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Sample records for cervicothoracic junction case

  1. Cervicothoracic junction arthroplasty after previous fusion surgery for adjacent segment degeneration: case report.

    PubMed

    Sekhon, Lali

    2005-01-01

    This is the first reported case of cervical arthroplasty using the Bryan Cervical Disc Prosthesis System (Medtronic Sofamor Danek, Inc., Memphis, TN) in the management of adjacent segment degeneration associated with previous fusion surgery and surgery at the cervicothoracic junction. This case report describes a 25-year-old woman who initially underwent a two-level anterior cervical fusion in 1998, 2 years after being involved in a motor vehicle accident. She was well until 18 months before presentation, when she developed bilateral shoulder pain, mechanical neck pain worse on flexion, and bilateral C8 distribution arm pain and paresthesia. On clinical examination, no focal deficits were found, although the range of motion was reduced. Preoperative cervical spine x-rays and magnetic resonance scanning confirmed accelerated degeneration of the C4-C5 and C7-T1 disc spaces, with evidence of neural compression at those levels. After careful consideration of various treatment options and failure of all conservative measures, the patient underwent an anterior C4-C5 and C7-T1 decompression with removal of the anterior cervical plate and placement of two artificial disc prostheses. After surgery, her course was uncomplicated and she was discharged from hospital well. There was complete resolution of the arm symptoms and reduction of the neck pain, with a reduction in the amount of analgesia she was taking. Seven months after surgery, she remains well with repeat x-rays confirming motion at the operated levels. This case demonstrates that cervical arthroplasty is a reasonable treatment option for patients who have had previous surgery in which interbody fusion has been performed and who have developed degeneration of adjacent levels. Despite the altered biomechanics at the cervicothoracic junction, no adverse features were noted with arthroplasty at this level.

  2. Surgical access to tumors of the cervicothoracic junction.

    PubMed

    Kraus, D H; Huo, J; Burt, M

    1995-01-01

    Surgical resection of tumors of the cervicothoracic junction is often problematic due to the limitations imposed by the thoracic cage and adjacent neurovascular structures. The majority of surgical approaches to this region have been designed with the intent of providing adequate exposure for vertebrectomy with tumor resection and vertebral column stabilization. These approaches do not provide adequate exposure for a heterogeneous group of tumors which also involve the cervicothoracic junction. We used a combined cervicothoracic surgical approach to determine its efficacy in tumor resection. Seventeen patients with a heterogeneous group of malignancies arising in a variety of soft tissues underwent combined cervicothoracic resection. The approach consisted of anterior cervical access, median sternotomy, and anterior thoracotomy. Complete gross tumor resection was accomplished in all 17 patients, 15 of whom had negative microscopic margins. Extensive reconstruction was employed in 6 patients. Three patients received intraoperative brachytherapy implants and 5 patients received external-beam postoperative radiotherapy. Local tumor control was obtained in 12 patients, and 10 patients are currently alive, free of disease (median: 12 months; range: 3-47 months). There was no inadvertent sacrifice of neurovascular structures. The sternoclavicular joint was maintained in all patients. There were 4 major complications, and no perioperative mortality associated with the surgical procedure. The combined "trap door" technique provides sufficient exposure for resection of cervicothoracic tumors. Surgery is performed with limited morbidity with the sparing of uninvolved neurovascular structures. The sterno-clavicular joint was maintained in all patients. Preliminary results using this approach for resections of tumors of the cervicothoracic junction are encouraging.

  3. Do supine oblique views provide better imaging of the cervicothoracic junction than swimmer's views?

    PubMed Central

    Ireland, A J; Britton, I; Forrester, A W

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine whether a swimmer's view or supine (trauma) oblique views are more likely to visualise the lower cervical spine when a lateral view fails to show the cervicothoracic junction. DESIGN: A prospective study comparing two 20 week periods. In the first phase the swimmer's view was performed as an additional view when the cervicothoracic junction was not demonstrated. In the second phase paired supine oblique views replaced the swimmer's view. RESULTS: 230 patients were included in the first phase, of whom 60 required swimmer's views. In the second phase 62 of 197 patients required supine oblique views. Radiology analysis of 53 pairs of supine oblique views showed that the vertebral bodies were adequately demonstrated at the cervicothoracic junction in only 20 patients (38%) compared with 22 in the swimmer's group (37%). The facet joints and posterior elements were, however, clearly seen in 37 (70%) of the supine oblique patients compared with 22 (37%) of the swimmer's group (p < 0.001, chi2 test). Exposure dose calculations showed a substantial reduction for a pair of supine oblique views (1.6 mGy) over a single swimmer's view (7.2 mGy). CONCLUSIONS: In injured patients for whom the standard three view series fails to demonstrate the cervicothoracic junction, swimmer's views and supine oblique views show the alignment of the vertebral bodies with equal frequency. However, supine oblique films are safer, expose patients to less radiation, and are more often successful in demonstrating the posterior elements. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:9639174

  4. Biomechanical Determination of Distal Level for Fusions across the Cervicothoracic Junction

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Ivan; Sundberg, Eric B.; Iezza, Alex; Lindsey, Derek P.; Riew, K. Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Study Design In vitro testing. Objective To determine whether long cervical and cervicothoracic fusions increase the intradiscal pressure at the adjacent caudal disk and to determine which thoracic end vertebra causes the least increase in the adjacent-level intradiscal pressure. Methods A bending moment was applied to six cadaveric cervicothoracic spine specimens with intact rib cages. Intradiscal pressures were recorded from C7–T1 to T9–10 before and after simulated fusion by anterior cervical plating and posterior thoracic pedicle screw constructs. The changes in the intradiscal pressure from baseline were calculated and compared. Results No significant differences where found when the changes of the juxtafusion intradiscal pressure at each level were compared for the flexion, extension, and left and right bending simulations. However, combining the pressures for all directions of bending at each level demonstrated a decrease in the pressures at the T2–T3 level. Exploratory analysis comparing changes in the pressure at T2–T3 to other levels showed a significant decrease in the pressures at this level (p = 0.005). Conclusions Based on the combined intradiscal pressures alone it may be advantageous to end long constructs spanning the cervicothoracic junction at the T2 level if there are no other mitigating factors. PMID:26225276

  5. An RCT study on the feasibility of anterior transpedicular screw fixation in the cervicothoracic junction.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Liujun; Hong, Jinjiong; Wandtke, Meghan E; Xu, Rongming; Ma, Weihu; Jiang, Weiyu; Gu, Yongjie; Chen, Jianqing; Wang, Liran; Liu, Jiayong; Ebraheim, Nabil A

    2016-06-01

    We evaluated the trajectory and the entry points of anterior transpedicular screws (ATPS) in the cervicothoracic junction (CTJ). This study aimed at investigating the feasibility of ATPS fixation in the CTJ. Application of an ATPS in the lower cervical spine has been reported; however, there were no reports exploring the feasibility of anterior transpedicular screw fixation in the CTJ. CT scans were performed in 50 cases and multiplanar reformation was used to measure the related parameters on pedicle axis view at C6-T2. Transverse pedicle angle, outer pedicle width, pedicle axis length, distance transverse intersection point (DtIP), sagittal pedicle angle, anterior vertebral body height, outer pedicle height, and distance sagittal intersection point (DsIP) were measured. The prozone of CTJ was divided into three different regions, which were named as the "manubrium region", the region "above" and "below" the manubrium. The distribution of the trajectory of sagittal pedicle axes was recorded in the three regions and the related data were statistically analyzed. There was no statistical difference in gender (P > 0.05). The transverse pedicle angle decreased from C6 (46.77° ± 2.72°) to T2 (20.62° ± 5.04°). DtIP increased from C6 to T2. DsIP was an average of 7.17 mm. The sagittal pedicle axis lines of the C6 and C7 were located in the region above the manubrium. T1 was mainly in the manubrium region followed by the region above the manubrium. T2 was mainly located in the manubrium region followed by the region below the manubrium. Implantation of ATPS at C6, C7, and some T1 is feasible through the low anterior cervical approach, while it is almost impossible to approach T2 that way.

  6. Treatment of tuberculous spondylitis at the cervicothoracic junction. Clinical impact of surgery by means of a sternotomy.

    PubMed

    Knoeller, Stefan M; Brethner, Ludwig F

    2002-11-01

    The operative treatment of tuberculous spondylitis remains a challenge with regard to the surgical approach to the cervicothoracic junction. In addition, it is difficult to restore the resected vertebral bodies. Two cases of tuberculous spondylitis in this area are presented. The first case concerns a 25-year-old African patient suffering from the effects of tuberculous spondylitis: Destruction of vertebral bodies dorsal (D)1, D2, and D3, kyphosis coupled with compression of the spinal cord, as well as incomplete motor and sensory paraplegia (Frankel grade C). The operative treatment of tuberculous spondylitis that is described, approached the cervicothoracic junction by means of a sternotomia. Corpectomy of vertebral bodies D1 through D3 were followed by their restoration with the help of a titanium cage. As a result, the paraplegia disappeared. Ventral decompression was followed by dorsal instrumentation. The results of the operation are decompression of the spinal cord, correction of the kyphosis, and stable fusion followed by restitution of the paraplegia. Primary stability was provided by the use of a titanium cage and dorsal instrumentation. There was no need for an external brace. There was no loss of correction 3 years after the operation. The 2nd case concerns a 49-year-old European patient suffering from thoracic pain radiating around the chest. A partial destruction of D2 and D3 with kyphosis and compression of the spinal cord because of a tuberculous spondylitis were detected, neurological deficits were not found. The corpectomy of D2 and D3 were proceeded by means of a sternotomy, the defect was restored with the help of a titanium cage. Due to the use of a ventral Morscher plate an additional dorsal instrumentation was not necessary. The patient was fixed in a minerva plaster for 3 months. There was no loss of correction 2 years after the operation. Both patients are manual workers and postoperatively adapted to their former work.

  7. Posterior-only stabilization of 2-column and 3-column injuries at the cervicothoracic junction: a biomechanical study.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Joseph R; Dmitriev, Anton E; Yu, Warren; Gelb, Daniel; Ludwig, Steven

    2009-07-01

    A biomechanical study conducted on cadaveric specimens. The objectives of the study were (1) to determine whether a 3-column injury at the cervicothoracic junction may be stabilized with only posterior instrumentation and (2) to determine optimal cross-link position. Previous literature has suggested that 3-column cervicothoracic injury requires both anterior and posterior instrumentation to restore spinal stability. Multidirectional flexibility analysis was performed under axial rotation, flexion extension, and lateral bending. After intact analysis, C7-T1 was destabilized simulating a 2-column injury and specimens instrumented from C6-T2 with lateral mass (C6) and pedicle (C7-T2) screws using dual diameter rods and retested. C7-T1 was further destabilized to a 3-column injury and specimens retested once again. The addition of a cross-link in either the cervical, thoracic, or combined positions was also analyzed. Range of motion (ROM) at C7-T1 and of the whole construct was recorded using optoelectronic markers and data normalized to intact condition (% intact). Statistical significance criterion was set at P<0.05. Greater than 75% reduction of intact ROM was achieved after posterior-only instrumentation of a 3-column injury (P<0.05) using modern instrumentation and technique. For a 2-column injury, no significant difference (P>0.05) was found with or without cross-links. ROM at C7-T1 was effectively reduced by 85% or more compared with intact preinjury motion in all planes. A trend toward increased stability at C7-T1 was noted from the application of a thoracic cross-link versus a cervical cross-link. A 3-column injury at the cervicothoracic junction may be stabilized from a biomechanical standpoint using posterior-only instrumentation. The addition of 2 cross-links further stabilizes the cervicothoracic junction in a 3-column injury. A thoracic cross-link was not significantly different from 2 cross-links. The use of a cross-link in 2-column flexion distraction

  8. Compressive Cervicothoracic Adhesive Arachnoiditis following Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage: A Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Rahmathulla, Gazanfar; Kamian, Kambiz

    2014-01-01

    We present the case of a 55-year-old woman with diffuse adhesive arachnoiditis in the posterior fossa and cervicothoracic spine following posterior inferior cerebellar artery aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). She underwent aneurysm clipping with subsequent gradual neurologic decline associated with sensory disturbances, gait ataxia, and spastic paraparesis. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed diffuse adhesive arachnoiditis in the posterior fossa and cervicothoracic spine, syringobulbia, and multiple arachnoid cysts in the cervicothoracic spine along with syringohydromyelia. Early surgical intervention with microlysis of the adhesions and duraplasty at the clinically relevant levels resulted in clinical improvement. Although adhesive arachnoiditis, secondary arachnoid cysts, and cerebrospinal fluid flow abnormalities resulting in syrinx are rare following aneurysmal SAH, early recognition and appropriate intervention lead to good clinical outcomes. PMID:25083391

  9. Compressive Cervicothoracic Adhesive Arachnoiditis following Aneurysmal Subarachnoid Hemorrhage: A Case Report and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Rahmathulla, Gazanfar; Kamian, Kambiz

    2014-08-01

    We present the case of a 55-year-old woman with diffuse adhesive arachnoiditis in the posterior fossa and cervicothoracic spine following posterior inferior cerebellar artery aneurysmal subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH). She underwent aneurysm clipping with subsequent gradual neurologic decline associated with sensory disturbances, gait ataxia, and spastic paraparesis. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed diffuse adhesive arachnoiditis in the posterior fossa and cervicothoracic spine, syringobulbia, and multiple arachnoid cysts in the cervicothoracic spine along with syringohydromyelia. Early surgical intervention with microlysis of the adhesions and duraplasty at the clinically relevant levels resulted in clinical improvement. Although adhesive arachnoiditis, secondary arachnoid cysts, and cerebrospinal fluid flow abnormalities resulting in syrinx are rare following aneurysmal SAH, early recognition and appropriate intervention lead to good clinical outcomes.

  10. ‘Serpent in the spine’: a case of giant spinal ependymoma of cervicothoracic spine

    PubMed Central

    Arrifin, Arlizan; Kaliaperumal, Chandrasekaran; Keohane, Catherine; O'Sullivan, Michael

    2012-01-01

    We describe a case of giant spinal ependymoma of cervicothoracic spine in a 30-year-old lady who presented with progressive spastic paraparesis and significant combined upper and lower motor neuron signs in her lower limbs over a 1-year period. She also had upper limb small muscle wasting with absent reflexes and diminished sensation. She was wheel chair bound with involvement of sphincters. Neuroimaging revealed a uniformly enhancing intramedullary lesion from C2–T3 level with associated syringomyelia. She underwent a complete excision of this World Health Organisation (WHO) II cellular ependymoma, resulting in significant clinical outcome and improvement in bladder and bowel function. PMID:22739334

  11. 'Serpent in the spine': a case of giant spinal ependymoma of cervicothoracic spine.

    PubMed

    Arrifin, Arlizan; Kaliaperumal, Chandrasekaran; Keohane, Catherine; O'Sullivan, Michael

    2012-06-27

    We describe a case of giant spinal ependymoma of cervicothoracic spine in a 30-year-old lady who presented with progressive spastic paraparesis and significant combined upper and lower motor neuron signs in her lower limbs over a 1-year period. She also had upper limb small muscle wasting with absent reflexes and diminished sensation. She was wheel chair bound with involvement of sphincters. Neuroimaging revealed a uniformly enhancing intramedullary lesion from C2-T3 level with associated syringomyelia. She underwent a complete excision of this World Health Organisation (WHO) II cellular ependymoma, resulting in significant clinical outcome and improvement in bladder and bowel function.

  12. Operative management of a non-traumatic cervico-thoracic spondylolisthesis: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction In contrast to spondylolisthesis of the lumbar spine, non-traumatic cervico-thoracic spondylolisthesis is a very rare lesion. Even minor changes in the displacement of the vertebrae or the cord can lead to cervical myelopathy and paralysis. Since only a few cases have been well-documented, there is currently no clear preference between operative techniques. Case presentation We describe the case of a 63-year-old Caucasian man with a 13 mm spondylolisthesis between C7 and T1. Within a few months, a progressive cervical myelopathy developed as he began to suffer pain and loss of function of his digits and was no longer able to walk unassisted. In an interdisciplinary collaboration between neurological and orthopedic surgeons, a ventral-dorsal-ventral approach was performed on one vertebral section. The ventral removal of the intervertebral disc was followed by laminectomy and dorsal instrumentation. A new application technique was established by inserting bicortical screws into the transverse processes of T2 and T3. The structure was subsequently stabilized by the ventral insertion of a Harms basket. The procedure was successful as it halted progression of the myelopathy. The patient demonstrated improved sensitivity and recovered the ability to walk unassisted. He has now been able to walk unassisted for two years postoperatively. Conclusion This paper describes a successful treatment for a very rare case of cervico-thoracic spondylolisthesis. The technique of inserting bicortical screws into the transverse processes is a fast, safe and successful method that does not require the use of intraoperative radiographs for placement of the bicortical screws into the transverse processes. PMID:22686409

  13. Surgical removal of a denture with sharp clasps impacted in the cervicothoracic esophagus: report of three cases.

    PubMed

    Toshima, Takeo; Morita, Masaru; Sadanaga, Noriaki; Yoshida, Rintaro; Yoshinaga, Keiji; Saeki, Hiroshi; Kakeji, Yoshihiro; Maehara, Yoshihiko

    2011-09-01

    We report three cases of successful surgical removal of a denture with sharp clasps impacted in the cervical esophagus. Patient 1 was a 57-year-old woman institutionalized for over 30 years for schizophrenia, patient 2 was a 62-year-old man hospitalized for brain paralysis, and patient 3 was a 64-year-old man suffering cerebral hemorrhage sequelae. All three patients swallowed a denture accidentally. Chest X-rays showed the denture with sharp clasps in the cervicothoracic region of the esophagus, and endoscopy revealed that it was lodged in the esophageal mucosa. The denture was subsequently removed by cervical esophagotomy. All three patients had a good clinical postoperative course without any complications. Thus, we recommend surgery via a cervical approach to remove a denture with sharp clasps impacted in the cervicothoracic esophagus, with intraoperative endoscopic examination for esophageal injury.

  14. Chronic Expanding Hematoma in the Dorsal Cervicothoracic Region as a Long-Term Complication of Retained Bullet Fragments: Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Saima; Ehmed, Salman; Blume, Terri; Fai, Emmanuel K; Khan, Agha S

    2016-01-01

    Chronic expanding hematoma is a rare pathology, which has not been previously described as a complication of gunshot injury with retained bullet fragments. Because of the similar characteristics of chronic expanding hematoma to malignancy, it can present a diagnostic challenge for clinicians. Imaging and biopsy evaluation is needed to reach a conclusive diagnosis and implement appropriate treatment. In this case report, we will discuss the development, diagnosis, and management of a chronic superficial cervicothoracic mass in a patient who presented 30 years post-gunshot injury with retained bullet fragments.  PMID:27917326

  15. Value of the swimming position and arm traction in visualizing the cervicothoracic junction over the standard lateral cervical X-ray.

    PubMed

    Toksoy, Aydin; Bektas, Firat; Eken, Cenker; Ceken, Kaan; Cete, Yildiray

    2010-03-23

    The cervicothoracic junction (CTJ) is often inadequately visualized on lateral cervical X-rays due to anatomic variations and technical factors. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the swimmer's view and arm traction could enhance the image field on the standard lateral cervical (SLC) X-ray. The study was conducted in a university hospital in October 2007 with 40 volunteers. SLC X-ray, lateral cervical X-ray in the swimming position, and lateral cervical X-ray with arm traction were performed in the supine position. The enhancements in the image fields were analyzed. There was a statistically significant difference for the increases in the view of cervical spines between SLC X-ray (12.60 +/- 7.48) and either lateral cervical X-ray with arm traction (21.73 +/- 9.78; p = 0.000) or in the swimming position (21.20 +/- 14.19; p = 0.001). Both arm traction and swimming position increased the field of view by approximately 9 mm. Increased visualization of the cervical spine occurred for 24 of the 40 participants using the arm traction view (60.0%) and 23 participants (57.5%) using the swimming position view-results found to be statistically similar according to the >/= 1/3 caudal vertebral height visualized (p = 0.902). Using the lateral cervical X-ray view, the number of cervical vertebrae visualized differed according to body mass index (BMI)-seven cervical vertebrae were visualized in participants with a BMI < 25 and six vertebrae were visualized in participants with a BMI >/= 25 (p = 0.007). Lateral cervical X-rays with arm traction and swimming position enhance the view of SLC X-rays. An initial SLC X-ray including the lower third of the cervical spine (with C7), arm traction, and swimming position may be beneficial in visualizing the CTJ. However, patients with an increased BMI are unlikely to benefit from all three methods.

  16. Value of the swimming position and arm traction in visualizing the cervicothoracic junction over the standard lateral cervical X-ray

    PubMed Central

    Toksoy, Aydin; Bektas, Firat; Ceken, Kaan; Cete, Yildiray

    2010-01-01

    Background The cervicothoracic junction (CTJ) is often inadequately visualized on lateral cervical X-rays due to anatomic variations and technical factors. Aims The aim of this study was to investigate whether the swimmer’s view and arm traction could enhance the image field on the standard lateral cervical (SLC) X-ray. Methods The study was conducted in a university hospital in October 2007 with 40 volunteers. SLC X-ray, lateral cervical X-ray in the swimming position, and lateral cervical X-ray with arm traction were performed in the supine position. The enhancements in the image fields were analyzed. Results There was a statistically significant difference for the increases in the view of cervical spines between SLC X-ray (12.60 ± 7.48) and either lateral cervical X-ray with arm traction (21.73 ± 9.78; p = 0.000) or in the swimming position (21.20 ± 14.19; p = 0.001). Both arm traction and swimming position increased the field of view by approximately 9 mm. Increased visualization of the cervical spine occurred for 24 of the 40 participants using the arm traction view (60.0%) and 23 participants (57.5%) using the swimming position view—results found to be statistically similar according to the ≥ 1/3 caudal vertebral height visualized (p = 0.902). Using the lateral cervical X-ray view, the number of cervical vertebrae visualized differed according to body mass index (BMI)—seven cervical vertebrae were visualized in participants with a BMI < 25 and six vertebrae were visualized in participants with a BMI ≥ 25 (p = 0.007). Conclusion Lateral cervical X-rays with arm traction and swimming position enhance the view of SLC X-rays. An initial SLC X-ray including the lower third of the cervical spine (with C7), arm traction, and swimming position may be beneficial in visualizing the CTJ. However, patients with an increased BMI are unlikely to benefit from all three methods. PMID:20606816

  17. [Postoperative complications in patients with cervicothoracic injuries].

    PubMed

    Tatarinova, E V; Pogodina, A N; Korovkina, E N

    2014-01-01

    The results of the diagnosis and treatment of 117 patients with cervicothoracic injuries were analyzed. Different complications were observed in 51 (43.6%) cases. The main reasons contributing to the development of complications included late diagnosis of lesions of trachea and esophagus, acute blood loss, inadequate hemostasis during surgery.

  18. Cervicothoracic spinal cord and pontomedullary injury secondary to high-voltage electrocution: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction High-voltage electrical injuries are uncommonly reported and may predispose to both immediate and delayed neurologic complications. Case presentation We report the case of a 43-year-old Caucasian man who experienced a high-voltage electrocution injury resulting in ischemic myelopathy and secondary paraparesis. Conclusion High-voltage electrocution injuries are a serious problem with potential for both immediate and delayed neurologic sequelae. The existing literature regarding effective treatment of neurologic complications is limited. Long-term follow-up and multidisciplinary management of these patients is required. PMID:22974044

  19. The MURCS Association: Mullerian Duct Aplasia, Renal Hypoplasia and Cervicothoracic Somite Dysplasia - A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Akhter, N; Begum, B N; Newaz, M

    2015-07-01

    We report on a 22 years old lady with aplasia of uterus and most of the vagina with normal secondary sexual characteristics, unilateral renal hypoplasia and anomalies of cervico throacic somites (MURCS Association), growth retardation, cardiac defect and congenital urethrovaginal fistula. Although there is a broad spectrum of anomalies described with MURCS association genitourinary fistula is not yet reported and reviewed in published articles. The relevance of this paper is to show the importance of further investigation in cases of primary amenorrhoea with mullerian agenesis to establish that the patient has MURCS association and not simply MRKH (Mayer Rokitansky-Kusterhauser Syndrome) syndrome. Consequently we should provide guidance to the patients and their families about the best way to conduct the case including genetic counseling and family screening.

  20. CAVITATION SOUNDS DURING CERVICOTHORACIC SPINAL MANIPULATION

    PubMed Central

    Mourad, Firas; Zingoni, Andrea; Iorio, Raffaele; Perreault, Thomas; Zacharko, Noah; de las Peñas, César Fernández; Butts, Raymond; Cleland, Joshua A.

    2017-01-01

    Background No study has previously investigated the side, duration or number of audible cavitation sounds during high-velocity low-amplitude (HVLA) thrust manipulation to the cervicothoracic spine. Purpose The primary purpose was to determine which side of the spine cavitates during cervicothoracic junction (CTJ) HVLA thrust manipulation. Secondary aims were to calculate the average number of cavitations, the duration of cervicothoracic thrust manipulation, and the duration of a single cavitation. Study Design Quasi-experimental study Methods Thirty-two patients with upper trapezius myalgia received two cervicothoracic HVLA thrust manipulations targeting the right and left T1-2 articulation, respectively. Two high sampling rate accelerometers were secured bilaterally 25 mm lateral to midline of the T1-2 interspace. For each manipulation, two audio signals were extracted using Short-Time Fourier Transformation (STFT) and singularly processed via spectrogram calculation in order to evaluate the frequency content and number of instantaneous energy bursts of both signals over time for each side of the CTJ. Result Unilateral cavitation sounds were detected in 53 (91.4%) of 58 cervicothoracic HVLA thrust manipulations and bilateral cavitation sounds were detected in just five (8.6%) of the 58 thrust manipulations; that is, cavitation was significantly (p<0.001) more likely to occur unilaterally than bilaterally. In addition, cavitation was significantly (p<0.0001) more likely to occur on the side contralateral to the clinician's short-lever applicator. The mean number of audible cavitations per manipulation was 4.35 (95% CI 2.88, 5.76). The mean duration of a single manipulation was 60.77 ms (95% CI 28.25, 97.42) and the mean duration of a single audible cavitation was 4.13 ms (95% CI 0.82, 7.46). In addition to single-peak and multi-peak energy bursts, spectrogram analysis also demonstrated high frequency sounds, low frequency sounds, and sounds of multiple

  1. CAVITATION SOUNDS DURING CERVICOTHORACIC SPINAL MANIPULATION.

    PubMed

    Dunning, James; Mourad, Firas; Zingoni, Andrea; Iorio, Raffaele; Perreault, Thomas; Zacharko, Noah; de Las Peñas, César Fernández; Butts, Raymond; Cleland, Joshua A

    2017-08-01

    No study has previously investigated the side, duration or number of audible cavitation sounds during high-velocity low-amplitude (HVLA) thrust manipulation to the cervicothoracic spine. The primary purpose was to determine which side of the spine cavitates during cervicothoracic junction (CTJ) HVLA thrust manipulation. Secondary aims were to calculate the average number of cavitations, the duration of cervicothoracic thrust manipulation, and the duration of a single cavitation. Quasi-experimental study. Thirty-two patients with upper trapezius myalgia received two cervicothoracic HVLA thrust manipulations targeting the right and left T1-2 articulation, respectively. Two high sampling rate accelerometers were secured bilaterally 25 mm lateral to midline of the T1-2 interspace. For each manipulation, two audio signals were extracted using Short-Time Fourier Transformation (STFT) and singularly processed via spectrogram calculation in order to evaluate the frequency content and number of instantaneous energy bursts of both signals over time for each side of the CTJ. Unilateral cavitation sounds were detected in 53 (91.4%) of 58 cervicothoracic HVLA thrust manipulations and bilateral cavitation sounds were detected in just five (8.6%) of the 58 thrust manipulations; that is, cavitation was significantly (p<0.001) more likely to occur unilaterally than bilaterally. In addition, cavitation was significantly (p<0.0001) more likely to occur on the side contralateral to the clinician's short-lever applicator. The mean number of audible cavitations per manipulation was 4.35 (95% CI 2.88, 5.76). The mean duration of a single manipulation was 60.77 ms (95% CI 28.25, 97.42) and the mean duration of a single audible cavitation was 4.13 ms (95% CI 0.82, 7.46). In addition to single-peak and multi-peak energy bursts, spectrogram analysis also demonstrated high frequency sounds, low frequency sounds, and sounds of multiple frequencies for all 58 manipulations. Cavitation was

  2. Discrete or diffuse intramedullary tumor? Contrast-enhanced intraoperative ultrasound in a case of intramedullary cervicothoracic hemangioblastomas mimicking a diffuse infiltrative glioma: technical note and case report.

    PubMed

    Vetrano, Ignazio G; Prada, Francesco; Nataloni, Ilaria F; Bene, Massimiliano Del; Dimeco, Francesco; Valentini, Laura G

    2015-08-01

    Hemangioblastomas are benign, highly vascularized intramedullary lesions that may also extend into the intradural space. Surgery represents the standard therapy, with the goal of obtaining complete resection even at the risk of neurological morbidity. MRI is the gold standard for diagnosis and assessment of intramedullary tumors. Nevertheless, sometimes MRI may not accurately differentiate between different types of intramedullary tumors, in particular if they are associated with syringes or intra- and peritumoral cysts. This could subsequently affect surgical strategies. Intraoperative ultrasound (ioUS) has become in the last few years a very useful tool for use during neurosurgical procedures. Various ioUS modalities such as B-mode and Doppler have been applied during neurosurgical procedures. On the other hand, the use of contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) is not yet well defined and standardized in this field. We report a case of a young patient harboring a cervicothoracic intramedullary tumor, for which the preoperative neuroradiologi-cal diagnosis was in favor of a diffuse astrocytoma with nodular components whereas ioUS demonstrated 3 distinct intramedullary nodules. CEUS showed highly vascularized lesions, compatible with hemangioblastomas. These findings, particularly those obtained with CEUS, allowed better definition of the lesions for diagnosis, enhanced understanding of the physiopathological aspects, and permitted the localization of all 3 nodules, thus limiting spinal cord manipulation and allowing complete resection of the lesions, with an uneventful postoperative neurological course. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of the use of intraoperative CEUS in a case of intramedullary hemangioblastoma.

  3. [Diagnosis and treatment of cervicothoracic injuries].

    PubMed

    Tatarinova, E V; Pogodina, A N; Abakumov, M M

    2014-01-01

    It analyzed the diagnosis and treatment results of 123 patients with cervicothoracic injuries for 21 years. The frequency of cervicothoracic injuries among all patients with cervical injuries was 5.7%. Preoperative and postoperative diagnosis included radial and endoscopic methods. The complications rate was 43.6%. The most severe complications were observed in patients with delayed diagnosis of trachea and esophagus injuries.

  4. [MRI evaluation of cervicothoracic CSF hypotension].

    PubMed

    Maraval, A; Brugieres, P; Combes, C; Thomas, P; Blanc, R; Gaston, A

    2006-06-01

    We propose studying signs of cervicothoracic CSF hypotension by MRI. Axial T1-weighted GRE sequence with and without saturation bands positioned above and below the selected image plane, MR venography and MR Angiography with contrast administration are helpful to confirm the venous nature of the epidural thickening and to make the differential diagnosis with infectious or neoplastic epiduritis.

  5. Contemporary management of civilian penetrating cervicothoracic arterial injuries.

    PubMed

    Weinberg, Jordan A; Moore, Andrew H; Magnotti, Louis J; Teague, Rebecca J; Ward, Tyler A; Wasmund, Joshua B; Lamb, Elena M P; Schroeppel, Thomas J; Savage, Stephanie A; Minard, Gayle; Maish, George O; Croce, Martin A; Fabian, Timothy C

    2016-08-01

    The management of arterial injury at the thoracic outlet has long hinged on the fundamental principles of extensile exposure and vascular anastomosis. Nonetheless, treatment options for such injuries have evolved to include both endovascular stent placement and temporary vascular shunts. The purpose of this study was to evaluate our recent experience with penetrating cervicothoracic arterial injuries in light of these developments in trauma care. Patients with penetrating injuries to the innominate, carotid, subclavian, or axillary arteries managed at a single civilian trauma center between 2000 and 2013 were categorized as the modern era (ME) cohort. The management strategies and outcomes pertaining to the ME group were compared to those of previously reported experience (PE) concerning injuries to the innominate, carotid, subclavian, or axillary arteries at the same institution from 1974 to 1988. Over the two eras, there were 202 patients: 110 in the ME group and 92 in the PE group. Most of the injuries in both groups were managed with primary repair (45% vs. 46%; p = 0.89). A similar proportion of injuries in each group was managed with anticoagulation alone (14% vs. 10%; p = 0.40). In the ME group, two cases were managed with temporary shunt placement, and endovascular stent placement was performed in 12 patients. Outcomes were similar between the groups (bivariate comparison): mortality (ME, 15% vs. PE, 14%; p = 0.76), amputation following subclavian or axillary artery injury (ME, 5% vs. PE, 4%; p = 0.58), and posttreatment stroke following carotid injury (ME, 2% vs. PE, 6%; p = 0.57). Experience with penetrating arterial cervicothoracic injuries at a high-volume urban trauma center remained remarkably similar with respect to both anatomic distribution of injury and treatment. Conventional operative exposure and repair remain the cornerstone of treatment for most civilian cervicothoracic arterial injuries. Therapeutic study, level V.

  6. Subaxial cervical and cervicothoracic fixation techniques--indications, techniques, and outcomes.

    PubMed

    Pelton, Miguel A; Schwartz, Joseph; Singh, Kern

    2012-01-01

    The subaxial and cervicothoracic junction is a relatively difficult area for spine surgeons to navigate. Because of different transitional stressors at the junction of the smaller cervical vertebrae and the larger thoracic segments, proximity to neurovascular structures, and complex anatomy, extreme care and precision must be assumed during fixation in these regions. Lateral mass screws, pedicle screws, and translaminar screws are currently the standard of choice in the subaxial cervical and upper thoracic spine. This article addresses the relevant surgical anatomy, pitfalls, and pearls associated with each of these fixation techniques.

  7. [Pyeloureteral junction syndrome in children. Apropos of 178 cases].

    PubMed

    Juskiewenski, S; Moscovici, J; Bouissou, F; Vaysse, P; Guitard, J

    1983-01-01

    The authors review 178 cases of anomalies of the pyelo-ureteric junction, with a total of 189 anomalies. Almost one half of the cases were less than 5 years old (47.2%) and about 1/4 were less than 1 year old (24.7%). In girls, the incident which reveals the diagnosis is most often an infection and in boys, it is pain or haematuria. 26% of the cases had an associated urological lesion (23 cases of vesico-ureteric reflux, 8 cases of renal stones, 5 cases of mega-ureter and 4 cases of horseshoe kidney). 133 children were operated, essentially by resection of the pyelo-ureteric junction with an upstream by-pass. From the 126 cases with sufficient follow-up, 48 (38.1%) obtained great improvement, 63 (50%) a moderate improvement and 15 (11.9%), a stabilisation of the dilatation. In all cases except 3, the pyelo-ureteric junction was perfectly catheterizable. The histological lesions of the junction were variable and difficult to systematise, but usually extended beyond the junction to involve a large part of the pelvis. The variability of the caliceal dilatation makes any attempt at classification difficult. The authors recommend cystography in every case, as associated reflux was discovered in 16% of cases. Retrograde uretero-pyelography is practically no longer indicated. The isotope kidney scan with DTPA technetium, with a hyper-diuresis test, is often used, as it gives an idea about the clearance of filtration and about the degree of obstruction. Quantitative DMSA kidney scan can reveal the effects on the renal parenchyma. Conservation of the isthmus of a horseshoe kidney never interferes with the uretero-pyelic re-implantation. After correction of the anomaly of the uretero-pyelic junction, 5 cases of unilateral reflux out of 8 and 3 cases of bilateral reflux out of 10 resolved spontaneously.

  8. Massive Cervicothoracic Subcutaneous Emphysema and Pneumomediastinum Developing during a Dental Hygiene Procedure.

    PubMed

    Bocchialini, Gabriele; Ambrosi, Serena; Castellani, Andrea

    2017-01-01

    Subcutaneous emphysema is rare during or after dental procedures (usually extractions). Here, we describe the case of a 65-year-old woman who developed massive cervicothoracic subcutaneous emphysema and pneumomediastinum during a dental hygiene procedure employing an artificial airflow. She was diagnosed based on clinical manifestations and computed tomography (CT). CT revealed massive subcutaneous emphysema extending from the superior left eyelid to the diaphragm. We describe the clinical and radiological characteristics of this rare case.

  9. Techniques for operative correction of proximal junctional kyphosis of the upper thoracic spine.

    PubMed

    McClendon, Jamal; O'Shaughnessy, Brian A; Sugrue, Patrick A; Neal, Chris J; Acosta, Frank L; Koski, Tyler R; Ondra, Stephen L

    2012-02-15

    Retrospective study of a consecutive series of patients treated for proximal junctional kyphosis (PJK) of the upper thoracic and cervicothoracic spine. To discuss corrective techniques for the management of symptomatic kyphosis at the junction of fused and mobile segments of the upper thoracic and cervicothoracic spine in patients who complain of pain, neurological deficit, ambulatory difficulty, and/or social isolation. PJK is an unfortunately common, but important, complication seen in long instrumented fusions to the upper thoracic and cervicothoracic spine. Although often asymptomatic, its incidence and prevalence warrant a discussion on treatment options for symptomatic patients. After the institutional review board confirmed approval, we retrospectively analyzed patients who received treatment of PJK from 2003 to 2009. Segmental instrumentation and intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring were used in all patients. Data acquisition was performed by reviewing electronic medical records and radiographs. Inclusion criteria were patients who underwent surgical correction of PJK of the cervicothoracic and upper thoracic spine and had more than 2-year follow-up. Preoperative lumbar lordosis, preoperative thoracic kyphosis, pre- and postoperative sagittal balance, and sagittal proximal junctional Cobb angle were obtained. All corrective procedures were performed in 2 stages, each patient receiving cervical traction between cases. Inclusion criteria were met in 7 patients (5 women and 2 men), with mean age of 55 years (range, 18-80 years). Six patients received multilevel Smith-Petersen osteotomies, with 2 patients receiving rib osteotomies, and 1 patient received a vertebral column resection. The mean preoperative and postoperative proximal junctional Cobb angles were 45° (range, 14°-89.7°) and 14° (range, 3.0°-38.0°), respectively. The mean degree of correction was 31° (range, 11°-79.2°). All patients had maintained or improved sagittal balance. No

  10. [Ureteropelvic junction syndrome in adults. 108 cases in 102 adults].

    PubMed

    Joual, A; Aboutaeib, R; Rabii, R; el Mrini, M; Benjelloun, S

    1996-01-01

    We report 108 cases of ureteropelvic junction obstruction corresponding 54 males and 48 females, with a mean age of 33 years. Pain was the commonest symptom. Delay in diagnosis was 3 and a half years. The diagnosis was made by IVP allowing our patients to be in different stages : Stage I (12 cases), stage II (39 cases), stage III (25 cases), stage IV (32 cases). We did not operate on 10 patients presenting with allow stage. 61 patients were operated by a conservative procedure : dismembered pyeloplasty (58 cases), YV pyeloplasty (3 cases). Nephrectomy was performed in 37 patients (34%). This high nephrectomy rate was due to be delayed in diagnosis.

  11. Breast metastasis from esophagogastric junction cancer: a case report.

    PubMed

    Jena, Sanghamitra; Bhattacharya, Samir; Gupta, Arnab; Roy, Shravasti; Sinha, Neetesh Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Metastasis to breast from nonmammary malignancy is only about 1.3-2.7%. A few cases of squamous cell carcinoma of esophagus and adenocarcinoma of stomach metastasizing to breast have been reported, but this is probably the first report of breast metastasis from esophagogastric junction (EGJ) cancer in the English literature. Herein we report a case of a 32-year-old patient diagnosed as adenocarcinoma of gastroesophageal junction, presenting with left breast metastasis two years after treatment. Given unusual site of metastasis in a follow-up case of EGJ cancer, not only it is challenging to differentiate it from primary carcinoma of breast but also it is important from treatment point of view. In our case, clinical data, radiology, histopathology, and immunohistochemistry (IHC) led us to reach the diagnosis.

  12. Junction-to-Case Thermal Resistance of a Silicon Carbide Bipolar Junction Transistor Measured

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niedra, Janis M.

    2006-01-01

    Junction temperature of a prototype SiC-based bipolar junction transistor (BJT) was estimated by using the base-emitter voltage (V(sub BE)) characteristic for thermometry. The V(sub BE) was measured as a function of the base current (I(sub B)) at selected temperatures (T), all at a fixed collector current (I(sub C)) and under very low duty cycle pulse conditions. Under such conditions, the average temperature of the chip was taken to be the same as that of the temperature-controlled case. At increased duty cycle such as to substantially heat the chip, but same I(sub C) pulse height, the chip temperature was identified by matching the V(sub BE) to the thermometry curves. From the measured average power, the chip-to-case thermal resistance could be estimated, giving a reasonable value. A tentative explanation for an observed bunching with increasing temperature of the calibration curves may relate to an increasing dopant atom ionization. A first-cut analysis, however, does not support this.

  13. Single-Stage Operation for Giant Schwannoma at the Craniocervical Junction with Minimal Laminectomy: A Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Sun; Park, Hunho; Lee, Kyu-Sung; Park, Seoung Woo

    2016-01-01

    Here we report a single-stage operation we performed on a patient with a large schwannoma that extended from the lower clivus to the cervico-thoracic junction caudally. A number of authors have previously performed multilevel laminectomy to remove giant schwannomas that extend for considerable length. This technique has caused cervical instability such as kyphosis or gooseneck deformity on several occasions. We removed the tumor with a left lateral suboccipital craniectomy with laminectomy only at C1 and without any subsequent surgery-related neurologic deficits. However, this technique requires meticulous preoperative evaluation on existence of Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) cleft between the tumor and spinal cord on magnetic resonance imaging, of tumor origin located at the upper cervical root, and of detachment of tumor from the origin site. PMID:27800002

  14. 68Ga-PSMA-HBED Uptake on Cervicothoracic (Stellate) Ganglia, a Common Pitfall on PET/CT.

    PubMed

    Beheshti, Mohsen; Rezaee, Alireza; Langsteger, Werner

    2017-03-01

    Ga-PSMA-HBED PET/CT showed promising results in staging and restaging of prostate cancer. However, nonspecific uptake has been reported in the celiac ganglia. In this case series, we showed faint radiotracer uptake on upper thoracic region in the location of cervicothoracic (stellate) ganglia. This ganglion is located anterior to the transverse process of C7 vertebra, inferior to subclavian artery, and superior to the neck of the first rib.

  15. Reliability and group differences in quantitative cervicothoracic measures among individuals with and without chronic neck pain.

    PubMed

    Shahidi, Bahar; Johnson, Cynthia L; Curran-Everett, Douglas; Maluf, Katrina S

    2012-10-31

    Clinicians frequently rely on subjective categorization of impairments in mobility, strength, and endurance for clinical decision-making; however, these assessments are often unreliable and lack sensitivity to change. The objective of this study was to determine the inter-rater reliability, minimum detectable change (MDC), and group differences in quantitative cervicothoracic measures for individuals with and without chronic neck pain (NP). Nineteen individuals with NP and 20 healthy controls participated in this case control study. Two physical therapists performed a 30-minute examination on separate days. A handheld dynamometer, gravity inclinometer, ruler, and stopwatch were used to quantify cervical range of motion (ROM), cervical muscle strength and endurance, and scapulothoracic muscle length and strength, respectively. Intraclass correlation coefficients for inter-rater reliability were significantly greater than zero for most impairment measures, with point estimates ranging from 0.45 to 0.93. The NP group exhibited reduced cervical ROM (P ≤ 0.012) and muscle strength (P ≤ 0.038) in most movement directions, reduced cervical extensor endurance (P = 0.029), and reduced rhomboid and middle trapezius muscle strength (P ≤ 0.049). Results demonstrate the feasibility of obtaining objective cervicothoracic impairment measures with acceptable inter-rater agreement across time. The clinical utility of these measures is supported by evidence of impaired mobility, strength, and endurance among patients with NP, with corresponding MDC values that can help establish benchmarks for clinically significant change.

  16. Resolution of whiplash-associated allodynia following cervicothoracic thrust and non-thrust manipulation.

    PubMed

    Lowry, Carina D; O'Hearn, Michael A; Courtney, Carol A

    2011-08-01

    Whiplash injuries of the cervical spine comprise 30% of injuries reported following motor vehicle accident (MVA) and often progress to chronic painful conditions. The purpose of this case report is to describe the management of a 37-year-old female referred to physical therapy with neck and shoulder pain after whiplash injury. The patient demonstrated limited cervical and shoulder active range of motion as well as quantitative sensory testing (QST) results consistent with central nervous system sensitization. She was treated for 11 visits over a 6-week period with manual therapy and specific exercise directed to the cervicothoracic spine. Her pain decreased from 9/10 to 2/10 by the end of treatment and remained improved at 1/10 at the 6-month follow-up. Her Copenhagen Neck Functional Disability Scale decreased from 23/30 to 4/30 by the 11th visit. In addition, she demonstrated clinically significant increases in cervical active range of motion and normal somatosensation. Manual therapy of the cervicothoracic spine may be a beneficial adjunct to the standard care of patients with signs and symptoms of central sensitization after whiplash-associated disorder and primary report of neck and shoulder pain.

  17. Neurenteric cyst of the craniocervical junction--case report.

    PubMed

    Abe, K; Oyama, K; Mori, K; Ishimaru, S; Eguchi, M; Maeda, M

    1999-11-01

    A 60-year-old female presented with occipital headache and limitation of neck movement. Neurological examination showed weakness of the right sternocleidomastoid muscle. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a cystic lesion at the craniocervical junction and posterior compression of the brain stem. The lesion was totally removed through the transcondylar approach. The histological diagnosis was neurenteric cyst. The transcondylar approach provides a direct operative view of the clivus and anterior craniovertebral junction.

  18. Utility of a 3-dimensional full-scale NaCl model for rib strut grafting for anterior fusion for cervicothoracic kyphosis

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Kazuyoshi; Imagama, Shiro; Muramoto, Akio; Ito, Zenya; Ando, Kei; Yagi, Hideki; Hida, Tetsuro; Ito, Kenyu; Ishikawa, Yoshimoto; Tsushima, Mikito; Ishiguro, Naoki

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT In severe spinal deformity, pain and neurological disorder may be caused by spinal cord compression. Surgery for spinal reconstruction is desirable, but may be difficult in a case with severe deformity. Here, we show the utility of a 3D NaCl (salt) model in preoperative planning of anterior reconstruction using a rib strut in a 49-year-old male patient with cervicothoracic degenerative spondylosis. We performed surgery in two stages: a posterior approach with decompression and posterior instrumentation with a pedicle screw; followed by a second operation using an anterior approach, for which we created a 3D NaCl model including the cervicothoracic lesion, spinal deformity, and ribs for anterior reconstruction. The 3D NaCl model was easily scraped compared with a conventional plaster model and was useful for planning of resection and identification of a suitable rib for grafting in a preoperative simulation. Surgery was performed successfully with reference to the 3D NaCl model. We conclude that preoperative simulation with a 3D NaCl model contributes to performance of anterior reconstruction using a rib strut in a case of cervicothoracic deformity. PMID:26412901

  19. The versatile application of cervicofacial and cervicothoracic rotation flaps in head and neck surgery

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The large defects resulting from head and neck tumour surgeries present a reconstructive challenge to surgeons. Although numerous methods can be used, they all have their own limitations. In this paper, we present our experience with cervicofacial and cervicothoracic rotation flaps to help expand the awareness and application of this useful system of flaps. Methods Twenty-one consecutive patients who underwent repair of a variety of defects of the head and neck with cervicofacial or cervicothoracic flaps in our hospital from 2006 to 2009 were retrospectively analysed. Statistics pertaining to the patients' clinical factors were gathered. Results Cheek neoplasms are the most common indication for cervicofacial and cervicothoracic rotation flaps, followed by parotid tumours. Among the 12 patients with medical comorbidities, the most common was hypertension. Defects ranging from 1.5 cm × 1.5 cm to 7 cm × 6 cm were reconstructed by cervicofacial flap, and defects from 3 cm × 2 cm to 16 cm × 7 cm were reconstructed by cervicothoracic flap. The two flaps also exhibited versatility in these reconstructions. When combined with the pectoralis major myocutaneous flap, the cervicothoracic flap could repair through-and-through cheek defects, and in combination with a temporalis myofacial flap, the cervicofacial flap was able to cover orbital defects. Additionally, 95% patients were satisfied with their resulting contour results. Conclusions Cervicofacial and cervicothoracic flaps provide a technically simple, reliable, safe, efficient and cosmetic means to reconstruct defects of the head and neck. PMID:22018437

  20. Traumatic closed index extensor tendon rupture at the musclotendinous junction: a report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Komura, Shingo; Yokoi, Tatsuo; Nonomura, Hidehiko

    2011-03-01

    This report describes two cases of traumatic closed index extensor tendon rupture at the musclotendinous junction. Both patients were injured when their work gloves were caught in the revolving parts of machines, and both were treated surgically. One of the patients completely ruptured the index extensor digitorum communis (EDC) and the extensor indicis proprius (EIP) tendons at the musclotendinous junction of dorsal forearm. In this patient, the distal stump of the index EDC tendon was sutured to the middle EDC tendon in an end-to-side juncture. The other patient completely ruptured the EIP tendon and partially ruptured the index EDC tendon at the musclotendinous junction. In this patient, tendon transfer of the extensor digiti minimi (EDM) to the EIP tendon and plication of the index EDC tendon were performed. In both cases, surgical intervention enabled the patients to extend their index fingers almost normally; however, the former complained of inability to extend his index finger independently. Tendon transfer of the EDM in cases of index extensor tendon rupture at the musclotendinous junction is a good method to restore ability to independently extend the index finger. However, consideration should be given to anatomical variation in the little finger. The EDC tendon is sometimes absent leaving the EDM tendon as the only extensor tendon to the little finger.

  1. Evaluation of the effectiveness of the Minerva cervicothoracic orthosis.

    PubMed

    Sharpe, K P; Rao, S; Ziogas, A

    1995-07-01

    This study evaluated a lightweight Minerva cervicothoracic orthosis with an occipital flare and forehead strap. The orthosis was evaluated for its ability to immobilize the cervical spine in normal healthy volunteers. Previous studies have been performed to evaluate cervical orthoses. Exception for the halo brace, none have controlled the upper cervical spine very well. The brace tested in the present report incorporates an occipital flare and forehead strap to better control the upper cervical spine. Sixteen healthy male volunteers were evaluated in and out of the orthosis in three planes of motion. Maximal active cervical flexion, extension, and lateral bending were recorded and measured radiographically. Rotation was measured from overhead photographs. In a comparison of the present results with those of similar previous studies, improvement in control of flexion/extension of the upper cervical spine and in control of rotation was found. The occiput to C1 level, however, remained poorly controlled. This orthosis provides good control of the cervical spine below C1.

  2. MURCS (Müllerian duct aplasia–renal agenesis–cervicothoracic somite dysplasia): a rare cause of primary amenorrhoea

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Sunil; Sharma, Shruti

    2016-01-01

    The agenesis of the Müllerian duct is the second most common cause of primary amenorrhoea after Turner syndrome. The abnormal development of Müllerian duct often associates with the urinary tract and skeletal abnormalities. MURCS (Müllerian duct aplasia–renal agenesis–cervicothoracic somite dysplasia) association is a unique and rare developmental disorder with four common features of uterine hypoplasia or aplasia, renal agenesis or ectopy, vertebral anomalies and short stature. We report a case of young female with primary amenorrhoea. She had well-developed secondary sexual characteristics along with multiple congenital developmental abnormalities such as the absence of uterus, ectopic kidney, cervical vertebral fusion, hemivertebrae, scoliosis, cervical rib, facial asymmetry and growth retardation. Our case highlights the rarity and clinical importance of this syndrome. For the evaluation of primary amenorrhoea in a female with well-developed secondary sexual characteristics, congenital anomalies should be ruled out before hormone and karyotype analyses. PMID:27099773

  3. Congenital dermal sinus with an infected dermoid cyst in the cervico-thoracic spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Lee, Brian; Jeelani, Yasser; McComb, J Gordon

    2013-01-01

    Congenital dermal sinuses (CDS) are epithelium-lined tracts that result from incomplete separation of cutaneous ectoderm from the underlying neuroectoderm. CDS may be associated with dermoid cysts and can cause complications by mass effect and by functioning as a pathway for infection. Cervical and thoracic tracts are rare, making up 1 and 10% of all CDS, respectively. We present an unusual case of a cervico-thoracic CDS with concomitant infected dermoid leading to neurological dysfunction. A 1-year-old male with a normal developmental history presented with a several-week history of progressive weakness. Previous visits to two outside emergency departments diagnosed the patient with acute otitis media. After another episode of fever and worsening of neurological symptoms, the patient was correctly diagnosed as having CDS with an infected dermoid cyst. Antibiotics were initiated, the lesion was resected, and the patient improved neurologically. Although cervical and thoracic CDS with infected dermoids are rare, one should have a high index of suspicion when cutaneous stigmata of spinal dysraphism are identified. Due to the risk of neurological deterioration, the recommended treatment of CDS with or without a concomitant intraspinal dermoid is prompt administration of antibiotics and definitive surgical intervention.

  4. Eye lens membrane junctional microdomains: a comparison between healthy and pathological cases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buzhynskyy, Nikolay; Sens, Pierre; Behar-Cohen, Francine; Scheuring, Simon

    2011-08-01

    The eye lens is a transparent tissue constituted of tightly packed fiber cells. To maintain homeostasis and transparency of the lens, the circulation of water, ions and metabolites is required. Junctional microdomains connect the lens cells and ensure both tight cell-to-cell adhesion and intercellular flow of fluids through a microcirculation system. Here, we overview membrane morphology and tissue functional requirements of the mammalian lens. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) has opened up the possibility of visualizing the junctional microdomains at unprecedented submolecular resolution, revealing the supramolecular assembly of lens-specific aquaporin-0 (AQP0) and connexins (Cx). We compare the membrane protein assembly in healthy lenses with senile and diabetes-II cataract cases and novel data of the lens membranes from a congenital cataract. In the healthy case, AQP0s form characteristic square arrays confined by connexons. In the cases of senile and diabetes-II cataract patients, connexons were degraded, leading to malformation of AQP0 arrays and breakdown of the microcirculation system. In the congenital cataract, connexons are present, indicating probable non-membranous grounds for lens opacification. Further, we discuss the energetic aspects of the membrane organization in junctional microdomains. The AFM hence becomes a biomedical nano-imaging tool for the analysis of single-membrane protein supramolecular association in healthy and pathological membranes.

  5. Retrospective analysis of a case series of patients with traumatic injuries to the craniocervical junction

    PubMed Central

    Esteves, Luiz Adriano; Joaquim, Andrei Fernandes; Tedeschi, Helder

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective To evaluate the correlation between the treatment, the characteristics of the lesions and the clinical outcome of patients with traumatic injuries to the craniocervical junction. Methods This was a retrospective study of patients treated conservatively or surgically between 2010 and 2013 with complete data sets. Results We analyzed 37 patients, 73% were men with mean age of 41.7 years. Of these, 32% were submitted to initial surgical treatment and 68% received conservative treatment. Seven (29%) underwent surgery subsequently. In the surgical group, there were seven cases of odontoid type II fractures, two cases of fracture of posterior elements of the axis, one case of C1-C2 dislocation with associated fractured C2, one case of occipitocervical dislocation, and one case of combined C1 and C2 fractures, and facet dislocation. Only one patient had neurological déficit that improved after treatment. Two surgical complications were seen: a liquoric fistula and one surgical wound infection (reaproached). In the group treated conservatively, odontoid fractures (eight cases) and fractures of the posterior elements of C2 (five cases) were more frequent. In two cases, in addition to the injuries of the craniocervical junction, there were fractures in other segments of the spine. None of the patients who underwent conservative treatment presented neurological deterioration. Conclusion Although injuries of craniocervical junction are relatively rare, they usually involve fractures of the odontoid and the posterior elements of the axis. Our results recommend early surgical treatment for type II odontoid fractures and ligament injuries, the conservative treatment for other injuries. PMID:28076601

  6. Circuit theory of multiple Andreev reflections in diffusive SNS junctions: The incoherent case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bezuglyi, E. V.; Bratus', E. N.; Shumeiko, V. S.; Wendin, G.; Takayanagi, H.

    2000-12-01

    The incoherent regime of multiple Andreev reflections (MAR) is studied in long diffusive SNS junctions at applied voltages larger than the Thouless energy. Incoherent MAR are treated as a transport problem in energy space by means of a circuit theory for an equivalent electrical network. The current through NS interfaces is explained in terms of diffusion flows of electrons and holes through ``tunnel'' and ``Andreev'' resistors. These resistors in diffusive junctions play roles analogous to the normal and Andreev reflection coefficients in Octavio-Tinkham-Blonder-Klapwijk theory for ballistic junctions. The theory is applied to the subharmonic gap structure (SGS); simple analytical results are obtained for the distribution function and current spectral density for the limiting cases of resistive and transparent NS interfaces. In the general case, the exact solution is found in terms of chain fractions, and the current is calculated numerically. SGS shows qualitatively different behavior for even and odd subharmonic numbers n=2Δ/eV, and the maximum slopes of the differential resistance correspond to the gap subharmonics, eV=2Δ/n. The influence of inelastic scattering on the subgap anomalies of the differential resistance is analyzed.

  7. A randomized, comparative trial: does pillow type alter cervico-thoracic spinal posture when side lying?

    PubMed Central

    Gordon, Susan J; Grimmer-Somers, Karen A; Trott, Patricia H

    2011-01-01

    Background Many patients ask for advice about choosing a pillow. This research was undertaken to determine if pillow type alters cervico-thoracic spine position when resting in the side-lying position. Aim To investigate the effect of different pillow shape and content on the slope of cervico-thoracic spine segments when side lying. Materials and methods The study was a randomized blinded comparative trial set in a laboratory that replicated a bedroom. The subjects were side sleepers aged over 18 years. Exclusion criteria were history of surgery to the cervico-thoracic spine, an injury or accident to the cervico-thoracic spine in the preceding year, or currently receiving treatment for neck symptoms. Each participant rested in a standardized side-lying position for 10 minutes on each of the trial pillows: regular shaped polyester, foam, feather, and latex pillows, and a contour shaped foam pillow. Reflective markers were placed on external occipital protuberance (EOP), C2, C4, C7, and T3, and digital images were recorded of subjects at 0 and 10 minutes on each pillow. Images were digitized using each reflective marker and the slope of each spinal segment calculated. Univariate analysis of variance models were used to investigate slope differences between pillows at 0 and 10 minutes. Significance was established at P < 0.01 to take account of chance effects from repeated measures and multiple comparisons. Results At 0 and 10 minutes, the EOP-C2, C2-C4, and C4-C7 segmental slopes were significantly different across all pillows. Significant differences were identified when comparing the feather pillow with the latex, regular and contour foam pillows, and when comparing the polyester and foam contour pillows. The regular and contour foam pillows produced similar slopes at all spinal segments. Conclusion Cervico-thoracic spinal segment slope alters significantly when people change from a foam, latex, or polyester pillow to a feather pillow and vice versa. The shape of a

  8. Ultrasound-guided trigger point injections in the cervicothoracic musculature: a new and unreported technique.

    PubMed

    Botwin, Kenneth P; Sharma, Kavita; Saliba, Romeo; Patel, Bharat C

    2008-01-01

    Myofascial pain is defined as pain that originates from myofascial trigger points in skeletal muscle. It is prevalent in regional musculoskeletal pain syndromes, either alone or in combination with other pain generators. The myofascial pain syndrome is one of the largest groups of under diagnosed and under treated medical problems encountered in clinical practice. Trigger points are commonly seen in patients with myofascial pain which is responsible for localized pain in the affected muscles as well as referred pain patterns. Correct needle placement in a myofascial trigger point is vital to prevent complications and improve efficacy of the trigger point injection to help reduce or relieve myofascial pain. In obese patients, these injections may not reach the target tissue. In the cervicothoracic spine, a misguided or misplaced injection can result in a pneumothorax. Here, we describe an ultrasound-guided trigger point injection technique to avoid this potential pitfall. Office based ultrasound-guided injection techniques for musculoskeletal disorders have been described in the literature with regard to tendon, bursa, cystic, and joint pathologies. For the interventionalist, utilizing ultrasound yields multiple advantages technically and practically, including observation of needle placement in real-time, ability to perform dynamic studies, the possibility of diagnosing musculoskeletal pathologies, avoidance of radiation exposure, reduced overall cost, and portability of equipment within the office setting. To our knowledge, the use of ultrasound guidance in performing trigger point injection in the cervicothoracic area, particularly in obese patients, has not been previously reported. A palpable trigger point in the cervicothoracic musculature was localized and marked by indenting the skin with the tip of a plastic needle cover. The skin was then sterile prepped. Then, using an ultrasound machine with sterile coupling gel and a sterile latex free transducer cover

  9. Remodeling Brain Activity by Repetitive Cervicothoracic Transspinal Stimulation after Human Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Murray, Lynda M.; Knikou, Maria

    2017-01-01

    Interventions that can produce targeted brain plasticity after human spinal cord injury (SCI) are needed for restoration of impaired movement in these patients. In this study, we tested the effects of repetitive cervicothoracic transspinal stimulation in one person with cervical motor incomplete SCI on cortical and corticospinal excitability, which were assessed via transcranial magnetic stimulation with paired and single pulses, respectively. We found that repetitive cervicothoracic transspinal stimulation potentiated intracortical facilitation in flexor and extensor wrist muscles, recovered intracortical inhibition in the more impaired wrist flexor muscle, increased corticospinal excitability bilaterally, and improved voluntary muscle strength. These effects may have been mediated by improvements in cortical integration of ascending sensory inputs and strengthening of corticospinal connections. Our novel therapeutic intervention opens new avenues for targeted brain neuromodulation protocols in individuals with cervical motor incomplete SCI. PMID:28265259

  10. Dorsal midline hemivertebra at the lumbosacral junction: report of 2 cases.

    PubMed

    Ansari, Shaheryar F; Rodgers, Richard B; Fulkerson, Daniel H

    2015-01-01

    Congenital scoliosis from laterally located hemivertebrae at the lumbosacral junction has been described previously. However, dorsally located midline hemivertebrae at this location have not been reported. The authors describe the presentation, treatment, and outcomes of 2 patients (1 male and 1 female) with this rare malformation. All clinical and radiographic records were reviewed. Outcomes were recorded using survey instruments (Oswestry Disability Index and the 36-Item Short Form Health Survey). Radiographic assessment of bony fusion was performed using CT scanning 1 year after surgery. Both patients presented with back and leg pain, urinary hesitancy/incontinence, difficulty sitting and lying down, waddling gait, and restriction of movement. Imaging showed a wedge-shaped dorsal deformity that stretched the nerve roots and compressed the canal. Both patients underwent resection of the hemivertebra with posterolateral instrumented fusion from L-2 to the pelvis. The female patient had a low-lying conus and underwent sectioning of the filum terminale. Both patients showed improvement in the ability to sit and lie flat and in bowel and bladder function after surgery. The authors describe their experience with 2 patients with similar, rare congenital bony deformities at the lumbosacral junction. To their knowledge, similar cases have not been previously reported.

  11. Functional outcome of pyeloplasty for ureteropelvic junction obstruction: Prospective study in 30 consecutive cases

    SciTech Connect

    O'Reilly, P.H.

    1989-08-01

    In a prospective study of 50 consecutive patients with urographic renal pelvic dilatation, 30 with genuine ureteropelvic junction obstruction identified by 123-iodine-hippurate diuretic renal scanning (renography) were treated by dismembered pyeloplasty. One patient with reduced preoperative function required secondary nephrectomy. Three patients with normal function in solitary kidneys had unchanged postoperative function. In the remaining 26 patients preoperative function measured by diuretic renal scanning was compared to 6-month postoperative values. If split function changes of less than 5 per cent were considered insignificant, to allow for inherent statistical errors of renal scanning, preoperative function was decreased in 18 patients, improved postoperatively in 10 and remained the same in 8. In 8 patients preoperative function was normal and remained so postoperatively. Drainage improved in 22 of the 26 patients and was unchanged in 4. Analysis of functional change by Student's t test and the Wilcoxon paired sums test showed significant improvement in mean and median function (p less than 0.001), with the degree of improvement being greatest in patients with the most severely depressed preoperative levels. In addition to producing significant improvement in drainage in ureteropelvic junction obstruction, pyeloplasty arrests functional deterioration in almost every case and improves function significantly in the majority.

  12. The Effect of Different Pillow Heights on the Parameters of Cervicothoracic Spine Segments

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hyung Cheol; Jun, Hyo Sub; Kim, Ji Hee; Ahn, Jun Hyong; Chang, In Bok; Song, Joon Ho

    2015-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effect of different pillow heights on the slope of the cervicothoracic spine segments. Methods A prospective analysis of data from 16 asymptomatic adults (aged 20 to 30 years) was carried out. Exclusion criteria were history of injury or accident to the cervicothoracic spine, cervicothoracic spine surgery, or treatment for neck symptoms. We used three different pillow heights: flat (0 cm), 10-cm, and 20-cm pillows. Cervical sagittal parameters, measured with radiography, included; C2-7 Cobb's angle, T1 slope (T1S), thoracic inlet angle (TIA), and neck tilt (NT). Statistical analyses were performed using Spearman correlation coefficients. Results As the height of the pillow increased, the T1S & C2-7 Cobb's angle increased while the NT values tended to decrease. The TIA values, however, remained constant. Additionally, there was a statistically significant sex difference in T1S with the 0-cm pillow (p=0.01), and in NT with the 20-cm pillow (p=0.01). Conclusion From the data obtained in this study, we recommend that the most suitable pillow height is 10 cm, considering the normal cervical lordosis. PMID:26512267

  13. The Effect of Different Pillow Heights on the Parameters of Cervicothoracic Spine Segments.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyung Cheol; Jun, Hyo Sub; Kim, Ji Hee; Ahn, Jun Hyong; Chang, In Bok; Song, Joon Ho; Oh, Jae Keun

    2015-09-01

    To investigate the effect of different pillow heights on the slope of the cervicothoracic spine segments. A prospective analysis of data from 16 asymptomatic adults (aged 20 to 30 years) was carried out. Exclusion criteria were history of injury or accident to the cervicothoracic spine, cervicothoracic spine surgery, or treatment for neck symptoms. We used three different pillow heights: flat (0 cm), 10-cm, and 20-cm pillows. Cervical sagittal parameters, measured with radiography, included; C2-7 Cobb's angle, T1 slope (T1S), thoracic inlet angle (TIA), and neck tilt (NT). Statistical analyses were performed using Spearman correlation coefficients. As the height of the pillow increased, the T1S & C2-7 Cobb's angle increased while the NT values tended to decrease. The TIA values, however, remained constant. Additionally, there was a statistically significant sex difference in T1S with the 0-cm pillow (p=0.01), and in NT with the 20-cm pillow (p=0.01). From the data obtained in this study, we recommend that the most suitable pillow height is 10 cm, considering the normal cervical lordosis.

