

  5. Relationship of Specific Bacteria in the Cervical and Vaginal Microbiotas with Cervicitis

    PubMed Central

    Srinivasan, Sujatha; Fiedler, Tina L.; Morgan, Martin T.; Balkus, Jennifer E.; McClelland, R. Scott; Fredricks, David N.; Marrazzo, Jeanne M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Cervicitis is an inflammatory condition of the cervix associated with upper genital tract infection and reproductive complications. Although cervicitis can be caused by several known pathogens, the etiology frequently remains obscure. Here we investigate vaginal bacteria associated with bacterial vaginosis as potential causes of cervicitis. Methods Associations between vaginal bacteria and cervicitis were assessed in a retrospective case control study of women attending a Seattle STD clinic. Individual bacterial species were detected using two molecular methods: quantitative PCR (qPCR) and broad range 16S rRNA gene PCR with pyrosequencing. The primary finding from this initial study was evaluated using qPCR in a second cohort of Kenyan women. Results The presence of Mageeibacillus indolicus, formerly BVAB3, in the cervix was associated with cervicitis, while the presence of Lactobacillus jensenii was inversely associated. Quantities of these bacteria did not differ between cervicitis cases and controls, though in a model inclusive of presence and abundance, M. indolicus remained significantly associated with cervicitis after adjustment for other cervicitis-causing pathogens. M. indolicus was not associated with cervicitis in our study of Kenyan women, possibly due to differences in the clinical definition of cervicitis. Conclusions Colonization of the endocervix with M. indolicus may contribute to the clinical manifestations of cervicitis, but further study is needed to determine whether this finding is repeatable and applicable to diverse groups of women. Colonization of the cervix with L. jensenii could be a marker of health, perhaps reducing inflammation or inhibiting pathogenic infection. PMID:26267872

  6. Impact of Isometric Contraction of Anterior Cervical Muscles on Cervical Lordosis

    PubMed Central

    Fedorchuk, Curtis A; McCoy, Matthew; Lightstone, Douglas F; Bak, David A; Moser, Jacque; Kubricht, Brett; Packer, John; Walton, Dustin; Binongo, Jose

    2016-01-01

    Objective This study investigates the impact of isometric contraction of anterior cervical muscles on cervical lordosis. Methods 29 volunteers were randomly assigned to an anterior head translation (n=15) or anterior head flexion (n=14) group. Resting neutral lateral cervical x-rays were compared to x-rays of sustained isometric contraction of the anterior cervical muscles producing anterior head translation or anterior head flexion. Results Paired sample t-tests indicate no significant difference between pre and post anterior head translation or anterior head flexion. Analysis of variance suggests that gender and peak force were not associated with change in cervical lordosis. Chamberlain’s to atlas plane line angle difference was significantly associated with cervical lordosis difference during anterior head translation (p=0.01). Conclusion This study shows no evidence that hypertonicity, as seen in muscle spasms, of the muscles responsible for anterior head translation and anterior head flexion have a significant impact on cervical lordosis. PMID:27761195

  7. Chemoradiation Therapy and Ipilimumab in Treating Patients With Stages IB2-IIB or IIIB-IVA Cervical Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-08

    Cervical Adenocarcinoma; Cervical Adenosquamous Carcinoma; Cervical Squamous Cell Carcinoma, Not Otherwise Specified; Positive Para-Aortic Lymph Node; Positive Pelvic Lymph Node; Stage IB2 Cervical Cancer; Stage II Cervical Cancer; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage IIIB Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer

  8. Effect of prenatal administration of therapeutic doses of topiramate on ossification of ribs and vertebrae in rat fetuses.

    PubMed

    Fadel, R A; Sequeira, R P; Abu-Hijleh, M F; Obeidat, M; Salem, A H A

    2012-01-01

    There are few studies that have addressed the effects of prenatal exposure of topiramate on ossification of the bones derived from the paraxial mesoderm. This study aimed to evaluate skeletal ossification of ribs and vertebrae in 20-day-old rat fetuses after maternal exposure to two therapeutic doses of topiramate. Three groups of Sprague-Dawley pregnant rats were used: control, topiramate 50 mg/kg/day and topiramate 100 mg/kg/day treated groups. Topiramate was administered by gavage from day 6-19 of gestation. Fetuses were collected on day 20 by caesarean section. Fetal bones were stained with alizarin red and ossification was assessed. Results showed significant delayed ossification of ribs and vertebrae in topiramate-exposed fetuses at both doses and the effects were not dose dependent. In all examined groups, there was a direct correlation between the fetal weight and the number of complete ossified vertebral centers. Also, there were significant increases in skeletal abnormalities, particularly in ribs in both treated groups when compared to the control group. In conclusion, therapeutic doses of topiramate should be taken cautiously during pregnancy as they lead to fetal growth restriction and increases abnormalities of axial skeleton in rat fetuses.