  14. Standard test case for a low-speed, turbulent junction vortex flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierce, F. J.

    1991-01-01

    The mean flow structure upstream, around within, and in the near wake of a turbulent junction or horseshoe vortex is reported for an incompressible subsonic flow. Measurements of the primitive variables of velocity and pressure are reported on all surfaces bounding the region of the vortex flow and on three transverse and one streamwise plane within the flowfield itself for comparisons between the measured and any calculated flow variables. Detailed surface flow visualizations and some direct force measurements of surface shear stress are also available. The data is a highly detailed, coherent, self-consistent set offered to the computational fluid mechanics community as a standard test case for the evaluation of the capability of numerical solvers intended for predicting the flowfield in such a complex, separated, three-dimensional turbulent flow. This data base is available for copying to user supplied tapes or for transmission via BITNET, as well as in two National Technical Information Service (NTIS) reports.

  15. Trombone tongue: a new clinical sign for significant medullary compression at the craniovertebral junction. Case report.

    PubMed

    Lee, Cheong H; Casey, Adrian T H; Allibone, James B; Chelvarajah, Ramesh

    2006-12-01

    The authors describe a previously unreported clinical sign that may indicate the onset of significant compression of the medulla oblongata in cases of craniovertebral junction abnormalities. This 17-year-old boy presented with mild bilateral leg weakness. Imaging studies revealed severe basilar invagination and a marked Chiari malformation. While awaiting surgery, his tongue developed an involuntary constant protrusion-intrusion repetitive motion. The onset of this so-named "trombone tongue" sign was followed shortly afterward by rapidly progressive spastic tetraparesis. After the authors performed a transmaxillary clivectomy, foramen magnum decompression, and occipitocervical fusion, they noted that the abnormal tongue motion promptly resolved and the tetraparesis gradually improved. The authors discuss their current understanding of the central control of tongue movements and present a hypothesis on the pathogenesis of trombone tongue based on the neuroanatomical basis of another abnormal tongue movement sign, lingual myoclonus.

  16. Singular layers for transmission problems in thin shallow shell theory: Elastic junction case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merabet, Ismail; Chacha, D. A.; Nicaise, Serge

    2010-05-01

    In this Note we study two-dimensional transmission problems for the linear Koiter's model of an elastic multi-structure composed of two thin shallow shells with the same thickness ɛ≪1, in the elastic junction case. We suppose that the loading is singular, that the elastic coefficients are of different order on each part ( O(ɛ) and O(1) respectively) and that the elastic stiffness coefficient of the hinge is k=O(ɛ). The formal limit problem fails to give a solution satisfying all boundary and transmission conditions; it gives only the outer solution. We derive the inner limit problem which allows us to describe the transmission layer.

  17. Spectrally-resolved optical efficiency using a multi-junction cell as light sensor: Application cases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Victoria, Marta; Domínguez, César; Jost, Norman; Vallerotto, Guido; Antón, Ignacio; Sala, Gabriel

    2017-09-01

    The experimental method to determine the spectrally-resolved optical efficiency of concentrating optics is described in this paper. The measurement uses a multi-junction solar cell as light sensor and a series of band-pass filters to isolate the optical performance of different narrow spectral bands throughout the spectrum of interest. Additional bias light is provided to saturate the subcells whose spectral response is out of the transmittance of every band-pass filter. The method allows the characterization of the combined transmittance, reflectance and absorbance of every material composing the optics including optical couplers and thin layers such as antireflective coatings. The two application cases included illustrate the potential of this novel characterization technique. Firstly, a novel refractive concentrator, the Achromatic Doublet on Glass (ADG) Fresnel lens is measured. Secondly, the method is applied to analyze the degradation of outdoor exposed glass molded Secondary Optical Elements (SOE).

  18. Retrospective analysis of a case series of patients with traumatic injuries to the craniocervical junction.

    PubMed

    Esteves, Luiz Adriano; Joaquim, Andrei Fernandes; Tedeschi, Helder

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the correlation between the treatment, the characteristics of the lesions and the clinical outcome of patients with traumatic injuries to the craniocervical junction. This was a retrospective study of patients treated conservatively or surgically between 2010 and 2013 with complete data sets. We analyzed 37 patients, 73% were men with mean age of 41.7 years. Of these, 32% were submitted to initial surgical treatment and 68% received conservative treatment. Seven (29%) underwent surgery subsequently. In the surgical group, there were seven cases of odontoid type II fractures, two cases of fracture of posterior elements of the axis, one case of C1-C2 dislocation with associated fractured C2, one case of occipitocervical dislocation, and one case of combined C1 and C2 fractures, and facet dislocation. Only one patient had neurological déficit that improved after treatment. Two surgical complications were seen: a liquoric fistula and one surgical wound infection (reaproached). In the group treated conservatively, odontoid fractures (eight cases) and fractures of the posterior elements of C2 (five cases) were more frequent. In two cases, in addition to the injuries of the craniocervical junction, there were fractures in other segments of the spine. None of the patients who underwent conservative treatment presented neurological deterioration. Although injuries of craniocervical junction are relatively rare, they usually involve fractures of the odontoid and the posterior elements of the axis. Our results recommend early surgical treatment for type II odontoid fractures and ligament injuries, the conservative treatment for other injuries. Avaliar a correlação entre o tratamento, as características das lesões e o resultado clínico em pacientes com lesões traumáticas na junção craniocervical. Estudo retrospectivo de pacientes maiores de 18 anos tratados de forma conservadora ou cirúrgica, entre 2010 e 2013. Foram analisados 37 pacientes, 73% eram do

  19. Wideband rotating junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pochernyaev, V. N.

    1993-06-01

    Rotating junctions of coaxial-waveguide and waveguide type with a traveling wave coefficient exceeding 0.8 in a wide frequency range are considered. The design of these junctions is based on a method of the theory of electrodynamic circuits. Numerical results are obtained for rotating junctions of partially filled rectangular waveguide type and their particular cases.

  20. Subarachnoid Hematoma of the Craniocervical Junction and Upper Cervical Spine After Traumatic Cerebral Contusion: Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Di Rienzo, Alessandro; Iacoangeli, Maurizio; Alvaro, Lorenzo; Colasanti, Roberto; Moriconi, Elisa; Gladi, Maurizio; Nocchi, Niccolo'; Scerrati, Massimo

    2013-01-01

    Spinal subarachnoid hematoma (SSH) is a rare condition, more commonly occurring after lumbar puncture for diagnostic or anesthesiological procedures. It has also been observed after traumatic events, in patients under anticoagulation therapy or in case of arteriovenous malformation rupture. In a very small number of cases no causative agent can be identified and a diagnosis of spontaneous SSH is established. The lumbar and thoracic spine are the most frequently involved segments and only seven cases of cervical spine SSH have been described until now. Differential diagnosis between subdural and subarachnoid hematoma is complex because the common neuroradiological investigations, including a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), are not enough sensitive to exactly define clot location. Actually, confirmation of the subarachnoid location of bleeding is obtained at surgery, which is necessary to resolve the fast and sometimes dramatic evolution of clinical symptoms. Nonetheless, there are occasional reports on successful conservative treatment of these lesions. We present a peculiar case of subarachnoid hematoma of the craniocervical junction, developing after the rupture of a right temporal lobe contusion within the adjacent arachnoidal spaces and the following clot migration along the right lateral aspect of the foramen magnum and the upper cervical spine, causing severe neurological impairment. After surgical removal of the hematoma, significant symptom improvement was observed. PMID:24067775

  1. Traumatic Tear of the Latissimus Dorsi Myotendinous Junction: Case Report of a CrossFit-Related Injury.

    PubMed

    Friedman, Michael V; Stensby, J Derek; Hillen, Travis J; Demertzis, Jennifer L; Keener, Jay D

    2015-01-01

    A case of a latissimus dorsi myotendinous junction strain in an avid CrossFit athlete is presented. The patient developed acute onset right axillary burning and swelling and subsequent palpable pop with weakness while performing a "muscle up." Magnetic resonance imaging examination demonstrated a high-grade tear of the right latissimus dorsi myotendinous junction approximately 9 cm proximal to its intact humeral insertion. There were no other injuries to the adjacent shoulder girdle structures. Isolated strain of the latissimus dorsi myotendinous junction is a very rare injury with a scarcity of information available regarding its imaging appearance and preferred treatment. This patient was treated conservatively and was able to resume active CrossFit training within 3 months. At 6 months postinjury, he had only a mild residual functional deficit compared with his preinjury level. © 2015 The Author(s).

  2. Lumbar and Cervico-Thoracic Spine Loading During a Fast Bowling Spell.

    PubMed

    Greig, Matt; Nagy, Philip

    2016-08-24

    Epidemiological studies highlight a prevalence of lumbar vertebrae injuries in cricket fast bowlers, with governing bodies implementing rules to reduce exposure. Analysis typically requires complex and laboratory-based biomechanical analyses, lacking ecological validity. Developments in GPS micro-technologies facilitate on-field measures of mechanical intensity, facilitating screening toward prevention and rehabilitation. To examine the efficacy of using GPS-mounted tri-axial accelerometers to quantify accumulated body 'load', and to investigate the effect of GPS unit placement in relation to epidemiological observations. Repeated measures, field-based. Regulation cricket pitch. 10 male injury-free participants were recruited from a cricket academy (18.1 ± 0.6yrs). Each participant was fitted with two GPS units placed at the cervico-thoracic and lumbar spine to measure tri-axial acceleration (100 Hz). The participants were instructed to deliver a 7 over 'spell' of Fast Bowling, as dictated by governing body guidelines. Tri-axial total accumulated body and the relative uni-axial contributions were calculated for each over. There was no significant main effect for overs bowled, either in total load or the tri-axial contributions to total load. This finding suggests no cumulative fatigue effect across the 10-over spell. However there was a significant main effect for GPS unit location, with the lumbar unit exposed to significantly greater load than the cervico-thoracic unit in each of the tri-axial planes. There was no evidence to suggest that accumulated 'load' significantly increased as a result of 'spell' duration. In this respect the governing body guidelines for this age group can be considered safe, or potentially even conservative. However the observation of higher body 'load' at the lumbar spine compared with the cervico-thoracic spine supports epidemiological observations of injury incidence. GPS micro-technologies might therefore be considered in screening

  3. Role of laparoscopy in ureteropelvic junction obstruction with concomitant pathology: a case series study

    PubMed Central

    El-Fayoumi, Abdel-Rahman; Gakis, Georgios; Amend, Bastian; Khairul-Asri, Mohd Ghani; Stenzl, Arnulf; Schwentner, Christian

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Laparoscopic pyeloplasty is considered a standard treatment for ureteropelvic junction obstruction (UPJO). However, the presence of another pathology makes it a more challenging operation and guides the surgeon towards open conversion. In this study, we present our experience in difficult pyeloplasty cases managed by laparoscopy. Material and methods Six patients (4 females and 2 males) with an average age of 44 and a range of 27 to 60 years old, were diagnosed for UPJO. Three were on the left side and 3 on the right side. In addition to UPJO, 2 patients had renal stones, one patient had both renal ptosis and an umbilical hernia, 3 patients had a para-pelvic cyst, hepatomegaly and malrotated kidney, respectively. All patients had a preoperative ultrasound, CT or IVU, and a renal isotope scan. Laparoscopic pyeloplasty was performed according to the dismembered Anderson-Hynes technique with auxiliary maneuver, according to the pathology. Results All patients were treated successfully for UPJO and the concomitant pathologies, except hepatomegaly and malrotation. Mean operative time was 125 minutes and estimated blood loss was <50 ml. Conclusions Laparoscopic pyeloplasty can be performed in difficult situations provided that the surgeon has enough experience with laparoscopy. PMID:26855804

  4. Cervicothoracic Subcutaneous Emphysema and Pneumomediastinum After Third Molar Extraction.

    PubMed

    Picard, Maxime; Pham Dang, Nathalie; Mondie, Jean Michel; Barthelemy, Isabelle

    2015-12-01

    Third molar extraction is one of the most common interventions in dental and maxillofacial surgery. Complications are frequent and well documented, with swelling, pain, bleeding, infection, and lingual or alveolar nerve injury being the most common. This report describes a case of subcutaneous extensive emphysema and pneumomediastinum that occurred 4 days after extraction of an impacted right mandibular third molar. The management and etiology of this case and those reported in the literature are discussed.

  5. Technology Solutions Case Study: New Insights for Improving the Designs of Flexible Duct Junction Boxes

    SciTech Connect

    2014-01-01

    In this project, IBACOS explored the relationships between pressure and physical configurations of flexible duct junction boxes by using computational fluid dynamics simulations to predict individual box parameters and total system pressure, thereby ensuring improved HVAC performance.

  6. Complex sarcolemmal invaginations mimicking myotendinous junctions in a case of Laing early-onset distal myopathy.

    PubMed

    Reis, Gerald F; de la Motte, Grant; Gooding, Rebecca; Laing, Nigel G; Margeta, Marta

    2015-12-01

    Distal myopathies are a group of clinically and pathologically overlapping muscle diseases that are genetically complex and can represent a diagnostic challenge. Laing early-onset distal myopathy (MPD1) is a form of distal myopathy caused by mutations in the MYH7 gene, which encodes the beta myosin heavy chain protein expressed in type 1 skeletal muscle fibers and cardiac myocytes. Here, we present a case of genetically confirmed MPD1 with a typical clinical presentation but distinctive light microscopic and ultrastructural findings on muscle biopsy. A 39-year-old professional male cellist presented with a bilateral foot drop that developed by age 8; analysis of the family pedigree showed an autosomal dominant pattern of inheritance. The physical exam demonstrated bilateral weakness of ankle dorsiflexors, toe extensors and finger extensors; creatine kinase level was normal. Biopsy of the quadriceps femoris muscle showed predominance and hypotrophy of type 1 fibers, hybrid fibers with co-expression of slow and fast myosin proteins (both in highly atrophic and normal size range), moth-eaten fibers and mini-cores, lack of rimmed vacuoles and rare desmin-positive eosinophilic sarcoplasmic inclusions. In addition to these abnormalities often observed in MPD1, the biopsy demonstrated frequent clefted fibers with complex sarcolemmal invaginations; on ultrastructural examination, these structures closely mimicked myotendinous junctions but were present away from the tendon and were almost exclusively found in type 1 fibers. Sequencing analysis of the MYH7 gene in the index patient and other affected family members demonstrated a previously described heterozygous c.4522_4524delGAG (p.Glu1508del) mutation. This case widens the pathologic spectrum of MPD1 and highlights the pathologic and clinical variability that can accompany the same genetic mutation, suggesting a significant role for modifier genes in MPD1 pathogenesis. © 2015 Japanese Society of Neuropathology.

  7. Neonatal Airway Compromise by a Giant Cervicothoracic Venous Haemangioma

    PubMed Central

    Shenoy, Janardhan; Coutinho, Anita; Pai, Suresh; Rai, Santosh PV

    2017-01-01

    Haemangiomas are most common non-malignant vascular tumours of infancy. Here, we describe an antenatally detected mass over the neck causing compressive respiratory compromise at birth requiring resuscitative measures at birth. The mass showed increased vascularity on Contrast Enhanced Computed Tomography (CECT) with extension upto superior mediastinum. Surgical excision was required following failure to medical measures with steroids and propranolol. Histopathology confirmed it to be a venous haemangioma. This case highlights that these benign lesions may reach large sizes and antenatal detection may help in planning effective delivery and resuscitative measures. PMID:28384953

  8. Spontaneous epidural hematoma due to cervico-thoracic angiolipoma.

    PubMed

    Eap, C; Bannwarth, M; Jazeron, J-F; Kleber, J-C; Theret, É; Duntze, J; Litre, C-F

    2015-12-01

    Epidural angiolipomas are uncommon benign tumors of the spine. Their clinical presentation is usually a progressive spinal cord compression. We report the case of a 22-year-old patient who presented with an acute paraparesis and a spontaneous epidural hematoma, which revealed a epidural angiolipoma which extended from C7 to T3. The patient underwent a C7-T3 laminectomy, in emergency, with evacuation of the hematoma and extradural complete resection of a fibrous epidural tumor bleeding. The postoperative course was favorable with regression of neurological symptoms. Epidural angiolipomas can be revealed by spontaneous intratumoral hemorrhage without traumatism. The standard treatment is total removal by surgery.

  9. Efficacy of cervicothoracic sympathectomy versus conservative management in patients suffering from incapacitating Raynaud's syndrome after frost bite.

    PubMed

    Khan, Mohammad Iqbal; Tariq, Mohammad; Rehman, Ahmed; Zafar, Afsheeen; Sheen, Salman Najam

    2008-01-01

    Raynaud's syndrome is a known complication of cold injuries. Stress, smoking and metabolic diseases may further aggravate the disease course. The purpose of this study was to determine the efficacy of Cervico-thoracic sympathectomy as compared to conservative management in severe Raynaud's syndrome after frostbite. This non-randomized controlled trial was conducted at Railway Hospital, Rawalpindi and Islamic International Medical Complex, Islamabad between January 1999 and June 2006. All patients sustained severe cold trauma in the mountain ridges of Himalayas in Kashmir. In all cases, an informed consent was obtained from patients and families. All operations performed were free of charges. Out of the total 48 patients who developed incapacitating Raynaud's syndrome of the upper limbs after frost bite, 17 patients underwent thoracic sympathectomy through anterior supraclavicular route. Remaining 31 patients were treated conservatively and were placed in the control group. Data was collected on pre-designed proforma and assessed using SPSS (version 11). Chi-square test was applied to assess the effectiveness of the two treatment modalities. All operated cases initially showed improvement in symptoms and incapacitation. Among sympathectomised patients, 11 patients became symptom free and 3 patients showed mild but improved symptoms. Two patients after initial transient improvement developed incapacitating symptoms requiring further treatment, one patient developed gangrene ofdistal phalanx nine month after sympathectomy requiring amputation of the finger. Frequency of attacks and duration between the attacks reduced in all operated patients of cervical sympathectomy (p < 0.05) as compared to conservative management. Cervical sympathectomy is a very effective modality of treatment in patients having severe Raynaud's disease of upper limbs secondary to frost bite.

  10. True Cervicothoracic Meningocele: A Rare and Benign Condition

    PubMed Central

    Pessoa, Bruno L.; Lima, Yara

    2015-01-01

    Cervical meningoceles are rare spinal dysraphism, accounting for approximately 7% of all cystic spinal dysraphism. In spite of the rarity, the clinical course is most of the times benign. The surgical treatment includes resection of the lesion and untethering, when presented. We present a 14-day-old female child with true meningoceles who underwent to surgical excision and dura-mater repair. Retrospect analysis of the literature concerning true cervical meningocele is performed. By reporting this illustrative case, we focus on its classification and its differentiation from other types of cervical spinal dysraphism, such as myelocystocele and myelomeningocele. Although its course is benign, it is mandatory a continuum follow up with periodic magnetic resonance imaging of spinal cord, since late neurological deterioration has been described. PMID:26788266

  11. [Dural arteriovenous fistulas at the craniocervical junction fed by bilateral vertebral arteries with intracranial drainage: a case report].

    PubMed

    Takeshita, Tomonori; Hayashi, Kentaro; Kitagawa, Naoki; Suyama, Kazuhiko; Nagata, Izumi

    2009-12-01

    We report a case of dural arteriovenous fistulas (DAVFs) at the craniocervical junction, which are supplied by the radicular arteries from bilateral vertebral arteries separately, and drainaged into intracranial sinuses. A 58-year-old man with intermittent neck pain visited our hospital. T2-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) imaging showed flow voids on the dorsal surface of the medulla and upper cervical cord without any signal changes suggesting ischemia. Postcontrast MR digital subtraction angiography (MRDSA) showed early venous filling at the craniocervical junction. Angiography demonstrated bilateral fistulas near each vertebral artery penetration point of the dura matter, which were drainaged into the superior and inferior petrosal sinuses. The patient underwent suboccipital craniotomy and laminectomy of the C1, then disruption of the bilateral fistulas was performed by using micro Doppler sonography after intradural exposure of the shunt points. His symptom subsided post operatively, and MRDSA showed no abnormal vessels. Angiography performed 1 week after surgery confirmed complete obliteration of the fistulas. DAVFs at the craniocervical junction fed by bilateral vertebral arteries is extremely rare. Even in such a case, direct interruption of the fistulas using micro Doppler sonography is the most effective treatment. In addition. MRDSA could be useful for screening and perioperative studies.

  12. Laser etching causing fatigue fracture at the neck-shoulder junction of an uncemented femoral stem: A case report.

    PubMed

    Jang, Bob; Kanawati, Andrew; Brazil, Declan; Bruce, Warwick

    2013-01-01

    Fatigue fracture of a femoral component in total hip arthroplasty is a rare occurrence but well documented in the literature. It is understood that proximal loosing of a femoral stem with a well fixed stem distally will result in cantilever bending and eventual fatigue fracture of the stem. Other factors which may potentiate a fatigue fracture are material design, implant positioning, and patient characteristics. More recently, laser etching on the femoral neck of an implant has resulted in fatigue fracture. We report a case of a fatigue fracture at the neck-shoulder junction in a well fixed, uncemented, femoral component due to laser etching in the region of high tensile stress.

  13. Traumatic dissecting aneurysm at the vertebrobasilar junction in a 3-month-old infant: evaluation and treatment strategies. Case report.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huan; Orbach, Darren B

    2008-05-01

    Intracranial aneurysms in young infants are extremely rare, with few published reports on the etiology, evaluation, treatment strategies, and follow-up of this condition in this population. The authors report the case of a traumatic dissecting aneurysm at the vertebrobasilar junction (VBJ) in a 3-month-old infant caused by nonaccidental trauma. Therapeutic occlusion of the VBJ was contemplated, but coil embolization of the main aneurysm sac proved feasible, and anticoagulation and antiplatelet agents were initiated. The patient made a full neurological recovery, and follow-up studies demonstrated stable aneurysm occlusion. Management and follow-up strategies for this challenging condition are discussed.

  14. Pneumothorax after trigger point injection: A case report and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Ahiskalioglu, Elif Oral; Alici, Haci Ahmet; Dostbil, Aysenur; Celik, Mine; Ahiskalioglu, Ali; Aksoy, Mehmet

    2016-11-21

    Myofascial pain syndrome is defined as ``pain and/or autonomic phenomena referred from active myofascial trigger points''. Trigger point injection is an effective treatment option, which is widely used to treat myofascial pain. Trigger point injection in the cervicothoracic regions can be associated with pneumothorax. In this paper, we presented a patient who developed pneumothorax after trigger point injection. This case report indicates there is a risk of pneumothorax during trigger point injection in the cervicothoracic regions.

  15. Model of stacked long Josephson junctions: Parallel algorithm and numerical results in case of weak coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zemlyanaya, E. V.; Bashashin, M. V.; Rahmonov, I. R.; Shukrinov, Yu. M.; Atanasova, P. Kh.; Volokhova, A. V.

    2016-10-01

    We consider a model of system of long Josephson junctions (LJJ) with inductive and capacitive coupling. Corresponding system of nonlinear partial differential equations is solved by means of the standard three-point finite-difference approximation in the spatial coordinate and utilizing the Runge-Kutta method for solution of the resulting Cauchy problem. A parallel algorithm is developed and implemented on a basis of the MPI (Message Passing Interface) technology. Effect of the coupling between the JJs on the properties of LJJ system is demonstrated. Numerical results are discussed from the viewpoint of effectiveness of parallel implementation.

  16. Circumferential Reconstruction of Subaxial Cervical and Cervicothoracic Spine by Simultaneously Combined Anterior-posterior Approaches in the Sitting Position.

    PubMed

    Han, Yue; Ma, Xin-Long; Hu, Yong-Cheng; Miao, Jun; Zhang, Ji-Dong; Bai, Jian-Qiang; Xia, Qun

    2017-08-01

    To introduce and analyze the feasibility of a new surgical strategy for circumferential reconstruction of subaxial cervical and cervicothoracic spine by simultaneously combined anterior-posterior approach in the sitting position. A retrospective review was performed for seven patients who underwent the above surgical procedure between July 2011 and January 2015. Among the seven patients, there were six men and one woman, with an average age of 52 years (range, 36-79 years). Six patients were confirmed to have a lower subaxial cervical fracture and dislocation with a locked facet joint, and the other patient had an invasive tumor involving both anterior and posterior parts of vertebrae and lamina, detected by radiological examination. The levels involved for all patients were from C4 to T2 . According to American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) classification, one case was class A, four were class B, and two were class D. The patients were restricted in the sitting position with traction and a halo in extension to immobilize the head during the operation. The simultaneously combined anterior-posterior operation for reduction, decompression or tumor resection and circumferential reconstruction was carried out. Both anterior and posterior procedures were successfully completed simultaneously in the sitting position in all cases. There were no perioperative complications. The average operative time was 175 ± 32 min (range, 120-240 min), and the mean blood loss was 430 ± 85 mL (range, 200-1100 mL). The patients were followed up for 35.8 months (range, 18-60 months). The symptom of neck pain improved distinctly and no evidence of implant failure was noted in any patients. Neurological status improvement was confirmed in six patients, who had suffered incomplete paralysis. The ASIA grade improved in five patients, and two cases had no change in grade. The "sitting position" simultaneously combined anterior-posterior approach is safe and is

  17. Nanotube junctions

    DOEpatents

    Crespi, Vincent Henry; Cohen, Marvin Lou; Louie, Steven Gwon; Zettl, Alexander Karlwalte

    2004-12-28

    The present invention comprises a new nanoscale metal-semiconductor, semiconductor-semiconductor, or metal-metal junction, designed by introducing topological or chemical defects in the atomic structure of the nanotube. Nanotubes comprising adjacent sections having differing electrical properties are described. These nanotubes can be constructed from combinations of carbon, boron, nitrogen and other elements. The nanotube can be designed having different indices on either side of a junction point in a continuous tube so that the electrical properties on either side of the junction vary in a useful fashion. For example, the inventive nanotube may be electrically conducting on one side of a junction and semiconducting on the other side. An example of a semiconductor-metal junction is a Schottky barrier. Alternatively, the nanotube may exhibit different semiconductor properties on either side of the junction. Nanotubes containing heterojunctions, Schottky barriers, and metal-metal junctions are useful for microcircuitry.

  18. Nanotube junctions

    DOEpatents

    Crespi, Vincent Henry; Cohen, Marvin Lou; Louie, Steven Gwon Sheng; Zettl, Alexander Karlwalter

    2003-01-01

    The present invention comprises a new nanoscale metal-semiconductor, semiconductor-semiconductor, or metal-metal junction, designed by introducing topological or chemical defects in the atomic structure of the nanotube. Nanotubes comprising adjacent sections having differing electrical properties are described. These nanotubes can be constructed from combinations of carbon, boron, nitrogen and other elements. The nanotube can be designed having different indices on either side of a junction point in a continuous tube so that the electrical properties on either side of the junction vary in a useful fashion. For example, the inventive nanotube may be electrically conducting on one side of a junction and semiconducting on the other side. An example of a semiconductor-metal junction is a Schottky barrier. Alternatively, the nanotube may exhibit different semiconductor properties on either side of the junction. Nanotubes containing heterojunctions, Schottky barriers, and metal-metal junctions are useful for microcircuitry.

  19. Do cervical collars and cervicothoracic orthoses effectively stabilize the injured cervical spine? A biomechanical investigation.

    PubMed

    Ivancic, Paul C

    2013-06-01

    In vitro biomechanical study. Our objective was to determine the effectiveness of cervical collars and cervicothoracic orthoses for stabilizing clinically relevant, experimentally produced cervical spine injuries. Most previous in vitro studies of cervical orthoses used a simplified injury model with all ligaments transected at a single spinal level, which differs from real-life neck injuries. Human volunteer studies are limited to measuring only sagittal motions or 3-dimensional motions only of the head or 1 or 2 spinal levels. Three-plane flexibility tests were performed to evaluate 2 cervical collars (Vista Collar and Vista Multipost Collar) and 2 cervicothoracic orthoses (Vista TS and Vista TS4) using a skull-neck-thorax model with 8 injured cervical spine specimens (manufacturer of orthoses: Aspen Medical Products Inc, Irvine, CA). The injuries consisted of flexion-compression at the lower cervical spine and extension-compression at superior spinal levels. Pair-wise repeated measures analysis of variance (P < 0.05) and Bonferroni post hoc tests determined significant differences in average range of motions of the head relative to the base, C7 or T1, among experimental conditions. RESULTS.: All orthoses significantly reduced unrestricted head/base flexion and extension. The orthoses allowed between 8.4% and 25.8% of unrestricted head/base motion in flexion/extension, 57.8% to 75.5% in axial rotation, and 53.8% to 73.7% in lateral bending. The average percentages of unrestricted motion allowed by the Vista Collar, Vista Multipost Collar, Vista TS, and Vista TS4 were: 14.0, 9.7, 6.1, and 4.7, respectively, for middle cervical spine extension and 13.2, 11.8, 3.3, and 0.4, respectively, for lower cervical spine flexion. Successive increases in immobilization were observed from Vista Collar to Vista Multipost Collar, Vista TS, and Vista TS4 in extension at the injured middle cervical spine and in flexion at the injured lower cervical spine. Our results may assist

  20. Assessment of environmental benefits of flyover construction over signalized junctions: a case study.

    PubMed

    Goyal, S K; Goel, Sangita; Tamhane, S M

    2009-01-01

    In the present study, the impact of the flyover construction to curb traffic congestion problem has been assessed in terms of traffic decongestion, time saving, fuel saving and emission reduction. A flyover has also been constructed over four signalized junctions in the main commercial area in Nagpur city, India. It was found that about 35% of the total traffic is diverted to the flyover, which results in a reduction of about 32% in the total emission generation. Travel on the flyover resulted in as much as 60-70% saving in time, compared to the travel on the main road, particularly when all the four signals are found to be in the red phase. The loss of fuel for combustion and the associated cost resulting from waiting for the signal to change are also estimated, and these are found to be significant.

  1. [Retroperitoneoscopic dismembered pyeloplasty for pediatric ureteropelvic junction obstruction: a report of 85 cases].

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhi; Chen, Xiang; Qi, Lin; Chen, Liang; Luo, Yancheng; He, Yao; Li, Nannan; Xie, Chaoqun

    2011-05-01

    To investigate the clinical application of retroperitoneoscopic dismembered pyeloplasty for pediatric ureteropelvic junction obstruction (UPJO). Of the 85 pediatric patients with UPJO, 56 were boys and 29 were girls. The age of the patients ranged from 2.5 to 11 years (mean = 4.6 years).B-ultrasonography showed hydronephrosis <15 mm (mild) in 15 patients,15-30 mm (moderate) in 59, <30 mm (severe) in the other 6. Intravenous urography (IVU) showed good imaging in 55 patients within 30 min, light imaging in 27 at 30-120 min, and no imaging in 3 after 120 min. The 85 patients underwent retroperitoneoscopic dismembered pyeloplasty. Conventional antegrade or modified antegrade double-J stenting was inserted in the 85 patients intraoperatively. The operation was successful in all, with no conversion to open surgery during the operation. The mean operation time was 146 min (125-240 min).The mean blood loss was 68 mL (55-112 mL).The mean postoperative hospitalization was 7 d (6-8 d ).Urine leakage occurred in 1 patient and with a good drainage, urine leakage disappeared in 1 week. Follow-up ranged 3-24 months (mean = 11 months).IVU showed on UPJ stricture, and good imaging in 75 patients within 30 min, light imaging in 10 at 30-120 min. Hydronephrosis was remitted:hydronephrosis resolution in 51 patients, mild in 6 and moderate in 3. Retroperitoneoscopic dismembered pyeloplasty is a safe, effective and mini-invasive procedure for pediatric ureteropelvic junction obstruction, with a rapid postoperative recovery. It will be the ideal treatment for UPJO in pediatric patients.

  2. Differential Strength and Endurance Parameters of the Craniocervical and Cervicothoracic Extensors and Flexors in Healthy Individuals.

    PubMed

    O'Leary, Shaun; Fagermoen, Charlotte Loraas; Hasegawa, Hiroyuki; Thorsen, Ann-Sofi Slettevold; Van Wyk, Luke

    2017-04-01

    This study examined isometric strength (maximal voluntary contraction [MVC]) and endurance of cervical flexor and extensor muscles in healthy individuals at the craniocervical (CC) and cervicothoracic (CT) axes. MVC and endurance measures (time to task failure in seconds [s]) at 50% MVC were recorded in 4 directions (CC flexion, CC extension, CT flexion, and CT extension) in 20 males and 20 females, and 6 strength and endurance ratios were calculated. The findings showed that the cervical extensor muscles are not only much stronger than the flexors (1.3-2 times greater MVC), but also have greater capacity for endurance (2-2.4 times greater). While males produced significantly greater MVC recordings than females (P < .003), strength ratios (P > .06) and endurance measures (P > .11) were similar. Endurance ratios were also similar except the CT extension to CC flexion ratio, which was significantly larger in females compared with males (P = .03). These findings demonstrate that substantial but normal variation exists in strength and endurance parameters between cervical flexor and extensor muscles. This is informative to clinicians when evaluating the performance of these neck muscles or when deciding on exercise parameters (eg, load, duration) when training their performance.

  3. [Right sensory-motor syndrome as the presentation of a spontaneous cervico-thoracic epidural hematoma].

    PubMed

    Castro, M; Egido, J A; Saldaña, C; Andrés, M T

    1998-10-01

    A spontaneous cervical epidural hematoma is an infrequent cause of cord compression. The commonest clinical presentations are with paraparesia and tetraparesia. Transient hemiparesia is very rare and a sensory-motor syndrome is exceptional. A 38 year old man had sudden onset of spontaneous interscapular vertebral pain with bilateral root radiation. A few minutes later he started to have weakness and sensory loss in his right limbs. On clinical examination there was pain on pressure over the spinal apophyses of the T4 and T5 vertebrae, hemiparesia and hemi-hypoalgesia of the right limbs. After ten hours this had all returned to normal. MRI of the cord showed an epidural hematoma extending from C6 to T2. Coagulation studies and spinal arteriography were normal. The sensory motor syndrome is an unusual form of presentation of a spontaneous cervico-thoracic epidural hematoma. Root pain is a symptom of great value for orientation of a syndrome which would otherwise seem to be of central origin. The explanation for this clinical findings may be compression of both lateral cord pathways due to their particular blood distribution. Regarding therapeutic approach, this should be conservative, with close observation to see whether it will resolve spontaneously in a short period of time.

  4. Postural neck pain: an investigation of habitual sitting posture, perception of 'good' posture and cervicothoracic kinaesthesia.

    PubMed

    Edmondston, Stephen J; Chan, Hon Yan; Ngai, Gorman Chi Wing; Warren, M Linda R; Williams, Jonathan M; Glennon, Susan; Netto, Kevin

    2007-11-01

    Impairments of cervico-cephalic kinaesthesia and habitual forward head posture have been considered important in the aetiology of postural neck pain, yet these factors have not been specifically examined in a homogeneous clinical population. The objective of this study was to compare the habitual sitting posture (HSP), perception of good posture and postural repositioning error (PRE) of the cervico-thoracic (CT) spine in individuals with postural neck pain, with a matched group of asymptomatic subjects. Twenty-one subjects with postural neck pain and 22 asymptomatic control subjects were recruited into the study. An optical motion analysis system was used to measure the HSP and perceived 'good' sitting posture. PRE was measured over six trials where the subject attempted to replicate their self-selected 'good' posture. There was no difference between the groups in the HSP but significant differences were identified in the perception of 'good' posture. Posture repositioning error was higher for the head posture variables than for CT and shoulder girdle variables in both groups. However, there was no significant difference in posture repositioning error between groups for any of the posture measures. The findings suggest that individuals with postural neck pain may have a different perception of 'good' posture, but no significant difference in HSP or kinaesthetic sensibility compared with matched asymptomatic subjects.

  5. Occult Congenital Ureteropelvic Junction Obstruction in Two Adults Presenting with Collecting System Rupture After Blunt Renal Trauma: A Case Report Series

    PubMed Central

    Hoffner, Haley E.; Dagrosa, Lawrence M.; Pais, Vernon M.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract We report two adult cases of congenital ureteropelvic junction obstruction detected incidentally in the setting of blunt abdominal trauma. CT images are provided to describe the presentation, while review of the literature and management of renal trauma are discussed. PMID:27579396

  6. Josephson junction

    DOEpatents

    Wendt, J.R.; Plut, T.A.; Martens, J.S.

    1995-05-02

    A novel method for fabricating nanometer geometry electronic devices is described. Such Josephson junctions can be accurately and reproducibly manufactured employing photolithographic and direct write electron beam lithography techniques in combination with aqueous etchants. In particular, a method is described for manufacturing planar Josephson junctions from high temperature superconducting material. 10 figs.

  7. Josephson junction

    DOEpatents

    Wendt, Joel R.; Plut, Thomas A.; Martens, Jon S.

    1995-01-01

    A novel method for fabricating nanometer geometry electronic devices is described. Such Josephson junctions can be accurately and reproducibly manufactured employing photolithographic and direct write electron beam lithography techniques in combination with aqueous etchants. In particular, a method is described for manufacturing planar Josephson junctions from high temperature superconducting material.

  8. [Adenocarcinoma of the gastro-esophagus junction associated to endobrachyesophagus. Two case reports. Review of the literature].

    PubMed

    Kreiker, Joseph; Daou, Robert

    2004-01-01

    Barrett esophagus (BE) is intestinal metaplasia (MI) within the distal tubular esophagus. The BE results in replacement of the normal squamous-lined epithelium with a columnar type epithelium. This metaplastic lesion is a clearly defined risk factor for the development of esophageal adenocarcinoma (ADC). In the western countries the incidence of adenocarcinoma of the lower esophagus and the gastro-esophagus junction have rapidly increased during the past twenty years. The 5-year survival is very poor. Although the relative risk of individuals in the United States with BE developing esophageal adenocarcinoma is very high, the absolute risk is extremely low due to the small number of cases. This lesion is caused by a persistent gastro-esophageal reflux. The nature of the reflux liquid is mixed acid and alkaline in the big majority of cases. A familial aggregation of BE and esophageal adenocarcinoma are present in 14% of patients with BE and esophageal adenocarcinoma. The diagnosis, the surveillance, the new tools of characterization of BE and the therapy remain an actual problem. We present 2 cases of endobrachyesophagus associated to an adenocarcinoma of the lower esophagus and a review of the main actual problem.

  9. Gap junctions.

    PubMed

    Goodenough, Daniel A; Paul, David L

    2009-07-01

    Gap junctions are aggregates of intercellular channels that permit direct cell-cell transfer of ions and small molecules. Initially described as low-resistance ion pathways joining excitable cells (nerve and muscle), gap junctions are found joining virtually all cells in solid tissues. Their long evolutionary history has permitted adaptation of gap-junctional intercellular communication to a variety of functions, with multiple regulatory mechanisms. Gap-junctional channels are composed of hexamers of medium-sized families of integral proteins: connexins in chordates and innexins in precordates. The functions of gap junctions have been explored by studying mutations in flies, worms, and humans, and targeted gene disruption in mice. These studies have revealed a wide diversity of function in tissue and organ biology.

  10. Gap Junctions

    PubMed Central

    Goodenough, Daniel A.; Paul, David L.

    2009-01-01

    Gap junctions are aggregates of intercellular channels that permit direct cell–cell transfer of ions and small molecules. Initially described as low-resistance ion pathways joining excitable cells (nerve and muscle), gap junctions are found joining virtually all cells in solid tissues. Their long evolutionary history has permitted adaptation of gap-junctional intercellular communication to a variety of functions, with multiple regulatory mechanisms. Gap-junctional channels are composed of hexamers of medium-sized families of integral proteins: connexins in chordates and innexins in precordates. The functions of gap junctions have been explored by studying mutations in flies, worms, and humans, and targeted gene disruption in mice. These studies have revealed a wide diversity of function in tissue and organ biology. PMID:20066080

  11. Giant prolactinoma causing cranio-cervical junction instability: a case report.

    PubMed

    Zaben, Malik J A; Harrisson, Stuart E; Mathad, N V

    2011-12-01

    Prolactinomas are common secretory pituitary tumours, usually managed with dopamine agonists. There have previously been case reports of rarer giant prolactinomas causing invasion of surrounding structures. We describe a case report of an exceptionally aggressive giant prolactinoma that eroded the occipital condyles causing cranio-cervical joint instability mandating surgical fixation.

  12. Gap junctions.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Morten Schak; Axelsen, Lene Nygaard; Sorgen, Paul L; Verma, Vandana; Delmar, Mario; Holstein-Rathlou, Niels-Henrik

    2012-07-01

    Gap junctions are essential to the function of multicellular animals, which require a high degree of coordination between cells. In vertebrates, gap junctions comprise connexins and currently 21 connexins are known in humans. The functions of gap junctions are highly diverse and include exchange of metabolites and electrical signals between cells, as well as functions, which are apparently unrelated to intercellular communication. Given the diversity of gap junction physiology, regulation of gap junction activity is complex. The structure of the various connexins is known to some extent; and structural rearrangements and intramolecular interactions are important for regulation of channel function. Intercellular coupling is further regulated by the number and activity of channels present in gap junctional plaques. The number of connexins in cell-cell channels is regulated by controlling transcription, translation, trafficking, and degradation; and all of these processes are under strict control. Once in the membrane, channel activity is determined by the conductive properties of the connexin involved, which can be regulated by voltage and chemical gating, as well as a large number of posttranslational modifications. The aim of the present article is to review our current knowledge on the structure, regulation, function, and pharmacology of gap junctions. This will be supported by examples of how different connexins and their regulation act in concert to achieve appropriate physiological control, and how disturbances of connexin function can lead to disease. © 2012 American Physiological Society. Compr Physiol 2:1853-1872, 2012.

  13. Gap Junctions

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, Morten Schak; Axelsen, Lene Nygaard; Sorgen, Paul L.; Verma, Vandana; Delmar, Mario; Holstein-Rathlou, Niels-Henrik

    2013-01-01

    Gap junctions are essential to the function of multicellular animals, which require a high degree of coordination between cells. In vertebrates, gap junctions comprise connexins and currently 21 connexins are known in humans. The functions of gap junctions are highly diverse and include exchange of metabolites and electrical signals between cells, as well as functions, which are apparently unrelated to intercellular communication. Given the diversity of gap junction physiology, regulation of gap junction activity is complex. The structure of the various connexins is known to some extent; and structural rearrangements and intramolecular interactions are important for regulation of channel function. Intercellular coupling is further regulated by the number and activity of channels present in gap junctional plaques. The number of connexins in cell-cell channels is regulated by controlling transcription, translation, trafficking, and degradation; and all of these processes are under strict control. Once in the membrane, channel activity is determined by the conductive properties of the connexin involved, which can be regulated by voltage and chemical gating, as well as a large number of posttranslational modifications. The aim of the present article is to review our current knowledge on the structure, regulation, function, and pharmacology of gap junctions. This will be supported by examples of how different connexins and their regulation act in concert to achieve appropriate physiological control, and how disturbances of connexin function can lead to disease. © 2012 American Physiological Society. Compr Physiol 2:1981-2035, 2012. PMID:23723031

  14. A median sacral artery anterior to the iliocaval junction: a case report-anatomical considerations and clinical relevance for spine surgery.

    PubMed

    Chenin, Louis; Tandabany, Sharmila; Foulon, Pascal; Havet, Eric; Peltier, Johann

    2017-09-05

    The median sacral artery (MSA) is a relatively small vessel that always arises from the posterior, terminal part of the infrarenal aorta. In most cases, the MSA runs behind the iliocaval junction. Here, we describe a very rare case of an MSA running in front of this junction. During a human cadaveric dissection of the retroperitoneal area, we unexpectedly observed that the MSA passed in front of the left common iliac vein. The anatomy of the MSA has been extensively described and variations are quite rare. On the basis of this specific case, knowledge of the anatomic interactions between the MSA and other lumbar retroperitoneal vessels may help to avoid potential complications during surgery.

  15. Gap junctions.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Kazumichi; Stopfer, Mark

    2013-12-02

    In vertebrates and invertebrates, signaling among neurons is most commonly mediated by chemical synapses. At these synapses neurotransmitter released by presynaptic neurons is detected by receptors on the postsynaptic neurons, leading to an influx of ions through the receptors themselves or through channels activated by intracellular signaling downstream of the receptors. But neurons can communicate with each other in a more direct way, by passing signals composed of small molecules and ions through pores called gap junctions. Gap junctions that transmit electrical signals are called electrical synapses. Unlike most chemical synapses, electrical synapses interact through axon-to-axon or dendrite-to-dendrite contacts. Found throughout the nervous system, they are probably best known for linking the relatively few inhibitory, GABAergic, neurons into large, effective networks within vertebrate brains. They are particularly important early in development before the formation of most chemical synapses, but recent work shows gap junctions play important roles in the adult nervous system, too. Gap junctions are sometimes thought to be mere passageways between cells. But, as recent work shows, their properties can be complex and surprising. Gap junctions help generate, propagate, and regulate neural oscillations, can filter electrical signals, and can be modulated in a variety of ways. Here we discuss recent work highlighting the diversity and importance of gap junctions throughout the nervous system. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Singular layers for transmission problems in thin shallow shell theory: Rigid junction case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merabet, Ismail; Chacha, D. A.; Nicaise, S.

    2010-02-01

    In this Note we study two-dimensional transmission problems for the linear Koiter's model of an elastic multi-structure composed of two thin shallow shells. This work enters in the framework of singular perturbation of problems depending on a small parameter ɛ. The formal limit problem fails to give a solution satisfying all boundary and transmission conditions; it gives only the outer solution. Both in the case of regular or singular loadings, we derive a limit problem which allows us to determine the inner solution explicitly.

  17. Three-column osteotomy for correction of cervical and cervicothoracic deformities: alignment changes and early complications in a multicenter prospective series of 23 patients.

    PubMed

    Smith, Justin S; Shaffrey, Christopher I; Lafage, Renaud; Lafage, Virginie; Schwab, Frank J; Kim, Han Jo; Scheer, Justin K; Protopsaltis, Themistocles; Passias, Peter; Mundis, Gregory; Hart, Robert; Neuman, Brian; Klineberg, Eric; Hostin, Richard; Bess, Shay; Deviren, Vedat; Ames, Christopher P

    2017-08-01

    Three-column osteotomy (3CO), including pedicle subtraction osteotomy (PSO) and vertebral column resection (VCR), can provide powerful alignment correction for adult cervical deformity (ACD). Our objective was to assess alignment changes and early complications associated with 3CO for ACD. ACD patients treated with 3CO with minimum 90-day follow-up were identified from a prospectively collected multicenter ACD database. Complications within 90-days of surgery and pre- and postoperative radiographs were collected. All 23 ACD patients treated with 3CO (14 PSO/9 VCR) had minimum 90-day follow-up (mean age 62.3 years, previous cervical/cervicothoracic instrumentation in 52.2% and thoracic/thoracolumbar instrumentation in 47.8%). The primary diagnosis was kyphosis in 91.3% and coronal deformity in 8.7%. The mean number of fusion levels was 12 (range 6-18). The most common 3CO levels were T1 (39.1%), T2 (30.4%) and T3 (21.7%). Eighteen (12 major/6 minor) complications affected 13 (56.5%) patients. The most common complications were neurologic deficit (17.4%), wound infection (8.7%), distal junctional kyphosis (DJK 8.7%), and cardiorespiratory failure (8.7%). Three (13.0%) patients required re-operation within 90-days (1 each for nerve root motor deficit, DJK, and implant pain/prominence). Cervical alignment improved significantly following 3CO, including cervical lordosis (-2.8° to -12.9°, p = 0.036), C2-7 sagittal vertical axis (64.6-42.3 mm, p < 0.001), and T1 slope minus cervical lordosis (46.4°-27.0°, p < 0.001). Among 23 ACD patients treated with 3CO, cervical alignment improved significantly following surgery. Thirteen (56.5%) patients had at least one complication. The most common complications were neurologic deficit, infection, DJK, and cardiorespiratory failure.

  18. Transcranial Direct Current Stimulation to the Right Temporoparietal Junction for Social Functioning in Autism Spectrum Disorder: Case Report.

    PubMed

    Esse Wilson, Joan; Quinn, Davin K; Wilson, J Kevin; Garcia, Christopher M; Tesche, Claudia D

    2017-08-18

    While there is evidence of improved social functioning after applying transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS) at the right temporoparietal junction (rTPJ) in individuals who are healthy, no current studies have investigated the use of tDCS at the rTPJ to improve social functioning in individuals with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). This case investigates the use of tDCS applied to the rTPJ to target social functioning in a high-functioning adult with ASD. The authors present a case of an 18-year old patient with ASD treated successfully with tDCS; 1.5 mA of tDCS was applied once a day for 30 minutes for 8 consecutive days with the anode electrode over rTPJ (CP6 in the 10/10 electroencephalogram system) and the cathode electrode placed on the ipsilateral deltoid. Behavioral outcome was assessed using the Autism Treatment Evaluation Checklist prior to tDCS, after the final tDCS session, and at 2 months after tDCS. An additional, informal follow-up was also made 1 year after tDCS. Autism Treatment Evaluation Checklist showed substantial improvement in social functioning from baseline to post-tDCS, which was maintained at 2 months. The patient also reported lessened feelings of anger and frustration over social disappointments. Informal follow-up 1 year after stimulation indicates that the patient continues to maintain many improvements. Anodal tDCS to the rTPJ may represent an effective treatment for improving social functioning in ASD, with a larger clinical trial needed to validate this effect.

  19. Video-assisted treatment of thoracolumbar junction fractures using a specific distractor for reduction: prospective study of 50 cases

    PubMed Central

    Tournier, C.; Aunoble, S.; Madi, K.; Leijssen, Ph.

    2009-01-01

    Posterior instrumentation allows good osteosynthesis for thoracolumbar junction fractures. However, in approximately 20% of cases, anterior bone defects may persist, leading to pseudoarthrosis and loss of reduction. Anterior approaches can circumvent this drawback, but they are considered aggressive with a high rate of complications. The advent of the endoscopic mini-invasive techniques has led to a reduction in the number of complications while maintaining the same consolidation rate. Nevertheless, poor restitution of anatomic curves is a reproach for this technique. This prospective study reports clinical and radiological result of 50 patients (19 women and 31 men) operated between April 2000 and March 2006 with a video-assisted anterior approach using an endodistractor for reduction and consequent insertion of the implant. There were A3 (n = 44), A2 (n = 2), A1 (n = 3) and C1 (n = 1) fractures (Magerl classification). The specific system for fracture reduction was used in the last 39 cases of this series. A Pyramesh cage (Medtronic, Memphis, USA) was used in 15 patients, a peek cage (Creaspine, Bordeaux, France) in 30 patients and a tricortical graft in 5 patients. Standard X-rays and CT scan were performed pre-operatively. Kyphosis, and angulations were measured pre-, per- and post-operatively. Mean immediate postoperative gain in localized kyphosis was 12.18° and mean gain at last follow-up was 11.71°. Mean immediate postoperative gain in RA was 13.24° and remained identical at last follow-up. Five patients had a transient pulmonary atelectasia and there was one pulmonary infection. No neurological complication occurred. Fracture reduction is comparable to the best thoracotomy series while limiting approach-related complications. PMID:19701654

  20. Video-assisted treatment of thoracolumbar junction fractures using a specific distractor for reduction: prospective study of 50 cases.

    PubMed

    Le Huec, Jean-Charles; Tournier, C; Aunoble, S; Madi, K; Leijssen, Ph

    2010-03-01

    Posterior instrumentation allows good osteosynthesis for thoracolumbar junction fractures. However, in approximately 20% of cases, anterior bone defects may persist, leading to pseudoarthrosis and loss of reduction. Anterior approaches can circumvent this drawback, but they are considered aggressive with a high rate of complications. The advent of the endoscopic mini-invasive techniques has led to a reduction in the number of complications while maintaining the same consolidation rate. Nevertheless, poor restitution of anatomic curves is a reproach for this technique. This prospective study reports clinical and radiological result of 50 patients (19 women and 31 men) operated between April 2000 and March 2006 with a video-assisted anterior approach using an endodistractor for reduction and consequent insertion of the implant. There were A3 (n = 44), A2 (n = 2), A1 (n = 3) and C1 (n = 1) fractures (Magerl classification). The specific system for fracture reduction was used in the last 39 cases of this series. A Pyramesh cage (Medtronic, Memphis, USA) was used in 15 patients, a peek cage (Creaspine, Bordeaux, France) in 30 patients and a tricortical graft in 5 patients. Standard X-rays and CT scan were performed pre-operatively. Kyphosis, and angulations were measured pre-, per- and post-operatively. Mean immediate postoperative gain in localized kyphosis was 12.18 degrees and mean gain at last follow-up was 11.71 degrees. Mean immediate postoperative gain in RA was 13.24 degrees and remained identical at last follow-up. Five patients had a transient pulmonary atelectasia and there was one pulmonary infection. No neurological complication occurred. Fracture reduction is comparable to the best thoracotomy series while limiting approach-related complications.

  1. Global Reconstruction for Extensive Destruction in Tuberculosis of the Lumbar Spine and Lumbosacral Junction: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Uvaraj, Nalli R; Bosco, Aju; Gopinath, Nalli R

    2015-08-01

    Study Design Case report. Objective To analyze the surgical difficulties in restoring global spinal stability and to describe an effective surgical option for tuberculosis with extensive destruction of the lumbosacral spine. Advanced tuberculosis with destruction of the lumbosacral spine can result in a kyphosis or hypolordosis, leading to back pain, spinal instability, and neurological deficits. The conventional treatment goals of lumbosacral tuberculosis are to correct and prevent a lumbar kyphosis, treat or prevent a neurological deficit, and restore global spinal stability. Instrumentation at the lumbosacral junction is technically demanding due to the complex local anatomy, the unique biomechanics, and the difficult fixation in the surrounding diseased bone. Methods We report a 21-year-old woman with tuberculosis from L1 to S2 with back pain and spinal instability. The radiographs showed a kyphosis of the lumbar spine. The magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography scans revealed extensive destruction of the lumbar and lumbosacral spine. Spinopelvic stabilization combined with anterior debridement and reconstruction with free fibular strut graft was performed. Results The radiographs at follow-up showed a good correction of the kyphosis and excellent graft incorporation and fusion. Conclusions Anterior column reconstruction with a fibular strut graft helps restore and maintain the vertebral height. Posterior stabilization with spinopelvic fixation can be an effective surgical option for reconstructing the spine in extensive lumbosacral tuberculosis with sacral body destruction, requiring long fusions to the sacrum. It augments spinal stability, prevents graft-related complications, and accelerates the graft incorporation and fusion, thereby permitting early mobilization and rehabilitation. In spinal tuberculosis, antitubercular therapy may have to be prolonged in cases with large disease load, based on the clinicoradiographic and laboratory

  2. Computer tomography navigation for the transoral anterior release of a complex craniovertebral junction deformity: A report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Miyahara, Junya; Hirao, Yujiro; Matsubayashi, Yoshitaka; Chikuda, Hirotaka

    2016-01-01

    The surgical correction of deformities of the craniovertebral junction (CVJ) remains a challenge due to its complex anatomy. Despite the well-known usefulness of computed tomography (CT) navigation in posterior spinal surgery, it is applied far less frequently in anterior spinal surgery, mainly due to registration difficulties. Case 1 was a 68-year-old female with rheumatoid arthritis, with a complaint of neck pain, motor weakness, and dysesthesia in the upper extremities. Case 2 was a 61-year-old male with Chiari malformation, with a complaint of neck pain and gait disturbance after a fall. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed severe atlantoaxial dislocation and multilevel cervical spinal cord compression in both patients. Continuous halo traction failed to reduce atlantoaxial dislocation, even under general anesthesia, and they were treated with combined anterior release and posterior decompression and fixation using CT navigation. Occipitocervical assimilation, which was present in both patients, enabled precise registration for navigation. The lack of anatomically characteristic landmarks on the vertebral surface makes obtaining accurate registration difficult in anterior CVJ surgery using CT navigation. The remaining mobility in the occipitocervical joint precludes the use of facial or cranial landmarks. However, occipitocervical assimilation, which is not uncommon in patients with CVJ deformities, enables accurate navigation during transoral surgery. Transoral anterior release using CT navigation is an effective treatment option for rigid complex CVJ deformities. The accurate identification of the patients' anatomical features such as occipitoatlantal assimilation, is crucial for the conducting accurate preoperative CT-based navigation during transoral surgery. Copyright © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  3. Craniovertebral junction realignment for the treatment of basilar invagination with syringomyelia: preliminary report of 12 cases.

    PubMed

    Goel, Atul; Sharma, Praveen

    2005-10-01

    Twelve selected patients, eight males and four females aged 14 to 50 years, with syringomyelia associated with congenital craniovertebral bony anomalies including basilar invagination and fixed atlantoaxial dislocation, and associated Chiari I malformation in eight, were treated by atlantoaxial joint manipulation and restoration of the craniovertebral region alignment between October 2002 and March 2004. Three patients had a history of trauma prior to the onset of symptoms. Spastic quadriparesis and ataxia were the most prominent symptoms. The mean duration of symptoms was 11 months. The atlantoaxial dislocation and basilar invagination were reduced by manual distraction of the facets of the atlas and axis, stabilization by placement of bone graft and metal spacers within the joint, and direct atlantoaxial fixation using an inter-articular plate and screw method technique. Following surgery all patients showed symptomatic improvement and restoration of craniovertebral alignment during follow up from 3 to 20 months (mean 7 months). Radiological improvement of the syrinx could not be evaluated as stainless steel metal plates, screws, and spacers were used for fixation. Manipulation of the atlantoaxial joints and restoring the anatomical craniovertebral alignments in selected cases of syringomyelia leads to remarkable and sustained clinical recovery, and is probably the optimum surgical treatment.

  4. Giant pseudomeningocele after spinal surgery: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Srilomsak, Prepram; Okuno, Kazuma; Sakakibara, Toshihiko; Wang, Zhuo; Kasai, Yuichi

    2012-01-01

    Very few reports have described giant pseudomeningoceles ≥ 8 cm in diameter. We report this case of the biggest giant pseudomeningocele at the unusual cervicothoracic level. A 59 year old man who underwent cervicothoracic laminectomy had a giant pseudomeningocele detected and the lesion gradually grew to about 15 cm in diameter by 2 years postoperatively. Cerebrospinal fluid leak closure was performed and the postoperative course was favorable. We present this case, review the literature and discuss the size and portion, mechanism of formation, symptoms and treatments of giant pseudomeningocele. PMID:22816066

  5. Proximal junctional vertebral fracture-subluxation after adult spine deformity surgery. Does vertebral augmentation avoid this complication? A case report

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background To report to the orthopedic community a case of vertebral fracture and adjacent vertebral subluxation through the upper instrumented vertebra after thoracolumbar fusion with augmentation of the cranial level. Methods This report reviewed the patient`s medical record, her imaging studies and related literature. The possible factors contributing to this fracture are hypothesized. Results A 70-year-old woman underwent decompressive surgery and posterolateral fusion for adult lumbar scoliosis. We used pedicular screws from T10 to S1 and iliac screw at the right side, augmented with cement at T10, T11, L1, L5 and S1; and prophylactic vertebroplasty at T9 to avoid the "topping-off syndrome". Thirty days after discharge, without recognizable inciting trauma, the patient complained of pain in the lower thoracic area. The exam revealed overall neurological deficit below the level of fracture. CT scan and MRI demonstrated a T10 vertebral collapse and T9 vertebral subluxation with morphologic features of flexion-distraction fracture through the upper edge of the screw. At this point, the authors performed posterior decompression at T9 to T10 and extended posterolateral arthrodesis from T2 to T10. To our knowledge, this is an unreported fracture. Conclusions Augmentation of the cranial level in a long thoracolumbar fusion has been developed to avoid the junctional kyphosis and compression fractures at that level. We alert the orthopedic community that this augmentation may lead to further and more severe fractures, although this opinion requires investigation for confirmation. PMID:22947422

  6. Primary spinal epidural cavernous hemangioma: clinical features and surgical outcome in 14 cases.

    PubMed

    Li, Teng-Yu; Xu, Yu-Lun; Yang, Jun; Wang, James; Wang, Gui-Huai

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the clinical characteristics, imaging features, differential diagnosis, treatment options, and prognosis for primary spinal epidural cavernous hemangiomas. Fourteen patients with pathologically diagnosed non-vertebral origin cavernous hemangiomas who had undergone surgery at Beijing Tiantan Hospital between 2003 and 2012 were identified in the hospital's database. The patients' clinical data, imaging characteristics, surgical treatment, and postoperative follow-up were analyzed retrospectively. There were 9 males and 5 females with an average age of 51.64 years. The primary epidural cavernous hemangiomas were located in the cervical spine (2 cases), cervicothoracic junction (2 cases), thoracic spine (8 cases), thoracolumbar junction (1 case), and lumbar spine (1 case). Hemorrhage was confirmed in 4 cases during surgery. Preoperatively 5 lesions were misdiagnosed as schwannoma, 1 was misdiagnosed as a meningioma, and 1 was misdiagnosed as an arachnoid cyst. Preoperative hemorrhages were identified in 2 cases. Three patients had recurrent cavernous hemangiomas. The initial presenting symptoms were local pain in 5 cases, radiculopathy in 6 cases, and myelopathy in 3 cases. Upon admission, 1 patient had radicular symptoms and 13 had myelopathic symptoms. The average symptom duration was 18 months. All patients underwent surgery; complete resection was achieved in 8 cases, subtotal resection in 4 cases, and partial resection in 2 cases. Postoperative follow-up was completed in 10 cases (average follow-up 34 months); 1 patient died, 5 patients showed clinical improvement, and 4 patients remained neurologically unchanged. Total surgical removal of spine epidural cavernous hemangiomas with a chronic course is the optimum treatment and carries a good prognosis. Secondary surgery for recurrent epidural cavernous hemangioma is technically more challenging. In patients with profound myelopathy from acute hemorrhage, even prompt surgical

  7. The behavior of series resistance of a p-n junction: the diode and the solar cell cases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bueno, Poliana H.; Costa, Diogo F.; Eick, Alexander; Carvalho, André; Monteiro, Davies W. L.

    2016-03-01

    This paper presents a comparison of the impact of the internal parasitic series resistance of a p-n junction, as seen from the microelectronics and photovoltaic communities. The elusive thermal behavior of the aforementioned resistance gave this work its origin. Each community uses a different approach to interpret the operational current-voltage behavior of a p-n junction, which might lead to confusion, since scientists and engineers of these two realms seldom interact. An improvement in the understanding of the different approaches will help one to better model the performance of devices based on p-n junctions and therefore it will favor the performance predictions of photovoltaic cells. For diodes, series resistance is usually determined from a specific forward-bias region of the I-V curve on a semi-logarithmic scale. However, in Photovoltaics this region is not commonly reported and therefore other methods to determine Rs are employed. We mathematically modeled an experimentally obtained I-V curve with various pairs of the ideality factor and Rs and found that more than one pair accurately synthesizes the measured curve. We can conclude that the reported series resistance not only depends on physical parameters, e.g. temperature or irradiance, but also on fitting parameters, i.e. the ideality factor. Generally the behavior of a p-n junction depends on its operating conditions and electrical modeling.

  8. Cervicothoracic Manual Therapy Plus Exercise Therapy Versus Exercise Therapy Alone in the Management of Individuals With Shoulder Pain: A Multicenter Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Mintken, Paul E; McDevitt, Amy W; Cleland, Joshua A; Boyles, Robert E; Beardslee, Amber R; Burns, Scott A; Haberl, Matthew D; Hinrichs, Lauren A; Michener, Lori A

    2016-08-01

    Study Design Multicenter randomized controlled trial. Background Cervicothoracic manual therapy has been shown to improve pain and disability in individuals with shoulder pain, but the incremental effects of manual therapy in addition to exercise therapy have not been investigated in a randomized controlled trial. Objectives To compare the effects of cervicothoracic manual therapy and exercise therapy to those of exercise therapy alone in individuals with shoulder pain. Methods Individuals (n = 140) with shoulder pain were randomly assigned to receive 2 sessions of cervicothoracic range-of-motion exercises plus 6 sessions of exercise therapy, or 2 sessions of high-dose cervicothoracic manual therapy and range-of-motion exercises plus 6 sessions of exercise therapy (manual therapy plus exercise). Pain and disability were assessed at baseline, 1 week, 4 weeks, and 6 months. The primary aim (treatment group by time) was examined using linear mixed-model analyses and the repeated measure of time for the Shoulder Pain and Disability Index (SPADI), the numeric pain-rating scale, and the shortened version of the Disabilities of the Arm, Shoulder and Hand questionnaire (QuickDASH). Patient-perceived success was assessed and analyzed using the global rating of change (GROC) and the Patient Acceptable Symptom State (PASS), using chi-square tests of independence. Results There were no significant 2-way interactions of group by time or main effects by group for pain or disability. Both groups improved significantly on the SPADI, numeric pain-rating scale, and QuickDASH. Secondary outcomes of success on the GROC and PASS significantly favored the manual therapy-plus-exercise group at 4 weeks (P = .03 and P<.01, respectively) and on the GROC at 6 months (P = .04). Conclusion Adding 2 sessions of high-dose cervicothoracic manual therapy to an exercise program did not improve pain or disability in patients with shoulder pain, but did improve patient-perceived success at 4 weeks

  9. Interplay between tight junctions & adherens junctions.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Hannah K; Maiers, Jessica L; DeMali, Kris A

    2017-09-01

    Cell-cell adhesions are critical for the development and maintenance of tissues. Present at sites of cell-cell contact are the adherens junctions and tight junctions. The adherens junctions mediate cell-cell adhesion via the actions of nectins and cadherins. The tight junctions regulate passage of ions and small molecules between cells and establish cell polarity. Historically, the adherens and tight junctions have been thought of as discrete complexes. However, it is now clear that a high level of interdependency exists between the two junctional complexes. The adherens junctions and tight junctions are physically linked, by the zonula occludens proteins, and linked via signaling molecules including several polarity complexes and actin cytoskeletal modifiers. This review will first describe the individual components of both the adherens and tight junctions and then discuss the coupling of the two complexes with an emphasis on the signaling links and physical interactions between the two junctional complexes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. [Establishment and analysis of a three-dimensional finite element model of human cervicotnoracic junction (C6-T1)].