  9. Synchrotron-induced X-ray fluorescence from rat bone and lumber vertebra of different age groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, Donepudi V.; Swapna, Medasani; Cesareo, Roberto; Brunetti, Antonio; Akatsuka, Tako; Yuasa, Tetsuya; Takeda, Tohoru; Tromba, Giuliana; Gigante, Giovanni E.

    2009-02-01

    The fluorescence spectra from rat bones of different age groups (8, 56 and 78 weeks) and lumber vertebra were measured with 8, 10 and 12 keV synchrotron X-rays. We have utilized the new hard X-ray micro-spectroscopy beamline facility, X27A, available at NSLS with a primary beam spot size of the order of ˜10 μm. With this spatial resolution and high flux throughput, X-ray fluorescent intensities for Ca and other trace elements were measured using a liquid-nitrogen-cooled 13-element energy-dispersive high-purity germanium detector. Regarding the lumber vertebra, we acquired the fluorescence spectra from the left, right and middle portions and calcium accumulation was evaluated and compared with the other samples. We have identified the major trace elements of Ca, Ni, Fe and Zn and minor trace elements of Ti, Cr and Mn in the sample. The percentage of scattered radiation and trace element contributions from these samples were highlighted at different energies.

  10. Anatomical differences in patients with lumbosacral transitional vertebrae and implications for minimally invasive spine surgery.

    PubMed

    Josiah, Darnell T; Boo, SoHyun; Tarabishy, Abdul; Bhatia, Sanjay

    2017-02-01

    OBJECTIVE The objective of this study was to investigate the neurovascular and anatomical differences in patients with lumbosacral transitional vertebrae (LSTV) and the associated risk of neurovascular injury in minimally invasive spine surgery. METHODS The authors performed a retrospective study of CT and MR images of the lumbar spine obtained at their institution between 2010 and 2014. The following characteristics were evaluated: level of the iliac crest in relation to the L4-5 disc space, union level of the iliac veins and arteries in relation to the L4-5 disc space, distribution of the iliac veins and inferior vena cava according to the different Moro zones (A, I, II, III, IV, P) at the L4-5 disc space, and the location of the psoas muscle at the L4-5 disc space. The findings were compared with findings on images obtained in 28 age- and sex-matched patients without LSTV who underwent imaging studies during the same time period. RESULTS Twenty-eight patients (12 male, 16 female) with LSTV and the required imaging studies were identified; 28 age- and sex-matched patients who had undergone CT and MRI studies of the thoracic and lumbar spine imaging but did not have LSTV were selected for comparison (control group). The mean ages of the patients in the LSTV group and the control group were 52 and 49 years, respectively. The iliac crest was located at a mean distance of 12 mm above the L4-5 disc space in the LSTV group and 4 mm below the L4-5 disc space in the controls. The iliac vein union was located at a mean distance of 8 mm above the L4-5 disc space in the LSTV group and 2.7 mm below the L4-5 disc space in the controls. The iliac artery bifurcation was located at a mean distance of 23 mm above the L4-5 disc space in the LSTV group and 11 mm below the L4-5 disc space in controls. In patients with LSTV, the distribution of iliac vein locations was as follows: Zone A, 7.1%; Zone I only, 78.6%; Zone I encroaching into Zone II, 7.1%; and Zone II only, 7.1%. In the

  11. Infection and Cervical Neoplasia: Facts and Fiction

    PubMed Central

    Al-Daraji, Wael I; Smith, John HF

    2009-01-01

    Whilst there is strong evidence that human papillomavirus (HPV) is the principal aetiological agent in cervical neoplasia, some other sexually transmitted agents may either contribute or protect against cervical carcinogenesis, such as the herpes virus family (HSV), cytomegalovirus (CMV), Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) or Chlamydia trachomatis (CT). Epidemiological studies suggest that HSV may have a role in cervical neoplasia, but there is no clear supportive experimental evidence. Serological studies have also failed to reveal a difference in the prevalence of antibodies to CMV and EBV between patients with cervical cancer and controls. However, longitudinal seroepidemiological studies have provided evidence that CT is an independent risk factor for the development of cervical squamous carcinoma and this association is serotype specific. The increased risk of cervical neoplasia in patients infected with HIV has been recognised for over a decade and HIV may interact with HPV either by alternating HPV gene transcription or by immunosuppression. Finally extensive experimental and limited epidemiological evidence suggests that adeno-associated viruses (AAV) may have antioncogenic activity in man and may protect against the development of cervical cancer. At present the mechanism of this action is unclear but may relate to AAV-induced regulation of HPV gene expression and the HPV life cycle. In this review we summarize the current literature relating to the associations and mechanisms of cervical carcinogenesis by each of these infectious microorganisms. PMID:18830380