    PubMed

    Ma, Xun; Guo, Jian-peng; Liang, Kai-heng; Song, Wen-hui

    2010-01-01

    To establish the cervicothoracic spine finite element model with three-dimensional finite element method, verify the effectiveness of this model and explore the stress distribution. DICOM image data of one normal healthy young male volunteer were obtained by spiral CT scan and processed with Mimics software. Datas were imported to ANSYS software to become a 3D entity. Disc structure and the main ligament were added. Disc structure was added using the shell-nuclear unit, representing the annulus fibrosus and nucleus pulposus. Ligament structure was established with 2-node cable element, the beginning and ending points of the ligament and the cross-sectional area were determined in accordance with references. C(6,7) and C7T1 facet joints were definded as the nonliner contact joints with friction coefficient. The lower surface of TI in all the directions was completely fixed in this model. In the model 2.0 Nm pure torque were imposed on C6, and the extension, flexion, axial rotation and lateral bending experiment were conducted. The experimental results were compared with the in vitro biomechanical tests. The cervicothoracic spine finite element model included 169,317 nodes and 106,242 units, and consistent with the in vitro biomechanical tests. The three-dimensional finite element model was in good running under external force. It is a convenient and precise method for physicians to establish the finite element model of the cervicothoracic junction. This method facilitates the computer study on the biomechanical behavior of the local structures of the model under various pressure conditions.

  11. Changes in mechanical load and extensor muscle activity in the cervico-thoracic spine induced by sitting posture modification.

    PubMed

    Edmondston, Stephen J; Sharp, Michael; Symes, Andew; Alhabib, Nawaf; Allison, Garry T

    2011-02-01

    The influence of whole body sitting posture on cervico-thoracic posture, mechanical load and extensor muscle activity was examined in 23 asymptomatic adults. Cervical and upper thoracic extensor muscle activity measured in guided slouched and lumbo-pelvic neutral postures was normalised to that measured in a self-selected habitual posture. Head and neck posture and gravitational load moment measurements were obtained in each posture. Sagittal head translation, upper cervical extension and load moment were significantly greater in the slouched posture (p < 0.001). Contrasting patterns of cervical and thoracic extensor activity were observed in the slouched and neutral postures, with cervical extensor activity 40% higher in the slouched posture (p < 0.0001). Thoracic extensor activity was significantly higher in the lumbo-pelvic neutral posture than the habitual posture (p = 0.002). The significant changes in extensor muscle activity with postural modification appear to be induced by the associated change in mechanical load moment of the head. STATEMENT OF RELEVANCE: More neutral sitting postures reduce the demand on the cervical extensor muscles and modify the relative contribution of cervical and thoracic extensors to the control of head and neck posture. Postures that promote these patterns of muscular activity may reduce cervical spine loading and the development of posture-related neck pain.

  12. Interrater reliability of the cervicothoracic and shoulder physical examination in patients with a primary complaint of shoulder pain.

    PubMed

    Burns, Scott A; Cleland, Joshua A; Carpenter, Kristin; Mintken, Paul E

    2016-03-01

    Examine the interrater reliability of cervicothoracic and shoulder physical examination in patients with a primary complaint of shoulder pain. Single-group repeated-measures design for interrater reliability. Orthopaedic physical therapy clinics. Twenty-one patients with a primary complaint of shoulder pain underwent a standardized examination by a physical therapist (PT). A PT conducted the first examination and one of two additional PTs conducted the 2nd examination. The Cohen κ and weighted κ were used to calculate the interrater reliability of ordinal level data. Intraclass correlation coefficients model 2,1 (ICC2,1) and the 95% confidence intervals were calculated to determine the interrater reliability. The kappa coefficients ranged from -.24 to .83 for the mobility assessment of the glenohumeral, acromioclavicular and sternoclavicular joints. The kappa coefficients ranged from -.20 to .58 for joint mobility assessment of the cervical and thoracic spine. The kappa coefficients ranged from .23 to 1.0 for special tests of the shoulder and cervical spine. The present study reported the reliability of a comprehensive upper quarter physical examination for a group of patients with a primary report of shoulder pain. The reliability varied considerably for the cervical and shoulder examination and was significantly higher for the examination of muscle length and cervical range of motion. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Fractional order junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machado, J. Tenreiro

    2015-01-01

    Gottfried Leibniz generalized the derivation and integration, extending the operators from integer up to real, or even complex, orders. It is presently recognized that the resulting models capture long term memory effects difficult to describe by classical tools. Leon Chua generalized the set of lumped electrical elements that provide the building blocks in mathematical models. His proposal of the memristor and of higher order elements broadened the scope of variables and relationships embedded in the development of models. This paper follows the two directions and proposes a new logical step, by generalizing the concept of junction. Classical junctions interconnect system elements using simple algebraic restrictions. Nevertheless, this simplistic approach may be misleading in the presence of unexpected dynamical phenomena and requires including additional "parasitic" elements. The novel γ -junction includes, as special cases, the standard series and parallel connections and allows a new degree of freedom when building models. The proposal motivates the search for experimental and real world manifestations of the abstract conjectures.

  14. A case of an anaplastic meningioma metastasizing to the mediastinal lymph nodes

    PubMed Central

    Nishida, Norihiro; Kanchiku, Tsukasa; Imajo, Yasuaki; Suzuki, Hidenori; Yoshida, Yuichiro; Kato, Yoshihiko; Hoshii, Yoshinobu; Taguchi, Toshihiko

    2016-01-01

    Context Grade II and III (World Health Organization classification) meningiomas rarely develop in the spinal cord. However, we experienced a case with an anaplastic meningioma that developed in the spinal cord at the cervicothoracic junction and metastasized to the mediastinal lymph nodes. No such cases have previously been reported. Findings The patient was a 68-year-old man who developed back pain that did not affect his daily living. He developed left lower limb paralysis, and was admitted after magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed an intramedullary tumor at the level of cervical vertebra 7 and thoracic vertebra 1. Positron emission tomography revealed tracer uptake in the intramedullary tumor and the mediastinal lymph nodes, suggesting a metastatic spinal cord tumor or malignant lymphoma. A lymph node biopsy was then performed. Although the tumor was highly malignant, its primary site was not identified. Detailed examinations by several other departments revealed no abnormalities. On hospital day 30, his left lower limb paralysis deteriorated, and MRI revealed that the tumor had grown. Thus, laminaplasty, laminectomy, and tumor resection were performed. The tumor was an anaplastic meningioma that resembled mediastinal lymph node tissue, and other tumor lesions were not found. These findings suggested that an anaplastic meningioma had metastasized to the mediastinal lymph nodes. The patient did not respond to radiotherapy, and he was transferred to another hospital. Conclusion In cases of intramedullary spinal tumors with metastasis without other potential primary tumor lesions, early diagnosis and treatment should be performed while considering anaplastic meningioma. PMID:25738779

  15. Association of Craniovertebral Junction Anomalies, Klippel-Feil Syndrome, Ruptured Dermoid Cyst and Mirror Movement in One Patient: A Unique Case and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu-Kun; Geng, Su-Min; Liu, Pi-Nan; Lv, Gang

    2016-01-01

    The Klippel-Feil syndrome (KFS) has been reported to be associated with intracranial neoplasms, most frequently epidermoid or dermoid cysts. To our knowledge, however, patients who present with a posterior fossa dermoid cyst (DC) and KFS are extremely rare with only 24 previously reported cases in the English literature worldwide. Therefore, we present the first report of a patient with a craniocervical ruptured DC accompanied by craniovertebral junction (CVJ) anomalies, KFS and mirror movement. Meanwhile, a literature review of KFS accompanying with posterior fossa DC discusses these conditions from the embryological, anatomical, clinical and therapeutic perspectives. Additionally, the combination of CVJ anomalies, KFS and DC may represent a new syndrome that has previously gone unnoticed.

  16. Acute subdural hematoma without subarachnoid hemorrhage caused by ruptured A1-A2 junction aneurysm. Case report.

    PubMed

    Takada, Tomoya; Yamamoto, Tetsuya; Ishikawa, Eiichi; Zaboronok, Alexander; Kujiraoka, Yuji; Akutsu, Hiroyoshi; Ihara, Satoshi; Nakai, Kei; Matsumura, Akira

    2012-01-01

    A 54-year-old man was admitted to our hospital with complaint of sudden headache. The patient had suffered two episodes of transient headache before admission. Computed tomography (CT) revealed acute subdural hematoma (ASDH) on the right side of the cerebral convexity with bilateral extension along the tentorium cerebelli without signs of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) or intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH). Three-dimensional CT angiography and conventional cerebral angiography revealed a left A1-A2 junction aneurysm. Neck clipping of the aneurysm was performed. The aneurysm extended inferiorly, with the dome embedded in the chiasmatic cistern and tightly adhered to the arachnoid membrane. There was no evidence of hematoma in the subarachnoid space. The patient was discharged without neurological deficit. Ruptured aneurysms resulting in ASDH without SAH or ICH are very rare. Radiological investigation such as three-dimensional CT angiography should be performed to find the causative aneurysm in a patient with ASDH with a history of repeated headaches and without traumatic signs or episodes, and the appropriate treatment should be planned with expediency.

  17. [Long-term evolution of esophago-gastric junctions surgically treated to correct gastro-esophageal reflux. 111 cases].

    PubMed

    Vaysse, P; Baunin, C; Guitard, J; Moscovici, J; Visentin, M; Chansou, A; Fedacou, F; Juskiewenski, S

    1989-01-01

    One hundred eleven patients underwent a surgical procedure for correction of intractable gastroesophageal reflux. Twenty children were severely mentally retarded. The range of follow up was 6 months to 15 years. Upper gastro-intestinal series was realised at tenth post-operative day for 111 children, then during the first year for 97 children, between the first and fifth year for 62 children and after the fifth year for 25 children. The first upper gastro-intestinal control (at tenth day) was normal for 111 patients. Next controls revealed, usually during the first post-operative year, an esophago-gastric junction anomaly for 49 patients (44%). Most of them are light (41/111 = 37%): occasional reflux (9 children; more frequent without pyloroplasty) of little paraesophageal hernia (32 children; more frequent with closure of esophageal hiatus by two suture lines, with esophageal fixation on median arcuatum ligament or without esophageal fixation on esophageal hiatus); these light anomalies are symptom free and sometimes transitories. Rarely, anomalies are important (8/111 = 7%): big paraesophageal hernia of recurrence (more frequent with partial posterior fundoplication and in children severely mentally retarded); five patients were symptomatic and had to be reoperated. Also now, we don't use partial posterior fundoplication and in mentally retarded children we prefer a Collis procedure.

  18. Disordered graphene Josephson junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muñoz, W. A.; Covaci, L.; Peeters, F. M.

    2015-02-01

    A tight-binding approach based on the Chebyshev-Bogoliubov-de Gennes method is used to describe disordered single-layer graphene Josephson junctions. Scattering by vacancies, ripples, or charged impurities is included. We compute the Josephson current and investigate the nature of multiple Andreev reflections, which induce bound states appearing as peaks in the density of states for energies below the superconducting gap. In the presence of single-atom vacancies, we observe a strong suppression of the supercurrent, which is a consequence of strong intervalley scattering. Although lattice deformations should not induce intervalley scattering, we find that the supercurrent is still suppressed, which is due to the presence of pseudomagnetic barriers. For charged impurities, we consider two cases depending on whether the average doping is zero, i.e., existence of electron-hole puddles, or finite. In both cases, short-range impurities strongly affect the supercurrent, similar to the vacancies scenario.

  19. Epithelial adhesive junctions

    PubMed Central

    Capaldo, Christopher T.; Farkas, Attila E.

    2014-01-01

    Epithelial adhesive cell-to-cell contacts contain large, plasma membrane-spanning multiprotein aggregates that perform vital structural and signaling functions. Three prominent adhesive contacts are the tight junction, adherens junction, and the desmosome. Each junction type has unique cellular functions and a complex molecular composition. In this review, we comment on recent and exciting advances in our understanding of junction composition and function. PMID:24592313

  20. YBCO Josephson Junction Arrays

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-07-14

    Conductus 969 West Maude Avenue ř ’AEOTR. 19 4 0 0 75 Sunnyvale CA 94086 9. SPONSORING MONITORING AGENCY NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) ’C 510 N’_ ; i )N !’->.G...the primary junction being investigated at Conductus (and one of the better performing junctions in the community) was the bi-epitaxial structure [4...achieved. 2.1 Junctions At the time of proposal, the primary junction being investigated at Conductus (and one of the better performing junctions in

  1. Ballistic bipolar junctions in chemically gated graphene ribbons

    PubMed Central

    Baringhaus, Jens; Stöhr, Alexander; Forti, Stiven; Starke, Ulrich; Tegenkamp, Christoph

    2015-01-01

    The realization of ballistic graphene pn-junctions is an essential task in order to study Klein tunneling phenomena. Here we show that intercalation of Ge under the buffer layer of pre-structured SiC-samples succeeds to make truly nano-scaled pn-junctions. By means of local tunneling spectroscopy the junction width is found to be as narrow as 5 nm which is a hundred times smaller compared to electrically gated structures. The ballistic transmission across the junction is directly proven by systematic transport measurements with a 4-tip STM. Various npn- and pnp-junctions are studied with respect to the barrier length. The pn-junctions are shown to act as polarizer and analyzer with the second junction becoming transparent in case of a fully ballistic barrier. This can be attributed to the almost full suppression of electron transmission through the junction away from normal incidence. PMID:25898259

  2. Coexistence of cervico-thoracic extradural en-plaque meningioma with multiple intracranial meningiomas.

    PubMed

    Kale, Aydemir; Akyol, Cetin; Keskin, Emrah; Aydoğmuş, Evren; Aydın, Hasan Ali; Barut, Figen; Gül, Sanser; Kalaycı, Murat

    2014-01-01

    Meningioma is one of the most common tumors in the spinal cord. Extradural and en-plaque variety of meningioma occur less frequently. A 47-year-old woman is presented with radiculopathy signs. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a lesion from C6 through T3 vertebral levels compressing the cord both anteriorly and posteriorly. Subtotally excision was performed and histopathologic signs showed transitional type of meningioma (WHO Grade 1). Post operatively, she had good neurological recovery. Intraoperative findings point out that the en-plaque meningioma was pure extradural. Twelve cases of pure extradural en-plaque meningioma have been reported in the literature. Besides, to the best our knowledge coexistence of "en plaque" spinal epidural meningioma with meningiomas in cranial cavity has not been reported. Complete resection is mandatory to prevent recurrence. Moreover, it is considerably difficult to remove the parts of tumor over anterior of the dura without complication. Copyright © 2014 Polish Neurological Society. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o. All rights reserved.

  3. Junction conditions for F (T ) gravity from a variational principle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velay-Vitow, Jesse; DeBenedictis, Andrew

    2017-07-01

    We derive a general set of acceptable junction conditions for F (T ) gravity via the variational principle. The analysis is valid for both the traditional form of F (T ) gravity theory as well as the more recently introduced Lorentz covariant theory of Krššák and Saridakis. We find that the general junction conditions derived, when applied to simple cases such as highly symmetric static or time dependent geometries (such as spherical symmetry), imply both the Synge junction conditions as well as the Israel-Sen-Lanczos-Darmois junction conditions of general relativity. In more complicated scenarios the junction conditions derived do not generally imply the well-known junction conditions of general relativity. However, the junction conditions of de la Cruz-Dombriz et al. make up an interesting subset of this more general case.

  4. Intraoperative somatosensory evoked potential recovery following opening of the fourth ventricle during posterior fossa decompression in Chiari malformation: case report.

    PubMed

    Grossauer, Stefan; Koeck, Katharina; Vince, Giles H

    2015-03-01

    The most appropriate surgical technique for posterior fossa decompression in Chiari malformation (CM) remains a matter of debate. Intraoperative electrophysiological studies during posterior fossa decompression of Type I CM (CM-I) aim to shed light on the entity's pathomechanism as well as on the ideal extent of decompression. The existing reports on this issue state that significant improvement in conduction occurs after craniotomy in all cases, but additional durotomy contributes a further improvement in only a minority of cases. This implies that craniotomy alone might suffice for clinical improvement without the need of duraplasty or even subarachnoid manipulation at the level of the craniocervical junction. In contrast to published data, the authors describe the case of a 32-year-old woman who underwent surgery for CM associated with extensive cervicothoracic syringomyelia and whose intraoperative somatosensory evoked potentials (SSEPs) did not notably improve after craniotomy or following durotomy; rather, they only improved after opening of the fourth ventricle and restoration of CSF flow through the foramen of Magendie. Postoperatively, the patient recovered completely from her preoperative neurological deficits. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first report of significant SSEP recovery after opening the fourth ventricle in the decompression of a CM-I. The electrophysiological and operative techniques are described in detail and the findings are discussed in the light of available literature. The authors conclude that there might be a subset of CM-I patients who require subarachnoid dissection at the level of the craniocervical junction to benefit clinically. Prospective studies with detailed electrophysiological analyses seem warranted to answer the question regarding the best surgical approach in CM-I decompression.

  5. Myosins in cell junctions

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Katy C.; Cheney, Richard E.

    2012-01-01

    The development of cell-cell junctions was a fundamental step in metazoan evolution, and human health depends on the formation and function of cell junctions. Although it has long been known that actin and conventional myosin have important roles in cell junctions, research has begun to reveal the specific functions of the different forms of conventional myosin. Exciting new data also reveals that a growing number of unconventional myosins have important roles in cell junctions. Experiments showing that cell junctions act as mechanosensors have also provided new impetus to understand the functions of myosins and the forces they exert. In this review we will summarize recent developments on the roles of myosins in cell junctions. PMID:22954512

  6. [Fourth branchial cleft deformity with skin orifice: a series of 10 cases].

    PubMed

    Huang, S L; Zhang, B; Chen, L S; Liang, L; Luo, X N; Lu, Z M; Zhang, S Y

    2016-10-07

    Objective: To report rare cases of congenital neck cutaneous sinus with an orifice near the sternoclavicular joint and to investigate their origins and managements. Methods: A total of ten patients with congenital neck cutaneous sinus having an orifice near the sternoclavicular joint treated in the Guangdong General Hospital from January 2010 to June 2015 were retrospectively analyzed. Results: There four boys and six girls, aging from 11 months to 96 months with an average of 33.4 months, and they had a common feature showing a congenital cutaneous sinus with an orifice near sternoclavicular joint. Discharge of pus from the orifice or abscess formation was commonly seen soon after infection. With bacteriological study, staphylococcus aureus was positive in five cases and klebsiella pneumonia in a case. Another orifice of fistula/sinus was not depicted in pyriform with barium swallow X-ray in five cases Ultrasound studies of three cases demonstrated anechoic (i.e., nearly black) and solid-cystic lesion near sternoclavicular joint with posterior acoustic enhancement. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed isointensity of the lesion on T1 and T2 weighted images with heterogeneous enhancement and a close relationship with sternoclavicular joint. All patients underwent laryngoscopic examination, which showed no orifice of sinus in pyriform at same side. Surgical resection of fistula/sinus was performed in all cases. The lengths of the fistula varied from 5 mm to 22 mm with an average of 11 mm. Postoperative pathological examination showed all specimens were accordance with fistula. No complications were noticed. Recurrence was not observed in the cases by following-up of 6 months to 70 months (median: 33 months). Conclusion: Congenital neck cutaneous sinus with orifice near the sternoclavicular joint maybe a special clinical phenotype of the fourth branchial cleft sinus with skin orifice in cervicothoracic junction. Differential diagnoses between low cervical diseases

  7. Extended generation profile - E.B.I.C model application in the case of a PN junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guermazi, S.; Toureille, A.; Grill, C.; El Jani, B.

    2000-01-01

    We have developed a model for the calculation of the induced current due to an electron beam with an extended generation profile. Added to the absorbed and diffuse electrons in the depth distribution, the generation profile takes into account the lateral diffusion. The analytical expression of the electron beam induced current (EBIC) is obtained by solving the continuity equation in permanent regime by the Green function method. The induced current profile, obtained in the case of a ternary component (Ga{0.7}Al{0.3}As:N^+/Ga{0.7}Al{0.3}As:P) sulfur doped and prepared by organometallic compounds phase vapor epitaxy method, is compared to the theoretical profiles whose analytical expressions are given by Van Roosbroeck and Bresse. The experimental current profile, measured by S.E.M provided us to calculate the diffusion length of the minority carriers: L_p=1 μm in the N region and L_n=1.80 μm in the P region of the ternaire component. The theoretical curve obtained from the proposed model is in good agreement with the experimental one for a surface recombination velocity of 10^6 cm s^{-1}. Our results are found to be consistent compared to those obtained by other experimental techniques using the same samples. Nous avons développé un modèle de calcul du courant induit par un faisceau d'électrons avec un profil de génération élargi. Le profil de génération prend en compte la répartition spatiale de la diffusion et de l'absorption des électrons. L'expression analytique du courant induit (E.B.I.C) est déterminée par résolution de l'équation de continuité en régime permanent par la méthode des fonctions de Green. Le profil de courant induit obtenu dans le cas d'une jonction PN (Ga{0,7}Al{0,3}As:N^+/Ga{0,7}Al{0,3}As:P) dopée par le soufre et préparée par épitaxie à phase vapeur organo-métallique, est comparé au profil de courant théorique dont l'expression analytique est explicitée par Van Roosbroeck et Bresse. Le profil expérimental de

  8. [A case of advanced esophagogastric junction cancer responding to pre-operative combination chemotherapy of docetaxel, cisplatin, S-1, and trastuzumab].

    PubMed

    Haruki, Shigeo; Takiguchi, Noriaki; Arita, Kaida; Usui, Shinsuke; Ito, Koji; Matsumoto, Akiyo; Hiranuma, Susumu; Bhunachet, Ekapot

    2013-08-01

    We have no consensus on surgical treatment and chemotherapy for esophagogastric junction cancer in Japan. A 51-yearold man reporting dysphagia was examined, and through upper gastrointestinal endoscopy was found to have a tumor at the esophagogastric junction. Histologically, biopsy specimens indicated adenocarcinoma with genetic amplification of human epidermal growth factor receptor type 2(HER2). Positron emission tomography showed swelling of several abdominal lymph nodes with accumulation of fluorodeoxyglucose. He was treated with esophagogastorectomy with left thoracotomy after combination chemotherapy of docetaxel, cisplatin, S-1, and trastuzumab. He had no complication from the operation and had no adverse effect from the combination chemotherapy. Histopathological examination of the resected specimen showed a minute residual cancer nest at the muscularis propria of the esophagus, but no lymph node metastasis. This regimen could be useful for advanced junctional cancer with HER2 amplification as preoperative chemotherapy.

  9. Indian Ocean Triple Junction

    SciTech Connect

    Tapscott, C.R.; Patriat, P.; Fisher, R.L.; Sclater, J.G.; Hoskins, H.; Parsons, B.

    1980-09-10

    The boundaries of three major plates (Africa, India, and Antarctica) meet in a triple junction in the Indian Ocean near 25 /sup 0/S, 70 /sup 0/E. Using observed bathymetry and magnetic anomalies, we locate the junction to within 5 km and show that it is a ridge-ridge-ridge type. Relative plate motion is N60 /sup 0/E at 50 mm/yr (full rate) across the Central Indian Ridge, N47 /sup 0/E at 60 mm/yr across the Southeast Indian Ridge, and N3 /sup 0/W at 15 mm/yr across te Southwest Indian Ridge; the observed velocity triangle is closed. Poles of instantaneous relative plate motion are determined for all plate pairs. The data in the South Atlantic and Indian oceans are consistent with a rigid African plate without significant internal deformation. Two of the ridges at the triple junction are normal midocean spreading centers with well-defined median valleys. The Southwest Indian Ridge, however, has a peculiar morphology near the triple junction, that of an elongate triangular deep, with the triple junction at its apex. The floor of the deep represents crust formed at the Southwest Indian Ridge, and the morphology is a consequence of the evolution of the triple junction and is similar to that at the Galapagos Triple Junction. Though one cannot determine with precision the stability conditions at the triple junction, the development of the junction over the last 10 m.y. can be mapped, and the topographic expressions of the triple junction traces may be detected on the three plates.

  10. Constraints on string networks with junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Copeland, E. J.; Kibble, T. W. B.; Steer, D. A.

    2007-03-15

    We consider the constraints on string networks with junctions in which the strings may all be different, as may be found, for example, in a network of (p,q) cosmic superstrings. We concentrate on three aspects of junction dynamics. First we consider the propagation of small-amplitude waves across a static three-string junction. Then, generalizing our earlier work, we determine the kinematic constraints on two colliding strings with different tensions. As before, the important conclusion is that strings do not always reconnect with a third string; they can pass straight through one another (or in the case of non-Abelian strings become stuck in an X configuration), the constraint depending on the angle at which the strings meet, on their relative velocity, and on the ratios of the string tensions. For example, if the two colliding strings have equal tensions, then for ultrarelativistic initial velocities they pass through one another. However, if their tensions are sufficiently different they can reconnect. Finally, we consider the global properties of junctions and strings in a network. Assuming that, in a network, the incoming waves at a junction are independently randomly distributed, we determine the root-mean-square (r.m.s.) velocities of strings and calculate the average speed at which a junction moves along each of the three strings from which it is formed. Our findings suggest that junction dynamics may be such as to preferentially remove the heavy strings from the network leaving a network of predominantly light strings. Furthermore the r.m.s. velocity of strings in a network with junctions is smaller than 1/{radical}(2), the result for conventional Nambu-Goto strings without junctions in Minkowski space-time.

  11. Case of Superficial Cancer Located at the Pharyngoesophageal Junction Which Was Dissected by Endoscopic Laryngopharyngeal Surgery Combined with Endoscopic Submucosal Dissection

    PubMed Central

    Kawano, Tatsuyuki; Sugimoto, Taro; Yamaguchi, Kazuya; Kawamura, Yuudai; Matsui, Toshihiro; Okuda, Masafumi; Ogo, Taichi; Kume, Yuuichiro; Nakajima, Yutaka; Mora, Andres; Okada, Takuya; Hoshino, Akihiro; Tokairin, Yutaka; Nakajima, Yasuaki; Okada, Ryuhei; Kiyokawa, Yusuke; Nomura, Fuminori; Asakage, Takahiro; Shimoda, Ryo; Ito, Takashi

    2017-01-01

    Aims. In order to determine the indications of transoral surgery for a tumor located at the pharyngoesophageal junction, the trumpet maneuver with transnasal endoscopy was used. Its efficacy is reported here. Material and Methods. An 88-year-old woman complaining of dysphagia, diagnosed with cervical esophageal cancer, and hoping to preserve her voice and swallowing function was admitted to our hospital. Conventional endoscopy showed that the tumor had invaded the hypopharynx. When inspecting the hypopharynx and the orifice of the esophagus, we asked the patient to blow hard and puff her cheeks with her mouth closed (trumpet maneuver). After the trumpet maneuver, the pharyngeal mucosa was stretched out. The pedicle of the tumor arose from the left-anterior wall of the pharyngoesophageal junction, so we decided to perform endoscopic resection. Result. Under general anesthesia, the curved laryngoscope made it possible to view the whole hypopharynx, including the apex of the piriform sinus and the orifice of the esophagus. The cervical esophageal cancer was pulled up to the hypopharynx. Under collaboration between a head and neck surgeon and an endoscopist, the tumor was resected en bloc by endoscopic laryngopharyngeal surgery combined with endoscopic submucosal dissection. Conclusion. Transnasal endoscopy using the trumpet maneuver is useful for a precise diagnosis of the pharyngoesophageal junction. Close collaboration between head and neck surgeons and endoscopists can provide good results in treating tumors of the pharyngoesophageal junction. PMID:28154766

  12. Transient, recurrent, white matter lesions in x-linked Charcot-Marie-tooth disease with novel mutation of gap junction protein beta 1 gene in China: a case report.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yuan; Xie, Yanchen; Zhu, Xiaoquan; Wang, Huigang; Li, Yao; Li, Jimei

    2014-08-03

    Transient white matter lesions have been rarely reported in X-linked Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1. We describe a 15-year-old boy who presented transient and recurrent weakness of the limbs for 5 days. His mother, his mother's mother and his mother's sister presented pes cavus. MRI and electrophysiology were performed in the proband. Gap junction protein beta l gene was analyzed by PCR-sequencing in the proband and his parents. The electrophysiological studies showed a mixed demyelinating and axonal sensorimotor neuropathy. MRI showed white matter lesions in the internal capsule, corpus callosum and periventricular areas, which showed almost complete resolution after two months. T278G mutation in Gap junction protein beta l gene was detected in the proband and his mother. This case report highlights that the novel T278G mutation of Gap junction protein beta l maybe could result in X-linked Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1 with predominant leucoencephalopathy. The white matter changes in MRI of X-linked Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1 patient are reversible.

  13. Geometrical theory of triple junctions of CSL boundaries.

    PubMed

    Gertsman, V Y

    2001-07-01

    When three grain boundaries having misorientations generating coincidence site lattices (CSLs) meet at a triple junction, a common (triple-junction) CSL is formed. A theory is developed as a set of theorems establishing the relationships between the geometrical parameters of the grain-boundary and triple-junction CSLs. Application of the theory is demonstrated in detail for the case of the cubic crystal system. It is also shown how the theory can be extended to an arbitrary crystal lattice.

  14. [A case of dural arteriovenous fistula at the craniocervical junction, which spinal MRI findings reveals increased intensity signal in Th3-medullary cone].

    PubMed

    Ueda, Masamichi; Ueda, Miki; Takeuchi, Yuko; Ochiai, Jun; Mabuchi, Chiyuki; Hattori, Shinnosuke

    2016-01-01

    A 60-year-old woman had transient weakness of the legs and urinary retention for six weeks. She presented with a gait disorder and was admitted to the hospital. She showed symptoms of paraplegia, tingling in the lower extremities, dysuria. She underwent an MRI, and T2-weighted images showed an enlargement of the thoracolumbar spinal cord and high intensity signal from Th3 to the medullary cone, and a contrast-enhanced T1-weighted image showed abnormal vessels anterior to the spine cord. Cervical and spinal angiography documented a dural arteriovenous fistula at the craniocervical junction that was fed by the right vertebral artery and the right ascending pharyngeal arteries and drained into the perimedullary veins. Surgical therapy improved her symptoms and MRI images. Craniocervical junction DAVF with thoracic-medullary cones lesion is rare.

  15. Quantum junction solar cells.

    PubMed

    Tang, Jiang; Liu, Huan; Zhitomirsky, David; Hoogland, Sjoerd; Wang, Xihua; Furukawa, Melissa; Levina, Larissa; Sargent, Edward H

    2012-09-12

    Colloidal quantum dot solids combine convenient solution-processing with quantum size effect tuning, offering avenues to high-efficiency multijunction cells based on a single materials synthesis and processing platform. The highest-performing colloidal quantum dot rectifying devices reported to date have relied on a junction between a quantum-tuned absorber and a bulk material (e.g., TiO(2)); however, quantum tuning of the absorber then requires complete redesign of the bulk acceptor, compromising the benefits of facile quantum tuning. Here we report rectifying junctions constructed entirely using inherently band-aligned quantum-tuned materials. Realizing these quantum junction diodes relied upon the creation of an n-type quantum dot solid having a clean bandgap. We combine stable, chemically compatible, high-performance n-type and p-type materials to create the first quantum junction solar cells. We present a family of photovoltaic devices having widely tuned bandgaps of 0.6-1.6 eV that excel where conventional quantum-to-bulk devices fail to perform. Devices having optimal single-junction bandgaps exhibit certified AM1.5 solar power conversion efficiencies of 5.4%. Control over doping in quantum solids, and the successful integration of these materials to form stable quantum junctions, offers a powerful new degree of freedom to colloidal quantum dot optoelectronics.

  16. The 'depletion layer' of amorphous p-n junctions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Von Roos, O.

    1981-01-01

    It is shown that within reasonable approximations for the density of state distribution within the mobility gap of a:Si, a one-to-one correspondence exists between the electric field distribution in the transition region of an amorphous p-n junction and that in the depletion layer of a crystalline p-n junction. Thus it is inferred that the depletion layer approximation which leads to a parabolic potential distribution within the depletion layer of crystalline junctions also constitutes a fair approximation in the case of amorphous junctions. This fact greatly simplifies an analysis of solid-state electronic devices based on amorphous material (i.e., solar cells).

  17. Towards field theory in spaces with multivolume junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fomin, P. I.; Shtanov, Yu V.

    2002-06-01

    We consider a spacetime formed by several pieces with common timelike boundary which plays the role of a junction between them. We establish junction conditions for fields of various spins and derive the resulting laws of wave propagation through the junction, which turn out to be quite similar for fields of all spins. As an application, we consider the case of multivolume junctions in four-dimensional spacetime that may arise in the context of the theory of quantum creation of a closed universe on the background of a big mother universe. The theory developed can also be applied to braneworld models and to the superstring theory.

  18. Diencephalic-Mesencephalic Junction Dysplasia: A Novel Recessive Brain Malformation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zaki, Maha S.; Saleem, Sahar N.; Dobyns, William B.; Barkovich, A. James; Bartsch, Hauke; Dale, Anders M.; Ashtari, Manzar; Akizu, Naiara; Gleeson, Joseph G.; Grijalvo-Perez, Ana Maria

    2012-01-01

    We describe six cases from three unrelated consanguineous Egyptian families with a novel characteristic brain malformation at the level of the diencephalic-mesencephalic junction. Brain magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated a dysplasia of the diencephalic-mesencephalic junction with a characteristic "butterfly"-like contour of the…

  19. Diencephalic-Mesencephalic Junction Dysplasia: A Novel Recessive Brain Malformation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zaki, Maha S.; Saleem, Sahar N.; Dobyns, William B.; Barkovich, A. James; Bartsch, Hauke; Dale, Anders M.; Ashtari, Manzar; Akizu, Naiara; Gleeson, Joseph G.; Grijalvo-Perez, Ana Maria

    2012-01-01

    We describe six cases from three unrelated consanguineous Egyptian families with a novel characteristic brain malformation at the level of the diencephalic-mesencephalic junction. Brain magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated a dysplasia of the diencephalic-mesencephalic junction with a characteristic "butterfly"-like contour of the…

  20. A critical appraisal of the evidence for botulinum toxin type A in the treatment for cervico-thoracic myofascial pain syndrome.

    PubMed

    Desai, Mehul J; Shkolnikova, Tatyana; Nava, Andrew; Inwald, Danielle

    2014-02-01

    Myofascial pain syndrome (MPS) is a musculoskeletal condition characterized by regional pain and muscle tenderness associated with the presence of myofascial trigger points (MTrPs). The last decade has seen an exponential increase in the use of botulinum toxin (BTX) to treat MPS. To understand the medical evidence substantiating the role of therapeutic BTX injections and to provide useful information for the medical practitioner, we applied the principles of evidence-based medicine to the treatment for cervico-thoracic MPS. A search was conducted through MEDLINE (PubMed, OVID, MDConsult), EMBASE, SCOPUS and the Cochrane database for the period 1966 to 2012 using the following keywords: myofascial pain, muscle pain, botulinum toxin, trigger points, and injections. A total of 7 trials satisfied our inclusion criteria and were evaluated in this review. Although the majority of studies found negative results, our analysis identified Gobel et al.'s as the highest quality study among these prospectively randomized investigations. This was due to appropriate identification of diagnostic criteria, excellent study design and objective endpoints. The 6 other identified studies had significant failings due to deficiencies in 1 or more major criteria. We conclude that higher quality, rigorously standardized studies are needed to more appropriately investigate this promising treatment modality. © 2013 World Institute of Pain.

  1. Four-junction superconducting circuit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Yueyin; Xiong, Wei; He, Xiao-Ling; Li, Tie-Fu; You, J. Q.

    2016-06-01

    We develop a theory for the quantum circuit consisting of a superconducting loop interrupted by four Josephson junctions and pierced by a magnetic flux (either static or time-dependent). In addition to the similarity with the typical three-junction flux qubit in the double-well regime, we demonstrate the difference of the four-junction circuit from its three-junction analogue, including its advantages over the latter. Moreover, the four-junction circuit in the single-well regime is also investigated. Our theory provides a tool to explore the physical properties of this four-junction superconducting circuit.

  2. Four-junction superconducting circuit

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Yueyin; Xiong, Wei; He, Xiao-Ling; Li, Tie-Fu; You, J. Q.

    2016-01-01

    We develop a theory for the quantum circuit consisting of a superconducting loop interrupted by four Josephson junctions and pierced by a magnetic flux (either static or time-dependent). In addition to the similarity with the typical three-junction flux qubit in the double-well regime, we demonstrate the difference of the four-junction circuit from its three-junction analogue, including its advantages over the latter. Moreover, the four-junction circuit in the single-well regime is also investigated. Our theory provides a tool to explore the physical properties of this four-junction superconducting circuit. PMID:27356619

  3. Ureteropelvic junction obstruction presenting after antireflux surgery

    PubMed Central

    Alizadeh, Farshid; Izadpanahi, Mohammad Hossein; Khorrami, Mohammad Hatef; Nouri-Mahdavi, Kia

    2012-01-01

    Ureteropelvic junction obstruction (UPJO) and vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) are two of the most common urologic problems in children that sometimes coexist simultaneously in a patient. However, presentation of UPJO after VUR treatment is rare. We will present two cases and discuss diagnostic and therapeutic aspects of the condition. PMID:23210079

  4. Dot junction solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daud, T.; Crotty, G. T.

    1986-01-01

    A design of solar cells with reduced junction area on the cell surface is investigated for reduction of saturation current and increase in open-circuit voltage. Equidiameter dot junctions distributed across the surface of the cell offer an efficient alternative, with variations in dot diameter and in the spacing between dots giving the required variations in the ratio of junction area to total surface area. A simplified analysis for short-circuit current and other cell parameters, which enables cell design optimization, is presented. Experimental solar-cell performance results, as functions of different area ratios, are presented and compared with the model. It is shown that saturation current reduction is possible for achieving efficiencies as high as 18 percent in flat-plate terrestrial applications.

  5. Josephson junctions with alternating critical current density

    SciTech Connect

    Mints, R.G.; Kogan, V.G.

    1997-04-01

    The magnetic-field dependence of the critical current I{sub c}(H) is considered for a short Josephson junction with the critical current density j{sub c} alternating along the tunnel contact. Two model cases, periodic and randomly alternating j{sub c}, are treated in detail. Recent experimental data on I{sub c}(H) for grain-boundary Josephson junctions in YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub x} are discussed. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Physical Society}

  6. Interplay between static and dynamic properties of semifluxons in YBa2Cu3O(7-delta) 0-pi Josephson junctions.

    PubMed

    Cedergren, K; Kirtley, J R; Bauch, T; Rotoli, G; Troeman, A; Hilgenkamp, H; Tafuri, F; Lombardi, F

    2010-04-30

    We have investigated the static and dynamic properties of long YBa2Cu3O(7-delta) 0-pi Josephson junctions and compared them with those of conventional 0 junctions. Scanning SQUID microscope imaging has revealed the presence of a semifluxon at the phase discontinuity point in 0-pi Josephson junctions. Zero field steps have been detected in the current-voltage characteristics of all junctions. Comparison with simulation allows us to attribute these steps to fluxons traveling in the junction for conventional 0 junctions and to fluxon-semifluxon interactions in the case of 0-pi Josephson junctions.

  7. Victory Junction Gang Camp

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shell, Ryan

    2007-01-01

    This article describes the Victory Junction Gang Camp, a not-for-profit, NASCAR-themed camp for children with chronic medical conditions that serves 24 different disease groups. The mission of the camp is to give children life-changing camping experiences that are exciting, fun, and empowering in a safe and medically sound environment. While doing…

  8. Myosin-dependent remodeling of adherens junctions protects junctions from Snail-dependent disassembly

    PubMed Central

    Weng, Mo

    2016-01-01

    Although Snail is essential for disassembly of adherens junctions during epithelial–mesenchymal transitions (EMTs), loss of adherens junctions in Drosophila melanogaster gastrula is delayed until mesoderm is internalized, despite the early expression of Snail in that primordium. By combining live imaging and quantitative image analysis, we track the behavior of E-cadherin–rich junction clusters, demonstrating that in the early stages of gastrulation most subapical clusters in mesoderm not only persist, but move apically and enhance in density and total intensity. All three phenomena depend on myosin II and are temporally correlated with the pulses of actomyosin accumulation that drive initial cell shape changes during gastrulation. When contractile myosin is absent, the normal Snail expression in mesoderm, or ectopic Snail expression in ectoderm, is sufficient to drive early disassembly of junctions. In both cases, junctional disassembly can be blocked by simultaneous induction of myosin contractility. Our findings provide in vivo evidence for mechanosensitivity of cell–cell junctions and imply that myosin-mediated tension can prevent Snail-driven EMT. PMID:26754645

  9. Brain barriers: Crosstalk between complex tight junctions and adherens junctions.

    PubMed

    Tietz, Silvia; Engelhardt, Britta

    2015-05-25

    Unique intercellular junctional complexes between the central nervous system (CNS) microvascular endothelial cells and the choroid plexus epithelial cells form the endothelial blood-brain barrier (BBB) and the epithelial blood-cerebrospinal fluid barrier (BCSFB), respectively. These barriers inhibit paracellular diffusion, thereby protecting the CNS from fluctuations in the blood. Studies of brain barrier integrity during development, normal physiology, and disease have focused on BBB and BCSFB tight junctions but not the corresponding endothelial and epithelial adherens junctions. The crosstalk between adherens junctions and tight junctions in maintaining barrier integrity is an understudied area that may represent a promising target for influencing brain barrier function. © 2015 Tietz and Engelhardt.

  10. Intercellular junctions in myriapods.

    PubMed

    Dallai, R; Bigliardi, E; Lane, N J

    1990-01-01

    Tissue from the intestinal tract of myriapods, including millipedes, centipedes and pauropods were examined in tracer-impregnated sections and freeze-fracture replicas. The foregut and hindgut of all three classes exhibit pleated septate junctions; these display undulating intercellular ribbons in thin sections. In replicas they show discrete intramembranous particle (IMP) arrays aligned in rows in parallel; with one another. The tissues of the hindgut also possess scalariform junctions, characterized by cross-striated intercellular clefts in sections and IMP-enriched membranes in replicas. Gap junctions occur in all groups, but they are atypical in replicas in that their component IMPs do not always fracture onto the E face, as is characteristic of other arthropods; some IMPs cleave to the P face and others to the E face. The midgut of these organisms exhibits smooth septate junctions with conventional straight septal ribbons and occasional interseptal columns. However the intramembranous appearance in replicas is variable, particularly in centipedes, in that the rows of IMPs in chemically-unfixed propanecryofixed tissues, are prominent and adhere preferentially to the E face, with complementary P face grooves, while in fixed tissues the IMPs are much less distinct and fracture to either P face or E face. They tend not to protrude far beyond the mid-plane of the membrane bilayer and lie in rows which commonly take on the form of a network. Individual rows of the network sometimes curve to run beside a second row, over a short distance, before bending away into another part of the network. The aligned particle rows, which are much more prominent in millipedes, where they frequently lie in close parallel appositions, do not fuse into ridges as often occurs in insect tissues. The myriapod junctions, therefore, are of the same general kind as are found in the gut tract of other arthropod groups, but differ with respect to the subtleties of their intramembranous

  11. θ0 thermal Josephson junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silaev, M. A.

    2017-08-01

    We predict the thermal counterpart of the anomalous Josephson effect in superconductor/ferromagnet/superconductor junctions with noncoplanar magnetic texture. The heat current through the junction is shown to have the phase-sensitive interference component proportional to cos(θ -θ0) , where θ is the Josephson phase difference and θ0 is the texture-dependent phase shift. In the generic trilayer magnetic structure with the spin-filtering tunnel barrier θ0 is determined by the spin chirality of magnetic configuration and can be considered as the direct manifestation of the energy transport with participation of spin-triplet Cooper pairs. In case of the ideal spin filter the phase shift is shown to be robust against spin relaxation caused by the spin-orbital scattering. Possible applications of the coupling between heat flow and magnetic precession are discussed. For the nonideal spin filters with practically relevant parameters we show that θ0 is much larger than the phase shift of the equilibrium Josephson current.

  12. Magic-T Junction using Microstrip/Slotline Transitions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    U-yen, Kongpop; Wollack, Edward J.; Doiron, Terence

    2008-01-01

    An improved broadband planar magic-T junction that incorporates microstrip/slotline transitions has been developed. In comparison with a prior broadband magic-T junction incorporating microstrip/slotline transitions, this junction offers superior broadband performance. In addition, because this junction is geometrically simpler and its performance is less affected by fabrication tolerances, the benefits of the improved design can be realized at lower fabrication cost. There are potential uses for junctions like this one in commercial microwave communication receivers, radar and polarimeter systems, and industrial microwave instrumentation. A magic-T junction is a four-port waveguide junction consisting of a combination of an H-type and an E-type junction. An E-type junction is so named because it includes a junction arm that extends from a main waveguide in the same direction as that of the electric (E) field in the waveguide. An H-type junction is so named because it includes a junction arm parallel to the magnetic (H) field in a main waveguide. A magic-T junction includes two input ports (here labeled 1 and 2, respectively) and two output ports (here labeled E and H, respectively). In an ideal case, (1) a magic-T junction is lossless, (2) the input signals add (that is, they combine in phase with each other) at port H, and (3) the input signals subtract (that is, they combine in opposite phase) at port E. The prior junction over which the present junction is an improvement affords in-phase-combining characterized by a broadband frequency response, and features a small slotline area to minimize in-band loss. However, with respect to isolation between ports 1 and 2 and return loss at port E, it exhibits narrowband frequency responses. In addition, its performance is sensitive to misalignment of microstrip and slotline components: this sensitivity is attributable to a limited number of quarter-wavelength (lambda/4) transmission-line sections for matching impedances

  13. Osteopathia striata with cranial sclerosis (OSCS): review of the literature and case report demonstrating challenges of spinal fusion after trauma.

    PubMed

    Katsevman, Gennadiy A; Turner, Ryan C; Lucke-Wold, Brandon P; Sedney, Cara L; Bhatia, Sanjay

    2016-06-01

    Osteopathia striata with cranial sclerosis (OSCS) is a rare but well-described pathology characterized by abnormalities in bone deposition in the axial and cranial skeleton as well as other abnormalities and associated deficits. These skeletal abnormalities can lead to significant intra-operative challenges for the surgeon and influence outcomes for the patient. In this report, we present a case of a patient with OSCS who was involved in a traumatic motor vehicle crash and underwent posterior cervico-thoracic fusion for a T4 chance fracture. Bony abnormalities in the cervico-thoracic spine presented a significant operative challenge due to alterations in bony anatomy and bone architecture. This case serves as an example of the challenges that the spine surgeon faces when dealing with OSCS, and highlights the differences between OSCS and commoner skeletal hyperplasias such as osteopetrosis.

  14. Effect of solar-cell junction geometry on open-circuit voltage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weizer, V. G.; Godlewski, M. P.

    1985-01-01

    Simple analytical models have been found that adequately describe the voltage behavior of both the stripe junction and dot junction grating cells as a function of junction area. While the voltage in the former case is found to be insensitive to junction area reduction, significant voltage increases are shown to be possible for the dot junction cell. With regard to cells in which the junction area has been increased in a quest for better performance, it was found that (1) texturation does not affect the average saturation current density J0, indicating that the texturation process is equivalent to a simple extension of junction area by a factor of square root of 3 and (2) the vertical junction cell geometry produces a sizable decrease in J0 that, unfortunately, is more than offset by the effects of attendant areal increases.

  15. Holliday Junction Resolvases

    PubMed Central

    Wyatt, Haley D.M.; West, Stephen C.

    2014-01-01

    Four-way DNA intermediates, called Holliday junctions (HJs), can form during meiotic and mitotic recombination, and their removal is crucial for chromosome segregation. A group of ubiquitous and highly specialized structure-selective endonucleases catalyze the cleavage of HJs into two disconnected DNA duplexes in a reaction called HJ resolution. These enzymes, called HJ resolvases, have been identified in bacteria and their bacteriophages, archaea, and eukaryotes. In this review, we discuss fundamental aspects of the HJ structure and their interaction with junction-resolving enzymes. This is followed by a brief discussion of the eubacterial RuvABC enzymes, which provide the paradigm for HJ resolvases in other organisms. Finally, we review the biochemical and structural properties of some well-characterized resolvases from archaea, bacteriophage, and eukaryotes. PMID:25183833

  16. Holliday junction resolvases.

    PubMed

    Wyatt, Haley D M; West, Stephen C

    2014-09-02

    Four-way DNA intermediates, called Holliday junctions (HJs), can form during meiotic and mitotic recombination, and their removal is crucial for chromosome segregation. A group of ubiquitous and highly specialized structure-selective endonucleases catalyze the cleavage of HJs into two disconnected DNA duplexes in a reaction called HJ resolution. These enzymes, called HJ resolvases, have been identified in bacteria and their bacteriophages, archaea, and eukaryotes. In this review, we discuss fundamental aspects of the HJ structure and their interaction with junction-resolving enzymes. This is followed by a brief discussion of the eubacterial RuvABC enzymes, which provide the paradigm for HJ resolvases in other organisms. Finally, we review the biochemical and structural properties of some well-characterized resolvases from archaea, bacteriophage, and eukaryotes. Copyright © 2014 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press; all rights reserved.

  17. Thermoelectricity in molecular junctions.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Pramod; Jang, Sung-Yeon; Segalman, Rachel A; Majumdar, Arun

    2007-03-16

    By trapping molecules between two gold electrodes with a temperature difference across them, the junction Seebeck coefficients of 1,4-benzenedithiol (BDT), 4,4'-dibenzenedithiol, and 4,4''-tribenzenedithiol in contact with gold were measured at room temperature to be +8.7 +/- 2.1 microvolts per kelvin (muV/K), +12.9 +/- 2.2 muV/K, and +14.2 +/- 3.2 muV/K, respectively (where the error is the full width half maximum of the statistical distributions). The positive sign unambiguously indicates p-type (hole) conduction in these heterojunctions, whereas the Au Fermi level position for Au-BDT-Au junctions was identified to be 1.2 eV above the highest occupied molecular orbital level of BDT. The ability to study thermoelectricity in molecular junctions provides the opportunity to address these fundamental unanswered questions about their electronic structure and to begin exploring molecular thermoelectric energy conversion.

  18. Tuberculous Spondylitis of the Craniovertebral Junction.

    PubMed

    Megaloikonomos, Panayiotis D; Igoumenou, Vasilios; Antoniadou, Thekla; Mavrogenis, Andreas F; Soultanis, Konstantinos

    2016-01-01

    Craniovertebral junction tuberculosis is rare, accounting for 0.3 to 1% of all tuberculous spondylitis cases. MR imaging is the modality of choice to detect bone involvement, abscess formation and subligamentous spreading of the pus, to differentiate from other lesions affecting the craniovertebral junction, and to determine the efficacy of treatment. Given the fact that surgical treatment of patients with craniovertebral junction tuberculosis has been associated with a high mortality rate ranging up to 10% and recurrence rate ranging up to 20%, conservative is the standard of treatment for most patients. This article presents a patient with craniovertebral junction Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection diagnosed with CT-guided biopsy. A halo vest was applied and antituberculous treatment with rifampicin, isoniazid and ethambutol was initiated. At 6-month follow-up, the patient was asymptomatic; CT of the cervical spine showed healing of the bony lesions. The halo vest was removed and physical therapy was recommended. Antituberculous treatment was continued for a total of 18 months, without any evidence of infection recurrence.

  19. Junction between surfaces of two topological insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sen, Diptiman; Deb, Oindrila

    2012-02-01

    We study scattering from a line junction which separates the surfaces of two three-dimensional topological insulators; some aspects of this problem were recently studied in Takahashi and Murakami, Phys. Rev. Lett. 107, 166805 (2011). The velocities of the Dirac electrons on the two surfaces may be unequal and may even have opposite signs; in the latter case, we find that the electrons must, in general, go into the two-dimensional interface separating the two topological insulators. We also study what happens if the two surfaces are at an angle φ with respect to each other. We find in this case that there are bound states which propagate along the line junction with a velocity and direction of spin which depend on the bending angle φ.

  20. Signatures of topological Josephson junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Yang; Pientka, Falko; Berg, Erez; Oreg, Yuval; von Oppen, Felix

    2016-08-01

    Quasiparticle poisoning and diabatic transitions may significantly narrow the window for the experimental observation of the 4 π -periodic dc Josephson effect predicted for topological Josephson junctions. Here, we show that switching-current measurements provide accessible and robust signatures for topological superconductivity which persist in the presence of quasiparticle poisoning processes. Such measurements provide access to the phase-dependent subgap spectrum and Josephson currents of the topological junction when incorporating it into an asymmetric SQUID together with a conventional Josephson junction with large critical current. We also argue that pump-probe experiments with multiple current pulses can be used to measure the quasiparticle poisoning rates of the topological junction. The proposed signatures are particularly robust, even in the presence of Zeeman fields and spin-orbit coupling, when focusing on short Josephson junctions. Finally, we also consider microwave excitations of short topological Josephson junctions which may complement switching-current measurements.

  1. Large eddy simulation of a wing-body junction flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryu, Sungmin; Emory, Michael; Campos, Alejandro; Duraisamy, Karthik; Iaccarino, Gianluca

    2014-11-01

    We present numerical simulations of the wing-body junction flow experimentally investigated by Devenport & Simpson (1990). Wall-junction flows are common in engineering applications but relevant flow physics close to the corner region is not well understood. Moreover, performance of turbulence models for the body-junction case is not well characterized. Motivated by the insufficient investigations, we have numerically investigated the case with Reynolds-averaged Naiver-Stokes equation (RANS) and Large Eddy Simulation (LES) approaches. The Vreman model applied for the LES and SST k- ω model for the RANS simulation are validated focusing on the ability to predict turbulence statistics near the junction region. Moreover, a sensitivity study of the form of the Vreman model will also be presented. This work is funded under NASA Cooperative Agreement NNX11AI41A (Technical Monitor Dr. Stephen Woodruff)

  2. Josephson junctions with delayed feedback

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grønbech-Jensen, Niels; Blackburn, James A.; Huberman, Bernardo A.; Smith, H. J. T.

    1992-12-01

    We study a simple model of an overdamped Josephson junction coupled to a transmission line, which is regarded as a delayed feedback to the junction. It is demonstrated analytically how the nonlocal time dependence can give rise to hysteresis and steps in the current-voltage characteristics of the junction and the fundamental difference between positive and negative feedback is discussed. Excellent agreement between the analytical results and the results of numerical simulations is found.

  3. An induced junction photovoltaic cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Call, R. L.

    1974-01-01

    Silicon solar cells operating with induced junctions rather than diffused junctions have been fabricated and tested. Induced junctions were created by forming an inversion layer near the surface of the silicon by supplying a sheet of positive charge above the surface. Measurements of the response of the inversion layer cell to light of different wavelengths indicated it to be more sensitive to the shorter wavelengths of the sun's spectrum than conventional cells. The greater sensitivity occurs because of the shallow junction and the strong electric field at the surface.

  4. GUARD RING SEMICONDUCTOR JUNCTION

    DOEpatents

    Goulding, F.S.; Hansen, W.L.

    1963-12-01

    A semiconductor diode having a very low noise characteristic when used under reverse bias is described. Surface leakage currents, which in conventional diodes greatly contribute to noise, are prevented from mixing with the desired signal currents. A p-n junction is formed with a thin layer of heavily doped semiconductor material disposed on a lightly doped, physically thick base material. An annular groove cuts through the thin layer and into the base for a short distance, dividing the thin layer into a peripheral guard ring that encircles the central region. Noise signal currents are shunted through the guard ring, leaving the central region free from such currents. (AEC)

  5. Notalgia paresthetica associated with cervical spinal stenosis and cervicothoracic disk disease at C4 through C7.

    PubMed

    Alai, Nili N; Skinner, Harry B; Nabili, Siamak T; Jeffes, Edward; Shahrokni, Seyed; Saemi, Arash M

    2010-02-01

    Notalgia paresthetica (NP) is a common refractory, sensory, neuropathic syndrome with the hallmark symptom of localized pruritus of the unilateral infrascapular back. It generally is a chronic noncurable condition with periodic remissions and exacerbations. While the dermatologic syndrome may be multifactorial in etiology, a possible association with underlying cervical spine disease should be evaluated for proper treatment. Collaborative multispecialty evaluation by dermatology, radiology, orthopedic surgery, and neurology may be indicated for primary management of this condition. First-line therapy for NP with associated cervical disease may include nondermatologic noninvasive treatments such as spinal manipulation, physical therapy, massage, cervical traction, cervical muscle strengthening, and oral nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and muscle relaxants. Notalgia paresthetica may in fact be a cutaneous sign of an underlying degenerative cervical spine disease. We report a case of a patient with cervical spinal stenosis that corresponded directly with the clinical findings of NP.

  6. A rare presentation of lipoma on mandibular mucogingival junction

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Gaurav; Jain, Kanu; Nagpal, Archna; Baiju, Chandrababu Sudha

    2016-01-01

    Lipoma is the most common tumor of mesenchymal tissues of body, but its occurrence in oral cavity is infrequent. Buccal mucosa is the most common intraoral site of lipoma followed by tongue, floor of the mouth, and buccal vestibule. The involvement of mucogingival junction is rare. We present a unique case report of oral lipoma occurring on mandibular mucogingival junction with review of literature which has emphasis on differential diagnosis. PMID:27143835

  7. Quantum statistical theory of semiconductor junctions in thermal equilibrium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Von Roos, O.

    1977-01-01

    Free carrier and electric field distributions of one-dimensional semiconductor junctions are evaluated using a quantum mechanical phase-space distribution and its corresponding Boltzmann equation. Attention is given to quantum and exchange corrections in cases of high doping concentrations when carrier densities become degenerate. Quantitative differences between degenerate and classical junction characteristics, e.g., maximum electric field and built-in voltage and carrier concentration within the transition region, are evaluated numerically.

  8. Quantum statistical theory of semiconductor junctions in thermal equilibrium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Von Roos, O.

    1977-01-01

    Free carrier and electric field distributions of one-dimensional semiconductor junctions are evaluated using a quantum mechanical phase-space distribution and its corresponding Boltzmann equation. Attention is given to quantum and exchange corrections in cases of high doping concentrations when carrier densities become degenerate. Quantitative differences between degenerate and classical junction characteristics, e.g., maximum electric field and built-in voltage and carrier concentration within the transition region, are evaluated numerically.

  9. Hormonal regulation of hepatocyte tight junctional permeability

    SciTech Connect

    Lowe, P.J.; Miyai, K.; Steinbach, J.H.; Hardison, W.G.M. Univ. of California, San Diego )

    1988-10-01

    The authors have investigated the effects of hormones on the permeability of the hepatocyte tight junction to two probes, ({sup 14}C)sucrose and horseradish peroxidase, using one-pass perfused rat livers. Using a single injection of horseradish peroxidase the authors have demonstrated that this probe can enter bile by two pathways that are kinetically distinct, a fast pathway, which corresponds to the passage of the probe through the hepatocyte tight junctions, and a slow pathway, which corresponds to the transcytotic entry into bile. The passage of horseradish peroxidase through the hepatocyte tight junctions was confirmed by electron microscopic histochemistry. Vasopressin, epinephrine, and angiotensin II, hormones that act in the hepatocyte through the intracellular mediators calcium, the inositol polyphosphates, and diacylglycerol, increased the bile-to-perfusion fluid ratio of ({sup 14}C)sucrose and the rapid entry of horseradish peroxidase into bile, indicating that the permeability of the tight junctions to these probes was increased. The effect of these hormones was dose dependent and in the cases of angiotensin II and epinephrine was inhibited by the specific inhibitors (Sar{sup 1},Thr{sup 8})angiotensin II and prazosin, respectively. Dibutyryl adenosine 3{prime},5{prime}-cyclic monophosphate did not affect the ({sup 14}C)sucrose bile-to-perfusion fluid ratio or the fast entry of horseradish peroxidase into bile. These results suggest that the hepatocyte tight junction can no longer be considered a static system of pores separating blood from bile. It is rather a dynamic barrier potentially capable of influencing the composition of the bile.

  10. Graphene junction field-effect transistor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ou, Tzu-Min; Borsa, Tomoko; van Zeghbroeck, Bart

    2014-03-01

    We have demonstrated for the first time a novel graphene transistor gated by a graphene/semiconductor junction rather than an insulating gate. The transistor operates much like a semiconductor junction Field Effect Transistor (jFET) where the depletion layer charge in the semiconductor modulates the mobile charge in the channel. The channel in our case is the graphene rather than another semiconductor layer. An increased reverse bias of the graphene/n-silicon junction increases the positive charge in the depletion region and thereby reduces the total charge in the graphene. We fabricated individual graphene/silicon junctions as well as graphene jFETs (GjFETs) on n-type (4.5x1015 cm-3) silicon with Cr/Au electrodes and 3 μm gate length. As a control device, we also fabricated back-gated graphene MOSFETs using a 90nm SiO2 on a p-type silicon substrate (1019 cm-3) . The graphene was grown by APCVD on copper foil and transferred with PMMA onto the silicon substrate. The GjFET exhibited an on-off ratio of 3.75, an intrinsic graphene doping of 1.75x1012 cm-2, compared to 1.17x1013 cm-2 in the MOSFET, and reached the Dirac point at 13.5V. Characteristics of the junctions and transistors were measured as a function of temperature and in response to light. Experimental data and a comparison with simulations will be presented.

  11. Tight Junctions Go Viral!

    PubMed

    Torres-Flores, Jesús M; Arias, Carlos F

    2015-09-23

    Tight junctions (TJs) are highly specialized membrane domains involved in many important cellular processes such as the regulation of the passage of ions and macromolecules across the paracellular space and the establishment of cell polarity in epithelial cells. Over the past few years there has been increasing evidence that different components of the TJs can be hijacked by viruses in order to complete their infectious cycle. Viruses from at least nine different families of DNA and RNA viruses have been reported to use TJ proteins in their benefit. For example, TJ proteins such as JAM-A or some members of the claudin family of proteins are used by members of the Reoviridae family and hepatitis C virus as receptors or co-receptors during their entry into their host cells. Reovirus, in addition, takes advantage of the TJ protein Junction Adhesion Molecule-A (JAM-A) to achieve its hematogenous dissemination. Some other viruses are capable of regulating the expression or the localization of TJ proteins to induce cell transformation or to improve the efficiency of their exit process. This review encompasses the importance of TJs for viral entry, replication, dissemination, and egress, and makes a clear statement of the importance of studying these proteins to gain a better understanding of the replication strategies used by viruses that infect epithelial and/or endothelial cells.