  12. Cervical Spine MRI in Abused Infants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feldman, Kenneth W.; And Others

    1997-01-01

    This study attempted to use cervical spine magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to detect cord injury in 12 dead children with head injury from child abuse. Eighty percent of children autopsied had small cervical spine hemorrhages; MRI did not identify them and did not identify cord injury in any child studied, indicating that MRI scans are probably…

  13. Cervical venous reflux in dynamic brain scintigraphy.

    PubMed

    Hayt, D B; Perez, L A

    1976-01-01

    Cervical venous reflux, shown by dynamic brain scintigraphy, was investigated through three avenues of approach: (A) by reviewing 371 randomly chosen routine dynamic intracerebral bloodflow studies to estimate its incidence; (B) by correlative positive-contrast superior venacavography in patients with characteristic cervical venous reflux; and (C) by performing dynamic brain scintigraphy while utilizing various positional and physiologic maneuvers to attempt to produce cervical venous reflux in patients who did not exhibit this phenomenon on earlier examination. Although any obstruction of the superior vena cava or a properly timed Valsalva maneuver in selected patients can produce the scintigraphic picture of cervical venous reflux, in most cases it is a normal phenomenon due to incompetent or absent cervical venous valves.

  14. Brachioradial pruritus and cervical spine manipulation.

    PubMed

    Tait, C P; Grigg, E; Quirk, C J

    1998-08-01

    Brachioradial pruritus (BRP) causes significant morbidity in the majority of patients for whom no effective treatment is found. Chronic ultraviolet radiation exposure has usually been cited as the cause, but nerve damage from cervical spine disease has also been implicated. We report on a small retrospective exploratory study, conducted by questionnaire, of a group of patients who were treated with a specific cervical spine manipulation. Ten of 14 patients reported resolution of symptoms following manipulative treatment. All six patients who had had previous cervical spine disease responded to manipulation, as did half the remaining eight patients who had no previous history of neck symptoms. Although patients with BRP, by definition, share similar symptoms, the aetiology is almost certainly multifactorial. Prospective studies looking for cervical spine disease, as well as assessment of this particular method of cervical spine manipulation as a treatment modality for BRP, should be considered.

  15. Mechanical and cellular processes driving cervical myelopathy

    PubMed Central

    Dolan, Roisin T; Butler, Joseph S; O’Byrne, John M; Poynton, Ashley R

    2016-01-01

    Cervical myelopathy is a well-described clinical syndrome that may evolve from a combination of etiological mechanisms. It is traditionally classified by cervical spinal cord and/or nerve root compression which varies in severity and number of levels involved. The vast array of clinical manifestations of cervical myelopathy cannot fully be explained by the simple concept that a narrowed spinal canal causes compression of the cord, local tissue ischemia, injury and neurological impairment. Despite advances in surgical technology and treatment innovations, there are limited neuro-protective treatments for cervical myelopathy, which reflects an incomplete understanding of the pathophysiological processes involved in this disease. The aim of this review is to provide a comprehensive overview of the key pathophysiological processes at play in the development of cervical myelopathy. PMID:26807352

  16. Triapine, Cisplatin, and Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients With Cervical Cancer or Vaginal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-04-21

    Recurrent Cervical Cancer; Recurrent Vaginal Cancer; Stage IB Cervical Cancer; Stage II Vaginal Cancer; Stage IIA Cervical Cancer; Stage IIB Cervical Cancer; Stage III Cervical Cancer; Stage III Vaginal Cancer; Stage IVA Cervical Cancer; Stage IVA Vaginal Cancer; Stage IVB Cervical Cancer; Stage IVB Vaginal Cancer; Therapy-related Toxicity

  17. Giant anterior cervical osteophyte leading to Dysphagia.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Jin Seop; Chough, Chung Kee; Joo, Won Il