  12. An unusual cause of chronic abdominal pain after laparoscopic Roux en Y gastric bypass: Case report of a penetrating fish bone causing adhesions at the biliary-digestive junction resulting in partial obstruction and chronic symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Ochieng, Vincent; Hendrickx, Leo; Valk, Jody

    2016-01-01

    Background The management of chronic abdominal pain after laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (LRYGP) is complex and challenging. Foreign body intestinal perforation including that caused by fish bones has previously been reported in the literature and if clinically unrecognized, can cause significant morbidity and mortality. Fish bone perforation as a cause of chronic abdominal pain after LRYGP has rarely been reported. Summary The unusual case of a 54 year old female presenting with recurrent episodes of postprandial pain 2 years after LRYGP is reported. Previous radiological and endoscopic investigations did not reveal any abnormality and after the most recent clinical presentation, a laparoscopic exploration was performed. A protruding fish bone at the biliary-digestive junction was discovered intra-operatively and successfully extracted. Dense adhesions between the involved intestinal loops were lysed in an attempt to improve intestinal transit and subsequently relieve post-prandial pain. Conclusion This case highlights the possibility of a missed fish bone perforation causing chronic postprandial abdominal pain and discomfort in a patient with a Roux-en-Y gastric bypass anatomy. Foreign body perforation is a rare cause of abdominal pain after gastric bypass that should be considered when evaluating chronic abdominal pain symptoms after LRYGP. PMID:27107305

  13. Video-Assisted Thoracoscopic Surgery and Minimal Access Spinal Surgery Compared in Anterior Thoracic or Thoracolumbar Junctional Spinal Reconstruction: A Case-Control Study and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ching-Yu; Wu, Meng-Huang; Li, Yen-Yao; Cheng, Chin-Chang; Lee, Chien-Yin

    2016-01-01

    There are no published reports that compare the outcomes of video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS) and minimal access spinal surgery (MASS) in anterior spinal reconstruction. We conducted a retrospective case-control study in a single center and systematically reviewed the literature to compare the efficacy and safety of VATS and MASS in anterior thoracic (T) and thoracolumbar junctional (TLJ) spinal reconstruction. From 1995 to 2012, there were 111 VATS patients and 76 MASS patients treated at our hospital. VATS patients had significantly (p < 0.001) longer operating times and significantly (p < 0.022) higher thoracotomy conversion rates. We reviewed 6 VATS articles and 10 MASS articles, in which there were 625 VATS patients and 399 MASS patients. We recorded clinical complications and a thoracotomy conversion rate from our cases and the selected articles. The incidence of approach-related complications was significantly (p = 0.021) higher in VATS patients. The conversion rate was 2% in VATS patients and 0% in MASS patients (p = 0.001). In conclusion, MASS is associated with reduction in operating time, approach-related complications, and the thoracotomy conversion rate. PMID:28101511

  14. A histone octamer blocks branch migration of a Holliday junction.

    PubMed Central

    Grigoriev, M; Hsieh, P

    1997-01-01

    The Holliday junction is a key intermediate in genetic recombination. Here, we examine the effect of a nucleosome core on movement of the Holliday junction in vitro by spontaneous branch migration. Histone octamers consisting of H2A, H2B, H3, and H4 are reconstituted onto DNA duplexes containing an artificial nucleosome-positioning sequence consisting of a tandem array of an alternating AT-GC sequence motif. Characterization of the reconstituted branch migration substrates by micrococcal nuclease mapping and exonuclease III and hydroxyl radical footprinting reveal that 70% of the reconstituted octamers are positioned near the center of the substrate and the remaining 30% are located at the distal end, although in both cases some translational degeneracy is observed. Branch migration assays with the octamer-containing substrates reveal that the Holliday junction cannot migrate spontaneously through DNA organized into a nucleosomal core unless DNA-histone interactions are completely disrupted. Similar results are obtained with branch migration substrates containing an octamer positioned on a naturally occurring sequence derived from the yeast GLN3 locus. Digestion of Holliday junctions with T7 endonuclease I establishes that the junction is not trapped by the octamer but can branch migrate in regions free of histone octamers. Our findings suggest that migration of Holliday junctions during recombination and the recombinational repair of DNA damage requires proteins not only to accelerate the intrinsic rate of branch migration but also to facilitate the passage of the Holliday junction through a nucleosome. PMID:9372946

  15. Single molecule junction conductance and binding geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamenetska, Maria

    case of pyridine-linked molecules, conductance can be reliably switched between two distinct conductance states using sub-nanometer mechanical manipulation. Using a methyl sulfide linker attached to an oligoene backbone, we are able to create a 3-nm-long molecular potentiometer, whose resistance can be tuned exponentially with Angstom-scale modulations in metal-molecule configuration. These experiments points to a new paradigm for attaining reproducible electrical characteristics of metal-organic devices which involves controlling linker-metal chemistry rather than fabricating identically structured metal-molecule interfaces. By choosing a linker group which is either insensitive to or responds reproducibly to changes in metal-molecule configuration, one can design single molecule devices with functionality more complex than a simple resistor. These ambient temperature experiments were combined with UHV conductance measurements performed in a commercial STM on amine-terminated benzene derivatives which conduct through a non-resonant tunneling mechanism, at temperatures varying from 5 to 300 Kelvin. Our results indicate that while amine-gold binding remains selective irrespective of environment, conductance is not temperature independent, in contrast to what is expected for a tunneling mechanism. Furthermore, using temperature-dependent measurements in ambient conditions we find that HOMO-conducting amines and LUMO-conducting pyridines show opposite dependence of conductance on temperature. These results indicate that energy-level alignment between the molecule and the electrodes changes as a result of varying electrode structure at different temperatures. We find that temperature can serve as a knob with which to tune transport properties of single molecule-metal junctions.

  16. Ultrastructural pathology of endothelial tight junctions in human brain oedema.

    PubMed

    Castejón, Orlando J

    2012-01-01

    Cortical biopsies of patients with the diagnosis of complicated brain trauma, congenital hydrocephalus, brain vascular anomaly, and brain tumour are studied with the electron microscope using cortical biopsies of different cortical brain regions to analyze the alterations of endothelial junctions, and their participation in the pathogenesis of human brain oedema. In moderate oedema, most endothelial tight junctions are structurally closed and intact, while in some cases of severe oedema, the opening of tight endothelial junctions is observed. In very severe brain oedema, a considerable enlargement of interjunctional pockets of extracellular space is also seen suggesting that in highly increased cerebrovascular permeability, the endothelial junctions are open in their entire extent, and that an intercellular or paracellular route through interendothelial clefts for transferring haematogenous oedema fluid from blood to the capillary basement membrane and the brain parenchyma is formed, contributing to the formation of brain oedema. High intensity brain trauma, seizures, osmotic forces, hypoxic conditions, and alteration of tight junctions proteins would explain the opening of endothelial junctions in severe and complicated brain oedema. In congenital hydrocephalus, the capillary wall shows evident signs of blood-brain barrier dysfunction characterized by closed and open interendothelial junctions, increased endothelial vesicular and vacuolar transport, thin and fragmented basement membrane with areas of focal thickening, and discontinuous perivascular astrocytic end-feet. The perivascular space is notably dilated and widely communicated with the enlarged extracellular space in the neuropil, showing the contribution of damaged endothelial junction to the formation of interstitial or hydrocephalic brain oedema. Altered expression of tight junction proteins could cause a blood-brain barrier breakdown following brain injury and hypoxic conditions leading to brain oedema

  17. Ion bipolar junction transistors.

    PubMed

    Tybrandt, Klas; Larsson, Karin C; Richter-Dahlfors, Agneta; Berggren, Magnus

    2010-06-01

    Dynamic control of chemical microenvironments is essential for continued development in numerous fields of life sciences. Such control could be achieved with active chemical circuits for delivery of ions and biomolecules. As the basis for such circuitry, we report a solid-state ion bipolar junction transistor (IBJT) based on conducting polymers and thin films of anion- and cation-selective membranes. The IBJT is the ionic analogue to the conventional semiconductor BJT and is manufactured using standard microfabrication techniques. Transistor characteristics along with a model describing the principle of operation, in which an anionic base current amplifies a cationic collector current, are presented. By employing the IBJT as a bioelectronic circuit element for delivery of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine, its efficacy in modulating neuronal cell signaling is demonstrated.

  18. Ion bipolar junction transistors

    PubMed Central

    Tybrandt, Klas; Larsson, Karin C.; Richter-Dahlfors, Agneta; Berggren, Magnus

    2010-01-01

    Dynamic control of chemical microenvironments is essential for continued development in numerous fields of life sciences. Such control could be achieved with active chemical circuits for delivery of ions and biomolecules. As the basis for such circuitry, we report a solid-state ion bipolar junction transistor (IBJT) based on conducting polymers and thin films of anion- and cation-selective membranes. The IBJT is the ionic analogue to the conventional semiconductor BJT and is manufactured using standard microfabrication techniques. Transistor characteristics along with a model describing the principle of operation, in which an anionic base current amplifies a cationic collector current, are presented. By employing the IBJT as a bioelectronic circuit element for delivery of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine, its efficacy in modulating neuronal cell signaling is demonstrated. PMID:20479274

  19. Flux Cloning Anomalities in Josephson Nano-Junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassan, Hanaa Farhan; Kusmartsev, Feo V.

    2010-12-01

    The propagation of single flux quanta in T-shaped Josephson junctions gives rise to the flux cloning phenomenon. We have studied numerically the dynamics of flux cloning in cases of extended Josephson junctions. The changing thicknesses of T-junctions lead to new and interesting effects in terms of their dynamics. We have found out that when an additional Josephson transmission line is larger than the main Josephson transmission line, numerical simulations do not show the cloning phenomenon and soliton is reflected when it approaches the T junction. This strange result may be happened because the soliton losses more energy in the sharp edge. Although the vortex is moving very highly and it has huge energy but it still does not give birth to a new vortex. We have investigated conditions at which flux cloning occurs when both widths, W and W0, are changing.

  20. Flux Cloning Anomalities in Josephson Nano-Junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassan, Hanaa Farhan; Kusmartsev, Feo V.

    The propagation of single flux quanta in T-shaped Josephson junctions gives rise to the flux cloning phenomenon. We have studied numerically the dynamics of flux cloning in cases of extended Josephson junctions. The changing thicknesses of T-junctions lead to new and interesting effects in terms of their dynamics. We have found out that when an additional Josephson transmission line is larger than the main Josephson transmission line, numerical simulations do not show the cloning phenomenon and soliton is reflected when it approaches the T junction. This strange result may be happened because the soliton losses more energy in the sharp edge. Although the vortex is moving very highly and it has huge energy but it still does not give birth to a new vortex. We have investigated conditions at which flux cloning occurs when both widths, W and W0, are changing.

  1. Late-Onset Postoperative Junctional Ectopic Tachycardia in Nonsurgical Procedures.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lijun; Shang, Xiaoke; Qiu, Qiu; Lu, Rong; Xiao, Shuna; Li, Dingyang; Yu, Jie; Zhang, Changdong; Xia, Cheng; Zhou, Hongmei; Zhang, Gangcheng

    2016-07-27

    Postoperative junctional ectopic tachycardia (JET) is a narrow complex tachycardia and most frequently occurs during and after surgical repair of certain types of congenital heart defects. Postoperative junctional ectopic tachycardia may produce unfavorable hemodynamics that prolongs stays in the cardiac intensive care unit and hospital, prolongs time on a ventilator, and occasionally requires the use of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) as rescue therapy. The present report describes a rare case of late-onset postoperative junctional ectopic tachycardia, which occurred 13 days after the deployment of a perimembranous ventricular septal defect (PmVSD) occluder in a 17-year-old female teenager. To the best of our knowledge, late-onset postoperative junctional ectopic tachycardia has not previously been reported as a complication in nonsurgical procedures. In this case, the junctional ectopic tachycardia remained resistant to medicines and the haemodynamic imbalance caused a serious life-threatening situation in the patient. The occluder was removed by an emergent thoracotomy; then, the patient was successfully cured by being supported with extracorporeal membrane oxygenation. The findings suggest that during follow-up management, the physician should pay attention postoperatively to junctional ectopic tachycardia even after discharge from the hospital.

  2. Iniencephaly: Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Alvis-Miranda, Hernando R.; Bula-Anichiarico, Doris A.; Calderón-Miranda, Willem G.; Moscote-Salazar, Luis R.

    2015-01-01

    The iniencephaly involves a variable defect in the occipital bone, resulting in a large foramen magnum, partial or total absence of the cervical and thoracic vertebrae, accompanied by incomplete closure of arcs and/or vertebral bodies, significant shortening of the spinal column and hyperextension of the malformed cervicothoracic spine; the individual's face is deviated upward, the mandibular skin is directly continuous with anterior thorax due to the absence of neck. Its incidence is about 1:1000–1:2000 births, so this is a pretty rare neural tube defect. We present a case of iniencephaly in association with cardiovascular, spinal cord, and intracranial malformations that ended demonstrating the low survival of patients affected with this condition. PMID:26167231

  3. Effects of the environment on the switching current in graphene-based Josephson Junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borzenets, Ivan; Ke, Chung-Ting; Amet, Francois; Tso Wei, Ming; Yamamoto, Michihisa; Bomze, Yuriy; Tarucha, Seigo; Finkelstein, Gleb

    The nature of the switching current and hysteresis (difference between switching and retrapping currents) in graphene-based Josephson junctions depends greatly on the interaction with the environment. Conventional devices result in underdamped Josephson junctions making the true critical current inaccessible. On the other hand, heavily isolating the Josephson junctions places them in the microscopic quantum tunneling regime even at high temperatures, also masking the critical current. We study the critical current, and the switching statistics in graphene Josephson junctions while varying the effects of the environment. Proper isolation of graphene Josephson junctions is necessary to measure the true critical current, especially so for the cases of small currents around the Dirac point. This is true for the case of conventional diffusive as well as the novel ballistic Josephson junctions.

  4. Gap junctions, pannexins and pain.

    PubMed

    Spray, David C; Hanani, Menachem

    2017-06-22

    Enhanced expression and function of gap junctions and pannexin (Panx) channels have been associated with both peripheral and central mechanisms of pain sensitization. At the level of the sensory ganglia, evidence includes augmented gap junction and pannexin1 expression in glial cells and neurons in inflammatory and neuropathic pain models and increased synchrony and enhanced cross-excitation among sensory neurons by gap junction-mediated coupling. In spinal cord and in suprapinal areas, evidence is largely limited to increased expression of relevant proteins, although in several rodent pain models, hypersensitivity is reduced by treatment with gap junction/Panx1 channel blocking compounds. Moreover, targeted modulation of Cx43 expression was shown to modulate pain thresholds, albeit in somewhat contradictory ways, and mice lacking Panx1 expression globally or in specific cell types show depressed hyperalgesia. We here review the evidence for involvement of gap junctions and Panx channels in a variety of animal pain studies and then discuss ways in which gap junctions and Panx channels may mediate their action in pain processing. This discussion focusses on spread of signals among satellite glial cells, in particular intercellular Ca(2+) waves, which are propagated through both gap junction and Panx1-dependent routes and have been associated with the phenomenon of spreading depression and the malady of migraine headache with aura. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. Metallic Junction Thermoelectric Device Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duzik, Adam J.; Choi, Sang H.

    2017-01-01

    Thermoelectric junctions made of semiconductors have existed in radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTG) for deep space missions, but are currently being adapted for terrestrial energy harvesting. Unfortunately, these devices are inefficient, operating at only 7% efficiency. This low efficiency has driven efforts to make high-figure-of-merit thermoelectric devices, which require a high electrical conductivity but a low thermal conductivity, a combination that is difficult to achieve. Lowered thermal conductivity has increased efficiency, but at the cost of power output. An alternative setup is to use metallic junctions rather than semiconductors as thermoelectric devices. Metals have orders of magnitude more electrons and electronic conductivities higher than semiconductors, but thermal conductivity is higher as well. To evaluate the viability of metallic junction thermoelectrics, a two dimensional heat transfer MATLAB simulation was constructed to calculate efficiency and power output. High Seebeck coefficient alloys, Chromel (90%Ni-10%Cr) and Constantan (55%Cu-45%Ni), produced efficiencies of around 20-30%. Parameters such as the number of layers of junctions, lateral junction density, and junction sizes for both series- and parallel-connected junctions were explored.

  6. Thermopower measurements in molecular junctions.

    PubMed

    Rincón-García, Laura; Evangeli, Charalambos; Rubio-Bollinger, Gabino; Agraït, Nicolás

    2016-08-07

    The measurement of thermopower in molecular junctions offers complementary information to conductance measurements and is becoming essential for the understanding of transport processes at the nanoscale. In this review, we discuss the recent advances in the study of the thermoelectric properties of molecular junctions. After presenting the theoretical background for thermoelectricity at the nanoscale, we review the experimental techniques for measuring the thermopower in these systems and discuss the main results. Finally, we consider the challenges in the application of molecular junctions in viable thermoelectric devices.

  7. ASSEMBLY AND CHARACTERIZATION OF 8-ARM AND 12-ARM DNA BRANCHED JUNCTIONS

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xing

    2012-01-01

    Branched DNA molecules can be assembled into objects and networks directed by sticky-ended cohesion. The connectivity of these species is limited by the number of arms flanking the branch point. To date, the only branched junctions constructed contain six or fewer arms. We report the construction of DNA branched junctions that contain either 8 or 12 double helical arms surrounding a branch point. The design of the 8-arm junction expoits the limits of a previous approach to thwart branch migration, but the design of the 12-arm junction uses a new to principle achieve this end. The 8-arm junction is stable with 16 nucleotide pairs per arm, but the 12-arm junction has been stabilized by 24 nucleotide pairs per arm. Ferguson analysis of these junctions in combination with three, four, five, and six-arm junctions indicates a linear increase in friction constant as the number of arms increases; the four-arm junction migrates anomalously at 4°C., suggesting stacking of its domains. All strands in both the 8-arm and 12-arm junctions show similar responses to hydroxyl radical autofootprinting analysis, indicating that they lack any dominant stacking structures. The stability of the 12-arm junction demonstrates that the number of arms in a junction is not limited to the case of having adjacent identical base pairs flanking the junction. The ability to construct eight-arm and twelve-arm junctions increases the number of objects, graphs and networks that can be built from branched DNA components. In principle, the stick structure corresponding to cubic close packing is now a possible target for assembly by DNA nanotechnology. PMID:17564446

  8. Josephson junction in a thin film

    SciTech Connect

    Kogan, V. G.; Dobrovitski, V. V.; Clem, J. R.; Mawatari, Yasunori; Mints, R. G.

    2001-04-01

    The phase difference {phi}(y) for a vortex at a line Josephson junction in a thin film attenuates at large distances as a power law, unlike the case of a bulk junction where it approaches exponentially the constant values at infinities. The field of a Josephson vortex is a superposition of fields of standard Pearl vortices distributed along the junction with the line density {phi}'(y)/2{pi}. We study the integral equation for {phi}(y) and show that the phase is sensitive to the ratio l/{Lambda}, where l={lambda}{sub J}{sup 2}/{lambda}{sub L}, {Lambda}=2{lambda}{sub L}{sup 2}/d, {lambda}{sub L}, and {lambda}{sub J} are the London and Josephson penetration depths, and d is the film thickness. For l<<{Lambda}, the vortex ''core'' of the size l is nearly temperature independent, while the phase ''tail'' scales as l{Lambda}/y{sup 2}={lambda}{sub J}2{lambda}{sub L}/d/y{sup 2}; i.e., it diverges as T{yields}T{sub c}. For l>>{Lambda}, both the core and the tail have nearly the same characteristic length l{Lambda}.

  9. Reconstruction of esophageal defects with microsurgically revascularized jejunal segments: a report of 13 cases.

    PubMed

    Chang, T S; Hwang, O L; Wang-Wei

    1980-12-01

    Experimental free transfer of a jejunal segment to a recipient bed in the neck was successfully performed in 5 mongrel dogs. This was followed by clinical application of 2 different microvascular procedures in 13 patients for repair of esophageal defects. In 7 of these patients a free jejunal transfer was used; in 6 of these patients a pedicled jejunal graft with revascularization of its distal end by microvascular anastomosis was used. The esophageal defects were located in the cervical portion in 7 cases, the cervicothoracic portion in 5 cases, and the thoracic portion in 1 case. Ten (77%) of the 13 procedures were successful.

  10. 27 CFR 9.164 - River Junction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false River Junction. 9.164... River Junction. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “River Junction.” (b) Approved maps. The appropriate maps for determining the boundaries of the River Junction...

  11. 27 CFR 9.164 - River Junction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false River Junction. 9.164... River Junction. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “River Junction.” (b) Approved maps. The appropriate maps for determining the boundaries of the River Junction...

  12. Thermal conductance of superlattice junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Simon; McGaughey, Alan J. H.

    2015-05-15

    We use molecular dynamics simulations and the lattice-based scattering boundary method to compute the thermal conductance of finite-length Lennard-Jones superlattice junctions confined by bulk crystalline leads. The superlattice junction thermal conductance depends on the properties of the leads. For junctions with a superlattice period of four atomic monolayers at temperatures between 5 and 20 K, those with mass-mismatched leads have a greater thermal conductance than those with mass-matched leads. We attribute this lead effect to interference between and the ballistic transport of emergent junction vibrational modes. The lead effect diminishes when the temperature is increased, when the superlattice period is increased, and when interfacial disorder is introduced, but is reversed in the harmonic limit.

  13. Josephson junction Q-spoiler

    DOEpatents

    Clarke, J.; Hilbert, C.; Hahn, E.L.; Sleator, T.

    1986-03-25

    An automatic Q-spoiler comprising at least one Josephson tunnel junction connected in an LC circuit for flow of resonant current therethrough. When in use in a system for detecting the magnetic resonance of a gyromagnetic particle system, a high energy pulse of high frequency energy irradiating the particle system will cause the critical current through the Josephson tunnel junctions to be exceeded, causing the tunnel junctions to act as resistors and thereby damp the ringing of the high-Q detection circuit after the pulse. When the current has damped to below the critical current, the Josephson tunnel junctions revert to their zero-resistance state, restoring the Q of the detection circuit and enabling the low energy magnetic resonance signals to be detected.

  14. Shalbatana/Simud Vallis Junction

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-01-11

    The sinuous channels and streamlined islands at the junction of Shalbatana and Simud Vallis, seen in this NASA Mars Odyssey image, present an erosional history of the catastrophic floods that scoured the Martian surface hundreds of millions of years ago.

  15. Josephson junction Q-spoiler

    DOEpatents

    Clarke, John; Hilbert, Claude; Hahn, Erwin L.; Sleator, Tycho

    1988-01-01

    An automatic Q-spoiler comprising at least one Josephson tunnel junction connected in an LC circuit for flow of resonant current therethrough. When in use in a system for detecting the magnetic resonance of a gyromagnetic particle system, a high energy pulse of high frequency energy irradiating the particle system will cause the critical current through the Josephson tunnel junctions to be exceeded, causing the tunnel junctions to act as resistors and thereby damp the ringing of the high-Q detection circuit after the pulse. When the current has damped to below the critical current, the Josephson tunnel junctions revert to their zero-resistance state, restoring the Q of the detection circuit and enabling the low energy magnetic resonance signals to be detected.

  16. Tunable φ Josephson junction ratchet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menditto, R.; Sickinger, H.; Weides, M.; Kohlstedt, H.; Koelle, D.; Kleiner, R.; Goldobin, E.

    2016-10-01

    We demonstrate experimentally the operation of a deterministic Josephson ratchet with tunable asymmetry. The ratchet is based on a φ Josephson junction with a ferromagnetic barrier operating in the underdamped regime. The system is probed also under the action of an additional dc current, which acts as a counterforce trying to stop the ratchet. Under these conditions the ratchet works against the counterforce, thus producing a nonzero output power. Finally, we estimate the efficiency of the φ Josephson junction ratchet.

  17. LOW RESISTANCE JUNCTIONS IN CRAYFISH

    PubMed Central

    Peracchia, Camillo

    1973-01-01

    The ultrastructure of low resistance junctions between segments of lateral giant fibers in crayfish is studied in sections from specimens fixed either by conventional methods or by glutaraldehyde-H2O2 or by glutaraldehyde-lanthanum. Cross sections through junctions fixed by conventional glutaraldehyde display the usual trilaminar profile of two parallel membranes separated by a narrow gap. Most of the junctional regions appear covered by 500–800 Å vesicles which lie on both sides of the junction in rows adjacent to the membranes. Gross sections through junctions fixed by glutaraldehyde-H2O2 display, in regions containing vesicles, membranes with a beaded profile. The beads correspond to globules ∼125 Å in width and ∼170 Å in height arranged in a hexagonal pattern with a unit cell of ∼200 Å. The globules of one membrane match precisely with those of the adjacent membrane, and opposite globules seem to come in contact with each other at the center of the junction. The membrane of the vesicles also contains globules. Occasionally the globules of the vesicles seem to join with those of the junctional membranes, apparently forming intracellular junctions. Injunctions negatively stained by lanthanum the globules are seen organized into two arrangements. Areas containing globules in a hexagonal array with a unit cell of ∼200 Å (swollen pattern) are seen adjacent to areas in which the globules are more closely and disorderly packed (close packing), the minimum center-to-center distance between adjacent globules being ∼125 Å. At higher magnification each globule appears composed of six subunits arranged in a circle around a central region occupied by lanthanum (possibly a pit). PMID:4120610

  18. Tight junctions as regulators of tissue remodelling.

    PubMed

    Balda, Maria S; Matter, Karl

    2016-10-01

    Formation of tissue barriers by epithelial and endothelial cells requires neighbouring cells to interact via intercellular junctions, which includes tight junctions. Tight junctions form a semipermeable paracellular diffusion barrier and act as signalling hubs that guide cell behaviour and differentiation. Components of tight junctions are also expressed in cell types not forming tight junctions, such as cardiomyocytes, where they associate with facia adherens and/or gap junctions. This review will focus on tight junction proteins and their importance in tissue homeostasis and remodelling with a particular emphasis on what we have learned from animal models and human diseases. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  19. Electronic thermometry in tunable tunnel junction

    DOEpatents

    Maksymovych, Petro

    2016-03-15

    A tunable tunnel junction thermometry circuit includes a variable width tunnel junction between a test object and a probe. The junction width is varied and a change in thermovoltage across the junction with respect to the change in distance across the junction is determined. Also, a change in biased current with respect to a change in distance across the junction is determined. A temperature gradient across the junction is determined based on a mathematical relationship between the temperature gradient, the change in thermovoltage with respect to distance and the change in biased current with respect to distance. Thermovoltage may be measured by nullifying a thermoelectric tunneling current with an applied voltage supply level. A piezoelectric actuator may modulate the probe, and thus the junction width, to vary thermovoltage and biased current across the junction. Lock-in amplifiers measure the derivatives of the thermovoltage and biased current modulated by varying junction width.

  20. Octagonal Defects at Carbon Nanotube Junctions

    PubMed Central

    Jaskólski, W.; Pelc, M.; Chico, Leonor; Ayuela, A.

    2013-01-01

    We investigate knee-shaped junctions of semiconductor zigzag carbon nanotubes. Two dissimilar octagons appear at such junctions; one of them can reconstruct into a pair of pentagons. The junction with two octagons presents two degenerate localized states at Fermi energy (EF). The reconstructed junction has only one state near EF, indicating that these localized states are related to the octagonal defects. The inclusion of Coulomb interaction splits the localized states in the junction with two octagons, yielding an antiferromagnetic system. PMID:24089604

  1. Apparent AV junctional escape in Wenckebach AV block: markedly slow conduction through the slow AV pathway.

    PubMed

    Kinoshita, Shinji; Katoh, Takakazu; Hagisawa, Kohsuke; Fukushima, Tsutomu; Ikawa, Shinji

    2009-02-01

    We report here two cases of Wenckebach atrioventricular (AV) block in which apparent AV junctional escape was observed, but most likely resulted from markedly slow conduction through the slow pathway of dual AV junctional pathways. In these cases, it seems that a blocked P-wave was followed by an AV junctional escape beat. However, a blocked P-wave occasionally failed to be followed by an escape beat, and the RR interval containing the blocked P-wave was markedly longer than the above escape interval. In one case, apparent AV junctional escape beats with aberrant ventricular conduction were found, and QRS complexes of the same configuration were also found without the preceding ventricular pause. This strengthens the possibility that apparent AV junctional escape occurred because of markedly slow conduction through the slow AV pathway.

  2. Measurement of compressible flow pressure losses in wye-junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Abou-Haidar, N.I. . Dept. of Engineering); Dixon, S.L. . Dept. of Mechanical Engineering)

    1994-07-01

    This paper considers the compressible flow pressure losses in sharp-cornered wye-junctions with symmetric branches under dividing and combining flow conditions. Determination of the additional total pressure losses occurring in flow through several three-leg junctions, using dry air as the working fluid, has been made experimentally. Results covering a wide speed range up to choking are presented for 30, 60, and 90 deg wye-junctions. Separate flow visualization schlieren tests detected the presence of normal shock waves, located at up to one duct diameter downstream of the junction, and therefore confirmed the choking of the flow at the vena contracta. The highest attainable Mach number (M[sub 3]) of the averaged whole flow was 0.9 for one of the dividing flow geometries and 0.65 for several of the combining flow cases. These values of M[sub 3] were the maximum possible and hence represent a limiting condition dictated by choking. In general, the compressible flow loss coefficients, caused by the presence of the wye-junctions, can be expected to be higher for dividing flows and lower for combining flows than would be the case for incompressible flows because of the influence of Mach number, M[sub 3].

  3. Spatial inhomogeneous barrier heights at graphene/semiconductor Schottky junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomer, Dushyant

    smooth interface fails to explain such behavior, hence, we apply a modified emission theory with Gaussian distribution of Schottky barrier heights. The modified theory, applicable to inhomogeneous interfaces, explains the temperature dependent behavior of our Schottky junctions and gives a temperature independent mean barrier height. We attribute the inhomogeneous barrier height to the presence of graphene ripples and ridges in case of SiC and MoS2 while surface states and trapped charges at the interface is dominating in Si and GaAs. Additionally, we observe bias dependent current and barrier height in reverse bias regime also for all Schottky junctions. To explain such behavior, we consider two types of reverse bias conduction mechanisms; Poole-Frenkel and Schottky emission. We find that Poole-Frenkel emission explains the characteristics of graphene/SiC junctions very well. However, both the mechanism fails to interpret the behavior of graphene/Si and graphene/GaAs Schottky junctions. These findings provide insight into the fundamental physics at the interface of graphene/semiconductor junctions.

  4. dc properties of series-parallel arrays of Josephson junctions in an external magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Lewandowski, S.J. )

    1991-04-01

    A detailed dc theory of superconducting multijunction interferometers has previously been developed by several authors for the case of parallel junction arrays. The theory is now extended to cover the case of a loop containing several junctions connected in series. The problem is closely associated with high-{ital T}{sub {ital c}} superconductors and their clusters of intrinsic Josephson junctions. These materials exhibit spontaneous interferometric effects, and there is no reason to assume that the intrinsic junctions form only parallel arrays. A simple formalism of phase states is developed in order to express the superconducting phase differences across the junctions forming a series array as functions of the phase difference across the weakest junction of the system, and to relate the differences in critical currents of the junctions to gaps in the allowed ranges of their phase functions. This formalism is used to investigate the energy states of the array, which in the case of different junctions are split and separated by energy barriers of height depending on the phase gaps. Modifications of the washboard model of a single junction are shown. Next a superconducting inductive loop containing a series array of two junctions is considered, and this model is used to demonstrate the transitions between phase states and the associated instabilities. Finally, the critical current of a parallel connection of two series arrays is analyzed and shown to be a multivalued function of the externally applied magnetic flux. The instabilities caused by the presence of intrinsic serial junctions in granular high-{ital T}{sub {ital c}} materials are pointed out as a potential source of additional noise.

  5. Joint measurement of current-phase relations and transport properties of hybrid junctions using a three junctions superconducting quantum interference device

    SciTech Connect

    Basset, J.; Delagrange, R.; Weil, R.; Kasumov, A.; Bouchiat, H.; Deblock, R.

    2014-07-14

    We propose a scheme to measure both the current-phase relation and differential conductance dI/dV of a superconducting junction, in the normal and the superconducting states. This is done using a dc Superconducting Quantum Interference Device with two Josephson junctions in parallel with the device under investigation and three contacts. As a demonstration, we measure the current-phase relation and dI/dV of a small Josephson junction and a carbon nanotube junction. In this latter case, in a regime where the nanotube is well conducting, we show that the non-sinusoidal current phase relation we find is consistent with the theory for a weak link, using the transmission extracted from the differential conductance in the normal state. This method holds great promise for future investigations of the current-phase relation of more exotic junctions.

  6. Computer-aided design of stripline ferrite junction circulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Uzdy, Z.

    1980-01-01

    A general design procedure is presented for stripline Y-junction circulators employing solid dielectric between ground planes. The resonator design and impedance matching are derived in a form suitable for computer evaluation. The procedure is applicable to cases where either the circulator bandwidth or the ground plane spacing is specified. An experimental S-band switching circulator design illustrates the technique.

  7. Transport in Carbon Nanotube Junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khoo, K. H.; Chelikowsky, James R.

    2008-03-01

    There is growing interest in the use of carbon nanotube thin films as transparent electrical conductors and thin-film transistors owing to their high optical transmittance, low sheet resistivity, and ease of fabrication. [1,2] A major contribution to the sheet resistivity originates at nanotube junctions, as electrical contact is typically poor between adjacent nanotubes. It is thus important to characterize carbon nanotube junctions in order to understand the conduction properties of nanotube thin films. To this end, we have performed ab initio density functional theory calculations to investigate the structural, electronic and transport properties of carbon nanotube junctions as a function of nanotube chirality and contact geometry [1] Z. Wu et al., Science 305, 1273 (2004) [2] E. S. Snow, J. P. Novak, P. M. Campbell, and D. Park, Appl. Phys. Lett. 82, 2145 (2003).

  8. Transoral approach to the craniovertebral junction.

    PubMed

    Landeiro, José Alberto; Boechat, Sávio; Christoph, Daniel de Holanda; Gonçalves, Mariângela Barbi; Castro, Igor de; Lapenta, Mario Alberto; Ribeiro, Carlos Henrique

    2007-12-01

    The transoral approach provides a safe exposure to lesions in the midline and the ventral side of the craniovertebral junction. The advantages of the transoral approach are 1) the impinging bony pathology and granulation tissue are accessible only via the ventral route; 2) the head is placed in the extended position, thus decreasing the angulation of the brainstem during the surgery; and 3) surgery is done through the avascular median pharyngeal raphe and clivus. We analyzed the clinical effects of odontoidectomy after treating 38 patients with basilar invagination. The anterior transoral operation to treat irreducible ventral compression in patients with basilar invagination was performed in 38 patients. The patients ages ranged from 34 to 67 years. Fourteen patients had associated Chiari malformation and eight had previously undergone posterior decompressive surgery. The main indication for surgery was significant neurological deterioration. Symptoms and signs included neck pain, myelopathy, lower cranial nerve dysfunction, nystagmus and gait disturbance. Extended exposure was performed in 24 patients. The surgery was beneficial to the majority of patients. There was one death within 10 days of surgery, due to pulmonary embolism. Postoperative complications included two cases of pneumonia, three cases of oronasal fistula with regurgitation and one cerebrospinal fluid leak. In patients with marked ventral compression, the transoral approach provides direct access to the anterior face of the craniovertebral junction and effective means for odontoidectomy.

  9. Gap junctions - guards of excitability.

    PubMed

    Stroemlund, Line Waring; Jensen, Christa Funch; Qvortrup, Klaus; Delmar, Mario; Nielsen, Morten Schak

    2015-06-01

    Cardiomyocytes are connected by mechanical and electrical junctions located at the intercalated discs (IDs). Although these structures have long been known, it is becoming increasingly clear that their components interact. This review describes the involvement of the ID in electrical disturbances of the heart and focuses on the role of the gap junctional protein connexin 43 (Cx43). Current evidence shows that Cx43 plays a crucial role in organizing microtubules at the intercalated disc and thereby regulating the trafficking of the cardiac sodium channel NaV1.5 to the membrane.

  10. Conducting polyaniline nanowire electrode junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaikwad, Sumedh; Bodkhe, Gajanan; Deshmukh, Megha; Patil, Harshada; Rushi, Arti; Shirsat, Mahendra D.; Koinkar, Pankaj; Kim, Yun-Hae; Mulchandani, Ashok

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, a synthesis of conducting polyaniline nanowires electrode junction (CPNEJ) has been reported. Conducting polyaniline nanowires electrode junction on Si/SiO2 substrate (having 3 μm gap between two gold microelectrodes) is prepared. Polyaniline nanowires with diameter (ca. 140 nm to 160 nm) were synthesized by one step electrochemical polymerization using galvanostatic (constant current) technique to bridge this gap. The surface morphology of CPNEJ was studied by scanning electron microscope (SEM). The synthesized CPNEJ is an excellent platform for biosensor applications.

  11. Model for large arrays of Josephson junctions with unconventional superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khveshchenko, D. V.; Crooks, R.

    2011-10-01

    We study large arrays of mesoscopic junctions made out of gapless unconventional superconductors where the tunneling processes of both particle-hole and Cooper pairs give rise to a strongly retarded effective action which, contrary to the standard case, cannot be readily characterized in terms of a local Josephson energy. This action can be relevant, for example, to grain boundary and c-axis junctions in layered high-Tc superconductors. By using a particular functional representation, we describe emergent collective phenomena in this system, ascertain its phase diagram, and compute electrical conductivity.

  12. Predicting coaxial helical stacking in RNA junctions

    PubMed Central

    Laing, Christian; Wen, Dongrong; Wang, Jason T. L.; Schlick, Tamar

    2012-01-01

    RNA junctions are important structural elements that form when three or more helices come together in space in the tertiary structures of RNA molecules. Determining their structural configuration is important for predicting RNA 3D structure. We introduce a computational method to predict, at the secondary structure level, the coaxial helical stacking arrangement in junctions, as well as classify the junction topology. Our approach uses a data mining approach known as random forests, which relies on a set of decision trees trained using length, sequence and other variables specified for any given junction. The resulting protocol predicts coaxial stacking within three- and four-way junctions with an accuracy of 81% and 77%, respectively; the accuracy increases to 83% and 87%, respectively, when knowledge from the junction family type is included. Coaxial stacking predictions for the five to ten-way junctions are less accurate (60%) due to sparse data available for training. Additionally, our application predicts the junction family with an accuracy of 85% for three-way junctions and 74% for four-way junctions. Comparisons with other methods, as well applications to unsolved RNAs, are also presented. The web server Junction-Explorer to predict junction topologies is freely available at: http://bioinformatics.njit.edu/junction. PMID:21917853

  13. Transition region width of nanowire hetero- and pn-junctions grown using vapor-liquid-solid processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Na; Tan, Teh Y.; Gösele, U.

    2008-03-01

    The transition region width of nanowire heterojunctions and pn-junctions grown using vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) processes has been modeled. With two constituents or dopants I and II, the achievable width or abruptness of the junctions is attributed to the residual I atom/molecule stored in the liquid droplet at the onset of introducing II to grow the junction, and the stored I atom/molecule consumption into the subsequently grown crystal layers. The model yields satisfactory quantitative fits to a set of available Si-Ge junction data. Moreover, the model provides a satisfactory explanation to the relative junction width or abruptness differences between elemental and compound semiconductor junction cases, as well as a guideline for achieving the most desirable pn-junction widths.

  14. Detection of noise-corrupted sinusoidal signals with Josephson junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filatrella, Giovanni; Pierro, Vincenzo

    2010-10-01

    We investigate the possibility of exploiting the speed and low noise features of Josephson junctions for detecting sinusoidal signals masked by Gaussian noise. We show that the escape time from the static locked state of a Josephson junction is very sensitive to a small periodic signal embedded in the noise, and therefore the analysis of the escape times can be employed to reveal the presence of the sinusoidal component. We propose and characterize two detection strategies: in the first, the initial phase is supposedly unknown (incoherent strategy), while in the second, the signal phase remains unknown but is fixed (coherent strategy). Our proposals are both suboptimal, with the linear filter being the optimal detection strategy, but they present some remarkable features, such as resonant activation, that make detection through Josephson junctions appealing in some special cases.

  15. Length and energy gap dependences of thermoelectricity in nanostructured junctions.

    PubMed

    Asai, Yoshihiro

    2013-04-17

    The possibilities of an enhanced thermoelectric figure of merit value, ZT, in a nanostructured junction are examined for a wide range of parameter values in a theoretical model. Our research shows that the figure of merit can take a very large maximum, which depends both on the length and the energy gap values. The maximum of ZT is achieved when the Fermi level of the electrodes is aligned to the edge of the electronic transmission function of the junction, where both the conductance and the Seebeck constant are significantly enhanced. On the basis of our results, we conclude that nanowires and molecular junctions form a special class of systems where a large ZT can be expected in some cases.

  16. Traumatic Tear of the Latissimus Dorsi Myotendinous Junction

    PubMed Central

    Friedman, Michael V.; Stensby, J. Derek; Hillen, Travis J.; Demertzis, Jennifer L.; Keener, Jay D.

    2015-01-01

    A case of a latissimus dorsi myotendinous junction strain in an avid CrossFit athlete is presented. The patient developed acute onset right axillary burning and swelling and subsequent palpable pop with weakness while performing a “muscle up.” Magnetic resonance imaging examination demonstrated a high-grade tear of the right latissimus dorsi myotendinous junction approximately 9 cm proximal to its intact humeral insertion. There were no other injuries to the adjacent shoulder girdle structures. Isolated strain of the latissimus dorsi myotendinous junction is a very rare injury with a scarcity of information available regarding its imaging appearance and preferred treatment. This patient was treated conservatively and was able to resume active CrossFit training within 3 months. At 6 months postinjury, he had only a mild residual functional deficit compared with his preinjury level. PMID:26502450

  17. Bile duct epithelial tight junctions and barrier function.

    PubMed

    Rao, R K; Samak, G

    2013-10-01

    Bile ducts play a crucial role in the formation and secretion of bile as well as excretion of circulating xenobiotic substances. In addition to its secretory and excretory functions, bile duct epithelium plays an important role in the formation of a barrier to the diffusion of toxic substances from bile into the hepatic interstitial tissue. Disruption of barrier function and toxic injury to liver cells appear to be involved in the pathogenesis of a variety of liver diseases such as primary sclerosing cholangitis, primary biliary cirrhosis and cholangiocarcinoma. Although the investigations into understanding the structure and regulation of tight junctions in gut, renal and endothelial tissues have expanded rapidly, very little is known about the structure and regulation of tight junctions in the bile duct epithelium. In this article we summarize the current understanding of physiology and pathophysiology of bile duct epithelium, the structure and regulation of tight junctions in canaliculi and bile duct epithelia and different mechanisms involved in the regulation of disruption and protection of bile duct epithelial tight junctions. This article will make a case for the need of future investigations toward our understanding of molecular organization and regulation of canalicular and bile duct epithelial tight junctions.

  18. Bile duct epithelial tight junctions and barrier function

    PubMed Central

    Rao, R.K.; Samak, G.

    2013-01-01

    Bile ducts play a crucial role in the formation and secretion of bile as well as excretion of circulating xenobiotic substances. In addition to its secretory and excretory functions, bile duct epithelium plays an important role in the formation of a barrier to the diffusion of toxic substances from bile into the hepatic interstitial tissue. Disruption of barrier function and toxic injury to liver cells appear to be involved in the pathogenesis of a variety of liver diseases such as primary sclerosing cholangitis, primary biliary cirrhosis and cholangiocarcinoma. Although the investigations into understanding the structure and regulation of tight junctions in gut, renal and endothelial tissues have expanded rapidly, very little is known about the structure and regulation of tight junctions in the bile duct epithelium. In this article we summarize the current understanding of physiology and pathophysiology of bile duct epithelium, the structure and regulation of tight junctions in canaliculi and bile duct epithelia and different mechanisms involved in the regulation of disruption and protection of bile duct epithelial tight junctions. This article will make a case for the need of future investigations toward our understanding of molecular organization and regulation of canalicular and bile duct epithelial tight junctions. PMID:24665411

  19. Simple Electronic Analog of a Josephson Junction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henry, R. W.; And Others

    1981-01-01

    Demonstrates that an electronic Josephson junction analog constructed from three integrated circuits plus an external reference oscillator can exhibit many of the circuit phenomena of a real Josephson junction. Includes computer and other applications of the analog. (Author/SK)

  20. Simple Electronic Analog of a Josephson Junction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henry, R. W.; And Others

    1981-01-01

    Demonstrates that an electronic Josephson junction analog constructed from three integrated circuits plus an external reference oscillator can exhibit many of the circuit phenomena of a real Josephson junction. Includes computer and other applications of the analog. (Author/SK)

  1. Work fluctuations in bosonic Josephson junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lena, R. G.; Palma, G. M.; De Chiara, G.

    2016-05-01

    We calculate the first two moments and full probability distribution of the work performed on a system of bosonic particles in a two-mode Bose-Hubbard Hamiltonian when the self-interaction term is varied instantaneously or with a finite-time ramp. In the instantaneous case, we show how the irreversible work scales differently depending on whether the system is driven to the Josephson or Fock regime of the bosonic Josephson junction. In the finite-time case, we use optimal control techniques to substantially decrease the irreversible work to negligible values. Our analysis can be implemented in present-day experiments with ultracold atoms and we show how to relate the work statistics to that of the population imbalance of the two modes.

  2. Vertical Junction Solar Cells.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-12-20

    during the cure cycle. CAUTION: CV-2567 CURING AGENT MAY CAUSE SKIN AND EYE IRRITATION. IN CASE OF EYE CONTACT, IRRIGATE WITH WATER IMMEDIATELY AND GET...a diffusion pumped vacuum chamber with the pressure monitored by an ionization gauge. The heating was supplied by tungsten halogen lamps and measured...environmental protection- 93-500 space-grade encapsulant arej 24 hours at 125 C (275 F) and less low water absorption (less than useable over a wide temperature

  3. The Yolla Bolly junction revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Blake, M.C.; Jayko, A.S. ); Jones, D.L. . Dept. of Geology and Geophysics); Engebretson, D.C. . Dept. of Geology)

    1993-04-01

    West of Red Bluff, California, rocks of the northern Coast Ranges, Klamath-Sierra Nevada, and Great Valley provinces come together at what has been called the Yolla Bolly junction. Mapping of the Red Bluff and Willows 1:100,000 quadrangles has greatly clarified the enigmatic features of this complex area. Terranes of the Klamath Mountains and their Cretaceous sedimentary cover have been thrust northwestward over the Elder Creek terrane and Franciscan rocks, north of the left-lateral Cold Fork fault zone. The Condrey Mountain window (Franciscan Pickett Peak terrane) provides a measure of the magnitude of this thrusting (ca 90 km). South of the Cold Fork fault zone, the Franciscan and Elder Creek terranes were driven southeastward as tectonic wedges onto Sierran-Klamath basement. Timing of this scissor-tectonics is not constrained near the junction, but further north in southwest Oregon, Lower Eocene strata were deformed by overthrusting of the Klamath block whereas Upper Eocene strata overlap the thrust, indicating that thrusting occurred between about 52 and 60 Ma. Plate reconstructions for this time interval indicate the close proximity of the Kula-Farallon-North America triple junction and that old (ca 100 m.y.) Farallon lithosphere was being subducted north of the junction whereas to the south, very young (ca 10 m.y.) Kula plate was presumably obducted onto North America.

  4. Lattice-pseudospin and spin-valley polarizations in dual ferromagnetic-gated silicene junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chantngarm, Peerasak; Yamada, Kou; Soodchomshom, Bumned

    2016-06-01

    We study spin-valley and lattice-pseudospin currents in a dual ferromagnetic-gated silicene-based junction. Silicene has buckled atomic structure which allows us to take sublattice-dependent ferromagnetism into account in the investigation. One of the study results show that transmission at the junctions exhibits anisotropic property only in anti-parallel cases. Interestingly, the studied junctions can be switched from a pure spin-polarizer to a pure valley-polarizer by reversing directions of exchange fields in the parallel junctions. The perfect control of spin-valley currents can be done only in the parallel cases and its resolution can be enhanced by increasing gate potential between the ferromagnetic barriers. The asymmetric barriers of anti-parallel junction is found to destroy both spin and valley filtering effects and yield a novel result, pure sub-lattice pseudospin polarization. The current in the anti-parallel junctions can be controlled to flow solely in either A or B sub-lattice, saying that the controllable lattice current in silicene is created in double ferromagnetic-gated junction. Our work reveals the potential of dual ferromagnetic-gated silicene junction which may be possible for applications in spin-valleytronics and lattice-pseudospintronics.

  5. Improved Solar-Cell Tunnel Junction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daud, T.; Kachare, A.

    1986-01-01

    Efficiency of multiple-junction silicon solar cells increased by inclusion of p+/n+ tunnel junctions of highly doped GaP between component cells. Relatively low recombination velocity at GaP junction principal reason for recommending this material. Relatively wide band gap also helps increase efficiency by reducing optical losses.

  6. Velocity selection problem in the presence of the triple junction.

    PubMed

    Brener, E A; Hüter, C; Pilipenko, D; Temkin, D E

    2007-09-07

    Melting of a bicrystal along the grain boundary is discussed. A triple junction plays a crucial role in the velocity selection problem in this case. In some range of the parameters an entirely analytical solution of this problem is given. This allows us to present a transparent picture of the structure of the selection theory. We also discuss the selection problem in the case of the growth of a "eutectoid dendrite."

  7. Metallic Electrode: Semiconducting Nanotube Junction Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamada, Toshishige; Biegel, Bryon (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    A model is proposed for two observed current-voltage (I-V) patterns in an experiment with a scanning tunneling microscope tip and a carbon nanotube [Collins et al., Science 278, 100 ('97)]. We claim that there are two contact modes for a tip (metal) -nanotube semi conductor) junction depending whether the alignment of the metal and semiconductor band structure is (1) variable (vacuum-gap) or (2) fixed (touching) with V. With the tip grounded, the tunneling case in (1) would produce large dI/dV with V > 0, small dI/dV with V < 0, and I = 0 near V = 0 for an either n- or p-nanotube. However, the Schottky mechanism in (2) would result in forward current with V < 0 for an n-nanotube, while with V > 0 for an p-nanotube. The two observed I-V patterns are thus entirely explained by a tip-nanotube contact of the two types, where the nanotube must be n-type. We apply this picture to the source-drain I-V characteristics in a long nanotube-channel field-effect-transistor (Zhou et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 76, 1597 ('00)], and show that two independent metal-semiconductor junctions connected in series are responsible for the observed behavior.

  8. Ultrafast Photophysics of Organic Semiconductor Junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burghardt, Irene; Bittner, Eric R.; Tamura, Hiroyuki; Pereverzev, Andrey; Ramon, John Glenn S.

    This contribution gives an overview of our recent studies of the electronic structure and ultrafast photophysics of semiconductor polymer junctions. We focus on the phonon-assisted exciton dissociation at donor-acceptor heterojunctions, using state-of-the-art electronic structure methods in conjunction with vibronic coupling models and multiconfigurational quantum dynamical techniques. The decay of the photogenerated exciton towards an interfacial charge-separated state is an ultrafast (femtosecond to picosecond scale) process which precedes photocurrent generation. We describe this process using a linear vibronic coupling model parametrized for two to three electronic states and 20-30 phonon modes. Several representative interface configurations are considered, which are shown to differ significantly in their cross-chain interactions but exhibit an efficient exciton dissociation in all cases investigated. The exciton decay depends critically on the presence of intermediate states and on the dynamical interplay between high-frequency (C=C stretch) and lowfrequency (ring-torsional) modes. The resulting molecular-level picture of exciton dissociation could contribute to the design of efficient polymer junctions.

  9. Spontaneous Spinal Epidural Hematoma Coexisting Guillan-Barré Syndrome in a Child: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chi Hyung; Song, Geun Sung; Kim, Young Ha; Son, Dong Wuk; Lee, Sang Weon

    2016-09-01

    Spontaneous spinal epidural hematoma (SSEH) has been reported as a rare cause of spinal cord compression, especially in children. Clinical features are usually nonspecific, although cervicothoracic location of hematoma could be presented with progressive paraplegia. Guillian-Barré syndrome (GBS) is clinically defined as an acute peripheral neuropathy causing progressive limb weakness. Because SSEH and GBS have very similar signs and symptoms, SSEH could be misdiagnosed as GBS. Nevertheless, they can be presented together. We describe a rare case of SSEH coexisting with GBS.

  10. Spontaneous Spinal Epidural Hematoma Coexisting Guillan-Barré Syndrome in a Child: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chi Hyung; Kim, Young Ha; Son, Dong Wuk; Lee, Sang Weon

    2016-01-01

    Spontaneous spinal epidural hematoma (SSEH) has been reported as a rare cause of spinal cord compression, especially in children. Clinical features are usually nonspecific, although cervicothoracic location of hematoma could be presented with progressive paraplegia. Guillian-Barré syndrome (GBS) is clinically defined as an acute peripheral neuropathy causing progressive limb weakness. Because SSEH and GBS have very similar signs and symptoms, SSEH could be misdiagnosed as GBS. Nevertheless, they can be presented together. We describe a rare case of SSEH coexisting with GBS. PMID:27800000

  11. Tight junction proteins: from barrier to tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Runkle, E Aaron; Mu, David

    2013-08-28

    The tight junction is a multi-protein complex and is the apical most junctional complex in certain epithelial and endothelial cells. A great deal of attention has been devoted to the understanding of these proteins in contributing to the barrier function - that is, regulating the paracellular flux or permeability between adjacent cells. However, tight junction proteins are now recognized as having functions beyond the barrier. The focus of this review is to discuss the barrier function of the tight junction and to summarize the literature with a focus on the role of tight junction proteins in proliferation, transformation, and metastasis.

  12. Tight Junction Proteins: From Barrier to Tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Runkle, E. Aaron; Mu, David

    2013-01-01

    The tight junction is a multi-protein complex and is the apical most junctional complex in certain epithelial and endothelial cells. A great deal of attention has been devoted to the understanding of these proteins in contributing to the barrier function - that is, regulating the paracellular flux or permeability between adjacent cells. However, tight junction proteins are now recognized as having functions beyond the barrier. The focus of this review is to discuss the barrier function of the tight junction and to summarize the literature with a focus on the role of tight junction proteins in proliferation, transformation, and metastasis. PMID:23743355

  13. Tight Junction Proteins in Human Schwann Cell Autotypic Junctions

    PubMed Central

    Alanne, Maria H.; Pummi, Kati; Heape, Anthony M.; Grènman, Reidar; Peltonen, Juha; Peltonen, Sirkku

    2009-01-01

    Tight junctions (TJs) form physical barriers in various tissues and regulate paracellular transport of ions, water, and molecules. Myelinating Schwann cells form highly organized structures, including compact myelin, nodes of Ranvier, paranodal regions, Schmidt-Lanterman incisures, periaxonal cytoplasmic collars, and mesaxons. Autotypic TJs are formed in non-compacted myelin compartments between adjacent membrane lamellae of the same Schwann cell. Using indirect immunofluorescence and RT-PCR, we analyzed the expression of adherens junction (E-cadherin) and TJ [claudins, zonula occludens (ZO)-1, occludin] components in human peripheral nerve endoneurium, showing clear differences with published rodent profiles. Adult nerve paranodal regions contained E-cadherin, claudin-1, claudin-2, and ZO-1. Schmidt-Lanterman incisures contained E-cadherin, claudin-1, claudin-2, claudin-3, claudin-5, ZO-1, and occludin. Mesaxons contained E-cadherin, claudin-1, claudin-2, claudin-3, ZO-1, and occludin. None of the proteins studied were associated with nodal inter-Schwann cell junctions. Fetal nerve expression of claudin-1, claudin-3, ZO-1, and occludin was predominantly punctate, with a mesaxonal labeling pattern, but paranodal (ZO-1, claudin-3) and Schmidt-Lanterman incisure (claudins-1 and -3) expression profiles typical of compact myelin were visible by gestational week 37. The clear differences observed between human and published rodent nerve profiles emphasize the importance of human studies when translating the results of animal models to human diseases. (J Histochem Cytochem 57:523–529, 2009) PMID:19153196

  14. AFP-producing adenocarcinoma of the esophagogastric junction: report of a case with atypical immunohistochemical findings responding to palliative chemotherapy with 5-fluorouracil, leucovorin, oxaliplatin, and docetaxel (FLOT regime).

    PubMed

    Häussler, U; Bitzer, M; Bösmüller, H; Clasen, S; Götz, M; Malek, N P; Plentz, R R

    2016-10-01

    AFP-producing adenocarcinoma of the esophagus and esophagogastric junction are rare tumor diseases. These tumors show an aggressive behavior characterized by early occurrence of liver metastases and mimic hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). A general recommendation for palliative therapy is not established for these special tumors.Here we report about a 61-year-old man with multiple liver metastases and high serum alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) level. First, HCC was suspected, but further evaluation showed an AFP-producing adenocarcinoma of the esophagogastric junction with unusual findings on further immunohistochemical analysis. Palliative chemotherapy with FLOT (5-fluorouracil, leucovorin, oxaliplatin, and docetaxel) regime showed a 9 month duration of partial response. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  15. Molecular series-tunneling junctions.

    PubMed

    Liao, Kung-Ching; Hsu, Liang-Yan; Bowers, Carleen M; Rabitz, Herschel; Whitesides, George M

    2015-05-13

    Charge transport through junctions consisting of insulating molecular units is a quantum phenomenon that cannot be described adequately by classical circuit laws. This paper explores tunneling current densities in self-assembled monolayer (SAM)-based junctions with the structure Ag(TS)/O2C-R1-R2-H//Ga2O3/EGaIn, where Ag(TS) is template-stripped silver and EGaIn is the eutectic alloy of gallium and indium; R1 and R2 refer to two classes of insulating molecular units-(CH2)n and (C6H4)m-that are connected in series and have different tunneling decay constants in the Simmons equation. These junctions can be analyzed as a form of series-tunneling junctions based on the observation that permuting the order of R1 and R2 in the junction does not alter the overall rate of charge transport. By using the Ag/O2C interface, this system decouples the highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO, which is localized on the carboxylate group) from strong interactions with the R1 and R2 units. The differences in rates of tunneling are thus determined by the electronic structure of the groups R1 and R2; these differences are not influenced by the order of R1 and R2 in the SAM. In an electrical potential model that rationalizes this observation, R1 and R2 contribute independently to the height of the barrier. This model explicitly assumes that contributions to rates of tunneling from the Ag(TS)/O2C and H//Ga2O3 interfaces are constant across the series examined. The current density of these series-tunneling junctions can be described by J(V) = J0(V) exp(-β1d1 - β2d2), where J(V) is the current density (A/cm(2)) at applied voltage V and βi and di are the parameters describing the attenuation of the tunneling current through a rectangular tunneling barrier, with width d and a height related to the attenuation factor β.

  16. Interplay of Bias-Driven Charging and the Vibrational Stark Effect in Molecular Junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yajing; Zolotavin, Pavlo; Doak, Peter; Kronik, Leeor; Neaton, Jeffrey B.; Natelson, Douglas

    2016-01-27

    We observe large, reversible, bias driven changes in the vibrational energies of PCBM based on simultaneous transport and surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) measurements on PCBM-gold junctions. A combination of linear and quadratic shifts in vibrational energies with voltage is analyzed and compared with similar measurements involving C-60-gold junctions. A theoretical model based on density functional theory (DFT) calculations suggests that both a vibrational Stark effect and bias-induced charging of the junction contribute to the shifts in vibrational energies. In the PCBM case, a linear vibrational Stark effect is observed due to the permanent electric dipole moment of PCBM. The vibrational Stark shifts shown here for PCBM junctions are comparable to or larger than the charging effects that dominate in C-60 junctions.

  17. Interplay of Bias-Driven Charging and the Vibrational Stark Effect in Molecular Junctions

    DOE PAGES

    Li, Yajing; Zolotavin, Pavlo; Doak, Peter; ...

    2016-01-27

    We observe large, reversible, bias driven changes in the vibrational energies of PCBM based on simultaneous transport and surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) measurements on PCBM-gold junctions. A combination of linear and quadratic shifts in vibrational energies with voltage is analyzed and compared with similar measurements involving C-60-gold junctions. A theoretical model based on density functional theory (DFT) calculations suggests that both a vibrational Stark effect and bias-induced charging of the junction contribute to the shifts in vibrational energies. In the PCBM case, a linear vibrational Stark effect is observed due to the permanent electric dipole moment of PCBM. The vibrationalmore » Stark shifts shown here for PCBM junctions are comparable to or larger than the charging effects that dominate in C-60 junctions.« less

  18. Role of gap junctions in epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Jin, Miao-Miao; Chen, Zhong

    2011-12-01

    Epilepsy is a common neurological disorder characterized by periodic and unpredictable seizures. Gap junctions have recently been proposed to be involved in the generation, synchronization and maintenance of seizure events. The present review mainly summarizes recent reports concerning the contribution of gap junctions to the pathophysiology of epilepsy, together with the regulation of connexin after clinical and experimental seizure activity. The anticonvulsant effects of gap junction blockers both in vitro and in vivo suggest that the gap junction is a candidate target for the development of antiepileptic drugs. It is also of interest that the roles of neuronal and astrocytic gap junctions in epilepsy have been investigated independently, based on evidence from pharmacological manipulations and connexin-knockout mice. Further studies using more specific manipulations of gap junctions in different cell types and in human epileptic tissue are needed to fully uncover the role of gap junctions in epilepsy.

  19. Experiments on non-equilibrium superconductor-normal metal-superconductor Josephson junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crosser, Michael S.

    By controlling the distribution function within the normal metal of a superconductor/normal metal/superconductor (SNS) Josephson junction, one can reverse the supercurrent-phase relation in the normal wire, creating a pi-junction. This manipulation is done by injecting normal quasiparticle current into the wire, via one or more leads attached at the middle of the junction. Two experiments evolve from this concept. First, in a sample of four reservoirs, two normal and two superconducting, all connected by a wire cross of normal metal, one may inject current either antisymmetrically (AS) or symmetrically (S). In the AS case, current is injected into one normal lead and extracted from the other, creating normal current flow that does not interact with the supercurrent except at the junction. In the S case, current is injected into both normal leads and extracted from the superconductors. Theory predicts that, in the absence of electron energy relaxation in the normal part of the junction, these two situations should result in identical behavior of the Josephson junction. However, due to Joule heating, the S case shows a slightly larger maximum pi-current than the AS case. The second experiment considers a more subtle effect resulting from normal current being injected symmetrically into a SNS Josephson junction. One side of the SNS junction has both normal current and supercurrent flowing in the same direction while the other side has opposing current flows. This situation creates an effective energy gradient across the SNS junction that can appear in the distribution function of the normal wire. Using superconductor/insulator/normal metal tunnelling spectroscopy, it is possible to extract these changes to the distribution function.

  20. Seebeck effect in molecular junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimbovskaya, Natalya A.

    2016-05-01

    Advances in the fabrication and characterization of nanoscale systems presently allow for a better understanding of their thermoelectric properties. As is known, the building blocks of thermoelectricity are the Peltier and Seebeck effects. In the present work we review results of theoretical studies of the Seebeck effect in single-molecule junctions and similar systems. The behavior of thermovoltage and thermopower in these systems is controlled by several factors including the geometry of molecular bridges, the characteristics of contacts between the bridge and the electrodes, the strength of the Coulomb interactions between electrons on the bridge, and of electron-phonon interactions. We describe the impact of these factors on the thermopower. Also, we discuss a nonlinear Seebeck effect in molecular junctions.

  1. Thermocouple, multiple junction reference oven

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leblanc, L. P. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    An improved oven for maintaining the junctions of a plurality of reference thermocouples at a common and constant temperature is described. The oven is characterized by a cylindrical body defining a heat sink with axially extended-cylindrical cavity a singularized heating element which comprises a unitary cylindrical heating element consisting of a resistance heating coil wound about the surface of metallic spool with an axial bore defined and seated in the cavity. Other features of the oven include an annular array of radially extended bores defined in the cylindrical body and a plurality of reference thermocouple junctions seated in the bores in uniformly spaced relation with the heating element, and a temperature sensing device seated in the axial bore for detecting temperature changes as they occur in the spool and circuit to apply a voltage across the coil in response to detected drops in temperatures of the spool.

  2. Seebeck effect in molecular junctions.

    PubMed

    Zimbovskaya, Natalya A

    2016-05-11

    Advances in the fabrication and characterization of nanoscale systems presently allow for a better understanding of their thermoelectric properties. As is known, the building blocks of thermoelectricity are the Peltier and Seebeck effects. In the present work we review results of theoretical studies of the Seebeck effect in single-molecule junctions and similar systems. The behavior of thermovoltage and thermopower in these systems is controlled by several factors including the geometry of molecular bridges, the characteristics of contacts between the bridge and the electrodes, the strength of the Coulomb interactions between electrons on the bridge, and of electron-phonon interactions. We describe the impact of these factors on the thermopower. Also, we discuss a nonlinear Seebeck effect in molecular junctions.

  3. Morphogenesis of rat myotendinous junction.

    PubMed

    Curzi, Davide; Ambrogini, Patrizia; Falcieri, Elisabetta; Burattini, Sabrina

    2013-10-01

    Myotendinous junction (MTJ) is the highly specialized complex which connects the skeletal muscle to the tendon for transmitting the contractile force between the two tissues. The purpose of this study was to investigate the MTJ development and rat EDL was chosen as a model. 1, 15, 30 day animals were considered and the junctions were analyzed by light and electron microscopy. The MTJ interface architecture increased during the development, extending the interaction between muscle and tendon. 1-day-old rats showed disorganized myofibril bundles, spread cytosol and incomplete rough endoplasmic reticulum, features partially improved in 15-day-old rats, and completely developed in 30-day-old animals. These findings indicate that muscle-tendon interface displays, during rat lifetime, numerically increased and longer tendon interdigitations, correlated with an improved organization of both tissues and with a progressive acquirement of full functionality.

  4. Morphogenesis of rat myotendinous junction

    PubMed Central

    Curzi, Davide; Ambrogini, Patrizia; Falcieri, Elisabetta; Burattini, Sabrina

    2013-01-01

    Summary Myotendinous junction (MTJ) is the highly specialized complex which connects the skeletal muscle to the tendon for transmitting the contractile force between the two tissues. The purpose of this study was to investigate the MTJ development and rat EDL was chosen as a model. 1, 15, 30 day animals were considered and the junctions were analyzed by light and electron microscopy. The MTJ interface architecture increased during the development, extending the interaction between muscle and tendon. 1-day-old rats showed disorganized myofibril bundles, spread cytosol and incomplete rough endoplasmic reticulum, features partially improved in 15-day-old rats, and completely developed in 30-day-old animals. These findings indicate that muscle-tendon interface displays, during rat lifetime, numerically increased and longer tendon interdigitations, correlated with an improved organization of both tissues and with a progressive acquirement of full functionality. PMID:24596690

  5. A pediatric case of idiopathic Harlequin syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ju Young; Lee, Moon Souk; Kim, Seung Yeon; Kim, Hyun Jung; Lee, Soo Jin; You, Chur Woo; Kim, Jon Soo

    2016-01-01

    Harlequin syndrome, which is a rare disorder caused by dysfunction of the autonomic system, manifests as asymmetric facial flushing and sweating in response to heat, exercise, or emotional factors. The syndrome may be primary (idiopathic) with a benign course, or can occur secondary to structural abnormalities or iatrogenic factors. The precise mechanism underlying idiopathic harlequin syndrome remains unclear. Here, we describe a case of a 6-year-old boy who reported left hemifacial flushing and sweating after exercise. He had an unremarkable birth history and no significant medical history. Complete ophthalmological and neurological examinations were performed, and no other abnormalities were identified. Magnetic resonance imaging was performed to exclude lesions of the cerebrum and cervicothoracic spinal cord, and no abnormalities were noted. His final diagnosis was classic idiopathic harlequin syndrome. Herein, we report the first pediatric case of idiopathic harlequin syndrome in Korea. PMID:28018464

  6. Inelastic effects of Josephson junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranjan, Samir

    We have investigated the effects of the inelastic interaction of electrons with phonons in the barrier region of S-I-S and S-N-S Josephson junctions. We find that under suitable conditions this mechanism can cause substantial modifications of the temperature dependence of the critical current jsb{c} as the inevitable loss of coherence can be more than compensated by the enhancement of the tunneling probability resulting from the phonon absorption. The effect depends strongly on the ratio qsb{TF}a of the junction width a to the screening length in the barrier region. For a S-I-S junction, a monotonic decrease in the critical current with temperature is found for qsb{TF}a ≫ 1 whereas for qsb{TF}a ≪ 1, the appearance of a peak in jsb{c}(T) near Tsb{c} is predicted. This new interesting effect is the consequence of the competition between the decrease of the superconducting gap function and the increase in the number of phonons with temperature. A wide range of parameter values has been explored and contact with relevant experimental results has been made. For an S-N-S junction, there is a large increase in the coherence length in the non-superconducting region leading to a substantial enhancement of the critical current over a wide range of temperature. It turns out that the entire temperature range can be divided broadly into two regimes. At low temperatures, the electron predominantly exchanges energy with just one phonon and it is this process that mainly determines the critical current. At higher temperatures the critical current is determined by processes in which the electrons exchange energy with many phonons during their under barrier motion.