    2013-09-01

    Large anterior cervical osteophytes can occur in degeneration of the cervical spine or in diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis(DISH). Large osteophytes can produce otolaryngological symptoms such as dysphagia, dysphonia, and foreign body sensation. We describe a DISH patient with giant anterior cervical osteophyte causing chronic dysphagia and dysphonia. A 56-year-old man presented with increasing dysphagia, dysphonia, neck pain and neck stiffness. Physical examination of the neck showed a non-tender and hard mass on the left side at the level of C4-5. Radiography showed extensive ossification of anterior longitudinal ligament along the left anterolateral aspect of vertebral bodies from C2 to T1. The ossification was espe cially prominent at the level of C4-5 and linear breakage was noted at same level. Esophagogram revealed a filling defect along the pharynx and lateral displacement of the esophagus. Giant anterior cervical osteophyte was removed through the leftsided anterolateral cervical approach to the spine. Anterior cervical interbody fusion at C4-5 was followed by posterior cervical fixation using lateral mass screws from C3 to C6. After surgery, dysphagia and dysphonia improved immediately. One year later, cervical CT showed bone fusion at C4-5 bodies and no recurrence of osteophyte. DISH is a common cause of anterior cervical osteophyte leading to progressive dysphagia. Keeping this clinical entity in the differential diagnosis is important in patients with progressive neck stiffness, dysphagia or dysphonia. And surgical treatment of symptomatic anterior cervical osteophyte due to DISH should be considered with a solid fusion procedure preventing postoperative instability or osteophyte progress.

  18. Past, present, and future of cervical arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Hyun Oh, Chang; Hwan Yoon, Seung

    2013-01-01

    Cervical arthroplasty was developed in an attempt to maintain cervical motion and potentially to avoid or minimize adjacent-segment degeneration. If cervical arthroplasty is successful, the long-term results of surgery for cervical disc disease should improve. However, problems associated with cervical arthroplasty have been reported: these include kyphosis, heterotopic ossification-induced motion limitation, no motion preservation even at the index level, and a higher revision rate in a limited number of cases compared with anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF). In addition, for degenerative cervical disc disorders, the risk of developing adjacent segment degeneration more than 2 years after surgery is reportedly similar for ACDF and cervical arthroplasty. Cervical disc arthroplasty is an emerging motion-sparing technology and is currently undergoing evaluation in many countries as an alternative to arthrodesis for the treatment of cervical radiculopathy and myelopathy. The decision whether to use arthrodesis or arthroplasty is a difficult one. The achievement of good prosthetic performance demands exacting implantation techniques to ensure correct placement. This fact underlines the increasing importance of special instrumentation and surgical skills that involve an understanding of prosthetic lubrication, wear, and biologic effects and familiarity with currently available information regarding kinematics, basic science, testing, and early clinical results. Fortunately, a number of devices are at the late preclinical study stage or at the early clinical trial stage, and results in many cases are promising. In the near future, it is likely that new designs will be produced to replace spinal discs totally or partially in a pathologic entity-specific manner.

  19. Cervical disc hernia operations through posterior laminoforaminotomy

    PubMed Central

    Yolas, Coskun; Ozdemir, Nuriye Guzin; Okay, Hilmi Onder; Kanat, Ayhan; Senol, Mehmet; Atci, Ibrahim Burak; Yilmaz, Hakan; Coban, Mustafa Kemal; Yuksel, Mehmet Onur; Kahraman, Umit

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The most common used technique for posterolateral cervical disc herniations is anterior approach. However, posterior cervical laminotoforaminomy can provide excellent results in appropriately selected patients with foraminal stenosis in either soft disc prolapse or cervical spondylosis. The purpose of this study was to present the clinical outcomes following posterior laminoforaminotomy in patients with radiculopathy. Materials and Methods: We retrospectively evaluated 35 patients diagnosed with posterolateral cervical disc herniation and cervical spondylosis with foraminal stenosis causing radiculopathy operated by the posterior cervical keyhole laminoforaminotomy between the years 2010 and 2015. Results: The file records and the radiographic images of the 35 patients were assessed retrospectively. The mean age was 46.4 years (range: 34-66 years). Of the patients, 19 were males and 16 were females. In all of the patients, the neurologic deficit observed was radiculopathy. The posterolaterally localized disc herniations and the osteophytic structures were on the left side in 18 cases and on the right in 17 cases. In 10 of the patients, the disc level was at C5-6, in 18 at C6-7, in 2 at C3-4, in 2 at C4-5, in 1 at C7-T1, in 1 patient at both C5-6 and C6-7, and in 1 at both C4-5 and C5-6. In 14 of these 35 patients, both osteophytic structures and protruded disc herniation were present. Intervertebral foramen stenosis was present in all of the patients with osteophytes. Postoperatively, in 31 patients the complaints were relieved completely and four patients had complaints of neck pain and paresthesia radiating to the arm (the success of operation was 88.5%). On control examinations, there was no finding of instability or cervical kyphosis. Conclusion: Posterior cervical laminoforaminotomy is an alternative appropriate choice in both cervical soft disc herniations and cervical stenosis. PMID:27217655