  7. Area-dependence of spin-triplet supercurrent in ferromagnetic Josephson junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yixing; Pratt, William P., Jr.; Birge, Norman O.

    2012-02-01

    Spin-triplet supercurrents in strong ferromagnetic Josephson junctions were reported by several groups in 2010. At the same time, the 0-π current-phase relationship of the spin-triplet supercurrent was predicted to be controllable by the magnetization orientations of different ferromagnetic layers. Our junctions contain a series of ferromagnetic layers consisting of a synthetic antiferromagnet Co/Ru/Co sandwiched between two thin magnetic layers such as PdNi or Ni [1]. When looking along the direction of current flow, one should obtain 0 junctions if the rotation direction of magnetizations is the same from one to the next, and π junctions when the opposite rotation direction is the case. Since our magnetic layers have multiple domains in the virgin state, we should expect 0 and π phases to alternate randomly in different locations in the junctions. The critical current in the virgin state should scale with the square-root of the junction area. After aligning the outer ferromagnetic layers in the same direction with an external field, the current-phase relation should be uniform across the whole junction area and the critical current should be proportional to the junction area. We will present data confirming this expectation for the magnetized state, whereas the situation for the virgin state is presently unclear. [4pt] [1] T.S. Khaire, M.A. Khasawneh, W.P. Pratt Jr and N.O. Birge, Phys. Rev. Lett. 104 137002 (2010).

  8. Superconducting tunnel-junction refrigerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melton, Robert G.; Paterson, James L.; Kaplan, S. B.

    1980-03-01

    The dc current through an S1-S2 tunnel junction, with Δ2 greater than Δ1, when biased with eV<Δ1+Δ2, will lower the energy in S1. This energy reduction will be shared by the phonons and electrons. This device is shown to be analogous to a thermoelectric refrigerator with an effective Peltier coefficient π*~Δ1e. Tunneling calculations yield the cooling power Pc, the electrical power Pe supplied by the bias supply, and the cooling efficiency η=PcPe. The maximum cooling power is obtained for eV=+/-(Δ2-Δ1) and t1=T1Tc1~0.9. Estimates are made of the temperature difference T2-T1 achievable in Al-Pb and Sn-Pb junctions with an Al2O3 tunneling barrier. The performance of this device is shown to yield a maximum cooling efficiency η~=Δ1(Δ2-Δ1) which can be compared with that available in an ideal Carnot refrigerator of η=T1(T2-T1). The development of a useful tunnel-junction refrigerator requires a tunneling barrier with an effective thermal conductance per unit area several orders of magnitude less than that provided by the Al2O3 barrier in the Al-Pb and Sn-Pb systems.

  9. Thermoelectric efficiency of molecular junctions.

    PubMed

    Perroni, C A; Ninno, D; Cataudella, V

    2016-09-21

    Focus of the review is on experimental set-ups and theoretical proposals aimed to enhance thermoelectric performances of molecular junctions. In addition to charge conductance, the thermoelectric parameter commonly measured in these systems is the thermopower, which is typically rather low. We review recent experimental outcomes relative to several junction configurations used to optimize the thermopower. On the other hand, theoretical calculations provide estimations of all the thermoelectric parameters in the linear and non-linear regime, in particular of the thermoelectric figure of merit and efficiency, completing our knowledge of molecular thermoelectricity. For this reason, the review will mainly focus on theoretical studies analyzing the role of not only electronic, but also of the vibrational degrees of freedom. Theoretical results about thermoelectric phenomena in the coherent regime are reviewed focusing on interference effects which play a significant role in enhancing the figure of merit. Moreover, we review theoretical studies including the effects of molecular many-body interactions, such as electron-vibration couplings, which typically tend to reduce the efficiency. Since a fine tuning of many parameters and coupling strengths is required to optimize the thermoelectric conversion in molecular junctions, new theoretically proposed set-ups are discussed in the conclusions.

  10. Squeezed States in Josephson Junctions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, X.; Nori, F.

    1996-03-01

    We have studied quantum fluctuation properties of Josephson junctions in the limit of large Josephson coupling energy and small charging energy, when the eigenstates of the system can be treated as being nearly localized. We have considered(X. Hu and F. Nori, preprints.) a Josephson junction in a variety of situations, e.g., coupled to one or several of the following elements: a capacitor, an inductor (in a superconducting ring), and an applied current source. By solving an effective Shrödinger equation, we have obtained squeezed vacuum (coherent) states as the ground states of a ``free-oscillating'' (linearly-driven) Josephson junction, and calculated the uncertainties of its canonical momentum, charge, and coordinate, phase. We have also shown that the excited states of the various systems we consider are similar to the number states of a simple harmonic oscillator but with different fluctuation properties. Furthermore, we have obtained the time-evolution operators for these systems. These operators can make it easier to calculate the time-dependence of the expectation values and fluctuations of various quantities starting from an arbitrary initial state.

  11. Synchronization in Disordered Josephson Junction Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dissanayake, S. T. M.; Trees, B. R.

    2001-10-01

    There is considerable scientific and technological interest in the time-dependent behavior of arrays of non-identical Josephson junctions, whose voltages oscillate with individual bare frequencies that can be made, through interactions, to renormalize their frequencies to a common value. We have studied the degree of synchronization of a subset of overdamped junctions in a ladder geometry, in which the voltages across the ``rung'' junctions of the ladder oscillate with the same, renormalized frequency and a fixed phase difference. We measure the degree of synchronization of the junctions with an order parameter, r (0<= r<= 1), as a function of the nearest-neighbor junction coupling strength. We also determined that a time-averaged version of the resistively-shunted junction (RSJ) equations could be used as an accurate description of the dynamics of the junctions. The solutions to the averaged equations exhibit phase slips between pairs of junctions for certain ranges of the junction coupling strength and also demonstrated that the relationship between the array size N and the critical coupling strength for all junctions to oscillate with the same frequency scales as N^2. This research was partially funded by a grant to Ohio Wesleyan University from the McGregor Foundation to support student research.

  12. AdS and ds Entropy from String Junctions or the Function of Junction Conjunctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silverstein, Eva

    Flux compactifications of string theory exhibiting the possibility of discretely tuning the cosmological constant to small values have been constructed. The highly tuned vacua in this discretuum have curvature radii which scale as large powers of the flux quantum numbers, exponential in the number of cycles in the compactiflcation. By the arguments of Susskind/Witten (in the AdS case) and Gibbons/Hawking (in the dS case), we expect correspondingly large entropies associated with these vacua. If they are to provide a dual description of these vacua on their Coulomb branch, branes traded for the flux need to account for this entropy at the appropriate energy scale. In this note, we argue that simple string junctions and webs ending on the branes can account for this large entropy, obtaining a rough estimate for junction entropy that agrees with the existing rough estimates for the spacing of the discretuum. In particular, the brane entropy can account for the (A)dS entropy far away from string scale correspondence limits.

  13. Measuring the momentum of a nanomechanical oscillator using tunnel junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doiron, Charles; Trauzettel, Bjoern; Bruder, Christoph

    2008-03-01

    We present a way to measure the momentum p of a nanomechanical oscillatorootnotetextC. B. Doiron, B. Trauzettel, C. Bruder. arXiv:0707.2709.. The momentum detector is based on two tunnel junctions in an Aharonov-Bohm-type setup, where one of the tunneling amplitudes depends on the motion of the oscillator and the other one does not. The coupling between the first tunnel junction and the oscillator is assumed to be linear in the position x of the oscillator t(x) = t0+ t1x. However, the presence of two junctions can, under certain conditions, lead to an effective imaginary coupling t(x) = t0+ i t1x. By calculating the equation-of-motion for the density matrix of the coupled (oscillator+tunnel junction) systemootnotetextA.A Clerk, S. Girvin. Phys. Rev. B 70, 121303 (2004)., we show that in this case the finite-frequency current noise of the detector is proportional to the momentum spectrum of the oscillator.

  14. Dynamically Active Compartments Coupled by a Stochastically Gated Gap Junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bressloff, Paul C.; Lawley, Sean D.

    2017-03-01

    We analyze a one-dimensional PDE-ODE system representing the diffusion of signaling molecules between two cells coupled by a stochastically gated gap junction. We assume that signaling molecules diffuse within the cytoplasm of each cell and then either bind to some active region of the cell's membrane (treated as a well-mixed compartment) or pass through the gap junction to the interior of the other cell. We treat the gap junction as a randomly fluctuating gate that switches between an open and a closed state according to a two-state Markov process. This means that the resulting PDE-ODE is stochastic due to the presence of a randomly switching boundary in the interior of the domain. It is assumed that each membrane compartment acts as a conditional oscillator, that is, it sits below a supercritical Hopf bifurcation. In the ungated case (gap junction always open), the system supports diffusion-induced oscillations, in which the concentration of signaling molecules within the two compartments is either in-phase or anti-phase. The presence of a reflection symmetry (for identical cells) means that the stochastic gate only affects the existence of anti-phase oscillations. In particular, there exist parameter choices where the gated system supports oscillations, but the ungated system does not, and vice versa. The existence of oscillations is investigated by solving a spectral problem obtained by averaging over realizations of the stochastic gate.

  15. Conductance spectroscopy of nontopological-topological superconductor junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Setiawan, F.; Cole, William S.; Sau, Jay D.; Das Sarma, S.

    2017-01-01

    We calculate the zero-temperature differential conductance d I /d V of a voltage-biased one-dimensional junction between a nontopological and a topological superconductor for arbitrary junction transparency using the scattering matrix formalism. We consider two representative models for the topological superconductors: (i) spinful p -wave and (ii) s -wave with spin-orbit coupling and spin splitting. We verify that in the tunneling limit (small junction transparencies) where only single Andreev reflections contribute to the current, the conductance for voltages below the nontopological superconductor gap Δs is zero and there are two symmetric conductance peaks appearing at e V =±Δs with the quantized value (4 -π ) 2 e2/h due to resonant Andreev reflection from the Majorana zero mode. However, when the junction transparency is not small, there is a finite conductance for e |V |< Δs arising from multiple Andreev reflections. The conductance at e V =±Δs in this case is no longer quantized. In general, the conductance is particle-hole asymmetric except for sufficiently small transparencies. We further show that, for certain values of parameters, the tunneling conductance from a zero-energy conventional Andreev bound state can be made to mimic the conductance from a true Majorana mode.

  16. Brachioradial Pruritus as a Harbinger of Syrinx in Chronic Spinal Cord Injury: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Skelton, Felicia; Frontera, Joel E

    2017-03-01

    This case describes a 56-year-old man with known thoracic spinal cord injury undergoing evaluation for a pruritic rash on the dorsolateral aspect of his forearms with no upper extremity neuromuscular symptoms. Common diagnoses were considered and treated with little success. The diagnosis of brachioradial pruritus (BRP) was made, and evaluation for possible causes revealed a large cervicothoracic syrinx. To our knowledge, BRP has not been described previously as the presenting sign of post-traumatic syringomelia. This patient's clinical course is delineated, as well as a brief review of BRP and its relationship to other cervical spine pathologies.

  17. Modeling of Intrinsic Josephson Junctions in High Temperature Superconductors under External Radiation in the Breakpoint Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shukrinov, Yu. M.; Rahmonov, I. R.; Plecenik, A.; Streltsova, O. I.; Zuev, M. I.; Ososkov, G. A.

    2016-02-01

    The current-voltage (IV) characteristics of the intrinsic Josephson junctions in high temperature superconductors under external electromagnetic radiation are calculated numerically in the parametric resonance region. We discuss a numerical method for calculation of the Shapiro step width on the amplitude of radiation. In order to accelerate computations we used parallelization by task parameter via Simple Linux Utility for Resource Management (SLURM) arrays and tested it in the case of a single junction. An analysis of the junction transitions between rotating and oscillating states in the branching region of IV-characteristics is presented.

  18. Experimental evidence for quantum interference and vibrationally induced decoherence in single-molecule junctions.

    PubMed

    Ballmann, Stefan; Härtle, Rainer; Coto, Pedro B; Elbing, Mark; Mayor, Marcel; Bryce, Martin R; Thoss, Michael; Weber, Heiko B

    2012-08-03

    We analyze quantum interference and decoherence effects in single-molecule junctions both experimentally and theoretically by means of the mechanically controlled break junction technique and density-functional theory. We consider the case where interference is provided by overlapping quasidegenerate states. Decoherence mechanisms arising from electronic-vibrational coupling strongly affect the electrical current flowing through a single-molecule contact and can be controlled by temperature variation. Our findings underline the universal relevance of vibrations for understanding charge transport through molecular junctions.

  19. [A case of recurrent gastroesophageal junction adenocarcinoma successfully treated with radiation plus chemotherapy (5-FU+CDDP, S-1, Paclitaxel, CPT-11) for long-term survival with good QOL].

    PubMed

    Kojima, Taiki; Matsui, Takanori; Uemura, Takanori; Fujimitsu, Yasunobu; Kure, Narihiro; Mochizuki, Yoshinari; Kojima, Hiroshi

    2008-11-01

    We report a 63-year-old man with recurrent gastroesophageal junction adenocarcinoma. He underwent esophagogastrectomy in August 2004. After curative operation with Stage III (pT3N1M0), a recurrence was found at the anastomosis site in November 2004. Chemoradiotherapy with S-1 followed by chemotherapy (S-1) was performed from January 2005 to April 2006. Lymphnode metastasis to the left side of the main bronchus appeared in May 2006, and paclitaxel was used until December 2007 when PR was indicated by CT scan and GIF. Now he is receiving CPT-11. During these 3 years and 3 months, his performance status was maintained from 0 to 1.

  20. In vitro formation of gap junction vesicles.

    PubMed

    Goodenough, D A

    1976-02-01

    A method is described that uses trypsin digestion combined with collagenase-hyaluronidase which produces a population of gap junction vesicles. The hexagonal lattice of subunits ("connexons") comprising the gapjunctions appears unaltered by various structural criteria and by buoyant density measurements. The gap junction vesciles are closed by either a single or a double profile of nonjunctional "membrane," which presents a smooth, particle-free fracture face. Horseradish peroxidase and cytochrome c studies have revealed that about 20% of the gap junction vesicles are impermeable to proteins 12,000 daltons or larger. The increased purity of the trypsinized junction preparation suggests that one of the disulfide reduction products of the gap-junction principal protein may be a nonjunctional contaminating peptide. The gap junction appears to be composed of a single 18,000-dalton protein, connexin, which may be reduced to a single 9,000-dalton peak. The number of peptides in this reduced peak are still unknown.

  1. Physics and Applications of NIS Junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Ullom, J N

    2001-08-24

    This paper reviews the physics and applications of Normal-Insulator-Superconductor (NIS) tunnel junctions. The current-voltage properties of NIS junctions are diode-like with a strong temperature dependence. Hence, these structures can be used as sensitive thermometers at temperatures well below the energy gap, {Delta}, of the superconducting electrode. For junction voltages comparable to {Delta}/q, current flow removes energy from the normal electrode. This property has been exploited to build refrigerators capable of cooling thin-film circuits from 0.3 K to 0.1 K. Calorimeters and bolometers for the detection of X-rays and millimeter-wave radiation, respectively, have successfully been built from NIS junctions. NIS junctions have also been used to probe the superconducting state. Finally, recent ideas for the use of NIS junctions as simple circuit elements are described.

  2. The Dissolution of Double Holliday Junctions

    PubMed Central

    Bizard, Anna H.; Hickson, Ian D.

    2014-01-01

    Double Holliday junctions (dHJS) are important intermediates of homologous recombination. The separate junctions can each be cleaved by DNA structure-selective endonucleases known as Holliday junction resolvases. Alternatively, double Holliday junctions can be processed by a reaction known as “double Holliday junction dissolution.” This reaction requires the cooperative action of a so-called “dissolvasome” comprising a Holliday junction branch migration enzyme (Sgs1/BLM RecQ helicase) and a type IA topoisomerase (Top3/TopoIIIα) in complex with its OB (oligonucleotide/oligosaccharide binding) fold containing accessory factor (Rmi1). This review details our current knowledge of the dissolution process and the players involved in catalyzing this mechanistically complex means of completing homologous recombination reactions. PMID:24984776

  3. [Gap junctions and cancer: implications and perspectives].

    PubMed

    Mesnil, Marc

    2004-02-01

    Gap junctions are made of intercellular channels which permit the diffusion from cytoplasm to cytoplasm of small hydrophilic molecules (<1,200 Da) such as ions, sugars, amino acids, nucleotides, second messengers (calcium, inositol triphosphate, etc.). Since their discovery in the early sixties, several groups have described the loss of their function in cancer cells. The accumulation of such data led to the hypothesis that gap junctions are involved in the carcinogenesis process. This assumption has been confirmed by data establishing that gap junctional intercellular communication is inhibited by most of the tumor promoters and that the restoration of such a communication, by transfection of cDNAs encoding gap junction proteins (connexins), inhibits the aberrant growth rates of tumorigenic cells. Despite these important informations, several fundamental questions remain still open. First, we do not know how gap junctions mediate such a tumor suppressor effect and whether it may depend either on the cell type or on the connexin type. Moreover, most of the data concerning a possible involvement of gap junctions in carcinogenesis have been obtained from in vitro and animal models. The very few results which have been currently collected from human tumors are not sufficient to have a clear idea concerning the real involvement of gap junctions in sporadic human cancers. These points as well as other unresolved questions about the role of gap junctional intercellular communication in carcinogenesis are mentioned. To bring some answers, some prospects are proposed with the objective to use gap junctions for increasing the effect of anticancer therapies.

  4. Ventral surgical approaches to craniovertebral junction chordomas.

    PubMed

    Singh, Harminder; Harrop, James; Schiffmacher, Paul; Rosen, Marc; Evans, James

    2010-03-01

    Chordomas are primarily malignant tumors encountered at either end of the neural axis; the craniovertebral junction and the sacrococcygeal junction. In this article, we discuss the surgical management of craniovertebral junction chordomas. In this paper, we discuss the surgical management of craniovertebral junction chordomas. The following approaches are illustrated: transoral-transpalatopharyngeal approach, high anterior cervical retropharyngeal approach, endoscopic transoral approach, and endoscopic transnasal approach. No single operative approach can be used for all craniovertebral chordomas. Therefore, the location of the tumor dictates which approach or approaches should be used.

  5. Gap Junctions Couple Astrocytes and Oligodendrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Orthmann-Murphy, Jennifer L.; Abrams, Charles K.; Scherer, Steven S.

    2009-01-01

    In vertebrates, a family of related proteins called connexins form gap junctions (GJs), which are intercellular channels. In the central nervous system (CNS), GJs couple oligodendrocytes and astrocytes (O/A junctions) and adjacent astrocytes (A/A junctions), but not adjacent oligodendrocytes, forming a “glial syncytium.” Oligodendrocytes and astrocytes each express different connexins. Mutations of these connexin genes demonstrate that the proper functioning of myelin and oligodendrocytes requires the expression of these connexins. The physiological function of O/A and A/A junctions, however, remains to be illuminated. PMID:18236012

  6. Ependymoma of the cauda equina starting with communicating hydrocephalus: a case report.

    PubMed

    Tzekov, Christo; Naydenov, Emanuil; Kalev, Ognian

    2007-01-01

    The presence of concomitant hydrocephalus in cases with spinal cord tumors is relatively rare. Here, we describe a case of myxopapillary ependymoma of the cauda equina starting with communicating hydrocephalus in a 14-year-old boy. The patient presented to the clinic without underlying causes of hydrocephalus on the neuroimaging data. After ventriculoperitoneal shunt placement, despite the numerous malfunction incidents, the patient was doing well. Eight years later, he developed progressive weakness and coldness of the lower limbs. Multiple cystic lesions in the cervicothoracic area were found on magnetic resonance imaging. Decompressive hemilaminectomy of the cervicothoracic region was performed with temporary improvement of the patient's condition. Because of persisting complaints, the sacral area of the spine was also observed and neuroimaging data for a tumoral lesion in the cauda equina region were found. The lesion was surgically removed and the histological result was myxopapillary ependymoma. Therefore, cases presenting with internal hydrocephalus without clear-cut intracranial etiology should have detailed neuroimaging of the whole central nervous system.

  7. Thermoelectric effects in nanoscale junctions.

    PubMed

    Dubi, Yonatan; Di Ventra, Massimiliano

    2009-01-01

    Despite its intrinsic nonequilibrium origin, thermoelectricity in nanoscale systems is usually described within a static scattering approach which disregards the dynamical interaction with the thermal baths that maintain energy flow. Using the theory of open quantum systems, we show instead that unexpected properties, such as a resonant structure and large sign sensitivity, emerge if the nonequilibrium nature of this problem is considered. Our approach also allows us to define and study a local temperature, which shows hot spots and oscillations along the system according to the coupling of the latter to the electrodes. This demonstrates that Fourier's lawa paradigm of statistical mechanicsis generally violated in nanoscale junctions.

  8. Magnetic tunnel junction pattern technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Eugene; Schwarz, Benjamin; Choi, Chang Ju; Kula, Witold; Wolfman, Jerome; Ounadjela, Kamel; Geha, Sam

    2003-05-01

    We have developed a magnetic tunnel junction (MTJ) pattern technique that involves transforming the magnetic layer above the tunnel barrier in unwanted areas into an insulator, thus providing insulation between different MTJ devices without suffering common tunnel barrier shorting problems. With this technique, 90%-100% yielding MTJ devices have been observed. MTJ results using this process are superior to an etching based process. Switching distribution of patterned magnetic bits is also narrower using this novel technique. Process control and the ability to stop on the tunnel barrier have been demonstrated.

  9. Operation Junction City, Vietnam, 1967

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-06-03

    a standard infantry rifle , the Soviet-made AK-47. They possessed some 7.62 machine guns in each battalion and very few .51 caliber machine guns, if... rifles , and Chinese-manufactured antitank mines. Fire support was provided by 6 0-mm, 82-mm, and for the first time in the war, 120-mm mortars. The...MINIHTHAN) ’ ~ 9j~ REPLACED BY ON I APRIL OL DAli TIENG AP’ GAU BANG’ OPERATION JUNCTION CITY TASK ORGANIZATION PHASE I II FIELD FORCE 1st Inf Div 25th

  10. Method for shallow junction formation

    DOEpatents

    Weiner, K.H.

    1996-10-29

    A doping sequence is disclosed that reduces the cost and complexity of forming source/drain regions in complementary metal oxide silicon (CMOS) integrated circuit technologies. The process combines the use of patterned excimer laser annealing, dopant-saturated spin-on glass, silicide contact structures and interference effects creates by thin dielectric layers to produce source and drain junctions that are ultrashallow in depth but exhibit low sheet and contact resistance. The process utilizes no photolithography and can be achieved without the use of expensive vacuum equipment. The process margins are wide, and yield loss due to contact of the ultrashallow dopants is eliminated. 8 figs.

  11. Method for shallow junction formation

    DOEpatents

    Weiner, Kurt H.

    1996-01-01

    A doping sequence that reduces the cost and complexity of forming source/drain regions in complementary metal oxide silicon (CMOS) integrated circuit technologies. The process combines the use of patterned excimer laser annealing, dopant-saturated spin-on glass, silicide contact structures and interference effects creates by thin dielectric layers to produce source and drain junctions that are ultrashallow in depth but exhibit low sheet and contact resistance. The process utilizes no photolithography and can be achieved without the use of expensive vacuum equipment. The process margins are wide, and yield loss due to contact of the ultrashallow dopants is eliminated.

  12. Computation of flow through the oesophagogastric junction

    PubMed Central

    McMahon, Barry P; Odie, Karl D; Moloney, Kenneth W; Gregersen, Hans

    2007-01-01

    Whilst methods exist to indirectly measure the effects of increased flow or gastro-oesophageal refluxing, they cannot quantitatively measure the amount of acid travelling back up into the oesophagus during reflux, nor can they indicate the flow rate through the oesophago-gastric junction (OGJ). Since OGJ dysfunction affects flow it seems most appropriate to describe the geometry of the OGJ and its effect on the flow. A device known as the functional lumen imaging probe (FLIP) has been shown to reliably measure the geometry of and pressure changes in the OGJ. FLIP cannot directly measure flow but the data gathered from the probe can be used to model flow through the junction by using computational flow dynamics (CFD). CFD uses a set of equations known as the Navier-Stokes equations to predict flow patterns and is a technique widely used in engineering. These equations are complex and require appropriate assumptions to provide simplifications before useful data can be obtained. With the assumption that the cross-sectional areas obtained via FLIP are circular, the radii of these circles can be obtained. A cubic interpolation scheme can then be applied to give a high-resolution geometry for the OGJ. In the case of modelling a reflux scenario, it can be seen that at the narrowest section a jet of fluid squirts into the oesophagus at a higher velocity than the fluid surrounding it. This jet has a maximum velocity of almost 2 ms-1 that occurs where the OGJ is at its narrowest. This simple prediction of acid ‘squirting’ into the oesophagus illustrates how the use of numerical methods can be used to develop a better understanding of the OGJ. This initial work using CFD shows some considerable promise for the future. PMID:17457966

  13. Giant leiomyoma of the gastroesophageal junction: technique and results of endoscopic full-thickness resection

    PubMed Central

    Bona, Davide; Aiolfi, Alberto; Siboni, Stefano; Bernardi, Daniele; Bonavina, Luigi

    2011-01-01

    Four consecutive patients with a giant leiomyoma originating from the posterior aspect of the gastroesophageal junction were treated with full-thickness endoscopic retroflex dissection. A complete removal of the lesion was obtained in all cases. No complications were observed except for some degree of air filtration causing symptomatic pneumoperitoneum in one patient. Retroflex endoscopic full-thickness resection of giant leiomyoma at the gastroesophageal junction is feasible and safe. PMID:22235168

  14. Formation and stability of ridge-ridge-ridge triple junctions in rheologically realistic lithosphere model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerya, Taras; Burov, Evgueni

    2015-04-01

    Triple junctions are probably the most remarkable features of plate boundaries since their presence constitutes one of the major demonstrations of plate tectonics theory. Divergent (R-R-R) triple junctions (at 120° and T junctions) are particular ones since their stability depends on the exact values of the relative velocities of plate divergence and hence is strongly affected by plate rheology and processes of crustal accretion. The mechanisms of their formation and long-term steadiness are not well understood even though it is commonly accepted, generally based on common sense, that the geometry and stability of triple junctions should be related to the intuitively acceptable geometric considerations that 3-branch configurations should be "stable" over the time on a 3D Earth surface. That said, most plate boundaries are in fact 2D in terms that they involve only two plates, while junctions with 3 and more branches, if even mechanically not excluded, are generally short-lived and hence rarely observed at tectonic scale. Indeed, it has been long-time suggested that triple junctions result from evolution of short-lived quadruple junctions, yet, without providing a consistent mechanical explanation or experimental demonstration of this process, due to the rheological complexity of the lithosphere and that of strain localization and crustal accretion processes. For example, it is supposed that R-R-R junctions form as result of axisymmetric mantle upwellings. However, impingement of buoyant fluid on a non-pre-stressed lithosphere should result in multiple radial cracks, as is well known from previous analog and numerical experiments. In case of uni-directionally pre-stressed lithosphere, it has also shown that linear 2D rift structures should be formed. Therefore, a complete 3D thermos-mechanically consistent approach is needed to understand the processes of formation of multi-branch junctions. With this goal we here reproduce and study the processes of multi

  15. Myelopathy associated with melorheostosis: a case report.

    PubMed

    Reznik, Mark; Fried, Guy W

    2005-07-01

    A man in his mid thirties presented with lower-extremity weakness and spasticity because of a myelopathy caused by a rare disorder of bone known as melorheostosis. The primary pathology involved was compression of the cord at the cervicothoracic levels by dystrophic osseous formation within the vertebral bodies. Based on a review of existing literature, it was evident that the spine is an uncommon location to find melorheostosis, making this disease entity a unique cause of myelopathy. The patient's progress was closely observed during his inpatient rehabilitation program, after he underwent spinal decompression surgery. Starting from the level of complete paralysis, he was able to regain functional strength in his legs by the end of his 2-month course. Despite the lack of reported outcomes in cases of myelopathy associated with melorheostosis, our report describes a favorable prognosis with good recovery of both strength and function.

  16. [Introduction to the structure and functions of junction communications or gap junctions].

    PubMed

    Rousset, B

    1996-01-01

    Cell-to-cell communication through gap junctions (GJ) represents a direct route of exchange of informations between neighboring cells within tissues and organs. GJ are formed from the assembly of a large number of channels that differ from the other known channels because they connect the cytoplasm of adjacent cells. The GJ channel is built from two parts: the connexons. A connexon inserted into the plasma membrane of a cell interacts with another connexon belonging to an adjacent cell. Connexons are composed of proteins with four transmembrane domains that are named connexins (Cx). Six Cx form a connexon. Cx belong to a protein family with 13 known members at present. Each Cx is defined by its molecular mass in kDa (ex: Cx32, Cx43...). A given cell type expresses one or several Cx. The cell to cell transfer of molecules through GJ channels exhibit a size selectivity; only molecules with a molecular mass lower than 1000 Da such as ions and second messengers freely pass through GJ. Depending on the Cx they are made of, GJ seem to differ somewhat in their permeability properties. Cell-to-cell communication via GJ is a regulated process. GJ channels can be either open or closed. GJ mediated cell-to-cell communication or junctional coupling can be detected and quantified by visualization of the cell to cell transfer of a fluorescent probe (such as Lucifer Yellow...) previously introduced in a single cell by microinjection. The presence of GJ channels can also be identified by recording the passage of an electric current between contiguous cells. GJ are involved in numerous fundamental biological processes from the embryonic development to the homeostasis in adult tissues and organs. GJ coordinate cell activities and sometimes synchronize cell behaviour. This is the case for the propagation of the excitation wave in the cardiac muscle and smooth muscle. GJ mediate metabolic cooperation between cells; they represent a way of supply of nutrients for tissues that are

  17. Electrodeposited, Transverse Nanowire Electroluminescent Junctions.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Shaopeng; Xu, Qiang; Dutta, Rajen K; Le Thai, Mya; Li, Xiaowei; Penner, Reginald M

    2016-09-27

    The preparation by electrodeposition of transverse nanowire electroluminescent junctions (tn-ELJs) is described, and the electroluminescence (EL) properties of these devices are characterized. The lithographically patterned nanowire electrodeposition process is first used to prepare long (millimeters), linear, nanocrystalline CdSe nanowires on glass. The thickness of these nanowires along the emission axis is 60 nm, and the width, wCdSe, along the electrical axis is adjustable from 100 to 450 nm. Ten pairs of nickel-gold electrical contacts are then positioned along the axis of this nanowire using lithographically directed electrodeposition. The resulting linear array of nickel-CdSe-gold junctions produces EL with an external quantum efficiency, EQE, and threshold voltage, Vth, that depend sensitively on wCdSe. EQE increases with increasing electric field and also with increasing wCdSe, and Vth also increases with wCdSe and, therefore, the electrical resistance of the tn-ELJs. Vth down to 1.8(±0.2) V (for wCdSe ≈ 100 nm) and EQE of 5.5(±0.5) × 10(-5) (for wCdSe ≈ 450 nm) are obtained. tn-ELJs produce a broad EL emission envelope, spanning the wavelength range from 600 to 960 nm.

  18. Effect of inductive and capacitive coupling on the current-voltage characteristic and electromagnetic radiation from a system of Josephson junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahmonov, I. R.; Shukrinov, Yu. M.; Atanasova, P. Kh.; Zemlyanaya, E. V.; Bashashin, M. V.

    2017-01-01

    We have studied the current-voltage characteristic of a system of long Josephson junctions taking into account the inductive and capacitive coupling. The dependence of the average time derivative of the phase difference on the bias current and spatiotemporal dependences of the phase difference and magnetic field in each junction are considered. The possibility of branching of the current-voltage characteristic in the region of zero field step, which is associated with different numbers of fluxons in individual Josephson junctions, is demonstrated. The current-voltage characteristic of the system of Josephson junctions is compared with the case of a single junction, and it is shown that the observed branching is due to coupling between the junctions. The intensity of electromagnetic radiation associated with motion of fluxons is calculated, and the effect of coupling between junctions on the radiation power is analyzed.

  19. Ballistic Graphene Josephson Junctions from the Short to the Long Junction Regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borzenets, I. V.; Amet, F.; Ke, C. T.; Draelos, A. W.; Wei, M. T.; Seredinski, A.; Watanabe, K.; Taniguchi, T.; Bomze, Y.; Yamamoto, M.; Tarucha, S.; Finkelstein, G.

    2016-12-01

    We investigate the critical current IC of ballistic Josephson junctions made of encapsulated graphene-boron-nitride heterostructures. We observe a crossover from the short to the long junction regimes as the length of the device increases. In long ballistic junctions, IC is found to scale as ∝exp (-kBT /δ E ). The extracted energies δ E are independent of the carrier density and proportional to the level spacing of the ballistic cavity. As T →0 the critical current of a long (or short) junction saturates at a level determined by the product of δ E (or Δ ) and the number of the junction's transversal modes.

  20. Some properties of Cosmic String Junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karouby, Johanna

    2011-07-01

    Cosmic strings are linear concentrations of energy of macroscopic size. Since cosmic superstrings can form junctions, observing them would give some support to string theory. In the following, we study the lensing cosmic string junctions create, the shift in photons' wavelength passing through (leading to the Kaiser-Stebbins effect), and the gravitational radiation they emit.

  1. Dressed fluxon in a Josephson window junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caputo, Jean Guy; Flytzanis, Nikos; Devoret, Michel

    1994-09-01

    The static fluxon solutions of a Josephson window junction have been studied numerically. We show that the effect of the idle region surrounding the junction is to ``dress'' the fluxon causing its energy to increase. This effect can be predicted accurately by a simple model.

  2. Slit Diaphragms Contain Tight Junction Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Fukasawa, Hirotaka; Bornheimer, Scott; Kudlicka, Krystyna; Farquhar, Marilyn G.

    2009-01-01

    Slit diaphragms are essential components of the glomerular filtration apparatus, as changes in these junctions are the hallmark of proteinuric diseases. Slit diaphragms, considered specialized adherens junctions, contain both unique membrane proteins (e.g., nephrin, podocin, and Neph1) and typical adherens junction proteins (e.g., P-cadherin, FAT, and catenins). Whether slit diaphragms also contain tight junction proteins is unknown. Here, immunofluorescence, immunogold labeling, and cell fractionation demonstrated that rat slit diaphragms contain the tight junction proteins JAM-A (junctional adhesion molecule A), occludin, and cingulin. We found these proteins in the same protein complexes as nephrin, podocin, CD2AP, ZO-1, and Neph1 by cosedimentation, coimmunoprecipitation, and pull-down assays. PAN nephrosis increased the protein levels of JAM-A, occludin, cingulin, and ZO-1 several-fold in glomeruli and loosened their attachment to the actin cytoskeleton. These data extend current information about the molecular composition of slit diaphragms by demonstrating the presence of tight junction proteins, although slit diaphragms lack the characteristic morphologic features of tight junctions. The contribution of these proteins to the assembly of slit diaphragms and potential signaling cascades requires further investigation. PMID:19478094

  3. The tight junction: a multifunctional complex.

    PubMed

    Schneeberger, Eveline E; Lynch, Robert D

    2004-06-01

    Multicellular organisms are separated from the external environment by a layer of epithelial cells whose integrity is maintained by intercellular junctional complexes composed of tight junctions, adherens junctions, and desmosomes, whereas gap junctions provide for intercellular communication. The aim of this review is to present an updated overview of recent developments in the area of tight junction biology. In a relatively short time, our knowledge of the tight junction has evolved from a relatively simple view of it being a permeability barrier in the paracellular space and a fence in the plane of the plasma membrane to one of it acting as a multicomponent, multifunctional complex that is involved in regulating numerous and diverse cell functions. A group of integral membrane proteins-occludin, claudins, and junction adhesion molecules-interact with an increasingly complex array of tight junction plaque proteins not only to regulate paracellular solute and water flux but also to integrate such diverse processes as gene transcription, tumor suppression, cell proliferation, and cell polarity.

  4. Analysis of Tight Junction Formation and Integrity

    SciTech Connect

    Karakaya, Mahmut; Kerekes, Ryan A; Morrell-Falvey, Jennifer L; Foster, Carmen M; Retterer, Scott T

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we study segmentation of tight junctions and analyze the formation and integrity of tight junctions in large-scale confocal image stacks, a challenging biological problem because of the low spatial resolution images and the presence of breaks in tight junction structure. We present an automated, three-step processing approach for tight junction analysis. In our approach, we first localize each individual nucleus in the image by using thresholding, morphological filters and active contours. By using each nucleus position as a seed point, we automatically segment the cell body based on the active contour. We then use an intensity-based skeletonization algorithm to generate the boundary regions for each cell, and features are extracted from tight junctions associated with each cell to assess tight junction continuity. Based on qualitative results and quantitative comparisons, we show that we are able to automatically segment tight junctions and compute relevant features that provide a quantitative measure of tight junction formation to which the permeability of the cell monolayer can ultimately be correlated.

  5. Dermal eosinophilic infiltrate in junctional epidermolysis bullosa.

    PubMed

    Saraiya, Ami; Yang, Catherine S; Kim, Jinah; Bercovitch, Lionel; Robinson-Bostom, Leslie; Telang, Gladys

    2015-08-01

    Junctional epidermolysis bullosa (JEB) is a rare genodermatosis characterized by a split in the lamina lucida usually because of mutations in LAMA3, LAMB3 and LAMC2 resulting in absence or reduction of laminin-332. Rare subtypes of JEB have mutations in COL17A1, ITGB4, ITGA6 and ITGA3 leading to reduction or dysfunction of collagen XVII, integrin α6β4 and integrin α3. The classic finding under light microscopy is a paucicellular, subepidermal split. We describe the unusual presence of an eosinophilic infiltrate in the bullae and subjacent dermis in a neonate with JEB, generalized intermediate (formerly known as non-Herlitz-type JEB), discuss the histologic differential diagnosis for a subepidermal blister in a neonate, review the literature regarding cases of epidermolysis bullosa (EB) presenting with inflammatory infiltrates, and discuss mechanisms to explain these findings. This case highlights that eosinophils can rarely be seen in EB and should not mislead the dermatopathologist into diagnosing an autoimmune blistering disorder. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Zipper and freeway shear zone junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Passchier, Cees; Platt, John

    2016-04-01

    Ductile shear zones are usually presented as isolated planar high-strain domains in a less deformed wall rock, characterised by shear sense indicators such as characteristic deflected foliation traces. Many shear zones, however, form branched systems and if movement on such branches is contemporaneous, the resulting geometry can be complicated and lead to unusual fabric geometries in the wall rock. For Y-shaped shear zone junctions with three simultaneously operating branches, and with slip directions at a high angle to the branch line, eight basic types of shear zone triple junctions are possible, divided into three groups. The simplest type, called freeway junctions, have similar shear sense on all three branches. If shear sense is different on the three branches, this can lead to space problems. Some of these junctions have shear zone branches that join to form a single branch, named zipper junctions, or a single shear zone which splits to form two, known as wedge junctions. Closing zipper junctions are most unusual, since they form a non-active high-strain zone with opposite deflection of foliations. Shear zipper and shear wedge junctions have two shear zones with similar shear sense, and one with the opposite sense. All categories of shear zone junctions show characteristic flow patterns in the shear zone and its wall rock. Shear zone junctions with slip directions normal to the branch line can easily be studied, since ideal sections of shear sense indicators lie in the plane normal to the shear zone branches and the branch line. Expanding the model to allow slip oblique and parallel to the branch line in a full 3D setting gives rise to a large number of geometries in three main groups. Slip directions can be parallel on all branches but oblique to the branch line: two slip directions can be parallel and a third oblique, or all three branches can have slip in different directions. Such more complex shear zone junctions cannot be studied to advantage in a

  7. Overlap junctions for high coherence superconducting qubits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, X.; Long, J. L.; Ku, H. S.; Lake, R. E.; Bal, M.; Pappas, D. P.

    2017-07-01

    Fabrication of sub-micron Josephson junctions is demonstrated using standard processing techniques for high-coherence, superconducting qubits. These junctions are made in two separate lithography steps with normal-angle evaporation. Most significantly, this work demonstrates that it is possible to achieve high coherence with junctions formed on aluminum surfaces cleaned in situ by Ar plasma before junction oxidation. This method eliminates the angle-dependent shadow masks typically used for small junctions. Therefore, this is conducive to the implementation of typical methods for improving margins and yield using conventional CMOS processing. The current method uses electron-beam lithography and an additive process to define the top and bottom electrodes. Extension of this work to optical lithography and subtractive processes is discussed.

  8. Determination of the dissipation in superconducting Josephson junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Mugnai, D. Ranfagni, A.; Cacciari, I.

    2015-02-07

    The results relative to macroscopic quantum tunneling rate, out of the metastable state of Josephson junctions, are examined in view of determining the effect of dissipation. We adopt a simple criterion in accordance to which the effect of dissipation can be evaluated by analyzing the shortening of the semiclassical traversal time of the barrier. In almost all the considered cases, especially those with relatively large capacitance values, the relative time shortening turns out to be about 20% and with a corresponding quality factor Q ≃ 5.5. However, beyond the specific cases here considered, still in the regime of moderate dissipation, the method is applicable also to different situations with different values of the quality factor. The method allows, within the error limits, for a reliable determination of the load resistance R{sub L}, the less accessible quantity in the framework of the resistively and capacitively shunted junction model, provided that the characteristics of the junction (intrinsic capacitance, critical current, and the ratio of the bias current to the critical one) are known with sufficient accuracy.

  9. Shear zone junctions: Of zippers and freeways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Passchier, Cees W.; Platt, John P.

    2017-02-01

    Ductile shear zones are commonly treated as straight high-strain domains with uniform shear sense and characteristic curved foliation trails, bounded by non-deforming wall rock. Many shear zones, however, are branched, and if movement on such branches is contemporaneous, the resulting shape can be complicated and lead to unusual shear sense arrangement and foliation geometries in the wall rock. For Y-shaped shear zone triple junctions with three joining branches and transport direction at a high angle to the branchline, only eight basic types of junction are thought to be stable and to produce significant displacement. The simplest type, called freeway junctions, have similar shear sense in all three branches. The other types show joining or separating behaviour of shear zone branches similar to the action of a zipper. Such junctions may have shear zone branches that join to form a single branch (closing zipper junction), or a single shear zone that splits to form two branches, (opening zipper junction). All categories of shear zone junctions show characteristic foliation patterns and deflection of markers in the wall rock. Closing zipper junctions are unusual, since they form a non-active zone with opposite deflection of foliations in the wall rock known as an extraction fault or wake. Shear zipper junctions can form domains of overprinting shear sense along their flanks. A small and large field example are given from NE Spain and Eastern Anatolia. The geometry of more complex, 3D shear zone junctions with slip parallel and oblique to the branchline is briefly discussed.

  10. Isolated popliteus rupture at the musculo-tendinous junction.

    PubMed

    Quinlan, John F; Webb, Sandra; McDonald, Karl; Meikle, Grant; McMahon, Simon F

    2011-06-01

    We report the case of a 23-year-old professional senior international rugby union player who sustained a lateral blow to his semiflexed knee during a competitive game. Initial clinical examination was unremarkable apart from some posterolateral tenderness. A magnetic resonance imaging scan showed an isolated popliteus tendon rupture at the musculo-tendinous junction. After 5 weeks of focused rehabilitation and graduated training, he was able to resume his playing career and resumed his international playing career later that season. At the time of reporting, he has completed a full domestic and international season without any sequelae from the injury. This report highlights the rarity of such an injury, especially at the musculo-tendinous junction, and sets out a detailed rehabilitation program that has enabled the patient in question to resume his playing career.

  11. Surface and implantation effects on p-n junctions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schacham, Samuel E.; Finkman, Eliezer

    1990-01-01

    The contribution of the graded region of implanted p-n junctions is analyzed using an exponential profile. Though previously neglected, it was recently shown that this contribution to the saturation current of HgCdTe diodes is significant. Assuming a dominant Auger recombination, an analytical solution to the continuity equation is obtained. An expression for the current generation by the graded region is presented for both ohmic and reflecting boundary conditions. A revised condition for a wide region is derived. When the region is narrow, the current differs drastically from that of the zero-gradient case. The effects of the junction depth and the substrate and surface concentrations on the current are investigated. It is shown that the reverse current does not saturate.

  12. Discovery of a photoresponse amplification mechanism in compensated PN junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Yuchun; Rahman, Samia N.; Hall, David; Lo, Yu-Hwa; Liu, Yu-Hsin; Sham, L. J.

    2015-01-19

    We report the experimental evidence of uncovering a photoresponse amplification mechanism in heavily doped, partially compensated silicon p-n junctions under very low bias voltage. We show that the observed photocurrent gain occurs at a bias that is more than an order of magnitude below the threshold voltage for conventional impact ionization. Moreover, contrary to the case of avalanche detectors and p-i-n diodes, the amplified photoresponse is enhanced rather than suppressed with increasing temperature. These distinctive characteristics lead us to hypothesize that the inelastic scattering between energetic electrons (holes) and the ionized impurities in the depletion and charge neutral regions of the p-n junction in a cyclic manner plays a significant role in the amplification process. Such an internal signal amplification mechanism, which occurs at much lower bias than impact ionization and favors room temperature over cryogenic temperature, makes it promising for practical device applications.

  13. First-principles study of interface doping in ferroelectric junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Pin-Zhi; Cai, Tian-Yi; Ju, Sheng; Wu, Yin-Zhong

    2016-04-01

    Effect of atomic monolayer insertion on the performance of ferroelectric tunneling junction is investigated in SrRuO3/BaTiO3/SrRuO3 heterostrucutures. Based on first-principles calculations, the atomic displacement, orbital occupancy, and ferroelectric polarization are studied. It is found that the ferroelectricity is enhanced when a (AlO2)- monolayer is inserted between the electrode SRO and the barrier BTO, where the relatively high mobility of doped holes effectively screen ferroelectric polarization. On the other hand, for the case of (LaO)+ inserted layer, the doped electrons resides at the both sides of middle ferroelectric barrier, making the ferroelectricity unfavorable. Our findings provide an alternative avenue to improve the performance of ferroelectric tunneling junctions.

  14. Endoscopic transoral surgery for craniovertebral junction anomalies. Technical note.

    PubMed

    Husain, Mazhar; Rastogi, Manu; Ojha, Bal Krishna; Chandra, Anil; Jha, Deepak K

    2006-10-01

    Craniovertebral junction (CVJ) anomalies continue to be challenging for neurosurgeons because of the complex anatomy of this region. To date, microsurgical decompression via a transoral route is the standard treatment for anteriorly located compressive lesions of the cervicomedullary junction (CMJ). The results obtained by minimizing surgical trauma are fewer complications, shorter hospital stays, and reduced overall psychological burden. Endoscopic surgery is becoming a leading modality in minimally invasive neurosurgical treatment. The authors performed surgery in 11 patients with irreducible osseous dislocations resulting from CVJ abnormality during a 2-year period. Anterior CMJ decompression was achieved in all patients by performing neuroendoscopically controlled transoral excision of bone and soft tissues. The surgical technique and results will be discussed. The use of the endoscope offers several advantages in cases requiring a transoral approach to the lower clivus and atlantoaxial region. The use of minimally invasive endoscopic techniques has the potential to reduce the need for a wider cranial base opening and to decrease postoperative complications.

  15. Low-high junction theory applied to solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Godlewski, M. P.; Baraona, C. R.; Brandhorst, H. W., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    Recent use of alloying techniques for rear contact formation has yielded a new kind of silicon solar cell, the back surface field (BSF) cell, with abnormally high open-circuit voltage and improved radiation resistance. Several analytical models for open-circuit voltage based on the reverse saturation current are formulated to explain these observations. The zero surface recombination velocity (SRV) case of the conventional cell model, the drift field model, and the low-high junction (LHJ) model can predict the experimental trends. The LHJ model applies the theory of the low-high junction and is considered to reflect a more realistic view of cell fabrication. This model can predict the experimental trends observed for BSF cells.

  16. Low-high junction theory applied to solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Godlewski, M. P.; Baraona, C. R.; Brandhorst, H. W., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    Recent use of alloying techniques for rear contact formation has yielded a new kind of silicon solar cell, the back surface field (BSF) cell, with abnormally high open-circuit voltage and improved radiation resistance. Several analytical models for open-circuit voltage based on the reverse saturation current are formulated to explain these observations. The zero surface recombination velocity (SRV) case of the conventional cell model, the drift field model, and the low-high junction (LHJ) model can predict the experimental trends. The LHJ model applies the theory of the low-high junction and is considered to reflect a more realistic view of cell fabrication. This model can predict the experimental trends observed for BSF cells.

  17. Low-high junction theory applied to solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Godlewski, M. P.; Baraona, C. R.; Brandhorst, H. W., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    Recent use of alloying techniques for rear contact formation has yielded a new kind of silicon solar cell, the back surface field (BSF) cell, with abnormally high open circuit voltage and improved radiation resistance. Several analytical models for open circuit voltage based on the reverse saturation current are formulated to explain these observations. The zero SRV case of the conventional cell model, the drift field model, and the low-high junction (LHJ) model can predict the experimental trends. The LHJ model applies the theory of the low-high junction and is considered to reflect a more realistic view of cell fabrication. This model can predict the experimental trends observed for BSF cells. Detailed descriptions and derivations for the models are included. The correspondences between them are discussed. This modeling suggests that the meaning of minority carrier diffusion length measured in BSF cells be reexamined.

  18. Endoscopic surgery on the thoracolumbar junction of the spine

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    The thoracolumbar junction is the section of the truncal spine most often affected by injuries. Acute instability with structural damage to the anterior load bearing spinal column and post-traumatic deformity represent the most frequent indications for surgery. In the past few years, endoscopic techniques for these indications have partially superseded the open procedures, which are associated with high access morbidity. The particular position of this section of the spine, which lies in the border area between the thoracic and abdominal cavities, makes it necessary in most cases to partially detach the diaphragm endoscopically in order to expose the operation site, and this also provides access to the retroperitoneal section of the thoracolumbar junction. A now standardised operating technique and instruments and implants specially developed for the endoscopic procedure, from angle stable plate and screw implants to endoscopically implantable vertebral body replacements, have gradually opened up the entire spectrum of anterior spine surgery to endoscopic techniques. PMID:19693549

  19. First-principles study of interface doping in ferroelectric junctions

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Pin-Zhi; Cai, Tian-Yi; Ju, Sheng; Wu, Yin-Zhong

    2016-01-01

    Effect of atomic monolayer insertion on the performance of ferroelectric tunneling junction is investigated in SrRuO3/BaTiO3/SrRuO3 heterostrucutures. Based on first-principles calculations, the atomic displacement, orbital occupancy, and ferroelectric polarization are studied. It is found that the ferroelectricity is enhanced when a (AlO2)− monolayer is inserted between the electrode SRO and the barrier BTO, where the relatively high mobility of doped holes effectively screen ferroelectric polarization. On the other hand, for the case of (LaO)+ inserted layer, the doped electrons resides at the both sides of middle ferroelectric barrier, making the ferroelectricity unfavorable. Our findings provide an alternative avenue to improve the performance of ferroelectric tunneling junctions. PMID:27063704

  20. Macroscopic quantum tunneling in Josephson tunnel junctions and Coulomb blockade in single small tunnel junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Cleland, A.N.

    1991-04-01

    Experiments investigating the process of macroscopic quantum tunneling in a moderately-damped, resistively shunted, Josephson junction are described, followed by a discussion of experiments performed on very small capacitance normal-metal tunnel junctions. The experiments on the resistively-shunted Josephson junction were designed to investigate a quantum process, that of the tunneling of the Josephson phase variable under a potential barrier, in a system in which dissipation plays a major role in the dynamics of motion. All the parameters of the junction were measured using the classical phenomena of thermal activation and resonant activation. Theoretical predictions are compared with the experimental results, showing good agreement with no adjustable parameters; the tunneling rate in the moderately damped (Q {approx} 1) junction is seen to be reduced by a factor of 300 from that predicted for an undamped junction. The phase is seen to be a good quantum-mechanical variable. The experiments on small capacitance tunnel junctions extend the measurements on the larger-area Josephson junctions from the region in which the phase variable has a fairly well-defined value, i.e. its wavefunction has a narrow width, to the region where its value is almost completely unknown. The charge on the junction becomes well-defined and is predicted to quantize the current through the junction, giving rise to the Coulomb blockade at low bias. I present the first clear observation of the Coulomb blockade in single junctions. The electrical environment of the tunnel junction, however, strongly affects the behavior of the junction: higher resistance leads are observed to greatly sharpen the Coulomb blockade over that seen with lower resistance leads. I present theoretical descriptions of how the environment influences the junctions; comparisons with the experimental results are in reasonable agreement.

  1. LOW RESISTANCE JUNCTIONS IN CRAYFISH

    PubMed Central

    Peracchia, Camillo

    1973-01-01

    Low resistance junctions between axons of crayfish ganglia are studied by freeze-fracture and negative staining. In freeze-fracture, fracture planes that go through a junctional membrane expose two faces, both internal, called face A and face B. Face A belongs to the internal membrane leaflet and faces the gap. Face B belongs to the external membrane leaflet and faces the axoplasm. Face A displays pits, 60–100 Å in diameter, arranged in a hexagonal array with a unit cell of ∼200 Å. An ∼25 Å bump is frequently seen at the center of each pit. Some pits are occupied by a globule ∼125 Å in diameter, which displays a central depression ∼25 Å in size. Face B contains globules also arranged in a fairly regular hexagonal pattern. The center-to-center distance between adjacent globules is most frequently ∼200 Å; however, occasionally certain globules are seen separated by a distance as short as ∼125 Å. The top surface of the globules occasionally displays a starlike profile and seems to contain a central depression ∼25 Å in diameter. In negatively stained preparations of membranes from the nerve cord, two types of membranes are seen containing a fairly regular pattern. In one, globules ∼95 Å in diameter form a hexagonal close packing with a unit cell of ∼95 Å. In the other, globules of the same size are organized in a larger hexagonal array with a unit cell of ∼155 Å (swollen arrangement). Some of the globules forming the swollen arrangement are seen containing six subunits. The six subunits form a hexagon which is skewed with respect to the main rows of hexagons in such a way that the subunits lie on rows which make an angle of ∼37° with the main rows. PMID:4120611

  2. Edge mixing dynamics in graphene p-n junctions in the quantum Hall regime.

    PubMed

    Matsuo, Sadashige; Takeshita, Shunpei; Tanaka, Takahiro; Nakaharai, Shu; Tsukagoshi, Kazuhito; Moriyama, Takahiro; Ono, Teruo; Kobayashi, Kensuke

    2015-09-04

    Massless Dirac electron systems such as graphene exhibit a distinct half-integer quantum Hall effect, and in the bipolar transport regime co-propagating edge states along the p-n junction are realized. Additionally, these edge states are uniformly mixed at the junction, which makes it a unique structure to partition electrons in these edge states. Although many experimental works have addressed this issue, the microscopic dynamics of electron partition in this peculiar structure remains unclear. Here we performed shot-noise measurements on the junction in the quantum Hall regime as well as at zero magnetic field. We found that, in sharp contrast with the zero-field case, the shot noise in the quantum Hall regime is finite in the bipolar regime, but is strongly suppressed in the unipolar regime. Our observation is consistent with the theoretical prediction and gives microscopic evidence that the edge states are uniquely mixed along the p-n junction.

  3. Inhibiting Klein Tunneling in a Graphene p -n Junction without an External Magnetic Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Hyungju; Coh, Sinisa; Son, Young-Woo; Cohen, Marvin L.

    2016-07-01

    We study by first-principles calculations a densely packed island of organic molecules (F4TCNQ ) adsorbed on graphene. We find that with electron doping the island naturally forms a p -n junction in the graphene sheet. For example, a doping level of ˜3 ×1013 electrons per cm2 results in a p -n junction with an 800 meV electrostatic potential barrier. Unlike in a conventional p -n junction in graphene, in the case of the junction formed by an adsorbed organic molecular island we expect that the Klein tunneling is inhibited, even without an applied external magnetic field. Here Klein tunneling is inhibited by the ferromagnetic order that spontaneously occurs in the molecular island upon doping. We estimate that the magnetic barrier in the graphene sheet is around 10 mT.

  4. Investigation of high-Tc superconducting tunnel junction after laser radiation processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broslavez, U. U.; Fomitchev, A. A.; Yakshin, Mikhail A.

    1995-03-01

    We investigate dynamic resistance (dV/dI) of high-Tc superconducting thin films and tunnel junction after laser radiation processing. The films of YBaCuO were prepared by laser and magnetron ablation on Al2O3 substrates. The tunnel junctions were made by fine silver wires attached to the processing surfaces. The resistance (dV/dI) was determined by a four-probe measurement. The YAG laser operating in Q-switched mode was used to interact with superconductors. The anomaly is observed in the current-voltage curve of the junction after radiation interaction. We observe hysteresis in the shape of V(I) curve. These effects are not observed without laser radiation interaction and in this case the behavior of tunnel junction is described for the standard BCS theory.

  5. Edge mixing dynamics in graphene p–n junctions in the quantum Hall regime

    PubMed Central

    Matsuo, Sadashige; Takeshita, Shunpei; Tanaka, Takahiro; Nakaharai, Shu; Tsukagoshi, Kazuhito; Moriyama, Takahiro; Ono, Teruo; Kobayashi, Kensuke

    2015-01-01

    Massless Dirac electron systems such as graphene exhibit a distinct half-integer quantum Hall effect, and in the bipolar transport regime co-propagating edge states along the p–n junction are realized. Additionally, these edge states are uniformly mixed at the junction, which makes it a unique structure to partition electrons in these edge states. Although many experimental works have addressed this issue, the microscopic dynamics of electron partition in this peculiar structure remains unclear. Here we performed shot-noise measurements on the junction in the quantum Hall regime as well as at zero magnetic field. We found that, in sharp contrast with the zero-field case, the shot noise in the quantum Hall regime is finite in the bipolar regime, but is strongly suppressed in the unipolar regime. Our observation is consistent with the theoretical prediction and gives microscopic evidence that the edge states are uniquely mixed along the p–n junction. PMID:26337445

  6. Edge mixing dynamics in graphene p-n junctions in the quantum Hall regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuo, Sadashige; Takeshita, Shunpei; Tanaka, Takahiro; Nakaharai, Shu; Tsukagoshi, Kazuhito; Moriyama, Takahiro; Ono, Teruo; Kobayashi, Kensuke

    2015-09-01

    Massless Dirac electron systems such as graphene exhibit a distinct half-integer quantum Hall effect, and in the bipolar transport regime co-propagating edge states along the p-n junction are realized. Additionally, these edge states are uniformly mixed at the junction, which makes it a unique structure to partition electrons in these edge states. Although many experimental works have addressed this issue, the microscopic dynamics of electron partition in this peculiar structure remains unclear. Here we performed shot-noise measurements on the junction in the quantum Hall regime as well as at zero magnetic field. We found that, in sharp contrast with the zero-field case, the shot noise in the quantum Hall regime is finite in the bipolar regime, but is strongly suppressed in the unipolar regime. Our observation is consistent with the theoretical prediction and gives microscopic evidence that the edge states are uniquely mixed along the p-n junction.

  7. Controlling charge transport mechanisms in molecular junctions: Distilling thermally induced hopping from coherent-resonant conduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyehwang; Segal, Dvira

    2017-04-01

    The electrical conductance of molecular junctions may depend strongly on the temperature and weakly on molecular length, under two distinct mechanisms: phase-coherent resonant conduction, with charges proceeding via delocalized molecular orbitals, and incoherent thermally assisted multi-step hopping. While in the case of coherent conduction, the temperature dependence arises from the broadening of the Fermi distribution in the metal electrodes, in the latter case it corresponds to electron-vibration interaction effects on the junction. With the objective to distill the thermally activated hopping component, thus exposing intrinsic electron-vibration interaction phenomena on the junction, we suggest the design of molecular junctions with "spacers," extended anchoring groups that act to filter out phase-coherent resonant electrons. Specifically, we study the electrical conductance of fixed-gap and variable-gap junctions that include a tunneling block, with spacers at the boundaries. Using numerical simulations and analytical considerations, we demonstrate that in our design, resonant conduction is suppressed. As a result, the electrical conductance is dominated by two (rather than three) mechanisms: superexchange (deep tunneling) and multi-step thermally induced hopping. We further exemplify our analysis on DNA junctions with an A:T block serving as a tunneling barrier. Here, we show that the electrical conductance is insensitive to the number of G:C base-pairs at the boundaries. This indicates that the tunneling-to-hopping crossover revealed in such sequences truly corresponds to the properties of the A:T barrier.

  8. Extended cervico-thoracic metastasectomy for testicular non-seminomatous germ cell tumour masses through an inverse T and combined collar incision.

    PubMed

    Schweiger, Thomas; Hoetzenecker, Konrad; Taghavi, Shahrokh; Klepetko, Walter

    2015-05-01

    Non-seminomatous germ cell tumours (NSGCT) are the most common malignancy from testicular origin in young males. They are characterized by early formation of metastases along retroperitoneal and subsequent mediastinal lymph node stations. Following cisplatin-based induction chemotherapy, residual tumour masses should be removed surgically, although this implies the need for extended procedures. Such an approach can result in cure rates of over 70%. Herein, we report 2 cases of maximally extended surgery for metastatic malignant germ cell tumour of the testis. In both patients, diagnostic work-up revealed a NSGCT with retroperitoneal, mediastinal and cervical lymph node metastases. Multimodal protocols including induction chemotherapy and surgical removal of all primary and secondary tumour masses with curative intent were applied. An 'inverse T' incision in combination with a collar incision was chosen to approach the excessive supra-diaphragmatic tumour spread. This large-scaled surgical access offered an excellent exposure and allowed complete resection of all cervical and thoracic metastases in both patients. Abdominal tumour masses were resected through a standard median laparotomy. These 2 cases illustrate that complete tumour resection is feasible even in stages of NSGCT with generalized lymphatic spread. Metastasectomy should be offered to NSGCT patients despite the necessity of extended surgical approaches.

  9. Electrostatic control of thermoelectricity in molecular junctions.

    PubMed

    Kim, Youngsang; Jeong, Wonho; Kim, Kyeongtae; Lee, Woochul; Reddy, Pramod

    2014-11-01

    Molecular junctions hold significant promise for efficient and high-power-output thermoelectric energy conversion. Recent experiments have probed the thermoelectric properties of molecular junctions. However, electrostatic control of thermoelectric properties via a gate electrode has not been possible due to technical challenges in creating temperature differentials in three-terminal devices. Here, we show that extremely large temperature gradients (exceeding 1 × 10(9) K m(-1)) can be established in nanoscale gaps bridged by molecules, while simultaneously controlling their electronic structure via a gate electrode. Using this platform, we study prototypical Au-biphenyl-4,4'-dithiol-Au and Au-fullerene-Au junctions to demonstrate that the Seebeck coefficient and the electrical conductance of molecular junctions can be simultaneously increased by electrostatic control. Moreover, from our studies of fullerene junctions, we show that thermoelectric properties can be significantly enhanced when the dominant transport orbital is located close to the chemical potential (Fermi level) of the electrodes. These results illustrate the intimate relationship between the thermoelectric properties and charge transmission characteristics of molecular junctions and should enable systematic exploration of the recent computational predictions that promise extremely efficient thermoelectric energy conversion in molecular junctions.

  10. Microtubules regulate disassembly of epithelial apical junctions

    PubMed Central

    Ivanov, Andrei I; McCall, Ingrid C; Babbin, Brian; Samarin, Stanislav N; Nusrat, Asma; Parkos, Charles A

    2006-01-01

    Background Epithelial tight junction (TJ) and adherens junction (AJ) form the apical junctional complex (AJC) which regulates cell-cell adhesion, paracellular permeability and cell polarity. The AJC is anchored on cytoskeletal structures including actin microfilaments and microtubules. Such cytoskeletal interactions are thought to be important for the assembly and remodeling of apical junctions. In the present study, we investigated the role of microtubules in disassembly of the AJC in intestinal epithelial cells using a model of extracellular calcium depletion. Results Calcium depletion resulted in disruption and internalization of epithelial TJs and AJs along with reorganization of perijunctional F-actin into contractile rings. Microtubules reorganized into dense plaques positioned inside such F-actin rings. Depolymerization of microtubules with nocodazole prevented junctional disassembly and F-actin ring formation. Stabilization of microtubules with either docetaxel or pacitaxel blocked contraction of F-actin rings and attenuated internalization of junctional proteins into a subapical cytosolic compartment. Likewise, pharmacological inhibition of microtubule motors, kinesins, prevented contraction of F-actin rings and attenuated disassembly of apical junctions. Kinesin-1 was enriched at the AJC in cultured epithelial cells and it also accumulated at epithelial cell-cell contacts in normal human colonic mucosa. Furthermore, immunoprecipitation experiments demonstrated association of kinesin-1 with the E-cadherin-catenin complex. Conclusion Our data suggest that microtubules play a role in disassembly of the AJC during calcium depletion by regulating formation of contractile F-actin rings and internalization of AJ/TJ proteins. PMID:16509970

  11. Atomically Abrupt Topological p-n Junction.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung Hwan; Jin, Kyung-Hwan; Kho, Byung Woo; Park, Byeong-Gyu; Liu, Feng; Kim, Jun Sung; Yeom, Han Woong

    2017-08-24

    Topological insulators (TI's) are a new class of quantum matter with extraordinary surface electronic states, which bear great potential for spintronics and error-tolerant quantum computing. In order to put a TI into any practical use, these materials need to be fabricated into devices whose basic units are often p-n junctions. Interesting electronic properties of a 'topological' p-n junction were proposed theoretically such as the junction electronic state and the spin rectification. However, the fabrication of a lateral topological p-n junction has been challenging because of materials, process, and fundamental reasons. Here, we demonstrate an innovative approach to realize a p-n junction of topological surface states (TSS's) of a three-dimensional (3D) topological insulator (TI) with an atomically abrupt interface. When a ultrathin Sb film is grown on a 3D TI of Bi2Se3 with a typical n-type TSS, the surface develops a strongly p-type TSS through the substantial hybridization between the 2D Sb film and the Bi2Se3 surface. Thus, the Bi2Se3 surface covered partially with Sb films bifurcates into areas of n- and p-type TSS's as separated by atomic step edges with a lateral electronic junction of as short as 2 nm. This approach opens a different avenue toward various electronic and spintronic devices based on well-defined topological p-n junctions with the scalability down to atomic dimensions.

  12. Temperature dependence of thermopower in molecular junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Youngsang; Lenert, Andrej; Meyhofer, Edgar; Reddy, Pramod

    2016-07-01

    The thermoelectric properties of molecular junctions are of considerable interest due to their promise for efficient energy conversion. While the dependence of thermoelectric properties of junctions on molecular structure has been recently studied, their temperature dependence remains unexplored. Using a custom built variable temperature scanning tunneling microscope, we measured the thermopower and electrical conductance of individual benzenedithiol junctions over a range of temperatures (100 K-300 K). We find that while the electrical conductance is independent of temperature, the thermopower increases linearly with temperature, confirming the predictions of the Landauer theory.

  13. Graded junction termination extensions for electronic devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merrett, J. Neil (Inventor); Isaacs-Smith, Tamara (Inventor); Sheridan, David C. (Inventor); Williams, John R. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A graded junction termination extension in a silicon carbide (SiC) semiconductor device and method of its fabrication using ion implementation techniques is provided for high power devices. The properties of silicon carbide (SiC) make this wide band gap semiconductor a promising material for high power devices. This potential is demonstrated in various devices such as p-n diodes, Schottky diodes, bipolar junction transistors, thyristors, etc. These devices require adequate and affordable termination techniques to reduce leakage current and increase breakdown voltage in order to maximize power handling capabilities. The graded junction termination extension disclosed is effective, self-aligned, and simplifies the implementation process.

  14. Graded junction termination extensions for electronic devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merrett, J. Neil (Inventor); Isaacs-Smith, Tamara (Inventor); Sheridan, David C. (Inventor); Williams, John R. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    A graded junction termination extension in a silicon carbide (SiC) semiconductor device and method of its fabrication using ion implementation techniques is provided for high power devices. The properties of silicon carbide (SiC) make this wide band gap semiconductor a promising material for high power devices. This potential is demonstrated in various devices such as p-n diodes, Schottky diodes, bipolar junction transistors, thyristors, etc. These devices require adequate and affordable termination techniques to reduce leakage current and increase breakdown voltage in order to maximize power handling capabilities. The graded junction termination extension disclosed is effective, self-aligned, and simplifies the implementation process.

  15. Circuit Theory of Unconventional Superconductor Junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Y.; Nazarov, Yu. V.; Kashiwaya, S.

    2003-04-01

    We extend the circuit theory of superconductivity to cover transport and proximity effect in mesoscopic systems that contain unconventional superconductor junctions. The approach fully accounts for zero-energy Andreev bound states forming at the surface of unconventional superconductors. As a simple application, we investigate the transport properties of a diffusive normal metal in series with a d-wave superconductor junction. We reveal the competition between the formation of Andreev bound states and proximity effect that depends on the crystal orientation of the junction interface.

  16. Efficient photonic crystal Y-junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Rab; Karle, Tim J.; Moerman, I.; Krauss, Thomas F.

    2003-07-01

    A highly efficient Y-junction based on a planar photonic crystal (PhC) platform is presented. The PhC consists of a triangular array of holes etched into a GaAs/AlGaAs heterostructure, with a typical period of 322 nm and ~35% fill factor. The Y-junction has smaller holes positioned at the centre of the junction, giving rise to very uniform splitting and high transmission. The performance is very encouraging, with experimental transmission of approximately 40% for each arm of the Y-splitter relative to a comparable single-defect PhC waveguide.

  17. Molecular mechanism of double Holliday junction dissolution

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Processing of homologous recombination intermediates is tightly coordinated to ensure that chromosomal integrity is maintained and tumorigenesis avoided. Decatenation of double Holliday junctions, for example, is catalysed by two enzymes that work in tight coordination and belong to the same ‘dissolvasome’ complex. Within the dissolvasome, the RecQ-like BLM helicase provides the translocase function for Holliday junction migration, while the topoisomerase III alpha-RMI1 subcomplex works as a proficient DNA decatenase, together resulting in double-Holliday-junction unlinking. Here, we review the available architectural and biochemical knowledge on the dissolvasome machinery, with a focus on the structural interplay between its components. PMID:25061510

  18. Coherently driven, ultrafast electron-phonon dynamics in transport junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Szekely, Joshua E.; Seideman, Tamar

    2014-07-28

    Although the vast majority of studies of transport via molecular-scale heterojunctions have been conducted in the (static) energy domain, experiments are currently beginning to apply time domain approaches to the nanoscale transport problem, combining spatial with temporal resolution. It is thus an opportune time for theory to develop models to explore both new phenomena in, and new potential applications of, time-domain, coherently driven molecular electronics. In this work, we study the interaction of a molecular phonon with an electronic wavepacket transmitted via a conductance junction within a time-domain model that treats the electron and phonon on equal footing and spans the weak to strong electron-phonon coupling strengths. We explore interference between two coherent energy pathways in the electronic subspace, thus complementing previous studies of coherent phenomena in conduction junctions, where the stationary framework was used to study interference between spatial pathways. Our model provides new insights into phase decoherence and population relaxation within the electronic subspace, which have been conventionally treated by density matrix approaches that often rely on phenomenological parameters. Although the specific case of a transport junction is explored, our results are general, applying also to other instances of coupled electron-phonon systems.

  19. Top 50 most-cited articles on craniovertebral junction surgery.

    PubMed

    Alan, Nima; Cohen, Jonathan Andrew; Zhou, James; Pease, Matthew; Kanter, Adam S; Okonkwo, David O; Hamilton, David Kojo

    2017-01-01

    Craniovertebral junction is a complex anatomical location posing unique challenges to the surgical management of its pathologies. We aimed to identify the fifty most-cited articles that are dedicated to this field. A keyword search using the Thomson Reuters Web of Knowledge was conducted to identify articles relevant to the field of craniovertebral junction surgery. The articles were reviewed based on title, abstract, and methods, if necessary, and then ranked based on the total number of citations to identify the fifty most-cited articles. Characteristics of the articles were determined and analyzed. The earliest top-cited article was published in 1948. When stratified by decade, 1990s was the most productive with 16 articles. The most-cited article was by Anderson and Dalonzo on a classification of odontoid fractures. By citation rate, the most-cited article was by Herms and Melcher who described Goel's technique of atlantoaxial fixation using C1 lateral mass screws and C2 pedicle screws with rod fixation. Atlantoaxial fixation was the most common topic. The United States, Barrow Neurological Institute, and VH Sonntag were the most represented country, institute, and author, respectively. The significant majority of articles were designed as case series providing level IV evidence. Using citation analysis, we have provided a list of the most-cited articles representing important contributions of various authors from many institutions across the world to the field of craniovertebral junction surgery.

  20. Top 50 most-cited articles on craniovertebral junction surgery

    PubMed Central

    Alan, Nima; Cohen, Jonathan Andrew; Zhou, James; Pease, Matthew; Kanter, Adam S; Okonkwo, David O; Hamilton, David Kojo

    2017-01-01

    Background: Craniovertebral junction is a complex anatomical location posing unique challenges to the surgical management of its pathologies. We aimed to identify the fifty most-cited articles that are dedicated to this field. Methods: A keyword search using the Thomson Reuters Web of Knowledge was conducted to identify articles relevant to the field of craniovertebral junction surgery. The articles were reviewed based on title, abstract, and methods, if necessary, and then ranked based on the total number of citations to identify the fifty most-cited articles. Characteristics of the articles were determined and analyzed. Results: The earliest top-cited article was published in 1948. When stratified by decade, 1990s was the most productive with 16 articles. The most-cited article was by Anderson and Dalonzo on a classification of odontoid fractures. By citation rate, the most-cited article was by Herms and Melcher who described Goel's technique of atlantoaxial fixation using C1 lateral mass screws and C2 pedicle screws with rod fixation. Atlantoaxial fixation was the most common topic. The United States, Barrow Neurological Institute, and VH Sonntag were the most represented country, institute, and author, respectively. The significant majority of articles were designed as case series providing level IV evidence. Conclusion: Using citation analysis, we have provided a list of the most-cited articles representing important contributions of various authors from many institutions across the world to the field of craniovertebral junction surgery. PMID:28250633

  1. Diamondoid-based molecular junctions: a computational study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adhikari, Bibek; Sivaraman, Ganesh; Fyta, Maria

    2016-12-01

    In this work, we deal with the computational investigation of diamondoid-based molecular conductance junctions and their electronic transport properties. A small diamondoid is placed between the two gold electrodes of the nanogap and is covalently bonded to the gold electrodes through two different molecules, a thiol group and a N-heterocyclic carbene molecule. We have shown that the thiol linker is more efficient as it introduces additional electron paths for transport at lower energies. The influence of doping the diamondoid on the properties of the molecular junctions has been investigated. We find that using a nitrogen atom to dope the diamondoids leads to a considerable increase of the zero bias conductance. For the N-doped system we show an asymmetric feature of the I-V curve of the junctions resulting in rectification within a very small range of bias voltages. The rectifying nature is the result of the characteristic shift in the bias-dependent highest occupied molecular orbital state. In all cases, the efficiency of the device is manifested and is discussed in view of novel nanotechnological applications.

  2. Subtidal flow division at a shallow tidal junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buschman, F. A.; Hoitink, A. J. F.; van der Vegt, M.; Hoekstra, P.

    2010-12-01

    Tides influence distribution of river discharge at tidally affected channel junctions. At the apex of a channel network in an Indonesian delta, observations of flow division suggest that tidally averaged flow division depends on the tidal range. To understand the mechanisms governing the subtidal flow division, an idealized hydrodynamic junction model inspired by the observations has been set up. The barotropic model consists of two exponentially converging tidal channels that connect to a tidal river at the junction and solves the nonlinear shallow water equations. By varying the depth, length, e-folding length scale of the channel width, and hydraulic roughness in one of the two tidal channels, the sensitivity of the subtidal flow division to those four parameters was investigated. For depth, length, and e-folding length scale differences between channels the effect of tides is generally to enhance unequal subtidal flow division that occurs in the case of river flow only. In contrast, for hydraulic roughness differences, the tidal effect partly cancels the inequality in river flow division. The tidal effect may even reverse the horizontal flow circulation that would occur in the absence of tides.

  3. Vortex noise and fluctuation conductivity in Josephson-junction arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, Ing-Jye; Stroud, D.

    1998-03-01

    We study the vortex number noise Sv(ω) and fluctuation conductivity σ1(ω) in two-dimensional Josephson-junction arrays at three different applied magnetic fields, corresponding to zero, one-half, and 124 of a flux quantum per plaquette (f=0, 12 and 124). Sv and σ1 are obtained by numerically solving the equations for the coupled overdamped resistively-shunted-junction model with Langevin noise to simulate the effects of temperature. In all three cases, we find that Sv(ω)~ω-3/2 at high frequencies ω and flattens out to become frequency independent at low ω, indicative of vortex diffusion, while σ1~ω-2 at sufficiently high ω and ~ω0 at low frequencies. Both quantities show clear evidence of critical slowing down and a simplified scaling behavior near the normal-to-superconducting transitions at f=0 and f=12, indicating that the vortex diffusion coefficient is approaching zero and the charge-carrier relaxation time is diverging at these temperatures. At f=124, there is no clear phase transition; instead, the vortex diffusion coefficient diminishes continuously as the temperature is lowered towards zero. The critical slowing down of Sv(ω), but not its frequency dependence, is in agreement with recent experiments on the flux noise SΦ(ω) in Josephson-junction arrays, which show a 1/ω frequency dependence. We speculate about some possible reasons for the absence of a 1/ω frequency regime.

  4. Invariant submanifold for series arrays of Josephson junctions.

    PubMed

    Marvel, Seth A; Strogatz, Steven H

    2009-03-01

    We study the nonlinear dynamics of series arrays of Josephson junctions in the large-N limit, where N is the number of junctions in the array. The junctions are assumed to be identical, overdamped, driven by a constant bias current, and globally coupled through a common load. Previous simulations of such arrays revealed that their dynamics are remarkably simple, hinting at the presence of some hidden symmetry or other structure. These observations were later explained by the discovery of N-3 constants of motion, the choice of which confines the resulting flow in phase space to a low-dimensional invariant manifold. Here we show that the dimensionality can be reduced further by restricting attention to a special family of states recently identified by Ott and Antonsen. In geometric terms, the Ott-Antonsen ansatz corresponds to an invariant submanifold of dimension one less than that found earlier. We derive and analyze the flow on this submanifold for two special cases: an array with purely resistive loading and another with resistive-inductive-capacitive loading. Our results recover (and in some instances improve) earlier findings based on linearization arguments.

  5. Chiral interface states in graphene p -n junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohnitz, Laura; De Martino, Alessandro; Häusler, Wolfgang; Egger, Reinhold

    2016-10-01

    We present a theoretical analysis of unidirectional interface states which form near p -n junctions in a graphene monolayer subject to a homogeneous magnetic field. The semiclassical limit of these states corresponds to trajectories propagating along the p -n interface by a combined skipping-snaking motion. Studying the two-dimensional Dirac equation with a magnetic field and an electrostatic potential step, we provide and discuss the exact and essentially analytical solution of the quantum-mechanical eigenproblem for both a straight and a circularly shaped junction. The spectrum consists of localized Landau-like and unidirectional snaking-skipping interface states, where we always find at least one chiral interface state. For a straight junction and at energies near the Dirac point, when increasing the potential step height, the group velocity of this state interpolates in an oscillatory manner between the classical drift velocity in a crossed electromagnetic field and the semiclassical value expected for a purely snaking motion. Away from the Dirac point, chiral interface states instead resemble the conventional skipping (edge-type) motion found also in the corresponding Schrödinger case. We also investigate the circular geometry, where chiral interface states are predicted to induce sizable equilibrium ring currents.

  6. Salvage reconstruction of the oesophagus: a retrospective study of 15 cases.

    PubMed

    Oki, Masanao; Asato, Hirotaka; Suzuki, Yasutoshi; Umekawa, Kohei; Takushima, Akihiko; Okazaki, Mutsumi; Harii, Kiyonori

    2010-04-01

    Salvage reconstruction of the oesophagus is still considered a challenging procedure for all head and neck surgeons. The risk of postoperative infection and delayed wound healing is high because of thick scar formation and persistent inflammation. Furthermore, recipient vessels for free tissue transfer or vascular supercharge are not always available. Alimentary tract reconstruction with skin or musculocutaneous flap may be necessary, but this method is susceptible to fistula formation.[Nakatsuka T, Harii K, Asato H, et al. Comparative evaluation in pharyngo-oesophageal reconstruction: radial forearm flap compared with jejunal flap. A 10-year experience. Scand J Plast Reconstr Surg Hand Surg 1998; 32: 307-10] In the past 10 years, we have experienced 15 cases of salvage reconstruction of the oesophagus after prior cancer treatment or aorto-oesophageal fistula; the cervical oesophagus was reconstructed in five cases and the cervico-thoracic oesophagus in 10. In four cases of cervical oesophagus and six of cervico-thoracic oesophagus we performed free jejunal transfer including two long segment transfers with double vascular pedicle. The cervico-thoracic oesophagus was also reconstructed with pedicled alimentary tract transfer (colon interposition or jejunal pull-up) with vascular supercharge in four cases. In one case, cervical oesophageal defect was reconstructed with a latissimus dorsi musculocutaneous flap. We also used a deltopectoral flap to cover the skin defect in three cases. In three cases, a second salvage operation was necessary because of flap necrosis that was caused by unreliable recipient vessels resulting from scar formation and persistent inflammation. Successful restoration of the oesophagus and oral alimentation was achieved in 11 cases. From this study, we concluded that free jejunal transfer is a useful procedure for salvage reconstruction of the oesophagus, particularly for cervical oesophagus or short oesophageal defects. Nonetheless, surgeons

  7. High-performance DC SQUIDs with submicrometer niobium Josephson junctions

    SciTech Connect

    de Waal, V.J.; Klapwijk, T.M.; van den Hamer, P.

    1983-11-01

    We report on the fabrication and performance of low-noise, all-niobium, thin-film planar dc SQUIDs with submicrometer Josephson junctions. The junctions are evaporated obliquely through a metal shadow evaporation mask, which is made using optical lithography with 0.5 ..mu..m tolerance. The Josephson junction barrier is formed by evaporating a thin silicon film and with a subsequent oxidation in a glow discharge. The junction parameters can be reproduced within a factor of two. Typical critical currents of the SQUIDs are about 3 ..mu..A and the resistances are about 100 ..cap omega... With SQUIDs having an inductance of 1 nH the voltage modulation is a least 60 ..mu..V. An intrinsic energy resolution of 4 x 10/sup -32/ J/Hz has been reached. The SQUIDs are coupled to wire-wound input coils or with thin-film input coils. The thin-film input coil consists of a niobium spiral of 20 turns on a separate substrate. In both cases the coil is glued onto a 2-nH SQUID with a coupling efficiency of at least 0.5. Referred to the thin-film input coil, the best coupled energy resolution achieved is 1.2 x 10/sup -30/ J/Hz measured in a flux-locked loop at frequencies above 10 Hz. As far as we know, this is the best figure achieved with an all-refractory-metal thin-film SQUID. The fabrication technique used is suited for making circuits with SQUID and pickup coil on the same substrate. We describe a compact, planar, first-order gradiometer integrated with a SQUID on a single substrate. The gradient noise of this device is 3 x 10/sup -12/ Tm/sup -1/. The gradiometer has a size of 12 mm x 17 mm, is simple to fabricate, an is suitable for biomedical applications.

  8. Contributions to myometrium study in uterine-tubal junction.

    PubMed

    Neamţu, M C; Neamţu, R L; Avramescu, Elena Taina; Vrabete, Maria; Călina, Lucia Mirela; Mîndrilă, I

    2009-01-01

    Complex coordinated contractions of the tubal musculature are thought to be important for movement of the ovum from the distal end to the proximal end of the tube, while at the same time aiding in the movement of sperm from the proximal end to the distal end of the oviduct. Studies of the anatomy and the physiology of the uterine-tubal junction (UTJ), with a main concern for the muscular pattern and the secretory activity of this part of the tube, in relation with the hormonal and nervous control, can play an important role in understanding and impairment of infertility. Related to these aspects, the purpose of our research is mainly to identify the determining factors in maintaining a morphological and structural balance between contractile items and extracellular matrix items within uterine myometrium, particularly uterine-tubal junction. For this reason, the present study includes analyses of anatomical sections within uterus and uterine tubes extracted from patients during therapeutic surgeries. Thirty anatomical pieces from patients aged 23-37-year-old (uterus and tubes) were used to perform microanatomical sections, 10 pieces for each pathology identified, namely leiomyofibroma, leiomyofibroma with pregnancy, ectopic pregnancies. At the same time, the study proposes a statistic and mathematic analysis of the cases with uterine-tubal junction pathology in Oltenia region within a period of 10 years. The novelty of the study is represented by the identification of certain continuity ratios between myocyte fascicles and average tunica of arteries and arterioles, which explains the existence of "vascular units" determined by myometrial structures. Moreover, the stereo-distribution of "vascular myometrial units" explains the existence of a plexiform cavernous network, which enables many authors to describe numerous barely individualized myometrial tunicas. These units are rich in orthosympathetic vegetative innervations that might be responsible for the unfavorable

  9. Tunnel junction multiple wavelength light-emitting diodes

    DOEpatents

    Olson, Jerry M.; Kurtz, Sarah R.

    1992-01-01

    A multiple wavelength LED having a monolithic cascade cell structure comprising at least two p-n junctions, wherein each of said at least two p-n junctions have substantially different band gaps, and electrical connector means by which said at least two p-n junctions may be collectively energized; and wherein said diode comprises a tunnel junction or interconnect.

  10. Tunnel junction multiple wavelength light-emitting diodes

    DOEpatents

    Olson, J.M.; Kurtz, S.R.

    1992-11-24

    A multiple wavelength LED having a monolithic cascade cell structure comprising at least two p-n junctions, wherein each of said at least two p-n junctions have substantially different band gaps, and electrical connector means by which said at least two p-n junctions may be collectively energized; and wherein said diode comprises a tunnel junction or interconnect. 5 figs.

  11. Current trends in salivary gland tight junctions

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Olga J.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Tight junctions form a continuous intercellular barrier between epithelial cells that is required to separate tissue spaces and regulate selective movement of solutes across the epithelium. They are composed of strands containing integral membrane proteins (e.g., claudins, occludin and tricellulin, junctional adhesion molecules and the coxsackie adenovirus receptor). These proteins are anchored to the cytoskeleton via scaffolding proteins such as ZO-1 and ZO-2. In salivary glands, tight junctions are involved in polarized saliva secretion and barrier maintenance between the extracellular environment and the glandular lumen. This review seeks to provide an overview of what is currently known, as well as the major questions and future research directions, regarding tight junction expression, organization and function within salivary glands. PMID:27583188

  12. Enhancement at the junction of silver nanorods.

    PubMed

    Gu, Geun Hoi; Suh, Jung Sang

    2008-08-19

    The enhancement of surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) at the junction of linearly joined silver nanorods (31 nm in diameter) deposited in the pores of anodic aluminum oxide templates was studied systematically by excitation with a 632.8 nm laser line. The single and joined silver nanorod arrays showed a similar extinction spectrum when their length was the same. Maximum enhancement was observed from the junction system of two nanorods of the same size with a total length of 62 nm. This length also corresponded to the optimum length of single nanorods for SERS by excitation with a 632.8 nm laser line. The enhancement at the junction was approximately 40 times higher than that of the 31 nm single nanorod, while it was 4 times higher than that of the 62 nm single nanorod. The enhancement factor at the junction after oxide removal was approximately 3.9 x 10 (9).

  13. Presynaptic spike broadening reduces junctional potential amplitude.

    PubMed

    Spencer, A N; Przysiezniak, J; Acosta-Urquidi, J; Basarsky, T A

    1989-08-24

    Presynaptic modulation of action potential duration may regulate synaptic transmission in both vertebrates and invertebrates. Such synaptic plasticity is brought about by modifications to membrane currents at presynaptic release sites, which, in turn, lead to changes in the concentration of cytosolic calcium available for mediating transmitter release. The 'primitive' neuromuscular junction of the jellyfish Polyorchis penicillatus is a useful model of presynaptic modulation. In this study, we show that the durations of action potentials in the motor neurons of this jellyfish are negatively correlated with the amplitude of excitatory junctional potentials. We present data from in vitro voltage-clamp experiments showing that short duration voltage spikes, which elicit large excitatory junctional potentials in vivo, produce larger and briefer calcium currents than do long duration action potentials, which elicit small excitatory junctional potentials.

  14. UTE MRI of the Osteochondral Junction

    PubMed Central

    Biswas, Reni; Chen, Karen; Chang, Eric Y.; Chung, Christine B.

    2014-01-01

    The osteochondral junction is composed of numerous tissue components and serves important functions relating to structural stability and proper nutrition in joints such as the knee and spine. Conventional MR techniques have been inadequate at imaging the tissues of the osteochondral junction primarily because of the intrinsically short T2 nature of these tissues, rendering them “invisible” with the standard acquisitions. Ultrashort time to echo (UTE) MR techniques acquire sufficient MR signal of osteochondral tissues, thereby allowing direct evaluation. This article reviews the anatomy of the osteochondral junction of the knee and the spine, technical aspects of UTE MRI, and the application of UTE MRI for evaluation of the osteochondral junction. PMID:25061547

  15. Chirality effect in disordered graphene ribbon junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Wen

    2012-05-01

    We investigate the influence of edge chirality on the electronic transport in clean or disordered graphene ribbon junctions. By using the tight-binding model and the Landauer-Büttiker formalism, the junction conductance is obtained. In the clean sample, the zero-magnetic-field junction conductance is strongly chirality-dependent in both unipolar and bipolar ribbons, whereas the high-magnetic-field conductance is either chirality-independent in the unipolar or chirality-dependent in the bipolar ribbon. Furthermore, we study the disordered sample in the presence of magnetic field and find that the junction conductance is always chirality-insensitive for both unipolar and bipolar ribbons with adequate disorders. In addition, the disorder-induced conductance plateaus can exist in all chiral bipolar ribbons provided the disorder strength is moderate. These results suggest that we can neglect the effect of edge chirality in fabricating electronic devices based on the magnetotransport in a disordered graphene ribbon.

  16. Adrenocortical Gap Junctions and Their Functions

    PubMed Central

    Bell, Cheryl L.; Murray, Sandra A.

    2016-01-01

    Adrenal cortical steroidogenesis and proliferation are thought to be modulated by gap junction-mediated direct cell–cell communication of regulatory molecules between cells. Such communication is regulated by the number of gap junction channels between contacting cells, the rate at which information flows between these channels, and the rate of channel turnover. Knowledge of the factors regulating gap junction-mediated communication and the turnover process are critical to an understanding of adrenal cortical cell functions, including development, hormonal response to adrenocorticotropin, and neoplastic dedifferentiation. Here, we review what is known about gap junctions in the adrenal gland, with particular attention to their role in adrenocortical cell steroidogenesis and proliferation. Information and insight gained from electrophysiological, molecular biological, and imaging (immunocytochemical, freeze fracture, transmission electron microscopic, and live cell) techniques will be provided. PMID:27445985

  17. Tight junctions in skin inflammation.

    PubMed

    Bäsler, Katja; Brandner, Johanna M

    2017-01-01

    Inflammation of the skin is found after various external stimuli, e.g., UV radiation, allergen uptake, microbial challenge, or contact with irritants, as well as due to intrinsic, not always well-defined, stimuli, e.g., in autoimmune responses. Often, it is also triggered by a combination of both. The specific processes, which mean the kind of cytokines and immune cells involved and the extent of the reaction, depend not only on the trigger but also on the predisposition of the individual. Tight junctions (TJs) in the skin have been shown to form a barrier in the granular cell layer of the epidermis. Furthermore, TJ proteins were found in several additional epidermal layers. Besides barrier function, TJ proteins have been shown to be involved in proliferation, differentiation, cell-cell adhesion, and apoptosis in keratinocytes. In inflamed skin, TJ proteins are often affected. We summarize here the impact of skin inflammation on TJs, e.g., in various forms of dermatitis including atopic dermatitis, in skin infection, and in UV-irradiated skin, and discuss the role of TJs in these inflammatory processes.

  18. Tunnel junctions with multiferroic barriers.

    PubMed

    Gajek, Martin; Bibes, Manuel; Fusil, Stéphane; Bouzehouane, Karim; Fontcuberta, Josep; Barthélémy, Agnès; Fert, Albert

    2007-04-01

    Multiferroics are singular materials that can exhibit simultaneously electric and magnetic orders. Some are ferroelectric and ferromagnetic and provide the opportunity to encode information in electric polarization and magnetization to obtain four logic states. However, such materials are rare and schemes allowing a simple electrical readout of these states have not been demonstrated in the same device. Here, we show that films of La(0.1)Bi(0.9)MnO(3) (LBMO) are ferromagnetic and ferroelectric, and retain both ferroic properties down to a thickness of 2 nm. We have integrated such ultrathin multiferroic films as barriers in spin-filter-type tunnel junctions that exploit the magnetic and ferroelectric degrees of freedom of LBMO. Whereas ferromagnetism permits read operations reminiscent of magnetic random access memories (MRAM), the electrical switching evokes a ferroelectric RAM write operation. Significantly, our device does not require the destructive ferroelectric readout, and therefore represents an advance over the original four-state memory concept based on multiferroics.

  19. Gap junctions, homeostasis, and injury.

    PubMed

    De Maio, Antonio; Vega, Virginia L; Contreras, Jorge E

    2002-06-01

    Gap junctions (Gj) play an important role in the communication between cells of many tissues. They are composed of channels that permit the passage of ions and low molecular weight metabolites between adjacent cells, without exposure to the extracellular environment. These pathways are formed by the interaction between two hemichannels on the surface of opposing cells. These hemichannels are formed by the association of six identical subunits, named connexins (Cx), which are integral membrane proteins. Cell coupling via Gj is dependent on the specific pattern of Cx gene expression. This pattern of gene expression is altered during several pathological conditions resulting in changes of cell coupling. The regulation of Cx gene expression is affected at different levels from transcription to post translational processes during injury. In addition, Gj cellular communication is regulated by gating mechanisms. The alteration of Gj communication during injury could be rationalized by two opposite theories. One hypothesis proposes that the alteration of Gj communication attenuates the spread of toxic metabolites from the injured area to healthy organ regions. The alternative proposition is that a reduction of cellular communication reduces the loss of important cellular metabolisms, such as ATP and glucose. Copyright 2002 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  20. Conductance spectra of asymmetric ferromagnet/ferromagnet/ferromagnet junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pasanai, K.

    2017-01-01

    A theory of tunneling spectroscopy of ferromagnet/ferromagnet/ferromagnet junctions was studied. We applied a delta-functional approximation for the interface scattering properties under a one-dimensional system of a free electron approach. The reflection and transmission probabilities were calculated in the ballistic regime, and the conductance spectra were then calculated using the Landauer formulation. The magnetization directions were set to be either parallel (P) or anti-parallel (AP) alignments, for comparison. We found that the conductance spectra was suppressed when increasing the interfacial scattering at the interfaces. Moreover, the electron could exhibit direct transmission when the thickness was rather thin. Thus, there was no oscillation in this case. However, in the case of a thick layer the conductance spectra oscillated, and this oscillation was most prominent when the middle layer thickness increased. In the case of direct transmission, the conductance spectra of P and AP systems were definitely suppressed with increased exchange energy of the middle ferromagnet. This also refers to an increase in the magnetoresistance of the junction. In the case of oscillatory behavior, the positions of the resonance peaks were changed as the exchange energy was changed.

  1. Modeling Intrajunction Dispersion at a Well-Mixed Tidal River Junction

    SciTech Connect

    Wolfram, Phillip J.; Fringer, Oliver B.; Monsen, Nancy E.; Gleichauf, Karla T.; Fong, Derek A.; Monismith, Stephen G.

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, the relative importance of small-scale, intrajunction flow features such as shear layers, separation zones, and secondary flows on dispersion in a well-mixed tidal river junction is explored. A fully nonlinear, nonhydrostatic, and unstructured three-dimensional (3D) model is used to resolve supertidal dispersion via scalar transport at a well-mixed tidal river junction. Mass transport simulated in the junction is compared against predictions using a simple node-channel model to quantify the effects of small-scale, 3D intrajunction flow features on mixing and dispersion. The effects of three-dimensionality are demonstrated by quantifying the difference between two-dimensional (2D) and 3D model results. An intermediate 3D model that does not resolve the secondary circulation or the recirculating flow at the junction is also compared to the 3D model to quantify the relative sensitivity of mixing on intrajunction flow features. Resolution of complex flow features simulated by the full 3D model is not always necessary because mixing is primarily governed by bulk flow splitting due to the confluence–diffluence cycle. Finally, results in 3D are comparable to the 2D case for many flow pathways simulated, suggesting that 2D modeling may be reasonable for nonstratified and predominantly hydrostatic flows through relatively straight junctions, but not necessarily for the full junction network.

  2. Modeling Intrajunction Dispersion at a Well-Mixed Tidal River Junction

    DOE PAGES

    Wolfram, Phillip J.; Fringer, Oliver B.; Monsen, Nancy E.; ...

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, the relative importance of small-scale, intrajunction flow features such as shear layers, separation zones, and secondary flows on dispersion in a well-mixed tidal river junction is explored. A fully nonlinear, nonhydrostatic, and unstructured three-dimensional (3D) model is used to resolve supertidal dispersion via scalar transport at a well-mixed tidal river junction. Mass transport simulated in the junction is compared against predictions using a simple node-channel model to quantify the effects of small-scale, 3D intrajunction flow features on mixing and dispersion. The effects of three-dimensionality are demonstrated by quantifying the difference between two-dimensional (2D) and 3D model results.more » An intermediate 3D model that does not resolve the secondary circulation or the recirculating flow at the junction is also compared to the 3D model to quantify the relative sensitivity of mixing on intrajunction flow features. Resolution of complex flow features simulated by the full 3D model is not always necessary because mixing is primarily governed by bulk flow splitting due to the confluence–diffluence cycle. Finally, results in 3D are comparable to the 2D case for many flow pathways simulated, suggesting that 2D modeling may be reasonable for nonstratified and predominantly hydrostatic flows through relatively straight junctions, but not necessarily for the full junction network.« less

  3. Single Molecule Junctions: A Laboratory for Chemistry, Mechanics and Bond Rupture

    SciTech Connect

    Hybertsen M. S.

    2013-07-08

    Simultaneous measurement [1] of junction conductance and sustained force in single molecule junctions bridging metal electrodes provides a powerful tool in the quantitative study of the character of molecule-metal bonds. In this talk I will discuss three topics. First, I will describe chemical trends in link bond strength based on experiments and Density Functional Theory based calculations. Second, I will focus on the specific case of pyridine-linked junctions. Bond rupture from the high conductance junction structure shows a requires a force that exceeds the rupture force of gold point contacts and clearly indicates the role of additional forces, beyond the specific N-Au donor acceptor bond. DFT-D2 calculations with empirical addition of dispersion interactions illustrates the interplay between the donor-acceptor bonding and the non-specific van der Waals interactions between the pyridine rings and Au asperities. Third, I will describe recent efforts to characterize the diversity of junction structures realized in break-junction experiments with suitable models for the potential surfaces that are observed. [1] Venkataraman Group, Columbia University.

  4. Modeling Intrajunction Dispersion at a Well-Mixed Tidal River Junction

    SciTech Connect

    Wolfram, Phillip J.; Fringer, Oliver B.; Monsen, Nancy E.; Gleichauf, Karla T.; Fong, Derek A.; Monismith, Stephen G.

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, the relative importance of small-scale, intrajunction flow features such as shear layers, separation zones, and secondary flows on dispersion in a well-mixed tidal river junction is explored. A fully nonlinear, nonhydrostatic, and unstructured three-dimensional (3D) model is used to resolve supertidal dispersion via scalar transport at a well-mixed tidal river junction. Mass transport simulated in the junction is compared against predictions using a simple node-channel model to quantify the effects of small-scale, 3D intrajunction flow features on mixing and dispersion. The effects of three-dimensionality are demonstrated by quantifying the difference between two-dimensional (2D) and 3D model results. An intermediate 3D model that does not resolve the secondary circulation or the recirculating flow at the junction is also compared to the 3D model to quantify the relative sensitivity of mixing on intrajunction flow features. Resolution of complex flow features simulated by the full 3D model is not always necessary because mixing is primarily governed by bulk flow splitting due to the confluence–diffluence cycle. Finally, results in 3D are comparable to the 2D case for many flow pathways simulated, suggesting that 2D modeling may be reasonable for nonstratified and predominantly hydrostatic flows through relatively straight junctions, but not necessarily for the full junction network.

  5. Three-way RNA junctions with remote tertiary contacts: A recurrent and highly versatile fold

    PubMed Central

    de la Peña, Marcos; Dufour, David; Gallego, José

    2009-01-01

    Three-way junction RNAs adopt a recurrent Y shape when two of the helices form a coaxial stack and the third helix establishes one or more tertiary contacts several base pairs away from the junction. In this review, the structure, distribution, and functional relevance of these motifs are examined. Structurally, the folds exhibit conserved junction topologies, and the distal tertiary interactions play a crucial role in determining the final shape of the structures. The junctions and remote tertiary contacts behave as flexible hinge motifs that respond to changes in the other region, providing these folds with switching mechanisms that have been shown to be functionally useful in a variety of contexts. In addition, the juxtaposition of RNA domains at the junction and at the distal tertiary complexes enables the RNA helices to adopt unusual conformations that are frequently used by proteins, RNA molecules, and antibiotics as platforms for specific binding. As a consequence of these properties, Y-shaped junctions are widely distributed in all kingdoms of life, having been observed in small naked RNAs such as riboswitches and ribozymes or embedded in complex ribonucleoprotein systems like ribosomal RNAs, RNase P, or the signal recognition particle. In all cases, the folds were found to play an essential role for the functioning or assembly of the RNA or ribonucleoprotein systems that contain them. PMID:19741022

  6. [Role of postoperative chemoradiotherapy in the therapeutic management of adenocarcinomas of the stomach and oesogastric junction].

    PubMed

    Ben Salah, H; Bahri, M; Dhouib, F; Daoud, J

    2016-12-01

    The available data in the literature show that for gastric adenocarcinoma or gastroesophageal junction adenocarcinoma, postoperative chemoradiotherapy improves disease-free survival after surgery with D0 or D1 lymph node dissection (and perhaps D2) as well as in case of positive node or R1 resection. With the publications of perioperative chemotherapy trials, the role of postoperative radiotherapy in the therapeutic arsenal of gastric adenocarcinoma or gastroesophageal junction adenocarcinoma becomes difficult to define. Postoperative radiotherapy is indicated in case of R1 resection.

  7. Bias dependence of synergistic radiation effects induced by electrons and protons on silicon bipolar junction transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chaoming; Li, Xingji; Yang, Jianqun; Ma, Guoliang; Xiao, Liyi

    2015-06-01

    Bias dependence on synergistic radiation effects caused by 110 keV electrons and 170 keV protons on the current gain of 3DG130 NPN bipolar junction transistors (BJTs) is studied in this paper. Experimental results indicate that the influence induced by 170 keV protons is always enhancement effect during the sequential irradiation. However, the influence induced by 110 keV electrons on the BJT under various bias cases is different during the sequential irradiation. The transition fluence of 110 keV electrons is dependent on the bias case on the emitter-base junction of BJT.

  8. [Clinical anatomy of the esophagogastric junction].

    PubMed

    Tănase, M; Aldea, A S

    2012-01-01

    The esophagogastric junction is a controversial anatomical area, due to its sphincteric mechanism which does not show an obvious anatomical basis. The aim of this study is to investigate the anatomical components that endoscopically indicate the mucosal esophagogastric junction in hiatal hernia patients. The esophagogastric junction was investigated in 27 hiatal hernia patients undergoing surgery. Hiatal hernia is an extension of the stomach situated between the esophagogastric junction and the diaphragmatic indentation. The following types of hiatal hernia were found: sliding hiatal hernia (type I) in 4 patients (14.81%), rolling hiatal hernia (type II) in 2 (7.4%), mixed hiatal hernia (type III) in 12 (44.44%), type IV hiatal hernia in 4 (14.81%) and recurrent hiatal hernia in 5 (18.51%). Of the 27 hiatal hernia patients, 8 (29.6%) were operated using classical procedures: laparotomy--6 (75%) and laparoscopic surgery--2 (25%). The angle of His cannot be used for marking the mucosal esophagogastric junction due to the severe damage of the lower esophageal sphincter in hiatal hernia patients. The squamocolumnar junction is displaced in hiatal hernia patients and was not an option for the study group. The distal end of the esophageal longitudinal palisading vessels needs medication (proton pump inhibitors that reduce the gastric acid production), in order to enhance the visibility of these vessels. The proximal end of gastric longitudinal mucosal folds proved to be the most reliable site to identify endoscopically the mucosal esophagogastric junction. The anatomical structure of the esophagogastric junction differs in hiatal hernia patients and these peculiarities are very important in surgery.

  9. Noise and Chaos in Driven Josephson Junctions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-03-01

    induced step ( n = integer), the corresponding Fokker - Planck equation is essentially the same as that for a purely dc biased junction in the zero... Planck equation which governs the two-dimensional distribution function P((j), d(t)/dt, t) will reduce to the one-dimensional Smoluchowski equation ...Junction). Its equation of motion turns out exacdy the same as a damped driven pendulum, except its characteristic frequency is about 10^-10^^ times

  10. Degradation of connexins and gap junctions

    PubMed Central

    Falk, Matthias M.; Kells, Rachael M.; Berthoud, Viviana M.

    2014-01-01

    Connexin proteins are short-lived within the cell, whether present in the secretory pathway or in gap junction plaques. Their levels can be modulated by their rate of degradation. Connexins, at different stages of assembly, are degraded through the proteasomal, endo-/lysosomal, and phago-/lysosomal pathways. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge about connexin and gap junction degradation including the signals and protein-protein interactions that participate in their targeting for degradation. PMID:24486527

  11. Anaesthesia management in craniovertebral junctional anomalies

    PubMed Central

    Mascarenhas, Oswald

    2016-01-01

    Craniovertebral Junctional (CVJ) anomalies are developmental disorders that affect the skeleton and enclosed neuraxis at the junction of cranium and cervical spine. The high prevalence of airway obstruction and restrictive pulmonary disease in combination with cardiovascular manifestations poses a high anaesthetic risk to these patients. This article provides a discussion of management of anaesthesia in patients with craniovertebral anomalies, the evaluation of risk factors in these patients and their management, including emergency airway issues. PMID:27891026

  12. Heat dissipation in atomic-scale junctions.

    PubMed

    Lee, Woochul; Kim, Kyeongtae; Jeong, Wonho; Zotti, Linda Angela; Pauly, Fabian; Cuevas, Juan Carlos; Reddy, Pramod

    2013-06-13

    Atomic and single-molecule junctions represent the ultimate limit to the miniaturization of electrical circuits. They are also ideal platforms for testing quantum transport theories that are required to describe charge and energy transfer in novel functional nanometre-scale devices. Recent work has successfully probed electric and thermoelectric phenomena in atomic-scale junctions. However, heat dissipation and transport in atomic-scale devices remain poorly characterized owing to experimental challenges. Here we use custom-fabricated scanning probes with integrated nanoscale thermocouples to investigate heat dissipation in the electrodes of single-molecule ('molecular') junctions. We find that if the junctions have transmission characteristics that are strongly energy dependent, this heat dissipation is asymmetric--that is, unequal between the electrodes--and also dependent on both the bias polarity and the identity of the majority charge carriers (electrons versus holes). In contrast, junctions consisting of only a few gold atoms ('atomic junctions') whose transmission characteristics show weak energy dependence do not exhibit appreciable asymmetry. Our results unambiguously relate the electronic transmission characteristics of atomic-scale junctions to their heat dissipation properties, establishing a framework for understanding heat dissipation in a range of mesoscopic systems where transport is elastic--that is, without exchange of energy in the contact region. We anticipate that the techniques established here will enable the study of Peltier effects at the atomic scale, a field that has been barely explored experimentally despite interesting theoretical predictions. Furthermore, the experimental advances described here are also expected to enable the study of heat transport in atomic and molecular junctions--an important and challenging scientific and technological goal that has remained elusive.

  13. Semiconductor tunnel junction with enhancement layer

    DOEpatents

    Klem, John F.; Zolper, John C.

    1997-01-01

    The incorporation of a pseudomorphic GaAsSb layer in a runnel diode structure affords a new degree of freedom in designing runnel junctions for p-n junction device interconnects. Previously only doping levels could be varied to control the tunneling properties. This invention uses the valence band alignment band of the GaAsSb with respect to the surrounding materials to greatly relax the doping requirements for tunneling.

  14. Semiconductor tunnel junction with enhancement layer

    DOEpatents

    Klem, J.F.; Zolper, J.C.

    1997-10-21

    The incorporation of a pseudomorphic GaAsSb layer in a runnel diode structure affords a new degree of freedom in designing runnel junctions for p-n junction device interconnects. Previously only doping levels could be varied to control the tunneling properties. This invention uses the valence band alignment band of the GaAsSb with respect to the surrounding materials to greatly relax the doping requirements for tunneling. 5 figs.

  15. A Model for the Behavior of Magnetic Tunnel Junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, Bryan John

    2003-01-01

    of states function, and has developed an exact analytic solution for the case of an electron band of finite width. The approach taken in this thesis easily allows extension to cases where the band structure is different on either side of the barrier (known as heterojunctions) which are of greater interest in real magnetic tunnel junction devices rather than the simple, identical band structure devices.

  16. Gravitational wave bursts from cosmic superstrings with Y-junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Binetruy, P.; Bohe, A.; Hertog, T.; Steer, D. A.

    2009-12-15

    Cosmic superstring loops generically contain strings of different tensions that meet at Y-junctions. These loops evolve nonperiodically in time, and have cusps and kinks that interact with the junctions. We study the effect of junctions on the gravitational wave signal emanating from cosmic string cusps and kinks. We find that earlier results on the strength of individual bursts from cusps and kinks on strings without junctions remain largely unchanged, but junctions give rise to additional contributions to the gravitational wave signal coming from strings expanding at the speed of light at a junction and kinks passing through a junction.

  17. Effective medium theory of the space-charge region electrostatics of arrays of nanoscale junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurugubelli, Vijaya Kumar; Karmalkar, Shreepad

    2016-01-01

    We develop an Effective Medium Theory for the electrostatics of the Space-Charge Region (SCR) of Schottky and p-n junctions in arrays of nanofilms (NFs), nanowires (NWs), and nanotubes (NTs) in a dielectric ambient. The theory captures the effects of electric fields in both the semiconductor, i.e., NF/NW/NT, and the dielectric media of the array. It shows that the depletion width and the screening length characterizing the SCR tail in the array correspond to those in a bulk junction with an effective semiconductor medium, whose permittivity and doping are their weighted averages over the cross-sectional areas of the semiconductor and dielectric; the shapes of the cross-sections are immaterial. Further, the reverse bias 1 /C2 -V behavior of junctions in NF/NW/NT arrays is linear, as in bulk junctions, and is useful to extract from measurements the built-in potential, effective doping including the semiconductor-dielectric interface charge, and NF/NW/NT length. The theory is validated with numerical simulations, is useful for the experimentalist, and yields simple formulas for nano-device design which predict the following. In the limiting case of a single sheet-like NF, the junction depletion width variation with potential drop is linear rather than square-root (as in a bulk junction). In arrays of symmetric silicon p-n junctions in oxide dielectric where NF/NW thickness and separation are 5% and 100% of the bulk depletion width, respectively, the junction depletion width and the screening length are scaled up from their bulk values by the same factor of ˜2 for NF and ˜10 for NW array.

  18. Effect of reinforcement on the strength of junctions between cylindrical and conical shell

    SciTech Connect

    Kalnins, A.; Updike, D.P.

    1995-05-01

    Two failure modes are addressed for cylinder-cone junctions under internal or external pressure: axisymmetric yielding and low-cycle fatigue. If the junction fails to meet the failure criterion of any one of the two modes, then it must be strengthened by reinforcement. It is shown in the paper that the degree to which a junction is strengthened depends on the distribution of the reinforcement. A placement of reinforcement on the cylinder alone, leaving the actual connection between the cylinder and cone unreinforced, adds strength with regard to axisymmetric yielding, but may not strengthen the junction sufficiently with regard to low-cycle fatigue. This means that the junction may appear reinforced, but is not strengthened. It is pointed out that the design rules of Section 8, Div. 1 of the ASME B and PV Code (1992) set the need for reinforcement according to the failure criterion of low-cycle fatigue, while the distribution of the reinforcement is guided by the criterion of axisymmetric yielding. There is no assurance that the reinforced junction will meet the failure criterion of low-cycle fatigue. This means that the safety margin on the number of allowed cycles is less than that which is expected and that the junction may be unfit for cyclic service. It is also shown in the paper that a reinforcement distribution that requires minimum thicknesses for sections of both the cylinder and cone near the junction can satisfy criteria for both failure modes. This approach is already used in Code Case 2150 of Section 8, Div. 1, for half-apex cone angles from 30 to 60 deg, and required in Div. 2 for cone angles from 0 to 30 deg. Its extension to angles from 0 to 60 deg for both internal and external pressure is recommended.

  19. Cell junctions in the gut of Protura.

    PubMed

    Xué, L; Romano, D

    1992-01-01

    The main cell junctions in the intestinal tract of a small group of apterygotan insects, Protura, were examined in conventional thin sections, tracer-infiltrated sections and freeze-fracture replicas. The smooth septate junctions in the midgut of collembolan Tomocerus minor were also studied for comparison. Pleated septate junctions are found in foregut, hindgut and Malpighian papillae. They exhibit regular septa crossing the intercellular clefts in thin sections; and the septa with a pronounced zig-zag appearance run parallel to form a honeycomb structure in tracer-impregnated sections. After freeze-fracture undulating rows of intramembranous particles (IMPs) are visible on the P face. Smooth septate junctions are observed in the midgut. The intercellular septa often run in pairs for long tracts and exhibit a wavy course in lanthanum impregnated sections. The IMPs exhibited on the E face are usually separated one from another. Twin arrangement of particle rows is also apparent on the replicas. Gap junctions are frequent in both the midgut and hindgut and possess the conventional characteristics of 'inverted gap junction' with E face connexons. These results provide further evidence relating Protura closely to Collembola as well as to primitive arthropods.

  20. Epidermal tight junctions in health and disease.

    PubMed

    Brandner, J M; Zorn-Kruppa, M; Yoshida, T; Moll, I; Beck, L A; De Benedetto, A

    2015-01-01

    The skin, the largest organ of the body, is an essential barrier that under homeostatic conditions efficiently protects and/or minimizes damage from both environmental (e.g. microorganisms, physical trauma, ultraviolet radiation) and endogenous (e.g., cancers, inflammation) factors. This formidable barrier function resides mainly in the epidermis, a dynamic, highly-stratified epithelium. The epidermis has 2 major barrier structures: stratum corneum, the outmost layer and tight junctions, intercellular junctions that seal adjacent keratinocytes in the stratum granulosum, found below the stratum corneum. In recent years there have been significant advances in our understanding of tight junction function, composition and regulation. Herein we review what is known about tight junctions in healthy skin and keratinocyte culture systems and highlight the dynamic crosstalk observed between tight junctions and the cutaneous immune system. Finally we discuss the preliminary observations suggesting that tight junction function or protein expression may be relevant for the pathogenesis of a number of common cutaneous inflammatory and neoplastic conditions.

  1. Predictive modelling of ferroelectric tunnel junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velev, Julian P.; Burton, John D.; Zhuravlev, Mikhail Ye; Tsymbal, Evgeny Y.

    2016-05-01

    Ferroelectric tunnel junctions combine the phenomena of quantum-mechanical tunnelling and switchable spontaneous polarisation of a nanometre-thick ferroelectric film into novel device functionality. Switching the ferroelectric barrier polarisation direction produces a sizable change in resistance of the junction—a phenomenon known as the tunnelling electroresistance effect. From a fundamental perspective, ferroelectric tunnel junctions and their version with ferromagnetic electrodes, i.e., multiferroic tunnel junctions, are testbeds for studying the underlying mechanisms of tunnelling electroresistance as well as the interplay between electric and magnetic degrees of freedom and their effect on transport. From a practical perspective, ferroelectric tunnel junctions hold promise for disruptive device applications. In a very short time, they have traversed the path from basic model predictions to prototypes for novel non-volatile ferroelectric random access memories with non-destructive readout. This remarkable progress is to a large extent driven by a productive cycle of predictive modelling and innovative experimental effort. In this review article, we outline the development of the ferroelectric tunnel junction concept and the role of theoretical modelling in guiding experimental work. We discuss a wide range of physical phenomena that control the functional properties of ferroelectric tunnel junctions and summarise the state-of-the-art achievements in the field.

  2. Multi-junction solar cell device

    DOEpatents

    Friedman, Daniel J.; Geisz, John F.

    2007-12-18

    A multi-junction solar cell device (10) is provided. The multi-junction solar cell device (10) comprises either two or three active solar cells connected in series in a monolithic structure. The multi-junction device (10) comprises a bottom active cell (20) having a single-crystal silicon substrate base and an emitter layer (23). The multi-junction device (10) further comprises one or two subsequent active cells each having a base layer (32) and an emitter layer (23) with interconnecting tunnel junctions between each active cell. At least one layer that forms each of the top and middle active cells is composed of a single-crystal III-V semiconductor alloy that is substantially lattice-matched to the silicon substrate (22). The polarity of the active p-n junction cells is either p-on-n or n-on-p. The present invention further includes a method for substantially lattice matching single-crystal III-V semiconductor layers with the silicon substrate (22) by including boron and/or nitrogen in the chemical structure of these layers.

  3. Gap junctions: structure and function (Review).

    PubMed

    Evans, W Howard; Martin, Patricia E M

    2002-01-01

    Gap junctions are plasma membrane spatial microdomains constructed of assemblies of channel proteins called connexins in vertebrates and innexins in invertebrates. The channels provide direct intercellular communication pathways allowing rapid exchange of ions and metabolites up to approximately 1 kD in size. Approximately 20 connexins are identified in the human or mouse genome, and orthologues are increasingly characterized in other vertebrates. Most cell types express multiple connexin isoforms, making likely the construction of a spectrum of heteromeric hemichannels and heterotypic gap junctions that could provide a structural basis for the charge and size selectivity of these intercellular channels. The precise nature of the potential signalling information traversing junctions in physiologically defined situations remains elusive, but extensive progress has been made in elucidating how connexins are assembled into gap junctions. Also, participation of gap junction hemichannels in the propagation of calcium waves via an extracellular purinergic pathway is emerging. Connexin mutations have been identified in a number of genetically inherited channel communication-opathies. These are detected in connexin 32 in Charcot Marie Tooth-X linked disease, in connexins 26 and 30 in deafness and skin diseases, and in connexins 46 and 50 in hereditary cataracts. Biochemical approaches indicate that many of the mutated connexins are mistargeted to gap junctions and/or fail to oligomerize correctly into hemichannels. Genetic ablation approaches are helping to map out a connexin code and point to specific connexins being required for cell growth and differentiation as well as underwriting basic intercellular communication.

  4. Exercise regulation of intestinal tight junction proteins.

    PubMed

    Zuhl, Micah; Schneider, Suzanne; Lanphere, Katherine; Conn, Carole; Dokladny, Karol; Moseley, Pope

    2014-06-01

    Gastrointestinal distress, such as diarrhoea, cramping, vomiting, nausea and gastric pain are common among athletes during training and competition. The mechanisms that cause these symptoms are not fully understood. The stress of heat and oxidative damage during exercise causes disruption to intestinal epithelial cell tight junction proteins resulting in increased permeability to luminal endotoxins. The endotoxin moves into the blood stream leading to a systemic immune response. Tight junction integrity is altered by the phosphoylation state of the proteins occludin and claudins, and may be regulated by the type of exercise performed. Prolonged exercise and high-intensity exercise lead to an increase in key phosphorylation enzymes that ultimately cause tight junction dysfunction, but the mechanisms are different. The purpose of this review is to (1) explain the function and physiology of tight junction regulation, (2) discuss the effects of prolonged and high-intensity exercise on tight junction permeability leading to gastrointestinal distress and (3) review agents that may increase or decrease tight junction integrity during exercise.

  5. Gap junctions and blood-tissue barriers.

    PubMed

    Li, Michelle W M; Mruk, Dolores D; Cheng, C Yan

    2012-01-01

    Gap junction is a cell-cell communication junction type found in virtually all mammalian epithelia and endothelia and provides the necessary "signals" to coordinate physiological events to maintain the homeostasis of an epithelium and/or endothelium under normal physiological condition and following changes in the cellular environment (e.g., stimuli from stress, growth, development, inflammation, infection). Recent studies have illustrated the significance of this junction type in the maintenance of different blood-tissue barriers, most notably the blood-brain barrier and blood-testis barrier, which are dynamic ultrastructures, undergoing restructuring in response to stimuli from the environment. In this chapter, we highlight and summarize the latest findings in the field regarding how changes at the gap junction, such as the result of a knock-out, knock-down, knock-in, or gap junction inhibition and/or its activation via the use of inhibitors and/or activators, would affect the integrity or permeability of the blood-tissue barriers. These findings illustrate that much research is needed to delineate the role of gap junction in the blood-tissue barriers, most notably its likely physiological role in mediating or regulating the transport of therapeutic drugs across the blood-tissue barriers.

  6. GAP JUNCTIONS AND BLOOD-TISSUE BARRIERS

    PubMed Central

    Li, Michelle W.M.; Mruk, Dolores D.; Cheng, C. Yan

    2014-01-01

    Gap junction is a cell-cell communication junction type found in virtually all mammalian epithelia and endothelia and provides the necessary “signals” to coordinate physiological events to maintain the homeostasis of an epithelium and/or endothelium under normal physiological condition and following changes in the cellular environment (e.g., stimuli from stress, growth, development, inflammation, infection). Recent studies have illustrated the significance of this junction type in the maintenance of different blood-tissue barriers, most notably the blood-brain barrier and blood-testis barrier, which are dynamic ultrastructures, undergoing restructuring in response to stimuli from the environment. In this chapter, we highlight and summarize the latest findings in the field regarding how changes at the gap junction, such as the result of a knock-out, knock-down, knock-in, or gap junction inhibition and/or its activation via the use of inhibitors and/or activators, would affect the integrity or permeability of the blood-tissue barriers. These findings illustrate that much research is needed to delineate the role of gap junction in the blood-tissue barriers, most notably its likely physiological role in mediating or regulating the transport of therapeutic drugs across the blood-tissue barriers. PMID:23397629

  7. Graphene tunnel junctions with aluminum oxide barrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Ying; Trainer, Daniel J.; Chen, Ke

    2016-10-01

    We report a development of graphene tunnel junctions made by chemical vapor deposition grown graphene and sputtered aluminum insulating by an in-situ grown aluminum oxide. The thin oxide layer formed in between the metal layer and the two-dimensional material is a crucial part of a tunnel junction. We characterized surface morphology of oxide layers and studied tunneling spectra of lead and silver tunnel junctions to estimate the quality of the aluminum oxide. The Brinkman-Rowell-Dynes model was applied to fit the conductance-voltage plots to calculate the thickness of oxide layers. Junctions with graphene both on bottom and on top were fabricated and their tunneling properties were characterized after exposure to air for weeks to test time stability. Furthermore, the resistances of graphene tunnel junctions with aluminum oxide formed naturally and in an oxygen atmosphere were studied. Our results demonstrate that in-situ aluminum oxide is an effective barrier for graphene tunnel junctions. The methods of barrier formation enable the realization of more tunnel devices and circuits based on graphene.

  8. Synchronization in Disordered Josephson Junction Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trees, B. R.; Dissanayake, S. T. M.

    2002-03-01

    We have studied the dynamics of a ladder array of overdamped Josephson junctions with periodic boundary conditions. The junctions have critical current and resistive disorder, are current biased above the critical current, and their voltages oscillate with nonidentical bare frequencies. We have been interested in the onset of synchronization in the rung junctions of the ladder, in which nearest neighbor interactions of strength α renormalize the bare frequencies to a common value. The degree of synchronization of the array is measured by an order parameter, r (0<= r<= 1), as a function of α and the spread of bare frequencies. For a given frequency spread, a synchronization phase transition is clearly visible with an increase in α. We have also determined that a time-averaged version of the resistively-shunted junction equations can be used as an accurate description of the dynamics of the junctions. The solutions to the averaged equations exhibit phase slips between pairs of junctions for certain ranges of values of α and also demonstrate that the relationship between the array size, N, and the critical coupling strength for the onset of synchronization scales as N^2. This research was partially funded by a grant to Ohio Wesleyan University from the McGregor Foundation to support student research.

  9. Epidermal tight junctions in health and disease

    PubMed Central

    Brandner, JM; Zorn-Kruppa, M; Yoshida, T; Moll, I; Beck, LA; De Benedetto, A

    2014-01-01

    The skin, the largest organ of the body, is an essential barrier that under homeostatic conditions efficiently protects and/or minimizes damage from both environmental (e.g. microorganisms, physical trauma, ultraviolet radiation) and endogenous (e.g., cancers, inflammation) factors. This formidable barrier function resides mainly in the epidermis, a dynamic, highly-stratified epithelium. The epidermis has 2 major barrier structures: stratum corneum, the outmost layer and tight junctions, intercellular junctions that seal adjacent keratinocytes in the stratum granulosum, found below the stratum corneum. In recent years there have been significant advances in our understanding of tight junction function, composition and regulation. Herein we review what is known about tight junctions in healthy skin and keratinocyte culture systems and highlight the dynamic crosstalk observed between tight junctions and the cutaneous immune system. Finally we discuss the preliminary observations suggesting that tight junction function or protein expression may be relevant for the pathogenesis of a number of common cutaneous inflammatory and neoplastic conditions. PMID:25838981

  10. Craniovertebral junction lesions: our experience with the transoral surgical approach.

    PubMed

    Mouchaty, Homère; Perrini, Paolo; Conti, Renato; Di Lorenzo, Nicola

    2009-06-01

    The aim of this study is to review our experience with the transoral surgical management of anterior craniovertebral junction (CVJ) lesions with particular attention to the decision making and to the indication for a consecutive stabilization. During 10 years (1998-2007), 52 consecutive patients presenting exclusively fixed anterior compression at the cervicomedullary junction underwent transoral surgery. Mean age was 55.85 years (range 17-75 years). Encountered lesions were: malformation (32 cases), rheumatoid arthritis (11 cases), tumor (5 cases) or trauma (4 cases). A total of 79% of patients presented with chronic/recurrent headache (cranial and/or high-cervical pain), 73% with varying degrees of quadrip aresis, and 29% with lower cranial nerve deficits. All of the patients but two, with posterior stabilization performed elsewhere, underwent synchronous anterior decompression and posterior occipitocervical fixation. Adjuncts to the transoral approach (Le Fort I with or without splitting of the palate), tailored to the local anatomy and to the extension of the lesions, were performed in seven cases. Follow-up ranged between 4 and 96 months. Of 35 patients with severe preoperative neurological deficits, 33 improved. The remaining 15 patients who presented with mild symptoms, healed throughout the follow-up. Perioperative mortality occurred in two cases and surgical morbidity in eight cases (dural laceration, cerebrospinal fluid leak with meningitis, malocclusion, oral wound dehiscence and occipital wound infection). Delayed instability occurred in one patient because of cranial settling of C2 vertebral body. A successful surgery achieving a stable decompression at the CVJ is an expertise demanding procedure. It requires accurate preoperative evaluation and, appropriate choice of decompression technique and stabilization instruments. Enlarged transoral approaches (despite higher morbidity) are a supportive means in cases of severe basilar invagination, cranial

  11. Embedded soliton dynamics in the asymmetric array of Josephson junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starodub, Ivan O.; Zolotaryuk, Yaroslav

    2017-06-01

    The dc-biased annular array of three-junction asymmetric superconducting quantum interference devices (SQUIDs) is investigated. The existence of embedded solitons (solitons that exist despite the resonance with the linear waves) is demonstrated both in the unbiased Hamiltonian limit and in the dc-biased and damped case on the current-voltage characteristics (CVCs) of the array. The existence diagram on the parameter plane is constructed. The signatures of the embedded solitons manifest themselves as inaccessible voltage intervals on the CVCs. The upper boundary of these intervals is proportional to the embedded soliton velocity.

  12. [Retroperitoneoscopic assisted pyeloplasty for ureteropelvic junction obstruction in children].

    PubMed

    Luque Mialdea, R; Martin-Crespo Izquierdo, R; Díaz Gómez, L; Moreno, L; Carrero, C; Cebrian, J

    2007-04-01

    Description of the retroperitoneoscopic approach in the conventional pyeloplasty for ureteropelvic junction obstruction in children. From 1998 pyeloplasty assisted by retroperitoneoscopic approach (PARA) was performed in 30 patients. Position in latero-dorsal decubitus and incision of 1 cm in angle costolumbar. We made retroperitoneoscopic space by ball dissection technique and 11 mm Hg pressure. The ureteropelvic junction was extracted through the incision of the port. The UPJ was resected in all patients and Anderson-Hynes pyeloplasty with double PDS 6/0 continuous sutures was performed. In all patients a drainage type Penrose in perirenal space was used. In the last 18 patients a 4F double-J stent was placed. The mean follow-up time was 42 months (range between 6 and 84 months). Operative time, hospital stay, handling of postoperative pain and the postoperative studies have been revised. In all the cases the retroperitoneoscopic approach was good for the identification and dissection of the ureteropelvic junction facilitating the extraction and reconstruction (pyeloplasty) through the mini-incision of the entrance port. The mean operative time was 90 min. (range between 65 and 128 min). We highlight the absence of intraoperative complications. The only postoperative complication has been a pyohydronephrosis in a patient not having internal drainage that was solved by percutaneous pyelostomy and didn't need reintervention. The postoperative handling of the pain was good by means of caudal locorregional anesthesia or by infiltration of the wound with local anesthesic and a dose of Ibuprofeno previous to leave the hospital. The mean hospital stay was 2 days (1-3 days) excluding the complicated case. Postoperative diuretic renograms at the 6 and 18 have shown absence of obstruction in all cases. In the long term follow-up, in 1 case nephrectomy was performed. The PARA for UPJ obstruction is a safe and effective procedure with the advantage of a minimal invasive

  13. Charge transport in nanoscale junctions.

    PubMed

    Albrecht, Tim; Kornyshev, Alexei; Bjørnholm, Thomas

    2008-09-03

    many particle excitations, new surface states in semiconductor electrodes, various mechanisms for single molecule rectification of the current, inelastic electron spectra and SERS spectroscopy. Three terminal architectures allowing (electrochemical) gating and transistor effects. Electrochemical nanojunctions and gating: intermolecular electron transfer in multi-redox metalloproteins, contact force modulation, characteristic current-noise patterns due to conformational fluctuations, resonance effects and electrocatalysis. Novel architectures: linear coupled quantum-dot-bridged junctions, electrochemical redox mediated transfer in two center systems leading to double maxima current-voltage plots and negative differential resistance, molecular-nanoparticle hybrid junctions and unexpected mesoscopic effects in polymeric wires. Device integration: techniques for creating stable metal/molecule/metal junctions using 'nano-alligator clips' and integration with 'traditional' silicon-based technology. The Guest Editors would like to thank all of the authors and referees of this special issue for their meticulous work in making each paper a valuable contribution to this research area, the early-bird authors for their patience, and Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter editorial staff in Bristol for their continuous support.