  20. Reoperations Following Cervical Disc Replacement

    PubMed Central

    Skovrlj, Branko; Lee, Dong-Ho; Caridi, John Michael

    2015-01-01

    Cervical disc replacement (CDR) has emerged as an alternative surgical option to cervical arthrodesis. With increasing numbers of patients and longer follow-ups, complications related to the device and/or aging spine are growing, leaving us with a new challenge in the management and surgical revision of CDR. The purpose of this study is to review the current literature regarding reoperations following CDR and to discuss about the approaches and solutions for the current and future potential complications associated with CDR. The published rates of reoperation (mean, 1.0%; range, 0%-3.1%), revision (mean, 0.2%; range, 0%-0.5%), and removal (mean, 1.2%; range, 0%-1.9%) following CDR are low and comparable to the published rates of reoperation (mean, 1.7%; range; 0%-3.4%), revision (mean, 1.5%; range, 0%-4.7%), and removal (mean, 2.0%; range, 0%-3.4%) following cervical arthrodesis. The surgical interventions following CDR range from the repositioning to explantation followed by fusion or the reimplantation to posterior foraminotomy or fusion. Strict patient selection, careful preoperative radiographic review and surgical planning, as well as surgical technique may reduce adverse events and the need for future intervention. Minimal literature and no guidelines exist for the approaches and techniques in revision and for the removal of implants following CDR. Adherence to strict indications and precise surgical technique may reduce the number of reoperations, revisions, and removals following CDR. Long-term follow-up studies are needed, assessing the implant survivorship and its effect on the revision and removal rates. PMID:26097667

  1. Design of a mechanism to simulate the quasi-static moment-deflection behaviour of the osteoligamentous structure of the C3-C4 cervical spine segment in the flexion-extension and lateral bending directions.

    PubMed

    Chen, Samuel; Arsenault, Marc; Moglo, Kodjo

    2012-11-01

    The human neck is susceptible to traumatic injuries due to impacts as well as chronic injuries caused by loads such as those attributed to the wearing of heavy headgear. To facilitate the analysis of the loads that cause injuries to the cervical spine, it is possible to replicate the human neck's behaviour with mechanical devices. The goal of this work is to lay the foundation for the eventual development of a novel mechanism used to simulate the behaviour of the cervical spine during laboratory experiments. The research presented herein focuses on the design of a mechanism capable of reproducing the non-linear relationships between moments applied to the C3 vertebra and its corresponding rotations with respect to the C4 vertebra. The geometrical and mechanical properties of the mechanism are optimized based on the ability of the latter to replicate the load-deflection profile of the osteoligamentous structure of the C3-C4 vertebral pair in the flexion-extension and lateral bending directions. The results show that the proposed design concept is capable of faithfully replicating the non-linear behaviour of the motion segment within acceptable tolerances.

  2. A comparative study on dynamic stiffness in typical finite element model and multi-body model of C6-C7 cervical spine segment.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yawei; Wang, Lizhen; Du, Chengfei; Mo, Zhongjun; Fan, Yubo

    2016-06-01

    In contrast to numerous researches on static or quasi-static stiffness of cervical spine segments, very few investigations on their dynamic stiffness were published. Currently, scale factors and estimated coefficients were usually used in multi-body models for including viscoelastic properties and damping effects, meanwhile viscoelastic properties of some tissues were unavailable for establishing finite element models. Because dynamic stiffness of cervical spine segments in these models were difficult to validate because of lacking in experimental data, we tried to gain some insights on current modeling methods through studying dynamic stiffness differences between these models. A finite element model and a multi-body model of C6-C7 segment were developed through using available material data and typical modeling technologies. These two models were validated with quasi-static response data of the C6-C7 cervical spine segment. Dynamic stiffness differences were investigated through controlling motions of C6 vertebrae at different rates and then comparing their reaction forces or moments. Validation results showed that both the finite element model and the multi-body model could generate reasonable responses under quasi-static loads, but the finite element segment model exhibited more nonlinear characters. Dynamic response investigations indicated that dynamic stiffness of this finite element model might be underestimated because of the absence of dynamic stiffen effect and damping effects of annulus fibrous, while representation of these effects also need to be improved in current multi-body model. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. 21 CFR 884.4250 - Expandable cervical dilator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Expandable cervical dilator. 884.4250 Section 884....4250 Expandable cervical dilator. (a) Identification. An expandable cervical dilator is an instrument with two handles and two opposing blades used manually to dilate (stretch open) the cervical os....

  4. 21 CFR 884.1040 - Viscometer for cervical mucus.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Viscometer for cervical mucus. 884.1040 Section... Devices § 884.1040 Viscometer for cervical mucus. (a) Identification. A viscometer for cervical mucus is a device that is intended to measure the relative viscoelasticity of cervical mucus collected from a...