  14. Cervical Extradural Meningioma: Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Frank, Brian L; Harrop, James S; Hanna, Amgad; Ratliff, John

    2008-01-01

    Background: Extradural lesions are most commonly metastatic neoplasms. Extradural meningioma accounts for 2.7 to 10% of spinal neoplasms and most commonly is found in the thoracic spine. Design: Case report. Findings: A 45-year-old woman presented with posterior cervicothoracic pain for 8 months following a motor vehicle crash. Magnetic resonance imaging of the cervical spine revealed an enhancing epidural mass. Computerized tomography of the chest, abdomen, and pelvis revealed no systemic disease. Due to the lesion's unusual signal characteristics and location, an open surgical biopsy was completed, which revealed a psammomatous meningioma. Surgical decompression of the spinal cord and nerve roots was then performed. The resection was subtotal due to the extension of the tumor around the vertebral artery. Conclusion: Meningiomas should be considered in the differential diagnosis of contrast-enhancing lesions in the cervical spine. PMID:18795481

  15. Junctional Beats During Cryo-Ablation Of The Slow Pathway For The Elimination Of Atrioventricular Nodal Reentrant Tachycardia.

    PubMed

    Sucu, Murat; Davutoglu, Vedat; Polat, Esra

    2016-01-01

    The patient was a 39-year-old female with recurrent paroxysmal, regular narrow QRS complex tachycardia. Atrioventricular nodal reentrant tachycardia (AVNRT) was induced. The cryo-ablation attempts (-80°C, 240 second) were performed in the inferior-posterior triangle of Koch. We observed several junctional beats during cryo-ablation. After successful cryo-ablation, AVNRT induction was repeatedly checked during a waiting period of 30 minutes without recurrence. In our case we demonstrated that junctional beats can be observed during cryo-ablation. We believe this to be the first description of junctional beats occurring during cryo-ablation of AVNRT.

  16. Model Building to Facilitate Understanding of Holliday Junction and Heteroduplex Formation, and Holliday Junction Resolution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Selvarajah, Geeta; Selvarajah, Susila

    2016-01-01

    Students frequently expressed difficulty in understanding the molecular mechanisms involved in chromosomal recombination. Therefore, we explored alternative methods for presenting the two concepts of the double-strand break model: Holliday junction and heteroduplex formation, and Holliday junction resolution. In addition to a lecture and…

  17. Model Building to Facilitate Understanding of Holliday Junction and Heteroduplex Formation, and Holliday Junction Resolution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Selvarajah, Geeta; Selvarajah, Susila

    2016-01-01

    Students frequently expressed difficulty in understanding the molecular mechanisms involved in chromosomal recombination. Therefore, we explored alternative methods for presenting the two concepts of the double-strand break model: Holliday junction and heteroduplex formation, and Holliday junction resolution. In addition to a lecture and…

  18. Spectrum of Lesions Affecting the Renal Pelvis and Pelviureteric Junction: A 13-Year Retrospective Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Kini, Hema; Suresh, Pooja Kundapur; Guni, Laxman Prabhu Gurupur; Bhat, Shaila; Kini, Jyoti Ramanath

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Both, the renal pelvis and the ureter, are affected by developmental, reactive and neoplastic disorders, though rare in incidence. Aim This series of cases were analysed to study the clinicopathological characteristics of the common and comparatively rare lesions involving the renal pelvis and pelviureteric junction. Materials and Methods A retrospective collection of 476 nephrectomies and pelviureteric junction resections, received over a period of 13 years from 2001 to 2013 was done. The patients’ clinical details were obtained and the histopathological findings reviewed. The lesions were classified into non-neoplastic and neoplastic categories. Results Primary involvement of the renal pelvis and pelviureteric junction was seen in 105 of 476 specimens. The mean age was 54.5 years with a male to female ratio of 2.2:1. The non-neoplastic lesions accounted for 76.2% of cases with a majority being pelviureteric junction obstruction due to inflammation induced fibromuscular hypertrophy (68.6%) causing hydronephrosis. Urothelial carcinomas were encountered in 20% of the cases. A majority of the urothelial carcinomas were infiltrative (81%) and high grade (71%) tumours. Conclusion Renal pelvis, a conduit to propel urine, can be the site for numerous disorders. Non-neoplastic lesions were more common than neoplasms. Pelviureteric junction obstruction due to inflammation induced fibromuscular hypertrophy was the commonest lesion in our study. In the neoplastic category, urothelial carcinoma was most common. However, rare lesions such as hamartomatous fibroepithelial polyp, Von Brunn’s nests, flat urothelial hyperplasia and intramuscular haemangioma of upper ureter at the pelviureteric junction were encountered along with occasional cases of tuberculosis and squamous cell carcinomas. PMID:27042468

  19. Scissors stab wound to the cervical spinal cord at the craniocervical junction.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiao-Yong; Yang, Ying-Ming

    2016-06-01

    Stab wounds resulting in spinal cord injury of the craniocervical junction are rare. A scissors stab wound to the cervical spinal cord has been reported only once in the literature. This paper aimed to report a case of Brown-Séquard-plus syndrome in an 8-year-old boy secondary to a scissors stab wound at the craniocervical junction. Case report and review of the literature. Case report of an 8-year-old boy accidentally stabbed in the neck by scissors, which were thrown as a dart. The case study of an 8-year-old boy who was hospitalized because of a scissors stab wound at the craniocervical junction. The patient developed Brown-Séquard-plus syndrome on the left side of the body. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed a laceration of the spinal cord at the craniocervical junction with cerebrospinal fluid leakage. Careful cleansing and interrupted sutures of the wounds were performed to prevent cerebrospinal fluid leakage. Rehabilitation therapy was performed 2 days later. A follow-up examination revealed complete recovery of the neurologic deficit 8 months post-injury. Treatment of scissors stab wounds to the cervical spinal cord, whether conservative management or thorough surgical exploration, should be individualized based on history, examination, and imaging. As shown in this case report, despite conservative management, complete recovery, which was unexpected, was attributed to the initial mild laceration of the spinal cord and ipsilateral spinal cord functional compensation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. A two isocenter IMRT technique with a controlled junction dose for long volume targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, G. G.; Heaton, R. K.; Catton, C. N.; Chung, P. W.; O'Sullivan, B.; Lau, M.; Parent, A.; Jaffray, D. A.

    2007-07-01

    Most IMRT techniques have been designed to treat targets smaller than the field size of conventional linac accelerators. In order to overcome the field size restrictions in applying IMRT, we developed a two isocenter IMRT technique to treat long volume targets. The technique exploits an extended dose gradient throughout a junction region of 4-6 cm to minimize the impact of field match errors on a junction dose and manipulates the inverse planning and IMRT segments to fill in the dose gradient and achieve dose uniformity. Techniques for abutting both conventional fields with IMRT ('Static + IMRT') and IMRT fields ('IMRT + IMRT') using two separate isocenters have been developed. Five long volume sarcoma cases have been planned in Pinnacle (Philips, Madison, USA) using Elekta Synergy and Varian 2100EX linacs; two of the cases were clinically treated with this technique. Advantages were demonstrated with well-controlled junction target uniformity and tolerance to setup uncertainties. The junction target dose heterogeneity was controlled at a level of ±5% for 3 mm setup errors at the field edges, the junction target dose changed less than 5% and the dose sparing to organs at risk (OARs) was maintained. Film measurements confirmed the treatment planning results.

  1. A two isocenter IMRT technique with a controlled junction dose for long volume targets.

    PubMed

    Zeng, G G; Heaton, R K; Catton, C N; Chung, P W; O'Sullivan, B; Lau, M; Parent, A; Jaffray, D A

    2007-08-07

    Most IMRT techniques have been designed to treat targets smaller than the field size of conventional linac accelerators. In order to overcome the field size restrictions in applying IMRT, we developed a two isocenter IMRT technique to treat long volume targets. The technique exploits an extended dose gradient throughout a junction region of 4-6 cm to minimize the impact of field match errors on a junction dose and manipulates the inverse planning and IMRT segments to fill in the dose gradient and achieve dose uniformity. Techniques for abutting both conventional fields with IMRT ('Static + IMRT') and IMRT fields ('IMRT + IMRT') using two separate isocenters have been developed. Five long volume sarcoma cases have been planned in Pinnacle (Philips, Madison, USA) using Elekta Synergy and Varian 2100EX linacs; two of the cases were clinically treated with this technique. Advantages were demonstrated with well-controlled junction target uniformity and tolerance to setup uncertainties. The junction target dose heterogeneity was controlled at a level of +/-5%; for 3 mm setup errors at the field edges, the junction target dose changed less than 5% and the dose sparing to organs at risk (OARs) was maintained. Film measurements confirmed the treatment planning results.

  2. Conductance of d-wave superconductor/normal metal/d-wave superconductor junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pesin, Dmytro; Andreev, Anton; Spivak, Boris

    2008-03-01

    We develop a theory of the low-temperature conductance of superconductor/normal metal/superconductor junctions in which the superconductors have d-wave pairing symmetry. We show that at low temperatures the conductance of the junction is determined by the inelastic relaxation time of quasiparticles in the bulk of d-wave superconductors, GDND√&(d)circ;ɛ. Thus it greatly exceeds the conductance of the normal metal part of the junction, which is controlled by the elastic mean free path. This dependence of GDND on the inelastic relaxation time should be contrasted with that of the low-temperature conductance of the junction in the case of the s- wave superconductor leads, GSNS. In the latter case the conductance is proportional to the first power of the inelastic electron relaxation time in the normal metal part of the junction, GSNSτɛ^(n) [1]. [1] S. V. Lempitskii, Sov. Phys. JETP 58, 624 (1983); U. Gunsenheimer and A. D. Zaikin, Phys. Rev. B50, 6317 (1994); F. Zhou and B. Spivak, JETP Lett. 65, 369 (1997).

  3. Ballistic Graphene Josephson Junctions from the Short to the Long Junction Regimes.

    PubMed

    Borzenets, I V; Amet, F; Ke, C T; Draelos, A W; Wei, M T; Seredinski, A; Watanabe, K; Taniguchi, T; Bomze, Y; Yamamoto, M; Tarucha, S; Finkelstein, G

    2016-12-02

    We investigate the critical current I_{C} of ballistic Josephson junctions made of encapsulated graphene-boron-nitride heterostructures. We observe a crossover from the short to the long junction regimes as the length of the device increases. In long ballistic junctions, I_{C} is found to scale as ∝exp(-k_{B}T/δE). The extracted energies δE are independent of the carrier density and proportional to the level spacing of the ballistic cavity. As T→0 the critical current of a long (or short) junction saturates at a level determined by the product of δE (or Δ) and the number of the junction's transversal modes.

  4. Collapse in ultracold Bose Josephson junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilardello, M.; Trombettoni, A.; Bassi, A.

    2017-03-01

    We investigate how ultracold atoms in double-well potentials can be used to study and put bounds on models describing wave-function collapse. We refer in particular to the continuous spontaneous localization (CSL) model, which is the most well studied among dynamical reduction models. It modifies the Schrödinger equation in order to include the collapse of the wave function in its dynamics. We consider Bose Josephson junctions, where ultracold bosons are trapped in a double-well potential, since they can be experimentally controlled with high accuracy and are suited and used to study macroscopic quantum phenomena on a scale of microns, with a number of particles typically ranging from ˜102-103 to ˜105-106 . We study the CSL dynamics of three atomic states showing macroscopic quantum coherence: the atomic coherent state, the superposition of two atomic coherent states, and the NOON state. We show that for the last two states, the suppression of quantum coherence induced by the CSL model increases exponentially with the number of atoms. We observe that in the case of optically trapped atoms, the spontaneous photon emission of the atoms induces a dynamics similar to the CSL one, and we conclude that magnetically trapped atoms may be more convenient to experimentally test the CSL model. Finally, we discuss decoherence effects in order to provide reasonable estimates on the bounds that it is (or will be) possible to obtain for the parameters of the CSL model in such class of experiments. As an example, we show that a NOON state with N ˜103 with a coherence time of ˜1 s can constrain the CSL parameters in a region where the other systems presently cannot.

  5. A single-gradient junction technique to replace multiple-junction shifts for craniospinal irradiation treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Hadley, Austin; Ding, George X.

    2014-01-01

    Craniospinal irradiation (CSI) requires abutting fields at the cervical spine. Junction shifts are conventionally used to prevent setup error–induced overdosage/underdosage from occurring at the same location. This study compared the dosimetric differences at the cranial-spinal junction between a single-gradient junction technique and conventional multiple-junction shifts and evaluated the effect of setup errors on the dose distributions between both techniques for a treatment course and single fraction. Conventionally, 2 lateral brain fields and a posterior spine field(s) are used for CSI with weekly 1-cm junction shifts. We retrospectively replanned 4 CSI patients using a single-gradient junction between the lateral brain fields and the posterior spine field. The fields were extended to allow a minimum 3-cm field overlap. The dose gradient at the junction was achieved using dose painting and intensity-modulated radiation therapy planning. The effect of positioning setup errors on the dose distributions for both techniques was simulated by applying shifts of ± 3 and 5 mm. The resulting cervical spine doses across the field junction for both techniques were calculated and compared. Dose profiles were obtained for both a single fraction and entire treatment course to include the effects of the conventional weekly junction shifts. Compared with the conventional technique, the gradient-dose technique resulted in higher dose uniformity and conformity to the target volumes, lower organ at risk (OAR) mean and maximum doses, and diminished hot spots from systematic positioning errors over the course of treatment. Single-fraction hot and cold spots were improved for the gradient-dose technique. The single-gradient junction technique provides improved conformity, dose uniformity, diminished hot spots, lower OAR mean and maximum dose, and one plan for the entire treatment course, which reduces the potential human error associated with conventional 4-shifted plans.

  6. Clathrin and Cx43 gap junction plaque endoexocytosis

    SciTech Connect

    Nickel, Beth M.; DeFranco, B. Hewa; Gay, Vernon L.; Murray, Sandra A.

    2008-10-03

    In earlier transmission electron microscopic studies, we have described pentilaminar gap junctional membrane invaginations and annular gap junction vesicles coated with short, electron-dense bristles. The similarity between these electron-dense bristles and the material surrounding clathrin-coated pits led us to suggest that the dense bristles associated with gap junction structures might be clathrin. To confirm that clathrin is indeed associated with annular gap junction vesicles and gap junction plaques, quantum dot immuno-electron microscopic techniques were used. We report here that clathrin associates with both connexin 43 (Cx43) gap junction plaques and pentilaminar gap junction vesicles. An important finding was the preferential localization of clathrin to the cytoplasmic surface of the annular or of the gap junction plaque membrane of one of the two contacting cells. This is consistent with the possibility that the direction of gap junction plaque internalization into one of two contacting cells is regulated by clathrin.

  7. Tunnel junctions, cantilevers, and potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanner, Shawn

    We have developed a process for making sub-micrometer dimensional cantilevers, clamped beams, and more complicate electro-mechanical structures that carry integrated electrical leads. Such objects are perhaps useful as test structures for connecting to and measuring the electrical properties of molecular sized objects, as high frequency electromechanical components for radio and microwave frequency applications, and as sensor components for studying the fluctuation physics of small machines. Our process uses two realigned electron-beam lithography steps, a thin film angled deposition system, and differential removal of sacrificial aluminum layers to produce freely suspended sub-micron electromechanical components. We have produced cantilevers and beams on a variety of substrates (silica, silicon, and poly-imide) and have produced insulating, conductive, and multi-layer mechanical structures. We have measured mechanical resonances in the 10 MHz range by electrostatically actuating the cantilevers while in a magnetic field (3500 gauss) and measuring the voltage that results across the front edge of the cantilever. Two structures are fabricated sharing a common ground so that a balanced detection technique can be used to eliminate background signals. Due to the square dependence of the electrostatic force on the voltage, they can be resonated by a drive voltage of 1/2 the natural frequency or at the natural frequency. Two separate attempts have been made to apply these resonators. First, a process was developed to integrate a tunnel junction with the cantilever. These devices can possibly be used for probing small-scale systems such as molecules. We have verified the exponential variation of the tunneling resistance with both substrate flex and electrostatic gating. Second, a novel gate structure was developed to create a double potential well for resonator motion. This is accomplished by placing a multilayer structure in front of the hairpin cantilever consisting two

  8. YBCO step-edge junctions with high IcRn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, E. E.; Foley, C. P.

    2010-06-01

    Step-edge junctions represent one type of grain boundary Josephson junction employed in high-temperature superconducting junction technology. To date, the majority of results published in the literature focus on [001]-tilt grain boundary junctions (GBJs) produced using bicrystal substrates. We investigate the step morphology and YBCO (yttrium barium copper oxide) film structure of YBCO-based step-edge junctions on MgO [001] substrates which structurally resemble [100]-tilt junctions. High-resolution electron microscopy reveals a clean GBJ interface of width ~ 1 nm and a single junction at the top edge. The dependence of the transport properties on the MgO step-edge and junction morphology is examined at 4.2 K, to enable direct comparison with results for other junction studies such as [001]-tilt and [100]-tilt junctions and building on previously published 77 K data. MgO step-edge junctions show a slower reduction in critical current density with step angle compared with [001]-tilt junctions. For optimized step parameters, transport measurements revealed large critical current and normal resistance (IcRN) products (~3-5 mV), comparable with the best results obtained in other kinds of [100]-tilt GBJs in YBCO at 4.2 K. Junction-based devices such as SQUIDs (superconducting quantum interference devices) and THz imagers show excellent performance when MgO-based step-edge junctions are used.

  9. The discovery of epidermal tight junctions.

    PubMed

    Ozawa, Toshiyuki; Sugawara, Koji; Tsuruta, Daisuke

    2014-06-01

    It was previously thought that the skin barrier is composed singly by the stratum corneum. However, this concept was overturned by the report of Tsukita's group in 2002. They convinced us that tight junctions exist in the stratum granulosum of the epidermis, with the constituent proteins being occludin, claudin-1 and claudin-4. However, more than 30 years before this, Hashimoto et al. described the possible existence of tight junctions in the epidermis in 'Intercellular spaces of the human epidermis as demonstrated with lanthanum' in 1971. Dr. Hashimoto observed lanthanum nitrate-injected human skin by electron microscopy. He discovered that the injected lanthanum penetrated the intercellular spaces of the basal and spinous layers of the epidermis and then moved towards the skin surface until penetration was halted in the granular cell layer near the stratum corneum. He described the cell-to-cell adhesion structures that blocked the movement of lanthanum as 'truly tight junctions'. Thus, this was the first description of the existence of tight junctions in the epidermis. However, the presence of these structures was denied by others and was forgotten. Thanks to the discovery of claudin, the existence of tight junctions between epidermal keratinocytes was finally confirmed. It is interesting that Hashimoto's finding was eventually proved to be correct three decades later as a result of progress in molecular biology. This article encourages us to recognize the importance of careful observation in the molecular biology era. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Dislocation Multi-junctions and Strain Hardening

    SciTech Connect

    Bulatov, V; Hsiung, L; Tang, M; Arsenlis, A; Bartelt, M; Cai, W; Florando, J; Hiratani, M; Rhee, M; Hommes, G; Pierce, T; Diaz de la Rubia, T

    2006-06-20

    At the microscopic scale, the strength of a crystal derives from the motion, multiplication and interaction of distinctive line defects--dislocations. First theorized in 1934 to explain low magnitudes of crystal strength observed experimentally, the existence of dislocations was confirmed only two decades later. Much of the research in dislocation physics has since focused on dislocation interactions and their role in strain hardening: a common phenomenon in which continued deformation increases a crystal's strength. The existing theory relates strain hardening to pair-wise dislocation reactions in which two intersecting dislocations form junctions tying dislocations together. Here we report that interactions among three dislocations result in the formation of unusual elements of dislocation network topology, termed hereafter multi-junctions. The existence of multi-junctions is first predicted by Dislocation Dynamics (DD) and atomistic simulations and then confirmed by the transmission electron microscopy (TEM) experiments in single crystal molybdenum. In large-scale Dislocation Dynamics simulations, multi-junctions present very strong, nearly indestructible, obstacles to dislocation motion and furnish new sources for dislocation multiplication thereby playing an essential role in the evolution of dislocation microstructure and strength of deforming crystals. Simulation analyses conclude that multi-junctions are responsible for the strong orientation dependence of strain hardening in BCC crystals.

  11. Dislocation multi-junctions and strain hardening.

    PubMed

    Bulatov, Vasily V; Hsiung, Luke L; Tang, Meijie; Arsenlis, Athanasios; Bartelt, Maria C; Cai, Wei; Florando, Jeff N; Hiratani, Masato; Rhee, Moon; Hommes, Gregg; Pierce, Tim G; de la Rubia, Tomas Diaz

    2006-04-27

    At the microscopic scale, the strength of a crystal derives from the motion, multiplication and interaction of distinctive line defects called dislocations. First proposed theoretically in 1934 (refs 1-3) to explain low magnitudes of crystal strength observed experimentally, the existence of dislocations was confirmed two decades later. Much of the research in dislocation physics has since focused on dislocation interactions and their role in strain hardening, a common phenomenon in which continued deformation increases a crystal's strength. The existing theory relates strain hardening to pair-wise dislocation reactions in which two intersecting dislocations form junctions that tie the dislocations together. Here we report that interactions among three dislocations result in the formation of unusual elements of dislocation network topology, termed 'multi-junctions'. We first predict the existence of multi-junctions using dislocation dynamics and atomistic simulations and then confirm their existence by transmission electron microscopy experiments in single-crystal molybdenum. In large-scale dislocation dynamics simulations, multi-junctions present very strong, nearly indestructible, obstacles to dislocation motion and furnish new sources for dislocation multiplication, thereby playing an essential role in the evolution of dislocation microstructure and strength of deforming crystals. Simulation analyses conclude that multi-junctions are responsible for the strong orientation dependence of strain hardening in body-centred cubic crystals.

  12. Semiconductor Lasers Containing Quantum Wells in Junctions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Rui Q.; Qiu, Yueming

    2004-01-01

    In a recent improvement upon In(x)Ga(1-x)As/InP semiconductor lasers of the bipolar cascade type, quantum wells are added to Esaki tunnel junctions, which are standard parts of such lasers. The energy depths and the geometric locations and thicknesses of the wells are tailored to exploit quantum tunneling such that, as described below, electrical resistances of junctions and concentrations of dopants can be reduced while laser performances can be improved. In(x)Ga(1-x)As/InP bipolar cascade lasers have been investigated as sources of near-infrared radiation (specifically, at wavelengths of about 980 and 1,550 nm) for photonic communication systems. The Esaki tunnel junctions in these lasers have been used to connect adjacent cascade stages and to enable transport of charge carriers between them. Typically, large concentrations of both n (electron-donor) and p (electron-acceptor) dopants have been necessary to impart low electrical resistances to Esaki tunnel junctions. Unfortunately, high doping contributes free-carrier absorption, thereby contributing to optical loss and thereby, further, degrading laser performance. In accordance with the present innovation, quantum wells are incorporated into the Esaki tunnel junctions so that the effective heights of barriers to quantum tunneling are reduced (see figure).

  13. Structural organization of the dendritic reticulum linked by gap junctions in layer 4 of the visual cortex.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, Takaichi

    2017-01-06

    Neuronal gap junctions are ubiquitous in the brain, but their precise positions in actual neuronal circuits have been uncertain, and their functional roles remain unclear. In this study, I visualized connexin36-immunoreactive gap junctions and examined the structural features of the interconnected dendrites arising from parvalbumin (PV)-positive interneurons in layer 4 of the feline visual cortex. I observed evidence for net-like dense linkages of dendrites among virtually all PV neurons (56/58 cells, 96.6%) in the tissue. This dendritic reticulum established connections among clustered cells and further among remote cells. The latter connectivity exhibited a preference for vertical direction, including translaminar linkages, but was also characterized by lateral continuity. Measurement of the distances from each dendritic gap junction back to the two connected somata revealed that at least one of two somata was within 50μm from the junction in 77.5% of the cases and within 75μm in 91.2% of the cases. Thus, distal gap junctions mediated morphologically asymmetrical connection where one soma was close to, but the other soma was far from the connecting junction. This connectivity was typically observed between neurons located apart in the same columnar space, where a long vertical dendrite bridged two neurons through an asymmetrically positioned gap junction. In contrast, gap junctions formed between nearby cells were close to both somata. Thalamocortical afferents established synapses densely on somata of layer 4 PV neurons, indicating the possible involvement of proximal gap junctions in visual stimulus-driven feedforward regulation. These findings provide a new structural basis for cortical investigations. Copyright © 2016 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  14. Role of gap junctions in the propagation of the cardiac action potential.

    PubMed

    Rohr, Stephan

    2004-05-01

    Gap junctions play a pivotal role for the velocity and the safety of impulse propagation in cardiac tissue. Under physiologic conditions, the specific subcellular distribution of gap junctions together with the tight packaging of the rod-shaped cardiomyocytes underlies anisotropic conduction, which is continuous at the macroscopic scale. However, when breaking down the three-dimensional network of cells into linear single cell chains, gap junctions can be shown to limit axial current flow and to induce 'saltatory' conduction at unchanged overall conduction velocities. In two- and three-dimensional tissue, these discontinuities disappear due to lateral averaging of depolarizing current flow at the activation wavefront. During gap junctional uncoupling, discontinuities reappear and are accompanied by slowed and meandering conduction. Critical gap junctional uncoupling reduces conduction velocities to a much larger extent than does a reduction of excitability, which suggests that the safety for conduction is higher at any given conduction velocity for gap junctional uncoupling. In uniformly structured tissue, gap junctional uncoupling is accompanied by a parallel decrease in conduction velocity. However, this is not necessarily the case for non-uniform structures like tissue expansion where partial uncoupling paradoxically increases conduction velocity and has the capacity to remove unidirectional conduction blocks. Whereas the impact of gap junctions on impulse conduction is generally assessed from the point of view of cell coupling among cardiomyocytes, it is possible that other cell types within the myocardium might be coupled to cardiomyocytes as well. In this context, it has been shown that fibroblasts establish successful conduction between sheets of cardiomyocytes over distances as long as 300 microm. This might not only explain electrical synchronization of heart transplants but might be of importance for cardiac diseases involving fibrosis. Finally, the

  15. Methods for the fabrication of thermally stable magnetic tunnel junctions

    DOEpatents

    Chang, Y. Austin; Yang, Jianhua J.; Ladwig, Peter F.

    2009-08-25

    Magnetic tunnel junctions and method for making the magnetic tunnel junctions are provided. The magnetic tunnel junctions are characterized by a tunnel barrier oxide layer sandwiched between two ferromagnetic layers. The methods used to fabricate the magnetic tunnel junctions are capable of completely and selectively oxidizing a tunnel junction precursor material using an oxidizing gas containing a mixture of gases to provide a tunnel junction oxide without oxidizing the adjacent ferromagnetic materials. In some embodiments the gas mixture is a mixture of CO and CO.sub.2 or a mixture of H.sub.2 and H.sub.2O.

  16. Flecainide toxicity in a preterm neonate with permanent junctional reciprocating tachycardia

    PubMed Central

    Karmegaraj, Balaganesh; Menon, Danish; Prabhu, Mukund A; Vaidyanathan, Balu

    2017-01-01

    We report a case of flecainide toxicity in a premature neonate with permanent junctional reciprocating tachycardia which was managed successfully by reversal of the sodium blockade with intravenous sodium bicarbonate and supportive care. This report highlights the importance of strict supervision and monitoring while administering antiarrhythmic drugs in neonates and prompt institution of appropriate remedial action for treatment when toxicity is suspected. PMID:28928617

  17. Flecainide toxicity in a preterm neonate with permanent junctional reciprocating tachycardia.

    PubMed

    Karmegaraj, Balaganesh; Menon, Danish; Prabhu, Mukund A; Vaidyanathan, Balu

    2017-01-01

    We report a case of flecainide toxicity in a premature neonate with permanent junctional reciprocating tachycardia which was managed successfully by reversal of the sodium blockade with intravenous sodium bicarbonate and supportive care. This report highlights the importance of strict supervision and monitoring while administering antiarrhythmic drugs in neonates and prompt institution of appropriate remedial action for treatment when toxicity is suspected.

  18. Isolated Renal Sinus Lymphangiectasia-Close Mimic of Pelviureteric Junction Obstruction and Hydronephrosis.

    PubMed

    Indiran, Venkatraman; Prabhu, P Sathish; Maduraimuthu, Prabakaran

    2016-01-01

    Renal lymphangiectasia is a rare disorder which may present as perirenal or peripelvic collection. Isolated renal sinus lymphangiectasia is a close differential diagnosis for pelviureteric junction obstruction on ultrasound, but can be resolved without ambiguity using computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging. Here we describe such a case where imaging helped avoid unnecessary confusion. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Molecular organization of tricellular tight junctions.

    PubMed

    Furuse, Mikio; Izumi, Yasushi; Oda, Yukako; Higashi, Tomohito; Iwamoto, Noriko

    2014-01-01

    When the apicolateral border of epithelial cells is compared with a polygon, its sides correspond to the apical junctional complex, where cell adhesion molecules assemble from the plasma membranes of two adjacent cells. On the other hand, its vertices correspond to tricellular contacts, where the corners of three cells meet. Vertebrate tricellular contacts have specialized structures of tight junctions, termed tricellular tight junctions (tTJs). tTJs were identified by electron microscopic observations more than 40 years ago, but have been largely forgotten in epithelial cell biology since then. The identification of tricellulin and angulin family proteins as tTJ-associated membrane proteins has enabled us to study tTJs in terms of not only the paracellular barrier function but also unknown characteristics of epithelial cell corners via molecular biological approaches.

  20. Brownian refrigeration by hybrid tunnel junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peltonen, J. T.; Helle, M.; Timofeev, A. V.; Solinas, P.; Hekking, F. W. J.; Pekola, J. P.

    2011-10-01

    Voltage fluctuations generated in a hot resistor can cause extraction of heat from a colder normal metal electrode of a hybrid tunnel junction between a normal metal and a superconductor. We extend the analysis presented in Phys. Rev. Lett.PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.98.210604 98, 210604 (2007) of this heat rectifying system, bearing resemblance to a Maxwell’s demon. Explicit analytic calculations show that the entropy of the total system is always increasing. We then consider a single-electron transistor configuration with two hybrid junctions in series, and show how the cooling is influenced by charging effects. We analyze also the cooling effect from nonequilibrium fluctuations instead of thermal noise, focusing on the shot noise generated in another tunnel junction. We conclude by discussing limitations for an experimental observation of the effect.

  1. Electrostatic Modeling of Vacuum Insulator Triple Junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Tully, L K; Goerz, D A; Houck, T L; Javedani, J B

    2006-10-25

    Triple junctions are often initiation points for insulator flashover in pulsed power devices. The two-dimensional finite-element TriComp [1] modeling software suite was utilized for its electrostatic field modeling package to investigate electric field behavior in the anode and cathode triple junctions of a high voltage vacuum-insulator interface. TriComp enables simple extraction of values from a macroscopic solution for use as boundary conditions in a subset solution. Electric fields computed with this zoom capability correlate with theoretical analysis of the anode and cathode triple junctions within submicron distances for nominal electrode spacing of 1.0 cm. This paper will discuss the iterative zoom process with TriComp finite-element software and the corresponding theoretical verification of the results.

  2. Tunnel junction based memristors as artificial synapses

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Andy; Niehörster, Stefan; Fabretti, Savio; Shepheard, Norman; Kuschel, Olga; Küpper, Karsten; Wollschläger, Joachim; Krzysteczko, Patryk; Chicca, Elisabetta

    2015-01-01

    We prepared magnesia, tantalum oxide, and barium titanate based tunnel junction structures and investigated their memristive properties. The low amplitudes of the resistance change in these types of junctions are the major obstacle for their use. Here, we increased the amplitude of the resistance change from 10% up to 100%. Utilizing the memristive properties, we looked into the use of the junction structures as artificial synapses. We observed analogs of long-term potentiation, long-term depression and spike-time dependent plasticity in these simple two terminal devices. Finally, we suggest a possible pathway of these devices toward their integration in neuromorphic systems for storing analog synaptic weights and supporting the implementation of biologically plausible learning mechanisms. PMID:26217173

  3. Photocurrent Measurements of Carbon Nanotube PN Junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabor, Nathaniel; Zhong, Zhaohui; Bosnick, Ken; Park, Jiwoong; McEuen, Paul

    2007-03-01

    Gated p-n junctions in semiconducting nanotubes have recently drawn much attention for their electronic and optoelectronic characteristics [1,2,3]. We investigate the photocurrent response at a nanotube gated p-n junction using a focused laser illumination source. We find that the photocurrent at zero source-drain bias increases linearly with optical power for the component of light along the length of the nanotube. Scanned photocurrent imaging demonstrates that carrier generation occurs primarily between the p- and n- type segments of the device. Measurements in an optical cryostat down to 4K reveal large photoresponse and step-like structure in the reverse bias photocurrent. These results show that nanotube p-n junctions are highly sensitive, nanoscale photodetectors. [1] J.U. Lee et al, App. Phys. Lett. 85, 145 (2004). [2] J.U. Lee, App. Phys. Lett. 87, 073101 (2005). [3] K. Bosnick et al, App. Phys. Lett. 89, 163121 (2006).

  4. Junction-side illuminated silicon detector arrays

    DOEpatents

    Iwanczyk, Jan S.; Patt, Bradley E.; Tull, Carolyn

    2004-03-30

    A junction-side illuminated detector array of pixelated detectors is constructed on a silicon wafer. A junction contact on the front-side may cover the whole detector array, and may be used as an entrance window for light, x-ray, gamma ray and/or other particles. The back-side has an array of individual ohmic contact pixels. Each of the ohmic contact pixels on the back-side may be surrounded by a grid or a ring of junction separation implants. Effective pixel size may be changed by separately biasing different sections of the grid. A scintillator may be coupled directly to the entrance window while readout electronics may be coupled directly to the ohmic contact pixels. The detector array may be used as a radiation hardened detector for high-energy physics research or as avalanche imaging arrays.

  5. Ferromagnetic resonance with long Josephson junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golovchanskiy, I. A.; Abramov, N. N.; Stolyarov, V. S.; Emelyanova, O. V.; Golubov, A. A.; Ustinov, A. V.; Ryazanov, V. V.

    2017-05-01

    In this work we propose a hybrid device based on a long Josephson junction (JJ) coupled inductively to an external ferromagnetic (FM) layer. The long JJ in a zero-field operation mode induces a localized AC magnetic field in the FM layer and enables a synchronized magnetostatic standing wave. The magnetostatic wave induces additional dissipation for soliton propagation in the junction and also enables a phase locking (resonant soliton synchronization) at a frequency of natural ferromagnetic resonance. The later manifests itself as an additional constant voltage step on the current-voltage characteristics at the corresponding voltage. The proposed device allows to study magnetization dynamics of individual micro-scaled FM samples using just DC technique, and also it provides additional phase locking frequency in the junction, determined exclusively by characteristics of the ferromagnet.

  6. Thermionic refrigeration at CNT-CNT junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, C.; Pipe, K. P.

    2016-10-01

    Monte Carlo (MC) simulation is used to study carrier energy relaxation following thermionic emission at the junction of two van der Waals bonded single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs). An energy-dependent transmission probability gives rise to energy filtering at the junction, which is predicted to increase the average electron transport energy by as much as 0.115 eV, leading to an effective Seebeck coefficient of 386 μV/K. MC results predict a long energy relaxation length (˜8 μm) for hot electrons crossing the junction into the barrier SWCNT. For SWCNTs of optimal length, an analytical transport model is used to show that thermionic cooling can outweigh parasitic heat conduction due to high SWCNT thermal conductivity, leading to a significant cooling capacity (2.4 × 106 W/cm2).

  7. Numerical Investigation of Josephson Junction Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Hristov, I.; Dimova, S.; Boyadjiev, T.

    2009-10-29

    Multilayered long Josephson Junction Structures form an interesting physical system where both nonlinearity and interaction between subsystems play an important role. Such systems allow to study physical effects that do not occur in single Josephson junction.The Sakai-Bodin-Pedersen model--a system of perturbed sine-Gordon equations--is used to study the dynamic states of stacks of inductively coupled long Josephson Junctions (LJJs). The corresponding static problem is numerically investigated as well. In order to study the stability of possible static solutions a Sturm-Liouville problem is generated and solved.The transitions from static to dynamic state and the scenario of these transitions are analyzed depending on the model parameters. Different physical characteristics--current-voltage characteristics, individual instant voltages and internal magnetic fields, are calculated and interpreted.

  8. Silicon fiber with p-n junction

    SciTech Connect

    Homa, D.; Cito, A.; Pickrell, G.; Hill, C.; Scott, B.

    2014-09-22

    In this study, we fabricated a p-n junction in a fiber with a phosphorous doped silicon core and fused silica cladding. The fibers were fabricated via a hybrid process of the core-suction and melt-draw techniques and maintained overall diameters ranging from 200 to 900 μm and core diameters of 20–800 μm. The p-n junction was formed by doping the fiber with boron and confirmed via the current-voltage characteristic. The demonstration of a p-n junction in a melt-drawn silicon core fiber paves the way for the seamless integration of optical and electronic devices in fibers.

  9. Holographic Josephson junction from massive gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Ya-Peng; Li, Huai-Fan; Zeng, Hua-Bi; Zhang, Hai-Qing

    2016-05-01

    We study the holographic superconductor-normal metal-superconductor (SNS) Josephson junction in de Rham-Gabadadze-Tolley massive gravity. If the boundary theory is independent of spatial directions, i.e., if the chemical potential is homogeneous in spatial directions, we find that the graviton mass parameter will make it more difficult for the normal metal-superconductor phase transition to take place. In the holographic model of the Josephson junction, it is found that the maximal tunneling current will decrease according to the graviton mass parameter. Besides, the coherence length of the junction decreases as well with respect to the graviton mass parameter. If one interprets the graviton mass parameter as the effect of momentum dissipation in the boundary field theory, this indicates that the stronger the momentum dissipation is, the smaller the coherence length is.

  10. Studies of silicon PN junction solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindholm, F. A.

    1975-01-01

    Silicon pn junction solar cells made with low-resistivity substrates show poorer performance than traditional theory predicts. The purpose of this research was to identify and characterize the physical mechanisms responsible for the discrepancy. Attention was concentrated on the open circuit voltage in shallow junction cells of 0.1 ohm-cm substrate resistivity. A number of possible mechanisms that can occur in silicon devices were considered. Two mechanisms which are likely to be of main importance in explaining the observed low values of open-circuit voltage were found: (1) recombination losses associated with defects introduced during junction formation, and (2) inhomogeneity of defects and impurities across the area of the cell. To explore these theoretical anticipations, various diode test structures were designed and fabricated and measurement configurations for characterizing the defect properties and the areal inhomogeneity were constructed.

  11. Density Functional Theory for Steady-State Nonequilibrium Molecular Junctions

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Shuanglong; Nurbawono, Argo; Zhang, Chun

    2015-01-01

    We present a density functional theory (DFT) for steady-state nonequilibrium quantum systems such as molecular junctions under a finite bias. Based on the steady-state nonequilibrium statistics that maps nonequilibrium to an effective equilibrium, we show that ground-state DFT (GS-DFT) is not applicable in this case and two densities, the total electron density and the density of current-carrying electrons, are needed to uniquely determine the properties of the corresponding nonequilibrium system. A self-consistent mean-field approach based on two densities is then derived. The theory is implemented into SIESTA computational package and applied to study nonequilibrium electronic/transport properties of a realistic carbon-nanotube (CNT)/Benzene junction. Results obtained from our steady-state DFT (SS-DFT) are compared with those of conventional GS-DFT based transport calculations. We show that SS-DFT yields energetically more stable nonequilibrium steady state, predicts significantly lower electric current, and is able to produce correct electronic structures in local equilibrium under a limiting case. PMID:26472080

  12. Electromagnetic scattering from two-dimensional thick material junctions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ricoy, M. A.; Volakis, John L.

    1990-01-01

    The problem of the plane wave diffraction is examined by an arbitrary symmetric two dimensional junction, where Generalized Impedance Boundary Conditions (GIBCs) and Generalized Sheet Transition Conditions (GSTCs) are employed to simulate the slabs. GIBCs and GSTCs are constructed for multilayer planar slabs of arbitrary thickness and the resulting GIBC/GSTC reflection coefficients are compared with exact counterparts to evaluate the GIBCs/GSTCs. The plane wave diffraction by a multilayer material slab recessed in a perfectly conducting ground plane is formulated and solved via the Generalized Scattering Matrix Formulation (GDMF) in conjunction with the dual integral equation approach. Various scattering patterns are computed and validated with exact results where possible. The diffraction by a material discontinuity in a thick dielectric/ferrite slab is considered by modelling the constituent slabs with GSTCs. A non-unique solution in terms of unknown constants is obtained, and these constants are evaluated for the recessed slab geometry by comparison with the solution obtained therein. Several other simplified cases are also presented and discussed. An eigenfunction expansion method is introduced to determine the unknown solution constants in the general case. This procedure is applied to the non-unique solution in terms of unknown constants; and scattering patterns are presented for various slab junctions and compared with alternative results where possible.

  13. Non-invasive microfluidic gap junction assay.

    PubMed

    Chen, Sisi; Lee, Luke P

    2010-03-01

    Gap junctions are protein channels between cells that allow direct electrical and metabolic coupling via the exchange of biomolecules and ions. Their expression, though ubiquitous in most mammalian cell types, is especially important for the proper functioning of cardiac and neuronal systems. Many existing methods for studying gap junction communication suffer from either unquantifiable data or difficulty of use. Here, we measure the extent of dye spread and effective diffusivities through gap junction connected cells using a quantitative microfluidic cell biology platform. After loading dye by hydrodynamic focusing of calcein/AM, dye transfer dynamics into neighboring, unexposed cells can be monitored via timelapse fluorescent microscopy. By using a selective microfluidic dye loading over a confluent layer of cells, we found that high expression of gap junctions in C6 cells transmits calcein across the monolayer with an effective diffusivity of 3.4 x 10(-13) m(2)/s, which are highly coupled by Cx43. We also found that the gap junction blocker 18alpha-GA works poorly in the presence of serum even at high concentrations (50 microM); however, it is highly effective down to 2.5 microM in the absence of serum. Furthermore, when the drug is washed out, dye spread resumes rapidly within 1 min for all doses, indicating the drug does not affect transcriptional regulation of connexins in these Cx43+ cells, in contrast to previous studies. This integrated microfluidic platform enables the in situ monitoring of gap junction communication, yielding dynamic information about intercellular molecular transfer and pharmacological inhibition and recovery.

  14. Electronic Properties of Carbon Nanotubes and Junctions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anantram, M. P.; Han, Jie; Yang, Liu; Govindan, T. R.; Jaffe, R.; Saini, Subhash (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    Metallic and semiconducting Single Wall Carbon Nanotubes (CNT) have recently been characterized using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and the manipulation of individual CNT has been demonstrated. These developments make the prospect of using CNT as molecular wires and possibly as electronic devices an even more interesting one. We have been modeling various electronic properties such as the density of states and the transmission coefficient of CNT wires and junctions. These studies involve first calculating the stability of junctions using molecular dynamics simulations and then calculating the electronic properties using a pi-electron tight binding Hamiltonian. We have developed the expertise to calculate the electronic properties of both finite-sized CNT and CNT systems with semi-infinite boundary conditions. In this poster, we will present an overview of some of our results. The electronic application of CNT that is most promising at this time is their use as molecular wires. The conductance can however be greatly reduced because of reflection due to defects and contacts. We have modeled the transmission through CNT in the presence of two types of defects: weak uniform disorder and strong isolated scatterers. We find that the conductance is affected in significantly different manners due to these defects Junctions of CNT have also been imaged using STM. This makes it essential to derive rules for the formation of junctions between tubes of different chirality, study their relative energies and electronic properties. We have generalized the rules for connecting two different CNT and have calculated the transmission and density of states through CNT junctions. Metallic and semiconducting CNT can be joined to form a stable junction and their current versus voltage characteristics are asymmetric. CNT are deformed by the application of external forces including interactions with a substrate or other CNT. In many experiments, these deformation are expected to

  15. Electronic Properties of Carbon Nanotubes and Junctions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anantram, M. P.; Han, Jie; Yang, Liu; Govindan, T. R.; Jaffe, R.; Saini, Subhash (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    Metallic and semiconducting Single Wall Carbon Nanotubes (CNT) have recently been characterized using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) and the manipulation of individual CNT has been demonstrated. These developments make the prospect of using CNT as molecular wires and possibly as electronic devices an even more interesting one. We have been modeling various electronic properties such as the density of states and the transmission coefficient of CNT wires and junctions. These studies involve first calculating the stability of junctions using molecular dynamics simulations and then calculating the electronic properties using a pi-electron tight binding Hamiltonian. We have developed the expertise to calculate the electronic properties of both finite-sized CNT and CNT systems with semi-infinite boundary conditions. In this poster, we will present an overview of some of our results. The electronic application of CNT that is most promising at this time is their use as molecular wires. The conductance can however be greatly reduced because of reflection due to defects and contacts. We have modeled the transmission through CNT in the presence of two types of defects: weak uniform disorder and strong isolated scatterers. We find that the conductance is affected in significantly different manners due to these defects Junctions of CNT have also been imaged using STM. This makes it essential to derive rules for the formation of junctions between tubes of different chirality, study their relative energies and electronic properties. We have generalized the rules for connecting two different CNT and have calculated the transmission and density of states through CNT junctions. Metallic and semiconducting CNT can be joined to form a stable junction and their current versus voltage characteristics are asymmetric. CNT are deformed by the application of external forces including interactions with a substrate or other CNT. In many experiments, these deformation are expected to

  16. Serotonin passes through myoendothelial gap junctions to promote pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Gairhe, Salina; Bauer, Natalie N; Gebb, Sarah A; McMurtry, Ivan F

    2012-11-01

    Myoendothelial gap junctional signaling mediates pulmonary arterial endothelial cell (PAEC)-induced activation of latent TGF-β and differentiation of cocultured pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells (PASMCs), but the nature of the signal passing from PAECs to PASMCs through the gap junctions is unknown. Because PAECs but not PASMCs synthesize serotonin, and serotonin can pass through gap junctions, we hypothesized that the monoamine is the intercellular signal. We aimed to determine whether PAEC-derived serotonin mediates PAEC-induced myoendothelial gap junction-dependent activation of TGF-β signaling and differentiation of PASMCs. Rat PAECs and PASMCs were monocultured or cocultured with (touch) or without (no-touch) direct cell-cell contact. In all cases, tryptophan hydroxylase 1 (Tph1) transcripts were expressed predominantly in PAECs. Serotonin was detected by immunostaining in both PAECs and PASMCs in PAEC/PASMC touch coculture but was not found in PASMCs in either PAEC/PASMC no-touch coculture or in PASMC/PASMC touch coculture. Furthermore, inhibition of gap junctions but not of the serotonin transporter in PAEC/PASMC touch coculture prevented serotonin transfer from PAECs to PASMCs. Inhibition of serotonin synthesis pharmacologically or by small interfering RNAs to Tph1 in PAECs inhibited the PAEC-induced activation of TGF-β signaling and differentiation of PASMCs. We concluded that serotonin synthesized by PAECs is transferred through myoendothelial gap junctions into PASMCs, where it activates TGF-β signaling and induces a more differentiated phenotype. This finding suggests a novel role of gap junction-mediated intercellular serotonin signaling in regulation of PASMC phenotype.

  17. Structure and function of gap junction proteins: role of gap junction proteins in embryonic heart development.

    PubMed

    Ahir, Bhavesh K; Pratten, Margaret K

    2014-01-01

    Intercellular (cell-to-cell) communication is a crucial and complex mechanism during embryonic heart development. In the cardiovascular system, the beating of the heart is a dynamic and key regulatory process, which is functionally regulated by the coordinated spread of electrical activity through heart muscle cells. Heart tissues are composed of individual cells, each bearing specialized cell surface membrane structures called gap junctions that permit the intercellular exchange of ions and low molecular weight molecules. Gap junction channels are essential in normal heart function and they assist in the mediated spread of electrical impulses that stimulate synchronized contraction (via an electrical syncytium) of cardiac tissues. This present review describes the current knowledge of gap junction biology. In the first part, we summarise some relevant biochemical and physiological properties of gap junction proteins, including their structure and function. In the second part, we review the current evidence demonstrating the role of gap junction proteins in embryonic development with particular reference to those involved in embryonic heart development. Genetics and transgenic animal studies of gap junction protein function in embryonic heart development are considered and the alteration/disruption of gap junction intercellular communication which may lead to abnormal heart development is also discussed.

  18. Effective medium theory based analytical models for the potential and field distributions in arrays of nanoscale junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurugubelli, Vijaya Kumar; Karmalkar, Shreepad

    2017-07-01

    Recently, we developed an Effective Medium Theory (EMT) for the Space-Charge Region electrostatics of Schottky and p-n junctions in arrays of nanofilms (NFs), nanowires, and nanotubes in a dielectric ambient and gave formulas for their junction depletion width and screening length characterizing the space-charge tail. In the present work, we develop this EMT further and derive simple formulas for the potential and field distributions in the semiconductor and dielectric media of the array. The formulas derived are validated with numerical simulations. It is shown that the potential and field distributions perpendicular to the junction plane in the array correspond to those in a bulk junction with an effective semiconductor medium, whose permittivity and doping are their weighted averages over the cross-sectional areas of the semiconductor and dielectric; the shapes of the cross-sections are immaterial. We also analyze a single NF junction, treating it as a limiting case of an array, and obtain the following key results. For negligible film thickness, the depletion width depends linearly on applied voltage and inverse of doping; the peak electric field depends linearly on doping and inverse of ambient permittivity and varies very gradually with applied voltage. These features of a thin film junction are remarkably different from the bulk junction, wherein the depletion width and peak field have a square-root dependence on applied voltage.

  19. Conductance Spectra in Graphene-Superconductor Junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Jie; Zhou, Shi-Ping; Deng, Zhen-Yan

    2015-01-01

    The conductance spectra of a graphene ribbon and graphene-superconductor (G-S) junctions are investigated, using the tight-binding model and non-equilibrium Green' function formalism. It is found that the quantized conductance related to graphene' edge-states is robust against perturbations in the model parameters for a graphene monolayer ribbon with the zigzag boundary. With appropriate model parameter of the spin-orbit interaction strength, a new bound state with odd-frequency symmetry is found in the G-S junction. An enhancement in the zero-energy conductance amplitude is followed.

  20. Fluctuation of heat current in Josephson junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Virtanen, P.; Giazotto, F.

    2015-02-15

    We discuss the statistics of heat current between two superconductors at different temperatures connected by a generic weak link. As the electronic heat in superconductors is carried by Bogoliubov quasiparticles, the heat transport fluctuations follow the Levitov–Lesovik relation. We identify the energy-dependent quasiparticle transmission probabilities and discuss the resulting probability density and fluctuation relations of the heat current. We consider multichannel junctions, and find that heat transport in diffusive junctions is unique in that its statistics is independent of the phase difference between the superconductors.

  1. Resolving Atomic Connectivity in Graphene Nanostructure Junctions.

    PubMed

    Dienel, Thomas; Kawai, Shigeki; Söde, Hajo; Feng, Xinliang; Müllen, Klaus; Ruffieux, Pascal; Fasel, Roman; Gröning, Oliver

    2015-08-12

    We report on the structural characterization of junctions between atomically well-defined graphene nanoribbons (GNRs) by means of low-temperature, noncontact scanning probe microscopy. We show that the combination of simultaneously acquired frequency shift and tunneling current maps with tight binding (TB) simulations allows a comprehensive characterization of the atomic connectivity in the GNR junctions. The proposed approach can be generally applied to the investigation of graphene nanomaterials and their interconnections and is thus expected to become an important tool in the development of graphene-based circuitry.

  2. Complementary junction heterostructure field-effect transistor

    DOEpatents

    Baca, Albert G.; Drummond, Timothy J.; Robertson, Perry J.; Zipperian, Thomas E.

    1995-01-01

    A complimentary pair of compound semiconductor junction heterostructure field-effect transistors and a method for their manufacture are disclosed. The p-channel junction heterostructure field-effect transistor uses a strained layer to split the degeneracy of the valence band for a greatly improved hole mobility and speed. The n-channel device is formed by a compatible process after removing the strained layer. In this manner, both types of transistors may be independently optimized. Ion implantation is used to form the transistor active and isolation regions for both types of complimentary devices. The invention has uses for the development of low power, high-speed digital integrated circuits.

  3. Complementary junction heterostructure field-effect transistor

    DOEpatents

    Baca, A.G.; Drummond, T.J.; Robertson, P.J.; Zipperian, T.E.

    1995-12-26

    A complimentary pair of compound semiconductor junction heterostructure field-effect transistors and a method for their manufacture are disclosed. The p-channel junction heterostructure field-effect transistor uses a strained layer to split the degeneracy of the valence band for a greatly improved hole mobility and speed. The n-channel device is formed by a compatible process after removing the strained layer. In this manner, both types of transistors may be independently optimized. Ion implantation is used to form the transistor active and isolation regions for both types of complimentary devices. The invention has uses for the development of low power, high-speed digital integrated circuits. 10 figs.

  4. Using ion irradiation to make high-T{sub c} Josephson junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Bergeal, N.; Lesueur, J.; Sirena, M.; Faini, G.; Aprili, M.; Contour, J. P.; Leridon, B.

    2007-10-15

    In this article we describe the effect of ion irradiation on high-T{sub c} superconductor thin film and its interest for the fabrication of Josephson junctions. In particular, we show that these alternative techniques allow to go beyond most of the limitations encountered in standard junction fabrication methods, both in the case of fundamental and technological purposes. Two different geometries are presented: a planar one using a single high-T{sub c} film and a mesa one defined in a trilayer structure.

  5. Endoscopic Removal of a Nitinol Mesh Stent from the Ureteropelvic Junction after 15 Years

    PubMed Central

    Smrkolj, Tomaž; Šalinović, Domagoj

    2015-01-01

    We report a rare case of a patient with a large stone encrusted on a nitinol mesh stent in the ureteropelvic junction. The stent was inserted in the year 2000 after failure of two pyeloplasty procedures performed due to symptomatic ureteropelvic junction stenosis. By combining minimally invasive urinary stone therapies—extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy, semirigid ureterorenoscopy with laser lithotripsy, and percutaneous nephrolithotomy—it was possible to completely remove the encrusted stone and nitinol mesh stent that was implanted for 15 years, rendering the patient symptom and obstruction free. PMID:26697258

  6. Two-dimensional S-N-S junction with Rashba spin-orbit coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Dimitrova, O. V. Feigel'man, M. V.

    2006-04-15

    The effect of Rashba spin-orbit coupling on the supercurrent in S-2DEG-S proximity junctions is investigated in the clean limit. A generalization of Beenakker's formula for Andreev levels to the case of spin-orbit scattering is presented. Spin-orbit induced splitting of Andreev bound states is predicted for an infinite-width junction with nonvanishing normal backscattering at S-N interfaces. However, a semiclassical average of the Josephson current is insensitive to the Rashba coupling as long as the electron-electron interaction in 2DEG is neglected.

  7. Tears at the myotendinous junction of the infraspinatus: ultrasound findings.

    PubMed

    Guerini, H; Pluot, E; Pessis, E; Thevenin, F; Campagna, R; Feydy, A; Gaudin, P; Drapé, J L

    2015-04-01

    Tears involving the myotendinous junction (MTJ) of the infraspinatus (IS) have been recently described on MRI. These occur centrally in the muscle belly, and are not associated with full thickness tears of the distal infraspinatus tendon. They also induce a rapidly progressive fatty infiltration of the muscles and amyotrophy. The purpose of this study is to assess the accuracy of ultrasonography in diagnosing MTJ tears of the infraspinatus and to describe the usual ultrasonographic appearance compared with MRI. Retrospective study of 2403 US examinations of the shoulder (over 5 years). Fifteen patients with a reported suspicion of infraspinatus MTJ tears were included. MRI examination was available in all cases, CT arthrography in 13 cases, and one patient underwent surgical confirmation. All patients were sent for an ultrasound for suspect lesion of the tendons of the rotator cuff, with posterior pain in the infraspinatus fossa. All cases seen on ultrasonography were confirmed on MRI. CT arthrography confirmed the absence of tear of the IS tendon in all cases and did not reveal the MTJ tears. Two signs appeared to us as being of special interest: the "tadpole sign" on longitudinal views, and the "black eye sign" on sagittal views. The proximal retraction of the tendon at the MTJ is the anatomical explanation of both signs. Tears at the myotendinous junction of the infraspinatus are rare but can be diagnosed on US examination, provided that the sonographer pays attention to the infraspinatus fossa especially in cases of normality of the distal tendinous cuff. Copyright © 2015 Éditions françaises de radiologie. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. A proposed route to independent measurements of tight junction conductance at discrete cell junctions

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Lushan; Zeng, Yuhan; Baker, Lane A; Hou, Jianghui

    2015-01-01

    Direct recording of tight junction permeability is of pivotal importance to many biologic fields. Previous approaches bear an intrinsic disadvantage due to the difficulty of separating tight junction conductance from nearby membrane conductance. Here, we propose the design of Double whole-cell Voltage Clamp - Ion Conductance Microscopy (DVC-ICM) based on previously demonstrated potentiometric scanning of local conductive pathways. As proposed, DVC-ICM utilizes two coordinated whole-cell patch-clamps to neutralize the apical membrane current during potentiometric scanning, which in models described here will profoundly enhance the specificity of tight junction recording. Several potential pitfalls are considered, evaluated and addressed with alternative countermeasures. PMID:26716077

  9. AdS and dS Entropy from String Junctions or The Function of Junction Conjunctions

    SciTech Connect

    Silverstein, Eva M

    2003-09-09

    Flux compactifications of string theory exhibiting the possibility of discretely tuning the cosmological constant to small values have been constructed. The highly tuned vacua in this discretuum have curvature radii which scale as large powers of the flux quantum numbers, exponential in the number of cycles in the compactification. By the arguments of Susskind/Witten (in the AdS case) and Gibbons/Hawking (in the dS case), we expect correspondingly large entropies associated with these vacua. If they are to provide a dual description of these vacua on their Coulomb branch, branes traded for the flux need to account for this entropy at the appropriate energy scale. In this note, we argue that simple string junctions and webs ending on the branes can account for this large entropy, obtaining a rough estimate for junction entropy that agrees with the existing rough estimates for the spacing of the discretuum. In particular, the brane entropy can account for the (A)dS entropy far away from string scale correspondence limits.

  10. Thermopower of benzenedithiol and C60 molecular junctions with Ni and Au electrodes.

    PubMed

    Lee, See Kei; Ohto, Tatsuhiko; Yamada, Ryo; Tada, Hirokazu

    2014-09-10

    We have performed thermoelectric measurements of benzenedithiol (BDT) and C60 molecules with Ni and Au electrodes using a home-built scanning tunneling microscope. The thermopower of C60 was negative for both Ni and Au electrodes, indicating the transport of carriers through the lowest unoccupied molecular orbital in both cases, as was expected from the work functions. On the other hand, the Ni-BDT-Ni junctions exhibited a negative thermopower, whereas the Au-BDT-Au junctions exhibited a positive thermopower. First-principle calculations revealed that the negative thermopower of Ni-BDT-Ni junctions is due to the spin-split hybridized states generated by the highest occupied molecular orbital of BDT coupled with s- and d-states of the Ni electrode.

  11. Molecule-lead coupling at molecular junctions: relation between the real- and state-space perspectives.

    PubMed

    Zelovich, Tamar; Kronik, Leeor; Hod, Oded

    2015-10-13

    We present insights into the lead-molecule coupling scheme in molecular electronics junctions. Using a "site-to-state" transformation that provides direct access to the coupling matrix elements between the molecular states and the eigenstate manifold of each lead, we find coupling bands whose character depends on the geometry and dimensionality of the lead. We use a standard tight-binding model to elucidate the origin of the coupling bands and explain their nature via simple "particle-in-a-box" type considerations. We further show that these coupling bands can shed light on the charge transport behavior of the junction. The picture presented in this study is not limited to the case of molecular electronics junctions and is relevant to any scenario where a finite molecular entity is coupled to a (semi)infinite system.

  12. Transition voltages of vacuum-spaced and molecular junctions with Ag and Pt electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Kunlin; Bai, Meilin; Hou, Shimin; Sanvito, Stefano

    2014-07-07

    The transition voltage of vacuum-spaced and molecular junctions constructed with Ag and Pt electrodes is investigated by non-equilibrium Green's function formalism combined with density functional theory. Our calculations show that, similarly to the case of Au-vacuum-Au previously studied, the transition voltages of Ag and Pt metal-vacuum-metal junctions with atomic protrusions on the electrode surface are determined by the local density of states of the p-type atomic orbitals of the protrusion. Since the energy position of the Pt 6p atomic orbitals is higher than that of the 5p/6p of Ag and Au, the transition voltage of Pt-vacuum-Pt junctions is larger than that of both Ag-vacuum-Ag and Au-vacuum-Au junctions. When one moves to analyzing asymmetric molecular junctions constructed with biphenyl thiol as central molecule, then the transition voltage is found to depend on the specific bonding site for the sulfur atom in the thiol group. In particular agreement with experiments, where the largest transition voltage is found for Ag and the smallest for Pt, is obtained when one assumes S binding at the hollow-bridge site on the Ag/Au(111) surface and at the adatom site on the Pt(111) one. This demonstrates the critical role played by the linker-electrode binding geometry in determining the transition voltage of devices made of conjugated thiol molecules.

  13. Netrin and Frazzled regulate presynaptic gap junctions at a Drosophila giant synapse.

    PubMed

    Orr, Brian O; Borgen, Melissa A; Caruccio, Phyllis M; Murphey, Rodney K

    2014-04-16

    Netrin and its receptor, Frazzled, dictate the strength of synaptic connections in the giant fiber system (GFS) of Drosophila melanogaster by regulating gap junction localization in the presynaptic terminal. In Netrin mutant animals, the synaptic coupling between a giant interneuron and the "jump" motor neuron was weakened and dye coupling between these two neurons was severely compromised or absent. In cases in which Netrin mutants displayed apparently normal synaptic anatomy, half of the specimens exhibited physiologically defective synapses and dye coupling between the giant fiber (GF) and the motor neuron was reduced or eliminated, suggesting that gap junctions were disrupted in the Netrin mutants. When we examined the gap junctions with antibodies to Shaking-B (ShakB) Innexin, they were significantly decreased or absent in the presynaptic terminal of the mutant GF. Frazzled loss of function mutants exhibited similar defects in synaptic transmission, dye coupling, and gap junction localization. These data are the first to show that Netrin and Frazzled regulate the placement of gap junctions presynaptically at a synapse.

  14. Numerical study of three-dimensional separation and flow control at a wing/body junction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ash, Robert L.; Lakshmanan, Balakrishnan

    1989-01-01

    The problem of three-dimensional separation and flow control at a wing/body junction has been investigated numerically using a three-dimensional Navier-Stokes code. The numerical code employs an algebraic grid generation technique for generating the grid for unmodified junction and an elliptic grid generation technique for filleted fin junction. The results for laminar flow past a blunt fin/flat plate junction demonstrate that after grid refinement, the computations agree with experiment and reveal a strong dependency of the number of vortices at the junction on Mach number and Reynolds number. The numerical results for pressure distribution, particle paths and limiting streamlines for turbulent flow past a swept fin show a decrease in the peak pressure and in the extent of the separated flow region compared to the laminar case. The results for a filleted juncture indicate that the streamline patterns lose much of their vortical character with proper filleting. Fillets with a radius of three and one-half times the fin leading edge diameter or two times the incoming boundary layer thickness, significantly weaken the usual necklace interaction vortex for the Mach number and Reynolds number considered in the present study.

  15. Insulator charging limits direct current across tunneling metal-insulator-semiconductor junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Vilan, Ayelet

    2016-01-07

    Molecular electronics studies how the molecular nature affects the probability of charge carriers to tunnel through the molecules. Nevertheless, transport is also critically affected by the contacts to the molecules, an aspect that is often overlooked. Specifically, the limited ability of non-metallic contacts to maintain the required charge balance across the fairly insulating molecule often have dramatic effects. This paper shows that in the case of lead/organic monolayer-silicon junctions, a charge balance is responsible for an unusual current scaling, with the junction diameter (perimeter), rather than its area. This is attributed to the balance between the 2D charging at the metal/insulator interface and the 3D charging of the semiconductor space-charge region. A derivative method is developed to quantify transport across tunneling metal-insulator-semiconductor junctions; this enables separating the tunneling barrier from the space-charge barrier for a given current-voltage curve, without complementary measurements. The paper provides practical tools to analyze specific molecular junctions compatible with existing silicon technology, and demonstrates the importance of contacts' physics in modeling charge transport across molecular junctions.

  16. Transition voltages of vacuum-spaced and molecular junctions with Ag and Pt electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Kunlin; Bai, Meilin; Sanvito, Stefano; Hou, Shimin

    2014-07-01

    The transition voltage of vacuum-spaced and molecular junctions constructed with Ag and Pt electrodes is investigated by non-equilibrium Green's function formalism combined with density functional theory. Our calculations show that, similarly to the case of Au-vacuum-Au previously studied, the transition voltages of Ag and Pt metal-vacuum-metal junctions with atomic protrusions on the electrode surface are determined by the local density of states of the p-type atomic orbitals of the protrusion. Since the energy position of the Pt 6p atomic orbitals is higher than that of the 5p/6p of Ag and Au, the transition voltage of Pt-vacuum-Pt junctions is larger than that of both Ag-vacuum-Ag and Au-vacuum-Au junctions. When one moves to analyzing asymmetric molecular junctions constructed with biphenyl thiol as central molecule, then the transition voltage is found to depend on the specific bonding site for the sulfur atom in the thiol group. In particular agreement with experiments, where the largest transition voltage is found for Ag and the smallest for Pt, is obtained when one assumes S binding at the hollow-bridge site on the Ag/Au(111) surface and at the adatom site on the Pt(111) one. This demonstrates the critical role played by the linker-electrode binding geometry in determining the transition voltage of devices made of conjugated thiol molecules.

  17. Fracture of the Vomero-Premaxillary Junction in a Repaired Bilateral Cleft Lip and Palate Patient

    PubMed Central

    Zwahlen, Roger Arthur; Jayaratne, Yasas Shri Nalaka; Htun, Su Yin; Bütow, Kurt-Wilhelm

    2014-01-01

    Although dental trauma is common in bilateral cleft lip and palate (BCLP), patients' reports on bony fractures of the vomero-premaxillary junction cannot be found. The aim of this report is to illustrate clinical findings and the technique of fracture fixation in a child suffering from a fractured vomero-premaxillary junction as well as subsequent columella lengthening. A 4-year-old girl with a repaired BCLP presented with an open mucosal laceration and fractured vomero-premaxillary junction. Open reduction and fixation of the dislocated premaxilla was performed under general anesthesia. Fractured bone pieces of the vomero-premaxillary junction were removed and sharp bone edges at the vomer and the premaxilla were grinded. The repositioned premaxilla was fixed to the lateral alveolar arches with two mucoperiosteal sutures on each side. Additional columella lengthening was performed 2 years later. All family members were very happy about the new aesthetics of the girl. Although rare, fractures of the vomero-premaxillary junction present several challenges to clinicians related to anatomical, physiological, and psychological issues. Immediate and minimal invasive treatment strategies are recommended when managing such cases. PMID:25383152

  18. Andreev Reflection in a Bilayer Graphene Junction: Role of Spatial Variation of the Charge Neutrality Point

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takane, Yositake; Yarimizu, Katsuhide; Kanda, Akinobu

    2017-06-01

    A graphene sheet partially covered with a bulk superconductor serves as a normal conductor-superconductor (NS) junction, in which electron transport is mainly governed by Andreev reflection (AR). As excess carriers induced over the covered region penetrate into the uncovered region over a screening length, the charge neutrality point (CNP) in the uncovered region shifts only near the NS interface. We theoretically study the electron transport in a bilayer graphene junction taking account of such spatial variation of the CNP in the electron-doped case. When the Fermi level is close to the CNP away from the NS interface, the AR takes place in a specular manner owing to the diffraction of a reflected hole occurring at a pn junction, which is naturally formed in the uncovered region. It is shown that the differential conductance shows an unusual asymmetric behavior as a function of bias voltage under the influence of the pn junction. It is also shown that, if the Fermi level is located below the CNP, the pn junction gives rise to quasi-bound states near the NS interface, leading to the appearance of resonant peaks in the differential conductance.

  19. 0-π phase-controllable thermal Josephson junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fornieri, Antonio; Timossi, Giuliano; Virtanen, Pauli; Solinas, Paolo; Giazotto, Francesco

    2017-05-01

    Two superconductors coupled by a weak link support an equilibrium Josephson electrical current that depends on the phase difference ϕ between the superconducting condensates. Yet, when a temperature gradient is imposed across the junction, the Josephson effect manifests itself through a coherent component of the heat current that flows opposite to the thermal gradient for |ϕ| < π/2 (refs 2-4). The direction of both the Josephson charge and heat currents can be inverted by adding a π shift to ϕ. In the static electrical case, this effect has been obtained in a few systems, for example via a ferromagnetic coupling or a non-equilibrium distribution in the weak link. These structures opened new possibilities for superconducting quantum logic and ultralow-power superconducting computers. Here, we report the first experimental realization of a thermal Josephson junction whose phase bias can be controlled from 0 to π. This is obtained thanks to a superconducting quantum interferometer that allows full control of the direction of the coherent energy transfer through the junction. This possibility, in conjunction with the completely superconducting nature of our system, provides temperature modulations with an unprecedented amplitude of ∼100 mK and transfer coefficients exceeding 1 K per flux quantum at 25 mK. Then, this quantum structure represents a fundamental step towards the realization of caloritronic logic components such as thermal transistors, switches and memory devices. These elements, combined with heat interferometers and diodes, would complete the thermal conversion of the most important phase-coherent electronic devices and benefit cryogenic microcircuits requiring energy management, such as quantum computing architectures and radiation sensors.

  20. Chaos and related nonlinear noise phenomena in Josephson tunnel junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Miracky, R.F.

    1984-07-01

    The nonlinear dynamics of Josephson tunnel junctions shunted by a resistance with substantial self-inductance have been thoroughly investigated. The current-voltage characteristics of these devices exhibit stable regions of negative differential resistance. Very large increases in the low-frequency voltage noise with equivalent noise temperatures of 10/sup 6/ K or more, observed in the vicinity of these regions, arise from switching, or hopping, between subharmonic modes. Moderate increases in the noise, with temperatures of about 10/sup 3/ K, arise from chaotic behavior. Analog and digital simulations indicate that under somewhat rarer circumstances the same junction system can sustain a purely deterministic hopping between two unstable subharmonic modes, accompanied by excess low-frequency noise. Unlike the noise-induced case, this chaotic process occurs over a much narrower range in bias current and is destroyed by the addition of thermal noise. The differential equation describing the junction system can be reduced to a one-dimensional mapping in the vicinity of one of the unstable modes. A general analytical calculation of switching processes for a class of mappings yields the frequency dependence of the noise spectrum in terms of the parameters of the mapping. Finally, the concepts of noise-induced hopping near bifurcation thresholds are applied to the problem of the three-photon Josephson parametric amplifier. Analog simulations indicate that the noise rise observed in experimental devices arises from occasional hopping between a mode at the pump frequency ..omega../sub p/ and a mode at the half harmonic ..omega../sub p//2. The hopping is induced by thermal noise associated with the shunt resistance. 71 references.

  1. 6. View northeast, junction of SR 141 and Rockland Road, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. View northeast, junction of SR 141 and Rockland Road, western estate wall and tree lines to right - A. I. Du Pont Estate, Junction of State Route 141 & Rockland Road, Wilmington, New Castle County, DE

  2. 8. Vidw southwest, junction of SR 141 and Rockland Road, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. Vidw southwest, junction of SR 141 and Rockland Road, northern estate wall and tree lines to left - A. I. Du Pont Estate, Junction of State Route 141 & Rockland Road, Wilmington, New Castle County, DE

  3. 3. View of junction from the west, looking east along ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. View of junction from the west, looking east along Trunk Highway 55 toward the western side of bridge no. 5820. - Cloverleaf Interchange, Junction of Trunk Highways 52, 3, & 55, Inver Grove Heights, Dakota County, MN

  4. Iniencephaly: Radiological and pathological features of a series of three cases.

    PubMed

    Chikkannaiah, Panduranga; Srinivasamurthy, V; Satish Prasad, B S; Lalyanayak, Pradeepkumar; Shivaram, Divya N

    2014-10-01

    Iniencephaly is a rare form of neural tube defect with an incidence of 0.1-10 in 10,000 pregnancies. It is characterized by the presence of occipital bone defects at foramen magnum, fixed retroflexion of head, spinal dysmorphism, and lordosis of cervicothoracic vertebrae. It is usually associated with central nervous system, gastrointestinal, and cardiovascular anomalies. We present radiological and autopsy findings in a series of 3 cases of iniencephaly (gestational ages 29.3, 23, and 24 weeks) first fetus in addition showed omphalocele, pulmonary hypoplasia, two lobes in right lung, accessory spleen, atrial septal defect, bilateral clubfoot, ambiguous genitalia, and single umbilical artery. Second fetus was a classical case of iniencephaly apertus with spina bifida. Third fetus had colpocephaly and bifid spine.

  5. Iniencephaly: Radiological and pathological features of a series of three cases

    PubMed Central

    Chikkannaiah, Panduranga; Srinivasamurthy, V.; Satish Prasad, B. S.; Lalyanayak, Pradeepkumar; Shivaram, Divya N.

    2014-01-01

    Iniencephaly is a rare form of neural tube defect with an incidence of 0.1-10 in 10,000 pregnancies. It is characterized by the presence of occipital bone defects at foramen magnum, fixed retroflexion of head, spinal dysmorphism, and lordosis of cervicothoracic vertebrae. It is usually associated with central nervous system, gastrointestinal, and cardiovascular anomalies. We present radiological and autopsy findings in a series of 3 cases of iniencephaly (gestational ages 29.3, 23, and 24 weeks) first fetus in addition showed omphalocele, pulmonary hypoplasia, two lobes in right lung, accessory spleen, atrial septal defect, bilateral clubfoot, ambiguous genitalia, and single umbilical artery. Second fetus was a classical case of iniencephaly apertus with spina bifida. Third fetus had colpocephaly and bifid spine. PMID:25288843

  6. Three-dimensional models: an emerging investigational revolution for craniovertebral junction surgery.

    PubMed

    Goel, Atul; Jankharia, Bhavin; Shah, Abhidha; Sathe, Prashant

    2016-12-01

    Complex craniovertebral junctional anomalies can be daunting to treat surgically, and preoperative information regarding the osseous abnormalities, course of the vertebral arteries, size of the pedicles, and location of the transverse foramina is invaluable to surgeons operating on these challenging cases. The authors present their experience with the emerging technology of 3D model acquisition for surgery in 11 cases of complex craniovertebral junction region anomalies. For each case, a 3D printed model was made from thin CT scans using a 64-slice CT scanner. The inclination of the joints, the presence of false articulations, the size of the pedicles, and the course of the vertebral arteries were studied preoperatively on the 3D models. The sizes of the plates and screws to be used and the angle of insertion of the screws were calculated based on the data from the models. The model was scaled to actual size and was kept beside the operating surgeon in its anatomical position during surgery. The potential uses of the models and their advantages over conventional radiological investigations are discussed. The authors conclude that 3D models can be an invaluable aid during surgery for complex craniovertebral junction anomalies. The information available from a real life-size model supersedes the information available from 3D CT reconstructions and can also be superior to virtual simulation. The models are both cost effective and easy to build and the authors suggest that they may form the basis of investigations in the near future for craniovertebral junction surgery.

  7. Endoscopic Endonasal Approaches to the Craniovertebral Junction: A Systematic Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Fujii, Tatsuhiro; Platt, Andrew; Zada, Gabriel

    2015-01-01

    Background We reviewed the current literature pertaining to extended endoscopic endonasal approaches to the craniovertebral junction. Methods A systematic literature review was utilized to identify published surgical cases of endoscopic endonasal approaches to the craniovertebral junction. Full-text manuscripts were examined for various measures of surgical indications, patient characteristics, operative technique, and surgical outcomes. Results We identified 71 cases involving endoscopic endonasal approaches for surgical management of a variety of pathologies located within the craniovertebral junction. Patient ages ranged from 3 to 87 years, with 40 females and 31 males. Five patients required tracheostomy, two were reintubated, and all others experienced an average intubation duration of 0.54 days following surgery. Fifty-eight patients (81.7%) underwent an additional posterior decompression or fusion either before or after the endonasal procedure. A complete resection of the pathologic lesion was reported in 57 cases (83.8%), another five were successful biopsies, and four resulted in partial resection. The follow-up time ranged from 0.5 to 57 months. Conclusion Although the transoral approach has been the standard for anterior surgical management for the past several decades, our systematic review illustrates that the extended endoscopic endonasal approach is a safe and effective alternative for most pathologies affecting the craniovertebral junction. PMID:26682128

  8. Connexin43 Mutation Causes Heterogeneous Gap Junction Loss and Sudden Infant Death

    PubMed Central

    Van Norstrand, David W.; Asimaki, Angeliki; Rubinos, Clio; Dolmatova, Elena; Srinivas, Miduturu; Tester, David J.; Saffitz, Jeffrey E.; Duffy, Heather S.; Ackerman, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    Background An estimated 10-15% of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) may stem from channelopathy-mediated lethal arrhythmias. Loss of the GJA1-encoded gap junction channel protein connexin43 (Cx43) is known to underlie formation of lethal arrhythmias. GJA1 mutations have been associated with cardiac diseases including atrial fibrillation. Therefore, GJA1 is a plausible candidate gene for premature sudden death. Methods and Results GJA1 open reading frame mutational analysis was performed using PCR, DHPLC, and direct DNA sequencing on DNA from 292 SIDS cases. Immunofluorescence and dual whole cell patch-clamp studies were performed to determine functionality of mutant gap junctions. Immunostaining for gap junction proteins was performed on SIDS-associated paraffin-embedded cardiac tissue. Two rare, novel missense mutations, E42K and S272P, were detected in 2 of 292 SIDS cases, a 2-month-old white male and a 3-month-old white female, respectively. Analysis of the E42K victim’s parental DNA demonstrated a de novo mutation. Both mutations involved highly conserved residues and were absent in over 1000 ethnic-matched reference alleles. Immunofluorescence demonstrated no trafficking abnormalities for either mutation and S272P demonstrated wildtype junctional conductance. However, junctional conductance measurements for the E42K mutation demonstrated a loss-of-function not rescued by wildtype. Moreover, the E42K victim cardiac tissue demonstrated a mosaic immunostaining pattern for Cx43 protein. Conclusions This study provides the first molecular and functional evidence implicating a GJA1 mutation as a novel pathogenic substrate for SIDS. E42K-Cx43 demonstrated a trafficking-independent reduction in junctional coupling in vitro as well as demonstrating a mosaic pattern of mutational DNA distribution in deceased cardiac tissue, suggesting a novel mechanism of Cx43-associated sudden death. PMID:22179534

  9. Retrospective review using targeted deep sequencing reveals mutational differences between gastroesophageal junction and gastric carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Li-Chang, Hector H; Kasaian, Katayoon; Ng, Ying; Lum, Amy; Kong, Esther; Lim, Howard; Jones, Steven Jm; Huntsman, David G; Schaeffer, David F; Yip, Stephen

    2015-02-06

    Adenocarcinomas of both the gastroesophageal junction and stomach are molecularly complex, but differ with respect to epidemiology, etiology and survival. There are few data directly comparing the frequencies of single nucleotide mutations in cancer-related genes between the two sites. Sequencing of targeted gene panels may be useful in uncovering multiple genomic aberrations using a single test. DNA from 92 gastroesophageal junction and 75 gastric adenocarcinoma resection specimens was extracted from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue. Targeted deep sequencing of 46 cancer-related genes was performed through emulsion PCR followed by semiconductor-based sequencing. Gastroesophageal junction and gastric carcinomas were contrasted with respect to mutational profiles, immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization, as well as corresponding clinicopathologic data. Gastroesophageal junction carcinomas were associated with younger age, more frequent intestinal-type histology, more frequent p53 overexpression, and worse disease-free survival on multivariable analysis. Among all cases, 145 mutations were detected in 31 genes. TP53 mutations were the most common abnormality detected, and were more common in gastroesophageal junction carcinomas (42% vs. 27%, p = 0.036). Mutations in the Wnt pathway components APC and CTNNB1 were more common among gastric carcinomas (16% vs. 3%, p = 0.006), and gastric carcinomas were more likely to have ≥3 driver mutations detected (11% vs. 2%, p = 0.044). Twenty percent of cases had potentially actionable mutations identified. R132H and R132C missense mutations in the IDH1 gene were observed, and are the first reported mutations of their kind in gastric carcinoma. Panel sequencing of routine pathology material can yield mutational information on several driver genes, including some for which targeted therapies are available. Differing rates of mutations and clinicopathologic differences support a distinction between

  10. Ballistic transport in InSb Josephson junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damasco, John Jeffrey; Gill, Stephen; Car, Diana; Bakkers, Erik; Mason, Nadya

    We present transport measurements on Josephson junctions consisting of InSb nanowires contacted by Al at various junction lengths. Junction behavior as a function of gate voltage, electric field, and magnetic field is discussed. We show that short junctions behave as 1D quantum wires, exhibiting quantized conductance steps. In addition, we show how Josephson behavior changes as transport evolves from ballistic to diffusive as a function of contact spacing.

  11. High voltage series connected tandem junction solar battery

    DOEpatents

    Hanak, Joseph J.

    1982-01-01

    A high voltage series connected tandem junction solar battery which comprises a plurality of strips of tandem junction solar cells of hydrogenated amorphous silicon having one optical path and electrically interconnected by a tunnel junction. The layers of hydrogenated amorphous silicon, arranged in a tandem configuration, can have the same bandgap or differing bandgaps. The tandem junction strip solar cells are series connected to produce a solar battery of any desired voltage.

  12. Costochondral junction osteomyelitis in 3 septic foals

    PubMed Central

    Cesarini, Carla; Macieira, Susana; Girard, Christiane; Drolet, Richard; d’Anjou, Marc-André; Jean, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    The costochondral junction constitutes a potential site of infection in septic foals and it could be favored by thoracic trauma. Standard radiographs and ultrasonography are useful tools for diagnosis of this condition and ultrasound-guided needle aspiration could permit the definitive confirmation of infection. PMID:22210943

  13. Intrinsically shunted Josephson junctions for electronics applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belogolovskii, M.; Zhitlukhina, E.; Lacquaniti, V.; De Leo, N.; Fretto, M.; Sosso, A.

    2017-07-01

    Conventional Josephson metal-insulator-metal devices are inherently underdamped and exhibit hysteretic current-voltage response due to a very high subgap resistance compared to that in the normal state. At the same time, overdamped junctions with single-valued characteristics are needed for most superconducting digital applications. The usual way to overcome the hysteretic behavior is to place an external low-resistance normal-metal shunt in parallel with each junction. Unfortunately, such solution results in a considerable complication of the circuitry design and introduces parasitic inductance through the junction. This paper provides a concise overview of some generic approaches that have been proposed in order to realize internal shunting in Josephson heterostructures with a barrier that itself contains the desired resistive component. The main attention is paid to self-shunted devices with local weak-link transmission probabilities that are so strongly disordered in the interface plane that transmission probabilities are tiny for the main part of the transition region between two super-conducting electrodes, while a small part of the interface is well transparent. We discuss the possibility of realizing a universal bimodal distribution function and emphasize advantages of such junctions that can be considered as a new class of self-shunted Josephson devices promising for practical applications in superconducting electronics operating at 4.2 K.

  14. Gap junctional communication during limb cartilage differentiation.

    PubMed

    Coelho, C N; Kosher, R A

    1991-03-01

    The onset of cartilage differentiation in the developing limb bud is characterized by a transient cellular condensation process in which prechondrogenic mesenchymal cells become closely apposed to one another prior to initiating cartilage matrix deposition. During this condensation process intimate cell-cell interactions occur which are necessary to trigger chondrogenic differentiation. In the present study, we demonstrate that extensive cell-cell communication via gap junctions as assayed by the intercellular transfer of lucifer yellow dye occurs during condensation and the onset of overt chondrogenesis in high density micromass cultures prepared from the homogeneous population of chondrogenic precursor cells comprising the distal subridge region of stage 25 embryonic chick wing buds. Furthermore, in heterogeneous micromass cultures prepared from the mesodermal cells of whole stage 23/24 limb buds, extensive gap junctional communication is limited to differentiating cartilage cells, while the nonchondrogenic cells of the cultures that are differentiating into the connective tissue lineage exhibit little or no intercellular communication via gap junctions. These results provide a strong incentive for considering and further investigating the possible involvement of cell-cell communication via gap junctions in the regulation of limb cartilage differentiation.

  15. Axion mass estimates from resonant Josephson junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, Christian

    2015-03-01

    Recently it has been proposed that dark matter axions from the galactic halo can produce a small Shapiro step-like signal in Josephson junctions whose Josephson frequency resonates with the axion mass (Beck, 2013). Here we show that the axion field equations in a voltage-driven Josephson junction environment allow for a nontrivial solution where the axion-induced electrical current manifests itself as an oscillating supercurrent. The linear change of phase associated with this nontrivial solution implies the formal existence of a large magnetic field in a tiny surface area of the weak link region of the junction which makes incoming axions decay into microwave photons. We derive a condition for the design of Josephson junction experiments so that they can act as optimum axion detectors. Four independent recent experiments are discussed in this context. The observed Shapiro step anomalies of all four experiments consistently point towards an axion mass of (110±2) μeV. This mass value is compatible with the recent BICEP2 results and implies that Peccei-Quinn symmetry breaking was taking place after inflation.

  16. Limiting process in shallow junction solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meulenberg, A.; Rittner, E.

    1979-01-01

    In extending the violet and nonreflective cell technology to lower resistivities, several processes limiting output power were encountered. The most important was the dark diffusion current due to recombination at the front grid contacts. After removal of this problem by reduction of the silicon metal contact area (to 0.14 percent of the total area), the electric field enhanced junction recombination current J sub r was the main limitation. Alteration of the diffusion profile to reduce the junction field is shown to be an effective means of influencing J sub r. The remaining problems are the bulk recombination in the n+ layer and the surface recombination at the oxide-silicon interface; both of these problems are aggravated by band-narrowing resulting from heavy doping in the diffused layer. Experimental evidence for the main limitations is shown, where increased diffusion temperature is seen to reduce both the influence of the front grid contacts and the junction electric field by increasing the junction depth. The potential for further significant improvement in efficiency appears to be high.

  17. Tight junction, selective permeability, and related diseases.

    PubMed

    Krug, Susanne M; Schulzke, Jörg D; Fromm, Michael

    2014-12-01

    The tight junction forms a barrier against unlimited paracellular passage but some of the tight junction proteins just do the opposite, they form extracellular channels zigzagging between lateral membranes of neighboring cells. All of these channel-forming proteins and even some of the barrier formers exhibit selectivity, which means that they prefer certain substances over others. All channel formers exhibit at least one of the three types of selectivity: for cations (claudin-2, -10b, -15), for anions (claudin-10a, -17) or for water (claudin-2). Also some, but not all, barrier-forming claudins are charge-selective (claudin-4, -8, -14). Moreover, occludin and tricellulin turned out to be relevant for barrier formation against macromolecule passage. Tight junction proteins are dysregulated or can be genetically defective in numerous diseases, which may lead to three effects: (i) impaired paracellular transport e.g. causing magnesium loss in the kidney, (ii) increased paracellular transport of solutes and water e.g. causing leak-flux diarrhea in the intestine, and (iii) increased permeability to large molecules e.g. unwanted intestinal pathogen uptake fueling inflammatory processes. This review gives an overview on the properties of tight junction proteins featuring selective permeability, and in this context explains how these proteins induce or aggravate diseases. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Polyphosphonium-based ion bipolar junction transistors.

    PubMed

    Gabrielsson, Erik O; Tybrandt, Klas; Berggren, Magnus

    2014-11-01

    Advancements in the field of electronics during the past few decades have inspired the use of transistors in a diversity of research fields, including biology and medicine. However, signals in living organisms are not only carried by electrons but also through fluxes of ions and biomolecules. Thus, in order to implement the transistor functionality to control biological signals, devices that can modulate currents of ions and biomolecules, i.e., ionic transistors and diodes, are needed. One successful approach for modulation of ionic currents is to use oppositely charged ion-selective membranes to form so called ion bipolar junction transistors (IBJTs). Unfortunately, overall IBJT device performance has been hindered due to the typical low mobility of ions, large geometries of the ion bipolar junction materials, and the possibility of electric field enhanced (EFE) water dissociation in the junction. Here, we introduce a novel polyphosphonium-based anion-selective material into npn-type IBJTs. The new material does not show EFE water dissociation and therefore allows for a reduction of junction length down to 2 μm, which significantly improves the switching performance of the ion transistor to 2 s. The presented improvement in speed as well the simplified design will be useful for future development of advanced iontronic circuits employing IBJTs, for example, addressable drug-delivery devices.

  19. Two-dimensional bipolar junction transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gharekhanlou, Behnaz; Khorasani, Sina; Sarvari, Reza

    2014-03-01

    Recent development in fabrication technology of planar two-dimensional (2D) materials has introduced the possibility of numerous novel applications. Our recent analysis has revealed that by definition of p-n junctions through appropriate patterned doping of 2D semiconductors, ideal exponential I-V characteristics may be expected. However, the theory of 2D junctions turns out to be very different to that of standard bulk junctions. Based on this theory of 2D diodes, we construct for the first time a model to describe 2D bipolar junction transistors (2D-BJTs). We derive the small-signal equivalent model, and estimate the performance of a 2D-BJT device based on graphone as the example material. A current gain of about 138 and maximum threshold frequency of 77 GHz, together with a power-delay product of only 4 fJ per 1 μm lateral width is expected at an operating voltage of 5 V. In addition, we derive the necessary formulae and a new approximate solution for the continuity equation in the 2D configuration, which have been verified against numerical solutions.

  20. All-carbon molecular tunnel junctions.

    PubMed

    Yan, Haijun; Bergren, Adam Johan; McCreery, Richard L

    2011-11-30

    This Article explores the idea of using nonmetallic contacts for molecular electronics. Metal-free, all-carbon molecular electronic junctions were fabricated by orienting a layer of organic molecules between two carbon conductors with high yield (>90%) and good reproducibility (rsd of current density at 0.5 V <30%). These all-carbon devices exhibit current density-voltage (J-V) behavior similar to those with metallic Cu top contacts. However, the all-carbon devices display enhanced stability to bias extremes and greatly improved thermal stability. Completed carbon/nitroazobenzene(NAB)/carbon junctions can sustain temperatures up to 300 °C in vacuum for 30 min and can be scanned at ±1 V for at least 1.2 × 10(9) cycles in air at 100 °C without a significant change in J-V characteristics. Furthermore, these all-carbon devices can withstand much higher voltages and current densities than can Cu-containing junctions, which fail upon oxidation and/or electromigration of the copper. The advantages of carbon contacts stem mainly from the strong covalent bonding in the disordered carbon materials, which resists electromigration or penetration into the molecular layer, and provides enhanced stability. These results highlight the significance of nonmetallic contacts for molecular electronics and the potential for integration of all-carbon molecular junctions with conventional microelectronics.

  1. Radiation comb generation with extended Josephson junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Solinas, P.; Bosisio, R.; Giazotto, F.

    2015-09-21

    We propose the implementation of a Josephson radiation comb generator based on an extended Josephson junction subject to a time dependent magnetic field. The junction critical current shows known diffraction patterns and determines the position of the critical nodes when it vanishes. When the magnetic flux passes through one of such critical nodes, the superconducting phase must undergo a π-jump to minimize the Josephson energy. Correspondingly, a voltage pulse is generated at the extremes of the junction. Under periodic driving, this allows us to produce a comb-like voltage pulses sequence. In the frequency domain, it is possible to generate up to hundreds of harmonics of the fundamental driving frequency, thus mimicking the frequency comb used in optics and metrology. We discuss several implementations through a rectangular, cylindrical, and annular junction geometries, allowing us to generate different radiation spectra and to produce an output power up to 10 pW at 50 GHz for a driving frequency of 100 MHz.

  2. Gallium nitride junction field-effect transistor

    DOEpatents

    Zolper, J.C.; Shul, R.J.

    1999-02-02

    An ion implanted gallium-nitride (GaN) junction field-effect transistor (JFET) and method of making the same are disclosed. Also disclosed are various ion implants, both n- and p-type, together with or without phosphorus co-implantation, in selected III-V semiconductor materials. 19 figs.

  3. Polyphosphonium-based ion bipolar junction transistors

    PubMed Central

    Gabrielsson, Erik O.; Berggren, Magnus

    2014-01-01

    Advancements in the field of electronics during the past few decades have inspired the use of transistors in a diversity of research fields, including biology and medicine. However, signals in living organisms are not only carried by electrons but also through fluxes of ions and biomolecules. Thus, in order to implement the transistor functionality to control biological signals, devices that can modulate currents of ions and biomolecules, i.e., ionic transistors and diodes, are needed. One successful approach for modulation of ionic currents is to use oppositely charged ion-selective membranes to form so called ion bipolar junction transistors (IBJTs). Unfortunately, overall IBJT device performance has been hindered due to the typical low mobility of ions, large geometries of the ion bipolar junction materials, and the possibility of electric field enhanced (EFE) water dissociation in the junction. Here, we introduce a novel polyphosphonium-based anion-selective material into npn-type IBJTs. The new material does not show EFE water dissociation and therefore allows for a reduction of junction length down to 2 μm, which significantly improves the switching performance of the ion transistor to 2 s. The presented improvement in speed as well the simplified design will be useful for future development of advanced iontronic circuits employing IBJTs, for example, addressable drug-delivery devices. PMID:25553192

  4. Gallium nitride junction field-effect transistor

    DOEpatents

    Zolper, John C.; Shul, Randy J.

    1999-01-01

    An all-ion implanted gallium-nitride (GaN) junction field-effect transistor (JFET) and method of making the same. Also disclosed are various ion implants, both n- and p-type, together with or without phosphorous co-implantation, in selected III-V semiconductor materials.

  5. Identification of Junctionally-Transmitted Growth Inhibitors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-08-01

    Fig 2b. Fig 2a.. Note junctional plaques (arrows). Fig 2b Western blott of induced (left) and non- induced (right) MDA cells. Arrow indicates 43KD MW...plaques in regions of cell/cell contact (Fig 2a ) and is of the correct molecular size as shown by Western blotting (Fig 2b). We had demonstrated that

  6. The dynamic organic p-n junction.

    PubMed

    Matyba, Piotr; Maturova, Klara; Kemerink, Martijn; Robinson, Nathaniel D; Edman, Ludvig

    2009-08-01

    Static p-n junctions in inorganic semiconductors are exploited in a wide range of today's electronic appliances. Here, we demonstrate the in situ formation of a dynamic p-n junction structure within an organic semiconductor through electrochemistry. Specifically, we use scanning kelvin probe microscopy and optical probing on planar light-emitting electrochemical cells (LECs) with a mixture of a conjugated polymer and an electrolyte connecting two electrodes separated by 120 microm. We find that a significant portion of the potential drop between the electrodes coincides with the location of a thin and distinct light-emission zone positioned >30 microm away from the negative electrode. These results are relevant in the context of a long-standing scientific debate, as they prove that electrochemical doping can take place in LECs. Moreover, a study on the doping formation and dissipation kinetics provides interesting detail regarding the electronic structure and stability of the dynamic organic p-n junction, which may be useful in future dynamic p-n junction-based devices.

  7. Regulation of Traffic Lights at Road Junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cutolo, Alfredo; Manzo, Rosanna; Rarità, Luigi

    2009-08-01

    In this work, we aim to investigate the effects of traffic lights regulation at road junctions, modelled by a fluid dynamic approach. Numerical simulations prove that it is possible to plan some optimization strategies for green and red phases for networks consisting of more nodes.

  8. Tricellular junctions: how to build junctions at the TRICkiest points of epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Higashi, Tomohito; Miller, Ann L.

    2017-01-01

    Tricellular contacts are the places where three cells meet. In vertebrate epithelial cells, specialized structures called tricellular tight junctions (tTJs) and tricellular adherens junctions (tAJs) have been identified. tTJs are important for the maintenance of barrier function, and disruption of tTJ proteins contributes to familial deafness. tAJs have recently been attracting the attention of mechanobiologists because these sites are hot spots of epithelial tension. Although the molecular components, regulation, and function of tTJs and tAJs, as well as of invertebrate tricellular junctions, are beginning to be characterized, many questions remain. Here we broadly cover what is known about tricellular junctions, propose a new model for tension transmission at tAJs, and discuss key open questions. PMID:28705832

  9. Statistical I-V measurements of single-molecule junctions with an asymmetric anchoring group 1,4-aminobenzenethiol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komoto, Yuki; Fujii, Shintaro; Kiguchi, Manabu

    2017-06-01

    Molecular diodes are an interesting topic in the field of single-molecule electronics. Rectification of molecules such as 1,4-aminobenzenethiol (ABT) having different contact areas was reported. However, a more statistical approach is necessary to clarify the rectification of the ABT single-molecule junctions. In this research, we statistically measured the single molecular conductance and I-V characteristics of ABT single-molecule junctions using the scanning tunneling microscope break junction (STM-BJ) method. Two single molecular conductances caused to difference of bridging geometries were observed in the conductance measurements. Statistically significant rectification was not observed for ABT junctions. We concluded rectification does not appear only due to the difference of two anchoring groups in case of a small conjugate molecule such as ABT. Invited talk at 8th International Workshop on Advanced Materials Science and Nanotechnology (IWAMSN2016), 8-12 November 2016, Ha Long City, Vietnam.

  10. Overview of the Grand Junction Office from Bluff east of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Overview of the Grand Junction Office from Bluff east of facility. Note Buildings #35. #33 and #31A in lower left of photograph. VIEW WEST - Department of Energy, Grand Junction Office, 2597 B3/4 Road, Grand Junction, Mesa County, CO

  11. Variety of horizontal cell gap junctions in the rabbit retina.

    PubMed

    Cha, Jiook; Kim, Hong-Lim; Pan, Feng; Chun, Myung-Hoon; Massey, Stephen C; Kim, In-Beom

    2012-02-29

    In the rabbit retina, there are two types of horizontal cell (HC). The axonless A-type HCs form a coupled network via connexin 50 (Cx50) gap junctions in the outer plexiform layer (OPL). The axon-bearing B-type HCs form two independently coupled networks; the dendritic network via gap junctions consisted of unknown Cx and the axon terminal network via Cx57. The present study was conducted to examine the localization and morphological features of Cx50 and Cx57 gap junctions in rabbit HCs at cellular and subcellular levels. The results showed that each gap junction composed of Cx50 or Cx57 showed distinct features. The larger Cx50 gap junctions were located more proximally than the smaller Cx50 gap junctions. Both Cx50 plaques formed symmetrical homotypic gap junctions, but some small ones had an asymmetrical appearance, suggesting the presence of heterotypic gap junctions or hemichannels. In contrast, Cx57 gap junctions were found in the more distal part of the OPL but never on the axon terminal endings entering the rod spherules, and they were exclusively homotypic. Interestingly, about half of the Cx57 gap junctions appeared to be invaginated. These distinct features of Cx50 and Cx57 gap junctions show the variety of HC gap junctions and may provide insights into the function of different types of HCs. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. 30 CFR 75.602 - Trailing cable junctions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Trailing cable junctions. 75.602 Section 75.602... MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Trailing Cables § 75.602 Trailing cable junctions. When two or more trailing cables junction to the same distribution center, means shall be provided to...

  13. 30 CFR 75.602 - Trailing cable junctions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Trailing cable junctions. 75.602 Section 75.602... MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Trailing Cables § 75.602 Trailing cable junctions. When two or more trailing cables junction to the same distribution center, means shall be provided to...

  14. 30 CFR 75.602 - Trailing cable junctions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Trailing cable junctions. 75.602 Section 75.602... MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Trailing Cables § 75.602 Trailing cable junctions. When two or more trailing cables junction to the same distribution center, means shall be provided to...

  15. 30 CFR 75.602 - Trailing cable junctions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Trailing cable junctions. 75.602 Section 75.602... MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Trailing Cables § 75.602 Trailing cable junctions. When two or more trailing cables junction to the same distribution center, means shall be provided to...

  16. 30 CFR 75.602 - Trailing cable junctions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Trailing cable junctions. 75.602 Section 75.602... MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Trailing Cables § 75.602 Trailing cable junctions. When two or more trailing cables junction to the same distribution center, means shall be provided to...

  17. 30 CFR 57.12007 - Junction box connection procedures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Junction box connection procedures. 57.12007... Electricity Surface and Underground § 57.12007 Junction box connection procedures. Trailing cable and power-cable connections to junction boxes shall not be made or broken under load....

  18. COEXISTENCE OF GAP AND SEPTATE JUNCTIONS IN AN INVERTEBRATE EPITHELIUM

    PubMed Central

    Hudspeth, A. J.; Revel, J. P.

    1971-01-01

    The intercellular junctions of the epithelium lining the hepatic caecum of Daphnia were examined. Electron microscope investigations involved both conventionally fixed material and tissue exposed to a lanthanum tracer of the extracellular space. Both septate junctions and gap junctions occur between the cells studied. The septate junctions lie apically and resemble those commonly discerned between cells of other invertebrates. They are atypical in that the high electron opacity of the extracellular space obscures septa in routine preparations. The gap junctions are characterized by a uniform 30 A space between apposed cell membranes. Lanthanum treatment of gap junctions reveals an array of particles of 95 A diameter and 120 A separation lying in the plane of the junction. As this pattern closely resembles that described previously in vertebrates, it appears that the gap junction is phylogenetically widespread. In view of evidence that the gap junction mediates intercellular electrotonic coupling, the assignment of a coupling role to other junctions, notably the septate junction, must be questioned wherever these junctions coexist. PMID:5563454

  19. Inverted Three-Junction Tandem Thermophotovoltaic Modules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wojtczuk, Steven

    2012-01-01

    An InGaAs-based three-junction (3J) tandem thermophotovoltaic (TPV) cell has been investigated to utilize more of the blackbody spectrum (from a 1,100 C general purpose heat source GPHS) efficiently. The tandem consists of three vertically stacked subcells, a 0.74-eV InGaAs cell, a 0.6- eV InGaAs cell, and a 0.55-eV InGaAs cell, as well as two interconnecting tunnel junctions. A greater than 20% TPV system efficiency was achieved by another group with a 1,040 C blackbody using a single-bandgap 0.6- eV InGaAs cell MIM (monolithic interconnected module) (30 lateral junctions) that delivered about 12 V/30 or 0.4 V/junction. It is expected that a three-bandgap tandem MIM will eventually have about 3 this voltage (1.15 V) and about half the current. A 4 A/cm2 would be generated by a single-bandgap 0.6-V InGaAs MIM, as opposed to the 2 A/cm2 available from the same spectrum when split among the three series-connected junctions in the tandem stack. This would then be about a 50% increase (3xVoc, 0.5xIsc) in output power if the proposed tandem replaced the single- bandgap MIM. The advantage of the innovation, if successful, would be a 50% increase in power conversion efficiency from radioisotope heat sources using existing thermophotovoltaics. Up to 50% more power would be generated for radioisotope GPHS deep space missions. This type of InGaAs multijunction stack could be used with terrestrial concentrator solar cells to increase efficiency from 41 to 45% or more.

  20. Gap junctional communication during human trophoblast differentiation: influence of human chorionic gonadotropin.

    PubMed

    Cronier, L; Bastide, B; Hervé, J C; Délèze, J; Malassiné, A

    1994-07-01

    During pregnancy, the trophoblast develops from the fusion of cytotrophoblastic cells into a syncytiotrophoblast. As the exchange of molecules through gap junctions is considered to play a role in the control of cell and tissue differentiation, the cell to cell diffusion of a fluorescent dye was investigated in human trophoblastic cells differentiating in culture. The fluorescence recovery after photobleaching technique was used to estimate the transfer of 6-carboxyfluorescein from contiguous cellular elements into photobleached cells. Fluorescence recovery follows a slow exponential time course when the cell to cell exchange process is rate limited by the presence of gap junctional channels between contiguous cells, contrasting with a much faster step-like course in the case of fusion of the plasma membranes. In the presence of 10% fetal calf serum, Percoll-purified cytotrophoblastic cells develop into cellular aggregates, then into a syncytium, within 24-48 h after plating. During this in vitro differentiation, fluorescence recoveries after photobleaching with a time course typical for gap junctions were observed between aggregated cytotrophoblastic cells, between cytotrophoblastic cells and syncytiotrophoblasts, and between contiguous syncytiotrophoblasts. The maximum percentage of gap junctional coupling occurs on the fourth day. This fluorescence recovery is attributed to the diffusion of dye through gap junctions, because it can be interrupted by exposure to a known junctional uncoupler (3 mM heptanol). The effects of hCG on this gap junctional communication during trophoblast differentiation were investigated. In the presence of 500 mIU/ml hCG in the culture medium, the percentage of coupled cells was increased at all stages of culture, and the highest proportion of coupled cells was observed after 2 days of culture vs. 4 days in control medium. Moreover, the diffusion rate constant k (the inverse value of the time constant measured on recovery curves) was

  1. Model building to facilitate understanding of holliday junction and heteroduplex formation, and holliday junction resolution.

    PubMed

    Selvarajah, Geeta; Selvarajah, Susila

    2016-07-08

    Students frequently expressed difficulty in understanding the molecular mechanisms involved in chromosomal recombination. Therefore, we explored alternative methods for presenting the two concepts of the double-strand break model: Holliday junction and heteroduplex formation, and Holliday junction resolution. In addition to a lecture and computer-animated video, we included a model building activity using pipe cleaners. Biotechnology undergraduates (n = 108) used the model to simulate Holliday junction and heteroduplex formation, and Holliday junction resolution. Based on student perception, an average of 12.85 and 78.35% students claimed that they completely and partially understood the two concepts, respectively. A test conducted to ascertain their understanding about the two concepts showed that 66.1% of the students provided the correct response to the three multiple choice questions. A majority of the 108 students attributed the inclusion of model building to their better understanding of Holliday junction and heteroduplex formation, and Holliday junction resolution. This underlines the importance of incorporating model building, particularly in concepts that require spatial visualization. © 2016 by The International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, 44(4):381-390, 2016.

  2. Simulations of chaos generation from Josephson junctions with various junction parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hiwatashi, R.; Tamura, Y.; Shimakage, H.

    2017-07-01

    It is well known that voltage waveforms between electrodes of Josephson junctions under irradiation of a microwave behave chaos characteristics under appropriate conditions. In order to apply the chaos to a random number generator, we have been studying Josephson chaos by simulations. In the simulation, the Josephson junction is assumed to fabricate with YBCO materials. We used a RCSJ model in order to present an equivalent circuit of the Josephson junction, and derived a derivative equation. Lyapunov exponents, which determined if the state of the Josephson junction was chaotic or not, were calculated from time evolutions of voltages obtained from the equation. In the simulation, junction parameters were assigned feasible values for an actual YBCO Josephson junctions. As a result, we found that chaos can be generated by adjusting element parameters. Moreover, we found that there were lower limits in the resistance values for generation of chaos. In addition, we found that frequency margins, at which the chaos was obtained, were broadened by decrease of the resistance and increase of capacitance.

  3. Fluid and particulate suspension flows at fracture junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo, Tak S.; Koplik, Joel

    2015-03-01

    Suspended particles can be a serious problem in geological contexts such as fluid recovery from reservoirs because they alter the rheology of the flowing liquids and may obstruct transport by narrowing flow channels due to deposition or gravitational sedimentation. In particular, the irregular geometry of the fracture walls can trap particles, induce jamming and cause unwanted channeling effects. We have investigated particle suspension flows in tight geological fractures using lattice Boltzmann method in the past. In this work we extend these studies to flows at a junction where two fractures intersect, an essential step towards a complete understanding of flows in fracture networks. The fracture walls are modeled as realistic self-affine fractal surfaces, and we focus on the case of tight fractures, where the wall roughness, the aperture and the particle size are all comparable. The simulations provide complete detail on the particle configurations and the fluid flow field, from which the stresses in the fluid and the forces acting on the bounding walls can be computed. With these information, phenomena such as particle mixing and dispersion, mechanical responses of the solid walls, possible jamming and release at junctions, and other situations of interest can be investigated. Work supported by NERSC and DOE.

  4. Dynamical Coulomb blockade of tunnel junctions driven by alternating voltages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grabert, Hermann

    2015-12-01

    The theory of the dynamical Coulomb blockade is extended to tunneling elements driven by a time-dependent voltage. It is shown that, for standard setups where an external voltage is applied to a tunnel junction via an impedance, time-dependent driving entails an excitation of the modes of the electromagnetic environment by the applied voltage. Previous approaches for ac driven circuits need to be extended to account for the driven bath modes. A unitary transformation involving also the variables of the electromagnetic environment is introduced which allows us to split off the time dependence from the Hamiltonian in the absence of tunneling. This greatly simplifies perturbation-theoretical calculations based on treating the tunneling Hamiltonian as a perturbation. In particular, the average current flowing in the leads of the tunnel junction is studied. Explicit results are given for the case of an applied voltage with a constant dc part and a sinusoidal ac part. The connection with standard dynamical Coulomb blockade theory for constant applied voltage is established. It is shown that an alternating voltage source reveals significant additional effects caused by the electromagnetic environment. The hallmark of the dynamical Coulomb blockade in ac driven devices is a suppression of higher harmonics of the current by the electromagnetic environment. The theory presented basically applies to all tunneling devices driven by alternating voltages.

  5. Phase dynamics of low critical current density YBCO Josephson junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massarotti, D.; Stornaiuolo, D.; Rotoli, G.; Carillo, F.; Galletti, L.; Longobardi, L.; Beltram, F.; Tafuri, F.

    2014-08-01

    High critical temperature superconductors (HTS) based devices can have impact in the study of the phase dynamics of Josephson junctions (JJs) thanks to the wide range of junction parameters they offer and to their unconventional properties. Measurements of current-voltage characteristics and of switching current distributions constitute a direct way to classify different regimes of the phase dynamics and of the transport, also in nontrivial case of the moderately damped regime (MDR). MDR is going to be more and more common in JJs with advances in nanopatterning superconductors and synthesizing novel hybrid systems. Distinctive signatures of macroscopic quantum tunneling and of thermal activation in presence of different tunable levels of dissipation have been detected in YBCO grain boundary JJs. Experimental data are supported by Monte Carlo simulations of the phase dynamics, in a wide range of temperatures and dissipation levels. This allows us to quantify dissipation in the MDR and partially reconstruct a phase diagram as guideline for a wide range of moderately damped systems.

  6. Direct detection at submillimetre wavelengths using superconducting tunnel junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Withington, S.; Isaak, K. G.; Kovtonyuk, S. A.; Panhuyzen, R. A.; Klapwijk, T. M.

    1995-12-01

    Superconducting tunnel-junction direct detectors are considered in some detail. For frequencies below twice that of the gap there is some bias voltage for which the input impedance is real, the responsivity quantum limited, and the dynamic range high. A susperconducting detector saturates for two reasons: intrinsic saturation due to the relative increase in two-photon tunnelling processes, and extrinsic saturation due to the input match changing with bias voltage. The responsivity of a detector with a resistive RF source is least sensitive to bias-voltage changes and has the greatest dynamic range when operating with a sloping load line. In the case of an inductive source, the dynamic range can be higher than the intrinsic saturation rate would suggest. Ideally, superconducting tunnel-junction detectors should be biased in a constant-voltage mode. If the responsivity is to be depressed by no more than a few percent, the photon step should have a height which is no more than one quarter of the total current turn-on at the gap. Superconducting direct detectors can be used to make precise and well-calibrated optical measurements at submillimetre wavelengths.

  7. Pediatric bony craniovertebral junction abnormalities: Institutional experience of 10 years

    PubMed Central

    Kale, S. S.; Ailawadhi, Pankaj; Yerramneni, Vamsi Krishna; Chandra, P. S.; Kumar, Rajender; Sharma, B. S.; Mahapatra, A. K.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To study the clinical features and treatment outcome of pediatric patients with bony craniovertebral abnormalities. Materials and Methods: The authors studied 189 consecutive cases of pediatric bony craniovertebral junction abnormalities operated between 2001 and March, 2010. Results: The pathologies were developmental (n = 162), traumatic (n = 18) and tuberculous (n = 9). Surgical procedures included transoral decompression (n = 118), occipitocervical fusion (OCF, n = 139), C 1 -C 2 fusion (n = 45), and posterior fossa decompression (n = 5). Methods for OCF included contoured stainless steel rods (n = 86), titanium lateral mass screws and plates (n = 47) and steel wires (n = 6). Constructs of all patients of posterior fixation with contoured rods and wires or lateral mass screw and rod who could be followed up were either stable/fused or were fused and stable. No implant failure was noticed among these two surgical procedures. However, 6 patients with C 1-C 2 fusion had broken wires on follow-up requiring repeat posterior fixation. Good neurological outcome was observed even in poor-grade patients. No significant effect on the curvature or growth of the spine was observed at follow-up. Conclusions: Pediatric craniovertebral junction anomalies can be managed successfully with good outcomes using a low cost contoured rod and wires. PMID:22069436

  8. Femoral head-neck junction reconstruction, after iatrogenic bone resection.

    PubMed

    Guevara-Alvarez, Alberto; Lash, Nicholas; Beck, Martin

    2015-07-01

    Arthroscopic over-resection of the head-neck junction during the treatment of a cam deformity can be a devastating complication and is difficult to treat. Large defects of the femoral head-neck junction (FHNJ) increase the risk of femoral neck fracture and can also affect hip biomechanics. We describe a case of an iatrogenic defect of the FHNJ due to excessive bone resection, and a previously non-described treatment using iliac crest autograft to restore femoral head-neck sphericity and hip joint stability. After protecting the femoral neck with an angled blade plate, the large anterior FHNJ defect was reconstructed using autogenous iliac crest bone graft; sphericity was restored by contouring the graft using spherical templates. Clinical and radiographic follow-up was performed up to 2 years. Results at 2 years showed no residual groin pain and normal range of motion. The Oxford Hip Score was 46/48, rated as excellent. Computed tomography (CT) scanning showed union of bone graft without resorption, and CT arthrogram indicating retained sphericity of the FHNJ without evidence of degenerative changes in the articular surface. This novel surgical technique can be used to restore the structural integrity and contour of the FHNJ that contains a significant anterior defect.

  9. Femoral head-neck junction reconstruction, after iatrogenic bone resection

    PubMed Central

    Guevara-Alvarez, Alberto; Lash, Nicholas; Beck, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Arthroscopic over-resection of the head-neck junction during the treatment of a cam deformity can be a devastating complication and is difficult to treat. Large defects of the femoral head-neck junction (FHNJ) increase the risk of femoral neck fracture and can also affect hip biomechanics. We describe a case of an iatrogenic defect of the FHNJ due to excessive bone resection, and a previously non-described treatment using iliac crest autograft to restore femoral head-neck sphericity and hip joint stability. After protecting the femoral neck with an angled blade plate, the large anterior FHNJ defect was reconstructed using autogenous iliac crest bone graft; sphericity was restored by contouring the graft using spherical templates. Clinical and radiographic follow-up was performed up to 2 years. Results at 2 years showed no residual groin pain and normal range of motion. The Oxford Hip Score was 46/48, rated as excellent. Computed tomography (CT) scanning showed union of bone graft without resorption, and CT arthrogram indicating retained sphericity of the FHNJ without evidence of degenerative changes in the articular surface. This novel surgical technique can be used to restore the structural integrity and contour of the FHNJ that contains a significant anterior defect. PMID:27011838

  10. Transperitoneal laparoscopic pyeloplasty in the treatment of ureteropelvic junction obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Gregorio, Sergio Alonso y; Eastmond, María A. Portilla; Gómez, Angel Tabernero; Ledo, Jesús Cisneros; Togores, Luis Hidalgo; Barthel, Jesús Javier de la Peña

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Laparoscopic pyeloplasty was first described by Schuessler. During the last decade, this technique has been developed in order to achieve the same results as open surgery, with lower rates of morbidity and complications. In this study we review our experience using laparoscopic pyeloplasty as the gold standard for the treatment of the ureteropelvic junction obstruction (UPJO). Material and methods We performed a retrospective review of 62 laparoscopic pyeloplasties carried out at our center. In the last 2 years we used 3 mm and 5 mm ports in order to achieve better cosmetics results. Demographic data is described and the functionality of the affected kidney and surgical data, among others were analyzed statistically. In the case of bilateral statistical tests were considered significant as those with p values <0.05. Results The most frequent reason for consultation was ureteral pain. Patients mean age was 40 years and 94% of them had preoperative renogram showing a full or partial obstructive pattern. The right side was affected in 61% of cases and the left in the remaining 39%. The presence of stones was observed in 12 patients and crossing vessels in 58% of cases. The average stay was 3.72 days. Post–surgery complications were observed in two patients. The operative time was 178 minutes. Mean follow–up was 45 months and a success was achieved in 91%. Conclusions The transperitoneal laparoscopic pyeloplasty has become the gold standard for the treatment of ureteropelvic junction stenosis in our center because of high success rate, shorter postoperative stay, and low intra and postoperative complications. PMID:24707387

  11. Differential pathways of claudin oligomerization and integration into tight junctions.

    PubMed

    Koval, Michael

    2013-07-01

    Tight junctions are the critical intercellular structure required to establish an epithelial barrier. Among the several classes of proteins required to form tight junctions are the tetraspan transmembrane proteins known as claudins that directly determine paracellular permeability. Considerable progress has been made in understanding how incorporation of different claudins into tight junctions increase or decrease paracellular permeability and ion selectivity. However, it has proven difficult to identify discrete steps in claudin assembly and whether claudins exist in distinct oligomerization states prior to tight junction assembly. Studies of homomeric and heteromeric claudin-claudin interactions using complementary techniques suggest a diversity of pathways used by different claudins to oligomerize and integrate into tight junctions.

  12. Delayed pulses from high-transparency Josephson junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Songtao; Mancini, C. A.; Feldman, M. J.

    2001-05-01

    Calculations of the shape and the timing of single-magnetic-flux quanta (SFQs) generated by high-current-density "self-shunted" Josephson junctions are presented. The junction current is assumed to be due in part to multiple Andreev reflections within the high-transparency barrier. The SFQ pulses from these junctions show several differences when compared to those from lower-current-density resistively shunted Josephson junctions, the most important being that the pulses are significantly delayed in the self-shunted junctions, by as much as many times the pulse width.

  13. Abnormal endothelial tight junctions in active lesions and normal-appearing white matter in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Plumb, Jonnie; McQuaid, Stephen; Mirakhur, Meenakshi; Kirk, John

    2002-04-01

    Blood-brain barrier (BBB) breakdown, demonstrable in vivo by enhanced MRI is characteristic of new and expanding inflammatory lesions in relapsing-remitting and chronic progressive multiple sclerosis (MS). Subtle leakage may also occur in primary progressive MS. However, the anatomical route(s) of BBB leakage have not been demonstrated. We investigated the possible involvement of interendothelial tight junctions (TJ) by examining the expression of TJ proteins (occludin and ZO-1 ) in blood vessels in active MS lesions from 8 cases of MS and in normal-appearing white (NAWM) matter from 6 cases. Blood vessels (10-50 per frozen section) were scanned using confocal laser scanning microscopy to acquire datasets for analysis. TJ abnormalities manifested as beading, interruption, absence or diffuse cytoplasmic localization of fluorescence, or separation of junctions (putative opening) were frequent (affecting 40% of vessels) in oil-red-O-positive active plaques but less frequent in NAWM (15%), and in normal (< 2%) and neurological controls (6%). Putatively "open" junctions were seen in vessels in active lesions and in microscopically inflamed vessels in NAWM. Dual fluorescence revealed abnormal TJs in vessels with pre-mortem serum protein leakage. Abnormal or open TJs, associated with inflammation may contribute to BBB leakage in enhancing MRI lesions and may also be involved in subtle leakage in non-enhancing focal and diffuse lesions in NAWM. BBB disruption due to tight junctional pathology should be regarded as a significant form of tissue injury in MS, alongside demyelination and axonopathy.

  14. Temporary fusionless posterior occipitocervical fixation for a proximal junctional type II odontoid fracture after previous C2-pelvis fusion: case report, description of a new surgical technique, and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Theologis, Alexander A; Deviren, Vedat; Tay, Bobby

    2017-05-01

    Axial fractures in patients with a previous C2-pelvis posterior instrumented fusion are rare and may be challenging to manage. Motion preservation in the axial spine for these patients is important, as the C1-2 and Occipit-C1 joints are their only remaining mobile spinal segments. In this unique report, we present for the first time the use of a fusionless occipitocervical operation for the treatment of a type II odontoid fracture and unilateral C2 pars fracture adjacent to a previous C2-pelvis posterior instrumented fusion. Case report. Three years after proximal extension of a T3-pelvis posterior instrumented fusion to C2, the patient sustained a displaced odontoid fracture and unilateral C2 pars fracture after a mechanical fall. She underwent fracture stabilization with extension of instrumentation to the occiput. No attempt at fusion was performed. Post-operatively, she was distraught by severely limited neck range of motion, which was reflected in worsening of health-related quality of life (HRQoL) scores. The fracture healed uneventfully after which the instrumentation from the occiput and C1 were removed, which resulted in improvement of neck range of motion. Two years post-operatively, HRQoL scores showed minimal neck disability (NDI 12), no neck or arm pain (VAS 0), and outstanding general health (EQ-5D 85 out of 100, SF-36 PCS 35.3, SF-36 MCS 41.1). In this one patient, instrumentation without fusion allowed for successful and timely union of a displaced odontoid fracture in a patient with a previous C2-pelvis fusion. Axial range of motion was preserved after instrumentation removal.

  15. Role of heteromeric gap junctions in the cytotoxicity of cisplatin.

    PubMed

    Tong, Xuhui; Dong, Shuying; Yu, Meiling; Wang, Qin; Tao, Liang

    2013-08-09

    In several systems, the presence of gap junctions made of a single connexin has been shown to enhance the cytotoxicity of cisplatin. However, most gap junction channels in vivo appear to be heteromeric (composed of more than one connexin isoform). Here we explore in HeLa cells the cytotoxicity to cisplatin that is enhanced by heteromeric gap junctions composed of Cx26 and Cx32, which have been shown to be more selective among biological permeants than the corresponding homomeric channels. We found that survival and subsequent proliferation of cells exposed to cisplatin were substantially reduced when gap junctions were present than when there were no gap junctions. Functional inhibition of gap junctions by oleamide enhanced survival/proliferation, and enhancement of gap junctions by retinoic acid decreased survival/proliferation. These effects occurred only in high density cultures, and the treatments were without effect when there was no opportunity for gap junction formation. The presence of functional gap junctions enhanced apoptosis as reflected in markers of both early-stage and late-stage apoptosis. Furthermore, analysis of caspases 3, 8 and 9 showed that functional gap junctions specifically induced apoptosis by the mitochondrial pathway. These results demonstrate that heteromeric Cx26/Cx32 gap junctions increase the cytotoxicity of cisplatin by induction of apoptosis via the mitochondrial pathway. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Gap junctional conductance and permeability are linearly related.

    PubMed

    Verselis, V; White, R L; Spray, D C; Bennett, M V

    1986-10-24

    The permeability of gap junctions to tetraethylammonium ions was measured in isolated pairs of blastomeres from Rana pipiens L. and compared to the junctional conductance. In this system, the junctional conductance is voltage-dependent and decreases with moderate transjunctional voltage of either sign. The permeability to tetraethylammonium ions was determined by injecting one cell of a pair with tetraethylammonium and monitoring its changing concentration in the prejunctional and postjunctional cells with ion-selective electrodes. Junctional conductance was determined by current-clamp and voltage-clamp techniques. For different cell pairs in which the transjunctional voltage was small and the junctional conductance at its maximum value, the permeability to tetraethylammonium ions was proportional to the junctional conductance. In individual cell pairs, a reduction in the junctional conductance induced by voltage was accompanied by a proportional reduction in the permeability of the gap junction over a wide range. The diameter of the tetraethylammonium ion (8.0 to 8.5 A, unhydrated) is larger than that of the potassium ion (4.6 A, hydrated), the predominant current-carrying species. The proportionality between the permeability to tetraethylammonium ions and the junctional conductance, measured here with exceptionally fine time resolution, indicates that a common gap junctional pathway mediates both electrical and chemical fluxes between cells, and that closure of single gap junction channels by voltage is all or none.

  17. Cell Junctions in the Specialized Conduction System of the Heart

    PubMed Central

    Mezzano, Valeria; Pellman, Jason; Sheikh, Farah

    2015-01-01

    Anchoring cell junctions are integral in maintaining electro-mechanical coupling of ventricular ‘working’ cardiomyocytes; however, their role in cardiomyocytes of the cardiac conduction system (CCS) remains less clear. Recent studies in genetic mouse models and humans highlight the appearance of these cell junctions alongside gap junctions in the CCS and also show that defects in these structures and their components are associated with conduction impairments in the CCS. Here we outline current evidence supporting an integral relationship between anchoring and gap junctions in the CCS. Specifically we focus on (1) molecular and ultrastructural evidence for cell-cell junctions in specialized cardiomyocytes of the CCS, (2) genetic mouse models specifically targeting cell-cell junction components in the heart which exhibit CCS conduction defects and (3) human clinical studies from patients with cell-cell junction-based diseases that exhibit CCS electrophysiological defects. PMID:24738884

  18. Connexin26 regulates assembly and maintenance of cochlear gap junction macromolecular complex for normal hearing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamiya, Kazusaku; Fukunaga, Ichiro; Hatakeyama, Kaori; Ikeda, Katsuhisa

    2015-12-01

    Hereditary deafness affects about 1 in 2000 children and GJB2 gene mutation is most frequent cause for this disease in the world. GJB2 encodes connexin26 (Cx26), a component in cochlear gap junction. Recently, we found macromolecular change of gap junction plaques with two different types of Cx26 mutation as major classification of clinical case, one is a model of dominant negative type, Cx26R75W+ and the other is conditional gene deficient mouse, Cx26f/fP0Cre as a model for insufficiency of gap junction protein [6]. Gap junction composed mainly of Cx26 and Cx30 in wild type mice formed large planar gap junction plaques (GJP). In contrast, Cx26R75W+ and Cx26f/fP0Cre showed fragmented small round GJPs around the cell border. In Cx26f/fP0Cre, some of the cells with Cx26 expression due to their cellular mosaicism showed normal large GJP with Cx26 and Cx30 only at the cell junction site between two Cx26 positive cells. These indicate that bilateral Cx26 expressions from both adjacent cells are essential for the formation of the cochlear linear GJP, and it is not compensated by other cochlear Connexins such as Connexin30. In the present study, we demonstrated a new molecular pathology in most common hereditary deafness with different types of Connexin26 mutations, and this machinery can be a new target for drag design of hereditary deafness.

  19. Distal Junctional Disease after Occipitothoracic Fusion for Rheumatoid Cervical Disorders: Correlation with Cervical Spine Sagittal Alignment

    PubMed Central

    Tanouchi, Tetsu; Shimizu, Takachika; Fueki, Keisuke; Ino, Masatake; Toda, Naofumi; Manabe, Nodoka; Itoh, Kanako

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective radiographic study. Objective We have performed occipitothoracic (OT) fusion for severe rheumatoid cervical disorders since 1991. In our previous study, we reported that the distal junctional disease occurred in patients with fusion of O–T4 or longer due to increased mechanical stress. The present study further evaluated the association between the distal junctional disease and the cervical spine sagittal alignment. Methods Among 60 consecutive OT fusion cases between 1991 and 2010, 24 patients who underwent O–T5 fusion were enrolled in this study. The patients were grouped based on whether they developed postoperative distal junctional disease (group F) or not (group N). We measured pre- and postoperative O–C2, C2–C7, and O–C7 angles and evaluated the association between these values and the occurrence of distal junctional disease. Results Seven (29%) of 24 patients developed adjacent-level vertebral fractures as distal junctional disease. In group F, the mean pre- and postoperative O–C2, C2–C7, and O–C7 angles were 12.1 and 16.8, 7.2 and 11.2, and 19.4 and 27.9 degrees, respectively. In group N, the mean pre- and postoperative O–C2, C2–C7, and O–C7 angles were 15.9 and 15.0, 4.9 and 5.8, and 21.0 and 20.9 degrees, respectively. There were no significant differences between the two groups. The difference in the O–C7 angle (postoperative angle − preoperative angle) in group F was significantly larger than that in group N (p = 0.04). Conclusion Excessive correction of the O–C7 angle (hyperlordotic alignment) is likely to cause postoperative distal junctional disease following the OT fusion. PMID:26430590

  20. Intermediate term outcomes associated with the surveillance of ureteropelvic junction obstruction in adults.

    PubMed

    Gurbuz, C; Best, S L; Donnally, C; Mir, S; Pearle, M S; Cadeddu, J A

    2011-03-01

    We determined the outcome of minimally symptomatic adult ureteropelvic junction obstruction in a group of patients treated conservatively with an active surveillance regimen. A total of 27 patients with asymptomatic or minimally symptomatic ureteropelvic junction obstruction were treated conservatively. All patients were evaluated with diuretic renograms. Ureteropelvic junction obstruction was defined by an obstructive pattern of the clearance curve and/or T1/2 greater than 20 minutes. Followup consisted of an office visit and renogram every 6 to 12 months. Cases of greater than 10% loss of relative renal function of the affected kidney, development of pyelonephritis and/or more than 1 episode of acute pain were considered active surveillance failures, and treatment was recommended. Of the 27 patients 6 were lost to followup, leaving 21 (median age 47 years) with sufficient followup for analysis. In the 4 patients (19%) who initially presented with mild pain that led to the diagnosis of ureteropelvic junction obstruction, the pain completely resolved. Ipsilateral relative renal function decreased significantly in 2 patients (9.5%, mean reduction 14%). Pain worsened in 3 patients (14.3%) and de novo pain occurred in 1 (4.7%). Surgical intervention for ureteropelvic junction obstruction was required in 6 patients (29%) at an average of 34 months. In total 15 patients (71%) remained on surveillance with a mean followup of 48 months. Active surveillance seems to be a reasonable initial option for asymptomatic or mildly symptomatic adult patients with ureteropelvic junction obstruction because only approximately 30% have progression to surgical intervention within 4 years of diagnosis. This strategy offers the advantage of individualizing therapy according to symptoms and renographic findings. Copyright © 2011 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.