  5. 21 CFR 884.4270 - Vibratory cervical dilators.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Vibratory cervical dilators. 884.4270 Section 884....4270 Vibratory cervical dilators. (a) Identification. A vibratory cervical dilator is a device designed to dilate the cervical os by stretching it with a power-driven vibrating probe head. The device...

  6. Anterior Cervical Spine Surgery for Degenerative Disease: A Review

    PubMed Central

    SUGAWARA, Taku

    Anterior cervical spine surgery is an established surgical intervention for cervical degenerative disease and high success rate with excellent long-term outcomes have been reported. However, indications of surgical procedures for certain conditions are still controversial and severe complications to cause neurological dysfunction or deaths may occur. This review is focused mainly on five widely performed procedures by anterior approach for cervical degenerative disease; anterior cervical discectomy, anterior cervical discectomy and fusion, anterior cervical corpectomy and fusion, anterior cervical foraminotomy, and arthroplasty. Indications, procedures, outcomes, and complications of these surgeries are discussed. PMID:26119899

  7. Network Topologies Decoding Cervical Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Jalan, Sarika; Kanhaiya, Krishna; Rai, Aparna; Bandapalli, Obul Reddy; Yadav, Alok

    2015-01-01

    According to the GLOBOCAN statistics, cervical cancer is one of the leading causes of death among women worldwide. It is found to be gradually increasing in the younger population, specifically in the developing countries. We analyzed the protein-protein interaction networks of the uterine cervix cells for the normal and disease states. It was found that the disease network was less random than the normal one, providing an insight into the change in complexity of the underlying network in disease state. The study also portrayed that, the disease state has faster signal processing as the diameter of the underlying network was very close to its corresponding random control. This may be a reason for the normal cells to change into malignant state. Further, the analysis revealed VEGFA and IL-6 proteins as the distinctly high degree nodes in the disease network, which are known to manifest a major contribution in promoting cervical cancer. Our analysis, being time proficient and cost effective, provides a direction for developing novel drugs, therapeutic targets and biomarkers by identifying specific interaction patterns, that have structural importance. PMID:26308848

  8. Invasive Cervical Resorption: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Kandalgaonkar, Shilpa D; Gharat, Leena A; Tupsakhare, Suyog D; Gabhane, Mahesh H

    2013-01-01

    Invasive cervical resorption is a relatively uncommon form of external root resorption exhibiting no external signs. The resorptive condition is often detected by routine radiographic examination. The clinical features vary from a small defect at the gingival margin to a pink coronal discoloration of the tooth crown resulting in ultimate cavitation of the overlying enamel which is painless unless pulpal or periodontal infection supervenes. Radiographic features of lesions vary from well-delineated to irregularly bordered mottled radiolucencies, and these can be confused with dental caries. A characteristic radiopaque line generally separates the image of the lesion from that of the root canal, because the pulp remains protected by a thin layer of predentin until late in the process. Histopathologically, the lesions contain fibrovascular tissue with resorbing clastic cells adjacent to the dentin surface. More advanced lesions display fibro-osseous characteristics with deposition of ectopic bonelike calcifications both within the resorbing tissue and directly on the dentin surface. How to cite this article: Kandalgaonkar SD, Gharat LA, Tupsakhare SD, Gabhane MH. Invasive Cervical Resorption: A Review. J Int Oral Health 2013;5(6):124-30 . PMID:24453457

  9. Cervical Spline Analysis for Ejection Injury Prediction.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-11-30

    bones are united into two structures; the first five form the sacrum and the remaining two the coccyx. A typical vertebra consists of an anterior ...segment and a posterior segment. The anterior segment consists of a body that is largely composed of spongy bone sur- rounded by a thin wall of cortical... anterior segments will take the bulk of the compressive load while the posterior portion will take the tension by means of the ligaments and muscles

  10. Spinal Column

    MedlinePlus

    ... head which is approximately 10-12 pounds. The cervical spine has the greatest range of motion, in part because of two specialized vertebra that move with the skull. Cervical vertebrae are the smallest of the vertebrae. The ...

  11. Esophageal perforation caused by fish vertebra ingestion in a seven-month-old infant demanded surgical intervention: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Ming-Yu; Chang, Ming-Ling; Wu, Chang-Teng

    2006-01-01

    A seven-month-old infant was admitted to our hospital with a 1-wk history of shortness of breath, dysphagia, and fever. Diagnosis of esophageal perforation following fish vertebra ingestion was made by history review, pneumomediastinum and an irregular hyperdense lesion noted in initial chest radiogram. Neck computed tomo-graphy (CT) confirmed that the foreign body located at the cricopharyngeal level and a small esophageal tracheal fistula was shown by esophagogram. The initial response to treatment of fish bone removal guided by panendoscopy and antibiotics administration was poor since pneumothorax plus empyema developed. Fortunately, the patient’s condition finally improved after decortication, mediastinotomy and perforated esophagus repair. To our knowledge, this is the first case report of esophageal perforation due to fish bone ingestion in infancy. In addition to particular caution that has to be taken when feeding the innocent, young victim, it may indicate the importance of surgical intervention for complicated esophageal perforation in infancy. PMID:17131491

  12. Esophageal perforation caused by fish vertebra ingestion in a seven-month-old infant demanded surgical intervention: A case report.

    PubMed

    Chang, Ming-Yu; Chang, Ming-Ling; Wu, Chang-Teng

    2006-11-28

    A seven-month-old infant was admitted to our hospital with a 1-wk history of shortness of breath, dysphagia, and fever. Diagnosis of esophageal perforation following fish vertebra ingestion was made by history review, pneumomediastinum and an irregular hyperdense lesion noted in initial chest radiogram. Neck computed tomography (CT) confirmed that the foreign body located at the cricopharyngeal level and a small esophageal tracheal fistula was shown by esophagogram. The initial response to treatment of fish bone removal guided by panendoscopy and antibiotics administration was poor since pneumothorax plus empyema developed. Fortunately, the patient's condition finally improved after decortication, mediastinotomy and perforated esophagus repair. To our knowledge, this is the first case report of esophageal perforation due to fish bone ingestion in infancy. In addition to particular caution that has to be taken when feeding the innocent, young victim, it may indicate the importance of surgical intervention for complicated esophageal perforation in infancy.

  13. [Double spinal cord compression by dorsal meningioma and Paget's disease of a vertebra. A propos of 2 cases treated surgically].

    PubMed

    Rousseaux, P; Lerais, J M; Scherpereel, B; Bernard, M H; Pluot, M

    1982-01-01

    A spinal cord compression due to intradural meningioma appeared in two patients with vertebral X-Rays lesions of foreknown Paget's disease. These lesions were located at the same level that the meningioma in the second case and three vertebra below the meningioma in the first case. In both cases, it took one year between the first clinical symptoms and the surgical decision. We truly think the Paget's disease and its X-Rays vertebral lesions to be responsible for the waist of time in myelography and surgical schedule. No other case of meningioma associated with Paget's disease has been found through literature. Because the treatment of Paget's disease paraplegia is now mostly medical, we thought important to report our experience in order to avoid other delays in this unusual diagnosis.

  14. Peripheral primitive neuroectodermal tumour in a lumbar vertebra and the liver of a dromedary camel (Camelus dromedarius).

    PubMed

    Weiss, R; Walz, P H

    2009-01-01

    A 9-year-old castrated male dromedary camel developed weakness and ataxia, progressing to sternal recumbency and hindlimb paralysis. Necropsy revealed multiple liver tumours and a mass in the 3rd lumbar vertebra, compressing the spinal cord. The hepatic and vertebral masses consisted of uniform sheets of primitive cells, with perivascular pseudorosettes and small numbers of neuroblastic Homer-Wright rosettes. Immunohistochemically, the tumour cells were uniformly positive for vimentin and variably positive for neuron-specific enolase and glial fibrillary acidic protein. The histopathological and immunohistochemical findings indicated a peripheral primitive neuroectodermal tumour (pPNET) exhibiting neuroblastic, glial and ependymomatous differentiation, probably reflecting the tumour's primitive multipotential neuroepithelial nature. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first reported case in the camel of a pPNET, presumably intraosseous in origin with hepatic metastasis, and morphologically similar to Ewing's sarcoma in man.

  15. Cervical lymphadenopathy: Unwinding the hidden truth

    PubMed Central

    Ramadas, Athira Aruna; Jose, Renju; Varma, Beena; Chandy, Marina Lazar

    2017-01-01

    Lymphadenopathy is a common clinical finding in a patient seeking oral health care. It may be in a localized, limited, or generalized form. Malignancies, infections, autoimmune disorders, iatrogenic, and other miscellaneous conditions are considered as the causes for cervical lymphadenopathy. Unexplained cervical lymphadenopathy is a cause of concern for physician and patient because sometimes it could be the manifestation of an underlying malignancy. However, a methodological approach to lymphadenopathy can disclose the accurate diagnosis causing minimal discomfort for the patient and in a short time. This paper reports the significance of cervical lymph node examination and ensuing investigations, which led to a diagnosis of non-Hodgkins lymphoma. PMID:28348622

  16. Invasive cervical resorption--a periodontist's perspective.

    PubMed

    Evans, R I

    2000-10-01

    Invasive cervical resorption (ICR) is a relatively uncommon, insidious, resorptive lesion starting subgingivally at the cervical root surface of a tooth. ICR is of uncertain aetiology, although damage to the cervical periodontal attachment to the tooth appears to be a prerequisite. For the most part the lesion is asymptomatic so early detection can be difficult. Nevertheless, if less than a third of the root of the tooth is affected by an ICR lesion treatment of the resorptive tissue using the chemical escharotic agent trichloracetic acid, with or without surgical access, followed by curettage of the lesion and restoration of the defect with glass ionomer cement, is generally successful.

  17. Cervical cancer: is vaccination necessary in India?

    PubMed

    Farhath, Seema; Vijaya, P P; Mumtaj, P

    2013-01-01

    In India, cervical cancer is the most common woman-related cancer, followed by breast cancer. The rate of cervical cancer in India is fourth worldwide. Two vaccines, Gardasil and Cervarix, both targeting HPV-16 and 18 which account for 70% of invasive cervical carcinomas, are licensed in the United States and numerous countries worldwide. Both vaccine formulations have shown excellent efficacy with minimal toxicity in active female population but numerous questions arise in vaccinating like cost effectiveness, lack of proven efficacy against other HPV strains, social acceptance of HPV vaccination and other ethical issues. The main objective of this study is to emphasis the advantages and disadvantages of the vaccination in India.

  18. [Chemoradiotherapy for locally advanced cervical cancer].

    PubMed

    Bazaeva, I Ia; Gorbunova, V A; Kravets, O A; Khokhlova, S V; Limareva, S V; Panov, V O; Strel'tsova, O N; Tarachkova, E V

    2014-01-01

    Cervical cancer takes second place in morbidity and third place in mortality from gynecological cancer. Advanced stages among newly diagnosed cases is still large. The "gold standard" of treatment for locally advanced cervical cancer is chemoradiotherapy with cisplatin that results in a lower risk of death. Improvement of radiotherapy methods allowed to bring optimal dose to the primary tumor with the inclusion of regional metastasis areas with less risk of damage to surrounding healthy tissue and organs. The search for alternative combinations of cytostatics, modes of drug administration, adjuvant chemotherapy after chemoradiotherapy showed an increase in survival of patients with locally advanced cervical cancer.

  19. Effect of joint mobilization using KEOMT and PNF on a patient with CLBP and a lumbar transitional vertebra: a case study.

    PubMed

    Park, Si-Eun; Wang, Joong-San

    2015-05-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this case study was to identify the effects of joint mobilization using Kaltenborn-Evjenth orthopedic manual therapy (KEOMT) and proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation (PNF) techniques on a patient with chronic low back pain (CLBP) and a lumbar transitional vertebra. [Methods] The intervention methods were joint mobilization using KEOMT and PNF techniques. The program consisted of 40-min sessions 3 days a week for 4 weeks. The spinal motion (thoracic and lumbar vertebrae), pain, and thickness of the multifidus were measured. [Results] The angle of spinal curvature increased, and the range of motions (ROMs) flexion and extension increased in the thoracic and lumbar vertebrae. The pain score as measured on a visual analogue scale (VAS) and the Oswestry disability index (ODI) score decreased. The thickness of the multifidus (L4) increased on the left and right sides. [Conclusion] These results suggest that joint mobilization using KEOMT and PNF techniques had a positive effect on the spinal motion, pain, and thickness of the multifidus of a patient with chronic low back pain and a lumbar transitional vertebra.

  20. Effect of joint mobilization using KEOMT and PNF on a patient with CLBP and a lumbar transitional vertebra: a case study

    PubMed Central

    Park, Si-Eun; Wang, Joong-San

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this case study was to identify the effects of joint mobilization using Kaltenborn-Evjenth orthopedic manual therapy (KEOMT) and proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation (PNF) techniques on a patient with chronic low back pain (CLBP) and a lumbar transitional vertebra. [Methods] The intervention methods were joint mobilization using KEOMT and PNF techniques. The program consisted of 40-min sessions 3 days a week for 4 weeks. The spinal motion (thoracic and lumbar vertebrae), pain, and thickness of the multifidus were measured. [Results] The angle of spinal curvature increased, and the range of motions (ROMs) flexion and extension increased in the thoracic and lumbar vertebrae. The pain score as measured on a visual analogue scale (VAS) and the Oswestry disability index (ODI) score decreased. The thickness of the multifidus (L4) increased on the left and right sides. [Conclusion] These results suggest that joint mobilization using KEOMT and PNF techniques had a positive effect on the spinal motion, pain, and thickness of the multifidus of a patient with chronic low back pain and a lumbar transitional vertebra. PMID:26157278